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Sample records for alkaloids flavonoids saponins

  1. New cycloartane saponin and monoterpenoid glucoindole alkaloids from Mussaenda luteola.

    PubMed

    Mohamed, Shaymaa M; Backheet, Enaam Y; Bayoumi, Soad A; Ross, Samir A

    2016-04-01

    A new cycloartane-type saponin with unusual hydroxylation at C-17 and a unique side chain, 9 (R), 19, 22 (S), 24 (R) bicyclolanost-3β, 12α, 16β, 17α tetrol-25-one 3-O-β-d-glucopyranosyl-(1→2)-β-d-glucopyranoside (1) and two new monoterpenoid glucoindole alkaloids, 10-methoxy pumiloside (2) and the previously chemically synthesized, 10-methoxy strictosidine (3) along with other five known compounds, 7α-morroniside (4), 7-epi-loganin (5), (7β)-7-O-methylmorroniside (6), 5(S)-5-carboxystrictisidine (7) and apigenin-7-O-neohesperidoside (8) were isolated from the aerial parts of Mussaenda luteola (Rubiaceae). The structural elucidation of the isolates was accomplished by extensive (1D and 2D NMR) spectroscopic data analysis and HR-ESI-MS. Compounds 4-8 were reported for the first time from the genus Mussaenda. Interestingly, this is the first report for the occurrence of the monoterpenoid glucoindole-type alkaloids in the genus which might be useful for the chemotaxonomic evaluation of the genus Mussaenda. All isolates were evaluated for their antiprotozoal activities. Compound 7 showed good antitrypanosomal activity with IC50 and IC90 values of 13.7 and 16.6 μM compared to IC50 and IC90 values of 13.06 and 28.99 μM for the positive control DFMO, difluoromethylornithine.

  2. New cycloartane saponin and monoterpenoid glucoindole alkaloids from Mussaenda luteola.

    PubMed

    Mohamed, Shaymaa M; Backheet, Enaam Y; Bayoumi, Soad A; Ross, Samir A

    2016-04-01

    A new cycloartane-type saponin with unusual hydroxylation at C-17 and a unique side chain, 9 (R), 19, 22 (S), 24 (R) bicyclolanost-3β, 12α, 16β, 17α tetrol-25-one 3-O-β-d-glucopyranosyl-(1→2)-β-d-glucopyranoside (1) and two new monoterpenoid glucoindole alkaloids, 10-methoxy pumiloside (2) and the previously chemically synthesized, 10-methoxy strictosidine (3) along with other five known compounds, 7α-morroniside (4), 7-epi-loganin (5), (7β)-7-O-methylmorroniside (6), 5(S)-5-carboxystrictisidine (7) and apigenin-7-O-neohesperidoside (8) were isolated from the aerial parts of Mussaenda luteola (Rubiaceae). The structural elucidation of the isolates was accomplished by extensive (1D and 2D NMR) spectroscopic data analysis and HR-ESI-MS. Compounds 4-8 were reported for the first time from the genus Mussaenda. Interestingly, this is the first report for the occurrence of the monoterpenoid glucoindole-type alkaloids in the genus which might be useful for the chemotaxonomic evaluation of the genus Mussaenda. All isolates were evaluated for their antiprotozoal activities. Compound 7 showed good antitrypanosomal activity with IC50 and IC90 values of 13.7 and 16.6 μM compared to IC50 and IC90 values of 13.06 and 28.99 μM for the positive control DFMO, difluoromethylornithine. PMID:26969788

  3. New cycloartane saponin and monoterpenoid glucoindole alkaloids from Mussaenda luteola

    PubMed Central

    Mohamed, Shaymaa M.; Backheet, Enaam Y.; Bayoumi, Soad A.; Ross, Samir A.

    2016-01-01

    A new cycloartane-type saponin with unusual hydroxylation at C-17 and a unique side chain, 9 (R), 19, 22 (S), 24 (R) bicyclolanost-3β, 12α, 16β, 17α tetrol-25-one 3-O-β-d-glucopyranosyl-(1→2)-β-d-glucopyranoside (1) and two new monoterpenoid glucoindole alkaloids, 10-methoxy pumiloside (2) and the previously chemically synthesized, 10-methoxy strictosidine (3) along with other five known compounds, 7α-morroniside (4), 7-epi-loganin (5), (7β)-7-O-methylmorroniside (6), 5(S)-5-carboxystrictisidine (7) and apigenin-7-O-neohesperidoside (8) were isolated from the aerial parts of Mussaenda luteola (Rubiaceae). The structural elucidation of the isolates was accomplished by extensive (1D and 2D NMR) spectroscopic data analysis and HR-ESI-MS. Compounds 4–8 were reported for the first time from the genus Mussaenda. Interestingly, this is the first report for the occurrence of the monoterpenoid glucoindole-type alkaloids in the genus which might be useful for the chemotaxonomic evaluation of the genus Mussaenda. All isolates were evaluated for their antiprotozoal activities. Compound 7 showed good antitrypanosomal activity with IC50 and IC90 values of 13.7 and 16.6 µM compared to IC50 and IC90 values of 13.06 and 28.99 µM for the positive control DFMO, difluoromethylornithine. PMID:26969788

  4. In vivo antimalarial efficacy of acetogenins, alkaloids and flavonoids enriched fractions from Annona crassiflora Mart.

    PubMed

    Pimenta, Lúcia Pinheiro Santos; Garcia, Giani Martins; Gonçalves, Samuel Geraldo do Vale; Dionísio, Bárbara Lana; Braga, Erika Martins; Mosqueira, Vanessa Carla Furtado

    2014-01-01

    Annona crassiflora and Annonaceae plants are known to be used to treat malaria by traditional healers. In this work, the antimalarial efficacy of different fractions of A. crassiflora, particularly acetogenin, alkaloids and flavonoid-rich fractions, was determined in vivo using Plasmodium berghei-infected mice model and toxicity was accessed by brine shrimp assay. The A. crassiflora fractions were administered at doses of 12.5 mg/kg/day in a 4-day test protocol. The results showed that some fractions from woods were rich in acetogenins, alkaloids and terpenes, and other fractions from leaves were rich in alkaloids and flavonoids. The parasitaemia was significantly (p < 0.05, p < 0.001) reduced (57-75%) with flavonoid and alkaloid-rich leaf fractions, which also increased mean survival time of mice after treatment. Our results confirm the usage of this plant in folk medicine as an antimalarial remedy.

  5. Analytical methods for determination of alkaloids and saponins from roots of Caulophyllum thalictroids (L) Michx using UPLC HPLC and HPTLC

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A comparison study of analytical methods including HPLC, UPLC and HPTLC are presented in this paper for the determination of major alkaloid and triterpene saponins from the roots of Caulophyllum thalictroides (L.) Michx. (blue cohosh) and dietary supplements claiming to contain blue cohosh. The meth...

  6. Detection and identification of diterpenoid alkaloids, isoflavonoids and saponins in Qifu decoction and rat plasma by liquid chromatography-time-of-flight mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Tan, Guangguo; Jing, Jing; Zhu, Zhenyu; Lou, Ziyang; Li, Wuhong; Zhao, Liang; Zhang, Guoqing; Chai, Yifeng

    2012-02-01

    A liquid chromatography-time-of-flight mass spectrometric (LC-TOFMS) method has been developed for analysis of components in Qifu decoction (QFD), a traditional Chinese medical formula consisting of Radix Astragali and Acontium carmichaeli, and in rat plasma after oral administration. Based on accurate mass measurements within 3 ppm error for each molecular ion and subsequent fragment ions of TOFMS, as well as matching of empirical molecular formulae with those of published components in the in-house chemical library, a total of 44 major components including 21 diterpenoid alkaloids, 12 flavonoids and 11 saponins were identified in QFD. After oral administration of QFD, 22 components in rat plasma were detected and identified by comparing and contrasting the constituents measured in QFD with those in the plasma samples. The results provided valuable chemical information for further pharmacology and active mechanism research on QFD. LC-TOFMS was also applied for the comparison of relative peak area of major active components between QFD and the single herb extracts. The concentration ratios of major saponins detected in the crude herb Radix Astragali were found to be different from those in QFD. The experimental data indicated that the decocting process could result in differences in the amounts of active components. PMID:21594877

  7. Combinations of alkaloids affecting different molecular targets with the saponin digitonin can synergistically enhance trypanocidal activity against Trypanosoma brucei brucei.

    PubMed

    Krstin, Sonja; Peixoto, Herbenya Silva; Wink, Michael

    2015-11-01

    The flagellate Trypanosoma brucei causes sleeping sickness in humans and nagana in animals. Only a few drugs are registered to treat trypanosomiasis, but those drugs show severe side effects. Also, because some pathogen strains have become resistant, new strategies are urgently needed to combat this parasitic disease. An underexplored possibility is the application of combinations of several trypanocidal agents, which may potentiate their trypanocidal activity in a synergistic fashion. In this study, the potential synergism of mutual combinations of bioactive alkaloids and alkaloids with a membrane-active steroidal saponin, digitonin, was explored with regard to their effect on T. b. brucei. Alkaloids were selected that affect different molecular targets: berberine and chelerythrine (intercalation of DNA), piperine (induction of apoptosis), vinblastine (inhibition of microtubule assembly), emetine (intercalation of DNA, inhibition of protein biosynthesis), homoharringtonine (inhibition of protein biosynthesis), and digitonin (membrane permeabilization and uptake facilitation of polar compounds). Most combinations resulted in an enhanced trypanocidal effect. The addition of digitonin significantly stimulated the activity of almost all alkaloids against trypanosomes. The strongest effect was measured in a combination of digitonin with vinblastine. The highest dose reduction indexes (DRI) were measured in the two-drug combination of digitonin or piperine with vinblastine, where the dose of vinblastine could be reduced 9.07-fold or 7.05-fold, respectively. The synergistic effects of mutual combinations of alkaloids and of alkaloids with digitonin present a new avenue to treat trypanosomiasis but one which needs to be corroborated in future animal experiments.

  8. Combinations of Alkaloids Affecting Different Molecular Targets with the Saponin Digitonin Can Synergistically Enhance Trypanocidal Activity against Trypanosoma brucei brucei

    PubMed Central

    Peixoto, Herbenya Silva

    2015-01-01

    The flagellate Trypanosoma brucei causes sleeping sickness in humans and nagana in animals. Only a few drugs are registered to treat trypanosomiasis, but those drugs show severe side effects. Also, because some pathogen strains have become resistant, new strategies are urgently needed to combat this parasitic disease. An underexplored possibility is the application of combinations of several trypanocidal agents, which may potentiate their trypanocidal activity in a synergistic fashion. In this study, the potential synergism of mutual combinations of bioactive alkaloids and alkaloids with a membrane-active steroidal saponin, digitonin, was explored with regard to their effect on T. b. brucei. Alkaloids were selected that affect different molecular targets: berberine and chelerythrine (intercalation of DNA), piperine (induction of apoptosis), vinblastine (inhibition of microtubule assembly), emetine (intercalation of DNA, inhibition of protein biosynthesis), homoharringtonine (inhibition of protein biosynthesis), and digitonin (membrane permeabilization and uptake facilitation of polar compounds). Most combinations resulted in an enhanced trypanocidal effect. The addition of digitonin significantly stimulated the activity of almost all alkaloids against trypanosomes. The strongest effect was measured in a combination of digitonin with vinblastine. The highest dose reduction indexes (DRI) were measured in the two-drug combination of digitonin or piperine with vinblastine, where the dose of vinblastine could be reduced 9.07-fold or 7.05-fold, respectively. The synergistic effects of mutual combinations of alkaloids and of alkaloids with digitonin present a new avenue to treat trypanosomiasis but one which needs to be corroborated in future animal experiments. PMID:26349826

  9. Delivery of Flavonoids and Saponins from Black Bean (Phaseolus vulgaris) Seed Coats Incorporated into Whole Wheat Bread

    PubMed Central

    Chávez-Santoscoy, Rocio A.; Lazo-Vélez, Marco A.; Serna-Sáldivar, Sergio O.; Gutiérrez-Uribe, Janet A.

    2016-01-01

    Cereal-based products can be used as vehicles for the delivery of relevant bioactive compounds since they are staple foods for most cultures throughout the world. The health promoting benefits of flavonoids and saponins contained in black bean seed coats have been previously described. In the present work, the effect of adding flavonoids and saponins from black bean seed coat to the typical yeast-leavened whole wheat bread formulation in terms of bread features, organoleptic properties and phytochemical profile was studied. The retention of bioactive compounds was determined and the inhibitory effects of in vitro enzyme digested samples on two colon cancer cell lines (Caco-2 and HT29) was evaluated. The addition of bioactive compounds did not significantly affect baking properties or texture parameters. Among organoleptic properties of enriched breads, only crumb color was affected by the addition of bioactive compounds. However, the use of whole wheat flour partially masked the effect on color. More than 90% of added flavonoids and saponins and 80% of anthocyanins were retained in bread after baking. However, saponins were reduced more than 50% after the in vitro enzyme digestion. The black bean seed coat phytochemicals recovered after in vitro enzyme digestion of enriched breads significantly reduced by 20% the viability of colon cancer cells without affecting standard fibroblast cells (p < 0.05). PMID:26901186

  10. Delivery of Flavonoids and Saponins from Black Bean (Phaseolus vulgaris) Seed Coats Incorporated into Whole Wheat Bread.

    PubMed

    Chávez-Santoscoy, Rocio A; Lazo-Vélez, Marco A; Serna-Sáldivar, Sergio O; Gutiérrez-Uribe, Janet A

    2016-01-01

    Cereal-based products can be used as vehicles for the delivery of relevant bioactive compounds since they are staple foods for most cultures throughout the world. The health promoting benefits of flavonoids and saponins contained in black bean seed coats have been previously described. In the present work, the effect of adding flavonoids and saponins from black bean seed coat to the typical yeast-leavened whole wheat bread formulation in terms of bread features, organoleptic properties and phytochemical profile was studied. The retention of bioactive compounds was determined and the inhibitory effects of in vitro enzyme digested samples on two colon cancer cell lines (Caco-2 and HT29) was evaluated. The addition of bioactive compounds did not significantly affect baking properties or texture parameters. Among organoleptic properties of enriched breads, only crumb color was affected by the addition of bioactive compounds. However, the use of whole wheat flour partially masked the effect on color. More than 90% of added flavonoids and saponins and 80% of anthocyanins were retained in bread after baking. However, saponins were reduced more than 50% after the in vitro enzyme digestion. The black bean seed coat phytochemicals recovered after in vitro enzyme digestion of enriched breads significantly reduced by 20% the viability of colon cancer cells without affecting standard fibroblast cells (p < 0.05). PMID:26901186

  11. Exploring Cancer Therapeutics with Natural Products from African Medicinal Plants, Part II: Alkaloids, Terpenoids and Flavonoids.

    PubMed

    Nwodo, Justina N; Ibezim, Akachukwu; Simoben, Conrad V; Ntie-Kang, Fidele

    2016-01-01

    Cancer stands as second most common cause of disease-related deaths in humans. Resistance of cancer to chemotherapy remains challenging to both scientists and physicians. Medicinal plants are known to contribute significantly to a large population of Africa, which is to a very large extent linked to folkloric claims which is part of their livelihood. In this review paper, the potential of naturally occurring anti-cancer agents from African flora has been explored, with suggested modes of action, where such data is available. Literature search revealed plant-derived compounds from African flora showing anti-cancer and/or cytotoxic activities, which have been tested in vitro and in vivo. This corresponds to 400 compounds (from mildly active to very active) covering various compound classes. However, in this part II, we only discussed the three major compound classes which are: flavonoids, alkaloids and terpenoids.

  12. β-Hydroxydihydrochalcone and flavonoid glycosides along with triterpene saponin and sesquiterpene from the herbs of Pimpinella rhodantha Boiss.

    PubMed

    Özbek, Hilal; Güvenalp, Zühal; Kuruüzüm-Uz, Ay E; Kazaz, Cavit; Demirezer, L Ömür

    2016-01-01

    A new β-hydroxydihydrochalcone glycoside named ziganin (1) and a new acylated flavonol glycoside named isorhamnetin-3-O-α-L-(2″,3″-di-O-trans-coumaroyl)-rhamnopyranoside) (2), along with two known flavonoid glycosides, a β-hydroxydihydrochalcone glycoside, a hydroxybenzoic acid derivative, a trinorguaiane type sesquiterpenoid, a triterpenic saponin and a polyol were isolated from the herbs of Pimpinella rhodantha Boiss. Their structures were elucidated on the basis of spectroscopic analyses including 1D-and 2D-NMR, UV, IR, CD, ESI-MS, APCI-MS, HR-ESI-MS techniques. The isolated compounds were evaluated for their antioxidant capacity through the DPPH free-radical scavenging assay and ferrous ion-chelating power test. PMID:26207840

  13. Production of maize tortillas and cookies from nixtamalized flour enriched with anthocyanins, flavonoids and saponins extracted from black bean (Phaseolus vulgaris) seed coats.

    PubMed

    Chávez-Santoscoy, Rocio A; Gutiérrez-Uribe, Janet A; Serna-Saldivar, Sergio O; Perez-Carrillo, Esther

    2016-02-01

    Ethanolic extract from black beans coat is a source of flavonoids, saponins and antocyanins. Nixtamalized maize flours (NF) are used for the preparation of products such as tortillas, tortillas chips, cookies among others. The objective of this research was to study the effect on textural parameters and color after adding flavonoids, saponins and anthocyanins from black bean seed coat in NF used for the production of tortillas and gluten-free cookies. Furthermore, the retention of bioactive compounds after tortilla and gluten-free-cookie preparation was assessed. Ethanolic extracts of black bean seed coats were added (3g/kg or 7 g/kg) to NF in order to prepare corn tortillas and gluten free cookies characterized in terms of dimensions, color and texture. Addition of 7 g/kg affected the color of cookies and tortillas without effect on texture and dimensions. It was possible to retain more than 80% and 60% of bioactives into baked tortillas and cookies, respectively.

  14. Dianthosaponins G-I, triterpene saponins, an anthranilic acid amide glucoside and a flavonoid glycoside from the aerial parts of Dianthus japonicus and their cytotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Kanehira, Yuka; Kawakami, Susumu; Sugimoto, Sachiko; Matsunami, Katsuyoshi; Otsuka, Hideaki

    2016-10-01

    Extensive isolation work on the 1-BuOH-soluble fraction of a MeOH extract of the aerial parts of Dianthus japonicus afforded three further triterpene glycosyl estsers, termed dianthosaponins G-I, an anthranilic acid amide glucoside and a C-glycosyl flavonoid along with one known triterpene saponin. Their structures were elucidated from spectroscopic evidence. The cytotoxicity of the isolated compounds toward A549 cells was evaluated.

  15. Dianthosaponins G-I, triterpene saponins, an anthranilic acid amide glucoside and a flavonoid glycoside from the aerial parts of Dianthus japonicus and their cytotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Kanehira, Yuka; Kawakami, Susumu; Sugimoto, Sachiko; Matsunami, Katsuyoshi; Otsuka, Hideaki

    2016-10-01

    Extensive isolation work on the 1-BuOH-soluble fraction of a MeOH extract of the aerial parts of Dianthus japonicus afforded three further triterpene glycosyl estsers, termed dianthosaponins G-I, an anthranilic acid amide glucoside and a C-glycosyl flavonoid along with one known triterpene saponin. Their structures were elucidated from spectroscopic evidence. The cytotoxicity of the isolated compounds toward A549 cells was evaluated. PMID:27351981

  16. Simultaneous determination of alkaloids and flavonoids from aerial parts of Passiflora species and dietary supplements using UPLC-UV-MS and HPTLC

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A rapid UPLC method was developed for the simultaneous analysis of five indole alkaloids (harmalol, harmol, harmane, harmaline and harmine) and four flavonoids (orientin, isoorientin, vitexin, and isovitexin) from the aerial parts of Passiflora incarnata L. (Passifloracea), different species of Pass...

  17. Dianthosaponins A-F, triterpene saponins, flavonoid glycoside, aromatic amide glucoside and γ-pyrone glucoside from Dianthus japonicus.

    PubMed

    Nakano, Takahiro; Sugimoto, Sachiko; Matsunami, Katsuyoshi; Otsuka, Hideaki

    2011-01-01

    From aerial parts of Dianthus japonicus, six new and seven known oleanane-type triterpene saponins were isolated. The structures of the new saponins, named dianthosaponins A-F, were elucidated by means of high resolution mass spectrometry, and extensive inspection of one- and two-dimensional NMR spectroscopic data. A new C-glycosyl flavone, a glycosidic derivative of anthranilic acid amide and a maltol glucoside were also isolated.

  18. Ultra high performance liquid chromatography coupled with triple quadrupole mass spectrometry and chemometric analysis of licorice based on the simultaneous determination of saponins and flavonoids.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Zhenzuo; Wang, Yuefei; Zheng, Yunfeng; Yang, Jing; Zhang, Lei

    2016-08-01

    Licorice is among the most popular herbal medicines and frequently used in traditional medicine, food products, and cosmetics. In China, only Glycyrrhiza uralensis Fisch., Glycyrrhiza inflata Bat. and Glycyrrhiza glabra L. are officially used and are usually processed with honey prior to use. To maintain the quality of commercially available herbal products, a simple, rapid, and reliable ultra high performance liquid chromatography with triple quadrupole mass spectrometry was developed to investigate the major active constituents of commercially available licorice products. Nineteen components were accurately determined, including eight triterpenoid saponins, one triterpene, and ten flavonoids. Subsequently, multivariate statistical analysis methods were employed to further explore and interpret the experimental data. The results indicated that liquiritin apioside may be considered as a candidate index for the quality control of licorice as well as 18β-glycyrrhizic acid and liquiritin. In addition, both 18β-glycyrrhizic acid and licorice-saponin G2 can be used for discrimination between crude and honey-processed licorice. Furthermore, using 18β-glycyrrhizic acid and liquiritin as markers, this work revealed that the quality of licorice products may have declined in recent years. This highlights the need for additional effort focused on good agricultural practice during the processing of licorice. In summary, this study provides a valuable reference for the quality assessment of licorice. PMID:27273927

  19. Analysis of steroidal alkaloids and saponins in Solanaceae plant extracts using UPLC-qTOF mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Heinig, Uwe; Aharoni, Asaph

    2014-01-01

    Plants of the Solanaceae family are renowned for the production of cholesterol-derived steroidal glycosides, including the nitrogen containing glycoalkaloids and steroidal saponins. In this chapter we describe the use of UPLC (Ultra Performance Liquid Chromatography) coupled with qTOF (Quadrupole Time-of-Flight) mass spectrometry for profiling of these two large classes of semipolar metabolites. The presented method includes an optimized sample preparation protocol, a procedure for high resolution chromatographic separation and metabolite detection using the TOF mass spectrometer which provides high resolution and mass accuracy. A detailed description for non-targeted data analysis and a strategy for putative identification of steroidal glycosides from complex extracts based on interpretation of mass fragmentation patterns is also provided. The described methodology allows profiling and putative identification of multiple steroidal glycoside compounds from the assortment of Solanaceae species producing these molecules.

  20. Simultaneous determination of iridoids, phenolic acids, flavonoids, and saponins in Flos Lonicerae and Flos Lonicerae Japonicae by HPLC-DAD-ELSD coupled with principal component analysis.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chun-Yun; Qi, Lian-Wen; Li, Hui-Jun; Li, Ping; Yi, Ling; Ma, Hong-Liang; Tang, Dan

    2007-12-01

    A method, HPLC coupled with diode-array and evaporative light scattering detectors (HPLC-DAD-ELSD), was newly developed to evaluate the quality of Flos Lonicerae (FL) and Flos Lonicerae Japonicae (FLJ), through a simultaneous determination of multiple types of bioactive components. By employing DAD, the detection wavelengths were set at 240 nm for the determination of iridoids, 330 nm for phenolic acids, and 360 nm for flavonoids, respectively. While ELSD, connected in series after DAD, was applied to the determination of saponins. This assay was fully validated with respect to precision, repeatability, and accuracy. Moreover, principal component analysis (PCA) was used for the similarity evaluation of different samples, and it was proven straightforward and reliable to differentiate FL and FLJ samples from different origins. For PCA, two principal components have been extracted. Principal component 1 (PC1) influences the separation between different sample sets, capturing 54.598% variance, while principal component 2 (PC2) affects differentiation within sample sets, capturing 12.579% variance. In conclusion, simultaneous quantification of bioactive components by HPLC-DAD-ELSD coupled with PCA would be a well-acceptable strategy to differentiate the sources and to comprehensively control the quality of the medicinal plants FL and FLJ.

  1. Steroidal Saponins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sahu, N. P.; Banerjee, S.; Mondal, N. B.; Mandal, D.

    The medicinal activities of plants are generally due to the secondary metabolites (1) which often occur as glycosides of steroids, terpenoids, phenols etc. Saponins are a group of naturally occurring plant glycosides, characterized by their strong foam-forming properties in aqueous solution. The cardiac glycosides also possess this, property but are classified separately because of their specific biological activity. Unlike the cardiac glycosides, saponins generally do not affect the heart. These are classified as steroid or triterpenoid saponins depending on the nature of the aglycone. Steroidal glycosides are naturally occurring sugar conjugates of C27 steroidal compounds. The aglycone of a steroid saponin is usually a spirostanol or a furostanol. The glycone parts of these compounds are mostly oligosaccharides, arranged either in a linear or branched fashion, attached to hydroxyl groups through an acetal linkage (2, 3). Another class of saponins, the basic steroid saponins, contain nitrogen analogues of steroid sapogenins as aglycones.

  2. Simultaneous qualitative and quantitative analysis of flavonoids and alkaloids from the leaves of Nelumbo nucifera Gaertn. using high-performance liquid chromatography with quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Guo, Yujie; Chen, Xi; Qi, Jin; Yu, Boyang

    2016-07-01

    A reliable method, combining qualitative analysis by high-performance liquid chromatography coupled with quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry and quantitative assessment by high-performance liquid chromatography with photodiode array detection, has been developed to simultaneously analyze flavonoids and alkaloids in lotus leaf extracts. In the qualitative analysis, a total of 30 compounds, including 12 flavonoids, 16 alkaloids, and two proanthocyanidins, were identified. The fragmentation behaviors of four types of flavone glycoside and three types of alkaloid are summarized. The mass spectra of four representative components, quercetin 3-O-glucuronide, norcoclaurine, nuciferine, and neferine, are shown to illustrate their fragmentation pathways. Five pairs of isomers were detected and three of them were distinguished by comparing the elution order with reference substances and the mass spectrometry data with reported data. In the quantitative analysis, 30 lotus leaf samples from different regions were analyzed to investigate the proportion of eight representative compounds. Quercetin 3-O-glucuronide was found to be the predominant constituent of lotus leaf extracts. For further discrimination among the samples, hierarchical cluster analysis, and principal component analysis, based on the areas of the eight quantitative peaks, were carried out.

  3. High-speed homogenization coupled with microwave-assisted extraction followed by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry for the direct determination of alkaloids and flavonoids in fresh Isatis tinctoria L. hairy root cultures.

    PubMed

    Jiao, Jiao; Gai, Qing-Yan; Zhang, Lin; Wang, Wei; Luo, Meng; Zu, Yuan-Gang; Fu, Yu-Jie

    2015-06-01

    A new, simple and efficient analysis method for fresh plant in vitro cultures-namely, high-speed homogenization coupled with microwave-assisted extraction (HSH-MAE) followed by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS)-was developed for simultaneous determination of six alkaloids and eight flavonoids in Isatis tinctoria hairy root cultures (ITHRCs). Compared with traditional methods, the proposed HSH-MAE offers the advantages of easy manipulation, higher efficiency, energy saving, and reduced waste. Cytohistological studies were conducted to clarify the mechanism of HSH-MAE at cellular/tissue levels. Moreover, the established LC-MS/MS method showed excellent linearity, precision, repeatability, and reproducibility. The HSH-MAE-LC-MS/MS method was also successfully applied for screening high-productivity ITHRCs. Overall, this study opened up a new avenue for the direct determination of secondary metabolic profiles from fresh plant in vitro cultures, which is valuable for improving quality control of plant cell/organ cultures and sheds light on the metabolomic analysis of biological samples. Graphical Abstract HSH-MAE-LC-MS/MS opened up a new avenue for the direct determination of alkaloids and flavonoids in fresh Isatis tinctoria hairy root cultures.

  4. Chemical fingerprint and simultaneous determination of alkaloids and flavonoids in aerial parts of genus Peganum indigenous to China based on HPLC-UV: application of analysis on secondary metabolites accumulation.

    PubMed

    Wen, Fangfang; Cheng, Xuemei; Liu, Wei; Xuan, Min; Zhang, Lei; Zhao, Xin; Shan, Meng; Li, Yan; Teng, Liang; Wang, Zhengtao; Wang, Changhong

    2014-12-01

    The aerial parts of genus Peganum are officially used in traditional Chinese medicine. The paper aims to establish a high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) method for fingerprint analysis and simultaneous determination of three alkaloids and two flavonoids in aerial parts of genus Peganum, and to analyze accumulative difference of secondary metabolites in inter-species, individuals of plants, inter-/intra-population and from different growing seasons. HPLC analysis was performed on a C18 column with gradient elution using 0.1% trifloroacetic acid and acetonitrile as mobile phase and detected at 265 nm, by conventional methodology validation. For fingerprint analysis, the RSDs of relative retention time and relative peak area of the characteristic peaks were within 0.07-0.78 and 0.94-9.09%, respectively. For simultaneous determination of vasicine, harmaline, harmine, deacetylpeganetin and peganetin, all calibration curves showed good linearity (r > 0.9990) within the test range. The relative standard deviations of precision, repeatability and stability test did not exceed 2.37, 2.68 and 2.67%, respectively. The average recoveries for the five analytes were between 96.47 and 101.20%. HPLC fingerprints play a minor role in authenticating and differentiating the herbs of different species of genus Peganum. However, the secondary metabolites levels of alkaloids and flavonoids in aerial parts of genus Peganum rely on species-, habitat-, and growth season-dependent accumulation.

  5. Quantitative and Qualitative Analysis of Phenolic and Flavonoid Content in Moringa oleifera Lam and Ocimum tenuiflorum L.

    PubMed Central

    Sankhalkar, Sangeeta; Vernekar, Vrunda

    2016-01-01

    Background: Number of secondary compounds is produced by plants as natural antioxidants. Moringa oleifera Lam. and Ocimum tenuiflorum L. are known for their wide applications in food and pharmaceutical industry. Objective: To compare phenolic and flavonoid content in M. oleifera Lam and O. tenuiflorum L. by quantitative and qualitative analysis. Materials and Methods: Phenolic and flavonoid content were studied spectrophotometrically and by paper chromatography in M. oleifera Lam. and O. tenuiflorum L. Results: Higher phenolic and flavonoid content were observed in Moringa leaf and flower. Ocimum flower showed higher phenolic content and low flavonoid in comparison to Moringa. Flavonoids such as biflavonyl, flavones, glycosylflavones, and kaempferol were identified by paper chromatography. Phytochemical analysis for flavonoid, tannins, saponins, alkaloids, reducing sugars, and anthraquinones were tested positive for Moringa and Ocimum leaf as well as flower. Conclusions: In the present study higher phenolic and flavonoid content, indicated the natural antioxidant nature of Moringa and Ocimum signifying their medicinal importance. SUMMARY Moringa oleifera Lam. and Ocimum tenuiflorum L. are widly grown in India and are known for their medicinal properties. Number of secondary metabolites like phenolics and flavonoids are known to be present in both the plants. The present study was conducted with an objective to qualitatively and quantitatively compare the phenolics and flavanoids in these two medicinally important plants.Quantitation of total phenolics and flavanoids was done by spectrophotometrically while qualitative analysis was perfomed by paper chromatography and by phytochemical tests. Our results have shown higher phenolics and flavanoid content in Moringa leaf and flower. However, higher phenolic content was absent in Ocimum flower compared to that of Moringa. Phytochemical analysis of various metabolites such as flavonoids, tanins, sapponins, alkaloids

  6. Triterpenoidal saponins: bioactive secondary metabolites from Zygophyllum coccineum L

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Phytochemical investigation of the aerial parts of Zygophyllum coccineum L., led to the isolation of nine ursane-type triterpene saponins (1-9) including one new: zygophylloside S (1), together with known flavonoid glycoside (10), and sterol glycoside (11). The isolated compounds were tested for ant...

  7. Complementary Flavonoid Prenylations by Fungal Indole Prenyltransferases.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Kang; Yu, Xia; Xie, Xiulan; Li, Shu-Ming

    2015-09-25

    Flavonoids are found mainly in plants and exhibit diverse biological and pharmacological activities, which can often be enhanced by prenylations. In plants, such reactions are catalyzed by membrane-bound prenyltransferases. In this study, the prenylation of nine flavonoids from different classes by a soluble fungal prenyltransferase (AnaPT) involved in the biosynthesis of the prenylated indole alkaloid acetylaszonalenin is demonstrated. The behavior of AnaPT toward flavonoids regarding substrate acceptance and prenylation positions clearly differs from that of the indole prenyltransferase 7-DMATS. The two enzymes are therefore complementary in flavonoid prenylations.

  8. Triterpenoid saponins from Argania spinosa.

    PubMed

    Charrouf, Z; Wieruszeski, J M; Fkih-Tetouani, S; Leroy, Y; Charrouf, M; Fournet, B

    1992-06-01

    Five new oleanane saponins named arganine A, B, D, E and F and two known saponins: arganine C and mi-saponin A were isolated from the kernel of Argania spinosa. The structures of these saponins were elucidated by using 1H NMR, 1H-1H COSY NMR, 13C NMR, FAB mass spectrometry and chemical evidence. PMID:1368219

  9. Alkaloids from Delphinium pentagynum.

    PubMed

    Díaz, Jesús G; Ruiz, Juan García; Herz, Werner

    2004-07-01

    Aerial parts of a collection of Delphinium pentagynum Lam. from Niebla, Southern Spain, furnished one diterpene alkaloid, 2-dehydrodeacetylheterophylloidine, two norditerpene alkaloids, 14-demethyl-14-isobutyrylanhweidelphinine and 14-demethyl-14-acetylanhweidelphinine, the known alkaloids 14-deacetylnudicauline, methyllycaconitine, 14-deacetyl-14-isobutyrylnudicauline, 14-acetylbrowniine, browniine, delcosine, lycoctonine, 18-methoxygadesine, neoline, karakoline and the aporphine alkaloid magnoflorine. Structures of the alkaloids were established by MS, 1D and 2-D NMR techniques.

  10. Steroidal Saponins in Oat Bran.

    PubMed

    Yang, Junli; Wang, Pei; Wu, Wenbin; Zhao, Yantao; Idehen, Emmanuel; Sang, Shengmin

    2016-02-24

    Saponins are one type of widespread defense compound in the plant kingdom and have been exploited for the production of lead compounds with diverse pharmacological properties in drug discovery. Oats contain two unique steroidal saponins, avenacoside A, 1, and avenacoside B, 2. However, the chemical composition, the levels of these saponins in commercial oat products, and their health effects are still largely unknown. In this study, we directly purified 5 steroidal saponins (1-5) from a methanol extract of oat bran, characterized their structures by analyzing their MS and NMR spectra, and also tentatively identified 11 steroidal saponins (6-16) on the basis of their tandem mass spectra (MS(n), n = 2-3). Among the five purified saponins, 5 is a new compound and 4 is purified from oats for the first time. Using HPLC-MS techniques, a complete profile of oat steroidal saponins was determined, and the contents of the two primary steroidal saponins, 1 and 2, were quantitated in 15 different commercial oat products. The total levels of these two saponins vary from 49.6 to 443.0 mg/kg, and oat bran or oatmeal has higher levels of these two saponins than cold oat cereal. Furthermore, our results on the inhibitory effects of 1 and 2 against the growth of human colon cancer cells HCT-116 and HT-29 showed that both had weak activity, with 2 being more active than 1. PMID:26852819

  11. Two new steroidal saponins from Tribulus terrestris.

    PubMed

    Su, Lan; Feng, Sheng-Guang; Qiao, Li; Zhou, Yu-Zhi; Yang, Rui-Ping; Pei, Yue-Hu

    2009-01-01

    Two new steroidal saponins and two known flavonoid glycosides were isolated from the fruits of Tribulus terrestris. Their structures were assigned by spectroscopic analysis and chemical reaction as 26-O-beta-D-glucopyranosyl-(25R)-5 alpha-furostan-12-one-3beta,22 alpha,26-triol-3-O-beta-D-glucopyranosyl (1 --> 2)-beta-D-glucopyranosyl(1 --> 4)-beta-D-galactopyranoside (1), 26-O-beta-D-glucopyranosyl-(25S)-5 alpha-furostan-22-methoxy-2 alpha,3beta,26-triol-3-O-beta-D-glucopyranosyl(1 --> 2)-beta-D-glucopyranosyl(1 --> 4)-beta-D-galactopyranoside (2), kaempferol-3-gentiobioside (3), and isorhamnetin-3-gentiobioside (4).

  12. Saponins from Barringtonia acutangula.

    PubMed

    Pal, B C; Chaudhuri, T; Yoshikawa, K; Arihara, S

    1994-03-30

    Three monodesmosidic glucuronide saponins of barringtogenol C, named barringtosides A, B and C have been isolated as their methyl esters from the dried seeds of Barringtonia acutangula. On the basis of chemical and spectral evidence, the structures of these new saponins were elucidated to be as follows: barringtoside A, 3-O-beta-D-xylopyranosyl(1-->3)-[beta-D-galactopyranosyl(1-->2)]-beta-D- glucuronopyranosyl barringtogenol C; barringtoside B, 3-O-beta-D-xylopyranosyl(1-->3)-]beta-D-galactopyranosyl(1-->2)]-beta-D- glucuronopyranosyl-21-O-tigloyl-28-O-isobutyryl barringtogenol C; barringtoside C, 3-O-alpha-L-arabinopyranosyl(1-->3)-[beta-D-galactopyranosyl(1-->2 )]-beta-D - glucuronopyranosyl barringtogenol C. PMID:7764822

  13. Saponins from Fagonia glutinosa.

    PubMed

    Melek, F R; Miyase, T; el-Gindy, M R; Abdel-Khalik, S M; Ghaly, N S; el-Kady, M

    2000-10-01

    Twelve triterpenoid saponins, including six new, were isolated and identified from the aerial parts of Fagonia glutinosa. The new saponins were characterised as 3-O-[beta-D-glucopyranosyl(1-->2)][beta-D-glucopyranosyl(1-->3)]-alpha-L - arabinopyranosyl-27-hydroxy oleanolic acid 28-O-beta-D-glucopyranosyl ester, 3-O-[beta-D-glucopyranosyl(1-->3)]-alpha-L-arabinopyranosyl ursolic acid, 3-O-alpha-L-arabinopyranosyl ursolic acid 28-O-beta-D-glucopyranosyl ester, 3-O-[beta-D-xylopyranosyl(1-->2)][beta- D-glucopyranosyl(1-->3)]-alpha-L-arabinopyranosyl ursolic acid, 3-O-[beta-D-glucopyranosyl(1-->2)][beta-D- glucopyranosyl(1-->3)]-alpha-L-arabinopyranosyl ursolic acid 28-O-beta-D-glucopyranosyl ester and 3-O-[beta-D-glucopyranosyl(1-->2)][beta-D-glucopyranosyl(1-->3)]-alpha-L - arabinopyranosyl-27-hydroxy ursolic acid 28-O-beta-D-glucopyranosyl ester. The structures of the saponins were established by spectral and chemical evidences. The assignments of the NMR signals were performed by means of HOHAHA, 1H-1H COSY, ROE, HMQC and HMBC experiments. PMID:11082842

  14. Exploiting plant alkaloids.

    PubMed

    Schläger, Sabrina; Dräger, Birgit

    2016-02-01

    Alkaloid-containing plants have been used for medicine since ancient times. Modern pharmaceuticals still rely on alkaloid extraction from plants, some of which grow slowly, are difficult to cultivate and produce low alkaloid yields. Microbial cells as alternative alkaloid production systems are emerging. Before industrial application of genetically engineered bacteria and yeasts, several steps have to be taken. Original alkaloid-forming enzymes have to be elucidated from plants. Their activity in the heterologous host cells, however, may be low. The exchange of individual plant enzymes for alternative catalysts with better performance and optimal fermentation parameters appear promising. The overall aim is enhancement and stabilization of alkaloid yields from microbes in order to replace the tedious extraction of low alkaloid concentrations from intact plants.

  15. Exploiting plant alkaloids.

    PubMed

    Schläger, Sabrina; Dräger, Birgit

    2016-02-01

    Alkaloid-containing plants have been used for medicine since ancient times. Modern pharmaceuticals still rely on alkaloid extraction from plants, some of which grow slowly, are difficult to cultivate and produce low alkaloid yields. Microbial cells as alternative alkaloid production systems are emerging. Before industrial application of genetically engineered bacteria and yeasts, several steps have to be taken. Original alkaloid-forming enzymes have to be elucidated from plants. Their activity in the heterologous host cells, however, may be low. The exchange of individual plant enzymes for alternative catalysts with better performance and optimal fermentation parameters appear promising. The overall aim is enhancement and stabilization of alkaloid yields from microbes in order to replace the tedious extraction of low alkaloid concentrations from intact plants. PMID:26748036

  16. Saponins from Fagonia arabica.

    PubMed

    Miyase, T; Melek, F R; El-Gindi, O D; Abdel-Khalik, S M; El-Gindi, M R; Haggag, M Y; Hilal, S H

    1996-03-01

    Seven new triterpenoid saponins were isolated and identified from the aerial parts of Fagonia arabica. They were characterized as 3-O-beta-D-xylopyranosyl(1-->2)-[beta-D-glucopyranosyl(1-->3)]-alpha-L- arabinopyranosyl oleanolic acid 28-O-beta-D-glucopyranoside, 3-O-beta-D-glucopyranosyl(1-->2)-[beta-D-glucopyranosyl(1-->3)]-alpha-L- arabino pyranosyl oleanolic acid 28-O-beta-D-glucopyranoside, 3-O-beta-D-xylopyranosyl(1-->2)-[beta-D-glucopyranosyl (1-->3)]-alpha- L-arabinopyranosyl oleanolic acid, 3-O-beta-D-glucopyranosyl(1-->2)-[beta-D-glucopyranosyl(1-->3)]-alpha-L- arabino pyranosyl oleanolic acid, 3-O-beta-D-xylopyranosyl(1-->2)-[beta-D-glucopyranosyl (1-->3)]-alpha-L-arabinopyranosyl 27-hydroxyoleanolic acid, 28-O-beta-D-glucopyranoside, 3-O-beta-D-xylopyranosyl(1-->2)-[beta-D-glucopyranosyl(1-->3)]-alpha-L- arabinopyranosyl ursolic acid 28-O-beta-D-glucopyranoside and 3-O-beta-D-xylopyranosyl (1-->2)-[beta-D-glucopyranosyl (1-->3)-alpha-L-arabinopyranosyl 27-hydroxyursolic acid 28-O-beta-D-glucopyranoside. The structures of the saponins were established by analyses of their 1H and 13C NMR spectra with the aid of 2D experiments. The two genins, 27-hydroxyoleanolic acid and 27-ursolic acid, are new. PMID:8728716

  17. Bioactive saponin from tea seed pomace with inhibitory effects against Rhizoctonia solani.

    PubMed

    Kuo, Ping-Chung; Lin, Tsung-Chun; Yang, Cheng-Wei; Lin, Chih-Lung; Chen, Guo-Feng; Huang, Jenn-Wen

    2010-08-11

    The present study was aimed to characterize the antifungal principles in methanol extract of tea ( Camellia oleifera ) seed pomace. Totally, two flavonoids, camelliasides A (1) and B (2), and one saponin mixture composed of camelliasaponin B(1) (3) were identified from the methanol extract. These constituents were tested for their ability to reduce the infection of cabbage seedlings by Rhizoctonia solani Kuhn AG-4 and to inhibit growth of the pathogen on potato dextrose agar plates. The saponin mixture is a potential candidate as a new plant-derived pesticide to control Rhizoctonia damping-off of vegetable seedlings.

  18. Flavonoids from the Genus Astragalus: Phytochemistry and Biological Activity

    PubMed Central

    Bratkov, Viktor M.; Shkondrov, Aleksandar M.; Zdraveva, Petranka K.; Krasteva, Ilina N.

    2016-01-01

    Flavonoids, the most common plant polyphenols are widely distributed in every species and possess a broad range of pharmacological activities. The genus Astragalus is the largest in the Fabaceae family with more than 2,500 species spread. They are known to contain different metabolites such as flavonoids, saponins, and polysaccharides. Plants from the genus have been used in the traditional medicine of many countries for centuries. This paper is focused on the large group of flavonoid compounds. Details on structure as well as information about the pharmacological properties of flavonoids, isolated from Astragalus species have been discussed. This review is based on publications until the first half of 2014 and includes also the results from our phytochemical investigations of the genus. PMID:27041870

  19. Flavonoids from the Genus Astragalus: Phytochemistry and Biological Activity.

    PubMed

    Bratkov, Viktor M; Shkondrov, Aleksandar M; Zdraveva, Petranka K; Krasteva, Ilina N

    2016-01-01

    Flavonoids, the most common plant polyphenols are widely distributed in every species and possess a broad range of pharmacological activities. The genus Astragalus is the largest in the Fabaceae family with more than 2,500 species spread. They are known to contain different metabolites such as flavonoids, saponins, and polysaccharides. Plants from the genus have been used in the traditional medicine of many countries for centuries. This paper is focused on the large group of flavonoid compounds. Details on structure as well as information about the pharmacological properties of flavonoids, isolated from Astragalus species have been discussed. This review is based on publications until the first half of 2014 and includes also the results from our phytochemical investigations of the genus.

  20. Two Faces of Alkaloids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dostál, Jirí

    2000-08-01

    Alkaloids can occur in two forms, denoted as ammonium salts and free bases. These forms differ substantially in their properties and in some cases in their structures. The article discusses and compares the salts and free bases of six well-known alkaloids: nicotine, morphine, cocaine, sanguinarine, allocryptopine, and magnoflorine. Relevance for the biological and medical uses of these compounds is emphasized.

  1. The discovery of alkaloids.

    PubMed

    Hosztafi, S

    1997-07-01

    This paper presents the history of the discovery of the first alkaloids. Isolation of alkaloids is connected with the study of the active principles of medicines of plant origin, for example opium and cinchona bark. Sertürner described morphine as a plant alkali and claimed that it was capable of neutralizing free acids yielding salts. The recognition of alkaloids as a new class of compounds was an important step at that time because of the dogmatic denial of the possible existence of plant bases. Isolation of alkaloids is a significant event from the point of view of chemistry, physiology and medicine. The discovery caused essential conceptual changes in chemistry. Priority claims with reference to the discovery of the alkaloids are also reviewed.

  2. [Alkaloids of Annonaceae. XXIX. Alkaloids of Annona muricata].

    PubMed

    Leboeuf, M; Legueut, C; Cavé, A; Desconclois, J F; Forgacs, P; Jacquemin, H

    1981-05-01

    From leaves, root - and stem - barks of Annona muricata L., seven isoquinoline alkaloids have been isolated: reticuline (main alkaloid), coclaurine, coreximine, atherosperminine, stepharine. Anomurine and anomuricine, two minor alkaloids, are new tetrahydrobenzylisoquinolines, with 5, 6, 7 substituted ring A. The phytochemical significance of these alkaloids is discussed.

  3. Saponin profile of green asparagus genotypes.

    PubMed

    Vázquez-Castilla, Sara; Jaramillo-Carmona, Sara; Fuentes-Alventosa, Jose María; Jiménez-Araujo, Ana; Rodríguez-Arcos, Rocío; Cermeño-Sacristán, Pedro; Espejo-Calvo, Juan Antonio; Guillén-Bejarano, Rafael

    2013-11-20

    The main goal of this study was to determine the saponin profiles of different "triguero" asparagus genotypes and to compare them to green asparagus commercial hybrids. The samples consisted of 31 commercial hybrids and 58 genotypes from the Huétor-Tájar (HT) population variety ("triguero"). The saponin analysis by high-performance liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry allowed for the determination of 12 saponins derived from a furostan-type steroidal genin, 4 of which had never been described in the edible part of asparagus. The saponin profile of "triguero" asparagus was a combination of these new saponins and protodioscin. Although protodioscin was the major saponin found in commercial hybrids, some of these 12 saponins were detected as major components in some of the commercial hybrids. The total contents of saponins described in some of these HT genotypes reach values as high as 10-100 times higher than those found in commercial hybrids.

  4. Saponins from Furcraea selloa var. marginata.

    PubMed

    Simmons-Boyce, Joanne L; Tinto, Winston F; McLean, Stewart; Reynolds, William F

    2004-12-01

    Four steroidal saponins were isolated from the leaves of Furcraea selloa var. marginata. These included one furostanol saponin, furcreafurostatin (1), and three known spirostanol saponins, furcreastatin (3), yuccaloeside C (4) and cantalasaponin-1 (5). The 22-O-methyl ether (2) of furcreafurostatin (1) was also characterized. The structures were determined by using a combination of spectroscopic techniques.

  5. Saponins as cytotoxic agents: a review

    PubMed Central

    Galanty, Agnieszka; Sobolewska, Danuta

    2010-01-01

    Saponins are natural glycosides which possess a wide range of pharmacological properties including cytotoxic activity. In this review, the recent studies (2005–2009) concerning the cytotoxic activity of saponins have been summarized. The correlations between the structure and the cytotoxicity of both steroid and triterpenoid saponins have been described as well as the most common mechanisms of action. PMID:20835386

  6. Dimeric Cinchona alkaloids.

    PubMed

    Boratyński, Przemysław J

    2015-05-01

    Nature is full of dimeric alkaloids of various types from many plant families, some of them with interesting biological properties. However, dimeric Cinchona alkaloids were not isolated from any species but were products of designed partial chemical synthesis. Although the Cinchona bark is amongst the sources of oldest efficient medicines, the synthetic dimers found most use in the field of asymmetric synthesis. Prominent examples include the Sharpless dihydroxylation and aminohydroxylation ligands, and dimeric phase transfer catalysts. In this article the syntheses of Cinchona alkaloid dimers and oligomers are reviewed, and their structure and applications are outlined. Various synthetic routes exploit reactivity of the alkaloids at the central 9-hydroxyl group, quinuclidine, and quinoline rings, as well as 3-vinyl group. This availability of reactive sites, in combination with a plethora of linker molecules, contributes to the diversity of the products obtained.

  7. Occurrence of halogenated alkaloids.

    PubMed

    Gribble, Gordon W

    2012-01-01

    Once considered to be isolation artifacts or chemical "mistakes" of nature, the number of naturally occurring organohalogen compounds has grown from a dozen in 1954 to >5000 today. Of these, at least 25% are halogenated alkaloids. This is not surprising since nitrogen-containing pyrroles, indoles, carbolines, tryptamines, tyrosines, and tyramines are excellent platforms for biohalogenation, particularly in the marine environment where both chloride and bromide are plentiful for biooxidation and subsequent incorporation into these electron-rich substrates. This review presents the occurrence of all halogenated alkaloids, with the exception of marine bromotyrosines where coverage begins where it left off in volume 61 of The Alkaloids. Whereas the biological activity of these extraordinary compounds is briefly cited for some examples, a future volume of The Alkaloids will present full coverage of this topic and will also include selected syntheses of halogenated alkaloids. Natural organohalogens of all types, especially marine and terrestrial halogenated alkaloids, comprise a rapidly expanding class of natural products, in many cases expressing powerful biological activity. This enormous proliferation has several origins: (1) a revitalization of natural product research in a search for new drugs, (2) improved compound characterization methods (multidimensional NMR, high-resolution mass spectrometry), (3) specific enzyme-based and other biological assays, (4) sophisticated collection methods (SCUBA and remote submersibles for deep ocean marine collections), (5) new separation and purification techniques (HPLC and countercurrent separation), (6) a greater appreciation of traditional folk medicine and ethobotany, and (7) marine bacteria and fungi as novel sources of natural products. Halogenated alkaloids are truly omnipresent in the environment. Indeed, one compound, Q1 (234), is ubiquitous in the marine food web and is found in the Inuit from their diet of whale

  8. Marine Indole Alkaloids

    PubMed Central

    Netz, Natalie; Opatz, Till

    2015-01-01

    Marine indole alkaloids comprise a large and steadily growing group of secondary metabolites. Their diverse biological activities make many compounds of this class attractive starting points for pharmaceutical development. Several marine-derived indoles were found to possess cytotoxic, antineoplastic, antibacterial and antimicrobial activities, in addition to the action on human enzymes and receptors. The newly isolated indole alkaloids of marine origin since the last comprehensive review in 2003 are reported, and biological aspects will be discussed. PMID:26287214

  9. Sarpagine and related alkaloids

    PubMed Central

    Namjoshi, Ojas A.; Cook, James M.

    2016-01-01

    The sarpagine-related macroline and ajmaline alkaloids share a common biosynthetic origin, and bear important structural similarities, as expected. These indole alkaloids are widely dispersed in 25 plant genera, principally in the Apocynaceae family. Very diverse and interesting biological properties have been reported for this group of natural products. Isolation of new sarpagine-related alkaloids as well as the asymmetric synthesis of these structurally complex molecules are of paramount importance to the synthetic and medicinal chemists. A total of 115 newly isolated sarpagine-related macroline and ajmaline alkaloids, along with their physicochemical properties have been included in this chapter. A general and efficient strategy for the synthesis of these monomeric alkaloids, as well as bisindoles has been presented, which involves application of the asymmetric Pictet–Spengler reaction (>98% ee) as a key step because of the ease of scale up of the tetracyclic template. Also included in this chapter are the syntheses of the sarpagine-related alkaloids, published since the year 2000. PMID:26827883

  10. Sarpagine and Related Alkaloids.

    PubMed

    Namjoshi, Ojas A; Cook, James M

    2016-01-01

    The sarpagine-related macroline and ajmaline alkaloids share a common biosynthetic origin, and bear important structural similarities, as expected. These indole alkaloids are widely dispersed in 25 plant genera, principally in the family Apocynaceae. Very diverse and interesting biological properties have been reported for this group of natural products. Isolation of new sarpagine-related alkaloids and the asymmetric synthesis of these structurally complex molecules are of paramount importance to the synthetic and medicinal chemists. A total of 115 newly isolated sarpagine-related macroline and ajmaline alkaloids, along with their physicochemical properties have been included in this chapter. A general and efficient strategy for the synthesis of these monomeric alkaloids, as well as bisindoles, has been presented, which involves application of the asymmetric Pictet-Spengler reaction (>98% ee) as a key step because of the ease of scale up of the tetracyclic template. Also included in this chapter are the syntheses of the sarpagine-related alkaloids, published since 2000. PMID:26827883

  11. Biosynthesis of Fungal Indole Alkaloids

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Wei; Gavia, Diego J.; Tang, Yi

    2014-01-01

    This review provides a summary of recent research advances in elucidating the biosynthesis of fungal indole alkaloids. Different strategies used to incorporate and derivatize the indole/indoline moieties in various families of fungal indole alkaloids will be discussed, including tryptophan-containing nonribosomal peptides and polyketide-nonribosomal peptide hybrids; and alkaloids derived from other indole building blocks. This review also includes discussion regarding the downstream modifications that generate chemical and structural diversity among indole alkaloids. PMID:25180619

  12. Triterpenoid saponins from Fagonia indica.

    PubMed

    Shaker, K H; Bernhardt, M; Elgamal, M H; Seifert, K

    1999-08-01

    Two new triterpenoid saponins, 3-O-{[beta-D-glucopyranosyl-(1-->2)]-[alpha-L-arabinopyranosyl-(1- ->3)]- alpha-L-arabinopyranosyl}-ursolic acid-28-O-[beta-D-glucopyranosyl] ester (indicasaponin A), 3-O-{[beta-D-glucopyranosyl-(1-->2)]-[alpha-L-arabinopyranosyl-(1- ->3)]- alpha-L-arabinopyranosyl}-oleanolic acid-28-O-[beta-D-glucopyranosyl] ester (indicasaponin B) and two known triterpenoid saponins, 3-O-[beta-D-glucopyranosyl-(1-->3)-alpha-L-arabinopyranosyl]-ur solic acid-28-O-[beta-D-glucopyranosyl] ester, 3-O-[beta-D-glucopyranosyl-(1-->3)-alpha-L-arabinopyranosyl]-olean olic acid-28-O-[beta-D-glucopyranosyl] ester have been isolated from Fagonia indica. The structures were determined primarily by NMR spectroscopy. The assignment of NMR signals was performed by means of 1H-1H COSY, NOESY, ROESY, TOCSY, HMQC and HMBC experiments. PMID:10444859

  13. Further saponins from Fagonia cretica.

    PubMed

    Abdel-Khalik, S M; Miyase, T; Melek, F R; el-Ashaal, H A

    2001-03-01

    Three triterpenoid saponins including two new ones were isolated and identified from the aerial parts of Fagonia cretica. The new saponins were characterized as 3-O-[beta-D-xylopyranosyl(1-->2)alpha-L-arabinopyranosyl]27-hydroxyoleanolic acid 28-O-[beta-D-glucopyranosyl(1-->6)beta-D-glucopyranosyl]ester and 3 beta-O-[beta-D-xylopyranosyl(1-->2)alpha-L-arabinopyranosyl] olean-12-en-27-al-28-oic acid 28-O-[beta-D-glucopyranosyl(1-->6)beta-D-glycopyranosyl] ester. The structures were determined by spectral analyses. The NMR assignments were made by means of HOHAHA, 1H-1H COSY, HMQC, HMBC spectra and NOE studies. PMID:11265595

  14. Steroidal saponins from Tribulus terrestris.

    PubMed

    Kang, Li-Ping; Wu, Ke-Lei; Yu, He-Shui; Pang, Xu; Liu, Jie; Han, Li-Feng; Zhang, Jie; Zhao, Yang; Xiong, Cheng-Qi; Song, Xin-Bo; Liu, Chao; Cong, Yu-Wen; Ma, Bai-Ping

    2014-11-01

    Sixteen steroidal saponins, including seven previously unreported compounds, were isolated from Tribulus terrestris. The structures of the saponins were established using 1D and 2D NMR spectroscopy, mass spectrometry, and chemical methods. They were identified as: 26-O-β-d-glucopyranosyl-(25R)-furost-4-en-2α,3β,22α,26-tetrol-12-one (terrestrinin C), 26-O-β-d-glucopyranosyl-(25R)-furost-4-en-22α,26-diol-3,12-dione (terrestrinin D), 26-O-β-d-glucopyranosyl-(25S)-furost-4-en-22α,26-diol-3,6,12-trione (terrestrinin E), 26-O-β-d-glucopyranosyl-(25R)-5α-furostan-3β,22α,26-triol-12-one (terrestrinin F), 26-O-β-d-glucopyranosyl-(25R)-furost-4-en-12β,22α,26-triol-3-one (terrestrinin G), 26-O-β-d-glucopyranosyl-(1→6)-β-d-glucopyranosyl-(25R)-furost-4-en-22α,26-diol-3,12-dione (terrestrinin H), and 24-O-β-d-glucopyranosyl-(25S)-5α-spirostan-3β,24β-diol-12-one-3-O-β-d-glucopyranosyl-(1→4)-β-d-galactopyranoside (terrestrinin I). The isolated compounds were evaluated for their platelet aggregation activities. Three of the known saponins exhibited strong effects on the induction of platelet aggregation.

  15. Analysis of Ergot Alkaloids

    PubMed Central

    Crews, Colin

    2015-01-01

    The principles and application of established and newer methods for the quantitative and semi-quantitative determination of ergot alkaloids in food, feed, plant materials and animal tissues are reviewed. The techniques of sampling, extraction, clean-up, detection, quantification and validation are described. The major procedures for ergot alkaloid analysis comprise liquid chromatography with tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) and liquid chromatography with fluorescence detection (LC-FLD). Other methods based on immunoassays are under development and variations of these and minor techniques are available for specific purposes. PMID:26046699

  16. The Securinega alkaloids.

    PubMed

    Chirkin, Eqor; Atkatlian, William; Porée, François-Hugues

    2015-01-01

    Securinega alkaloids represent a family of plant secondary metabolites known for 50 years. Securinine (1), the most abundant and studied alkaloid of this series was isolated by Russian researchers in 1956. In the following years, French and Japanese scientists reported other Securinega compounds and extensive work was done to elucidate their intriguing structures. The homogeneity of this family relies mainly on its tetracyclic chemical backbone, which features a butenolide moiety (cycle D) and an azabicyclo[3.2.1]octane ring system (rings B and C). Interestingly, after a period of latency of 20 years, the Securinega topic reemerged as a prolific source of new natural structures and to date more than 50 compounds have been identified and characterized. The oligomeric subgroup gathering dimeric, trimeric, and tetrameric units is of particular interest. The unprecedented structure of the Securinega alkaloids was the subject of extensive synthetic efforts culminating in several efficient and elegant total syntheses. The botanical distribution of these alkaloids seems limited to the Securinega, Flueggea, Margaritaria, and Breynia genera (Phyllanthaceae). However, only a limited number of plant species have been considered for their alkaloid contents, and additional phytochemical as well as genetic studies are needed. Concerning the biosynthesis, experiments carried out with radiolabelled aminoacids allowed to identify lysine and tyrosine as the precursors of the piperidine ring A and the CD rings of securinine (1), respectively. Besides, plausible biosynthetic pathways were proposed for virosaine A (38) and B (39), flueggine A (46), and also the different oligomers flueggenine A-D (48-51), fluevirosinine A (56), and flueggedine (20). The case of nirurine (45) and secu'amamine (37) remains elusive and additional studies seem necessary to understand their mode of production. The scope of biological of activities of the Securinega alkaloids was mainly centered on the CNS

  17. The Securinega alkaloids.

    PubMed

    Chirkin, Eqor; Atkatlian, William; Porée, François-Hugues

    2015-01-01

    Securinega alkaloids represent a family of plant secondary metabolites known for 50 years. Securinine (1), the most abundant and studied alkaloid of this series was isolated by Russian researchers in 1956. In the following years, French and Japanese scientists reported other Securinega compounds and extensive work was done to elucidate their intriguing structures. The homogeneity of this family relies mainly on its tetracyclic chemical backbone, which features a butenolide moiety (cycle D) and an azabicyclo[3.2.1]octane ring system (rings B and C). Interestingly, after a period of latency of 20 years, the Securinega topic reemerged as a prolific source of new natural structures and to date more than 50 compounds have been identified and characterized. The oligomeric subgroup gathering dimeric, trimeric, and tetrameric units is of particular interest. The unprecedented structure of the Securinega alkaloids was the subject of extensive synthetic efforts culminating in several efficient and elegant total syntheses. The botanical distribution of these alkaloids seems limited to the Securinega, Flueggea, Margaritaria, and Breynia genera (Phyllanthaceae). However, only a limited number of plant species have been considered for their alkaloid contents, and additional phytochemical as well as genetic studies are needed. Concerning the biosynthesis, experiments carried out with radiolabelled aminoacids allowed to identify lysine and tyrosine as the precursors of the piperidine ring A and the CD rings of securinine (1), respectively. Besides, plausible biosynthetic pathways were proposed for virosaine A (38) and B (39), flueggine A (46), and also the different oligomers flueggenine A-D (48-51), fluevirosinine A (56), and flueggedine (20). The case of nirurine (45) and secu'amamine (37) remains elusive and additional studies seem necessary to understand their mode of production. The scope of biological of activities of the Securinega alkaloids was mainly centered on the CNS

  18. Simple Indolizidine and Quinolizidine Alkaloids.

    PubMed

    Michael, Joseph P

    2016-01-01

    This review of simple indolizidine and quinolizidine alkaloids (i.e., those in which the parent bicyclic systems are in general not embedded in polycyclic arrays) is an update of the previous coverage in Volume 55 of this series (2001). The present survey covers the literature from mid-1999 to the end of 2013; and in addition to aspects of the isolation, characterization, and biological activity of the alkaloids, much emphasis is placed on their total synthesis. A brief introduction to the topic is followed by an overview of relevant alkaloids from fungal and microbial sources, among them slaframine, cyclizidine, Steptomyces metabolites, and the pantocins. The important iminosugar alkaloids lentiginosine, steviamine, swainsonine, castanospermine, and related hydroxyindolizidines are dealt with in the subsequent section. The fourth and fifth sections cover metabolites from terrestrial plants. Pertinent plant alkaloids bearing alkyl, functionalized alkyl or alkenyl substituents include dendroprimine, anibamine, simple alkaloids belonging to the genera Prosopis, Elaeocarpus, Lycopodium, and Poranthera, and bicyclic alkaloids of the lupin family. Plant alkaloids bearing aryl or heteroaryl substituents include ipalbidine and analogs, secophenanthroindolizidine and secophenanthroquinolizidine alkaloids (among them septicine, julandine, and analogs), ficuseptine, lasubines, and other simple quinolizidines of the Lythraceae, the simple furyl-substituted Nuphar alkaloids, and a mixed quinolizidine-quinazoline alkaloid. The penultimate section of the review deals with the sizable group of simple indolizidine and quinolizidine alkaloids isolated from, or detected in, ants, mites, and terrestrial amphibians, and includes an overview of the "dietary hypothesis" for the origin of the amphibian metabolites. The final section surveys relevant alkaloids from marine sources, and includes clathryimines and analogs, stellettamides, the clavepictines and pictamine, and bis

  19. Simple Indolizidine and Quinolizidine Alkaloids.

    PubMed

    Michael, Joseph P

    2016-01-01

    This review of simple indolizidine and quinolizidine alkaloids (i.e., those in which the parent bicyclic systems are in general not embedded in polycyclic arrays) is an update of the previous coverage in Volume 55 of this series (2001). The present survey covers the literature from mid-1999 to the end of 2013; and in addition to aspects of the isolation, characterization, and biological activity of the alkaloids, much emphasis is placed on their total synthesis. A brief introduction to the topic is followed by an overview of relevant alkaloids from fungal and microbial sources, among them slaframine, cyclizidine, Steptomyces metabolites, and the pantocins. The important iminosugar alkaloids lentiginosine, steviamine, swainsonine, castanospermine, and related hydroxyindolizidines are dealt with in the subsequent section. The fourth and fifth sections cover metabolites from terrestrial plants. Pertinent plant alkaloids bearing alkyl, functionalized alkyl or alkenyl substituents include dendroprimine, anibamine, simple alkaloids belonging to the genera Prosopis, Elaeocarpus, Lycopodium, and Poranthera, and bicyclic alkaloids of the lupin family. Plant alkaloids bearing aryl or heteroaryl substituents include ipalbidine and analogs, secophenanthroindolizidine and secophenanthroquinolizidine alkaloids (among them septicine, julandine, and analogs), ficuseptine, lasubines, and other simple quinolizidines of the Lythraceae, the simple furyl-substituted Nuphar alkaloids, and a mixed quinolizidine-quinazoline alkaloid. The penultimate section of the review deals with the sizable group of simple indolizidine and quinolizidine alkaloids isolated from, or detected in, ants, mites, and terrestrial amphibians, and includes an overview of the "dietary hypothesis" for the origin of the amphibian metabolites. The final section surveys relevant alkaloids from marine sources, and includes clathryimines and analogs, stellettamides, the clavepictines and pictamine, and bis

  20. Direct and comprehensive analysis of ginsenosides and diterpene alkaloids in Shenfu injection by combinatory liquid chromatography-mass spectrometric techniques.

    PubMed

    Yang, Hua; Liu, Lei; Gao, Wen; Liu, Ke; Qi, Lian-Wen; Li, Ping

    2014-04-01

    Shenfu injection (SFI) is a widely used Chinese herbal formulation for cardiac diseases prepared from red ginseng and processed aconite root. Clinical observations and pharmacological effects on SFI have been well investigated. Chemical analysis and quality control studies of this formulation, however, are relatively limited, especially regarding toxic aconite alkaloids. In this work, a high-performance liquid chromatography coupled with quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry (HPLC-QTOF MS) method was applied to comprehensive analysis of constituents in SFI. Highly sensitive MS allows direct analysis of injections without additional sample pretreatment required. Using diagnostic ions and fragmentation rules, we identified 23 trace diterpene alkaloids, nineteen ginseng saponins, one panaxytriol, and one 5-hydroxymethylfurfural in SFI. A LC-MS method with selected ion monitoring was then used to quantify 24 major alkaloids and ginsenosides. The method was validated in terms of linearity, accuracy and precision. Especially, the limits of quantification were low to 0.4-18ng/mL for diterpene alkaloids. The total concentrations of saponins and alkaloids were about 676-742μg/mL and 3-7μg/mL in five batches of SFI samples, respectively. Finally, cosine ratio and euclidean distance were introduced to evaluate the batch-to-batch reproducibility of SFI samples, and the results demonstrated high quality consistency. Global identification and quantification of complex constituents based on LC-MS promises wide applications in quality control and batch monitoring for herbal products.

  1. Flavonoids in Sophora Species

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shirataki, Yoshiaki; Motohashi, Noboru

    Sophora species of Leguminosae are abundantly present in the natural kingdom. Today, among Sophora plants, the flavonoids of the plant phenols occupy a remarkable position. For a very long time flavonoids have been used as natural pigments and dyes. Some of the colorful anthocyanins of the glucosides are used for color and flavor in foodstuffs. Therefore, these flavonoids are beneficial to daily human life. Herein we concentrate on flavonoids in Sophora plants, and the relationship between their chemical structures and nutraceutical effect. For this purpose, soy-based infant formulas, osteoporosis, antitumor activity, antimicrobial activity, anti-HIV activity, radical generation and O2 - scavenging activity, and enzyme inhibitory activity have been described.

  2. Antifungal Activity of C-27 Steroidal Saponins

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Chong-Ren; Zhang, Ying; Jacob, Melissa R.; Khan, Shabana I.; Zhang, Ying-Jun; Li, Xing-Cong

    2006-01-01

    As part of our search for new antifungal agents from natural resources, 22 C-27 steroidal saponins and 6 steroidal sapogenins isolated from several monocotyledonous plants were tested for their antifungal activity against the opportunistic pathogens Candida albicans, Candida glabrata, Candida krusei, Cryptococcus neoformans, and Aspergillus fumigatus. The results showed that the antifungal activity of the steroidal saponins was associated with their aglycone moieties and the number and structure of monosaccharide units in their sugar chains. Within the 10 active saponins, four tigogenin saponins (compounds 1 to 4) with a sugar moiety of four or five monosaccharide units exhibited significant activity against C. neoformans and A. fumigatus, comparable to the positive control amphotericin B. The antifungal potency of these compounds was not associated with cytotoxicity to mammalian cells. This suggests that the C-27 steroidal saponins may be considered potential antifungal leads for further preclinical study. PMID:16641439

  3. Triterpenoid saponins from Dianthus versicolor.

    PubMed

    Ma, Li; Gu, Yu-Cheng; Luo, Jian-Guang; Wang, Jun-Song; Huang, Xue-Feng; Kong, Ling-Yi

    2009-04-01

    Seven new pentacyclic triterpenoid saponins, named dianversicosides A-G (1-7), together with nine known compounds, were isolated from the aerial parts of Dianthus versicolor. The structures of 1-7 were elucidated on the basis of spectroscopic data and chemical evidence. The absolute configuration of the 3-hydroxyl-3-methylglutaryl (HMG) group in 1-4 was ascertained by chemical analysis combined with a chiral HPLC method. Cytotoxic activities of the isolated compounds were evaluated against a small panel of cancer and other cell lines.

  4. Triterpenoid saponins from Fagonia cretica.

    PubMed

    Abdel Khalik, S M; Miyase, T; El-Ashaal, H A; Melek, F R

    2000-08-01

    Four new triterpenoid saponins were isolated and identified from the aerial parts of Fagonia cretica. They were characterized as 3-O-[beta-D-glucopyranosyl (1-->2)-alpha-L-arabinopyranosyl] hederagenin 28-O-beta-D-glucopyranosyl ester, 3-O-[beta-D-glucopyranosyl (1-->2)-alpha-L-arabinopyranosyl] oleanolic acid 28-O-[beta-D-glucopyranosyl (1-->6)-beta-D-glucopyranosyl] ester, 3-O-[beta-D-glucopyranosyl (1-->2)-alpha-L-arabinopyranosyl] 27-hydroxy oleanolic acid 28-O-[beta-D-glucopyranosyl (1-->6)-beta-D-glucopyranosyl] ester and 3beta-O-[beta-D-glucopyranosyl (1-->2)-alpha-L-arabinopyranosyl] olean-12-en-27-al-28-oic acid 28-O-[beta-D-glucopyranosyl (1-->6)-beta-D-glucopyranosyl] ester. The structures of the saponins were assigned by spectral analyses (FABMS, 1H, 13C NMR, 1H-1H COSY, TOCSY, HMQC and HMBC spectra) and NOE experiments. To the best of our knowledge the genin 3beta hydroxy olean-12-en-27-al-28-oic acid is new. PMID:11014278

  5. Glucosylation of steroidal saponins by cyclodextrin glucanotransferase.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yong-ze; Feng, Bing; Huang, Hong-zhi; Kang, Li-ping; Cong, Yue; Zhou, Wen-bin; Zou, Peng; Cong, Yu-wen; Song, Xin-Bo; Ma, Bai-ping

    2010-10-01

    It is known that the sugar chains of steroidal saponins play an important role in the biological and pharmacological activities. In order to synthesize steroidal saponins with novel sugar chains in one step for further studies on pharmacological activity, we here describe the glucosylation of steroidal saponins, and 5 compounds, timosaponin AIII (1), saponin Ta (2), saponin Tb (3), trillin (4) and cantalasaponin I (5), were converted into their glucosylated products by Toruzyme 3.0 L, a cyclodextrin glucanotransferase (CGTase). 12 glucosylated products were isolated and their structures elucidated on the basis of spectral data; they were all characterized as new compounds. The results showed that Toruzyme 3.0 L had the specific ability to add the α-D-glucopyranosyl group to the glucosyl group linked at the sugar chains of steroidal saponins, and the glucosyl group was the only acceptor. This is the first report of steroidal saponins with different degrees of glucosylation. The substrates and their glucosylated derivatives were evaluated for their cytotoxicity against HL-60 human promyelocytic leukemia cell by MTT assay. The substrates all exhibited high cytotoxicity (IC(50) < 10 µmol/L), excluding compound 5 (IC(50) > 150 µmol/L), and the cytotoxicity of most of the products showed no obvious changes compared with those of their substrates.

  6. Quinolizidine alkaloids from Lupinus lanatus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neto, Alexandre T.; Oliveira, Carolina Q.; Ilha, Vinicius; Pedroso, Marcelo; Burrow, Robert A.; Dalcol, Ionara I.; Morel, Ademir F.

    2011-10-01

    In this study, one new quinolizidine alkaloid, lanatine A ( 1), together with three other known alkaloids, 13-α- trans-cinnamoyloxylupanine ( 2), 13-α-hydroxylupanine ( 3), and (-)-multiflorine ( 4) were isolated from the aerial parts of Lupinus lanatus (Fabaceae). The structures of alkaloids 1- 4 were elucidated by spectroscopic data analysis. The stereochemistry of 1 was determined by single crystal X-ray analysis. Bayesian statistical analysis of the Bijvoet differences suggests the absolute stereochemistry of 1. In addition, the antimicrobial potential of alkaloids 1- 4 is also reported.

  7. Flavonoids: prospective drug candidates.

    PubMed

    Cazarolli, Luisa Helena; Zanatta, Leila; Alberton, Elga Heloisa; Figueiredo, Maria Santos Reis Bonorino; Folador, Poliane; Damazio, Rosangela Guollo; Pizzolatti, Moacir Geraldo; Silva, Fátima Regina Mena Barreto

    2008-11-01

    The purpose of this review is to discuss the recent developments related to the chemistry and medicinal properties of flavonoids. Major flavonoids that show well categorized structures and well defined structure function-relationships are: flavans, flavanones, flavones, flavanonols, flavonols, catechins, anthocyanidins and isoflavone. The biological properties of flavonoids include antioxidant, anti-inflamatory, antitumoral, antiviral and antibacterial, as well as a direct cytoprotective effect on coronary and vascular systems, the pancreas and the liver. These characteristics place them among the most attractive natural substances available to enrich the current therapy options.

  8. The Veratrum and Solanum alkaloids.

    PubMed

    Heretsch, Philipp; Giannis, Athanassios

    2015-01-01

    This survey on steroidal alkaloids of the Veratrum and Solanum family isolated between 1974 and 2014 includes 187 compounds and 197 references. New developments in the chemistry and biology of this family of natural products with a special focus on the medicinal relevance of the jervanine alkaloid cyclopamine are discussed. PMID:25845062

  9. Triterpenoid saponins from the roots of Clematis argentilucida.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Mei; Ma, Ning; Qiu, Feng; Tian, Xiangrong; Zhang, Yan; Tang, Haifeng; Liu, Xinyou

    2014-09-01

    Reinvestigation of the n-BuOH extract of the roots of Clematis argentilucida led to the isolation of a new ursane-type triterpenoid saponin 1 and a new taraxerane-type saponin 2, four known saponins 3-6 first isolated from the species, together with seven saponins 7-13 reported in the previous papers. The structures of saponins 1-6 were elucidated by extensive spectroscopic analysis and chemical evidences. The ursane-type and taraxerane-type triterpenoid saponins were obtained from genus Clematis for the first time, and the aglycone of saponin 1, 3β,28-dihydroxy-18αH-ursan-20-en was first encountered. The cytotoxicity of all the saponins was evaluated against human glioblastoma U251MG cell lines. The monodesmosidic saponins 1, 2 and 4-8 exhibited cytotoxic activity against the cells with IC50 values ranging from 6.95 to 38.51 μM.

  10. Automatic alkaloid removal system.

    PubMed

    Yahaya, Muhammad Rizuwan; Hj Razali, Mohd Hudzari; Abu Bakar, Che Abdullah; Ismail, Wan Ishak Wan; Muda, Wan Musa Wan; Mat, Nashriyah; Zakaria, Abd

    2014-01-01

    This alkaloid automated removal machine was developed at Instrumentation Laboratory, Universiti Sultan Zainal Abidin Malaysia that purposely for removing the alkaloid toxicity from Dioscorea hispida (DH) tuber. It is a poisonous plant where scientific study has shown that its tubers contain toxic alkaloid constituents, dioscorine. The tubers can only be consumed after it poisonous is removed. In this experiment, the tubers are needed to blend as powder form before inserting into machine basket. The user is need to push the START button on machine controller for switching the water pump ON by then creating turbulence wave of water in machine tank. The water will stop automatically by triggering the outlet solenoid valve. The powders of tubers are washed for 10 minutes while 1 liter of contaminated water due toxin mixture is flowing out. At this time, the controller will automatically triggered inlet solenoid valve and the new water will flow in machine tank until achieve the desire level that which determined by ultra sonic sensor. This process will repeated for 7 h and the positive result is achieved and shows it significant according to the several parameters of biological character ofpH, temperature, dissolve oxygen, turbidity, conductivity and fish survival rate or time. From that parameter, it also shows the positive result which is near or same with control water and assuming was made that the toxin is fully removed when the pH of DH powder is near with control water. For control water, the pH is about 5.3 while water from this experiment process is 6.0 and before run the machine the pH of contaminated water is about 3.8 which are too acid. This automated machine can save time for removing toxicity from DH compared with a traditional method while less observation of the user. PMID:24783795

  11. Alkaloids from Galanthus nivalis.

    PubMed

    Berkov, Strahil; Codina, Carles; Viladomat, Francesc; Bastida, Jaume

    2007-07-01

    Phytochemical studies on Galanthus nivalis of Bulgarian origin resulted in the isolation of five compounds: 11-O-(3'-hydroxybutanoyl)hamayne, 3,11-O-(3',3''-dihydroxybutanoyl)hamayne, 3-O-(2''-butenoyl)-11-O-(3'-hydroxybutanoyl)hamayne, 3,11,3''-O-(3',3'',3'''-trihydroxybutanoyl)hamayne, and 2-O-(3'-acetoxybutanoyl)lycorine, together with five known alkaloids: ungeremine, lycorine, tazettine, hamayne, and ismine. Their structures were determined by (1)H and (13)C NMR spectroscopy and two-dimensional (1)H-(1)H and (1)H-(13)C chemical shift correlation experiments.

  12. Saponin determination, expression analysis and functional characterization of saponin biosynthetic genes in Chenopodium quinoa leaves.

    PubMed

    Fiallos-Jurado, Jennifer; Pollier, Jacob; Moses, Tessa; Arendt, Philipp; Barriga-Medina, Noelia; Morillo, Eduardo; Arahana, Venancio; de Lourdes Torres, Maria; Goossens, Alain; Leon-Reyes, Antonio

    2016-09-01

    Quinoa (Chenopodium quinoa Willd.) is a highly nutritious pseudocereal with an outstanding protein, vitamin, mineral and nutraceutical content. The leaves, flowers and seed coat of quinoa contain triterpenoid saponins, which impart bitterness to the grain and make them unpalatable without postharvest removal of the saponins. In this study, we quantified saponin content in quinoa leaves from Ecuadorian sweet and bitter genotypes and assessed the expression of saponin biosynthetic genes in leaf samples elicited with methyl jasmonate. We found saponin accumulation in leaves after MeJA treatment in both ecotypes tested. As no reference genes were available to perform qPCR in quinoa, we mined publicly available RNA-Seq data for orthologs of 22 genes known to be stably expressed in Arabidopsis thaliana using geNorm, NormFinder and BestKeeper algorithms. The quinoa ortholog of At2g28390 (Monensin Sensitivity 1, MON1) was stably expressed and chosen as a suitable reference gene for qPCR analysis. Candidate saponin biosynthesis genes were screened in the quinoa RNA-Seq data and subsequent functional characterization in yeast led to the identification of CqbAS1, CqCYP716A78 and CqCYP716A79. These genes were found to be induced by MeJA, suggesting this phytohormone might also modulate saponin biosynthesis in quinoa leaves. Knowledge of the saponin biosynthesis and its regulation in quinoa may aid the further development of sweet cultivars that do not require postharvest processing.

  13. Saponin determination, expression analysis and functional characterization of saponin biosynthetic genes in Chenopodium quinoa leaves.

    PubMed

    Fiallos-Jurado, Jennifer; Pollier, Jacob; Moses, Tessa; Arendt, Philipp; Barriga-Medina, Noelia; Morillo, Eduardo; Arahana, Venancio; de Lourdes Torres, Maria; Goossens, Alain; Leon-Reyes, Antonio

    2016-09-01

    Quinoa (Chenopodium quinoa Willd.) is a highly nutritious pseudocereal with an outstanding protein, vitamin, mineral and nutraceutical content. The leaves, flowers and seed coat of quinoa contain triterpenoid saponins, which impart bitterness to the grain and make them unpalatable without postharvest removal of the saponins. In this study, we quantified saponin content in quinoa leaves from Ecuadorian sweet and bitter genotypes and assessed the expression of saponin biosynthetic genes in leaf samples elicited with methyl jasmonate. We found saponin accumulation in leaves after MeJA treatment in both ecotypes tested. As no reference genes were available to perform qPCR in quinoa, we mined publicly available RNA-Seq data for orthologs of 22 genes known to be stably expressed in Arabidopsis thaliana using geNorm, NormFinder and BestKeeper algorithms. The quinoa ortholog of At2g28390 (Monensin Sensitivity 1, MON1) was stably expressed and chosen as a suitable reference gene for qPCR analysis. Candidate saponin biosynthesis genes were screened in the quinoa RNA-Seq data and subsequent functional characterization in yeast led to the identification of CqbAS1, CqCYP716A78 and CqCYP716A79. These genes were found to be induced by MeJA, suggesting this phytohormone might also modulate saponin biosynthesis in quinoa leaves. Knowledge of the saponin biosynthesis and its regulation in quinoa may aid the further development of sweet cultivars that do not require postharvest processing. PMID:27457995

  14. Metabolite fingerprinting of Camptotheca acuminata and the HPLC-ESI-MS/MS analysis of camptothecin and related alkaloids.

    PubMed

    Montoro, Paola; Maldini, Mariateresa; Piacente, Sonia; Macchia, Mario; Pizza, Cosimo

    2010-01-20

    The major phytochemical constituents, namely, alkaloids, flavonoids and ellagic acid derivatives, of leaves of Camptotheca acuminata were identified using high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) coupled with electrospray mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) in extracts of plants cultivated in Italy and collected at different growth stages. Alkaloids related to camptothecin were identified and quantified by HPLC coupled with ESI-tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) employing, respectively, an ion trap and a triple quadrupole mass analyser. The fragmentation patterns of alkaloids related to camptothecin were analysed and a specific Multiple Reaction Monitoring HPLC-MS/MS method was developed for the quantitative determination of these constituents. The described method provides high sensitivity and specificity for the characterisation and quantitative determination of the alkaloids in C. acuminata.

  15. Flavonoids in foods: a review.

    PubMed

    Terahara, Norihiko

    2015-03-01

    The flavonoids in edible plants and foods are surveyed. The food materials rich in flavonoids, such as grape, tea, and cocoa receive particular attention. Also, the ingestion of flavonoids, the absorption and the bioavailability in vivo are discussed. Flavonoids have antioxidant and other living-body modulating activities. When expressing these functionalities, interactions between flavonoids and proteins are important. The interactions with various enzymes and receptors are described. Moreover, as an example of a processed food containing flavonoids, fermented red vinegar that we have investigated is highlighted. The structural determination, antioxidant activity and the generation mechanism of the new acylated polyphenols in red vinegar are described. PMID:25924542

  16. Neuroprotection by flavonoids.

    PubMed

    Dajas, F; Rivera-Megret, F; Blasina, F; Arredondo, F; Abin-Carriquiry, J A; Costa, G; Echeverry, C; Lafon, L; Heizen, H; Ferreira, M; Morquio, A

    2003-12-01

    The high morbidity, high socioeconomic costs and lack of specific treatments are key factors that define the relevance of brain pathology for human health and the importance of research on neuronal protective agents. Epidemiological studies have shown beneficial effects of flavonoids on arteriosclerosis-related pathology in general and neurodegeneration in particular. Flavonoids can protect the brain by their ability to modulate intracellular signals promoting cellular survival. Quercetin and structurally related flavonoids (myricetin, fisetin, luteolin) showed a marked cytoprotective capacity in in vitro experimental conditions in models of predominantly apoptotic death such as that induced by medium concentrations (200 M) of H2O2 added to PC12 cells in culture. Nevertheless, quercetin did not protect substantia nigra neurons in vivo from an oxidative insult (6-hydroxydopamine), probably due to difficulties in crossing the blood-brain barrier. On the other hand, treatment of permanent focal ischemia with a lecithin/quercetin preparation decreased lesion volume, showing that preparations that help to cross the blood-brain barrier may be critical for the expression of the effects of flavonoids on the brain. The hypothesis is advanced that a group of quercetin-related flavonoids could become lead molecules for the development of neuroprotective compounds with multitarget anti-ischemic effects.

  17. Steroidal saponins from Tribulus terrestris.

    PubMed

    Su, Lan; Chen, Gang; Feng, Sheng-Guang; Wang, Wei; Li, Zhi-Feng; Chen, Huan; Liu, Ying-Xue; Pei, Yue-Hu

    2009-01-01

    Five new steroidal saponins were isolated from the fruits of Tribulus terrestris. Their structures were fully established by spectroscopic and chemical analysis as (23S,25S)-5alpha-spirostane-24-one-3beta,23-diol-3-O-{alpha-l-rhamnopyranosyl-(1-->2)-O-[beta-d-glucopyranosyl-(1-->4)]-beta-d-galactopyranoside} (1), (24S,25S)-5alpha-spirostane-3beta,24-diol-3-O-{alpha-l-rhamnopyranosyl-(1-->2)-O-[beta-d-glucopyranosyl-(1-->4)]-beta-d-galactopyranoside} (2), 26-O-beta-d-glucopyranosyl-(25R)-5alpha-furostan-2alpha,3beta,22alpha,26-tetraol-3-O-{beta-d-glucopyranosyl-(1-->2)-O-beta-d-glucopyranosyl-(1-->4)-beta-d-galactopyranoside} (3), 26-O-beta-d-glucopyranosyl-(25R)-5alpha-furostan-20(22)-en-2alpha,3beta,26-triol-3-O-{beta-d-glucopyranosyl-(1-->2)-O-beta-d-glucopyranosyl-(1-->4)-beta-d-galactopyranoside} (4), and 26-O-beta-d-glucopyranosyl-(25S)-5alpha-furostan-12-one-22-methoxy-3beta,26-diol-3-O-{alpha-l-rhamnopyranosyl-(1-->2)-O-[beta-d-glucopyranosyl-(1-->4)]-beta-d-galactopyranoside} (5). The isolated compounds were evaluated for cytostatic activity against HL-60 cells.

  18. Steroidal saponins from Dioscorea preussii.

    PubMed

    Tabopda, Turibio Kuiate; Mitaine-Offer, Anne-Claire; Tanaka, Chiaki; Miyamoto, Tomofumi; Mirjolet, Jean-François; Duchamp, Olivier; Ngadjui, Bonaventure Tchaleu; Lacaille-Dubois, Marie-Aleth

    2014-09-01

    Three new steroidal saponins, named diospreussinosides A-C (1-3), along with two known ones (4, 5) were isolated from rhizomes of Dioscorea preussii. Their structures were elucidated mainly by 1D and 2D NMR spectroscopic analysis and mass spectrometry as (25S)-17α,25-dihydroxyspirost-5-en-3β-yl-O-α-L-rhamnopyranosyl-(1→4)-α-L-rhamnopyranosyl-(1→4)-β-D-glucopyranoside (1), (25S)-17α,25-dihydroxyspirost-5-en-3β-yl-O-α-L-rhamnopyranosyl-(1→4)-α-L-rhamnopyranosyl-(1→4)-[α-L-rhamnopyranosyl-(1→2)]-β-D-glucopyranoside (2), and (24S,25R)-17α,24,25-trihydroxyspirost-5-en-3β-yl-O-α-L-rhamnopyranosyl-(1→4)-α-L-rhamnopyranosyl-(1→4)-[α-L-rhamnopyranosyl-(1→2)]-β-D-glucopyranoside (3). The spirostane-type skeleton of compound 3 possessing an unusual dihydroxylation pattern on the F-ring is reported for the first time. Cytotoxicity of compounds 2-5 was evaluated against two human colon carcinoma cell lines (HT-29 and HCT 116).

  19. Purine alkaloids in Paullinia.

    PubMed

    Weckerle, Caroline S; Stutz, Michael A; Baumann, Thomas W

    2003-10-01

    Among the few purine alkaloid-containing genera consumed as stimulants, Paullinia is the least investigated with respect to both chemotaxonomy and within-the-plant allocation of caffeine and its allies. Since purine alkaloids (PuA) have been proved to be valuable marker compounds in chemotaxonomy, 34 species of Paullinia and related genera were screened for them, but only one, P. pachycarpa, was positive in addition to the already known P. cupana and P. yoco. The PuA allocation in P. pachycarpa was examined and found to be restricted to theobromine in the stem, leaves and flowers. Moreover, the theobromine concentration in the stem cortex increased significantly towards the base of the plant. Since the stem cortex of P. yoco is traditionally used by the natives of Colombia and Ecuador to prepare a caffeine-rich beverage, we suspected that within the genus Paullinia the PuA are preferentially allocated to the older parts of the stem and not to young shoots like e.g., in the coffee plant (Coffea spp.). Indeed, the axis (greenhouse) of P. cupana (guaraná), known for its caffeine-rich seeds, exhibited a basipetal PuA gradient (0.005-0.145%). Moreover, the analysis of young cortex samples (herbarium) and of one piece of old stem (museum collection) revealed the same for P. yoco, even though we found much less (0.5 vs 2.5%) caffeine in the old cortex as compared to the only two analyses in 1926 of similar material. However, this discrepancy may be explained by the high variability of the PuA pattern we detected among yoco, the diversity of which the Indians take advantage.

  20. A new steroidal saponin from the leaves of Agave americana.

    PubMed

    Yokosuka, A; Mimaki, Y; Kuroda, M; Sashida, Y

    2000-05-01

    A new bisdesmosidic spirostanol saponin, along with three known saponins, were isolated from Agave americana (Agavaceae). The structure of the new saponin was elucidated as (25R)-3 beta,6 alpha-dihydroxy-5 alpha-spirostan-12-one 3,6-di-O-beta-D-glucopyranoside. Among the isolated saponins, hecogenin tetraglycoside showed cytotoxic activity against HL-60 human promyelocytic leukemia cells with an IC50 value of 4.3 micrograms/mL.

  1. Antifungal and molluscicidal saponins from Serjania salzmanniana.

    PubMed

    Ekabo, O A; Farnsworth, N R; Henderson, T O; Mao, G; Mukherjee, R

    1996-04-01

    An investigation of Serjania salzmanniana for biologically active substances has led to the isolation of two novel saponins, salzmannianoside A (3-O-[[beta-D- glucopyranosyl-(1-->4)]-[alpha-L-rhamnopyranosyl-(1-->2)]-alpha-L- arabinopyranosyl] gypsogenin) [3] and salzmannianoside B (3-O-[[beta-D-glucopyranosyl-(1-->4)]-[alpha-L- arabinopyranosyl-(1-->3)-alpha-L-rhamnopyranosyl-(1-->2)] -alpha-L-arabinopyranosyl] hederagenin) (4). Two known saponins, pulsatilla saponin D (3-O-[[beta-D- glucopyranosyl-(1-->4)]-[alpha-L-rhamnopyranosyl-(1-->2)]-alpha-L- arabinopyranosyl] hederagenin) (1) and 3-O-[[beta-D-glucopyranosyl-(1-->4)]-[alpha-L-rhamnopyranosyl-(1-->2)]-a lpha-L- arabinopyranosyl] oleanolic acid (2) were also isolated from this plant. The structures of 3 and 4 were elucidated by FABMS and 2D NMR techniques. All these four saponins were mollusicidal, causing 70-100% mortality at 10 ppm against Biomphalaria alexandrina, a vector of Schistosoma mansoni in the Nile Valley. The saponins also showed antifungal activity against Cryptococcus neoformans and Candida albicans at minimal inhibitory concentrations of 8 and 16 micrograms/mL, respectively.

  2. Biosynthetic Pathways of Ergot Alkaloids

    PubMed Central

    Gerhards, Nina; Neubauer, Lisa; Tudzynski, Paul; Li, Shu-Ming

    2014-01-01

    Ergot alkaloids are nitrogen-containing natural products belonging to indole alkaloids. The best known producers are fungi of the phylum Ascomycota, e.g., Claviceps, Epichloë, Penicillium and Aspergillus species. According to their structures, ergot alkaloids can be divided into three groups: clavines, lysergic acid amides and peptides (ergopeptines). All of them share the first biosynthetic steps, which lead to the formation of the tetracyclic ergoline ring system (except the simplest, tricyclic compound: chanoclavine). Different modifications on the ergoline ring by specific enzymes result in an abundance of bioactive natural products, which are used as pharmaceutical drugs or precursors thereof. From the 1950s through to recent years, most of the biosynthetic pathways have been elucidated. Gene clusters from several ergot alkaloid producers have been identified by genome mining and the functions of many of those genes have been demonstrated by knock-out experiments or biochemical investigations of the overproduced enzymes. PMID:25513893

  3. Vascular effects of flavonoids.

    PubMed

    Almeida Rezende, Bruno; Pereira, Aline Carvalho; Cortes, Steyner F; Lemos, Virginia Soares

    2016-01-01

    Flavonoids are natural plant-derived polyphenolic compounds with various biological properties particularly in the cardiovascular system, including antiatherogenic, antioxidant, vasodilation, antihypertensive, and antiplatelet activities. These biological properties have been evaluated in several experimental and clinical studies. In addition, extensive reviews have discussed the antiatherogenic effect of these polyphenols. However, limited studies have investigated the potential therapeutic vascular effects of these compounds. This review brings together some recent studies, to establish the different signaling pathways involved in the molecular mechanisms that underlie the vasodilation induced by flavonoids.

  4. Saponins of Agave: Chemistry and bioactivity.

    PubMed

    Sidana, Jasmeen; Singh, Bikram; Sharma, Om P

    2016-10-01

    The genus Agave comprises more than 400 species with geographical presence in the tropical and sub-tropical regions of the world. These plants have a rich history of folkloric use and are known for a wide spectrum of applications. Secondary metabolites of diverse chemical classes have been reported from Agave species. Owing to their pharmacological significance, the steroidal saponins of Agave have caught the attention of phytochemists, biologists and drug discovery scientists. The present review describes 141 steroidal saponins and sapogenins and covers the literature published from 1970 to 2015. It is a comprehensive and coherent presentation of the structures, methods of chemical profiling, structure elucidation and biological activities of the saponins and sapogenins reported from Agave. The article provides a perspective of the research on steroidal compounds of Agave. PMID:27374482

  5. Saponins of Agave: Chemistry and bioactivity.

    PubMed

    Sidana, Jasmeen; Singh, Bikram; Sharma, Om P

    2016-10-01

    The genus Agave comprises more than 400 species with geographical presence in the tropical and sub-tropical regions of the world. These plants have a rich history of folkloric use and are known for a wide spectrum of applications. Secondary metabolites of diverse chemical classes have been reported from Agave species. Owing to their pharmacological significance, the steroidal saponins of Agave have caught the attention of phytochemists, biologists and drug discovery scientists. The present review describes 141 steroidal saponins and sapogenins and covers the literature published from 1970 to 2015. It is a comprehensive and coherent presentation of the structures, methods of chemical profiling, structure elucidation and biological activities of the saponins and sapogenins reported from Agave. The article provides a perspective of the research on steroidal compounds of Agave.

  6. Cytotoxic steroidal saponins from Agave sisalana.

    PubMed

    Chen, Pi-Yu; Chen, Chin-Hui; Kuo, Ching-Chuan; Lee, Tzong-Huei; Kuo, Yueh-Hsiung; Lee, Ching-Kuo

    2011-06-01

    Two new steroidal saponins, 8 and 10, along with 7 known steroidal sapogenins and saponins (1-7) and a furostanol saponin (9) were isolated from Agave sisalana Perrine ex Engelm. The structures of these two new compounds were identified and characterized by 1D and 2D NMR spectroscopy and mass spectrometry. In addition, acid hydrolysis and GC-FID were used to confirm the sugar moieties of 8 and 10. The cytotoxic effects of 1-10 on MCF-7, NCI-H460, and SF-268 cancer cells were evaluated, and among them, compound 10 proved to be the most cytotoxic with IC₅₀ values of 1.2, 3.8, and 1.5 µM, respectively.

  7. Isolation of focal contact membrane using saponin.

    PubMed

    Neyfakh, A A; Svitkina, T M

    1983-12-01

    The fragments of lower cell surface remained attached to the substrate after incubation of mouse or chick fibroblasts in 0.2% saponin solution and subsequent removal of cells under the action of shearing force. These fragments corresponded exactly to the cellular focal contacts seen by interference reflection microscopy. Ultrastructurally they were membrane fragments with typical three-layered structure. No cytoskeletal components were found in saponin-isolated focal contact membranes either by immunofluorescence or electron microscopy. Only one major cell-derived protein with an apparent molecular weight (MW) of 51 kD (chick embryo fibroblasts) or 47 kD (mouse embryo fibroblasts) remained on the substrate after saponin treatment and removal of cells.

  8. Steroidal saponins from Chlorophytum deistelianum.

    PubMed

    Tabopda, Turibio Kuiate; Mitaine-Offer, Anne-Claire; Paululat, Thomas; Delemasure, Stéphanie; Dutartre, Patrick; Ngadjui, Bonaventure Tchaleu; Lacaille-Dubois, Marie-Aleth

    2016-06-01

    Phytochemical investigation of the aerial parts of Chlorophytum deistelianum led to the isolation of four previously undescribed steroidal saponins called chlorodeistelianosides A-D with five known ones. Their structures were established mainly by extensive 1D and 2D NMR spectroscopic techniques and mass spectrometry as (25R)-3β-[(β-D-glucopyranosyl-(1→3)-[α-L-rhamnopyranosyl-(1→4)]-β-D-xylopyranosyl-(1→3)-[β-D-glucopyranosyl-(1→2)]-β-D-glucopyranosyl-(1→4)-β-D-galactopyranosyl)oxy]-5α-spirostan-12-one, (24S,25S)-24-[(β-D-glucopyranosyl)oxy]-3β-[(β-d-glucopyranosyl-(1→2)-[β-D-xylopyranosyl-(1→3)]-β-D-glucopyranosyl-(1→4)-β-D-galactopyranosyl)oxy]-5α-spirostan-12-one, (25R)-26-[(β-D-glucopyranosyl)oxy]-2α-hydroxy-22α-methoxy-5α-furostan-3β-yl β-D-glucopyranosyl-(1→2)-[β-D-xylopyranosyl-(1→3)]-β-D-glucopyranosyl-(1→4)-β-D-galactopyranoside, and (25R)-26-[(β-D-glucopyranosyl)oxy]-3β-[(β-D-glucopyranosyl-(1→2)-[β-D-xylopyranosyl-(1→3)]-β-D-glucopyranosyl-(1→4)-β-D-galactopyranosyl)oxy]-5α-furost-20(22)-en-12-one. Cytotoxicity of most compounds was evaluated against one human cancer cell line (SW480) and one rat cardiomyoblast cell line (H9c2). Among them, three known spirostane-type glycosides exhibited cytotoxicity on both cell lines with IC50 ranging from 8 to 10 μM. PMID:27012932

  9. A new steroidal saponin from Agave attenuata.

    PubMed

    Mendes, Tatiana Paz; Silva, Graziela de Medeiros; da Silva, Bernadete Pereira; Parente, José Paz

    2004-04-01

    A new steroidal saponin was isolated from the leaves of Agave attenuata. Its structure was established as (3beta,beta,25S)-spirostan-3-yl O-beta-D-glucopyranosyl-(1 --> 2)-beta-D-glucopyranosyl-(1 --> 2)-O-[beta-D-glucopyranosyl-(1 --> 3)]-beta-D-glucopyranosyl-(1 --> 4)-beta-D-galactopyranoside. The structural identification was performed using detailed analyses of 1H- and 13C-NMR spectra including 2D NMR spectroscopic techniques (COSY, HETCOR, and COLOC) and chemical conversions. The hemolytic activity of the steroidal saponin was evaluated using an in vitro assay.

  10. A new steroidal saponin from Agave shrevei.

    PubMed

    Pereira Da Silva, Bernadete; Valente, Ana Paula; Paz Parente, José

    2006-04-01

    A new steroidal saponin was isolated from the leaves of Agave shrevei. Its structure was established as 3-[O-beta-D-glucopyranosyl-(1-->2)-O-[O-beta-D-glucopyranosyl-(1-->4)-O-[O-beta-D-glucopyranosyl-(1-->6)]-O-beta-D-glucopyranosyl-(1-->4)-beta-D-galactopyranosyl)-oxy]-(3beta,5alpha,25R)-spirostane. The structural identification was performed using detailed analyses of 1H- and 13C-NMR spectra including 2D NMR spectroscopic techniques (COSY, HETCOR, HMBC, and HMQC) and chemical conversions. The haemolytic activity of the steroidal saponin was evaluated using an in vitro assay.

  11. Catalase is inhibited by flavonoids.

    PubMed

    Krych, Justyna; Gebicka, Lidia

    2013-07-01

    Catalases, heme enzymes, which catalyze decomposition of hydrogen peroxide to water and molecular oxygen, belong to the antioxidant defense system of the cell. In this work we have shown that catalase from bovine liver is inhibited by flavonoids. The inhibition is, at least partially, due to the formation of hydrogen bonds between catalase and flavonoids. In the presence of some flavonoids the formation of unreactive catalase compound II has been detected. The most potent catalase inhibitors among the tested flavonoids have appeared myricetin, epicatechin gallate and epigallocatechin gallate. The relationship between the degree of enzyme inhibition and molecular structure of flavonoids has been analyzed. PMID:23567286

  12. Protein and alkaloid patterns of the floral nectar in some solanaceous species.

    PubMed

    Kerchner, András; Darók, Judit; Bacskay, Ivett; Felinger, Attila; Jakab, Gábor; Farkas, Ágnes

    2015-09-01

    The family Solanaceae includes several melliferous plants, which tend to produce copious amounts of nectar. Floral nectar is a chemically complex aqueous solution, dominated by sugars, but minor components such as amino acids, proteins, flavonoids and alkaloids are present as well. This study aimed at analysing the protein and alkaloid profile of the nectar in seven solanaceous species. Proteins were examined with SDS-PAGE and alkaloids were analyzed with HPLC. The investigation of protein profile revealed significant differences in nectar-protein patterns not only between different plant genera, but also between the three Nicotiana species investigated. SDS-PAGE suggested the presence of several Nectarin proteins with antimicrobial activity in Nicotiana species. The nectar of all tobacco species contained the alkaloid nicotine, N. tabacum having the highest nicotine content. The nectar of Brugmansia suaveolens, Datura stramonium, Hyoscyamus niger and Lycium barbarum contained scopolamine, the highest content of which was measured in B. suaveolens. The alkaloid concentrations in the nectars of most solanaceous species investigated can cause deterrence in honeybees, and the nectar of N. rustica and N. tabacum can be considered toxic for honeybees. PMID:26344026

  13. Soya Saponins Induce Enteritis in Atlantic Salmon (Salmo salar L.).

    PubMed

    Krogdahl, Åshild; Gajardo, Karina; Kortner, Trond M; Penn, Michael; Gu, Min; Berge, Gerd Marit; Bakke, Anne Marie

    2015-04-22

    Soybean meal-induced enteritis (SBMIE) is a well-described condition in the distal intestine of salmonids, and saponins have been implicated as the causal agent. However, the question remains whether saponins alone cause SBMIE. Moreover, the dose-response relationship has not been described. In a 10 week feeding trial with Atlantic salmon, a highly purified (95%) soya saponin preparation was supplemented (0, 2, 4, 6, or 10 g/kg) to two basal diets, one containing fishmeal as the major protein source (FM) and the other 25% lupin meal (LP). Saponins caused dose-dependent increases in the severity of inflammation independent of the basal diet, with concomitant alterations in digestive functions and immunological marker expression. Thus, saponins induced inflammation whether the diet contained other legume components or not. However, responses were often the same or stronger in fish fed the corresponding saponin-supplemented LP diets despite lower saponin exposure, suggesting potentiation by other legume component(s).

  14. New oleanene triterpenoid saponins from Madhuca longifolia.

    PubMed

    Yoshikawa, K; Tanaka, M; Arihara, S; Pal, B C; Roy, S K; Matsumura, E; Katayama, S

    2000-12-01

    Four new oleanane-type triterpene glycosides, madlongisides A-D (1-4), were isolated from the seeds of Madhuca longifolia, and their structures were elucidated on the basis of extensive NMR experiments and chemical methods. Also obtained in this investigation were the known compounds mimusopside A, Mi-saponins A, B, and C, and 3-O-beta-D-glucopyranosyl protobassic acid.

  15. Soy Saponins: Current Research and Future Goals

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Saponins are a biologically active class of triterpenoid phytochemicals found in soybeans at concentrations similar to those of the isoflavones, and the role they may play in nutrition and health is not well understood. Research the functionality of these compounds in animals and humans has been ha...

  16. Anxiolytic-like effect of ethanolic extract of Argemone mexicana and its alkaloids in Wistar rats

    PubMed Central

    Arcos-Martínez, Aideé Itzel; Muñoz-Muñiz, Omar David; Domínguez-Ortiz, Miguel Ángel; Saavedra-Vélez, Margarita Virginia; Vázquez-Hernández, Maribel; Alcántara-López, María Gabriela

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Argemone mexicana is a Papaveracea plant; some reports have shown their antibacterial, anti-cancer, sedative and probably anti-anxiety properties. From their aerial parts, flavonoids and alkaloids have been isolated, which are intrinsically related to some actions on the central nervous system. The aim of this study was to evaluate the anxiolytic-like effects of the plant, using its ethanolic extract and alkaloid-enriched extract obtained from fresh leaves. Material and Methods: Phytochemical screening was carried out together with evaluation of antioxidant capacity and the enrichment of alkaloids present in the extract. Subsequently, 100 and 200 mg/kg doses of ethanolic extract and alkaloid-enriched extract (200 µg/kg) were intraperitoneally administered to female Wistar rats, which were exposed to elevated plus maze (EPM) test. Picrotoxin (1 mg/kg), a non-competitive gamma-aminobutyric acid A (GABAA) chloride channel antagonist, was used in experimental procedures to evaluate if this receptor is involved in the anxiolytic-like effects of A. mexicana. To discard motor effects associated with the treatments, the rats were evaluated by the locomotor activity test. Results: Only the ethanolic extract at 200 mg/kg and alkaloid-enriched extract (200 µg/kg) produced anxiolytic-like effects similarly to diazepam 2 mg/kg on EPM test, without affecting locomotor activity. Meanwhile, the administration of picrotoxin blocked anti-anxiety effect of alkaloid-enriched extract of the plant. Conclusion: These results showed that A. mexicana is a potential anxiolytic agent and we suggest that this effect is mediated by the GABAA receptor. These effects are related to the presence of alkaloids. PMID:27516989

  17. The Chemistry of the Akuammiline Alkaloids.

    PubMed

    Adams, Gregory L; Smith, Amos B

    2016-01-01

    An update on the literature covering the akuammiline family of alkaloids is presented. This chapter begins with a summary of new akuammiline alkaloids reported since 2000 and is followed by an overview of new reported bioactivities of akuammiline alkaloids since 2000. The remainder of the chapter comprises a comprehensive review of the synthetic chemistry that has been reported in the last 50 years concerning akuammiline alkaloids and their structural motifs.

  18. 27 CFR 21.99 - Brucine alkaloid.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Brucine alkaloid. 21.99... Brucine alkaloid. (a) Identification test. Add a few drops of concentrated nitric acid to about 10 mg of brucine alkaloid. A vivid red color is produced. Dilute the red solution with a few drops of water and...

  19. 27 CFR 21.99 - Brucine alkaloid.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Brucine alkaloid. 21.99... Brucine alkaloid. (a) Identification test. Add a few drops of concentrated nitric acid to about 10 mg of brucine alkaloid. A vivid red color is produced. Dilute the red solution with a few drops of water and...

  20. 27 CFR 21.99 - Brucine alkaloid.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Brucine alkaloid. 21.99... Brucine alkaloid. (a) Identification test. Add a few drops of concentrated nitric acid to about 10 mg of brucine alkaloid. A vivid red color is produced. Dilute the red solution with a few drops of water and...

  1. 27 CFR 21.99 - Brucine alkaloid.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Brucine alkaloid. 21.99... Brucine alkaloid. (a) Identification test. Add a few drops of concentrated nitric acid to about 10 mg of brucine alkaloid. A vivid red color is produced. Dilute the red solution with a few drops of water and...

  2. Flavonoid analysis of buckwheat sprouts.

    PubMed

    Nam, Tae-Gyu; Lee, Sun Mi; Park, Ji-Hae; Kim, Dae-Ok; Baek, Nam-in; Eom, Seok Hyun

    2015-03-01

    It is known that common buckwheat sprouts contain several flavonoids, including orientin, isoorientin, vitexin, isovitexin, rutin, and quercetrin, whereas tartary buckwheat sprouts contain only rutin. In this study, we evaluated flavonoids present in buckwheat sprouts and identified a previously unreported flavonoid. Simultaneous detection by HPLC was used to separate rutin and a compound that was not separated in previous studies. We used a novel HPLC elution gradient method to successfully separate rutin and the previously unidentified compound, for which we performed structural analysis. The identification of six flavonoids by HPLC was confirmed using HPLC-ESI-MS/MS analysis. The newly identified compound, [M+H](+) =611.17, was identified by NMR as the rutin epimer quercetin-3-O-robinobioside. Unlike common buckwheat sprout, tartary buckwheat sprout contained rutin as a main flavonoid, whereas other flavonoids appeared only in trace amounts or were not detected. Quercetin-3-O-robinobioside was not detected in tartary buckwheat sprout.

  3. The alkaloid profiles of Lupinus sulphureus.

    PubMed

    Cook, Daniel; Lee, Stephen T; Gardner, Dale R; Pfister, James A; Welch, Kevin D; Green, Benedict T; Davis, T Zane; Panter, Kip E

    2009-02-25

    Lupines are common plants on the rangelands in the western United States. Lupines contain alkaloids that can be toxic and teratogenic causing congenital birth defects (crooked calf disease). One such lupine, Lupinus sulphureus, occurs in parts of Oregon, Washington, and British Columbia. Specimens of L. sulphureus from field collections and herbaria were evaluated taxonomically and by chemical means. A total of seven distinct alkaloid profiles and the individual alkaloids associated with each profile were identified. Each alkaloid profile was unique in its geographical distribution and its potential risk to livestock. In conclusion, taxonomic classification is not sufficient to determine risk, as chemical characterization of the alkaloids must also be performed.

  4. Quantitative determination of the major saponin mixture bacoside A in Bacopa monnieri by HPLC.

    PubMed

    Deepak, M; Sangli, G K; Arun, P C; Amit, A

    2005-01-01

    Bacoside A, the putative bioactive component of the Indian medicinal plant Bacopa monnieri, was found to be a mixture of saponins with bacoside A3 (1), bacopaside II (2), jujubogenin isomer of bacopasaponin C (3) and bacopasaponin C (4) as major constituents. An HPLC method together with an optimised extraction procedure was developed for the estimation of 1-4 in B. monnieri to enable standardisation of the latter. Concentration ranges of the analytes in samples of B. monnieri collected from different regions of India were 0.14-0.85% (w/w) (1), 0.12-0.69% (2), 0.05-0.72% (3) and 0.05-0.44% (4). The importance of using bacoside A, with known concentrations of 1-4, as a reference standard for the routine analysis of B. monnieri is highlighted. Two common flavonoids, luteolin and apigenin, were present in all samples of B. monnieri.

  5. Structural and quantitative analysis of Equisetum alkaloids.

    PubMed

    Cramer, Luise; Ernst, Ludger; Lubienski, Marcus; Papke, Uli; Schiebel, Hans-Martin; Jerz, Gerold; Beuerle, Till

    2015-08-01

    Equisetum palustre L. is known for its toxicity for livestock. Several studies in the past addressed the isolation and identification of the responsible alkaloids. So far, palustrine (1) and N(5)-formylpalustrine (2) are known alkaloids of E. palustre. A HPLC-ESI-MS/MS method in combination with simple sample work-up was developed to identify and quantitate Equisetum alkaloids. Besides the two known alkaloids six related alkaloids were detected in different Equisetum samples. The structure of the alkaloid palustridiene (3) was derived by comprehensive 1D and 2D NMR experiments. N(5)-Acetylpalustrine (4) was also thoroughly characterized by NMR for the first time. The structure of N(5)-formylpalustridiene (5) is proposed based on mass spectrometry results. Twenty-two E. palustre samples were screened by a HPLC-ESI-MS/MS method after development of a simple sample work-up and in most cases the set of all eight alkaloids were detected in all parts of the plant. A high variability of the alkaloid content and distribution was found depending on plant organ, plant origin and season ranging from 88 to 597mg/kg dried weight. However, palustrine (1) and the alkaloid palustridiene (3) always represented the main alkaloids. For the first time, a comprehensive identification, quantitation and distribution of Equisetum alkaloids was achieved.

  6. An improved method for thin layer chromatographic analysis of saponins.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Om P; Kumar, Neeraj; Singh, Bikram; Bhat, Tej K

    2012-05-01

    Analysis of saponins by thin layer chromatography (TLC) is reported. The solvent system was n-butanol:water:acetic acid (84:14:7). Detection of saponins on the TLC plates after development and air-drying was done by immersion in a suspension of sheep erythrocytes, followed by washing off the excess blood on the plate surface. Saponins appeared as white spots against a pink background. The protocol provided specific detection of saponins in the saponins enriched extracts from Aesculusindica (Wall. ex Camb.) Hook.f., Lonicera japonica Thunb., Silene inflata Sm., Sapindusmukorossi Gaertn., Chlorophytum borivilianum Santapau & Fernandes, Asparagusadscendens Roxb., Asparagus racemosus Willd., Agave americana L., Camellia sinensis [L.] O. Kuntze. The protocol is convenient, inexpensive, does not require any corrosive chemicals and provides specific detection of saponins. PMID:26434348

  7. An improved method for thin layer chromatographic analysis of saponins.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Om P; Kumar, Neeraj; Singh, Bikram; Bhat, Tej K

    2012-05-01

    Analysis of saponins by thin layer chromatography (TLC) is reported. The solvent system was n-butanol:water:acetic acid (84:14:7). Detection of saponins on the TLC plates after development and air-drying was done by immersion in a suspension of sheep erythrocytes, followed by washing off the excess blood on the plate surface. Saponins appeared as white spots against a pink background. The protocol provided specific detection of saponins in the saponins enriched extracts from Aesculusindica (Wall. ex Camb.) Hook.f., Lonicera japonica Thunb., Silene inflata Sm., Sapindusmukorossi Gaertn., Chlorophytum borivilianum Santapau & Fernandes, Asparagusadscendens Roxb., Asparagus racemosus Willd., Agave americana L., Camellia sinensis [L.] O. Kuntze. The protocol is convenient, inexpensive, does not require any corrosive chemicals and provides specific detection of saponins.

  8. Monoterpene alkaloids from Argylia radiata.

    PubMed

    Bianco, Armandodoriano; Bonadies, Francesco; Cianciolo, Valeria; Melchioni, Cristiana; Ramunno, Alessia; Dezzi, Sandro; Nicoletti, Marcello; Serafini, Mauro; Ballero, Mauro

    2002-04-01

    Argylia radiata (L.) D. Don (Bignoniaceae) represents an important source of secondary metabolites, largely unexplored. The paper presents the isolation from the plant root of two new monoterpene alkaloids, 10-acetoxy-actinidine and 4-nor-7,8-dehydro-10-hydroxy-skytanthine, whose structures were elucidated by Mass spectrometry and 1H-NMR data.

  9. Indole alkaloids from Antirhea lucida.

    PubMed

    Weniger, B; Rafik, W; Bastida, J; Quirion, J C; Anton, R

    1995-12-01

    A new indole alkaloid, N,N-methyl-3'-indolylmethyl-5-methoxytryptamine, as well as the known gramine, N,N-dimethyltryptamine and 6-methoxy-2-methyl-1,2,3,4-tetrahydro-beta-carboline were isolated from the roots of Antirhea lucida (Sw.) Hook (Rubiaceae). Their structures were established by spectroscopic methods.

  10. Quaternary alkaloids of tinospora species.

    PubMed

    Bisset, N G; Nwaiwu, J

    1983-08-01

    The occurrence of quaternary alkaloids in TINOSPORA (and PARABAENA) species (Menispermaceae) has been studied. The main components were generally the protoberberine bases berberine and palmatine, with jatrorrhizine an occasional minor constituent, and the aporphine base magnoflorine. Choline was also often present. Only magnoflorine was detected in the PARABAENA material examined. PMID:17404996

  11. Distribution of steroidal saponins in Tribulus terrestris from different geographical regions.

    PubMed

    Dinchev, Dragomir; Janda, Bogdan; Evstatieva, Liuba; Oleszek, Wieslaw; Aslani, Mohammad R; Kostova, Ivanka

    2008-01-01

    The steroidal saponins of Tribulus terrestris L. (Zygophyllaceae) are considered to be the factor responsible for biological activity of products derived from this plant. The activity depends on the concentration and the composition of active saponins, which in turn is influenced by the geographical origin of plant material. Samples of T. terrestris collected in Bulgaria, Greece, Serbia, Macedonia, Turkey, Georgia, Iran, Vietnam and India were analyzed by LC-ESI/MS/MS for the presence and the concentration of protodioscin (1), prototribestin (2), pseudoprotodioscin (3), dioscin (4), tribestin (5) and tribulosin (6). The flavonoid rutin (7) was also included in the comparison. The results revealed distinct differences in the content of these compounds depending on region of sample collection, plant part studied and stage of plant development. The samples from Bulgaria, Turkey, Greece, Serbia, Macedonia, Georgia and Iran exhibited similar chemical profile and only some quantitative difference in the content of 1-7 with protodioscin (1) and prototribestin (2) as main components. The Vietnamese and Indian samples exhibit totally different chemical profile. They lack 2 and 5, while tribulosin (6) is present in high amounts. Compounds different from 1 to 7 are dominating in these 3 samples. The presented results suggested the existence of one chemotype common to the East South European and West Asian regions. Most probably, the Vietnamese and Indian samples belong to other chemotypes which are still to be studied and characterized. No clear correlation between the burrs morphology and the chemical composition of the samples has been found.

  12. Cytotoxic triterpene saponins from Cercodemas anceps.

    PubMed

    Cuong, Nguyen Xuan; Vien, Le Thi; Hanh, Tran Thi Hong; Thao, Nguyen Phuong; Thao, Do Thi; Thanh, Nguyen Van; Nam, Nguyen Hoai; Thung, Do Cong; Kiem, Phan Van; Minh, Chau Van

    2015-08-15

    Seven holostane-type triterpene saponins (1-7), including five new compounds namely cercodemasoides A-E (2-6), were isolated from the sea cucumber Cercodemas anceps. Their structures were elucidated on the basis of spectroscopic evidence including HR ESI MS, ESI MS/MS, 1D and 2D NMR. The cytotoxic effects of isolated compounds were evaluated by SRB method on five human cancer cell lines including Hep-G2 (hepatoma cancer), KB (epidermoid carcinoma), LNCaP (prostate cancer), MCF7 (breast cancer), and SK-Mel2 (melanoma). Compounds 1-7 showed potent cytotoxicity on five tested cancer cell lines with IC50 values ranging from 0.03 ± 0.01 to 7.36 ± 0.46 μM. With respect to the potent cytotoxicity of the isolated saponins, further studies are required to confirm efficacy in vivo and the mechanism of cytotoxic effects. PMID:26099533

  13. Steroidal saponins from Hemerocallis fulva var. kwanso.

    PubMed

    Konishi, T; Fujiwara, Y; Konoshima, T; Kiyosawa, S; Nishi, M; Miyahara, K

    2001-03-01

    Two steroidal saponins, hemeroside A and B, were isolated from the aerial part of Hemerocallis fulva var. kwanso for the first time. The structures of these compounds were established as 24S-hydroxy-neotokorogenin 1-O-alpha-L-arabinopyranosyl 24-O-beta-D-glucopyranoside (1) and isorhodeasapogenin 3-O-beta-D-glucopyranosyl-(1-->3)-[beta-D-xylopyranosyl-(1-->2)]-beta-D-glucopyranosyl-(1-->4)-beta-D-galactopyranoside (2) through NMR experiments. PMID:11253923

  14. Potent antitrypanosomal triterpenoid saponins from Mussaenda luteola

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Five new triterpenoid saponins, heinsiagenin A 3-O-[a-L-rhamnopyranosyl-(1->2)-Beta-D-glucopyranosyl-(1->2)]-B-D-glucopyranoside (1), heinsiagenin A 3-O-[a-L-rhamnopyranosyl-(1->2)-B-D-glucopyranosyl- (1->2)]-[B-D-glucopyranosyl-(1-4)]-B-D-glucopyranoside (2). 2a-hydroxyheinsiagenin A 3-o-[a-L-rhamn...

  15. Chemical diversity of ginseng saponins from Panax ginseng☆

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Byong-Kyu; Kwon, Sung Won; Park, Jeong Hill

    2015-01-01

    Ginseng, a perennial plant belonging to the genus Panax of the Araliaceae family, is well known for its medicinal properties that help alleviate pathological symptoms, promote health, and prevent potential diseases. Among the active ingredients of ginseng are saponins, most of which are glycosides of triterpenoid aglycones. So far, numerous saponins have been reported as components of Panax ginseng, also known as Korean ginseng. Herein, we summarize available information about 112 saponins related to P. ginseng; >80 of them are isolated from raw or processed ginseng, and the others are acid/base hydrolysates, semisynthetic saponins, or metabolites. PMID:26869820

  16. First results on the insecticidal action of saponins.

    PubMed

    De Geyter, Ellen; Geelen, Danny; Smagghe, Guy

    2007-01-01

    In the search for new, natural insecticides, numerous scientists are currently trying to obtain useful compound from plants. A possibly interesting class of molecules are the saponins, a group of steroidal or triterpenoidal secondary plant metabolites with divergent biological activities. In this study, we investigated the activity of saponins against living caterpillars Spodoptera littoralis) and aphids (Acyrthosiphon pisum) via treatment on artificial diets containing different concentrations of saponins. We conclude that saponins have insecticidal activity, causing mortality and/or growth inhibition in the tested insects, although from our experiments the mode of action could not be identified. PMID:18399498

  17. Chemical diversity of ginseng saponins from Panax ginseng.

    PubMed

    Shin, Byong-Kyu; Kwon, Sung Won; Park, Jeong Hill

    2015-10-01

    Ginseng, a perennial plant belonging to the genus Panax of the Araliaceae family, is well known for its medicinal properties that help alleviate pathological symptoms, promote health, and prevent potential diseases. Among the active ingredients of ginseng are saponins, most of which are glycosides of triterpenoid aglycones. So far, numerous saponins have been reported as components of Panax ginseng, also known as Korean ginseng. Herein, we summarize available information about 112 saponins related to P. ginseng; >80 of them are isolated from raw or processed ginseng, and the others are acid/base hydrolysates, semisynthetic saponins, or metabolites.

  18. Plant tropane alkaloid biosynthesis evolved independently in the Solanaceae and Erythroxylaceae.

    PubMed

    Jirschitzka, Jan; Schmidt, Gregor W; Reichelt, Michael; Schneider, Bernd; Gershenzon, Jonathan; D'Auria, John Charles

    2012-06-26

    The pharmacologically important tropane alkaloids have a scattered distribution among angiosperm families, like many other groups of secondary metabolites. To determine whether tropane alkaloids have evolved repeatedly in different lineages or arise from an ancestral pathway that has been lost in most lines, we investigated the tropinone-reduction step of their biosynthesis. In species of the Solanaceae, which produce compounds such as atropine and scopolamine, this reaction is known to be catalyzed by enzymes of the short-chain dehydrogenase/reductase family. However, in Erythroxylum coca (Erythroxylaceae), which accumulates cocaine and other tropane alkaloids, no proteins of the short-chain dehydrogenase/reductase family were found that could catalyze this reaction. Instead, purification of E. coca tropinone-reduction activity and cloning of the corresponding gene revealed that a protein of the aldo-keto reductase family carries out this reaction in E. coca. This protein, designated methylecgonone reductase, converts methylecgonone to methylecgonine, the penultimate step in cocaine biosynthesis. The protein has highest sequence similarity to other aldo-keto reductases, such as chalcone reductase, an enzyme of flavonoid biosynthesis, and codeinone reductase, an enzyme of morphine alkaloid biosynthesis. Methylecgonone reductase reduces methylecgonone (2-carbomethoxy-3-tropinone) stereospecifically to 2-carbomethoxy-3β-tropine (methylecgonine), and has its highest activity, protein level, and gene transcript level in young, expanding leaves of E. coca. This enzyme is not found at all in root tissues, which are the site of tropane alkaloid biosynthesis in the Solanaceae. This evidence supports the theory that the ability to produce tropane alkaloids has arisen more than once during the evolution of the angiosperms.

  19. Flavonoid intake and bone health

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Flavonoids, found in a wide diversity of plant foods, from fruits and vegetables, herbs and spices, essential oils, and beverages, have the most potential of dietary components for promotion of bone health beyond calcium and vitamin D. Recent epidemiological studies show flavonoid consumption to ha...

  20. Quercetin-induced benzophenanthridine alkaloid production in suspension cell cultures of Sanguinaria canadensis.

    PubMed

    Mahady, G B; Beecher, C W

    1994-12-01

    Addition of micromolar concentrations of quercetin or rutin to suspension cell cultures of Sanguinaria canadensis L. (bloodroot) induced the biosynthesis of sanguinarine and chelerythrine in a dose-dependent manner. In contrast, related compounds: baicalein, naringin, naringenin, catechin, caffeic acid and benzoic acid displayed very weak inductive activity. Of the two active flavonoids, quercetin was the most effective for inducing benzophenanthridine alkaloid biosynthesis, with doses of 100 microM increasing alkaloid production over 375% as compared to negative controls. Quercetin's inductive effects were similar to that of an elicitor derived from fungus Penicillium expansum (PE-elicitor). Suppression of quercetin and PE-induced alkaloid biosynthesis by low doses of actinomycin D (5 micrograms/ml, alpha-amanitin (20 micrograms/ml), or cycloheximide (1 microgram/ml) demonstrate a requirement for both RNA and de novo cytoplasmic protein synthesis and suggest that alterations in gene expression are involved in the inductive mechanism. Furthermore, quercetin-induced alkaloid biosynthesis was significantly reduced by pretreatment of the cells with the calcium chelator, EGTA (3 mM), or the calcium channel inhibitor, verapamil (100 microM), suggesting that this process was calcium dependent.

  1. Unprecedented Utilization of Pelargonidin and Indole for the Biosynthesis of Plant Indole Alkaloids.

    PubMed

    Warskulat, Anne-Christin; Tatsis, Evangelos C; Dudek, Bettina; Kai, Marco; Lorenz, Sybille; Schneider, Bernd

    2016-02-15

    Nudicaulins are a group of indole alkaloid glycosides responsible for the color of yellow petals of Papaver nudicaule (Iceland poppy). The unique aglycone scaffold of these alkaloids attracted our interest as one of the most unusual flavonoid-indole hybrid structures that occur in nature. Stable isotope labeling experiments with sliced petals identified free indole, but not tryptamine or l-tryptophan, as one of the two key biosynthetic precursors of the nudicaulin aglycone. Pelargonidin was identified as the second key precursor, contributing the polyphenolic unit to the nudicaulin molecule. This finding was inferred from the temporary accumulation of pelargonidin glycosides in the petals during flower bud development and a drop at the point in time when nudicaulin levels start to increase. The precursor-directed incorporation of cyanidin into a new 3'-hydroxynudicaulin strongly supports the hypothesis that anthocyanins are involved in the biosynthesis of nudicaulins. PMID:26670055

  2. Antifeedant C20 diterpene alkaloids.

    PubMed

    González-Coloma, Azucena; Reina, Matías; Guadaño, Ana; Martínez-Díaz, Rafael; Díaz, Jesús G; García-Rodriguez, Juan; Alva, Allenger; Grandez, Maritza

    2004-09-01

    We have tested the insect antifeedant and toxic activity of 21 C20 diterpenoid alkaloids on Spodoptera littoralis and Leptinotarsa decemlineata. The antifeedant effects of the test compounds were structure- and species-dependent. The most active antifeedants to L. decemlineata and S. littoralis were the rearranged form of hetisine (20; EC50 = 1.7 microg/cm2) and 19-oxodihydroatisine (9; EC50 = 0.1 microg/cm2), resp. Glandulosine (8) moderately affected orally injected S. littoralis larvae. A few compounds (13-oxocardiopetamine (4), 9, and atisinium chloride (13)) had cytotoxic effects to insect-derived Sf9 cells with varying degrees of selectivity with respect to mammalian CHO cells. Compounds 4 and 15,22-O-diacetyl-19-oxodihydroatisine (10) increased Trypanosoma cruzi mortality. Our results support the plant protective role of C20 diterpenoid alkaloids and open a new field for parasite control strategies.

  3. Flavonoids from Pseudotsuga menziesii.

    PubMed

    Krauze-Baranowska, Mirosława; Sowiński, Paweł; Kawiak, Anna; Sparzak, Barbara

    2013-01-01

    Four O-acylated flavonol glycosides, new in the plant kingdom, were isolated from the needles of Pseudotsuga menziesii. Their structures were established by 1D and 2D NMR and MS data as: daglesioside I [kaempferol 3-O-[2",5"-O-(4''',4(IV)-dihydroxy)-beta-truxinoyl]-alpha-L-arabinofuranoside] (1), daglesioside II [kaempferol 3-O-[2",5"-O-(4"'-hydroxy)-beta-truxinoyl]-alpha-L-arabinofuranoside] (2), daglesioside III [kaempferol 3-O-[2",5"-di-O-(E)-p-coumaroyl]-alpha-L-arabinofuranoside] (3), and daglesioside IV [kaempferol 3-O-[3",6"-di-O-(E)-cinnamoyl]-beta-D-glucopyranoside] (4). In addition, the known flavonoids (E)-tiliroside, (E)-ditiliroside, astragalin (kaempferol 3-O-beta-D-glucopyranoside), isorhamnetin, kaempferol, and quercetin were identified. The cytotoxic activity of compounds 1 and 3 was evaluated towards the HL-60, HeLa, and MDA-MB468 cell lines.

  4. Transcriptional control of flavonoid biosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    Li, Shutian

    2014-01-01

    Flavonoids are plant secondary polyphenolic metabolites and fulfil many vital biological functions, offering a valuable metabolic and genetic model for studying transcriptional control of gene expression. Arabidopsis thaliana mainly accumulates 3 types of flavonoids, including flavonols, anthocyanins, and proanthocyanidins (PAs). Flavonoid biosynthesis involves a multitude of well-characterized enzymatic and regulatory proteins. Three R2R3-MYB proteins (MYB11, MYB12, and MYB111) control flavonol biosynthesis via activating the early biosynthetic steps, whereas the production of anthocyanins and PAs requires the MYB-bHLH-WD40 (MBW) complex to activate the late biosynthetic genes. Additional regulators of flavonoid biosynthesis have recently come to light, which interact with R2R3-MYBs or bHLHs to organize or disrupt the formation of the MBW complex, leading to enhanced or compromised flavonoid production. This mini-review gives an overview of how these novel players modulate flavonoid metabolism and thus plant developmental processes and further proposes a fine-tuning mechanism to complete the complex regulatory network controlling flavonoid biosynthesis. PMID:24393776

  5. Stereoselective synthesis of (+)-loline alkaloid skeleton.

    PubMed

    Miller, Kelsey E; Wright, Anthony J; Olesen, Margaret K; Hovey, M Todd; Scheerer, Jonathan R

    2015-02-01

    The loline alkaloids present a compact polycyclic pyrrolizidine skeleton and contain a strained five-membered ethereal bridge, structural features that have proven challenging for synthetic chemists to incorporate since the discovery of this natural product family more than 100 years ago. These alkaloids are produced by mutualistic fungal symbionts (endophytes) living on certain species of pasture grasses and protect the host plant from insect herbivory. The asymmetric total synthesis of loline alkaloids is reported and extends our first-generation (racemic) synthesis of this alkaloid family. Key to the synthesis is a diastereoselective tethered aminohydroxylation of a homoallylic carbamate function and a Petasis Borono-Mannich addition.

  6. Six new alkaloids from Melodinus henryi.

    PubMed

    Ma, Ke; Wang, Jun-Song; Luo, Jun; Kong, Ling-Yi

    2015-01-01

    A total of six new alkaloids, melodinhenines A-F (1-6), were isolated from Melodinus henryi. Melodinhenines A and B are new eburnan-vindolinine-type bisindole alkaloids and melodinhenines C-F are new quinolinic melodinus alkaloids. Their structures were elucidated through extensive spectroscopic methods including 2D NMR and HRESIMS analyses. The absolute configuration of 1 and 2 was determined using ECD exciton chirality method. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report on the determination of the absolute configuration of eburnan-vindolinine-type bisindole alkaloid using this method.

  7. Microalgae harvesting by flotation using natural saponin and chitosan.

    PubMed

    Kurniawati, H Agnes; Ismadji, Suryadi; Liu, J C

    2014-08-01

    This study aims to investigate the harvesting of microalgae by dispersed air flotation (DiAF) using natural biosurfactant saponin as the collector and chitosan as the flocculant. Two types of microalgae, Chlorella vulgaris and Scenedesmus obliquus, were used in this study. It was observed that saponin was a good frother, but not an effective collector when used alone for flotation separation of algae. However, with the pre-flocculation of 5 mg/L of chitosan, separation efficiency of >93% microalgae cells was found at 20 mg/L of saponin. Removal efficiency of >54.4% and >73.0% was found for polysaccharide and protein, respectively at 20 mg/L of saponin and chitosan each. Experimental results show that DiAF using saponin and chitosan is effective for separation of microalgae, and algogenic organic matter (AOM). It can potentially be applied in the integrated microalgae-based biorefinery.

  8. Effects of Ultrasound on Extraction of Saponin from Ginseng

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Hui; Ohdaira, Etsuzo; Ide, Masao

    1994-05-01

    We performed a study of the effects of ultrasound on the extraction of saponin from Panax ginseng C. A. Meyer. In this study, the extraction of saponin was examined as functions of irradiation time (0.5 to 6 h) and acoustic pressure (0 to 90 kPa). It has been observed that the yields of both total extract and saponin are larger with ultrasonic irradiation than those without ultrasonic irradiation; the increase in yield of total extract is approximately 15 wt%, and that of saponin is approximately 30 wt% at an acoustic pressure 67 kPa. In addition, the yield increases with the acoustic pressure. It is also demonstrated that saponin was not resolved in the acoustic intensity range of this experiment. The enhancement in liquid-solid extraction caused by ultrasound can be attributed to the phenomenon of cavitation.

  9. [Correlation of gene expression related to amount of ginseng saponin in 15 tissues and 6 kinds of ginseng saponin biosynthesis].

    PubMed

    Wang, Kang-yu; Zhang, Mei-ping; Li, Chuang; Jiang, Shi-cui; Yin, Rui; Sun, Chun-yu; Wang, Yi

    2015-08-01

    Fifteen tissues of 4-year-old fruit repining stage Jilin ginseng were chosen as materials, six kinds of monomer saponins (ginsenosides Rg1, Re, Rb1, Rc, Rb2 and Rd) content in 15 tissues was measured by HPLC and vanillin-sulfuric acid method. The relative expression of FPS, SQS, SQE, OSC, β-AS and P450 genes in 15 tissues was analyzed by real-time PCR. The correlations between ginseng saponin content in 15 tissues of Jilin ginseng and biosynthetic pathway -related genes were obtained. The results showed that was a synergistic increase and decrease trend of positive linear correlation among six kinds of monomer saponin content, and there was a significantly (P < 0.01) positive correlation between monomer saponin content and total saponins content. Monomer saponin content and 6 kinds of enzyme gene correlation were different. Biosynthesis of ginseng total saponins and monomer saponin were regulated by six kinds of participation ginsenoside biosynthesis enzyme genes, the expression of these six kinds of genes in different tissues of ginseng showed collaborative increase and decrease trend, and regulated biosynthesis of ginseng ginsenoside by group coordinative manner. PMID:26790286

  10. Two new furostanol saponins from Tribulus terrestris.

    PubMed

    Xu, Ya-Juan; Xu, Tun-Hai; Zhou, Hai-Ou; Li, Bo; Xie, Sheng-Xu; Si, Yun-Shan; Liu, Yue; Liu, Tong-Hua; Xu, Dong-Ming

    2010-05-01

    Two new furostanol saponins were isolated from the fruits of Tribulus terrestris L. Their structures were established as 26-O-beta-D-glucopyranosyl-(25S)-5alpha-furost-20(22)-en-3beta,26-diol-3-O-alpha-L-rhamnopyranosyl-(1 --> 2)-[beta-D-glucopyranosyl-(1 --> 4)]-beta-D-galactopyranoside (1) and 26-O-beta-D-glucopyranosyl-(25S)-5alpha-furost-20(22)-en-12-one-3beta,26-diol-3-O-beta-D-galactopyranosyl-(1 --> 2)-beta-D-glucopyranosyl-(1 --> 4)-beta-D-galactopyranoside (2) on the basis of spectroscopic data as well as chemical evidence.

  11. Saponins from soy and chickpea: stability during beadmaking and in vitro bioaccessibility

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This study investigated the stability of saponins during the making and simulated digestion of soy and soy-chickpea breads and the bioaccessibility of saponins in digested breads. Recovery of saponins in soy bread exceeded that in soy-chickpea breads, and recovery of type A and B saponins was great...

  12. Kinetic study of Saponins B stability in navy beans under different processing conditions

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Saponins are rich in the legumes which are known to provide many health benefits for human beings. Saponins B is the main component in the saponins group present in navy beans. The stability of saponins B during food processing is a key issue to evaluating the quality and nutrition of food products....

  13. Flavonoid intake and bone health.

    PubMed

    Weaver, Connie M; Alekel, D Lee; Ward, Wendy E; Ronis, Martin J

    2012-01-01

    Flavonoids, found in a wide diversity of plant foods from fruits and vegetables, herbs and spices, essential oils, and beverages, have the most potential of dietary components for promotion of bone health beyond calcium and vitamin D. Recent epidemiological studies show flavonoid consumption to have a stronger association with bone than general fruit and vegetable consumption. Bioactive flavonoids are being assessed for properties beyond their chemical antioxidant capacity, including anti-inflammatory actions. Some have been reported to enhance bone formation and to inhibit bone resorption through their action on cell signaling pathways that influence osteoblast and osteoclast differentiation. Future research is needed to determine which of the flavonoids and their metabolites are most effective and at what dose, as well as the mechanism of modulating cellular events, in order to set priorities for clinical trials.

  14. Antiartherosclerotic Effects of Plant Flavonoids

    PubMed Central

    Gunasekaran, Baskaran; Shukor, Mohd Yunus

    2014-01-01

    Atherosclerosis is the process of hardening and narrowing the arteries. Atherosclerosis is generally associated with cardiovascular diseases such as strokes, heart attacks, and peripheral vascular diseases. Since the usage of the synthetic drug, statins, leads to various side effects, the plants flavonoids with antiartherosclerotic activity gained much attention and were proven to reduce the risk of atherosclerosis in vitro and in vivo based on different animal models. The flavonoids compounds also exhibit lipid lowering effects and anti-inflammatory and antiatherogenic properties. The future development of flavonoids-based drugs is believed to provide significant effects on atherosclerosis and its related diseases. This paper discusses the antiatherosclerotic effects of selected plant flavonoids such as quercetin, kaempferol, myricetin, rutin, naringenin, catechin, fisetin, and gossypetin. PMID:24971331

  15. Flavonoid intake and eye health.

    PubMed

    Milbury, Paul E

    2012-01-01

    In the modern era of evidence-based scientific medicine, there is little recognition of centuries of shaman observational evidence. Yet it is extremely difficult to conduct long duration controlled studies of large populations. The controversy surrounding the issue of flavonoid bioactivity and alleged benefits for eye health is also plagued by natural product industry marketing efforts that rely on small, often poorly designed studies. Ample laboratory evidence exists from in vitro and in vivo studies that provide plausible mechanistic evidence for flavonoid interactions relevant to visual function. Lacking are large randomized double-blind placebo-controlled studies in older subjects who have early signs of vision impairment. These studies could link flavonoid intake and bioavailability to efficacy in prevention of age related vision disorders that develop over decades. Support for clinical trials remains to be found before a full "recommendation" can be made regarding the value of diets high in flavonoids for eye health. PMID:22888841

  16. Microbial biotransformation of bioactive flavonoids.

    PubMed

    Cao, Hui; Chen, Xiaoqing; Jassbi, Amir Reza; Xiao, Jianbo

    2015-01-01

    The bioactive flavonoids are considered as the most important phytochemicals in food, which exert a wide range of biological benefits for human being. Microbial biotransformation strategies for production of flavonoids have attracted considerable interest because they allow yielding novel flavonoids, which do not exist in nature. In this review, we summarize the existing knowledge on the production and biotransformation of flavonoids by various microbes. The main reactions during microbial biotransformation are hydroxylation, dehydroxylation, O-methylation, O-demethylation, glycosylation, deglycosylation, dehydrogenation, hydrogenation, C ring cleavage of the benzo-γ-pyrone system, cyclization, and carbonyl reduction. Cunninghamella, Penicillium, and Aspergillus strains are very popular to biotransform flavonoids and they can perform almost all the reactions with excellent yields. Aspergillus niger is one of the most applied microorganisms in the flavonoids' biotransformation; for example, A. niger can transfer flavanone to flavan-4-ol, 2'-hydroxydihydrochalcone, flavone, 3-hydroxyflavone, 6-hydroxyflavanone, and 4'-hydroxyflavanone. The hydroxylation of flavones by microbes usually happens on the ortho position of hydroxyl group on the A ring and C-4' position of the B ring and microbes commonly hydroxylate flavonols at the C-8 position. The microorganisms tend to hydroxylate flavanones at the C-5, 6, and 4' positions; however, for prenylated flavanones, dihydroxylation often takes place on the C4α=C5α double bond on the prenyl group (the side chain of A ring). Isoflavones are usually hydroxylated at the C-3' position of the B ring by microorganisms. The microbes convert flavonoids to their 7-O-glycosides and 3-O-glycosides (when flavonoids have a hydroxyl moiety at the C-3 position). The demethylation of multimethoxyl flavonoids by microbes tends to happen at the C-3' and C-4' positions of the B ring. Multimethoxyl flavanones and isoflavone are demethylated at

  17. Steroidal saponins of Yucca schidigera Roezl.

    PubMed

    Oleszek, W; Sitek, M; Stochmal, A; Piacente, S; Pizza, C; Cheeke, P

    2001-09-01

    Eight steroidal saponins have been isolated from Yucca schidigera Roezl. trunk, and their structures were established by spectral (MS and NMR) techniques. These included three novel furostanol glycosides including 3-O-beta-D-glucopyranosyl-(1-->2)-[beta-D-xylopyranosyl-(1-->3)]-beta-D-glucopyranosyl-5 beta(25R)-furostan-3 beta,22 alpha,26-triol 26-O-beta-D-glucopyranoside, 3-O-beta-D-glcopyranosyl-(1-->2)-[beta-D-xylopyranosyl-(1-->3)]-beta-D-glucopyranosyl-5 beta(25R)-furost-20(22)-en-3 beta,26-diol-12-one 26-O-beta-D-glucopyranoside, 3-O-beta-D-glcopyranosyl-(1-->2)-beta-D-glucopyranosyl-5 beta(25R)-furostan-3 beta,22 alpha,26-triol 26-O-beta-D-glucopyranoside, and five known spirostanol glycosides. On the basis of the extraction efficiency, furostanol glycosides made up only 6.8% of total saponins isolated. PMID:11559144

  18. Intraspecific variability in the alkaloid metabolism of Galanthus elwesii.

    PubMed

    Berkov, Strahil; Sidjimova, Borjana; Evstatieva, Luba; Popov, Simeon

    2004-03-01

    Alkaloid pattern of individuals from 16 Bulgarian Galanthus elwesii populations was investigated by GC/MS and TLC. Twenty-one Amaryllidaceae alkaloids were detected and 14 of them were identified. Crinane type alkaloids, haemanthamine or crinine, dominated alkaloid metabolism in most of the populations. With exception of one population, where the separate individuals showed variable alkaloid profiles (dominated by crinine or haemanthamine) the individuals of the rest of populations have identical and characteristic alkaloid profiles. Some populations showed remarkable differences in respect to their alkaloid pattern-type of biosynthesis, main alkaloids and number of alkaloids. Populations dominated by galanthamine type alkaloids were found as well. These data demonstrate that like the morphological features, the alkaloid metabolism of G. elwesii is also variable.

  19. Alkaloids of Nelumbo lutea (Wild.) pers. (Nymphaeaceae)

    PubMed

    Zelenski, S G

    1977-11-01

    A phytochemical investigation of an alcoholic extract of the petioles of Nelumbo lutea resulted in the identification of the alkaloids N-methylasimilobine, anonaine, and roemerine. The alkaloids nuciferine, armepavine, N-nornuciferine, and N-norarmepavine, previously previously reported in the whole plant, were also identified.

  20. Halogenated Indole Alkaloids from Marine Invertebrates

    PubMed Central

    Pauletti, Patrícia Mendonça; Cintra, Lucas Silva; Braguine, Caio Guedes; da Silva Filho, Ademar Alves; Silva, Márcio Luís Andrade e; Cunha, Wilson Roberto; Januário, Ana Helena

    2010-01-01

    This review discusses the isolation, structural elucidation, and biological activities of halogenated indole alkaloids obtained from marine invertebrates. Meridianins and related compounds (variolins, psammopemmins, and aplicyanins), as well as aplysinopsins and leptoclinidamines, are focused on. A compilation of the 13C-NMR spectral data of these selected natural indole alkaloids is also provided. PMID:20559487

  1. Phenylalkylamine alkaloids from Stapelia hirsuta L.

    PubMed

    Shabana, Marwan; Gonaid, Mariam; Salama, Maha Mahmoud; Abdel-Sattar, Essam

    2006-07-10

    Four alkaloids of the phenethylamine derivatives have been isolated from the n-butanol fraction of the aerial parts of Stapelia hirsuta L. The structures of the isolated alkaloids were determined as N-acetyl hordenine (a new natural compound), hordenine, candicine and hordenine-1-O-beta-D-glucoside, in addition to luteolin-7-O-beta-D-glucopyranoside. PMID:16753902

  2. In vivo Cytotoxicity Studies of Amaryllidaceae Alkaloids.

    PubMed

    Nair, Jerald J; Bastida, Jaume; van Staden, Johannes

    2016-01-01

    The plant family Amaryllidaceae is recognizable for its esthetic floral characteristics, its widespread usage in traditional medicine as well as its unique alkaloid principles. Few alkaloid-producing families rival the Amaryllidaceae in terms of the diversity of its structures as well as their wide applicability on the biological landscape. In particular, cytotoxic effects have come to be a dominant theme in the biological properties of Amaryllidacea alkaloids. To this extent, a significant number of structures have been subjected to in vitro studies in numerous cell lines from which several targets have been identified as promising chemotherapeutics. By contrast, in vivo models of study involving these alkaloids have been carried out to a lesser extent and should prove crucial in the continued development of a clinical target such as pancratistatin. This survey examines the cytotoxic effects of Amaryllidaceae alkaloids in vivo and contrasts these against the corresponding in vitro effects.

  3. In vitro ruminal metabolism of larkspur alkaloids.

    PubMed

    Siemion, R S; Raisbeck, M F; Waggoner, J W; Tidwell, M A; Sanchez, D A

    1992-06-01

    Larkspur (Delphinium sp) poisoning of range cattle is a serious, recurring problem in the western United States. Numerous stratagems have been recommended to ameliorate larkspur intoxication, but none are completely effective. Previous studies in this laboratory indicated bovine ruminal microflora are capable of chemically modifying Delphinium alkaloids. Research reported herein was undertaken to further evaluate whether differences in ovine and bovine rumen metabolism might explain differences in susceptibility to larkspur intoxication and whether existing metabolic activity can be enhanced by sustained exposure to Delphinium alkaloids. Comparison of ovine and bovine rumen metabolism of Delphinium geyeri alkaloids in vitro failed to demonstrate differences in the rate of alkaloid metabolism. Rumen liquor collected sequentially from a fistulated cow dosed with dried Delphinium geyeri did not vary in ability to metabolize larkspur alkaloids.

  4. Ginseng Saponins in Different Parts of Panax vietnamensis.

    PubMed

    Le, Thi Hong Van; Lee, Gwang Jin; Vu, Huynh Kim Long; Kwon, Sung Won; Nguyen, Ngoc Khoi; Park, Jeong Hill; Nguyen, Minh Duc

    2015-01-01

    Chemical and pharmacological studies of Panax vietnamensis (Vietnamese ginseng; VG) have been reported since its discovery in 1973. However, the content of each saponin in different parts of VG has not been reported. In this study, 17 ginsenosides in the different underground parts of P. vietnamensis were analyzed by HPLC/evaporative light scattering detector (ELSD). Their contents in the dried rhizome, radix, and fine roots were 195, 156, and 139 mg/g, respectively, which were extremely high compared to other Panax species. The content of protopanaxatriol (PPT)-type saponins were not much different among underground parts; however, the content of protopanaxadiol (PPD)- and ocotillol (OCT)-type saponins were greatly different. It is noteworthy that the ginsenoside pattern in the fine roots is different from other underground parts. In particular, despite the content of PPD-type saponins being the highest in the fine roots, which is similar to other Panax species, the total content of saponins was the lowest in the fine roots, which is different from other Panax species. The ratios of PPT : PPD : OCT-type saponins were 1 : 1.7 : 7.8, 1 : 1.6 : 5.5, and 1 : 4.8 : 3.3 for the rhizome, radix, and fine roots, respectively. OCT-type saponins accounted for 36-75% of total saponins and contributed mostly to the difference in the total saponin content of each part. PMID:26521860

  5. Bioactive triterpene saponins from the roots of Phytolacca americana.

    PubMed

    Wang, Liyan; Bai, Liming; Nagasawa, Takashi; Hasegawa, Toshiaki; Yang, Xiaoyang; Sakai, Jun-ichi; Bai, Yuhua; Kataoka, Takao; Oka, Seiko; Hirose, Katsutoshi; Tomida, Akihiro; Tsuruo, Takashi; Ando, Masayoshi

    2008-01-01

    Five new triterpene saponins named phytolaccasaponins N-1 (1), N-2 (2), N-3 (3) N-4 (4), and N-5 (5) were isolated from the roots of Phytolacca americana together with seven known triterpene saponins (6-12). The structures of the five new saponins were established as shown in structures 1-5 on the basis of their spectroscopic data. The MDR-reversal activity of 1-12 was evaluated on the basis of the amount of calcein accumulated in MDR human ovarian cancer 2780 AD cells in the presence of each compound. The most effective compound was 8 (155% of control at 25 microg/mL).

  6. Steroidal saponins from the leaves of Agave macroacantha.

    PubMed

    Eskander, Jacqueline; Lavaud, Catherine; Harakat, Dominique

    2010-07-01

    A new monodesmosidic spirostanol saponin, along with three known saponins was isolated from Agave macroacantha Zucc leaves. The structure of the new saponin was established as hecogenin-3-O-alpha-L-rhamnopyranosyl (1-->4) beta-D-xylopyranosyl (1-->3)[beta-D-glucopyranosyl (1-->2)] beta-D-glucopyranosyl (1-->4) beta-D-galactopyranoside. The (1)H and (13)C resonances of the four compounds were assigned using a combination of 1D and 2D NMR techniques including (1)H, (13)C, COSY, TOCSY, ROESY, HSQC and HMBC NMR and confirmed by mass spectrometry.

  7. Flavonoids and the aging brain.

    PubMed

    Schmitt-Schillig, S; Schaffer, S; Weber, C C; Eckert, G P; Müller, W E

    2005-03-01

    Like in all other organs, the functional capacity of the human brain deteriorates over time. Pathological events such as oxidative stress, due to the elevated release of free radicals and reactive oxygen or nitrogen species, the subsequently enhanced oxidative modification of lipids, protein, and nucleic acids, and the modulation of apoptotic signaling pathways contribute to loss of brain function. The identification of neuroprotective food components is one strategy to facilitate healthy brain aging. Flavonoids were shown to activate key enzymes in mitochondrial respiration and to protect neuronal cells by acting as antioxidants, thus breaking the vicious cycle of oxidative stress and tissue damage. Furthermore, recent data indicate a favorable effect of flavonoids on neuro-inflammatory events. Whereas most of these effects have been shown in vitro, limited data in vivo are available, suggesting a rather low penetration of flavonoids into the brain. Nevertheless, several reports support the concept that flavonoid intake inhibits certain biochemical processes of brain aging, and might thus prevent to some extent the decline of cognitive functions with aging as well as the development or the course of neurodegenerative diseases. However, more data are needed to assess the true impact of flavonoids on brain aging.

  8. Three new triterpenoid saponins from Dianthus superbus.

    PubMed

    Luo, Jian-Guang; Chen, Xia; Kong, Ling-Yi

    2011-01-01

    Three new triterpenoid saponins (1-3) were isolated from the dried aerial parts of Dianthus superbus L. (Caryophyllaceae). Their structures were established as 3-O-β-D-glucopyranosyl gypsogenic acid 28-O-[β-D-6-O-((3S)-3-hydroxyl-3-methylglutaryl)glucopyranosyl(1→6)]-β-D-glucopyranoside (1), 3-O-β-D-glucopyranosyl gypsogenic acid 28-O-[β-D-glucopyranosyl(1→3)][β-D-6-O-((3S)-hydroxyl-3-methylglutaryl)glucopyranosyl(1→6)]-β-D-glucopyranoside (2), 3-O-α-L-arabinopyranosyl-3β,16α-dihydroxyolean-12-en-23,28-dioic acid 28-O-[β-D-glucopyranosyl-(1→6)]-β-D-glucopyranoside (3), on the basis of various spectroscopic analyses and chemical degradations.

  9. Two new triterpenoid saponins from Ardisia crenata.

    PubMed

    Liu, D-L; Wang, N-L; Zhang, X; Gao, H; Yao, X-S

    2007-03-01

    Two new triterpenoid saponins, ardisicrenoside K (1) and ardisicrenoside L (2), have been isolated from the roots of Ardisia crenata Sims. Their structures have been determined as 3beta-O-[alpha-L-rhamnopyranosyl-(1 --> 2)-beta-D-glucopyranosyl-(1 --> 4)-[beta-D-glucopyranosyl-(1 --> 2)]-alpha-L-arabinopyranosyl]-13beta,28-epoxy-16-oxo-30,30-dimethoxyoleanane and 3beta-O-[beta-D-xylopyranosyl-(1 --> 2)-beta-D-glucopyranosyl-(1 --> 4)-[beta-D-glucopyranosyl-(1 --> 2)]-alpha-L-arabinopyranosyl]-13beta,28-epoxy-16alpha,20-dihydroxyoleanane by means of chemical evidences and spectral analysis. Their weak anti-fungal activity against the plant pathogenic fungus Pyricularia oryzae was evaluated in vitro. PMID:17454309

  10. Steroidal Saponins from the Rhizomes of Aspidistra typica

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Yang; Zhao, Jian-Yuan; Zhang, Jie; Pang, Xu; Yu, He-Shui; Jia, De-Xian; Liu, Chao; Yu, Li-Yan; Ma, Bai-Ping

    2016-01-01

    Eleven new furostanol saponins, typaspidosides B-L (1–11), one new spirostanol saponin, typaspidoside M (12), and five known spirostanol saponins, 25S-atropuroside (13), neoaspidistrin (14), (25S)-pratioside D1 (15), 25S-aspidistrin (16) and 25S-neosibiricoside (17) were isolated from the rhizomes of Aspidistra typica Baill. The structures of the new compounds were established using 1D and 2D NMR (1H-1H COSY, HMQC, HMBC and ROESY) spectroscopy, high resolution mass spectrometry, and chemical methods. The aglycones of 1–3 (unusual furostanol saponins with opened E ring type), 9 and 10 (the methoxyl substituent at C-23 position) were found, identified from natural products for the first time. Moreover, the anti-HIV activities of the isolated steroidal glycosides were assessed, and compounds 13, 14, 16 and 17 exhibited high active against HIV-1. PMID:26937954

  11. Bacoside A3--a triterpenoid saponin from Bacopa monniera.

    PubMed

    Rastogi, S; Pal, R; KulshreshthaDK

    1994-05-01

    A new triterpenoid saponin, bacoside A3, a constituent of bacosides the saponin mixture of Bacopa monniera, was isolated and characterized. Its structure was established as 3-beta-[O-beta-D-glucopyranosyl(1-->3)-O- [alpha-L-arabinofuranosyl(1-->2) ]O-beta-D-glucopyranosyl)oxy]jujubogenin by chemical and spectral analyses. The cis-isomer of ebelin lactone was also obtained as one of the artefacts of the aglycone and its structure revised.

  12. Kinetics of the sorption of triterpene saponin by hypercrosslinked polystyrene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mironenko, N. V.; Brezhneva, T. A.; Selemenev, V. F.

    2013-03-01

    The kinetics of sorption of triterpene saponin by the polymer sorbent NM-200 is considered. The influence of the surface activity of glycoside on the rate of formation and structure of the adsorption layer on the sorbent's surface is established. The rate-determining step of sorption is found to be diffusion into the sorbent grain. The value of the activation energy demonstrates the determining role of dispersion forces in the interaction between triterpene saponin and the polymer sorbent MN-200.

  13. Digestive parameters in young turkeys fed yucca saponin

    SciTech Connect

    Dziuk, H.E.; Duke, G.E.; Buck, R.J.; Janni, K.A.

    1985-06-01

    Yucca saponin fed in a concentration of 63 ppm to turkey poults at 6 to 14 weeks of age did not significantly improve weight gains, feed conversion, or digestive coefficients. Compared with nonstressed control groups, saponin-fed poults did not have significantly greater average weight gains or feed intakes when stressed by crowding (3 poults per cage) or by adding ammonia to the atmosphere (30 to 35 ppm).

  14. Polycyclic Guanidine Alkaloids from Poecilosclerida Marine Sponges

    PubMed Central

    Sfecci, Estelle; Lacour, Thierry; Amade, Philippe; Mehiri, Mohamed

    2016-01-01

    Sessile marine sponges provide an abundance of unique and diversified scaffolds. In particular, marine guanidine alkaloids display a very wide range of biological applications. A large number of cyclic guanidine alkaloids, including crambines, crambescins, crambescidins, batzelladines or netamins have been isolated from Poecilosclerida marine sponges. In this review, we will explore the chemodiversity of tri- and pentacyclic guanidine alkaloids. NMR and MS data tools will also be provided, and an overview of the wide range of bioactivities of crambescidins and batzelladines derivatives will be given. PMID:27070629

  15. Marine Pyridoacridine Alkaloids: Biosynthesis and Biological Activities.

    PubMed

    Ibrahim, Sabrin R M; Mohamed, Gamal A

    2016-01-01

    Pyridoacridines are a class of strictly marine-derived alkaloids that constitute one of the largest chemical families of marine alkaloids. During the last few years, both natural pyridoacridines and their analogues have constituted excellent targets for synthetic works. They have been the subject of intense study due to their significant biological activities; cytotoxic, antibacterial, antifungal, antiviral, insecticidal, anti-HIV, and anti-parasitic activities. In the present review, 95 pyridoacridine alkaloids isolated from marine organisms are discussed in term of their occurrence, biosynthesis, biological activities, and structural assignment.

  16. Saponin accumulation in the seedling root of Panax notoginseng

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Panax notoginseng is an important Chinese medicinal plant. Dammarene-type triterpenoid saponins are main pharmacologically effective compounds in P. notoginseng. This study aims to investigate the formation and accumulation of saponins in P. notoginseng roots during germination and juvenile stage. Methods P. notoginseng seeds were collected and stored in wet sand. After germination, the seedlings were transplanted into a soil nursery bed and cultivated for one year. During this period, samples were collected every month and the concentrations of ginsengnosides Rg1, Re, Rb1, Rd and notoginsengnoside R1 were determined by HPLC. Results There was little saponin in the P. notoginseng seed. The chemical composition of seed was different from that of root. After germination, Rb1, Rg1, Re, Rd and R1 appeared successively in the seedling root. And in the five-month-old root, all these five main saponins came into existence. The accumulation of saponins in P. notoginseng root was affected by seasons. Conclusion The accumulation of saponins showed a time-dependent increase after germination of P. notoginseng. PMID:21255468

  17. Chemical analysis reveals the botanical origin of shatavari products and confirms the absence of alkaloid asparagamine A in Asparagus racemosus.

    PubMed

    Kumeta, Yukie; Maruyama, Takuro; Wakana, Daigo; Kamakura, Hiroyuki; Goda, Yukihiro

    2013-01-01

    Shatavari-a famous Ayurveda materia medica used mainly as a tonic for women-is distributed in health food products all over the world. The Ayurvedic Pharmacopoeia of India identifies the botanical origin of shatavari as the tuberous root of Asparagus racemosus. We recently investigated by DNA analysis the botanical origin of shatavari products on the Japanese market. The results suggested that their botanical origin was Asparagus; however, species identification was difficult. In this study, we analyzed steroidal saponins, including those specific to this plant, in these products and confirmed their origin as A. racemosus. Next, alkaloid analyses of an authentic A. racemosus plant and these products were performed, because several papers have reported the isolation of a pyrrolo[1,2-a]azepine alkaloid, asparagamine A, from this plant. Our results suggest that neither plant material nor products contained asparagamine A. It has been pointed out that Stemona plants are sometimes mistaken for shatavari, because their tuberous roots have a similar shape to that of A. racemosus, and pyrrolo[1,2-a]azepine alkaloids are thought to be Stemona-specific. These data strongly suggest that A. racemosus does not contain asparagamine A, and that previous isolation of asparagamine A from materials claimed as originating from A. racemosus was likely caused by misidentification of Stemona plants as A. racemosus.

  18. The Occurrence of Flavonoids and Related Compounds in Flower Sections of Papaver nudicaule.

    PubMed

    Dudek, Bettina; Warskulat, Anne-Christin; Schneider, Bernd

    2016-01-01

    Flavonoids play an important role in the pigmentation of flowers; in addition, they protect petals and other flower parts from UV irradiation and oxidative stress. Nudicaulins, flavonoid-derived indole alkaloids, along with pelargonidin, kaempferol, and gossypetin glycosides, are responsible for the color of white, red, orange, and yellow petals of different Papaver nudicaule cultivars. The color of the petals is essential to attract pollinators. We investigated the occurrence of flavonoids in basal and apical petal areas, stamens, and capsules of four differently colored P. nudicaule cultivars by means of chromatographic and spectroscopic methods. The results reveal the specific occurrence of gossypetin glycosides in the basal spot of all cultivars and demonstrate that kaempferol glycosides are the major secondary metabolites in the capsules. Unlike previous reports, the yellow-colored stamens of all four P. nudicaule cultivars are shown to contain not nudicaulins but carotenoids. In addition, the presence of nudicaulins, pelargonidin, and kaempferol glycosides in the apical petal area was confirmed. The flavonoids and related compounds in the investigated flower parts and cultivars of P. nudicaule are profiled, and their potential ecological role is discussed. PMID:27338493

  19. The Occurrence of Flavonoids and Related Compounds in Flower Sections of Papaver nudicaule

    PubMed Central

    Dudek, Bettina; Warskulat, Anne-Christin; Schneider, Bernd

    2016-01-01

    Flavonoids play an important role in the pigmentation of flowers; in addition, they protect petals and other flower parts from UV irradiation and oxidative stress. Nudicaulins, flavonoid-derived indole alkaloids, along with pelargonidin, kaempferol, and gossypetin glycosides, are responsible for the color of white, red, orange, and yellow petals of different Papaver nudicaule cultivars. The color of the petals is essential to attract pollinators. We investigated the occurrence of flavonoids in basal and apical petal areas, stamens, and capsules of four differently colored P. nudicaule cultivars by means of chromatographic and spectroscopic methods. The results reveal the specific occurrence of gossypetin glycosides in the basal spot of all cultivars and demonstrate that kaempferol glycosides are the major secondary metabolites in the capsules. Unlike previous reports, the yellow-colored stamens of all four P. nudicaule cultivars are shown to contain not nudicaulins but carotenoids. In addition, the presence of nudicaulins, pelargonidin, and kaempferol glycosides in the apical petal area was confirmed. The flavonoids and related compounds in the investigated flower parts and cultivars of P. nudicaule are profiled, and their potential ecological role is discussed. PMID:27338493

  20. [Advances in studies on flavonoids of licorice].

    PubMed

    Xing, Guo-xiu; Li, Nan; Wang, Tong; Yao, Mei-yan

    2003-07-01

    The progress in the research of the active ingredients of licorice flavonoid and the pharmacological activities was reviewed. Licorice flavonoid constituents mainly included flavones, flavonals, isoflavones, chalcones, bihydroflavones and bihydrochalcones. Pharmacological investigation concluded that they had antioxidant, antibacterial, antitumer and inhibiting HIV activities. It is important to study further the flavonoid constituents and pharmacological activities. PMID:15139098

  1. Piperidine alkaloids: Human and food animal teratogens

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Piperidine alkaloids are acutely toxic to adult livestock species and produce musculoskeletal deformities in neonatal animals. These teratogenic effects include multiple congenital contracture (MCC) deformities and cleft palate in cattle, pigs, sheep, and goats. Poisonous plants containing teratogen...

  2. Anxiolytic Activity of Diterpene Alkaloid Songorine.

    PubMed

    Nesterova, Yu V; Povet'eva, T N; Suslov, N I; Shults, E E; Ziuz'kov, G N; Aksinenko, S G; Afanas'eva, O G; Krapivin, A V; Kharina, T G

    2015-09-01

    Antianxiety action of diterpene alkaloid songorine was studied using Vogel conflict test. Songorine in a dose of 0.25 mg/kg demonstrated high anxiolytic activity comparable to that of phenazepam and produced no sedative effect.

  3. Anxiolytic Activity of Diterpene Alkaloid Songorine.

    PubMed

    Nesterova, Yu V; Povet'eva, T N; Suslov, N I; Shults, E E; Ziuz'kov, G N; Aksinenko, S G; Afanas'eva, O G; Krapivin, A V; Kharina, T G

    2015-09-01

    Antianxiety action of diterpene alkaloid songorine was studied using Vogel conflict test. Songorine in a dose of 0.25 mg/kg demonstrated high anxiolytic activity comparable to that of phenazepam and produced no sedative effect. PMID:26468026

  4. New furocarbazole alkaloids from Lonicera quinquelocularis.

    PubMed

    Khan, Dilfaraz; Khan, Shafiullah; Badshah, Syed; Ali, Hazrat; Ullah, Hamid; Muhammad, Zia; Woodward, Simon

    2016-01-01

    Two new furocarbazole alkaloids, 3-formyl-6,7-dimethoxy-furo[1,2]carbazole (1) and methyl-6,7-dimethoxy-furo[1,2]carbazole-3-carboxylate (2), along with two known carbazole alkaloids, 3-formyl-2-hydroxy-7-methoxycarbazole (3) and methyl 2,7-dimethoxycarbazole-3-carboxylate (4) were isolated from the ethyl acetate soluble fraction of Lonicera quinquelocularis. Their structures were established on the basis of spectroscopic analysis.

  5. Total Synthesis of the Akuammiline Alkaloid Picrinine

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    We report the first total synthesis of the complex akuammiline alkaloid picrinine, which was first isolated nearly five decades ago. Our synthetic approach features a concise assembly of the [3.3.1]-azabicyclic core, a key Fischer indolization reaction to forge the natural product’s carbon framework, and a series of delicate late-stage transformations to complete the synthesis. Our synthesis of picrinine also constitutes a formal synthesis of the related polycyclic alkaloid strictamine. PMID:24597784

  6. Bioactive indole alkaloids isolated from Alstonia angustifolia

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Li; Terrazas, César; Muñoz Acuña, Ulyana; Ninh, Tran Ngoc; Chai, Heebyung; Carcache de Blanco, Esperanza J.; Soejarto, Djaja D.; Satoskar, Abhay R.

    2014-01-01

    Bioassay-guided fractionation was conducted on a CHCl3-soluble extract of the stem bark of Alstonia angustifolia (Apocynaceae) collected in Vietnam using the HT-29 human colon cancer cell line, and led to the isolation of a new sarpagine-type indole alkaloid (1), together with nine known alkaloids, including four macroline-derived alkaloids (2–5), a sarpagine-type alkaloid (6), and four macroline-pleiocarpamine bisindole alkaloids (7–10). The structure of the new compound (1) was determined on the basis of spectroscopic data interpretation. Compounds 1–10 were evaluated in vitro for their NF-κB (p65) inhibitory activity against the Hela cells in an ELISA assay. The new sarpagine alkaloid, N(4)-methyltalpinine (1), was found to show significant NF-κB inhibitory activity (ED50 = 1.2 µM). Furthermore, all the isolates (1–10) were evaluated in vitro for their antileishmanial activity, and compounds (1–4, 6 and 8–10) exhibited leishmaniacidal activity against promastigotes of Leishmania mexicana. PMID:25584095

  7. Bioactive steroidal saponins from Agave offoyana flowers.

    PubMed

    Pérez, Andy J; Calle, Juan M; Simonet, Ana M; Guerra, José O; Stochmal, Anna; Macías, Francisco A

    2013-11-01

    Bioguided studies of flowers of Agave offoyana allowed the isolation of five steroidal saponins never described previously, Magueyosides A-E (1-5), along with six known steroidal saponins (6-11). The structures of compounds were determined as (25R)-spirost-5-en-2α,3β-diol-12-one 3-O-{β-d-xylopyranosyl-(1→3)-O-β-d-glucopyranosyl-(1→2)-O-[β-d-xylopyranosyl-(1→3)]-O-β-d-glucopyranosyl-(1→4)-O-β-d-galactopyranoside} (1), (25R)-spirost-5-en-2α,3β-diol-12-one 3-O-{β-d-glucopyranosyl-(1→2)-O-[β-d-xylopyranosyl-(1→3)]-O-β-d-glucopyranosyl-(1→4)-O-β-d-galactopyranoside} (2), (25R)-spirost-5-en-2α,3β,12β-triol 3-O-{β-d-glucopyranosyl-(1→2)-O-[β-d-xylopyranosyl-(1→3)]-O-β-d-glucopyranosyl-(1→4)-O-β-d-galactopyranoside} (3), (25R)-5α-spirostan-2α,3β-diol-12-one 3-O-{β-d-xylopyranosyl-(1→3)-O-β-d-glucopyranosyl-(1→2)-O-[β-d-xylopyranosyl-(1→3)]-O-β-d-glucopyranosyl-(1→4)-O-β-d-galactopyranoside} (4), and (25R)-5α-spirostan-2α,3β-diol-9(11)-en-12-one 3-O-{β-d-xylopyranosyl-(1→3)-O-β-d-glucopyranosyl-(1→2)-O-[β-d-xylopyranosyl-(1→3)]-O-β-d-glucopyranosyl-(1→4)-O-β-d-galactopyranoside} (5), by comprehensive spectroscopic analysis, including one- and two-dimensional NMR techniques, mass spectrometry and chemical methods. The bioactivities of the isolated compounds on the standard target species Lactuca sativa were evaluated. A dose-dependent phytotoxicity and low dose stimulation were observed. PMID:23859261

  8. Phytotoxic steroidal saponins from Agave offoyana leaves.

    PubMed

    Pérez, Andy J; Simonet, Ana M; Calle, Juan M; Pecio, Łukasz; Guerra, José O; Stochmal, Anna; Macías, Francisco A

    2014-09-01

    A bioassay-guided fractionation of Agave offoyana leaves led to the isolation of five steroidal saponins (1-5) along with six known saponins (6-11). The compounds were identified as (25R)-spirost-5-en-2α,3β-diol-12-one 3-O-{α-l-rhamnopyranosyl-(1→3)-O-β-d-glucopyranosyl-(1→2)-O-[β-d-xylopyranosyl-(1→3)]-O-β-d-glucopyranosyl-(1→4)-O-β-d-galactopyranoside} (1), (25R)-spirost-5-en-3β-ol-12-one 3-O-{α-l-rhamnopyranosyl-(1→3)-O-β-d-glucopyranosyl-(1→2)-O-[β-d-xylopyranosyl-(1→3)]-O-β-d-glucopyranosyl-(1→4)-O-β-d-galactopyranoside} (2), (25R)-spirost-5-en-3β-ol-12-one 3-O-{β-d-xylopyranosyl-(1→3)-O-β-d-glucopyranosyl-(1→2)-O-[β-d-xylopyranosyl-(1→3)]-O-β-d-glucopyranosyl-(1→4)-O-β-d-galactopyranoside} (3), (25R)-26-O-β-d-glucopyranosylfurost-5-en-3β,22α,26-triol-12-one 3-O-{α-l-rhamnopyranosyl-(1→3)-O-β-d-glucopyranosyl-(1→2)-O-[β-d-xylopyranosyl-(1→3)]-O-β-d-glucopyranosyl-(1→4)-O-β-d-galactopyranoside} (4) and (25R)-26-O-β-d-glucopyranosylfurost-5-en-3β,22α,26-triol-12-one 3-O-{β-d-xylopyranosyl-(1→3)-O-β-d-glucopyranosyl-(1→2)-O-[β-d-xylopyranosyl-(1→3)]-O-β-d-glucopyranosyl-(1→4)-O-β-d-galactopyranoside} (5) by comprehensive spectroscopic analysis, including one- and two-dimensional NMR techniques, mass spectrometry and chemical methods. The phytotoxicity of the isolated compounds on the standard target species Lactuca sativa was evaluated. PMID:24939800

  9. Phytotoxic steroidal saponins from Agave offoyana leaves.

    PubMed

    Pérez, Andy J; Simonet, Ana M; Calle, Juan M; Pecio, Łukasz; Guerra, José O; Stochmal, Anna; Macías, Francisco A

    2014-09-01

    A bioassay-guided fractionation of Agave offoyana leaves led to the isolation of five steroidal saponins (1-5) along with six known saponins (6-11). The compounds were identified as (25R)-spirost-5-en-2α,3β-diol-12-one 3-O-{α-l-rhamnopyranosyl-(1→3)-O-β-d-glucopyranosyl-(1→2)-O-[β-d-xylopyranosyl-(1→3)]-O-β-d-glucopyranosyl-(1→4)-O-β-d-galactopyranoside} (1), (25R)-spirost-5-en-3β-ol-12-one 3-O-{α-l-rhamnopyranosyl-(1→3)-O-β-d-glucopyranosyl-(1→2)-O-[β-d-xylopyranosyl-(1→3)]-O-β-d-glucopyranosyl-(1→4)-O-β-d-galactopyranoside} (2), (25R)-spirost-5-en-3β-ol-12-one 3-O-{β-d-xylopyranosyl-(1→3)-O-β-d-glucopyranosyl-(1→2)-O-[β-d-xylopyranosyl-(1→3)]-O-β-d-glucopyranosyl-(1→4)-O-β-d-galactopyranoside} (3), (25R)-26-O-β-d-glucopyranosylfurost-5-en-3β,22α,26-triol-12-one 3-O-{α-l-rhamnopyranosyl-(1→3)-O-β-d-glucopyranosyl-(1→2)-O-[β-d-xylopyranosyl-(1→3)]-O-β-d-glucopyranosyl-(1→4)-O-β-d-galactopyranoside} (4) and (25R)-26-O-β-d-glucopyranosylfurost-5-en-3β,22α,26-triol-12-one 3-O-{β-d-xylopyranosyl-(1→3)-O-β-d-glucopyranosyl-(1→2)-O-[β-d-xylopyranosyl-(1→3)]-O-β-d-glucopyranosyl-(1→4)-O-β-d-galactopyranoside} (5) by comprehensive spectroscopic analysis, including one- and two-dimensional NMR techniques, mass spectrometry and chemical methods. The phytotoxicity of the isolated compounds on the standard target species Lactuca sativa was evaluated.

  10. Bioactive steroidal saponins from Agave offoyana flowers.

    PubMed

    Pérez, Andy J; Calle, Juan M; Simonet, Ana M; Guerra, José O; Stochmal, Anna; Macías, Francisco A

    2013-11-01

    Bioguided studies of flowers of Agave offoyana allowed the isolation of five steroidal saponins never described previously, Magueyosides A-E (1-5), along with six known steroidal saponins (6-11). The structures of compounds were determined as (25R)-spirost-5-en-2α,3β-diol-12-one 3-O-{β-d-xylopyranosyl-(1→3)-O-β-d-glucopyranosyl-(1→2)-O-[β-d-xylopyranosyl-(1→3)]-O-β-d-glucopyranosyl-(1→4)-O-β-d-galactopyranoside} (1), (25R)-spirost-5-en-2α,3β-diol-12-one 3-O-{β-d-glucopyranosyl-(1→2)-O-[β-d-xylopyranosyl-(1→3)]-O-β-d-glucopyranosyl-(1→4)-O-β-d-galactopyranoside} (2), (25R)-spirost-5-en-2α,3β,12β-triol 3-O-{β-d-glucopyranosyl-(1→2)-O-[β-d-xylopyranosyl-(1→3)]-O-β-d-glucopyranosyl-(1→4)-O-β-d-galactopyranoside} (3), (25R)-5α-spirostan-2α,3β-diol-12-one 3-O-{β-d-xylopyranosyl-(1→3)-O-β-d-glucopyranosyl-(1→2)-O-[β-d-xylopyranosyl-(1→3)]-O-β-d-glucopyranosyl-(1→4)-O-β-d-galactopyranoside} (4), and (25R)-5α-spirostan-2α,3β-diol-9(11)-en-12-one 3-O-{β-d-xylopyranosyl-(1→3)-O-β-d-glucopyranosyl-(1→2)-O-[β-d-xylopyranosyl-(1→3)]-O-β-d-glucopyranosyl-(1→4)-O-β-d-galactopyranoside} (5), by comprehensive spectroscopic analysis, including one- and two-dimensional NMR techniques, mass spectrometry and chemical methods. The bioactivities of the isolated compounds on the standard target species Lactuca sativa were evaluated. A dose-dependent phytotoxicity and low dose stimulation were observed.

  11. Electrospray ionization ion-trap multiple-stage mass spectrometry of Quillaja saponins.

    PubMed

    Bankefors, Johan; Broberg, Susanna; Nord, Lars I; Kenne, Lennart

    2011-07-01

    Fifteen identified C-18 fatty acyl-containing saponin structures from Quillaja saponaria Molina have been investigated by electrospray ionization ion-trap multiple-stage mass spectrometry (ESI-IT-MS(n)) in positive ion mode. Their MS(1)-MS(3) spectra were analyzed and ions corresponding to useful fragments, important for the structural identification of Quillaja saponins, were recognized. A few key fragments could describe the structural variations in the C-3 and the C-28 oligosaccharides of the Quillaja saponins. A flowchart involving a stepwise procedure based on key fragments from the MS(1)-MS(3) spectra of these saponins, together with key fragments from these saponins and 13 previously investigated saponins, was constructed for the identification of structural elements in Quillaja saponins. Peak intensity ratios in MS(3) spectra were found to be correlated to structural features of the investigated saponins and is therefore of value for the identification of regioisomers.

  12. Curcuma increasing antitumor effect of Rhizoma paridis saponins through absorptive enhancement of paridis saponins.

    PubMed

    Man, Shuli; Li, Yuanyuan; Fan, Wei; Gao, Wenyuan; Liu, Zhen; Li, Nan; Zhang, Yao; Liu, Changxiao

    2013-09-15

    Rhizoma paridis saponins (RPS) played a good antitumor role in many clinical applications. However, low oral bioavailability limited its application. In this research, water extract of Curcuma (CW) significantly increased antitumor effect of Rhizoma paridis saponins (RPS). GC-MS was used to identify its polar composition. HPLC was applied for determination of the content of curcuminoids in CW. As a result, 47 analytes with 0.65% of curcuminoids were identified in CW. According to the in vivo anti-tumor data, the best proportion of curcuminoids in CW with RPS was 16:500 (w/w). Using this ratio, curcuminoids significantly increased absorption of RPS in the everted rat duodenum sac system. In addition, curcuminoids decreased the promotion of RPS on rhodamine 123 efflux. The effect of curcuminoids was similar to that of the P-gp inhibitor, cyclosporin A in combination with RPS. In conclusion, drug combination of water extract of Curcuma with RPS was a good method to increase the antitumor effect of RPS. This combination would be a potent anticancer agent used in the prospective application.

  13. High-performance liquid chromatography analysis of plant saponins: An update 2005-2010

    PubMed Central

    Negi, Jagmohan S.; Singh, Pramod; Pant, Geeta Joshi Nee; Rawat, M. S. M.

    2011-01-01

    Saponins are widely distributed in plant kingdom. In view of their wide range of biological activities and occurrence as complex mixtures, saponins have been purified and separated by high-performance liquid chromatography using reverse-phase columns at lower wavelength. Mostly, saponins are not detected by ultraviolet detector due to lack of chromophores. Electrospray ionization mass spectrometry, diode array detector , evaporative light scattering detection, and charged aerosols have been used for overcoming the detection problem of saponins. PMID:22303089

  14. Determination of saponins in legumes by direct densitometry.

    PubMed

    Gurfinkel, D M; Rao, A V

    2002-01-30

    Research has shown that dietary saponins may have health benefits. A simple, rapid method for the determination of saponins in legumes, using densitometry, is described. Saponin preparations, after pretreatment to remove nonsaponin components, are spotted in rows on a thin-layer chromatography plate, along with soyasaponin standards. The plate, without solvent development, is directly treated with sulfuric acid and heated. Violet spots develop which have a density proportional to the amount of saponin present. The standard curve has a correlation coefficient of 0.99 and is linear over the range of 1.25 to 10 microg of soyasaponins applied. The method has a coefficient of variation of less than 3% and compares favorably with quantitative thin-layer chromatography. Using this method the saponin contents of defatted soy flour (0.58%), dried navy beans (0.32%), and dried kidney beans (0.29%) were determined, and these results were found to be consistent with previous reports in the literature. PMID:11804507

  15. Components characterization of total tetraploid jiaogulan (Gynostemma pentaphylla) saponin and its cholesterol-lowering properties

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This study characterized chemical structures of tetraploid jiaogulan saponins, and investigated their cholesterol-lowering effects and mechanisms in hamsters fed a high-fat diet (HFD). Nine saponins, including five reported for the first time, were obtained from total jiaogulan saponins (TJS) and el...

  16. 40 CFR 180.1278 - Quillaja saponaria extract (saponins); exemption from the requirement of a tolerance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 25 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Quillaja saponaria extract (saponins... RESIDUES IN FOOD Exemptions From Tolerances § 180.1278 Quillaja saponaria extract (saponins); exemption... (saponins) are exempt from the requirement of a tolerance in or on all food commodities....

  17. 40 CFR 180.1278 - Quillaja saponaria extract (saponins); exemption from the requirement of a tolerance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 24 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Quillaja saponaria extract (saponins... RESIDUES IN FOOD Exemptions From Tolerances § 180.1278 Quillaja saponaria extract (saponins); exemption... (saponins) are exempt from the requirement of a tolerance in or on all food commodities....

  18. 40 CFR 180.1278 - Quillaja saponaria extract (saponins); exemption from the requirement of a tolerance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 23 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Quillaja saponaria extract (saponins... RESIDUES IN FOOD Exemptions From Tolerances § 180.1278 Quillaja saponaria extract (saponins); exemption... (saponins) are exempt from the requirement of a tolerance in or on all food commodities....

  19. 40 CFR 180.1278 - Quillaja saponaria extract (saponins); exemption from the requirement of a tolerance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 24 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Quillaja saponaria extract (saponins... RESIDUES IN FOOD Exemptions From Tolerances § 180.1278 Quillaja saponaria extract (saponins); exemption... (saponins) are exempt from the requirement of a tolerance in or on all food commodities....

  20. 40 CFR 180.1278 - Quillaja saponaria extract (saponins); exemption from the requirement of a tolerance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 25 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Quillaja saponaria extract (saponins... RESIDUES IN FOOD Exemptions From Tolerances § 180.1278 Quillaja saponaria extract (saponins); exemption... (saponins) are exempt from the requirement of a tolerance in or on all food commodities....

  1. Glycosyl trifluoroacetimidates. 2. Synthesis of dioscin and xiebai saponin I.

    PubMed

    Yu, Biao; Tao, Houchao

    2002-12-13

    Two trisaccharide steroidal saponins, dioscin (1) and Xiebai saponin I (2) with various bioactivities, were efficiently synthesized using the newly developed glycosyl N-phenyl trifluoroacetimidates (10-13) as glycosylation donors. Thus, dioscin was synthesized in five steps and a 33% overall yield from diosgenin and glycosyl trifluoroacetimidates (10 and 11). Xiebai saponin I was synthesized in eight steps and a 32% overall yield from laxogenin and glycosyl trifluoroacetimidates (10, 12, and 13), whereupon, the rare steroid laxogenin was prepared from diosgenin in four steps and an overall 69% yield. All the glycosylation reactions involved in the present syntheses demonstrated that glycosyl trifluoroacetimidates were successful donors comparable to the corresponding glycosyl trichloroacetimidates. PMID:12467439

  2. [Study on pretreatment of saponin wastewater by water hyacinthy].

    PubMed

    Li, Ze-tang; Cai, He-sheng; Ma, Teng; Wang, Hai-hua

    2006-07-01

    The pretreatment of the saponin wastewater by water hyacinth (Eichhornia crassipe) was studied. With contrast experiments, the results indicate that after 8 h adsorption by the dry air cells of water hyacinth, the concentration of chlorine ion in the saponin wastewater reduce 10%, chroma reduce 97.2%, pH change from 1.09 to 1.26, COD removal efficiency is 20%. The results indicate that the pretreatment process can improve biodegradability of the saponin wastewater, the biogas rate is 1.5 multiple than before , resulting in the benefit to the follow-up biological treatment. After the adsorption, water hyacinth biogas fermenting also improvement which is used for improve the effect of fermentative. PMID:16881311

  3. Adjuvant effects of saponins on animal immune responses*

    PubMed Central

    Rajput, Zahid Iqbal; Hu, Song-hua; Xiao, Chen-wen; Arijo, Abdullah G.

    2007-01-01

    Vaccines require optimal adjuvants including immunopotentiator and delivery systems to offer long term protection from infectious diseases in animals and man. Initially it was believed that adjuvants are responsible for promoting strong and sustainable antibody responses. Now it has been shown that adjuvants influence the isotype and avidity of antibody and also affect the properties of cell-mediated immunity. Mostly oil emulsions, lipopolysaccharides, polymers, saponins, liposomes, cytokines, ISCOMs (immunostimulating complexes), Freund’s complete adjuvant, Freund’s incomplete adjuvant, alums, bacterial toxins etc., are common adjuvants under investigation. Saponin based adjuvants have the ability to stimulate the cell mediated immune system as well as to enhance antibody production and have the advantage that only a low dose is needed for adjuvant activity. In the present study the importance of adjuvants, their role and the effect of saponin in immune system is reviewed. PMID:17323426

  4. Hemlock alkaloids from Socrates to poison aloes.

    PubMed

    Reynolds, Tom

    2005-06-01

    Hemlock (Conium maculatum L. Umbelliferae) has long been known as a poisonous plant. Toxicity is due to a group of piperidine alkaloids of which the representative members are coniine and gamma-coniceine. The latter is the more toxic and is the first formed biosynthetically. Its levels in relation to coniine vary widely according to environmental conditions and to provenance of the plants. Surprisingly, these piperidine alkaloids have turned up in quite unrelated species in the monocotyledons as well as the dicotyledons. Aloes, for instance, important medicinal plants, are not regarded as poisonous although some species are very bitter. Nevertheless a small number of mostly local species contain the alkaloids, especially gamma-coniceine and there have been records of human poisoning. The compounds are recognized by their characteristic mousy smell. Both acute and chronic symptoms have been described. The compounds are neurotoxins and death results from respiratory failure, recalling the effects of curare. Chronic non-lethal ingestion by pregnant livestock leads to foetal malformation. Both acute and chronic toxicity are seen with stock in damp meadows and have been recorded as problems especially in North America. The alkaloids derive biosynthetically from acetate units via the polyketide pathway in contrast to other piperidine alkaloids which derive from lysine.

  5. Benzylisoquinoline alkaloid biosynthesis in opium poppy.

    PubMed

    Beaudoin, Guillaume A W; Facchini, Peter J

    2014-07-01

    Opium poppy (Papaver somniferum) is one of the world's oldest medicinal plants and remains the only commercial source for the narcotic analgesics morphine, codeine and semi-synthetic derivatives such as oxycodone and naltrexone. The plant also produces several other benzylisoquinoline alkaloids with potent pharmacological properties including the vasodilator papaverine, the cough suppressant and potential anticancer drug noscapine and the antimicrobial agent sanguinarine. Opium poppy has served as a model system to investigate the biosynthesis of benzylisoquinoline alkaloids in plants. The application of biochemical and functional genomics has resulted in a recent surge in the discovery of biosynthetic genes involved in the formation of major benzylisoquinoline alkaloids in opium poppy. The availability of extensive biochemical genetic tools and information pertaining to benzylisoquinoline alkaloid metabolism is facilitating the study of a wide range of phenomena including the structural biology of novel catalysts, the genomic organization of biosynthetic genes, the cellular and sub-cellular localization of biosynthetic enzymes and a variety of biotechnological applications. In this review, we highlight recent developments and summarize the frontiers of knowledge regarding the biochemistry, cellular biology and biotechnology of benzylisoquinoline alkaloid biosynthesis in opium poppy.

  6. The alkaloids of the madangamine group.

    PubMed

    Amat, Mercedes; Pérez, Maria; Ballette, Roberto; Proto, Stefano; Bosch, Joan

    2015-01-01

    This chapter is focused on madangamines, a small group of complex diamine alkaloids isolated from marine sponges of the order Haplosclerida, and covers their isolation, characterization, biogenesis, biological activity, and synthesis. Structurally, madangamines are pentacyclic alkaloids with an unprecedented skeletal type, characterized by a common diazatricyclic core and two peripheral macrocyclic rings. The isolation of these alkaloids from Xestospongia ingens (madangamines A-E) and Pachychalina alcaloidifera (madangamine F) is described in detail. Physical and complete spectroscopic 1H and 13C NMR data are included. The proposed biogenesis of madangamines from ammonia, a functionalized three-carbon unit, and saturated or unsaturated linear long-chain dialdehydes, via partially reduced bis-alkylpyridine macrocycles, is discussed. The synthesis of alkaloids of the madangamine group has been little explored, with only one total synthesis reported so far, that of (+)-madangamine D. This review also describes several model synthetic approaches to the diazatricyclic ABC core of these alkaloids, as well as model studies on the construction of the (Z,Z)-unsaturated 11-membered E macrocycle common to madangamines A-E, the 13- and 14-membered D rings of madangamines C-E, and the all-cis-triunsaturated 15-membered D ring of madangamine A. Some members of this group have shown significant in vitro cytotoxicity against a number of cancer cell lines.

  7. Benzylisoquinoline alkaloid biosynthesis in opium poppy.

    PubMed

    Beaudoin, Guillaume A W; Facchini, Peter J

    2014-07-01

    Opium poppy (Papaver somniferum) is one of the world's oldest medicinal plants and remains the only commercial source for the narcotic analgesics morphine, codeine and semi-synthetic derivatives such as oxycodone and naltrexone. The plant also produces several other benzylisoquinoline alkaloids with potent pharmacological properties including the vasodilator papaverine, the cough suppressant and potential anticancer drug noscapine and the antimicrobial agent sanguinarine. Opium poppy has served as a model system to investigate the biosynthesis of benzylisoquinoline alkaloids in plants. The application of biochemical and functional genomics has resulted in a recent surge in the discovery of biosynthetic genes involved in the formation of major benzylisoquinoline alkaloids in opium poppy. The availability of extensive biochemical genetic tools and information pertaining to benzylisoquinoline alkaloid metabolism is facilitating the study of a wide range of phenomena including the structural biology of novel catalysts, the genomic organization of biosynthetic genes, the cellular and sub-cellular localization of biosynthetic enzymes and a variety of biotechnological applications. In this review, we highlight recent developments and summarize the frontiers of knowledge regarding the biochemistry, cellular biology and biotechnology of benzylisoquinoline alkaloid biosynthesis in opium poppy. PMID:24671624

  8. Actions of Piperidine Alkaloid Teratogens at Fetal Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptors.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Teratogenic alkaloids are found in many species of plants including Conium maculatum L., Nicotiana glauca, Nicotiana tabaccum, and multiple Lupinus spp. Fetal musculoskeletal defects produced by alkaloids from these plants include arthrogyropisis, scoliosis, torticollis, kyposis, lordosis, and clef...

  9. Biological activity of alkaloids from Solanum dulcamara L.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Padma; Sharma, Bindu; Bakshi, Nidhi

    2009-01-01

    Alkaloids are well known for their antimicrobial activity. Though all natural alkaloids come from plants, not all plants produce alkaloids. Plants of the Solanaceae family are known for their high alkaloid content. Alkaloids are found in all plant parts like roots, stems, leaves, flowers, fruits and seeds. In the present study, those plant parts of Solanum dulcamara were selected which have been reported to produce a high content of a specific alkaloid: solanine (from unripe fruits), solasodine (from flowers) and beta-solamarine (from roots). These alkaloids were extracted from various parts of S. dulcamara by well-established methods and were screened for their antibacterial activity. Human pathogenic bacteria, viz., Enterobacter aerogenes, Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus aureus, were selected for the study. All three alkaloids inhibited the growth of E. coli and S. aureus. However, no significant activity was observed against E. aerogenes. Minimum inhibitory concentration and minimum bactericidal concentration were also evaluated.

  10. Potent antitrypanosomal triterpenoid saponins from Mussaenda luteola

    PubMed Central

    Mohamed, Shaymaa M.; Bachkeet, Enaam Y.; Bayoumi, Soad A.; Jain, Surendra; Cutler, Stephen J.; Tekwani, Babu L.; Ross, Samir A.

    2016-01-01

    Five new triterpenoid saponins, heinsiagenin A 3-O-[α-l-rhamnopyranosyl-(1→2)-β-d-glucopyranosyl-(1→2)]-β-d-glucopyranoside (1), heinsiagenin A 3-O-[α-l-rhamnopyranosyl-(1→2)-β-d-glucopyranosyl-(1→2)]-[β-d-glucopyranosyl-(1→4)]-β-d-glucopyranoside (2), 2α-hydroxyheinsiagenin A 3-O-[α-l-rhamnopyranosyl-(1→2)-β-d-glucopyranosyl-(1→2)]-β-d-glucopyranoside (3), 2α-hydroxyheinsiagenin A 3-O-[β-d-glucopyranosyl-(1→2)]-[β-d-glucopyranosyl-(1→4)]-β-d-glucopyranoside (4) and N-(2S, 3R, 4R-3-methyl-4-pentanolid-2-yl)-18-hydroxylanosta-8 (9), 22E, 24E-trien-27-amide-3-O-[α-l-rhamnopyranosyl-(1→2)-β-d-glucopyranosyl-(1→2)]-[β-d-glucopyranosyl-(1→4)]-β-d-glucopyranoside (5) were isolated from the aerial parts of Mussaenda luteola Delile (Rubiaceae). Structural elucidation was based on the analysis of spectroscopic data (1D and 2D NMR) and HR-ESI-MS. Compound 1 showed potent antitrypanosomal activity with an IC50 value of 8.80 μM. Compounds 2–4 showed highly potent antitrypanosomal activity with IC50 values ranging between (2.57–2.84 μM) and IC90 values ranging between (3.36–4.35 μM), which are 5 fold greater than the positive control DFMO (IC50 and IC90 values of 13.06 and 28.99 μM, respectively). Compounds 1 and 2 showed moderate affinity to μ-opioid receptors with Ki values of 9.936 μM and 0.872 μM, respectively compared to a Ki value of 1.958 nM for the positive control, naloxone HCl. PMID:26524249

  11. Potent antitrypanosomal triterpenoid saponins from Mussaenda luteola.

    PubMed

    Mohamed, Shaymaa M; Bachkeet, Enaam Y; Bayoumi, Soad A; Jain, Surendra; Cutler, Stephen J; Tekwani, Babu L; Ross, Samir A

    2015-12-01

    Five new triterpenoid saponins, heinsiagenin A 3-O-[α-l-rhamnopyranosyl-(1→2)-β-d-glucopyranosyl-(1→2)]-β-d-glucopyranoside (1), heinsiagenin A 3-O-[α-l-rhamnopyranosyl-(1→2)-β-d-glucopyranosyl-(1→2)]-[β-d-glucopyranosyl-(1→4)]-β-d-glucopyranoside (2), 2α-hydroxyheinsiagenin A 3-O-[α-l-rhamnopyranosyl-(1→2)-β-d-glucopyranosyl-(1→2)]-β-d-glucopyranoside (3), 2α-hydroxyheinsiagenin A 3-O-[β-d-glucopyranosyl-(1→2)]-[β-d-glucopyranosyl-(1→4)]-β-d-glucopyranoside (4) and N-(2S, 3R, 4R-3-methyl-4-pentanolid-2-yl)-18-hydroxylanosta-8 (9), 22E, 24E-trien-27-amide-3-O-[α-l-rhamnopyranosyl-(1→2)-β-d-glucopyranosyl-(1→2)]-[β-d-glucopyranosyl-(1→4)]-β-d-glucopyranoside (5) were isolated from the aerial parts of Mussaenda luteola Delile (Rubiaceae). Structural elucidation was based on the analysis of spectroscopic data (1D and 2D NMR) and HR-ESI-MS. Compound 1 showed potent antitrypanosomal activity with an IC50 value of 8.80μM. Compounds 2-4 showed highly potent antitrypanosomal activity with IC50 values ranging between (2.57-2.84μM) and IC90 values ranging between (3.36-4.35μM), which are 5 fold greater than the positive control DFMO (IC50 and IC90 values of 13.06 and 28.99μM, respectively). Compounds 1 and 2 showed moderate affinity to μ-opioid receptors with Ki values of 9.936μM and 0.872μM, respectively compared to a Ki value of 1.958nM for the positive control, naloxone HCl. PMID:26524249

  12. The Double-Bond Configuration of Corynanthean Alkaloids and Its Impact on Monoterpenoid Indole Alkaloid Biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Eckermann, Ruben; Gaich, Tanja

    2016-04-11

    Experimental evidence is provided for the coherence of the double-bond geometry and the occurrence of "secondary cyclizations" in the biosynthesis of monoterpenoid indole alkaloids. Biosynthetically, akuammiline, C-mavacurine, and Strychnos alkaloids are proposed to be derived from the corynanthean alkaloid geissoschizine, a key intermediate in the biosynthetic pathway of these monoterpenoid indole alkaloids. This process occurs by so-called "secondary cyclizations" from geissoschizine or its derivatives. Although corynanthean alkaloids like geissoschizine incorporate E or Z double bonds located at C19-C20, the alkaloids downstream in the biosynthesis exclusively exhibit the E double bond. This study shows that secondary cyclizations preferentially occur with the E isomer of geissoschizine or its derivatives. This is attributed to the flexibility of the quinolizidine system of the corynanthean alkaloids, which can adopt a cis or trans conformation. For the secondary cyclization to take place, the cis-quinolizidine conformation is required. Experimental evidence supports the hypothesis that the E double bond of geissoschizine induces the cis conformation, whereas the Z double bond induces the trans conformation, which prohibits secondary cyclization of the Z compounds.

  13. Simulation of the type of coralin alkaloid-DNA binding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kulikov, K. G.; Koshlan, T. V.

    2015-05-01

    Interaction between a synthesized coralin protoberberine alkaloid and the DNA double helix of the calf's thymus in a salt solution is studied by optical absorption spectroscopy and spectropolarimetry. The dependence of the spectral characteristics of the alkaloid on a ratio between the DNA base pair concentration and the alkaloid molecule concentration is considered. The parameters of bonds between the coralin alkaloid and the DNA double helix are determined using modified McGhee-von Hippel equations.

  14. Two new furostanol saponins from Tribulus terrestris L.

    PubMed

    Xu, Tun-Hai; Xu, Ya-Juan; Xie, Sheng-Xiu; Zhao, Hong-Feng; Han, Dong; Li, Yu; Niu, Jian-Zhao; Xu, Dong-Ming

    2008-01-01

    Two new furostanol saponins, tribufurosides B (1) and C (2), were isolated from the fruits of Tribulus terrestris L. With the help of chemical and spectral analyses (IR, MS, 1D NMR and 2D NMR), the structures of two new furostanol saponins were established as 26-O-beta-d-glucopyranosyl-(25S)-5alpha-furost-20(22)-en-2alpha,3beta,26-triol-3-O-beta-d-galactopyranosyl(1 --> 2)-beta-d-glucopyranosyl(1 --> 2)-beta-d-galactopyranoside (1) and (25S)-5alpha-furost-20(22)-en-12-one-3beta, 26-diol-26-O-beta-d-glucopyranoside (2).

  15. [Inactivated saponin vaccine against salmonellal abortion in sheep].

    PubMed

    Girginov, G; Vodas, K; Bozhilov, B

    1978-01-01

    An inactivated saponine vaccine is prepared from five highly immunogenic Salmonella abortus ovis strains, selected by means of a biological test on white rats. Saline was used as a diluent of the vaccine, with the addition of 30 per cent glycerine, 0.012 per cent saponine and 0.1 per cent propiolactone. The optimum immunization dose of 5 cm3 is injected singly subcutaneously behind the elbow, two and a half months after impregnation. The vaccine is applied on infected farms before the disease occurs. The cellular-humoral immunity, which forms 14 days after the injection, lasts 4--5 months and protects the sheep against salmonellosis abortion. PMID:571645

  16. Steroidal Saponins from the Rhizomes of Anemarrhena asphodeloides.

    PubMed

    Yang, Bing-You; Zhang, Jing; Liu, Yan; Kuang, Hai-Xue

    2016-01-01

    Four new steroid saponins 1-4 were isolated from the rhizomes of Anemarrhena asphodeloides (Asparagaceae), as well as four known saponins: anemarsaponin B (5) timosaponin D (6), timosaponin E1 (7) anemarsaponin B II (8). Their structures were established through UV and NMR as well as MS data. All the compounds were evaluated for cytotoxicity against HepG2 and SGC7901 human cancer lines. Compounds 3 and 7 displayed medium antiproliferative activities on HepG2 and SGC7901 cells, with IC50 values of 43.90 and 57.90 μM, respectively. PMID:27548119

  17. Rotational Investigation of Tropane Alkaloids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cocinero, Emilio J.; Lesarri, Alberto; Ecija, Patricia; Grabow, Jens-Uwe; Fernández, Jose A.; Castano, Fernando

    2010-06-01

    We report an investigation of the rotational spectrum of several tropane alkaloids using the new Balle-Flygare-type FT-MW spectrometer built at the University of the Basque Country. The initial work focused on the azabicycles of tropinone, scopine and scopoline, vaporized using heating methods. For tropinone the spectrum confirmed the presence of equatorial and axial conformers originated by the inversion of the N-methyl group, with the tropane motif adopting a distorted chair configuration. The determination of substitution and effective structures for the two conformers included the 13C, 15N and 18O isotopomers observed in natural abundance. The structures revealed the flexibility and structural changes associated to the N-methyl inversion, mostly a flattening at the nitrogen atom and a simultaneous rising of the carbonyl group in the axial form. The investigation of scopine gave an intense spectrum, but it was inconsistent with the structural models expected for this molecule. The carrier of the new spectrum was later identified as scopoline, generated in situ by an intramolecular reaction at the moderate temperatures of the nozzle. A single conformation was detected for scopoline, with an ether bridge seriously distorting the tropane motif. E. J. Cocinero, A. Lesarri, P. écija, J.-U. Grabow, J. A. Fernández, F. Castaño, in publication, 2010 E. J. Cocinero, A. Lesarri, P. Écija, J.-U. Grabow, J. A. Fernández, F. Castaño, Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys.,in press, 2010

  18. An efficient synthesis of loline alkaloids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cakmak, Mesut; Mayer, Peter; Trauner, Dirk

    2011-07-01

    Loline (1) is a small alkaloid that, in spite of its simple-looking structure, has posed surprising challenges to synthetic chemists. It has been known for more than a century and has been the subject of extensive biological investigations, but only two total syntheses have been achieved to date. Here, we report an asymmetric total synthesis of loline that, with less then ten steps, is remarkably short. Our synthesis incorporates a Sharpless epoxidation, a Grubbs olefin metathesis and an unprecedented transannular aminobromination, which converts an eight-membered cyclic carbamate into a bromopyrrolizidine. The synthesis is marked by a high degree of chemo- and stereoselectivity and gives access to several members of the loline alkaloid family. It delivers sufficient material to support a programme aimed at studying the complex interactions between plants, fungi, insects and bacteria brokered by loline alkaloids.

  19. Ether bridge formation in loline alkaloid biosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Juan; Bhardwaj, Minakshi; Faulkner, Jerome R.; Nagabhyru, Padmaja; Charlton, Nikki D.; Higashi, Richard M.; Miller, Anne-Frances; Young, Carolyn A.; Grossman, Robert B.; Schardl, Christopher L.

    2014-01-01

    Lolines are potent insecticidal agents produced by endophytic fungi of cool-season grasses. These alkaloids are composed of a pyrrolizidine ring system and an uncommon ether bridge linking carbons 2 and 7. Previous results indicated that 1-aminopyrrolizidine was a pathway intermediate. We used RNA interference to knock down expression of lolO, resulting in the accumulation of a novel alkaloid identified as exo-1-acetamidopyrrolizidine based on high-resolution MS and NMR. Genomes of endophytes differing in alkaloid profiles were sequenced, revealing that those with mutated lolO accumulated exo-1-acetamidopyrrolizidine but no lolines. Heterologous expression of wild-type lolO complemented a lolO mutant, resulting in the production of N-acetylnorloline. These results indicated that the non-heme iron oxygenase, LolO, is required for ether bridge formation, probably through oxidation of exo-1-acetamidopyrrolizidine. PMID:24374065

  20. Alfalfa Root Flavonoid Production Is Nitrogen Regulated.

    PubMed Central

    Coronado, C.; Zuanazzi, JAS.; Sallaud, C.; Quirion, J. C.; Esnault, R.; Husson, H. P.; Kondorosi, A.; Ratet, P.

    1995-01-01

    Flavonoids produced by legume roots are signal molecules acting both as chemoattractants and nod gene inducers for the symbiotic Rhizobium partner. Combined nitrogen inhibits the establishment of the symbiosis. To know whether nitrogen nutrition could act at the level of signal production, we have studied the expression of flavonoid biosynthetic genes as well as the production of flavonoids in the roots of plants grown under nitrogen-limiting or nonlimiting conditions. We show here that growth of the plant under nitrogen-limiting conditions results in the enhancement of expression of the flavonoid biosynthesis genes chalcone synthase and isoflavone reductase and in an increase of root flavonoid and isoflavonoid production as well as in the Rhizobium meliloti nod gene-inducing activity of the root extract. These results indicate that in alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.) roots, the production of flavonoids can be influenced by the nitrogen nutrition of the plant. PMID:12228491

  1. Flavonoid Bioavailability and Attempts for Bioavailability Enhancement

    PubMed Central

    Thilakarathna, Surangi H.; Rupasinghe, H. P. Vasantha

    2013-01-01

    Flavonoids are a group of phytochemicals that have shown numerous health effects and have therefore been studied extensively. Of the six common food flavonoid classes, flavonols are distributed ubiquitously among different plant foods whereas appreciable amounts of isoflavones are found in leguminous plant-based foods. Flavonoids have shown promising health promoting effects in human cell culture, experimental animal and human clinical studies. They have shown antioxidant, hypocholesterolemic, anti-inflammatory effects as well as ability to modulate cell signaling and gene expression related disease development. Low bioavailability of flavonoids has been a concern as it can limit or even hinder their health effects. Therefore, attempts to improve their bioavailability in order to improve the efficacy of flavonoids are being studied. Further investigations on bioavailability are warranted as it is a determining factor for flavonoid biological activity. PMID:23989753

  2. Alkaloid profiles of Mimosa tenuiflora and associated methods of analysis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The alkaloid contents of the leaves and seeds of M. tenuiflora collected from northeastern Brazil were studied. Alkaloids were isolated by classical acid/base extraction procedures and by cation exchange solid phase extraction. The crude alkaloid fractions were then analysed by thin layer chromatogr...

  3. 21 CFR 119.1 - Dietary supplements containing ephedrine alkaloids.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Dietary supplements containing ephedrine alkaloids... UNREASONABLE RISK § 119.1 Dietary supplements containing ephedrine alkaloids. Dietary supplements containing ephedrine alkaloids present an unreasonable risk of illness or injury under conditions of use recommended...

  4. 21 CFR 119.1 - Dietary supplements containing ephedrine alkaloids.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Dietary supplements containing ephedrine alkaloids... UNREASONABLE RISK § 119.1 Dietary supplements containing ephedrine alkaloids. Dietary supplements containing ephedrine alkaloids present an unreasonable risk of illness or injury under conditions of use recommended...

  5. 21 CFR 119.1 - Dietary supplements containing ephedrine alkaloids.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Dietary supplements containing ephedrine alkaloids... UNREASONABLE RISK § 119.1 Dietary supplements containing ephedrine alkaloids. Dietary supplements containing ephedrine alkaloids present an unreasonable risk of illness or injury under conditions of use recommended...

  6. 21 CFR 119.1 - Dietary supplements containing ephedrine alkaloids.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Dietary supplements containing ephedrine alkaloids... UNREASONABLE RISK § 119.1 Dietary supplements containing ephedrine alkaloids. Dietary supplements containing ephedrine alkaloids present an unreasonable risk of illness or injury under conditions of use recommended...

  7. 21 CFR 119.1 - Dietary supplements containing ephedrine alkaloids.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Dietary supplements containing ephedrine alkaloids... UNREASONABLE RISK § 119.1 Dietary supplements containing ephedrine alkaloids. Dietary supplements containing ephedrine alkaloids present an unreasonable risk of illness or injury under conditions of use recommended...

  8. Production, detection, and purification of clavine-type ergot alkaloids.

    PubMed

    Wallwey, Christiane; Li, Shu-Ming

    2012-01-01

    Ergot alkaloids are indole derivatives with diverse structures and biological activities. This chapter describes the procedure from fungal cultivation to purified ergot alkaloids, as exemplified by fumigaclavine A in Penicillium commune. Furthermore, useful notes for working with purified ergot alkaloids are given. PMID:23065612

  9. Pancratium canariense as an important source of amaryllidaceae alkaloids.

    PubMed

    Cedrón, Juan C; Oberti, Juan C; Estévez-Braun, Ana; Ravelo, Angel G; Del Arco-Aguilar, Marcelino; López, Matías

    2009-01-01

    Four new alkaloids (1-4) have been isolated from a methanolic extract of bulbs of Pancratium canariense, together with 12 known alkaloids (5-16). The structures of the new alkaloids were determined by extensive 1D and 2D NMR spectroscopic studies and X-ray diffraction.

  10. Separation of soybean saponins from soybean meal by a technology of foam fractionation and resin adsorption.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Jianxing; Wu, Zhaoliang; Liu, Wei; Gao, Yanfei; Guo, Shenghao; Kang, Shufang

    2016-05-18

    Foam fractionation and resin adsorption were used to recover soybean saponins from the industrial residue of soybean meal. First, a two-stage foam fractionation technology was studied for concentrating soybean saponins from the leaching liquor. Subsequently, resin adsorption was used to purify soybean saponins from the foamate in foam fractionation. The results showed that the enrichment ratio, the recovery percentage, and the purity of soybean saponins by using the two-stage foam fractionation technology could reach 4.45, 74%, and 67%, respectively. After resin adsorption and desorption, the purity of soybean saponins in the freeze-dried powder from the desorption solution was 88.4%.

  11. Evaporative light scattering detection of pyrrolizidine alkaloids.

    PubMed

    Schaneberg, Brian T; Molyneux, Russell J; Khan, Ikhlas A

    2004-01-01

    A reverse-phase high-performance liquid chromatography method utilizing evaporative light scattering detection (ELSD) has been developed for the simultaneous detection of hepatotoxic pyrrolizidine alkaloids with and without chromophores, namely, riddelliine, riddelliine N-oxide, senecionine, senecionine N-oxide, seneciphylline, retrorsine, integerrimine, lasiocarpine and heliotrine. Pyrrolizidine alkaloids were detected in five plant extracts (Senecio spartioides, S. douglasii var. longilobus, S. jacobaea, S. intergerrimus var. exaltatus and Symphytum officinale). The detection of heliotrine (which does not contain a chromophore) was much improved by ELSD compared with photodiode array detection. PMID:14979525

  12. Antitussive indole alkaloids from Kopsia hainanensis.

    PubMed

    Tan, Min-Jia; Yin, Chun; Tang, Chun-Ping; Ke, Chang-Qiang; Lin, Ge; Ye, Yang

    2011-06-01

    Three new indole alkaloids, named kopsihainins A-C (1-3), and two known compounds, kopsinine (4) and methyl demethoxycarbonylchanofruticosinate (5), were isolated from the stems of Kopsia hainanensis. Their structures were determined using extensive spectroscopic methods. The two main constituents 4 and 5 exhibited significant antitussive activity in a citric acid induced guinea pig cough model. The antitussive effect of 4 was demonstrated to interact with the δ-opioid receptor. This is the first report of antitussive effects of aspidofractinine type and chanofruticosinate type alkaloids.

  13. The expanding universe of alkaloid biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    De Luca, V; Laflamme, P

    2001-06-01

    Characterization of many of the major gene families responsible for the generation of central intermediates and for their decoration, together with the development of large genomics and proteomics databases, has revolutionized our capability to identify exotic and interesting natural-product pathways. Over the next few years, these tools will facilitate dramatic advances in our knowledge of the biosynthesis of alkaloids, which will far surpass that which we have learned in the past 50 years. These tools will also be exploited for the rapid characterization of regulatory genes, which control the development of specialized cell factories for alkaloid biosynthesis.

  14. Antimicrobial hasubanalactam alkaloid from Stephania glabra.

    PubMed

    Semwal, Deepak Kumar; Rawat, Usha

    2009-03-01

    A novel hasubanalactam alkaloid, named glabradine, has been isolated from the tubers of Stephania glabra, together with three known quaternary protoberberine alkaloids, palmatine, dehydrocorydalmine and stepharanine. The structure of glabradine was assigned as 7-O-demethyl-N,O-dimethyloxostephinine, by means of rigorous spectroscopic analysis including 2 D NMR measurements. It was evaluated for antimicrobial activity against Staphylococcus aureus, S. mutans, Microsporum gypseum, M. canis and Trichophyton rubrum and displayed potent antimicrobial activity superior to those of novobiocin and erythromycin used as positive controls. PMID:19148860

  15. Effect of dietary karaya saponin on serum and egg yolk cholesterol in laying hens.

    PubMed

    Afrose, S; Hossain, M S; Tsujii, H

    2010-12-01

    1. The objective of the study was to investigate the effect of dietary karaya saponin on cholesterol deposition in laying hens. 2. A total of 40 Boris Brown hens were randomly assigned at 20 weeks of age to 4 treatment groups and fed on diets supplemented with 0 (control), 25, 50 or 75 mg/kg karaya saponin for an 8-week experimental period. 3. After 8 weeks of dietary supplementation, karaya-saponin-treated groups had significantly lower serum cholesterol (23·0%) and triglycerides but increased high density lipoproteins cholesterol concentration than controls, irrespective of karaya saponin content in the diet. Egg yolk cholesterol and triglycerides were also significantly reduced by dietary karaya saponin. Hepatic cholesterol and triglycerides were significantly reduced by karaya saponin but bile acids concentration in the faeces and liver were significantly increased by karaya saponin. The concentrations of oleic, linoleic and linolenic acids in the yolk were greater in hens receiving karaya saponin than in controls. Karaya saponin significantly increased egg production, feed efficiency and yolk colour compared with controls. Karaya saponin tended to increase egg weight, feed consumption, Haugh units, albumen weight and yolk index. 4. In conclusion, karaya saponin is a potential agent for reducing yolk cholesterol concentration together with an overall increase of production performance and improvement in egg quality. PMID:21161787

  16. Effects of saponins against clinical E. coli strains and eukaryotic cell line.

    PubMed

    Arabski, Michał; Węgierek-Ciuk, Aneta; Czerwonka, Grzegorz; Lankoff, Anna; Kaca, Wiesław

    2012-01-01

    Saponins are detergent-like substances showing antibacterial as well as anticancer potential. In this study, the effects of saponins from Quillaja saponaria were analyzed against prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells. Multidrug-resistant clinical E. coli strains were isolated from human urine. As eukaryotic cells, the CHO-K1 cell lines were applied. Antibacterial effect of ampicillin, streptomycin, and ciprofloxacin in the presence of saponins was measured by cultivation methods. Properties of saponins against CHO-K1 cells were measured by the MTT test, hemolysis assay and flow cytometry. Saponin from Quillaja saponaria has a cytotoxic effect at concentrations higher than 25 μg/mL and in the range of 12-50 μg/mL significantly increases the level of early apoptotic cells. Saponin at dose of 12 μg/mL enhances the six E. coli strains growth. We postulate that saponins increase the influx of nutrients from the medium into E. coli cells. Saponins do not have synergetic effects on antibacterial action of tested antibiotics. In contrary, in the presence of saponins and antibiotics, more CFU/mL E. coli cells were observed. This effect was similar to saponins action alone towards E. coli cells. In conclusion, saponins was cytotoxic against CHO-K1 cells, whereas against E. coli cells this effect was not observed. PMID:22500084

  17. Studies on saponin production in tropical medicinal plants Maesa argentea and Maesa lanceolata

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faizal, Ahmad; Geelen, Danny

    2015-09-01

    The continuous need for new compounds with important medicinal activities has lead to the identification and characterization of various plant-derived natural products. As a part of this program, we studied the saponin production from two tropical medicinal plants Maesa argentea and M. lanceolata and evaluated several treatments to enhance their saponin production. In this experiment, we present the analyses of saponin production from greenhouse grown plants by means of TLC and HPLC-MS. We observed that the content of saponin from these plants varied depending on organ and physiological age of the plants. In addition, the impact of elicitors on saponin accumulation on in vitro grown plants was analyzed using TLC. The production of saponin was very stable and not affected by treatment with methyl jasmonate, and salicylic acid. In conclusion, Maesa saponins are constitutively produced in plants and the level of these compounds in plants is mainly affected by the developmental or physiological stage.

  18. A new steroidal saponin from dragon's blood of Dracaena cambodiana.

    PubMed

    Luo, Ying; Shen, Hai-Yan; Zuo, Wen-Jian; Wang, Hui; Mei, Wen-Li; Dai, Hao-Fu

    2015-01-01

    Phytochemical study on dragon's blood of Dracaena cambodiana led to a new steroidal saponin, cambodianoside G(1), and six known ones (2-7). The structure of the new compound was elucidated on the basis of detailed spectroscopic analysis. Evaluation of antibacterial activities showed that compound 7 exhibited antibacterial activity against Staphylococcus aureus. PMID:25523446

  19. A new steroidal saponin from dragon's blood of Dracaena cambodiana.

    PubMed

    Luo, Ying; Shen, Hai-Yan; Zuo, Wen-Jian; Wang, Hui; Mei, Wen-Li; Dai, Hao-Fu

    2015-01-01

    Phytochemical study on dragon's blood of Dracaena cambodiana led to a new steroidal saponin, cambodianoside G(1), and six known ones (2-7). The structure of the new compound was elucidated on the basis of detailed spectroscopic analysis. Evaluation of antibacterial activities showed that compound 7 exhibited antibacterial activity against Staphylococcus aureus.

  20. Interaction of Quillaja bark saponins with food-relevant proteins.

    PubMed

    Kezwon, Aleksandra; Wojciechowski, Kamil

    2014-07-01

    The surface activity and aggregation behaviour of two Quillaja bark saponins (QBS) are compared using surface tension, conductometry and light scattering. Despite formally of the same origin (bark of the Quillaja saponaria Molina tree), the two QBS show markedly different ionic characters and critical micelle concentrations (7.7·10(-6) mol·dm(-3) and 1.2·10(-4) mol·dm(-3)). The new interpretation of the surface tension isotherms for both QBS allowed us to propose an explanation for the previous discrepancy concerning the orientation of the saponin molecules in the adsorbed layer. The effect of three food-related proteins (hen egg lysozyme, bovine β-lactoglobulin and β-casein) on surface tension of the saponins is also described. Dynamic surface tension was measured at fixed protein concentrations and QBS concentrations varying in the range 5·10(-7)-1·10(-3) mol·dm(-3). Both dynamic and extrapolated equilibrium surface tensions of the protein/QBS mixtures depend not only on the protein, but also on the QBS source. In general, the surface tension for mixtures of the QBS with lower CMC and less ionic character shows less pronounced synergistic effects. This is especially well visible for β-casein/QBS mixtures, where a characteristic maximum in the surface tension isotherm around the molar ratio of one can be noticed for one saponin product, but not for the other.

  1. Absorption and Transport of Sea Cucumber Saponins from Apostichopus japonicus.

    PubMed

    Li, Shuai; Wang, Yuanhong; Jiang, Tingfu; Wang, Han; Yang, Shuang; Lv, Zhihua

    2016-01-01

    The present study is focused on the intestinal absorption of sea cucumber saponins. We determined the pharmacokinetic characteristics and bioavailability of Echinoside A and Holotoxin A₁; the findings indicated that the bioavailability of Holotoxin A₁ was lower than Echinoside A. We inferred that the differences in chemical structure between compounds was a factor that explained their different characteristics of transport across the intestine. In order to confirm the absorption characteristics of Echinoside A and Holotoxin A₁, we examined their transport across Caco-2 cell monolayer and effective permeability by single-pass intestinal perfusion. The results of Caco-2 cell model indicate that Echinoside A is transported by passive diffusion, and not influenced by the exocytosis of P-glycoprotein (P-gp, expressed in the apical side of Caco-2 monolayers as the classic inhibitor). The intestinal perfusion also demonstrated well the absorption of Echinoside A and poor absorption of Holotoxin A₁, which matched up with the result of the Caco-2 cell model. The results demonstrated our conjecture and provides fundamental information on the relationship between the chemical structure of these sea cucumber saponins and their absorption characteristics, and we believe that our findings build a foundation for the further metabolism study of sea cucumber saponins and contribute to the further clinical research of saponins. PMID:27322290

  2. Lipidated Steroid Saponins from Dioscorea villosa (Wild Yam)†

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Shi-Hui; Cai, Geping; Napolitano, José G.; Nikolić, Dejan; Lankin, David C.; McAlpine, James B.; van Breemen, Richard B.; Soejarto, Djaja D.; Pauli, Guido F.; Chen, Shao-Nong

    2014-01-01

    Two groups of lipidated steroid saponins including seven new compounds (2, 3, 5, and 7–10) were isolated from the widely used botanical, wild yam (Dioscorea villosa), employing a fractionation protocol of metabolomic mining. This methodology has very recently led to the isolation of 14 diarylheptanoids from the same plant. Together with these lipidated steroid saponins, they establish additional new markers for Dioscorea villosa. The lipidation of steroids with analogue long-chain fatty acids containing different degrees of unsaturation generates entire series of compounds which are difficult to purify and analyze. The structures of the two series of lipidated steroid saponins (series A and B) were demonstrated by a combination of 1D and 2D NMR as well as GC-MS after chemical modification. Series A was determined to be a mixture of lipidated spirostanol glycosides (1–5), while series B (6–10) proved to be a mixture of five lipidated clionasterol glucosides. The latter group represents the first derivatives of clionasterol to be found in D. villosa. The discovery of this specific structural type of aliphatic esters of steroid saponins expands the characterization of the secondary metabolome of D. villosa. It also may inspire biological studies which take into account the lipophilic character and significantly altered physiochemical characteristics of these otherwise relatively polar phytoconstituents. PMID:23968665

  3. Lipidated steroid saponins from Dioscorea villosa (wild yam).

    PubMed

    Dong, Shi-Hui; Cai, Geping; Napolitano, José G; Nikolić, Dejan; Lankin, David C; McAlpine, James B; van Breemen, Richard B; Soejarto, Djaja D; Pauli, Guido F; Chen, Shao-Nong

    2013-12-01

    Two groups of lipidated steroid saponins including seven new compounds (2, 3, 5, and 7-10) were isolated from the widely used botanical, wild yam (Dioscorea villosa), employing a fractionation protocol of metabolomic mining. This methodology recently led to the isolation of 14 diarylheptanoids from the same plant. Together with these lipidated steroid saponins, they establish additional new markers for D. villosa. The lipidation of steroids with analog long-chain fatty acids containing different degrees of unsaturation generates an entire series of compounds which are difficult to purify and analyze. The structures of the two series of lipidated steroid saponins (series A and B) were established by a combination of 1D and 2D NMR as well as GC-MS after chemical modification. Series A was determined to be a mixture of lipidated spirostanol glycosides (1-5), while series B (6-10) was proved to be a mixture of five lipidated clionasterol glucosides. The latter group represents the first derivatives of clionasterol to be found in D. villosa. The discovery of this specific structural type of aliphatic esters of steroid saponins expands the characterization of the secondary metabolome of D. villosa. It may also inspire biological studies which take into account the lipophilic character and significantly altered physiochemical characteristics of these otherwise relatively polar phytoconstituents.

  4. Absorption and Transport of Sea Cucumber Saponins from Apostichopus japonicus.

    PubMed

    Li, Shuai; Wang, Yuanhong; Jiang, Tingfu; Wang, Han; Yang, Shuang; Lv, Zhihua

    2016-01-01

    The present study is focused on the intestinal absorption of sea cucumber saponins. We determined the pharmacokinetic characteristics and bioavailability of Echinoside A and Holotoxin A₁; the findings indicated that the bioavailability of Holotoxin A₁ was lower than Echinoside A. We inferred that the differences in chemical structure between compounds was a factor that explained their different characteristics of transport across the intestine. In order to confirm the absorption characteristics of Echinoside A and Holotoxin A₁, we examined their transport across Caco-2 cell monolayer and effective permeability by single-pass intestinal perfusion. The results of Caco-2 cell model indicate that Echinoside A is transported by passive diffusion, and not influenced by the exocytosis of P-glycoprotein (P-gp, expressed in the apical side of Caco-2 monolayers as the classic inhibitor). The intestinal perfusion also demonstrated well the absorption of Echinoside A and poor absorption of Holotoxin A₁, which matched up with the result of the Caco-2 cell model. The results demonstrated our conjecture and provides fundamental information on the relationship between the chemical structure of these sea cucumber saponins and their absorption characteristics, and we believe that our findings build a foundation for the further metabolism study of sea cucumber saponins and contribute to the further clinical research of saponins.

  5. Absorption and Transport of Sea Cucumber Saponins from Apostichopus japonicus

    PubMed Central

    Li, Shuai; Wang, Yuanhong; Jiang, Tingfu; Wang, Han; Yang, Shuang; Lv, Zhihua

    2016-01-01

    The present study is focused on the intestinal absorption of sea cucumber saponins. We determined the pharmacokinetic characteristics and bioavailability of Echinoside A and Holotoxin A1; the findings indicated that the bioavailability of Holotoxin A1 was lower than Echinoside A. We inferred that the differences in chemical structure between compounds was a factor that explained their different characteristics of transport across the intestine. In order to confirm the absorption characteristics of Echinoside A and Holotoxin A1, we examined their transport across Caco-2 cell monolayer and effective permeability by single-pass intestinal perfusion. The results of Caco-2 cell model indicate that Echinoside A is transported by passive diffusion, and not influenced by the exocytosis of P-glycoprotein (P-gp, expressed in the apical side of Caco-2 monolayers as the classic inhibitor). The intestinal perfusion also demonstrated well the absorption of Echinoside A and poor absorption of Holotoxin A1, which matched up with the result of the Caco-2 cell model. The results demonstrated our conjecture and provides fundamental information on the relationship between the chemical structure of these sea cucumber saponins and their absorption characteristics, and we believe that our findings build a foundation for the further metabolism study of sea cucumber saponins and contribute to the further clinical research of saponins. PMID:27322290

  6. Cycloartane-Type Saponins from Astragalus tmoleus var. tmoleus.

    PubMed

    Avunduk, Sibel; Mitaine-Offer, Anne-Claire; Miyamoto, Tomofumi; Tanaka, Chiaki; Lacaille-Dubois, Marie-Aleth

    2016-01-01

    Five known cycloartane-type glycosides were isolated from the roots of A. tmoleus Boiss. var. tmoleus. The identification of these compounds was mainly achieved by 1D and 2D NMR spectroscopic techniques and FABMS. The results of our studies confirm that triterpene saponins with the cycloartane-type skeleton might be chemotaxonomically significant for the genus Astragalus.

  7. Oleanane-type triterpenoid saponins from Silene armeria.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Nobuyuki; Li, Wei; Koike, Kazuo

    2016-09-01

    Twelve triterpenoid saponins, including seven compounds (i.e., armerosides A-G) hitherto unknown, were isolated from whole plants of Silene armeria. Their structures were established based on extensive spectroscopic analyses and chemical methods. From a biosynthetic perspective, C-23 oxidation of the sapogenin appears to be a key factor in the glycosylation pathway. PMID:27460531

  8. Steroidal saponins from fresh stems of Dracaena angustifolia

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Six new steroidal saponins (1-6), angudracanosides A-F, were isolated from fresh stems of Dracaena angustifolia, together with eight known compounds. The structures of compounds 1-6 were determined by detailed spectroscopic analyses and chemical methods. Antifungal testing of all compounds showed th...

  9. Vegetable flavonoids and cardiovascular disease.

    PubMed

    Terao, Junji; Kawai, Yoshichika; Murota, Kaeko

    2008-01-01

    Studies have suggested that dietary flavonoids are helpful in the prevention of atherosclerosis and cardiovascular disease. Antioxidant activity should be noted as underlying mechanism of their health impact in the vascular system, as atherosclerosis is closely related to oxidative events such as oxidized LDL accumulation in the macrophages. Vegetables contain a variety of flavonoids, such as flavonols, flavones and anthocyanidins. We focused on quercetin (3,3',4',5,7- pentahydroxyflavone), a major flavonoid in onion, and its anti-atherosclerotic effect was examined from the aspect of the bioavailability and translocation to the target site. Although quercetin exists as its glucoside form in onion, it is metabolized into several glucuronides and/or sulfate conjugates with or without methylation during its intestinal absorption. We found that these metabolites circulating in the human blood stream were mostly localized in plasma albumin fraction, but not LDL fraction. Onion consumption failed to enhance the antioxidant activity of plasma fraction against LDL oxidation, indicating that the level of quercetin metabolites bound to albumin is insufficient to exert the antioxidative effect in vivo. In contrast, we discovered that quercetin metabolites accumulate in the aorta tissue and exerted their antioxidant activity, when rabbits were fed with quercetin glucoside and high cholesterol diet. Furthermore, quercetin metabolites were detected in human atherosclerotic aorta exclusively. These imply that quercetin metabolites are incorporated into the atherosclerotic region and act as complementary antioxidants, when oxidative stress is loaded in the vascular system. It is likely that plasma albumin is a carrier for translocation of quercetin metabolites to vascular target. PMID:18296359

  10. Flavonoids from Prunus serotina Ehrh.

    PubMed

    Olszewska, Monika

    2005-01-01

    In the course of chemotaxonomic study of the genus Prunus, seven flavonol glycosides were isolated from the leaves of Prunus serotina Ehrh., characterized by UV and NMR spectroscopy, and identified finally as three quercetin monosides: hyperoside, avicularin, reynoutrin, three quercetin biosides: 3-O-(6"-O-alpha-L-rhamnopyranosyl)-beta-D-glucopyranoside, 3-O-(2"-O-alpha-L-rhamnopyranosyl)-beta-D-glucopyranoside and 3-O-(2"-O-alpha-L-rhamnopyranosyl)-beta-D-galactopyranoside as well isorhamnetin 3-O-(6"-O-alpha-L-rhamnopyranosyl)-beta-D-glucopyranoside. The presence of determined flavonoids in the flowers was confirmed by TLC. PMID:16161354

  11. Therapeutic Potential of Steroidal Alkaloids in Cancer and Other Diseases.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Qi-Wei; Chen, Mei-Wan; Cheng, Ke-Jun; Yu, Pei-Zhong; Wei, Xing; Shi, Zhi

    2016-01-01

    Steroidal alkaloids are a class of secondary metabolites isolated from plants, amphibians, and marine invertebrates. Evidence accumulated in the recent two decades demonstrates that steroidal alkaloids have a wide range of bioactivities including anticancer, antimicrobial, anti-inflammatory, antinociceptive, etc., suggesting their great potential for application. It is therefore necessary to comprehensively summarize the bioactivities, especially anticancer activities and mechanisms of steroidal alkaloids. Here we systematically highlight the anticancer profiles both in vitro and in vivo of steroidal alkaloids such as dendrogenin, solanidine, solasodine, tomatidine, cyclopamine, and their derivatives. Furthermore, other bioactivities of steroidal alkaloids are also discussed. The integrated molecular mechanisms in this review can increase our understanding on the utilization of steroidal alkaloids and contribute to the development of new drug candidates. Although the therapeutic potentials of steroidal alkaloids look promising in the preclinical and clinical studies, further pharmacokinetic and clinical studies are mandated to define their efficacy and safety in cancer and other diseases.

  12. Alkaloid diversity in Galanthus elwesii and Galanthus nivalis.

    PubMed

    Berkov, Strahil; Bastida, Jaume; Sidjimova, Borjana; Viladomat, Francesc; Codina, Carles

    2011-01-01

    Seventy alkaloids of galanthamine, lycorine, homolycorine, tazettine, haemanthamine, narciclasine, and tyramine types were detected by GC/MS in 25 Galanthus elwesii and seven Galanthus nivalis populations, collected from different locations in Bulgaria. Intraspecies diversity in the alkaloid profiles regarding the main alkaloid types (chemotypes) was observed. Tyramine-type protoalkaloids (namely, hordenine and its derivatives) were dominant in 19 populations of G. elwesii. In other populations of G. elwesii, the plants accumulated mainly homolycorine-, lycorine-, and galanthamine-type alkaloids. The alkaloid profiles of G. nivalis were dominated by narciclasine-, galanthamine-, lycorine-, haemanthamine-, or tazettine-type compounds. Geographical distribution of chemotypes indicated a relationship between populations, since adjacent populations often displayed similar alkaloid profiles. The results from year-to-year sampling and transplantation experiments imply genetic determination of alkaloid synthesis in the two studied species of Galanthus.

  13. Apoptosis-Inducing Effects of Amaryllidaceae Alkaloids.

    PubMed

    Nair, Jerald J; van Staden, Johannes; Bastida, Jaume

    2016-01-01

    The Amaryllidaceae occupies a privileged status amongst medicinal plants in having delivered the Alzheimer's drug galanthamine to the clinical market. Following its resounding success, there have been several positive indicators for the emergence of an anticancer drug from the family due to the potent antiproliferative activities manifested by several of its alkaloid constituents. Of these, the phenanthridones such as pancratistatin hold most promise as potential chemotherapeutics having succumbed to various phases of clinical trials. Other cytotoxic targets of the Amaryllidaceae are to be found within the lycorane and crinane groups, as exemplified by crinine and lycorine. Although the molecular targets of these alkaloids still remain elusive, much effort has gone into understanding their mode of action in cancer cells. Recent findings have shown that the apoptotic pathway may be a key factor in cancer cell death instigated by Amaryllidaceae alkaloids. As such, this review seeks to: (a) examine the apoptotic effects of Amaryllidaceae alkaloids in cancer cells; (b) explore the molecular basis to these effects; and (c) provide a pharmacophoric rationale in support of these activities.

  14. Highly selective hydroformylation of the cinchona alkaloids.

    PubMed

    Lambers, Marielle; Beijer, Felix H; Padron, José M; Toth, Imre; de Vries, Johannes G

    2002-07-12

    The four naturally occurring cinchona alkaloids were subjected to hydroformylation to create an extra functional group that allows immobilization. Cinchonidine, quinine, and quinidine, could be hydroformylated with virtually complete terminal selectivity, using a rhodium/tetraphosphite catalyst. The cinchonidine aldehyde was reduced to the alcohol and subjected to reductive amination with benzylamine.

  15. Chinchona alkaloid from Dendrosenecio kilimanjari subsp. cottonii.

    PubMed

    Were, O; Benn, M; Munavu, R

    1997-02-01

    Investigation of the Tanzanian Dendrosenecio kilimanjari subsp. cottonii resulted in the isolation of the cinchona alkaloid, cinchonidine. Conversion of cinchonidine to deoxy-cinchonidine was achieved in high yield using zinc dust in aqueous sulphuric acid. This illustrates the first reduction of a quinoline system using these reagents.

  16. Efficiently prepared ephedrine alkaloids-free Ephedra Herb extract: a putative marker and antiproliferative effects.

    PubMed

    Oshima, Naohiro; Yamashita, Tadatoshi; Hyuga, Sumiko; Hyuga, Masashi; Kamakura, Hiroyuki; Yoshimura, Morio; Maruyama, Takuro; Hakamatsuka, Takashi; Amakura, Yoshiaki; Hanawa, Toshihiko; Goda, Yukihiro

    2016-07-01

    Ephedrine alkaloids (EAs) have been considered the main pharmacologically active substances in Ephedra Herb (, Mao; EH) since they were first identified by Prof. N. Nagai, and are known to induce palpitation, hypertension, insomnia, and dysuria as side effects. Therefore, the administration of drugs containing EH to patients with cardiovascular-related diseases is severely contraindicated. While our previous studies suggest that some of the effects of EH may not be due to EAs, considering their side effects would be expedient to develop a new EAs-free EH extract (EFE). Here, we established a preparation method for EFE and revealed its chemical composition, including the content of herbacetin, a flavonoid aglycon present in EH and a potential putative marker for EFE quality control. In addition, we showed the antiproliferative effects of EFE against the H1975 non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cell line. EFE was prepared from EH extract using the ion exchange resin SK-1B. LC/Orbitrap MS analysis revealed the removal of EAs, 6-methoxykynurenic acid, and 6-hydroxykynurenic acid from the original extract. Quantitative analysis of herbacetin using LC/MS in acid-hydrolyzed EFE showed that its content was 0.104 %. Although several alkaloidal constituents were removed from EH extract, the antiproliferative effect of EFE against H1975 cells was comparable to that of EH extract. These results indicate that EFE retained the anticancer effect of EH and demonstrated its potential for future development as a new herbal medicine with reduced side effects. PMID:26976141

  17. A new flavonoid from Chromolaena odorata.

    PubMed

    Pisutthanan, N; Liawruangrath, B; Liawruangrath, S; Bremner, J B

    2006-11-01

    Fractionation of the aerial parts of Chromolaena odorata afforded a new flavonoid, 5,7-dihydroxy-6,4'-dimethoxyflavanone, in addition to 14 known flavonoid compounds, six of which had not been isolated previously from this plant. The structure of the new compound was determined by spectroscopic methods particularly 2D-NMR analysis.

  18. Light-controlled flavonoid biosynthesis in fruits

    PubMed Central

    Zoratti, Laura; Karppinen, Katja; Luengo Escobar, Ana; Häggman, Hely; Jaakola, Laura

    2014-01-01

    Light is one of the most important environmental factors affecting flavonoid biosynthesis in plants. The absolute dependency of light to the plant development has driven evolvement of sophisticated mechanisms to sense and transduce multiple aspects of the light signal. Light effects can be categorized in photoperiod (duration), intensity (quantity), direction and quality (wavelength) including UV-light. Recently, new information has been achieved on the regulation of light-controlled flavonoid biosynthesis in fruits, in which flavonoids have a major contribution on quality. This review focuses on the effects of the different light conditions on the control of flavonoid biosynthesis in fruit producing plants. An overview of the currently known mechanisms of the light-controlled flavonoid accumulation is provided. R2R3 MYB transcription factors are known to regulate by differential expression the biosynthesis of distinct flavonoids in response to specific light wavelengths. Despite recent advances, many gaps remain to be understood in the mechanisms of the transduction pathway of light-controlled flavonoid biosynthesis. A better knowledge on these regulatory mechanisms is likely to be useful for breeding programs aiming to modify fruit flavonoid pattern. PMID:25346743

  19. Flavonoids and dementia: an update.

    PubMed

    Orhan, I E; Daglia, M; Nabavi, S F; Loizzo, M R; Sobarzo-Sánchez, E; Nabavi, S M

    2015-01-01

    Dementia is a strongly age-related syndrome due to cognitive decline that can be considered a typical example of the combination of physiological and pathological aging-associated changes occurring in old people; it ranges from intact cognition to mild cognitive impairment, which is an intermediate stage of cognitive deterioration, and dementia. The spread of this syndrome has induced to study and try to reduce dementia modifiable risk factors. They include insulin resistance and hyperinsulinaemia, high blood pressure, obesity, smoking, depression, cognitive inactivity or low educational attainment as well as physical inactivity and incorrect diet, which can be considered one of the most important factors. One emerging strategy to decrease the prevalence of mild cognitive impairment and dementia may be the use of nutritional interventions. In the last decade, prospective data have suggested that high fruit and vegetable intakes are related to improved cognitive functions and reduced risks of developing a neurodegenerative process. The protective effects against neurodegeneration could be in part due to the intake of flavonoids that have been associated with several health benefits such as antioxidant and anti-inflammatory activities, increased neuronal signaling, and improved metabolic functions. The present article is aimed at reviewing scientific studies that show the protective effects of flavonoid intake against mild cognitive impairment and dementia.

  20. Alum-type adjuvant effect of non-haemolytic saponins purified from Ilex and Passiflora spp.

    PubMed

    Silveira, F; Rossi, S; Fernández, C; Gosmann, G; Schenkel, E; Ferreira, F

    2011-12-01

    Five saponins purified from the leaves of three Ilex species (saponins 1 and 2 from I. dumosa; saponin 3 from I. argentina; saponin 4 from I. paraguariensis) and from Passiflora alata (saponin 5) were evaluated for their in vitro haemolytic activity and in vivo immunostimulatory ability in a mouse model using tetanus toxoid (TT) as a model antigen. The assayed saponins showed very weak or no haemolytic activity over the tested concentration range. Mice were immunized twice with TT formulated with pure saponins 1-5, or with a mixture of saponins from Quillaja saponaria, aluminum hydroxide gel or saline, which were used as controls. The elicited humoral response was evaluated by means of the time course of specific serum antibody levels up to day 131 post-priming (total IgG and isotypes); the cellular response was tested through a delayed-type hypersensitivity (DTH) assay. The assayed saponins, in particular saponins 3 and 5, showed an adjuvant effect similar to that of alum for all tested parameters. The immunostimulating potential of these compounds deserves further investigation, especially taking into account that some Ilex spp. and Passiflora alata are native crops of widespread use and economical importance in Latin America. PMID:21480409

  1. Alum-type adjuvant effect of non-haemolytic saponins purified from Ilex and Passiflora spp.

    PubMed

    Silveira, F; Rossi, S; Fernández, C; Gosmann, G; Schenkel, E; Ferreira, F

    2011-12-01

    Five saponins purified from the leaves of three Ilex species (saponins 1 and 2 from I. dumosa; saponin 3 from I. argentina; saponin 4 from I. paraguariensis) and from Passiflora alata (saponin 5) were evaluated for their in vitro haemolytic activity and in vivo immunostimulatory ability in a mouse model using tetanus toxoid (TT) as a model antigen. The assayed saponins showed very weak or no haemolytic activity over the tested concentration range. Mice were immunized twice with TT formulated with pure saponins 1-5, or with a mixture of saponins from Quillaja saponaria, aluminum hydroxide gel or saline, which were used as controls. The elicited humoral response was evaluated by means of the time course of specific serum antibody levels up to day 131 post-priming (total IgG and isotypes); the cellular response was tested through a delayed-type hypersensitivity (DTH) assay. The assayed saponins, in particular saponins 3 and 5, showed an adjuvant effect similar to that of alum for all tested parameters. The immunostimulating potential of these compounds deserves further investigation, especially taking into account that some Ilex spp. and Passiflora alata are native crops of widespread use and economical importance in Latin America.

  2. Flavonoids--food sources and health benefits.

    PubMed

    Kozłowska, Aleksandra; Szostak-Wegierek, Dorota

    2014-01-01

    Flavonoids are a group of bioactive compounds that are extensively found in foodstuffs of plant origin. Their regular consumption is associated with reduced risk of a number of chronic diseases, including cancer, cardiovascular disease (CVD) and neurodegenerative disorders. Flavonoids are classified into subgroups based on their chemical structure: flavanones, flavones, flavonols, flavan-3-ols, anthocyanins and isoflavones. Their actions at the molecular level include antioxidant effects, as well the ability to modulate several key enzymatic pathways. The growing body of scientific evidence indicates that flavonoids play a beneficial role in disease prevention, however further clinical and epidemiological trials are greatly needed. Among dietary sources of flavonoids there are fruits, vegetables, nuts, seeds and spices. Consumption of these substances with diet appears to be safe. It seems that a diet rich in flavonoids is beneficial and its promotion is thus justifiable.

  3. Insecticidal Constituents and Activity of Alkaloids from Cynanchum mongolicum.

    PubMed

    Ge, Yang; Liu, Pingping; Yang, Rui; Zhang, Liu; Chen, Hongxing; Camara, Ibrahima; Liu, Yiqing; Shi, Wangpeng

    2015-09-21

    Based on MS and NMR data and bioassay-guided tracing, three insecticidal alkaloids I, II and III from Cynanchum mongolicum were identified to be antofine N-oxide, antofine and tylophorine. Alkaloid I was more toxic than alkaloids II and III, but they were less active against Spodoptera litura than total alkaloids. The contact toxicity from these alkaloids against the aphid Lipaphis erysimi was significant, as the 24 h-LC50 values of alkaloids I, II, III and total alkaloids were 292.48, 367.21, 487.791 and 163.52 mg/L, respectively. The development disruption of S. litura larvae was tested, the pupation and emergence rates of S. litura decreased and the acute mortality of S. litura increased significantly by day 3 after being injected in their body cavity with 10-40 mg/L of total alkaloid. The ecdysone titer of treated S. litura larvae and prepupae declined with increasing alkaloid concentration. The alkaloids of Cynanchum mongolicum are potential insect growth inhibitors.

  4. Aconitum lipo-alkaloids--semisynthetic products of the traditional medicine.

    PubMed

    Borcsa, Botond; Csupor, Dezso; Forgo, Peter; Widowitz, Ute; Bauer, Rudolf; Hohmann, Judit

    2011-04-01

    The term lipo-alkaloid is used for C19 aconitane alkaloids containing one or two long-chain fatty acid residues. Lipo-alkaloids are transesterified derivatives of the most toxic and highly effective diester-type diterpene alkaloids, such as aconitine, hypaconitine, mesaconitine. Lipo-alkaloids are native minor compounds of aconite drugs, but their amount significantly increases after traditional processing, which is a general method in the Far Eastern traditional medicinal systems. Analytical works demonstrated that cautious processing (usually boiling) of crude aconite roots decreases the amount of normal diterpene alkaloids and increases the concentration of lipo-alkaloids resulting in the reduction of toxicity of the drugs. Many papers reported that lipo-alkaloids occur as a complex mixture in the drugs, and the isolation of the individual components is extremely difficult. These compounds have been identified using highly sensitive analytical methods (HPLC-MS, NMR), and semisynthetic approaches have been developed to ensure lipo-alkaloids in pure form for pharmacological studies. This review summarizes the structure, chemistry, semisynthesis, analytics and bioactivities of lipo-alkaloids. On the basis of 32 references this is the first comprehensive study on this topic, covering the data of 173 compounds.

  5. Alkaloids in Erythrina by UPLC-ESI-MS and In Vivo Hypotensive Potential of Extractive Preparations

    PubMed Central

    Merlugo, Liara; Santos, Marí C.; Sant'Anna, Liane S.; Cordeiro, Everson W. F.; Batista, Luiz A. C.; Miotto, Silvia T. S.; Garcia, Cássia V.; Moreira, Cleci M.; Mendez, Andreas S. L.

    2015-01-01

    Erythrina species are used in popular medicine as sedative, anxiolytic, anti-inflammatory, and antihypertensive. In this work, we investigated the chemical composition of extracts obtained from leaves of E. falcata and E. crista-galli. The hypotensive potential of E. falcata and the mechanism of action were also studied. The extracts were obtained by maceration and infusion. The total content of phenolic compounds and flavonoids was estimated by spectrophotometric methods. The chemical constituents were studied performing a chromatographic analysis by UPLC-ESI-MS. For in vivo protocols, blood pressure and heart rate were measured by the invasive hemodynamic monitoring method. Different concentrations of extracts and drugs such as L-NAME, losartan, hexamethonium, and propranolol were administrated i.v. The results of total phenolic contents for E. falcata and E. crista-galli were 1.3193–1.4989 mgGAE/mL for maceration and 0.8771–0.9506 mgGAE/mL for infusion. In total flavonoids, the content was 7.7829–8.1976 mg RE/g for maceration and 9.3471–10.4765 RE mg/g for infusion. The chemical composition was based on alkaloids, suggesting the presence of erythristemine, 11β-methoxyglucoerysodine, erysothiopine, 11β-hydroxyerysodine-glucose, and 11-hydroxyerysotinone-rhamnoside. A potent dose-dependent hypotensive effect was observed for E. falcata, which may be related to the route of β-adrenergic receptors. PMID:26356581

  6. Synergistic interactions among flavonoids and acetogenins in Graviola (Annona muricata) leaves confer protection against prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Yang, Chunhua; Gundala, Sushma Reddy; Mukkavilli, Rao; Vangala, Subrahmanyam; Reid, Michelle D; Aneja, Ritu

    2015-06-01

    Phytochemical complexity of plant extracts may offer health-promoting benefits including chemotherapeutic and chemopreventive effects. Isolation of 'most-active fraction' or single constituents from whole extracts may not only compromise the therapeutic efficacy but also render toxicity, thus emphasizing the importance of preserving the natural composition of whole extracts. The leaves of Annona muricata, commonly known as Graviola, are known to be rich in flavonoids, isoquinoline alkaloids and annonaceous acetogenins. Here, we demonstrate phytochemical synergy among the constituents of Graviola leaf extract (GLE) compared to its flavonoid-enriched (FEF) and acetogenin-enriched (AEF) fractions. Comparative quantitation of flavonoids revealed enrichment of rutin (~7-fold) and quercetin-3-glucoside (Q-3-G, ~3-fold) in FEF compared to GLE. In vivo pharmacokinetics and in vitro absorption kinetics of flavonoids revealed enhanced bioavailability of rutin in FEF compared to GLE. However, GLE was more effective in inhibiting in vitro prostate cancer proliferation, viability and clonogenic capacity compared to FEF. Oral administration of 100mg/kg bw GLE showed ~1.2-fold higher tumor growth-inhibitory efficacy than FEF in human prostate tumor xenografts although the concentration of rutin and Q-3-G was more in FEF. Contrarily, AEF, despite its superior in vitro and in vivo efficacy, resulted in death of the mice due to toxicity. Our data indicate that despite lower absorption and bioavailability of rutin, maximum efficacy was achieved in the case of GLE, which also comprises of other phytochemical groups including acetogenins that make up its natural complex environment. Hence, our study emphasizes on evaluating the nature of interactions among Graviola leaf phytochemcials for developing favorable dose regimen for prostate cancer management to achieve optimal therapeutic benefits.

  7. Synergistic interactions among flavonoids and acetogenins in Graviola (Annona muricata) leaves confer protection against prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Chunhua; Gundala, Sushma Reddy; Mukkavilli, Rao; Vangala, Subrahmanyam; Reid, Michelle D.; Aneja, Ritu

    2015-01-01

    Phytochemical complexity of plant extracts may offer health-promoting benefits including chemotherapeutic and chemopreventive effects. Isolation of ‘most-active fraction’ or single constituents from whole extracts may not only compromise the therapeutic efficacy but also render toxicity, thus emphasizing the importance of preserving the natural composition of whole extracts. The leaves of Annona muricata, commonly known as Graviola, are known to be rich in flavonoids, isoquinoline alkaloids and annonaceous acetogenins. Here, we demonstrate phytochemical synergy among the constituents of Graviola leaf extract (GLE) compared to its flavonoid-enriched (FEF) and acetogenin-enriched (AEF) fractions. Comparative quantitation of flavonoids revealed enrichment of rutin (~7-fold) and quercetin-3-glucoside (Q-3-G, ~3-fold) in FEF compared to GLE. In vivo pharmacokinetics and in vitro absorption kinetics of flavonoids revealed enhanced bioavailability of rutin in FEF compared to GLE. However, GLE was more effective in inhibiting in vitro prostate cancer proliferation, viability and clonogenic capacity compared to FEF. Oral administration of 100mg/kg bw GLE showed ~1.2-fold higher tumor growth-inhibitory efficacy than FEF in human prostate tumor xenografts although the concentration of rutin and Q-3-G was more in FEF. Contrarily, AEF, despite its superior in vitro and in vivo efficacy, resulted in death of the mice due to toxicity. Our data indicate that despite lower absorption and bioavailability of rutin, maximum efficacy was achieved in the case of GLE, which also comprises of other phytochemical groups including acetogenins that make up its natural complex environment. Hence, our study emphasizes on evaluating the nature of interactions among Graviola leaf phytochemcials for developing favorable dose regimen for prostate cancer management to achieve optimal therapeutic benefits. PMID:25863125

  8. Isolation of a flavonoid, apigenin 7-O-glucoside, from Mentha longifolia (L.) Hudson subspecies longifolia and its genotoxic potency.

    PubMed

    Gulluce, Medine; Orhan, Furkan; Yanmis, Derya; Arasoglu, Tulin; Guvenalp, Zuhal; Demirezer, Lutfiye Omur

    2015-09-01

    Mentha is a medicinal and aromatic plant belonging to the Lamiaceae family, which is widely used in food, flavor, cosmetic and pharmaceutical industries. Recently, it has been found that the use of Mentha as a pharmaceutical source is based on its phytochemical constituents that have far been identified as tannins, saponins, phenolic acids and flavonoids. This study was designed to evaluate the mutagenic and antimutagenic activities of apigenin 7-O-glucoside (A7G), a flavonoid isolated from Mentha longifolia (L.) Hudson subspecies longifolia (ML). The possible antimutagenic potential of A7G was examined against mutagens ethyl methanesulfonate and acridine in an eukaryotic cell system Saccharomyces cerevisiae and sodium azide in Salmonella typhimurium TA1535 and 9-aminoacridine in S. typhimurium TA1537. According to our findings, any concentrations of the A7G used did not show mutagenic activity but exerted strong antimutagenic activities at tested concentrations. The inhibition rates for the Ames test ranged from 27.2% (S. typhimurium TA1535: 0.4 μM/plate) to 91.1% (S. typhimurium TA1537: 0.2 μM/plate) and for the yeast deletion assay from 4% to 57.7%. This genotoxicological study suggests that a flavonoid from ML owing to antimutagenic properties is of great pharmacological importance and might be beneficial to industries producing food additives, cosmetics and pharmaceuticals products.

  9. New steroidal saponins from the rhizomes of Paris delavayi and their cytotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yang; Tian, Xiangrong; Hua, Dong; Cheng, Guang; Wang, Kaixing; Zhang, Lihan; Tang, Haifeng; Wang, Minchang

    2016-06-01

    Four new furostanol saponins, named padelaosides C-F (1-4), together with four known spirostanol saponins 5-8 were isolated from the rhizomes of Paris delavayi Franchet. Their structures were elucidated on the basis of extensive spectroscopic analysis and chemical evidences. The discovery of the new compounds 1-4 extended the diversity and complexity of this furostanol saponin family. The cytotoxicity of all the saponins was evaluated for their cytotoxicity against human glioblastoma U87MG and human hepatocellular carcinoma Hep-G2 cell lines. The known spirostanol saponins 7 and 8 exhibited notable cytotoxicity against the two tumor cell lines with IC50 values of 1.13 and 3.42μM, respectively, while the new furostanol saponins 3 and 4 showed moderate cytotoxicity with IC50 values of 15.28 to 16.98μM. PMID:27118322

  10. Anti-ischemia steroidal saponins from the seeds of Allium fistulosum.

    PubMed

    Lai, Wei; Wu, Zhijun; Lin, Houwen; Li, Tiejun; Sun, Lianna; Chai, Yifeng; Chen, Wansheng

    2010-06-25

    Six new furostanol saponins (1-6), named fistulosaponins A-F, three known furostanol saponins (7-9), and seven known aromatic compounds were isolated from seeds of Welsh onion (Allium fistulosum). The structures of these compounds were characterized by spectroscopic analyses including 2D NMR spectroscopy, mass spectrometry, and acid hydrolysis. The protective effect of the saponins on hypoxia-induced human umbilical vein endothelial cell injury was evaluated. PMID:20515043

  11. Steroidal saponins from the whole plants of Agave utahensis and their cytotoxic activity.

    PubMed

    Yokosuka, Akihito; Mimaki, Yoshihiro

    2009-04-01

    Phytochemical investigation of the whole plants of Agave utahensis Engelm. (Agavaceae) has resulted in the isolation of 15 steroidal saponins (1-15), including five spirostanol saponins (1-5) and three furostanol saponins (11-13). Structures of compounds 1-5 and 11-13 were determined by spectroscopic analysis and the results of hydrolytic cleavage. The isolated compounds were evaluated for their cytotoxic activity against HL-60 human promyelocytic leukemia cells.

  12. A saponin-detoxifying enzyme mediates suppression of plant defences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouarab, K.; Melton, R.; Peart, J.; Baulcombe, D.; Osbourn, A.

    2002-08-01

    Plant disease resistance can be conferred by constitutive features such as structural barriers or preformed antimicrobial secondary metabolites. Additional defence mechanisms are activated in response to pathogen attack and include localized cell death (the hypersensitive response). Pathogens use different strategies to counter constitutive and induced plant defences, including degradation of preformed antimicrobial compounds and the production of molecules that suppress induced plant defences. Here we present evidence for a two-component process in which a fungal pathogen subverts the preformed antimicrobial compounds of its host and uses them to interfere with induced defence responses. Antimicrobial saponins are first hydrolysed by a fungal saponin-detoxifying enzyme. The degradation product of this hydrolysis then suppresses induced defence responses by interfering with fundamental signal transduction processes leading to disease resistance.

  13. A new bioactive steroidal saponin from Agave shrevei.

    PubMed

    da Silva, Bernadete Pereira; Parente, José Paz

    2005-01-01

    A new steroidal saponin was isolated from the leaves of Agave shrevei Gentry. Its structure was established as 26-(beta-D-glucopyranosyloxy)-22-methoxy-3-(O-beta-D-glucopyranosyl-(1-->2)O-[O-beta-D-glucopyranosyl-(1-->4)-O-[O-beta-D-glucopyranosyl-(1-->6)]-O-beta-D-glucopyranosyl(1-->4)-beta-D-galactopyranosyl]oxy)-(3beta,5alpha,25R)-furostane. The structural identification was performed using detailed analyses of 1H and 13C NMR spectra including 2D NMR spectroscopic techniques (COSY, HETCOR, and COLOC) and chemical conversions. The steroidal saponin showed absence of haemolytic effects in the in vitro assay, but demonstrated a significant inhibition of the capillary permeability activity.

  14. A new bioactive steroidal saponin from Agave attenuata.

    PubMed

    da Silva, Bernadete P; de Sousa, Allyne C; Silva, Graziela M; Mendes, Tatiana P; Parente, José P

    2002-01-01

    A new steroidal saponin was isolated from the leaves of Agave attenuata Salm-Dyck. Its structure was established as (3beta,5beta,22alpha,25S)-26-(beta-D-glucopyranosyloxy)-22-methoxyfurostan-3-yl O-beta-D-glucopyranosyl-(1-->2)-beta-D-glucopyranosyl-(1-->2)-O-[beta-D-glucopyranosyl-(1-->3)]-beta-D-glucopyranosyl-(1-->4)-beta-D-galactopyranoside. The structural identification was performed using detailed analyses of 1H and 13C NMR spectra including 2D NMR spectroscopic techniques (COSY, HETCOR and COLOC) and chemical conversions. The haemolytic potential of the steroidal saponin was evaluated and the anti-inflammatory activity was performed using the capillary permeability assay.

  15. Trifasciatosides A-J, Steroidal Saponins from Sansevieria trifasciata.

    PubMed

    Teponno, Rémy Bertrand; Tanaka, Chiaki; Jie, Bai; Tapondjou, Léon Azefack; Miyamoto, Tomofumi

    2016-01-01

    Four previously unreported steroidal saponins, trifasciatosides A-D (1-4), three pairs of previously undescribed steroidal saponins, trifasciatosides E-J (5a, b-7a, b) including acetylated ones, together with twelve known compounds were isolated from the n-butanol soluble fraction of the methanol extract of Sansevieria trifasciata. Their structures were elucidated on the basis of detailed spectroscopic analysis, including (1)H-NMR, (13)C-NMR, (1)H-(1)H correlated spectroscopy (COSY), heteronuclear single quantum coherence (HSQC), heteronuclear multiple bond connectivity (HMBC), total correlated spectroscopy (TOCSY), nuclear Overhauser enhancement and exchange spectroscopy (NOESY), electrospray ionization-time of flight (ESI-TOF)-MS and chemical methods. Compounds 2, 4, and 7a, b exhibited moderate antiproliferative activity against HeLa cells. PMID:27581639

  16. Mechanisms of growth inhibition of Phytomonas serpens by the alkaloids tomatine and tomatidine

    PubMed Central

    Medina, Jorge Mansur; Rodrigues, Juliany Cola Fernandes; Moreira, Otacilio C; Atella, Geórgia; de Souza, Wanderley; Barrabin, Hector

    2015-01-01

    Phytomonas serpens are flagellates in the family Trypanosomatidae that parasitise the tomato plant (Solanum lycopersicum L.), which results in fruits with low commercial value. The tomato glycoalkaloid tomatine and its aglycone tomatidine inhibit the growth of P. serpens in axenic cultures. Tomatine, like many other saponins, induces permeabilisation of the cell membrane and a loss of cell content, including the cytosolic enzyme pyruvate kinase. In contrast, tomatidine does not cause permeabilisation of membranes, but instead provokes morphological changes, including vacuolisation. Phytomonas treated with tomatidine show an increased accumulation of labelled neutral lipids (BODYPY-palmitic), a notable decrease in the amount of C24-alkylated sterols and an increase in zymosterol content. These results are consistent with the inhibition of 24-sterol methyltransferase (SMT), which is an important enzyme that is responsible for the methylation of sterols at the 24 position. We propose that the main target of tomatidine is the sterols biosynthetic pathway, specifically, inhibition of the 24-SMT. Altogether, the results obtained in the present paper suggest a more general effect of alkaloids in trypanosomatids, which opens potential therapeutic possibilities for the treatment of the diseases caused by these pathogens. PMID:25742263

  17. Total synthesis of the Daphniphyllum alkaloid daphenylline

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Zhaoyong; Li, Yong; Deng, Jun; Li, Ang

    2013-08-01

    The Daphniphyllum alkaloids are a large class of natural products isolated from a genus of evergreen plants widely used in Chinese herbal medicine. They display a remarkable range of biological activities, including anticancer, antioxidant, and vasorelaxation properties as well as elevation of nerve growth factor. Daphenylline is a structurally unique member among the predominately aliphatic Daphniphyllum alkaloids, and contains a tetrasubstituted arene moiety mounted on a sterically compact hexacyclic scaffold. Herein, we describe the first total synthesis of daphenylline. A gold-catalysed 6-exo-dig cyclization reaction and a subsequent intramolecular Michael addition reaction, inspired by Dixon's seminal work, were exploited to construct the bridged 6,6,5-tricyclic motif of the natural product at an early stage, and the aromatic moiety was forged through a photoinduced olefin isomerization/6π-electrocyclization cascade followed by an oxidative aromatization process.

  18. Quinolizidine alkaloid biosynthesis: recent advances and future prospects

    PubMed Central

    Bunsupa, Somnuk; Yamazaki, Mami; Saito, Kazuki

    2012-01-01

    Lys-derived alkaloids, including piperidine, quinolizidine, indolizidine, and lycopodium alkaloids, are widely distributed throughout the plant kingdom. Several of these alkaloids have beneficial properties for humans and have been used in medicine. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying the biosynthesis of these alkaloids are not well understood. In the present article, we discuss recent advances in our understanding of Lys-derived alkaloids, especially the biochemistry, molecular biology, and biotechnology of quinolizidine alkaloid (QA) biosynthesis. We have also highlighted Lys decarboxylase (LDC), the enzyme that catalyzes the first committed step of QA biosynthesis and answers a longstanding question about the molecular entity of LDC activity in plants. Further prospects using current advanced technologies, such as next-generation sequencing, in medicinal plants have also been discussed. PMID:23112802

  19. Recent developments in the chemistry of quinazolinone alkaloids.

    PubMed

    Kshirsagar, U A

    2015-09-28

    Quinazolinones, an important class of fused heterocyclic alkaloids has attracted high attention in organic and medicinal chemistry due to their significant and wide range of biological activities. There are approximately 150 naturally occurring quinazolinone alkaloids known till 2005. Several new quinazolinone alkaloids (∼55) have been isolated in the last decade. Natural quinazolinones with exotic structural features and remarkable biological activities have incited a lot of activities in the synthetic community towards the development of new synthetic strategies and approaches for the total synthesis of quinazolinone alkaloids. This review is focused on these advances in the chemistry of quinazolinone alkaloids in the last decade. This article covers the newly isolated quinazolinone natural products with their biological activities and the recently reported total syntheses of quinazolinone alkaloids from 2006 to 2015.

  20. Natural alkaloids: basic aspects, biological roles, and future perspectives.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Shi; Sun, Hui; Zhang, Ai-Hua; Xu, Hong-Ying; Yan, Guang-Li; Han, Ying; Wang, Xi-Jun

    2014-06-01

    Natural products have gained popularity worldwide for promoting healthcare, as well as disease prevention. Alkaloids are important chemical compounds that serve as a rich reservoir for drug discovery. Several alkaloids isolated from natural herbs exhibit antiproliferation, antibacterial, antiviral, insecticidal, and antimetastatic effects on various types of cancers both in vitro and in vivo. This paper focuses on the naturally-derived alkaloids such as berberine, matrine, piperine, fritillarine, and rhynchophylline, etc., and summarizes the action mechanisms of these compounds. Based on the information in the literature that is summarized in this paper, the use of alkaloids as drugs is very promising, but more research and clinical trials are necessary before final recommendations on specific alkaloids can be made. Following this, it is hoped that as a result of this review, there will be a greater awareness of the excellent promise that natural alkaloids show for use in the therapy of diseases.

  1. Toxicosis by Plant Alkaloids in Humans and Animals in Colombia

    PubMed Central

    Diaz, Gonzalo J.

    2015-01-01

    Due to its tropical location, chains of mountains, inter-Andean valleys, Amazon basin area, eastern plains and shores on both the Atlantic and Pacific Oceans, Colombia has many ecosystems and the second largest plant biodiversity in the world. Many plant species, both native and naturalized, are currently recognized as toxic for both animals and humans, and some of them are known to cause their toxic effects due to their alkaloid content. Among these, there are plants containing the hepatotoxic pyrrolizidine alkaloids, neurotoxins such as the indolizidine alkaloid swainsonine and the piperidine alkaloids coniine and γ-coniceine and tropane alkaloids. Unfortunately, the research in toxic plants in Colombia is not nearly proportional to its plant biodiversity and the scientific information available is only very scarce. The present review aims at summarizing the scarce information about plant alkaloid toxicosis in animals and humans in Colombia. PMID:26690479

  2. Toxicosis by Plant Alkaloids in Humans and Animals in Colombia.

    PubMed

    Diaz, Gonzalo J

    2015-12-11

    Due to its tropical location, chains of mountains, inter-Andean valleys, Amazon basin area, eastern plains and shores on both the Atlantic and Pacific Oceans, Colombia has many ecosystems and the second largest plant biodiversity in the world. Many plant species, both native and naturalized, are currently recognized as toxic for both animals and humans, and some of them are known to cause their toxic effects due to their alkaloid content. Among these, there are plants containing the hepatotoxic pyrrolizidine alkaloids, neurotoxins such as the indolizidine alkaloid swainsonine and the piperidine alkaloids coniine and γ-coniceine and tropane alkaloids. Unfortunately, the research in toxic plants in Colombia is not nearly proportional to its plant biodiversity and the scientific information available is only very scarce. The present review aims at summarizing the scarce information about plant alkaloid toxicosis in animals and humans in Colombia.

  3. Alkaloids Isolated from Natural Herbs as the Anticancer Agents

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Jin-Jian; Bao, Jiao-Lin; Chen, Xiu-Ping; Huang, Min; Wang, Yi-Tao

    2012-01-01

    Alkaloids are important chemical compounds that serve as a rich reservoir for drug discovery. Several alkaloids isolated from natural herbs exhibit antiproliferation and antimetastasis effects on various types of cancers both in vitro and in vivo. Alkaloids, such as camptothecin and vinblastine, have already been successfully developed into anticancer drugs. This paper focuses on the naturally derived alkaloids with prospective anticancer properties, such as berberine, evodiamine, matrine, piperine, sanguinarine, and tetrandrine, and summarizes the mechanisms of action of these compounds. Based on the information in the literature that is summarized in this paper, the use of alkaloids as anticancer agents is very promising, but more research and clinical trials are necessary before final recommendations on specific alkaloids can be made. PMID:22988474

  4. Two new triterpenoid saponins from Dianthus superbus L.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xia; Luo, Jian-Guang; Kong, Ling-Yi

    2010-06-01

    Two new triterpenoid saponins (1 and 2) were isolated from the dried aerial parts of Dianthus superbus L. (Caryophyllaceae). Their structures were elucidated on the basis of spectral data to be 3-O-beta-D-glucopyranosyl olean-9(11),12-diene-23,28-dioic acid 28-O-beta-D-glucopyranoside (1) and 3-O-beta-D-glucopyranosyl olean-11,13(18)-diene-23,28-dioic acid 28-O-beta-D-glucopyranoside (2).

  5. Steroidal saponins from dragon's blood of Dracaena cambodiana.

    PubMed

    Shen, Hai-Yan; Zuo, Wen-Jian; Wang, Hui; Zhao, You-Xing; Guo, Zhi-Kai; Luo, Ying; Li, Xiao-Na; Dai, Hao-Fu; Mei, Wen-Li

    2014-04-01

    Six new steroidal saponins, cambodianosides A-F (1-6), together with seven known ones, were isolated from the dragon's blood of Dracaena cambodiana. The structures of 1-6 were elucidated on the basis of detailed spectroscopic analysis, including 1D and 2D NMR techniques and chemical methods. The cytotoxicities of all the isolated compounds were evaluated in vitro against three human cancer cell lines, and compounds 7, 8, and 11 showed significant inhibitory activities. PMID:24480383

  6. Steroidal saponins from dragon's blood of Dracaena cambodiana.

    PubMed

    Shen, Hai-Yan; Zuo, Wen-Jian; Wang, Hui; Zhao, You-Xing; Guo, Zhi-Kai; Luo, Ying; Li, Xiao-Na; Dai, Hao-Fu; Mei, Wen-Li

    2014-04-01

    Six new steroidal saponins, cambodianosides A-F (1-6), together with seven known ones, were isolated from the dragon's blood of Dracaena cambodiana. The structures of 1-6 were elucidated on the basis of detailed spectroscopic analysis, including 1D and 2D NMR techniques and chemical methods. The cytotoxicities of all the isolated compounds were evaluated in vitro against three human cancer cell lines, and compounds 7, 8, and 11 showed significant inhibitory activities.

  7. [Isolation and identification of a saponine from Patrinia scabiosaefolia].

    PubMed

    Yan, B; Ding, L; Shen, D; Chen, Y; Pei, Y

    1999-04-01

    A saponine compound was isolated from the acetone extract of the roots and rhizomes of Patrinia scabiosaefolia Fish. ex Link. Its structure was identified by combination of chemical reaction and spectrum analysis as 3-O-alpha-L-rhamnopyranosyl-(1-2)-beta-D-xylopyranosyl oleanolic acid (giganteaside D), and part of its 13C-NMR data was revised by the 2D-NMR. The compound was found in the Patrinia for the first time. PMID:12575104

  8. Histamine release inhibition activity of bisbenzylisoquinoline alkaloids.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, K; Tsuchiya, S; Sugimoto, Y; Sugimura, Y; Yamada, Y

    1992-12-01

    Eleven examples of bisbenzylisoquinoline alkaloids (head-to-head; 10, head-to-tail; 1) and one half molecule type (N-methylcoclaurine), were tested by in vitro histamine release inhibition assay. The order of the potency of the inhibitory effect was ranked thus: homoaromoline, aromoline, isotetrandrine, cepharanthine, fangchinoline, obaberine, and tetrandrine. The following substances, cepharanoline, berbamine, oxyacanthine, and cycleanine (head-to-tail structure) had no inhibitory effect. N-Methylcoclaurine showed an inhibitory effect comparable to that of fangchinoline. PMID:1484888

  9. Synthesis studies on the Melodinus alkaloid meloscine

    PubMed Central

    Feldman, Ken S.; Antoline, Joshua F.

    2012-01-01

    The pentacyclic Melodinus alkaloid (±)-meloscine was synthesized in 19 chemical steps from 2-bromobenzaldehyde through a route featuring an allenyl azide cyclization cascade to deliver the core azabicyclo[3.3.0]octane substructure. Peripheral functionalization of this core included a Tollens-type aldol condensation to set the quaternary center at C(20) and a diastereoselective ring closing metathesis to forge the tetrahydropyridine ring. PMID:23316092

  10. Inter- and intra-organ spatial distributions of sea star saponins by MALDI imaging.

    PubMed

    Demeyer, Marie; Wisztorski, Maxence; Decroo, Corentin; De Winter, Julien; Caulier, Guillaume; Hennebert, Elise; Eeckhaut, Igor; Fournier, Isabelle; Flammang, Patrick; Gerbaux, Pascal

    2015-11-01

    Saponins are secondary metabolites that are abundant and diversified in echinoderms. Mass spectrometry is increasingly used not only to identify saponin congeners within animal extracts but also to decipher the structure/biological activity relationships of these molecules by determining their inter-organ and inter-individual variability. The usual method requires extensive purification procedures to prepare saponin extracts compatible with mass spectrometry analysis. Here, we selected the sea star Asterias rubens as a model animal to prove that direct analysis of saponins can be performed on tissue sections. We also demonstrated that carboxymethyl cellulose can be used as an embedding medium to facilitate the cryosectioning procedure. Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) imaging was also revealed to afford interesting data on the distribution of saponin molecules within the tissues. We indeed highlight that saponins are located not only inside the body wall of the animals but also within the mucus layer that probably protects the animal against external aggressions. Graphical Abstract Saponins are the most abundant secondary metabolites in sea stars. They should therefore participate in important biological activities. Here, MALDI imaging is presented as a powerful method to determine the spatial distribution of saponins within the animal tissues. The inhomogeneity of the intra-organ saponin distribution is highlighted, paving the way for future elegant structure/activity relationship investigations.

  11. Qualitative and quantitative saponin contents in five sea cucumbers from the Indian ocean.

    PubMed

    Van Dyck, Séverine; Gerbaux, Pascal; Flammang, Patrick

    2010-01-01

    To avoid predation, holothuroids produce feeding-deterrent molecules in their body wall and viscera, the so-called saponins. Five tropical sea cucumber species of the family Holothuriidae were investigated in order to study their saponin content in two different organs, the body wall and the Cuvierian tubules. Mass spectrometry techniques (MALDI- and ESI-MS) were used to detect and analyze saponins. The smallest number of saponins was observed in Holothuria atra, which contained a total of four congeners, followed by Holothuria leucospilota, Pearsonothuria graeffei and Actinopyga echinites with six, eight and ten congeners, respectively. Bohadschia subrubra revealed the highest saponin diversity (19 congeners). Saponin mixtures also varied between the two body compartments within a given animal. A semi-quantitative approach completed these results and showed that a high diversity of saponins is not particularly correlated to a high saponin concentration. Although the complexity of the saponin mixtures described makes the elucidation of their respective biological roles difficult, the comparisons between species and between body compartments give some clues about how these molecules may act as predator repellents. PMID:20161976

  12. Qualitative and Quantitative Saponin Contents in Five Sea Cucumbers from the Indian Ocean

    PubMed Central

    Van Dyck, Séverine; Gerbaux, Pascal; Flammang, Patrick

    2010-01-01

    To avoid predation, holothuroids produce feeding-deterrent molecules in their body wall and viscera, the so-called saponins. Five tropical sea cucumber species of the family Holothuriidae were investigated in order to study their saponin content in two different organs, the body wall and the Cuvierian tubules. Mass spectrometry techniques (MALDI- and ESI-MS) were used to detect and analyze saponins. The smallest number of saponins was observed in Holothuria atra, which contained a total of four congeners, followed by Holothuria leucospilota, Pearsonothuria graeffei and Actinopyga echinites with six, eight and ten congeners, respectively. Bohadschia subrubra revealed the highest saponin diversity (19 congeners). Saponin mixtures also varied between the two body compartments within a given animal. A semi-quantitative approach completed these results and showed that a high diversity of saponins is not particularly correlated to a high saponin concentration. Although the complexity of the saponin mixtures described makes the elucidation of their respective biological roles difficult, the comparisons between species and between body compartments give some clues about how these molecules may act as predator repellents. PMID:20161976

  13. Bioactive constituents of oleanane-type triterpene saponins from the roots of Glycyrrhiza glabra.

    PubMed

    Wei, Juan-Hua; Zheng, Yun-Feng; Li, Cun-Yu; Tang, Yu-Ping; Peng, Guo-Ping

    2014-01-01

    Three new oleanane-type triterpene saponins, namely licorice-saponin M3 (1), licorice-saponin N4 (2), and licorice-saponin O4 (3), an artificial product (4), as well as five known triterpene glucuronides (5-9), were isolated from the roots of Glycyrrhiza glabra L. Their structures were established using 1D and 2D NMR spectroscopy, mass spectrometry, and by comparison with spectroscopic data reported in the literature. The inhibitory effects of the selected compounds on neuraminidase were evaluated, and the preliminary structure-activity relationship was also predicted.

  14. Metastatic Inhibitory and Radical Scavenging Efficacies of Saponins Extracted from the Brittle Star (Ophiocoma erinaceus).

    PubMed

    Amini, Elaheh; Nabiuni, Mohammad; Baharara, Javad; Parivar, Kazem; Asili, Javad

    2015-01-01

    Echinodermata use saponins in chemical defense against pathogens and predators. The molecular mechanisms of antimetastatic effects of brittle star saponins are still unknown. The present study examined antioxidant capacity and invasive ability in HeLa carcinoma cells exposed to brittle star crude saponins. Discolorating methods with DPPH and ABTS and expression of SOD-2 with RT-PCR were used to estimate the antioxidant activity. The anti-invasive activity of extracted saponins was examined through adhesion of HeLa cells to extracellular matrix, wound healing and evaluation of the mRNA levels of MMP-2 and MMP-9 by real time-PCR. The results showed that extracted saponins had cytotoxicity against cervical cancer cells and ABTS and DPPH scavenging properties with IC50 values of 604.5, 1012 μg/ml, respectively. Further, we found that, in wound healing assay, brittle star saponins could prevent invasion of HeLa cells in a concentration dependent manner. Furthermore, cell adhesion assay demonstrated blockage of cell attachment to extracellular matrix with an IC50 concentration of 16.1μg/ml. The significant dose dependent down regulation of MMP-2 and MMP-9 in treated cells demonstrated that isolated saponins can decline tumor metastasis in vitro. The brittle star saponins remarkably prevented cervical cancer invasion and migration associated with down regulation of matrix metalloproteinase expression. Therefore, saponins could be suggested as an anti-invasive candidate against cervical cancer and an antioxidant as well.

  15. Electrophoretic mobility as a tool to separate immune adjuvant saponins from Quillaja saponaria Molina.

    PubMed

    Gilabert-Oriol, Roger; Weng, Alexander; von Mallinckrodt, Benedicta; Stöshel, Anja; Nissi, Linda; Melzig, Matthias F; Fuchs, Hendrik; Thakur, Mayank

    2015-06-20

    Quillaja saponins are used as adjuvants in animal vaccines but their application in human vaccination is still under investigation. Isolation and characterization of adjuvant saponins is very tedious. Furthermore, standardization of Quillaja saponins is critical pertaining to its application in humans. In this study, a convenient method based on agarose gel electrophoresis was developed for the separation of Quillaja saponins. Six different commercial Quillaja saponins were segregated by size/charge into numerous fractions. Each of the fractions was characterized by ESI-TOF-MS spectroscopy and thin layer chromatography. Real-time impedance-based monitoring and red blood cell lysis assay were used to evaluate cytotoxicity and hemolytic activities respectively. Two specific regions in the agarose gel (delimited by specific relative electrophoretic mobility values) were identified and characterized by exclusive migration of acylated saponins known to possess immune adjuvant properties (0.18-0.58), and cytotoxic and hemolytic saponins (0.18-0.94). In vivo experiments in mice with the isolated fractions for evaluation of adjuvant activity also correlated with the relative electrophoretic mobility. In addition to the separation of specific Quillaja saponins with adjuvant effects as a pre-purification step to HPLC, agarose gel electrophoresis stands out as a new method for rapid screening, separation and quality control of saponins. PMID:25839418

  16. Application of aqueous saponin on the remediation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons-contaminated soil.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Takayuki; Kaminaga, Hirohisa; Navarro, Ronald R; Iimura, Yosuke

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this research was to evaluate the feasibility of aqueous saponin for the removal and biodegradation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) from contaminated soil. Dissolution test confirmed the ability of saponin to increase the apparent solubility of the tested 3-5 rings PAH above the critical micelle concentration (approximately 1000 mg/L). Microbial test with pure culture of Sphingomonas sp. showed that saponin significantly enhanced the degradation of pyrene. For example, the percent degradation was 2.1 times higher in the presence of 2500 mg/L saponin than that of control without saponin after 60 hours incubation at around 10(8) CFU/mL initial cell loading. These results suggest that the binding of pyrene with saponin does not pose a serious constraint to bacterial uptake. Contrary to pyrene, saponin was chemically stable against the PAHs degrader. It is also not toxic to the cell at least up to 2500 mg/L. Finally, using a spiked soil sample, extraction tests with 10,000 mg/L of saponin showed that around 52.7% and 0.3% of pyrene was removed from low and high organic spiked soils, respectively. The results from this study indicate that aqueous saponin is appropriate as a washing agent as well as biodegradation enhancer for the detoxification of PAHs-contaminated low organic carbon soil.

  17. A new diketopiperazine alkaloid from Aspergillus oryzae.

    PubMed

    Shaaban, Mohamed; El-Metwally, Mohammad Magdy; Nasr, Hamdi

    2014-01-01

    Investigation of bioactive secondary metabolites from terrestrial Aspergillus oryzae sp. MMAO1 using M2 medium afforded a new diketopiperazine alkaloid, 7,9-dihydroxy-3-(1H-indol-3-ylmethyl)-8-methoxy-2,3,11,11a-tetrahydro-6H-pyrazino[1,2-b]isoquinoline-1,4-dione (1a), containing the unusual amino acid L-6,8-dihydroxy-7-methoxyphenylalanine. This was co-isolated with ditryptophenaline (2), cyclo-(Tryp,Tyr) (4), cyclo-(Pro,Val), α-cyclopiazonic acid (3), kojic acid and uridine. Re-cultivation of the fungal strain on Dox medium led to the production of bisdethio(bismethylthio)gliotoxin (5), pseurotin A (6) along with linoleic acid, α-cyclopiazonic acid (3) and kojic acid. The chemical structure of the new diketopiperazine alkaloid including the relative configuration was determined by 1D and 2D NMR spectroscopy and HR-ESI-MS spectrometry, and by comparison with the related literature. The new alkaloid (1a) showed no antimicrobial activity or cytotoxicity against brine shrimps.

  18. A new monoterpenoid oxindole alkaloid from Hamelia patens micropropagated plantlets.

    PubMed

    Paniagua-Vega, David; Cerda-García-Rojas, Carlos M; Ponce-Noyola, Teresa; Ramos-Valdivia, Ana C

    2012-11-01

    Chemical studies on Hamelia patens (Rubiaceae) micropropagated plantlets allowed production of a new monoterpenoid oxindole alkaloid, named (-)-hameline (7), together with eight known alkaloids, tetrahydroalstonine (1), aricine (2), pteropodine (3), isopteropodine (4), uncarine F (5), speciophylline (6), palmirine (8), and rumberine (9). The structure of the new alkaloid was assigned on the basis of 1D and 2D NMR spectroscopy, mass spectrometry, and molecular modeling.

  19. New Perspectives in the Chemistry of Marine Pyridoacridine Alkaloids

    PubMed Central

    Plodek, Alois; Bracher, Franz

    2016-01-01

    Secondary metabolites from marine organisms are a rich source of novel leads for drug development. Among these natural products, polycyclic aromatic alkaloids of the pyridoacridine type have attracted the highest attention as lead compounds for the development of novel anti-cancer and anti-infective drugs. Numerous sophisticated total syntheses of pyridoacridine alkaloids have been worked out, and many of them have also been extended to the synthesis of libraries of analogues of the alkaloids. This review summarizes the progress in the chemistry of pyridoacridine alkaloids that was made in the last one-and-a-half decades. PMID:26821033

  20. Plant alkaloids as drug leads for Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Ng, Yu Pong; Or, Terry Cho Tsun; Ip, Nancy Y

    2015-10-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a neurodegenerative illness associated with dementia and is most prevalent among the elderly population. Current medications can only treat symptoms. Alkaloids are structurally diverse and have been an important source of therapeutics for various brain disorders. Two US Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-approved acetylcholinesterase inhibitors for AD, galantamine and rivastigmine, are in fact alkaloids. In addition, clinical trials of four other extensively studied alkaloids-huperzine A, caffeine, nicotine, and indomethacin-have been conducted but do not convincingly demonstrate their clinical efficacy for AD. Interestingly, rhynchophylline, a known neuroprotective alkaloid, was recently discovered by in silico screening as an inhibitor of EphA4, a novel target for AD. Here, we review the pathophysiological mechanisms underlying AD, current treatment strategies, and therapeutic potential of several selected plant alkaloids in AD, highlighting their various drug targets and the key supportive preclinical and clinical studies. Future research should include more rigorous clinical studies of the most promising alkaloids, the further development of recently discovered candidate alkaloids, and the continual search for new alkaloids for relevant drug targets. It remains promising that an alkaloid drug candidate could significantly affect the progression of AD in addition to providing symptomatic relief.

  1. Evaluation of Biosynthetic Pathway and Engineered Biosynthesis of Alkaloids.

    PubMed

    Kishimoto, Shinji; Sato, Michio; Tsunematsu, Yuta; Watanabe, Kenji

    2016-01-01

    Varieties of alkaloids are known to be produced by various organisms, including bacteria, fungi and plants, as secondary metabolites that exhibit useful bioactivities. However, understanding of how those metabolites are biosynthesized still remains limited, because most of these compounds are isolated from plants and at a trace level of production. In this review, we focus on recent efforts in identifying the genes responsible for the biosynthesis of those nitrogen-containing natural products and elucidating the mechanisms involved in the biosynthetic processes. The alkaloids discussed in this review are ditryptophenaline (dimeric diketopiperazine alkaloid), saframycin (tetrahydroisoquinoline alkaloid), strictosidine (monoterpene indole alkaloid), ergotamine (ergot alkaloid) and opiates (benzylisoquinoline and morphinan alkaloid). This review also discusses the engineered biosynthesis of these compounds, primarily through heterologous reconstitution of target biosynthetic pathways in suitable hosts, such as Escherichia coli, Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Aspergillus nidulans. Those heterologous biosynthetic systems can be used to confirm the functions of the isolated genes, economically scale up the production of the alkaloids for commercial distributions and engineer the biosynthetic pathways to produce valuable analogs of the alkaloids. In particular, extensive involvement of oxidation reactions catalyzed by oxidoreductases, such as cytochrome P450s, during the secondary metabolite biosynthesis is discussed in details. PMID:27548127

  2. Plant alkaloids as drug leads for Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Ng, Yu Pong; Or, Terry Cho Tsun; Ip, Nancy Y

    2015-10-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a neurodegenerative illness associated with dementia and is most prevalent among the elderly population. Current medications can only treat symptoms. Alkaloids are structurally diverse and have been an important source of therapeutics for various brain disorders. Two US Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-approved acetylcholinesterase inhibitors for AD, galantamine and rivastigmine, are in fact alkaloids. In addition, clinical trials of four other extensively studied alkaloids-huperzine A, caffeine, nicotine, and indomethacin-have been conducted but do not convincingly demonstrate their clinical efficacy for AD. Interestingly, rhynchophylline, a known neuroprotective alkaloid, was recently discovered by in silico screening as an inhibitor of EphA4, a novel target for AD. Here, we review the pathophysiological mechanisms underlying AD, current treatment strategies, and therapeutic potential of several selected plant alkaloids in AD, highlighting their various drug targets and the key supportive preclinical and clinical studies. Future research should include more rigorous clinical studies of the most promising alkaloids, the further development of recently discovered candidate alkaloids, and the continual search for new alkaloids for relevant drug targets. It remains promising that an alkaloid drug candidate could significantly affect the progression of AD in addition to providing symptomatic relief. PMID:26220901

  3. Drug Delivery Systems and Combination Therapy by Using Vinca Alkaloids

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Chun-Ting; Huang, Yen-Wei; Yang, Chih-Hui; Huang, Keng-Shiang

    2015-01-01

    Developing new methods for chemotherapy drug delivery has become a topic of great concern. Vinca alkaloids are among the most widely used chemotherapy reagents for tumor therapy; however, their side effects are particularly problematic for many medical doctors. To reduce the toxicity and enhance the therapeutic efficiency of vinca alkaloids, many researchers have developed strategies such as using liposome-entrapped drugs, chemical- or peptide-modified drugs, polymeric packaging drugs, and chemotherapy drug combinations. This review mainly focuses on the development of a vinca alkaloid drug delivery system and the combination therapy. Five vinca alkaloids (eg, vincristine, vinblastine, vinorelbine, vindesine, and vinflunine) are reviewed. PMID:25877096

  4. Biosynthesis and Regulation of Bioprotective Alkaloids in the Gramineae Endophytic Fungi with Implications for Herbivores Deterrents.

    PubMed

    Luo, Hongping; Xie, Longxiang; Zeng, Jie; Xie, Jianping

    2015-12-01

    Four kinds of bioprotective alkaloids-peramine, loline, ergot alkaloid, indole-diterpenes, produced by grass-fungal endophyte symbioses, are deterrents or toxic to vertebrate and invertebrate herbivores. Ergot alkaloids have pharmacological properties and widely are used clinically. The regulation of alkaloids biosynthesis is under intensive study to improve the yield for better agricultural and medicinal application. In this paper, we summarize the structure, related genes, regulation, and toxicity of alkaloids. We focus on the biosynthesis and the regulation network of alkaloids.

  5. Protective Mechanisms of Flavonoids in Parkinson's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Magalingam, Kasthuri Bai; Radhakrishnan, Ammu Kutty; Haleagrahara, Nagaraja

    2015-01-01

    Parkinson's disease is a chronic, debilitating neurodegenerative movement disorder characterized by progressive degeneration of dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra pars compacta region in human midbrain. To date, oxidative stress is the well accepted concept in the etiology and progression of Parkinson's disease. Hence, the therapeutic agent is targeted against suppressing and alleviating the oxidative stress-induced cellular damage. Within the past decades, an explosion of research discoveries has reported on the protective mechanisms of flavonoids, which are plant-based polyphenols, in the treatment of neurodegenerative disease using both in vitro and in vivo models. In this paper, we have reviewed the literature on the neuroprotective mechanisms of flavonoids in protecting the dopaminergic neurons hence reducing the symptoms of this movement disorder. The mechanism reviewed includes effect of flavonoids in activation of endogenous antioxidant enzymes, suppressing the lipid peroxidation, inhibition of inflammatory mediators, flavonoids as a mitochondrial target therapy, and modulation of gene expression in neuronal cells. PMID:26576219

  6. Dietary alkaloid sequestration in a poison frog: an experimental test of alkaloid uptake in Melanophryniscus stelzneri (Bufonidae).

    PubMed

    Hantak, Maggie M; Grant, Taran; Reinsch, Sherri; McGinnity, Dale; Loring, Marjorie; Toyooka, Naoki; Saporito, Ralph A

    2013-12-01

    Several lineages of brightly colored anurans independently evolved the ability to secrete alkaloid-containing defensive chemicals from granular glands in the skin. These species, collectively referred to as 'poison frogs,' form a polyphyletic assemblage that includes some species of Dendrobatidae, Mantellidae, Myobatrachidae, Bufonidae, and Eleutherodactylidae. The ability to sequester alkaloids from dietary arthropods has been demonstrated experimentally in most poison frog lineages but not in bufonid or eleutherodactylid poison frogs. As with other poison frogs, species of the genus Melanophryniscus (Bufonidae) consume large numbers of mites and ants, suggesting they might also sequester defensive alkaloids from dietary sources. To test this hypothesis, fruit flies dusted with alkaloid/nutritional supplement powder were fed to individual Melanophryniscus stelzneri in two experiments. In the first experiment, the alkaloids 5,8-disubstituted indolizidine 235B' and decahydroquinoline were administered to three individuals for 104 days. In the second experiment, the alkaloids 3,5-disubstituted indolizidine 239Q and decahydroquinoline were given to three frogs for 153 days. Control frogs were fed fruit flies dusted only with nutritional supplement. Gas chromatography/mass spectrometry analyses revealed that skin secretions of all experimental frogs contained alkaloids, whereas those of all control frogs lacked alkaloids. Uptake of decahydroquinoline was greater than uptake of 5,8-disubstituted indolizidine, and uptake of 3,5-disubstituted indolizidine was greater than uptake of decahydroquinoline, suggesting greater uptake efficiency of certain alkaloids. Frogs in the second experiment accumulated a greater amount of alkaloid, which corresponds to the longer duration and greater number of alkaloid-dusted fruit flies that were consumed. These findings provide the first experimental evidence that bufonid poison frogs sequester alkaloid-based defenses from dietary

  7. Chromatographic behaviour of steroidal saponins studied by high-performance liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Kite, Geoffrey C; Porter, Elaine A; Simmonds, Monique S J

    2007-05-01

    The chromatographic behaviour of steroidal saponins found in Anemarrhena asphodeloides, Asparagus officinalis, Convallaria majalis, Digitalis purpurea and Ruscus aculeatus was studied by HPLC-MS using a C-18 reversed-phase column and aqueous acetonitrile or aqueous methanol mobile phase gradients, with or without the addition of 1% acetic acid. The behaviour was compared to that of triterpene saponins found in Aesculus hippocastanum, Centella asiatica, Panax notoginseng and Potentilla tormentilla. Inclusion of methanol in the mobile phase under acidic conditions was found to cause furostanol saponins hydroxylated at C-22 to chromatograph as broad peaks, whereas the peak shapes of the spirostanol saponins and triterpene saponins studied remained acceptable. In aqueous methanol mobile phases without the addition of acid, furostanol saponins chromatographed with good peak shape, but each C-22 hydroxylated furostanol saponin was accompanied by a second chromatographic peak identified as its C-22 methyl ether. Methanolic extracts analysed in non-acidified aqueous acetonitrile mobile phases also resolved pairs of C-22 hydroxy and C-22 methoxy furostanol saponins. The C-22 methyl ether of deglucoruscoside was found to convert to deglucoruscoside during chromatography in acidified aqueous acetonitrile, or by dissolving in water. Poor chromatography of furostanol saponins in acidified aqueous methanol is due to the interconversion of the C-22 hydroxy and C-22 methoxy forms. It is recommended that initial analysis of saponins by HPLC-MS using a C-18 stationary phase is performed using acidified aqueous acetonitrile mobile phase gradients. The existence of naturally-occurring furostanol saponins methoxylated at C-22 can be investigated with aqueous acetonitrile mobile phases and avoiding methanol in the extraction solvent. PMID:17391684

  8. Hemolytic and cytotoxic properties of saponin purified from Holothuria leucospilota sea cucumber

    PubMed Central

    Soltani, Mozhgan; Parivar, Kazem; Baharara, Javad; Kerachian, Mohammad Amin; Asili, Javad

    2014-01-01

    Background: Holothuroids (sea cucumbers) are members of the phylum echinodermata, which produce saponins. Saponins exhibit a wide spectrum of pharmacological and biological activities. In this study, we isolated the crude saponins from the body wall of the dominant Iranian species of sea cucumber, Holothuria leucospilota (H. leucospilota). The purpose of this study was to confirm the presence of saponins in the Persian Gulf H. leucospilota and study the hemolytic and cytotoxic activities of these compounds. Methods: The body wall of sea cucumber was dried and powdered and the crude saponins were isolated using various solvents. The crude saponins were further purified by column chromatography using HP-20 resin. The foam test, Thin Layer Chromatography (TLC), hemolytic assay, and Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR) confirmed the presence of saponins. Cytotoxicity was analyzed using a 3-(4, 5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2, 5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay on A549 cells, a human lung cancer cell line. Results: The foam test, hemolytic assay, and TLC supported the presence of saponin compounds in the 80% ethanol fraction of H. leucospilota. The infrared (IR) spectrum of the extract showed hydroxyl (-OH), alkyl (C-H), ether (C-O) and ester (–C=O) absorption characteristic of teriterpenoid saponins. The C-O-C absorption indicated glycoside linkages to the sapogenins. The crude saponin extracted from sea cucumber was cytotoxic to A549 cells. Conclusion: The 80% ethanol fraction of saponin isolated from H. leucospilota exhibited hemolytic activity and offers promise as an anti-cancer candidate. PMID:26989736

  9. Flavonoids, Flavonoid Subclasses, and Esophageal Cancer Risk: A Meta-Analysis of Epidemiologic Studies

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Lingling; Liu, Xinxin; Tian, Yalan; Xie, Chen; Li, Qianwen; Cui, Han; Sun, Changqing

    2016-01-01

    Flavonoids have been suggested to play a chemopreventive role in carcinogenesis. However, the epidemiologic studies assessing dietary intake of flavonoids and esophageal cancer risk have yielded inconsistent results. This study was designed to examine the association between flavonoids, each flavonoid subclass, and the risk of esophageal cancer with a meta-analysis approach. We searched for all relevant studies with a prospective cohort or case-control study design published from January 1990 to April 2016, using PUBMED, EMBASE, and Web of Science. Pooled odds ratios (ORs) were calculated using fixed or random-effect models. In total, seven articles including 2629 cases and 481,193 non-cases were selected for the meta-analysis. Comparing the highest-intake patients with the lowest-intake patients for total flavonoids and for each flavonoid subclass, we found that anthocyanidins (OR = 0.60, 95% CI: 0.49–0.74), flavanones (OR = 0.65, 95% CI: 0.49–0.86), and flavones (OR = 0.78, 95% CI 0.64–0.95) were inversely associated with the risk of esophageal cancer. However, total flavonoids showed marginal association with esophageal cancer risk (OR = 0.78, 95% CI: 0.59–1.04). In conclusion, our study suggested that dietary intake of total flavonoids, anthocyanidins, flavanones, and flavones might reduce the risk of esophageal cancer. PMID:27338463

  10. Comparison of saponin composition and content in wild soybean (Glycine soja Sieb. and Zucc.) before and after germination.

    PubMed

    Krishnamurthy, Panneerselvam; Tsukamoto, Chigen; Takahashi, Yuya; Hongo, Yuji; Singh, Ram J; Lee, Jeong Dong; Chung, Gyuhwa

    2014-01-01

    Eight wild soybean accessions with different saponin phenotypes were used to examine saponin composition and relative saponin quantity in various tissues of mature seeds and two-week-old seedlings by LC-PDA/MS/MS. Saponin composition and content were varied according to tissues and accessions. The average total saponin concentration in 1 g mature dry seeds of wild soybean was 16.08 ± 3.13 μmol. In two-week-old seedlings, produced from 1 g mature seeds, it was 27.94 ± 6.52 μmol. Group A saponins were highly concentrated in seed hypocotyl (4.04 ± 0.71 μmol). High concentration of DDMP saponins (7.37 ± 5.22 μmol) and Sg-6 saponins (2.19 ± 0.59 μmol) was found in cotyledonary leaf. In seedlings, the amounts of group A and Sg-6 saponins reduced 2.3- and 1.3-folds, respectively, while DDMP + B + E saponins increased 2.5-fold than those of mature seeds. Our findings show that the group A and Sg-6 saponins in mature seeds were degraded and/or translocated by germination whereas DDMP saponins were newly synthesized.

  11. Soyasaponin Bh, a Triterpene Saponin Containing a Unique Hemiacetal-Functional Five-Membered Ring from Glycine max (Soybeans)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Soybeans (Glycine max L. Merill) and soy-based food products are major dietary sources of saponins. An oleanane triterpenoid saponin, soyasaponin Bh (1) containing a unique five-membered ring with a hemiacetal functionality together with seven known saponins were isolated from soybeans. Their struct...

  12. A new ursane-type triterpenoid saponin from the aerial parts of Clematoclethra scandens subsp. actinidioides.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Shi-Ji; Chen, Fang; Ding, Li-Sheng; Zhou, Yan

    2015-01-01

    A new ursane-type triterpenoid saponin, 2α,3α,24-trihydroxyurs-12,20(30)-dien-28-oic acid β-D-glucopyranosyl ester (1), together with six known triterpenoid saponins, was isolated and characterized from the aerial parts of Clematoclethra scandens subsp. actinidioides. PMID:25660290

  13. Versatile strategy for the divergent synthesis of linear oligosaccharide domain variants of Quillaja saponin vaccine adjuvants.

    PubMed

    Fernández-Tejada, Alberto; Tan, Derek S; Gin, David Y

    2015-09-21

    We describe a new, versatile synthetic approach to Quillaja saponin variants based on the natural product immunoadjuvant QS-21. This modular, divergent strategy provides efficient access to linear oligosaccharide domain variants with modified sugars and regiochemistries. This new synthetic approach opens the door to the rapid generation of diverse analogues to identify novel saponin adjuvants with improved synthetic accessibility.

  14. Multidirectional effects of triterpene saponins on cancer cells - mini-review of in vitro studies.

    PubMed

    Koczurkiewicz, Paulina; Czyż, Jarosław; Podolak, Irma; Wójcik, Katarzyna; Galanty, Agnieszka; Janeczko, Zbigniew; Michalik, Marta

    2015-01-01

    Triterpene saponins (saponosides) are found in a variety of higher plants and display a wide range of pharmacological activities, including expectorant, anti-inflamatory, vasoprotective, gastroprotective and antimicrobial properties. Recently, a potential anticancer activity of saponins has been suggested by their cytotoxic, cytostatic, pro-apoptotic and anti-invasive effects. At high concentrations (more than 100 µM) saponins exert cytotoxic and haemolytic effects via permeabilization of the cell membranes. Noteworthy, the inhibition of cancer cell proliferation, the induction of apoptosis and attenuation of cell invasiveness is observed in the presence of low saponin concentrations. Saponins might affect the expression of genes associated with malignancy. These alterations are directly related to the invasive phenotype of cancer cells and depend on "cellular context". It illustrates the relationships between the action of saponins, and the momentary genomic/proteomic status of cancer cells. Here, we discuss the hallmarks of anti-cancer activity of saponins with the particular emphasis on anti-invasive effect of diverse groups of saponins that have been investigated in relation to tumor therapy.

  15. Structural Elucidation of Novel Saponins in the Sea Cucumber Holothuria lessoni

    PubMed Central

    Bahrami, Yadollah; Zhang, Wei; Chataway, Tim; Franco, Chris

    2014-01-01

    Sea cucumbers are prolific producers of a wide range of bioactive compounds. This study aimed to purify and characterize one class of compound, the saponins, from the viscera of the Australian sea cucumber Holothuria lessoni. The saponins were obtained by ethanolic extraction of the viscera and enriched by a liquid-liquid partition process and adsorption column chromatography. A high performance centrifugal partition chromatography (HPCPC) was applied to the saponin-enriched mixture to obtain saponins with high purity. The resultant purified saponins were profiled using MALDI-MS/MS and ESI-MS/MS which revealed the structure of isomeric saponins to contain multiple aglycones and/or sugar residues. We have elucidated the structure of five novel saponins, Holothurins D/E and Holothurinosides X/Y/Z, along with seven reported triterpene glycosides, including sulfated and non-sulfated saponins containing a range of aglycones and sugar moieties, from the viscera of H. lessoni. The abundance of novel compounds from this species holds promise for biotechnological applications. PMID:25110919

  16. Tall fescue seed extraction and partial purification of ergot alkaloids

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Many substances in the tall fescue/endophyte association (Schedonorus arundinaceus/Epichloë coenophiala) have biological activity. Of these compounds only the ergot alkaloids are known to have significant mammalian toxicity and the predominant ergot alkaloids are ergovaline and ergovalinine. Because...

  17. Cinchona alkaloids from Cinchona succirubra and Cinchona ledgeriana.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Gui-Guang; Cai, Xiang-Hai; Zhang, Bao-Hong; Li, Yan; Gu, Ji; Bao, Mei-Fen; Liu, Ya-Ping; Luo, Xiao-Dong

    2014-02-01

    Seven new cinchona alkaloids, cinchonanines A-G (1-7), and 29 known alkaloids were isolated from the barks of Cinchona surrirubra and C. ledgeriana collected from Yunnan Province in China. The new structures were elucidated by extensive spectroscopic analysis. All compounds were evaluated for their cytotoxicity against five human cancer cell lines. Compounds 2, 13, 14, and 15 showed moderate cytotoxicity.

  18. Effects of Ergot Alkaloids on Bovine Sperm Motility In Vitro

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Ergot alkaloids are synthesized by endophyte-infected (Neotyphodium coenophialum) tall fescue (Lolium arundinaceum (Schreb.) S.J. Darbyshire). Our objective was to determine direct effects of ergot alkaloids (ergotamine, dihydroergotamine and ergonovine) on the motility of bovine spermatozoa in vit...

  19. A new alkaloid isolated from Abies webbiana leaf

    PubMed Central

    Ghosh, Ashoke K.; Sen, Debanjan; Bhattacharya, Sanjib

    2010-01-01

    A new alkaloid namely 1-(4’-methoxyphenyl)-aziridine was isolated from the leaf of Abies webbiana Lindl. (Pinaceae), grown in Sikkim Himalayan region of India. Its chemical structure was elucidated on the basis of elemental and spectral analyses. This is the first experimental report of the isolation of any alkaloid from A. webbiana. PMID:21808564

  20. Galanthindole: a new indole alkaloid from Galanthus plicatus ssp. byzantinus.

    PubMed

    Unver, Nehir; Kaya, G Irem; Werner, Christa; Verpoorte, Robert; Gözler, Belkis

    2003-09-01

    A new indole alkaloid, galanthindole, was isolated from Galanthus plicatus ssp. byzantinus (Amaryllidaceae), a plant native to northwestern Turkey. Incorporating a non-fused indole ring, galanthindole may represent the prototype of a new subgroup of the Amaryllidaceae alkaloids. Two other bases, (+)-11-hydroxyvittatine and hordenine, are also reported from the same plant.

  1. Identification of the quinolizidine alkaloids in Sophora leachiana

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Sophora is a diverse genus representing herbs, shrubs, and trees that occurs throughout the world, primarily in the northern hemisphere. Sophora species contain a variety of quinolizidine alkaloids that are toxic and potentially teratogenic. However, there are no previous reports on the alkaloid c...

  2. Antiproliferative and Structure Activity Relationships of Amaryllidaceae Alkaloids.

    PubMed

    Cedrón, Juan C; Ravelo, Ángel G; León, Leticia G; Padrón, José M; Estévez-Braun, Ana

    2015-07-30

    The antiproliferative activity of a set of seven natural Amaryllidaceae alkaloids and 32 derivatives against four cancer cell lines (A2780, SW1573, T47-D and WiDr) was determined. The best antiproliferative activities were achieved with alkaloids derived from pancracine (2), haemanthamine (6) and haemantidine (7). For each skeleton, some structure-activity relationships were outlined.

  3. Human erythrocytes are affected in vitro by flavonoids of Aristotelia chilensis (Maqui) leaves.

    PubMed

    Suwalsky, Mario; Vargas, Pedro; Avello, Marcia; Villena, Fernando; Sotomayor, Carlos P

    2008-11-01

    Aristotelia chilensis (Mol.) Stuntz (A. chilensis), also known as maqui, is a plant of the Elaeocarpaceae family that grows in central and southern Chile as well as southwestern Argentina. Infusions of its leaves have long been used in the traditional native herbal medicine to treat different ailments. Phytochemical studies of the plant's chemical composition of the plant indicate the presence of indolic alkaloids, flavonoids, cianidine glucosides, delfidine, malvidine, petunidine, cumarines and triterpenes. These compounds, particularly the flavonoids, have antioxidant properties. In order to evaluate the mechanisms of its toxicity and their antioxidant properties, the leaves' aqueous extracts were induced to interact with human red cells, their isolated unsealed membranes (IUM), and molecular models of the human erythrocyte membrane. These consisted of multibilayers of dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine (DMPC) and dimyristoylphosphatidylethanolamine (DMPE), representative of phospholipids classes located in the outer and inner monolayers of the human erythrocyte membrane, and large unilamellar vesicles (LUV) of DMPC. The capacity of A. chilensis aqueous extracts to perturb the bilayer structure of DMPC and DMPE was evaluated by X-ray diffraction, DMPC LUV and IUM were studied by fluorescence spectroscopy, and intact human erythrocytes were observed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Results of the present study indicate that aqueous extracts of A. chilensis induced an alteration of human erythrocyte morphology from the normal discoid shape to an echinocytic form, changes that are explained in terms of the extract interaction with the membrane's outer phospholipid monolayer. PMID:18687390

  4. Alkaloids from Piper sarmentosum and Piper nigrum.

    PubMed

    Ee, G C L; Lim, C M; Lim, C K; Rahmani, M; Shaari, K; Bong, C F J

    2009-01-01

    Detailed chemical studies on the roots of Piper sarmentosum and Piper nigrum have resulted in several alkaloids. The roots of P. sarmentosum gave a new aromatic compound, 1-nitrosoimino-2,4,5-trimethoxybenzene (1). Piper nigrum roots gave pellitorine (2), (E)-1-[3',4'-(methylenedioxy)cinnamoyl]piperidine (3), 2,4-tetradecadienoic acid isobutyl amide (4), piperine (5), sylvamide (6), cepharadione A (7), piperolactam D (8) and paprazine (9). Structural elucidation of these compounds was achieved through NMR and MS techniques. Cytotoxic activity screening of the plant extracts indicated some activity.

  5. Efficient improvement of surface activity of tea saponin through Gemini-like modification by straightforward esterification.

    PubMed

    Feng, Jin; Chen, Ying; Liu, Xin; Liu, Songbai

    2015-03-15

    Novel strategy of Gemini-like modification has been applied in development of new nonionic surfactants, tea saponin esters, with enhanced surface activity by simple esterification. Tea saponin was treated with acyl chlorides of different chain length and different ratio of tea saponin and acyl chloride under alkaline condition. The structures of tea saponin esters were analysed and confirmed by FT-IR, NMR and ESI-MS. Surface activity investigation revealed that esterification with the chain length of C12 and C14 and the ratio of 1:4 to 1:6 produced superior surface activity compared with tea saponin. The exceptional surface activity of the new surfactants suggested their great potential application in food industry as green surfactants due to their environmental benign nature as well as simple and inexpensive preparation. The strategy of Gemini-like modification will facilitate development of green surfactants based on natural resources.

  6. Optimization of a method for the profiling and quantification of saponins in different green asparagus genotypes.

    PubMed

    Vázquez-Castilla, Sara; Jaramillo-Carmona, Sara; Fuentes-Alventosa, Jose María; Jiménez-Araujo, Ana; Rodriguez-Arcos, Rocío; Cermeño-Sacristán, Pedro; Espejo-Calvo, Juan Antonio; Guillén-Bejarano, Rafael

    2013-07-01

    The main goal of this study was the optimization of a HPLC-MS method for the qualitative and quantitative analysis of asparagus saponins. The method includes extraction with aqueous ethanol, cleanup by solid phase extraction, separation by reverse phase chromatography, electrospray ionization, and detection in a single quadrupole mass analyzer. The method was used for the comparison of selected genotypes of Huétor-Tájar asparagus landrace and selected varieties of commercial diploid hybrids of green asparagus. The results showed that while protodioscin was almost the only saponin detected in the commercial hybrids, eight different saponins were detected in the Huétor-Tájar asparagus genotypes. The mass spectra indicated that HT saponins are derived from a furostan type steroidal genin having a single bond between carbons 5 and 6 of the B ring. The total concentration of saponins was found to be higher in triguero asparagus than in commercial hybrids.

  7. Saponins: the phytochemical with an emerging potential for curing clinical depression.

    PubMed

    Abbas, Ghulam; Rauf, Khalid; Mahmood, Wajahat

    2015-01-01

    Depression is on the rise globally and expected to lead in global burden of diseases by 2030. The current therapy has serious limitations in terms of safety, efficacy, tolerability and therapeutic success. This review, based on the literature of the last decade, is aimed at exploring the preclinical profile of plant-based saponins (the abundant secondary metabolite) as an emerging therapy for depression. Enough scientific evidences reflect that saponins promote neurogenesis, restore monoaminergic tone and enhance neurotrophic factors. In multiple stress models, they have exhibited adaptogenic effects via normalising hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal axis, corticosterone levels and oxidative stress. Scientific data revealed neuroprotective effect of saponins by inhibiting apoptosis and intraneuronal calcium dynamics. Many plants possessing saponins as their principal antidepressant moiety need investigation at clinical level. Last decade literature revealed numerous preclinical reports supporting the role of saponins as natural cure for depression and justified their inclusion in antidepressant drug discovery programs.

  8. Simenoside A, a new triterpenoid saponin from Gypsophila simonii Hub.-Mor.

    PubMed

    Arslan, Idris

    2014-03-01

    Saponins are amphiphilic glycoconjugates which give soap-like foams in H2 O. A new triterpenoid saponin, simenoside A (1), based on gypsogenin aglycone, and the known saponin 2 were isolated from Gypsophila simonii Hub.-Mor. The structure of the new saponin was elucidated as 3-O-β-D-galactopyranosyl-(1→2)-[β-D-xylopyranosyl-(1→3)]-β-D-glucuronopyranosylgypsogenin 28-O-β-D-glucopyranosyl-(1→3)-[β-D-glucopyranosyl-(1→2)-β-D-xylopyranosyl-(1→4)]-α-L-rhamnopyranosyl-(1→2)-β-D-fucopyranosyl ester on the basis of extensive spectral analyses and chemical evidence. Saponins 1 and 2 were isolated from G. simonii for the first time. PMID:24634074

  9. Oligosaccharide sequences in Quillaja saponins by electrospray ionization ion trap multiple-stage mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Broberg, Susanna; Nord, Lars I; Kenne, Lennart

    2004-06-01

    Ten different samples with 13 previously identified saponin structures from Quillaja saponaria Molina were investigated by electrospray ionization ion trap multiple-stage mass spectrometry (ESI-ITMS(n)) in positive and negative ion modes. Both positive and negative ion mode MS(1)-MS(4) spectra were analyzed, showing that structural information on the two oligosaccharide parts in the saponin can be obtained from positive ion mode spectra whereas negative ion mode spectra mainly gave information on one of the oligosaccharide parts. Analysis of MS(1)-MS(4) spectra identified useful key fragment ions important for the structural elucidation of Quillaja saponins. A flowchart involving a stepwise procedure based on key fragments from MS(1)-MS(3) spectra was constructed for the identification of structural elements in the saponin. Peak intensity ratios in MS(3) spectra were found to be correlated with structural features of the investigated saponins and are therefore of value for the identification of terminal monosaccharide residues.

  10. Estimation of total alkaloid in Chitrakadivati by UV-Spectrophotometer

    PubMed Central

    Ajanal, Manjunath; Gundkalle, Mahadev B.; Nayak, Shradda U.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Herbal formulation standardization by adopting newer technique is need of the hour in the field of Ayurvedic pharmaceutical industry. As very few reports exist. These kind of studies would certainly widen the herbal research area. Chitrakadivati is one such popular herbal formulation used in Ayurveda. Many of its ingredients are known for presence of alkaloids. Methodology: Presence of alkaloid was tested qualitatively by Dragondroff's method then subjected to quantitative estimation by UV-Spectrophotometer. This method is based on the reaction between alkaloid and bromocresol green (BCG). Results and Conclusion: Study discloses that out of 16 ingredients, 9 contain alkaloid. Chitrakadivati has shown 0.16% of concentration of alkaloid and which is significantly higher than it's individual ingredients. PMID:23661869

  11. Haemolytic activities of plant saponins and adjuvants. Effect of Periandra mediterranea saponin on the humoral response to the FML antigen of Leishmania donovani.

    PubMed

    Santos, W R; Bernardo, R R; Peçanha, L M; Palatnik, M; Parente, J P; Palatnik de Sousa, C B

    1997-06-01

    An 87.7% (P < 0.01) and 84% (P < 0.001) of protection against visceral leishmaniasis was achieved in CB hamsters and Balb/c mice, respectively, with saponin combined to the fucose-mannose ligand of Leishmania donovani (FML). However, an undesirable haemolytic effect was described for several saponins. Aiming to improve the formulation with FML/saponin, we comparatively analysed the haemolytic potential of recently characterized plant saponins and currently used adjuvants. The haemolytic activity of steroidic saponins from Agave sisalana; Smilax officinalis as well as commercial saponin (Riedel De Haën's), was higher than that of triterpenoid ones (Bredemeyera floribunda; Periandra mediterranea) and the Freund's complete adjuvant. The concentration resulting in 50% haemolysis was 500 micrograms ml-1 for aluminum hydroxide. The low haemolytic effect of P. mediterranea saponin was abolished by removal of its glycidic moiety and its sapogenin fraction as well as the Freund's Incomplete Adjuvant were non-haemolytic within this range. Furthermore, the adjuvant effect of three doses of P. mediterranea saponin injected with the FML antigen of L. donovani, was assayed in mice, either by the intraperitoneal (i.p.) or the subcutaneous (s.c.) route. The anti-FML IgG antibody levels increased and detectable levels were observed up to 3 months in the s.c. group. The response was expanded in both groups after an injection with a fourth vaccine dose. The IgG response showed increased levels of IgG2a only in the i.p. group, while IgG2b and IgG1 but not IgG3 antibodies were higher than controls in both groups. In conclusion, the results suggest that the recently described triterpenoid fractions of P. mediterranea can be safely used as adjuvant with low or non-haemolytic effect.

  12. Effect of Holothuria leucospilota extracted saponin on maturation of mice oocyte and granulosa cells.

    PubMed

    Moghadam, Fereshteh Delghandi; Baharara, Javad; Balanezhad, Saeedeh Zafar; Jalali, Mohsen; Amini, Elaheh

    2016-01-01

    Sea cucumbers saponins are triterpenoid glycosides which exert beneficial biomedical effects. This study was performed to assess the effect of saponin extracted from sea cucumber Holothuria leucospilota (H. leucospilota) on maturation of mice oocytes and granulosa cells. The germinal vesicles oocytes were collected from 6-8 weeks old Naval Medical Research Institute (NMRI) mice ovaries, randomly divided into untreated and four experimental groups and cultured In vitro. Maturation medium was supplemented with 0, 1, 2, 4 and 8 μg/ml saponin for 12 days. The rates of maturation were recorded through morphological observation by measurement of follicle diameter during treatment. After 4 days, the effects of saponin on granulosa cells were investigated by reactive oxygen species (ROS) measurement, super oxide dismutase (SOD) activity, caspase assay and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) expression. The oocyte maturation rate was significantly higher in treated groups (1 μg/ml). The ROS and SOD assays demonstrated the antioxidant potential of saponin. The caspase assay exhibited that optimum concentrations of saponin (1, 2 μg/ml) reduced caspase activity in granulosa cells. Flow cytometry showed that optimum concentration of saponin promoted oocyte maturation via down regulation of TNF-α as follicular degenerative factor in nursing cells. These results proposed that maturation rate were obtained after the incorporation of 1 μg/ml sea cucumber saponin. Moreover, the extracted saponin at concentrations of 1, 2 μg/ml enhanced follicle growth which is accompanied by attenuating ROS formation, elevating SOD activity and reducing TNF-α expression in granulosa cells. But, further examinations are required to understand precise mechanisms of saponin action on oocyte and granulosa cells. PMID:27168752

  13. Effect of Holothuria leucospilota extracted saponin on maturation of mice oocyte and granulosa cells

    PubMed Central

    Moghadam, Fereshteh Delghandi; Baharara, Javad; Balanezhad, Saeedeh Zafar; Jalali, Mohsen; Amini, Elaheh

    2016-01-01

    Sea cucumbers saponins are triterpenoid glycosides which exert beneficial biomedical effects. This study was performed to assess the effect of saponin extracted from sea cucumber Holothuria leucospilota (H. leucospilota) on maturation of mice oocytes and granulosa cells. The germinal vesicles oocytes were collected from 6–8 weeks old Naval Medical Research Institute (NMRI) mice ovaries, randomly divided into untreated and four experimental groups and cultured In vitro. Maturation medium was supplemented with 0, 1, 2, 4 and 8 μg/ml saponin for 12 days. The rates of maturation were recorded through morphological observation by measurement of follicle diameter during treatment. After 4 days, the effects of saponin on granulosa cells were investigated by reactive oxygen species (ROS) measurement, super oxide dismutase (SOD) activity, caspase assay and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) expression. The oocyte maturation rate was significantly higher in treated groups (1 μg/ml). The ROS and SOD assays demonstrated the antioxidant potential of saponin. The caspase assay exhibited that optimum concentrations of saponin (1, 2 μg/ml) reduced caspase activity in granulosa cells. Flow cytometry showed that optimum concentration of saponin promoted oocyte maturation via down regulation of TNF-α as follicular degenerative factor in nursing cells. These results proposed that maturation rate were obtained after the incorporation of 1 μg/ml sea cucumber saponin. Moreover, the extracted saponin at concentrations of 1, 2 μg/ml enhanced follicle growth which is accompanied by attenuating ROS formation, elevating SOD activity and reducing TNF-α expression in granulosa cells. But, further examinations are required to understand precise mechanisms of saponin action on oocyte and granulosa cells. PMID:27168752

  14. Two new steroidal saponins from Tribulus terrestris L.

    PubMed

    Liu, Tao; Lu, Xuan; Wu, Biao; Chen, Gang; Hua, Hui-Ming; Pei, Yue-Hu

    2010-01-01

    Two new steroidal saponins were isolated from the fruits of Tribulus terrestris L. Their structures were elucidated by spectroscopic and chemical analysis as (23S,24R,25R)-5alpha-spirostane-3beta,23,24-triol-3-O-{alpha-L-rhamnopyranosyl-(1 --> 2)-[beta-D-glucopyranosyl-(1 --> 4)]-beta-D-galactopyranoside} (1) and (23S,24R,25S)-5alpha-spirostane-3beta,23,24-triol-3-O-{alpha-L-rhamnopyranosyl-(1 --> 2)-[beta-D-glucopyranosyl-(1 --> 4)]-beta-D-galactopyranoside} (2).

  15. Furostanol saponins from the fruits of Tribulus terrestris.

    PubMed

    Chen, Gang; Su, Lan; Feng, Sheng-Guang; Lu, Xuan; Wang, Haifeng; Pei, Yue-Hu

    2013-01-01

    Two new steroidal saponins were isolated from the fruits of Tribulus terrestris. Their structures were assigned by spectroscopic analysis and colour reaction as 26-O-β-D-glucopyranosyl-(25R)-5α-furostane-12-one-3β,22α,26-triol-3-O-β-D-glucopyranosyl(1 → 4)-β-D-galactopyranoside (1); 26-O-β- D-glucopyranosyl-25(R)-5α-furostan-12-one-3β,22α,26-triol-3-O-α-L-rhamnopyranosyl-(1 → 2)-O-[β-D-glucopyranosyl-(1 → 4)]-β-D-galactopyranoside (2).

  16. Triterpene saponins from the sea cucumber Stichopus chloronotus.

    PubMed

    Thao, Nguyen Phuong; Luyen, Bui Thi Thuy; Le Vien, Thi; Tai, Bui Huu; Le Dat, Duc; Cuong, Nguyen Xuan; Nam, Nguyen Hoai; Van Kiem, Phan; Van Minh, Chau; Kim, Young Ho

    2014-05-01

    Sea cucumbers have been used as a dietary delicacy and important ingredient in Asian traditional medicine and functional foods over many centuries. Using combined chromatographic methods, six triterpene saponins (1-6), including a new compound, stichloroside F (1), were isolated from a methanol extract of the sea cucumber Stichopus chloronotus Brandt. Their structures were determined on the basis of spectroscopic (1H and 13C NMR, HSQC, HMBC, 1H-1lH COSY, ROESY) and FTICR-MS data and by comparison with literature values. PMID:25026701

  17. Triterpenoid saponins from the shells of Argania spinosa seeds.

    PubMed

    Alaoui, Asma; Charrouf, Zoubida; Soufiaoui, Mohamed; Carbone, Virginia; Malorni, Antonio; Pizza, Cosimo; Piacente, Sonia

    2002-07-31

    Two new oleanene saponins were isolated from the MeOH extract of the shell of Argania spinosa. They possess protobassic acid and 16alpha-protobassic acid as aglycons. The disaccharide moiety linked to C-3 of the aglycon is made up of two glucose units; the pentasaccharide moiety linked to C-28 is made up of arabinose, xylose, and three rhamnose units. Their structures were elucidated by 1D and 2D NMR experiments including (1)H-(1)H (DQF-COSY, 1D TOCSY, and 2D HOHAHA) and (1)H-(13)C (HSQC and HMBC) spectroscopy along with mass spectrometry. PMID:12137482

  18. A new triterpenoid saponin from Abrus precatorius Linn.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Zhi-Hui; Wang, Fa-Zuo; Sun, Ai-Jun; Li, Chuan-Rong; Huang, Cai-Guo; Zhang, Si

    2012-01-01

    A new triterpenoid saponin, 3-O-β-D-glucopyranosyl-(1→2)-β-D-glucopyranosyl subprogenin D (1), together with six known triterpenoids: subprogenin D (2), abrusgenic acid (3), triptotriterpenic acid B (4), abruslactone A (5), abrusogenin (6) and abrusoside C (7) were isolated from the leaves and stems of Abrus precatorius. Their structures were elucidated on the basis of physical and NMR analysis, respectively. Compounds 5 and 6 showed moderate cytotoxicity against MCF-7, SW1990, Hela, and Du-145 cell lines. Compounds 1, 2 and 4 were isolated from this plant for the first time.

  19. Antifungal Quinoline Alkaloids from Waltheria indica.

    PubMed

    Cretton, Sylvian; Dorsaz, Stéphane; Azzollini, Antonio; Favre-Godal, Quentin; Marcourt, Laurence; Ebrahimi, Samad Nejad; Voinesco, Francine; Michellod, Emilie; Sanglard, Dominique; Gindro, Katia; Wolfender, Jean-Luc; Cuendet, Muriel; Christen, Philippe

    2016-02-26

    Chemical investigation of a dichloromethane extract of the aerial parts of Waltheria indica led to the isolation and characterization of five polyhydroxymethoxyflavonoids, namely, oxyanin A (1), vitexicarpin (3), chrysosplenol E (4), flindulatin (5), 5-hydroxy-3,7,4'-trimethoxyflavone (6), and six quinolone alkaloids, waltheriones M-Q (2, 7, 8, 10, 11) and 5(R)-vanessine (9). Among these, compounds 2, 7, 8, 10, and 11 have not yet been described in the literature. Their chemical structures were established by means of spectroscopic data interpretation including (1)H and (13)C, HSQC, HMBC, COSY, and NOESY NMR experiments and UV, IR, and HRESIMS. The absolute configurations of the compounds were established by ECD. The isolated constituents and 10 additional quinoline alkaloids previously isolated from the roots of the plant were evaluated for their in vitro antifungal activity against the human fungal pathogen Candida albicans, and 10 compounds (7, 9, 11-16, 18, 21) showed growth inhibitory activity on both planktonic cells and biofilms (MIC ≤ 32 μg/mL). Their spectrum of activity against other pathogenic Candida species and their cytotoxicity against human HeLa cells were also determined. In addition, the cytological effect of the antifungal isolated compounds on the ultrastructure of C. albicans was evaluated by transmission electron microscopy.

  20. Chirality and numbering of substituted tropane alkaloids.

    PubMed

    Humam, Munir; Shoul, Tarik; Jeannerat, Damien; Muñoz, Orlando; Christen, Philippe

    2011-08-25

    The strict application of IUPAC rules for the numbering of tropane alkaloids is not always applied by authors and there is hence a lot of confusion in the literature. In most cases, the notation of 3, 6/7-disubstituted derivatives has been chosen arbitrarily, based on NMR and MS data, without taking into account the absolute configuration of these two carbons. This paper discusses the problem and the relevance of CD and NMR to determine molecular configurations. We report on the use of (1)H-NMR anisochrony (Δδ) induced by the Mosher's chiral auxiliary reagents (R)-(-)- and (S)-(+)-α-methoxy-α-trifluoromethyl-phenylacetyl chlorides (MTPA-Cl), to determine the absolute configuration of (3R,6R)-3α-hydroxy-6β-senecioyloxytropane, a disubstituted tropane alkaloid isolated from the aerial parts of Schizanthus grahamii (Solanaceae). These analytical tools should help future works in correctly assigning the configuration of additional 3, 6/7 disubstituted tropane derivatives.

  1. A Systematic Computational Study on Flavonoids

    PubMed Central

    Aparicio, Santiago

    2010-01-01

    17 selected flavones derivatives, flavonoids, were analyzed through a systematic B3LYP/6-311++G** computational study with the aim of understanding the molecular factors that determine their structural and energetic properties in gas phase. Flavonoids were selected in a systematic way to infer the effect of the number and relative positions of hydroxyl groups on molecular properties. Different conformers for each flavonoid were analyzed and the strength and topology of the intramolecular hydrogen bonds studied through the computation of the corresponding torsional profiles. Atoms in a Molecule, and Natural Bond Orbital methodology was applied to the analysis of charge distribution along the studied molecules, and the intramolecular hydrogen bonds. Molecular shapes were studied through full geometry optimization, and the position of the catechol ring analyzed through dihedral scans. PMID:20559499

  2. Flavonoids in Inflammatory Bowel Disease: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Vezza, Teresa; Rodríguez-Nogales, Alba; Algieri, Francesca; Utrilla, Maria Pilar; Rodriguez-Cabezas, Maria Elena; Galvez, Julio

    2016-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is characterized by chronic inflammation of the intestine that compromises the patients’ life quality and requires sustained pharmacological and surgical treatments. Since their etiology is not completely understood, non-fully-efficient drugs have been developed and those that have shown effectiveness are not devoid of quite important adverse effects that impair their long-term use. In this regard, a growing body of evidence confirms the health benefits of flavonoids. Flavonoids are compounds with low molecular weight that are widely distributed throughout the vegetable kingdom, including in edible plants. They may be of great utility in conditions of acute or chronic intestinal inflammation through different mechanisms including protection against oxidative stress, and preservation of epithelial barrier function and immunomodulatory properties in the gut. In this review we have revised the main flavonoid classes that have been assessed in different experimental models of colitis as well as the proposed mechanisms that support their beneficial effects. PMID:27070642

  3. Flavonoids in Inflammatory Bowel Disease: A Review.

    PubMed

    Vezza, Teresa; Rodríguez-Nogales, Alba; Algieri, Francesca; Utrilla, Maria Pilar; Rodriguez-Cabezas, Maria Elena; Galvez, Julio

    2016-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is characterized by chronic inflammation of the intestine that compromises the patients' life quality and requires sustained pharmacological and surgical treatments. Since their etiology is not completely understood, non-fully-efficient drugs have been developed and those that have shown effectiveness are not devoid of quite important adverse effects that impair their long-term use. In this regard, a growing body of evidence confirms the health benefits of flavonoids. Flavonoids are compounds with low molecular weight that are widely distributed throughout the vegetable kingdom, including in edible plants. They may be of great utility in conditions of acute or chronic intestinal inflammation through different mechanisms including protection against oxidative stress, and preservation of epithelial barrier function and immunomodulatory properties in the gut. In this review we have revised the main flavonoid classes that have been assessed in different experimental models of colitis as well as the proposed mechanisms that support their beneficial effects. PMID:27070642

  4. Strains for the production of flavonoids from glucose

    DOEpatents

    Stephanopoulos, Gregory; Santos, Christine; Koffas, Mattheos

    2015-11-13

    The invention relates to the production of flavonoids and flavonoid precursors in cells through recombinant expression of tyrosine ammonia lyase (TAL), 4-coumarate:CoA ligase (4CL), chalcone synthase (CHS), and chalcone isomerase (CHI).

  5. Identification of saponins from sugar beet (Beta vulgaris) by low and high-resolution HPLC-MS/MS.

    PubMed

    Mikołajczyk-Bator, Katarzyna; Błaszczyk, Alfred; Czyżniejewski, Mariusz; Kachlicki, Piotr

    2016-09-01

    We profiled triterpene saponins from the roots of sugar beet Beta vulgaris L. cultivars Huzar and Boryna using reversed-phase liquid chromatography combined with negative-ion electrospray ionization quadrupole mass spectrometry. We tentatively identified 26 triterpene saponins, including 17 that had not been detected previously in this plant species and 7 saponins that were tentatively identified as new compounds. All observed compounds were glycosides of five different aglycones, of which gypsogenin and norhederagenin are reported for the first time in sugar beet. Thirteen of the saponins detected in sugar beet roots were substituted with dioxolane-type (4 saponins) or acetal-type (9 saponins) dicarboxylic acids. Among the 26 detected saponins, we identified 2 groups of isomers distinguished using high-resolution mass measurements that were detected only in the Huzar cultivar of sugar beet.

  6. Identification of saponins from sugar beet (Beta vulgaris) by low and high-resolution HPLC-MS/MS.

    PubMed

    Mikołajczyk-Bator, Katarzyna; Błaszczyk, Alfred; Czyżniejewski, Mariusz; Kachlicki, Piotr

    2016-09-01

    We profiled triterpene saponins from the roots of sugar beet Beta vulgaris L. cultivars Huzar and Boryna using reversed-phase liquid chromatography combined with negative-ion electrospray ionization quadrupole mass spectrometry. We tentatively identified 26 triterpene saponins, including 17 that had not been detected previously in this plant species and 7 saponins that were tentatively identified as new compounds. All observed compounds were glycosides of five different aglycones, of which gypsogenin and norhederagenin are reported for the first time in sugar beet. Thirteen of the saponins detected in sugar beet roots were substituted with dioxolane-type (4 saponins) or acetal-type (9 saponins) dicarboxylic acids. Among the 26 detected saponins, we identified 2 groups of isomers distinguished using high-resolution mass measurements that were detected only in the Huzar cultivar of sugar beet. PMID:27423042

  7. Anticonvulsant properties of saponins from Ficus platyphylla stem bark.

    PubMed

    Chindo, Ben A; Anuka, Joseph A; McNeil, Lilly; Yaro, Abdullahi H; Adamu, Simon S; Amos, Samson; Connelly, William K; Lees, George; Gamaniel, Karniyus S

    2009-03-30

    Preparations of Ficus platyphylla have been used in Nigerian traditional medicine for the management of epilepsy for many years and their efficacy is widely acclaimed among the Hausa communities of northern Nigeria. The anticonvulsant properties of the saponin rich fraction (SFG) obtained from the methanol extract of F. platyphylla stem bark were studied on pentylenetetrazole-, strychnine- and maximal electroshock seizures in mice. Effects of SFG were also examined in murine models for neurological disease and on relevant in vitro targets for anticonvulsant drugs. SFG protected mice against pentylenetetrazole- and strychnine-induced seizures; and significantly delayed the onset of myoclonic jerks and tonic seizures. SFG failed to protect mice against maximal electroshock seizures at doses tested. SFG neither abolished the spontaneous discharges induced by 4-aminopyridine in a neonatal rat brain slice model of tonic-clonic epilepsy nor could it modulate chloride currents through GABA(A) receptor channel complex in cultured cortical cells. However, it was able to non-selectively suppress excitatory and inhibitory synaptic traffic, blocked sustained repetitive firing (SRF) and spontaneous action potential firing in these cultured cells. Our results provide scientific evidence that F. platyphylla stem bark may contain psychoactive principles with potential anticonvulsant properties. SFG impaired membrane excitability; a property shared by most anticonvulsants particularly the voltage-gated sodium channel (VGSC) blocking drugs, thus supporting the isolation and development of the saponin components of this plant as anticonvulsant agents.

  8. Steroidal saponins from the rhizomes of Smilax sieboldii.

    PubMed

    Kubo, S; Mimaki, Y; Sashida, Y; Nikaido, T; Ohmoto, T

    1992-07-01

    Six new steroidal saponins were isolated from the rhizomes of Smilax sieboldii. Their structures were determined by spectroscopic analysis and hydrolysis to be 3 beta-hydroxy-(25R)-5 alpha-spirostan-6-one (laxogenin) 3-O-beta-D-glucopyranosyl-(1----4)-O-[alpha-L-arabinopyranosyl-(1- ---6)]-beta-D-glucopyranoside, laxogenin 3-O-alpha-L-arabinopyranosyl-(1----6)-beta-D-glucopyranoside, 3 beta,27-dihydroxy-(25S)-5 alpha-spirostan-6-one 3-O-beta-D-glucopyranosyl-(1----4)-O-[alpha-L-arabinopyranosyl-(1- ---6)]- beta-D-glucopyranoside, 26-O-beta-D-glucopyranosyl-3 beta,22 xi,26-trihydroxy-(25R)-5 alpha-furostan-6-one 3-O-alpha-L-arabinopyranosyl-(1----6)-beta-D-glucopyranoside, 26-O-beta-D-glucopyranosyl-3 beta,22 xi,26-trihydroxy-(25R)-5 alpha-furostan-6- one 3-O-beta-D-glucopyranosyl-(1----4)-O-[alpha-L-arabinopyranosyl-(1- ---6)]- beta-D-glucopyranoside and (25R)-5 alpha-spirostan-3 beta-ol (tigogenin) 3-O-beta-D-glucopyranosyl-(1----4)-O-[alpha-L-arabinopyranosyl- (1----6)]-beta-D-glucopyranoside. The inhibition of cAMP phosphodiesterase by the saponins was evaluated. PMID:1369386

  9. Oleanane-type triterpene saponins from Hydrocotyle nepalensis.

    PubMed

    Ma, Rui-Jing; Liu, Zhen-Hua; Zi, Cheng-Ting; Gao, Wei; Dong, Fa-Wu; Yang, Liu; Li, Jin-Yu; Zhou, Jun; Hu, Jiang-Miao

    2016-04-01

    Five new oleanane-type triterpene saponins including steganogenin 3-O-β-D-glucopyranoside (1), steganogenin 3-O-α-L-rhamnopyranosyl-(1→2)-β-D-glucopyranoside (2), steganogenin 3-O-β-D-glucopyranosyl-(1→2)-β-D-glucopyranoside (3), chichipegenin 3-O-α-L-rhamnopyranosyl-(1→2)-β-D-glucopyranoside (4) and chichipegenin 3-O-β-D-glucopyranosyl-(1→2)-β-D-glucopyranoside (5), along with four known oleanane-type triterpenes and triterpene saponins (6-9) were isolated from EtOH extract of the whole plant of Hydrocotyle nepalensis. To the best of our knowledge, oleanane-type triterpenes possessing skeleton with 17, 22-seco-backbone (1-3) are not common in natural products. Compound 8 was isolated as a new natural product. The structures of new compounds were elucidated by extensive spectroscopic methods and chemical evidence. Moreover, the cytotoxic activity of all the isolates against five selected human cancer cell lines (HL-60, SMMC-7721, A-549, MCF-7 and SW480) was evaluated and the results indicated that compounds 6 and 7 show stronger cytotoxic activity. PMID:26851174

  10. Pyrrolizidine alkaloids of Echium vulgare honey found in pure pollen.

    PubMed

    Boppré, Michael; Colegate, Steven M; Edgar, John A

    2005-02-01

    The pyrrolizidine alkaloids previously identified in floral honey attributed to Echium vulgare (Boraginaceae) have been detected (8000-14 000 ppm) in pure pollen collected from the anthers of Echium vulgare. Pyrrolizidine alkaloids and/or their N-oxides were isolated from the aqueous acid extracts of pollen by use of strong cation-exchange, solid-phase extraction and identified by liquid chromatographic/mass spectrometric (LCMS) analysis. The pyrrolizidine alkaloids in the pollen are present mainly as the N-oxides. In addition to seven previously described pyrrolizidine alkaloids and/or their N-oxides (echimidine, acetylechimidine, uplandicine, 9-O-angelylretronecine, echiuplatine, leptanthine, and echimiplatine), one unidentified (echivulgarine), but previously found in honey, and two previously undescribed (vulgarine and 7-O-acetylvulgarine) pyrrolizidine alkaloids and/or their N-oxides were identified in the pollen. Tentative structures for these unidentified pyrrolizidine alkaloids are proposed on the basis of the mass spectrometric data and biogenetic considerations. The implications of these results for identifying the source and subsequent concentrations of pyrrolizidine alkaloids in honeys and commercial bee pollen are briefly discussed. PMID:15686407

  11. Miscibility of Quillaja Saponins with other Co-surfactants under Different pH Values.

    PubMed

    Reichert, Corina L; Salminen, Hanna; Leuenberger, Bruno H; Hinrichs, Jörg; Weiss, Jochen

    2015-11-01

    The miscibility behavior of mixed surfactant systems and the influence of extrinsic parameters are crucial for their application as emulsifiers. Therefore, the objective of this study was to evaluate the miscibility behavior of mixed systems composed of commercial Quillaja saponin and a co-surfactant, namely sodium caseinate, pea protein, rapeseed lecithin, or egg lecithin. These mixtures were evaluated macro- and microscopically at different concentration ratios (maximum concentration 5% w/v) at pH 3, 5, and 7 at 25 °C. The individual ingredients were also assessed for their charge properties and surface hydrophobicity. The results showed that Quillaja saponin-caseinate mixtures were miscible only at pH 7, and showed aggregation and precipitation at lower pH due to increasing electrostatic attraction forces. Rheological measurements showed that Quillaja saponin-pea protein mixtures formed gelled structures at all tested pH values mainly via association of hydrophobic patches. Quillaja saponins mixed with rapeseed lecithin were miscible at all tested pH values due to electrostatic repulsion. Quillaja saponin-egg lecithin mixtures aggregated independent of pH and concentration ratio. The microscopic analysis revealed that the lower the pH and the higher the Quillaja saponin ratio, the denser were the formed Quillaja saponin-egg lecithin aggregates. The results are summarized in ternary phase diagrams that provide a useful tool in selecting a surfactant system for food applications. PMID:26458074

  12. Effect of saponins on n-hexane removal in biotrickling filters.

    PubMed

    Tu, Yanhong; Yang, Chunping; Cheng, Yan; Zeng, Guangming; Lu, Li; Wang, Lu

    2015-01-01

    Saponins was applied to enhance the removal of n-hexane in a biotrickling filter (BTF) in this study. Comparison experiments were carried out to examine the effect of saponins on n-hexane removal in two BTFs at various saponins concentrations, n-hexane loading rates (LRs) and gas empty bed contact times (EBCTs). Results show that the optimum concentration of saponins in nutrient feed was 50.0mgL(-1). When organic LR of n-hexane increased from 47.8 to 120.0gm(-3)h(-1), the removal efficiency (RE) for BTF1 (with saponins) and BTF2 (without saponins) decreased from 91.3% to 83.3% and from 62.8% to 56.8%, respectively. As gas EBCT decreased from 30.0 to 7.5s, the RE declined from 88.4% to 64.5% for BTF1 and from 61.4% to 38.3% for BTF2. Saponins could also decrease the biomass accumulation rate within the medium bed. These results could be referred in the design and operation of BTFs for hydrophobic VOC removal. PMID:25459827

  13. Effect of Agave americana and Agave salmiana Ripeness on Saponin Content from Aguamiel (Agave Sap).

    PubMed

    Leal-Díaz, Ana María; Santos-Zea, Liliana; Martínez-Escobedo, Hilda Cecilia; Guajardo-Flores, Daniel; Gutiérrez-Uribe, Janet Alejandra; Serna-Saldivar, Sergio Othón

    2015-04-22

    Steroidal saponins have shown beneficial health effects. Agave spp. leaves and rhizomes are sources of these compounds, but their presence has not been reported in the aguamiel. Aguamiel is the sweet edible sap from mature agave, and its quality is influenced by the plant ripening stage. The purpose of this research was to identify and quantitate saponins in aguamiel from Agave americana and Agave salmiana at two ripening stages. Saponins and sapogenins were identified with HPLC/ESI-MS/TOF and quantitated with HPLC/ELSD. Results proved the presence of saponins derived from kammogenin, manogenin, gentrogenin, and hecogenin. The saponin content in aguamiel from immature A. salmiana was 2-fold higher (478.3 protodioscin equivalents (PE) μg/g aguamiel (DM)) compared with A. americana (179.0 PE μg/g aguamiel (DM)). In both species, saponin content decreased when plants reached sexual maturity. This should be considered before evaluating the effects of Agave spp. as a source of bioactive saponins. PMID:25811101

  14. Inhibition of DNA-Topoisomerase I by Acylated Triterpene Saponins from Pittosporum angustifolium Lodd.

    PubMed

    Bäcker, Christian; Drwal, Malgorzata N; Preissner, Robert; Lindequist, Ulrike

    2016-04-01

    Previous phytochemical investigation of the leaves and seeds of Pittosporum angustifolium Lodd. led to the isolation and structural elucidation of polyphenols and triterpene saponins. Evaluation for cytotoxicity of isolated saponins revealed that the predominant structural feature for a cytotoxic activity are acyl substituents at the oleanane aglycon backbone. The present work reports the results of a screening of 10 selected acylated saponins for their potential to inhibit the human DNA-topoisomerase I, giving rise to IC50 values in a range of 2.8-46.5 µM. To clarify the mode of observed cytotoxic action and, moreover, to distinguish from a pure surfactant effect which is commonly accompanied with saponins, these results indicate an involvement of the topoisomerase I and its role as a possible target structure for a cytotoxic activity. In addition, computational predictions of the fitting of saponins to the topoisomerase I-DNA complex, indicate a similar binding mode to that of clinically used topoisomerase I inhibitors. Ten acylated triterpene saponins from Pittosporum angustifolium were investigated for their potential to inhibit the human DNA-topoisomerase I and computational predictions of the fitting of saponins to the topoisomerase I-DNA complex were carried out. PMID:26803837

  15. Effect of Agave americana and Agave salmiana Ripeness on Saponin Content from Aguamiel (Agave Sap).

    PubMed

    Leal-Díaz, Ana María; Santos-Zea, Liliana; Martínez-Escobedo, Hilda Cecilia; Guajardo-Flores, Daniel; Gutiérrez-Uribe, Janet Alejandra; Serna-Saldivar, Sergio Othón

    2015-04-22

    Steroidal saponins have shown beneficial health effects. Agave spp. leaves and rhizomes are sources of these compounds, but their presence has not been reported in the aguamiel. Aguamiel is the sweet edible sap from mature agave, and its quality is influenced by the plant ripening stage. The purpose of this research was to identify and quantitate saponins in aguamiel from Agave americana and Agave salmiana at two ripening stages. Saponins and sapogenins were identified with HPLC/ESI-MS/TOF and quantitated with HPLC/ELSD. Results proved the presence of saponins derived from kammogenin, manogenin, gentrogenin, and hecogenin. The saponin content in aguamiel from immature A. salmiana was 2-fold higher (478.3 protodioscin equivalents (PE) μg/g aguamiel (DM)) compared with A. americana (179.0 PE μg/g aguamiel (DM)). In both species, saponin content decreased when plants reached sexual maturity. This should be considered before evaluating the effects of Agave spp. as a source of bioactive saponins.

  16. Application of chitin and chitosan as elicitors of coumarins and fluoroquinolone alkaloids in Ruta graveolens L. (common rue).

    PubMed

    Orlita, Aleksandra; Sidwa-Gorycka, Matylda; Paszkiewicz, Monika; Malinski, Edmund; Kumirska, Jolanta; Siedlecka, Ewa M; Łojkowska, Ewa; Stepnowski, Piotr

    2008-10-01

    Common rue (Ruta graveolens L.) accumulates various types of secondary metabolites, such as coumarins furanocoumarins, acridone and quinolone alkaloids and flavonoids. Elicitation is a tool extensively used for enhancing secondary-metabolite yields. Chitin and chitosan are examples of elicitors inducing phytoalexin accumulation in plant tissue. The present paper describes the application of chitin and chitosan as potential elicitors of secondary-metabolite accumulation in R. graveolens shoots cultivated in vitro. The simple coumarins, linear furanocoumarins, dihydrofuranocoumarins and fluoroquinolone alkaloids biosynthesized in the presence of chitin and chitosan were isolated, separated and identified. There was a significant increase in the growth rate of R. graveolens shoots in the presence of either chitin or chitosan. Moreover, the results of the elicitation of coumarins and alkaloids accumulated by R. graveolens shoots in the presence of chitin and chitosan show that both compounds induced a significant increase in the concentrations of nearly all the metabolites. Adding 0.01% chitin caused the increase in the quantity (microg/g dry weight) of coumarins (pinnarin up to 116.7, rutacultin up to 287.0, bergapten up to 904.3, isopimpinelin up to 490.0, psoralen up to 522.2, xanhotoxin up to 1531.5 and rutamarin up to 133.7). The higher concentration of chitosan (0.1%) induced production of simple coumarins (pinnarin up to 116.7 and rutacultin up to 287.0), furanocoumarins (bergapten up to 904.3, isopimpinelin up to 490.0, psoralen up to 522.2, xanhotoxin up to 1531.5) and dihydrofuranocoumarins (chalepin up to 18 and rutamarin up to 133.7). Such a dramatic increase in the production of nearly all metabolites suggests that these compounds may be participating in the natural resistance mechanisms of R. graveolens. The application of chitin- and chitosan-containing media may be considered a promising prospect in the biotechnological production of xanthotoxin

  17. Cytotoxic and antimalarial bisbenzylisoquinoline alkaloids from Stephania erecta.

    PubMed

    Likhitwitayawuid, K; Angerhofer, C K; Cordell, G A; Pezzuto, J M; Ruangrungsi, N

    1993-01-01

    (+)-2-N-Methyltelobine [1], a new alkaloid, together with twelve known bisbenzylisoquinolines, was isolated from the tubers of Stephania erecta. The structure determination and the complete 1H- and unambiguous 13C-nmr assignments of 1 were obtained through extensive use of several 1D and 2D nmr techniques. All alkaloids inhibited the growth of cultured Plasmodium falciparum strains D-6 and W-2 and displayed nonselective cytotoxicity with a battery of cultured mammalian cells. These data were used for the calculation of selectivity indices. Relative to known antimalarial agents, these bisbenzylisoquinoline alkaloids do not appear to be promising clinical candidates at the present time. PMID:8450319

  18. γ-Lactam alkaloids from the flower buds of daylily.

    PubMed

    Matsumoto, Takahiro; Nakamura, Seikou; Nakashima, Souichi; Ohta, Tomoe; Yano, Mamiko; Tsujihata, Junichiro; Tsukioka, Junko; Ogawa, Keiko; Fukaya, Masashi; Yoshikawa, Masayuki; Matsuda, Hisashi

    2016-07-01

    Four new alkaloids, hemerocallisamines IV-VII, were isolated from the methanol extract of flower buds of daylily. The chemical structures of the new compounds were elucidated on the basis of chemical and physicochemical evidence. The absolute stereochemistry of the hemerocallisamines IV-VI was elucidated by the application of the modified Mosher's method, HPLC analysis, and optical rotation. In the present study, the isolated alkaloids significantly inhibited the aggregation of Aβ42 in vitro. This is the first report about bioactive alkaloids with a γ-lactam ring from daylily. In addition, isolated nucleosides showed accelerative effects on neurite outgrowth under the non-fasting condition. PMID:26849229

  19. γ-Lactam alkaloids from the flower buds of daylily.

    PubMed

    Matsumoto, Takahiro; Nakamura, Seikou; Nakashima, Souichi; Ohta, Tomoe; Yano, Mamiko; Tsujihata, Junichiro; Tsukioka, Junko; Ogawa, Keiko; Fukaya, Masashi; Yoshikawa, Masayuki; Matsuda, Hisashi

    2016-07-01

    Four new alkaloids, hemerocallisamines IV-VII, were isolated from the methanol extract of flower buds of daylily. The chemical structures of the new compounds were elucidated on the basis of chemical and physicochemical evidence. The absolute stereochemistry of the hemerocallisamines IV-VI was elucidated by the application of the modified Mosher's method, HPLC analysis, and optical rotation. In the present study, the isolated alkaloids significantly inhibited the aggregation of Aβ42 in vitro. This is the first report about bioactive alkaloids with a γ-lactam ring from daylily. In addition, isolated nucleosides showed accelerative effects on neurite outgrowth under the non-fasting condition.

  20. Indole Alkaloids from the Leaves of Nauclea officinalis.

    PubMed

    Fan, Long; Liao, Cheng-Hui; Kang, Qiang-Rong; Zheng, Kai; Jiang, Ying-Chun; He, Zhen-Dan

    2016-07-23

    Three new indole alkaloids, named naucleamide G (1), and nauclealomide B and C (5 and 6), were isolated from the n-BuOH-soluble fraction of an EtOH extract of the leaves of Nauclea officinalis, together with three known alkaloids, paratunamide C (2), paratunamide D (3) and paratunamide A (4). The structures with absolute configurations of the new compounds were identified on the basis of 1D and 2D NMR, HRESIMS, acid hydrolysis and quantum chemical circular dichroism (CD) calculation. According to the structures of isolated indole alkaloids, their plausible biosynthetic pathway was deduced.

  1. Cyclobutane-Containing Alkaloids: Origin, Synthesis, and Biological Activities

    PubMed Central

    Sergeiko, Anastasia; Poroikov, Vladimir V; Hanuš, Lumir O; Dembitsky, Valery M

    2008-01-01

    Present review describes research on novel natural cyclobutane-containing alkaloids isolated from terrestrial and marine species. More than 60 biological active compounds have been confirmed to have antimicrobial, antibacterial, antitumor, and other activities. The structures, synthesis, origins, and biological activities of a selection of cyclobutane-containing alkaloids are reviewed. With the computer program PASS some additional biological activities are also predicted, which point toward new possible applications of these compounds. This review emphasizes the role of cyclobutane-containing alkaloids as an important source of leads for drug discovery. PMID:19696873

  2. Effects of Holothuroid Ichtyotoxic Saponins on the Gills of Free-Living Fishes and Symbiotic Pearlfishes.

    PubMed

    Eeckhaut, Igor; Caulier, Guillaume; Brasseur, Lola; Flammang, Patrick; Gerbaux, Pascal; Parmentier, Eric

    2015-06-01

    Several carapid fishes, known as pearlfishes, are endosymbiotic in holothuroids and asteroids. These echinoderms contain a strong concentration of saponins that are efficient membranolytic repellents to predators. We compared the effects of exposure to saponins from the sea cucumber body wall and from the Cuvierian tubules on the behavior and gill ultrastructure of pearlfishes and free-living fishes. Saponins were extracted from the body wall of two holothuroids, the Mediterranean Holothuria forskali and the tropical Bohadschia atra, and from the water surrounding the Cuvierian tubules of B. atra. Five species of carapids that live in symbiosis with holothuroids and seven species of free-living fishes were exposed to these extracts. The free-living fishes exhibited a stress response and died about 45 times faster than pearlfishes when exposed to the same quantity of saponins. Cuvierian tubules and saponins extracted from the body wall were lethal to the free-living fishes, whereas the carapids were much less sensitive. The carapids did not exhibit a stress response. The high toxicity shown by Cuvierian tubules was not explained by the nature of the saponins that were identified by mass spectrometry, but it is likely due to the higher concentration of saponins in the tubules. Histology and scanning and transmission electron microscopy of the gills of the free-living fishes and pearlfishes showed that saponins act at the level of the secondary lamellae where they induce the detachment of the epithelia, create edema at the level of the epithelia, and induce pores in the epithelial cells that lead to their destruction and the invasion of inner cells (pillar cells and red blood cells). This sequence of events happens 5 min after saponin exposure in free-living fishes and after 1 h in carapids. PMID:26124451

  3. Effects of Holothuroid Ichtyotoxic Saponins on the Gills of Free-Living Fishes and Symbiotic Pearlfishes.

    PubMed

    Eeckhaut, Igor; Caulier, Guillaume; Brasseur, Lola; Flammang, Patrick; Gerbaux, Pascal; Parmentier, Eric

    2015-06-01

    Several carapid fishes, known as pearlfishes, are endosymbiotic in holothuroids and asteroids. These echinoderms contain a strong concentration of saponins that are efficient membranolytic repellents to predators. We compared the effects of exposure to saponins from the sea cucumber body wall and from the Cuvierian tubules on the behavior and gill ultrastructure of pearlfishes and free-living fishes. Saponins were extracted from the body wall of two holothuroids, the Mediterranean Holothuria forskali and the tropical Bohadschia atra, and from the water surrounding the Cuvierian tubules of B. atra. Five species of carapids that live in symbiosis with holothuroids and seven species of free-living fishes were exposed to these extracts. The free-living fishes exhibited a stress response and died about 45 times faster than pearlfishes when exposed to the same quantity of saponins. Cuvierian tubules and saponins extracted from the body wall were lethal to the free-living fishes, whereas the carapids were much less sensitive. The carapids did not exhibit a stress response. The high toxicity shown by Cuvierian tubules was not explained by the nature of the saponins that were identified by mass spectrometry, but it is likely due to the higher concentration of saponins in the tubules. Histology and scanning and transmission electron microscopy of the gills of the free-living fishes and pearlfishes showed that saponins act at the level of the secondary lamellae where they induce the detachment of the epithelia, create edema at the level of the epithelia, and induce pores in the epithelial cells that lead to their destruction and the invasion of inner cells (pillar cells and red blood cells). This sequence of events happens 5 min after saponin exposure in free-living fishes and after 1 h in carapids.

  4. Rapid characterization of triterpene saponins from Conyza blinii by liquid chromatography coupled with mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Qiao, Xue; Zhang, Xing; Ye, Min; Su, Yan-fang; Dong, Jing; Han, Jian; Yin, Jun; Guo, De-an

    2010-11-30

    Conyza blinii Le'vl is a medicinal herb used for the treatment of inflammation in Chinese folk medicine. Its major bioactive constituents are triterpene saponins, most of which contain 6-8 sugar residues. In this report, electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry fragmentation behaviors of bisdesmosidic triterpene saponins (conyzasaponin A, B, and C) were studied in both positive and negative ion modes with an ion-trap mass spectrometer. In full scan mass spectrometry, these saponins gave predominant [M-H](-) and [M+Na](+) ions, which determined the molecular weights. In tandem mass spectrometry (MS(n), n = 2-4), the [M-H](-) and [M+Na](+) ions yielded fragments [Y(0α)-H](-) and [B(α)+Na](+), which were diagnostic for the structures of the triterpene skeleton and sugar chains. The structural elucidation was approved by accurate mass data using IT-TOF-MS. An interpretation guideline based on MS(n) (n = 2-4) diagnostic ions was proposed in order to elucidate the chemical structures of unknown triterpene saponins in C. blinii extract. The saponins in C. blinii were separated by liquid chromatography with a methanol/acetonitrile/water solvent system, and then analyzed by ion-trap and IT-TOF mass spectrometers. Based on the interpretation guideline, a total of 35 triterpenoid saponins were tentatively identified. Among them, 15 saponins had been previously reported, and the other 20 saponins were reported from Conyza species for the first time. This study indicates that LC/MS is a powerful technology for the rapid characterization of complicated saponins in herbal extracts.

  5. Symphytoxide A, a triterpenoid saponin from the roots of Symphytum officinale.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, V U; Noorwala, M; Mohammad, F V; Sener, B; Gilani, A H; Aftab, K

    1993-03-01

    A new triterpenoidal saponin of hederagenin named symphytoxide A has been isolated from the ethanolic extract of the roots of Symphytum officinale and characterized on the basis of chemical investigations and spectroscopic studies as 3-O-[beta-D-glucopyranosyl-(1-->2)-beta-D-glucopyranosyl-(1-->4)- alpha-L-arabinopyranosyl] hederagenin. The structure of this new saponin was established on the basis of 1D and 2D NMR experiments including heteroCOSY, COSY-45 degrees as well as HMBC measurements and other spectroscopic techniques. The saponin exhibited hypotensive activity in anesthetized rats. PMID:7763474

  6. Steroidal saponins obtained by biotransformation of total furostanol glycosides from Dioscorea zingiberensis with Absidia coerulea.

    PubMed

    Pang, Xu; Wen, Di; Zhao, Yang; Xiong, Cheng-Qi; Wang, Xiao-Qin; Yu, Li-Yan; Ma, Bai-Ping

    2015-01-30

    Five new steroidal saponins (1-5) were isolated from the fermentation broth of total furostanol glycosides from tubers of Dioscorea zingiberensis C.H. Wright incubated with a fungal, Absidia coerulea AS 3.3389, along with known saponins, zingiberensis new saponin (6), deltonin (7), prosapogenin A of dioscin (8), and protobioside (9), and their structures were established by NMR spectroscopy and mass spectrometry as well as by comparison with previously reported spectral data in the literatures. The induced effects in vitro on rat platelet aggregation of all compounds were evaluated.

  7. The interleukin-18 inhibitory activities of echinocystic acid and its saponins from Impatiens pritzellii var. hupehensis.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Xue-Feng; Tang, Lan; Zhang, Peng; Zhaod, Xiao-Ya; Pi, Hui-Fang; Zhang, Yong-Hui; Ruan, Han-Li; Liu, Yonghong; Wu, Ji-Zhou

    2009-01-01

    Echinocystic acid (1), an echinocystic acid saponin, 2, and four of its ester saponins, 3-6, obtained from the active fraction of Impatiens pritzellii var. hupehensis, an traditional Chinese medicine for rheumatoid arthritis, were investigated for their effects on lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced interleukin (IL)-18 in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells. Three of them, 1, 2 and 6, showed obvious activity to inhibit the production of IL-18, especially the ester saponins with a sugar chain at C-28, 6. Structure-activity relationships are discussed in brief.

  8. Flavonoid-membrane Interactions: A Protective Role of Flavonoids at the Membrane Surface?

    PubMed Central

    Oteiza, Patricia I.; Erlejman, Alejandra G.; Verstraeten, Sandra V.; Keen, Carl L.; Fraga, César G.

    2005-01-01

    Flavonoids can exert beneficial health effects through multiple mechanisms. In this paper, we address the important, although not fully understood, capacity of flavonoids to interact with cell membranes. The interactions of polyphenols with bilayers include: (a) the partition of the more non-polar compounds in the hydrophobic interior of the membrane, and (b) the formation of hydrogen bonds between the polar head groups of lipids and the more hydrophilic flavonoids at the membrane interface. The consequences of these interactions are discussed. The induction of changes in membrane physical properties can affect the rates of membrane lipid and protein oxidation. The partition of certain flavonoids in the hydrophobic core can result in a chain breaking antioxidant activity. We suggest that interactions of polyphenols at the surface of bilayers through hydrogen bonding, can act to reduce the access of deleterious molecules (i.e. oxidants), thus protecting the structure and function of membranes. PMID:15712595

  9. Photofragmentation mechanisms in protonated chiral cinchona alkaloids.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Sunil; Lucas, Bruno; Fayeton, Jacqueline; Scuderi, Debora; Alata, Ivan; Broquier, Michel; Barbu-Debus, Katia Le; Lepère, Valeria; Zehnacker, Anne

    2016-08-10

    The photo-stability of protonated cinchona alkaloids is studied in the gas phase by a multi-technique approach. A multi-coincidence technique is used to demonstrate that the dissociation is a direct process. Two dissociation channels are observed. They result from the C8-C9 cleavage, accompanied or not by hydrogen migration. The branching ratio between the two photo-fragments is different for the two pseudo-enantiomers quinine and quinidine. Mass spectrometry experiments coupling UV photo-dissociation of the reactants and structural characterization of the ionic photo-products by Infra-Red Multiple Photo-Dissociation (IRMPD) spectroscopy provide unambiguous information on their structure. In addition, quantum chemical calculations allow proposing a reactive scheme and discussing it in terms of the ground-state geometry of the reactant.

  10. Benhamycin, novel alkaloid from terrestrial Streptomyces sp.

    PubMed

    Shaaban, Mohamed; Abdel-Aziz, Mohamed S

    2007-11-01

    During our screening for bioactive natural compounds from microorganisms, a novel alkaloid has been isolated from a terrestrial Streptomyces sp. isolate NR12, and named as benhamycin (1). This was along with the known metabolites, uracil, thymine, p-hydroxybenzoic acid, 2'-deoxyuridin, tryptophol, indolyl-3-carboxylic acid, and indolyl-3-carbaldehyde. Chemical structure of the novel compound was determined by detailed analysis of its spectroscopic data (extensive NMR experiments, 1 & 2D, MS spectroscopy, and MS high resolution). Structurally, Benhamycin (1) is a pentacyclic aromatic compound bearing an acridine moiety lactamized with benzene. Biological studies showed that the strain extract was moderately active against Gram-positive, Gram-negative bacteria and fungi.

  11. Total Synthesis of Alkaloid 205B

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Concise and highly stereocontrolled total syntheses of racemic and enantiopure frog alkaloid 205B (1) were accomplished in 11 steps from 4-methoxypyridines 6 and 7 in overall yields of 8 and 8%, respectively. The assembly of the core of the natural product relies on a stereoselective Tsuji–Trost allylic amination reaction and a ring-closing metathesis. The synthesis features the use of an N-acylpyridinium salt reaction to introduce the first stereocenter and an unprecedented trifluoroacetic anhydride-mediated addition of an allylstannane to a vinylogous amide with complete facial selectivity. Deoxygenation of the C4 ketone proved difficult but was accomplished via a modified Barton–McCombie reaction in the presence of a catalytic amount of diphenyl diselenide. PMID:25180567

  12. Pyrrolidonyl and pyridyl alkaloids in Lymantria dispar.

    PubMed

    Deml, Reinhold

    2003-01-01

    The occurrence and metabolism of nicotine and related N-containing compounds in body fluids of the gipsy moth were addressed. Thin layer chromatographic studies clearly showed the simultaneous presence of GABA and 2-pyrrolidone but not of GABamide in the larval haemolymph and osmeterial secretion of Lymantria dispar as well as in the corresponding body fluids of the saturniids, Saturnia pavonia and Attacus atlas. Furthermore, feeding and injection experiments using alkylated precursors and combined gas chromatography/mass spectrometry gave evidence of the transformation of 2-pyrrolidone to nicotine and of nicotinic acid to nicotinamide in caterpillars of L. dispar. Based on these results, on the earlier described variation of the secondary-compound patterns of L. dispar during its development, and on literature data, metabolic pathways for the hitherto detected pyridyl and pyrrolidonyl alkaloids in Lymantriidae (and possibly Saturniidae) are proposed.

  13. Alkaloids from Spathelia excelsa: their chemosystematic significance.

    PubMed

    Lima, M da Paz; Rosas, Lisandra Vieira; da Silva, M Fátima das G F; Ferreira, A Gilberto; Fernandes, João B; Vieira, Paulo C

    2005-07-01

    The methanol extract from the leaves of Spathelia excelsa yielded six alkaloids: 2-(12-oxo-tridecanyl)-3-methoxy-4-quinolone, 2-(10-hydroxy-10-methyldodecanyl)-3-methoxy-4-quinolone, 2-(11-hydroxy-11-methyldodecanyl)-3-methoxy-4-quinolone, 2-(12-hydroxytridecanyl)-3-methoxy-4-quinolone, 7-hydroxy-2-(3-hydroxy-3-methylbutyl)-4-quinolone and 6-hydroxy-2-(3-hydroxy-3-methylbutyl)-4-quinolone, in addition to the known 3-O-beta-d-glucopiranosylsitosterol and (-)-epicatechin. The 2-alkyl-4(1H)-quinolones in S. excelsa display strong similarities with those in Dictyolomatoideae, which contains several 2-alkyl-4-quinolones. The data reported herein thus provide firm support for placing Spathelioideae close to or within the Dictyolomatoideae. PMID:16002107

  14. Flavonoids from Artocarpus anisophyllus and their bioactivities.

    PubMed

    Lathiff, Siti Mariam Abdul; Jemaon, Noraini; Abdullah, Siti Awanis; Jamil, Shajarahtunnur

    2015-03-01

    Two new prenylated flavonoids, 4',5-dihydroxy-6,7-(2,2-dimethylpyrano)-2'-methoxy-8-γ,γ-dimethylallylflavone 1 and 3'-hydroxycycloartocarpin 2 along with six known flavonoids, 5,7-dihydroxy-4'-methoxy-8-prenylflavanone 3, isobavachalcone 4, pyranocycloartobiloxanthone A 5, artocarpin 6, chaplashin 7 and cycloartocarpin 8 were isolated for the first time from the leaves and the heartwoods of Artocarpus anisophyllus Miq. The structures of isolated flavonoids were elucidated spectroscopically using 1D and 2D NMR, FTIR, MS, UV and also by comparison with literature data. These flavonoids were screened for their antioxidant and tyrosinase inhibitory activities. The dichloromethane and ethyl acetate crude extracts together with 3'-hydroxycycloartocarpin 2, pyranocycloartobiloxanthone A 5 and artocarpin 6 showed DPPH (2,2-diphenyl-l-picrylhydrazyl) radical scavenging activity with SC50 values of 80.2, 40.0, 152.9, 20.2 and 140.0 μg/mL in 30 min, respectively. Pyranocycloartobiloxanthone A 5 exhibited significant tyrosinase inhibitory activity against tyrosinase from mushroom with IC50 values of 60.5 μg/mL.

  15. Flavonoids protecting food and beverages against light.

    PubMed

    Huvaere, Kevin; Skibsted, Leif H

    2015-01-01

    Flavonoids, which are ubiquitously present in the plant kingdom, preserve food and beverages at the parts per million level with minor perturbation of sensory impressions. Additionally, they are safe and possibly contribute positive health effects. Flavonoids should be further exploited for the protection of food and beverages against light-induced quality deterioration through: (1) direct absorption of photons as inner filters protecting sensitive food components; (2) deactivation of (triplet-)excited states of sensitisers like chlorophyll and riboflavin; (3) quenching of singlet oxygen from type II photosensitisation; and (iv) scavenging of radicals formed as reaction intermediates in type I photosensitisation. For absorption of light, combinations of flavonoids, as found in natural co-pigmentation, facilitate dissipation of photon energy to heat thus averting photodegradation. For protection against singlet oxygen and triplet sensitisers, chemical quenching gradually decreases efficiency hence the pathway to physical quenching should be optimised through product formulation. The feasibility of these protection strategies is further supported by kinetic data that are becoming available, allowing for calculation of threshold levels of flavonoids to prevent beer and dairy products from going off. On the other hand, increasing understanding of the interplay between light and matrix physicochemistry, for example the effect of aprotic microenvironments on phototautomerisation of compounds like quercetin, opens up for engineering better light-to-heat converting channels in processed food to eventually prevent quality loss.

  16. Flavonoids and arbutin from Turnera diffusa.

    PubMed

    Piacente, Sonia; Camargo, Ely E S; Zampelli, Aurelia; Gracioso, Juliano S; Souza Brito, Alba R; Pizza, Cosimo; Vilegas, Wagner

    2002-01-01

    The infusion of the aerial parts of Turnera diffusa was phytochemically examined. Chromatographic procedures led to the isolation of a new flavone glycoside, five known flavonoids and p-arbutin. Structures were determined by 1D- and 2D NMR experiments, as well as ES-MS and UV spectra. PMID:12562080

  17. Flavonoids from Artocarpus anisophyllus and their bioactivities.

    PubMed

    Lathiff, Siti Mariam Abdul; Jemaon, Noraini; Abdullah, Siti Awanis; Jamil, Shajarahtunnur

    2015-03-01

    Two new prenylated flavonoids, 4',5-dihydroxy-6,7-(2,2-dimethylpyrano)-2'-methoxy-8-γ,γ-dimethylallylflavone 1 and 3'-hydroxycycloartocarpin 2 along with six known flavonoids, 5,7-dihydroxy-4'-methoxy-8-prenylflavanone 3, isobavachalcone 4, pyranocycloartobiloxanthone A 5, artocarpin 6, chaplashin 7 and cycloartocarpin 8 were isolated for the first time from the leaves and the heartwoods of Artocarpus anisophyllus Miq. The structures of isolated flavonoids were elucidated spectroscopically using 1D and 2D NMR, FTIR, MS, UV and also by comparison with literature data. These flavonoids were screened for their antioxidant and tyrosinase inhibitory activities. The dichloromethane and ethyl acetate crude extracts together with 3'-hydroxycycloartocarpin 2, pyranocycloartobiloxanthone A 5 and artocarpin 6 showed DPPH (2,2-diphenyl-l-picrylhydrazyl) radical scavenging activity with SC50 values of 80.2, 40.0, 152.9, 20.2 and 140.0 μg/mL in 30 min, respectively. Pyranocycloartobiloxanthone A 5 exhibited significant tyrosinase inhibitory activity against tyrosinase from mushroom with IC50 values of 60.5 μg/mL. PMID:25924513

  18. The antibacterial properties of sulfur containing flavonoids.

    PubMed

    Bahrin, Lucian G; Apostu, Mircea O; Birsa, Lucian M; Stefan, Marius

    2014-05-15

    Some dithiocarbamic esters bearing a flavanone backbone, as well as their corresponding 1,3-dithiolium salts were tested against Staphylococcus aureus and Escherichia coli. The 1,3-dithiolium tricyclic flavonoids display good inhibitory properties against both Gram-positive and Gram-negative pathogens. PMID:24751444

  19. Flavonoids protecting food and beverages against light.

    PubMed

    Huvaere, Kevin; Skibsted, Leif H

    2015-01-01

    Flavonoids, which are ubiquitously present in the plant kingdom, preserve food and beverages at the parts per million level with minor perturbation of sensory impressions. Additionally, they are safe and possibly contribute positive health effects. Flavonoids should be further exploited for the protection of food and beverages against light-induced quality deterioration through: (1) direct absorption of photons as inner filters protecting sensitive food components; (2) deactivation of (triplet-)excited states of sensitisers like chlorophyll and riboflavin; (3) quenching of singlet oxygen from type II photosensitisation; and (iv) scavenging of radicals formed as reaction intermediates in type I photosensitisation. For absorption of light, combinations of flavonoids, as found in natural co-pigmentation, facilitate dissipation of photon energy to heat thus averting photodegradation. For protection against singlet oxygen and triplet sensitisers, chemical quenching gradually decreases efficiency hence the pathway to physical quenching should be optimised through product formulation. The feasibility of these protection strategies is further supported by kinetic data that are becoming available, allowing for calculation of threshold levels of flavonoids to prevent beer and dairy products from going off. On the other hand, increasing understanding of the interplay between light and matrix physicochemistry, for example the effect of aprotic microenvironments on phototautomerisation of compounds like quercetin, opens up for engineering better light-to-heat converting channels in processed food to eventually prevent quality loss. PMID:24961228

  20. Erythroidine alkaloids: a novel class of phytoestrogens.

    PubMed

    Djiogue, Sefirin; Halabalaki, Maria; Njamen, Dieudonné; Kretzschmar, Georg; Lambrinidis, George; Hoepping, Josephine; Raffaelli, Francesca M; Mikros, Emmanuel; Skaltsounis, Alexios-Leandros; Vollmer, Günter

    2014-07-01

    Erythrina poeppigiana is a medicinal plant which is widely used in Asia, Latin America, and Africa in traditional remedies for gynecological complications and maladies. In continuation of studies for the discovery of novel phytoestrogens, four erythroidine alkaloids, namely α-erythroidine, β-erythroidine, and their oxo-derivatives 8-oxo-α-erythroidine and 8-oxo-β-erythroidine, were isolated and structurally characterized from the methanolic extract of the stem bark of E. poeppigiana. Due to the high amounts of erythroidines in the extract and considering the widespread utilization of Erythrina preparations in traditional medicine, the exploration of their estrogenic properties was performed. The estrogenicity of the isolated erythroidines was assayed in various estrogen receptor-(ER)-dependent test systems, including receptor binding affinity, cell culture based ER-dependent reporter gene assays, and gene expression studies in cultured cells using reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction techniques. α-Erythroidine and β-erythroidine showed binding affinity values for ERα of 0.015 ± 0.010% and 0.005 ± 0.010%, respectively, whereas only β-erythroidine bound to ERβ (0.006 ± 0.010%). In reporter gene assays, both erythroidines exhibited a significant dose-dependent estrogenic stimulation of ER-dependent reporter gene activity in osteosarcoma cells detectable already at 10 nM. Results were confirmed in the MVLN cells, a bioluminescent variant of MCF-7 breast cancer cells. Further, α-erythroidine and β-erythroidine both induced the enhanced expression of the specific ERα-dependent genes trefoil factor-1 and serum/glucocorticoid regulated kinase 3 in MCF-7 cells, confirming estrogenicity. Additionally, using molecular docking simulations, a potential mode of binding on ERα, is proposed, supporting the experimental evidences. This is the first time that an estrogenic profile is reported for erythroidine alkaloids, potentially a new class of

  1. Association among Dietary Flavonoids, Flavonoid Subclasses and Ovarian Cancer Risk: A Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    You, Ruxu; Yang, Yu; Liao, Jing; Chen, Dongsheng; Yu, Lixiu

    2016-01-01

    Background Previous studies have indicated that intake of dietary flavonoids or flavonoid subclasses is associated with the ovarian cancer risk, but presented controversial results. Therefore, we conducted a meta-analysis to derive a more precise estimation of these associations. Methods We performed a search in PubMed, Google Scholar and ISI Web of Science from their inception to April 25, 2015 to select studies on the association among dietary flavonoids, flavonoid subclasses and ovarian cancer risk. The information was extracted by two independent authors. We assessed the heterogeneity, sensitivity, publication bias and quality of the articles. A random-effects model was used to calculate the pooled risk estimates. Results Five cohort studies and seven case-control studies were included in the final meta-analysis. We observed that intake of dietary flavonoids can decrease ovarian cancer risk, which was demonstrated by pooled RR (RR = 0.82, 95% CI = 0.68–0.98). In a subgroup analysis by flavonoid subtypes, the ovarian cancer risk was also decreased for isoflavones (RR = 0.67, 95% CI = 0.50–0.92) and flavonols (RR = 0.68, 95% CI = 0.58–0.80). While there was no compelling evidence that consumption of flavones (RR = 0.86, 95% CI = 0.71–1.03) could decrease ovarian cancer risk, which revealed part sources of heterogeneity. The sensitivity analysis indicated stable results, and no publication bias was observed based on the results of Funnel plot analysis and Egger’s test (p = 0.26). Conclusions This meta-analysis suggested that consumption of dietary flavonoids and subtypes (isoflavones, flavonols) has a protective effect against ovarian cancer with a reduced risk of ovarian cancer except for flavones consumption. Nevertheless, further investigations on a larger population covering more flavonoid subclasses are warranted. PMID:26960146

  2. Flavonoids of Calligonum polygonoides and their cytotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Hayam; Moawad, Abeer; Owis, Asmaa; AbouZid, Sameh; Ahmed, Osama

    2016-10-01

    Context Calligonum polygonoides L. subsp. comosum L' Hér. (Polygonaceae), locally known as "arta", is a slow-growing small leafless desert shrub. Objective Isolation, structure elucidation and evaluation of cytotoxic activity of flavonoids from C. polygonoides aerial parts. Materials and methods Flavonoids in the hydroalcoholic extract of the of C. polygonoides were isolated and purified using column chromatography and preparative HPLC. The structures of the isolated flavonoids were elucidated on the basis of spectroscopic data including 2D NMR techniques. The cytotoxic activity of the isolated flavonoids (6.25, 25, 50 and 100 μg/mL) was evaluated against liver HepG2 and breast MCF-7 cancer cell lines using sulphorhodamine-B assay. Results A new flavonoid, kaempferol-3-O-β-D-(6″-n-butyl glucuronide) (1), and 13 known flavonoids, quercetin 3-O-β-D-(6″-n-butyl glucuronide) (2), kaempferol-3-O-β-D-(6″-methyl glucuronide) (3), quercetin-3-O-β-D-(6″-methyl glucuronide) (4), quercetin-3-O-glucuronide (5), kaempferol-3-O-glucuronide (6), quercetin-3-O-α-rhamnopyranoside (7), astragalin (8), quercetin-3-O-glucopyranoside (9), taxifolin (10), (+)-catechin (11), dehydrodicatechin A (12), quercetin (13), and kaempferol (14), were isolated from the aerial parts of C. polygonoides. Quercetin showed significant cytotoxic activity against HepG2 and MCF-7 cell lines with IC50 values of 4.88 and 0.87 μg/mL, respectively. Structure-activity relationships were analyzed by comparing IC50 values of several pairs of flavonoids differing in one structural element. Discussion and conclusion The activity against breast cancer cell lines decreased by glycosylation at C-3. The presence of 2,3-double bond in ring C, carbonyl group at C-4 and 3',4'-dihydroxy substituents in ring B are essential structural requirements for the cytotoxic activity against breast cancer cells.

  3. Potential ecological roles of flavonoids from Stellera chamaejasme.

    PubMed

    Yan, Zhiqiang; Zeng, Liming; Jin, Hui; Qin, Bo

    2015-01-01

    Stellera chamaejasme L. (Thymelaeaceae), a perennial weed, distributes widely in the grasslands of Russia, Mongolia and China. The plant synthesizes various secondary metabolites including a group of flavonoids. To our knowledge, flavonoids play important roles in the interactions between plants and the environment. So, what are the benefits to S. chamaejasme from producing these flavonoids? Here, we discuss the potential ecological role of flavonoids from S. chamaejasme in protecting the plant from insects and other herbivores, as well as pathogens and competing plant species, and new data are provided on the phytotoxicity of flavonoids from S. chamaejasme toward Poa annua L.

  4. Potential ecological roles of flavonoids from Stellera chamaejasme

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Zhiqiang; Zeng, Liming; Jin, Hui; Qin, Bo

    2015-01-01

    Stellera chamaejasme L. (Thymelaeaceae), a perennial weed, distributes widely in the grasslands of Russia, Mongolia and China. The plant synthesizes various secondary metabolites including a group of flavonoids. To our knowledge, flavonoids play important roles in the interactions between plants and the environment. So, what are the benefits to S. chamaejasme from producing these flavonoids? Here, we discuss the potential ecological role of flavonoids from S. chamaejasme in protecting the plant from insects and other herbivores, as well as pathogens and competing plant species, and new data are provided on the phytotoxicity of flavonoids from S. chamaejasme toward Poa annua L. PMID:25848835

  5. The Role of Flavonoids on Oxidative Stress in Epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Diniz, Tâmara Coimbra; Silva, Juliane Cabral; de Lima-Saraiva, Sarah Raquel Gomes; Ribeiro, Fernanda Pires Rodrigues de Almeida; Pacheco, Alessandra Gomes Marques; de Freitas, Rivelilson Mendes; Quintans-Júnior, Lucindo José; Quintans, Jullyana de Souza Siqueira; Mendes, Rosemairy Luciane; Almeida, Jackson Roberto Guedes da Silva

    2015-01-01

    Backgrounds. Oxidative stress can result from excessive free-radical production and it is likely implicated as a possible mechanism involved in the initiation and progression of epileptogenesis. Flavonoids can protect the brain from oxidative stress. In the central nervous system (CNS) several flavonoids bind to the benzodiazepine site on the GABAA-receptor resulting in anticonvulsive effects. Objective. This review provides an overview about the role of flavonoids in oxidative stress in epilepsy. The mechanism of action of flavonoids and its relation to the chemical structure is also discussed. Results/Conclusions. There is evidence that suggests that flavonoids have potential for neuroprotection in epilepsy. PMID:25653736

  6. Activity of pyrrolizidine alkaloids against biofilm formation and Trichomonas vaginalis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Crotalaria genus belongs to the subfamily Papilionoideae comprising about 600 species spread throughout tropical, neotropical and subtropical regions. In this study, seeds of Crolatalaria pallida were used to the isolation of usaramine, a pyrrolizidine alkaloid. Thus, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Stap...

  7. Microcalorimetry studies of the antimicrobial actions of Aconitum alkaloids.

    PubMed

    Shi, Yan-bin; Liu, Lian; Shao, Wei; Wei, Ting; Lin, Gui-mei

    2015-08-01

    The metabolic activity of organisms can be measured by recording the heat output using microcalorimetry. In this paper, the total alkaloids in the traditional Chinese medicine Radix Aconiti Lateralis were extracted and applied to Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus. The effect of alkaloids on bacteria growth was studied by microcalorimetry. The power-time curves were plotted with a thermal activity monitor (TAM) air isothermal microcalorimeter and parameters such as growth rate constant (μ), peak-time (Tm), inhibitory ratio (I), and enhancement ratio (E) were calculated. The relationships between the concentration of Aconitum alkaloids and μ of E. coli or S. aureus were discussed. The results showed that Aconitum alkaloids had little effect on E. coli and had a potentially inhibitory effect on the growth of S. aureus.

  8. Crinine-type alkaloids from Hippeastrum aulicum and H. calyptratum.

    PubMed

    de Andrade, Jean Paulo; Guo, Ying; Font-Bardia, Mercè; Calvet, Teresa; Dutilh, Jullie; Viladomat, Francesc; Codina, Carles; Nair, Jerald J; Zuanazzi, Jose A Silveira; Bastida, Jaume

    2014-07-01

    An ongoing search for alkaloids in the Amaryllidaceae species using GC-MS resulted in the identification of two crinine-type alkaloids, aulicine (1) and 3-O-methyl-epimacowine, (2) from the indigenous Brazilian species Hippeastrum aulicum and Hippeastrum calyptratum, respectively. In addition, two alkaloids, 11-oxohaemanthamine (3) and 7-methoxy-O-methyllycorenine (4) were both isolated from H. aulicum. Furthermore, we provide here complete NMR spectroscopic data for the homolycorine analogues nerinine (5) and albomaculine (6). The absolute stereochemistry of the 5,10b-ethano bridge in the crinine variants was determined by circular dichroism and X-ray crystallographic analysis, thus presenting the first direct evidence for the presence of crinine-type alkaloids in the genus Hippeastrum.

  9. A new pyrrole alkaloid from seeds of Castanea sativa.

    PubMed

    Hiermann, Alois; Kedwani, Samir; Schramm, Hans Wolfgang; Seger, Christoph

    2002-02-01

    A new pyrrole alkaloid, methyl-(5-formyl-1H-pyrrole-2-yl)-4-hydroxybutyrate (1), was isolated from sweet chestnut seeds and its structure elucidated on the basis of data from NMR spectroscopy and by comparison with synthetic analogues.

  10. Crinine-type alkaloids from Hippeastrum aulicum and H. calyptratum.

    PubMed

    de Andrade, Jean Paulo; Guo, Ying; Font-Bardia, Mercè; Calvet, Teresa; Dutilh, Jullie; Viladomat, Francesc; Codina, Carles; Nair, Jerald J; Zuanazzi, Jose A Silveira; Bastida, Jaume

    2014-07-01

    An ongoing search for alkaloids in the Amaryllidaceae species using GC-MS resulted in the identification of two crinine-type alkaloids, aulicine (1) and 3-O-methyl-epimacowine, (2) from the indigenous Brazilian species Hippeastrum aulicum and Hippeastrum calyptratum, respectively. In addition, two alkaloids, 11-oxohaemanthamine (3) and 7-methoxy-O-methyllycorenine (4) were both isolated from H. aulicum. Furthermore, we provide here complete NMR spectroscopic data for the homolycorine analogues nerinine (5) and albomaculine (6). The absolute stereochemistry of the 5,10b-ethano bridge in the crinine variants was determined by circular dichroism and X-ray crystallographic analysis, thus presenting the first direct evidence for the presence of crinine-type alkaloids in the genus Hippeastrum. PMID:24768284

  11. Alkaloids with Different Carbon Units from Myrioneuron faberi.

    PubMed

    Cao, Ming-Ming; Zhang, Yu; Huang, Sheng-Dian; Di, Ying-Tong; Peng, Zong-Gen; Jiang, Jian-Dong; Yuan, Chun-Mao; Chen, Duo-Zhi; Li, Shun-Lin; He, Hong-Ping; Hao, Xiao-Jiang

    2015-11-25

    Three new Myrioneuron alkaloids, myrifamines A-C (1-3), with unique skeletons were isolated from Myrioneuron faberi. The absolute configuration of 1 was confirmed by single-crystal X-ray diffraction analysis, and the stereochemistry of the other two alkaloids was determined using a combination of ROESY experiments and calculated and experimental electronic circular dichroism spectra. Myrifamine C (3) is the first example of a symmetric dimer among the Myrioneuron alkaloids. Known alkaloids myrionamide (4) and schoberine (5) were also isolated, and experimental NMR and X-ray diffraction data suggest their structural revision. Compound 2 showed significant inhibitory activity toward the hepatitis C virus in vitro, with a therapeutic index (CC50/EC50) greater than 108.7.

  12. Arginine decarboxylase as the source of putrescine for tobacco alkaloids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tiburcio, A. F.; Galston, A. W.

    1986-01-01

    The putrescine which forms a part of nicotine and other pyrrolidine alkaloids is generally assumed to arise through the action of ornithine decarboxylase (ODC). However, we have previously noted that changes in the activity of arginine decarboxylase (ADC), an alternate source of putrescine, parallel changes in tissue alkaloids, while changes in ODC activity do not. This led us to undertake experiments to permit discrimination between ADC and ODC as enzymatic sources of putrescine destined for alkaloids. Two kinds of evidence presented here support a major role for ADC in the generation of putrescine going into alkaloids: (a) A specific 'suicide inhibitor' of ADC effectively inhibits the biosynthesis of nicotine and nornicotine in tobacco callus, while the analogous inhibitor of ODC is less effective, and (b) the flow of 14C from uniformly labelled arginine into nicotine is much more efficient than that from ornithine.

  13. Marine bromopyrrole alkaloids: synthesis and diverse medicinal applications.

    PubMed

    Rane, Rajesh; Sahu, Niteshkumar; Shah, Chetan; Karpoormath, Rajshekhar

    2014-01-01

    Marine organisms have been found to be a very rich source of bioactive molecules. Among marine organisms, sponges have been proven to be excellent producers of secondary metabolites. More than 5,300 compounds have been isolated from sponges with around 200 new molecules reported each year. Bromopyrrole alkaloids constitute a family of exclusively marine alkaloids and represent a fascinating example of the large variety of compounds formed by marine sponges which exhibit different biological activities such as antifeedent, anti-biofilm, anticancer, antiinflammatory, antimicrobial, immunomodulatory, analgesic, antiserotonergic, antiangiogenic, antihistaminic, chitinase inhibitor and actimyosin ATPase activator. More than 140 derivatives with different structures and biological activities, have been isolated from more than 20 different sponges. Most of these alkaloids share a key building block, pyrrole-imidazole with oroidin being their underlying structural motif. In this review detailed account of isolation and medicinal application of marine bromopyrrole alkaloids and their synthetic derivatives are discussed. PMID:24359195

  14. Two new alkaloids from marine sponge Callyspongia sp.

    PubMed

    Yang, Bin; Tao, Huaming; Zhou, Xuefeng; Lin, Xiu-Ping; Liu, Yonghong

    2013-03-01

    Two new alkaloids, callylactam A (1) and callyimine A (4), along with three known ones (2, 3 and 5), were isolated from the marine sponge Callyspongia sp. The structures were determined on the basis of NMR and MS analysis.

  15. Computational Studies on Cinchona Alkaloid-Catalyzed Asymmetric Organic Reactions.

    PubMed

    Tanriver, Gamze; Dedeoglu, Burcu; Catak, Saron; Aviyente, Viktorya

    2016-06-21

    Remarkable progress in the area of asymmetric organocatalysis has been achieved in the last decades. Cinchona alkaloids and their derivatives have emerged as powerful organocatalysts owing to their reactivities leading to high enantioselectivities. The widespread usage of cinchona alkaloids has been attributed to their nontoxicity, ease of use, stability, cost effectiveness, recyclability, and practical utilization in industry. The presence of tunable functional groups enables cinchona alkaloids to catalyze a broad range of reactions. Excellent experimental studies have extensively contributed to this field, and highly selective reactions were catalyzed by cinchona alkaloids and their derivatives. Computational modeling has helped elucidate the mechanistic aspects of cinchona alkaloid catalyzed reactions as well as the origins of the selectivity they induce. These studies have complemented experimental work for the design of more efficient catalysts. This Account presents recent computational studies on cinchona alkaloid catalyzed organic reactions and the theoretical rationalizations behind their effectiveness and ability to induce selectivity. Valuable efforts to investigate the mechanisms of reactions catalyzed by cinchona alkaloids and the key aspects of the catalytic activity of cinchona alkaloids in reactions ranging from pharmaceutical to industrial applications are summarized. Quantum mechanics, particularly density functional theory (DFT), and molecular mechanics, including ONIOM, were used to rationalize experimental findings by providing mechanistic insights into reaction mechanisms. B3LYP with modest basis sets has been used in most of the studies; nonetheless, the energetics have been corrected with higher basis sets as well as functionals parametrized to include dispersion M05-2X, M06-2X, and M06-L and functionals with dispersion corrections. Since cinchona alkaloids catalyze reactions by forming complexes with substrates via hydrogen bonds and long

  16. The effects of Aconitum alkaloids on the central nervous system.

    PubMed

    Ameri, A

    1998-10-01

    Preparations of Aconitum roots are employed in Chinese and Japanese medicine for analgesic, antirheumatic and neurological indications. The recent surge in use of phytomedicine derived from traditional Chinese medicine as well as increasing concerns about possible toxic effects of these compounds have inspired a great deal of research into the mechanisms by which certain Aconitum alkaloids may act on the central nervous system. The pharmacological effects of preparations of Aconitum roots are attributed to several diterpenoid alkaloids. The main alkaloid of these plants is aconitine, a highly toxic diterpenoid alkaloid which is known to suppress the inactivation of voltage-dependent Na+ channels by binding to neurotoxin binding site 2 of the alpha-subunit of the channel protein. In this article the pharmacology of several structurally related Aconitum alkaloids is highlighted and their therapeutic vs toxic potential is discussed. Neurochemical and neurophysiological studies will be reviewed with emphasis on the effects of the alkaloids in regions of the brain that have been implicated in pain transmission and generation of epileptic activity. Considering the chemical structure of the Aconitum alkaloids as well as their mechanism of action, a subdivision in three groups becomes obvious: the first group comprises such alkaloids which possess high toxicity due to two ester boundings at the diterpene skeleton. The members of this group activate voltage-dependent sodium channels already at resting potential and inhibit noradrenaline reuptake. Activation of sodium channels and in consequence excessive depolarization with final inexcitability and suppression of pain transmission account for their antinociceptive properties. The second group comprises less toxic monoesters which have been shown to possess strong antinociceptive, antiarrhythmic and antiepileptiform properties due to a blockade of the voltage-dependent sodium channel. Electrophysiological studies have

  17. Computational Studies on Cinchona Alkaloid-Catalyzed Asymmetric Organic Reactions.

    PubMed

    Tanriver, Gamze; Dedeoglu, Burcu; Catak, Saron; Aviyente, Viktorya

    2016-06-21

    Remarkable progress in the area of asymmetric organocatalysis has been achieved in the last decades. Cinchona alkaloids and their derivatives have emerged as powerful organocatalysts owing to their reactivities leading to high enantioselectivities. The widespread usage of cinchona alkaloids has been attributed to their nontoxicity, ease of use, stability, cost effectiveness, recyclability, and practical utilization in industry. The presence of tunable functional groups enables cinchona alkaloids to catalyze a broad range of reactions. Excellent experimental studies have extensively contributed to this field, and highly selective reactions were catalyzed by cinchona alkaloids and their derivatives. Computational modeling has helped elucidate the mechanistic aspects of cinchona alkaloid catalyzed reactions as well as the origins of the selectivity they induce. These studies have complemented experimental work for the design of more efficient catalysts. This Account presents recent computational studies on cinchona alkaloid catalyzed organic reactions and the theoretical rationalizations behind their effectiveness and ability to induce selectivity. Valuable efforts to investigate the mechanisms of reactions catalyzed by cinchona alkaloids and the key aspects of the catalytic activity of cinchona alkaloids in reactions ranging from pharmaceutical to industrial applications are summarized. Quantum mechanics, particularly density functional theory (DFT), and molecular mechanics, including ONIOM, were used to rationalize experimental findings by providing mechanistic insights into reaction mechanisms. B3LYP with modest basis sets has been used in most of the studies; nonetheless, the energetics have been corrected with higher basis sets as well as functionals parametrized to include dispersion M05-2X, M06-2X, and M06-L and functionals with dispersion corrections. Since cinchona alkaloids catalyze reactions by forming complexes with substrates via hydrogen bonds and long

  18. LC-MS(n) characterization of steroidal saponins in Helleborus niger L. roots and their conversion products during fermentation.

    PubMed

    Duckstein, Sarina M; Stintzing, Florian C

    2015-01-01

    Steroidal saponins comprise a substantial part of the secondary metabolite spectrum in the medicinal plant Helleborus niger L. (black hellebore). The saponin fraction from the roots was investigated by LC-MS(n) resulting in 38 saponins and β-ecdysone. Nine diosgenyl-type glycosides, mainly furostanols consisting of the aglycones diosgenin, macranthogenin, sceptrumgenin, and sarsasapogenin were accompanied by 5 diosgenyl-type saponins exhibiting an aglycone with an additional OH group. However, the most relevant compounds were 24 acetylated polyhydroxy saponins including hellebosaponins A and D. The enzymes glucuronidase, β-glucosidase, and pectinase were used to obtain an idea on potential fermentative transformation reactions by incubation of the isolated model saponins macranthosid I and hellebosaponin A. In a second step, aqueous H. niger extracts containing a much greater range of saponins were monitored during fermentation and 12months of storage. The metabolites were examined and assigned by LC-MS(n) and targeted extracted ion current (EIC) scan analyses. Good agreement was found among the results from the model compounds and the whole aqueous fermented extracts. The native diosgenyl-type furostanol saponins were converted to spirostanols under scission of hexoses. Alteration of the acetylated polyhydroxy saponins, exclusively spirostanols, took place following cleavage of acetyl groups and terminal deoxyhexoses. Most interestingly, the pentoses of the sugar chain at C(1) were not affected. Conversion of acetylated polyhydroxy saponins resulted in a final structure type which was stable and detectable, even after 12months of fermentation and storage. PMID:25449769

  19. Cytotoxic and antimalarial bisbenzylisoquinoline alkaloids from Cyclea barbata.

    PubMed

    Lin, L Z; Shieh, H L; Angerhofer, C K; Pezzuto, J M; Cordell, G A; Xue, L; Johnson, M E; Ruangrungsi, N

    1993-01-01

    An alkaloid extract derived from the roots of Cyclea barbata demonstrated cytotoxic and antimalarial activities, and five bisbenzylisoquinoline alkaloids, (+)-tetrandrine [1], (-)-limacine [2], (+)-thalrugosine [3], (+)-homoaromoline [4], and (-)-cycleapeltine [5], were isolated as the active principles. The complete and unambiguous assignments of the 1H- and 13C-nmr data of these substances were made by 1D and 2D nmr techniques (COSY, phase-sensitive ROESY, HETCOR, and FLOCK). PMID:8450318

  20. Alkaloids from roots of Stemona sessilifolia and their antitussive activities.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xin-Zhou; Zhu, Jian-Yu; Tang, Chun-Ping; Ke, Chang-Qiang; Lin, Ge; Cheng, Tin-Yan; Rudd, John A; Ye, Yang

    2009-02-01

    Protostemonamide ( 1), a new protostemonine-type alkaloid, and 12 known compounds were isolated from the roots of Stemona sessilifolia. Their structures were elucidated by 1 D and 2 D NMR spectral and other spectroscopic studies. The main alkaloidal constituents, protostemonine ( 2), stemospironine ( 4), and maistemonine ( 7), showed significant antitussive activity in a citric acid-induced guinea pig cough model following peripheral administration; stemonamine ( 11) had antitussive activity following i. c. v. administration.

  1. Synthesis of the Common Core Structure of the Stemofoline Alkaloids.

    PubMed

    Ideue, Eiji; Shimokawa, Jun; Fukuyama, Tohru

    2015-10-16

    A novel synthetic route to the common core structural motif of the stemofoline alkaloids has been developed. The key transformations include (1) an intramolecular 1,3-dipolar cycloaddition reaction of a highly functionalized nitrone, (2) the subsequent formation of a caged structure via lithiated allylic sulfoxide, and (3) the concomitant sila-Pummerer reaction of α-silylalkenyl sulfoxide to prepare a thioester precursor. A series of stereochemistries on the highly caged core structure characteristic of the stemofoline alkaloids was successfully assembled.

  2. Carbazole and amide alkaloids from the stems of Clausena lansium.

    PubMed

    Du, Yi-Qian; Liu, Hang; Li, Chuang-Jun; Yang, Jing-Zhi; Ma, Jie; Zhang, Dan; Sun, Hua; Zhang, Dong-Ming

    2015-01-01

    Two new carbazole alkaloids, claulansine S (1) and claulansine T (2), and one new amide alkaloid, clauamide A (3), together with four known analogues (4-7) were isolated from the stems of Clausena lansium. Their structures were elucidated on the basis of spectroscopic analyses, including UV, IR, and NMR experiments (HSQC, HMBC, and NOE experiments). Compounds 4 and 6 showed moderate hepatoprotective activities. PMID:26095884

  3. Metabolism of Flavonoids in Novel Banana Germplasm during Fruit Development

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Chen; Hu, Huigang; Hu, Yulin; Xie, Jianghui

    2016-01-01

    Banana is a commercially important fruit, but its flavonoid composition and characteristics has not been well studied in detail. In the present study, the metabolism of flavonoids was investigated in banana pulp during the entire developmental period of fruit. ‘Xiangfen 1,’ a novel flavonoid-rich banana germplasm, was studied with ‘Brazil’ serving as a control. In both varieties, flavonoids were found to exist mainly in free soluble form and quercetin was the predominant flavonoid. The most abundant free soluble flavonoid was cyanidin-3-O-glucoside chloride, and quercetin was the major conjugated soluble and bound flavonoid. Higher content of soluble flavonoids was associated with stronger antioxidant activity compared with the bound flavonoids. Strong correlation was observed between antioxidant activity and cyanidin-3-O-glucoside chloride content, suggesting that cyanidin-3-O-glucoside chloride is one of the major antioxidants in banana. In addition, compared with ‘Brazil,’ ‘Xiangfen 1’ fruit exhibited higher antioxidant activity and had more total flavonoids. These results indicate that soluble flavonoids play a key role in the antioxidant activity of banana, and ‘Xiangfen 1’ banana can be a rich source of natural antioxidants in human diets. PMID:27625665

  4. Metabolism of Flavonoids in Novel Banana Germplasm during Fruit Development

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Chen; Hu, Huigang; Hu, Yulin; Xie, Jianghui

    2016-01-01

    Banana is a commercially important fruit, but its flavonoid composition and characteristics has not been well studied in detail. In the present study, the metabolism of flavonoids was investigated in banana pulp during the entire developmental period of fruit. ‘Xiangfen 1,’ a novel flavonoid-rich banana germplasm, was studied with ‘Brazil’ serving as a control. In both varieties, flavonoids were found to exist mainly in free soluble form and quercetin was the predominant flavonoid. The most abundant free soluble flavonoid was cyanidin-3-O-glucoside chloride, and quercetin was the major conjugated soluble and bound flavonoid. Higher content of soluble flavonoids was associated with stronger antioxidant activity compared with the bound flavonoids. Strong correlation was observed between antioxidant activity and cyanidin-3-O-glucoside chloride content, suggesting that cyanidin-3-O-glucoside chloride is one of the major antioxidants in banana. In addition, compared with ‘Brazil,’ ‘Xiangfen 1’ fruit exhibited higher antioxidant activity and had more total flavonoids. These results indicate that soluble flavonoids play a key role in the antioxidant activity of banana, and ‘Xiangfen 1’ banana can be a rich source of natural antioxidants in human diets.

  5. Metabolism of Flavonoids in Novel Banana Germplasm during Fruit Development.

    PubMed

    Dong, Chen; Hu, Huigang; Hu, Yulin; Xie, Jianghui

    2016-01-01

    Banana is a commercially important fruit, but its flavonoid composition and characteristics has not been well studied in detail. In the present study, the metabolism of flavonoids was investigated in banana pulp during the entire developmental period of fruit. 'Xiangfen 1,' a novel flavonoid-rich banana germplasm, was studied with 'Brazil' serving as a control. In both varieties, flavonoids were found to exist mainly in free soluble form and quercetin was the predominant flavonoid. The most abundant free soluble flavonoid was cyanidin-3-O-glucoside chloride, and quercetin was the major conjugated soluble and bound flavonoid. Higher content of soluble flavonoids was associated with stronger antioxidant activity compared with the bound flavonoids. Strong correlation was observed between antioxidant activity and cyanidin-3-O-glucoside chloride content, suggesting that cyanidin-3-O-glucoside chloride is one of the major antioxidants in banana. In addition, compared with 'Brazil,' 'Xiangfen 1' fruit exhibited higher antioxidant activity and had more total flavonoids. These results indicate that soluble flavonoids play a key role in the antioxidant activity of banana, and 'Xiangfen 1' banana can be a rich source of natural antioxidants in human diets. PMID:27625665

  6. Longipetalosides A-C, new steroidal saponins from Tribulus longipetalus.

    PubMed

    Naveed, Muhammad Akram; Riaz, Naheed; Saleem, Muhammad; Jabeen, Bushra; Ashraf, Muhammad; Ismail, Tayaba; Jabbar, Abdul

    2014-05-01

    Longipetalosides A-C (1-3); three new furostane steroidal saponins together with (25S)-5α-furastan-3β,22,26-triol (4) and gitogenin (5) were isolated from the methanolic extract of the whole plant of Tribulus longipetalus. The structures of these compounds (1-5) were established by using 1D ((1)H, (13)C) and 2D NMR (HMQC, HMBC, COSY, NOESY) spectroscopy, and mass spectrometry (ESIMS, HRESIMS), and in comparison with literature data reported for related compounds. Compounds 1-5 were evaluated for their inhibitory activities against enzymes α-glucosidase, lipoxygenase, acetylcholinesterase, and butyrylcholinesterase. Only the compounds 4 and 5 were found as the inhibitors of enzyme α-glucosidase with IC50 values of 33.5±0.22 and 37.2±0.18μM, respectively.

  7. Two New Triterpenoidal Saponins from Roots of Pachystela msolo.

    PubMed

    Ache, Roland N; Tabopda, Turibio K; Yeboah, Samuel O; Ngadjui, Bonaventure T

    2015-11-01

    Two new triterpenoidal saponins, pachystelanosides A (1) and B (2), and six known compounds have been isolated from the roots of Pachystela msolo. Their structures were elucidated on the basis of extensive ID and 2D NMR studies ('H, "C, DEPT, COSY, TOCSY, NOESY, HSQC, HMBC), and ESI-MS as 3-O-(β-D-glucopyranosyl-(1-->2)-β-D-apiofuranosyl-(1-->6)-β-D-glucopyranosyl)-28-O-(β-D-xylopyranosyl-(1--4)[α-L-rhamnopyranosyl-(1-->2)}-α-L-arabino- pyranosyl)-hydroxyprotobassic acid (1) and 3-O-(β-D-glucopyranosyl-(1-->2)-β-D-apiofuranosyl-(1-->6)-β-D-glucopyranosyl)-28-O-(β-D-xylopyranosyl- (1-->4)[α-L-rhamnopyranosyl-(1-->2)]-α-L-arabinopyranosyl)-7α-hydroxyprotobassic acid (2). PMID:26749830

  8. Steroidal saponins from the flowers of Dioscorea bulbifera var. sativa.

    PubMed

    Tapondjou, Léon Azefack; Jenett-Siems, Kristina; Böttger, Stefan; Melzig, Matthias F

    2013-11-01

    Eleven steroidal saponins, dioscoreanosides A-K, along with five known congeners, were isolated from the flowers of Dioscorea bulbifera var. sativa. Their structures were established by extensive NMR experiments in conjunction with mass spectrometry. The isolated compounds were tested for cytotoxicity against urinary bladder carcinoma cells (ECV-304 cells). Our results revealed a moderate activity for spiroconazol A (15), pennogenin 3-O-α-l-rhamnopyranosyl-(1→4)-α-l-rhamnopyranosyl-(1→4)-[α-l-rhamnopyranosyl-(1→2)]-β-d-glucopyranoside (12), and 26-O-ß-d-glucopyranosyl-(25R)-5-en-furost-3ß,17α,22α,26-tetraol-3-O-α-l-rhamnopyranosyl-(1→4)-α-l-rhamnopyranosyl-(1→4)-[α-l-rhamnopyranosyl-(1→2)]-β-d-glucopyranoside (13).

  9. [Acute and chronic toxicity of saponins from Argania spinosa].

    PubMed

    Alaoui, K; Belabbes, M; Cherrah, Y; Hassar, M; Charrouf, Z; Amarouch, H; Roquebert, J

    1998-01-01

    We evaluated the acute and chronic experimental toxicity of a water extract of saponins from Argania spinosa following oral and intraperitoneal (i.p.) administration in mice (Iops Ofa) and rats (Wistar). The DL50 obtained were 79 mg/kg for the i.p. route and 1,300 mg/kg for the oral route. For the chronic toxicity studies, we administred 100 and 200 mg/kg orally once a day during a 3 month period. There was a decrease in blood sugar in the third month of each therapy. Blood creatinine levels increased, thus evoking a renal pathology. A slight increase in transaminases levels was not significatif. Hematologic parameters were unchanged during the treatment and the histopathologic study showed hepatic glycogen decrease and a focal renal tube deterioration. PMID:9805821

  10. Genetics, Genomics and Evolution of Ergot Alkaloid Diversity

    PubMed Central

    Young, Carolyn A.; Schardl, Christopher L.; Panaccione, Daniel G.; Florea, Simona; Takach, Johanna E.; Charlton, Nikki D.; Moore, Neil; Webb, Jennifer S.; Jaromczyk, Jolanta

    2015-01-01

    The ergot alkaloid biosynthesis system has become an excellent model to study evolutionary diversification of specialized (secondary) metabolites. This is a very diverse class of alkaloids with various neurotropic activities, produced by fungi in several orders of the phylum Ascomycota, including plant pathogens and protective plant symbionts in the family Clavicipitaceae. Results of comparative genomics and phylogenomic analyses reveal multiple examples of three evolutionary processes that have generated ergot-alkaloid diversity: gene gains, gene losses, and gene sequence changes that have led to altered substrates or product specificities of the enzymes that they encode (neofunctionalization). The chromosome ends appear to be particularly effective engines for gene gains, losses and rearrangements, but not necessarily for neofunctionalization. Changes in gene expression could lead to accumulation of various pathway intermediates and affect levels of different ergot alkaloids. Genetic alterations associated with interspecific hybrids of Epichloë species suggest that such variation is also selectively favored. The huge structural diversity of ergot alkaloids probably represents adaptations to a wide variety of ecological situations by affecting the biological spectra and mechanisms of defense against herbivores, as evidenced by the diverse pharmacological effects of ergot alkaloids used in medicine. PMID:25875294

  11. [ALKALOIDS OF PEGANUM HARMALA L. AND THEIR BIOLOGICAL ACTIVITY].

    PubMed

    Vachnadze, V; Suladze, T; Vachnadze, N; Kintsurashvili, L; Novikova, J

    2015-06-01

    Peganum Harmala L., Peganасеае widely distributed in Georgia. On the basis of chemical analysis of the composition of alkaloids it was found out that the plant contains quinazoline derivatives, among which dominats alkaloid d, 1 peganine: С11Н12NО2, m.p. 198-99ºC (СН3ОН). UV, λmax 275 (lgε 3,95). In IR-spectrum (KBr) 1625 cm- (-N=C) 3200-370 (OH)cm-1 . Mass- spectrum: М+ 171(100%). It was studied the dynamics of accumulation for total alkaloids and d, l - peganine: in the budding phase the amount of alkaloids was - 3,71%, d, l - peganine 0,07÷0,09%; in the phase of mass flowering the sum of alkaloids - 4,51% ,d, l - peganine - 0,1÷0,13%; in the phase of ripeness total alkaloids - 3.92%; d,l - peganine - 0,08÷0,1. The study of specific pharmacological activity showed that the d,l - peganine similar to peganine at a dose of 30 mg/kg causes a decrease in heart rate by 30÷40 beats/min, which is characteristic for anticholinesterases, in parallel with this, a decrease in cholinesterase activity in blood serum has been observed.

  12. Tropane alkaloids and calystegines as chemotaxonomic markers in the Solanaceae.

    PubMed

    Pigatto, Aline G S; Blanco, Carolina C; Mentz, Lilian A; Soares, Geraldo L G

    2015-01-01

    This study assessed the occurrence and distribution of tropane alkaloids and calystegines in genera of the family Solanaceae to identify patterns of distribution and make evolutionary inferences. A database of tropane alkaloids and calystegines occurrences was constructed from the results of a search of scientific websites and a hand search of periodicals. The terms "Solanaceae", "tropane alkaloids", and "calystegines" were used as index terms for a full-text article search unrestricted by date of publications. The number of occurrence and chemical diversity indices were calculated and cluster analysis and principal components analysis were performed. Overall, 996 occurrences were reported, 879 of tropane alkaloids (88.3%) and 117 of calystegines (11.7%). The calystegines were significantly more relevant than tropane alkaloids for characterization of distinct groups of genera on both analyses performed here. This corroborates the trend toward a chemical dichotomy observed on database analysis and somewhat reinforces the correlation between geographic distribution and occurrence of secondary metabolites, as the presence of calystegines alone (without tropane alkaloids) was only reported in genera that have South America as their center of diversity.

  13. Evaluation of Aconitum diterpenoid alkaloids as antiproliferative agents.

    PubMed

    Wada, Koji; Ohkoshi, Emika; Zhao, Yu; Goto, Masuo; Morris-Natschke, Susan L; Lee, Kuo-Hsiung

    2015-04-01

    Little information has been reported on the antitumor effects of the diterpenoid alkaloid constituents of Aconitum plants, used in the herbal drug 'bushi'. This study was aimed at determining the antitumor activities of Aconitum C19-and C20-diterpenoid alkaloids and synthetic derivatives against lung (A549), prostate (DU145), nasopharyngeal (KB), and vincristine-resistant nasopharyngeal (KB-VIN) cancer cell lines. Newly synthesized C20-diterpenoid alkaloid derivatives showed substantial suppressive effects against all human tumor cell lines tested. In contrast, natural and derivatized C19-diterpenoid alkaloids showed only a slight or no effect. Most of the active compounds were hetisine-type C20-diterpenoid alkaloids, specifically kobusine and pseudokobusine analogs with two different substitution patterns, C-11 and C-11,15. Notably, several C20-diterpenoid alkaloids were more potent against multidrug-resistant KB subline KB-VIN cells. Pseudokobusine 11-3'-trifluoromethylbenzoate (94) is a possible promising new lead meriting additional evaluation against multidrug-resistant tumors.

  14. Anticholinesterase inhibitory activity of quaternary alkaloids from Tinospora crispa.

    PubMed

    Yusoff, Mashitah; Hamid, Hazrulrizawati; Houghton, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Quaternary alkaloids are the major alkaloids isolated from Tinospora species. A previous study pointed to the necessary presence of quaternary nitrogens for strong acetylcholinesterase (AChE) inhibitory activity in such alkaloids. Repeated column chromatography of the vine of Tinospora crispa extract led to the isolation of one new protoberberine alkaloid, 4,13-dihydroxy-2,8,9-trimethoxydibenzo[a,g]quinolizinium (1), along with six known alkaloids-dihydrodiscretamine (2), columbamine (3), magnoflorine (4), N-formylannonaine (5), N-formylnornuciferine (6), and N-trans-feruloyltyramine (7). The seven compounds were isolated and structurally elucidated by spectroscopic analysis. Two known alkaloids, namely, dihydrodiscretamine and columbamine are reported for the first time for this plant. The compounds were tested for AChE inhibitory activity using Ellman's method. In the AChE inhibition assay, only columbamine (3) showed strong activity with IC50 48.1 µM. The structure-activity relationships derived from these results suggest that the quaternary nitrogen in the skeleton has some effect, but that a high degree of methoxylation is more important for acetylcholinesterase inhibition. PMID:24448061

  15. Structure of a new saponin: chrysantellin A from Chrysanthellum procumbens Rich.

    PubMed

    Becchi, M; Bruneteau, M; Trouilloud, M; Combier, H; Sartre, J; Michel, G

    1979-12-01

    A new saponin has been isolated from a tropical plant Chrysantellum procumbens Rich. which is thought to be useful in the therapy of digestive troubles. The structure of this saponin was determined by chemical methods, nuclear magnetic resonance and mass spectrometry. The aglycone moiety is a triterpene, echinocystic acid; D-glucose, D-xylose and L-rhamnose are carbohydrate components. The structure of saponin was established as 3-O-beta-D-glucopyranosyl [L-rhamnopyranosyl-(alpha 1 leads to 3)-D-xylopyranosyl-)beta 1 leads to 4)-L-rhamnopyranosyl-(alpha 1 leads to 2)-D-xylopyranosyl]-(alpha 1 leads to 28)-echinocystyl. The name, chrysantellin A, is proposed for this new saponin.

  16. Differential activity of multiple saponins against omnivorous insects with varying feeding preferences

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A variety of saponin glycosides and aglycones from seven different plant families (Aquifoliaceae, Asparagaceae, Caryophyllaceae, Dioscoreaceae, Leguminosae, Rosaceae, Sapindaceae) were tested against the corn earworm, Helicoverpa zea, and the fall armyworm, Spodoptera frugiperda. The corn earworm fe...

  17. Steroidal saponins from stems and leaves of Paris polyphylla var. yunnanensis.

    PubMed

    Qin, Xu-Jie; Yu, Mu-Yuan; Ni, Wei; Yan, Huan; Chen, Chang-Xiang; Cheng, Yung-Chi; He, Li; Liu, Hai-Yang

    2016-01-01

    Phytochemical investigation of the stems and leaves of Paris polyphylla var. yunnanensis led to isolation of 12 steroidal saponins, chonglouosides SL-9-SL-20, which had not been described previously, along with 13 known compounds. Their structures were established on the basis of extensive spectroscopic analysis and chemical methods. Four of the twelve steroidal saponins possessed three steroidal aglycones which have not been reported in nature. Steroidal saponins were also evaluated for their cytotoxicities against two human cancer cell lines (HepG2 and HEK293) and anti-HCV effects. One known steroidal saponin was the most cytotoxic compound overall with IC50 values of 2.9 ± 0.5 μM and 5.0 ± 0.6 μM against HepG2 and HEK293 cell lines, respectively, while none showed anti-HCV activity at a concentration of 20 μM.

  18. Influence of pearling process on phenolic and saponin content in quinoa (Chenopodium quinoa Willd).

    PubMed

    Gómez-Caravaca, Ana Maria; Iafelice, Giovanna; Verardo, Vito; Marconi, Emanuele; Caboni, Maria Fiorenza

    2014-08-15

    The aim of this work was to obtain sweet quinoa seeds by a pearling process. Thus, two different pearling degrees (20% and 30%) were tested. Moreover, the effect of pearling process on saponins and phenolic content in quinoa were evaluated. To this end, GC-MS methodology was used to identify and quantify the saponins and reversed phase-high performance liquid chromatography coupled to DAD and mass spectrometer detectors was applied to study the phenolic composition. As expected, whole quinoa had the highest saponins and phenolics contents. An abrasion degree of 30% was necessary to obtain sweet quinoa (with a total saponin content lower than 110 mg/100 g). Obviously, this process caused a decrease of 21.5% and 35.2% of free and bound phenolic compounds, respectively. However, this decrease was lower if compared with other cereals. Thus, pearling process is a promising sustainable method to obtain sweet quinoa with a "green" approach.

  19. Hydrolysed ginseng-saponin quaternary: a novel conditioning agent for hair care products.

    PubMed

    Young-Dae, K; Chang-Kew, K; Chung-Nam, L; Byung-Jo, H

    1989-10-01

    Synopsis A new quaternary ammonium compound, hydrolysed ginseng-saponin quaternary (HGSQ), from Korean ginseng saponin and 2,3-epoxypropyltrimethyl ammonium chloride, has been developed as a conditioning agent for hair care products. This structure has a hydrophobic group from the aglycone of ginseng saponin which is biologically active and considered as the most important component of Korean ginseng. Its properties of surface tension, conductivity, critical micelle concentration (CMC), eye irritation, sorption onto hair, tensile strength for 20% extension and moisture retention effect were studied. Its cationic character allows the molecule to be more substantive than ginseng saponin. HGSQ had good physical properties and was safe enough as a cosmetic raw material. Also half-head tests of HGSQ-containing shampoo were carried out to evaluate the conditioning effects in shampoos. HGSQ showed good conditioning properties in a shampoo.

  20. Protective effect of saponins from Argania spinosa against free radical-induced oxidative haemolysis.

    PubMed

    Amzal, H; Alaoui, K; Tok, S; Errachidi, A; Charof, R; Cherrah, Y; Benjouad, A

    2008-07-01

    Saponins from Argania spinosa at a non-haemolytic concentration diminish by 53.2% erythrocyte haemolysis induced by free radicals. 2 mM aspirin and acetaminophen diminish by 75% and 68% , respectively, erythrocyte haemolysis induced by free radicals, while 0.3 microM vitamin E shows no significant antioxidant activity. Interestingly, a combination of 1 mg/l of A. spinosa saponins and vitamin E at 0.3 microM resulted in a 68% level of protection against free radical-induced erythrocyte haemolysis, which may suggest that A. spinosa saponins enhance the antioxidant effect of vitamin E. In contrast, no synergic effect was observed for acetaminophen (2 mM) when in combination with vitamin E (0.3 microM). These results demonstrate the antioxidant properties of saponins from A. spinosa and their ability to potentate the antioxidant effect of vitamin E. PMID:18514434

  1. A novel technology coupling extraction and foam fractionation for separating the total saponins from Achyranthes bidentata.

    PubMed

    Ding, Linlin; Wang, Yanji; Wu, Zhaoliang; Liu, Wei; Li, Rui; Wang, Yanyan

    2016-10-01

    A novel technology coupling extraction and foam fractionation was developed for separating the total saponins from Achyranthes bidentata. In the developed technology, the powder of A. bidentata was loaded in a nylon filter cloth pocket with bore diameter of 180 µm. The pocket was fixed in the bulk liquid phase for continuously releasing saponins. Under the optimal conditions, the concentration and the extraction rate of the total saponins in the foamate by the developed technology were 73.5% and 416.2% higher than those by the traditional technology, respectively. The foamates obtained by the traditional technology and the developed technology were analyzed by ultraperformance liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry to determine their ingredients, and the results appeared that the developed technology exhibited a better performance for separating saponins than the traditional technology. The study is expected to develop a novel technology for cost effectively separating plant-derived materials with surface activity.

  2. New steroidal saponins and antiulcer activity from Solanum paniculatum L.

    PubMed

    Vieira Júnior, Gerardo Magela; da Rocha, Cláudia Quintino; de Souza Rodrigues, Tamires; Hiruma-Lima, Clélia Akiko; Vilegas, Wagner

    2015-11-01

    Solanum paniculatum L. (Solanaceae) is a plant species widespread throughout tropical America, especially in the Brazilian Savanna region. It is used in Brazil for culinary purposes and in folk medicine to treat liver and gastric dysfunctions, as well as hangovers. Fractionation of the ethanolic extracts (70%) from aerial parts (leaves and twigs) of S. paniculatum led to the isolation of the two new saponins (22R, 23S, 25R)-3β, 6α, 23-trihydroxy-5α-spirostane 6-O-β-D-xylopyranosyl-(1" → 3"')-O-[β-D-quinovopyranosyl(1″' → 2')]-O-[α-L-rhamnopyranosyl(1" → 3')]-O-β-D-quinovopyranoside (1) and diosgenin 3-O-β-D-glucopyranosyl(1" → 6')-O-β-D-glucopyranoside (2) together with four know compounds: caffeic acid (3), diosgenin β-D-glucopyranoside (4), rutin (5), and quercetin 3-O-α-L-rhamnopyranosyl (1"' → 6 ″)-O-β-D-galactopyranoside (6). The structures of these compounds were elucidated by extensive use of 1D and 2D NMR experiments along with HRESIMS analyses. Different doses (31.25-500 mg/kg) of ethanolic extract of leaves from S. paniculatum were evaluated against gastric ulcer induced by ethanol in rats. The lower dose of extract able to promote antiulcer effect was 125 mg/kg. The treatment with S. paniculatum by oral route was able to decrease gastric lesion area and also reduced levels of myeloperoxidase (MPO) in the gastric mucosa. Our results reveal for the first time, steroidal saponins from S. paniculatum and the antiulcer effect of this species at this lower dose. PMID:25976806

  3. Evaluation of spermicidal activity of MI-saponin A.

    PubMed

    Saha, P; Majumdar, S; Pal, D; Pal, B C; Kabir, S N

    2010-05-01

    The seed extracts of Madhuca latifolia were reported to have spermicidal activity. The current investigation identified the spermicidal component of the extracts and evaluated its spermicidal potential in vitro. As characterized by infrared, mass, and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectral analyses, Mi-saponin A (MSA) was found to be the most potent component among a mixture of saponins. The mean effective concentrations of MSA that induced irreversible immobilization were 320 microg/mL for rat and 500 microg/mL for human sperm, as against the respective concentrations of 350 and 550 microg/mL of nonoxynol 9 (N-9). The mode of spermicidal action was evaluated by a battery of tests including (a) double fluoroprobe staining for sperm viability, (b) hypoosmotic swelling test and, assays for 5' nucleotidase and acrosin for physiological integrity of sperm plasma membrane, (c) scanning and transmission electron microscopy for sperm membrane ultrastructure, and (d) plasma membrane lipid peroxidation (LPO). The observations, taken together, were interpreted to mean that the spermicidal effect of MSA involved increased membrane LPO leading to structural and functional disintegration of sperm plasma membrane and acrosomal vesicle. A comparative in vitro cytotoxicity study in human vaginal keratocyte (Vk2/E6E7) and endocervical (End/E6E7) cell lines demonstrated that the 50% cell cytotoxicity (CC(50)) values, and consequently the safety indices, for MSA were >or= 8-fold higher as compared to those of N-9. In conclusion, MSA is a potent spermicidal molecule that may be explored further for its suitability as an effective component of vaginal contraceptive. PMID:20220105

  4. Noradrenaline contractions in rabbit mesenteric arteries skinned with saponin.

    PubMed Central

    Haeusler, G; Richards, J G; Thorens, S

    1981-01-01

    1. In rings of small rabbit mesenteric arteries, noradrenaline induced oscillatory contractions. After depolarization with potassium, which produced in this preparation only a transient contraction, the arteries responded to noradrenaline with tonic contraction. 2. Artery rings, skinned for 6 min with saponin (0.5 mg/ml.), were highly sensitive to calcium (half-maximum contraction at 4 x 10(-7) M-Ca2+). In the skinned preparations, a contraction was still elicited by noradrenaline. 3. Treatment with saponin renders virtually all smooth muscle cells of the mesenteric artery preparation hyperpermeable as indicated by both physiological and morphological criteria. 4. While the Ca stores responsible for the noradrenaline-induced contraction of skinned arteries were depleted at a slow rate by 0.1 mM-EGTA, they were completely emptied by a 4 min exposure to 10 mM-EGTA. After release of intracellular Ca by noradrenaline, the Ca stores could be partially replenished by incubating the preparation in 10(-6) M-Ca2+ for 4 min. 5. Noradrenaline failed to contract skinned arteries after part of the intracellular Ca had been released by caffeine but not after Ca release by the ionophore X-537 A. 6. The mitochondrial uncoupler, carbonyl cyanide m-chlorophenylhydrazone, inhibited noradrenaline-induced contractions of skinned arteries. 7. Noradrenaline had no effect on 45Ca translocation in either membrane vesicles or mitochondria isolated from mesenteric arteries. 8. The present results show that in vascular smooth muscle a certain degree of structural integrity of the cell membrane, but not its selective permeability, is required for the coupling between alpha-adrenoceptors and Ca release from intracellular stores; the data also suggest that alpha-adrenoceptor stimulation results in release of Ca bound to the plasma membrane rather than indirect release of Ca accumulated in intracellular organelles. Images Plate 1 PMID:6802959

  5. A comparison of the antimalarial activity of the cinchona alkaloids against Plasmodium falciparum in vitro.

    PubMed

    Wesche, D L; Black, J

    1990-06-01

    The effects of four major cinchona alkaloids: (-) quinine, (+) quinidine, (-)cinchonidine, and (+)cinchonine against Plasmodium falciparum FCQ-27/PNG were studied. The alkaloids were tested in vitro as either single alkaloids, racemic mixtures of stereoisomers, or as an equimolar combination of all four alkaloids. Results indicate (+)quinidine to be most effective and both (+)stereoisomers were more potent than the (-)stereoisomers. Inhibitory concentrations 50% (Ki) of racemic mixtures of stereoisomers were similar to those of the (+)stereoisomers alone. The Ki of four alkaloids in equimolar combination were similar to that of the (-) cinchonidine/(+)cinchonine racemic mixture. A total alkaloidal extract of Cinchona sp. was tested and compared with the pure alkaloids. HPLC analysis indicated that (+)cinchonine, (-)cinchonidine and (-)quinine were present in a ratio of approximately 1:1:2, respectively. The total alkaloid extract, with (-)stereoisomers predominating, was less effective than the four alkaloids in combination. The nature of the interaction between stereoisomers was investigated and appears to be one of addition.

  6. A New Bidesmosidic Triterpenoidal Saponin from the Roots of Symphytum officinale.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, V U; Mohammad, F V; Noorwala, M; Sener, B

    1993-10-01

    A new triterpenoidal saponin having hederagenin as the aglycone was isolated from the roots of SYMPHYTUM OFFICINALE L. The structure of this saponin was elucidated by FAB-MS, (1)H-, (13)C-NMR, 2D-NMR analyses and chemical studies as 3- O-[beta- D-glucopyranosyl-(1-->4)-alpha- L-arabinopyranosyl]-hederagenin 28- O-[beta- D-glucopyranosyl-(1-->6)-beta- D-glucopyranosyl] ester. PMID:17236008

  7. Immunological Adjuvant Activity of Pectinioside A, the Steroidal Saponin from the Starfish Patiria pectinifera.

    PubMed

    Kawase, Osamu; Ohno, Osamu; Suenaga, Kiyotake; Xuan, Xuenan

    2016-05-01

    The steroidal saponin, pectinioside A, was isolated from the starfish, Patiria pectinifera. When it was subcutaneously injected into mice with ovalbumin (OVA), it facilitated the production of OVA-specific total IgG and IgG1 but not IgG2a. To our knowledge, this is the first report suggesting that starfish saponin has the potential to be an immunological adjuvant, stimulating Th2 type immune response. PMID:27319128

  8. Acylated Triterpene Saponins from the Stem Bark of Acer nikoense (Aceraceae).

    PubMed

    Kurimoto, Shin-Ichiro; Sasaki, Yu F; Suyama, Yoshihiro; Tanaka, Naonobu; Kashiwada, Yoshiki; Nakamura, Takanori

    2016-01-01

    Three new acylated triterpene saponins, acernikoenosides A-C (1-3), were isolated from the stem bark of Acer nikoense, together with a known sterol glucoside. Their structures were elucidated on the basis of extensive spectroscopic analyses. This study provided the first example of triterpene saponins isolated from this plant. The anti-genotoxic activity of 1, 3 and 4 against ultraviolet irradiation was evaluated by comet assay. PMID:27373647

  9. Cytotoxic spirostane-type saponins from the roots of Chlorophytum borivilianum.

    PubMed

    Acharya, Debabrata; Mitaine-Offer, Anne-Claire; Kaushik, Nutan; Miyamoto, Tomofumi; Paululat, Thomas; Mirjolet, Jean-François; Duchamp, Olivier; Lacaille-Dubois, Marie-Aleth

    2009-01-01

    Four new spirostane-type saponins named borivilianosides E-H (1-4) were isolated from an ethanol extract of the roots of Chlorophytum borivilianum together with two known steroid saponins (5 and 6). The structures of 1-4 were elucidated using mainly 2D NMR spectroscopic techniques and mass spectrometry. The cytotoxicity of borivilianosides F (2), G (3), and H (4) and three known compounds was evaluated using two human colon cancer cell lines (HT-29 and HCT 116).

  10. Triterpenoid saponins with antifeedant activities from stem bark of Catunaregam spinosa (Rubiaceae) against Plutella xylostella (Plutellidae).

    PubMed

    Gao, Guangchun; Lu, Zhongxian; Tao, Shuhong; Zhang, Si; Wang, Fazuo

    2011-10-18

    Seven triterpenoid saponins, including four new compounds, catunarosides A-D (1-4), and three known compounds, swartziatrioside (5), aralia-saponin V (6), araliasaponin IV (7) were isolated from the stem bark of Catunaregam spinosa, a Chinese mangrove associate. Their structures were elucidated on the basis of their spectral data and hydrolysis experiments. The antifeedant activities of compounds 1-7 against Plutella xylostella were also evaluated.

  11. Identification and genome organization of saponin pathway genes from a wild crucifer, and their use for transient production of saponins in Nicotiana benthamiana.

    PubMed

    Khakimov, Bekzod; Kuzina, Vera; Erthmann, Pernille Ø; Fukushima, Ery Odette; Augustin, Jörg M; Olsen, Carl Erik; Scholtalbers, Jelle; Volpin, Hanne; Andersen, Sven Bode; Hauser, Thure P; Muranaka, Toshiya; Bak, Søren

    2015-11-01

    The ability to evolve novel metabolites has been instrumental for the defence of plants against antagonists. A few species in the Barbarea genus are the only crucifers known to produce saponins, some of which make plants resistant to specialist herbivores, like Plutella xylostella, the diamondback moth. Genetic mapping in Barbarea vulgaris revealed that genes for saponin biosynthesis are not clustered but are located in different linkage groups. Using co-location with quantitative trait loci (QTLs) for resistance, transcriptome and genome sequences, we identified two 2,3-oxidosqualene cyclases that form the major triterpenoid backbones. LUP2 mainly produces lupeol, and is preferentially expressed in insect-susceptible B. vulgaris plants, whereas LUP5 produces β-amyrin and α-amyrin, and is preferentially expressed in resistant plants; β-amyrin is the backbone for the resistance-conferring saponins in Barbarea. Two loci for cytochromes P450, predicted to add functional groups to the saponin backbone, were identified: CYP72As co-localized with insect resistance, whereas CYP716As did not. When B. vulgaris sapogenin biosynthesis genes were transiently expressed by CPMV-HT technology in Nicotiana benthamiana, high levels of hydroxylated and carboxylated triterpenoid structures accumulated, including oleanolic acid, which is a precursor of the major resistance-conferring saponins. When the B. vulgaris gene for sapogenin 3-O-glucosylation was co-expressed, the insect deterrent 3-O-oleanolic acid monoglucoside accumulated, as well as triterpene structures with up to six hexoses, demonstrating that N. benthamiana further decorates the monoglucosides. We argue that saponin biosynthesis in the Barbarea genus evolved by a neofunctionalized glucosyl transferase, whereas the difference between resistant and susceptible B. vulgaris chemotypes evolved by different expression of oxidosqualene cyclases (OSCs).

  12. Identification and genome organization of saponin pathway genes from a wild crucifer, and their use for transient production of saponins in Nicotiana benthamiana.

    PubMed

    Khakimov, Bekzod; Kuzina, Vera; Erthmann, Pernille Ø; Fukushima, Ery Odette; Augustin, Jörg M; Olsen, Carl Erik; Scholtalbers, Jelle; Volpin, Hanne; Andersen, Sven Bode; Hauser, Thure P; Muranaka, Toshiya; Bak, Søren

    2015-11-01

    The ability to evolve novel metabolites has been instrumental for the defence of plants against antagonists. A few species in the Barbarea genus are the only crucifers known to produce saponins, some of which make plants resistant to specialist herbivores, like Plutella xylostella, the diamondback moth. Genetic mapping in Barbarea vulgaris revealed that genes for saponin biosynthesis are not clustered but are located in different linkage groups. Using co-location with quantitative trait loci (QTLs) for resistance, transcriptome and genome sequences, we identified two 2,3-oxidosqualene cyclases that form the major triterpenoid backbones. LUP2 mainly produces lupeol, and is preferentially expressed in insect-susceptible B. vulgaris plants, whereas LUP5 produces β-amyrin and α-amyrin, and is preferentially expressed in resistant plants; β-amyrin is the backbone for the resistance-conferring saponins in Barbarea. Two loci for cytochromes P450, predicted to add functional groups to the saponin backbone, were identified: CYP72As co-localized with insect resistance, whereas CYP716As did not. When B. vulgaris sapogenin biosynthesis genes were transiently expressed by CPMV-HT technology in Nicotiana benthamiana, high levels of hydroxylated and carboxylated triterpenoid structures accumulated, including oleanolic acid, which is a precursor of the major resistance-conferring saponins. When the B. vulgaris gene for sapogenin 3-O-glucosylation was co-expressed, the insect deterrent 3-O-oleanolic acid monoglucoside accumulated, as well as triterpene structures with up to six hexoses, demonstrating that N. benthamiana further decorates the monoglucosides. We argue that saponin biosynthesis in the Barbarea genus evolved by a neofunctionalized glucosyl transferase, whereas the difference between resistant and susceptible B. vulgaris chemotypes evolved by different expression of oxidosqualene cyclases (OSCs). PMID:26333142

  13. Cross-reactivity of Schistosoma mansoni-Fasciola gigantica influenced by saponins.

    PubMed

    Maghraby, Amany Sayed; Shaker, Kamel H; Gaber, Hanaa M

    2009-01-01

    The aim of the present work was to investigate the Schistosoma mansoni and Fasciola gigantica cross-reactivity between adult worms and egg homogenates of the parasites. Immunoprophylactic effects of crude Schistosoma mansoni worms and egg antigens mixed with or without saponins extracted from Atriplex nummularia were studied followed by challenge with 80 cercariae of Schistosoma mansoni. Our results showed that post 1st immunization with schistosome egg antigens (SEA) there was a significant change (P approximately 0.05) in the IgM levels against Fasciola egg homogenate (FgEH) without saponins. Post 2nd immunization with SEA mixed with saponins the levels of IgM increased significantly (P approximately 0.05) against Fasciola worm homogenate (FgWH) as compared with a non-immunized group. Post 2nd immunization the level of IgG was significantly elevated (P approximately 0.05) by SEA mixed with saponins against FgWH. Post 2nd immunizations with SEA mixed with saponins showed a significant change (P approximately 0.05) in IgG levels against FgEH. These results clearly demonstrated that there is a cross-reactivity between Schistosoma mansoni eggs and Fasciola gigantica worms and eggs. Saponins were found to be immunostimulatory adjuvants in our study. PMID:19526726

  14. Macromolecular interactions of triterpenoids and targeted toxins: role of saponins charge.

    PubMed

    Thakur, Mayank; Weng, Alexander; Pieper, Alexandra; Mergel, Katharina; von Mallinckrodt, Benedicta; Gilabert-Oriol, Roger; Görick, Cornelia; Wiesner, Burkhard; Eichhorst, Jenny; Melzig, Matthias F; Fuchs, Hendrik

    2013-10-01

    Macromolecular interaction of protein toxins with certain plant triterpenoids holds potential for application in tumor therapy. The ability of only certain saponins to enhance the endosomal escape of toxins specifically in tumor cells was evaluated and set into correlation with the electrophoretic mobility. Saponins from Saponaria officinalis Linn, were selected as a lead to understand this evolutionarily conserved principle in detail. Agarose gel electrophoresis was utilized to procure pure saponin fractions with different electrophoretic mobility, which were tested for their ability to enhance the toxicity by live cell monitoring. Five fractions (SOG1-SOG5) were isolated with a relative electrophoretic mobility of (-0.05, 0.41, 0.59, 0.75 and 1.00) and evaluated using thin layer chromatography, HPLC, and mass spectroscopic analysis. Cytotoxicity experiments revealed highest effectiveness with SOG3. Live cell imaging experiments with SOG3 revealed that this saponin with a specific REM of 0.59 could assist in the lyso/endosomal release of the toxic payload without affecting the integrity of plasma membrane and could lead to the induction of apoptosis. This charge dependent enhancement was also found to be highly specific to type I ribosome inactivating proteins compared to bacterial toxins. Charge interaction of plant toxins and saponins with tumor cells, plays a major role in toxin specific modulation of response. The finding opens up newer ways of finding protein saponin interaction conserved evolutionarily and to test their role in endosomal escape of therapeutic molecules.

  15. The role of the hydrophobic phase in the unique rheological properties of saponin adsorption layers.

    PubMed

    Golemanov, Konstantin; Tcholakova, Slavka; Denkov, Nikolai; Pelan, Eddie; Stoyanov, Simeon D

    2014-09-28

    Saponins are a diverse class of natural, plant derived surfactants, with peculiar molecular structure consisting of a hydrophobic scaffold and one or several hydrophilic oligosaccharide chains. Saponins have strong surface activity and are used as natural emulsifiers and foaming agents in food and beverage, pharmaceutical, ore processing, and other industries. Many saponins form adsorption layers at the air-water interface with extremely high surface elasticity and viscosity. The molecular origin of the observed unique interfacial visco-elasticity of saponin adsorption layers is of great interest from both scientific and application viewpoints. In the current study we demonstrate that the hydrophobic phase in contact with water has a very strong effect on the interfacial properties of saponins and that the interfacial elasticity and viscosity of the saponin adsorption layers decrease in the order: air > hexadecane ≫ tricaprylin. The molecular mechanisms behind these trends are analyzed and discussed in the context of the general structure of the surfactant adsorption layers at various nonpolar phase-water interfaces.

  16. Metabolic and functional diversity of saponins, biosynthetic intermediates and semi-synthetic derivatives

    PubMed Central

    Moses, Tessa; Papadopoulou, Kalliope K.

    2014-01-01

    Saponins are widely distributed plant natural products with vast structural and functional diversity. They are typically composed of a hydrophobic aglycone, which is extensively decorated with functional groups prior to the addition of hydrophilic sugar moieties, to result in surface-active amphipathic compounds. The saponins are broadly classified as triterpenoids, steroids or steroidal glycoalkaloids, based on the aglycone structure from which they are derived. The saponins and their biosynthetic intermediates display a variety of biological activities of interest to the pharmaceutical, cosmetic and food sectors. Although their relevance in industrial applications has long been recognized, their role in plants is underexplored. Recent research on modulating native pathway flux in saponin biosynthesis has demonstrated the roles of saponins and their biosynthetic intermediates in plant growth and development. Here, we review the literature on the effects of these molecules on plant physiology, which collectively implicate them in plant primary processes. The industrial uses and potential of saponins are discussed with respect to structure and activity, highlighting the undoubted value of these molecules as therapeutics. PMID:25286183

  17. Combined therapeutic effects of vinblastine and Astragalus saponins in human colon cancer cells and tumor xenograft via inhibition of tumor growth and proangiogenic factors.

    PubMed

    Auyeung, Kathy K W; Law, P C; Ko, Joshua K S

    2014-01-01

    Our previous study had demonstrated that Astragalus saponins (AST) could reduce the side effects of orthodox chemotherapeutic drugs, while concurrently promote antitumor activity. In the present study, we attempted to investigate the potential synergistic anticarcinogenic effects of AST and a vinca alkaloid vinblastine (VBL). Reduced expression of key proangiogenic and metastatic factors including VEGF, bFGF, metalloproteinase (MMP)-2, and MMP-9 was detected in VBL-treated colon cancer cells, with further downregulation by combined VBL/AST treatment. Subsequently, VBL or AST decreased LoVo cell invasiveness, with further reduction when the drugs were cotreated. Significant growth inhibition and cell cycle arrest at G2/M phase were achieved by either drug treatment with apparent synergistic effects. VBL-induced apoptosis was confirmed but found to be unrelated to induction of the novel apoptotic protein NSAID-activated gene 1. In vivo study in tumor xenograft indicates that combined VBL/AST treatment resulted in sustained regression of tumor growth, with attenuation of the neutropenic and anemic effects of VBL. In addition, downregulation of proangiogenic and proliferative factors was also visualized, with boosting effect by combined drug treatment. These findings have provided evidence that AST combined with adjuvant chemotherapeutics like VBL could alleviate cancer development through diversified modes of action, including the regulation of angiogenesis.

  18. In vitro antioxidant profiles of some flavonoids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aksoy, Mine; Gülçin, Ilhami; Küfrevioǧlu, Ö. Irfan

    2016-04-01

    Baicalin ((2S,3S,4S,5R,6S)-6-(5,6-dihydroxy-4-oxo-2-phenyl-chromen-7-yl)oxy-3,4,5-trihydroxy-tetrahydropyran-2-carboxylic acid) and baicalein (5,6,7-trihydroxyflavone) are a flavone, a type of flavonoid. Baicalin is the glucuronide of baicalein. Phlorizin, or phloridzin is a naturally occurring flavonoid produced in some plants. It belongs to the group of dihydrochalcones. In this study, we investigated the in vitro antioxidant properties of baicalin, baicalein and phloridzin using different methods including ferric ion (Fe3+) reducing power, cupric ion (Cu2+) reducing power (CUPRAC method), reduction of Fe3+-TPTZ complex, 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl free radicals (DPPH.) scavenging, 2,2'-azino-bis(3-ethylbenzthiazoline-6-sulphonic acid radicals (ABTS.+) scavenging activities. Also, butylated hydroxyanisole (BHA), butylated hydroxytoluene (BHT) and α-Tocopherol were used as standard antioxidants.

  19. Flavonoids: from cell cycle regulation to biotechnology.

    PubMed

    Woo, Ho-Hyung; Jeong, Byeong Ryong; Hawes, Martha C

    2005-03-01

    Flavonoids have been proposed to play diverse roles in plant growth and development, including defense, symbiosis, pollen development and male fertility, polar auxin transport, and protection against ultraviolet radiation. Recently, a new role in cell cycle regulation has emerged. Genetic alteration of glucuronide metabolism by altered expression of a Pisum sativum UDP-glucuronosyltransferase (PsUGT1) results in an altered cell cycle in pea, alfalfa, and Arabidopsis. In alfalfa, altered expression of PsUGT1 results in accumulation of a flavonoid-like compound that suppresses growth of cultured cells. The results are consistent with the hypothesis that PsUGT1 functions by controlling cellular levels of a factor controlling cell cycle (FCC). PMID:15834800

  20. Triterpenoids and flavonoids from celery (Apium graveolens).

    PubMed

    Zhou, Kailan; Zhao, Feng; Liu, Zhihui; Zhuang, Yulei; Chen, Lixia; Qiu, Feng

    2009-09-01

    Three new triterpenoids, 11,21-dioxo-2beta,3beta,15alpha-trihydroxyurs-12-ene-2-O-beta-D-glucopyranoside (1), 11,21-dioxo-3beta,15alpha,24-trihydroxyurs-12-ene-24-O-beta-D-glucopyranoside (2), and 11,21-dioxo-3beta,15alpha,24-trihydroxyolean-12-ene-24-O-beta-D-glucopyranoside (3), and two new flavonoids, apigenin-7-O-[2''-O-(5'''-O-feruloyl)-beta-D-apiofuranosyl]-beta-D-glucopyranoside (4) and chrysoeriol-7-O-[2''-O-(5'''-O-feruloyl)-beta-D-apiofuranosyl]-beta-d-glucopyranoside (5), were isolated from the whole plant of fresh celery (Apium graveolens), together with 10 known flavonoids. The structures of the new compounds were elucidated by analysis of spectroscopic data. The inhibitory effects of the compounds isolated on nitric oxide production in lipopolysaccaride-activated macrophages were evaluated.

  1. Which sources of flavonoids: complex diets or dietary supplements?

    PubMed

    Egert, Sarah; Rimbach, Gerald

    2011-01-01

    There is increasing interest in the potential health benefits of dietary flavonoids. Fruits and vegetables, tea, and cocoa are rich natural sources of flavonoids. Epidemiological studies have indicated that consumption of these foods is likely to be associated with a reduced risk of cardiovascular disease, but the etiology of this benefit is not yet clearly defined. Furthermore, in some acute interventions, a positive effect of tea and cocoa on vascular function has been reported. An alternative source of flavonoids is dietary supplements, which have become increasingly popular in the recent past. In this context, it needs to be critically evaluated whether vascular health-promoting and other positive properties of flavonoid-rich diets can be replaced by purified flavonoids as dietary supplements. Plant sources of flavonoids contain a complex mixture of secondary plant metabolites and not only flavonoids per se. This complex mixture of secondary plant metabolites cannot be simply exchanged by single purified compounds as dietary supplements. If flavonoids are given as dietary supplements, toxicity issues as well as nutrient drug interactions need to be taken into account. Purified flavonoids given in high doses as dietary supplements may affect trace element, folate, and vitamin C status. Furthermore, they may exhibit antithyroid and goitrogenic activities. In this review article, the available literature on the safety issues surrounding high dose supplemental flavonoid consumption has been summarized.

  2. Flavonoids as antioxidants in plants: location and functional significance.

    PubMed

    Agati, Giovanni; Azzarello, Elisa; Pollastri, Susanna; Tattini, Massimiliano

    2012-11-01

    Stress-responsive dihydroxy B-ring-substituted flavonoids have great potential to inhibit the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and reduce the levels of ROS once they are formed, i.e., to perform antioxidant functions. These flavonoids are located within or in the proximity of centers of ROS generation in severely stressed plants. Efficient mechanisms have been recently identified for the transport of flavonoids from the endoplasmic reticulum, the site of their biosynthesis, to different cellular compartments. The mechanism underlying flavonoid-mediated ROS reduction in plants is still unclear. 'Antioxidant' flavonoids are found in the chloroplast, which suggests a role as scavengers of singlet oxygen and stabilizers of the chloroplast outer envelope membrane. Dihydroxy B-ring substituted flavonoids are present in the nucleus of mesophyll cells and may inhibit ROS-generation making complexes with Fe and Cu ions. The genes that govern the biosynthesis of antioxidant flavonoids are present in liverworts and mosses and are mostly up-regulated as a consequence of severe stress. This suggests that the antioxidant flavonoid metabolism is a robust trait of terrestrial plants. Vacuolar dihydroxy B-ring flavonoids have been reported to serve as co-substrates for vacuolar peroxidases to reduce H(2)O(2) escape from the chloroplast, following the depletion of ascorbate peroxidase activity. Antioxidant flavonoids may effectively control key steps of cell growth and differentiation, thus acting regulating the development of the whole plant and individual organs.

  3. Citrus Flavonoids as Regulators of Lipoprotein Metabolism and Atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Mulvihill, Erin E; Burke, Amy C; Huff, Murray W

    2016-07-17

    Citrus flavonoids are polyphenolic compounds with significant biological properties. This review summarizes recent advances in understanding the ability of citrus flavonoids to modulate lipid metabolism, other metabolic parameters related to the metabolic syndrome, and atherosclerosis. Citrus flavonoids, including naringenin, hesperitin, nobiletin, and tangeretin, have emerged as potential therapeutics for the treatment of metabolic dysregulation. Epidemiological studies reveal an association between the intake of citrus flavonoid-containing foods and a decreased incidence of cardiovascular disease. Studies in cell culture and animal models, as well as a limited number of clinical studies, reveal the lipid-lowering, insulin-sensitizing, antihypertensive, and anti-inflammatory properties of citrus flavonoids. In animal models, supplementation of rodent diets with citrus flavonoids prevents hepatic steatosis, dyslipidemia, and insulin resistance primarily through inhibition of hepatic fatty acid synthesis and increased fatty acid oxidation. Citrus flavonoids blunt the inflammatory response in metabolically important tissues including liver, adipose, kidney, and the aorta. The mechanisms underlying flavonoid-induced metabolic regulation have not been completely established, although several potential targets have been identified. In mouse models, citrus flavonoids show marked suppression of atherogenesis through improved metabolic parameters as well as through direct impact on the vessel wall. Recent studies support a role for citrus flavonoids in the treatment of dyslipidemia, insulin resistance, hepatic steatosis, obesity, and atherosclerosis. Larger human studies examining dose, bioavailability, efficacy, and safety are required to promote the development of these promising therapeutic agents. PMID:27146015

  4. Advance on the Flavonoid C-glycosides and Health Benefits.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Jianbo; Capanoglu, Esra; Jassbi, Amir Reza; Miron, Anca

    2016-07-29

    The dietary flavonoids, especially their glycosides, are the most vital phytochemicals in diets and are of great general interest due to their diverse bioactivity. Almost all natural flavonoids exist as their O-glycoside or C-glycoside forms in plants. The dietary flavonoid C-glycosides have received less attention than their corresponding O-glycosides. This review summarizes current knowledge regarding flavonoid C-glycosides and their influence on human health. Among the flavonoid C-glycosides, flavone C-glycosides, especially vitexin, isoorientin, orientin, isovitexin and their multiglycosides are more frequently mentioned than others. Flavonoid C-monoglycosides are poorly absorbed in human beings with very few metabolites in urine and blood and are deglycosylated and degraded by human intestinal bacteria in colon. However, flavonoid C-multiglycosides are absorbed unchanged in the intestine and distributed to other tissues. Flavonoid C-glycosides showed significant antioxidant activity, anticancer and antitumor activity, hepatoprotective activity, anti-inflammatory activity, anti-diabetes activity, antiviral activity, antibacterial and antifungal activity, and other biological effects. It looks like that the C-glycosylflavonoids in most cases showed higher antioxidant and anti-diabetes potential than their corresponding O-glycosylflavonoids and aglycones. However, there is a lack of in vivo data on the biological benefits of flavonoid C-glycosides. It is necessary to investigate more on how flavonoid C-glycosides prevent and handle the diseases.

  5. Chemistry and Biological Activities of Flavonoids: An Overview

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Shashank; Pandey, Abhay K.

    2013-01-01

    There has been increasing interest in the research on flavonoids from plant sources because of their versatile health benefits reported in various epidemiological studies. Since flavonoids are directly associated with human dietary ingredients and health, there is need to evaluate structure and function relationship. The bioavailability, metabolism, and biological activity of flavonoids depend upon the configuration, total number of hydroxyl groups, and substitution of functional groups about their nuclear structure. Fruits and vegetables are the main dietary sources of flavonoids for humans, along with tea and wine. Most recent researches have focused on the health aspects of flavonoids for humans. Many flavonoids are shown to have antioxidative activity, free radical scavenging capacity, coronary heart disease prevention, hepatoprotective, anti-inflammatory, and anticancer activities, while some flavonoids exhibit potential antiviral activities. In plant systems, flavonoids help in combating oxidative stress and act as growth regulators. For pharmaceutical purposes cost-effective bulk production of different types of flavonoids has been made possible with the help of microbial biotechnology. This review highlights the structural features of flavonoids, their beneficial roles in human health, and significance in plants as well as their microbial production. PMID:24470791

  6. A benzoquinone and flavonoids from Cyperus alopecuroides.

    PubMed

    Nassar, Mahmoud I; Abdel-Razik, Ayman F; El-Khrisy, Ezz El-Din A M; Dawidar, Abdel-Aziz M; Bystrom, Amy; Mabry, Tom J

    2002-06-01

    A benzoquinone, named alopecuquinone, was isolated from the ethanol extract of the inflorescences of Cyperus alopecuroides. Its structure was primarily elucidated by spectroscopic analysis including 1H, 13C NMR, APT, HMQC, 1H-1H COSY and CIMS. The known flavonoids, vicenin 2, orientin, diosmetin, quercetin 3,3'-dimethyl ether and its 3,4'-dimethyl ether, were also isolated and characterized. The ethanol extract of the plant material showed moderate estrogenic activity using a strain of Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

  7. Flavonoid-specific staining of Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Sheahan, J J; Rechnitz, G A

    1992-12-01

    Crop yields may be threatened by increases in UV-B radiation resulting from depletion of the ozone layer. In higher plants, the presence of flavonols provides a protective mechanism, and we report a novel staining procedure for the visualization of such protectants in plant tissue. It is shown that the proposed technique provides sensitive and specific fluorescence of flavonoids in chlorophyll-bleached tissue of Arabidopsis thaliana.

  8. Accumulation of ergot alkaloids during conidiophore development in Aspergillus fumigatus.

    PubMed

    Mulinti, Prashanthi; Allen, Natalie A; Coyle, Christine M; Gravelat, Fabrice N; Sheppard, Donald C; Panaccione, Daniel G

    2014-01-01

    Production of ergot alkaloids in the opportunistic fungal pathogen Aspergillus fumigatus is restricted to conidiating cultures. These cultures typically accumulate several pathway intermediates at concentrations comparable to that of the pathway end product. We investigated the contribution of different cell types that constitute the multicellular conidiophore of A. fumigatus to the production of ergot alkaloid pathway intermediates versus the pathway end product, fumigaclavine C. A relatively minor share (11 %) of the ergot alkaloid yield on a molar basis was secreted into the medium, whereas the remainder was associated with the conidiating colonies. Entire conidiating cultures (containing hyphae, vesicle of conidiophore, phialides of conidiophore, and conidia) accumulated higher levels of the pathway intermediate festuclavine and lower levels of the pathway end product fumigaclavine C than did isolated, abscised conidia, indicating that conidiophores and/or hyphae have a quantitatively different ergot alkaloid profile compared to that of conidia. Differences in alkaloid accumulation among cell types also were indicated by studies with conidiophore development mutants. A ∆medA mutant, in which conidiophores are numerous but develop poorly, accumulated higher levels of pathway intermediates than did the wildtype or a complemented ∆medA mutant. A ∆stuA mutant, which grows mainly as hyphae and produces very few, abnormal conidiophores, produced no detectable ergot alkaloids. The data indicated heterogeneous spatial distribution of ergot alkaloid pathway intermediates versus pathway end product in conidiating cultures of A. fumigatus. This skewed distribution may reflect differences in abundance or activity of pathway enzymes among cell types of those conidiating cultures. PMID:23925951

  9. [Simultaneous determination of 4 alkaloids and a flavonoid in Picrasmae Ramulus et Folium by RP-HPLC].

    PubMed

    Wu, Chong; Deng, Gui-Hua; Lin, Chao-Zhan; Zhu, Chen-Chen

    2014-05-01

    A RP-HPLC method was developed to evaluate the quality of Picrasmae Ramulus et Folium by simultaneous determination of five constituents including 1-hydroxymethyl-beta-carboline (1), 1-methoxicabony-beta-carboline (2), 4-methoxy-5-hydroxy-canthin-6-one (3), 4, 5-dimethoxy-canthin-6-one (4) and maackiain (5) in Picrasmae Ramulus et Folium. The samples were separated on a Kromasil RP-C18 (4.6 mm x 250 mm, 5 microm) column eluted with acetonitrile and 0.1% phosphoric acid as mobile phases in gradient mode. The detection wavelength was set at 254 nm. The calibration curves and linearity of the above five standards were determined as (1) Y = 6 525.6X + 37.25 (0.009-1.780 microg, r = 0.996 8), (2) Y = 3 662.3X + 41.55 (0.005-0.920 microg, r = 0.999 5), (3) Y = 3763.1X + 146.87 (0.015-3.060 microg, r = 0.999 0), (4) Y = 2 174.1X + 21.52 (0.003-0.620 microg, r = 0.999 5), and (5) Y = 276.25X + 7.65 (0.010-1.960 microg, r = 0.998 9), respectively. The method is simple and repeatable, and can be used for the quality assessment of Picrasmae Ramulus et Folium.

  10. Myocardial effects of flavonoids from Crataegus species.

    PubMed

    Schüssler, M; Hölzl, J; Fricke, U

    1995-08-01

    The influence of the main flavonoids from Crataegus species (hawthorn, Rosaceae) on coronary flow, heart rate and left ventricular pressure as well as on the velocity of contraction and relaxation was investigated in Langendorff perfused isolated guinea pig hearts at a constant pressure of 70 cmH2O. Drug action was evaluated in a concentration range of 10(-7) to 5 x 10(-4) mol/l. An increase of coronary flow caused by the O-glycosides luteolin-7-glucoside (186%), hyperoside (66%) and rutin (66%) as well as an increase of the relaxation velocity (positive lusitropism) by luteolin-7-glucoside (104%), hyperoside (62%) and rutin (73%) were the major effects observed at a maximum concentration of 0.5 mmol/l. Furthermore, slight positive inotropic effects and a rise in heart rate were seen. Similar but less intensive actions were found with the C-glycosides vitexin, vitexin-rhamnoside and monoacetyl-vitexin-rhamnoside. Possible beta-adrenergic activities of the flavonoids could be excluded by the addition of propranolol in fixed concentrations of 10(-8) to 10(-5) mol/l. Moreover, pretreatment of the animals with reserpine (7 mg/kg) did not influence myocardial activity of hyperoside (10(-4) mol/l). As previous experiments showed an inhibition of the 3',5'-cyclic adenosine monophosphate phosphodiesterase, the results suggest an inhibition of this enzyme as the possible underlying mechanism of cardiac action of flavonoids from Crataegus species.

  11. Flavonoid profile of green asparagus genotypes.

    PubMed

    Fuentes-Alventosa, J M; Jaramillo, S; Rodríguez-Gutiérrez, G; Cermeño, P; Espejo, J A; Jiménez-Araujo, A; Guillén-Bejarano, R; Fernández-Bolaños, J; Rodríguez-Arcos, R

    2008-08-27

    The determination of flavonoid profiles from different genotypes of triguero asparagus and their comparison to those from green asparagus commercial hybrids was the main goal of this study. The samples consisted of 32 commercial hybrids and 65 genotypes from the Huetor-Tajar population variety (triguero). The analysis of individual flavonoids by HPLC-DAD-MS has allowed the determination of eight naturally occurring flavonol derivatives in several genotypes of triguero asparagus. Those compounds included mono-, di-, and triglycosides of three flavonols, that is, quercetin, isorhamnetin, and kaempferol. The detailed analysis of the flavonoid profiles revealed significant differences among the distinct genotypes. These have been classified in three distinct groups as the result of a k-means clustering analysis, two of them containing both commercial hybrids and triguero asparagus and another cluster constituted by 21 genotypes of triguero asparagus, which contain several key flavonol derivatives able to differentiate them. Hence, the triglycosides tentatively identified as quercetin-3-rhamnosyl-rutinoside, isorhamnetin-3-rhamnosyl-rutinoside, and isorhamnetin-3-O-glucoside have been detected only in the genotypes grouped in the above-mentioned cluster. On the other hand, the compound tentatively identified as isorhamnetin-3-glucosyl-rutinoside was present in most genotypes of triguero asparagus, whereas it has not been detected in any of the commercial hybrids.

  12. Myocardial effects of flavonoids from Crataegus species.

    PubMed

    Schüssler, M; Hölzl, J; Fricke, U

    1995-08-01

    The influence of the main flavonoids from Crataegus species (hawthorn, Rosaceae) on coronary flow, heart rate and left ventricular pressure as well as on the velocity of contraction and relaxation was investigated in Langendorff perfused isolated guinea pig hearts at a constant pressure of 70 cmH2O. Drug action was evaluated in a concentration range of 10(-7) to 5 x 10(-4) mol/l. An increase of coronary flow caused by the O-glycosides luteolin-7-glucoside (186%), hyperoside (66%) and rutin (66%) as well as an increase of the relaxation velocity (positive lusitropism) by luteolin-7-glucoside (104%), hyperoside (62%) and rutin (73%) were the major effects observed at a maximum concentration of 0.5 mmol/l. Furthermore, slight positive inotropic effects and a rise in heart rate were seen. Similar but less intensive actions were found with the C-glycosides vitexin, vitexin-rhamnoside and monoacetyl-vitexin-rhamnoside. Possible beta-adrenergic activities of the flavonoids could be excluded by the addition of propranolol in fixed concentrations of 10(-8) to 10(-5) mol/l. Moreover, pretreatment of the animals with reserpine (7 mg/kg) did not influence myocardial activity of hyperoside (10(-4) mol/l). As previous experiments showed an inhibition of the 3',5'-cyclic adenosine monophosphate phosphodiesterase, the results suggest an inhibition of this enzyme as the possible underlying mechanism of cardiac action of flavonoids from Crataegus species. PMID:7575743

  13. Synthesis of Morphinan Alkaloids in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Fossati, Elena; Narcross, Lauren; Ekins, Andrew; Falgueyret, Jean-Pierre; Martin, Vincent J. J.

    2015-01-01

    Morphinan alkaloids are the most powerful narcotic analgesics currently used to treat moderate to severe and chronic pain. The feasibility of morphinan synthesis in recombinant Saccharomyces cerevisiae starting from the precursor (R,S)-norlaudanosoline was investigated. Chiral analysis of the reticuline produced by the expression of opium poppy methyltransferases showed strict enantioselectivity for (S)-reticuline starting from (R,S)-norlaudanosoline. In addition, the P. somniferum enzymes salutaridine synthase (PsSAS), salutaridine reductase (PsSAR) and salutaridinol acetyltransferase (PsSAT) were functionally co-expressed in S. cerevisiae and optimization of the pH conditions allowed for productive spontaneous rearrangement of salutaridinol-7-O-acetate and synthesis of thebaine from (R)-reticuline. Finally, we reconstituted a 7-gene pathway for the production of codeine and morphine from (R)-reticuline. Yeast cell feeding assays using (R)-reticuline, salutaridine or codeine as substrates showed that all enzymes were functionally co-expressed in yeast and that activity of salutaridine reductase and codeine-O-demethylase likely limit flux to morphine synthesis. The results of this study describe a significant advance for the synthesis of morphinans in S. cerevisiae and pave the way for their complete synthesis in recombinant microbes. PMID:25905794

  14. Synthesis of Morphinan Alkaloids in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Fossati, Elena; Narcross, Lauren; Ekins, Andrew; Falgueyret, Jean-Pierre; Martin, Vincent J J

    2015-01-01

    Morphinan alkaloids are the most powerful narcotic analgesics currently used to treat moderate to severe and chronic pain. The feasibility of morphinan synthesis in recombinant Saccharomyces cerevisiae starting from the precursor (R,S)-norlaudanosoline was investigated. Chiral analysis of the reticuline produced by the expression of opium poppy methyltransferases showed strict enantioselectivity for (S)-reticuline starting from (R,S)-norlaudanosoline. In addition, the P. somniferum enzymes salutaridine synthase (PsSAS), salutaridine reductase (PsSAR) and salutaridinol acetyltransferase (PsSAT) were functionally co-expressed in S. cerevisiae and optimization of the pH conditions allowed for productive spontaneous rearrangement of salutaridinol-7-O-acetate and synthesis of thebaine from (R)-reticuline. Finally, we reconstituted a 7-gene pathway for the production of codeine and morphine from (R)-reticuline. Yeast cell feeding assays using (R)-reticuline, salutaridine or codeine as substrates showed that all enzymes were functionally co-expressed in yeast and that activity of salutaridine reductase and codeine-O-demethylase likely limit flux to morphine synthesis. The results of this study describe a significant advance for the synthesis of morphinans in S. cerevisiae and pave the way for their complete synthesis in recombinant microbes. PMID:25905794

  15. Alkaloids and athlete immune function: caffeine, theophylline, gingerol, ephedrine, and their congeners.

    PubMed

    Senchina, David S; Hallam, Justus E; Kohut, Marian L; Nguyen, Norah A; Perera, M Ann d N

    2014-01-01

    Plant alkaloids are found in foods, beverages, and supplements consumed by athletes for daily nutrition, performance enhancement, and immune function improvement. This paper examined possible immunomodulatory roles of alkaloids in exercise contexts, with a focus on human studies. Four representative groups were scrutinized: (a) caffeine (guaranine, mateine); (b) theophylline and its isomers, theobromine and paraxanthine; (c) ginger alkaloids including gingerols and shogaol; and (d) ephedra alkaloids such as ephedrine and pseudoephedrine. Emerging or prospective alkaloid sources (Goji berry, Noni berry, and bloodroot) were also considered. Human in vitro and in vivo studies on alkaloids and immune function were often conflicting. Caffeine may be immunomodulatory in vivo depending on subject characteristics, exercise characteristics, and immune parameters measured. Caffeine may exhibit antioxidant capacities. Ginger may exert in vivo anti-inflammatory effects in certain populations, but it is unclear whether these effects are due to alkaloids or other biochemicals. Evidence for an immunomodulatory role of alkaloids in energy drinks, cocoa, or ephedra products in vivo is weak to nonexistent. For alkaloid sources derived from plants, variability in the reviewed studies may be due to the presence of unrecognized alkaloids or non-alkaloid compounds (which may themselves be immunomodulatory), and pre-experimental factors such as agricultural or manufacturing differences. Athletes should not look to alkaloids or alkaloid-rich sources as a means of improving immune function given their inconsistent activities, safety concerns, and lack of commercial regulation.

  16. Alkaloids and athlete immune function: caffeine, theophylline, gingerol, ephedrine, and their congeners.

    PubMed

    Senchina, David S; Hallam, Justus E; Kohut, Marian L; Nguyen, Norah A; Perera, M Ann d N

    2014-01-01

    Plant alkaloids are found in foods, beverages, and supplements consumed by athletes for daily nutrition, performance enhancement, and immune function improvement. This paper examined possible immunomodulatory roles of alkaloids in exercise contexts, with a focus on human studies. Four representative groups were scrutinized: (a) caffeine (guaranine, mateine); (b) theophylline and its isomers, theobromine and paraxanthine; (c) ginger alkaloids including gingerols and shogaol; and (d) ephedra alkaloids such as ephedrine and pseudoephedrine. Emerging or prospective alkaloid sources (Goji berry, Noni berry, and bloodroot) were also considered. Human in vitro and in vivo studies on alkaloids and immune function were often conflicting. Caffeine may be immunomodulatory in vivo depending on subject characteristics, exercise characteristics, and immune parameters measured. Caffeine may exhibit antioxidant capacities. Ginger may exert in vivo anti-inflammatory effects in certain populations, but it is unclear whether these effects are due to alkaloids or other biochemicals. Evidence for an immunomodulatory role of alkaloids in energy drinks, cocoa, or ephedra products in vivo is weak to nonexistent. For alkaloid sources derived from plants, variability in the reviewed studies may be due to the presence of unrecognized alkaloids or non-alkaloid compounds (which may themselves be immunomodulatory), and pre-experimental factors such as agricultural or manufacturing differences. Athletes should not look to alkaloids or alkaloid-rich sources as a means of improving immune function given their inconsistent activities, safety concerns, and lack of commercial regulation. PMID:24974722

  17. Flavonoid Values for USDA Survey Foods and Beverages 2007-2008: Provisional Flavonoid Addendum, FNDDS 4.1 and Flavonoid Intake Data, WWEIA, NHANES 2007-2008

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This release of the Flavonoid Values for Survey Foods and Beverages 2007-2008 makes possible, for the first time, calculation of flavonoid intakes based on all foods and beverages reported in national surveys. This release has two components. The first component is an addendum to USDA’s Food and N...

  18. Transgenic rice seed expressing flavonoid biosynthetic genes accumulate glycosylated and/or acylated flavonoids in protein bodies

    PubMed Central

    Ogo, Yuko; Mori, Tetsuya; Nakabayashi, Ryo; Saito, Kazuki; Takaiwa, Fumio

    2016-01-01

    Plant-specialized (or secondary) metabolites represent an important source of high-value chemicals. In order to generate a new production platform for these metabolites, an attempt was made to produce flavonoids in rice seeds. Metabolome analysis of these transgenic rice seeds using liquid chromatography-photodiode array-quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry was performed. A total of 4392 peaks were detected in both transgenic and non-transgenic rice, 20–40% of which were only detected in transgenic rice. Among these, 82 flavonoids, including 37 flavonols, 11 isoflavones, and 34 flavones, were chemically assigned. Most of the flavonols and isoflavones were O-glycosylated, while many flavones were O-glycosylated and/or C-glycosylated. Several flavonoids were acylated with malonyl, feruloyl, acetyl, and coumaroyl groups. These glycosylated/acylated flavonoids are thought to have been biosynthesized by endogenous rice enzymes using newly synthesized flavonoids whose biosynthesis was catalysed by exogenous enzymes. The subcellular localization of the flavonoids differed depending on the class of aglycone and the glycosylation/acylation pattern. Therefore, flavonoids with the intended aglycones were efficiently produced in rice seeds via the exogenous enzymes introduced, while the flavonoids were variously glycosylated/acylated by endogenous enzymes. The results suggest that rice seeds are useful not only as a production platform for plant-specialized metabolites such as flavonoids but also as a tool for expanding the diversity of flavonoid structures, providing novel, physiologically active substances. PMID:26438413

  19. Onions: a source of unique dietary flavonoids.

    PubMed

    Slimestad, Rune; Fossen, Torgils; Vågen, Ingunn Molund

    2007-12-12

    Onion bulbs (Allium cepa L.) are among the richest sources of dietary flavonoids and contribute to a large extent to the overall intake of flavonoids. This review includes a compilation of the existing qualitative and quantitative information about flavonoids reported to occur in onion bulbs, including NMR spectroscopic evidence used for structural characterization. In addition, a summary is given to index onion cultivars according to their content of flavonoids measured as quercetin. Only compounds belonging to the flavonols, the anthocyanins, and the dihydroflavonols have been reported to occur in onion bulbs. Yellow onions contain 270-1187 mg of flavonols per kilogram of fresh weight (FW), whereas red onions contain 415-1917 mg of flavonols per kilogram of FW. Flavonols are the predominant pigments of onions. At least 25 different flavonols have been characterized, and quercetin derivatives are the most important ones in all onion cultivars. Their glycosyl moieties are almost exclusively glucose, which is mainly attached to the 4', 3, and/or 7-positions of the aglycones. Quercetin 4'-glucoside and quercetin 3,4'-diglucoside are in most cases reported as the main flavonols in recent literature. Analogous derivatives of kaempferol and isorhamnetin have been identified as minor pigments. Recent reports indicate that the outer dry layers of onion bulbs contain oligomeric structures of quercetin in addition to condensation products of quercetin and protocatechuic acid. The anthocyanins of red onions are mainly cyanidin glucosides acylated with malonic acid or nonacylated. Some of these pigments facilitate unique structural features like 4'-glycosylation and unusual substitution patterns of sugar moieties. Altogether at least 25 different anthocyanins have been reported from red onions, including two novel 5-carboxypyranocyanidin-derivatives. The quantitative content of anthocyanins in some red onion cultivars has been reported to be approximately 10% of the total

  20. Different Flavonoids Can Shape Unique Gut Microbiota Profile In Vitro.

    PubMed

    Huang, Jiacheng; Chen, Long; Xue, Bin; Liu, Qianyue; Ou, Shiyi; Wang, Yong; Peng, Xichun

    2016-09-01

    The impact of flavonoids has been discussed on the relative viability of bacterial groups in human microbiota. This study was aimed to compare the modulation of various flavonoids, including quercetin, catechin and puerarin, on gut microbiota culture in vitro, and analyze the interactions between bacterial species using fructo-oligosaccharide (FOS) as carbon source under the stress of flavonoids. Three plant flavonoids, quercetin, catechin, and puerarin, were added into multispecies culture to ferment for 24 h, respectively. The bacterial 16S rDNA amplicons were sequenced, and the composition of microbiota community was analyzed. The results revealed that the tested flavonoids, quercetin, catechin, and puerarin, presented different activities of regulating gut microbiota; flavonoid aglycones, but not glycosides, may inhibit growth of certain species. Quercetin and catechin shaped unique biological webs. Bifidobacterium spp. was the center of the biological web constructed in this study.

  1. Different Flavonoids Can Shape Unique Gut Microbiota Profile In Vitro.

    PubMed

    Huang, Jiacheng; Chen, Long; Xue, Bin; Liu, Qianyue; Ou, Shiyi; Wang, Yong; Peng, Xichun

    2016-09-01

    The impact of flavonoids has been discussed on the relative viability of bacterial groups in human microbiota. This study was aimed to compare the modulation of various flavonoids, including quercetin, catechin and puerarin, on gut microbiota culture in vitro, and analyze the interactions between bacterial species using fructo-oligosaccharide (FOS) as carbon source under the stress of flavonoids. Three plant flavonoids, quercetin, catechin, and puerarin, were added into multispecies culture to ferment for 24 h, respectively. The bacterial 16S rDNA amplicons were sequenced, and the composition of microbiota community was analyzed. The results revealed that the tested flavonoids, quercetin, catechin, and puerarin, presented different activities of regulating gut microbiota; flavonoid aglycones, but not glycosides, may inhibit growth of certain species. Quercetin and catechin shaped unique biological webs. Bifidobacterium spp. was the center of the biological web constructed in this study. PMID:27472307

  2. How relevant are flavonoids as antioxidants in plants?

    PubMed

    Hernández, Iker; Alegre, Leonor; Van Breusegem, Frank; Munné-Bosch, Sergi

    2009-03-01

    Flavonoids are a large family of plant secondary metabolites, principally recognized for their health-promoting properties in human diets. Most flavonoids outperform well-known antioxidants, such as ascorbate (vitamin C) and alpha-tocopherol (vitamin E), in in vitro antioxidant assays because of their strong capacity to donate electrons or hydrogen atoms. However, experimental evidence for an antioxidant function in plants is limited to a few individual flavonoids under very specific experimental and developmental conditions. As we discuss here, although flavonoids have been demonstrated to accumulate with oxidative stress during abiotic and biotic environmental assaults, a convincing spatio-temporal correlation with the flavonoid oxidation products is not yet available. Thereby, the widely accepted antioxidant function of flavonoids in plants is still a matter of debate.

  3. Content and distribution of flavonoids among 91 edible plant species.

    PubMed

    Yang, Ray-Yu; Lin, Shou; Kuo, George

    2008-01-01

    Flavonoid contents as aglycones (for quercetin, kaempherol, isorhamnetin, luteolin and apigenin) were reported for 115 edible plants (91 species). Plant materials mostly originated in tropical zones were grown and harvested from AVRDC, Taiwan. Acid extraction and HPLC were used as analytical methods. Total flavonoid contents ranged from 0 to 254 mg/100g fresh weight. About 75% of samples were found to contain flavonoids > 0.5 mg/100g with the group mean 33 +/- 48 mg/100g. Data for only 30 samples (20 species) in this study are also available (measured as raw vegetables) in the USDA flavonoid database. This study can expand the flavonoid database and contribute to measurement of flavonoid intake, especially for populations consuming tropical and underutilized vegetables. PMID:18296355

  4. Micelle assisted structural conversion with fluorescence modulation of benzophenanthridine alkaloids.

    PubMed

    Pradhan, Ankur Bikash; Bhuiya, Sutanwi; Haque, Lucy; Tiwari, Richa; Das, Suman

    2017-01-01

    In this study we have reported the anionic surfactant (Sodium dodecyl sulfate, SDS) driven structural conversion of two benzophenanthridine plant alkaloids namely Chelerythrine (herein after CHL) and Sanguinarine (herein after SANG). Both the alkaloids exist in two forms: the charged iminium and the neutral alkanolamine form. The iminium form is stable at low pH (<6.5) and the alkanolamine form exists at higher pH (>10.1). The fluorescence intensity of the alkanolamine form is much stronger than the iminium form. The iminium form of both the alkaloids remains stable whereas the alkanolamine form gets converted to the iminium form in the SDS micelle environment. The iminium form possesses positive charge and it seems that electrostatic interaction between the positively charged iminium and negatively charged surfactant leads to the stabilization of the iminium form in the Stern layer of the anionic micelle. Whereas the conversion of the alkanolamine form into the iminium form takes place and that can be monitored in naked eye since the iminium form is orange in colour and the alkanolamine form has blue violet emission. Such a detail insight about the photophysical properties of the benzophenanthridine alkaloids would be a valuable addition in the field of alkaloid-surfactant interaction. PMID:27419642

  5. Post-genome research on the biosynthesis of ergot alkaloids.

    PubMed

    Li, Shu-Ming; Unsöld, Inge A

    2006-10-01

    Genome sequencing provides new opportunities and challenges for identifying genes for the biosynthesis of secondary metabolites. A putative biosynthetic gene cluster of fumigaclavine C, an ergot alkaloid of the clavine type, was identified in the genome sequence of ASPERGILLUS FUMIGATUS by a bioinformatic approach. This cluster spans 22 kb of genomic DNA and comprises at least 11 open reading frames (ORFs). Seven of them are orthologous to genes from the biosynthetic gene cluster of ergot alkaloids in CLAVICEPS PURPUREA. Experimental evidence of the identified cluster was provided by heterologous expression and biochemical characterization of two ORFs, FgaPT1 and FgaPT2, in the cluster of A. FUMIGATUS, which show remarkable similarities to dimethylallyltryptophan synthase from C. PURPUREA and function as prenyltransferases. FgaPT2 converts L-tryptophan to dimethylallyltryptophan and thereby catalyzes the first step of ergot alkaloid biosynthesis, whilst FgaPT1 catalyzes the last step of the fumigaclavine C biosynthesis, i. e., the prenylation of fumigaclavine A at C-2 position of the indole nucleus. In addition to information obtained from the gene cluster of ergot alkaloids from C. PURPUREA, the identification of the biosynthetic gene cluster of fumigaclavine C in A. FUMIGATUS opens an alternative way to study the biosynthesis of ergot alkaloids in fungi. PMID:16902860

  6. Ornithine Decarboxylase, Polyamines, and Pyrrolizidine Alkaloids in Senecio and Crotalaria

    PubMed Central

    Birecka, Helena; Birecki, Mieczyslaw; Cohen, Eric J.; Bitonti, Alan J.; McCann, Peter P.

    1988-01-01

    When tested for ornithine and arginine decarboxylases, pyrrolizidine alkaloid-bearing Senecio riddellii, S. longilobus (Compositae), and Crotalaria retusa (Leguminosae) plants exhibited only ornithine decarboxylase activity. This contrasts with previous studies of four species of pyrrolizidine alkaloid-bearing Heliotropium (Boraginaceae) in which arginine decarboxylase activity was very high relative to that of ornithine decarboxylase. Unlike Heliotropium angiospermum and Heliotropium indicum, in which endogenous arginine was the only detectable precursor of putrescine channeled into pyrrolizidines, in the species studied here—using difluoromethylornithine and difluoromethylarginine as the enzyme inhibitors—endogenous ornithine was the main if not the only precursor of putrescine converted into the alkaloid aminoalcohol moiety. In S. riddellii and C. retusa at flowering, ornithine decarboxylase activity was present mainly in leaves, especially the young ones. However, other very young organs such as inflorescence and growing roots exhibited much lower or very low activities; the enzyme activity in stems was negligible. There was no correlation between the enzyme activity and polyamine or alkaloid content in either species. In both species only free polyamines were detected except for C. retusa roots and inflorescence—with relatively very high levels of these compounds—in which conjugated putrescine, spermidine, and spermine were also found; agmatine was not identified by HPLC in any plant organ except for C. retusa roots with rhizobial nodules. Organ- or age-dependent differences in the polyamine levels were small or insignificant. The highest alkaloid contents were found in young leaves and inflorescence. PMID:16665870

  7. Geographic distribution of three alkaloid chemotypes of Croton lechleri.

    PubMed

    Milanowski, Dennis J; Winter, Rudolph E K; Elvin-Lewis, Memory P F; Lewis, Walter H

    2002-06-01

    Three known alkaloids, isoboldine (2), norisoboldine (1), and magnoflorine (8), have been isolated for the first time from Croton lechleri, a source of the wound healing latex "sangre de grado". An HPLC system was developed, and a large number of latex and leaf samples of C. lechleri from 22 sites in northern Peru and Ecuador were analyzed to gain an understanding of the natural variation in alkaloid content for the species. Up to six alkaloids were found to occur in the leaves including, in addition to those listed above, thaliporphine (3), glaucine (4), and taspine (9), whereas the latex contained only 9. Taspine (9) is the component that has been previously found to be responsible for the wound healing activity of C. lechleri latex, and its mean concentration throughout the range examined was found to be 9% of the latex by dry weight. In addition, three chemotypes are defined based on the alkaloid content of the leaves, and the geographic distribution of these chemotypes is discussed along with a quantitative analysis of the alkaloid content as a function of chemotype.

  8. Bovine lateral saphenous veins exposed to ergopeptine alkaloids do not relax

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The ergot alkaloid, ergovaline has demonstrated a persistent binding and sustained contractile response in several vascular models. It was hypothesized that different alkaloids isolated from tall fescue (Lolium arundinaceum) will contribute to this response differently. The objective was to compare ...

  9. Bovine lateral saphenous veins exposed to ergopeptine alkaloids do not relax

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The ergot alkaloid ergovaline has demonstrated a persistent and sustained contractile response in several different vascular models. It was hypothesized that different alkaloids isolated from tall fescue (Lolium arundinaceum) will contribute to this contractile response differently. The objective wa...

  10. Alkaloids of the Annonaceae: occurrence and a compilation of their biological activities.

    PubMed

    Lúcio, Ana Silvia Suassuna Carneiro; Almeida, Jackson Roberto Guedes da Silva; Da-Cunha, Emídio Vasconcelos Leitão; Tavares, Josean Fechine; Barbosa Filho, Jos Maria

    2015-01-01

    This chapter presents an overview of the chemistry and pharmacology of the alkaloids found in species of the Annonaceae family. The occurrence of alkaloids from Annonaceae species, as well as their chemical structures and pharmacological activities are summarized in informative and easy-to-understand tables. Within the Annonaceae family, the genera Annona, Duguetia, and Guatteria have led to many important publications. Valuable and comprehensive information about the structure of these alkaloids is provided. The alkaloids of the aporphine type represent the predominant group in this family. Many of the isolated alkaloids exhibit unique structures. In addition to the chemical structures, the pharmacological activities of some alkaloids are also presented in this chapter. Thus, the leishmanicidal, antimicrobial, antitumor, cytotoxic, and antimalarial activities observed for these alkaloids are highlighted. The chapter is presented as a contribution for the scientific community, mainly to enable the search for alkaloids in species belonging to the Annonaceae family.

  11. Mechanism of angiogenic effects of saponin from ginseng Radix rubra in human umbilical vein endothelial cells.

    PubMed Central

    Morisaki, N.; Watanabe, S.; Tezuka, M.; Zenibayashi, M.; Shiina, R.; Koyama, N.; Kanzaki, T.; Saito, Y.

    1995-01-01

    1. The effects of saponin from Ginseng Radix rubra on angiogenesis (tube formation) and its key steps (protease secretion, proliferation and migration) in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) were examined to elucidate the mechanism of the tissue repairing effects of Ginseng Radix rubra. The effect on a wound healing model was also studied. 2. Tube formation was measured by an in vitro system. The activity and immunoreactivity of tissue-type plasminogen activator (tPA) as a protease for angiogenesis and the immunoreactivity of its inhibitor, plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1), were measured in conditioned medium of HUVEC stimulated for 24 h with saponin. Cell proliferation was measured by counting the cell numbers at 2-7 days after seeding. Migration was measured by Boyden's chamber method. The effect on wound healing was studied in the skin of diabetic rats. 3. Saponin at 10-100 micrograms ml-1 significantly stimulated tube formation by HUVEC in a dose-dependent manner. Saponin in a similar concentration-range increased the secretion of tPA from HUVEC as estimated by immunoreactivity and enzyme activity. On the other hand, PAI-1 immunoreactivity was slightly increased at 10 micrograms ml-1 of saponin, but then was significantly decreased at 50 and 100 micrograms ml-1. Cell proliferation was only slightly enhanced by 1-100 micrograms ml-1 of saponin, but migration was significantly enhanced by 10-100 micrograms ml-1 in a dose-dependent manner. Moreover, saponin stimulated wound healing with enhanced angiogenesis in vivo.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) Images Figure 1 Figure 8 PMID:7582543

  12. [Leaching Remediation of Copper and Lead Contaminated Lou Soil by Saponin Under Different Conditions].

    PubMed

    Deng, Hong-xia; Yang, Ya-li; Li, Zhen; Xu, Yan; Li, Rong-hua; Meng, Zhao-fu; Yang, Ya-ti

    2015-04-01

    In order to investigate the leaching remediation effect of the eco-friendly biosurfactant saponin for Cu and Pb in contaminated Lou soil, batch tests method was used to study the leaching effect of saponin solution on single Cu, Pb contaminated Lou soil and mixed Cu and Pb contaminated Lou soil under different conditions such as reaction time, mass concentration of saponin, pH, concentration of background electrolyte and leaching times. The results showed that the maximum leaching removal effect of Cu and Pb in contaminated Lou soil was achieved by complexation of the heavy metals with saponin micelle, when the mass concentration of saponin solution was 50 g x L(-1), pH was 5.0, the reaction time was 240 min, and there was no background electrolyte. In single and mixed contaminated Lou soil, the leaching percentages of Cu were 29.02% and 25.09% after a single leaching with 50 g x L(-1) saponin under optimal condition, while the single leaching percentages of Pb were 31.56% and 28.03%, respectively. The result indicated the removal efficiency of Pb was more significant than that of Cu. After 4 times of leaching, the cumulative leaching percentages of Cu reached 58.92% and 53.11%, while the cumulative leaching percentages of Pb reached 77.69% and 65.32% for single and mixed contaminated Lou soil, respectively. The fractionation results of heavy metals in soil before and after a single leaching showed that the contents of adsorbed and exchangeable Cu and Pb increased in the contaminated soil, while the carbonate-bound, organic bound and sulfide residual Cu and Pb in the contaminated Lou soil could be effectively removed by saponin.

  13. Identification of flavonoids and expression of flavonoid biosynthetic genes in two coloured tree peony flowers.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Daqiu; Tang, Wenhui; Hao, Zhaojun; Tao, Jun

    2015-04-10

    Tree peony (Paeonia suffruticosa Andr.) has been named the "king of flowers" because of its elegant and gorgeous flower colour. Among these colours, the molecular mechanisms of white formation and how white turned to red in P. suffruticosa is little known. In this study, flower colour variables, flavonoid accumulation and expression of flavonoid biosynthetic genes of white ('Xueta') and red ('Caihui') P. suffruticosa were investigated. The results showed that the flower colours of both cultivars were gradually deepened with the development of flowers. Moreover, two anthoxanthin compositions apigenin 7-O-glucoside together with apigenin deoxyheso-hexoside were identified in 'Xueta' and 'Caihui', but one main anthocyanin composition peonidin 3,5-di-O-glucoside (Pn3G5G) was only found in 'Caihui'. Total contents of anthocyanins in 'Caihui' was increased during flower development, and the same trend was presented in anthoxanthins and flavonoids of these two cultivars, but the contents of these two category flavonoid in 'Caihui' were always higher than those in 'Xueta'. Furthermore, nine structural genes in flavonoid biosynthetic pathway were isolated including the full-length cDNAs of phenylalanine ammonialyase gene (PAL), chalcone synthase gene (CHS) and chalcone isomerase gene (CHI), together with the partial-length cDNAs of flavanone 3-hydroxylase gene (F3H), flavonoid 3'-hydroxylase gene (F3'H), dihydroflavonol 4-reductase gene (DFR), anthocyanidin synthase gene (ANS), UDP-glucose: flavonoid 3-O-glucosyltransferase gene (UF3GT) and UDP-glucose: flavonoid 5-O-glucosyltransferase gene (UF5GT), and PAL, UF3GT and UF5GT were reported in P. suffruticosa for the first time. Their expression patterns showed that transcription levels of downstream genes in 'Caihui' were basically higher than those in 'Xueta', especially PsDFR and PsANS, suggesting that these two genes may play a key role in the anthocyanin biosynthesis which resulted in the shift from white to red in

  14. Identification of flavonoids and expression of flavonoid biosynthetic genes in two coloured tree peony flowers.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Daqiu; Tang, Wenhui; Hao, Zhaojun; Tao, Jun

    2015-04-10

    Tree peony (Paeonia suffruticosa Andr.) has been named the "king of flowers" because of its elegant and gorgeous flower colour. Among these colours, the molecular mechanisms of white formation and how white turned to red in P. suffruticosa is little known. In this study, flower colour variables, flavonoid accumulation and expression of flavonoid biosynthetic genes of white ('Xueta') and red ('Caihui') P. suffruticosa were investigated. The results showed that the flower colours of both cultivars were gradually deepened with the development of flowers. Moreover, two anthoxanthin compositions apigenin 7-O-glucoside together with apigenin deoxyheso-hexoside were identified in 'Xueta' and 'Caihui', but one main anthocyanin composition peonidin 3,5-di-O-glucoside (Pn3G5G) was only found in 'Caihui'. Total contents of anthocyanins in 'Caihui' was increased during flower development, and the same trend was presented in anthoxanthins and flavonoids of these two cultivars, but the contents of these two category flavonoid in 'Caihui' were always higher than those in 'Xueta'. Furthermore, nine structural genes in flavonoid biosynthetic pathway were isolated including the full-length cDNAs of phenylalanine ammonialyase gene (PAL), chalcone synthase gene (CHS) and chalcone isomerase gene (CHI), together with the partial-length cDNAs of flavanone 3-hydroxylase gene (F3H), flavonoid 3'-hydroxylase gene (F3'H), dihydroflavonol 4-reductase gene (DFR), anthocyanidin synthase gene (ANS), UDP-glucose: flavonoid 3-O-glucosyltransferase gene (UF3GT) and UDP-glucose: flavonoid 5-O-glucosyltransferase gene (UF5GT), and PAL, UF3GT and UF5GT were reported in P. suffruticosa for the first time. Their expression patterns showed that transcription levels of downstream genes in 'Caihui' were basically higher than those in 'Xueta', especially PsDFR and PsANS, suggesting that these two genes may play a key role in the anthocyanin biosynthesis which resulted in the shift from white to red in

  15. Flavonoids – Clinical effects and applications in dentistry: A review

    PubMed Central

    Sankari, S. Leena; Babu, N. Aravindha; Rani, Vidya; Priyadharsini, C.; Masthan, K. M. K.

    2014-01-01

    Flavonoids include a huge group of naturally occurring organic compounds. It is found in a large variety of plants including fruits, seeds, grains, tea vegetables, nuts, and wine. Many studies have shown that there is a strong association between flavonoid intake and the long-term effects on mortality. It is widely used in dentistry and it has many clinical effects. This article summarizes the effects of flavonoids to humankind and its clinical applications in dentistry. PMID:25210379

  16. Tricyclic flavonoids with 1,3-dithiolium substructure.

    PubMed

    Bahrin, Lucian G; Jones, Peter G; Hopf, Henning

    2012-01-01

    The synthesis of new 3-dithiocarbamic flavonoids has been accomplished by the reaction of the corresponding 2-hydroxyaryl dithiocarbamates with aminals. These flavonoids were obtained as a mixture of diastereoisomers, the anti isomer being the major one. The heterocyclization of these compounds provided novel tricyclic flavonoids bearing a 1,3-dithiolium-2-yl ring fused at the 3,4-carbon positions of the benzopyran moiety. PMID:23209535

  17. Diterpene alkaloids with an aza-ent-kaurane skeleton from Isodon rubescens.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xu; Yang, Jing; Wang, Wei-Guang; Li, Yan; Wu, Ji-Zhou; Pu, Jian-Xin; Sun, Han-Dong

    2015-02-27

    Two compounds belonging to a new group of diterpene alkaloids, kaurines A and B (1 and 2), and an alkaloid bearing a succinimide moiety (3) were obtained from Isodon rubescens. Their structures and absolute configurations were determined by spectroscopy and quantum-chemical computational (13)C NMR and ECD data analysis. These alkaloids differ from known diterpene alkaloids and diterpenoids and are presumably biosynthesized from ent-kaurane diterpenoids. PMID:25590529

  18. Comparative qualitative and quantitative determination of alkaloids in narcotic and condiment Papaver somniferum cultivars.

    PubMed

    Frick, Susanne; Kramell, Robert; Schmidt, Jürgen; Fist, Anthony J; Kutchan, Toni M

    2005-05-01

    In the present study morphinan, tetrahydrobenzylisoquinoline, benzo[c]phenanthridine, and phthalideisoquinoline alkaloids were determined qualitatively and quantitatively by HPLC and LC-MS analysis in tissues of the Tasmanian Papaver somniferum L. elite cultivar C048-6-14-64. The data were compared with the results from the low-morphine cultivar "Marianne". In the elite cultivar, 91.2% of the latex alkaloids consist of the three pharmaceutically most valuable alkaloids: morphine, codeine, and thebaine. In the root system, the major alkaloids are sanguinarine/10-hydroxysanguinarine and dihydrosanguinarine/10-hydroxydihydrosanguinarine. In the stems and leaves of C048-6-14-64, the same alkaloids were measured as in the latex. In the stems, a gradient in relative total alkaloid content from the top downward toward the roots was observed. The concentration of morphine was decreasing toward the roots, whereas an increasing gradient from the upper to the lower stem parts was detected for codeine. The relative total alkaloid concentration in leaves remained constant; no gradient was observed. The cultivar "Marianne" displayed a shifted pattern of alkaloid accumulation and reduced levels of total alkaloid. In the condiment cultivar, 80.5% of the alkaloids of the latex consisted of the two phthalideisoquinoline alkaloids narcotoline and noscapine. Only 18.8% of the relative total alkaloid content were morphinan alkaloids. In contrast to the narcotic cultivar, in which the benzo[c]phenanthridines in roots dominated over the morphinan and tetrahydrobenzylisoquinoline alkaloids, the concentration of benzo[c]phenanthridines in "Marianne" was similar to that of morphinan and tetrahydrobenzylisoquinoline alkaloids. These data suggest a differential alkaloid regulation in each cultivar of P. somniferum.

  19. (+)-Chenabinol (Revised NMR Data) and Two New Alkaloids from Berberis vulgaris and their Biological Activity.

    PubMed

    Novák, Zdenĕk; Hošt'álková, Anna; Opletal, Lubomír; Nováková, Lucie; Hrabinová, Martina; Kuneš, Jiří; Cahlíková, Lucie

    2015-10-01

    A known alkaloid (+)-chenabinol (1) and two new secobisbenzylisoquinoline alkaloids were isolated by standard chromatographic methods from the root bark of Berberis vulgaris L. The structures of the new alkaloids, named berkristine (2) and verfilline (3), were established by spectroscopic (including 2D NMR), and HRMS (ESI) methods. The alkaloids were tested for their inhibition activity of human cholinesterases and prolyl oligopeptidase. Compound 1 inhibited human butyrylcholinesterase with an IC50 value of 44.8 ± 5.4 μM.

  20. Hydrofocusing Bioreactor Produces Anti-Cancer Alkaloids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gonda, Steve R.; Valluri, Jagan V.

    2011-01-01

    microgravitation of an HFB do not need to maintain the same surface forces as in normal Earth gravitation, they can divert more energy sources to growth and differentiation and, perhaps, to biosynthesis of greater quantities of desired medicinal compounds. Because one can adjust the HFB to vary effective gravitation, one can also test the effects of intermediate levels of gravitation on biosynthesis of various products. The potential utility of this methodology for producing drugs was demonstrated in experiments in which sandalwood and Madagascar periwinkle cells were grown in an HFB. The conditions in the HFB were chosen to induce the cells to form into aggregate cultures that produced anti-cancer indole alkaloids in amounts greater than do comparable numbers of cells of the same species cultured according to previously known methodologies. The observations made in these experiments were interpreted as suggesting that the aggregation of the cells might be responsible for the enhancement of production of alkaloids.

  1. Characterisation and identification of triterpene saponins in the roots of red beets (Beta vulgaris L.) using two HPLC-MS systems.

    PubMed

    Mikołajczyk-Bator, Katarzyna; Błaszczyk, Alfred; Czyżniejewski, Mariusz; Kachlicki, Piotr

    2016-02-01

    Triterpene saponins are important bioactive constituents with an enormous variety in structure widely distributed in many plants. Here, we profiled triterpene saponins from the skin and flesh of red beetroot Beta vulgaris L. cultivars Nochowski from 2012 and 2013 season using reversed-phase liquid chromatography combined with negative-ion electrospray ionisation quadrupole mass spectrometry. We tentatively identified 44 triterpene saponins, of which 37 had not been detected previously in the root of red beets and 27 saponins were tentatively identified as potentially new compounds. All observed compounds were glycosides of four different aglycone structures, of which akebonoic acid and gypsogenin were not detected previous in red beetroot. Based on the high-resolution mass measurements among these 44 detected saponins 10 groups of isomers were identified. We report for the first time that 18 saponins with dioxolane-type (2 saponins) and acetal-type (16 saponins) substituents were detected in the roots of red beet.

  2. Characterisation and identification of triterpene saponins in the roots of red beets (Beta vulgaris L.) using two HPLC-MS systems.

    PubMed

    Mikołajczyk-Bator, Katarzyna; Błaszczyk, Alfred; Czyżniejewski, Mariusz; Kachlicki, Piotr

    2016-02-01

    Triterpene saponins are important bioactive constituents with an enormous variety in structure widely distributed in many plants. Here, we profiled triterpene saponins from the skin and flesh of red beetroot Beta vulgaris L. cultivars Nochowski from 2012 and 2013 season using reversed-phase liquid chromatography combined with negative-ion electrospray ionisation quadrupole mass spectrometry. We tentatively identified 44 triterpene saponins, of which 37 had not been detected previously in the root of red beets and 27 saponins were tentatively identified as potentially new compounds. All observed compounds were glycosides of four different aglycone structures, of which akebonoic acid and gypsogenin were not detected previous in red beetroot. Based on the high-resolution mass measurements among these 44 detected saponins 10 groups of isomers were identified. We report for the first time that 18 saponins with dioxolane-type (2 saponins) and acetal-type (16 saponins) substituents were detected in the roots of red beet. PMID:26304438

  3. Characterization and Quantitation of Triterpenoid Saponins in Raw and Sprouted Chenopodium berlandieri spp. (Huauzontle) Grains Subjected to Germination with or without Selenium Stress Conditions.

    PubMed

    Lazo-Vélez, Marco A; Guajardo-Flores, Daniel; Mata-Ramírez, Daniel; Gutiérrez-Uribe, Janet A; Serna-Saldivar, Sergio O

    2016-01-01

    Pseudocereal Chenopodium berlandieri spp. (huauzontle) was evaluated to determine saponin composition. Saponins were evaluated in raw and germinated grains subjected to chemical stress induced by sodium selenite. Analysis by liquid chromatography coupled with ELSD detector revealed the presence of 12 saponins, identified according to compounds previously assayed in Chenopodium quinoa. Saponins found at the highest concentrations in raw grains were derived from oleanolic and phytolaccagenic acids. Total saponin concentration significantly decreased in germinated compared to raw grains due to the significant loss of 90.1% and 95.7% of the phytolaccagenic acid without and with chemical selenium stress, respectively. The most abundant saponin in germinated sprouts decreased during normal germination. Interestingly, the concentration of this particular saponin significantly increased during the Se-induced stress germination. Chemical stress with selenium salts proved to change the saponin composition in geminated Chenopodium berlandieri spp. grains, therefore affecting their potential use as ingredient in the food industry. PMID:26646715

  4. Characterization and Quantitation of Triterpenoid Saponins in Raw and Sprouted Chenopodium berlandieri spp. (Huauzontle) Grains Subjected to Germination with or without Selenium Stress Conditions.

    PubMed

    Lazo-Vélez, Marco A; Guajardo-Flores, Daniel; Mata-Ramírez, Daniel; Gutiérrez-Uribe, Janet A; Serna-Saldivar, Sergio O

    2016-01-01

    Pseudocereal Chenopodium berlandieri spp. (huauzontle) was evaluated to determine saponin composition. Saponins were evaluated in raw and germinated grains subjected to chemical stress induced by sodium selenite. Analysis by liquid chromatography coupled with ELSD detector revealed the presence of 12 saponins, identified according to compounds previously assayed in Chenopodium quinoa. Saponins found at the highest concentrations in raw grains were derived from oleanolic and phytolaccagenic acids. Total saponin concentration significantly decreased in germinated compared to raw grains due to the significant loss of 90.1% and 95.7% of the phytolaccagenic acid without and with chemical selenium stress, respectively. The most abundant saponin in germinated sprouts decreased during normal germination. Interestingly, the concentration of this particular saponin significantly increased during the Se-induced stress germination. Chemical stress with selenium salts proved to change the saponin composition in geminated Chenopodium berlandieri spp. grains, therefore affecting their potential use as ingredient in the food industry.

  5. Phenylethanoids, iridoids and a spirostanol saponin from Veronica turrilliana.

    PubMed

    Kostadinova, Emanuela P; Alipieva, Kalina I; Kokubun, Tetsuo; Taskova, Rilka M; Handjieva, Nedjalka V

    2007-05-01

    From the aerial parts of Veronica turrilliana two phenylethanoid glycosides, turrilliosides A and B and a steroidal saponin, turrillianoside were isolated and their structures elucidated as beta-(3,4-dihydroxyphenyl)ethyl-4-O-E-caffeoyl-O-[beta-glucopyranosyl-(1-->4)-alpha-rhamnopyranosyl-(1-->6)]-beta-glucopyranoside, beta-(3,4-dihydroxyphenyl)ethyl-4-O-E-caffeoyl-[6-O-E-feruloyl-beta-glucopyranosyl-(1-->4)-alpha-rhamnopyranosyl-(1-->6)]-beta-glucopyranoside and (23S,25S)-12beta,23-dihydroxyspirost-5-en-3beta-yl O-alpha-rhamnopyranosyl-(1-->4)-beta-glucopyranoside, respectively. Furthermore, eight known glucosides are reported namely, catalpol, catalposide, verproside, amphicoside, isovanilloylcatalpol, aucubin, arbutin, and 6-O-E-caffeoylarbutin, the latter two for the first time in the genus Veronica. The two phenylethanoid glycosides were found to be potent DPPH radical scavengers. All of the tested compounds were inactive against the representative species of fungi and bacteria.

  6. Anti-inflammatory tirucallane saponins from Paramignya scandens.

    PubMed

    Phan, Nguyen Huu Toan; Thuan, Nguyen Thi Dieu; Ngoc, Ninh Thi; Thao, Nguyen Phuong; Kim, Sohyun; Koh, Young Sang; Thanh, Nguyen Van; Cuong, Nguyen Xuan; Nam, Nguyen Hoai; Kiem, Phan Van; Kim, Young Ho; Minh, Chau Van

    2015-01-01

    Five new tirucallane saponins, paramignyosides A-E (1-5), were isolated from the water fraction of the Paramignya scandens stem and leaves. Their structures were elucidated on the basis of spectroscopic evidence including high-resolution electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (HR-ESI-MS) and one dimensional (1D)- and 2D-NMR. The effects of isolated compounds on pro-inflammatory cytokines were evaluated by measuring the production of interleukin (IL)-12 p40, IL-6, and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated bone marrow-derived dendritic cells (BMDCs). Paramignyoside C (3) exhibited selective and potent inhibitory effect (IC50=5.03±0.19 µM) on the production of IL-12 p40 comparable to that of the positive control, SB203580 (IC50=5.00±0.16 µM). Further studies are required to confirm efficacy in vivo and the mechanism of anti-inflammatory effects. PMID:26133071

  7. Antioxidative effects of Panax notoginseng saponins in brain cells.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Ningna; Tang, Yang; Keep, Richard F; Ma, Xiaoxia; Xiang, Jianming

    2014-09-15

    Oxidative stress resulting from accumulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) is involved in cell death associated with neurological disorders such as stroke, Alzheimer's disease and traumatic brain injury. Antioxidant compounds that improve endogenous antioxidant defenses have been proposed for neural protection. The purpose of this study was to investigate the potential protective effects of total saponin in leaves of Panax notoginseng (LPNS) on oxidative stress and cell death in brain cells in vitro. Lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) assay indicated that LPNS (5 μg/ml) reduced H2O2-induced cell death in primary rat cortical astrocytes (23±8% reduction in LDH release vs. control). Similar protection was found in oxygen and glucose deprivation/reoxygenation induced SH-SY5Y (a human neuroblastoma cell line) cell damage (78±7% reduction vs. control). The protective effects of LPNS in astrocytes were associated with attenuation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) accumulation. These effects involved activation of Nrf2 (nuclear translocation) and upregulation of downstream antioxidant systems including heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) and glutathione S-transferase pi 1 (GSTP1). These results demonstrate for the first time that LPNS has antioxidative effects which may be neuroprotective in neurological disorders. PMID:24916704

  8. Antitumor effects of dammarane-type saponins from steamed Notoginseng

    PubMed Central

    He, Fan; Ding, Yan; Liang, Chun; Song, Seok Bean; Dou, De-Qiang; Song, Gyu Yong; Kim, Young Ho

    2014-01-01

    Six dammarane-type saponins were extracted from steamed Panax notoginseng. Their chemical structures were identified spectroscopically as ginsenosides Rh1 (1), Rg1 (2), 20 (S)-Rg3 (3), 20 (R)-Rg3 (4), Rb3 (5), and Rb1 (6). Compounds (0.1-10 μM) were tested for inhibition of tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF)-induced nuclear factor kappa-light-chain-enhancer of activated B cells (NF-κB) luciferase reporter activity using a human kidney 293T cell-based assay. Ginsenoside Rb3 (5) showed the most significant activity with an IC50 of 8.2 μM. This compound also inhibited the induction of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) messenger Ribonucleic acid (mRNA) in a dose-dependent manner after HepG2 cells had been treated with TNF-α (10 ng/mL). PMID:25210319

  9. Acylated triterpene saponins from the roots of Securidaca longepedunculata.

    PubMed

    Mitaine-Offer, Anne-Claire; Pénez, Nicolas; Miyamoto, Tomofumi; Delaude, Clément; Mirjolet, Jean-François; Duchamp, Olivier; Lacaille-Dubois, Marie-Aleth

    2010-01-01

    Four triterpene saponins, 3-O-beta-D-glucopyranosylpresenegenin 28-O-beta-D-apiofuranosyl-(1-->3)-beta-d-xylopyranosyl-(1-->4)-[beta-D-apiofuranosyl-(1-->3)]-alpha-L-rhamnopyranosyl-(1-->2)-{4-O-[(E)-3,4,5-trimethoxycinnamoyl]}-beta-D-fucopyranosyl ester, 3-O-beta-D-glucopyranosylpresenegenin 28-O-beta-D-apiofuranosyl-(1-->3)-beta-D-xylopyranosyl-(1-->4)-[beta-D-apiofuranosyl-(1-->3)]-alpha-L-rhamnopyranosyl-(1-->2)-[(6-O-acetyl)-beta-D-glucopyranosyl-(1-->3)]-{4-O-[(E)-3,4,5-trimethoxycinnamoyl]}-beta-D-fucopyranosyl ester, 3-O-beta-D-glucopyranosylpresenegenin 28-O-beta-D-apiofuranosyl-(1-->3)-beta-D-xylopyranosyl-(1-->4)-[beta-D-apiofuranosyl-(1-->3)]-alpha-L-rhamnopyranosyl-(1-->2)-[beta-D-galactopyranosyl-(1-->3)]-{4-O-[(E)-3,4,5-trimethoxycinnamoyl]}-beta-D-fucopyranosyl ester, and 3-O-beta-D-glucopyranosylpresenegenin 28-O-beta-D-apiofuranosyl-(1-->3)-[alpha-L-arabinopyranosyl-(1-->4)]-beta-D-xylopyranosyl-(1-->4)-[beta-D-apiofuranosyl-(1-->3)]-alpha-L-rhamnopyranosyl-(1-->2)-{4-O-[(E)-3,4,5-trimethoxycinnamoyl]}-beta-D-fucopyranosyl ester, were isolated from the roots of Securidaca longepedunculata, together with three known compounds. Their structures were established mainly by 2D NMR techniques and mass spectrometry. PMID:19863977

  10. The role of biocatalysis in the asymmetric synthesis of alkaloids

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Alkaloids are not only one of the most intensively studied classes of natural products, their wide spectrum of pharmacological activities also makes them indispensable drug ingredients in both traditional and modern medicine. Among the methods for their production, biotechnological approaches are gaining importance, and biocatalysis has emerged as an essential tool in this context. A number of chemo-enzymatic strategies for alkaloid synthesis have been developed over the years, in which the biotransformations nowadays take an increasingly ‘central’ role. This review summarises different applications of biocatalysis in the asymmetric synthesis of alkaloids and discusses how recent developments and novel enzymes render innovative and efficient chemo-enzymatic production routes possible. PMID:25580241

  11. [Occurrence of indole alkaloids among secondary metabolites of soil Aspergillus].

    PubMed

    Vinokurova, N G; Khmel'nitskaia, I I; Baskunov, B P; Arinbasarov, M U

    2003-01-01

    The occurrence of indole alkaloids among secondary fungal metabolites was studied in species of the genus Aspergillus, isolated from soils that were sampled in various regions of Russia (a total of 102 isolates of the species A. niger, A. phoenicis, A. fumigatus, A. flavus, A. versicolor, A. ustus, A. clavatus, and A. ochraceus). Clavine alkaloids were represented by fumigaclavine, which was formed by A. fumigatus. alpha-Cyclopiazonic acid was formed by isolates of A. fumigatus, A. flavus, A. versicolor, A. phoenicis, and A. clavatus. The occurrence of indole-containing diketopiperazine alkaloids was documented for isolates of A. flavus, A. fumigatus, A. clavatus, and A. ochraceus. No indole-containing metabolites were found among the metabolites of A. ustus or A. niger. PMID:12722658

  12. In vitro production of alkaloids: Factors, approaches, challenges and prospects

    PubMed Central

    Ahmad, Sayeed; Garg, Madhukar; Tamboli, Ennus Tajuddin; Abdin, M. Z.; Ansari, S. H.

    2013-01-01

    The wide diversity of plant secondary metabolites is largely used for the production of various pharmaceutical compounds. In vitro cell tissue or organ culture has been employed as a possible alternative to produce such industrial compounds. Tissue culture techniques provide continuous, reliable, and renewable source of valuable plant pharmaceuticals and might be used for the large-scale culture of the plant cells from which these secondary metabolites can be extracted. Alkaloids are one of the most important secondary metabolites known to play a vital role in various pharmaceutical applications leading to an increased commercial importance in recent years. The tissue culture techniques may be utilized to improve their production of alkaloids via somaclonal variations and genetic transformations. The focus of this review is toward the application of different tissue culture methods/techniques employed for the in vitro production of alkaloids with a systematic approach to improve their production. PMID:23922453

  13. HPTLC and GC/MS Study of Amaryllidaceae Alkaloids of Two Narcissus Species.

    PubMed

    Shawky, Eman; Abou-Donia, Amina H; Darwish, Fikria A; Toaima, Soad M; Takla, Sarah S; Pigni, Natalia B; Bastida, Jaume

    2015-08-01

    In this article, we report on the alkaloid profile and dynamic of alkaloid content and diversity in two Narcissus plants at different stages of development. The alkaloid profile of the two Narcissus species was investigated by GC/MS and HPTLC. Fifty eight Amaryllidaceae alkaloids were detected, and 25 of them were identified in the different organs of N. tazetta and N. papyraceus. The alkaloid 3-O-methyl-9-O-demethylmaritidine is tentatively identified here for the first time from the Amaryllidaceae family, and four alkaloids (tazettamide, sternbergine, 1-O-acetyllycorine, 2,11-didehydro-2-dehydroxylycorine) are tentatively identified for the first time in the genus Narcissus. The different organs of the two species analyzed showed remarkable differences in their alkaloid pattern, type of biosynthesis, main alkaloid and number of alkaloids. Lycorine-type alkaloids dominated the alkaloid, metabolism in N. papyraceus, while alkaloids of narciclasine-, galanthamine- and homolycorine-types were found only in the species N. tazetta L.

  14. [Clavine alkaloid biosynthesis by the fungus Penicillium palitans westling 1911 isolated from ancient permafrost deposits].

    PubMed

    Kozlovskiĭ, A G; Zhelifonova, V P; Antipova, T V

    2009-01-01

    The relic strain of Penicillium palitans isolated from the ancient permafrost deposits produces clavine alkaloids such as festuclavine, fumigaclavine A, and fumigaclavine B. Alkaloid biosynthesis is concurrent with the growth. Tryptophan and zinc ion additives to the culture medium stimulate the synthesis of alkaloids. PMID:19382708

  15. Triterpenoid Saponins Isolated from Platycodon grandiflorum Inhibit Hepatitis C Virus Replication

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jong-Woo; Park, Sang Jin; Lim, Jong Hwan; Yang, Jae Won; Shin, Jung Cheul; Lee, Sang Wook; Suh, Joo Won; Hwang, Soon B.

    2013-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is a major cause of liver disease, including cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma. Due to significant adverse effects and emergence of resistant strains of currently developed anti-HCV agents, plant extracts have been considered to be potential sources of new bioactive compounds against HCV. The aim of this study was to evaluate the functional effects of triterpenoid saponins contained in the root extract of Platycodon grandiflorum (PG) on viral enzyme activities and replication in both HCV replicon cells and cell culture grown HCV- (HCVcc-) infected cells. Inhibitory activities of triterpenoid saponins from PG were verified by NS5B RNA-dependent RNA polymerase assay and were further confirmed in the context of HCV replication. Six triterpenoid saponins (platycodin D, platycodin D2, platycodin D3, deapioplatycodin D, deapioplatycodin D2, and platyconic acid A), PG saponin mixture (PGSM), were identified as active components exerting anti-HCV activity. Importantly, PGSM exerted synergistic anti-HCV activity in combination with either interferon-α or NS5A inhibitors. We demonstrated that combinatorial treatment of PGSM and IFN-α efficiently suppressed colony formation with significant reduction in drug resistant variant of HCV. These data suggest that triterpenoid saponin may represent a novel anti-HCV therapeutic agent. PMID:24489585

  16. Panax notoginseng saponins improve recovery after spinal cord transection by upregulating neurotrophic factors.

    PubMed

    Wang, Bo; Li, Yu; Li, Xuan-Peng; Li, Yang

    2015-08-01

    Saponins extracted from Panax notoginseng are neuroprotective, but the mechanisms underlying this effect remain unclear. In the present study, we established a rat model of thoracic (T10) spinal cord transection, and injected Panax notoginseng saponins (100 mg/kg) or saline 30 minutes after injury. Locomotor functions were assessed using the Basso, Beattie, and Bresnahan (BBB) scale from 1 to 30 days after injury, and immunohistochemistry was carried out in the ventral horn of the spinal cord at 1 and 7 days to determine expression of nerve growth factor (NGF) and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF). Our results show that at 7-30 days post injury, the BBB score was higher in rats treated with Panax notoginseng saponins than in those that received saline. Furthermore, at 7 days, more NGF- and BDNF-immunoreactive neurons were observed in the ventral horn of the spinal cord of rats that had received Panax notoginseng saponins than in those that received saline. These results indicate that Panax notoginseng saponins caused an upregulation of NGF and BDNF in rats with spinal cord transection, and improved hindlimb motor function. PMID:26487862

  17. Saponins from Tribulus terrestris L. protect human keratinocytes from UVB-induced damage.

    PubMed

    Sisto, Margherita; Lisi, Sabrina; D'Amore, Massimo; De Lucro, Raffaella; Carati, Davide; Castellana, Donatello; La Pesa, Velia; Zuccarello, Vincenzo; Lofrumento, Dario D

    2012-12-01

    Chronic exposure to solar UVB radiation damages skin, increasing the risk to develop cancer. Hence the identification of compounds with a photoprotective efficacy is essential. This study examined the role of saponins derived from Tribulus terrestris L. (TT) on the modulation of apoptosis in normal human keratinocytes (NHEK) exposed to physiological doses of UVB and to evaluate their antitumoral properties. In NHEK, TT saponins attenuate UVB-induced programmed cell death through inhibition of intrinsic apoptotic pathway. In squamous cell carcinomas (SCC) TT saponins do not make the malignant keratinocytes more resistant to UVB and determine an enhanced apoptotic response. The photoprotective effect of TT saponins is tightly correlated to the enhancement of NER genes expression and the block of UVB-mediated NF-κB activation. Collectively, our study shows experimental evidence that TT has a preventive efficacy against UVB-induced carcinogenesis and the molecular knowledge on the mechanisms through which TT saponins regulate cell death suggests great potential for TT to be developed into a new medicine for cancer patients.

  18. A triterpene saponin from Tribulus terrestris attenuates apoptosis in cardiocyte via activating PKC signalling transduction pathway.

    PubMed

    Sun, Wei; Li, Hong; Yang, Shi-Jie

    2008-01-01

    The present study was conducted to examine the role of hecogenin-3-O-beta-D-glucopyranosyl(1-->4)-beta-D-galactopyranoside (1), which is a triterpene saponin of Tribulus terrestris in cardiocytes during chemical hypoxia-ischaemia in vitro. Neonatal rat ventricular myocytes were isolated by collagenase digestion and treated with NaCN for 12 h. Cell apoptosis was defined by terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP nick end labelling (TUNEL) and flow cytometry. [Ca(2+)] was measured by confocal microscopy. There was a marked increase in the expression of the anti-apoptotic protein, Bcl-2, by NaCN. This change was increased by the saponin 1. PKCepsilon protein contents were increased in the cardiocyte membrane fraction in response to NaCN. PKCepsilon activation was augmented by the saponin 1. Inhibition of PKCepsilon with inhibitory peptide prevented Bcl-2 expression. Moreover, the saponin attenuated the apoptosis in cardiocyte in response to NaCN. It is therefore suggested that the saponin 1 may play a role in cardiocyte survival via PKCepsilon and Bcl-2.

  19. Panax notoginseng saponins improve recovery after spinal cord transection by upregulating neurotrophic factors

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Bo; Li, Yu; Li, Xuan-peng; Li, Yang

    2015-01-01

    Saponins extracted from Panax notoginseng are neuroprotective, but the mechanisms underlying this effect remain unclear. In the present study, we established a rat model of thoracic (T10) spinal cord transection, and injected Panax notoginseng saponins (100 mg/kg) or saline 30 minutes after injury. Locomotor functions were assessed using the Basso, Beattie, and Bresnahan (BBB) scale from 1 to 30 days after injury, and immunohistochemistry was carried out in the ventral horn of the spinal cord at 1 and 7 days to determine expression of nerve growth factor (NGF) and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF). Our results show that at 7–30 days post injury, the BBB score was higher in rats treated with Panax notoginseng saponins than in those that received saline. Furthermore, at 7 days, more NGF- and BDNF-immunoreactive neurons were observed in the ventral horn of the spinal cord of rats that had received Panax notoginseng saponins than in those that received saline. These results indicate that Panax notoginseng saponins caused an upregulation of NGF and BDNF in rats with spinal cord transection, and improved hindlimb motor function. PMID:26487862

  20. Tocopherols and saponins derived from Argania spinosa exert, an antiproliferative effect on human prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Drissi, A; Bennani, H; Giton, F; Charrouf, Z; Fiet, J; Adlouni, A

    2006-10-01

    The aim of our study is to evaluate the antiproliferative effect of tocopherols obtained from alimentary virgin argan oil extracted from the endemic argan tree of Morocco and of saponins extracted from argan press cake on three human prostatic cell lines (DU145, LNCaP, and PC3). The results were compared to 2-methoxyestradiol as antiproliferative drug candidates. Cytotoxicity and antiproliferative effects were investigated after cells' treatment with tocopherols and saponins compared to 2-Methoxyoestradiol as the positive control. Tocopherols and saponins extracted from argan tree and 2-methoxyestradiol exhibit a dose-response cytotoxic effect and an antiproliferative action on the tested cell lines. The best antiproliferative effect of tocopherols is obtained with DU145 and LNCaP cell lines (28 microg/ml and 32 microg/ml, respectively, as GI50). The saponins fraction displayed the best antiproliferative effect on the PC3 cell line with 18 microg/ml as GI50. Our results confirm the antiproliferative effect of 2-methoxyestradiol and show for the first time the antiproliferative effect of tocopherols and saponins extracted from the argan tree on hormone-dependent and hormone-independent prostate cancer cell lines. These data suggest that argan oil is of potential interest in developing new strategies for prostate cancer prevention. PMID:16982463

  1. Tocopherols and saponins derived from Argania spinosa exert, an antiproliferative effect on human prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Drissi, A; Bennani, H; Giton, F; Charrouf, Z; Fiet, J; Adlouni, A

    2006-10-01

    The aim of our study is to evaluate the antiproliferative effect of tocopherols obtained from alimentary virgin argan oil extracted from the endemic argan tree of Morocco and of saponins extracted from argan press cake on three human prostatic cell lines (DU145, LNCaP, and PC3). The results were compared to 2-methoxyestradiol as antiproliferative drug candidates. Cytotoxicity and antiproliferative effects were investigated after cells' treatment with tocopherols and saponins compared to 2-Methoxyoestradiol as the positive control. Tocopherols and saponins extracted from argan tree and 2-methoxyestradiol exhibit a dose-response cytotoxic effect and an antiproliferative action on the tested cell lines. The best antiproliferative effect of tocopherols is obtained with DU145 and LNCaP cell lines (28 microg/ml and 32 microg/ml, respectively, as GI50). The saponins fraction displayed the best antiproliferative effect on the PC3 cell line with 18 microg/ml as GI50. Our results confirm the antiproliferative effect of 2-methoxyestradiol and show for the first time the antiproliferative effect of tocopherols and saponins extracted from the argan tree on hormone-dependent and hormone-independent prostate cancer cell lines. These data suggest that argan oil is of potential interest in developing new strategies for prostate cancer prevention.

  2. Effects of domestic processing on steroidal saponins in Taiwanese yam cultivar (Dioscorea pseudojaponica Yamamoto).

    PubMed

    Lin, Jau-Tien; Liu, Shih-Chuan; Chen, Su-Lin; Chen, Hsin-Yi; Yang, Deng-Jye

    2006-12-27

    The effects of domestic processing on steroidal saponins and furostanol and spirostanol glycosides in Taiwanese yam cultivar (Dioscorea pseudojaponica Yamamoto) were studied. The baking or frying of yam slices was conducted at 150, 180, and 200 degrees C for 3, 5, and 10 min. Yam slices were steamed or microwave cooked at 2450 MHz with an output power of 850 W for 3, 5, and 10 min. The various saponins were quantified by HPLC with an evaporative light scattering detector (ELSD). Results showed that the contents of saponins were decreased along with increasing cooking temperature and time except for the steaming treatment. None of the steamed yam slices significantly change their initial compositions or quantities of furostanol and spirostanol glycosides. Fried yam slices had the highest loss of saponins, especially at 200 degrees C for 10 min (93 and 97% reductions for total furostanol and spirostanol glycosides, respectively). After baking for 10 min at 200 degrees C, the total furostanol and spirostanol glycosides were reduced by 67 and 74%, respectively. There were 12, 44, and 84% decreases for total furostanol glycosides and 10, 35, and 75% reductions for total spirostanol glycosides in yam slices after microwave cooking for 3, 5, and 10 min, respectively. Diosgenin, the aglycone of these saponins, could be found in yams after microwave cooking and baking, but not in steamed and fried yams. PMID:17177526

  3. Saponins can perturb biologic membranes and reduce the surface tension of aqueous solutions: a correlation?

    PubMed

    Böttger, Stefan; Hofmann, Katja; Melzig, Matthias F

    2012-05-01

    Saponins are secondary plant compounds. They have a triterpenoid or steroidal backbone. Sugars are attached to one or more points of this structure, forming chains that can be branched. This appearance leads to amphiphilic properties giving saponins the ability to interact with both lipophilic and hydrophilic structures. The surfactant behavior lets them lower the surface tension in aqueous solutions and form micelles when reaching the critical micelle concentration (cmc). It also lets them interact with biologic membrane layers that usually consist of phospholipids and cholesterol. This action may perturb the membrane and its function leading to membrane perforation or complete lysis. Thus saponins are also known for their cytotoxicity and membranolytic, respectively hemolytic features. In our studies we wanted to answer the question if there is a correlation between the unspecific detergent behavior when lowering the surface tension and the ability to perforate cell membranes and to act cytotoxic. Do saponins showing a considerable reduction in the surface tension also reveal an evident cytotoxicity or/and a marked cell membrane perforation? We tested a variety of saponins with distinct structures. The reduction in the surface tension and the cmc were analyzed on a tensiometer using the Wilhelmy plate method. The general cytotoxicity was determined in a cell model by DNA quantification. The cell membrane toxicity or membrane perforation was explored in a cell model by quantification of the leakage of the intracellular enzyme lactate dehydrogenase (LDH). The experiments revealed a correlation between the membrane toxicity and the reduction in surface tension.

  4. Antioxidative effect of ginseng stem-leaf saponins on oxidative stress induced by cyclophosphamide in chickens.

    PubMed

    Yu, J; Chen, Y; Zhai, L; Zhang, L; Xu, Y; Wang, S; Hu, S

    2015-05-01

    Previous investigation demonstrated that oral administration of ginseng stem-leaf saponins in chickens could enhance the immune response. The present study was designed to evaluate the effects of ginseng stem-leaf saponins on oxidative stress induced by cyclophosphamide in chickens. One hundred and twenty chickens were randomly divided into 5 groups. Groups 1 to 4 received intramuscular injection of cyclophosphamide to induce oxidative stress while group 5 was injected with saline solution and served as control. Following administration of cyclophosphamide, groups 1 to 3 were orally administered ginseng stem-leaf saponins at 2.5, 5, and 10 mg/kg BW in drinking water for 7 d, respectively. After that, the spleen, thymus, bursa, and serum were collected to measure the indices of the organs and oxidative parameters. The results showed that ginseng stem-leaf saponins significantly inhibited cyclophosphamide-induced oxidative stress by increasing the organ indices, total antioxidant capacity, and the levels of glutathione, ascorbic acid, and α-tocopherol, while elevating the activity of total superoxide dismutase, catalase, and glutathione peroxidase, as well as decreasing the protein carbonyl content and malondialdehyde. Therefore, ginseng stem-leaf saponins could be a promising agent against oxidative stress in the poultry industry. PMID:25713395

  5. Cytotoxicity of Naturally Occurring Isoquinoline Alkaloids of Different Structural Types.

    PubMed

    Chlebek, Jakub; Doskocil, Ivo; Hulcová, Daniela; Breiterová, Katerina; Šafratová, Marcela; Havelek, Radim; Habartová, Klára; Hošt'álková, Anna; Volštátová, Tereza; Cahlíková, Lucie

    2016-06-01

    Forty-six isoquinoline alkaloids, of eleven structural types isolated in our laboratory, have been evaluated for their cytotoxicity against two cancer cell lines (Caco-2 and Hep-G2 cancer cells), as well as against normal human lung fibroblast cells. Only scoulerine, aromoline, berbamine and parfumidine showed significant cytotoxic effects, but only scoulerine was active against both Caco-2 and Hep-G2 cells (IC50 values 6.44 ± 0.87 and 4.57 ± 0.42, respectively). Unfortunately, except for parfumidine, the other active alkaloids were also cytotoxic to the normal human lung fibroblast cells.

  6. Antitussive stemoninine alkaloids from the roots of Stemona tuberosa.

    PubMed

    Lin, Li-Gen; Li, Kan Man; Tang, Chun-Ping; Ke, Chang-Qiang; Rudd, John A; Lin, Ge; Ye, Yang

    2008-06-01

    Investigation of the roots of Stemona tuberosa afforded five minor constituents, stemoenonine (1), 9a- O-methylstemoenonine (2), oxystemoenonine (3), 1,9a- seco-stemoenonine (4), and oxystemoninine (5), along with the known compound stemoninoamide (6). Their structures were elucidated by 1D and 2D NMR spectra and other spectroscopic studies. Alkaloids 1, 2, and 6, as well as the representative stemoninine-type alkaloid, stemoninine (7), were screened for antitussive activity in the citric acid-induced guinea pig cough model. Compounds 6 and 7 exhibited strong antitussive activity after oral and intraperitoneal administrations.

  7. Cytotoxicity of Naturally Occurring Isoquinoline Alkaloids of Different Structural Types.

    PubMed

    Chlebek, Jakub; Doskocil, Ivo; Hulcová, Daniela; Breiterová, Katerina; Šafratová, Marcela; Havelek, Radim; Habartová, Klára; Hošt'álková, Anna; Volštátová, Tereza; Cahlíková, Lucie

    2016-06-01

    Forty-six isoquinoline alkaloids, of eleven structural types isolated in our laboratory, have been evaluated for their cytotoxicity against two cancer cell lines (Caco-2 and Hep-G2 cancer cells), as well as against normal human lung fibroblast cells. Only scoulerine, aromoline, berbamine and parfumidine showed significant cytotoxic effects, but only scoulerine was active against both Caco-2 and Hep-G2 cells (IC50 values 6.44 ± 0.87 and 4.57 ± 0.42, respectively). Unfortunately, except for parfumidine, the other active alkaloids were also cytotoxic to the normal human lung fibroblast cells. PMID:27534109

  8. Chemiluminescence detection of opium poppy (Papaver somniferum) alkaloids.

    PubMed

    Francis, Paul S; Adcock, Jacqui L; Costin, Jason W; Purcell, Stuart D; Pfeffer, Frederick M; Barnett, Neil W

    2008-11-01

    A review with 98 references. The determination of the opium poppy (Papaver somniferum) alkaloids and their semi-synthetic derivatives has important applications in industrial process monitoring, clinical analysis and forensic science. Liquid-phase chemiluminescence reagents such as tris(2,2'-bipyridyl)ruthenium(II) and acidic potassium permanganate exhibit remarkable sensitivity and complementary selectivity for many P. somniferum alkaloids, which has been exploited in the development of a range of analytical procedures using flow analysis, high-performance liquid chromatography, capillary electrophoresis and microfluidic instrumentation.

  9. Alkaloid-derived molecules in low rank Argonne premium coals.

    SciTech Connect

    Winans, R. E.; Tomczyk, N. A.; Hunt, J. E.

    2000-11-30

    Molecules that are probably derived from alkaloids have been found in the extracts of the subbituminous and lignite Argonne Premium Coals. High resolution mass spectrometry (HRMS) and liquid chromatography mass spectrometry (LCMS) have been used to characterize pyridine and supercritical extracts. The supercritical extraction used an approach that has been successful for extracting alkaloids from natural products. The first indication that there might be these natural products in coals was the large number of molecules found containing multiple nitrogen and oxygen heteroatoms. These molecules are much less abundant in bituminous coals and absent in the higher rank coals.

  10. Recent Advances in the Synthesis of Morphine and Related Alkaloids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chida, Noritaka

    Morphine, an alkaloid isolated from the opium poppy, has been widely used as an analgesic, and has been a fascinating synthetic target of organic chemists. After the first total synthesis reported in 1952, a number of synthetic studies toward morphine have been reported, and findings obtained in such studies have greatly contributed to the progress of synthetic organic chemistry as well as medicinal chemistry. This review provides an overview of recent studies toward the total synthesis of morphine and related alkaloids. Work reported in the literature since 2004 will be reviewed.

  11. The cell and developmental biology of alkaloid biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    De Luca, V; St Pierre, B

    2000-04-01

    Plants produce unique natural products as a result of gene mutation and subsequent adaptation of metabolic pathways to create new secondary metabolites. However, their biosynthesis and accumulation remains remarkably under the control of the biotic and abiotic environments. Alkaloid biosynthesis, which requires the adaptation of cellular activities to perform specialized metabolism without compromising general homeostasis, is accomplished by restricting product biosynthesis and accumulation to particular cells and to defined times of plant development. The cell and developmental biology of alkaloid biosynthesis, which is remarkably complex, evolved in part by recruiting pre-existing enzymes to perform new functions.

  12. 3-Methoxysampangine, a novel antifungal copyrine alkaloid from Cleistopholis patens.

    PubMed Central

    Liu, S C; Oguntimein, B; Hufford, C D; Clark, A M

    1990-01-01

    Further examination of the active ethanolic extract of the root bark of Cleistopholis patens by using bioassay-directed fractionation resulted in the isolation of a new alkaloid, 3-methoxysampangine (compound I), together with three known alkaloids, eupolauridine (compound II), liriodenine (compound III), and eupolauridine N-oxide (compound IV). The proposed structure of compound I was based on its physicochemical properties and spectral data. 3-Methoxysampangine exhibited significant antifungal activity against Candida albicans, Aspergillus fumigatus, and Cryptococcus neoformans. This is the first report of the isolation of liriodenine (compound III) from the root bark of C. patens. PMID:2188584

  13. Antifouling indole alkaloids from two marine derived fungi.

    PubMed

    He, Fei; Han, Zhuang; Peng, Jiang; Qian, Pei-Yuan; Qi, Shu-Hua

    2013-03-01

    In order to find non-toxic antifouling natural products from marine microorganisms, the chemical constituents of two marine derived fungi Penicillium sp. and Aspergillus sydowii have been investigated under bio-guided fractionation. A new indolyl diketopiperazine compound, penilloid A (1), together with 15 known ones were isolated from these two strains. The structure of 1 was elucidated on the basis of NMR and mass spectra. Some alkaloids showed significant antifouling and antibacterial activities. The results indicate that indole alkaloids could be a potential antifouling agent resource.

  14. Alkaloids from the South China Sea Black Coral Antipathes dichotoma.

    PubMed

    Qi, Shu-Hua; Su, Guo-Chen; Wang, Yi-Fei; Liu, Qiu-Ying; Gao, Cheng-Hai

    2009-01-01

    A new carbazole alkaloid, antipathine A (1), together with three known zoanthoxanthin alkaloids (2--4) was isolated from the EtOH/CH2Cl2 extracts of the South China Sea black coral Antipathes dichotoma. The structure of 1 was determined on the bases of extensive spectroscopic analysis, including 1D and 2D NMR data. Compounds 1 and 2 showed moderate cytotoxicity against human stomach carcinoma SGC-7901 cell line with IC50 of 67.38 and 86.40 microg/ml, respectively, and 1 and 2 also showed weak cytotoxicity toward human liver carcinoma Hep_G2 cell line.

  15. Dietary flavonoids and cancer risk in the Zutphen Elderly Study.

    PubMed

    Hertog, M G; Feskens, E J; Hollman, P C; Katan, M B; Kromhout, D

    1994-01-01

    Flavonoids are polyphenolic antioxidants naturally present in vegetable foods. Some flavonoids, such as quercetin, inhibit carcinogenesis in rodents, but their effect in humans is unknown. We measured the flavonoids quercetin, kaempferol, myricetin, apigenin, and luteolin in foods and assessed flavonoid intake in 1985 by dietary history in 738 men aged 65-84 years without a history of cancer, who were then followed for five years. Mean flavonoid intake was 25.9 mg/day. The major sources of flavonoid intake were tea at 61% and vegetables and fruits (mainly onions, kale, endive, and apples) at 38%. Between 1985 and 1990, 75 men developed cancer (all sites) and 34 men died from cancer. Flavonoid intake in 1985 was not associated with incidence of all-cause cancer (p for trend = 0.54) or with mortality from all-cause cancer (p for trend = 0.51). Flavonoid intake was also not associated with risk of cancers of the alimentary and respiratory tract (p for trend = 0.92). Adjustment for age, body mass index, smoking, physical activity, and vitamin C, vitamin E, beta-carotene, and dietary fiber intake did not change the relative risks. A high intake of flavonoids from vegetables and fruits only was inversely associated with risk of cancer of the alimentary and respiratory tract (relative risk of highest vs. lowest tertile = 0.51, 95% confidence interval 0.25-1.05); these results suggest the presence of other nonvitamin components with anticarcinogenic potential in these foods. We conclude that intake of flavonoids, mainly from tea, apples, and onions, does not predict a reduced risk of all-cause cancer or of cancer of the alimentary and respiratory tract in elderly men. The effect of flavonoids on risk of cancer at specific sites needs further investigation in prospective cohort studies. PMID:14502846

  16. Computational molecular characterization of the flavonoid rutin.

    PubMed

    Payán-Gómez, Sergio A; Flores-Holguín, Norma; Pérez-Hernández, Antonino; Piñón-Miramontes, Manuel; Glossman-Mitnik, Daniel

    2010-06-22

    In this work, we make use of a model chemistry within Density Functional Theory (DFT) recently presented, which is called M05-2X, to calculate the molecular structure of the flavonoid Rutin, as well as to predict the infrared (IR) and ultraviolet (UV-Vis) spectra, the dipole moment and polarizability, the free energy of solvation in different solvents as an indication of solubility, the HOMO and LUMO orbitals, and the chemical reactivity parameters that arise from Conceptual DFT. The calculated values are compared with the available experimental data for this molecule as a means of validation of the used model chemistry.

  17. Computational molecular characterization of the flavonoid rutin

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    In this work, we make use of a model chemistry within Density Functional Theory (DFT) recently presented, which is called M05-2X, to calculate the molecular structure of the flavonoid Rutin, as well as to predict the infrared (IR) and ultraviolet (UV-Vis) spectra, the dipole moment and polarizability, the free energy of solvation in different solvents as an indication of solubility, the HOMO and LUMO orbitals, and the chemical reactivity parameters that arise from Conceptual DFT. The calculated values are compared with the available experimental data for this molecule as a means of validation of the used model chemistry. PMID:20569488

  18. Orphan flavonoids and dihydrochalcones from Primula exudates.

    PubMed

    Bhutia, Tshering Doma; Valant-Vetschera, Karin M; Brecker, Lothar

    2013-08-01

    Two orphan flavonoids containing an oxepin structure in ring A and named as Primcortusin (1) and 3'-OH-Primcortusin (2) were isolated from leaf exudates of Primula cortusoides, while P. glutinosa exudates yielded two dihydrochalcone derivatives (3,4). These novel structures have not been detected in other species of Primula so far. Chemical structures were elucidated by 2D NMR and mas spectrometry. The nature of compounds 1 and 2 is discussed, and ideas about their possible origin and that of unsubstituted flavone and other irregular substituted Primula flavones are presented.

  19. Cytotoxic terpenoids and flavonoids from Artemisia annua.

    PubMed

    Zheng, G Q

    1994-02-01

    The cytotoxic activity of nine terpenoids and flavonoids isolated from Artemisia annua was tested in vitro on several human tumor cell lines. These compounds are artemisinin, deoxyartemisinin, artemisinic acid, arteannuin-B, stigmasterol, friedelin, friedelan-3 beta-ol, artemetin, and quercetagetin 6,7,3',4'-tetramethyl ether. Friedelane-type triterpenoids were isolated for the first time from this plant. Artemisinin and quercetagetin 6,7,3',4'-tetramethyl ether showed significant cytotoxicity against P-388, A-549, HT-29, MCF-7, and KB tumor cells. PMID:8134418

  20. Overview of antibacterial, antitoxin, antiviral, and antifungal activities of tea flavonoids and teas.

    PubMed

    Friedman, Mendel

    2007-01-01

    Tea leaves produce organic compounds that may be involved in the defense of the plants against invading pathogens including insects, bacteria, fungi, and viruses. These metabolites include polyphenolic compounds, the six so-called catechins, and the methyl-xanthine alkaloids caffeine, theobromine, and theophylline. Postharvest inactivation of phenol oxidases in green tea leaves prevents oxidation of the catechins, whereas postharvest enzyme-catalyzed oxidation (fermentation) of catechins in tea leaves results in the formation of four theaflavins as well as polymeric thearubigins. These substances impart the black color to black teas. Black and partly fermented oolong teas contain both classes of phenolic compounds. A need exists to develop a better understanding of the roles of polyphenolic tea compounds in food and medical microbiology. This overview surveys and interprets our present knowledge of activities of tea flavonoids and teas against foodborne and other pathogenic bacteria, virulent protein toxins produced by some of the bacteria, virulent bacteriophages, pathogenic viruses and fungi. Also covered are synergistic, mechanistic, and bioavailability aspects of the antimicrobial effects. Further research is suggested for each of these categories. The herein described findings are not only of fundamental interest, but also have practical implications for nutrition, food safety, and animal and human health. PMID:17195249