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Sample records for alkaloids flavonoids saponins

  1. Diterpenoid alkaloids and flavonoids from Delphinium trichophorum.

    PubMed

    Lin, Chao-Zhan; Zhao, Zhong-Xiang; Xie, Si-Min; Mao, Ju-Hua; Zhu, Chen-Chen; Li, Xiao-Hui; Zeren-dawa, Bairi; Suolang-qimei, Kangsa; Zhu, Dun; Xiong, Tian-Qin; Wu, Ai-Zhi

    2014-01-01

    Five hetisane-type C20-diterpenoid alkaloids, trichodelphinines A-E, one delnudine-type C20-diterpenoid alkaloid, trichodelphinine F and three known flavonoids, quercetin, quercetin 3-O-β-D-glucopyranoside, and quercetin 3-O-β-D-glucopyranoside-7-O-α-L-arabinopyranoside, were isolated from whole plants of Delphinium trichophorum Franch. Their structures were elucidated on the basis of extensive spectroscopic analysis, including HSQC, HMBC, (1)H-(1)H COSY, NOESY and X-ray crystallographic analysis, and from chemical evidence. The cytotoxic activities of the diterpenoid alkaloids were evaluated using the MTT method, and the IC50 values of their cytotoxicity against A549 cancer cells ranged from 12.03 to 52.79 μM.

  2. Saponins and flavonoids of Allium triquetrum.

    PubMed

    Corea, Gabriella; Fattorusso, Ernesto; Lanzotti, Virginia

    2003-11-01

    A phytochemical investigation of the flowers and bulbs of Allium triquetrum has been undertaken, leading to the isolation of five new furostanol saponins, triquetrosides A1/A2 (1a/1b), B (3), and C1/C2 (4a/4b), from the flowers, along with ascalonisides A1/A2 (6a/6b). The 22-O-methyl derivatives of triquetrosides A1/A2 (2a and 2b) and C1/C2 (5a and 5b) were also isolated, but they are considered extraction artifacts. Large amounts of seven kaempferol glycosides, of which one (7) has a new structure, were also isolated from both flowers and bulbs. The structures of the new compounds were determined by spectral and chemical methods.

  3. New cycloartane saponin and monoterpenoid glucoindole alkaloids from Mussaenda luteola

    PubMed Central

    Mohamed, Shaymaa M.; Backheet, Enaam Y.; Bayoumi, Soad A.; Ross, Samir A.

    2016-01-01

    A new cycloartane-type saponin with unusual hydroxylation at C-17 and a unique side chain, 9 (R), 19, 22 (S), 24 (R) bicyclolanost-3β, 12α, 16β, 17α tetrol-25-one 3-O-β-d-glucopyranosyl-(1→2)-β-d-glucopyranoside (1) and two new monoterpenoid glucoindole alkaloids, 10-methoxy pumiloside (2) and the previously chemically synthesized, 10-methoxy strictosidine (3) along with other five known compounds, 7α-morroniside (4), 7-epi-loganin (5), (7β)-7-O-methylmorroniside (6), 5(S)-5-carboxystrictisidine (7) and apigenin-7-O-neohesperidoside (8) were isolated from the aerial parts of Mussaenda luteola (Rubiaceae). The structural elucidation of the isolates was accomplished by extensive (1D and 2D NMR) spectroscopic data analysis and HR-ESI-MS. Compounds 4–8 were reported for the first time from the genus Mussaenda. Interestingly, this is the first report for the occurrence of the monoterpenoid glucoindole-type alkaloids in the genus which might be useful for the chemotaxonomic evaluation of the genus Mussaenda. All isolates were evaluated for their antiprotozoal activities. Compound 7 showed good antitrypanosomal activity with IC50 and IC90 values of 13.7 and 16.6 µM compared to IC50 and IC90 values of 13.06 and 28.99 µM for the positive control DFMO, difluoromethylornithine. PMID:26969788

  4. Comparative Metabolite Profiling of Triterpenoid Saponins and Flavonoids in Flower Color Mutations of Primula veris L.

    PubMed

    Apel, Lysanne; Kammerer, Dietmar R; Stintzing, Florian C; Spring, Otmar

    2017-01-13

    Primula veris L. is an important medicinal plant with documented use for the treatment of gout, headache and migraine reaching back to the Middle Ages. Triterpenoid saponins from roots and flowers are used in up-to-date phytotherapeutic treatment of bronchitis and colds due to their expectorant and secretolytic effects. In addition to the wild type plants with yellow petals, a red variant and an intermediate orange form of Primula veris L. have recently been found in a natural habitat. The secondary metabolite profiles of roots, leaves and flowers of these rare variants were investigated and compared with the wild type metabolome. Two flavonoids, six flavonoid glycosides, four novel methylated flavonoid glycosides, five anthocyanins and three triterpenoid saponins were identified in alcoholic extracts from the petals, leaves and roots of the three variants by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC)-diode array detection (DAD)/mass spectrometry (MS(n)) analyses. Anthocyanins were detected in the petals of the red and orange variety, but not in the wild type. No other effects on the metabolite profiles of the three varieties have been observed. The possibility is discussed that a regulatory step of the anthocyanin biosynthetic pathway may have been affected by mutation thus triggering color polymorphism in the petals.

  5. Comparative Metabolite Profiling of Triterpenoid Saponins and Flavonoids in Flower Color Mutations of Primula veris L.

    PubMed Central

    Apel, Lysanne; Kammerer, Dietmar R.; Stintzing, Florian C.; Spring, Otmar

    2017-01-01

    Primula veris L. is an important medicinal plant with documented use for the treatment of gout, headache and migraine reaching back to the Middle Ages. Triterpenoid saponins from roots and flowers are used in up-to-date phytotherapeutic treatment of bronchitis and colds due to their expectorant and secretolytic effects. In addition to the wild type plants with yellow petals, a red variant and an intermediate orange form of Primula veris L. have recently been found in a natural habitat. The secondary metabolite profiles of roots, leaves and flowers of these rare variants were investigated and compared with the wild type metabolome. Two flavonoids, six flavonoid glycosides, four novel methylated flavonoid glycosides, five anthocyanins and three triterpenoid saponins were identified in alcoholic extracts from the petals, leaves and roots of the three variants by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC)-diode array detection (DAD)/mass spectrometry (MSn) analyses. Anthocyanins were detected in the petals of the red and orange variety, but not in the wild type. No other effects on the metabolite profiles of the three varieties have been observed. The possibility is discussed that a regulatory step of the anthocyanin biosynthetic pathway may have been affected by mutation thus triggering color polymorphism in the petals. PMID:28098796

  6. Analytical methods for determination of alkaloids and saponins from roots of Caulophyllum thalictroids (L) Michx using UPLC HPLC and HPTLC

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A comparison study of analytical methods including HPLC, UPLC and HPTLC are presented in this paper for the determination of major alkaloid and triterpene saponins from the roots of Caulophyllum thalictroides (L.) Michx. (blue cohosh) and dietary supplements claiming to contain blue cohosh. The meth...

  7. In vivo antimalarial efficacy of acetogenins, alkaloids and flavonoids enriched fractions from Annona crassiflora Mart.

    PubMed

    Pimenta, Lúcia Pinheiro Santos; Garcia, Giani Martins; Gonçalves, Samuel Geraldo do Vale; Dionísio, Bárbara Lana; Braga, Erika Martins; Mosqueira, Vanessa Carla Furtado

    2014-01-01

    Annona crassiflora and Annonaceae plants are known to be used to treat malaria by traditional healers. In this work, the antimalarial efficacy of different fractions of A. crassiflora, particularly acetogenin, alkaloids and flavonoid-rich fractions, was determined in vivo using Plasmodium berghei-infected mice model and toxicity was accessed by brine shrimp assay. The A. crassiflora fractions were administered at doses of 12.5 mg/kg/day in a 4-day test protocol. The results showed that some fractions from woods were rich in acetogenins, alkaloids and terpenes, and other fractions from leaves were rich in alkaloids and flavonoids. The parasitaemia was significantly (p < 0.05, p < 0.001) reduced (57-75%) with flavonoid and alkaloid-rich leaf fractions, which also increased mean survival time of mice after treatment. Our results confirm the usage of this plant in folk medicine as an antimalarial remedy.

  8. New Alkaloids and α-Glucosidase Inhibitory Flavonoids from Ficus hispida.

    PubMed

    Shi, Zheng-Feng; Lei, Chun; Yu, Bang-Wei; Wang, He-Yao; Hou, Ai-Jun

    2016-04-01

    Two new pyrrolidine alkaloids, ficushispimines A (1) and B (2), a new ω-(dimethylamino)caprophenone alkaloid, ficushispimine C (3), and a new indolizidine alkaloid, ficushispidine (4), together with the known alkaloid 5 and 11 known isoprenylated flavonoids 6 - 16, were isolated from the twigs of Ficus hispida. Their structures were elucidated by spectroscopic methods. Isoderrone (8), 3'-(3-methylbut-2-en-1-yl)biochanin A (11), myrsininone A (12), ficusin A (13), and 4',5,7-trihydroxy-6-[(1R*,6R*)-3-methyl-6-(1-methylethenyl)cyclohex-2-en-1-yl]isoflavone (14) showed inhibitory effects on α-glucosidase in vitro.

  9. Delivery of Flavonoids and Saponins from Black Bean (Phaseolus vulgaris) Seed Coats Incorporated into Whole Wheat Bread

    PubMed Central

    Chávez-Santoscoy, Rocio A.; Lazo-Vélez, Marco A.; Serna-Sáldivar, Sergio O.; Gutiérrez-Uribe, Janet A.

    2016-01-01

    Cereal-based products can be used as vehicles for the delivery of relevant bioactive compounds since they are staple foods for most cultures throughout the world. The health promoting benefits of flavonoids and saponins contained in black bean seed coats have been previously described. In the present work, the effect of adding flavonoids and saponins from black bean seed coat to the typical yeast-leavened whole wheat bread formulation in terms of bread features, organoleptic properties and phytochemical profile was studied. The retention of bioactive compounds was determined and the inhibitory effects of in vitro enzyme digested samples on two colon cancer cell lines (Caco-2 and HT29) was evaluated. The addition of bioactive compounds did not significantly affect baking properties or texture parameters. Among organoleptic properties of enriched breads, only crumb color was affected by the addition of bioactive compounds. However, the use of whole wheat flour partially masked the effect on color. More than 90% of added flavonoids and saponins and 80% of anthocyanins were retained in bread after baking. However, saponins were reduced more than 50% after the in vitro enzyme digestion. The black bean seed coat phytochemicals recovered after in vitro enzyme digestion of enriched breads significantly reduced by 20% the viability of colon cancer cells without affecting standard fibroblast cells (p < 0.05). PMID:26901186

  10. Delivery of Flavonoids and Saponins from Black Bean (Phaseolus vulgaris) Seed Coats Incorporated into Whole Wheat Bread.

    PubMed

    Chávez-Santoscoy, Rocio A; Lazo-Vélez, Marco A; Serna-Sáldivar, Sergio O; Gutiérrez-Uribe, Janet A

    2016-02-17

    Cereal-based products can be used as vehicles for the delivery of relevant bioactive compounds since they are staple foods for most cultures throughout the world. The health promoting benefits of flavonoids and saponins contained in black bean seed coats have been previously described. In the present work, the effect of adding flavonoids and saponins from black bean seed coat to the typical yeast-leavened whole wheat bread formulation in terms of bread features, organoleptic properties and phytochemical profile was studied. The retention of bioactive compounds was determined and the inhibitory effects of in vitro enzyme digested samples on two colon cancer cell lines (Caco-2 and HT29) was evaluated. The addition of bioactive compounds did not significantly affect baking properties or texture parameters. Among organoleptic properties of enriched breads, only crumb color was affected by the addition of bioactive compounds. However, the use of whole wheat flour partially masked the effect on color. More than 90% of added flavonoids and saponins and 80% of anthocyanins were retained in bread after baking. However, saponins were reduced more than 50% after the in vitro enzyme digestion. The black bean seed coat phytochemicals recovered after in vitro enzyme digestion of enriched breads significantly reduced by 20% the viability of colon cancer cells without affecting standard fibroblast cells (p < 0.05).

  11. Combinations of alkaloids affecting different molecular targets with the saponin digitonin can synergistically enhance trypanocidal activity against Trypanosoma brucei brucei.

    PubMed

    Krstin, Sonja; Peixoto, Herbenya Silva; Wink, Michael

    2015-11-01

    The flagellate Trypanosoma brucei causes sleeping sickness in humans and nagana in animals. Only a few drugs are registered to treat trypanosomiasis, but those drugs show severe side effects. Also, because some pathogen strains have become resistant, new strategies are urgently needed to combat this parasitic disease. An underexplored possibility is the application of combinations of several trypanocidal agents, which may potentiate their trypanocidal activity in a synergistic fashion. In this study, the potential synergism of mutual combinations of bioactive alkaloids and alkaloids with a membrane-active steroidal saponin, digitonin, was explored with regard to their effect on T. b. brucei. Alkaloids were selected that affect different molecular targets: berberine and chelerythrine (intercalation of DNA), piperine (induction of apoptosis), vinblastine (inhibition of microtubule assembly), emetine (intercalation of DNA, inhibition of protein biosynthesis), homoharringtonine (inhibition of protein biosynthesis), and digitonin (membrane permeabilization and uptake facilitation of polar compounds). Most combinations resulted in an enhanced trypanocidal effect. The addition of digitonin significantly stimulated the activity of almost all alkaloids against trypanosomes. The strongest effect was measured in a combination of digitonin with vinblastine. The highest dose reduction indexes (DRI) were measured in the two-drug combination of digitonin or piperine with vinblastine, where the dose of vinblastine could be reduced 9.07-fold or 7.05-fold, respectively. The synergistic effects of mutual combinations of alkaloids and of alkaloids with digitonin present a new avenue to treat trypanosomiasis but one which needs to be corroborated in future animal experiments.

  12. Simultaneous separation of triterpenoid saponins and flavonoid glycosides from the roots of Glycyrrhiza uralensis Fisch by pH-zone-refining counter-current chromatography.

    PubMed

    Xu, Jinfang; Luo, Jianguang; Kong, Lingyi

    2013-10-01

    Glycosides including triterpenoid saponins and flavonoid glycosides are the main constituents of Glycyrrhiza uralensis Fisch (licorice) and exhibit prominent pharmacological activities. However, conventional methods for the separation of glycosides always cause irreversible adsorption and unavoidable loss of sample due to their high hydrophilicities. The present paper describes a convenient method for the simultaneous separation of triterpenoid saponins and flavonoid glycosides from licorice by pH-zone-refining counter-current chromatography. Ethyl acetate/n-butanol/water (2:3:5, v/v) with 10 mM TFA in the upper organic stationary phase and 10 mM ammonia in the lower aqueous mobile phase was used as the biphasic solvent system. Three triterpenoid saponins and two flavonoid glycosides including licorice-saponin A3 (63.3 mg), glycyrrhizic acid (342.2 mg), 3-O-[β-D-glucuronopyranosyl-(1 → 2)-β-D-galactopyranosyl]glycyrrhetic acid (56.0 mg), liquiritin apioside (232.6 mg), and liquiritin (386.5 mg) were successfully obtained from licorice ethanol extract (2 g) in one step. This method subtly takes advantage of the common acidic properties of triterpenoid saponins and flavonoid glycosides, and obviously is much more efficient and convenient than the previous methods. It is also the first time that the separation of acidic triterpenoid saponins by using pH-zone-refining counter-current chromatography has been reported.

  13. Combined effect of total alkaloids from Feculae Bombycis and natural flavonoids on diabetes.

    PubMed

    Geng, Peng; Yang, Yang; Gao, Zhihui; Yu, Yangsheng; Shi, Qian; Bai, Gang

    2007-08-01

    Both total alkaloids from Feculae Bombycis (TAFB) and natural flavonoids can inhibit alpha-glucosidase activity to depress the glucose level in blood. To investigate the cooperative effect of TAFB and flavonoids on blood glucose, we have studied their combined function compared with individual ingredients on enzymology, in-vitro and in-vivo. In the enzymological assay, the combination of TAFB and flavonoids showed more effective inhibition, compared with either TAFB or flavonoids alone, to alpha-glucosidase activity. In the everted intestine model in-vitro, the combined inhibition of starch hydrolysation and glucose transference to blood was much stronger than with separate components. In short-term studies with normal and experimentally-induced diabetic mice in-vivo, the combination of TAFB and flavonoids also had a stronger suppressive effect on the postprandial elevation in blood glucose after oral administration. In long-term treatment to diabetic mice in-vivo, the compound prescription could depress not only the fasting blood glucose, but also the fasting blood total cholesterol. These results demonstrated that TAFB and flavonoids could inhibit alpha-glucosidase activity cooperatively, which would successfully depress blood glucose level in the therapy of diabetes.

  14. β-Hydroxydihydrochalcone and flavonoid glycosides along with triterpene saponin and sesquiterpene from the herbs of Pimpinella rhodantha Boiss.

    PubMed

    Özbek, Hilal; Güvenalp, Zühal; Kuruüzüm-Uz, Ay E; Kazaz, Cavit; Demirezer, L Ömür

    2016-01-01

    A new β-hydroxydihydrochalcone glycoside named ziganin (1) and a new acylated flavonol glycoside named isorhamnetin-3-O-α-L-(2″,3″-di-O-trans-coumaroyl)-rhamnopyranoside) (2), along with two known flavonoid glycosides, a β-hydroxydihydrochalcone glycoside, a hydroxybenzoic acid derivative, a trinorguaiane type sesquiterpenoid, a triterpenic saponin and a polyol were isolated from the herbs of Pimpinella rhodantha Boiss. Their structures were elucidated on the basis of spectroscopic analyses including 1D-and 2D-NMR, UV, IR, CD, ESI-MS, APCI-MS, HR-ESI-MS techniques. The isolated compounds were evaluated for their antioxidant capacity through the DPPH free-radical scavenging assay and ferrous ion-chelating power test.

  15. Antagonistic effect of alkaloids and saponins on bioactivity in the quinine tree (Rauvolfia caffra sond.): further evidence to support biotechnology in traditional medicinal plants

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The Quinine tree (Rauvolfia caffra) is used as a medicinal plant among traditional communities in many countries to manage tumors and other diseases associated with oxidative stress. To validate indigenous knowledge and possibly position this herb for technology uptake and utilization, we established the level of antioxidant activity in R. caffra, and probed for the presence of associated phytochemicals. Methods Antioxidant activity was determined on 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) while major phytochemicals were identified by multiple tests on methanol fractions. Results R. caffra showed promise as a cure, with antioxidant activity comparable to the commercially used drug quercetin (R. caffra = 79.7% ±1.9; quercetin = 82.6% ± 2.0). However, we found two phytochemicals with possible antagonistic effect: co-occurrence of alkaloids and saponins significantly reduced antioxidant activity (alkaloids only = 63%; alkaloids plus saponins = 15%; steroids, terpenoids and cardiac glycosides = 82%), thus alkaloids and saponins should be exclusive to each other in drug formulations. Conclusions Antagonistic relationship among phytochemicals would affect the efficacy of crude extracts as used in traditional medicine. Unlike in herbal medicine, use of modern biotechnology in extraction, purification and design of optimal combinations will ensure efficient drug formulations with optimum bioactivity and minimum toxicity. Metabolic pathway engineering under a controlled environment may optimize availability of desired compounds. PMID:24160735

  16. Exploring Cancer Therapeutics with Natural Products from African Medicinal Plants, Part II: Alkaloids, Terpenoids and Flavonoids.

    PubMed

    Nwodo, Justina N; Ibezim, Akachukwu; Simoben, Conrad V; Ntie-Kang, Fidele

    2016-01-01

    Cancer stands as second most common cause of disease-related deaths in humans. Resistance of cancer to chemotherapy remains challenging to both scientists and physicians. Medicinal plants are known to contribute significantly to a large population of Africa, which is to a very large extent linked to folkloric claims which is part of their livelihood. In this review paper, the potential of naturally occurring anti-cancer agents from African flora has been explored, with suggested modes of action, where such data is available. Literature search revealed plant-derived compounds from African flora showing anti-cancer and/or cytotoxic activities, which have been tested in vitro and in vivo. This corresponds to 400 compounds (from mildly active to very active) covering various compound classes. However, in this part II, we only discussed the three major compound classes which are: flavonoids, alkaloids and terpenoids.

  17. Production of maize tortillas and cookies from nixtamalized flour enriched with anthocyanins, flavonoids and saponins extracted from black bean (Phaseolus vulgaris) seed coats.

    PubMed

    Chávez-Santoscoy, Rocio A; Gutiérrez-Uribe, Janet A; Serna-Saldivar, Sergio O; Perez-Carrillo, Esther

    2016-02-01

    Ethanolic extract from black beans coat is a source of flavonoids, saponins and antocyanins. Nixtamalized maize flours (NF) are used for the preparation of products such as tortillas, tortillas chips, cookies among others. The objective of this research was to study the effect on textural parameters and color after adding flavonoids, saponins and anthocyanins from black bean seed coat in NF used for the production of tortillas and gluten-free cookies. Furthermore, the retention of bioactive compounds after tortilla and gluten-free-cookie preparation was assessed. Ethanolic extracts of black bean seed coats were added (3g/kg or 7 g/kg) to NF in order to prepare corn tortillas and gluten free cookies characterized in terms of dimensions, color and texture. Addition of 7 g/kg affected the color of cookies and tortillas without effect on texture and dimensions. It was possible to retain more than 80% and 60% of bioactives into baked tortillas and cookies, respectively.

  18. Untargeted Metabotyping Lolium perenne Reveals Population-Level Variation in Plant Flavonoids and Alkaloids

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Mingshu; Fraser, Karl; Jones, Chris; Stewart, Alan; Lyons, Thomas; Faville, Marty; Barrett, Brent

    2017-01-01

    Metabolomics provides a powerful platform to characterize plants at the biochemical level, allowing a search for underlying genes and associations with higher level complex traits such as yield and nutritional value. Efficient and reliable methods to characterize metabolic variation in economically important species are considered of high value to the evaluation and prioritization of germplasm and breeding lines. In this investigation, a large-scale metabolomic survey was performed on a collection of diverse perennial ryegrass (Lolium perenne L.) plants. A total of 2,708 data files, derived from liquid chromatography coupled to high resolution mass spectrometry (LCMS), were selected to assess the effectiveness and efficiency of applying high throughput metabolomics to survey chemical diversity in plant populations. The data set was generated from 23 ryegrass populations, with 3–25 genotypes per population, and five clonal replicates per genotype. We demonstrate an integrated approach to rapidly mine and analyze metabolic variation from this large, multi-batch LCMS data set. After performing quality control, statistical data mining and peak annotation, a wide range of variation for flavonoid glycosides and plant alkaloids was discovered among the populations. Structural variation of flavonoids occurs both in aglycone structures and acetylated/malonylated/feruloylated sugar moieties. The discovery of comprehensive metabolic variation among the plant populations offers opportunities to probe into the genetic basis of the variation, and provides a valuable resource to gain insight into biochemical functions and to relate metabolic variation with higher level traits in the species. PMID:28223996

  19. 2-Oxoglutarate: linking TCA cycle function with amino acid, glucosinolate, flavonoid, alkaloid, and gibberellin biosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    Araújo, Wagner L.; Martins, Auxiliadora O.; Fernie, Alisdair R.; Tohge, Takayuki

    2014-01-01

    The tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle intermediate 2-oxoglutarate (2-OG) is used as an obligatory substrate in a range of oxidative reactions catalyzed by 2-OG-dependent dioxygenases. These enzymes are widespread in nature being involved in several important biochemical processes. We have recently demonstrated that tomato plants in which the TCA cycle enzyme 2-OG dehydrogenase (2-ODD) was antisense inhibited were characterized by early senescence and modified fruit ripening associated with differences in the levels of bioactive gibberellin (GA). Accordingly, there is now compelling evidence that the TCA cycle plays an important role in modulating the rate of flux from 2-OG to amino acid metabolism. Here we discuss recent advances in the biochemistry and molecular biology of 2-OG metabolism occurring in different biological systems indicating the importance of 2-OG and 2-OG dependent dioxygenases not only in glucosinolate, flavonoid and alkaloid metabolism but also in GA and amino acid metabolism. We additionally summarize recent findings regarding the impact of modification of 2-OG metabolism on biosynthetic pathways involving 2-ODDs. PMID:25360142

  20. Fungal endophyte-derived Fritillaria unibracteata var. wabuensis: diversity, antioxidant capacities in vitro and relations to phenolic, flavonoid or saponin compounds.

    PubMed

    Pan, Feng; Su, Tian-Jiao; Cai, Shi-Mei; Wu, Wei

    2017-02-06

    Diverse fungal endophytes are rich fungal resources for the production of an enormous quantity of natural products. In the present study, 53 fungal endophytes were isolated from the bulbs of Fritillaria unibracteata var. wabuensis (FUW). Of these, 49 strains were identified and grouped into 17 different taxa, and priority was conferred to the Fusarium genus. All fungal fermented filtrates displayed antioxidant activities. The DPPH activity, total antioxidant capacities (ABTS), reduction power (FRAP), total phenolic content (TPC), total flavonoid content (TFC) and total saponin content (TSC) were evaluated using petroleum ether, ethyl acetate, n-butyl alcohol and ethanol fractions extracted from five representative fungal cultures. The last three fractions showed more potent antioxidant activity than the first fraction. Significant positive correlations were found between the compositions (TPC, TFC and TSC) and antioxidant capacities (DPPH, ABTS and FRAP). In addition, multifarious natural antioxidant components were identified from the fungal extracts, including gallic acid, rutin, phlorizin, 2,4-di-tert-butylphenol and 2,6-di-tert-butyl hydroquinone; these were determined preliminarily by TLC-bioautography, HPLC and GC-MS analysis. This study showed abundant fungal resources in FUW. Phenolics, flavonoids and saponins are crucial bioactive constituents in these abundant fungal endophytes and can be viewed as new potential antioxidant resources.

  1. Fungal endophyte-derived Fritillaria unibracteata var. wabuensis: diversity, antioxidant capacities in vitro and relations to phenolic, flavonoid or saponin compounds

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Feng; Su, Tian-Jiao; Cai, Shi-Mei; Wu, Wei

    2017-01-01

    Diverse fungal endophytes are rich fungal resources for the production of an enormous quantity of natural products. In the present study, 53 fungal endophytes were isolated from the bulbs of Fritillaria unibracteata var. wabuensis (FUW). Of these, 49 strains were identified and grouped into 17 different taxa, and priority was conferred to the Fusarium genus. All fungal fermented filtrates displayed antioxidant activities. The DPPH activity, total antioxidant capacities (ABTS), reduction power (FRAP), total phenolic content (TPC), total flavonoid content (TFC) and total saponin content (TSC) were evaluated using petroleum ether, ethyl acetate, n-butyl alcohol and ethanol fractions extracted from five representative fungal cultures. The last three fractions showed more potent antioxidant activity than the first fraction. Significant positive correlations were found between the compositions (TPC, TFC and TSC) and antioxidant capacities (DPPH, ABTS and FRAP). In addition, multifarious natural antioxidant components were identified from the fungal extracts, including gallic acid, rutin, phlorizin, 2,4-di-tert-butylphenol and 2,6-di-tert-butyl hydroquinone; these were determined preliminarily by TLC-bioautography, HPLC and GC-MS analysis. This study showed abundant fungal resources in FUW. Phenolics, flavonoids and saponins are crucial bioactive constituents in these abundant fungal endophytes and can be viewed as new potential antioxidant resources. PMID:28165019

  2. Dianthosaponins A-F, triterpene saponins, flavonoid glycoside, aromatic amide glucoside and γ-pyrone glucoside from Dianthus japonicus.

    PubMed

    Nakano, Takahiro; Sugimoto, Sachiko; Matsunami, Katsuyoshi; Otsuka, Hideaki

    2011-01-01

    From aerial parts of Dianthus japonicus, six new and seven known oleanane-type triterpene saponins were isolated. The structures of the new saponins, named dianthosaponins A-F, were elucidated by means of high resolution mass spectrometry, and extensive inspection of one- and two-dimensional NMR spectroscopic data. A new C-glycosyl flavone, a glycosidic derivative of anthranilic acid amide and a maltol glucoside were also isolated.

  3. Pharmacokinetic comparisons of puerarin, daidzin and the glucuronide metabolite of puerarin after administration of total flavonoid from Gegen alone and total flavonoid from Gegen combined with total saponin from Sanqi in rats under different physiological states.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiaoming; Zhao, Yunli; Gao, Enze; Zhao, Xing; Liu, Zheng; Yu, Zhiguo

    2013-07-15

    Gegen is one of the most commonly used traditional Chinese medicines for promoting blood circulation and removing blood stasis. Puerarin and daidzin are the main active constituents of Gegen. Puerarin is mainly metabolized in rats by glucuronidation and the major metabolite from rat urine has been identified as puerarin-7-O-glucuronide through semi-preparative HPLC isolation and then spectroscopic analysis. The study investigated the pharmacokinetic behavior of puerarin-7-O-glucuronide (without enzymatic hydrolysis), puerarin and daidzin when total flavonoid from Gegen was administered in normal and blood stasis animals or in blood stasis animals alone or in combination with Sanqi. The plasma samples were processed by protein precipitation with methanol, and chromatographed on a Thermo Syncronis C18 column (10cm×2.1mm, 1.7μm) by gradient elution at a flow rate of 0.25mL/min, and detected with a triple quadrupole tandem mass spectrometer by selected reaction monitoring via electrospray ionization source with positive ionization mode. An unpaired Student's t-test was used for the statistical comparison of the main pharmacokinetic parameters. There were statistically significant differences (P<0.05) in the pharmacokinetic parameters of puerarin-7-O-glucuronide, puerarin and daidzin involving the AUC, CL and Vd not only between normal rats and blood stasis rats after administration of total flavonoid from Gegen, but also between administration of total flavonoid from Gegen alone and in combination with total saponin from Sanqi in blood stasis rats. The results obtained suggest that the pharmacokinetic behavior of puerarin-7-O-glucuronide, puerarin and daidzin are changed when total flavonoid from Gegen was administered in blood stasis animals or in combination with total saponin from Sanqi.

  4. Alkaloid and flavonoid rich fractions of fenugreek seeds (Trigonella foenum-graecum L.) with antinociceptive and anti-inflammatory effects.

    PubMed

    Mandegary, Ali; Pournamdari, Mostafa; Sharififar, Fariba; Pournourmohammadi, Shirin; Fardiar, Reza; Shooli, Sedigheh

    2012-07-01

    The seeds of fenugreek (Trigonella foenum-graecum L.) have medicinal uses as hypoglycemic, antinociceptive and anti-inflammatory agents. We aimed to evaluate the antinociceptive and anti-inflammatory effects of the major fractions of fenugreek seeds. The methanolic extract of the plant seeds was partitioned using a liquid-liquid extraction procedure to give six major fractions. Following phytochemical screening of isolated fractions, the total extract and each fraction were evaluated for their antinociception and anti-inflammatory effects using formalin and carrageenan-induced paw edema tests respectively. The methanolic extract exhibited both antinociceptive and anti-inflammatory effects at a dose of 100mg/kg. Among the tested fractions, alkaline chloroform fraction (AKC), which was alkaloid positive in screening tests, showed the most anti-nociceptive effect in a dose-dependent manner. AKC fraction was as effective as morphine (5mg/kg) in this regard. Both aqueous and acidified chloroform fractions (ACC) could significantly inhibit paw edema at a different dose. The latter fraction dose-dependently inhibited carrageenan-induced paw edema. The results of phytochemical screening tests confirmed the presence of flavonoids in both ACC and aqueous fractions. It can be concluded that the alkaloid and flavonoid content of fenugreek seeds can be responsible for antinociception and anti-inflammatory effects of the plant respectively.

  5. Simultaneous determination of alkaloids and flavonoids from aerial parts of Passiflora species and dietary supplements using UPLC-UV-MS and HPTLC

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A rapid UPLC method was developed for the simultaneous analysis of five indole alkaloids (harmalol, harmol, harmane, harmaline and harmine) and four flavonoids (orientin, isoorientin, vitexin, and isovitexin) from the aerial parts of Passiflora incarnata L. (Passifloracea), different species of Pass...

  6. Analysis of steroidal alkaloids and saponins in Solanaceae plant extracts using UPLC-qTOF mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Heinig, Uwe; Aharoni, Asaph

    2014-01-01

    Plants of the Solanaceae family are renowned for the production of cholesterol-derived steroidal glycosides, including the nitrogen containing glycoalkaloids and steroidal saponins. In this chapter we describe the use of UPLC (Ultra Performance Liquid Chromatography) coupled with qTOF (Quadrupole Time-of-Flight) mass spectrometry for profiling of these two large classes of semipolar metabolites. The presented method includes an optimized sample preparation protocol, a procedure for high resolution chromatographic separation and metabolite detection using the TOF mass spectrometer which provides high resolution and mass accuracy. A detailed description for non-targeted data analysis and a strategy for putative identification of steroidal glycosides from complex extracts based on interpretation of mass fragmentation patterns is also provided. The described methodology allows profiling and putative identification of multiple steroidal glycoside compounds from the assortment of Solanaceae species producing these molecules.

  7. Simultaneous determination of alkaloids and flavonoids from aerial parts of Passiflora species and dietary supplements using UPLC-UV-MS and HPTLC.

    PubMed

    Avula, Bharathi; Wang, Yan-Hong; Rumalla, Chidananda Swamy; Smillie, Troy J; Khan, Ikhlas A

    2012-09-01

    A rapid UPLC method was developed for the simultaneous analysis of five indole alkaloids (harmalol, harmol, harmane, harmaline and harmine) and four flavonoids (orientin, isoorientin, vitexin, and isovitexin) from the aerial parts of Passiflora incarnata L. (Passifloraceae), other species of Passiflora (P. violacea Veil., P. edulis Sims., P. suberosa L., P. morifolia Mast. and P. quadrangularis L.), Peganum harmala, and dietary supplements that claim to contain Passiflora. The separation was achieved within eight minutes by using C-18 column, a water/acetonitrile mobile phase, both containing formic acid, using a gradient system and a temperature of 35 degrees C. The method was validated for linearity, repeatability, limits of detection (LOD), and limits of quantification (LOQ). The wavelength used for quantification with the diode array detector was 340 nm for flavonoids and alkaloids. The developed method is simple, economic, fast and especially suitable for quality control analysis of flavonoids and alkaloids in plant samples and dietary supplements. The compounds (including isoschaftoside and schaftoside) in plant samples and commercial products of Passiflora were identified and confirmed by UPLC-MS. A HPTLC method was also developed for the chemical fingerprint analysis of Passiflora samples.

  8. Behavioural effects of Passiflora incarnata L. and its indole alkaloid and flavonoid derivatives and maltol in the mouse.

    PubMed

    Soulimani, R; Younos, C; Jarmouni, S; Bousta, D; Misslin, R; Mortier, F

    1997-06-01

    Lyophilised hydroalcoholic and aqueous extracts of the aerial parts of Passiflora incarnata L. (Passifloraceae) (Passion-flower), as well as chemical constituents of the plant, indole alkaloids (harman, harmin, harmalin, harmol, and harmalol) maltol and flavonoids (orientin, isoorientin, vitexin and isovitexin) were assessed for behavioral effects in mice. The accordance with the traditional use of P. incarnata, psychotropic properties were confirmed by some behavioral tests in mice. The anxiolytic properties of hydroalcoholic extract were confirmed at 400 mg/kg by the increase of rears and steps climbed in the staircase test (non-familiar environmental test), and the increase in locomotion and time spent in light side in the light/dark box choice test (non-familiar environmental test). The sedative properties of aqueous extract were confirmed at 400 g/kg by decrease of rears and steps climbed in the staircase test and the decrease of rears and locomotion in the free exploratory test. Moreover, the aqueous extract induced sleep in mice after treatment with a sub-hypnotic dose of pentobarbital.

  9. Steroidal Saponins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sahu, N. P.; Banerjee, S.; Mondal, N. B.; Mandal, D.

    The medicinal activities of plants are generally due to the secondary metabolites (1) which often occur as glycosides of steroids, terpenoids, phenols etc. Saponins are a group of naturally occurring plant glycosides, characterized by their strong foam-forming properties in aqueous solution. The cardiac glycosides also possess this, property but are classified separately because of their specific biological activity. Unlike the cardiac glycosides, saponins generally do not affect the heart. These are classified as steroid or triterpenoid saponins depending on the nature of the aglycone. Steroidal glycosides are naturally occurring sugar conjugates of C27 steroidal compounds. The aglycone of a steroid saponin is usually a spirostanol or a furostanol. The glycone parts of these compounds are mostly oligosaccharides, arranged either in a linear or branched fashion, attached to hydroxyl groups through an acetal linkage (2, 3). Another class of saponins, the basic steroid saponins, contain nitrogen analogues of steroid sapogenins as aglycones.

  10. Simultaneous qualitative and quantitative analysis of flavonoids and alkaloids from the leaves of Nelumbo nucifera Gaertn. using high-performance liquid chromatography with quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Guo, Yujie; Chen, Xi; Qi, Jin; Yu, Boyang

    2016-07-01

    A reliable method, combining qualitative analysis by high-performance liquid chromatography coupled with quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry and quantitative assessment by high-performance liquid chromatography with photodiode array detection, has been developed to simultaneously analyze flavonoids and alkaloids in lotus leaf extracts. In the qualitative analysis, a total of 30 compounds, including 12 flavonoids, 16 alkaloids, and two proanthocyanidins, were identified. The fragmentation behaviors of four types of flavone glycoside and three types of alkaloid are summarized. The mass spectra of four representative components, quercetin 3-O-glucuronide, norcoclaurine, nuciferine, and neferine, are shown to illustrate their fragmentation pathways. Five pairs of isomers were detected and three of them were distinguished by comparing the elution order with reference substances and the mass spectrometry data with reported data. In the quantitative analysis, 30 lotus leaf samples from different regions were analyzed to investigate the proportion of eight representative compounds. Quercetin 3-O-glucuronide was found to be the predominant constituent of lotus leaf extracts. For further discrimination among the samples, hierarchical cluster analysis, and principal component analysis, based on the areas of the eight quantitative peaks, were carried out.

  11. Simultaneous determination of pyrroquinazoline alkaloids and flavonoids in Adhatoda beddomei and Adhatoda vasica and their marketed herbal formulations using ultra-high-performance liquid chromatography coupled with triple quadrupole linear ion trap mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Singh, Awantika; Kumar, Sunil; Bajpai, Vikas; Kumar, Brijesh

    2017-03-01

    Adhatoda beddomei and Adhatoda vasica leaf, known as 'Vasaka' and/or 'Vasa' in Ayurveda and 'Malabar nut' in English, is an official drug in the Indian Pharmacopoeia. The medicinal properties of these plants are due to the presence of pyrroquinazoline alkaloids. An UHPLC-ESI/MS/MS method in both positive and negative electrospray ionization in multiple-reaction-monitoring mode was developed and validated for the estimation of alkaloids and flavonoids in Adhatoda species and their marketed herbal formulations. Chromatographic separation was achieved on an Acquity UPLC® BEH C18 -column using a gradient elution with 0.1% formic acid in water and methanol. The developed method was validated as per International Conference on Harmonization guidelines and found to be accurate with overall recovery in the range 94.2-105.0% (RSD ≤ 1.71%), precise (RSD ≤ 3.44%) and linear (R(2)  ≥ 0.9992) over the concentration range of 0.5-1000 ng/mL. The total content of alkaloids and flavonoids were highest in the chloroform and aqueous fraction of A. vasica leaf, respectively. The results indicated that the developed method was simple, rapid, sensitive, selective and accurate for the estimation of multiple bioactive constituents in crude mixture, and therefore could make a contribution to the quality control of Adhatoda species and its derived herbal formulations.

  12. Chemical fingerprint and simultaneous determination of alkaloids and flavonoids in aerial parts of genus Peganum indigenous to China based on HPLC-UV: application of analysis on secondary metabolites accumulation.

    PubMed

    Wen, Fangfang; Cheng, Xuemei; Liu, Wei; Xuan, Min; Zhang, Lei; Zhao, Xin; Shan, Meng; Li, Yan; Teng, Liang; Wang, Zhengtao; Wang, Changhong

    2014-12-01

    The aerial parts of genus Peganum are officially used in traditional Chinese medicine. The paper aims to establish a high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) method for fingerprint analysis and simultaneous determination of three alkaloids and two flavonoids in aerial parts of genus Peganum, and to analyze accumulative difference of secondary metabolites in inter-species, individuals of plants, inter-/intra-population and from different growing seasons. HPLC analysis was performed on a C18 column with gradient elution using 0.1% trifloroacetic acid and acetonitrile as mobile phase and detected at 265 nm, by conventional methodology validation. For fingerprint analysis, the RSDs of relative retention time and relative peak area of the characteristic peaks were within 0.07-0.78 and 0.94-9.09%, respectively. For simultaneous determination of vasicine, harmaline, harmine, deacetylpeganetin and peganetin, all calibration curves showed good linearity (r > 0.9990) within the test range. The relative standard deviations of precision, repeatability and stability test did not exceed 2.37, 2.68 and 2.67%, respectively. The average recoveries for the five analytes were between 96.47 and 101.20%. HPLC fingerprints play a minor role in authenticating and differentiating the herbs of different species of genus Peganum. However, the secondary metabolites levels of alkaloids and flavonoids in aerial parts of genus Peganum rely on species-, habitat-, and growth season-dependent accumulation.

  13. Quantitative and Qualitative Analysis of Phenolic and Flavonoid Content in Moringa oleifera Lam and Ocimum tenuiflorum L.

    PubMed Central

    Sankhalkar, Sangeeta; Vernekar, Vrunda

    2016-01-01

    Background: Number of secondary compounds is produced by plants as natural antioxidants. Moringa oleifera Lam. and Ocimum tenuiflorum L. are known for their wide applications in food and pharmaceutical industry. Objective: To compare phenolic and flavonoid content in M. oleifera Lam and O. tenuiflorum L. by quantitative and qualitative analysis. Materials and Methods: Phenolic and flavonoid content were studied spectrophotometrically and by paper chromatography in M. oleifera Lam. and O. tenuiflorum L. Results: Higher phenolic and flavonoid content were observed in Moringa leaf and flower. Ocimum flower showed higher phenolic content and low flavonoid in comparison to Moringa. Flavonoids such as biflavonyl, flavones, glycosylflavones, and kaempferol were identified by paper chromatography. Phytochemical analysis for flavonoid, tannins, saponins, alkaloids, reducing sugars, and anthraquinones were tested positive for Moringa and Ocimum leaf as well as flower. Conclusions: In the present study higher phenolic and flavonoid content, indicated the natural antioxidant nature of Moringa and Ocimum signifying their medicinal importance. SUMMARY Moringa oleifera Lam. and Ocimum tenuiflorum L. are widly grown in India and are known for their medicinal properties. Number of secondary metabolites like phenolics and flavonoids are known to be present in both the plants. The present study was conducted with an objective to qualitatively and quantitatively compare the phenolics and flavanoids in these two medicinally important plants.Quantitation of total phenolics and flavanoids was done by spectrophotometrically while qualitative analysis was perfomed by paper chromatography and by phytochemical tests. Our results have shown higher phenolics and flavanoid content in Moringa leaf and flower. However, higher phenolic content was absent in Ocimum flower compared to that of Moringa. Phytochemical analysis of various metabolites such as flavonoids, tanins, sapponins, alkaloids

  14. A novel glucosyltransferase involved in steroid saponin biosynthesis in Solanum aculeatissimum.

    PubMed

    Kohara, Atsuko; Nakajima, Chiharu; Hashimoto, Kimiko; Ikenaga, Toshihiko; Tanaka, Hiroyuki; Shoyama, Yukihiro; Yoshida, Shigeo; Muranaka, Toshiya

    2005-01-01

    Steroidal saponins are widely distributed in many plant species. Their diverse structures have resulted in a wide range of applications, including drug and medicine production. It has been suggested that the nature of the non-saccharide and oligosaccharide portions of the saponin molecule both contribute to the properties of individual saponins. Despite numerous studies on the occurrence, chemical structure, and varying pharmaceutical activities of steroidal saponins, their biosynthesis pathway is poorly understood. Glycosylation is thought to be the final step in steroidal saponin biosynthesis and it is thought to be involved in regulating the biological activities of saponins. Isolation of the glycosyltransferases that catalyze the transfer of sugar molecules to steroidal compounds will help to clarify the mechanisms that produce diverse saponins and control their activities in plants. In this study, we obtained three cDNAs encoding putative glycosyltransferases from Solanum aculeatissimum. One of the three, SaGT4A showed UDP-glucosyltransferase activity. This is the first cloned glucosyltransferase involved in steroidal saponin biosynthesis. SaGT4A catalyzes the 3-O-glucosylation of steroidal sapogenins, such as diosgenin, nuatigenin, and tigogenin. This enzyme also glucosylates steroidal alkaloids, such as solanidine, solasodine, and tomatidine. Gene expression analysis revealed that the accumulation of SaGT4A transcripts showed a unique response to wounding stress indicating the involvement of SaGT4A in plant defense system.

  15. Analytical methods for determination of magnoflorine and saponins from roots of Caulophyllum thalictroides (L.) Michx. using UPLC, HPLC and HPTLC.

    PubMed

    Avula, Bharathi; Wang, Yan-Hong; Rumalla, Chidananda Swamy; Ali, Zulfiqar; Smillie, Troy J; Khan, Ikhlas A

    2011-12-15

    Analytical methods including HPLC, UPLC and HPTLC are presented for the determination of major alkaloid and triterpene saponins from the roots of Caulophyllum thalictroides (L.) Michx. (blue cohosh) and dietary supplements claiming to contain blue cohosh. A separation by LC was achieved using a reversed phase column, PDA with ELS detection, and ammonium acetate/acetonitrile gradient as the mobile phase. Owing to their low UV absorption, the triterpene saponins were detected by evaporative light scattering. The eight triterpene saponins (cauloside H, leonticin D, cauloside G, cauloside D, cauloside B, cauloside C, cauloside A and saponin PE) and the alkaloid magnoflorine could be separated within 35 min using HPLC method and within 8.0 min using UPLC method with detection limits of 10 μg/mL for saponins and 1 μg/mL for magnoflorine. The detection wavelength was 320 nm for magnoflorine and ELS detection was used for the eight saponins. The methods were also successfully applied to analyze different dietary supplements. For the products claiming to contain blue cohosh, there was a significant variability in the amounts of triterpene saponins detected. Calculations based on the analysis results for dietary supplements showed that maximum daily intake of alkaloid and saponins vary with the form (solids/liquids) and recommended doses according to the products label. Intakes varied from 0.57 to 15.8 mg/day for magnoflorine and from 5.97 to 302.4 mg/day for total saponins. LC-mass spectrometry coupled with electrospray ionization (ESI) method is described for the identification and confirmation of nine compounds in plant samples and dietary products. A HPTLC method was also developed for the fast chemical fingerprint analysis of C. thalictroides samples.

  16. Alkaloids in Marine Algae

    PubMed Central

    Güven, Kasım Cemal; Percot, Aline; Sezik, Ekrem

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents the alkaloids found in green, brown and red marine algae. Algal chemistry has interested many researchers in order to develop new drugs, as algae include compounds with functional groups which are characteristic from this particular source. Among these compounds, alkaloids present special interest because of their pharmacological activities. Alkaloid chemistry has been widely studied in terrestrial plants, but the number of studies in algae is insignificant. In this review, a detailed account of macro algae alkaloids with their structure and pharmacological activities is presented. The alkaloids found in marine algae may be divided into three groups: 1. Phenylethylamine alkaloids, 2. Indole and halogenated indole alkaloids, 3. Other alkaloids. PMID:20390105

  17. Saponin profile of green asparagus genotypes.

    PubMed

    Vázquez-Castilla, Sara; Jaramillo-Carmona, Sara; Fuentes-Alventosa, Jose María; Jiménez-Araujo, Ana; Rodríguez-Arcos, Rocío; Cermeño-Sacristán, Pedro; Espejo-Calvo, Juan Antonio; Guillén-Bejarano, Rafael

    2013-11-20

    The main goal of this study was to determine the saponin profiles of different "triguero" asparagus genotypes and to compare them to green asparagus commercial hybrids. The samples consisted of 31 commercial hybrids and 58 genotypes from the Huétor-Tájar (HT) population variety ("triguero"). The saponin analysis by high-performance liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry allowed for the determination of 12 saponins derived from a furostan-type steroidal genin, 4 of which had never been described in the edible part of asparagus. The saponin profile of "triguero" asparagus was a combination of these new saponins and protodioscin. Although protodioscin was the major saponin found in commercial hybrids, some of these 12 saponins were detected as major components in some of the commercial hybrids. The total contents of saponins described in some of these HT genotypes reach values as high as 10-100 times higher than those found in commercial hybrids.

  18. Saponins as cytotoxic agents: a review

    PubMed Central

    Galanty, Agnieszka; Sobolewska, Danuta

    2010-01-01

    Saponins are natural glycosides which possess a wide range of pharmacological properties including cytotoxic activity. In this review, the recent studies (2005–2009) concerning the cytotoxic activity of saponins have been summarized. The correlations between the structure and the cytotoxicity of both steroid and triterpenoid saponins have been described as well as the most common mechanisms of action. PMID:20835386

  19. Flavonoids from the Genus Astragalus: Phytochemistry and Biological Activity

    PubMed Central

    Bratkov, Viktor M.; Shkondrov, Aleksandar M.; Zdraveva, Petranka K.; Krasteva, Ilina N.

    2016-01-01

    Flavonoids, the most common plant polyphenols are widely distributed in every species and possess a broad range of pharmacological activities. The genus Astragalus is the largest in the Fabaceae family with more than 2,500 species spread. They are known to contain different metabolites such as flavonoids, saponins, and polysaccharides. Plants from the genus have been used in the traditional medicine of many countries for centuries. This paper is focused on the large group of flavonoid compounds. Details on structure as well as information about the pharmacological properties of flavonoids, isolated from Astragalus species have been discussed. This review is based on publications until the first half of 2014 and includes also the results from our phytochemical investigations of the genus. PMID:27041870

  20. [Alkaloids of Pausinystalia macroceras].

    PubMed

    Leboef, M; Cavé, A; Mangeney, P; Bouquet, A

    1981-04-01

    A study of the alkaloidal content of trunk-barks of Pausinystalia macroceras (K. Schum.) Pierre, Rubiaceae, resulted in the isolation of six alkaloids, five of which are indole alkaloids that belong to the yohimbane and heteroyohimbane groups; among them, yohimbine was found in major amount. Moreover, the levorotatory isomer of calycanthine, a quinoline dimeric tryptophane derived base, has been isolated for the first time. The phytochemical significance of calycanthine and related alkaloids is discussed.

  1. Exploiting plant alkaloids.

    PubMed

    Schläger, Sabrina; Dräger, Birgit

    2016-02-01

    Alkaloid-containing plants have been used for medicine since ancient times. Modern pharmaceuticals still rely on alkaloid extraction from plants, some of which grow slowly, are difficult to cultivate and produce low alkaloid yields. Microbial cells as alternative alkaloid production systems are emerging. Before industrial application of genetically engineered bacteria and yeasts, several steps have to be taken. Original alkaloid-forming enzymes have to be elucidated from plants. Their activity in the heterologous host cells, however, may be low. The exchange of individual plant enzymes for alternative catalysts with better performance and optimal fermentation parameters appear promising. The overall aim is enhancement and stabilization of alkaloid yields from microbes in order to replace the tedious extraction of low alkaloid concentrations from intact plants.

  2. Antisweet saponins from Gymnema sylvestre.

    PubMed

    Ye, W; Liu, X; Zhang, Q; Che, C T; Zhao, S

    2001-02-01

    Three new oleanane-type triterpene glycosides (1-3), along with the sodium salt of alternoside II (4), were isolated from an ethanol extract of the leaves of Gymnema sylvestre. The structures of these new saponins were identified as 21 beta-O-benzoylsitakisogenin 3-O-beta-D-glucopyranosyl(1-->3)-beta-D-glucuronopyranoside (1), the potassium salt of longispinogenin 3-O-beta-D-glucopyranosyl(1-->3)-beta-D-glucuronopyranoside (2), and the potassium salt of 29-hydroxylongispinogenin 3-O-beta-D-glucopyranosyl(1-->3)-beta-D-glucuronopyranoside (3). The aglycon of 3, gymnemagenol (3a), was characterized as 3 beta,16 beta,28, 29-tetrahydroxyolean-12-ene. Structure elucidation was accomplished by interpretation of NMR (DQF-COSY, HMQC, and HMBC) results, FABMS, and hydrolysis. Saponin 1 and the sodium salt of alternoside II (4) exhibited antisweet activity.

  3. Triterpenoid saponins from Echinopsis macrogona (Cactaceae).

    PubMed

    Okazaki, Sachie; Kinoshita, Kaoru; Ito, Satoru; Koyama, Kiyotaka; Yuasa, Hiroshi; Takahashi, Kunio

    2011-01-01

    Triterpene saponins, pachanosides C1, E1, F1 and G1 (1-4), and bridgesides A1, C1, C2, D1, D2, E1 and E2 (5-11) were isolated from Echinopsis macrogona. Compounds 1-4 were saponins with pachanane type triterpene saponins, while the others (5-11) were oleanane type triterpene saponins. While the aglycones of 2-4 and 8-11 were hitherto unknown, the structure of pachanol C was revised in this paper. Their structures were elucidated on the basis of chemical and physicochemical evidence.

  4. Amaryllidaceae and Sceletium alkaloids.

    PubMed

    Jin, Zhong

    2009-03-01

    Alkaloids from the plants of Amaryllidaceae family consists of an unique class of nitrogen-containing compounds showing diverse and significant biological activities, including anticancer and acetylcholinesterase (AChE) inhibitory activities. This review summarizes the research into the isolation, structure elucidation, biological activity, and chemical aspects of the Amaryllidaceae alkaloids over the last two years. In addition, structurally closely related Sceletium alkaloids are also discussed.

  5. Antiproliferative oleanane saponins from Dizygotheca elegantissima.

    PubMed

    Vassallo, Antonio; Pesca, Mariasabina; Ambrosio, Letizia; Malafronte, Nicola; Melle, Nadia Dekdouk; Dal Piaz, Fabrizio; Severino, Lorella

    2012-11-01

    Four new oleanane saponins (1-4), together with three known saponins, were isolated from the aerial parts of Dizygotheca elegantissima R. Vig. & Guillaumin. Their structures were elucidated by 1D and 2D NMR experiments including 1D TOCSY, DQF-COSY, HSQC, and HMBC spectroscopy, as well as ESIMS analysis. The antiproliferative activity of all isolated compounds was evaluated.

  6. Antifungal Activity of C-27 Steroidal Saponins

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Chong-Ren; Zhang, Ying; Jacob, Melissa R.; Khan, Shabana I.; Zhang, Ying-Jun; Li, Xing-Cong

    2006-01-01

    As part of our search for new antifungal agents from natural resources, 22 C-27 steroidal saponins and 6 steroidal sapogenins isolated from several monocotyledonous plants were tested for their antifungal activity against the opportunistic pathogens Candida albicans, Candida glabrata, Candida krusei, Cryptococcus neoformans, and Aspergillus fumigatus. The results showed that the antifungal activity of the steroidal saponins was associated with their aglycone moieties and the number and structure of monosaccharide units in their sugar chains. Within the 10 active saponins, four tigogenin saponins (compounds 1 to 4) with a sugar moiety of four or five monosaccharide units exhibited significant activity against C. neoformans and A. fumigatus, comparable to the positive control amphotericin B. The antifungal potency of these compounds was not associated with cytotoxicity to mammalian cells. This suggests that the C-27 steroidal saponins may be considered potential antifungal leads for further preclinical study. PMID:16641439

  7. Triterpenoid saponins from Gymnema sylvestre.

    PubMed

    Sahu, N P; Mahato, S B; Sarkar, S K; Poddar, G

    1996-03-01

    Besides six known gymnemic acids, four new tritepenoid saponins, gymnemasins A, B, C and D, isolated from the leaves of Gymnema sylvestre, were identified as 3-O-[beta-D-glucopyranosyl(1-->3)-beta-D-glucuronopyranosyl]-22-O- tigloyl- gymnemanol, 3-O-[beta-D-glucopyranosyl (1-->3)-beta-D-glucuronopyranosyl]-gymnemanol, 3-O-beta-D-glucuronopyranosyl-22-O-tigloyl-gymnemanol and 3-O-beta-D-glucuronopyranosyl-gymnemanol, respectively. The aglycone, gymnemanol, which is a new compound, was characterized as 3 beta, 16 beta, 22 alpha, 23, 28-pentahydroxyolean-12-ene.

  8. Alkaloids from Menispermum dauricum.

    PubMed

    Yu, Bing-Wu; Chen, Jian-Yong; Wang, Yan-Ping; Cheng, Kin-Fin; Li, Xiao-Yu; Qin, Guo-Wei

    2002-10-01

    The alkaloids, dechloroacutumidine and 1-epidechloroacutumine, together with three known alkaloids, acutumidine, acutumine, and dechloroacutumine, were isolated from the rhizomes of Menispermum dauricum and their structures established by spectral and chemical methods. The cytotoxicity of each compound against the growth of human cell lines was studied, and acutumine selectively inhibited T-cell growth.

  9. Two Faces of Alkaloids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dostál, Jirí

    2000-08-01

    Alkaloids can occur in two forms, denoted as ammonium salts and free bases. These forms differ substantially in their properties and in some cases in their structures. The article discusses and compares the salts and free bases of six well-known alkaloids: nicotine, morphine, cocaine, sanguinarine, allocryptopine, and magnoflorine. Relevance for the biological and medical uses of these compounds is emphasized.

  10. Steroidal saponins from Fritillaria pallidiflora Schrenk.

    PubMed

    Shen, Shuo; Li, Guoyu; Huang, Jian; Chen, Chaojun; Ren, Bu; Lu, Ga; Tan, Yong; Zhang, Jiaxu; Li, Xian; Wang, Jinhui

    2012-06-01

    Five new steroidal saponins, Pallidifloside D (1), Pallidifloside E (2), Pallidifloside G (5), Pallidifloside H (6) and Pallidifloside I (7), together with seven other steroidal saponins (3, 4, 8-12) were isolated from the dry bulbs of Fritillaria pallidiflora Schrenk. Their structures were established by spectroscopic techniques (IR, MS, 1D and 2D NMR) and chemical means. The isolated steroidal saponins were evaluated for cyotoxic activity against human C6 brain gliomas and Hela cervix cancer cell lines using MTT assays. Compounds 1, 10, 11, 12 showed cytotoxicity against C6 and Hela cell lines with IC(50) values in the range of 5.1-75.8μM.

  11. Occurrence of halogenated alkaloids.

    PubMed

    Gribble, Gordon W

    2012-01-01

    Once considered to be isolation artifacts or chemical "mistakes" of nature, the number of naturally occurring organohalogen compounds has grown from a dozen in 1954 to >5000 today. Of these, at least 25% are halogenated alkaloids. This is not surprising since nitrogen-containing pyrroles, indoles, carbolines, tryptamines, tyrosines, and tyramines are excellent platforms for biohalogenation, particularly in the marine environment where both chloride and bromide are plentiful for biooxidation and subsequent incorporation into these electron-rich substrates. This review presents the occurrence of all halogenated alkaloids, with the exception of marine bromotyrosines where coverage begins where it left off in volume 61 of The Alkaloids. Whereas the biological activity of these extraordinary compounds is briefly cited for some examples, a future volume of The Alkaloids will present full coverage of this topic and will also include selected syntheses of halogenated alkaloids. Natural organohalogens of all types, especially marine and terrestrial halogenated alkaloids, comprise a rapidly expanding class of natural products, in many cases expressing powerful biological activity. This enormous proliferation has several origins: (1) a revitalization of natural product research in a search for new drugs, (2) improved compound characterization methods (multidimensional NMR, high-resolution mass spectrometry), (3) specific enzyme-based and other biological assays, (4) sophisticated collection methods (SCUBA and remote submersibles for deep ocean marine collections), (5) new separation and purification techniques (HPLC and countercurrent separation), (6) a greater appreciation of traditional folk medicine and ethobotany, and (7) marine bacteria and fungi as novel sources of natural products. Halogenated alkaloids are truly omnipresent in the environment. Indeed, one compound, Q1 (234), is ubiquitous in the marine food web and is found in the Inuit from their diet of whale

  12. Alkaloids from Esenbeckia pilocarpoides.

    PubMed

    Bevalot, F; Fournet, A; Moretti, C; Vaquette, J

    1984-12-01

    A preliminary screening showed the occurrence of alkaloids only in root bark and roots of ESENBECKIA PILOCARPOIDES H. B. K., (Rutaceae). Six alkaloids have been isolated and identified from root bark: one acridone, 1-hydroxy-3-methoxy- N-methyl-acridone; four furoquinolines, maculine, flindersiamine, kokusaginine, kokusagine; the sixth, isomaculine, a furo-4-quinolone, known as a synthetic product, has been isolated for the first time from a natural source.

  13. Marine Indole Alkaloids

    PubMed Central

    Netz, Natalie; Opatz, Till

    2015-01-01

    Marine indole alkaloids comprise a large and steadily growing group of secondary metabolites. Their diverse biological activities make many compounds of this class attractive starting points for pharmaceutical development. Several marine-derived indoles were found to possess cytotoxic, antineoplastic, antibacterial and antimicrobial activities, in addition to the action on human enzymes and receptors. The newly isolated indole alkaloids of marine origin since the last comprehensive review in 2003 are reported, and biological aspects will be discussed. PMID:26287214

  14. Saponin determination, expression analysis and functional characterization of saponin biosynthetic genes in Chenopodium quinoa leaves.

    PubMed

    Fiallos-Jurado, Jennifer; Pollier, Jacob; Moses, Tessa; Arendt, Philipp; Barriga-Medina, Noelia; Morillo, Eduardo; Arahana, Venancio; de Lourdes Torres, Maria; Goossens, Alain; Leon-Reyes, Antonio

    2016-09-01

    Quinoa (Chenopodium quinoa Willd.) is a highly nutritious pseudocereal with an outstanding protein, vitamin, mineral and nutraceutical content. The leaves, flowers and seed coat of quinoa contain triterpenoid saponins, which impart bitterness to the grain and make them unpalatable without postharvest removal of the saponins. In this study, we quantified saponin content in quinoa leaves from Ecuadorian sweet and bitter genotypes and assessed the expression of saponin biosynthetic genes in leaf samples elicited with methyl jasmonate. We found saponin accumulation in leaves after MeJA treatment in both ecotypes tested. As no reference genes were available to perform qPCR in quinoa, we mined publicly available RNA-Seq data for orthologs of 22 genes known to be stably expressed in Arabidopsis thaliana using geNorm, NormFinder and BestKeeper algorithms. The quinoa ortholog of At2g28390 (Monensin Sensitivity 1, MON1) was stably expressed and chosen as a suitable reference gene for qPCR analysis. Candidate saponin biosynthesis genes were screened in the quinoa RNA-Seq data and subsequent functional characterization in yeast led to the identification of CqbAS1, CqCYP716A78 and CqCYP716A79. These genes were found to be induced by MeJA, suggesting this phytohormone might also modulate saponin biosynthesis in quinoa leaves. Knowledge of the saponin biosynthesis and its regulation in quinoa may aid the further development of sweet cultivars that do not require postharvest processing.

  15. Flavonoids from Tephrosia aequilata.

    PubMed

    Tarus, Paul K; Machocho, Alex K; Lang'at-Thoruwa, Caroline C; Chhabra, Sumesh C

    2002-06-01

    From the roots of the plant Tephrosia aequilata Baker, five flavonoids were isolated of which, 3,4:8,9-dimethylenedioxypterocarpan is reported for the first time. Its structure and those of the already known flavonoids were established by physical and spectroscopic analysis. Application of 2D NMR techniques was useful for complete characterization of the new pterocarpan as well as the other known flavonoids.

  16. Direct and comprehensive analysis of ginsenosides and diterpene alkaloids in Shenfu injection by combinatory liquid chromatography-mass spectrometric techniques.

    PubMed

    Yang, Hua; Liu, Lei; Gao, Wen; Liu, Ke; Qi, Lian-Wen; Li, Ping

    2014-04-01

    Shenfu injection (SFI) is a widely used Chinese herbal formulation for cardiac diseases prepared from red ginseng and processed aconite root. Clinical observations and pharmacological effects on SFI have been well investigated. Chemical analysis and quality control studies of this formulation, however, are relatively limited, especially regarding toxic aconite alkaloids. In this work, a high-performance liquid chromatography coupled with quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry (HPLC-QTOF MS) method was applied to comprehensive analysis of constituents in SFI. Highly sensitive MS allows direct analysis of injections without additional sample pretreatment required. Using diagnostic ions and fragmentation rules, we identified 23 trace diterpene alkaloids, nineteen ginseng saponins, one panaxytriol, and one 5-hydroxymethylfurfural in SFI. A LC-MS method with selected ion monitoring was then used to quantify 24 major alkaloids and ginsenosides. The method was validated in terms of linearity, accuracy and precision. Especially, the limits of quantification were low to 0.4-18ng/mL for diterpene alkaloids. The total concentrations of saponins and alkaloids were about 676-742μg/mL and 3-7μg/mL in five batches of SFI samples, respectively. Finally, cosine ratio and euclidean distance were introduced to evaluate the batch-to-batch reproducibility of SFI samples, and the results demonstrated high quality consistency. Global identification and quantification of complex constituents based on LC-MS promises wide applications in quality control and batch monitoring for herbal products.

  17. Flavonoids in Sophora Species

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shirataki, Yoshiaki; Motohashi, Noboru

    Sophora species of Leguminosae are abundantly present in the natural kingdom. Today, among Sophora plants, the flavonoids of the plant phenols occupy a remarkable position. For a very long time flavonoids have been used as natural pigments and dyes. Some of the colorful anthocyanins of the glucosides are used for color and flavor in foodstuffs. Therefore, these flavonoids are beneficial to daily human life. Herein we concentrate on flavonoids in Sophora plants, and the relationship between their chemical structures and nutraceutical effect. For this purpose, soy-based infant formulas, osteoporosis, antitumor activity, antimicrobial activity, anti-HIV activity, radical generation and O2 - scavenging activity, and enzyme inhibitory activity have been described.

  18. Cytotoxicity of Hymenocallis expansa alkaloids.

    PubMed

    Antoun, M D; Mendoza, N T; Ríos, Y R; Proctor, G R; Wickramaratne, D B; Pezzuto, J M; Kinghorn, A D

    1993-08-01

    From the bulbs and leaves of Hymenocallis expansa (Amaryllidaceae), three alkaloid constituents were identified: (+)-tazettine, (+)-hippeastrine, and (-)-haemanthidine. These alkaloids demonstrated significant cytotoxicity when tested against a panel of human and murine tumor cell lines.

  19. Steroidal saponins from Dioscorea preussii.

    PubMed

    Tabopda, Turibio Kuiate; Mitaine-Offer, Anne-Claire; Tanaka, Chiaki; Miyamoto, Tomofumi; Mirjolet, Jean-François; Duchamp, Olivier; Ngadjui, Bonaventure Tchaleu; Lacaille-Dubois, Marie-Aleth

    2014-09-01

    Three new steroidal saponins, named diospreussinosides A-C (1-3), along with two known ones (4, 5) were isolated from rhizomes of Dioscorea preussii. Their structures were elucidated mainly by 1D and 2D NMR spectroscopic analysis and mass spectrometry as (25S)-17α,25-dihydroxyspirost-5-en-3β-yl-O-α-L-rhamnopyranosyl-(1→4)-α-L-rhamnopyranosyl-(1→4)-β-D-glucopyranoside (1), (25S)-17α,25-dihydroxyspirost-5-en-3β-yl-O-α-L-rhamnopyranosyl-(1→4)-α-L-rhamnopyranosyl-(1→4)-[α-L-rhamnopyranosyl-(1→2)]-β-D-glucopyranoside (2), and (24S,25R)-17α,24,25-trihydroxyspirost-5-en-3β-yl-O-α-L-rhamnopyranosyl-(1→4)-α-L-rhamnopyranosyl-(1→4)-[α-L-rhamnopyranosyl-(1→2)]-β-D-glucopyranoside (3). The spirostane-type skeleton of compound 3 possessing an unusual dihydroxylation pattern on the F-ring is reported for the first time. Cytotoxicity of compounds 2-5 was evaluated against two human colon carcinoma cell lines (HT-29 and HCT 116).

  20. A new steroidal saponin from the leaves of Agave americana.

    PubMed

    Yokosuka, A; Mimaki, Y; Kuroda, M; Sashida, Y

    2000-05-01

    A new bisdesmosidic spirostanol saponin, along with three known saponins, were isolated from Agave americana (Agavaceae). The structure of the new saponin was elucidated as (25R)-3 beta,6 alpha-dihydroxy-5 alpha-spirostan-12-one 3,6-di-O-beta-D-glucopyranoside. Among the isolated saponins, hecogenin tetraglycoside showed cytotoxic activity against HL-60 human promyelocytic leukemia cells with an IC50 value of 4.3 micrograms/mL.

  1. Alkaloids from Hippeastrum papilio.

    PubMed

    de Andrade, Jean Paulo; Berkov, Strahil; Viladomat, Francesc; Codina, Carles; Zuanazzi, José Angelo S; Bastida, Jaume

    2011-08-18

    Galanthamine, an acetylcholinesterase inhibitor marketed as a hydrobromide salt (Razadyne®, Reminyl®) for the treatment of Alzheimer's disease (AD), is obtained from Amaryllidaceae plants, especially those belonging to the genera Leucojum, Narcissus, Lycoris and Ungernia. The growing demand for galanthamine has prompted searches for new sources of this compound, as well as other bioactive alkaloids for the treatment of AD. In this paper we report the isolation of the new alkaloid 11β-hydroxygalanthamine, an epimer of the previously isolated alkaloid habranthine, which was identified using NMR techniques. It has been shown that 11β-hydroxygalanthamine has an important in vitro acetylcholinesterase inhibitory activity. Additionally, Hippeastrum papilio yielded substantial quantities of galanthamine.

  2. Antimicrobial activity of flavonoids.

    PubMed

    Cushnie, T P Tim; Lamb, Andrew J

    2005-11-01

    Flavonoids are ubiquitous in photosynthesising cells and are commonly found in fruit, vegetables, nuts, seeds, stems, flowers, tea, wine, propolis and honey. For centuries, preparations containing these compounds as the principal physiologically active constituents have been used to treat human diseases. Increasingly, this class of natural products is becoming the subject of anti-infective research, and many groups have isolated and identified the structures of flavonoids possessing antifungal, antiviral and antibacterial activity. Moreover, several groups have demonstrated synergy between active flavonoids as well as between flavonoids and existing chemotherapeutics. Reports of activity in the field of antibacterial flavonoid research are widely conflicting, probably owing to inter- and intra-assay variation in susceptibility testing. However, several high-quality investigations have examined the relationship between flavonoid structure and antibacterial activity and these are in close agreement. In addition, numerous research groups have sought to elucidate the antibacterial mechanisms of action of selected flavonoids. The activity of quercetin, for example, has been at least partially attributed to inhibition of DNA gyrase. It has also been proposed that sophoraflavone G and (-)-epigallocatechin gallate inhibit cytoplasmic membrane function, and that licochalcones A and C inhibit energy metabolism. Other flavonoids whose mechanisms of action have been investigated include robinetin, myricetin, apigenin, rutin, galangin, 2,4,2'-trihydroxy-5'-methylchalcone and lonchocarpol A. These compounds represent novel leads, and future studies may allow the development of a pharmacologically acceptable antimicrobial agent or class of agents.

  3. Cytotoxic steroidal saponins from Agave sisalana.

    PubMed

    Chen, Pi-Yu; Chen, Chin-Hui; Kuo, Ching-Chuan; Lee, Tzong-Huei; Kuo, Yueh-Hsiung; Lee, Ching-Kuo

    2011-06-01

    Two new steroidal saponins, 8 and 10, along with 7 known steroidal sapogenins and saponins (1-7) and a furostanol saponin (9) were isolated from Agave sisalana Perrine ex Engelm. The structures of these two new compounds were identified and characterized by 1D and 2D NMR spectroscopy and mass spectrometry. In addition, acid hydrolysis and GC-FID were used to confirm the sugar moieties of 8 and 10. The cytotoxic effects of 1-10 on MCF-7, NCI-H460, and SF-268 cancer cells were evaluated, and among them, compound 10 proved to be the most cytotoxic with IC₅₀ values of 1.2, 3.8, and 1.5 µM, respectively.

  4. Saponins of Agave: Chemistry and bioactivity.

    PubMed

    Sidana, Jasmeen; Singh, Bikram; Sharma, Om P

    2016-10-01

    The genus Agave comprises more than 400 species with geographical presence in the tropical and sub-tropical regions of the world. These plants have a rich history of folkloric use and are known for a wide spectrum of applications. Secondary metabolites of diverse chemical classes have been reported from Agave species. Owing to their pharmacological significance, the steroidal saponins of Agave have caught the attention of phytochemists, biologists and drug discovery scientists. The present review describes 141 steroidal saponins and sapogenins and covers the literature published from 1970 to 2015. It is a comprehensive and coherent presentation of the structures, methods of chemical profiling, structure elucidation and biological activities of the saponins and sapogenins reported from Agave. The article provides a perspective of the research on steroidal compounds of Agave.

  5. Analysis of Ergot Alkaloids

    PubMed Central

    Crews, Colin

    2015-01-01

    The principles and application of established and newer methods for the quantitative and semi-quantitative determination of ergot alkaloids in food, feed, plant materials and animal tissues are reviewed. The techniques of sampling, extraction, clean-up, detection, quantification and validation are described. The major procedures for ergot alkaloid analysis comprise liquid chromatography with tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) and liquid chromatography with fluorescence detection (LC-FLD). Other methods based on immunoassays are under development and variations of these and minor techniques are available for specific purposes. PMID:26046699

  6. Analysis of Ergot Alkaloids.

    PubMed

    Crews, Colin

    2015-06-03

    The principles and application of established and newer methods for the quantitative and semi-quantitative determination of ergot alkaloids in food, feed, plant materials and animal tissues are reviewed. The techniques of sampling, extraction, clean-up, detection, quantification and validation are described. The major procedures for ergot alkaloid analysis comprise liquid chromatography with tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) and liquid chromatography with fluorescence detection (LC-FLD). Other methods based on immunoassays are under development and variations of these and minor techniques are available for specific purposes.

  7. Triterpene saponins from Chenopodium quinoa Willd.

    PubMed

    Kuljanabhagavad, Tiwatt; Thongphasuk, Piyanut; Chamulitrat, Walee; Wink, Michael

    2008-06-01

    Twenty triterpene saponins (1-20) have been isolated from different parts of Chenopodium quinoa (flowers, fruits, seed coats, and seeds) and their structures have been elucidated by analysis of chemical and spectroscopic data including 1D- and 2D-NMR. Four compounds (1-4) were identified: 3beta-[(O-beta-d-glucopyranosyl-(1-->3)-alpha-l-arabinopyranosyl)oxy]-23-oxo-olean-12-en-28-oic acid beta-d-glucopyranoside (1), 3beta-[(O-beta-d-glucopyranosyl-(1-->3)-alpha-l-arabinopyranosyl)oxy]-27-oxo-olean-12-en-28-oic acid beta-d-glucopyranoside (2), 3-O-alpha-l-arabinopyranosyl serjanic acid 28-O-beta-d-glucopyranosyl ester (3), and 3-O-beta-d-glucuronopyranosyl serjanic acid 28-O-beta-d-glucopyranosyl ester (4). The following known compounds have not previously been reported as saponin constituents from the flowers and the fruits of this plant: two bidesmosides of serjanic acid (5,6), four bidesmosides of oleanolic acid (7-10), five bidesmosides of phytolaccagenic acid (11-15), four bidesmosides of hederagenin (16-19), and one bidesmoside of 3beta,23,30-trihydroxy olean-12-en-28-oic acid (20). The cytotoxicity of these saponins and their aglycones was tested in HeLa cells. Induction of apoptosis in Caco-2 cells by bidesmosidic saponins 1-4 and their aglycones I-III was determined by flow cytometric DNA analysis. The saponins with an aldehyde group were most active. The relationships between structure and cytotoxic activity of saponins and their aglycones are discussed.

  8. A new triterpenoid saponin from Gymnema sylvestre.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Man-Qi; Liu, Yue; Xie, Sheng-Xu; Xu, Tun-Hai; Liu, Tong-Hua; Xu, Ya-Juan; Xu, Dong-Ming

    2012-01-01

    Besides four known compounds, a new triterpenoid saponin was isolated from the stems of Gymnema sylvestre. The structure of the new triterpenoid saponin was established as 3β,16β,22α-trihydroxy-olean-12-ene 3-O-β-D-xylopyranosyl-(1 → 6)-β-D-glucopyranosyl-(1 → 6)-β-D-glucopyranoside (1) on the basis of 1D and 2D NMR techniques, including COSY, HMBC, HMQC, and NOESY correlations. Four known compounds 2, 3, 4, and 5 were identified on the basis of spectroscopic data.

  9. A new steroidal saponin from Agave attenuata.

    PubMed

    Mendes, Tatiana Paz; Silva, Graziela de Medeiros; da Silva, Bernadete Pereira; Parente, José Paz

    2004-04-01

    A new steroidal saponin was isolated from the leaves of Agave attenuata. Its structure was established as (3beta,beta,25S)-spirostan-3-yl O-beta-D-glucopyranosyl-(1 --> 2)-beta-D-glucopyranosyl-(1 --> 2)-O-[beta-D-glucopyranosyl-(1 --> 3)]-beta-D-glucopyranosyl-(1 --> 4)-beta-D-galactopyranoside. The structural identification was performed using detailed analyses of 1H- and 13C-NMR spectra including 2D NMR spectroscopic techniques (COSY, HETCOR, and COLOC) and chemical conversions. The hemolytic activity of the steroidal saponin was evaluated using an in vitro assay.

  10. A new steroidal saponin from Agave shrevei.

    PubMed

    Pereira Da Silva, Bernadete; Valente, Ana Paula; Paz Parente, José

    2006-04-01

    A new steroidal saponin was isolated from the leaves of Agave shrevei. Its structure was established as 3-[O-beta-D-glucopyranosyl-(1-->2)-O-[O-beta-D-glucopyranosyl-(1-->4)-O-[O-beta-D-glucopyranosyl-(1-->6)]-O-beta-D-glucopyranosyl-(1-->4)-beta-D-galactopyranosyl)-oxy]-(3beta,5alpha,25R)-spirostane. The structural identification was performed using detailed analyses of 1H- and 13C-NMR spectra including 2D NMR spectroscopic techniques (COSY, HETCOR, HMBC, and HMQC) and chemical conversions. The haemolytic activity of the steroidal saponin was evaluated using an in vitro assay.

  11. Simple Indolizidine and Quinolizidine Alkaloids.

    PubMed

    Michael, Joseph P

    2016-01-01

    This review of simple indolizidine and quinolizidine alkaloids (i.e., those in which the parent bicyclic systems are in general not embedded in polycyclic arrays) is an update of the previous coverage in Volume 55 of this series (2001). The present survey covers the literature from mid-1999 to the end of 2013; and in addition to aspects of the isolation, characterization, and biological activity of the alkaloids, much emphasis is placed on their total synthesis. A brief introduction to the topic is followed by an overview of relevant alkaloids from fungal and microbial sources, among them slaframine, cyclizidine, Steptomyces metabolites, and the pantocins. The important iminosugar alkaloids lentiginosine, steviamine, swainsonine, castanospermine, and related hydroxyindolizidines are dealt with in the subsequent section. The fourth and fifth sections cover metabolites from terrestrial plants. Pertinent plant alkaloids bearing alkyl, functionalized alkyl or alkenyl substituents include dendroprimine, anibamine, simple alkaloids belonging to the genera Prosopis, Elaeocarpus, Lycopodium, and Poranthera, and bicyclic alkaloids of the lupin family. Plant alkaloids bearing aryl or heteroaryl substituents include ipalbidine and analogs, secophenanthroindolizidine and secophenanthroquinolizidine alkaloids (among them septicine, julandine, and analogs), ficuseptine, lasubines, and other simple quinolizidines of the Lythraceae, the simple furyl-substituted Nuphar alkaloids, and a mixed quinolizidine-quinazoline alkaloid. The penultimate section of the review deals with the sizable group of simple indolizidine and quinolizidine alkaloids isolated from, or detected in, ants, mites, and terrestrial amphibians, and includes an overview of the "dietary hypothesis" for the origin of the amphibian metabolites. The final section surveys relevant alkaloids from marine sources, and includes clathryimines and analogs, stellettamides, the clavepictines and pictamine, and bis

  12. The Securinega alkaloids.

    PubMed

    Chirkin, Eqor; Atkatlian, William; Porée, François-Hugues

    2015-01-01

    Securinega alkaloids represent a family of plant secondary metabolites known for 50 years. Securinine (1), the most abundant and studied alkaloid of this series was isolated by Russian researchers in 1956. In the following years, French and Japanese scientists reported other Securinega compounds and extensive work was done to elucidate their intriguing structures. The homogeneity of this family relies mainly on its tetracyclic chemical backbone, which features a butenolide moiety (cycle D) and an azabicyclo[3.2.1]octane ring system (rings B and C). Interestingly, after a period of latency of 20 years, the Securinega topic reemerged as a prolific source of new natural structures and to date more than 50 compounds have been identified and characterized. The oligomeric subgroup gathering dimeric, trimeric, and tetrameric units is of particular interest. The unprecedented structure of the Securinega alkaloids was the subject of extensive synthetic efforts culminating in several efficient and elegant total syntheses. The botanical distribution of these alkaloids seems limited to the Securinega, Flueggea, Margaritaria, and Breynia genera (Phyllanthaceae). However, only a limited number of plant species have been considered for their alkaloid contents, and additional phytochemical as well as genetic studies are needed. Concerning the biosynthesis, experiments carried out with radiolabelled aminoacids allowed to identify lysine and tyrosine as the precursors of the piperidine ring A and the CD rings of securinine (1), respectively. Besides, plausible biosynthetic pathways were proposed for virosaine A (38) and B (39), flueggine A (46), and also the different oligomers flueggenine A-D (48-51), fluevirosinine A (56), and flueggedine (20). The case of nirurine (45) and secu'amamine (37) remains elusive and additional studies seem necessary to understand their mode of production. The scope of biological of activities of the Securinega alkaloids was mainly centered on the CNS

  13. Soya Saponins Induce Enteritis in Atlantic Salmon (Salmo salar L.).

    PubMed

    Krogdahl, Åshild; Gajardo, Karina; Kortner, Trond M; Penn, Michael; Gu, Min; Berge, Gerd Marit; Bakke, Anne Marie

    2015-04-22

    Soybean meal-induced enteritis (SBMIE) is a well-described condition in the distal intestine of salmonids, and saponins have been implicated as the causal agent. However, the question remains whether saponins alone cause SBMIE. Moreover, the dose-response relationship has not been described. In a 10 week feeding trial with Atlantic salmon, a highly purified (95%) soya saponin preparation was supplemented (0, 2, 4, 6, or 10 g/kg) to two basal diets, one containing fishmeal as the major protein source (FM) and the other 25% lupin meal (LP). Saponins caused dose-dependent increases in the severity of inflammation independent of the basal diet, with concomitant alterations in digestive functions and immunological marker expression. Thus, saponins induced inflammation whether the diet contained other legume components or not. However, responses were often the same or stronger in fish fed the corresponding saponin-supplemented LP diets despite lower saponin exposure, suggesting potentiation by other legume component(s).

  14. Two triterpenoidal saponins from sapindus, mukorossi gaertn.

    PubMed

    Azhar, I; Usmanghani, K; Perveen, S; Ali, M S; Ahmad, V U

    1993-07-01

    The two triterpenoidal saponins 2 and 3 containing hederagenin aglycone moiety (1) have been isolated from the butanol soluble fraction of the fruits (without shells) of Sapindus mukorossi Gaertn. Their structures were elucidated with the aid of chemical and spectroscopic means.

  15. Barbarea vulgaris linkage map and quantitative trait loci for saponins, glucosinolates, hairiness and resistance to the herbivore Phyllotreta nemorum.

    PubMed

    Kuzina, Vera; Nielsen, Jens Kvist; Augustin, Jörg Manfred; Torp, Anna Maria; Bak, Søren; Andersen, Sven Bode

    2011-02-01

    Combined genomics and metabolomics approaches were used to unravel molecular mechanisms behind interactions between winter cress (Barbarea vulgaris) and flea beetle (Phyllotreta nemorum). B. vulgaris comprises two morphologically, biochemically and cytologically deviating types, which differ in flea beetle resistance, saponin and glucosinolate profiles, as well as leaf pubescence. An F2 population generated from a cross between the two B. vulgaris types was used to construct a B. vulgaris genetic map based on 100 AFLP and 31 microsatellite markers. The map was divided into eight linkage groups. QTL (quantitative trait loci) analysis revealed a total of 15 QTL affecting eight traits, including nine QTL for four saponins, two QTL for two glucosinolates, two QTL for hairiness, and two QTL for flea beetle resistance. The two QTL for resistance towards flea beetles in B. vulgaris co-localized with QTL for the four saponins associated with resistance. Furthermore, global QTL analysis of B. vulgaris metabolites identified QTL for a number of flavonoid glycosides and additional saponins from both resistant and susceptible types. The transcriptome of the resistant B. vulgaris type was sequenced by pyrosequencing, and sequences containing microsatellites were identified. Microsatellite types in B. vulgaris were similar to Arabidopsis thaliana but different from Oryza sativa. Comparative analysis between B. vulgaris and A. thaliana revealed a remarkable degree of synteny between a large part of linkage groups 1 and 4 of B. vulgaris harboring the two QTL for flea beetle resistance and Arabidopsis chromosomes 3 and 1. Gene candidates that may underlie QTL for resistance and saponin biosynthesis are discussed.

  16. Phenolic dimers and an indole alkaloid from Campylospermum flavum (Ochnaceae).

    PubMed

    Ndongo, Joseph Thierry; Shaaban, Mohamed; Mbing, Joséphine Ngo; Bikobo, Dominique Ngono; Atchadé, Alex de Théodore; Pegnyemb, Dieudonné Emmanuel; Laatsch, Hartmut

    2010-11-01

    From the leaves and stem bark of Campylospermum flavum (Ochnaceae), three compounds, namely 4‴-O-methylagathisflavone, flavumchalcone, and flavumindole have been isolated together with 10 known compounds, including three flavonoids, two biflavonoids, two alkaloids, two nitrile glucosides, and glucopyranosyl-β-sistosterol. The structures of these compounds and their relative configurations were established by 1D and 2D NMR experiments. The methanolic crude extracts of leaves and stem bark of C. flavum and compounds displayed a significant cytotoxicity towards Artemia salina larvae.

  17. The flavonoids of tomatoes.

    PubMed

    Slimestad, Rune; Fossen, Torgils; Verheul, Michel J

    2008-04-09

    Tomatoes ( Lycopersicon esculentum Mill.) have been recognized as an important source of dietary flavonoids because of a high consumption worldwide. The qualitative and quantitative flavonoid compositions of assorted tomato cultivars including individual quantitative contributions of the five most significant flavonoids have been determined in this work. The dihydrochalcone phloretin 3',5'-di-C-beta-glucopyranoside and the flavonol quercetin 3-O-(2''-O-beta-apiofuranosyl-6''-O-alpha-rhamnopyranosyl-beta-glucopyranoside) were identified for the first time in Solanaceae spp. and found to be among the main flavonoids in all cultivars. Phloretin 3',5'-di-C-glc is the first C-glycoside identified in tomatoes and also the first dihydrochalcone from this species. In addition, chalconaringenin, kaempferol 3-rutinoside, and quercetin 3-rutinoside (rutin), though previously reported to occur in tomato, were fully characterized by extensive use of 2D NMR techniques and high-resolution LCMS. The total flavonoid content of different tomato types varied from 4 to 26 mg 100 (-1) g FW with chalconaringenin as the predominant compound comprising 35 to 71% of the total flavonoid content. The individual quantities of quercetin 3-O-(2''- O-beta-apiofuranosyl-6''- O-alpha-rhamnopyranosyl-beta-glucopyranoside) and phloretin 3',5'-di-C-beta-glucopyranoside was similar to that of rutin in several cultivars.

  18. Indole alkaloids from Geissospermum reticulatum.

    PubMed

    Reina, M; Ruiz-Mesia, W; López-Rodríguez, M; Ruiz-Mesia, L; González-Coloma, A; Martínez-Díaz, R

    2012-05-25

    Ten indole alkaloids were isolated from Geissospermum reticulatum, seven (1-7) from the leaves and three (8-10) from the bark. Seven were aspidospermatan-type alkaloids (1-3, 5-9), including four (5-8) with a 1-oxa-3-cyclopentene group in their molecule, which we named geissospermidine subtype. Compounds 1-3, 5-8, and 10 had not been reported previously as natural products, while 4 and 9 were the known alkaloids O-demethylaspidospermine and flavopereirine. Their structures were determined by spectroscopic techniques including 1D and 2D NMR experiments (COSY, NOESY, HSQC, HMBC). Additionally, X-ray crystallographic analyses of 1, 2, and 6 were performed. Antiparasitic activities of the ethanolic and alkaloidal extracts and of the pure alkaloids were tested against Trypanosoma cruzi and Leishmania infantum. In general, the extracts exhibited selective action and were more active against Leishmania than against Trypanosoma. Alkaloid 4 was also very active against L. infantum.

  19. Quinoline alkaloids from Acronychia laurifolia.

    PubMed

    Cui, B; Chai, H; Dong, Y; Horgen, F D; Hansen, B; Madulid, D A; Soejarto, D D; Farnsworth, N R; Cordell, G A; Pezzuto, J M; Kinghorn, A D

    1999-09-01

    Bioassay-directed fractionation of a root extract of Acronychia laurifolia (Rutaceae) using the KB-V1+ human tumor cell line led to the isolation of six quinoline alkaloids. One of these alkaloids is novel, namely, 2,3-methylenedioxy-4,7-dimethoxyquinoline and the other five were identified as the known compounds, evolitrine, gamma-fagarine, skimmianine, kokusaginine and maculosidine. Two known bis-tetrahydrofuran lignans, sesamolin and yangambin, were also identified. The structure of the new alkaloid was determined by spectroscopic methods. All of the isolates were evaluated against a panel of human cancer cell lines; four of the alkaloids showed weak cytotoxic activity.

  20. Quinolizidine alkaloids from Lupinus lanatus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neto, Alexandre T.; Oliveira, Carolina Q.; Ilha, Vinicius; Pedroso, Marcelo; Burrow, Robert A.; Dalcol, Ionara I.; Morel, Ademir F.

    2011-10-01

    In this study, one new quinolizidine alkaloid, lanatine A ( 1), together with three other known alkaloids, 13-α- trans-cinnamoyloxylupanine ( 2), 13-α-hydroxylupanine ( 3), and (-)-multiflorine ( 4) were isolated from the aerial parts of Lupinus lanatus (Fabaceae). The structures of alkaloids 1- 4 were elucidated by spectroscopic data analysis. The stereochemistry of 1 was determined by single crystal X-ray analysis. Bayesian statistical analysis of the Bijvoet differences suggests the absolute stereochemistry of 1. In addition, the antimicrobial potential of alkaloids 1- 4 is also reported.

  1. An improved method for thin layer chromatographic analysis of saponins.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Om P; Kumar, Neeraj; Singh, Bikram; Bhat, Tej K

    2012-05-01

    Analysis of saponins by thin layer chromatography (TLC) is reported. The solvent system was n-butanol:water:acetic acid (84:14:7). Detection of saponins on the TLC plates after development and air-drying was done by immersion in a suspension of sheep erythrocytes, followed by washing off the excess blood on the plate surface. Saponins appeared as white spots against a pink background. The protocol provided specific detection of saponins in the saponins enriched extracts from Aesculusindica (Wall. ex Camb.) Hook.f., Lonicera japonica Thunb., Silene inflata Sm., Sapindusmukorossi Gaertn., Chlorophytum borivilianum Santapau & Fernandes, Asparagusadscendens Roxb., Asparagus racemosus Willd., Agave americana L., Camellia sinensis [L.] O. Kuntze. The protocol is convenient, inexpensive, does not require any corrosive chemicals and provides specific detection of saponins.

  2. Steroidal saponins from Smilax excelsa rhizomes.

    PubMed

    Ivanova, Antoaneta; Mikhova, Bozhanka; Klaiber, Iris; Dinchev, Dragomir; Kostova, Ivanka

    2009-01-01

    From the n-butanol soluble fraction of the methanol extract of the rhizomes of Smilax excelsa, three new furostanol saponins 3-O-[4-O-acetyl-alpha-L-rhamnopyranosyl-(1 --> 2)-{alpha-L-rhamnopyranosyl-(1 --> 4)}-beta-D-glucopyranosyl]-26-O-[beta-D-glucopyranosyl]-22alpha-hydroxy-(25R)-furost-5-ene-3beta,26-diol (1), 3-O-[2-O-acetyl-alpha-L-rhamnopyranosyl-(1 --> 2)-{alpha-L-rhamnopyranosyl-(1 --> 4)}-beta-D-glucopyranosyl]-26-O-[beta-D-glucopyranosyl]-22alpha-hydroxy-(25R)-furost-5-ene-3beta,26-diol (2), 3-O-[3-O-acetyl-alpha-L-rhamnopyranosyl-(1 --> 2)-{alpha-L-rhamnopyranosyl-(1 --> 4)}-beta-D-glucopyranosyl]-26-O-[beta-D-glucopyranosyl]-22alpha-hydroxy-(25R)-furost-5-ene-3beta,26-diol (3), and three known saponins: protodioscin (4), pseudoprotodioscin (5) and dioscin (6) were isolated.

  3. A new triterpene saponin from the roots of Ilex pubescens.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Zhong-Liu; Feng, Zong-Cai; Fu, Chun-Yan; Zeng, Li

    2013-08-01

    A new triterpene saponin, ilexoside P (1), along with three known triterpene saponins, ilexoside O (2), ilexsaponin B3 (3) and ilexpublesnin A (4) was isolated from the roots of Ilex pubescens. Their chemical structures were elucidated on the basis of UV, IR, MS, and NMR spectroscopic analyses coupled with chemical degradation. In addition, the xanthine oxidase (XOD) inhibitory activity of the isolated saponins was reported. Compound 1 exhibited weak XOD inhibitory activity in the test.

  4. Potent antitrypanosomal triterpenoid saponins from Mussaenda luteola

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Five new triterpenoid saponins, heinsiagenin A 3-O-[a-L-rhamnopyranosyl-(1->2)-Beta-D-glucopyranosyl-(1->2)]-B-D-glucopyranoside (1), heinsiagenin A 3-O-[a-L-rhamnopyranosyl-(1->2)-B-D-glucopyranosyl- (1->2)]-[B-D-glucopyranosyl-(1-4)]-B-D-glucopyranoside (2). 2a-hydroxyheinsiagenin A 3-o-[a-L-rhamn...

  5. New triterpenoidal saponins from Koelreuteria paniculata

    PubMed Central

    Mostafa, Ahmad E.; El-Hela, Atef A.; Mohammad, Abd-Elsalam I.; Cutler, Stephen J.; Ross, Samir A.

    2016-01-01

    Bioassay guided fractionation and chemical investigation of the ethanolic extract of the aerial parts of Koelreuteria paniculata Laxm. (Sapindaceae), resulted in the isolation and identification of three new triterpenoid saponins 1–3 named Paniculatosoid A–C, along with eleven known compounds. The structures of the isolated compounds were elucidated using 1D and 2D NMR experiments, HRESIMS, and comparison with literature data. The occurrence of tridesmosidic saponin is reported for the first time from family Sapindaceae, as well as it is rarely found in natural saponins. Compounds 4–13 were evaluated for their antibacterial, antifungal, antimalarial and antileishmanial activities. Compound 12 showed weak antibacterial activity against Escherichia coli with an IC50 value of 101 μM. Compounds 12 and 13 showed antimalarial activity against chloroquine-sensitive (D6) Plasmodium falciparum protozoan with IC50 values of 6.46 and 6.95 μM, and against chloroquine-resistant (W2) Plasmodium falciparum protozoan with IC50 values of 9.34 and 4.18 μM. PMID:28250867

  6. Time course and inhibition of saponin-induced hemolysis.

    PubMed

    Takechi, M; Shimada, S; Tanaka, Y

    1992-04-01

    Hemolytic activities of 3 steroid saponins reached plateaus within 5 min, whereas those of 4 triterpenoid saponins did not within 60 min. Erythrocytes pretreated with a low concentration of tigogenin were resistant to hemolysis of some of these saponins, but those pretreated with hecogenin or tomatidine were as sensitive as non-treated erythrocytes. Therefore, the ketone group of hecogenin or the amino group of tomatidine would weaken the interactions between the erythrocytes and these sapogenins. Furthermore, incubations of these saponins with a small amount of cholesterol diminished the hemolytic activities.

  7. Thermochemistry of myricetin flavonoid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abil'daeva, A. Z.; Kasenova, Sh. B.; Kasenov, B. K.; Sagintaeva, Zh. I.; Kuanyshbekov, E. E.; Rakhimova, B. B.; Polyakov, V. V.; Adekenov, S. M.

    2014-08-01

    The enthalpies of myricetin dissolution are measured by means of calorimetry with mol dilutions of flavonoid: 96 mol % ethanol equal to 1: 9000, 1: 18000, and 1: 36000. The standard enthalpies of dissolution for the biologically active substance in an infinitely diluted (standard) solution of 96% ethanol are calculated from the experimental data. Physicochemical means of approximation are used to estimate the values of the standard enthalpy of combustion, and the enthalpy of melting is calculated for the investigated flavonoid. Finally, the compound's standard enthalpy of formation is calculated using the Hess cycle.

  8. Catalase is inhibited by flavonoids.

    PubMed

    Krych, Justyna; Gebicka, Lidia

    2013-07-01

    Catalases, heme enzymes, which catalyze decomposition of hydrogen peroxide to water and molecular oxygen, belong to the antioxidant defense system of the cell. In this work we have shown that catalase from bovine liver is inhibited by flavonoids. The inhibition is, at least partially, due to the formation of hydrogen bonds between catalase and flavonoids. In the presence of some flavonoids the formation of unreactive catalase compound II has been detected. The most potent catalase inhibitors among the tested flavonoids have appeared myricetin, epicatechin gallate and epigallocatechin gallate. The relationship between the degree of enzyme inhibition and molecular structure of flavonoids has been analyzed.

  9. Transcription factors in alkaloid biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Yamada, Yasuyuki; Sato, Fumihiko

    2013-01-01

    Higher plants produce a large variety of low-molecular weight secondary compounds. Among them, nitrogen-containing alkaloids are the most biologically active and are often used pharmaceutically. Whereas alkaloid chemistry has been intensively investigated, alkaloid biosynthesis, including the relevant biosynthetic enzymes, genes and their regulation, and especially transcription factors, is largely unknown, as only a limited number of plant species produce certain types of alkaloids and they are difficult to study. Recently, however, several groups have succeeded in isolating the transcription factors that are involved in the biosynthesis of several types of alkaloids, including bHLH, ERF, and WRKY. Most of them show Jasmonate (JA) responsiveness, which suggests that the JA signaling cascade plays an important role in alkaloid biosynthesis. Here, we summarize the types and functions of transcription factors that have been isolated in alkaloid biosynthesis, and characterize their similarities and differences compared to those in other secondary metabolite pathways, such as phenylpropanoid and terpenoid biosyntheses. The evolution of this biosynthetic pathway and regulatory network, as well as the application of these transcription factors to metabolic engineering, is discussed.

  10. Ruminal metabolism in sheep of saponins from Yucca schidigera.

    PubMed

    Flåøyen, A; Wilkins, A L; Sandvik, M

    2002-02-01

    Fifty-five mg per kg live weight of crystallized Yucca schidigera saponins, corresponding to 26 mg/kg live weight of sapogenins, was given daily intraruminally to two lambs for 11 consecutive days. Neither of the lambs showed any sign of toxicity throughout the experimental period. One lamb was killed 5 h after the last dose and GC-MS analysis of the free and conjugated sapogenin content samples of liver, and of the contents of the rumen, omasum, abomasum, duodenum, jejunum, ileum, colon and rectum, of faecal samples collected before dosing started, and of parts of the administered Yucca saponin were performed. The Yucca material contained mainly sarsasapogenin and smilagenin saponins. Ingested saponins were quickly hydrolysed in the rumen to free sapogenins and, in part, epimerized at C-3 to afford episapogenins. The absorption of free sapogenins appeared to occur in the jejunum. The metabolism of Yucca saponins was identical to that of Narthecium ossifragum saponins, and it is suggested that Yucca saponins could replace N. ossifragum saponins for toxicity studies on the latter plant.

  11. Bioactive complex triterpenoid saponins from the Leguminosae family.

    PubMed

    Parente, José P; da Silva, Bernadete P

    2009-01-01

    Many classes of phytochemical products are finding therapeutic use, for example, complex triterpenoid saponins containing in their structures monoterpene moieties. Some of these compounds possess cytotoxic, anti-HIV and adjuvant activities. This review aims to give an overview of these complex triterpenoid saponins with biological activity from the Leguminosae.

  12. Effects of Ultrasound on Extraction of Saponin from Ginseng

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Hui; Ohdaira, Etsuzo; Ide, Masao

    1994-05-01

    We performed a study of the effects of ultrasound on the extraction of saponin from Panax ginseng C. A. Meyer. In this study, the extraction of saponin was examined as functions of irradiation time (0.5 to 6 h) and acoustic pressure (0 to 90 kPa). It has been observed that the yields of both total extract and saponin are larger with ultrasonic irradiation than those without ultrasonic irradiation; the increase in yield of total extract is approximately 15 wt%, and that of saponin is approximately 30 wt% at an acoustic pressure 67 kPa. In addition, the yield increases with the acoustic pressure. It is also demonstrated that saponin was not resolved in the acoustic intensity range of this experiment. The enhancement in liquid-solid extraction caused by ultrasound can be attributed to the phenomenon of cavitation.

  13. Microalgae harvesting by flotation using natural saponin and chitosan.

    PubMed

    Kurniawati, H Agnes; Ismadji, Suryadi; Liu, J C

    2014-08-01

    This study aims to investigate the harvesting of microalgae by dispersed air flotation (DiAF) using natural biosurfactant saponin as the collector and chitosan as the flocculant. Two types of microalgae, Chlorella vulgaris and Scenedesmus obliquus, were used in this study. It was observed that saponin was a good frother, but not an effective collector when used alone for flotation separation of algae. However, with the pre-flocculation of 5 mg/L of chitosan, separation efficiency of >93% microalgae cells was found at 20 mg/L of saponin. Removal efficiency of >54.4% and >73.0% was found for polysaccharide and protein, respectively at 20 mg/L of saponin and chitosan each. Experimental results show that DiAF using saponin and chitosan is effective for separation of microalgae, and algogenic organic matter (AOM). It can potentially be applied in the integrated microalgae-based biorefinery.

  14. Two new triterpenoid saponins from Gymnema sylvestre.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Xu-Min; Xie, Ping; Di, Ying-Tong; Peng, Shu-Lin; Ding, Li-Sheng; Wang, Ming-Kui

    2008-05-01

    Two new oleanane-type triterpenoid saponins, gymnemoside-W1 and W2, together with seven known compounds were isolated from the leaves of Gymnema sylvestre R. Br. By means of spectral and chemical analysis, the structures of the new compounds were elucidated as 16 beta-hydroxyl olean-12-en-3-O-[beta-D-glucopyranosyl (1-->6)-beta-D-glucopyranosyl]-28-O-beta-D-glucopyranoside(1) and 16 beta,21 beta,28-trihydroxyl-olean-12-ene-3-O-glucoronopyranoside (2). The EtOH/H(2)O extracts of this plant were shown to be able to inhibit glucose absorption in rats.

  15. Triterpenes and saponins from Rudgea viburnioides.

    PubMed

    Young, M C; Araújo, A R; da Silva, C A; Lopes, M N; Trevisan, L M; Bolzani, V S

    1998-07-01

    A novel triterpene, viburgenin (1), has been isolated from an extract of the ripe fruit rinds of Rudgea viburnioides, together with the known saponins, arjunglucoside I and trachelosperosides B-1 and E-1, and the triterpenes trachelosperogenin B (2) and arjungenin. Compound 2 was previously obtained as a product from enzymatic hydrolysis, and it is reported for the first time as a natural product. The structure of compound 1 was determined as 2alpha,3beta, 19alpha,23,24-pentahydroxyurs-12-ene by extensive use of 1D and 2D NMR spectroscopic methods. Compound 1 exhibited moderate antifungal activity against Cladosporium cladosporioides.

  16. Kinetic study of Saponins B stability in navy beans under different processing conditions

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Saponins are rich in the legumes which are known to provide many health benefits for human beings. Saponins B is the main component in the saponins group present in navy beans. The stability of saponins B during food processing is a key issue to evaluating the quality and nutrition of food products....

  17. Saponins from soy and chickpea: stability during beadmaking and in vitro bioaccessibility

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This study investigated the stability of saponins during the making and simulated digestion of soy and soy-chickpea breads and the bioaccessibility of saponins in digested breads. Recovery of saponins in soy bread exceeded that in soy-chickpea breads, and recovery of type A and B saponins was great...

  18. Biosynthetic Pathways of Ergot Alkaloids

    PubMed Central

    Gerhards, Nina; Neubauer, Lisa; Tudzynski, Paul; Li, Shu-Ming

    2014-01-01

    Ergot alkaloids are nitrogen-containing natural products belonging to indole alkaloids. The best known producers are fungi of the phylum Ascomycota, e.g., Claviceps, Epichloë, Penicillium and Aspergillus species. According to their structures, ergot alkaloids can be divided into three groups: clavines, lysergic acid amides and peptides (ergopeptines). All of them share the first biosynthetic steps, which lead to the formation of the tetracyclic ergoline ring system (except the simplest, tricyclic compound: chanoclavine). Different modifications on the ergoline ring by specific enzymes result in an abundance of bioactive natural products, which are used as pharmaceutical drugs or precursors thereof. From the 1950s through to recent years, most of the biosynthetic pathways have been elucidated. Gene clusters from several ergot alkaloid producers have been identified by genome mining and the functions of many of those genes have been demonstrated by knock-out experiments or biochemical investigations of the overproduced enzymes. PMID:25513893

  19. Purine alkaloids in Paullinia.

    PubMed

    Weckerle, Caroline S; Stutz, Michael A; Baumann, Thomas W

    2003-10-01

    Among the few purine alkaloid-containing genera consumed as stimulants, Paullinia is the least investigated with respect to both chemotaxonomy and within-the-plant allocation of caffeine and its allies. Since purine alkaloids (PuA) have been proved to be valuable marker compounds in chemotaxonomy, 34 species of Paullinia and related genera were screened for them, but only one, P. pachycarpa, was positive in addition to the already known P. cupana and P. yoco. The PuA allocation in P. pachycarpa was examined and found to be restricted to theobromine in the stem, leaves and flowers. Moreover, the theobromine concentration in the stem cortex increased significantly towards the base of the plant. Since the stem cortex of P. yoco is traditionally used by the natives of Colombia and Ecuador to prepare a caffeine-rich beverage, we suspected that within the genus Paullinia the PuA are preferentially allocated to the older parts of the stem and not to young shoots like e.g., in the coffee plant (Coffea spp.). Indeed, the axis (greenhouse) of P. cupana (guaraná), known for its caffeine-rich seeds, exhibited a basipetal PuA gradient (0.005-0.145%). Moreover, the analysis of young cortex samples (herbarium) and of one piece of old stem (museum collection) revealed the same for P. yoco, even though we found much less (0.5 vs 2.5%) caffeine in the old cortex as compared to the only two analyses in 1926 of similar material. However, this discrepancy may be explained by the high variability of the PuA pattern we detected among yoco, the diversity of which the Indians take advantage.

  20. [Flavonoids from Selaginella uncinata].

    PubMed

    Yi, Mei-ling; Sheng, Xi-feng; Xu, Kang-ping; Tan, Gui-shan; Zou, Hui

    2015-08-01

    In the current study, nine flavonoids were isolated and purified from 75% ethanol extract of Selaginella uncinata (Desv.) Spring by column chromatographic techniques over macroporous resin, polyamide, silica gel, Sephadex LH-20 and pre-HPLC. On the basis of their physico-chemical properties and spectroscopic data analyses, these compounds were elucidated as cirsimarin (1), nepitrin (2), apigenin-6-C-α-L-arabinopyranosyl-8-C-β-D-glucopyranoside (3), apigenin-6-C-β-D-glucopyranosyl-8-C-α-L-arabinopyranoside (4), apigenin-7-O-β-D-glucopyranoside (5), 2,3-dihydroamentoflavone (6), 4'-O-methylamentoflavone (7), 2,3-dihydro-4'-O-methyl-amentoflavone (8), and 2,3,2",3"-tetrahydron-4'-O-methyl-robustaflavone (9). Compounds 1-5 belong to flavonoid glycosides and were isolated from the genus Selaginella for the first time.

  1. Flavonoids of Crotalaria sessiliflora.

    PubMed

    Yoo, Hun Sung; Lee, Ji Suk; Kim, Chul Young; Kim, Jinwoong

    2004-05-01

    Phytochemical investigation of the whole plants of Crotalaria sessiliflora L. led to the isolation of four flavonoids. The structures of these compounds were identified as 2',4',5,7-tetrahydroxyisoflavone (1), 2',4',7-trihydroxyisoflavone (2), 4',7-dihydroxyflavone (3), and isovitexin (4) using spectroscopic analysis. Among these, compounds 2, and 3 have not been reported from Crotalaria species, whereas compounds 1, and 4 were reported from this plant for the first time.

  2. Flavonoid analysis of buckwheat sprouts.

    PubMed

    Nam, Tae-Gyu; Lee, Sun Mi; Park, Ji-Hae; Kim, Dae-Ok; Baek, Nam-in; Eom, Seok Hyun

    2015-03-01

    It is known that common buckwheat sprouts contain several flavonoids, including orientin, isoorientin, vitexin, isovitexin, rutin, and quercetrin, whereas tartary buckwheat sprouts contain only rutin. In this study, we evaluated flavonoids present in buckwheat sprouts and identified a previously unreported flavonoid. Simultaneous detection by HPLC was used to separate rutin and a compound that was not separated in previous studies. We used a novel HPLC elution gradient method to successfully separate rutin and the previously unidentified compound, for which we performed structural analysis. The identification of six flavonoids by HPLC was confirmed using HPLC-ESI-MS/MS analysis. The newly identified compound, [M+H](+) =611.17, was identified by NMR as the rutin epimer quercetin-3-O-robinobioside. Unlike common buckwheat sprout, tartary buckwheat sprout contained rutin as a main flavonoid, whereas other flavonoids appeared only in trace amounts or were not detected. Quercetin-3-O-robinobioside was not detected in tartary buckwheat sprout.

  3. Determination of saponins and flavonoids in ivy leaf extracts using HPLC-DAD.

    PubMed

    Yu, Miao; Shin, Young June; Kim, Nanyoung; Yoo, Guijae; Park, SeonJu; Kim, Seung Hyun

    2015-04-01

    A new method for the determination of six compounds, chlorogenic acid, rutin, nicotiflorin, hederacoside C, hederasaponin B and α-hederin, in ivy leaf extracts using high-performance liquid chromatography with diode array detector was developed. The chromatographic separation was performed on a YMC Hydrosphere C18 analytical column using a gradient elution of 0.1% phosphoric acid and acetonitrile. The method was validated in terms of specificity, linearity (r(2) > 0.9999), precision [relative standard deviation (RSD) < 0.36%] and accuracy (97.4-103.8%). The limit of detection and limit of quantification were <20.32 and 61.56 ng for all analytes, respectively. The tested compounds were found to be stable in the ivy leaf extract from 0 to 48 h, and the RSD value for each compound was <0.90%. The validated method was successfully applied to quantify all six compounds in a 30% ethanol ivy leaf extract and 13 ivy leaf extract products. The results showed that all the tested products satisfied the minimum requirement for the content of hederacoside C. However, there were some differences between the contents of other constituents.

  4. Anxiolytic-like effect of ethanolic extract of Argemone mexicana and its alkaloids in Wistar rats

    PubMed Central

    Arcos-Martínez, Aideé Itzel; Muñoz-Muñiz, Omar David; Domínguez-Ortiz, Miguel Ángel; Saavedra-Vélez, Margarita Virginia; Vázquez-Hernández, Maribel; Alcántara-López, María Gabriela

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Argemone mexicana is a Papaveracea plant; some reports have shown their antibacterial, anti-cancer, sedative and probably anti-anxiety properties. From their aerial parts, flavonoids and alkaloids have been isolated, which are intrinsically related to some actions on the central nervous system. The aim of this study was to evaluate the anxiolytic-like effects of the plant, using its ethanolic extract and alkaloid-enriched extract obtained from fresh leaves. Material and Methods: Phytochemical screening was carried out together with evaluation of antioxidant capacity and the enrichment of alkaloids present in the extract. Subsequently, 100 and 200 mg/kg doses of ethanolic extract and alkaloid-enriched extract (200 µg/kg) were intraperitoneally administered to female Wistar rats, which were exposed to elevated plus maze (EPM) test. Picrotoxin (1 mg/kg), a non-competitive gamma-aminobutyric acid A (GABAA) chloride channel antagonist, was used in experimental procedures to evaluate if this receptor is involved in the anxiolytic-like effects of A. mexicana. To discard motor effects associated with the treatments, the rats were evaluated by the locomotor activity test. Results: Only the ethanolic extract at 200 mg/kg and alkaloid-enriched extract (200 µg/kg) produced anxiolytic-like effects similarly to diazepam 2 mg/kg on EPM test, without affecting locomotor activity. Meanwhile, the administration of picrotoxin blocked anti-anxiety effect of alkaloid-enriched extract of the plant. Conclusion: These results showed that A. mexicana is a potential anxiolytic agent and we suggest that this effect is mediated by the GABAA receptor. These effects are related to the presence of alkaloids. PMID:27516989

  5. New triterpenoid saponins from cacti and anti-type I allergy activity of saponins from cactus.

    PubMed

    Kakuta, Kazutaka; Baba, Masaki; Ito, Satoru; Kinoshita, Kaoru; Koyama, Kiyotaka; Takahashi, Kunio

    2012-07-15

    The research in our laboratory focuses on the isolation of saponins from cactus. In this study, we report five new triterpenoid saponins, dumortierinoside A methyl ester (1), pachanoside I1 (2), pachanoside D1 (3), gummososide A (4), and gummososide A methyl ester (5). Compounds 1-3 isolated from Isolatocereus dumortieri Backbg., and compounds 4 and 5 were isolated from Stenocereus alamosensis A. C. Gibson & K. E. Horak. Compound 2 possessed a new pachanane-type triterpene skeleton, pachanol I, in its aglycon. The aglycon of 3 was pachanol D, while those of 4 and 5 were both gummosogenin, which we have previously reported, but this is the first report of pachanol D and gummosogenin in their aglycon forms. Additionally, we evaluated the anti-type I allergy activity of the saponins with RBL-2H3 (Rat basophilic leukemia) cells by measuring the β-hexosaminidase release inhibitory activity. As a result of these studies, gummososide A methyl ester (5) was found to show activity (IC(50)=99.5 μM) and thurberoside A exhibited mild activity (IC(50)=166.9 μM).

  6. Digital Gene Expression Analysis Provides Insight into the Transcript Profile of the Genes Involved in Aporphine Alkaloid Biosynthesis in Lotus (Nelumbo nucifera)

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Mei; Zhu, Lingping; Li, Ling; Li, Juanjuan; Xu, Liming; Feng, Ji; Liu, Yanling

    2017-01-01

    The predominant alkaloids in lotus leaves are aporphine alkaloids. These are the most important active components and have many pharmacological properties, but little is known about their biosynthesis. We used digital gene expression (DGE) technology to identify differentially-expressed genes (DEGs) between two lotus cultivars with different alkaloid contents at four leaf development stages. We also predicted potential genes involved in aporphine alkaloid biosynthesis by weighted gene co-expression network analysis (WGCNA). Approximately 335 billion nucleotides were generated; and 94% of which were aligned against the reference genome. Of 22 thousand expressed genes, 19,000 were differentially expressed between the two cultivars at the four stages. Gene Ontology (GO) enrichment analysis revealed that catalytic activity and oxidoreductase activity were enriched significantly in most pairwise comparisons. In Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG) analysis, dozens of DEGs were assigned to the categories of biosynthesis of secondary metabolites, isoquinoline alkaloid biosynthesis, and flavonoid biosynthesis. The genes encoding norcoclaurine synthase (NCS), norcoclaurine 6-O-methyltransferase (6OMT), coclaurine N-methyltransferase (CNMT), N-methylcoclaurine 3′-hydroxylase (NMCH), and 3′-hydroxy-N-methylcoclaurine 4′-O-methyltransferase (4′OMT) in the common pathways of benzylisoquinoline alkaloid biosynthesis and the ones encoding corytuberine synthase (CTS) in aporphine alkaloid biosynthetic pathway, which have been characterized in other plants, were identified in lotus. These genes had positive effects on alkaloid content, albeit with phenotypic lag. The WGCNA of DEGs revealed that one network module was associated with the dynamic change of alkaloid content. Eleven genes encoding proteins with methyltransferase, oxidoreductase and CYP450 activities were identified. These were surmised to be genes involved in aporphine alkaloid biosynthesis. This

  7. Saponins from three species of Mimusops.

    PubMed

    Lavaud, C; Massiot, G; Becchi, M; Misra, G; Nigam, S K

    1996-02-01

    Six saponins were isolated from the seed kernel of Mimusops elengi, M. hexandra and M. manilkara. Their structures were determined using a combination of 1H NMR, 13C NMR and mass spectroscopy. Three of them are new compounds: 3-O-(beta-D-glucuronopyranosyl) 28-O-(alpha-L-rhamnopyranosyl (1-->3) beta-D-xylopyranosyl(1-->4) [alpha-L-rhamnopyranosyl(1-->3)] alpha-L-rhamnopyranosyl(1-->2) alpha-L-arabinopyranosyl) protobassic acid, 3-O-(beta-D-glucuronopyranosly) 28-O-(alpha-L-rhamnopyranosyl(1-->3) beta-D-xylopyranosyl(1-->4) alpha-L-rhamnopyranosyl(1-->2) alpha-L-arabinopyranosyl) 16-alpha-hydroxyprotobassic acid and 3-O-(beta-D-glucopyranosyl(1-->3) beta-D-glucopyranosyl) 28-O-(alpha-L-rhamnopyranosyl(1-->3) beta-D-xylopyranosyl(1-->4) alpha-L-rhamnopyranosyl(1-->2) alpha-L-arabinopyranosyl) protobassic acid.

  8. Three new triterpenoid saponins from Ilex pubescens.

    PubMed

    Li, Ling; He, Yu-Xin; Gou, Mei-Ling; Dai, Chun

    2012-01-01

    Three new triterpene saponins, ilexsaponins D-F (1-3), were isolated from the roots of Ilex pubescens. Their structures were elucidated as 3-O-β-D-glucopyranosyl(1 → 3)-α-L-arabinopyranosyl urs-12,18-diene-24,28-dioic acid 28-O-β-D-glucopyranoside (1), 3-O-β-D-glucopyranosyl(1 → 3)-α-L-arabinopyranosyl urs-12,18-diene-24,28-dioic acid (2), and 3-O-β-D-glucopyranosyl(1 → 3)-α-L-arabinoyranosyl-30-hydroxyurs-12,19-diene-24,28-dioic acid 28-O-β-D-glucopyranoside (3) on the basis of the chemical and spectroscopic evidence.

  9. Two new triterpenoid saponins from Ilex cornuta.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ming-Lei; Liu, Yan-Li; Xu, Qiong-Ming; Li, Yun-Qiu; Yang, Shi-Lin

    2015-01-01

    Two new triterpenoid saponins (1 and 2) were isolated from the stems of Ilex cornuta, along with two known triterpenoids (3 and 4). The structures of compounds 1 and 2 were determined as ursane-12,19-diene-28-oic acid 3β-O-β-D-glucuronopyranoside-6-O-methyl ester (1), 3α,23α-dihydroxy-olean-9(11),12-diene-28-oic acid 28-O-β-D-glucopyranosyl ester (2), on the basis of hydrolysis and spectral evidence, including 1D and 2D NMR and high resolution electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (HR-ESI-MS) analyses. Protective effects of compounds 1-4 were tested against H(2)O(2)-induced H9c2 cardiomyocyte injury, and the data showed that all these compounds had no cell-protective effect.

  10. Three new triterpenoid saponins from Dianthus superbus.

    PubMed

    Luo, Jian-Guang; Chen, Xia; Kong, Ling-Yi

    2011-01-01

    Three new triterpenoid saponins (1-3) were isolated from the dried aerial parts of Dianthus superbus L. (Caryophyllaceae). Their structures were established as 3-O-β-D-glucopyranosyl gypsogenic acid 28-O-[β-D-6-O-((3S)-3-hydroxyl-3-methylglutaryl)glucopyranosyl(1→6)]-β-D-glucopyranoside (1), 3-O-β-D-glucopyranosyl gypsogenic acid 28-O-[β-D-glucopyranosyl(1→3)][β-D-6-O-((3S)-hydroxyl-3-methylglutaryl)glucopyranosyl(1→6)]-β-D-glucopyranoside (2), 3-O-α-L-arabinopyranosyl-3β,16α-dihydroxyolean-12-en-23,28-dioic acid 28-O-[β-D-glucopyranosyl-(1→6)]-β-D-glucopyranoside (3), on the basis of various spectroscopic analyses and chemical degradations.

  11. The Chemistry of the Akuammiline Alkaloids.

    PubMed

    Adams, Gregory L; Smith, Amos B

    2016-01-01

    An update on the literature covering the akuammiline family of alkaloids is presented. This chapter begins with a summary of new akuammiline alkaloids reported since 2000 and is followed by an overview of new reported bioactivities of akuammiline alkaloids since 2000. The remainder of the chapter comprises a comprehensive review of the synthetic chemistry that has been reported in the last 50 years concerning akuammiline alkaloids and their structural motifs.

  12. Steroidal Saponins from the Rhizomes of Aspidistra typica

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Yang; Zhao, Jian-Yuan; Zhang, Jie; Pang, Xu; Yu, He-Shui; Jia, De-Xian; Liu, Chao; Yu, Li-Yan; Ma, Bai-Ping

    2016-01-01

    Eleven new furostanol saponins, typaspidosides B-L (1–11), one new spirostanol saponin, typaspidoside M (12), and five known spirostanol saponins, 25S-atropuroside (13), neoaspidistrin (14), (25S)-pratioside D1 (15), 25S-aspidistrin (16) and 25S-neosibiricoside (17) were isolated from the rhizomes of Aspidistra typica Baill. The structures of the new compounds were established using 1D and 2D NMR (1H-1H COSY, HMQC, HMBC and ROESY) spectroscopy, high resolution mass spectrometry, and chemical methods. The aglycones of 1–3 (unusual furostanol saponins with opened E ring type), 9 and 10 (the methoxyl substituent at C-23 position) were found, identified from natural products for the first time. Moreover, the anti-HIV activities of the isolated steroidal glycosides were assessed, and compounds 13, 14, 16 and 17 exhibited high active against HIV-1. PMID:26937954

  13. 27 CFR 21.99 - Brucine alkaloid.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Brucine alkaloid. 21.99... Brucine alkaloid. (a) Identification test. Add a few drops of concentrated nitric acid to about 10 mg of brucine alkaloid. A vivid red color is produced. Dilute the red solution with a few drops of water and...

  14. 27 CFR 21.99 - Brucine alkaloid.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Brucine alkaloid. 21.99... Brucine alkaloid. (a) Identification test. Add a few drops of concentrated nitric acid to about 10 mg of brucine alkaloid. A vivid red color is produced. Dilute the red solution with a few drops of water and...

  15. 27 CFR 21.99 - Brucine alkaloid.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Brucine alkaloid. 21.99... Brucine alkaloid. (a) Identification test. Add a few drops of concentrated nitric acid to about 10 mg of brucine alkaloid. A vivid red color is produced. Dilute the red solution with a few drops of water and...

  16. 27 CFR 21.99 - Brucine alkaloid.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Brucine alkaloid. 21.99... Brucine alkaloid. (a) Identification test. Add a few drops of concentrated nitric acid to about 10 mg of brucine alkaloid. A vivid red color is produced. Dilute the red solution with a few drops of water and...

  17. 27 CFR 21.99 - Brucine alkaloid.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Brucine alkaloid. 21.99... Brucine alkaloid. (a) Identification test. Add a few drops of concentrated nitric acid to about 10 mg of brucine alkaloid. A vivid red color is produced. Dilute the red solution with a few drops of water and...

  18. Flavonoid intake and bone health

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Flavonoids, found in a wide diversity of plant foods, from fruits and vegetables, herbs and spices, essential oils, and beverages, have the most potential of dietary components for promotion of bone health beyond calcium and vitamin D. Recent epidemiological studies show flavonoid consumption to ha...

  19. Kinetics of the sorption of triterpene saponin by hypercrosslinked polystyrene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mironenko, N. V.; Brezhneva, T. A.; Selemenev, V. F.

    2013-03-01

    The kinetics of sorption of triterpene saponin by the polymer sorbent NM-200 is considered. The influence of the surface activity of glycoside on the rate of formation and structure of the adsorption layer on the sorbent's surface is established. The rate-determining step of sorption is found to be diffusion into the sorbent grain. The value of the activation energy demonstrates the determining role of dispersion forces in the interaction between triterpene saponin and the polymer sorbent MN-200.

  20. [Purification and monosaccharide composition of saponin from Asparagus officianlis L].

    PubMed

    Fang, You-Lan

    2005-05-01

    The saponins extracted from the stem of Asparagus officinalis L., is a glucoside. In the mean time, it solved the problem of environment pollution about wastes of Asparagus officinalis L., and made the waste useful. The factors affected extractive efficiency of the saponin from Asparagus officinalis L. was investigated. The optimal conditions were 95% alcohol; V/W = 6:1; 90 degrees C; 4h. The saponins average abstraction rate from fresh and dry wastes of Asparagus officinalis L. was 1.70% and 4.01% respectively. The saponins were dissociated with Al2O3 column. The eluent was 40% alcohol, the elute curves showed a symmetrical peak. The compound structure was determined by UV, IR and HPLC spectra et al. The results indicated that it belonged to the furostanol saponins and its glycosyl composed of xylose, fucose, arabinose, as well as the mole ratio was Xyl: Fuc : Ara = 1.0:0.13:19.42, Mw 18 500. In this paper, the saponins were extracted from wastes of Asparagus officinalis L. and analyzed glycosyl component in detail.

  1. Alkaloids with antioxidant activities from Aconitum handelianum.

    PubMed

    Yin, Tian-Peng; Cai, Le; Xing, Yun; Yu, Jing; Li, Xue-Jiao; Mei, Rui-Feng; Ding, Zhong-Tao

    2016-06-01

    A new C20-diterpenoid alkaloid handelidine (1) and twenty-seven known alkaloids (2-28) were isolated from the roots of Aconitum handelianum. Their structures were established on the basis of extensive spectroscopic analyses. The study indicated that denudatine-type C20-diterpenoid alkaloids with vicinal-triol system and benzyltetrahydroisoquinoline alkaloids exhibited significant antioxidant activities measured by three antioxidant test systems. The aconitine-type C19-diterpenoid alkaloids could serve as potential secondary antioxidants for their strong binding effects to metal ions.

  2. Structural and quantitative analysis of Equisetum alkaloids.

    PubMed

    Cramer, Luise; Ernst, Ludger; Lubienski, Marcus; Papke, Uli; Schiebel, Hans-Martin; Jerz, Gerold; Beuerle, Till

    2015-08-01

    Equisetum palustre L. is known for its toxicity for livestock. Several studies in the past addressed the isolation and identification of the responsible alkaloids. So far, palustrine (1) and N(5)-formylpalustrine (2) are known alkaloids of E. palustre. A HPLC-ESI-MS/MS method in combination with simple sample work-up was developed to identify and quantitate Equisetum alkaloids. Besides the two known alkaloids six related alkaloids were detected in different Equisetum samples. The structure of the alkaloid palustridiene (3) was derived by comprehensive 1D and 2D NMR experiments. N(5)-Acetylpalustrine (4) was also thoroughly characterized by NMR for the first time. The structure of N(5)-formylpalustridiene (5) is proposed based on mass spectrometry results. Twenty-two E. palustre samples were screened by a HPLC-ESI-MS/MS method after development of a simple sample work-up and in most cases the set of all eight alkaloids were detected in all parts of the plant. A high variability of the alkaloid content and distribution was found depending on plant organ, plant origin and season ranging from 88 to 597mg/kg dried weight. However, palustrine (1) and the alkaloid palustridiene (3) always represented the main alkaloids. For the first time, a comprehensive identification, quantitation and distribution of Equisetum alkaloids was achieved.

  3. Evaluation of antinociceptive and anti-inflammatory activities of a new triterpene saponin from Bauhinia variegata leaves.

    PubMed

    Mohamed, Mona A; Mammoud, Madeha R; Hayen, Heiko

    2009-01-01

    A new triterpene saponin, named as 23-hydroxy-3alpha-[O-alpha-L-1C4-rhamnopyranosyl-(1"-->4')-O-alpha-L-4C1-arabinopyranosyl-oxy]olean-12-en-28-oic acid O-alpha-L-1C4-rhamnopyranosyl-(1"'-->4")-O-beta-D-4C1-glucopyranosyl-(1"-->6"')-O-beta-D-4C1-glucopyranosyl ester (9), was isolated from the leaves of Bauhinia variegata Linn. In addition, six flavonoid compounds along with two cinnamic acid derivatives were isolated and identified based on their chromatographic properties, and chemical and spectral data (ESI-high resolution-MSn, 1H NMR, 13C NMR, 1H-1H COSY, HSQC, and HMBC). Compound 9 was found to be nontoxic (LD50) and to have significant anti-inflammatory and antinociceptive activities. It also showed a slight antischistosomal activity.

  4. Plant tropane alkaloid biosynthesis evolved independently in the Solanaceae and Erythroxylaceae.

    PubMed

    Jirschitzka, Jan; Schmidt, Gregor W; Reichelt, Michael; Schneider, Bernd; Gershenzon, Jonathan; D'Auria, John Charles

    2012-06-26

    The pharmacologically important tropane alkaloids have a scattered distribution among angiosperm families, like many other groups of secondary metabolites. To determine whether tropane alkaloids have evolved repeatedly in different lineages or arise from an ancestral pathway that has been lost in most lines, we investigated the tropinone-reduction step of their biosynthesis. In species of the Solanaceae, which produce compounds such as atropine and scopolamine, this reaction is known to be catalyzed by enzymes of the short-chain dehydrogenase/reductase family. However, in Erythroxylum coca (Erythroxylaceae), which accumulates cocaine and other tropane alkaloids, no proteins of the short-chain dehydrogenase/reductase family were found that could catalyze this reaction. Instead, purification of E. coca tropinone-reduction activity and cloning of the corresponding gene revealed that a protein of the aldo-keto reductase family carries out this reaction in E. coca. This protein, designated methylecgonone reductase, converts methylecgonone to methylecgonine, the penultimate step in cocaine biosynthesis. The protein has highest sequence similarity to other aldo-keto reductases, such as chalcone reductase, an enzyme of flavonoid biosynthesis, and codeinone reductase, an enzyme of morphine alkaloid biosynthesis. Methylecgonone reductase reduces methylecgonone (2-carbomethoxy-3-tropinone) stereospecifically to 2-carbomethoxy-3β-tropine (methylecgonine), and has its highest activity, protein level, and gene transcript level in young, expanding leaves of E. coca. This enzyme is not found at all in root tissues, which are the site of tropane alkaloid biosynthesis in the Solanaceae. This evidence supports the theory that the ability to produce tropane alkaloids has arisen more than once during the evolution of the angiosperms.

  5. Phytotoxic steroidal saponins from Agave offoyana leaves.

    PubMed

    Pérez, Andy J; Simonet, Ana M; Calle, Juan M; Pecio, Łukasz; Guerra, José O; Stochmal, Anna; Macías, Francisco A

    2014-09-01

    A bioassay-guided fractionation of Agave offoyana leaves led to the isolation of five steroidal saponins (1-5) along with six known saponins (6-11). The compounds were identified as (25R)-spirost-5-en-2α,3β-diol-12-one 3-O-{α-l-rhamnopyranosyl-(1→3)-O-β-d-glucopyranosyl-(1→2)-O-[β-d-xylopyranosyl-(1→3)]-O-β-d-glucopyranosyl-(1→4)-O-β-d-galactopyranoside} (1), (25R)-spirost-5-en-3β-ol-12-one 3-O-{α-l-rhamnopyranosyl-(1→3)-O-β-d-glucopyranosyl-(1→2)-O-[β-d-xylopyranosyl-(1→3)]-O-β-d-glucopyranosyl-(1→4)-O-β-d-galactopyranoside} (2), (25R)-spirost-5-en-3β-ol-12-one 3-O-{β-d-xylopyranosyl-(1→3)-O-β-d-glucopyranosyl-(1→2)-O-[β-d-xylopyranosyl-(1→3)]-O-β-d-glucopyranosyl-(1→4)-O-β-d-galactopyranoside} (3), (25R)-26-O-β-d-glucopyranosylfurost-5-en-3β,22α,26-triol-12-one 3-O-{α-l-rhamnopyranosyl-(1→3)-O-β-d-glucopyranosyl-(1→2)-O-[β-d-xylopyranosyl-(1→3)]-O-β-d-glucopyranosyl-(1→4)-O-β-d-galactopyranoside} (4) and (25R)-26-O-β-d-glucopyranosylfurost-5-en-3β,22α,26-triol-12-one 3-O-{β-d-xylopyranosyl-(1→3)-O-β-d-glucopyranosyl-(1→2)-O-[β-d-xylopyranosyl-(1→3)]-O-β-d-glucopyranosyl-(1→4)-O-β-d-galactopyranoside} (5) by comprehensive spectroscopic analysis, including one- and two-dimensional NMR techniques, mass spectrometry and chemical methods. The phytotoxicity of the isolated compounds on the standard target species Lactuca sativa was evaluated.

  6. Bioactive steroidal saponins from Agave offoyana flowers.

    PubMed

    Pérez, Andy J; Calle, Juan M; Simonet, Ana M; Guerra, José O; Stochmal, Anna; Macías, Francisco A

    2013-11-01

    Bioguided studies of flowers of Agave offoyana allowed the isolation of five steroidal saponins never described previously, Magueyosides A-E (1-5), along with six known steroidal saponins (6-11). The structures of compounds were determined as (25R)-spirost-5-en-2α,3β-diol-12-one 3-O-{β-d-xylopyranosyl-(1→3)-O-β-d-glucopyranosyl-(1→2)-O-[β-d-xylopyranosyl-(1→3)]-O-β-d-glucopyranosyl-(1→4)-O-β-d-galactopyranoside} (1), (25R)-spirost-5-en-2α,3β-diol-12-one 3-O-{β-d-glucopyranosyl-(1→2)-O-[β-d-xylopyranosyl-(1→3)]-O-β-d-glucopyranosyl-(1→4)-O-β-d-galactopyranoside} (2), (25R)-spirost-5-en-2α,3β,12β-triol 3-O-{β-d-glucopyranosyl-(1→2)-O-[β-d-xylopyranosyl-(1→3)]-O-β-d-glucopyranosyl-(1→4)-O-β-d-galactopyranoside} (3), (25R)-5α-spirostan-2α,3β-diol-12-one 3-O-{β-d-xylopyranosyl-(1→3)-O-β-d-glucopyranosyl-(1→2)-O-[β-d-xylopyranosyl-(1→3)]-O-β-d-glucopyranosyl-(1→4)-O-β-d-galactopyranoside} (4), and (25R)-5α-spirostan-2α,3β-diol-9(11)-en-12-one 3-O-{β-d-xylopyranosyl-(1→3)-O-β-d-glucopyranosyl-(1→2)-O-[β-d-xylopyranosyl-(1→3)]-O-β-d-glucopyranosyl-(1→4)-O-β-d-galactopyranoside} (5), by comprehensive spectroscopic analysis, including one- and two-dimensional NMR techniques, mass spectrometry and chemical methods. The bioactivities of the isolated compounds on the standard target species Lactuca sativa were evaluated. A dose-dependent phytotoxicity and low dose stimulation were observed.

  7. Unprecedented Utilization of Pelargonidin and Indole for the Biosynthesis of Plant Indole Alkaloids.

    PubMed

    Warskulat, Anne-Christin; Tatsis, Evangelos C; Dudek, Bettina; Kai, Marco; Lorenz, Sybille; Schneider, Bernd

    2016-02-15

    Nudicaulins are a group of indole alkaloid glycosides responsible for the color of yellow petals of Papaver nudicaule (Iceland poppy). The unique aglycone scaffold of these alkaloids attracted our interest as one of the most unusual flavonoid-indole hybrid structures that occur in nature. Stable isotope labeling experiments with sliced petals identified free indole, but not tryptamine or l-tryptophan, as one of the two key biosynthetic precursors of the nudicaulin aglycone. Pelargonidin was identified as the second key precursor, contributing the polyphenolic unit to the nudicaulin molecule. This finding was inferred from the temporary accumulation of pelargonidin glycosides in the petals during flower bud development and a drop at the point in time when nudicaulin levels start to increase. The precursor-directed incorporation of cyanidin into a new 3'-hydroxynudicaulin strongly supports the hypothesis that anthocyanins are involved in the biosynthesis of nudicaulins.

  8. Antiartherosclerotic Effects of Plant Flavonoids

    PubMed Central

    Gunasekaran, Baskaran; Shukor, Mohd Yunus

    2014-01-01

    Atherosclerosis is the process of hardening and narrowing the arteries. Atherosclerosis is generally associated with cardiovascular diseases such as strokes, heart attacks, and peripheral vascular diseases. Since the usage of the synthetic drug, statins, leads to various side effects, the plants flavonoids with antiartherosclerotic activity gained much attention and were proven to reduce the risk of atherosclerosis in vitro and in vivo based on different animal models. The flavonoids compounds also exhibit lipid lowering effects and anti-inflammatory and antiatherogenic properties. The future development of flavonoids-based drugs is believed to provide significant effects on atherosclerosis and its related diseases. This paper discusses the antiatherosclerotic effects of selected plant flavonoids such as quercetin, kaempferol, myricetin, rutin, naringenin, catechin, fisetin, and gossypetin. PMID:24971331

  9. Microbial biotransformation of bioactive flavonoids.

    PubMed

    Cao, Hui; Chen, Xiaoqing; Jassbi, Amir Reza; Xiao, Jianbo

    2015-01-01

    The bioactive flavonoids are considered as the most important phytochemicals in food, which exert a wide range of biological benefits for human being. Microbial biotransformation strategies for production of flavonoids have attracted considerable interest because they allow yielding novel flavonoids, which do not exist in nature. In this review, we summarize the existing knowledge on the production and biotransformation of flavonoids by various microbes. The main reactions during microbial biotransformation are hydroxylation, dehydroxylation, O-methylation, O-demethylation, glycosylation, deglycosylation, dehydrogenation, hydrogenation, C ring cleavage of the benzo-γ-pyrone system, cyclization, and carbonyl reduction. Cunninghamella, Penicillium, and Aspergillus strains are very popular to biotransform flavonoids and they can perform almost all the reactions with excellent yields. Aspergillus niger is one of the most applied microorganisms in the flavonoids' biotransformation; for example, A. niger can transfer flavanone to flavan-4-ol, 2'-hydroxydihydrochalcone, flavone, 3-hydroxyflavone, 6-hydroxyflavanone, and 4'-hydroxyflavanone. The hydroxylation of flavones by microbes usually happens on the ortho position of hydroxyl group on the A ring and C-4' position of the B ring and microbes commonly hydroxylate flavonols at the C-8 position. The microorganisms tend to hydroxylate flavanones at the C-5, 6, and 4' positions; however, for prenylated flavanones, dihydroxylation often takes place on the C4α=C5α double bond on the prenyl group (the side chain of A ring). Isoflavones are usually hydroxylated at the C-3' position of the B ring by microorganisms. The microbes convert flavonoids to their 7-O-glycosides and 3-O-glycosides (when flavonoids have a hydroxyl moiety at the C-3 position). The demethylation of multimethoxyl flavonoids by microbes tends to happen at the C-3' and C-4' positions of the B ring. Multimethoxyl flavanones and isoflavone are demethylated at

  10. The Catharanthus alkaloids: pharmacognosy and biotechnology.

    PubMed

    van Der Heijden, Robert; Jacobs, Denise I; Snoeijer, Wim; Hallard, Didier; Verpoorte, Robert

    2004-03-01

    The Catharanthus (or Vinca) alkaloids comprise a group of about 130 terpenoid indole alkaloids. Vinblastine is now marketed for more than 40 years as an anticancer drug and became a true lead compound for drug development. Due to the pharmaceutical importance and the low content in the plant of vinblastine and the related alkaloid vincristine, Catharanthus roseus became one of the best-studied medicinal plants. Consequently it developed as a model system for biotechnological studies on plant secondary metabolism. The aim of this review is to acquaint a broader audience with the recent progress in this research and with its exciting perspectives. The pharmacognostical aspects of the Catharanthus alkaloids cover botanical (including some historical), phytochemical and analytical data. An up-to-date view on the biosynthesis of the alkaloids is given. The pharmacological aspects of these alkaloids and their semi-synthetic derivatives are only discussed briefly. The biotechnological part focuses on alternative production systems for these alkaloids, for example by in vitro culture of C. roseus cells. Subsequently it will be discussed to what extent the alkaloid biosynthetic pathway can be manipulated genetically ("metabolic engineering"), aiming at higher production levels of the alkaloids. Another approach is to produce the alkaloids (or their precursors) in other organisms such as yeast. Despite the availability of only a limited number of biosynthetic genes, the research on C. roseus has already led to a broad scientific spin-off. It is clear that many interesting results can be expected when more genes become available.

  11. Chromium recovery from tannery sludge with saponin and oxidative remediation.

    PubMed

    Kiliç, Eylem; Font, Joaquim; Puig, Rita; Colak, Selime; Celik, Deniz

    2011-01-15

    Two new methods for treatment of tannery sludge were studied to achieve cost-effective and environmentally acceptable remediation solutions for high chromium containing tannery sludge. Quillaja bark saponin, a plant derived biosurfactant, was applied to dewatered tannery sludge for chromium recovery and a comparative assessment with H(2)O(2) oxidative treatment method is presented. Tannery sludge samples were treated on a laboratory scale with saponin in the pH range 2-3. The effects of various factors like time, concentration of saponin, pH, and temperature on the extraction of chromium were studied. The treatment with saponin extracted 24% of Cr from tannery sludge at a pH around2, performing multiple wash of 6h, at 33 °C. On the other hand, the H(2)O(2) treatment, which include Cr(III) oxidation to Cr(VI) and extraction with sulfuric acid solution at pH 2, enabled to extract 70% of chromium within less than 4h at room temperature (21 °C). The results indicate that the extraction efficiency of saponin was strongly dependent on the organic matter content of the sample, which affects chromium mobility by its high adsorption capacity. On the other hand hydrogen peroxide treatment is effective and the duration of the process is short and requires cheap chemicals and moderate conditions.

  12. Ergot alkaloid transport across ruminant gastric tissues.

    PubMed

    Hill, N S; Thompson, F N; Stuedemann, J A; Rottinghaus, G W; Ju, H J; Dawe, D L; Hiatt, E E

    2001-02-01

    Ergot alkaloids cause fescue toxicosis when livestock graze endophyte-infected tall fescue. It is generally accepted that ergovaline is the toxic component of endophyte-infected tall fescue, but there is no direct evidence to support this hypothesis. The objective of this study was to examine relative and potential transport of ergoline and ergopeptine alkaloids across isolated gastric tissues in vitro. Sheep ruminal and omasal tissues were surgically removed and placed in parabiotic chambers. Equimolar concentrations of lysergic acid, lysergol, ergonovine, ergotamine, and ergocryptine were added to a Kreb's Ringer phosphate (KRP) solution on the mucosal side of the tissue. Tissue was incubated in near-physiological conditions for 240 min. Samples were taken from KRP on the serosal side of the chambers at times 0, 30, 60, 120, 180, and 240 min and analyzed for ergot alkaloids by competitive ELISA. The serosal KRP remaining after incubation was freeze-dried and the alkaloid species quantified by HPLC. The area of ruminal and omasal tissues was measured and the potential transportable alkaloids calculated by multiplying the moles of transported alkaloids per square centimeter of each tissue type by the surface area of the tissue. Studies were conducted to compare alkaloid transport in reticular, ruminal, and omasal tissues and to determine whether transport was active or passive. Ruminal tissue had greater ergot alkaloid transport potential than omasal tissue (85 vs 60 mmol) because of a larger surface area. The ruminal posterior dorsal sac had the greatest potential for alkaloid transport, but the other ruminal tissues were not different from one another. Alkaloid transport was less among reticular tissues than among ruminal tissues. Transport of alkaloids seemed to be an active process. The alkaloids with greatest transport potential were lysergic acid and lysergol. Ergopeptine alkaloids tended to pass across omasal tissues in greater quantities than across ruminal

  13. High-performance liquid chromatography analysis of plant saponins: An update 2005-2010

    PubMed Central

    Negi, Jagmohan S.; Singh, Pramod; Pant, Geeta Joshi Nee; Rawat, M. S. M.

    2011-01-01

    Saponins are widely distributed in plant kingdom. In view of their wide range of biological activities and occurrence as complex mixtures, saponins have been purified and separated by high-performance liquid chromatography using reverse-phase columns at lower wavelength. Mostly, saponins are not detected by ultraviolet detector due to lack of chromophores. Electrospray ionization mass spectrometry, diode array detector , evaporative light scattering detection, and charged aerosols have been used for overcoming the detection problem of saponins. PMID:22303089

  14. Components characterization of total tetraploid jiaogulan (Gynostemma pentaphylla) saponin and its cholesterol-lowering properties

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This study characterized chemical structures of tetraploid jiaogulan saponins, and investigated their cholesterol-lowering effects and mechanisms in hamsters fed a high-fat diet (HFD). Nine saponins, including five reported for the first time, were obtained from total jiaogulan saponins (TJS) and el...

  15. Alkaloids from Hippeastrum equestre. Part I. Phamine, a new phenanthridone alkaloid.

    PubMed

    Döpke, W; Pham, L H; Gründemann, E; Bartoszek, M; Flatau, S

    1995-12-01

    From the bulbs of Vietnamese Hippeastrum equestre Herb. (Amaryllidaceae), besides the well known alkaloids lycorine, tazettine, and hippeastrine, a new alkaloid, phamine, has been isolated. Its structure was established by spectroscopic methods.

  16. Adjuvant effects of saponins on animal immune responses*

    PubMed Central

    Rajput, Zahid Iqbal; Hu, Song-hua; Xiao, Chen-wen; Arijo, Abdullah G.

    2007-01-01

    Vaccines require optimal adjuvants including immunopotentiator and delivery systems to offer long term protection from infectious diseases in animals and man. Initially it was believed that adjuvants are responsible for promoting strong and sustainable antibody responses. Now it has been shown that adjuvants influence the isotype and avidity of antibody and also affect the properties of cell-mediated immunity. Mostly oil emulsions, lipopolysaccharides, polymers, saponins, liposomes, cytokines, ISCOMs (immunostimulating complexes), Freund’s complete adjuvant, Freund’s incomplete adjuvant, alums, bacterial toxins etc., are common adjuvants under investigation. Saponin based adjuvants have the ability to stimulate the cell mediated immune system as well as to enhance antibody production and have the advantage that only a low dose is needed for adjuvant activity. In the present study the importance of adjuvants, their role and the effect of saponin in immune system is reviewed. PMID:17323426

  17. Progress of pharmacological studies on alkaloids from Apocynaceae.

    PubMed

    Liu, Lu; Cao, Jian-Xin; Yao, Yuan-Cheng; Xu, Sheng-Ping

    2013-01-01

    Alkaloid was a kind of biological active ingredient. There were various types of alkaloids in Apocynaceae. This paper reviewed the progress on alkaloids from Apocynaceae, which contained origin, structure, and pharmacological activity.

  18. Angustilobine and andranginine type indole alkaloids and an uleine-secovallesamine bisindole alkaloid from Alstonia angustiloba.

    PubMed

    Ku, Wai-Foong; Tan, Shin-Jowl; Low, Yun-Yee; Komiyama, Kanki; Kam, Toh-Seok

    2011-12-01

    A total of 20 alkaloids were isolated from the leaf and stem-bark extracts of Alstonia angustiloba, of which two are hitherto unknown. One is an alkaloid of the angustilobine type (angustilobine C), while the other is a bisindole alkaloid angustiphylline, derived from the union of uleine and secovallesamine moieties. The structures of these alkaloids were established using NMR and MS analysis. Angustilobine C showed moderate cytotoxicity towards KB cells.

  19. Potent antitrypanosomal triterpenoid saponins from Mussaenda luteola

    PubMed Central

    Mohamed, Shaymaa M.; Bachkeet, Enaam Y.; Bayoumi, Soad A.; Jain, Surendra; Cutler, Stephen J.; Tekwani, Babu L.; Ross, Samir A.

    2016-01-01

    Five new triterpenoid saponins, heinsiagenin A 3-O-[α-l-rhamnopyranosyl-(1→2)-β-d-glucopyranosyl-(1→2)]-β-d-glucopyranoside (1), heinsiagenin A 3-O-[α-l-rhamnopyranosyl-(1→2)-β-d-glucopyranosyl-(1→2)]-[β-d-glucopyranosyl-(1→4)]-β-d-glucopyranoside (2), 2α-hydroxyheinsiagenin A 3-O-[α-l-rhamnopyranosyl-(1→2)-β-d-glucopyranosyl-(1→2)]-β-d-glucopyranoside (3), 2α-hydroxyheinsiagenin A 3-O-[β-d-glucopyranosyl-(1→2)]-[β-d-glucopyranosyl-(1→4)]-β-d-glucopyranoside (4) and N-(2S, 3R, 4R-3-methyl-4-pentanolid-2-yl)-18-hydroxylanosta-8 (9), 22E, 24E-trien-27-amide-3-O-[α-l-rhamnopyranosyl-(1→2)-β-d-glucopyranosyl-(1→2)]-[β-d-glucopyranosyl-(1→4)]-β-d-glucopyranoside (5) were isolated from the aerial parts of Mussaenda luteola Delile (Rubiaceae). Structural elucidation was based on the analysis of spectroscopic data (1D and 2D NMR) and HR-ESI-MS. Compound 1 showed potent antitrypanosomal activity with an IC50 value of 8.80 μM. Compounds 2–4 showed highly potent antitrypanosomal activity with IC50 values ranging between (2.57–2.84 μM) and IC90 values ranging between (3.36–4.35 μM), which are 5 fold greater than the positive control DFMO (IC50 and IC90 values of 13.06 and 28.99 μM, respectively). Compounds 1 and 2 showed moderate affinity to μ-opioid receptors with Ki values of 9.936 μM and 0.872 μM, respectively compared to a Ki value of 1.958 nM for the positive control, naloxone HCl. PMID:26524249

  20. Four new fluorenone alkaloids and one new dihydroazafluoranthene alkaloid from Caulophyllum robustum Maxim.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiao-Ling; Liu, Bing-Rui; Chen, Chien-Kuang; Wang, Jun-Ru; Lee, Shoei-Sheng

    2011-09-01

    Four new fluorenone alkaloids, caulophylline A-D (1-4), and one new dihydroazafluoranthene alkaloid, caulophylline E (5) were isolated from the roots of Caulophyllum robustum Maxim. Their structures were elucidated by spectroscopic analysis. Among the isolated alkaloids, Caulophylline E showed good scavenging effects against DPPH radical with IC(50) of 39 μM.

  1. The alkaloids of Delphinium cashmirianum.

    PubMed

    Shamma, M; Chinnasamy, P; Miana, G A; Khan, A; Bashir, M; Salazar, M; Patil, P; Beal, J L

    1979-01-01

    Dephinium cashmirianum Royle (Ranunculaceae) has yielded the new base cashmiradelphine (12), together with the known alkaloids anthranoyllycoctonine (9), lycaconitine (15), avadharidine (17), lappaconitine (4), and N-deacetyllappaconitine (7). Pyridinium chlorochromate oxidation of lycoctonine furnished the new aldehyde lycoctonal (11). The arrhythmogenic and heart rate effects of several of these diterpenoidal alkaloids have been measured on the isolated guinea atria. Lappaconitine was arrhythmogenic at 10(-4)M concentrations. But in contrast to the reference drug aconitine, lappaconitine did not increase the heart rate. In anesthetized rabbits injected with lappaconitine, N-deacetyllappaconitine, and lappaconine up to 1 mg/kg, cardiac arrhythmia was quickly observed. Even up to 5 mg/kg, the other substances were non-arrhythmogenic.

  2. Triterpenoidal Saponins: Bioactive Secondary Metabolites from Zygophyllum coccineum

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-01-22

    of the publishers only Planta Medica Journal of Medicinal Plant and Natural Product Research www.thieme.de/fz/plantamedica l www.thieme-connect.com...insecticidal activity of compounds 1, 3, 5, 6, and 9. Amin E et al. Triterpenoidal Saponins: Bioactive… Planta Med Letters Th is is a co py of th e...Amin E et al. Triterpenoidal Saponins: Bioactive… Planta Med Letters Th is is a co py of th e au th or ʼs pe rs on al re pr in t Th is is a co py of th

  3. [Inactivated saponin vaccine against salmonellal abortion in sheep].

    PubMed

    Girginov, G; Vodas, K; Bozhilov, B

    1978-01-01

    An inactivated saponine vaccine is prepared from five highly immunogenic Salmonella abortus ovis strains, selected by means of a biological test on white rats. Saline was used as a diluent of the vaccine, with the addition of 30 per cent glycerine, 0.012 per cent saponine and 0.1 per cent propiolactone. The optimum immunization dose of 5 cm3 is injected singly subcutaneously behind the elbow, two and a half months after impregnation. The vaccine is applied on infected farms before the disease occurs. The cellular-humoral immunity, which forms 14 days after the injection, lasts 4--5 months and protects the sheep against salmonellosis abortion.

  4. [Analysis of saponin in Chinese ginsengs by NIR spectroscopy].

    PubMed

    Lu, Yong-jun; Qu, Yan-ling; Feng, Zhi-qing; Cao, Zhi-qiang; Song, Min

    2007-03-01

    In the present paper the saponin in Chinese ginseng was analysed quantitatively by using near infrared spectroscopy. The spectral characteristics of the primary ingredients in Chinese ginseng were obtained by applying second derivative, MSC (Multiple Scatter Correction), and correlation chart to the original absorbance spectra of ginseng. Meantime, in combination with the PLS algorithm the calibration process was performed for the quantitative analysis of saponin in Chinese ginseng. The result obtained shows a fine precision of the method, with RMSEC of 0.154% and correlation coefficient of 0.9828.

  5. A new bioactive steroidal saponin from Sansevieria cylindrica.

    PubMed

    Da Silva Antunes, Alexandra; Da Silva, Bernadete Pereira; Parente, José Paz; Valente, Ana Paula

    2003-02-01

    A new steroidal saponin was isolated from the leaves of Sansevieria cylindrica. Its structure was established as (3beta,12beta,15alpha,25S)-26-(beta-D-glucopyranosyloxy)-22-hydroxyfurost-5-en-3-yl 12-O- (6-deoxy-alpha-L-mannopyranosyl)-15-O-(6-deoxy-alpha-L-mannopyranosyl)-beta-D-glucopyranoside. The structural identification was performed using detailed analyses of (1)H and (13)C NMR spectra including 2D NMR spectroscopic techniques (COSY, HETCOR, HMBC and HMQC) and chemical conversions. The steroidal saponin showed no haemolytic effects in the in vitro assays and demonstrated inhibition of the capillary permeability activity.

  6. Steroidal saponins from the leaves of Cestrum sendtenerianum.

    PubMed

    Haraguchi, M; Mimaki, Y; Motidome, M; Morita, H; Takeya, K; Itokawa, H; Yokosuka, A; Sashida, Y

    2000-12-01

    Five steroidal saponins were isolated from the EtOH extract of Cestrium sendtenerianum (Solanaceae), as confirmed by detailed analysis of their 1H, 13C, and two-dimensional NMR spectral data, and by the results of hydrolytic cleavage. The saponins were revealed to contain three hydroxyl groups at the C-1beta, C-2alpha, and C-3beta positions in the spirostanol skeleton, and to bear a di- or triglycoside at C-3 as the common structural features. One of the compounds, a spirostanol triglycoside, showed weak cytotoxic activity on HL-60 human promyelocytic leukemia cells, with an IC50 value of 7.7 microg/ml.

  7. Alkaloids from Boophone haemanthoides (Amaryllidaceae).

    PubMed

    Nair, Jerald J; Rárová, Lucie; Strnad, Miroslav; Bastidad, Jaume; van Staden, Johannes

    2013-12-01

    In this study, the South African Amaryllid Boophone haemanthoides was examined for its phytochemical composition and cytotoxicity. In the process eight alkaloid structures, including the new compound distichaminol, were identified in bulb ethanolic extracts. Of the isolates, lycorine and distichamine exhibited strong activities against human acute lymphoblastic leukemia (CEM), breast adenocarcinoma (MCF7) and cervical adenocarcinoma (HeLa) cells with IC50S ranging from 1.8 to 9.2 microM.

  8. Morphinane alkaloid dimers from Sinomenium acutum.

    PubMed

    Jin, Hui-Zi; Wang, Xiao-Ling; Wang, Hong-Bing; Wang, Yu-Bo; Lin, Li-Ping; Ding, Jian; Qin, Guo-Wei

    2008-01-01

    Two new morphinane alkaloid dimers, 2,2'-disinomenine (1) and 7',8'-dihydro-1,1'-disinomenine (2), and known 1, 1'-disinomenine (3), were isolated from ethanol extracts of stems of Sinomenium acutum. Their structures were elucidated on the basis of spectroscopic methods. The absolute configuration of alkaloids 1-3 was determined by direct comparison of their CD spectra with the known alkaloid sinomenine. The isolated alkaloids were tested for cytotoxicity against A549, P388, and HeLa cell lines, and 1 and 3 showed weak inhibition against A549 and Hela cells.

  9. Six new alkaloids from Melodinus henryi.

    PubMed

    Ma, Ke; Wang, Jun-Song; Luo, Jun; Kong, Ling-Yi

    2015-01-01

    A total of six new alkaloids, melodinhenines A-F (1-6), were isolated from Melodinus henryi. Melodinhenines A and B are new eburnan-vindolinine-type bisindole alkaloids and melodinhenines C-F are new quinolinic melodinus alkaloids. Their structures were elucidated through extensive spectroscopic methods including 2D NMR and HRESIMS analyses. The absolute configuration of 1 and 2 was determined using ECD exciton chirality method. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report on the determination of the absolute configuration of eburnan-vindolinine-type bisindole alkaloid using this method.

  10. Separation of soybean saponins from soybean meal by a technology of foam fractionation and resin adsorption.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Jianxing; Wu, Zhaoliang; Liu, Wei; Gao, Yanfei; Guo, Shenghao; Kang, Shufang

    2016-05-18

    Foam fractionation and resin adsorption were used to recover soybean saponins from the industrial residue of soybean meal. First, a two-stage foam fractionation technology was studied for concentrating soybean saponins from the leaching liquor. Subsequently, resin adsorption was used to purify soybean saponins from the foamate in foam fractionation. The results showed that the enrichment ratio, the recovery percentage, and the purity of soybean saponins by using the two-stage foam fractionation technology could reach 4.45, 74%, and 67%, respectively. After resin adsorption and desorption, the purity of soybean saponins in the freeze-dried powder from the desorption solution was 88.4%.

  11. High-performance liquid chromatographic determination of molluscicidal saponins from Phytolacca dodecandra (Phytolaccaceae).

    PubMed

    Slacanin, I; Marston, A; Hostettmann, K

    1988-09-02

    A high-performance liquid chromatographic method is described for the determination of oleanane saponins in Phytolacca dodecandra (Phytolaccaceae), a plant with potent molluscicidal properties. The molluscicidal monodesmosidic saponins of the berries were determined at 254 nm as their 4-bromophenacyl derivatives, whereas the non-derivatized bidesmosidic saponins, lacking a free carboxyl group, were determined at 206 nm. A comparison of different extraction procedures showed that with cold water predominantly monodesmosidic saponins were obtained, whereas hot water gave mainly bidesmosidic (non-molluscicidal) saponins.

  12. Characterization of tryptic hydrolysis of alpha-lactalbumin/saponin mixture and structural change of alpha-lactalbumin interacting with soybean saponin.

    PubMed

    Shimoyamada, Makoto; Okada, Yuri; Watanabe, Kenji; Yamauchi, Ryo

    2005-03-15

    Bovine milk alpha-lactalbumin (alpha-La) was mixed with soybean saponin, and the resulting mixture was hydrolyzed by trypsin. Saponin increased the tryptic-hydrolysis level of alpha-La only at relatively high phosphate buffer concentrations (> or = 0.05 M). T(1) experiments with acetylated soybean saponin demonstrated that there were some interactions between alpha-La and saponin not only at high concentrations of phosphate buffers but even at low concentrations as well. Circular dichroism spectra of alpha-La showed that the tertiary structure of alpha-La was changed through interactions with saponin only at high buffer concentrations. Furthermore, by analyzing the tryptic peptides from an alpha-La/saponin mixture, hydrolyzing rates at all or some of K5, R10, and K16 of alpha-La were accelerated by saponin interactions. The increase in the tryptic hydrolysis of alpha-La by saponin addition was considered due to modification of the tertiary structure of alpha-La by saponin.

  13. Studies on saponin production in tropical medicinal plants Maesa argentea and Maesa lanceolata

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faizal, Ahmad; Geelen, Danny

    2015-09-01

    The continuous need for new compounds with important medicinal activities has lead to the identification and characterization of various plant-derived natural products. As a part of this program, we studied the saponin production from two tropical medicinal plants Maesa argentea and M. lanceolata and evaluated several treatments to enhance their saponin production. In this experiment, we present the analyses of saponin production from greenhouse grown plants by means of TLC and HPLC-MS. We observed that the content of saponin from these plants varied depending on organ and physiological age of the plants. In addition, the impact of elicitors on saponin accumulation on in vitro grown plants was analyzed using TLC. The production of saponin was very stable and not affected by treatment with methyl jasmonate, and salicylic acid. In conclusion, Maesa saponins are constitutively produced in plants and the level of these compounds in plants is mainly affected by the developmental or physiological stage.

  14. Influence of saponins on the biodegradation of halogenated phenols.

    PubMed

    Kaczorek, Ewa; Smułek, Wojciech; Zdarta, Agata; Sawczuk, Agata; Zgoła-Grześkowiak, Agnieszka

    2016-09-01

    Biotransformation of aromatic compounds is a challenge due to their low aqueous solubility and sorptive losses. The main obstacle in this process is binding of organic pollutants to the microbial cell surface. To overcome these, we applied saponins from plant extract to the microbial culture, to increase pollutants solubility and enhance diffusive massive transfer. This study investigated the efficiency of Quillaja saponaria and Sapindus mukorossi saponins-rich extracts on biodegradation of halogenated phenols by Raoultella planticola WS2 and Pseudomonas sp. OS2, as an effect of cell surface modification of tested strains. Both strains display changes in inner membrane permeability and cell surface hydrophobicity in the presence of saponins during the process of halogenated phenols biotransformation. This allows them to more efficient pollutants removal from the environment. However, only in case of the Pseudomonas sp. OS2 the addition of surfactants to the culture improved effectiveness of bromo-, chloro- and fluorophenols biodegradation. Also introduction of surfactant allowed higher biodegradability of halogenated phenols and can shorten the process. Therefore this suggests that usage of plant saponins can indicate more successful halogenated phenols biodegradation for selected strains.

  15. Absorption and Transport of Sea Cucumber Saponins from Apostichopus japonicus.

    PubMed

    Li, Shuai; Wang, Yuanhong; Jiang, Tingfu; Wang, Han; Yang, Shuang; Lv, Zhihua

    2016-06-17

    The present study is focused on the intestinal absorption of sea cucumber saponins. We determined the pharmacokinetic characteristics and bioavailability of Echinoside A and Holotoxin A₁; the findings indicated that the bioavailability of Holotoxin A₁ was lower than Echinoside A. We inferred that the differences in chemical structure between compounds was a factor that explained their different characteristics of transport across the intestine. In order to confirm the absorption characteristics of Echinoside A and Holotoxin A₁, we examined their transport across Caco-2 cell monolayer and effective permeability by single-pass intestinal perfusion. The results of Caco-2 cell model indicate that Echinoside A is transported by passive diffusion, and not influenced by the exocytosis of P-glycoprotein (P-gp, expressed in the apical side of Caco-2 monolayers as the classic inhibitor). The intestinal perfusion also demonstrated well the absorption of Echinoside A and poor absorption of Holotoxin A₁, which matched up with the result of the Caco-2 cell model. The results demonstrated our conjecture and provides fundamental information on the relationship between the chemical structure of these sea cucumber saponins and their absorption characteristics, and we believe that our findings build a foundation for the further metabolism study of sea cucumber saponins and contribute to the further clinical research of saponins.

  16. [Saponins in nutrition of swine, poultry and ruminants].

    PubMed

    Westendarp, H

    2005-02-01

    Saponins are glycosides found in many plants, which have soap character due to their surfactant properties. They work haemolytic and may cause symptoms of intoxication in high concentration. Among therapeutically relevant effects expectorative, anti-inflammatory and immune-stimulating effects have the highest ranking. Beyond that, saponins demonstrate antimicrobial properties particularly against fungi and additionally against bacteria and protozoa. In animal nutrition additions of saponins can suppress intestinal and ruminal ammonia production. The ammonia-reducing effect is primarily attributed to an inhibition of proteolytic microorganisms. Due to reduced NH3-concentrations metabolism is relieved, which offers benefits to animal welfare and animal performance. Accordingly improved feed convertion ratio can be registered in weanling and growing-finishing pigs with the employment of saponin-containing feed additives. With regard to ruminal fermentation in vitro and in vivo studies have shown that beside proteolytic protozoa also cellolytic and amylolytic bacterial species are restrained. To what extent antimicrobial activity supress digestion or whether the selective effects on microorganisms can be used purposefully to manipulate ruminal fermentation, must be clarified in further investigations.

  17. Lipidated steroid saponins from Dioscorea villosa (wild yam).

    PubMed

    Dong, Shi-Hui; Cai, Geping; Napolitano, José G; Nikolić, Dejan; Lankin, David C; McAlpine, James B; van Breemen, Richard B; Soejarto, Djaja D; Pauli, Guido F; Chen, Shao-Nong

    2013-12-01

    Two groups of lipidated steroid saponins including seven new compounds (2, 3, 5, and 7-10) were isolated from the widely used botanical, wild yam (Dioscorea villosa), employing a fractionation protocol of metabolomic mining. This methodology recently led to the isolation of 14 diarylheptanoids from the same plant. Together with these lipidated steroid saponins, they establish additional new markers for D. villosa. The lipidation of steroids with analog long-chain fatty acids containing different degrees of unsaturation generates an entire series of compounds which are difficult to purify and analyze. The structures of the two series of lipidated steroid saponins (series A and B) were established by a combination of 1D and 2D NMR as well as GC-MS after chemical modification. Series A was determined to be a mixture of lipidated spirostanol glycosides (1-5), while series B (6-10) was proved to be a mixture of five lipidated clionasterol glucosides. The latter group represents the first derivatives of clionasterol to be found in D. villosa. The discovery of this specific structural type of aliphatic esters of steroid saponins expands the characterization of the secondary metabolome of D. villosa. It may also inspire biological studies which take into account the lipophilic character and significantly altered physiochemical characteristics of these otherwise relatively polar phytoconstituents.

  18. Absorption and Transport of Sea Cucumber Saponins from Apostichopus japonicus

    PubMed Central

    Li, Shuai; Wang, Yuanhong; Jiang, Tingfu; Wang, Han; Yang, Shuang; Lv, Zhihua

    2016-01-01

    The present study is focused on the intestinal absorption of sea cucumber saponins. We determined the pharmacokinetic characteristics and bioavailability of Echinoside A and Holotoxin A1; the findings indicated that the bioavailability of Holotoxin A1 was lower than Echinoside A. We inferred that the differences in chemical structure between compounds was a factor that explained their different characteristics of transport across the intestine. In order to confirm the absorption characteristics of Echinoside A and Holotoxin A1, we examined their transport across Caco-2 cell monolayer and effective permeability by single-pass intestinal perfusion. The results of Caco-2 cell model indicate that Echinoside A is transported by passive diffusion, and not influenced by the exocytosis of P-glycoprotein (P-gp, expressed in the apical side of Caco-2 monolayers as the classic inhibitor). The intestinal perfusion also demonstrated well the absorption of Echinoside A and poor absorption of Holotoxin A1, which matched up with the result of the Caco-2 cell model. The results demonstrated our conjecture and provides fundamental information on the relationship between the chemical structure of these sea cucumber saponins and their absorption characteristics, and we believe that our findings build a foundation for the further metabolism study of sea cucumber saponins and contribute to the further clinical research of saponins. PMID:27322290

  19. Artefact formation during acid hydrolysis of saponins from Medicago spp.

    PubMed

    Tava, Aldo; Biazzi, Elisa; Mella, Mariella; Quadrelli, Paolo; Avato, Pinarosa

    2017-02-28

    Artefact compounds obtained during acid hydrolysis of saponins from Medicago spp. (Fabaceae), have been monitored and evaluated by GC-FID. Their identification has been performed by GC-MS and (1)H and (13)C NMR. Saponins with different substituents on the triterpenic pentacyclic aglycones were considered, and their hydrolysis products were detected and quantified during 10 h of time course reaction. From soyasapogenol B glycoside the well known soyasapogenols B, C, D and F were obtained together with a previously undescribed sapogenol artefact identified as 3β,22β,24-trihydroxyolean-18(19)-en and named soyasapogenol H. From a zanhic acid saponin two major artefact compounds identified as 2β,3β,16α-trihydroxyolean-13(18)-en-23,28-dioic acid and 2β,3β,16α-trihydroxyolean-28,13β-olide-23-oic acid were obtained, together with some zanhic acid. Other compounds, detected in very small amount in the reaction mixture, were also tentatively identified based on their GC-MS and UV spectra. The other most characteristic saponins in Medicago spp., hederagenin, bayogenin and medicagenic acid glycosides, under acidic condition of hydrolysis, released instead the correspondent aglycones and generated a negligible amount of artefacts. Nature of artefacts and mechanism of their formation, involving a stable tertiary carbocation, is here proposed and discussed for the first time.

  20. Steroidal saponins from the fruits of Cestrum ruizteranianum.

    PubMed

    Galarraga, Elier; Mitaine-Offer, Anne-Claire; Amaro-Luis, Juan Manuel; Miyamoto, Tomofumi; Tanaka, Chiaki; Pouységu, Laurent; Quideau, Stéphane; Rojas, Luis B; Lacaille-Dubois, Marie-Aleth

    2011-12-01

    Seven spirostane and furostane-type glycosides were isolated from the aqueous methanolic extract of the fruits of Cestrum ruizteranianum and characterized mainly by 2D NMR spectroscopy and mass spectrometry. These known saponins belong to the delta5-spirostene and delta5-furostene series and are reported in this species for the first time.

  1. Cesdiurins I-III, steroidal saponins from Cestrum diurnum L.

    PubMed

    Fouad, Mostafa A; Mohamed, Khaled M; Kamel, Mohamed S; Matsunami, Katsuyoshi; Otsuka, Hideaki

    2008-04-01

    Phytochemical investigation of a methanolic extract of leaves of Cestrum diurnum L (Solanaceae) resulted in isolation of several furostanol steroidal saponins, named cesdiurins I-III (1-3). Their structures of the isolated compounds were determined by spectroscopic analyses, including by use of 1D and 2D NMR spectroscopic techniques as well as by mass spectral analyses.

  2. Triterpenes acids and saponins isolated from Licania arianeae Prance (Chrysobalanaceae).

    PubMed

    de Carvalho, Mário Geraldo; Cândido, Lucilene Faustina de Oliveira; da Costa, Patrícia Miranda; do Nascimento, Ildomar Alves; Braz-Filho, Raimundo

    2008-07-01

    From the leaves and wood of Licania arianeae, ten known compounds were isolated and identified. They belong to pharmacological active triterpenes acids, including three oleanoic acids, five ursane acids, and two triterpenes saponin acids. Their structures were established by analysis of infrared, mass spectrometry, and nuclear magnetic resonance spectral data of natural triterpenes and of methyl acetyl derivatives.

  3. The flavonoids of Allium ursinum.

    PubMed

    Carotenuto, A; De Feo, V; Fattorusso, E; Lanzotti, V; Magno, S; Cicala, C

    1996-02-01

    From wild garlic Allium ursinum three new flavonoid glycosides were identified as kaempferol 3-O-beta-neohesperidoside-7-O-[2-O-(trans-p-coumaroyl)]-beta -D- glucopyranoside, kaempferol 3-O-beta-neohesperidoside-7-O-[2-O-(trans-feruloyl)]-beta-D- glucopyranoside, kaempferol 3-O-beta-neohesperidoside-7-O-[2-O-(trans-p-coumaroyl)-3-O-b eta-D- glucopyranosyl]-beta-D-glucopyranoside and characterized as the peracetates. Additionally, two known flavonoid glycosides kaempferol 3-O-beta-glucopyranoside and kaempferol 3-O-beta-neohesperidoside were isolated. The isolated compounds showed an inhibition of human platelet aggregation.

  4. [Flavonoids of Cuscuta australis R. Br].

    PubMed

    Guo, H; Li, J

    1997-01-01

    Six flavonoids were isolated from the seed of Cuscuta australis and four of them were identified as kaempferol, quercetin, astragalin and hyperoside. Hyperoside was obtained from this plant for the first time. In comparison with the flavonoids in C. chinensis, it is found that quercetin and its glycoside are the main flavonoids in C. australis. This result suggests that the flavonoids can be used to distinguish these two medicinal materials.

  5. Alkaloids of Nelumbo lutea (Wild.) pers. (Nymphaeaceae)

    PubMed

    Zelenski, S G

    1977-11-01

    A phytochemical investigation of an alcoholic extract of the petioles of Nelumbo lutea resulted in the identification of the alkaloids N-methylasimilobine, anonaine, and roemerine. The alkaloids nuciferine, armepavine, N-nornuciferine, and N-norarmepavine, previously previously reported in the whole plant, were also identified.

  6. Cytotoxic oxoisoaporphine alkaloids from Menispermum dauricum.

    PubMed

    Yu, B W; Meng, L H; Chen, J Y; Zhou, T X; Cheng, K F; Ding, J; Qin, G W

    2001-07-01

    Four new oxoisoaporphine alkaloids, daurioxoisoporphines A-D (1-4), were isolated from the rhizomes of Menispermum dauricum. The structures of these alkaloids were established by spectroscopic methods. The cytotoxic evaluation of 1 and 2 is reported against four cancer cell lines.

  7. Plant alkaloids of the polymethyleneamine series

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rogoza, Ludmila N.; Salakhutdinov, Nariman F.; Tolstikov, Genrikh A.

    2005-04-01

    The published data on the structures and biological activities of the plant alkaloids of the biogenic polymethyleneamine series, viz., putrescine (1,4-diaminobutane), spermidine (1,8-diamino-4 -azaoctane), and spermine (1,12-diamino-4,9-diazadodecane), are considered and systematised. The structures and biological activities of some synthetic analogues of these alkaloids are also presented.

  8. Glycoalkaloids and calystegine alkaloids in potatoes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Potatoes contain two classes of alkaloids: the glycoalkaloids and the calystegines. The presence of glycoalkaloids in potatoes and their toxicity has been known for more than a century and much has been written about them. Discovery of the nortropane calystegine alkaloids is more recent, and the k...

  9. Chemical analysis reveals the botanical origin of shatavari products and confirms the absence of alkaloid asparagamine A in Asparagus racemosus.

    PubMed

    Kumeta, Yukie; Maruyama, Takuro; Wakana, Daigo; Kamakura, Hiroyuki; Goda, Yukihiro

    2013-01-01

    Shatavari-a famous Ayurveda materia medica used mainly as a tonic for women-is distributed in health food products all over the world. The Ayurvedic Pharmacopoeia of India identifies the botanical origin of shatavari as the tuberous root of Asparagus racemosus. We recently investigated by DNA analysis the botanical origin of shatavari products on the Japanese market. The results suggested that their botanical origin was Asparagus; however, species identification was difficult. In this study, we analyzed steroidal saponins, including those specific to this plant, in these products and confirmed their origin as A. racemosus. Next, alkaloid analyses of an authentic A. racemosus plant and these products were performed, because several papers have reported the isolation of a pyrrolo[1,2-a]azepine alkaloid, asparagamine A, from this plant. Our results suggest that neither plant material nor products contained asparagamine A. It has been pointed out that Stemona plants are sometimes mistaken for shatavari, because their tuberous roots have a similar shape to that of A. racemosus, and pyrrolo[1,2-a]azepine alkaloids are thought to be Stemona-specific. These data strongly suggest that A. racemosus does not contain asparagamine A, and that previous isolation of asparagamine A from materials claimed as originating from A. racemosus was likely caused by misidentification of Stemona plants as A. racemosus.

  10. In vivo Cytotoxicity Studies of Amaryllidaceae Alkaloids.

    PubMed

    Nair, Jerald J; Bastida, Jaume; van Staden, Johannes

    2016-01-01

    The plant family Amaryllidaceae is recognizable for its esthetic floral characteristics, its widespread usage in traditional medicine as well as its unique alkaloid principles. Few alkaloid-producing families rival the Amaryllidaceae in terms of the diversity of its structures as well as their wide applicability on the biological landscape. In particular, cytotoxic effects have come to be a dominant theme in the biological properties of Amaryllidacea alkaloids. To this extent, a significant number of structures have been subjected to in vitro studies in numerous cell lines from which several targets have been identified as promising chemotherapeutics. By contrast, in vivo models of study involving these alkaloids have been carried out to a lesser extent and should prove crucial in the continued development of a clinical target such as pancratistatin. This survey examines the cytotoxic effects of Amaryllidaceae alkaloids in vivo and contrasts these against the corresponding in vitro effects.

  11. Indole Alkaloids from Alocasia macrorrhiza.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Ling-Hua; Chen, Cheng; Wang, Hui; Ye, Wen-Cai; Zhou, Guang-Xiong

    2012-01-01

    Five new indole alkaloids, alocasins A-E (3-7), together with known hyrtiosin B (1) and hyrtiosulawesin (2) were isolated from Alocasia macrorrhiza (L.) SCHOTT; their structures were elucidated on the basis of spectroscopic data. Compounds 1-7 were in vitro tested for cytostatic activity on human throat cancer (Hep-2), human hepatocarcinoma (Hep-G2), and human nasopharyngeal carcinoma epithelial (CNE) cell lines by 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) method; compounds 2, 3, 6 and 7 showed mild antiproliferative activity against Hep-2 and Hep-G2 whereas compounds 2 and 4 showed gentle antiproliferative activity against CNE.

  12. Enantioselective synthesis of alkaloids from phenylglycinol-derived lactams.

    PubMed

    Amat, Mercedes; Llor, Núria; Griera, Rosa; Pérez, Maria; Bosch, Joan

    2011-04-01

    This review is focused on recent synthetic achievements and ongoing work in our laboratory using phenylglycinol-derived oxazolopiperidone lactams as starting materials for the enantioselective synthesis of piperidine-containing alkaloids: madangamines, 2,5-disubstituted decahydroquinoline and 1-substituted tetrahydroisoquinoline alkaloids, the indole alkaloids 20S- and 20R-dihydrocleavamine and quebrachamine, and indole alkaloids of the uleine and silicine groups.

  13. Effect of MDL-Type alkaloids on tall larkspur toxicosis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Larkspur plants contain numerous norditerpenoid alkaloids which include the 7, 8-methylenedioxylycoctonine (MDL) -type alkaloids and the N-(methylsuccinimido) anthranoyllycoctonine (MSAL) -type alkaloids. The MSAL-type alkaloids are generally much more toxic (typically > 20x) than the MDL-type alka...

  14. Effect of MDL-type alkaloids on tall larkspur toxicosis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Larkspur plants contain numerous norditerpenoid alkaloids which include the 7, 8-methylenedioxylycoctonine (MDL) -type alkaloids and the N-(methylsuccinimido) anthranoyllycoctonine (MSAL) -type alkaloids. The MSAL-type alkaloids are generally much more toxic (typically > 20x). Toxicity of many tal...

  15. Antioxidant activity of banana flavonoids.

    PubMed

    Vijayakumar, S; Presannakumar, G; Vijayalakshmi, N R

    2008-06-01

    The antioxidant activity of flavonoids from banana (Musa paradisiaca) was studied in rats fed normal as well as high fat diets. Concentrations of peroxidation products namely malondialdehyde, hydroperoxides and conjugated diens were significantly decreased whereas the activities of catalase and superoxide dismutase were enhanced significantly. Concentrations of glutathione were also elevated in the treated animals.

  16. Hemolytic and antimicrobial activities differ among saponin-rich extracts from guar, quillaja, yucca, and soybean.

    PubMed

    Hassan, Sherif M; Byrd, James A; Cartwright, Aubry L; Bailey, Chris A

    2010-10-01

    Hemolytic and antibacterial activities of eight serial concentrations ranged from 5-666 microg/mL of saponin-rich extracts from guar meal (GM), quillaja, yucca, and soybean were tested in 96-well plates and read by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay plate-well as 650 nm. Hemolytic assay used a 1% suspension of chicken red blood cells with water and phosphate buffered saline as positive and negative controls, respectively. Antibacterial activity against Staphylococcus aureus, Salmonella typhimurium, and Escherichia coli were evaluated using ampicillin and bacteria without saponin-rich extract as positive and negative controls, respectively. The 100% MeOH GM and commercial quillaja saponin-rich extracts were significantly the highest in both hemolytic and antibacterial activities against all bacteria at the same concentration tested. Soybean saponin-rich extract had no antibacterial activity against any of the bacteria at the concentrations tested while yucca saponin-rich extract had no antibacterial activity against the gram-negative bacteria at the concentrations tested. GM and quillaja saponin-rich extracts were hemolytic, while yucca and soybean saponin-rich extracts were not hemolytic at the concentrations tested. No saponin-rich extract source had antibacterial activity against S. typhimurium or E. coli at the concentrations tested. Both GM and quillaja saponin-rich extracts exhibited antibacterial activity against S. aureus. Saponin-rich extracts from different plant sources have different hemolytic and antibacterial activities.

  17. Alum-type adjuvant effect of non-haemolytic saponins purified from Ilex and Passiflora spp.

    PubMed

    Silveira, F; Rossi, S; Fernández, C; Gosmann, G; Schenkel, E; Ferreira, F

    2011-12-01

    Five saponins purified from the leaves of three Ilex species (saponins 1 and 2 from I. dumosa; saponin 3 from I. argentina; saponin 4 from I. paraguariensis) and from Passiflora alata (saponin 5) were evaluated for their in vitro haemolytic activity and in vivo immunostimulatory ability in a mouse model using tetanus toxoid (TT) as a model antigen. The assayed saponins showed very weak or no haemolytic activity over the tested concentration range. Mice were immunized twice with TT formulated with pure saponins 1-5, or with a mixture of saponins from Quillaja saponaria, aluminum hydroxide gel or saline, which were used as controls. The elicited humoral response was evaluated by means of the time course of specific serum antibody levels up to day 131 post-priming (total IgG and isotypes); the cellular response was tested through a delayed-type hypersensitivity (DTH) assay. The assayed saponins, in particular saponins 3 and 5, showed an adjuvant effect similar to that of alum for all tested parameters. The immunostimulating potential of these compounds deserves further investigation, especially taking into account that some Ilex spp. and Passiflora alata are native crops of widespread use and economical importance in Latin America.

  18. Systematic identification and quantification of tetracyclic monoterpenoid oxindole alkaloids in Uncaria rhynchophylla and their fragmentations in Q-TOF-MS spectra.

    PubMed

    Xie, Shuanglu; Shi, Yuanyuan; Wang, Yixiang; Wu, Chunyong; Liu, Wenyuan; Feng, Feng; Xie, Ning

    2013-01-01

    Uncaria rhynchophylla (UR) is a species of Uncaria that is distributed mainly in China and Japan. In this study, the chemical constituents, including alkaloids, flavonoids, and quinic acids, in UR have been systematically identified and quantified by a developed method of high-performance liquid chromatography coupled with diode-array detection and quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry (Q-TOF-MS). Tetracyclic monoterpenoid oxindole alkaloids (TMOAs) are characteristic compounds in this herb, and their fragmentations in Q-TOF-MS have been investigated. Diagnostic fragmentation ions (DFIs) were first delineated for isorhynchophylline-type (7S, C20-ethyl) and corynoxeine-type (7R, C20-vinyl) TMOAs, and these were used for identification of these alkaloids in UR. In this study, a total of 29 compounds, comprising 18 alkaloids, six flavonoids, and five quinic acids, were identified. Among them, there are four novel TMOAs, named as 22-O-β-glucopyranosyl isorhynchophyllic acid (10), 22-O-β-glucopyranosyl rhynchophyllic acid (11), 9-hydroxy isocorynoxeine (16), and 9-hydroxy corynoxeine (20), which have not been reported previously. Furthermore, eight marker compounds, namely chlorogenic acid (3), catechin (8), epicatechin (9), isocorynoxeine (24), rhynchophylline (25), isorhynchophylline (27), vincoside lactam (28), and corynoxeine (29), have been simultaneously quantified. The developed method has been validated and successfully applied to analyze three samples of UR from Jiangxi Province. The contents of the marker compounds have been detected and compared.

  19. Genetic variation in alkaloid accumulation in leaves of Nicotiana.

    PubMed

    Sun, Bo; Zhang, Fen; Zhou, Guo-jun; Chu, Guo-hai; Huang, Fang-fang; Wang, Qiao-mei; Jin, Li-feng; Lin, Fu-cheng; Yang, Jun

    2013-12-01

    Alkaloids are plant secondary metabolites that are widely distributed in Nicotiana species and contribute greatly to the quality of tobacco leaves. Some alkaloids, such as nornicotine and myosmine, have adverse effects on human health. To reduce the content of harmful alkaloids in tobacco leaves through conventional breeding, a genetic study of the alkaloid variation among different genotypes is required. In this study, alkaloid profiles in leaves of five Nicotiana tabacum cultivars and Nicotiana tomentosiformis were investigated. Six alkaloids were identified from all six genotypes via gas chromatograph-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). Significant differences in alkaloid content were observed both among different leaf positions and among cultivars. The contents of nornicotine and myosmine were positively and significantly correlated (R(2)=0.881), and were also separated from those of other alkaloids by clustering. Thus, the genotype plays a major role in alkaloid accumulation, indicating a high potential for manipulation of alkaloid content through traditional breeding.

  20. Comparative Study of Alkaloid Pattern of Four Bulgarian Fumaria species.

    PubMed

    Doncheva, Tsvetelina; Yordanova, Gabriela; Vutov, Vassil; Kostova, Nadezhda; Philipov, Stefan

    2016-02-01

    The alkaloid pattern of four Fumaria species (Fumaria kralikii, Fumaria rostellata, Fumaria schleicherii, Fumaria thureii) growing in Bulgaria was investigated by GC-MS and twenty isoquinoline alkaloids were determined. Phytochemical investigation of the alkaloid composition on Fumaria thuretii Boiss was made for the first time. The alkaloid profile of the species was compared at two levels, between different species and within two species from different habitats. Two chemotypical groups, based on the types of isoquinoline alkaloids were suggested. To group A belong species F. kralikii, F. rostellata (F. r. 1) and F. thuretii containing more than 50% spirobenzylisoquinoline alkaloids of the crude alkaloid mixtures. To group B belong species F. rostellata (F. r. 2) and F. schleicherii containing more than 40% protopine alkaloids and relatively high percentage phthaldeisoquinoline alkaloids (11-19%). In group A phthaldeisoquinoline alkaloids were not detected.

  1. Flavonoids in horse chestnut (Aesculus hippocastanum) seeds and powdered waste water byproducts.

    PubMed

    Kapusta, Ireneusz; Janda, Bogdan; Szajwaj, Barbara; Stochmal, Anna; Piacente, Sonia; Pizza, Cosimo; Franceschi, Federico; Franz, Chlodwig; Oleszek, Wieslaw

    2007-10-17

    Horse chestnut extracts are widely used in pharmacy and cosmetic industries. The main active constituents are saponins of oleane type, but seeds of horse chestnut also contain flavonoids, being glycosides of quercetin and kaempferol. Their contribution to the overall activity of the extracts was not clear. In the present work, the main flavonoids from horse chestnut seeds were isolated and their structures established with spectral methods. Seven glycosides were isolated, out of which six ( 2, 3, 4, 7, 11, 13) were previously reported and one ( 9) was identified as a new tamarixetin 3- O- [beta- d-glucopyranosyl(1-->3)]- O-beta- d-xylopyranosyl-(1-->2)- O-beta- d-glucopyranoside. The structures of three additional compounds 1, 10, and 12, not previously reported, were deduced on the basis of their LC-ESI/MS/MS fragmentation characteristics. A new ultraperformance liquid chromatographic (UPLC) method has been developed for profiling and quantitation of horse chestnut flavonoids. The method allowed good separation over 4.5 min. Thirteen compounds could be identified in the profile, out of which di- and triglycoisdes of quercetin and kaempferol were the dominant forms and their acylated forms occurred in just trace amounts. The total concentration of flavonoids in the powdered horse chestnut seed was 0.88% of dry matter. The alcohol extract contained 3.46%, and after purification on C18 solid phase, this concentration increased to 9.40% of dry matter. The flavonoid profile and their content were also measured in the horse chestnut wastewater obtained as byproduct in industrial processing of horse chestnut seeds. The total flavonoid concentration in the powder obtained after evaporation of water was 2.58%, while after purification on solid phase, this increased to 11.23% dry matter. It was concluded that flavonoids are present in a horse chestnut extract in a relatively high amount and have the potential to contribute to the overall activity of these extracts

  2. Bromopyrrole Alkaloids from Okinawan Marine Sponges Agelas spp.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Naonobu; Kusama, Taishi; Kashiwada, Yoshiki; Kobayashi, Jun'ichi

    2016-01-01

    In our continuing study for structurally and biogenetically interesting natural products from marine organisms, Okinawan marine sponges Agelas spp. were investigated, resulting in the isolation of 18 unique alkaloids including five dimeric bromopyrrole alkaloids (1-5), ten monomeric bromopyrrole alkaloids (6-15), and three conjugates of monomeric bromopyrrole alkaloid and hydroxykynurenine (16-18). In this mini-review, the isolation, structure elucidation, and antimicrobial activities of these alkaloids are summarized.

  3. Direct detection of saponins in crude extracts of soapnuts by FTIR.

    PubMed

    Almutairi, Meshari Saad; Ali, Muhammad

    2015-01-01

    Direct detection of saponins in soapnuts (Sapindus mukorossi) using Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy is investigated in this project. Potassium bromide powder was mixed with extracted powder of soapnuts and compressed to a thin pellet for examination process. The outcome of the FTIR spectra of saponin demonstrated characteristic triterpenoid saponin absorptions of OH, C = O, C-H, and C = C, while the glycoside linkages to the sapogenins were indicated by the absorptions of C-O. The significance of this study is that saponin absorption peaks are directly detectable in crude aqueous and 95% ethanol extracts of soapnuts powder using FTIR spectroscopy, thereby eliminating the need of further expensive and exhaustive purification steps. The extracts of soapnuts were screened for saponins along with controls by phytochemical tests, and advanced spectroscopic techniques such as ultra fast liquid chromatography and ultra performance liquid chromatography quadrupole-time of flight-mass spectrometry were also implemented to validate the saponins.

  4. Preliminary Phytochemical Screening, Quantitative Analysis of Alkaloids, and Antioxidant Activity of Crude Plant Extracts from Ephedra intermedia Indigenous to Balochistan.

    PubMed

    Gul, Rahman; Jan, Syed Umer; Faridullah, Syed; Sherani, Samiullah; Jahan, Nusrat

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the antioxidant activity, screening the phytogenic chemical compounds, and to assess the alkaloids present in the E. intermedia to prove its uses in Pakistani folk medicines for the treatment of asthma and bronchitis. Antioxidant activity was analyzed by using 2,2-diphenyl-1-picryl-hydrazyl-hydrate assay. Standard methods were used for the identification of cardiac glycosides, phenolic compounds, flavonoids, anthraquinones, and alkaloids. High performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) was used for quantitative purpose of ephedrine alkaloids in E. intermedia. The quantitative separation was confirmed on Shimadzu 10AVP column (Shampack) of internal diameter (id) 3.0 mm and 50 mm in length. The extract of the solute in flow rate of 1 ml/min at the wavelength 210 nm and methanolic extract showed the antioxidant activity and powerful oxygen free radicals scavenging activities and the IC50 for the E. intermedia plant was near to the reference standard ascorbic acid. The HPLC method was useful for the quantitative purpose of ephedrine (E) and pseudoephedrine (PE) used for 45 samples of one species collected from central habitat in three districts (Ziarat, Shairani, and Kalat) of Balochistan. Results showed that average alkaloid substance in E. intermedia was as follows: PE (0.209%, 0.238%, and 0.22%) and E (0.0538%, 0.0666%, and 0.0514%).

  5. Preliminary Phytochemical Screening, Quantitative Analysis of Alkaloids, and Antioxidant Activity of Crude Plant Extracts from Ephedra intermedia Indigenous to Balochistan

    PubMed Central

    Jan, Syed Umer; Faridullah, Syed; Sherani, Samiullah; Jahan, Nusrat

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the antioxidant activity, screening the phytogenic chemical compounds, and to assess the alkaloids present in the E. intermedia to prove its uses in Pakistani folk medicines for the treatment of asthma and bronchitis. Antioxidant activity was analyzed by using 2,2-diphenyl-1-picryl-hydrazyl-hydrate assay. Standard methods were used for the identification of cardiac glycosides, phenolic compounds, flavonoids, anthraquinones, and alkaloids. High performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) was used for quantitative purpose of ephedrine alkaloids in E. intermedia. The quantitative separation was confirmed on Shimadzu 10AVP column (Shampack) of internal diameter (id) 3.0 mm and 50 mm in length. The extract of the solute in flow rate of 1 ml/min at the wavelength 210 nm and methanolic extract showed the antioxidant activity and powerful oxygen free radicals scavenging activities and the IC50 for the E. intermedia plant was near to the reference standard ascorbic acid. The HPLC method was useful for the quantitative purpose of ephedrine (E) and pseudoephedrine (PE) used for 45 samples of one species collected from central habitat in three districts (Ziarat, Shairani, and Kalat) of Balochistan. Results showed that average alkaloid substance in E. intermedia was as follows: PE (0.209%, 0.238%, and 0.22%) and E (0.0538%, 0.0666%, and 0.0514%). PMID:28386582

  6. The Genus Diphasiastrum and Its Lycopodium Alkaloids.

    PubMed

    Halldorsdottir, Elsa Steinunn; Kowal, Natalia Magdalena; Olafsdottir, Elin Soffia

    2015-08-01

    The genus Diphasiastrum includes at least 23 species distributed primarily across the northern temperate and subarctic areas of the world. These plants produce an array of lycopodium alkaloids, and some species such as Diphasiastrum complanatum have been used in traditional medicine for ages for various conditions. Hybridization is common in this group of plants and they have always been a challenge for taxonomists and other scientists studying them. To date, 11 Diphasiastrum species have been reported to produce lycopodium alkaloids. In this review, reported alkaloids and their distribution patterns across these species along with taxonomical and bioactivity considerations are reviewed and discussed.

  7. 4-Quinolone alkaloids from Melochia odorata.

    PubMed

    Jadulco, Raquel C; Pond, Christopher D; Van Wagoner, Ryan M; Koch, Michael; Gideon, Osia G; Matainaho, Teatulohi K; Piskaut, Pius; Barrows, Louis R

    2014-01-24

    The methanol extract of Melochia odorata yielded three 4-quinolone alkaloids including waltherione A (1) and two new alkaloids, waltherione C (2) and waltherione D (3). Waltheriones A and C showed significant activities in an in vitro anti-HIV cytoprotection assay at concentrations of 56.2 and 0.84 μM and inhibition of HIV P24 formation of more than 50% at 1.7 and 0.95 μM, respectively. The structures of the alkaloids were established by spectroscopic data interpretation.

  8. 4-Quinolone Alkaloids from Melochia odorata

    PubMed Central

    Jadulco, Raquel C.; Pond, Christopher D.; Van Wagoner, Ryan M.; Koch, Michael; Gideon, Osia G.; Matainaho, Teatulohi K.; Piskaut, Pius; Barrows, Louis R.

    2014-01-01

    The methanol extract of Melochia odorata yielded three 4-quinolone alkaloids including waltherione A (1) and two new alkaloids, waltherione C (2) and waltherione D (3). Waltheriones A and C showed significant activities in an in vitro anti-HIV cytoprotection assay at concentrations of 56.2 and 0.84 μM, and inhibition of HIV P24 formation of more than 50% at 1.7 and 0.95 μM, respectively. The structures of the alkaloids were established by spectroscopic data interpretation. PMID:24392742

  9. Synthesis of morphine alkaloids and derivatives.

    PubMed

    Rinner, Uwe; Hudlicky, Tomas

    2012-01-01

    This review summarizes recent developments in the total synthesis of morphine alkaloids and some of the semisynthetic derivatives. The literature is covered for the period of 5 years after the publication of the last review in 2005. The syntheses that appeared in this period are covered in detail and are placed in the context of all syntheses of opiate alkaloids since the original one published by Gates in 1952. The introduction covers the historical aspects of total synthesis of these alkaloids. The synthesis of some of the medicinally useful derivatives is reviewed in the last section along with some of the methodology required for their preparation.

  10. Isoquinoline and isoindole alkaloids from Menispermum dauricum.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiaoqi; Ye, Wencai; Zhao, Shouxun; Che, Chun-Tao

    2004-04-01

    Three isoquinoline alkaloids and an isoindole alkaloid, along with eight known compounds, were isolated from the roots of Menispermum dauricum (Menispermacese). The alkaloids were characterized as 7-hydroxy-6-methoxy-1(2H)-isoquinolinone, 6,7-dimethoxy-N-methyl-3,4-dioxo-1(2H)-isoquinolinone, 1-(4-hydroxybenzoyl)-7-hydroxy-6-methoxy-isoquinoline and 6-hydroxy-5-methoxy-N-methylphthalimide, on the basis of spectral evidence including 1D- and 2D-NMR and MS analyses.

  11. Gelsemium alkaloids, immunosuppressive agents from Gelsemium elegans.

    PubMed

    Xu, You-Kai; Liao, Shang-Gao; Na, Zhi; Hu, Hua-Bin; Li, Yan; Luo, Huai-Rong

    2012-09-01

    Bioassay-guided isolation of the stems of Gelsemium elegans has led to the isolation of two new Gelsemium alkaloids, 21-(2-oxopropyl)-koumine (1) and 11-methoxygelselegine (2), and two known alkaloids, koumine (3) and gelselegine (4). The structures of 1-2 were determined by spectroscopic (for both) and single-crystal X-ray diffraction (for 1) analysis. All compounds isolated were evaluated for their potential as immunosuppressive agents and the data suggested that Gelsemium alkaloids of different structural types possibly have potential as immunosuppressive agents.

  12. Racemic alkaloids from the fungus Ganoderma cochlear.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xin-Long; Dou, Man; Luo, Qi; Cheng, Li-Zhi; Yan, Yong-Ming; Li, Rong-Tao; Cheng, Yong-Xian

    2017-01-01

    Seven pairs of new alkaloid enantiomers, ganocochlearines C-I (1, 3-8), and three pairs of known alkaloids were isolated from the fruiting bodies of Ganoderma cochlear. The chemical structures of new compounds were elucidated on the basis of 1D and 2D NMR data. The absolute configurations of compounds 1, 3-10 were assigned by ECD calculations. Biological activities of these isolates against renal fibrosis were accessed in rat normal or diseased renal interstitial fibroblast cells. Importantly, the plausible biosynthetic pathway for this class of alkaloids was originally proposed.

  13. Polycyclic Guanidine Alkaloids from Poecilosclerida Marine Sponges.

    PubMed

    Sfecci, Estelle; Lacour, Thierry; Amade, Philippe; Mehiri, Mohamed

    2016-04-09

    Sessile marine sponges provide an abundance of unique and diversified scaffolds. In particular, marine guanidine alkaloids display a very wide range of biological applications. A large number of cyclic guanidine alkaloids, including crambines, crambescins, crambescidins, batzelladines or netamins have been isolated from Poecilosclerida marine sponges. In this review, we will explore the chemodiversity of tri- and pentacyclic guanidine alkaloids. NMR and MS data tools will also be provided, and an overview of the wide range of bioactivities of crambescidins and batzelladines derivatives will be given.

  14. Marine Pyridoacridine Alkaloids: Biosynthesis and Biological Activities.

    PubMed

    Ibrahim, Sabrin R M; Mohamed, Gamal A

    2016-01-01

    Pyridoacridines are a class of strictly marine-derived alkaloids that constitute one of the largest chemical families of marine alkaloids. During the last few years, both natural pyridoacridines and their analogues have constituted excellent targets for synthetic works. They have been the subject of intense study due to their significant biological activities; cytotoxic, antibacterial, antifungal, antiviral, insecticidal, anti-HIV, and anti-parasitic activities. In the present review, 95 pyridoacridine alkaloids isolated from marine organisms are discussed in term of their occurrence, biosynthesis, biological activities, and structural assignment.

  15. A saponin-detoxifying enzyme mediates suppression of plant defences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouarab, K.; Melton, R.; Peart, J.; Baulcombe, D.; Osbourn, A.

    2002-08-01

    Plant disease resistance can be conferred by constitutive features such as structural barriers or preformed antimicrobial secondary metabolites. Additional defence mechanisms are activated in response to pathogen attack and include localized cell death (the hypersensitive response). Pathogens use different strategies to counter constitutive and induced plant defences, including degradation of preformed antimicrobial compounds and the production of molecules that suppress induced plant defences. Here we present evidence for a two-component process in which a fungal pathogen subverts the preformed antimicrobial compounds of its host and uses them to interfere with induced defence responses. Antimicrobial saponins are first hydrolysed by a fungal saponin-detoxifying enzyme. The degradation product of this hydrolysis then suppresses induced defence responses by interfering with fundamental signal transduction processes leading to disease resistance.

  16. Acetylated triterpene saponins from the Thai medicinal plant, Sapindus emarginatus.

    PubMed

    Kanchanapoom, T; Kasai, R; Yamasaki, K

    2001-09-01

    From the pericarps of Sapindus emarginatus (Sapindaceae), three new acetylated triterpene saponins were isolated together with hederagenin and five known triterpene saponins, as well as one known sweet acyclic sesquiterpene glycoside, mukurozioside IIb. The structures of new compounds were elucidated as hederagenin 3-O-(2-O-acetyl-beta-D-xylopyranosyl)-(1-->3)-alpha-L-rhamnopyranosyl-(1-->2)-alpha-L-arabinopyranoside, 23-O-acetyl-hederagenin 3-O-(4-O-acetyl-beta-D-xylopyranosyl)-(1-->3)-alpha-L-rhamnopyranosyl-(1-->2)-alpha-L-arabinopyranoside and oleanolic acid 3-O-(4-O-acetyl-beta-D-xylopyranosyl)-(1-->3)-alpha-L-rhamnopyranosyl-(1-->2)-alpha-L-arabinopyranoside by chemical and spectroscopic data.

  17. Two new triterpenoid saponins from the leaves of Ilex kudingcha.

    PubMed

    Zuo, Wen-Jian; Dai, Hao-Fu; Zeng, Yan-Bo; Wang, Hui; Chen, Hui-Qin; Wang, Jin-Hui

    2012-01-01

    Two new triterpene saponins, ilekudinchosides F (1) and G (2), along with three known saponins were isolated from the leaves of Ilex kudingcha C. J. Tseng. The new compounds were characterized as 3β,19α-dihydroxy-12α-ethoxy-urs-13(18)-ene-28,20β-lactone-3-O-[β-D-glucopyranosyl(1 → 3)]-[α-L-rhamnopyranosyl(1 → 2)]-α-L-arabinopyranoside (1) and 3β,19α-dihydroxy-12α-methoxy-urs-13(18)-ene-28,20β-lactone-3-O-[α-L-rhamnopyranosyl(1 → 2)]-α-L-arabinopyranoside (2). The new structures were elucidated by spectroscopic methods including 1D and 2D NMR, HR-TOF-MS, and CD spectrometry, and the known compounds were identified by the comparison of their NMR and HR-TOF-MS data with those reported in the literature.

  18. A new bioactive steroidal saponin from Agave shrevei.

    PubMed

    da Silva, Bernadete Pereira; Parente, José Paz

    2005-01-01

    A new steroidal saponin was isolated from the leaves of Agave shrevei Gentry. Its structure was established as 26-(beta-D-glucopyranosyloxy)-22-methoxy-3-(O-beta-D-glucopyranosyl-(1-->2)O-[O-beta-D-glucopyranosyl-(1-->4)-O-[O-beta-D-glucopyranosyl-(1-->6)]-O-beta-D-glucopyranosyl(1-->4)-beta-D-galactopyranosyl]oxy)-(3beta,5alpha,25R)-furostane. The structural identification was performed using detailed analyses of 1H and 13C NMR spectra including 2D NMR spectroscopic techniques (COSY, HETCOR, and COLOC) and chemical conversions. The steroidal saponin showed absence of haemolytic effects in the in vitro assay, but demonstrated a significant inhibition of the capillary permeability activity.

  19. New steroidal saponins from rhizomes of Costus spiralis.

    PubMed

    da Silva, Bernadete P; Parente, José P

    2004-01-01

    Two new steroidal saponins were isolated from the rhizomes of Costus spiralis Rosc. Their structures were established as (3beta,25R)-26-(beta-D-glucopyranosyloxy)-22-hydroxyfurost-5-en-3-yl O-D-apio-beta-D-furanosyl-(1-->2)-O-[alpha-L-rhamnopyranosyl-(1-->4)]-beta-D-glucopyranoside (1) and (3beta,25R)-26-(beta-D-glucopyranosyloxy)-22-hydroxyfurost-5-en-3-yl O-D-apio-beta-D-furanosyl-(1-->4)-O-[alpha-L-rhamnopyranosyl-(1-->2)]-beta-D-glucopyranoside (2). Their structural identifications were performed using detailed analyses of 1H and 13C NMR spectra including 2D NMR spectroscopic techniques (DEPT, COSY, HETCOR and COLOC) and chemical conversions. The steroidal saponins were evaluated for anti-inflammatory activity.

  20. A new bioactive steroidal saponin from Agave attenuata.

    PubMed

    da Silva, Bernadete P; de Sousa, Allyne C; Silva, Graziela M; Mendes, Tatiana P; Parente, José P

    2002-01-01

    A new steroidal saponin was isolated from the leaves of Agave attenuata Salm-Dyck. Its structure was established as (3beta,5beta,22alpha,25S)-26-(beta-D-glucopyranosyloxy)-22-methoxyfurostan-3-yl O-beta-D-glucopyranosyl-(1-->2)-beta-D-glucopyranosyl-(1-->2)-O-[beta-D-glucopyranosyl-(1-->3)]-beta-D-glucopyranosyl-(1-->4)-beta-D-galactopyranoside. The structural identification was performed using detailed analyses of 1H and 13C NMR spectra including 2D NMR spectroscopic techniques (COSY, HETCOR and COLOC) and chemical conversions. The haemolytic potential of the steroidal saponin was evaluated and the anti-inflammatory activity was performed using the capillary permeability assay.

  1. Triterpene saponins from the roots of Acacia albida Del. (Mimosaceae).

    PubMed

    Tchoukoua, Abdou; Tabopda, Turibio Kuiate; Uesugi, Shota; Ohno, Misa; Kimura, Ken-Ichi; Kwon, Eunsang; Momma, Hiroyuki; Horo, Ibrahim; Çalişkan, Özgen Alankuş; Shiono, Yoshihito; Ngadjui, Bonaventure Tchaleu

    2017-04-01

    Seven previously undescribed bidesmosidic triterpenoid saponins named albidosides A - G, were isolated from a methanol extract of the roots of Acacia albida. Their structures were elucidated using 1D and 2D NMR spectroscopy and mass spectrometry and determined to be bidesmosides of oleanolic acid and of 16α-hydroxyoleanolic acid. Albidosides B - G were assayed for their cytotoxicity against HeLa and HL60 cells using MTT method and microscopic observation.

  2. Structural determination of two new steroidal saponins from Smilax china.

    PubMed

    Huang, Hui-Lian; Liu, Rong-Hua; Shao, Feng

    2009-09-01

    Two new steroidal saponins (1 and 2) were isolated from the BuOH fraction of the 70% EtOH extract of the tubes of Smilax china, together with four known analogues, 3-6. The structures of the new compounds were elucidated by means of chemical evidence and spectroscopic analyses, including HR-MS, IR, (1)H- and (13)C-NMR, and 2D experiments ((1)H-(1)H COSY, HSQC and HMBC).

  3. Steroidal saponins and pregnane glycosides from Smilax microphylla.

    PubMed

    Lin, Tao; Huang, Hui-Lian; Liu, Rong-Hua; Shu, Ji-Cheng; Ren, Gang; Shao, Feng; Liu, Li-sha

    2012-12-01

    Six steroidal saponins and two pregnane glycosides were isolated from the BuOH subfraction of 70% EtOH extract of Smilax microphylla C.H.Wright, among them two were new compounds (1 and 7). Pregnane glycosides were firstly isolated from the genus Smilax (Smilacaceae). Structures of the new compounds were determined on the basis of HR-ESI-MS, 1D and 2D NMR spectroscopic analysis.

  4. [Isolation and identification of a saponine from Patrinia scabiosaefolia].

    PubMed

    Yan, B; Ding, L; Shen, D; Chen, Y; Pei, Y

    1999-04-01

    A saponine compound was isolated from the acetone extract of the roots and rhizomes of Patrinia scabiosaefolia Fish. ex Link. Its structure was identified by combination of chemical reaction and spectrum analysis as 3-O-alpha-L-rhamnopyranosyl-(1-2)-beta-D-xylopyranosyl oleanolic acid (giganteaside D), and part of its 13C-NMR data was revised by the 2D-NMR. The compound was found in the Patrinia for the first time.

  5. Triterpenes and triterpenoid saponins from the leaves of Ilex kudincha.

    PubMed

    Zuo, Wen-Jian; Dai, Hao-Fu; Chen, Jing; Chen, Hui-Qin; Zhao, You-Xing; Mei, Wen-Li; Li, Xian; Wang, Jin-Hui

    2011-11-01

    One new triterpene, kudinchalactone A (1), and four new triterpenoid saponins, ilekudinchosides A-D (2- 5), were isolated from the leaves of Ilex kudincha C. J. Tseng along with eight known triterpenoids. These new compounds were elucidated by spectroscopic methods including 1D and 2D NMR, HR-TOF-MS, and CD spectra. Compounds 2, 3, 12, and 13 showed antibacterial activities against Staphylococcus aureus (SA) and methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA).

  6. Antiviral triterpenoid saponins from the roots of Ilex asprella.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Min; Xu, Min; Ma, Xiao-Xia; Zheng, Kai; Yang, Ke; Yang, Chong-Ren; Wang, Yi-Fei; Zhang, Ying-Jun

    2012-10-01

    Two new sulfur-containing triterpenoid saponins, asprellanosides A (1) and B (2), were isolated from the roots of Ilex asprella, together with 10 known compounds (3-12). An in vitro anti-HSV-1 activity test of the isolates (1-4, 6-7, and 9-12) showed that only asprellanoside A (1) and oblonganoside H (6) exhibited anti-HSV-1 activity with TIC values of 0.14 and 0.18 mM, respectively.

  7. Two new triterpenoid saponins from Dianthus superbus L.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xia; Luo, Jian-Guang; Kong, Ling-Yi

    2010-06-01

    Two new triterpenoid saponins (1 and 2) were isolated from the dried aerial parts of Dianthus superbus L. (Caryophyllaceae). Their structures were elucidated on the basis of spectral data to be 3-O-beta-D-glucopyranosyl olean-9(11),12-diene-23,28-dioic acid 28-O-beta-D-glucopyranoside (1) and 3-O-beta-D-glucopyranosyl olean-11,13(18)-diene-23,28-dioic acid 28-O-beta-D-glucopyranoside (2).

  8. Cytotoxic triterpenoid saponins from Lysimachia foenum-graecum.

    PubMed

    Dai, Lu-Mei; Huang, Ri-Zhen; Zhang, Bin; Hua, Jing; Wang, Heng-Shan; Liang, Dong

    2017-04-01

    Eleven oleanane-type triterpenoid saponins, foegraecumosides A-K, and eight known ones, were isolated from the aerial parts of Lysimachia foenum-graecum. Their structures were elucidated by spectroscopic data analyses and chemical methods. All isolated saponins were evaluated for their cytotoxicity against four human cancer cell lines (NCI-H460, MGC-803, HepG2, and T24). Seven saponins containing the aglycone cyclamiretin A exhibited moderate cytotoxicity against all tested human cancer cell lines, with IC50 values of 9.3-24.5 μM. Simultaneously, the cytotoxic activities of foegraecumosides A and B, lysichriside A, ardisiacrispins A and B, cyclaminorin, and 3-O-α-L-rhamnopyranosyl-(1 → 2)-β-d-glucopyranosyl-(1 → 4)-α-l-arabinopyranosyl-cyclamiretin A were tested on drug-resistant lung cancer cell lines (A549 and A549/CDDP, respectively). Ardisiacrispin B displayed moderate cytotoxicity against A549/CDDP, with an IC50 value of 8.7 μM and a resistant factor (RF) of 0.9.

  9. Triterpenoid saponins from the fruits and galls of Sapindus mukorossi.

    PubMed

    Huang, Hui-Chi; Wu, Ming-Der; Tsai, Wei-Jern; Liao, Sin-Chung; Liaw, Chia-Ching; Hsu, Li-Chuan; Wu, Yang-Chang; Kuo, Yao-Haur

    2008-05-01

    Six saponins, sapinmusaponin K (1) [hederagenin-3-O-(3-O-acetyl-alpha-L-arabinopyranosyl)-(1-->3)-alpha-L-rhamnopyranosyl-(1-->2)-alpha-L-arabinopyranoside], sapinmusaponin L (2) [hederagenin-3-O-(4-O-acetyl-alpha-L-arabinopyranosyl)-(1-->3)-alpha-L-rhamnopyranosyl-(1-->2)-alpha-L-arabino-pyranoside], sapinmusaponin M (3) [hederagenin-3-O-(2,3-O-diacetyl-beta-D-xylopyranosyl)-(1-->3)-alpha-L-rhamnopyranosyl-(1-->2)-alpha-L-arabinopyranoside], sapinmusaponin N (4) [hederagenin-3-O-(2,4-O-diacetyl-beta-D-xylopyranosyl)-(1-->3)-alpha-L-rhamnopyranosyl-(1-->2)-alpha-L-arabinopyranoside], sapinmusaponin O (5) [3,7,20(S)-trihydroxydammar-24-ene-3-O-alpha-L-rhamnopyranosyl-(1-->2)-beta-D-glucopyranoside], and sapinmusaponin P (6) [3,7,20(R)-trihydroxydammar-24-ene-3-O-alpha-L-rhamnopyranosyl-(1-->2)-beta-d-glucopyranoside], along with seven known saponins (7-13), were isolated from fruits and the galls of Sapindus mukorossi. Their structures were elucidated by 1D and 2D NMR spectroscopic techniques and acid hydrolysis. Biological evaluation indicated that saponins 1-4 and 7-13 showed moderate cytotoxicity against several human tumor cell lines.

  10. Hepatoprotective triterpene saponins from the roots of Glycyrrhiza inflata.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Yun-Feng; Wei, Juan-Hua; Fang, Shi-Qi; Tang, Yu-Ping; Cheng, Hai-Bo; Wang, Tian-Lin; Li, Cun-Yu; Peng, Guo-Ping

    2015-04-09

    Two novel oleanane-type triterpene saponins, licorice-saponin P2 (1) and licorice-saponin Q2 (3), together with nine known compounds 2, 4-11, have been isolated from the water extract of the roots of Glycyrrhiza inflata. The structures of these compounds were elucidated on the basis of spectroscopic analysis, including 2D-NMR experiments (1H-1H COSY, HSQC, HMBC and ROESY). In in vitro assays, compounds 2-4, 6 and 11 showed significant hepatoprotective activities by lowering the ALT and AST levels in primary rat hepatocytes injured by D-galactosamine (D-GalN). In addition, compounds 2-4, 6, 7 and 11 were found to inhibit the activity of PLA2 with IC50 values of 6.9 μM, 3.6 μM, 16.9 μM, 27.1 μM, 32.2 μM and 9.3 μM, respectively, which might be involved in the regulation of the hepatoprotective activities observed.

  11. Foam Properties and Detergent Abilities of the Saponins from Camellia oleifera

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yu-Fen; Yang, Chao-Hsun; Chang, Ming-Shiang; Ciou, Yong-Ping; Huang, Yu-Chun

    2010-01-01

    The defatted seed meal of Camellia oleifera has been used as a natural detergent and its extract is commercially utilized as a foam-stabilizing and emulsifying agent. The goal of this study was to investigate the foam properties and detergent ability of the saponins from the defatted seed meal of C. oleifera. The crude saponin content in the defatted seed meal of C. oleifera was 8.34 and the total saponins content in the crude saponins extract was 39.5% (w/w). The foaming power of the 0.5 crude saponins extract solution from defatted seed meal of C. oleifera was 37.1 of 0.5 SLS solution and 51.3% to that of 0.5% Tween 80 solution. The R5 value of 86.0% represents good foam stability of the crude saponins extracted from the defatted seed meal of the plant. With the reduction of water surface tension from 72 mN/m to 50.0 mN/m, the 0.5% crude saponins extract solution has wetting ability. The sebum-removal experiment indicated that the crude saponins extract has moderate detergency. The detergent abilities of the saponins from C. oleifera and Sapindus mukorossi were also compared. PMID:21151446

  12. Foam properties and detergent abilities of the saponins from Camellia oleifera.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yu-Fen; Yang, Chao-Hsun; Chang, Ming-Shiang; Ciou, Yong-Ping; Huang, Yu-Chun

    2010-11-04

    The defatted seed meal of Camellia oleifera has been used as a natural detergent and its extract is commercially utilized as a foam-stabilizing and emulsifying agent. The goal of this study was to investigate the foam properties and detergent ability of the saponins from the defatted seed meal of C. oleifera. The crude saponin content in the defatted seed meal of C. oleifera was 8.34 and the total saponins content in the crude saponins extract was 39.5% (w/w). The foaming power of the 0.5 crude saponins extract solution from defatted seed meal of C. oleifera was 37.1 of 0.5 SLS solution and 51.3% to that of 0.5% Tween 80 solution. The R5 value of 86.0% represents good foam stability of the crude saponins extracted from the defatted seed meal of the plant. With the reduction of water surface tension from 72 mN/m to 50.0 mN/m, the 0.5% crude saponins extract solution has wetting ability. The sebum-removal experiment indicated that the crude saponins extract has moderate detergency. The detergent abilities of the saponins from C. oleifera and Sapindus mukorossi were also compared.

  13. Application of aqueous saponin on the remediation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons-contaminated soil.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Takayuki; Kaminaga, Hirohisa; Navarro, Ronald R; Iimura, Yosuke

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this research was to evaluate the feasibility of aqueous saponin for the removal and biodegradation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) from contaminated soil. Dissolution test confirmed the ability of saponin to increase the apparent solubility of the tested 3-5 rings PAH above the critical micelle concentration (approximately 1000 mg/L). Microbial test with pure culture of Sphingomonas sp. showed that saponin significantly enhanced the degradation of pyrene. For example, the percent degradation was 2.1 times higher in the presence of 2500 mg/L saponin than that of control without saponin after 60 hours incubation at around 10(8) CFU/mL initial cell loading. These results suggest that the binding of pyrene with saponin does not pose a serious constraint to bacterial uptake. Contrary to pyrene, saponin was chemically stable against the PAHs degrader. It is also not toxic to the cell at least up to 2500 mg/L. Finally, using a spiked soil sample, extraction tests with 10,000 mg/L of saponin showed that around 52.7% and 0.3% of pyrene was removed from low and high organic spiked soils, respectively. The results from this study indicate that aqueous saponin is appropriate as a washing agent as well as biodegradation enhancer for the detoxification of PAHs-contaminated low organic carbon soil.

  14. Bioactive constituents of oleanane-type triterpene saponins from the roots of Glycyrrhiza glabra.

    PubMed

    Wei, Juan-Hua; Zheng, Yun-Feng; Li, Cun-Yu; Tang, Yu-Ping; Peng, Guo-Ping

    2014-01-01

    Three new oleanane-type triterpene saponins, namely licorice-saponin M3 (1), licorice-saponin N4 (2), and licorice-saponin O4 (3), an artificial product (4), as well as five known triterpene glucuronides (5-9), were isolated from the roots of Glycyrrhiza glabra L. Their structures were established using 1D and 2D NMR spectroscopy, mass spectrometry, and by comparison with spectroscopic data reported in the literature. The inhibitory effects of the selected compounds on neuraminidase were evaluated, and the preliminary structure-activity relationship was also predicted.

  15. Qualitative and Quantitative Saponin Contents in Five Sea Cucumbers from the Indian Ocean

    PubMed Central

    Van Dyck, Séverine; Gerbaux, Pascal; Flammang, Patrick

    2010-01-01

    To avoid predation, holothuroids produce feeding-deterrent molecules in their body wall and viscera, the so-called saponins. Five tropical sea cucumber species of the family Holothuriidae were investigated in order to study their saponin content in two different organs, the body wall and the Cuvierian tubules. Mass spectrometry techniques (MALDI- and ESI-MS) were used to detect and analyze saponins. The smallest number of saponins was observed in Holothuria atra, which contained a total of four congeners, followed by Holothuria leucospilota, Pearsonothuria graeffei and Actinopyga echinites with six, eight and ten congeners, respectively. Bohadschia subrubra revealed the highest saponin diversity (19 congeners). Saponin mixtures also varied between the two body compartments within a given animal. A semi-quantitative approach completed these results and showed that a high diversity of saponins is not particularly correlated to a high saponin concentration. Although the complexity of the saponin mixtures described makes the elucidation of their respective biological roles difficult, the comparisons between species and between body compartments give some clues about how these molecules may act as predator repellents. PMID:20161976

  16. Qualitative and quantitative saponin contents in five sea cucumbers from the Indian ocean.

    PubMed

    Van Dyck, Séverine; Gerbaux, Pascal; Flammang, Patrick

    2010-01-21

    To avoid predation, holothuroids produce feeding-deterrent molecules in their body wall and viscera, the so-called saponins. Five tropical sea cucumber species of the family Holothuriidae were investigated in order to study their saponin content in two different organs, the body wall and the Cuvierian tubules. Mass spectrometry techniques (MALDI- and ESI-MS) were used to detect and analyze saponins. The smallest number of saponins was observed in Holothuria atra, which contained a total of four congeners, followed by Holothuria leucospilota, Pearsonothuria graeffei and Actinopyga echinites with six, eight and ten congeners, respectively. Bohadschia subrubra revealed the highest saponin diversity (19 congeners). Saponin mixtures also varied between the two body compartments within a given animal. A semi-quantitative approach completed these results and showed that a high diversity of saponins is not particularly correlated to a high saponin concentration. Although the complexity of the saponin mixtures described makes the elucidation of their respective biological roles difficult, the comparisons between species and between body compartments give some clues about how these molecules may act as predator repellents.

  17. Flavonoid glucuronides from Helicteres isora.

    PubMed

    Kamiya, K; Saiki, Y; Hama, T; Fujimoto, Y; Endang, H; Umar, M; Satake, T

    2001-05-01

    Five flavonoid glucuronides were obtained from the fruit of Helicteres isora, three of which were previously unknown compounds: isoscutellarein 4'-methyl ether 8-O-beta-D-glucuronide 6"-n-butyl ester. isoscutellarein 4'-methyl ether 8-O-beta-D-glucuronide 2", 4"-disulfate and isoscutellarein 8-O-beta-D-glucuronide 2",4"-disulfate. The structures were determined on the basis of spectroscopy and hydrolysis experiments.

  18. Pharmacokinetic studies of active triterpenoid saponins and the total secondary saponin from Anemone raddeana Regel.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Dandan; Lei, Tianli; Lv, Chongning; Zhao, Huimin; Xu, Haiyan; Lu, Jincai

    2017-02-15

    The rhizome of Anemone raddeana Regel, a Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) which has a robust history treating rheumatism and neuralgia. The total secondary saponin (TSS) from it has demonstrated antitumor activity. In this study, a rapid and validated LC-MS/MS method was developed to simultaneously determine the active compounds (Hederacolchiside A1 and Eleutheroside K). Analytes were separated on a reverse-phase C18 column with acetonitrile-water (5mmol/L ammonium acetate) as the mobile phase. This assay showed acceptable linearity (r>0.99) over the concentration range 5-1000 nmol/L for two analytes. The intra- and inter-day precision was within 8.06% and accuracy was ranged from -3.16% to 3.34% for two analytes. The mean extraction recoveries of analytes and IS from rat plasma were all more than 76.0%. Under the developed analytical conditions, the obtained values of main pharmacokinetic parameters (Cmax and AUC0-t) indicated that the pure compounds were more efficient than the TSS extract in Hederacolchiside A1 and Eleutheroside K absorption. In addition, pharmacokinetic studies of two individual compounds demonstrated their poor oral absorption in rat ((a)F%, 0.019-1.521). In the study of absorption and transportation of Hederacolchiside A1 and Eleutheroside K in Caco-2 cell monolayer model, the uptake permeability was in 10(-6)cm/sec range suggesting poor absorption, which confirmed the previous pharmacokinetic profiles in vivo. Interestingly, the uptake ratio of them declined significantly when treated with phloridzin (SGLT1 inhibitor). It indicated that the absorption of Hederacolchiside A1 in intestine was mainly through positive transport and SGLT1 might participate in its active absorption.

  19. Piperidine alkaloids: Human and food animal teratogens

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Piperidine alkaloids are acutely toxic to adult livestock species and produce musculoskeletal deformities in neonatal animals. These teratogenic effects include multiple congenital contracture (MCC) deformities and cleft palate in cattle, pigs, sheep, and goats. Poisonous plants containing teratogen...

  20. Steroidal alkaloid toxicity to fish embryos.

    PubMed

    Crawford, L; Kocan, R M

    1993-02-01

    Embryos of two species of fish were evaluated for their suitability as model systems for steroidal alkaloid toxicity, the Japanese rice fish, medaka (Oryzius latipes) and the rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss). Additionally, the equine neurotoxic sesquiterpene lactone repin, was also tested. A PROBIT program was used to evaluate the EC1, EC50 and EC99 as well as the associated confidence limits. The steroidal alkaloids tested were the Solanum potato glycoalkaloids alpha-chaconine, alpha-solanine, the aglyclones solanidine and solasodine and the Veratrum alkaloid, jervine. Embryo mortality, likely due to structural or functional abnormalities in the early development stages of the embryo, were the only response observed in both species. The rainbow trout exhibited a toxic response to chaconine, solasidine, repin and solanine but the medaka embryos were only affected by the compounds, chaconine and solanine. Rainbow trout may indeed serve as a good lower vertebrate model for studying the toxicity of steroidal alkaloids.

  1. Anxiolytic Activity of Diterpene Alkaloid Songorine.

    PubMed

    Nesterova, Yu V; Povet'eva, T N; Suslov, N I; Shults, E E; Ziuz'kov, G N; Aksinenko, S G; Afanas'eva, O G; Krapivin, A V; Kharina, T G

    2015-09-01

    Antianxiety action of diterpene alkaloid songorine was studied using Vogel conflict test. Songorine in a dose of 0.25 mg/kg demonstrated high anxiolytic activity comparable to that of phenazepam and produced no sedative effect.

  2. Antiprotozoal and antioxidant alkaloids from Alternanthera littoralis.

    PubMed

    Koolen, Hector H F; Pral, Elizabeth M F; Alfieri, Silvia C; Marinho, Jane V N; Serain, Alessandra F; Hernández-Tasco, Alvaro J; Andreazza, Nathalia L; Salvador, Marcos J

    2017-02-01

    Five alkaloids, in addition to hydroxytyrosol and uridine, were isolated from aerial parts of Alternanthera littoralis P. Beauv. Among the isolated compounds, alternamide A was an unusual tricyclic alkaloid with a bridged benzoazepine core. All isolated alkaloids have a catechol moiety, indicating a possible common biosynthetic route. Their structures were established by 1D and 2D NMR spectroscopy in combination with extensive tandem MS experiments by collisional induced dissociation (CID). The antiprotozoal activity of the isolated compounds was assayed against trypomastigote forms of Trypanosoma cruzi and amastigotes of Leishmania amazonensis. Alternamine A was the most active compound, reducing markedly the viability of both parasites. Antioxidant capacities evaluated by ORACFL assay showed that the isolated alkaloids (mainly alternamide B) contributed to the high activity recorded for the ethanolic crude extract; possibly, the catechol moiety present in all structures plays a central role in this result.

  3. Opiate alkaloids in Ascaris suum.

    PubMed

    Pryor, S C; Putnam, Jennifer; Hoo, Nanyamka

    2004-01-01

    The parasitic worm Ascaris suum contains the opiate alkaloids morphine and morphine-6-glucuronide as determined by HPLC coupled to electrochemical detection and by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry. The level of morphine in muscle tissue of female and male is 252 +/- 32.68, 1168 +/- 278 and 180 +/- 23.47 (ng/g of wet tissue), respectively. The level of M6G in muscle tissue of female and male is 167 +/- 28.37 and 92 +/- 11.45 (ng/g of wet tissue), respectively. Furthermore, Ascaris maintained for 5 days contained a significant amount of morphine, as did their medium, demonstrating their ability to synthesize the opiate alkaloid. The anatomic distribution of morphine was examined by indirect immunofluorescent staining and HPLC of various tissues dissected from male and female adult worms. Immunofluorescence revealed morphine in the subcuticle layers, in the animals' nerve chords and in the female reproductive organs. Morphine was found to be most prevalent in the muscle tissue and there is significantly more morphine in females than males, probably due to the large amounts in the female uterus. Morphine (10(-9) M) and morphine-6-glucuronide (10(-9) M) stimulated the release of NO from Ascaris muscle tissue. Naloxone (10(-7) M), and L-NAME (10(-6) M) blocked (P < 0.005) morphine-stimulated NO release from A. suum muscle. CTOP (10(-7) M) did not block morphine's NO release. However, naloxone could not block M6G stimulated NO release by muscle tissue, whereas CTOP (10(-7) M) blocked its release. These findings were in seeming contradiction to our inability to isolate a mu opiate receptor messenger RNA by RT-PCR using a human mu primer. This suggests that a novel mu opiate receptor was present and selective toward M6G.

  4. Spatial transcriptome analysis provides insights of key gene(s) involved in steroidal saponin biosynthesis in medicinally important herb Trillium govanianum

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Pradeep; Singh, Gagandeep; Bhandawat, Abhishek; Singh, Gopal; Parmar, Rajni; Seth, Romit; Sharma, Ram Kumar

    2017-01-01

    Trillium govanianum, an endangered medicinal herb native to the Himalaya, is less studied at the molecular level due to the non-availability of genomic resources. To facilitate the basic understanding of the key genes and regulatory mechanism of pharmaceutically important biosynthesis pathways, first spatial transcriptome sequencing of T. govanianum was performed. 151,622,376 (~11.5 Gb) high quality reads obtained using paired-end Illumina sequencing were de novo assembled into 69,174 transcripts. Functional annotation with multiple public databases identified array of genes involved in steroidal saponin biosynthesis and other secondary metabolite pathways including brassinosteroid, carotenoid, diterpenoid, flavonoid, phenylpropanoid, steroid and terpenoid backbone biosynthesis, and important TF families (bHLH, MYB related, NAC, FAR1, bZIP, B3 and WRKY). Differentially expressed large number of transcripts, together with CYPs and UGTs suggests involvement of these candidates in tissue specific expression. Combined transcriptome and expression analysis revealed that leaf and fruit tissues are the main site of steroidal saponin biosynthesis. In conclusion, comprehensive genomic dataset created in the current study will serve as a resource for identification of potential candidates for genetic manipulation of targeted bioactive metabolites and also contribute for development of functionally relevant molecular marker resource to expedite molecular breeding and conservation efforts in T. govanianum. PMID:28349986

  5. Alkaloids from Fissistigma latifolium (Dunal) Merr.

    PubMed

    Alias, Asmah; Hazni, Hazrina; Jaafar, Faridahanim Mohd; Awang, Khalijah; Ismail, Nor Hadiani

    2010-06-24

    A phytochemical study of the bark of Fissistigma latifolium (Annonaceae) yielded a new aporphine alkaloid, (-)-N-methylguattescidine (1), and eight known alkaloids: liriodenine (2), oxoxylopine (3), (-)-asimilobine (4), dimethyltryptamine (5), (-)-remerine (6), (-)-anonaine (7), columbamine (8) and lysicamine (9). The compounds were isolated using various chromatographic methods and structural elucidation was accomplished by means of spectroscopic methods, notably 1D-NMR ((1)H, (13)C, DEPT), 2D-NMR (COSY, HMQC, HMBC), UV, IR and MS.

  6. New furocarbazole alkaloids from Lonicera quinquelocularis.

    PubMed

    Khan, Dilfaraz; Khan, Shafiullah; Badshah, Syed; Ali, Hazrat; Ullah, Hamid; Muhammad, Zia; Woodward, Simon

    2016-01-01

    Two new furocarbazole alkaloids, 3-formyl-6,7-dimethoxy-furo[1,2]carbazole (1) and methyl-6,7-dimethoxy-furo[1,2]carbazole-3-carboxylate (2), along with two known carbazole alkaloids, 3-formyl-2-hydroxy-7-methoxycarbazole (3) and methyl 2,7-dimethoxycarbazole-3-carboxylate (4) were isolated from the ethyl acetate soluble fraction of Lonicera quinquelocularis. Their structures were established on the basis of spectroscopic analysis.

  7. Flavonoid Bioavailability and Attempts for Bioavailability Enhancement

    PubMed Central

    Thilakarathna, Surangi H.; Rupasinghe, H. P. Vasantha

    2013-01-01

    Flavonoids are a group of phytochemicals that have shown numerous health effects and have therefore been studied extensively. Of the six common food flavonoid classes, flavonols are distributed ubiquitously among different plant foods whereas appreciable amounts of isoflavones are found in leguminous plant-based foods. Flavonoids have shown promising health promoting effects in human cell culture, experimental animal and human clinical studies. They have shown antioxidant, hypocholesterolemic, anti-inflammatory effects as well as ability to modulate cell signaling and gene expression related disease development. Low bioavailability of flavonoids has been a concern as it can limit or even hinder their health effects. Therefore, attempts to improve their bioavailability in order to improve the efficacy of flavonoids are being studied. Further investigations on bioavailability are warranted as it is a determining factor for flavonoid biological activity. PMID:23989753

  8. [Intermolecular hydrogen bond between protein and flavonoid and its contribution to the stability of the flavonoids].

    PubMed

    Fang, Ru; Leng, Xiao-jing; Wu, Xia; Li, Qi; Hao, Rui-fang; Ren, Fa-zheng; Jing, Hao

    2012-01-01

    The interactions between three proteins (BSA, lysozyme and myoglobin) and three flavonoids (quercetin, kaempferol and rutin) were analyzed, using three-dimensional fluorescence spectrometry in combination with UV-Vis spectrometry and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy. The stabilities of unbound flavonoids and protein-bound flavonoids were compared. The correlation between the interaction and stability was analyzed. The results showed that the hydrophobic interaction was the main binding code in all proteins and flavonoids systems. However, the hydrogen bond has been involved merely in the BSA system. The stability of all three flavonoids (quercetin, kaempferol and rutin) was improved by BSA. There was a great correlation between the hydrogen bonding and the stability of the flavonoids in the presence of BSA. It suggested that the protection of BSA on the flavonoids was due to the intermolecular hydrogen bonding between BSA and flavonoid, and the stronger hydrogen bonding resulted in more protection.

  9. Screening of promising chemotherapeutic candidates from plants against human adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma (V): coumarins and alkaloids from Boenninghausenia japonica and Ruta graveolens.

    PubMed

    Nakano, Daisuke; Ishitsuka, Kenji; Matsuda, Narumi; Kouguchi, Ai; Tsuchihashi, Ryota; Okawa, Masafumi; Okabe, Hikaru; Tamura, Kazuo; Kinjo, Junei

    2017-01-01

    During the course of our studies towards the identification of promising chemotherapeutic candidates from plants against two human T-cell lymphotropic virus type I-infected T-cell lines (MT-1 and MT-2), we screened 17 extracts from 9 rutaceous plants against MT-1 and MT-2 cells. The extracts from the aerial parts and roots of Boenninghausenia japonica, as well as the leaves and roots of Ruta graveolens showed potent antiproliferative effects. After activity-guided fractionation, we isolated 44 compounds from two rutaceous plants, including three new compounds (1-3), which were classified into 26 coumarin analogs (13 coumarins, 8 furanocoumarins, 4 dihydrofuranocoumarins and one dihydropyranocoumarin), 15 alkaloid analogs (7 quinolone alkaloids, 4 acridone alkaloids, 3 furanoquinoline alkaloids and one tetrahydroacridone alkaloid) and 3 flavonoid glycosides. Structure-activity relationship studies were also evaluated. The coumarin compounds (2, 3 and 7-9) bearing a 3-dimethylallyl moiety showed potent activity. Similarly, of all the furanocoumarins evaluated in the current study, compound 17 bearing a 3-dimethylallyl group also showed potent activity. A dihydrofuranocoumarin (27) bearing a 3-dimethylallyl moiety showed the most potent activity. Following 27, compound 28 showed potent activity. These results therefore suggested that the presence of a 3-dimethylallyl moiety was important to the antiproliferative activity of these coumarin analogs.

  10. Hemolytic and cytotoxic properties of saponin purified from Holothuria leucospilota sea cucumber

    PubMed Central

    Soltani, Mozhgan; Parivar, Kazem; Baharara, Javad; Kerachian, Mohammad Amin; Asili, Javad

    2014-01-01

    Background: Holothuroids (sea cucumbers) are members of the phylum echinodermata, which produce saponins. Saponins exhibit a wide spectrum of pharmacological and biological activities. In this study, we isolated the crude saponins from the body wall of the dominant Iranian species of sea cucumber, Holothuria leucospilota (H. leucospilota). The purpose of this study was to confirm the presence of saponins in the Persian Gulf H. leucospilota and study the hemolytic and cytotoxic activities of these compounds. Methods: The body wall of sea cucumber was dried and powdered and the crude saponins were isolated using various solvents. The crude saponins were further purified by column chromatography using HP-20 resin. The foam test, Thin Layer Chromatography (TLC), hemolytic assay, and Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR) confirmed the presence of saponins. Cytotoxicity was analyzed using a 3-(4, 5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2, 5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay on A549 cells, a human lung cancer cell line. Results: The foam test, hemolytic assay, and TLC supported the presence of saponin compounds in the 80% ethanol fraction of H. leucospilota. The infrared (IR) spectrum of the extract showed hydroxyl (-OH), alkyl (C-H), ether (C-O) and ester (–C=O) absorption characteristic of teriterpenoid saponins. The C-O-C absorption indicated glycoside linkages to the sapogenins. The crude saponin extracted from sea cucumber was cytotoxic to A549 cells. Conclusion: The 80% ethanol fraction of saponin isolated from H. leucospilota exhibited hemolytic activity and offers promise as an anti-cancer candidate. PMID:26989736

  11. In vitro activity of CAY-1, a saponin from Capsicum frutescens, against microsporum and trichophyton species

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Dermatomycoses are among the world’s most common diseases. The incidence of dermatomycoses has increased over recent years, particularly in immunosuppressed patients. In previous studies, the saponin CAY-1, a saponin from cayenne pepper (Capsicum frutenses), has shown antifungal activities against...

  12. Structural Elucidation of Novel Saponins in the Sea Cucumber Holothuria lessoni

    PubMed Central

    Bahrami, Yadollah; Zhang, Wei; Chataway, Tim; Franco, Chris

    2014-01-01

    Sea cucumbers are prolific producers of a wide range of bioactive compounds. This study aimed to purify and characterize one class of compound, the saponins, from the viscera of the Australian sea cucumber Holothuria lessoni. The saponins were obtained by ethanolic extraction of the viscera and enriched by a liquid-liquid partition process and adsorption column chromatography. A high performance centrifugal partition chromatography (HPCPC) was applied to the saponin-enriched mixture to obtain saponins with high purity. The resultant purified saponins were profiled using MALDI-MS/MS and ESI-MS/MS which revealed the structure of isomeric saponins to contain multiple aglycones and/or sugar residues. We have elucidated the structure of five novel saponins, Holothurins D/E and Holothurinosides X/Y/Z, along with seven reported triterpene glycosides, including sulfated and non-sulfated saponins containing a range of aglycones and sugar moieties, from the viscera of H. lessoni. The abundance of novel compounds from this species holds promise for biotechnological applications. PMID:25110919

  13. Kinetic and equilibrium characteristics of sorption of saponin of Quillaja Saponaria Molina on chitosan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mironenko, N. V.; Smuseva, S. O.; Brezhneva, T. A.; Selemenev, V. F.

    2016-12-01

    The equilibrium and kinetic curves of the sorption of saponin of Quillaja saponaria molina on chitosan were analyzed. The inner diffusion was found to be limiting, and its coefficients were calculated. It was found that the form of the curves of the sorption isotherms of saponin is determined by the competing processes of association in solution and absorption by chitosan.

  14. Comparison of saponin composition and content in wild soybean (Glycine soja Sieb. and Zucc.) before and after germination.

    PubMed

    Krishnamurthy, Panneerselvam; Tsukamoto, Chigen; Takahashi, Yuya; Hongo, Yuji; Singh, Ram J; Lee, Jeong Dong; Chung, Gyuhwa

    2014-01-01

    Eight wild soybean accessions with different saponin phenotypes were used to examine saponin composition and relative saponin quantity in various tissues of mature seeds and two-week-old seedlings by LC-PDA/MS/MS. Saponin composition and content were varied according to tissues and accessions. The average total saponin concentration in 1 g mature dry seeds of wild soybean was 16.08 ± 3.13 μmol. In two-week-old seedlings, produced from 1 g mature seeds, it was 27.94 ± 6.52 μmol. Group A saponins were highly concentrated in seed hypocotyl (4.04 ± 0.71 μmol). High concentration of DDMP saponins (7.37 ± 5.22 μmol) and Sg-6 saponins (2.19 ± 0.59 μmol) was found in cotyledonary leaf. In seedlings, the amounts of group A and Sg-6 saponins reduced 2.3- and 1.3-folds, respectively, while DDMP + B + E saponins increased 2.5-fold than those of mature seeds. Our findings show that the group A and Sg-6 saponins in mature seeds were degraded and/or translocated by germination whereas DDMP saponins were newly synthesized.

  15. Alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.) shoot saponins: identification and bio-activity by the assessment of aphid feeding.

    PubMed

    Mazahery-Laghab, H; Yazdi-Samadi, B; Bagheri, M; Bagheri, A R

    2011-01-01

    Biochemical components in alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.), such as saponins, can act as protecting factors against bio-stresses. Saponins are also antifeedants and show oral toxicity towards higher and lower animals. Changes in saponins, such as variation in the carbon skeleton, or hydrolysis of saponin glycosides and other conjugates, may change their biological effects. The aims of this research were to study saponin variation in different growth stages of alfalfa and to investigate the biological role of saponins in the spotted alfalfa aphid, Therioaphis maculata. Saponins from alfalfa shoots in different growth stages were extracted, chemically purified and analysed by TLC. Specific saponins such as soyasaponin1 from root and shoot and two bisdesmosides of medicagenic acid, one from shoot and another from root tissues, were identified using reference compounds allowing changes in saponin composition during plant development in different shoot tissues of alfalfa to be assessed. The response of the alfalfa aphid to feeding on alfalfa in different growth stages was studied. No significant difference in the survival of aphids, from neonate to adult, was observed, but due to the antibiotic effects of saponins, two differences were found in the onset of nymph production and cumulative nymph production. The results show that the saponin composition in alfalfa changes with plant development and this, in turn, can often negatively affect the development of specific insect pests such as the spotted alfalfa aphid, suggesting a possible biological role of alfalfa saponins.

  16. Wine Flavonoids in Health and Disease Prevention.

    PubMed

    Fernandes, Iva; Pérez-Gregorio, Rosa; Soares, Susana; Mateus, Nuno; de Freitas, Victor

    2017-02-14

    Wine, and particularly red wine, is a beverage with a great chemical complexity that is in continuous evolution. Chemically, wine is a hydroalcoholic solution (~78% water) that comprises a wide variety of chemical components, including aldehydes, esters, ketones, lipids, minerals, organic acids, phenolics, soluble proteins, sugars and vitamins. Flavonoids constitute a major group of polyphenolic compounds which are directly associated with the organoleptic and health-promoting properties of red wine. However, due to the insufficient epidemiological and in vivo evidences on this subject, the presence of a high number of variables such as human age, metabolism, the presence of alcohol, the complex wine chemistry, and the wide array of in vivo biological effects of these compounds suggest that only cautious conclusions may be drawn from studies focusing on the direct effect of wine and any specific health issue. Nevertheless, there are several reports on the health protective properties of wine phenolics for several diseases such as cardiovascular diseases, some cancers, obesity, neurodegenerative diseases, diabetes, allergies and osteoporosis. The different interactions that wine flavonoids may have with key biological targets are crucial for some of these health-promoting effects. The interaction between some wine flavonoids and some specific enzymes are one example. The way wine flavonoids may be absorbed and metabolized could interfere with their bioavailability and therefore in their health-promoting effect. Hence, some reports have focused on flavonoids absorption, metabolism, microbiota effect and overall on flavonoids bioavailability. This review summarizes some of these major issues which are directly related to the potential health-promoting effects of wine flavonoids. Reports related to flavonoids and health highlight some relevant scientific information. However, there is still a gap between the knowledge of wine flavonoids bioavailability and their health

  17. Adsorption of saponin compound in Carica papaya leaves extract using weakly basic ion exchanger resin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abidin, Noraziani Zainal; Janam, Anathasia; Zubairi, Saiful Irwan

    2016-11-01

    Adsorption of saponin compound in papaya leaves juice extract using Amberlite® IRA-67 resin was not reported in previous studies. In this research, Amberlite® IRA-67 was used to determine the amount of saponin that can be adsorbed using different weights of dry resin (0.1 g and 0.5 g). Peleg model was used to determine the maximum yield of saponin (43.67 mg) and the exhaustive time (5.7 days) prior to a preliminary resin-saponin adsorption study. After adsorption process, there was no significant difference (p>0.05) in total saponin content (mg) for sample treated with 0.1 g (3.79 ± 0.55 mg) and sample treated with 0.5 g (3.43 ± 0.51 mg) dry weight resin. Long-term kinetic adsorption of resin-saponin method (>24 hours) should be conducted to obtain optimum freed saponin extract. Besides that, sample treated with 0.1 g dry weight resin had high free radical scavenging value of 50.33 ± 2.74% compared to sample treated with 0.5 g dry weight resin that had low free radical scavenging value of 24.54 ± 1.66% dry weights. Total saponin content (mg), total phenolic content (mg GAE) and free radical scavenging activity (%) was investigated to determine the interaction of those compounds with Amberlite® IRA-67. The RP-HPLC analysis using ursolic acid as standard at 203 nm showed no peak even though ursolic acid was one of the saponin components that was ubiquitous in plant kingdom. The absence of peak was due to weak solubility of ursolic acid in water and since it was only soluble in solvent with moderate polarity. The Pearson's correlation coefficient for total saponin content (mg) versus total phenolic content (mg GAE) and radical scavenging activity (%) were +0.959 and +0.807. Positive values showed that whenever there was an increase in saponin content (mg), the phenolic content (mg GAE) and radical scavenging activity (%) would also increase. However, as the resin-saponin adsorption was carried out, there was a significant decrease of radical scavenging activity

  18. Actions of Piperidine Alkaloid Teratogens at Fetal Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptors.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Teratogenic alkaloids are found in many species of plants including Conium maculatum L., Nicotiana glauca, Nicotiana tabaccum, and multiple Lupinus spp. Fetal musculoskeletal defects produced by alkaloids from these plants include arthrogyropisis, scoliosis, torticollis, kyposis, lordosis, and clef...

  19. Biological activity of alkaloids from Solanum dulcamara L.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Padma; Sharma, Bindu; Bakshi, Nidhi

    2009-01-01

    Alkaloids are well known for their antimicrobial activity. Though all natural alkaloids come from plants, not all plants produce alkaloids. Plants of the Solanaceae family are known for their high alkaloid content. Alkaloids are found in all plant parts like roots, stems, leaves, flowers, fruits and seeds. In the present study, those plant parts of Solanum dulcamara were selected which have been reported to produce a high content of a specific alkaloid: solanine (from unripe fruits), solasodine (from flowers) and beta-solamarine (from roots). These alkaloids were extracted from various parts of S. dulcamara by well-established methods and were screened for their antibacterial activity. Human pathogenic bacteria, viz., Enterobacter aerogenes, Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus aureus, were selected for the study. All three alkaloids inhibited the growth of E. coli and S. aureus. However, no significant activity was observed against E. aerogenes. Minimum inhibitory concentration and minimum bactericidal concentration were also evaluated.

  20. Efficient improvement of surface activity of tea saponin through Gemini-like modification by straightforward esterification.

    PubMed

    Feng, Jin; Chen, Ying; Liu, Xin; Liu, Songbai

    2015-03-15

    Novel strategy of Gemini-like modification has been applied in development of new nonionic surfactants, tea saponin esters, with enhanced surface activity by simple esterification. Tea saponin was treated with acyl chlorides of different chain length and different ratio of tea saponin and acyl chloride under alkaline condition. The structures of tea saponin esters were analysed and confirmed by FT-IR, NMR and ESI-MS. Surface activity investigation revealed that esterification with the chain length of C12 and C14 and the ratio of 1:4 to 1:6 produced superior surface activity compared with tea saponin. The exceptional surface activity of the new surfactants suggested their great potential application in food industry as green surfactants due to their environmental benign nature as well as simple and inexpensive preparation. The strategy of Gemini-like modification will facilitate development of green surfactants based on natural resources.

  1. Optimization of a method for the profiling and quantification of saponins in different green asparagus genotypes.

    PubMed

    Vázquez-Castilla, Sara; Jaramillo-Carmona, Sara; Fuentes-Alventosa, Jose María; Jiménez-Araujo, Ana; Rodriguez-Arcos, Rocío; Cermeño-Sacristán, Pedro; Espejo-Calvo, Juan Antonio; Guillén-Bejarano, Rafael

    2013-07-03

    The main goal of this study was the optimization of a HPLC-MS method for the qualitative and quantitative analysis of asparagus saponins. The method includes extraction with aqueous ethanol, cleanup by solid phase extraction, separation by reverse phase chromatography, electrospray ionization, and detection in a single quadrupole mass analyzer. The method was used for the comparison of selected genotypes of Huétor-Tájar asparagus landrace and selected varieties of commercial diploid hybrids of green asparagus. The results showed that while protodioscin was almost the only saponin detected in the commercial hybrids, eight different saponins were detected in the Huétor-Tájar asparagus genotypes. The mass spectra indicated that HT saponins are derived from a furostan type steroidal genin having a single bond between carbons 5 and 6 of the B ring. The total concentration of saponins was found to be higher in triguero asparagus than in commercial hybrids.

  2. Structural analysis of complex saponins of Balanites aegyptiaca by 800 MHz 1H NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Staerk, Dan; Chapagain, Bishnu P; Lindin, Therese; Wiesman, Zeev; Jaroszewski, Jerzy W

    2006-10-01

    The main saponin (1) present in the mesocarp of Balanites aegyptiaca fruit is a mixture of 22R and 22S epimers of 26-(O-beta-D-glucopyranosyl)-3-beta-[4-O-(beta-D-glucopyranosyl)-2-O-(alpha-L-rhamnopyranosyl)-beta-D-glucopyranosyloxy]-22,26-dihydroxyfurost-5-ene. This structure differs from a previously reported saponin isolated from this source by the site of attachment of the rhamnosyl residue, and presumably represents a structural revision of the latter. The main saponin (2) present in the kernel is a xylopyranosyl derivative of 1. The use of high-field NMR enabled the practically complete assignment of 1H and 13C chemical shifts of these complex saponins, existing as a mixture of C-22 epimers. Moreover, the work represents a new approach to structural elucidation of saponins: direct preparative-scale HPLC-RID of crude extracts followed by high-field NMR investigations supported by ESI-MSn.

  3. Multicomponent Therapeutics of Berberine Alkaloids

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Jiaoyang; Yan, Dan; Yang, Meihua; Dong, Xiaoping; Xiao, Xiaohe

    2013-01-01

    Although berberine alkaloids (BAs) are reported to be with broad-spectrum antibacterial and antiviral activities, the interactions among BAs have not been elucidated. In the present study, methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) was chosen as a model organism, and modified broth microdilution was applied for the determination of the fluorescence absorption values to calculate the anti-MRSA activity of BAs. We have initiated four steps to seek the optimal combination of BAs that are (1) determining the anti-MRSA activity of single BA, (2) investigating the two-component combination to clarify the interactions among BAs by checkerboard assay, (3) investigating the multicomponent combination to determine the optimal ratio by quadratic rotation-orthogonal combination design, and (4) in vivo and in vitro validation of the optimal combination. The results showed that the interactions among BAs are related to their concentrations. The synergetic combinations included “berberine and epiberberine,” “jatrorrhizine and palmatine” and “jatrorrhizine and coptisine”; the antagonistic combinations included “coptisine and epiberberine”. The optimal combination was berberine : coptisine : jatrorrhizine : palmatine : epiberberine = 0.702 : 0.863 : 1 : 0.491 : 0.526, and the potency of the optimal combination on cyclophosphamide-immunocompromised mouse model was better than the natural combinations of herbs containing BAs. PMID:23634170

  4. Antiplatelet aggregation triterpene saponins from the barks of Ilex rotunda.

    PubMed

    Fan, Zhen; Zhou, Lian; Xiong, Tianqin; Zhou, Jinsong; Li, Qingguo; Tan, Qinglong; Zhao, Zhongxiang; Jin, Jing

    2015-03-01

    Four new triterpene saponins, rotundinosides A-D (1-4) and seven known triterpene saponins (5-11) were isolated from a methanol extract of the barks of Ilex rotunda Thunb. The new saponins were characterized as 3-O-β-d-glucopyranosy1-(1→2)-β-d-xylopyranosyl siaresinolic acid 28-O-β-d-glucopyranoside (1), 3-O-[β-d-glucopyranosy1-(1→2)-β-d-xylopyranosyl]-3β,19α-dihydroxyurs-12-en-28-oic-O-β-d-glucopranosy1ester (2), 3-O-[α-l-rhamnopyranosyl-(1→2)-β-d-glucopyranosy1-(1→2)-α-l-arabinopyranosyl]-3β,19α-dihydroxyurs-12-en-28-oic-O-β-d-glucopyranosy1 ester (3), and 3-O-α-l-rhamanopyranosyl-(1→2)-β-d-glucopyranosy1-(1→2)-α-l-arabinopyranosyl ilexgenin B 28-O-β-d-glucopyranosy1 ester (4), respectively. Their structures were established by extensive spectroscopic analysis, including HSQC, HMBC, (1)H-(1)H COSY, NOESY and acid hydrolysis, and also by the comparison of their spectroscopic data with those of related compounds. The known compounds 5-11 were all obtained from this species for the first time. The biological activity of compounds 1-11 against ADP induced platelet aggregation in rabbit plasma was determined. Among the tested compounds 1, 3, 5 and 10 exhibited strong inhibition of platelet aggregation in vitro, with IC50 values of 11.4±2.2, 10.4±1.3, 13.2±2.4, and 15.1±3.4μM, respectively.

  5. Haemolytic activities of plant saponins and adjuvants. Effect of Periandra mediterranea saponin on the humoral response to the FML antigen of Leishmania donovani.

    PubMed

    Santos, W R; Bernardo, R R; Peçanha, L M; Palatnik, M; Parente, J P; Palatnik de Sousa, C B

    1997-06-01

    An 87.7% (P < 0.01) and 84% (P < 0.001) of protection against visceral leishmaniasis was achieved in CB hamsters and Balb/c mice, respectively, with saponin combined to the fucose-mannose ligand of Leishmania donovani (FML). However, an undesirable haemolytic effect was described for several saponins. Aiming to improve the formulation with FML/saponin, we comparatively analysed the haemolytic potential of recently characterized plant saponins and currently used adjuvants. The haemolytic activity of steroidic saponins from Agave sisalana; Smilax officinalis as well as commercial saponin (Riedel De Haën's), was higher than that of triterpenoid ones (Bredemeyera floribunda; Periandra mediterranea) and the Freund's complete adjuvant. The concentration resulting in 50% haemolysis was 500 micrograms ml-1 for aluminum hydroxide. The low haemolytic effect of P. mediterranea saponin was abolished by removal of its glycidic moiety and its sapogenin fraction as well as the Freund's Incomplete Adjuvant were non-haemolytic within this range. Furthermore, the adjuvant effect of three doses of P. mediterranea saponin injected with the FML antigen of L. donovani, was assayed in mice, either by the intraperitoneal (i.p.) or the subcutaneous (s.c.) route. The anti-FML IgG antibody levels increased and detectable levels were observed up to 3 months in the s.c. group. The response was expanded in both groups after an injection with a fourth vaccine dose. The IgG response showed increased levels of IgG2a only in the i.p. group, while IgG2b and IgG1 but not IgG3 antibodies were higher than controls in both groups. In conclusion, the results suggest that the recently described triterpenoid fractions of P. mediterranea can be safely used as adjuvant with low or non-haemolytic effect.

  6. Isolation of a flavonoid, apigenin 7-O-glucoside, from Mentha longifolia (L.) Hudson subspecies longifolia and its genotoxic potency.

    PubMed

    Gulluce, Medine; Orhan, Furkan; Yanmis, Derya; Arasoglu, Tulin; Guvenalp, Zuhal; Demirezer, Lutfiye Omur

    2015-09-01

    Mentha is a medicinal and aromatic plant belonging to the Lamiaceae family, which is widely used in food, flavor, cosmetic and pharmaceutical industries. Recently, it has been found that the use of Mentha as a pharmaceutical source is based on its phytochemical constituents that have far been identified as tannins, saponins, phenolic acids and flavonoids. This study was designed to evaluate the mutagenic and antimutagenic activities of apigenin 7-O-glucoside (A7G), a flavonoid isolated from Mentha longifolia (L.) Hudson subspecies longifolia (ML). The possible antimutagenic potential of A7G was examined against mutagens ethyl methanesulfonate and acridine in an eukaryotic cell system Saccharomyces cerevisiae and sodium azide in Salmonella typhimurium TA1535 and 9-aminoacridine in S. typhimurium TA1537. According to our findings, any concentrations of the A7G used did not show mutagenic activity but exerted strong antimutagenic activities at tested concentrations. The inhibition rates for the Ames test ranged from 27.2% (S. typhimurium TA1535: 0.4 μM/plate) to 91.1% (S. typhimurium TA1537: 0.2 μM/plate) and for the yeast deletion assay from 4% to 57.7%. This genotoxicological study suggests that a flavonoid from ML owing to antimutagenic properties is of great pharmacological importance and might be beneficial to industries producing food additives, cosmetics and pharmaceuticals products.

  7. Flavonoids and DNA Repair in Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-12-01

    hours of naringenin treatment. The tea flavonoid EGC and apigenin from parsley did not show any DNA repair-stimulatory activity. 15. SUBJECT TERMS No...flavonoids to continue the investigations on the stimulatory effect on DNA repair: -naringenin from citrus -apigenin from parsley -epicatechin

  8. Light-controlled flavonoid biosynthesis in fruits.

    PubMed

    Zoratti, Laura; Karppinen, Katja; Luengo Escobar, Ana; Häggman, Hely; Jaakola, Laura

    2014-01-01

    Light is one of the most important environmental factors affecting flavonoid biosynthesis in plants. The absolute dependency of light to the plant development has driven evolvement of sophisticated mechanisms to sense and transduce multiple aspects of the light signal. Light effects can be categorized in photoperiod (duration), intensity (quantity), direction and quality (wavelength) including UV-light. Recently, new information has been achieved on the regulation of light-controlled flavonoid biosynthesis in fruits, in which flavonoids have a major contribution on quality. This review focuses on the effects of the different light conditions on the control of flavonoid biosynthesis in fruit producing plants. An overview of the currently known mechanisms of the light-controlled flavonoid accumulation is provided. R2R3 MYB transcription factors are known to regulate by differential expression the biosynthesis of distinct flavonoids in response to specific light wavelengths. Despite recent advances, many gaps remain to be understood in the mechanisms of the transduction pathway of light-controlled flavonoid biosynthesis. A better knowledge on these regulatory mechanisms is likely to be useful for breeding programs aiming to modify fruit flavonoid pattern.

  9. Light-controlled flavonoid biosynthesis in fruits

    PubMed Central

    Zoratti, Laura; Karppinen, Katja; Luengo Escobar, Ana; Häggman, Hely; Jaakola, Laura

    2014-01-01

    Light is one of the most important environmental factors affecting flavonoid biosynthesis in plants. The absolute dependency of light to the plant development has driven evolvement of sophisticated mechanisms to sense and transduce multiple aspects of the light signal. Light effects can be categorized in photoperiod (duration), intensity (quantity), direction and quality (wavelength) including UV-light. Recently, new information has been achieved on the regulation of light-controlled flavonoid biosynthesis in fruits, in which flavonoids have a major contribution on quality. This review focuses on the effects of the different light conditions on the control of flavonoid biosynthesis in fruit producing plants. An overview of the currently known mechanisms of the light-controlled flavonoid accumulation is provided. R2R3 MYB transcription factors are known to regulate by differential expression the biosynthesis of distinct flavonoids in response to specific light wavelengths. Despite recent advances, many gaps remain to be understood in the mechanisms of the transduction pathway of light-controlled flavonoid biosynthesis. A better knowledge on these regulatory mechanisms is likely to be useful for breeding programs aiming to modify fruit flavonoid pattern. PMID:25346743

  10. Rare prenylated flavonoids from Tephrosia purpurea.

    PubMed

    Hegazy, Mohamed-Elamir F; Abd el-Razek, Mohamed H; Nagashima, Fumihiro; Asakawa, Yoshinori; Paré, Paul W

    2009-01-01

    Chemical investigations of aerial parts of Tephrosia purpurea yielded the rare prenylated flavonoids, tephropurpulin A (1) and isoglabratephrin (2), in addition to a previously identified flavonoid, glabratephrin (3). Structures were established by 1D and 2D NMR spectroscopy, as well as by HR-MS analysis; for compounds 2 and 3, structures were confirmed by X-ray analysis.

  11. Steroidal saponins from the stem of Yucca elephantipes.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ying; Zhang, Ying-Jun; Jacob, Melissa R; Li, Xing-Cong; Yang, Chong-Ren

    2008-01-01

    Ten steroidal saponins with cis-fused A/B ring, including a smilagenin glycoside, elephanoside A (4), and the five furostanol bisdesmosides, elephanosides B-F (6-10), were isolated from the stems of Yucca elephantipes Regel. (Agavaceae). Their structures were determined by detailed chemical and spectroscopic analysis. All the isolated compounds were tested for their in vitro antifungal and antibacterial activities. Only the two known spirostanol glycosides Ys-II (1) and Ys-IV (2) showed moderate inhibitory activity against the growth of Candida albicans and Cryptococcus neoformans.

  12. Synthesis of novel spirostanic saponins and their cytotoxic activity.

    PubMed

    Hernández, Juan C; León, Francisco; Brouard, Ignacio; Torres, Fernando; Rubio, Sara; Quintana, José; Estévez, Francisco; Bermejo, Jaime

    2008-02-15

    This study was carried out to assess the cytotoxicity of several new synthetic steroidal saponins against the human myeloid leukemia cell lines (HL-60 and U937) and against human melanoma cells (SK-MEL-1). Several diosgenyl glycosides analyzed showed strong cell growth inhibition which was associated with alterations in cell cycle progression and induction of apoptosis. Studies of cytochrome c release and caspase-9 activation suggest a main role of the intrinsic pathway of apoptosis in the mechanism of cytotoxicity caused by this kind of compounds.

  13. Triterpene saponins from the roots of Ilex pubescens.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yuan; Zeng, Kewu; Zhang, Jiayu; Li, Ning; Chai, Xingyun; Jiang, Yong; Tu, Pengfei

    2014-09-01

    Five new triterpene saponins, Ilexpublesnins N-R (1-5), along with seven known analogs were isolated from the root of Ilex pubescens. Their structures were elucidated on the basis of extensive spectroscopic analysis, including 1D and 2D NMR experiments. Ilexpublesnin N (1) possessed a rare 20-hydroxyursolic acid scaffold from natural resource. These compounds were evaluated in vitro for their cytotoxic effects on human cancer cell lines HepG2, HLE, BEL7402, BEL7403, BEL7405, MCF-7, HeLa. Among them, only compounds 5 and 10 showed cytotoxic potentiality against BEl-7403 and HEL cell lines [inhibition (%): 35.38 and 45.12, respectively].

  14. Triterpenoid saponins from the seeds of Caragana microphylla.

    PubMed

    Jin, Gui-Lin; Zheng, Cheng-Jian; Xin, Wen-Bo; Mao, Zhu-Jun; Sun, Pei-Xin; Zeng, Zhi-Xin; Qin, Lu-Ping

    2011-06-01

    Two new triterpenoid saponins, namely caraganoside C (1) and caraganoside D (2), were isolated from the seeds of Caragana microphylla. Their structures were elucidated on the basis of spectroscopic analyses, including homo- and hetero-nuclear correlation NMR experiments (COSY, HSQC and HMBC). Both 1 and 2 exhibited moderate inhibitory activity against NO production in LPS-stimulated RAW264.7 cells with IC(50) values of 26.4 μM and 32.2 μM, respectively. In addition, 1 showed weak cytotoxicity against MCF-7, HL-60, HCT116, and A549 cell lines.

  15. Two new triterpenoid saponins from Caragana microphylla seeds.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Cheng-Jian; Jin, Gui-Lin; Zou, Jing-Ping; Jiang, Yi-Ping; Sun, Pei-Xin; Qin, Lu-Ping

    2013-01-01

    Two new triterpenoid saponins, caraganins A and B (1 and 2), structurally characterized by a 22-oxo group, were isolated from the seeds of Caragana microphylla Lam., together with their n-butyl esters as artifacts (1a and 2a). Their structures and configurations were elucidated by detailed spectroscopic analyses on the basis of NMR, IR, and MS data. Compounds 1a and 2a exhibited potent antibacterial activity against Staphylococcus aureus and Bacillus subtilis with minimum inhibitory concentration values ranging from 3.125 to 6.25 μg/ml.

  16. Steroidal saponins from the roots of Smilax aspera subsp. mauritanica.

    PubMed

    Belhouchet, Zineddine; Sautour, Marc; Miyamoto, Tomofumi; Lacaille-Dubois, Marie-Aleth

    2008-09-01

    Two new steroidal saponins (1, 2) were isolated from the roots of Smilax aspera subsp. mauritanica (POIR.) ARCANG. (Liliaceae), together with the known curillin G (3), asparagoside E (4), asparoside A (5), asparoside B (6) and the phenolic compound resveratrol (7). Their structures were established mainly on the basis of 600 MHz 2D-NMR spectral data. 3 exhibited antifungal activity against the human pathogenic yeasts Candida albicans, C. glabrata and C. tropicalis (minimum inhibitory concentrations of 25, 25 and 50 microg/ml, respectively) whereas the other compounds were inactive.

  17. Simulation of the type of coralin alkaloid-DNA binding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kulikov, K. G.; Koshlan, T. V.

    2015-05-01

    Interaction between a synthesized coralin protoberberine alkaloid and the DNA double helix of the calf's thymus in a salt solution is studied by optical absorption spectroscopy and spectropolarimetry. The dependence of the spectral characteristics of the alkaloid on a ratio between the DNA base pair concentration and the alkaloid molecule concentration is considered. The parameters of bonds between the coralin alkaloid and the DNA double helix are determined using modified McGhee-von Hippel equations.

  18. [Study on optimum extraction conditions of alkaloids from Pinellia ternate].

    PubMed

    Zeng, Jianhong; Peng, Zhengsong; Mao, Zicheng; Wei, Shuhong

    2003-05-01

    The optimum extraction conditions of alkaloids from Pinellia ternate (Thunb.) Breit were studied by orthogonal test. The results showed that the highest extraction rate of the alkaloids could be obtained by smashing the material in 60 (sieve number) of fragmentation and socking the material in 2.575 mol/L ammonia water, extracting alkaloids with 18 times as much chlorolform at room temperature for 25 hours. The highest extraction rate of alkaloids was 0.0817%.

  19. Hemlock alkaloids from Socrates to poison aloes.

    PubMed

    Reynolds, Tom

    2005-06-01

    Hemlock (Conium maculatum L. Umbelliferae) has long been known as a poisonous plant. Toxicity is due to a group of piperidine alkaloids of which the representative members are coniine and gamma-coniceine. The latter is the more toxic and is the first formed biosynthetically. Its levels in relation to coniine vary widely according to environmental conditions and to provenance of the plants. Surprisingly, these piperidine alkaloids have turned up in quite unrelated species in the monocotyledons as well as the dicotyledons. Aloes, for instance, important medicinal plants, are not regarded as poisonous although some species are very bitter. Nevertheless a small number of mostly local species contain the alkaloids, especially gamma-coniceine and there have been records of human poisoning. The compounds are recognized by their characteristic mousy smell. Both acute and chronic symptoms have been described. The compounds are neurotoxins and death results from respiratory failure, recalling the effects of curare. Chronic non-lethal ingestion by pregnant livestock leads to foetal malformation. Both acute and chronic toxicity are seen with stock in damp meadows and have been recorded as problems especially in North America. The alkaloids derive biosynthetically from acetate units via the polyketide pathway in contrast to other piperidine alkaloids which derive from lysine.

  20. Mitochondria: a promising target for anticancer alkaloids.

    PubMed

    Urra, Félix A; Cordova-Delgado, Miguel; Pessoa-Mahana, Hernan; Ramírez-Rodríguez, Oney; Weiss-Lopez, Boris; Ferreira, Jorge; Araya-Maturana, Ramiro

    2013-01-01

    A great number of alkaloids exhibit high potential in cancer research. Some of them are anticancer drugs with well-defined clinical uses, exerting their action on microtubules dynamics or DNA replication and topology. On the other hand, mitochondria have been recognized as an essential organelle in the establishment of tumor characteristics, especially the resistance to cell death, high proliferative capacity and adaptation to unfavorable cellular environment. Interestingly, many alkaloids exert their anticancer activities affecting selectively some functions of the tumor mitochondria by 1) modulating OXPHOS and ADP/ATP transport, 2) increasing ROS levels and mitochondrial potential dissipation by crosstalk between endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and mitochondria, 3) inducing mitochondria-dependent apoptosis and autophagy, 4) inhibiting mitochondrial metabolic pathways and 5) by alteration of the morphology and biogenesis of this organelle. These antecedents show the relevance of developing research about the effects of alkaloids on functions controlled by tumor mitochondria, offering an attractive target for the design of new alkaloid derivatives, considering organelle- specific delivery strategies. This review describes mitochondria as a central component in the anticancer action of a set of alkaloids, in a way to illustrate the importance of this organelle in medicinal chemistry.

  1. Benzylisoquinoline alkaloid biosynthesis in opium poppy.

    PubMed

    Beaudoin, Guillaume A W; Facchini, Peter J

    2014-07-01

    Opium poppy (Papaver somniferum) is one of the world's oldest medicinal plants and remains the only commercial source for the narcotic analgesics morphine, codeine and semi-synthetic derivatives such as oxycodone and naltrexone. The plant also produces several other benzylisoquinoline alkaloids with potent pharmacological properties including the vasodilator papaverine, the cough suppressant and potential anticancer drug noscapine and the antimicrobial agent sanguinarine. Opium poppy has served as a model system to investigate the biosynthesis of benzylisoquinoline alkaloids in plants. The application of biochemical and functional genomics has resulted in a recent surge in the discovery of biosynthetic genes involved in the formation of major benzylisoquinoline alkaloids in opium poppy. The availability of extensive biochemical genetic tools and information pertaining to benzylisoquinoline alkaloid metabolism is facilitating the study of a wide range of phenomena including the structural biology of novel catalysts, the genomic organization of biosynthetic genes, the cellular and sub-cellular localization of biosynthetic enzymes and a variety of biotechnological applications. In this review, we highlight recent developments and summarize the frontiers of knowledge regarding the biochemistry, cellular biology and biotechnology of benzylisoquinoline alkaloid biosynthesis in opium poppy.

  2. The alkaloids of the madangamine group.

    PubMed

    Amat, Mercedes; Pérez, Maria; Ballette, Roberto; Proto, Stefano; Bosch, Joan

    2015-01-01

    This chapter is focused on madangamines, a small group of complex diamine alkaloids isolated from marine sponges of the order Haplosclerida, and covers their isolation, characterization, biogenesis, biological activity, and synthesis. Structurally, madangamines are pentacyclic alkaloids with an unprecedented skeletal type, characterized by a common diazatricyclic core and two peripheral macrocyclic rings. The isolation of these alkaloids from Xestospongia ingens (madangamines A-E) and Pachychalina alcaloidifera (madangamine F) is described in detail. Physical and complete spectroscopic 1H and 13C NMR data are included. The proposed biogenesis of madangamines from ammonia, a functionalized three-carbon unit, and saturated or unsaturated linear long-chain dialdehydes, via partially reduced bis-alkylpyridine macrocycles, is discussed. The synthesis of alkaloids of the madangamine group has been little explored, with only one total synthesis reported so far, that of (+)-madangamine D. This review also describes several model synthetic approaches to the diazatricyclic ABC core of these alkaloids, as well as model studies on the construction of the (Z,Z)-unsaturated 11-membered E macrocycle common to madangamines A-E, the 13- and 14-membered D rings of madangamines C-E, and the all-cis-triunsaturated 15-membered D ring of madangamine A. Some members of this group have shown significant in vitro cytotoxicity against a number of cancer cell lines.

  3. Tackling saponin diversity in marine animals by mass spectrometry: data acquisition and integration.

    PubMed

    Decroo, Corentin; Colson, Emmanuel; Demeyer, Marie; Lemaur, Vincent; Caulier, Guillaume; Eeckhaut, Igor; Cornil, Jérôme; Flammang, Patrick; Gerbaux, Pascal

    2017-03-01

    Saponin analysis by mass spectrometry methods is nowadays progressively supplementing other analytical methods such as nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). Indeed, saponin extracts from plant or marine animals are often constituted by a complex mixture of (slightly) different saponin molecules that requires extensive purification and separation steps to meet the requirement for NMR spectroscopy measurements. Based on its intrinsic features, mass spectrometry represents an inescapable tool to access the structures of saponins within extracts by using LC-MS, MALDI-MS, and tandem mass spectrometry experiments. The combination of different MS methods nowadays allows for a nice description of saponin structures, without extensive purification. However, the structural characterization process is based on low kinetic energy CID which cannot afford a total structure elucidation as far as stereochemistry is concerned. Moreover, the structural difference between saponins in a same extract is often so small that coelution upon LC-MS analysis is unavoidable, rendering the isomeric distinction and characterization by CID challenging or impossible. In the present paper, we introduce ion mobility in combination with liquid chromatography to better tackle the structural complexity of saponin congeners. When analyzing saponin extracts with MS-based methods, handling the data remains problematic for the comprehensive report of the results, but also for their efficient comparison. We here introduce an original schematic representation using sector diagrams that are constructed from mass spectrometry data. We strongly believe that the proposed data integration could be useful for data interpretation since it allows for a direct and fast comparison, both in terms of composition and relative proportion of the saponin contents in different extracts. Graphical Abstract A combination of state-of-the-art mass spectrometry methods, including ion mobility spectroscopy, is developed to afford a

  4. Effect of Holothuria leucospilota extracted saponin on maturation of mice oocyte and granulosa cells

    PubMed Central

    Moghadam, Fereshteh Delghandi; Baharara, Javad; Balanezhad, Saeedeh Zafar; Jalali, Mohsen; Amini, Elaheh

    2016-01-01

    Sea cucumbers saponins are triterpenoid glycosides which exert beneficial biomedical effects. This study was performed to assess the effect of saponin extracted from sea cucumber Holothuria leucospilota (H. leucospilota) on maturation of mice oocytes and granulosa cells. The germinal vesicles oocytes were collected from 6–8 weeks old Naval Medical Research Institute (NMRI) mice ovaries, randomly divided into untreated and four experimental groups and cultured In vitro. Maturation medium was supplemented with 0, 1, 2, 4 and 8 μg/ml saponin for 12 days. The rates of maturation were recorded through morphological observation by measurement of follicle diameter during treatment. After 4 days, the effects of saponin on granulosa cells were investigated by reactive oxygen species (ROS) measurement, super oxide dismutase (SOD) activity, caspase assay and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) expression. The oocyte maturation rate was significantly higher in treated groups (1 μg/ml). The ROS and SOD assays demonstrated the antioxidant potential of saponin. The caspase assay exhibited that optimum concentrations of saponin (1, 2 μg/ml) reduced caspase activity in granulosa cells. Flow cytometry showed that optimum concentration of saponin promoted oocyte maturation via down regulation of TNF-α as follicular degenerative factor in nursing cells. These results proposed that maturation rate were obtained after the incorporation of 1 μg/ml sea cucumber saponin. Moreover, the extracted saponin at concentrations of 1, 2 μg/ml enhanced follicle growth which is accompanied by attenuating ROS formation, elevating SOD activity and reducing TNF-α expression in granulosa cells. But, further examinations are required to understand precise mechanisms of saponin action on oocyte and granulosa cells. PMID:27168752

  5. Flavonoids and dementia: an update.

    PubMed

    Orhan, I E; Daglia, M; Nabavi, S F; Loizzo, M R; Sobarzo-Sánchez, E; Nabavi, S M

    2015-01-01

    Dementia is a strongly age-related syndrome due to cognitive decline that can be considered a typical example of the combination of physiological and pathological aging-associated changes occurring in old people; it ranges from intact cognition to mild cognitive impairment, which is an intermediate stage of cognitive deterioration, and dementia. The spread of this syndrome has induced to study and try to reduce dementia modifiable risk factors. They include insulin resistance and hyperinsulinaemia, high blood pressure, obesity, smoking, depression, cognitive inactivity or low educational attainment as well as physical inactivity and incorrect diet, which can be considered one of the most important factors. One emerging strategy to decrease the prevalence of mild cognitive impairment and dementia may be the use of nutritional interventions. In the last decade, prospective data have suggested that high fruit and vegetable intakes are related to improved cognitive functions and reduced risks of developing a neurodegenerative process. The protective effects against neurodegeneration could be in part due to the intake of flavonoids that have been associated with several health benefits such as antioxidant and anti-inflammatory activities, increased neuronal signaling, and improved metabolic functions. The present article is aimed at reviewing scientific studies that show the protective effects of flavonoid intake against mild cognitive impairment and dementia.

  6. The Double-Bond Configuration of Corynanthean Alkaloids and Its Impact on Monoterpenoid Indole Alkaloid Biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Eckermann, Ruben; Gaich, Tanja

    2016-04-11

    Experimental evidence is provided for the coherence of the double-bond geometry and the occurrence of "secondary cyclizations" in the biosynthesis of monoterpenoid indole alkaloids. Biosynthetically, akuammiline, C-mavacurine, and Strychnos alkaloids are proposed to be derived from the corynanthean alkaloid geissoschizine, a key intermediate in the biosynthetic pathway of these monoterpenoid indole alkaloids. This process occurs by so-called "secondary cyclizations" from geissoschizine or its derivatives. Although corynanthean alkaloids like geissoschizine incorporate E or Z double bonds located at C19-C20, the alkaloids downstream in the biosynthesis exclusively exhibit the E double bond. This study shows that secondary cyclizations preferentially occur with the E isomer of geissoschizine or its derivatives. This is attributed to the flexibility of the quinolizidine system of the corynanthean alkaloids, which can adopt a cis or trans conformation. For the secondary cyclization to take place, the cis-quinolizidine conformation is required. Experimental evidence supports the hypothesis that the E double bond of geissoschizine induces the cis conformation, whereas the Z double bond induces the trans conformation, which prohibits secondary cyclization of the Z compounds.

  7. Flavonoids--food sources and health benefits.

    PubMed

    Kozłowska, Aleksandra; Szostak-Wegierek, Dorota

    2014-01-01

    Flavonoids are a group of bioactive compounds that are extensively found in foodstuffs of plant origin. Their regular consumption is associated with reduced risk of a number of chronic diseases, including cancer, cardiovascular disease (CVD) and neurodegenerative disorders. Flavonoids are classified into subgroups based on their chemical structure: flavanones, flavones, flavonols, flavan-3-ols, anthocyanins and isoflavones. Their actions at the molecular level include antioxidant effects, as well the ability to modulate several key enzymatic pathways. The growing body of scientific evidence indicates that flavonoids play a beneficial role in disease prevention, however further clinical and epidemiological trials are greatly needed. Among dietary sources of flavonoids there are fruits, vegetables, nuts, seeds and spices. Consumption of these substances with diet appears to be safe. It seems that a diet rich in flavonoids is beneficial and its promotion is thus justifiable.

  8. Development of an Alkaloid-Pyrone Annulation: Synthesis of Pleiomaltinine**

    PubMed Central

    Ziegler, Robert E.; Tan, Shin-Jowl; Kam, Toh-Seok

    2012-01-01

    Odd Couple Methodology for the synthesis of alkaloid-pyrones using a novel pyrone annulation of β–carbolines and indoles with 3-siloxy-4-pyrones is reported. The approach has enabled semisynthesis of the unprecedented alkaloid-pyrone pleiomaltinine from the plant-derived indole-alkaloid pleiocarpamine. PMID:22893619

  9. 21 CFR 119.1 - Dietary supplements containing ephedrine alkaloids.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Dietary supplements containing ephedrine alkaloids... UNREASONABLE RISK § 119.1 Dietary supplements containing ephedrine alkaloids. Dietary supplements containing ephedrine alkaloids present an unreasonable risk of illness or injury under conditions of use recommended...

  10. 21 CFR 119.1 - Dietary supplements containing ephedrine alkaloids.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Dietary supplements containing ephedrine alkaloids... UNREASONABLE RISK § 119.1 Dietary supplements containing ephedrine alkaloids. Dietary supplements containing ephedrine alkaloids present an unreasonable risk of illness or injury under conditions of use recommended...

  11. 21 CFR 119.1 - Dietary supplements containing ephedrine alkaloids.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Dietary supplements containing ephedrine alkaloids... UNREASONABLE RISK § 119.1 Dietary supplements containing ephedrine alkaloids. Dietary supplements containing ephedrine alkaloids present an unreasonable risk of illness or injury under conditions of use recommended...

  12. 21 CFR 119.1 - Dietary supplements containing ephedrine alkaloids.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Dietary supplements containing ephedrine alkaloids... UNREASONABLE RISK § 119.1 Dietary supplements containing ephedrine alkaloids. Dietary supplements containing ephedrine alkaloids present an unreasonable risk of illness or injury under conditions of use recommended...

  13. 21 CFR 119.1 - Dietary supplements containing ephedrine alkaloids.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Dietary supplements containing ephedrine alkaloids... UNREASONABLE RISK § 119.1 Dietary supplements containing ephedrine alkaloids. Dietary supplements containing ephedrine alkaloids present an unreasonable risk of illness or injury under conditions of use recommended...

  14. Alkaloid profiles of Mimosa tenuiflora and associated methods of analysis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The alkaloid contents of the leaves and seeds of M. tenuiflora collected from northeastern Brazil were studied. Alkaloids were isolated by classical acid/base extraction procedures and by cation exchange solid phase extraction. The crude alkaloid fractions were then analysed by thin layer chromatogr...

  15. Two new amaryllidaceae alkaloids from the bulbs of Lycoris radiata.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lei; Zhang, Xiao-Qi; Yin, Zhi-Qi; Wang, Ying; Ye, Wen-Cai

    2009-06-01

    Two new Amaryllidaceae alkaloids, named lycoranines A (1) and B (2), were isolated from the bulbs of Lycoris radiata. Their structures were elucidated on the basis of extensive spectroscopic analysis. Compound 2 was a new-type alkaloid, which provided a new insight into the biosynthesis of alkaloids in Amaryllidaceae plants.

  16. Flavonoids as anti-inflammatory agents.

    PubMed

    Serafini, Mauro; Peluso, Ilaria; Raguzzini, Anna

    2010-08-01

    Epidemiological evidence suggests that a high intake of plant foods is associated with lower risk of chronic diseases. However, the mechanism of action and the components involved in this effect have not been identified clearly. In recent years, the scientific community has agreed to focus its attention on a class of secondary metabolites extensively present in a wide range of plant foods: the flavonoids, suggested as having different biological roles. The anti-inflammatory actions of flavonoids in vitro or in cellular models involve the inhibition of the synthesis and activities of different pro-inflammatory mediators such as eicosanoids, cytokines, adhesion molecules and C-reactive protein. Molecular activities of flavonoids include inhibition of transcription factors such as NF-kappaB and activating protein-1 (AP-1), as well as activation of nuclear factor-erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2). However, the in vitro evidence might be somehow of limited impact due to the non-physiological concentrations utilized and to the fact that in vivo flavonoids are extensively metabolized to molecules with different chemical structures and activities compared with the ones originally present in the food. Human studies investigating the effect of flavonoids on markers of inflammation are insufficient, and are mainly focused on flavonoid-rich foods but not on pure molecules. Most of the studies lack assessment of flavonoid absorption or fail to associate an effect on inflammation with a change in circulating levels of flavonoids. Human trials with appropriate placebo and pure flavonoid molecules are needed to clarify if flavonoids represent ancillary ingredients or key molecules involved in the anti-inflammatory properties of plant foods.

  17. Ether bridge formation in loline alkaloid biosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Juan; Bhardwaj, Minakshi; Faulkner, Jerome R.; Nagabhyru, Padmaja; Charlton, Nikki D.; Higashi, Richard M.; Miller, Anne-Frances; Young, Carolyn A.; Grossman, Robert B.; Schardl, Christopher L.

    2014-01-01

    Lolines are potent insecticidal agents produced by endophytic fungi of cool-season grasses. These alkaloids are composed of a pyrrolizidine ring system and an uncommon ether bridge linking carbons 2 and 7. Previous results indicated that 1-aminopyrrolizidine was a pathway intermediate. We used RNA interference to knock down expression of lolO, resulting in the accumulation of a novel alkaloid identified as exo-1-acetamidopyrrolizidine based on high-resolution MS and NMR. Genomes of endophytes differing in alkaloid profiles were sequenced, revealing that those with mutated lolO accumulated exo-1-acetamidopyrrolizidine but no lolines. Heterologous expression of wild-type lolO complemented a lolO mutant, resulting in the production of N-acetylnorloline. These results indicated that the non-heme iron oxygenase, LolO, is required for ether bridge formation, probably through oxidation of exo-1-acetamidopyrrolizidine. PMID:24374065

  18. An efficient synthesis of loline alkaloids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cakmak, Mesut; Mayer, Peter; Trauner, Dirk

    2011-07-01

    Loline (1) is a small alkaloid that, in spite of its simple-looking structure, has posed surprising challenges to synthetic chemists. It has been known for more than a century and has been the subject of extensive biological investigations, but only two total syntheses have been achieved to date. Here, we report an asymmetric total synthesis of loline that, with less then ten steps, is remarkably short. Our synthesis incorporates a Sharpless epoxidation, a Grubbs olefin metathesis and an unprecedented transannular aminobromination, which converts an eight-membered cyclic carbamate into a bromopyrrolizidine. The synthesis is marked by a high degree of chemo- and stereoselectivity and gives access to several members of the loline alkaloid family. It delivers sufficient material to support a programme aimed at studying the complex interactions between plants, fungi, insects and bacteria brokered by loline alkaloids.

  19. Two new alkaloids from Narcissus serotinus L.

    PubMed

    Pigni, Natalia B; Berkov, Strahil; Elamrani, Abdelaziz; Benaissa, Mohammed; Viladomat, Francesc; Codina, Carles; Bastida, Jaume

    2010-10-14

    The Amaryllidaceae family is well known for the presence of an exclusive group of alkaloids with a wide range of biological activities. Narcissus serotinus L. is a plant belonging to this family and its geographical distribution is mainly located along the Mediterranean coast. In the present work, specimens collected near Casablanca (Morocco) were used to study the alkaloid content of this species. Starting with 350 g of the whole plant we used standard extraction and purification procedures to obtain fractions and compounds for GC-MS and NMR analysis. As well as five known alkaloids, we isolated two new compounds: 1-O-(3´-acetoxybutanoyl)lycorine and narseronine. The latter has been previously published, but with an erroneous structure.

  20. [Evaluation of antimicrobial activity of indol alkaloids].

    PubMed

    Rojas Hernández, N M

    1979-01-01

    In pursuing the study of the antimicrobial properties of alkaloids prepared from Cuban plants the activity of 10 indol alkaloids and 4 semisynthetic variables obtained from three plants--Catharanthus roseus G. Don., Vallesia antillana Wood and Ervatamia coronaria Staph, of the family Apocynaceae--growing in Cuba was assessed in vitro. The alkaloids and the variables used were catharantine, vindoline, vindolinine, perivine, reserpine, tabernaemontanine, tetrahydroalstonine, aparicine, vindolinic acid, reserpic acid and vindolininol. These were faced to 40 bacterial strains from the genera Salmonella, Shigella, Proteus, Escherichia, Pseudomonas, Staphylococcus and Corynebacterium as well as to fungi and yeasts from the genera Aspergillus, kCunnighamella, kCandida and Saccharomyces. The method involving cylindric sections in a double agar layer was applied and lectures were obtained at 24-48 hours of incubation at 25 degrees C for fungi and yeasts and 37 degrees C for bacteria. Inhibition zones are reported in millimeters.

  1. Rotational Investigation of Tropane Alkaloids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cocinero, Emilio J.; Lesarri, Alberto; Ecija, Patricia; Grabow, Jens-Uwe; Fernández, Jose A.; Castano, Fernando

    2010-06-01

    We report an investigation of the rotational spectrum of several tropane alkaloids using the new Balle-Flygare-type FT-MW spectrometer built at the University of the Basque Country. The initial work focused on the azabicycles of tropinone, scopine and scopoline, vaporized using heating methods. For tropinone the spectrum confirmed the presence of equatorial and axial conformers originated by the inversion of the N-methyl group, with the tropane motif adopting a distorted chair configuration. The determination of substitution and effective structures for the two conformers included the 13C, 15N and 18O isotopomers observed in natural abundance. The structures revealed the flexibility and structural changes associated to the N-methyl inversion, mostly a flattening at the nitrogen atom and a simultaneous rising of the carbonyl group in the axial form. The investigation of scopine gave an intense spectrum, but it was inconsistent with the structural models expected for this molecule. The carrier of the new spectrum was later identified as scopoline, generated in situ by an intramolecular reaction at the moderate temperatures of the nozzle. A single conformation was detected for scopoline, with an ether bridge seriously distorting the tropane motif. E. J. Cocinero, A. Lesarri, P. écija, J.-U. Grabow, J. A. Fernández, F. Castaño, in publication, 2010 E. J. Cocinero, A. Lesarri, P. Écija, J.-U. Grabow, J. A. Fernández, F. Castaño, Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys.,in press, 2010

  2. Synergistic interactions among flavonoids and acetogenins in Graviola (Annona muricata) leaves confer protection against prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Yang, Chunhua; Gundala, Sushma Reddy; Mukkavilli, Rao; Vangala, Subrahmanyam; Reid, Michelle D; Aneja, Ritu

    2015-06-01

    Phytochemical complexity of plant extracts may offer health-promoting benefits including chemotherapeutic and chemopreventive effects. Isolation of 'most-active fraction' or single constituents from whole extracts may not only compromise the therapeutic efficacy but also render toxicity, thus emphasizing the importance of preserving the natural composition of whole extracts. The leaves of Annona muricata, commonly known as Graviola, are known to be rich in flavonoids, isoquinoline alkaloids and annonaceous acetogenins. Here, we demonstrate phytochemical synergy among the constituents of Graviola leaf extract (GLE) compared to its flavonoid-enriched (FEF) and acetogenin-enriched (AEF) fractions. Comparative quantitation of flavonoids revealed enrichment of rutin (~7-fold) and quercetin-3-glucoside (Q-3-G, ~3-fold) in FEF compared to GLE. In vivo pharmacokinetics and in vitro absorption kinetics of flavonoids revealed enhanced bioavailability of rutin in FEF compared to GLE. However, GLE was more effective in inhibiting in vitro prostate cancer proliferation, viability and clonogenic capacity compared to FEF. Oral administration of 100mg/kg bw GLE showed ~1.2-fold higher tumor growth-inhibitory efficacy than FEF in human prostate tumor xenografts although the concentration of rutin and Q-3-G was more in FEF. Contrarily, AEF, despite its superior in vitro and in vivo efficacy, resulted in death of the mice due to toxicity. Our data indicate that despite lower absorption and bioavailability of rutin, maximum efficacy was achieved in the case of GLE, which also comprises of other phytochemical groups including acetogenins that make up its natural complex environment. Hence, our study emphasizes on evaluating the nature of interactions among Graviola leaf phytochemcials for developing favorable dose regimen for prostate cancer management to achieve optimal therapeutic benefits.

  3. Synergistic interactions among flavonoids and acetogenins in Graviola (Annona muricata) leaves confer protection against prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Chunhua; Gundala, Sushma Reddy; Mukkavilli, Rao; Vangala, Subrahmanyam; Reid, Michelle D.; Aneja, Ritu

    2015-01-01

    Phytochemical complexity of plant extracts may offer health-promoting benefits including chemotherapeutic and chemopreventive effects. Isolation of ‘most-active fraction’ or single constituents from whole extracts may not only compromise the therapeutic efficacy but also render toxicity, thus emphasizing the importance of preserving the natural composition of whole extracts. The leaves of Annona muricata, commonly known as Graviola, are known to be rich in flavonoids, isoquinoline alkaloids and annonaceous acetogenins. Here, we demonstrate phytochemical synergy among the constituents of Graviola leaf extract (GLE) compared to its flavonoid-enriched (FEF) and acetogenin-enriched (AEF) fractions. Comparative quantitation of flavonoids revealed enrichment of rutin (~7-fold) and quercetin-3-glucoside (Q-3-G, ~3-fold) in FEF compared to GLE. In vivo pharmacokinetics and in vitro absorption kinetics of flavonoids revealed enhanced bioavailability of rutin in FEF compared to GLE. However, GLE was more effective in inhibiting in vitro prostate cancer proliferation, viability and clonogenic capacity compared to FEF. Oral administration of 100mg/kg bw GLE showed ~1.2-fold higher tumor growth-inhibitory efficacy than FEF in human prostate tumor xenografts although the concentration of rutin and Q-3-G was more in FEF. Contrarily, AEF, despite its superior in vitro and in vivo efficacy, resulted in death of the mice due to toxicity. Our data indicate that despite lower absorption and bioavailability of rutin, maximum efficacy was achieved in the case of GLE, which also comprises of other phytochemical groups including acetogenins that make up its natural complex environment. Hence, our study emphasizes on evaluating the nature of interactions among Graviola leaf phytochemcials for developing favorable dose regimen for prostate cancer management to achieve optimal therapeutic benefits. PMID:25863125

  4. Tea saponin enhanced biodegradation of decabromodiphenyl ether by Brevibacillus brevis.

    PubMed

    Tang, Shaoyu; Bai, Jieqiong; Yin, Hua; Ye, Jinshao; Peng, Hui; Liu, Zehua; Dang, Zhi

    2014-11-01

    Decabromodiphenyl ether (BDE209) is a ubiquitous persistent pollutant and has contaminated the environment worldwide. To accelerate BDE209 elimination and reveal the mechanism concerned, the biosurfactant tea saponin enhanced degradation of BDE209 by Brevibacillus brevis was conducted. The results revealed that tea saponin could efficiently increase the solubility of BDE209 in mineral salts medium and improve its biodegradation. The degradation efficiency of 0.5 mg L(-1) BDE209 by 1 g L(-1) biomass with surfactant was up to 55% within 5d. Contact time was a significant factor for BDE209 biodegradation. BDE209 biodegradation was coupled with bioaccumulation, ion release and utilization, and debromination to lower brominated PBDE metabolites. During the biodegradation process, B. brevis metabolically released Na(+), NH4(+), NO2(-) and Cl(-), and utilized the nutrient ions Mg(2+), PO4(3-) and SO4(2-). GC-MS analysis revealed that the structure of BDE209 changed under the action of strain and nonabromodiphenyl ethers (BDE-208, -207 and -206), octabromodiphenyl ethers (BDE-203, -197 and -196) and heptabromodiphenyl ether (BDE-183) were generated by debromination.

  5. Nootropic and anxiolytic activity of saponins of Albizzia lebbeck leaves.

    PubMed

    Une, H D; Sarveiya, V P; Pal, S C; Kasture, V S; Kasture, S B

    2001-01-01

    The effect of saponin containing, n-butanolic fraction (BF), extracted from dried leaves of Albizzia lebbeck, was studied on cognitive behavior and anxiety in albino mice. The elevated plus maze was used for assessment of both nootropic and anxiolytic activity. The nootropic activity was evaluated by recording the effect of BF (0, 10, 25, and 50 mg/kg) on the transfer latency, whereas anxiolytic activity was assessed by studying its effect on the duration of occupancy in the closed arm. Results showed significant improvement in the retention ability of the normal and amnesic mice as compared to their respective controls. Animals treated with BF (25 mg/kg) spent more time in the open arm in a dose-dependent manner. The BF was without any significant effect on motor coordination. However, it significantly inhibited passivity and hypothermia induced by baclofen (10 mg/kg), a GABA(B) agonist. The data emanated in the present study suggests involvement of gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) in the nootropic and anxiolytic activity of saponins obtained from A. lebbeck.

  6. Triterpene saponins from the roots of Ilex asprella.

    PubMed

    Lei, Yu; Shi, She-Po; Song, Yue-Lin; Bi, Dan; Tu, Peng-Fei

    2014-05-01

    Six new triterpene saponins, ilexasprellanosides A-F (1-6, resp.), together with eleven known compounds were isolated from the roots of Ilex asprella. The new saponins were characterized as ursa-12,18-dien-28-oic acid 3-O-β-D-xylopyranoside (1), 19α-hydroxyursolic acid 3-O-β-D-(2'-O-acetylxylopyranoside) (2), 19α-hydroxyursolic acid 3-O-β-D-glucuronopyranoside (3), 3β,19α-dihydroxyolean-12-en-23,28-dioic acid 28-O-β-D-glucopyranoside (4), 19α-hydroxyoleanolic acid 3-O-β-D-(2'-O-acetylxylopyranoside) (5), 19α-hydroxyoleanolic acid 3-O-β-D-glucuronopyranoside (6). The structures of the new compounds were elucidated by analysis of their spectroscopic data and chemical degradation. Compounds 2, 4, oleanolic acid 3-O-β-D-glucuronopyranoside, 3-β-acetoxy-28-hydroxyurs-12-ene, and pomolic acid showed significant cytotoxic activities against human tumor cell line A549 (IC50 values of 1.87, 2.51, 1.41, 3.24, and 5.63 μM, resp.).

  7. Leucovernine and acetylleucovernine, alkaloids from Leucojum vernum.

    PubMed

    Forgo, Peter; Hohmann, Judit

    2005-11-01

    The fresh bulbs of Leucojum vernum provided seven tyrosine-derived alkaloids; two of them have not been reported before and are named leucovernine and acetylleucovernine. The five known alkaloids were N-demethylgalanthamine, hippeastrine, 9-O-demethylhomolycorine, 5alpha-hydroxyhomolycorine, and 11-hydroxyvittatine. These compounds have been isolated from this species for the first time. The structure determination was carried out by the combination of liquid-phase one- and two-dimensional NMR spectroscopy and high-resolution mass spectrometry.

  8. Antitussive indole alkaloids from Kopsia hainanensis.

    PubMed

    Tan, Min-Jia; Yin, Chun; Tang, Chun-Ping; Ke, Chang-Qiang; Lin, Ge; Ye, Yang

    2011-06-01

    Three new indole alkaloids, named kopsihainins A-C (1-3), and two known compounds, kopsinine (4) and methyl demethoxycarbonylchanofruticosinate (5), were isolated from the stems of Kopsia hainanensis. Their structures were determined using extensive spectroscopic methods. The two main constituents 4 and 5 exhibited significant antitussive activity in a citric acid induced guinea pig cough model. The antitussive effect of 4 was demonstrated to interact with the δ-opioid receptor. This is the first report of antitussive effects of aspidofractinine type and chanofruticosinate type alkaloids.

  9. The expanding universe of alkaloid biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    De Luca, V; Laflamme, P

    2001-06-01

    Characterization of many of the major gene families responsible for the generation of central intermediates and for their decoration, together with the development of large genomics and proteomics databases, has revolutionized our capability to identify exotic and interesting natural-product pathways. Over the next few years, these tools will facilitate dramatic advances in our knowledge of the biosynthesis of alkaloids, which will far surpass that which we have learned in the past 50 years. These tools will also be exploited for the rapid characterization of regulatory genes, which control the development of specialized cell factories for alkaloid biosynthesis.

  10. Alkaloids from Hippeastrum morelianum Lem. (Amaryllidaceae).

    PubMed

    Giordani, Raquel B; de Andrade, Jean P; Verli, Hugo; Dutilh, Julie H; Henriques, Amélia T; Berkov, Strahil; Bastida, Jaume; Zuanazzi, José Angelo S

    2011-10-01

    The Amaryllidaceae family has proven to be a rich source of active molecules. As part of an ongoing project, we report a phytochemical study of Hippeastrum morelianum (Amaryllidaceae), from which we have isolated two homolycorine-type alkaloids, the new 2α,7-dimethoxyhomolycorine (1) and the poorly described candimine (2), as well as six known alkaloids: tazettine, pretazettine, 3-epimacronine, haemanthamine, hamayne and trisphaeridine. For reference purposes, the NMR of the isolated compounds was unequivocally described, based on 2D NMR measurements including (1)H-(1)H COSY, (1)H-(1)H NOESY, HSQC and HMBC.

  11. Rapid, cost-effective and accurate quantification of Yucca schidigera Roezl. steroidal saponins using HPLC-ELSD method.

    PubMed

    Tenon, Mathieu; Feuillère, Nicolas; Roller, Marc; Birtić, Simona

    2017-04-15

    Yucca GRAS-labelled saponins have been and are increasingly used in food/feed, pharmaceutical or cosmetic industries. Existing techniques presently used for Yucca steroidal saponin quantification remain either inaccurate and misleading or accurate but time consuming and cost prohibitive. The method reported here addresses all of the above challenges. HPLC/ELSD technique is an accurate and reliable method that yields results of appropriate repeatability and reproducibility. This method does not over- or under-estimate levels of steroidal saponins. HPLC/ELSD method does not require each and every pure standard of saponins, to quantify the group of steroidal saponins. The method is a time- and cost-effective technique that is suitable for routine industrial analyses. HPLC/ELSD methods yield a saponin fingerprints specific to the plant species. As the method is capable of distinguishing saponin profiles from taxonomically distant species, it can unravel plant adulteration issues.

  12. Identification of saponins from sugar beet (Beta vulgaris) by low and high-resolution HPLC-MS/MS.

    PubMed

    Mikołajczyk-Bator, Katarzyna; Błaszczyk, Alfred; Czyżniejewski, Mariusz; Kachlicki, Piotr

    2016-09-01

    We profiled triterpene saponins from the roots of sugar beet Beta vulgaris L. cultivars Huzar and Boryna using reversed-phase liquid chromatography combined with negative-ion electrospray ionization quadrupole mass spectrometry. We tentatively identified 26 triterpene saponins, including 17 that had not been detected previously in this plant species and 7 saponins that were tentatively identified as new compounds. All observed compounds were glycosides of five different aglycones, of which gypsogenin and norhederagenin are reported for the first time in sugar beet. Thirteen of the saponins detected in sugar beet roots were substituted with dioxolane-type (4 saponins) or acetal-type (9 saponins) dicarboxylic acids. Among the 26 detected saponins, we identified 2 groups of isomers distinguished using high-resolution mass measurements that were detected only in the Huzar cultivar of sugar beet.

  13. Effect of saponins on n-hexane removal in biotrickling filters.

    PubMed

    Tu, Yanhong; Yang, Chunping; Cheng, Yan; Zeng, Guangming; Lu, Li; Wang, Lu

    2015-01-01

    Saponins was applied to enhance the removal of n-hexane in a biotrickling filter (BTF) in this study. Comparison experiments were carried out to examine the effect of saponins on n-hexane removal in two BTFs at various saponins concentrations, n-hexane loading rates (LRs) and gas empty bed contact times (EBCTs). Results show that the optimum concentration of saponins in nutrient feed was 50.0mgL(-1). When organic LR of n-hexane increased from 47.8 to 120.0gm(-3)h(-1), the removal efficiency (RE) for BTF1 (with saponins) and BTF2 (without saponins) decreased from 91.3% to 83.3% and from 62.8% to 56.8%, respectively. As gas EBCT decreased from 30.0 to 7.5s, the RE declined from 88.4% to 64.5% for BTF1 and from 61.4% to 38.3% for BTF2. Saponins could also decrease the biomass accumulation rate within the medium bed. These results could be referred in the design and operation of BTFs for hydrophobic VOC removal.

  14. Effect of Agave americana and Agave salmiana Ripeness on Saponin Content from Aguamiel (Agave Sap).

    PubMed

    Leal-Díaz, Ana María; Santos-Zea, Liliana; Martínez-Escobedo, Hilda Cecilia; Guajardo-Flores, Daniel; Gutiérrez-Uribe, Janet Alejandra; Serna-Saldivar, Sergio Othón

    2015-04-22

    Steroidal saponins have shown beneficial health effects. Agave spp. leaves and rhizomes are sources of these compounds, but their presence has not been reported in the aguamiel. Aguamiel is the sweet edible sap from mature agave, and its quality is influenced by the plant ripening stage. The purpose of this research was to identify and quantitate saponins in aguamiel from Agave americana and Agave salmiana at two ripening stages. Saponins and sapogenins were identified with HPLC/ESI-MS/TOF and quantitated with HPLC/ELSD. Results proved the presence of saponins derived from kammogenin, manogenin, gentrogenin, and hecogenin. The saponin content in aguamiel from immature A. salmiana was 2-fold higher (478.3 protodioscin equivalents (PE) μg/g aguamiel (DM)) compared with A. americana (179.0 PE μg/g aguamiel (DM)). In both species, saponin content decreased when plants reached sexual maturity. This should be considered before evaluating the effects of Agave spp. as a source of bioactive saponins.

  15. Flavonoid regulation of EAG1 channels

    PubMed Central

    Carlson, Anne E.; Brelidze, Tinatin I.

    2013-01-01

    The voltage-gated, K+-selective ether á go-go 1 (EAG1) channel is expressed throughout the brain where it is thought to regulate neuronal excitability. Besides its normal physiological role in the brain, EAG1 is abnormally expressed in several cancer cell types and promotes tumor progression. Like all other channels in the KCNH family, EAG1 channels have a large intracellular carboxy-terminal region that shares structural similarity with cyclic nucleotide–binding homology domains (CNBHDs). EAG1 channels, however, are not regulated by the direct binding of cyclic nucleotides and have no known endogenous ligands. In a screen of biological metabolites, we have now identified four flavonoids as potentiators of EAG1 channels: fisetin, quercetin, luteolin, and kaempferol. These four flavonoids shifted the voltage dependence of activation toward more hyperpolarizing potentials and slowed channel deactivation. All four flavonoids regulated channel gating with half-maximal concentrations of 2–8 µM. The potentiation of gating did not require the amino-terminal or post-CNBHD regions of EAG1 channels. However, in fluorescence resonance energy transfer and anisotropy-based binding assays, flavonoids bound to the purified CNBHD of EAG1 channels. The CNBHD of KCNH channels contains an intrinsic ligand, a conserved stretch of residues that occupy the cyclic nucleotide–binding pocket. Mutations of the intrinsic ligand in EAG1 (Y699A) potentiated gating similar to flavonoids, and flavonoids did not further potentiate EAG1-Y699A channels. Furthermore, the Y699A mutant CNBHD bound to flavonoids with higher affinity than wild-type CNBHD. These results suggest that the flavonoids identified here potentiated EAG1 channels by binding to the CNBHD, possibly by displacing their intrinsic ligand. EAG1 channels should be considered as a possible target for the physiological effects of flavonoids. PMID:23440277

  16. Efficiently prepared ephedrine alkaloids-free Ephedra Herb extract: a putative marker and antiproliferative effects.

    PubMed

    Oshima, Naohiro; Yamashita, Tadatoshi; Hyuga, Sumiko; Hyuga, Masashi; Kamakura, Hiroyuki; Yoshimura, Morio; Maruyama, Takuro; Hakamatsuka, Takashi; Amakura, Yoshiaki; Hanawa, Toshihiko; Goda, Yukihiro

    2016-07-01

    Ephedrine alkaloids (EAs) have been considered the main pharmacologically active substances in Ephedra Herb (, Mao; EH) since they were first identified by Prof. N. Nagai, and are known to induce palpitation, hypertension, insomnia, and dysuria as side effects. Therefore, the administration of drugs containing EH to patients with cardiovascular-related diseases is severely contraindicated. While our previous studies suggest that some of the effects of EH may not be due to EAs, considering their side effects would be expedient to develop a new EAs-free EH extract (EFE). Here, we established a preparation method for EFE and revealed its chemical composition, including the content of herbacetin, a flavonoid aglycon present in EH and a potential putative marker for EFE quality control. In addition, we showed the antiproliferative effects of EFE against the H1975 non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cell line. EFE was prepared from EH extract using the ion exchange resin SK-1B. LC/Orbitrap MS analysis revealed the removal of EAs, 6-methoxykynurenic acid, and 6-hydroxykynurenic acid from the original extract. Quantitative analysis of herbacetin using LC/MS in acid-hydrolyzed EFE showed that its content was 0.104 %. Although several alkaloidal constituents were removed from EH extract, the antiproliferative effect of EFE against H1975 cells was comparable to that of EH extract. These results indicate that EFE retained the anticancer effect of EH and demonstrated its potential for future development as a new herbal medicine with reduced side effects.

  17. Effects of Holothuroid Ichtyotoxic Saponins on the Gills of Free-Living Fishes and Symbiotic Pearlfishes.

    PubMed

    Eeckhaut, Igor; Caulier, Guillaume; Brasseur, Lola; Flammang, Patrick; Gerbaux, Pascal; Parmentier, Eric

    2015-06-01

    Several carapid fishes, known as pearlfishes, are endosymbiotic in holothuroids and asteroids. These echinoderms contain a strong concentration of saponins that are efficient membranolytic repellents to predators. We compared the effects of exposure to saponins from the sea cucumber body wall and from the Cuvierian tubules on the behavior and gill ultrastructure of pearlfishes and free-living fishes. Saponins were extracted from the body wall of two holothuroids, the Mediterranean Holothuria forskali and the tropical Bohadschia atra, and from the water surrounding the Cuvierian tubules of B. atra. Five species of carapids that live in symbiosis with holothuroids and seven species of free-living fishes were exposed to these extracts. The free-living fishes exhibited a stress response and died about 45 times faster than pearlfishes when exposed to the same quantity of saponins. Cuvierian tubules and saponins extracted from the body wall were lethal to the free-living fishes, whereas the carapids were much less sensitive. The carapids did not exhibit a stress response. The high toxicity shown by Cuvierian tubules was not explained by the nature of the saponins that were identified by mass spectrometry, but it is likely due to the higher concentration of saponins in the tubules. Histology and scanning and transmission electron microscopy of the gills of the free-living fishes and pearlfishes showed that saponins act at the level of the secondary lamellae where they induce the detachment of the epithelia, create edema at the level of the epithelia, and induce pores in the epithelial cells that lead to their destruction and the invasion of inner cells (pillar cells and red blood cells). This sequence of events happens 5 min after saponin exposure in free-living fishes and after 1 h in carapids.

  18. Alkaloid production by callous tissue cultures of Cereus peruvianus (Cactaceae).

    PubMed

    de Oliveira, Arildo José Braz; Machado, Maria Fátima Pires da Silva

    2003-02-01

    The morphologically undifferentiated cells of nonregenerant callous tissue of Cereus peruvianus cultured in the original medium and in medium supplemented with tyrosine were used as an alkaloid source. Comparison of alkaloid production by C. peruvianus plants and by callous tissues indicated that alkaloid levels were almost twice as high in callous tissues as in shoots of C. peruvianus plants. The ratio of alkaloid concentration between mature plant and morphologically undifferentiated cells of callous tissue was 1:1.7. A relationship between culture medium containing tyrosine and alkaloid production was also observed in the callous tissues of C. peruvianus. Since increased alkaloid production may be induced by additional factors such as tyrosine, increasing levels of tyrosine or other conditions of the culture medium may be considered factors for inducing higher alkaloid production by C. peruvianus callous tissues.

  19. Therapeutic Potential of Steroidal Alkaloids in Cancer and Other Diseases.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Qi-Wei; Chen, Mei-Wan; Cheng, Ke-Jun; Yu, Pei-Zhong; Wei, Xing; Shi, Zhi

    2016-01-01

    Steroidal alkaloids are a class of secondary metabolites isolated from plants, amphibians, and marine invertebrates. Evidence accumulated in the recent two decades demonstrates that steroidal alkaloids have a wide range of bioactivities including anticancer, antimicrobial, anti-inflammatory, antinociceptive, etc., suggesting their great potential for application. It is therefore necessary to comprehensively summarize the bioactivities, especially anticancer activities and mechanisms of steroidal alkaloids. Here we systematically highlight the anticancer profiles both in vitro and in vivo of steroidal alkaloids such as dendrogenin, solanidine, solasodine, tomatidine, cyclopamine, and their derivatives. Furthermore, other bioactivities of steroidal alkaloids are also discussed. The integrated molecular mechanisms in this review can increase our understanding on the utilization of steroidal alkaloids and contribute to the development of new drug candidates. Although the therapeutic potentials of steroidal alkaloids look promising in the preclinical and clinical studies, further pharmacokinetic and clinical studies are mandated to define their efficacy and safety in cancer and other diseases.

  20. Honatisine, a novel diterpenoid alkaloid, and six known alkaloids from Delphinium honanense and their cytotoxic activity.

    PubMed

    He, Yang Qing; Ma, Zhan Ying; Wei, Xiao Mei; Liu, Dong Jie; Du, Bao Zhong; Yao, Bing Hua; Gao, Li Ming

    2011-11-01

    A novel diterpene alkaloid named honatisine (1) has been isolated from the whole plants of Delphinium honanense, along with six known alkaloids, siwanine E (2), isoatisine (3), atisine (4), delcorinine (5), uraphine (6), and nordhagenine A (7). Their structures were deduced on the basis of their spectral data. All of them were evaluated by a SRB assay for their cytotoxicity, and compound 1 showed a significant cytotoxic activity (IC(50) =3.16 μM) against the MCF-7 cell line.

  1. Steroidal saponins from the roots of Smilax sp.: structure and bioactivity.

    PubMed

    Challinor, Victoria L; Parsons, Peter G; Chap, Sonet; White, Eve F; Blanchfield, Joanne T; Lehmann, Reginald P; De Voss, James J

    2012-04-01

    Phytochemical characterization of a commercial herb sample supplied as Smilax ornata Lem. (sarsaparilla) led to the isolation of five steroidal saponins, including two new furostanol saponins sarsaparilloside B (1) and sarsaparilloside C (2), whose structures were elucidated via a combination of multistage mass spectrometry (MS(n)), 1D and 2D NMR experiments, and chemical degradation. The previously unreported spectroscopic characterization of sarsaparilloside (3), Δ(20(22))-sarsaparilloside (4), and parillin (5) is also provided. The antiproliferative activity of the isolated saponins was compared in six human cell lines derived from different tumor types and one of the structures (2) was particularly active against the HT29 colon tumor cell line.

  2. Saponins from leaves of Kalopanax pictum var. maximowiczii, a Korean medicinal plant.

    PubMed

    Hahn, D R; Oinaka, T; Kasai, R; Tanaka, O

    1989-08-01

    From leaves of Kalopanax pictum var. maximowiczii, a Korean medicinal plant, six known saponins of hederagenin were isolated. One of the monodesmosides was identified as sapindoside A, previously isolated from Sapindus spp. Another monodesmoside and four bisdesmosides were proved to be identical with saponins-K3, -K10 and -K12 and Kizuta saponins-K8 and -K11, respectively, all of which have been isolated from Hedera rhombea. It was observed that the water solubilities of these monodesmosides were increased in the presence of the co-occurring bisdesmosides. The relationship between structure and solubilizing effect is reported.

  3. Steroidal saponins obtained by biotransformation of total furostanol glycosides from Dioscorea zingiberensis with Absidia coerulea.

    PubMed

    Pang, Xu; Wen, Di; Zhao, Yang; Xiong, Cheng-Qi; Wang, Xiao-Qin; Yu, Li-Yan; Ma, Bai-Ping

    2015-01-30

    Five new steroidal saponins (1-5) were isolated from the fermentation broth of total furostanol glycosides from tubers of Dioscorea zingiberensis C.H. Wright incubated with a fungal, Absidia coerulea AS 3.3389, along with known saponins, zingiberensis new saponin (6), deltonin (7), prosapogenin A of dioscin (8), and protobioside (9), and their structures were established by NMR spectroscopy and mass spectrometry as well as by comparison with previously reported spectral data in the literatures. The induced effects in vitro on rat platelet aggregation of all compounds were evaluated.

  4. The Alkaloid Profiles of Lupinus sulphureus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Lupines are common plants found on the rangelands in the western United States. Lupines are known to contain alkaloids that can be toxic and teratogenic causing congenital birth defects (crooked calf disease). One such lupine, Lupinus sulphureus, occurs in parts of Oregon, Washington, and British ...

  5. Ergot alkaloids decrease rumen epithelial blood flow

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Two experiments were conducted to determine if ergot alkaloids affect blood flow to the absorptive surface of the rumen of steers. Steers (n=8 total) were pair-fed alfalfa cubes at 1.5× NEM and received ground endophyte-infected tall fescue seed (E+) or endophyte-free tall fescue seed (E-) via rumen...

  6. Photochemical N-demethylation of alkaloids.

    PubMed

    Ripper, J A; Tiekink, E R; Scammells, P J

    2001-02-26

    Certain alkaloids were observed to undergo N-demethylation processes under photochemical conditions. Tropine, acetyltropine, tropinone, and atropine were cleanly N-demethylated upon treatment with tetraphenylporphin, oxygen, and light. Dextromethorphan also underwent a N-demethylation reaction, but reacted further to afford an imine. In contrast, 14-acyloxycodeinones underwent a photochemically induced tandem N-demethylation acyl migration.

  7. Dehydropyrrolizidine alkaloid toxicity, cytotoxicity, and carcinogenicity

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Dehyro-pyrrolizidine alkaloid (PA)-containing plants compose about 5% of the world’s flowering plants and they commonly poison livestock, wildlife and humans. Previous work has produced considerable understanding of PA toxicity, species susceptibility, conditions and routes of exposure, toxin metab...

  8. Apoptosis-Inducing Effects of Amaryllidaceae Alkaloids.

    PubMed

    Nair, Jerald J; van Staden, Johannes; Bastida, Jaume

    2016-01-01

    The Amaryllidaceae occupies a privileged status amongst medicinal plants in having delivered the Alzheimer's drug galanthamine to the clinical market. Following its resounding success, there have been several positive indicators for the emergence of an anticancer drug from the family due to the potent antiproliferative activities manifested by several of its alkaloid constituents. Of these, the phenanthridones such as pancratistatin hold most promise as potential chemotherapeutics having succumbed to various phases of clinical trials. Other cytotoxic targets of the Amaryllidaceae are to be found within the lycorane and crinane groups, as exemplified by crinine and lycorine. Although the molecular targets of these alkaloids still remain elusive, much effort has gone into understanding their mode of action in cancer cells. Recent findings have shown that the apoptotic pathway may be a key factor in cancer cell death instigated by Amaryllidaceae alkaloids. As such, this review seeks to: (a) examine the apoptotic effects of Amaryllidaceae alkaloids in cancer cells; (b) explore the molecular basis to these effects; and (c) provide a pharmacophoric rationale in support of these activities.

  9. New indole alkaloid from Peschiera affinis (Apocynaceae).

    PubMed

    Santos, Allana Kellen L; Machado, Luciana L; Bizerra, Ayla Marcia C; Monte, Francisco José Q; Santiago, Gilvandete M P; Braz-Filho, Raimundo; Lemos, Telma L G

    2012-06-01

    A new indole alkaloid of the pyridocarbazole type, named 6N-hydroxy-olivacine, and two known compounds, 2N-oxide-olivacine and olivacine, were isolated from roots of Peschiera affinis. The structures of the compounds were determined by spectroscopic {IR and extensive NMR (COSY, HMQC, HMBCand NOESY)} and EIMS analysis.

  10. Four new Amaryllidaceae alkaloids from Zephyranthes candida.

    PubMed

    Shitara, Nanase; Hirasawa, Yusuke; Hasumi, Shunsuke; Sasaki, Tadahiro; Matsumoto, Misaki; Wong, Chin Piow; Kaneda, Toshio; Asakawa, Yoshinori; Morita, Hiroshi

    2014-07-01

    Four new Amaryllidaceae alkaloids (1-4) possessing a homolycorine-type or a crinine-type skeleton have been isolated from the aerial part of Zephyranthes candida, and their structures were elucidated on the basis of spectroscopic data. The stereochemistry was elucidated by combination of NOESY correlations and CD analyses.

  11. Mechanisms of growth inhibition of Phytomonas serpens by the alkaloids tomatine and tomatidine.

    PubMed

    Medina, Jorge Mansur; Rodrigues, Juliany Cola Fernandes; Moreira, Otacilio C; Atella, Geórgia; Souza, Wanderley de; Barrabin, Hector

    2015-02-01

    Phytomonas serpens are flagellates in the family Trypanosomatidae that parasitise the tomato plant (Solanum lycopersicum L.), which results in fruits with low commercial value. The tomato glycoalkaloid tomatine and its aglycone tomatidine inhibit the growth of P. serpens in axenic cultures. Tomatine, like many other saponins, induces permeabilisation of the cell membrane and a loss of cell content, including the cytosolic enzyme pyruvate kinase. In contrast, tomatidine does not cause permeabilisation of membranes, but instead provokes morphological changes, including vacuolisation. Phytomonas treated with tomatidine show an increased accumulation of labelled neutral lipids (BODYPY-palmitic), a notable decrease in the amount of C24-alkylated sterols and an increase in zymosterol content. These results are consistent with the inhibition of 24-sterol methyltransferase (SMT), which is an important enzyme that is responsible for the methylation of sterols at the 24 position. We propose that the main target of tomatidine is the sterols biosynthetic pathway, specifically, inhibition of the 24-SMT. Altogether, the results obtained in the present paper suggest a more general effect of alkaloids in trypanosomatids, which opens potential therapeutic possibilities for the treatment of the diseases caused by these pathogens.

  12. Mechanisms of growth inhibition of Phytomonas serpens by the alkaloids tomatine and tomatidine.

    PubMed

    Medina, Jorge Mansur; Rodrigues, Juliany Cola Fernandes; Moreira, Otacilio C; Atella, Geórgia; Souza, Wanderley de; Barrabin, Hector

    2015-02-13

    Phytomonas serpens are flagellates in the family Trypanosomatidae that parasitise the tomato plant (Solanum lycopersicum L.), which results in fruits with low commercial value. The tomato glycoalkaloid tomatine and its aglycone tomatidine inhibit the growth of P. serpens in axenic cultures. Tomatine, like many other saponins, induces permeabilisation of the cell membrane and a loss of cell content, including the cytosolic enzyme pyruvate kinase. In contrast, tomatidine does not cause permeabilisation of membranes, but instead provokes morphological changes, including vacuolisation. Phytomonas treated with tomatidine show an increased accumulation of labelled neutral lipids (BODYPY-palmitic), a notable decrease in the amount of C24-alkylated sterols and an increase in zymosterol content. These results are consistent with the inhibition of 24-sterol methyltransferase (SMT), which is an important enzyme that is responsible for the methylation of sterols at the 24 position. We propose that the main target of tomatidine is the sterols biosynthetic pathway, specifically, inhibition of the 24-SMT. Altogether, the results obtained in the present paper suggest a more general effect of alkaloids in trypanosomatids, which opens potential therapeutic possibilities for the treatment of the diseases caused by these pathogens.

  13. Mechanisms of growth inhibition of Phytomonas serpens by the alkaloids tomatine and tomatidine

    PubMed Central

    Medina, Jorge Mansur; Rodrigues, Juliany Cola Fernandes; Moreira, Otacilio C; Atella, Geórgia; de Souza, Wanderley; Barrabin, Hector

    2015-01-01

    Phytomonas serpens are flagellates in the family Trypanosomatidae that parasitise the tomato plant (Solanum lycopersicum L.), which results in fruits with low commercial value. The tomato glycoalkaloid tomatine and its aglycone tomatidine inhibit the growth of P. serpens in axenic cultures. Tomatine, like many other saponins, induces permeabilisation of the cell membrane and a loss of cell content, including the cytosolic enzyme pyruvate kinase. In contrast, tomatidine does not cause permeabilisation of membranes, but instead provokes morphological changes, including vacuolisation. Phytomonas treated with tomatidine show an increased accumulation of labelled neutral lipids (BODYPY-palmitic), a notable decrease in the amount of C24-alkylated sterols and an increase in zymosterol content. These results are consistent with the inhibition of 24-sterol methyltransferase (SMT), which is an important enzyme that is responsible for the methylation of sterols at the 24 position. We propose that the main target of tomatidine is the sterols biosynthetic pathway, specifically, inhibition of the 24-SMT. Altogether, the results obtained in the present paper suggest a more general effect of alkaloids in trypanosomatids, which opens potential therapeutic possibilities for the treatment of the diseases caused by these pathogens. PMID:25742263

  14. Alkaloids in Erythrina by UPLC-ESI-MS and In Vivo Hypotensive Potential of Extractive Preparations

    PubMed Central

    Merlugo, Liara; Santos, Marí C.; Sant'Anna, Liane S.; Cordeiro, Everson W. F.; Batista, Luiz A. C.; Miotto, Silvia T. S.; Garcia, Cássia V.; Moreira, Cleci M.; Mendez, Andreas S. L.

    2015-01-01

    Erythrina species are used in popular medicine as sedative, anxiolytic, anti-inflammatory, and antihypertensive. In this work, we investigated the chemical composition of extracts obtained from leaves of E. falcata and E. crista-galli. The hypotensive potential of E. falcata and the mechanism of action were also studied. The extracts were obtained by maceration and infusion. The total content of phenolic compounds and flavonoids was estimated by spectrophotometric methods. The chemical constituents were studied performing a chromatographic analysis by UPLC-ESI-MS. For in vivo protocols, blood pressure and heart rate were measured by the invasive hemodynamic monitoring method. Different concentrations of extracts and drugs such as L-NAME, losartan, hexamethonium, and propranolol were administrated i.v. The results of total phenolic contents for E. falcata and E. crista-galli were 1.3193–1.4989 mgGAE/mL for maceration and 0.8771–0.9506 mgGAE/mL for infusion. In total flavonoids, the content was 7.7829–8.1976 mg RE/g for maceration and 9.3471–10.4765 RE mg/g for infusion. The chemical composition was based on alkaloids, suggesting the presence of erythristemine, 11β-methoxyglucoerysodine, erysothiopine, 11β-hydroxyerysodine-glucose, and 11-hydroxyerysotinone-rhamnoside. A potent dose-dependent hypotensive effect was observed for E. falcata, which may be related to the route of β-adrenergic receptors. PMID:26356581

  15. Protective Mechanisms of Flavonoids in Parkinson's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Magalingam, Kasthuri Bai; Radhakrishnan, Ammu Kutty; Haleagrahara, Nagaraja

    2015-01-01

    Parkinson's disease is a chronic, debilitating neurodegenerative movement disorder characterized by progressive degeneration of dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra pars compacta region in human midbrain. To date, oxidative stress is the well accepted concept in the etiology and progression of Parkinson's disease. Hence, the therapeutic agent is targeted against suppressing and alleviating the oxidative stress-induced cellular damage. Within the past decades, an explosion of research discoveries has reported on the protective mechanisms of flavonoids, which are plant-based polyphenols, in the treatment of neurodegenerative disease using both in vitro and in vivo models. In this paper, we have reviewed the literature on the neuroprotective mechanisms of flavonoids in protecting the dopaminergic neurons hence reducing the symptoms of this movement disorder. The mechanism reviewed includes effect of flavonoids in activation of endogenous antioxidant enzymes, suppressing the lipid peroxidation, inhibition of inflammatory mediators, flavonoids as a mitochondrial target therapy, and modulation of gene expression in neuronal cells. PMID:26576219

  16. LC-MS(n) characterization of steroidal saponins in Helleborus niger L. roots and their conversion products during fermentation.

    PubMed

    Duckstein, Sarina M; Stintzing, Florian C

    2015-01-01

    Steroidal saponins comprise a substantial part of the secondary metabolite spectrum in the medicinal plant Helleborus niger L. (black hellebore). The saponin fraction from the roots was investigated by LC-MS(n) resulting in 38 saponins and β-ecdysone. Nine diosgenyl-type glycosides, mainly furostanols consisting of the aglycones diosgenin, macranthogenin, sceptrumgenin, and sarsasapogenin were accompanied by 5 diosgenyl-type saponins exhibiting an aglycone with an additional OH group. However, the most relevant compounds were 24 acetylated polyhydroxy saponins including hellebosaponins A and D. The enzymes glucuronidase, β-glucosidase, and pectinase were used to obtain an idea on potential fermentative transformation reactions by incubation of the isolated model saponins macranthosid I and hellebosaponin A. In a second step, aqueous H. niger extracts containing a much greater range of saponins were monitored during fermentation and 12months of storage. The metabolites were examined and assigned by LC-MS(n) and targeted extracted ion current (EIC) scan analyses. Good agreement was found among the results from the model compounds and the whole aqueous fermented extracts. The native diosgenyl-type furostanol saponins were converted to spirostanols under scission of hexoses. Alteration of the acetylated polyhydroxy saponins, exclusively spirostanols, took place following cleavage of acetyl groups and terminal deoxyhexoses. Most interestingly, the pentoses of the sugar chain at C(1) were not affected. Conversion of acetylated polyhydroxy saponins resulted in a final structure type which was stable and detectable, even after 12months of fermentation and storage.

  17. Antioxidant flavonoids bind human serum albumin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanakis, C. D.; Tarantilis, P. A.; Polissiou, M. G.; Diamantoglou, S.; Tajmir-Riahi, H. A.

    2006-10-01

    Human serum albumin (HSA) is a principal extracellular protein with a high concentration in blood plasma and carrier for many drugs to different molecular targets. Flavonoids are powerful antioxidants and prevent DNA damage. The antioxidative protections are related to their binding modes to DNA duplex and complexation with free radicals in vivo. However, flavonoids are known to inhibit the activities of several enzymes such as calcium phospholipid-dependent protein kinase, tyrosine protein kinase from rat lung, phosphorylase kinase, phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase and DNA topoisomerases that exhibit the importance of flavonoid-protein interaction. This study was designed to examine the interaction of human serum albumin (HSA) with quercetin (que), kaempferol (kae) and delphinidin (del) in aqueous solution at physiological conditions, using constant protein concentration of 0.25 mM (final) and various drug contents of 1 μM-1 mM. FTIR and UV-vis spectroscopic methods were used to determine the polyphenolic binding mode, the binding constant and the effects of flavonoid complexation on protein secondary structure. The spectroscopic results showed that flavonoids are located along the polypeptide chains through H-bonding interactions with overall affinity constant of Kque = 1.4 × 10 4 M -1, Kkae = 2.6 × 10 5 M -1 and Kdel = 4.71 × 10 5 M -1. The protein secondary structure showed no alterations at low pigment concentration (1 μM), whereas at high flavonoid content (1 mM), major reduction of α-helix from 55% (free HSA) to 42-46% and increase of β-sheet from 15% (free HSA) to 17-19% and β-anti from 7% (free HSA) to 10-20% occurred in the flavonoid-HSA adducts. The major reduction of HSA α-helix is indicative of a partial protein unfolding upon flavonoid interaction.

  18. Inhibition of aromatase activity by flavonoids.

    PubMed

    Jeong, H J; Shin, Y G; Kim, I H; Pezzuto, J M

    1999-06-01

    In searching for potent cancer chemopreventive agents from synthetic or natural products, 28 randomly selected flavonoids were screened for inhibitory effects against partially purified aromatase prepared from human placenta. Over 50% of the flavonoids significantly inhibited aromatase activity, with greatest activity being demonstrated with apigenin (IC50: 0.9 microg/mL), chrysin (IC50: 1.1 microg/mL), and hesperetin (IC50: 1.0 microg/mL).

  19. Phytolacacinoside A, a new triterpenoid saponin from Phytolacca acinosa Roxb.

    PubMed

    Gao, Hui-Min; Liu, Jin-Xiu; Wang, Zhi-Min; Wang, Wei-Hao

    2009-01-01

    Phytolacacinoside A (1), a novel triterpenoid saponin, together with the seven known compounds, was isolated from 75% ethanol extract of the root of Phytolacca acinosa Roxb (Phytolaccaceae). Their structures were elucidated on the basis of analysis of spectroscopic data and physicochemical properties as 3-O-beta-[(beta-d-glucopyranosyl-(1 --> 4)-O-beta-D-xylopyranosyl)]-11beta-methoxy-jaligonic acid 30-methyl ester 28-O-beta-D-glucopyranoside (1), 3-O-beta-[(beta-D-glucopyranosyl-(1 --> 4)-O-beta-D-xylopyranosyl)]-jaligonic acid 30-methyl ester 28-O-beta-D-glucopyranoside (2, esculentoside G), 3-O-beta-[(beta-D-glucopyranosyl-(1 --> 4)-O-beta-D-xylopyranosyl)]-jaligonic acid 30-methyl ester (3, phytolaccoside E), 3-O-beta-D-xylopyranosyl-jaligonic acid 30-methyl ester (4, phytolaccoside B), hypaphorine (5), palmitic acid monoglyceride (6), beta-sitosterol (7), and daucosterol (8).

  20. New tirucallane-type triterpenoid saponins from Sapindus mukorossi Gaetn.

    PubMed

    Ni, Wei; Hua, Yan; Teng, Rong-Wei; Kong, Yun-Cheung; Chen, Chang-Xiang

    2004-09-01

    Two new tirucallane-type triterpenoid saponins, sapimukoside C (1) and sapimukoside D (2), have been isolated from the roots of Sapindus mukorossi Gaetn. Their structures have been determined, on the basis of spectral and chemical analysis, as 3-O-alpha-L-rhamnopyranosyl-(1-->2)-[alpha-L- arabinopyranosyl-(1-->3)]-beta-D-glucopyranosyl (21,23R)-epoxyl tirucalla-7,24-diene-(21S)-ethoxyl-3 beta-ol (1) and 3-O-alpha-L-rhamnopyranosyl-(1-->2)-[alpha-L-arabinopyranosyl-(1-->3)]- beta-D-glucopyranosyl (21,23R)-epoxyl tirucall-7,24-diene-(21S)-methoxyl-3 beta-ol (2).

  1. Steroidal Saponins from Furcraea hexapetala Leaves and Their Phytotoxic Activity.

    PubMed

    Calle, Juan M; Pérez, Andy J; Simonet, Ana M; Guerra, José O; Macías, Francisco A

    2016-11-23

    Four new steroidal saponins (1-4) along with 13 known saponins were isolated from the leaves of Furcraea hexapetala. The new compounds were identified as (20R,22R,25R)-3β-hydroxy-5α-spirostan-12-one 3-O-{α-l-rhamnopyranosyl-(1→4)-O-β-d-glucopyranosyl-(1→3)-O-[β-d-glucopyranosyl-(1→3)-O-β-d-glucopyranosyl-(1→2)]-O-β-d-glucopyranosyl-(1→4)-O-β-d-galactopyranoside} (1), (25R)-3β-hydroxy-5α-spirost-20(21)-en-12-one 3-O-{α-l-rhamnopyranosyl-(1→4)-O-β-d-glucopyranosyl-(1→3)-O-[β-d-glucopyranosyl-(1→3)-O-β-d-glucopyranosyl-(1→2)]-O-β-d-glucopyranosyl-(1→4)-O-β-d-galactopyranoside} (2), (25R)-5α-spirostan-3β-ol 3-O-{β-d-glucopyranosyl-(1→2)-O-β-d-glucopyranosyl-(1→2)-O-β-d-glucopyranosyl-(1→4)-O-β-d-galactopyranoside} (3), and (25R)-5β-spirostan-3β-ol 3-O-{β-d-glucopyranosyl-(1→6)-O-β-d-galactopyranoside} (4) by spectroscopic analysis, including one- and two-dimensional NMR techniques, mass spectrometry, and chemical methods. The phytotoxicity of the isolated compounds against the standard target species Lactuca sativa was evaluated. Structure-activity relationships for these compounds with respect to phytotoxic effects are discussed.

  2. Impact of flavonoids on thyroid function.

    PubMed

    de Souza Dos Santos, Maria Carolina; Gonçalves, Carlos Frederico Lima; Vaisman, Mário; Ferreira, Andrea Claudia Freitas; de Carvalho, Denise Pires

    2011-10-01

    Flavonoids are polyphenolic compounds of natural occurrence produced by plants that are largely consumed both for therapeutic purposes and as food. Experimental data have shown that many flavonoids could inhibit thyroperoxidase activity, decreasing thyroid hormones levels thus increasing TSH and causing goiter. In humans, infants fed with soy formula have been shown to develop goiter. However, in post-menopausal women soy intake did not affect thyroid function. In thyroid tumor cell line, flavonoids were shown to inhibit cell growth, but they can also decrease radioiodine uptake, that could reduce the efficacy of radioiodine therapy. Flavonoids could also affect the availability of thyroid hormones to target tissues, by inhibiting deiodinase activity or displacing T4 from transthyretin. Thus, flavonoids have been shown to interfere with many aspects of the thyroid hormones synthesis and availability in in vivo and in vitro models. In the present article, we review and synthesize the literature on the effects of flavonoids on thyroid and discuss the possible relevance of these effects for humans.

  3. Flavonoids in monospecific eucalyptus honeys from Australia.

    PubMed

    Martos, I; Ferreres, F; Yao, L; D'Arcy, B; Caffin, N; Tomás-Barberán, F A

    2000-10-01

    The HPLC analyses of Australian unifloral Eucalyptus honeys have shown that the flavonoids myricetin (3,5,7,3',4', 5'-hexahydroxyflavone), tricetin (5,7,3',4',5'-pentahydroxyflavone), quercetin (3,5,7,3',4'-pentahydroxyflavone), luteolin (5,7,3', 4'-tetrahydroxyflavone), and kaempferol (3,5,7, 4'-tetrahydroxyflavone) are present in all samples. These compounds were previously suggested as floral markers of European Eucalyptus honeys. The present results confirm the use of flavonoid analysis as an objective method for the botanical origin determination of eucalyptus honey. Honeys from E. camaldulensis (river red gum honey) contain tricetin as the main flavonoid marker, whereas in honeys from E. pilligaensis (mallee honey), luteolin is the main flavonoid marker, suggesting that species-specific differences can be detected with this analysis. The main difference between the flavonoid profiles of Australian and European Eucalyptus honeys is that in the Australian honeys, the propolis-derived flavonoids (pinobanksin (3,5, 7-trihydroxyflavanone), pinocembrin (5,7-dihydroxyflavanone), and chrysin (5,7-dihydroxyflavone)) are seldom found and in much smaller amounts.

  4. Dietary flavonoids, lignans and colorectal cancer prognosis

    PubMed Central

    Zamora-Ros, Raul; Guinó, Elisabeth; Henar Alonso, M.; Vidal, Carmen; Barenys, Mercè; Soriano, Antonio; Moreno, Victor

    2015-01-01

    Flavonoids and lignans are polyphenol classes with anticarcinogenic activities against colorectal cancer (CRC). However, very limited epidemiological evidence exists on their effects on CRC prognosis. This study aimed to evaluate the association between flavonoid and lignan intakes with the risk of CRC recurrence and overall survival in CRC patients. The study followed incident histologically confirmed CRC cases in Barcelona (Spain). Validated dietary questionnaires and lifestyle information were collected at recruitment. An ad hoc food composition database on flavonoids and lignans was compiled by using data from the US Department of Agriculture and Phenol-Explorer databases. Adjusted hazards ratios (HR) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were estimated using multivariable Cox models. After 8.6 years of mean follow-up, 133 of 409 (32.5%) participants died and 77 of 319 (24.1%) had a CRC recurrence. Total flavonoids were associated neither with CRC recurrence (HR comparing extreme tertiles 1.13, 95% CI 0.64–2.02; P-trend 0.67) nor with overall survival (HRT3vsT1 1.06, 95% CI 0.69–1.65; P-trend 0.78) in the multivariable models. No associations were also observed with either total lignans or any flavonoid subclass intake. In conclusion, the results of the current study do not support a role of flavonoid and lignan intake in the CRC prognosis. PMID:26369380

  5. Dietary flavonoid sources in Australian adults.

    PubMed

    Somerset, Shawn M; Johannot, Lidwine

    2008-01-01

    Evidence from laboratory-based in vitro studies provides compelling evidence supporting the involvement of dietary flavonoid intake in human cancer risk. Associations between intakes of individual flavonoids and disease outcomes at the population level are emerging from recent epidemiological studies. As an important step in the development of methods to assess flavonoid intakes across populations, the major sources of dietary flavonoids in the adult Australian population were identified. Data from a 24-h diet recall questionnaire used in a national nutrition survey (NNS95-comprising a sample of 10,851 subjects aged 19 yr and over) were combined with U.S. Department of Agriculture data on flavonoid content of foods to identify key sources. Black and green teas clearly were the dominant sources of the flavonols kaempferol, myricetin, and quercetin. Other significant flavonol sources included onion (isorhamnetin and quercetin), broccoli (kaempferol and quercetin), apple (quercetin), grape (quercetin), coffee (myrcetin), and beans (quercetin). Black and green teas also were dominant sources of flavon-3-ols, with wine, apples, and pears contributing somewhat. In terms of flavanone consumption, oranges (hesperetin and naringenin), lemon (eriodictyol), mandarin (hesperetin), and grapefruit (naringenin) were the major sources. Parsley (apigenin), celery (apigenin and luteolin), and English spinach (luteolin) were the major flavone sources. Wine was the major anthocyanadin source (delphinidin, malvidin, peonidin and petunidin), with smaller amounts from cherry (peonidin) and blueberry (delphinidin, malvidin, peonidin and petunidin). It is suggested that the relatively small number of aforementioned key foods form the basis of food frequency questionnaires to assess flavonoid intake.

  6. Flavonoids and oxidative stress in Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Sotibrán, América Nitxin Castañeda; Ordaz-Téllez, María Guadalupe; Rodríguez-Arnaiz, Rosario

    2011-11-27

    Flavonoids are a family of antioxidants that are widely represented in fruits, vegetables, dry legumes, and chocolate, as well as in popular beverages, such as red wine, coffee, and tea. The flavonoids chlorogenic acid, kaempferol, quercetin and quercetin 3β-d-glycoside were investigated for genotoxicity using the wing somatic mutation and recombination test (SMART). This test makes use of two recessive wing cell markers: multiple wing hairs (mwh) and flare (flr(3)), which are mutations located on the left arm of chromosome 3 of Drosophila melanogaster and are indicative of both mitotic recombination and various types of mutational events. In order to test the antioxidant capacities of the flavonoids, experiments were conducted with various combinations of oxidants and polyphenols. Oxidative stress was induced using hydrogen peroxide, the Fenton reaction and paraquat. Third-instar transheterozygous larvae were chronically treated for all experiments. The data obtained in this study showed that, at the concentrations tested, the flavonoids did not induce somatic mutations or recombination in D. melanogaster with the exception of quercetin, which proved to be genotoxic at only one concentration. The oxidants hydrogen peroxide and the Fenton reaction did not induce mutations in the wing somatic assay of D. melanogaster, while paraquat and combinations of flavonoids produced significant numbers of small single spots. Quercetin 3β-d-glycoside mixed with paraquat was shown to be desmutagenic. Combinations of the oxidants with the other flavonoids did not show any antioxidant activity.

  7. Insecticidal Constituents and Activity of Alkaloids from Cynanchum mongolicum.

    PubMed

    Ge, Yang; Liu, Pingping; Yang, Rui; Zhang, Liu; Chen, Hongxing; Camara, Ibrahima; Liu, Yiqing; Shi, Wangpeng

    2015-09-21

    Based on MS and NMR data and bioassay-guided tracing, three insecticidal alkaloids I, II and III from Cynanchum mongolicum were identified to be antofine N-oxide, antofine and tylophorine. Alkaloid I was more toxic than alkaloids II and III, but they were less active against Spodoptera litura than total alkaloids. The contact toxicity from these alkaloids against the aphid Lipaphis erysimi was significant, as the 24 h-LC50 values of alkaloids I, II, III and total alkaloids were 292.48, 367.21, 487.791 and 163.52 mg/L, respectively. The development disruption of S. litura larvae was tested, the pupation and emergence rates of S. litura decreased and the acute mortality of S. litura increased significantly by day 3 after being injected in their body cavity with 10-40 mg/L of total alkaloid. The ecdysone titer of treated S. litura larvae and prepupae declined with increasing alkaloid concentration. The alkaloids of Cynanchum mongolicum are potential insect growth inhibitors.

  8. Structure of a new saponin: chrysantellin A from Chrysanthellum procumbens Rich.

    PubMed

    Becchi, M; Bruneteau, M; Trouilloud, M; Combier, H; Sartre, J; Michel, G

    1979-12-01

    A new saponin has been isolated from a tropical plant Chrysantellum procumbens Rich. which is thought to be useful in the therapy of digestive troubles. The structure of this saponin was determined by chemical methods, nuclear magnetic resonance and mass spectrometry. The aglycone moiety is a triterpene, echinocystic acid; D-glucose, D-xylose and L-rhamnose are carbohydrate components. The structure of saponin was established as 3-O-beta-D-glucopyranosyl [L-rhamnopyranosyl-(alpha 1 leads to 3)-D-xylopyranosyl-)beta 1 leads to 4)-L-rhamnopyranosyl-(alpha 1 leads to 2)-D-xylopyranosyl]-(alpha 1 leads to 28)-echinocystyl. The name, chrysantellin A, is proposed for this new saponin.

  9. Saponins from the Spanish saffron Crocus sativus are efficient adjuvants for protein-based vaccines.

    PubMed

    Castro-Díaz, Nathaly; Salaun, Bruno; Perret, Rachel; Sierro, Sophie; Romero, Jackeline F; Fernández, Jose-Antonio; Rubio-Moraga, Angela; Romero, Pedro

    2012-01-05

    Protein and peptide-based vaccines provide rigorously formulated antigens. However, these purified products are only weakly immunogenic by themselves and therefore require the addition of immunostimulatory components or adjuvants in the vaccine formulation. Various compounds derived from pathogens, minerals or plants, possess pro-inflammatory properties which allow them to act as adjuvants and contribute to the induction of an effective immune response. The results presented here demonstrate the adjuvant properties of novel saponins derived from the Spanish saffron Crocus sativus. In vivo immunization studies and tumor protection experiments unambiguously establish the value of saffron saponins as candidate adjuvants. These saponins were indeed able to increase both humoral and cellular immune responses to protein-based vaccines, ultimately providing a significant degree of protection against tumor challenge when administered in combination with a tumor antigen. This preclinical study provides an in depth immunological characterization of a new saponin as a vaccine adjuvant, and encourages its further development for use in vaccine formulations.

  10. Differential activity of multiple saponins against omnivorous insects with varying feeding preferences

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A variety of saponin glycosides and aglycones from seven different plant families (Aquifoliaceae, Asparagaceae, Caryophyllaceae, Dioscoreaceae, Leguminosae, Rosaceae, Sapindaceae) were tested against the corn earworm, Helicoverpa zea, and the fall armyworm, Spodoptera frugiperda. The corn earworm fe...

  11. [Structure and biological action on cardiovascular systems of saponins from Panax notoginseng].

    PubMed

    Li, Juan; Wang, Ru-feng; Yang, Li; Wang, Zheng-tao

    2015-09-01

    Notoginseng Radix et Rhizoma (Sanqi), the underground part of Panax notoginseng (Burk.) F. H. Chen (Araliaceae) is commonly used in Chinese medicine for treatment of haemorrhage, haemostasis, swelling, etc. The aerial part including leaves, flowers and fruits are also applied for similar functions. Triterpenoid saponins are considered to be responsible for the biological activities of Sanqi. Up to date, more than 100 saponins have been isolated from theroots, rhizomes, leaves, flowers and fruits of P. notoginseng. The reported saponins can be classified into protopanaxadiol (PPD), protopanaxatriol (PPT), C17 side-chain varied and other types, according to the skeletons of the aglycons. The present review summarizes the saponins isolated from P. notoginseng and their distribution in different medicinal organs, as well as the pharmacological actions on cardiovascular system.

  12. MS/MS similarity networking accelerated target profiling of triterpene saponins in Eleutherococcus senticosus leaves.

    PubMed

    Ge, Yue-Wei; Zhu, Shu; Yoshimatsu, Kayo; Komatsu, Katsuko

    2017-07-15

    The targeted mass information of compounds accelerated their discovery in a large volume of untargeted MS data. An MS/MS similarity networking is advanced in clustering the structural analogues, which benefits the collection of mass information of similar compounds. The triterpene saponins extracted from Eleutherococcus senticosus leaves (ESL), a kind of functional tea, have shown promise in the relief of Alzheimer's disease. In this work, a target-precursor list (TPL) generated using MS/MS similarity networking was employed to rapidly trace 106 triterpene saponins from the aqueous extracts of ESL, of which 49 were tentatively identified as potentially new triterpene saponins. Moreover, a compound database of triterpene saponins was established and successfully applied to uncover their distribution features in ESL samples collected from different areas.

  13. Influence of pearling process on phenolic and saponin content in quinoa (Chenopodium quinoa Willd).

    PubMed

    Gómez-Caravaca, Ana Maria; Iafelice, Giovanna; Verardo, Vito; Marconi, Emanuele; Caboni, Maria Fiorenza

    2014-08-15

    The aim of this work was to obtain sweet quinoa seeds by a pearling process. Thus, two different pearling degrees (20% and 30%) were tested. Moreover, the effect of pearling process on saponins and phenolic content in quinoa were evaluated. To this end, GC-MS methodology was used to identify and quantify the saponins and reversed phase-high performance liquid chromatography coupled to DAD and mass spectrometer detectors was applied to study the phenolic composition. As expected, whole quinoa had the highest saponins and phenolics contents. An abrasion degree of 30% was necessary to obtain sweet quinoa (with a total saponin content lower than 110 mg/100 g). Obviously, this process caused a decrease of 21.5% and 35.2% of free and bound phenolic compounds, respectively. However, this decrease was lower if compared with other cereals. Thus, pearling process is a promising sustainable method to obtain sweet quinoa with a "green" approach.

  14. Tirucallane-type triterpenoid saponins from the roots of Sapindus mukorossi.

    PubMed

    Ni, Wei; Hua, Yan; Liu, Hai-Yang; Teng, Rong-Wei; Kong, Yun-Cheung; Hu, Xiu-Ying; Chen, Chang-Xiang

    2006-10-01

    Six new tirucallane-type triterpenoid saponins, sapimukosides E-J (1-6) were isolated from the roots of Sapindus mukorossi GAERTN. Their structures were elucidated by a combination of spectral and chemical analysis.

  15. Anti-platelet aggregation triterpene saponins from the galls of Sapindus mukorossi.

    PubMed

    Huang, Hui-Chi; Tsai, Wei-Jern; Liaw, Chia-Ching; Wu, Shih-Hsiung; Wu, Yang-Chang; Kuo, Yao-Haur

    2007-09-01

    Bioassay-directed fractionation of an ethanolic extract of the galls of Sapindus mukorossi has resulted in the isolation of two new tirucallane-type triterpenoid saponins, sapinmusaponins Q (1) and R (2), along with three known oleanane-type triterpenoid saponins (3-5). Their structures were elucidated on the basis of spectroscopic analysis and chemical hydrolysis. Biological evaluation showed that both sapinmusaponins Q and R demonstrated more potent anti-platelet aggregation activity than aspirin.

  16. Haemolytic and Antimicrobial Activites of Saponin-Rich Extracts from Guar Meal

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Saponin-rich GM extract was prepared by refluxing 25 g of GM with 250 ml of EtOH/H2O (1:1, v/v) for 3 h then filtering and distilling EtOH at 50oC. The refluxed extract was partitioned with equal volume of BuOH obtaining crude saponin-rich GM extract with 4.8 ± 0.6% DM of GM that was purified by RP...

  17. Rapid quantification of 14 saponins of Maesa lanceolata by UPLC-MS/MS.

    PubMed

    Foubert, K; Cuyckens, F; Vleeschouwer, K; Theunis, M; Vlietinck, A; Pieters, L; Apers, S

    2010-06-15

    Saponins are high molecular weight glycosides which are known for their broad range of biological activities. In case of Maesa lanceolata, a tree growing in African countries, the maesasaponins showed virucidal, haemolytic, molluscicidal and anti-angiogenic activity. Since the different activities are dependent on the structure of the saponins, a method was developed and validated for the analysis of the individual saponins in this plant. Since the saponins were only present in small amounts, it was necessary to develop a very sensitive analytical method. For the fast and sensitive analysis of the extracted and purified plant samples ultra-performance liquid chromatography was coupled to a triple quadrupole mass spectrometer for MS/MS detection. A method in positive ESI mode, using sodium acetate in the mobile phase, was developed. The sodium adduct ion was selected as the precursor ion since it provided better sensitivity and a better, more stable fragmentation compared to the deprotonated and protonated ions. The intensity of the signal obtained by fragmentation of the sodium adducts of the saponins, was optimized by the addition of different concentrations of sodium acetate to the mobile phase. Reference standards were not available for all 14 saponins. Therefore, a relative MS/UV response was calculated allowing the estimation of the saponins in real samples. alpha-Hederin was used as external standard. The method was linear over the investigated concentration range with a good correlation coefficient (>0.99). The intra- and inter-day precisions were below 15% for most maesasaponins with the exception of maesasaponin II, which showed a precision within 20%. The recoveries of the spiked pure compounds maesasaponin IV.1 and VII.1 were 96.6% and 85.5%, respectively. The validated method can be applied in the investigation of the content of 14 saponins in transgenic and non-transgenic plant material of M. lanceolata.

  18. Bioactive flavonoids from Flos Sophorae.

    PubMed

    Shi, Wenzhong; Liu, Lili; Li, Jian; Qu, Lu; Pang, Xu; Yu, Haiyang; Zhang, Yi; Wang, Tao

    2017-03-29

    Three new flavonoid glycosides-soyaflavonosides A (1), B (2), and C (3)-together with 23 known ones were obtained from the 70% EtOH extract of Flos Sophorae (Sophora japonica, Leguminosae). Their structures were elucidated by chemical and spectroscopic methods. Among the known isolates, 14, 18, 20, 22, and 26 were isolated from the Sophora genus for the first time; 12, 19, 24, and 25 were obtained from the species firstly. Moreover, NMR data for compounds 18 and 26 are reported for the first time here. Meanwhile, compounds 4, 8-13, 15, 16, 19, 21, and 22 presented obvious inhibitory effects on TG accumulation in HepG2 cells. Analysis of the structure-activity relationship indicated that all of the quercetin glycosides examined in this study possess significant activity that is not significantly influenced by the amount of glycosyl present, whereas increasing the amount of glycosyl reduced the activities of isorhamnetin glycosides and orobol. In addition, a high dose (30 μmol/l) of kaempferol was found to inhibit HepG2 cell growth, while a low dose (10 μmol/l) was observed to decrease TG accumulation.

  19. Preliminary phytochemical screening and alpha-glucosidase inhibitory activity of Philippine taro (Colocasia esculenta (L.) Schott var. PSB-VG #9)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lebosada, Richemae Grace R.; Librando, Ivy L.

    2017-01-01

    The study was conducted to determine the anti-hyperglycemic property in terms of α-glucosidase inhibitory activity of the various parts (corm, leaf and petiole) of Colocasia esculenta (L.) Schott var. PSB-VG #9. Each of the plant parts were extracted with 95% ethanol and concentrated using a rotary evaporator at 40 °C. The crude extracts were screened for the presence of alkaloids, flavonoids, glycosides and saponins using Thin Layer Chromatography. The α-glucosidase inhibitory activity of the crude extracts (50 mg/L) were assayed spectrophotometrically using a microplate reader. The results of the phytochemical screening revealed the presence of alkaloids, flavonoids, and saponins in the leaf part while flavonoids and saponins were detected in the petiole and only saponins were present in the corm. The assay showed that the percentage α-glucosidase inhibition of the 50 mg/L ethanolic crude extract of the corm, leaves and petiole of C. esculenta are 68.03, 71.64 and 71.39%, respectively. Statistical analysis shows significant differences in the α-glucosidase inhibition among the various plant parts. It can be concluded that the ethanolic crude extracts of the different parts of C. esculenta (L.) Schott var. PSB-VG #9 exhibited inhibitory activity against α-glucosidase and the presence of phytochemicals like alkaloids, flavonoids and saponins may have contributed greatly to the inhibitory activity of the plant extract and can be further subjected for isolation of the therapeutically active compounds with antidiabetes potency.

  20. Metabolic and functional diversity of saponins, biosynthetic intermediates and semi-synthetic derivatives

    PubMed Central

    Moses, Tessa; Papadopoulou, Kalliope K.

    2014-01-01

    Saponins are widely distributed plant natural products with vast structural and functional diversity. They are typically composed of a hydrophobic aglycone, which is extensively decorated with functional groups prior to the addition of hydrophilic sugar moieties, to result in surface-active amphipathic compounds. The saponins are broadly classified as triterpenoids, steroids or steroidal glycoalkaloids, based on the aglycone structure from which they are derived. The saponins and their biosynthetic intermediates display a variety of biological activities of interest to the pharmaceutical, cosmetic and food sectors. Although their relevance in industrial applications has long been recognized, their role in plants is underexplored. Recent research on modulating native pathway flux in saponin biosynthesis has demonstrated the roles of saponins and their biosynthetic intermediates in plant growth and development. Here, we review the literature on the effects of these molecules on plant physiology, which collectively implicate them in plant primary processes. The industrial uses and potential of saponins are discussed with respect to structure and activity, highlighting the undoubted value of these molecules as therapeutics. PMID:25286183

  1. Effect of spermicides on Lactobacillus acidophilus in vitro-nonoxynol-9 vs. Sapindus saponins.

    PubMed

    Ojha, P; Maikhuri, J P; Gupta, G

    2003-08-01

    Saponins extracted from the fruit pericarp of Sapindus mukorosii were tested for their bactericidal/bacteriostatic property against Lactobacillus acidophilus. Nonoxynol-9 was used as a reference compound for the comparison of activity. Lactobacillus colonies were grown on specific medium (Rogosa SL agar) containing different concentrations of saponins and nonoxynol-9 in an atmosphere of 5% CO2/95% air at 37 degrees C for 72 h. The number and size of colonies were recorded at the end of the experiment and compared with controls. Results indicated that nearly 90% of Lactobacillus colonies with minor reduction in size thrived at 0.05% concentration of saponins whereas only 18% of colonies with approximately 75% reduction in size grew in dishes containing 0.05% nonoxynol-9. At higher concentrations of saponins, there was a gradual, dose-dependent reduction in the number and size of colonies and at 2.5% concentration there was an approximately 55% reduction in the number and 60% reduction in the size of surviving colonies. No lactobacillus colonies, however, grew in dishes containing 0.1% and higher concentrations of nonoxynol-9. The studies indicate that Sapindus saponins as compared to nonoxynol-9 are far less toxic to lactobacillus species and therefore saponins containing spermicidal preparations are likely to be more vaginal-friendly than equivalent nonoxynol-9 preparations.

  2. Determination of saponins in the kernel cake of Balanites aegyptiaca by HPLC-ESI/MS.

    PubMed

    Chapagain, Bishnu P; Wiesman, Zeev

    2007-01-01

    The kernel cake produced from Balanites aegyptiaca fruit of Israeli origin was analysed for its saponin constituents using high-performance liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (HPLC-MS). The HPLC was equipped with a reversed-phase C18 column and a refractive index detector (RID), and elution was isocratic with methanol and water (70:30). The MS system was equipped with electrospray ionisation (ESI). Nine compounds were chromatographically separated, their masses were determined in the negative ion mode and subsequent fragmentation of each component was carried out. From the nine components, six saponins with molecular masses of 1196, 1064, 1210, 1224, 1078 and 1046 Da were identified, with the compound of mass 1210 Da being the main saponin (ca. 36%). Saponins with masses of 1224 and 1046 Da have not been previously reported in B. aegyptiaca. In all saponins, diosgenin was found to be the sole aglycone. This study shows that HPLC-ESI/MS is a quick and reliable technique for characterizing the saponins from kernel cake of B. aegyptiaca.

  3. Insect growth regulator activity of Cestrum parqui saponins: an interaction with cholesterol metabolism.

    PubMed

    Ikbal, C; Ben, Halima-Kamel M; Ben, Hamouda M H

    2006-01-01

    Cestrum parqui is an ornamental shrub known for its insecticidal activity against some insect pests; this activity comes from the crude saponic extract of the leaves of this plant, the saponins cause insect growth regulator symptoms (development and moulting perturbation). In this work we try to demonstrate the hypothesis that saponins interact with ecdysone (moulting hormone) synthesis mechanisms by reducing diet cholesterol absorption (cholesterol forms the skeleton of ecdysone and of other ecdysteroids). To show the cholesterol/saponin interaction we used a stored product pest insect (Tribolium confuisurn), the larva of this insect are affected by saponins added in their diet, but the addition of cholesterol permits to reduce significatively this insecticidal propriety. Using Spodoptera littoralis larva model the tentative to detect a cholesterol rate reduction on the level of hemolymph is also unsuccessful. All these experiments shows that this type of reaction can't occur in the diet or in the digestive system but probably in insect cells. It is clear that Cestrurn parqui saponins affect the cholesterol metabolism but the exactly mechanism is still unknown. More investigations are necessary to develop this hypothesis and to envisage the use of Cestrum saponins as insect growth regulator bioinsecticide.

  4. Phyto-saponins as a natural adjuvant for delivery of agromaterials through plant cuticle membranes.

    PubMed

    Chapagain, Bishnu P; Wiesman, Zeev

    2006-08-23

    With growing use of synthetic adjuvants in modern agriculture, their impacts on the environment are being questioned. In a search for an environmentally safe phyto-adjuvant, we have investigated natural glycosidic saponin for delivery of agromaterials through plant cuticle membranes. Four saponin preparations from Quillaja saponaria bark (QE), obtained from Sigma-Aldrich, and Balanites aegyptiaca fruit mesocarp (ME), kernel (KE), and root (RE), isolated and characterized in our laboratory, were used for testing the delivery of [14C]-2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D) across isolated intact astomatous adaxial Citrus grandis leaf cuticle membranes (CMs). The results showed that both Q. saponaria and B. aegyptiaca saponin preparations enhanced delivery of 2,4-D through CMs. Among the saponin preparations, ME exhibited a significantly higher level of delivery of 2,4-D with a concentration effect (2% being the highest). Transmission electron microscope (TEM) and dynamic light scattering (DLS) characterization of these saponin preparations in aqueous solution clearly demonstrated the formation of nanoscale vesicles. Various possibilities for a natural amphiphatic phyto-saponin as a delivery adjuvant through CMs are discussed.

  5. Flavonoids, Flavonoid Subclasses, and Esophageal Cancer Risk: A Meta-Analysis of Epidemiologic Studies.

    PubMed

    Cui, Lingling; Liu, Xinxin; Tian, Yalan; Xie, Chen; Li, Qianwen; Cui, Han; Sun, Changqing

    2016-06-08

    Flavonoids have been suggested to play a chemopreventive role in carcinogenesis. However, the epidemiologic studies assessing dietary intake of flavonoids and esophageal cancer risk have yielded inconsistent results. This study was designed to examine the association between flavonoids, each flavonoid subclass, and the risk of esophageal cancer with a meta-analysis approach. We searched for all relevant studies with a prospective cohort or case-control study design published from January 1990 to April 2016, using PUBMED, EMBASE, and Web of Science. Pooled odds ratios (ORs) were calculated using fixed or random-effect models. In total, seven articles including 2629 cases and 481,193 non-cases were selected for the meta-analysis. Comparing the highest-intake patients with the lowest-intake patients for total flavonoids and for each flavonoid subclass, we found that anthocyanidins (OR = 0.60, 95% CI: 0.49-0.74), flavanones (OR = 0.65, 95% CI: 0.49-0.86), and flavones (OR = 0.78, 95% CI 0.64-0.95) were inversely associated with the risk of esophageal cancer. However, total flavonoids showed marginal association with esophageal cancer risk (OR = 0.78, 95% CI: 0.59-1.04). In conclusion, our study suggested that dietary intake of total flavonoids, anthocyanidins, flavanones, and flavones might reduce the risk of esophageal cancer.

  6. Toxicosis by Plant Alkaloids in Humans and Animals in Colombia.

    PubMed

    Diaz, Gonzalo J

    2015-12-11

    Due to its tropical location, chains of mountains, inter-Andean valleys, Amazon basin area, eastern plains and shores on both the Atlantic and Pacific Oceans, Colombia has many ecosystems and the second largest plant biodiversity in the world. Many plant species, both native and naturalized, are currently recognized as toxic for both animals and humans, and some of them are known to cause their toxic effects due to their alkaloid content. Among these, there are plants containing the hepatotoxic pyrrolizidine alkaloids, neurotoxins such as the indolizidine alkaloid swainsonine and the piperidine alkaloids coniine and γ-coniceine and tropane alkaloids. Unfortunately, the research in toxic plants in Colombia is not nearly proportional to its plant biodiversity and the scientific information available is only very scarce. The present review aims at summarizing the scarce information about plant alkaloid toxicosis in animals and humans in Colombia.

  7. Toxicosis by Plant Alkaloids in Humans and Animals in Colombia

    PubMed Central

    Diaz, Gonzalo J.

    2015-01-01

    Due to its tropical location, chains of mountains, inter-Andean valleys, Amazon basin area, eastern plains and shores on both the Atlantic and Pacific Oceans, Colombia has many ecosystems and the second largest plant biodiversity in the world. Many plant species, both native and naturalized, are currently recognized as toxic for both animals and humans, and some of them are known to cause their toxic effects due to their alkaloid content. Among these, there are plants containing the hepatotoxic pyrrolizidine alkaloids, neurotoxins such as the indolizidine alkaloid swainsonine and the piperidine alkaloids coniine and γ-coniceine and tropane alkaloids. Unfortunately, the research in toxic plants in Colombia is not nearly proportional to its plant biodiversity and the scientific information available is only very scarce. The present review aims at summarizing the scarce information about plant alkaloid toxicosis in animals and humans in Colombia. PMID:26690479

  8. Chlorinated alkaloids in Menispermum dauricum DC: root culture.

    PubMed

    Sugimoto, Y; Babiker, H A; Saisho, T; Furumoto, T; Inanaga, S; Kato, M

    2001-05-18

    Feeding experiments using (36)Cl showed that Menispermum dauricum root culture produces four alkaloids containing chlorine. They included the novel alkaloids dauricumine and dauricumidine as well as the known alkaloids acutumine and acutumidine. The structures of novel alkaloids were established by spectroscopic, crystallographic, and chemical methods. These four alkaloids were labeled with (36)Cl, isolated, and fed independently to root cultures. Mutual conversion between acutumine and acutumidine, and between dauricumine and dauricumidine by N-methylation and N-demethylation, was demonstrated. Moreover, dauricumine was converted to acutumine and acutumidine. Epimerization of acutumidine to dauricumidine or vice versa was not observed. These results suggest that dauricumine is the first chlorinated alkaloid formed in cultured M. dauricum roots. Skewed distribution of radioactivity derived from labeled dauricumine is proof that epimerization at C-1 proceeds at a lower rate than N-demethylation.

  9. Alkaloids Isolated from Natural Herbs as the Anticancer Agents

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Jin-Jian; Bao, Jiao-Lin; Chen, Xiu-Ping; Huang, Min; Wang, Yi-Tao

    2012-01-01

    Alkaloids are important chemical compounds that serve as a rich reservoir for drug discovery. Several alkaloids isolated from natural herbs exhibit antiproliferation and antimetastasis effects on various types of cancers both in vitro and in vivo. Alkaloids, such as camptothecin and vinblastine, have already been successfully developed into anticancer drugs. This paper focuses on the naturally derived alkaloids with prospective anticancer properties, such as berberine, evodiamine, matrine, piperine, sanguinarine, and tetrandrine, and summarizes the mechanisms of action of these compounds. Based on the information in the literature that is summarized in this paper, the use of alkaloids as anticancer agents is very promising, but more research and clinical trials are necessary before final recommendations on specific alkaloids can be made. PMID:22988474

  10. Quinolizidine alkaloid biosynthesis: recent advances and future prospects

    PubMed Central

    Bunsupa, Somnuk; Yamazaki, Mami; Saito, Kazuki

    2012-01-01

    Lys-derived alkaloids, including piperidine, quinolizidine, indolizidine, and lycopodium alkaloids, are widely distributed throughout the plant kingdom. Several of these alkaloids have beneficial properties for humans and have been used in medicine. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying the biosynthesis of these alkaloids are not well understood. In the present article, we discuss recent advances in our understanding of Lys-derived alkaloids, especially the biochemistry, molecular biology, and biotechnology of quinolizidine alkaloid (QA) biosynthesis. We have also highlighted Lys decarboxylase (LDC), the enzyme that catalyzes the first committed step of QA biosynthesis and answers a longstanding question about the molecular entity of LDC activity in plants. Further prospects using current advanced technologies, such as next-generation sequencing, in medicinal plants have also been discussed. PMID:23112802

  11. Recent developments in the chemistry of quinazolinone alkaloids.

    PubMed

    Kshirsagar, U A

    2015-09-28

    Quinazolinones, an important class of fused heterocyclic alkaloids has attracted high attention in organic and medicinal chemistry due to their significant and wide range of biological activities. There are approximately 150 naturally occurring quinazolinone alkaloids known till 2005. Several new quinazolinone alkaloids (∼55) have been isolated in the last decade. Natural quinazolinones with exotic structural features and remarkable biological activities have incited a lot of activities in the synthetic community towards the development of new synthetic strategies and approaches for the total synthesis of quinazolinone alkaloids. This review is focused on these advances in the chemistry of quinazolinone alkaloids in the last decade. This article covers the newly isolated quinazolinone natural products with their biological activities and the recently reported total syntheses of quinazolinone alkaloids from 2006 to 2015.

  12. GC-MS investigation of tropane alkaloids in Datura stramonium.

    PubMed

    Philipov, Stefan; Berkov, Strahil

    2002-01-01

    Alkaloids, GS-MS, Datura stramonium The alkaloid spectrum in roots, leaves and seeds of Datura stramonium L. was investigated by GC-MS. Twenty-nine tropane alkaloids are detected. Twelve of them are new constituents for the species and the two tropane esters 3-(3'-acetoxytropoyloxy)tropane (21) and 3-(2'-hydroxytropoyloxy)tropane (26) are described for the first time.

  13. Two new morphinane alkaloids from Sinomenium acutum.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiao-Ling; Liu, Bing-Rui; Wang, Jun-Ru; Chen, Chien-Kuang; Qin, Guo-Wei; Lee, Shoei-Sheng

    2011-06-01

    Two new morphinane alkaloids, 1-hydroxy-10-oxo-sinomenine (1) and 4,5-epoxy-14-hydroxy sinomenine N-oxide (2), have been isolated from the stems of Sinomenium acutum. Their structures were established by various spectral analyses, especially 2D NMR experiments. The structure of 2 was confirmed by single crystal X-ray diffraction. The absolute configurations of 1 and 2 were deduced by comparison of CD spectra with the known alkaloid sinomenine (3). Compound 1 was tested for DPPH inhibition and gave IC(50) of 27.9 μM. Compound 2 was tested for neuroprotective effect and showed significant activity against β-amyloid(25-35)-induced oxidative injury (*P < 0.05) at 10 μM in PC-12 cells.

  14. Total synthesis of the Daphniphyllum alkaloid daphenylline

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Zhaoyong; Li, Yong; Deng, Jun; Li, Ang

    2013-08-01

    The Daphniphyllum alkaloids are a large class of natural products isolated from a genus of evergreen plants widely used in Chinese herbal medicine. They display a remarkable range of biological activities, including anticancer, antioxidant, and vasorelaxation properties as well as elevation of nerve growth factor. Daphenylline is a structurally unique member among the predominately aliphatic Daphniphyllum alkaloids, and contains a tetrasubstituted arene moiety mounted on a sterically compact hexacyclic scaffold. Herein, we describe the first total synthesis of daphenylline. A gold-catalysed 6-exo-dig cyclization reaction and a subsequent intramolecular Michael addition reaction, inspired by Dixon's seminal work, were exploited to construct the bridged 6,6,5-tricyclic motif of the natural product at an early stage, and the aromatic moiety was forged through a photoinduced olefin isomerization/6π-electrocyclization cascade followed by an oxidative aromatization process.

  15. Greater apparent absorption of flavonoids is associated with lesser human fecal flavonoid disappearance rates.

    PubMed

    Simons, Andrean L; Renouf, Mathieu; Murphy, Patricia A; Hendrich, Suzanne

    2010-01-13

    It was hypothesized that 5,7,4'-OH-flavonoids disappeared more rapidly from human fecal incubations and were less absorbable by humans than flavonoids without 5-OH moieties. Anaerobic fecal disappearance rates over 24 h were determined for 15 flavonoids in samples from 20 men and 13 women. In these anaerobic fecal mixtures, flavonoids with 5,7,4'-OH groups, genistein, apigenin, naringenin, luteolin, kaempferol, and quercetin (disappearance rate, k=0.46+/-0.10 h(-1)), and methoxylated flavonoids, hesperetin and glycitein (k=0.24+/-0.21 h(-1)), disappeared rapidly compared with flavonoids lacking 5-OH (e.g., daidzein, k=0.07+/-0.03 h(-1)). Apparent absorption of flavonoids that disappeared rapidly from in vitro fecal incubations, genistein, naringenin, quercetin, and hesperetin, was compared with that of daidzein, a slowly disappearing flavonoid, in 5 men and 5 women. Subjects ingested 104 micromol of genistein and 62 micromol of daidzein (soy milk), 1549 micromol of naringenin and 26 micromol of hesperetin (grapefruit juice), and 381 micromol of quercetin (onions) in three test meals, each separated by 1 week. Blood and urine samples were collected over 24 h after each test meal. Plasma flavonoid concentrations ranged from 0.01 to 1 microM. The apparent absorption, expressed as percentage of ingested dose excreted in urine, was significantly less for naringenin (3.2+/-1.7%), genistein (7.2+/-4.6%), hesperetin (7.3+/-3.2%), and quercetin (5.6+/-3.7%) compared with daidzein (43.4+/-15.5%, p=0.02). These data affirmed the hypothesis that the 5,7,4'-OH of flavonoids limited apparent absorption of these compounds in humans.

  16. Biosynthesis and Regulation of Bioprotective Alkaloids in the Gramineae Endophytic Fungi with Implications for Herbivores Deterrents.

    PubMed

    Luo, Hongping; Xie, Longxiang; Zeng, Jie; Xie, Jianping

    2015-12-01

    Four kinds of bioprotective alkaloids-peramine, loline, ergot alkaloid, indole-diterpenes, produced by grass-fungal endophyte symbioses, are deterrents or toxic to vertebrate and invertebrate herbivores. Ergot alkaloids have pharmacological properties and widely are used clinically. The regulation of alkaloids biosynthesis is under intensive study to improve the yield for better agricultural and medicinal application. In this paper, we summarize the structure, related genes, regulation, and toxicity of alkaloids. We focus on the biosynthesis and the regulation network of alkaloids.

  17. Two new alkaloids from Capparis himalayensis.

    PubMed

    Li, Yun-Qiu; Yang, Shi-Lin; Li, He-Ran; Xu, Li-Zhen

    2008-02-01

    Two new alkaloids, Capparin A (1) and B (2), along with seven known compounds 6-methoxyindoline-2,3-dione (3), wogonin (4), oroxylin A (5), kaempferol (6), apigenin (7), quercetin (8) and luteolin (9), were isolated from the whole plant of Capparis himalayensis. Their structures have been established on the basis of spectral methods and the structure of 1 was confirmed by X-ray crystallographic analysis.

  18. Muscarine, imidaozle, oxazole and thiazole alkaloids.

    PubMed

    Jin, Zhong

    2013-06-01

    Covering: July 2010 to June 2012. Previous review: Nat. Prod. Rep., 2011, 28, 1143-1191. Structurally diverse alkaloids containing five-membered heterocyclic subunits, such as imidazole, oxazole, thiazole, as well as their saturated congeners, are widely distributed in terrestrial and marine organisms and microorganisms. These naturally occurring secondary metabolites often exhibit extensive and pharmacologically important biological activities. The latest progress involving isolation, biological activities, chemical synthetic studies, and biosynthetic pathways of these natural products has been summarized in this review.

  19. Synthesis studies on the Melodinus alkaloid meloscine

    PubMed Central

    Feldman, Ken S.; Antoline, Joshua F.

    2012-01-01

    The pentacyclic Melodinus alkaloid (±)-meloscine was synthesized in 19 chemical steps from 2-bromobenzaldehyde through a route featuring an allenyl azide cyclization cascade to deliver the core azabicyclo[3.3.0]octane substructure. Peripheral functionalization of this core included a Tollens-type aldol condensation to set the quaternary center at C(20) and a diastereoselective ring closing metathesis to forge the tetrahydropyridine ring. PMID:23316092

  20. New Perspectives in the Chemistry of Marine Pyridoacridine Alkaloids

    PubMed Central

    Plodek, Alois; Bracher, Franz

    2016-01-01

    Secondary metabolites from marine organisms are a rich source of novel leads for drug development. Among these natural products, polycyclic aromatic alkaloids of the pyridoacridine type have attracted the highest attention as lead compounds for the development of novel anti-cancer and anti-infective drugs. Numerous sophisticated total syntheses of pyridoacridine alkaloids have been worked out, and many of them have also been extended to the synthesis of libraries of analogues of the alkaloids. This review summarizes the progress in the chemistry of pyridoacridine alkaloids that was made in the last one-and-a-half decades. PMID:26821033

  1. Alkaloid patterns in some varieties of Datura stramonium.

    PubMed

    Berkov, Strahil; Zayed, Rawia; Doncheva, Tsvetelina

    2006-04-01

    A comparative GC-MS investigation of the alkaloid patterns of three varieties of Datura stramonium vars. stramonium, tatula and godronii, was carried out. Twenty-five tropane alkaloids were identified in the plant organs. Alkaloid patterns of the roots, leaves and seeds of the varieties grown at equal conditions in Bulgaria were very similar. In contrast, alkaloid pattern of D. stramonium var. stramonium, grown in Egypt, showed significant differences indicating that it is influenced more strongly by the environmental factors than genetic ones.

  2. Drug Delivery Systems and Combination Therapy by Using Vinca Alkaloids

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Chun-Ting; Huang, Yen-Wei; Yang, Chih-Hui; Huang, Keng-Shiang

    2015-01-01

    Developing new methods for chemotherapy drug delivery has become a topic of great concern. Vinca alkaloids are among the most widely used chemotherapy reagents for tumor therapy; however, their side effects are particularly problematic for many medical doctors. To reduce the toxicity and enhance the therapeutic efficiency of vinca alkaloids, many researchers have developed strategies such as using liposome-entrapped drugs, chemical- or peptide-modified drugs, polymeric packaging drugs, and chemotherapy drug combinations. This review mainly focuses on the development of a vinca alkaloid drug delivery system and the combination therapy. Five vinca alkaloids (eg, vincristine, vinblastine, vinorelbine, vindesine, and vinflunine) are reviewed. PMID:25877096

  3. Plant alkaloids as drug leads for Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Ng, Yu Pong; Or, Terry Cho Tsun; Ip, Nancy Y

    2015-10-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a neurodegenerative illness associated with dementia and is most prevalent among the elderly population. Current medications can only treat symptoms. Alkaloids are structurally diverse and have been an important source of therapeutics for various brain disorders. Two US Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-approved acetylcholinesterase inhibitors for AD, galantamine and rivastigmine, are in fact alkaloids. In addition, clinical trials of four other extensively studied alkaloids-huperzine A, caffeine, nicotine, and indomethacin-have been conducted but do not convincingly demonstrate their clinical efficacy for AD. Interestingly, rhynchophylline, a known neuroprotective alkaloid, was recently discovered by in silico screening as an inhibitor of EphA4, a novel target for AD. Here, we review the pathophysiological mechanisms underlying AD, current treatment strategies, and therapeutic potential of several selected plant alkaloids in AD, highlighting their various drug targets and the key supportive preclinical and clinical studies. Future research should include more rigorous clinical studies of the most promising alkaloids, the further development of recently discovered candidate alkaloids, and the continual search for new alkaloids for relevant drug targets. It remains promising that an alkaloid drug candidate could significantly affect the progression of AD in addition to providing symptomatic relief.

  4. New Perspectives in the Chemistry of Marine Pyridoacridine Alkaloids.

    PubMed

    Plodek, Alois; Bracher, Franz

    2016-01-26

    Secondary metabolites from marine organisms are a rich source of novel leads for drug development. Among these natural products, polycyclic aromatic alkaloids of the pyridoacridine type have attracted the highest attention as lead compounds for the development of novel anti-cancer and anti-infective drugs. Numerous sophisticated total syntheses of pyridoacridine alkaloids have been worked out, and many of them have also been extended to the synthesis of libraries of analogues of the alkaloids. This review summarizes the progress in the chemistry of pyridoacridine alkaloids that was made in the last one-and-a-half decades.

  5. Indole alkaloids from the leaves of Philippine Alstonia scholaris.

    PubMed

    Macabeo, Allan Patrick G; Krohn, Karsten; Gehle, Dietmar; Read, Roger W; Brophy, Joseph J; Cordell, Geoffrey A; Franzblau, Scott G; Aguinaldo, Alicia M

    2005-05-01

    The first seco-uleine alkaloids, manilamine (1) (18-hydroxy-19,20-dehydro-7,21-seco-uleine) and N4-methyl angustilobine B (2), were isolated from the (pH 5) alkaloid extract of Philippine Alstonia scholaris leaves together with the known indole alkaloids 19,20-(E)-vallesamine (3), angustilobine B N4-oxide (4), 20(S)-tubotaiwine (5), and 6,7-seco-angustilobine B (6). The structure of the alkaloids was established from MS and NMR experiments.

  6. Anticancer Alkaloids from Trees: Development into Drugs

    PubMed Central

    Isah, Tasiu

    2016-01-01

    Trees have made an enormous phytochemical contribution in anticancer drugs' development more than any other life form. The contributions include alkaloids that are biosynthesized in various ways and yield. Lead alkaloids isolated from the trees are taxol and camptothecins that currently have annual sales in billion dollars. Other important alkaloids isolated from these life forms include rohitukine, harringtonine, acronycine, thalicarpine, usambarensine, ellipticine, and matrines. Studies on their mechanism of action and target on the DNA and protein of cancerous cells aided the development of potent hemisynthesized congeners. The molecules and their congeners passed/are passing a long period of historical development before approved as antineoplastic drugs for cancer chemotherapy. Some of them did not find the application as anticancer drugs due to ineffectiveness in clinical trials; others are generating research interest in the antineoplastic activity at the present and have reached clinical trial stages. Potentials in antineoplastic molecules from trees are high and are hoped to be commensurate with cancer types afflicting human society in the future. PMID:28082790

  7. Dietary alkaloid sequestration in a poison frog: an experimental test of alkaloid uptake in Melanophryniscus stelzneri (Bufonidae).

    PubMed

    Hantak, Maggie M; Grant, Taran; Reinsch, Sherri; McGinnity, Dale; Loring, Marjorie; Toyooka, Naoki; Saporito, Ralph A

    2013-12-01

    Several lineages of brightly colored anurans independently evolved the ability to secrete alkaloid-containing defensive chemicals from granular glands in the skin. These species, collectively referred to as 'poison frogs,' form a polyphyletic assemblage that includes some species of Dendrobatidae, Mantellidae, Myobatrachidae, Bufonidae, and Eleutherodactylidae. The ability to sequester alkaloids from dietary arthropods has been demonstrated experimentally in most poison frog lineages but not in bufonid or eleutherodactylid poison frogs. As with other poison frogs, species of the genus Melanophryniscus (Bufonidae) consume large numbers of mites and ants, suggesting they might also sequester defensive alkaloids from dietary sources. To test this hypothesis, fruit flies dusted with alkaloid/nutritional supplement powder were fed to individual Melanophryniscus stelzneri in two experiments. In the first experiment, the alkaloids 5,8-disubstituted indolizidine 235B' and decahydroquinoline were administered to three individuals for 104 days. In the second experiment, the alkaloids 3,5-disubstituted indolizidine 239Q and decahydroquinoline were given to three frogs for 153 days. Control frogs were fed fruit flies dusted only with nutritional supplement. Gas chromatography/mass spectrometry analyses revealed that skin secretions of all experimental frogs contained alkaloids, whereas those of all control frogs lacked alkaloids. Uptake of decahydroquinoline was greater than uptake of 5,8-disubstituted indolizidine, and uptake of 3,5-disubstituted indolizidine was greater than uptake of decahydroquinoline, suggesting greater uptake efficiency of certain alkaloids. Frogs in the second experiment accumulated a greater amount of alkaloid, which corresponds to the longer duration and greater number of alkaloid-dusted fruit flies that were consumed. These findings provide the first experimental evidence that bufonid poison frogs sequester alkaloid-based defenses from dietary

  8. Advances in the biotechnological glycosylation of valuable flavonoids.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Jianbo; Muzashvili, Tamar S; Georgiev, Milen I

    2014-11-01

    The natural flavonoids, especially their glycosides, are the most abundant polyphenols in foods and have diverse bioactivities. The biotransformation of flavonoid aglycones into their glycosides is vital in flavonoid biosynthesis. The main biological strategies that have been used to achieve flavonoid glycosylation in the laboratory involve metabolic pathway engineering and microbial biotransformation. In this review, we summarize the existing knowledge on the production and biotransformation of flavonoid glycosides using biotechnology, as well as the impact of glycosylation on flavonoid bioactivity. Uridine diphosphate glycosyltransferases play key roles in decorating flavonoids with sugars. Modern metabolic engineering and proteomic tools have been used in an integrated fashion to generate numerous structurally diverse flavonoid glycosides. In vitro, enzymatic glycosylation tends to preferentially generate flavonoid 3- and 7-O-glucosides; microorganisms typically convert flavonoids into their 7-O-glycosides and will produce 3-O-glycosides if supplied with flavonoid substrates having a hydroxyl group at the C-3 position. In general, O-glycosylation reduces flavonoid bioactivity. However, C-glycosylation can enhance some of the benefits of flavonoids on human health, including their antioxidant and anti-diabetic potential.

  9. Monoterpene Indole Alkaloids from the Fruit of Tabernaemontana litoralis and Differential Alkaloid Composition in Various Fruit Components.

    PubMed

    Qu, Yang; Simonescu, Razvan; De Luca, Vincenzo

    2016-12-23

    Two new monoterpene indole alkaloids, isoakuammiline (1) and 18-hydroxypseudovincadifformine (2), and five known alkaloids, coronaridine (3), heyneanine (4), 3,19-oxidocoronaridine (5), tabersonine, and strictosidine, were identified from the fruit of Tabernaemontana litoralis. The structures of the alkaloids were determined using NMR and MS data analyses. While 18-hydroxypseudovincadifformine (2) showed a new hydroxylation pattern, isoakuammiline (1) revealed a novel skeleton for monoterpene indole alkaloids. In spite of the isolation of stemmadenine from the fruit tissues in other Tabernaemontana species, this vital biosynthetic precursor of iboga, aspidosperma, and pseudoaspidosperma skeletons was not found in T. litoralis.

  10. [Leaching Remediation of Copper and Lead Contaminated Lou Soil by Saponin Under Different Conditions].

    PubMed

    Deng, Hong-xia; Yang, Ya-li; Li, Zhen; Xu, Yan; Li, Rong-hua; Meng, Zhao-fu; Yang, Ya-ti

    2015-04-01

    In order to investigate the leaching remediation effect of the eco-friendly biosurfactant saponin for Cu and Pb in contaminated Lou soil, batch tests method was used to study the leaching effect of saponin solution on single Cu, Pb contaminated Lou soil and mixed Cu and Pb contaminated Lou soil under different conditions such as reaction time, mass concentration of saponin, pH, concentration of background electrolyte and leaching times. The results showed that the maximum leaching removal effect of Cu and Pb in contaminated Lou soil was achieved by complexation of the heavy metals with saponin micelle, when the mass concentration of saponin solution was 50 g x L(-1), pH was 5.0, the reaction time was 240 min, and there was no background electrolyte. In single and mixed contaminated Lou soil, the leaching percentages of Cu were 29.02% and 25.09% after a single leaching with 50 g x L(-1) saponin under optimal condition, while the single leaching percentages of Pb were 31.56% and 28.03%, respectively. The result indicated the removal efficiency of Pb was more significant than that of Cu. After 4 times of leaching, the cumulative leaching percentages of Cu reached 58.92% and 53.11%, while the cumulative leaching percentages of Pb reached 77.69% and 65.32% for single and mixed contaminated Lou soil, respectively. The fractionation results of heavy metals in soil before and after a single leaching showed that the contents of adsorbed and exchangeable Cu and Pb increased in the contaminated soil, while the carbonate-bound, organic bound and sulfide residual Cu and Pb in the contaminated Lou soil could be effectively removed by saponin.

  11. Hypocholesterolemic effect of karaya saponin in Japanese laying quails (Coturnix coturnix japonica).

    PubMed

    Afrose, S; Hossain, M S; Tsujii, H

    2011-12-01

    The effect of karaya saponin supplementation on the serum and egg yolk cholesterol and fatty acid composition in egg yolk were investigated in Japanese quails. A total of 80 Japanese quails aged 5 weeks were equally divided into four groups of 20. Four levels (0, 25, 50 and 75 mg/kg feed) of karaya saponin were included in the basal diet and experiment was lasted for 6 weeks. The cholesterol fractions in the egg yolk and serum were measured by enzymatic assay, and the fatty acid composition in egg yolk was determined by gas chromatography. The results revealed that the supplementation of 75 mg/kg karaya saponin significantly reduced (p < 0.05) cholesterol and triglycerides concentration in serum and egg yolk. High-density lipoprotein-cholesterol was increased, low-density lipoprotein-cholesterol and the atherogenic index were decreased (p < 0.05) by the dietary supplementations. Hepatic cholesterol was reduced (p < 0.05) by the 25 mg/kg karaya saponin. A higher degree of yolk colour was improved (p < 0.05) when 75 mg/kg saponin was supplemented in the diet. The concentration of polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) in egg yolk was increased (p < 0.05) in a dose-dependent manner in quails fed the supplemented diet than the control diet. The ratio of PUFA to saturated fatty acids in egg yolk was improved (p < 0.05) by 75 mg/kg feed karaya saponin-supplemented diet. Therefore, the dietary supplementation of 75 mg/kg karaya saponin may be a feasible means of producing quail eggs with lower cholesterol and higher PUFA content for health conscious consumers.

  12. Flavonoid-membrane interactions: involvement of flavonoid-metal complexes in raft signaling.

    PubMed

    Tarahovsky, Yury S; Kim, Yuri A; Yagolnik, Elena A; Muzafarov, Eugeny N

    2014-05-01

    Flavonoids are polyphenolic compounds produced by plants and delivered to the human body through food. Although the epidemiological analyses of large human populations did not reveal a simple correlation between flavonoid consumption and health, laboratory investigations and clinical trials clearly demonstrate the effectiveness of flavonoids in the prevention of cardiovascular, carcinogenic, neurodegenerative and immune diseases, as well as other diseases. At present, the abilities of flavonoids in the regulation of cell metabolism, gene expression, and protection against oxidative stress are well-known, although certain biophysical aspects of their functioning are not yet clear. Most flavonoids are poorly soluble in water and, similar to lipophilic compounds, have a tendency to accumulate in biological membranes, particularly in lipid rafts, where they can interact with different receptors and signal transducers and influence their functioning through modulation of the lipid-phase behavior. In this study, we discuss the enhancement in the lipophilicity and antioxidative activity of flavonoids after their complexation with transient metal cations. We hypothesize that flavonoid-metal complexes are involved in the formation of molecular assemblies due to the facilitation of membrane adhesion and fusion, protein-protein and protein-membrane binding, and other processes responsible for the regulation of cell metabolism and protection against environmental hazards.

  13. Flavonoid composition of Juniperus oblonga Bieb.

    PubMed

    Pisarev, D I; Novikov, O O; Novikova, M Yu; Zhilyakova, E T

    2011-04-01

    Juniperus oblonga Bieb is widely spread in the Caucasus Mountains, particularly in its eastern and southern regions. Diuretic effect of juniper berries is determined by the presence of volatile oils and polyphenol complex, particularly flavonoids. Flavonoids were extracted from raw material with 70% ethanol and then with ethyl acetate. Column chromatography of ethyl acetate fraction on polyamide yielded 5 compounds, which were identified on the basis of physicochemical constants of parent compounds and products of acid hydrolysis and alkaline degradation of aglycones and on the basis of UV-spectroscopy as apigenin, isoquercitrin, apigenin-7-glucoside, quercetin-3-rutinoside, and scutellarin-7-glucoside. Quantitative composition of flavonoid in equivalent to rutin concentration in Juniperus oblonga Bieb was 0.910±0.007% (UV-spectrophotometry data).

  14. Biotransformations and biological activities of hop flavonoids.

    PubMed

    Karabin, Marcel; Hudcova, Tereza; Jelinek, Lukas; Dostalek, Pavel

    2015-11-01

    Female hop cones are used extensively in the brewing industry, but there is now increasing interest in possible uses of hops for non-brewing purposes, especially in the pharmaceutical industry. Among pharmaceutically important compounds from hops are flavonoids, having proven anticarcinogenic, antioxidant, antimicrobial, anti-inflammatory and estrogenic effects. In this review we aim to present current knowledge on the biotransformation of flavonoids from hop cones with respect to products, catalysis and conversion. A list of microbial enzymatic reactions associated with gastrointestinal microbiota is presented. A comparative analysis of the biological activities of hop flavonoids and their biotransformation products is described, indicating where further research has potential for applications in the pharmaceutical industry.

  15. Flavonoids in Inflammatory Bowel Disease: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Vezza, Teresa; Rodríguez-Nogales, Alba; Algieri, Francesca; Utrilla, Maria Pilar; Rodriguez-Cabezas, Maria Elena; Galvez, Julio

    2016-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is characterized by chronic inflammation of the intestine that compromises the patients’ life quality and requires sustained pharmacological and surgical treatments. Since their etiology is not completely understood, non-fully-efficient drugs have been developed and those that have shown effectiveness are not devoid of quite important adverse effects that impair their long-term use. In this regard, a growing body of evidence confirms the health benefits of flavonoids. Flavonoids are compounds with low molecular weight that are widely distributed throughout the vegetable kingdom, including in edible plants. They may be of great utility in conditions of acute or chronic intestinal inflammation through different mechanisms including protection against oxidative stress, and preservation of epithelial barrier function and immunomodulatory properties in the gut. In this review we have revised the main flavonoid classes that have been assessed in different experimental models of colitis as well as the proposed mechanisms that support their beneficial effects. PMID:27070642

  16. A systematic computational study on flavonoids.

    PubMed

    Aparicio, Santiago

    2010-05-03

    17 selected flavones derivatives, flavonoids, were analyzed through a systematic B3LYP/6-311++G** computational study with the aim of understanding the molecular factors that determine their structural and energetic properties in gas phase. Flavonoids were selected in a systematic way to infer the effect of the number and relative positions of hydroxyl groups on molecular properties. Different conformers for each flavonoid were analyzed and the strength and topology of the intramolecular hydrogen bonds studied through the computation of the corresponding torsional profiles. Atoms in a Molecule, and Natural Bond Orbital methodology was applied to the analysis of charge distribution along the studied molecules, and the intramolecular hydrogen bonds. Molecular shapes were studied through full geometry optimization, and the position of the catechol ring analyzed through dihedral scans.

  17. Transgenic rice seed synthesizing diverse flavonoids at high levels: a new platform for flavonoid production with associated health benefits.

    PubMed

    Ogo, Yuko; Ozawa, Kenjiro; Ishimaru, Tsutomu; Murayama, Tsugiya; Takaiwa, Fumio

    2013-08-01

    Flavonoids possess diverse health-promoting benefits but are nearly absent from rice, because most of the genes encoding enzymes for flavonoid biosynthesis are not expressed in rice seeds. In the present study, a transgenic rice plant producing several classes of flavonoids in seeds was developed by introducing multiple genes encoding enzymes involved in flavonoid synthesis, from phenylalanine to the target flavonoids, into rice. Rice accumulating naringenin was developed by introducing phenylalanine ammonia lyase (PAL) and chalcone synthase (CHS) genes. Rice producing other classes of flavonoids, kaempferol, genistein, and apigenin, was developed by introducing, together with PAL and CHS, genes encoding flavonol synthase/flavanone-3-hydroxylase, isoflavone synthase, and flavone synthases, respectively. The endosperm-specific GluB-1 promoter or embryo- and aleurone-specific 18-kDa oleosin promoters were used to express these biosynthetic genes in seed. The target flavonoids of naringenin, kaempferol, genistein, and apigenin were highly accumulated in each transgenic rice, respectively. Furthermore, tricin was accumulated by introducing hydroxylase and methyltransferase, demonstrating that modification to flavonoid backbones can be also well manipulated in rice seeds. The flavonoids accumulated as both aglycones and several types of glycosides, and flavonoids in the endosperm were deposited into PB-II-type protein bodies. Therefore, these rice seeds provide an ideal platform for the production of particular flavonoids due to efficient glycosylation, the presence of appropriate organelles for flavonoid accumulation, and the small effect of endogenous enzymes on the production of flavonoids by exogenous enzymes.

  18. Strains for the production of flavonoids from glucose

    DOEpatents

    Stephanopoulos, Gregory; Santos, Christine; Koffas, Mattheos

    2015-11-13

    The invention relates to the production of flavonoids and flavonoid precursors in cells through recombinant expression of tyrosine ammonia lyase (TAL), 4-coumarate:CoA ligase (4CL), chalcone synthase (CHS), and chalcone isomerase (CHI).

  19. Anti-inflammatory flavonoids from Cryptocarya chingii.

    PubMed

    Feng, Rui; Guo, Zhi Kai; Yan, Chun Min; Li, Er Guang; Tan, Ren Xiang; Ge, Hui Ming

    2012-04-01

    Six flavonoids named cryptogiones A-F, and nine known compounds were isolated from an ethanol extract of stems of Cryptocaryachingii. The structures of the compounds were elucidated by interpretation of comprehensive spectroscopic data and X-ray analysis. A majority of these flavonoids contained an acetic acid/lactone moiety, a possible taxonomic marker. Anti-inflammatory effects of the compounds were evaluated using in vitro assays. At 20 μM concentration, three compounds significantly inhibited TNFα-induced NF-кB activation and LPS-induced IL-1β expression.

  20. Furostanol saponins from the seeds of Allium cepa L.

    PubMed

    Li, Chuang-Jun; Yuan, Ling; Ji, Teng-Fei; Yang, Jian-Bo; Wang, Ai-Guo; Su, Ya-Lun

    2014-12-01

    Allium cepa L. is one of the most widely cultivated and used plants. In addition to its bulb (onion), which is used as food in many cultures, the seeds of A. cepa L. are used as a traditional herbal medicine by the Uygur nationality in China to treat diarrhea and promote blood flow. In a bioactivity-screening, the ethanol extract of seeds of A. cepa L. showed inhibitory effects on protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B (PTP1B) enzyme, with 81.1% inhibition. Phytochemical investigation of the ethanol extract of red onion (Allium cepa L.) seeds led to the isolation of eight new furostanol saponins, named ceparosides E-L (1-8). Their structures were established using 1D and 2D NMR spectroscopy, mass spectrometry and chemical methods. Compounds 1-8 were screened for inhibitory effects on the PTP1B enzyme and cytotoxic activity against five human cells, including HCT-8, Bel-7402, BGC-823, A549 and A2780, but all were found to be inactive.

  1. Anxiolytic effect of saponins from Panax quinquefolium in mice.

    PubMed

    Wei, Xiu-Yan; Yang, Jing-Yu; Wang, Jin-Hui; Wu, Chun-Fu

    2007-05-22

    The anxiolytic effect of the saponins from Aniliaeea Panax quinquefolium L. (PQS) was studied in male mice by using a number of experimental paradigms of anxiety and compared with that of the known anxiolytic compound diazepam. Use of the elevated plus-maze test revealed that PQS (50 mg/kg, p.o.) and diazepam (2.5 mg/kg, p.o.) increased the percentage of time and entries spent in open arms. In the light/dark test, PQS (50 and 100 mg/kg, p.o.) and diazepam (2.5 mg/kg, p.o.) prolonged the time spent in the light area. In the hole-board test, PQS (50 and 100 mg/kg, p.o.) and diazepam (2.5 mg/kg, p.o.) significantly increased both head-dip counts and head-dip duration. Both PQS (50 and 100 mg/kg, p.o.) and diazepam (2.5 mg/kg, p.o.) decreased the total fighting time in the isolation-induced aggressive test. Since PQS, in contrast to diazepam, had no effect on locomotion in these tests, its side-effect profile might be considered superior to the benzodiazepines. Thus, the present findings suggest that PQS might be a potential candidate for use as an anxiolytic drug.

  2. Screening for feeding deterrent and insect growth regulatory activity of triterpenic saponins from Diploknema butyracea and Sapindus mukorossi.

    PubMed

    Saha, Supradip; Walia, Suresh; Kumar, Jitendra; Dhingra, Swaran; Parmar, Balraj S

    2010-01-13

    Antifeeding and insect growth regulatory effects of saponins and its hydrolyzed products from Diploknema butyracea and Sapindus mukorossi on the insect pest Spodoptera litura (F.) were investigated in the laboratory. D. butyracea saponins as well as their hydrolyzed prosapogenins were found to be better biologically active in controlling pests. A concentration of 1200 and 3400 mg L(-1) alkaline and acid hydrolyzed D. butyracea saponins exhibited significant antifeeding and toxic effects to third instar larvae when compared to the emulsified water as control. The n-BuOH extract after prep-HPLC separation provided two saponins from the D. butyracea saponin mixture: 3-O-[beta-D-glucopyarnosyl-beta-d-glucopyranosyl]-16-alpha-hydroxyprotobassic acid-28-O-[ara-glc-xyl]-ara (MI-I) and 3-O-beta-D-glucopyranosyl-glucopyranosyl-glucopyranosyl-16-alpha-hydroxyprotobassic acid-28-O-[ara-xyl-ara]-apiose (MI-III). The single saponin extracted from the S. mukorossi saponin mixture was 3-O-[beta-D-xyl(OAc).beta-D-arabinopyranosyl.beta-D-rhamnopyranosyl] hederagenin-28-O-[beta-D-glc.beta-D-glc.beta-D-rhamnopyranosyl] ester (SM-I). Five days after saponin treatment on larvae, the growth index (GI50) was reduced from 0.92% to 1520 ppm in alkaline hydrolyzed D. butyracea saponins. Upon hydrolysis, growth regulatory activity was improved in S. mukorossi saponin, whereas very little difference was found in antifeedant activity. Hydrophile-lipophile balance is important for the proper functioning of saponin/prosapogenin/sapogenin, which could be achieved by manipulating the sugar molecule in the triterpenic skeleton.

  3. Characterisation and identification of triterpene saponins in the roots of red beets (Beta vulgaris L.) using two HPLC-MS systems.

    PubMed

    Mikołajczyk-Bator, Katarzyna; Błaszczyk, Alfred; Czyżniejewski, Mariusz; Kachlicki, Piotr

    2016-02-01

    Triterpene saponins are important bioactive constituents with an enormous variety in structure widely distributed in many plants. Here, we profiled triterpene saponins from the skin and flesh of red beetroot Beta vulgaris L. cultivars Nochowski from 2012 and 2013 season using reversed-phase liquid chromatography combined with negative-ion electrospray ionisation quadrupole mass spectrometry. We tentatively identified 44 triterpene saponins, of which 37 had not been detected previously in the root of red beets and 27 saponins were tentatively identified as potentially new compounds. All observed compounds were glycosides of four different aglycone structures, of which akebonoic acid and gypsogenin were not detected previous in red beetroot. Based on the high-resolution mass measurements among these 44 detected saponins 10 groups of isomers were identified. We report for the first time that 18 saponins with dioxolane-type (2 saponins) and acetal-type (16 saponins) substituents were detected in the roots of red beet.

  4. Comprehensive profiling and natural variation of flavonoids in rice.

    PubMed

    Dong, Xuekui; Chen, Wei; Wang, Wensheng; Zhang, Hongyan; Liu, Xianqing; Luo, Jie

    2014-09-01

    Flavonoids constitute a major group of plant phenolic compounds. While extensively studied in Arabidopsis, profiling and naturally occurring variation of these compounds in rice (Oryza sativa), the monocot model plant, are less reported. Using a collection of rice germplasm, comprehensive profiling and natural variation of flavonoids were presented in this report. Application of a widely targeted metabolomics method facilitated the simultaneous identification and quantification of more than 90 flavonoids using liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). Comparing flavonoid contents in various tissues during different developmental stages revealed tissue-specific accumulation of most flavonoids. Further investigation indicated that flavone mono-C-glycosides, malonylated flavonoid O-hexosides, and some flavonoid O-glycosides accumulated at significantly higher levels in indica than in japonica, while the opposite was observed for aromatic acylated flavone C-hexosyl-O-hexosides. In contrast to the highly differential accumulation between the two subspecies, relatively small variations within subspecies were detected for most flavonoids. Besides, an association analysis between flavonoid accumulation and its biosynthetic gene sequence polymorphisms disclosed that natural variation of flavonoids was probably caused by sequence polymorphisms in the coding region of flavonoid biosynthetic genes. Our work paves the way for future dissection of biosynthesis and regulation of flavonoid pathway in rice.

  5. Intakes of total and individual flavonoids by US adults.

    PubMed

    Bai, Wei; Wang, Chunyang; Ren, Cuirong

    2014-02-01

    Knowing the dietary flavonoid intake of individuals and populations is the first step to clearly understand their health effects. Dietary flavonoid intake studies have been hampered by the lack of flavonoid food composition data. The objectives of this study were to estimate intakes of individual, classes and total flavonoids in the US adults; to evaluate the effects of socio-demographic factors on the flavonoid consumption patterns; and to establish major dietary sources of flavonoids. We calculated flavonoid intakes using the most updated USDA flavonoid and isoflavone databases, and the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) III 24-h dietary recall (DR). Estimated mean total flavonoid intake by US adults was 344.83 ± 9.13 mg/day. The flavan-3-ols (191.99 ± 6.84 mg/day) were the most abundant flavonoid class. The three most dominant individual flavonoids were catechin, epicatechin and polymers. Tea, wine, beer, citrus fruits and apples were the most important sources of total flavonoid intakes in the US adults.

  6. Metabolism of flavonoids in human: a comprehensive review.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhongjian; Zheng, Shirui; Li, Liping; Jiang, Huidi

    2014-01-01

    Flavonoids are naturally occurring polyphenols, which are widely taken in diets, supplements and herbal medicines. Epidemiological studies have shown a flavonoid-rich diet is associated with the decrease in incidence of a range of diseases. Pharmacological evidences also reveal flavonoids display anti-oxidant, anti-allergic, anti-cancer, anti-inflammatory, anti-microbial and anti-diarrheal activities. Therefore, it is critical to study the biotransformation and disposition of flavonoids in human. This review summarizes the major metabolism pathways of flavonoids in human. First, lactase-phlorizin hydrolase (LPH) and human intestinal microflora mediate the hydrolysis of flavonoid glycosides, which is recognized as the first and determinant step in the absorption of flavonoids. Second, phase II metabolic enzymes (UGTs, SULTs and COMT) dominate the metabolism of flavonoids in vivo. UGTs are the most major contributors, followed by SULTs and COMT. By contrast, phase I metabolism pathway mediated by CYPs only plays a minor role. Third, the coupling of transporters (such as BCRP and MRPs) and phase II enzymes (UGTs and SULTs) plays an important role in the disposition of flavonoids, especially in the enteroenteric and enterohepatic circulations. Thus, all the above factors should be taken into consideration when studying pharmacokinetics of flavonoids. Here we describe a comprehensive metabolism profile of flavonoids, which will enhance our understanding of the mechanisms underlying the disposition and pharmacological effects of flavonoids in vivo.

  7. Solubilization properties of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons by saponin, a plant-derived biosurfactant.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Wenjun; Yang, Juanjuan; Lou, Linjie; Zhu, Lizhong

    2011-05-01

    The enhanced solubilization of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) by saponin, a plant-derived non-ionic biosurfactant, was investigated. The results indicated that the solubilization capabilities of saponin for PAHs were greater than some representative synthetic non-ionic surfactants and showed strong dependence on solution pH and ionic strength. The molar solubilization ratio (MSR) of saponin for phenanthrene was about 3-6 times of those of the synthetic non-ionic surfactants, and decreased by about 70% with the increase of solution pH from 4.0 to 8.0, but increased by approximately 1 times with NaCl concentration increased from 0.01 to 1.0 M. Heavy metal ions can enhance saponin solubilization for phenanthrene and the corresponding MSR values increased by about 25% with the presence of 0.01 M of Cd2+ or Zn2+. Saponin is more effective in enhancing PAHs solubilization than synthetic non-ionic surfactants and has potential application in removing organic pollutants from contaminated soils.

  8. Saponin as regulator of biofuel: implication for ethnobotanical management of diabetes.

    PubMed

    Elekofehinti, Olusola Olalekan; Omotuyi, Idowu Olaposi; Kamdem, Jean Paul; Ejelonu, Oluwamodupe Cecilia; Alves, Guimarae Vanessa; Adanlawo, Isaac Gbadura; Rocha, João Batista Teixeira

    2014-06-01

    There has been a sharp rise in the global prevalence of diabetes, obesity, and their comorbid conditions within the last decade prompting significant research into possible causes and cure via therapeutic intervention and lifestyle adjustments. Here, the molecular bases of antidiabetic plants used in the prehistorical treatment of diabetes and obesity are reviewed with particular focus on saponin as the phytotherapeutic principle. Until recently, the phytotherapeutic potentials of saponins have been masked in the heterogeneity of phytochemicals co-extractable during traditional preparations. With improved technique of purification and cutting edge biological assay methods, saponins have emerged as a regulator of primary biofuel availability through direct interaction with energy metabolism, cell signaling, and gene expression. Specific cases of lipoprotein lipase/peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR)-gamma/phosphatidylinositide 3-kinase (PI-3-K)/protein kinase B (Akt) activation, adiponectin gene upregulation, fatty acid binding protein 4 repression (FABP4), and glucose transporter type 4 (Glut4) membrane exocytosis have been documented which provide molecular basis for hypocholesterolemic, hypoglycemic, and anti-obesity manifestations observed in experimental animals following saponin treatment. Although intensified research is required to characterize the pharmacophoric features in saponins exhibiting these interactions, however, this preliminary lead is valuable if the world will be free of diabetes, obesity, hypertension, hyperlipidemia, and atherosclerosis in no distant future.

  9. Tandem mass spectrometric analysis of a complex triterpene saponin mixture of Chenopodium quinoa.

    PubMed

    Madl, Tobias; Sterk, Heinz; Mittelbach, Martin; Rechberger, Gerald N

    2006-06-01

    A nano-HPLC electrospray ionization multi-stage tandem mass spectrometry (nLC-ESI-MS/MS) approach was applied to a complex crude triterpene saponin extract of Chenopodium quinoa seed coats. In ESI-MS/MS spectra of triterpene saponins, characteristic fragmentation reactions are observed and allow the determination of aglycones, saccharide sequences, compositions, and branching. Fragmentation of aglycones provided further structural information. The chemical complexity of the mixture was resolved by a complete profiling. Eighty-seven triterpene saponins comprising 19 reported and 68 novel components were identified and studied by MS. In addition to four reported, five novel triterpene aglycones were detected and characterized according to their fragmentation reactions in ESI-MS/MS and electron ionization mass spectrometry (EI-MS). As a novelty fragmentation pathways were proposed and analyzed based upon quantum chemical calculations using a hybrid Hartree-Fock density functional method. Accuracy of the assignment procedure was proven by isolation and structure determination of a novel compound. As the relative distribution and composition of saponins varies between different cultivars and soils, the presented strategy allows a rapid and complete analysis of Chenopodium quinoa saponin distribution and composition, and is particularly suitable for quality control and screening of extracts designated for pharmaceutical, agricultural, and industrial applications.

  10. Four new furostanol saponins from the rhizomes and roots of Smilax scobinicaulis and their cytotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Xu, Jing; Feng, Shixiu; Wang, Qi; Cao, Yingli; Sun, Miao; Zhang, Cunli

    2014-12-15

    Four new furostanol saponins 1-4, along with two known furostanol saponins 5 and 6 and one known spirostanol saponin 7 were isolated from the rhizomes and roots of Smilax scobinicaulis. The structures of the new saponins were elucidated as 26-O-β-D-glucopyranoside-3β,26-dihydroxy-(25R)-5α-furostan-22-methoxyl-6-one-3-O-α-L-arabinopyranosyl-(1→6)-β-D-glucopyranoside (1), 26-O-β-D-glucopyranoside-3β,26-dihydroxy-(25R)-5α-furostan-22-methoxyl-6-one (2), 26-O-β-D-glucopyranoside-3β,26-dihydroxy-(25R)-5α-furostan-20(22)-en-6-one (3), 26-O-β-D-glucopyranoside-3β,23,26-trihydroxy-(23R, 25R)-5α-furostan-20(22)-en-6-one (4) on the basis of spectroscopic analysis. The isolated saponins were evaluated for cytotoxic activity against two human cancer cell lines including Hela (cervical carcinoma) and SMMC-7221 (hepatocellular carcinoma). Compounds 1 and 7 demonstrated cytotoxicity against the tested cell lines.

  11. Assessment of Antioxidant and Cytotoxicity Activities of Saponin and Crude Extracts of Chlorophytum borivilianum

    PubMed Central

    Abd Aziz, Maheran; Stanslas, Johnson; Abdul Kadir, Mihdzar

    2013-01-01

    The present paper focused on antioxidant and cytotoxicity assessment of crude and total saponin fraction of Chlorophytum borivilianum as an important medicinal plant. In this study, three different antioxidant activities (2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl radical scavenging (DPPH), ferrous ion chelating (FIC), and β-carotene bleaching (BCB) activity) of crude extract and total saponin fraction of C. borivilianum tubers were performed. Crude extract was found to possess higher free radical scavenging activity (ascorbic acid equivalents 2578 ± 111 mg AA/100 g) and bleaching activity (IC50 = 0.7 mg mL−1), while total saponin fraction displayed higher ferrous ion chelating (EC50 = 1 mg mL−1). Cytotoxicity evaluation of crude extract and total saponin fraction against MCF-7, PC3, and HCT-116 cancer cell lines using 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5 diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) cell viability assay indicated a higher cytotoxicity activity of the crude extract than the total saponin fraction on all cell lines, being most effective and selective on MCF-7 human breast cancer cell line. PMID:24223502

  12. Saponins from the traditional medicinal plant Momordica charantia stimulate insulin secretion in vitro.

    PubMed

    Keller, Amy C; Ma, Jun; Kavalier, Adam; He, Kan; Brillantes, Anne-Marie B; Kennelly, Edward J

    2011-12-15

    The antidiabetic activity of Momordica charantia (L.), Cucurbitaceae, a widely-used treatment for diabetes in a number of traditional medicine systems, was investigated in vitro. Antidiabetic activity has been reported for certain saponins isolated from M. charantia. In this study insulin secretion was measured in MIN6 β-cells incubated with an ethanol extract, saponin-rich fraction, and five purified saponins and cucurbitane triterpenoids from M. charantia, 3β,7β,25-trihydroxycucurbita-5,23(E)-dien-19-al (1), momordicine I (2), momordicine II (3), 3-hydroxycucurbita-5,24-dien-19-al-7,23-di-O-β-glucopyranoside (4), and kuguaglycoside G (5). Treatments were compared to incubation with high glucose (27 mM) and the insulin secretagogue, glipizide (50 μM). At 125 μg/ml, an LC-ToF-MS characterized saponin-rich fraction stimulated insulin secretion significantly more than the DMSO vehicle, p=0.02. At concentrations 10 and 25 μg/ml, compounds 3 and 5 also significantly stimulated insulin secretion as compared to the vehicle, p≤0.007, and p=0.002, respectively. This is the first report of a saponin-rich fraction, and isolated compounds from M. charantia, stimulating insulin secretion in an in vitro, static incubation assay.

  13. Enhanced removal of lead from contaminated soil by polyol-based deep eutectic solvents and saponin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukhopadhyay, Soumyadeep; Mukherjee, Sumona; Hayyan, Adeeb; Hayyan, Maan; Hashim, Mohd Ali; Sen Gupta, Bhaskar

    2016-11-01

    Deep eutectic solvents (DESs) are a class of green solvents analogous to ionic liquids, but less costly and easier to prepare. The objective of this study is to remove lead (Pb) from a contaminated soil by using polyol based DESs mixed with a natural surfactant saponin for the first time. The DESs used in this study were prepared by mixing a quaternary ammonium salt choline chloride with polyols e.g. glycerol and ethylene glycol. A natural surfactant saponin obtained from soapnut fruit pericarp, was mixed with DESs to boost their efficiency. The DESs on their own did not perform satisfactory due to higher pH; however, they improved the performance of soapnut by up to 100%. Pb removal from contaminated soil using mixture of 40% DES-Gly and 1% saponin and mixture of 10% DES-Gly and 2% saponin were above 72% XRD and SEM studies did not detect any major corrosion in the soil texture. The environmental friendliness of both DESs and saponin and their affordable costs merit thorough investigation of their potential as soil washing agents.

  14. Effects of Tribulus terrestris saponins on exercise performance in overtraining rats and the underlying mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Yin, Liang; Wang, Qian; Wang, Xiaohui; Song, Liang-Nian

    2016-06-22

    The objective of this study was to determine the effects of Tribulus terrestris L. (TT) saponins on exercise performance and the underlying mechanisms. A rat overtraining model was established and animals were treated with TT extracts (120 mg/kg body mass) 30 min before each training session. Serum levels of testosterone and corticosterone and levels of androgen receptor (AR) and insulin growth factor-1 receptor (IGF-1R) in the liver, gastrocnemius, and soleus were determined by ELISA and Western blot. Treatment of rats with TT saponins significantly improved the performance of the overtraining rats, reflected by the extension of time to exhaustion, with a concomitant increase in body mass, relative mass, and protein levels of gastrocnemius. Overtraining alone induced a significant decrease in the serum level of testosterone. In contrast, treatment with TT saponins dramatically increased the serum level of testosterone in overtraining rats to about 150% of control and 216% of overtraining groups, respectively. In addition, TT saponins resulted in a further significant increase in AR in gastrocnemius and significantly suppressed the overtraining-induced increase in IGF-1R in the liver. These results indicated that TT saponins increased performance, body mass, and gastrocnemius mass of rats undergoing overtraining, which might be attributed to the changes in androgen-AR axis and IGF-1R signaling.

  15. Fractionation, structural studies, and immunological characterization of the semi-synthetic Quillaja saponins derivative GPI-0100.

    PubMed

    Marciani, Dante J; Reynolds, Robert C; Pathak, Ashish K; Finley-Woodman, Kyra; May, Richard D

    2003-09-08

    Unfractionated GPI-0100 (UFGPI-0100) containing semi-synthetic derivatives of deacylated Quillaja saponins (DS saponins) modified at the glucuronic acid residue was resolved by reverse phase low-pressure liquid chromatography (RP-LPLC) into two fractions, RP18-1 and RP18-2, with different compositions and adjuvanticity. The fraction RP18-1 contained DS saponin adducts of N-dicyclohexylurea, and stimulated Th2 immunity with production of IgG1, while the RP18-2 fraction contained the dodecylamide derivatives of DS saponins and stimulated Th1 immunity with production of IgG2a, IFN-gamma, IL-2, and CTL. The strong immune stimulatory properties of RP18-2, relative to RP18-1, and the formation of RP18-1/RP18-2 mixed micelles may account for the effective stimulation of Th1 immunity by UFGPI-0100. UFGPI-0100 was free of acylated quillaja saponin components, including the more stable QS-7.

  16. The Sg-1 glycosyltransferase locus regulates structural diversity of triterpenoid saponins of soybean.

    PubMed

    Sayama, Takashi; Ono, Eiichiro; Takagi, Kyoko; Takada, Yoshitake; Horikawa, Manabu; Nakamoto, Yumi; Hirose, Aya; Sasama, Hiroko; Ohashi, Mihoko; Hasegawa, Hisakazu; Terakawa, Teruhiko; Kikuchi, Akio; Kato, Shin; Tatsuzaki, Nana; Tsukamoto, Chigen; Ishimoto, Masao

    2012-05-01

    Triterpene saponins are a diverse group of biologically functional products in plants. Saponins usually are glycosylated, which gives rise to a wide diversity of structures and functions. In the group A saponins of soybean (Glycine max), differences in the terminal sugar species located on the C-22 sugar chain of an aglycone core, soyasapogenol A, were observed to be under genetic control. Further genetic analyses and mapping revealed that the structural diversity of glycosylation was determined by multiple alleles of a single locus, Sg-1, and led to identification of a UDP-sugar-dependent glycosyltransferase gene (Glyma07g38460). Although their sequences are highly similar and both glycosylate the nonacetylated saponin A0-αg, the Sg-1(a) allele encodes the xylosyltransferase UGT73F4, whereas Sg-1(b) encodes the glucosyltransferase UGT73F2. Homology models and site-directed mutagenesis analyses showed that Ser-138 in Sg-1(a) and Gly-138 in Sg-1(b) proteins are crucial residues for their respective sugar donor specificities. Transgenic complementation tests followed by recombinant enzyme assays in vitro demonstrated that sg-1(0) is a loss-of-function allele of Sg-1. Considering that the terminal sugar species in the group A saponins are responsible for the strong bitterness and astringent aftertastes of soybean seeds, our findings herein provide useful tools to improve commercial properties of soybean products.

  17. Improving abnormal hemorheological parameters in ApoE-/- mice by Ilex kudingcha total saponins.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Jiao; Wang, Xianwei; Li, Haixia; Gu, Yueqing; Tu, Pengfei; Wen, Zongyao

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this study was to test the effects of Ilex kudingcha total saponins on hemorheology of ApoE-/- mice suffering from hypercholesterolemia induced by high-cholesterol diet. The mice were randomly divided into six groups: the control group, the high-cholesterol diet group, 50 mg/kg atorvastatin treatment group, 75, 150 and 300 mg/kg Ilex kudingcha saponins treatment groups, and all the drug treatment groups were fed with a high-cholesterol diet. After administration with saponins (150 mg/kg or more) and atorvastatin (50 mg/kg) for six weeks, the plasma total cholesterol (TC), whole blood viscosity (WBV), plasma viscosity (PV), and erythrocyte aggregation index (EAI) had a remarkable decrease compared with that of the high-cholesterol diet group, but the hematocrit (Hct) and erythrocyte deformation index (DI) had no significant changes. In addition, it is found that the improving effects of saponins on reducing plasma fibrinogen (Fg) levels and prolonging the blood coagulation times including activated partial thromboplastin time (APTT), thrombin time (TT), and prothrombin time (PT). In conclusion, the Ilex kudingcha total saponins may have a significant therapy application of hypercholesterolemia and atherosclerosis by considering its actions on hemorheological characteristics.

  18. Enhanced removal of lead from contaminated soil by polyol-based deep eutectic solvents and saponin.

    PubMed

    Mukhopadhyay, Soumyadeep; Mukherjee, Sumona; Hayyan, Adeeb; Hayyan, Maan; Hashim, Mohd Ali; Sen Gupta, Bhaskar

    2016-11-01

    Deep eutectic solvents (DESs) are a class of green solvents analogous to ionic liquids, but less costly and easier to prepare. The objective of this study is to remove lead (Pb) from a contaminated soil by using polyol based DESs mixed with a natural surfactant saponin for the first time. The DESs used in this study were prepared by mixing a quaternary ammonium salt choline chloride with polyols e.g. glycerol and ethylene glycol. A natural surfactant saponin obtained from soapnut fruit pericarp, was mixed with DESs to boost their efficiency. The DESs on their own did not perform satisfactory due to higher pH; however, they improved the performance of soapnut by up to 100%. Pb removal from contaminated soil using mixture of 40% DES-Gly and 1% saponin and mixture of 10% DES-Gly and 2% saponin were above 72% XRD and SEM studies did not detect any major corrosion in the soil texture. The environmental friendliness of both DESs and saponin and their affordable costs merit thorough investigation of their potential as soil washing agents.

  19. [A new alkaloid of Menispermum dauricum DC--dauriciline].

    PubMed

    Pang, X P; Chen, Y W; Li, X J; Long, J G

    1991-01-01

    A new phenolic dauricine-type alkaloid, named "dauriciline", was isolated from the rhizome of Menispermum dauricum DC. It is a pale yellow powder. Based on spectrometric analysis (UV.FAB-MS and 1HNMR) and chemical reaction the structure of the new alkaloid was elucidated as RR,7,7'-demethyldauricine (VI).

  20. Identification of the quinolizidine alkaloids in Sophora leachiana

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Sophora is a diverse genus representing herbs, shrubs, and trees that occurs throughout the world, primarily in the northern hemisphere. Sophora species contain a variety of quinolizidine alkaloids that are toxic and potentially teratogenic. However, there are no previous reports on the alkaloid c...

  1. Tall fescue seed extraction and partial purification of ergot alkaloids

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Many substances in the tall fescue/endophyte association (Schedonorus arundinaceus/Epichloë coenophiala) have biological activity. Of these compounds only the ergot alkaloids are known to have significant mammalian toxicity and the predominant ergot alkaloids are ergovaline and ergovalinine. Because...

  2. Leptopyrine, new alkaloid from Leptopyrum fumarioides L. (Ranunculaceae).

    PubMed

    Doncheva, Tsvetelina; Solongo, Amgalan; Kostova, Nadezhda; Gerelt-Od, Yadamsuren; Selenge, Dangaa; Philipov, Stefan

    2015-01-01

    A new type of isoquinoline alkaloid leptopyrine was isolated from the aerial parts of Leptopyrum fumarioides L. (Ranunculaceae) of Mongolian origin. The known alkaloids protopine and thalifoline were isolated for the first time from this the species. All structures were established by physical and spectral analyses.

  3. Evolution of alkaloid biosynthesis in the genus Narcissus.

    PubMed

    Berkov, Strahil; Martínez-Francés, Vanessa; Bastida, Jaume; Codina, Carles; Ríos, Segundo

    2014-03-01

    In an attempt to reveal the relationships between alkaloid biosynthesis and phylogeny, we investigated by GC-MS the alkaloid patterns of 22 species and 3 hybrids (from 45 locations) from seven main sections of the genus Narcissus (Amaryllidaceae). The results indicate that the first alkaloids to evolve in the genus Narcissus were of the lycorine- and homolycorine-type. The alkaloid pattern of the Nevadensis section supports its recent separation from the Pseudonarcissus section. The plants of Narcissus pallidulus (Ganymedes section) show a predominance of Sceletium-type compounds, which are quite rare in the Amaryllidaceae family. Two successful evolutionary strategies involving alkaloid biosynthesis and leading to an expansion in taxa and occupied area were determined. Firstly, a diversification of alkaloid patterns and a high alkaloid concentration in the organs of the large Narcissus species (in the Pseudonarcissus section) resulted in an improved chemical defence in diverse habitats. Secondly, both plant size and alkaloid biosynthesis were reduced (in the Bulbocodium and Apodanthi sections) relegated to dry pastures and rocky places.

  4. MULTICOMPONENT REACTIONS IN ALKALOID-BASED DRUG DISCOVERY

    PubMed Central

    Magedov, I. V.; Kornienko, A.

    2016-01-01

    Multicomponent reactions are emerging as a powerful tool in alkaloid-based drug discovery. This Highlight describes several recent (all published in 2011) examples of the employment of multicomponent reactions for the synthesis of biologically active alkaloids and their medicinally relevant analogues. PMID:27917001

  5. Binding of quinolizidine alkaloids to nicotinic and muscarinic acetylcholine receptors.

    PubMed

    Schmeller, T; Sauerwein, M; Sporer, F; Wink, M; Müller, W E

    1994-09-01

    Fourteen quinolizidine alkaloids, isolated from Lupinus albus, L. mutabilis, and Anagyris foetida, were analyzed for their affinity for nicotinic and/or muscarinic acetylcholine receptors. Of the compounds tested, the alpha-pyridones, N-methylcytisine and cytisine, showed the highest affinities at the nicotinic receptor, while several quinolizidine alkaloid types were especially active at the muscarinic receptor.

  6. Antiproliferative and Structure Activity Relationships of Amaryllidaceae Alkaloids.

    PubMed

    Cedrón, Juan C; Ravelo, Ángel G; León, Leticia G; Padrón, José M; Estévez-Braun, Ana

    2015-07-30

    The antiproliferative activity of a set of seven natural Amaryllidaceae alkaloids and 32 derivatives against four cancer cell lines (A2780, SW1573, T47-D and WiDr) was determined. The best antiproliferative activities were achieved with alkaloids derived from pancracine (2), haemanthamine (6) and haemantidine (7). For each skeleton, some structure-activity relationships were outlined.

  7. Effects of Ergot Alkaloids on Bovine Sperm Motility In Vitro

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Ergot alkaloids are synthesized by endophyte-infected (Neotyphodium coenophialum) tall fescue (Lolium arundinaceum (Schreb.) S.J. Darbyshire). Our objective was to determine direct effects of ergot alkaloids (ergotamine, dihydroergotamine and ergonovine) on the motility of bovine spermatozoa in vit...

  8. Mate (Ilex paraguariensis St. Hilaire) saponins induce caspase-3-dependent apoptosis in human colon cancer cells in vitro

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Saponins are naturally occurring metabolites present in Yerba mate (Ilex paraguariensis), and other plant sources which have been associated with several health benefits. Mate saponins were extracted with methanol from dry leaves, partially purified and quantified. UV-HPLC analysis showed that the m...

  9. Flavonoids protecting food and beverages against light.

    PubMed

    Huvaere, Kevin; Skibsted, Leif H

    2015-01-01

    Flavonoids, which are ubiquitously present in the plant kingdom, preserve food and beverages at the parts per million level with minor perturbation of sensory impressions. Additionally, they are safe and possibly contribute positive health effects. Flavonoids should be further exploited for the protection of food and beverages against light-induced quality deterioration through: (1) direct absorption of photons as inner filters protecting sensitive food components; (2) deactivation of (triplet-)excited states of sensitisers like chlorophyll and riboflavin; (3) quenching of singlet oxygen from type II photosensitisation; and (iv) scavenging of radicals formed as reaction intermediates in type I photosensitisation. For absorption of light, combinations of flavonoids, as found in natural co-pigmentation, facilitate dissipation of photon energy to heat thus averting photodegradation. For protection against singlet oxygen and triplet sensitisers, chemical quenching gradually decreases efficiency hence the pathway to physical quenching should be optimised through product formulation. The feasibility of these protection strategies is further supported by kinetic data that are becoming available, allowing for calculation of threshold levels of flavonoids to prevent beer and dairy products from going off. On the other hand, increasing understanding of the interplay between light and matrix physicochemistry, for example the effect of aprotic microenvironments on phototautomerisation of compounds like quercetin, opens up for engineering better light-to-heat converting channels in processed food to eventually prevent quality loss.

  10. UV Treatment Enhances Flavonoid Content in Blueberries

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Treatment of blueberries (Vaccinium corymbosum, cv. Sierra) with UV-C at 2.15 or 4.30 kJ m-2 enhanced blueberry fruit content of flavonoids including resveratrol, myricetin 3-arabinoside, quercetin 3-galactoside, quercetin 3-arabinoside, quercetin derivative, kaempferol 3-glucoside, delphinidin-3-ga...

  11. Flavonoids and DNA Repair in Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2004-12-01

    responsible to fill the gap created by the excision of 8-OHdG. There is in vitro evidence that some flavonoids such as myricetin and baicalin will...myricetin. Methods Enzymol., 335, 308-316. 4. Chen,X., Nishida,H., and Konishi,T. (2003) Baicalin promoted the repair of DNA single strand breakage caused by

  12. Effects of flavonoids on cognitive performance

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Recent studies suggest that nutritional interventions, such as increasing dietary intake of fruits and vegetables, could possibly delay and even reverse age-related declines in brain function such as cognitive and motor performance. Fruits and vegetables rich in flavonoids play a critical role in pr...

  13. Flavonoids from Artocarpus anisophyllus and their bioactivities.

    PubMed

    Lathiff, Siti Mariam Abdul; Jemaon, Noraini; Abdullah, Siti Awanis; Jamil, Shajarahtunnur

    2015-03-01

    Two new prenylated flavonoids, 4',5-dihydroxy-6,7-(2,2-dimethylpyrano)-2'-methoxy-8-γ,γ-dimethylallylflavone 1 and 3'-hydroxycycloartocarpin 2 along with six known flavonoids, 5,7-dihydroxy-4'-methoxy-8-prenylflavanone 3, isobavachalcone 4, pyranocycloartobiloxanthone A 5, artocarpin 6, chaplashin 7 and cycloartocarpin 8 were isolated for the first time from the leaves and the heartwoods of Artocarpus anisophyllus Miq. The structures of isolated flavonoids were elucidated spectroscopically using 1D and 2D NMR, FTIR, MS, UV and also by comparison with literature data. These flavonoids were screened for their antioxidant and tyrosinase inhibitory activities. The dichloromethane and ethyl acetate crude extracts together with 3'-hydroxycycloartocarpin 2, pyranocycloartobiloxanthone A 5 and artocarpin 6 showed DPPH (2,2-diphenyl-l-picrylhydrazyl) radical scavenging activity with SC50 values of 80.2, 40.0, 152.9, 20.2 and 140.0 μg/mL in 30 min, respectively. Pyranocycloartobiloxanthone A 5 exhibited significant tyrosinase inhibitory activity against tyrosinase from mushroom with IC50 values of 60.5 μg/mL.

  14. Association among Dietary Flavonoids, Flavonoid Subclasses and Ovarian Cancer Risk: A Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    You, Ruxu; Yang, Yu; Liao, Jing; Chen, Dongsheng; Yu, Lixiu

    2016-01-01

    Background Previous studies have indicated that intake of dietary flavonoids or flavonoid subclasses is associated with the ovarian cancer risk, but presented controversial results. Therefore, we conducted a meta-analysis to derive a more precise estimation of these associations. Methods We performed a search in PubMed, Google Scholar and ISI Web of Science from their inception to April 25, 2015 to select studies on the association among dietary flavonoids, flavonoid subclasses and ovarian cancer risk. The information was extracted by two independent authors. We assessed the heterogeneity, sensitivity, publication bias and quality of the articles. A random-effects model was used to calculate the pooled risk estimates. Results Five cohort studies and seven case-control studies were included in the final meta-analysis. We observed that intake of dietary flavonoids can decrease ovarian cancer risk, which was demonstrated by pooled RR (RR = 0.82, 95% CI = 0.68–0.98). In a subgroup analysis by flavonoid subtypes, the ovarian cancer risk was also decreased for isoflavones (RR = 0.67, 95% CI = 0.50–0.92) and flavonols (RR = 0.68, 95% CI = 0.58–0.80). While there was no compelling evidence that consumption of flavones (RR = 0.86, 95% CI = 0.71–1.03) could decrease ovarian cancer risk, which revealed part sources of heterogeneity. The sensitivity analysis indicated stable results, and no publication bias was observed based on the results of Funnel plot analysis and Egger’s test (p = 0.26). Conclusions This meta-analysis suggested that consumption of dietary flavonoids and subtypes (isoflavones, flavonols) has a protective effect against ovarian cancer with a reduced risk of ovarian cancer except for flavones consumption. Nevertheless, further investigations on a larger population covering more flavonoid subclasses are warranted. PMID:26960146

  15. Alkaloids from Piper sarmentosum and Piper nigrum.

    PubMed

    Ee, G C L; Lim, C M; Lim, C K; Rahmani, M; Shaari, K; Bong, C F J

    2009-01-01

    Detailed chemical studies on the roots of Piper sarmentosum and Piper nigrum have resulted in several alkaloids. The roots of P. sarmentosum gave a new aromatic compound, 1-nitrosoimino-2,4,5-trimethoxybenzene (1). Piper nigrum roots gave pellitorine (2), (E)-1-[3',4'-(methylenedioxy)cinnamoyl]piperidine (3), 2,4-tetradecadienoic acid isobutyl amide (4), piperine (5), sylvamide (6), cepharadione A (7), piperolactam D (8) and paprazine (9). Structural elucidation of these compounds was achieved through NMR and MS techniques. Cytotoxic activity screening of the plant extracts indicated some activity.

  16. A new pyrroloquinazoline alkaloid from Linaria vulgaris.

    PubMed

    Hua, Huiming; Cheng, Maosheng; Li, Xian; Pei, Yuehu

    2002-10-01

    A new alkaloid, 1,2,3,9-tetrahydropyrrolo(2,1-b)quinazolin-1-carboxylic acid (1), together with eight known compounds, 7-hydroxy vasicine (2), benzyl alcohol beta-D-(2'-O-beta-xylopyranosyl)glucopyranoside (3), benzyl alcohol O-beta-D-glucopyranoside (4), benzyl alcohol O-beta-D-primveroside (5), 3,5-dimethyl-4-hydroxy benzaldehyde (6), gluco-syringic acid (7), syringin (8), and liriodendrin (9), were isolated from the plants of Linaria vulgaris. Their structures were established by spectroscopic methods.

  17. Enantioselective Total Synthesis of Tricyclic Myrmicarin Alkaloids

    PubMed Central

    Movassaghi, Mohammad; Ondrus, Alison E.

    2010-01-01

    An enantioselective gram-scale synthesis of a key dihydroindolizine intermediate for the preparation of myrmicarin alkaloids is described. Key transformations in this convergent approach include a stereospecific palladium–catalyzed N-vinylation of a pyrrole with a vinyl triflate, a copper–catalyzed enantioselective conjugate reduction of a β-pyrrolyl enoate, and a regioselective Friedel-Crafts reaction. The synthesis of optically active and isomerically pure samples of (4aR)-myrmicarins 215A, 215B, and 217 in addition to their respective C4a-epimers is presented. PMID:16178549

  18. New ester alkaloids from lupins (genus lupinus).

    PubMed

    Mühlbauer, P; Witte, L; Wink, M

    1988-06-01

    Esters of 13-hydroxylupanine and 4-hydroxylupanine with acetic, propionic, butyric, isobutyric, valeric, isovaleric, tiglic, benzoic, and TRANS-cinnamic acid have been synthesized and characterized by capillary gas-liquid chromatography and mass spectrometry (EI-MS, CI-MS). In LUPINUS POLYPHYLLUS, L. ALBUS, L. ANGUSTIFOLIUS, and L. MUTABILIS we could identify new ester alkaloids (e.g. 13-propyloxylupanine, 13-butyryloxylupanine, 13-isobutyryloxylupanine, and 4-tigloyloxylupanine) besides the known esters, i.e. 13-acetoxylupanine, 13-isovaleroyloxylupanine, 13-angeloyloxylupanine, 13-tigloyloxylupanine, 13-benzoyloxylupanine, 13- CIS-cinnamoyloxylupanine nine, and 13- TRANS-cinnamoyloxylupanine.

  19. Where do health benefits of flavonoids come from? Insights from flavonoid targets and their evolutionary history.

    PubMed

    Lu, Ming-Feng; Xiao, Zheng-Tao; Zhang, Hong-Yu

    2013-05-17

    Flavonoid intake is negatively correlated with the incidence of some chronic diseases including cardiovascular diseases, type II diabetes, neurodegenerative diseases, and cancers. Thus, the molecular mechanisms underlying this correlation are of great interest. Although ample attention has been given to the free radical-scavenging potential of flavonoids, the poor bioavailability of exogenous flavonoids suggests that the direct antioxidant activity is unlikely responsible for their favorable effects. This study comprehensively analyzed flavonoid targets. The results show that the main functions of these targets are associated with cancers and cardiovascular and metabolic diseases. Moreover, evolutionary analysis of these targets showed that ~1000 of the targets have homologues in human gut bacterial metagenomes. Clusters of orthologous groups of proteins (COG) analysis indicated that most of these bacterial targets are associated with bacterial metabolism. Given that the metabolism of gut microbiota is coupled with the metabolism of the host, this finding implies that flavonoids exert their benefits by regulating gut microbes. Therefore, the health benefits of flavonoids are well explained by their targets rather than their direct antioxidant potential.

  20. Triterpenoid saponins with N-acetyl sugar from the bark of Albizia procera.

    PubMed

    Melek, F R; Miyase, Toshio; Ghaly, N S; Nabil, Marian

    2007-05-01

    Three (1,2,4) and one known (3) triterpenoid saponins were isolated from the bark of Albizia procera. The saponins were characterized as 3-O-[beta-D-xylopyranosyl-(1-->2)-alpha-L-arabinopyranosyl-(1-->6)-2-acetamido-2-deoxy-beta-D-glucopyranosyl] echinocystic acid (1), 3-O-[alpha-L-arabinopyranosyl-(1-->2)-beta-D-fucopyranosyl-(1-->6)-2-acetamido-2-deoxy-beta-D-glucopyranosyl] echinocystic acid (2) and 3-O-[beta-D-xylopyranosyl-(1-->2)-alpha-L-arabinopyranosyl-(1-->6)-2-acetamido-2-deoxy-beta-D-glucopyranosyl] acacic acid lactone (4). Their structures were elucidated by 1D and 2D NMR experiments, FABMS as well as chemical means. Saponins 1 and 3 exhibited cytotoxicity against HEPG2 cell line with IC50 9.13 microg/ml and 10 microg/ml, respectively.

  1. Triterpene saponin content in the roots of red beet (Beta vulgaris L.) cultivars.

    PubMed

    Mroczek, Agnieszka; Kapusta, Ireneusz; Janda, Bogdan; Janiszowska, Wirginia

    2012-12-19

    Triterpene saponins in the roots of Beta vulgaris cultivars Red Sphere, Rocket, and Wodan were profiled and quantitated using reverse-phase liquid chromatography coupled with electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (HPLC-ESI/MS/MS). Results obtained indicated that the roots of all three cultivars contained 11 saponins consisting of oleanolic acid or hederagenin aglycone and varying numbers of sugars, with the dominant triglycoside derivative of oleanolic acid. The relative proportions of derivatives of these two aglycones were similar in the three subspecies: cv. Red Sphere contained 99.1 and 0.9%; cv. Rocket, 98.2 and 1.8%; and Wodan 98.8 and 1.2% of oleanolic acid and hederagenin glycosides, respectively. To the best of our knowledge this is the first report on the occurrence, structure, and content of triterpenoid saponins in red beet.

  2. A new cytotoxic steroidal saponin from the rhizomes and roots of Smilax scobinicaulis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Cunli; Feng, Shixiu; Zhang, Lanxi; Ren, Zhanjun

    2013-01-01

    A phytochemical investigation of the EtOH extract from the rhizomes and roots of Smilax scobinicaulis resulted in the isolation of a new isospirostanol-type steroidal saponin, namely (25 R)-5α-spirostan-3β,6β-diol 3-O-β-D-glucopyranosyl-(1 → 4)-[α-L-arabinopyranosyl-(1 → 6)]-β-D-glucopyranoside (1), along with four known steroidal saponins (2-5). The structures of these compounds were determined by 1D- and 2D-NMR spectroscopic analysis, FABMS and HR-ESI-MS as well as chemical degradation. The isolated saponins were evaluated for their in vitro cytotoxicity against A549, LAC and Hela human cancer cell lines, which demonstrated that only compound 1 possessed significant cytotoxic activity with IC₅₀ values of 3.70, 5.70 and 3.64 µM, respectively.

  3. Effects on chicks of Balanites aegyptiaca kernel saponin given by different routes of administration.

    PubMed

    Nakhla, H B; Mohammed, O S; Abu al Futuh, I M; Adam, S E

    1992-06-01

    The effect of oral or parenteral administration of crude saponin extract from Balanites aegyptiaca seed kernal on Hisex-type chicks was studied. Seven-d-old chicks were given 5 mg Balanites crude saponin/kg/d im, 25 mg/kg/d ip or 250 mg/kg/day po for 3 w. When compared to controls, the body weights of dosed chicks were depressed and serum LDH and GOT activities and uric acid concentrations were significantly elevated. There were no consistent differences in serum GGT, CPK, total cholesterol and total protein between control and dosed birds. The main lesions were fatty cytoplasmic vacuolation and necrosis of hepatocytes, lymphocytic nodules, epithelial cell degeneration of the renal tubules, catarrhal enteritis and varying degrees of hemorrhage in the thigh and breast muscles. Myositis or peritonitis were observed in chicks given Balanites crude saponins im or ip, respectively.

  4. The Role of Flavonoids on Oxidative Stress in Epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Diniz, Tâmara Coimbra; Silva, Juliane Cabral; de Lima-Saraiva, Sarah Raquel Gomes; Ribeiro, Fernanda Pires Rodrigues de Almeida; Pacheco, Alessandra Gomes Marques; de Freitas, Rivelilson Mendes; Quintans-Júnior, Lucindo José; Quintans, Jullyana de Souza Siqueira; Mendes, Rosemairy Luciane; Almeida, Jackson Roberto Guedes da Silva

    2015-01-01

    Backgrounds. Oxidative stress can result from excessive free-radical production and it is likely implicated as a possible mechanism involved in the initiation and progression of epileptogenesis. Flavonoids can protect the brain from oxidative stress. In the central nervous system (CNS) several flavonoids bind to the benzodiazepine site on the GABAA-receptor resulting in anticonvulsive effects. Objective. This review provides an overview about the role of flavonoids in oxidative stress in epilepsy. The mechanism of action of flavonoids and its relation to the chemical structure is also discussed. Results/Conclusions. There is evidence that suggests that flavonoids have potential for neuroprotection in epilepsy. PMID:25653736

  5. Flavonoid transport mechanisms: how to go, and with whom.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Jian

    2015-09-01

    Subcellular flavonoid transport and its underlying regulatory mechanisms are still poorly understood, but are fascinating research frontiers in plant science. Recent studies support and further extend previous hypotheses indicating that vacuolar sequestration of flavonoids involves vesicle trafficking, membrane transporters, and glutathione S-transferase (GST). However, the question remains to be addressed of how three distinct but nonexclusive mechanisms are functionally integrated into diverse but redundant transport routes for vacuolar sequestration or extracellular secretion of flavonoids. In this review, I highlight recent progress in understanding flavonoid-transporting vesicle behavior and properties, GST and membrane transporter functions and mechanisms, and flavonoid transport substrate specificity and preference.

  6. Potential ecological roles of flavonoids from Stellera chamaejasme

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Zhiqiang; Zeng, Liming; Jin, Hui; Qin, Bo

    2015-01-01

    Stellera chamaejasme L. (Thymelaeaceae), a perennial weed, distributes widely in the grasslands of Russia, Mongolia and China. The plant synthesizes various secondary metabolites including a group of flavonoids. To our knowledge, flavonoids play important roles in the interactions between plants and the environment. So, what are the benefits to S. chamaejasme from producing these flavonoids? Here, we discuss the potential ecological role of flavonoids from S. chamaejasme in protecting the plant from insects and other herbivores, as well as pathogens and competing plant species, and new data are provided on the phytotoxicity of flavonoids from S. chamaejasme toward Poa annua L. PMID:25848835

  7. The effect of 7, 8-Methylenedioxylycoctonine -Type Diterpenoid Alkaloids on the Toxicity of Methyllycaconitine in Mice

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Larkspur plants contain numerous norditerpenoid alkaloids which include the 7, 8-methylenedioxylycoctonine (MDL-type) alkaloids and the N-(methylsuccinimido) anthranoyllycoctonine (MSAL-type) alkaloids. The MSAL-type alkaloids are generally much more toxic (typically > 20x). The toxicity of many t...

  8. Qualitative and quantitative analysis of steroidal saponins in crude extract and bark powder of Yucca schidigera Roezl.

    PubMed

    Kowalczyk, Mariusz; Pecio, Łukasz; Stochmal, Anna; Oleszek, Wiesław

    2011-08-10

    Steroidal saponins in commercial stem syrup and in extract of a bark of Yucca schidigera were identified with high-performance liquid chromatography ion trap mass spectrometry and quantitated using ultraperformance liquid chromatography with quadrupole mass spectrometric detection. Fragmentation patterns of yucca saponins were generated using collision-induced dissociation and compared with fragmentation of authentic standards as well as with published spectrometric information. In addition to detection of twelve saponins known to occur in Y. schidigera, collected fragmentation data led to tentative identifications of seven new saponins. A quantitation method for all 19 detected compounds was developed and validated. Samples derived from the syrup and the bark of yucca were quantitatively measured and compared. Obtained results indicate that yucca bark accumulates polar, bidesmosidic saponins, while in the stem steroidal glycosides with middle- and short-length saccharide chains are predominant. The newly developed method provides an opportunity to evaluate the composition of yucca products available on the market.

  9. The plant hopper Issus coleoptratus can detoxify phloem sap saponins including the degradation of the terpene core.

    PubMed

    Himmelsbach, Markus; Weth, Agnes; Böhme, Christine; Schwarz, Martin; Bräunig, Peter; Baumgartner, Werner

    2016-02-10

    Issus coleoptratus is a small plant hopper which mainly feeds on the phloem sap from ivy. Although all parts of ivy are poisonous as the plant contains saponins, especially hederasaponins, I. coleoptratus can cope with the poison. In contrast to other animals like the stick insect Carausius morosus which accumulates saponins in its body, I. coleoptratus can degrade and disintegrate not only the saponins but even the genines, i.e. the triterpene core of the substances. This is perhaps made possible by a specialised midgut and/or the salivary glands. When the glands and the gut are dissected and added to saponins in solution, the saponins, including the genines, are degraded ex vivo.

  10. The plant hopper Issus coleoptratus can detoxify phloem sap saponins including the degradation of the terpene core

    PubMed Central

    Himmelsbach, Markus; Weth, Agnes; Böhme, Christine; Schwarz, Martin; Bräunig, Peter; Baumgartner, Werner

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Issus coleoptratus is a small plant hopper which mainly feeds on the phloem sap from ivy. Although all parts of ivy are poisonous as the plant contains saponins, especially hederasaponins, I. coleoptratus can cope with the poison. In contrast to other animals like the stick insect Carausius morosus which accumulates saponins in its body, I. coleoptratus can degrade and disintegrate not only the saponins but even the genines, i.e. the triterpene core of the substances. This is perhaps made possible by a specialised midgut and/or the salivary glands. When the glands and the gut are dissected and added to saponins in solution, the saponins, including the genines, are degraded ex vivo. PMID:26863940

  11. Inactivation of Alicyclobacillus acidoterrestris in orange juice by saponin extracts combined with heat-treatment.

    PubMed

    Alberice, Juliana Vieira; Funes-Huacca, Maribel Elizabeth; Guterres, Sheila Barreto; Carrilho, Emanuel

    2012-10-01

    Alicyclobacillus acidoterrestris is a spoilage-causing bacterium in fruit juices. The inactivation of this bacterium by commercial saponin and saponin purified extract from Sapindus saponaria fruits combined with heat-treatment is described. We investigated heat treatment (87, 90, 95, and 99°C) with incubation time ranging from 0 to 50min, in both concentrated and reconstituted juice. Juices were inoculated with 1.0×10(4)CFU/mL of A. acidoterrestris spores for the evaluation of the best temperature for inactivation. For the temperatures of 87, 90, and 95°C counts of cell viability decreased rapidly within the first 10 to 20min of incubation in both concentrated and reconstituted juices; inactivation at 99°C ensued within 1 and 2min. Combination of commercial saponin (100mg/L) with a very short incubation time (1min) at 99°C showed a reduction of 2.34 log cycle for concentrated juice A. acidoterrestris spores (1.0×10(4)CFU/mL) in the first 24h of incubation after treatments. The most efficient treatment was reached with 300, 400 or 500mg/L of purified extract of saponins from S. saponaria after 5days of incubation in concentrated juice, and after 5days with 300 and 400mg/L or 72h with 500mg/L in reconstituted juice. Commercial saponin and purified extracts from S. saponaria had similar inactivation power on A. acidoterrestris spores, without significant differences (P>0.05). Therefore, purified extract of saponins can be an alternative for the control of A. acidoterrestris in fruit juices.

  12. Metabolism of Flavonoids in Novel Banana Germplasm during Fruit Development

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Chen; Hu, Huigang; Hu, Yulin; Xie, Jianghui

    2016-01-01

    Banana is a commercially important fruit, but its flavonoid composition and characteristics has not been well studied in detail. In the present study, the metabolism of flavonoids was investigated in banana pulp during the entire developmental period of fruit. ‘Xiangfen 1,’ a novel flavonoid-rich banana germplasm, was studied with ‘Brazil’ serving as a control. In both varieties, flavonoids were found to exist mainly in free soluble form and quercetin was the predominant flavonoid. The most abundant free soluble flavonoid was cyanidin-3-O-glucoside chloride, and quercetin was the major conjugated soluble and bound flavonoid. Higher content of soluble flavonoids was associated with stronger antioxidant activity compared with the bound flavonoids. Strong correlation was observed between antioxidant activity and cyanidin-3-O-glucoside chloride content, suggesting that cyanidin-3-O-glucoside chloride is one of the major antioxidants in banana. In addition, compared with ‘Brazil,’ ‘Xiangfen 1’ fruit exhibited higher antioxidant activity and had more total flavonoids. These results indicate that soluble flavonoids play a key role in the antioxidant activity of banana, and ‘Xiangfen 1’ banana can be a rich source of natural antioxidants in human diets. PMID:27625665

  13. Cytotoxic and anthelmintic potential of crude saponins isolated from Achillea Wilhelmsii C. Koch and Teucrium Stocksianum boiss

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Saponins isolated from plant sources have a number of traditional and industrial applications. Saponins have pharmacological effects like anti-inflammatory, molluscicidal, antimicrobial, antispasmodic, antidiabetic, anticancer, anticonvulsant, anthelmintic, antitussive and cytotoxic activities. The current work describes the anthelmintic and cytotoxic activities of crude saponins of Achillea Wilhelmsii and Teucrium Stocksianum as these plants are rich with saponins. Methods Brine shrimp cytotoxic activity of crude saponins was determined by Meyer et al. (1982) at test concentrations of 1000 μg/ml, 100 μg/ml, 10 μg/ml, 7.5 μg/ml, 5.0 μg/ml, 2.5 μg/ml and 1.25 μg/ml. Percentage mortality of test concentrations was determined. Similarly, in vitro anthelmintic activity was determined against roundworms, tapeworms and earthworms. Albendazole and piperazine citrate at concentration 10 mg/ml were used as standard anthelmintic drugs. Results Crude saponins of Achillea wilhelmsii (CSA) and Teucrium stocksianum (CST) had, respectively, cytotoxic activity with LC50 values 2.3 ± 0.16 and 5.23 ± 0. 34 μg/ml. For in vitro anthelmintic activity, time for paralysis and death of parasites (parasiticidal activity) was noted. At concentration 40 mg/ml, crude saponins of Achillea wilhelmsii are 1.96 and 2.12 times more potent than albendazole against Pheretima posthuma and Raillietina spiralis, respectively. Similarly, at concentration 40 mg/ml, crude saponins of Teucrium stocksianum (CST) has 1.89, 1.96 and 1.37 times more parasiticidal activity than albendazole against Pheretima posthuma, Raillietina spiralis and Ascardia galli, respectively. Conclusion Crude saponins of Achillea wilhelmsii and Teucrium stocksianum have cytotoxic and anthelmintic activity. The crude saponins may be excellent sources of cytotoxic and anthelmintic constituents that warrant its isolation and purification for new drug development. PMID:22051373

  14. Natural Flavonoids as Promising Analgesic Candidates: A Systematic Review.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Xiao; Wang, Xiaoyu; Gui, Xuan; Chen, Lu; Huang, Baokang

    2016-11-01

    Due to the chemical structural diversity and various analgesic mechanisms, an increasing number of studies indicated that some flavonoids from medicinal plants could be promising candidates for new natural analgesic drugs, which attract high interests of advanced users and academic researchers. The aim of this systematic review is to report flavonoids and its derivatives as new analgesic candidates based on the pharmacological evidences. Sixty-four papers were found concerning the potential analgesic activity of 46 flavonoids. In this case, the evidence for analgesic activity of flavonoids and total flavonoids was investigated. Meanwhile, the corresponding analgesic mechanism of flavonoids was discussed by generalizing and analyzing the current publications. Based on this review, the conclusion can be drawn that some flavonoids are promising candidates for painful conditions and deserve particular attention in further research and development.

  15. A new triterpenoid saponin and an oligosaccharide isolated from the fruits of Sapindus mukorossi.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xuan-Ming; Yang, De-Po; Xie, Zhi-Yong; Xue, Xue; Zhu, Long-Ping; Wang, Dong-Mei; Zhao, Zhi-Min

    2014-01-01

    A new triterpenoid saponin (1) and a new oligosaccharide (2), together with three known saponins (3-5), have been isolated from n-BuOH extract of the fruits of Sapindus mukorossi Gaertn. The structures were elucidated using detailed analysis of one- and two-dimensional nuclear magnetic resonance spectra along with their mass spectrometric data and the results of acid hydrolysis. Of the isolated compounds 1 and 3-5 displayed cytotoxic effects against human cancer cell lines in A-549 (lung carcinoma), MDA-231 (breast carcinoma) and PC-3 (prostatic carcinoma).

  16. A new steroidal saponin, yuccalan, from the leaves of Yucca smalliana.

    PubMed

    Jin, Yu-Lan; Kuk, Ju-Hee; Oh, Kyung-Taek; Kim, Young-Ju; Piao, Xiang-Lan; Park, Ro-Dong

    2007-05-01

    An extract of the leaves of Yucca smalliana Fern. (Agavaceae) showed potential antimicrobial activity. Employing a bioassay linked fractionation method, one of the active principles, namely yuccalan, was isolated as a new steroidal saponin. The structure of the new steroidal saponin was elucidated as 3-O-beta-D-glucopyranosyl-(1-->6)-beta-D-glucopyranosyl-(3beta, 5alpha, 6alpha, 25S)-spirostan-3,6,27-triol (1) using various spectroscopic techniques, including IR, MS, 1D and 2D 1H-NMR, and 13C-NMR. The purified yuccalan showed antifungal activities against both Rhizoctonia solani and Fusarium oxysporum.

  17. Saponins and a lignan derivative of Terminalia tropophylla from the Madagascar Dry Forest†

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Shugeng; Brodie, Peggy J.; Callmander, Martin; Randrianaivo, Richard; Rakotobe, Etienne; Rasamison, Vincent E.; Kingston, David G. I.

    2009-01-01

    A study of an EtOH extract obtained from the roots of the Madagascan plant Terminalia tropophylla H. Perrier (Combretaceae) led to the isolation of the new oleanane-type triterpenoid saponin 1, the new lignan derivative 2, and the two known saponins arjunglucoside I (3) and sericoside (4). The structures of the new compounds 1 (terminaliaside A) and 2 (4′-O-cinnamoyl cleomiscosin A) were elucidated using 1D and 2D NMR experiments and mass spectrometry. Compound 1 showed antiproliferative activity against the A2780 human ovarian cancer cell line with an IC50 value of 1.2 μM. PMID:19875137

  18. Saponins of the ivy plant, Hedera helix, and their leishmanicidic activity.

    PubMed

    Majester-Savornin, B; Elias, R; Diaz-Lanza, A M; Balansard, G; Gasquet, M; Delmas, F

    1991-06-01

    Antileishmanial activity is reported for the first time for saponins of ivy, Hedera helix L., in vitro on promastigote and amastigote forms of Leishmania infantum and Leishmania tropica. The compounds tested were an extract containing 60% of saponic complex (CS 60), the bidesmosides hederasaponin B, C, and D (saponin K10), their corresponding monodesmosides alpha-, beta-, and delta-hederin, and hederagenin. CS 60 and bidesmosides have shown no effect. Monodesmosides were found to be as effective on promastigote forms as the reference compound (pentamidine). Against amastigote forms only hederagenin exhibited a significant activity which was equivalent to that of the reference compound (N-methylglucamine antimonate).

  19. Sapinmusaponins F-J, bioactive tirucallane-type saponins from the galls of Sapindus mukorossi.

    PubMed

    Huang, Hui-Chi; Tsai, Wei-Jern; Morris-Natschke, Susan L; Tokuda, Harukuni; Lee, Kuo-Hsiung; Wu, Yang-Chang; Kuo, Yao-Haur

    2006-05-01

    Five new tirucallane-type saponins, sapinmusaponins F-J (1-5), were isolated from the galls of Sapindus mukorossi. The structures of these saponins were elucidated on the basis of spectroscopic analysis including 1D and 2D NMR techniques ((1)H-(1)H COSY, HMQC, HMBC, TOCSY, and NOESY). Compounds 1-5 showed anti-platelet-aggregation effects, but no obvious cytotoxic activity for platelets as assayed by lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) leakage. Compounds 1-5 also showed moderate activity in a 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA)-induced Epstein-Barr virus early antigen (EBV-EA) activation assay.

  20. Steroidal Saponins from the Mesocarp of the Fruits of Raphia farinifera (Arecaceae) and their Cytotoxic Activity.

    PubMed

    Tapondjou, Léon A; Siems, Kristina J; Böttger, Stefan; Melzig, Matthias F

    2015-11-01

    Eight steroidal saponins (1-8), including one previously unreported derivative (1), have been isolated from the mesocarp of Raphia farinifera fruits by combined column chromatography and RP-HPLC methods. They were characterized by spectroscopic (1D and 2D NMR experiments) and spectrometric (ESIMS) methods, as well as by comparison of their spectral data with those of reported compounds in the literature. All the isolated compounds were tested for cytotoxicity against urinary bladder carcinoma cells (ECV-304). Our results revealed that, for a high cytotoxicity, a sugar chain of at least three sugar moieties attached to C-3 of the steroidal saponin is necessary.

  1. Analysis and quantitative determination of group B saponins in processed soybean products.

    PubMed

    Berhow, Mark A; Cantrell, Charles L; Duval, Sandra M; Dobbins, Thomas A; Maynes, Jonathan; Vaughn, Steven F

    2002-01-01

    Pure analytical standards for the major saponins present in processed soy products, the group B saponins (soyasaponins I, II, III and IV), were isolated in mg quantities by a combination of processing, precipitation/re-solubilisation, TLC and preparative HPLC. These standards were determined to be pure by LC-ESI/MS analysis and NMR. The standards were used to perfect a facile analytical HPLC method using spectrometric detection to determine the percent composition of the group B soyasaponins in various products from processing of soybean.

  2. Nitrate but not tea saponin feed additives decreased enteric methane emissions in nonlactating cows.

    PubMed

    Guyader, J; Eugène, M; Doreau, M; Morgavi, D P; Gérard, C; Loncke, C; Martin, C

    2015-11-01

    Tea saponin is considered a promising natural compound for reducing enteric methane emissions in ruminants. A trial was conducted to study the effect of this plant extract fed alone or in combination with nitrate on methane emissions, total tract digestive processes, and ruminal characteristics in cattle. The experiment was conducted as a 2 × 2 factorial design with 4 ruminally cannulated nonlactating dairy cows. Feed offer was restricted to 90% of voluntary intake and diets consisted of (DM basis): 1) control (CON; 50% hay and 50% pelleted concentrates), 2) CON with 0.5% tea saponin (TEA), 3) CON with 2.3% nitrate (NIT), and 4) CON with 0.5% tea saponin and 2.3% nitrate (TEA+NIT). Tea saponin and nitrate were included in pelleted concentrates. Diets contained similar amounts of CP (12.2%), starch (26.0%), and NDF (40.1%). Experimental periods lasted 5 wk including 2 wk of measurement (wk 4 and 5), during which intake was measured daily. In wk 4, daily methane emissions were quantified for 4 d using open circuit respiratory chambers. In wk 5, total tract digestibility, N balance, and urinary excretion of purine derivatives were determined from total feces and urine collected separately for 6 d. Ruminal fermentation products and protozoa concentration were analyzed from samples taken after morning feeding for 2 nonconsecutive days in wk 5. Tea saponin and nitrate supplementation decreased feed intake ( < 0.05), with an additive effect when fed in combination. Compared with CON, tea saponin did not modify methane emissions (g/kg DMI; > 0.05), whereas nitrate-containing diets (NIT and TEA+NIT) decreased methanogenesis by 28%, on average ( < 0.001). Total tract digestibility, N balance, and urinary excretion of purine derivatives were similar among diets. Ruminal fermentation products were not affected by tea saponin, whereas nitrate-containing diets increased acetate proportion and decreased butyrate proportion and ammonia concentration ( < 0.05). Under the

  3. Cardiovascular pharmacological effects of bisbenzylisoquinoline alkaloid derivatives.

    PubMed

    Qian, Jia-Qing

    2002-12-01

    Tetrandrine, dauricine, daurisoline and neferine are bisbenzylisoquinoline alkaloid derivatives isolated from Chinese traditional medicine and herbs. The cardiovascular pharmacological effects and the mechanism of actions of these compounds were reviewed. Tetrandrine isolated from Stephania tetrandra S Moore possesses antihypertensive and antiarrhythmic effects. The antihypertensive effects of tetrandrine have been demonstrated in experimental hypertensive animals and in hypertensive patients. Recent studies showed that in addition to its calcium antagonistic effect, tetrandrine interacted with M receptors. Modulation by M receptor is one of the pharmacological mechanisms of cardiovascular effects of tetrandrine. Dauricine and daurisoloine were isolated from Menispermum dauricum DC. The antiarrhythmic effects of dauricine have been verified in different experimental arrhythmic models and in cardiac arrhythmic patients. Dauricine blocked the cardiac transmembrane Na+,K+ and Ca2+ ion currents. Differing from quinidine and sotalol, which exhibited reverse use-dependent effect, dauricine prolonged APD in a normal use-dependent manner in experimental studies. The antiarrhythmic effect of daurisoline and neferine which is an alkaloid isolated from Nelumbo nucifera Gaertn, and their mechanisms of actions have also been studied. The antiarrhythmic effect of daurisoline is more potent than that of dauricine.

  4. Antifungal Indole Alkaloids from Winchia calophylla.

    PubMed

    Yang, Mei-Li; Chen, Jia; Sun, Meng; Zhang, Dong-Bo; Gao, Kun

    2016-05-01

    Ten indole alkaloids (1-10) were obtained from an antifungal extract of Winchia calophylla, of which two (2 and 4) were new. N(4)-Methyl-10-hydroxyl-desacetylakuammilin (2) was an akuammiline-type indole alkaloid. N(1)-Methyl-echitaminic acid (4) was an unusual zwitterion with a basic vincorine-type skeleton. This is the first report of 10 in W. calophylla. The structures of all of the compounds were determined based on spectroscopic data, and their bioactivities were assessed. Compound 1 showed potent activity against the plant pathogenic fungi of Penicillium italicum and Fusarium oxysporum f.sp cubens with IC50 s of 10.4 and 11.5 µM, respectively, and 3 inhibited Rhizoctonia solani with an IC50 of 11.7 µM. Compounds 2 and 4 showed weak cytotoxicity against the human leukemic cell line HL-60 in vitro with IC50 s of 51.4 and 75.3 µM, respectively. Compounds 1 and 2 displayed weak activity against acetylcholinesterase with IC50 s around 61.3 and 52.6 µM, respectively.

  5. Mutual interactions between flavonoids and enzymatic and transporter elements responsible for flavonoid disposition via phase II metabolic pathways.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Wen; Hu, Ming

    2012-09-21

    Flavonoids, existing mainly as glycosides in nature, have multiple "claimed" beneficial effects in humans. Flavonoids are extensively metabolized in enterocytes and hepatocytes by phase II enzymes such as UGTs and SULTs to form glucuronides and sulfates, respectively. These glucuronides and sulfates are subsequently excreted via ABC transporters (e.g., MRP2 or BCRP). Therefore, it is the interplay between phase II enzymes and efflux transporters that affects the disposition of flavonoids and leads to the low bioavailability of flavonoid aglycones. Flavonoids can also serve as chemical regulators that affect the activity or expression levels of phase II enzymes including UGTs, SULTs and GSTs, and transporters including P-gp, MRP2, BCRP, OATP and OAT. In general, flavonoids may exert the inhibitory or inductive effects on the phase II enzymes and transporters via multiple mechanisms that may involve different nuclear receptors. Since flavonoids may affect the metabolic pathways shared by many important clinical drugs, drug-flavonoid interaction is becoming an increasingly important concern. This review article focused on the disposition of flavonoids and effects of flavonoids on relevant enzymes (e.g. UGTs and SULTs) and transporters (e.g. MRP2 and BCRP) involved in the interplay between phase II enzymes and efflux transporters. The effects of flavonoids on other metabolic enzymes (e.g. GSTs) or transporters (e.g. P-gp, OATP and OAT) are also addressed but that is not the emphasis of this review.

  6. Mutual interactions between flavonoids and enzymatic and transporter elements responsible for flavonoid disposition via phase II metabolic pathways

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Wen; Hu, Ming

    2014-01-01

    Flavonoids, existing mainly as glycosides in nature, have multiple “claimed” beneficial effects in humans. Flavonoids are extensively metabolized in enterocytes and hepatocytes by phase II enzymes such as UGTs and SULTs to form glucuronides and sulfates, respectively. These glucuronides and sulfates are subsequently excreted via ABC transporters (e.g., MRP2 or BCRP). Therefore, it is the interplay between phase II enzymes and efflux transporters that affects the disposition of flavonoids and leads to the low bioavailability of flavonoid aglycones. Flavonoids can also serve as chemical regulators that affect the activity or expression levels of phase II enzymes including UGTs, SULTs and GSTs, and transporters including P-gp, MRP2, BCRP, OATP and OAT. In general, flavonoids may exert the inhibitory or inductive effects on the phase II enzymes and transporters via multiple mechanisms that may involve different nuclear receptors. Since flavonoids may affect the metabolic pathways shared by many important clinical drugs, drug-flavonoid interaction is becoming an increasingly important concern. This review article focused on the disposition of flavonoids and effects of flavonoids on relevant enzymes (e.g. UGTs and SULTs) and transporters (e.g. MRP2 and BCRP) involved in the interplay between phase II enzymes and efflux transporters. The effects of flavonoids on other metabolic enzymes (e.g. GSTs) or transporters (e.g. P-gp, OATP and OAT) are also addressed but that is not the emphasis of this review. PMID:25400909

  7. Copper removal from contaminated soils by soil washing process using camellian-derived saponin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reyes, Arturo; Fernanda Campos, Maria; Videla, Álvaro; Letelier, María Victoria; Fuentes, Bárbara

    2015-04-01

    Antofagasta Region in North of Chile has been the main copper producer district in the world. As a consequence of a lack of mining closure regulation, a large number of abandon small-to-medium size metal-contaminated sites have been identified in the last survey performed by the Chilean Government. Therefore, more research development on sustainable reclamation technologies must be made in this extreme arid-dry zone. The objective of this study is to test the effectiveness of soil remediation by washing contaminated soil using camellian-derived saponin for the mobilization of copper. Soil samples were taken from an abandoned copper mine site located at 30 km North Antofagasta city. They were dried and sieved at 75 µm for physico-chemical characterization. A commercial saponin extracted from camellias seed was used as biosurfactant. The soil used contains 67.4 % sand, 26.3 % silt and 6.3 % clay. The soil is highly saline (electric conductivity, 61 mScm-1), with low organic matter content (0.41%), with pH 7.30, and a high copper concentration (2200 mg Kg-1 soil). According to the sequential extraction procedure of the whole soil, copper species are mainly as exchangeable fraction (608.2 mg Kg-1 soil) and reducible fraction (787.3 mg Kg-1 soil), whereas the oxidizable and residual fractions are around 205.7 and 598.8 mg Kg-1 soil, respectively. Soil particles under 75 µm contain higher copper concentrations (1242 mg Kg-1 soil) than the particle fraction over 75 µm (912 mg Kg-1 soil). All washing assays were conducted in triplicate using a standard batch technique with and without pH adjustment. The testing protocols includes evaluation of four solid to liquid ratio (0.5:50; 1.0:50; 2.0:50, and 5.0:50) and three saponin concentrations (0, 1, and 4 mg L-1). After shaking (24 h, 20±1 °C) and subsequently filtration (0.45 µm), the supernatants were analyzed for copper and pH. The removal efficiencies of copper by saponin solutions were calculated in according to the

  8. The effect of isoquinoline alkaloids on opiate withdrawal.

    PubMed

    Capasso, A; Piacente, S; De Tommasi, N; Rastrelli, L; Pizza, C

    2006-01-01

    Our interest has been centered on isoquinoline alkaloids obtained from Argemone mexicana (Papaveraceae), Aristolochia constricta (Aristolochiaceae) and the opium alkaloid, papaverine. In this respect, the effect of these isoquinoline alkaloids was investigated on contractions induced by naloxone of isolated guinea pig ileum acutely exposed to morphine in vitro. The activity of these alkaloids was compared to the control compound, papaverine. Furthermore, the effect of these isoquinoline alkaloids was also determined on naloxone-precipitated withdrawal in isolated guinea pig ileum exposed to DAMGO (highly selective mu opioid receptor agonist) and U50-488H (highly selective kappa opioid receptor agonist) to test whether the possible interaction of isoquinoline alkaloids on opioid withdrawal involves mu- and/or kappa-opioid receptors. Isoquinoline alkaloids from A. mexicana (from 5 x 10(-6) to 1 x 10(-4) M), from A. constricta (1 x 10(-5) x 10(-5)-1 x 10(-4) M) as well as papaverine treatment (1 x 10(-7)-5 x 10(-6)-1 x 10(-6) M) before or after the opioid agonists were able of both preventing and reversing the naloxone-induced contraction after exposure to mu (morphine and DAMGO) or kappa (U50-488H) opiate receptor agonists in a concentration-dependent manner. Both acetylcholine response and electrical stimulation were also reduced by isoquinoline alkaloids and papaverine treatment as well as the final opiate withdrawal was still reduced. The results of the present study indicate that isoquinoline alkaloids as well as papaverine were able to produce significant influence on the opiate withdrawal in vitro and these compounds were able to exert their effects both at mu and kappa opioid agonists.

  9. Effect of saponin treatment on the sarcoplasmic reticulum of rat, cane toad and crustacean (yabby) skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Launikonis, B S; Stephenson, D G

    1997-10-15

    1. Mechanically skinned fibres from skeletal muscles of the rat, toad and yabby were used to investigate the effect of saponin treatment on sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) Ca2+ loading properties. The SR was loaded submaximally under control conditions before and after treatment with saponin and SR Ca2+ was released with caffeine. 2. Treatment with 10 micrograms ml-1 saponin greatly reduced the SR Ca2+ loading ability of skinned fibres from the extensor digitorum longus muscle of the rat with a rate constant of 0.24 min-1. Saponin concentrations up to 150 micrograms ml-1 and increased exposure time up to 30 min did not further reduce the SR Ca2+ loading ability of the SR, which indicates that the inhibitory action of 10-150 micrograms ml-1 saponin is not dose dependent. The effect of saponin was also not dependent on the state of polarization of the transverse-tubular system. 3. Treatment with saponin at concentrations up to 100 micrograms ml-1 for 30 min did not affect the Ca2+ loading ability of SR in skinned skeletal muscle fibres from the twitch portion of the toad iliofibularis muscle but SR Ca2+ loading ability decreased markedly with a time constant of 0.22 min-1 in the presence of 150 micrograms ml-1 saponin. 4. The saponin dependent increase in permeability could be reversed in both rat and toad fibres by short treatment with 6 microM Ruthenium Red, a potent SR Ca2+ channel blocker, suggesting that saponin does affect the SR Ca2+ channel properties in mammalian and anuran skeletal muscle. 5. Treatment of skinned fibres of long sarcomere length (> 6 microns) from the claw muscle of the yabby (a freshwater decapod crustacean) with 10 micrograms ml-1 saponin for 30 min abolished the ability of the SR to load Ca2+, indicating that saponin affects differently the SR from skeletal muscles of mammals, anurans and crustaceans. 6. It is concluded that at relatively low concentrations, saponin causes inhibition of the skeletal SR Ca2+ loading ability in a species

  10. Comparison of the anti-inflammatory active constituents and hepatotoxic pyrrolizidine alkaloids in two Senecio plants and their preparations by LC-UV and LC-MS.

    PubMed

    Chen, Pinghong; Wang, Yi; Chen, Lulin; Jiang, Wei; Niu, Yan; Shao, Qing; Gao, Lu; Zhao, Quancheng; Yan, Licheng; Wang, Shufang

    2015-11-10

    Two Senecio plants, Senecio cannabifolius Less. and its variety S. cannabifolius Less. var. integrifolius (Kiodz.) Kidam., were both used as the raw material of Feining granule, a traditional Chinese medicine product for treating respiratory diseases. In this study, the chemical profiles of these two plants were investigated and compared by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS) and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). A total number of 83 constituents, including 55 organic acids, 11 flavonoids, 4 alkaloids, 3 terpenes and 10 other types of compounds, were characterized. The results indicated that the levels of most flavonoids were higher in S. cannabifolius than in S. cannabifolius var. integrifolius, however, the levels of hepatotoxic pyrrolizidine alkaloids (PAs) were higher in S. cannabifolius var. integrifolius than in S. cannabifolius. Fifteen constituents were evaluated on lipopolysaccharides (LPS) induced RAW 264.7 cells, and eleven of them showed inhibition effect against nitric oxide (NO) production. Finally, the levels of ten major constituents (including seven anti-inflammatory active ones) and two PAs in Feining granule from two Senecio plants were determined and compared by the LC-UV and LC-MS methods, respectively. It was found that one organic acid (homogentisic acid) and two PAs (seneciphylline and senecionine) had higher contents in the preparation of S. cannabifolius var. integrifolius than in that of S. cannabifolius, however, the situations were inverse for the levels of four organic acids and flavonoids (chlorogenic acid, hyperoside, isoquercitrin, and isochlorogenic acid B). Based on the above results, S. cannabifolius might be a better raw material for Feining granule than S. cannabifolius var. integrifolius, because it contained more anti-inflammatory constituents and less hepatotoxic PAs than the latter. However, more pharmacological evaluations should be carried out to support the selection. The results in this study were helpful

  11. [A new alkaloid from Menispermum dauricum DC--N-desmethyldauricine].

    PubMed

    Pan, X P

    1992-01-01

    A new phenolic dauricine-type alkaloid together with the know dauricine were isolated from the rhizoma of Menispermum dauricum DC cultivated in Xianning district, Hubei province. Dauricine was obtained as the major alkaloid and was confirmed by comparison with authentic sample. The new alkaloid is an unstable white powder: Based on spectrometric analysis (UV, IR, FAB-MS and 1HNMR) and N-methylation which offered dauricine dimethiodide (V), the structure was elucidated as RR, N-desmethyldauricine (II), which was isolated for the first time from nature.

  12. Morphinane alkaloids with cell protective effects from Sinomenium acutum.

    PubMed

    Bao, Guan-Hu; Qin, Guo-Wei; Wang, Rui; Tang, Xi-Can

    2005-07-01

    One new morphinane alkaloid, sinomenine N-oxide (1), and one new natural occurring morphinane alkaloid, N-demethylsinomenine (2), together with six known alkaloids, 7,8-didehydro-4-hydroxy-3,7-dimethoxymorphinan-6-ol (3), sinomenine (4), sinoacutine (5), N-norsinoacutine, acutumine, and acutumidine, were isolated from the stems of Sinomenium acutum. Their structures were elucidated on the basis of spectroscopic analysis and chemical methods. Compounds 2, 3, and 5 have protective effects against hydrogen peroxide-induced cell injury.

  13. Cytotoxic alkaloids from stems, leaves and twigs of Dasymaschalon blumei.

    PubMed

    Chanakul, Waraporn; Tuchinda, Patoomratana; Anantachoke, Natthinee; Pohmakotr, Manat; Piyachaturawat, Pawinee; Jariyawat, Surawat; Suksen, Kanoknetr; Jaipetch, Tharworn; Nuntasaen, Narong; Reutrakul, Vichai

    2011-10-01

    Bioassay-guided fractionation of the cytotoxic ethyl acetate extract from the stems of Dasymaschalon blumei (Annonaceae) led to the isolation of four aristololactam alkaloids, including the hitherto unknown 3,5-dihydroxy-2,4-dimethoxyaristolactam (1), as well as the three known compounds, aristolactam BI, goniopedaline, and griffithinam. Additionally, the cytotoxic extract from the combined leaves and twigs of the same plant yielded three known oxoaporphine alkaloids, oxodiscoguattine, dicentrinone, and duguevalline. The structures of aristolactams and oxoaporphine alkaloids were elucidated on the basis of spectroscopic methods. All isolates were evaluated for cytotoxicity against a panel of mammalian cancer cell lines and a noncancerous human embryonic kidney cell Hek 293.

  14. γ-Lactam alkaloids from the flower buds of daylily.

    PubMed

    Matsumoto, Takahiro; Nakamura, Seikou; Nakashima, Souichi; Ohta, Tomoe; Yano, Mamiko; Tsujihata, Junichiro; Tsukioka, Junko; Ogawa, Keiko; Fukaya, Masashi; Yoshikawa, Masayuki; Matsuda, Hisashi

    2016-07-01

    Four new alkaloids, hemerocallisamines IV-VII, were isolated from the methanol extract of flower buds of daylily. The chemical structures of the new compounds were elucidated on the basis of chemical and physicochemical evidence. The absolute stereochemistry of the hemerocallisamines IV-VI was elucidated by the application of the modified Mosher's method, HPLC analysis, and optical rotation. In the present study, the isolated alkaloids significantly inhibited the aggregation of Aβ42 in vitro. This is the first report about bioactive alkaloids with a γ-lactam ring from daylily. In addition, isolated nucleosides showed accelerative effects on neurite outgrowth under the non-fasting condition.

  15. The Amaryllidaceae alkaloids: biosynthesis and methods for enzyme discovery.

    PubMed

    Kilgore, Matthew B; Kutchan, Toni M

    2016-06-01

    Amaryllidaceae alkaloids are an example of the vast diversity of secondary metabolites with great therapeutic promise. The identification of novel compounds in this group with over 300 known structures continues to be an area of active study. The recent identification of norbelladine 4'-O-methyltransferase (N4OMT), an Amaryllidaceae alkaloid biosynthetic enzyme, and the assembly of transcriptomes for Narcissus sp. aff. pseudonarcissus and Lycoris aurea highlight the potential for discovery of Amaryllidaceae alkaloid biosynthetic genes with new technologies. Recent technical advances of interest include those in enzymology, next generation sequencing, genetic modification, nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (NMR), and mass spectrometry (MS).

  16. A new cytotoxic carbazole alkaloid and two new other alkaloids from Clausena excavata.

    PubMed

    Peng, Wen-Wen; Zeng, Guang-Zhi; Song, Wei-Wu; Tan, Ning-Hua

    2013-07-01

    One new carbazole alkaloid, excavatine A (1), and two additional new alkaloids, excavatine B (2) and excavatine C (3), were isolated from the stems and leaves of Clausena excavata Burm.f. (Rutaceae). Their structures were determined on the basis of detailed spectroscopic analyses, especially 2D-NMR and HR-EI-MS data. Compounds 1-3 were tested for their cytotoxic activities against A549, HeLa, and BGC-823 cancer cell lines, and for their antimicrobial activities against Candida albicans and Staphylococcus aureus. Only 1 exhibited cytotoxicity against A549 and HeLa cell lines with the IC50 values of 5.25 and 1.91 μg/ml, respectively.

  17. Which sources of flavonoids: complex diets or dietary supplements?

    PubMed

    Egert, Sarah; Rimbach, Gerald

    2011-01-01

    There is increasing interest in the potential health benefits of dietary flavonoids. Fruits and vegetables, tea, and cocoa are rich natural sources of flavonoids. Epidemiological studies have indicated that consumption of these foods is likely to be associated with a reduced risk of cardiovascular disease, but the etiology of this benefit is not yet clearly defined. Furthermore, in some acute interventions, a positive effect of tea and cocoa on vascular function has been reported. An alternative source of flavonoids is dietary supplements, which have become increasingly popular in the recent past. In this context, it needs to be critically evaluated whether vascular health-promoting and other positive properties of flavonoid-rich diets can be replaced by purified flavonoids as dietary supplements. Plant sources of flavonoids contain a complex mixture of secondary plant metabolites and not only flavonoids per se. This complex mixture of secondary plant metabolites cannot be simply exchanged by single purified compounds as dietary supplements. If flavonoids are given as dietary supplements, toxicity issues as well as nutrient drug interactions need to be taken into account. Purified flavonoids given in high doses as dietary supplements may affect trace element, folate, and vitamin C status. Furthermore, they may exhibit antithyroid and goitrogenic activities. In this review article, the available literature on the safety issues surrounding high dose supplemental flavonoid consumption has been summarized.

  18. Chemistry and Biological Activities of Flavonoids: An Overview

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Shashank; Pandey, Abhay K.

    2013-01-01

    There has been increasing interest in the research on flavonoids from plant sources because of their versatile health benefits reported in various epidemiological studies. Since flavonoids are directly associated with human dietary ingredients and health, there is need to evaluate structure and function relationship. The bioavailability, metabolism, and biological activity of flavonoids depend upon the configuration, total number of hydroxyl groups, and substitution of functional groups about their nuclear structure. Fruits and vegetables are the main dietary sources of flavonoids for humans, along with tea and wine. Most recent researches have focused on the health aspects of flavonoids for humans. Many flavonoids are shown to have antioxidative activity, free radical scavenging capacity, coronary heart disease prevention, hepatoprotective, anti-inflammatory, and anticancer activities, while some flavonoids exhibit potential antiviral activities. In plant systems, flavonoids help in combating oxidative stress and act as growth regulators. For pharmaceutical purposes cost-effective bulk production of different types of flavonoids has been made possible with the help of microbial biotechnology. This review highlights the structural features of flavonoids, their beneficial roles in human health, and significance in plants as well as their microbial production. PMID:24470791

  19. Chemistry and biological activities of flavonoids: an overview.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Shashank; Pandey, Abhay K

    2013-01-01

    There has been increasing interest in the research on flavonoids from plant sources because of their versatile health benefits reported in various epidemiological studies. Since flavonoids are directly associated with human dietary ingredients and health, there is need to evaluate structure and function relationship. The bioavailability, metabolism, and biological activity of flavonoids depend upon the configuration, total number of hydroxyl groups, and substitution of functional groups about their nuclear structure. Fruits and vegetables are the main dietary sources of flavonoids for humans, along with tea and wine. Most recent researches have focused on the health aspects of flavonoids for humans. Many flavonoids are shown to have antioxidative activity, free radical scavenging capacity, coronary heart disease prevention, hepatoprotective, anti-inflammatory, and anticancer activities, while some flavonoids exhibit potential antiviral activities. In plant systems, flavonoids help in combating oxidative stress and act as growth regulators. For pharmaceutical purposes cost-effective bulk production of different types of flavonoids has been made possible with the help of microbial biotechnology. This review highlights the structural features of flavonoids, their beneficial roles in human health, and significance in plants as well as their microbial production.

  20. Advance on the Flavonoid C-glycosides and Health Benefits.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Jianbo; Capanoglu, Esra; Jassbi, Amir Reza; Miron, Anca

    2016-07-29

    The dietary flavonoids, especially their glycosides, are the most vital phytochemicals in diets and are of great general interest due to their diverse bioactivity. Almost all natural flavonoids exist as their O-glycoside or C-glycoside forms in plants. The dietary flavonoid C-glycosides have received less attention than their corresponding O-glycosides. This review summarizes current knowledge regarding flavonoid C-glycosides and their influence on human health. Among the flavonoid C-glycosides, flavone C-glycosides, especially vitexin, isoorientin, orientin, isovitexin and their multiglycosides are more frequently mentioned than others. Flavonoid C-monoglycosides are poorly absorbed in human beings with very few metabolites in urine and blood and are deglycosylated and degraded by human intestinal bacteria in colon. However, flavonoid C-multiglycosides are absorbed unchanged in the intestine and distributed to other tissues. Flavonoid C-glycosides showed significant antioxidant activity, anticancer and antitumor activity, hepatoprotective activity, anti-inflammatory activity, anti-diabetes activity, antiviral activity, antibacterial and antifungal activity, and other biological effects. It looks like that the C-glycosylflavonoids in most cases showed higher antioxidant and anti-diabetes potential than their corresponding O-glycosylflavonoids and aglycones. However, there is a lack of in vivo data on the biological benefits of flavonoid C-glycosides. It is necessary to investigate more on how flavonoid C-glycosides prevent and handle the diseases.

  1. Triterpenoids and flavonoids from celery (Apium graveolens).

    PubMed

    Zhou, Kailan; Zhao, Feng; Liu, Zhihui; Zhuang, Yulei; Chen, Lixia; Qiu, Feng

    2009-09-01

    Three new triterpenoids, 11,21-dioxo-2beta,3beta,15alpha-trihydroxyurs-12-ene-2-O-beta-D-glucopyranoside (1), 11,21-dioxo-3beta,15alpha,24-trihydroxyurs-12-ene-24-O-beta-D-glucopyranoside (2), and 11,21-dioxo-3beta,15alpha,24-trihydroxyolean-12-ene-24-O-beta-D-glucopyranoside (3), and two new flavonoids, apigenin-7-O-[2''-O-(5'''-O-feruloyl)-beta-D-apiofuranosyl]-beta-D-glucopyranoside (4) and chrysoeriol-7-O-[2''-O-(5'''-O-feruloyl)-beta-D-apiofuranosyl]-beta-d-glucopyranoside (5), were isolated from the whole plant of fresh celery (Apium graveolens), together with 10 known flavonoids. The structures of the new compounds were elucidated by analysis of spectroscopic data. The inhibitory effects of the compounds isolated on nitric oxide production in lipopolysaccaride-activated macrophages were evaluated.

  2. The basic antioxidant structure for flavonoid derivatives.

    PubMed

    Mendes, Anna P S; Borges, Rosivaldo S; Neto, Antonio M J Chaves; de Macedo, Luiz G M; da Silva, Albérico B F

    2012-09-01

    An antioxidant structure-activity study is carried out in this work with ten flavonoid compounds using quantum chemistry calculations with the functional of density theory method. According to the geometry obtained by using the B3LYP/6-31G(d) method, the HOMO, ionization potential, stabilization energies, and spin density distribution showed that the flavonol is the more antioxidant nucleus. The spin density contribution is determinant for the stability of the free radical. The number of resonance structures is related to the π-type electron system. 3-hydroxyflavone is the basic antioxidant structure for the simplified flavonoids studied here. The electron abstraction is more favored in the molecules where ether group and 3-hydroxyl are present, nonetheless 2,3-double bond and carbonyl moiety are facultative.

  3. In vitro antioxidant profiles of some flavonoids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aksoy, Mine; Gülçin, Ilhami; Küfrevioǧlu, Ö. Irfan

    2016-04-01

    Baicalin ((2S,3S,4S,5R,6S)-6-(5,6-dihydroxy-4-oxo-2-phenyl-chromen-7-yl)oxy-3,4,5-trihydroxy-tetrahydropyran-2-carboxylic acid) and baicalein (5,6,7-trihydroxyflavone) are a flavone, a type of flavonoid. Baicalin is the glucuronide of baicalein. Phlorizin, or phloridzin is a naturally occurring flavonoid produced in some plants. It belongs to the group of dihydrochalcones. In this study, we investigated the in vitro antioxidant properties of baicalin, baicalein and phloridzin using different methods including ferric ion (Fe3+) reducing power, cupric ion (Cu2+) reducing power (CUPRAC method), reduction of Fe3+-TPTZ complex, 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl free radicals (DPPH.) scavenging, 2,2'-azino-bis(3-ethylbenzthiazoline-6-sulphonic acid radicals (ABTS.+) scavenging activities. Also, butylated hydroxyanisole (BHA), butylated hydroxytoluene (BHT) and α-Tocopherol were used as standard antioxidants.

  4. Two new flavonoids from Selaginella uncinata.

    PubMed

    Zou, Hui; Yi, Mei-Ling; Xu, Kang-Ping; Sheng, Xi-Feng; Tan, Gui-Shan

    2016-01-01

    Two new flavonoids, uncinataflavones A (1) and B (2), along with one known compound 6-(5-carboxyl-2-methoxyphenyl)-apigenin (3), were isolated from Selaginella uncinata (Desv.) Spring. All these compounds belong to apigenin derivatives with aryl substituents at C-6 position. The structures of new compounds were elucidated on the basis of comprehensive spectroscopic analyses (UV, IR, 1D, and 2D NMR as well as HR-ESI-MS).

  5. Flavonoid profile of green asparagus genotypes.

    PubMed

    Fuentes-Alventosa, J M; Jaramillo, S; Rodríguez-Gutiérrez, G; Cermeño, P; Espejo, J A; Jiménez-Araujo, A; Guillén-Bejarano, R; Fernández-Bolaños, J; Rodríguez-Arcos, R

    2008-08-27

    The determination of flavonoid profiles from different genotypes of triguero asparagus and their comparison to those from green asparagus commercial hybrids was the main goal of this study. The samples consisted of 32 commercial hybrids and 65 genotypes from the Huetor-Tajar population variety (triguero). The analysis of individual flavonoids by HPLC-DAD-MS has allowed the determination of eight naturally occurring flavonol derivatives in several genotypes of triguero asparagus. Those compounds included mono-, di-, and triglycosides of three flavonols, that is, quercetin, isorhamnetin, and kaempferol. The detailed analysis of the flavonoid profiles revealed significant differences among the distinct genotypes. These have been classified in three distinct groups as the result of a k-means clustering analysis, two of them containing both commercial hybrids and triguero asparagus and another cluster constituted by 21 genotypes of triguero asparagus, which contain several key flavonol derivatives able to differentiate them. Hence, the triglycosides tentatively identified as quercetin-3-rhamnosyl-rutinoside, isorhamnetin-3-rhamnosyl-rutinoside, and isorhamnetin-3-O-glucoside have been detected only in the genotypes grouped in the above-mentioned cluster. On the other hand, the compound tentatively identified as isorhamnetin-3-glucosyl-rutinoside was present in most genotypes of triguero asparagus, whereas it has not been detected in any of the commercial hybrids.

  6. Development of NIR calibrations for isoflavone and saponin concentrations in soybeans: data collection and correlations

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Isoflavones and saponins are the major unique phytochemical constituents of soybean seeds. They are essential in preserving the health of germinating seeds, and have been implicated in biochemical roles in both human and animal nutritional health. The accumulation of these compounds in developing se...

  7. Structural and Sensory Characterization of Bitter Tasting Steroidal Saponins from Asparagus Spears (Asparagus officinalis L.).

    PubMed

    Dawid, Corinna; Hofmann, Thomas

    2012-12-05

    Application of sequential solvent extraction and iterative chromatographic separation in combination with taste dilution analysis recently revealed a series of steroidal saponins as the key contributors to the typical bitter taste of white asparagus spears (Asparagus officinalis L.). Besides six previously reported saponins, (25R)-furost-5-en-3β,22,26-triol-3-O-[α-L-rhamnopyranosyl-(1→4)-β-D-glucopyranoside]-26-O-β-D-glucopyranoside, (25R)-furostane-3β,22,26-triol-3-O-[α-L-rhamnopyranosyl-(1→4)-β-D-glucopyranoside]-26-O-β-D-glucopyranoside, and (25S)-furostane-3β,22,26-triol-3-O-[α-L-rhamnopyranosyl-(1→4)-β-D-glucopyranoside]-26-O-β-D-glucopyranoside, and 3-O-[{α-L-rhamnopyranosyl-(1→2)}{α-L-rhamnopyranosyl-(1→4)}-β-D-glucopyranosyl]-(25S)-spirost-5-ene-3β-ol were identified for the first time as key bitter compounds in the edible spears of white asparagus by means of LC-MS/MS, LC-TOF-MS, 1D/2D-NMR spectroscopy, and hydrolysis experiments. This paper presents the isolation, structure determination, and sensory activity of these saponins. Depending on their chemical structure, the saponins identified showed human bitter recognition thresholds between 10.9 and 199.7 μmol/L (water).

  8. Variability in Saponin Content, Cancer Antiproliferative Activity and Physicochemical Properties of Concentrated Agave Sap.

    PubMed

    Santos-Zea, Liliana; Rosas-Pérez, Aratza Mireya; Leal-Díaz, Ana María; Gutiérrez-Uribe, Janet A

    2016-08-01

    Concentrated agave sap (CAS) has gained popularity as an unrefined sweetener. It is obtained by boiling "aguamiel" that contains phytochemicals with diverse bioactivities. Saponins have been the most widely studied agave phytochemicals due to their cancer antiproliferative effect but their concentration may vary due to maturity of the agave plant and collection site. In this study, 18 CAS samples produced in different states of Mexico were analyzed using multivariate methods to determine which physicochemical or phytochemical parameters were responsible for variation. Additionally, extracts with different saponin profiles were tested to determine possible correlations with antiproliferative activity. Total soluble solids, pH, and water activity were similar to those reported for other agave sweeteners. Antioxidant capacity of samples was correlated to browning index. Eleven steroidal saponins were found in CAS samples and they were the main source of variability. Magueyoside B, a kammogenin tetraglycoside, was the most abundant saponin in all samples. With respect to bioactivity, multivariate analysis indicated that magueyoside B and a gentrogenin tetraglycoside were compounds strongly related with bioactivity. CAS from Hidalgo, Puebla, and Veracruz had higher concentration of magueyoside B than from the other kamogenin tetraglycoside found in the samples from other Mexican states. These results could be used as a first approach to characterize and standardize CAS to validate the potential health benefits derived from its consumption.

  9. Structure and absolute configuration of helosides A and B, new saponins from Chamaelirium luteum.

    PubMed

    Challinor, Victoria L; Stuthe, Julia M U; Bernhardt, Paul V; Lehmann, Reginald P; Kitching, William; De Voss, James J

    2011-07-22

    Investigation of Chamaelirium luteum roots led to the isolation of two new steroidal saponins, helosides A and B, that contain a previously unreported aglycone, helogenin. Their structures and absolute configuration were elucidated through MS-MS, NMR, chemical degradation, and X-ray crystallography.

  10. Effect of steroidal saponins-loaded nano-bioglass/phosphatidylserine/collagen bone substitute on bone healing.

    PubMed

    Yang, Chunrong; Wu, Huazhong; Wang, Jianhua

    2016-11-10

    The objective of this study was to investigate the therapeutic potential of nano-bioglass/phosphatidylserine/collagen (nBG/PS/COL) scaffolds loaded with steroidal saponins as an inducer factor for skeletal defects. The drugs-encapsulated bone substitute was prepared by loading steroidal saponins-collagen microsphere suspension in nano-bioglass and phosphatidylserine (PS) composite. The scaffolds possess an interconnected porous structure with a porosity of about 82.3%. The pore size ranges from several micrometers up to about 400 μm. The drug release assays showed the long-term sustained release of steroidal saponins from the scaffolds with effective and safe bioactivity. Moreover, in vitro and in vivo studies showed that the involvement of steroidal saponins contributed to the secretion of nerve growth factor (NGF) in MC3T3-E1 cells, which may be the possible factor that greatly enhanced bone healing. The results suggest that the bone substitute is an effective implantable drug-delivery system for use in bone repair.

  11. Synergy studies of the fungicidal plant saponin, CAY-1, with EDTA and silver

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Background: CAY-1 is a fungicidal saponin produced by Capsicum species. Silver (Ag) and EDTA inhibit Aspergillus and Fusarium growth. This study determined Ag and EDTA fungicidal properties for several Aspergillus and Fusarium species both alone and with CAY-1. Methods: CAY-1 was purified by col...

  12. Anti-Trichomonas vaginalis activity of saponins from Quillaja, Passiflora, and Ilex species.

    PubMed

    Rocha, Tábitha Dahmer; de Brum Vieira, Patrícia; Gnoatto, Simone Cristina Baggio; Tasca, Tiana; Gosmann, Grace

    2012-06-01

    Trichomonas vaginalis is a flagellated protozoan that causes trichomonosis, the most prevalent non-viral STD worldwide. The pathogen has been associated with serious health consequences including predisposition to cervical cancer and adverse pregnancy outcomes and infertility. It also acts as a co-factor in HIV transmission and acquisition. The 5-nitroimidazole drugs are used in the treatment, however, treatment noncompliance is observed, and a growing number of T. vaginalis isolates resistant to the drugs have been related. Saponins are natural products possessing many biological activities such as antiprotozoan activity. The aim of this study was to evaluate the anti-T. vaginalis activity of saponins from Quillaja, Passiflora, and Ilex species. Saponins from Passiflora alata and Quillaja saponaria presented the best anti-T. vaginalis activity (MIC = 0.025%). In addition, all samples induced erythrocyte lysis and LDH release. As far as we know, this is the first report demonstrating the potential anti-T. vaginalis activity of these saponins.

  13. In-Vitro Activity of Saponins of Bauhinia Purpurea, Madhuca Longifolia, Celastrus Paniculatus and Semecarpus Anacardium on Selected Oral Pathogens

    PubMed Central

    Jyothi, K. S.; Seshagiri, M.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: Dental caries, periodontitis and other mucosal diseases are caused by a complex community of microorganisms. This study aimed to investigate the antimicrobial properties of saponins of four important oil yielding medicinal plant extracts on selected oral pathogens that are involved in such diseases. Materials and Methods: Saponins were extracted from Bauhinia purpurea, Madhuca longifolia, Celastrus paniculatus and Semecarpus anacardium and purified. Antimicrobial properties of these saponins against Streptococcus mutans, Streptococcus mitis, Streptococcus salivarius, Staphylococcus aureus and Lactobacillus acidophilus were determined using well diffusion method. The minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) was determined as the lowest concentration of saponins inhibiting bacterial growth after 14 h of incubation at 37°C. The bactericidal activity was evaluated using the viable cell count method. Results: The minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) and minimum bactericidal concentration (MBC) of Madhuca longifolia saponin on Streptococcus mutans MTCC 890, Streptococcus mitis and Staphylococcus aureus was 18.3 ± 0.15/34.4 ± 0.24 μg/ml, 19.0 ± 0.05/32.2 ± 0.0 μg/ml and 21.2 ± 0.35/39.0 ± 0.30 μg/ml, respectively and Bauhinia purpurea saponin on Streptococcus mutans MTCC 890, Staphylococcus aureus and Lactobacillus acidophilus was 26.4 ± 0.20/43.0 ± 0.40 μg/ml, 29.0 ± 0.30/39.6 ± 0.12 μg/ml and 20.2 ± 0.05/36.8 ± 0.23 μg/ml, respectively. Conclusion: The strong antimicrobial activity of Madhuca longifolia and Bauhinia purpurea may be due to the presence of complex triterpenoid saponins, oleanane type triterpenoid glycosides or atypical pentacyclic triterpenoid saponin. Hence, these extracted saponins may be used in food and oral products to prevent and control oral diseases. PMID:23323183

  14. Flavonoid Values for USDA Survey Foods and Beverages 2007-2008: Provisional Flavonoid Addendum, FNDDS 4.1 and Flavonoid Intake Data, WWEIA, NHANES 2007-2008

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This release of the Flavonoid Values for Survey Foods and Beverages 2007-2008 makes possible, for the first time, calculation of flavonoid intakes based on all foods and beverages reported in national surveys. This release has two components. The first component is an addendum to USDA’s Food and N...

  15. Transgenic rice seed expressing flavonoid biosynthetic genes accumulate glycosylated and/or acylated flavonoids in protein bodies

    PubMed Central

    Ogo, Yuko; Mori, Tetsuya; Nakabayashi, Ryo; Saito, Kazuki; Takaiwa, Fumio

    2016-01-01

    Plant-specialized (or secondary) metabolites represent an important source of high-value chemicals. In order to generate a new production platform for these metabolites, an attempt was made to produce flavonoids in rice seeds. Metabolome analysis of these transgenic rice seeds using liquid chromatography-photodiode array-quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry was performed. A total of 4392 peaks were detected in both transgenic and non-transgenic rice, 20–40% of which were only detected in transgenic rice. Among these, 82 flavonoids, including 37 flavonols, 11 isoflavones, and 34 flavones, were chemically assigned. Most of the flavonols and isoflavones were O-glycosylated, while many flavones were O-glycosylated and/or C-glycosylated. Several flavonoids were acylated with malonyl, feruloyl, acetyl, and coumaroyl groups. These glycosylated/acylated flavonoids are thought to have been biosynthesized by endogenous rice enzymes using newly synthesized flavonoids whose biosynthesis was catalysed by exogenous enzymes. The subcellular localization of the flavonoids differed depending on the class of aglycone and the glycosylation/acylation pattern. Therefore, flavonoids with the intended aglycones were efficiently produced in rice seeds via the exogenous enzymes introduced, while the flavonoids were variously glycosylated/acylated by endogenous enzymes. The results suggest that rice seeds are useful not only as a production platform for plant-specialized metabolites such as flavonoids but also as a tool for expanding the diversity of flavonoid structures, providing novel, physiologically active substances. PMID:26438413

  16. Transgenic rice seed expressing flavonoid biosynthetic genes accumulate glycosylated and/or acylated flavonoids in protein bodies.

    PubMed

    Ogo, Yuko; Mori, Tetsuya; Nakabayashi, Ryo; Saito, Kazuki; Takaiwa, Fumio

    2016-01-01

    Plant-specialized (or secondary) metabolites represent an important source of high-value chemicals. In order to generate a new production platform for these metabolites, an attempt was made to produce flavonoids in rice seeds. Metabolome analysis of these transgenic rice seeds using liquid chromatography-photodiode array-quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry was performed. A total of 4392 peaks were detected in both transgenic and non-transgenic rice, 20-40% of which were only detected in transgenic rice. Among these, 82 flavonoids, including 37 flavonols, 11 isoflavones, and 34 flavones, were chemically assigned. Most of the flavonols and isoflavones were O-glycosylated, while many flavones were O-glycosylated and/or C-glycosylated. Several flavonoids were acylated with malonyl, feruloyl, acetyl, and coumaroyl groups. These glycosylated/acylated flavonoids are thought to have been biosynthesized by endogenous rice enzymes using newly synthesized flavonoids whose biosynthesis was catalysed by exogenous enzymes. The subcellular localization of the flavonoids differed depending on the class of aglycone and the glycosylation/acylation pattern. Therefore, flavonoids with the intended aglycones were efficiently produced in rice seeds via the exogenous enzymes introduced, while the flavonoids were variously glycosylated/acylated by endogenous enzymes. The results suggest that rice seeds are useful not only as a production platform for plant-specialized metabolites such as flavonoids but also as a tool for expanding the diversity of flavonoid structures, providing novel, physiologically active substances.

  17. Photofragmentation mechanisms in protonated chiral cinchona alkaloids.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Sunil; Lucas, Bruno; Fayeton, Jacqueline; Scuderi, Debora; Alata, Ivan; Broquier, Michel; Barbu-Debus, Katia Le; Lepère, Valeria; Zehnacker, Anne

    2016-08-10

    The photo-stability of protonated cinchona alkaloids is studied in the gas phase by a multi-technique approach. A multi-coincidence technique is used to demonstrate that the dissociation is a direct process. Two dissociation channels are observed. They result from the C8-C9 cleavage, accompanied or not by hydrogen migration. The branching ratio between the two photo-fragments is different for the two pseudo-enantiomers quinine and quinidine. Mass spectrometry experiments coupling UV photo-dissociation of the reactants and structural characterization of the ionic photo-products by Infra-Red Multiple Photo-Dissociation (IRMPD) spectroscopy provide unambiguous information on their structure. In addition, quantum chemical calculations allow proposing a reactive scheme and discussing it in terms of the ground-state geometry of the reactant.

  18. Total Synthesis and Study of Myrmicarin Alkaloids

    PubMed Central

    Ondrus, Alison E.

    2010-01-01

    The myrmicarins are a family of air and temperature sensitive alkaloids that possess unique structural features. Our concise enantioselective synthesis of the tricyclic myrmicarins enabled evaluation of a potentially biomimetic assembly of the complex members via direct dimerization of simpler structures. These studies revealed that myrmicarin 215B undergoes efficient and highly diastereoselective Brønsted acid-induced dimerization to generate a new heptacyclic structure, isomyrmicarin 430A. Mechanistic analysis demonstrated that heterodimerization between myrmicarin 215B and a conformationally restricted azafulvenium ion precursor afforded a functionalized isomyrmicarin 430A structure in a manner that was consistent with a highly efficient, non-concerted ionic process. Recent advancement in heterodimerization between tricyclic derivatives has enabled the preparation of strategically functionalized hexacyclic structures. The design and synthesis of structurally versatile dimeric compounds has greatly facilitated manipulation of these structures en route to more complex myrmicarin derivatives. PMID:19585010

  19. Tetrahydroberberine, a pharmacologically active naturally occurring alkaloid.

    PubMed

    Pingali, Subramanya; Donahue, James P; Payton-Stewart, Florastina

    2015-04-01

    Tetrahydroberberine (systematic name: 9,10-dimethoxy-5,8,13,13a-tetrahydro-6H-benzo[g][1,3]benzodioxolo[5,6-a]quinolizine), C20H21NO4, a widely distributed naturally occurring alkaloid, has been crystallized as a racemic mixture about an inversion center. A bent conformation of the molecule is observed, with an angle of 24.72 (5)° between the arene rings at the two ends of the reduced quinolizinium core. The intermolecular hydrogen bonds that play an apparent role in crystal packing are 1,3-benzodioxole -CH2···OCH3 and -OCH3···OCH3 interactions between neighboring molecules.

  20. Synthesis and Anticancer Activity of Epipolythiodiketopiperazine Alkaloids

    PubMed Central

    Boyer, Nicolas; Morrison, Karen C.; Kim, Justin; Hergenrother, Paul J.; Movassaghi, Mohammad

    2013-01-01

    The epipolythiodiketopiperazine (ETP) alkaloids are a highly complex class of natural products with potent anticancer activity. Herein, we report the application of a flexible and scalable synthesis, allowing the construction of dozens of ETP derivatives. The evaluation of these compounds against cancer cell lines in culture allows for the first expansive structure–activity relationship (SAR) to be defined for monomeric and dimeric ETP-containing natural products and their synthetic cognates. Many ETP derivatives demonstrate potent anticancer activity across a broad range of cancer cell lines, and kill cancer cellsviainduction of apoptosis. Several traits thatbode well for the translational potential of the ETP class of natural products includeconcise and efficient synthetic access, potent induction of apoptotic cell death, activity against a wide range of cancer types, and a broad tolerance for modifications at multiple sitesthat should facilitate small-molecule drug development, mechanistic studies, and evaluation in vivo. PMID:23914293

  1. Heterocyclic Amaryllidaceae Alkaloids: Biosynthesis and Pharmacological Applications.

    PubMed

    Hotchandani, Tarun; Desgagne-Penix, Isabel

    2017-01-01

    Amaryllidaceae alkaloids (AAs), which are natural heterocyclic compounds, are isolated from Amaryllidaceae plants such as narcissus, snowdrop and spider lily. AAs have been extensively studied due to their multiple pharmacological properties. Nevertheless, knowledge of AA synthesis in plants is lacking and most genes encoding enzymes involved in their production remain unknown. AAs are structurally complex compounds which are challenging for total chemical synthesis that is economically viable. Therefore the understanding of AA biosynthesis could allow for the development of biotechnologies for the production of natural AAs or analogues, maintaining or improving their pharmacological properties. In this review, we describe the progress regarding the biosynthesis and pharmacological properties of AAs. The most recent developments in neurological, anti-cancer and anti-microbial bioactivities of heterocyclic AAs are covered.

  2. Molecular Docking Studies of Flavonoids Derivatives on the Flavonoid 3- O-Glucosyltransferase.

    PubMed

    Harsa, Alexandra M; Harsa, Teodora E; Diudea, Mircea V; Janezic, Dusanka

    2015-01-01

    A study of 30 flavonoid derivatives, taken from PubChem database and docked on flavonoid 3-O-glucosyltransferase 3HBF, next submitted to a QSAR study, performed within a hypermolecule frame, to model their LD50 values, is reported. The initial set of molecules was split into a training set and the test set (taken from the best scored molecules in the docking test); the predicted LD50 values, computed on similarity clusters, built up for each of the molecules of the test set, surpassed in accuracy the best model. The binding energies to 3HBF protein, provided by the docking step, are not related to the LD50 of these flavonoids, more protein targets are to be investigated in this respect. However, the docking step was useful in choosing the test set of molecules.

  3. Quantitative determination of ergot alkaloids in biological fluids by radioimmunoassay.

    PubMed Central

    Kleimola, T T

    1978-01-01

    1 Cross-reactivity of ergot alkaloids with an antiserum produced against lysergic acid conjugated with human serum, albumin was utilized to develop a radioimmunoassay for ergotamine, dihydroergotamine, dihydroergotoxine, ergometrine and methylergometrine in biological fluids. The antisera showed no cross-reactivity with simpler indole structures. 2 A procedure for extraction and concentration of alkaloids in biological fluids was developed. 3 The assay is sensitive for 1.8 ng/ml ergotamine, 1.5 ng/ml dihydroergotamine, 2.2 ng/ml dihydroergotoxine, 0.7 ng/ml ergotmetrine and 0.5 ng/ml methylergometrine. 4 The assay is sufficiently sensitive to permit the measurement of urine and plasma ergot alkaloid levels and it is suitable for determination in cases where a known ergot alkaloid is used. PMID:687503

  4. Activity of pyrrolizidine alkaloids against biofilm formation and Trichomonas vaginalis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Crotalaria genus belongs to the subfamily Papilionoideae comprising about 600 species spread throughout tropical, neotropical and subtropical regions. In this study, seeds of Crolatalaria pallida were used to the isolation of usaramine, a pyrrolizidine alkaloid. Thus, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Stap...

  5. Effects of Psychotria colorata alkaloids in brain opioid system.

    PubMed

    Amador, T A; Elisabetsky, E; Souza, D O

    1996-01-01

    An ethnopharmacological survey showed that home remedies prepared with flowers and fruits of Psychotria colorata are used by Amazonian peasants as pain killers. Psychopharmacological in vivo evaluation of alkaloids obtained from leaves and flowers of this species showed a marked dose-dependent naloxone-reversible analgesic activity, therefore suggesting an opioid-like pharmacological profile. This paper reports an inhibitory effect of P. colorata flower alkaloids on [3H]naloxone binding in rat striata as well as a decrease in adenylate cyclase basal activity. The alkaloids did not affect [3H] GMP-PNP binding. These findings provide a neurochemical basis for the opioid-like activity previously detected in vivo and point to Psychotria alkaloids as a potential source of new bioactive opiate derivatives.

  6. Marine bromopyrrole alkaloids: synthesis and diverse medicinal applications.

    PubMed

    Rane, Rajesh; Sahu, Niteshkumar; Shah, Chetan; Karpoormath, Rajshekhar

    2014-01-01

    Marine organisms have been found to be a very rich source of bioactive molecules. Among marine organisms, sponges have been proven to be excellent producers of secondary metabolites. More than 5,300 compounds have been isolated from sponges with around 200 new molecules reported each year. Bromopyrrole alkaloids constitute a family of exclusively marine alkaloids and represent a fascinating example of the large variety of compounds formed by marine sponges which exhibit different biological activities such as antifeedent, anti-biofilm, anticancer, antiinflammatory, antimicrobial, immunomodulatory, analgesic, antiserotonergic, antiangiogenic, antihistaminic, chitinase inhibitor and actimyosin ATPase activator. More than 140 derivatives with different structures and biological activities, have been isolated from more than 20 different sponges. Most of these alkaloids share a key building block, pyrrole-imidazole with oroidin being their underlying structural motif. In this review detailed account of isolation and medicinal application of marine bromopyrrole alkaloids and their synthetic derivatives are discussed.

  7. Crinine-type alkaloids from Hippeastrum aulicum and H. calyptratum.

    PubMed

    de Andrade, Jean Paulo; Guo, Ying; Font-Bardia, Mercè; Calvet, Teresa; Dutilh, Jullie; Viladomat, Francesc; Codina, Carles; Nair, Jerald J; Zuanazzi, Jose A Silveira; Bastida, Jaume

    2014-07-01

    An ongoing search for alkaloids in the Amaryllidaceae species using GC-MS resulted in the identification of two crinine-type alkaloids, aulicine (1) and 3-O-methyl-epimacowine, (2) from the indigenous Brazilian species Hippeastrum aulicum and Hippeastrum calyptratum, respectively. In addition, two alkaloids, 11-oxohaemanthamine (3) and 7-methoxy-O-methyllycorenine (4) were both isolated from H. aulicum. Furthermore, we provide here complete NMR spectroscopic data for the homolycorine analogues nerinine (5) and albomaculine (6). The absolute stereochemistry of the 5,10b-ethano bridge in the crinine variants was determined by circular dichroism and X-ray crystallographic analysis, thus presenting the first direct evidence for the presence of crinine-type alkaloids in the genus Hippeastrum.

  8. Arginine decarboxylase as the source of putrescine for tobacco alkaloids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tiburcio, A. F.; Galston, A. W.

    1986-01-01

    The putrescine which forms a part of nicotine and other pyrrolidine alkaloids is generally assumed to arise through the action of ornithine decarboxylase (ODC). However, we have previously noted that changes in the activity of arginine decarboxylase (ADC), an alternate source of putrescine, parallel changes in tissue alkaloids, while changes in ODC activity do not. This led us to undertake experiments to permit discrimination between ADC and ODC as enzymatic sources of putrescine destined for alkaloids. Two kinds of evidence presented here support a major role for ADC in the generation of putrescine going into alkaloids: (a) A specific 'suicide inhibitor' of ADC effectively inhibits the biosynthesis of nicotine and nornicotine in tobacco callus, while the analogous inhibitor of ODC is less effective, and (b) the flow of 14C from uniformly labelled arginine into nicotine is much more efficient than that from ornithine.

  9. Alkaloids with Different Carbon Units from Myrioneuron faberi.

    PubMed

    Cao, Ming-Ming; Zhang, Yu; Huang, Sheng-Dian; Di, Ying-Tong; Peng, Zong-Gen; Jiang, Jian-Dong; Yuan, Chun-Mao; Chen, Duo-Zhi; Li, Shun-Lin; He, Hong-Ping; Hao, Xiao-Jiang

    2015-11-25

    Three new Myrioneuron alkaloids, myrifamines A-C (1-3), with unique skeletons were isolated from Myrioneuron faberi. The absolute configuration of 1 was confirmed by single-crystal X-ray diffraction analysis, and the stereochemistry of the other two alkaloids was determined using a combination of ROESY experiments and calculated and experimental electronic circular dichroism spectra. Myrifamine C (3) is the first example of a symmetric dimer among the Myrioneuron alkaloids. Known alkaloids myrionamide (4) and schoberine (5) were also isolated, and experimental NMR and X-ray diffraction data suggest their structural revision. Compound 2 showed significant inhibitory activity toward the hepatitis C virus in vitro, with a therapeutic index (CC50/EC50) greater than 108.7.

  10. Microcalorimetry studies of the antimicrobial actions of Aconitum alkaloids.

    PubMed

    Shi, Yan-bin; Liu, Lian; Shao, Wei; Wei, Ting; Lin, Gui-mei

    2015-08-01

    The metabolic activity of organisms can be measured by recording the heat output using microcalorimetry. In this paper, the total alkaloids in the traditional Chinese medicine Radix Aconiti Lateralis were extracted and applied to Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus. The effect of alkaloids on bacteria growth was studied by microcalorimetry. The power-time curves were plotted with a thermal activity monitor (TAM) air isothermal microcalorimeter and parameters such as growth rate constant (μ), peak-time (Tm), inhibitory ratio (I), and enhancement ratio (E) were calculated. The relationships between the concentration of Aconitum alkaloids and μ of E. coli or S. aureus were discussed. The results showed that Aconitum alkaloids had little effect on E. coli and had a potentially inhibitory effect on the growth of S. aureus.

  11. Use of quinoline alkaloids as markers of the floral origin of chestnut honey.

    PubMed

    Truchado, Pilar; Martos, Isabel; Bortolotti, Laura; Sabatini, Anna G; Ferreres, Federico; Tomas-Barberan, Francisco A

    2009-07-08

    To identify potential floral markers of chestnut honey, the phytochemicals present in chestnut floral nectar collected by bees were analyzed. Two nitrogen-containing compounds were detected, isolated, and identified as 4-hydroxyquinaldic acid (kynurenic acid) and 4-quinolone-2-carboxylic acid by (1)H NMR and (13)C NMR. In addition, chestnut nectar contained the monoterpene 4-(1-hydroxy-1-methylethyl)cyclohexa-1,3-diene-1-carboxylic acid, its gentiobioside ester, and the flavonol quercetin 3-pentosylhexoside. These nectar markers were found in different chestnut unifloral honey samples, although the flavonol was not detected in all samples analyzed. The terpenoid derivatives had previously been found in linden and tilia honeys. These results show that quinoline alkaloids are potentially good markers of chestnut honey, as they were not detected in any other unifloral honey analyzed so far. They are present at concentrations ranging from 34 to 65 mg/100 g of honey in the samples analyzed. In addition, the terpenoid and flavonoid derivatives present in nectar, although not exclusively characteristic of this floral origin, are good complementary markers for the determination of the floral origin of chestnut honey.

  12. Quercetin Prevents Pyrrolizidine Alkaloid Clivorine-Induced Liver Injury in Mice by Elevating Body Defense Capacity

    PubMed Central

    Ji, Lili; Ma, Yibo; Wang, Zaiyong; Cai, Zhunxiu; Pang, Chun; Wang, Zhengtao

    2014-01-01

    Quercetin is a plant-derived flavonoid that is widely distributed in nature. The present study is designed to analyze the underlying mechanism in the protection of quercetin against pyrrolizidine alkaloid clivorine-induced acute liver injury in vivo. Serum transaminases, total bilirubin analysis, and liver histological evaluation demonstrated the protection of quercetin against clivorine-induced liver injury. Terminal dUTP nick end-labeling assay demonstrated that quercetin reduced the increased amount of liver apoptotic cells induced by clivorine. Western-blot analysis of caspase-3 showed that quercetin inhibited the cleaved activation of caspase-3 induced by clivorine. Results also showed that quercetin reduced the increase in liver glutathione and lipid peroxidative product malondialdehyde induced by clivorine. Quercetin reduced the enhanced liver immunohistochemical staining for 4-hydroxynonenal induced by clivorine. Results of the Mouse Stress and Toxicity PathwayFinder RT2 Profiler PCR Array demonstrated that the expression of genes related with oxidative or metabolic stress and heat shock was obviously altered after quercetin treatment. Some of the alterations were confirmed by real-time PCR. Our results demonstrated that quercetin prevents clivorine-induced acute liver injury in vivo by inhibiting apoptotic cell death and ameliorating oxidative stress injury. This protection may be caused by the elevation of the body defense capacity induced by quercetin. PMID:24905073

  13. Onions: a source of unique dietary flavonoids.

    PubMed

    Slimestad, Rune; Fossen, Torgils; Vågen, Ingunn Molund

    2007-12-12

    Onion bulbs (Allium cepa L.) are among the richest sources of dietary flavonoids and contribute to a large extent to the overall intake of flavonoids. This review includes a compilation of the existing qualitative and quantitative information about flavonoids reported to occur in onion bulbs, including NMR spectroscopic evidence used for structural characterization. In addition, a summary is given to index onion cultivars according to their content of flavonoids measured as quercetin. Only compounds belonging to the flavonols, the anthocyanins, and the dihydroflavonols have been reported to occur in onion bulbs. Yellow onions contain 270-1187 mg of flavonols per kilogram of fresh weight (FW), whereas red onions contain 415-1917 mg of flavonols per kilogram of FW. Flavonols are the predominant pigments of onions. At least 25 different flavonols have been characterized, and quercetin derivatives are the most important ones in all onion cultivars. Their glycosyl moieties are almost exclusively glucose, which is mainly attached to the 4', 3, and/or 7-positions of the aglycones. Quercetin 4'-glucoside and quercetin 3,4'-diglucoside are in most cases reported as the main flavonols in recent literature. Analogous derivatives of kaempferol and isorhamnetin have been identified as minor pigments. Recent reports indicate that the outer dry layers of onion bulbs contain oligomeric structures of quercetin in addition to condensation products of quercetin and protocatechuic acid. The anthocyanins of red onions are mainly cyanidin glucosides acylated with malonic acid or nonacylated. Some of these pigments facilitate unique structural features like 4'-glycosylation and unusual substitution patterns of sugar moieties. Altogether at least 25 different anthocyanins have been reported from red onions, including two novel 5-carboxypyranocyanidin-derivatives. The quantitative content of anthocyanins in some red onion cultivars has been reported to be approximately 10% of the total

  14. [Chemical and biological evaluation of quinua (Chenopodium quinoa Willd). Effect of the extraction of saponins by heat treatment].

    PubMed

    Tellería Rios, M L; Sgarbieri, V C; Amaya, J

    1978-09-01

    The changes in proximate composition, amino acid content and protein efficiency ratio (PER) caused by hot-water extraction of the saponins were studied in four Bolivian varieties of quinua (Chenopodium quinoa, Willd). Detectable saponin was eliminated with an extraction at 70 degrees C. Extraction at 87 degrees C also eliminated the saponins but, in addition, had the tendency of slightly increasing the protein amino acid content. The maximum PER obtained was 2.99 for the Blanca variety, followed by 2.72 for the Sajama variety, also extracted at 87 degrees C (casein gave a PER value of 3.21).

  15. A comparison of the antimalarial activity of the cinchona alkaloids against Plasmodium falciparum in vitro.

    PubMed

    Wesche, D L; Black, J

    1990-06-01

    The effects of four major cinchona alkaloids: (-) quinine, (+) quinidine, (-)cinchonidine, and (+)cinchonine against Plasmodium falciparum FCQ-27/PNG were studied. The alkaloids were tested in vitro as either single alkaloids, racemic mixtures of stereoisomers, or as an equimolar combination of all four alkaloids. Results indicate (+)quinidine to be most effective and both (+)stereoisomers were more potent than the (-)stereoisomers. Inhibitory concentrations 50% (Ki) of racemic mixtures of stereoisomers were similar to those of the (+)stereoisomers alone. The Ki of four alkaloids in equimolar combination were similar to that of the (-) cinchonidine/(+)cinchonine racemic mixture. A total alkaloidal extract of Cinchona sp. was tested and compared with the pure alkaloids. HPLC analysis indicated that (+)cinchonine, (-)cinchonidine and (-)quinine were present in a ratio of approximately 1:1:2, respectively. The total alkaloid extract, with (-)stereoisomers predominating, was less effective than the four alkaloids in combination. The nature of the interaction between stereoisomers was investigated and appears to be one of addition.

  16. Computational Studies on Cinchona Alkaloid-Catalyzed Asymmetric Organic Reactions.

    PubMed

    Tanriver, Gamze; Dedeoglu, Burcu; Catak, Saron; Aviyente, Viktorya

    2016-06-21

    Remarkable progress in the area of asymmetric organocatalysis has been achieved in the last decades. Cinchona alkaloids and their derivatives have emerged as powerful organocatalysts owing to their reactivities leading to high enantioselectivities. The widespread usage of cinchona alkaloids has been attributed to their nontoxicity, ease of use, stability, cost effectiveness, recyclability, and practical utilization in industry. The presence of tunable functional groups enables cinchona alkaloids to catalyze a broad range of reactions. Excellent experimental studies have extensively contributed to this field, and highly selective reactions were catalyzed by cinchona alkaloids and their derivatives. Computational modeling has helped elucidate the mechanistic aspects of cinchona alkaloid catalyzed reactions as well as the origins of the selectivity they induce. These studies have complemented experimental work for the design of more efficient catalysts. This Account presents recent computational studies on cinchona alkaloid catalyzed organic reactions and the theoretical rationalizations behind their effectiveness and ability to induce selectivity. Valuable efforts to investigate the mechanisms of reactions catalyzed by cinchona alkaloids and the key aspects of the catalytic activity of cinchona alkaloids in reactions ranging from pharmaceutical to industrial applications are summarized. Quantum mechanics, particularly density functional theory (DFT), and molecular mechanics, including ONIOM, were used to rationalize experimental findings by providing mechanistic insights into reaction mechanisms. B3LYP with modest basis sets has been used in most of the studies; nonetheless, the energetics have been corrected with higher basis sets as well as functionals parametrized to include dispersion M05-2X, M06-2X, and M06-L and functionals with dispersion corrections. Since cinchona alkaloids catalyze reactions by forming complexes with substrates via hydrogen bonds and long

  17. Determination of flavonoids in Semen Cuscutae by RP-HPLC.

    PubMed

    Ye, Min; Li, Yan; Yan, Yuning; Liu, Huwei; Ji, Xiuhong

    2002-05-15

    Flavonoids contents in 40 samples of Semen Cuscutae collected from areas all around China were investigated. Five principal flavonoids, quercetin 3-O-beta-D-galactoside-7-O-beta-D-glucoside, quercetin 3-O-beta-D-apiofuranosyl-(1-->2)-beta-D-galactoside, hyperoside, quercetin and kaempferol were analyzed simultaneously by using a reversed phase liquid chromatograph system with 0.025 M phosphoric acid-methanol as mobile phase. The recovery of the method was 97.0-102.9%, and all the flavonoids showed good linearity (r > or = 0.9990) in a relatively wide concentration range. The results indicated that contents of flavonoids in S. Cuscutae varied significantly from species to species, locality to locality, and parasiting host to host. Cuscuta australis contained a much higher content of kaempferol than C. chinensis, and few flavonoids were detected in C. japonica. The quality of S. Cuscutae can be evaluated according to the contents of flavonoids.

  18. Human gut microbial degradation of flavonoids: structure-function relationships.

    PubMed

    Simons, Andrean L; Renouf, Mathieu; Hendrich, Suzanne; Murphy, Patricia A

    2005-05-18

    The relationship between chemical structure and gut microbial degradation rates of 14 flavonoids, flavone, apigenin, chrysin, naringenin, kaempferol, genistein, daidzein, daidzin, puerarin, 7,4'-dihydroxyflavone, 6,4'-dihydroxyflavone, 5,4'-dihydroxyflavone, 5,3'-dihydroxyflavone, and 4'-hydroxyflavone, was investigated by anaerobically fermenting the flavonoids with human gut microflora (n = 11 subjects). Degradation rates for the 5,7,4'-trihydroxyl flavonoids, apigenin, genistein, naringenin, and kaempferol, were significantly faster than the other structural motifs. Puerarin was resistant to degradation by the gut microflora. Extensive degradation of flavonoids by gut microflora may result in lower overall bioavailability than those flavonoids that are slowly degraded because rapidly degrading flavonoids are less likely to be absorbed intact.

  19. Micellar aggregates of saponins from Chenopodium quinoa: characterization by dynamic light scattering and transmission electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Verza, S G; de Resende, P E; Kaiser, S; Quirici, L; Teixeira, H F; Gosmann, G; Ferreira, F; Ortega, G G

    2012-04-01

    Entire seeds of Chenopodium quinoa Willd are a rich protein source and are also well-known for their high saponin content. Due to their amphiphily quinoa saponins are able to form intricate micellar aggregates in aqueous media. In this paper we study the aggregates formed by self-association of these compounds from two quinoa saponin fractions (FQ70 and FQ90) as well as several distinctive nanostructures obtained after their complexation with different ratios of cholesterol (CHOL) and phosphatidylcholine (PC). The FQ70 and FQ90 fractions were obtained by reversed-phase preparative chromatography. The structural features of their resulting aggregates were determined by Dynamic Light Scattering (DLS) and Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM). Novel nanosized spherical vesicles formed by self-association with mean diameter about 100-200 nm were observed in FQ70 aqueous solutions whereas worm-like micelles an approximate width of 20 nm were detected in FQ90 aqueous solutions. Under experimental conditions similar to those reported for the preparation of Quillaja saponaria ISCOM matrices, tubular and ring-like micelles arose from FQ70:CHOL:PC and FQ90:CHOL:PC formulations, respectively. However, under these conditions no cage-like ISCOM matrices were observed. The saponin composition of FQ70 and FQ90 seems to determine the nanosized structures viewed by TEM. Phytolaccagenic acid, predominant in FQ70 and FQ90 fractions, is accountable for the formation of the nanosized vesicles and tubular structures observed by TEM in the aqueous solutions of both samples. Conversely, ring-like micelles observed in FQ90:CHOL:PC complexes can be attributed to the presence of less polar saponins present in FQ90, in particular those derived from oleanolic acid.

  20. Is fucose the answer to the immunomodulatory paradox of Quillaja saponins?

    PubMed

    Marciani, Dante J

    2015-12-01

    Quillaja saponins, e.g. QS-21, are immunomodulating aldehyde-carrying triterpene glycosides, which depending on the acylation state of their single fucosyl residue (Fucp) induce either Th1/Th2 or Th2 immunity. Indeed, their changes in immunomodulation or adjuvanticity from Th1/Th2 to sole Th2 immunity, correlate with the presence of acylated and de-acylated Fucp residues, respectively. Thus, it is possible to infer that the single Fucp residue is responsible for the Th2 immunity biasing induced by de-acylated Q. saponins (QT-0101). That removal of the fucosylated oligosaccharide from de-acylated Q. saponins results once more in the induction of Th1/Th2 immunity supports the Fucp role in polarizing the response toward Th2 immunity. From structural and functional analogies with the helminths' fucosylated glycans, it is possible to infer that these saponins' Fucp must bind to the lectin DC-SIGN on dendritic cells (DC). This binding to DC-SIGN, a C-type lectin that shows significant pliability in its binding interactions, must result in polarization toward Th2 while inhibiting Th1 immunity. Apparently, acylation of the Fucp by large fatty acids sterically hinders this sugar from binding to DC-SIGN, preventing a biasing to Th2 immunity. Evidently, de-acylation of Q. saponins may negatively affect vaccines requiring Th1 immunity for immune protection, particularly those against pathogens that use DC-SIGN to infect DCs and modulate Th2 immunity. However, it could be valuable in vaccines that require a sole Th2 immunity, like those against proteinopathies, e.g. Alzheimer's disease. Hence, it would valuable to elucidate the possible interactions between DC-SIGN and the QT-0101 immunomodulator.