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Sample records for alkane degrading geobacillus

  1. Cloning and expression of three ladA-type alkane monooxygenase genes from an extremely thermophilic alkane-degrading bacterium Geobacillus thermoleovorans B23.

    PubMed

    Boonmak, Chanita; Takahashi, Yasunori; Morikawa, Masaaki

    2014-05-01

    An extremely thermophilic bacterium, Geobacillus thermoleovorans B23, is capable of degrading a broad range of alkanes (with carbon chain lengths ranging between C11 and C32) at 70 °C. Whole-genome sequence analysis revealed that unlike most alkane-degrading bacteria, strain B23 does not possess an alkB-type alkane monooxygenase gene. Instead, it possesses a cluster of three ladA-type genes, ladAαB23, ladAβB23, and ladB B23, on its chromosome, whose protein products share significant amino acid sequence identities, 49.8, 34.4, and 22.7 %, respectively, with that of ladA alkane monooxygenase gene found on a plasmid of Geobacillus thermodetrificans NG 80-2. Each of the three genes, ladAαB23, ladAβB23, and ladB B23, was heterologously expressed individually in an alkB1 deletion mutant strain, Pseudomonas fluorescens KOB2Δ1. It was found that all three genes were functional in P. fluorescens KOB2Δ1, and partially restored alkane degradation activity. In this study, we suggest that G. thermoleovorans B23 utilizes multiple LadA-type alkane monooxygenases for the degradation of a broad range of alkanes.

  2. Genome and proteome of long-chain alkane degrading Geobacillus thermodenitrificans NG80-2 isolated from a deep-subsurface oil reservoir.

    PubMed

    Feng, Lu; Wang, Wei; Cheng, Jiansong; Ren, Yi; Zhao, Guang; Gao, Chunxu; Tang, Yun; Liu, Xueqian; Han, Weiqing; Peng, Xia; Liu, Rulin; Wang, Lei

    2007-03-27

    The complete genome sequence of Geobacillus thermodenitrificans NG80-2, a thermophilic bacillus isolated from a deep oil reservoir in Northern China, consists of a 3,550,319-bp chromosome and a 57,693-bp plasmid. The genome reveals that NG80-2 is well equipped for adaptation into a wide variety of environmental niches, including oil reservoirs, by possessing genes for utilization of a broad range of energy sources, genes encoding various transporters for efficient nutrient uptake and detoxification, and genes for a flexible respiration system including an aerobic branch comprising five terminal oxidases and an anaerobic branch comprising a complete denitrification pathway for quick response to dissolved oxygen fluctuation. The identification of a nitrous oxide reductase gene has not been previously described in Gram-positive bacteria. The proteome further reveals the presence of a long-chain alkane degradation pathway; and the function of the key enzyme in the pathway, the long-chain alkane monooxygenase LadA, is confirmed by in vivo and in vitro experiments. The thermophilic soluble monomeric LadA is an ideal candidate for treatment of environmental oil pollutions and biosynthesis of complex molecules.

  3. [Characterization of a thermophilic Geobacillus strain DM-2 degrading hydrocarbons].

    PubMed

    Liu, Qing-kun; Wang, Jun; Li, Guo-qiang; Ma, Ting; Liang, Feng-lai; Liu, Ru-lin

    2008-12-01

    A thermophilic Geobacillus strain DM-2 from a deep-subsurface oil reservoir was investigated on its capability of degrading crude oil under various conditions as well as its characters on degrading hydrocarbons in optimal conditions. The results showed that Geobacillus strain DM-2 was able to degrade crude oil under anoxic wide-range conditions with pH ranging from 4.0 to 10.0, high temperature in the range of 45-70 degrees C and saline concentration ranging from 0.2% to 3.0%. Furthermore, the optimal temperature and pH value for utilizing hydrocarbons by the strain were 60 degrees C and 7.0, respectively. Under such optimal conditions, the strain utilized liquid paraffine emulsified by itself as its carbon source for growth; further analysis by gas chromatography (GC) and infrared absorption spectroscopy demonstrated that it was able to degrade n-alkanes (C14-C30), branched-chain alkanes and aromatic hydrocarbons in crude oil and could also utilize long-chain n-alkanes from C16 to C36, among of which the degradation efficiency of C28 was the highest, up to 88.95%. One metabolite of the strain oxidizing alkanes is fatty acid.While utilizing C16 as carbon source for 5 d, only one fatty acid-acetic acid was detected by HPLC and MS as the product, with the amount of 0.312 g/L, which indicated that it degraded n-alkanes with pathway of inferior terminal oxidation,and then followed by a beta-oxidation pathway. Due to its characters of efficient emulsification, high-performance degradation of hydrocarbons and fatty-acid production under high temperature and anoxic condition, the strain DM-2 may be potentially applied to oil-waste treatment and microbial enhanced heavy oil recovery in extreme conditions.

  4. Characteristics of Newly Isolated Geobacillus sp. ZY-10 Degrading Hydrocarbons in Crude Oil.

    PubMed

    Sun, Yumei; Ning, Zhanguo; Yang, Fan; Li, Xianzhen

    2015-01-01

    An obligately thermophilic strain ZY-10 was isolated from the crude oil in a high-temperature oilfield, which was capable of degrading heavy crude oil. Phenotypic and phylogenetic analysis demonstrated that the isolate should be grouped in the genus Geobacillus, which shared thd highest similarity (99%) of the 16S rDNA sequence to Geobacillus stearothermophilus. However, the major cellular fatty acid iso-15:0 (28.55%), iso-16:0 (24.93%), iso-17:0 (23.53%) and the characteristics including indole production, tolerance to NaN3 and carbohydrate fermentation showed some difference from the recognized species in the genus Geobacillus. The isolate could use tridecane, hexadecane, octacosane and hexatridecane as sole carbon source for cell growth, and the digesting rate of long-chain alkane was lower than that of short-chain alkane. When the isolate was cultured in the heavy crude oil supplement with inorganic salts and trace yeast extract, the concentration of short-chain alkane was significantly increased and the content of long-chain alkane was decreased, suggesting that the larger hydrocarbon components in crude oil were degraded into shorter-chain alkane. Strain ZY-10 would be useful for improving the mobility of crude oil and upgrading heavy crude oil in situ.

  5. Degradation of alkanes by bacteria.

    PubMed

    Rojo, Fernando

    2009-10-01

    Pollution of soil and water environments by crude oil has been, and is still today, an important problem. Crude oil is a complex mixture of thousands of compounds. Among them, alkanes constitute the major fraction. Alkanes are saturated hydrocarbons of different sizes and structures. Although they are chemically very inert, most of them can be efficiently degraded by several microorganisms. This review summarizes current knowledge on how microorganisms degrade alkanes, focusing on the biochemical pathways used and on how the expression of pathway genes is regulated and integrated within cell physiology.

  6. Isolation of a thermophilic bacterium, Geobacillus sp. SH-1, capable of degrading aliphatic hydrocarbons and naphthalene simultaneously, and identification of its naphthalene degrading pathway.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jian; Zhang, Xu; Liu, Juan; Li, Rong; Shen, Biao

    2012-11-01

    A thermophilic naphthalene- and aliphatic hydrocarbon-degrading bacterium SH-1 was isolated from a deep oil well and identified as Geobacillus sp. n-alkanes from C12 to C33 in crude oil and naphthalene were effectively degraded by strain SH-1, and this strain could readily utilize these compounds as its sole carbon and energy resources. During the degradation of naphthalene, strain SH-1 initiated its attack on naphthalene by a monooxygenation at its C-1 to give 1-naphthol and further monooxygenation at C-2 to produce 1,2-dihydroxynaphthalene. The ring of 1,2-dihydroxynaphthalene was cleaved to form trans-o-hydroxybenzylidenepyruvate. Subsequently, trans-o-hydroxybenzylidenepyruvate was transformed to (2E)-3-(2-hydroxyphenyl)prop-2-enal by losing a carboxyl group. Additionally, benzoic acid was identified as an intermediate in the naphthalene degradation pathway of this Geobacillus strain. This study highlights an important potential use of the thermophilic degradative strain SH-1 in the cleanup of environmental contamination by naphthalene and crude oil and presents a mechanism for naphthalene metabolism. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Draft genome sequence of pectic polysaccharide-degrading moderate thermophilic bacterium Geobacillus thermodenitrificans DSM 101594.

    PubMed

    Petkauskaite, Raimonda; Blom, Jochen; Goesmann, Alexander; Kuisiene, Nomeda

    Geobacillus thermodenitrificans DSM 101594 was isolated as a producer of extracellular thermostable pectic polysaccharide degrading enzymes. The completely sequenced genome was 3.6Mb in length with GC content of 48.86%. A number of genes encoding enzymatic active against the high molecular weight polysaccharides of potential biotechnological importance were identified in the genome.

  8. Genomic analysis of six new Geobacillus strains reveals highly conserved carbohydrate degradation architectures and strategies

    PubMed Central

    Brumm, Phillip J.; De Maayer, Pieter; Mead, David A.; Cowan, Don A.

    2015-01-01

    In this work we report the whole genome sequences of six new Geobacillus xylanolytic strains along with the genomic analysis of their capability to degrade carbohydrates. The six sequenced Geobacillus strains described here have a range of GC contents from 43.9% to 52.5% and clade with named Geobacillus species throughout the entire genus. We have identified a ~200 kb unique super-cluster in all six strains, containing five to eight distinct carbohydrate degradation clusters in a single genomic region, a feature not seen in other genera. The Geobacillus strains rely on a small number of secreted enzymes located within distinct clusters for carbohydrate utilization, in contrast to most biomass-degrading organisms which contain numerous secreted enzymes located randomly throughout the genomes. All six strains are able to utilize fructose, arabinose, xylose, mannitol, gluconate, xylan, and α-1,6-glucosides. The gene clusters for utilization of these seven substrates have identical organization and the individual proteins have a high percent identity to their homologs. The strains show significant differences in their ability to utilize inositol, sucrose, lactose, α-mannosides, α-1,4-glucosides and arabinan. PMID:26029180

  9. Complete genome sequences of Geobacillus sp. Y412MC52, a xylan-degrading strain isolated from obsidian hot spring in Yellowstone National Park

    SciTech Connect

    Brumm, Phillip; Land, Miriam L.; Hauser, Loren J.; Jeffries, Cynthia D.; Chang, Yun-Juan; Mead, David A.

    2015-10-19

    We isolated geobacillus sp. Y412MC52 from Obsidian Hot Spring, Yellowstone National Park, Montana, USA under permit from the National Park Service. The genome was sequenced, assembled, and annotated by the DOE Joint Genome Institute and deposited at the NCBI in December 2011 (CP002835). Based on 16S rRNA genes and average nucleotide identity, Geobacillus sp. Y412MC52 and the related Geobacillus sp. Y412MC61 appear to be members of a new species of Geobacillus. Moreover, te genome of Geobacillus sp. Y412MC52 consists of one circular chromosome of 3,628,883 bp, an average G + C content of 52 % and one circular plasmid of 45,057 bp and an average G + C content of 45 %. Y412MC52 possesses arabinan, arabinoglucuronoxylan, and aromatic acid degradation clusters for degradation of hemicellulose from biomass. Finally, we present transport and utilization clusters for other carbohydrates including starch, cellobiose, and - and -galactooligosaccharides.

  10. Cold-tolerant alkane-degrading Rhodococcus species from Antarctica

    SciTech Connect

    Bej, A.K.; Saul, D.; Aislabie, J.

    2000-07-01

    Bioremediation is a possible mechanism for clean-up of hydrocarbon-contaminated soils in the Antarctic. Microbes indigenous to the Antarctic are required that degrade the hydrocarbon contaminants found in the soil, and that are able to survive and maintain activity under in situ conditions. Alkane-degrading bacteria previously isolated from oil-contaminated soil from around Scott Base, Antarctica, grew on a number of n-alkanes from hexane (C6) through to eicosane (C20) and the branched alkane pristane. Mineralization of {sup 14}C-dodecane was demonstrated with four strains. Representative isolates were identified as Rhodococcus species using 16S rDNA sequence analysis. Rhodococcus spp. strains 5/14 and 7/1 grew at -2 C but numbers of viable cells declined when incubated t 37 C. Both strains appear to have the major cold-shock gene cspA. Partial nucleotide sequence analyses of the PCR-amplified cspA open reading frame from Rhodococcus spp. strains 5/14 and 7/1 were approximately 60% identical to cspA from Escherichia coli.

  11. Involvement of an alkane hydroxylase system of Gordonia sp. strain SoCg in degradation of solid n-alkanes.

    PubMed

    Lo Piccolo, Luca; De Pasquale, Claudio; Fodale, Roberta; Puglia, Anna Maria; Quatrini, Paola

    2011-02-01

    Enzymes involved in oxidation of long-chain n-alkanes are still not well known, especially those in gram-positive bacteria. This work describes the alkane degradation system of the n-alkane degrader actinobacterium Gordonia sp. strain SoCg, which is able to grow on n-alkanes from dodecane (C(12)) to hexatriacontane (C(36)) as the sole C source. SoCg harbors in its chromosome a single alk locus carrying six open reading frames (ORFs), which shows 78 to 79% identity with the alkane hydroxylase (AH)-encoding systems of other alkane-degrading actinobacteria. Quantitative reverse transcription-PCR showed that the genes encoding AlkB (alkane 1-monooxygenase), RubA3 (rubredoxin), RubA4 (rubredoxin), and RubB (rubredoxin reductase) were induced by both n-hexadecane and n-triacontane, which were chosen as representative long-chain liquid and solid n-alkane molecules, respectively. Biotransformation of n-hexadecane into the corresponding 1-hexadecanol was detected by solid-phase microextraction coupled with gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (SPME/GC-MS) analysis. The Gordonia SoCg alkB was heterologously expressed in Escherichia coli BL21 and in Streptomyces coelicolor M145, and both hosts acquired the ability to transform n-hexadecane into 1-hexadecanol, but the corresponding long-chain alcohol was never detected on n-triacontane. However, the recombinant S. coelicolor M145-AH, expressing the Gordonia alkB gene, was able to grow on n-triacontane as the sole C source. A SoCg alkB disruption mutant that is completely unable to grow on n-triacontane was obtained, demonstrating the role of an AlkB-type AH system in degradation of solid n-alkanes.

  12. Polysaccharide-degrading thermophiles generated by heterologous gene expression in Geobacillus kaustophilus HTA426.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Hirokazu; Yoshida, Ken-ichi; Ohshima, Toshihisa

    2013-09-01

    Thermophiles have important advantages over mesophiles as host organisms for high-temperature bioprocesses, functional production of thermostable enzymes, and efficient expression of enzymatic activities in vivo. To capitalize on these advantages of thermophiles, we describe here a new inducible gene expression system in the thermophile Geobacillus kaustophilus HTA426. Six promoter regions in the HTA426 genome were identified and analyzed for expression profiles using β-galactosidase reporter assay. This analysis identified a promoter region upstream of a putative amylose-metabolizing gene cluster that directed high-level expression of the reporter gene. The expression was >280-fold that without a promoter and was further enhanced 12-fold by maltose addition. In association with a multicopy plasmid, this promoter region was used to express heterologous genes. Several genes, including a gene whose product was insoluble when expressed in Escherichia coli, were successfully expressed as soluble proteins, with yields of 0.16 to 59 mg/liter, and conferred new functions to G. kaustophilus strains. Remarkably, cellulase and α-amylase genes conferred the ability to degrade cellulose paper and insoluble starch at high temperatures, respectively, generating thermophiles with the potential to degrade plant biomass. Our results demonstrate that this novel expression system expands the potential applications of G. kaustophilus.

  13. Polysaccharide-Degrading Thermophiles Generated by Heterologous Gene Expression in Geobacillus kaustophilus HTA426

    PubMed Central

    Yoshida, Ken-ichi; Ohshima, Toshihisa

    2013-01-01

    Thermophiles have important advantages over mesophiles as host organisms for high-temperature bioprocesses, functional production of thermostable enzymes, and efficient expression of enzymatic activities in vivo. To capitalize on these advantages of thermophiles, we describe here a new inducible gene expression system in the thermophile Geobacillus kaustophilus HTA426. Six promoter regions in the HTA426 genome were identified and analyzed for expression profiles using β-galactosidase reporter assay. This analysis identified a promoter region upstream of a putative amylose-metabolizing gene cluster that directed high-level expression of the reporter gene. The expression was >280-fold that without a promoter and was further enhanced 12-fold by maltose addition. In association with a multicopy plasmid, this promoter region was used to express heterologous genes. Several genes, including a gene whose product was insoluble when expressed in Escherichia coli, were successfully expressed as soluble proteins, with yields of 0.16 to 59 mg/liter, and conferred new functions to G. kaustophilus strains. Remarkably, cellulase and α-amylase genes conferred the ability to degrade cellulose paper and insoluble starch at high temperatures, respectively, generating thermophiles with the potential to degrade plant biomass. Our results demonstrate that this novel expression system expands the potential applications of G. kaustophilus. PMID:23793634

  14. Draft Genome Sequence of Gordonia sihwensis Strain 9, a Branched Alkane-Degrading Bacterium

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Lisa M.; Gunasekera, Thusitha S.; Striebich, Richard C.

    2016-01-01

    Gordonia sihwensis strain 9 is a Gram-positive bacterium capable of efficient aerobic degradation of branched and normal alkanes. The draft genome of G. sihwensis S9 is 4.16 Mb in size, with 3,686 coding sequences and 68.1% G+C content. Alkane monooxygenase and P-450 cytochrome genes required for alkane degradation are predicted in G. sihwensis S9. PMID:27340079

  15. Multiple alkane hydroxylase systems in a marine alkane degrader, Alcanivorax dieselolei B-5.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chenli; Wang, Wanpeng; Wu, Yehui; Zhou, Zhongwen; Lai, Qiliang; Shao, Zongze

    2011-05-01

    Alcanivorax dieselolei strain B-5 is a marine bacterium that can utilize a broad range of n-alkanes (C(5) -C(36) ) as sole carbon source. However, the mechanisms responsible for this trait remain to be established. Here we report on the characterization of four alkane hydroxylases from A. dieselolei, including two homologues of AlkB (AlkB1 and AlkB2), a CYP153 homologue (P450), as well as an AlmA-like (AlmA) alkane hydroxylase. Heterologous expression of alkB1, alkB2, p450 and almA in Pseudomonas putida GPo12 (pGEc47ΔB) or P. fluorescens KOB2Δ1 verified their functions in alkane oxidation. Quantitative real-time RT-PCR analysis showed that these genes could be induced by alkanes ranging from C(8) to C(36) . Notably, the expression of the p450 and almA genes was only upregulated in the presence of medium-chain (C(8) -C(16) ) or long-chain (C(22) -C(36) ) n-alkanes, respectively; while alkB1 and alkB2 responded to both medium- and long-chain n-alkanes (C(12) -C(26) ). Moreover, branched alkanes (pristane and phytane) significantly elevated alkB1 and almA expression levels. Our findings demonstrate that the multiple alkane hydroxylase systems ensure the utilization of substrates of a broad chain length range.

  16. Co-metabolic conversion of toluene in anaerobic n-alkane-degrading bacteria.

    PubMed

    Rabus, Ralf; Jarling, René; Lahme, Sven; Kühner, Simon; Heider, Johann; Widdel, Friedrich; Wilkes, Heinz

    2011-09-01

    Diverse microorganisms have been described to degrade petroleum hydrocarbons anaerobically. Strains able to utilize n-alkanes do not grow with aromatic hydrocarbons, whereas strains able to utilize aromatic hydrocarbons do not grow with n-alkanes. To investigate this specificity in more detail, three anaerobic n-alkane degraders (two denitrifying, one sulfate-reducing) and eight anaerobic alkylbenzene degraders (five denitrifying, three sulfate-reducing) were incubated with mixtures of n-alkanes and toluene. Whereas the toluene degradationers formed only the characteristic toluene-derived benzylsuccinate and benzoate, but no n-alkane-derived metabolites, the n-alkane degraders formed toluene-derived benzylsuccinate, 4-phenylbutanoate, phenylacetate and benzoate besides the regular n-alkane-derived (1-methylalkyl)succinates and methyl-branched alkanoates. The co-metabolic conversion of toluene by anaerobic n-alkane degraders to the level of benzoate obviously follows the anaerobic n-alkane degradation pathway with C-skeleton rearrangement and decarboxylation rather than the β-oxidation pathway of anaerobic toluene metabolism. Hence, petroleum-derived aromatic metabolites detectable in anoxic environments may not be exclusively formed by genuine alkylbenzene degraders. In addition, the hitherto largely unexplored fate of fumarate hydrogen during the activation reactions was examined with (2,3-(2) H(2) )fumarate as co-substrate. Deuterium was completely exchanged with hydrogen at the substituted carbon atom (C-2) of the succinate adducts of n-alkanes, whereas it is retained in toluene-derived benzylsuccinate, regardless of the type of enzyme catalysing the fumarate addition reaction.

  17. Genes involved in alkane degradation in the Alcanivorax hongdengensis strain A-11-3.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wanpeng; Shao, Zongze

    2012-04-01

    Alcanivorax hongdengensis A-11-3 is a newly identified type strain isolated from the surface water of the Malacca and Singapore Straits that can degrade a wide range of alkanes. To understand the degradation mechanism of this strain, the genes encoding alkane hydroxylases were obtained by PCR screening and shotgun sequencing of a genomic fosmid library. Six genes involved in alkane degradation were found, including alkB1, alkB2, p450-1, p450-2, p450-3 and almA. Heterogeneous expression analysis confirmed their functions as alkane oxidases in Pseudomonas putida GPo12 (pGEc47ΔB) or Pseudomonas fluorescens KOB2Δ1. Q-PCR revealed that the transcription of alkB1 and alkB2 was enhanced in the presence of n-alkanes C(12) to C(24); three p450 genes were up-regulated by C(8)-C(16) n-alkanes at different levels, whereas enhanced expression of almA was observed when strain A-11-3 grew with long-chain alkanes (C(24) to C(36)). In the case of branched alkanes, pristane significantly enhanced the expression of alkB1, p450-3 and almA. The six genes enable strain A-11-3 to degrade short (C(8)) to long (C(36)) alkanes that are straight or branched. The ability of A. hongdengensis A-11-3 to thrive in oil-polluted marine environments may be due to this strain's multiple systems for alkane degradation and its range of substrates.

  18. Complete genome sequences of Geobacillus sp. Y412MC52, a xylan-degrading strain isolated from obsidian hot spring in Yellowstone National Park

    DOE PAGES

    Brumm, Phillip; Land, Miriam L.; Hauser, Loren J.; ...

    2015-10-19

    We isolated geobacillus sp. Y412MC52 from Obsidian Hot Spring, Yellowstone National Park, Montana, USA under permit from the National Park Service. The genome was sequenced, assembled, and annotated by the DOE Joint Genome Institute and deposited at the NCBI in December 2011 (CP002835). Based on 16S rRNA genes and average nucleotide identity, Geobacillus sp. Y412MC52 and the related Geobacillus sp. Y412MC61 appear to be members of a new species of Geobacillus. Moreover, te genome of Geobacillus sp. Y412MC52 consists of one circular chromosome of 3,628,883 bp, an average G + C content of 52 % and one circular plasmid ofmore » 45,057 bp and an average G + C content of 45 %. Y412MC52 possesses arabinan, arabinoglucuronoxylan, and aromatic acid degradation clusters for degradation of hemicellulose from biomass. Finally, we present transport and utilization clusters for other carbohydrates including starch, cellobiose, and - and -galactooligosaccharides.« less

  19. Complete genome sequences of Geobacillus sp. Y412MC52, a xylan-degrading strain isolated from obsidian hot spring in Yellowstone National Park.

    PubMed

    Brumm, Phillip; Land, Miriam L; Hauser, Loren J; Jeffries, Cynthia D; Chang, Yun-Juan; Mead, David A

    2015-01-01

    Geobacillus sp. Y412MC52 was isolated from Obsidian Hot Spring, Yellowstone National Park, Montana, USA under permit from the National Park Service. The genome was sequenced, assembled, and annotated by the DOE Joint Genome Institute and deposited at the NCBI in December 2011 (CP002835). Based on 16S rRNA genes and average nucleotide identity, Geobacillus sp. Y412MC52 and the related Geobacillus sp. Y412MC61 appear to be members of a new species of Geobacillus. The genome of Geobacillus sp. Y412MC52 consists of one circular chromosome of 3,628,883 bp, an average G + C content of 52 % and one circular plasmid of 45,057 bp and an average G + C content of 45 %. Y412MC52 possesses arabinan, arabinoglucuronoxylan, and aromatic acid degradation clusters for degradation of hemicellulose from biomass. Transport and utilization clusters are also present for other carbohydrates including starch, cellobiose, and α- and β-galactooligosaccharides.

  20. The quantitative significance of Syntrophaceae and syntrophic partnerships in methanogenic degradation of crude oil alkanes.

    PubMed

    Gray, N D; Sherry, A; Grant, R J; Rowan, A K; Hubert, C R J; Callbeck, C M; Aitken, C M; Jones, D M; Adams, J J; Larter, S R; Head, I M

    2011-11-01

    Libraries of 16S rRNA genes cloned from methanogenic oil degrading microcosms amended with North Sea crude oil and inoculated with estuarine sediment indicated that bacteria from the genera Smithella (Deltaproteobacteria, Syntrophaceace) and Marinobacter sp. (Gammaproteobacteria) were enriched during degradation. Growth yields and doubling times (36 days for both Smithella and Marinobacter) were determined using qPCR and quantitative data on alkanes, which were the predominant hydrocarbons degraded. The growth yield of the Smithella sp. [0.020 g(cell-C)/g(alkane-C)], assuming it utilized all alkanes removed was consistent with yields of bacteria that degrade hydrocarbons and other organic compounds in methanogenic consortia. Over 450 days of incubation predominance and exponential growth of Smithella was coincident with alkane removal and exponential accumulation of methane. This growth is consistent with Smithella's occurrence in near surface anoxic hydrocarbon degrading systems and their complete oxidation of crude oil alkanes to acetate and/or hydrogen in syntrophic partnership with methanogens in such systems. The calculated growth yield of the Marinobacter sp., assuming it grew on alkanes, was [0.0005 g(cell-C)/g(alkane-C)] suggesting that it played a minor role in alkane degradation. The dominant methanogens were hydrogenotrophs (Methanocalculus spp. from the Methanomicrobiales). Enrichment of hydrogen-oxidizing methanogens relative to acetoclastic methanogens was consistent with syntrophic acetate oxidation measured in methanogenic crude oil degrading enrichment cultures. qPCR of the Methanomicrobiales indicated growth characteristics consistent with measured rates of methane production and growth in partnership with Smithella.

  1. The quantitative significance of Syntrophaceae and syntrophic partnerships in methanogenic degradation of crude oil alkanes

    PubMed Central

    Gray, N D; Sherry, A; Grant, R J; Rowan, A K; Hubert, C R J; Callbeck, C M; Aitken, C M; Jones, D M; Adams, J J; Larter, S R; Head, I M

    2011-01-01

    Libraries of 16S rRNA genes cloned from methanogenic oil degrading microcosms amended with North Sea crude oil and inoculated with estuarine sediment indicated that bacteria from the genera Smithella (Deltaproteobacteria, Syntrophaceace) and Marinobacter sp. (Gammaproteobacteria) were enriched during degradation. Growth yields and doubling times (36 days for both Smithella and Marinobacter) were determined using qPCR and quantitative data on alkanes, which were the predominant hydrocarbons degraded. The growth yield of the Smithella sp. [0.020 g(cell-C)/g(alkane-C)], assuming it utilized all alkanes removed was consistent with yields of bacteria that degrade hydrocarbons and other organic compounds in methanogenic consortia. Over 450 days of incubation predominance and exponential growth of Smithella was coincident with alkane removal and exponential accumulation of methane. This growth is consistent with Smithella's occurrence in near surface anoxic hydrocarbon degrading systems and their complete oxidation of crude oil alkanes to acetate and/or hydrogen in syntrophic partnership with methanogens in such systems. The calculated growth yield of the Marinobacter sp., assuming it grew on alkanes, was [0.0005 g(cell-C)/g(alkane-C)] suggesting that it played a minor role in alkane degradation. The dominant methanogens were hydrogenotrophs (Methanocalculus spp. from the Methanomicrobiales). Enrichment of hydrogen-oxidizing methanogens relative to acetoclastic methanogens was consistent with syntrophic acetate oxidation measured in methanogenic crude oil degrading enrichment cultures. qPCR of the Methanomicrobiales indicated growth characteristics consistent with measured rates of methane production and growth in partnership with Smithella. PMID:21914097

  2. Ubiquitous Presence and Novel Diversity of Anaerobic Alkane Degraders in Cold Marine Sediments

    PubMed Central

    Gittel, Antje; Donhauser, Johanna; Røy, Hans; Girguis, Peter R.; Jørgensen, Bo B.; Kjeldsen, Kasper U.

    2015-01-01

    Alkanes are major constituents of crude oil and are released to the marine environment by natural seepage and from anthropogenic sources. Due to their chemical inertness, their removal from anoxic marine sediments is primarily controlled by the activity of anaerobic alkane-degrading microorganisms. To facilitate comprehensive cultivation-independent surveys of the diversity and distribution of anaerobic alkane degraders, we designed novel PCR primers that cover all known diversity of the 1-methylalkyl succinate synthase gene (masD/assA), which catalyzes the initial activation of alkanes. We studied masD/assA gene diversity in pristine and seepage-impacted Danish coastal sediments, as well as in sediments and alkane-degrading enrichment cultures from the Middle Valley (MV) hydrothermal vent system in the Pacific Northwest. MasD/assA genes were ubiquitously present, and the primers captured the diversity of both known and previously undiscovered masD/assA gene diversity. Seepage sediments were dominated by a single masD/assA gene cluster, which is presumably indicative of a substrate-adapted community, while pristine sediments harbored a diverse range of masD/assA phylotypes including those present in seepage sediments. This rare biosphere of anaerobic alkane degraders will likely increase in abundance in the event of seepage or accidental oil spillage. Nanomolar concentrations of short-chain alkanes (SCA) were detected in pristine and seepage sediments. Interestingly, anaerobic alkane degraders closely related to strain BuS5, the only SCA degrader in pure culture, were found in mesophilic MV enrichments, but not in cold sediments from Danish waters. We propose that the new masD/assA gene lineages in these sediments represent novel phylotypes that are either fueled by naturally occurring low levels of SCA or that metabolize medium- to long-chain alkanes. Our study highlights that masD/assA genes are a relevant diagnostic marker to identify seepage and microseepage, e

  3. Ubiquitous Presence and Novel Diversity of Anaerobic Alkane Degraders in Cold Marine Sediments.

    PubMed

    Gittel, Antje; Donhauser, Johanna; Røy, Hans; Girguis, Peter R; Jørgensen, Bo B; Kjeldsen, Kasper U

    2015-01-01

    Alkanes are major constituents of crude oil and are released to the marine environment by natural seepage and from anthropogenic sources. Due to their chemical inertness, their removal from anoxic marine sediments is primarily controlled by the activity of anaerobic alkane-degrading microorganisms. To facilitate comprehensive cultivation-independent surveys of the diversity and distribution of anaerobic alkane degraders, we designed novel PCR primers that cover all known diversity of the 1-methylalkyl succinate synthase gene (masD/assA), which catalyzes the initial activation of alkanes. We studied masD/assA gene diversity in pristine and seepage-impacted Danish coastal sediments, as well as in sediments and alkane-degrading enrichment cultures from the Middle Valley (MV) hydrothermal vent system in the Pacific Northwest. MasD/assA genes were ubiquitously present, and the primers captured the diversity of both known and previously undiscovered masD/assA gene diversity. Seepage sediments were dominated by a single masD/assA gene cluster, which is presumably indicative of a substrate-adapted community, while pristine sediments harbored a diverse range of masD/assA phylotypes including those present in seepage sediments. This rare biosphere of anaerobic alkane degraders will likely increase in abundance in the event of seepage or accidental oil spillage. Nanomolar concentrations of short-chain alkanes (SCA) were detected in pristine and seepage sediments. Interestingly, anaerobic alkane degraders closely related to strain BuS5, the only SCA degrader in pure culture, were found in mesophilic MV enrichments, but not in cold sediments from Danish waters. We propose that the new masD/assA gene lineages in these sediments represent novel phylotypes that are either fueled by naturally occurring low levels of SCA or that metabolize medium- to long-chain alkanes. Our study highlights that masD/assA genes are a relevant diagnostic marker to identify seepage and microseepage, e

  4. The anaerobic degradation of gaseous, nonmethane alkanes — From in situ processes to microorganisms

    PubMed Central

    Musat, Florin

    2015-01-01

    The short chain, gaseous alkanes ethane, propane, n- and iso-butane are released in significant amounts into the atmosphere, where they contribute to tropospheric chemistry and ozone formation. Biodegradation of gaseous alkanes by aerobic microorganisms, mostly bacteria and fungi isolated from terrestrial environments, has been known for several decades. The first indications for short chain alkane anaerobic degradation were provided by geochemical studies of deep-sea environments around hydrocarbon seeps, and included the uncoupling of the sulfate-reduction and anaerobic oxidation of methane rates, the consumption of gaseous alkanes in anoxic sediments, or the enrichment in 13C of gases in interstitial water vs. the source gas. Microorganisms able to degrade gaseous alkanes were recently obtained from deep-sea and terrestrial sediments around hydrocarbon seeps. Up to date, only sulfate-reducing pure or enriched cultures with ethane, propane and n-butane have been reported. The only pure culture presently available, strain BuS5, is affiliated to the Desulfosarcina–Desulfococcus cluster of the Deltaproteobacteria. Other phylotypes involved in gaseous alkane degradation have been identified based on stable-isotope labeling and whole-cell hybridization. Under anoxic conditions, propane and n-butane are activated similar to the higher alkanes, by homolytic cleavage of the C—H bond of a subterminal carbon atom, and addition of the ensuing radical to fumarate, yielding methylalkylsuccinates. An additional mechanism of activation at the terminal carbon atoms was demonstrated for propane, which could in principle be employed also for the activation of ethane. PMID:25904994

  5. Alkane-degrading bacteria at the soil-litter interface: comparing isolates with T-RFLP-based community profiles.

    PubMed

    Giebler, Julia; Wick, Lukas Y; Chatzinotas, Antonis; Harms, Hauke

    2013-10-01

    Alkane-degrading bacteria were isolated from uncontaminated soil microcosms, which had been incubated with maize litter as natural alkane source. The isolates served to understand spatio-temporal community changes at the soil-litter interface, which had been detected using alkB as a functional marker gene for bacterial alkane degraders. To obtain a large spectrum of isolates, liquid subcultivation was combined with a matrix-assisted enrichment (Teflon membranes, litter). Elevated cell numbers of alkane degraders were detected by most probable number counting indicating enhanced alkane degradation potential in soil in response to litter treatment. Partial 16S rRNA gene sequencing of 395 isolates revealed forty different phylogenetic groups [operational taxonomic units (OTUs)] and spatio-temporal shifts in community composition. Ten OTUs comprised so far unknown alkane degraders, and five OTUs represented putative new bacterial genera. The combination of enrichment methods yielded a higher diversity of isolates than liquid subcultivation alone. Comparison of 16S rRNA gene T-RFLP profiles indicated that many alkane degraders present in the enrichments were not detectable in the DNA extracts from soil microcosms. These possibly rare specialists might represent a seed bank for the alkane degradation capacity in uncontaminated soil. This relevant ecosystem function can be fostered by the formation of the soil-litter interface.

  6. Isolation of a thermophilic and halophilic tyrosol-degrading Geobacillus from a Tunisian high-temperature oil field.

    PubMed

    Chamkha, Mohamed; Mnif, Sami; Sayadi, Sami

    2008-06-01

    An aerobic, thermophilic, halotolerant and Gram-positive bacterium, designated strain C5, was isolated from a high-temperature oil field, located in Sfax, Tunisia, after enrichment on tyrosol. Strain C5 grew between 25 and 70 degrees C and optimally at 50 degrees C. It grew in the presence of 0-12% (w/v) NaCl, with optimum growth at 3% (w/v) NaCl. Strain C5 was able to degrade tyrosol aerobically, in the presence of 30 g L(-1) NaCl and under warm conditions (55 degrees C). The degradation of tyrosol proceeded via p-hydroxyphenylacetic and 3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetic acids. The products were confirmed by HPLC and GC-MS analyses. Strain C5 was also found to degrde a wide range of other aromatic compounds, including benzoic, p-hydroxybenzoic, protocatechuic, vanillic, p-hydroxyphenylacetic, 3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetic, cinnamic and ferulic acids, phenol and m-cresol. Moreover, strain C5 was grown on diesel and crude oil as sole carbon and energy sources. Strain C5 was also able to utilize several carbohydrates. Phenotypic characteristics and phylogenetic analysis of the 16S rRNA gene sequence of strain C5 revealed that it was related to members of the genus Geobacillus, being most closely related to the type strain of G. pallidus (99% sequence similarity). In addition, we report on growth of the type strain of G. pallidus on different aromatic compounds and hydrocarbons.

  7. Two novel alkane hydroxylase-rubredoxin fusion genes isolated from a Dietzia bacterium and the functions of fused rubredoxin domains in long-chain n-alkane degradation.

    PubMed

    Nie, Yong; Liang, Jieliang; Fang, Hui; Tang, Yue-Qin; Wu, Xiao-Lei

    2011-10-01

    Two alkane hydroxylase-rubredoxin fusion gene homologs (alkW1 and alkW2) were cloned from a Dietzia strain, designated DQ12-45-1b, which can grow on crude oil and n-alkanes ranging in length from 6 to 40 carbon atoms as sole carbon sources. Both AlkW1 and AlkW2 have an integral-membrane alkane monooxygenase (AlkB) conserved domain and a rubredoxin (Rd) conserved domain which are fused together. Phylogenetic analysis showed that these two AlkB-fused Rd domains formed a novel third cluster with all the Rds from the alkane hydroxylase-rubredoxin fusion gene clusters in Gram-positive bacteria and that this third cluster was distant from the known AlkG1- and AlkG2-type Rds. Expression of the alkW1 gene in DQ12-45-1b was induced when cells were grown on C(8) to C(32) n-alkanes as sole carbon sources, but expression of the alkW2 gene was not detected. Functional heterologous expression in an alkB deletion mutant of Pseudomonas fluorescens KOB2Δ1 suggested the alkW1 could restore the growth of KOB2Δ1 on C(14) and C(16) n-alkanes and induce faster growth on C(18) to C(32) n-alkanes than alkW1ΔRd, the Rd domain deletion mutant gene of alkW1, which also caused faster growth than KOB2Δ1 itself. In addition, the artificial fusion of AlkB from the Gram-negative P. fluorescens CHA0 and the Rds from both Gram-negative P. fluorescens CHA0 and Gram-positive Dietzia sp. DQ12-45-1b significantly increased the degradation of C(32) alkane compared to that seen with AlkB itself. In conclusion, the alkW1 gene cloned from Dietzia species encoded an alkane hydroxylase which increased growth on and degradation of n-alkanes up to C(32) in length, with its fused rubredoxin domain being necessary to maintain the functions. In addition, the fusion of alkane hydroxylase and rubredoxin genes from both Gram-positive and -negative bacteria can increase the degradation of long-chain n-alkanes (such as C(32)) in the Gram-negative bacterium.

  8. Characterization of the medium- and long-chain n-alkanes degrading Pseudomonas aeruginosa strain SJTD-1 and its alkane hydroxylase genes.

    PubMed

    Liu, Huan; Xu, Jing; Liang, Rubing; Liu, Jianhua

    2014-01-01

    A gram-negative aliphatic hydrocarbon-degrading bacterium SJTD-1 isolated from oil-contaminated soil was identified as Pseudomonas aeruginosa by comparative analyses of the 16S rRNA sequence, phenotype, and physiological features. SJTD-1 could efficiently mineralize medium- and long-chain n-alkanes (C12-C30) as its sole carbon source within seven days, showing the most optimal growth on n-hexadecane, followed by n-octadecane, and n-eicosane. In 36 h, 500 mg/L of tetradecane, hexadecane, and octadecane were transformed completely; and 2 g/L n-hexadecane was degraded to undetectable levels within 72 h. Two putative alkane-degrading genes (gene 3623 and gene 4712) were characterized and our results indicated that their gene products were rate-limiting enzymes involved in the synergetic catabolism of C12-C16 alkanes. On the basis of bioinformatics and transcriptional analysis, two P450 monooxygenases, along with a putative AlmA-like oxygenase, were examined. Genetically defective mutants lacking the characteristic alkane hydroxylase failed to degrade n-octadecane, thereby suggesting a different catalytic mechanism for the microbial transformation of alkanes with chain lengths over C18.

  9. Separating and characterizing functional alkane degraders from crude-oil-contaminated sites via magnetic nanoparticle-mediated isolation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xinzi; Zhao, Xiaohui; Li, Hanbing; Jia, Jianli; Liu, Yueqiao; Ejenavi, Odafe; Ding, Aizhong; Sun, Yujiao; Zhang, Dayi

    Uncultivable microorganisms account for over 99% of all species on the planet, but their functions are yet not well characterized. Though many cultivable degraders for n-alkanes have been intensively investigated, the roles of functional n-alkane degraders remain hidden in the natural environment. This study introduces the novel magnetic nanoparticle-mediated isolation (MMI) technology in Nigerian soils and successfully separates functional microbes belonging to the families Oxalobacteraceae and Moraxellaceae, which are dominant and responsible for alkane metabolism in situ. The alkR-type n-alkane monooxygenase genes, instead of alkA- or alkP-type, were the key functional genes involved in the n-alkane degradation process. Further physiological investigation via a BIOLOG PM plate revealed some carbon (Tween 20, Tween 40 and Tween 80) and nitrogen (tyramine, l-glutamine and d-aspartic acid) sources promoting microbial respiration and n-alkane degradation. With further addition of promoter carbon or nitrogen sources, the separated functional alkane degraders significantly improved n-alkane biodegradation rates. This suggests that MMI is a promising technology for separating functional microbes from complex microbiota, with deeper insight into their ecological functions and influencing factors. The technique also broadens the application of the BIOLOG PM plate for physiological research on functional yet uncultivable microorganisms.

  10. Distribution of alkB genes within n-alkane-degrading bacteria.

    PubMed

    Vomberg, A; Klinner, U

    2000-08-01

    Fifty-four bacterial strains belonging to 37 species were tested for their ability to assimilate short chain and/or medium chain liquid n-alkanes. A gene probe derived from the alkB gene of Pseudomonas oleovorans ATCC 29347 was utilized in hybridization experiments. Results of Southern hybridization of PCR-amplificates were compared with those of colony hybridization and dot blot hybridization. Strongest signals were received only from Gram-negative bacteria growing solely with short n-alkanes (C10). Hybridization results with soil isolates growing with n-alkanes of different chain lengths suggested as well that alkB genes seem to be widespread only in solely short-chain n-alkane-degrading pseudomonads. PCR products of Rhodococcus sp., Nocardioides sp., Gordona sp. and Sphingomonas sp. growing additionally or solely with medium-chain n-alkane as hexadecane had only few sequence identity with alkB though hybridizing with the gene probe. The derived amino acid sequence of the alkB-amplificate of Pseudomonas aureofaciens showed high homology (95%) with AlkB from Ps. oleovorans. alkB gene disruptants were not able to grow with decane.

  11. Isolation and characterization of a potential paraffin-wax degrading thermophilic bacterial strain Geobacillus kaustophilus TERI NSM for application in oil wells with paraffin deposition problems.

    PubMed

    Sood, Nitu; Lal, Banwari

    2008-02-01

    Paraffin deposition problems, that have plagued the oil industry, are currently remediated by mechanical and chemical means. However, since these methods are problematic, a microbiological approach has been considered. The bacteria, required for the mitigation of paraffin deposition problems, should be able to survive the high temperatures of oil wells and degrade the paraffins under low oxygen and nutrient conditions while sparing the low carbon chain paraffins. In this study, a thermophilic paraffinic wax degrading bacterial strain was isolated from a soil sample contaminated with paraffinic crude oil. The selected strain, Geobacillus TERI NSM, could degrade 600mg of paraffinic wax as the sole carbon source in 1000ml minimal salts medium in 7d at 55 degrees C. This strain was identified as Geobacillus kaustophilus by fatty acid methyl esters analysis and 16S rRNA full gene sequencing. G. kaustophilus TERI NSM showed 97% degradation of eicosane, 85% degradation of pentacosane and 77% degradation of triacontane in 10d when used as the carbon source. The strain TERI NSM could also degrade the paraffins of crude oil collected from oil wells that had a history of paraffin deposition problems.

  12. Characterization of a CYP153 alkane hydroxylase gene in a Gram-positive Dietzia sp. DQ12-45-1b and its "team role" with alkW1 in alkane degradation.

    PubMed

    Nie, Yong; Liang, Jie-Liang; Fang, Hui; Tang, Yue-Qin; Wu, Xiao-Lei

    2014-01-01

    CYP153 and AlkB-like hydroxylases were recently discovered in Gram-positive alkane-degrading bacteria. However, it is unclear whether they cooperate with each other in alkane degradation as they do in Gram-negative bacteria. In this paper, we cloned the CYP153 gene from a representative Gram-positive alkane-degrading bacterium, Dietzia sp. DQ12-45-1b. The CYP153 gene transcription in Dietzia sp. DQ12-45-1b and heterologous expression in alkB gene knockout mutant strain Pseudomonas fluorescens KOB2∆1 both confirmed the functions of CYP153 on C6-C10 n-alkanes degradation, but not on longer chain-length n-alkanes. In addition, substrate-binding analysis of the purified CYP153 protein revealed different substrate affinities to C6-C16 n-alkanes, confirming n-alkanes binding to CYP153 protein. Along with AlkW1, an AlkB-like alkane hydroxylase in Dietzia sp. DQ12-45-1b, a teamwork pattern was found in n-alkane degradation, i.e. CYP153 was responsible for hydroxylating n-alkanes shorter than C10 while AlkW1 was responsible for those longer than C14. Further sequence analysis suggested that the high horizontal gene transfer (HGT) potential of CYP153 genes may be universal in Gram-positive alkane-degrading actinomycetes that contain both alkB and CYP153 genes.

  13. Inhibitory Effect of Taurine on Biofilm Formation During Alkane Degradation in Acinetobacter oleivorans DR1.

    PubMed

    Eom, Hyo Jung; Park, Woojun

    2017-06-15

    Taurine, 2-aminoethanesulfonate, is known to function as an antioxidant or membrane stabilizer in eukaryotic cells, but its role in bacteria has been poorly characterized. Biofilm formation of Acinetobacter oleivorans DR1 was significantly reduced by taurine only during alkane degradation, suggesting that taurine affects alkane-induced cell surface. Structurally similar compounds harboring an amine group such as hypotaurine or ethylenediamine have a similar effect, which was not observed with sulfonate-containing chemicals such as ethanesulfonic acid, hexanesulfonic acid. Our biochemical assays and physiological tests demonstrate that taurine reduced cell surface hydrophobicity, which resulted in interruption of the interactions between cells and oily substrate surfaces, such that cells utilized alkanes less effectively. Interestingly, taurine-mediated reduction of quorum sensing (QS) signal production and QS-control sapA gene expression indicated that membrane permeability of quorum signals was also interfered by taurine. Composition and biomass of extracellular polymeric saccharides were changed in taurine-amended conditions. Taken together, our data provide evidence that amine-containing taurine can inhibit biofilm formation of DR1 cells during alkane degradation by (i) changing cell surface charge and (ii) reducing membrane hydrophobicity and QS sensing.

  14. Distribution, activity and function of short-chain alkane degrading phylotypes in hydrothermal vent sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adams, M. M.; Joye, S. B.; Hoarfrost, A.; Girguis, P. R.

    2012-12-01

    Global geochemical analyses suggest that C2-C4 short chain alkanes are a common component of the utilizable carbon pool in deep-sea sediments worldwide and have been found in diverse ecosystems. From a thermodynamic standpoint, the anaerobic microbial oxidation of these aliphatic hydrocarbons is more energetically yielding than the anaerobic oxidation of methane (AOM). Therefore, the preferential degradation of these hydrocarbons may compete with AOM for the use of oxidants such as sulfate, or other potential oxidants. Such processes could influence the fate of methane in the deep-sea. Sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) from hydrocarbon seep sediments of the Gulf of Mexico and Guaymas Basin have previously been enriched that anaerobically oxidize short chain alkanes to generate CO2 with the preferential utilization of 12C-enriched alkanes (Kniemeyer et al. 2007). Different temperature regimens along with multiple substrates were tested and a pure culture (deemed BuS5) was isolated from mesophilic enrichments with propane or n-butane as the sole carbon source. Through comparative sequence analysis, strain BuS5 was determined to cluster with the metabolically diverse Desulfosarcina / Desulfococcus cluster, which also contains the SRB found in consortia with anaerobic, methane-oxidizing archaea in seep sediments. Enrichments from a terrestrial, low temperature sulfidic hydrocarbon seep also corroborated that propane degradation occurred with most bacterial phylotypes surveyed belonging to the Deltaproteobacteria, particularly Desulfobacteraceae (Savage et al. 2011). To date, no microbes capable of ethane oxidation or anaerobic C2-C4 alkane oxidation at thermophilic temperature have been isolated. The sediment-covered, hydrothermal vent systems found at Middle Valley (Juan de Fuca Ridge, eastern Pacific Ocean) are a prime environment for investigating mesophilic to thermophilic anaerobic oxidation of short-chain alkanes, given the elevated temperatures and dissolved

  15. Diverse Bacterial Groups Contribute to the Alkane Degradation Potential of Chronically Polluted Subantarctic Coastal Sediments

    SciTech Connect

    Guibert, Lilian M.; Loviso, Claudia L.; Borglin, Sharon; Jansson, Janet K.; Dionisi, Hebe M.; Lozada, Mariana

    2015-11-07

    We aimed to gain insight into the alkane degradation potential of microbial communities from chronically polluted sediments of a subantarctic coastal environment using a combination of metagenomic approaches. A total of 6178 sequences annotated as alkane-1-monooxygenases (EC 1.14.15.3) were retrieved from a shotgun metagenomic dataset that included two sites analyzed in triplicate. The majority of the sequences binned with AlkB described in Bacteroidetes (32 ± 13 %) or Proteobacteria (29 ± 7 %), although a large proportion remained unclassified at the phylum level. Operational taxonomic unit (OTU)-based analyses showed small differences in AlkB distribution among samples that could be correlated with alkane concentrations, as well as with site-specific variations in pH and salinity. A number of low-abundance OTUs, mostly affiliated with Actinobacterial sequences, were found to be only present in the most contaminated samples. On the other hand, the molecular screening of a large-insert metagenomic library of intertidal sediments from one of the sampling sites identified two genomic fragments containing novel alkB gene sequences, as well as various contiguous genes related to lipid metabolism. Both genomic fragments were affiliated with the phylum Planctomycetes, and one could be further assigned to the genus Rhodopirellula due to the presence of a partial sequence of the 23S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) gene. This work highlights the diversity of bacterial groups contributing to the alkane degradation potential and reveals patterns of functional diversity in relation with environmental stressors in a chronically polluted, high-latitude coastal environment. In addition, alkane biodegradation genes are described for the first time in members of Planctomycetes.

  16. Diverse Bacterial Groups Contribute to the Alkane Degradation Potential of Chronically Polluted Subantarctic Coastal Sediments.

    PubMed

    Guibert, Lilian M; Loviso, Claudia L; Borglin, Sharon; Jansson, Janet K; Dionisi, Hebe M; Lozada, Mariana

    2016-01-01

    We aimed to gain insight into the alkane degradation potential of microbial communities from chronically polluted sediments of a subantarctic coastal environment using a combination of metagenomic approaches. A total of 6178 sequences annotated as alkane-1-monooxygenases (EC 1.14.15.3) were retrieved from a shotgun metagenomic dataset that included two sites analyzed in triplicate. The majority of the sequences binned with AlkB described in Bacteroidetes (32 ± 13 %) or Proteobacteria (29 ± 7 %), although a large proportion remained unclassified at the phylum level. Operational taxonomic unit (OTU)-based analyses showed small differences in AlkB distribution among samples that could be correlated with alkane concentrations, as well as with site-specific variations in pH and salinity. A number of low-abundance OTUs, mostly affiliated with Actinobacterial sequences, were found to be only present in the most contaminated samples. On the other hand, the molecular screening of a large-insert metagenomic library of intertidal sediments from one of the sampling sites identified two genomic fragments containing novel alkB gene sequences, as well as various contiguous genes related to lipid metabolism. Both genomic fragments were affiliated with the phylum Planctomycetes, and one could be further assigned to the genus Rhodopirellula due to the presence of a partial sequence of the 23S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) gene. This work highlights the diversity of bacterial groups contributing to the alkane degradation potential and reveals patterns of functional diversity in relation with environmental stressors in a chronically polluted, high-latitude coastal environment. In addition, alkane biodegradation genes are described for the first time in members of Planctomycetes.

  17. Draft Genome Sequence of Nocardioides luteus Strain BAFB, an Alkane-Degrading Bacterium Isolated from JP-7-Polluted Soil

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Lisa M.; Gunasekera, Thusitha S.

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Nocardioides luteus strain BAFB is a Gram-positive bacterium that efficiently degrades C8 to C11 alkanes aerobically. The draft genome of N. luteus BAFB is 5.76 Mb in size, with 5,358 coding sequences and 69.9% G+C content. The genes responsible for alkane degradation are present in this strain. PMID:28126947

  18. Regulation of the Alkane Hydroxylase CYP153 Gene in a Gram-Positive Alkane-Degrading Bacterium, Dietzia sp. Strain DQ12-45-1b.

    PubMed

    Liang, Jie-Liang; JiangYang, Jing-Hong; Nie, Yong; Wu, Xiao-Lei

    2015-11-13

    CYP153, one of the most common medium-chain n-alkane hydroxylases belonging to the cytochrome P450 superfamily, is widely expressed in n-alkane-degrading bacteria. CYP153 is also thought to cooperate with AlkB in degrading various n-alkanes. However, the mechanisms regulating the expression of the protein remain largely unknown. In this paper, we studied CYP153 gene transcription regulation by the potential AraC family regulator (CypR) located upstream of the CYP153 gene cluster in a broad-spectrum n-alkane-degrading Gram-positive bacterium, Dietzia sp. strain DQ12-45-1b. We first identified the transcriptional start site and the promoter of the CYP153 gene cluster. Sequence alignment of upstream regions of CYP153 gene clusters revealed high conservation in the -10 and -35 regions in Actinobacteria. Further analysis of the β-galactosidase activity in the CYP153 gene promoter-lacZ fusion cell indicated that the CYP153 gene promoter was induced by n-alkanes comprised of 8 to 14 carbon atoms, but not by derived decanol and decanic acid. Moreover, we constructed a cypR mutant strain and found that the CYP153 gene promoter activities and CYP153 gene transcriptional levels in the mutant strain were depressed compared with those in the wild-type strain in the presence of n-alkanes, suggesting that CypR served as an activator for the CYP153 gene promoter. By comparing CYP153 gene arrangements in Actinobacteria and Proteobacteria, we found that the AraC family regulator is ubiquitously located upstream of the CYP153 gene, suggesting its universal regulatory role in CYP153 gene transcription. We further hypothesize that the observed mode of CYP153 gene regulation is shared by many Actinobacteria.

  19. Regulation of the Alkane Hydroxylase CYP153 Gene in a Gram-Positive Alkane-Degrading Bacterium, Dietzia sp. Strain DQ12-45-1b

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Jie-Liang; JiangYang, Jing-Hong

    2015-01-01

    CYP153, one of the most common medium-chain n-alkane hydroxylases belonging to the cytochrome P450 superfamily, is widely expressed in n-alkane-degrading bacteria. CYP153 is also thought to cooperate with AlkB in degrading various n-alkanes. However, the mechanisms regulating the expression of the protein remain largely unknown. In this paper, we studied CYP153 gene transcription regulation by the potential AraC family regulator (CypR) located upstream of the CYP153 gene cluster in a broad-spectrum n-alkane-degrading Gram-positive bacterium, Dietzia sp. strain DQ12-45-1b. We first identified the transcriptional start site and the promoter of the CYP153 gene cluster. Sequence alignment of upstream regions of CYP153 gene clusters revealed high conservation in the −10 and −35 regions in Actinobacteria. Further analysis of the β-galactosidase activity in the CYP153 gene promoter-lacZ fusion cell indicated that the CYP153 gene promoter was induced by n-alkanes comprised of 8 to 14 carbon atoms, but not by derived decanol and decanic acid. Moreover, we constructed a cypR mutant strain and found that the CYP153 gene promoter activities and CYP153 gene transcriptional levels in the mutant strain were depressed compared with those in the wild-type strain in the presence of n-alkanes, suggesting that CypR served as an activator for the CYP153 gene promoter. By comparing CYP153 gene arrangements in Actinobacteria and Proteobacteria, we found that the AraC family regulator is ubiquitously located upstream of the CYP153 gene, suggesting its universal regulatory role in CYP153 gene transcription. We further hypothesize that the observed mode of CYP153 gene regulation is shared by many Actinobacteria. PMID:26567302

  20. Diversity of alkane degrading bacteria associated with plants in a petroleum oil-contaminated environment and expression of alkane monooxygenase (alkB) genes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andria, V.; Yousaf, S.; Reichenauer, T. G.; Smalla, K.; Sessitsch, A.

    2009-04-01

    Among twenty-six different plant species, Italian ryegrass (Lolium multiflorum var. Taurus), Birdsfoot trefoil (Lotus corniculatus var. Leo), and the combination of both plants performed well in a petroleum oil contaminated soil. Hydrocarbon degrading bacteria were isolated from the rhizosphere, root interior and shoot interior and subjected to the analysis of 16S rRNA, the 16S and 23S rRNA intergenic spacer region and alkane hydroxylase genes. Higher numbers of culturable, degrading bacteria were associated with Italian ryegrass, which were also characterized by a higher diversity, particularly in the plant interior. Only half of the isolated bacteria hosted known alkane hydroxylase genes (alkB and cytochrome P153-like). Our results indicated that alkB genes have spread through horizontal gene transfer, particularly in the Italian ryegrass rhizosphere, and suggested mobility of catabolic genes between Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria. We furthermore studied the colonization behaviour of selected hydrocarbon-degrading strains (comprising an endopyhte and a rhizosphere strain) as well as the expression of their alkane monooxygenase genes in association with Italian ryegrass. Results showed that the endophyte strain better colonized the plant, particularly the plant interior, and also showed higher expression of alkB genes suggesting a more efficient degradation of the pollutant. Furthermore, plants inoculated with the endophyte were better able to grow in the presence of diesel. The rhizosphere strain colonized primarily the rhizosphere and showed low alkB gene expression in the plant interior.

  1. Clay minerals and metal oxides strongly influence the structure of alkane-degrading microbial communities during soil maturation.

    PubMed

    Steinbach, Annelie; Schulz, Stefanie; Giebler, Julia; Schulz, Stephan; Pronk, Geertje J; Kögel-Knabner, Ingrid; Harms, Hauke; Wick, Lukas Y; Schloter, Michael

    2015-07-01

    Clay minerals, charcoal and metal oxides are essential parts of the soil matrix and strongly influence the formation of biogeochemical interfaces in soil. We investigated the role of these parental materials for the development of functional microbial guilds using the example of alkane-degrading bacteria harbouring the alkane monooxygenase gene (alkB) in artificial mixtures composed of different minerals and charcoal, sterile manure and a microbial inoculum extracted from an agricultural soil. We followed changes in abundance and community structure of alkane-degrading microbial communities after 3 and 12 months of soil maturation and in response to a subsequent 2-week plant litter addition. During maturation we observed an overall increasing divergence in community composition. The impact of metal oxides on alkane-degrading community structure increased during soil maturation, whereas the charcoal impact decreased from 3 to 12 months. Among the clay minerals illite influenced the community structure of alkB-harbouring bacteria significantly, but not montmorillonite. The litter application induced strong community shifts in soils, maturated for 12 months, towards functional guilds typical for younger maturation stages pointing to a resilience of the alkane-degradation function potentially fostered by an extant 'seed bank'.

  2. Clay minerals and metal oxides strongly influence the structure of alkane-degrading microbial communities during soil maturation

    PubMed Central

    Steinbach, Annelie; Schulz, Stefanie; Giebler, Julia; Schulz, Stephan; Pronk, Geertje J; Kögel-Knabner, Ingrid; Harms, Hauke; Wick, Lukas Y; Schloter, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Clay minerals, charcoal and metal oxides are essential parts of the soil matrix and strongly influence the formation of biogeochemical interfaces in soil. We investigated the role of these parental materials for the development of functional microbial guilds using the example of alkane-degrading bacteria harbouring the alkane monooxygenase gene (alkB) in artificial mixtures composed of different minerals and charcoal, sterile manure and a microbial inoculum extracted from an agricultural soil. We followed changes in abundance and community structure of alkane-degrading microbial communities after 3 and 12 months of soil maturation and in response to a subsequent 2-week plant litter addition. During maturation we observed an overall increasing divergence in community composition. The impact of metal oxides on alkane-degrading community structure increased during soil maturation, whereas the charcoal impact decreased from 3 to 12 months. Among the clay minerals illite influenced the community structure of alkB-harbouring bacteria significantly, but not montmorillonite. The litter application induced strong community shifts in soils, maturated for 12 months, towards functional guilds typical for younger maturation stages pointing to a resilience of the alkane-degradation function potentially fostered by an extant ‘seed bank'. PMID:25535940

  3. Radiation-induced degradation of alkane molecules in solid rare gas matrices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feldman, V. I.; Sukhov, F. F.; Slovokhotova, N. A.; Bazov, V. P.

    1996-09-01

    The radiation-induced degradation of heptane molecules in solid argon and xenon matrices at 15 K was studied using low-temperature IR spectroscopy. The total radiation-chemical yield of the destruction of heptane molecules in argon (mole ratio 500:1) was estimated to be 1.4 molecule per 100 eV. Methane, vinyl- and trans-vinylene-type olefins, and allyl-type radicals were identified among the main radiolysis products in both matrices. The C-C bond rupture is favoured in argon probably due to formation of excited heptane cations in the hole transfer in this matrix. An indication of the radical cation trapping was obtained in a xenon matrix containing an electron scavenger (Freon-113). The mechanism of the radiation-induced degradation of alkane molecules and the fate of the primary cations in rigid inert media are discussed.

  4. Progressive Degradation of Crude Oil n-Alkanes Coupled to Methane Production under Mesophilic and Thermophilic Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Lei; Shi, Shengbao; Li, Qiang; Chen, Jianfa; Zhang, Hui; Lu, Yahai

    2014-01-01

    Although methanogenic degradation of hydrocarbons has become a well-known process, little is known about which crude oil tend to be degraded at different temperatures and how the microbial community is responded. In this study, we assessed the methanogenic crude oil degradation capacity of oily sludge microbes enriched from the Shengli oilfield under mesophilic and thermophilic conditions. The microbial communities were investigated by terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP) analysis of 16S rRNA genes combined with cloning and sequencing. Enrichment incubation demonstrated the microbial oxidation of crude oil coupled to methane production at 35 and 55°C, which generated 3.7±0.3 and 2.8±0.3 mmol of methane per gram oil, respectively. Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) analysis revealed that crude oil n-alkanes were obviously degraded, and high molecular weight n-alkanes were preferentially removed over relatively shorter-chain n-alkanes. Phylogenetic analysis revealed the concurrence of acetoclastic Methanosaeta and hydrogenotrophic methanogens but different methanogenic community structures under the two temperature conditions. Candidate divisions of JS1 and WWE 1, Proteobacteria (mainly consisting of Syntrophaceae, Desulfobacteraceae and Syntrophorhabdus) and Firmicutes (mainly consisting of Desulfotomaculum) were supposed to be involved with n-alkane degradation in the mesophilic conditions. By contrast, the different bacterial phylotypes affiliated with Caldisericales, “Shengli Cluster” and Synergistetes dominated the thermophilic consortium, which was most likely to be associated with thermophilic crude oil degradation. This study revealed that the oily sludge in Shengli oilfield harbors diverse uncultured microbes with great potential in methanogenic crude oil degradation over a wide temperature range, which extend our previous understanding of methanogenic degradation of crude oil alkanes. PMID:25409013

  5. Progressive degradation of crude oil n-alkanes coupled to methane production under mesophilic and thermophilic conditions.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Lei; Shi, Shengbao; Li, Qiang; Chen, Jianfa; Zhang, Hui; Lu, Yahai

    2014-01-01

    Although methanogenic degradation of hydrocarbons has become a well-known process, little is known about which crude oil tend to be degraded at different temperatures and how the microbial community is responded. In this study, we assessed the methanogenic crude oil degradation capacity of oily sludge microbes enriched from the Shengli oilfield under mesophilic and thermophilic conditions. The microbial communities were investigated by terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP) analysis of 16S rRNA genes combined with cloning and sequencing. Enrichment incubation demonstrated the microbial oxidation of crude oil coupled to methane production at 35 and 55°C, which generated 3.7±0.3 and 2.8±0.3 mmol of methane per gram oil, respectively. Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) analysis revealed that crude oil n-alkanes were obviously degraded, and high molecular weight n-alkanes were preferentially removed over relatively shorter-chain n-alkanes. Phylogenetic analysis revealed the concurrence of acetoclastic Methanosaeta and hydrogenotrophic methanogens but different methanogenic community structures under the two temperature conditions. Candidate divisions of JS1 and WWE 1, Proteobacteria (mainly consisting of Syntrophaceae, Desulfobacteraceae and Syntrophorhabdus) and Firmicutes (mainly consisting of Desulfotomaculum) were supposed to be involved with n-alkane degradation in the mesophilic conditions. By contrast, the different bacterial phylotypes affiliated with Caldisericales, "Shengli Cluster" and Synergistetes dominated the thermophilic consortium, which was most likely to be associated with thermophilic crude oil degradation. This study revealed that the oily sludge in Shengli oilfield harbors diverse uncultured microbes with great potential in methanogenic crude oil degradation over a wide temperature range, which extend our previous understanding of methanogenic degradation of crude oil alkanes.

  6. The Use of a Combination of alkB Primers to Better Characterize the Distribution of Alkane-Degrading Bacteria.

    PubMed

    Jurelevicius, Diogo; Alvarez, Vanessa Marques; Peixoto, Raquel; Rosado, Alexandre S; Seldin, Lucy

    2013-01-01

    The alkane monooxygenase AlkB, which is encoded by the alkB gene, is a key enzyme involved in bacterial alkane degradation. To study the alkB gene within bacterial communities, researchers need to be aware of the variations in alkB nucleotide sequences; a failure to consider the sequence variations results in the low representation of the diversity and richness of alkane-degrading bacteria. To minimize this shortcoming, the use of a combination of three alkB-targeting primers to enhance the detection of the alkB gene in previously isolated alkane-degrading bacteria was proposed. Using this approach, alkB-related PCR products were detected in 79% of the strains tested. Furthermore, the chosen set of primers was used to study alkB richness and diversity in different soils sampled in Carmópolis, Brazil and King George Island, Antarctica. The DNA extracted from the different soils was PCR amplified with each set of alkB-targeting primers, and clone libraries were constructed, sequenced and analyzed. A total of 255 alkB phylotypes were detected. Venn diagram analyses revealed that only low numbers of alkB phylotypes were shared among the different libraries derived from each primer pair. Therefore, the combination of three alkB-targeting primers enhanced the richness of alkB phylotypes detected in the different soils by 45% to 139%, when compared to the use of a single alkB-targeting primer. In addition, a dendrogram analysis and beta diversity comparison of the alkB composition showed that each of the sampling sites studied had a particular set of alkane-degrading bacteria. The use of a combination of alkB primers was an efficient strategy for enhancing the detection of the alkB gene in cultivable bacteria and for better characterizing the distribution of alkane-degrading bacteria in different soil environments.

  7. The Use of a Combination of alkB Primers to Better Characterize the Distribution of Alkane-Degrading Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Jurelevicius, Diogo; Alvarez, Vanessa Marques; Peixoto, Raquel; Rosado, Alexandre S.; Seldin, Lucy

    2013-01-01

    The alkane monooxygenase AlkB, which is encoded by the alkB gene, is a key enzyme involved in bacterial alkane degradation. To study the alkB gene within bacterial communities, researchers need to be aware of the variations in alkB nucleotide sequences; a failure to consider the sequence variations results in the low representation of the diversity and richness of alkane-degrading bacteria. To minimize this shortcoming, the use of a combination of three alkB-targeting primers to enhance the detection of the alkB gene in previously isolated alkane-degrading bacteria was proposed. Using this approach, alkB-related PCR products were detected in 79% of the strains tested. Furthermore, the chosen set of primers was used to study alkB richness and diversity in different soils sampled in Carmópolis, Brazil and King George Island, Antarctica. The DNA extracted from the different soils was PCR amplified with each set of alkB-targeting primers, and clone libraries were constructed, sequenced and analyzed. A total of 255 alkB phylotypes were detected. Venn diagram analyses revealed that only low numbers of alkB phylotypes were shared among the different libraries derived from each primer pair. Therefore, the combination of three alkB-targeting primers enhanced the richness of alkB phylotypes detected in the different soils by 45% to 139%, when compared to the use of a single alkB-targeting primer. In addition, a dendrogram analysis and beta diversity comparison of the alkB composition showed that each of the sampling sites studied had a particular set of alkane-degrading bacteria. The use of a combination of alkB primers was an efficient strategy for enhancing the detection of the alkB gene in cultivable bacteria and for better characterizing the distribution of alkane-degrading bacteria in different soil environments. PMID:23825163

  8. Isolation and characterization of alkane degrading bacteria from petroleum reservoir waste water in Iran (Kerman and Tehran provenances).

    PubMed

    Hassanshahian, Mehdi; Ahmadinejad, Mohammad; Tebyanian, Hamid; Kariminik, Ashraf

    2013-08-15

    Petroleum products spill and leakage have become two major environmental challenges in Iran. Sampling was performed in the petroleum reservoir waste water of Tehran and Kerman Provinces of Iran. Alkane degrading bacteria were isolated by enrichment in a Bushnel-Hass medium, with hexadecane as sole source of carbon and energy. The isolated strains were identified by amplification of 16S rDNA gene and sequencing. Specific primers were used for identification of alkane hydroxylase gene. Fifteen alkane degrading bacteria were isolated and 8 strains were selected as powerful degradative bacteria. These 8 strains relate to Rhodococcus jostii, Stenotrophomonas maltophilia, Achromobacter piechaudii, Tsukamurella tyrosinosolvens, Pseudomonas fluorescens, Rhodococcus erythropolis, Stenotrophomonas maltophilia, Pseudomonas aeruginosa genera. The optimum concentration of hexadecane that allowed high growth was 2.5%. Gas chromatography results show that all strains can degrade approximately half of hexadecane in one week of incubation. All of the strains have alkane hydroxylase gene which are important for biodegradation. As a result, this study indicates that there is a high diversity of degradative bacteria in petroleum reservoir waste water in Iran. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Isolation and characterization of Pseudomonas aeruginosa strain SJTD-2 for degrading long-chain n-alkanes and crude oil.

    PubMed

    Xu, Jing; Liu, Huan; Liu, Jianhua; Liang, Rubing

    2015-06-04

    Oil pollution poses a severe threat to ecosystems, and bioremediation is considered as a safe and efficient alternative to physicochemical. for eliminating this contaminant. In this study, a gram-negative bacteria strain SJTD-2 isolated from oil-contaminated soil was found capable of utilizing n-alkanes and crude oil as sole energy sources. The efficiency of this strain in degrading these pollutants was analyzed. Strain SJTD-2 was identified on the basis of its phenotype, its physiological features, and a comparative genetic analysis using 16S rRNA sequence. Growth of strain SJTD-2 with different carbon sources (n-alkanes of different lengths and crude oil) was assessed, and the gas chromatography-mass spectrometry method was used to analyze the degradation efficiency of strain SJTD-2 for n-alkanes and petroleum by detecting the residual n-alkane concentrations. Strain SJTD-2 was identified as Pseudomonas aeruginosa based on the phenotype, physiological features, and 16S rRNA sequence analysis. This strain can efficiently decompose medium-chain and long-chain n-alkanes (C10-C26), and petroleum as its sole carbon sources. It preferred the long-chain n-alkanes (C18-C22), and n-docosane was considered as the best carbon source for its growth. In 48 h, 500 mg/L n-docosane could be degraded completely, and 2 g/L n-docosane was decomposed to undetectable levels within 72 h. Moreover, strain SJTD-2 could utilize about 88% of 2 g/L crude oil in 7days. Compared with other alkane-utilizing strains, strain SJTD-2 showed outstanding degradation efficiency for long-chain n-alkanes and high tolerance to petroleum at elevated concentrations. The isolation and characterization of strain SJTD-2 would help researchers study the mechanisms underlying the biodegradation of n-alkanes, and this strain could be used as a potential strain for environmental governance and soil bioremediation.

  10. Homology modeling and protein engineering of alkane monooxygenase in Burkholderia thailandensis MSMB121: in silico insights.

    PubMed

    Jain, Chakresh Kumar; Gupta, Money; Prasad, Yamuna; Wadhwa, Gulshan; Sharma, Sanjeev Kumar

    2014-07-01

    The degradation of hydrocarbons plays an important role in the eco-balancing of petroleum products, pesticides and other toxic products in the environment. The degradation of hydrocarbons by microbes such as Geobacillus thermodenitrificans, Burkhulderia, Gordonia sp. and Acinetobacter sp. has been studied intensively in the literature. The present study focused on the in silico protein engineering of alkane monooxygenase (ladA)-a protein involved in the alkane degradation pathway. We demonstrated the improvement in substrate binding energy with engineered ladA in Burkholderia thailandensis MSMB121. We identified an ortholog of ladA monooxygenase found in B. thailandensis MSMB121, and showed it to be an enzyme involved in an alkane degradation pathway studied extensively in Geobacillus thermodenitrificans. Homology modeling of the three-dimensional structure of ladA was performed with a crystal structure (protein databank ID: 3B9N) as a template in MODELLER 9v11, and further validated using PROCHECK, VERIFY-3D and WHATIF tools. Specific amino acids were substituted in the region corresponding to amino acids 305-370 of ladA protein, resulting in an enhancement of binding energy in different alkane chain molecules as compared to wild protein structures in the docking experiments. The substrate binding energy with the protein was calculated using Vina (Implemented in VEGAZZ). Molecular dynamics simulations were performed to study the dynamics of different alkane chain molecules inside the binding pockets of wild and mutated ladA. Here, we hypothesize an improvement in binding energies and accessibility of substrates towards engineered ladA enzyme, which could be further facilitated for wet laboratory-based experiments for validation of the alkane degradation pathway in this organism.

  11. Complete genome sequence of Geobacillus thermoglucosidasius C56-YS93, a novel biomass degrader isolated from obsidian hot spring in Yellowstone National Park

    SciTech Connect

    Brumm, Phillip J.; Land, Miriam L.; Mead, David A.

    2015-10-05

    Geobacillus thermoglucosidasius C56-YS93 was one of several thermophilic organisms isolated from Obsidian Hot Spring, Yellowstone National Park, Montana, USA under permit from the National Park Service. Comparison of 16 S rRNA sequences confirmed the classification of the strain as a G. thermoglucosidasius species. We sequenced the genome, assembled, and annotated by the DOE Joint Genome Institute and deposited at the NCBI in December 2011 (CP002835). Moreover, the genome of G. thermoglucosidasius C56-YS93 consists of one circular chromosome of 3,893,306 bp and two circular plasmids of 80,849 and 19,638 bp and an average G + C content of 43.93 %. G. thermoglucosidasius C56-YS93 possesses a xylan degradation cluster not found in the other G. thermoglucosidasius sequenced strains. Furthermore this cluster appears to be related to the xylan degradation cluster found in G. stearothermophilus. G. thermoglucosidasius C56-YS93 possesses two plasmids not found in the other two strains. One plasmid contains a novel gene cluster coding for proteins involved in proline degradation and metabolism, the other contains a collection of mostly hypothetical proteins.

  12. Complete genome sequence of Geobacillus thermoglucosidasius C56-YS93, a novel biomass degrader isolated from obsidian hot spring in Yellowstone National Park

    DOE PAGES

    Brumm, Phillip J.; Land, Miriam L.; Mead, David A.

    2015-10-05

    Geobacillus thermoglucosidasius C56-YS93 was one of several thermophilic organisms isolated from Obsidian Hot Spring, Yellowstone National Park, Montana, USA under permit from the National Park Service. Comparison of 16 S rRNA sequences confirmed the classification of the strain as a G. thermoglucosidasius species. We sequenced the genome, assembled, and annotated by the DOE Joint Genome Institute and deposited at the NCBI in December 2011 (CP002835). Moreover, the genome of G. thermoglucosidasius C56-YS93 consists of one circular chromosome of 3,893,306 bp and two circular plasmids of 80,849 and 19,638 bp and an average G + C content of 43.93 %. G.more » thermoglucosidasius C56-YS93 possesses a xylan degradation cluster not found in the other G. thermoglucosidasius sequenced strains. Furthermore this cluster appears to be related to the xylan degradation cluster found in G. stearothermophilus. G. thermoglucosidasius C56-YS93 possesses two plasmids not found in the other two strains. One plasmid contains a novel gene cluster coding for proteins involved in proline degradation and metabolism, the other contains a collection of mostly hypothetical proteins.« less

  13. Complete genome sequence of Geobacillus thermoglucosidasius C56-YS93, a novel biomass degrader isolated from obsidian hot spring in Yellowstone National Park.

    PubMed

    Brumm, Phillip J; Land, Miriam L; Mead, David A

    2015-01-01

    Geobacillus thermoglucosidasius C56-YS93 was one of several thermophilic organisms isolated from Obsidian Hot Spring, Yellowstone National Park, Montana, USA under permit from the National Park Service. Comparison of 16 S rRNA sequences confirmed the classification of the strain as a G. thermoglucosidasius species. The genome was sequenced, assembled, and annotated by the DOE Joint Genome Institute and deposited at the NCBI in December 2011 (CP002835). The genome of G. thermoglucosidasius C56-YS93 consists of one circular chromosome of 3,893,306 bp and two circular plasmids of 80,849 and 19,638 bp and an average G + C content of 43.93 %. G. thermoglucosidasius C56-YS93 possesses a xylan degradation cluster not found in the other G. thermoglucosidasius sequenced strains. This cluster appears to be related to the xylan degradation cluster found in G. stearothermophilus. G. thermoglucosidasius C56-YS93 possesses two plasmids not found in the other two strains. One plasmid contains a novel gene cluster coding for proteins involved in proline degradation and metabolism, the other contains a collection of mostly hypothetical proteins.

  14. Clues on the role of Beauveria bassiana catalases in alkane degradation events.

    PubMed

    Pedrini, Nicolás; Juárez, M Patricia; Crespo, Rosana; de Alaniz, María J T

    2006-01-01

    Entomopathogenic fungi adapt to growth in a culture medium containing an insect-like hydrocarbon as the sole carbon source inducing the beta-oxidation pathway during the alkane degradation. The effect of two carbon sources on the catalase activity was studied in the entomopathogenic fungus Beauveria bassiana. Catalase activity was detected both in the peroxisomal and cytosolic fraction. A significant increment in the specific activity of the peroxisomal fraction (12.6-fold) was observed when glucose was replaced by an insect-like hydrocarbon, whereas the specific activity in the cytosol diminished more than 1.2-fold in the same culture condition. After purification to homogeneity by gel filtration and strong anion exchange chromatography, an apparent molecular mass of 54.7 and 84.0 kDa per subunit were determined respectively for the peroxisomal and cytosolic catalase. The enzymes showed different biochemical and kinetic characteristics, but both were inhibited by 3-amino-1,2,4 triazole. Peroxisomal catalase was sensitive to pH, heat and high concentration of the hydrogen peroxide substrate. Inversely the cytosolic isoform exhibited a broad range of optimal pH (6.0-10.0), high thermostability (<55 C) and remained fully active at least up to 70 mM hydrogen peroxide. Measurement of catalase activity is a new approach for evaluating fungal ability to degrade hydrocarbons.

  15. Diverse sulfate-reducing bacteria of the Desulfosarcina/Desulfococcus clade are the key alkane degraders at marine seeps

    PubMed Central

    Kleindienst, Sara; Herbst, Florian-Alexander; Stagars, Marion; von Netzer, Frederick; von Bergen, Martin; Seifert, Jana; Peplies, Jörg; Amann, Rudolf; Musat, Florin; Lueders, Tillmann; Knittel, Katrin

    2014-01-01

    Biogeochemical and microbiological data indicate that the anaerobic oxidation of non-methane hydrocarbons by sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) has an important role in carbon and sulfur cycling at marine seeps. Yet, little is known about the bacterial hydrocarbon degraders active in situ. Here, we provide the link between previous biogeochemical measurements and the cultivation of degraders by direct identification of SRB responsible for butane and dodecane degradation in complex on-site microbiota. Two contrasting seep sediments from Mediterranean Amon mud volcano and Guaymas Basin (Gulf of California) were incubated with 13C-labeled butane or dodecane under sulfate-reducing conditions and analyzed via complementary stable isotope probing (SIP) techniques. Using DNA- and rRNA-SIP, we identified four specialized clades of alkane oxidizers within Desulfobacteraceae to be distinctively active in oxidation of short- and long-chain alkanes. All clades belong to the Desulfosarcina/Desulfococcus (DSS) clade, substantiating the crucial role of these bacteria in anaerobic hydrocarbon degradation at marine seeps. The identification of key enzymes of anaerobic alkane degradation, subsequent β-oxidation and the reverse Wood–Ljungdahl pathway for complete substrate oxidation by protein-SIP further corroborated the importance of the DSS clade and indicated that biochemical pathways, analog to those discovered in the laboratory, are of great relevance for natural settings. The high diversity within identified subclades together with their capability to initiate alkane degradation and growth within days to weeks after substrate amendment suggest an overlooked potential of marine benthic microbiota to react to natural changes in seepage, as well as to massive hydrocarbon input, for example, as encountered during anthropogenic oil spills. PMID:24722631

  16. Diverse sulfate-reducing bacteria of the Desulfosarcina/Desulfococcus clade are the key alkane degraders at marine seeps.

    PubMed

    Kleindienst, Sara; Herbst, Florian-Alexander; Stagars, Marion; von Netzer, Frederick; von Bergen, Martin; Seifert, Jana; Peplies, Jörg; Amann, Rudolf; Musat, Florin; Lueders, Tillmann; Knittel, Katrin

    2014-10-01

    Biogeochemical and microbiological data indicate that the anaerobic oxidation of non-methane hydrocarbons by sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) has an important role in carbon and sulfur cycling at marine seeps. Yet, little is known about the bacterial hydrocarbon degraders active in situ. Here, we provide the link between previous biogeochemical measurements and the cultivation of degraders by direct identification of SRB responsible for butane and dodecane degradation in complex on-site microbiota. Two contrasting seep sediments from Mediterranean Amon mud volcano and Guaymas Basin (Gulf of California) were incubated with (13)C-labeled butane or dodecane under sulfate-reducing conditions and analyzed via complementary stable isotope probing (SIP) techniques. Using DNA- and rRNA-SIP, we identified four specialized clades of alkane oxidizers within Desulfobacteraceae to be distinctively active in oxidation of short- and long-chain alkanes. All clades belong to the Desulfosarcina/Desulfococcus (DSS) clade, substantiating the crucial role of these bacteria in anaerobic hydrocarbon degradation at marine seeps. The identification of key enzymes of anaerobic alkane degradation, subsequent β-oxidation and the reverse Wood-Ljungdahl pathway for complete substrate oxidation by protein-SIP further corroborated the importance of the DSS clade and indicated that biochemical pathways, analog to those discovered in the laboratory, are of great relevance for natural settings. The high diversity within identified subclades together with their capability to initiate alkane degradation and growth within days to weeks after substrate amendment suggest an overlooked potential of marine benthic microbiota to react to natural changes in seepage, as well as to massive hydrocarbon input, for example, as encountered during anthropogenic oil spills.

  17. Occurrence of diverse alkane hydroxylase alkB genes in indigenous oil-degrading bacteria of Baltic Sea surface water.

    PubMed

    Viggor, Signe; Jõesaar, Merike; Vedler, Eve; Kiiker, Riinu; Pärnpuu, Liis; Heinaru, Ain

    2015-12-30

    Formation of specific oil degrading bacterial communities in diesel fuel, crude oil, heptane and hexadecane supplemented microcosms of the Baltic Sea surface water samples was revealed. The 475 sequences from constructed alkane hydroxylase alkB gene clone libraries were grouped into 30 OPFs. The two largest groups were most similar to Pedobacter sp. (245 from 475) and Limnobacter sp. (112 from 475) alkB gene sequences. From 56 alkane-degrading bacterial strains 41 belonged to the Pseudomonas spp. and 8 to the Rhodococcus spp. having redundant alkB genes. Together 68 alkB gene sequences were identified. These genes grouped into 20 OPFs, half of them being specific only to the isolated strains. Altogether 543 diverse alkB genes were characterized in the brackish Baltic Sea water; some of them representing novel lineages having very low sequence identities with corresponding genes of the reference strains.

  18. High Diversity of Anaerobic Alkane-Degrading Microbial Communities in Marine Seep Sediments Based on (1-methylalkyl)succinate Synthase Genes

    PubMed Central

    Stagars, Marion H.; Ruff, S. Emil; Amann, Rudolf; Knittel, Katrin

    2016-01-01

    Alkanes comprise a substantial fraction of crude oil and are prevalent at marine seeps. These environments are typically anoxic and host diverse microbial communities that grow on alkanes. The most widely distributed mechanism of anaerobic alkane activation is the addition of alkanes to fumarate by (1-methylalkyl)succinate synthase (Mas). Here we studied the diversity of MasD, the catalytic subunit of the enzyme, in 12 marine sediments sampled at seven seeps. We aimed to identify cosmopolitan species as well as to identify factors structuring the alkane-degrading community. Using next generation sequencing we obtained a total of 420 MasD species-level operational taxonomic units (OTU0.96) at 96% amino acid identity. Diversity analysis shows a high richness and evenness of alkane-degrading bacteria. Sites with similar hydrocarbon composition harbored similar alkane-degrading communities based on MasD genes; the MasD community structure is clearly driven by the hydrocarbon source available at the various seeps. Two of the detected OTU0.96 were cosmopolitan and abundant while 75% were locally restricted, suggesting the presence of few abundant and globally distributed alkane degraders as well as specialized variants that have developed under specific conditions at the diverse seep environments. Of the three MasD clades identified, the most diverse was affiliated with Deltaproteobacteria. A second clade was affiliated with both Deltaproteobacteria and Firmicutes likely indicating lateral gene transfer events. The third clade was only distantly related to known alkane-degrading organisms and comprises new divergent lineages of MasD homologs, which might belong to an overlooked phylum of alkane-degrading bacteria. In addition, masD geneFISH allowed for the in situ identification and quantification of the target guild in alkane-degrading enrichment cultures. Altogether, these findings suggest an unexpectedly high number of yet unknown groups of anaerobic alkane degraders

  19. Draft Genome Sequence of the Versatile Alkane-Degrading Bacterium Aquabacterium sp. Strain NJ1.

    PubMed

    Masuda, Hisako; Shiwa, Yuh; Yoshikawa, Hirofumi; Zylstra, Gerben J

    2014-12-04

    The draft genome sequence of a soil bacterium, Aquabacterium sp. strain NJ1, capable of utilizing both liquid and solid alkanes, was deciphered. This is the first report of an Aquabacterium genome sequence.

  20. Draft Genome Sequence of the Versatile Alkane-Degrading Bacterium Aquabacterium sp. Strain NJ1

    PubMed Central

    Shiwa, Yuh; Yoshikawa, Hirofumi; Zylstra, Gerben J.

    2014-01-01

    The draft genome sequence of a soil bacterium, Aquabacterium sp. strain NJ1, capable of utilizing both liquid and solid alkanes, was deciphered. This is the first report of an Aquabacterium genome sequence. PMID:25477416

  1. Phylogenetic and functional diversity of alkane degrading bacteria associated with Italian ryegrass (Lolium multiflorum) and Birdsfoot trefoil (Lotus corniculatus) in a petroleum oil-contaminated environment.

    PubMed

    Yousaf, Sohail; Andria, Verania; Reichenauer, Thomas G; Smalla, Kornelia; Sessitsch, Angela

    2010-12-15

    Twenty-six different plant species were analyzed regarding their performance in soil contaminated with petroleum oil. Two well-performing species, Italian ryegrass (Lolium multiflorum var. Taurus), Birdsfoot trefoil (Lotus corniculatus var. Leo) and the combination of these two plants were selected to study the ecology of plant-associated, culturable alkane-degrading bacteria. Hydrocarbon degrading bacteria were isolated from the rhizosphere, root interior and shoot interior and subjected to the analysis of 16S rRNA gene, the 16S and 23S rRNA intergenic spacer region and alkane hydroxylase genes. Furthermore, we investigated whether alkane hydroxylase genes are plasmid located. Higher numbers of culturable, alkane-degrading bacteria were associated with Italian ryegrass, which were also characterized by a higher diversity, particularly in the plant interior. Only half of the isolated bacteria hosted known alkane hydroxylase genes (alkB and cytochrome P153-like). Degradation genes were found both on plasmids as well as in the chromosome. In regard to application of plants for rhizodegradation, where support of numerous degrading bacteria is essential for efficient break-down of pollutants, Italian ryegrass seems to be more appropriate than Birdsfoot trefoil.

  2. Combined use of alkane-degrading and plant growth-promoting bacteria enhanced phytoremediation of diesel contaminated soil.

    PubMed

    Tara, Nain; Afzal, Muhammad; Ansari, Tariq M; Tahseen, Razia; Iqbal, Samina; Khan, Qaiser M

    2014-01-01

    Inoculation of plants with pollutant-degrading and plant growth-promoting microorganisms is a simple strategy to enhance phytoremediation activity. The objective of this study was to determine the effect of inoculation of different bacterial strains, possessing alkane-degradation and 1-amino-cyclopropane-1 -carboxylic acid (ACC) deaminase activity, on plant growth and phytoremediation activity. Carpet grass (Axonopus affinis) was planted in soil spiked with diesel (1% w/w) for 90 days and inoculated with different bacterial strains, Pseudomonas sp. ITRH25, Pantoea sp. BTRH79 and Burkholderia sp. PsJN, individually and in combination. Generally, bacterial application increased total numbers of culturable hydrocarbon-degrading bacteria in the rhizosphere ofcarpet grass, plant biomass production, hydrocarbon degradation and reduced genotoxicity. Bacterial strains possessing different beneficial traits affect plant growth and phytoremediation activity in different ways. Maximum bacterial population, plant biomass production and hydrocarbon degradation were achieved when carpet grass was inoculated with a consortium of three strains. Enhanced plant biomass production and hydrocarbon degradation were associated with increased numbers of culturable hydrocarbon-degrading bacteria in the rhizosphere of carpet grass. The present study revealed that the combined use of different bacterial strains, exhibiting different beneficial traits, is a highly effective strategy to improve plant growth and phytoremediation activity.

  3. Diversity of flavin-binding monooxygenase genes (almA) in marine bacteria capable of degradation long-chain alkanes.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wanpeng; Shao, Zongze

    2012-06-01

    Many bacteria have been reported as degraders of long-chain (LC) n-alkanes, but the mechanism is poorly understood. Flavin-binding monooxygenase (AlmA) was recently found to be involved in LC-alkane degradation in bacteria of the Acinetobacter and Alcanivorax genera. However, the diversity of this gene and the role it plays in other bacteria remains unclear. In this study, we surveyed the diversity of almA in marine bacteria and in bacteria found in oil-enrichment communities. To identify the presence of this gene, a pair of degenerate PCR primers were was designed based on conserved motifs of the almA gene sequences in public databases. Using this approach, we identified diverse almA genes in the hydrocarbon-degrading bacteria and in bacterial communities from the surface seawater of the Xiamen coastal area, the South China Sea, the Indian Ocean, and the Atlantic Ocean. As a result, almA was positively detected in 35 isolates belonging to four genera, and a total of 39 different almA sequences were obtained. Five isolates were confirmed to harbor two to three almA genes. From the Xiamen coastal area and the Atlantic Ocean oil-enrichment communities, a total of 60 different almA sequences were obtained. These sequences mainly formed two clusters in the phylogenetic tree, named Class I and Class II, and these shared 45-56% identity at the amino acid level. Class I contained 11 sequences from bacteria represented by the Salinisphaera and Parvibaculum genera. Class II was larger and more diverse, and it was composed of 88 sequences from Proteobacteria, Gram-negative bacteria, and the enriched bacterial communities. These communities were represented by the Alcanivorax and Marinobacter genera, which are the two most popular genera hosting the almA gene. AlmA was also detected across a wide geographical range, as determined by the origin of the bacterial host. Our results demonstrate the diversity of almA and confirm its high rate of occurrence in hydrocarbon-degrading

  4. Regulation of alkane degradation pathway by a TetR family repressor via an autoregulation positive feedback mechanism in a Gram-positive Dietzia bacterium.

    PubMed

    Liang, Jie-Liang; Nie, Yong; Wang, Miaoxiao; Xiong, Guangming; Wang, Yi-Ping; Maser, Edmund; Wu, Xiao-Lei

    2016-01-01

    n-Alkanes are ubiquitous in nature and serve as important carbon sources for both Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria. Hydroxylation of n-alkanes by alkane monooxygenases is the first and most critical step in n-alkane metabolism. However, regulation of alkane degradation genes in Gram-positive bacteria remains poorly characterized. We therefore explored the transcriptional regulation of an alkB-type alkane hydroxylase-rubredoxin fusion gene, alkW1, from Dietzia sp. DQ12-45-1b. The alkW1 promoter was characterized and so was the putative TetR family regulator, AlkX, located downstream of alkW1 gene. We further identified an unusually long 48 bp inverted repeat upstream of alkW1 and demonstrated the binding of AlkX to this operator. Analytical ultracentrifugation and microcalorimetric results indicated that AlkX formed stable dimers in solution and two dimers bound to one operator in a positive cooperative fashion characterized by a Hill coefficient of 1.64 (± 0.03) [k(D)  = 1.06 (± 0.16) μM, k(D) ' = 0.05 (± 0.01) μM]. However, the DNA-binding affinity was disrupted in the presence of long-chain fatty acids (C10-C24), suggesting that AlkX can sense the concentrations of n-alkane degradation metabolites. A model was therefore proposed where AlkX controls alkW1 expression in a metabolite-dependent manner. Bioinformatic analysis revealed that the alkane hydroxylase gene regulation mechanism may be common among Actinobacteria.

  5. Inactivation of Cytochrome o Ubiquinol Oxidase Relieves Catabolic Repression of the Pseudomonas putida GPo1 Alkane Degradation Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Dinamarca, M. Alejandro; Ruiz-Manzano, Ana; Rojo, Fernando

    2002-01-01

    Expression of the alkane degradation pathway encoded by the OCT plasmid of Pseudomonas putida GPo1 is regulated by two control systems. One relies on the transcriptional regulator AlkS, which activates expression of the pathway in the presence of alkanes. The other, which is a dominant global regulation control, represses the expression of the pathway genes when a preferred carbon source is present in the growth medium in addition to alkanes. This catabolite repression control occurs through a poorly characterized mechanism that ultimately regulates transcription from the two AlkS-activated promoters of the pathway. To identify the factors involved, a screening method was developed to isolate mutants without this control. Several isolates were obtained, all of which contained mutations that mapped to genes encoding cytochrome o ubiquinol oxidase, the main terminal oxidase of the electron transport chain under highly aerobic conditions. Elimination of this terminal oxidase led to a decrease in the catabolic repression observed both in rich Luria-Bertani medium and in a defined medium containing lactate or succinate as the carbon source. This suggests that catabolic repression could monitor the physiological or metabolic status by using information from the electron transport chain or from the redox state of the cell. Since inactivation of the crc gene also reduces catabolic repression in rich medium (although not that observed in a defined medium), a strain was generated lacking both the Crc function and the cytochrome o terminal oxidase. The two mutations had an additive effect in relieving catabolic repression in rich medium. This suggests that crc and cyo belong to different regulation pathways, both contributing to catabolic repression. PMID:12081947

  6. Diversity of crude oil-degrading bacteria and alkane hydroxylase (alkB) genes from the Qinghai-Tibet Plateau.

    PubMed

    Long, Haozhi; Wang, Yilin; Chang, Sijing; Liu, Guangxiu; Chen, Tuo; Huo, Guanghua; Zhang, Wei; Wu, Xiukun; Tai, Xisheng; Sun, Likun; Zhang, Baogui

    2017-03-01

    The aim of this study was to survey the response of the microbial community to crude oil and the diversity of alkane hydroxylase (alkB) genes in soil samples from the Qinghai-Tibet Plateau (QTP). The enrichment cultures and clone libraries were used. Finally, 53 isolates and 94 alkB sequences were obtained from 10 pristine soil samples after enrichment at 10 °C with crude oil as sole carbon source. The isolates fell into the phyla Proteobacteria, Actinobacteria, and Bacteroidetes, with the dominance of Pseudomonas and Acinetobacter. The composition of degraders was different from polar habitats where Acinetobacter sp. is not a predominant responder of alkane degradative microbial communities. Phylogenetic analysis showed that the alkB genes from isolates and enrichment communities formed eight clusters and mainly related with alkB genes of Pseudomonas, Rhodococcus, and Acinetobacter. The alkB gene diversity in the QTP was lower than marine environments and polar soil samples. In particular, a total of 10 isolates exhibiting vigorous growth with crude oil could detect no crude oil degradation-related gene sequences, such as alkB, P450, almA, ndoB, and xylE genes. The Shannon-Wiener index of the alkB clone libraries from the QTP ranged from 1.00 to 2.24 which is similar with polar pristine soil samples but lower than that of contaminated soils. These results indicated that the Pseudomonas, Acinetobacter, and Rhodococcus genera are the candidate for in situ bioremediation, and the environment of QTP may be still relatively uncontaminated by crude oil.

  7. Diversity and abundance of n-alkane degrading bacteria in the near surface soils of a Chinese onshore oil and gas field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, K.; Tang, Y.; Ren, C.; Zhao, K.; Sun, Y.

    2012-10-01

    Alkane degrading bacteria have long been used as an important biological indicator for oil and gas prospecting, but their ecological characteristics in hydrocarbon microseep habitats are still poorly understood. In this study, the diversity and abundance of n-alkane degrading bacterial community in the near surface soils of a Chinese onshore oil and gas field were investigated using molecular techniques. Terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP) analyses in combination with cloning and sequencing of alkB genes revealed that trace amount of volatile hydrocarbons migrated from oil and gas reservoirs caused a shift of the n-alkane degrading bacterial community from Gram-positive bacteria (Mycobacterium and Rhodococcus) to Gram-negative genotypes (Alcanivorax and Acinetobacter). Real-time PCR results furthermore showed that the abundance of alkB genes increased substantially in the surface soils underlying oil and gas reservoirs even though only low or undetectable concentrations of hydrocarbons were measured in these soils due to efficient microbial degradation. Our findings broadened the knowledge on the ecological characteristics of alkane degrading community in hydrocarbon microseeps and may provide a new approach for microbial prospecting for oil and gas (MPOG).

  8. Methanogenic paraffin degradation proceeds via alkane addition to fumarate by 'Smithella' spp. mediated by a syntrophic coupling with hydrogenotrophic methanogens.

    PubMed

    Wawrik, Boris; Marks, Christopher R; Davidova, Irene A; McInerney, Michael J; Pruitt, Shane; Duncan, Kathleen E; Suflita, Joseph M; Callaghan, Amy V

    2016-09-01

    Anaerobic microbial biodegradation of recalcitrant, water-insoluble substrates, such as paraffins, presents unique metabolic challenges. To elucidate this process, a methanogenic consortium capable of mineralizing long-chain n-paraffins (C28 -C50 ) was enriched from San Diego Bay sediment. Analysis of 16S rRNA genes indicated the dominance of Syntrophobacterales (43%) and Methanomicrobiales (26%). Metagenomic sequencing allowed draft genome assembly of dominant uncultivated community members belonging to the bacterial genus Smithella and the archaeal genera Methanoculleus and Methanosaeta. Five contigs encoding homologs of the catalytic subunit of alkylsuccinate synthase (assA) were detected. Additionally, mRNA transcripts for these genes, including a homolog binned within the 'Smithella' sp. SDB genome scaffold, were detected via RT-PCR, implying that paraffins are activated via 'fumarate addition'. Metabolic reconstruction and comparison with genome scaffolds of uncultivated n-alkane degrading 'Smithella' spp. are consistent with the hypothesis that syntrophically growing 'Smithella' spp. may achieve reverse electron transfer by coupling the reoxidation of ETFred to a membrane-bound FeS oxidoreductase functioning as an ETF:menaquinone oxidoreductase. Subsequent electron transfer could proceed via a periplasmic formate dehydrogenase and/or hydrogenase, allowing energetic coupling to hydrogenotrophic methanogens such as Methanoculleus. Ultimately, these data provide fundamental insight into the energy conservation mechanisms that dictate interspecies interactions salient to methanogenic alkane mineralization. © 2016 Society for Applied Microbiology and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. Draft Genome Sequence of Thermophilic Geobacillus sp. Strain Sah69, Isolated from Saharan Soil, Southeast Algeria

    PubMed Central

    Bezuidt, Oliver K. I.; Makhalanyane, Thulani P.; Gomri, Mohamed A.; Kharroub, Karima

    2015-01-01

    Geobacillus spp. are potential sources of novel enzymes, such as those involved in the degradation of recalcitrant polymers. Here, we report a Geobacillus genome that may help reveal genomic differences between this strain and publicly available representatives of the same genus from diverse niches. PMID:26679578

  10. Draft Genome Sequence of Alkane-Degrading Acinetobacter venetianus JKSF02, Isolated from Contaminated Sediment of the San Jacinto River in Houston, Texas.

    PubMed

    Iyer, Rupa; Damania, Ashish

    2016-04-14

    Acinetobacter venetianusJKSF02 was isolated from contaminated sediment in eastern Houston, Texas along the San Jacinto River. This microorganism specializes in n-alkane degradation and is well suited for bioremediation of the petroleum hydrocarbon deposited throughout the region by shipping and industrial activity from the Houston Ship Channel. Copyright © 2016 Iyer and Damania.

  11. Draft Genome Sequence of Alkane-Degrading Acinetobacter venetianus JKSF02, Isolated from Contaminated Sediment of the San Jacinto River in Houston, Texas

    PubMed Central

    Damania, Ashish

    2016-01-01

    Acinetobacter venetianus JKSF02 was isolated from contaminated sediment in eastern Houston, Texas along the San Jacinto River. This microorganism specializes in n-alkane degradation and is well suited for bioremediation of the petroleum hydrocarbon deposited throughout the region by shipping and industrial activity from the Houston Ship Channel. PMID:27081144

  12. High Frequency of Thermodesulfovibrio spp. and Anaerolineaceae in Association with Methanoculleus spp. in a Long-Term Incubation of n-Alkanes-Degrading Methanogenic Enrichment Culture

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Bo; Wang, Li-Ying; Zhou, Zhichao; Mbadinga, Serge M.; Zhou, Lei; Liu, Jin-Feng; Yang, Shi-Zhong; Gu, Ji-Dong; Mu, Bo-Zhong

    2016-01-01

    In the present study, the microbial community and functional gene composition of a long-term active alkane-degrading methanogenic culture was established after two successive enrichment culture transfers and incubated for a total period of 1750 days. Molecular analysis was conducted after the second transfer (incubated for 750 days) for both the active alkanes-degrading methanogenic enrichment cultures (T2-AE) and the background control (T2-BC). A net increase of methane as the end product was detected in the headspace of the enrichment cultures amended with long-chain n-alkanes and intermediate metabolites, including octadecanoate, hexadecanoate, isocaprylate, butyrate, isobutyrate, propionate, acetate, and formate were measured in the liquid cultures. The composition of microbial community shifted through the successive transfers over time of incubation. Sequences of bacterial and archaeal 16S rRNA gene (16S rDNA) and mcrA functional gene indicated that bacterial sequences affiliated to Thermodesulfovibrio spp. and Anaerolineaceae and archaeal sequences falling within the genus Methanoculleus were the most frequently encountered and thus represented the dominant members performing the anaerobic degradation of long-chain n-alkanes and methanogenesis. In addition, the presence of assA functional genes encoding the alkylsuccinate synthase α subunit indicated that fumarate addition mechanism could be considered as a possible initial activation step of n-alkanes in the present study. The succession pattern of microbial communities indicates that Thermodesulfovibrio spp. could be a generalist participating in the metabolism of intermediates, while Anaerolineaceae plays a key role in the initial activation of long-chain n-alkane biodegradation. PMID:27695441

  13. Monitoring the alkane monooxygenase gene alkB in different soil interfaces during plant litter degradation of C3 and C4 plants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schulz, S.; Munch, J. C.; Schloter, M.

    2009-04-01

    Hydrocarbons like n-alkanes are ubiquitous in the environment as a result of anthropogenic contamination (e.g. oil spills) as well as a part of an ecosystem's biomass. For example n-alkanes become released during plant litter degradation; consequently they become a high abundant carbon source for microorganism. One possibility for the prokaryotic hydrocarbon metabolisation is an aerobic degradation pathway where the initial step is catalysed by the membrane bound alkane monooxygenase alkB. We analysed the influence of alkanes on the abundance of the alkB gene in different interfaces of the litter-soil system during the degradation of maize and pea litter. Therefore soil samples of a sandy and a loamy soil have been incubated with straw of maize and pea plants up to 30 weeks with constant soil moisture and temperature. Using quantitative real-time PCR we were able to monitor the changes of the abundance and the expression rates of alkB. In our experiments we focused on the straw layer, the litter/soil interface and the soil 1 cm below this interface (bulk soil). Our results clearly demonstrate time and space dependent abundance patterns of alkB genes and transcripts in the different layers studied, which are additionally shaped by the soil type used.

  14. Diversity and abundance of n-alkane-degrading bacteria in the near-surface soils of a Chinese onshore oil and gas field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, K.; Tang, Y.; Ren, C.; Zhao, K.; Sun, Y.

    2013-03-01

    Alkane-degrading bacteria have long been used as an important biological indicator for oil and gas prospecting, but their ecological characteristics in hydrocarbon microseep habitats are still poorly understood. In this study, the diversity and abundance of n-alkane-degrading bacterial community in the near-surface soils of a Chinese onshore oil and gas field were investigated using molecular techniques. Terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP) analyses in combination with cloning and sequencing of alkB genes revealed that Gram-negative genotypes (Alcanivorax and Acinetobacter) dominated n-alkane-degrading bacterial communities in the near-surface soils of oil and gas reservoirs, while the dominant microbial communities were Gram-positive bacteria (Mycobacterium and Rhodococcus) in background soil. Real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (PCR) results furthermore showed that the abundance of alkB genes increased substantially in the surface soils above oil and gas reservoirs even though only low or undetectable concentrations of hydrocarbons were measured in these soils. The results of this study implicate that trace amounts of volatile hydrocarbons migrate from oil and gas reservoirs, and likely result in the changes of microbial communities in the near-surface soil.

  15. Genetic engineering of Geobacillus spp.

    PubMed

    Kananavičiūtė, Rūta; Čitavičius, Donaldas

    2015-04-01

    Members of the genus Geobacillus are thermophiles that are of great biotechnological importance, since they are sources of many thermostable enzymes. Because of their metabolic versatility, geobacilli can be used as whole-cell catalysts in processes such as bioconversion and bioremediation. The effective employment of Geobacillus spp. requires the development of reliable methods for genetic engineering of these bacteria. Currently, genetic manipulation tools and protocols are under rapid development. However, there are several convenient cloning vectors, some of which replicate autonomously, while others are suitable for the genetic modification of chromosomal genes. Gene expression systems are also intensively studied. Combining these tools together with proper techniques for DNA transfer, some Geobacillus strains were shown to be valuable producers of recombinant proteins and industrially important biochemicals, such as ethanol or isobutanol. This review encompasses the progress made in the genetic engineering of Geobacillus spp. and surveys the vectors and transformation methods that are available for this genus.

  16. Genome sequence of n-alkane-degrading Hydrocarboniphaga effusa strain AP103T (ATCC BAA-332T).

    PubMed

    Chang, Hung-Kuang; Zylstra, Gerben J; Chae, Jong-Chan

    2012-09-01

    Hydrocarboniphaga effusa strain AP103(T) (ATCC BAA-332(T)) is a member of the Gammaproteobacteria utilizing n-alkanes as the sole source of carbon and energy. Here we report the draft genome sequence of AP103(T), which consists of 5,193,926 bp with a G + C content of 65.18%.

  17. Expression of the Pseudomonas putida OCT Plasmid Alkane Degradation Pathway Is Modulated by Two Different Global Control Signals: Evidence from Continuous Cultures

    PubMed Central

    Dinamarca, M. Alejandro; Aranda-Olmedo, Isabel; Puyet, Antonio; Rojo, Fernando

    2003-01-01

    Expression of the genes of the alkane degradation pathway encoded in the Pseudomonas putida OCT plasmid are subject to negative and dominant global control depending on the carbon source used and on the physiological status of the cell. We investigated the signals responsible for this control in chemostat cultures under conditions of nutrient or oxygen limitation. Our results show that this global control is not related to the growth rate and responds to two different signals. One signal is the concentration of the carbon source that generates the repressing effect (true catabolite repression control). The second signal is influenced by the level of expression of the cytochome o ubiquinol oxidase, which in turn depends on factors such as oxygen availability or the carbon source used. Since under carbon limitation conditions the first signal is relieved but the second signal is not, we propose that modulation mediated by the cytochrome o ubiquinol oxidase is not classical catabolite repression control but rather a more general physiological control mechanism. The two signals have an additive, but independent, effect, inhibiting induction of the alkane degradation pathway. PMID:12896996

  18. Microbial Degradation of the Multiply Branched Alkane 2,6,10,15,19,23-Hexamethyltetracosane (Squalane) by Mycobacterium fortuitum and Mycobacterium ratisbonense

    PubMed Central

    Berekaa, Mahmoud M.; Steinbüchel, Alexander

    2000-01-01

    Among several bacterial species belonging to the general Gordonia, Mycobacterium, Micromonospora, Pseudomonas, and Rhodococcus, only two mycobacterial isolates, Mycobacterium fortuitum strain NF4 and the new isolate Mycobacterium ratisbonense strain SD4, which was isolated from a sewage treatment plant, were capable of utilizing the multiply branched hydrocarbon squalane (2,6,10,15,19,23-hexamethyltetracosane) and its analogous unsaturated hydrocarbon squalene as the sole carbon source for growth. Detailed degradation studies and high-pressure liquid chromatography analysis showed a clear decrease of the concentrations of squalane and squalene during biomass increase. These results were supported by resting-cell experiments using strain SD4 and squalane or squalene as the substrate. The degradation of acyclic isoprenoids and alkanes as well as of acids derived from these compounds was also investigated. Inhibition of squalane and squalene degradation by acrylic acid indicated the possible involvement of β-oxidation in the degradation route. To our knowledge, this is the first report demonstrating the biodegradation of squalane by using defined axenic cultures. PMID:11010899

  19. Analyses of n-alkanes degrading community dynamics of a high-temperature methanogenic consortium enriched from production water of a petroleum reservoir by a combination of molecular techniques.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Lei; Li, Kai-Ping; Mbadinga, Serge Maurice; Yang, Shi-Zhong; Gu, Ji-Dong; Mu, Bo-Zhong

    2012-08-01

    Despite the knowledge on anaerobic degradation of hydrocarbons and signature metabolites in the oil reservoirs, little is known about the functioning microbes and the related biochemical pathways involved, especially about the methanogenic communities. In the present study, a methanogenic consortium enriched from high-temperature oil reservoir production water and incubated at 55 °C with a mixture of long chain n-alkanes (C(15)-C(20)) as the sole carbon and energy sources was characterized. Biodegradation of n-alkanes was observed as methane production in the alkanes-amended methanogenic enrichment reached 141.47 μmol above the controls after 749 days of incubation, corresponding to 17 % of the theoretical total. GC-MS analysis confirmed the presence of putative downstream metabolites probably from the anaerobic biodegradation of n-alkanes and indicating an incomplete conversion of the n-alkanes to methane. Enrichment cultures taken at different incubation times were subjected to microbial community analysis. Both 16S rRNA gene clone libraries and DGGE profiles showed that alkanes-degrading community was dynamic during incubation. The dominant bacterial species in the enrichment cultures were affiliated with Firmicutes members clustering with thermophilic syntrophic bacteria of the genera Moorella sp. and Gelria sp. Other represented within the bacterial community were members of the Leptospiraceae, Thermodesulfobiaceae, Thermotogaceae, Chloroflexi, Bacteroidetes and Candidate Division OP1. The archaeal community was predominantly represented by members of the phyla Crenarchaeota and Euryarchaeota. Corresponding sequences within the Euryarchaeota were associated with methanogens clustering with orders Methanomicrobiales, Methanosarcinales and Methanobacteriales. On the other hand, PCR amplification for detection of functional genes encoding the alkylsuccinate synthase α-subunit (assA) was positive in the enrichment cultures. Moreover, the appearance of a new ass

  20. Analysis of the microbial gene landscape and transcriptome for aromatic pollutants and alkane degradation using a novel internally calibrated microarray system.

    PubMed

    Vilchez-Vargas, Ramiro; Geffers, Robert; Suárez-Diez, María; Conte, Ianina; Waliczek, Agnes; Kaser, Vanessa Sabrina; Kralova, Monika; Junca, Howard; Pieper, Dietmar H

    2013-04-01

    Despite various efforts to develop tools to detect and compare the catabolic potential and activity for pollutant degradation in environmental samples, there is still a need for an open-source, curated and reliable array method. We developed a custom array system including a novel normalization strategy that can be applied to any microarray design, allowing the calculation of the reliability of signals and make cross-experimental comparisons. Array probes, which are fully available to the scientific community, were designed from knowledge-based curated databases for key aromatic catabolic gene families and key alkane degradation genes. This design assigns signals to the respective protein subfamilies, thus directly inferring function and substrate specificity. Experimental procedures were optimized using DNA of four genome sequenced biodegradation strains and reliability of signals assessed through a novel normalization procedure, where a plasmid containing four artificial targets in increased copy numbers and co-amplified with the environmental DNA served as an internal calibration curve. The array system was applied to assess the catabolic gene landscape and transcriptome of aromatic contaminated environmental samples, confirming the abundance of catabolic gene subfamilies previously detected by functional metagenomics but also revealing the presence of previously undetected catabolic groups and specifically their expression under pollutant stress.

  1. Abundance and diversity of n-alkane-degrading bacteria in a forest soil co-contaminated with hydrocarbons and metals: a molecular study on alkB homologous genes.

    PubMed

    Pérez-de-Mora, Alfredo; Engel, Marion; Schloter, Michael

    2011-11-01

    Unraveling functional genes related to biodegradation of organic compounds has profoundly improved our understanding of biological remediation processes, yet the ecology of such genes is only poorly understood. We used a culture-independent approach to assess the abundance and diversity of bacteria catalyzing the degradation of n-alkanes with a chain length between C(5) and C(16) at a forest site co-contaminated with mineral oil hydrocarbons and metals for nearly 60 years. The alkB gene coding for a rubredoxin-dependent alkane monooxygenase enzyme involved in the initial activation step of aerobic aliphatic hydrocarbon metabolism was used as biomarker. Within the area of study, four different zones were evaluated: one highly contaminated, two intermediately contaminated, and a noncontaminated zone. Contaminant concentrations, hydrocarbon profiles, and soil microbial respiration and biomass were studied. Abundance of n-alkane-degrading bacteria was quantified via real-time PCR of alkB, whereas genetic diversity was examined using molecular fingerprints (T-RFLP) and clone libraries. Along the contamination plume, hydrocarbon profiles and increased respiration rates suggested on-going natural attenuation at the site. Gene copy numbers of alkB were similar in contaminated and control areas. However, T-RFLP-based fingerprints suggested lower diversity and evenness of the n-alkane-degrading bacterial community in the highly contaminated zone compared to the other areas; both diversity and evenness were negatively correlated with metal and hydrocarbon concentrations. Phylogenetic analysis of alkB denoted a shift of the hydrocarbon-degrading bacterial community from Gram-positive bacteria in the control zone (most similar to Mycobacterium and Nocardia types) to Gram-negative genotypes in the contaminated zones (Acinetobacter and alkB sequences with little similarity to those of known bacteria). Our results underscore a qualitative rather than a quantitative response of

  2. Draft Genome Sequence of a Thermophilic Desulfurization Bacterium, Geobacillus thermoglucosidasius Strain W-2

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Lin; Li, Mingchang; Guo, Shuyi

    2016-01-01

    Geobacillus thermoglucosidasius strain W-2 is a thermophilic bacterium isolated from a deep-subsurface oil reservoir in northern China, which is capable of degrading organosulfur compounds. Here, we report the draft genome sequence of G. thermoglucosidasius strain W-2, which may help to elucidate the genetic basis of biodegradation of organosulfur pollutants under heated conditions. PMID:27491977

  3. Structural insights into diversity and n-alkane biodegradation mechanisms of alkane hydroxylases

    PubMed Central

    Ji, Yurui; Mao, Guannan; Wang, Yingying; Bartlam, Mark

    2013-01-01

    Environmental microbes utilize four degradation pathways for the oxidation of n-alkanes. Although the enzymes degrading n-alkanes in different microbes may vary, enzymes functioning in the first step in the aerobic degradation of alkanes all belong to the alkane hydroxylases. Alkane hydroxylases are a class of enzymes that insert oxygen atoms derived from molecular oxygen into different sites of the alkane terminus (or termini) depending on the type of enzymes. In this review, we summarize the different types of alkane hydroxylases, their degrading steps, and compare typical enzymes from various classes with regard to their three-dimensional structures, in order to provide insights into how the enzymes mediate their different roles in the degradation of n-alkanes and what determines their different substrate ranges. Through the above analyzes, the degrading mechanisms of enzymes can be elucidated and molecular biological methods can be utilized to expand their catalytic roles in the petrochemical industry or in bioremediation of oil-contaminated environments. PMID:23519435

  4. Alcanivorax dieselolei, an alkane-degrading bacterium associated with the mucus of the zoanthid Palythoa caribaeorum (Cnidaria, Anthozoa).

    PubMed

    Campos, F F; Garcia, J E; Luna-Finkler, C L; Davolos, C C; Lemos, M V F; Pérez, C D

    2015-05-01

    Analyses of 16S rDNA genes were used to identify the microbiota isolated from the mucus of the zoanthid Palythoa caribaeorum at Porto de Galinhas on the coast of Pernambuco State, Brazil. This study is important as the first report of this association, because of the potential biotechnological applications of the bacterium Alcanivorax dieselolei, and as evidence for the presence of a hydrocarbon degrading bacterium in a reef ecosystem such as Porto de Galinhas.

  5. Characterization of thermostable cellulases produced by Bacillus and Geobacillus strains.

    PubMed

    Rastogi, Gurdeep; Bhalla, Aditya; Adhikari, Akash; Bischoff, Kenneth M; Hughes, Stephen R; Christopher, Lew P; Sani, Rajesh K

    2010-11-01

    The composition of thermophilic (60 degrees C) mixed cellulose-degrading enrichment culture initiated from compost samples was examined by constructing a 16S rRNA gene clone library and the presence of sequences related to Actinobacteria, Bacteroidetes, Chloroflexi, Deinococcus-Thermus, Firmicutes, and Proteobacteria were identified. Eight isolates capable of degrading cellulose, carboxymethyl cellulose (CMC), or ponderosa pine sawdust were identified as belonging to the genera Geobacillus, Thermobacillus, Cohnella, and Thermus. A compost isolate WSUCF1 (Geobacillus sp.) was selected based on its higher growth rate and cellulase activity compared to others in liquid minimal medium containing cellulose as a source of carbon and energy. Strain WSUCF1 and a previously isolated thermophilic cellulose-degrading deep gold mine strain DUSELR13 (Bacillus sp.) were examined for their enzyme properties and kinetics. The optimal pH for carboxymethyl cellulase (CMCase) activity was 5.0 for both isolates. The optimum temperatures for CMCase of WSUCFI and DUSELR13 were 70 and 75 degrees C, respectively. For CMC, the DUSELR13 and WSUCF1 CMCases had K(m) values of 3.11 and 1.08mg/ml, respectively. Most remarkably, WSUCF1 and DUSELR13 retained 89% and 78% of the initial CMCase activities, respectively, after incubation at 70 degrees C for 1day. These thermostable enzymes would facilitate development of more efficient and cost-effective forms of the simultaneous saccharification and fermentation process to convert lignocellulosic biomass into biofuels.

  6. Gene Structures and Regulation of the Alkane Hydroxylase Complex in Acinetobacter sp. Strain M-1

    PubMed Central

    Tani, Akio; Ishige, Takeru; Sakai, Yasuyoshi; Kato, Nobuo

    2001-01-01

    In the long-chain n-alkane degrader Acinetobacter sp. strain M-1, two alkane hydroxylase complexes are switched by controlling the expression of two n-alkane hydroxylase-encoding genes in response to the chain length of n-alkanes, while rubredoxin and rubredoxin ruductase are encoded by a single gene and expressed constitutively. PMID:11160120

  7. The long-chain alkane metabolism network of Alcanivorax dieselolei.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wanpeng; Shao, Zongze

    2014-12-12

    Alkane-degrading bacteria are ubiquitous in marine environments, but little is known about how alkane degradation is regulated. Here we investigate alkane sensing, chemotaxis, signal transduction, uptake and pathway regulation in Alcanivorax dieselolei. The outer membrane protein OmpS detects the presence of alkanes and triggers the expression of an alkane chemotaxis complex. The coupling protein CheW2 of the chemotaxis complex, which is induced only by long-chain (LC) alkanes, sends signals to trigger the expression of Cyo, which participates in modulating the expression of the negative regulator protein AlmR. This change in turn leads to the expression of ompT1 and almA, which drive the selective uptake and hydroxylation of LC alkanes, respectively. AlmA is confirmed as a hydroxylase of LC alkanes. Additional factors responsible for the metabolism of medium-chain-length alkanes are also identified, including CheW1, OmpT1 and OmpT2. These results provide new insights into alkane metabolism pathways from alkane sensing to degradation.

  8. Rubredoxins Involved in Alkane Oxidation

    PubMed Central

    van Beilen, Jan B.; Neuenschwander, Martin; Smits, Theo H. M.; Roth, Christian; Balada, Stefanie B.; Witholt, Bernard

    2002-01-01

    Rubredoxins (Rds) are essential electron transfer components of bacterial membrane-bound alkane hydroxylase systems. Several Rd genes associated with alkane hydroxylase or Rd reductase genes were cloned from gram-positive and gram-negative organisms able to grow on n-alkanes (Alk-Rds). Complementation tests in an Escherichia coli recombinant containing all Pseudomonas putida GPo1 genes necessary for growth on alkanes except Rd 2 (AlkG) and sequence comparisons showed that the Alk-Rds can be divided in AlkG1- and AlkG2-type Rds. All alkane-degrading strains contain AlkG2-type Rds, which are able to replace the GPo1 Rd 2 in n-octane hydroxylation. Most strains also contain AlkG1-type Rds, which do not complement the deletion mutant but are highly conserved among gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria. Common to most Rds are the two iron-binding CXXCG motifs. All Alk-Rds possess four negatively charged residues that are not conserved in other Rds. The AlkG1-type Rds can be distinguished from the AlkG2-type Rds by the insertion of an arginine downstream of the second CXXCG motif. In addition, the glycines in the two CXXCG motifs are usually replaced by other amino acids. Mutagenesis of residues conserved in either the AlkG1- or the AlkG2-type Rds, but not between both types, shows that AlkG1 is unable to transfer electrons to the alkane hydroxylase mainly due to the insertion of the arginine, whereas the exchange of the glycines in the two CXXCG motifs only has a limited effect. PMID:11872724

  9. Isobutanol production at elevated temperatures in thermophilic Geobacillus thermoglucosidasius.

    PubMed

    Lin, Paul P; Rabe, Kersten S; Takasumi, Jennifer L; Kadisch, Marvin; Arnold, Frances H; Liao, James C

    2014-07-01

    The potential advantages of biological production of chemicals or fuels from biomass at high temperatures include reduced enzyme loading for cellulose degradation, decreased chance of contamination, and lower product separation cost. In general, high temperature production of compounds that are not native to the thermophilic hosts is limited by enzyme stability and the lack of suitable expression systems. Further complications can arise when the pathway includes a volatile intermediate. Here we report the engineering of Geobacillus thermoglucosidasius to produce isobutanol at 50°C. We prospected various enzymes in the isobutanol synthesis pathway and characterized their thermostabilities. We also constructed an expression system based on the lactate dehydrogenase promoter from Geobacillus thermodenitrificans. With the best enzyme combination and the expression system, 3.3g/l of isobutanol was produced from glucose and 0.6g/l of isobutanol from cellobiose in G. thermoglucosidasius within 48h at 50°C. This is the first demonstration of isobutanol production in recombinant bacteria at an elevated temperature. Copyright © 2014 International Metabolic Engineering Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Biotransformation of eugenol via protocatechuic acid by thermophilic Geobacillus sp. AY 946034 strain.

    PubMed

    Giedraityte, Gražina; Kalėdienė, Lilija

    2014-04-01

    The metabolic pathway of eugenol degradation by thermophilic Geobacillus sp. AY 946034 strain was analyzed based on the lack of data about eugenol degradation by thermophiles. TLC, GC-MS, and biotransformation with resting cells showed that eugenol was oxidized through coniferyl alcohol, and ferulic and vanillic acids to protocatechuic acid before the aromatic ring was cleaved. The cell-free extract of Geobacillus sp. AY 946034 strain grown on eugenol showed a high activity of eugenol hydroxylase, feruloyl-CoA synthetase, vanillate-O-demethylase, and protocatechuate 3,4-dioxygenase. The key enzyme, protocatechuate 3,4- dioxygenase, which plays a crucial role in the degradation of various aromatic compounds, was purified 135-fold to homogeneity with a 34% overall recovery from Geobacillus sp. AY 946034. The relative molecular mass of the native enzyme was about 450 ± 10 kDa and was composed of the non-identical subunits. The pH and temperature optima for enzyme activity were 8 and 60°C, respectively. The half-life of protocatechuate 3,4-dioxygenase at the optimum temperature was 50 min.

  11. Hydrocarbon Metabolism by Brevibacterium erythrogenes: Normal and Branched Alkanes1

    PubMed Central

    Pirnik, M. P.; Atlas, R. M.; Bartha, R.

    1974-01-01

    Branched- and straight-chain alkanes are metabolized by Brevibacterium erythrogenes by means of two distinct pathways. Normal alkanes (e.g., n-pentadecane) are degraded, after terminal oxidation, by the beta-oxidation system operational in fatty acid catabolism. Branched alkanes like pristane (2,6,10,14-tetramethylpentadecane) and 2-methylundecane are degraded as dicarboxylic acids, which also undergo beta-oxidation. Pristane-derived intermediates are observed to accumulate, with time, as a series of dicarboxylic acids. This dicarboxylic acid pathway is not observed in the presence of normal alkanes. Release of 14CO2 from [1-14C]pristane is delayed, or entirely inhibited, in the presence of n-hexadecane, whereas CO2 release from n-hexadecane remains unaffected. These results suggest an inducible dicarboxylic acid pathway for degradation of branched-chain alkanes. PMID:4852318

  12. Microbial biosynthesis of alkanes.

    PubMed

    Schirmer, Andreas; Rude, Mathew A; Li, Xuezhi; Popova, Emanuela; del Cardayre, Stephen B

    2010-07-30

    Alkanes, the major constituents of gasoline, diesel, and jet fuel, are naturally produced by diverse species; however, the genetics and biochemistry behind this biology have remained elusive. Here we describe the discovery of an alkane biosynthesis pathway from cyanobacteria. The pathway consists of an acyl-acyl carrier protein reductase and an aldehyde decarbonylase, which together convert intermediates of fatty acid metabolism to alkanes and alkenes. The aldehyde decarbonylase is related to the broadly functional nonheme diiron enzymes. Heterologous expression of the alkane operon in Escherichia coli leads to the production and secretion of C13 to C17 mixtures of alkanes and alkenes. These genes and enzymes can now be leveraged for the simple and direct conversion of renewable raw materials to fungible hydrocarbon fuels.

  13. Cloning, purification and characterization of an alkali-stable endoxylanase from thermophilic Geobacillus sp. 71.

    PubMed

    Canakcı, Sabriye; Cevher, Zeliha; Inan, Kadriye; Tokgoz, Muslum; Bahar, Fatmagul; Kacagan, Murat; Sal, Fulya Ay; Belduz, Ali Osman

    2012-05-01

    The gene encoding a xylanase from Geobacillus sp. 71 was isolated, cloned, and sequenced. Purification of the Geobacillus sp 7.1 xylanase, XyzGeo71, following overexpression in E. coli produced an enzyme of 47 kDa with an optimum temperature of 75°C. The optimum pH of the enzyme is 8.0, but it is active over a broad pH range. This protein showed the highest sequence identity (93%) with the xylanase from Geobacillus thermodenitrificans NG80-2. XyzGeo71 contains a catalytic domain that belongs to the glycoside hydrolase family 10 (GH10). XyzGeo71 exhibited good pH stability, remaining stable after treatment with buffers ranging from pH 7.0 to 11.0 for 6 h. Its activity was partially inhibited by Al(3+) and Cu(2+) but strongly inhibited by Hg(2+). The enzyme follows Michaelis-Menten kinetics, with K(m) and V(max) values of 0.425 mg xylan/ml and 500 μmol/min.mg, respectively. The enzyme was free from cellulase activity and degraded xylan in an endo fashion. The action of the enzyme on oat spelt xylan produced xylobiose and xylotetrose.

  14. Contribution of cyanobacterial alkane production to the ocean hydrocarbon cycle

    PubMed Central

    Lea-Smith, David J.; Biller, Steven J.; Davey, Matthew P.; Cotton, Charles A. R.; Perez Sepulveda, Blanca M.; Turchyn, Alexandra V.; Scanlan, David J.; Smith, Alison G.; Chisholm, Sallie W.; Howe, Christopher J.

    2015-01-01

    Hydrocarbons are ubiquitous in the ocean, where alkanes such as pentadecane and heptadecane can be found even in waters minimally polluted with crude oil. Populations of hydrocarbon-degrading bacteria, which are responsible for the turnover of these compounds, are also found throughout marine systems, including in unpolluted waters. These observations suggest the existence of an unknown and widespread source of hydrocarbons in the oceans. Here, we report that strains of the two most abundant marine cyanobacteria, Prochlorococcus and Synechococcus, produce and accumulate hydrocarbons, predominantly C15 and C17 alkanes, between 0.022 and 0.368% of dry cell weight. Based on global population sizes and turnover rates, we estimate that these species have the capacity to produce 2–540 pg alkanes per mL per day, which translates into a global ocean yield of ∼308–771 million tons of hydrocarbons annually. We also demonstrate that both obligate and facultative marine hydrocarbon-degrading bacteria can consume cyanobacterial alkanes, which likely prevents these hydrocarbons from accumulating in the environment. Our findings implicate cyanobacteria and hydrocarbon degraders as key players in a notable internal hydrocarbon cycle within the upper ocean, where alkanes are continually produced and subsequently consumed within days. Furthermore we show that cyanobacterial alkane production is likely sufficient to sustain populations of hydrocarbon-degrading bacteria, whose abundances can rapidly expand upon localized release of crude oil from natural seepage and human activities. PMID:26438854

  15. Contribution of cyanobacterial alkane production to the ocean hydrocarbon cycle.

    PubMed

    Lea-Smith, David J; Biller, Steven J; Davey, Matthew P; Cotton, Charles A R; Perez Sepulveda, Blanca M; Turchyn, Alexandra V; Scanlan, David J; Smith, Alison G; Chisholm, Sallie W; Howe, Christopher J

    2015-11-03

    Hydrocarbons are ubiquitous in the ocean, where alkanes such as pentadecane and heptadecane can be found even in waters minimally polluted with crude oil. Populations of hydrocarbon-degrading bacteria, which are responsible for the turnover of these compounds, are also found throughout marine systems, including in unpolluted waters. These observations suggest the existence of an unknown and widespread source of hydrocarbons in the oceans. Here, we report that strains of the two most abundant marine cyanobacteria, Prochlorococcus and Synechococcus, produce and accumulate hydrocarbons, predominantly C15 and C17 alkanes, between 0.022 and 0.368% of dry cell weight. Based on global population sizes and turnover rates, we estimate that these species have the capacity to produce 2-540 pg alkanes per mL per day, which translates into a global ocean yield of ∼ 308-771 million tons of hydrocarbons annually. We also demonstrate that both obligate and facultative marine hydrocarbon-degrading bacteria can consume cyanobacterial alkanes, which likely prevents these hydrocarbons from accumulating in the environment. Our findings implicate cyanobacteria and hydrocarbon degraders as key players in a notable internal hydrocarbon cycle within the upper ocean, where alkanes are continually produced and subsequently consumed within days. Furthermore we show that cyanobacterial alkane production is likely sufficient to sustain populations of hydrocarbon-degrading bacteria, whose abundances can rapidly expand upon localized release of crude oil from natural seepage and human activities.

  16. Geobacillus debilis sp. nov., a novel obligately thermophilic bacterium isolated from a cool soil environment, and reassignment of Bacillus pallidus to Geobacillus pallidus comb. nov.

    PubMed

    Banat, Ibrahim M; Marchant, Roger; Rahman, Thahira J

    2004-11-01

    Several aerobic, motile, rod-shaped, thermophilic, spore-forming Geobacillus bacteria predominantly giving a Gram-positive staining reaction were isolated from a cool soil environment in Northern Ireland and taxonomically investigated. Two isolates, F10 and Tf(T), showed low 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity to recognized members of the genus Geobacillus. Phylogenetic tree investigation using neighbour-joining, maximum-likelihood and parsimony methods indicated that strains F10 and Tf(T) represent a single novel species, for which the name Geobacillus debilis sp. nov. is proposed, with type strain Tf(T) (=DSM 16016(T)=NCIMB 13995(T)) and which belongs to a subgroup of the genus Geobacillus comprising Geobacillus toebii and Geobacillus caldoxylosilyticus. However, G. debilis showed closest affinities to Bacillus pallidus, which we propose should become Geobacillus pallidus comb. nov.

  17. Photocatalytic degradation of 1,10-dichlorodecane in aqueous suspensions of TiO{sub 2}: A reaction of adsorbed chlorinated alkane with surface hydroxyl radicals

    SciTech Connect

    El-Morsi, T.M.; Bubakowski, W.R.; Abd-El-Aziz, A.S.; Friesen, K.J.

    2000-03-15

    1,10-Dichlorodecane (D{sub 2}C{sub 10}) is shown to be effectively photodegraded in aqueous suspensions of TiO{sub 2} using a photoreactor equipped with 300 nm lamps. Solutions exposed to UV light intensities of 3.6 x 10{sup {minus}5} Ein L{sup {minus}1} min{sup {minus}1}, established by ferrioxalate actinometry, showed negligible direct photolysis in the absence of TiO{sub 2} and a D{sub 2}C{sub 10} concentration approaching its solubility limit. Kinetics of photodegradation followed a Langmuir-Hinshelwood model suggesting that the reaction occurred on the surface of the photocatalyst. The presence of h{sup +}{sub vb} and OH{sm_bullet} radical scavengers, including methanol and iodide, inhibited the degradation supporting a photooxidation reaction. Electron scavengers (Ag{sup +}, Cu{sup 2+}, and Fe{sup 3+}) had small effects on the degradation rate. The lack of transformation of D{sub 2}C{sub 10} in acetonitrile as solvent indicated that the major oxidants were OH{sm_bullet} radicals. The presence of tetranitromethane, effectively eliminating the formation of free OH{sm_bullet} radicals, did not affect the degradation rates significantly. This result, combined with observed increases in photolysis rates with the degree of adsorption of D{sub 2}C{sub 10} onto the surface of the photocatalyst, confirmed that the reaction involved adsorbed 1,10-dichlorodecane and surface bound OH{sm_bullet} radicals.

  18. Functional characterization of the galactan utilization system of Geobacillus stearothermophilus.

    PubMed

    Tabachnikov, Orly; Shoham, Yuval

    2013-02-01

    Type I galactan is a pectic polysaccharide composed of β-1,4 linked units of d-galactose and is part of the main plant cell wall polysaccharides, which are the most abundant sources of renewable carbon in the biosphere. The thermophilic bacterium Geobacillus stearothermophilus T-6 possesses an extensive system for the utilization of plant cell wall polysaccharides, including a 9.4-kb gene cluster, ganREFGBA, which encodes galactan-utilization elements. Based on enzyme activity assays, the ganEFGBA genes, which probably constitute an operon, are induced by short galactosaccharides but not by galactose. GanA is a glycoside hydrolase family 53 β-1,4-galactanase, active on high molecular weight galactan, producing galactotetraose as the main product. Homology modelling of the active site residues suggests that the enzyme can accommodate at least eight galactose molecules (at subsites -4 to +4) in the active site. GanB is a glycoside hydrolase family 42 β-galactosidase capable of hydrolyzing short β-1,4 galactosaccharides into galactose. Applying both GanA and GanB on galactan resulted in the full degradation of the polymer into galactose. The ganEFG genes encode an ATP-binding cassette sugar transport system whose sugar-binding lipoprotein, GanE, was shown to bind galacto-oligosaccharides. The utilization of galactan by G. stearothermophilus involves the extracellular galactanase GanA cleaving galactan into galacto-oligosaccharides that enter the cell via a specific transport system GanEFG. The galacto-oligosaccharides are further degraded by the intracellular β-galactosidase GanB into galactose, which is then metabolized into UDP-glucose via the Leloir pathway by the galKET gene products. Nucleotide sequence data have been deposited in the GenBank database under the accession number JF327803. © 2012 The Authors Journal compilation © 2012 FEBS.

  19. Heterologous biosynthesis and manipulation of alkanes in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Cao, Ying-Xiu; Xiao, Wen-Hai; Zhang, Jin-Lai; Xie, Ze-Xiong; Ding, Ming-Zhu; Yuan, Ying-Jin

    2016-11-01

    Biosynthesis of alkanes in microbial foundries offers a sustainable and green supplement to traditional fossil fuels. The dynamic equilibrium of fatty aldehydes, key intermediates, played a critical role in microbial alkanes production, due to the poor catalytic capability of aldehyde deformylating oxygenase (ADO). In our study, exploration of competitive pathway together with multi-modular optimization was utilized to improve fatty aldehydes balance and consequently enhance alkanes formation in Escherichia coli. Endogenous fatty alcohol formation was supposed to be competitive with alkane production, since both of the two routes consumed the same intermediate-fatty aldehyde. Nevertheless, in our case, alkanes production in E. coli was enhanced from trace amount to 58.8mg/L by the facilitation of moderate fatty alcohol biosynthesis, which was validated by deletion of endogenous aldehyde reductase (AHR), overexpression of fatty alcohol oxidase (FAO) and consequent transcriptional assay of aar, ado and adhP genes. Moreover, alkanes production was further improved to 81.8mg/L, 86.6mg/L or 101.7mg/L by manipulation of fatty acid biosynthesis, lipids degradation or electron transfer system modules, which directly referenced to fatty aldehydes dynamic pools. A titer of 1.31g/L alkanes was achieved in 2.5L fed-batch fermentation, which was the highest reported titer in E. coli. Our research has offered a reference for chemical overproduction in microbial cell factories facilitated by exploring competitive pathway.

  20. The l-Arabinan Utilization System of Geobacillus stearothermophilus▿

    PubMed Central

    Shulami, Smadar; Raz-Pasteur, Ayelet; Tabachnikov, Orly; Gilead-Gropper, Sarah; Shner, Itzhak; Shoham, Yuval

    2011-01-01

    Geobacillus stearothermophilus T-6 is a thermophilic soil bacterium that has a 38-kb gene cluster for the utilization of arabinan, a branched polysaccharide that is part of the plant cell wall. The bacterium encodes a unique three-component regulatory system (araPST) that includes a sugar-binding lipoprotein (AraP), a histidine sensor kinase (AraS), and a response regulator (AraT) and lies adjacent to an ATP-binding cassette (ABC) arabinose transport system (araEGH). The lipoprotein (AraP) specifically bound arabinose, and gel mobility shift experiments showed that the response regulator, AraT, binds to a 139-bp fragment corresponding to the araE promoter region. Taken together, the results showed that the araPST system appeared to sense extracellular arabinose and to activate a specific ABC transporter for arabinose (AraEGH). The promoter regions of the arabinan utilization genes contain a 14-bp inverted repeat motif resembling an operator site for the arabinose repressor, AraR. AraR was found to bind specifically to these sequences, and binding was efficiently prevented in the presence of arabinose, suggesting that arabinose is the molecular inducer of the arabinan utilization system. The expression of the arabinan utilization genes was reduced in the presence of glucose, indicating that regulation is also mediated via a catabolic repression mechanism. The cluster also encodes a second putative ABC sugar transporter (AbnEFJ) whose sugar-binding lipoprotein (AbnE) was shown to interact specifically with linear and branched arabino-oligosaccharides. The final degradation of the arabino-oligosaccharides is likely carried out by intracellular enzymes, including two α-l-arabinofuranosidases (AbfA and AbfB), a β-l-arabinopyranosidase (Abp), and an arabinanase (AbnB), all of which are encoded in the 38-kb cluster. PMID:21460081

  1. Determining and quantifying specific sources of light alkane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bill, M.; Conrad, M. E.

    2015-12-01

    Determining and quantifying specific sources of emission of methane (an important greenhouse gas) and light alkanes from abandoned gas and oil wells, hydraulic fracturing or associated with CO2 sequestration are a challenge in determining their contribution to the atmospheric greenhouse gas budget or to identify source of groundwater contamination. Here, we review organic biogeochemistry proprieties and isotopic fingerprinting of C1-C5 alkanes to address this problem. For instance, the concentration ratios of CH4 to C2-C5 alkanes can be used to distinguish between thermogenic and microbial generated CH4. Together C and H isotopes of CH4 are used to differentiate bacterial generated sources and thermogenic CH4 and may also identify processes such as alteration and source mixing. Carbon isotope ratios pattern of C1-C5 alkanes highlight sources and oxidation processes in the gas reservoirs. Stable carbon isotope measurements are a viable tool for monitoring the degradation progress of methane and light hydrocarbons. The carbon isotope ratios of the reactants and products are independent of the concentration and only depend on the relative progress of the particular reaction. Oxidation/degradation of light alkanes are typically associated with increasing ð13C values. Isotopic mass balances offer the possibility to independently determine the fractions coming from microbial versus thermogenic and would also permit differentiation of the isotope fractionations associated with degradation. Unlike conventional concentration measurements, this approach is constrained by the different isotopic signatures of various sources and sinks.

  2. Anaerobic alkane biodegradation by cultures enriched from oil sands tailings ponds involves multiple species capable of fumarate addition.

    PubMed

    Tan, BoonFei; Semple, Kathleen; Foght, Julia

    2015-05-01

    A methanogenic short-chain alkane-degrading culture (SCADC) was enriched from oil sands tailings and transferred several times with a mixture of C6, C7, C8 and C10 n-alkanes as the predominant organic carbon source, plus 2-methylpentane, 3-methylpentane and methylcyclopentane as minor components. Cultures produced ∼40% of the maximum theoretical methane during 18 months incubation while depleting the n-alkanes, 2-methylpentane and methylcyclopentane. Substrate depletion correlated with detection of metabolites characteristic of fumarate activation of 2-methylpentane and methylcyclopentane, but not n-alkane metabolites. During active methanogenesis with the mixed alkanes, reverse-transcription PCR confirmed the expression of functional genes (assA and bssA) associated with hydrocarbon addition to fumarate. Pyrosequencing of 16S rRNA genes amplified during active alkane degradation revealed enrichment of Clostridia (particularly Peptococcaceae) and methanogenic Archaea (Methanosaetaceae and Methanomicrobiaceae). Methanogenic cultures transferred into medium containing sulphate produced sulphide, depleted n-alkanes and produced the corresponding succinylated alkane metabolites, but were slow to degrade 2-methylpentane and methylcyclopentane; these cultures were enriched in Deltaproteobacteria rather than Clostridia. 3-Methylpentane was not degraded by any cultures. Thus, nominally methanogenic oil sands tailings harbour dynamic and versatile hydrocarbon-degrading fermentative syntrophs and sulphate reducers capable of degrading n-, iso- and cyclo-alkanes by addition to fumarate.

  3. Physiological function of the Pseudomonas putida PpG6 (Pseudomonas oleovorans) alkane hydroxylase: monoterminal oxidation of alkanes and fatty acids.

    PubMed Central

    Nieder, M; Shapiro, J

    1975-01-01

    Pseudomonas putida PpG6 is able to utilize purified n-alkanes of six to ten carbon atoms for growth. It can also grow on the primary terminal oxidation products of these alkanes and on 1-dodecanol but not on the corresponding 2-ketones or 1,6-hexanediol, adipic acid, or pimelic acid. Revertible point mutants can be isolated which have simultaneously lost the ability to grow on all five n-alkane growth substrates but which can still grow on octanol or nonanol. An acetate-negative mutant defective in isocitrate lysase activity is unable to grow on even-numbered alkanes and fatty acids. Analysis of double mutants defective in acetate and propionate or in acetate and glutarate metabolism shows that alkane carbon is assimilated only via acetyl-coenzyme A and propionyl-coenzyme A. These results support the following conclusions: (i) The n-alkane growth specificity of P. putida PpG6 is due to the substrate specificity of whole-cell alkane hydroxylation; (ii) there is a single alkane hydroxylase enzyme complex; (iii) the physiological role of this complex is to initiate the monoterminal oxidation of alkane chains; and (iv) straight-chain fatty acids from butyric through nonanoic are degraded exclusively by beta-oxidation from the carboxyl end of the molecule. PMID:804473

  4. An improved agar medium for growth of Geobacillus thermoglucosidarius strains.

    PubMed

    Javed, M; Baghaei-Yazdi, N; Qin, W; Amartey, S

    2017-01-01

    Geobacillus species have potential applications in many biotechnological processes. They are fastidious in their vitamin and amino acid requirements. A new semi-defined agar medium (SDM) was developed which gave consistently high viable cell counts of various G. thermoglucosidasius strains (5×10(8)-6×10(8)cfu/ml) under aerobic conditions at 70°C.

  5. Phylogenomic re-assessment of the thermophilic genus Geobacillus.

    PubMed

    Aliyu, Habibu; Lebre, Pedro; Blom, Jochen; Cowan, Don; De Maayer, Pieter

    2016-12-01

    Geobacillus is a genus of Gram-positive, aerobic, spore-forming obligate thermophiles. The descriptions and subsequent affiliations of the species in the genus have mostly been based on polyphasic taxonomy rules that include traditional sequence-based methods such as DNA-DNA hybridization and comparison of 16S rRNA gene sequences. Currently, there are fifteen validly described species within the genus. The availability of whole genome sequences has provided an opportunity to validate and/or re-assess these conventional estimates of genome relatedness. We have applied whole genome approaches to estimate the phylogenetic relatedness among the sixty-three Geobacillus strains for which genome sequences are currently publicly available, including the type strains of eleven validly described species. The phylogenomic metrics AAI (Average Amino acid Identity), ANI (Average Nucleotide Identity) and dDDH (digital DNA-DNA hybridization) indicated that the current genus Geobacillus is comprised of sixteen distinct genomospecies, including several potentially novel species. Furthermore, a phylogeny constructed on the basis of the core genes identified from the whole genome analyses indicated that the genus clusters into two monophyletic clades that clearly differ in terms of nucleotide base composition. The G+C content ranges for clade I and II were 48.8-53.1% and 42.1-44.4%, respectively. We therefore suggest that the Geobacillus species currently residing within clade II be considered as a new genus. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  6. Isolation and characterization of N-acylhomoserine lactonase from the thermophilic bacterium, Geobacillus caldoxylosilyticus YS-8.

    PubMed

    Seo, Myung-Ji; Lee, Beom-Seon; Pyun, Yu-Ryang; Park, Hoon

    2011-01-01

    Geobacillus caldoxylosilyticus YS-8, which was isolated from volcanic soil in Indonesia, was found to degrade various N-acylhomoserine lactones (AHLs) with different lengths and acyl side-chain substitutions over a wide temperature range of 30-70 °C. The purified AHL-degrading enzyme showed a single band of 32 kDa, and its N-terminal amino acid sequence was determined to be ANVIKARPKLYVMDN, tentatively suggesting that the AHL-degrading enzyme was AHL lactonase. The AHL-degrading activity of the purified enzyme was maximized at pH 7.5 and 50 °C, and it retained about 50% of its activity even after a heat treatment at 60 °C for 3 h, exhibiting properties consistent with a thermostable enzyme. The mass spectrometric analysis demonstrated that the AHL-degrading enzyme catalyzed lactone ring opening of N-3-oxohexanoyl-L-homoserine lactone and N-hexanoyl-L-homoserine lactone by hydrolyzing the lactones and working as an AHL lactonase.

  7. Changes in iso- and n-alkane distribution during biodegradation of crude oil under nitrate and sulphate reducing conditions.

    PubMed

    Hasinger, Marion; Scherr, Kerstin E; Lundaa, Tserennyam; Bräuer, Leopold; Zach, Clemens; Loibner, Andreas Paul

    2012-02-20

    Crude oil consists of a large number of hydrocarbons with different susceptibility to microbial degradation. The influence of hydrocarbon structure and molecular weight on hydrocarbon biodegradation under anaerobic conditions is not fully explored. In this study oxygen, nitrate and sulphate served as terminal electron acceptors (TEAs) for the microbial degradation of a paraffin-rich crude oil in a freshly contaminated soil. During 185 days of incubation, alkanes from n-C11 to n-C39, three n- to iso-alkane ratios commonly used as weathering indicators and the unresolved complex mixture (UCM) were quantified and statistically analyzed. The use of different TEAs for hydrocarbon degradation resulted in dissimilar degradative patterns for n- and iso-alkanes. While n-alkane biodegradation followed well-established patterns under aerobic conditions, lower molecular weight alkanes were found to be more recalcitrant than mid- to high-molecular weight alkanes under nitrate-reducing conditions. Biodegradation with sulphate as the TEA was most pronounced for long-chain (n-C32 to n-C39) alkanes. The observation of increasing ratios of n-C17 to pristane and of n-C18 to phytane provides first evidence of the preferential degradation of branched over normal alkanes under sulphate reducing conditions. The formation of distinctly different n- and iso-alkane biodegradation fingerprints under different electron accepting conditions may be used to assess the occurrence of specific degradation processes at a contaminated site. The use of n- to iso-alkane ratios for this purpose may require adjustment if applied for anaerobic sites. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Diverse alkane hydroxylase genes in microorganisms and environments

    PubMed Central

    Nie, Yong; Chi, Chang-Qiao; Fang, Hui; Liang, Jie-Liang; Lu, She-Lian; Lai, Guo-Li; Tang, Yue-Qin; Wu, Xiao-Lei

    2014-01-01

    AlkB and CYP153 are important alkane hydroxylases responsible for aerobic alkane degradation in bioremediation of oil-polluted environments and microbial enhanced oil recovery. Since their distribution in nature is not clear, we made the investigation among thus-far sequenced 3,979 microbial genomes and 137 metagenomes from terrestrial, freshwater, and marine environments. Hundreds of diverse alkB and CYP153 genes including many novel ones were found in bacterial genomes, whereas none were found in archaeal genomes. Moreover, these genes were detected with different distributional patterns in the terrestrial, freshwater, and marine metagenomes. Hints for horizontal gene transfer, gene duplication, and gene fusion were found, which together are likely responsible for diversifying the alkB and CYP153 genes adapt to the ubiquitous distribution of different alkanes in nature. In addition, different distributions of these genes between bacterial genomes and metagenomes suggested the potentially important roles of unknown or less common alkane degraders in nature. PMID:24829093

  9. Metabolism of Hydrocarbons in n-Alkane-Utilizing Anaerobic Bacteria.

    PubMed

    Wilkes, Heinz; Buckel, Wolfgang; Golding, Bernard T; Rabus, Ralf

    2016-01-01

    The glycyl radical enzyme-catalyzed addition of n-alkanes to fumarate creates a C-C-bond between two concomitantly formed stereogenic carbon centers. The configurations of the two diastereoisomers of the product resulting from n-hexane activation by the n-alkane-utilizing denitrifying bacterium strain HxN1, i.e. (1-methylpentyl)succinate, were assigned as (2S,1'R) and (2R,1'R). Experiments with stereospecifically deuterated n-(2,5-2H2)hexanes revealed that exclusively the pro-S hydrogen atom is abstracted from C2 of the n-alkane by the enzyme and later transferred back to C3 of the alkylsuccinate formed. These results indicate that the alkylsuccinate-forming reaction proceeds with an inversion of configuration at the carbon atom (C2) of the n-alkane forming the new C-C-bond, and thus stereochemically resembles a SN2-type reaction. Therefore, the reaction may occur in a concerted manner, which may avoid the highly energetic hex-2-yl radical as an intermediate. The reaction is associated with a significant primary kinetic isotope effect (kH/kD ≥3) for hydrogen, indicating that the homolytic C-H-bond cleavage is involved in the first irreversible step of the reaction mechanism. The (1-methylalkyl)succinate synthases of n-alkane-utilizing anaerobic bacteria apparently have very broad substrate ranges enabling them to activate not only aliphatic but also alkyl-aromatic hydrocarbons. Thus, two denitrifiers and one sulfate reducer were shown to convert the nongrowth substrate toluene to benzylsuccinate and further to the dead-end product benzoyl-CoA. For this purpose, however, the modified β-oxidation pathway known from alkylbenzene-utilizing bacteria was not employed, but rather the pathway used for n-alkane degradation involving CoA ligation, carbon skeleton rearrangement and decarboxylation. Furthermore, various n-alkane- and alkylbenzene-utilizing denitrifiers and sulfate reducers were found to be capable of forming benzyl alcohols from diverse alkylbenzenes

  10. Complete Genome Sequence of the Thermophilic Bacterium Geobacillus thermoleovorans CCB_US3_UF5

    PubMed Central

    Abdul Rahman, Ahmad Yamin; Saito, Jennifer A.; Hou, Shaobin

    2012-01-01

    Geobacillus thermoleovorans CCB_US3_UF5 is a thermophilic bacterium isolated from a hot spring in Malaysia. Here, we report the complete genome of G. thermoleovorans CCB_US3_UF5, which shows high similarity to the genome of Geobacillus kaustophilus HTA 426 in terms of synteny and orthologous genes. PMID:22328744

  11. CitA (citrate) and DcuS (C4-dicarboxylate) sensor kinases in thermophilic Geobacillus kaustophilus and Geobacillus thermodenitrificans.

    PubMed

    Graf, Sabrina; Broll, Constanze; Wissig, Juliane; Strecker, Alexander; Parowatkin, Maria; Unden, Gottfried

    2016-01-01

    The thermophilic Geobacillus thermodenitrificans and Geobacillus kaustophilus are able to use citrate or C4-dicarboxylates like fumarate or succinate as the substrates for growth. The genomes of the sequenced Geobacillus strains (nine strains) each encoded a two-component system of the CitA family. The sensor kinase of G. thermodenitrificans (termed CitAGt) was able to replace CitA of Escherichia coli (CitAEc) in a heterologous complementation assay restoring expression of the CitAEc-dependent citC-lacZ reporter gene and anaerobic growth on citrate. Complementation was specific for citrate. The sensor kinase of G. kaustophilus (termed DcuSGk) was able to replace DcuSEc of E. coli. It responded in the heterologous expression system to C4-dicarboxylates and to citrate, suggesting that DcuSGk is, like DcuSEc, a C4-dicarboxylate sensor with a side-activity for citrate. DcuSGk, unlike the homologous DctS from Bacillus subtilis, required no binding protein for function in the complementation assay. Thus, the thermophilic G. thermodenitrificans and G. kaustophilus contain citrate and C4-dicarboxylate sensor kinases of the CitA and DcuS type, respectively, and retain function and substrate specificity under mesophilic growth conditions in E. coli.

  12. Liquid-liquid interfaces of semifluorinated alkane diblock copolymers with water, alkanes, and perfluorinated alkanes.

    PubMed

    Pierce, Flint; Tsige, Mesfin; Perahia, Dvora; Grest, Gary S

    2008-12-18

    The liquid-liquid interface between semifluorinated alkane diblock copolymers of the form F3C(CF2)n-1-(CH2)m-1CH3 and water, protonated alkanes, and perfluorinated alkanes are studied by fully atomistic molecular dynamics simulations. A modified version of the OPLS-AA (Optimized Parameter for Liquid Simulation All-Atom) force field of Jorgensen et al. has been used to study the interfacial behavior of semifluorinated diblocks. Aqueous interfaces are found to be sharp, with correspondingly large values of the interfacial tension. Due to the reduced hydrophobicity of the protonated block compared to the fluorinated block, hydrogen enhancement is observed at the interface. Water dipoles in the interfacial region are found to be oriented nearly parallel to the liquid-liquid interface. A number of protonated alkanes and perfluorinated alkanes are found to be mutually miscible with the semifluorinated diblocks. For these liquids, interdiffusion follows the expected Fickian behavior, and concentration-dependent diffusivities are determined.

  13. Liquid-liquid interfaces of semifluorinated alkane diblock copolymers with water, alkanes, and perfluorinated alkanes.

    SciTech Connect

    Perahia, Dvora, Dr.; Pierce, Flint; Tsige, Mesfin; Grest, Gary Stephen, Dr.

    2008-08-01

    The liquid-liquid interface between semifluorinated alkane diblock copolymers of the form F3C(CF2)n-1-(CH2)m-1CH3 and water, protonated alkanes, and perfluorinated alkanes are studied by fully atomistic molecular dynamics simulations. A modified version of the OPLS-AA (Optimized Parameter for Liquid Simulation All-Atom) force field of Jorgensen et al. has been used to study the interfacial behavior of semifluorinated diblocks. Aqueous interfaces are found to be sharp, with correspondingly large values of the interfacial tension. Due to the reduced hydrophobicity of the protonated block compared to the fluorinated block, hydrogen enhancement is observed at the interface. Water dipoles in the interfacial region are found to be oriented nearly parallel to the liquid-liquid interface. A number of protonated alkanes and perfluorinated alkanes are found to be mutually miscible with the semifluorinated diblocks. For these liquids, interdiffusion follows the expected Fickian behavior, and concentration-dependent diffusivities are determined.

  14. Geomicrobiological linkages between short-chain alkane consumption and sulfate reduction rates in seep sediments.

    PubMed

    Bose, Arpita; Rogers, Daniel R; Adams, Melissa M; Joye, Samantha B; Girguis, Peter R

    2013-01-01

    Marine hydrocarbon seeps are ecosystems that are rich in methane, and, in some cases, short-chain (C2-C5) and longer alkanes. C2-C4 alkanes such as ethane, propane, and butane can be significant components of seeping fluids. Some sulfate-reducing microbes oxidize short-chain alkanes anaerobically, and may play an important role in both the competition for sulfate and the local carbon budget. To better understand the anaerobic oxidation of short-chain n-alkanes coupled with sulfate-reduction, hydrocarbon-rich sediments from the Gulf of Mexico (GoM) were amended with artificial, sulfate-replete seawater and one of four n-alkanes (C1-C4) then incubated under strict anaerobic conditions. Measured rates of alkane oxidation and sulfate reduction closely follow stoichiometric predictions that assume the complete oxidation of alkanes to CO2 (though other sinks for alkane carbon likely exist). Changes in the δ(13)C of all the alkanes in the reactors show enrichment over the course of the incubation, with the C3 and C4 incubations showing the greatest enrichment (4.4 and 4.5‰, respectively). The concurrent depletion in the δ(13)C of dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) implies a transfer of carbon from the alkane to the DIC pool (-3.5 and -6.7‰ for C3 and C4 incubations, respectively). Microbial community analyses reveal that certain members of the class Deltaproteobacteria are selectively enriched as the incubations degrade C1-C4 alkanes. Phylogenetic analyses indicate that distinct phylotypes are enriched in the ethane reactors, while phylotypes in the propane and butane reactors align with previously identified C3-C4 alkane-oxidizing sulfate-reducers. These data further constrain the potential influence of alkane oxidation on sulfate reduction rates (SRRs) in cold hydrocarbon-rich sediments, provide insight into their contribution to local carbon cycling, and illustrate the extent to which short-chain alkanes can serve as electron donors and govern microbial community

  15. Geomicrobiological linkages between short-chain alkane consumption and sulfate reduction rates in seep sediments

    PubMed Central

    Bose, Arpita; Rogers, Daniel R.; Adams, Melissa M.; Joye, Samantha B.; Girguis, Peter R.

    2013-01-01

    Marine hydrocarbon seeps are ecosystems that are rich in methane, and, in some cases, short-chain (C2–C5) and longer alkanes. C2–C4 alkanes such as ethane, propane, and butane can be significant components of seeping fluids. Some sulfate-reducing microbes oxidize short-chain alkanes anaerobically, and may play an important role in both the competition for sulfate and the local carbon budget. To better understand the anaerobic oxidation of short-chain n-alkanes coupled with sulfate-reduction, hydrocarbon-rich sediments from the Gulf of Mexico (GoM) were amended with artificial, sulfate-replete seawater and one of four n-alkanes (C1–C4) then incubated under strict anaerobic conditions. Measured rates of alkane oxidation and sulfate reduction closely follow stoichiometric predictions that assume the complete oxidation of alkanes to CO2 (though other sinks for alkane carbon likely exist). Changes in the δ13C of all the alkanes in the reactors show enrichment over the course of the incubation, with the C3 and C4 incubations showing the greatest enrichment (4.4 and 4.5‰, respectively). The concurrent depletion in the δ13C of dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) implies a transfer of carbon from the alkane to the DIC pool (−3.5 and −6.7‰ for C3 and C4 incubations, respectively). Microbial community analyses reveal that certain members of the class Deltaproteobacteria are selectively enriched as the incubations degrade C1–C4 alkanes. Phylogenetic analyses indicate that distinct phylotypes are enriched in the ethane reactors, while phylotypes in the propane and butane reactors align with previously identified C3–C4 alkane-oxidizing sulfate-reducers. These data further constrain the potential influence of alkane oxidation on sulfate reduction rates (SRRs) in cold hydrocarbon-rich sediments, provide insight into their contribution to local carbon cycling, and illustrate the extent to which short-chain alkanes can serve as electron donors and govern microbial

  16. Theoretical study of the rhenium–alkane interaction in transition metal–alkane σ-complexes

    PubMed Central

    Cobar, Erika A.; Khaliullin, Rustam Z.; Bergman, Robert G.; Head-Gordon, Martin

    2007-01-01

    Metal–alkane binding energies have been calculated for [CpRe(CO)2](alkane) and [(CO)2M(C5H4)CC(C5H4)M(CO)2](alkane), where M = Re or Mn. Calculated binding energies were found to increase with the number of metal–alkane interaction sites. In all cases examined, the manganese–alkane binding energies were predicted to be significantly lower than those for the analogous rhenium–alkane complexes. The metal (Mn or Re)–alkane interaction was predicted to be primarily one of charge transfer, both from the alkane to the metal complex (70–80% of total charge transfer) and from the metal complex to the alkane (20–30% of the total charge transfer). PMID:17442751

  17. Theoretical study of the rhenium-alkane interaction in transition metal-alkane sigma-complexes.

    PubMed

    Cobar, Erika A; Khaliullin, Rustam Z; Bergman, Robert G; Head-Gordon, Martin

    2007-04-24

    Metal-alkane binding energies have been calculated for [CpRe(CO)2](alkane) and [(CO)2M(C5H4)C[triple bond]C(C5H4)M(CO)2](alkane), where M = Re or Mn. Calculated binding energies were found to increase with the number of metal-alkane interaction sites. In all cases examined, the manganese-alkane binding energies were predicted to be significantly lower than those for the analogous rhenium-alkane complexes. The metal (Mn or Re)-alkane interaction was predicted to be primarily one of charge transfer, both from the alkane to the metal complex (70-80% of total charge transfer) and from the metal complex to the alkane (20-30% of the total charge transfer).

  18. Alkane hydroxylase gene (alkB) phylotype composition and diversity in northern Gulf of Mexico bacterioplankton

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Conor B.; Tolar, Bradley B.; Hollibaugh, James T.; King, Gary M.

    2013-01-01

    Natural and anthropogenic activities introduce alkanes into marine systems where they are degraded by alkane hydroxylases expressed by phylogenetically diverse bacteria. Partial sequences for alkB, one of the structural genes of alkane hydroxylase, have been used to assess the composition of alkane-degrading communities, and to determine their responses to hydrocarbon inputs. We present here the first spatially extensive analysis of alkB in bacterioplankton of the northern Gulf of Mexico (nGoM), a region that experiences numerous hydrocarbon inputs. We have analyzed 401 partial alkB gene sequences amplified from genomic extracts collected during March 2010 from 17 water column samples that included surface waters and bathypelagic depths. Previous analyses of 16S rRNA gene sequences for these and related samples have shown that nGoM bacterial community composition and structure stratify strongly with depth, with distinctly different communities above and below 100 m. Although we hypothesized that alkB gene sequences would exhibit a similar pattern, PCA analyses of operational protein units (OPU) indicated that community composition did not vary consistently with depth or other major physical-chemical variables. We observed 22 distinct OPUs, one of which was ubiquitous and accounted for 57% of all sequences. This OPU clustered with AlkB sequences from known hydrocarbon oxidizers (e.g., Alcanivorax and Marinobacter). Some OPUs could not be associated with known alkane degraders, however, and perhaps represent novel hydrocarbon-oxidizing populations or genes. These results indicate that the capacity for alkane hydrolysis occurs widely in the nGoM, but that alkane degrader diversity varies substantially among sites and responds differently than bulk communities to physical-chemical variables. PMID:24376439

  19. Biodegradation of variable-chain-length n-alkanes in Rhodococcus opacus R7 and the involvement of an alkane hydroxylase system in the metabolism.

    PubMed

    Zampolli, Jessica; Collina, Elena; Lasagni, Marina; Di Gennaro, Patrizia

    2014-01-01

    Rhodococcus opacus R7 is a Gram-positive bacterium isolated from a polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon contaminated soil for its versatile metabolism; indeed the strain is able to grow on naphthalene, o-xylene, and several long- and medium-chain n-alkanes. In this work we determined the degradation of n-alkanes in Rhodococcus opacus R7 in presence of n-dodecane (C12), n-hexadecane (C16), n-eicosane (C20), n-tetracosane (C24) and the metabolic pathway in presence of C12. The consumption rate of C12 was 88%, of C16 was 69%, of C20 was 51% and of C24 it was 78%. The decrement of the degradation rate seems to be correlated to the length of the aliphatic chain of these hydrocarbons. On the basis of the metabolic intermediates determined by the R7 growth on C12, our data indicated that R. opacus R7 metabolizes medium-chain n-alkanes by the primary alcohol formation. This represents a difference in comparison with other Rhodococcus strains, in which a mixture of the two alcohols was observed. By GC-MSD analysis we also identified the monocarboxylic acid, confirming the terminal oxidation. Moreover, the alkB gene cluster from R. opacus R7 was isolated and its involvement in the n-alkane degradation system was investigated by the cloning of this genomic region into a shuttle-vector E. coli-Rhodococcus to evaluate the alkane hydroxylase activity. Our results showed an increased biodegradation of C12 in the recombinant strain R. erythropolis AP (pTipQT1-alkR7) in comparison with the wild type strain R. erythropolis AP. These data supported the involvement of the alkB gene cluster in the n-alkane degradation in the R7 strain.

  20. Biodegradation of variable-chain-length n-alkanes in Rhodococcus opacus R7 and the involvement of an alkane hydroxylase system in the metabolism

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Rhodococcus opacus R7 is a Gram-positive bacterium isolated from a polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon contaminated soil for its versatile metabolism; indeed the strain is able to grow on naphthalene, o-xylene, and several long- and medium-chain n-alkanes. In this work we determined the degradation of n-alkanes in Rhodococcus opacus R7 in presence of n-dodecane (C12), n-hexadecane (C16), n-eicosane (C20), n-tetracosane (C24) and the metabolic pathway in presence of C12. The consumption rate of C12 was 88%, of C16 was 69%, of C20 was 51% and of C24 it was 78%. The decrement of the degradation rate seems to be correlated to the length of the aliphatic chain of these hydrocarbons. On the basis of the metabolic intermediates determined by the R7 growth on C12, our data indicated that R. opacus R7 metabolizes medium-chain n-alkanes by the primary alcohol formation. This represents a difference in comparison with other Rhodococcus strains, in which a mixture of the two alcohols was observed. By GC-MSD analysis we also identified the monocarboxylic acid, confirming the terminal oxidation. Moreover, the alkB gene cluster from R. opacus R7 was isolated and its involvement in the n-alkane degradation system was investigated by the cloning of this genomic region into a shuttle-vector E. coli-Rhodococcus to evaluate the alkane hydroxylase activity. Our results showed an increased biodegradation of C12 in the recombinant strain R. erythropolis AP (pTipQT1-alkR7) in comparison with the wild type strain R. erythropolis AP. These data supported the involvement of the alkB gene cluster in the n-alkane degradation in the R7 strain. PMID:25401074

  1. Biodegradation of variable-chain-length alkanes at low temperatures by a psychrotrophic Rhodococcus sp.

    SciTech Connect

    Whyte, L.G.; Hawari, J.; Zhou, E.; Bourbonniere, L.; Greer, C.W.; Inniss, W.E.

    1998-07-01

    The psychrotroph Rhodococcus sp. strain Q15 was examined for its ability to degrade individual n-alkanes and diesel fuel at low temperatures, and its alkane catabolic pathway was investigated by biochemical and genetic techniques. At 0 and 5 C, Q15 mineralized the short-chain alkanes dodecane and hexadecane to a greater extent than that observed for the long-chain alkanes octacosane and dotriacontane. Q15 utilized a broad range of aliphatics (C{sub 10} to C{sub 21} alkanes, branched alkanes, and a substituted cyclohexane) present in diesel fuel at 5 C. Mineralization of hexadecane at 5 C was significantly greater in both hydrocarbon-contaminated and pristine soil microcosms seeded with Q15 cells than in uninoculated control soil microcosms. The detection of hexadecane and dodecane metabolic intermediates (1-hexadecanol and 2-hexadecanol and 1-do-decanol and 2-dodecanone, respectively) by solid-phase microextraction-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry and the utilization of potential metabolic intermediates indicated that Q15 oxidizes alkanes by both the terminal oxidation pathway and the subterminal oxidation pathway. Genetic characterization by PCR and nucleotide sequence analysis indicated that Q15 possesses an aliphatic aldehyde dehydrogenase gene highly homologous to the Rhodococcus erythropolis thcA gene. Rhodococcus sp. strain Q15 possessed two large plasmids of approximately 90 and 115 kb (shown to mediate Cd resistance) which were not required for alkane mineralization, although the 90-kb plasmid enhanced mineralization of some alkanes and growth on diesel oil at both 5 and 25 C.

  2. Biodegradation of Variable-Chain-Length Alkanes at Low Temperatures by a Psychrotrophic Rhodococcus sp.

    PubMed Central

    Whyte, Lyle G.; Hawari, Jalal; Zhou, Edward; Bourbonnière, Luc; Inniss, William E.; Greer, Charles W.

    1998-01-01

    The psychrotroph Rhodococcus sp. strain Q15 was examined for its ability to degrade individual n-alkanes and diesel fuel at low temperatures, and its alkane catabolic pathway was investigated by biochemical and genetic techniques. At 0 and 5°C, Q15 mineralized the short-chain alkanes dodecane and hexadecane to a greater extent than that observed for the long-chain alkanes octacosane and dotriacontane. Q15 utilized a broad range of aliphatics (C10 to C21 alkanes, branched alkanes, and a substituted cyclohexane) present in diesel fuel at 5°C. Mineralization of hexadecane at 5°C was significantly greater in both hydrocarbon-contaminated and pristine soil microcosms seeded with Q15 cells than in uninoculated control soil microcosms. The detection of hexadecane and dodecane metabolic intermediates (1-hexadecanol and 2-hexadecanol and 1-dodecanol and 2-dodecanone, respectively) by solid-phase microextraction–gas chromatography-mass spectrometry and the utilization of potential metabolic intermediates indicated that Q15 oxidizes alkanes by both the terminal oxidation pathway and the subterminal oxidation pathway. Genetic characterization by PCR and nucleotide sequence analysis indicated that Q15 possesses an aliphatic aldehyde dehydrogenase gene highly homologous to the Rhodococcus erythropolis thcA gene. Rhodococcus sp. strain Q15 possessed two large plasmids of approximately 90 and 115 kb (shown to mediate Cd resistance) which were not required for alkane mineralization, although the 90-kb plasmid enhanced mineralization of some alkanes and growth on diesel oil at both 5 and 25°C. PMID:9647833

  3. Catalytic conversion of light alkanes

    SciTech Connect

    Lyons, J.E.

    1992-06-30

    The second Quarterly Report of 1992 on the Catalytic Conversion of Light Alkanes reviews the work done between April 1, 1992 and June 31, 1992 on the Cooperative Agreement. The mission of this work is to devise a new catalyst which can be used in a simple economic process to convert the light alkanes in natural gas to oxygenate products that can either be used as clean-burning, high octane liquid fuels, as fuel components or as precursors to liquid hydrocarbon uwspomdon fuel. During the past quarter we have continued to design, prepare, characterize and test novel catalysts for the mild selective reaction of light hydrocarbons with air or oxygen to produce alcohols directly. These catalysts are designed to form active metal oxo (MO) species and to be uniquely active for the homolytic cleavage of the carbon-hydrogen bonds in light alkanes producing intermediates which can form alcohols. We continue to investigate three molecular environments for the active catalytic species that we are trying to generate: electron-deficient macrocycles (PHASE I), polyoxometallates (PHASE II), and regular oxidic lattices including zeolites and related structures as well as other molecular surface structures having metal oxo groups (PHASE I).

  4. Adaptation of the Hydrocarbonoclastic Bacterium Alcanivorax borkumensis SK2 to Alkanes and Toxic Organic Compounds: a Physiological and Transcriptomic Approach

    PubMed Central

    Naether, Daniela J.; Slawtschew, Slavtscho; Stasik, Sebastian; Engel, Maria; Olzog, Martin; Wick, Lukas Y.; Timmis, Kenneth N.

    2013-01-01

    The marine hydrocarbonoclastic bacterium Alcanivorax borkumensis is able to degrade mixtures of n-alkanes as they occur in marine oil spills. However, investigations of growth behavior and physiology of these bacteria when cultivated with n-alkanes of different chain lengths (C6 to C30) as the substrates are still lacking. Growth rates increased with increasing alkane chain length up to a maximum between C12 and C19, with no evident difference between even- and odd-numbered chain lengths, before decreasing with chain lengths greater than C19. Surface hydrophobicity of alkane-grown cells, assessed by determination of the water contact angles, showed a similar pattern, with maximum values associated with growth rates on alkanes with chain lengths between C11 and C19 and significantly lower values for cells grown on pyruvate. A. borkumensis was found to incorporate and modify the fatty acid intermediates generated by the corresponding n-alkane degradation pathway. Cells grown on distinct n-alkanes proved that A. borkumensis is able to not only incorporate but also modify fatty acid intermediates derived from the alkane degradation pathway. Comparing cells grown on pyruvate with those cultivated on hexadecane in terms of their tolerance toward two groups of toxic organic compounds, chlorophenols and alkanols, representing intensely studied organic compounds, revealed similar tolerances toward chlorophenols, whereas the toxicities of different n-alkanols were significantly reduced when hexadecane was used as a carbon source. As one adaptive mechanism of A. borkumensis to these toxic organic solvents, the activity of cis-trans isomerization of unsaturated fatty acids was proven. These findings could be verified by a detailed transcriptomic comparison between cultures grown on hexadecane and pyruvate and including solvent stress caused by the addition of 1-octanol as the most toxic intermediate of n-alkane degradation. PMID:23645199

  5. Adaptation of the hydrocarbonoclastic bacterium Alcanivorax borkumensis SK2 to alkanes and toxic organic compounds: a physiological and transcriptomic approach.

    PubMed

    Naether, Daniela J; Slawtschew, Slavtscho; Stasik, Sebastian; Engel, Maria; Olzog, Martin; Wick, Lukas Y; Timmis, Kenneth N; Heipieper, Hermann J

    2013-07-01

    The marine hydrocarbonoclastic bacterium Alcanivorax borkumensis is able to degrade mixtures of n-alkanes as they occur in marine oil spills. However, investigations of growth behavior and physiology of these bacteria when cultivated with n-alkanes of different chain lengths (C6 to C30) as the substrates are still lacking. Growth rates increased with increasing alkane chain length up to a maximum between C12 and C19, with no evident difference between even- and odd-numbered chain lengths, before decreasing with chain lengths greater than C19. Surface hydrophobicity of alkane-grown cells, assessed by determination of the water contact angles, showed a similar pattern, with maximum values associated with growth rates on alkanes with chain lengths between C11 and C19 and significantly lower values for cells grown on pyruvate. A. borkumensis was found to incorporate and modify the fatty acid intermediates generated by the corresponding n-alkane degradation pathway. Cells grown on distinct n-alkanes proved that A. borkumensis is able to not only incorporate but also modify fatty acid intermediates derived from the alkane degradation pathway. Comparing cells grown on pyruvate with those cultivated on hexadecane in terms of their tolerance toward two groups of toxic organic compounds, chlorophenols and alkanols, representing intensely studied organic compounds, revealed similar tolerances toward chlorophenols, whereas the toxicities of different n-alkanols were significantly reduced when hexadecane was used as a carbon source. As one adaptive mechanism of A. borkumensis to these toxic organic solvents, the activity of cis-trans isomerization of unsaturated fatty acids was proven. These findings could be verified by a detailed transcriptomic comparison between cultures grown on hexadecane and pyruvate and including solvent stress caused by the addition of 1-octanol as the most toxic intermediate of n-alkane degradation.

  6. FORMALDEHYDE GAS INACTIVATION OF BACILLUS ANTHRACIS, BACILLUS SUBTILIS AND GEOBACILLUS STEAROTHERMOPHILUS SPORES ON INDOOR SURFACE MATERIALS.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Research evaluated the decontamination of Bacillus anthracis, Bacillus subtilis, and Geobacillus stearothermophilus spores on indoor surface material using formaldehyde gas. Spores were dried on seven types of indoor surfaces and exposed to 1100 ppm formaldehyde gas for 10 hr. Fo...

  7. Crystal structures of Geobacillus stearothermophilus alpha-glucuronidase complexed with its substrate and products: mechanistic implications.

    PubMed

    Golan, Gali; Shallom, Dalia; Teplitsky, Anna; Zaide, Galia; Shulami, Smadar; Baasov, Timor; Stojanoff, Vivian; Thompson, Andy; Shoham, Yuval; Shoham, Gil

    2004-01-23

    Alpha-glucuronidases cleave the alpha-1,2-glycosidic bond between 4-O-methyl-d-glucuronic acid and short xylooligomers as part of the hemicellulose degradation system. To date, all of the alpha-glucuronidases are classified as family 67 glycosidases, which catalyze the hydrolysis via the investing mechanism. Here we describe several high resolution crystal structures of the alpha-glucuronidase (AguA) from Geobacillus stearothermophilus, in complex with its substrate and products. In the complex of AguA with the intact substrate, the 4-O-methyl-d-glucuronic acid sugar ring is distorted into a half-chair conformation, which is closer to the planar conformation required for the oxocarbenium ion-like transition state structure. In the active site, a water molecule is coordinated between two carboxylic acids, in an appropriate position to act as a nucleophile. From the structural data it is likely that two carboxylic acids, Asp(364) and Glu(392), activate together the nucleophilic water molecule. The loop carrying the catalytic general acid Glu(285) cannot be resolved in some of the structures but could be visualized in its "open" and "closed" (catalytic) conformations in other structures. The protonated state of Glu(285) is presumably stabilized by its proximity to the negative charge of the substrate, representing a new variation of substrate-assisted catalysis mechanism.

  8. Growth of Pseudomonas chloritidismutans AW-1(T) on n-alkanes with chlorate as electron acceptor.

    PubMed

    Mehboob, Farrakh; Junca, Howard; Schraa, Gosse; Stams, Alfons J M

    2009-06-01

    Microbial (per)chlorate reduction is a unique process in which molecular oxygen is formed during the dismutation of chlorite. The oxygen thus formed may be used to degrade hydrocarbons by means of oxygenases under seemingly anoxic conditions. Up to now, no bacterium has been described that grows on aliphatic hydrocarbons with chlorate. Here, we report that Pseudomonas chloritidismutans AW-1(T) grows on n-alkanes (ranging from C7 until C12) with chlorate as electron acceptor. Strain AW-1(T) also grows on the intermediates of the presumed n-alkane degradation pathway. The specific growth rates on n-decane and chlorate and n-decane and oxygen were 0.5 +/- 0.1 and 0.4 +/- 0.02 day(-1), respectively. The key enzymes chlorate reductase and chlorite dismutase were assayed and found to be present. The oxygen-dependent alkane oxidation was demonstrated in whole-cell suspensions. The strain degrades n-alkanes with oxygen and chlorate but not with nitrate, thus suggesting that the strain employs oxygenase-dependent pathways for the breakdown of n-alkanes.

  9. Biodegradation of C7 and C8 iso-alkanes under methanogenic conditions.

    PubMed

    Abu Laban, Nidal; Dao, Anh; Semple, Kathleen; Foght, Julia

    2015-12-01

    Iso-alkanes comprise a substantial proportion of petroleum and refined products that impact the environment, but their fate is cryptic under methanogenic conditions. We investigated methanogenic biodegradation of C7 and C8 iso-alkanes found in naphtha, specifically 2-methylhexane, 3-methylhexane, 2-methylheptane, 4-methylheptane and 3-ethylhexane. These were incubated as a mixture or individually with enrichment cultures derived from oil sands tailings ponds that generate methane from naphtha components; substrate depletion and methane production were monitored for up to 663 days. 3-Methylhexane and 4-methylheptane were degraded both singly and in the mixture, whereas 2-methylhexane and 2-methylheptane resisted degradation as single substrates but were depleted in the iso-alkane mixture, suggesting co-metabolism. 3-Ethylhexane was degraded neither singly nor with co-substrates. Putative metabolites consistent with succinylated C7 and C8 were detected, suggesting activation by addition of iso-alkanes to fumarate and corresponding to detection of alkylsuccinate synthase-like genes. 454 pyrotag sequencing, cloning and terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism of 16S rRNA genes revealed predominance of a novel member of the family Peptococcaceae (order Clostridiales) and Archaea affiliated with Methanoregula and Methanosaeta. We report here isomer-specific metabolism of C7 -C8 iso-alkanes under methanogenic conditions and propose their activation by a novel Peptococcaceae via addition to fumarate. © 2014 Society for Applied Microbiology and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. Alkane biohydroxylation: Interests, constraints and future developments.

    PubMed

    Soussan, Laurence; Pen, Nakry; Belleville, Marie-Pierre; Marcano, José Sanchez; Paolucci-Jeanjean, Delphine

    2016-03-20

    Alkanes constitute one of the vastest reserves of raw materials for the production of fine chemicals. This paper focuses on recent advances in alkane biohydroxylation, i.e. the bioactivation of alkanes into their corresponding alcohols. Enzyme and whole-cell biocatalysts have been reviewed. Process considerations to implement such biocatalysts in bioreactors at large scale by coupling the bioconversion with cofactor regeneration and product removal are also discussed.

  11. The Roles of Microbial Communities in n-Alkane Distribution of The Nanjenshan Lowland Subtropical Rainforest in Taiwan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Y. W.; Huang, T. Y.; Fan, C. W.; Chao, W. C.; Yang, T. N.; Huang, C. P.; Hsu, B. M.

    2016-12-01

    Analysis of total organic carbon in Nanjenshan, a lowland subtropical rainforest in southern Taiwan, revealed that the carbon storage of litter-layer was about 35% lower in ravine area than in windward and leeward areas, while the soil storage in these areas were similar. In this one year follow-up study, we aimed to investigate the kinetic changes of n-alkane (C14-C35) concentration from litter fall, litter-layer, surface soil, soil in -10 cm depth, and soil in -30 cm depth by a GC-FID method. The n-alkane distribution and n-alkane flux of these areas were also analyzed. Next generation sequencing was carried out to examine the metagenomics of uncultured microbial community in litter-layer of these areas. Our results showed that the net weight of one year-litter fall in ravine area was 30% higher than the others. The average concentration of n-alkane in leaves in ravine was 90% and 50% higher than in windward area and leeward area, respectively. Although the n-alkane flux in ravine area was twice higher than the other areas, the n-alkane concentrations in litter-layer and soils of different layers were similar among all areas, suggesting a rapid degradation of n-alkane in liter layer in ravine area. Interestingly, the character of odd over even predominance of n-alkane was gradually lost in soil layer in ravine area. Metagenomic data have showed that the structure of microbial abundance in ravine area was different from windward and leeward areas. In ravine area, the numbers in phyla of Bacteroidetes, Actinobacteria, and Proteobacteria, were higher than the other areas, while in phyla of Acidobacteria and Planctomycetes were lower. Our data provided evidence that microbial communities may not only play a role on n-alkane degradation but also change the profile in abundance of high-chain length n-alkanes.

  12. Characterization of a thermophilic bacteriophage of Geobacillus kaustophilus.

    PubMed

    Marks, Timothy J; Hamilton, Paul T

    2014-10-01

    GBK2 is a bacteriophage, isolated from a backyard compost pile, that infects the thermophile Geobacillus kaustophilus. GBK2 has a circularly permuted genome of 39,078 bp with a G+C content of 43 %. Annotation of the genome reveals 62 putative open reading frames (ORFs), 25 of which (40.3 %) show homology to known proteins and 37 of which (59.7 %) are proteins with unknown functions. Twelve of the identified ORFs had the greatest homology to genes from the phage SPP1, a phage that infects the mesophile Bacillus subtilis. The overall genomic arrangement of GBK2 is similar to that of SPP1, with the majority of GBK2 SPP1-like genes coding for proteins involved in DNA replication and metabolism.

  13. Geobacillus zalihae sp. nov., a thermophilic lipolytic bacterium isolated from palm oil mill effluent in Malaysia

    PubMed Central

    Rahman, Raja Noor Zaliha Raja Abd; Leow, Thean Chor; Salleh, Abu Bakar; Basri, Mahiran

    2007-01-01

    Background Thermophilic Bacillus strains of phylogenetic Bacillus rRNA group 5 were described as a new genus Geobacillus. Their geographical distribution included oilfields, hay compost, hydrothermal vent or soils. The members from the genus Geobacillus have a growth temperatures ranging from 35 to 78°C and contained iso-branched saturated fatty acids (iso-15:0, iso-16:0 and iso-17:0) as the major fatty acids. The members of Geobacillus have similarity in their 16S rRNA gene sequences (96.5–99.2%). Thermophiles harboring intrinsically stable enzymes are suitable for industrial applications. The quest for intrinsically thermostable lipases from thermophiles is a prominent task due to the laborious processes via genetic modification. Results Twenty-nine putative lipase producers were screened and isolated from palm oil mill effluent in Malaysia. Of these, isolate T1T was chosen for further study as relatively higher lipase activity was detected quantitatively. The crude T1 lipase showed high optimum temperature of 70°C and was also stable up to 60°C without significant loss of crude enzyme activity. Strain T1T was a Gram-positive, rod-shaped, endospore forming bacterium. On the basic of 16S rDNA analysis, strain T1T was shown to belong to the Bacillus rRNA group 5 related to Geobacillus thermoleovorans (DSM 5366T) and Geobacillus kaustophilus (DSM 7263T). Chemotaxonomic data of cellular fatty acids supported the affiliation of strain T1T to the genus Geobacillus. The results of physiological and biochemical tests, DNA/DNA hybridization, RiboPrint analysis, the length of lipase gene and protein pattern allowed genotypic and phenotypic differentiation of strain T1T from its validly published closest phylogenetic neighbors. Strain T1T therefore represents a novel species, for which the name Geobacillus zalihae sp. nov. is proposed, with the type strain T1T (=DSM 18318T; NBRC 101842T). Conclusion Strain T1T was able to secrete extracellular thermostable lipase into

  14. Reaction pathway for alkane dehydrocyclization

    SciTech Connect

    Shi, Buchang; Davis, B.H.

    1996-08-01

    Naphtha reforming to produce high octane gasoline is an important process. Many reaction mechanisms are involved in this process. For example, the study of the fundamentals of this process led to the concept of bi- or poly-functional catalysis. The results of this study provide additional mechanistic information about the dehydrocyclization of an n-alkane to produce aromatics. The reaction coordinate diagram advanced to account for the observation of irreversible adsorption should be modified to account for the present results. 32 refs., 1 fig.

  15. Changes in the concentration and relative abundance of alkanes and PAHs from the Deepwater Horizon oiling of coastal marshes.

    PubMed

    Turner, R E; Overton, E B; Meyer, B M; Miles, M S; Hooper-Bui, L

    2014-09-15

    We determined changes of 28 alkanes and 43 different PAHs in 418 wetland soil samples collected on ten sampling trips to three Louisiana estuaries before and after they were oiled from the 2010 Deepwater Horizon disaster. There was a significant decline in 22 of the 28 alkane analytes (0.42% day(-1)), no change in 6, over 2.5 years. The concentration of five aromatic petroleum hydrocarbons (PAHs) increased (range 0.25-0.70% day(-1)), whereas the total PAH pool did not change. Of these five, naphthalene and C-1-naphthalenes are suggested to be of higher toxicity than the other three because of their relatively higher volatility or solubility. The relative proportions of alkane analytes, but not PAHs, does not yet resemble that in the pre-oiled marshes after 3 years, The trajectories of nine indicators for degradation/weathering were either inconclusive or misleading (alkanes) or confirmed the relatively meager degradation of PAHs.

  16. Alkane-Based Urethane Potting Compounds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morris, D. E.

    1986-01-01

    New low viscosity urethanes easily mixed, molded, and outgassed. Alkane-based urethanes resist hydrolysis and oxidation and have excellent dielectric properties. Low-viscosity alkane-based urethane prepolymer prepared by one-step reaction of either isophorone diisocyanate or methyl-bis (4-cyclohexyl isocyanate) with hydrogenated, hydroxy-terminated polybutadiene (HTPBD).

  17. Interrogation of Chesapeake Bay sediment microbial communities for intrinsic alkane-utilizing potential under anaerobic conditions.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Jamie M; Wawrik, Boris; Isom, Catherine; Boling, Wilford B; Callaghan, Amy V

    2015-02-01

    Based on the transient exposure of Chesapeake Bay sediments to hydrocarbons and the metabolic versatility of known anaerobic alkane-degrading microorganisms, it was hypothesized that distinct Bay sediment communities, governed by geochemical gradients, would have intrinsic alkane-utilizing potential under sulfate-reducing and/or methanogenic conditions. Sediment cores were collected along a transect of the Bay. Community DNA was interrogated via pyrosequencing of 16S rRNA genes, PCR of anaerobic hydrocarbon activation genes, and qPCR of 16S rRNA genes and genes involved in sulfate reduction/methanogenesis. Site sediments were used to establish microcosms amended with n-hexadecane under sulfate-reducing and methanogenic conditions. Sequencing of 16S rRNA genes indicated that sediments associated with hypoxic water columns contained significantly greater proportions of Bacteria and Archaea consistent with syntrophic degradation of organic matter and methanogenesis compared to less reduced sediments. Microbial taxa frequently associated with hydrocarbon-degrading communities were found throughout the Bay, and the genetic potential for hydrocarbon metabolism was demonstrated via the detection of benzyl-(bssA) and alkylsuccinate synthase (assA) genes. Although microcosm studies did not indicate sulfidogenic alkane degradation, the data suggested that methanogenic conversion of alkanes was occurring. These findings highlight the potential role that anaerobic microorganisms could play in the bioremediation of hydrocarbons in the Bay.

  18. Microbial alteration of normal alkane δ13C and δD in sedimentary archives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brittingham, A.; Hren, M. T.; Hartman, G.

    2016-12-01

    Long-carbon chain normal alkanes (e.g. C25-C33) are produced by a wide range of terrestrial plants and commonly preserved in ancient sediments. These serve as a potential paleoclimate proxy because their hydrogen (δD) and carbon (δ13C) isotope values reflect the combined effect of plant-specific species effects and responses to environmental conditions. While these are commonly believed to remain unaltered at low burial temperatures (e.g. <150°C), there is still uncertainty around the role microbes play during the breakdown of these compounds in stored sediment and the potential risk for isotopic alteration. We analyzed two sets of identical samples to assess the role of microbial and other degradation process on the hydrogen and carbon isotope composition of these compounds. The first set of sediment samples were collected in the summer of 2011 from central Armenia, a region with continental climate, and allowed to sit in sealed bags at room temperature for three years. A second and identical set was collected in 2014 and frozen immediately. Stored samples showed high amounts of medium chain length n-alkanes (C19-C26), produced by microorganisms, which were absent from the samples that were collected in 2014 and frozen immediately after sampling. Along with the presence of medium chain length n-alkanes, the average chain length of n-alkanes from C25-C33 decreased significantly in all 2011 samples. Storage of the samples over three years resulted in altered δD and δ13C values of C29 and C31 n-alkanes. While δD values were heavier relative to the control by 4-25‰, δ13C values were mostly lighter (maximum change of -4.2‰ in C29 and -2.9‰ in C31). DNA analysis of the soil showed Rhodococcus and Aeromicrobium, genera that contain multiple coding regions for alkane degrading enzymes CYP153 and AlkB, increased by an order of magnitude during sample storage (from 0.7% to 7.5% of bacteria present). The proliferation of alkane degrading bacteria, combined with

  19. The Geobacillus Pan-Genome: Implications for the Evolution of the Genus

    PubMed Central

    Bezuidt, Oliver K.; Pierneef, Rian; Gomri, Amin M.; Adesioye, Fiyin; Makhalanyane, Thulani P.; Kharroub, Karima; Cowan, Don A.

    2016-01-01

    The genus Geobacillus is comprised of a diverse group of spore-forming Gram-positive thermophilic bacterial species and is well known for both its ecological diversity and as a source of novel thermostable enzymes. Although the mechanisms underlying the thermophilicity of the organism and the thermostability of its macromolecules are reasonably well understood, relatively little is known of the evolutionary mechanisms, which underlie the structural and functional properties of members of this genus. In this study, we have compared 29 Geobacillus genomes, with a specific focus on the elements, which comprise the conserved core and flexible genomes. Based on comparisons of conserved core and flexible genomes, we present evidence of habitat delineation with specific Geobacillus genomes linked to specific niches. Our analysis revealed that Geobacillus and Anoxybacillus share a high proportion of genes. Moreover, the results strongly suggest that horizontal gene transfer is a major factor deriving the evolution of Geobacillus from Bacillus, with genetic contributions from other phylogenetically distant taxa. PMID:27252683

  20. Complete genome sequences of Geobacillus sp. WCH70, a thermophilic strain isolated from wood compost

    DOE PAGES

    Brumm, Phillip; Land, Miriam L.; Mead, David

    2016-04-27

    Geobacillus sp. WCH70 was one of several thermophilic organisms isolated from hot composts in the Middleton, WI area. Comparison of 16 S rRNA sequences showed the strain may be a new species, and is most closely related to G. galactosidasius and G. toebii. The genome was sequenced, assembled, and annotated by the DOE Joint Genome Institute and deposited at the NCBI in December 2009 (CP001638). The genome of Geobacillus species WCH70 consists of one circular chromosome of 3,893,306 bp with an average G + C content of 43 %, and two circular plasmids of 33,899 and 10,287 bp with anmore » average G + C content of 40 %. Among sequenced organisms, Geobacillus sp. WCH70 shares highest Average Nucleotide Identity (86 %) with G. thermoglucosidasius strains, as well as similar genome organization. Geobacillus sp. WCH70 appears to be a highly adaptable organism, with an exceptionally high 125 annotated transposons in the genome. The organism also possesses four predicted restriction-modification systems not found in other Geobacillus species.« less

  1. Complete genome sequences of Geobacillus sp. WCH70, a thermophilic strain isolated from wood compost

    SciTech Connect

    Brumm, Phillip; Land, Miriam L.; Mead, David

    2016-04-27

    Geobacillus sp. WCH70 was one of several thermophilic organisms isolated from hot composts in the Middleton, WI area. Comparison of 16 S rRNA sequences showed the strain may be a new species, and is most closely related to G. galactosidasius and G. toebii. The genome was sequenced, assembled, and annotated by the DOE Joint Genome Institute and deposited at the NCBI in December 2009 (CP001638). The genome of Geobacillus species WCH70 consists of one circular chromosome of 3,893,306 bp with an average G + C content of 43 %, and two circular plasmids of 33,899 and 10,287 bp with an average G + C content of 40 %. Among sequenced organisms, Geobacillus sp. WCH70 shares highest Average Nucleotide Identity (86 %) with G. thermoglucosidasius strains, as well as similar genome organization. Geobacillus sp. WCH70 appears to be a highly adaptable organism, with an exceptionally high 125 annotated transposons in the genome. The organism also possesses four predicted restriction-modification systems not found in other Geobacillus species.

  2. Complete genome sequences of Geobacillus sp. WCH70, a thermophilic strain isolated from wood compost.

    PubMed

    Brumm, Phillip J; Land, Miriam L; Mead, David A

    2016-01-01

    Geobacillus sp. WCH70 was one of several thermophilic organisms isolated from hot composts in the Middleton, WI area. Comparison of 16 S rRNA sequences showed the strain may be a new species, and is most closely related to G. galactosidasius and G. toebii. The genome was sequenced, assembled, and annotated by the DOE Joint Genome Institute and deposited at the NCBI in December 2009 (CP001638). The genome of Geobacillus species WCH70 consists of one circular chromosome of 3,893,306 bp with an average G + C content of 43 %, and two circular plasmids of 33,899 and 10,287 bp with an average G + C content of 40 %. Among sequenced organisms, Geobacillus sp. WCH70 shares highest Average Nucleotide Identity (86 %) with G. thermoglucosidasius strains, as well as similar genome organization. Geobacillus sp. WCH70 appears to be a highly adaptable organism, with an exceptionally high 125 annotated transposons in the genome. The organism also possesses four predicted restriction-modification systems not found in other Geobacillus species.

  3. Enhanced biodegradation of alkane hydrocarbons and crude oil by mixed strains and bacterial community analysis.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yu; Li, Chen; Zhou, Zhengxi; Wen, Jianping; You, Xueyi; Mao, Youzhi; Lu, Chunzhe; Huo, Guangxin; Jia, Xiaoqiang

    2014-04-01

    In this study, two strains, Acinetobacter sp. XM-02 and Pseudomonas sp. XM-01, were isolated from soil samples polluted by crude oil at Bohai offshore. The former one could degrade alkane hydrocarbons (crude oil and diesel, 1:4 (v/v)) and crude oil efficiently; the latter one failed to grow on alkane hydrocarbons but could produce rhamnolipid (a biosurfactant) with glycerol as sole carbon source. Compared with pure culture, mixed culture of the two strains showed higher capability in degrading alkane hydrocarbons and crude oil of which degradation rate were increased from 89.35 and 74.32 ± 4.09 to 97.41 and 87.29 ± 2.41 %, respectively. In the mixed culture, Acinetobacter sp. XM-02 grew fast with sufficient carbon source and produced intermediates which were subsequently utilized for the growth of Pseudomonas sp. XM-01 and then, rhamnolipid was produced by Pseudomonas sp. XM-01. Till the end of the process, Acinetobacter sp. XM-02 was inhibited by the rapid growth of Pseudomonas sp. XM-01. In addition, alkane hydrocarbon degradation rate of the mixed culture increased by 8.06 to 97.41 % compared with 87.29 % of the pure culture. The surface tension of medium dropping from 73.2 × 10(-3) to 28.6 × 10(-3) N/m. Based on newly found cooperation between the degrader and the coworking strain, rational investigations and optimal strategies to alkane hydrocarbons biodegradation were utilized for enhancing crude oil biodegradation.

  4. Genetic toolbox for controlled expression of functional proteins in Geobacillus spp.

    PubMed Central

    Pogrebnyakov, Ivan; Jendresen, Christian Bille

    2017-01-01

    Species of genus Geobacillus are thermophilic bacteria and play an ever increasing role as hosts for biotechnological applications both in academia and industry. Here we screened a number of Geobacillus strains to determine which industrially relevant carbon sources they can utilize. One of the strains, G. thermoglucosidasius C56-YS93, was then chosen to develop a toolbox for controlled gene expression over a wide range of levels. It includes a library of semi-synthetic constitutive promoters (76-fold difference in expression levels) and an inducible promoter from the xylA gene. A library of synthetic in silico designed ribosome binding sites was also created for further tuning of translation. The PxylA was further used to successfully express native and heterologous xylanases in G. thermoglucosidasius. This toolbox enables fine-tuning of gene expression in Geobacillus species for metabolic engineering approaches in production of biochemicals and heterologous proteins. PMID:28152017

  5. Effects of steam autoclave treatment on Geobacillus stearothermophilus spores.

    PubMed

    Huesca-Espitia, L C; Suvira, M; Rosenbeck, K; Korza, G; Setlow, B; Li, W; Wang, S; Li, Y-Q; Setlow, P

    2016-11-01

    To determine the mechanism of autoclave killing of Geobacillus stearothermophilus spores used in biological indicators (BIs) for steam autoclave sterilization, and rates of loss of spore viability and a spore enzyme used in BIs. Spore viability, dipicolinic acid (DPA) release, nucleic acid staining, α-glucosidase activity, protein structure and mutagenesis were measured during autoclaving of G. stearothermophilus spores. Loss of DPA and increases in spore core nucleic acid staining were slower than loss of spore viability. Spore core α-glucosidase was also lost more slowly than spore viability, although soluble α-glucosidase in spore preparations was lost more rapidly. However, spores exposed to an effective autoclave sterilization lost all viability and α-glucosidase activity. Apparently killed autoclaved spores were not recovered by artificial germination in supportive media, much spore protein was denatured during autoclaving, and partially killed autoclave-treated spore preparations did not acquire mutations. These results indicate that autoclave-killed spores cannot be revived, spore killing by autoclaving is likely by protein damage, and spore core α-glucosidase activity is lost more slowly than spore viability. This work provides insight into the mechanism of autoclave killing of spores of an organism used in BIs, and that a spore enzyme in a BI is more stable to autoclaving than spore viability. © 2016 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  6. Engineering resistance to phage GVE3 in Geobacillus thermoglucosidasius.

    PubMed

    van Zyl, Leonardo Joaquim; Taylor, Mark Paul; Trindade, Marla

    2016-02-01

    Geobacillus thermoglucosidasius is a promising platform organism for the production of biofuels and other metabolites of interest. G. thermoglucosidasius fermentations could be subject to bacteriophage-related failure and financial loss. We develop two strains resistant to a recently described G. thermoglucosidasius-infecting phage GVE3. The phage-encoded immunity gene, imm, was overexpressed in the host leading to phage resistance. A phage-resistant mutant was isolated following expression of a putative anti-repressor-like protein and phage challenge. A point mutation was identified in the polysaccharide pyruvyl transferase, csaB. A double crossover knockout mutation of csaB confirmed its role in the phage resistance phenotype. These resistance mechanisms appear to prevent phage DNA injection and/or lysogenic conversion rather than just reducing efficiency of plating, as no phage DNA could be detected in resistant bacteria challenged with GVE3 and no plaques observed even at high phage titers. Not only do the strains developed here shed light on the biological relationship between the GVE3 phage and its host, they could be employed by those looking to make use of this organism for metabolite production, with reduced occurrence of GVE3-related failure.

  7. Genome shuffling enhances lipase production of thermophilic Geobacillus sp.

    PubMed

    Chalopagorn, Pornchanok; Charoenpanich, Jittima; Choowongkomon, Kiattawee

    2014-10-01

    Thermostable lipases are potential enzymes for biocatalytic application. In this study, the lipase production of Geobacillus sp. CF03 (WT) was improved by genome shuffling. After two rounds of genome shuffling, one fusant strain (FB1) achieved increase lipase activity from the populations generated by ultraviolet irradiation and ethyl methylsulfonate (EMS) mutagenesis. The growth rate and lipase production of FB1 increased highest by 150 and 238 %, respectively, in comparison to the wild type. The fusant enzyme had a significant change in substrate specificity but still prefers the long-chain length substrates. It had an optimum activity at 60 °C, pH at 7.0-8.0, with p-nitrophenyl palmitate (C16) as a substrate and retained about 50 % of their activity after 15 min at 70 °C, pH 8.0. Furthermore, the fusant lipase showed the preference of sesame oil, waste palm oil, and canola oil. Therefore, the genome shuffling strategy has been successful to strain improvement and selecting strain with multiple desirable characteristics.

  8. Hydrogen isotope alteration of normal alkanes during artificial maturation experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, C.; Eley, Y.; Oakes, A.; Hren, M. T.

    2016-12-01

    Hydrogen isotopes of normal alkanes provide a record of past climate, hydrocarbon source and migration, and thermal history. Numerous authors have investigated the preservation potential of organic compounds during burial diagenesis and developed a range of molecular indicators of thermal maturity. A key uncertainty in application of organic biomarkers for paleoenvironmental work is how the δD values of individual molecular compounds changes during burial heating and thermal cracking. Studies suggest that n-alkanes are unlikely to exchange hydrogen at modest temperatures (below 150°C) over geologic time, however there is still debate over the potential for alteration of primary isotopic signatures due to the combined effect of exchange and cracking of more complex molecules. We conducted a suite of heating experiments in ambient air and oxygen-free systems using pure alkane mixtures and natural soil extracts to evaluate the preservation potential of the hydrogen isotopic composition of both short (nC20) carbon chain n-alkanes. Our data show that for pure mixtures, there is a positive shift in the δD of long carbon chains during heating of up to 12‰ and a negative shift in short chains of up to 28‰. Experiments with natural sediment extracts show 2H enrichment of long carbon chains during heating in both ambient air and oxygen free systems, and at temperatures below 150°C. These changes are accompanied by shifts in the carbon preference and average chain length. Experimental data show that there is potential for 2H/1H alteration of long-carbon chain normal alkanes during shallow burial, however these changes rarely exceed 10-15‰ before compounds are degraded to quantities below useful abundances for isotope measurements. A potentially significant result is that low temperature alteration of organics within sediments can shift the average chain length, particularly in the presence of oxygen. Thus, lithology and gas permeability may play an important role in

  9. Anaerobic biodegradation of longer-chain n-alkanes coupled to methane production in oil sands tailings.

    PubMed

    Siddique, Tariq; Penner, Tara; Semple, Kathleen; Foght, Julia M

    2011-07-01

    Extraction of bitumen from mined oil sands ores produces enormous volumes of tailings that are stored in settling basins (current inventory ≥ 840 million m(3)). Our previous studies revealed that certain hydrocarbons (short-chain n-alkanes [C(6)-C(10)] and monoaromatics [toluene, o-xylene, m-xylene]) in residual naphtha entrained in the tailings are biodegraded to CH(4) by a consortium of microorganisms. Here we show that higher molecular weight n-alkanes (C(14), C(16), and C(18)) are also degraded under methanogenic conditions in oil sands tailings, albeit after a lengthy lag (~180 d) before the onset of methanogenesis. Gas chromatographic analyses showed that the longer-chain n-alkanes each added at ~400 mg L(-1) were completely degraded by the resident microorganisms within ~440 d at ~20 °C. 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis of clone libraries implied that the predominant pathway of longer-chain n-alkane metabolism in tailings is through syntrophic oxidation of n-alkanes coupled with CO(2) reduction to CH(4). These studies demonstrating methanogenic biodegradation of longer-chain n-alkanes by microbes native to oil sands tailings may be important for effective management of tailings and greenhouse gas emissions from tailings ponds.

  10. Supported organoiridium catalysts for alkane dehydrogenation

    SciTech Connect

    Baker, R. Thomas; Sattelberger, Alfred P.; Li, Hongbo

    2013-09-03

    Solid supported organoiridium catalysts, a process for preparing such solid supported organoiridium catalysts, and the use of such solid supported organoiridium catalysts in dehydrogenation reactions of alkanes is provided. The catalysts can be easily recovered and recycled.

  11. Preferential methanogenic biodegradation of short-chain n-alkanes by microbial communities from two different oil sands tailings ponds.

    PubMed

    Shahimin, Mohd Faidz Mohamad; Foght, Julia M; Siddique, Tariq

    2016-05-15

    Oil sands tailings ponds harbor diverse anaerobic microbial communities capable of methanogenic biodegradation of solvent hydrocarbons entrained in the tailings. Mature fine tailings (MFT) from two operators (Albian and CNRL) that use different extraction solvents were incubated with mixtures of either two (n-pentane and n-hexane) or four (n-pentane, n-hexane, n-octane and n-decane) n-alkanes under methanogenic conditions for ~600 d. Microbes in Albian MFT began methane production by ~80 d, achieving complete depletion of n-pentane and n-hexane in the two-alkane mixture and their preferential biodegradation in the four-alkane mixture. Microbes in CNRL MFT preferentially metabolized n-octane and n-decane in the four-alkane mixture after a ~80 d lag but exhibited a lag of ~360 d before commencing biodegradation of n-pentane and n-hexane in the two-alkane mixture. 16S rRNA gene pyrosequencing revealed Peptococcaceae members as key bacterial n-alkane degraders in all treatments except CNRL MFT amended with the four-alkane mixture, in which Anaerolineaceae, Desulfobacteraceae (Desulfobacterium) and Syntrophaceae (Smithella) dominated during n-octane and n-decane biodegradation. Anaerolineaceae sequences increased only in cultures amended with the four-alkane mixture and only during n-octane and n-decane biodegradation. The dominant methanogens were acetoclastic Methanosaetaceae. These results highlight preferential n-alkane biodegradation by microbes in oil sands tailings from different producers, with implications for tailings management and reclamation.

  12. Evidence that crude oil alkane activation proceeds by different mechanisms under sulfate-reducing and methanogenic conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aitken, C. M.; Jones, D. M.; Maguire, M. J.; Gray, N. D.; Sherry, A.; Bowler, B. F. J.; Ditchfield, A. K.; Larter, S. R.; Head, I. M.

    2013-05-01

    Fumarate addition has been widely proposed as an initial step in the anaerobic oxidation of both aromatic and aliphatic hydrocarbons. Alkyl and aryl succinates have been reported as metabolites of hydrocarbon degradation in laboratory studies with both pure and enrichment cultures of sulfate-, nitrate-, and iron-reducing bacteria. In addition these compounds have been reported in samples from environments such as hydrocarbon contaminated aquifers where, in addition to the above redox processes, hydrocarbon degradation linked to methanogenesis was observed. Here we report data from anaerobic crude oil degrading microcosms which revealed significant differences between the acid metabolite profiles of crude oil degraded under sulfate-reducing or methanogenic conditions. Under sulfate-reducing conditions fumarate addition and the formation of alkylsuccinate metabolites was the principal mechanism for the anaerobic degradation of n-alkanes and branched chain alkanes. Other than alkyl succinates that represent indigenous metabolites in the sediment inoculum, alkyl succinate metabolites were never detected in sediment microcosms where methane generation was quantitatively linked to n-alkane degradation. This indicates that alternative mechanisms of alkane activation may operate under methanogenic conditions.

  13. Solar photothermochemical alkane reverse combustion.

    PubMed

    Chanmanee, Wilaiwan; Islam, Mohammad Fakrul; Dennis, Brian H; MacDonnell, Frederick M

    2016-03-08

    A one-step, gas-phase photothermocatalytic process for the synthesis of hydrocarbons, including liquid alkanes, aromatics, and oxygenates, with carbon numbers (Cn) up to C13, from CO2 and water is demonstrated in a flow photoreactor operating at elevated temperatures (180-200 °C) and pressures (1-6 bar) using a 5% cobalt on TiO2 catalyst and under UV irradiation. A parametric study of temperature, pressure, and partial pressure ratio revealed that temperatures in excess of 160 °C are needed to obtain the higher Cn products in quantity and that the product distribution shifts toward higher Cn products with increasing pressure. In the best run so far, over 13% by mass of the products were C5+ hydrocarbons and some of these, i.e., octane, are drop-in replacements for existing liquid hydrocarbons fuels. Dioxygen was detected in yields ranging between 64% and 150%. In principle, this tandem photochemical-thermochemical process, fitted with a photocatalyst better matched to the solar spectrum, could provide a cheap and direct method to produce liquid hydrocarbons from CO2 and water via a solar process which uses concentrated sunlight for both photochemical excitation to generate high-energy intermediates and heat to drive important thermochemical carbon-chain-forming reactions.

  14. Solar photothermochemical alkane reverse combustion

    PubMed Central

    Chanmanee, Wilaiwan; Islam, Mohammad Fakrul; Dennis, Brian H.; MacDonnell, Frederick M.

    2016-01-01

    A one-step, gas-phase photothermocatalytic process for the synthesis of hydrocarbons, including liquid alkanes, aromatics, and oxygenates, with carbon numbers (Cn) up to C13, from CO2 and water is demonstrated in a flow photoreactor operating at elevated temperatures (180–200 °C) and pressures (1–6 bar) using a 5% cobalt on TiO2 catalyst and under UV irradiation. A parametric study of temperature, pressure, and partial pressure ratio revealed that temperatures in excess of 160 °C are needed to obtain the higher Cn products in quantity and that the product distribution shifts toward higher Cn products with increasing pressure. In the best run so far, over 13% by mass of the products were C5+ hydrocarbons and some of these, i.e., octane, are drop-in replacements for existing liquid hydrocarbons fuels. Dioxygen was detected in yields ranging between 64% and 150%. In principle, this tandem photochemical–thermochemical process, fitted with a photocatalyst better matched to the solar spectrum, could provide a cheap and direct method to produce liquid hydrocarbons from CO2 and water via a solar process which uses concentrated sunlight for both photochemical excitation to generate high-energy intermediates and heat to drive important thermochemical carbon-chain-forming reactions. PMID:26903631

  15. Reclassification of Geobacillus pallidus (Scholz et al. 1988) Banat et al. 2004 as Aeribacillus pallidus gen. nov., comb. nov.

    PubMed

    Miñana-Galbis, David; Pinzón, Dora L; Lorén, J Gaspar; Manresa, Angels; Oliart-Ros, Rosa M

    2010-07-01

    Although Anoxybacillus and Geobacillus, two genera of thermophilic bacteria close to the genus Bacillus, have only been described recently, the number of species in these genera has increased rapidly. Four thermophilic, lipolytic strains (DR01, DR02, DR03 and DR04) isolated from a hot spring in Veracruz (Mexico), which could not be identified phenotypically, were subjected to 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis. Three strains were identified as belonging to the genus Anoxybacillus, but strain DR03 was identified as Geobacillus pallidus. This result led us to perform a phylogenetic analysis of the genera Anoxybacillus and Geobacillus based on 16S rRNA gene sequences from all the type strains of these genera. Phylogenetic trees showed three major clusters, Anoxybacillus-Geobacillus tepidamans, Geobacillus sensu stricto and Geobacillus pallidus, while the 16S rRNA gene sequences of G. pallidus (DR03 and the type strain) showed low similarity to sequences of Anoxybacillus (92.5-95.1 %) and Geobacillus (92.8-94.5 %) species, as well as to Bacillus subtilis (92.2-92.4 %). In addition, G. pallidus could be differentiated from Anoxybacillus and Geobacillus on the basis of DNA G+C content and fatty acid and polar lipid profiles. From these results, it is proposed that Geobacillus pallidus should be classified in a novel genus, for which we propose the name Aeribacillus, as Aeribacillus pallidus gen. nov., comb. nov. The type strain of Aeribacillus pallidus is H12(T) (=ATCC 51176(T) =DSM 3670(T) =LMG 19006(T)).

  16. Metathesis of alkanes and related reactions.

    PubMed

    Basset, Jean-Marie; Copéret, Christophe; Soulivong, Daravong; Taoufik, Mostafa; Cazat, Jean Thivolle

    2010-02-16

    The transformation of alkanes remains a difficult challenge because of the relative inertness of the C-H and C-C bonds. The rewards for asserting synthetic control over unfunctionalized, saturated hydrocarbons are considerable, however, because converting short alkanes into longer chain analogues is usually a value-adding process. Alkane metathesis is a novel catalytic and direct transformation of two molecules of a given alkane into its lower and higher homologues; moreover, the process proceeds at relatively low temperature (ambient conditions or higher). It was discovered through the use of a silica-supported tantalum hydride, ([triple bond]SiO)(2)TaH, a multifunctional catalyst with a single site of action. This reaction completes the story of the metathesis reactions discovered over the past 40 years: olefin metathesis, alkyne metathesis, and ene-yne cyclizations. In this Account, we examine the fundamental mechanistic aspects of alkane metathesis as well as the novel reactions that have been derived from its study. The silica-supported tantalum hydride catalyst was developed as the result of systematic and meticulous studies of the interaction between oxide supports and organometallic complexes, a field of study denoted surface organometallic chemistry (SOMC). A careful examination of this surface-supported tantalum hydride led to the later discovery of alumina-supported tungsten hydride, W(H)(3)/Al(2)O(3), which proved to be an even better catalyst for alkane metathesis. Supported tantalum and tungsten hydrides are highly unsaturated, electron-deficient species that are very reactive toward the C-H and C-C bonds of alkanes. They show a great versatility in various other reactions, such as cross-metathesis between methane and alkanes, cross-metathesis between toluene and ethane, or even methane nonoxidative coupling. Moreover, tungsten hydride exhibits a specific ability in the transformation of isobutane into 2,3-dimethylbutane as well as in the metathesis

  17. Evolution of an alkane-inducible biosensor for increased responsiveness to short-chain alkanes.

    PubMed

    Reed, Ben; Blazeck, John; Alper, Hal

    2012-04-15

    Synthetic alkane-inducible biosensors have applications as detectors for environmental hydrocarbon contamination and as novel inducible expression systems with low-cost inducers. Here, we have assembled and evolved an alkane-responsive biosensor with a fluorescence output signal in Escherichia coli by utilizing regulatory machinery from Pseudomonas putida's alkane metabolism. Within our system, the transcriptional regulator, AlkSp, is activated by the presence of alkanes and binds to the P(alkB) promoter, stimulating transcription of a Green Fluorescent Protein reporter. Through two successive rounds of directed evolution via error prone PCR and fluorescence activated cell sorting, we isolated alkS mutants enabling up to a 5 fold increase in fluorescence output signal in response to short-chain alkanes such as hexane and pentane. Further characterization of selected mutants demonstrated altered responsiveness to a wide range of linear alkanes (pentane to dodecane). Sequence analysis highlighted the S470T mutation as a likely candidate responsible for increased effectiveness of the AlkS protein for short-chain alkanes. This work represents the first evolution of a synthetic biosensor system for alkanes.

  18. Evolutionary engineering of Geobacillus thermoglucosidasius for improved ethanol production.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Jiewen; Wu, Kang; Rao, Christopher V

    2016-10-01

    The ability to grow at high temperatures makes thermophiles attractive for many fermentation processes. In this work, we used evolutionary engineering to increase ethanol production in the thermophile Geobacillus thermoglucosidasius. This bacterium is a facultative anaerobe, grows at an optimal temperature of 60°C, and can ferment diverse carbohydrates. However, it natively performs mixed-acid fermentation. To improve ethanol productivity, we first eliminated lactate and formate production in two strains of G. thermoglucosidasius, 95A1 and C56-YS93. These deletion strains were generated by selection on spectinomycin, which represents, to the best of our knowledge, the first time this antibiotic has been shown to work with thermophiles. Both knockout strains, however, were unable to grow under microaerobic conditions. We were able to recover growth in G. thermoglucosidasius 95A1 by serial adaptation in the presence of acetic acid. The evolved 95A1 strain was able to efficiently produce ethanol during growth on glucose or cellobiose. Genome sequencing identified loss-of-function mutations in adenine phosphoribosyltransferase (aprt) and the stage III sporulation protein AA (spoIIIAA). Disruption of both genes improved ethanol production in the unadapted strains: however, the increase was significant only when aprt was deleted. In conclusion, we were able to engineer a strain of G. thermoglucosidasius to efficiently produce ethanol from glucose and cellobiose using a combination of metabolic engineering and evolutionary strategies. This work further establishes this thermophile as a platform organism for fuel and chemical production. Biotechnol. Bioeng. 2016;113: 2156-2167. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. A method of increasing test range and accuracy of bioindicators: Geobacillus stearothermophilus spores.

    PubMed

    Lundahl, Gunnel

    2003-01-01

    Spores of Geobacillus stearothermophilus are very sensitive to changes in temperature. When validating sterilizing processes, the most common bioindicator (BI) is spores of Geobacillus stearothermophilus ATCC12980 and ATCC7953 with about 10(6) spores /BI and a D121-value of about 2 minutes in water. Because these spores of Geobacillus stearothermophilus do not survive at a F0-value above 12 minutes, it has not been possible to evaluate the agreement between the biological F-value (F(BIO)) and physical measurements (time and temperature) when the physical F0-value exceeds that limit. However, it has been proven that glycerin substantially increases the heat resistance of the spores, and it is possible to utilize that property when manufacturing BIs suitable to use in processes with longer sterilization time or high temperature (above 121 degrees C). By the method described, it is possible to make use of the sensitivity and durability of Geobacillus stearothermophilus' spores when glycerin has increased both test range and accuracy. Experience from years of development and validation work with the use of the highly sensitive glycerin-water-spore-suspension sensor (GWS-sensor) is reported. Validation of the steam sterilization process at high temperature has been possible with the use of GWS-sensors. It has also been shown that the spores in suspension keep their characteristics for a period of 19 months when stored cold (8 degrees C).

  20. Complete Genome Sequence of Geobacillus thermoglucosidasius NCIMB 11955, the Progenitor of a Bioethanol Production Strain

    PubMed Central

    Sheng, Lili; Zhang, Ying

    2016-01-01

    The industrially important thermophile Geobacillus thermoglucosidasius has the potential to produce chemicals and fuels from biomass-derived sugar feedstocks. Here, we present the genome sequence of strain NCIMB 11955, the progenitor of an ethanologenic industrial strain, revealing 11 single-nucleotide polymorphisms and 2 indels compared to strain DSM 2542 and two novel plasmids. PMID:27688322

  1. Insights into the Anaerobic Biodegradation Pathway of n-Alkanes in Oil Reservoirs by Detection of Signature Metabolites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bian, Xin-Yu; Maurice Mbadinga, Serge; Liu, Yi-Fan; Yang, Shi-Zhong; Liu, Jin-Feng; Ye, Ru-Qiang; Gu, Ji-Dong; Mu, Bo-Zhong

    2015-05-01

    Anaerobic degradation of alkanes in hydrocarbon-rich environments has been documented and different degradation strategies proposed, of which the most encountered one is fumarate addition mechanism, generating alkylsuccinates as specific biomarkers. However, little is known about the mechanisms of anaerobic degradation of alkanes in oil reservoirs, due to low concentrations of signature metabolites and lack of mass spectral characteristics to allow identification. In this work, we used a multidisciplinary approach combining metabolite profiling and selective gene assays to establish the biodegradation mechanism of alkanes in oil reservoirs. A total of twelve production fluids from three different oil reservoirs were collected and treated with alkali; organic acids were extracted, derivatized with ethanol to form ethyl esters and determined using GC-MS analysis. Collectively, signature metabolite alkylsuccinates of parent compounds from C1 to C8 together with their (putative) downstream metabolites were detected from these samples. Additionally, metabolites indicative of the anaerobic degradation of mono- and poly-aromatic hydrocarbons (2-benzylsuccinate, naphthoate, 5,6,7,8-tetrahydro-naphthoate) were also observed. The detection of alkylsuccinates and genes encoding for alkylsuccinate synthase shows that anaerobic degradation of alkanes via fumarate addition occurs in oil reservoirs. This work provides strong evidence on the in situ anaerobic biodegradation mechanisms of hydrocarbons by fumarate addition.

  2. Insights into the Anaerobic Biodegradation Pathway of n-Alkanes in Oil Reservoirs by Detection of Signature Metabolites

    PubMed Central

    Bian, Xin-Yu; Maurice Mbadinga, Serge; Liu, Yi-Fan; Yang, Shi-Zhong; Liu, Jin-Feng; Ye, Ru-Qiang; Gu, Ji-Dong; Mu, Bo-Zhong

    2015-01-01

    Anaerobic degradation of alkanes in hydrocarbon-rich environments has been documented and different degradation strategies proposed, of which the most encountered one is fumarate addition mechanism, generating alkylsuccinates as specific biomarkers. However, little is known about the mechanisms of anaerobic degradation of alkanes in oil reservoirs, due to low concentrations of signature metabolites and lack of mass spectral characteristics to allow identification. In this work, we used a multidisciplinary approach combining metabolite profiling and selective gene assays to establish the biodegradation mechanism of alkanes in oil reservoirs. A total of twelve production fluids from three different oil reservoirs were collected and treated with alkali; organic acids were extracted, derivatized with ethanol to form ethyl esters and determined using GC-MS analysis. Collectively, signature metabolite alkylsuccinates of parent compounds from C1 to C8 together with their (putative) downstream metabolites were detected from these samples. Additionally, metabolites indicative of the anaerobic degradation of mono- and poly-aromatic hydrocarbons (2-benzylsuccinate, naphthoate, 5,6,7,8-tetrahydro-naphthoate) were also observed. The detection of alkylsuccinates and genes encoding for alkylsuccinate synthase shows that anaerobic degradation of alkanes via fumarate addition occurs in oil reservoirs. This work provides strong evidence on the in situ anaerobic biodegradation mechanisms of hydrocarbons by fumarate addition. PMID:25966798

  3. Structural basis for thermostability revealed through the identification and characterization of a highly thermostable phosphotriesterase-like lactonase from Geobacillus stearothermophilus

    SciTech Connect

    Hawwa, Renda; Aikens, John; Turner, Robert J.; Santarsiero, Bernard D.; Mescar, Andrew D.

    2009-08-31

    A new enzyme homologous to phosphotriesterase was identified from the bacterium Geobacillus stearothermophilus (GsP). This enzyme belongs to the amidohydrolase family and possesses the ability to hydrolyze both lactone and organophosphate (OP) compounds, making it a phosphotriesterase-like lactonase (PLL). GsP possesses higher OP-degrading activity than recently characterized PLLs, and it is extremely thermostable. GsP is active up to 100 C with an energy of activation of 8.0 kcal/mol towards ethyl paraoxon, and it can withstand an incubation temperature of 60 C for two days. In an attempt to understand the thermostability of PLLs, the X-ray structure of GsP was determined and compared to those of existing PLLs. Based upon a comparative analysis, a new thermal advantage score and plot was developed and reveals that a number of different factors contribute to the thermostability of PLLs.

  4. Leaf wax n-alkane distributions in and across modern plants: Implications for paleoecology and chemotaxonomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bush, Rosemary T.; McInerney, Francesca A.

    2013-09-01

    Long chain (C21 to C37) n-alkanes are among the most long-lived and widely utilized terrestrial plant biomarkers. Dozens of studies have examined the range and variation of n-alkane chain-length abundances in modern plants from around the world, and n-alkane distributions have been used for a variety of purposes in paleoclimatology and paleoecology as well as chemotaxonomy. However, most of the paleoecological applications of n-alkane distributions have been based on a narrow set of modern data that cannot address intra- and inter-plant variability. Here, we present the results of a study using trees from near Chicago, IL, USA, as well as a meta-analysis of published data on modern plant n-alkane distributions. First, we test the conformity of n-alkane distributions in mature leaves across the canopy of 38 individual plants from 24 species as well as across a single growing season and find no significant differences for either canopy position or time of leaf collection. Second, we compile 2093 observations from 86 sources, including the new data here, to examine the generalities of n-alkane parameters such as carbon preference index (CPI), average chain length (ACL), and chain-length ratios for different plant groups. We show that angiosperms generally produce more n-alkanes than do gymnosperms, supporting previous observations, and furthermore that CPI values show such variation in modern plants that it is prudent to discard the use of CPI as a quantitative indicator of n-alkane degradation in sediments. We also test the hypotheses that certain n-alkane chain lengths predominate in and therefore can be representative of particular plant groups, namely, C23 and C25 in Sphagnum mosses, C27 and C29 in woody plants, and C31 in graminoids (grasses). We find that chain-length distributions are highly variable within plant groups, such that chemotaxonomic distinctions between grasses and woody plants are difficult to make based on n-alkane abundances. In contrast

  5. Genomic and biochemical studies demonstrating the absence of an alkane-producing phenotype in Vibrio furnissii M1.

    PubMed

    Wackett, Lawrence P; Frias, Janice A; Seffernick, Jennifer L; Sukovich, David J; Cameron, Stephan M

    2007-11-01

    Vibrio furnissii M1 was recently reported to biosynthesize n-alkanes when grown on biopolymers, sugars, or organic acids (M. O. Park, J. Bacteriol. 187:1426-1429, 2005). In the present study, V. furnissii M1 was subjected to genomic analysis and studied biochemically. The sequence of the 16S rRNA gene and repetitive PCR showed that V. furnissii M1 was not identical to other V. furnissii strains tested, but the level of relatedness was consistent with its assignment as a V. furnissii strain. Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis showed chromosomal bands at approximately 3.2 and 1.8 Mb, similar to other Vibrio strains. Complete genomic DNA from V. furnissii M1 was sequenced with 21-fold coverage. Alkane biosynthetic and degradation genes could not be identified. Moreover, V. furnissii M1 did not produce demonstrable levels of n-alkanes in vivo or in vitro. In vivo experiments were conducted by growing V. furnissii M1 under different conditions, extracting with solvent, and analyzing extracts by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. A highly sensitive assay was used for in vitro experiments with cell extracts and [(14)C]hexadecanol. The data are consistent with the present strain being a V. furnissii with properties similar to those previously described but lacking the alkane-producing phenotype. V. furnissii ATCC 35016, also reported to biosynthesize alkanes, was found in the present study not to produce alkanes.

  6. Analysis of alkane-dependent methanogenic community derived from production water of a high-temperature petroleum reservoir.

    PubMed

    Mbadinga, Serge Maurice; Li, Kai-Ping; Zhou, Lei; Wang, Li-Ying; Yang, Shi-Zhong; Liu, Jin-Feng; Gu, Ji-Dong; Mu, Bo-Zhong

    2012-10-01

    Microbial assemblage in an n-alkanes-dependent thermophilic methanogenic enrichment cultures derived from production waters of a high-temperature petroleum reservoir was investigated in this study. Substantially higher amounts of methane were generated from the enrichment cultures incubated at 55 °C for 528 days with a mixture of long-chain n-alkanes (C(15)-C(20)). Stoichiometric estimation showed that alkanes-dependent methanogenesis accounted for about 19.8% of the total amount of methane expected. Hydrogen was occasionally detected together with methane in the gas phase of the cultures. Chemical analysis of the liquid cultures resulted only in low concentrations of acetate and formate. Phylogenetic analysis of the enrichment revealed the presence of several bacterial taxa related to Firmicutes, Thermodesulfobiaceae, Thermotogaceae, Nitrospiraceae, Dictyoglomaceae, Candidate division OP8 and others without close cultured representatives, and Archaea predominantly related to uncultured members in the order Archaeoglobales and CO(2)-reducing methanogens. Screening of genomic DNA retrieved from the alkanes-amended enrichment cultures also suggested the presence of new alkylsuccinate synthase alpha-subunit (assA) homologues. These findings suggest the presence of poorly characterized (putative) anaerobic n-alkanes degraders in the thermophilic methanogenic enrichment cultures. Our results indicate that methanogenesis of alkanes under thermophilic condition is likely to proceed via syntrophic acetate and/or formate oxidation linked with hydrogenotrophic methanogenesis.

  7. Methyl ketones in high altitude Ecuadorian Andosols confirm excellent conservation of plant-specific n-alkane patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jansen, B.; Nierop, K. G. J.

    2009-04-01

    Montane forest composition and specifically the position of the upper forest line (UFL) is very sensitive to climate change and human interference. As a consequence, reconstructions of past altitudinal UFL dynamics and forest species composition are crucial instruments to infer relationships between climate change and vegetation dynamics, and assess the impact of (pre)historic human settlement. One of the most detailed methods available to date to reconstruct past vegetation dynamics is the analysis of fossil pollen. Unfortunately, fossil pollen analysis does not distinguish beyond family or generic level in most cases, while its spatial resolution is limited amongst others by windblown dispersal of pollen, affecting the accuracy of pollen based reconstructions of UFL positions. To overcome these limitations, we developed a new method based on the analysis of plant-specific groups of biomarkers preserved in suitable archives, such as peat deposits, that are unravelled into the plant species of origin by the newly developed VERHIB model. In a study of UFL positions in the Northern Ecuadorian Andes we found longer chain-length n-alkanes, (C19-C35) to occur in plant-specific patterns in the dominant vegetation in the area as well as preliminary soil and peat samples. A crucial factor in determining the applicability of these n-alkanes as biomarkers for past vegetation is their preservation in soils and peat deposits. Therefore, we investigated the preservation of C19-C35 n-alkanes in a peat core and in five excavations along an altitudinal transect (3500-3860 m.a.s.l) in the study area. We were able to establish that n-methyl ketones are the main degradation product of the n-alkanes in question, while the degradation of the n-alkanes was the main source of the n-methyl ketones. This allowed us to use the relationship between the concentrations and carbon chain length patterns of n-alkanes and n-methyl ketones to assess possible (selective) degradation of the n-alkanes

  8. DECONTAMINATION ASSESSMENT OF BACILLUS ANTHRACIS, BACILLUS SUBTILIS, AND GEOBACILLUS STEAROTHERMOPHILUS SPORES ON INDOOR SURFACTS USING A HYDROGEN PERIOXIDE GAS GENERATOR

    EPA Science Inventory

    Aims: To evaluate the decontamination of Bacillus anthracis, Bacillus subtilis, and Geobacillus stearothermophilus spores on indoor surface materials using hydrogen peroxide gas. Methods and Results: B. anthracis, B. subtilis, and G. Stearothermophilus spores were dried on seven...

  9. Substrate-Ligand Interactions in Geobacillus Stearothermophilus Nitric Oxide Synthase†

    PubMed Central

    Kabir, Mariam; Sudhamsu, Jawahar; Crane, Brian R.; Yeh, Syun-Ru; Rousseau, Denis L.

    2012-01-01

    Ntric oxide synthase (NOS) generates NO via a sequential two-step reaction, L-arginine (L-Arg) → N-hydroxy-L-arginine (NOHA) → L-citrulline + NO. Each step of the reaction follows a distinct mechanism defined by the chemical environment introduced by each substrate bound to the heme active site. The dioxygen complex of the NOS enzyme from a thermophilic bacterium, Geobacillus stearothermophilus (gsNOS), is unusually stable; hence it provides a unique model for the studies of the mechanistic differences between the two steps of the NOS reaction. By using CO as a structural probe, it was found that gsNOS exhibits two conformations in the absence of substrate, as indicated by the presence of two sets of the νFe-CO/νC-O modes in the resonance Raman spectra. In the νFe-CO versus νC-O inverse correlation plot, one set of the data falls on the correlation line characterized by mammalian NOSs (mNOS), whereas the other set of the data lies on a new correlation line defined by a bacterial NOS from Bacillus subtilis (bsNOS), reflecting a difference in the proximal Fe-Cys bond strength in the two conformers of gsNOS. The addition of L-Arg stabilizes the conformer associated with the mNOS correlation line, whereas NOHA stabilizes the conformer associated with the bsNOS correlation line, although both substrates introduce a positive electrostatic potential to the distal heme pocket. To assess how substrate-binding affects the Fe-Cys bond strength, the frequency of the Fe-Cys stretching mode of gsNOS was monitored by resonance Raman spectroscopy with 363.8 nm excitation. In the substrate-free form, the Fe-Cys stretching mode was detected at 342.5 cm−1 similar to that of bsNOS. The binding of L-Arg and NOHA brings about a small decrease and increase in the Fe-Cys stretching frequency, respectively. The implication of these unique structural features on the oxygen chemistry of NOS is discussed. PMID:18956884

  10. Substrate-ligand interactions in Geobacillus stearothermophilus nitric oxide synthase.

    PubMed

    Kabir, Mariam; Sudhamsu, Jawahar; Crane, Brian R; Yeh, Syun-Ru; Rousseau, Denis L

    2008-11-25

    Nitric oxide synthase (NOS) generates NO via a sequential two-step reaction [l-arginine (l-Arg) --> N-hydroxy-l-arginine (NOHA) --> l-citrulline + NO]. Each step of the reaction follows a distinct mechanism defined by the chemical environment introduced by each substrate bound to the heme active site. The dioxygen complex of the NOS enzyme from a thermophilic bacterium, Geobacillus stearothermophilus (gsNOS), is unusually stable; hence, it provides a unique model for the studies of the mechanistic differences between the two steps of the NOS reaction. By using CO as a structural probe, we found that gsNOS exhibits two conformations in the absence of substrate, as indicated by the presence of two sets of nu(Fe-CO)/nu(C-O) modes in the resonance Raman spectra. In the nu(Fe-CO) versus nu(C-O) inverse correlation plot, one set of data falls on the correlation line characterized by mammalian NOSs (mNOS), whereas the other set of data lies on a new correlation line defined by a bacterial NOS from Bacillus subtilis (bsNOS), reflecting a difference in the proximal Fe-Cys bond strength in the two conformers of gsNOS. The addition of l-Arg stabilizes the conformer associated with the mNOS correlation line, whereas NOHA stabilizes the conformer associated with the bsNOS correlation line, although both substrates introduce a positive electrostatic potential into the distal heme pocket. To assess how substrate binding affects Fe-Cys bond strength, the frequency of the Fe-Cys stretching mode of gsNOS was monitored by resonance Raman spectroscopy with 363.8 nm excitation. In the substrate-free form, the Fe-Cys stretching mode was detected at 342.5 cm(-1), similar to that of bsNOS. The binding of l-Arg and NOHA brings about a small decrease and increase in the Fe-Cys stretching frequency, respectively. The implication of these unique structural features with respect to the oxygen chemistry of NOS is discussed.

  11. Conversion of alkanes to organoseleniums and organotelluriums

    DOEpatents

    Periana, Roy A.; Konnick, Michael M.; Hashiguchi, Brian G.

    2016-11-29

    The invention provides processes and materials for the efficient and costeffective functionalization of alkanes and heteroalkanes, comprising contacting the alkane or heteroalkane and a soft oxidizing electrophile comprising Se(VI) or Te(VI), in an acidic medium, optionally further comprising an aprotic medium, which can be carried out at a temperature of less than 300 C. Isolation of the alkylselenium or alkyltellurium intermediate allows the subsequent conversion to products not necessarily compatible with the initial reaction conditions, such as amines, stannanes, organosulfur compounds, acyls, halocarbons, and olefins.

  12. Arbuscular mycorrhizal wheat inoculation promotes alkane and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon biodegradation: Microcosm experiment on aged-contaminated soil.

    PubMed

    Ingrid, Lenoir; Lounès-Hadj Sahraoui, Anissa; Frédéric, Laruelle; Yolande, Dalpé; Joël, Fontaine

    2016-06-01

    Very few studies reported the potential of arbuscular mycorrhizal symbiosis to dissipate hydrocarbons in aged polluted soils. The present work aims to study the efficiency of arbuscular mycorrhizal colonized wheat plants in the dissipation of alkanes and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). Our results demonstrated that the inoculation of wheat with Rhizophagus irregularis allowed a better dissipation of PAHs and alkanes after 16 weeks of culture by comparison to non-inoculated condition. These dissipations observed in the inoculated soil resulted from several processes: (i) a light adsorption on roots (0.5% for PAHs), (ii) a bioaccumulation in roots (5.7% for PAHs and 6.6% for alkanes), (iii) a transfer in shoots (0.4 for PAHs and 0.5% for alkanes) and mainly a biodegradation. Whereas PAHs and alkanes degradation rates were respectively estimated to 12 and 47% with non-inoculated wheat, their degradation rates reached 18 and 48% with inoculated wheat. The mycorrhizal inoculation induced an increase of Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria by 56 and 37% compared to the non-inoculated wheat. Moreover, an increase of peroxidase activity was assessed in mycorrhizal roots. Taken together, our findings suggested that mycorrhization led to a better hydrocarbon biodegradation in the aged-contaminated soil thanks to a stimulation of telluric bacteria and hydrocarbon metabolization in mycorrhizal roots.

  13. Anaerobic oxidation of long-chain n-alkanes by the hyperthermophilic sulfate-reducing archaeon, Archaeoglobus fulgidus.

    PubMed

    Khelifi, Nadia; Amin Ali, Oulfat; Roche, Philippe; Grossi, Vincent; Brochier-Armanet, Céline; Valette, Odile; Ollivier, Bernard; Dolla, Alain; Hirschler-Réa, Agnès

    2014-11-01

    The thermophilic sulfate-reducing archaeon Archaeoglobus fulgidus strain VC-16 (DSM 4304), which is known to oxidize fatty acids and n-alkenes, was shown to oxidize saturated hydrocarbons (n-alkanes in the range C10-C21) with thiosulfate or sulfate as a terminal electron acceptor. The amount of n-hexadecane degradation observed was in stoichiometric agreement with the theoretically expected amount of thiosulfate reduction. One of the pathways used by anaerobic microorganisms to activate alkanes is addition to fumarate that involves alkylsuccinate synthase as a key enzyme. A search for genes encoding homologous enzymes in A. fulgidus identified the pflD gene (locus-tag AF1449) that was previously annotated as a pyruvate formate lyase. A phylogenetic analysis revealed that this gene is of bacterial origin and was likely acquired by A. fulgidus from a bacterial donor through a horizontal gene transfer. Based on three-dimensional modeling of the corresponding protein and molecular dynamic simulations, we hypothesize an alkylsuccinate synthase activity for this gene product. The pflD gene expression was upregulated during the growth of A. fulgidus on an n-alkane (C16) compared with growth on a fatty acid. Our results suggest that anaerobic alkane degradation in A. fulgidus may involve the gene pflD in alkane activation through addition to fumarate. These findings highlight the possible importance of hydrocarbon oxidation at high temperatures by A. fulgidus in hydrothermal vents and the deep biosphere.

  14. Anaerobic oxidation of long-chain n-alkanes by the hyperthermophilic sulfate-reducing archaeon, Archaeoglobus fulgidus

    PubMed Central

    Khelifi, Nadia; Amin Ali, Oulfat; Roche, Philippe; Grossi, Vincent; Brochier-Armanet, Céline; Valette, Odile; Ollivier, Bernard; Dolla, Alain; Hirschler-Réa, Agnès

    2014-01-01

    The thermophilic sulfate-reducing archaeon Archaeoglobus fulgidus strain VC-16 (DSM 4304), which is known to oxidize fatty acids and n-alkenes, was shown to oxidize saturated hydrocarbons (n-alkanes in the range C10–C21) with thiosulfate or sulfate as a terminal electron acceptor. The amount of n-hexadecane degradation observed was in stoichiometric agreement with the theoretically expected amount of thiosulfate reduction. One of the pathways used by anaerobic microorganisms to activate alkanes is addition to fumarate that involves alkylsuccinate synthase as a key enzyme. A search for genes encoding homologous enzymes in A. fulgidus identified the pflD gene (locus-tag AF1449) that was previously annotated as a pyruvate formate lyase. A phylogenetic analysis revealed that this gene is of bacterial origin and was likely acquired by A. fulgidus from a bacterial donor through a horizontal gene transfer. Based on three-dimensional modeling of the corresponding protein and molecular dynamic simulations, we hypothesize an alkylsuccinate synthase activity for this gene product. The pflD gene expression was upregulated during the growth of A. fulgidus on an n-alkane (C16) compared with growth on a fatty acid. Our results suggest that anaerobic alkane degradation in A. fulgidus may involve the gene pflD in alkane activation through addition to fumarate. These findings highlight the possible importance of hydrocarbon oxidation at high temperatures by A. fulgidus in hydrothermal vents and the deep biosphere. PMID:24763368

  15. Oxidation of Alkanes to Internal Monoalkenes by a Nocardia1

    PubMed Central

    Abbott, Bernard J.; Casida, L. E.

    1968-01-01

    A suspension of glucose-grown resting cells of Nocardia salmonicolor PSU-N-18 oxidized hexadecane to a mixture of internal monohexadecenes. The latter exhibited a cis configuration, and the mixture consisted of the following: 7-hexadecene, 80%; 8-hexadecene, 18%; and 6-hexadecene, 2%. Alkanes other than hexadecane also were unsaturated by the resting cells, and the composition of the monoalkenes resulting from octadecane dehydrogenation was 9-octadecene, 91%; 8-octadecene, 2 to 3%; 7-octadecene, 1 to 2%; and 6- and 5-octadecenes, trace amounts. Only minute quantities of unsaturated hydrocarbons accumulated during growth on hexadecane and during resting-cell incubation of hexadecane-grown cells with hexadecane. The dehydrogenation of hydrocarbons did not appear to be related to the formation of unsaturated fatty acids. It is postulated that double bond insertion may represent an early step in a new pathway of aliphatic hydrocarbon degradation. PMID:5686017

  16. Improved Alkane Production in Nitrogen-Fixing and Halotolerant Cyanobacteria via Abiotic Stresses and Genetic Manipulation of Alkane Synthetic Genes.

    PubMed

    Kageyama, Hakuto; Waditee-Sirisattha, Rungaroon; Sirisattha, Sophon; Tanaka, Yoshito; Mahakhant, Aparat; Takabe, Teruhiro

    2015-07-01

    Cyanobacteria possess the unique capacity to produce alkane. In this study, effects of nitrogen deficiency and salt stress on biosynthesis of alkanes were investigated in three kinds of cyanobacteria. Intracellular alkane accumulation was increased in nitrogen-fixing cyanobacterium Anabaena sp. PCC7120, but decreased in non-diazotrophic cyanobacterium Synechococcus elongatus PCC7942 and constant in a halotolerant cyanobacterium Aphanothece halophytica under nitrogen-deficient condition. We also found that salt stress increased alkane accumulation in Anabaena sp. PCC7120 and A. halophytica. The expression levels of two alkane synthetic genes were not upregulated significantly under nitrogen deficiency or salt stress in Anabaena sp. PCC7120. The transformant Anabaena sp. PCC7120 cells with additional alkane synthetic gene set from A. halophytica increased intracellular alkane accumulation level compared to control cells. These results provide a prospect to improve bioproduction of alkanes in nitrogen-fixing halotolerant cyanobacteria via abiotic stresses and genetic engineering.

  17. In situ detection of anaerobic alkane metabolites in subsurface environments

    PubMed Central

    Agrawal, Akhil; Gieg, Lisa M.

    2013-01-01

    Alkanes comprise a substantial fraction of crude oil and refined fuels. As such, they are prevalent within deep subsurface fossil fuel deposits and in shallow subsurface environments such as aquifers that are contaminated with hydrocarbons. These environments are typically anaerobic, and host diverse microbial communities that can potentially use alkanes as substrates. Anaerobic alkane biodegradation has been reported to occur under nitrate-reducing, sulfate-reducing, and methanogenic conditions. Elucidating the pathways of anaerobic alkane metabolism has been of interest in order to understand how microbes can be used to remediate contaminated sites. Alkane activation primarily occurs by addition to fumarate, yielding alkylsuccinates, unique anaerobic metabolites that can be used to indicate in situ anaerobic alkane metabolism. These metabolites have been detected in hydrocarbon-contaminated shallow aquifers, offering strong evidence for intrinsic anaerobic bioremediation. Recently, studies have also revealed that alkylsuccinates are present in oil and coal seam production waters, indicating that anaerobic microbial communities can utilize alkanes in these deeper subsurface environments. In many crude oil reservoirs, the in situ anaerobic metabolism of hydrocarbons such as alkanes may be contributing to modern-day detrimental effects such as oilfield souring, or may lead to more beneficial technologies such as enhanced energy recovery from mature oilfields. In this review, we briefly describe the key metabolic pathways for anaerobic alkane (including n-alkanes, isoalkanes, and cyclic alkanes) metabolism and highlight several field reports wherein alkylsuccinates have provided evidence for anaerobic in situ alkane metabolism in shallow and deep subsurface environments. PMID:23761789

  18. 40 CFR 721.536 - Halogenated phenyl alkane.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Halogenated phenyl alkane. 721.536... Substances § 721.536 Halogenated phenyl alkane. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as halogenated phenyl alkane (PMN P-89-867)...

  19. 40 CFR 721.10163 - Chloro fluoro alkane (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Chloro fluoro alkane (generic). 721... Substances § 721.10163 Chloro fluoro alkane (generic). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as chloro fluoro alkane (PMN...

  20. 40 CFR 721.535 - Halogenated alkane (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Halogenated alkane (generic). 721.535... Substances § 721.535 Halogenated alkane (generic). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as halogenated alkane (PMN P-01-433) is...

  1. In situ detection of anaerobic alkane metabolites in subsurface environments.

    PubMed

    Agrawal, Akhil; Gieg, Lisa M

    2013-01-01

    Alkanes comprise a substantial fraction of crude oil and refined fuels. As such, they are prevalent within deep subsurface fossil fuel deposits and in shallow subsurface environments such as aquifers that are contaminated with hydrocarbons. These environments are typically anaerobic, and host diverse microbial communities that can potentially use alkanes as substrates. Anaerobic alkane biodegradation has been reported to occur under nitrate-reducing, sulfate-reducing, and methanogenic conditions. Elucidating the pathways of anaerobic alkane metabolism has been of interest in order to understand how microbes can be used to remediate contaminated sites. Alkane activation primarily occurs by addition to fumarate, yielding alkylsuccinates, unique anaerobic metabolites that can be used to indicate in situ anaerobic alkane metabolism. These metabolites have been detected in hydrocarbon-contaminated shallow aquifers, offering strong evidence for intrinsic anaerobic bioremediation. Recently, studies have also revealed that alkylsuccinates are present in oil and coal seam production waters, indicating that anaerobic microbial communities can utilize alkanes in these deeper subsurface environments. In many crude oil reservoirs, the in situ anaerobic metabolism of hydrocarbons such as alkanes may be contributing to modern-day detrimental effects such as oilfield souring, or may lead to more beneficial technologies such as enhanced energy recovery from mature oilfields. In this review, we briefly describe the key metabolic pathways for anaerobic alkane (including n-alkanes, isoalkanes, and cyclic alkanes) metabolism and highlight several field reports wherein alkylsuccinates have provided evidence for anaerobic in situ alkane metabolism in shallow and deep subsurface environments.

  2. Nitrated metalloporphyrins as catalysts for alkane oxidation

    DOEpatents

    Ellis, P.E. Jr.; Lyons, J.E.

    1994-01-18

    Compositions of matter comprising nitro-substituted metal complexes of porphyrins are catalysts for the oxidation of alkanes. The metal is iron, chromium, manganese, ruthenium, copper or cobalt. The porphyrin ring has nitro groups attached thereto in meso and/or [beta]-pyrrolic positions.

  3. Nitrated metalloporphyrins as catalysts for alkane oxidation

    DOEpatents

    Ellis, Jr., Paul E.; Lyons, James E.

    1994-01-01

    Compositions of matter comprising nitro-substituted metal complexes of porphyrins are catalysts for the oxidation of alkanes. The metal is iron, chromium, manganese, ruthenium, copper or cobalt. The porphyrin ring has nitro groups attached thereto in meso and/or .beta.-pyrrolic positions.

  4. Reflectance spectroscopy of organic compounds: 1. Alkanes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Clark, R.N.; Curchin, J.M.; Hoefen, T.M.; Swayze, G.A.

    2009-01-01

    Reflectance spectra of the organic compounds comprising the alkane series are presented from the ultraviolet to midinfrared, 0.35 to 15.5 /??m. Alkanes are hydrocarbon molecules containing only single carbon-carbon bonds, and are found naturally on the Earth and in the atmospheres of the giant planets and Saturn's moon, Titan. This paper presents the spectral properties of the alkanes as the first in a series of papers to build a spectral database of organic compounds for use in remote sensing studies. Applications range from mapping the environment on the Earth, to the search for organic molecules and life in the solar system and throughout the. universe. We show that the spectral reflectance properties of organic compounds are rich, with major diagnostic spectral features throughout the spectral range studied. Little to no spectral change was observed as a function of temperature and only small shifts and changes in the width of absorption bands were observed between liquids and solids, making remote detection of spectral properties throughout the solar system simpler. Some high molecular weight organic compounds contain single-bonded carbon chains and have spectra similar to alkanes even ' when they fall into other families. Small spectral differences are often present allowing discrimination among some compounds, further illustrating the need to catalog spectral properties for accurate remote sensing identification with spectroscopy.

  5. Nitrated metalloporphyrins as catalysts for alkane oxidation

    DOEpatents

    Ellis, Jr., Paul E.; Lyons, James E.

    1992-01-01

    Alkanes are oxidized by contact with oxygen-containing gas in the presence as catalyst of a metalloporphyrin in which hydrogen atoms in the porphyrin ring have been replaced with one or more nitro groups. Hydrogen atoms in the porphyrin ring may also be substituted with halogen atoms.

  6. Revised charge equilibration potential for liquid alkanes.

    PubMed

    Davis, Joseph E; Warren, G Lee; Patel, Sandeep

    2008-07-17

    We present a revised liquid alkane force field based on the charge equilibration formalism for incorporating electrostatic nonadditive effects arising from local polarization. The model is a revision of earlier work by Patel and Brooks, specifically addressing deficiencies in the dihedral potential, electrostatic, and Lennard-Jones (van der Waals) parameters of the force field. We discuss refinement of the alkane backbone torsion potential to match high-level ab initio relative conformational energetics for pentane, hexane, and heptane. We further discuss refinement of the electrostatic and Lennard-Jones (van der Waals) parameters to reproduce the experimental polarizability, liquid density, and vaporization enthalpy of hexane. Finally, we calculate bulk liquid properties including densities, vaporization enthalpies, self-diffusion constants, isothermal compressibilities, constant pressure heat capacities, and NMR T 1 relaxation times for a series of linear alkanes ranging from hexane to pentadecane based on the current revised model. We also compute free energies of hydration for pentane, hexane, and heptane. The revised force field offers a significantly improved overall description of these properties relative to the original parametrization. The current alkane force field represents a platform for ongoing development of a CHARMM (Chemistry at Harvard Molecular Mechanics) polarizable force field for lipids and integral membrane proteins.

  7. Regulation of alkane oxidation in Pseudomonas putida.

    PubMed Central

    Grund, A; Shapiro, J; Fennewald, M; Bacha, P; Leahy, J; Markbreiter, K; Nieder, M; Toepfer, M

    1975-01-01

    We have studied the appearance of whole-cell oxidizing activity for n-alkanes and their oxidation products in strains of Pseudomonas putida carrying the OCT plasmid. Our results indicate that the OCT plasmid codes for inducible alkane-hydroxylating and primary alcohol-dehydrogenating activities and that the chromosome codes for constitutive oxidizing activities for primary alcohols, aliphatic aldehydes, and fatty acids. Mutant isolation confirms the presence of an alcohol dehydrogenase locus on the OCT plasmid and indicated the presence of multiple alcohol and aldehyde dehydrogenase loci on the P. putida chromosome. Induction tests with various compounds indicate that inducer recognition has specificity for chain length and can be affected by the degree of oxidation of the carbon chain. Some inducers are neither growth nor respiration substrates. Growth tests with and without a gratuitous inducer indicate that undecane is not a growth substrate because it does not induce alkane hydroxylase activity. Using a growth test for determining induction of the plasmid alcohol dehydrogenase it is possible to show that heptane induces this activity in hydroxylase-negative mutants. This suggests that unoxidized alkane molecules are the physiological inducers of both plasmid activities. PMID:1150626

  8. Biosurfactant-mediated biodegradation of straight and methyl-branched alkanes by Pseudomonas aeruginosa ATCC 55925

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Accidental oil spills and waste disposal are important sources for environmental pollution. We investigated the biodegradation of alkanes by Pseudomonas aeruginosa ATCC 55925 in relation to a rhamnolipid surfactant produced by the same bacterial strain. Results showed that the linear C11-C21 compounds in a heating oil sample degraded from 6% to 100%, whereas the iso-alkanes tended to be recalcitrant unless they were exposed to the biosurfactant; under such condition total biodegradation was achieved. Only the biodegradation of the commercial C12-C19 alkanes could be demonstrated, ranging from 23% to 100%, depending on the experimental conditions. Pristane (a C19 branched alkane) only biodegraded when present alone with the biosurfactant and when included in an artificial mixture even without the biosurfactant. In all cases the biosurfactant significantly enhanced biodegradation. The electron scanning microscopy showed that cells depicted several adaptations to growth on hydrocarbons, such as biopolymeric spheres with embedded cells distributed over different layers on the spherical surfaces and cells linked to each other by extracellular appendages. Electron transmission microscopy revealed transparent inclusions, which were associated with hydrocarbon based-culture cells. These patterns of hydrocarbon biodegradation and cell adaptations depended on the substrate bioavailability, type and length of hydrocarbon. PMID:21906343

  9. Adsorption of alkyltrimethylammonium bromides at water/alkane interfaces: competitive adsorption of alkanes and surfactants.

    PubMed

    Fainerman, V B; Mucic, N; Pradines, V; Aksenenko, E V; Miller, R

    2013-11-12

    The adsorption of members of the homologous series of alkyl trimethylammonium bromides (C(n)TAB) is studied at water/alkane interfaces by drop profile analysis tensiometry. The results are discussed in terms of a competitive adsorption process of alkane and surfactant molecules. A thermodynamic model, derived originally for the adsorption of surfactant mixtures, is adapted such that it describes a competitive adsorption of the surfactant molecules from the aqueous phase and alkane molecules from the oil phase. This new model involves the interspecies attraction coefficient, which mutually increases the adsorption activities of the alkane and C(n)TAB. The effects of the alkyl chain length n of C(n)TABs and the influence of the number of C atoms in the alkane chain are discussed, and the physical quantities are compared to those determined at the aqueous solution/air interface. The new theoretical model for aqueous solution/oil interfaces is also compared to a theory that does not consider the adsorption of alkane. The proposed new model demonstrates good agreement with the experimental data.

  10. Incorrect when uncorrected: Reconstructing vegetation history using n-alkane biomarkers in loess-paleosol sequences - a case study from the Saxonian loess region, Germany

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zech, M.; Krause, T.; Meszner, S.; Faust, D.

    2012-04-01

    With our study (Zech et al., Quaternary International, accepted) we aim at contributing to the reconstruction of the paleoenvironment of the Saxonian loess region by investigating sedimentary n-alkanes as plant leafwax derived biomarkers in two loess-paleosol sequences (LPSs), namely the Gleina and the Rottewitz LPSs. The Weichselian paleosols are characterised by n-alkane concentration maxima when compared to the loess layers. When this coincides with high odd-over-even predominances (OEPs), this points not only to increased n-alkane input and/or production but also to increased n-alkane preservation in the soils, namely in gleysols with water-logged edaphic conditions. By contrast, the buried cambisols reveal low OEPs, indicating accelerated degradation under aerobic edaphic conditions. The n-alkane concentrations in the truncated Eemian Interglacial paleosol are very low. This reflects the removal of the formerly n-alkane-enriched Eemian topsoil, low n-alkane input into the Bt-Sd-horizon (subsoil horizon of the Eemian luvisol) and/or strong soil organic matter mineralization. Four investigated n-alkane ratios show distinct variations during the Weichselian tempting to infer vegetation changes in terms of varying contributions of tree/shrub-derived (dominated by nC27 or nC29) versus grass-derived (dominated by nC31 or nC33) n-alkanes. However, using the OEP as a proxy for degradation and considering that n-alkane ratios are prone to degradation effects, we highlight that the above interpretation is very likely incorrect. Indeed, degradation can be accounted for most variability of the n-alkane ratios. Applying an endmember model based on a modern n-alkane reference dataset allows estimating the contribution of tree/shrub- versus grass-derived n-alkanes semi-quantitatively. These modelling results suggest that both the Gleina and the Rottewitz LPSs were formed under prevailing grassland. Minor contributions of trees/shrubs are only likely for the Gleinaer Soil

  11. Isolation of Glucocardiolipins from Geobacillus stearothermophilus NRS 2004/3a

    PubMed Central

    Schäffer, Christina; Beckedorf, Anke I.; Scheberl, Andrea; Zayni, Sonja; Peter-Katalinić, Jasna; Messner, Paul

    2002-01-01

    Glucose-substituted cardiolipins account for about 4 mol% of total phospholipid extracted from exponentially grown cells of Geobacillus stearothermophilus NRS 2004/3a. Individual glucocardiolipin species exhibited differences in fatty acid substitution, with iso-C15:0 and anteiso-C17:0 prevailing. The compounds were purified to homogeneity by a novel protocol and precharacterized by matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry. PMID:12426359

  12. Novel thermostable endo-xylanase cloned and expressed from bacterium Geobacillus sp. WSUCF1

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    A gene encoding a GH10 endo-xylanase from Geobacillus sp. WSUCF1 was cloned and expressed in Escherichia coli. Recombinant endo-xylanase (37 kDa) exhibited high specific activity of 461.0 U/ mg of protein. Endo-xylanase was optimally active on birchwood xylan at 70°C and pH 6.5. Zn2+ and Ca2+ ions i...

  13. Complete genome sequence of the thermophilic bacterium Geobacillus subterraneus KCTC 3922(T) as a potential denitrifier.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yong-Jik; Park, Min-Kyu; Park, Gun-Seok; Lee, Sang-Jae; Lee, Sang Jun; Kim, Bradley Seokhan; Shin, Jae-Ho; Lee, Dong-Woo

    2017-06-10

    Denitrification is a crucial process for the global nitrogen cycle through the reduction of nitrates by heterotrophic bacteria. Denitrifying microorganisms play an important role in eliminating fixed nitrogen pollutants from the ecosystem, concomitant with N2O emission. Although many microbial denitrifiers have been identified, little is known about the denitrifying ability of the genus Geobacillus. Here, we report the first complete genome sequences of Geobacillus subterraneus KCTC 3922(T), isolated from Liaohe oil field in China, and G. thermodenitrificans KCTC 3902(T). The strain KCTC 3922(T) contains a complete set of genes involved in denitrification, cofactor biogenesis, and transport systems, which is consistent with a denitrifying activity. On the other hand, G. thermodenitrificans KCTC 3902(T) exhibited no denitrifying activity probably due to the lack of molybdnumtransferase (moeA) and nitrite transporter (nirC) genes. Therefore, comparative genome analysis of Geobacillus strains highlights the potential impact on treatment of nitrate-contaminated environments. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Cadmium Ion Biosorption by the Thermophilic Bacteria Geobacillus stearothermophilus and G. thermocatenulatus

    PubMed Central

    Hetzer, Adrian; Daughney, Christopher J.; Morgan, Hugh W.

    2006-01-01

    This study reports surface complexation models (SCMs) for quantifying metal ion adsorption by thermophilic microorganisms. In initial cadmium ion toxicity tests, members of the genus Geobacillus displayed the highest tolerance to CdCl2 (as high as 400 to 3,200 μM). The thermophilic, gram-positive bacteria Geobacillus stearothermophilus and G. thermocatenulatus were selected for further electrophoretic mobility, potentiometric titration, and Cd2+ adsorption experiments to characterize Cd2+ complexation by functional groups within and on the cell wall. Distinct one-site SCMs described the extent of cadmium ion adsorption by both studied Geobacillus sp. strains over a range of pH values and metal/bacteria concentration ratios. The results indicate that a functional group with a deprotonation constant pK value of approximately 3.8 accounts for 66% and 80% of all titratable sites for G. thermocatenulatus and G. stearothermophilus, respectively, and is dominant in Cd2+ adsorption reactions. The results suggest a different type of functional group may be involved in cadmium biosorption for both thermophilic strains investigated here, compared to previous reports for mesophilic bacteria. PMID:16751511

  15. Evaluating the potential of long chain n-alkanes and n-carboxylic acids as biomarkers for past vegetation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lanny, Verena; Zech, Roland; Eglinton, Timothy

    2014-05-01

    Leaf waxes, such as long chain n-alkanes and n-carboxylic acids, may have a great potential for the reconstruction of past environmental and climate conditions (e.g. (Zech R. et al., 2013). While n-C27 and n-C29 alkanes often predominantly occur in trees and shrubs, n-C31 and n-C33 are more abundant in grasses and herbs. However, little is known about chain-length distributions of n-carboxylic acids, and very few studies have systematically investigated leaf waxes in top soils. We analyzed n-alkanes and n-carboxylic acids in ~100 litter and topsoil samples from Southern Germany to Sweden. Our results show that sites under deciduous trees often contain a lot of C27 n-alkanes and C28 n-carboxylic acids. Coniferous sites are characterized by dominance in n-alkanes C29 and C31 and have relatively high concentrations of n-carboxylic acids C22 and C24. Grass sites show a Cmax at C31 for n-alkanes and at C24 or C26 for n-carboxylic acids. Differences in homologue patterns are most pronounced in the litter samples, but are well preserved also in the topsoils (0-3 cm depth, a little less in the lower topsoils from 3-10 cm). Our results illustrate the potential of combining n-alkane and n-carboxylic acid analyses for paleo-vegetation reconstructions, yet indicate that the degree of degradation may have to be taken into consideration (Zech M. et al., 2013). References: Zech, M. et al. (2013) Quat. Int. 296, 108-116. Zech, R. et al. (2013) Palaeo3, 387, 165-175.

  16. Crystal structure of the TetR family repressor, AlkX, from Dietzia sp. DQ12-45-1b implicated in biodegradation of n-alkanes.

    PubMed

    Liang, Jie-Liang; Gao, Yuan; He, Zheng; Nie, Yong; Wang, Meng; JiangYang, Jing-Hong; Zhang, Xuejun C; Shu, Wen-Sheng; Wu, Xiao-Lei

    2017-08-18

    n-Alkanes are ubiquitous in nature and are widely used by microorganisms as carbon sources. Alkane hydroxylation by alkane monooxygenases is a critical step in the aerobic biodegradation of n-alkanes, which plays important roles in natural alkane attenuation and is used in industrial and environmental applications. The alkane oxidation operon, alkW1-alkX, in an alkane-degrading strain Dietzia sp. DQ12-45-1b, is negatively auto-regulated by the TetR family repressor, AlkX, via a product positive feedback mechanism. To predict the gene regulation mechanism, we determined the 3.1 Å crystal structure of an AlkX homodimer in a non-DNA-bound state. The structure showed traceable long electron density deep inside a hydrophobic cavity of each monomer along the long axis of the helix bundle, and further gas chromatography-mass spectrometry analysis of AlkX revealed that it contained the E.coli-derived long-chain fatty acid molecules as ligand. Moreover, an unusual structural feature of AlkX is an extra helix, α6' , forming a lid-like structure with α6 covering the inducer-binding pocket and occupying the space between the two symmetrical DNA-binding motifs in one dimer, indicating a distinct conformational transition mode in modulating DNA binding. Sequence alignment of AlkX homologs from Dietzia strains showed that the residues involved in DNA and inducer binding are highly conserved, suggesting that the regulation mechanisms of n-alkane hydroxylation is possibly a common characteristic of Dietzia strains.Importance With ubiquitous n-alkanes in nature, many bacteria from terrestrial and aquatic environments have evolved n-alkane oxidation functions. Alkane hydroxylation by alkane monooxygenases is a critical step in the aerobic biodegradation of n-alkanes, which plays important roles in natural alkane attenuation and petroleum-contaminating environment bioremediation. The gene regulation of the most common alkane hydroxylase AlkB has been studied widely in Gram

  17. Application of pheB as a Reporter Gene for Geobacillus spp., Enabling Qualitative Colony Screening and Quantitative Analysis of Promoter Strength

    PubMed Central

    Bartosiak-Jentys, Jeremy; Eley, Kirstin

    2012-01-01

    The pheB gene from Geobacillus stearothermophilus DSM6285 has been exploited as a reporter gene for Geobacillus spp. The gene product, catechol 2,3-dioxygenase (C23O), catalyzes the formation of 2-hydroxymuconic semialdehyde, which can be readily assayed. The reporter was used to examine expression from the ldh promoter associated with fermentative metabolism. PMID:22685159

  18. A diffusionless transition in a normal alkane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nene, Shailesh; Karhu, Eric; Flemming, Roberta L.; Hutter, Jeffrey L.

    2009-12-01

    The normal alkanes are an interesting class of material, both in terms of their intrinsic properties and because many biological materials contain hydrocarbon domains. The normal alkanes often exhibit complicated phase behavior, with phase diagrams containing multiple solid phases. We report here a study of a curious pattern of twinned domains seen in one phase of tricosane (C 23H 48), which we have studied by X-ray diffraction, as well as by optical and atomic force microscopy. This pattern is seen in the rotator R V phase, a monoclinic arrangement of tricosane molecules without orientational order. Transitions between this polymorph and the orthorhombic R I rotator phase lying at higher temperatures preserve features at the molecular level, and thus represent a diffusionless, martensitic-like transformation.

  19. Density functional steric analysis of linear and branched alkanes.

    PubMed

    Ess, Daniel H; Liu, Shubin; De Proft, Frank

    2010-12-16

    Branched alkane hydrocarbons are thermodynamically more stable than straight-chain linear alkanes. This thermodynamic stability is also manifest in alkane bond separation energies. To understand the physical differences between branched and linear alkanes, we have utilized a novel density functional theory (DFT) definition of steric energy based on the Weizäcker kinetic energy. Using the M06-2X functional, the total DFT energy was partitioned into a steric energy term (E(s)[ρ]), an electrostatic energy term (E(e)[ρ]), and a fermionic quantum energy term (E(q)[ρ]). This analysis revealed that branched alkanes have less (destabilizing) DFT steric energy than linear alkanes. The lower steric energy of branched alkanes is mitigated by an equal and opposite quantum energy term that contains the Pauli component of the kinetic energy and exchange-correlation energy. Because the steric and quantum energy terms cancel, this leaves the electrostatic energy term that favors alkane branching. Electrostatic effects, combined with correlation energy, explains why branched alkanes are more stable than linear alkanes.

  20. Density Functional Steric Analysis of Linear and Branched Alkanes

    SciTech Connect

    Ess, Daniel H.; Liu, Shubin; De Proft, Frank

    2010-11-18

    Branched alkane hydrocarbons are thermodynamically more stable than straight-chain linear alkanes. This thermodynamic stability is also manifest in alkane bond separation energies. To understand the physical differences between branched and linear alkanes, we have utilized a novel density functional theory (DFT) definition of steric energy based on the Weizäcker kinetic energy. Using the M06-2X functional, the total DFT energy was partitioned into a steric energy term (Ee[[ρ]), an electrostatic energy term (Ee[ρ]), and a fermionic quantum energy term (Eq[[ρ]). This analysis revealed that branched alkanes have less (destabilizing) DFT steric energy than linear alkanes. The lower steric energy of branched alkanes is mitigated by an equal and opposite quantum energy term that contains the Pauli component of the kinetic energy and exchange-correlation energy. Because the steric and quantum energy terms cancel, this leaves the electrostatic energy term that favors alkane branching. Electrostatic effects, combined with correlation energy, explains why branched alkanes are more stable than linear alkanes.

  1. Long-Term Incubation Reveals Methanogenic Biodegradation of C5 and C6 iso-Alkanes in Oil Sands Tailings.

    PubMed

    Siddique, Tariq; Mohamad Shahimin, Mohd Faidz; Zamir, Saima; Semple, Kathleen; Li, Carmen; Foght, Julia M

    2015-12-15

    iso-Alkanes are major components of petroleum and have been considered recalcitrant to biodegradation under methanogenic conditions. However, indigenous microbes in oil sands tailings ponds exposed to solvents rich in 2-methylbutane, 2-methylpentane, 3-methylpentane, n-pentane, and n-hexane produce methane in situ. We incubated defined mixtures of iso- or n-alkanes with mature fine tailings from two tailings ponds of different ages historically exposed to different solvents: one, ~10 years old, receiving C5-C6 paraffins and the other, ~35 years old, receiving naphtha. A lengthy incubation (>6 years) revealed iso-alkane biodegradation after lag phases of 900-1800 and ~280 days, respectively, before the onset of methanogenesis, although lag phases were shorter with n-alkanes (~650-1675 and ~170 days, respectively). 2-Methylpentane and both n-alkanes were completely depleted during ~2400 days of incubation, whereas 2-methylbutane and 3-methylpentane were partially depleted only during active degradation of 2-methylpentane, suggesting co-metabolism. In both cases, pyrotag sequencing of 16S rRNA genes showed codominance of Peptococcaceae with acetoclastic (Methanosaeta) and hydrogenotrophic (Methanoregula and Methanolinea) methanogens. These observations are important for predicting long-term greenhouse-gas emissions from oil sands tailings ponds and extend the known range of hydrocarbons susceptible to methanogenic biodegradation in petroleum-impacted anaerobic environments.

  2. Oxidative dehydrogenation of alkanes to unsaturated hydrocarbons

    DOEpatents

    Kung, Harold H.; Chaar, Mohamed A.

    1988-01-01

    Oxidative dehydrogenation of alkanes to unsaturated hydrocarbons is carried out over metal vanadate catalysts under oxidizing conditions. The vanadate catalysts are represented by the formulas M.sub.3 (VO.sub.4).sub.2 and MV.sub.2 O.sub.6, M representing Mg, Zn, Ca, Pb, or Cd. The reaction is carried out in the presence of oxygen, but the formation of oxygenate by-products is suppressed.

  3. Oxidative dehydrogenation of alkanes to unsaturated hydrocarbons

    DOEpatents

    Kung, H.H.; Chaar, M.A.

    1988-10-11

    Oxidative dehydrogenation of alkanes to unsaturated hydrocarbons is carried out over metal vanadate catalysts under oxidizing conditions. The vanadate catalysts are represented by the formulas M[sub 3](VO[sub 4])[sub 2] and MV[sub 2]O[sub 6], M representing Mg, Zn, Ca, Pb, or Cd. The reaction is carried out in the presence of oxygen, but the formation of oxygenate by-products is suppressed.

  4. Interfacial properties of semifluorinated alkane diblock copolymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pierce, Flint; Tsige, Mesfin; Borodin, Oleg; Perahia, Dvora; Grest, Gary S.

    2008-06-01

    The liquid-vapor interfacial properties of semifluorinated linear alkane diblock copolymers of the form F3C(CF2)n-1(CH2)m-1CH3 are studied by fully atomistic molecular dynamics simulations. The chemical composition and the conformation of the molecules at the interface are identified and correlated with the interfacial energies. A modified form of the Optimized Parameter for Liquid Simulation All-Atom (OPLS-AA) force field of Jorgensen and co-workers [J. Am. Chem. Soc. 106, 6638 (1984); 118, 11225 (1996); J. Phys. Chem. A 105, 4118 (2001)], which includes specific dihedral terms for H-F blocks-and corrections to the H-F nonbonded interaction, is used together with a new version of the exp-6 force field developed in this work. Both force fields yield good agreement with the available experimental liquid density and surface tension data as well as each other over significant temperature ranges and for a variety of chain lengths and compositions. The interfacial regions of semifluorinated alkanes are found to be rich in fluorinated groups compared to hydrogenated groups, an effect that decreases with increasing temperature but is independent of the fractional length of the fluorinated segments. The proliferation of fluorine at the surface substantially lowers the surface tension of the diblock copolymers, yielding values near those of perfluorinated alkanes and distinct from those of protonated alkanes of the same chain length. With decreasing temperatures within the liquid state, chains are found to preferentially align perpendicular to the interface, as previously seen.

  5. N-Alkane oxidation enzymes of a pseudomonad.

    PubMed Central

    Parekh, V R; Traxler, R W; Sobek, J M

    1977-01-01

    A nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD)-dependent n-alkane dehydrogenase and an NAD phosphate (reduced form)-dependent alkane hydroxylase have been purified from cell-free extracts of Pseudomonas sp. strain 196Aa grown anaerobically on n-alkane. The n-alkane dehydrogenase (fraction R-3), obtained as a single peak from Bio-Gel P-60, showed an overall 135-fold purification and was demonstrated by infrared spectroscopy and gas chromatography to convert n-decane to 1-decene. The alkene hydroxylase activity in the S-3 fraction, purified 167 times from diethylaminoethyl-cellulose, was shown by the same methodology to convert decene to decanol. Commercial ferredoxin has been shown to increase the alkane dehydrogenase activity. An NAD-, flavine adenine dinucleotide-, and iron-dependent alcohol dehydrogenase was demonstrated in the R-3 fraction. A mechanism for the anaerobic conversion of n-alkane to fatty acid has been proposed. PMID:869535

  6. Crystallization and preliminary crystallographic analysis of Abp, a GH27 β-L-arabinopyranosidase from Geobacillus stearothermophilus.

    PubMed

    Lansky, Shifra; Salama, Rachel; Solomon, Vered H; Belrhali, Hassan; Shoham, Yuval; Shoham, Gil

    2013-06-01

    Geobacillus stearothermophilus T-6 is a thermophilic soil bacterium that possesses an extensive system for the utilization of hemicellulose. The bacterium produces a small number of endo-acting extracellular enzymes that cleave high-molecular-weight hemicellulolytic polymers into short decorated oligosaccharides, which are further hydrolysed into the respective sugar monomers by a battery of intracellular glycoside hydrolases. One of these intracellular processing enzymes is β-L-arabinopyranosidase (Abp), which is capable of removing β-L-arabinopyranose residues from naturally occurring arabino-polysaccharides. As arabino-polymers constitute a significant part of the hemicellulolytic content of plant biomass, their efficient enzymatic degradation presents an important challenge for many potential biotechnological applications. This aspect has led to an increasing interest in the biochemical characterization and structural analysis of this and related hemicellulases. Abp from G. stearothermophilus T-6 has recently been cloned, overexpressed, purified, biochemically characterized and crystallized in our laboratory, as part of its complete structure-function study. The best crystals obtained for this enzyme belonged to the primitive orthorhombic space group P2(1)2(1)2(1), with average unit-cell parameters a = 107.7, b = 202.2, c = 287.3 Å. Full diffraction data sets to 2.3 Å resolution have been collected for both the wild-type enzyme and its D197A catalytic mutant from flash-cooled crystals at 100 K, using synchrotron radiation. These data are currently being used for a high-resolution three-dimensional structure determination of Abp.

  7. Crystallization and preliminary crystallographic analysis of GanB, a GH42 intracellular β-galactosidase from Geobacillus stearothermophilus.

    PubMed

    Solomon, Hodaya V; Tabachnikov, Orly; Feinberg, Hadar; Govada, Lata; Chayen, Naomi E; Shoham, Yuval; Shoham, Gil

    2013-10-01

    Geobacillus stearothermophilus T-6 is a Gram-positive thermophilic soil bacterium that contains a multi-enzyme system for the utilization of plant cell-wall polysaccharides, including xylan, arabinan and galactan. The bacterium uses a number of endo-acting extracellular enzymes that break down the high-molecular-weight polysaccharides into decorated oligosaccharides. These oligosaccharides enter the cell and are further hydrolyzed into sugar monomers by a set of intracellular glycoside hydrolases. One of these intracellular degrading enzymes is GanB, a glycoside hydrolase family 42 β-galactosidase capable of hydrolyzing short β-1,4-galactosaccharides to galactose. GanB and related enzymes therefore play an important part in the hemicellulolytic utilization system of many microorganisms which use plant biomass for growth. The interest in the biochemical characterization and structural analysis of these enzymes stems from their potential biotechnological applications. GanB from G. stearothermophilus T-6 has recently been cloned, overexpressed, purified, biochemically characterized and crystallized in our laboratory as part of its complete structure-function study. The best crystals obtained for this enzyme belong to the primitive orthorhombic space group P2₁2₁2₁, with average crystallographic unit-cell parameters of a=71.84, b=181.35, c=196.57 Å. Full diffraction data sets to 2.45 and 2.50 Å resolution have been collected for both the wild-type enzyme and its E323A nucleophile catalytic mutant, respectively, as measured from flash-cooled crystals at 100 K using synchrotron radiation. These data are currently being used for the full three-dimensional crystal structure determination of GanB.

  8. Molecular modelling and quantum biochemistry computations of a naturally occurring bioremediation enzyme: Alkane hydroxylase from Pseudomonas putida P1.

    PubMed

    de Sousa, B G; Oliveira, J I N; Albuquerque, E L; Fulco, U L; Amaro, V E; Blaha, C A G

    2017-09-01

    Many species of bacteria involved in degradation of n-alkanes have an important constitutional metabolic enzyme, the alkane hydroxylase called AlkB, specialized in the conversion of hydrocarbons molecules that can be used as carbon and/or energy source. This enzyme plays an important role in the microbial degradation of oil, chlorinated hydrocarbons, fuel additives, and many other compounds. A number of these enzymes has been biochemically characterized in detail because the potential of alkane hydroxylases to catalyse high added-value reactions is widely recognized. Nevertheless, the industrial and process bioremediation application of them is restricted, owing to their complex biochemistry, challenging process requirements, and the limited number of their three-dimensional structures. Furthermore, AlkB has great potential as biocatalysts for selective transformation of a wide range of chemically inert unreactive alkanes into reactive chemical precursors that can be used as tools for bioremediation and bioprocesses. Aiming to understand the possible ways the AlkB enzyme Pseudomonas putida P1 interacts with octane, octanol and 1-octyne, we consider its suitable biochemical structure taking into account a 3-D homology modelling. Besides, by using a quantum chemistry computational model based on the density functional theory (DFT), we determine possible protein-substrate interaction regions measured by means of its binding energy simulated throughout the Molecular Fractionation with Conjugated Caps (MFCC) approach. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Regioselective functionalization of alkanes by sequential dehydrogenation-hydrozirconation.

    PubMed

    Kuninobu, Yoichiro; Ureshino, Tomonari; Yamamoto, Shun-ichi; Takai, Kazuhiko

    2010-08-07

    We have succeeded in formal regioselective functionalization of alkanes by iridium-catalyzed dehydrogenation, hydrozirconation of the resulting alkenes, and electrophilic reaction of the generated alkylzirconium intermediate.

  10. Expanding the alkane oxygenase toolbox: new enzymes and applications.

    PubMed

    van Beilen, Jan B; Funhoff, Enrico G

    2005-06-01

    As highly reduced hydrocarbons are abundant in the environment, enzymes that catalyze the terminal or subterminal oxygenation of alkanes are relatively easy to find. A number of these enzymes have been biochemically characterized in detail, because the potential of alkane hydroxylases to catalyze high added-value reactions is widely recognized. Nevertheless, the industrial application of these enzymes is restricted owing to the complex biochemistry, challenging process requirements, and the limited number of cloned and expressed enzymes. Rational and evolutionary engineering approaches have started to yield more robust and versatile enzyme systems, broadening the alkane oxygenase portfolio. In addition, metagenomic approaches provide access to many novel alkane oxygenase sequences.

  11. Removal of chlorinated and non-chlorinated alkanes in a trickle-bed biofilter

    SciTech Connect

    Klasson, K.T.; Davison, B.H.; Barton, J.W.; Jacobs, J.E.

    1998-01-01

    Increasing restrictions in emissions from a variety of industrial settings demand low cost removal of dilute contaminants in air. Many of these contaminants such as volatile organic components (VOCs) and sulfur compounds are biodegradable and can be removed from air streams via biofiltration. The simplest form of biofiltration consists of compost-based systems. More advanced systems designed for unique contaminants are biofilters with bioactive structured packing operating in trickle-bed mode. These advanced systems rely on a microbial consortium capable of degrading the contaminants of concern and the consortium usually is isolated or enriched from a more complex microbial mixture. This paper describes the use of a trickle-bed reactor seeded with a microbial consortium enriched from a methanotrophic culture. The microbial consortium has been found to degrade chlorinated alkanes as the sole carbon source. Degradation rates of alkane mixtures are presented for the trickle-bed as well as results from batch cultures experiments designed to study degradation of various chlorinated and non-chlorinated VOCs.

  12. Short-chain alkanes fuel mussel and sponge Cycloclasticus symbionts from deep-sea gas and oil seeps.

    PubMed

    Rubin-Blum, Maxim; Antony, Chakkiath Paul; Borowski, Christian; Sayavedra, Lizbeth; Pape, Thomas; Sahling, Heiko; Bohrmann, Gerhard; Kleiner, Manuel; Redmond, Molly C; Valentine, David L; Dubilier, Nicole

    2017-06-19

    Cycloclasticus bacteria are ubiquitous in oil-rich regions of the ocean and are known for their ability to degrade polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). In this study, we describe Cycloclasticus that have established a symbiosis with Bathymodiolus heckerae mussels and poecilosclerid sponges from asphalt-rich, deep-sea oil seeps at Campeche Knolls in the southern Gulf of Mexico. Genomic and transcriptomic analyses revealed that, in contrast to all previously known Cycloclasticus, the symbiotic Cycloclasticus appears to lack the genes needed for PAH degradation. Instead, these symbionts use propane and other short-chain alkanes such as ethane and butane as carbon and energy sources, thus expanding the limited range of substrates known to power chemosynthetic symbioses. Analyses of short-chain alkanes in the environment of the Campeche Knolls symbioses revealed that these are present at high concentrations (in the μM to mM range). Comparative genomic analyses revealed high similarities between the genes used by the symbiotic Cycloclasticus to degrade short-chain alkanes and those of free-living Cycloclasticus that bloomed during the Deepwater Horizon oil spill. Our results indicate that the metabolic versatility of bacteria within the Cycloclasticus clade is higher than previously assumed, and highlight the expanded role of these keystone species in the degradation of marine hydrocarbons.

  13. Biotransformation of 2,6-diaminopurine nucleosides by immobilized Geobacillus stearothermophilus.

    PubMed

    De Benedetti, Eliana C; Rivero, Cintia W; Britos, Claudia N; Lozano, Mario E; Trelles, Jorge A

    2012-01-01

    An efficient and green bioprocess to obtain 2,6-diaminopurine nucleosides using thermophilic bacteria is herein reported. Geobacillus stearothermophilus CECT 43 showed a conversion rate of 90 and 83% at 2 h to obtain 2,6-diaminopurine-2'-deoxyriboside and 2,6-diaminopurine riboside, respectively. The selected biocatalyst was successfully stabilized in an agarose matrix and used to produce up to 23.4 g of 2,6-diaminopurine-2'-deoxyriboside in 240 h of process. These nucleoside analogues can be used as prodrug precursors or in antisense oligonucleotide synthesis.

  14. 40 CFR 721.3435 - Butoxy-substituted ether alkane.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Butoxy-substituted ether alkane. 721... Substances § 721.3435 Butoxy-substituted ether alkane. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as butoxy-substituted ether...

  15. Melting of linear alkanes between swollen elastomers and solid substrates.

    PubMed

    Nanjundiah, Kumar; Dhinojwala, Ali

    2013-10-01

    We have measured the melting and freezing behavior of linear alkanes confined between cross-linked poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) elastomers and solid sapphire substrates. Small molecules are often used as lubricants to reduce friction or as plasticizers, but very little is directly known about the migration or changes in physical properties of these small molecules at interfaces, particularly the changes in transition temperatures upon confinement. Our previous studies highlighted striking differences between the crystal structure of confined and unconfined pentadecane crystals in contact with sapphire substrates. Here, we have used surface-sensitive infrared-visible sum-frequency-generation spectroscopy (SFG) to study the melting temperatures (Tm) of alkanes in nanometer thick interfacial regions between swollen PDMS elastomers in contact with sapphire substrate. We find that confined alkanes show depression in Tm compared to the melting temperature of unconfined bulk alkanes. The depression in Tm is a function of chain length, and these differences were smallest for shorter alkanes and largest for 19 unit long alkanes. In comparison, the DSC results for swollen PDMS elastomer show a broad distribution of melting points corresponding to different sizes of crystals formed within the network. The Tm for confined alkanes has been modeled using the combination of Flory-Rehner and Gibbs-Thomson models, and the depression in Tm is related to the thickness of the confined alkanes. These findings have important implications in understanding friction and adhesion of soft elastomeric materials and also the effects of confinement between two solid materials.

  16. Products of Chemistry: Alkanes: Abundant, Pervasive, Important, and Essential.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seymour, Raymond B.

    1989-01-01

    Discusses the history and commercialization of alkanes. Examines the nomenclature and uses of alkanes. Studies polymerization and several types of polyethylenes: low-density, high-density, low-molecular-weight, cross-linked, linear low-density, and ultrahigh-molecular-weight. Includes a glossary of hydrocarbon terms. (MVL)

  17. Products of Chemistry: Alkanes: Abundant, Pervasive, Important, and Essential.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seymour, Raymond B.

    1989-01-01

    Discusses the history and commercialization of alkanes. Examines the nomenclature and uses of alkanes. Studies polymerization and several types of polyethylenes: low-density, high-density, low-molecular-weight, cross-linked, linear low-density, and ultrahigh-molecular-weight. Includes a glossary of hydrocarbon terms. (MVL)

  18. Biosurfactant produced by novel Pseudomonas sp. WJ6 with biodegradation of n-alkanes and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons.

    PubMed

    Xia, Wenjie; Du, Zhifeng; Cui, Qingfeng; Dong, Hao; Wang, Fuyi; He, Panqing; Tang, YongChun

    2014-07-15

    Alkanes and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) have threatened the environment due to toxicity and poor bioavailability. Interest in degradation of these hazardous materials by biosurfactant-producing bacteria has been steadily increasing in recent years. In this work, a novel biosurfactant-producing Pseudomonas sp. WJ6 was isolated to degrade a wide range of n-alkanes and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. Production of lipopeptide biosurfactant was observed in all biodegradable studies. These lipopeptides were purified and identified by C18 RP-HPLC system and electrospray ionization-mass spectrometry. Results of structural analysis showed that these lipopeptides generated from different hydrocarbons were classified to be surfactin, fengycin and lichenysin. Heavy-oil sludge washing experiments demonstrated that lipopeptides produced by Pseudomonas sp. WJ6 have 92.46% of heavy-oil washing efficiency. The obtained results indicate that this novel bacterial strain and its lipopeptides have great potentials in the environmental remediation and petroleum recovery.

  19. Biodegradation of petroleum hydrocarbons by psychrotrophic Pseudomonas strains possessing both alkane (alk) and naphthalene (nah) catabolic pathways.

    PubMed Central

    Whyte, L G; Bourbonniére, L; Greer, C W

    1997-01-01

    Three hydrocarbon-degrading psychrotrophic bacteria were isolated from petroleum-contaminated Arctic soils and characterized. Two of the strains, identified as Pseudomonas spp., degraded C5 to C12 n-alkanes, toluene, and naphthalene at both 5 and 25 degrees C and possessed both the alk catabolic pathway for alkane biodegradation and the nah catabolic pathway for polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbon biodegradation. One of these strains contained both a plasmid slightly smaller than the P. oleovorans OCT plasmid, which hybridized to an alkB gene probe, and a NAH plasmid similar to NAH7, demonstrating that both catabolic pathways, located on separate plasmids, can naturally coexist in the same bacterium. PMID:9293024

  20. Reactivity and fate of secondary alkane sulfonates (SAS) in marine sediments.

    PubMed

    Baena-Nogueras, Rosa María; Rojas-Ojeda, Patricia; Sanz, José Luis; González-Mazo, Eduardo; Lara-Martín, Pablo A

    2014-06-01

    This research is focused on secondary alkane sulfonates (SAS), anionic surfactants widely used in household applications that access aquatic environments mainly via sewage discharges. We studied their sorption capacity and anaerobic degradation in marine sediments, providing the first data available on this topic. SAS partition coefficients increased towards those homologues having longer alkyl chains (from up to 141 L kg(-1) for C14 to up to 1753 L kg(-1) for C17), which were those less susceptible to undergo biodegradation. Overall, SAS removal percentages reached up to 98% after 166 days of incubation using anoxic sediments. The degradation pathway consisted on the formation of sulfocarboxylic acids after an initial fumarate attack of the alkyl chain and successive β-oxidations. This is the first study showing that SAS can be degraded in absence of oxygen, so this new information should be taken into account for future environmental risk assessments on these chemicals.

  1. n-Alkane adsorption to polar silica surfaces.

    PubMed

    Brindza, Michael R; Ding, Feng; Fourkas, John T; Walker, Robert A

    2010-03-21

    The structures of medium-length n-alkane species (C(8)-C(11)) adsorbed to a hydrophilic silica/vapor interface were examined using vibrational sum frequency spectroscopy. Experiments sampling out-of-plane orientation show a clear pattern in vibrational band intensities that implies chains having primarily all-trans conformations lying flat along the interface. Further analysis shows that the methylene groups of the alkane chains have their local symmetry axes directed into and away from the surface. Spectra acquired under different polarization conditions interlock to reinforce this picture of interfacial structure and organization. Variation in signal intensities with chain length suggests that correlation between adsorbed monomers weakens with increasing chain length. This result stands in contrast with alkane behavior at neat liquid/vapor interfaces where longer length alkanes show considerably more surface induced ordering than short chain alkanes.

  2. Sophorolipids from Torulopsis bombicola: possible relation to alkane uptake.

    PubMed Central

    Ito, S; Inoue, S

    1982-01-01

    Torulopsis bombicola produces extracellular sophorolipids when it is grown on water-insoluble alkanes. Sophorolipids and related model compounds, which were not themselves used for growth, were found to stimulate markedly the growth of T. bombicola on alkanes. This stimulatory effect was restricted to growth on C10 to C20 alkanes, whereas no significantly influence was observed for growth on fatty alcohols, fatty acids, glucose, or glycerol. The nonionic methyl ester of the glycolipid supported the greatest cell yield. However, a number of synthetic nonionic surfactants were unable to replace the glycolipid. When organisms were grown on hexadecane, stimulation of growth by sophorolipids was observed almost exclusively with strains of Torulopsis yeasts. In contrast, the growth of other typical alkane-utilizing yeasts, such as candida and Pichia strains, was inhibited or not affected. It appears that sophorolipids are involved in alkane dissimilation by T. bombicola through an undetermined mechanism. PMID:7201782

  3. Alkanes in benthic organisms from the Buccaneer oil field

    SciTech Connect

    Middleditch, B.S.; Basile, B.

    1980-06-01

    About 200 g per day of alkanes are present in brine discharged from each of two production platforms in the Buccaneer oil field in the NW Gulf of Mexico. These alkanes disperse rapidly in the water column, so that seawater concentrations of petroleum alkanes in this region are generally very low. They can be taken up to some extent by plankton, fish, and barnacles, but the petroleum alkane concentrations in these organisms are also relatively low. The largest pool of petroleum alkanes is in the surficial sediments, where concentrations of up to 25 ppM are observed, with concentration gradients extending more than 20 m from the production platforms. Organisms are examined which are exposed to these sediments and, for comparison, other specimens from control sites around structures from which there are no discharges.

  4. Utilization of n-Alkanes by Cladosporium resinae

    PubMed Central

    Teh, J. S.; Lee, K. H.

    1973-01-01

    Four different isolates of Cladosporium resinae from Australian soils were tested for their ability to utilize liquid n-alkanes ranging from n-hexane to n-octadecane under standard conditions. The isolates were unable to make use of n-hexane, n-heptane, and n-octane for growth. In fact, these hydrocarbons, particularly n-hexane, exerted an inhibitory effect on spore germination and mycelial growth. All higher n-alkanes from n-nonane to n-octadecane were assimilated by the fungus, although only limited growth occurred on n-nonane and n-decane. The long chain n-alkanes (C14 to C18) supported good growth of all isolates, but there was no obvious correlation between cell yields and chain lengths of these n-alkanes. Variation in growth responses to individual n-alkane among the different isolates was also observed. The cause of this variation is unknown. PMID:4735447

  5. Structure-function relationships in Gan42B, an intracellular GH42 β-galactosidase from Geobacillus stearothermophilus.

    PubMed

    Solomon, Hodaya V; Tabachnikov, Orly; Lansky, Shifra; Salama, Rachel; Feinberg, Hadar; Shoham, Yuval; Shoham, Gil

    2015-12-01

    Geobacillus stearothermophilus T-6 is a Gram-positive thermophilic soil bacterium that contains a battery of degrading enzymes for the utilization of plant cell-wall polysaccharides, including xylan, arabinan and galactan. A 9.4 kb gene cluster has recently been characterized in G. stearothermophilus that encodes a number of galactan-utilization elements. A key enzyme of this degradation system is Gan42B, an intracellular GH42 β-galactosidase capable of hydrolyzing short β-1,4-galactosaccharides into galactose units, making it of high potential for various biotechnological applications. The Gan42B monomer is made up of 686 amino acids, and based on sequence homology it was suggested that Glu323 is the catalytic nucleophile and Glu159 is the catalytic acid/base. In the current study, the detailed three-dimensional structure of wild-type Gan42B (at 2.45 Å resolution) and its catalytic mutant E323A (at 2.50 Å resolution), as determined by X-ray crystallography, are reported. These structures demonstrate that the three-dimensional structure of the Gan42B monomer generally correlates with the overall fold observed for GH42 proteins, consisting of three main domains: an N-terminal TIM-barrel domain, a smaller mixed α/β domain, and the smallest all-β domain at the C-terminus. The two catalytic residues are located in the TIM-barrel domain in a pocket-like active site such that their carboxylic functional groups are about 5.3 Å from each other, consistent with a retaining mechanism. The crystal structure demonstrates that Gan42B is a homotrimer, resembling a flowerpot in general shape, in which each monomer interacts with the other two to form a cone-shaped tunnel cavity in the centre. The cavity is ∼35 Å at the wide opening and ∼5 Å at the small opening and ∼40 Å in length. The active sites are situated at the interfaces between the monomers, so that every two neighbouring monomers participate in the formation of each of the three active

  6. A group IIC-type intron interrupts the rRNA methylase gene of Geobacillus stearothermophilus strain 10.

    PubMed

    Moretz, Samuel E; Lampson, Bert C

    2010-10-01

    Group IIC introns insert next to the stem-loop structure of rho-independent transcription terminators, thus avoiding intact genes. The insertion sites of 17 copies of the G.st.I1 intron from Geobacillus stearothermophilus were compared. One copy of the intron was found to interrupt an open reading frame (ORF) encoding an rRNA methylase.

  7. Thermostable hemicellulases of a bacterium, Geobacillus sp. DC3, isolated from the former Homestake Gold Mine in Lead, South Dakota

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    A thermophilic strain, Geobacillus sp. DC3, capable of producing hemicellulolytic enzymes was isolated from the 1.5-km depth of the former Homestake gold mine in Lead, South Dakota. The DC3 strain expressed a high level of extracellular endoxylanase at 39.5 U/mg protein with additional hemicellulase...

  8. Draft Genome Sequence of Geobacillus sp. Isolate T6, a Thermophilic Bacterium Collected from a Thermal Spring in Argentina

    PubMed Central

    Ortiz, Elio M.; Berretta, Marcelo F.; Benintende, Graciela B.; Zandomeni, Rubén O.

    2015-01-01

    Geobacillus sp. isolate T6 was collected from a thermal spring in Salta, Argentina. The draft genome sequence (3,767,773 bp) of this isolate is represented by one major scaffold of 3,46 Mbp, a second one of 207 kbp, and 20 scaffolds of <13 kbp. The assembled sequences revealed 3,919 protein-coding genes. PMID:26184933

  9. Bioremediation of hydrocarbon degradation in a petroleum-contaminated soil and microbial population and activity determination.

    PubMed

    Wu, Manli; Li, Wei; Dick, Warren A; Ye, Xiqiong; Chen, Kaili; Kost, David; Chen, Liming

    2017-02-01

    Bioremediation of hydrocarbon degradation in petroleum-polluted soil is carried out by various microorganisms. However, little information is available for the relationships between hydrocarbon degradation rates in petroleum-contaminated soil and microbial population and activity in laboratory assay. In a microcosm study, degradation rate and efficiency of total petroleum hydrocarbons (TPH), alkanes, and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) in a petroleum-contaminated soil were determined using an infrared photometer oil content analyzer and a gas chromatography mass spectrometry (GC-MS). Also, the populations of TPH, alkane, and PAH degraders were enumerated by a modified most probable number (MPN) procedure, and the hydrocarbon degrading activities of these degraders were determined by the Biolog (MT2) MicroPlates assay. Results showed linear correlations between the TPH and alkane degradation rates and the population and activity increases of TPH and alkane degraders, but no correlation was observed between the PAH degradation rates and the PAH population and activity increases. Petroleum hydrocarbon degrading microbial population measured by MPN was significantly correlated with metabolic activity in the Biolog assay. The results suggest that the MPN procedure and the Biolog assay are efficient methods for assessing the rates of TPH and alkane, but not PAH, bioremediation in oil-contaminated soil in laboratory.

  10. Isolation and characterization of arsenic resistant Geobacillus kaustophilus strain from geothermal soils.

    PubMed

    Cuebas, Mariola; Sannino, David; Bini, Elisabetta

    2011-08-01

    A thermophilic, arsenate resistant bacterial strain was isolated from a geothermal field located in the area surrounding Monterotondo (Tuscany, Italy). Based on 16S rRNA gene analysis and recN comparisons the strain was identified as Geobacillus kaustophilus. Cells of the strain, designated A1, were rod-shaped, 2-3 μm long and reacted negatively to Gram staining, despite its taxonomic classification as a Gram positive microorganism. Strain A1 is a thermophilic spore-forming bacterium, and grows optimally at pH 6.5 and 55 °C. An arsenate MIC of 80 mM was determined for strain A1, and the close relative G. kaustophilus DSM 7263(T) showed similar levels of arsenate resistance. These observations were consistent with the presence of arsenic detoxification genes in the genome of G. kaustophilus HTA426. Furthermore, strain A1 growth was not inhibited by 5 mM antimonite and 15 mM arsenite, the highest tested concentrations. This is the first description of arsenic resistance in a Geobacillus strain and supports the hypothesis that members of the genus may have a role in the biogeochemical cycling of arsenic. Copyright © 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  11. Cloning, Expression, and Characterization of a Novel Thermophilic Monofunctional Catalase from Geobacillus sp. CHB1

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Catalases are widely used in many scientific areas. A catalase gene (Kat) from Geobacillus sp. CHB1 encoding a monofunctional catalase was cloned and recombinant expressed in Escherichia coli (E. coli), which was the first time to clone and express this type of catalase of genus Geobacillus strains as far as we know. This Kat gene was 1,467 bp in length and encoded a catalase with 488 amino acid residuals, which is only 81% similar to the previously studied Bacillus sp. catalase in terms of amino acid sequence. Recombinant catalase was highly soluble in E. coli and made up 30% of the total E. coli protein. Fermentation broth of the recombinant E. coli showed a high catalase activity level up to 35,831 U/mL which was only lower than recombinant Bacillus sp. WSHDZ-01 among the reported catalase production strains. The purified recombinant catalase had a specific activity of 40,526 U/mg and K m of 51.1 mM. The optimal reaction temperature of this recombinant enzyme was 60°C to 70°C, and it exhibited high activity over a wide range of reaction temperatures, ranging from 10°C to 90°C. The enzyme retained 94.7% of its residual activity after incubation at 60°C for 1 hour. High yield and excellent thermophilic properties are valuable features for this catalase in industrial applications. PMID:27579320

  12. Cloning, Expression, and Characterization of a Novel Thermophilic Monofunctional Catalase from Geobacillus sp. CHB1.

    PubMed

    Jia, Xianbo; Chen, Jichen; Lin, Chenqiang; Lin, Xinjian

    2016-01-01

    Catalases are widely used in many scientific areas. A catalase gene (Kat) from Geobacillus sp. CHB1 encoding a monofunctional catalase was cloned and recombinant expressed in Escherichia coli (E. coli), which was the first time to clone and express this type of catalase of genus Geobacillus strains as far as we know. This Kat gene was 1,467 bp in length and encoded a catalase with 488 amino acid residuals, which is only 81% similar to the previously studied Bacillus sp. catalase in terms of amino acid sequence. Recombinant catalase was highly soluble in E. coli and made up 30% of the total E. coli protein. Fermentation broth of the recombinant E. coli showed a high catalase activity level up to 35,831 U/mL which was only lower than recombinant Bacillus sp. WSHDZ-01 among the reported catalase production strains. The purified recombinant catalase had a specific activity of 40,526 U/mg and K m of 51.1 mM. The optimal reaction temperature of this recombinant enzyme was 60°C to 70°C, and it exhibited high activity over a wide range of reaction temperatures, ranging from 10°C to 90°C. The enzyme retained 94.7% of its residual activity after incubation at 60°C for 1 hour. High yield and excellent thermophilic properties are valuable features for this catalase in industrial applications.

  13. Magnesium-Calcite Crystal Formation Mediated by the Thermophilic Bacterium Geobacillus thermoglucosidasius Requires Calcium and Endospores.

    PubMed

    Murai, Rie; Yoshida, Naoto

    2016-11-01

    Fresh Geobacillus thermoglucosidasius cells grown on soybean-casein digest nutrient agar were inoculated as a parent colony 1 cm in diameter on the surface of an agar gel containing acetate and calcium ions (calcite-promoting hydrogel) and incubated at 60 °C for 4 days, after which magnesium-calcite single crystals of 50-130 µm in size formed within the parent colony. Addition of EDTA, polyacrylic acid or N,N-dicyclohexylcarbodiimide to the calcite-forming hydrogel inhibited the parent colony from forming magnesium-calcite crystals. Inoculation of G. thermoglucosidasius on calcite-forming hydrogel containing 5 µM cadmium and 20 µM zinc resulted in a decrease in the sporulation rate from 55 to 7-8 %. Magnesium-calcite synthesis decreased relative to the sporulation rate. G. thermoglucosidasius exhibited higher adsorption/absorbance of calcium than other Geobacillus sp. that do not mediate calcite formation and higher levels of magnesium accumulation. Calcium ions contained in the calcite-promoting hydrogel and magnesium ions concentrated in G. thermoglucosidasius cells serve as the elements for magnesium-calcite synthesis. The observed decreases in sporulation rate and magnesium-calcite formation support the hypothesis that endospores act as nuclei for the synthesis of magnesium-calcite single crystals.

  14. Characterization and identification of Geobacillus spp. isolated from Soldhar hot spring site of Garhwal Himalaya, India.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Avinash; Pandey, Anita; Shouche, Yogesh S; Kumar, Bhavesh; Kulkarni, Girish

    2009-04-01

    13 morphologically distinct strains of thermophilic bacteria isolated from a hot spring site in Garhwal region of Indian Himalaya have been characterized and identified using phenotypic and genotypic characters. All the strains developed circular to irregular colonies between 2-3 mm on Tryptone Yeast extract (TY) agar plates at 65 degrees C following 24-36 h incubation. In TY broth, facultative bacterial growth was observed within 12-16 h of incubation at 65 degrees C. The bacterial strains could tolerate a temperature range between 40-45 degrees C to 85-90 degrees C (optimum 65-70 degrees C) and pH between 4-11 (optimum 6-8). The cell morphology varied from short to long rods arranged in single, diplobacilli (in V or L shape) or short or long spiral chains with coiling. The bacterial strains varied in respect of their biochemical tests conducted for various enzymes, fermentation of sugars, tolerance to antibiotics and salt. Based on the 16S rRNA analysis, 11 strains showed maximum similarity with Geobacillus stereothermophilus, one strain with G. kaustophilus and one with Geobacillus sp. ((c) 2009 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim).

  15. Expression and characterization of thermostable glycogen branching enzyme from Geobacillus mahadia Geo-05

    PubMed Central

    Mohtar, Nur Syazwani; Raja Abd Rahman, Raja Noor Zaliha; Leow, Thean Chor; Salleh, Abu Bakar; Mat Isa, Mohd Noor

    2016-01-01

    The glycogen branching enzyme (EC 2.4.1.18), which catalyses the formation of α-1,6-glycosidic branch points in glycogen structure, is often used to enhance the nutritional value and quality of food and beverages. In order to be applicable in industries, enzymes that are stable and active at high temperature are much desired. Using genome mining, the nucleotide sequence of the branching enzyme gene (glgB) was extracted from the Geobacillus mahadia Geo-05 genome sequence provided by the Malaysia Genome Institute. The size of the gene is 2013 bp, and the theoretical molecular weight of the protein is 78.43 kDa. The gene sequence was then used to predict the thermostability, function and the three dimensional structure of the enzyme. The gene was cloned and overexpressed in E. coli to verify the predicted result experimentally. The purified enzyme was used to study the effect of temperature and pH on enzyme activity and stability, and the inhibitory effect by metal ion on enzyme activity. This thermostable glycogen branching enzyme was found to be most active at 55 °C, and the half-life at 60 °C and 70 °C was 24 h and 5 h, respectively. From this research, a thermostable glycogen branching enzyme was successfully isolated from Geobacillus mahadia Geo-05 by genome mining together with molecular biology technique. PMID:27957389

  16. Preliminary characterization of the probiotic properties of Candida famata and Geobacillus thermoleovorans

    PubMed Central

    Mahdhi, A; Hmila, Z; Behi, A; Bakhrouf, A

    2011-01-01

    Background and Objective Probiotics are live microbial feed supplements which beneficially affect the host animal by improving its intestinal microbial balance, producing metabolites which inhibit the colonization or growth of other microorganisms or by competing with them for resources such as nutrients or space. The aim of this study was to investigate the probiotic properties of Candida famata and Geobacillus thermoleovorans. Material and Methods In this study, yeast and bacterial strains isolated from pure oil waste were identified using Api 50 CHB and Api Candida Systems and their probiotic properties were studied through antimicrobial activity, biofilm production, adherence assay and enzymatic characterization. Results and Conclusion According to biochemical analyses, these strains corresponded to Geobacillus thermoleovorans and Candida famata. Antagonism assay results showed that the tested strains have an inhibitory effect against tested pathogenic bacteria. The yeast Candida famata was unable to produce biofilm on Congo Red Agar (CRA), while the bacterial strain was a slime producer. Adherence assays to abiotic surfaces revealed that the investigated strains were fairly adhesive to polystyrene with values ranging from 0.18 to 0.34 at 595 nm. The enzymatic characterization revealed that the tested strains expressed enzymes such as phosphatase alkaline, esterase lipase (C8), amylase, lipase, lecitenase and caseinase. The obtained results may allow the isolated strains to be considered as having the potential to be candidate probiotics. PMID:22347595

  17. Characterization of growth-supporting factors produced by Geobacillus toebii for the commensal thermophile Symbiobacterium toebii.

    PubMed

    Kim, Joong-Jae; Masui, Ryoji; Kuramitsu, Seiki; Seo, Jin-Ho; Kim, Kwang; Sung, Moon-Hee

    2008-03-01

    Symbiobacterium toebii is a commensal symbiotic thermophile that cannot grow without support from a partner bacterium. We investigated the properties of Symbiobacterium growth-supporting factors (SGSFs) produced by the partner bacterium Geobacillus toebii. SGSFs occurred in both the cell-free extract (CFE) and culture supernatant of G. toebii and might comprise multifarious materials because of their different biological properties. The heavy SGSF contained in the cytosolic component exhibited heat- and proteinase-sensitive proteinaceous properties and had a molecular mass of >50 kDa. In contrast, the light SGSF contained in the extracellular component exhibited heat-stable, proteinase-resistant, nonprotein properties and had a molecular mass of <10 kDa. Under morphological examination using light microscopy, S. toebii cultured with the culture supernatant of G. toebii was filamentous, whereas S. toebii cultured with the CFE of G. toebii was rod-shaped. These results strongly suggest that the SGSFs produced by G. toebii comprise two or more types that differ in their growth-supporting mechanisms, although all support the growth of S. toebii. Upon the examination of the distribution of SGSFs in other bacteria, both cytosolic and extracellular components of Geobacillus kaustophilus, Escherichia coli, and Bacillus subtilis had detectable growth-supporting effects for S. toebii, indicating that common SGSF materials are widely present in various bacterial strains.

  18. Highly active metallocarboxypeptidase from newly isolated Geobacillus strain SBS-4S: cloning and characterization.

    PubMed

    Tayyab, Muhammad; Rashid, Naeem; Angkawidjaja, Clement; Kanaya, Shigenori; Akhtar, Muhammad

    2011-03-01

    The carboxypeptidase gene from Geobacillus SBS-4S was cloned and sequenced. The sequence analysis displayed the gene consists of an open reading frame of 1503 nucleotides encoding a protein of 500 amino acids (CBP(SBS)). The amino acid sequence comparison revealed that CBP(SBS) exhibited a highest homology of 41.6% (identity) with carboxypeptidase Taq from Thermus aquaticus among the characterized proteases. CBP(SBS) contained an active site motif (265)HEXXH(269) which is conserved in family-M32 of carboxypeptidases. The gene was expressed with His-Tag utilizing Escherichia coli expression system and purified to apparent homogeneity. The purified CBP(SBS) showed highest activity at pH 7.5 and 70°C. The enzyme activity was metal ion dependent. Among metal ions highest activity was found in the presence of Co(2+). Thermostability studies of CBP(SBS) by circular dichroism spectroscopy demonstrated the melting temperature of the protein around 77°C. The enzyme exhibited K(m) and V(max) values of 14 mM and 10526 μmol min(-1) mg(-1) when carbobenzoxy-alanine-arginine was used as substrate. k(cat) and k(cat)/K(m) valves were 10175 s(-1) and 726 mM(-1) s(-1). To our knowledge this is the highest ever reported enzyme activity of a metallocarboxypeptidase and the first characterization of a metallocarboxypeptidase from genus Geobacillus.

  19. Isolation and characterization of different bacterial strains for bioremediation of n-alkanes and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons.

    PubMed

    Guermouche M'rassi, A; Bensalah, F; Gury, J; Duran, R

    2015-10-01

    Crude oil is a common environmental pollutant composed of a large number of both aromatic and aliphatic hydrocarbons. Biodegradation is carried out by microbial communities that are important in determining the fate of pollutants in the environment. The intrinsic biodegradability of the hydrocarbons and the distribution in the environment of competent degrading microorganisms are crucial information for the implementation of bioremediation processes. In the present study, the biodegradation capacities of various bacteria toward aliphatic and aromatic hydrocarbons were determined. The purpose of the study was to isolate and characterize hydrocarbon-degrading bacteria from contaminated soil of a refinery in Arzew, Algeria. A collection of 150 bacterial strains was obtained; the bacterial isolates were identified by 16S rRNA gene sequencing and their ability to degrade hydrocarbon compounds characterized. The isolated strains were mainly affiliated to the Gamma-Proteobacteria class. Among them, Pseudomonas spp. had the ability to metabolize high molecular weight hydrocarbon compounds such as pristane (C19) at 35.11 % by strain LGM22 and benzo[a] pyrene (C20) at 33.93 % by strain LGM11. Some strains were able to grow on all the hydrocarbons tested including octadecane, squalene, phenanthrene, and pyrene. Some strains were specialized degrading only few substrates. In contrast, the strain LGM2 designated as Pseudomonas sp. was found able to degrade both linear and branched alkanes as well as low and high poly-aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). The alkB gene involved in alkane degradation was detected in LGM2 and other Pseudomonas-related isolates. The capabilities of the isolated bacterial strains to degrade alkanes and PAHs should be of great practical significance in bioremediation of oil-contaminated environments.

  20. Petroleum pollutant degradation by surface water microorganisms.

    PubMed

    Antić, Malisa P; Jovancićević, Branimir S; Ilić, Mila; Vrvić, Miroslav M; Schwarzbauer, Jan

    2006-09-01

    It is well known that the composition of petroleum or some of its processing products changes in the environment mostly under the influence of microorganisms. A series of experiments was conducted in order to define the optimum conditions for an efficient biodegradation of petroleum pollutant, or bioremediation of different segments of the environment. The aim of these investigations was to show to what extent the hydrocarbons of a petroleum pollutant are degraded by microbial cultures which were isolated as dominant microorganisms from a surface water of a wastewater canal of an oil refinery and a nitrogen plant. Biodegradation experiments were conducted on one paraffinic, and one naphthenic type of petroleum during a three month period under aerobic conditions, varying the following parameters: Inorganic (Kp) or an organic medium (Bh) with or without exposition to light. Microorganisms were analyzed in a surface water sample from a canal (Pancevo, Serbia), into which wastewater from an oil refinery and a nitrogen plant is released. The consortia of microorganisms were isolated from the water sample (most abundant species: Phormidium foveolarum--filamentous Cyanobacteria, blue-green algae and Achanthes minutissima, diatoms, algae). The simulation experiments of biodegradation were conducted with the biomass suspension and crude oils Sirakovo (Sir, paraffinic type) and Velebit (Ve, naphthenic type). After a three month period, organic substance was extracted by means of chloroform. In the extracts, the content of saturated hydrocarbons, aromatic hydrocarbons, alcohols and fatty acids was determined (the group composition). n-Alkanes and isoprenoid aliphatic alkanes, pristane and phytane, in the aliphatic fractions, were analyzed using gas chromatography (GC). Total isoprenoid aliphatic alkanes and polycyclic alkanes of sterane and triterpane types were analyzed by GC-MS. Paraffinic type petroleums have a significant loss of saturated hydrocarbons. For naphthenic

  1. Hydrogen isotopic composition of individual n-alkanes as an intrinsic tracer for bioremediation and source identification of petroleum contamination.

    PubMed

    Pond, Kristy L; Huang, Yongsong; Wang, Yi; Kulpa, Charles F

    2002-02-15

    The isotopic signatures of crude oil hydrocarbons are potentially powerful intrinsic tracers to their origins and the processes by which the oils are modified in the environment. Stable carbon isotopic data are of limited use for studying petroleum contaminants because of the relatively small amount of isotopic fractionation that occurs during natural processes. Hydrogen isotopes, in contrast, are commonly fractionated to a much greater extent and as a result display larger variations in delta values. We studied the effect of in vitro aerobic biodegradation on the hydrogen isotopic composition of individual n-alkanes from crude oil. The isotopic analysis was conducted using gas chromatography-thermal conversion-isotope ratio mass spectrometry. In general, biodegradation rates decreased with increasing hydrocarbon chain length, consistent with previous studies. More importantly the n-alkanes that were degraded at the fastest rates (n-C15 to n-C18) also showed the largest overall isotopic fractionation (approximately 12-25 per thousand deuterium enrichment), suggesting that the lower molecular weight n-alkanes can be used to monitor in-situ bioremediation of crude oil contamination. The hydrogen isotopic compositions of the longer chain alkanes (n-C19 to n-C27) were relatively stable during biodegradation (<5%o overall deuterium enrichment), indicating that these compounds are effective tracers for oil-source identification studies.

  2. High-order harmonic generation in alkanes

    SciTech Connect

    Altucci, C.; Velotta, R.; Heesel, E.; Springate, E.; Marangos, J. P.; Vozzi, C.; Benedetti, E.; Calegari, F.; Sansone, G.; Stagira, S.; Nisoli, M.; Tosa, V.

    2006-04-15

    We have investigated the process of high-order harmonic generation in light alkanes by using femtosecond laser pulses. We show the experimental results cannot be matched by a model that assumes a single active electron only in a hydrogenic s orbital. Clear evidences are shown of the important role played by the p-like character originating from the covalent C-H bond. By constructing a suitable mixture of s-type and p-type atomic wave functions, an excellent agreement between measurements in methane and simulations is found, thus confirming the validity of the developed method as a general tool for the analysis of high-order harmonic generation in complex molecules.

  3. Kinetic study of asphaltene dissolution in amphiphile/alkane solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Permsukarome, P.; Chang, C.; Fogler, H.S.

    1997-09-01

    The kinetics of dissolution of pentane-insoluble solid asphaltene precipitates by amphiphile/alkane solutions were investigated using a differential reactor flow system. Two amphiphiles, dodecylbenzenesulfonic acid and nonylphenol, and five alkane solvents, ranging from hexane to hexadecane, were used. Results showed that the rate of asphaltene dissolution in amphiphile/alkane fluids could be approximated with a first-order kinetics with respect to the undissolved asphaltene mass in solution. The specific dissolution rate constant, k, varied with the concentration of amphiphiles, the type of alkane solvents, the temperature, and the fluid flow rate. The rate of asphaltene dissolution displayed a Langmuir-Hinshelwood kinetics with respect to the concentration of amphiphiles. Increasing the temperature of amphiphile/alkane fluids also enhanced the rate of asphaltene dissolution. The apparent activation energy for asphaltene dissolution was approximated to be 4--7 kcal/mol. The rate of asphaltene dissolution was also greater in amphiphile solutions containing lighter alkanes, such as hexane, with lower viscosities. These trends suggest that both surface reaction and mass transfer processes are important to the rate of asphaltene dissolution in amphiphile/alkane fluids.

  4. Expanding the product profile of a microbial alkane biosynthetic pathway.

    PubMed

    Harger, Matthew; Zheng, Lei; Moon, Austin; Ager, Casey; An, Ju Hye; Choe, Chris; Lai, Yi-Ling; Mo, Benjamin; Zong, David; Smith, Matthew D; Egbert, Robert G; Mills, Jeremy H; Baker, David; Pultz, Ingrid Swanson; Siegel, Justin B

    2013-01-18

    Microbially produced alkanes are a new class of biofuels that closely match the chemical composition of petroleum-based fuels. Alkanes can be generated from the fatty acid biosynthetic pathway by the reduction of acyl-ACPs followed by decarbonylation of the resulting aldehydes. A current limitation of this pathway is the restricted product profile, which consists of n-alkanes of 13, 15, and 17 carbons in length. To expand the product profile, we incorporated a new part, FabH2 from Bacillus subtilis , an enzyme known to have a broader specificity profile for fatty acid initiation than the native FabH of Escherichia coli . When provided with the appropriate substrate, the addition of FabH2 resulted in an altered alkane product profile in which significant levels of n-alkanes of 14 and 16 carbons in length are produced. The production of even chain length alkanes represents initial steps toward the expansion of this recently discovered microbial alkane production pathway to synthesize complex fuels. This work was conceived and performed as part of the 2011 University of Washington international Genetically Engineered Machines (iGEM) project.

  5. The vapor-particle partitioning of n-alkanes

    SciTech Connect

    Doskey, P.V.

    1994-04-01

    A mixed-phase partitioning model has been proposed to predict the distribution of n-alkanes between the vapor and particle phases in the atmosphere. n-Alkanes having terrestrial plant wax and petroleum origins are assumed to be associated with atmospheric particles as microcrystalline solids and subcooled liquids, respectively. The fraction of n-alkanes on atmospheric particles having plant wax and petroleum origins is estimated with carbon preference indices. Hypothetical terrestrial plant wax and petroleum mixtures are used to estimate the mole fractions of the n-alkanes in each phase and the molecular weights of the phases. Solid and subcooled liquid phase n-alkane vapor pressures are used in the model to predict the fraction of n-alkanes associated with particles in the atmosphere. Trends in the prediction of vapor-particle partitioning using these assumptions agree well with field observations. However, the fraction of particle phase n-alkanes predicted by the model was significantly different from the field observations.

  6. Long-chain alkane production by the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Buijs, Nicolaas A; Zhou, Yongjin J; Siewers, Verena; Nielsen, Jens

    2015-06-01

    In the past decade industrial-scale production of renewable transportation biofuels has been developed as an alternative to fossil fuels, with ethanol as the most prominent biofuel and yeast as the production organism of choice. However, ethanol is a less efficient substitute fuel for heavy-duty and maritime transportation as well as aviation due to its low energy density. Therefore, new types of biofuels, such as alkanes, are being developed that can be used as drop-in fuels and can substitute gasoline, diesel, and kerosene. Here, we describe for the first time the heterologous biosynthesis of long-chain alkanes by the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. We show that elimination of the hexadecenal dehydrogenase Hfd1 and expression of a redox system are essential for alkane biosynthesis in yeast. Deletion of HFD1 together with expression of an alkane biosynthesis pathway resulted in the production of the alkanes tridecane, pentadecane, and heptadecane. Our study provides a proof of principle for producing long-chain alkanes in the industrial workhorse S. cerevisiae, which was so far limited to bacteria. We anticipate that these findings will be a key factor for further yeast engineering to enable industrial production of alkane based drop-in biofuels, which can allow the biofuel industry to diversify beyond bioethanol.

  7. Draft Genome Sequences of Seven Thermophilic Spore-Forming Bacteria Isolated from Foods That Produce Highly Heat-Resistant Spores, Comprising Geobacillus spp., Caldibacillus debilis, and Anoxybacillus flavithermus

    PubMed Central

    Berendsen, Erwin M.; Wells-Bennik, Marjon H. J.; Krawczyk, Antonina O.; de Jong, Anne; van Heel, Auke; Holsappel, Siger; Eijlander, Robyn T.

    2016-01-01

    Here, we report the draft genomes of five strains of Geobacillus spp., one Caldibacillus debilis strain, and one draft genome of Anoxybacillus flavithermus, all thermophilic spore-forming Gram-positive bacteria. PMID:27151781

  8. Draft Genome Sequences of Seven Thermophilic Spore-Forming Bacteria Isolated from Foods That Produce Highly Heat-Resistant Spores, Comprising Geobacillus spp., Caldibacillus debilis, and Anoxybacillus flavithermus.

    PubMed

    Berendsen, Erwin M; Wells-Bennik, Marjon H J; Krawczyk, Antonina O; de Jong, Anne; van Heel, Auke; Holsappel, Siger; Eijlander, Robyn T; Kuipers, Oscar P

    2016-05-05

    Here, we report the draft genomes of five strains of Geobacillus spp., one Caldibacillus debilis strain, and one draft genome of Anoxybacillus flavithermus, all thermophilic spore-forming Gram-positive bacteria. Copyright © 2016 Berendsen et al.

  9. Heterogeneity of Alkane Chain Length in Freshwater and Marine Cyanobacteria

    PubMed Central

    Shakeel, Tabinda; Fatma, Zia; Fatma, Tasneem; Yazdani, Syed Shams

    2015-01-01

    The potential utilization of cyanobacteria for the biological production of alkanes represents an exceptional system for the next generation of biofuels. Here, we analyzed a diverse group of freshwater and marine cyanobacterial isolates from Indian culture collections for their ability to produce both alkanes and alkenes. Among the 50 cyanobacterial isolates screened, 32 isolates; 14 freshwater and 18 marine isolates; produced predominantly alkanes. The GC-MS/MS profiles revealed a higher percentage of pentadecane and heptadecane production for marine and freshwater strains, respectively. Oscillatoria species were found to be the highest producers of alkanes. Among the freshwater isolates, Oscillatoria CCC305 produced the maximum alkane level with 0.43 μg/mg dry cell weight, while Oscillatoria formosa BDU30603 was the highest producer among the marine isolates with 0.13 μg/mg dry cell weight. Culturing these strains under different media compositions showed that the alkane chain length was not influenced by the growth medium but was rather an inherent property of the strains. Analysis of the cellular fatty acid content indicated the presence of predominantly C16 chain length fatty acids in marine strains, while the proportion of C18 chain length fatty acids increased in the majority of freshwater strains. These results correlated with alkane chain length specificity of marine and freshwater isolates indicating that alkane chain lengths may be primarily determined by the fatty acid synthesis pathway. Moreover, the phylogenetic analysis showed clustering of pentadecane-producing marine strains that was distinct from heptadecane-producing freshwater strains strongly suggesting a close association between alkane chain length and the cyanobacteria habitat. PMID:25853127

  10. Characterisation of a new thermoalkaliphilic bacterium for the production of high-quality hemp fibres, Geobacillus thermoglucosidasius strain PB94A.

    PubMed

    Valladares Juárez, A G; Dreyer, J; Göpel, P K; Koschke, N; Frank, D; Märkl, H; Müller, R

    2009-06-01

    Novel thermophilic and alkaliphilic bacteria for the processing of bast fibres were isolated using hemp pectin as substrate. The strain PB94A, which showed the highest growth rate (micro = 0.5/h) was identified as Geobacillus thermoglucosidasius (DSM 21625). The strain grew optimally at 60 degrees C and pH 8.5. During growth on citrus pectin, the strain produced pectinolytic lyases, which were excreted into the medium. In contrast to the commercially available pectinase Bioprep 3000 L, the enzymes from G. thermoglucosidasius PB94A converted pectin isolated from hemp fibres. In addition to hemp pectin, the culture supernatant also degraded citrus, sugar beet and apple pectin and polygalacturonic acid. When hemp fibres were incubated with the cell-free fermentation broth of G. thermoglucosidasius PB94A, the fineness of the fibres increased. The strain did not produce any cellulases, which is important in order to avoid damaging the fibres during incubation. Therefore, these bacteria or their enzymes can be used to produce fine high-quality hemp fibres.

  11. Three-dimensional structure of a variant `Termamyl-like' Geobacillus stearothermophilus α-amylase at 1.9 Å resolution.

    PubMed

    Offen, Wendy A; Viksoe-Nielsen, Anders; Borchert, Torben V; Wilson, Keith S; Davies, Gideon J

    2015-01-01

    The enzyme-catalysed degradation of starch is central to many industrial processes, including sugar manufacture and first-generation biofuels. Classical biotechnological platforms involve steam explosion of starch followed by the action of endo-acting glycoside hydrolases termed α-amylases and then exo-acting α-glucosidases (glucoamylases) to yield glucose, which is subsequently processed. A key enzymatic player in this pipeline is the `Termamyl' class of bacterial α-amylases and designed/evolved variants thereof. Here, the three-dimensional structure of one such Termamyl α-amylase variant based upon the parent Geobacillus stearothermophilus α-amylase is presented. The structure has been solved at 1.9 Å resolution, revealing the classical three-domain fold stabilized by Ca2+ and a Ca2+-Na+-Ca2+ triad. As expected, the structure is similar to the G. stearothermophilus α-amylase but with main-chain deviations of up to 3 Å in some regions, reflecting both the mutations and differing crystal-packing environments.

  12. Complete genome sequence, metabolic model construction and phenotypic characterization of Geobacillus LC300, an extremely thermophilic, fast growing, xylose-utilizing bacterium.

    PubMed

    Cordova, Lauren T; Long, Christopher P; Venkataramanan, Keerthi P; Antoniewicz, Maciek R

    2015-11-01

    We have isolated a new extremely thermophilic fast-growing Geobacillus strain that can efficiently utilize xylose, glucose, mannose and galactose for cell growth. When grown aerobically at 72 °C, Geobacillus LC300 has a growth rate of 2.15 h(-1) on glucose and 1.52 h(-1) on xylose (doubling time less than 30 min). The corresponding specific glucose and xylose utilization rates are 5.55 g/g/h and 5.24 g/g/h, respectively. As such, Geobacillus LC300 grows 3-times faster than E. coli on glucose and xylose, and has a specific xylose utilization rate that is 3-times higher than the best metabolically engineered organism to date. To gain more insight into the metabolism of Geobacillus LC300 its genome was sequenced using PacBio's RS II single-molecule real-time (SMRT) sequencing platform and annotated using the RAST server. Based on the genome annotation and the measured biomass composition a core metabolic network model was constructed. To further demonstrate the biotechnological potential of this organism, Geobacillus LC300 was grown to high cell-densities in a fed-batch culture, where cells maintained a high xylose utilization rate under low dissolved oxygen concentrations. All of these characteristics make Geobacillus LC300 an attractive host for future metabolic engineering and biotechnology applications.

  13. Proteomic analysis of Marinobacter hydrocarbonoclasticus SP17 biofilm formation at the alkane-water interface reveals novel proteins and cellular processes involved in hexadecane assimilation.

    PubMed

    Vaysse, Pierre-Joseph; Prat, Laure; Mangenot, Sophie; Cruveiller, Stéphane; Goulas, Philippe; Grimaud, Régis

    2009-12-01

    Many hydrocarbon-degrading bacteria form biofilms at the hydrocarbon-water interface to overcome the weak accessibility of these poorly water-soluble substrates. In order to gain insight into the cellular functions involved, we undertook a proteomic analysis of Marinobacter hydrocarbonoclasticus SP17 biofilm developing at the hexadecane-water interface. Biofilm formation on hexadecane led to a global change in cell physiology involving modulation of the expression of 576 out of 1144 detected proteins when compared with planktonic cells growing on acetate. Biofilm cells overproduced a protein encoded by MARHY0478 that contains a conserved domain belonging to the family of the outer membrane transporters of hydrophobic compounds. Homologs of MARHY0478 were exclusively found in marine bacteria degrading alkanes or possessing alkane degradation genes, and hence presumably constitute a family of alkane transporters specific to marine bacteria. Interestingly, we also found that sessile cells growing on hexadecane overexpressed type VI secretion system components. This secretion system has been identified as a key factor in virulence and in symbiotic interaction with host organisms. This observation is the first experimental evidence of the contribution of a type VI secretion system to environmental adaptation, and raises the intriguing question about the role of this secretion machine in alkane assimilation.

  14. Process for converting light alkanes to higher hydrocarbons

    DOEpatents

    Noceti, Richard P.; Taylor, Charles E.

    1988-01-01

    A process is disclosed for the production of aromatic-rich, gasoline boiling range hydrocarbons from the lower alkanes, particularly from methane. The process is carried out in two stages. In the first, alkane is reacted with oxygen and hydrogen chloride over an oxyhydrochlorination catalyst such as copper chloride with minor proportions of potassium chloride and rare earth chloride. This produces an intermediate gaseous mixture containing water and chlorinated alkanes. The chlorinated alkanes are contacted with a crystalline aluminosilicate catalyst in the hydrogen or metal promoted form to produce gasoline range hydrocarbons with a high proportion of aromatics and a small percentage of light hydrocarbons (C.sub.2 -C.sub.4). The light hydrocarbons can be recycled for further processing over the oxyhydrochlorination catalyst.

  15. DITERMINAL OXIDATION OF LONG-CHAIN ALKANES BY BACTERIA1

    PubMed Central

    Kester, A. S.; Foster, J. W.

    1963-01-01

    Kester, A. S. (The University of Texas, Austin) and J. W. Foster. Diterminal oxidation of long-chain alkanes by bacteria. J. Bacteriol. 85:859–869. 1963.—A corynebacterial organism capable of growing in mineral salts with individual pure alkanes as carbon sources produces a series of acids from the C10-C14 alkanes. They have been isolated in pure form and identified as monoic, ω-hydroxy monoic, and dioic acids containing the same number of carbon atoms as the substrate alkane. Oxidation took place at both terminal methyl groups—“diterminal oxidation.” Appropriate labeling experiments indicate that omega oxidation of fatty acids occurs in this organism and that an oxygenation with O2 occurs. Images PMID:14044955

  16. Hydrocarbon degradation by antarctic bacteria

    SciTech Connect

    Cavanagh, J.A.E.; Nichols, P.D.; McMeekin, T.A.; Franzmann, P.D.

    1996-12-31

    Bacterial cultures obtained from sediment samples collected during a trial oil spill experiment conducted at Airport beach, Eastern Antarctica were selectively enriched for n-alkane-degrading and phenanthrenedegrading bacteria. Samples were collected from a control site and sites treated with different hydrocarbon mixtures - Special Antarctic blend (SAB), BP-Visco and orange roughy oils. One set of replicate sites was also treated with water from Organic Lake which had previously been shown to contain hydrocarbon-degrading bacteria. No viable bacteria were obtained from samples collected from sites treated with orange roughy oil. Extensive degradation of n-alkanes by enrichment cultures obtained from sites treated with SAB and BP-Visco occurred at both 25{degrees}C and 10{degrees}C. Extensive degradation of phenanthrene also occurred in enrichment cultures from these sites grown at 25{degrees}C. Concurrent increases of polar lipid in these cultures were also observed. The presence of 1,4-naphthaquinone and 1-naphthol during the growth of the cultures on phenanthrene is unusual and warrants further investigation of the mechanism of phenanthrene-degradation by these Antarctic bacteria.

  17. Crystal structure of ATP-binding subunit of an ABC transporter from Geobacillus kaustophilus.

    PubMed

    Manjula, M; Pampa, K J; Kumar, S M; Mukherjee, S; Kunishima, N; Rangappa, K S; Lokanath, N K

    2015-03-27

    The ATP binding cassette (ABC) transporters, represent one of the largest superfamilies of primary transporters, which are very essential for various biological functions. The crystal structure of ATP-binding subunit of an ABC transporter from Geobacillus kaustophilus has been determined at 1.77 Å resolution. The crystal structure revealed that the protomer has two thick arms, (arm I and II), which resemble 'L' shape. The ATP-binding pocket is located close to the end of arm I. ATP molecule is docked into the active site of the protein. The dimeric crystal structure of ATP-binding subunit of ABC transporter from G. kaustophilus has been compared with the previously reported crystal structure of ATP-binding subunit of ABC transporter from Salmonella typhimurium.

  18. Thermal Adaptation of Dihydrofolate Reductase from the Moderate Thermophile Geobacillus stearothermophilus

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    The thermal melting temperature of dihydrofolate reductase from Geobacillus stearothermophilus (BsDHFR) is ∼30 °C higher than that of its homologue from the psychrophile Moritella profunda. Additional proline residues in the loop regions of BsDHFR have been proposed to enhance the thermostability of BsDHFR, but site-directed mutagenesis studies reveal that these proline residues contribute only minimally. Instead, the high thermal stability of BsDHFR is partly due to removal of water-accessible thermolabile residues such as glutamine and methionine, which are prone to hydrolysis or oxidation at high temperatures. The extra thermostability of BsDHFR can be obtained by ligand binding, or in the presence of salts or cosolvents such as glycerol and sucrose. The sum of all these incremental factors allows BsDHFR to function efficiently in the natural habitat of G. stearothermophilus, which is characterized by temperatures that can reach 75 °C. PMID:24730604

  19. Keratinous waste decomposition and peptide production by keratinase from Geobacillus stearothermophilus AD-11.

    PubMed

    Gegeckas, Audrius; Gudiukaitė, Renata; Debski, Janusz; Citavicius, Donaldas

    2015-04-01

    A keratinolytic proteinase was cloned from thermophilic bacterium Geobacillus stearothermophilus AD-11 and was expressed in Escherichia coli BL21(DE3). Recombinant keratinolytic proteinase (RecGEOker) with an estimated molecular weight of 57 kDa was purified and keratinase activity was measured. RecGEOker showed optimal activity at pH 9 and 60 °C. Recombinant keratinolytic proteinase showed the highest substrate specificity toward keratin from wool > collagen > sodium caseinate > gelatin > and BSA in descending order. RecGEOker is applicable for efficient keratin waste biodegradation and can replace conventional non-biological hydrolysis processes. High-value small peptides obtained from enzymatic biodegradation by RecGEOker are suitable for industrial application in white and/or green biotechnology for use as major additives in various products.

  20. Investigation of Sterilization Mechanism for Geobacillus stearothermophilus Spores with Plasma-Excited Neutral Gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsui, Kei; Ikenaga, Noriaki; Sakudo, Noriyuki

    2015-09-01

    We investigate the mechanism of the sterilization with plasma-excited neutral gas that uniformly sterilizes both the space and inner wall of the reactor chamber at atmospheric pressure. Only reactive neutral species such as plasma-excited gas molecules and radicals are separated from the plasma and sent to the reactor chamber for chemical sterilization. The plasma source gas uses humidified mixture of nitrogen and oxygen. Geobacillus stearothermophilus spores and tyrosine which is amino acid are treated by the plasma-excited neutral gas. Shape change of the treated spore is observed by SEM, and chemical modification of the treated tyrosine is analyzed by HPLC. As a result, the surface of the treated spore shows depression. Hydroxylation and nitration of tyrosine are shown after the treatment. For these reasons, we believe that the sterilization with plasma-excited neutral gas results from the deformation of spore structure due to the chemical modification of amino acid.

  1. Effectiveness of inoculation with isolated Geobacillus strains in the thermophilic stage of vegetable waste composting.

    PubMed

    Sarkar, Sutripta; Banerjee, Rajdeep; Chanda, Sunanda; Das, Pradeep; Ganguly, Sandipan; Pal, Subrata

    2010-04-01

    An inoculum containing two amylolytic and three cellulolytic thermophilic bacteria, isolated from a preceding compost pile and identified as Geobacillus species by 16S rRNA gene sequencing, was applied to a mixture of market waste, rice straw and cow dung (5:1:0.2) so that the initial cell density was 2 x 10(8) colony forming unit (CFU) per gram dry weight at 55 degrees Celsius. The inoculation increased the total cell count particularly in the thermophilic stage as determined by flow cytometry. Concomitantly, there was a significant rise in microbial metabolism in the compost pile as reflected by the dehydrogenase activity. As a result, the C/N ratio dropped more rapidly in the inoculated mixture than that in the control without inoculum. The study, therefore, suggested that inoculation by thermophilic bacteria would be effective in the composting process at least in the thermophilic stage. Copyright 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Site-selective Alkane Dehydrogenation of Fatty Acids

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-12-14

    dehydrogenation of fatty acids Contract/Grant#: FA9550-10-1-0532 Final Reporting Period: 15 September 2011 to 14 September 2011...directly incorporate fatty acids into the ligand. The preparation of the acyl phosphines (1-5) was easily accomplished starting from the corresponding...AFOSR Final Report Final Report 
 The proposed research examines the site-selective dehydrogenation of alkanes. The alkanes employed were fatty

  3. Arsenate reduction and expression of multiple chromosomal ars operons in Geobacillus kaustophilus A1.

    PubMed

    Cuebas, Mariola; Villafane, Aramis; McBride, Michelle; Yee, Nathan; Bini, Elisabetta

    2011-07-01

    Geobacillus kaustophilus strain A1 was previously isolated from a geothermal environment for its ability to grow in the presence of high arsenate levels. In this study, the molecular mechanisms of arsenate resistance of the strain were investigated. As(V) was reduced to As(III), as shown by HPLC analysis. Consistent with the observation that the micro-organism is not capable of anaerobic growth, no respiratory arsenate reductases were identified. Using specific PCR primers based on the genome sequence of G. kaustophilus HTA426, three unlinked genes encoding detoxifying arsenate reductases were detected in strain A1. These genes were designated arsC1, arsC2 and arsC3. While arsC3 is a monocistronic locus, sequencing of the regions flanking arsC1 and arsC2 revealed the presence of additional genes encoding a putative arsenite transporter and an ArsR-like regulator upstream of each arsenate reductase, indicating the presence of sequences with putative roles in As(V) reduction, As(III) export and arsenic-responsive regulation. RT-PCR demonstrated that both sets of genes were co-transcribed. Furthermore, arsC1 and arsC2, monitored by quantitative real-time RT-PCR, were upregulated in response to As(V), while arsC3 was constitutively expressed at a low level. A mechanism for regulation of As(V) detoxification by Geobacillus that is both consistent with our findings and relevant to the biogeochemical cycle of arsenic and its mobility in the environment is proposed.

  4. Product Repression of Alkane Monooxygenase Expression in Pseudomonas butanovora

    PubMed Central

    Doughty, D. M.; Sayavedra-Soto, L. A.; Arp, D. J.; Bottomley, P. J.

    2006-01-01

    Physiological and regulatory mechanisms that allow the alkane-oxidizing bacterium Pseudomonas butanovora to consume C2 to C8 alkane substrates via butane monooxygenase (BMO) were examined. Striking differences were observed in response to even- versus odd-chain-length alkanes. Propionate, the downstream product of propane oxidation and of the oxidation of other odd-chain-length alkanes following β-oxidation, was a potent repressor of BMO expression. The transcriptional activity of the BMO promoter was reduced with as little as 10 μM propionate, even in the presence of appropriate inducers. Propionate accumulated stoichiometrically when 1-propanol and propionaldehyde were added to butane- and ethane-grown cells, indicating that propionate catabolism was inactive during growth on even-chain-length alkanes. In contrast, propionate consumption was induced (about 80 nmol propionate consumed · min−1 · mg protein−1) following growth on the odd-chain-length alkanes, propane and pentane. The induction of propionate consumption could be brought on by the addition of propionate or pentanoate to the growth medium. In a reporter strain of P. butanovora in which the BMO promoter controls β-galactosidase expression, only even-chain-length alcohols (C2 to C8) induced β-galactosidase following growth on acetate or butyrate. In contrast, both even- and odd-chain-length alcohols (C3 to C7) were able to induce β-galactosidase following the induction of propionate consumption by propionate or pentanoate. PMID:16547046

  5. Hydrogen-hydrogen bonds in highly branched alkanes and in alkane complexes: A DFT, ab initio, QTAIM, and ELF study.

    PubMed

    Monteiro, Norberto K V; Firme, Caio L

    2014-03-06

    The hydrogen-hydrogen (H-H) bond or hydrogen-hydrogen bonding is formed by the interaction between a pair of identical or similar hydrogen atoms that are close to electrical neutrality and it yields a stabilizing contribution to the overall molecular energy. This work provides new, important information regarding hydrogen-hydrogen bonds. We report that stability of alkane complexes and boiling point of alkanes are directly related to H-H bond, which means that intermolecular interactions between alkane chains are directional H-H bond, not nondirectional induced dipole-induced dipole. Moreover, we show the existence of intramolecular H-H bonds in highly branched alkanes playing a secondary role in their increased stabilities in comparison with linear or less branched isomers. These results were accomplished by different approaches: density functional theory (DFT), ab initio, quantum theory of atoms in molecules (QTAIM), and electron localization function (ELF).

  6. (19)F Oximetry with semifluorinated alkanes.

    PubMed

    Kegel, Stefan; Chacon-Caldera, Jorge; Tsagogiorgas, Charalambos; Theisinger, Bastian; Glatting, Gerhard; Schad, Lothar R

    2016-12-01

    This work examines the variation of longitudinal relaxation rate R1(= 1/T1) of the (19)F-CF3-resonance of semifluorinated alkanes (SFAs) with oxygen tension (pO2), temperature (T) and pH in vitro. Contrary to their related perfluorocarbons (PFCs), SFA are amphiphilic and facilitate stable emulsions, a prerequisite for clinical use. A linear relationship between R1 and pO2 was confirmed for the observed SFAs at different temperatures. Using a standard saturation recovery sequence, T1 has been successfully measured using fluorine (19)F-MRI with a self-constructed birdcage resonator at 9.4 T. A calibration curve to calculate pO2 depending on T and R1 was found for each SFA used. In contrast to the commonly used PFC, SFAs are less sensitive to changes in pO2, but more sensitive to changes in temperature. The influence of pH to R1 was found to be negligible.

  7. Properties of Langmuir monolayers from semifluorinated alkanes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Broniatowski, M.; Macho, I. Sandez; Miñones, J.; Dynarowicz-Łątka, P.

    2005-06-01

    The aim of this study was to characterize several semifluorinated alkanes (SFA), of the general formula F(CF 2) m(CH 2) nH (in short F mH n), containing 25 carbon atoms in total (pentacosanes) differing in the m/ n ratio, as Langmuir monolayers at the free water surface. The following compounds have been studied: F6H19, F8H17, F10H15 and F12H13. Surface pressure ( π) and electric surface potential (Δ V) isotherms were recorded in addition to quantitative Brewster angle microscopy results. The negative sign of Δ V evidenced for the orientation of all the investigated semifluorinated pentacosanes, regardless the length of the hydrogenated segment, with their perfluorinated parts directed towards the air. As inferred from apparent dipole moment values and relative reflectivity results, the fluorinated pentacosanes with shorter perfluorinated fragment (F6H19 and F8H17) were found to be vertically oriented at the air/water interface, while those with longer perfluorinated moiety (F10H15 and F12H13) remain titled even in the vicinity of the film collapse.

  8. Thermodiffusion in multicomponent n-alkane mixtures.

    PubMed

    Galliero, Guillaume; Bataller, Henri; Bazile, Jean-Patrick; Diaz, Joseph; Croccolo, Fabrizio; Hoang, Hai; Vermorel, Romain; Artola, Pierre-Arnaud; Rousseau, Bernard; Vesovic, Velisa; Bou-Ali, M Mounir; Ortiz de Zárate, José M; Xu, Shenghua; Zhang, Ke; Montel, François; Verga, Antonio; Minster, Olivier

    2017-01-01

    Compositional grading within a mixture has a strong impact on the evaluation of the pre-exploitation distribution of hydrocarbons in underground layers and sediments. Thermodiffusion, which leads to a partial diffusive separation of species in a mixture due to the geothermal gradient, is thought to play an important role in determining the distribution of species in a reservoir. However, despite recent progress, thermodiffusion is still difficult to measure and model in multicomponent mixtures. In this work, we report on experimental investigations of the thermodiffusion of multicomponent n-alkane mixtures at pressure above 30 MPa. The experiments have been conducted in space onboard the Shi Jian 10 spacecraft so as to isolate the studied phenomena from convection. For the two exploitable cells, containing a ternary liquid mixture and a condensate gas, measurements have shown that the lightest and heaviest species had a tendency to migrate, relatively to the rest of the species, to the hot and cold region, respectively. These trends have been confirmed by molecular dynamics simulations. The measured condensate gas data have been used to quantify the influence of thermodiffusion on the initial fluid distribution of an idealised one dimension reservoir. The results obtained indicate that thermodiffusion tends to noticeably counteract the influence of gravitational segregation on the vertical distribution of species, which could result in an unstable fluid column. This confirms that, in oil and gas reservoirs, the availability of thermodiffusion data for multicomponent mixtures is crucial for a correct evaluation of the initial state fluid distribution.

  9. Cloning, expression, purification, crystallization and preliminary X-ray crystallographic study of DHNA synthetase from Geobacillus kaustophilus

    SciTech Connect

    Kanaujia, Shankar Prasad; Ranjani, Chellamuthu Vasuki; Jeyakanthan, Jeyaraman; Baba, Seiki; Kuroishi, Chizu; Ebihara, Akio; Shinkai, Akeo; Kuramitsu, Seiki; Shiro, Yoshitsugu; Sekar, Kanagaraj; Yokoyama, Shigeyuki

    2007-02-01

    DHNA synthetase from G. kaustophilus has been cloned, expressed, purified and crystallized. The aerobic Gram-positive bacterium Geobacillus kaustophilus is a bacillus species that was isolated from deep-sea sediment from the Mariana Trench. 1,4-Dihydroxy-2-naphthoate (DHNA) synthetase plays a vital role in the biosynthesis of menaquinone (vitamin K{sub 2}) in this bacterium. DHNA synthetase from Geobacillus kaustophilus was crystallized in the orthorhombic space group C222{sub 1}, with unit-cell parameters a = 77.01, b = 130.66, c = 131.69 Å. The crystal diffracted to a resolution of 2.2 Å. Preliminary studies and molecular-replacement calculations reveal the presence of three monomers in the asymmetric unit.

  10. Volatile hydrocarbons inhibit methanogenic crude oil degradation

    PubMed Central

    Sherry, Angela; Grant, Russell J.; Aitken, Carolyn M.; Jones, D. Martin; Head, Ian M.; Gray, Neil D.

    2014-01-01

    Methanogenic degradation of crude oil in subsurface sediments occurs slowly, but without the need for exogenous electron acceptors, is sustained for long periods and has enormous economic and environmental consequences. Here we show that volatile hydrocarbons are inhibitory to methanogenic oil biodegradation by comparing degradation of an artificially weathered crude oil with volatile hydrocarbons removed, with the same oil that was not weathered. Volatile hydrocarbons (nC5–nC10, methylcyclohexane, benzene, toluene, and xylenes) were quantified in the headspace of microcosms. Aliphatic (n-alkanes nC12–nC34) and aromatic hydrocarbons (4-methylbiphenyl, 3-methylbiphenyl, 2-methylnaphthalene, 1-methylnaphthalene) were quantified in the total hydrocarbon fraction extracted from the microcosms. 16S rRNA genes from key microorganisms known to play an important role in methanogenic alkane degradation (Smithella and Methanomicrobiales) were quantified by quantitative PCR. Methane production from degradation of weathered oil in microcosms was rapid (1.1 ± 0.1 μmol CH4/g sediment/day) with stoichiometric yields consistent with degradation of heavier n-alkanes (nC12–nC34). For non-weathered oil, degradation rates in microcosms were significantly lower (0.4 ± 0.3 μmol CH4/g sediment/day). This indicated that volatile hydrocarbons present in the non-weathered oil inhibit, but do not completely halt, methanogenic alkane biodegradation. These findings are significant with respect to rates of biodegradation of crude oils with abundant volatile hydrocarbons in anoxic, sulphate-depleted subsurface environments, such as contaminated marine sediments which have been entrained below the sulfate-reduction zone, as well as crude oil biodegradation in petroleum reservoirs and contaminated aquifers. PMID:24765087

  11. Volatile hydrocarbons inhibit methanogenic crude oil degradation.

    PubMed

    Sherry, Angela; Grant, Russell J; Aitken, Carolyn M; Jones, D Martin; Head, Ian M; Gray, Neil D

    2014-01-01

    Methanogenic degradation of crude oil in subsurface sediments occurs slowly, but without the need for exogenous electron acceptors, is sustained for long periods and has enormous economic and environmental consequences. Here we show that volatile hydrocarbons are inhibitory to methanogenic oil biodegradation by comparing degradation of an artificially weathered crude oil with volatile hydrocarbons removed, with the same oil that was not weathered. Volatile hydrocarbons (nC5-nC10, methylcyclohexane, benzene, toluene, and xylenes) were quantified in the headspace of microcosms. Aliphatic (n-alkanes nC12-nC34) and aromatic hydrocarbons (4-methylbiphenyl, 3-methylbiphenyl, 2-methylnaphthalene, 1-methylnaphthalene) were quantified in the total hydrocarbon fraction extracted from the microcosms. 16S rRNA genes from key microorganisms known to play an important role in methanogenic alkane degradation (Smithella and Methanomicrobiales) were quantified by quantitative PCR. Methane production from degradation of weathered oil in microcosms was rapid (1.1 ± 0.1 μmol CH4/g sediment/day) with stoichiometric yields consistent with degradation of heavier n-alkanes (nC12-nC34). For non-weathered oil, degradation rates in microcosms were significantly lower (0.4 ± 0.3 μmol CH4/g sediment/day). This indicated that volatile hydrocarbons present in the non-weathered oil inhibit, but do not completely halt, methanogenic alkane biodegradation. These findings are significant with respect to rates of biodegradation of crude oils with abundant volatile hydrocarbons in anoxic, sulphate-depleted subsurface environments, such as contaminated marine sediments which have been entrained below the sulfate-reduction zone, as well as crude oil biodegradation in petroleum reservoirs and contaminated aquifers.

  12. (13)C metabolic flux analysis of the extremely thermophilic, fast growing, xylose-utilizing Geobacillus strain LC300.

    PubMed

    Cordova, Lauren T; Antoniewicz, Maciek R

    2016-01-01

    Thermophiles are increasingly used as versatile hosts in the biotechnology industry. One of the key advantages of thermophiles is the potential to achieve high rates of feedstock conversion at elevated temperatures. The recently isolated Geobacillus strain LC300 grows extremely fast on xylose, with a doubling time of less than 30 min. In the accompanying paper, the genome of Geobacillus LC300 was sequenced and annotated. In this work, we have experimentally validated the metabolic network model using parallel (13)C-labeling experiments and applied (13)C-metabolic flux analysis to quantify precise metabolic fluxes. Specifically, the complete set of singly labeled xylose tracers, [1-(13)C], [2-(13)C], [3-(13)C], [4-(13)C], and [5-(13)C]xylose, was used for the first time. Isotopic labeling of biomass amino acids was measured by gas chromatography mass spectrometry (GC-MS). Isotopic labeling of carbon dioxide in the off-gas was also measured by an on-line mass spectrometer. The (13)C-labeling data was then rigorously integrated for flux elucidation using the COMPLETE-MFA approach. The results provided important new insights into the metabolism of Geobacillus LC300, its efficient xylose utilization pathways, and the balance between carbon, redox and energy fluxes. The pentose phosphate pathway, glycolysis and TCA cycle were found to be highly active in Geobacillus LC300. The oxidative pentose phosphate pathway was also active and contributed significantly to NADPH production. No transhydrogenase activity was detected. Results from this work provide a solid foundation for future studies of this strain and its metabolic engineering and biotechnological applications.

  13. Tailoring nutritional and process variables for hyperproduction of catalase from a novel isolated bacterium Geobacillus sp. BSS-7.

    PubMed

    Kauldhar, Baljinder Singh; Sooch, Balwinder Singh

    2016-01-14

    Catalase (EC 1.11.1.6) is one of the important industrial enzyme employed in diagnostic and analytical methods in the form of biomarkers and biosensors in addition to their enormous applications in textile, paper, food and pharmaceutical sectors. The present study demonstrates the utility of a newly isolated and adapted strain of genus Geobacillus possessing unique combination of several industrially important extremophilic properties for the hyper production of catalase. The bacterium can grow over a wide range of pH (3-12) and temperature (10-90 °C) with extraordinary capability to produce catalase. A novel extremophilic strain belonging to genus Geobacillus was exploited for the production of catalase by tailoring its nutritional requirements and process variables. One variable at a time traditional approach followed by computational designing was applied to customize the fermentation process. A simple fermentation media containing only three components namely sucrose (0.55 %, w/v), yeast extract (1.0 %, w/v) and BaCl2 (0.08 %, w/v) was designed for the hyperproduction of catalase. A controlled and optimum air supply caused a tremendous increase in the enzyme production on moving the bioprocess from the flask to bioreactor level. The present paper reports high quantum of catalase production (105,000 IU/mg of cells) in a short fermentation time of 12 h. To the best of our knowledge, there is no report in the literature that matches the performance of the developed protocol for the catalase production. This is the first serious study covering intracellular catalase production from thermophilic genus Geobacillus. An increase in intracellular catalase production by 214.72 % was achieved in the optimized medium when transferred from the shake flask to the fermenter level. The extraordinary high production of catalase from Geobacillus sp. BSS-7 makes the isolated strain a prospective candidate for bulk catalase production on an industrial scale.

  14. Characterization of a Novel Thermostable Carboxylesterase from Geobacillus kaustophilus HTA426 Shows the Existence of a New Carboxylesterase Family▿

    PubMed Central

    Montoro-García, Silvia; Martínez-Martínez, Irene; Navarro-Fernández, José; Takami, Hideto; García-Carmona, Francisco; Sánchez-Ferrer, Álvaro

    2009-01-01

    The gene GK3045 (741 bp) from Geobacillus kaustophilus HTA426 was cloned, sequenced, and overexpressed into Escherichia coli Rosetta (DE3). The deduced protein was a 30-kDa monomeric esterase with high homology to carboxylesterases from Geobacillus thermoleovorans NY (99% identity) and Geobacillus stearothermophilus (97% identity). This protein suffered a proteolytic cut in E. coli, and the problem was overcome by introducing a mutation in the gene (K212R) without affecting the activity. The resulting Est30 showed remarkable thermostability at 65°C, above the optimum growth temperature of G. kaustophilus HTA426. The optimum pH of the enzyme was 8.0. In addition, the purified enzyme exhibited stability against denaturing agents, like organic solvents, detergents, and urea. The protein catalyzed the hydrolysis of p-nitrophenyl esters of different acyl chain lengths, confirming the esterase activity. The sequence analysis showed that the protein contains a catalytic triad formed by Ser93, Asp192, and His222, and the Ser of the active site is located in the conserved motif Gly91-X-Ser93-X-Gly95 included in most esterases and lipases. However, this carboxylesterase showed no more than 17% sequence identity with the closest members in the eight families of microbial carboxylesterases. The three-dimensional structure was modeled by sequence alignment and compared with others carboxylesterases. The topological differences suggested the classification of this enzyme and other Geobacillus-related carboxylesterases in a new α/β hydrolase family different from IV and VI. PMID:19304850

  15. Hypervariable pili and flagella genes provide suitable new targets for DNA high-resolution melt-based genotyping of dairy Geobacillus spp.

    PubMed

    Chauhan, Kanika; Seale, R Brent; Deeth, Hilton C; Turner, Mark S

    2014-10-01

    Although nonpathogenic in nature, spores of Geobacillus are able to attach to surfaces, germinate, and form biofilms, allowing rapid multiplication and persistence within milk powder processing plants, causing final product contamination, and eventually leading to a loss of revenue in terms of downgraded product quality. As a result, Geobacillus spp. have been found to be common contaminants of milk powder worldwide. Genotyping methods can help in gaining insight into the ecology and transmission of these thermophilic bacteria within and between dairy processing plants. The objective of this study was to use the assembled draft genomes of two Geobacillus spp. to identify and test new hypervariable genotyping targets for differentiating closely related dairy Geobacillus isolates. The two Geobacillus spp. strains obtained from high spore count powders were obtained in 2010 (isolate 7E) and in 1995 (isolate 126) and were previously shown to be of same genotype based on a variable number tandem repeat genotyping method. Significant nucleotide sequence variation was found in genes encoding pili and flagella, which were further investigated as suitable loci for a new high-resolution melt analysis (HRMA)-based genotyping method. Three genes encoding pulG (containing prepilin-type N-terminal cleavage domain), pilT (pili retraction protein), and fliW (flagellar assembly protein) were selected as targets for the new pili/flagella gene (PilFla) HRMA genotyping method. The three-gene-based PilFla-HRMA genotyping method differentiated 35 milk powder Geobacillus spp. isolates into 19 different genotype groups (D = 0.93), which compared favorably to the previous method (which used four variable number tandem repeat loci) that generated 16 different genotype groups (D = 0.90). In conclusion, through comparative genomics of two closely related dairy Geobacillus strains, we have identified new hypervariable regions that prove to be useful targets for highly discriminatory genotyping.

  16. Quantification of chemotaxis-related alkane accumulation in Acinetobacter baylyi using Raman microspectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Li, Hanbing; L Martin, Francis Luke; Zhang, Dayi

    2017-03-03

    Alkanes are one of the most widespread contaminants in the natural environment, primarily as a consequence of biological synthesis and oil spills. Many indigenous microbes metabolize alkanes, and the chemotaxis and accumulation in some strains has been identified. For the first time, we apply Raman microspectroscopy to identify such chemotaxis-related affinity, and quantify the alkane concentrations via spectral alterations. Raman spectral alterations were only found for the alkane chemo-attractant bacteria Acinetobacter baylyi ADP1, not for Pseudomonas fluorescence, which exhibits limited chemotaxis towards alkane. The significant alterations were attributed to the strong chemotactic ability of A. baylyi enhancing the affinity and accumulation of alkane molecules on cell membranes or cellular internalization. Spectral fingerprints of A. baylyi significantly altered after 1-h exposure to pure alkanes (dodecane or tetradecane) and alkane mixtures (mineral oil or crude oil), but not monocyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (MAHs) or polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). A semi-log linear regression relationship between Raman spectral alterations and alkane concentrations showed its feasibility in quantifying alkane concentration in environmental samples. Pure alkanes or alkane mixtures exhibited different limits of detection and regression slopes, indicating that the chemotaxis-related alkane accumulation in A. baylyi is dependent on the carbon chain length. This work provides a novel biospectroscopy approach to characterize the chemotaxis-related alkane bioaccumulation, and has immense potential for fast and high-throughput screening bacterial chemotaxis.

  17. Variation in n-Alkane Distributions of Modern Plants: Questioning Applications of n-Alkanes in Chemotaxonomy and Paleoecology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bush, R. T.; McInerney, F. A.

    2010-12-01

    Long chain n-alkanes (n-C21 to n-C37) are synthesized as part of the epicuticular leaf wax of terrestrial plants and are among the most recognizable and widely used plant biomarkers. n-Alkane distributions have been utilized in previous studies on modern plant chemotaxonomy, testing whether taxa can be identified based on characteristic n-alkane profiles. Dominant n-alkanes (e.g. n-C27 or n-C31) have also been ascribed to major plant groups (e.g. trees or grasses respectively) and have been used in paleoecology studies to reconstruct fluctuations in plant functional types. However, many of these studies have been based on relatively few modern plant data; with the wealth of modern n-alkane studies, a more comprehensive analysis of n-alkanes in modern plants is now possible and can inform the usefulness of n-alkane distributions as paleoecological indicators. The work presented here is a combination of measurements made using plant leaves collected from the Chicago Botanic Garden and a compilation of published literature data from six continents. We categorized plants by type: angiosperms, gymnosperms, woody plants, forbs, grasses, ferns and pteridophytes, and mosses. We then quantified n-alkane distribution parameters such as carbon preference index (CPI), average chain length (ACL), and dispersion (a measure of the spread of the profile over multiple chain lengths) and used these to compare plant groups. Among all plants, one of the emergent correlations is a decrease in dispersion with increasing CPI. Within and among plant groups, n-alkane distributions show a very large range of variation, and the results show little or no correspondence between broad plant groups and a single dominant n-alkane or a ratio of n-alkanes. These findings are true both when data from six continents are combined and when plants from a given region are compared (North America). We also compared the n-alkane distributions of woody angiosperms, woody gymnosperms, and grasses with one

  18. Detailed chemical kinetic models for large n-alkanes and iso-alkanes found in conventional and F-T diesel fuels

    SciTech Connect

    Westbrook, C K; Pitz, W J; Curran, H J; Mehl, M

    2008-12-15

    Detailed chemical kinetic models are needed to simulate the combustion of current and future transportation fuels. These models should represent the various chemical classes in these fuels. Conventional diesel fuels are composed of n-alkanes, iso-alkanes, cycloalkanes and aromatics (Farrell et al. 2007). For future fuels, there is a renewed interest in Fischer-Tropsch (F-T) processes which can be used to synthesize diesel and other transportation fuels from biomass, coal and natural gas. F-T diesel fuels are expected to be similar to F-T jet fuels which are commonly comprised of iso-alkanes with some n-alkanes (Smith and Bruno, 2008). Thus, n-alkanes and iso-alkanes are common chemical classes in these conventional and future fuels. This paper reports on the development of chemical kinetic models of large n-alkanes and iso-alkanes to represent these chemical classes in conventional and future fuels. Two large iso-alkanes are 2,2,4,4,6,8,8-heptamethylnonane, which is a primary reference fuel for diesel, and isooctane, a primary reference fuel for gasoline. Other iso-alkanes are branched alkanes with a single methyl side chain, typical of most F-T fuels. The chemical kinetic models are then used to predict the effect of these fuel components on ignition characteristics under conditions found in internal combustion engines.

  19. Effective degradation of aflatoxin B1 using a novel thermophilic microbial consortium TADC7.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yi; Zhao, Chunxia; Zhang, Dongdong; Zhao, Mingming; Zheng, Dan; Lyu, Yucai; Cheng, Wei; Guo, Peng; Cui, Zongjun

    2017-01-01

    We constructed a novel thermophilic microbial consortium, TADC7, with stable and efficient aflatoxin B1 (AFB1) degradation activity. The microbial consortium degraded more than 95% of the toxin within 72h when cultured with AFB1, and the optimum temperature was 55-60°C. TADC7 tolerated high doses of AFB1, with no inhibitory effects up to 5000μgL(-1) AFB1; moreover, the degradation kinetics fit well with the Monod model. The proteins or enzymes in the TADC7 cell-free supernatant played a major role in AFB1 degradation. AFB1 degradation by the cell-free supernatant was stable up to 90°C, with an optimal pH of 8-10. We performed 16S rRNA sequencing to determine TADC7 community structure dynamics; the results indicated that Geobacillus and Tepidimicrobium played major roles in AFB1 degradation.

  20. Alkane desaturation by concerted double hydrogen atom transfer to benzyne.

    PubMed

    Niu, Dawen; Willoughby, Patrick H; Woods, Brian P; Baire, Beeraiah; Hoye, Thomas R

    2013-09-26

    The removal of two vicinal hydrogen atoms from an alkane to produce an alkene is a challenge for synthetic chemists. In nature, desaturases and acetylenases are adept at achieving this essential oxidative functionalization reaction, for example during the biosynthesis of unsaturated fatty acids, eicosanoids, gibberellins and carotenoids. Alkane-to-alkene conversion almost always involves one or more chemical intermediates in a multistep reaction pathway; these may be either isolable species (such as alcohols or alkyl halides) or reactive intermediates (such as carbocations, alkyl radicals, or σ-alkyl-metal species). Here we report a desaturation reaction of simple, unactivated alkanes that is mechanistically unique. We show that benzynes are capable of the concerted removal of two vicinal hydrogen atoms from a hydrocarbon. The discovery of this exothermic, net redox process was enabled by the simple thermal generation of reactive benzyne intermediates through the hexadehydro-Diels-Alder cycloisomerization reaction of triyne substrates. We are not aware of any single-step, bimolecular reaction in which two hydrogen atoms are simultaneously transferred from a saturated alkane. Computational studies indicate a preferred geometry with eclipsed vicinal C-H bonds in the alkane donor.

  1. Surface freezing in binary alkane-alcohol mixtures

    SciTech Connect

    Ofer, E.; Sloutskin, E.; Tamam, L.; Deutsch, M.; Ocko, B. M.

    2006-08-15

    Surface freezing was detected and studied in mixtures of alcohol and alkane molecules, using surface tensiometry and surface-specific x-ray scattering methods. Considering that surface freezing in pure alkanes forms an ordered monolayer and in alcohols it forms an ordered bilayer, the length mismatch repulsion was minimized by varying the carbon number of the alkane component around 2n, where n is the carbon number of the alcohol molecule. A solutionlike behavior was found for all mixtures, where the ideal liquid mixture phase-separates upon freezing both in the bulk and the surface. The solid exhibits a herringbone crystalline phase below an alkane mole fraction {phi}{sub t}{approx_equal}0.8 and a rotator phase above it. The surface frozen film below {phi}{sub t} is an alkane monolayer exhibiting a next-nearest neighbor molecular tilt of a composition-dependent magnitude. Above {phi}{sub t}, no diffraction peaks were observed. This could be explained by the intrinsically shorter-range order of the rotator phase and a possible proliferation of defects.

  2. Thermophilic fermentation of acetoin and 2,3-butanediol by a novel Geobacillus strain

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Acetoin and 2,3-butanediol are two important biorefinery platform chemicals. They are currently fermented below 40°C using mesophilic strains, but the processes often suffer from bacterial contamination. Results This work reports the isolation and identification of a novel aerobic Geobacillus strain XT15 capable of producing both of these chemicals under elevated temperatures, thus reducing the risk of bacterial contamination. The optimum growth temperature was found to be between 45 and 55°C and the medium initial pH to be 8.0. In addition to glucose, galactose, mannitol, arabionose, and xylose were all acceptable substrates, enabling the potential use of cellulosic biomass as the feedstock. XT15 preferred organic nitrogen sources including corn steep liquor powder, a cheap by-product from corn wet-milling. At 55°C, 7.7 g/L of acetoin and 14.5 g/L of 2,3-butanediol could be obtained using corn steep liquor powder as a nitrogen source. Thirteen volatile products from the cultivation broth of XT15 were identified by gas chromatography–mass spectrometry. Acetoin, 2,3-butanediol, and their derivatives including a novel metabolite 2,3-dihydroxy-3-methylheptan-4-one, accounted for a total of about 96% of all the volatile products. In contrast, organic acids and other products were minor by-products. α-Acetolactate decarboxylase and acetoin:2,6-dichlorophenolindophenol oxidoreductase in XT15, the two key enzymes in acetoin metabolic pathway, were found to be both moderately thermophilic with the identical optimum temperature of 45°C. Conclusions Geobacillus sp. XT15 is the first naturally occurring thermophile excreting acetoin and/or 2,3-butanediol. This work has demonstrated the attractive prospect of developing it as an industrial strain in the thermophilic fermentation of acetoin and 2,3-butanediol with improved anti-contamination performance. The novel metabolites and enzymes identified in XT15 also indicated its strong promise as a precious

  3. Plasma Decontamination: A Case Study on Kill Efficacy of Geobacillus stearothermophilus Spores on Different Carrier Materials.

    PubMed

    Semmler, Egmont; Novak, Wenzel; Allinson, Wilf; Wallis, Darren; Wood, Nigel; Awakowicz, Peter; Wunderlich, Joachim

    2016-01-01

    A new technology to the pharmaceutical field is presented: surface decontamination by plasmas The technology is comparable to established barrier systems like e-beam, volatile hydrogen peroxide, or radiation inactivation of microbiological contaminations. This plasma technology is part of a fully automated and validated syringe filling line at a major pharmaceutical company and is in production operation. Incoming pre-sterilized syringe containers ("tubs") are processed by plasma, solely on the outside, and passed into the aseptic filling isolator upon successful decontamination. The objective of this article is to present the operating principles and develop and establish a validation routine on the basis of standard commercial biological indicators. Their decontamination efficacies are determined and correlated to the actual inactivation efficacy on the pharmaceutical packaging material.The reference setup is explained in detail and a short presentation of the cycle development and the relevant plasma control parameters is given, with a special focus on the in-process monitor determining the cycle validity. Different microbial inactivation mechanisms are also discussed and evaluated for their contribution and interaction to enhance plasma decontamination. A material-dependent inactivation behavior was observed. In order to be able to correlate the tub surface inactivation of Geobacillus stearothermophilus endospores to metallic biological indicators, a comparative study was performed. Through consistently demonstrating the linear inactivation behavior between the different materials, it becomes possible to develop an effective and time-saving validation scheme. The challenge in new decontamination systems lies in a thorough validation of the inactivation efficacy under different operating regimes. With plasma, as an ionized gas, a new barrier concept is introduced into pharmaceutical aseptic processing of syringes. The presented system operates in vacuum and only

  4. Thermophilic fermentation of acetoin and 2,3-butanediol by a novel Geobacillus strain.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Zijun; Wang, Xiangming; Huang, Yunling; Huo, Fangfang; Zhu, Xiankun; Xi, Lijun; Lu, Jian R

    2012-12-06

    Acetoin and 2,3-butanediol are two important biorefinery platform chemicals. They are currently fermented below 40°C using mesophilic strains, but the processes often suffer from bacterial contamination. This work reports the isolation and identification of a novel aerobic Geobacillus strain XT15 capable of producing both of these chemicals under elevated temperatures, thus reducing the risk of bacterial contamination. The optimum growth temperature was found to be between 45 and 55°C and the medium initial pH to be 8.0. In addition to glucose, galactose, mannitol, arabionose, and xylose were all acceptable substrates, enabling the potential use of cellulosic biomass as the feedstock. XT15 preferred organic nitrogen sources including corn steep liquor powder, a cheap by-product from corn wet-milling. At 55°C, 7.7 g/L of acetoin and 14.5 g/L of 2,3-butanediol could be obtained using corn steep liquor powder as a nitrogen source. Thirteen volatile products from the cultivation broth of XT15 were identified by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. Acetoin, 2,3-butanediol, and their derivatives including a novel metabolite 2,3-dihydroxy-3-methylheptan-4-one, accounted for a total of about 96% of all the volatile products. In contrast, organic acids and other products were minor by-products. α-Acetolactate decarboxylase and acetoin:2,6-dichlorophenolindophenol oxidoreductase in XT15, the two key enzymes in acetoin metabolic pathway, were found to be both moderately thermophilic with the identical optimum temperature of 45°C. Geobacillus sp. XT15 is the first naturally occurring thermophile excreting acetoin and/or 2,3-butanediol. This work has demonstrated the attractive prospect of developing it as an industrial strain in the thermophilic fermentation of acetoin and 2,3-butanediol with improved anti-contamination performance. The novel metabolites and enzymes identified in XT15 also indicated its strong promise as a precious biological resource. Thermophilic

  5. Isolation and polyphasic characterization of a novel hyper catalase producing thermophilic bacterium for the degradation of hydrogen peroxide.

    PubMed

    Sooch, Balwinder Singh; Kauldhar, Baljinder Singh; Puri, Munish

    2016-11-01

    A newly isolated microbial strain of thermophilic genus Geobacillus has been described with emphasis on polyphasic characterization and its application for degradation of hydrogen peroxide. The validation of this thermophilic strain of genus Geobacillus designated as BSS-7 has been demonstrated by polyphasic taxonomy approaches through its morphological, biochemical, fatty acid methyl ester profile and 16S rDNA sequencing. This thermophilic species of Geobacillus exhibited growth at broad pH and temperature ranges coupled with production of extraordinarily high quantities of intracellular catalase, the latter of which as yet not been reported in any member of this genus. The isolated thermophilic bacterial culture BSS-7 exhibited resistance against a variety of organic solvents. The immobilized whole cells of the bacterium successfully demonstrated the degradation of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) in a packed bed reactor. This strain has potential application in various analytical and diagnostic methods in the form of biosensors and biomarkers in addition to applications in the textile, paper, food and pharmaceutical industries.

  6. Surface crystallization in normal-alkanes and alcohols

    SciTech Connect

    Deutsch, M.; Ocko, B.M.; Wu, X.Z. |; Sirota, E.B.; Sinha, S.K.

    1995-06-01

    A new, rare surface freezing, phenomenon is observed in molten normal-alkanes and their derivatives (alcohols, thiols, etc.). X-ray and surface tension measurements show the formation of a crystalline monolayer on the surface of the liquid alkane at temperatures up to 3 C above the bulk solidification temperature, T{sub f}. For alcohols, a single bilayer is formed. In both cases, the molecules in the layer are hexagonally packed and oriented normal to the surface for short chain lengths, and tilted for long ones. In both cases the single layer persists down to T{sub f}. In terms of wetting theory, this constitutes a very limited partial wetting of the liquid surface by the crystalline layer. The new surface phase is obtained only for chain lengths 14 < n {le} 50 in alkanes, and 16 < n < 30 in alcohols. The measurements are satisfactorily accounted for within a simple theory based on surface energy considerations.

  7. High Temperature Chemical Kinetic Combustion Modeling of Lightly Methylated Alkanes

    SciTech Connect

    Sarathy, S M; Westbrook, C K; Pitz, W J; Mehl, M

    2011-03-01

    Conventional petroleum jet and diesel fuels, as well as alternative Fischer-Tropsch (FT) fuels and hydrotreated renewable jet (HRJ) fuels, contain high molecular weight lightly branched alkanes (i.e., methylalkanes) and straight chain alkanes (n-alkanes). Improving the combustion of these fuels in practical applications requires a fundamental understanding of large hydrocarbon combustion chemistry. This research project presents a detailed high temperature chemical kinetic mechanism for n-octane and three lightly branched isomers octane (i.e., 2-methylheptane, 3-methylheptane, and 2,5-dimethylhexane). The model is validated against experimental data from a variety of fundamental combustion devices. This new model is used to show how the location and number of methyl branches affects fuel reactivity including laminar flame speed and species formation.

  8. Infrared Spectroscopic Investigation on CH Bond Acidity in Cationic Alkanes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsuda, Yoshiyuki; Xie, Min; Fujii, Asuka

    2016-06-01

    We have demonstrated large enhancements of CH bond acidities in alcohol, ether, and amine cations through infrared predissociation spectroscopy based on the vacuum ultraviolet photoionization detection. In this study, we investigate for the cationic alkanes (pentane, hexane, and heptane) with different alkyl chain lengths. The σ electrons are ejected in the ionization of alkanes, while nonbonding electrons are ejected in ionization of alcohols, ethers, and amines. Nevertheless, the acidity enhancements of CH in these cationic alkanes have also been demonstrated by infrared spectroscopy. The correlations of their CH bond acidities with the alkyl chain lengths as well as the mechanisms of their acidity enhancements will be discussed by comparison of infrared spectra and theoretical calculations.

  9. Alkanes in shrimp from the Buccaneer Oil Field

    SciTech Connect

    Middleditch, B.S.; Basile, B.; Chang, E.S.

    1982-07-01

    A total of 36 samples of shrimp were examined from the region of the Buccaneer oil field, eighteen of which were representatives of the commercial species Penaeus aztecus and the rest were various other species: Penaeus duorarum (pink shrimp), Trachypenaeus duorarum (sugar shrimp), Squilla empusa (mantis shrimp), and Sicyonia dorsalis (chevron shrimp). The alkanes and deuteriated alkanes were completely separated by GC, so a mass spectrometer was not required for their detection and quantitation. To confirm the identities of individual compounds, however, some samples were examined by combined gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. Results show that only thirteen of the forty shrimp collected from the region of the Buccaneer oil field contained petroleum alkanes, and the majority of these were obtained from trawls immediately adjacent to the production platforms. It appears that shrimp caught in the region of the Buccaneer oil field are not appreciably tainted with hydrocarbons discharged from the production platforms. (JMT)

  10. Regioselective alkane hydroxylation with a mutant AlkB enzyme

    DOEpatents

    Koch, Daniel J.; Arnold, Frances H.

    2012-11-13

    AlkB from Pseudomonas putida was engineered using in-vivo directed evolution to hydroxylate small chain alkanes. Mutant AlkB-BMO1 hydroxylates propane and butane at the terminal carbon at a rate greater than the wild-type to form 1-propanol and 1-butanol, respectively. Mutant AlkB-BMO2 similarly hydroxylates propane and butane at the terminal carbon at a rate greater than the wild-type to form 1-propanol and 1-butanol, respectively. These biocatalysts are highly active for small chain alkane substrates and their regioselectivity is retained in whole-cell biotransformations.

  11. Assimilation of chlorinated alkanes by hydrocarbon-utilizing fungi

    SciTech Connect

    Murphy, G.L.; Perry, J.J.

    1984-12-01

    The fatty acid compositions of two filamentous fungi (Cunninghamella elegans and Penicillium zonatum) and a yeast (Candida lipolytica) were determined after the organisms were grown on 1-chlorohexadecane or 1-chlorooctadecane. These organisms utilized the chlorinated alkanes as sole sources of carbon and energy. Analyses of the fatty acids present after growth on the chlorinated alkanes indicated that 60 to 70% of the total fatty acids in C. elegans were chlorinated. Approximately 50% of the fatty acids in C. lipolytica were also chlorinated. P. zonatum contained 20% 1-chlorohexadecanoic acid after growth on either substrate but did not incorporate C/sub 18/ chlorinated fatty acids.

  12. Catalytic, mild, and selective oxyfunctionalization of linear alkanes: current challenges.

    PubMed

    Bordeaux, Mélanie; Galarneau, Anne; Drone, Jullien

    2012-10-22

    Selective catalysts for sustainable oxidation of alkanes are highly demanded because of the abundance of these molecules in the environment, the possibility to transform them into higher-value compounds, such as chemicals or synthetic fuels, and the fact that, kinetically speaking, this is a difficult reaction. Numerous chemical and biological catalysts have been developed in the lasts decades for this purpose, rendering the overview over this field of chemistry difficult. After giving a definition of the ideal catalyst for alkane oxyfunctionalization, this review aims to present the catalysts available today that are closest to ideal.

  13. Modeling of alkane emissions from a wood stain

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, J.C.S.; Guo, Z.

    1993-01-01

    The article discusses full-scale residential house tests to evaluate the effects of organic emissions from a wood finishing product--wood stain--on indoor air quality (IAQ). The test house concentrations of three alkane species, nonane, decane, and undecane, were measured as a function of time after the application of the wood stain. It was found that the test house concentrations can be simulated by an integrated IAQ model which takes into consideration source, sink, and ventilation effects. The alkane emissions were controlled by an evaporation-like process.

  14. Two-Dimensional Stable Isotope Fractionation During Aerobic and Anaerobic Alkane Biodegradation and Implications for the Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El Morris, Brandon; Suflita, Joseph M.; Richnow, Hans-Hermann

    2010-05-01

    Quantitatively, n-alkanes comprise a major portion of most crude oils. In petroliferous formations, it may be possible to relate the loss of these compounds to the levels of biodegradation occurring in situ [1]. Moreover, it is important to develop indicators of alkane degradation that may be used to monitor bioremediation of hydrocarbon-impacted environments. Desulfoglaeba alkanexedens and Pseudomonas putida GPo1 were used to determine if carbon and hydrogen stable isotope fractionation could differentiate between n-alkane degradation under anaerobic and aerobic conditions, respectively in the context of the Rayleigh equation model [2]. Bacterial cultures were sacrificed by acidification and headspace samples were analyzed for stable isotope composition using gas chromatography-isotope ratio mass spectrometry. Carbon enrichment factors (bulk) for anaerobic and aerobic biodegradation of hexane were -5.52 ± 0.2‰ and -4.34 ± 0.3‰, respectively. Hydrogen enrichment during hexane degradation was -43.14 ± 6.32‰ under sulfate-reducing conditions, and was too low for quantification during aerobiosis. Collectively, this indicates that the correlation between carbon and hydrogen stable isotope fractionation (may be used to help elucidate in situ microbial processes in oil reservoirs, and during intrinsic as well as engineered remediation efforts. References 1. Asif, M.; Grice, K.; Fazeelat, T., Assessment of petroleum biodegradation using stable hydrogen isotopes of individual saturated hydrocarbon and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon distributions in oils from the Upper Indus Basin, Pakistan. Organic Geochemistry 2009, 40, (3), 301-311. 2. Fischer, A.; Herklotz, I.; Herrmann, S.; Thullner, M.; Weelink, S. A. B.; Stams, A., J. M.; Schloemann, M.; Richnow, H.-H.; Vogt, C., Combined carbon and hydrogen isotope fractionation investigations for elucidating benzene biodegradation pathways. Environ. Sci. Technol. 2008, 42, 4356-4363.

  15. Materials Degradation and Fatigue Under Extreme Conditions

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1997-10-29

    molecularly-thin fluids of very different structure were contrasted: a globular molecule, branched alkanes, and a polymer brush in near-theta solution...34 A. Dhinojwala, L. Cai, and S. Granick, Langmuir 12, 4537 (1996). 28. "New Approaches to Measure Interfacial Rheology of Confined Fluids ," A...Degradation of Fluorocarbon Lubricants; Molecular Tribology of Perfluoroether Lubricants; Fluids , Including Lubricants Under Extreme Conditions of

  16. Survival and Adaptation of the Thermophilic Species Geobacillus thermantarcticus in Simulated Spatial Conditions.

    PubMed

    Di Donato, Paola; Romano, Ida; Mastascusa, Vincenza; Poli, Annarita; Orlando, Pierangelo; Pugliese, Mariagabriella; Nicolaus, Barbara

    2017-06-08

    Astrobiology studies the origin and evolution of life on Earth and in the universe. According to the panspermia theory, life on Earth could have emerged from bacterial species transported by meteorites, that were able to adapt and proliferate on our planet. Therefore, the study of extremophiles, i.e. bacterial species able to live in extreme terrestrial environments, can be relevant to Astrobiology studies. In this work we described the ability of the thermophilic species Geobacillus thermantarcticus to survive after exposition to simulated spatial conditions including temperature's variation, desiccation, X-rays and UVC irradiation. The response to the exposition to the space conditions was assessed at a molecular level by studying the changes in the morphology, the lipid and protein patterns, the nucleic acids. G. thermantarcticus survived to the exposition to all the stressing conditions examined, since it was able to restart cellular growth in comparable levels to control experiments carried out in the optimal growth conditions. Survival was elicited by changing proteins and lipids distribution, and by protecting the DNA's integrity.

  17. Geobacillus thermoglucosidasius Endospores Function as Nuclei for the Formation of Single Calcite Crystals

    PubMed Central

    Murai, Rie

    2013-01-01

    Geobacillus thermoglucosidasius colonies were placed on an agar hydrogel containing acetate, calcium ions, and magnesium ions, resulting in the formation of single calcite crystals (calcites) within and peripheral to the plating area or parent colony. Microscopic observation of purified calcites placed on the surface of soybean casein digest (SCD) nutrient medium revealed interior crevices from which bacterial colonies originated. Calcites formed on the gel contained [1-13C]- and [2-13C]acetate, demonstrating that G. thermoglucosidasius utilizes carbon derived from acetate for calcite formation. During calcite formation, vegetative cells swam away from the parent colony in the hydrogel. Hard-agar hydrogel inhibited the formation of calcites peripheral to the parent colony. The calcite dissolved completely in 1 M HCl, with production of bubbles, and the remaining endospore-like particles were easily stained with Brilliant green dye. The presence of DNA and protein in calcites was demonstrated by electrophoresis. We propose that endospores initiate the nucleation of calcites. Endospores of G. thermoglucosidasius remain alive and encapsulated in calcites. PMID:23455343

  18. Production of Thermoalkaliphilic Lipase from Geobacillus thermoleovorans DA2 and Application in Leather Industry

    PubMed Central

    Abol Fotouh, Deyaa M.; Bayoumi, Reda A.; Hassan, Mohamed A.

    2016-01-01

    Thermophilic and alkaliphilic lipases are meeting a growing global attention as their increased importance in several industrial fields. Over 23 bacterial strains, novel strain with high lipolytic activity was isolated from Southern Sinai, Egypt, and it was identified as Geobacillus thermoleovorans DA2 using 16S rRNA as well as morphological and biochemical features. The lipase was produced in presence of fatty restaurant wastes as an inducing substrate. The optimized conditions for lipase production were recorded to be temperature 60°C, pH 10, and incubation time for 48 hrs. Enzymatic production increased when the organism was grown in a medium containing galactose as carbon source and ammonium phosphate as nitrogen source at concentrations of 1 and 0.5% (w/v), respectively. Moreover, the optimum conditions for lipase production such as substrate concentration, inoculum size, and agitation rate were found to be 10% (w/v), 4% (v/v), and 120 rpm, respectively. The TA lipase with Triton X-100 had the best degreasing agent by lowering the total lipid content to 2.6% as compared to kerosene (7.5%) or the sole crude enzyme (8.9%). It can be concluded that the chemical leather process can be substituted with TA lipase for boosting the quality of leather and reducing the environmental hazards. PMID:26881066

  19. Crystal structure of a compact α-amylase from Geobacillus thermoleovorans.

    PubMed

    Mok, Sook-Chen; Teh, Aik-Hong; Saito, Jennifer A; Najimudin, Nazalan; Alam, Maqsudul

    2013-06-10

    A truncated form of an α-amylase, GTA, from thermophilic Geobacillus thermoleovorans CCB_US3_UF5 was biochemically and structurally characterized. The recombinant GTA, which lacked both the N- and C-terminal transmembrane regions, functioned optimally at 70°C and pH 6.0. While enzyme activity was not enhanced by the addition of CaCl2, GTA's thermostability was significantly improved in the presence of CaCl2. The structure, in complex with an acarbose-derived pseudo-hexasaccharide, consists of the typical three domains and binds one Ca(2+) ion. This Ca(2+) ion was strongly bound and not chelated by EDTA. A predicted second Ca(2+)-binding site, however, was disordered. With limited subsites, two novel substrate-binding residues, Y147 and Y182, may help increase substrate affinity. No distinct starch-binding domain is present, although two regions rich in aromatic residues have been observed. GTA, with a smaller domain B and several shorter loops compared to other α-amylases, has one of the most compact α-amylase folds that may contribute greatly to its tight Ca(2+) binding and thermostability.

  20. Active Site Loop Conformation Regulates Promiscuous Activity in a Lactonase from Geobacillus kaustophilus HTA426

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yu; An, Jiao; Yang, Guang-Yu; Bai, Aixi; Zheng, Baisong; Lou, Zhiyong; Wu, Geng; Ye, Wei; Chen, Hai-Feng; Feng, Yan; Manco, Giuseppe

    2015-01-01

    Enzyme promiscuity is a prerequisite for fast divergent evolution of biocatalysts. A phosphotriesterase-like lactonase (PLL) from Geobacillus kaustophilus HTA426 (GkaP) exhibits main lactonase and promiscuous phosphotriesterase activities. To understand its catalytic and evolutionary mechanisms, we investigated a “hot spot” in the active site by saturation mutagenesis as well as X-ray crystallographic analyses. We found that position 99 in the active site was involved in substrate discrimination. One mutant, Y99L, exhibited 11-fold improvement over wild-type in reactivity (kcat/Km) toward the phosphotriesterase substrate ethyl-paraoxon, but showed 15-fold decrease toward the lactonase substrate δ-decanolactone, resulting in a 157-fold inversion of the substrate specificity. Structural analysis of Y99L revealed that the mutation causes a ∼6.6 Å outward shift of adjacent loop 7, which may cause increased flexibility of the active site and facilitate accommodation and/or catalysis of organophosphate substrate. This study provides for the PLL family an example of how the evolutionary route from promiscuity to specificity can derive from very few mutations, which promotes alteration in the conformational adjustment of the active site loops, in turn draws the capacity of substrate binding and activity. PMID:25706379

  1. Immobilization of Lipase from Geobacillus sp. and Its Application in Synthesis of Methyl Salicylate.

    PubMed

    Bhardwaj, Kamal Kumar; Saun, Nitin Kumar; Gupta, Reena

    2017-04-03

    The present study showed unique properties of an alkaline, thermophilic lipase of Geobacillus sp. which was isolated from soil of hot spring. The study was aimed to investigate the optimum immobilization conditions of lipase onto silica gel matrix (100-200 mesh) by surface adsorption method and its application in the synthesis of methyl salicylate. Lipase immobilized by surface adsorption onto silica pretreated with 4% glutaraldehyde showed 74.67% binding of protein and the optimum binding time for glutaraldehyde was found to be 2 h. The enzyme showed maximum activity at temperature 55°C, incubation time of 10 min at pH 9.5 of Tris buffer (0.1 M). Free as well as immobilized lipase was more specific to p-NPP (20 mM). All the metal ions and detergents used had inhibitory effect on free as well as immobilized enzyme. The silica immobilized enzyme was reused for hydrolysis and it retained almost 40.78% of its original activity up to 4(th) cycle. On optimizing different parameters such as molar ratio, incubation time, temperature, amount of enzyme, amount of molecular sieve, the % yield of methyl salicylate was found to be 82.94.

  2. Production of Thermoalkaliphilic Lipase from Geobacillus thermoleovorans DA2 and Application in Leather Industry.

    PubMed

    Abol Fotouh, Deyaa M; Bayoumi, Reda A; Hassan, Mohamed A

    2016-01-01

    Thermophilic and alkaliphilic lipases are meeting a growing global attention as their increased importance in several industrial fields. Over 23 bacterial strains, novel strain with high lipolytic activity was isolated from Southern Sinai, Egypt, and it was identified as Geobacillus thermoleovorans DA2 using 16S rRNA as well as morphological and biochemical features. The lipase was produced in presence of fatty restaurant wastes as an inducing substrate. The optimized conditions for lipase production were recorded to be temperature 60°C, pH 10, and incubation time for 48 hrs. Enzymatic production increased when the organism was grown in a medium containing galactose as carbon source and ammonium phosphate as nitrogen source at concentrations of 1 and 0.5% (w/v), respectively. Moreover, the optimum conditions for lipase production such as substrate concentration, inoculum size, and agitation rate were found to be 10% (w/v), 4% (v/v), and 120 rpm, respectively. The TA lipase with Triton X-100 had the best degreasing agent by lowering the total lipid content to 2.6% as compared to kerosene (7.5%) or the sole crude enzyme (8.9%). It can be concluded that the chemical leather process can be substituted with TA lipase for boosting the quality of leather and reducing the environmental hazards.

  3. Enzyme-substrate complex structures of a GH39 beta-xylosidase from Geobacillus stearothermophilus.

    PubMed

    Czjzek, Mirjam; Ben David, Alon; Bravman, Tsafrir; Shoham, Gil; Henrissat, Bernard; Shoham, Yuval

    2005-11-04

    Beta-D-Xylosidases are glycoside hydrolases that catalyse the release of xylose units from short xylooligosaccharides and are engaged in the final breakdown of plant cell-wall hemicelluloses. beta-D-Xylosidases are found in glycoside hydrolase families 3, 39, 43, 52 and 54. The first crystal structure of a GH39 beta-xylosidase revealed a multi-domain organization with the catalytic domain having the canonical (beta/alpha)8 barrel fold. Here, we report the crystal structure of the GH39 Geobacillus stearothermophilus beta-D-xylosidase, inactivated by a point mutation of the general acid-base residue E160A, in complex with the chromogenic substrate molecule 2,5-dinitrophenyl-beta-D-xyloside. Surprisingly, six of the eight active sites present in the crystallographic asymmetric unit contain the trapped covalent glycosyl-enzyme intermediate, while two of them still contain the uncleaved substrate. The structural characterization of these two critical species along the reaction coordinate of this enzyme identifies the residues forming its xyloside-binding pocket as well as those essential for its aglycone recognition.

  4. Crystal Structure of the Geobacillus stearothermophilus Carboxylesterase Est55 and Its Activation of Prodrug CPT-11

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Ping; Ewis, Hosam E.; Tai, Phang C.; Lu, Chung-Dar; Weber, Irene T.

    2007-01-01

    Several mammalian carboxylesterases were shown to activate the prodrug irinotecan (CPT-11) to produce SN-38, a topoisomerase inhibitor used in cancer therapy. However, the potential use of bacterial carboxylesterases, which have the advantage of high stability, has not been explored. We present the crystal structure of the carboxyesterase Est55 from Geobacillus stearothermophilus and evaluation of its enzyme activity on CPT-11. Crystal structures were determined at pH 6.2 and 6.8 and resolution of 2.0 and 1.58 Å, respectively. Est55 folds into three domains, a catalytic domain, an α/β domain and a regulatory domain. The structure is in an inactive form; the side chain of His409, one of the catalytic triad residues, is directed away from the other catalytic residues Ser194 and Glu310. Moreover, the adjacent Cys408 is triply oxidized and lies in the oxyanion hole, which would block the binding of substrate, suggesting a regulatory role. However, Cys408 is not essential for enzyme activity. Mutation of Cys408 showed that hydrophobic side chains were favorable, while polar serine was unfavorable for enzyme activity. Est55 was shown to hydrolyze CPT-11 into the active form SN-38. The mutant C408V provided a more stable enzyme for activation of CPT-11. Therefore, engineered thermostable Est55 is a candidate for use with irinotecan in enzyme-prodrug cancer therapy. PMID:17239398

  5. Evolved beta-galactosidases from Geobacillus stearothermophilus with improved transgalactosylation yield for galacto-oligosaccharide production.

    PubMed

    Placier, Gaël; Watzlawick, Hildegard; Rabiller, Claude; Mattes, Ralf

    2009-10-01

    A mutagenesis approach was applied to the beta-galactosidase BgaB from Geobacillus stearothermophilus KVE39 in order to improve its enzymatic transglycosylation of lactose into oligosaccharides. A simple screening strategy, which was based on the reduction of the hydrolysis of a potential transglycosylation product (lactosucrose), provided mutant enzymes possessing improved synthetic properties for the autocondensation product from nitrophenyl-galactoside and galacto-oligosaccharides (GOS) from lactose. The effects of the mutations on enzyme activity and kinetics were determined. An change of one arginine to lysine (R109K) increased the oligosaccharide yield compared to that for the wild-type BgaB. Subsequently, saturation mutagenesis at this position demonstrated that valine and tryptophan further increased the transglycosylation performance of BgaB. During the transglycosylation reaction with lactose of the evolved beta-galactosidases, a major trisaccharide was formed. Its structure was characterized as beta-D-galactopyranosyl-(1-->3)-beta-D-galactopyranosyl-(1-->4)-D-glucopyranoside (3'-galactosyl-lactose). At the lactose concentration of 18% (wt/vol), this trisaccharide was obtained in yields of 11.5% (wt/wt) with GP21 (BgaB R109K), 21% with GP637.2 (BgaB R109V), and only 2% with the wild-type BgaB enzyme. GP643.3 (BgaB R109W) was shown to be the most efficient mutant, with a 3'-galactosyl-lactose production of 23%.

  6. Antimicrobial Protein Candidates from the Thermophilic Geobacillus sp. Strain ZGt-1: Production, Proteomics, and Bioinformatics Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Alkhalili, Rawana N.; Bernfur, Katja; Dishisha, Tarek; Mamo, Gashaw; Schelin, Jenny; Canbäck, Björn; Emanuelsson, Cecilia; Hatti-Kaul, Rajni

    2016-01-01

    A thermophilic bacterial strain, Geobacillus sp. ZGt-1, isolated from Zara hot spring in Jordan, was capable of inhibiting the growth of the thermophilic G. stearothermophilus and the mesophilic Bacillus subtilis and Salmonella typhimurium on a solid cultivation medium. Antibacterial activity was not observed when ZGt-1 was cultivated in a liquid medium; however, immobilization of the cells in agar beads that were subjected to sequential batch cultivation in the liquid medium at 60 °C showed increasing antibacterial activity up to 14 cycles. The antibacterial activity was lost on protease treatment of the culture supernatant. Concentration of the protein fraction by ammonium sulphate precipitation followed by denaturing polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis separation and analysis of the gel for antibacterial activity against G. stearothermophilus showed a distinct inhibition zone in 15–20 kDa range, suggesting that the active molecule(s) are resistant to denaturation by SDS. Mass spectrometric analysis of the protein bands around the active region resulted in identification of 22 proteins with molecular weight in the range of interest, three of which were new and are here proposed as potential antimicrobial protein candidates by in silico analysis of their amino acid sequences. Mass spectrometric analysis also indicated the presence of partial sequences of antimicrobial enzymes, amidase and dd-carboxypeptidase. PMID:27548162

  7. Applicability of recombinant β-xylosidase from the extremely thermophilic bacterium Geobacillus thermodenitrificans in synthesizing alkylxylosides.

    PubMed

    Jain, Ira; Kumar, Vikash; Satyanarayana, T

    2014-10-01

    The β-xylosidase encoding gene (XsidB) of the extremely thermophilic bacterium Geobacillus thermodenitrificans has been cloned and expressed in Escherichia coli. The homotrimeric recombinant XsidB is of 204.0kDa, which is optimally active at 60°C and pH 7.0 with T1/2 of 58min at 70°C. The β-xylosidase remains unaffected in the presence of most metal ions and organic solvents. The Km [p-nitrophenyl β-xyloside (pNPX)], Vmax and kcat values of the enzyme are 2×10(-3)M, 1250μmolesmg(-1)min(-1) and 13.20×10(5)min(-1), respectively. The enzyme catalyzes transxylosylation reactions in the presence of alcohols as acceptors. The pharmaceutically important β-methyl-d-xylosides could be produced using pNPX as the donor and methanol as acceptor. The products of transxylosylation were identified by TLC and HPLC, and the structure was confirmed by (1)H NMR analysis. The enzyme is also useful in synthesizing transxylosylation products from the wheat bran hydrolysate.

  8. Survival and Adaptation of the Thermophilic Species Geobacillus thermantarcticus in Simulated Spatial Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Donato, Paola; Romano, Ida; Mastascusa, Vincenza; Poli, Annarita; Orlando, Pierangelo; Pugliese, Mariagabriella; Nicolaus, Barbara

    2017-06-01

    Astrobiology studies the origin and evolution of life on Earth and in the universe. According to the panspermia theory, life on Earth could have emerged from bacterial species transported by meteorites, that were able to adapt and proliferate on our planet. Therefore, the study of extremophiles, i.e. bacterial species able to live in extreme terrestrial environments, can be relevant to Astrobiology studies. In this work we described the ability of the thermophilic species Geobacillus thermantarcticus to survive after exposition to simulated spatial conditions including temperature's variation, desiccation, X-rays and UVC irradiation. The response to the exposition to the space conditions was assessed at a molecular level by studying the changes in the morphology, the lipid and protein patterns, the nucleic acids. G. thermantarcticus survived to the exposition to all the stressing conditions examined, since it was able to restart cellular growth in comparable levels to control experiments carried out in the optimal growth conditions. Survival was elicited by changing proteins and lipids distribution, and by protecting the DNA's integrity.

  9. Characteristics and applications of recombinant thermostable amylopullulanase of Geobacillus thermoleovorans secreted by Pichia pastoris.

    PubMed

    Nisha, M; Satyanarayana, T

    2017-03-01

    The 3'-deleted amylopullulanase gene from the extreme thermophile Geobacillus thermoleovorans (Gt-apuΔC) was expressed extracellularly in Pichia pastoris under both methanol-inducible AOX1 and constitutive GAP promoters. The expression of the gene (Gt-apuΔC) was higher under GAP promoter (36.2 U ml(-1), α-amylase; 33.5 U ml(-1), pullulanase) than that under AOX1 promoter (32.5 and 28.6 U ml(-1)). The heavily glycosylated Gt-apuΔC from the recombinant P. pastoris displays higher substrate specificity, thermal stability and starch saccharification efficiency than that expressed in Escherichia coli. The enzyme hydrolyses maltotriose and maltotetraose unlike that expressed in E. coli. The enzyme action on wheat bran liberates maltose and glucose without detectable amount(s) of maltooligosaccharides. The sugars released from wheat bran (glucose and maltose) could be fractionated by ultrafiltration, as confirmed by TLC and HPLC analysis. This is the first report on the production of recombinant amylopullulanase extracellularly in P. pastoris.

  10. 40 CFR 721.785 - Halogenated alkane aromatic compound (generic name).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Halogenated alkane aromatic compound... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.785 Halogenated alkane aromatic compound (generic name). (a) Chemical... as a halogenated alkane aromatic compound (PMN P-94-1747) is subject to reporting under this...

  11. 40 CFR 721.785 - Halogenated alkane aromatic compound (generic name).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Halogenated alkane aromatic compound... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.785 Halogenated alkane aromatic compound (generic name). (a) Chemical... as a halogenated alkane aromatic compound (PMN P-94-1747) is subject to reporting under this...

  12. 40 CFR 721.785 - Halogenated alkane aromatic compound (generic name).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Halogenated alkane aromatic compound... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.785 Halogenated alkane aromatic compound (generic name). (a) Chemical... as a halogenated alkane aromatic compound (PMN P-94-1747) is subject to reporting under this...

  13. 40 CFR 721.785 - Halogenated alkane aromatic compound (generic name).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Halogenated alkane aromatic compound... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.785 Halogenated alkane aromatic compound (generic name). (a) Chemical... as a halogenated alkane aromatic compound (PMN P-94-1747) is subject to reporting under this...

  14. 40 CFR 721.785 - Halogenated alkane aromatic compound (generic name).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Halogenated alkane aromatic compound... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.785 Halogenated alkane aromatic compound (generic name). (a) Chemical... as a halogenated alkane aromatic compound (PMN P-94-1747) is subject to reporting under this...

  15. 40 CFR 721.4464 - Mixture of hydrofluoro alkanes and hydrofluoro alkene.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Mixture of hydrofluoro alkanes and... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.4464 Mixture of hydrofluoro alkanes and hydrofluoro alkene. (a) Chemical... as a mixture of hydrofluoro alkanes and hydrofluoro alkene (PMNs P-96-945/946/947/948) are subject...

  16. 40 CFR 721.4464 - Mixture of hydrofluoro alkanes and hydrofluoro alkene.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Mixture of hydrofluoro alkanes and... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.4464 Mixture of hydrofluoro alkanes and hydrofluoro alkene. (a) Chemical... as a mixture of hydrofluoro alkanes and hydrofluoro alkene (PMNs P-96-945/946/947/948) are subject...

  17. 40 CFR 721.4464 - Mixture of hydrofluoro alkanes and hydrofluoro alkene.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Mixture of hydrofluoro alkanes and... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.4464 Mixture of hydrofluoro alkanes and hydrofluoro alkene. (a) Chemical... as a mixture of hydrofluoro alkanes and hydrofluoro alkene (PMNs P-96-945/946/947/948) are subject...

  18. 40 CFR 721.4464 - Mixture of hydrofluoro alkanes and hydrofluoro alkene.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Mixture of hydrofluoro alkanes and... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.4464 Mixture of hydrofluoro alkanes and hydrofluoro alkene. (a) Chemical... as a mixture of hydrofluoro alkanes and hydrofluoro alkene (PMNs P-96-945/946/947/948) are subject...

  19. 40 CFR 721.4464 - Mixture of hydrofluoro alkanes and hydrofluoro alkene.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Mixture of hydrofluoro alkanes and... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.4464 Mixture of hydrofluoro alkanes and hydrofluoro alkene. (a) Chemical... as a mixture of hydrofluoro alkanes and hydrofluoro alkene (PMNs P-96-945/946/947/948) are subject...

  20. 40 CFR 721.10148 - Acryloxy alkanoic alkane derivative with mixed metal oxides (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Acryloxy alkanoic alkane derivative... Significant New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10148 Acryloxy alkanoic alkane derivative with...) The chemical substance identified generically as acryloxy alkanoic alkane derivative with mixed...

  1. 40 CFR 721.10148 - Acryloxy alkanoic alkane derivative with mixed metal oxides (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Acryloxy alkanoic alkane derivative... Significant New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10148 Acryloxy alkanoic alkane derivative with...) The chemical substance identified generically as acryloxy alkanoic alkane derivative with mixed...

  2. Hydrogen isotope exchange between n-alkanes and water under hydrothermal conditions: implications for abiotic and thermogenic hydrocarbons in vent fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reeves, E. P.; Seewald, J.; Sylva, S.

    2010-12-01

    Stable isotopes are extensively utilized in studies of hydrocarbons in naturals fluids. However, factors controlling the hydrogen isotope (2H/1H) composition of dissolved hydrocarbons in hydrothermal fluids are still poorly understood despite interest in their 2H/1H signatures as indicators of abiogenesis. Due to its high activation energy for exchange, alkyl-bound hydrogen (H) is typically considered to be isotopically conservative. Incorporation of water-derived H under hydrothermal conditions may, however, obscure any primary signatures associated with abiotic polymerization. To examine this process, we conducted experiments to investigate 2H/1H exchange between aqueous n-alkanes and water using a Au-TiO2 flexible cell hydrothermal apparatus. C1-C5 n-alkanes were heated at 325°C and 350 bar in aqueous solutions of varying initial 2H/1H ratios (δ2H) in the presence of a pyrite-pyrrhotite-magnetite (PPM) mineral redox buffer. Extensive incorporation of water-derived H into C2-C5 n-alkanes was observed on timescales of months. In contrast, relatively minor incorporation was observed for CH4. Isotopic exchange is facilitated by reversible equilibration of n-alkanes and their corresponding alkenes by the reaction: CnH2n+2(aq) = CnH2n(aq) + H2(aq) Where H2(aq) is derived from water. The lack of substantial n-alkane decomposition on the timescale of observation, combined with an approach to steady-state isotopic compositions, indicate that n-alkane δD values likely reflect an approach to isotopic equilibrium rather than kinetically-controlled fractionation effects associated with degradation reactions. Substantially lower amounts of exchange were observed for ethane relative to C3-C5 n-alkanes, which suggests that alkene isomerization reactions may enhance incorporation of water-derived H in these compounds. Thus, reaction mechanisms exist in hydrothermal fluids that allow rapid 2H/1H exchange of alkyl-H with water on timescales comparable to crustal residence times

  3. Abundance and diversity of soil petroleum hydrocarbon-degrading microbial communities in oil exploring areas.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yuyin; Wang, Jie; Liao, Jingqiu; Xie, Shuguang; Huang, Yi

    2015-02-01

    Alkanes and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are the commonly detected petroleum hydrocarbon contaminants in soils in oil exploring areas. Hydrocarbon-degrading genes are useful biomarks for estimation of the bioremediation potential of contaminated sites. However, the links between environmental factors and the distribution of alkane and PAH metabolic genes still remain largely unclear. The present study investigated the abundances and diversities of soil n-alkane and PAH-degrading bacterial communities targeting both alkB and nah genes in two oil exploring areas at different geographic regions. A large variation in the abundances and diversities of alkB and nah genes occurred in the studied soil samples. Various environmental variables regulated the spatial distribution of soil alkane and PAH metabolic genes, dependent on geographic location. The soil alkane-degrading bacterial communities in oil exploring areas mainly consisted of Pedobacter, Mycobacterium, and unknown alkB-harboring microorganisms. Moreover, the novel PAH-degraders predominated in nah gene clone libraries from soils of the two oil exploring areas. This work could provide some new insights towards the distribution of hydrocarbon-degrading microorganisms and their biodegradation potential in soil ecosystems.

  4. MPN- and Real-Time-Based PCR Methods for the Quantification of Alkane Monooxygenase Homologous Genes (alkB) in Environmental Samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pérez-de-Mora, Alfredo; Schulz, Stephan; Schloter, Michael

    Hydrocarbons are major contaminants of soil ecosystems as a result of uncontrolled oil spills and wastes disposal into the environment. Ecological risk assessment and remediation of affected sites is often constrained due to lack of suitable prognostic and diagnostic tools that provide information of abiotic-biotic interactions occurring between contaminants and biological targets. Therefore, the identification and quantification of genes involved in the degradation of hydrocarbons may play a crucial role for evaluating the natural attenuation potential of contaminated sites and the development of successful bioremediation strategies. Besides other gene clusters, the alk operon has been identified as a major player for alkane degradation in different soils. An oxygenase gene (alkB) codes for the initial step of the degradation of aliphatic alkanes under aerobic conditions. In this work, we present an MPN- and a real-time PCR method for the quantification of the bacterial gene alkB (coding for rubredoxin-dependent alkane monooxygenase) in environmental samples. Both approaches enable a rapid culture-independent screening of the alkB gene in the environment, which can be used to assess the intrinsic natural attenuation potential of a site or to follow up the on-going progress of bioremediation assays.

  5. Characterization and degradation potential of diesel-degrading bacterial strains for application in bioremediation.

    PubMed

    Balseiro-Romero, María; Gkorezis, Panagiotis; Kidd, Petra S; Van Hamme, Jonathan; Weyens, Nele; Monterroso, Carmen; Vangronsveld, Jaco

    2017-10-03

    Bioremediation of polluted soils is a promising technique with low environmental impact, which uses soil organisms to degrade soil contaminants. In this study, 19 bacterial strains isolated from a diesel-contaminated soil were screened for their diesel-degrading potential, biosurfactant (BS) production, and biofilm formation abilities, all desirable characteristics when selecting strains for re-inoculation into hydrocarbon-contaminated soils. Diesel-degradation rates were determined in vitro in minimal medium with diesel as the sole carbon source. The capacity to degrade diesel range organics (DROs) of strains SPG23 (Arthobacter sp.) and PF1 (Acinetobacter oleivorans) reached 17-26% of total DROs after 10 days, and 90% for strain GK2 (Acinetobacter calcoaceticus). The amount and rate of alkane degradation decreased significantly with increasing carbon number for strains SPG23 and PF1. Strain GK2, which produced BSs and biofilms, exhibited a greater extent, and faster rate of alkane degradation compared to SPG23 and PF1. Based on the outcomes of degradation experiments, in addition to BS production, biofilm formation capacities, and previous genome characterizations, strain GK2 is a promising candidate for microbial-assisted phytoremediation of diesel-contaminated soils. These results are of particular interest to select suitable strains for bioremediation, not only presenting high diesel-degradation rates, but also other characteristics which could improve rhizosphere colonization.

  6. Cyano- and polycyanometallo-porphyrins as catalysts for alkane oxidation

    DOEpatents

    Ellis, P.E. Jr.; Lyons, J.E.

    1995-01-17

    New compositions of matter comprising cyano-substituted metal complexes of porphyrins are catalysts for the oxidation of alkanes. The metal is iron, chromium, manganese, ruthenium, copper or cobalt. The porphyrin ring has cyano groups attached thereto in meso and/or [beta]-pyrrolic positions.

  7. Cyano- and polycyanometallo-porphyrins as catalysts for alkane oxidation

    DOEpatents

    Ellis, P.E. Jr.; Lyons, J.E.

    1993-05-18

    New compositions of matter comprising cyano-substituted metal complexes of porphyrins are catalysts for the oxidation of alkanes. The metal is iron, chromium, manganese, ruthenium, copper or cobalt. The porphyrin ring has cyano groups attached thereto in meso- and/or [beta]-pyrrolic positions.

  8. Crystallization and prevention of supercooling of microencapsulated n-alkanes.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xing-xiang; Fan, Yao-feng; Tao, Xiao-ming; Yick, Kit-lun

    2005-01-15

    Microencapsulated n-alkanes (n-octadecane, n-nonadecane, and n-eicosane) were synthesized by in situ polymerization using urea-melamine-formaldehyde polymer as shells. Microcapsules 5.0 and 10.0 wt% of 1-tetradecanol, paraffin, and 1-octadecanol were used as nucleating agents. The fabrication was characterized using Fourier transform infrared, light microscopy, and scanning electron microscopy. The crystallization and prevention of supercooling of the microcapsules are studied using differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and wide-angle X-ray diffraction. The crystal system of the microencapsulated n-alkane is the same as that of the bulk. The enthalpies of the microcapsules containing 70 wt% n-alkanes are approximately 160 J/g. The melting temperature of the n-alkanes in the microcapsule is the same as that in the bulk. There are multiple peaks on the DSC cooling curves that are attributed to liquid-rotator, rotator-crystal, and liquid-crystal transitions. The DSC cooling behavior of microencapsulated n-octadecane is affected by the average diameters. The measured maximum degree of supercooling of the microencapsulated n-octadecane is approximately 26.0 degrees C at a heating and cooling rate of 10.0 degrees C/min. The degree of supercooling of microencapsulated n-octadecane is decreased by adding 10.0 wt% of 1-octadecanol as a nucleating agent.

  9. Cyano- and polycyanometallo-porphyrins as catalysts for alkane oxidation

    DOEpatents

    Ellis, Jr., Paul E.; Lyons, James E.

    1995-01-01

    New compositions of matter comprising cyano-substituted metal complexes of porphyrins are catalysts for the oxidation of alkanes. The metal is iron, chromium, manganese, ruthenium, copper or cobalt. The porphyrin ring has cyano groups attached thereto in meso and/or .beta.-pyrrolic positions.

  10. Cyano- and polycyanometallo-porphyrins as catalysts for alkane oxidation

    DOEpatents

    Ellis, Jr., Paul E.; Lyons, James E.

    1993-01-01

    New compositions of matter comprising cyano-substituted metal complexes of porphyrins are catalysts for the oxidation of alkanes. The metal is iron, chromium, manganese, ruthenium, copper or cobalt. The porphyrin ring has cyano groups attached thereto in meso and/or .beta.-pyrrolic positions.

  11. Modular and selective biosynthesis of gasoline-range alkanes.

    PubMed

    Sheppard, Micah J; Kunjapur, Aditya M; Prather, Kristala L J

    2016-01-01

    Typical renewable liquid fuel alternatives to gasoline are not entirely compatible with current infrastructure. We have engineered Escherichia coli to selectively produce alkanes found in gasoline (propane, butane, pentane, heptane, and nonane) from renewable substrates such as glucose or glycerol. Our modular pathway framework achieves carbon-chain extension by two different mechanisms. A fatty acid synthesis route is used to generate longer chains heptane and nonane, while a more energy efficient alternative, reverse-β-oxidation, is used for synthesis of propane, butane, and pentane. We demonstrate that both upstream (thiolase) and intermediate (thioesterase) reactions can act as control points for chain-length specificity. Specific free fatty acids are subsequently converted to alkanes using a broad-specificity carboxylic acid reductase and a cyanobacterial aldehyde decarbonylase (AD). The selectivity obtained by different module pairings provides a foundation for tuning alkane product distribution for desired fuel properties. Alternate ADs that have greater activity on shorter substrates improve observed alkane titer. However, even in an engineered host strain that significantly reduces endogenous conversion of aldehyde intermediates to alcohol byproducts, AD activity is observed to be limiting for all chain lengths. Given these insights, we discuss guiding principles for pathway selection and potential opportunities for pathway improvement. Copyright © 2015 International Metabolic Engineering Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Cyano- and polycyanometalloporphyrins as catalysts for alkane oxidation

    DOEpatents

    Ellis, Jr., Paul E.; Lyons, James E.

    1992-01-01

    Alkanes are oxidized by contact with oxygen-containing gas in the presence as catalyst of a metalloporphyrin in which hydrogen atoms in the porphyrin ring have been substituted with one or more cyano groups. Hydrogen atoms in the porphyrin ring may also be substituted with halogen atoms.

  13. Improving alkane synthesis in Escherichia coli via metabolic engineering.

    PubMed

    Song, Xuejiao; Yu, Haiying; Zhu, Kun

    2016-01-01

    Concerns about energy security and global petroleum supply have made the production of renewable biofuels an industrial imperative. The ideal biofuels are n-alkanes in that they are chemically and structurally identical to the fossil fuels and can "drop in" to the transportation infrastructure. In this work, an Escherichia coli strain that produces n-alkanes was constructed by heterologous expression of acyl-acyl carrier protein (ACP) reductase (AAR) and aldehyde deformylating oxygenase (ADO) from Synechococcus elongatus PCC7942. The accumulation of alkanes ranged from 3.1 to 24.0 mg/L using different expressing strategies. Deletion of yqhD, an inherent aldehyde reductase in E. coli, or overexpression of fadR, an activator for fatty acid biosynthesis, exhibited a nearly twofold increase in alkane titers, respectively. Combining yqhD deletion and fadR overexpression resulted in a production titer of 255.6 mg/L in E. coli, and heptadecene was the most abundant product.

  14. MODELING OF ALKANE EMISSIONS FROM A WOOD STAIN

    EPA Science Inventory

    The article discusses full-scale residential house tests to evaluate the effects of organic emissions from a wood finishing product--wood stain--on indoor air quality (IAQ). The test house concentrations of three alkane species, nonane, decane, and undecane, were measured as a fu...

  15. Synthesis of a photo-caged aminooxy alkane thiol.

    PubMed

    Mancini, Rock J; Li, Ronald C; Tolstyka, Zachary P; Maynard, Heather D

    2009-12-07

    A photo-caged aminooxy alkane thiol synthesized in 7 steps and 15% overall yield was used to form a self-assembled monolayer (SAM). Photo-deprotection on the surface was confirmed by FT-IR spectroscopy and contact angle goniometry. Conjugation of a small molecule ketone, ethyl levulinate, further confirmed the presence of aminooxy groups on the surface.

  16. Johari-Goldstein secondary relaxation in methylated alkanes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ngai, K. L.

    2005-06-01

    Dielectric relaxation measurements of the methylated alkanes, 3-methylpentane, 3-methylheptane, 4-methylheptane, 2,3-dimethylpentane, and 2,4,6-trimethylheptane by S. Shahriari, A. Mandanici, L-M Wang, and R. Richert [J. Chem. Phys. 121, 8960 (2004)] have found a primary α relaxation of these glass-forming liquids and a slow secondary β relaxation that are in close proximity to each other on the frequency scale. These glass formers have one or more methyl groups individually attached to various carbons on the alkane chain. They cannot contribute to such a slow secondary relaxation. Hence the observed secondary relaxations is not intramolecular in origin and, similar to secondary relaxations found in rigid molecules by Johari and Goldstein, they are potentially important in the consideration of a mechanism for the glass transition. These secondary relaxations in the methylated alkanes are special and belong to the class of Johari-Goldstein in a generalized sense. The coupling model has predicted that its primitive relaxation time should be approximately the same as the relaxation time of the secondary relaxation if the latter is of the Johari-Goldstein kind. This prediction has been shown to hold in many other glass formers. The published data of the methylated alkanes provide an opportunity to test this prediction once more. The results of this work confirm the prediction.

  17. Integrated process for preparing a carboxylic acid from an alkane

    SciTech Connect

    Benderly, Abraham; Chadda, Nitin; Sevon, Douglass

    2011-12-20

    The present invention relates to an integrated process for producing unsaturated carboxylic acids from the corresponding C.sub.2-C.sub.4 alkane. The process begins with performance of thermally integrated dehydrogenation reactions which convert a C.sub.2-C.sub.4 alkane to its corresponding C.sub.2-C.sub.4 alkene, and which involve exothermically converting a portion of an alkane to its corresponding alkene by oxidative dehydrogenation in an exothermic reaction zone, in the presence of oxygen and a suitable catalyst, and then feeding the products of the exothermic reaction zone to an endothermic reaction zone wherein at least a portion of the remaining unconverted alkane is endothermically dehydrogenated to form an additional quantity of the same corresponding alkene, in the presence of carbon dioxide and an other suitable catalyst. The alkene products of the thermally integrated dehydrogenation reactions are then provided to a catalytic vapor phase partial oxidation process for conversion of the alkene to the corresponding unsaturated carboxylic acid or nitrile. Unreacted alkene and carbon dioxide are recovered from the oxidation product stream and recycled back to the thermally integrated dehydrogenation reactions.

  18. Roaming radical pathways for the decomposition of alkanes.

    SciTech Connect

    Harding, L. B.; Klippenstein, S. J.

    2010-01-01

    CASPT2 calculations predict the existence of roaming radical pathways for the decomposition of propane, n-butane, isobutane and neopentane. The roaming radical paths lead to the formation of an alkane and an alkene instead of the expected radical products. The predicted barriers for the roaming radical paths lie {approx}1 kcal/mol below the corresponding radical asymptotes.

  19. Catalytic oxidation of light alkanes in presence of a base

    DOEpatents

    Bhinde, Manoj V.; Bierl, Thomas W.

    1998-01-01

    The presence of a base in the reaction mixture in a metal-ligand catalyzed partial oxidation of alkanes results in sustained catalyst activity, and in greater percent conversion as compared with oxidation in the absence of base, while maintaining satisfactory selectivity for the desired oxidation, for example the oxidation of isobutane to isobutanol.

  20. Catalytic oxidation of light alkanes in presence of a base

    DOEpatents

    Bhinde, M.V.; Bierl, T.W.

    1998-03-03

    The presence of a base in the reaction mixture in a metal-ligand catalyzed partial oxidation of alkanes results in sustained catalyst activity, and in greater percent conversion as compared with oxidation in the absence of base, while maintaining satisfactory selectivity for the desired oxidation, for example the oxidation of isobutane to isobutanol. 1 fig.

  1. Isolating the non-polar contributions to the intermolecular potential for water-alkane interactions.

    PubMed

    Ballal, Deepti; Venkataraman, Pradeep; Fouad, Wael A; Cox, Kenneth R; Chapman, Walter G

    2014-08-14

    Intermolecular potential models for water and alkanes describe pure component properties fairly well, but fail to reproduce properties of water-alkane mixtures. Understanding interactions between water and non-polar molecules like alkanes is important not only for the hydrocarbon industry but has implications to biological processes as well. Although non-polar solutes in water have been widely studied, much less work has focused on water in non-polar solvents. In this study we calculate the solubility of water in different alkanes (methane to dodecane) at ambient conditions where the water content in alkanes is very low so that the non-polar water-alkane interactions determine solubility. Only the alkane-rich phase is simulated since the fugacity of water in the water rich phase is calculated from an accurate equation of state. Using the SPC/E model for water and TraPPE model for alkanes along with Lorentz-Berthelot mixing rules for the cross parameters produces a water solubility that is an order of magnitude lower than the experimental value. It is found that an effective water Lennard-Jones energy ε(W)/k = 220 K is required to match the experimental water solubility in TraPPE alkanes. This number is much higher than used in most simulation water models (SPC/E-ε(W)/k = 78.2 K). It is surprising that the interaction energy obtained here is also higher than the water-alkane interaction energy predicted by studies on solubility of alkanes in water. The reason for this high water-alkane interaction energy is not completely understood. Some factors that might contribute to the large interaction energy, such as polarizability of alkanes, octupole moment of methane, and clustering of water at low concentrations in alkanes, are examined. It is found that, though important, these factors do not completely explain the anomalously strong attraction between alkanes and water observed experimentally.

  2. Redesigning pH optimum of Geobacillus sp. TF16 endoxylanase through in silico designed DNA swapping strategy.

    PubMed

    Uzuner, Ugur; Canakci, Sabriye; Bektas, Kadriye Inan; Sapmaz, Merve Tuncel; Belduz, Ali Osman

    2017-06-01

    Thermoalkaliphilic xylanases are highly desired and of great importance due to their vast potential in paper pulp and bleaching processes. Here, we report rapid, cost-effective, and result-oriented combinatorial potential of in silico DNA swapping strategy to engineer the pH optimum of industrially crucial enzymes, particularly engineering of Geobacillus sp. TF16 endoxylanase for alkaline environments. The 3D structures of Geobacillus sp. TF16 and donor Bacillus halodurans C-125 endoxylanases were firstly predicted, analyzed, and compared for their similarities before any in silico design of mutants. Reasonably, to improve its alkaline pH tolerance, the corresponding regions in Geobacillus sp.TF16 endoxylanase were further engineered by swapping with negatively-charged amino acid-rich regions from B. halodurans C-125 endoxylanase. Through only two of four in silico-designed mutants, the optimum pH of GeoTF16 endoxylanase was improved from 8.5 to 10.0. Moreover, as compared to GeoTF16 parental enzyme, both GeoInt3 and GeoInt4 mutants revealed (i) enhanced biobleaching performance, (ii) improved adaptability to alkaline conditions, and (iii) better activity for broader pH range. Unlike GeoTF16 losing activity at pH 11.0 completely, GeoInt4 retained 60% and 40% of its activity at pH 11.0 and 12.0, respectively. Thus, GeoInt4 stands out as a more competent biocatalyst that is suitable for alkaline environments of diverse industrial applications. The current study represents an efficient protein engineering strategy to adapt industrial catalysts to diverse processing conditions. Further comprehensive and fine-tuned research efforts may result in biotechnologically more promising outcomes. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. and Société Française de Biochimie et Biologie Moléculaire (SFBBM). All rights reserved.

  3. Crystallization features of normal alkanes in confined geometry.

    PubMed

    Su, Yunlan; Liu, Guoming; Xie, Baoquan; Fu, Dongsheng; Wang, Dujin

    2014-01-21

    How polymers crystallize can greatly affect their thermal and mechanical properties, which influence the practical applications of these materials. Polymeric materials, such as block copolymers, graft polymers, and polymer blends, have complex molecular structures. Due to the multiple hierarchical structures and different size domains in polymer systems, confined hard environments for polymer crystallization exist widely in these materials. The confined geometry is closely related to both the phase metastability and lifetime of polymer. This affects the phase miscibility, microphase separation, and crystallization behaviors and determines both the performance of polymer materials and how easily these materials can be processed. Furthermore, the size effect of metastable states needs to be clarified in polymers. However, scientists find it difficult to propose a quantitative formula to describe the transition dynamics of metastable states in these complex systems. Normal alkanes [CnH2n+2, n-alkanes], especially linear saturated hydrocarbons, can provide a well-defined model system for studying the complex crystallization behaviors of polymer materials, surfactants, and lipids. Therefore, a deeper investigation of normal alkane phase behavior in confinement will help scientists to understand the crystalline phase transition and ultimate properties of many polymeric materials, especially polyolefins. In this Account, we provide an in-depth look at the research concerning the confined crystallization behavior of n-alkanes and binary mixtures in microcapsules by our laboratory and others. Since 2006, our group has developed a technique for synthesizing nearly monodispersed n-alkane containing microcapsules with controllable size and surface porous morphology. We applied an in situ polymerization method, using melamine-formaldehyde resin as shell material and nonionic surfactants as emulsifiers. The solid shell of microcapsules can provide a stable three-dimensional (3-D

  4. Increase in D-tagatose production rate by site-directed mutagenesis of L-arabinose isomerase from Geobacillus thermodenitrificans.

    PubMed

    Oh, Hyo-Jung; Kim, Hye-Jung; Oh, Deok-Kun

    2006-02-01

    Among single-site mutations of L-arabinose isomerase derived from Geobacillus thermodenitrificans, two mutants were produced having the lowest and highest activities of D-tagatose production. Site-directed mutagenesis at these sites showed that the aromatic ring at amino acid 164 and the size of amino acid 475 were important for D-tagatose production. Among double-site mutations, one mutant converted D-galactose into D-tagatose with a yield of 58% whereas the wild type gave 46% D-tagatose conversion after 300 min at 65 degrees C.

  5. Surface vibrational structure at alkane liquid/vapor interfaces.

    PubMed

    Esenturk, Okan; Walker, Robert A

    2006-11-07

    Broadband vibrational sum frequency spectroscopy (VSFS) has been used to examine the surface structure of alkane liquid/vapor interfaces. The alkanes range in length from n-nonane (C(9)H(20)) to n-heptadecane (C(17)H(36)), and all liquids except heptadecane are studied at temperatures well above their bulk (and surface) freezing temperatures. Intensities of vibrational bands in the CH stretching region acquired under different polarization conditions show systematic, chain length dependent changes. Data provide clear evidence of methyl group segregation at the liquid/vapor interface, but two different models of alkane chain structure can predict chain length dependent changes in band intensities. Each model leads to a different interpretation of the extent to which different chain segments contribute to the anisotropic interfacial region. One model postulates that changes in vibrational band intensities arise solely from a reduced surface coverage of methyl groups as alkane chain length increases. The additional methylene groups at the surface must be randomly distributed and make no net contribution to the observed VSF spectra. The second model considers a simple statistical distribution of methyl and methylene groups populating a three dimensional, interfacial lattice. This statistical picture implies that the VSF signal arises from a region extending several functional groups into the bulk liquid, and that the growing fraction of methylene groups in longer chain alkanes bears responsibility for the observed spectral changes. The data and resulting interpretations provide clear benchmarks for emerging theories of molecular structure and organization at liquid surfaces, especially for liquids lacking strong polar ordering.

  6. Reconstitution of plant alkane biosynthesis in yeast demonstrates that Arabidopsis ECERIFERUM1 and ECERIFERUM3 are core components of a very-long-chain alkane synthesis complex.

    PubMed

    Bernard, Amélie; Domergue, Frédéric; Pascal, Stéphanie; Jetter, Reinhard; Renne, Charlotte; Faure, Jean-Denis; Haslam, Richard P; Napier, Johnathan A; Lessire, René; Joubès, Jérôme

    2012-07-01

    In land plants, very-long-chain (VLC) alkanes are major components of cuticular waxes that cover aerial organs, mainly acting as a waterproof barrier to prevent nonstomatal water loss. Although thoroughly investigated, plant alkane synthesis remains largely undiscovered. The Arabidopsis thaliana ECERIFERUM1 (CER1) protein has been recognized as an essential element of wax alkane synthesis; nevertheless, its function remains elusive. In this study, a screen for CER1 physical interaction partners was performed. The screen revealed that CER1 interacts with the wax-associated protein ECERIFERUM3 (CER3) and endoplasmic reticulum-localized cytochrome b5 isoforms (CYTB5s). The functional relevance of these interactions was assayed through an iterative approach using yeast as a heterologous expression system. In a yeast strain manipulated to produce VLC acyl-CoAs, a strict CER1 and CER3 coexpression resulted in VLC alkane synthesis. The additional presence of CYTB5s was found to enhance CER1/CER3 alkane production. Site-directed mutagenesis showed that CER1 His clusters are essential for alkane synthesis, whereas those of CER3 are not, suggesting that CYTB5s are specific CER1 cofactors. Collectively, our study reports the identification of plant alkane synthesis enzymatic components and supports a new model for alkane production in which CER1 interacts with both CER3 and CYTB5 to catalyze the redox-dependent synthesis of VLC alkanes from VLC acyl-CoAs.

  7. Image Charge Effects in the Wetting Behavior of Alkanes on Water with Accounting for Water Solubility

    PubMed Central

    Emelyanenko, Kirill A.; Emelyanenko, Alexandre M.; Boinovich, Ludmila B.

    2016-01-01

    Different types of surface forces, acting in the films of pentane, hexane, and heptane on water are discussed. It is shown that an important contribution to the surface forces originates from the solubility of water in alkanes. The equations for the distribution of electric potential inside the film are derived within the Debye-Hückel approximation, taking into account the polarization of the film boundaries by discrete charges at water-alkane interface and by the dipoles of water molecules dissolved in the film. On the basis of above equations we estimate the image charge contribution to the surface forces, excess free energy, isotherms of water adsorption in alkane film, and the total isotherms of disjoining pressure in alkane film. The results indicate the essential influence of water/alkane interface charging on the disjoining pressure in alkane films, and the wettability of water surface by different alkanes is discussed. PMID:28773305

  8. Genetically assembled fluorescent biosensor for in situ detection of bio-synthesized alkanes.

    PubMed

    Wu, Wei; Zhang, Lei; Yao, Lun; Tan, Xiaoming; Liu, Xufeng; Lu, Xuefeng

    2015-06-03

    Construction of highly efficient microbial cell factories producing drop-in biofuel alkanes is severely limited due to the lack of a fast detection method against alkanes. Here we first developed a sensitive fluorescent biosensor for rapid and in situ monitoring of intracellular alkane synthesis. Using GFP as reporter, the biosensor could actively respond to the intracellular alkane products, especially for the mid- and long-chain alkanes synthesized in the recombinant Escherichia coli and give a concentration-dependent fluorescence response. Our results also suggested the feasibility of developing high-throughput strategies basing on the alkane biosensor device in E. coli, and thus will greatly facilitate the application of directed evolution strategies to further improve the alkane-producing microbial cell factories.

  9. The detection and phylogenetic analysis of the alkane 1-monooxygenase gene of members of the genus Rhodococcus.

    PubMed

    Táncsics, András; Benedek, Tibor; Szoboszlay, Sándor; Veres, Péter G; Farkas, Milán; Máthé, István; Márialigeti, Károly; Kukolya, József; Lányi, Szabolcs; Kriszt, Balázs

    2015-02-01

    Naturally occurring and anthropogenic petroleum hydrocarbons are potential carbon sources for many bacteria. The AlkB-related alkane hydroxylases, which are integral membrane non-heme iron enzymes, play a key role in the microbial degradation of many of these hydrocarbons. Several members of the genus Rhodococcus are well-known alkane degraders and are known to harbor multiple alkB genes encoding for different alkane 1-monooxygenases. In the present study, 48 Rhodococcus strains, representing 35 species of the genus, were investigated to find out whether there was a dominant type of alkB gene widespread among species of the genus that could be used as a phylogenetic marker. Phylogenetic analysis of rhodococcal alkB gene sequences indicated that a certain type of alkB gene was present in almost every member of the genus Rhodococcus. These alkB genes were common in a unique nucleotide sequence stretch absent from other types of rhodococcal alkB genes that encoded a conserved amino acid motif: WLG(I/V/L)D(G/D)GL. The sequence identity of the targeted alkB gene in Rhodococcus ranged from 78.5 to 99.2% and showed higher nucleotide sequence variation at the inter-species level compared to the 16S rRNA gene (93.9-99.8%). The results indicated that the alkB gene type investigated might be applicable for: (i) differentiating closely related Rhodococcus species, (ii) properly assigning environmental isolates to existing Rhodococcus species, and finally (iii) assessing whether a new Rhodococcus isolate represents a novel species of the genus. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  10. Crystallization and preliminary crystallographic analysis of Axe2, an acetylxylan esterase from Geobacillus stearothermophilus.

    PubMed

    Lansky, Shifra; Alalouf, Onit; Solomon, Vered; Alhassid, Anat; Govada, Lata; Chayen, Naomi E; Chayan, Naomi E; Belrhali, Hassan; Shoham, Yuval; Shoham, Gil

    2013-04-01

    Acetylxylan esterases are part of the hemi-cellulolytic system of many microorganisms which utilize plant biomass for growth. Xylans, which are polymeric sugars that constitute a significant part of the plant biomass, are usually substituted with acetyl side groups attached at position 2 or 3 of the xylose backbone units. Acetylxylan esterases hydrolyse the ester linkages of the xylan acetyl groups and thus improve the ability of main-chain hydrolysing enzymes to break down the sugar backbone units. As such, these enzymes play an important part in the hemi-cellulolytic utilization system of many microorganisms that use plant biomass for growth. Interest in the biochemical characterization and structural analysis of these enzymes stems from their numerous potential biotechnological applications. An acetylxylan esterase (Axe2) of this type from Geobacillus stearothermophilus T-6 has recently been cloned, overexpressed, purified, biochemically characterized and crystallized. One of the crystal forms obtained (RB1) belonged to the tetragonal space group I422, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 110.2, c = 213.1 Å. A full diffraction data set was collected to 1.85 Å resolution from flash-cooled crystals of the wild-type enzyme at 100 K using synchrotron radiation. A selenomethionine derivative of Axe2 has also been prepared and crystallized for single-wavelength anomalous diffraction experiments. The crystals of the selenomethionine-derivatized Axe2 appeared to be isomorphous to those of the wild-type enzyme and enabled the measurement of a full 1.85 Å resolution diffraction data set at the selenium absorption edge and a full 1.70 Å resolution data set at a remote wavelength. These data are currently being used for three-dimensional structure determination of the Axe2 protein.

  11. Expression and Characterization of Geobacillus stearothermophilus SR74 Recombinant α-Amylase in Pichia pastoris

    PubMed Central

    Gandhi, Sivasangkary; Salleh, Abu Bakar; Rahman, Raja Noor Zaliha Raja Abd; Chor Leow, Thean; Oslan, Siti Nurbaya

    2015-01-01

    Geobacillus stearothermophilus SR74 is a locally isolated thermophilic bacteria producing thermostable and thermoactive α-amylase. Increased production and commercialization of thermostable α-amylase strongly warrant the need of a suitable expression system. In this study, the gene encoding the thermostable α-amylase in G. stearothermophilus SR74 was amplified, sequenced, and subcloned into P. pastoris GS115 strain under the control of a methanol inducible promoter, alcohol oxidase (AOX). Methanol induced recombinant expression and secretion of the protein resulted in high levels of extracellular amylase production. YPTM medium supplemented with methanol (1% v/v) was the best medium and once optimized, the maximum recombinant α-amylase SR74 achieved in shake flask was 28.6 U mL−1 at 120 h after induction. The recombinant 59 kDa α-amylase SR74 was purified 1.9-fold using affinity chromatography with a product yield of 52.6% and a specific activity of 151.8 U mg−1. The optimum pH of α-amylase SR74 was 7.0 and the enzyme was stable between pH 6.0–8.0. The purified enzyme was thermostable and thermoactive, exhibiting maximum activity at 65°C with a half-life (t 1/2) of 88 min at 60°C. In conclusion, thermostable α-amylase SR74 from G. stearothermophilus SR74 would be beneficial for industrial applications, especially in liquefying saccrification. PMID:26090417

  12. Expression and Characterization of Geobacillus stearothermophilus SR74 Recombinant α-Amylase in Pichia pastoris.

    PubMed

    Gandhi, Sivasangkary; Salleh, Abu Bakar; Rahman, Raja Noor Zaliha Raja Abd; Chor Leow, Thean; Oslan, Siti Nurbaya

    2015-01-01

    Geobacillus stearothermophilus SR74 is a locally isolated thermophilic bacteria producing thermostable and thermoactive α-amylase. Increased production and commercialization of thermostable α-amylase strongly warrant the need of a suitable expression system. In this study, the gene encoding the thermostable α-amylase in G. stearothermophilus SR74 was amplified, sequenced, and subcloned into P. pastoris GS115 strain under the control of a methanol inducible promoter, alcohol oxidase (AOX). Methanol induced recombinant expression and secretion of the protein resulted in high levels of extracellular amylase production. YPTM medium supplemented with methanol (1% v/v) was the best medium and once optimized, the maximum recombinant α-amylase SR74 achieved in shake flask was 28.6 U mL(-1) at 120 h after induction. The recombinant 59 kDa α-amylase SR74 was purified 1.9-fold using affinity chromatography with a product yield of 52.6% and a specific activity of 151.8 U mg(-1). The optimum pH of α-amylase SR74 was 7.0 and the enzyme was stable between pH 6.0-8.0. The purified enzyme was thermostable and thermoactive, exhibiting maximum activity at 65°C with a half-life (t₁/₂) of 88 min at 60°C. In conclusion, thermostable α-amylase SR74 from G. stearothermophilus SR74 would be beneficial for industrial applications, especially in liquefying saccrification.

  13. Cold plasma technology: bactericidal effects on Geobacillus stearothermophilus and Bacillus cereus microorganisms.

    PubMed

    Morris, Angela D; McCombs, Gayle B; Akan, Tamer; Hynes, Wayne; Laroussi, Mounir; Tolle, Susan L

    2009-01-01

    Cold plasma, also known as Low Temperature Atmospheric Pressure Plasma (LTAPP) is a novel technology consisting of neutral and charged particles, including free radicals, which can be used to destroy or inactivate microorganisms. Research has been conducted regarding the effect of cold plasma on gram-positive bacteria; however, there is limited research regarding its ability to inactivate the spore-formers Geobacillus stearothermophilus and Bacillus cereus. The purpose of this study was to determine if cold plasma inactivates G. stearothermophilus and B. cereus vegetative cells and spores. Nine hundred eighty-one samples were included in this study (762 experimental and 219 controls). Experimental samples were exposed indirectly or directly to cold plasma, before plating and incubating for 16 hours. Control samples were not exposed to cold plasma. The percentage-kill and cell number reductions were calculated from Colony Forming Units (CFU). Data were statistically analyzed at the .05 level using one-way ANOVA, Kruskal Wallis and Tukey's tests. There was a statistically significant difference in the inactivation of G. stearothermophilus vegetative cells receiving indirect and direct exposure (p=0.0001 and p=0.0013, respectively), as well as for B. cereus vegetative cells and spores (p=0.0001 for direct and indirect). There was no statistically significant difference in the inactivation of G. stearothermophilus spores receiving indirect exposure (p=0.7208) or direct exposure (p=0.0835). Results demonstrate that cold plasma exposure effectively kills G. stearothermophilus vegetative cells and B. cereus vegetative cells and spores; however, G. stearothermophilus spores were not significantly inactivated.

  14. Structural elements of thermostability in the maltogenic amylase of Geobacillus thermoleovorans.

    PubMed

    Mehta, Deepika; Satyanarayana, T

    2015-08-01

    Maltogenic amylase of Geobacillus thermoleovorans (Gt-MamyIII), which has the highest thermostability among bacterial maltogenic amylases, has been used as a model enzyme to understand the role of networked salt bridges in thermoadaptation. The role of intra-chain cross-domain salt bridge networks in the thermostabilization of maltogenic amylase of G. thermoleovorans was confirmed by site-directed mutagenesis and CD analysis. The amino acid pairs in seven salt bridges have been mutated singly and pair-wise, and their free energy of thermal inactivation has been calculated. Among seven, single and double mutations in the amino acids corresponding to four salt bridges (lys306.glu336, arg403.asp65, arg497.glu523 and lys524.glu523) decrease T1/2 and Tm of Gt-MamyIII significantly. Moreover, glu523 forms networked salt bridges with arg497 and lys524. OE1 of glu523 forms electrostatic interactions with NH1 of arg497, NH2 of arg497 and NZ of lys524 at a distance of 2.33, 2.02 and 0.33Å, respectively. The mutations in three buried amino acids led to a decline in T1/2 and Tm. The buried as well as networked cross-domain salt bridges thus appear to play a significant role in the thermostabilization of Gt-MamyIII. The salt bridges lys306.glu336 and arg403.asp65, which are isolated and partially accessible, play a minor role in its thermostabilization.

  15. Structural insights into methanol-stable variants of lipase T6 from Geobacillus stearothermophilus.

    PubMed

    Dror, Adi; Kanteev, Margarita; Kagan, Irit; Gihaz, Shalev; Shahar, Anat; Fishman, Ayelet

    2015-11-01

    Enzymatic production of biodiesel by transesterification of triglycerides and alcohol, catalyzed by lipases, offers an environmentally friendly and efficient alternative to the chemically catalyzed process while using low-grade feedstocks. Methanol is utilized frequently as the alcohol in the reaction due to its reactivity and low cost. However, one of the major drawbacks of the enzymatic system is the presence of high methanol concentrations which leads to methanol-induced unfolding and inactivation of the biocatalyst. Therefore, a methanol-stable lipase is of great interest for the biodiesel industry. In this study, protein engineering was applied to substitute charged surface residues with hydrophobic ones to enhance the stability in methanol of a lipase from Geobacillus stearothermophilus T6. We identified a methanol-stable variant, R374W, and combined it with a variant found previously, H86Y/A269T. The triple mutant, H86Y/A269T/R374W, had a half-life value at 70 % methanol of 324 min which reflects an 87-fold enhanced stability compared to the wild type together with elevated thermostability in buffer and in 50 % methanol. This variant also exhibited an improved biodiesel yield from waste chicken oil compared to commercial Lipolase 100L® and Novozyme® CALB. Crystal structures of the wild type and the methanol-stable variants provided insights regarding structure-stability correlations. The most prominent features were the extensive formation of new hydrogen bonds between surface residues directly or mediated by structural water molecules and the stabilization of Zn and Ca binding sites. Mutation sites were also characterized by lower B-factor values calculated from the X-ray structures indicating improved rigidity.

  16. Substrate preference of a Geobacillus maltogenic amylase: a kinetic and thermodynamic analysis.

    PubMed

    Nasrollahi, Samira; Golalizadeh, Leila; Sajedi, Reza H; Taghdir, Majid; Asghari, S Mohsen; Rassa, Mehdi

    2013-09-01

    The gene encoding a maltogenic amylase (MAase) from a newly isolated strain of thermophilic Geobacillus has been isolated, cloned and expressed. Following purification, biochemical and structural characterization have been performed. The enzyme exhibited maximal activity at a broad temperature range between 55 and 65 °C, clearly higher than that of other dimeric MAses. The optimum pH was 6.0 and catalytic activity increased by of Li(+) and K(+). A noticeable preference was demonstrated for α-, β- and γ-cyclodextrin (CD) compared to polymeric substrates (amylose, amylopectin, glycogen and starch) possibly due to steric interference. The affinity for CD substrates increased in the order of γ-CD>β-CD>α-CD, but k(cat)/K(m) increased as α-CD>β-CD>γ-CD, implying that increased substrate specificities are mainly attribute to kcat. Thermodynamic analysis of the activation process showed that improved activity (decrease in ΔG(#)) is accompanied by increases in activation entropy (ΔS(#)) for aforementioned substrates. Molecular docking on the binding interactions between substrates and active site residues revealed a considerably higher accessible surface area for the active site residues in the presence of α-CD than β-CD, indicating that interactions in the transition state are stronger in the presence of α-CD. This result explains the increased ΔH(#) of the activation process and increased K(m) of the enzyme in the presence of α-CD, compared to that of β-CD. This study, which presents the first detailed comparative analysis on the substrate preference of dimeric MAases for different substrates, may shed some lights into the molecular mechanism of these enzymes.

  17. Purification and characterization of cloned alkaline protease gene of Geobacillus stearothermophilus.

    PubMed

    Iqbal, Irfana; Aftab, Muhammad Nauman; Afzal, Mohammed; Ur-Rehman, Asad; Aftab, Saima; Zafar, Asma; Ud-Din, Zia; Khuharo, Ateeque Rahman; Iqbal, Jawad; Ul-Haq, Ikram

    2015-02-01

    Thermostable alkaline serine protease gene of Geobacillus stearothermophilus B-1172 was cloned and expressed in Escherichia coli BL21 (DE3) using pET-22b(+), as an expression vector. The growth conditions were optimized for maximal production of the protease using variable fermentation parameters, i.e., pH, temperature, and addition of an inducer. Protease, thus produced, was purified by ammonium sulfate precipitation followed by ion exchange chromatography with 13.7-fold purification, with specific activity of 97.5 U mg(-1) , and a recovery of 23.6%. Molecular weight of the purified protease, 39 kDa, was determined by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE). The enzyme was stable at 90 °C at pH 9. The enzyme activity was steady in the presence of EDTA indicating that the protease was not a metalloprotease. No significant change in the activity of protease after addition of various metal ions further strengthened this fact. However, an addition of 1% Triton X-100 or SDS surfactants constrained the enzyme specific activity to 34 and 19%, respectively. Among organic solvents, an addition of 1-butanol (20%) augmented the enzyme activity by 29% of the original activity. With casein as a substrate, the enzyme activity under optimized conditions was found to be 73.8 U mg(-1) . The effect of protease expression on the host cells growth was also studied and found to negatively affect E. coli cells to certain extent. Catalytic domains of serine proteases from eight important thermostable organisms were analyzed through WebLogo and found to be conserved in all serine protease sequences suggesting that protease of G. stearothermophilus could be beneficially used as a biocontrol agent and in many industries including detergent industry.

  18. Effect of storage temperature on the lag time of Geobacillus stearothermophilus individual spores.

    PubMed

    Kakagianni, Myrsini; Aguirre, Juan S; Lianou, Alexandra; Koutsoumanis, Konstantinos P

    2017-10-01

    The lag times (λ) of Geobacillus stearothermophilus single spores were studied at different storage temperatures ranging from 45 to 59 °C using the Bioscreen C method. A significant variability of λ was observed among individual spores at all temperatures tested. The storage temperature affected both the position and the spread of the λ distributions. The minimum mean value of λ (i.e. 10.87 h) was observed at 55 °C, while moving away from this temperature resulted in an increase for both the mean and standard deviation of λ. A Cardinal Model with Inflection (CMI) was fitted to the reverse mean λ, and the estimated values for the cardinal parameters Tmin, Tmax, Topt and the optimum mean λ of G. stearothermophilus were found to be 38.1, 64.2, 53.6 °C and 10.3 h, respectively. To interpret the observations, a probabilistic growth model for G. stearothermophilus individual spores, taking into account λ variability, was developed. The model describes the growth of a population, initially consisting of N0 spores, over time as the sum of cells in each of the N0 imminent subpopulations originating from a single spore. Growth simulations for different initial contamination levels showed that for low N0 the number of cells in the population at any time is highly variable. An increase in N0 to levels exceeding 100 spores results in a significant decrease of the above variability and a shorter λ of the population. Considering that the number of G. stearothermophilus surviving spores in the final product is usually very low, the data provided in this work can be used to evaluate the probability distribution of the time-to-spoilage and enable decision-making based on the "acceptable level of risk". Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Physicochemical characterization of tensio-active produced by Geobacillus stearothermophilus isolated from petroleum-contaminated soil.

    PubMed

    Jara, Alícia M A T; Andrade, Rosileide F S; Campos-Takaki, Galba M

    2013-01-01

    Biosurfactants are surface-active agents of microbial origin, and have a property of lowering the interfacial tension between two liquids. They act on the interface and are amphiphathic molecules; in with both hydrophilic and hydrophobic portions are present in the same molecule. However, the economics of producing biosurfactant has limited its commercial applications, and the costs can be reduced using cheap substrates or industrial waste. The present study showed the biosurfactant production using corn steep liquor and palm oil as carbon and nitrogen sources for reduction the costs of production. The biosurfactant production by Geobacillus stearothermophilus UCP 986 was carried out using optimized culture medium constituted by palm oil (7.5%) and corn steep liquor (4.5%) using Bioflo fermentor, at temperature of 45°C, during 32 h and agitation of 300 rpm. The biosurfactant showed a reduction of the water surface tension of 72-31 mN/m and interfacial tension of 0.3 mN/m. The biosurfactant was obtained from the net metabolic liquid by acetone precipitation corresponding to the yield of 2.3g/L. The isolate biosurfactant showed a CMC of 2.5% and non-ionic profile. The best emulsification index (E(24)) obtained was 87% using motor oil burned. The biosurfactant solution (2.5%) used in oil spreading test increases the viscosity of engine burning oil of 149.2% and 138.2% to vegetable fat post-frying, respectively. The gas chromatography-mass spectrometer indicated at 29.52 min a molecular weight of 207 Da and eight peaks by FT-IR identified the chemical structure of the biosurfactant produced by G. stearothermophilus. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  20. Thermoactive extracellular proteases of Geobacillus caldoproteolyticus, sp. nov., from sewage sludge.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xiao-Ge; Stabnikova, Olena; Tay, Joo-Hwa; Wang, Jing-Yuan; Tay, Stephen Tiong-Lee

    2004-12-01

    A proteolytic thermophilic bacterial strain, designated as strain SF03, was isolated from sewage sludge in Singapore. Strain SF03 is a strictly aerobic, Gram stain-positive, catalase-positive, oxidase-positive, and endospore-forming rod. It grows at temperatures ranging from 35 to 65 degrees C, pH ranging from 6.0 to 9.0, and salinities ranging from 0 to 2.5%. Phylogenetic analyses revealed that strain SF03 was most similar to Saccharococcus thermophilus, Geobacillus caldoxylosilyticus, and G. thermoglucosidasius, with 16S rRNA gene sequence identities of 97.6, 97.5 and 97.2%, respectively. Based on taxonomic and 16S rRNA analyses, strain SF03 was named G. caldoproteolyticus sp. nov. Production of extracellular protease from strain SF03 was observed on a basal peptone medium supplemented with different carbon and nitrogen sources. Protease production was repressed by glucose, lactose, and casamino acids but was enhanced by sucrose and NH4Cl. The cell growth and protease production were significantly improved when strain SF03 was cultivated on a 10% skim-milk culture medium, suggesting that the presence of protein induced the synthesis of protease. The protease produced by strain SF03 remained active over a pH range of 6.0-11.0 and a temperature range of 40-90 degrees C, with an optimal pH of 8.0-9.0 and an optimal temperature of 70-80 degrees C, respectively. The protease was stable over the temperature range of 40-70 degrees C and retained 57 and 38% of its activity at 80 and 90 degrees C, respectively, after 1 h.

  1. Analysis of the tryptophanase expression in Symbiobacterium thermophilum in a coculture with Geobacillus stearothermophilus.

    PubMed

    Watsuji, Tomo-O; Takano, Hideaki; Yamabe, Tomoya; Tamazawa, Satoshi; Ikemura, Hiroka; Ohishi, Takanori; Matsuda, Tohyo; Shiratori-Takano, Hatsumi; Beppu, Teruhiko; Ueda, Kenji

    2014-12-01

    The tryptophanase-positive Symbiobacterium thermophilum is a free-living syntrophic bacterium that grows effectively in a coculture with Geobacillus stearothermophilus. Our studies have shown that S. thermophilum growth depends on the high CO2 and low O2 condition established by the precedent growth of G. stearothermophilus. The use of an anoxic atmosphere containing high CO2 allows S. thermophilum to grow independently of G. stearothermophilus, but the cellular yield is ten times lower than that achieved in the coculture. In this study, we characterized the coculture-dependent expression and activity of tryptophanase in S. thermophilum. S. thermophilum cells accumulated a marked amount of indole in a coculture with G. stearothermophilus, but not in the bacterium's pure culture irrespective of the addition of tryptophan. S. thermophilum cells accumulated indole in its pure culture consisting of conditioned medium (medium supplied with culture supernatant of G. stearothermophilus). Proteomic analysis identified the protein specifically produced in the S. thermophilum cells grown in conditioned medium, which was a tryptophanase encoded by tna2 (STH439). An attempt to isolate the tryptophanase-inducing component from the culture supernatant of G. stearothermophilus was unsuccessful, but we did discover that the indole accumulation occurs when 10 mM bicarbonate is added to the medium. RT-PCR analysis showed that the addition of bicarbonate stimulated transcription of tna2. The transcriptional start site, identified within the tna2 promoter, was preceded by the -24 and -12 consensus sequences specified by an alternative sigma factor, σ(54). The evidence suggests that the transcription of some genes involved in amino acid metabolism is σ(54)-dependent, and that a bacterial enhancer-binding protein containing a PAS domain controls the transcription under the presence of high levels of bicarbonate.

  2. Molecular cloning, over expression and characterization of thermoalkalophilic esterases isolated from Geobacillus sp.

    PubMed

    Tekedar, Hasan Cihad; Sanlı-Mohamed, Gülşah

    2011-03-01

    Due to potential use for variety of biotechnological applications, genes encoding thermoalkalophilic esterase from three different Geobacillus strains isolated from thermal environmental samples in Balçova (Agamemnon) geothermal site were cloned and respective proteins were expressed in Escherichia coli (E.coli) and characterized in detail. Three esterases (Est1, Est2, Est3) were cloned directly by PCR amplification using consensus degenerate primers from genomic DNA of the strains Est1, Est2 and Est3 which were from mud, reinjection water and uncontrolled thermal leak, respectively. The genes contained an open reading frame (ORF) consisting of 741 bp for Est1 and Est2, which encoded 246 amino acids and ORF of Est3 was 729 bp encoded 242 amino acids. The esterase genes were expressed in E. coli and purified using His-Select HF nickel affinity gel. The molecular mass of the recombinant enzyme for each esterase was approximately 27.5 kDa. The three esterases showed high specific activity toward short chain p-NP esters. Recombinant Est1, Est2, Est3 have exhibited similar activity and the highest esterase activity of 1,100 U/mg with p-nitrophenyl acetate (pNPC(2)) as substrate was observed with Est1. All three esterase were most active around 65°C and pH 9.5-10.0. The effect of organic solvents, several metal ions, inhibitors and detergents on enzyme activity for purified Est1, Est2, Est3 were determined separately and compared.

  3. Inactivation of Geobacillus stearothermophilus spores by alkaline hydrolysis applied to medical waste treatment.

    PubMed

    Pinho, Sílvia C; Nunes, Olga C; Lobo-da-Cunha, Alexandre; Almeida, Manuel F

    2015-09-15

    Although alkaline hydrolysis treatment emerges as an alternative disinfection/sterilization method for medical waste, information on its effects on the inactivation of biological indicators is scarce. The effects of alkaline treatment on the resistance of Geobacillus stearothermophilus spores were investigated and the influence of temperature (80 °C, 100 °C and 110 °C) and NaOH concentration was evaluated. In addition, spore inactivation in the presence of animal tissues and discarded medical components, used as surrogate of medical waste, was also assessed. The effectiveness of the alkaline treatment was carried out by determination of survival curves and D-values. No significant differences were seen in D-values obtained at 80 °C and 100 °C for NaOH concentrations of 0.5 M and 0.75 M. The D-values obtained at 110 °C (2.3-0.5 min) were approximately 3 times lower than those at 100 °C (8.8-1.6 min). Independent of the presence of animal tissues and discarded medical components, 6 log10 reduction times varied between 66 and 5 min at 100 °C-0.1 M NaOH and 110 °C-1 M NaOH, respectively. The alkaline treatment may be used in future as a disinfection or sterilization alternative method for contaminated waste.

  4. The effects of microbial degradation on ignitable liquids.

    PubMed

    Turner, Dee A; Goodpaster, John V

    2009-05-01

    The identification of ignitable liquid residues in fire debris is a key finding for determining the cause and origin of a suspicious fire. However, the complex mixtures of organic compounds that comprise ignitable liquids are susceptible to microbiological attack following collection of the sample. Biodegradation can result in selective removal of many of the compounds required for identification of an ignitable liquid. Such degradation has been found to occur rapidly in substrates such as soil, rotting wood, or other organic matter. Furthermore, fire debris evidence must often be stored for extended periods at room temperature prior to analysis due to case backlogs and available evidence storage. Hence, extensive damage to ignitable liquid residues by microbes poses a significant threat to subsequent laboratory work. In this work, the effects of microbial degradation of ignitable liquids in soil have been evaluated as a function of time. Key findings include the loss of n-alkanes, particularly C(9)-C(16), which showed the most dramatic decrease in gasoline as well as the petroleum distillates, while branched alkanes remained unchanged. Monosubstituted benzenes also showed the most dramatic loss in gasoline. In the heavy petroleum distillates, n-alkanes with even carbon numbers were degraded more than n-alkanes with odd carbon numbers.

  5. Efficient and selective degradation of polyethylenes into liquid fuels and waxes under mild conditions

    PubMed Central

    Jia, Xiangqing; Qin, Chuan; Friedberger, Tobias; Guan, Zhibin; Huang, Zheng

    2016-01-01

    Polyethylene (PE) is the largest-volume synthetic polymer, and its chemical inertness makes its degradation by low-energy processes a challenging problem. We report a tandem catalytic cross alkane metathesis method for highly efficient degradation of polyethylenes under mild conditions. With the use of widely available, low-value, short alkanes (for example, petroleum ethers) as cross metathesis partners, different types of polyethylenes with various molecular weights undergo complete conversion into useful liquid fuels and waxes. This method shows excellent selectivity for linear alkane formation, and the degradation product distribution (liquid fuels versus waxes) can be controlled by the catalyst structure and reaction time. In addition, the catalysts are compatible with various polyolefin additives; therefore, common plastic wastes, such as postconsumer polyethylene bottles, bags, and films could be converted into valuable chemical feedstocks without any pretreatment. PMID:27386559

  6. Efficient and selective degradation of polyethylenes into liquid fuels and waxes under mild conditions.

    PubMed

    Jia, Xiangqing; Qin, Chuan; Friedberger, Tobias; Guan, Zhibin; Huang, Zheng

    2016-06-01

    Polyethylene (PE) is the largest-volume synthetic polymer, and its chemical inertness makes its degradation by low-energy processes a challenging problem. We report a tandem catalytic cross alkane metathesis method for highly efficient degradation of polyethylenes under mild conditions. With the use of widely available, low-value, short alkanes (for example, petroleum ethers) as cross metathesis partners, different types of polyethylenes with various molecular weights undergo complete conversion into useful liquid fuels and waxes. This method shows excellent selectivity for linear alkane formation, and the degradation product distribution (liquid fuels versus waxes) can be controlled by the catalyst structure and reaction time. In addition, the catalysts are compatible with various polyolefin additives; therefore, common plastic wastes, such as postconsumer polyethylene bottles, bags, and films could be converted into valuable chemical feedstocks without any pretreatment.

  7. Oxidation Products of Semi-volatile Alkanes by Hydroxyl Radicals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, H.; Worton, D. R.; Nah, T.; Goldstein, A. H.; Wilson, K. R.

    2013-12-01

    Alkanes are ubiquitous in the atmosphere and are important components that influence atmospheric chemistry. Semi-volatile alkanes are partitioned between the gas- and the particle-phases and can be readily oxidized in both phases. Previous studies have demonstrated that reaction rates and the products of OH oxidation are very different for organic compounds in the gas- and particle phases. In the present study, n-octadecane (C18H38), n-eicosane (C20H42), n-docosane (C22H46), n-tricosane (C24H50), and n-pentadecylcyclohexane (C21H42) were chosen as model compounds for semi-volatile alkanes to examine their OH-initiated oxidation reactions in a flow tube reactor. OH exposure was varied in the experiments, equivalent to oxidation of up to one week in the atmosphere. Oxidation products were collected on filters and analyzed using two-dimensional gas chromatography coupled to a high-resolution time-of-flight electron impact ionization and vacuum ultraviolet photoionization mass spectrometer. Most of the oxygenated higher molecular weight isomers were separated and quantified. Our results suggest that aerosol samples formed in the n-octadecane experiment were more oxidized than the other model compounds (i.e., functionalization products with three oxygen atoms per molecule compared to two oxygen atoms per molecule) at similar OH exposures and aerosol mass loadings. This is likely due to the concentration of n-octadecane in the gas phase where oxidation is more rapid. We find that the first-generation gas-phase oxidation products quickly partition to the particle phase after which higher-generation oxidation likely occurs in the particle phase. Interestingly, functionalized carbonyl isomers for the normal alkanes were only observed on the 4 carbon positions closest to the molecule end in all cases, which is in contrast to structure-reactivity relationship (SRR) predictions for gas-phase reactions. For n-octadecane, the concentrations of first-generation functionalization

  8. Genome Sequence of the Multiple-Protease-Producing Strain Geobacillus thermoleovorans N7, a Thermophilic Bacterium Isolated from Paniphala Hot Spring, West Bengal, India

    PubMed Central

    Bose, Sucharita; Mukherjee, Trinetra; Sen, Urmimala; Roy, Chayan; Rameez, Moidu Jameela; Ghosh, Wriddhiman

    2016-01-01

    Here, we present the draft genome sequence of Geobacillus thermoleovorans strain N7 (MCC 3175), isolated from Paniphala Hot Spring, West Bengal, India, which contains genes that encode several industrially and medically important thermostable enzymes like neutral protease, xylose isomerase, rhamnogalacturonan acetylesterase, nitrate and nitrite reductase, l-asparaginase, glutaminase, and RNase P. PMID:27789644

  9. Genome Sequence of the Multiple-Protease-Producing Strain Geobacillus thermoleovorans N7, a Thermophilic Bacterium Isolated from Paniphala Hot Spring, West Bengal, India.

    PubMed

    Bose, Sucharita; Mukherjee, Trinetra; Sen, Urmimala; Roy, Chayan; Rameez, Moidu Jameela; Ghosh, Wriddhiman; Mukhopadhyay, Subhra Kanti

    2016-10-27

    Here, we present the draft genome sequence of Geobacillus thermoleovorans strain N7 (MCC 3175), isolated from Paniphala Hot Spring, West Bengal, India, which contains genes that encode several industrially and medically important thermostable enzymes like neutral protease, xylose isomerase, rhamnogalacturonan acetylesterase, nitrate and nitrite reductase, l-asparaginase, glutaminase, and RNase P.

  10. Characterization of a thermostable raw-starch hydrolyzing α-amylase from deep-sea thermophile Geobacillus sp.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Tao; Cai, Menghao; Huang, Mengmeng; He, Hao; Lu, Jian; Zhou, Xiangshan; Zhang, Yuanxing

    2015-10-01

    A deep-sea thermophile, Geobacillus sp. 4j, was identified to grow on starch and produce thermostable amylase. N-terminally truncated form of Geobacillus sp. 4j α-amylase (Gs4j-amyA) was fused at its N-terminal end with the signal peptide of outer membrane protein A (OmpA) of Escherichia coli. The enzyme was over-expressed in E. coli BL21 with a maximum extracellular production of 130U/ml in shake flask. The yield of the transformant increased 22-fold as compared with that of the wild strain. The recombinant enzyme purified to apparent homogeneity by metal-affinity chromatography, exhibited a molecular mass of 62kDa. It displayed the maximal activity at 60-65°C and pH 5.5. Its half-life (t1/2) at 80°C was 4.25h with a temperature deactivation energy of 166.3kJ/mol. Compared to three commonly used commercial α-amylases, the Gs4j-amyA exhibited similar thermostable performance to BLA but better than BAA and BSA. It also showed a universally efficient raw starch hydrolysis performance superior to commercial α-amylases at an acidic pH approaching nature of starch slurry. As a new acidic-resistant thermostable α-amylase, it has the potential to bypass the industrial gelatinization step in raw starch hydrolysis.

  11. Thermostable hemicellulases of a bacterium, Geobacillus sp. DC3, isolated from the former Homestake gold mine in Lead, South Dakota.

    PubMed

    Bergdale, Terran E; Hughes, Stephen R; Bang, Sookie S

    2014-04-01

    A thermophilic strain, Geobacillus sp. DC3, capable of producing hemicellulolytic enzymes was isolated from the 1.5-km depth of the former Homestake gold mine in Lead, South Dakota. The DC3 strain expressed a high level of extracellular endoxylanase at 39.5 U/mg protein with additional hemicellulases including β-xylosidase (0.209 U/mg) and arabinofuranosidase (0.230 U/mg), after the bacterium was grown in xylan for 24 h. Partially purified DC3 endoxylanase exhibited a molecular mass of approximately 43 kDa according to zymography with an optimal pH of 7 and optimal temperature of 70 °C. The kinetic constants, K m and V max, were 13.8 mg/mL and 77.5 μmol xylose/min·mg xylan, respectively. The endoxylanase was highly stable and maintained 70 % of its original activity after 16 h incubation at 70 °C. The thermostable properties and presence of three different hemicellulases of Geobacillus sp. DC3 strain support its potential application for industrial hydrolysis of renewable biomass such as lignocelluloses.

  12. Direct fermentation of potato starch and potato residues to lactic acid by Geobacillus stearothermophilus under non-sterile conditions

    PubMed Central

    Smerilli, Marina; Neureiter, Markus; Wurz, Stefan; Haas, Cornelia; Frühauf, Sabine; Fuchs, Werner

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND Lactic acid is an important biorefinery platform chemical. The use of thermophilic amylolytic microorganisms to produce lactic acid by fermentation constitutes an efficient strategy to reduce operating costs, including raw materials and sterilization costs. RESULTS A process for the thermophilic production of lactic acid by Geobacillus stearothermophilus directly from potato starch was characterized and optimized. Geobacillus stearothermophilus DSM 494 was selected out of 12 strains screened for amylolytic activity and the ability to form lactic acid as the major product of the anaerobic metabolism. In total more than 30 batches at 3–l scale were run at 60 °C under non-sterile conditions. The process developed produced 37 g L−1 optically pure (98%) L-lactic acid in 20 h from 50 g L−1 raw potato starch. As co-metabolites smaller amounts (<7% w/v) of acetate, formate and ethanol were formed. Yields of lactic acid increased from 66% to 81% when potato residues from food processing were used as a starchy substrate in place of raw potato starch. CONCLUSIONS Potato starch and residues were successfully converted to lactic acid by G. stearothermophilus. The process described in this study provides major benefits in industrial applications and for the valorization of starch-rich waste streams. © 2015 The Authors.Journal of Chemical Technology & Biotechnology published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of Society of Chemical Industry. PMID:25937690

  13. Evidence-based validation of quorum quenching from Lysinibacillus sphaericus and Geobacillus sp. in bioremediation of oil sludge.

    PubMed

    Gómez-Garzón, Camilo; Dussán, Jenny

    2017-01-01

    Many studies on quorum quenching focus on the discovery and characterization of novel acyl-homoserine lactonases (AHL-lactonases) because these enzymes could be used in the control of diseases caused by Gram-negative bacteria. The effects of quorum quenching are also remarkable in the performance of bacterial consortia in applications such as bioremediation. In the current work, we demonstrated the presence of a potential novel AHL-lactonase-encoding locus (Bsph_3377) from Lysinibacillus sphaericus and Geobacillus sp. The deduced amino acid sequences for this enzyme possess the characteristic domains and motifs involved in Zn-binding from AHL lactonases and were grouped into 1 clade within the phylogeny of the lactonases from firmicutes, showing 70% of identity with the lactonase AhlS from Solibacillus silvestris. We demonstrated the locus transcription by RT-qPCR and its relationship with the suppression of the pathogenicity of Pectobacterium carotovorum. Additionally, we analyzed the interaction of these bacilli with a commercial consortium in the bioremediation of a hydrocarbon-contaminated soil, showing inhibitory effects on its establishment. These results represent a new contribution in the understanding of the potential biotechnological applications of L. sphaericus and Geobacillus sp. as well as in the research on antibacterial techniques based on quorum-sensing disruption.

  14. Stereoselective microbial dehalorespiration with vicinal dichlorinated alkanes.

    PubMed

    De Wildeman, Stefaan; Diekert, Gabriele; Van Langenhove, Herman; Verstraete, Willy

    2003-09-01

    The suspected carcinogen 1,2-dichloroethane (1,2-DCA) is the most abundant chlorinated C(2) groundwater pollutant on earth. However, a reductive in situ detoxification technology for this compound does not exist. Although anaerobic dehalorespiring bacteria are known to catalyze several dechlorination steps in the reductive-degradation pathway of chlorinated ethenes and ethanes, no appropriate isolates that selectively and metabolically convert them into completely dechlorinated end products in defined growth media have been reported. Here we report on the isolation of Desulfitobacterium dichloroeliminans strain DCA1, a nutritionally defined anaerobic dehalorespiring bacterium that selectively converts 1,2-dichloroethane and all possible vicinal dichloropropanes and -butanes into completely dechlorinated end products. Menaquinone was identified as an essential cofactor for growth of strain DCA1 in pure culture. Strain DCA1 converts chiral chlorosubstrates, revealing the presence of a stereoselective dehalogenase that exclusively catalyzes an energy-conserving anti mechanistic dichloroelimination. Unlike any known dehalorespiring isolate, strain DCA1 does not carry out reductive hydrogenolysis reactions but rather exclusively dichloroeliminates its substrates. This unique dehalorespiratory biochemistry has shown promising application possibilities for bioremediation purposes and fine-chemical synthesis.

  15. Nutrients can enhance the abundance and expression of alkane hydroxylase CYP153 gene in the rhizosphere of ryegrass planted in hydrocarbon-polluted soil.

    PubMed

    Arslan, Muhammad; Afzal, Muhammad; Amin, Imran; Iqbal, Samina; Khan, Qaiser M

    2014-01-01

    Plant-bacteria partnership is a promising strategy for the remediation of soil and water polluted with hydrocarbons. However, the limitation of major nutrients (N, P and K) in soil affects the survival and metabolic activity of plant associated bacteria. The objective of this study was to explore the effects of nutrients on survival and metabolic activity of an alkane degrading rhizo-bacterium. Annual ryegrass (Lolium multiflorum) was grown in diesel-contaminated soil and inoculated with an alkane degrading bacterium, Pantoea sp. strain BTRH79, in greenhouse experiments. Two levels of nutrients were applied and plant growth, hydrocarbon removal, and gene abundance and expression were determined after 100 days of sowing of ryegrass. Results obtained from these experiments showed that the bacterial inoculation improved plant growth and hydrocarbon degradation and these were further enhanced by nutrients application. Maximum plant biomass production and hydrocarbon mineralization was observed by the combined use of inoculum and higher level of nutrients. The presence of nutrients in soil enhanced the colonization and metabolic activity of the inoculated bacterium in the rhizosphere. The abundance and expression of CYP153 gene in the rhizosphere of ryegrass was found to be directly associated with the level of applied nutrients. Enhanced hydrocarbon degradation was associated with the population of the inoculum bacterium, the abundance and expression of CYP153 gene in the rhizosphere of ryegrass. It is thus concluded that the combination between vegetation, inoculation with pollutant-degrading bacteria and nutrients amendment was an efficient approach to reduce hydrocarbon contamination.

  16. Nutrients Can Enhance the Abundance and Expression of Alkane Hydroxylase CYP153 Gene in the Rhizosphere of Ryegrass Planted in Hydrocarbon-Polluted Soil

    PubMed Central

    Arslan, Muhammad; Afzal, Muhammad; Amin, Imran; Iqbal, Samina; Khan, Qaiser M.

    2014-01-01

    Plant-bacteria partnership is a promising strategy for the remediation of soil and water polluted with hydrocarbons. However, the limitation of major nutrients (N, P and K) in soil affects the survival and metabolic activity of plant associated bacteria. The objective of this study was to explore the effects of nutrients on survival and metabolic activity of an alkane degrading rhizo-bacterium. Annual ryegrass (Lolium multiflorum) was grown in diesel-contaminated soil and inoculated with an alkane degrading bacterium, Pantoea sp. strain BTRH79, in greenhouse experiments. Two levels of nutrients were applied and plant growth, hydrocarbon removal, and gene abundance and expression were determined after 100 days of sowing of ryegrass. Results obtained from these experiments showed that the bacterial inoculation improved plant growth and hydrocarbon degradation and these were further enhanced by nutrients application. Maximum plant biomass production and hydrocarbon mineralization was observed by the combined use of inoculum and higher level of nutrients. The presence of nutrients in soil enhanced the colonization and metabolic activity of the inoculated bacterium in the rhizosphere. The abundance and expression of CYP153 gene in the rhizosphere of ryegrass was found to be directly associated with the level of applied nutrients. Enhanced hydrocarbon degradation was associated with the population of the inoculum bacterium, the abundance and expression of CYP153 gene in the rhizosphere of ryegrass. It is thus concluded that the combination between vegetation, inoculation with pollutant-degrading bacteria and nutrients amendment was an efficient approach to reduce hydrocarbon contamination. PMID:25360680

  17. Site isolation in vanadium phosphorus oxide alkane oxidation

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, M R; Ebner, J R

    1991-06-01

    Single crystal X-ray diffraction studies of vanadyl pyrophosphate indicate that at least two polytypical structures exists for this active and selective alkane oxidation catalyst. The crystal structures of these materials differ with respect to the symmetry and direction of columns of vanadyl groups within the unit cell. Single crystals of vanadyl pyrophosphate have been generated at extreme temperatures not often experienced by microcrystalline catalysts. The crystallography of the system suggests that other crystalline modifications or disordered phases might also exist. Zeroth-order models of crystal surface termination of vanadyl pyrophosphate have been constructed which conceptually illustrate the ability of vanadyl pyrophosphate to accommodate varying amounts of surface phosphorus parallel to (1,0,0), (0,1,0) and (0,2,4). Pyrophosphate termination of surfaces parallel to (1,0,0) likely results in the isolation of clusters of reactive centers and limits overoxidation of the alkane substrate. 23 refs., 6 figs.

  18. Alkane Coiling in Perfluoroalkane Solutions: A New Primitive Solvophobic Effect.

    PubMed

    Morgado, Pedro; Garcia, Ana Rosa; Martins, Luís F G; Ilharco, Laura M; Filipe, Eduardo J M

    2017-10-02

    In this work, we demonstrate that n-alkanes coil when mixed with perfluoroalkanes, changing their conformational equilibria to more globular states, with a higher number of gauche conformations. The new coiling effect is here observed in fluids governed exclusively by dispersion interactions, contrary to other examples in which hydrogen bonding and polarity play important roles. FTIR spectra of liquid mixtures of n-hexane and perfluorohexane unambiguously reveal that the population of n-hexane molecules in all-trans conformation reduces from 32% in the pure n-alkane to practically zero. The spectra of perfluorohexane remain unchanged, suggesting nanosegregation of the hydrogenated and fluorinated chains. Molecular dynamics simulations support this analysis. The new solvophobic effect is prone to have a major impact on the structure, organization, and therefore thermodynamic properties and phase equilibria of fluids involving mixed hydrogenated and fluorinated chains.

  19. Natural neo acids and neo alkanes: their analogs and derivatives.

    PubMed

    Dembitsky, Valery M

    2006-04-01

    This review presents more than 260 naturally occurring (as well as 47 synthesized) neo fatty (carboxylic) acids, neo alkanes, and their analogs and derivatives, isolated and identified from plants, algae, fungi, marine invertebrates, and microorganisms, that demonstrate different biological activities. These natural metabolites are good prospects for future chemical preparations as antioxidants, and also as anticancer, antimicrobial, and antibacterial agents. Described also are some synthetic bioactive compounds containing a tertiary butyl group(s) that have shown high anticancer, antifungal, and other activities. Applications of some neo fatty (carboxylic) acid derivatives in cosmetic, agronomic, and pharmaceutical industries also are considered. This is the first review to consider naturally occurring neo fatty (carboxylic) acids, neo alkanes, and other metabolites containing a tertiary butyl group(s) [or tert-butyl unit(s)].

  20. Adsorption of n-alkane vapours at the water surface.

    PubMed

    Biscay, Frédéric; Ghoufi, Aziz; Malfreyt, Patrice

    2011-06-21

    Monte Carlo simulations are reported here to predict the surface tension of the liquid-vapour interface of water upon adsorption of alkane vapours (methane to hexane). A decrease of the surface tension has been established from n-pentane. A correlation has been evidenced between the decrease of the surface tension and the absence of specific arrangement at the water surface for n-pentane and n-hexane. The thermodynamic stability of the adsorption layer and the absence of film for longer alkanes have been checked through the calculation of a potential of mean force. This complements the work recently published [Ghoufi et al., Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys., 2010, 12, 5203] concerning the adsorption of methane at the water surface. The decrease of the surface tension has been interpreted in terms of the degree of hydrogen bonding of water molecules at the liquid-vapour interface upon adsorption.

  1. Melting of thin films of alkanes on magnesium oxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arnold, T.; Barbour, A.; Chanaa, S.; Cook, R. E.; Fernandez-Canato, D.; Landry, P.; Seydel, T.; Yaron, P.; Larese, J. Z.

    2009-02-01

    Recent incoherent neutron scattering investigations of the dynamics of thin alkane films adsorbed on the Magnesium Oxide (100) surface are reported. There are marked differences in the behaviour of these films, as a function of temperature and coverage, compared to similar measurements on graphite. In particular, it has previously been shown that adsorbed multilayer films on graphite exhibit an interfacial solid monolayer that coexists with bulk-like liquid, well above the bulk melting point. In contrast, these studies show that the alkane films on MgO exhibit no such stabilization of the solid layer closest to the substrate as a function of the film thickness, even though the monolayer crystal structures are remarkably similar. These studies are supported by extensive thermodynamic data, a growing body of structural data from neutron diffraction and state of the art computer modelling

  2. Structure and dynamics of fluorinated alkanes on silicon dioxide surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsige, Mesfin

    2007-03-01

    Despite their great promise in various applications, the structure and dynamics of fluorinated alkanes at interfaces is still an open question. In particular, the knowledge from both theoretical and experimental perspectives is very limited when it comes to understanding the interface between these systems and a solid substrate. Molecular dynamics simulations based on the All Atom OPLS model are used to predict the equilibrium structure and dynamics of short fluorinated alkanes on both amorphous and crystalline silicon dioxide surfaces. In order to understand the effect of layer-layer interaction on the ordering of chains in a given layer, the thickness of the liquid film is increased layer-by-layer from monolayer to multilayers. Results for structural and dynamics of the liquid films near the silicon dioxide surfaces will be presented.

  3. The vibrational spectrum of water in liquid alkanes.

    PubMed Central

    Conrad, M P; Strauss, H L

    1985-01-01

    The water wire hypothesis of hydrogen-ion transport in lipid bilayers has prompted a search for water aggregates in bulk hydrocarbons. The asymmetric stretching vibration of the water dissolved in n-decane and in a number of other alkanes and alkenes has been observed. The water band in the alkanes is very wide and fits to the results of a J-diffusion calculation for the water rotation. This implies that the water is freely rotating between collisions with the solvent and certainly not hydrogen bonded to anything. The existence of water aggregates is thus most unlikely. In contrast, water in an alkene is hydrogen bonded to the solvent molecules (although not to other water molecules) and shows an entirely different spectrum. PMID:4016205

  4. Metal-organic framework for the separation of alkane isomers

    DOEpatents

    Long, Jeffrey R.; Herm, Zoey R.; Wiers, Brian M.; Krishna, Rajamani

    2017-01-10

    A metal organic framework Fe.sub.2(bdp).sub.3 (BDP.sup.2-=1,4-benzenedipyrazolate) with triangular channels is particularly suited for C5-C7 separations of alkanes according to the number of branches in the molecule rather than by carbon number. The metal-organic framework can offer pore geometries that is unavailable in zeolites or other porous media, facilitating distinct types of shape-based molecular separations.

  5. Alkane Biosynthesis Genes in Cyanobacteria and Their Transcriptional Organization

    PubMed Central

    Klähn, Stephan; Baumgartner, Desirée; Pfreundt, Ulrike; Voigt, Karsten; Schön, Verena; Steglich, Claudia; Hess, Wolfgang R.

    2014-01-01

    In cyanobacteria, alkanes are synthesized from a fatty acyl-ACP by two enzymes, acyl–acyl carrier protein reductase and aldehyde deformylating oxygenase. Despite the great interest in the exploitation for biofuel production, nothing is known about the transcriptional organization of their genes or the physiological function of alkane synthesis. The comparison of 115 microarray datasets indicates the relatively constitutive expression of aar and ado genes. The analysis of 181 available genomes showed that in 90% of the genomes both genes are present, likely indicating their physiological relevance. In 61% of them they cluster together with genes encoding acetyl-CoA carboxyl transferase and a short-chain dehydrogenase, strengthening the link to fatty acid metabolism and in 76% of the genomes they are located in tandem, suggesting constraints on the gene arrangement. However, contrary to the expectations for an operon, we found in Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 specific promoters for the two genes, sll0208 (ado) and sll0209 (aar), which give rise to monocistronic transcripts. Moreover, the upstream located ado gene is driven by a proximal as well as a second, distal, promoter, from which a third transcript, the ~160 nt sRNA SyR9 is transcribed. Thus, the transcriptional organization of the alkane biosynthesis genes in Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 is of substantial complexity. We verified all three promoters to function independently from each other and show a similar promoter arrangement also in the more distant Nodularia spumigena, Trichodesmium erythraeum, Anabaena sp. PCC 7120, Prochlorococcus MIT9313, and MED4. The presence of separate regulatory elements and the dominance of monocistronic mRNAs suggest the possible autonomous regulation of ado and aar. The complex transcriptional organization of the alkane synthesis gene cluster has possible metabolic implications and should be considered when manipulating the expression of these genes in cyanobacteria. PMID

  6. Removal of alkanes from drinking water using membrane technologies

    SciTech Connect

    Fronk, C.A.

    1995-10-01

    Increasingly, the public is concerned about the quality of its drinking water. The chlorinated alkanes are saturated, aliphatic, synthetic organic compounds (SOC`s). When hydrocarbon feedstocks are chlorinated, a wide variety of chlorocarbons and chlorohydrocarbons are produced that are used as industrial solvents, degreasers and intermediaries. Because compounds such as Carbon Tetrachloride and 1,2-Dichloroethane are widely used, they often find their way into drinking water, particularly groundwaters. Surface waters are somewhat less affected bemuse of the high volatility of many chlorinated alkanes. The Drinking Water Research Division is responsible for evaluating various membrane technologies that may be feasible for meeting Maximum Contaminant Levels. Several membrane processes are under investigation to determine their effectiveness in removing SOC`s from drinking water. One study addressed the removal of a variety of alkanes from spiked groundwater by six reverse osmosis membranes: a cellulose acetate, a polyamide (hollow fiber), and four different types of thin-film composite membranes. Progressive chlorination of methanes, ethanes and propanes produces compounds that exhibit differing physicochemical properties. The differences in compound properties have an effect on the removal of these compounds by reverse osmosis membranes. For example only 25% of the methylene chloride (Dichloromethane) was removed by one thin-film composite versus 90% removal of the carbon tetrachloride. In addition, the various membranes are made of different polymeric materials and showed a wide range of removals. Generally, the thin-film composite membranes out performed the other membranes and the more highly chlorinated the compound the better the removal. Pervaporation is yet another membrane process that may prove effective in removal of alkanes and future studies will address its usefulness as a drinking water.

  7. Monolayer solids of short (perfluoro)alkanes on graphite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bruch, L. W.

    2009-03-01

    Calculations are reported for the relative stability of monolayer solid latices on graphite for C2H6, C3H8, C2F6, and C3F8. Triangular, centered rectangular and two-sublattice herringbone lattices are treated. The calculations use all-atom (AA) models and are based on non-bonding interactions formulated for three dimensional dense phases of alkanes and perfluoroalkanes.

  8. Alkane production from biomass: chemo-, bio- and integrated catalytic approaches.

    PubMed

    Deneyer, Aron; Renders, Tom; Van Aelst, Joost; Van den Bosch, Sander; Gabriëls, Dries; Sels, Bert F

    2015-12-01

    Linear, branched and cyclic alkanes are important intermediates and end products of the chemical industry and are nowadays mainly obtained from fossil resources. In search for alternatives, biomass feedstocks are often presented as a renewable carbon source for the production of fuels, chemicals and materials. However, providing a complete market for all these applications seems unrealistic due to both financial and logistic issues. Despite the very large scale of current alkane-based fuel applications, biomass definitely has the potential to offer a partial solution to the fuel business. For the smaller market of chemicals and materials, a transition to biomass as main carbon source is more realistic and even probably unavoidable in the long term. The appropriate use and further development of integrated chemo- and biotechnological (catalytic) process strategies will be crucial to successfully accomplish this petro-to-bio feedstock transition. Furthermore, a selection of the most promising technologies from the available chemo- and biocatalytic tool box is presented. New opportunities will certainly arise when multidisciplinary approaches are further explored in the future. In an attempt to select the most appropriate biomass sources for each specific alkane-based application, a diagram inspired by van Krevelen is applied, taking into account both the C-number and the relative functionality of the product molecules. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Biochemical studies on the metabolic activation of halogenated alkanes.

    PubMed Central

    Cheeseman, K H; Albano, E F; Tomasi, A; Slater, T F

    1985-01-01

    This paper reviews recent investigations by Slater and colleagues into the metabolic activation of halogenated alkanes in general and carbon tetrachloride in particular. It is becoming increasingly accepted that free radical intermediates are involved in the toxicity of many such compounds through mechanisms including lipid peroxidation, covalent binding, and cofactor depletion. Here we describe the experimental approaches that are used to establish that halogenated alkanes are metabolized in animal tissues to reactive free radicals. Electron spin resonance spectroscopy is used to identify free-radical products, often using spin-trapping compounds. The generation of specific free radicals by radiolytic methods is useful in the determination of the precise reactivity of radical intermediates postulated to be injurious to the cell. The enzymic mechanism of the production of such free radicals and their subsequent reactions with biological molecules is studied with specific metabolic inhibitors and free-radical scavengers. These combined techniques provide considerable insight into the process of metabolic activation of halogenated compounds. It is readily apparent, for instance, that the local oxygen concentration at the site of activation is of crucial importance to the subsequent reactions; the formation of peroxy radical derivatives from the primary free-radical product is shown to be of great significance in relation to carbon tetrachloride and may be of general importance. However, while these studies have provided much information on the biochemical mechanisms of halogenated alkane toxicity, it is clear that many problems remain to be solved. PMID:3007102

  10. Dielectric constant of liquid alkanes and hydrocarbon mixtures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sen, A. D.; Anicich, V. G.; Arakelian, T.

    1992-01-01

    The complex dielectric constants of n-alkanes with two to seven carbon atoms have been measured. The measurements were conducted using a slotted-line technique at 1.2 GHz and at atmospheric pressure. The temperature was varied from the melting point to the boiling point of the respective alkanes. The real part of the dielectric constant was found to decrease with increasing temperature and correlate with the change in the molar volume. An upper limit to all the loss tangents was established at 0.001. The complex dielectric constants of a few mixtures of liquid alkanes were also measured at room temperature. For a pentane-octane mixture the real part of the dielectric constant could be explained by the Clausius-Mosotti theory. For the mixtures of n-hexane-ethylacetate and n-hexane-acetone the real part of the dielectric constants could be explained by the Onsager theory extended to mixtures. The dielectric constant of the n-hexane-acetone mixture displayed deviations from the Onsager theory at the highest fractions of acetone. The dipole moments of ethylacetate and acetone were determined for dilute mixtures using the Onsager theory and were found to be in agreement with their accepted gas-phase values. The loss tangents of the mixtures exhibited a linear relationship with the volume fraction for low concentrations of the polar liquids.

  11. Modeling SOA production from the oxidation of intermediate volatility alkanes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aumont, B.; Mouchel-Vallon, C.; Camredon, M.; Lee-Taylor, J.; Madronich, S.

    2012-12-01

    Secondary Organic Aerosols (SOA) production and ageing is a multigenerational oxidation process involving the formation of successive organic compounds with higher oxidation degree and lower vapour pressure. This process was investigated using the explicit oxidation model GECKO-A (Generator for Explicit Chemistry and Kinetics of Organics in the Atmosphere). Results for the C8-C24 n-alkane series show the expected trends, i.e. (i) SOA yield grows with the carbon backbone of the parent hydrocarbon, (ii) SOA yields decreases with the decreasing pre-existing organic aerosol concentration, (iii) the number of generations required to describe SOA production increases when the pre-existing organic aerosol concentration decreases. Most SOA contributors were found to be not oxidized enough to be categorized as highly oxygenated organic aerosols (OOA) but reduced enough to be categorized as hydrocarbon like organic aerosols (HOA). Branched alkanes are more prone to fragment in the early stage of the oxidation than their corresponding linear analogues. Fragmentation is expected to alter both the yield and the mean oxidation state of the SOA. Here, GECKO-A is applied to generate highly detailed oxidation schemes for various series of branched and cyclised alkanes. Branching and cyclisation effects on SOA yields and oxidation states will be examined.

  12. Dielectric constant of liquid alkanes and hydrocarbon mixtures.

    PubMed

    Sen, A D; Anicich, V G; Arakelian, T

    1992-01-01

    The complex dielectric constants of n-alkanes with two to seven carbon atoms have been measured. The measurements were conducted using a slotted-line technique at 1.2 GHz and at atmospheric pressure. The temperature was varied from the melting point to the boiling point of the respective alkanes. The real part of the dielectric constant was found to decrease with increasing temperature and correlate with the change in the molar volume. An upper limit to all the loss tangents was established at 0.001. The complex dielectric constants of a few mixtures of liquid alkanes were also measured at room temperature. For a pentane-octane mixture the real part of the dielectric constant could be explained by the Clausius-Mosotti theory. For the mixtures of n-hexane-ethylacetate and n-hexane-acetone the real part of the dielectric constants could be explained by the Onsager theory extended to mixtures. The dielectric constant of the n-hexane-acetone mixture displayed deviations from the Onsager theory at the highest fractions of acetone. The dipole moments of ethylacetate and acetone were determined for dilute mixtures using the Onsager theory and were found to be in agreement with their accepted gas-phase values. The loss tangents of the mixtures exhibited a linear relationship with the volume fraction for low concentrations of the polar liquids.

  13. Dielectric constant of liquid alkanes and hydrocarbon mixtures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sen, A. D.; Anicich, V. G.; Arakelian, T.

    1992-01-01

    The complex dielectric constants of n-alkanes with two to seven carbon atoms have been measured. The measurements were conducted using a slotted-line technique at 1.2 GHz and at atmospheric pressure. The temperature was varied from the melting point to the boiling point of the respective alkanes. The real part of the dielectric constant was found to decrease with increasing temperature and correlate with the change in the molar volume. An upper limit to all the loss tangents was established at 0.001. The complex dielectric constants of a few mixtures of liquid alkanes were also measured at room temperature. For a pentane-octane mixture the real part of the dielectric constant could be explained by the Clausius-Mosotti theory. For the mixtures of n-hexane-ethylacetate and n-hexane-acetone the real part of the dielectric constants could be explained by the Onsager theory extended to mixtures. The dielectric constant of the n-hexane-acetone mixture displayed deviations from the Onsager theory at the highest fractions of acetone. The dipole moments of ethylacetate and acetone were determined for dilute mixtures using the Onsager theory and were found to be in agreement with their accepted gas-phase values. The loss tangents of the mixtures exhibited a linear relationship with the volume fraction for low concentrations of the polar liquids.

  14. Dihydrogen contacts in alkanes are subtle but not faint.

    PubMed

    Echeverría, Jorge; Aullón, Gabriel; Danovich, David; Shaik, Sason; Alvarez, Santiago

    2011-04-01

    Alkane molecules are held together in the crystal state by purportedly weak homonuclear R-H···H-R dihydrogen interactions. In an apparent contradiction, the high melting points and vaporization enthalpies of polyhedranes in condensed phases require quite strong intermolecular interactions. Two questions arise: 'How strong can a weak C-H···H-C bond be?' and 'How do the size and topology of the carbon skeleton affect these bonding interactions?' A systematic computational study of intermolecular interactions in dimers of n-alkanes and polyhedranes, such as tetrahedrane, cubane, octahedrane or dodecahedrane, showed that attractive C-H···H-C interactions are stronger than usually thought. We identified factors that account for the strength of these interactions, including the tertiary nature of the carbon atoms and their low pyramidality. An alkane with a bowl shape was designed in the search for stronger dihydrogen intermolecular bonding, and a dissociation energy as high as 12 kJ mol⁻¹ is predicted by our calculations.

  15. On the inclusion of alkanes into the monolayer of aliphatic alcohols at the water/alkane vapor interface: a quantum chemical approach.

    PubMed

    Vysotsky, Yuri B; Fomina, Elena S; Belyaeva, Elena A; Fainerman, Valentin B; Vollhardt, Dieter

    2013-02-14

    In the framework of the quantum chemical semiempirical PM3 method thermodynamic and structural parameters of the formation and clusterization of aliphatic alcohols C(n)H(2n+1)OH (n(OH) = 8-16) at 298 K at the water/alkane vapor C(n)H(2n+2), (n(CH(3)) = 6-16) interface were calculated. The dependencies of enthalpy, entropy and Gibbs' energy of clusterization per one monomer molecule of 2D films on the alkyl chain length of corresponding alcohols and alkanes, the molar fraction of alkanes in the monolayers and the immersion degree of alcohol molecules into the water phase were shown to be linear or stepwise. The threshold of spontaneous clusterization of aliphatic alcohols at the water/alkane vapor interface was 10-11 carbon atoms at 298 K which is in line with experimental data at the air/water interface. It is shown that the presence of alkane vapor does not influence the process of alcohol monolayer formation. The structure of these monolayers is analogous to those obtained at the air/water interface in agreement with experimental data. The inclusion of alkane molecules into the amphiphilic monolayer at the water/alkane vapor interface is possible for amphiphiles with the spontaneous clusterization threshold at the air/water interface (n(s)(0)) of at least 16 methylene units in the alkyl chain, and it does not depend on the molar fraction of alkanes in the corresponding monolayer. The inclusion of alkanes from the vapor phase into the amphiphilic monolayer also requires that the difference between the alkyl chain lengths of alcohols and alkanes is not larger than n(s)(0) - 15 and n(s)(0) - 14 for the 2D film 1 and 2D film 2, respectively.

  16. Probing the structure of liquids with 129Xe NMR spectroscopy: n-alkanes, cycloalkanes, and branched alkanes.

    PubMed

    Morgado, Pedro; Bonifácio, Rui; Martins, Luís F G; Filipe, Eduardo J M

    2013-08-01

    The liquid organization of linear, branched, and cyclic alkanes was studied using atomic (129)Xe as a NMR probe. (129)Xe chemical shifts have been experimentally determined for xenon dissolved in a total of 21 alkanes. In order to allow the comparison of the different solvents at similar thermodynamic conditions, the measurements were performed over a wide range of temperatures, from the melting point of the solvent up to 350 K. The results were rationalized in terms of the density, nature, and organization of the chemical groups within xenon's coordination sphere. Additionally, molecular dynamics simulations were performed using established atomistic force fields to interpret and clarify the conclusions suggested by the experimental results. The analysis is able to interpret previous results in the literature for ethane and propane at very different experimental conditions.

  17. Isolation and characterization of crude-oil-degrading bacteria from the Persian Gulf and the Caspian Sea.

    PubMed

    Hassanshahian, Mehdi; Emtiazi, Giti; Cappello, Simone

    2012-01-01

    Twenty-five crude-oil-degrading bacteria were isolated from oil-contaminated sites in the Persian Gulf and the Caspian Sea. Based on a high growth rate on crude oil and on hydrocarbon degradation ability, 11 strains were selected from the 25 isolated strains for further study. Determination of the nucleotide sequence of the 16S rRNA gene showed that these isolated strains belonged to genera Acinetobacter, Pseudomonas, Gordonia, Rhodococcus, Cobetia, Halomonas, Alcanivorax, Marinobacter and Microbacterium. Among the 11 isolates, strains BS (Acinetobacter calcoaceticus, 98%) and PG-12 (Alcanivorax dieselolei, 98%) were the most effective in degrading crude oil. Rate of crude-oil degradation of 82% (isolate BS) and 71% (isolate PG-12) were observed after 1 week of cultivation in mineral medium. These strains had high emulsification activity and biosurfactant production. GC-MS analysis showed that A. dieselolei PG-12 can degrade different alkanes in crude oil. Screening of the distribution of the alkane hydroxylase gene in 25 isolates in relation to the source of isolation indicated that the group (II) alkane hydroxylase is prevalent in the Caspian Sea, but in the Persian Gulf, the frequency of the group (III) alkane hydroxylase gene is greater than that of the group (II) alkane hydroxylase gene.

  18. Highly thermostable GH39 β-xylosidase from a Geobacillus sp. strain WSUCF1.

    PubMed

    Bhalla, Aditya; Bischoff, Kenneth M; Sani, Rajesh K

    2014-12-23

    Complete enzymatic hydrolysis of xylan to xylose requires the action of endoxylanase and β-xylosidase. β-xylosidases play an important part in hydrolyzing xylo-oligosaccharides to xylose. Thermostable β-xylosidases have been a focus of attention as industrially important enzymes due to their long shelf life and role in the relief of end-product inhibition of xylanases caused by xylo-oligosaccharides. Therefore, a highly thermostable β-xylosidase with high specific activity has significant potential in lignocellulose bioconversion. A gene encoding a highly thermostable GH39 β-xylosidase was cloned from Geobacillus sp. strain WSUCF1 and expressed in Escherichia coli. Recombinant β-xylosidase was active over a wide range of temperatures and pH with optimum temperature of 70 °C and pH 6.5. It exhibited very high thermostability, retaining 50% activity at 70 °C after 9 days. WSUCF1 β-xylosidase is more thermostable than β-xylosidases reported from other thermophiles (growth temperature ≤ 70 °C). Specific activity was 133 U/mg when incubated with p-nitrophenyl xylopyranoside, with Km and Vmax values of 2.38 mM and 147 U/mg, respectively. SDS-PAGE analysis indicated that the recombinant enzyme had a mass of 58 kDa, but omitting heating prior to electrophoresis increased the apparent mass to 230 kDa, suggesting the enzyme exists as a tetramer. Enzyme exhibited high tolerance to xylose, retained approximately 70% of relative activity at 210 mM xylose concentration. Thin layer chromatography showed that the enzyme had potential to convert xylo-oligomers (xylobiose, triose, tetraose, and pentaose) into fermentable xylose. WSUCF1 β-xylosidase along with WSUCF1 endo-xylanase synergistically converted the xylan into fermentable xylose with more than 90% conversion. Properties of the WSUCF1 β-xylosidase i.e. high tolerance to elevated temperatures, high specific activity, conversion of xylo-oligomers to xylose, and resistance to inhibition from xylose, make this

  19. Development and application of Geobacillus stearothermophilus growth model for predicting spoilage of evaporated milk.

    PubMed

    Kakagianni, Myrsini; Gougouli, Maria; Koutsoumanis, Konstantinos P

    2016-08-01

    The presence of Geobacillus stearothermophilus spores in evaporated milk constitutes an important quality problem for the milk industry. This study was undertaken to provide an approach in modelling the effect of temperature on G. stearothermophilus ATCC 7953 growth and in predicting spoilage of evaporated milk. The growth of G. stearothermophilus was monitored in tryptone soy broth at isothermal conditions (35-67 °C). The data derived were used to model the effect of temperature on G. stearothermophilus growth with a cardinal type model. The cardinal values of the model for the maximum specific growth rate were Tmin = 33.76 °C, Tmax = 68.14 °C, Topt = 61.82 °C and μopt = 2.068/h. The growth of G. stearothermophilus was assessed in evaporated milk at Topt in order to adjust the model to milk. The efficiency of the model in predicting G. stearothermophilus growth at non-isothermal conditions was evaluated by comparing predictions with observed growth under dynamic conditions and the results showed a good performance of the model. The model was further used to predict the time-to-spoilage (tts) of evaporated milk. The spoilage of this product caused by acid coagulation when the pH approached a level around 5.2, eight generations after G. stearothermophilus reached the maximum population density (Nmax). Based on the above, the tts was predicted from the growth model as the sum of the time required for the microorganism to multiply from the initial to the maximum level ( [Formula: see text] ), plus the time required after the [Formula: see text] to complete eight generations. The observed tts was very close to the predicted one indicating that the model is able to describe satisfactorily the growth of G. stearothermophilus and to provide realistic predictions for evaporated milk spoilage. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Evidence for alkane coordination to an electron-rich uranium center.

    PubMed

    Castro-Rodriguez, Ingrid; Nakai, Hidetaka; Gantzel, Peter; Zakharov, Lev N; Rheingold, Arnold L; Meyer, Karsten

    2003-12-24

    A series of five uranium-alkane complexes of the general formula [(ArO)3tacn)U(alkane)].(cy-alkane) has been synthesized and crystallographically characterized. In all cases, X-ray diffraction studies revealed a pseudo-six-coordinate trivalent uranium core structure, [(ArO)3tacn)U], with a coordinated alkane ligand at the axial position. The average U-C bond distance to the bound alkane was determined to be 3.798 A, which is considerably shorter than the sum of the van der Waals radii of the U atom and a CH2 or CH3 unit (3.9 A). In all complexes, the alkane is coordinated in an eta2-H,C fashion.

  1. Fundamental Flame Velocities of Pure Hydrocarbons I : Alkanes, Alkenes, Alkynes Benzene, and Cyclohexane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gerstein, Melvin; Levine, Oscar; Wong, Edgar L

    1950-01-01

    The flame velocities of 37 pure hydrocarbons including normal and branched alkanes, alkenes, and alkynes; as well as benzene and cyclohexane, together with the experimental technique employed are presented. The normal alkanes have about the same flame velocity from ethane through heptane with methane being about 16 percent lower. Unsaturation increases the flame velocity in the order of alkanes, alkenes, and alkynes. Branching reduces the flame velocity.

  2. Photochemical dimerization and functionalization of alkanes, ethers, primary alcohols and silanes

    DOEpatents

    Crabtree, R.H.; Brown, S.H.

    1988-02-16

    The space-time yield and/or the selectivity of the photochemical dimerization of alkanes, ethers, primary alcohols and tertiary silanes with Hg and U.V. light is enhanced by refluxing the substrate in the irradiated reaction zone at a temperature at which the dimer product condenses and remains condensed promptly upon its formation. Cross-dimerization of the alkanes, ethers and silanes with primary alcohols is disclosed, as is the functionalization to aldehydes of the alkanes with carbon monoxide.

  3. Photochemical dimerization and functionalization of alkanes, ethers, primary alcohols and silanes

    DOEpatents

    Crabtree, Robert H.; Brown, Stephen H.

    1988-01-01

    The space-time yield and/or the selectivity of the photochemical dimerization of alkanes, ethers, primary alcohols and tertiary silanes with Hg and U.V. light is enhanced by refluxing the substrate in the irradiated reaction zone at a temperature at which the dimer product condenses and remains condensed promptly upon its formation. Cross-dimerization of the alkanes, ethers and silanes with primary alcohols is disclosed, as is the functionalization to aldehydes of the alkanes with carbon monoxide.

  4. Alkanes in Natural and Synthetic Petroleums: Comparison of Calculated and Actual Compositions.

    PubMed

    Friedel, R A; Sharkey, A G

    1963-03-22

    A similarity exists between the low molecular weight alkane isomers in crude oil and Fischer-Tropsch catalytic synthesis products. The composition of the C(4) through C(7) alkane isomers in a crude oil was calculated quantitatively with the equations previously used to calculate the alkane isomers in Fischer-Tropsch products. These results may have significance in ascertaining the origin of the volatile hydrocarbons in crude oils.

  5. Revised Charge Equilibration Parameters for More Accurate Hydration Free Energies of Alkanes.

    PubMed

    Davis, Joseph E; Patel, Sandeep

    2010-01-01

    We present a refined alkane charge equilibration (CHEQ) force field, improving our previously reported CHEQ alkane force field[1] to better reproduce experimental hydration free energies. Experimental hydration free energies of ethane, propane, butane, pentane, hexane, and heptane are reproduced to within 3.6% on average. We demonstrate that explicit polarization results in a shift in molecular dipole moment for water molecules associated with the alkane molecule. We also show that our new parameters do not have a significant effect on the alkane-water interactions as measured by the radial distribution function (RDF).

  6. Progression of methanogenic degradation of crude oil in the subsurface

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bekins, B.A.; Hostettler, F.D.; Herkelrath, W.N.; Delin, G.N.; Warren, E.; Essaid, H.I.

    2005-01-01

    Our results show that subsurface crude-oil degradation rates at a long-term research site were strongly influenced by small-scale variations in hydrologic conditions. The site is a shallow glacial outwash aquifer located near Bemidji in northern Minnesota that became contaminated when oil spilled from a broken pipeline in August 1979. In the study area, separate-phase oil forms a subsurface oil body extending from land surface to about 1 m (3.3 ft) below the 6-8-m (20-26 ft)-deep water table. Oil saturation in the sediments ranges from 10-20% in the vadose zone to 30-70% near the water table. At depths below 2 m (6.6 ft), degradation of the separate-phase crude oil occurs under methanogenic conditions. The sequence of methanogenic alkane degradation depletes the longer chain n-alkanes before the shorter chain n-alkanes, which is opposite to the better known aerobic sequence. The rates of degradation vary significantly with location in the subsurface. Oil-coated soils within 1.5 m (5 ft) of land surface have experienced little degradation where soil water saturation is less than 20%. Oil located 2-8 m (6.6-26 ft) below land surface in areas of higher recharge has been substantially degraded. The best explanation for the association between recharge and enhanced degradation seems to be increased downward transport of microbial growth nutrients to the oil body. This is supported by observations of greater microbial numbers at higher elevations in the oil body and significant decreases with depth in nutrient concentrations, especially phosphorus. Our results suggest that environmental effects may cause widely diverging degradation rates in the same spill, calling into question dating methods based on degradation state. Copyright ?? 2005. The American Association of Petroleum Geologists/Division of Environmental Geosciences. All rights reserved.

  7. Identification and use of an alkane transporter plug-in for applications in biocatalysis and whole-cell biosensing of alkanes.

    PubMed

    Grant, Chris; Deszcz, Dawid; Wei, Yu-Chia; Martínez-Torres, Rubéns Julio; Morris, Phattaraporn; Folliard, Thomas; Sreenivasan, Rakesh; Ward, John; Dalby, Paul; Woodley, John M; Baganz, Frank

    2014-07-28

    Effective application of whole-cell devices in synthetic biology and biocatalysis will always require consideration of the uptake of molecules of interest into the cell. Here we demonstrate that the AlkL protein from Pseudomonas putida GPo1 is an alkane import protein capable of industrially relevant rates of uptake of C7-C16 n-alkanes. Without alkL expression, native E.coli n-alkane uptake was the rate-limiting step in both the whole-cell bioconversion of C7-C16 n-alkanes and in the activation of a whole-cell alkane biosensor by C10 and C11 alkanes. By coexpression of alkL as a transporter plug-in, specific yields improved by up to 100-fold for bioxidation of >C12 alkanes to fatty alcohols and acids. The alkL protein was shown to be toxic to the host when overexpressed but when expressed from a vector capable of controlled induction, yields of alkane oxidation were improved a further 10-fold (8 g/L and 1.7 g/g of total oxidized products). Further testing of activity on n-octane with the controlled expression vector revealed the highest reported rates of 120 μmol/min/g and 1 g/L/h total oxidized products. This is the first time AlkL has been shown to directly facilitate enhanced uptake of C10-C16 alkanes and represents the highest reported gain in product yields resulting from its use.

  8. Utilization of n-alkanes by a newly isolated strain of Acinetobacter venetianus: the role of two AlkB-type alkane hydroxylases.

    PubMed

    Throne-Holst, Mimmi; Markussen, Sidsel; Winnberg, Asgeir; Ellingsen, Trond E; Kotlar, Hans-Kristian; Zotchev, Sergey B

    2006-09-01

    A bacterial strain capable of utilizing n-alkanes with chain lengths ranging from decane (C10H22) to tetracontane (C40H82) as a sole carbon source was isolated using a system for screening microorganisms able to grow on paraffin (mixed long-chain n-alkanes). The isolate, identified according to its 16S rRNA sequence as Acinetobacter venetianus, was designated A. venetianus 6A2. Two DNA fragments encoding parts of AlkB-type alkane hydroxylase homologues, designated alkMa and alkMb, were polymerase chain reaction-amplified from the genome of A. venetianus 6A2. To study the roles of these two alkM paralogues in n-alkane utilization in A. venetianus 6A2, we constructed alkMa, alkMb, and alkMa/alkMb disruption mutants. Studies on the growth patterns of the disruption mutants using n-alkanes with different chain lengths as sole carbon source demonstrated central roles for the alkMa and alkMb genes in utilization of C10 to C18 n-alkanes. Comparative analysis of these patterns also suggested different substrate preferences for AlkMa and AlkMb in n-alkane utilization. Because both single and double mutants were able to grow on n-alkanes with chain lengths of C20 and longer, we concluded that yet another enzyme(s) for the utilization of these n-alkanes must exist in A. venetianus 6A2.

  9. Identification and use of an alkane transporter plug-in for applications in biocatalysis and whole-cell biosensing of alkanes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grant, Chris; Deszcz, Dawid; Wei, Yu-Chia; Martínez-Torres, Rubéns Julio; Morris, Phattaraporn; Folliard, Thomas; Sreenivasan, Rakesh; Ward, John; Dalby, Paul; Woodley, John M.; Baganz, Frank

    2014-07-01

    Effective application of whole-cell devices in synthetic biology and biocatalysis will always require consideration of the uptake of molecules of interest into the cell. Here we demonstrate that the AlkL protein from Pseudomonas putida GPo1 is an alkane import protein capable of industrially relevant rates of uptake of C7-C16 n-alkanes. Without alkL expression, native E.coli n-alkane uptake was the rate-limiting step in both the whole-cell bioconversion of C7-C16 n-alkanes and in the activation of a whole-cell alkane biosensor by C10 and C11 alkanes. By coexpression of alkL as a transporter plug-in, specific yields improved by up to 100-fold for bioxidation of >C12 alkanes to fatty alcohols and acids. The alkL protein was shown to be toxic to the host when overexpressed but when expressed from a vector capable of controlled induction, yields of alkane oxidation were improved a further 10-fold (8 g/L and 1.7 g/g of total oxidized products). Further testing of activity on n-octane with the controlled expression vector revealed the highest reported rates of 120 μmol/min/g and 1 g/L/h total oxidized products. This is the first time AlkL has been shown to directly facilitate enhanced uptake of C10-C16 alkanes and represents the highest reported gain in product yields resulting from its use.

  10. Identification and use of an alkane transporter plug-in for applications in biocatalysis and whole-cell biosensing of alkanes

    PubMed Central

    Grant, Chris; Deszcz, Dawid; Wei, Yu-Chia; Martínez-Torres, Rubéns Julio; Morris, Phattaraporn; Folliard, Thomas; Sreenivasan, Rakesh; Ward, John; Dalby, Paul; Woodley, John M.; Baganz, Frank

    2014-01-01

    Effective application of whole-cell devices in synthetic biology and biocatalysis will always require consideration of the uptake of molecules of interest into the cell. Here we demonstrate that the AlkL protein from Pseudomonas putida GPo1 is an alkane import protein capable of industrially relevant rates of uptake of C7-C16 n-alkanes. Without alkL expression, native E.coli n-alkane uptake was the rate-limiting step in both the whole-cell bioconversion of C7-C16 n-alkanes and in the activation of a whole-cell alkane biosensor by C10 and C11 alkanes. By coexpression of alkL as a transporter plug-in, specific yields improved by up to 100-fold for bioxidation of >C12 alkanes to fatty alcohols and acids. The alkL protein was shown to be toxic to the host when overexpressed but when expressed from a vector capable of controlled induction, yields of alkane oxidation were improved a further 10-fold (8 g/L and 1.7 g/g of total oxidized products). Further testing of activity on n-octane with the controlled expression vector revealed the highest reported rates of 120 μmol/min/g and 1 g/L/h total oxidized products. This is the first time AlkL has been shown to directly facilitate enhanced uptake of C10-C16 alkanes and represents the highest reported gain in product yields resulting from its use. PMID:25068650

  11. Anaerobic degradation of cyclohexane by sulfate-reducing bacteria from hydrocarbon-contaminated marine sediments

    PubMed Central

    Jaekel, Ulrike; Zedelius, Johannes; Wilkes, Heinz; Musat, Florin

    2015-01-01

    The fate of cyclohexane, often used as a model compound for the biodegradation of cyclic alkanes due to its abundance in crude oils, in anoxic marine sediments has been poorly investigated. In the present study, we obtained an enrichment culture of cyclohexane-degrading sulfate-reducing bacteria from hydrocarbon-contaminated intertidal marine sediments. Microscopic analyses showed an apparent dominance by oval cells of 1.5 × 0.8 μm. Analysis of a 16S rRNA gene library, followed by whole-cell hybridization with group- and sequence-specific oligonucleotide probes showed that these cells belonged to a single phylotype, and were accounting for more than 80% of the total cell number. The dominant phylotype, affiliated with the Desulfosarcina-Desulfococcus cluster of the Deltaproteobacteria, is proposed to be responsible for the degradation of cyclohexane. Quantitative growth experiments showed that cyclohexane degradation was coupled with the stoichiometric reduction of sulfate to sulfide. Substrate response tests corroborated with hybridization with a sequence-specific oligonucleotide probe suggested that the dominant phylotype apparently was able to degrade other cyclic and n-alkanes, including the gaseous alkane n-butane. Based on GC-MS analyses of culture extracts cyclohexylsuccinate was identified as a metabolite, indicating an activation of cyclohexane by addition to fumarate. Other metabolites detected were 3-cyclohexylpropionate and cyclohexanecarboxylate providing evidence that the overall degradation pathway of cyclohexane under anoxic conditions is analogous to that of n-alkanes. PMID:25806023

  12. Crystallization and preliminary crystallographic studies of the recombinant l-N-carbamoylase from Geobacillus stearothermophilus CECT43

    PubMed Central

    Martínez-Rodríguez, Sergio; García-Pino, Abel; Las Heras-Vázquez, Francisco Javier; Clemente-Jiménez, Josefa María; Rodríguez-Vico, Felipe; Loris, Remy; García-Ruiz, Juan Ma.; Gavira, Jose Antonio

    2008-01-01

    N-Carbamoyl-l-amino-acid amidohydrolases (l-N-carbamoylases; EC 3.5.1.87) hydrolyze the carbon–nitrogen bond of the ureido group in N-carbamoyl-l-α-amino acids. These enzymes are commonly used in the production of optically pure natural and non-natural l-amino acids using the ‘hydantoinase process’. Recombinant l-N-carbamoylase from Geobacillus stearothermophilus CECT43 has been expressed, purified and crystallized by hanging-drop vapour diffusion. X-­ray data were collected to a resolution of 2.75 Å. The crystals belonged to space group P21212, with unit-cell parameters a = 103.2, b = 211.7, c = 43.1 Å and two subunits in the asymmetric unit. PMID:19052368

  13. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray crystallographic studies of Pz peptidase A from Geobacillus collagenovorans MO-1.

    PubMed

    Kawasaki, Akio; Nakano, Hiroaki; Tsujimoto, Yoshiyuki; Matsui, Hiroshi; Shimizu, Tetsuya; Nakatsu, Toru; Kato, Hiroaki; Watanabe, Kunihiko

    2007-02-01

    Pz peptidase A is an intracellular M3 metallopeptidase found in the thermophile Geobacillus collagenovorans MO-1 that recognizes collagen-specific tripeptide units (Gly-Pro-Xaa). Pz peptidase A shares common reactions with mammalian thimet oligopeptidase (TOP) and neurolysin, but has extremely low primary sequence identity to these enzymes. In this work, Pz peptidase A was cocrystallized with a phosphine peptide inhibitor (PPI) that selectively inhibits TOP and neurolysin. The crystals belong to space group P2(1), with unit-cell parameters a = 56.38, b = 194.15, c = 59.93 A, beta = 106.22 degrees . This is the first crystallographic study of an M3 family peptidase-PPI complex.

  14. Variability in Pseudomonas aeruginosa Lipopolysaccharide Expression during Crude Oil Degradation

    PubMed Central

    Norman, R. Sean; Frontera-Suau, Roberto; Morris, Pamela J.

    2002-01-01

    Bacterial utilization of crude oil components, such as the n-alkanes, requires complex cell surface adaptation to allow adherence to oil. To better understand microbial cell surface adaptation to growth on crude oil, the cell surface characteristics of two Pseudomonas aeruginosa strains, U1 and U3, both isolated from the same crude oil-degrading microbial community enriched on Bonny Light crude oil (BLC), were compared. Analysis of growth rates demonstrated an increased lag time for U1 cells compared to U3 cells. Amendment with EDTA inhibited U1 and U3 growth and degradation of the n-alkane component of BLC, suggesting a link between cell surface structure and crude oil degradation. U1 cells demonstrated a smooth-to-rough colony morphology transition when grown on BLC, while U3 cells exhibited rough colony morphology at the outset. Combining high-resolution atomic force microscopy of the cell surface and sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis of extracted lipopolysaccharides (LPS), we demonstrate that isolates grown on BLC have reduced O-antigen expression compared with that of glucose-grown cells. The loss of O-antigen resulted in shorter LPS molecules, increased cell surface hydrophobicity, and increased n-alkane degradation. PMID:12324360

  15. A Comprehensive Study of the Alteration of Ignitable Liquids by Weathering and Microbial Degradation.

    PubMed

    Turner, Dee A; Williams, Mary; Sigman, Michael A; Goodpaster, John V

    2017-05-02

    The differing effects of weathering and microbial degradation are described here in a comprehensive study that involved 50 different ignitable liquids from the Ignitable Liquids Database and Reference Collection. Examples of ignitable liquid residues from each of the main classes established by the American Society of Testing and Materials are presented. Weathering was accomplished via evaporation, whereas microbial degradation was carried out on soil at room temperature for periods of up to 21 days. Major trends included the rapid degradation of long n-alkanes and monosubstituted alkyl benzenes (e.g., toluene, ethylbenzene, and propylbenzene). Surprisingly, some longer branched alkanes (e.g., trimethyloctanes) were also susceptible to microbial attack. Although all ignitable liquids examined suffered at least to some extent from microbial degradation, gasoline, petroleum distillates, and oxygenates were the most susceptible. Isoparaffinic and naphthenic-paraffinic products were the most resistant to microbial degradation. © 2017 American Academy of Forensic Sciences.

  16. Shape selective properties of the Al-fumarate metal-organic framework in the adsorption and separation of n-alkanes, iso-alkanes, cyclo-alkanes and aromatic hydrocarbons.

    PubMed

    Bozbiyik, Belgin; Lannoeye, Jeroen; De Vos, Dirk E; Baron, Gino V; Denayer, Joeri F M

    2016-01-28

    The primary goal of this work is to study the adsorption of a wide range of hydrocarbon adsorbates in the Al-fumarate metal-organic framework in order to identify and explore trends in adsorption behaviour that can be related to the sorbate's molecular properties and as well as the properties of this MOF. The pulse chromatographic technique was used to study the adsorption properties of C5-C8 linear, branched, cyclic and aromatic hydrocarbons in vapour phase at low coverage and at high temperatures (150-250 °C). Chromatograms of alkanes having the same number of carbon atoms (C5-C8) clearly show that the linear alkane is retained the longest over its branched and cyclic isomers. Moreover, xylene isomers are also clearly separated by Al-fumarate, with retention times increasing in the order: ortho-xylene < meta-xylene < para-xylene. Differences in adsorption enthalpy of more than 10 kJ mol(-1) between linear alkanes and their di/tri-branched or cyclo-alkane isomers were observed, clearly showing that steric effects imposed by the pore structure of the adsorbent cause the difference in adsorption between linear alkanes and their isomers. In conclusion, Al-fumarate behaves as a shape selective material with respect to structural isomers of linear alkanes, with properties resembling those of medium pore size zeolites.

  17. Bent alkanes in a new thiourea-containing capsule.

    PubMed

    Asadi, Ali; Ajami, Dariush; Rebek, Julius

    2011-07-20

    The synthesis of a cavitand featuring thiourea hydrogen bonding sites and its dimerization in the presence of suitable guests are reported. Dimerization creates a capsule host wider than the corresponding urea or imide structures, and longer alkanes can be accommodated. Specifically, n-C(15)H(32) is encapsulated, but this guest appears folded inside as deduced from NMR studies. Apparently, the plasticity of hydrogen bonds between thiourea groups allows a stable encapsulation complex to persist in solution even though the guest is contorted.

  18. The Genome of the Moderate Halophile Amycolicicoccus subflavus DQS3-9A1T Reveals Four Alkane Hydroxylation Systems and Provides Some Clues on the Genetic Basis for Its Adaptation to a Petroleum Environment

    PubMed Central

    Nie, Yong; Fang, Hui; Li, Yan; Chi, Chang-Qiao; Tang, Yue-Qin; Wu, Xiao-Lei

    2013-01-01

    The moderate halophile Amycolicicoccus subflavus DQS3-9A1T is the type strain of a novel species in the recently described novel genus Amycolicicoccus, which was isolated from oil mud precipitated from oil produced water. The complete genome of A. subflavus DQS3-9A1T has been sequenced and is characteristic of harboring the genes for adaption to the harsh petroleum environment with salinity, high osmotic pressure, and poor nutrient levels. Firstly, it characteristically contains four types of alkane hydroxylases, including the integral-membrane non-heme iron monooxygenase (AlkB) and cytochrome P450 CYP153, a long-chain alkane monooxygenase (LadA) and propane monooxygenase. It also accommodates complete pathways for the response to osmotic pressure. Physiological tests proved that the strain could grow on n-alkanes ranging from C10 to C36 and propane as the sole carbon sources, with the differential induction of four kinds of alkane hydroxylase coding genes. In addition, the strain could grow in 1–12% NaCl with the putative genes responsible for osmotic stresses induced as expected. These results reveal the effective adaptation of the strain DQS3-9A1T to harsh oil environment and provide a genome platform to investigate the global regulation of different alkane metabolisms in bacteria that are crucially important for petroleum degradation. To our knowledge, this is the first report to describe the co-existence of such four types of alkane hydroxylases in a bacterial strain. PMID:23967144

  19. The genome of the moderate halophile Amycolicicoccus subflavus DQS3-9A1(T) reveals four alkane hydroxylation systems and provides some clues on the genetic basis for its adaptation to a petroleum environment.

    PubMed

    Nie, Yong; Fang, Hui; Li, Yan; Chi, Chang-Qiao; Tang, Yue-Qin; Wu, Xiao-Lei

    2013-01-01

    The moderate halophile Amycolicicoccus subflavus DQS3-9A1(T) is the type strain of a novel species in the recently described novel genus Amycolicicoccus, which was isolated from oil mud precipitated from oil produced water. The complete genome of A. subflavus DQS3-9A1(T) has been sequenced and is characteristic of harboring the genes for adaption to the harsh petroleum environment with salinity, high osmotic pressure, and poor nutrient levels. Firstly, it characteristically contains four types of alkane hydroxylases, including the integral-membrane non-heme iron monooxygenase (AlkB) and cytochrome P450 CYP153, a long-chain alkane monooxygenase (LadA) and propane monooxygenase. It also accommodates complete pathways for the response to osmotic pressure. Physiological tests proved that the strain could grow on n-alkanes ranging from C10 to C36 and propane as the sole carbon sources, with the differential induction of four kinds of alkane hydroxylase coding genes. In addition, the strain could grow in 1-12% NaCl with the putative genes responsible for osmotic stresses induced as expected. These results reveal the effective adaptation of the strain DQS3-9A1(T) to harsh oil environment and provide a genome platform to investigate the global regulation of different alkane metabolisms in bacteria that are crucially important for petroleum degradation. To our knowledge, this is the first report to describe the co-existence of such four types of alkane hydroxylases in a bacterial strain.

  20. Untypical even-to-odd predominance in the low-molecular n-alkanes of water, suspended matter, and bottom sediments in some regions of the Arctic Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drozdova, Anastasia; Belyaev, Nikolay; Ponyaev, Mikhail

    2014-05-01

    Over the years, several studies have shown an unusual predominance of even-carbon number n-alkanes in dissolved and particulate phase samples and sediment samples from various regions of the World Ocean [Nachman, 1985; Nishimura and Baker, 1985; Elias et al., 1997]. Different possible sources were proposed such as diagenesis (diagenetic origin from co-occurring fatty acids and alcohols), direct microbial input, microbial degradation of algal detritus, etc. Some researchers, however, are incredulous about this phenomenon and consider relatively high content of even-carbon number n-alkanes as contamination during the experiments. We report here the results of GC and GC-MS analysis of water, suspended particulate matter and sediment samples collected during 7 marine and coastal scientific expeditions to the White and Kara Seas, and to the central Arctic Basin (2004-2013). Many of the above samples (more than 30) present n-alkane distribution with a strong even-carbon number predominance of n-C14H30, and n-C16H34. Maximum enrichment was observed in some suspended matter samples with predominance of n-C16H34. The origin of even-carbon number n-alkanes in marine ecosystems is still not clear. In Antarctic region n-C16 and n-C18 and other even chain n-alkanes were reported to be dominant in the samples of the sea-ice algae, zooplankton and fish [Green et al. 1997] however in the Arctic region this phenomenon has not been demonstrated yet. Increasing of bacteria number and δ13C values observed in course of the accompanying studies [Lein et al., 2013] suggest existence of mechanism of phytoplankton bacterial destruction in the Arctic ecosystems, leading to formation of even-carbon number n-alkanes. R.J. Nachman - Lipids, Vol. 20, No 9, pp. 629-633 (1985). M. Nishimura, E.W. Baker - Geochim. et Cosmochim. Acta, Vol. 50, pp. 299-305 (1986). V.O. Elias, B.R.T. Simoneit, J.N. Cardoso - Naturwissenschaften, Vol. 84, pp. 415-420 (1997). G. Green et al. - Marine Pollution

  1. Biosynthesis of ω-alicyclic fatty acids induced by cyclic precursors and change of membrane fluidity in thermophilic bacteria Geobacillus stearothermophilus and Meiothermus ruber.

    PubMed

    Siristova, Lucie; Luhovy, Radek; Sigler, Karel; Rezanka, Tomas

    2011-05-01

    Two thermophilic strains belonging to Geobacillus stearothermophilus and Meiothermus ruber, which naturally do not synthesize ω-alicyclic fatty acids (ω-FAs) were cultivated with cyclopropyl, cyclobutyl, cyclopentyl and cyclohexyl carboxylic acids. Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry analysis of fatty acid methyl and picolinyl esters showed that both strains are able to synthesize ω-FAs when cultivated with the appropriate precursor. The incorporation of cyclic acids influenced the whole FA composition as well as membrane fluidity. Membrane fluidity of intact cells was studied by measuring the fluorescence polarisation of the probe l,6-diphenyl-1,3,5-hexatriene incorporated into membrane lipid bilayers. Cytoplasmic membrane became more fluid with increasing content of ω-FAs. This is caused by considerable changes in lipid packing within the membrane induced by the presence of ω-FAs not found in the natural environment of Geobacillus and Meiothermus strains.

  2. Effect of alkane chain length and counterion on the freezing transition of cationic surfactant adsorbed film at alkane mixture - water interfaces.

    PubMed

    Tokiwa, Yuhei; Sakamoto, Hiroyasu; Takiue, Takanori; Aratono, Makoto; Matsubara, Hiroki

    2015-05-21

    Penetration of alkane molecules into the adsorbed film gives rise to a surface freezing transition of cationic surfactant at the alkane-water interface. To examine the effect of the alkane chain length and counterion on the surface freezing, we employed interfacial tensiometry and ellipsometry to study the interface of cetyltrimethylammonium bromide and cetyltrimethylammonium chloride aqueous solutions against dodecane, tetradecane, hexadecane, and their mixtures. Applying theoretical equations to the experimental results obtained, we found that the alkane molecules that have the same chain length as the surfactant adsorb preferentially into the surface freezing film. Furthermore, we demonstrated that the freezing transition temperature of cationic surfactant adsorbed film was independent of the kind of counterion.

  3. Leaf wax n-alkane patterns from plants and topsoils in the semi-humid to arid southern Caucasus region as a base for paleoenvironmental reconstructions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bliedtner, Marcel; von Suchodoletz, Hans; Schäfer, Imke; Zech, Roland

    2017-04-01

    Leaf waxes of terrestrial plants are relatively resistant against degradation and can thus serve as valuable biomarkers that are preserved in various sedimentary archives for millenia. Particularly long-chain n-alkanes are increasingly used for paleoenvironmental studies as they have the great potential to reconstruct past changes in vegetation and climate. However, prior to any robust interpretation of the homologue patterns of long-chain n-alkanes, reference samples from modern vegetation and topsoil material should be investigated at a regional scale, because it has been questioned recently, whether n-alkane patterns are suitable to distinguish between different vegetation types at a global scale (Bush and McInerney, 2013). Apart from Central and Southeastern Europe (Zech et al., 2013; Schäfer et al., 2016), systematic regional studies are still largely lacking. To address this issues and to test the potential of leaf wax n-alkanes for paleoenvironmental studies in the semi-humid to arid southern Caucasus region, we investigated the influence of different vegetation types on the leaf wax signal in modern plants and topsoil material in eastern Georgia. We sampled modern plant and topsoil (0-5 cm) material from (i) grassland sites that included steppe, cultivated grassland and meadows, and (ii) from sites that are dominated by deciduous hornbeam forests. The n-alkane results show distinct differences between samples from sites with grassland and deciduous forests and thus corroborate our results from Central and Southeastern Europe (Schäfer et al., 2016): n-Alkanes from grassland sites are mainly dominated by C31 and C33, while n-alkanes from deciduous sites show high abundances of C27 and C29. Thus, chain-length ratios allow to discriminate between these vegetation types and have a great potential when used for paleoenvironmental reconstructions at least in this region. We updated the existing end-member model of Zech et al. (2013) which accounts for

  4. Identity and mechanisms of alkane-oxidizing metalloenzymes from deep-sea hydrothermal vents

    PubMed Central

    Bertrand, Erin M.; Keddis, Ramaydalis; Groves, John T.; Vetriani, Costantino; Austin, Rachel Narehood

    2013-01-01

    Six aerobic alkanotrophs (organism that can metabolize alkanes as their sole carbon source) isolated from deep-sea hydrothermal vents were characterized using the radical clock substrate norcarane to determine the metalloenzyme and reaction mechanism used to oxidize alkanes. The organisms studied were Alcanivorax sp. strains EPR7 and MAR14, Marinobacter sp. strain EPR21, Nocardioides sp. strains EPR26w, EPR28w, and Parvibaculum hydrocarbonoclasticum strain EPR92. Each organism was able to grow on n-alkanes as the sole carbon source and therefore must express genes encoding an alkane-oxidizing enzyme. Results from the oxidation of the radical-clock diagnostic substrate norcarane demonstrated that five of the six organisms (EPR7, MAR14, EPR21, EPR26w, and EPR28w) used an alkane hydroxylase functionally similar to AlkB to catalyze the oxidation of medium-chain alkanes, while the sixth organism (EPR92) used an alkane-oxidizing cytochrome P450 (CYP)-like protein to catalyze the oxidation. DNA sequencing indicated that EPR7 and EPR21 possess genes encoding AlkB proteins, while sequencing results from EPR92 confirmed the presence of a gene encoding CYP-like alkane hydroxylase, consistent with the results from the norcarane experiments. PMID:23825470

  5. Enhanced production of n-alkanes in Escherichia coli by spatial organization of biosynthetic pathway enzymes.

    PubMed

    Rahmana, Ziaur; Sung, Bong Hyun; Yi, Ji-Yeun; Bui, Le Minh; Lee, Jun Hyoung; Kim, Sun Chang

    2014-12-20

    Alkanes chemically mimic hydrocarbons found in petroleum, and their demand as biofuels is steadily increasing. Biologically, n-alkanes are produced from fatty acyl-ACPs by acyl-ACP reductases (AARs) and aldehyde deformylating oxygenases (ADOs). One of the major impediments in n-alkane biosynthesis is the low catalytic turnover rates of ADOs. Here, we studied n-alkane biosynthesis in Escherichia coli using a chimeric ADO-AAR fusion protein or zinc finger protein-guided ADO/AAR assembly on DNA scaffolds to control their stoichiometric ratios and spatial arrangements. Bacterial production of n-alkanes with the ADO-AAR fusion protein was increased 4.8-fold (24 mg/L) over a control strain expressing ADO and AAR separately. Optimal n-alkane biosynthesis was achieved when the ADO:AAR binding site ratio on a DNA scaffold was 3:1, yielding an 8.8-fold increase (44 mg/L) over the control strain. Our findings indicate that the spatial organization of alkane-producing enzymes is critical for efficient n-alkane biosynthesis in E. coli.

  6. Infra-Red Spectra of Small Alkanes Interacting with Aluminum Ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ashraf, Muhammad Affawn; Copeland, Christopher; Metz, Ricardo B.

    2016-06-01

    Herein we present experimentally determined infra-red spectra of entrance channel complexes of various small alkanes interacting with alkanes. The entrance channel complexes of ethane, propane and n-butane with positively charged aluminum ions were studied in the gas phase. The spectra are compared with theoretical calculations, and the structures of various products are elucidated from the spectra.

  7. 40 CFR 721.2625 - Reaction product of alkane-diol and epichlorohydrin.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Reaction product of alkane-diol and... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.2625 Reaction product of alkane-diol and epichlorohydrin. (a) Chemical... as reaction product of alkanediol and epichlorohydrin (PMN P-89-760) is subject to reporting...

  8. 40 CFR 721.2625 - Reaction product of alkane-diol and epichlorohydrin.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Reaction product of alkane-diol and... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.2625 Reaction product of alkane-diol and epichlorohydrin. (a) Chemical... as reaction product of alkanediol and epichlorohydrin (PMN P-89-760) is subject to reporting...

  9. 40 CFR 721.2625 - Reaction product of alkane-diol and epichlorohydrin.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Reaction product of alkane-diol and... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.2625 Reaction product of alkane-diol and epichlorohydrin. (a) Chemical... as reaction product of alkanediol and epichlorohydrin (PMN P-89-760) is subject to reporting...

  10. 40 CFR 721.2625 - Reaction product of alkane-diol and epichlorohydrin.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Reaction product of alkane-diol and... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.2625 Reaction product of alkane-diol and epichlorohydrin. (a) Chemical... as reaction product of alkanediol and epichlorohydrin (PMN P-89-760) is subject to reporting...

  11. 40 CFR 721.2625 - Reaction product of alkane-diol and epichlorohydrin.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Reaction product of alkane-diol and... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.2625 Reaction product of alkane-diol and epichlorohydrin. (a) Chemical... as reaction product of alkanediol and epichlorohydrin (PMN P-89-760) is subject to reporting...

  12. Identity and mechanisms of alkane-oxidizing metalloenzymes from deep-sea hydrothermal vents.

    PubMed

    Bertrand, Erin M; Keddis, Ramaydalis; Groves, John T; Vetriani, Costantino; Austin, Rachel Narehood

    2013-01-01

    Six aerobic alkanotrophs (organism that can metabolize alkanes as their sole carbon source) isolated from deep-sea hydrothermal vents were characterized using the radical clock substrate norcarane to determine the metalloenzyme and reaction mechanism used to oxidize alkanes. The organisms studied were Alcanivorax sp. strains EPR7 and MAR14, Marinobacter sp. strain EPR21, Nocardioides sp. strains EPR26w, EPR28w, and Parvibaculum hydrocarbonoclasticum strain EPR92. Each organism was able to grow on n-alkanes as the sole carbon source and therefore must express genes encoding an alkane-oxidizing enzyme. Results from the oxidation of the radical-clock diagnostic substrate norcarane demonstrated that five of the six organisms (EPR7, MAR14, EPR21, EPR26w, and EPR28w) used an alkane hydroxylase functionally similar to AlkB to catalyze the oxidation of medium-chain alkanes, while the sixth organism (EPR92) used an alkane-oxidizing cytochrome P450 (CYP)-like protein to catalyze the oxidation. DNA sequencing indicated that EPR7 and EPR21 possess genes encoding AlkB proteins, while sequencing results from EPR92 confirmed the presence of a gene encoding CYP-like alkane hydroxylase, consistent with the results from the norcarane experiments.

  13. Draft Genome Sequence of Geobacillus icigianus Strain G1w1T Isolated from Hot Springs in the Valley of Geysers, Kamchatka (Russian Federation)

    PubMed Central

    Bryanskaya, Alla V.; Logacheva, Maria D.; Kotenko, Anastasia V.; Peltek, Sergey E.

    2014-01-01

    The Geobacillus icigianus G1w1T strain was isolated from sludge samples of unnamed vaporing hydrothermal (97°С) outlets situated in a geyser in the Troinoy region (Valley of Geysers, Kronotsky Nature Reserve, Kamchatka, Russian Federation; 54°25′51.40″N, 160°7′41.40″E). The sequenced and annotated genome is 3,457,810 bp and encodes 3,342 genes. PMID:25342695

  14. Draft Genome Sequence of Geobacillus icigianus Strain G1w1T Isolated from Hot Springs in the Valley of Geysers, Kamchatka (Russian Federation).

    PubMed

    Bryanskaya, Alla V; Rozanov, Aleksey S; Logacheva, Maria D; Kotenko, Anastasia V; Peltek, Sergey E

    2014-10-23

    The Geobacillus icigianus G1w1(T) strain was isolated from sludge samples of unnamed vaporing hydrothermal (97°С) outlets situated in a geyser in the Troinoy region (Valley of Geysers, Kronotsky Nature Reserve, Kamchatka, Russian Federation; 54°25'51.40″N, 160°7'41.40″E). The sequenced and annotated genome is 3,457,810 bp and encodes 3,342 genes.

  15. Geologic seepage of methane and light alkanes in Los Angeles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doezema, L. A.; Chang, K.; Baril, R.; Nwachuku, I.; Contreras, P.; Marquez, A.; Howard, D.

    2013-12-01

    Natural geologic seepage of methane from underground oil and natural gas reservoirs has been suggested to be an underreported part of the global methane budget. Other light alkanes are also given off in combination with the methane seepage, making it possible that geologic seepage is also a potentially significant global source of these light alkanes. This study reports C1-C5 findings from geologic seepage made in the Los Angeles region. Microseepage, invisible escape of gases, was measured primarily at Kenneth Hahn Regional Park, while macroseepage, the visible release of gases, was measured at the La Brea Tar Pits. Samples were collected using stainless steel canisters and flux chambers and were analyzed using gas chromatography with flame ionization detectors (GC-FID). Average microseepage flux rates of 0.95 μg m-2 h-1 for ethane and 0.51 μg m-2 h-1 were found for propane, while average macroseepage rates for methane, ethane, and propane were 664, 19.8, and 18.1 mg m-2 h-1 respectively. Relationships between microseepage flux rate and location of underground oil and natural deposit and earthquake fault lines are presented. Additionally, the relative importance of findings in context with global budgets and local air quality is discussed.

  16. A martensitic-like transition in a normal alkane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hutter, Jeffrey; Nene, Shailesh; Karhu, Eric; Flemming, Roberta

    2009-03-01

    The normal alkanes, CnH2n+2, with a structure consisting of a single chain, are the simplest hydrocarbons. These are an interesting class of material, both in terms of their intrinsic properties and the fact that many biological molecules contain hydrocarbon domains. Normal alkanes exhibit an unusual phase diagram with several solid phases, some of which---the ``rotator phases''---are characterized by positional order without long-range orientational order. We have found a striking pattern of twinned, striped domains that occurs in thin layers the monoclinic rotator RV phase of tricosane (C23H48). We have studied this structure, and its transitions to other phases, by X-ray diffraction, as well as by optical and atomic-force microscopy. Intriguingly, transitions between the RV phase and the RI orthorhombic phase lying at higher temperatures appear to be diffusionless, and preserve molecular-scale features even after multiple transitions between the phases. These properties are reminiscent of martensitic transformations, which are better-known in metal alloys, but occur here at convenient temperatures and with slow kinetics.

  17. Radiation induced oxidation of liquid alkanes as a polymer model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soebianto, Yanti S.; Katsumura, Yosuke; Ishigure, Kenkichi; Kubo, Junichi; Hamakawa, Satoshi; Kudoh, Hisaaki; Seguchi, Tadao

    1996-10-01

    Radiation induced oxidation of liquid n-hexadecane ( n-C 16H 34) and squalene (C 30H 62) as a polymer model has been investigated by the measurements of the gas evolution and O 2 uptake, and analyses of the oxidation products. Low O 2 uptake [G(-O 2 ≈ 6.0] in liquid alkanes, indicates in solid oxidation reaction does not exhibit chain kinetics, which is a big contrast to the process observed in solid, G(-O 2) ≫ 10. H 2 is the main gas product. More than 90% of the consumed O 2 are converted into the oxidation products in liquid phase, mainly carboxylic acids, which is also a big contrast to the results of the radiolysis of liquid cyclohexane in the presence of O 2 and thermal oxidation of hexadecene at elevated temperatures, where ketones and alcohols are major products at the initial stage. In the presence of aromatic additives, energy and charge transfer to the additives taking place despite the presence of O 2 reduce the H 2 evolution and the acid formation in parallel. Although hydroaromatic compounds act as an energy and charge scavenger, the are selectively oxidized through the donation of hydrogen in cyclic alkyl part attached to the phenyl ring, leading to large O 2 uptake and corresponding ketone formation. From the comparison of the G-values of the O 2 uptake, it was found that the oxidation reactions of liquid alkanes reflect well the oxidation of amorphous part in polymers.

  18. Primary products and mechanistic considerations in alkane metathesis.

    PubMed

    Basset, Jean Marie; Copéret, Christophe; Lefort, Laurent; Maunders, Barry M; Maury, Olivier; Le Roux, Erwan; Saggio, Guillaume; Soignier, Sophie; Soulivong, Daravong; Sunley, Glenn J; Taoufik, Mostafa; Thivolle-Cazat, Jean

    2005-06-22

    Alkane metathesis, a reaction catalyzed by the silica-supported tantalum hydride [(SiO)2Ta-H], 1, which transforms acyclic alkanes into their higher and lower homologues, was reported in 1997. New studies conducted in a continuous flow reactor in the case of propane indicate that, by varying the contact time, hydrogen and olefins are primary products. This crucial observation, as well as the known properties of tantalum alkyls to perform alpha-H or beta-H eliminations, supports the proposition of a new mechanism involving metallacyclobutane intermediates just like in olefin metathesis. The observed selectivities for linear and branched Cn+1 and Cn+2 products as well as the linear/branched ratio can be well-explained on the basis of the minimization of steric interactions between 1,2- or 1,3-substituents in the various tantallacyclobutane intermediates or during their formation. Hydrogen plays a specific role in the cleavage of metal alkyls to complete the catalytic cycle.

  19. Direct hydrodeoxygenation of raw woody biomass into liquid alkanes.

    PubMed

    Xia, Qineng; Chen, Zongjia; Shao, Yi; Gong, Xueqing; Wang, Haifeng; Liu, Xiaohui; Parker, Stewart F; Han, Xue; Yang, Sihai; Wang, Yanqin

    2016-03-30

    Being the only sustainable source of organic carbon, biomass is playing an ever-increasingly important role in our energy landscape. The conversion of renewable lignocellulosic biomass into liquid fuels is particularly attractive but extremely challenging due to the inertness and complexity of lignocellulose. Here we describe the direct hydrodeoxygenation of raw woods into liquid alkanes with mass yields up to 28.1 wt% over a multifunctional Pt/NbOPO4 catalyst in cyclohexane. The superior performance of this catalyst allows simultaneous conversion of cellulose, hemicellulose and, more significantly, lignin fractions in the wood sawdust into hexane, pentane and alkylcyclohexanes, respectively. Investigation on the molecular mechanism reveals that a synergistic effect between Pt, NbOx species and acidic sites promotes this highly efficient hydrodeoxygenation of bulk lignocellulose. No chemical pretreatment of the raw woody biomass or separation is required for this one-pot process, which opens a general and energy-efficient route for converting raw lignocellulose into valuable alkanes.

  20. Multiple sources of alkanes in Quaternary oceanic sediment of Antarctica

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kvenvolden, K.A.; Rapp, J.B.; Golan-Bac, M.; Hostettler, F.D.

    1987-01-01

    Normal alkanes (n-C13n-C36), isoprenoid hydrocarbons (i-C15, i-C16, i-C18, i-C19, and i-C20) triterpanes (C27C32), and (C27C29) are present in low concentrations offshore Antarctica in near-surface, Quaternary sediment of the Wilkes Land continental margin and of the western Ross Sea. The distributions of these hydrocarbons are interpreted relative to possible sources and processes. The hydrocarbons appear to be mixtures of primary and recycled material from marine and terrigenous sources. The n-alkanes are most abundant and are characterized by two distinct populations, one of probable marine origin and the other likely from terrigenous, vascular plant sources. Because the continent of Antarctica today is devoid of higher plants, the plant-derived hydrocarbons in these offshore sediments probably came from wind-blown material and recycled Antarctic sediment that contains land-plant remains from an earlier period of time. Isoprenoid hydrocarbons are partially recycled and mainly of marine origin; the dominance of pristane over phytane suggests oxic paleoenvironmental conditions. Both modern and ancient triterpanes and steranes are present, and the distribution of these indicates a mixture of primary and recycled bacterial, algal, and possible higher-plant materials. Although the sampled sediments were deposited during the Quaternary, they apparently contain a significant component of hydrocarbons of pre-Quaternary age. ?? 1987.

  1. Direct hydrodeoxygenation of raw woody biomass into liquid alkanes

    PubMed Central

    Xia, Qineng; Chen, Zongjia; Shao, Yi; Gong, Xueqing; Wang, Haifeng; Liu, Xiaohui; Parker, Stewart F.; Han, Xue; Yang, Sihai; Wang, Yanqin

    2016-01-01

    Being the only sustainable source of organic carbon, biomass is playing an ever-increasingly important role in our energy landscape. The conversion of renewable lignocellulosic biomass into liquid fuels is particularly attractive but extremely challenging due to the inertness and complexity of lignocellulose. Here we describe the direct hydrodeoxygenation of raw woods into liquid alkanes with mass yields up to 28.1 wt% over a multifunctional Pt/NbOPO4 catalyst in cyclohexane. The superior performance of this catalyst allows simultaneous conversion of cellulose, hemicellulose and, more significantly, lignin fractions in the wood sawdust into hexane, pentane and alkylcyclohexanes, respectively. Investigation on the molecular mechanism reveals that a synergistic effect between Pt, NbOx species and acidic sites promotes this highly efficient hydrodeoxygenation of bulk lignocellulose. No chemical pretreatment of the raw woody biomass or separation is required for this one-pot process, which opens a general and energy-efficient route for converting raw lignocellulose into valuable alkanes. PMID:27025898

  2. Advenella alkanexedens sp. nov., an alkane-degrading bacterium isolated from biogas slurry samples.

    PubMed

    Wang, Huimin; Zhou, Shan; Wang, Yanwei; Kong, Delong; Guo, Xiang; Zhu, Jie; Dong, Weiwei; Ruan, Zhiyong

    2015-11-30

    A novel aerobic bacterium, designated strain LAM0050T, was isolated from a biogas slurry sample enriched with diesel oil for 30 d. Cells of strain LAM0050T were gram-stain-negative, non-motile, non-spore-forming and coccoid-shaped. The optimal temperature and pH for growth were 30-35 °C and 8.5, respectively. The strain did not require NaCl for growth but tolerated up to 5.3 % (w/v) NaCl. Phylogenetic analysis of 16S rRNA gene sequence revealed that strain LAM0050T was a member within the genus Advenella, and was most closely related to A. faeciporci KCTC 23732T, A. incenata CCUG 45225T, A. kashmirensis DSM 17095T and A. mimigardefordensis DSM 17166T, with 98.1, 96.6, 96.6 and 96.3 % sequence similarity, respectively. The value of DNA-DNA hybridization between strain LAM0050T and A. faeciporci KCTC 23732T was 41.7±2.4 %. The genomic DNA G+C content was 51.2 mol% as determined by the Tm method. The major fatty acids of strain LAM0050T were C16:0, C17:0 cyclo, summed feature 3 (C16:1 ω7c and/or C16:1 ω6c) and summed feature 8 (C18:1 ω7c and/or C18:1 ω6c). The predonimant ubiquinone was Q-8. The main polar lipids were diphosphatidyglycerol, phosphatidylethanolamine, phosphatidylmethyl ethanolamine and four unidentified phospholipids. Based on the phenotypic and genotypic properties, strain LAM0050T is suggested to represent a novel species of the genus Advenella, for which the name Advenella alkanexedens sp. nov., is proposed, the type strain is LAM0050T (=ACCC 06485T = JCM 30465T).

  3. The genome sequence of Desulfatibacillum alkenivorans AK-01: a blueprint for anaerobic alkane oxidation.

    PubMed

    Callaghan, A V; Morris, B E L; Pereira, I A C; McInerney, M J; Austin, R N; Groves, J T; Kukor, J J; Suflita, J M; Young, L Y; Zylstra, G J; Wawrik, B

    2012-01-01

    Desulfatibacillum alkenivorans AK-01 serves as a model organism for anaerobic alkane biodegradation because of its distinctive biochemistry and metabolic versatility. The D. alkenivorans genome provides a blueprint for understanding the genetic systems involved in alkane metabolism including substrate activation, CoA ligation, carbon-skeleton rearrangement and decarboxylation. Genomic analysis suggested a route to regenerate the fumarate needed for alkane activation via methylmalonyl-CoA and predicted the capability for syntrophic alkane metabolism, which was experimentally verified. Pathways involved in the oxidation of alkanes, alcohols, organic acids and n-saturated fatty acids coupled to sulfate reduction and the ability to grow chemolithoautotrophically were predicted. A complement of genes for motility and oxygen detoxification suggests that D. alkenivorans may be physiologically adapted to a wide range of environmental conditions. The D. alkenivorans genome serves as a platform for further study of anaerobic, hydrocarbon-oxidizing microorganisms and their roles in bioremediation, energy recovery and global carbon cycling.

  4. Reductive dechlorination of chlorinated alkanes and alkenes by iron metal and metal mixtures

    SciTech Connect

    Orth, R.G.; McKenzie, D.E.

    1995-12-31

    Reductive dechlorination using zero valent metals such as iron has seen an increase in interest over the past few years with the extension of iron dechlorination to in-situ treatment of ground water using a process developed by Gillham and O`Hannes in 1994. Earlier applications included the use of metals for water treatment for the degradation of halogenated pesticides. This increased interest is demonstrated by the recent ACS symposium on zero valent metal dechlorination. The work that will be presented involves the reduction of selected chlorinated alkanes and alkenes beginning with chlorobutanes. The position of the chlorines on the carbon chain relative to each other was studied by determining the rates of the dechlorination processes. These studies were carried out in seated batch reactors so that loss of the chlorinated hydrocarbons was minimized and total carbon and chloride mass balances could be obtained. The goal of the studies was to understand the mechanism of the reaction that is believed to follow metal corrosion processes involving two electron transfer reactions.

  5. Microbial Hydrocarbon and ToxicPollutant Degradation Method

    SciTech Connect

    Schlueter, Dietrich; Janabi, Mustafa; O'Neil, James; Budinger, Thomas

    2011-08-16

    The goal of this project is to determine optimum conditions for bacterial oxidation of hydrocarbons and long-chain alkanes that are representative of petroleum contamination of the environment. Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons (PAHs) are of concern because of their toxicity, low volatility, and resistance to microbial degradation, especially under anaerobic conditions. The uniqueness of our approach is to use carbon-11 in lieu of the traditional use of carbon-14.

  6. 40 CFR 721.10178 - Distillates (Fischer-Tropsch), hydroisomerized middle, C10-13-branched alkane fraction.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...), hydroisomerized middle, C10-13-branched alkane fraction. 721.10178 Section 721.10178 Protection of Environment...), hydroisomerized middle, C10-13-branched alkane fraction. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject... middle, C10-13-branched alkane fraction (PMN P-04-319; CAS No. 642928-30-1) is subject to reporting...

  7. Isolation, identification, and crude oil degradation characteristics of a high-temperature, hydrocarbon-degrading strain.

    PubMed

    Liu, Boqun; Ju, Meiting; Liu, Jinpeng; Wu, Wentao; Li, Xiaojing

    2016-05-15

    In this work, a hydrocarbon-degrading bacterium Y-1 isolated from petroleum contaminated soil in the Dagang Oilfield was investigated for its potential effect in biodegradation of crude oil. According to the analysis of 16S rRNA sequences, strain Y-1 was identified as Bacillus licheniformis. The growth parameters such as pH, temperature, and salinity were optimised and 60.2% degradation of crude oil removal was observed in 5days. The strain Y-1 showed strong tolerance to high salinity, alkalinity, and temperature. Emplastic produced by strain Y-1 at high temperatures could be applied as biosurfactant. Gas chromatography analysis demonstrated that the strain Y-1 efficiently degraded different alkanes from crude oil, and the emplastic produced by strain Y-1 promoted the degradation rates of long-chain alkanes when the temperature increased to 55°C. Therefore, strain Y-1 would play an important role in the area of crude oil contaminant bioremediation even in some extreme conditions.

  8. Microbial degradation of n-hexadecane in mineral salt medium as mediated by degradative enzymes.

    PubMed

    Mishra, Shweta; Singh, S N

    2012-05-01

    In the present study, n-hexadecane degradation in MSM was investigated by three bacteria identified as Pseudomonas aeruginosa PSA5, Rhodococcus sp. NJ2 and Ochrobactrum intermedium P2, isolated from petroleum sludge. During 10 days of incubation, n-hexadecane was degraded to 99% by P. aeruginosa PSA5, 95% by Rhodococcus sp. NJ2 and 92% by O. intermedium P2. During degradation process, the induction of catabolic enzymes alkane hydroxylase, alcohol dehydrogenase and lipase were also examined. Among these enzymes, the highest activities of alkane hydroxylase (185 μmol mg(-1) protein) and alcohol dehydrogenase (75.78 μmol mg(-1) protein) were recorded in Rhodococcus sp. NJ2 while lipase activity was highly induced in P. aeruginosa PSA5 (48.71 μmol mg(-1) protein). Besides, accumulation of n-hexadecane in inclusion bodies was found to be maximum 60.8 g l(-1) in P. aeruginosa PSA5, followed by Rhodococcus sp. NJ2 (56.1 g l(-1)) and the least (51.6 g l(-1)) was found in O. intermedium P2. Biosurfactant production by bacterial strains was indicated by the reduction in surface tension and induction of cell surface hydrophobicity and pseudosolubilization which facilitated n-hexadecane degradation.

  9. On the large σ-hyperconjugation in alkanes and alkenes.

    PubMed

    Wu, Judy I-Chia; Wang, Changwei; McKee, William Chadwick; Schleyer, Paul von Ragué; Wu, Wei; Mo, Yirong

    2014-06-01

    The conventional view that the σCC and σCH bonds in alkanes and unsaturated hydrocarbons are so highly localized that their non-steric interactions are negligible is scrutinized by the block-localized wavefunction (BLW) method. Even molecules considered conventionally to be "strain free" and "unperturbed" have surprisingly large and quite significant total σ-BLW-delocalization energies (DEs) due to their geminal and vicinal hyperconjugative interactions. Thus, the computed BLW-DEs (in kcal mol(-1)) for the antiperiplanar conformations of the n-alkanes (C(N)H(2N+2), N = 1-10) range from 11.6 for ethane to 82.2 for n-decane and are 50.9 for cyclohexane and 91.0 for adamantane. Although σ-electron delocalization in unsaturated hydrocarbons usually is ignored, the σ-BLW-DEs (in kcal mol(-1)) are substantial, as exemplified by D2h ethylene (9.0), triplet D2d ethylene (16.4), allene (19.3), butadiene (19.0), hexatriene (28.3), benzene (28.1), and cyclobutadiene (21.1). While each individual geminal and vicinal hyperconjugative interaction between hydrocarbon σ-bonding and σ-antibonding orbitals tends to be smaller than an individual π conjugative interaction (e.g., 10.2 kcal mol(-1) in anti-1,3-butadiene, the presence of many σ-hyperconjugative interactions (e.g., a total of 12 in anti-1,3-butadiene, see text), result in substantial total σ-stabilization energies (e.g., 19.0 kcal mol(-1) for butadiene), which may surpass those from the π interactions. Although large in magnitude, σ-electron delocalization energies often are obscured by cancellation when two hydrocarbons are compared. Rather than being strain-free, cyclohexane, adamantane, and diamantane suffer from their increasing number of intramolecular 1,4-C…C repulsions resulting in elongated C-C bond lengths and reduced σ-hyperconjugation, compared to the (skew-free) antiperiplanar n-alkane conformers. Instead of being inconsequential, σ-bond interactions are important and merit consideration.

  10. Copper-Catalyzed Intermolecular Amidation and Imidation of Unactivated Alkanes

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    We report a set of rare copper-catalyzed reactions of alkanes with simple amides, sulfonamides, and imides (i.e., benzamides, tosylamides, carbamates, and phthalimide) to form the corresponding N-alkyl products. The reactions lead to functionalization at secondary C–H bonds over tertiary C–H bonds and even occur at primary C–H bonds. [(phen)Cu(phth)] (1-phth) and [(phen)Cu(phth)2] (1-phth2), which are potential intermediates in the reaction, have been isolated and fully characterized. The stoichiometric reactions of 1-phth and 1-phth2 with alkanes, alkyl radicals, and radical probes were investigated to elucidate the mechanism of the amidation. The catalytic and stoichiometric reactions require both copper and tBuOOtBu for the generation of N-alkyl product. Neither 1-phth nor 1-phth2 reacted with excess cyclohexane at 100 °C without tBuOOtBu. However, the reactions of 1-phth and 1-phth2 with tBuOOtBu afforded N-cyclohexylphthalimide (Cy-phth), N-methylphthalimide, and tert-butoxycyclohexane (Cy-OtBu) in approximate ratios of 70:20:30, respectively. Reactions with radical traps support the intermediacy of a tert-butoxy radical, which forms an alkyl radical intermediate. The intermediacy of an alkyl radical was evidenced by the catalytic reaction of cyclohexane with benzamide in the presence of CBr4, which formed exclusively bromocyclohexane. Furthermore, stoichiometric reactions of [(phen)Cu(phth)2] with tBuOOtBu and (Ph(Me)2CO)2 at 100 °C without cyclohexane afforded N-methylphthalimide (Me-phth) from β-Me scission of the alkoxy radicals to form a methyl radical. Separate reactions of cyclohexane and d12-cyclohexane with benzamide showed that the turnover-limiting step in the catalytic reaction is the C–H cleavage of cyclohexane by a tert-butoxy radical. These mechanistic data imply that the tert-butoxy radical reacts with the C–H bonds of alkanes, and the subsequent alkyl radical combines with 1-phth2 to form the corresponding N-alkyl imide product

  11. Repeated batch cultivation of the hydrocarbon-degrading, micro-algal strain Prototheca zopfii RND16 immobilized in polyurethane foam.

    PubMed

    Ueno, Ryohei; Wada, Shun; Urano, Naoto

    2008-01-01

    This study reports on the stability of the cells of a heterotrophic green micro-algal strain Prototheca zopfii RND16 immobilized in polyurethane foam (PUF) cubes during degradation of mixed hydrocarbon substrate, which was composed of n-alkanes and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), in 5 successive cycles of repeated batch cultivation at 30 degrees C. Both RND16 cells and mixed hydrocarbon substrate components had been entrapped in PUF cubes through cultivation. PUF-immobilized RND16 degraded n-alkanes almost completely, whereas the strain hardly degraded PAHs in PUFs, rather they accumulated in the matrices. It is noteworthy that this result is strikingly different from that of the free-living cell culture, where RND16 reduced concentrations of both n-alkanes and PAHs. However, PAHs accumulation in the PUFs did not impair the performance of the immobilized alga to utilize n-alkanes. These results suggest that the PUFs harboring RND16 cells could be used repeatedly for selective retrieval of PAHs from oil-polluted waters after preferential biodegradation of n-alkanes by algae.

  12. Characterization of marine isoprene-degrading communities.

    PubMed

    Alvarez, Laura Acuña; Exton, Daniel A; Timmis, Kenneth N; Suggett, David J; McGenity, Terry J

    2009-12-01

    Isoprene is a volatile and climate-altering hydrocarbon with an atmospheric concentration similar to that of methane. It is well established that marine algae produce isoprene; however, until now there was no specific information about marine isoprene sinks. Here we demonstrate isoprene consumption in samples from temperate and tropical marine and coastal environments, and furthermore show that the most rapid degradation of isoprene coincides with the highest rates of isoprene production in estuarine sediments. Isoprene-degrading enrichment cultures, analysed by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis and 454 pyrosequencing of the 16S rRNA gene and by culturing, were generally dominated by Actinobacteria, but included other groups such as Alphaproteobacteria and Bacteroidetes, previously not known to degrade isoprene. In contrast to specialist methane-oxidizing bacteria, cultivated isoprene degraders were nutritionally versatile, and nearly all of them were able to use n-alkanes as a source of carbon and energy. We therefore tested and showed that the ubiquitous marine hydrocarbon-degrader, Alcanivorax borkumensis, could also degrade isoprene. A mixture of the isolates consumed isoprene emitted from algal cultures, confirming that isoprene can be metabolized at low, environmentally relevant concentrations, and suggesting that, in the absence of spilled petroleum hydrocarbons, algal production of isoprene could maintain viable populations of hydrocarbon-degrading microbes. This discovery of a missing marine sink for isoprene is the first step in obtaining more robust predictions of its flux, and suggests that algal-derived isoprene provides an additional source of carbon for diverse microbes in the oceans.

  13. Cometabolism of Methyl tertiary Butyl Ether and Gaseous n-Alkanes by Pseudomonas mendocina KR-1 Grown on C5 to C8 n-Alkanes

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Christy A.; O'Reilly, Kirk T.; Hyman, Michael R.

    2003-01-01

    Pseudomonas mendocina KR-1 grew well on toluene, n-alkanes (C5 to C8), and 1° alcohols (C2 to C8) but not on other aromatics, gaseous n-alkanes (C1 to C4), isoalkanes (C4 to C6), 2° alcohols (C3 to C8), methyl tertiary butyl ether (MTBE), or tertiary butyl alcohol (TBA). Cells grown under carbon-limited conditions on n-alkanes in the presence of MTBE (42 μmol) oxidized up to 94% of the added MTBE to TBA. Less than 3% of the added MTBE was oxidized to TBA when cells were grown on either 1° alcohols, toluene, or dextrose in the presence of MTBE. Concentrated n-pentane-grown cells oxidized MTBE to TBA without a lag phase and without generating tertiary butyl formate (TBF) as an intermediate. Neither TBF nor TBA was consumed by n-pentane-grown cells, while formaldehyde, the expected C1 product of MTBE dealkylation, was rapidly consumed. Similar Ks values for MTBE were observed for cells grown on C5 to C8 n-alkanes (12.95 ± 2.04 mM), suggesting that the same enzyme oxidizes MTBE in cells grown on each n-alkane. All growth-supporting n-alkanes (C5 to C8) inhibited MTBE oxidation by resting n-pentane-grown cells. Propane (Ki = 53 μM) and n-butane (Ki = 16 μM) also inhibited MTBE oxidation, and both gases were also consumed by cells during growth on n-pentane. Cultures grown on C5 to C8 n-alkanes also exhibited up to twofold-higher levels of growth in the presence of propane or n-butane, whereas no growth stimulation was observed with methane, ethane, MTBE, TBA, or formaldehyde. The results are discussed in terms of their impacts on our understanding of MTBE biodegradation and cometabolism. PMID:14660389

  14. Modeling of Alkane Oxidation Using Constituents and Species

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bellan, Jasette; Harstad, Kenneth G.

    2010-01-01

    It is currently not possible to perform simulations of turbulent reactive flows due in particular to complex chemistry, which may contain thousands of reactions and hundreds of species. This complex chemistry results in additional differential equations, making the numerical solution of the equation set computationally prohibitive. Reducing the chemical kinetics mathematical description is one of several important goals in turbulent reactive flow modeling. A chemical kinetics reduction model is proposed for alkane oxidation in air that is based on a parallel methodology to that used in turbulence modeling in the context of the Large Eddy Simulation. The objective of kinetic modeling is to predict the heat release and temperature evolution. This kinetic mechanism is valid over a pressure range from atmospheric to 60 bar, temperatures from 600 K to 2,500 K, and equivalence ratios from 0.125 to 8. This range encompasses diesel, HCCI, and gas-turbine engines, including cold ignition. A computationally efficient kinetic reduction has been proposed for alkanes that has been illustrated for n-heptane using the LLNL heptane mechanism. This model is consistent with turbulence modeling in that scales were first categorized into either those modeled or those computed as progress variables. Species were identified as being either light or heavy. The heavy species were decomposed into defined 13 constituents, and their total molar density was shown to evolve in a quasi-steady manner. The light species behave either in a quasi-steady or unsteady manner. The modeled scales are the total constituent molar density, Nc, and the molar density of the quasi-steady light species. The progress variables are the total constituent molar density rate evolution and the molar densities of the unsteady light species. The unsteady equations for the light species contain contributions of the type gain/loss rates from the heavy species that are modeled consistent with the developed mathematical

  15. Communication: Stiffening of dilute alcohol and alkane mixtures with water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ashbaugh, Henry S.; Wesley Barnett, J.; Saltzman, Alexander; Langrehr, Mae E.; Houser, Hayden

    2016-11-01

    We probe the anomalous compressibilities of dilute mixtures of alcohols and alkane gases in water using molecular simulations. The response to increasing solute concentration depends sensitively on temperature, with the compressibility decreasing upon solute addition at low temperatures and increasing at elevated temperatures. The thermodynamic origin of stiffening is directly tied to the solute's partial compressibility, which is negative at low temperatures and rises above water's compressibility with increasing temperature. Hydration shell waters concurrently tilt towards clathrate-like structures at low temperatures that fade with heating. Kirkwood-Buff theory traces the solute's partial compressibility to changes in the solute-water association volume upon heating and incongruous packing of waters at the boundary between the more structured hydration shell and bulk water.

  16. Thermal analysis of n-alkane phase change material mixtures

    SciTech Connect

    Chio, Y.I.; Choi, E.; Lorsch, H.G.

    1991-03-31

    Tests were performed to characterize the thermal behavior of it number of n-alkanes to be used as phase change materials (PCMs) in district cooling applications. Hexadecane and tetradecane were mixed in different fractions, and their thermal behavior was experimentally evaluated. Test results for melting temperature and fusion energy for laboratory grade hexadecane and tetradecane showed good agreement with datain the literature. However, values for commercial grade hexadecane were found to be considerably lower. In the range of temperatures of interest for district cooling, mixtures of tetradecane and hexadecane can be treated as homogeneous substances. However, their heats of fusion are slightly lower than those of the pure substances. Their melting temperatures are also lower by an amount that can be predicted.

  17. Chain length dependence of the thermodynamic properties of linear and cyclic alkanes and polymers.

    PubMed

    Huang, Dinghai; Simon, Sindee L; McKenna, Gregory B

    2005-02-22

    The specific heat capacity was measured with step-scan differential scanning calorimetry for linear alkanes from pentane (C(5)H(12)) to nonadecane (C(19)H(40)), for several cyclic alkanes, for linear and cyclic polyethylenes, and for a linear and a cyclic polystyrene. For the linear alkanes, the specific heat capacity in the equilibrium liquid state decreases as chain length increases; above a carbon number N of 10 (decane) the specific heat asymptotes to a constant value. For the cyclic alkanes, the heat capacity in the equilibrium liquid state is lower than that of the corresponding linear chains and increases with increasing chain length. At high enough molecular weights, the heat capacities of cyclic and linear molecules are expected to be equal, and this is found to be the case for the polyethylenes and polystyrenes studied. In addition, the thermal properties of the solid-liquid and the solid-solid transitions are examined for the linear and cyclic alkanes; solid-solid transitions are observed only in the odd-numbered alkanes. The thermal expansion coefficients and the specific volumes of the linear and cyclic alkanes are also calculated from literature data and compared with the trends in the specific heats.

  18. Characterization of n-alkanes in PM 2.5 of the Taipei aerosol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Young, Li-Hao; Wang, Chiu-Sen

    Ambient concentrations of n-alkanes with carbon number ranging from 17 to 36 were determined for PM 2.5 samples collected in Taipei city during September 1997-February 1998. The measured concentrations of particulate n-alkanes were in the range of 69-702 ng m -3, considerably higher than the concentration levels observed in Los Angeles and Hong Kong. The concentration distributions of n-alkanes homologues obtained in this study exhibited peaks at C 19, C 24 or C 25. This suggests that fossil fuel utilization, such as vehicular exhaust and lubricant residues, was an important contributor to the Taipei aerosol. Source apportionment of PM 2.5 was conducted using carbon preference index (CPI, defined as the ratio of the total concentration of particulate n-alkanes with odd carbon number to that with even carbon number) and U : R ratio (the concentration ratio of unresolved components to resolved components obtained from chromatograms). The low CPI value (0.9-1.9) and high U : R ratio (2.6-6.4) for each sample further confirmed that fossil fuel utilization was the major source of n-alkanes in ambient PM 2.5 of Taipei city. Estimates from these results showed that 69-93% of the n-alkanes in PM 2.5 of the Taipei aerosol originated from vehicular exhaust. The higher concentration level of particulate n-alkanes in the Taipei aerosol was mainly a result of vehicular emissions.

  19. MIR and NIR group spectra of n-alkanes and 1-chloroalkanes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwaśniewicz, Michał; Czarnecki, Mirosław A.

    2015-05-01

    Numerous attempts were undertaken to resolve the absorption originating from different parts of alkanes. The separation of the contributions from the terminal and midchain methylene units was observed only in the spectra of solid alkanes at low temperatures. On the other hand, for liquid alkanes this effect was not reported as yet. In this study, ATR-IR, Raman and NIR spectra of eight n-alkanes and seven 1-chloroalkanes in the liquid phase were measured from 1000 to 12,000 cm-1. The spectra were analyzed by using two-dimensional (2D) correlation approach and chemometrics methods. It was shown that in 2D asynchronous contour plots, constructed from the spectra of n-alkanes and 1-chloroalkanes, the methylene band was resolved into two components. These two components were assigned to the terminal and midchain methylene groups. For the first time, the contributions from these two molecular fragments were resolved in the spectra of liquid n-alkanes and 1-chloroalkanes. MCR-ALS resolved these spectra into two components that were assigned to the ethyl and midchain methylene groups. These components represent the group spectra that can be used for assignment, spectral analysis and prediction of unknown spectra. The spectral prediction based on the group spectra provides very good results for n-alkanes, especially in the first and second overtone regions.

  20. [Digestion of alkane yeast carbohydrates by the preruminant calf].

    PubMed

    Besle, J M; Lassalas, B; Thivend, P

    1980-01-01

    Four 15-day old preruminant calves were fitted with two single cannulae, one in the lower ileum and the other in the upper colon. They were fed (on dry-matter basis) a milk substitute containing 35 p. 100 of dried, defatted, micronized alkane yeast (Candida tropicalis). Yeast carbohydrate digestion was studied in the ileum, colon and feces of two calves at 48, 72 and 102 days of age (three periods), using 1 p. 100 of chromic oxide in the diet as a marker. During each period, samples were collected every 2 hours and then pooled to obtain a sample from each part of the digestive tract. The carbohydrates were separated into 40 degrees C water-soluble (neutral and non-neutral) and water-insoluble fractions (fig. 1), and the composition of each was determined by hydrolysis and ion-exchange chromatography. The alkane yeast contained almost 22 p. 100 (in DM) of carbohydrate (table 1), mainly composed of 7.5 p. 100 of non-soluble mannans and 10.1 p. 100 of glucans, both from the hull, and 0.3 p. 100 of soluble galactans. The total carbohydrate content (table 2) was high in the ileum (23 to 28 p. 100 of DM) and low in the feces (3 to 8 p. 100 of DM). At the end of the small intestine, the soluble fraction contained some mannans and galactans partly bonded with non-carbohydrate compounds, but mainly neutral glucans (fig. 2). The apparent digestibilities (table 3, fig. 3) varied between animals and increased with age (total yeast carbohydrates: calf: 0.53 to 0.75; calf 2: 0.62 to 0.85). Mannans were better digested than glucans (calf 2: 0.95 and 0.57, respectively, at 102 days); the galactans were completely digested.

  1. CYP153A6, a Soluble P450 Oxygenase Catalyzing Terminal-Alkane Hydroxylation

    PubMed Central

    Funhoff, Enrico G.; Bauer, Ulrich; García-Rubio, Inés; Witholt, Bernard; van Beilen, Jan B.

    2006-01-01

    The first and key step in alkane metabolism is the terminal hydroxylation of alkanes to 1-alkanols, a reaction catalyzed by a family of integral-membrane diiron enzymes related to Pseudomonas putida GPo1 AlkB, by a diverse group of methane, propane, and butane monooxygenases and by some membrane-bound cytochrome P450s. Recently, a family of cytoplasmic P450 enzymes was identified in prokaryotes that allow their host to grow on aliphatic alkanes. One member of this family, CYP153A6 from Mycobacterium sp. HXN-1500, hydroxylates medium-chain-length alkanes (C6 to C11) to 1-alkanols with a maximal turnover number of 70 min−1 and has a regiospecificity of ≥95% for the terminal carbon atom position. Spectroscopic binding studies showed that C6-to-C11 aliphatic alkanes bind in the active site with Kd values varying from ∼20 nM to 3.7 μM. Longer alkanes bind more strongly than shorter alkanes, while the introduction of sterically hindering groups reduces the affinity. This suggests that the substrate-binding pocket is shaped such that linear alkanes are preferred. Electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy in the presence of the substrate showed the formation of an enzyme-substrate complex, which confirmed the binding of substrates observed in optical titrations. To rationalize the experimental observations on a molecular scale, homology modeling of CYP153A6 and docking of substrates were used to provide the first insight into structural features required for terminal alkane hydroxylation. PMID:16816194

  2. Mechanistic Insights into Alkane Metathesis Catalyzed by Silica-Supported Tantalum Hydrides: A DFT Study.

    PubMed

    Núñez-Zarur, Francisco; Solans-Monfort, Xavier; Restrepo, Albeiro

    2017-09-05

    Alkane metathesis transforms small alkanes into their higher and lower homologues. The reaction is catalyzed by either supported d(0) metal hydrides (M = Ta, W) or d(0) alkyl alkylidene complexes (M = Ta, Mo, W, Re). For the silica-supported tantalum hydrides, several reaction mechanisms have been proposed. We performed DFT-D3 calculations to analyze the viability of the proposed pathways and compare them with alkane hydrogenolysis, which is a competitive process observed at the early stages of the reaction. The results show that the reaction mechanisms for alkane metathesis and for alkane hydrogenolysis present similar energetics, and this is consistent with the fact that the process taking place depends on the concentrations of the initial reactants. Overall, a modified version of the so-called one-site mechanism that involves alkyl alkylidene intermediates appears to be more likely and consistent with experiments. According to this proposal, tantalum hydrides are precursors of the alkyl alkylidene active species. During precursor activation, H2 is released and this allows alkane hydrogenolysis to occur. In contrast, the catalytic cycle implies only the reaction with alkane molecules in excess and does not form H2. Thus, the activity for alkane hydrogenolysis decreases. The catalytic cycle proposed here implies three stages: (i) β-H elimination from the alkyl ligand, liberating ethene, (ii) alkene cross-metathesis, allowing olefin substituent exchange, and (iii) formation of the final products and alkyl alkylidene regeneration by olefin insertion and three successive 1,2-CH insertions to the alkylidene followed by α abstraction. These results relate the reactivity of silica-supported hydrides with that of the alkyl alkylidene complexes, the other common catalyst for alkane metathesis.

  3. n-alkane profiles of engine lubricating oil and particulate matter by molecular sieve extraction.

    PubMed

    Caravaggio, Gianni A; Charland, Jean-Pierre; Macdonald, Penny; Graham, Lisa

    2007-05-15

    As part of the Canadian Atmospheric Fine Particle Research Program to obtain reliable primary source emission profiles, a molecular sieve method was developed to reliably determine n-alkanes in lubricating oils, vehicle emissions, and mobile source dominated ambient particulate matter (PM). This work was also initiated to better calculate carbon preference index values (CPI: the ratio of the sums of odd over even n-alkanes), a parameter for estimating anthropogenic versus biogenic contributions in PM. n-Alkanes in lubricating oil and mobile source dominated PM are difficult to identify and quantify by gas chromatography due to the presence of similar components that cannot be fully resolved. This results in a hump, the unresolved complex mixture (UCM) that leads to incorrect n-alkane concentrations and CPI values. The sieve method yielded better chromatography, unambiguous identification of n-alkanes and allowed examination of differences between n-alkane profiles in light (LDV) and heavy duty vehicle (HDV) lubricating oils that would have been otherwise difficult. These profile differences made it possible to relate the LDV profile to that of the PM samples collected during a tunnel study in August 2001 near Vancouver (British Columbia, Canada). The n-alkane PM data revealed that longer sampling times result in a negative artifact, i.e., the desorption of the more volatile n-alkanes from the filters. Furthermore, the sieve procedure yielded n-alkane data that allowed calculation of accurate CPI values for lubricating oils and PM samples. Finally, this method may prove helpful in estimating the respective diesel and gasoline contributions to ambient PM.

  4. Hydrogen isotope exchange between n-alkanes and water under hydrothermal conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reeves, Eoghan P.; Seewald, Jeffrey S.; Sylva, Sean P.

    2012-01-01

    To investigate the extent of hydrogen isotope (2H and 1H) exchange between hydrocarbons and water under hydrothermal conditions, we performed experiments heating C1-C5n-alkanes in aqueous solutions of varying initial 2H/1H ratios in the presence of a pyrite-pyrrhotite-magnetite redox buffer at 323 °C and 35-36 MPa. Extensive and reversible incorporation of water-derived hydrogen into C2-C5n-alkanes was observed on timescales of months. In contrast, comparatively minor exchange was observed for CH4. Isotopic exchange is facilitated by reversible equilibration of n-alkanes and their corresponding n-alkenes with H2 derived from the disproportionation of water. Rates of δ2H variation in C3+n-alkanes decreased with time, a trend that is consistent with an asymptotic approach to steady state isotopic compositions regulated by alkane-water isotopic equilibrium. Substantially slower δ2H variation was observed for ethane relative to C3-C5n-alkanes, suggesting that the greater stability of C3+ alkenes and isomerization reactions may dramatically enhance rates of 2H/1H exchange in C3+n-alkanes. Thus, in reducing aqueous environments, reversible reaction of alkanes and their corresponding alkenes facilitates rapid 2H/1H exchange between water and alkyl-bound hydrogen on relatively short geological timescales at elevated temperatures and pressures. The proximity of some thermogenic and purported abiogenic alkane δ2H values to those predicted for equilibrium 2H/1H fractionation with ambient water suggests that this process may regulate the δ2H signatures of some naturally occurring hydrocarbons.

  5. CYP153A6, a soluble P450 oxygenase catalyzing terminal-alkane hydroxylation.

    PubMed

    Funhoff, Enrico G; Bauer, Ulrich; García-Rubio, Inés; Witholt, Bernard; van Beilen, Jan B

    2006-07-01

    The first and key step in alkane metabolism is the terminal hydroxylation of alkanes to 1-alkanols, a reaction catalyzed by a family of integral-membrane diiron enzymes related to Pseudomonas putida GPo1 AlkB, by a diverse group of methane, propane, and butane monooxygenases and by some membrane-bound cytochrome P450s. Recently, a family of cytoplasmic P450 enzymes was identified in prokaryotes that allow their host to grow on aliphatic alkanes. One member of this family, CYP153A6 from Mycobacterium sp. HXN-1500, hydroxylates medium-chain-length alkanes (C6 to C11) to 1-alkanols with a maximal turnover number of 70 min(-1) and has a regiospecificity of > or =95% for the terminal carbon atom position. Spectroscopic binding studies showed that C6-to-C11 aliphatic alkanes bind in the active site with Kd values varying from approximately 20 nM to 3.7 microM. Longer alkanes bind more strongly than shorter alkanes, while the introduction of sterically hindering groups reduces the affinity. This suggests that the substrate-binding pocket is shaped such that linear alkanes are preferred. Electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy in the presence of the substrate showed the formation of an enzyme-substrate complex, which confirmed the binding of substrates observed in optical titrations. To rationalize the experimental observations on a molecular scale, homology modeling of CYP153A6 and docking of substrates were used to provide the first insight into structural features required for terminal alkane hydroxylation.

  6. Biosynthetic origin of the saw-toothed profile in delta(13)C and delta(2)H of n-alkanes and systematic isotopic differences between n-, iso- and anteiso-alkanes in leaf waxes of land plants.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Youping; Grice, Kliti; Stuart-Williams, Hilary; Farquhar, Graham D; Hocart, Charles H; Lu, Hong; Liu, Weiguo

    2010-03-01

    The n-fatty acids containing an even number of carbons (ECN-n-FAs) in higher plants are biosynthesised by repetitive addition of a two carbon unit from malonyl-ACP. The n-alkanes containing an odd number of carbon atoms (OCN-n-alkanes) are generally formed by the decarboxylation of ECN-n-FAs, but it is unknown how the less abundant even-carbon-numbered alkanes (ECN-n-alkanes) are biosynthesised in higher plants. There is a distinctive compositional pattern of incorporation of stable carbon ((13)C) and hydrogen ((2)H) isotopes in co-existing ECN- and OCN-n-alkanes in leaves of higher plants, such that the OCN n-alkanes are relatively enriched in (13)C but relatively depleted in (2)H against the ECN-n-alkanes. This is consistent with the OCN-n-fatty acids having a propionate precursor which is derived from reduction of pyruvate. A tentative pathway is presented with propionate produced by enzymatic reduction of pyruvate which is then thio-esterified with CoSH (coenzyme A thiol) in the chloroplast to form the terminal precursor molecule propionyl-CoA. This is then repetitively extended/elongated with the 2-carbon unit from malonyl-ACP to form the long chain OCN-n-fatty acids. The anteiso- and iso-alkanes in Nicotiana tabacum leaf waxes have previously been found to be systematically enriched in (13)C compared with the n-alkanes by Grice et al. (2008). This is consistent with the isotopic composition of their putative respective precursors (pyruvate as precursor for n-alkanes, valine for iso-alkanes and isoleucine for anteiso-alkanes). The current study complements that of Grice et al. (2008) and looks at the distribution of hydrogen isotopes. The n-alkanes were found to be more enriched in deuterium ((2)H) than the iso-alkanes which in turn were more enriched than the anteiso-alkanes. We propose therefore that the depletion of (2)H in the iso-alkanes, relative to the n-alkanes is the consequence of accepting highly (2)H-depleted hydrogen atoms from NADPH during their

  7. Activated aluminum oxide selectively retaining long chain n-alkanes. Part I, description of the retention properties.

    PubMed

    Fiselier, Katell; Fiorini, Dennis; Grob, Koni

    2009-02-16

    Aluminum oxide activated by heating to 350-400 degrees C retains n-alkanes with more than about 20 carbon atoms, whereas iso-alkanes largely pass the column non-retained. Retention of n-alkanes is strong with n-pentane or n-hexane as mobile phase, but weak or negligible with cyclohexane or iso-octane. It is strongly reduced with increasing column temperature. Even small amounts of polar components, such as modifiers or impurities in the mobile phase, cause the retention of n-alkanes to irreversibly collapse. Since n-alkanes are not more polar than iso-alkanes and long chain n-alkanes not more polar than those of shorter chains, retention by a mechanism based on steric properties is assumed. The sensitivity to deactivation by polar components indicates that polar components and n-alkanes are retained by the same sites. The capacity for retaining n-alkanes is low, with the effect that the retention of n-alkanes depends on the load with retained paraffins. These retention properties are useful for the pre-separation of hydrocarbons in the context of the analysis of mineral oil paraffins in foodstuffs and tissue, where plant n-alkanes, typically ranging from C(23) to C(33), may severely disturb the analysis (subject of Part II).

  8. Complete genome sequence of Geobacillus strain Y4.1MC1, a novel CO-utilizing Geobacillus thermoglucosidasius strain isolated from Bath Hot Spring in Yellowstone National Park

    SciTech Connect

    Brumm, Phillip; Land, Miriam L.; Hauser, Loren John; Jeffries, Cynthia D.; Chang, Yun-Juan; Mead, David A.

    2015-01-01

    Geobacillus thermoglucosidasius Y4.1MC1 was isolated from a boiling spring in the lower geyser basin of Yellowstone National Park. We present this species is of interest because of its metabolic versatility. The genome consists of one circular chromosome of 3,840,330 bp and a circular plasmid of 71,617 bp with an average GC content of 44.01%. The genome is available in the GenBank database (NC_014650.1 and NC_014651.1). In addition to the expected metabolic pathways for sugars and amino acids, the Y4.1MC1 genome codes for two separate carbon monoxide utilization pathways, an aerobic oxidation pathway and an anaerobic reductive acetyl CoA (Wood-Ljungdahl) pathway. This is the first report of a nonanaerobic organism with the Wood-Ljungdahl pathway. Also, this anaerobic pathway permits the strain to utilize H2 and fix CO2 present in the hot spring environment. Y4.1MC1 and its related species may play a significant role in carbon capture and sequestration in thermophilic ecosystems and may open up new routes to produce biofuels and chemicals from CO, H2, and CO2.

  9. Complete genome sequence of Geobacillus strain Y4.1MC1, a novel CO-utilizing Geobacillus thermoglucosidasius strain isolated from Bath Hot Spring in Yellowstone National Park

    DOE PAGES

    Brumm, Phillip; Land, Miriam L.; Hauser, Loren John; ...

    2015-01-01

    Geobacillus thermoglucosidasius Y4.1MC1 was isolated from a boiling spring in the lower geyser basin of Yellowstone National Park. We present this species is of interest because of its metabolic versatility. The genome consists of one circular chromosome of 3,840,330 bp and a circular plasmid of 71,617 bp with an average GC content of 44.01%. The genome is available in the GenBank database (NC_014650.1 and NC_014651.1). In addition to the expected metabolic pathways for sugars and amino acids, the Y4.1MC1 genome codes for two separate carbon monoxide utilization pathways, an aerobic oxidation pathway and an anaerobic reductive acetyl CoA (Wood-Ljungdahl) pathway.more » This is the first report of a nonanaerobic organism with the Wood-Ljungdahl pathway. Also, this anaerobic pathway permits the strain to utilize H2 and fix CO2 present in the hot spring environment. Y4.1MC1 and its related species may play a significant role in carbon capture and sequestration in thermophilic ecosystems and may open up new routes to produce biofuels and chemicals from CO, H2, and CO2.« less

  10. Oceanobacter-related bacteria are important for the degradation of petroleum aliphatic hydrocarbons in the tropical marine environment.

    PubMed

    Teramoto, Maki; Suzuki, Masahito; Okazaki, Fumiyoshi; Hatmanti, Ariani; Harayama, Shigeaki

    2009-10-01

    Petroleum-hydrocarbon-degrading bacteria were obtained after enrichment on crude oil (as a 'chocolate mousse') in a continuous supply of Indonesian seawater amended with nitrogen, phosphorus and iron nutrients. They were related to Alcanivorax and Marinobacter strains, which are ubiquitous petroleum-hydrocarbon-degrading bacteria in marine environments, and to Oceanobacter kriegii (96.4-96.5 % similarities in almost full-length 16S rRNA gene sequences). The Oceanobacter-related bacteria showed high n-alkane-degrading activity, comparable to that of Alcanivorax borkumensis strain SK2. On the other hand, Alcanivorax strains exhibited high activity for branched-alkane degradation and thus could be key bacteria for branched-alkane biodegradation in tropical seas. Oceanobacter-related bacteria became most dominant in microcosms that simulated a crude oil spill event with Indonesian seawater. The dominance was observed in microcosms that were unamended or amended with fertilizer, suggesting that the Oceanobacter-related strains could become dominant in the natural tropical marine environment after an accidental oil spill, and would continue to dominate in the environment after biostimulation. These results suggest that Oceanobacter-related bacteria could be major degraders of petroleum n-alkanes spilt in the tropical sea.

  11. Degradation of Bunker C Fuel Oil by White-Rot Fungi in Sawdust Cultures Suggests Potential Applications in Bioremediation.

    PubMed

    Young, Darcy; Rice, James; Martin, Rachael; Lindquist, Erika; Lipzen, Anna; Grigoriev, Igor; Hibbett, David

    2015-01-01

    Fungal lignocellulolytic enzymes are promising agents for oxidizing pollutants. This study investigated degradation of Number 6 "Bunker C" fuel oil compounds by the white-rot fungi Irpex lacteus, Trichaptum biforme, Phlebia radiata, Trametes versicolor, and Pleurotus ostreatus (Basidiomycota, Agaricomycetes). Averaging across all studied species, 98.1%, 48.6%, and 76.4% of the initial Bunker C C10 alkane, C14 alkane, and phenanthrene, respectively were degraded after 180 days of fungal growth on pine media. This study also investigated whether Bunker C oil induces changes in gene expression in the white-rot fungus Punctularia strigosozonata, for which a complete reference genome is available. After 20 days of growth, a monokaryon P. strigosozonata strain degraded 99% of the initial C10 alkane in both pine and aspen media but did not affect the amounts of the C14 alkane or phenanthrene. Differential gene expression analysis identified 119 genes with ≥ log2(2-fold) greater expression in one or more treatment comparisons. Six genes were significantly upregulated in media containing oil; these genes included three enzymes with potential roles in xenobiotic biotransformation. Carbohydrate metabolism genes showing differential expression significantly accumulated transcripts on aspen vs. pine substrates, perhaps reflecting white-rot adaptations to growth on hardwood substrates. The mechanisms by which P. strigosozonata may degrade complex oil compounds remain obscure, but degradation results of the 180-day cultures suggest that diverse white-rot fungi have promise for bioremediation of petroleum fuels.

  12. Degradation of Bunker C Fuel Oil by White-Rot Fungi in Sawdust Cultures Suggests Potential Applications in Bioremediation

    PubMed Central

    Young, Darcy; Rice, James; Martin, Rachael; Lindquist, Erika; Lipzen, Anna; Grigoriev, Igor; Hibbett, David

    2015-01-01

    Fungal lignocellulolytic enzymes are promising agents for oxidizing pollutants. This study investigated degradation of Number 6 “Bunker C” fuel oil compounds by the white-rot fungi Irpex lacteus, Trichaptum biforme, Phlebia radiata, Trametes versicolor, and Pleurotus ostreatus (Basidiomycota, Agaricomycetes). Averaging across all studied species, 98.1%, 48.6%, and 76.4% of the initial Bunker C C10 alkane, C14 alkane, and phenanthrene, respectively were degraded after 180 days of fungal growth on pine media. This study also investigated whether Bunker C oil induces changes in gene expression in the white-rot fungus Punctularia strigosozonata, for which a complete reference genome is available. After 20 days of growth, a monokaryon P. strigosozonata strain degraded 99% of the initial C10 alkane in both pine and aspen media but did not affect the amounts of the C14 alkane or phenanthrene. Differential gene expression analysis identified 119 genes with ≥ log2(2-fold) greater expression in one or more treatment comparisons. Six genes were significantly upregulated in media containing oil; these genes included three enzymes with potential roles in xenobiotic biotransformation. Carbohydrate metabolism genes showing differential expression significantly accumulated transcripts on aspen vs. pine substrates, perhaps reflecting white-rot adaptations to growth on hardwood substrates. The mechanisms by which P. strigosozonata may degrade complex oil compounds remain obscure, but degradation results of the 180-day cultures suggest that diverse white-rot fungi have promise for bioremediation of petroleum fuels. PMID:26111162

  13. Effect of n-alkanes on asphaltene structuring in petroleum oils.

    PubMed

    Stachowiak, Christian; Viguié, Jean-Romain; Grolier, Jean-Pierre E; Rogalski, Marek

    2005-05-24

    The interactions between asphaltenes and short- to medium-chain n-alkanes were studied using titration microcalorimetry and inverse chromatography. The exothermic heat effects observed upon mixing of asphaltenes and n-alkanes were interpreted in terms of assembling of the two types of compounds into mixed structures. We show that the energy of the interactions between n-alkanes and the asphaltene hydrocarbon chains is close to the energy of the interactions between the asphaltene chains. We propose that the latter interactions are responsible for the formation of the asphaltene aggregates and are the driving force of the aggregate assembly into higher structures.

  14. [Respiratory activity of bacteria Acinetobacter calcoaceticus TM-31 during assimilation of alkane hydrocarbons].

    PubMed

    Ignatov, O V; Grechkina, E V; Muratova, A Iu; Turkovskaia, O V; Ignatov, V V

    2000-01-01

    The respiratory activity of Acinetobacter calcoaceticus TM-31 with resect to alkane hydrocarbons was studied. The dynamics of oxygen consumption by the cells while assimilating n-hexadecane was assayed by a modified technique using an oxygen electrode. The dependence of cell respiratory activity on the amount of n-hexadecane within the concentration range of 0.03-0.66% was determined. It was demonstrated that the cells also displayed respiratory activity towards other medium-chain n-alkanes: hexane, octane, decane, tridecane, and heptadecane. Thus, we demonstrated the possibility of determining alkanes by measuring the respiratory activities of microorganisms.

  15. Effect of nanoparticles on the RII -RI -RV rotator phase transitions of alkanes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukherjee, Prabir K.

    2017-08-01

    Experimental studies have shown that nanoparticles play an important role on the rotator phase transitions of n-alkanes. A phenomenological model for predicting the RII -RI -RV phase transitions in mixtures of alkanes and nanoparticles has been proposed by combining Flory-Huggins free energy of isotropic mixing and Landau free energy. The impact of nanoparticles on the RII -RI -RV phase transitions and their transition temperatures is discussed by means of phenomenological theory. The possibility of the tricritical behavior of the RI -RV phase transition in the mixtures of alkanes and nanoparticles is discussed. The theoretical predictions are in good qualitative agreement with available experimental results.

  16. Photochemical dimerization and functionalization of alkanes, ethers, primary and secondary alcohols, phosphine oxides and silanes

    DOEpatents

    Crabtree, R.H.; Brown, S.H.

    1989-10-17

    The space-time yield and/or the selectivity of the photochemical dimerization of alkanes, ethers, primary and secondary alcohols, phosphine oxides and primary, secondary and tertiary silanes with Hg and U.V. light is enhanced by refluxing the substrate in the irradiated reaction zone at a temperature at which the dimer product condenses and remains condensed promptly upon its formation. Cross-dimerization of the alkanes, ethers and silanes with primary alcohols is disclosed, as is the functionalization to aldehydes of the alkanes with carbon monoxide.

  17. Photochemical dimerization and functionalization of alkanes, ethers, primary and secondary alcohols, phosphine oxides and silanes

    DOEpatents

    Crabtree, Robert H.; Brown, Stephen H.

    1989-01-01

    The space-time yield and/or the selectivity of the photochemical dimerization of alkanes, ethers, primary and secondary alcohols, phosphine oxides and primary, secondary and tertiary silanes with Hg and U.V. light is enhanced by refluxing the substrate in the irradiated reaction zone at a temperature at which the dimer product condenses and remains condensed promptly upon its formation. Cross-dimerization of the alkanes, ethers and silanes with primary alcohols is disclosed, as is the functionalization to aldehydes of the alkanes with carbon monoxide.

  18. Light alkane conversion processes - Suprabiotic catalyst systems for selective oxidation of light alkane gases to fuel oxygenates.

    SciTech Connect

    Lyons, J.E.

    1992-07-01

    The objective of the work presented in this paper is to develop new, efficient catalysts for the selective transformation of the light alkanes in natural gas to alcohols for use as liquid transportation fuels, fuel precursors and chemical products. There currently exists no DIRECT one-step catalytic air-oxidation process to convert these substrates to alcohols. Such a one-step route would represent superior useful technology for the utilization of natural gas and similar refinery-derived light hydrocarbon streams. Processes for converting natural gas or its components (methane, ethane, propane, and the butanes) to alcohols for use as motor fuels, fuel additives or fuel precursors will not only add a valuable alternative to crude oil but will produce a clean-burning, high octane alternative to conventional gasoline.

  19. Light alkane conversion processes - Suprabiotic catalyst systems for selective oxidation of light alkane gases to fuel oxygenates

    SciTech Connect

    Lyons, J.E.

    1992-01-01

    The objective of the work presented in this paper is to develop new, efficient catalysts for the selective transformation of the light alkanes in natural gas to alcohols for use as liquid transportation fuels, fuel precursors and chemical products. There currently exists no DIRECT one-step catalytic air-oxidation process to convert these substrates to alcohols. Such a one-step route would represent superior useful technology for the utilization of natural gas and similar refinery-derived light hydrocarbon streams. Processes for converting natural gas or its components (methane, ethane, propane, and the butanes) to alcohols for use as motor fuels, fuel additives or fuel precursors will not only add a valuable alternative to crude oil but will produce a clean-burning, high octane alternative to conventional gasoline.

  20. Cloning, expression and applicability of thermo-alkali-stable xylanase of Geobacillus thermoleovorans in generating xylooligosaccharides from agro-residues.

    PubMed

    Verma, Digvijay; Satyanarayana, T

    2012-03-01

    A xylanase gene (xyl-gt) of 1.224 kbp was cloned from the extremely thermophilic bacterium Geobacillus thermoleovorans that encodes a protein containing 408 amino acid residues. Eight conserved regions (signature sequences) of GH family 10 xylanases have been found in the xylanase. When the xylanase gene was cloned and expressed in Escherichia coli BL21 (DE3), the recombinant strain produced xylanase titer of 270 U mg(-1) which is 27-fold higher than the wild strain. It is optimally active at 80°C and pH 8.5 with a high thermostability over broad range of pH (6-12) and temperature (40-100°C). The end products of the hydrolysis of birch wood xylan and agro-residues included xylobiose, xylotriose, xylotetraose and xylopentaose. The xylanase of G. thermoleovorans is one of the rare xylanases that exhibits thermo-alkali-stability, and thus, it is a suitable candidate for pre-bleaching of paper pulps and generating xylooligosaccharides from agro-residues for use as prebiotics.

  1. How to Switch Off a Histidine Kinase: Crystal Structure of Geobacillus Stearothermophilus KinB with the Inhibitor Sda

    SciTech Connect

    Bick, M.; Lamour, V; Rajashankar, K; Gordiyenko, Y; Robinson, C; Darst, S

    2009-01-01

    Entry to sporulation in bacilli is governed by a histidine kinase phosphorelay, a variation of the predominant signal transduction mechanism in prokaryotes. Sda directly inhibits sporulation histidine kinases in response to DNA damage and replication defects. We determined a 2.0-Angstroms-resolution X-ray crystal structure of the intact cytoplasmic catalytic core [comprising the dimerization and histidine phosphotransfer domain (DHp domain), connected to the ATP binding catalytic domain] of the Geobacillus stearothermophilus sporulation kinase KinB complexed with Sda. Structural and biochemical analyses reveal that Sda binds to the base of the DHp domain and prevents molecular transactions with the DHp domain to which it is bound by acting as a simple molecular barricade. Sda acts to sterically block communication between the catalytic domain and the DHp domain, which is required for autophosphorylation, as well as to sterically block communication between the response regulator Spo0F and the DHp domain, which is required for phosphotransfer and phosphatase activities.

  2. A double mutant of highly purified Geobacillus stearothermophilus lactate dehydrogenase recognises l-mandelic acid as a substrate.

    PubMed

    Binay, Barış; Sessions, Richard B; Karagüler, Nevin Gül

    2013-05-10

    Lactate dehydrogenase from the thermophilic organism Geobacillus stearothermophilus (formerly Bacillus stearothermophilus) (bsLDH) has a crucial role in producing chirally pure hydroxyl compounds. α-Hydroxy acids are used in many industrial situations, ranging from pharmaceutical to cosmetic dermatology products. One drawback of this enzyme is its limited substrate specificity. For instance, l-lactate dehydrogenase exhibits no detectable activity towards the large side chain of 2-hydroxy acid l-mandelic acid, an α-hydroxy acid with anti-bacterial activity. Despite many attempts to engineer bsLDH to accept α-hydroxy acid substrates, there have been no attempts to introduce the industrially important l-mandelic acid to bsLDH. Herein, we describe attempts to change the reactivity of bsLDH towards l-mandelic acid. Using the Insight II molecular modelling programme (except 'program' in computers) and protein engineering techniques, we have successfully introduced substantial mandelate dehydrogenase activity to the enzyme. Energy minimisation modelling studies suggested that two mutations, T246G and I240A, would allow the enzyme to utilise l-mandelic acid as a substrate. Genes encoding for the wild-type and mutant enzymes were constructed, and the resulting bsLDH proteins were overexpressed in Escherichia coli and purified using the TAGZyme system. Enzyme assays showed that insertion of this double mutation into highly purified bsLDH switched the substrate specificity from lactate to l-mandelic acid.

  3. Isolation and Characterization of Novel Denitrifying Bacterium Geobacillus sp. SG-01 Strain from Wood Chips Composted with Swine Manure

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Seung-Hak; Cho, Jin-Kook; Lee, Soon-Youl; Abanto, Oliver D.; Kim, Soo-Ki; Ghosh, Chiranjit; Lim, Joung-Soo; Hwang, Seong-Gu

    2013-01-01

    Nitrate contamination in ground and surface water is an increasingly serious environmental problem and only a few bacterial strains have been identified that have the ability to remove nitrogen pollutants from wastewater under thermophilic conditions. We therefore isolated thermophilic facultative bacterial strains from wood chips that had been composted with swine manure under aerated high temperature conditions so as to identify strains with denitrifying ability. Nine different colonies were screened and 3 long rod-shaped bacterial strains designated as SG-01, SG-02, and SG-03 were selected. The strain SG-01 could be differentiated from SG-02 and SG-03 on the basis of the method that it used for sugar utilization. The 16S rRNA genes of this strain also had high sequence similarity with Geobacillus thermodenitrificans 465T (99.6%). The optimal growth temperatures (55°C), pH values (pH 7.0), and NaCl concentrations (1%) required for the growth of strain SG-01 were established. This strain reduced 1.18 mM nitrate and 1.45 mM nitrite in LB broth after 48 h of incubation. These results suggest that the G. thermodenitrificans SG-01 strain may be useful in the removal of nitrates and nitrites from wastewater generated as a result of livestock farming. PMID:25049754

  4. Die another day: Fate of heat-treated Geobacillus stearothermophilus ATCC 12980 spores during storage under growth-preventing conditions.

    PubMed

    Mtimet, Narjes; Trunet, Clément; Mathot, Anne-Gabrielle; Venaille, Laurent; Leguérinel, Ivan; Coroller, Louis; Couvert, Olivier

    2016-06-01

    Geobacillus stearothermophilus spores are recognized as one of the most wet-heat resistant among aerobic spore-forming bacteria and are responsible for 35% of canned food spoilage after incubation at 55 °C. The purpose of this study was to investigate and model the fate of heat-treated survivor spores of G. stearothermophilus ATCC 12980 in growth-preventing environment. G. stearothermophilus spores were heat-treated at four different conditions to reach one or two decimal reductions. Heat-treated spores were stored in nutrient broth at different temperatures and pH under growth-preventing conditions. Spore survival during storage was evaluated by count plating over a period of months. Results reveal that G. stearothermophilus spores surviving heat treatment lose their viability during storage under growth-preventing conditions. Two different subpopulations were observed during non-thermal inactivation. They differed according to the level of their resistance to storage stress, and the proportion of each subpopulation can be modulated by heat treatment conditions. Finally, tolerance to storage stress under growth-preventing conditions increases at refrigerated temperature and neutral pH regardless of heat treatment conditions. Such results suggest that spore inactivation due to heat treatment could be completed by storage under growth-preventing conditions.

  5. Semi-Rational Design of Geobacillus stearothermophilus L-Lactate Dehydrogenase to Access Various Chiral α-Hydroxy Acids.

    PubMed

    Aslan, Aşkın Sevinç; Birmingham, William R; Karagüler, Nevin Gül; Turner, Nicholas J; Binay, Barış

    2016-06-01

    Chiral α-hydroxy acids (AHAs) are rapidly becoming important synthetic building blocks, in particular for the production of pharmaceuticals and other fine chemicals. Chiral compounds of a variety of functionalities are now often derived using enzymes, and L-lactate dehydrogenase from the thermophilic organism Geobacillus stearothermophilus (bsLDH) has the potential to be employed for the industrial synthesis of chiral α-hydroxy acids. Despite the thorough characterization of this enzyme, generation of variants with high activity on non-natural substrates has remained difficult and therefore limits the use of bsLDH in industry. Here, we present the engineering of bsLDH using semi-rational design as a method of focusing screening in a small and smart library for novel biocatalysts. In this study, six mutant libraries were designed in an effort to expand the substrate range of bsLDH. The eight variants identified as having enhanced activity toward the selected α-keto acids belonged to the same library, which targeted two positions simultaneously. These new variants now may be useful biocatalysts for chiral synthesis of α-hydroxy acids.

  6. A chimeric α-amylase engineered from Bacillus acidicola and Geobacillus thermoleovorans with improved thermostability and catalytic efficiency.

    PubMed

    Parashar, Deepak; Satyanarayana, T

    2016-04-01

    The α-amylase (Ba-amy) of Bacillus acidicola was fused with DNA fragments encoding partial N- and C-terminal region of thermostable α-amylase gene of Geobacillus thermoleovorans (Gt-amy). The chimeric enzyme (Ba-Gt-amy) expressed in Escherichia coli displays marked increase in catalytic efficiency [K cat: 4 × 10(4) s(-1) and K cat/K m: 5 × 10(4) mL(-1) mg(-1) s(-1)] and higher thermostability than Ba-amy. The melting temperature (T m) of Ba-Gt-amy (73.8 °C) is also higher than Ba-amy (62 °C), and the CD spectrum analysis revealed the stability of the former, despite minor alteration in secondary structure. Langmuir-Hinshelwood kinetic analysis suggests that the adsorption of Ba-Gt-amy onto raw starch is more favourable than Ba-amy. Ba-Gt-amy is thus a suitable biocatalyst for raw starch saccharification at sub-gelatinization temperatures because of its acid stability, thermostability and Ca(2+) independence, and better than the other known bacterial acidic α-amylases.

  7. 1H, 13C, and 15N backbone and side chain resonance assignments of thermophilic Geobacillus kaustophilus cyclophilin-A

    SciTech Connect

    Holliday, Michael; Zhang, Fengli; Isern, Nancy G.; Armstrong, Geoffrey S.; Eisenmesser, Elan Z.

    2014-04-01

    Cyclophilins catalyze the reversible peptidyl-prolyl isomerization of their substrates and are present across all kingdoms of life from humans to bacteria. Although numerous biological roles have now been discovered for cyclophilins, their function was initially ascribed to their chaperone-like activity in protein folding where they catalyze the often rate-limiting step of proline isomerization. This chaperone-like activity may be especially important under extreme conditions where cyclophilins are often over expressed, such as in tumors for human cyclophilins {Lee, 2010 #1167}, but also in organisms that thrive under extreme conditions, such as theromophilic bacteria. Moreover, the reversible nature of the peptidyl-prolyl isomerization reaction catalyzed by cyclophilins has allowed these enzymes to serve as model systems for probing the role of conformational changes during catalytic turnover {Eisenmesser, 2002 #20;Eisenmesser, 2005 #203}. Thus, we present here the resonance assignments of a thermophilic cyclophilin from Geobacillus kaustophilus derived from deep-sea sediment {Takami, 2004 #1384}. This thermophilic cyclophilin may now be studied at a variety of temperatures to provide insight into the comparative structure, dynamics, and catalytic mechanism of cyclophilins.

  8. Gold nanoparticles synthesized by Geobacillus sp. strain ID17 a thermophilic bacterium isolated from Deception Island, Antarctica

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The use of microorganisms in the synthesis of nanoparticles emerges as an eco-friendly and exciting approach, for production of nanoparticles due to its low energy requirement, environmental compatibility, reduced costs of manufacture, scalability, and nanoparticle stabilization compared with the chemical synthesis. Results The production of gold nanoparticles by the thermophilic bacterium Geobacillus sp. strain ID17 is reported in this study. Cells exposed to Au3+ turned from colourless into an intense purple colour. This change of colour indicates the accumulation of intracellular gold nanoparticles. Elemental analysis of particles composition was verified using TEM and EDX analysis. The intracellular localization and particles size were verified by TEM showing two different types of particles of predominant quasi-hexagonal shape with size ranging from 5–50 nm. The mayority of them were between 10‒20 nm in size. FT-IR was utilized to characterize the chemical surface of gold nanoparticles. This assay supports the idea of a protein type of compound on the surface of biosynthesized gold nanoparticles. Reductase activity involved in the synthesis of gold nanoparticles has been previously reported to be present in others microorganisms. This reduction using NADH as substrate was tested in ID17. Crude extracts of the microorganism could catalyze the NADH-dependent Au3+ reduction. Conclusions Our results strongly suggest that the biosynthesis of gold nanoparticles by ID17 is mediated by enzymes and NADH as a cofactor for this biological transformation. PMID:23919572

  9. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray crystallographic analysis of l-arabinose isomerase from thermophilic Geobacillus kaustophilus

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Thinh-Phat; Choi, Jin Myung; Lee, Sang-Jae; Lee, Yong-Jik; Lee, Sung-Keun; Jun, Youngsoo; Lee, Dong-Woo; Lee, Sung Haeng

    2014-01-01

    l-Arabinose isomerase (AI), which catalyzes the isomerization of l-arabinose to l-ribulose, can also convert d-galactose to d-tagatose, a natural sugar replacer, which is of commercial interest in the food and healthcare industries. Intriguingly, mesophilic and thermophilic AIs showed different substrate preferences and metal requirements in catalysis and different thermostabilities. However, the catalytic mechanism of thermophilic AIs still remains unclear. Therefore, thermophilic Geobacillus kaustophilus AI (GKAI) was overexpressed, purified and crystallized, and a preliminary X-ray diffraction data set was obtained. Diffraction data were collected from a GKAI crystal to 2.70 Å resolution. The crystal belonged to the monoclinic space group C2, with unit-cell parameters a = 224.12, b = 152.95, c = 91.28 Å, β = 103.61°. The asymmetric unit contained six molecules, with a calculated Matthews coefficient of 2.25 Å3 Da−1 and a solvent content of 45.39%. The three-dimensional structure determination of GKAI is currently in progress by molecular replacement and model building. PMID:24419630

  10. Evolved β-Galactosidases from Geobacillus stearothermophilus with Improved Transgalactosylation Yield for Galacto-Oligosaccharide Production▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Placier, Gaël; Watzlawick, Hildegard; Rabiller, Claude; Mattes, Ralf

    2009-01-01

    A mutagenesis approach was applied to the β-galactosidase BgaB from Geobacillus stearothermophilus KVE39 in order to improve its enzymatic transglycosylation of lactose into oligosaccharides. A simple screening strategy, which was based on the reduction of the hydrolysis of a potential transglycosylation product (lactosucrose), provided mutant enzymes possessing improved synthetic properties for the autocondensation product from nitrophenyl-galactoside and galacto-oligosaccharides (GOS) from lactose. The effects of the mutations on enzyme activity and kinetics were determined. An change of one arginine to lysine (R109K) increased the oligosaccharide yield compared to that for the wild-type BgaB. Subsequently, saturation mutagenesis at this position demonstrated that valine and tryptophan further increased the transglycosylation performance of BgaB. During the transglycosylation reaction with lactose of the evolved β-galactosidases, a major trisaccharide was formed. Its structure was characterized as β-d-galactopyranosyl-(1→3)-β-d-galactopyranosyl-(1→4)-d-glucopyranoside (3′-galactosyl-lactose). At the lactose concentration of 18% (wt/vol), this trisaccharide was obtained in yields of 11.5% (wt/wt) with GP21 (BgaB R109K), 21% with GP637.2 (BgaB R109V), and only 2% with the wild-type BgaB enzyme. GP643.3 (BgaB R109W) was shown to be the most efficient mutant, with a 3′-galactosyl-lactose production of 23%. PMID:19666723

  11. Crystallization and preliminary crystallographic analysis of a family 43 β-d-xylosidase from Geobacillus stearothermophilus T-6

    PubMed Central

    Brüx, Christian; Niefind, Karsten; Ben-David, Alon; Leon, Maya; Shoham, Gil; Shoham, Yuval; Schomburg, Dietmar

    2005-01-01

    β-d-Xylosidases (EC 3.2.1.37) are hemicellulases that cleave single xylose units from the nonreducing end of xylooligomers. In this study, the crystallization and preliminary X-ray analysis of a β-d-xylosidase from Geobacillus stearothermophilus T-6 (XynB3), a family 43 glycoside hydrolase, is described. XynB3 is a 535-amino-acid protein with a calculated molecular weight of 61 891 Da. Purified recombinant native and catalytic inactive mutant proteins were crystallized and cocrystallized with xylobiose in two different space groups, P21212 (unit-cell parameters a = 98.32, b = 99.36, c = 258.64 Å) and P41212 (or the enantiomorphic space group P43212; unit-cell parameters a = b = 140.15, c = 233.11 Å), depending on the detergent. Transferring crystals to cryoconditions required a very careful protocol. Orthorhombic crystals diffract to 2.5 Å and tetragonal crystals to 2.2 Å. PMID:16511233

  12. Characterization of a mutated Geobacillus stearothermophilus L-arabinose isomerase that increases the production rate of D-tagatose.

    PubMed

    Kim, H-J; Kim, J-H; Oh, H-J; Oh, D-K

    2006-07-01

    Characterization of a mutated Geobacillus stearothermophilus L-arabinose isomerase used to increase the production rate of D-tagatose. A mutated gene was obtained by an error-prone polymerase chain reaction using L-arabinose isomerase gene from G. stearothermophilus as a template and the gene was expressed in Escherichia coli. The expressed mutated L-arabinose isomerase exhibited the change of three amino acids (Met322-->Val, Ser393-->Thr, and Val408-->Ala), compared with the wild-type enzyme and was then purified to homogeneity. The mutated enzyme had a maximum galactose isomerization activity at pH 8.0, 65 degrees C, and 1.0 mM Co2+, while the wild-type enzyme had a maximum activity at pH 8.0, 60 degrees C, and 1.0-mM Mn2+. The mutated L-arabinose isomerase exhibited increases in D-galactose isomerization activity, optimum temperature, catalytic efficiency (kcat/Km) for D-galactose, and the production rate of D-tagatose from D-galactose. The mutated L-arabinose isomerase from G. stearothermophilus is valuable for the commercial production of D-tagatose. This work contributes knowledge on the characterization of a mutated L-arabinose isomerase, and allows an increased production rate for D-tagatose from D-galactose using the mutated enzyme.

  13. Isolation of lipase producing thermophilic bacteria: optimization of production and reaction conditions for lipase from Geobacillus sp.

    PubMed

    Mehta, Akshita; Kumar, Rakesh; Gupta, Reena

    2012-12-01

    Lipases catalyze the hydrolysis and the synthesis of esters formed from glycerol and long chain fatty acids. Lipases occur widely in nature, but only microbial lipases are commercially significant. In the present study, thirty-two bacterial strains, isolated from soil sample of a hot spring were screened for lipase production. The strain TS-4, which gave maximum activity, was identified as Geobacillus sp. at MTCC, IMTECH, Chandigarh. The isolated lipase producing bacteria were grown on minimal salt medium containing olive oil. Maximal quantities of lipase were produced when 30 h old inoculum was used at 10% (v/v) in production medium and incubated in shaking conditions (150 rpm) for 72 h. The optimal temperature and pH for the bacterial growth and lipase production were found to be 60°C and 9.5, respectively. Maximal enzyme production resulted when mustard oil was used as carbon source and yeast extract as sole nitrogen source at a concentration of 1% (v/v) and 0.15% (w/v), respectively. The different optimized reaction parameters were temperature 65°C, pH 8.5, incubation time 10 min and substrate p-nitrophenyl palmitate. The Km and Vmax values of enzyme were found to be 14 mM and 17.86 μmol ml-1min-1, respectively, with p-nitrophenyl palmitate as substrate. All metal ions studied (1 mM) increased the lipase activity.

  14. Walking dead: Permeabilization of heat-treated Geobacillus stearothermophilus ATCC 12980 spores under growth-preventing conditions.

    PubMed

    Mtimet, Narjes; Trunet, Clément; Mathot, Anne-Gabrielle; Venaille, Laurent; Leguérinel, Ivan; Coroller, Louis; Couvert, Olivier

    2017-06-01

    Although heat treatment is probably the oldest and the most common method used to inactivate spores in food processes, the specific mechanism of heat killing of spores is still not fully understood. The purpose of this study is to investigate the evolution of the permeabilization and the viability of heat-treated spores during storage under growth-preventing conditions. Geobacillus stearothermophilus spores were heat-treated under various conditions of temperature and pH, and then stored under conditions of temperature and pH that prevent growth. Spore survival was evaluated by count plating immediately after heat treatment, and then during storage over a period of months. Flow cytometry analyses were performed to investigate the Syto 9 permeability of heat-treated spores. Sub-lethally heat-treated spores of G. stearothermophilus were physically committed to permeabilization after heat treatment. However, prolonged heat treatment may abolish the spore permeabilization and block heat-treated spores in the refractive state. However, viability loss and permeabilization during heat treatment seem to be two different mechanisms that occur independently, and the loss of permeabilization properties takes place at a much slower rate than spore killing. Under growth-preventing conditions, viable heat-treated spores presumably lose their viability due to the permeabilization phenomena, which makes them more susceptible to the action of adverse conditions precluding growth.

  15. [Hydrocarbon-Oxidizing potential and the genes for n-alkane biodegradation in a new acidophilic mycobacterial association from sulfur blocks].

    PubMed

    Ivanova, I E; Sukhacheva, M V; Kanat'eva, A Yu; Kravchenko, I K; Kurganov, A A

    2014-01-01

    Capacity of AG(S10), a new aerobic acidophilic (growing within the pH range from 1.3 to 4.5 with the optimum at 2.0-2.5) bacterial association from sulfur blocks of the Astrakhan gas-processing complex (AGC), for oxidation of hydrocarbons of various chemical structure was investigated. A broad spectrum of normal (C10-C21) and iso-alkanes, toluene, naphthalene, andphenanthrene, as well as isoprenoids resistant to microbial degradation, pristane and phytane (components of paraffin oil), and 2,2,4,4,6,8,8,-heptamethylnonane, a branched hydrocarbon, were biodegraded under acidic conditions. Microbiological investigation revealed the dominance of mycobacteria in the AGS10 association, which was confirmed by analysis of the 16S rRNA gene clone library. In the phylogenetic tree, the 16S rRNA sequences formed a branch within the cluster of slow-growing mycobacteria, with 98% homology to the closest species Mycobacterium florentinum. Genomic DNA of AG(S10) culture grown on C14-C17 n-alkanes at pH 2.5 was found to contain the genes of two hydroxylase families, alkB and Cyp 153, indicating their combined involvement in hydrocarbon biodegradation. The high hydrocarbon-oxidizing potential of the AGS10 bacterial association, indicated that further search for the genes responsible for degradation of various hydrocarbons in acidophilic mycobacteria could be promising.

  16. Enhanced cometabolic degradation of methyl tert-butyl ether by a Pseudomonas sp. strain grown on n-pentane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, S. S.; Wang, S.; Yan, W.

    2016-08-01

    When methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE) is added as oxygenates it increases the octane number and decreases the release of nitric oxide from the incomplete combustion of reformulated gasoline. The extensive use of MTBE allowed it to be detectable as a pollutant in both ground-level and underground water worldwide. The present study focuses on the isolatio