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Sample records for alkane radical cations

  1. Infrared Spectroscopic Investigation on CH Bond Acidity in Cationic Alkanes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsuda, Yoshiyuki; Xie, Min; Fujii, Asuka

    2016-06-01

    We have demonstrated large enhancements of CH bond acidities in alcohol, ether, and amine cations through infrared predissociation spectroscopy based on the vacuum ultraviolet photoionization detection. In this study, we investigate for the cationic alkanes (pentane, hexane, and heptane) with different alkyl chain lengths. The σ electrons are ejected in the ionization of alkanes, while nonbonding electrons are ejected in ionization of alcohols, ethers, and amines. Nevertheless, the acidity enhancements of CH in these cationic alkanes have also been demonstrated by infrared spectroscopy. The correlations of their CH bond acidities with the alkyl chain lengths as well as the mechanisms of their acidity enhancements will be discussed by comparison of infrared spectra and theoretical calculations.

  2. Halogenated silanes, radicals, and cations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Liming; He, Yi-Liang

    2008-09-01

    Quantum chemistry study has been carried out on the structure and energetics of halogenated silanes, radicals, and cations (SiHxXy0,+1, X = F, Cl, Br; x + y = 1-4). The geometries are optimized at B3LYP/6-31+G(2df,p) level. The adiabatic ionization energiess (IEas), relative energetics of cations, proton affinities (PAs) of silanes, and the enthalpies of formation are predicted using G3(CC) model chemistry. Non-classical ion complex structures are found for hydrogenated cations and transition states connecting classical and non-classical structures are also located. The most stable cations for silylene and silyl radicals have their classical divalent and trivalent structures, and those for silanes have non-classical structures except for SiH3Br+ and SiH2Br2+. The non-classical structures for halosilane cations imply difficulty in experimentally measurement of the adiabatic ionization energies using photoionization or photoelectron studies. For SiH3X, SiH2X2, and SiHX3, the G3(CC) adiabatic IEas to classical ionic structures closest to their neutrals agree better with the photoelectron spectroscopic measurements. The transition states between classical and non-classical structures also hamper the photoionization determination of the appearance energies for silylene cations from silanes. The G3(CC) results for SiHx0,+1 agree excellently with the photoionization mass spectrometric study, and the results for fluorinated and chlorinated species also agree with the previous theoretical predictions at correlation levels from BAC-MP4 to CCSD(T)/CBS. The predicted enthalpy differences between SiH2Cl+, SiHCl2+, and SiCl3+ are also in accordance with previous kinetics study. The G3(CC) results show large discrepancies to the collision-induced charge transfer and/or dissociation reactions involving SiFx+ and SiClx+ ions, for which the G3(CC) enthalpies of formation are also significantly differed from the previous theoretical predictions, especially on SiFx+ (x = 2-4). The G3

  3. Radical cation cyclization of 1,5-hexadiene to cyclohexene via the cyclohexane-2,5-diyl radical cation intermediate

    SciTech Connect

    Guo, Q.X.; Qin, X.Z.; Wang, J.T.; Williams, F.

    1988-03-16

    The classical example of a neutral carbon-centered radical cyclization reaction is the regioselective 1,5-ring closure (exocyclization) of the 5-hexenyl radical to the cyclopentylcarbinyl radical. Here the authors report the title reaction, a comparable addition process whereby an ..cap alpha.., omega-diene radical cation reacts by endocyclization and hydrogen shift(s) to produce a cycloolefin radical cation.

  4. Electronic spectrum of 9-methylanthracenium radical cation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Connor, Gerard D.; Sanelli, Julian A.; Dryza, Vik; Bieske, Evan J.; Schmidt, Timothy W.

    2016-04-01

    The predissociation spectrum of the cold, argon-tagged, 9-methylanthracenium radical cation is reported from 8000 cm-1 to 44 500 cm-1. The reported spectrum contains bands corresponding to at least eight electronic transitions ranging from the near infrared to the ultraviolet. These electronic transitions are assigned through comparison with ab initio energies and intensities. The infrared D1←D0 transitions exhibit significant vibronic activity, which is assigned through comparison with TD-B3LYP excited state frequencies and intensities, as well as modelled vibronic interactions. Dissociation of 9-methylanthracenium is also observed at high visible-photon energies, resulting in the loss of either CH2 or CH3. The relevance of these spectra, and the spectra of other polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon radical cations, to the largely unassigned diffuse interstellar bands, is discussed.

  5. Fragmentation Pathways in the Uracil Radical Cation

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, Congyi; Matsika, Spiridoula; Kotur, Marija; Weinacht, Thomas C.

    2012-08-24

    We investigate pathways for fragmentation in the uracil radical cation using ab initio electronic structure calculations. We focus on the main fragments produced in pump–probe dissociative ionization experiments. These are fragments with mass to charge ratios (m/z) of 69, 28, 41, and 42. Barriers to dissociation along the ground ionic surface are reported, which provide an estimate of the energetic requirements for the production of the main fragments. Finally, direct and sequential fragmentation mechanisms have been analyzed, and it is concluded that sequential fragmentation after production of fragment with m/z 69 is the dominant mechanism for the production of the smaller fragments.

  6. The pi-Cation Radical of Chlorophyll a.

    PubMed

    Borg, D C; Fajer, J; Felton, R H; Dolphin, D

    1970-10-01

    Chlorophyll a undergoes reversible one-electron oxidation in dichloromethane and butyronitrile. Removal of the electron by controlled potential electrolysis or by stoichiometric charge transfer to a known cation radical yields a radical (epr line width = 9 gauss, g = 2.0025 +/- 0.0001) whose optical spectrum is bleached relative to that of chlorophyll. Upon electrophoresis this bleached species behaves as a cation. By comparison with the known properties of pi-cation radicals of porphyrins and chlorins, the chlorophyll radical is also identified as a pi-cation. Further correlation of optical and epr properties with published studies on photosynthesis leads to the conclusion that oxidized P700, the first photochemical product of photosystem I in green plants, contains a pi-cation radical of the chlorin component of chlorophyll a. This radical is the likely source of the rapidly-decaying, narrow epr signal of photosynthesis.

  7. Transition-Metal Hydride Radical Cations.

    PubMed

    Hu, Yue; Shaw, Anthony P; Estes, Deven P; Norton, Jack R

    2016-08-10

    Transition-metal hydride radical cations (TMHRCs) are involved in a variety of chemical and biochemical reactions, making a more thorough understanding of their properties essential for explaining observed reactivity and for the eventual development of new applications. Generally, these species may be treated as the ones formed by one-electron oxidation of diamagnetic analogues that are neutral or cationic. Despite the importance of TMHRCs, the generally sensitive nature of these complexes has hindered their development. However, over the last four decades, many more TMHRCs have been synthesized, characterized, isolated, or hypothesized as reaction intermediates. This comprehensive review focuses on experimental studies of TMHRCs reported through the year 2014, with an emphasis on isolated and observed species. The methods used for the generation or synthesis of TMHRCs are surveyed, followed by a discussion about the stability of these complexes. The fundamental properties of TMHRCs, especially those pertaining to the M-H bond, are described, followed by a detailed treatment of decomposition pathways. Finally, reactions involving TMHRCs as intermediates are described.

  8. Preferential activation of primary C-H bonds in the reactions of small alkanes with the diatomic MgO(+*) cation.

    PubMed

    Schröder, Detlef; Roithová, Jana; Alikhani, Esmail; Kwapien, Karolina; Sauer, Joachim

    2010-04-06

    The C-H bond activation of small alkanes by the gaseous MgO(+*) cation is probed by mass spectrometric means. In addition to H-atom abstraction from methane, the MgO(+*) cation reacts with ethane, propane, n- and iso-butane through several pathways, which can all be assigned to the occurrence of initial C-H bond activations. Specifically, the formal C-C bond cleavages observed are assigned to C-H bond activation as the first step, followed by cleavage of a beta-C-C bond concomitant with release of the corresponding alkyl radical. Kinetic modeling of the observed product distributions reveals a high preference of MgO(+*) for the attack of primary C-H bonds. This feature represents a notable distinction of the main-group metal oxide MgO(+*) from various transition-metal oxide cations, which show a clear preference for the attack of secondary C-H bonds. The results of complementary theoretical calculations indicate that the C-H bond activation of larger alkanes by the MgO(+*) cation is subject to pronounced kinetic control.

  9. Pyridine radical cation and its fluorine substituted derivatives

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bondybey, V.E.; English, J.H.; Shiley, R.H.

    1982-01-01

    The spectra and relaxation of the pyridine cation and of several of its fluorinated derivatives are studied in low temperature Ne matrices. The ions are generated by direct photoionization of the parent compounds. Of the compounds studied, laser induced → and → fluorescence is observed only for the 2, 6‐difluoropyridine cation. The analysis of the spectrum indicates that the ion is planar both in the and states. The large variety in the spectroscopic and relaxation behavior of fluoropyridine radical cations is explained in terms of their electronic structure and of the differential shifts of the individual electronic states caused by the fluorine substitution.

  10. Surface hopping investigation of the relaxation dynamics in radical cations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Assmann, Mariana; Weinacht, Thomas; Matsika, Spiridoula

    2016-01-01

    Ionization processes can lead to the formation of radical cations with population in several ionic states. In this study, we examine the dynamics of three radical cations starting from an excited ionic state using trajectory surface hopping dynamics in combination with multiconfigurational electronic structure methods. The efficiency of relaxation to the ground state is examined in an effort to understand better whether fragmentation of cations is likely to occur directly on excited states or after relaxation to the ground state. The results on cyclohexadiene, hexatriene, and uracil indicate that relaxation to the ground ionic state is very fast in these systems, while fragmentation before relaxation is rare. Ultrafast relaxation is facilitated by the close proximity of electronic states and the presence of two- and three-state conical intersections. Examining the properties of the systems in the Franck-Condon region can give some insight into the subsequent dynamics.

  11. Carotenoid cation radicals: electrochemical, optical, and EPR study

    SciTech Connect

    Grant, J.L.; Kramer, V.J.; Ding, R.; Kispert, L.D.

    1988-03-30

    The general aim of this investigation is to determine whether carotenoid cation radicals can be produced, and stabilized, electrochemically. Hence, the authors have undertaken a detailed study of the electrooxidation of various carotenoids (..beta..-carotene (I), ..beta..-apo-8'-carotenal (II), and canthaxanthin (III) using the techniques of cyclic voltammetry, controlled-potential electrolysis (cpe) in conjunction with optical spectroscopy, and EPR spectroscopy coupled with in situ electrolysis. They report the successful generation of carotenoid cation radicals via electrochemical oxidation and, furthermore, the stabilization of these radicals for several minutes in CH/sub 2/Cl/sub 2/ and C/sub 2/H/sub 4/Cl/sub 2/ solvents.

  12. Formation and Dissociation of Phosphorylated Peptide Radical Cations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kong, Ricky P. W.; Quan, Quan; Hao, Qiang; Lai, Cheuk-Kuen; Siu, Chi-Kit; Chu, Ivan K.

    2012-12-01

    In this study, we generated phosphoserine- and phosphothreonine-containing peptide radical cations through low-energy collision-induced dissociation (CID) of the ternary metal-ligand phosphorylated peptide complexes [CuII(terpy) p M]·2+ and [CoIII(salen) p M]·+ [ p M: phosphorylated angiotensin III derivative; terpy: 2,2':6',2''-terpyridine; salen: N, N '-ethylenebis(salicylideneiminato)]. Subsequent CID of the phosphorylated peptide radical cations ( p M·+) revealed fascinating gas-phase radical chemistry, yielding (1) charge-directed b- and y-type product ions, (2) radical-driven product ions through cleavages of peptide backbones and side chains, and (3) different degrees of formation of [M - H3PO4]·+ species through phosphate ester bond cleavage. The CID spectra of the p M·+ species and their non-phosphorylated analogues featured fragment ions of similar sequence, suggesting that the phosphoryl group did not play a significant role in the fragmentation of the peptide backbone or side chain. The extent of neutral H3PO4 loss was influenced by the peptide sequence and the initial sites of the charge and radical. A preliminary density functional theory study, at the B3LYP 6-311++G(d,p) level of theory, of the neutral loss of H3PO4 from a prototypical model— N-acetylphosphorylserine methylamide—revealed several factors governing the elimination of neutral phosphoryl groups through charge- and radical-induced mechanisms.

  13. Absorption and electroabsorption spectra of carotenoid cation radical and dication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krawczyk, Stanisław

    1998-05-01

    Radical cations and dications of two carotenoids astaxanthin and canthaxanthin were prepared by oxidation with FeCl 3 in fluorinated alcohols at room temperature. Absorption and electroabsorption (Stark effect) spectra were recorded for astaxanthin cations in mixed frozen matrices at temperatures about 160 K. The D 0→D 2 transition in cation radical is at 835 nm. The electroabsorption spectrum for the D 0→D 2 transition exhibits a negative change of molecular polarizability, Δ α=-1.2·10 -38 C·m 2/V (-105 A 3), which seems to originate from the change in bond order alternation in the ground state rather than from the electric field-induced interaction of D 1 and D 2 excited states. Absorption spectrum of astaxanthin dication is located at 715-717 nm, between those of D 0→D 2 in cation radical and S 0→S 2 in neutral carotenoid. Its shape reflects a short vibronic progression and strong inhomogeneous broadening. The polarizability change on electronic excitation, Δ α=2.89·10 -38 C·m 2/V (260 A 3), is five times smaller than in neutral astaxanthin. This value reflects the larger energetic distance from the lowest excited state to the higher excited states than in the neutral molecule.

  14. Oxoferryl porphyrin cation radicals in model systems: Evidence for variable metal-radical spin coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bill, E.; Bominaar, E. L.; Ding, X.-Q.; Trautwein, A. X.; Winkler, H.; Mandon, D.; Weiss, R.; Gold, A.; Jayaraj, K.; Toney, G. E.

    1990-07-01

    Magnetic properties of frozen solutions of highly oxidized iron porphyrin complexes were investigated by EPR and Mössbauer spectroscopy. The Mössbauer spectra, recorded at low temperatures in various magnetic fields, were analyzed on the basis of spin Hamiltonian simulations. Spin coupling between ferryl iron (FeIV) and porphyrin cation radical was taken into account explicitly. Hyperfine and spin-coupling parameters are given for several complexes, together with zero-field parameters. One of the complexes exhibits weak spin coupling, it is the first model system exhibiting properties comparable to those of the oxoferryl cation radical enzyme Horse Radish Peroxidase I.

  15. Changes in fluorescent emission of cationic fluorophores in the presence of n-alkanes and alcohols in different polarity solvents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delgado-Camón, Arantzazu; Garriga, Rosa; Mateos, Elena; Cebolla, Vicente L.; Galbán, Javier; Membrado, Luis; Marcos, Susana de; Gálvez, Eva M.

    2011-01-01

    Berberine and coralyne experience either fluorescence enhancement or quenching when long hydrocarbon chain compounds (e.g., n-alkanes or alcohols) are added to their solutions, depending on solvent polarity. In polar solvents, as methanol or acetonitrile, the added compounds provide an apolar microenvironment that hinders alternative relaxation mechanisms, favouring fluorescence emission. However, alkane additions produce quenching in dichloromethane, which has been explained taking into account ion pairing between cationic fluorophore and counterion. The strong quenching measured after alcohol additions in dichloromethane suggests reversed micelle formation. Procedures and results described here may find practical applications in the development of analytical methods.

  16. Tuning aryl, hydrazine radical cation electronic interactions using substituent effects.

    PubMed

    Valverde-Aguilar, Guadalupe; Wang, Xianghuai; Plummer, Edward; Lockard, Jenny V; Zink, Jeffrey I; Luo, Yun; Weaver, Michael N; Nelsen, Stephen F

    2008-08-14

    Absorption spectra for 2,3-diaryl-2,3-diazabicyclo[2.2.2]octane radical cations (2(X)(*+)) and for their monoaryl analogues 2-tert-butyl-3-aryl-2,3-diazabicyclo[2.2.2]octane radical cations (1(X)(*+)) having para chloro, bromo, iodo, cyano, phenyl, and nitro substituents are reported and compared with those for the previously reported 1- and 2(H)(*+) and 1- and 2(OMe)(*+). The calculated geometries and optical absorption spectra for 2(Cl)(*+) demonstrate that p-C6H4Cl lies between p-C6H4OMe and C6H5 in its ability to stabilize the lowest energy optical transition of the radical cation, which involves electron donation from the aryl groups toward the pi*(NN)(+)-centered singly occupied molecular orbital of 2(X)(*+). Resonance Raman spectral determination of the reorganization energy for their lowest energy transitions (lambda(v)(sym)) increase in the same order, having values of 1420, 5300, and 6000 cm(-1) for X = H, Cl, and OMe, respectively. A neighboring orbital analysis using Koopmans-based calculations of relative orbital energies indicates that the diabatic aryl pi-centered molecular orbital that interacts with the dinitrogen pi system lies closest in energy to the bonding pi(NN)-centered orbital and has an electronic coupling with it of about 9200 +/- 600 cm(-1), which does not vary regularly with electron donating power of the X substituent.

  17. Nature of the lowest excited states of neutral polyenyl radicals and polyene radical cations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Starcke, Jan Hendrik; Wormit, Michael; Dreuw, Andreas

    2009-10-01

    Due to the close relation of the polyenyl radicals C2n+1H2n+3• and polyene radical cations C2nH2n+2•+ to the neutral linear polyenes, one may suspect their excited states to possess substantial double excitation character, similar to the famous S1 state of neutral polyenes and thus to be equally problematic for simple excited state theories. Using the recently developed unrestricted algebraic-diagrammatic construction scheme of second order perturbation theory and the equation-of-motion coupled-cluster method, the vertical excitation energies, their corresponding oscillator strengths, and the nature of the wave functions of the lowest excited electronic states of the radicals are calculated and analyzed in detail. For the polyenyl radicals two one-photon allowed states are found as D1 and D4 states, with two symmetry-forbidden D2 and D3 states in between, while in the polyene radical cations D1 and D2 are allowed and D3 is forbidden. The order of the states is conserved with increasing chain length. It is found that all low-lying excited states exhibit a significant but similar amount of doubly excited configuration in their wave functions of 15%-20%. Using extrapolation, predictions for the excitation energies of the five lowest excited states of the polyene radical cations are made for longer chain lengths.

  18. Kinetics for Tautomerizations and Dissociations of Triglycine Radical Cations

    SciTech Connect

    Siu, Chi-Kit; Zhao, Junfang; Laskin, Julia; Chu, Ivan K.; Hopkinson, Alan C.; Siu , K W Michael

    2009-06-01

    Fragmentations of tautomers of the α-centered radical triglycine radical cation, [GGG*]+, [GG*G]+, and [G*GG]+, are charge-driven, giving b-type ions; these are processes that are facilitated by a mobile proton, as in the fragmentation of protonated triglycine (Rodriquez, C.F. et al. J. Am. Chem. Soc. 2001, 123, 3006 - 3012). By contrast, radical centers are less mobile. Two mechanisms have been examined theoretically utilizing density functional theory and Rice-Ramsperger-Kassel-Marcus modeling: (1) a direct hydrogen-atom migration between two α-carbons, and (2) a two-step proton migration involving a canonical [GGG]*+ as an intermediate. Predictions employing the latter mechanism are in good agreement with results of recent CID experiments (Chu, I.K. et al. J. Am. Chem. Soc. 2008, 130, 7862 - 7872).

  19. Mechanistic aspects of hydration of guanine radical cations in DNA.

    PubMed

    Rokhlenko, Yekaterina; Cadet, Jean; Geacintov, Nicholas E; Shafirovich, Vladimir

    2014-04-23

    The mechanistic aspects of hydration of guanine radical cations, G(•+) in double- and single-stranded oligonucleotides were investigated by direct time-resolved spectroscopic monitoring methods. The G(•+) radical one-electron oxidation products were generated by SO4(•-) radical anions derived from the photolysis of S2O8(2-) anions by 308 nm laser pulses. In neutral aqueous solutions (pH 7.0), after the complete decay of SO4(•-) radicals (∼5 μs after the actinic laser flash) the transient absorbance of neutral guanine radicals, G(-H)(•) with maximum at 312 nm, is dominant. The kinetics of decay of G(-H)(•) radicals depend strongly on the DNA secondary structure. In double-stranded DNA, the G(-H)(•) decay is biphasic with one component decaying with a lifetime of ∼2.2 ms and the other with a lifetime of ∼0.18 s. By contrast, in single-stranded DNA the G(-H)(•) radicals decay monophasically with a ∼ 0.28 s lifetime. The ms decay component in double-stranded DNA is correlated with the enhancement of 8-oxo-7,8-dihydroguanine (8-oxoG) yields which are ∼7 greater than in single-stranded DNA. In double-stranded DNA, it is proposed that the G(-H)(•) radicals retain radical cation character by sharing the N1-proton with the N3-site of C in the [G(•+):C] base pair. This [G(-H)(•):H(+)C ⇆ G(•+):C] equilibrium allows for the hydration of G(•+) followed by formation of 8-oxoG. By contrast, in single-stranded DNA, deprotonation of G(•+) and the irreversible escape of the proton into the aqueous phase competes more effectively with the hydration mechanism, thus diminishing the yield of 8-oxoG, as observed experimentally.

  20. Multi-State Vibronic Interactions in Fluorinated Benzene Radical Cations.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faraji, S.; Köppel, H.

    2009-06-01

    Conical intersections of potential energy surfaces have emerged as paradigms for signalling strong nonadiabatic coupling effects. An important class of systems where some of these effects have been analyzed in the literature, are the benzene and benzenoid cations, where the electronic structure, spectroscopy, and dynamics have received great attention in the literature. In the present work a brief overview is given over our theoretical treatments of multi-mode and multi-state vibronic interactions in the benzene radical cation and some of its fluorinated derivatives. The fluorobenzene derivatives are of systematic interest for at least two different reasons. (1) The reduction of symmetry by incomplete fluorination leads to a disappearance of the Jahn-Teller effect present in the parent cation. (2) A specific, more chemical effect of fluorination consists in the energetic increase of the lowest σ-type electronic states of the radical cations. The multi-mode multi-state vibronic interactions between the five lowest electronic states of the fluorobenzene radical cations are investigated theoretically, based on ab initio electronic structure data, and employing the well-established linear vibronic coupling model, augmented by quadratic coupling terms for the totally symmetric vibrational modes. Low-energy conical intersections, and strong vibronic couplings are found to prevail within the set of tilde{X}-tilde{A} and tilde{B}-tilde{C}-tilde{D} cationic states, while the interactions between these two sets of states are found to be weaker and depend on the particular isomer. This is attributed to the different location of the minima of the various conical intersections occurring in these systems. Wave-packet dynamical simulations for these coupled potential energy surfaces, utilizing the powerful multi-configuration time-dependent Hartree method are performed. Ultrafast internal conversion processes and the analysis of the MATI and photo-electron spectra shed new light

  1. Electronic spectra of the tetraphenylcyclobutadienecyclopentadienylnickel(II) cation and radical

    SciTech Connect

    Peter R. Craig; Miller, John R.; Havlas, Zdenek; Trujillo, Marianela; Rempala, Pawel; Kirby, James P.; Noll, Bruce C.; Michl, Josef

    2016-05-02

    In this study, properties of the tetraphenylcyclobutadienecyclopentadienylnickel(II) cation 1 and its tetra-o-fluoro derivative 1a have been measured and calculated. The B3LYP/TZP optimized geometry of the free cation 1 agrees with a single-crystal X-ray diffraction structure except that in the crystal one of the phenyl substituents is strongly twisted to permit a close-packing interaction of two of its hydrogens with a nearby BF4 anion. The low-energy parts of the solution electronic absorption and magnetic circular dichroism (MCD) spectra of 1 and 1a have been interpreted by comparison with TD-DFT (B3LYP/TZP) results. Reduction or pulse radiolysis lead to a neutral 19-electron radical, whose visible absorption and MCD spectra have been recorded and interpreted as well. The reduction is facilitated by ~0.1 V upon going from 1 to 1a

  2. Theoretical studies on the dimerization of substituted paraphenylenediamine radical cations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Punyain, Kraiwan; Kelterer, Anne-Marie; Grampp, Günter

    2011-12-01

    Organic radical cations form dicationic dimers in solution, observed experimentally as diamagnetic species in temperature-dependent EPR and low temperature UV/Vis spectroscopy. Dimerization of paraphenylenediamine, N,N-dimethyl-paraphenylenediamine and 2,3,5,6-tetramethyl-paraphenylenediamine radical cation in ethanol/diethylether mixture was investigated theoretically according to geometry, energetics and UV/Vis spectroscopy. Density Functional Theory including dispersion correction describes stable dimers after geometry optimization with conductor-like screening model of solvation and inclusion of the counter-ion. Energy corrections were done on double-hybrid Density Functional Theory with perturbative second-order correlation (B2PLYP-D) including basis set superposition error (BSSE), and multireference Møller-Plesset second-order perturbation theory method (MRMP2) based on complete active space method (CASSCF(2,2)) single point calculation, respectively. All three dication π-dimers exhibit long multicenter π-bonds around 2.9 ± 0.1 Å with strongly interacting orbitals. Substitution with methyl groups does not influence the dimerization process substantially. Dispersion interaction and electrostatic attraction from counter-ion play an important role to stabilize the dication dimers in solution. Dispersion-corrected double hybrid functional B2PLYP-D and CASSCF(2,2) can describe the interaction energetics properly. Vertical excitations were computed with Tamm-Dancoff approximation for time-dependent Density Functional Theory (TDA-DFT) at the B3LYP level with the cc-pVTZ basis set including ethanol solvent molecules explicitly. A strong interaction of the counter-ion and the solvent ethanol with the monomeric species is observed, whereas in the dimers the strong interaction of both radical cation species is the dominating factor for the additional peak in UV/Vis spectra.

  3. Structure and Reactivity of the N-Acetyl-Cysteine Radical Cation and Anion: Does Radical Migration Occur?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osburn, Sandra; Berden, Giel; Oomens, Jos; O'Hair, Richard A. J.; Ryzhov, Victor

    2011-10-01

    The structure and reactivity of the N-acetyl-cysteine radical cation and anion were studied using ion-molecule reactions, infrared multi-photon dissociation (IRMPD) spectroscopy, and density functional theory (DFT) calculations. The radical cation was generated by first nitrosylating the thiol of N-acetyl-cysteine followed by the homolytic cleavage of the S-NO bond in the gas phase. IRMPD spectroscopy coupled with DFT calculations revealed that for the radical cation the radical migrates from its initial position on the sulfur atom to the α-carbon position, which is 2.5 kJ mol-1 lower in energy. The radical migration was confirmed by time-resolved ion-molecule reactions. These results are in contrast with our previous study on cysteine methyl ester radical cation (Osburn et al., Chem. Eur. J. 2011, 17, 873-879) and the study by Sinha et al. for cysteine radical cation ( Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys. 2010, 12, 9794-9800) where the radical was found to stay on the sulfur atom as formed. A similar approach allowed us to form a hydrogen-deficient radical anion of N-acetyl-cysteine, (M - 2H) •- . IRMPD studies and ion-molecule reactions performed on the radical anion showed that the radical remains on the sulfur, which is the initial and more stable (by 63.6 kJ mol-1) position, and does not rearrange.

  4. Magnetic Resonance Studies of Proton Loss from Carotenoid Radical Cations

    SciTech Connect

    Kispert, Lowell D; Focsan, A Ligia; Konovalova, Tatyana A; Lawrence, Jesse; Bowman, Michael K; Dixon, David A; Molnar, Peter; Deli, Jozsef

    2007-06-11

    Carotenoids, intrinsic components of reaction centers and pigment-protein complexes in photosynthetic membranes, play a photoprotective role and serve as a secondary electron donor. Before optimum use of carotenoids can be made in artificial photosynthetic systems, their robust nature in living materials requires extensive characterization of their electron transfer, radical trapping ability, stability, structure in and on various hosts, and photochemical behavior. Pulsed ENDOR and 2D-HYSCORE studies combined with DFT calculations reveal that photo-oxidation of natural zeaxanthin (I) and violaxanthin (II) on silica-alumina produces not only the carotenoid radical cations (Car•+) but also neutral radicals (#Car•) by proton loss from the methyl groups at positions 5 or 5', and possibly 9 or 9' and 13 or 13'. Notably, the proton loss favored in I at the 5 position by DFT calculations, is unfavorable in II due to the epoxide at the 5, 6 position. DFT calculations predict the isotropic methyl proton couplings of 8-10 MHz for Car•+ which agree with the ENDOR for carotenoid α-conjugated radical cations. Large α-proton hyperfine coupling constants (>10 MHz) determined from HYSCORE are assigned from the DFT calculations to neutral carotenoid radicals. Proton loss upon photolysis was also examined as a function of carotenoid polarity [Lycopene (III) versus 8'-apo-β-caroten-8'-al (IV)]; hydrogen bonding [Lutein (V) versus III]; host [silica-alumina versus MCM-41 molecular sieve]; and substituted metal in MCM-41. Loss of H+ from the 5(5'), 9(9') or 13(13') methyl positions has importance in photoprotection. Photoprotection involves nonphotochemical quenching (NPQ) in which 1Ch1* decays via energy transfer to the carotenoid which returns to the ground state by thermal dissipation; or via electron transfer to form a charge transfer state (I •+…Chl•-), lower in energy than 1Chl*. Formation of I •+ results in bond lengthening, a mechanism for nonradiative energy

  5. A Photo Touch on Amines: New Synthetic Adventures of Nitrogen Radical Cations

    PubMed Central

    Maity, Soumitira; Zheng, Nan

    2013-01-01

    Amines have been used as sacrificial electron donors to reduce photoexcited Ru(II) or Ir(III) complexes, during which they are oxidized to nitrogen radical cations. Recently, the synthetic potential of these nitrogen radical cations have caught synthetic organic chemists’ attention. They have been exploited in various transformations yielding a number of elegant methods for amine synthesis. This article highlights recent developments on nitrogen radical cation chemistry under visible-light photocatalysis. PMID:23419975

  6. Reactions and structural investigation of chlorpromazine radical cation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joshi, Ravi; Ghanty, Tapan K.; Mukherjee, T.

    2008-10-01

    Experimental and theoretical studies have been carried out to understand pro-oxidant behaviour of chlorpromazine radical cation (CPZ rad + ). Pulse radiolysis studies have shown that CPZ rad + oxidizes physiological antioxidants (uric acid and bilirubin), and biomolecules like, tyrosine and proteins (bovine serum albumin and casein), thereby acting as a pro-oxidant. Ab-initio quantum chemical calculations suggest structural and electronic changes on oxidation of CPZ. The calculations with Hartree-Fock and density functional methods show that ring nitrogen atom is the site of electron removal from CPZ and sulfur atom is the site of maximum spin in CPZ rad + . The calculations also suggest that oxidation of CPZ leads to increase in planarity of the tricyclic ring as well as tilting of alkyl side chain towards chlorine containing ring. The structural changes on oxidation of CPZ and spin delocalization in CPZ rad + fairly explain the pro-oxidant activity of CPZ.

  7. Gas-Phase Reactions of Doubly Charged Lanthanide Cations with Alkanes and Alkenes. Trends in Metal(2+) Reactivity

    SciTech Connect

    Gibson, John K.; Marcalo, Joaquim; Santos, Marta; Pires de Matos, Antonio; Haire, Richard G.

    2008-12-08

    The gas-phase reactivity of doubly-charged lanthanide cations, Ln2+ (Ln = La, Ce, Pr, Nd, Sm, Eu, Gd, Tb, Dy, Ho, Er, Tm, Yb, Lu), with alkanes (methane, ethane, propane, n-butane) and alkenes (ethene, propene, 1-butene) was studied by Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry. The reaction products consisted of different combinations of doubly-charged organometallic ions?adducts or species formed via metal-ion-induced hydrogen, dihydrogen, alkyl, or alkane eliminations from the hydrocarbons?and singly-charged ions that resulted from electron, hydride, or methide transfers from the hydrocarbons to the metal ions. The only lanthanide cations capable of activating the hydrocarbons to form doubly-charged organometallic ions were La2+, Ce2+, Gd2+, and Tb2+, which have ground-state or low-lying d1 electronic configurations. Lu2+, with an accessible d1 electronic configuration but a rather high electron affinity, reacted only through transfer channels. The remaining Ln2+ reacted via transfer channels or adduct formation. The different accessibilities of d1 electronic configurations and the range of electron affinities of the Ln2+ cations allowed for a detailed analysis of the trends for metal(2+) reactivity and the conditions for occurrence of bond activation, adduct formation, and electron, hydride, and methide transfers.

  8. Electronic spectra of the tetraphenylcyclobutadienecyclopentadienylnickel(II) cation and radical

    DOE PAGES

    Peter R. Craig; Miller, John R.; Havlas, Zdenek; ...

    2016-05-02

    In this study, properties of the tetraphenylcyclobutadienecyclopentadienylnickel(II) cation 1 and its tetra-o-fluoro derivative 1a have been measured and calculated. The B3LYP/TZP optimized geometry of the free cation 1 agrees with a single-crystal X-ray diffraction structure except that in the crystal one of the phenyl substituents is strongly twisted to permit a close-packing interaction of two of its hydrogens with a nearby BF–4 anion. The low-energy parts of the solution electronic absorption and magnetic circular dichroism (MCD) spectra of 1 and 1a have been interpreted by comparison with TD-DFT (B3LYP/TZP) results. Reduction or pulse radiolysis lead to a neutral 19-electron radical,more » whose visible absorption and MCD spectra have been recorded and interpreted as well. The reduction is facilitated by ~0.1 V upon going from 1 to 1a« less

  9. Are the Radical Centers in Peptide Radical Cations Mobile? The Generation, Tautomerism, and Dissociation of Isomeric α-Carbon-Centered Triglycine Radical Cations in the Gas Phase

    SciTech Connect

    Chu, Ivan K.; Zhao, Junfang; Xu, Minjie; Siu, Shiu On; Hopkinson, Alan C.; Siu , K W Michael

    2008-05-31

    The mobility of the radical center in three isomeric triglycine radical cationss[G•GG]+, [GG•G]+, and [GGG•]+shas been investigated theoretically via density functional theory (DFT) and experimentally via tandem mass spectrometry. These radical cations were generated by collision-induced dissociations (CIDs) of Cu(II)-containing ternary complexes that contain the tripeptides YGG, GYG, and GGY, respectively (G and Y are the glycine and tyrosine residues, respectively). Dissociative electron transfer within the complexes led to observation of [Y•GG]+, [GY•G]+, and [GGY•]+; CID resulted in cleavage of the tyrosine side chain as p-quinomethide, yielding [G•GG]+, [GG•G]+, and [GGG•]+, respectively. Interconversions between these isomeric triglycine radical cations have relatively high barriers (g44.7 kcal/mol), in support of the thesis that isomerically pure [G•GG]+, [GG•G]+, and [GGG•]+ can be experimentally produced. This is to be contrasted with barriers < 17 kcal/mol that were encountered in the tautomerism of protonated triglycine [Rodriquez C. F. et al. J. Am. Chem. Soc. 2001, 123, 3006-3012]. The CID spectra of [G•GG]+, [GG•G]+, and [GGG•]+ were substantially different, providing experimental proof that initially these ions have distinct structures. DFT calculations showed that direct dissociations are competitive with interconversions followed by dissociation.

  10. The chemistry of amine radical cations produced by visible light photoredox catalysis

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Jie; Wang, Jiang; Nguyen, Theresa H

    2013-01-01

    Summary Amine radical cations are highly useful reactive intermediates in amine synthesis. They have displayed several modes of reactivity leading to some highly sought-after synthetic intermediates including iminium ions, α-amino radicals, and distonic ions. One appealing method to access amine radical cations is through one-electron oxidation of the corresponding amines under visible light photoredox conditions. This approach and subsequent chemistries are emerging as a powerful tool in amine synthesis. This article reviews synthetic applications of amine radical cations produced by visible light photocatalysis. PMID:24204409

  11. Halogenated benzene radical cations and ground state degeneracy splitting by asymmetric substitution

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bondybey, V.E.; Vaughn, C.R.; Miller, T.A.; English, J.H.; Shiley, R.H.

    1981-01-01

    The absorption and laser induced fluorescence of several halogenated benzene radical cations were studied in solid Ne matrices. The spectra of 1,2,4-trifluorobenzene, l,3-dichloro-5-fluorobenzene, and l-chloro-3,5- difluorobenzene radical cations are observed and analyzed. Studies of fluorescence polarization and a photoselection technique were used to examine the splitting of the degeneracy of the benzene cation ground state by asymmetric subsitution. ?? 1981 American Institute of Physics.

  12. Radiation-induced polymerisation of 2,3-dihydrofuran: free-radical or cationic mechanism?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janovský, Igor; Naumov, Sergej; Knolle, Wolfgang; Mehnert, Reiner

    2005-02-01

    Concentrated (10 mol%) solutions of 2,3-dihydrofuran in CFCl 2CF 2Cl matrix were irradiated at 77 K and several intermediates (dimer radical cation, dihydrofuryl radical, and polymer radicals) were observed by low-temperature EPR spectroscopy. The irradiated solutions yielded after melting a polymeric product, which was characterised by IR spectroscopy and gel permeation chromatography. The polydisperse polymer is assumed to be formed mainly by a cationic process initiated by a dimer carbocation. The free-radical mechanism via the dihydrofuryl radical leads to low molecular weight oligomers only. Quantum chemical calculations support the interpretation of the experimental results.

  13. The Prowess of Photogenerated Amine Radical Cations in Cascade Reactions: From Carbocycles to Heterocycles.

    PubMed

    Morris, Scott A; Wang, Jiang; Zheng, Nan

    2016-09-20

    Cascade reactions represent a class of ideal organic reactions because they empower efficiency, elegance, and novelty. However, development of cascade reactions remains a daunting task for synthetic chemists. Radicals are known to be well suited for cascade reactions. Compared with widely used carbon-based radicals, nitrogen-based radicals, such as neutral aminyl radicals and protonated aminyl radicals (amine radical cations), are underutilized, although they are behind some notable synthetic methods such as the Hofmann-Löffler-Freytag reaction. The constraint on their usage is generally attributed to the limited number of available stable precursors. Since amine radical cations offer increased reactivity and selectivity in chemical transformations compared with neutral aminyl radicals, their generation is of utmost importance. Recently, a surge of reports has been revealed using visible light photoredox catalysis. It has been demonstrated that amines can act as an electron donor in a reductive quenching cycle while the amine itself is oxidized to the amine radical cation. Although a number of methods exist to generate amine radical cations, the photochemical formation of these species offers many practical advantages. In this Account, we discuss our journey to the development of annulation reactions with various π-bonds and electrophilic addition reactions to alkenes using photogenerated amine radical cations. Various carbocycles and heterocycles are produced by these reactions. In our annulation work, we first show that single electron photooxidation of cyclopropylanilines to the amine radical cations triggers ring opening of the strained carbocycle, producing distonic radical cations. These odd-electron species are shown to react with alkenes and alkynes to yield the corresponding cyclopentanes and cyclopentenes in an overall redox neutral process. Further development of this annulation reaction allows us to achieve the [4 + 2] annulation of cyclobutylanilines

  14. UVA-visible photo-excitation of guanine radical cations produces sugar radicals in DNA and model structures

    PubMed Central

    Adhikary, Amitava; Malkhasian, Aramice Y. S.; Collins, Sean; Koppen, Jessica; Becker, David; Sevilla, Michael D.

    2005-01-01

    This work presents evidence that photo-excitation of guanine radical cations results in high yields of deoxyribose sugar radicals in DNA, guanine deoxyribonucleosides and deoxyribonucleotides. In dsDNA at low temperatures, formation of C1′• is observed from photo-excitation of G•+ in the 310–480 nm range with no C1′• formation observed ≥520 nm. Illumination of guanine radical cations in 2′dG, 3′-dGMP and 5′-dGMP in aqueous LiCl glasses at 143 K is found to result in remarkably high yields (∼85–95%) of sugar radicals, namely C1′•, C3′• and C5′•. The amount of each of the sugar radicals formed varies dramatically with compound structure and temperature of illumination. Radical assignments were confirmed using selective deuteration at C5′ or C3′ in 2′-dG and at C8 in all the guanine nucleosides/tides. Studies of the effect of temperature, pH, and wavelength of excitation provide important information about the mechanism of formation of these sugar radicals. Time-dependent density functional theory calculations verify that specific excited states in G•+ show considerable hole delocalization into the sugar structure, in accord with our proposed mechanism of action, namely deprotonation from the sugar moiety of the excited molecular radical cation. PMID:16204456

  15. Fragmentation of alpha-Radical Cations of Arginine-Containing Peptides

    SciTech Connect

    Laskin, Julia; Yang, Zhibo; Ng, Dominic C.; Chu, Ivan K.

    2010-04-01

    Fragmentation pathways of peptide radical cations, M+, with well-defined initial location of the radical site were explored using collision-induced dissociation (CID) experiments. Peptide radical cations were produced by gas-phase fragmentation of CoIII(salen)-peptide complexes [salen = N,N´-ethylenebis (salicylideneaminato)]. Subsequent hydrogen abstraction from the -carbon of the side chain followed by Ca-C bond cleavage results in the loss of a neutral side chain and formation of an a-radical cation with the radical site localized on the a-carbon of the backbone. Similar CID spectra dominated by radical-driven dissociation products were obtained for a number of a-radicals when the basic arginine side chain was present in the sequence. In contrast, proton-driven fragmentation dominates CID spectra of a-radicals produced via the loss of the arginine side chain. Our results suggest that in most cases radical migration precedes fragmentation of large peptide radical cations.

  16. Stabilization and isomerization of radical cations generated by fast electron irradiation of unsaturated organic molecules in a solid argon matrix

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feldman, V. I.; Sukhov, F. F.; Orlov, A. Yu.; Tyulpina, I. V.; Ivanchenko, V. K.

    2006-01-01

    Matrix isolation EPR spectroscopy was used to study the fate of "hot" unsaturated radical cations produced by fast electron irradiation in solid argon. It was found that the radical cations of cis-2-butene, trans-2-butene and ethyl vinyl ether resulting from highly exothermic hole transfer (excess energy>6 eV) underwent effective relaxation in an argon matrix. 1-Butene radical cation exhibits isomerization to cis-2-butene radical cation. The role of molecular structure of organic radical cations in excess energy relaxation is discussed.

  17. Spectroscopic detection, reactivity, and acid-base behavior of ring-dimethoxylated phenylethanoic acid radical cations and radical zwitterions in aqueous solution.

    PubMed

    Bietti, Massimo; Capone, Alberto

    2004-01-23

    A product and time-resolved kinetic study of the one-electron oxidation of ring-dimethoxylated phenylethanoic acids has been carried out at different pH values. Oxidation leads to the formation of aromatic radical cations or radical zwitterions depending on pH, and pK(a) values for the corresponding acid-base equilibria have been measured. The radical cations undergo decarboxylation with first-order rate constants (k(dec)) ranging from <10(2) to 5.6 x 10(4) s(-1) depending on radical cation stability. A significant increase in k(dec) (between 10 and 40 times) is observed on going from the radical cations to the corresponding radical zwitterions. The results are discussed in terms of the ease of intramolecular side chain to ring electron transfer required for decarboxylation, in both the radical cations and radical zwitterions.

  18. UV/Vis Action Spectroscopy and Structures of Tyrosine Peptide Cation Radicals in the Gas Phase.

    PubMed

    Viglino, Emilie; Shaffer, Christopher J; Tureček, František

    2016-06-20

    We report the first application of UV/Vis photodissociation action spectroscopy for the structure elucidation of tyrosine peptide cation radicals produced by oxidative intramolecular electron transfer in gas-phase metal complexes. Oxidation of Tyr-Ala-Ala-Ala-Arg (YAAAR) produces Tyr-O radicals by combined electron and proton transfer involving the phenol and carboxyl groups. Oxidation of Ala-Ala-Ala-Tyr-Arg (AAAYR) produces a mixture of cation radicals involving electron abstraction from the Tyr phenol ring and N-terminal amino group in combination with hydrogen-atom transfer from the Cα positions of the peptide backbone.

  19. Radical cations of sulfides and disulfides: An ESR study

    SciTech Connect

    Bonazzola, L.; Michaut, J.P.; Roncin, J.

    1985-09-15

    Exposure of dilute solutions of dimethylsulfide, methanethiol, tetrahydrothiophene, terbutyl and diterbutyl-sulfides, dimethyl-disulfide, and diterbutyldisulfide, in freon at 77 K to /sup 60/Co ..gamma.. rays gave the corresponding cations. From the reported ESR spectra, g tensors were obtained. It was found that both sulfide and disulfide cations exhibit the same g tensor: (g/sub max/ = 2.034 +- 0.002, g/sub int/ = 2.017 +- 0.001, g/sub min/ = 2.001 +- 0.005). From this result it has been shown that the disulfide cation is planar. This finding was supported by fully optimized geometry ab initio calculations.

  20. Comparing the gas-phase fragmentation reactions of protonated and radical cations of the tripeptides GXR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wee, Sheena; O'Hair, Richard A. J.; McFadyen, W. David

    2004-05-01

    Electrospray ionization (ESI) mass spectrometry of methanolic solutions of mixtures of the copper salt (2,2':6',2''-terpyridine)copper(II) nitrate monohydrate ([Cu(II)(tpy)(NO3)2].H2O) and a tripeptide GXR (where X = 1 of the 20 naturally occurring amino acids) yielded [Cu(II)(tpy)(GXR)][radical sign]2+ ions, which were then subjected to collision induced dissociation (CID). In all but one case (GRR), these [Cu(II)(tpy)(GXR)][radical sign]2+ ions fragment to form odd electron GXR[radical sign]+ radical cations with sufficient abundance to examine their gas-phase fragmentation reactions. The GXR[radical sign]+ radical cations undergo a diverse range of fragmentation reactions which depend on the nature of the side chain of X. Many of these reactions can be rationalized as arising from the intermediacy of isomeric distonic ions in which the charge (i.e. proton) is sequestered by the highly basic arginine side chain and the radical site is located at various positions on the tripeptide including the peptide back bone and side chains. The radical sites in these distonic ions often direct the fragmentation reactions via the expulsion of small radicals (to yield even electron ions) or small neutrals (to form radical cations). Both classes of reaction can yield useful structural information, allowing for example, distinction between leucine and isoleucine residues. The gas-phase fragmentation reactions of the GXR[radical sign]+ radical cations are also compared to their even electron [GXR+H]+ and [GXR+2H]2+ counterparts. The [GXR+H]+ ions give fewer sequence ions and more small molecule losses while the [GXR+2H]2+ ions yield more sequence information, consistent with the [`]mobile proton model' described in previous studies. In general, all three classes of ions give complementary structural information, but the GXR[radical sign]+ radical cations exhibit a more diverse loss of small species (radicals and neutrals). Finally, links between these gas-phase results and key

  1. Fourier transform infrared spectrum of the radical cation of beta-carotene photoinduced in photosystem II.

    PubMed

    Noguchi, T; Mitsuka, T; Inoue, Y

    1994-12-19

    A Fourier-transform infrared (FTIR) spectrum of the radical cation of beta-carotene photoinduced in photosystem II (PSII) membranes was obtained at 80K under oxidizing conditions, by utilizing the light-induced FTIR difference technique. Formation of the beta-carotene cation was monitored with the electronic absorption band at 993 nm. An FTIR spectrum of a chemically-generated beta-carotene cation in chloroform was also measured and compared with the spectrum of PSII. Since the FTIR bands of carotenoid cation have characteristic features with strong intensities, they can be useful markers in studying the reaction of carotenoid in PSII.

  2. EPR and DFT Study of the Polycyclic Aromatic Radical Cations from Friedel-Crafts Alkylation Reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Tao; Wu, An-an; Gao, Li-guo; Wang, Han-qing

    2009-02-01

    Electron paramagnetic resonance and electron-nuclear double resonance methods were used to study the polycyclic aromatic radical cations produced in a Friedel-Crafts alkylating system, with m-xylene, or p-xylene and alkyl chloride. The results indicate that the observed electron paramagnetic resonance spectra are due to polycyclic aromatic radicals formed from the parent hydrocarbons. It is suggested that benzyl halides produced in the Friedel-Crafts alkylation reactions undergo Scholl self-condensation to give polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, which are converted into corresponding polycyclic aromatic radical cations in the presence of AlCl3. The identification of observed two radicals 2,6-dimethylanthracene and 1,4,5,8-tetramethylanthracene were supported by density functional theory calculations using the B3LYP/6-31G(d,p)//B3LYP/6-31G(d) approach. The theoretical coupling constants support the experimental assignment of the observed radicals.

  3. Kinetic investigation of the reactions of NCO radicals with alkanes in the temperature range 294 to 1,113 K

    SciTech Connect

    Schuck, A.; Volpp, H.R.; Wolfrum, J. . Physikalisch-Chemisches Inst.)

    1994-12-01

    Absolute rate coefficients for the reaction of NCO radicals with methane (k[sub 1]), ethane (k[sub 2]), and propane (k[sub 3]) were measured as a function of temperature in a heatable quartz reactor by means of the laser photolysis/laser-induced fluorescence (LP/LIF) pump-probe technique. NCO radicals were produced by the fast precursor reaction NH(a[sup 1] [Delta]) + HNCO [yields] NH[sub 2] + NCO, following the 193-nm photolysis of isocyanic acid. The measure rate coefficients can be described by the following expressions: k[sub 1](512 < T < 1,113 K) = 10[sup 12.99 [+-] 0.12] [times] exp(-34.0[+-]1.8 kJ/mol/RT) cm[sup 3]/mol s; k[sub 2](296 < T < 922 K) = 10[sup 8.21] [times] (T/298 K)[sup (6.89[+-]0.02)] [times] exp(12.2[+-]0.5 kJ/mol/RT)cm[sup 3]/mol s; and k[sub 3](300 < T < 849 K) = 10[sup 11.49] [times] (T/298 K)[sup (2.15[+-]0.02)] [times] exp(-1.8[+-]0.4 kJ/mol/RT)cm[sup 3]/mol s. A comparison with the corresponding reactions of CN, Cl, and OH radicals with alkanes suggests that all these title reactions also proceed predominantly via a hydrogen atom abstraction mechanism to form HNCO.

  4. Theoretical study of second-order hyperpolarizability for nitrogen radical cation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarazkar, Maryam; Romanov, Dmitri A.; Levis, Robert J.

    2015-05-01

    We report calculations of the static and dynamic hyperpolarizabilities of the nitrogen radical cation in doublet state. The electronic contributions were computed analytically using density functional theory and multi-configurational self-consistent field method with extended basis sets for non-resonant excitation. The open-shell electronic system of nitrogen radical cation provides negative second-order optical nonlinearity, suggesting that the hyperpolarizability coefficient, {{γ }(2)}, in the non-resonant regime is mainly composed of combinations of virtual one-photon transitions rather than two-photon transitions. The second-order optical properties of nitrogen radical cation have been calculated as a function of bond length starting with the neutral molecular geometry (S0 minimum) and stretching the N-N triple bond, reaching the ionic D0 relaxed geometry all the way toward dissociation limit, to investigate the effect of internuclear bond distance on second-order hyperpolarizability.

  5. [Spectral-kinetic characteristics of the cation-radical of pheophytin a].

    PubMed

    Evstigneev, V B

    1977-01-01

    The photochemical generation of pheophytin a cation-radical in acidulated ethanol and aceto nitril has been studied by the method of flash-photolysis. The bands with maxima at 450, 580 and 800 nm correspond to pheophytin a cation-radical in the differential absorption spectra. The efficient rate constants of pheophytin a triplet state desactivation in ethanol, acetonitril, aceton have the following values: 1.5.10(4), 9.10(3), 8.7.10(3) sec(-1) correspondingly. The rate constant of electron transfer from pheophytin a to p-benzoqui-none in ethanol solutions is 7.8.10(9) l/m.sec. The recombination constants of pheophytin a cation-radical with Q-in acetonitril, and with quinone neutral (QH) in acidulated ethanol have the following values: 5.10(9) and 2.10(9) l/m.sec correspondingly.

  6. Fingerprinting DNA oxidation processes: IR characterization of the 5-methyl-2'-deoxycytidine radical cation.

    PubMed

    Bucher, Dominik B; Pilles, Bert M; Pfaffeneder, Toni; Carell, Thomas; Zinth, Wolfgang

    2014-02-24

    Methylated cytidine plays an important role as an epigenetic signal in gene regulation. Its oxidation products are assumed to be involved in active demethylation processes but also in damaging DNA. Here, we report the photochemical production of the 5-methyl-2'-deoxycytidine radical cation via a two-photon ionization process. The radical cation is detected by time-resolved IR spectroscopy and identified by band assignment using density functional theory calculations. Two final oxidation products are characterized with liquid chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry.

  7. Berberine cation: A fluorescent chemosensor for alkanes and other low-polarity compounds. An explanation of this phenomenon

    PubMed

    Cossio; Arrieta; Cebolla; Membrado; Vela; Garriga; Domingo

    2000-07-27

    Alkanes in the presence of berberine sulfate provide an enhancement of fluorescent signal, which depends on alkane concentration and structure, when the system is irradiated with monochromatic UV light. Computational analysis suggests that an ion-induced dipole between alkanes and berberine sulfate is responsible for this phenomenon. This interaction can properly model the experimentally obtained fluorescent response. The proposed explanation allows other interacting systems to be designed, which have been experimentally confirmed.

  8. Cationic and radical intermediates in the acid photorelease from aryl sulfonates and phosphates.

    PubMed

    Terpolilli, Marco; Merli, Daniele; Protti, Stefano; Dichiarante, Valentina; Fagnoni, Maurizio; Albini, Angelo

    2011-01-01

    The irradiation of a series of phenyl sulfonates and phosphates leads to the quantitative release of acidity with a reasonable quantum yield (≈0.2). Products characterization, ion chromatography analysis and potentiometric titration are consistent with the intervening of two different paths in this reaction, viz. cationic with phosphates and (mainly) radical with sulfonates.

  9. Isomerization of 4-vinylcyclohexene radical cation. A tandem mass spectrometry study

    SciTech Connect

    Vollmer, D.; Rempel, D.L.; Gross, M. L. ); Williams, F. )

    1995-02-08

    Investigation by matrix-isolation ESR has shown that 4-vinylcyclohexene, 1, surprisingly undergoes isomerization to the bicyclo[3.2.1]oct-2-ene ion, 3. Here we demonstrate the occurrence of this isomerization in the gas phase by use of tandem (MS/MS) sector and Fourier transform (FT) mass spectrometries. The radical cations of 4-vinylcyclohexene (IE = 8.93 eV) or bicyclo[3.2.1]oct-2-ene (approximately 14 kcal/mol more stable than that of 4-vinylcyclohexene) were formed, in separate trials, in a chemical ionization (CI) source by electron ionization (EI). The radical cations were then studied by obtaining their collisionally activated decomposition (CAD) spectra. The CAD spectra are similar, indicating that the isomerization has occurred. Both the sector and the FT mass spectrometer results reflect those obtained in the matrix-isolation ESR investigation. That is isomerizes to 3 at high internal energy, but is stable at low internal energy. Two mechanisms explain this rearrangement. The second mechanism is questionable because the most stable olefin radical cation formed from 5 is that of bicyclo[2.2.2]-2-octene, which gives different ESR and CAD spectra than those of 1 or 3. The CAD spectrum of bicyclo[2.2.2]-2-octene radical cation indicates that the retro-Diels-Alder loss of ethylene is more facile than that from 1 or 3. 18 refs., 3 figs.

  10. Geometrical isomerization of carotenoids mediated by cation radical/dication formation

    SciTech Connect

    Gao, G.; Wei, C.C.; Jeevarajan, A.S.; Kispert, L.D.

    1996-03-28

    Electrochemical oxidation of all-trans-canthaxanthin and {beta}-carotene in dichloromethane leads to significant trans-to-cis isomerization, with cis isomers accounting for about 40% of the products formed. The electrochemically generated isomers were separated by reverse-phase high-performance liquid chromatography and identified as 9-cis, 13-cis, 15-cis, and 9,13-di-cis isomers of the carotenoids by {sup 1}H-NMR spectroscopy and optical spectroscopy (Q ratio). The results of simultaneous bulk electrolysis and optical absorption spectroscopy indicate the following isomerization mechanism: the all-trans cation radicals and/or dications formed by electrochemical oxidation of all-trans-carotenoids can easily undergo geometrical isomerization to form cis cation radicals and/or dications. The latter are converted by the comproportionation equilibrium to cation radicals which are then transformed to neutral cis-carotenoids by exchanging one electron with neutral carotenoids. AM1 molecular orbital calculations, which show that the energy barriers of configurational transformation from trans to cis are much lower in the cation radical and dication species than in the neutral molecule, strongly support the first step of this mechanism. 36 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

  11. Spectroscopy and decay dynamics of several methyl-and fluorine-substituted benzene radical cations

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bondybey, V.E.; Vaughn, C.; Miller, T.A.; English, J.H.; Shiley, R.H.

    1981-01-01

    Spectra of several fluorobenzene cation radicals containing 1-3 methyl substituents were observed in solid Ne matrix and analyzed. Comparisons between these compounds and other fluorobenzenes studied previously as well as comparisons between the B?? state lifetimes in the gas phase and in the matrix are used to gain a deeper insight into the B?? state decay dynamics. ?? 1981 American Chemical Society.

  12. Spectral properties and reactivity of diarylmethanol radical cations in aqueous solution. Evidence for intramolecular charge resonance.

    PubMed

    Bietti, Massimo; Lanzalunga, Osvaldo

    2002-04-19

    Spectral properties and reactivities of ring-methoxylated diarylmethane and diarylmethanol radical cations, generated in aqueous solution by pulse and gamma-radiolysis and by the one-electron chemical oxidant potassium 12-tungstocobalt(III)ate, have been studied. The radical cations display three bands in the UV, visible, and vis-NIR regions of the spectrum. The vis-NIR band is assigned to an intramolecular charge resonance interaction (CR) between the neutral donor and charged acceptor rings, as indicated by the observation that the relative intensity of the vis-NIR band compared to that of the UV and visible bands does not increase with increasing substrate concentration and that the position and intensity of this band is influenced by the ring-substitution pattern. In acidic solution (pH = 4), monomethoxylated diarylmethanol radical cations 1a.(+ -)1e.(+) decay by C(alpha)-H deprotonation [k = (1.7-1.9) x 10(4)s(-1)] through the intermediacy of a ketyl radical, which is further oxidized in the reaction medium to give the corresponding benzophenones, as evidenced by both time-resolved spectroscopic and product studies. With the dimethoxylated radical cation 2.(+), C(alpha)-H deprotonation is instead significantly slower (k = 6.7 x 10(2)s(-1)). In basic solution, 1a.(+)-1e.(+) undergo (-)OH-induced deprotonation from the alpha-OH group with k(OH.)approximately equal to 1.4 x 10(10)M(-1)s(-1), leading to a ketyl radical anion, which is oxidized in the reaction medium to the corresponding benzophenone.

  13. A combined EPR and DFT study of the overcrowded aromatic radical cations from Friedel-Crafts alkylation reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Tao; Tang, Fu Ming; Wu, Yi Fang

    2011-09-01

    Electron paramagnetic resonance and electron-nuclear double resonance methods were used to study the polycyclic aromatic radical cations produced in a Friedel-Crafts alkylating system, and the following radical cations were indentified: 3,6,11,14-tetramethyl dibenzo (a, c) triphylene and 2,6-dimethyl-9,10-di(p-methylbenzyl) anthracene radical cations. The results indicate that the observed electron paramagnetic resonance spectra are due to overcrowded polycyclic aromatic radical cations formed from the parent hydrocarbons. It is suggested that benzyl halides produced in the Friedel-Crafts alkylation reactions undergo Scholl condensation to give polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, which are converted into corresponding polycyclic aromatic radical cations in the presence of AlCl 3. We carried out the theoretical calculation of the isotropic 1H hyperfine coupling constants for studied both PAHs radical cations. The results indicate that the IEFPCM-DFT calculation at B3LYP level with 6-31++G(d,p), EPRII and EPRIII basis sets could well support the experimental hfcc assignment of the observed radicals. Optimized geometry indicates that the aromatic rings in both PAHs radical cations twisted significantly out of co-planarity.

  14. Multi-mode vibronic interactions in the five lowest electronic states of the fluorobenzene radical cation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bâldea, Ioan; Franz, Jan; Szalay, Péter G.; Köppel, Horst

    2006-10-01

    The multi-mode vibronic interactions between the five lowest electronic states of the fluorobenzene radical cation are investigated theoretically, based on ab initio electronic structure data, and employing the linear vibronic coupling model. Low-energy conical intersections, and strong vibronic couplings are found to prevail within the set of X˜-A˜ and B˜-C˜-D˜ cationic states, while the interactions between these two sets of states are found to be rather weak (owing to high-energy conical intersections). The overall intensity distribution of the experimental photoelectron spectrum, as well as the line positions observed in the MATI spectrum, are well reproduced. The vibronic interactions in the X˜-A˜ states are found to be a replica of the multi-mode dynamical Jahn-Teller effect in the parent system, the XE ground state of the benzene radical cation. Ultrafast internal conversion processes within the electronic manifolds in question demonstrate the strength of the nonadiabatic coupling effects and complement the analogous findings for the electronic spectra. The implications for the fluorescence dynamics of the fluorobenzene radical cation are discussed.

  15. Kinetics of the hydrogen abstraction C2H3* + alkane --> C2H4 + alkyl radical reaction class.

    PubMed

    Muszyńska, Marta; Ratkiewicz, Artur; Huynh, Lam K; Truong, Thanh N

    2009-07-23

    This paper presents an application of the reaction class transition state theory (RC-TST) to predict thermal rate constants for hydrogen abstraction reactions of the type C(2)H(3) + alkane --> C(2)H(4) + alkyl radical. The linear energy relationship (LER) was proven to hold for both noncyclic and cyclic hydrocarbons. We have derived all parameters for the RC-TST method from rate constants of 19 representative reactions, coupling with LER and the barrier height grouping (BHG) approach. Both the RC-TST/LER, where only reaction energy is needed, and the RC-TST/BHG, where no other information is needed, can predict rate constants for any reaction in this reaction class with satisfactory accuracy for combustion modeling. Our analysis indicates that less than 90% systematic errors on the average exist in the predicted rate constants using the RC-TST/LER or RC-TST/BHG method, while in comparison to explicit rate calculations, the differences are within a factor of 2 on the average.

  16. (Iso)pagodane radical cations in liquid hydrocarbons: `Time-resolved fluorescence-detected magnetic resonance` study of valence isomeric radical cations

    SciTech Connect

    Trifunac, A.D.; Werst, D.W.; Herges, R.; Neumann, H.; Prinzbach, H.; Etzkorn, M.

    1996-10-02

    The `tight` (T), cyclobutanoid, and the `extended` (E), {pi}-complex-like, four-centred-three-electron radical cations (4c/3e) derived from (iso)pagodanes and from the valence isomeric (iso)dienes can be viewed as well-separated stationary points on the reaction coordinate for the ethylene/ethylene radical cation [2+1]cycloaddition. So far, experimentally verified examples (ESR, CV, PE) are the extended [1.1.1.1](2{sup .+}) and iso-[2.2.1.1](4{sup .+})ions, persistent in fluid solution at room temperature, and the tight iso-[1.1.1.1]{sup .+} and [2.2.1.1]{sup .+} ions, observable only in Freon matrix (CFCl{sub 3}, {gamma}-rays, 77K). According to calculations, these are the thermodynamically more stable ones of the respective pairs of valence isomers. In this communication the direct observation of tight 1{sup .+} and the activation barrier for its isomerization into extended 2{sup .+} are reported. 16 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  17. Efficient scavenging of β-carotene radical cations by antiinflammatory salicylates.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Hong; Liang, Ran; Han, Rui-Min; Zhang, Jian-Ping; Skibsted, Leif H

    2014-02-01

    The radical cation generated during photobleaching of β-carotene is scavenged efficiently by the anion of methyl salicylate from wintergreen oil in a second-order reaction approaching the diffusion limit with k2 = 3.2 × 10(9) L mol(-1) s(-1) in 9 : 1 v/v chloroform-methanol at 23 °C, less efficiently by the anion of salicylic acid with 2.2 × 10(8) L mol(-1) s(-1), but still of possible importance for light-exposed tissue. Surprisingly, acetylsalicylate, the aspirin anion, reacts with an intermediate rate in a reaction assigned to the anion of the mixed acetic-salicylic acid anhydride formed through base induced rearrangements. The relative scavenging rate of the β-carotene radical cation by the three salicylates is supported by DFT-calculations.

  18. The role of organic solvent radical cations in separations ligand degradation

    DOE PAGES

    Mezyk, Stephen P.; Mincher, Bruce J.; Dhiman, Surajdevprakash B.; ...

    2015-11-04

    The dodecane radical cation reaction rate constant with CMPO was measured using ps electron pulse radiolysis/absorption spectroscopy as k = (1.30 ± 0.11) x 1010 M-1 s-1 in dodecane/0.10 M CH2Cl2 solution. No reactivity increase occurred when these solutions were pre-contacted with nitric acid, similar to the behavior observed for TODGA. To corroborate these kinetic data with steady-state radiolysis measurements, where acid pre contacted CMPO showed significantly less degradation, it is proposed that the dodecane radical cation always reacts directly with TODGA, but for CMPO the charge-transfer occurs with the CMPO•HNO3 complex formed in the acid contacted solvent.

  19. The role of organic solvent radical cations in separations ligand degradation

    SciTech Connect

    Mezyk, Stephen P.; Mincher, Bruce J.; Dhiman, Surajdevprakash B.; Layne, Bobby; Wishart, James F.

    2015-11-04

    The dodecane radical cation reaction rate constant with CMPO was measured using ps electron pulse radiolysis/absorption spectroscopy as k = (1.30 ± 0.11) x 1010 M-1 s-1 in dodecane/0.10 M CH2Cl2 solution. No reactivity increase occurred when these solutions were pre-contacted with nitric acid, similar to the behavior observed for TODGA. To corroborate these kinetic data with steady-state radiolysis measurements, where acid pre contacted CMPO showed significantly less degradation, it is proposed that the dodecane radical cation always reacts directly with TODGA, but for CMPO the charge-transfer occurs with the CMPO•HNO3 complex formed in the acid contacted solvent.

  20. Compounds I of catalase and horse radish peroxidase: pi-cation radicals.

    PubMed

    Dolphin, D; Forman, A; Borg, D C; Fajer, J; Felton, R H

    1971-03-01

    Two-electron oxidation of cobaltous octaethylporphyrin [Co(II)(Et)(8)P] yields a stable pi-cation radical [Co(III)(Et)(8)P](2+.), the optical spectrum of which exhibits spectral changes dependent upon the nature of the counterion. Comparison of these spectra with those of Compounds I of horseradish peroxidase and catalase leads us to propose that these Compounds I contain a pi-cation radical of the heme prosthetic group. This proposal explains the oxidation level, optical spectra, and stability of the primary compounds without recourse to properties such as stoichiometric mixtures of special porphyrins, stable Fe(V) porphyrins, or unique conformers of heme porphyrins. Explanations are advanced to account for the missing electron spin resonance signal of Compound I of horseradish peroxidase.

  1. Intramolecular Electron Transfer in Bis(tetraalkyl Hydrazine) and Bis(hydrazyl) Radical Cations.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Hao

    A series of multicyclic bis(hydrazine) and bis(diazenium) compounds connected by relatively rigid hydrocarbon frameworks were prepared for the study of intramolecular electron transfer. The thermodynamics of electron removal of these compounds was investigated by cyclic voltammetry. The difference between the first and second oxidation potentials for the 4 sigma-bonded species was found to be larger for the bis(hydrazyl) radical systems than for the bis(hydrazines) by ca. 0.2 V (4.6 kcal/mol). This indicates a greater degree of interaction between the two nitrogen moieties for the hydrazyl systems, which is consistent with a greater degree of electronic coupling (H _{rm AB}) in these systems. The ESR spectra of the 4 sigma -bonded bis(hydrazine) radical cations indicate localized radical cations, which corresponds to slow intramolecular electron transfer on the ESR timescale. Conversely, the ESR spectra of the corresponding bis(hydrazyl) radical cation systems show nitrogen hyperfine splittings of a(4N) of ca. 4.5 G. This indicates that intramolecular electron transfer between the two nitrogen moieties is fast on the ESR timescale; the rate of exchange, k_ {rm ex} was estimated to be well above 1.9 times 10^8 s^{-1}. The contrast in exchange rates is consistent with the large geometry change upon oxidation which is characteristic of hydrazines. The hydrazyls undergo a smaller geometry change upon oxidation, and thus are expected to exhibit smaller inner-sphere reorganization energies. The optical spectra of these radical species was investigated in hopes of observing absorption bands corresponding to intramolecular electron transfer, as predicted by Hush theory. A broad absorption band was observed in the near IR region for the saturated bis(hydrazyl) radical cation system at 1060 nm (9420 cm^{-1} ) in acetonitrile at room temperature, and was accompanied by a narrower band at 1430 nm (6993 cm^ {-1}). The width of this band was estimated to be 545 nm (6496 cm^{-1

  2. The radical cation of syn-tricyclooctadiene and its rearrangement products

    PubMed

    Bally; Bernhard; Matzinger; Roulin; Sastry; Truttmann; Zhu; Marcinek; Adamus; Kaminski; Gebicki; Williams; Chen; Fulscher

    2000-03-03

    The syn dimer of cyclobutadiene (tricyclo[4.2.0.0(2.5)]octa-3,7-diene, TOD) is subjected to ionization under different conditions and the resulting species are probed by optical and ESR spectroscopy. By means of quantum chemical modelling of the potential energy surfaces and the optical spectra, it is possible to assign the different products that arise spontaneously after ionization or after subsequent warming or illumination of the samples. Based on these findings, we propose a mechanistic scheme which involves a partitioning of the incipient radical cation of TOD between two electronic states. These two states engage in (near) activation-less decay to the more stable valence isomers, cyclooctatetraene (COT*+) and a bis-cyclobutenylium radical cation BCB*+. The latter product undergoes further rearrangement, first to tetracyclo[4.2.0.0(2,4).0(3,5]oct-7-ene (TCO*+) and eventually to bicyclo[4.2.0]octa-2,4,7-triene (BOT*+) which can also be generated photochemically from BCB*+ or TCO*+. The surprising departure of syn-TOD*+ from the least-motion reaction path leading to BOT*+ can be traced to strong vibronic interactions (second-order Jahn-Teller effects) which prevail in both possible ground states of syn-TOD*+. Such effects seem to be more important in determining the intramolecular reactivity of radical cations than orbital or state symmetry rules.

  3. The lightest organic radical cation for charge storage in redox flow batteries

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Jinhua; Pan, Baofei; Duan, Wentao; Wei, Xiaoliang; Assary, Rajeev S.; Su, Liang; Brushett, Fikile; Cheng, Lei; Liao, Chen; Ferrandon, Magali S.; Wang, Wei; Zhang, Zhengcheng; Burrell, Anthony K.; Curtiss, Larry A.; Shkrob, Ilya A.; Moore, Jeffrey S.; Zhang, Lu

    2016-08-25

    Electrochemically reversible fluids of high energy density are promising materials for capturing the electrical energy generated from intermittent sources like solar and wind. To meet this technological challenge there is a need to understand the fundamental limits and interplay of electrochemical potential, stability and solubility in “lean” derivatives of redox-active molecules. Here we describe the process of molecular pruning, illustrated for 2,5-di-tert-butyl-1,4-bis(2-methoxyethoxy)benzene, a molecule known to produce a persistently stable, high-potential radical cation. By systematically shedding molecular fragments considered important for radical cation steric stabilization, we discovered a minimalistic structure that retains long-term stability in its oxidized form. Interestingly, we find the tert-butyl groups are unnecessary; high stability of the radical cation and high solubility are both realized in derivatives having appropriately positioned arene methyl groups. These stability trends are rationalized by mechanistic considerations of the postulated decomposition pathways. We suggest that the molecular pruning approach will uncover lean redox active derivatives for electrochemical energy storage leading to materials with long-term stability and high intrinsic capacity.

  4. Carotenoid radical cations as a probe for the molecular mechanism of nonphotochemical quenching in oxygenic photosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Amarie, Sergiu; Standfuss, Jörg; Barros, Tiago; Kühlbrandt, Werner; Dreuw, Andreas; Wachtveitl, Josef

    2007-04-05

    Nonphotochemical quenching (NPQ) is a fundamental mechanism in photosynthesis which protects plants against excess excitation energy and is of crucial importance for their survival and fitness. Recently, carotenoid radical cation (Car*+) formation has been discovered to be a key step for the feedback deexcitation quenching mechanism (qE), a component of NPQ, of which the molecular mechanism and location is still unknown. We have generated and characterized carotenoid radical cations by means of resonant two color, two photon ionization (R2C2PI) spectroscopy. The Car*+ bands have maxima located at 830 nm (violaxanthin), 880 nm (lutein), 900 nm (zeaxanthin), and 920 nm (beta-carotene). The positions of these maxima depend strongly on solution conditions, the number of conjugated C=C bonds, and molecular structure. Furthermore, R2C2PI measurements on the light-harvesting complex of photosystem II (LHC II) samples with or without zeaxanthin (Zea) reveal the violaxanthin (Vio) radical cation (Vio*+) band at 909 nm and the Zea*+ band at 983 nm. The replacement of Vio by Zea in the light-harvesting complex II (LHC II) has no influence on the Chl excitation lifetime, and by exciting the Chls lowest excited state, no additional rise and decay corresponding to the Car*+ signal observed previously during qE was detected in the spectral range investigated (800-1050 nm). On the basis of our findings, the mechanism of qE involving the simple replacement of Vio with Zea in LHC II needs to be reconsidered.

  5. Formation, isomerization, and dissociation of alpha-carbon-centered and pi-centered glycylglycyltryptophan radical cations

    SciTech Connect

    Ng, Dominic C.; Song, Tao; Siu, Shiu On; Siu, Chi-Kit; Laskin, Julia; Chu, Ivan K.

    2010-02-11

    Gas phase fragmentations of two isomeric radical cationic tripeptides of glycylglycyltryptophan-G•GW+ and [GGW]•+—with well-defined initial radical sites at the α-carbon atom and the 3-methylindole ring, respectively, have been studied using collision-induced dissociation (CID), density functional theory (DFT), and Rice-Ramsperger-Kassel-Marcus (RRKM) theory. Substantially different low-energy CID spectra were obtained for these two isomeric GGW structures, suggesting that they did not interconvert on the time scale of these experiments. DFT and RRKM calculations were used to investigate the influence of the kinetics, stabilities, and locations of the radicals on the competition between the isomerization and dissociation channels. The calculated isomerization barrier between the GGW radical cations (>35.4 kcal/mol) was slightly higher than the barrier for competitive dissociation of these species (<30.5 kcal/mol); the corresponding microcanonical rate constants for isomerization obtained from RRKM calculations were all considerably lower than the dissociation rates at all internal energies. Thus, interconversion between the GGW isomers examined in this study cannot compete with their fragmentations.

  6. The radical cation of naphthalene: First correct analysis of its ESR spectrum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerson, Fabian; Qin, Xue-Zhi

    1988-12-01

    The radical cations of naphthalene ( 1) and its 1,4-dideutero derivative ( 1- d2), generated from the corresponding neutral compounds by γ-rays in a CFCl 3 matrix at 77 K, have been studied by ESR and ENDOR spectroscopy. At 140 K, the hyperfineanisotropy tensors of the protons in 1+• appear to be quasi-axial, presumably as a consequence of the fast rotation about the twofold symmetry axis perpendicular to the molecular plane. The isotropic coupling constants are -0.74±0.01 and -0.187 ± 0.014 mT for the two sets of four equivalent protons in the 1,4,5,8- and 2,3,6,7-positions, respectively. The relative increase in the coupling constant of the 1,4,5,8-protons on going from the radical anion 1-• (-0.495 mT) to the radical cation 1+• (-0.74 mT) is similar to that found for the 1,4-protons in the corresponding radical ions ( 2-• and 2+•) of s-trans-buta-1,3-diene ( 2).

  7. Solvent effects on the resonance Raman spectra of bacteriochlorophyll a cation radical

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Misono, Yasuhito; Nishizawa, Ei-ichi; Limantara, Leenawaty; Koyama, Yasushi; Itoh, Koichi

    1995-04-01

    Resonance Raman (RR) spectra were measured for the cation radical of bacteriochlorophyll a in acetone, methanol, dichloromethane and mixed solvents of acetone and methanol. The ring-breathing (C a-C m stretching) frequency of the radical (abbreviated as vr+) was observed at 1601 cm -1 in acetone (forming a penta-coordinated monomer), at 1587 cm -1 in a methanol (forming a hexa-coordinated monomer) and at 1600 cm -1 in dichloromethane (forming a penta-coordinated aggregate). The RR spectrum of the radical in dichloromethane is almost identical to the transient RR spectrum ascribed to 'the aggregated T 1 species of Bchl a' formed in the particular solvent by Nishizawa, Limantara, Nanjou, Nagae, Kakuno and Koyama, indicating that their interpretation needs to be revised.

  8. High-field EPR study of carotenoid and chlorophyll cation radicals in photosystem II.

    SciTech Connect

    Lakshmi, K. V.; Reifler, M. J.; Brudvig, G. W.; Poluektov, O. G.; Wagner, A. M.; Thurnuaer, M. C.; Chemistry; Yale Univ.

    2000-11-16

    In photosystem II (PS II), chlorophyll, {beta}-carotene, and cytochrome b{sub 559} are alternate electron donors that may be involved in a photoprotection mechanism. The present study describes the use of high-field EPR spectroscopy to characterize the low-temperature photooxidation of Chl{sub z} and Car cofactors in PS II. The EPR signals of the individual species, previously not resolved at X-band frequency (9 GHz), are resolved at higher D-band frequency (130 GHz) in deuterated Synechococcus lividus PS II. Deuteration of PS II results in significant narrowing of the EPR lines, yielding well-resolved EPR spectra of the Car{sup +} and Chl{sub z}{sup +} radicals at 130 GHz. The g tensors of the individual species were determined by EPR spectral simulations. The g tensor determined for the Car{sup +} radical (g{sub xx} = 2.00335, g{sub yy} = 2.00251, g{sub zz} = 2.00227) is similar to that previously observed for a canthaxanthin cation radical but with a slightly rhombic tensor. The Chl{sub z}{sup +} g tensor (g{sub xx} = 2.00312, g{sub yy} = 2.00263, g{sub zz} = 2.00202) is similar to that of a chlorophyll a cation radical. This study shows that both the carotenoid and chlorophyll radicals are generated in PS II by illumination at temperatures from 6 to 190 K and that there is no interconversion of Car{sup +} and Chl{sub z}{sup +} radicals upon dark annealing at temperatures up to 160 K. This study also establishes the feasibility of using deuteration and high-field EPR to resolve previously unresolvable cofactor signals in PS II.

  9. Influence of "remote" intramolecular hydrogen bonds on the stabilities of phenoxyl radicals and benzyl cations.

    PubMed

    Foti, Mario C; Amorati, Riccardo; Pedulli, Gian Franco; Daquino, Carmelo; Pratt, Derek A; Ingold, K U

    2010-07-02

    Remote intramolecular hydrogen bonds (HBs) in phenols and benzylammonium cations influence the dissociation enthalpies of their O-H and C-N bonds, respectively. The direction of these intramolecular HBs, para --> meta or meta --> para, determines the sign of the variation with respect to molecules lacking remote intramolecular HBs. For example, the O-H bond dissociation enthalpy of 3-methoxy-4-hydroxyphenol, 4, is about 2.5 kcal/mol lower than that of its isomer 3-hydroxy-4-methoxyphenol, 5, although group additivity rules would predict nearly identical values. In the case of 3-methoxy-4-hydroxybenzylammonium and 3-hydroxy-4-methoxybenzylammonium ions, the CBS-QB3 level calculated C-N eterolytic dissociation enthalpy is about 3.7 kcal/mol lower in the former ion. These effects are caused by the strong electron-withdrawing character of the -O(*) and -CH(2)(+) groups in the phenoxyl radical and benzyl cation, respectively, which modulates the strength of the HB. An O-H group in the para position of ArO(*) or ArCH(2)(+) becomes more acidic than in the parent molecules and hence forms stronger HBs with hydrogen bond acceptors (HBAs) in the meta position. Conversely, HBAs, such as OCH(3), in the para position become weaker HBAs in phenoxyl radicals and benzyl cations than in the parent molecules. These product thermochemistries are reflected in the transition states for, and hence in the kinetics of, hydrogen atom abstraction from phenols by free radicals (dpph(*) and ROO(*)). For example, the 298 K rate constant for the 4 + dpph(*) reaction is 22 times greater than that for the 5 + dpph(*) reaction. Fragmentation of ring-substituted benzylammonium ions, generated by ESI-MS, to form the benzyl cations reflects similar remote intramolecular HB effects.

  10. Quantum chemical insights in energy dissipation and carotenoid radical cation formation in light harvesting complexes.

    PubMed

    Wormit, Michael; Dreuw, Andreas

    2007-06-21

    Light harvesting complexes (LHCs) have been identified in all photosynthetic organisms. To understand their function in light harvesting and energy dissipation, detailed knowledge about possible excitation energy transfer (EET) and electron transfer (ET) processes in these pigment proteins is of prime importance. This again requires the study of electronically excited states of the involved pigment molecules, in LHCs of chlorophylls and carotenoids. This paper represents a critical review of recent quantum chemical calculations on EET and ET processes between pigment pairs relevant for the major LHCs of green plants (LHC-II) and of purple bacteria (LH2). The theoretical methodology for a meaningful investigation of such processes is described in detail, and benefits and limitations of standard methods are discussed. The current status of excited state calculations on chlorophylls and carotenoids is outlined. It is focused on the possibility of EET and ET in the context of chlorophyll fluorescence quenching in LHC-II and carotenoid radical cation formation in LH2. In the context of non-photochemical quenching of green plants, it is shown that replacement of the carotenoid violaxanthin by zeaxanthin in its binding pocket of LHC-II can not result in efficient quenching. In LH2, our computational results give strong evidence that the S(1) states of the carotenoids are involved in carotenoid cation formation. By comparison of theoretical findings with recent experimental data, a general mechanism for carotenoid radical cation formation is suggested.

  11. In vitro antioxidant and radical-scavenging capacities of Citrullus colocynthes (L) and Artemisia absinthium extracts using promethazine hydrochloride radical cation and contemporary assays.

    PubMed

    Asghar, M Nadeem; Khan, I Ullah; Bano, N

    2011-10-01

    A new, quick and economical decolorization assay based upon the generation of a radical cation made from promethazine hydrochloride (PMZH) is described for screening of antioxidant activity of plants/herbal extracts. PMZH radical cations, produced through a reaction between PMZH and potassium persulfate (K(2)S(2)O(8)) in phosphoric acid medium, have maximum absorption at 515 nm in their first-order derivative spectrum. Theconcentrations of chromagen and K(2)S(2)O(8) were optimized (final concentration of PMZH and K₂S₂O₈ were 0.166 mM and 0.11 mM, respectively) for better stability and sensitivity of the radical cation produced. Agood linear correlation was found between the percentage inhibition and the increasing amounts of standard antioxidants, with correlation coefficients ranging from 0.989 to 0.999. The newly developed assay was employed to evaluate the antioxidant capacity of Citrullus colocynthes L. and Artemisia absinthium extracts. The proposed assay involved a more stable radical cation and required only 1 h for preparation of a working solution in comparison to the 2,2'-azinobis(3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulfonic acid) (ABTS) radical cation decolorizaion assay, which was reported to be less sensitive at low pH and almost 12-16 h were required for preparation of a working ABTS solution. Other assays employed to evaluate the antioxidant potential andradical-scavenging capacities of the extracts were the ferric-reducing antioxidant power, 2,2'-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl radical scavenging, total phenolic contents assay, total flavonoid contents and metal-chelating activity assays, and the lipid peroxidation value in linoleic acid emulsion systems. The results indicate that boththe plants have potent free radical-scavenging activity and the ability to prevent lipid peroxidation and radical chain reactions.

  12. Near-UV Photodissociation of Tryptic Peptide Cation Radicals. Scope and Effects of Amino Acid Residues and Radical Sites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, Huong T. H.; Tureček, František

    2017-02-01

    Peptide cation-radical fragment ions of the z-type, [●AXAR+], [●AXAK+], and [●XAR+], where X = A, C, D, E, F, G, H, K, L, M, N, P, Y, and W, were generated by electron transfer dissociation of peptide dications and investigated by MS3-near-ultraviolet photodissociation (UVPD) at 355 nm. Laser-pulse dependence measurements indicated that the ion populations were homogeneous for most X residues except phenylalanine. UVPD resulted in dissociations of backbone CO-NH bonds that were accompanied by hydrogen atom transfer, producing fragment ions of the [yn]+ type. Compared with collision-induced dissociation, UVPD yielded less side-chain dissociations even for residues that are sensitive to radical-induced side-chain bond cleavages. The backbone dissociations are triggered by transitions to second (B) excited electronic states in the peptide ion R-CH●-CONH- chromophores that are resonant with the 355-nm photon energy. Electron promotion increases the polarity of the B excited states, R-CH+-C●(O-)NH-, and steers the reaction to proceed by transfer of protons from proximate acidic Cα and amide nitrogen positions.

  13. Electrochemical and electron paramagnetic resonance studies of a carotenoid cation radicals and dications: Effect of deuteration

    SciTech Connect

    Khaled, M.; Hadjipetrou, A.; Kispert, L. )

    1990-06-14

    The oxidation process involving the transfer of two electrons for {beta}-carotene is confirmed by bulk electrolysis in a CH{sub 2}Cl{sub 2} solvent and the observation of {Delta}E = 42 mV from cyclic voltammetric measurements. A similar process is also found to occur for {beta}-apo-8{prime}-carotenal and canthaxanthin. An additional cathodic peak between 0.2 0.5 relative to SCE is shown to be dependent on the initial formation of dications followed by the loss of H{sup +} as evidenced by a large isotope effect and most likely due to the reduction of a carotenoid cation. EPR evidence exists for the formation of radical cations by the reaction of diffusing carotenoid dictations with neutral carotenoids. The rate of formation is consistent with the differences in the diffusion coefficients of the carotenoids deduced by chronocoulometric measurements, being fastest for canthaxanthin.

  14. External electric field promotes proton transfer in the radical cation of adenine-thymine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Guiqing; Xie, Shijie

    2016-07-01

    According to pKa measurements, it has been predicted that proton transfer would not occur in the radical cation of adenine-thymine (A:T). However, recent theoretical calculations indicate that proton transfer takes place in the base pair in water below the room temperature. We have performed simulations of proton transfer in the cation of B-DNA stack composed of 10 A:T base pairs in water from 20 K to 300 K. Proton transfer occurs below the room temperature, meanwhile it could also be observed at the room temperature under the external electric field. Another case that interests us is that proton transfer bounces back after ˜300 fs from the appearance of proton transfer at low temperatures.

  15. Pulse radiolysis of alkanes: A time-resolved electron paramagnetic resonance study

    SciTech Connect

    Shkrob, I.A.; Trifunac, A.D.

    1994-02-14

    Time-resolved spin-echo-detected electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) was applied to examine short-lived alkyl radicals formed in pulse radiolysis of liquid alkanes. It was found that the ratio of yields of penultimate and interior radicals in n-alkanes at the instant of their generation is temperature-independent and is ca. 1.25 times greater than the statistical quantity. This higher-than-statistical production of penultimate radicals indicates that the fast ion molecule reactions involving radical cations are a significant route of radical generation. The analysis of spin-echo kinetics in n-alkanes suggests that the alkyl radicals are emissively polarized in spur reactions. this initial polarization rapidly increases with shortening of the aliphatic chain. Another finding is that a long-chain structure of these radicals results in much higher rate of Heisenberg spin exchange relative to the recombination rate. The relative yields of hydrogen abstraction and fragmentation for various branched alkanes are estimated. It is concluded that the fragmentation occurs prior to the formation of radicals in an excited precursor species. Effects of phenolic and alkene additives in radiolysis of n-alkanes are examined. It is demonstrated that phenoxy radicals are produced in dissociative capture of electrons and alkane holes. Another route is a reaction of phenols with free hydrogen atoms. A rapid transfer of singlet correlation from the geminate radical ion pairs is responsible for unusual polarization patterns in the phenoxy and cyclohexadienyl radicals. The significance of these results in the context of cross-linking in polyethylene and higher paraffins is discussed. 56 refs.

  16. The radical cation of anti-tricyclooctadiene and its rearrangement products

    PubMed

    Bally; Bernhard; Matzinger; Truttmann; Zhu; Roulin; Marcinek; Gebicki; Williams; Chen; Roth; Herbertz

    2000-03-03

    The anti dimer of cyclobutadiene (anti-tricyclo[4.2.0.0(2.5)]octa-3,7-diene, TOD) is subjected to ionization by gamma-irradiation in Freon matrices, pulse radiolysis in hydrocarbon matrices, and photoinduced electron transfer in solution. The resulting species are probed by optical and ESR spectroscopy (solid phase) as well as by CIDNP spectroscopy (solution). Thereby it is found that ionization of anti-TOD invariably leads to spontaneous decay to two products, that is bicyclo[4.2.0]octa-2,4,7-triene (BOT) and 1,4-dihydropentalene (1,4-DHP), whose relative yield strongly depends on the conditions of the experiment. Exploration of the C8H8*+ potential energy surface by the B3LYP/6-31G* density functional method leads to a mechanistic hypothesis for the observed rearrangements which involves a bifurcation between a pathway leading to the simple valence isomer, BOT*+, and another one leading to an unprecedented other valence isomer, the anti form of the bicyclo[3.3.0]octa-2,6-diene-4,8-diyl radical cation (anti-BOD*+). The latter product undergoes a very facile H-shift to yield the radical cation of 1,3a-dihydropentalene (1,3a-DHP*+) which ultimately rearrranges by a further H-shift to the observed product, 1,4-DHP*+.

  17. Multistate vibronic interactions in difluorobenzene radical cations. II. Quantum dynamical simulations.

    PubMed

    Faraji, Shirin; Meyer, H-D; Köppel, Horst

    2008-08-21

    The multistate vibronic dynamics in the X-D electronic states of all three difluorobenzene radical cations are investigated theoretically by an ab initio quantum dynamical approach. The vibronic coupling scheme and the ab initio values of the system parameters are adopted from Paper I [S. Faraji and H. Koppel, J. Chem. Phys. 129, 074310 (2008)]. Extensive calculations by wave-packet propagation have been performed with the aid of the multiconfiguration time-dependent Hartree method. Five coupled electronic potential energy surfaces and 10 (11 in the case of the orthoisomer) vibrational degrees of freedom have been included in these calculations. The nonadiabatic interactions lead to the restructuring of the photoelectron spectral envelopes. Ultrafast internal conversion processes within the electronic manifolds in question demonstrate the strength of the nonadiabatic coupling effects and complement the analogous findings for the electronic spectra. The internal conversion dynamics is characterized by a stepwise transfer of the electronic population to the lowest electronic state on a time scale of femtoseconds to picoseconds. A difference between the three isomers is found to be related to the weaker interaction between the sets of X-A and B-C-D states (with high-energy conical intersections) in the meta isomer, as compared to the other isomers. The implications of these findings for the qualitative understanding of the fluorescence dynamics of fluorinated benzene radical cations are discussed.

  18. Zeaxanthin Radical Cation Formation in Minor Light-Harvesting Complexes of Higher Plant Antenna

    SciTech Connect

    Avenson, Thomas H.; Ahn, Tae Kyu; Zigmantas, Donatas; Niyogi, Krishna K.; Li, Zhirong; Ballottari, Matteo; Bassi, Roberto; Fleming, Graham R.

    2008-01-31

    Previous work on intact thylakoid membranes showed that transient formation of a zeaxanthin radical cation was correlated with regulation of photosynthetic light-harvesting via energy-dependent quenching. A molecular mechanism for such quenching was proposed to involve charge transfer within a chlorophyll-zeaxanthin heterodimer. Using near infrared (880-1100 nm) transient absorption spectroscopy, we demonstrate that carotenoid (mainly zeaxanthin) radical cation generation occurs solely in isolated minor light-harvesting complexes that bind zeaxanthin, consistent with the engagement of charge transfer quenching therein. We estimated that less than 0.5percent of the isolated minor complexes undergo charge transfer quenching in vitro, whereas the fraction of minor complexes estimated to be engaged in charge transfer quenching in isolated thylakoids was more than 80 times higher. We conclude that minor complexes which bind zeaxanthin are sites of charge transfer quenching in vivo and that they can assume Non-quenching and Quenching conformations, the equilibrium LHC(N)<--> LHC(Q) of which is modulated by the transthylakoid pH gradient, the PsbS protein, and protein-protein interactions.

  19. Controlling the dissociation dynamics of acetophenone radical cation through excitation of ground and excited state wavepackets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore Tibbetts, Katharine; Tarazkar, Maryam; Bohinski, Timothy; Romanov, Dmitri A.; Matsika, Spiridoula; Levis, Robert J.

    2015-08-01

    Time-resolved measurements of the acetophenone radical cation prepared via adiabatic ionization with strong field 1270 nm excitation reveal coupled wavepacket dynamics that depend on the intensity of the 790 nm probe pulse. At probe intensities below 7× {10}11 W cm-2, out of phase oscillations between the parent molecular ion and the benzoyl fragment ion are shown to arise from a one-photon excitation from the ground D0 ionic surface to the D1 and/or D2 excited surfaces by the probe pulse. At higher probe intensities, a second set of wavepacket dynamics are observed that couple the benzoyl ion to the phenyl, butadienyl, and acylium fragment ions. Equation of motion coupled cluster calculations of the ten lowest lying ionic surfaces and the dipole couplings between the ground ionic surface D0 and the nine excited states enable elucidation of the dissociation pathways and deduction of potential dissociation mechanisms. The results can lead to improved control schemes for selective dissociation of the acetophenone radical cation.

  20. The Effect of the Secondary Structure on Dissociation of Peptide Radical Cations: Fragmentation of Angiotensin III and Its Analogues

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Zhibo; Lam, Corey; Chu, Ivan K.; Laskin, Julia

    2008-09-28

    Fragmentation of protonated RVYIHPF and RVYIHPF-OMe and the corresponding radical cations was studied using time- and collision energy-resolved surface-induced dissociation (SID) in a Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometer (FT-ICR MS) specially equipped to perform SID experiments. Peptide radical cations were produced by gas-phase fragmentation of CoIII(salen)-peptide complexes. Both the energetics and mechanisms of dissociation of even-electron and odd-electron angiotensin III ions are quite different. Protonated molecules are much more stable towards fragmentation than the corresponding radical cations. RRKM modeling of the experimental data suggests that this stability is largely attributed to differences in threshold energies for dissociation while activation entropies are very similar. Detailed analysis of the experimental data obtained for radical cations demonstrated the presence of two distinct structures separated by a high free-energy barrier. The two families of structures were ascribed to the canonical and zwitterionic forms of the radical cations produced in our experiments.

  1. Facile Smiles-type rearrangement in radical cations of N-acyl arylsulfonamides and analogs

    PubMed Central

    Irikura, Karl K.; Todua, Nino G.

    2016-01-01

    RATIONALE N-Alkylation of sulfonylbenzamides was reported recently to cause a dramatic and surprising change in electron ionization mass spectrometry (EIMS), leading to a closed-shell base peak. Only an incomplete, speculative mechanism was available at that time. The fragmentation mechanism is determined in the present work and set in the context of related compounds. METHODS Candidate reaction mechanisms were evaluated theoretically using modest density-functional calculations. The fragmentation mechanism with the lowest barriers was identified and one of its implications tested successfully by experimental 18O-isotopic substitution. RESULTS The amide oxygen atom attacks the arylsulfonyl group at the ipso position (Smiles-type rearrangement), displacing a molecule of SO2. The resulting carboximidate radical cation has a weak C–O bond that breaks easily. The incipient aryloxyl radical abstracts a proton from the amide nitrogen to form the dominant product ion, but if the molecule is N-alkylated this cannot occur. Instead, the neutral aryloxyl radical is lost and a closed-shell, N-alkyl nitrilium ion is the major product. CONCLUSIONS The Smiles-type ion fragmentation mechanism is facile for the title compounds, despite the necessity for carbonyl oxygen to serve as a nucleophile. This rearrangement probably occurs in many of the mass spectra reported for structurally similar compounds, in which the nucleophile may be a thione, arylthio, imine, methylene, or methine moiety. PMID:24573815

  2. Lifetimes and reaction pathways of guanine radical cations and neutral guanine radicals in an oligonucleotide in aqueous solutions.

    PubMed

    Rokhlenko, Yekaterina; Geacintov, Nicholas E; Shafirovich, Vladimir

    2012-03-14

    The exposure of guanine in the oligonucleotide 5'-d(TCGCT) to one-electron oxidants leads initially to the formation of the guanine radical cation G(•+), its deptotonation product G(-H)(•), and, ultimately, various two- and four-electron oxidation products via pathways that depend on the oxidants and reaction conditions. We utilized single or successive multiple laser pulses (308 nm, 1 Hz rate) to generate the oxidants CO(3)(•-) and SO(4)(•-) (via the photolysis of S(2)O(8)(2-) in aqueous solutions in the presence and absence of bicarbonate, respectively) at concentrations/pulse that were ∼20-fold lower than the concentration of 5'-d(TCGCT). Time-resolved absorption spectroscopy measurements following single-pulse excitation show that the G(•+) radical (pK(a) = 3.9) can be observed only at low pH and is hydrated within 3 ms at pH 2.5, thus forming the two-electron oxidation product 8-oxo-7,8-dihydroguanosine (8-oxoG). At neutral pH, and single pulse excitation, the principal reactive intermediate is G(-H)(•), which, at best, reacts only slowly with H(2)O and lives for ∼70 ms in the absence of oxidants/other radicals to form base sequence-dependent intrastrand cross-links via the nucleophilic addition of N3-thymidine to C8-guanine (5'-G*CT* and 5'-T*CG*). Alternatively, G(-H)(•) can be oxidized further by reaction with CO(3)(•-), generating the two-electron oxidation products 8-oxoG (C8 addition) and 5-carboxamido-5-formamido-2-iminohydantoin (2Ih, by C5 addition). The four-electron oxidation products, guanidinohydantoin (Gh) and spiroiminodihydantoin (Sp), appear only after a second (or more) laser pulse. The levels of all products, except 8-oxoG, which remains at a low constant value, increase with the number of laser pulses.

  3. Dynamics of radical cations of poly(4-hydroxystyrene) in the presence and absence of triphenylsulfonium triflate as determined by pulse radiolysis of its highly concentrated solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okamoto, Kazumasa; Ishida, Takuya; Yamamoto, Hiroki; Kozawa, Takahiro; Fujiyoshi, Ryoko; Umegaki, Kikuo

    2016-07-01

    Pulse radiolysis of highly concentrated poly(4-hydroxystyrene) (PHS) solutions in cyclohexanone and p-dioxane was performed both with and without an onium-type photoacid generator (PAG). With increasing PHS concentration, the rate constant of deprotonation of PHS radical cations was found to decrease. In the presence of PAG, the yield of the multimer radical cation of PHS was shown to decrease. We found that pairing between the anions produced by the attachment of dissociative electrons of PAGs and the monomer PHS radical cations restrict local molecular motions, leading to the formation of the multimer PHS radical cations.

  4. Gas-phase reactions of doubly charged actinide cations with alkanes and alkenes--probing the chemical activity of 5f electrons from Th to Cm.

    PubMed

    Marçalo, Joaquim; Santos, Marta; Gibson, John K

    2011-11-07

    Small alkanes (methane, ethane, propane, n-butane) and alkenes (ethene, propene, 1-butene) were used to probe the gas-phase reactivity of doubly charged actinide cations, An(2+) (An = Th, Pa, U, Np, Pu, Am, Cm), by means of Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry. Different combinations of doubly and singly charged ions were observed as reaction products, comprising species formed via metal-ion induced eliminations of small molecules, simple adducts and ions resulting from electron, hydride or methide transfer channels. Th(2+), Pa(2+), U(2+) and Np(2+) preferentially yielded doubly charged products of hydrocarbon activation, while Pu(2+), Am(2+) and Cm(2+) reacted mainly through transfer channels. Cm(2+) was also capable of forming doubly charged products with some of the hydrocarbons whereas Pu(2+) and Am(2+) were not, these latter two ions conversely being the only for which adduct formation was observed. The product distributions and the reaction efficiencies are discussed in relation to the electronic configurations of the metal ions, the energetics of the reactions and similar studies previously performed with doubly charged lanthanide and transition metal cations. The conditions for hydrocarbon activation to occur as related to the accessibility of electronic configurations with one or two 5f and/or 6d unpaired electrons are examined and the possible chemical activity of the 5f electrons in these early actinide ions, particularly Pa(2+), is considered.

  5. Single-Crystal X-ray Structures of conductive π-Stacking Dimers of Tetrakis(alkylthio)benzene Radical Cations

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xiaoyu; Gao, Feng; Yang, Wuqin

    2016-01-01

    Salts containing radical cations of 1,2,4,5-tetrakis(isopropylthio)benzene (TPB) and 1,2,4,5-tetrakis(ethylthio) benzene (TEB) have been successfully synthesized with . These newly synthesized salts have been characterized by UV-Vis absorption, EPR spectroscopy, conductivity measurement, single crystal X-ray diffraction analysis as well as DFT calculation. This study raises the first crystal structure of conductive π-stacking radical cation with single phenyl ring and reveals their conductivity has relationship with the stack structure which affected by the substituent. PMID:27403720

  6. Carotenoid cation radicals produced by the interaction of carotenoids with iodine

    SciTech Connect

    Ding, R.; Grant, J.L.; Metzger, R.M.; Kispert, L.D.

    1988-08-11

    Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) and optical absorption spectra of 1,2-dichloroethane and dichloromethane solutions of ..beta..-carotene (C/sub 40/H/sub 56/) and iodine have been studied. EPR studies showed that ..beta..-carotene cation radicals are formed. These radicals form complexes at 77 K, in highly concentrated (0.1 M) iodine solutions, with higher order polyiodide anions, I/sub 5//sup -/, I/sub 7//sup -/, I/sub 9//sup -/ (as evidenced by g value shifts and line-width increases), while at room temperature and in dilute (10/sup -4/-10/sup -5/ M) solutions of iodine only I/sub 3//sup -/ counterions are involved. In dilute solutions (total molar concentratino = 2 x 10/sup -4/ M), a Job plot showed the stoichiometry to be 2:3, indicating the reaction 2C/sub 40/H/sub 56/ + 31/sub 2/ /r equilibrium/ 2C/sub 40/H/sub 56//sup .+/ + 2I/sub 3//sup -/. The radical fraction (EPR) is /approximately/ 2% at 77 K and 0.4% at 300 K (for a 2 mM ..beta..-carotene/0.1 M I/sub 2/ solution); it increases at lower ..beta..-carotene concentrations. Dimers and trimers of ..beta..-carotene cation radicals are formed in dilute solution (I/sub 2/ < 10/sup -4/ M) if (I/sub 2/)/(..beta..-carotene) < 1, and an intense absorption band occurs at lambda/sub max/ /approximately/ 1030 nm. Canthaxanthin and ..beta..-apo-8'-carotenal with I/sub 2/ produce new absorption bands with lambda/sub max/ < 1000 nm; the g values are independent of iodine concentration, suggesting a poorer ability to form complexes with the polyiodide anions. All three carotenoids react with other electron acceptors (7,7,8,8-tetracyanoquinodimethane (TCNQ), tetrachloro-1,4-benzoquinone (chloranil), and Br/sub 2/) according to the electron affinity of the acceptor used.

  7. Density Functional Theory and Mass Spectrometry of Phthalate Fragmentations Mechanisms: Modeling Hyperconjugated Carbocation and Radical Cation Complexes with Neutral Molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeilani, Yassin A.; Cardelino, Beatriz H.; Ibeanusi, Victor M.

    2011-11-01

    This is the first ab initio study of the energetics of the fragmentation mechanisms of phthalate, by mass spectrometry, leading to protonated phthalic anhydride ( m/z 149). Phthalates fragment by two major pathways; namely, the McLafferty + 1 rearrangement and the loss of alkoxy. Both pathways involve a carbonyl oxygen attack to the ortho-carbonyl carbon leading to structures with tetrahedral carbon intermediates that eventually give m/z 149. These pathways were studied by collision induced dissociation (CID) using triple quadrupole mass spectrometry. The proposed McLafferty + 1 pathway proceeds through a distonic M•+, leading to the loss of an allylic-stabilized alkene radical. The McLafferty rearrangement step proceeds through a six-membered ring transition state with a small activation energy ranging 0.4-6.2 kcal/mol; the transfer of a second H from the distonic ion of the rearrangement step proceeds through a radical cation molecule complex. Based on quantum chemical modeling of the cation molecule complexes, two kinds of cation molecule complexes were identified as radical cation molecule complex and hyperconjugated cation molecule complex. This distinction is based on the cation and simplifies future modeling of similar complexes. Optimization of important fragments in these pathways showed cyclized and hydrogen-bonded structures to be favored. An exception was the optimized structure of the protonated phthalic anhydride ( m/z 149) that showed a structure with an open anhydride ring.

  8. Multistate vibronic interactions in difluorobenzene radical cations. I. Electronic structure calculations.

    PubMed

    Faraji, Shirin; Köppel, Horst

    2008-08-21

    The multimode multistate vibronic interactions between the five lowest electronic states of all three isomers of the difluorobenzene radical cation are investigated theoretically, based on ab initio electronic structure data, and employing a well-established vibronic coupling model. The approach rests on the linear vibronic coupling scheme, augmented by quadratic coupling terms for the totally symmetric modes. The underlying ionization potentials and coupling constants are obtained from ab initio coupled-cluster calculations. Low-energy conical intersections and strong vibronic couplings are found to prevail within the sets of X-A and B-C-D cationic states, while the interactions between these two sets of states are found to be weaker and depend on the isomer. The inclusion of the aforementioned quadratic couplings is found to be essential to correctly reproduce the lowest-energy conical intersections between the two different sets of electronic states. Differences between the three isomers regarding these quantities are pointed out. The results will be used as basis for multidimensional wave-packet dynamical simulations for these coupled potential energy surfaces to be presented in the following paper (Paper II).

  9. Synthesis of the iron phthalocyaninate radical cation μ-nitrido dimer and its interaction with hydrogen peroxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grishina, E. S.; Makarova, A. S.; Kudrik, E. V.; Makarov, S. V.; Koifman, O. I.

    2016-03-01

    The iron phthalocyaninate μ-nitrido dimer radical cation, as well as the μ-nitrido dimer complexes of iron phthalocyaninate, was found to have high catalytic activity in the oxidation of organic compounds. It was concluded that this compound is of interest as a model of active intermediates—catalase and oxidase enzymes.

  10. Direct observation of hexamethylbenzenium radical cations generated during zeolite methanol-to-olefin catalysis: an ESR study.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sun Jung; Jang, Hoi-Gu; Lee, Jun Kyu; Min, Hyung-Ki; Hong, Suk Bong; Seo, Gon

    2011-09-07

    The generation of hexamethylbenzenium radical cations as the key reaction intermediate in chabazite-type molecular sieve acids (i.e., H-SAPO-34 and H-SSZ-13) during the methanol-to-olefin process has been directly evidenced by ESR spectroscopy.

  11. Photoinduced electron-transfer reactions of 2(3H)-furanones and bis(benzofuranones). Spectral and kinetic behavior of radicals and radical cations

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, H.F.; Lohray, B.B.; Gopidas, K.R.; Kumar, C.V.; Das, P.K.; George, M.V.

    1985-10-04

    The spectral and kinetic behaviors of radical cations produced under efficient electron-transfer quenching of 1,4-dicyanonaphthalene or 9,10-dicyanoanthracene singlet by a number of 2(3H)-furanones and bis(benzo-furanones) have been examined by nanosecond laser flash photolysis (337.1 and 425 nm). The efficiencies of net electron transfer in the course of quenching processes are moderately high (0.2-0.6) in acetonitrile. The radical cations from bis(benzofuranones) several 2(3H)-furanones containing a benzyl group at the 3-position undergo fragmentation to benzofuranoxy and furanoxy radicals (+ benzyl or benzofuranoyl carbocations) with rate constants of 0.3 x 10W s . The long-lived furanoxy radicals, independently generated via hydrogen abstraction by tert-butoxy radicals from 2(5H)-furanones and 3-phenyl-2(3H)-benzofuranone, as well as via direct photolysis of 3-benzoyl-3,5-diphenyl-2(3H)-furanone, are characterized by sharply structured absorption spectra and relatively slow second-order decay kinetics (6-8 x 10Y M s in 1:2 benzene-di-tert butyl peroxide, v/v). 28 references, 7 figures, 3 tables.

  12. The first BETS radical cation salts with dicyanamide anion: Crystal growth, structure and conductivity study

    SciTech Connect

    Kushch, N.D.; Buravov, L.I.; Chekhlov, A.N.; Spitsina, N.G.; Kushch, P.P.; Yagubskii, E.B.; Herdtweck, E.; Kobayashi, A.

    2011-11-15

    Electrochemical oxidation of bis(ethylenedithio)tetraselenafulvalene (BETS) has been investigated. Simple and complex dicyanamides of transition metals (Mn{sup 2+}, Ni{sup 2+} and Fe{sup 2+}) were used as electrolytes. The correlation between composition of prepared radical cation salts and metal nature in electrolytes was established. Manganese dicyanamides provide the formation of BETS salts with the {l_brace}Mn[N(CN){sub 2}]{sub 3}{r_brace}- and [N(CN){sub 2}]-XH{sub 2}O anions. When Ni- or Fe-containing electrolytes were used only metalless BETS salts, {alpha}''-BETS{sub 2}[N(CN){sub 2}].2H{sub 2}O (I) and {theta}-BETS{sub 2}[N(CN){sub 2}].3.6H{sub 2}O (II), formed. Structures and conducting properties of these salts were analyzed. Both salts exhibit layered structure. Conducting radical cation layers have {alpha}'' (I)- or {theta}-type (II). Anion sheets appear as two-dimensional polymer networks of different types. These networks are formed by [N(CN)]{sub 2}{sup -} anions and water molecules interlinked by hydrogen bonds. Salt I is a semiconductor and II demonstrates resistance drop down to150 K at normal pressure and down to 72 K at {approx}0.4 kbar pressure. - Graphical abstract: We studied electrochemical oxidation of BETS donor in the presence of simple and/or complex dicyanamides of transition metals (Ni, Fe, Mn) as electrolytes. New conducting salts {alpha}''-BETS{sub 2}[N(CN){sub 2}].2H{sub 2}O and {theta}-BETS{sub 2}[N(CN){sub 2}].3.8H{sub 2}O have been synthesized and characterized. Highlights: > We studied electrochemical oxidation of BETS donor. > Dicyanamides of transition metals (Ni, Fe, Mn) were used as electrolytes. > We found a well-reproducible synthesis of magnetic superconductor BETS{sub 2}Mn[N(CN){sub 2}]{sub 3}. > Two new metalless BETS salts form when Ni and Fe electrolytes were used. > Their structure and conductivity were investigated.

  13. Iron corrolates: unambiguous chloroiron(III) (corrolate)(2-.) pi-cation radicals.

    PubMed

    Walker, F Ann; Licoccia, Silvia; Paolesse, Roberto

    2006-04-01

    The structures, electron configurations, magnetic susceptibilities, spectroscopic properties, molecular orbital energies and spin density distributions, redox properties and reactivities of iron corrolates having chloride, phenyl, pyridine, NO and other ligands are reviewed. It is shown that with one very strong donor ligand such as phenyl anion the electron configuration of the metal is d(4)S=1 Fe(IV) coordinated to a (corrolate)(3-) anion, while with one weaker donor ligand such as chloride or other halide, the electron configuration is d(5)S=3/2 Fe(III) coordinated to a (corrolate)(2-.) pi-cation radical, with antiferromagnetic coupling between the metal and corrolate radical electron. Many of these complexes have been studied by electrochemical techniques and have rich redox reactivity, in most cases involving two 1-electron oxidations and two 1-electron reductions, and it is not possible to tell, from the shapes of cyclic voltammetric waves, whether the electron is added or removed from the metal or the macrocycle; often infrared, UV-Vis, or EPR spectroscopy can provide this information. (1)H and (13)C NMR spectroscopic methods are most useful in delineating the spin state and pattern of spin density distribution of the complexes listed above, as would also be expected to be the case for the recently-reported formal Fe(V)O corrolate, if this complex were stable enough for characterization by NMR spectroscopy. Iron, manganese and chromium corrolates can be oxidized by iodosylbenzene and other common oxidants used previously with metalloporphyrinates to effect efficient oxidation of substrates. Whether the "resting state" form of these complexes, most generally in the case of iron [FeCl(Corr)], actually has the electron configuration Fe(IV)(Corr)(3-) or Fe(III)(Corr)(2-.) is not relevant to the high-valent reactivity of the complex.

  14. Assigning structures to gas-phase peptide cations and cation-radicals. An infrared multiphoton dissociation, ion mobility, electron transfer, and computational study of a histidine peptide ion.

    PubMed

    Moss, Christopher L; Chamot-Rooke, Julia; Nicol, Edith; Brown, Jeffery; Campuzano, Iain; Richardson, Keith; Williams, Jonathan P; Bush, Matthew F; Bythell, Benjamin; Paizs, Bela; Turecek, Frantisek

    2012-03-15

    Infrared multiphoton dissociation (IRMPD) spectroscopy, using a free-electron laser, and ion mobility measurements, using both drift-cell and traveling-wave instruments, were used to investigate the structure of gas-phase peptide (AAHAL + 2H)(2+) ions produced by electrospray ionization. The experimental data from the IRMPD spectra and collisional cross section (Ω) measurements were consistent with the respective infrared spectra and Ω calculated for the lowest-energy peptide ion conformer obtained by extensive molecular dynamics searches and combined density functional theory and ab initio geometry optimizations and energy calculations. Traveling-wave ion mobility measurements were employed to obtain the Ω of charge-reduced peptide cation-radicals, (AAHAL + 2H)(+●), and the c(3), c(4), z(3), and z(4) fragments from electron-transfer dissociation (ETD) of (AAHAL + 2H)(2+). The experimental Ω for the ETD charge-reduced and fragment ions were consistent with the values calculated for fully optimized ion structures and indicated that the ions retained specific hydrogen bonding motifs from the precursor ion. In particular, the Ω for the doubly protonated ions and charge-reduced cation-radicals were nearly identical, indicating negligible unfolding and small secondary structure changes upon electron transfer. The experimental Ω for the (AAHAL + 2H)(+●) cation-radicals were compatible with both zwitterionic and histidine radical structures formed by electron attachment to different sites in the precursor ion, but did not allow their distinction. The best agreement with the experimental Ω was found for ion structures fully optimized with M06-2X/6-31+G(d,p) and using both projection approximation and trajectory methods to calculate the theoretical Ω values.

  15. The role of the position of the basic residue in the generation and fragmentation of peptide radical cations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wee, Sheena; O'Hair, Richard A. J.; McFadyen, W. David

    2006-03-01

    Using simple di- and tripeptides GX, GGX, GXG, XG and XGG, the influence of the position of the basic residue, X (X = R, K and H), on the formation of peptide radical cations (M+) from [CuII(tpy)M]2+ complexes (where tpy = 2,2':6',2''-terpyridine) was probed. It was found that M+ is formed with greatest abundance when the basic residue is at the C-terminus. For arginine containing peptides, this may be due to further fragmentation of GRG+, RG+ and RGG+ at the MS2 stage. For lysine and histidine containing peptides, when the basic residue is not located at the C-terminus, competing fragmentation pathways that lead to peptide backbone cleavage are more facile than M+ formation. In order to gain some insights into the binding modes of these peptides to [CuII(tpy)]2+, the formation and fragmentation of copper(II) complexes of tripeptides protected as their carboxy methyl/ethyl esters (M-OR', R' = Me/Et) were also probed. The products of the competing fragmentation pathways of [CuII(tpy)M]2+, as well as the formation and fragmentation of [CuII(tpy)(M-OR')]2+, suggest that the unprotected peptides, M, mainly bind as zwitterions to [CuII(tpy)]2+. The fragmentation reactions of the radical cations (M+) were also studied. Radical driven side chain fragmentation reactions of M+ are dependent on both the position of the residue as well as the identity of other residues present in the peptide radical cations. GR and RG, which undergo rearrangement to form a mixed anhydride in their protonated forms, do not undergo the same rearrangement in their radical cation forms.

  16. Self-assembly of three-dimensional supramolecular polymers through cooperative tetrathiafulvalene radical cation dimerization.

    PubMed

    Tian, Jia; Ding, Yu-Di; Zhou, Tian-You; Zhang, Kang-Da; Zhao, Xin; Wang, Hui; Zhang, Dan-Wei; Liu, Yi; Li, Zhan-Ting

    2014-01-07

    The self-assembly of a new type of three-dimensional (3D) supramolecular polymers from tetrahedral monomers in both organic and aqueous media is described. We have designed and synthesized two tetraphenylmethane derivatives T1 and T2, both of which bear four tetrathiafulvalene (TTF) units. When the TTF units were oxidized to the radical cation TTF(.+) , their pre-organized tetrahedral arrangement remarkably enhanced their intermolecular dimerization, leading to the formation of new 3D spherical supramolecular polymers. The structure of the supramolecular polymers has been inferred on the basis of UV/Vis absorption, electron paramagnetic resonance, cyclic voltammetry, and dynamic light scattering (DLS) analysis, as well as by comparing these properties with those of the self-assembled structures of mono-, di-, and tritopic control compounds. DLS experiments revealed that the spherical supramolecular polymers had hydrodynamic diameters of 68 nm for T1 (75 μM) in acetonitrile and 105 nm for T2 (75 μM) in water/acetonitrile (1:1). The 3D spherical structures of the supramolecular polymers formed in different solvents were also supported by SEM and AFM experiments.

  17. Role of. pi. -cation radicals in the enzymatic cycles of peroxidases, catalases, and nitrite and sulfite reductases

    SciTech Connect

    Hanson, L K; Chang, C K; Davis, M S; Fajer, J

    1980-01-01

    Charge iterative extended Hueckel calculations, and magnetic and optical results on porphyrins, chlorins, and isobacteriochlorins (1) suggest that the catalytic cycles of the enzymes horseradish peroxidase, catalase, Neurospora crassa catalase, and nitrite and sulfite reductases proceed via ..pi..-cation radicals of their prosthetic groups; (2) offer distinguishing features for the optical and magnetic spectra of these radicals, pertinent to their detection as enzymatic intermediates; (3) reconcile the seemingly contradictory optical and NMR data on Compounds I of horseradish peroxidase; and (4) predict that the axial ligation of the heme differs for horseradish peroxidase and catalase.

  18. Unconventional hydrogen bonding to organic ions in the gas phase: stepwise association of hydrogen cyanide with the pyridine and pyrimidine radical cations and protonated pyridine.

    PubMed

    Hamid, Ahmed M; El-Shall, M Samy; Hilal, Rifaat; Elroby, Shaaban; Aziz, Saadullah G

    2014-08-07

    Equilibrium thermochemical measurements using the ion mobility drift cell technique have been utilized to investigate the binding energies and entropy changes for the stepwise association of HCN molecules with the pyridine and pyrimidine radical cations forming the C5H5N(+·)(HCN)n and C4H4N2 (+·)(HCN)n clusters, respectively, with n = 1-4. For comparison, the binding of 1-4 HCN molecules to the protonated pyridine C5H5NH(+)(HCN)n has also been investigated. The binding energies of HCN to the pyridine and pyrimidine radical cations are nearly equal (11.4 and 12.0 kcal/mol, respectively) but weaker than the HCN binding to the protonated pyridine (14.0 kcal/mol). The pyridine and pyrimidine radical cations form unconventional carbon-based ionic hydrogen bonds with HCN (CH(δ+)⋯NCH). Protonated pyridine forms a stronger ionic hydrogen bond with HCN (NH(+)⋯NCH) which can be extended to a linear chain with the clustering of additional HCN molecules (NH(+)⋯NCH··NCH⋯NCH) leading to a rapid decrease in the bond strength as the length of the chain increases. The lowest energy structures of the pyridine and pyrimidine radical cation clusters containing 3-4 HCN molecules show a strong tendency for the internal solvation of the radical cation by the HCN molecules where bifurcated structures involving multiple hydrogen bonding sites with the ring hydrogen atoms are formed. The unconventional H-bonds (CH(δ+)⋯NCH) formed between the pyridine or the pyrimidine radical cations and HCN molecules (11-12 kcal/mol) are stronger than the similar (CH(δ+)⋯NCH) bonds formed between the benzene radical cation and HCN molecules (9 kcal/mol) indicating that the CH(δ+) centers in the pyridine and pyrimidine radical cations have more effective charges than in the benzene radical cation.

  19. The standard enthalpies of formation of 1- and 2-Adamantyl cations and radicals. An ab initio study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abboud, J.-L. M.; Castaño, O.; Dávalos, J. Z.; Gomperts, R.

    2001-04-01

    The results of a G2(MP2) computational study involving 1- and 2-Adamantyl cations ( 1+, 2+) as well as 1- and 2-Adamantyl radicals ( 1rad , 2rad ) are presented. They provide purely computational thermodynamic data for the following processes: (i) Ionization of 1rad and 2rad , (ii) Exchange of hydrogen atoms or hydride anions between Adamantyl radicals or cations and alkyl radicals or cations, respectively. These data, once combined with the experimental enthalpies of formation of iso -C3H7 rad ,iso -C3H7 + ,tert -C4H9 rad and tert -C4H9 + , allowed us to screen the available experimental data and to define a self-consistent set of experimentally-based standard enthalpies of formation, Δ fH 0 m, for Adamantyl species, namely: Δ fH 0 m( 1+, g)=162.0±2.0 ; Δ fH 0 m( 2+, g)=171.9±2.0 ; Δ fH 0 m( 1rad , g)=17.9±2.1 , Δ fH 0 m( 2rad , g)=16.6±2.0 kcal mol -1.

  20. Resonance Raman spectra of the anion and cation radicals of bacterial photosynthetic pigments

    SciTech Connect

    Diers, J.R.; Bocian, D.F. )

    1994-12-08

    Resonance Raman (RR) spectra are reported for the radical ions of the bacterial photosynthetic pigments bacteriochlorophyll a (BCh) and its metal-free analog bacteriopheophytin a (BPh). The radical anions, BCh[sup [minus

  1. Spectral and Kinetic Properties of Radical Cations Derived from Oxoisoaporphines: Relevance to Electron-Transfer Processes Involving Phytoalexins.

    PubMed

    De la Fuente, Julio R; Kciuk, Gabriel; Aliaga, Christian; Bobrowski, Krzysztof

    2014-05-16

    The thermally induced intermolecular electron transfer reaction in acetonitrile between the tetracyanoethylene (TCNE), a π-electron acceptor with a large electron affinity, and six oxoisoaporphines (2,3-dihydro-7H-dibenzo[de,h]quinolin-7-one, 5-methoxy-2,3-dihydro-7H-dibenzo[de,h]quinolin-7-one, 1-azabenzo[de]anthracen-7-one, 5-methoxy-1-azabenzo[de]anthracen-7-one, 7H-benzo[e]perimidin-7-one, and 2-methyl-7h-benzo[e]perimidin-7-one) is reported. Spectral and kinetic characteristics are presented for radical cations derived from these six oxoisoaporphines either generated by a thermal reaction or generated radiolytically in argon-saturated 1,2-dichloroethane, oxygen-saturated acetone, and acetonitrile. The radical cations of oxoisoaporphines are insensitive to oxygen and are mostly characterized by absorption maxima of their most intense bands located at λmax = 400-410 nm, except of the radical cations derived from 2,3-dihydrooxoisoaporphines. For the latter compounds, the absorption maxima of the most intense absorption bands are located at λmax = 290-295 nm. Their locations are independent of the presence of functional groups and the solvents used. They are formed in bimolecular processes with pseudo-first-order rate constants ranging from 2.1 × 10(5) to 1.5 × 10(6) s(-1) (in solutions containing 10(-4) M of the substrate), depending on the derivative and the solvent used. They are stable either when formed via the electron-transfer reaction with TCNE or when generated in isolation in pulse radiolysis of Ar-saturated 1,2-dichloroethane. In acetone and acetonitrile they decay predominantly by first-order kinetics with the first-order rate constants ranging from 2.3 × 10(4) to 5.1 × 10(4) s(-1). Formation of dimeric radical cations for all of the oxoisoaporphines studied was observed in acetonitrile solutions, and for azaoxoisoaporphines also in acetone solutions. The experimental spectra show a reasonably good agreement with the ZINDO/S semiempirical

  2. Reactivity and acid-base behavior of ring-methoxylated arylalkanoic acid radical cations and radical zwitterions in aqueous solution. Influence of structural effects and pH on the benzylic C-H deprotonation pathway.

    PubMed

    Bietti, Massimo; Capone, Alberto

    2006-07-07

    A product and time-resolved kinetic study of the one-electron oxidation of ring-methoxylated phenylpropanoic and phenylbutanoic acids (Ar(CH2)nCO2H, n = 2, 3) has been carried out at different pH values. Oxidation leads to the formation of aromatic radical cations (Ar.+(CH2)nCO2H) or radical zwitterions (Ar.+(CH2)nCO2-) depending on pH, and pKa values for the corresponding acid-base equilibria have been measured. In the radical cation, the acidity of the carboxylic proton decreases by increasing the number of methoxy ring substituents and by increasing the distance between the carboxylic group and the aromatic ring. At pH 1.7 or 6.7, the radical cations or radical zwitterions undergo benzylic C-H deprotonation as the exclusive side-chain fragmentation pathway, as clearly shown by product analysis results. At pH 1.7, the first-order deprotonation rate constants measured for the ring-methoxylated arylalkanoic acid radical cations are similar to those measured previously in acidic aqueous solution for the alpha-C-H deprotonation of structurally related ring-methoxylated alkylaromatic radical cations. In basic solution, the second-order rate constants for reaction of the radical zwitterions with (-)OH (k-OH)) have been obtained. These values are similar to those obtained previously for the (-)OH-induced alpha-C-H deprotonation of structurally related ring-methoxylated alkylaromatic radical cations, indicating that under these conditions the radical zwitterions undergo benzylic C-H deprotonation. Very interestingly, with 3,4-dimethoxyphenylethanoic acid radical zwitterion, that was previously observed to undergo exclusive decarboxylation up to pH 10, competition between decarboxylation and benzylic C-H deprotonation is observed above pH 11.

  3. Structural evolution and solvation of the OH radical in ionized water radical cations (H2O)n(+), n = 5-8.

    PubMed

    Lu, En-Ping; Pan, Piin-Ruey; Li, Ying-Cheng; Tsai, Ming-Kang; Kuo, Jer-Lai

    2014-09-21

    Structural evolution of ionized water radical cations (H2O)n(+), n = 5-8, is studied by ab intio methods. A structure searching method based on the previous understanding of the hydrogen bond (H-bond) network in neutral and protonated water clusters is found to be effective, covering a wide range of structural isomers of (H2O)n(+). With these local minima, we can analyze both the size and temperature dependence of the structure of (H2O)n(+) and solvation of the OH radical. Agreement between our calculated IR spectra and experimental data in the free OH stretching region confirms that the OH radical preferred to stay on the terminal site of the H-bond network at n = 5 and n = 6. Furthermore, we found that the OH radical began to form H-bonds with water molecules as a H-bond donor at n = 7 and 8. Vibrational signatures of fully solvated OH were found to be located at 3200-3400 cm(-1) coinciding with the additional peaks found in previous experimental data obtained by Mizuse and Fujii.

  4. Characterization of a solvent-separated ion-radical pair in cationized water networks: infrared photodissociation and Ar-attachment experiments for water cluster radical cations (H2O)n+(n = 3-8).

    PubMed

    Mizuse, Kenta; Fujii, Asuka

    2013-02-07

    We present infrared spectra of nominal water cluster radical cations (H(2)O)(n)(+) (n = 3-8), or to be precise, ion-radical complexes H(+)(H(2)O)(n-1)(OH), with and without an Ar tag. These clusters are closely related to the ionizing radiation-induced processes in water and are a good model to characterize solvation structures of the ion-radical pair. The spectra of Ar-tagged species show narrower bandwidths relative to those of the bare clusters due to the reduced internal energy via an Ar-attachment. The observed spectra are analyzed by comparing with those of the similar system, H(+)(H(2)O)(n), and calculated ones. We find that the observed spectra are attributable to ion-radical-separated motifs in n ≥ 5, as reported in the previous study (Mizuse et al. Chem. Sci.2011, 2, 868-876). Beyond the structural trends found in the previous study, we characterize isomeric structures and determine the number of water molecules between the charged site and the OH radical in each cluster size. In all of the characterized cluster structures (n = 5-8), the most favorable position of OH radical is the next neighbor of the charged site (H(3)O(+) or H(5)O(2)(+)). The positions and cluster structures are governed by the balance among the hydrogen-bonding abilities of the charged site, H(2)O, and OH radical. These findings on the ionized water networks lead to understanding of the detailed processes of ionizing radiation-initiated reactions in liquid water and aqueous solutions.

  5. The cyclopropene radical cation: Rovibrational level structure at low energies from high-resolution photoelectron spectra

    SciTech Connect

    Vasilatou, K.; Michaud, J. M.; Baykusheva, D.; Grassi, G.; Merkt, F.

    2014-08-14

    The cyclopropene radical cation (c-C{sub 3}H{sub 4}{sup +}) is an important but poorly characterized three-membered-ring hydrocarbon. We report on a measurement of the high-resolution photoelectron and photoionization spectra of cyclopropene and several deuterated isotopomers, from which we have determined the rovibrational energy level structure of the X{sup ~+} {sup 2}B{sub 2} ground electronic state of c-C{sub 3}H{sub 4}{sup +} at low energies for the first time. The synthesis of the partially deuterated isotopomers always resulted in mixtures of several isotopomers, differing in their number of D atoms and in the location of these atoms, so that the photoelectron spectra of deuterated samples are superpositions of the spectra of several isotopomers. The rotationally resolved spectra indicate a C{sub 2v}-symmetric R{sub 0} structure for the ground electronic state of c-C{sub 3}H{sub 4}{sup +}. Two vibrational modes of c-C{sub 3}H{sub 4}{sup +} are found to have vibrational wave numbers below 300 cm{sup −1}, which is surprising for such a small cyclic hydrocarbon. The analysis of the isotopic shifts of the vibrational levels enabled the assignment of the lowest-frequency mode (fundamental wave number of ≈110 cm{sup −1} in c-C{sub 3}H{sub 4}{sup +}) to the CH{sub 2} torsional mode (ν{sub 8}{sup +}, A{sub 2} symmetry) and of the second-lowest-frequency mode (≈210 cm{sup −1} in c-C{sub 3}H{sub 4}{sup +}) to a mode combining a CH out-of-plane with a CH{sub 2} rocking motion (ν{sub 15}{sup +}, B{sub 2} symmetry). The potential energy along the CH{sub 2} torsional coordinate is flat near the equilibrium structure and leads to a pronounced anharmonicity.

  6. Optical spectra of protected diamine 10-bond-bridged intervalence radical cations related to N,N,N'N'-tetraalkylbenzidine.

    PubMed

    Nelsen, Stephen F; Luo, Yun; Weaver, Michael N; Lockard, Jenny V; Zink, Jeffrey I

    2006-05-26

    The optical absorption spectra of the delocalized intervalence radical cations of seven o,o'-linked benzidine derivatives that have the nitrogens protected as 9-(9-aza-bicyclo[3.3.1]nonan-3-one) derivatives are discussed and compared with that of the p-phenylene radical cation. The linking units are CH2, CH2CH2, NMe, S, SO2, and C=O, and we also studied H,H (the unlinked benzidine). The lowest-energy absorption band is assigned as the transition from the antibonding combination of symmetrical N and aromatic orbitals to the antibonding combination of the antisymmetric N and aromatic orbitals using TD-DFT calculations, and a good correlation between the observed transition energies and those calculated using the simple Koopmans theorem-based "neutral in-cation geometry" calculations on the UB3LYP/6-31G* structures is found. The use of the two-state model that equates the electronic interaction through the bridge between the amino groups with half of the lowest transition energy is seriously incorrect for these and other delocalized intervalence compounds. The problem of extracting the electronic interactions that actually are involved from calculated transition energies is discussed.

  7. The loss of NH2O from the N-hydroxyacetamide radical cation CH3C(O)NHOH+

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jobst, Karl J.; Burgers, Peter C.; Ruttink, Paul J. A.; Terlouw, Johan K.

    2006-08-01

    A previous study [Ch. Lifshitz, P.J.A. Ruttink, G. Schaftenaar, J.K. Terlouw, Rapid Commun. Mass Spectrom. 1 (1987) 61] shows that metastable N-hydroxyacetamide ions CH3C(O)NHOH+ (HA-1) do not dissociate into CH3CO+ + NHOH by direct bond cleavage but rather yield CH3CO+ + NH2OE The tandem mass spectrometry based experiments of the present study on the isotopologue CH3C(O)NDOD+ reveal that the majority of the metastable ions lose the NH2O radical as NHDO rather than ND2O. A mechanistic analysis using the CBS-QB3 model chemistry shows that the molecular ions HA-1 rearrange into hydrogen-bridged radical cations [OCC(H2)H...N(H)OH]+ whose acetyl cation component then catalyses the transformation NHOH --> NH2O prior to dissociation. The high barrier for the unassisted 1,2-H shift in the free radical, 43 kcal mol-1, is reduced to a mere 7 kcal mol-1 for the catalysed transformation which can be viewed as a quid-pro-quo reaction involving two proton transfers.

  8. Solution-phase mechanistic study and solid-state structure of a tris(bipyridinium radical cation) inclusion complex.

    PubMed

    Fahrenbach, Albert C; Barnes, Jonathan C; Lanfranchi, Don Antoine; Li, Hao; Coskun, Ali; Gassensmith, Jeremiah J; Liu, Zhichang; Benítez, Diego; Trabolsi, Ali; Goddard, William A; Elhabiri, Mourad; Stoddart, J Fraser

    2012-02-15

    The ability of the diradical dicationic cyclobis(paraquat-p-phenylene) (CBPQT(2(•+))) ring to form inclusion complexes with 1,1'-dialkyl-4,4'-bipyridinium radical cationic (BIPY(•+)) guests has been investigated mechanistically and quantitatively. Two BIPY(•+) radical cations, methyl viologen (MV(•+)) and a dibutynyl derivative (V(•+)), were investigated as guests for the CBPQT(2(•+)) ring. Both guests form trisradical complexes, namely, CBPQT(2(•+))⊂MV(•+) and CBPQT(2(•+))⊂V(•+), respectively. The structural details of the CBPQT(2(•+))⊂MV(•+) complex, which were ascertained by single-crystal X-ray crystallography, reveal that MV(•+) is located inside the cavity of the ring in a centrosymmetric fashion: the 1:1 complexes pack in continuous radical cation stacks. A similar solid-state packing was observed in the case of CBPQT(2(•+)) by itself. Quantum mechanical calculations agree well with the superstructure revealed by X-ray crystallography for CBPQT(2(•+))⊂MV(•+) and further suggest an electronic asymmetry in the SOMO caused by radical-pairing interactions. The electronic asymmetry is maintained in solution. The thermodynamic stability of the CBPQT(2(•+))⊂MV(•+) complex was probed by both isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) and UV/vis spectroscopy, leading to binding constants of (5.0 ± 0.6) × 10(4) M(-1) and (7.9 ± 5.5) × 10(4) M(-1), respectively. The kinetics of association and dissociation were determined by stopped-flow spectroscopy, yielding a k(f) and k(b) of (2.1 ± 0.3) × 10(6) M(-1) s(-1) and 250 ± 50 s(-1), respectively. The electrochemical mechanistic details were studied by variable scan rate cyclic voltammetry (CV), and the experimental data were compared digitally with simulated data, modeled on the proposed mechanism using the thermodynamic and kinetic parameters obtained from ITC, UV/vis, and stopped-flow spectroscopy. In particular, the electrochemical mechanism of association

  9. β-carotene radical cation addition to green tea polyphenols. Mechanism of antioxidant antagonism in peroxidizing liposomes.

    PubMed

    Song, Lin-Lin; Liang, Ran; Li, Dan-Dan; Xing, Ya-Dong; Han, Rui-Min; Zhang, Jian-Ping; Skibsted, Leif H

    2011-12-14

    Green tea polyphenols, (-)-epicatechin (EC), (-)-epigallocatechin (EGC), (-)-epicatechin gallate (ECG), and (-)-epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG), all showed antioxidative effect in liposomes for lipid oxidation initiated in the lipid phase (antioxidant efficiency EC > EGCG > ECG > EGC) or in the aqueous phase (EC ≫ EGC > EGCG > ECG) as monitored by the formation of conjugated dienes. For initiation in the lipid phase, β-carotene, itself active as an antioxidant, showed antagonism with the polyphenols (EC > ECG > EGCG > EGC). The Trolox equivalent antioxidant capacity (TEAC EGC > EGCG > ECG > EC) correlates with the lowest phenol O-H bond dissociation enthalpy (BDE) as calculated by density functional theory (DFT). Surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) was used to assess the reducing power of the phenolic hydroxyls in corroboration with DFT calculations. For homogeneous (1:9 v/v methanol/chloroform) solution, the β-carotene radical cation reacted readily with each of the polyphenol monoanions (but not with the neutral polyphenols) with a rate approaching the diffusion limit for EC as studied by laser flash photolysis at 25 °C monitoring the radical cation at 950 nm. The rate constant did not correlate with polyphenol HOMO/LUMO energy gap (DFT calculations), and β-carotene was not regenerated by an electron transfer reaction (monitored at 500 nm). It is suggested that the β-carotene radical cation is rather reacting with the tea polyphenols through addition, as further evidenced by steady-state absorption spectroscopy and liquid chromatography-mass spectroscopy (LC-MS), in effect preventing regeneration of β-carotene as an active lipid phase antioxidant and leading to the observed antagonism.

  10. Photo-excitation of adenine cation radical [A•+] in the near UV-vis region produces sugar radicals in Adenosine and in its nucleotides

    PubMed Central

    Adhikary, Amitava; Khanduri, Deepti; Kumar, Anil; Sevilla, Michael D.

    2011-01-01

    In this study, we report the formation of ribose sugar radicals in high yields (85 – 100%) via photo-excitation of adenine cation radical (A•+) in Ado and its ribonucleotides. Photo-excitation of A•+ at low temperatures in homogenous aqueous glassy samples of Ado, 2′-AMP, 3′-AMP and 5′-AMP forms sugar radicals predominantly at C5′- and also at C3′-sites. The C5′• and C3′• sugar radicals were identified employing Ado deuterated at specific carbon sites: C1′, C2′, and at C5′. Phosphate substitution is found to deactivate sugar radical formation at the site of substitution. Thus, in 5′-AMP, C3′• is observed to be the main radical formed via photo-excitation at ca. 143 K whereas in 3′-AMP, C5′• is the only species found. These results were supported by results obtained employing 5′-AMP with specific deuteration at C5′-site (i.e., 5′,5′-D,D-5′-AMP). Moreover, contrary to the C5′• observed in 3′-dAMP, we find that C5′• in 3′-AMP shows a clear pH dependent conformational change as evidenced by a large increase in the C4′ β–hyperfine coupling on increasing the pH from 6 to 9. Calculations performed employing DFT (B3LYP/6-31G*) for C5′• in 3′-AMP show that the two conformations of C5′• result from strong hydrogen bond formation between the O5′-H and the 3′-phosphate dianion at higher pHs. Employing time-dependent density functional theory [TD-DFT, B3LYP/6-31G(d)] we show that in the excited state, the hole transfers to the sugar moiety and has significant hole localization at the C5′-site in a number of allowed transitions. This hole localization is proposed to lead to the formation of the neutral C5′-radical (C5′•) via deprotonation. PMID:19367991

  11. Organic conductors and superconductors based on bis(ethylenedithio)tetrathiafulvalene radical cation salts with supramolecular tris(oxalato)metallate anions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prokhorova, T. G.; Yagubskii, E. B.

    2017-02-01

    The results of studies of a family of conductors and superconductors based on bis(ethylenedithio)tetrathiafulvalene radical cation salts with paramagnetic and diamagnetic supramolecular tris(oxalato)metallate anions are collated and analyzed. Methods for the preparation of these salts and various types of packing of conducting layers within the salt structures are considered. The transport properties of crystals of the salts of this family and the effect of guest solvent molecules on these properties are discussed. The contribution of scientists from the Institute of Problems of Chemical Physics, RAS, to the research into organic conductors and superconductors is noted. The bibliography includes 70 references.

  12. Fast regeneration of carotenoids from radical cations by isoflavonoid dianions: importance of the carotenoid keto group for electron transfer.

    PubMed

    Han, Rui-Min; Chen, Chang-Hui; Tian, Yu-Xi; Zhang, Jian-Ping; Skibsted, Leif H

    2010-01-14

    Electron transfer to radical cations of beta-carotene, zeaxanthin, canthaxanthin, and astaxanthin from each of the three acid/base forms of the diphenolic isoflavonoid daidzein and its C-glycoside puerarin, as studied by laser flash photolysis in homogeneous methanol/chloroform (1/9) solution, was found to depend on carotenoid structures and more significantly on the deprotonation degree of the isoflavonoids. None of the carotenoid radical cations reacted with the neutral forms of the isoflavonoids while the monoanionic and dianionic forms of the isoflavonoids regenerated the oxidized carotenoid. Electron transfer to the beta-carotene radical cation from the puerarin dianion followed second order kinetics with the rate constant at 25 degrees C k(2) = 5.5 x 10(9) M(-1) s(-1), zeaxanthin 8.5 x 10(9) M(-1) s(-1), canthaxanthin 6.5 x 10(10) M(-1) s(-1), and astaxanthin 11.1 x 10(10) M(-1) s(-1) approaching the diffusion limit and establishing a linear free energy relationship between rate constants and driving force. Comparable results found for the daidzein dianion indicate that the steric hindrance from the glucoside is not important suggesting the more reducing but less acidic 4'-OH/4'-O(-) as electron donors. On the basis of the rate constants obtained from kinetic analyses, the keto group of carotenoids is concluded to facilitate electron transfer. The driving force was estimated from oxidation potentials, as determined by cyclic-voltametry for puerarin and daidzein in aqueous solutions at varying pH conditions, which led to the standard reduction potentials E degrees = 1.13 and 1.10 V versus NHE corresponding to the uncharged puerarin and daidzein. For pH > pK(a2), the apparent potentials of both puerarin and daidzein became constants and were E degrees = 0.69 and 0.65 V, respectively. Electron transfer from isoflavonoids to the carotenoid radical cation, as formed during oxidative stress, is faster for astaxanthin than for the other carotenoids, which may relate

  13. Mechanistic and comparative studies of melatonin and classic antioxidants in terms of their interactions with the ABTS cation radical.

    PubMed

    Tan, Dun-xian; Hardeland, Rüdiger; Manchester, Lucien C; Poeggeler, Burkhard; Lopez-Burillo, Silvia; Mayo, Juan C; Sainz, Rosa M; Reiter, Russel J

    2003-05-01

    Melatonin and classic antioxidants possess the capacity to scavenge ABTSb+ with IC50s of 4, 11, 15.5, 15.5, 17 and 21 microm for melatonin, glutathione, vitamin C, trolox, NADH and NADPH, respectively. In terms of scavenging ABTSb+, melatonin exhibits a different profile than that of the classic antioxidants. Classic antioxidants scavenge one or less ABTSb+, while each melatonin molecule can scavenge more than one ABTSb+, probably with a maximum of four. Classic antioxidants do not synergize when combined in terms of scavenging ABTSb+. However, a synergistic action is observed when melatonin is combined with any of the classic antioxidants. Cyclic voltammetry indicates that melatonin donates an electron at the potential of 715 mV. The scavenging mechanism of melatonin on ABTSb+ may involve multiple-electron donations via intermediates through a stepwise process. Intermediates including the melatoninyl cation radical, the melatoninyl neutral radical and cyclic 3-hydroxymelatonin (cyclic 3-OHM) and N1-acetyl-N2-formyl-5-methoxykynuramine (AFMK) seem to participate in these reactions. More interestingly, the pH of the solution dramatically modifies the ABTSb+ scavenging capacity of melatonin while pH changes have no measurable influence on the scavenging activity of classic antioxidants. An acidic pH markedly reduces the ABTSb+ scavenging capacity of melatonin while an increased pH promotes the interaction of melatonin and ABTSb+. The major melatonin metabolites that develop when melatonin interacts with ABTSb+ are cyclic 3-OHM and AFMK. Cyclic 3-OHM is the intermediate between melatonin and AFMK, and cyclic 3-OHM also has the ability to scavenge ABTSb+. Melatonin and the metabolites which are generated via the interaction of melatonin with ABTSb+, i.e. the melatoninyl cation radical, melatoninyl neutral radical and cyclic 3-OHM, all scavenge ABTSb+. This unique cascade action of melatonin, in terms of scavenging, increases its efficiency to neutralized ABTSb+; this

  14. Rate constants and H atom branching ratios of the gas-phase reactions of methylidyne CH(X2Pi) radical with a series of alkanes.

    PubMed

    Loison, Jean-Christophe; Bergeat, Astrid; Caralp, Françoise; Hannachi, Yacine

    2006-12-21

    The reactions of the CH radical with several alkanes were studied, at room temperature, in a low-pressure fast-flow reactor. CH(X2Pi, v = 0) radicals were obtained from the reaction of CHBr(3) with potassium atoms. The overall rate constants at 300 K are (0.76 +/- 0.20) x 10(-10) [Fleurat-Lessard, P.; Rayez, J. C.; Bergeat, A.; Loison, J. C. Chem. Phys. 2002, 279, 87],1 (1.60 +/- 0.60) x 10(-10)[Galland, N.; Caralp, F.; Hannachi, Y.; Bergeat, A.; Loison, J.-C. J. Phys. Chem. A 2003, 107, 5419],2 (2.20 +/- 0.80) x 10(-10), (2.80 +/- 0.80) x 10(-10), (3.20 +/- 0.80) x 10(-10), (3.30 +/- 0.60) x 10(-10), and (3.60 +/- 0.80) x 10(-10) cm3 molecule(-1) s(-1), (errors refer to +/-2sigma) for methane, ethane, propane, n-butane, n-pentane, neo-pentane, and n-hexane respectively. The experimental overall rate constants correspond to those obtained using a simple classical capture theory. Absolute atomic hydrogen production was determined by V.U.V. resonance fluorescence, with H production from the CH + CH4 reaction being used as a reference. Observed H branching ratios were for CH4, 1.00[Fleurat-Lessard, P.; Rayez, J. C.; Bergeat, A.; Loison, J. C. Chem. Phys. 2002, 279, 87];1 C(2)H(6), 0.22 +/- 0.08 [Galland, N.; Caralp, F.; Hannachi, Y.; Bergeat, A.; Loison, J.-C. J. Phys. Chem. A 2003, 107, 5419];2 C(3)H(8), 0.19 +/- 0.07; C(4)H(10) (n-butane), 0.14 +/- 0.06; C(5)H(12) (n-pentane), 0.52 +/- 0.08; C(5)H(12) (neo-pentane), 0.51 +/- 0.08; C(5)H(12) (iso-pentane), 0.12 +/- 0.06; C(6)H(14) (n-hexane), 0.06 +/- 0.04.

  15. Enhancement of a Lewis acid-base interaction via solvation: ammonia molecules and the benzene radical cation.

    PubMed

    Chiang, Chi-Tung; Freindorf, Marek; Furlani, Thomas; DeLeon, Robert L; Richard, John P; Garvey, James F

    2007-07-12

    The interaction between ammonia and the benzene radical cation has been investigated by gas-phase studies of mass selected ion clusters {C(6)H(6)-(NH(3))(n=0-8)}(+) via tandem quadrupole mass spectrometry and through calculations. Experiments show a special stability for the cluster ion that contains four ammonias: {C(6)H(6)(NH(3))(4)}(+). Calculations provide evidence that the first ammonia forms a weak dative bond to the cyclohexadienyl radical cation, {C(6)H(6)-NH(3)}(+), where there is a transfer of electrons from ammonia to benzene. Additional solvating ammonia molecules form stabilizing hydrogen bonds to the ring-bound ammonia {C(6)H(6)-NH(3)}(+).(NH(3))(n), which cause cooperative changes in the structure of the cluster complex. Free ammonia is a weak hydrogen bond donor, but electron transfer from NH(3) to the benzene ring that strengthens the dative bond will increase the hydrogen acidity and the strength of the cluster hydrogen bonds to the added ammonia. A progressive "tightening" of this dative bond is observed upon addition of the first, second, and third ammonia to give a cluster stabilized by three N-(+)H x N hydrogen bonds. This shows that the energetic cost of tightening the dative bond is recovered with dividends in the formation of stable cluster hydrogen bonds.

  16. Key Role of End-Capping Groups in Optoelectronic Properties of Poly-p-phenylene Cation Radicals

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Poly-p-phenylenes (PPs) are prototype systems for understanding the charge transport in π-conjugated polymers. In a combined computational and experimental study, we demonstrate that the smooth evolution of redox and optoelectronic properties of PP cation radicals toward the polymeric limit can be significantly altered by electron-donating iso-alkyl and iso-alkoxy end-capping groups. A multiparabolic model (MPM) developed and validated here rationalizes this unexpected effect by interplay of the two modes of hole stabilization: due to the framework of equivalent p-phenylene units and due to the electron-donating end-capping groups. A symmetric, bell-shaped hole in unsubstituted PPs becomes either slightly skewed and shifted toward an end of the molecule in iso-alkyl-capped PPs or highly deformed and concentrated on a terminal unit in PPs with strongly electron-donating iso-alkoxy capping groups. The MPM shows that the observed linear 1/n evolution of the PP cation radical properties toward the polymer limit originates from the hole stabilization due to the growing chain of p-phenylene units, while shifting of the hole toward electron-donating end-capping groups leads to early breakdown of these 1/n dependencies. These insights, along with the readily applicable and flexible multistate parabolic model, can guide studies of complex donor–spacer–acceptor systems and doped molecular wires to aid the design of the next generation materials for long-range charge transport and photovoltaic applications. PMID:25264475

  17. Electron transfer from aromatic amino acids to guanine and adenine radical cations in pi stacked and T-shaped complexes.

    PubMed

    Butchosa, Cristina; Simon, Sílvia; Voityuk, Alexander A

    2010-04-21

    Similar redox properties of the natural nucleobases and aromatic amino acids make it possible for electron transfer (ET) to occur between these sites in protein-nucleic acid complexes. Using DFT calculations, we estimate the ET rate from aromatic amino acid X (X = Phe, His, Tyr and Trp) to radical cations of guanine (G) and adenine (A) in dimers G-X and A-X with different arrangement of the subunits. We show that irrespective of the mutual orientation of the aromatic rings, the electronic interaction in the systems is strong enough to ensure effective ET from X to G(+) or A(+). Surprisingly, relatively high ET rates are found in T-shaped dimers. This suggests that pi stacking of nucleobases and aromatic amino acids is not required for feasible ET. In most complexes [G-X](+) and [A-X](+), we find the excess charge to be confined to a single site, either the nucleobase or amino acid X. Then, conformational changes may initiate migration of the radical cation state from the nucleobase to X and back. The ET process from Trp and Tyr to G(+) is found to be faster than deprotonation of G(+). Because the last reaction may lead to the formation of highly mutagenic species, the efficient repair of G(+) may play an important role in the protection of genomic DNA from oxidative damage.

  18. Unconventional hydrogen bonding to organic ions in the gas phase: Stepwise association of hydrogen cyanide with the pyridine and pyrimidine radical cations and protonated pyridine

    SciTech Connect

    Hamid, Ahmed M.; El-Shall, M. Samy; Hilal, Rifaat; Elroby, Shaaban; Aziz, Saadullah G.

    2014-08-07

    Equilibrium thermochemical measurements using the ion mobility drift cell technique have been utilized to investigate the binding energies and entropy changes for the stepwise association of HCN molecules with the pyridine and pyrimidine radical cations forming the C{sub 5}H{sub 5}N{sup +·}(HCN){sub n} and C{sub 4}H{sub 4}N{sub 2}{sup +·}(HCN){sub n} clusters, respectively, with n = 1–4. For comparison, the binding of 1–4 HCN molecules to the protonated pyridine C{sub 5}H{sub 5}NH{sup +}(HCN){sub n} has also been investigated. The binding energies of HCN to the pyridine and pyrimidine radical cations are nearly equal (11.4 and 12.0 kcal/mol, respectively) but weaker than the HCN binding to the protonated pyridine (14.0 kcal/mol). The pyridine and pyrimidine radical cations form unconventional carbon-based ionic hydrogen bonds with HCN (CH{sup δ+}⋯NCH). Protonated pyridine forms a stronger ionic hydrogen bond with HCN (NH{sup +}⋯NCH) which can be extended to a linear chain with the clustering of additional HCN molecules (NH{sup +}⋯NCH··NCH⋯NCH) leading to a rapid decrease in the bond strength as the length of the chain increases. The lowest energy structures of the pyridine and pyrimidine radical cation clusters containing 3-4 HCN molecules show a strong tendency for the internal solvation of the radical cation by the HCN molecules where bifurcated structures involving multiple hydrogen bonding sites with the ring hydrogen atoms are formed. The unconventional H-bonds (CH{sup δ+}⋯NCH) formed between the pyridine or the pyrimidine radical cations and HCN molecules (11–12 kcal/mol) are stronger than the similar (CH{sup δ+}⋯NCH) bonds formed between the benzene radical cation and HCN molecules (9 kcal/mol) indicating that the CH{sup δ+} centers in the pyridine and pyrimidine radical cations have more effective charges than in the benzene radical cation.

  19. Electronic and vibrational spectra of matrix isolated anthracene radical cations - Experimental and theoretical aspects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Szczepanski, Jan; Vala, Martin; Talbi, Dahbia; Parisel, Olivier; Ellinger, Yves

    1993-01-01

    The IR vibrational and visible/UV electronic absorption spectra of the anthracene cation, An(+), were studied experimentally, in argon matrices at 12 K, as well as theoretically, using ab initio calculations for the vibrational modes and enhanced semiempirical methods with configuration interaction for the electronic spectra. It was found that both approaches predicted well the observed photoelectron spectrum. The theoretical IR intensities showed some remarkable differences between neutral and ionized species (for example, the CH in-plane bending modes and CC in-plane stretching vibrations were predicted to increase by several orders of magnitude upon ionization). Likewise, estimated experimental IR intensities showed a significant increase in the cation band intensities over the neutrals. The implication of these findings for the hypothesis that polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon cations are responsible for the unidentified IR emission bands from interstellar space is discussed.

  20. Activation of Methane by the Pyridine Radical Cation and its Substituted Forms in the Gas Phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Guohua; Stewart, Hamish; Liu, Zeyu; Wang, Yongcheng; Stace, Anthony J.

    2015-08-01

    We present an experimental study of methane activation by pyridine cation and its substituents in the gas phase. Mass spectrometric experiments in an ion trap demonstrate that pyridine cation and some of its substituent cations are able to react with methane. The deuterated methane experiment has confirmed that the hydrogen atom in the ionic product of reaction does come from methane. The collected information about kinetic isotope effects has been used to distinguish the nature of the bond activation as a hydrogen abstraction. Furthermore, experimental results demonstrated that the substituent groups on the pyridine ring can crucially influence their reactivity in methane bond activation processes. Density functional calculation (DFT) was employed to study the electronic structures of the complex and reaction mechanism of CH4+C5H5N+. The calculations confirmed the hypothesis from the experimental observation, namely, the reaction is rapid with no energy barrier.

  1. Mechanistic examination of Cβ-Cγ bond cleavages of tryptophan residues during dissociations of molecular peptide radical cations.

    PubMed

    Song, Tao; Ma, Ching-Yung; Chu, Ivan K; Siu, Chi-Kit; Laskin, Julia

    2013-02-14

    In this study, we used collision-induced dissociation (CID) to examine the gas-phase fragmentations of [G(n)W](•+) (n = 2-4) and [GXW](•+) (X = C, S, L, F, Y, Q) species. The C(β)-C(γ) bond cleavage of a C-terminal decarboxylated tryptophan residue ([M - CO(2)](•+)) can generate [M - CO(2) - 116](+), [M - CO(2) - 117](•+), and [1H-indole](•+) (m/z 117) species as possible product ions. Competition between the formation of [M - CO(2) - 116](+) and [1H-indole](•+) systems implies the existence of a proton-bound dimer formed between the indole ring and peptide backbone. Formation of such a proton-bound dimer is facile via a protonation of the tryptophan γ-carbon atom as suggested by density functional theory (DFT) calculations. DFT calculations also suggested the initially formed ion 2, the decarboxylated species that is active against C(β)-C(γ) bond cleavage, can efficiently isomerize to form a more stable π-radical isomer (ion 9) as supported by Rice-Ramsperger-Kassel-Marcus (RRKM) modeling. The C(β)-C(γ) bond cleavage of a tryptophan residue also can occur directly from peptide radical cations containing a basic residue. CID of [WG(n)R](•+) (n = 1-3) radical cations consistently resulted in predominant formation of [M - 116](+) product ions. It appears that the basic arginine residue tightly sequesters the proton and allows the charge-remote C(β)-C(γ) bond cleavage to prevail over the charge-directed one. DFT calculations predicted that the barrier for the former is 6.2 kcal mol(-1) lower than that of the latter. Furthermore, the pathway involving a salt-bridge intermediate also was accessible during such a bond cleavage event.

  2. Mechanistic Examination of Cβ–Cγ Bond Cleavages of Tryptophan Residues during Dissociations of Molecular Peptide Radical Cations

    SciTech Connect

    Song, Tao; Ma, Ching-Yung; Chu, Ivan K.; Siu, Chi-Kit; Laskin, Julia

    2013-02-14

    In this study, we used collision-induced dissociation (CID) to examine the gas-phase fragmentations of [GnW]•+ (n = 2-4) and [GXW]•+ (X = C, S, L, F, Y, Q) species. The Cβ–Cγ bond cleavage of a C-terminal decarboxylated tryptophan residue ([M - CO2]•+) can generate [M - CO2 - 116]+, [M - CO2 - 117]•+, and [1H-indole]•+ (m/z 117) species as possible product ions. Competition between the formation of [M - CO2 - 116]+ and [1H-indole]•+ systems implies the existence of a proton-bound dimer formed between the indole ring and peptide backbone. Formation of such a proton-bound dimer is facile via a protonation of the tryptophan γ-carbon atom as suggested by density functional theory (DFT) calculations. DFT calculations also suggested the initially formed ion 2--the decarboxylated species that is active against Cβ–Cγ bond cleavage -can efficiently isomerize to form a more-stable -radical isomer (ion 9) as supported by Rice-Ramsperger-Kassel-Marcus (RRKM) modeling. The Cβ–Cγ bond cleavage of a tryptophan residue also can occur directly from peptide radical cations containing a basic residue. CID of [WGnR]•+ (n = 1-3) radical cations consistently resulted in predominant formation of [M-116]+ product ions. It appears that the basic arginine residue tightly sequesters the proton and allows the charge-remote Cβ–Cγ bond cleavage to prevail over the charge-directed one. DFT calculations predicted the barrier for the former is 6.2 kcal mol -1 lower than that of the latter. Furthermore, the pathway involving a salt-bridge intermediate also was accessible during such a bond cleavage event.

  3. Serine effects on collision-induced dissociation and photodissociation of peptide cation radicals of the z(+•) -type.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Huong T H; Shaffer, Christopher J; Ledvina, Aaron R; Coon, Joshua J; Tureček, František

    2015-02-15

    The serine residue displays specific effects on the dissociations of peptide fragment cation-radicals of the z(+•) type which are produced by electron transfer dissociation. Energy-resolved collision-induced dissociation (ER-CID), time-resolved infrared multiphoton dissociation (TR-IRMPD), and single-photon UV photodissociation at 355 nm revealed several competitive dissociation pathways consisting of loss of OH radical, water, and backbone cleavages occurring at N-terminal and C-terminal positions relative to the serine residue. The activation modes using slow-heating and UV photon absorption resulted in different relative intensities of fragment ions. This indicated that the dissociations proceeded through several channels with different energy-dependent kinetics. The experimental data were interpreted with the help of electron structure calculations that provided fully optimized structures and relative energies for cis and trans amide isomers of the z4(+•) ions as well as isomerization, dissociation, and transition state energies. UV photon absorption by the z4(+•) ions was due to Cα-radical amide groups created by ETD that provided a new chromophore absorbing at 355 nm.

  4. Serine effects on collision-induced dissociation and photodissociation of peptide cation radicals of the z+•-type

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Huong T. H.; Shaffer, Christopher J.; Ledvina, Aaron R.; Coon, Joshua J.

    2014-01-01

    The serine residue displays specific effects on the dissociations of peptide fragment cation-radicals of the z+• type which are produced by electron transfer dissociation. Energy-resolved collision-induced dissociation (ER-CID), time-resolved infrared multiphoton dissociation (TR-IRMPD), and single-photon UV photodissociation at 355 nm revealed several competitive dissociation pathways consisting of loss of OH radical, water, and backbone cleavages occurring at N-terminal and C-terminal positions relative to the serine residue. The activation modes using slow-heating and UV photon absorption resulted in different relative intensities of fragment ions. This indicated that the dissociations proceeded through several channels with different energy-dependent kinetics. The experimental data were interpreted with the help of electron structure calculations that provided fully optimized structures and relative energies for cis and trans amide isomers of the z4+• ions as well as isomerization, dissociation, and transition state energies. UV photon absorption by the z4+• ions was due to Cα-radical amide groups created by ETD that provided a new chromophore absorbing at 355 nm. PMID:26005367

  5. Theoretical study of electronically excited radical cations of naphthalene and anthracene as archetypal models for astrophysical observations. Part I. Static aspects.

    PubMed

    Ghanta, S; Reddy, V Sivaranjana; Mahapatra, S

    2011-08-28

    Motivated by the recent discovery of new diffuse interstellar bands and results from laboratory experiments, ab initio quantum chemistry calculations are carried out for the lowest six electronic states of naphthalene and anthracene radical cations. The calculated adiabatic electronic energies are utilized to construct suitable diabatic electronic Hamiltonians in order to perform nuclear dynamics studies in Part II. Complex entanglement of the electronic states is established for both the radical cations and the coupling surfaces among them are also derived in accordance with the symmetry selection rules. Critical examination of the coupling parameters of the Hamiltonian suggests that 29 (out of 48) and 31 (out of 66) vibrational modes are relevant in the nuclear dynamics in the six lowest electronic states of naphthalene and anthracene radical cations, respectively.

  6. Pentachlorophenol radical cations generated on Fe(III)-montmorillonite initiate octachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin formation in clays: DFT and FTIR studies

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Cheng; Liu, Cun; Johnston, Cliff T.; Teppen, Brian J.; Li, Hui; Boyd, Stephen A.

    2011-01-01

    Octachlorodibenzodioxin (OCDD) forms spontaneously from pentachlorophenol (PCP) on the surfaces of Fe(III)-saturated smectite clay (1). Here, we used in situ FTIR methods and quantum mechanical calculations to determine the mechanism by which this reaction is initiated. As the clay was dehydrated, vibrational spectra showed new peaks that grew and then reversibly disappeared as the clay rehydrated. First principle DFT calculations of hydrated Fe-PCP clusters reproduced these transient FTIR peaks when inner-sphere complexation and concomitant electron transfer produced Fe(II) and PCP radical cations. Thus, our experimental (FTIR) and theoretical (quantum mechanical) results mutually support the hypothesis that OCDD formation on Fe-smectite surfaces is initiated by the reversible formation of metastable PCP radical cations via single electron transfer from PCP to Fe(III). The negatively charged clay surface apparently selects for this reaction mechanism by stabilizing PCP radical cations. PMID:21254769

  7. ENDOR and ESEEM of the 15N labelled radical cations of chlorophyll a and the primary donor P 700 in photosystem I

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Käβ, H.; Bittersmann-Weidlich, E.; Andréasson, L.-E.; Bönigk, B.; Lubitz, W.

    1995-05-01

    The hyperfine couplings of the nitrogen nuclei in the radical cations of both 15N-labelled chlorophyll a and the primary donor P 700 in Photosystem I of Synechococcus elongatus and spinach ( Spinacea oleracea) in frozen solutions were investigated by ENDOR and, for confirmation, by two-dimensional ESEEM techniques. In addition, 1H ENDOR experiments were performed on these compounds. The experimental 15N hyperfine couplings of the chlorophyll a radical cation are compared with theoretical ones obtained by RHF-INDO/SP calculations and with the respective hyperfine couplings in the closely related 15N-bacteriochlorophyll a radical cation. Based on the observed 15N and 1H hyperfine couplings two possible models are discussed for P 700+: (a) the special pair model with a strongly asymmetric spin density distribution over the dimer halves; (b) the model of a strongly perturbed chlorophyll a monomer.

  8. Structure of radical cations of saturated heterocyclic compounds with two heteroatoms as studied by electron paramagnetic resonance, electron-nuclear double resonance, and density functional theory calculations.

    PubMed

    Nuzhdin, Kirill B; Nesterov, Sergej V; Tyurin, Daniil A; Feldman, Vladimir I; Wei, Liu; Lund, Anders

    2005-07-21

    The radical cations of piperazine, morpholine, thiomorpholine, and thioxane were investigated by electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) and electron-nuclear double resonance (ENDOR) spectroscopy in a solid Freon matrix. Optimized geometry and magnetic parameters of the radical cations were calculated using a density functional theory (DFT)/Perdew-Burke-Ernzerhof (PBE) method. Both experimental and theoretical results suggest that all the studied species adopt chair (or distorted chair) conformations. No evidence for the boat conformers with intramolecular sigma-bonding between heteroatoms were obtained. In the cases of morpholine and thioxane, the oxygen atoms are characterized by relatively small spin populations, whereas a major part of spin density is located at N and S atoms, respectively. The thiomorpholine radical cation exhibits nearly equal spin population of N and S atoms. In most cases (except for thioxane), the calculated magnetic parameters agree with the experimental data reasonably well.

  9. Hydration of the pyrimidine radical cation and stepwise solvation of protonated pyrimidine with water, methanol, and acetonitrile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamid, Ahmed M.; Sharma, Pramod; Samy El-Shall, M.; Hilal, Rifaat; Elroby, Shaaban; Aziz, Saadullah G.; Alyoubi, Abdulrahman O.

    2013-08-01

    Equilibrium thermochemical measurements using an ion mobility drift cell technique have been utilized to investigate the binding energies and entropy changes associated with the stepwise hydration of the biologically significant ions pyrimidine radical cation and protonated pyrimidine. The binding energy of the hydrated pyrimidine radical cation is weaker than that of the proton-bound dimer pyrimidineH+(H2O) consistent with the formation of a weak carbon-based CHδ+..OH2 hydrogen bond (11.9 kcal/mol) and a stronger NH+..OH2 hydrogen bond (15.6 kcal/mol), respectively. Other proton-bound dimers such as pyrimidineH+(CH3OH) and pyrimidineH+(CH3CN) exhibit higher binding energies (18.2 kcal/mol and 22.8 kcal/mol, respectively) due to the higher proton affinities and dipole moments of acetonitrile and methanol as compared to water. The measured collisional cross sections of the proton-bound dimers provide experimental-based support for the DFT calculated structures at the M06-2x/6-311++G (d,p) level. The calculations show that the hydrated pyrimidine radical cation clusters form internally solvated structures in which the water molecules are bonded to the C4N2H4•+ ion by weak CHδ+..OH2 hydrogen bonds. The hydrated protonated pyrimidine clusters form externally solvated structures where the water molecules are bonded to each other and the ion is external to the water cluster. Dissociative proton transfer reactions C4N2H4•+(H2O)n-1 + H2O → C4N2H3• + (H2O)nH+ and C4N2H5+(H2O)n-1 + H2O → C4N2H4 + (H2O)nH+ are observed for n ≥ 4 where the reactions become thermoneutral or exothermic. The absence of the dissociative proton transfer reaction within the C4N2H5+(CH3CN)n clusters results from the inability of acetonitrile molecules to form extended hydrogen bonding structures such as those formed by water and methanol due to the presence of the methyl groups which block the extension of hydrogen bonding networks.

  10. Hydration of the pyrimidine radical cation and stepwise solvation of protonated pyrimidine with water, methanol, and acetonitrile.

    PubMed

    Hamid, Ahmed M; Sharma, Pramod; El-Shall, M Samy; Hilal, Rifaat; Elroby, Shaaban; Aziz, Saadullah G; Alyoubi, Abdulrahman O

    2013-08-28

    Equilibrium thermochemical measurements using an ion mobility drift cell technique have been utilized to investigate the binding energies and entropy changes associated with the stepwise hydration of the biologically significant ions pyrimidine radical cation and protonated pyrimidine. The binding energy of the hydrated pyrimidine radical cation is weaker than that of the proton-bound dimer pyrimidineH(+)(H2O) consistent with the formation of a weak carbon-based CH(δ+)··OH2 hydrogen bond (11.9 kcal/mol) and a stronger NH(+)··OH2 hydrogen bond (15.6 kcal/mol), respectively. Other proton-bound dimers such as pyrimidineH(+)(CH3OH) and pyrimidineH(+)(CH3CN) exhibit higher binding energies (18.2 kcal/mol and 22.8 kcal/mol, respectively) due to the higher proton affinities and dipole moments of acetonitrile and methanol as compared to water. The measured collisional cross sections of the proton-bound dimers provide experimental-based support for the DFT calculated structures at the M06-2x/6-311++G (d,p) level. The calculations show that the hydrated pyrimidine radical cation clusters form internally solvated structures in which the water molecules are bonded to the C4N2H4(●+) ion by weak CH(δ+)··OH2 hydrogen bonds. The hydrated protonated pyrimidine clusters form externally solvated structures where the water molecules are bonded to each other and the ion is external to the water cluster. Dissociative proton transfer reactions C4N2H4(●+)(H2O)(n-1) + H2O → C4N2H3(●) + (H2O)(n)H(+) and C4N2H5(+)(H2O)(n-1) + H2O → C4N2H4 + (H2O)(n)H(+) are observed for n ≥ 4 where the reactions become thermoneutral or exothermic. The absence of the dissociative proton transfer reaction within the C4N2H5(+)(CH3CN)n clusters results from the inability of acetonitrile molecules to form extended hydrogen bonding structures such as those formed by water and methanol due to the presence of the methyl groups which block the extension of hydrogen bonding networks.

  11. Ne matrix spectra of the sym-C6Br3F3+ radical cation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bondybey, V.E.; Sears, T.J.; Miller, T.A.; Vaughn, C.; English, J.H.; Shiley, R.S.

    1981-01-01

    The electronic absorption and laser excited, wavelength resolved fluorescence spectra of the title cation have been observed in solid Ne matrix and vibrationally analysed. The vibrational structure of the excited B2A2??? state shows close similarity to the parent compound. The X2E??? ground state structure is strongly perturbed and irregular owing to a large Jahn-Teller distortion. The data are analysed in terms of a recently developed, sophisticated multimode Jahn-Teller theoretical model. We have generated the sym-C6Br3F3+ cations in solid Ne matrix and obtained their wavelength resolved emission and absorption spectra. T ground electronic X2E??? state exhibits an irregular and strongly perturbed vibrational structure, which can be successfully modeled using sophisticated multimode Jahn-Teller theory. ?? 1981.

  12. A Visible Light Initiating System for Free Radical Promoted Cationic Polymerization

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-02-02

    bis-(4, 4’-dimethylaminoihenyl)methane as the main product and crystal violet, methyl violet, as well as the leuco rorms of these dyes as minor...cation in chain polymerization is reported. The system is based on electron transfer photoreduction of xanthene dye triplets by aromatic amines...Previously, Crivello and Lam 9 had reported attempts to use visible light absorbing dyes to sensitize the decomposition of iodonium salts to initiate

  13. Theoretical study of the electronically excited radical cations of naphthalene and anthracene as archetypal models for astrophysical observations. Part II. Dynamics consequences.

    PubMed

    Ghanta, S; Reddy, V Sivaranjana; Mahapatra, S

    2011-08-28

    Nuclear dynamics is investigated theoretically from first principles by employing the ab initio vibronic models of the prototypical naphthalene and anthracene radical cations developed in Part I. This Part is primarily aimed at corroborating a large amount of available experimental data with a specific final goal to establish an unambiguous link with the current observations in astrophysics and astronomy. The detailed analyses presented here perhaps establish that these two prototypical polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon radical cations are indeed potential carriers of the observed diffuse interstellar bands.

  14. Evaluation of 2D-ESEEM data of 15N-labeled radical cations of the primary donor P 700 in photosystem I and chlorophyll a

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Käβ, H.; Lubitz, W.

    1996-03-01

    Hyperfine couplings (hfc's) of the nitrogen nuclei in the 15N-labeled radical cations of chlorophyll a and the primary donor P 700 in photosystem I of spinach were investigated in frozen solution by two-dimensional stimulated echo ESEEM. 15N hfc tensors were evaluated by comparison of the experimental data with simulations of the time domain and frequency domain ESEEM signals. The results are discussed in the framework of a chlorophyll a dimer model for the radical cation of P 700.

  15. Comparison of the Reactivity of the Three Distonic Isomers of the Pyridine Radical Cation Toward Tetrahydrofuran in Solution and in the Gas Phase

    PubMed Central

    Widjaja, Fanny; Jin, Zhicheng; Nash, John J.; Kenttämaa, Hilkka I.

    2013-01-01

    The reactivity of the three distonic isomers of the pyridine radical cation toward tetrahydrofuran is compared in solution and in the gas phase. In solution, the distonic ions were generated by UV photolysis at 300 nm from iodo-precursors in acidic 50:50 tetrahydrofuran/water solutions. In the gas phase, the ions were generated by collisionally activated dissociation (CAD) of protonated iodo-precursors in an FT-ICR mass spectrometer, as described in the literature. The same major reaction, hydrogen atom abstraction, was observed in solution and in the gas phase. Attempts to cleave the iodine atom from the 2-iodopyridinium cation in the gas phase and in solution yielded the 2-pyridyl cation in addition to the desired 2-dehydropyridinium cation. In the gas phase, this ion was ejected prior to the examination of the desired ion’s chemical properties. This was not possible in solution. This study suggests that solvation effects are not significant for radical reactions of charged radicals. On the other hand, the even-electron ion studied, the 2-pyridyl cation, shows substantial solvation effects. For example, in solution, the 2-pyridyl cation forms a stable adduct with tetrahydrofuran, whereas in the gas phase, only addition/elimination reactions were observed. PMID:23345033

  16. Role of configurational gating in intracomplex electron transfer from cytochrome c to the radical cation in cytochrome c peroxidase.

    PubMed

    Mei, H; Wang, K; Peffer, N; Weatherly, G; Cohen, D S; Miller, M; Pielak, G; Durham, B; Millett, F

    1999-05-25

    Electron transfer within complexes of cytochrome c (Cc) and cytochrome c peroxidase (CcP) was studied to determine whether the reactions are gated by fluctuations in configuration. Electron transfer in the physiological complex of yeast Cc (yCc) and CcP was studied using the Ru-39-Cc derivative, in which the H39C/C102T variant of yeast iso-1-cytochrome c is labeled at the single cysteine residue on the back surface with trisbipyridylruthenium(II). Laser excitation of the 1:1 Ru-39-Cc-CcP compound I complex at low ionic strength results in rapid electron transfer from RuII to heme c FeIII, followed by electron transfer from heme c FeII to the Trp-191 indolyl radical cation with a rate constant keta of 2 x 10(6) s-1 at 20 degrees C. keta is not changed by increasing the viscosity up to 40 cP with glycerol and is independent of temperature. These results suggest that this reaction is not gated by fluctuations in the configuration of the complex, but may represent the elementary electron transfer step. The value of keta is consistent with the efficient pathway for electron transfer in the crystalline yCc-CcP complex, which has a distance of 16 A between the edge of heme c and the Trp-191 indole [Pelletier, H., and Kraut, J. (1992) Science 258, 1748-1755]. Electron transfer in the complex of horse Cc (hCc) and CcP was examined using Ru-27-Cc, in which hCc is labeled with trisbipyridylruthenium(II) at Lys-27. Laser excitation of the Ru-27-Cc-CcP complex results in electron transfer from RuII to heme c FeII with a rate constant k1 of 2.3 x 10(7) s-1, followed by oxidation of the Trp-191 indole to a radical cation by RuIII with a rate constant k3 of 7 x 10(6) s-1. The cycle is completed by electron transfer from heme c FeII to the Trp-191 radical cation with a rate constant k4 of 6.1 x 10(4) s-1. The rate constant k4 decreases to 3.4 x 10(3) s-1 as the viscosity is increased to 84 cP, but the rate constants k1 and k3 remain the same. The results are consistent with a

  17. Formaldehyde mediated proton-transport catalysis in the ketene-water radical cation CH2C(O)OH2+

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Richard; Ruttink, Paul J. A.; Burgers, Peter C.; Terlouw, Johan K.

    2006-09-01

    Previous studies have shown that the solitary ketene-water ion CH2C(O)OH2+ (1) does not isomerize into CH2C(OH)2+ (2), its more stable hydrogen shift isomer. Tandem mass spectrometry based collision experiments reveal that this isomerization does take place in the CH2O loss from low-energy 1,3-dihydroxyacetone ions (HOCH2)2CO+. A mechanistic analysis using the CBS-QB3 model chemistry shows that such molecular ions rearrange into hydrogen-bridged radical cations [CH2C(O)O(H)-H...OCH2]+ in which the CH2O molecule catalyzes the transformation 1 --> 2 prior to dissociation. The barrier for the unassisted reaction, 29 kcal mol-1, is reduced to a mere 0.6 kcal mol-1 for the catalysed transformation. Formaldehyde is an efficient catalyst because its proton affinity meets the criterion for facile proton-transport catalysis.

  18. Large excited state two photon absorptions in the near infrared region of surprisingly stable radical cations of (ferrocenyl)indenes.

    PubMed

    Orian, Laura; Scuppa, Stefano; Santi, Saverio; Meneghetti, Moreno

    2013-08-21

    Multiphoton absorptions are important non-linear optical processes which allow us to explore excited states with low energy photons giving rise to new possibilities for photoinduced processes. Among these processes, multiphoton absorptions from excited states are particularly interesting because of the large susceptibilities characteristic of excited states. Here we explore the nonlinear transmission measurements recorded with 9 ns laser pulses at 1064 nm of the radical cations of (2-ferrocenyl)indene and of (2-ferrocenyl)-hexamethylindene, two interesting very stable molecules. The non-linear transmission data can be interpreted with a multiphoton sequence of three photon absorptions, the first being a one photon absorption related to the intramolecular charge transfer and the second a two photon absorption from the excited state created with the first process. The two photon absorption cross section is found to be several orders of magnitude larger than those usually found for two photon absorbing systems excited from the ground state.

  19. Synthesis, Physical Properties and Reactivity of Stable Antiaromatic 1,4-DIHYDROPYRAZINES and Their Associated Radical Cations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brook, David James Rawsthorne

    Self condensation of 3-(chloromethyl)-5,6-dihydro -5,5-dimethyl oxazin-2-one and 3-(chloromethyl)-5,6-dihydro -1,5, 5-trimethylpyrazin-2-one gave the 1,4-dihydropyrazines, 4a,8a-diaza-2,6-dioxa-3,4,7,8-tetrahydro- 4,4,8,8 -tetramethylanthracene-1,5,-dione (DDTTA), and 2,4,4,6,8,8-hexamethyl-2,4a,6,8a-tetraaza - 3,4,7,8-tetrahydroanthracene-1,5-dione (HTTA), respectively. Extension of this reaction to other systems resulted in failure. Thionation of DDTTA with phosphorus pentasulphide in pyridine gave mono and dithiono ester derivatives. The dihydropyrazine rings of these systems were planar and showed long wavelength pi-pi^* electronic absorption resulting in the compounds being coloured. The long wavelength band showed significant solvatochromism. NMR measurements indicated that the rings are also paratropic. DDTTA, HTTA and the thiones all showed reversible one electron oxidation to the radical cation which was characterised by electron spin resonance spectroscopy. HTTA and DDTTA also showed reversible oxidation of the radical cation to the dication. Hydrogenation of DDTTA resulted in a tetrahydropyrazine derivative, 4a,8a-diaza-2,6-dioxa -3,4,7,8,9,9a-hexahydro- 4,4,8,8-tetramethylanthracene -1,5-dione (4.5), which underwent atmospheric oxidation back to DDTTA and the alcohol 4a,8a-diaza-2,6-dioxa-3,4,7,8,9,9a -hexahydro-9a-hydroxy- 4,4,8,8-tetramethylanthracene -1,5-dione (4.6). The HTTA analogue 2,4,4,6,8,8-hexamethyl -3,4,7,8,9,9a-hexahydro- 2,4a,6,8a-tetraazaanthracene -1,5-dione (4.9) is stable under the same conditions. The difference in behaviour was explained as a result of the captodative effect. DDTTA was found to undergo rapid (2 + 2) cycloaddition to the dienophile, 4-phenyl-1,2,4-triazoline -3,5-dione (PTAD). Reaction of DDTTA with ^ {3}O_{2} was found to be solvent dependent. In acetic acid the dioxetane 4a,8a-diaza-2,6-dioxa-9,9a-epidioxy-3,4,7,8,9,9a -hexahydro- 4,4,8,8-tetramethylanthracene -1,5-dione was observed; whereas, in acetonitrile

  20. Fluorescence of the perylene radical cation and an inaccessible D0/D1 conical intersection: An MMVB, RASSCF, and TD-DFT computational study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tokmachev, Andrei M.; Boggio-Pasqua, Martial; Mendive-Tapia, David; Bearpark, Michael J.; Robb, Michael A.

    2010-01-01

    The photophysics of the perylene radical cation (Pe•+) was studied using the molecular mechanics-valence bond (MMVB) hybrid force field. Potential energy surfaces of the first three electronic states were investigated. Geometry optimizations of critical points—including conical intersections between the relevant electronic states—were performed using the MMVB analytical energy gradient for cations. No accessible planar conical intersection between the D0 and D1 states of Pe•+ was found; this is consistent with the experimentally observed D1 lifetimes and the observation of D1 emission from this cation in the condensed phase. Benchmark RASSCF and TD-DFT calculations support the reliability of the MMVB results.

  1. Ab Initio Study of Ionized Water Radical Cation (H2O)8(+) in Combination with the Particle Swarm Optimization Method.

    PubMed

    Tang, Mei; Hu, Cui-E; Lv, Zhen-Long; Chen, Xiang-Rong; Cai, Ling-Cang

    2016-12-01

    The structures of cationic water clusters (H2O)8(+) have been globally explored by the particle swarm optimization method in combination with quantum chemical calculations. Geometry optimization and vibrational analysis for the 15 most interesting clusters were computed at the MP2/aug-cc-pVDZ level and infrared spectrum calculation at MPW1K/6-311++G** level. Special attention was paid to the relationships between their configurations and energies. Both MP2 and B3LYP-D3 calculations revealed that the cage-like structure is the most stable, which is different from a five-membered ring lowest energy structure but agrees well with a cage-like structure in the literature. Furthermore, our obtained cage-like structure is more stable by 0.87 and 1.23 kcal/mol than the previously reported structures at MP2 and B3LYP-D3 levels, respectively. Interestingly, on the basis of their relative Gibbs free energies and the temperature dependence of populations, the cage-like structure predominates only at very low temperatures, and the most dominating species transforms into a newfound four-membered ring structure from 100 to 400 K, which can contribute greatly to the experimental infrared spectrum. By topological analysis and reduced density gradient analysis, we also investigated the structural characteristics and bonding strengths of these water cluster radical cations.

  2. Competitive Hydrogen Atom Migrations Accompanying Cascade Dissociations of Peptide Cation-Radicals of the z(+•) Type.

    PubMed

    Ledvina, Aaron R; Coon, Joshua J; Tureček, František

    2015-02-01

    We report a combined experimental and computational study of energy-resolved collision-induced dissociation (ER-CID) and time-resolved infrared multiphoton dissociation (TR-IRMPD) of z4 ions prepared by electron transfer dissociation of peptide (Ala-Ala-Asn-Ala-Arg + 2H)(2+) ions. The z4 cation-radicals, (•)ANAR(+), undergo competitive dissociations by backbone cleavage and loss of a CONH2 radical from the Asn side chain. The backbone cleavage proceeds by radical-assisted dissociation of the Asn Cα-CO bond, forming an x2 ion intermediate which rapidly dissociates by HNCO elimination to yield a stable z2 fragment ion, (•)AR(+). The ER-CID and TR-IRMPD data were consistent with the consecutive nature of the backbone dissociation but showed different branching ratios for the two major fragmentations. The ER-CID data showed branching ratios 0.6-1.0 for the side-chain and backbone cleavages whereas the TR-IRMPD data showed an earlier onset for the latter dissociation. Computational analysis of the potential energy surface with density functional theory and ab initio calculations was carried out to provide structures and energies for the reactant ions as well as several intermediates, products, and transition states. Dissociation pathways for cis and trans amide conformers were distinguished and their energies were evaluated. The threshold dissociation energies for the backbone and side-chain dissociations were similar in accordance with the experimental ER-CID branching ratio. The TR-IRMPD data were interpreted by different absorbances of intermediates produced by hydrogen atom migrations along the dissociation pathways.

  3. Competitive Hydrogen Atom Migrations Accompanying Cascade Dissociations of Peptide Cation-Radicals of the z+• Type

    PubMed Central

    Ledvina, Aaron R.; Coon, Joshua J.

    2014-01-01

    We report a combined experimental and computational study of energy-resolved collision-induced dissociation (ER-CID) and time-resolved infrared multiphoton dissociation (TR-IRMPD) of z4 ions prepared by electron transfer dissociation of peptide (Ala-Ala-Asn-Ala-Arg + 2H)2+ ions. The z4 cation-radicals, •ANAR+, undergo competitive dissociations by backbone cleavage and loss of a CONH2 radical from the Asn side chain. The backbone cleavage proceeds by radical-assisted dissociation of the Asn Cα—CO bond, forming an x2 ion intermediate which rapidly dissociates by HNCO elimination to yield a stable z2 fragment ion, •AR+. The ER-CID and TR-IRMPD data were consistent with the consecutive nature of the backbone dissociation but showed different branching ratios for the two major fragmentations. The ER-CID data showed branching ratios 0.6-1.0 for the side-chain and backbone cleavages whereas the TR-IRMPD data showed an earlier onset for the latter dissociation. Computational analysis of the potential energy surface with density functional theory and ab initio calculations was carried out to provide structures and energies for the reactant ions as well as several intermediates, products, and transition states. Dissociation pathways for cis and trans amide conformers were distinguished and their energies were evaluated. The threshold dissociation energies for the backbone and side-chain dissociations were similar in accordance with the experimental ER-CID branching ratio. The TR-IRMPD data were interpreted by different absorbances of intermediates produced by hydrogen atom migrations along the dissociation pathways. PMID:25844055

  4. Some Rearrangements of Free Alkyl Radicals and Alkyl Cations in Solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reutov, Oleg A.

    1984-03-01

    The results of studies of rearrangement reactions by the author and his co-workers during the last 20 years are described. A rearrangement of the n-propyl free radical in solutions as a result of the hydrogen 1,3-shift has been discovered and its characteristic features have been investigated (using carbon-14, deuterium, and tritium). The reaction involving the formation of organomercury compounds from mercury salts of carboxylic acids and peroxides has been studied and a mechanism has been proposed for it. New skeletal rearrangements in the thermal decomposition of cycloalkyl peroxides in benzene and bromoform have been discovered. It has been shown by the method of double 13C NMR that some of the reactions involve the formation of species which manifest properties intermediate between those of free radicals and carbonium ions. The mechanism of the thermolysis of peroxides is considered. The skeletal rearrangements and hydride shifts in the deamination and solvolysis of alicyclic compounds have been studied and a number of rearrangements with 1,2-migration of the halogen and in particular the isomerisation of acyloxybromopropanes in organic solvents, which takes place particularly readily, have been observed. The bibliography includes 103 references.

  5. Cymantrene radical cation family: spectral and structural characterization of the half-sandwich analogues of ferrocenium ion.

    PubMed

    Laws, Derek R; Chong, Daesung; Nash, Karen; Rheingold, Arnold L; Geiger, William E

    2008-07-30

    The anodic one-electron oxidation of three members of the half-sandwich family of piano-stool compounds MnCp (gamma)(CO) 3, where Cp (gamma) is a generic cyclopentadienyl ligand, has been studied in a CH 2Cl 2/[NBu 4][TFAB] electrolyte (TFAB = [B(C6F5) 4] (-)). The long-sought 17 e (-) radical cation of the parent complex MnCp(CO) 3 (cymantrene, 1, E 1/2 = 0.92 V vs ferrocene) has been shown to be persistent in solutions that use weakly coordinating anions in place of more nucleophilic traditional electrolyte anions. Spectroscopically characterized for the first time, 1 (+) was shown to absorb in the visible (530 nm), near-IR (2066 nm), and IR (2118, 1934 cm (-1)) regions. It was ESR-active at low temperatures (g parallel = 2.213, g perpendicular = 2.079, A parallel (Mn) = 79.2 G, A perpendicular (Mn) = 50 G) and NMR active at room temperature (delta = 22.4 vs TMS). The radical cations of the Cp-functionalized analogues, Mn(eta (5)-C5H 4NH2)(CO) 3, 2, E 1/2 = 0.62 V, and MnCp*(CO) 3 (Cp*= eta (5)-C 5Me 5, 3), E 1/2 = 0.64 V, were generated electrochemically as well by the chemical oxidant [ReCp(CO) 3] (+). The structures of 2 (+) and 3 (+) were determined by X-ray crystallographic studies of their TFAB salts. Compared to the structures of the corresponding neutral compounds, the cations showed elongated Mn-C(O) bonds and shortened C-O bonds, displaying the effect of diminished metal-to-CO backbonding. The bond-length changes in the Mn(CO) 3 moiety were much larger in 3 (+) (avg changes, Mn-C(O) = + 0.142 A, C-O = -0.063 A) than in 2 (+) (avg changes, Mn-C(O) = + 0.006 A, C-O = -0.003 A). Although there were only minor changes in the metal-to-center ring distances upon oxidation of either 2 or 3, there was decidedly less bending of the C(N) atom out of the cyclopentadienyl plane in 2 (+) compared to 2. The optical, vibrational, and magnetic resonance spectra of radicals 2 (+) and 3 (+) were also observed. The spectral data argue for the SOMOs of the 17-electron

  6. Anion size control of the packing in the metallic versus semiconducting chiral radical cation salts (DM-EDT-TTF)2XF6 (X = P, As, Sb).

    PubMed

    Pop, Flavia; Auban-Senzier, Pascale; Canadell, Enric; Avarvari, Narcis

    2016-10-13

    Control of the structural type in metallic enantiopure and racemic radical cation salts is achieved through hydrogen bonding interactions between the chiral donor DM-EDT-TTF and the XF6 anions (X = P, As, Sb), determined by the anion size and the chiral information.

  7. Chronoamperometric study of the films formed by 4,4'-bipyridyl cation radical salts on mercury in the presence of iodide ions: consecutive two-dimensional phase transitions.

    PubMed

    Gómez, L; Ruiz, J J; Camacho, L; Rodríguez-Amaro, R

    2005-01-04

    This paper reports a new mathematical model for consecutive two-dimensional phase transitions that accounts for the chronoamperometric behavior observed in the formation of electrochemical phases by 4,4'-bipyridyl cation radical (BpyH(2)(*)(+)) on mercury in aqueous iodide solutions. Also, a new interpretation for the induction time is proposed.

  8. Theoretical vibrational spectra and thermodynamics of organic semiconductive tetrathiafulvalene and its cation radical.

    PubMed

    Mukherjee, V; Singh, N P

    2014-01-03

    Molecular structure in optimum geometry and vibrational frequencies of pentafulvalene [bicyclopentyliden-2,4,2',4'-tetraene], tetrathiafulvalene [2,2'-bis(1,3-dithiolylidene)] and its cation are calculated. All the calculations are carried out by employing density functional theory incorporated with a suitable basis set. Normal coordinate analysis is also employed to scale the DFT calculated frequencies and to calculate potential energy distributions. The molecular structures and vibrational frequencies are compared for both the pentafulvalene and tetrathiafulvalene molecules. The effect upon geometry and vibrational frequencies of TTF due to charge transfer has also been studied. The vibrational partition function and hence, the thermodynamical properties, such as Helmholtz free energy, entropy, specific heat at constant volume and enthalpy are also calculated and compared for the title molecules. The reason of conductivity of tetrathiafulvalene has been tried to explain on the basis of molecular geometry and normal modes. Study of vibrational partition function exhibits that below 109 K, PFV starts to condense.

  9. Formation of environmentally persistent free radical (EPFR) in iron(III) cation-exchanged smectite clay.

    PubMed

    Nwosu, Ugwumsinachi G; Roy, Amitava; dela Cruz, Albert Leo N; Dellinger, Barry; Cook, Robert

    2016-01-01

    Environmentally persistent free radicals (EPFRs) have been found at a number of Superfund sites, with EPFRs being formed via a proposed redox process at ambient environmental conditions. The possibility of such a redox process taking place at ambient environmental conditions is studied utilizing a surrogate soil system of phenol and iron(III)-exchanged calcium montmorillonite clay, Fe(III)CaM. Sorption of phenol by the Fe(III)CaM is demonstrated by Fourier-transformed infra-red (FT-IR) spectroscopy, as evidenced by the peaks between 1345 cm(-1) and 1595 cm(-1), and at lower frequencies between 694 cm(-1) and 806 cm(-1), as well as X-ray diffraction (XRD) spectroscopy, as shown by an increase in interlayer spacing within Fe(III)CaM. The formation and characterization of the EPFRs is determined by electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy, showing phenoxyl-type radical with a g-factor of 2.0034 and ΔHP-P of 6.1 G at an average concentration of 7.5 × 10(17) spins per g. EPFRs lifetime data are indicative of oxygen and water molecules being responsible for EPFR decay. The change in the oxidation state of the iron redox center is studied by X-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES) spectroscopy, showing that 23% of the Fe(III) is reduced to Fe(II). X-ray photoemission spectroscopy (XPS) results confirm the XANES results. These findings, when combined with the EPFR concentration data, demonstrate that the stoichiometry of the EPFR formation under the conditions of this study is 1.5 × 10(-2) spins per Fe(II) atom.

  10. 15N electron nuclear double resonance of the primary donor cation radical P+.865 in reaction centers of Rhodopseudomonas sphaeroides: additional evidence for the dimer model.

    PubMed Central

    Lubitz, W; Isaacson, R A; Abresch, E C; Feher, G

    1984-01-01

    Four 15N hyperfine coupling constants, including signs, have been measured by electron nuclear double resonance (ENDOR) and electron nuclear nuclear triple resonance (TRIPLE) for the bacteriochlorophyll a radical cation, BChla+., in vitro and for the light-induced primary donor radical cation, P+.865, in reaction centers of Rhodopseudomonas sphaeroides R-26. A comparison of the data shows that the hyperfine coupling constants have the same sign in both radicals and are, on the average, smaller by a factor of 2 in P+.865. These results provide additional evidence that P+.865 is a bacteriochlorophyll dimer and are in contradiction with the monomer structure of P+.865 recently proposed by O'Malley and Babcock. The reduction factors of the individual 15N couplings, together with the evidence from proton ENDOR data and molecular orbital calculations, indicate a dimer structure in which only two rings (either I and I or III and III) of the bacteriochlorophyll macrocycles overlap. PMID:6096857

  11. Where Does the Electron Go? Stable and Metastable Peptide Cation Radicals Formed by Electron Transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pepin, Robert; Layton, Erik D.; Liu, Yang; Afonso, Carlos; Tureček, František

    2017-01-01

    Electron transfer to doubly and triply charged heptapeptide ions containing polar residues Arg, Lys, and Asp in combination with nonpolar Gly, Ala, and Pro or Leu generates stable and metastable charge-reduced ions, (M + 2H)+●, in addition to standard electron-transfer dissociation (ETD) fragment ions. The metastable (M + 2H)+● ions spontaneously dissociate upon resonant ejection from the linear ion trap, giving irregularly shaped peaks with offset m/ z values. The fractions of stable and metastable (M + 2H)+● ions and their mass shifts depend on the presence of Pro-4 and Leu-4 residues in the peptides, with the Pro-4 sequences giving larger fractions of the stable ions while showing smaller mass shifts for the metastables. Conversion of the Asp and C-terminal carboxyl groups to methyl esters further lowers the charge-reduced ion stability. Collisional activation and photodissociation at 355 nm of mass-selected (M + 2H)+● results in different dissociations that give sequence specific MS3 spectra. With a single exception of charge-reduced (LKGLADR + 2H)+●, the MS3 spectra do not produce ETD sequence fragments of the c and z type. Hence, these (M + 2H)+● ions are covalent radicals, not ion-molecule complexes, undergoing dramatically different dissociations in the ground and excited electronic states. The increased stability of the Pro-4 containing (M + 2H)+● ions is attributed to radicals formed by opening of the Pro ring and undergoing further stabilization by hydrogen atom migrations. UV-VIS photodissociation action spectroscopy and time-dependent density functional theory calculations are used in a case in point study of the stable (LKGPADR + 2H)+● ion produced by ETD. In contrast to singly-reduced peptide ions, doubly reduced (M + 3H)+ ions are stable only when formed from the Pro-4 precursors and show all characteristics of even electron ions regarding no photon absorption at 355 nm or ion-molecule reactions, and exhibiting proton driven

  12. Pressure-induced spectral changes for the special-pair radical cation of the bacterial photosynthetic reaction center.

    PubMed

    Leiger, Kristjan; Freiberg, Arvi; Dahlbom, Mats G; Hush, Noel S; Reimers, Jeffrey R

    2007-06-07

    The effect of pressure up to 6 kbars on the near to mid infrared absorption spectrum (7500-14,300 cm(-1) or 1333-700 nm) of the oxidized reaction center of Rhodobacter sphaeroides is measured and interpreted using density-functional B3LYP, INDO, and PM5 calculations. Two weak electronic transition origins at approximately 8010 and approximately 10,210 cm(-1) are unambiguously identified. The first transition is assigned to a Qy tripdoublet band that involves, in the localized description of the excitation, a triplet absorption on one of the bacteriochlorophyll molecules (PM) in the reaction center's special pair intensified by the presence of a radical cation on the other (PL). While most chlorophyll transition energies decrease significantly with increasing pressure, the tripdoublet band is found to be almost pressure insensitive. This difference is attributed to the additional increase in the tripdoublet-band energy accompanying compression of the pi-stacked special pair. The second band could either be the anticipated second Qy tripdoublet state, a Qx tripdoublet state, or a state involving excitation from a low-lying doubly occupied orbital to the half-occupied cationic orbital. A variety of absorption bands that are also resolved in the 8300-9600 cm(-1) region are assigned as vibrational structure associated with the first tripdoublet absorption. These sidebands are composites that are shown by the calculations to comprise many unresolved individual modes; while the calculated pressure sensitivity of each individual mode is small, the calculated pressure dependence of the combined sideband structure is qualitatively similar to the observed pressure dependence, preventing the positive identification of possible additional electronic transitions in this spectral region.

  13. Pathways for the reaction of the butadiene radical cation, [C{sub 4}H{sub 6}]{sup {sm{underscore}bullet}+}, with ethylene

    SciTech Connect

    Hofmann, M.; Schaefer, H.F. III

    1999-11-04

    The Diels-Alder (DA) reaction, a [4+2] cycloaddition used to build six membered rings, is one of the most valuable cycloadditions in organic chemistry. In cases where the ene does not add to the diene (even with the help of Lewis acids which may reduce the electron density of one reactant by complexation) one electron oxidation (by an oxidizing agent or by photoinduced electron transfer (PET)) may accelerate the reaction. Reaction pathways for the addition of ethylene, 1, to butadiene radical cation, 2, involving H-shifts have been investigated at the coupled cluster UCCSD(T)/DZP//UMP2(fc)/DZP + ZPE level of theory. Activation energies are relatively low for [1,2]- (10.0 kcal mol{sup {minus}1}, TS-4/20) and [1,5]-hydrogen shifts (7.7 kcal mol{sup {minus}1}, TS-4/26) but are relatively high for [1,4]-(33.8 kcal mol{sup {minus}1}, TS-4/14) and [1,3]-H shifts (e.g., 42.2 kcal mol{sup {minus}1}, TS-12/13; 57.2 kcal mol{sup {minus}1}, TS-16/21). Several rearrangement reactions have been found to occur below the energy limit of separated 1 + 2. The cyclopentenyl cation, [C{sub 5}{sub 7}]{sup +}, 18, experimentally observed as reaction product of the butadiene radical cation, 2, and ethylene, 1, in the gas phase may origin from various reaction pathways. The following reaction sequence has been identified as the lowest in energy path from 1 + 2 to 18 with all relative energies ({Delta}E{degree}) of transition structures below that of 1 + 2: (a) ethylene adds to the butadiene radical cation to form an open-chain distonic intermediate, that undergoes a [1,5]-H shift to the 1,4-hexadiene radical cation; (b) intramolecular [2+1] cycloaddition to methyl-cyclopenta-1,3-diyl intermediates, which can interconvert through a bicyclo[2.1.0]pentane radical cation; (c) [1,2]-H shift to the 3-methyl cyclopentene radical cation; (d) methyl radical loss to give cyclopenten-3-yl cation. Along this reaction pathway, {Delta}H{sup 298} is below that of 1 + 2; max. ({Delta}G{sup 298} by

  14. Theoretical study of reactivity of methane, methyl fluoride, and methyl chloride: Interaction with their radical cations and proton donors

    SciTech Connect

    Hess, B.A. Jr. ); Zahradnik, R. )

    1990-07-18

    This work deals with interactions between CH{sub 4} and CH{sub 4}{sup {sm bullet}+}, CH{sub 3}F and CH{sub 3}F{sup {sm bullet}+}, and CH{sub 3}Cl and CH{sub 3}Cl{sup {sm bullet}+}. The calculated {Delta}H{sub 0} values (MP4/6-31G**//MP2/6-31G**, ZPE included) for processes leading to CH{sub 5}{sup +} and CH{sub 3}{sup {sm bullet}}, and to CFH{sub 4} and CH{sub 2}F{sup {sm bullet}} amount to {minus}1.8 and {minus}21.0 kcal/mol, respectively. The {Delta}H{sub 0} leading to CClH{sub 4}{sup +} and CH{sub 2}Cl{sup {sm bullet}} (MP4/6-31G**//SCF/6-31G**, ZPE included) is {minus}2.3 kcal/mol. The calculated reaction heat for the first interaction is significantly closer to experimental values ({minus}4.16 and {minus}6 kcal/mol, respectively) than their previous theoretical estimates. The structures of the radical cations (CH{sub 4}{sup {sm bullet}+}, CH{sub 3}F{sup {sm bullet}+}) possess features of van der Waals associates.

  15. Accidental degeneracy in the spiropyran radical cation: charge transfer between two orthogonal rings inducing ultra-efficient reactivity.

    PubMed

    Mendive-Tapia, David; Kortekaas, Luuk; Steen, Jorn D; Perrier, Aurélie; Lasorne, Benjamin; Browne, Wesley R; Jacquemin, Denis

    2016-11-16

    Photochromism of the spiropyran radical cation to the corresponding merocyanine form is investigated by a combination of electrochemical oxidation, UV/vis absorption spectroscopy, spectroelectrochemistry and first-principles calculations (TD-DFT, CAS-SCF and CAS-PT2). First, we demonstrate that the ring-opening of mono-spiropyrans occurs upon one-electron oxidation and that it can be driven photochemically as well as thermally, with trapping of the merocyanine by protonation. Second, in order to explain this experimentally observed spectroelectrochemical behaviour we suggest a theoretical mechanism based on the reactivity of the two lowest electronic excited-states, which promotes effective electron transfer from the indoline (nitrogen-ring) to the pyran (oxygen-ring) moieties (and vice versa) through a conical intersection seam of degeneracy. Characterisation of the minimum energy conical intersection on this crossing revealed that it presents a rare diabatic trapping topology. The excited state molecule cannot escape from crossing the intersection seam due to the presence of only one degeneracy-lifting coordinate that efficiently channels into the formation of the merocyanine photoproduct, so giving rise to a "kitchen sink" funnel-like effect. Therefore, assuming rapid relaxation after vertical excitation to a higher electronic state, photoconversion cannot be avoided in the D1 electronic state, which rationalises the remarkably efficient visible light driven excited-state reactivity observed experimentally.

  16. The role of aspartate-235 in the binding of cations to an artificial cavity at the radical site of cytochrome c peroxidase.

    PubMed

    Fitzgerald, M M; Trester, M L; Jensen, G M; McRee, D E; Goodin, D B

    1995-09-01

    The activated state of cytochrome c peroxidase, compound ES, contains a cation radical on the Trp-191 side chain. We recently reported that replacing this tryptophan with glycine creates a buried cavity at the active site that contains ordered solvent and that will specifically bind substituted imidazoles in their protonated cationic forms (Fitzgerald MM, Churchill MJ, McRee DE, Goodin DB, 1994, Biochemistry 33:3807-3818). Proposals that a nearby carboxylate, Asp-235, and competing monovalent cations should modulate the affinity of the W191G cavity for ligand binding are addressed in this study. Competitive binding titrations of the imidazolium ion to W191G as a function of [K+] show that potassium competes weakly with the binding of imidazoles. The dissociation constant observed for potassium binding (18 mM) is more than 3,000-fold higher than that for 1,2-dimethylimidazole (5.5 microM) in the absence of competing cations. Significantly, the W191G-D235N double mutant shows no evidence for binding imidazoles in their cationic or neutral forms, even though the structure of the cavity remains largely unperturbed by replacement of the carboxylate. Refined crystallographic B-values of solvent positions indicate that the weakly bound potassium in W191G is significantly depopulated in the double mutant. These results demonstrate that the buried negative charge of Asp-235 is an essential feature of the cation binding determinant and indicate that this carboxylate plays a critical role in stabilizing the formation of the Trp-191 radical cation.

  17. The role of aspartate-235 in the binding of cations to an artificial cavity at the radical site of cytochrome c peroxidase.

    PubMed Central

    Fitzgerald, M. M.; Trester, M. L.; Jensen, G. M.; McRee, D. E.; Goodin, D. B.

    1995-01-01

    The activated state of cytochrome c peroxidase, compound ES, contains a cation radical on the Trp-191 side chain. We recently reported that replacing this tryptophan with glycine creates a buried cavity at the active site that contains ordered solvent and that will specifically bind substituted imidazoles in their protonated cationic forms (Fitzgerald MM, Churchill MJ, McRee DE, Goodin DB, 1994, Biochemistry 33:3807-3818). Proposals that a nearby carboxylate, Asp-235, and competing monovalent cations should modulate the affinity of the W191G cavity for ligand binding are addressed in this study. Competitive binding titrations of the imidazolium ion to W191G as a function of [K+] show that potassium competes weakly with the binding of imidazoles. The dissociation constant observed for potassium binding (18 mM) is more than 3,000-fold higher than that for 1,2-dimethylimidazole (5.5 microM) in the absence of competing cations. Significantly, the W191G-D235N double mutant shows no evidence for binding imidazoles in their cationic or neutral forms, even though the structure of the cavity remains largely unperturbed by replacement of the carboxylate. Refined crystallographic B-values of solvent positions indicate that the weakly bound potassium in W191G is significantly depopulated in the double mutant. These results demonstrate that the buried negative charge of Asp-235 is an essential feature of the cation binding determinant and indicate that this carboxylate plays a critical role in stabilizing the formation of the Trp-191 radical cation. PMID:8528082

  18. A valence bond analysis of electronic degeneracies in Jahn-Teller systems: low-lying states of the cyclopentadienyl radical and cation.

    PubMed

    Zilberg, Shmuel; Haas, Yehuda

    2002-09-11

    The lowest doublet electronic state of the cyclopentadienyl radical (CPDR) and the lowest singlet state of the cyclopentadienyl cation (CPDC) are distorted from the highly symmetric D(5h) structure due to the Jahn-Teller effect. A valence bond analysis based on the phase-change rule of Longuet-Higgins reveals that in both cases the distortion is due to the first-order Jahn-Teller effect. It is shown that, while for the radical an isolated Jahn-Teller degeneracy is expected, in the case of the cation the main Jahn-Teller degeneracy is accompanied by five satellite degeneracies. The method offers a chemically oriented way for identifying the distortive coordinates.

  19. A new special pair model comprising meso-di-p-anisylaminoporphyrin: enhancement of visible-light absorptivities and quantification of electronic communication in mixed-valent cation radical.

    PubMed

    Sakamoto, Ryota; Nishikawa, Michihiro; Yamamura, Takeshi; Kume, Shoko; Nishihara, Hiroshi

    2010-03-28

    Slipped cofacial porphyrin dimer 1(2) with di-p-anisylamino groups on the meso-positions shows characteristic photo- and electroproperties making it suitable as a photosynthetic special pair model: more intense and red-shifted absorptivities in the visible region, and electronic communication between the two porphyrins in mixed-valent cation radical 1(2)(+), which is quantified with an IVCT band analysis.

  20. Electronic Characterization of Reaction Intermediates: The Fluorenylium, Phenalenylium, and Benz[f]indenylium Cations and Their Radicals.

    PubMed

    Fulara, Jan; Chakraborty, Arghya; Maier, John P

    2016-03-01

    Three vibrationally resolved absorption systems commencing at 538, 518, and 392 nm were detected in a 6 K neon matrix after mass-selected deposition of C13 H9 (+) ions (m/z=165) produced from fluorene in a hot-cathode discharge ion source. The benz[f]indenylium (BfI(+) : 538 nm), fluorenylium (FL9(+) : 518 nm), and phenalenylium (PHL(+) : 392 nm) cations are the absorbing molecules. Two electronic systems corresponding to neutral species are apparent at 490 and 546 nm after irradiation of the matrix with λ<260 nm photons and were assigned to the FL9 and BfI radicals, respectively. The strongest peak at 518 nm is the origin of the 2 (1) B2 ←X̃ (1) A1 absorption of FL9(+) , and the 490 nm band is the 2 (2) A2 ←X̃ (2) B1 origin of FL9. The electronic systems commencing at 538 nm and 546 nm were assigned to the 1 (1) A1 ←X̃ (1) A1 and 1 (2) A2 ←X̃ (2) A2 transitions of BfI(+) and BfI. The 392 nm band is the 1 (1) E'←X̃ (1) A1 ' transition of PHL(+). The electronic spectra of C13 H9 (+) /C13 H9 were assigned on the basis of the vertical excitation energies calculated with SAC-CI and MS-CASPT2 methods.

  1. Influence of pH on the decay of β-carotene radical cation in aqueous Triton X-100: A laser flash photolysis study.

    PubMed

    El-Agamey, Ali; El-Hagrasy, Maha A; Suenobu, Tomoyoshi; Fukuzumi, Shunichi

    2015-05-01

    The identification of the spectral information of carotenoid neutral radicals is essential for studying their reactivities towards O2 and thereby evaluating their role in the antioxidant-prooxidant properties of the corresponding carotenoid. Recently, it was reported that β-carotene neutral radical (β-CAR) has an absorption maximum at 750 nm. This contradicts the results of many reports that show carotenoid neutral radicals (CAR) absorb in the same or near to the spectral region as their parent carotenoids. In this manuscript, the influence of pH on the decay of β-carotene radical cation (β-CAR-H(+)), generated in an aqueous solution of 2% Triton X-100 (TX-100), was investigated, employing laser flash photolysis (LFP) coupled with kinetic absorption spectroscopy, to identify the absorption bands of the β-carotene neutral radicals. By increasing the pH value of the solution, the decay of β-CAR-H(+) is enhanced and this enhancement is not associated with the formation of any positive absorption bands over the range 550-900 nm. By comparing these results with the literature, it can be concluded that β-carotene neutral radicals most probably absorb within the same spectral range as that of β-carotene. The reaction pathways of the reaction of β-CAR-H(+) with (-)OH have been discussed.

  2. Picosecond pulse radiolysis of highly concentrated sulfuric acid solutions: evidence for the oxidation reactivity of radical cation H2O(•+).

    PubMed

    Ma, Jun; Schmidhammer, Uli; Mostafavi, Mehran

    2014-06-12

    Aqueous solution of sulfuric acid is used as a suitable system to investigate the reactivity of the short-lived radical cation H2O(•+) which is generated by radiation in water. Ten aqueous solutions containing sulfuric acid with concentration from 1 to 18 mol L(-1) are studied by picosecond pulse radiolysis. The absorbance of the secondary radical SO4(•-) (or HSO4(•)) formed within the 10 ps electron pulse is measured by a pulse-probe method in the visible range. The analysis of the kinetics show that the radicals of sulfuric acid are formed within the picosecond electron pulse via two parallel mechanisms: direct electron detachment by the electron pulse and oxidation by the radical cation of water H2O(•+). In highly concentrated solution when SO4(2-) is in contact with H2O(•+), the electron transfer becomes competitive against proton transfer with another water molecule. Therefore, H2O(•+) may act as an extremely strong oxidant. The maximum radiolytic yield of scavenged H2O(•+) is estimated to be 5.3 ± 0.1 × 10(-7) mol J(-1).

  3. Alkyl nitrate formation from the reactions of C8-C14 n-alkanes with OH radicals in the presence of NO(x): measured yields with essential corrections for gas-wall partitioning.

    PubMed

    Yeh, Geoffrey K; Ziemann, Paul J

    2014-09-18

    In this study, C8-C14 n-alkanes were reacted with OH radicals in the presence of NO(x) in a Teflon film environmental chamber and isomer-specific yields of alkyl nitrates were determined using gas chromatography. Because results indicated significant losses of alkyl nitrates to chamber walls, gas-wall partitioning was investigated by monitoring the concentrations of a suite of synthesized alkyl nitrates added to the chamber. Gas-to-wall partitioning increased with increasing carbon number and with proximity of the nitrooxy group to the terminal carbon, with losses as high as 86%. The results were used to develop a structure-activity model to predict the effects of carbon number and isomer structure on gas-wall partitioning, which was used to correct the measured yields of alkyl nitrate isomers formed in chamber reactions. The resulting branching ratios for formation of secondary alkyl nitrates were similar for all isomers of a particular carbon number, and average values, which were almost identical to alkyl nitrate yields, were 0.219, 0.206, 0.254, 0.291, and 0.315 for reactions of n-octane, n-decane, n-dodecane, n-tridecane, and n-tetradecane, respectively. The increase in average branching ratios and alkyl nitrate yields with increasing carbon number to a plateau value of ∼0.30 at about C13-C14 is consistent with predictions of a previously developed model, indicating that the model is valid for alkane carbon numbers ≥C3.

  4. Photocatalytic degradation of 1,10-dichlorodecane in aqueous suspensions of TiO{sub 2}: A reaction of adsorbed chlorinated alkane with surface hydroxyl radicals

    SciTech Connect

    El-Morsi, T.M.; Bubakowski, W.R.; Abd-El-Aziz, A.S.; Friesen, K.J.

    2000-03-15

    1,10-Dichlorodecane (D{sub 2}C{sub 10}) is shown to be effectively photodegraded in aqueous suspensions of TiO{sub 2} using a photoreactor equipped with 300 nm lamps. Solutions exposed to UV light intensities of 3.6 x 10{sup {minus}5} Ein L{sup {minus}1} min{sup {minus}1}, established by ferrioxalate actinometry, showed negligible direct photolysis in the absence of TiO{sub 2} and a D{sub 2}C{sub 10} concentration approaching its solubility limit. Kinetics of photodegradation followed a Langmuir-Hinshelwood model suggesting that the reaction occurred on the surface of the photocatalyst. The presence of h{sup +}{sub vb} and OH{sm_bullet} radical scavengers, including methanol and iodide, inhibited the degradation supporting a photooxidation reaction. Electron scavengers (Ag{sup +}, Cu{sup 2+}, and Fe{sup 3+}) had small effects on the degradation rate. The lack of transformation of D{sub 2}C{sub 10} in acetonitrile as solvent indicated that the major oxidants were OH{sm_bullet} radicals. The presence of tetranitromethane, effectively eliminating the formation of free OH{sm_bullet} radicals, did not affect the degradation rates significantly. This result, combined with observed increases in photolysis rates with the degree of adsorption of D{sub 2}C{sub 10} onto the surface of the photocatalyst, confirmed that the reaction involved adsorbed 1,10-dichlorodecane and surface bound OH{sm_bullet} radicals.

  5. Effects of structural factors on the pi-dimerization and/or disproportionation of the cation radical of extended TTF containing thiophene-based pi-conjugated spacers.

    PubMed

    Frère, Pierre; Allain, Magali; Elandaloussi, El Hadj; Levillain, Eric; Sauvage, François-Xavier; Riou, Amédée; Roncali, Jean

    2002-02-15

    The electrochemical and chemical oxidation of extended TTF 4 and 5 are analysed by cyclic voltammetry, Visible/NIR and ESR spectroscopies, and the X-ray structures of the new salts 5 x BF(4)(CH(2)Cl(2)) and 4 x ClO(4)(THF)(1/2) are presented. The effects of structural factors on the pi-dimerization or the disproportionation reaction of the cation radical are shown. The oxidation of compound 4 presents the successive formation of stable cation radical and dication species both in dichloromethane (DCM) and in a CH(3)CN/THF mixture. In contrast, for compound 5, the stability of the oxidation states strongly depends on the nature of the solvent. In DCM, the oxidation of 5 proceeds by two close one-electron transfers while in CH(3)CN/THF the dication is directly formed via a two-electron process. The X-ray structures of the two salts reveal the formation of pi-dimers of cation radical. While the dimer (5(2))(2+) is due mainly to pi-pi interactions between the conjugating spacer, the multiplication of the sulfur atoms in compound 4 contributes to stabilize the dimer by the combined effects of S-S and pi-pi interactions. Visible/NIR and ESR experiments confirm the higher tendency of 4(+)(.) to dimerize with the occurrence of dimer and monomer in solution, while for 5(+)(.) only the monomer is detected in DCM. On the other hand, by dissolution of 5 x BF(4)(CH(2)Cl(2)) in CH(3)CN, only the neutral and the dicationic states of compounds 5 are observed owing to the disproportionation reaction.

  6. Ion/molecule reactions of 2-chloro- and 2-bromopropene radical cations with methanol and ethanol--FT-ICR spectrometry and DFT calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grützmacher, Hans-Friedrich; Büchner, Michael; Zipse, Hendrik

    2005-02-01

    Continuing the studies of ion/molecule reactions of haloalkene radical cations with nucleophiles, the reactions of the radical cations of 2-chloropropene, 1+, and 2-bromopropene. 2+, with methanol and ethanol, respectively, have been investigated by FT-ICR spectrometry and by computational analysis using DFT calculation (BHLYP/6-311 + G(2d,p)//BHLYP/6-31 + G(d) level). Only slow reactions (reaction efficiency <1%) are observed for 1+/methanol and 2+/methanol. Slow proton transfer is the main process for 1+/methanol besides minor addition of methanol to 1+ followed by loss of HCl or Cl. Addition of methanol accompanied by loss of Br is the exclusive process observed for 2+/methanol. In contrast, both 1+ and 2+ react efficiently with ethanol yielding protonated acetaldehyde as the exclusive (1+) or by far dominant (2+) primary reaction product. The computational analysis of these ion/molecule reactions shows that in the case of 1+/methanol and 2+/methanol all processes are either endothermic or blocked by large activation energies. Nonetheless, addition of methanol to the ionized CC double bond of 1+ or 2+ is exothermic, yielding in each case a pair of isomeric [beta]-distonic methoxonium ions. A new reaction mechanism has been found for the HX (X = Cl, Br) elimination from the less stable isomer of the distonic intermediates. Further, an energetically favorable transition state has been detected for hydrogen atom transfer from the [alpha]-CH2 group of alcohol to the halogenoalkene radical cations. These findings lead to a revised mechanism of the oxidation process and provide a plausible explanation for the excessive H/D exchange between 1+ and CD3OH during their slow reaction.

  7. A search for blues brothers: X-ray crystallographic/spectroscopic characterization of the tetraarylbenzidine cation radical as a product of aging of solid magic blue.

    PubMed

    Talipov, Marat R; Hossain, Mohammad M; Boddeda, Anitha; Thakur, Khushabu; Rathore, Rajendra

    2016-03-14

    Magic blue (MB+˙ SbCl6− salt), i.e. tris-4-bromophenylamminium cation radical, is a routinely employed one-electron oxidant that slowly decomposes in the solid state upon storage to form so called ‘blues brothers’, which often complicate the quantitative analyses of the oxidation processes. Herein, we disclose the identity of the main ‘blues brother’ as the cation radical and dication of tetrakis-(4-bromophenyl)benzidine (TAB) by a combined DFT and experimental approach, including isolation of TAB+˙ SbCl6− and its X-ray crystallography characterization. The formation of TAB in aged magic blue samples occurs by a Scholl-type coupling of a pair of MB followed by a loss of molecular bromine. The recognition of this fact led us to the rational design and synthesis of tris(2-bromo-4-tert-butylphenyl)amine, referred to as ‘blues cousin’ (BC: Eox1 = 0.78 V vs. Fc/Fc+, λmax(BC+˙) = 805 nm, εmax = 9930 cm−1 M−1), whose oxidative dimerization is significantly hampered by positioning the sterically demanding tert-butyl groups at the para-positions of the aryl rings. A ready two-step synthesis of BC from triphenylamine and the high stability of its cation radical (BC+˙) promise that BC will serve as a ready replacement for MB and an oxidant of choice for mechanistic investigations of one-electron transfer processes in organic, inorganic, and organometallic transformations.

  8. A complete map of the ion chemistry of the naphthalene radical cation? DFT and RRKM modeling of a complex potential energy surface

    SciTech Connect

    Solano, Eduardo A.; Mayer, Paul M.

    2015-09-14

    The fragmentation mechanisms of the naphthalene molecular ion to [M–C{sub 4}H{sub 2}]{sup +•}, [M–C{sub 2}H{sub 2}]{sup +•}, [M–H{sub 2}]{sup +•}, and [M–H{sup •}]{sup +} were obtained at the UB3LYP/6-311+G(3df,2p)//UB3LYP/6-31G(d) level of theory and were subsequently used to calculate the microcanonical rate constants, k(E)’s, for all the steps by the Rice-Ramsperger-Kassel-Marcus formalism. The pre-equilibrium and steady state approximations were applied on different regions of the potential energy profiles to obtain the fragmentation k(E)’s and calculate the relative abundances of the ions as a function of energy. These results reproduce acceptably well the imaging photoelectron-photoion coincidence spectra of naphthalene, in the photon-energy range 14.0–18.8 eV that was previously reported by our group. Prior to dissociation, the molecular ion rapidly equilibrates with a set of isomers that includes the Z- and E-phenylvinylacetylene (PVA) radical cations. The naphthalene ion is the predominant isomer below 10 eV internal energy, with the other isomers remaining at steady state concentrations. Later on, new steady-state intermediates are formed, such as the azulene and 1-phenyl-butatriene radical cations. The naphthalene ion does not eject an H atom directly but eliminates an H{sub 2} molecule in a two-step fragmentation. H{sup •} loss occurs instead from the 1-phenyl-butatriene ion. The PVA ions initiate the ejection of diacetylene (C{sub 4}H{sub 2}) to yield the benzene radical cation. Acetylene elimination yields the pentalene cation at low energies (where it can account for 45.9%–100.0% of the rate constant of this channel), in a three-step mechanism starting from the azulene ion. However, above 7.6 eV, the major [M–C{sub 2}H{sub 2}]{sup +•} structure is the phenylacetylene cation.

  9. A complete map of the ion chemistry of the naphthalene radical cation? DFT and RRKM modeling of a complex potential energy surface.

    PubMed

    Solano, Eduardo A; Mayer, Paul M

    2015-09-14

    The fragmentation mechanisms of the naphthalene molecular ion to [M-C4H2](+•), [M-C2H2](+•), [M-H2](+•), and [M-H(•)](+) were obtained at the UB3LYP/6-311+G(3df,2p)//UB3LYP/6-31G(d) level of theory and were subsequently used to calculate the microcanonical rate constants, k(E)'s, for all the steps by the Rice-Ramsperger-Kassel-Marcus formalism. The pre-equilibrium and steady state approximations were applied on different regions of the potential energy profiles to obtain the fragmentation k(E)'s and calculate the relative abundances of the ions as a function of energy. These results reproduce acceptably well the imaging photoelectron-photoion coincidence spectra of naphthalene, in the photon-energy range 14.0-18.8 eV that was previously reported by our group. Prior to dissociation, the molecular ion rapidly equilibrates with a set of isomers that includes the Z- and E-phenylvinylacetylene (PVA) radical cations. The naphthalene ion is the predominant isomer below 10 eV internal energy, with the other isomers remaining at steady state concentrations. Later on, new steady-state intermediates are formed, such as the azulene and 1-phenyl-butatriene radical cations. The naphthalene ion does not eject an H atom directly but eliminates an H2 molecule in a two-step fragmentation. H(•) loss occurs instead from the 1-phenyl-butatriene ion. The PVA ions initiate the ejection of diacetylene (C4H2) to yield the benzene radical cation. Acetylene elimination yields the pentalene cation at low energies (where it can account for 45.9%-100.0% of the rate constant of this channel), in a three-step mechanism starting from the azulene ion. However, above 7.6 eV, the major [M-C2H2](+•) structure is the phenylacetylene cation.

  10. A complete map of the ion chemistry of the naphthalene radical cation? DFT and RRKM modeling of a complex potential energy surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solano, Eduardo A.; Mayer, Paul M.

    2015-09-01

    The fragmentation mechanisms of the naphthalene molecular ion to [M-C4H2]+•, [M-C2H2]+•, [M-H2]+•, and [M-H•]+ were obtained at the UB3LYP/6-311+G(3df,2p)//UB3LYP/6-31G(d) level of theory and were subsequently used to calculate the microcanonical rate constants, k(E)'s, for all the steps by the Rice-Ramsperger-Kassel-Marcus formalism. The pre-equilibrium and steady state approximations were applied on different regions of the potential energy profiles to obtain the fragmentation k(E)'s and calculate the relative abundances of the ions as a function of energy. These results reproduce acceptably well the imaging photoelectron-photoion coincidence spectra of naphthalene, in the photon-energy range 14.0-18.8 eV that was previously reported by our group. Prior to dissociation, the molecular ion rapidly equilibrates with a set of isomers that includes the Z- and E-phenylvinylacetylene (PVA) radical cations. The naphthalene ion is the predominant isomer below 10 eV internal energy, with the other isomers remaining at steady state concentrations. Later on, new steady-state intermediates are formed, such as the azulene and 1-phenyl-butatriene radical cations. The naphthalene ion does not eject an H atom directly but eliminates an H2 molecule in a two-step fragmentation. H• loss occurs instead from the 1-phenyl-butatriene ion. The PVA ions initiate the ejection of diacetylene (C4H2) to yield the benzene radical cation. Acetylene elimination yields the pentalene cation at low energies (where it can account for 45.9%-100.0% of the rate constant of this channel), in a three-step mechanism starting from the azulene ion. However, above 7.6 eV, the major [M-C2H2]+• structure is the phenylacetylene cation.

  11. Oxygen acidity of ring methoxylated 1,1-diarylalkanol radical cations bearing alpha-cyclopropyl groups. The competition between O-neophyl shift and C-cyclopropyl beta-scission in the intermediate 1,1-diarylalkoxyl radicals.

    PubMed

    Bietti, Massimo; Fiorentini, Simone; Pato, Iria Pèrez; Salamone, Michela

    2006-04-14

    A product and time-resolved kinetic study on the reactivity of the radical cations generated from cyclopropyl(4-methoxyphenyl)phenylmethanol (1) and cyclopropyl[bis(4-methoxyphenyl)]methanol (2) has been carried out in aqueous solution. In acidic solution, 1*+ and 2*+ display very low reactivities toward fragmentation, consistent with the presence of groups at Calpha (aryl and cyclopropyl) that after Calpha-Cbeta bond cleavage would produce relatively unstable carbon-centered radicals. In basic solution, 1*+ and 2*+ display oxygen acidity, undergoing -OH-induced deprotonation from the alpha-OH group, leading to the corresponding 1,1-diarylalkoxyl radicals 1r* and 2r*, respectively, as directly observed by time-resolved spectroscopy. The product distributions observed in the reactions of 1*+ and 2*+ under these conditions (cyclopropyl phenyl ketone, cyclopropyl(4-methoxyphenyl) ketone, and 4-methoxybenzophenone from 1*+; cyclopropyl(4-methoxyphenyl) ketone and 4,4'-dimethoxybenzophenone from 2*+) have been rationalized in terms of a water-induced competition between O-neophyl shift and C-cyclopropyl beta-scission in the intermediate 1,1-diarylalkoxyl radicals 1r* and 2r*.

  12. Reactions of 5-methylcytosine cation radicals in DNA and model systems: thermal deprotonation from the 5-methyl group vs. excited state deprotonation from sugar

    PubMed Central

    Adhikary, Amitava; Kumar, Anil; Palmer, Brian J.; Todd, Andrew D.; Heizer, Alicia N.; Sevilla, Michael D.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To study the formation and subsequent reactions of the 5-methyl-2′-deoxycytidine cation radical (5-Me-2′-dC•+) in nucleosides and DNA-oligomers and compare to one electron oxidized thymidine. Materials and methods Employing electron spin resonance (ESR), cation radical formation and its reactions were investigated in 5-Me-2′-dC, thymidine (Thd) and their derivatives, in fully double stranded (ds) d[GC*GC*GC*GC*]2 and in the 5-Me-C/A mismatched, d[GGAC*AAGC:CCTAATCG], where C* = 5-Me-C. Results We report 5-Me-2′-dC•+ production by one-electron oxidation of 5-Me-2′-dC by Cl2•− via annealing in the dark at 155 K. Progressive annealing of 5-Me-2′-dC•+ at 155 K produces the allylic radical (C-CH2•). However, photoexcitation of 5-Me-2′-dC•+ by 405 nm laser or by photoflood lamp leads to only C3′• formation. Photoexcitation of N3-deprotonated thyminyl radical in Thd and its 5′-nucleotides leads to C3′• formation but not in 3′-TMP which resulted in the allylic radical (U-CH2•) and C5′• production. For excited 5-Me-2′,3′-ddC•+, absence of the 3′-OH group does not prevent C3′• formation. For d[GC*GC*GC*GC*]2 and d[GGAC*AAGC:CCTAATCG], intra-base paired proton transferred form of G cation radical (G(N1-H)•:C(+H+)) is found with no observable 5-Me-2′-dC•+ formation. Photoexcitation of (G(N1-H)•:C(+H+)) in d[GC*GC*GC*GC*]2 produced only C1′• and not the expected photoproducts from 5-Me-2′-dC•+. However, photoexcitation of (G(N1-H)•:C(+H+)) in d[GGAC*AAGC:CCTAATCG] led to C5′• and C1′• formation. Conclusions C-CH2• formation from 5-Me-2′-dC•+ occurs via ground state deprotonation from C5-methyl group on the base. In the excited 5-Me-2′-dC•+ and 5-Me-2′,3′-ddC•+, spin and charge localization at C3′ followed by deprotonation leads to C3′• formation. Thus, deprotonation from C3′ in the excited cation radical is kinetically controlled and sugar C-H bond energies are

  13. Acid-base equilibria involved in secondary reactions following the 4-carboxybenzophenone sensitized photooxidation of methionylglycine in aqueous solution. Spectral and time resolution of the decaying (S...N){sup +} radical cation

    SciTech Connect

    Hug, G.L.; Marciniak, B. |; Bobrowski, K. ||

    1996-09-05

    A radical cation with an intramolecular sulfur-nitrogen bond was formed in the photoinitiated transfer of an electron from the sulfur atom of the dipeptide Met-Gly to 4-carboxybenzophenone in its triplet state. The sulfur-nitrogen coupling involved two-center, three-electron bonds. The kinetics of the reactions of these radical cations, which were initiated by a laser flash, were followed over time. The principal method of implementing the spectral resolutions was accomplished through a multiple linear regression technique. This spectral analysis was repeated for numerous time windows during the lifetime of the transients` decays. The resulting concentrations of the transients were consistent with an independent factor analysis. It was found that the decay of the radical cations was multiexponential and that the decay varied with pH. A simplified reaction scheme was proposed whereby the absorbing radical cations can alternatively decay by an irreversible channel or react reversibly with OH{sup -}. Rate constants for the three elementary reactions of this scheme were determined from an analysis of the decay of the concentration of the radical cations. In addition, the equilibrium constant for the reversible reaction was determined by two separate procedures. 35 refs., 7 figs., 2 tabs.

  14. Kinetics and product branching fractions of reactions between a cation and a radical: Ar(+) + CH3 and O2(+) + CH3.

    PubMed

    Sawyer, Jordan C; Shuman, Nicholas S; Wiens, Justin P; Viggiano, Albert A

    2015-02-12

    A novel technique is described for the measurement of rate constants and product branching fractions of thermal reactions between cation and radical species. The technique is a variant of the variable electron and neutral density attachment mass spectrometry (VENDAMS) method, employing a flowing afterglow-Langmuir probe apparatus. A radical species is produced in situ via dissociative electron attachment to a neutral precursor; this allows for a quantitative derivation of the radical concentration and, as a result, a quantitative determination of rate constants. The technique is applied to the reactions of Ar(+) and O2(+) with CH3 at 300 K. The Ar(+) + CH3 reaction proceeds near the collisional rate constant of 1.1 × 10(-9) cm(3) s(-1) and has three product channels: → CH3(+) + Ar (k = 5 ± 2 × 10(-10) cm(3) s(-1)), → CH2(+) + H + Ar (k = 7 ± 2 × 10(-10) cm(3) s(-1)), → CH(+) + H2 + Ar (k = 5 ± 3 × 10(-11) cm(3) s(-1)). The O2(+) + CH3 reaction is also efficient, with direct charge transfer yielding CH3(+) as the primary product channel. Several results needed to support these measurements are reported, including the kinetics of Ar(+) and O2(+) with CH3I, electron attachment to CH3I, and mutual neutralization of CH3(+) and CH2(+) with I(-).

  15. Detection of Anisotropic Hyperfine Components of Chemically Prepared Carotenoid Radical Cations:1D and 2D ESEEM and Pulsed ENDOR Study

    SciTech Connect

    Konovalova, Tatyana A.; Dikanov, Sergei A.; Bowman, Michael K.; Kispert, Lowell D.

    2001-09-06

    Canthaxanthin and 8'-apo-B-caroten-8'-al radical cations chemically prepared on activated silica-alumina and in CH2CI2 solution containing A1C13 were studied by pulsed EPR and ENDOR spectroscopies. Both the 1D three-pulse ESEEM and the 2D HYSCORE spectra of the carotenoid-A1C13 mixtures exhibited the 27 A1 nuclei peak at 3.75 MHz. This indicates electron-transfer interactions between carotenoids and A1III ions resulting in the formation and stabilization of carotenoid radical cations. Davies ENDOR measurements of the canthaxanthin radical cation on silica-alumina determined the hyperfine couplings of B protons belonging to three different methyl groups with ahI=2.6 MHz, aH2=8.6MHz, and ah3 ca. 13 MHz. The principal components of the proton hyperfine tensors were obtained from HYSCORE spectra in A1C13 solutions and on the solid support. Identification of the protons was made on the basis of isotropic hyperfine couplings determined by RHF-INDO/SP molecular orbital calculations. In frozen A1C13 solution, the C(7, 7')Ha and C(14, 14')-Ha a protons were observed for Canthaxanthin and the C(8 or 14')-Ha, C(15')-Ha were observed for 8'-apo-B-caroten-8'-al. On the silica-alumina support, the C(10, 10')-Ha, C(11, 11')-Ha, and C(15,15')-Ha a protons were measured for Canthaxanthin and the C(12)-Ha and C(15')-Ha were measured for 8' apo-B-caroten-8'-al. Some protons with large isotropic couplings (>10 MHz) determined from HYSCORE analysis could be assigned to B protons, but the principal components of their hyperfine tensors are much more anisotropic than those reported previously for B protons. We suggest that cis/trans isomerization of carotenoids on silica-alumina results in stabilization of di-cis isomers with large isotropic couplings for some a protons which are comparable to those of B protons.

  16. Oxidation of guanine in G, GG, and GGG sequence contexts by aromatic pyrenyl radical cations and carbonate radical anions: relationship between kinetics and distribution of alkali-labile lesions.

    PubMed

    Lee, Young Ae; Durandin, Alexander; Dedon, Peter C; Geacintov, Nicholas E; Shafirovich, Vladimir

    2008-02-14

    Oxidatively generated DNA damage induced by the aromatic radical cation of the pyrene derivative 7,8,9,10-tetrahydroxytetrahydrobenzo[a]pyrene (BPT), and by carbonate radicals anions, was monitored from the initial one-electron transfer, or hole injection step, to the formation of hot alkali-labile chemical end-products monitored by gel electrophoresis. The fractions of BPT molecules bound to double-stranded 20-35-mer oligonucleotides with noncontiguous guanines G and grouped as contiguous GG and GGG sequences were determined by a fluorescence quenching method. Utilizing intense nanosecond 355 nm Nd:YAG laser pulses, the DNA-bound BPT molecules were photoionized to BPT*+ radicals by a consecutive two-photon ionization mechanism. The BPT*+ radicals thus generated within the duplexes selectively oxidize guanine by intraduplex electron-transfer reactions, and the rate constants of these reactions follow the trend 5'-..GGG.. > 5'-..GG.. > 5'-..G... In the case of CO3*- radicals, the oxidation of guanine occurs by intermolecular collision pathways, and the bimolecular rate constants are independent of base sequence context. However, the distributions of the end-products generated by CO3*- radicals, as well as by BPT*+, are base sequence context-dependent and are greater than those in isolated guanines at the 5'-G in 5'-...GG... sequences, and the first two 5'- guanines in the 5'-..GGG sequences. These results help to clarify the conditions that lead to a similar or different base sequence dependence of the initial hole injection step and the final distribution of oxidized, alkali-labile guanine products. In the case of the intermolecular one-electron oxidant CO3*-, the rate constant of hole injection is similar for contiguous and isolated guanines, but the subsequent equilibration of holes by hopping favors trapping and product formation at contiguous guanines, and the sequence dependence of these two phenomena are not correlated. In contrast, in the case of the DNA

  17. A manganese(V)-oxo π-cation radical complex: influence of one-electron oxidation on oxygen-atom transfer.

    PubMed

    Prokop, Katharine A; Neu, Heather M; de Visser, Sam P; Goldberg, David P

    2011-10-12

    One-electron oxidation of Mn(V)-oxo corrolazine 2 affords 2(+), the first example of a Mn(V)(O) π-cation radical porphyrinoid complex, which was characterized by UV-vis, EPR, LDI-MS, and DFT methods. Access to 2 and 2(+) allowed for a direct comparison of their reactivities in oxygen-atom transfer (OAT) reactions. Both complexes are capable of OAT to PPh(3) and RSR substrates, and 2(+) was found to be a more potent oxidant than 2. Analysis of rate constants and activation parameters, together with DFT calculations, points to a concerted OAT mechanism for 2(+) and 2 and indicates that the greater electrophilicity of 2(+) likely plays a dominant role in enhancing its reactivity. These results are relevant to comparisons between Compound I and Compound II in heme enzymes.

  18. Microbial biosynthesis of alkanes.

    PubMed

    Schirmer, Andreas; Rude, Mathew A; Li, Xuezhi; Popova, Emanuela; del Cardayre, Stephen B

    2010-07-30

    Alkanes, the major constituents of gasoline, diesel, and jet fuel, are naturally produced by diverse species; however, the genetics and biochemistry behind this biology have remained elusive. Here we describe the discovery of an alkane biosynthesis pathway from cyanobacteria. The pathway consists of an acyl-acyl carrier protein reductase and an aldehyde decarbonylase, which together convert intermediates of fatty acid metabolism to alkanes and alkenes. The aldehyde decarbonylase is related to the broadly functional nonheme diiron enzymes. Heterologous expression of the alkane operon in Escherichia coli leads to the production and secretion of C13 to C17 mixtures of alkanes and alkenes. These genes and enzymes can now be leveraged for the simple and direct conversion of renewable raw materials to fungible hydrocarbon fuels.

  19. Cascade Dissociations of Peptide Cation-Radicals. Part 1. Scope and Effects of Amino Acid Residues in Penta-, Nona- and Decapeptides

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Thomas W.; Hui, Renjie; Ledvina, Aaron; Coon, Joshua J.

    2013-01-01

    Amino acid residue-specific backbone and side-chain dissociations of peptide z ions in MS3 spectra were elucidated for over 40 pentapeptides with arginine C-terminated sequences of the AAXAR and AAHXR type, nonapeptides of the AAHAAXYAR and AAHAXAYAR type, and AAHAAXYAAR decapeptides. Peptide zn ions containing amino acid residues with readily transferrable benzylic or tertiary β-hydrogen atoms (Phe, Tyr, His, Trp, Val) underwent facile backbone cleavages to form dominant zn-2 or zn-3 ions. These backbone cleavages are thought to be triggered by a side-chain β-hydrogen atom transfer to the z ion Cα radical site followed by homolytic dissociation of the adjacent Cα—CO bond, forming zn-2 + HNCO cation-radicals that spontaneously dissociate by loss of HNCO. Amino acid residues that do not have readily transferrable β-hydrogen atoms (Gly, Ala) do not undergo the zn → zn-2 dissociations. The backbone cleavages compete with side-chain dissociations in z ions containing Asp and Asn residues. Side-chain dissociations are thought to be triggered by α-hydrogen atom transfers that activate the Cβ—Cγ or Cβ—heteroatom bonds for dissociations that dominate the MS3 spectra of z ions from peptides containing Leu, Cys, Lys, Met, Ser, Arg, Glu and Gln residues. The Lys, Arg, Gln, and Glu residues also participate in γ-hydrogen atom transfers that trigger other side-chain dissociations. PMID:22669761

  20. Fragmentation of peptide radical cations containing a tyrosine or tryptophan residue: structural features that favor formation of [x(n-1) + H]˙⁺ and [z(n-1) + H]˙⁺ ions.

    PubMed

    Mädler, Stefanie; Lau, Justin Kai-Chi; Williams, Declan; Wang, Yating; Saminathan, Irine S; Zhao, Junfang; Siu, K W Michael; Hopkinson, Alan C

    2014-06-12

    Peptide radical cations A(n)Y(•+) (where n = 3, 4, or 5) and A5W(•+) have been generated by collision-induced dissociation (CID) of [Cu(II)(tpy)(peptide)](•2+) complexes. Apart from the charge-driven fragmentation at the N-Cα bond of the hetero residue producing either [c + 2H](+) or [z - H](•+) ions and radical-driven fragmentation at the Cα-C bond to give a(+) ions, unusual product ions [x + H](•+) and [z + H](•+) are abundant in the CID spectra of the peptides with the hetero residue in the second or third position of the chain. The formation of these ions requires that both the charge and radical be located on the peptide backbone. Energy-resolved spectra established that the [z + H](•+) ion can be produced either directly from the peptide radical cation or via the fragment ion [x + H](•+). Additionally, backbone dissociation by loss of the C-terminal amino acid giving [b(n-1) - H](•+) increases in abundance with the length of the peptides. Mechanisms by which peptide radical cations dissociate have been modeled using density functional theory (B3LYP/6-31++G** level) on tetrapeptides AYAG(•+), AAYG(•+), and AWAG(•+).

  1. A search for pure compounds suitable for use as matrix in spectroscopic studies of radiation-produced radical cations. III. A selection of compounds based on the thermochemistry of hydrogen and proton transfer reactions between neutral molecules and their cations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van den Bosch, Ann; Ceulemans, Jan

    A systematic investigation is made of the thermochemistry of hydrogen and proton transfer between neutral molecules and their cations covering the entire organic chemistry, with the aim of selecting those compounds that are suitable for use as matrices in spectroscopic studies of radiation-produced radical cations. Compounds that are characterized by positive reaction enthalpies may be considered promising for use as matrices in such studies. Calculations are based on experimentally determined ionization energies and proton affinities and on carbon-hydrogen bond strengths that are arbitrarily taken as 418 kJ.mol -1 (100 kcal.mol -1). Effects of actual deviations from this value are considered. In the aliphatic series of compounds, reaction enthalpies depend strongly on functional groups present. Marked positive reaction enthalpies are obtained for alkenes, alkadienes, thioethers, mercaptans, iodoalkanes and tertiary amines. Non-aromatic cyclic compounds generally behave as their aliphatic counterparts. Thus, positive reaction enthalpies are generally obtained for unsaturated alicyclic hydrocarbons and cyclic thioethers. Positive reaction enthalpies are also obtained for piperidine, quinuclidine, manxine and derivatives. In the homocyclic aromatic series of compounds, reaction enthalpies are generally positive. Thus, positive reaction enthalpies are obtained for aromatic hydrocarbons, fluoro- and chlorobenzenes, aromatic amines (amino group attached directly to the ring) and halo- and methoxyanilines. In the heterocyclic aromatic series of compounds reaction enthalpies are generally negative. This is for instance the case for a large number of pyridine derivatives, di- and triazines and a number of bi- and tricyclic compounds. Positive reaction enthalpies are however obtained for furan and pyrrole.

  2. Biochemical studies on the metabolic activation of halogenated alkanes.

    PubMed Central

    Cheeseman, K H; Albano, E F; Tomasi, A; Slater, T F

    1985-01-01

    This paper reviews recent investigations by Slater and colleagues into the metabolic activation of halogenated alkanes in general and carbon tetrachloride in particular. It is becoming increasingly accepted that free radical intermediates are involved in the toxicity of many such compounds through mechanisms including lipid peroxidation, covalent binding, and cofactor depletion. Here we describe the experimental approaches that are used to establish that halogenated alkanes are metabolized in animal tissues to reactive free radicals. Electron spin resonance spectroscopy is used to identify free-radical products, often using spin-trapping compounds. The generation of specific free radicals by radiolytic methods is useful in the determination of the precise reactivity of radical intermediates postulated to be injurious to the cell. The enzymic mechanism of the production of such free radicals and their subsequent reactions with biological molecules is studied with specific metabolic inhibitors and free-radical scavengers. These combined techniques provide considerable insight into the process of metabolic activation of halogenated compounds. It is readily apparent, for instance, that the local oxygen concentration at the site of activation is of crucial importance to the subsequent reactions; the formation of peroxy radical derivatives from the primary free-radical product is shown to be of great significance in relation to carbon tetrachloride and may be of general importance. However, while these studies have provided much information on the biochemical mechanisms of halogenated alkane toxicity, it is clear that many problems remain to be solved. PMID:3007102

  3. Observation of covalent and electrostatic bonds in nitrogen-containing polycyclic ions formed by gas phase reactions of the benzene radical cation with pyrimidine.

    PubMed

    Attah, Isaac Kwame; Soliman, Abdel-Rahman; Platt, Sean P; Meot-Ner Mautner, Michael; Aziz, Saaudallah G; Samy El-Shall, M

    2017-03-01

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and polycyclic aromatic nitrogen heterocyclics (PANHs) are present in ionizing environments, including interstellar clouds and solar nebulae, where their ions can interact with neutral PAH and PANH molecules leading to the formation of a variety of complex organics including large N-containing ions. Herein, we report on the formation of a covalently-bonded (benzene·pyrimidine) radical cation dimer by the gas phase reaction of pyrimidine with the benzene radical cation at room temperature using the mass-selected ion mobility technique. No ligand exchange reactions with benzene and pyrimidine are observed indicating that the binding energy of the (benzene·pyrimidine)˙(+) adduct is significantly higher than both the benzene dimer cation and the proton-bound pyrimidine dimer. The (benzene·pyrimidine)˙(+) adduct shows thermal stability up to 541 K. Thermal dissociation of the (C6D6·C4H4N2)˙(+) adduct at temperatures higher than 500 K produces C4H4N2D(+) (m/z 82) suggesting the transfer of a D atom from the C6D6 moiety to the C4H4N2 moiety before the dissociation of the adduct. Mass-selected ion mobility of the (benzene·pyrimidine)˙(+) dimer reveals the presence of two families of isomers formed by electron impact ionization of the neutral (benzene·pyrimidine) dimer. The slower mobility peak corresponds to a non-covalent family of isomers with larger collision cross sections (76.0 ± 1.8 Å(2)) and the faster peak is consistent with a family of covalent isomers with more compact structures and smaller collision cross sections (67.7 ± 2.2 Å(2)). The mobility measurements at 509 K show only one peak corresponding to the family of stable covalently bonded isomers characterized by smaller collision cross sections (66.9 ± 1.9 Å(2) at 509 K). DFT calculations at the M06-2X/6-311++G** level show that the most stable (benzene·pyrimidine)˙(+) isomer forms a covalent C-N bond with a binding energy of 49.7 kcal mol(-1) and a

  4. Cascade dissociations of peptide cation-radicals. Part 1. Scope and effects of amino acid residues in penta-, nona-, and decapeptides.

    PubMed

    Chung, Thomas W; Hui, Renjie; Ledvina, Aaron; Coon, Joshua J; Tureček, Frantisek

    2012-08-01

    Amino acid residue-specific backbone and side-chain dissociations of peptide z ions in MS(3) spectra were elucidated for over 40 pentapeptides with arginine C-terminated sequences of the AAXAR and AAHXR type, nonapeptides of the AAHAAXX"AR and AAHAXAX"AR type, and AAHAAXX"AAR decapeptides. Peptide z(n) ions containing amino acid residues with readily transferrable benzylic or tertiary β-hydrogen atoms (Phe, Tyr, His, Trp, Val) underwent facile backbone cleavages to form dominant z(n-2) or z(n-3) ions. These backbone cleavages are thought to be triggered by a side-chain β-hydrogen atom transfer to the z ion C(α) radical site followed by homolytic dissociation of the adjacent C(α)-CO bond, forming x(n-2) cation-radicals that spontaneously dissociate by loss of HNCO. Amino acid residues that do not have readily transferrable β-hydrogen atoms (Gly, Ala) do not undergo the z(n) → z(n-2) dissociations. The backbone cleavages compete with side-chain dissociations in z ions containing Asp and Asn residues. Side-chain dissociations are thought to be triggered by α-hydrogen atom transfers that activate the C(β)-C(γ) or C(β)-heteroatom bonds for dissociations that dominate the MS(3) spectra of z ions from peptides containing Leu, Cys, Lys, Met, Ser, Arg, Glu, and Gln residues. The Lys, Arg, Gln, and Glu residues also participate in γ-hydrogen atom transfers that trigger other side-chain dissociations.

  5. Influence of ionization on the conformational preferences of peptide models. Ramachandran surfaces of N-formyl-glycine amide and N-formyl-alanine amide radical cations.

    PubMed

    Gil, Adrià; Sodupe, Mariona; Bertran, Juan

    2009-09-01

    Ramachandran maps of neutral and ionized HCO-Gly-NH2 and HCO-Ala-NH2 peptide models have been built at the B3LYP/6-31++G(d,p) level of calculation. Direct optimizations using B3LYP and the recently developed MPWB1K functional have also been carried out, as well as single-point calculations at the CCSD(T) level of theory with the 6-311++G(2df,2p) basis set. Results indicate that for both peptide models ionization can cause drastic changes in the shape of the PES in such a way that highly disallowed regions in neutral PES become low-energy regions in the radical cation surface. The structures localized in such regions, epsilonL+* and epsilonD+* are highly stabilized due to the formation of 2-centre-3-electron interactions between the two carbonyl oxygens. Inclusion of solvent effects by the conductor-like polarizable continuum model (CPCM) shows that the solute-solvent interaction energy plays an important role in determining the stability order.

  6. The hydrogen-bridged radical cation [NH 2C dbnd O⋯H⋯O dbnd CHCH 3] rad + and its dissociation by proton-transport catalysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jobst, Karl J.; Terlouw, Johan K.

    2012-01-01

    The title ion (HBRC-1) is an easily accessible hydrogen-bridged radical cation when generated by the decarbonylation of ionized ethyl oxamate, NH2COCOOC2H5. Tandem mass spectrometry experiments and CBS-QB3 model chemistry calculations agree that HBRC-1 dissociates into HC(OH)NH2+ + CH3COrad by proton-transport catalysis. Its CH3CHO component catalyzes the isomerization NH2-C-OHrad + → NH2C(O)Hrad + and the ensuing intermediate [NH2C(O)H⋯OCHCH3]rad + loses CH3COrad by a facile proton transfer. In support of this, lactamide ions ND2C(O)CH(OD)CH3rad + dissociate into DC(OH)ND2+ + CH3COrad via the HBRC-1 isotopologue [ND2CO⋯D⋯OCHCH3]rad +. HBRC-1 also plays a key role in the decarbonylation of its isomer ionized urethan, NH2COOC2H5.

  7. Structural and magnetic effects of meso-substitution in alkyl-substituted metalloporphyrinate pi-cation radicals: characterization of [Fe(TalkylP*)(Cl)]SbCl6 (alkyl = ethyl and n-propyl).

    PubMed

    Li, Ming; Neal, Teresa J; Wyllie, Graeme R A; Schulz, Charles E; Scheidt, W Robert

    2010-09-06

    We report the preparation and characterization of two meso-alkyl substituted porphyrin pi-cation radical derivatives, [Fe(TalkylP(*))(Cl)]SbCl(6) (alkyl = ethyl or propyl). Both complexes have been characterized by UV/vis/near-IR, IR, and Mossbauer spectroscopy, temperature-dependent solid-state magnetic susceptibility measurements, and X-ray structure determinations. All data for both oxidized species are consistent with the formulation of the complexes as ring-oxidized iron(III) porphyrin species. The molecular structures of the two five-coordinate species have the typical square-pyramidal coordination group of high-spin iron(III) derivatives. The crystal structures also reveal that the species form cofacial pi-pi dimers with lateral shifts of 1.44 A and 3.22 A, respectively, for the propyl and ethyl radical derivatives. Both radicals exhibit porphyrin cores with alternating bond distance patterns in the inner 16-membered ring. In addition, [Fe(TEtP(*))(Cl)]SbCl(6) and [Fe(TPrP(*))(Cl)]SbCl(6) have been characterized by temperature-dependent (6-300 K) magnetic susceptibility studies, the best fitting of the temperature-dependent moments reveal strong coupling between iron spins and porphyrin radical, and a smaller magnitude of antiferromagnetic coupling between ring radicals, which are opposite to those found in the five-coordinate iron(III) OEP radicals. The differences in structure and properties of the cation radical meso-alkyl and beta-alkyl derivatives possibly reflect differences in properties of a(1u)- and a(2u)-forming radicals.

  8. Full dimensional quantum-mechanical simulations for the vibronic dynamics of difluorobenzene radical cation isomers using the multilayer multiconfiguration time-dependent Hartree method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meng, Qingyong; Faraji, Shirin; Vendrell, Oriol; Meyer, Hans-Dieter

    2012-10-01

    Full dimensional multilayer multiconfiguration time-dependent Hartree (ML-MCTDH) calculations of the dynamics of the three difluorobenzene cationic isomers in five lowest-lying doublet electronic states using the ab initio multistate multimode vibronic coupling Hamiltonian (MMVCH) model are carried out using the Heidelberg MCTDH package. The same dynamical problems, but treated with the MCTDH scheme and using a reduced dimensional ab initio MMVCH model, have been previously reported [S. Faraji, H.-D. Meyer, and H. Köppel, "Multistate vibronic interactions in difluorobenzene radical cations. II Quantum dynamical simulations," J. Chem. Phys. 129, 074311 (2008), 10.1063/1.2958918]. For easy comparison with the reduced dimensional results, 11D or 10D ML-MCTDH calculations are also performed. Extensive ML-MCTDH test calculations are performed to find appropriate ML-MCTDH wavefunction structures (ML-trees), and the convergence of the ML-MCTDH calculations are carefully checked to ensure accurate results. Based on the appropriate ML-trees, the photoelectron (PE) spectrum and the mass analyzed threshold ionization (MATI) spectrum are simulated, analyzed, and compared with corresponding experimental spectra. Because of its efficient simulation capability for large systems, ML-MCTDH calculations save a considerable amount of central processing unit (CPU)-time, even when a reduced dimensional MMVCH is used, i.e., the same reduced model as in the corresponding MCTDH calculations. Simulations of the experimental PE spectra by full dimensional ML-MCTDH calculations reproduced main peaks, which originate from different electronic states. The agreement is improved as compared to the reduced dimensionality calculations. Unfortunately, the experimental PE spectra are not very well resolved. Therefore, we compare our calculations additionally with highly resolved MATI spectra, which, however, are only available for the tilde{X} state. Based on a series of ML-MCTDH simulations with

  9. Conformational Distortions of π-Cation Radical (β-Oxoporphyrin)copper(II) Derivatives: [Cu(2,7,12-TrioxoOEHP)][SbCl(6)] and [Cu(2,7-DioxoOEiBC)][SbCl(6)].

    PubMed

    Turowska-Tyrk, Ilona; Kang, Seong-Joo; Scheidt, W Robert

    2011-03-01

    The preparation and characterization of two π-cation radical derivatives of copper β-oxo porphyrins is described. [3,3,8,8,13,13,17,18-Octaethyl-(3H,8H,13H)-porphine-2,7,12-trionato (2-)] copper π-cation radical, [Cu(2,7,12-trioxoOEHP(.))](+), and [3,3,8,8,12,13,17,18-octaethyl-(3H,8H)-porphine-2,7-dionato(2-)] copper π-cation radical, [Cu(2,7-dioxoOEiBC(.))](+), have been prepared and characterized by single-crystal X-ray determinations, UV/vis/NIR, and IR spectroscopies. Both molecules have modest distortion from the planarity and show monomeric units in the solid state. [Cu(2,7-dioxoOEiBC(.))](+) shows a concentration dependent near-IR band at 1410 nm. Crystal data for [Cu(2,7,12-trioxoOEHP(.))][SbCl(6)]: tetragonal, space group P4(2)/n, a = 31.085 (14) Å, c = 9.410 (4) Å, V = 9093 Å(3), Z = 8, T = 127 K. Crystal data for [Cu(2,7-dioxoOEiBC(.))][SbCl(6)]: monoclinic, space group P2(1)/n, a = 9.655 (4) Å, b = 20.592 (8) Å, c = 43.347 (17) Åβ = 89.97(1)(°), V = 8618. Å(3), Z = 8, T = 100 K.

  10. Spectroscopic and Kinetic Characterization of Peroxidase-Like π-Cation Radical Pinch-Porphyrin-Iron(III) Reaction Intermediate Models of Peroxidase Enzymes.

    PubMed

    Hernández Anzaldo, Samuel; Arroyo Abad, Uriel; León García, Armando; Ramírez Rosales, Daniel; Zamorano Ulloa, Rafael; Reyes Ortega, Yasmi

    2016-06-27

    The spectroscopic and kinetic characterization of two intermediates from the H₂O₂ oxidation of three dimethyl ester [(proto), (meso), (deuteroporphyrinato) (picdien)]Fe(III) complexes ([FePPPic], [FeMPPic] and [FeDPPic], respectively) pinch-porphyrin peroxidase enzyme models, with s = 5/2 and 3/2 Fe(III) quantum mixed spin (qms) ground states is described herein. The kinetic study by UV/Vis at λmax = 465 nm showed two different types of kinetics during the oxidation process in the guaiacol test for peroxidases (1-3 + guaiacol + H₂O₂ → oxidation guaiacol products). The first intermediate was observed during the first 24 s of the reaction. When the reaction conditions were changed to higher concentration of pinch-porphyrins and hydrogen peroxide only one type of kinetics was observed. Next, the reaction was performed only between pinch-porphyrins-Fe(III) and H₂O₂, resulting in only two types of kinetics that were developed during the first 0-4 s. After this time a self-oxidation process was observed. Our hypotheses state that the formation of the π-cation radicals, reaction intermediates of the pinch-porphyrin-Fe(III) family with the ligand picdien [N,N'-bis-pyridin-2-ylmethyl-propane-1,3-diamine], occurred with unique kinetics that are different from the overall process and was involved in the oxidation pathway. UV-Vis, ¹H-NMR and ESR spectra confirmed the formation of such intermediates. The results in this paper highlight the link between different spectroscopic techniques that positively depict the kinetic traits of artificial compounds with enzyme-like activity.

  11. A unified description of the electrochemical, charge distribution, and spectroscopic properties of the special-pair radical cation in bacterial photosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Reimers, Jeffrey R; Hush, Noel S

    2004-04-07

    We apply our four-state 70-vibration vibronic-coupling model for the properties of the photosynthetic special-pair radical cation to: (1) interpret the observed correlations between the midpoint potential and the distribution of spin density between the two bacteriochlorophylls for 30 mutants of Rhodobacter sphaeroides, (2) interpret the observed average intervalence hole-transfer absorption energies as a function of spin density for six mutants, and (3) simulate the recently obtained intervalence electroabsorption Stark spectrum of the wild-type reaction center. While three new parameters describing the location of the sites of mutation with respect to the special pair are required to describe the midpoint-potential data, a priori predictions are made for the transition energies and the Stark spectrum. In general, excellent predictions are made of the observed quantities, with deviations being typically of the order of twice the experimental uncertainties. A unified description of many chemical and spectroscopic properties of the bacterial reaction center is thus provided. Central to the analysis is the assumption that the perturbations made to the reaction center, either via mutations of protein residues or by application of an external electric field, act only to independently modify the oxidation potentials of the two halves of the special pair and hence the redox asymmetry E0. While this appears to be a good approximation, clear evidence is presented that effects of mutation can be more extensive than what is allowed for. A thorough set of analytical equations describing the observed properties is obtained using the Born-Oppenheimer adiabatic approximation. These equations are generally appropriate for intervalence charge-transfer problems and include, for the first time, full treatment of both symmetric and antisymmetric vibrational motions. The limits of validity of the adiabatic approach to the full nonadiabatic problem are obtained.

  12. Crystalline bipyridinium radical complexes and uses thereof

    DOEpatents

    Fahrenbach, Albert C.; Barnes, Jonathan C.; Li, Hao; Stoddart, J. Fraser; Basuray, Ashish Neil; Sampath, Srinivasan

    2015-09-01

    Described herein are methods of generating 4,4'-bipyridinium radical cations (BIPY.sup..cndot.+), and methods for utilizing the radical-radical interactions between two or more BIPY.sup..cndot.+ radical cations that ensue for the creation of novel materials for applications in nanotechnology. Synthetic methodologies, crystallographic engineering techniques, methods of physical characterization, and end uses are described.

  13. Effect of electrolytes and temperature on dications and radical cations of carotenoids: Electrochemical, optical absorption, and high-performance liquid chromatography studies

    SciTech Connect

    He, Z.; Kispert, L.D.

    1999-11-25

    The effect of supporting electrolytes and temperature on the behavior of dications and radical cations of carotenoids is studied. Cyclic voltammograms (CVs) of canthaxanthin (I) at 23 and {minus}25 C show that Car{sup sm{underscore}bullet+} of I has similar stability during the time of the CV scan, when using tetrabutylammonium perchlorate (TBAPC), tetrabutylammonium tetrafluoroborate (TBATFB), or tetrabutylammonium hexafluorophosphate (TBAHFP) as supporting electrolyte. However, the stability of Car{sup 2+} decreases when using TBAPC or TBATFB; {beta}-carotene (II) shows similar behavior. The CV of I at {minus}25 C shows a strong cathodic wave (wave 6) near {minus}0.15 V (vs Ag) with an intensity about half that of the neutral oxidation wave when TBAPC or TBATFB is the supporting electrolyte. When TBAHFP is used, wave 6 (ca. {minus}0.05 V vs Ag) is ca. 8 times weaker than when TBAPC or TBATFB is used. This wave results from the reduction of a species that may be a decay product of Car{sup 2+} of I. Results show that these electrolytes commonly used in electrochemical studies may affect the studied systems to different extents. In simultaneous bulk electrolysis (BE) and optical absorption spectroscopic measurements, the absorption band of Car{sup 2+} of I in the presence of 0.1 M TBAHFP can be observed by lowering the BE temperature to {minus}20 C. In the presence of 0.1 M TBAPC or TBATFB, this band is not observed, even at {minus}50 C. Isomerization of neutral I (as shown by HPLC and its blue absorption band shift) is observed only when the Car{sup 2+} absorption band is absent during BE. This observation, along with an increase of the neutral absorption band after stopping BE, suggests that the equilibrium Car + Car{sup 2+} {r{underscore}equilibrium} 2Car{sup {sm{underscore}bullet}+} is shifted to the left because Car{sup 2+} decays more quickly than Car{sup {sm{underscore}bullet}+} in the presence of electrolyte and this is a major path for formation of cis

  14. Strong Inhibition of O-Atom Transfer Reactivity for Mn(IV)(O)(π-Radical-Cation)(Lewis Acid) versus Mn(V)(O) Porphyrinoid Complexes.

    PubMed

    Zaragoza, Jan Paulo T; Baglia, Regina A; Siegler, Maxime A; Goldberg, David P

    2015-05-27

    The oxygen atom transfer (OAT) reactivity of two valence tautomers of a Mn(V)(O) porphyrinoid complex was compared. The OAT kinetics of Mn(V)(O)(TBP8Cz) (TBP8Cz = octakis(p-tert-butylphenyl)corrolazinato(3-)) reacting with a series of triarylphosphine (PAr3) substrates were monitored by stopped-flow UV-vis spectroscopy, and revealed second-order rate constants ranging from 16(1) to 1.43(6) × 10(4) M(-1) s(-1). Characterization of the OAT transition state analogues Mn(III)(OPPh3)(TBP8Cz) and Mn(III)(OP(o-tolyl)3)(TBP8Cz) was carried out by single-crystal X-ray diffraction (XRD). A valence tautomer of the closed-shell Mn(V)(O)(TBP8Cz) can be stabilized by the addition of Lewis and Brønsted acids, resulting in the open-shell Mn(IV)(O)(TBP8Cz(•+)):LA (LA = Zn(II), B(C6F5)3, H(+)) complexes. These Mn(IV)(O)(π-radical-cation) derivatives exhibit dramatically inhibited rates of OAT with the PAr3 substrates (k = 8.5(2) × 10(-3) - 8.7 M(-1) s(-1)), contrasting the previously observed rate increase of H-atom transfer (HAT) for Mn(IV)(O)(TBP8Cz(•+)):LA with phenols. A Hammett analysis showed that the OAT reactivity for Mn(IV)(O)(TBP8Cz(•+)):LA is influenced by the Lewis acid strength. Spectral redox titration of Mn(IV)(O)(TBP8Cz(•+)):Zn(II) gives Ered = 0.69 V vs SCE, which is nearly +700 mV above its valence tautomer Mn(V)(O)(TBP8Cz) (Ered = -0.05 V). These data suggest that the two-electron electrophilicity of the Mn(O) valence tautomers dominate OAT reactivity and do not follow the trend in one-electron redox potentials, which appear to dominate HAT reactivity. This study provides new fundamental insights regarding the relative OAT and HAT reactivity of valence tautomers such as M(V)(O)(porph) versus M(IV)(O)(porph(•+)) (M = Mn or Fe) found in heme enzymes.

  15. Identity and mechanisms of alkane-oxidizing metalloenzymes from deep-sea hydrothermal vents.

    PubMed

    Bertrand, Erin M; Keddis, Ramaydalis; Groves, John T; Vetriani, Costantino; Austin, Rachel Narehood

    2013-01-01

    Six aerobic alkanotrophs (organism that can metabolize alkanes as their sole carbon source) isolated from deep-sea hydrothermal vents were characterized using the radical clock substrate norcarane to determine the metalloenzyme and reaction mechanism used to oxidize alkanes. The organisms studied were Alcanivorax sp. strains EPR7 and MAR14, Marinobacter sp. strain EPR21, Nocardioides sp. strains EPR26w, EPR28w, and Parvibaculum hydrocarbonoclasticum strain EPR92. Each organism was able to grow on n-alkanes as the sole carbon source and therefore must express genes encoding an alkane-oxidizing enzyme. Results from the oxidation of the radical-clock diagnostic substrate norcarane demonstrated that five of the six organisms (EPR7, MAR14, EPR21, EPR26w, and EPR28w) used an alkane hydroxylase functionally similar to AlkB to catalyze the oxidation of medium-chain alkanes, while the sixth organism (EPR92) used an alkane-oxidizing cytochrome P450 (CYP)-like protein to catalyze the oxidation. DNA sequencing indicated that EPR7 and EPR21 possess genes encoding AlkB proteins, while sequencing results from EPR92 confirmed the presence of a gene encoding CYP-like alkane hydroxylase, consistent with the results from the norcarane experiments.

  16. Identity and mechanisms of alkane-oxidizing metalloenzymes from deep-sea hydrothermal vents

    PubMed Central

    Bertrand, Erin M.; Keddis, Ramaydalis; Groves, John T.; Vetriani, Costantino; Austin, Rachel Narehood

    2013-01-01

    Six aerobic alkanotrophs (organism that can metabolize alkanes as their sole carbon source) isolated from deep-sea hydrothermal vents were characterized using the radical clock substrate norcarane to determine the metalloenzyme and reaction mechanism used to oxidize alkanes. The organisms studied were Alcanivorax sp. strains EPR7 and MAR14, Marinobacter sp. strain EPR21, Nocardioides sp. strains EPR26w, EPR28w, and Parvibaculum hydrocarbonoclasticum strain EPR92. Each organism was able to grow on n-alkanes as the sole carbon source and therefore must express genes encoding an alkane-oxidizing enzyme. Results from the oxidation of the radical-clock diagnostic substrate norcarane demonstrated that five of the six organisms (EPR7, MAR14, EPR21, EPR26w, and EPR28w) used an alkane hydroxylase functionally similar to AlkB to catalyze the oxidation of medium-chain alkanes, while the sixth organism (EPR92) used an alkane-oxidizing cytochrome P450 (CYP)-like protein to catalyze the oxidation. DNA sequencing indicated that EPR7 and EPR21 possess genes encoding AlkB proteins, while sequencing results from EPR92 confirmed the presence of a gene encoding CYP-like alkane hydroxylase, consistent with the results from the norcarane experiments. PMID:23825470

  17. Surface functionalized SiO2 nanoparticles with cationic polymers via the combination of mussel inspired chemistry and surface initiated atom transfer radical polymerization: Characterization and enhanced removal of organic dye.

    PubMed

    Huang, Qiang; Liu, Meiying; Mao, Liucheng; Xu, Dazhuang; Zeng, Guangjian; Huang, Hongye; Jiang, Ruming; Deng, Fengjie; Zhang, Xiaoyong; Wei, Yen

    2017-03-28

    Monodispersed SiO2 particles functionalized with cationic polymers poly-((3-acrylamidopropyl)trimethylammonium chloride) (PAPTCl) were prepared using mussel inspired surface modification strategy and surface initiated atom transfer radical polymerization (SI-ATRP). Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, transmission electron microscope, thermogravimetric analysis, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and zeta potential were employed to characterize these SiO2 samples. The adsorption performance of the functionalized SiO2 (donated as SiO2-PDA-PAPTCl) towards anionic organic dye Congo red (CR) was investigated to evaluate their potential environmental applications. We demonstrated that the surface of SiO2 particles can be successfully functionalized with cationic PAPTCl. The adsorption capability of as-prepared SiO2 was found to increases from 28.70 and 106.65mg/g after surface grafted with cationic polymers. The significant enhancement in the adsorption capability of SiO2-PDA-PAPTCl is mainly attributed to the introduction of cationic polymers. More importantly, this strategy is expected to be promising for fabrication of many other functional polymer nanocomposites for environmental applications due to the universality of mussel inspired chemistry and well designability and good monomer adaptability of SI-ATRP.

  18. Determination of melamine and cyromazine in milk by high performance liquid chromatography coupled with online solid-phase extraction using a novel cation-exchange restricted access material synthesized by surface initiated atom transfer radical polymerization.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yingying; Lin, Shen; Jiang, Ping; Zhu, Xudong; Ling, Jing; Zhang, Wen; Dong, Xiangchao

    2014-04-11

    A novel strong-cation-exchange restricted access material has been synthesized by atom transfer radical polymerization (ATRP). In the synthesis, poly(3-sulfopropyl methacrylate-co-ethylene dimethacrylate), [p(SPM/EDMA)] was grafted on the silica by surface-initiated ATRP first. The poly(glycerol mono-methacrylate) [pGMMA] was then immobilized on the external surface, which created a chemical diffusion barrier for protein exclusion. The resulting Sil-g-p(SPM/EDMA)-g-pGMMA has both functions of protein exclusion and cation exchange, exhibiting the property of cation-exchange restricted access material. The application of Sil-g-p(SPM/EDMA)-g-pGMMA has been studied by the determination of melamine and cyromazine in bovine milk using the online solid-phase extraction/HPLC method. In the process, the Sil-g-p(SPM/EDMA)-g-pGMMA was used for the sample pre-treatment and a HILIC column was employed as the analytical column. The method has shown good accuracy, precision and low limits of detections. The result demonstrated that the Sil-g-p(SPM/EDMA)-g-pGMMA can be used for the cation extraction from biological samples by direct HPLC injection.

  19. Cyclic voltammetry, spectroelectrochemical and photochemical studies of 7,7{prime}-diphenyl-7,7{prime}-diapocarotene cation radicals and dications adsorbed on the surface of electrodes

    SciTech Connect

    Gao, G.; Kispert, L.D.

    1996-10-01

    7,7{prime}-diphenyl-7,7{prime}-diapocarotene in dichloromethane can adsorb on glassy carbon, platinum and gold electrode surfaces upon electrochemical oxidation, resulting in an intense cyclic voltammogram(CV) cathodic peak. Spectroelectrochemical studies of the adsorbed material on ITO electrode surfaces showed that cation radicals, dications and possibly dimers were formed. Irradiation of the surface with visible light resulting in changes in the optical absorption bands. Similar adsorption behavior was also observed by using various supporting electrolytes and solvents. However CV and simultaneous bulk electrolysis-optical spectra obtained in anhydrous acetonitrile show no adsorption. A mechanism involving electrode reactions and adsorption equilibria will be presented.

  20. H and D attachment to naphthalene: spectra and thermochemistry of cold gas-phase 1-C10H9 and 1-C10H8D radicals and cations.

    PubMed

    Krechkivska, Olha; Wilcox, Callan M; Chan, Bun; Jacob, Rebecca; Liu, Yu; Nauta, Klaas; Kable, Scott H; Radom, Leo; Schmidt, Timothy W

    2015-04-02

    Excitation spectra of the 1H-naphthalene (1-C10H9) and 1D-naphthalene (1-C10H8D) radicals, and their cations, are obtained by laser spectroscopy and mass spectrometry of a skimmed free-jet expansion following an electrical discharge. The spectra are assigned on the basis of density functional theory calculations. Isotopic shifts in origin transitions, vibrational frequencies and ionization energies were found to be well reproduced by (time-dependent) density functional theory. Absolute bond dissociation energies, ionization energies and proton affinities were calculated using high-level quantum chemical methods.

  1. Metabolism of Hydrocarbons in n-Alkane-Utilizing Anaerobic Bacteria.

    PubMed

    Wilkes, Heinz; Buckel, Wolfgang; Golding, Bernard T; Rabus, Ralf

    2016-01-01

    The glycyl radical enzyme-catalyzed addition of n-alkanes to fumarate creates a C-C-bond between two concomitantly formed stereogenic carbon centers. The configurations of the two diastereoisomers of the product resulting from n-hexane activation by the n-alkane-utilizing denitrifying bacterium strain HxN1, i.e. (1-methylpentyl)succinate, were assigned as (2S,1'R) and (2R,1'R). Experiments with stereospecifically deuterated n-(2,5-2H2)hexanes revealed that exclusively the pro-S hydrogen atom is abstracted from C2 of the n-alkane by the enzyme and later transferred back to C3 of the alkylsuccinate formed. These results indicate that the alkylsuccinate-forming reaction proceeds with an inversion of configuration at the carbon atom (C2) of the n-alkane forming the new C-C-bond, and thus stereochemically resembles a SN2-type reaction. Therefore, the reaction may occur in a concerted manner, which may avoid the highly energetic hex-2-yl radical as an intermediate. The reaction is associated with a significant primary kinetic isotope effect (kH/kD ≥3) for hydrogen, indicating that the homolytic C-H-bond cleavage is involved in the first irreversible step of the reaction mechanism. The (1-methylalkyl)succinate synthases of n-alkane-utilizing anaerobic bacteria apparently have very broad substrate ranges enabling them to activate not only aliphatic but also alkyl-aromatic hydrocarbons. Thus, two denitrifiers and one sulfate reducer were shown to convert the nongrowth substrate toluene to benzylsuccinate and further to the dead-end product benzoyl-CoA. For this purpose, however, the modified β-oxidation pathway known from alkylbenzene-utilizing bacteria was not employed, but rather the pathway used for n-alkane degradation involving CoA ligation, carbon skeleton rearrangement and decarboxylation. Furthermore, various n-alkane- and alkylbenzene-utilizing denitrifiers and sulfate reducers were found to be capable of forming benzyl alcohols from diverse alkylbenzenes

  2. Alkane desaturation by concerted double hydrogen atom transfer to benzyne.

    PubMed

    Niu, Dawen; Willoughby, Patrick H; Woods, Brian P; Baire, Beeraiah; Hoye, Thomas R

    2013-09-26

    The removal of two vicinal hydrogen atoms from an alkane to produce an alkene is a challenge for synthetic chemists. In nature, desaturases and acetylenases are adept at achieving this essential oxidative functionalization reaction, for example during the biosynthesis of unsaturated fatty acids, eicosanoids, gibberellins and carotenoids. Alkane-to-alkene conversion almost always involves one or more chemical intermediates in a multistep reaction pathway; these may be either isolable species (such as alcohols or alkyl halides) or reactive intermediates (such as carbocations, alkyl radicals, or σ-alkyl-metal species). Here we report a desaturation reaction of simple, unactivated alkanes that is mechanistically unique. We show that benzynes are capable of the concerted removal of two vicinal hydrogen atoms from a hydrocarbon. The discovery of this exothermic, net redox process was enabled by the simple thermal generation of reactive benzyne intermediates through the hexadehydro-Diels-Alder cycloisomerization reaction of triyne substrates. We are not aware of any single-step, bimolecular reaction in which two hydrogen atoms are simultaneously transferred from a saturated alkane. Computational studies indicate a preferred geometry with eclipsed vicinal C-H bonds in the alkane donor.

  3. Diastereo-specific conformational properties of neutral, protonated and radical cation forms of (1R,2S)-cis- and (1R,2R)-trans-amino-indanol by gas phase spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Bouchet, Aude; Klyne, Johanna; Piani, Giovanni; Dopfer, Otto; Zehnacker, Anne

    2015-10-21

    Chirality effects on the intramolecular interactions strongly depend on the charge and protonation states. Here, the influence of chirality on the structure of the neutral, protonated, and radical cation forms of (1R,2S)-cis- and (1R,2R)-trans-1-amino-2-indanol diastereomers, prototypical molecules with two chiral centers, is investigated in a molecular beam by laser spectroscopy coupled with quantum chemical calculations. The neutral systems are structurally characterised by double resonance IR-UV spectroscopy, while IR-induced dissociation spectroscopy is employed for the charged molecules. The sterical constraints due to the cyclic nature of the molecule emphasise the chirality effects, which manifest themselves by the formation of an intramolecular hydrogen bond in neutral or protonated (1R,2S)-cis-amino-indanol. In contrast, this interaction is not possible in (1R,2R)-trans-amino-indanol. In the protonated species, chirality also influences the spectroscopic probes in the NH/OH stretch range by fine-tuning subtle effects such as the hyperconjugation between the σ(OH) orbital and σ* orbitals localised on the alicyclic ring. The radical cation undergoes opening of the alicyclic ring, which results in an ionisation-induced loss of the chirality effects.

  4. Modelling the bacterial photosynthetic reaction center. V. Assignment of the electronic transition observed at 2200 cm-1 in the special-pair radical-cation as a second-highest occupied molecular orbital to highest occupied molecular orbital transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reimers, Jeffrey R.; Shapley, Warwick A.; Hush, Noel S.

    2003-08-01

    Primary charge separation in photoexcited photosynthetic reaction centers produces the radical cation P+ of a bacteriochlorophyll dimer known as the special-pair P. P+ has an intense electronic transition in the vicinity of 1800-5000 cm-1 which is usually assigned to the interchromophore hole-transfer excitation of the dimer radical cation; in principle, this spectrum can give much insight into key steps of the solar-to-electrical energy-conversion process. The extent to which this transition is localized on one-half of the dimer or delocalized over both is of utmost importance; an authoritative deduction of this quantity from purely spectroscopic arguments requires the detailed assignment of the observed high to medium resolution spectra. For reaction centers containing bacteriochlorophylls a or b, a shoulder is observed at 2200 cm-1 on the low-energy side of the main hole-transfer absorption band, a band whose maximum is near 2700 cm-1. Before quantitative analysis of the hole-transfer absorption in these well-studied systems can be attempted, the nature of the processes leading to this shoulder must be determined. We interpret it as arising from an intrachromophore SHOMO to HOMO transition whose intensity arises wholly through vibronic coupling with the hole-transfer band. A range of ab initio and density-functional calculations are performed to estimate the energy of this transition both for monomeric cations and for P+ of Blastochloris viridis, Rhodobacter sphaeroides, Chlorobium limicola, Chlorobium tepidum, Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, Synochocystis S.6803, spinach photosystems I and II, Heliobacillus mobilis, and finally Heliobacterium modesticaldum, with the results found to qualitatively describe the available experimental data. Subsequent papers in this series provide quantitative analyses of the vibronic coupling and complete spectral simulations based on the model developed herein.

  5. Degradation of alkanes by bacteria.

    PubMed

    Rojo, Fernando

    2009-10-01

    Pollution of soil and water environments by crude oil has been, and is still today, an important problem. Crude oil is a complex mixture of thousands of compounds. Among them, alkanes constitute the major fraction. Alkanes are saturated hydrocarbons of different sizes and structures. Although they are chemically very inert, most of them can be efficiently degraded by several microorganisms. This review summarizes current knowledge on how microorganisms degrade alkanes, focusing on the biochemical pathways used and on how the expression of pathway genes is regulated and integrated within cell physiology.

  6. Notable effects of the metal salts on the formation and decay reactions of α-tocopheroxyl radical in acetonitrile solution. The complex formation between α-tocopheroxyl and metal cations.

    PubMed

    Kohno, Yutaro; Fujii, Miyabi; Matsuoka, Chihiro; Hashimoto, Haruka; Ouchi, Aya; Nagaoka, Shin-ichi; Mukai, Kazuo

    2011-08-18

    The measurement of the UV-vis absorption spectrum of α-tocopheroxyl (α-Toc(•)) radical was performed by reacting aroxyl (ArO(•)) radical with α-tocopherol (α-TocH) in acetonitrile solution including four kinds of alkali and alkaline earth metal salts (MX or MX(2)) (LiClO(4), LiI, NaClO(4), and Mg(ClO(4))(2)), using stopped-flow spectrophotometry. The maximum wavelength (λ(max)) of the absorption spectrum of the α-Toc(•) at 425.0 nm increased with increasing concentration of metal salts (0-0.500 M) in acetonitrile, and it approached constant values, suggesting an [α-Toc(•)-M(+) (or M(2+))] complex formation. The stability constants (K) were determined to be 9.2, 2.8, and 45 M(-1) for LiClO(4), NaClO(4), and Mg(ClO(4))(2), respectively. By reacting ArO(•) with α-TocH in acetonitrile, the absorption of ArO(•) disappeared rapidly, while that of α-Toc(•) appeared and then decreased gradually as a result of the bimolecular self-reaction of α-Toc(•) after passing through the maximum. The second-order rate constants (k(s)) obtained for the reaction of α-TocH with ArO(•) increased linearly with an increasing concentration of metal salts. The results indicate that the hydrogen transfer reaction of α-TocH proceeds via an electron transfer intermediate from α-TocH to ArO(•) radicals followed by proton transfer. Both the coordination of metal cations to the one-electron reduced anions of ArO(•) (ArO:(-)) and the coordination of counteranions to the one-electron oxidized cations of α-TocH (α-TocH(•)(+)) may stabilize the intermediate, resulting in the acceleration of electron transfer. A remarkable effect of metal salts on the rate of bimolecular self-reaction (2k(d)) of the α-Toc(•) radical was also observed. The rate constant (2k(d)) decreased rapidly with increasing concentrations of the metal salts. The 2k(d) value decreased at the same concentration of the metal salts in the following order: no metal salt > NaClO(4) > LiClO(4) > Mg

  7. Copper-Catalyzed Intermolecular Amidation and Imidation of Unactivated Alkanes

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    We report a set of rare copper-catalyzed reactions of alkanes with simple amides, sulfonamides, and imides (i.e., benzamides, tosylamides, carbamates, and phthalimide) to form the corresponding N-alkyl products. The reactions lead to functionalization at secondary C–H bonds over tertiary C–H bonds and even occur at primary C–H bonds. [(phen)Cu(phth)] (1-phth) and [(phen)Cu(phth)2] (1-phth2), which are potential intermediates in the reaction, have been isolated and fully characterized. The stoichiometric reactions of 1-phth and 1-phth2 with alkanes, alkyl radicals, and radical probes were investigated to elucidate the mechanism of the amidation. The catalytic and stoichiometric reactions require both copper and tBuOOtBu for the generation of N-alkyl product. Neither 1-phth nor 1-phth2 reacted with excess cyclohexane at 100 °C without tBuOOtBu. However, the reactions of 1-phth and 1-phth2 with tBuOOtBu afforded N-cyclohexylphthalimide (Cy-phth), N-methylphthalimide, and tert-butoxycyclohexane (Cy-OtBu) in approximate ratios of 70:20:30, respectively. Reactions with radical traps support the intermediacy of a tert-butoxy radical, which forms an alkyl radical intermediate. The intermediacy of an alkyl radical was evidenced by the catalytic reaction of cyclohexane with benzamide in the presence of CBr4, which formed exclusively bromocyclohexane. Furthermore, stoichiometric reactions of [(phen)Cu(phth)2] with tBuOOtBu and (Ph(Me)2CO)2 at 100 °C without cyclohexane afforded N-methylphthalimide (Me-phth) from β-Me scission of the alkoxy radicals to form a methyl radical. Separate reactions of cyclohexane and d12-cyclohexane with benzamide showed that the turnover-limiting step in the catalytic reaction is the C–H cleavage of cyclohexane by a tert-butoxy radical. These mechanistic data imply that the tert-butoxy radical reacts with the C–H bonds of alkanes, and the subsequent alkyl radical combines with 1-phth2 to form the corresponding N-alkyl imide product

  8. Process for functionalizing alkanes

    DOEpatents

    Bergman, R.G.; Janowicz, A.H.; Periana, R.A.

    1988-05-24

    Process for functionalizing saturated hydrocarbons comprises: (a) reacting said saturated hydrocarbons of the formula: R[sub 1]H wherein H represents a hydrogen atom; and R[sub 1] represents a saturated hydrocarbon radical, with a metal complex of the formula: CpRh[P(R[sub 2])[sub 3

  9. Studies of radiation-produced radicals and radical ions

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, T.F.

    1991-01-01

    The radiolytic oxidation of anti-5-methylbicyclo(2.1.0)pentane gives the 1-methylcyclopentene radical cation as the sole rearrangement product H migration whereas oxidation of its syn isomer results in the highly selective formation of the 3-methylcyclopentene radical cation by methyl group migration. Since exactly the same stereoselectivity of olefin formation was observed in corresponding PET (photosensitized electron transfer) studies in the liquid phase, it is concluded that the rearrangement in this case also occurs through the intermediacy of radical cations. Clearly, the radical cation rearrangement must occur very rapidly (10{sup {minus}8}--10{sup {minus}9}s) under liquid-phase conditions at room temperature to compete with back electron transfer, and therefore the hydrogen (or methyl) migration is a fast process under these conditions. An intramolecular cycloaddition reaction was demonstrated in the radical cation rearrangement of 4-vinylcyclohexene to bicyclo(3.2.1)oct-2-ene. ESR studies show that the radiolytic oxidation of quadricyclane in Freon matrices under conditions of high substrate dilution leads to the bicyclo(3.2.0)hepta-2,6-diene radical cation as well as the previously reported norbornadiene radical cation, the former species predominating at sufficiently low concentrations.

  10. Cascade dissociations of peptide cation-radicals. Part 2. Infrared multiphoton dissociation and mechanistic studies of z-ions from pentapeptides.

    PubMed

    Ledvina, Aaron R; Chung, Thomas W; Hui, Renjie; Coon, Joshua J; Tureček, Frantisek

    2012-08-01

    Dissociations of z(4) ions from pentapeptides AAXAR where X=H, Y, F, W, and V produce dominant z(2) ions that account for >50 % of the fragment ion intensity. The dissociation has been studied in detail by experiment and theory and found to involve several isomerization and bond-breaking steps. Isomerizations in z(4) ions proceed by amide trans→cis rotations followed by radical-induced transfer of a β-hydrogen atom from the side chain, forming stable C(β) radical intermediates. These undergo rate-determining cleavage of the C(α)-CO bond at the X residue followed by loss of the neutral AX fragment, forming x(2) intermediates. The latter were detected by energy-resolved resonant excitation collision-induced dissociation (CID) and infrared multiphoton dissociation (IRMPD) experiments. The x(2) intermediates undergo facile loss of HNCO to form z(2) fragment ions, as also confirmed by energy-resolved CID and IRMPD MS(4) experiments. The loss of HNCO from the x(2) ion from AAHWR is kinetically hampered by the Trp residue that traps the OCNH radical group in a cyclic intermediate.

  11. Cascade Dissociations of Peptide Cation-Radicals. Part2. Infrared Multiphoton Dissociation and Mechanistic Studies of z-Ions from Pentapeptides

    PubMed Central

    Ledvina, Aaron R.; Chung, Thomas W.; Hui, Renjie; Coon, Joshua J.

    2013-01-01

    Dissociations of z4 ions from pentapeptides AAXAR, where X = H, Y, F, W, and V, produce dominant z2 ions that account for >50% of the fragment ion intensity. The dissociation has been studied in detail by experiment and theory and found to involve several isomerization and bond-breaking steps. Isomerizations in z4 ions proceed by amide transcis rotations followed by radical-induced transfer of a β-hydrogen atom from the side chain, forming stable Cβ radical intermediates. These undergo rate-determining cleavage of the Cα—CO bond at the X residue followed by loss of the neutral AX fragment, forming x2 intermediates. The latter were detected by energy-resolved resonant excitation collision-activated dissociation (CAD) and infrared multiphoton dissociation (IRMPD) experiments. The x2 intermediates undergo facile loss of HNCO to form z2 fragment ions, as also confirmed by energy-resolved CAD and IRMPD MS4 experiments. The loss of HNCO from the x2 ion from AAHWR is kinetically hampered by the Trp residue that traps the OCNH radical group in a cyclic intermediate. PMID:22669762

  12. Modelling the bacterial photosynthetic reaction center. VI. Use of density-functional theory to determine the nature of the vibronic coupling between the four lowest-energy electronic states of the special-pair radical cation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reimers, Jeffrey R.; Shapley, Warwick A.; Rendell, Alistair P.; Hush, Noel S.

    2003-08-01

    It is now over ten years since the first FTIR spectra were recorded of the radical cation of the special-pair, a dimer of bacteriochlorophyll molecules that forms the primary electron donor responsible for primary charge separation in bacterial photosynthesis. While spectra of this type promise to reveal much concerning the role of the special pair electron donor in photosynthesis, attempts to model and interpret them have been limited by poor knowledge of the vibrationally specific aspects of the electron-phonon coupling and have thus been restricted to crude model calculations only. We develop techniques through which density-functional theory can be employed to evaluate most of the unknown properties. This includes symmetric-mode displacements, antisymmetric-mode vibronic coupling constants, and interstate electronic couplings evaluated for interactions between the four lowest-energy states of the special-pair cation radical: the ground state, the primary hole-transfer state, and states involving these two combined with SHOMO to HOMO transitions. Geometry optimizations are performed for all four states of the dimer while vibrational analyses are obtained for the first two; vibronic coupling constants are extracted from analysis of stolen infrared transition moments using Herzberg-Teller theory. Quantitatively, these results are employed in the subsequent paper in this series to simulate the observed spectra. Qualitatively, these results indicate that: (1) vibronic coupling occurs through a large number of antisymmetric modes of the dimer rather than through a small number of strongly active modes, (2) the role of symmetric vibrational motions of the dimer is only minor, (3) that the active symmetric modes are significant in number and low in frequency, (4) that vibronic coupling between the hole-transfer state and the SHOMO to HOMO state is relatively weak and influences spectra only near resonance, and (5) that the calculated electronic couplings are

  13. Process for functionalizing alkanes

    DOEpatents

    Bergman, Robert G.; Janowicz, Andrew H.; Periana, Roy A.

    1988-01-01

    Process for functionalizing saturated hydrocarbons comprising: (a) reacting said saturated hydrocarbons of the formula: R.sub.1 H wherein H represents a hydrogen atom; and R.sub.1 represents a saturated hydrocarbon radical, with a metal complex of the formula: CpRh[P(R.sub.2).sub.3 ]H.sub.2 wherein Cp represents a cyclopentadienyl or alkylcyclopentadienyl radical; Rh represents a rhodium atom; P represents a phosphorus atom; R.sub.2 represents a hydrocarbon radical; H represents a hydrogen atom, in the presence of ultraviolet radiation to form a hydridoalkyl complex of the formula: CpRh[P(R.sub.2).sub.3 ](R.sub.1)H (b) reacting said hydridoalkyl complex with an organic halogenating agent such as a tetrahalomethane or a haloform of the formulas: CX'X''X'''X'''' or CHX'X''X''' wherein X', X'', X'", X"" represent halogens selected from bromine, iodine or chlorine atom, at a temperature in the range of about -60.degree. to -17.degree. C. to form the corresponding haloalkyl complex of step (a) having the formula: CpRhPMe.sub.3 RX; and, (c) reacting said haloalkyl complex formed in (b) with halogen (X.sub.2) at a temperature in the range of about -60.degree. to 25.degree. C. (i.e., ambient) to form a functional haloalkyl compound.

  14. Liquid Crystalline Polymers by Cationic Polymerization,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-01-01

    cation mechanism of Scholl reaction the Lewis acid and by the benzylic carbocations . Hydride transfer to benzylic carbenium ions leads to methyl groups...reviewed. Examples from ring-opening, carbocationic , and radical-cation poly- merizations and oligomerizations are discussed. Accesion For DrIC TAB3...Examples from ring- opening, carbocationic , and radical-cation polymeri- zations and oligomerizations are discussed. INTRODUCTION This paper will

  15. Reactivity of oxygen radical anions bound to scandia nanoparticles in the gas phase: C-H bond activation.

    PubMed

    Tian, Li-Hua; Meng, Jing-Heng; Wu, Xiao-Nan; Zhao, Yan-Xia; Ding, Xun-Lei; He, Sheng-Gui; Ma, Tong-Mei

    2014-01-20

    The activation of C-H bonds in alkanes is currently a hot research topic in chemistry. The atomic oxygen radical anion (O(-·)) is an important species in C-H activation. The mechanistic details of C-H activation by O(-·) radicals can be well understood by studying the reactions between O(-·) containing transition metal oxide clusters and alkanes. Here the reactivity of scandium oxide cluster anions toward n-butane was studied by using a high-resolution time-of-flight mass spectrometer coupled with a fast flow reactor. Hydrogen atom abstraction (HAA) from n-butane by (Sc2O3)(N)O(-) (N=1-18) clusters was observed. The reactivity of (Sc2O3)(N)O(-) (N=1-18) clusters is significantly sizedependent and the highest reactivity was observed for N=4 (Sc8O13(-)) and 12 (Sc24O37(-)). Larger (Sc2O3)(N)O(-) clusters generally have higher reactivity than the smaller ones. Density functional theory calculations were performed to interpret the reactivity of (Sc2O3)(N)O(-) (N=1-5) clusters, which were found to contain the O(-·) radicals as the active sites. The local charge environment around the O(-·) radicals was demonstrated to control the experimentally observed size-dependent reactivity. This work is among the first to report HAA reactivity of cluster anions with dimensions up to nanosize toward alkane molecules. The anionic O(-·) containing scandium oxide clusters are found to be more reactive than the corresponding cationic ones in the C-H bond activation.

  16. Process for functionalizing alkanes

    DOEpatents

    Bergman, Robert G.; Janowicz, Andrew H.; Periana-Pillai, Roy A.

    1985-01-01

    Process for functionalizing saturated hydrocarbons selectively in the terminal position comprising: (a) reacting said saturated hydrocarbons of the formula: RH where: H represents a hydrogen atom, and R represents a saturated hydrocarbon radical, with a metal complex of the formula: CpRhPMe.sub.3 H.sub.2 where: Cp represents a pentamethylated cyclopentadienyl radical, Rh represents a rhodium atom, P represents a phosphorous atom, Me represents a methyl group, H represents a hydrogen atom, in the presence of ultraviolet radiation at a temperature maintained at about -60.degree. to -17.degree. C. to form a hydridoalkyl complex of the formula: CpRhPMe.sub.3 RH (b) reacting said hydridoalkyl complex with a haloform of the formula: CHX.sub.3 where: X represents a bromine, iodine or chlorine atom, at a temperature in the range of about -60.degree. to -17.degree. C. to form the corresponding haloalkyl complex of step (a) having the formula: CpRhPMe.sub.3 RX; and, (c) reacting said haloalkyl complex formed in (b) with halogen (X.sub.2) at a temperature in the range of about -60.degree. to 25.degree. C. (i.e. ambient) to form a functional haloalkyl compound.

  17. Liquid-liquid interfaces of semifluorinated alkane diblock copolymers with water, alkanes, and perfluorinated alkanes.

    SciTech Connect

    Perahia, Dvora, Dr.; Pierce, Flint; Tsige, Mesfin; Grest, Gary Stephen, Dr.

    2008-08-01

    The liquid-liquid interface between semifluorinated alkane diblock copolymers of the form F3C(CF2)n-1-(CH2)m-1CH3 and water, protonated alkanes, and perfluorinated alkanes are studied by fully atomistic molecular dynamics simulations. A modified version of the OPLS-AA (Optimized Parameter for Liquid Simulation All-Atom) force field of Jorgensen et al. has been used to study the interfacial behavior of semifluorinated diblocks. Aqueous interfaces are found to be sharp, with correspondingly large values of the interfacial tension. Due to the reduced hydrophobicity of the protonated block compared to the fluorinated block, hydrogen enhancement is observed at the interface. Water dipoles in the interfacial region are found to be oriented nearly parallel to the liquid-liquid interface. A number of protonated alkanes and perfluorinated alkanes are found to be mutually miscible with the semifluorinated diblocks. For these liquids, interdiffusion follows the expected Fickian behavior, and concentration-dependent diffusivities are determined.

  18. Liquid-liquid interfaces of semifluorinated alkane diblock copolymers with water, alkanes, and perfluorinated alkanes.

    PubMed

    Pierce, Flint; Tsige, Mesfin; Perahia, Dvora; Grest, Gary S

    2008-12-18

    The liquid-liquid interface between semifluorinated alkane diblock copolymers of the form F3C(CF2)n-1-(CH2)m-1CH3 and water, protonated alkanes, and perfluorinated alkanes are studied by fully atomistic molecular dynamics simulations. A modified version of the OPLS-AA (Optimized Parameter for Liquid Simulation All-Atom) force field of Jorgensen et al. has been used to study the interfacial behavior of semifluorinated diblocks. Aqueous interfaces are found to be sharp, with correspondingly large values of the interfacial tension. Due to the reduced hydrophobicity of the protonated block compared to the fluorinated block, hydrogen enhancement is observed at the interface. Water dipoles in the interfacial region are found to be oriented nearly parallel to the liquid-liquid interface. A number of protonated alkanes and perfluorinated alkanes are found to be mutually miscible with the semifluorinated diblocks. For these liquids, interdiffusion follows the expected Fickian behavior, and concentration-dependent diffusivities are determined.

  19. Fourier transform infrared study of the cation radical of P680 in the photosystem II reaction center: evidence for charge delocalization on the chlorophyll dimer.

    PubMed

    Noguchi, T; Tomo, T; Inoue, Y

    1998-09-29

    A Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) difference spectrum of the primary electron donor (P680) of photosystem II upon its photooxidation (P680+/P680) was obtained in the frequency region of 1000-3000 cm-1. The reaction center (RC) complex (D1-D2-Cytb559) was used for the measurements in the presence of ferricyanide as an exogenous electron acceptor. Control measurements of electronic absorption (300-1200 nm) showed that illumination of the RC complex at 150 K induced major oxidation of P680 concomitant with oxidation of a carotenoid and an accessory chlorophyll (Chl). Illumination at 250 K also specifically bleached one of the two beta-carotene molecules bound to the RC complex, and the sample thus treated exhibited little formation of a carotenoid cation on subsequent illumination at 150 K. The P680+/P680 FTIR difference spectrum (with minor contamination of Chl+/Chl) was measured at 150 K using this partially carotenoid-deficient RC complex. The spectrum showed a broad positive band centered at approximately 1940 cm-1, which could be ascribed to an infrared electronic transition of P680+ analogous to that previously observed in various bacterial P+. This finding indicates that a positive charge is delocalized over (or hopping between) the two Chl molecules in P680+. The low intensity of this electronic band compared with that of the bacterial band could have three possible explanations: weak resonance interaction between the constituent Chl molecules, an asymmetric structure of P680+, and the difference in Chl species. Bands in the C=O stretching region (1600-1750 cm-1) were interpreted in comparison with resonance Raman spectra of the RC complex. The negative peaks at 1704 and 1679 cm-1 were proposed as candidates for the keto C9=O bands of P680. The observation that neither of these bands agreed with the main keto C9=O band at 1669 cm-1 in the previous 3P680/P680 FTIR spectrum [Noguchi et al. (1993) Biochemistry 32, 7186-7195] led to the idea that the triplet

  20. Communication: Oscillating charge migration between lone pairs persists without significant interaction with nuclear motion in the glycine and Gly-Gly-NH-CH{sub 3} radical cations

    SciTech Connect

    Vacher, Morgane; Bearpark, Michael J.; Robb, Michael A.

    2014-05-28

    Coupled electron-nuclear dynamics has been studied, using the Ehrenfest method, for four conformations of the glycine molecule and a single conformation of Gly-Gly-NH-CH{sub 3}. The initial electronic wavepacket was a superposition of eigenstates corresponding to ionization from the σ lone pairs associated with the carbonyl oxygens and the amine nitrogen. For glycine, oscillating charge migration (when the nuclei were frozen) was observed for the 4 conformers studied with periods ranging from 2 to 5 fs, depending on the energy gap between the lone pair cationic states. When coupled nuclear motion was allowed (which was mainly NH{sub 2} partial inversion), the oscillations hardly changed. For Gly-Gly-NH-CH{sub 3}, charge migration between the carbonyl oxygens and the NH{sub 2} lone pair can be observed with a period similar to glycine itself, also without interaction with nuclear motion. These simulations suggest that charge migration between lone pairs can occur independently of the nuclear motion.

  1. Neutral, cationic, and anionic low-spin iron(III) complexes stabilized by amidophenolate and iminobenzosemiquinonate radical in N,N,O ligands.

    PubMed

    Rajput, Amit; Sharma, Anuj K; Barman, Suman K; Koley, Debasis; Steinert, Markus; Mukherjee, Rabindranath

    2014-01-06

    A brownish-black complex [Fe(III)(L)2] (1) (S = 0), supported by two tridentate redox-active azo-appended o-amidophenolates [H2L = 2-(2-phenylazo)-anilino-4,6-di-tert-butylphenol], has been synthesized and structurally characterized. In CH2Cl2 1 displays two oxidative and two reductive 1e(-) redox processes at E1/2 values of 0.48 and 1.06 V and -0.42 and -1.48 V vs SCE, respectively. The one-electron oxidized form [1](+) isolated as a green solid [Fe(III)(L)2][BF4] (2) (S = 1/2) has been structurally characterized. Isolation of a dark ink-blue one-electron reduced form [1](-) has also been achieved [Co(III)(η(5)-C10H15)2][Fe(III)(L)2] (3) (S = 1/2). Mössbauer spectral parameters unequivocally establish that 1 is a low-spin (LS) Fe(III) complex. Careful analysis of Mössbauer spectral data of 2 and 3 at 200 and 80 K reveal that each complex has a major LS Fe(III) and a minor LS Fe(II) component (redox isomers): [Fe(III){(L(ISQ))(-•)}2](+) and [Fe(II){(L(IBQ))(0)}{(L(ISQ))(-•)}](+) (2) and [Fe(III){(L(AP))(2-)}2](-) and [Fe(II){(L(ISQ))(-•)}{(L(AP))(2-)}](-) (3). Notably, for both at 8 K mainly the major component exists. Broken-Symmetry (BS) Density Functional Theory (DFT) calculations at the B3LYP level reveals that in 1 the unpaired electron of LS Fe(III) is strongly antiferromagnetically coupled with a π-radical of o-iminobenzosemiquinonate(1-) (L(ISQ))(-•) form of the ligand, delocalized over two ligands providing 3- charge (X-ray structure). DFT calculations reveal that the unpaired electron in 2 is due to (L(ISQ))(-•) [LS Fe(III) (SFe = 1/2) is strongly antiferromagnetically coupled to one of the (L(ISQ))(-•) radicals (Srad = 1/2)] and 3 is primarily a LS Fe(III) complex, supported by two o-amidophenolate(2-) ligands. Time-Dependent-DFT calculations shed light on the origin of UV-vis-NIR spectral absorptions for 1-3. The collective consideration of Mössbauer, variable-temperature (77-298 K) electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR), and absorption

  2. Theoretical study of the rhenium–alkane interaction in transition metal–alkane σ-complexes

    PubMed Central

    Cobar, Erika A.; Khaliullin, Rustam Z.; Bergman, Robert G.; Head-Gordon, Martin

    2007-01-01

    Metal–alkane binding energies have been calculated for [CpRe(CO)2](alkane) and [(CO)2M(C5H4)CC(C5H4)M(CO)2](alkane), where M = Re or Mn. Calculated binding energies were found to increase with the number of metal–alkane interaction sites. In all cases examined, the manganese–alkane binding energies were predicted to be significantly lower than those for the analogous rhenium–alkane complexes. The metal (Mn or Re)–alkane interaction was predicted to be primarily one of charge transfer, both from the alkane to the metal complex (70–80% of total charge transfer) and from the metal complex to the alkane (20–30% of the total charge transfer). PMID:17442751

  3. Theoretical study of the rhenium-alkane interaction in transition metal-alkane sigma-complexes.

    PubMed

    Cobar, Erika A; Khaliullin, Rustam Z; Bergman, Robert G; Head-Gordon, Martin

    2007-04-24

    Metal-alkane binding energies have been calculated for [CpRe(CO)2](alkane) and [(CO)2M(C5H4)C[triple bond]C(C5H4)M(CO)2](alkane), where M = Re or Mn. Calculated binding energies were found to increase with the number of metal-alkane interaction sites. In all cases examined, the manganese-alkane binding energies were predicted to be significantly lower than those for the analogous rhenium-alkane complexes. The metal (Mn or Re)-alkane interaction was predicted to be primarily one of charge transfer, both from the alkane to the metal complex (70-80% of total charge transfer) and from the metal complex to the alkane (20-30% of the total charge transfer).

  4. Catalytic conversion of light alkanes

    SciTech Connect

    Lyons, J.E.

    1992-06-30

    The second Quarterly Report of 1992 on the Catalytic Conversion of Light Alkanes reviews the work done between April 1, 1992 and June 31, 1992 on the Cooperative Agreement. The mission of this work is to devise a new catalyst which can be used in a simple economic process to convert the light alkanes in natural gas to oxygenate products that can either be used as clean-burning, high octane liquid fuels, as fuel components or as precursors to liquid hydrocarbon uwspomdon fuel. During the past quarter we have continued to design, prepare, characterize and test novel catalysts for the mild selective reaction of light hydrocarbons with air or oxygen to produce alcohols directly. These catalysts are designed to form active metal oxo (MO) species and to be uniquely active for the homolytic cleavage of the carbon-hydrogen bonds in light alkanes producing intermediates which can form alcohols. We continue to investigate three molecular environments for the active catalytic species that we are trying to generate: electron-deficient macrocycles (PHASE I), polyoxometallates (PHASE II), and regular oxidic lattices including zeolites and related structures as well as other molecular surface structures having metal oxo groups (PHASE I).

  5. Alkane biohydroxylation: Interests, constraints and future developments.

    PubMed

    Soussan, Laurence; Pen, Nakry; Belleville, Marie-Pierre; Marcano, José Sanchez; Paolucci-Jeanjean, Delphine

    2016-03-20

    Alkanes constitute one of the vastest reserves of raw materials for the production of fine chemicals. This paper focuses on recent advances in alkane biohydroxylation, i.e. the bioactivation of alkanes into their corresponding alcohols. Enzyme and whole-cell biocatalysts have been reviewed. Process considerations to implement such biocatalysts in bioreactors at large scale by coupling the bioconversion with cofactor regeneration and product removal are also discussed.

  6. One-electron oxidation of 2-(4-methoxyphenyl)-2-methylpropanoic and 1-(4-methoxyphenyl)cyclopropanecarboxylic acids in aqueous solution. the involvement of radical cations and the influence of structural effects and pH on the side-chain fragmentation reactivity.

    PubMed

    Bietti, Massimo; Capone, Alberto

    2008-01-18

    A product and time-resolved kinetic study on the one-electron oxidation of 2-(4-methoxyphenyl)-2-methylpropanoic acid (2), 1-(4-methoxyphenyl)cyclopropanecarboxylic acid (3), and of the corresponding methyl esters (substrates 4 and 5, respectively) has been carried out in aqueous solution. With 2, no direct evidence for the formation of an intermediate radical cation 2*+ but only of the decarboxylated 4-methoxycumyl radical has been obtained, indicating either that 2*+ is not formed or that its decarboxylation is too fast to allow detection under the experimental conditions employed (k > 1 x 10(7) s(-1)). With 3, oxidation leads to the formation of the corresponding radical cation 3*+ or radical zwitterion -3*+ depending on pH. At pH 1.0 and 6.7, 3*+ and -3*+ have been observed to undergo decarboxylation as the exclusive side-chain fragmentation pathway with rate constants k = 4.6 x 10(3) and 2.3 x 10(4) s(-1), respectively. With methyl esters 4 and 5, direct evidence for the formation of the corresponding radical cations 4*+ and 5*+ has been obtained. Both radical cations have been observed to display a very low reactivity and an upper limit for their decay rate constants has been determined as k < 10(3) s(-1). Comparison between the one-electron oxidation reactions of 2 and 3 shows that the replacement of the C(CH3)2 moiety with a cyclopropyl group determines a decrease in decarboxylation rate constant of more than 3 orders of magnitude. This large difference in reactivity has been qualitatively explained in terms of three main contributions: substrate oxidation potential, stability of the carbon-centered radical formed after decarboxylation, and stereoelectronic effects. In basic solution, -3*+ and 5*+ have been observed to react with -OH in a process that is assigned to the -OH-induced ring-opening of the cyclopropane ring, and the corresponding second-order rate constants (k-OH) have been obtained. With -3*+, competition between decarboxylation and -OH

  7. Application of the 2,2'-azinobis(3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulfonic acid) radical cation assay to a flow injection system for the evaluation of antioxidant activity of some pure compounds and beverages.

    PubMed

    Pellegrini, Nicoletta; Del Rio, Daniele; Colombi, Barbara; Bianchi, Marta; Brighenti, Furio

    2003-01-01

    The 2,2'-azinobis(3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulfonic acid) radical cation (ABTS(*)(+)) assay was adapted to a flow injection (FI) system to obtain a sensitive and rapid technique for the monitoring of antioxidant activity of pure compounds and complex matrixes, such as beverages and food extracts. The FI system includes a HPLC pump that flows the mobile phase (a solution of ABTS(*)(+) in ethanol) through a 20 microL loop injector, a single bead string reactor filled with acid-washed silanized beads, a delay coil and a photodiode array UV-visible detector. The technique was very sensitive, with limits of detection and of quantification of 4.14 and 9.29 micromol of Trolox/L, respectively, and demonstrated high repeatability and reproducibility. The proposed technique was then applied to the evaluation of the antioxidant activity of some pure compounds, demonstrating good agreement with published data obtained by the original spectrophotometric ABTS(*)(+) assay. Finally, the total antioxidant activity of 10 beverages was determined by both the proposed and the original method. The values ranged from 0.09 mmol L(-)(1) for cola to 49.24 mmol L(-)(1) for espresso coffee and did not result significantly different from those obtained by the original spectrophotometric ABTS(*)(+) assay (Student's paired t-test: t = 1.4074, p = 0.1929). In conclusion, the proposed FI technique seems suitable for the direct, rapid and reliable monitoring of total antioxidant activity of pure compounds and beverages and, due to the ability to operate in continuous, it allows the analysis of about 30 samples h(-)(1) making the assay particularly suitable for large screening of total antioxidant activity in food samples.

  8. Radically enhanced molecular recognition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trabolsi, Ali; Khashab, Niveen; Fahrenbach, Albert C.; Friedman, Douglas C.; Colvin, Michael T.; Cotí, Karla K.; Benítez, Diego; Tkatchouk, Ekaterina; Olsen, John-Carl; Belowich, Matthew E.; Carmielli, Raanan; Khatib, Hussam A.; Goddard, William A.; Wasielewski, Michael R.; Stoddart, J. Fraser

    2010-01-01

    The tendency for viologen radical cations to dimerize has been harnessed to establish a recognition motif based on their ability to form extremely strong inclusion complexes with cyclobis(paraquat-p-phenylene) in its diradical dicationic redox state. This previously unreported complex involving three bipyridinium cation radicals increases the versatility of host-guest chemistry, extending its practice beyond the traditional reliance on neutral and charged guests and hosts. In particular, transporting the concept of radical dimerization into the field of mechanically interlocked molecules introduces a higher level of control within molecular switches and machines. Herein, we report that bistable and tristable [2]rotaxanes can be switched by altering electrochemical potentials. In a tristable [2]rotaxane composed of a cyclobis(paraquat-p-phenylene) ring and a dumbbell with tetrathiafulvalene, dioxynaphthalene and bipyridinium recognition sites, the position of the ring can be switched. On oxidation, it moves from the tetrathiafulvalene to the dioxynaphthalene, and on reduction, to the bipyridinium radical cation, provided the ring is also reduced simultaneously to the diradical dication.

  9. Reaction pathway for alkane dehydrocyclization

    SciTech Connect

    Shi, Buchang; Davis, B.H.

    1996-08-01

    Naphtha reforming to produce high octane gasoline is an important process. Many reaction mechanisms are involved in this process. For example, the study of the fundamentals of this process led to the concept of bi- or poly-functional catalysis. The results of this study provide additional mechanistic information about the dehydrocyclization of an n-alkane to produce aromatics. The reaction coordinate diagram advanced to account for the observation of irreversible adsorption should be modified to account for the present results. 32 refs., 1 fig.

  10. Elucidating alkane adsorption in sodium-exchanged zeolites from molecular simulations to empirical equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García-Pérez, E.; Torréns, I. M.; Lago, S.; Dubbeldam, D.; Vlugt, T. J. H.; Maesen, T. L. M.; Smit, B.; Krishna, R.; Calero, S.

    2005-10-01

    Configurational-bias Monte Carlo (CBMC) simulations provide adsorption isotherms, Henry coefficients and heats of adsorption of linear alkanes in sodium-exchanged MFI- and FAU-type zeolites. These simulations were carried out using our newly developed force field that reproduces experimental sodium positions in the dehydrated zeolites, and successfully predicts alkane adsorption properties over a wide range of sodium cation densities, temperatures, and pressures. We derived empirical expressions from the simulation data to describe the adsorption of linear alkanes in MFI- and FAU-type zeolites. These expressions afford a suitable substitute for complex CBMC simulations. In the low coverage regime we provide simple expressions that adequately describe the Henry coefficient and adsorption enthalpy of n-alkanes as a function of sodium density and temperature. The predicted Henry coefficients and heats of adsorption compare extremely well to available experimental data. In the high coverage regime we provide an expression for saturation capacities of linear alkanes in the zeolite. This expression, combined with the expression for the Henry coefficients, provides of the complete adsorption isotherms of pure adsorbents and mixtures, in good agreement with the adsorption isotherms obtained from CBMC.

  11. Alkane-Based Urethane Potting Compounds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morris, D. E.

    1986-01-01

    New low viscosity urethanes easily mixed, molded, and outgassed. Alkane-based urethanes resist hydrolysis and oxidation and have excellent dielectric properties. Low-viscosity alkane-based urethane prepolymer prepared by one-step reaction of either isophorone diisocyanate or methyl-bis (4-cyclohexyl isocyanate) with hydrogenated, hydroxy-terminated polybutadiene (HTPBD).

  12. The anaerobic degradation of gaseous, nonmethane alkanes — From in situ processes to microorganisms

    PubMed Central

    Musat, Florin

    2015-01-01

    The short chain, gaseous alkanes ethane, propane, n- and iso-butane are released in significant amounts into the atmosphere, where they contribute to tropospheric chemistry and ozone formation. Biodegradation of gaseous alkanes by aerobic microorganisms, mostly bacteria and fungi isolated from terrestrial environments, has been known for several decades. The first indications for short chain alkane anaerobic degradation were provided by geochemical studies of deep-sea environments around hydrocarbon seeps, and included the uncoupling of the sulfate-reduction and anaerobic oxidation of methane rates, the consumption of gaseous alkanes in anoxic sediments, or the enrichment in 13C of gases in interstitial water vs. the source gas. Microorganisms able to degrade gaseous alkanes were recently obtained from deep-sea and terrestrial sediments around hydrocarbon seeps. Up to date, only sulfate-reducing pure or enriched cultures with ethane, propane and n-butane have been reported. The only pure culture presently available, strain BuS5, is affiliated to the Desulfosarcina–Desulfococcus cluster of the Deltaproteobacteria. Other phylotypes involved in gaseous alkane degradation have been identified based on stable-isotope labeling and whole-cell hybridization. Under anoxic conditions, propane and n-butane are activated similar to the higher alkanes, by homolytic cleavage of the C—H bond of a subterminal carbon atom, and addition of the ensuing radical to fumarate, yielding methylalkylsuccinates. An additional mechanism of activation at the terminal carbon atoms was demonstrated for propane, which could in principle be employed also for the activation of ethane. PMID:25904994

  13. An alternative interpretation of the C-H bond strengths of alkanes.

    PubMed

    Gronert, Scott

    2006-02-03

    A new model based on 1,3 repulsive steric interactions (geminal repulsion) is proposed for explaining the variation in the C-H bond strengths of the alkanes. The model builds from the assumption that 1,3 repulsive interactions are the major factor in determining the stability of a C-C or C-H bond in an alkane. From this simple premise, the model successfully reproduces the effect of branching on the stability of alkanes, alkyl radicals, and alkenes. The results suggest that geminal repulsion can provide a simple, unified explanation for these fundamental stability trends. Although previous explanations have been widely accepted, it is shown that the theoretical support for them is relatively shallow and that the current hyperconjugative stabilization model is inconsistent with several experimental and computational results concerning alkyl radicals. In contrast, an explanation based on geminal repulsion provides a general conceptual framework for rationalizing each of these stability trends and is based on a physical effect that is known to play a role in the stability of alkanes and related species.

  14. Polarized absorption spectra of aromatic radicals in stretched polymer film. 3. Radical ions of acridine and phenazine

    SciTech Connect

    Sekigucki, K.; Hiratsuka, H.; Tanizaki, Y.; Hatano, Y.

    1980-02-21

    Radical anions and cations of acridine and phenazine have been prepared in polymer film by ..gamma..-ray irradiation at 77 K. For the preparation of radical anions the sample was incorporated into polyethylene film by sec-butylamine, while for radical cations poly(vinyl chloride) film and sec-butyl chloride were used. Polarized absorption spectra of these radical ions have been measured in stretched polymer film and analyzed qualitatively in terms of molecular orbital calculations.

  15. Generation of oxoiron (IV) tetramesitylporphyrin pi-cation radical complexes by m-CPBA oxidation of ferric tetramesitylporphyrin derivatives in butyronitrile at - 78 degrees C. Evidence for the formation of six-coordinate oxoiron (IV) tetramesitylporphyrin pi-cation radical complexes FeIV = O(tmp*)X (X = Cl-, Br-), by Mössbauer and X-ray absorption spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Wolter, T; Meyer-Klaucke, W; Müther, M; Mandon, D; Winkler, H; Trautwein, A X; Weiss, R

    2000-01-30

    The generation of six-coordinate oxoiron (IV) tetramesitylporphyrin pi-caption radical complexes by m-CPBA (meta-chloroperbenzoic acid) oxidation of ferric tetramesitylporphyrin derivatives in butyronitrile at - 78 degrees C was investigated. UV-Vis and EPR spectroscopies indicate that the axial ligand present in the ferric starting derivatives is retained in the high-valent iron complexes. Indirect evidence for the formation of six-coordinate oxoiron (IV) tetramesitylporphyrin complexes FeIV = O(tmp*)X (X=Cl-, Br-) by m-CPBA oxidation of FeX(tmp) (X=Cl-, Br-) in butyronitrile at - 78 degrees C was also obtained by Mössbauer spectroscopy. Direct confirmation of the presence of a halide ion as second axial ligand of iron in these high-valent iron species was obtained by X-ray absorption spectroscopy. The EXAFS spectra of the samples obtained by m-CPBA oxidation of FeX(tmp) (X=Cl-, Br-) were refined using two different coordination models including both four porphyrinato-nitrogens and the axial oxo group. The two models include (model I) or exclude (model II) the axial halogen. The statistical tests indicate the presence of a halide ion as second axial ligand of iron in both derivatives. The refinements led to the following bond distances: FeIV=O(tmp*)Cl(3):Fe-O=1.66(1),Fe-Cl=2.39(2) and Fe-Np=1.99(1) A;FeIV=O(tmp*)Br(4):Fe-O=1.65(1),Fe-Br=2.93(2), Fe-Np=2.02(1) A. The lengthening of the Fe-X(X=Cl-, Br-) distances relative to those occurring in the ferric precursor porphyrins is, most probably, related to the strong trans influence of the oxoiron(IV) fragment present in 3 or 4.

  16. Linear Four-Chalcogen Interactions in Radical Cationic and Dicationic Dimers of 1,5-(Dichalcogena)canes: Nature of the Interactions Elucidated by QTAIM Dual Functional Analysis with QC Calculations.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Satoko; Nagata, Kengo; Otsuki, Shota; Nakanishi, Waro

    2017-03-15

    The dynamic and static nature of extended hypervalent interactions of the (B)E···(A)E···(A)E···(B)E type are elucidated for four center-seven electron interactions (4c-7e) in the radical cationic dimers (1·(+)) and 4c-6e in the dicationic dimers (1(2+)) of 1,5-(dichalcogena)canes (2: (A)E(CH2CH2CH2)2(B)E: (A)E, (B)E = S, Se, Te, and O). The quantum theory of atoms-in-molecules dual functional analysis (QTAIM-DFA) is applied for the analysis. Total electron energy densities Hb(rc) are plotted versus Hb(rc) - Vb(rc)/2 [= (ℏ(2)/8m)∇(2)ρb(rc)] at bond critical points (BCPs) of the interactions, where Vb(rc) values show potential energy densities at BCPs. Data from the fully optimized structures correspond to the static nature of the interactions. Those from the perturbed structures around the fully optimized ones are also plotted, in addition to those of the fully optimized ones, which represent the dynamic nature of interactions. The (B)E···(A)E-(A)E···(B)E interactions in 1(2+) are stronger than the corresponding ones in 1·(+), respectively. On the one hand, for 1(2+) with (A)E, (B)E = S, Se, and Te, (A)E···(A)E are all classified by the shared shell interactions and predicted to have the weak covalent nature, except for those in 1a(2+) ((A)E = (B)E = S) and 1d(2+) ((A)E = (B)E = Se), which have the nature of regular closed shell (r-CS)/trigonal bipyramidal adduct formation through charge transfer (CT-TBP). On the other hand, (A)E···(B)E are predicted to have the nature of r-CS/molecular complex formation through charge transfer for 1a(2+), 1b(2+) ((A)E = Se; (B)E = S), and 1d(2+) or r-CS/CT-TBP for 1c(2+) ((A)E = Te; (B)E = S), 1e(2+) ((A)E = Te; (B)E = Se), and 1f(2+) ((A)E = (B)E = Te). The (B)E···(A)E-(A)E···(B)E interactions in 1·(+) and 1(2+) are well-analyzed by applying QTAIM-DFA.

  17. Selective Generation of the Radical Cation Isomers [CH3CN](•+) and [CH2CNH](•+) via VUV Photoionization of Different Neutral Precursors and Their Reactivity with C2H4.

    PubMed

    Polášek, Miroslav; Zins, Emilie-Laure; Alcaraz, Christian; Žabka, Ján; Křížová, Věra; Giacomozzi, Linda; Tosi, Paolo; Ascenzi, Daniela

    2016-07-14

    Experimental and theoretical studies have been carried out to demonstrate the selective generation of two different C2H3N(+) isomers, namely, the acetonitrile [CH3CN](•+) and the ketenimine [CH2CNH](•+) radical cations. Photoionization and dissociative photoionization experiments from different neutral precursors (acetonitrile and butanenitrile) have been performed using vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) synchrotron radiation in the 10-15 eV energy range, delivered by the DESIRS beamline at the SOLEIL storage ring. For butanenitrile (CH3CH2CH2CN) an experimental ionization threshold of 11.29 ± 0.05 eV is obtained, whereas the appearance energy for the formation of [CH2CNH](•+) fragments is 11.52 ± 0.05 eV. Experimental findings are fully supported by theoretical calculations at the G4 level of theory (ZPVE corrected energies at 0 K), giving a value of 11.33 eV for the adiabatic ionization energy of butanenitrile and an exothermicity of 0.49 for fragmentation into [CH2CNH](•+) plus C2H4, hampered by an energy barrier of 0.29 eV. The energy difference between [CH3CN](•+) and [CH2CNH](•+) is 2.28 eV (with the latter being the lowest energy isomer), and the isomerization barrier is 0.84 eV. Reactive monitoring experiments of the [CH3CN](•+) and [CH2CNH](•+) isomers with C2H4 have been performed using the CERISES guided ion beam tandem mass spectrometer and exploiting the selectivity of ethylene that gives exothermic charge exchange and proton transfer reactions with [CH3CN](•+) but not with [CH2CNH](•+) isomers. In addition, minor reactive channels are observed leading to the formation of new C-C bonds upon reaction of [CH3CN](•+) with C2H4, and their astrochemical implications are briefly discussed.

  18. High-level ab initio predictions for the ionization energy, electron affinity, and heats of formation of cyclopentadienyl radical, cation, and anion, C5H5/C5H5+/C5H5-.

    PubMed

    Lo, Po-Kam; Lau, Kai-Chung

    2014-04-03

    The ionization energy (IE), electron affinity (EA), and heats of formation (ΔH°f0/ΔH°f298) for cyclopentadienyl radical, cation, and anion, C5H5/C5H5(+)/C5H5(-), have been calculated by wave function-based ab initio CCSDT/CBS approach, which involves approximation to complete basis set (CBS) limit at coupled-cluster level with up to full triple excitations (CCSDT). The zero-point vibrational energy correction, core-valence electronic correction, scalar relativistic effect, and higher-order corrections beyond the CCSD(T) wave function are included in these calculations. The allylic [C5H5((2)A2)] and dienylic [C5H5((2)B1)] forms of cyclopentadienyl radical are considered: the ground state structure exists in the dienyl form and it is about 30 meV more stable than the allylic structure. Both structures are lying closely and are interconvertible along the normal mode of b2 in-plane vibration. The CCSDT/CBS predictions (in eV) for IE[C5H5(+)((3)A1')←C5H5((2)B1)] = 8.443, IE[C5H5(+)((1)A1)←C5H5((2)B1)] = 8.634 and EA[C5H5(-)((1)A1')←C5H5((2)B1)] = 1.785 are consistent with the respective experimental values of 8.4268 ± 0.0005, 8.6170 ± 0.0005, and 1.808 ± 0.006, obtained from photoelectron spectroscopic measurements. The ΔH°f0/ΔH°f298's (in kJ/mol) for C5H5/C5H5(+)/C5H5(-) have also been predicted by the CCSDT/CBS method: ΔH°f0/ΔH°f298[C5H5((2)B1)] = 283.6/272.0, ΔH°f0/ΔH°f298[C5H5(+)((3)A1')] = 1098.2/1086.9, ΔH°f0/ΔH°f298[C5H5(+)((1)A1)] = 1116.6/1106.0, and ΔH°f0/ΔH°f298[C5H5(-)((1)A1')] = 111.4/100.0. The comparisons between the CCSDT/CBS predictions and the experimental values suggest that the CCSDT/CBS procedure is capable of predicting reliable IE(C5H5)'s and EA(C5H5) with uncertainties of ± 17 and ± 23 meV, respectively.

  19. Elementary radical formation and conversion processes in. gamma. -irradiated polyvinylchloride

    SciTech Connect

    Torikai, A.; Adachi, T.; Fueki, K.

    1981-11-01

    Elementary processes of ..gamma..-irradiated polyvinylchloride (PVC) have been investigated by both electron spin resonance (ESR) and optical absorption measurements. On irradiating PVC film with ..gamma.. rays at -196/sup 0/C, alkyl-type radicals are produced. When the PVC film is warmed to room temperature, the radicals convert to polyenyl type. ..gamma.. irradiation of PVC film containing biphenyl (Ph/sub 2/) or pyrene (Py) at -196/sup 0/C yields the corresponding radical cation. The relative ESR peak heights of the radicals decrease and the G values for the formation of cation radicals increase with increasing additive concentrations. These facts indicate that energy is transferred from the precursor of the radicals to the additive. In the case of PVC film containing Py, the Py cation radical decreases the cyclohexadienyl-type radical from Py is produced by thermal annealing. A possible mechanism for radical formation and conversion is proposed.

  20. Stepwise association of hydrogen cyanide and acetonitrile with the benzene radical cation: structures and binding energies of (C6H6•+)(HCN)n, n = 1-6, and (C6H6•+)(CH3CN)n, n = 1-4, clusters.

    PubMed

    Hamid, Ahmed M; Soliman, Abdel-Rahman; El-Shall, M Samy

    2013-02-14

    Equilibrium thermochemical measurements using the ion mobility drift cell technique have been utilized to investigate the binding energies and entropy changes associated with the stepwise association of HCN and CH(3)CN molecules with the benzene radical cation in the C(6)H(6)(•+)(HCN)(n) and C(6)H(6)(•+)(CH(3)CN)(n) clusters with n = 1-6 and 1-4, respectively. The binding energy of CH(3)CN to the benzene cation (14 kcal/mol) is stronger than that of HCN (9 kcal/mol) mostly due to a stronger ion-dipole interaction because of the large dipole moment of acetonitrile (3.9 D). However, HCN can form hydrogen bonds with the hydrogen atoms of the benzene cation (CH(δ+)···NCH) and linear hydrogen bonding chains involving HCN···HCN interaction. HCN molecules tend to form externally solvated structures with the benzene cation where the ion is hydrogen bonded to the exterior of HCN chains. For the C(6)H(6)(•+)(CH(3)CN)(n) clusters, internally solvated structures are formed where the acetonitrile molecules are directly interacting with the benzene cation through ion-dipole and hydrogen bonding interactions. The lack of formation of higher clusters with n > 4, in contrast to HCN, suggests the formation of a solvent shell at n = 4, which is attributed to steric interactions among the acetonitrile molecules attached to the benzene cation and to the presence of the blocking CH(3) groups, both effects make the addition of more than four acetonitrile molecules less favorable.

  1. Multiple alkane hydroxylase systems in a marine alkane degrader, Alcanivorax dieselolei B-5.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chenli; Wang, Wanpeng; Wu, Yehui; Zhou, Zhongwen; Lai, Qiliang; Shao, Zongze

    2011-05-01

    Alcanivorax dieselolei strain B-5 is a marine bacterium that can utilize a broad range of n-alkanes (C(5) -C(36) ) as sole carbon source. However, the mechanisms responsible for this trait remain to be established. Here we report on the characterization of four alkane hydroxylases from A. dieselolei, including two homologues of AlkB (AlkB1 and AlkB2), a CYP153 homologue (P450), as well as an AlmA-like (AlmA) alkane hydroxylase. Heterologous expression of alkB1, alkB2, p450 and almA in Pseudomonas putida GPo12 (pGEc47ΔB) or P. fluorescens KOB2Δ1 verified their functions in alkane oxidation. Quantitative real-time RT-PCR analysis showed that these genes could be induced by alkanes ranging from C(8) to C(36) . Notably, the expression of the p450 and almA genes was only upregulated in the presence of medium-chain (C(8) -C(16) ) or long-chain (C(22) -C(36) ) n-alkanes, respectively; while alkB1 and alkB2 responded to both medium- and long-chain n-alkanes (C(12) -C(26) ). Moreover, branched alkanes (pristane and phytane) significantly elevated alkB1 and almA expression levels. Our findings demonstrate that the multiple alkane hydroxylase systems ensure the utilization of substrates of a broad chain length range.

  2. Supported organoiridium catalysts for alkane dehydrogenation

    DOEpatents

    Baker, R. Thomas; Sattelberger, Alfred P.; Li, Hongbo

    2013-09-03

    Solid supported organoiridium catalysts, a process for preparing such solid supported organoiridium catalysts, and the use of such solid supported organoiridium catalysts in dehydrogenation reactions of alkanes is provided. The catalysts can be easily recovered and recycled.

  3. Carbon and hydrogen isotopic composition of methane and C2+ alkanes in electrical spark discharge: implications for identifying sources of hydrocarbons in terrestrial and extraterrestrial settings.

    PubMed

    Telling, Jon; Lacrampe-Couloume, Georges; Sherwood Lollar, Barbara

    2013-05-01

    The low-molecular-weight alkanes--methane, ethane, propane, and butane--are found in a wide range of terrestrial and extraterrestrial settings. The development of robust criteria for distinguishing abiogenic from biogenic alkanes is essential for current investigations of Mars' atmosphere and for future exobiology missions to other planets and moons. Here, we show that alkanes synthesized during gas-phase radical recombination reactions in electrical discharge experiments have values of δ(2)H(methane)>δ(2)H(ethane)>δ(2)H(propane), similar to those of the carbon isotopes. The distribution of hydrogen isotopes in gas-phase radical reactions is likely due to kinetic fractionations either (i) from the preferential incorporation of (1)H into longer-chain alkanes due to the more rapid rate of collisions of the smaller (1)H-containing molecules or (ii) by secondary ion effects. Similar δ(13)C(C1-C2+) and δ(2)H(C1-C2+) patterns may be expected in a range of extraterrestrial environments where gas-phase radical reactions dominate, including interstellar space, the atmosphere and liquid hydrocarbon lakes of Saturn's moon Titan, and the outer atmospheres of Jupiter, Saturn, Neptune, and Uranus. Radical recombination reactions at high temperatures and pressures may provide an explanation for the combined reversed δ(13)C(C1-C2+) and δ(2)H(C1-C2+) patterns of terrestrial alkanes documented at a number of high-temperature/pressure crustal sites.

  4. Solar photothermochemical alkane reverse combustion.

    PubMed

    Chanmanee, Wilaiwan; Islam, Mohammad Fakrul; Dennis, Brian H; MacDonnell, Frederick M

    2016-03-08

    A one-step, gas-phase photothermocatalytic process for the synthesis of hydrocarbons, including liquid alkanes, aromatics, and oxygenates, with carbon numbers (Cn) up to C13, from CO2 and water is demonstrated in a flow photoreactor operating at elevated temperatures (180-200 °C) and pressures (1-6 bar) using a 5% cobalt on TiO2 catalyst and under UV irradiation. A parametric study of temperature, pressure, and partial pressure ratio revealed that temperatures in excess of 160 °C are needed to obtain the higher Cn products in quantity and that the product distribution shifts toward higher Cn products with increasing pressure. In the best run so far, over 13% by mass of the products were C5+ hydrocarbons and some of these, i.e., octane, are drop-in replacements for existing liquid hydrocarbons fuels. Dioxygen was detected in yields ranging between 64% and 150%. In principle, this tandem photochemical-thermochemical process, fitted with a photocatalyst better matched to the solar spectrum, could provide a cheap and direct method to produce liquid hydrocarbons from CO2 and water via a solar process which uses concentrated sunlight for both photochemical excitation to generate high-energy intermediates and heat to drive important thermochemical carbon-chain-forming reactions.

  5. Solar photothermochemical alkane reverse combustion

    PubMed Central

    Chanmanee, Wilaiwan; Islam, Mohammad Fakrul; Dennis, Brian H.; MacDonnell, Frederick M.

    2016-01-01

    A one-step, gas-phase photothermocatalytic process for the synthesis of hydrocarbons, including liquid alkanes, aromatics, and oxygenates, with carbon numbers (Cn) up to C13, from CO2 and water is demonstrated in a flow photoreactor operating at elevated temperatures (180–200 °C) and pressures (1–6 bar) using a 5% cobalt on TiO2 catalyst and under UV irradiation. A parametric study of temperature, pressure, and partial pressure ratio revealed that temperatures in excess of 160 °C are needed to obtain the higher Cn products in quantity and that the product distribution shifts toward higher Cn products with increasing pressure. In the best run so far, over 13% by mass of the products were C5+ hydrocarbons and some of these, i.e., octane, are drop-in replacements for existing liquid hydrocarbons fuels. Dioxygen was detected in yields ranging between 64% and 150%. In principle, this tandem photochemical–thermochemical process, fitted with a photocatalyst better matched to the solar spectrum, could provide a cheap and direct method to produce liquid hydrocarbons from CO2 and water via a solar process which uses concentrated sunlight for both photochemical excitation to generate high-energy intermediates and heat to drive important thermochemical carbon-chain-forming reactions. PMID:26903631

  6. The role of alkane coordination in CH bond cleavage at a Pt(II) center

    PubMed Central

    Chen, George S.; Labinger, Jay A.; Bercaw, John E.

    2007-01-01

    The rates of CH bond activation for various alkanes by [(N–N)Pt(Me)(TFEd3)]+ (N N = ArNC(Me)C(Me)NAr; Ar = 3,5-di-tert-butylphenyl; TFE-d3 = CF3CD2OD) were studied. Both linear and cyclic alkanes give the corresponding alkene-hydride cation [(N–N)Pt(H)(alkene)]+ via (i) rate determining alkane coordination to form a CH σ complex, (ii) oxidative cleavage of the coordinated CH bond to give a platinum(IV) alkyl-methyl-hydride intermediate, (iii) reductive coupling to generate a methane σ complex, (iv) dissociation of methane, and (v) β-H elimination to form the observed product. Second-order rate constants for cycloalkane activation (CnH2n), are proportional to the size of the ring (k ∼ n). For cyclohexane, the deuterium kinetic isotope effect (kH/kD) of 1.28 (5) is consistent with the proposed rate determining alkane coordination to form a CH σ complex. Statistical scrambling of the five hydrogens of the Pt-methyl and the coordinated methylene unit, via rapid, reversible steps ii and iii, and interchange of geminal CH bonds of the methane and cyclohexane CH σ adducts, is observed before loss of methane. PMID:17416678

  7. Evolution of an alkane-inducible biosensor for increased responsiveness to short-chain alkanes.

    PubMed

    Reed, Ben; Blazeck, John; Alper, Hal

    2012-04-15

    Synthetic alkane-inducible biosensors have applications as detectors for environmental hydrocarbon contamination and as novel inducible expression systems with low-cost inducers. Here, we have assembled and evolved an alkane-responsive biosensor with a fluorescence output signal in Escherichia coli by utilizing regulatory machinery from Pseudomonas putida's alkane metabolism. Within our system, the transcriptional regulator, AlkSp, is activated by the presence of alkanes and binds to the P(alkB) promoter, stimulating transcription of a Green Fluorescent Protein reporter. Through two successive rounds of directed evolution via error prone PCR and fluorescence activated cell sorting, we isolated alkS mutants enabling up to a 5 fold increase in fluorescence output signal in response to short-chain alkanes such as hexane and pentane. Further characterization of selected mutants demonstrated altered responsiveness to a wide range of linear alkanes (pentane to dodecane). Sequence analysis highlighted the S470T mutation as a likely candidate responsible for increased effectiveness of the AlkS protein for short-chain alkanes. This work represents the first evolution of a synthetic biosensor system for alkanes.

  8. Structural insights into diversity and n-alkane biodegradation mechanisms of alkane hydroxylases

    PubMed Central

    Ji, Yurui; Mao, Guannan; Wang, Yingying; Bartlam, Mark

    2013-01-01

    Environmental microbes utilize four degradation pathways for the oxidation of n-alkanes. Although the enzymes degrading n-alkanes in different microbes may vary, enzymes functioning in the first step in the aerobic degradation of alkanes all belong to the alkane hydroxylases. Alkane hydroxylases are a class of enzymes that insert oxygen atoms derived from molecular oxygen into different sites of the alkane terminus (or termini) depending on the type of enzymes. In this review, we summarize the different types of alkane hydroxylases, their degrading steps, and compare typical enzymes from various classes with regard to their three-dimensional structures, in order to provide insights into how the enzymes mediate their different roles in the degradation of n-alkanes and what determines their different substrate ranges. Through the above analyzes, the degrading mechanisms of enzymes can be elucidated and molecular biological methods can be utilized to expand their catalytic roles in the petrochemical industry or in bioremediation of oil-contaminated environments. PMID:23519435

  9. Hispidin analogs from the mushroom Inonotus xeranticus and their free radical scavenging activity.

    PubMed

    Lee, In-Kyoung; Yun, Bong-Sik

    2006-05-01

    Three new free radical scavengers were isolated from the methanolic extract of the fruiting bodies of Inonotus xeranticus (Hymenochaetaceae), along with the known compound davallialactone. Their structures were established as hispidin analogs by extensive NMR spectral data. Compounds 3 and 4 displayed significant scavenging activity against the superoxide radical anion, ABTS radical cation, and DPPH radical, while 1 and 2 exhibited potent antioxidative activity only against ABTS radical cation.

  10. Bioinspired terpene synthesis: a radical approach.

    PubMed

    Justicia, José; Álvarez de Cienfuegos, Luis; Campaña, Araceli G; Miguel, Delia; Jakoby, Verena; Gansäuer, Andreas; Cuerva, Juan M

    2011-07-01

    This tutorial review highlights the development of radical-based bioinspired synthesis of terpenes from the initial proposal to the development of modern catalytic methods for performing such processes. The power of the radical approach is demonstrated by the straightforward syntheses of many natural products from readily available starting materials. The efficiency of these processes nicely complements the described cationic polyolefin cyclisations and even suggests that modern radical methods provide means to improve upon nature's synthetic pathways.

  11. Heats of immersion of active carbon and carbon black in n-alcohols and n-alkanes

    SciTech Connect

    Isirikyan, A.A.; Polyakov, N.S.; Tatarinova, L.I.

    1994-07-01

    The heats of immersion Q{sub i} of microporous carbon and nonporous carbon black in n-alcohols and n-alkanes are equal for molecules with the same number of carbon atoms n and increase linearly with an increase in n. The structure of the liquid-solid interface is similar for two types of liquids: only the hydrocarbon radicals are closely adjacent to the hydrophobic carbon surface, and the OH alcohol groups are directed toward the bulk of the adsorbate. The heat of immersion Q{sub is} of the alcohols and alkanes per unit carbon surface is 120 + n, mJ/m{sup 2}. The Q{sub is} values for the alcohols and alkanes with n varying from 1 to 16 can be used for the determination of the specific surface area s of any nonporous or mesoporous carbon adsorbent: s = Q{sub i}/Q{sub is}.

  12. Low-temperature functionalisation of alkanes and cycloalkanes by 'classical' and 'non-classical' (superacidic) Friedel-Crafts complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akhrem, Irena S.; Orlinkov, Alexander V.; Vol'pin, Mark E.

    1996-10-01

    The results of studies on direct functionalisation of activated alkanes and cycloalkanes under the action of 'classical' Friedel-Crafts complexes (viz. equimolar complexes of acyl halides with aluminium halides) and related systems containing smaller or somewhat larger amounts of aluminium halide are surveyed. The studies carried out during the last decade on functionalisation of saturated hydrocarbons devoid of tertiary carbon atoms, by aprotic organic superacids RCOX . 2AlCl3 are summarised. Reactions of alkanes with acylium cations in superacidic media are considered. The published data on the structure of complexes RCOX . AlCl3 and RCOX . 2AlCl3 and on the nature of the active complexes in the reactions of arenes with acylium cations and with complexes RCOX . AlCl3 in both acidic and organic media as well as in the reactions of alkanes with acylium salts in protic superacids and with superacidic complexes RCOX . 2AlCl3 in aprotic solvents are analysed. The prospects for the synthesis of organic compounds from alkanes and cycloalkanes under the action of complexes of acyl halides with aluminium halides are outlined. The bibliography includes 128 references.

  13. Conversion of alkanes to organoseleniums and organotelluriums

    DOEpatents

    Periana, Roy A.; Konnick, Michael M.; Hashiguchi, Brian G.

    2016-11-29

    The invention provides processes and materials for the efficient and costeffective functionalization of alkanes and heteroalkanes, comprising contacting the alkane or heteroalkane and a soft oxidizing electrophile comprising Se(VI) or Te(VI), in an acidic medium, optionally further comprising an aprotic medium, which can be carried out at a temperature of less than 300 C. Isolation of the alkylselenium or alkyltellurium intermediate allows the subsequent conversion to products not necessarily compatible with the initial reaction conditions, such as amines, stannanes, organosulfur compounds, acyls, halocarbons, and olefins.

  14. Crossed-beam DC slice imaging of fluorine atom reactions with linear alkanes

    SciTech Connect

    Shi, Yuanyuan; Kamasah, Alexander; Joalland, Baptiste; Suits, Arthur G.

    2015-05-14

    We report the reaction dynamics of F atom with selected alkanes studied by crossed beam scattering with DC slice ion imaging. The target alkanes are propane, n-butane, and n-pentane. The product alkyl radicals are probed by 157 nm single photon ionization following reaction at a collision energy of ∼10 kcal mol{sup −1}. The analyzed data are compared with the corresponding theoretical studies. Reduced translational energy distributions for each system show similar trends with little of the reaction exoergicity appearing in translation. However, the pentane reaction shows a somewhat smaller fraction of available energy in translation than the other two, suggesting greater energy channeled into pentyl internal degrees of freedom. The center-of-mass angular distributions all show backscattering as well as sharp forward scattering that decreases in relative intensity with the size of the molecule. Possible reasons for these trends are discussed.

  15. Improved Alkane Production in Nitrogen-Fixing and Halotolerant Cyanobacteria via Abiotic Stresses and Genetic Manipulation of Alkane Synthetic Genes.

    PubMed

    Kageyama, Hakuto; Waditee-Sirisattha, Rungaroon; Sirisattha, Sophon; Tanaka, Yoshito; Mahakhant, Aparat; Takabe, Teruhiro

    2015-07-01

    Cyanobacteria possess the unique capacity to produce alkane. In this study, effects of nitrogen deficiency and salt stress on biosynthesis of alkanes were investigated in three kinds of cyanobacteria. Intracellular alkane accumulation was increased in nitrogen-fixing cyanobacterium Anabaena sp. PCC7120, but decreased in non-diazotrophic cyanobacterium Synechococcus elongatus PCC7942 and constant in a halotolerant cyanobacterium Aphanothece halophytica under nitrogen-deficient condition. We also found that salt stress increased alkane accumulation in Anabaena sp. PCC7120 and A. halophytica. The expression levels of two alkane synthetic genes were not upregulated significantly under nitrogen deficiency or salt stress in Anabaena sp. PCC7120. The transformant Anabaena sp. PCC7120 cells with additional alkane synthetic gene set from A. halophytica increased intracellular alkane accumulation level compared to control cells. These results provide a prospect to improve bioproduction of alkanes in nitrogen-fixing halotolerant cyanobacteria via abiotic stresses and genetic engineering.

  16. In situ detection of anaerobic alkane metabolites in subsurface environments.

    PubMed

    Agrawal, Akhil; Gieg, Lisa M

    2013-01-01

    Alkanes comprise a substantial fraction of crude oil and refined fuels. As such, they are prevalent within deep subsurface fossil fuel deposits and in shallow subsurface environments such as aquifers that are contaminated with hydrocarbons. These environments are typically anaerobic, and host diverse microbial communities that can potentially use alkanes as substrates. Anaerobic alkane biodegradation has been reported to occur under nitrate-reducing, sulfate-reducing, and methanogenic conditions. Elucidating the pathways of anaerobic alkane metabolism has been of interest in order to understand how microbes can be used to remediate contaminated sites. Alkane activation primarily occurs by addition to fumarate, yielding alkylsuccinates, unique anaerobic metabolites that can be used to indicate in situ anaerobic alkane metabolism. These metabolites have been detected in hydrocarbon-contaminated shallow aquifers, offering strong evidence for intrinsic anaerobic bioremediation. Recently, studies have also revealed that alkylsuccinates are present in oil and coal seam production waters, indicating that anaerobic microbial communities can utilize alkanes in these deeper subsurface environments. In many crude oil reservoirs, the in situ anaerobic metabolism of hydrocarbons such as alkanes may be contributing to modern-day detrimental effects such as oilfield souring, or may lead to more beneficial technologies such as enhanced energy recovery from mature oilfields. In this review, we briefly describe the key metabolic pathways for anaerobic alkane (including n-alkanes, isoalkanes, and cyclic alkanes) metabolism and highlight several field reports wherein alkylsuccinates have provided evidence for anaerobic in situ alkane metabolism in shallow and deep subsurface environments.

  17. 40 CFR 721.536 - Halogenated phenyl alkane.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Halogenated phenyl alkane. 721.536... Substances § 721.536 Halogenated phenyl alkane. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as halogenated phenyl alkane (PMN P-89-867)...

  18. 40 CFR 721.10163 - Chloro fluoro alkane (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Chloro fluoro alkane (generic). 721... Substances § 721.10163 Chloro fluoro alkane (generic). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as chloro fluoro alkane (PMN...

  19. 40 CFR 721.535 - Halogenated alkane (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Halogenated alkane (generic). 721.535... Substances § 721.535 Halogenated alkane (generic). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as halogenated alkane (PMN P-01-433) is...

  20. In situ detection of anaerobic alkane metabolites in subsurface environments

    PubMed Central

    Agrawal, Akhil; Gieg, Lisa M.

    2013-01-01

    Alkanes comprise a substantial fraction of crude oil and refined fuels. As such, they are prevalent within deep subsurface fossil fuel deposits and in shallow subsurface environments such as aquifers that are contaminated with hydrocarbons. These environments are typically anaerobic, and host diverse microbial communities that can potentially use alkanes as substrates. Anaerobic alkane biodegradation has been reported to occur under nitrate-reducing, sulfate-reducing, and methanogenic conditions. Elucidating the pathways of anaerobic alkane metabolism has been of interest in order to understand how microbes can be used to remediate contaminated sites. Alkane activation primarily occurs by addition to fumarate, yielding alkylsuccinates, unique anaerobic metabolites that can be used to indicate in situ anaerobic alkane metabolism. These metabolites have been detected in hydrocarbon-contaminated shallow aquifers, offering strong evidence for intrinsic anaerobic bioremediation. Recently, studies have also revealed that alkylsuccinates are present in oil and coal seam production waters, indicating that anaerobic microbial communities can utilize alkanes in these deeper subsurface environments. In many crude oil reservoirs, the in situ anaerobic metabolism of hydrocarbons such as alkanes may be contributing to modern-day detrimental effects such as oilfield souring, or may lead to more beneficial technologies such as enhanced energy recovery from mature oilfields. In this review, we briefly describe the key metabolic pathways for anaerobic alkane (including n-alkanes, isoalkanes, and cyclic alkanes) metabolism and highlight several field reports wherein alkylsuccinates have provided evidence for anaerobic in situ alkane metabolism in shallow and deep subsurface environments. PMID:23761789

  1. A new approach to the non-oxidative conversion of gaseous alkanes in a barrier discharge and features of the reaction mechanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kudryashov, S.; Ryabov, A.; Shchyogoleva, G.

    2016-01-01

    A new approach to the non-oxidative conversion of C1-C4 alkanes into gaseous and liquid products in a barrier discharge is proposed. It consists in inhibiting the formation of deposits on the reactor electrode surfaces due to the addition of distilled water into the flow of hydrocarbon gases. The energy consumption on hydrocarbon conversion decreases from methane to n-butane from ~46 to 35 eV molecule-1. The main gaseous products of the conversion of light alkanes are hydrogen and C2-C4 hydrocarbons. The liquid reaction products contain C5+ alkanes with a predominantly isomeric structure. The results of modeling the kinetics of chemical reactions show that an increase in the molecular weight of the reaction products is mainly due to processes involving CH2 radical and the recombination of alkyl radicals.

  2. Structural and Kinetic Studies of Novel Cytochrome P450 Small-Alkane Hydroxylases

    SciTech Connect

    Arnold, Frances H.

    2012-02-27

    The goals of this project are to investigate (1) the kinetics and stabilities of engineered cytochrome P450 (P450) small alkane hydroxylases and their evolutionary intermediates, (2) the structural basis for catalytic proficiency on small alkanes of these engineered P450s, and (3) the changes in redox control resulting from protein engineering. To reach these goals, we have established new methods for determining the kinetics and stabilities of multicomponent P450s such as CYP153A6. Using these, we were able to determine that CYP153A6 is proficient for hydroxylation of alkanes as small as ethane, an activity that has never been observed previously in any natural P450. To elucidate the structures of the engineered P450s, we obtained x-ray diffraction data for two variants in the P450PMO (propane monooxygenase) lineage and a preliminary structure for the most evolved variant. This structure shows changes in the substrate binding regions of the enzyme and a reduction in active site volume that are consistent with the observed changes in substrate specificity from fatty acids in the native enzyme to small alkanes in P450PMO. We also constructed semi-rational designed libraries mutating only residues in the enzyme active site that in one round of mutagenesis and screening produced variants that achieved nearly half of the activity of the most evolved enzymes of the P450PMO lineage. Finally, we found that changes in redox properties of the laboratory-evolved P450 alkane hydroxylases did not reflect the improvement in their electron transfer efficiency. The heme redox potential remained constant throughout evolution, while activity increased and coupling efficiency improved from 10% to 90%. The lack of correlation between heme redox potential and enzyme activity and coupling efficiency led us to search for other enzyme properties that could be better predictors for activity towards small alkanes, specifically methane. We investigated the oxidation potential of the radical

  3. Regulation of alkane oxidation in Pseudomonas putida.

    PubMed Central

    Grund, A; Shapiro, J; Fennewald, M; Bacha, P; Leahy, J; Markbreiter, K; Nieder, M; Toepfer, M

    1975-01-01

    We have studied the appearance of whole-cell oxidizing activity for n-alkanes and their oxidation products in strains of Pseudomonas putida carrying the OCT plasmid. Our results indicate that the OCT plasmid codes for inducible alkane-hydroxylating and primary alcohol-dehydrogenating activities and that the chromosome codes for constitutive oxidizing activities for primary alcohols, aliphatic aldehydes, and fatty acids. Mutant isolation confirms the presence of an alcohol dehydrogenase locus on the OCT plasmid and indicated the presence of multiple alcohol and aldehyde dehydrogenase loci on the P. putida chromosome. Induction tests with various compounds indicate that inducer recognition has specificity for chain length and can be affected by the degree of oxidation of the carbon chain. Some inducers are neither growth nor respiration substrates. Growth tests with and without a gratuitous inducer indicate that undecane is not a growth substrate because it does not induce alkane hydroxylase activity. Using a growth test for determining induction of the plasmid alcohol dehydrogenase it is possible to show that heptane induces this activity in hydroxylase-negative mutants. This suggests that unoxidized alkane molecules are the physiological inducers of both plasmid activities. PMID:1150626

  4. Revised charge equilibration potential for liquid alkanes.

    PubMed

    Davis, Joseph E; Warren, G Lee; Patel, Sandeep

    2008-07-17

    We present a revised liquid alkane force field based on the charge equilibration formalism for incorporating electrostatic nonadditive effects arising from local polarization. The model is a revision of earlier work by Patel and Brooks, specifically addressing deficiencies in the dihedral potential, electrostatic, and Lennard-Jones (van der Waals) parameters of the force field. We discuss refinement of the alkane backbone torsion potential to match high-level ab initio relative conformational energetics for pentane, hexane, and heptane. We further discuss refinement of the electrostatic and Lennard-Jones (van der Waals) parameters to reproduce the experimental polarizability, liquid density, and vaporization enthalpy of hexane. Finally, we calculate bulk liquid properties including densities, vaporization enthalpies, self-diffusion constants, isothermal compressibilities, constant pressure heat capacities, and NMR T 1 relaxation times for a series of linear alkanes ranging from hexane to pentadecane based on the current revised model. We also compute free energies of hydration for pentane, hexane, and heptane. The revised force field offers a significantly improved overall description of these properties relative to the original parametrization. The current alkane force field represents a platform for ongoing development of a CHARMM (Chemistry at Harvard Molecular Mechanics) polarizable force field for lipids and integral membrane proteins.

  5. Nitrated metalloporphyrins as catalysts for alkane oxidation

    DOEpatents

    Ellis, Jr., Paul E.; Lyons, James E.

    1994-01-01

    Compositions of matter comprising nitro-substituted metal complexes of porphyrins are catalysts for the oxidation of alkanes. The metal is iron, chromium, manganese, ruthenium, copper or cobalt. The porphyrin ring has nitro groups attached thereto in meso and/or .beta.-pyrrolic positions.

  6. Nitrated metalloporphyrins as catalysts for alkane oxidation

    DOEpatents

    Ellis, Jr., Paul E.; Lyons, James E.

    1992-01-01

    Alkanes are oxidized by contact with oxygen-containing gas in the presence as catalyst of a metalloporphyrin in which hydrogen atoms in the porphyrin ring have been replaced with one or more nitro groups. Hydrogen atoms in the porphyrin ring may also be substituted with halogen atoms.

  7. Reflectance spectroscopy of organic compounds: 1. Alkanes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Clark, R.N.; Curchin, J.M.; Hoefen, T.M.; Swayze, G.A.

    2009-01-01

    Reflectance spectra of the organic compounds comprising the alkane series are presented from the ultraviolet to midinfrared, 0.35 to 15.5 /??m. Alkanes are hydrocarbon molecules containing only single carbon-carbon bonds, and are found naturally on the Earth and in the atmospheres of the giant planets and Saturn's moon, Titan. This paper presents the spectral properties of the alkanes as the first in a series of papers to build a spectral database of organic compounds for use in remote sensing studies. Applications range from mapping the environment on the Earth, to the search for organic molecules and life in the solar system and throughout the. universe. We show that the spectral reflectance properties of organic compounds are rich, with major diagnostic spectral features throughout the spectral range studied. Little to no spectral change was observed as a function of temperature and only small shifts and changes in the width of absorption bands were observed between liquids and solids, making remote detection of spectral properties throughout the solar system simpler. Some high molecular weight organic compounds contain single-bonded carbon chains and have spectra similar to alkanes even ' when they fall into other families. Small spectral differences are often present allowing discrimination among some compounds, further illustrating the need to catalog spectral properties for accurate remote sensing identification with spectroscopy.

  8. Nitrated metalloporphyrins as catalysts for alkane oxidation

    DOEpatents

    Ellis, P.E. Jr.; Lyons, J.E.

    1994-01-18

    Compositions of matter comprising nitro-substituted metal complexes of porphyrins are catalysts for the oxidation of alkanes. The metal is iron, chromium, manganese, ruthenium, copper or cobalt. The porphyrin ring has nitro groups attached thereto in meso and/or [beta]-pyrrolic positions.

  9. Adsorption of alkyltrimethylammonium bromides at water/alkane interfaces: competitive adsorption of alkanes and surfactants.

    PubMed

    Fainerman, V B; Mucic, N; Pradines, V; Aksenenko, E V; Miller, R

    2013-11-12

    The adsorption of members of the homologous series of alkyl trimethylammonium bromides (C(n)TAB) is studied at water/alkane interfaces by drop profile analysis tensiometry. The results are discussed in terms of a competitive adsorption process of alkane and surfactant molecules. A thermodynamic model, derived originally for the adsorption of surfactant mixtures, is adapted such that it describes a competitive adsorption of the surfactant molecules from the aqueous phase and alkane molecules from the oil phase. This new model involves the interspecies attraction coefficient, which mutually increases the adsorption activities of the alkane and C(n)TAB. The effects of the alkyl chain length n of C(n)TABs and the influence of the number of C atoms in the alkane chain are discussed, and the physical quantities are compared to those determined at the aqueous solution/air interface. The new theoretical model for aqueous solution/oil interfaces is also compared to a theory that does not consider the adsorption of alkane. The proposed new model demonstrates good agreement with the experimental data.

  10. Studies of radiation-produced radicals and radical ions. Progress report, September 1, 1990--October 15, 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, T.F.

    1991-12-31

    The radiolytic oxidation of anti-5-methylbicyclo[2.1.0]pentane gives the 1-methylcyclopentene radical cation as the sole rearrangement product H migration whereas oxidation of its syn isomer results in the highly selective formation of the 3-methylcyclopentene radical cation by methyl group migration. Since exactly the same stereoselectivity of olefin formation was observed in corresponding PET (photosensitized electron transfer) studies in the liquid phase, it is concluded that the rearrangement in this case also occurs through the intermediacy of radical cations. Clearly, the radical cation rearrangement must occur very rapidly (10{sup {minus}8}--10{sup {minus}9}s) under liquid-phase conditions at room temperature to compete with back electron transfer, and therefore the hydrogen (or methyl) migration is a fast process under these conditions. An intramolecular cycloaddition reaction was demonstrated in the radical cation rearrangement of 4-vinylcyclohexene to bicyclo[3.2.1]oct-2-ene. ESR studies show that the radiolytic oxidation of quadricyclane in Freon matrices under conditions of high substrate dilution leads to the bicyclo[3.2.0]hepta-2,6-diene radical cation as well as the previously reported norbornadiene radical cation, the former species predominating at sufficiently low concentrations.

  11. Zinc(II)-Mediated Carbene Insertion into C-H Bonds in Alkanes.

    PubMed

    Kulkarni, Naveen V; Dash, Chandrakanta; Jayaratna, Naleen B; Ridlen, Shawn G; Karbalaei Khani, Sarah; Das, Animesh; Kou, Xiaodi; Yousufuddin, Muhammed; Cundari, Thomas R; Dias, H V Rasika

    2015-12-07

    The cationic zinc adduct {[HB(3,5-(CF3)2Pz)3]Zn(NCMe)2}ClO4 catalyzes the functionalization of tertiary, secondary, and primary C-H bonds of alkanes via carbene insertion. Ethyl diazoacetate serves as the :CHCO2Et carbene precursor. The counteranion, supporting ligand, and coordinating solvents affect the catalytic activity. An in situ generated {[HB(3,5-(CF3)2Pz)3]Zn}(+) species containing a bulkier {B[3,5-(CF3)2C6H3]4}(-) anion gives the best results among the zinc catalysts used.

  12. The long-chain alkane metabolism network of Alcanivorax dieselolei.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wanpeng; Shao, Zongze

    2014-12-12

    Alkane-degrading bacteria are ubiquitous in marine environments, but little is known about how alkane degradation is regulated. Here we investigate alkane sensing, chemotaxis, signal transduction, uptake and pathway regulation in Alcanivorax dieselolei. The outer membrane protein OmpS detects the presence of alkanes and triggers the expression of an alkane chemotaxis complex. The coupling protein CheW2 of the chemotaxis complex, which is induced only by long-chain (LC) alkanes, sends signals to trigger the expression of Cyo, which participates in modulating the expression of the negative regulator protein AlmR. This change in turn leads to the expression of ompT1 and almA, which drive the selective uptake and hydroxylation of LC alkanes, respectively. AlmA is confirmed as a hydroxylase of LC alkanes. Additional factors responsible for the metabolism of medium-chain-length alkanes are also identified, including CheW1, OmpT1 and OmpT2. These results provide new insights into alkane metabolism pathways from alkane sensing to degradation.

  13. Osteoclast radicals.

    PubMed

    Silverton, S

    1994-11-01

    In biological research, new ideas arise and quickly spread to encompass the entire field. Thus, the evolution of molecular biology has significantly changed our methods of approaching our research. A similar far-reaching finding has been the advent of radical reactions into biology. Although radical chemistry has been utilized for many technological advances that affect our daily lives, the appreciation of this same process within our cells has opened an unexplored arena for research enquiry. As cellular messengers, radical molecules seem whimsically designed: they are evanescent, rapidly and apparently indiscriminately reactive, and barely detectable by most biological methods. Yet, our initial probing of these reactive agents in cells and organisms has led us to postulate a virtually undescribed system of communication within and among cells which may have significant effects in multiple organs. In bone, radical reactants have been attributed with an important role in the control of bone resorption.

  14. OH-initiated heterogeneous oxidation of cholestane: a model system for understanding the photochemical aging of cyclic alkane aerosols.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Haofei; Ruehl, Christopher R; Chan, Arthur W H; Nah, Theodora; Worton, David R; Isaacman, Gabriel; Goldstein, Allen H; Wilson, Kevin R

    2013-11-27

    Aerosols containing aliphatic hydrocarbons play a substantial role in the urban atmosphere. Cyclic alkanes constitute a large fraction of aliphatic hydrocarbon emissions originating from incomplete combustion of diesel fuel and motor oil. In the present study, cholestane (C27H48) is used as a model system to examine the OH-initiated heterogeneous oxidation pathways of cyclic alkanes in a photochemical flow tube reactor. Oxidation products are collected on filters and analyzed by a novel soft ionization two-dimensional gas chromatography/mass spectrometry technique. The analysis reveals that the first-generation functionalization products (cholestanones, cholestanals, and cholestanols) are the dominant reaction products that account for up to 70% by mass of the total speciated compounds. The ratio of first-generation carbonyls to alcohols is near unity at every oxidation level. Among the cholestanones/cholestanals, 55% are found to have the carbonyl group on the rings of the androstane skeleton, while 74% of cholestanols have the hydroxyl group on the rings. Particle-phase oxidation products with carbon numbers less than 27 (i.e., "fragmentation products") and higher-generation functionalization products are much less abundant. Carbon bond cleavage was found to occur only on the side chain. Tertiary-carbon alkoxy radicals are suggested to play an important role in governing both the distribution of functionalization products (via alkoxy radical isomerization and reaction with oxygen) and the fragmentation products (via alkoxy radical decomposition). These results provide new insights into the oxidation mechanism of cyclic alkanes.

  15. Density functional steric analysis of linear and branched alkanes.

    PubMed

    Ess, Daniel H; Liu, Shubin; De Proft, Frank

    2010-12-16

    Branched alkane hydrocarbons are thermodynamically more stable than straight-chain linear alkanes. This thermodynamic stability is also manifest in alkane bond separation energies. To understand the physical differences between branched and linear alkanes, we have utilized a novel density functional theory (DFT) definition of steric energy based on the Weizäcker kinetic energy. Using the M06-2X functional, the total DFT energy was partitioned into a steric energy term (E(s)[ρ]), an electrostatic energy term (E(e)[ρ]), and a fermionic quantum energy term (E(q)[ρ]). This analysis revealed that branched alkanes have less (destabilizing) DFT steric energy than linear alkanes. The lower steric energy of branched alkanes is mitigated by an equal and opposite quantum energy term that contains the Pauli component of the kinetic energy and exchange-correlation energy. Because the steric and quantum energy terms cancel, this leaves the electrostatic energy term that favors alkane branching. Electrostatic effects, combined with correlation energy, explains why branched alkanes are more stable than linear alkanes.

  16. Density Functional Steric Analysis of Linear and Branched Alkanes

    SciTech Connect

    Ess, Daniel H.; Liu, Shubin; De Proft, Frank

    2010-11-18

    Branched alkane hydrocarbons are thermodynamically more stable than straight-chain linear alkanes. This thermodynamic stability is also manifest in alkane bond separation energies. To understand the physical differences between branched and linear alkanes, we have utilized a novel density functional theory (DFT) definition of steric energy based on the Weizäcker kinetic energy. Using the M06-2X functional, the total DFT energy was partitioned into a steric energy term (Ee[[ρ]), an electrostatic energy term (Ee[ρ]), and a fermionic quantum energy term (Eq[[ρ]). This analysis revealed that branched alkanes have less (destabilizing) DFT steric energy than linear alkanes. The lower steric energy of branched alkanes is mitigated by an equal and opposite quantum energy term that contains the Pauli component of the kinetic energy and exchange-correlation energy. Because the steric and quantum energy terms cancel, this leaves the electrostatic energy term that favors alkane branching. Electrostatic effects, combined with correlation energy, explains why branched alkanes are more stable than linear alkanes.

  17. Interfacial properties of semifluorinated alkane diblock copolymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pierce, Flint; Tsige, Mesfin; Borodin, Oleg; Perahia, Dvora; Grest, Gary S.

    2008-06-01

    The liquid-vapor interfacial properties of semifluorinated linear alkane diblock copolymers of the form F3C(CF2)n-1(CH2)m-1CH3 are studied by fully atomistic molecular dynamics simulations. The chemical composition and the conformation of the molecules at the interface are identified and correlated with the interfacial energies. A modified form of the Optimized Parameter for Liquid Simulation All-Atom (OPLS-AA) force field of Jorgensen and co-workers [J. Am. Chem. Soc. 106, 6638 (1984); 118, 11225 (1996); J. Phys. Chem. A 105, 4118 (2001)], which includes specific dihedral terms for H-F blocks-and corrections to the H-F nonbonded interaction, is used together with a new version of the exp-6 force field developed in this work. Both force fields yield good agreement with the available experimental liquid density and surface tension data as well as each other over significant temperature ranges and for a variety of chain lengths and compositions. The interfacial regions of semifluorinated alkanes are found to be rich in fluorinated groups compared to hydrogenated groups, an effect that decreases with increasing temperature but is independent of the fractional length of the fluorinated segments. The proliferation of fluorine at the surface substantially lowers the surface tension of the diblock copolymers, yielding values near those of perfluorinated alkanes and distinct from those of protonated alkanes of the same chain length. With decreasing temperatures within the liquid state, chains are found to preferentially align perpendicular to the interface, as previously seen.

  18. Oxidative dehydrogenation of alkanes to unsaturated hydrocarbons

    DOEpatents

    Kung, Harold H.; Chaar, Mohamed A.

    1988-01-01

    Oxidative dehydrogenation of alkanes to unsaturated hydrocarbons is carried out over metal vanadate catalysts under oxidizing conditions. The vanadate catalysts are represented by the formulas M.sub.3 (VO.sub.4).sub.2 and MV.sub.2 O.sub.6, M representing Mg, Zn, Ca, Pb, or Cd. The reaction is carried out in the presence of oxygen, but the formation of oxygenate by-products is suppressed.

  19. Oxidative dehydrogenation of alkanes to unsaturated hydrocarbons

    DOEpatents

    Kung, H.H.; Chaar, M.A.

    1988-10-11

    Oxidative dehydrogenation of alkanes to unsaturated hydrocarbons is carried out over metal vanadate catalysts under oxidizing conditions. The vanadate catalysts are represented by the formulas M[sub 3](VO[sub 4])[sub 2] and MV[sub 2]O[sub 6], M representing Mg, Zn, Ca, Pb, or Cd. The reaction is carried out in the presence of oxygen, but the formation of oxygenate by-products is suppressed.

  20. Electrophilic nitration of alkanes with nitronium hexafluorophosphate

    PubMed Central

    Olah, George A.; Ramaiah, Pichika; Prakash, G. K. Surya

    1997-01-01

    Nitration of alkanes such as methane, ethane, propane, n-butane, isobutane, neopentane, and cyclohexane was carried out with nitronium hexafluorophosphate in methylene chloride or nitroethane solution. Nitration of methane, albeit in poor yield, required protolytic activation of the nitronium ion. The results indicate direct electrophilic insertion of NO2+ into C 000000000000 000000000000 000000000000 000000000000 111111111111 000000000000 000000000000 000000000000 000000000000 H and CC σ-bonds. PMID:11038587

  1. N-Alkane oxidation enzymes of a pseudomonad.

    PubMed Central

    Parekh, V R; Traxler, R W; Sobek, J M

    1977-01-01

    A nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD)-dependent n-alkane dehydrogenase and an NAD phosphate (reduced form)-dependent alkane hydroxylase have been purified from cell-free extracts of Pseudomonas sp. strain 196Aa grown anaerobically on n-alkane. The n-alkane dehydrogenase (fraction R-3), obtained as a single peak from Bio-Gel P-60, showed an overall 135-fold purification and was demonstrated by infrared spectroscopy and gas chromatography to convert n-decane to 1-decene. The alkene hydroxylase activity in the S-3 fraction, purified 167 times from diethylaminoethyl-cellulose, was shown by the same methodology to convert decene to decanol. Commercial ferredoxin has been shown to increase the alkane dehydrogenase activity. An NAD-, flavine adenine dinucleotide-, and iron-dependent alcohol dehydrogenase was demonstrated in the R-3 fraction. A mechanism for the anaerobic conversion of n-alkane to fatty acid has been proposed. PMID:869535

  2. VUV Photoionisation of hydrocarbon radicals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alcaraz, C.; Noller, Bastian; Hemberger, Patrick; Fischer, Ingo; Gans, Bérenger; Boyé-Peronne, Séverine; Douin, Stéphane; Gauyacq, Dolorès; Soldi-Lose, Héloïse; Garcia, Gustavo

    2008-09-01

    Hydrocarbon radicals CxHy are constituents of various planetary atmospheres, in particular Titan, as a result of the methane photochemistry induced by the solar radiation. They contribute to the neutral chemistry, but are also important for the ionosphere through their photoionisation leading to their cations CxHy +. These cations are also produced by ion-molecule reactions starting from the reaction of the primary ions CH4 + and CH3 + which are created in the non-dissociative and dissociative photoionisation of CH4. This work aims at caracterizing the VUV photoionisation of small hydrocarbon radicals as a function of photon energy. The objective is to provide laboratory data for modelers on the spectroscopy, the thermochemistry, and the reactivity of the radicals and their cations. The hydrocarbon radicals are much less caracterized than stable molecules since they have to be produced in situ in the laboratory experiment. We have adapted at Orsay [1-3] a pyrolysis source (Figure 1) well suited to produce cold beams of hydrocarbon radicals to our experimental setups. Available now at Orsay, we have two new sources of VUV radiation, complementary in terms of tunability and resolution, that can be used for these studies. The first one is the DESIRS beamline [4] at the new french synchrotron, SOLEIL. The second one is the VUV laser developped at the Centre Laser de l'Université Paris-Sud (CLUPS) [5]. At SOLEIL, a photoelectron-photoion coincidence spectrometer is used to monitor the photoionisation on a large photon energy range. At the CLUPS, a pulsedfield ionisation (PFI-ZEKE) spectrometer allows studies at higher resolution on selected photon energies. The first results obtained with these new setups will be presented. References [1] Fischer, I., Schussler, T., Deyerl, H.J., Elhanine, M. & Alcaraz, C., Photoionization and dissociative photoionization of the allyl radical, C3H5. Int. J. Mass Spectrom., 261 (2-3), 227-233 (2007) [2] Schüßler, T., Roth, W., Gerber

  3. Regioselective functionalization of alkanes by sequential dehydrogenation-hydrozirconation.

    PubMed

    Kuninobu, Yoichiro; Ureshino, Tomonari; Yamamoto, Shun-ichi; Takai, Kazuhiko

    2010-08-07

    We have succeeded in formal regioselective functionalization of alkanes by iridium-catalyzed dehydrogenation, hydrozirconation of the resulting alkenes, and electrophilic reaction of the generated alkylzirconium intermediate.

  4. Expanding the alkane oxygenase toolbox: new enzymes and applications.

    PubMed

    van Beilen, Jan B; Funhoff, Enrico G

    2005-06-01

    As highly reduced hydrocarbons are abundant in the environment, enzymes that catalyze the terminal or subterminal oxygenation of alkanes are relatively easy to find. A number of these enzymes have been biochemically characterized in detail, because the potential of alkane hydroxylases to catalyze high added-value reactions is widely recognized. Nevertheless, the industrial application of these enzymes is restricted owing to the complex biochemistry, challenging process requirements, and the limited number of cloned and expressed enzymes. Rational and evolutionary engineering approaches have started to yield more robust and versatile enzyme systems, broadening the alkane oxygenase portfolio. In addition, metagenomic approaches provide access to many novel alkane oxygenase sequences.

  5. Oligorotaxane Radicals under Orders.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yuping; Frasconi, Marco; Liu, Wei-Guang; Sun, Junling; Wu, Yilei; Nassar, Majed S; Botros, Youssry Y; Goddard, William A; Wasielewski, Michael R; Stoddart, J Fraser

    2016-02-24

    A strategy for creating foldameric oligorotaxanes composed of only positively charged components is reported. Threadlike components-namely oligoviologens-in which different numbers of 4,4'-bipyridinium (BIPY(2+)) subunits are linked by p-xylylene bridges, are shown to be capable of being threaded by cyclobis(paraquat-p-phenylene) (CBPQT(4+)) rings following the introduction of radical-pairing interactions under reducing conditions. UV/vis/NIR spectroscopic and electrochemical investigations suggest that the reduced oligopseudorotaxanes fold into highly ordered secondary structures as a result of the formation of BIPY(•+) radical cation pairs. Furthermore, by installing bulky stoppers at each end of the oligopseudorotaxanes by means of Cu-free alkyne-azide cycloadditions, their analogous oligorotaxanes, which retain the same stoichiometries as their progenitors, can be prepared. Solution-state studies of the oligorotaxanes indicate that their mechanically interlocked structures lead to the enforced interactions between the dumbbell and ring components, allowing them to fold (contract) in their reduced states and unfold (expand) in their fully oxidized states as a result of Coulombic repulsions. This electrochemically controlled reversible folding and unfolding process, during which the oligorotaxanes experience length contractions and expansions, is reminiscent of the mechanisms of actuation associated with muscle fibers.

  6. Oligorotaxane Radicals under Orders

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    A strategy for creating foldameric oligorotaxanes composed of only positively charged components is reported. Threadlike components—namely oligoviologens—in which different numbers of 4,4′-bipyridinium (BIPY2+) subunits are linked by p-xylylene bridges, are shown to be capable of being threaded by cyclobis(paraquat-p-phenylene) (CBPQT4+) rings following the introduction of radical-pairing interactions under reducing conditions. UV/vis/NIR spectroscopic and electrochemical investigations suggest that the reduced oligopseudorotaxanes fold into highly ordered secondary structures as a result of the formation of BIPY•+ radical cation pairs. Furthermore, by installing bulky stoppers at each end of the oligopseudorotaxanes by means of Cu-free alkyne–azide cycloadditions, their analogous oligorotaxanes, which retain the same stoichiometries as their progenitors, can be prepared. Solution-state studies of the oligorotaxanes indicate that their mechanically interlocked structures lead to the enforced interactions between the dumbbell and ring components, allowing them to fold (contract) in their reduced states and unfold (expand) in their fully oxidized states as a result of Coulombic repulsions. This electrochemically controlled reversible folding and unfolding process, during which the oligorotaxanes experience length contractions and expansions, is reminiscent of the mechanisms of actuation associated with muscle fibers. PMID:27163033

  7. Formation of Carotenoid Neutral Radicals in Photosystem II

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Yunlong; Shinopoulos, Katherine E.; Tracewell, Cara A.; Focsan, A. Ligia; Brudvig, Gary W.; Kispert, Lowell D.

    2010-01-01

    β-carotene radicals produced in the hexagonal pores of the molecular sieve Cu(II)-MCM-41 were studied by ENDOR and visible/near IR spectroscopies. ENDOR studies showed that neutral radicals of β-carotene were produced in humid air under ambient fluorescent light. The maximum absorption wavelengths of the neutral radicals were measured and were additionally predicted by using time-dependent density functional theory (TD-DFT) calculations. An absorption peak at 750 nm, assigned to the neutral radical with a proton loss from the 4(4') position of the β-carotene radical cation in Cu(II)-MCM-41, was also observed in photosystem II (PS II) samples using near-IR spectroscopy after illumination at 20 K. This peak was previously unassigned in PS II samples. The intensity of the absorption peak at 750 nm relative to the absorption of chlorophyll radical cations and β-carotene radical cations increased with increasing pH of the PS II sample, providing further evidence that the absorption peak is due to the deprotonation of the β-carotene radical cation. Based on a consideration of possible proton acceptors that are adjacent to β-carotene molecules in photosystem II, as modeled in the X-ray crystal structure of Guskov et al. Nat. Struct. Mol. Biol. 2009, 16, 334-342, an electron-transfer pathway from a β-carotene molecule with an adjacent proton acceptor to P680•+ is proposed. PMID:19552399

  8. Melting of linear alkanes between swollen elastomers and solid substrates.

    PubMed

    Nanjundiah, Kumar; Dhinojwala, Ali

    2013-10-01

    We have measured the melting and freezing behavior of linear alkanes confined between cross-linked poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) elastomers and solid sapphire substrates. Small molecules are often used as lubricants to reduce friction or as plasticizers, but very little is directly known about the migration or changes in physical properties of these small molecules at interfaces, particularly the changes in transition temperatures upon confinement. Our previous studies highlighted striking differences between the crystal structure of confined and unconfined pentadecane crystals in contact with sapphire substrates. Here, we have used surface-sensitive infrared-visible sum-frequency-generation spectroscopy (SFG) to study the melting temperatures (Tm) of alkanes in nanometer thick interfacial regions between swollen PDMS elastomers in contact with sapphire substrate. We find that confined alkanes show depression in Tm compared to the melting temperature of unconfined bulk alkanes. The depression in Tm is a function of chain length, and these differences were smallest for shorter alkanes and largest for 19 unit long alkanes. In comparison, the DSC results for swollen PDMS elastomer show a broad distribution of melting points corresponding to different sizes of crystals formed within the network. The Tm for confined alkanes has been modeled using the combination of Flory-Rehner and Gibbs-Thomson models, and the depression in Tm is related to the thickness of the confined alkanes. These findings have important implications in understanding friction and adhesion of soft elastomeric materials and also the effects of confinement between two solid materials.

  9. 40 CFR 721.3435 - Butoxy-substituted ether alkane.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Butoxy-substituted ether alkane. 721... Substances § 721.3435 Butoxy-substituted ether alkane. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as butoxy-substituted ether...

  10. Products of Chemistry: Alkanes: Abundant, Pervasive, Important, and Essential.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seymour, Raymond B.

    1989-01-01

    Discusses the history and commercialization of alkanes. Examines the nomenclature and uses of alkanes. Studies polymerization and several types of polyethylenes: low-density, high-density, low-molecular-weight, cross-linked, linear low-density, and ultrahigh-molecular-weight. Includes a glossary of hydrocarbon terms. (MVL)

  11. Formation of ions and radicals from icy grains in comets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jackson, William M.

    1992-01-01

    Two theoretical models for the formation of radicals from ice grains are examined to determine if this can explain the jets in comets. It is shown that the production rates for these radicals by the photolysis of molecules in the icy grains are not high enough to explain the jets. A new mechanism is proposed involving the release of cations and anions in the gas phase as the icy mantle surrounding the grains is evaporated. Solar visible radiation can then form radicals by photodetachment of the electrons from these anions. The production rate of radicals formed in this manner is in accord with the production rates of the observed radicals.

  12. Electronic spectra of indolyl radicals: a time-dependent DFT study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crespo, Alejandro; Turjanski, Adrián G.; Estrin, Darío. A.

    2002-10-01

    Neutral and cationic indolyl radicals, such as those arising from tryptophan and melatonin, are involved in a variety of physiological situations. Due to their short life times, experimental characterization of these species is incomplete. We have performed density functional theory (DFT) calculations in order to provide information of the electronic spectral properties of indole, melatonin and tryptophan radical and radical cations. We predict that the neutral and cationic radicals exhibit absorption ranges from 450 to 500 nm and from 520 to 570 nm, respectively.

  13. Sophorolipids from Torulopsis bombicola: possible relation to alkane uptake.

    PubMed Central

    Ito, S; Inoue, S

    1982-01-01

    Torulopsis bombicola produces extracellular sophorolipids when it is grown on water-insoluble alkanes. Sophorolipids and related model compounds, which were not themselves used for growth, were found to stimulate markedly the growth of T. bombicola on alkanes. This stimulatory effect was restricted to growth on C10 to C20 alkanes, whereas no significantly influence was observed for growth on fatty alcohols, fatty acids, glucose, or glycerol. The nonionic methyl ester of the glycolipid supported the greatest cell yield. However, a number of synthetic nonionic surfactants were unable to replace the glycolipid. When organisms were grown on hexadecane, stimulation of growth by sophorolipids was observed almost exclusively with strains of Torulopsis yeasts. In contrast, the growth of other typical alkane-utilizing yeasts, such as candida and Pichia strains, was inhibited or not affected. It appears that sophorolipids are involved in alkane dissimilation by T. bombicola through an undetermined mechanism. PMID:7201782

  14. Alkanes in benthic organisms from the Buccaneer oil field

    SciTech Connect

    Middleditch, B.S.; Basile, B.

    1980-06-01

    About 200 g per day of alkanes are present in brine discharged from each of two production platforms in the Buccaneer oil field in the NW Gulf of Mexico. These alkanes disperse rapidly in the water column, so that seawater concentrations of petroleum alkanes in this region are generally very low. They can be taken up to some extent by plankton, fish, and barnacles, but the petroleum alkane concentrations in these organisms are also relatively low. The largest pool of petroleum alkanes is in the surficial sediments, where concentrations of up to 25 ppM are observed, with concentration gradients extending more than 20 m from the production platforms. Organisms are examined which are exposed to these sediments and, for comparison, other specimens from control sites around structures from which there are no discharges.

  15. Utilization of n-Alkanes by Cladosporium resinae

    PubMed Central

    Teh, J. S.; Lee, K. H.

    1973-01-01

    Four different isolates of Cladosporium resinae from Australian soils were tested for their ability to utilize liquid n-alkanes ranging from n-hexane to n-octadecane under standard conditions. The isolates were unable to make use of n-hexane, n-heptane, and n-octane for growth. In fact, these hydrocarbons, particularly n-hexane, exerted an inhibitory effect on spore germination and mycelial growth. All higher n-alkanes from n-nonane to n-octadecane were assimilated by the fungus, although only limited growth occurred on n-nonane and n-decane. The long chain n-alkanes (C14 to C18) supported good growth of all isolates, but there was no obvious correlation between cell yields and chain lengths of these n-alkanes. Variation in growth responses to individual n-alkane among the different isolates was also observed. The cause of this variation is unknown. PMID:4735447

  16. n-Alkane adsorption to polar silica surfaces.

    PubMed

    Brindza, Michael R; Ding, Feng; Fourkas, John T; Walker, Robert A

    2010-03-21

    The structures of medium-length n-alkane species (C(8)-C(11)) adsorbed to a hydrophilic silica/vapor interface were examined using vibrational sum frequency spectroscopy. Experiments sampling out-of-plane orientation show a clear pattern in vibrational band intensities that implies chains having primarily all-trans conformations lying flat along the interface. Further analysis shows that the methylene groups of the alkane chains have their local symmetry axes directed into and away from the surface. Spectra acquired under different polarization conditions interlock to reinforce this picture of interfacial structure and organization. Variation in signal intensities with chain length suggests that correlation between adsorbed monomers weakens with increasing chain length. This result stands in contrast with alkane behavior at neat liquid/vapor interfaces where longer length alkanes show considerably more surface induced ordering than short chain alkanes.

  17. Hydrocarbon Metabolism by Brevibacterium erythrogenes: Normal and Branched Alkanes1

    PubMed Central

    Pirnik, M. P.; Atlas, R. M.; Bartha, R.

    1974-01-01

    Branched- and straight-chain alkanes are metabolized by Brevibacterium erythrogenes by means of two distinct pathways. Normal alkanes (e.g., n-pentadecane) are degraded, after terminal oxidation, by the beta-oxidation system operational in fatty acid catabolism. Branched alkanes like pristane (2,6,10,14-tetramethylpentadecane) and 2-methylundecane are degraded as dicarboxylic acids, which also undergo beta-oxidation. Pristane-derived intermediates are observed to accumulate, with time, as a series of dicarboxylic acids. This dicarboxylic acid pathway is not observed in the presence of normal alkanes. Release of 14CO2 from [1-14C]pristane is delayed, or entirely inhibited, in the presence of n-hexadecane, whereas CO2 release from n-hexadecane remains unaffected. These results suggest an inducible dicarboxylic acid pathway for degradation of branched-chain alkanes. PMID:4852318

  18. Influence of various functional groups on the relative stability of alkylperoxy triplet cations: A theoretical study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Kenneth J.; Meloni, Giovanni

    2015-07-01

    CBS-QB3 energy calculations show that the formation of a stable triplet cation for alkylperoxy radicals is dependent on factors other than the stability of the daughter cations exclusively. We have found that in cases where the daughter ions are not capable of stabilizing the cation through hyperconjugation, it is possible for the triplet cation to be bound. In many circumstances, CBS-QB3 calculations have found bound triplet cation states with 'negative dissociation energies.' These results are attributed to the effects that electron donating/withdrawing substituents have on the spin and charge densities of the resulting cations.

  19. Comparative study of alkali-vapour cells with alkane-, alkeneand 1-nonadecylbenzene-based antirelaxation wall coatings

    SciTech Connect

    Balabas, M V; Tretiak, O Yu

    2013-12-31

    The dependence of both longitudinal and transverse relaxation times of ground-state magnetic polarisation in alkali atoms on the coating temperature is experimentally studied for the first time in a rubidium-vapour cell with 1-nonadecylbenzene antirelaxation coating of inner walls. The comparison of these times with the relaxation times in a caesium-vapour cell with alkane wall coatings is presented. It is found that within the studied temperature range (294 – 340K) the transverse relaxation time decreases with increasing temperature of alkene and 1-nonadecylbenzene coatings. For the alkane coating such a dependence was not explicitly found. The longitudinal relaxation time begins to decrease in all cases when passing a certain critical temperature of the coating material. It is found that the unsaturated radical structure of the coating material molecules strongly affects its antirelaxation properties. (optical pumping)

  20. Pyrimidine nucleobase radical reactivity in DNA and RNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greenberg, Marc M.

    2016-11-01

    Nucleobase radicals are major products of the reactions between nucleic acids and hydroxyl radical, which is produced via the indirect effect of ionizing radiation. The nucleobase radicals also result from hydration of cation radicals that are produced via the direct effect of ionizing radiation. The role that nucleobase radicals play in strand scission has been investigated indirectly using ionizing radiation to generate them. More recently, the reactivity of nucleobase radicals resulting from formal hydrogen atom or hydroxyl radical addition to pyrimidines has been studied by independently generating the reactive intermediates via UV-photolysis of synthetic precursors. This approach has provided control over where the reactive intermediates are produced within biopolymers and facilitated studying their reactivity. The contributions to our understanding of pyrimidine nucleobase radical reactivity by this approach are summarized.

  1. Cationization of organometallo carbonyl compounds by fast ion bombardment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siuzdak, Gary; Wendeborn, Sebastian V.; Nicolaou, K. C.

    1992-01-01

    Organodicobalt, organochromium, and organomolybdenum carbonyl complexes have been studied using fast ion bombardment mass spectrometry. It has been found that the addition of cesium iodide to the liquid matrix, m-NBA, can significantly enhance the ability to observed the precursor ions of these organometallics through charge localization. In most cases the [M + Cs]+ ions were more abundant than the radical cations M-, the protonated molecules [M + H]+, or the sodium cationized molecules [M + Na]+ which were either unobservable or less intense than those treated with the cesium iodide salt solution. The decomposition of the compounds took place primarily through the successive loss of carbonyls from the radical cation with some carbonyl loss observed through the protonated and cationized species. The FAB matrix ions produced when cesium iodide was added to m-NBA also allowed for internal calibration.

  2. Copper-Catalyzed Oxidative Dehydrogenative Carboxylation of Unactivated Alkanes to Allylic Esters via Alkenes

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    We report copper-catalyzed oxidative dehydrogenative carboxylation (ODC) of unactivated alkanes with various substituted benzoic acids to produce the corresponding allylic esters. Spectroscopic studies (EPR, UV–vis) revealed that the resting state of the catalyst is [(BPI)Cu(O2CPh)] (1-O2CPh), formed from [(BPI)Cu(PPh3)2], oxidant, and benzoic acid. Catalytic and stoichiometric reactions of 1-O2CPh with alkyl radicals and radical probes imply that C–H bond cleavage occurs by a tert-butoxy radical. In addition, the deuterium kinetic isotope effect from reactions of cyclohexane and d12-cyclohexane in separate vessels showed that the turnover-limiting step for the ODC of cyclohexane is C–H bond cleavage. To understand the origin of the difference in products formed from copper-catalyzed amidation and copper-catalyzed ODC, reactions of an alkyl radical with a series of copper–carboxylate, copper–amidate, and copper–imidate complexes were performed. The results of competition experiments revealed that the relative rate of reaction of alkyl radicals with the copper complexes follows the trend Cu(II)–amidate > Cu(II)–imidate > Cu(II)–benzoate. Consistent with this trend, Cu(II)–amidates and Cu(II)–benzoates containing more electron-rich aryl groups on the benzamidate and benzoate react faster with the alkyl radical than do those with more electron-poor aryl groups on these ligands to produce the corresponding products. These data on the ODC of cyclohexane led to preliminary investigation of copper-catalyzed oxidative dehydrogenative amination of cyclohexane to generate a mixture of N-alkyl and N-allylic products. PMID:25389772

  3. UV-Induced Adenine Radicals Induced in DNA A-Tracts: Spectral and Dynamical Characterization.

    PubMed

    Banyasz, Akos; Ketola, Tiia-Maaria; Muñoz-Losa, Aurora; Rishi, Sunny; Adhikary, Amitava; Sevilla, Michael D; Martinez-Fernandez, Lara; Improta, Roberto; Markovitsi, Dimitra

    2016-10-06

    Adenyl radicals generated in DNA single and double strands, (dA)20 and (dA)20·(dT)20, by one- and two-photon ionization by 266 nm laser pulses decay at 600 nm with half-times of 1.0 ± 0.1 and 4 ± 1 ms, respectively. Though ionization initially forms the cation radical, the radicals detected for (dA)20 are quantitatively identified as N6-deprotonated adenyl radicals by their absorption spectrum, which is computed quantum mechanically employing TD-DFT. Theoretical calculations show that deprotonation of the cation radical induces only weak spectral changes, in line with the spectra of the adenyl radical cation and the deprotonated radical trapped in low temperature glasses.

  4. Kinetic study of asphaltene dissolution in amphiphile/alkane solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Permsukarome, P.; Chang, C.; Fogler, H.S.

    1997-09-01

    The kinetics of dissolution of pentane-insoluble solid asphaltene precipitates by amphiphile/alkane solutions were investigated using a differential reactor flow system. Two amphiphiles, dodecylbenzenesulfonic acid and nonylphenol, and five alkane solvents, ranging from hexane to hexadecane, were used. Results showed that the rate of asphaltene dissolution in amphiphile/alkane fluids could be approximated with a first-order kinetics with respect to the undissolved asphaltene mass in solution. The specific dissolution rate constant, k, varied with the concentration of amphiphiles, the type of alkane solvents, the temperature, and the fluid flow rate. The rate of asphaltene dissolution displayed a Langmuir-Hinshelwood kinetics with respect to the concentration of amphiphiles. Increasing the temperature of amphiphile/alkane fluids also enhanced the rate of asphaltene dissolution. The apparent activation energy for asphaltene dissolution was approximated to be 4--7 kcal/mol. The rate of asphaltene dissolution was also greater in amphiphile solutions containing lighter alkanes, such as hexane, with lower viscosities. These trends suggest that both surface reaction and mass transfer processes are important to the rate of asphaltene dissolution in amphiphile/alkane fluids.

  5. Expanding the product profile of a microbial alkane biosynthetic pathway.

    PubMed

    Harger, Matthew; Zheng, Lei; Moon, Austin; Ager, Casey; An, Ju Hye; Choe, Chris; Lai, Yi-Ling; Mo, Benjamin; Zong, David; Smith, Matthew D; Egbert, Robert G; Mills, Jeremy H; Baker, David; Pultz, Ingrid Swanson; Siegel, Justin B

    2013-01-18

    Microbially produced alkanes are a new class of biofuels that closely match the chemical composition of petroleum-based fuels. Alkanes can be generated from the fatty acid biosynthetic pathway by the reduction of acyl-ACPs followed by decarbonylation of the resulting aldehydes. A current limitation of this pathway is the restricted product profile, which consists of n-alkanes of 13, 15, and 17 carbons in length. To expand the product profile, we incorporated a new part, FabH2 from Bacillus subtilis , an enzyme known to have a broader specificity profile for fatty acid initiation than the native FabH of Escherichia coli . When provided with the appropriate substrate, the addition of FabH2 resulted in an altered alkane product profile in which significant levels of n-alkanes of 14 and 16 carbons in length are produced. The production of even chain length alkanes represents initial steps toward the expansion of this recently discovered microbial alkane production pathway to synthesize complex fuels. This work was conceived and performed as part of the 2011 University of Washington international Genetically Engineered Machines (iGEM) project.

  6. Heterologous biosynthesis and manipulation of alkanes in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Cao, Ying-Xiu; Xiao, Wen-Hai; Zhang, Jin-Lai; Xie, Ze-Xiong; Ding, Ming-Zhu; Yuan, Ying-Jin

    2016-11-01

    Biosynthesis of alkanes in microbial foundries offers a sustainable and green supplement to traditional fossil fuels. The dynamic equilibrium of fatty aldehydes, key intermediates, played a critical role in microbial alkanes production, due to the poor catalytic capability of aldehyde deformylating oxygenase (ADO). In our study, exploration of competitive pathway together with multi-modular optimization was utilized to improve fatty aldehydes balance and consequently enhance alkanes formation in Escherichia coli. Endogenous fatty alcohol formation was supposed to be competitive with alkane production, since both of the two routes consumed the same intermediate-fatty aldehyde. Nevertheless, in our case, alkanes production in E. coli was enhanced from trace amount to 58.8mg/L by the facilitation of moderate fatty alcohol biosynthesis, which was validated by deletion of endogenous aldehyde reductase (AHR), overexpression of fatty alcohol oxidase (FAO) and consequent transcriptional assay of aar, ado and adhP genes. Moreover, alkanes production was further improved to 81.8mg/L, 86.6mg/L or 101.7mg/L by manipulation of fatty acid biosynthesis, lipids degradation or electron transfer system modules, which directly referenced to fatty aldehydes dynamic pools. A titer of 1.31g/L alkanes was achieved in 2.5L fed-batch fermentation, which was the highest reported titer in E. coli. Our research has offered a reference for chemical overproduction in microbial cell factories facilitated by exploring competitive pathway.

  7. Long-chain alkane production by the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Buijs, Nicolaas A; Zhou, Yongjin J; Siewers, Verena; Nielsen, Jens

    2015-06-01

    In the past decade industrial-scale production of renewable transportation biofuels has been developed as an alternative to fossil fuels, with ethanol as the most prominent biofuel and yeast as the production organism of choice. However, ethanol is a less efficient substitute fuel for heavy-duty and maritime transportation as well as aviation due to its low energy density. Therefore, new types of biofuels, such as alkanes, are being developed that can be used as drop-in fuels and can substitute gasoline, diesel, and kerosene. Here, we describe for the first time the heterologous biosynthesis of long-chain alkanes by the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. We show that elimination of the hexadecenal dehydrogenase Hfd1 and expression of a redox system are essential for alkane biosynthesis in yeast. Deletion of HFD1 together with expression of an alkane biosynthesis pathway resulted in the production of the alkanes tridecane, pentadecane, and heptadecane. Our study provides a proof of principle for producing long-chain alkanes in the industrial workhorse S. cerevisiae, which was so far limited to bacteria. We anticipate that these findings will be a key factor for further yeast engineering to enable industrial production of alkane based drop-in biofuels, which can allow the biofuel industry to diversify beyond bioethanol.

  8. High-order harmonic generation in alkanes

    SciTech Connect

    Altucci, C.; Velotta, R.; Heesel, E.; Springate, E.; Marangos, J. P.; Vozzi, C.; Benedetti, E.; Calegari, F.; Sansone, G.; Stagira, S.; Nisoli, M.; Tosa, V.

    2006-04-15

    We have investigated the process of high-order harmonic generation in light alkanes by using femtosecond laser pulses. We show the experimental results cannot be matched by a model that assumes a single active electron only in a hydrogenic s orbital. Clear evidences are shown of the important role played by the p-like character originating from the covalent C-H bond. By constructing a suitable mixture of s-type and p-type atomic wave functions, an excellent agreement between measurements in methane and simulations is found, thus confirming the validity of the developed method as a general tool for the analysis of high-order harmonic generation in complex molecules.

  9. Carotenoid cation formation and the regulation of photosynthetic light harvesting.

    PubMed

    Holt, Nancy E; Zigmantas, Donatas; Valkunas, Leonas; Li, Xiao-Ping; Niyogi, Krishna K; Fleming, Graham R

    2005-01-21

    Photosynthetic light harvesting in excess light is regulated by a process known as feedback deexcitation. Femtosecond transient absorption measurements on thylakoid membranes show selective formation of a carotenoid radical cation upon excitation of chlorophyll under conditions of maximum, steady-state feedback deexcitation. Studies on transgenic Arabidopsis thaliana plants confirmed that this carotenoid radical cation formation is correlated with feedback deexcitation and requires the presence of zeaxanthin, the specific carotenoid synthesized during high light exposure. These results indicate that energy transfer from chlorophyll molecules to a chlorophyllzeaxanthin heterodimer, which then undergoes charge separation, is the mechanism for excess energy dissipation during feedback deexcitation.

  10. Heterogeneity of Alkane Chain Length in Freshwater and Marine Cyanobacteria

    PubMed Central

    Shakeel, Tabinda; Fatma, Zia; Fatma, Tasneem; Yazdani, Syed Shams

    2015-01-01

    The potential utilization of cyanobacteria for the biological production of alkanes represents an exceptional system for the next generation of biofuels. Here, we analyzed a diverse group of freshwater and marine cyanobacterial isolates from Indian culture collections for their ability to produce both alkanes and alkenes. Among the 50 cyanobacterial isolates screened, 32 isolates; 14 freshwater and 18 marine isolates; produced predominantly alkanes. The GC-MS/MS profiles revealed a higher percentage of pentadecane and heptadecane production for marine and freshwater strains, respectively. Oscillatoria species were found to be the highest producers of alkanes. Among the freshwater isolates, Oscillatoria CCC305 produced the maximum alkane level with 0.43 μg/mg dry cell weight, while Oscillatoria formosa BDU30603 was the highest producer among the marine isolates with 0.13 μg/mg dry cell weight. Culturing these strains under different media compositions showed that the alkane chain length was not influenced by the growth medium but was rather an inherent property of the strains. Analysis of the cellular fatty acid content indicated the presence of predominantly C16 chain length fatty acids in marine strains, while the proportion of C18 chain length fatty acids increased in the majority of freshwater strains. These results correlated with alkane chain length specificity of marine and freshwater isolates indicating that alkane chain lengths may be primarily determined by the fatty acid synthesis pathway. Moreover, the phylogenetic analysis showed clustering of pentadecane-producing marine strains that was distinct from heptadecane-producing freshwater strains strongly suggesting a close association between alkane chain length and the cyanobacteria habitat. PMID:25853127

  11. Gene Structures and Regulation of the Alkane Hydroxylase Complex in Acinetobacter sp. Strain M-1

    PubMed Central

    Tani, Akio; Ishige, Takeru; Sakai, Yasuyoshi; Kato, Nobuo

    2001-01-01

    In the long-chain n-alkane degrader Acinetobacter sp. strain M-1, two alkane hydroxylase complexes are switched by controlling the expression of two n-alkane hydroxylase-encoding genes in response to the chain length of n-alkanes, while rubredoxin and rubredoxin ruductase are encoded by a single gene and expressed constitutively. PMID:11160120

  12. The cubyl cation rearrangements.

    PubMed

    Jalife, Said; Mondal, Sukanta; Cabellos, Jose Luis; Martinez-Guajardo, Gerardo; Fernandez-Herrera, Maria A; Merino, Gabriel

    2016-02-25

    Born-Oppenheimer molecular dynamics simulations and high-level ab initio computations predict that the cage-opening rearrangement of the cubyl cation to the 7H(+)-pentalenyl cation is feasible in the gas phase. The rate-determining step is the formation of the cuneyl cation with an activation barrier of 25.3 kcal mol(-1) at the CCSD(T)/def2-TZVP//MP2/def2-TZVP level. Thus, the cubyl cation is kinetically stable enough to be formed and trapped at moderate temperatures, but it may be rearranged at higher temperatures.

  13. Involvement of an alkane hydroxylase system of Gordonia sp. strain SoCg in degradation of solid n-alkanes.

    PubMed

    Lo Piccolo, Luca; De Pasquale, Claudio; Fodale, Roberta; Puglia, Anna Maria; Quatrini, Paola

    2011-02-01

    Enzymes involved in oxidation of long-chain n-alkanes are still not well known, especially those in gram-positive bacteria. This work describes the alkane degradation system of the n-alkane degrader actinobacterium Gordonia sp. strain SoCg, which is able to grow on n-alkanes from dodecane (C(12)) to hexatriacontane (C(36)) as the sole C source. SoCg harbors in its chromosome a single alk locus carrying six open reading frames (ORFs), which shows 78 to 79% identity with the alkane hydroxylase (AH)-encoding systems of other alkane-degrading actinobacteria. Quantitative reverse transcription-PCR showed that the genes encoding AlkB (alkane 1-monooxygenase), RubA3 (rubredoxin), RubA4 (rubredoxin), and RubB (rubredoxin reductase) were induced by both n-hexadecane and n-triacontane, which were chosen as representative long-chain liquid and solid n-alkane molecules, respectively. Biotransformation of n-hexadecane into the corresponding 1-hexadecanol was detected by solid-phase microextraction coupled with gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (SPME/GC-MS) analysis. The Gordonia SoCg alkB was heterologously expressed in Escherichia coli BL21 and in Streptomyces coelicolor M145, and both hosts acquired the ability to transform n-hexadecane into 1-hexadecanol, but the corresponding long-chain alcohol was never detected on n-triacontane. However, the recombinant S. coelicolor M145-AH, expressing the Gordonia alkB gene, was able to grow on n-triacontane as the sole C source. A SoCg alkB disruption mutant that is completely unable to grow on n-triacontane was obtained, demonstrating the role of an AlkB-type AH system in degradation of solid n-alkanes.

  14. DITERMINAL OXIDATION OF LONG-CHAIN ALKANES BY BACTERIA1

    PubMed Central

    Kester, A. S.; Foster, J. W.

    1963-01-01

    Kester, A. S. (The University of Texas, Austin) and J. W. Foster. Diterminal oxidation of long-chain alkanes by bacteria. J. Bacteriol. 85:859–869. 1963.—A corynebacterial organism capable of growing in mineral salts with individual pure alkanes as carbon sources produces a series of acids from the C10-C14 alkanes. They have been isolated in pure form and identified as monoic, ω-hydroxy monoic, and dioic acids containing the same number of carbon atoms as the substrate alkane. Oxidation took place at both terminal methyl groups—“diterminal oxidation.” Appropriate labeling experiments indicate that omega oxidation of fatty acids occurs in this organism and that an oxygenation with O2 occurs. Images PMID:14044955

  15. Process for converting light alkanes to higher hydrocarbons

    DOEpatents

    Noceti, Richard P.; Taylor, Charles E.

    1988-01-01

    A process is disclosed for the production of aromatic-rich, gasoline boiling range hydrocarbons from the lower alkanes, particularly from methane. The process is carried out in two stages. In the first, alkane is reacted with oxygen and hydrogen chloride over an oxyhydrochlorination catalyst such as copper chloride with minor proportions of potassium chloride and rare earth chloride. This produces an intermediate gaseous mixture containing water and chlorinated alkanes. The chlorinated alkanes are contacted with a crystalline aluminosilicate catalyst in the hydrogen or metal promoted form to produce gasoline range hydrocarbons with a high proportion of aromatics and a small percentage of light hydrocarbons (C.sub.2 -C.sub.4). The light hydrocarbons can be recycled for further processing over the oxyhydrochlorination catalyst.

  16. Site-selective Alkane Dehydrogenation of Fatty Acids

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-12-14

    dehydrogenation of fatty acids Contract/Grant#: FA9550-10-1-0532 Final Reporting Period: 15 September 2011 to 14 September 2011...directly incorporate fatty acids into the ligand. The preparation of the acyl phosphines (1-5) was easily accomplished starting from the corresponding...AFOSR Final Report Final Report 
 The proposed research examines the site-selective dehydrogenation of alkanes. The alkanes employed were fatty

  17. Transannular E···E' Interactions in Neutral, Radical Cationic, and Dicationic Forms of cyclo-[E(CH2CH2CH2)2E'] (E, E' = S, Se, Te, and O) with Structural Feature: Dynamic and Static Behavior of E···E' Elucidated by QTAIM Dual Functional Analysis.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Satoko; Matsuiwa, Kohei; Nishizawa, Nozomu; Nakanishi, Waro

    2015-12-18

    The nature of the transannular E-∗-E' interactions in neutral, radical cationic, and dicationic forms of cyclo-E(CH2CH2CH2)2E' (1) (E, E' = S, Se, Te, and O) (1, 1(•+), and 1(2+), respectively) is elucidated by applying QTAIM dual functional analysis (QTAIM-DFA). Hb(rc) are plotted versus Hb(rc) - Vb(rc)/2 for the data of E-∗-E' at BCPs in QTAIM-DFA, where ∗ emphasizes the existence of BCP. Plots for the fully optimized structures are analyzed by the polar coordinate (R, θ) representation. Those containing the perturbed structures are by (θp, κp): θp corresponds to the tangent line of the plot, and κp is the curvature. While (R, θ) describes the static nature, (θp, κp) represents the dynamic nature of interactions. The nature is well-specified by (R, θ) and (θp, κp). E-∗-E' becomes stronger in the order of 1 < 1(•+) < 1(2+), except for O-∗-O. While E-∗-E' (E, E' = S, Se, and Te) in 1(2+) are characterized as weak covalent bonds, except for S-∗-Te (MC nature through CT) and Se-∗-Te (TBP nature through CT), O-∗-E' seems more complex. The behavior of E-∗-E' in 1(2+) is very close to that of cyclo-E(CH2CH2CH2)E' (E, E' = S, Se, Te, and O), except for O-∗-O.

  18. Contribution of cyanobacterial alkane production to the ocean hydrocarbon cycle.

    PubMed

    Lea-Smith, David J; Biller, Steven J; Davey, Matthew P; Cotton, Charles A R; Perez Sepulveda, Blanca M; Turchyn, Alexandra V; Scanlan, David J; Smith, Alison G; Chisholm, Sallie W; Howe, Christopher J

    2015-11-03

    Hydrocarbons are ubiquitous in the ocean, where alkanes such as pentadecane and heptadecane can be found even in waters minimally polluted with crude oil. Populations of hydrocarbon-degrading bacteria, which are responsible for the turnover of these compounds, are also found throughout marine systems, including in unpolluted waters. These observations suggest the existence of an unknown and widespread source of hydrocarbons in the oceans. Here, we report that strains of the two most abundant marine cyanobacteria, Prochlorococcus and Synechococcus, produce and accumulate hydrocarbons, predominantly C15 and C17 alkanes, between 0.022 and 0.368% of dry cell weight. Based on global population sizes and turnover rates, we estimate that these species have the capacity to produce 2-540 pg alkanes per mL per day, which translates into a global ocean yield of ∼ 308-771 million tons of hydrocarbons annually. We also demonstrate that both obligate and facultative marine hydrocarbon-degrading bacteria can consume cyanobacterial alkanes, which likely prevents these hydrocarbons from accumulating in the environment. Our findings implicate cyanobacteria and hydrocarbon degraders as key players in a notable internal hydrocarbon cycle within the upper ocean, where alkanes are continually produced and subsequently consumed within days. Furthermore we show that cyanobacterial alkane production is likely sufficient to sustain populations of hydrocarbon-degrading bacteria, whose abundances can rapidly expand upon localized release of crude oil from natural seepage and human activities.

  19. Contribution of cyanobacterial alkane production to the ocean hydrocarbon cycle

    PubMed Central

    Lea-Smith, David J.; Biller, Steven J.; Davey, Matthew P.; Cotton, Charles A. R.; Perez Sepulveda, Blanca M.; Turchyn, Alexandra V.; Scanlan, David J.; Smith, Alison G.; Chisholm, Sallie W.; Howe, Christopher J.

    2015-01-01

    Hydrocarbons are ubiquitous in the ocean, where alkanes such as pentadecane and heptadecane can be found even in waters minimally polluted with crude oil. Populations of hydrocarbon-degrading bacteria, which are responsible for the turnover of these compounds, are also found throughout marine systems, including in unpolluted waters. These observations suggest the existence of an unknown and widespread source of hydrocarbons in the oceans. Here, we report that strains of the two most abundant marine cyanobacteria, Prochlorococcus and Synechococcus, produce and accumulate hydrocarbons, predominantly C15 and C17 alkanes, between 0.022 and 0.368% of dry cell weight. Based on global population sizes and turnover rates, we estimate that these species have the capacity to produce 2–540 pg alkanes per mL per day, which translates into a global ocean yield of ∼308–771 million tons of hydrocarbons annually. We also demonstrate that both obligate and facultative marine hydrocarbon-degrading bacteria can consume cyanobacterial alkanes, which likely prevents these hydrocarbons from accumulating in the environment. Our findings implicate cyanobacteria and hydrocarbon degraders as key players in a notable internal hydrocarbon cycle within the upper ocean, where alkanes are continually produced and subsequently consumed within days. Furthermore we show that cyanobacterial alkane production is likely sufficient to sustain populations of hydrocarbon-degrading bacteria, whose abundances can rapidly expand upon localized release of crude oil from natural seepage and human activities. PMID:26438854

  20. Dynamics of CN+alkane reactions by crossed-beam dc slice imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Huang Cunshun; Li Wen; Estillore, Armando D.; Suits, Arthur G.

    2008-08-21

    The hydrogen atom abstraction reactions of CN (X {sup 2}{sigma}{sup +}) with alkanes have been studied using the crossed molecular beam technique with dc slice ion imaging at collision energies of 7.5 and 10.8 kcal/mol. The product alkyl radical images were obtained via single photon ionization at 157 nm for the reactions of CN (X {sup 2}{sigma}{sup +}) with n-butane, n-pentane, n-hexane, and cyclohexane. From analysis of the images, we obtained the center-of-mass frame product angular distributions and translational energy distributions directly. The results indicate that the products are largely backscattered and that most of the available energy ({approx}80%-85%) goes to the internal energy of the products. The reaction dynamics is discussed in light of recent kinetics data, theoretical calculations, and results for related halogen and oxygen atom reactions.

  1. Hydrogen-hydrogen bonds in highly branched alkanes and in alkane complexes: A DFT, ab initio, QTAIM, and ELF study.

    PubMed

    Monteiro, Norberto K V; Firme, Caio L

    2014-03-06

    The hydrogen-hydrogen (H-H) bond or hydrogen-hydrogen bonding is formed by the interaction between a pair of identical or similar hydrogen atoms that are close to electrical neutrality and it yields a stabilizing contribution to the overall molecular energy. This work provides new, important information regarding hydrogen-hydrogen bonds. We report that stability of alkane complexes and boiling point of alkanes are directly related to H-H bond, which means that intermolecular interactions between alkane chains are directional H-H bond, not nondirectional induced dipole-induced dipole. Moreover, we show the existence of intramolecular H-H bonds in highly branched alkanes playing a secondary role in their increased stabilities in comparison with linear or less branched isomers. These results were accomplished by different approaches: density functional theory (DFT), ab initio, quantum theory of atoms in molecules (QTAIM), and electron localization function (ELF).

  2. Charge transfer complexes of metal-free phthalocyanine radical anions with decamethylmetallocenium cations: (Cp*2Co(+))(H2Pc˙(-))·solvent and (Cp*2Cr(+))(H2Pc˙(-))·4C6H4Cl2.

    PubMed

    Konarev, Dmitri V; Khasanov, Salavat S; Ishikawa, Manabu; Otsuka, Akihiro; Yamochi, Hideki; Saito, Gunzi; Lyubovskaya, Rimma N

    2017-03-14

    Charge transfer complexes (Cp*2Co(+))(H2Pc˙(-))·0.5C6H4Cl2·0.7C6H5CN·0.3C6H14 (1) and (Cp*2Cr(+))(H2Pc˙(-))·4C6H4Cl2 (2) have been obtained as single crystals. Both complexes contain metal-free phthalocyanine (Pc) radical anions and decamethylmetallocenium cations. Reduction of the Pc macrocycle leads to the appearance of new bands at 1026-1030 nm in the NIR range and blue shifts of both Soret and Q-bands of H2Pc in the spectra of 1 and 2. The geometry of the Pc macrocycles supports the formation of H2Pc˙(-) by the alternation of shorter and longer C-N(imine) bonds in the macrocycles in 2. Complex 1 contains pairs of H2Pc˙(-) having effective π-π interactions with two sandwiched Cp*2Co(+) cations, whereas complex 2 contains stacks composed of alternating Cp*2Cr(+) and H2Pc˙(-) ions. The magnetic moment of 1 is 1.64 μB at 300 K due to the contribution of the H2Pc˙(-) spins with the S = 1/2 state and diamagnetism of Cp*2Co(+). This is supported by the observation of a narrow EPR signal of 1 with g = 2.0032-2.0036 characteristic of H2Pc˙(-). Strong antiferromagnetic coupling of spins with a Weiss temperature of -23 K is observed between H2Pc˙(-) in 1. This coupling is probably mediated by the Cp*2Co(+) cations. The magnetic moment of 2 is 4.18 μB at 300 K indicating the contribution of both paramagnetic H2Pc˙(-) (S = 1/2) and Cp*2Cr(+) (S = 3/2) species. In spite of the presence of stacks of alternating ions in 2, only weak magnetic coupling is observed with a Weiss temperature of -4 K most probably due to ineffective π-π interactions between Cp*2Cr(+) and H2Pc˙(-). The EPR spectrum of 2 contains an asymmetric signal attributed to Cr(III) (g1 = 3.9059-3.9220) and a narrow Lorentzian signal from H2Pc˙(-) with g2 = 1.9943-1.9961. In addition to these signals, a broad EPR signal grows in intensity below 80 K with g4 = 2.1085-2.2438 which can be attributed to both paramagnetic Cp*2Cr(+) and H2Pc˙(-) species having exchange interactions.

  3. Electrochemistry and spectroelectrochemistry of nitroxyl free radicals

    SciTech Connect

    Fish, J.R.; Swarts, S.G.; Sevilla, M.D.; Malinski, T.

    1988-06-30

    This work reports electrochemical and spectroelectrochemical studies of the two nitroxyl radicals 2,2,6,6-tetramethyl-1-piperidinyloxy (TEMPO) and 3-carbamoyl-2,2,5,5-tetramethyl-3-pyrrolin-1-yloxy (3-carbamoyl-PROXYL). Oxidation and reduction reactions have been observed in aqueous media over the pH range 2-12 in the potential range -0.8 to +0.8 V by differential pulse voltammetry, cyclic voltammetry, and thin-layer UV-visible spectroelectrochemistry, and the reaction products have been characterized by IR, NMR, and ESR spectrometry. At pH values less than 10, characteristic electrochemical behavior is observed to be analogous for both radicals, and the products from electron transfer compare quite favorably with those found by pulse radiolysis of aqueous solutions of nitroxyl radicals. At pH 2-9, a stable cation from a reversible oxidation and hydroxylamine following an irreversible reduction, as well as hydroxylated cation at pH higher than 9, are the same as those obtained in pulse radiolysis experiments. Spectroscopic evidence indicates that behavior following reduction at high pH differs for the two radicals. At pH 12, reduced TEMPO may undergo structural changes leading to the formation of a new radical consisting of a seven-membered ring.

  4. Properties of Langmuir monolayers from semifluorinated alkanes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Broniatowski, M.; Macho, I. Sandez; Miñones, J.; Dynarowicz-Łątka, P.

    2005-06-01

    The aim of this study was to characterize several semifluorinated alkanes (SFA), of the general formula F(CF 2) m(CH 2) nH (in short F mH n), containing 25 carbon atoms in total (pentacosanes) differing in the m/ n ratio, as Langmuir monolayers at the free water surface. The following compounds have been studied: F6H19, F8H17, F10H15 and F12H13. Surface pressure ( π) and electric surface potential (Δ V) isotherms were recorded in addition to quantitative Brewster angle microscopy results. The negative sign of Δ V evidenced for the orientation of all the investigated semifluorinated pentacosanes, regardless the length of the hydrogenated segment, with their perfluorinated parts directed towards the air. As inferred from apparent dipole moment values and relative reflectivity results, the fluorinated pentacosanes with shorter perfluorinated fragment (F6H19 and F8H17) were found to be vertically oriented at the air/water interface, while those with longer perfluorinated moiety (F10H15 and F12H13) remain titled even in the vicinity of the film collapse.

  5. (19)F Oximetry with semifluorinated alkanes.

    PubMed

    Kegel, Stefan; Chacon-Caldera, Jorge; Tsagogiorgas, Charalambos; Theisinger, Bastian; Glatting, Gerhard; Schad, Lothar R

    2016-12-01

    This work examines the variation of longitudinal relaxation rate R1(= 1/T1) of the (19)F-CF3-resonance of semifluorinated alkanes (SFAs) with oxygen tension (pO2), temperature (T) and pH in vitro. Contrary to their related perfluorocarbons (PFCs), SFA are amphiphilic and facilitate stable emulsions, a prerequisite for clinical use. A linear relationship between R1 and pO2 was confirmed for the observed SFAs at different temperatures. Using a standard saturation recovery sequence, T1 has been successfully measured using fluorine (19)F-MRI with a self-constructed birdcage resonator at 9.4 T. A calibration curve to calculate pO2 depending on T and R1 was found for each SFA used. In contrast to the commonly used PFC, SFAs are less sensitive to changes in pO2, but more sensitive to changes in temperature. The influence of pH to R1 was found to be negligible.

  6. Evidence for strong, widespread chlorine radical chemistry associated with pollution outflow from continental Asia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baker, Angela K.; Sauvage, Carina; Thorenz, Ute R.; van Velthoven, Peter; Oram, David E.; Zahn, Andreas; Brenninkmeijer, Carl A. M.; Williams, Jonathan

    2016-11-01

    The chlorine radical is a potent atmospheric oxidant, capable of perturbing tropospheric oxidative cycles normally controlled by the hydroxyl radical. Significantly faster reaction rates allow chlorine radicals to expedite oxidation of hydrocarbons, including methane, and in polluted environments, to enhance ozone production. Here we present evidence, from the CARIBIC airborne dataset, for extensive chlorine radical chemistry associated with Asian pollution outflow, from airborne observations made over the Malaysian Peninsula in winter. This region is known for persistent convection that regularly delivers surface air to higher altitudes and serves as a major transport pathway into the stratosphere. Oxidant ratios inferred from hydrocarbon relationships show that chlorine radicals were regionally more important than hydroxyl radicals for alkane oxidation and were also important for methane and alkene oxidation (>10%). Our observations reveal pollution-related chlorine chemistry that is both widespread and recurrent, and has implications for tropospheric oxidizing capacity, stratospheric composition and ozone chemistry.

  7. Evidence for strong, widespread chlorine radical chemistry associated with pollution outflow from continental Asia

    PubMed Central

    Baker, Angela K.; Sauvage, Carina; Thorenz, Ute R.; van Velthoven, Peter; Oram, David E.; Zahn, Andreas; Brenninkmeijer, Carl A. M.; Williams, Jonathan

    2016-01-01

    The chlorine radical is a potent atmospheric oxidant, capable of perturbing tropospheric oxidative cycles normally controlled by the hydroxyl radical. Significantly faster reaction rates allow chlorine radicals to expedite oxidation of hydrocarbons, including methane, and in polluted environments, to enhance ozone production. Here we present evidence, from the CARIBIC airborne dataset, for extensive chlorine radical chemistry associated with Asian pollution outflow, from airborne observations made over the Malaysian Peninsula in winter. This region is known for persistent convection that regularly delivers surface air to higher altitudes and serves as a major transport pathway into the stratosphere. Oxidant ratios inferred from hydrocarbon relationships show that chlorine radicals were regionally more important than hydroxyl radicals for alkane oxidation and were also important for methane and alkene oxidation (>10%). Our observations reveal pollution-related chlorine chemistry that is both widespread and recurrent, and has implications for tropospheric oxidizing capacity, stratospheric composition and ozone chemistry. PMID:27845366

  8. Is Dissociation of Peptide Radical Cations an Ergodic Process?

    SciTech Connect

    Laskin, Julia; Futrell, Jean H.; Chu, Ivan K.

    2007-08-08

    Achieving a fundamental understanding of the mechanism of unimolecular dissociation of internally excited complex molecules is one of the most important challenges in modern mass spectrometry. One of the central questions is whether the dissociation of large molecules is properly described by statistical theories—RRKM/QET or Phase Space Theories —that have proved to be remarkably successful both for small molecules and a number of small and medium size peptides. The concept question is whether the ergodic assumption that the internal excitation of the ion is randomly redistributed among the vibrational degrees of freedom prior to fragmentation is satisfied for large molecules. The validity of the ergodic hypothesis for dissociation of gas-phase biomolecules has been recently reviewed and will be only briefly discussed here.

  9. Peroxyl radical reactions with carotenoids in microemulsions: Influence of microemulsion composition and the nature of peroxyl radical precursor.

    PubMed

    El-Agamey, Ali; McGarvey, David J

    2016-01-01

    The reactions of acetylperoxyl radicals with different carotenoids (7,7'-dihydro-β-carotene and ζ-carotene) in SDS and CTAC microemulsions of different compositions were investigated using laser flash photolysis (LFP) coupled with kinetic absorption spectroscopy. The primary objective of this study was to explore the influence of microemulsion composition and the type of surfactant used on the yields and kinetics of various transients formed from the reaction of acetylperoxyl radicals with carotenoids. Also, the influence of the site (hydrocarbon phases or aqueous phase) of generation of the peroxyl radical precursor was examined by using 4-acetyl-4-phenylpiperidine hydrochloride (APPHCl) and 1,1-diphenylacetone (11DPA) as water-soluble and lipid-soluble peroxyl radical precursors, respectively. LFP of peroxyl radical precursors with 7,7'-dihydro-β-carotene (77DH) in different microemulsions gives rise to the formation of three distinct transients namely addition radical (λmax=460 nm), near infrared transient1 (NIR, λmax=700 nm) and 7,7'-dihydro-β-carotene radical cation (77DH(•+), λmax=770 nm). In addition, for ζ-carotene (ZETA) two transients (near infrared transient1 (NIR1, λmax=660 nm) and ζ-carotene radical cation (ZETA(•+), λmax=730-740 nm)) are generated following LFP of peroxyl radical precursors in the presence of ζ-carotene (ZETA) in different microemulsions. The results show that the composition of the microemulsion strongly influences the observed yield and kinetics of the transients formed from the reactions of peroxyl radicals (acetylperoxyl radicals) with carotenoids (77DH and ZETA). Also, the type of surfactant used in the microemulsions influences the yield of the transients formed. The dependence of the transient yields and kinetics on microemulsion composition (or the type of surfactant used in the microemulsion) can be attributed to the change of the polarity of the microenvironment of the carotenoid. Furthermore, the nature of

  10. Quantification of chemotaxis-related alkane accumulation in Acinetobacter baylyi using Raman microspectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Li, Hanbing; L Martin, Francis Luke; Zhang, Dayi

    2017-03-03

    Alkanes are one of the most widespread contaminants in the natural environment, primarily as a consequence of biological synthesis and oil spills. Many indigenous microbes metabolize alkanes, and the chemotaxis and accumulation in some strains has been identified. For the first time, we apply Raman microspectroscopy to identify such chemotaxis-related affinity, and quantify the alkane concentrations via spectral alterations. Raman spectral alterations were only found for the alkane chemo-attractant bacteria Acinetobacter baylyi ADP1, not for Pseudomonas fluorescence, which exhibits limited chemotaxis towards alkane. The significant alterations were attributed to the strong chemotactic ability of A. baylyi enhancing the affinity and accumulation of alkane molecules on cell membranes or cellular internalization. Spectral fingerprints of A. baylyi significantly altered after 1-h exposure to pure alkanes (dodecane or tetradecane) and alkane mixtures (mineral oil or crude oil), but not monocyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (MAHs) or polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). A semi-log linear regression relationship between Raman spectral alterations and alkane concentrations showed its feasibility in quantifying alkane concentration in environmental samples. Pure alkanes or alkane mixtures exhibited different limits of detection and regression slopes, indicating that the chemotaxis-related alkane accumulation in A. baylyi is dependent on the carbon chain length. This work provides a novel biospectroscopy approach to characterize the chemotaxis-related alkane bioaccumulation, and has immense potential for fast and high-throughput screening bacterial chemotaxis.

  11. Antioxidant, electrochemical, thermal, antimicrobial and alkane oxidation properties of tridentate Schiff base ligands and their metal complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ceyhan, Gökhan; Çelik, Cumali; Uruş, Serhan; Demirtaş, İbrahim; Elmastaş, Mahfuz; Tümer, Mehmet

    2011-10-01

    In this study, two Schiff base ligands (HL 1 and HL 2) and their Cu(II), Co(II), Ni(II), Pd(II) and Ru(III) metal complexes were synthesized and characterized by the analytical and spectroscopic methods. Alkane oxidation activities of the metal complexes were studied on cyclohexane as substrate. The ligands and their metal complexes were evaluated for their antimicrobial activity against Corynebacterium xerosis, Bacillus brevis, Bacillus megaterium, Bacillus cereus, Mycobacterium smegmatis, Staphylococcus aureus, Micrococcus luteus and Enterococcus faecalis (as Gram-positive bacteria) and Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Escherichia coli, Yersinia enterocolitica, Klebsiella fragilis, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, and Candida albicans (as Gram-negative bacteria). The antioxidant properties of the Schiff base ligands were evaluated in a series of in vitro tests: 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH rad ) free radical scavenging and reducing power activity of superoxide anion radical generated non-enzymatic systems. Electrochemical and thermal properties of the compounds were investigated.

  12. Variation in n-Alkane Distributions of Modern Plants: Questioning Applications of n-Alkanes in Chemotaxonomy and Paleoecology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bush, R. T.; McInerney, F. A.

    2010-12-01

    Long chain n-alkanes (n-C21 to n-C37) are synthesized as part of the epicuticular leaf wax of terrestrial plants and are among the most recognizable and widely used plant biomarkers. n-Alkane distributions have been utilized in previous studies on modern plant chemotaxonomy, testing whether taxa can be identified based on characteristic n-alkane profiles. Dominant n-alkanes (e.g. n-C27 or n-C31) have also been ascribed to major plant groups (e.g. trees or grasses respectively) and have been used in paleoecology studies to reconstruct fluctuations in plant functional types. However, many of these studies have been based on relatively few modern plant data; with the wealth of modern n-alkane studies, a more comprehensive analysis of n-alkanes in modern plants is now possible and can inform the usefulness of n-alkane distributions as paleoecological indicators. The work presented here is a combination of measurements made using plant leaves collected from the Chicago Botanic Garden and a compilation of published literature data from six continents. We categorized plants by type: angiosperms, gymnosperms, woody plants, forbs, grasses, ferns and pteridophytes, and mosses. We then quantified n-alkane distribution parameters such as carbon preference index (CPI), average chain length (ACL), and dispersion (a measure of the spread of the profile over multiple chain lengths) and used these to compare plant groups. Among all plants, one of the emergent correlations is a decrease in dispersion with increasing CPI. Within and among plant groups, n-alkane distributions show a very large range of variation, and the results show little or no correspondence between broad plant groups and a single dominant n-alkane or a ratio of n-alkanes. These findings are true both when data from six continents are combined and when plants from a given region are compared (North America). We also compared the n-alkane distributions of woody angiosperms, woody gymnosperms, and grasses with one

  13. Detailed chemical kinetic models for large n-alkanes and iso-alkanes found in conventional and F-T diesel fuels

    SciTech Connect

    Westbrook, C K; Pitz, W J; Curran, H J; Mehl, M

    2008-12-15

    Detailed chemical kinetic models are needed to simulate the combustion of current and future transportation fuels. These models should represent the various chemical classes in these fuels. Conventional diesel fuels are composed of n-alkanes, iso-alkanes, cycloalkanes and aromatics (Farrell et al. 2007). For future fuels, there is a renewed interest in Fischer-Tropsch (F-T) processes which can be used to synthesize diesel and other transportation fuels from biomass, coal and natural gas. F-T diesel fuels are expected to be similar to F-T jet fuels which are commonly comprised of iso-alkanes with some n-alkanes (Smith and Bruno, 2008). Thus, n-alkanes and iso-alkanes are common chemical classes in these conventional and future fuels. This paper reports on the development of chemical kinetic models of large n-alkanes and iso-alkanes to represent these chemical classes in conventional and future fuels. Two large iso-alkanes are 2,2,4,4,6,8,8-heptamethylnonane, which is a primary reference fuel for diesel, and isooctane, a primary reference fuel for gasoline. Other iso-alkanes are branched alkanes with a single methyl side chain, typical of most F-T fuels. The chemical kinetic models are then used to predict the effect of these fuel components on ignition characteristics under conditions found in internal combustion engines.

  14. Determining and quantifying specific sources of light alkane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bill, M.; Conrad, M. E.

    2015-12-01

    Determining and quantifying specific sources of emission of methane (an important greenhouse gas) and light alkanes from abandoned gas and oil wells, hydraulic fracturing or associated with CO2 sequestration are a challenge in determining their contribution to the atmospheric greenhouse gas budget or to identify source of groundwater contamination. Here, we review organic biogeochemistry proprieties and isotopic fingerprinting of C1-C5 alkanes to address this problem. For instance, the concentration ratios of CH4 to C2-C5 alkanes can be used to distinguish between thermogenic and microbial generated CH4. Together C and H isotopes of CH4 are used to differentiate bacterial generated sources and thermogenic CH4 and may also identify processes such as alteration and source mixing. Carbon isotope ratios pattern of C1-C5 alkanes highlight sources and oxidation processes in the gas reservoirs. Stable carbon isotope measurements are a viable tool for monitoring the degradation progress of methane and light hydrocarbons. The carbon isotope ratios of the reactants and products are independent of the concentration and only depend on the relative progress of the particular reaction. Oxidation/degradation of light alkanes are typically associated with increasing ð13C values. Isotopic mass balances offer the possibility to independently determine the fractions coming from microbial versus thermogenic and would also permit differentiation of the isotope fractionations associated with degradation. Unlike conventional concentration measurements, this approach is constrained by the different isotopic signatures of various sources and sinks.

  15. Additional chain-branching pathways in the low-temperature oxidation of branched alkanes

    DOE PAGES

    Wang, Zhandong; Zhang, Lidong; Moshammer, Kai; ...

    2015-12-31

    Chain-branching reactions represent a general motif in chemistry, encountered in atmospheric chemistry, combustion, polymerization, and photochemistry; the nature and amount of radicals generated by chain-branching are decisive for the reaction progress, its energy signature, and the time towards its completion. In this study, experimental evidence for two new types of chain-branching reactions is presented, based upon detection of highly oxidized multifunctional molecules (HOM) formed during the gas-phase low-temperature oxidation of a branched alkane under conditions relevant to combustion. The oxidation of 2,5-dimethylhexane (DMH) in a jet-stirred reactor (JSR) was studied using synchrotron vacuum ultra-violet photoionization molecular beam mass spectrometry (SVUV-PI-MBMS).more » Specifically, species with four and five oxygen atoms were probed, having molecular formulas of C8H14O4 (e.g., diketo-hydroperoxide/keto-hydroperoxy cyclic ether) and C8H16O5 (e.g., keto-dihydroperoxide/dihydroperoxy cyclic ether), respectively. The formation of C8H16O5 species involves alternative isomerization of OOQOOH radicals via intramolecular H-atom migration, followed by third O2 addition, intramolecular isomerization, and OH release; C8H14O4 species are proposed to result from subsequent reactions of C8H16O5 species. The mechanistic pathways involving these species are related to those proposed as a source of low-volatility highly oxygenated species in Earth's troposphere. At the higher temperatures relevant to auto-ignition, they can result in a net increase of hydroxyl radical production, so these are additional radical chain-branching pathways for ignition. Furthermore, the results presented herein extend the conceptual basis of reaction mechanisms used to predict the reaction behavior of ignition, and have implications on atmospheric gas-phase chemistry and the oxidative stability of organic substances.« less

  16. Rate Constants for the Reactions of Hydroxyl Radical with Several Alkanes, Cycloalkanes, and Dimethyl Ether

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DeMore, W.; Bayes, K.

    1998-01-01

    Relative rate experiements were used to measure rate constants and temperature denpendencies of the reactions of OH with propane, n-butane, n-pentane, n-hexane, cyclopropane, cyclobutane, cyclopentane, and dimethyl ether.

  17. Evaluated Kinetics of the Reactions of H and CH3 with n-Alkanes: Experiments with n-Butane and a Combustion Model Reaction Network Analysis.

    PubMed

    Manion, Jeffrey A; Sheen, David A; Awan, Iftikhar A

    2015-07-16

    Presented is a combined experimental and modeling study of the kinetics of the reactions of H and CH3 with n-butane, a representative aliphatic fuel. Abstraction of H from n-alkane fuels creates alkyl radicals that rapidly decompose at high temperatures to alkenes and daughter radicals. In combustion and pyrolysis, the branching ratio for attack on primary and secondary hydrogens is a key determinant of the initial olefin and radical pool, and results propagate through the chemistry of ignition, combustion, and byproduct formation. Experiments to determine relative and absolute rate constants for attack of H and CH3 have been carried out in a shock tube between 859 and 1136 K for methyl radicals and 890 to 1146 K for H atoms. Pressures ranged from 140 to 410 kPa. Appropriate precursors are used to thermally generate H and CH3 in separate experiments under dilute and well-defined conditions. A mathematical design algorithm has been applied to select the optimum experimental conditions. In conjunction with postshock product analyses, a network analysis based on the detailed chemical kinetic combustion model JetSurf 2 has been applied. Polynomial chaos expansion techniques and Monte Carlo methods are used to analyze the data and assess uncertainties. The present results provide the first experimental measurements of the branching ratios for attack of H and CH3 on primary and secondary hydrogens at temperatures near 1000 K. Results from the literature are reviewed and combined with the present data to generate evaluated rate expressions for attack on n-butane covering 300 to 2000 K for H atoms and 400 to 2000 K for methyl radicals. Values for generic n-alkanes and related hydrocarbons are also recommended. The present experiments and network analysis further demonstrate that the C-H bond scission channels in butyl radicals are an order of magnitude less important than currently indicated by JetSurf 2. Updated rate expressions for butyl radical fragmentation reactions

  18. High Temperature Chemical Kinetic Combustion Modeling of Lightly Methylated Alkanes

    SciTech Connect

    Sarathy, S M; Westbrook, C K; Pitz, W J; Mehl, M

    2011-03-01

    Conventional petroleum jet and diesel fuels, as well as alternative Fischer-Tropsch (FT) fuels and hydrotreated renewable jet (HRJ) fuels, contain high molecular weight lightly branched alkanes (i.e., methylalkanes) and straight chain alkanes (n-alkanes). Improving the combustion of these fuels in practical applications requires a fundamental understanding of large hydrocarbon combustion chemistry. This research project presents a detailed high temperature chemical kinetic mechanism for n-octane and three lightly branched isomers octane (i.e., 2-methylheptane, 3-methylheptane, and 2,5-dimethylhexane). The model is validated against experimental data from a variety of fundamental combustion devices. This new model is used to show how the location and number of methyl branches affects fuel reactivity including laminar flame speed and species formation.

  19. Alkanes in shrimp from the Buccaneer Oil Field

    SciTech Connect

    Middleditch, B.S.; Basile, B.; Chang, E.S.

    1982-07-01

    A total of 36 samples of shrimp were examined from the region of the Buccaneer oil field, eighteen of which were representatives of the commercial species Penaeus aztecus and the rest were various other species: Penaeus duorarum (pink shrimp), Trachypenaeus duorarum (sugar shrimp), Squilla empusa (mantis shrimp), and Sicyonia dorsalis (chevron shrimp). The alkanes and deuteriated alkanes were completely separated by GC, so a mass spectrometer was not required for their detection and quantitation. To confirm the identities of individual compounds, however, some samples were examined by combined gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. Results show that only thirteen of the forty shrimp collected from the region of the Buccaneer oil field contained petroleum alkanes, and the majority of these were obtained from trawls immediately adjacent to the production platforms. It appears that shrimp caught in the region of the Buccaneer oil field are not appreciably tainted with hydrocarbons discharged from the production platforms. (JMT)

  20. A nonequilibrium molecular dynamics study of the rheology of alkanes

    SciTech Connect

    Gupta, S.A.; Cui, S.T.; Cummings, P.T.; Cochran, H.D. |

    1996-05-01

    We examine the rheological properties of four different alkanes: n-decane, n-hexadecane, n-tetracosane, and squalane. Simulations of Couette flow are performed for a range of shear rates with 100 molecules in each case using a replicated data version of our code. Number of interaction sites ranges from 1000 to 3000. We have performed extremely long simulations required to obtain acceptable statistics at low shear rates. The alkanes show a transition from non-Newtonian to Newtonian behavior as the shear rate decreases to low values. 1 tab, 1 fig, 17 refs.

  1. Modeling of alkane emissions from a wood stain

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, J.C.S.; Guo, Z.

    1993-01-01

    The article discusses full-scale residential house tests to evaluate the effects of organic emissions from a wood finishing product--wood stain--on indoor air quality (IAQ). The test house concentrations of three alkane species, nonane, decane, and undecane, were measured as a function of time after the application of the wood stain. It was found that the test house concentrations can be simulated by an integrated IAQ model which takes into consideration source, sink, and ventilation effects. The alkane emissions were controlled by an evaporation-like process.

  2. Catalytic, mild, and selective oxyfunctionalization of linear alkanes: current challenges.

    PubMed

    Bordeaux, Mélanie; Galarneau, Anne; Drone, Jullien

    2012-10-22

    Selective catalysts for sustainable oxidation of alkanes are highly demanded because of the abundance of these molecules in the environment, the possibility to transform them into higher-value compounds, such as chemicals or synthetic fuels, and the fact that, kinetically speaking, this is a difficult reaction. Numerous chemical and biological catalysts have been developed in the lasts decades for this purpose, rendering the overview over this field of chemistry difficult. After giving a definition of the ideal catalyst for alkane oxyfunctionalization, this review aims to present the catalysts available today that are closest to ideal.

  3. Assimilation of chlorinated alkanes by hydrocarbon-utilizing fungi

    SciTech Connect

    Murphy, G.L.; Perry, J.J.

    1984-12-01

    The fatty acid compositions of two filamentous fungi (Cunninghamella elegans and Penicillium zonatum) and a yeast (Candida lipolytica) were determined after the organisms were grown on 1-chlorohexadecane or 1-chlorooctadecane. These organisms utilized the chlorinated alkanes as sole sources of carbon and energy. Analyses of the fatty acids present after growth on the chlorinated alkanes indicated that 60 to 70% of the total fatty acids in C. elegans were chlorinated. Approximately 50% of the fatty acids in C. lipolytica were also chlorinated. P. zonatum contained 20% 1-chlorohexadecanoic acid after growth on either substrate but did not incorporate C/sub 18/ chlorinated fatty acids.

  4. Regioselective alkane hydroxylation with a mutant AlkB enzyme

    DOEpatents

    Koch, Daniel J.; Arnold, Frances H.

    2012-11-13

    AlkB from Pseudomonas putida was engineered using in-vivo directed evolution to hydroxylate small chain alkanes. Mutant AlkB-BMO1 hydroxylates propane and butane at the terminal carbon at a rate greater than the wild-type to form 1-propanol and 1-butanol, respectively. Mutant AlkB-BMO2 similarly hydroxylates propane and butane at the terminal carbon at a rate greater than the wild-type to form 1-propanol and 1-butanol, respectively. These biocatalysts are highly active for small chain alkane substrates and their regioselectivity is retained in whole-cell biotransformations.

  5. 40 CFR 721.10148 - Acryloxy alkanoic alkane derivative with mixed metal oxides (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Acryloxy alkanoic alkane derivative... Significant New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10148 Acryloxy alkanoic alkane derivative with...) The chemical substance identified generically as acryloxy alkanoic alkane derivative with mixed...

  6. 40 CFR 721.4464 - Mixture of hydrofluoro alkanes and hydrofluoro alkene.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Mixture of hydrofluoro alkanes and... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.4464 Mixture of hydrofluoro alkanes and hydrofluoro alkene. (a) Chemical... as a mixture of hydrofluoro alkanes and hydrofluoro alkene (PMNs P-96-945/946/947/948) are subject...

  7. 40 CFR 721.4464 - Mixture of hydrofluoro alkanes and hydrofluoro alkene.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Mixture of hydrofluoro alkanes and... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.4464 Mixture of hydrofluoro alkanes and hydrofluoro alkene. (a) Chemical... as a mixture of hydrofluoro alkanes and hydrofluoro alkene (PMNs P-96-945/946/947/948) are subject...

  8. 40 CFR 721.4464 - Mixture of hydrofluoro alkanes and hydrofluoro alkene.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Mixture of hydrofluoro alkanes and... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.4464 Mixture of hydrofluoro alkanes and hydrofluoro alkene. (a) Chemical... as a mixture of hydrofluoro alkanes and hydrofluoro alkene (PMNs P-96-945/946/947/948) are subject...

  9. 40 CFR 721.4464 - Mixture of hydrofluoro alkanes and hydrofluoro alkene.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Mixture of hydrofluoro alkanes and... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.4464 Mixture of hydrofluoro alkanes and hydrofluoro alkene. (a) Chemical... as a mixture of hydrofluoro alkanes and hydrofluoro alkene (PMNs P-96-945/946/947/948) are subject...

  10. 40 CFR 721.4464 - Mixture of hydrofluoro alkanes and hydrofluoro alkene.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Mixture of hydrofluoro alkanes and... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.4464 Mixture of hydrofluoro alkanes and hydrofluoro alkene. (a) Chemical... as a mixture of hydrofluoro alkanes and hydrofluoro alkene (PMNs P-96-945/946/947/948) are subject...

  11. 40 CFR 721.10148 - Acryloxy alkanoic alkane derivative with mixed metal oxides (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Acryloxy alkanoic alkane derivative... Significant New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10148 Acryloxy alkanoic alkane derivative with...) The chemical substance identified generically as acryloxy alkanoic alkane derivative with mixed...

  12. 40 CFR 721.785 - Halogenated alkane aromatic compound (generic name).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Halogenated alkane aromatic compound... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.785 Halogenated alkane aromatic compound (generic name). (a) Chemical... as a halogenated alkane aromatic compound (PMN P-94-1747) is subject to reporting under this...

  13. 40 CFR 721.785 - Halogenated alkane aromatic compound (generic name).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Halogenated alkane aromatic compound... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.785 Halogenated alkane aromatic compound (generic name). (a) Chemical... as a halogenated alkane aromatic compound (PMN P-94-1747) is subject to reporting under this...

  14. 40 CFR 721.785 - Halogenated alkane aromatic compound (generic name).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Halogenated alkane aromatic compound... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.785 Halogenated alkane aromatic compound (generic name). (a) Chemical... as a halogenated alkane aromatic compound (PMN P-94-1747) is subject to reporting under this...

  15. 40 CFR 721.785 - Halogenated alkane aromatic compound (generic name).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Halogenated alkane aromatic compound... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.785 Halogenated alkane aromatic compound (generic name). (a) Chemical... as a halogenated alkane aromatic compound (PMN P-94-1747) is subject to reporting under this...

  16. 40 CFR 721.785 - Halogenated alkane aromatic compound (generic name).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Halogenated alkane aromatic compound... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.785 Halogenated alkane aromatic compound (generic name). (a) Chemical... as a halogenated alkane aromatic compound (PMN P-94-1747) is subject to reporting under this...

  17. Contemporary Radical Economics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sherman, Howard J.

    1984-01-01

    The origins of contemporary radical economics are examined. Applications of radical economics to price and value theory, labor segmentation theory, business cycles, industrial organization, government and business, imperialism and development, and comparative systems are reviewed. (Author/RM)

  18. The radical amplifier

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hastie, D. R.

    1994-01-01

    The radical amplifier as a method for measuring radical concentrations in the atmosphere has received renewed attention lately. In principle, it can measure the total concentration of HO(x) and RO(x) radicals by reacting ambient air with high concentrations of CO (3-10 percent) and NO (2-6 ppmv), and measuring the NO2 produced.

  19. Integrated process for preparing a carboxylic acid from an alkane

    SciTech Connect

    Benderly, Abraham; Chadda, Nitin; Sevon, Douglass

    2011-12-20

    The present invention relates to an integrated process for producing unsaturated carboxylic acids from the corresponding C.sub.2-C.sub.4 alkane. The process begins with performance of thermally integrated dehydrogenation reactions which convert a C.sub.2-C.sub.4 alkane to its corresponding C.sub.2-C.sub.4 alkene, and which involve exothermically converting a portion of an alkane to its corresponding alkene by oxidative dehydrogenation in an exothermic reaction zone, in the presence of oxygen and a suitable catalyst, and then feeding the products of the exothermic reaction zone to an endothermic reaction zone wherein at least a portion of the remaining unconverted alkane is endothermically dehydrogenated to form an additional quantity of the same corresponding alkene, in the presence of carbon dioxide and an other suitable catalyst. The alkene products of the thermally integrated dehydrogenation reactions are then provided to a catalytic vapor phase partial oxidation process for conversion of the alkene to the corresponding unsaturated carboxylic acid or nitrile. Unreacted alkene and carbon dioxide are recovered from the oxidation product stream and recycled back to the thermally integrated dehydrogenation reactions.

  20. Improving alkane synthesis in Escherichia coli via metabolic engineering.

    PubMed

    Song, Xuejiao; Yu, Haiying; Zhu, Kun

    2016-01-01

    Concerns about energy security and global petroleum supply have made the production of renewable biofuels an industrial imperative. The ideal biofuels are n-alkanes in that they are chemically and structurally identical to the fossil fuels and can "drop in" to the transportation infrastructure. In this work, an Escherichia coli strain that produces n-alkanes was constructed by heterologous expression of acyl-acyl carrier protein (ACP) reductase (AAR) and aldehyde deformylating oxygenase (ADO) from Synechococcus elongatus PCC7942. The accumulation of alkanes ranged from 3.1 to 24.0 mg/L using different expressing strategies. Deletion of yqhD, an inherent aldehyde reductase in E. coli, or overexpression of fadR, an activator for fatty acid biosynthesis, exhibited a nearly twofold increase in alkane titers, respectively. Combining yqhD deletion and fadR overexpression resulted in a production titer of 255.6 mg/L in E. coli, and heptadecene was the most abundant product.

  1. MODELING OF ALKANE EMISSIONS FROM A WOOD STAIN

    EPA Science Inventory

    The article discusses full-scale residential house tests to evaluate the effects of organic emissions from a wood finishing product--wood stain--on indoor air quality (IAQ). The test house concentrations of three alkane species, nonane, decane, and undecane, were measured as a fu...

  2. Synthesis of a photo-caged aminooxy alkane thiol.

    PubMed

    Mancini, Rock J; Li, Ronald C; Tolstyka, Zachary P; Maynard, Heather D

    2009-12-07

    A photo-caged aminooxy alkane thiol synthesized in 7 steps and 15% overall yield was used to form a self-assembled monolayer (SAM). Photo-deprotection on the surface was confirmed by FT-IR spectroscopy and contact angle goniometry. Conjugation of a small molecule ketone, ethyl levulinate, further confirmed the presence of aminooxy groups on the surface.

  3. Cyano- and polycyanometalloporphyrins as catalysts for alkane oxidation

    DOEpatents

    Ellis, Jr., Paul E.; Lyons, James E.

    1992-01-01

    Alkanes are oxidized by contact with oxygen-containing gas in the presence as catalyst of a metalloporphyrin in which hydrogen atoms in the porphyrin ring have been substituted with one or more cyano groups. Hydrogen atoms in the porphyrin ring may also be substituted with halogen atoms.

  4. Cyano- and polycyanometallo-porphyrins as catalysts for alkane oxidation

    DOEpatents

    Ellis, Jr., Paul E.; Lyons, James E.

    1995-01-01

    New compositions of matter comprising cyano-substituted metal complexes of porphyrins are catalysts for the oxidation of alkanes. The metal is iron, chromium, manganese, ruthenium, copper or cobalt. The porphyrin ring has cyano groups attached thereto in meso and/or .beta.-pyrrolic positions.

  5. Cyano- and polycyanometallo-porphyrins as catalysts for alkane oxidation

    DOEpatents

    Ellis, Jr., Paul E.; Lyons, James E.

    1993-01-01

    New compositions of matter comprising cyano-substituted metal complexes of porphyrins are catalysts for the oxidation of alkanes. The metal is iron, chromium, manganese, ruthenium, copper or cobalt. The porphyrin ring has cyano groups attached thereto in meso and/or .beta.-pyrrolic positions.

  6. Catalytic oxidation of light alkanes in presence of a base

    DOEpatents

    Bhinde, Manoj V.; Bierl, Thomas W.

    1998-01-01

    The presence of a base in the reaction mixture in a metal-ligand catalyzed partial oxidation of alkanes results in sustained catalyst activity, and in greater percent conversion as compared with oxidation in the absence of base, while maintaining satisfactory selectivity for the desired oxidation, for example the oxidation of isobutane to isobutanol.

  7. Catalytic oxidation of light alkanes in presence of a base

    DOEpatents

    Bhinde, M.V.; Bierl, T.W.

    1998-03-03

    The presence of a base in the reaction mixture in a metal-ligand catalyzed partial oxidation of alkanes results in sustained catalyst activity, and in greater percent conversion as compared with oxidation in the absence of base, while maintaining satisfactory selectivity for the desired oxidation, for example the oxidation of isobutane to isobutanol. 1 fig.

  8. Modular and selective biosynthesis of gasoline-range alkanes.

    PubMed

    Sheppard, Micah J; Kunjapur, Aditya M; Prather, Kristala L J

    2016-01-01

    Typical renewable liquid fuel alternatives to gasoline are not entirely compatible with current infrastructure. We have engineered Escherichia coli to selectively produce alkanes found in gasoline (propane, butane, pentane, heptane, and nonane) from renewable substrates such as glucose or glycerol. Our modular pathway framework achieves carbon-chain extension by two different mechanisms. A fatty acid synthesis route is used to generate longer chains heptane and nonane, while a more energy efficient alternative, reverse-β-oxidation, is used for synthesis of propane, butane, and pentane. We demonstrate that both upstream (thiolase) and intermediate (thioesterase) reactions can act as control points for chain-length specificity. Specific free fatty acids are subsequently converted to alkanes using a broad-specificity carboxylic acid reductase and a cyanobacterial aldehyde decarbonylase (AD). The selectivity obtained by different module pairings provides a foundation for tuning alkane product distribution for desired fuel properties. Alternate ADs that have greater activity on shorter substrates improve observed alkane titer. However, even in an engineered host strain that significantly reduces endogenous conversion of aldehyde intermediates to alcohol byproducts, AD activity is observed to be limiting for all chain lengths. Given these insights, we discuss guiding principles for pathway selection and potential opportunities for pathway improvement.

  9. Diverse alkane hydroxylase genes in microorganisms and environments

    PubMed Central

    Nie, Yong; Chi, Chang-Qiao; Fang, Hui; Liang, Jie-Liang; Lu, She-Lian; Lai, Guo-Li; Tang, Yue-Qin; Wu, Xiao-Lei

    2014-01-01

    AlkB and CYP153 are important alkane hydroxylases responsible for aerobic alkane degradation in bioremediation of oil-polluted environments and microbial enhanced oil recovery. Since their distribution in nature is not clear, we made the investigation among thus-far sequenced 3,979 microbial genomes and 137 metagenomes from terrestrial, freshwater, and marine environments. Hundreds of diverse alkB and CYP153 genes including many novel ones were found in bacterial genomes, whereas none were found in archaeal genomes. Moreover, these genes were detected with different distributional patterns in the terrestrial, freshwater, and marine metagenomes. Hints for horizontal gene transfer, gene duplication, and gene fusion were found, which together are likely responsible for diversifying the alkB and CYP153 genes adapt to the ubiquitous distribution of different alkanes in nature. In addition, different distributions of these genes between bacterial genomes and metagenomes suggested the potentially important roles of unknown or less common alkane degraders in nature. PMID:24829093

  10. Crystallization and prevention of supercooling of microencapsulated n-alkanes.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xing-xiang; Fan, Yao-feng; Tao, Xiao-ming; Yick, Kit-lun

    2005-01-15

    Microencapsulated n-alkanes (n-octadecane, n-nonadecane, and n-eicosane) were synthesized by in situ polymerization using urea-melamine-formaldehyde polymer as shells. Microcapsules 5.0 and 10.0 wt% of 1-tetradecanol, paraffin, and 1-octadecanol were used as nucleating agents. The fabrication was characterized using Fourier transform infrared, light microscopy, and scanning electron microscopy. The crystallization and prevention of supercooling of the microcapsules are studied using differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and wide-angle X-ray diffraction. The crystal system of the microencapsulated n-alkane is the same as that of the bulk. The enthalpies of the microcapsules containing 70 wt% n-alkanes are approximately 160 J/g. The melting temperature of the n-alkanes in the microcapsule is the same as that in the bulk. There are multiple peaks on the DSC cooling curves that are attributed to liquid-rotator, rotator-crystal, and liquid-crystal transitions. The DSC cooling behavior of microencapsulated n-octadecane is affected by the average diameters. The measured maximum degree of supercooling of the microencapsulated n-octadecane is approximately 26.0 degrees C at a heating and cooling rate of 10.0 degrees C/min. The degree of supercooling of microencapsulated n-octadecane is decreased by adding 10.0 wt% of 1-octadecanol as a nucleating agent.

  11. Cyano- and polycyanometallo-porphyrins as catalysts for alkane oxidation

    DOEpatents

    Ellis, P.E. Jr.; Lyons, J.E.

    1995-01-17

    New compositions of matter comprising cyano-substituted metal complexes of porphyrins are catalysts for the oxidation of alkanes. The metal is iron, chromium, manganese, ruthenium, copper or cobalt. The porphyrin ring has cyano groups attached thereto in meso and/or [beta]-pyrrolic positions.

  12. Cyano- and polycyanometallo-porphyrins as catalysts for alkane oxidation

    DOEpatents

    Ellis, P.E. Jr.; Lyons, J.E.

    1993-05-18

    New compositions of matter comprising cyano-substituted metal complexes of porphyrins are catalysts for the oxidation of alkanes. The metal is iron, chromium, manganese, ruthenium, copper or cobalt. The porphyrin ring has cyano groups attached thereto in meso- and/or [beta]-pyrrolic positions.

  13. Isolating the non-polar contributions to the intermolecular potential for water-alkane interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ballal, Deepti; Venkataraman, Pradeep; Fouad, Wael A.; Cox, Kenneth R.; Chapman, Walter G.

    2014-08-01

    Intermolecular potential models for water and alkanes describe pure component properties fairly well, but fail to reproduce properties of water-alkane mixtures. Understanding interactions between water and non-polar molecules like alkanes is important not only for the hydrocarbon industry but has implications to biological processes as well. Although non-polar solutes in water have been widely studied, much less work has focused on water in non-polar solvents. In this study we calculate the solubility of water in different alkanes (methane to dodecane) at ambient conditions where the water content in alkanes is very low so that the non-polar water-alkane interactions determine solubility. Only the alkane-rich phase is simulated since the fugacity of water in the water rich phase is calculated from an accurate equation of state. Using the SPC/E model for water and TraPPE model for alkanes along with Lorentz-Berthelot mixing rules for the cross parameters produces a water solubility that is an order of magnitude lower than the experimental value. It is found that an effective water Lennard-Jones energy ɛW/k = 220 K is required to match the experimental water solubility in TraPPE alkanes. This number is much higher than used in most simulation water models (SPC/E—ɛW/k = 78.2 K). It is surprising that the interaction energy obtained here is also higher than the water-alkane interaction energy predicted by studies on solubility of alkanes in water. The reason for this high water-alkane interaction energy is not completely understood. Some factors that might contribute to the large interaction energy, such as polarizability of alkanes, octupole moment of methane, and clustering of water at low concentrations in alkanes, are examined. It is found that, though important, these factors do not completely explain the anomalously strong attraction between alkanes and water observed experimentally.

  14. Isolating the non-polar contributions to the intermolecular potential for water-alkane interactions.

    PubMed

    Ballal, Deepti; Venkataraman, Pradeep; Fouad, Wael A; Cox, Kenneth R; Chapman, Walter G

    2014-08-14

    Intermolecular potential models for water and alkanes describe pure component properties fairly well, but fail to reproduce properties of water-alkane mixtures. Understanding interactions between water and non-polar molecules like alkanes is important not only for the hydrocarbon industry but has implications to biological processes as well. Although non-polar solutes in water have been widely studied, much less work has focused on water in non-polar solvents. In this study we calculate the solubility of water in different alkanes (methane to dodecane) at ambient conditions where the water content in alkanes is very low so that the non-polar water-alkane interactions determine solubility. Only the alkane-rich phase is simulated since the fugacity of water in the water rich phase is calculated from an accurate equation of state. Using the SPC/E model for water and TraPPE model for alkanes along with Lorentz-Berthelot mixing rules for the cross parameters produces a water solubility that is an order of magnitude lower than the experimental value. It is found that an effective water Lennard-Jones energy ε(W)/k = 220 K is required to match the experimental water solubility in TraPPE alkanes. This number is much higher than used in most simulation water models (SPC/E-ε(W)/k = 78.2 K). It is surprising that the interaction energy obtained here is also higher than the water-alkane interaction energy predicted by studies on solubility of alkanes in water. The reason for this high water-alkane interaction energy is not completely understood. Some factors that might contribute to the large interaction energy, such as polarizability of alkanes, octupole moment of methane, and clustering of water at low concentrations in alkanes, are examined. It is found that, though important, these factors do not completely explain the anomalously strong attraction between alkanes and water observed experimentally.

  15. Crystallization features of normal alkanes in confined geometry.

    PubMed

    Su, Yunlan; Liu, Guoming; Xie, Baoquan; Fu, Dongsheng; Wang, Dujin

    2014-01-21

    How polymers crystallize can greatly affect their thermal and mechanical properties, which influence the practical applications of these materials. Polymeric materials, such as block copolymers, graft polymers, and polymer blends, have complex molecular structures. Due to the multiple hierarchical structures and different size domains in polymer systems, confined hard environments for polymer crystallization exist widely in these materials. The confined geometry is closely related to both the phase metastability and lifetime of polymer. This affects the phase miscibility, microphase separation, and crystallization behaviors and determines both the performance of polymer materials and how easily these materials can be processed. Furthermore, the size effect of metastable states needs to be clarified in polymers. However, scientists find it difficult to propose a quantitative formula to describe the transition dynamics of metastable states in these complex systems. Normal alkanes [CnH2n+2, n-alkanes], especially linear saturated hydrocarbons, can provide a well-defined model system for studying the complex crystallization behaviors of polymer materials, surfactants, and lipids. Therefore, a deeper investigation of normal alkane phase behavior in confinement will help scientists to understand the crystalline phase transition and ultimate properties of many polymeric materials, especially polyolefins. In this Account, we provide an in-depth look at the research concerning the confined crystallization behavior of n-alkanes and binary mixtures in microcapsules by our laboratory and others. Since 2006, our group has developed a technique for synthesizing nearly monodispersed n-alkane containing microcapsules with controllable size and surface porous morphology. We applied an in situ polymerization method, using melamine-formaldehyde resin as shell material and nonionic surfactants as emulsifiers. The solid shell of microcapsules can provide a stable three-dimensional (3-D

  16. Dynamics of Peroxy and Alkenyl Radicals Undergoing Competing Rearrangements in Biodiesel Combustion

    SciTech Connect

    Dibble, Theodore S.

    2016-03-24

    Biodiesel fuel is increasingly being used worldwide. Although we have a fair understanding of the molecular details of the chemistry of peroxy radicals derived from alkanes, biodiesel fuels contain ester and olefin groups which significantly impact the thermodynamics and kinetics of biodiesel ignition. The broader goal of this research is to carry out systematic computational studies of the elementary kinetics of the chemistry of ROO•, QOOH and •OOQOOH compounds that are models for biodiesel ignition.

  17. Surface vibrational structure at alkane liquid/vapor interfaces.

    PubMed

    Esenturk, Okan; Walker, Robert A

    2006-11-07

    Broadband vibrational sum frequency spectroscopy (VSFS) has been used to examine the surface structure of alkane liquid/vapor interfaces. The alkanes range in length from n-nonane (C(9)H(20)) to n-heptadecane (C(17)H(36)), and all liquids except heptadecane are studied at temperatures well above their bulk (and surface) freezing temperatures. Intensities of vibrational bands in the CH stretching region acquired under different polarization conditions show systematic, chain length dependent changes. Data provide clear evidence of methyl group segregation at the liquid/vapor interface, but two different models of alkane chain structure can predict chain length dependent changes in band intensities. Each model leads to a different interpretation of the extent to which different chain segments contribute to the anisotropic interfacial region. One model postulates that changes in vibrational band intensities arise solely from a reduced surface coverage of methyl groups as alkane chain length increases. The additional methylene groups at the surface must be randomly distributed and make no net contribution to the observed VSF spectra. The second model considers a simple statistical distribution of methyl and methylene groups populating a three dimensional, interfacial lattice. This statistical picture implies that the VSF signal arises from a region extending several functional groups into the bulk liquid, and that the growing fraction of methylene groups in longer chain alkanes bears responsibility for the observed spectral changes. The data and resulting interpretations provide clear benchmarks for emerging theories of molecular structure and organization at liquid surfaces, especially for liquids lacking strong polar ordering.

  18. Physiological function of the Pseudomonas putida PpG6 (Pseudomonas oleovorans) alkane hydroxylase: monoterminal oxidation of alkanes and fatty acids.

    PubMed Central

    Nieder, M; Shapiro, J

    1975-01-01

    Pseudomonas putida PpG6 is able to utilize purified n-alkanes of six to ten carbon atoms for growth. It can also grow on the primary terminal oxidation products of these alkanes and on 1-dodecanol but not on the corresponding 2-ketones or 1,6-hexanediol, adipic acid, or pimelic acid. Revertible point mutants can be isolated which have simultaneously lost the ability to grow on all five n-alkane growth substrates but which can still grow on octanol or nonanol. An acetate-negative mutant defective in isocitrate lysase activity is unable to grow on even-numbered alkanes and fatty acids. Analysis of double mutants defective in acetate and propionate or in acetate and glutarate metabolism shows that alkane carbon is assimilated only via acetyl-coenzyme A and propionyl-coenzyme A. These results support the following conclusions: (i) The n-alkane growth specificity of P. putida PpG6 is due to the substrate specificity of whole-cell alkane hydroxylation; (ii) there is a single alkane hydroxylase enzyme complex; (iii) the physiological role of this complex is to initiate the monoterminal oxidation of alkane chains; and (iv) straight-chain fatty acids from butyric through nonanoic are degraded exclusively by beta-oxidation from the carboxyl end of the molecule. PMID:804473

  19. Reconstitution of plant alkane biosynthesis in yeast demonstrates that Arabidopsis ECERIFERUM1 and ECERIFERUM3 are core components of a very-long-chain alkane synthesis complex.

    PubMed

    Bernard, Amélie; Domergue, Frédéric; Pascal, Stéphanie; Jetter, Reinhard; Renne, Charlotte; Faure, Jean-Denis; Haslam, Richard P; Napier, Johnathan A; Lessire, René; Joubès, Jérôme

    2012-07-01

    In land plants, very-long-chain (VLC) alkanes are major components of cuticular waxes that cover aerial organs, mainly acting as a waterproof barrier to prevent nonstomatal water loss. Although thoroughly investigated, plant alkane synthesis remains largely undiscovered. The Arabidopsis thaliana ECERIFERUM1 (CER1) protein has been recognized as an essential element of wax alkane synthesis; nevertheless, its function remains elusive. In this study, a screen for CER1 physical interaction partners was performed. The screen revealed that CER1 interacts with the wax-associated protein ECERIFERUM3 (CER3) and endoplasmic reticulum-localized cytochrome b5 isoforms (CYTB5s). The functional relevance of these interactions was assayed through an iterative approach using yeast as a heterologous expression system. In a yeast strain manipulated to produce VLC acyl-CoAs, a strict CER1 and CER3 coexpression resulted in VLC alkane synthesis. The additional presence of CYTB5s was found to enhance CER1/CER3 alkane production. Site-directed mutagenesis showed that CER1 His clusters are essential for alkane synthesis, whereas those of CER3 are not, suggesting that CYTB5s are specific CER1 cofactors. Collectively, our study reports the identification of plant alkane synthesis enzymatic components and supports a new model for alkane production in which CER1 interacts with both CER3 and CYTB5 to catalyze the redox-dependent synthesis of VLC alkanes from VLC acyl-CoAs.

  20. [Lavoisier and radicals].

    PubMed

    Lafont, Olivier

    2007-01-01

    Lavoisier and his co-workers (Guyton de Morveau, Bertholet, Fourcroy) considered that acids were constituted of oxygen and of something else that they called radicals. These radicals were known in some cases, i.e. nitrogen for nitrous acid, carbon for carbonic acid, phosphorus for phosphoric acid. In the case of sulfur, the sulfuric radical could be associated with different quantities of oxigen leading to sulfuric or sulfurous acids. In other cases radicals remained unknown at the time i.e. muriatic radical for muriatic acid, or benzoyl radical for benzoic acid. It is interesting to notice that Lavoisier evoked the case of compound radicals constituted of different substances such as carbon and hydrogen.

  1. Genetically assembled fluorescent biosensor for in situ detection of bio-synthesized alkanes.

    PubMed

    Wu, Wei; Zhang, Lei; Yao, Lun; Tan, Xiaoming; Liu, Xufeng; Lu, Xuefeng

    2015-06-03

    Construction of highly efficient microbial cell factories producing drop-in biofuel alkanes is severely limited due to the lack of a fast detection method against alkanes. Here we first developed a sensitive fluorescent biosensor for rapid and in situ monitoring of intracellular alkane synthesis. Using GFP as reporter, the biosensor could actively respond to the intracellular alkane products, especially for the mid- and long-chain alkanes synthesized in the recombinant Escherichia coli and give a concentration-dependent fluorescence response. Our results also suggested the feasibility of developing high-throughput strategies basing on the alkane biosensor device in E. coli, and thus will greatly facilitate the application of directed evolution strategies to further improve the alkane-producing microbial cell factories.

  2. A Theoretical Investigation of the Infrared Spectroscopic Properties of Closed-Shell Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbon Cations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hudgins, Douglas M.; Bauschlicher, Charles W., Jr.; Allamandola, Louis J.; DeVincenzi, Donald L. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Density functional theory has been employed to calculate the harmonic frequencies and intensities of a range of PAH cations which explore both size and electronic structure effects on the infrared spectroscopic of these species. The sample extends the size range of PAH species considered to more than 50 carbon atoms and includes several representatives from each of two heretofore unexplored categories of PAH cations: (1) fully benzenoid PAH cations whose carbon skeleton is composed of an odd number of carbon atoms and (2) protonated PAH cations. Unlike the radical electronic structures of the PAH cations that have been the subject of previous theoretical and experimental work, the species in these two classes have a closed-shell electronic configuration. The calculated spectra of circumcoronene, C54H18, in both neutral and (radical) cationic form are also reported and compared to those of the other species. Closed-shell species are inherently less reactive than radical (or open-shell) cations and are known to play a role in combustion chemistry. Since interstellar PAHs are typically exposed to abundant atomic hydrogen and are thought to originate under pseudo-combustion conditions in carbon-rich circumstellar shells, such species may represent an important component of the interstellar PAH population. Furthermore, species larger than 50 carbon atoms are more representative of the size of the typical interstellar PAH. Overall, as has been the case for previous studies of PAH radical cations, the general pattern of band positions and intensities are consistent with that of the interstellar infrared emission spectrum. In addition, the spectra of closed-shell and open-shell cations are found to converge with increasing molecular size and are found to be relatively similar for species containing about 50 carbon atoms.

  3. Organometallic model complexes elucidate the active gallium species in alkane dehydrogenation catalysts based on ligand effects in Ga K-edge XANES

    SciTech Connect

    Getsoian, Andrew “Bean”; Das, Ujjal; Camacho-Bunquin, Jeffrey; Zhang, Guanghui; Gallagher, James R.; Hu, Bo; Cheah, Singfoong; Schaidle, Joshua A.; Ruddy, Daniel A.; Hensley, Jesse E.; Krause, Theodore R.; Curtiss, Larry A.; Miller, Jeffrey T.; Hock, Adam S.

    2016-01-01

    Gallium-modified zeolites are known catalysts for the dehydrogenation of alkanes, reactivity that finds industrial application in the aromatization of light alkanes by Ga-ZSM5. While the role of gallium cations in alkane activation is well known, the oxidation state and coordination environment of gallium under reaction conditions has been the subject of debate. Edge shifts in Ga K-edge XANES spectra acquired under reaction conditions have long been interpreted as evidence for reduction of Ga(III) to Ga(I). However, a change in oxidation state is not the only factor that can give rise to a change in the XANES spectrum. In order to better understand the XANES spectra of working catalysts, we have synthesized a series of molecular model compounds and grafted surface organometallic Ga species and compared their XANES spectra to those of gallium-based catalysts acquired under reducing conditions. We demonstrate that changes in the identity and number of gallium nearest neighbors can give rise to changes in XANES spectra similar to those attributed in literature to changes in oxidation state. Specifically, spectral features previously attributed to Ga(I) may be equally well interpreted as evidence for low-coordinate Ga(III) alkyl or hydride species. These findings apply both to gallium-impregnated zeolite catalysts and to silica-supported single site gallium catalysts, the latter of which is found to be active and selective for dehydrogenation of propane and hydrogenation of propylene.

  4. Reaction of Photochemically Generated Organic Cations with Colloidal Clays.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-05-01

    University of Notre Dame. IS. KEY WORDS (Continue on reverse aide if neceary end identify by block number) Chemistry of colloidal montmorillonite Absorption...Centlws m ftves n N mee.iy mi Identify by block number) Qi Organic radical cations will dimerize when adsorbed to the surface D of montmorillonite in...1 The Nature and Chemistry of Micelles .... 2 The Nature and Chemistry of Clay Minerals 5 Montmorillonite Catalyzed Color

  5. Forgotten Radicals in Biology

    PubMed Central

    Luc, Rochette; Vergely, Catherine

    2008-01-01

    Redox reactions play key roles in intra- and inter-cellular signaling, and in adaptative processes of tissues towards stress. Among the major free radicals with essential functions in cells are reactive oxygen species (ROS) including superoxide anion (O2•-), hydroxyl radical (•OH) and reactive nitrogen species (RNS) such as nitric oxide (•NO). In this article, we review the forgotten and new radicals with potential relevance to cardiovascular pathophysiology. Approximately 0.3% of O2•- present in cytosol exists in its protonated form: hydroperoxyl radical (HO2•). Water (H2O) can be split into two free radicals: •OH and hydrogen radical (H•). Several free radicals, including thiyl radicals (RS•) and nitrogen dioxide (NO2•) are known to isomerize double bonds. In the omega-6 series of poly-unsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs), cis-trans isomerization of γ-linolenate and arachidonate catalyzed by RS• has been investigated. Evidence is emerging that hydrogen disulphide (H2S) is a signaling molecule in vivo which can be a source of free radicals. The Cu-Zn superoxide dismutase (SOD) enzyme can oxidize the ionized form of H2S to hydro-sulphide radical: HS•. Recent studies suggest that H2S plays an important function in cardiovascular functions. Carbonate radical, which can be formed when •OH reacts with carbonate or bicarbonate ions, is also involved in the activity of Cu-Zn-SOD. Recently, it has been reported that carbonate anion were potentially relevant oxidants of nucleic acids in physiological environments. In conclusion, there is solid evidence supporting the formation of many free radicals by cells leading which may play an important role in their homeostasis. PMID:23675099

  6. CO capture and conversion to HOCO radical by ionized water clusters.

    PubMed

    Lee, Han Myoung; Youn, Il-Seung; Kim, Kwang S

    2014-09-04

    The CO molecule can interact with the hydroxyl radical ((•)OH) via either a weak noncovalent interaction or strong covalent bonding. Upon the ionization of neutral water clusters, the resulting water cluster cations produce protonated water clusters and hydroxyl radicals. In this regard, we investigate the interactions of a CO molecule with water dimer and trimer cations using density functional theory (DFT), Möller-Plesset second-order perturbation theory (MP2), and coupled cluster theory with single, double, and perturbative triple excitations [CCSD(T)]. It is found that the reaction products of CO by the water dimer and trimer cations form a HOĊO radical solvated by a protonated water monomer and dimer, respectively. These radicals are useful intermediates to make oxalic acids, formic acids, metal ligands, and so on, which is important in green chemistry.

  7. Radical prostatectomy - discharge

    MedlinePlus

    ... prostatectomy - discharge; Laparoscopic radical prostatectomy - discharge; LRP - discharge; Robotic-assisted laparoscopic prostatectomy - discharge ; RALP - discharge; Pelvic lymphadenectomy - discharge; Prostate cancer - prostatectomy

  8. Adsorption of n-alkane vapours at the water surface.

    PubMed

    Biscay, Frédéric; Ghoufi, Aziz; Malfreyt, Patrice

    2011-06-21

    Monte Carlo simulations are reported here to predict the surface tension of the liquid-vapour interface of water upon adsorption of alkane vapours (methane to hexane). A decrease of the surface tension has been established from n-pentane. A correlation has been evidenced between the decrease of the surface tension and the absence of specific arrangement at the water surface for n-pentane and n-hexane. The thermodynamic stability of the adsorption layer and the absence of film for longer alkanes have been checked through the calculation of a potential of mean force. This complements the work recently published [Ghoufi et al., Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys., 2010, 12, 5203] concerning the adsorption of methane at the water surface. The decrease of the surface tension has been interpreted in terms of the degree of hydrogen bonding of water molecules at the liquid-vapour interface upon adsorption.

  9. Melting of thin films of alkanes on magnesium oxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arnold, T.; Barbour, A.; Chanaa, S.; Cook, R. E.; Fernandez-Canato, D.; Landry, P.; Seydel, T.; Yaron, P.; Larese, J. Z.

    2009-02-01

    Recent incoherent neutron scattering investigations of the dynamics of thin alkane films adsorbed on the Magnesium Oxide (100) surface are reported. There are marked differences in the behaviour of these films, as a function of temperature and coverage, compared to similar measurements on graphite. In particular, it has previously been shown that adsorbed multilayer films on graphite exhibit an interfacial solid monolayer that coexists with bulk-like liquid, well above the bulk melting point. In contrast, these studies show that the alkane films on MgO exhibit no such stabilization of the solid layer closest to the substrate as a function of the film thickness, even though the monolayer crystal structures are remarkably similar. These studies are supported by extensive thermodynamic data, a growing body of structural data from neutron diffraction and state of the art computer modelling

  10. The vibrational spectrum of water in liquid alkanes.

    PubMed Central

    Conrad, M P; Strauss, H L

    1985-01-01

    The water wire hypothesis of hydrogen-ion transport in lipid bilayers has prompted a search for water aggregates in bulk hydrocarbons. The asymmetric stretching vibration of the water dissolved in n-decane and in a number of other alkanes and alkenes has been observed. The water band in the alkanes is very wide and fits to the results of a J-diffusion calculation for the water rotation. This implies that the water is freely rotating between collisions with the solvent and certainly not hydrogen bonded to anything. The existence of water aggregates is thus most unlikely. In contrast, water in an alkene is hydrogen bonded to the solvent molecules (although not to other water molecules) and shows an entirely different spectrum. PMID:4016205

  11. Structure and dynamics of fluorinated alkanes on silicon dioxide surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsige, Mesfin

    2007-03-01

    Despite their great promise in various applications, the structure and dynamics of fluorinated alkanes at interfaces is still an open question. In particular, the knowledge from both theoretical and experimental perspectives is very limited when it comes to understanding the interface between these systems and a solid substrate. Molecular dynamics simulations based on the All Atom OPLS model are used to predict the equilibrium structure and dynamics of short fluorinated alkanes on both amorphous and crystalline silicon dioxide surfaces. In order to understand the effect of layer-layer interaction on the ordering of chains in a given layer, the thickness of the liquid film is increased layer-by-layer from monolayer to multilayers. Results for structural and dynamics of the liquid films near the silicon dioxide surfaces will be presented.

  12. Site isolation in vanadium phosphorus oxide alkane oxidation

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, M R; Ebner, J R

    1991-06-01

    Single crystal X-ray diffraction studies of vanadyl pyrophosphate indicate that at least two polytypical structures exists for this active and selective alkane oxidation catalyst. The crystal structures of these materials differ with respect to the symmetry and direction of columns of vanadyl groups within the unit cell. Single crystals of vanadyl pyrophosphate have been generated at extreme temperatures not often experienced by microcrystalline catalysts. The crystallography of the system suggests that other crystalline modifications or disordered phases might also exist. Zeroth-order models of crystal surface termination of vanadyl pyrophosphate have been constructed which conceptually illustrate the ability of vanadyl pyrophosphate to accommodate varying amounts of surface phosphorus parallel to (1,0,0), (0,1,0) and (0,2,4). Pyrophosphate termination of surfaces parallel to (1,0,0) likely results in the isolation of clusters of reactive centers and limits overoxidation of the alkane substrate. 23 refs., 6 figs.

  13. Observation of an aromatic radical anion dimer: (C{sub 10}F{sub 8}){sub 2}{sm_bullet}{sub {minus}}

    SciTech Connect

    Werst, D.W.

    1994-03-01

    Radical cation dimers are observed for many alkenes and aromatic hydrocarbons as products of the reaction between monomer radical cation and neutral molecule. In most cases, the dimer radical anions, formed via reaction of the monomer radical anion with a neutral molecule, have not been observed. Here we report the observation of the dimer radical anion of octafluoronaphthalene, formed by reaction of C{sub 10}F{sub 8}{sup {center_dot}{minus}} with the neutral parent molecules in nonpolar solvents following pulse radiolysis. Both monomer and dimer ions have been characterized by EPR spectra obtained by the time-resolved fluorescence-detected magnetic resonance.

  14. Metal-organic framework for the separation of alkane isomers

    DOEpatents

    Long, Jeffrey R.; Herm, Zoey R.; Wiers, Brian M.; Krishna, Rajamani

    2017-01-10

    A metal organic framework Fe.sub.2(bdp).sub.3 (BDP.sup.2-=1,4-benzenedipyrazolate) with triangular channels is particularly suited for C5-C7 separations of alkanes according to the number of branches in the molecule rather than by carbon number. The metal-organic framework can offer pore geometries that is unavailable in zeolites or other porous media, facilitating distinct types of shape-based molecular separations.

  15. Alkane Biosynthesis Genes in Cyanobacteria and Their Transcriptional Organization

    PubMed Central

    Klähn, Stephan; Baumgartner, Desirée; Pfreundt, Ulrike; Voigt, Karsten; Schön, Verena; Steglich, Claudia; Hess, Wolfgang R.

    2014-01-01

    In cyanobacteria, alkanes are synthesized from a fatty acyl-ACP by two enzymes, acyl–acyl carrier protein reductase and aldehyde deformylating oxygenase. Despite the great interest in the exploitation for biofuel production, nothing is known about the transcriptional organization of their genes or the physiological function of alkane synthesis. The comparison of 115 microarray datasets indicates the relatively constitutive expression of aar and ado genes. The analysis of 181 available genomes showed that in 90% of the genomes both genes are present, likely indicating their physiological relevance. In 61% of them they cluster together with genes encoding acetyl-CoA carboxyl transferase and a short-chain dehydrogenase, strengthening the link to fatty acid metabolism and in 76% of the genomes they are located in tandem, suggesting constraints on the gene arrangement. However, contrary to the expectations for an operon, we found in Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 specific promoters for the two genes, sll0208 (ado) and sll0209 (aar), which give rise to monocistronic transcripts. Moreover, the upstream located ado gene is driven by a proximal as well as a second, distal, promoter, from which a third transcript, the ~160 nt sRNA SyR9 is transcribed. Thus, the transcriptional organization of the alkane biosynthesis genes in Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 is of substantial complexity. We verified all three promoters to function independently from each other and show a similar promoter arrangement also in the more distant Nodularia spumigena, Trichodesmium erythraeum, Anabaena sp. PCC 7120, Prochlorococcus MIT9313, and MED4. The presence of separate regulatory elements and the dominance of monocistronic mRNAs suggest the possible autonomous regulation of ado and aar. The complex transcriptional organization of the alkane synthesis gene cluster has possible metabolic implications and should be considered when manipulating the expression of these genes in cyanobacteria. PMID

  16. Monolayer solids of short (perfluoro)alkanes on graphite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bruch, L. W.

    2009-03-01

    Calculations are reported for the relative stability of monolayer solid latices on graphite for C2H6, C3H8, C2F6, and C3F8. Triangular, centered rectangular and two-sublattice herringbone lattices are treated. The calculations use all-atom (AA) models and are based on non-bonding interactions formulated for three dimensional dense phases of alkanes and perfluoroalkanes.

  17. Removal of alkanes from drinking water using membrane technologies

    SciTech Connect

    Fronk, C.A.

    1995-10-01

    Increasingly, the public is concerned about the quality of its drinking water. The chlorinated alkanes are saturated, aliphatic, synthetic organic compounds (SOC`s). When hydrocarbon feedstocks are chlorinated, a wide variety of chlorocarbons and chlorohydrocarbons are produced that are used as industrial solvents, degreasers and intermediaries. Because compounds such as Carbon Tetrachloride and 1,2-Dichloroethane are widely used, they often find their way into drinking water, particularly groundwaters. Surface waters are somewhat less affected bemuse of the high volatility of many chlorinated alkanes. The Drinking Water Research Division is responsible for evaluating various membrane technologies that may be feasible for meeting Maximum Contaminant Levels. Several membrane processes are under investigation to determine their effectiveness in removing SOC`s from drinking water. One study addressed the removal of a variety of alkanes from spiked groundwater by six reverse osmosis membranes: a cellulose acetate, a polyamide (hollow fiber), and four different types of thin-film composite membranes. Progressive chlorination of methanes, ethanes and propanes produces compounds that exhibit differing physicochemical properties. The differences in compound properties have an effect on the removal of these compounds by reverse osmosis membranes. For example only 25% of the methylene chloride (Dichloromethane) was removed by one thin-film composite versus 90% removal of the carbon tetrachloride. In addition, the various membranes are made of different polymeric materials and showed a wide range of removals. Generally, the thin-film composite membranes out performed the other membranes and the more highly chlorinated the compound the better the removal. Pervaporation is yet another membrane process that may prove effective in removal of alkanes and future studies will address its usefulness as a drinking water.

  18. Cold-tolerant alkane-degrading Rhodococcus species from Antarctica

    SciTech Connect

    Bej, A.K.; Saul, D.; Aislabie, J.

    2000-07-01

    Bioremediation is a possible mechanism for clean-up of hydrocarbon-contaminated soils in the Antarctic. Microbes indigenous to the Antarctic are required that degrade the hydrocarbon contaminants found in the soil, and that are able to survive and maintain activity under in situ conditions. Alkane-degrading bacteria previously isolated from oil-contaminated soil from around Scott Base, Antarctica, grew on a number of n-alkanes from hexane (C6) through to eicosane (C20) and the branched alkane pristane. Mineralization of {sup 14}C-dodecane was demonstrated with four strains. Representative isolates were identified as Rhodococcus species using 16S rDNA sequence analysis. Rhodococcus spp. strains 5/14 and 7/1 grew at -2 C but numbers of viable cells declined when incubated t 37 C. Both strains appear to have the major cold-shock gene cspA. Partial nucleotide sequence analyses of the PCR-amplified cspA open reading frame from Rhodococcus spp. strains 5/14 and 7/1 were approximately 60% identical to cspA from Escherichia coli.

  19. Alkane production from biomass: chemo-, bio- and integrated catalytic approaches.

    PubMed

    Deneyer, Aron; Renders, Tom; Van Aelst, Joost; Van den Bosch, Sander; Gabriëls, Dries; Sels, Bert F

    2015-12-01

    Linear, branched and cyclic alkanes are important intermediates and end products of the chemical industry and are nowadays mainly obtained from fossil resources. In search for alternatives, biomass feedstocks are often presented as a renewable carbon source for the production of fuels, chemicals and materials. However, providing a complete market for all these applications seems unrealistic due to both financial and logistic issues. Despite the very large scale of current alkane-based fuel applications, biomass definitely has the potential to offer a partial solution to the fuel business. For the smaller market of chemicals and materials, a transition to biomass as main carbon source is more realistic and even probably unavoidable in the long term. The appropriate use and further development of integrated chemo- and biotechnological (catalytic) process strategies will be crucial to successfully accomplish this petro-to-bio feedstock transition. Furthermore, a selection of the most promising technologies from the available chemo- and biocatalytic tool box is presented. New opportunities will certainly arise when multidisciplinary approaches are further explored in the future. In an attempt to select the most appropriate biomass sources for each specific alkane-based application, a diagram inspired by van Krevelen is applied, taking into account both the C-number and the relative functionality of the product molecules.

  20. Dielectric constant of liquid alkanes and hydrocarbon mixtures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sen, A. D.; Anicich, V. G.; Arakelian, T.

    1992-01-01

    The complex dielectric constants of n-alkanes with two to seven carbon atoms have been measured. The measurements were conducted using a slotted-line technique at 1.2 GHz and at atmospheric pressure. The temperature was varied from the melting point to the boiling point of the respective alkanes. The real part of the dielectric constant was found to decrease with increasing temperature and correlate with the change in the molar volume. An upper limit to all the loss tangents was established at 0.001. The complex dielectric constants of a few mixtures of liquid alkanes were also measured at room temperature. For a pentane-octane mixture the real part of the dielectric constant could be explained by the Clausius-Mosotti theory. For the mixtures of n-hexane-ethylacetate and n-hexane-acetone the real part of the dielectric constants could be explained by the Onsager theory extended to mixtures. The dielectric constant of the n-hexane-acetone mixture displayed deviations from the Onsager theory at the highest fractions of acetone. The dipole moments of ethylacetate and acetone were determined for dilute mixtures using the Onsager theory and were found to be in agreement with their accepted gas-phase values. The loss tangents of the mixtures exhibited a linear relationship with the volume fraction for low concentrations of the polar liquids.

  1. Dielectric constant of liquid alkanes and hydrocarbon mixtures.

    PubMed

    Sen, A D; Anicich, V G; Arakelian, T

    1992-01-01

    The complex dielectric constants of n-alkanes with two to seven carbon atoms have been measured. The measurements were conducted using a slotted-line technique at 1.2 GHz and at atmospheric pressure. The temperature was varied from the melting point to the boiling point of the respective alkanes. The real part of the dielectric constant was found to decrease with increasing temperature and correlate with the change in the molar volume. An upper limit to all the loss tangents was established at 0.001. The complex dielectric constants of a few mixtures of liquid alkanes were also measured at room temperature. For a pentane-octane mixture the real part of the dielectric constant could be explained by the Clausius-Mosotti theory. For the mixtures of n-hexane-ethylacetate and n-hexane-acetone the real part of the dielectric constants could be explained by the Onsager theory extended to mixtures. The dielectric constant of the n-hexane-acetone mixture displayed deviations from the Onsager theory at the highest fractions of acetone. The dipole moments of ethylacetate and acetone were determined for dilute mixtures using the Onsager theory and were found to be in agreement with their accepted gas-phase values. The loss tangents of the mixtures exhibited a linear relationship with the volume fraction for low concentrations of the polar liquids.

  2. Modeling SOA production from the oxidation of intermediate volatility alkanes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aumont, B.; Mouchel-Vallon, C.; Camredon, M.; Lee-Taylor, J.; Madronich, S.

    2012-12-01

    Secondary Organic Aerosols (SOA) production and ageing is a multigenerational oxidation process involving the formation of successive organic compounds with higher oxidation degree and lower vapour pressure. This process was investigated using the explicit oxidation model GECKO-A (Generator for Explicit Chemistry and Kinetics of Organics in the Atmosphere). Results for the C8-C24 n-alkane series show the expected trends, i.e. (i) SOA yield grows with the carbon backbone of the parent hydrocarbon, (ii) SOA yields decreases with the decreasing pre-existing organic aerosol concentration, (iii) the number of generations required to describe SOA production increases when the pre-existing organic aerosol concentration decreases. Most SOA contributors were found to be not oxidized enough to be categorized as highly oxygenated organic aerosols (OOA) but reduced enough to be categorized as hydrocarbon like organic aerosols (HOA). Branched alkanes are more prone to fragment in the early stage of the oxidation than their corresponding linear analogues. Fragmentation is expected to alter both the yield and the mean oxidation state of the SOA. Here, GECKO-A is applied to generate highly detailed oxidation schemes for various series of branched and cyclised alkanes. Branching and cyclisation effects on SOA yields and oxidation states will be examined.

  3. Additional chain-branching pathways in the low-temperature oxidation of branched alkanes

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Zhandong; Zhang, Lidong; Moshammer, Kai; Popolan-Vaida, Denisia M.; Shankar, Vijai Shankar Bhavani; Lucassen, Arnas; Hemken, Christian; Taatjes, Craig A.; Leone, Stephen R.; Kohse-Hoinghaus, Katharina; Hansen, Nils; Dagaut, Philippe; Sarathy, S. Mani

    2015-12-31

    Chain-branching reactions represent a general motif in chemistry, encountered in atmospheric chemistry, combustion, polymerization, and photochemistry; the nature and amount of radicals generated by chain-branching are decisive for the reaction progress, its energy signature, and the time towards its completion. In this study, experimental evidence for two new types of chain-branching reactions is presented, based upon detection of highly oxidized multifunctional molecules (HOM) formed during the gas-phase low-temperature oxidation of a branched alkane under conditions relevant to combustion. The oxidation of 2,5-dimethylhexane (DMH) in a jet-stirred reactor (JSR) was studied using synchrotron vacuum ultra-violet photoionization molecular beam mass spectrometry (SVUV-PI-MBMS). Specifically, species with four and five oxygen atoms were probed, having molecular formulas of C8H14O4 (e.g., diketo-hydroperoxide/keto-hydroperoxy cyclic ether) and C8H16O5 (e.g., keto-dihydroperoxide/dihydroperoxy cyclic ether), respectively. The formation of C8H16O5 species involves alternative isomerization of OOQOOH radicals via intramolecular H-atom migration, followed by third O2 addition, intramolecular isomerization, and OH release; C8H14O4 species are proposed to result from subsequent reactions of C8H16O5 species. The mechanistic pathways involving these species are related to those proposed as a source of low-volatility highly oxygenated species in Earth's troposphere. At the higher temperatures relevant to auto-ignition, they can result in a net increase of hydroxyl radical production, so these are additional radical chain-branching pathways for ignition. Furthermore, the results presented herein extend the conceptual basis of reaction mechanisms used to predict the reaction behavior of ignition, and have

  4. On the inclusion of alkanes into the monolayer of aliphatic alcohols at the water/alkane vapor interface: a quantum chemical approach.

    PubMed

    Vysotsky, Yuri B; Fomina, Elena S; Belyaeva, Elena A; Fainerman, Valentin B; Vollhardt, Dieter

    2013-02-14

    In the framework of the quantum chemical semiempirical PM3 method thermodynamic and structural parameters of the formation and clusterization of aliphatic alcohols C(n)H(2n+1)OH (n(OH) = 8-16) at 298 K at the water/alkane vapor C(n)H(2n+2), (n(CH(3)) = 6-16) interface were calculated. The dependencies of enthalpy, entropy and Gibbs' energy of clusterization per one monomer molecule of 2D films on the alkyl chain length of corresponding alcohols and alkanes, the molar fraction of alkanes in the monolayers and the immersion degree of alcohol molecules into the water phase were shown to be linear or stepwise. The threshold of spontaneous clusterization of aliphatic alcohols at the water/alkane vapor interface was 10-11 carbon atoms at 298 K which is in line with experimental data at the air/water interface. It is shown that the presence of alkane vapor does not influence the process of alcohol monolayer formation. The structure of these monolayers is analogous to those obtained at the air/water interface in agreement with experimental data. The inclusion of alkane molecules into the amphiphilic monolayer at the water/alkane vapor interface is possible for amphiphiles with the spontaneous clusterization threshold at the air/water interface (n(s)(0)) of at least 16 methylene units in the alkyl chain, and it does not depend on the molar fraction of alkanes in the corresponding monolayer. The inclusion of alkanes from the vapor phase into the amphiphilic monolayer also requires that the difference between the alkyl chain lengths of alcohols and alkanes is not larger than n(s)(0) - 15 and n(s)(0) - 14 for the 2D film 1 and 2D film 2, respectively.

  5. Cation diffusion in titanomagnetites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aragon, R.; McCallister, R. H.; Harrison, H. R.

    1984-02-01

    Interdiffusion couple experiments were performed with titanomagnetite single crystals at 1,000°C, 1,100° C and 1,200° C in various buffered atmospheres. The dependence of the interdiffusion coefficient on oxygen fugacity, composition and temperature was interpreted in terms of point defect structure. Estimates of the cation tracer diffusivities indicate that Fe migrates via a point defect mechanism, involving mixed tetrahedral-octahedral site jumps, with an activation energy of 33 Kcal/mole; whereas Ti migration is one to two orders of magnitude slower, is restricted to octahedral sites and has an activation energy of 60 Kcal/mole.

  6. Laboratory spectroscopic analyses of electron irradiated alkanes and alkenes in solar system ices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hand, K. P.; Carlson, R. W.

    2012-03-01

    We report results from laboratory experiments of 10 keV electron irradiation of thin ice films of water and short-chain hydrocarbons at ˜10-8 Torr and temperatures ranging from 70-100 K. Hydrocarbon mixtures include water with C3H8, C3H6, C4H10 (butane and isobutane), and C4H8, (1-butene and cis/trans-2-butene). The double bonds of the alkenes in our initial mixtures were rapidly destroyed or converted to single carbon bonds, covalent bonds with hydrogen, bonds with -OH (hydroxyl), bonds with oxygen (C-O), or double bonds with oxygen (carbonyl). Spectra resulting from irradiation of alkane and alkene ices are largely indistinguishable; the initial differences in film composition are destroyed and the resulting mixture includes long-chain, branched aliphatics, aldehydes, ketones, esters, and alcohols. Methane was observed as a product during radiolysis but CO was largely absent. We find that while some of the carbon is oxidized and lost to CO2 formation, some carbon is sequestered into highly refractory, long-chain aliphatic compounds that remain as a thin residue even after the ice film has been raised to standard temperature and pressure. We conclude that the high availability of hydrogen in our experiments leads to the formation of the formyl radical which then serves as the precursor for formaldehyde and polymerization of longer hydrocarbon chains.

  7. Evidence for alkane coordination to an electron-rich uranium center.

    PubMed

    Castro-Rodriguez, Ingrid; Nakai, Hidetaka; Gantzel, Peter; Zakharov, Lev N; Rheingold, Arnold L; Meyer, Karsten

    2003-12-24

    A series of five uranium-alkane complexes of the general formula [(ArO)3tacn)U(alkane)].(cy-alkane) has been synthesized and crystallographically characterized. In all cases, X-ray diffraction studies revealed a pseudo-six-coordinate trivalent uranium core structure, [(ArO)3tacn)U], with a coordinated alkane ligand at the axial position. The average U-C bond distance to the bound alkane was determined to be 3.798 A, which is considerably shorter than the sum of the van der Waals radii of the U atom and a CH2 or CH3 unit (3.9 A). In all complexes, the alkane is coordinated in an eta2-H,C fashion.

  8. Radiation induced redox reactions and fragmentation of constituent ions in ionic liquids II. Imidazolium cations.

    SciTech Connect

    Shkrob, I. A.; Marin, T. W.; Chemerisov, S. D.; Hatcher, J.; Wishart, J.

    2011-04-14

    In part 1 of this study, radiolytic degradation of constituent anions in ionic liquids (ILs) was examined. The present study continues the themes addressed in part 1 and examines the radiation chemistry of 1,3-dialkyl substituted imidazolium cations, which currently comprise the most practically important and versatile class of ionic liquid cations. For comparison, we also examined 1,3-dimethoxy- and 2-methyl-substituted imidazolium and 1-butyl-4-methylpyridinium cations. In addition to identification of radicals using electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy (EPR) and selective deuterium substitution, we analyzed stable radiolytic products using {sup 1}H and {sup 13}C nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and tandem electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESMS). Our EPR studies reveal rich chemistry initiated through 'ionization of the ions': oxidation and the formation of radical dications in the aliphatic arms of the parent cations (leading to deprotonation and the formation of alkyl radicals in these arms) and reduction of the parent cation, yielding 2-imidazolyl radicals. The subsequent reactions of these radicals depend on the nature of the IL. If the cation is 2-substituted, the resulting 2-imidazolyl radical is relatively stable. If there is no substitution at C(2), the radical then either is protonated or reacts with the parent cation forming a C(2)-C(2) {sigma}{sigma}*-bound dimer radical cation. In addition to these reactions, when methoxy or C{sub {alpha}}-substituted alkyl groups occupy the N(1,3) positions, their elimination is observed. The elimination of methyl groups from N(1,3) was not observed. Product analyses of imidazolium liquids irradiated in the very-high-dose regime (6.7 MGy) reveal several detrimental processes, including volatilization, acidification, and oligomerization. The latter yields a polymer with m/z of 650 {+-} 300 whose radiolytic yield increases with dose (0.23 monomer units per 100 eV for 1-methyl-3-butylimidazolium

  9. DFT studies of all fluorothiophenes and their cations as candidate monomers for conductive polymers

    SciTech Connect

    Shirani, Hossein; Jameh-Bozorghi, Saeed; Yousefi, Ali

    2015-01-22

    In this paper, electronic, structural, and properties of mono-, di-, tri-, and tetrafluorothiophenes and their radical cations are studied using the density functional theory and B3LYP method with 6-311++G** basis set. Also, the effects of the number and position of the substituent of fluorine atoms on the properties of the thiophene ring have been studied using optimized structures obtained for these molecules and their radical cations; vibrational frequencies, spin-density distribution, size and direction of the dipole moment vector, ionization potential, electric Polarizabilities, HOMO–LUMO gaps and NICS values of these compounds have been calculated and analyzed.

  10. Radiation induced redox reactions and fragmentation of constituent ions in ionic liquids. 2. Imidazolium cations.

    PubMed

    Shkrob, Ilya A; Marin, Timothy W; Chemerisov, Sergey D; Hatcher, Jasmine L; Wishart, James F

    2011-04-14

    In part 1 of this study, radiolytic degradation of constituent anions in ionic liquids (ILs) was examined. The present study continues the themes addressed in part 1 and examines the radiation chemistry of 1,3-dialkyl substituted imidazolium cations, which currently comprise the most practically important and versatile class of ionic liquid cations. For comparison, we also examined 1,3-dimethoxy- and 2-methyl-substituted imidazolium and 1-butyl-4-methylpyridinium cations. In addition to identification of radicals using electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy (EPR) and selective deuterium substitution, we analyzed stable radiolytic products using (1)H and (13)C nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and tandem electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESMS). Our EPR studies reveal rich chemistry initiated through "ionization of the ions": oxidation and the formation of radical dications in the aliphatic arms of the parent cations (leading to deprotonation and the formation of alkyl radicals in these arms) and reduction of the parent cation, yielding 2-imidazolyl radicals. The subsequent reactions of these radicals depend on the nature of the IL. If the cation is 2-substituted, the resulting 2-imidazolyl radical is relatively stable. If there is no substitution at C(2), the radical then either is protonated or reacts with the parent cation forming a C(2)-C(2) σσ*-bound dimer radical cation. In addition to these reactions, when methoxy or C(α)-substituted alkyl groups occupy the N(1,3) positions, their elimination is observed. The elimination of methyl groups from N(1,3) was not observed. Product analyses of imidazolium liquids irradiated in the very-high-dose regime (6.7 MGy) reveal several detrimental processes, including volatilization, acidification, and oligomerization. The latter yields a polymer with m/z of 650 ± 300 whose radiolytic yield increases with dose (~0.23 monomer units per 100 eV for 1-methyl-3-butylimidazolium trifluorosulfonate). Gradual

  11. Dissecting the cation-cation interaction between two uranyl units.

    PubMed

    Tecmer, Paweł; Hong, Sung W; Boguslawski, Katharina

    2016-07-21

    We present a state-of-the-art computational study of the uranyl(vi) and uranyl(v) cation-cation interactions (dications) in aqueous solution. Reliable electronic structures of two interacting uranyl(vi) and uranyl(v) subunits as well as those of the uranyl(vi) and uranyl(v) clusters are presented for the first time. Our theoretical study elucidates the impact of cation-cation interactions on changes in the molecular structure as well as changes in vibrational and UV-Vis spectra of the bare uranyl(vi) and uranyl(v) moieties for different total spin-states and total charges of the dications.

  12. Fundamental Flame Velocities of Pure Hydrocarbons I : Alkanes, Alkenes, Alkynes Benzene, and Cyclohexane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gerstein, Melvin; Levine, Oscar; Wong, Edgar L

    1950-01-01

    The flame velocities of 37 pure hydrocarbons including normal and branched alkanes, alkenes, and alkynes; as well as benzene and cyclohexane, together with the experimental technique employed are presented. The normal alkanes have about the same flame velocity from ethane through heptane with methane being about 16 percent lower. Unsaturation increases the flame velocity in the order of alkanes, alkenes, and alkynes. Branching reduces the flame velocity.

  13. Photochemical dimerization and functionalization of alkanes, ethers, primary alcohols and silanes

    DOEpatents

    Crabtree, R.H.; Brown, S.H.

    1988-02-16

    The space-time yield and/or the selectivity of the photochemical dimerization of alkanes, ethers, primary alcohols and tertiary silanes with Hg and U.V. light is enhanced by refluxing the substrate in the irradiated reaction zone at a temperature at which the dimer product condenses and remains condensed promptly upon its formation. Cross-dimerization of the alkanes, ethers and silanes with primary alcohols is disclosed, as is the functionalization to aldehydes of the alkanes with carbon monoxide.

  14. Draft Genome Sequence of Gordonia sihwensis Strain 9, a Branched Alkane-Degrading Bacterium

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Lisa M.; Gunasekera, Thusitha S.; Striebich, Richard C.

    2016-01-01

    Gordonia sihwensis strain 9 is a Gram-positive bacterium capable of efficient aerobic degradation of branched and normal alkanes. The draft genome of G. sihwensis S9 is 4.16 Mb in size, with 3,686 coding sequences and 68.1% G+C content. Alkane monooxygenase and P-450 cytochrome genes required for alkane degradation are predicted in G. sihwensis S9. PMID:27340079

  15. Photochemical dimerization and functionalization of alkanes, ethers, primary alcohols and silanes

    DOEpatents

    Crabtree, Robert H.; Brown, Stephen H.

    1988-01-01

    The space-time yield and/or the selectivity of the photochemical dimerization of alkanes, ethers, primary alcohols and tertiary silanes with Hg and U.V. light is enhanced by refluxing the substrate in the irradiated reaction zone at a temperature at which the dimer product condenses and remains condensed promptly upon its formation. Cross-dimerization of the alkanes, ethers and silanes with primary alcohols is disclosed, as is the functionalization to aldehydes of the alkanes with carbon monoxide.

  16. Alkanes in Natural and Synthetic Petroleums: Comparison of Calculated and Actual Compositions.

    PubMed

    Friedel, R A; Sharkey, A G

    1963-03-22

    A similarity exists between the low molecular weight alkane isomers in crude oil and Fischer-Tropsch catalytic synthesis products. The composition of the C(4) through C(7) alkane isomers in a crude oil was calculated quantitatively with the equations previously used to calculate the alkane isomers in Fischer-Tropsch products. These results may have significance in ascertaining the origin of the volatile hydrocarbons in crude oils.

  17. Revised Charge Equilibration Parameters for More Accurate Hydration Free Energies of Alkanes.

    PubMed

    Davis, Joseph E; Patel, Sandeep

    2010-01-01

    We present a refined alkane charge equilibration (CHEQ) force field, improving our previously reported CHEQ alkane force field[1] to better reproduce experimental hydration free energies. Experimental hydration free energies of ethane, propane, butane, pentane, hexane, and heptane are reproduced to within 3.6% on average. We demonstrate that explicit polarization results in a shift in molecular dipole moment for water molecules associated with the alkane molecule. We also show that our new parameters do not have a significant effect on the alkane-water interactions as measured by the radial distribution function (RDF).

  18. Cationic Antimicrobial Polymers and Their Assemblies

    PubMed Central

    Carmona-Ribeiro, Ana Maria; de Melo Carrasco, Letícia Dias

    2013-01-01

    Cationic compounds are promising candidates for development of antimicrobial agents. Positive charges attached to surfaces, particles, polymers, peptides or bilayers have been used as antimicrobial agents by themselves or in sophisticated formulations. The main positively charged moieties in these natural or synthetic structures are quaternary ammonium groups, resulting in quaternary ammonium compounds (QACs). The advantage of amphiphilic cationic polymers when compared to small amphiphilic molecules is their enhanced microbicidal activity. Besides, many of these polymeric structures also show low toxicity to human cells; a major requirement for biomedical applications. Determination of the specific elements in polymers, which affect their antimicrobial activity, has been previously difficult due to broad molecular weight distributions and random sequences characteristic of radical polymerization. With the advances in polymerization control, selection of well defined polymers and structures are allowing greater insight into their structure-antimicrobial activity relationship. On the other hand, antimicrobial polymers grafted or self-assembled to inert or non inert vehicles can yield hybrid antimicrobial nanostructures or films, which can act as antimicrobials by themselves or deliver bioactive molecules for a variety of applications, such as wound dressing, photodynamic antimicrobial therapy, food packing and preservation and antifouling applications. PMID:23665898

  19. Cloning and expression of three ladA-type alkane monooxygenase genes from an extremely thermophilic alkane-degrading bacterium Geobacillus thermoleovorans B23.

    PubMed

    Boonmak, Chanita; Takahashi, Yasunori; Morikawa, Masaaki

    2014-05-01

    An extremely thermophilic bacterium, Geobacillus thermoleovorans B23, is capable of degrading a broad range of alkanes (with carbon chain lengths ranging between C11 and C32) at 70 °C. Whole-genome sequence analysis revealed that unlike most alkane-degrading bacteria, strain B23 does not possess an alkB-type alkane monooxygenase gene. Instead, it possesses a cluster of three ladA-type genes, ladAαB23, ladAβB23, and ladB B23, on its chromosome, whose protein products share significant amino acid sequence identities, 49.8, 34.4, and 22.7 %, respectively, with that of ladA alkane monooxygenase gene found on a plasmid of Geobacillus thermodetrificans NG 80-2. Each of the three genes, ladAαB23, ladAβB23, and ladB B23, was heterologously expressed individually in an alkB1 deletion mutant strain, Pseudomonas fluorescens KOB2Δ1. It was found that all three genes were functional in P. fluorescens KOB2Δ1, and partially restored alkane degradation activity. In this study, we suggest that G. thermoleovorans B23 utilizes multiple LadA-type alkane monooxygenases for the degradation of a broad range of alkanes.

  20. Identification and use of an alkane transporter plug-in for applications in biocatalysis and whole-cell biosensing of alkanes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grant, Chris; Deszcz, Dawid; Wei, Yu-Chia; Martínez-Torres, Rubéns Julio; Morris, Phattaraporn; Folliard, Thomas; Sreenivasan, Rakesh; Ward, John; Dalby, Paul; Woodley, John M.; Baganz, Frank

    2014-07-01

    Effective application of whole-cell devices in synthetic biology and biocatalysis will always require consideration of the uptake of molecules of interest into the cell. Here we demonstrate that the AlkL protein from Pseudomonas putida GPo1 is an alkane import protein capable of industrially relevant rates of uptake of C7-C16 n-alkanes. Without alkL expression, native E.coli n-alkane uptake was the rate-limiting step in both the whole-cell bioconversion of C7-C16 n-alkanes and in the activation of a whole-cell alkane biosensor by C10 and C11 alkanes. By coexpression of alkL as a transporter plug-in, specific yields improved by up to 100-fold for bioxidation of >C12 alkanes to fatty alcohols and acids. The alkL protein was shown to be toxic to the host when overexpressed but when expressed from a vector capable of controlled induction, yields of alkane oxidation were improved a further 10-fold (8 g/L and 1.7 g/g of total oxidized products). Further testing of activity on n-octane with the controlled expression vector revealed the highest reported rates of 120 μmol/min/g and 1 g/L/h total oxidized products. This is the first time AlkL has been shown to directly facilitate enhanced uptake of C10-C16 alkanes and represents the highest reported gain in product yields resulting from its use.

  1. Identification and use of an alkane transporter plug-in for applications in biocatalysis and whole-cell biosensing of alkanes.

    PubMed

    Grant, Chris; Deszcz, Dawid; Wei, Yu-Chia; Martínez-Torres, Rubéns Julio; Morris, Phattaraporn; Folliard, Thomas; Sreenivasan, Rakesh; Ward, John; Dalby, Paul; Woodley, John M; Baganz, Frank

    2014-07-28

    Effective application of whole-cell devices in synthetic biology and biocatalysis will always require consideration of the uptake of molecules of interest into the cell. Here we demonstrate that the AlkL protein from Pseudomonas putida GPo1 is an alkane import protein capable of industrially relevant rates of uptake of C7-C16 n-alkanes. Without alkL expression, native E.coli n-alkane uptake was the rate-limiting step in both the whole-cell bioconversion of C7-C16 n-alkanes and in the activation of a whole-cell alkane biosensor by C10 and C11 alkanes. By coexpression of alkL as a transporter plug-in, specific yields improved by up to 100-fold for bioxidation of >C12 alkanes to fatty alcohols and acids. The alkL protein was shown to be toxic to the host when overexpressed but when expressed from a vector capable of controlled induction, yields of alkane oxidation were improved a further 10-fold (8 g/L and 1.7 g/g of total oxidized products). Further testing of activity on n-octane with the controlled expression vector revealed the highest reported rates of 120 μmol/min/g and 1 g/L/h total oxidized products. This is the first time AlkL has been shown to directly facilitate enhanced uptake of C10-C16 alkanes and represents the highest reported gain in product yields resulting from its use.

  2. Utilization of n-alkanes by a newly isolated strain of Acinetobacter venetianus: the role of two AlkB-type alkane hydroxylases.

    PubMed

    Throne-Holst, Mimmi; Markussen, Sidsel; Winnberg, Asgeir; Ellingsen, Trond E; Kotlar, Hans-Kristian; Zotchev, Sergey B

    2006-09-01

    A bacterial strain capable of utilizing n-alkanes with chain lengths ranging from decane (C10H22) to tetracontane (C40H82) as a sole carbon source was isolated using a system for screening microorganisms able to grow on paraffin (mixed long-chain n-alkanes). The isolate, identified according to its 16S rRNA sequence as Acinetobacter venetianus, was designated A. venetianus 6A2. Two DNA fragments encoding parts of AlkB-type alkane hydroxylase homologues, designated alkMa and alkMb, were polymerase chain reaction-amplified from the genome of A. venetianus 6A2. To study the roles of these two alkM paralogues in n-alkane utilization in A. venetianus 6A2, we constructed alkMa, alkMb, and alkMa/alkMb disruption mutants. Studies on the growth patterns of the disruption mutants using n-alkanes with different chain lengths as sole carbon source demonstrated central roles for the alkMa and alkMb genes in utilization of C10 to C18 n-alkanes. Comparative analysis of these patterns also suggested different substrate preferences for AlkMa and AlkMb in n-alkane utilization. Because both single and double mutants were able to grow on n-alkanes with chain lengths of C20 and longer, we concluded that yet another enzyme(s) for the utilization of these n-alkanes must exist in A. venetianus 6A2.

  3. Identification and use of an alkane transporter plug-in for applications in biocatalysis and whole-cell biosensing of alkanes

    PubMed Central

    Grant, Chris; Deszcz, Dawid; Wei, Yu-Chia; Martínez-Torres, Rubéns Julio; Morris, Phattaraporn; Folliard, Thomas; Sreenivasan, Rakesh; Ward, John; Dalby, Paul; Woodley, John M.; Baganz, Frank

    2014-01-01

    Effective application of whole-cell devices in synthetic biology and biocatalysis will always require consideration of the uptake of molecules of interest into the cell. Here we demonstrate that the AlkL protein from Pseudomonas putida GPo1 is an alkane import protein capable of industrially relevant rates of uptake of C7-C16 n-alkanes. Without alkL expression, native E.coli n-alkane uptake was the rate-limiting step in both the whole-cell bioconversion of C7-C16 n-alkanes and in the activation of a whole-cell alkane biosensor by C10 and C11 alkanes. By coexpression of alkL as a transporter plug-in, specific yields improved by up to 100-fold for bioxidation of >C12 alkanes to fatty alcohols and acids. The alkL protein was shown to be toxic to the host when overexpressed but when expressed from a vector capable of controlled induction, yields of alkane oxidation were improved a further 10-fold (8 g/L and 1.7 g/g of total oxidized products). Further testing of activity on n-octane with the controlled expression vector revealed the highest reported rates of 120 μmol/min/g and 1 g/L/h total oxidized products. This is the first time AlkL has been shown to directly facilitate enhanced uptake of C10-C16 alkanes and represents the highest reported gain in product yields resulting from its use. PMID:25068650

  4. Radical chemistry of artemisinin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Denisov, Evgenii T.; Solodova, S. L.; Denisova, Taisa G.

    2010-12-01

    The review summarizes physicochemical characteristics of the natural sesquiterpene peroxide artemisinin. The kinetic schemes of transformations of artemisinin radicals under anaerobic conditions are presented and analyzed. The sequence of radical reactions of artemisinin in the presence of oxygen is considered in detail. Special emphasis is given to the intramolecular chain oxidation resulting in the transformation of artemisinin into polyatomic hydroperoxide. The kinetic characteristics of elementary reaction steps involving alkyl, alkoxyl, and peroxyl radicals generated from artemisinin are discussed. The results of testing of artemisinin and its derivatives for the antimalarial activity and the scheme of the biochemical synthesis of artemisinin in nature are considered.

  5. Radical aminomethylation of imines.

    PubMed

    Fujii, Shintaro; Konishi, Takehito; Matsumoto, Yusuke; Yamaoka, Yousuke; Takasu, Kiyosei; Yamada, Ken-Ichi

    2014-09-05

    Taking advantage of the high level of performance of N-alkoxycarbonyl-imines, we achieved the first example of addition of the aminomethyl radical to imine. The reaction efficiency depended on the structure of the radical precursor, whether it is an iodide or a xanthate, and an electron-withdrawing group on the nitrogen atom of the radical. This reaction allows direct introduction of an N-substituted aminomethyl group onto imine to provide 1,2-diamine as well as the short-step synthesis of ICI-199,441.

  6. Two novel alkane hydroxylase-rubredoxin fusion genes isolated from a Dietzia bacterium and the functions of fused rubredoxin domains in long-chain n-alkane degradation.

    PubMed

    Nie, Yong; Liang, Jieliang; Fang, Hui; Tang, Yue-Qin; Wu, Xiao-Lei

    2011-10-01

    Two alkane hydroxylase-rubredoxin fusion gene homologs (alkW1 and alkW2) were cloned from a Dietzia strain, designated DQ12-45-1b, which can grow on crude oil and n-alkanes ranging in length from 6 to 40 carbon atoms as sole carbon sources. Both AlkW1 and AlkW2 have an integral-membrane alkane monooxygenase (AlkB) conserved domain and a rubredoxin (Rd) conserved domain which are fused together. Phylogenetic analysis showed that these two AlkB-fused Rd domains formed a novel third cluster with all the Rds from the alkane hydroxylase-rubredoxin fusion gene clusters in Gram-positive bacteria and that this third cluster was distant from the known AlkG1- and AlkG2-type Rds. Expression of the alkW1 gene in DQ12-45-1b was induced when cells were grown on C(8) to C(32) n-alkanes as sole carbon sources, but expression of the alkW2 gene was not detected. Functional heterologous expression in an alkB deletion mutant of Pseudomonas fluorescens KOB2Δ1 suggested the alkW1 could restore the growth of KOB2Δ1 on C(14) and C(16) n-alkanes and induce faster growth on C(18) to C(32) n-alkanes than alkW1ΔRd, the Rd domain deletion mutant gene of alkW1, which also caused faster growth than KOB2Δ1 itself. In addition, the artificial fusion of AlkB from the Gram-negative P. fluorescens CHA0 and the Rds from both Gram-negative P. fluorescens CHA0 and Gram-positive Dietzia sp. DQ12-45-1b significantly increased the degradation of C(32) alkane compared to that seen with AlkB itself. In conclusion, the alkW1 gene cloned from Dietzia species encoded an alkane hydroxylase which increased growth on and degradation of n-alkanes up to C(32) in length, with its fused rubredoxin domain being necessary to maintain the functions. In addition, the fusion of alkane hydroxylase and rubredoxin genes from both Gram-positive and -negative bacteria can increase the degradation of long-chain n-alkanes (such as C(32)) in the Gram-negative bacterium.

  7. Shape selective properties of the Al-fumarate metal-organic framework in the adsorption and separation of n-alkanes, iso-alkanes, cyclo-alkanes and aromatic hydrocarbons.

    PubMed

    Bozbiyik, Belgin; Lannoeye, Jeroen; De Vos, Dirk E; Baron, Gino V; Denayer, Joeri F M

    2016-01-28

    The primary goal of this work is to study the adsorption of a wide range of hydrocarbon adsorbates in the Al-fumarate metal-organic framework in order to identify and explore trends in adsorption behaviour that can be related to the sorbate's molecular properties and as well as the properties of this MOF. The pulse chromatographic technique was used to study the adsorption properties of C5-C8 linear, branched, cyclic and aromatic hydrocarbons in vapour phase at low coverage and at high temperatures (150-250 °C). Chromatograms of alkanes having the same number of carbon atoms (C5-C8) clearly show that the linear alkane is retained the longest over its branched and cyclic isomers. Moreover, xylene isomers are also clearly separated by Al-fumarate, with retention times increasing in the order: ortho-xylene < meta-xylene < para-xylene. Differences in adsorption enthalpy of more than 10 kJ mol(-1) between linear alkanes and their di/tri-branched or cyclo-alkane isomers were observed, clearly showing that steric effects imposed by the pore structure of the adsorbent cause the difference in adsorption between linear alkanes and their isomers. In conclusion, Al-fumarate behaves as a shape selective material with respect to structural isomers of linear alkanes, with properties resembling those of medium pore size zeolites.

  8. Closed-Shell Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbon Cations: A New Category of Interstellar Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hudgins, Douglas M.; Bauschlicher, Charles W., Jr.; Allamandola, Louis J.; DeVincenzi, Donald (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Density functional theory has been employed to calculate the harmonic frequencies and intensities of a range of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) cations that explore both size and electronic structure effects of the infrared spectroscopic properties of these species. The sample extends the size range of PAH species considered to more than 50 carbon atoms and includes several representatives from each of two heretofore unexplored categories of PAH cations: (1) fully benzenoid PAH cations whose carbon skeleton is composed of an odd number of carbon atoms (C(sub odd) PAHs); and (2) protonated PAH cations (HPAH+). Unlike the radical electronic structures of the PAH cations that have been the subject of previous theoretical and experimental work, the species in these two classes have a closed-shell electronic configuration. The calculated spectra of circumcoronene, C54H18 in both neutral and (radical) cationic form are also reported and compared with those of the other species. Overall, the C(sub odd) PAHs spectra are dominated by strong CC stretching modes near 1600 cm(exp -1) and display spectra that are remarkably insensitive to molecular size. The HPAH+ species evince a more complex spectrum consistent with the added contributions of aliphatic modes and their generally lower symmetry. Finally, for both classes of closed-shell cations, the intensity of the aromatic CH stretching modes is found to increase with molecular size far out of proportion with the number of CH groups, approaching a value more typical of neutral PAHs for the largest species studied.

  9. Cationic liposomes as vaccine adjuvants.

    PubMed

    Christensen, Dennis; Korsholm, Karen Smith; Andersen, Peter; Agger, Else Marie

    2011-04-01

    The application of cationic liposomes as vaccine delivery systems and adjuvants has been investigated extensively over the last few decades. However, cationic liposomes are, in general, not sufficiently immunostimulatory, which is why the combination of liposomes with immunostimulating ligands has arisen as a strategy in the development of novel adjuvant systems. Within the last 5 years, two novel adjuvant systems based on cationic liposomes incorporating Toll-like receptor or non-Toll-like receptor immunostimulating ligands have progressed from preclinical testing in smaller animal species to clinical testing in humans. The immune responses that these clinical candidates induce are primarily of the Th1 type for which there is a profound unmet need. Furthermore, a number of new cationic liposome-forming surfactants with notable immunostimulatory properties have been discovered. In this article we review the recent progress on the application of cationic liposomes as vaccine delivery systems/adjuvants.

  10. Enhanced production of n-alkanes in Escherichia coli by spatial organization of biosynthetic pathway enzymes.

    PubMed

    Rahmana, Ziaur; Sung, Bong Hyun; Yi, Ji-Yeun; Bui, Le Minh; Lee, Jun Hyoung; Kim, Sun Chang

    2014-12-20

    Alkanes chemically mimic hydrocarbons found in petroleum, and their demand as biofuels is steadily increasing. Biologically, n-alkanes are produced from fatty acyl-ACPs by acyl-ACP reductases (AARs) and aldehyde deformylating oxygenases (ADOs). One of the major impediments in n-alkane biosynthesis is the low catalytic turnover rates of ADOs. Here, we studied n-alkane biosynthesis in Escherichia coli using a chimeric ADO-AAR fusion protein or zinc finger protein-guided ADO/AAR assembly on DNA scaffolds to control their stoichiometric ratios and spatial arrangements. Bacterial production of n-alkanes with the ADO-AAR fusion protein was increased 4.8-fold (24 mg/L) over a control strain expressing ADO and AAR separately. Optimal n-alkane biosynthesis was achieved when the ADO:AAR binding site ratio on a DNA scaffold was 3:1, yielding an 8.8-fold increase (44 mg/L) over the control strain. Our findings indicate that the spatial organization of alkane-producing enzymes is critical for efficient n-alkane biosynthesis in E. coli.

  11. 40 CFR 721.2625 - Reaction product of alkane-diol and epichlorohydrin.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Reaction product of alkane-diol and... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.2625 Reaction product of alkane-diol and epichlorohydrin. (a) Chemical... as reaction product of alkanediol and epichlorohydrin (PMN P-89-760) is subject to reporting...

  12. 40 CFR 721.2625 - Reaction product of alkane-diol and epichlorohydrin.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Reaction product of alkane-diol and... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.2625 Reaction product of alkane-diol and epichlorohydrin. (a) Chemical... as reaction product of alkanediol and epichlorohydrin (PMN P-89-760) is subject to reporting...

  13. 40 CFR 721.2625 - Reaction product of alkane-diol and epichlorohydrin.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Reaction product of alkane-diol and... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.2625 Reaction product of alkane-diol and epichlorohydrin. (a) Chemical... as reaction product of alkanediol and epichlorohydrin (PMN P-89-760) is subject to reporting...

  14. 40 CFR 721.2625 - Reaction product of alkane-diol and epichlorohydrin.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Reaction product of alkane-diol and... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.2625 Reaction product of alkane-diol and epichlorohydrin. (a) Chemical... as reaction product of alkanediol and epichlorohydrin (PMN P-89-760) is subject to reporting...

  15. 40 CFR 721.2625 - Reaction product of alkane-diol and epichlorohydrin.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Reaction product of alkane-diol and... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.2625 Reaction product of alkane-diol and epichlorohydrin. (a) Chemical... as reaction product of alkanediol and epichlorohydrin (PMN P-89-760) is subject to reporting...

  16. Free Radical Reactions in Food.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taub, Irwin A.

    1984-01-01

    Discusses reactions of free radicals that determine the chemistry of many fresh, processed, and stored foods. Focuses on reactions involving ascorbic acid, myoglobin, and palmitate radicals as representative radicals derived from a vitamin, metallo-protein, and saturated lipid. Basic concepts related to free radical structure, formation, and…

  17. Multiple sources of alkanes in Quaternary oceanic sediment of Antarctica

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kvenvolden, K.A.; Rapp, J.B.; Golan-Bac, M.; Hostettler, F.D.

    1987-01-01

    Normal alkanes (n-C13n-C36), isoprenoid hydrocarbons (i-C15, i-C16, i-C18, i-C19, and i-C20) triterpanes (C27C32), and (C27C29) are present in low concentrations offshore Antarctica in near-surface, Quaternary sediment of the Wilkes Land continental margin and of the western Ross Sea. The distributions of these hydrocarbons are interpreted relative to possible sources and processes. The hydrocarbons appear to be mixtures of primary and recycled material from marine and terrigenous sources. The n-alkanes are most abundant and are characterized by two distinct populations, one of probable marine origin and the other likely from terrigenous, vascular plant sources. Because the continent of Antarctica today is devoid of higher plants, the plant-derived hydrocarbons in these offshore sediments probably came from wind-blown material and recycled Antarctic sediment that contains land-plant remains from an earlier period of time. Isoprenoid hydrocarbons are partially recycled and mainly of marine origin; the dominance of pristane over phytane suggests oxic paleoenvironmental conditions. Both modern and ancient triterpanes and steranes are present, and the distribution of these indicates a mixture of primary and recycled bacterial, algal, and possible higher-plant materials. Although the sampled sediments were deposited during the Quaternary, they apparently contain a significant component of hydrocarbons of pre-Quaternary age. ?? 1987.

  18. Direct hydrodeoxygenation of raw woody biomass into liquid alkanes.

    PubMed

    Xia, Qineng; Chen, Zongjia; Shao, Yi; Gong, Xueqing; Wang, Haifeng; Liu, Xiaohui; Parker, Stewart F; Han, Xue; Yang, Sihai; Wang, Yanqin

    2016-03-30

    Being the only sustainable source of organic carbon, biomass is playing an ever-increasingly important role in our energy landscape. The conversion of renewable lignocellulosic biomass into liquid fuels is particularly attractive but extremely challenging due to the inertness and complexity of lignocellulose. Here we describe the direct hydrodeoxygenation of raw woods into liquid alkanes with mass yields up to 28.1 wt% over a multifunctional Pt/NbOPO4 catalyst in cyclohexane. The superior performance of this catalyst allows simultaneous conversion of cellulose, hemicellulose and, more significantly, lignin fractions in the wood sawdust into hexane, pentane and alkylcyclohexanes, respectively. Investigation on the molecular mechanism reveals that a synergistic effect between Pt, NbOx species and acidic sites promotes this highly efficient hydrodeoxygenation of bulk lignocellulose. No chemical pretreatment of the raw woody biomass or separation is required for this one-pot process, which opens a general and energy-efficient route for converting raw lignocellulose into valuable alkanes.

  19. Direct hydrodeoxygenation of raw woody biomass into liquid alkanes

    PubMed Central

    Xia, Qineng; Chen, Zongjia; Shao, Yi; Gong, Xueqing; Wang, Haifeng; Liu, Xiaohui; Parker, Stewart F.; Han, Xue; Yang, Sihai; Wang, Yanqin

    2016-01-01

    Being the only sustainable source of organic carbon, biomass is playing an ever-increasingly important role in our energy landscape. The conversion of renewable lignocellulosic biomass into liquid fuels is particularly attractive but extremely challenging due to the inertness and complexity of lignocellulose. Here we describe the direct hydrodeoxygenation of raw woods into liquid alkanes with mass yields up to 28.1 wt% over a multifunctional Pt/NbOPO4 catalyst in cyclohexane. The superior performance of this catalyst allows simultaneous conversion of cellulose, hemicellulose and, more significantly, lignin fractions in the wood sawdust into hexane, pentane and alkylcyclohexanes, respectively. Investigation on the molecular mechanism reveals that a synergistic effect between Pt, NbOx species and acidic sites promotes this highly efficient hydrodeoxygenation of bulk lignocellulose. No chemical pretreatment of the raw woody biomass or separation is required for this one-pot process, which opens a general and energy-efficient route for converting raw lignocellulose into valuable alkanes. PMID:27025898

  20. Geologic seepage of methane and light alkanes in Los Angeles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doezema, L. A.; Chang, K.; Baril, R.; Nwachuku, I.; Contreras, P.; Marquez, A.; Howard, D.

    2013-12-01

    Natural geologic seepage of methane from underground oil and natural gas reservoirs has been suggested to be an underreported part of the global methane budget. Other light alkanes are also given off in combination with the methane seepage, making it possible that geologic seepage is also a potentially significant global source of these light alkanes. This study reports C1-C5 findings from geologic seepage made in the Los Angeles region. Microseepage, invisible escape of gases, was measured primarily at Kenneth Hahn Regional Park, while macroseepage, the visible release of gases, was measured at the La Brea Tar Pits. Samples were collected using stainless steel canisters and flux chambers and were analyzed using gas chromatography with flame ionization detectors (GC-FID). Average microseepage flux rates of 0.95 μg m-2 h-1 for ethane and 0.51 μg m-2 h-1 were found for propane, while average macroseepage rates for methane, ethane, and propane were 664, 19.8, and 18.1 mg m-2 h-1 respectively. Relationships between microseepage flux rate and location of underground oil and natural deposit and earthquake fault lines are presented. Additionally, the relative importance of findings in context with global budgets and local air quality is discussed.

  1. Geomicrobiological linkages between short-chain alkane consumption and sulfate reduction rates in seep sediments

    PubMed Central

    Bose, Arpita; Rogers, Daniel R.; Adams, Melissa M.; Joye, Samantha B.; Girguis, Peter R.

    2013-01-01

    Marine hydrocarbon seeps are ecosystems that are rich in methane, and, in some cases, short-chain (C2–C5) and longer alkanes. C2–C4 alkanes such as ethane, propane, and butane can be significant components of seeping fluids. Some sulfate-reducing microbes oxidize short-chain alkanes anaerobically, and may play an important role in both the competition for sulfate and the local carbon budget. To better understand the anaerobic oxidation of short-chain n-alkanes coupled with sulfate-reduction, hydrocarbon-rich sediments from the Gulf of Mexico (GoM) were amended with artificial, sulfate-replete seawater and one of four n-alkanes (C1–C4) then incubated under strict anaerobic conditions. Measured rates of alkane oxidation and sulfate reduction closely follow stoichiometric predictions that assume the complete oxidation of alkanes to CO2 (though other sinks for alkane carbon likely exist). Changes in the δ13C of all the alkanes in the reactors show enrichment over the course of the incubation, with the C3 and C4 incubations showing the greatest enrichment (4.4 and 4.5‰, respectively). The concurrent depletion in the δ13C of dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) implies a transfer of carbon from the alkane to the DIC pool (−3.5 and −6.7‰ for C3 and C4 incubations, respectively). Microbial community analyses reveal that certain members of the class Deltaproteobacteria are selectively enriched as the incubations degrade C1–C4 alkanes. Phylogenetic analyses indicate that distinct phylotypes are enriched in the ethane reactors, while phylotypes in the propane and butane reactors align with previously identified C3–C4 alkane-oxidizing sulfate-reducers. These data further constrain the potential influence of alkane oxidation on sulfate reduction rates (SRRs) in cold hydrocarbon-rich sediments, provide insight into their contribution to local carbon cycling, and illustrate the extent to which short-chain alkanes can serve as electron donors and govern microbial

  2. Geomicrobiological linkages between short-chain alkane consumption and sulfate reduction rates in seep sediments.

    PubMed

    Bose, Arpita; Rogers, Daniel R; Adams, Melissa M; Joye, Samantha B; Girguis, Peter R

    2013-01-01

    Marine hydrocarbon seeps are ecosystems that are rich in methane, and, in some cases, short-chain (C2-C5) and longer alkanes. C2-C4 alkanes such as ethane, propane, and butane can be significant components of seeping fluids. Some sulfate-reducing microbes oxidize short-chain alkanes anaerobically, and may play an important role in both the competition for sulfate and the local carbon budget. To better understand the anaerobic oxidation of short-chain n-alkanes coupled with sulfate-reduction, hydrocarbon-rich sediments from the Gulf of Mexico (GoM) were amended with artificial, sulfate-replete seawater and one of four n-alkanes (C1-C4) then incubated under strict anaerobic conditions. Measured rates of alkane oxidation and sulfate reduction closely follow stoichiometric predictions that assume the complete oxidation of alkanes to CO2 (though other sinks for alkane carbon likely exist). Changes in the δ(13)C of all the alkanes in the reactors show enrichment over the course of the incubation, with the C3 and C4 incubations showing the greatest enrichment (4.4 and 4.5‰, respectively). The concurrent depletion in the δ(13)C of dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) implies a transfer of carbon from the alkane to the DIC pool (-3.5 and -6.7‰ for C3 and C4 incubations, respectively). Microbial community analyses reveal that certain members of the class Deltaproteobacteria are selectively enriched as the incubations degrade C1-C4 alkanes. Phylogenetic analyses indicate that distinct phylotypes are enriched in the ethane reactors, while phylotypes in the propane and butane reactors align with previously identified C3-C4 alkane-oxidizing sulfate-reducers. These data further constrain the potential influence of alkane oxidation on sulfate reduction rates (SRRs) in cold hydrocarbon-rich sediments, provide insight into their contribution to local carbon cycling, and illustrate the extent to which short-chain alkanes can serve as electron donors and govern microbial community

  3. The genome sequence of Desulfatibacillum alkenivorans AK-01: a blueprint for anaerobic alkane oxidation.

    PubMed

    Callaghan, A V; Morris, B E L; Pereira, I A C; McInerney, M J; Austin, R N; Groves, J T; Kukor, J J; Suflita, J M; Young, L Y; Zylstra, G J; Wawrik, B

    2012-01-01

    Desulfatibacillum alkenivorans AK-01 serves as a model organism for anaerobic alkane biodegradation because of its distinctive biochemistry and metabolic versatility. The D. alkenivorans genome provides a blueprint for understanding the genetic systems involved in alkane metabolism including substrate activation, CoA ligation, carbon-skeleton rearrangement and decarboxylation. Genomic analysis suggested a route to regenerate the fumarate needed for alkane activation via methylmalonyl-CoA and predicted the capability for syntrophic alkane metabolism, which was experimentally verified. Pathways involved in the oxidation of alkanes, alcohols, organic acids and n-saturated fatty acids coupled to sulfate reduction and the ability to grow chemolithoautotrophically were predicted. A complement of genes for motility and oxygen detoxification suggests that D. alkenivorans may be physiologically adapted to a wide range of environmental conditions. The D. alkenivorans genome serves as a platform for further study of anaerobic, hydrocarbon-oxidizing microorganisms and their roles in bioremediation, energy recovery and global carbon cycling.

  4. The intercalation of a vermiculite by cationic surfactants and its subsequent swelling with organic solvents.

    PubMed

    Williams-Daryn, S; Thomas, R K

    2002-11-15

    We have measured the dimensions of the interlamellar space following intercalation of a vermiculite by a range of cationic surfactants and followed the subsequent swelling of the organoclay compounds with several organic solvents. A single vermiculite (Eucatex) was used with three series of surfactants, N-alkyltrimethylammonium bromides, N,N'-dialkyldimethylammonium bromides, and the gemini cationic surfactants, alpha,omega-bis (N-alkyldimethylammonium) alkanes. In all cases well-defined stoichiometric compounds are obtained and the amount of surfactant intercalating the layer indicates that there are two factors controlling this amount, charge neutralization of the clay and hydrophobic packing. Packing arguments are used to deduce the fraction of non-charge-neutralizing material in the interlamellar space. It is clear that by altering the surfactant charge and structure it is possible to control the degree to which adsorption beyond charge neutralization occurs in these complexes, which is important when the capacity of such complexes to sorb other materials is considered. The general pattern of swelling of the surfactant/vermiculite complex by toluene suggests that the maximum expansion of the intralamellar space is limited by the longest chain in the surfactant. In contrast to earlier results we found that these vermiculites could be swollen by alkanes as well as aromatic solvents. This is attributed to the greater hydrophobicity of the interior of an organoclay formed from a clay of higher charge density.

  5. Chemistry of ascorbic acid radicals

    SciTech Connect

    Bielski, B.H.J.

    1982-01-01

    The chemistry of ascorbic acid free radicals is reviewed. Particular emphasis is placed on identification and characterization of ascorbate radicals by spectrophotometric and electron paramagnetic resonance techniques, the kinetics of formation and disappearance of ascorbate free radicals in enzymatic and nonenzymatic reactions, the effect of pH upon the spectral and kinetic properties of ascorbate anion radical, and chemical reactivity of ascorbate free radicals.

  6. Co-metabolic conversion of toluene in anaerobic n-alkane-degrading bacteria.

    PubMed

    Rabus, Ralf; Jarling, René; Lahme, Sven; Kühner, Simon; Heider, Johann; Widdel, Friedrich; Wilkes, Heinz

    2011-09-01

    Diverse microorganisms have been described to degrade petroleum hydrocarbons anaerobically. Strains able to utilize n-alkanes do not grow with aromatic hydrocarbons, whereas strains able to utilize aromatic hydrocarbons do not grow with n-alkanes. To investigate this specificity in more detail, three anaerobic n-alkane degraders (two denitrifying, one sulfate-reducing) and eight anaerobic alkylbenzene degraders (five denitrifying, three sulfate-reducing) were incubated with mixtures of n-alkanes and toluene. Whereas the toluene degradationers formed only the characteristic toluene-derived benzylsuccinate and benzoate, but no n-alkane-derived metabolites, the n-alkane degraders formed toluene-derived benzylsuccinate, 4-phenylbutanoate, phenylacetate and benzoate besides the regular n-alkane-derived (1-methylalkyl)succinates and methyl-branched alkanoates. The co-metabolic conversion of toluene by anaerobic n-alkane degraders to the level of benzoate obviously follows the anaerobic n-alkane degradation pathway with C-skeleton rearrangement and decarboxylation rather than the β-oxidation pathway of anaerobic toluene metabolism. Hence, petroleum-derived aromatic metabolites detectable in anoxic environments may not be exclusively formed by genuine alkylbenzene degraders. In addition, the hitherto largely unexplored fate of fumarate hydrogen during the activation reactions was examined with (2,3-(2) H(2) )fumarate as co-substrate. Deuterium was completely exchanged with hydrogen at the substituted carbon atom (C-2) of the succinate adducts of n-alkanes, whereas it is retained in toluene-derived benzylsuccinate, regardless of the type of enzyme catalysing the fumarate addition reaction.

  7. Genes involved in alkane degradation in the Alcanivorax hongdengensis strain A-11-3.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wanpeng; Shao, Zongze

    2012-04-01

    Alcanivorax hongdengensis A-11-3 is a newly identified type strain isolated from the surface water of the Malacca and Singapore Straits that can degrade a wide range of alkanes. To understand the degradation mechanism of this strain, the genes encoding alkane hydroxylases were obtained by PCR screening and shotgun sequencing of a genomic fosmid library. Six genes involved in alkane degradation were found, including alkB1, alkB2, p450-1, p450-2, p450-3 and almA. Heterogeneous expression analysis confirmed their functions as alkane oxidases in Pseudomonas putida GPo12 (pGEc47ΔB) or Pseudomonas fluorescens KOB2Δ1. Q-PCR revealed that the transcription of alkB1 and alkB2 was enhanced in the presence of n-alkanes C(12) to C(24); three p450 genes were up-regulated by C(8)-C(16) n-alkanes at different levels, whereas enhanced expression of almA was observed when strain A-11-3 grew with long-chain alkanes (C(24) to C(36)). In the case of branched alkanes, pristane significantly enhanced the expression of alkB1, p450-3 and almA. The six genes enable strain A-11-3 to degrade short (C(8)) to long (C(36)) alkanes that are straight or branched. The ability of A. hongdengensis A-11-3 to thrive in oil-polluted marine environments may be due to this strain's multiple systems for alkane degradation and its range of substrates.

  8. 40 CFR 721.10625 - Distillation bottoms, alkylated benzene by-product, brominated and bromo diphenyl alkane (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... benzene by-product, brominated and bromo diphenyl alkane (generic). 721.10625 Section 721.10625 Protection... Distillation bottoms, alkylated benzene by-product, brominated and bromo diphenyl alkane (generic). (a... generically as distillation bottoms, alkylated benzene by-product, brominated and bromo diphenyl alkane...

  9. 40 CFR 721.10625 - Distillation bottoms, alkylated benzene by-product, brominated and bromo diphenyl alkane (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... benzene by-product, brominated and bromo diphenyl alkane (generic). 721.10625 Section 721.10625 Protection... Distillation bottoms, alkylated benzene by-product, brominated and bromo diphenyl alkane (generic). (a... generically as distillation bottoms, alkylated benzene by-product, brominated and bromo diphenyl alkane...

  10. 40 CFR 721.10178 - Distillates (Fischer-Tropsch), hydroisomerized middle, C10-13-branched alkane fraction.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...), hydroisomerized middle, C10-13-branched alkane fraction. 721.10178 Section 721.10178 Protection of Environment...), hydroisomerized middle, C10-13-branched alkane fraction. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject... middle, C10-13-branched alkane fraction (PMN P-04-319; CAS No. 642928-30-1) is subject to reporting...

  11. Radicals in ionic liquids.

    PubMed

    Strehmel, Veronika

    2012-05-14

    Stable radicals and recombination of photogenerated lophyl radicals are investigated in ionic liquids. The 2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidine-1-yloxyl derivatives contain various substituents at the 4-position to the nitroxyl group, including hydrogen-bond-forming or ionic substituents that undergo additional interactions with the individual ions of the ionic liquids. Some of these spin probes contain similar ions to ionic liquids to avoid counter-ion exchange with the ionic liquid. Depending on the ionic liquid anion, the Stokes-Einstein theory or the Spernol-Gierer-Wirtz theory can be applied to describe the temperature dependence of the average rotational correlation time of the spin probe in the ionic liquids. Furthermore, the spin probes give information about the micropolarity of the ionic liquids. In this context the substituent at the 4-position to the nitroxyl group plays a significant role. Covalent bonding of a spin probe to the imidazolium ion results in bulky spin probes that are strongly immobilized in the ionic liquid. Furthermore, lophyl radical recombination in the dark, which is chosen to understand the dynamics of bimolecular reactions in ionic liquids, shows a slow process at longer timescale and a rise time at a shorter timescale. Although various reactions may contribute to the slower process during lophyl radical recombination, it follows a second-order kinetics that does not clearly show solvent viscosity dependence. However, the rise time, which may be attributed to radical pair formation, increases with increasing solvent viscosity.

  12. Stereospecific alkane hydroxylation by non-heme iron catalysts: mechanistic evidence for an Fe(V)=O active species.

    PubMed

    Chen, K; Que, L

    2001-07-04

    High-valent iron-oxo species have frequently been invoked in the oxidation of hydrocarbons by both heme and non-heme enzymes. Although a formally Fe(V)=O species, that is, [(Por(*))Fe(IV)=O](+), has been widely accepted as the key oxidant in stereospecific alkane hydroxylation by heme systems, it is not established that such a high-valent state can be accessed by a non-heme ligand environment. Herein we report a systematic study on alkane oxidations with H(2)O(2) catalyzed by a group of non-heme iron complexes, that is, [Fe(II)(TPA)(CH(3)CN)(2)](2+) (1, TPA = tris(2-pyridylmethyl)amine) and its alpha- and beta-substituted analogues. The reactivity patterns of this family of Fe(II)(TPA) catalysts can be modulated by the electronic and steric properties of the ligand environment, which affects the spin states of a common Fe(III)-OOH intermediate. Such an Fe(III)-peroxo species is high-spin when the TPA ligand has two or three alpha-substituents and is proposed to be directly responsible for the selective C-H bond cleavage of the alkane substrate. The thus-generated alkyl radicals, however, have relatively long lifetimes and are susceptible to radical epimerization and trapping by O(2). On the other hand, 1 and the beta-substituted Fe(II)(TPA) complexes catalyze stereospecific alkane hydroxylation by a mechanism involving both a low-spin Fe(III)-OOH intermediate and an Fe(V)=O species derived from O-O bond heterolysis. We propose that the heterolysis pathway is promoted by two factors: (a) the low-spin iron(III) center which weakens the O-O bond and (b) the binding of an adjacent water ligand that can hydrogen bond to the terminal oxygen of the hydroperoxo group and facilitate the departure of the hydroxide. Evidence for the Fe(V)=O species comes from isotope-labeling studies showing incorporation of (18)O from H(2)(18)O into the alcohol products. (18)O-incorporation occurs by H(2)(18)O binding to the low-spin Fe(III)-OOH intermediate, its conversion to a cis-H(18)O

  13. Synthetic cation-selective nanotube: Permeant cations chaperoned by anions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hilder, Tamsyn A.; Gordon, Dan; Chung, Shin-Ho

    2011-01-01

    The ability to design ion-selective, synthetic nanotubes which mimic biological ion channels may have significant implications for the future treatment of bacteria, diseases, and as ultrasensitive biosensors. We present the design of a synthetic nanotube made from carbon atoms that selectively allows monovalent cations to move across and rejects all anions. The cation-selective nanotube mimics some of the salient properties of biological ion channels. Before practical nanodevices are successfully fabricated it is vital that proof-of-concept computational studies are performed. With this in mind we use molecular and stochastic dynamics simulations to characterize the dynamics of ion permeation across a single-walled (10, 10), 36 Å long, carbon nanotube terminated with carboxylic acid with an effective radius of 5.08 Å. Although cations encounter a high energy barrier of 7 kT, its height is drastically reduced by a chloride ion in the nanotube. The presence of a chloride ion near the pore entrance thus enables a cation to enter the pore and, once in the pore, it is chaperoned by the resident counterion across the narrow pore. The moment the chaperoned cation transits the pore, the counterion moves back to the entrance to ferry another ion. The synthetic nanotube has a high sodium conductance of 124 pS and shows linear current-voltage and current-concentration profiles. The cation-anion selectivity ratio ranges from 8 to 25, depending on the ionic concentrations in the reservoirs.

  14. Recent Developments of Versatile Photoinitiating Systems for Cationic Ring Opening Polymerization Operating at Any Wavelengths and under Low Light Intensity Sources.

    PubMed

    Lalevée, Jacques; Mokbel, Haifaa; Fouassier, Jean-Pierre

    2015-04-20

    Photoinitiators (PI) or photoinitiating systems (PIS) usable in light induced cationic polymerization (CP) and free radical promoted cationic polymerization (FRPCP) reactions (more specifically for cationic ring opening polymerization (ROP)) together with the involved mechanisms are briefly reviewed. The recent developments of novel two- and three-component PISs for CP and FRPCP upon exposure to low intensity blue to red lights is emphasized in details. Examples of such reactions under various experimental conditions are provided.

  15. Imidazole Metalloporphyrins as Photosensitizers for Photodynamic Therapy: Role of Molecular Charge, Central Metal and Hydroxyl Radical Production

    PubMed Central

    Mroz, Pawel; Bhaumik, Jayeeta; Dogutan, Dilek K.; Aly, Zarmeneh; Kamal, Zahra; Khalid, Laiqua; Kee, Hooi Ling; Bocian, David F.; Holten, Dewey; Lindsey, Jonathan S.; Hamblin, Michael R.

    2009-01-01

    SUMMARY The in vitro photodynamic therapy activity of four imidazole-substituted metalloporphyrins has been studied using human (HeLa) and mouse (CT26) cancer cell lines: an anionic Zn porphyrin and a homologous series of three cationic Zn, Pd or InCl porphyrins. A dramatic difference in phototoxicity was found: Pd cationic > InCl cationic > Zn cationic > Zn anionic. HeLa cells were more susceptible than CT26 cells. Induction of apoptosis was demonstrated using a fluorescent caspase assay. The anionic Zn porphyrin localized in lysosomes while the cationic Zn porphyrin localized in lysosomes and mitochondria, as assessed by fluorescence microscopy. Studies using fluorescent probes suggested that the cationic Pd porphyrin produced more hydroxyl radicals as the reactive oxygen species. Thus, the cationic Pd porphyrin has high potential as a photosensitizer and gives insights into characteristics for improved molecular designs. PMID:19346065

  16. Flow reactor studies of non-equilibrium plasma-assisted oxidation of n-alkanes.

    PubMed

    Tsolas, Nicholas; Lee, Jong Guen; Yetter, Richard A

    2015-08-13

    The oxidation of n-alkanes (C1-C7) has been studied with and without the effects of a nanosecond, non-equilibrium plasma discharge at 1 atm pressure from 420 to 1250 K. Experiments have been performed under nearly isothermal conditions in a flow reactor, where reactive mixtures are diluted in Ar to minimize temperature changes from chemical reactions. Sample extraction performed at the exit of the reactor captures product and intermediate species and stores them in a multi-position valve for subsequent identification and quantification using gas chromatography. By fixing the flow rate in the reactor and varying the temperature, reactivity maps for the oxidation of fuels are achieved. Considering all the fuels studied, fuel consumption under the effects of the plasma is shown to have been enhanced significantly, particularly for the low-temperature regime (T<800 K). In fact, multiple transitions in the rates of fuel consumption are observed depending on fuel with the emergence of a negative-temperature-coefficient regime. For all fuels, the temperature for the transition into the high-temperature chemistry is lowered as a consequence of the plasma being able to increase the rate of fuel consumption. Using a phenomenological interpretation of the intermediate species formed, it can be shown that the active particles produced from the plasma enhance alkyl radical formation at all temperatures and enable low-temperature chain branching for fuels C3 and greater. The significance of this result demonstrates that the plasma provides an opportunity for low-temperature chain branching to occur at reduced pressures, which is typically observed at elevated pressures in thermal induced systems.

  17. Synthesis and spectral characterization of new bis(2-(pyrimidin-2-yl)ethoxy)alkanes and their pharmacological activity.

    PubMed

    Rani, Vangavaragu Jhansi; Aminedi, Raghavendra; Polireddy, Kishore; Jagadeeswarareddy, Kanala

    2012-08-01

    The pyrimidine nucleus is an important component of nucleic acids (DNA and RNA) and vitamins (B(2) and folic acid). It is evident from the literature that pyrimidine derivatives possess a wide spectrum of biological activities such as antioxidant, anticancer, antibacterial, and anti-inflammatory activities. On the basis of diverse biological activities, we attempted to synthesize a series of novel bis(2-(pyrimidin-2-yl)ethoxy)alkanes 5a-j in four steps with good yields. 2-Chloropyrimidine (1) was reacted with diethyl malonate in the presence of sodium hydride in dry dimethyl formamide to yield the intermediate diethyl 2-(pyrimidin-2-yl)malonate (2), which on further reaction with sodium chloride and dimethyl sulfoxide yielded ethyl 2-(pyrimidin-2-yl)ethanoate (3). Reduction with sodium borohydride (NaBH(4) ) resulted in the formation of 2-(pyrimidin-2-yl)ethanol (4). This was further reacted with various dibromoalkanes to obtain the title compounds 5a-j. In this current study, we evaluated the antioxidant properties of the title compounds using four in vitro test systems: the 2,2-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl radical-, superoxide radical-, and hydroxyl radical-scavenging assays, and the anti-lipid peroxidation activity test. The title compounds showed promising antioxidant activity when compared to butylated hydroxytoluene. The potency of their antioxidant activity was mainly influenced by the alkyl fragment attached to 2-(pyrimidin-2-yl)ethanol. The ethyl and butyl fragments linked to oxygen led to increased antioxidant activity of the title compounds (i.e., 5b and 5d) in all our in vitro assays.

  18. Energy and Entropy Effects in Dissociation of Peptide Radical Anions

    SciTech Connect

    Laskin, Julia; Yang, Zhibo; Lam, Corey; Chu, Ivan K.

    2012-04-15

    Time- and collision energy-resolved surface-induced dissociation (SID) of peptide radical anions was studied for the first time using a Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometer (FT-ICR MS) configured for SID experiments. Peptide radical cations and anions were produced by gas-phase fragmentation of CoIII(salen)-peptide complexes. The effect of the charge, radical, and the presence of a basic residue on the energetics and dynamics of dissociation of peptide ions was examined using RVYIHPF (1) and HVYIHPF (2) as model systems. Comparison of the survival curves for of [M+H]{sup +}, [M-H]{sup -}, M{sup +{sm_bullet}}, and [M-2H]{sup -{sm_bullet}} ions of these precursors demonstrated that even-electron ions are more stable towards fragmentation than their odd-electron counterparts. RRKM modeling of the experimental data demonstrated that the lower stability of the positive radicals is mainly attributed to lower dissociation thresholds while entropy effects are responsible the relative instability of the negative radicals. Substitution of arginine with less basic histidine residue has a strong destabilizing effect on the [M+H]{sup +} ions and a measurable stabilizing effect on the odd-electron ions. Lower threshold energies for dissociation of both positive and negative radicals of 1 are attributed to the presence of lower-energy dissociation pathways that are most likely promoted by the presence of the basic residue.

  19. Characterization of a CYP153 alkane hydroxylase gene in a Gram-positive Dietzia sp. DQ12-45-1b and its "team role" with alkW1 in alkane degradation.

    PubMed

    Nie, Yong; Liang, Jie-Liang; Fang, Hui; Tang, Yue-Qin; Wu, Xiao-Lei

    2014-01-01

    CYP153 and AlkB-like hydroxylases were recently discovered in Gram-positive alkane-degrading bacteria. However, it is unclear whether they cooperate with each other in alkane degradation as they do in Gram-negative bacteria. In this paper, we cloned the CYP153 gene from a representative Gram-positive alkane-degrading bacterium, Dietzia sp. DQ12-45-1b. The CYP153 gene transcription in Dietzia sp. DQ12-45-1b and heterologous expression in alkB gene knockout mutant strain Pseudomonas fluorescens KOB2∆1 both confirmed the functions of CYP153 on C6-C10 n-alkanes degradation, but not on longer chain-length n-alkanes. In addition, substrate-binding analysis of the purified CYP153 protein revealed different substrate affinities to C6-C16 n-alkanes, confirming n-alkanes binding to CYP153 protein. Along with AlkW1, an AlkB-like alkane hydroxylase in Dietzia sp. DQ12-45-1b, a teamwork pattern was found in n-alkane degradation, i.e. CYP153 was responsible for hydroxylating n-alkanes shorter than C10 while AlkW1 was responsible for those longer than C14. Further sequence analysis suggested that the high horizontal gene transfer (HGT) potential of CYP153 genes may be universal in Gram-positive alkane-degrading actinomycetes that contain both alkB and CYP153 genes.

  20. Calmodulin Methionine Residues are Targets For One-Electron Oxidation by Hydroxyl Radicals: Formation of S therefore N three-electron bonded Radical Complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Nauser, Thomas; Jacoby, Michael E.; Koppenol, Willem H.; Squier, Thomas C.; Schoneich, Christian

    2005-02-01

    The one-electron (1e) oxidation of organic sulfides and methionine (Met) constitutes an important reaction mechanism in vivo.1,2 Evidence for a Cu(II)-catalyzed oxidation of Met35 in the Alzheimer's disease -amyloid peptide was obtained,3 and, based on theoretical studies, Met radical cations were proposed as intermediates.4 In the structure of -amyloid peptide, the formation of Met radical cations appears to be facilitated by a preexisting close sulfur-oxygen (S-O) interaction between the Met35 sulfur and the carbonyl oxygen of the peptide bond C-terminal to Ile31.5 Substitution of Ile31 with Pro31 abolishes this S-O interaction,5 significantly reducing the ability of -amyloid to reduce Cu(II), and converts the neurotoxic wild-type -amyloid into a non-toxic peptide.6 The preexisting S-O bond characterized for wild-type -amyloid suggests that electron transfer from Met35 to Cu(II) is supported through stabilization of the Met radical cation by the electron-rich carbonyl oxygen, generating an SO-bonded7 sulfide radical cation (Scheme 1, reaction 1).5

  1. Structural Characterization of Hydroxyl Radical Adducts in Aqueous Media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janik, Ireneusz; Tripathi, G. N. R.

    2015-06-01

    The oxidation by the hydroxyl (OH) radical is one of the most widely studied reactions because of its central role in chemistry, biology, organic synthesis, and photocatalysis in aqueous environments, wastewater treatment, and numerous other chemical processes. Although the redox potential of OH is very high, direct electron transfer (ET) is rarely observed. If it happens, it mostly proceeds through the formation of elusive OH adduct intermediate which facilitates ET and formation of hydroxide anion. Using time resolved resonance Raman technique we structurally characterized variety of OH adducts to sulfur containing organic compounds, halide ions as well as some metal cations. The bond between oxygen of OH radical and the atom of oxidized molecule differs depending on the nature of solute that OH radical reacts with. For most of sulfur containing organics, as well as halide and pseudo-halide ions, our observation suggested that this bond has two-center three-electron character. For several metal aqua ions studied, the nature of the bond depends on type of the cation being oxidized. Discussion on spectral parameters of all studied hydroxyl radical adducts as well as the role solvent plays in their stabilization will be presented.

  2. Capturing Polyradical Protein Cations after an Electron Capture Event: Evidence for their Stable Distonic Structures in the Gas Phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baba, Takashi; Campbell, J. Larry

    2015-08-01

    We report on the formation and "capture" of polyradical protein cations after an electron capture event. Performed in a unique electron-capture dissociation (ECD) instrument, these experiments can generate reduced forms of multiply protonated proteins by sequential charge reduction using electrons with ~1 eV. The true structures of these possible polyradicals is considered: Do the introduced unpaired electrons recombine quickly to form a new two-electron bond, or do these unpaired electrons exist as radical sites with appropriate chemical reactivity? Using an established chemical probe—radical quenching with molecular oxygen—we demonstrate that these charge-reduced protein cations are indeed polyradicals that form adducts with up to three molecules of oxygen (i.e., tri-radical protein cations) that are stable for at least 100 ms.

  3. Cometabolism of Methyl tertiary Butyl Ether and Gaseous n-Alkanes by Pseudomonas mendocina KR-1 Grown on C5 to C8 n-Alkanes

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Christy A.; O'Reilly, Kirk T.; Hyman, Michael R.

    2003-01-01

    Pseudomonas mendocina KR-1 grew well on toluene, n-alkanes (C5 to C8), and 1° alcohols (C2 to C8) but not on other aromatics, gaseous n-alkanes (C1 to C4), isoalkanes (C4 to C6), 2° alcohols (C3 to C8), methyl tertiary butyl ether (MTBE), or tertiary butyl alcohol (TBA). Cells grown under carbon-limited conditions on n-alkanes in the presence of MTBE (42 μmol) oxidized up to 94% of the added MTBE to TBA. Less than 3% of the added MTBE was oxidized to TBA when cells were grown on either 1° alcohols, toluene, or dextrose in the presence of MTBE. Concentrated n-pentane-grown cells oxidized MTBE to TBA without a lag phase and without generating tertiary butyl formate (TBF) as an intermediate. Neither TBF nor TBA was consumed by n-pentane-grown cells, while formaldehyde, the expected C1 product of MTBE dealkylation, was rapidly consumed. Similar Ks values for MTBE were observed for cells grown on C5 to C8 n-alkanes (12.95 ± 2.04 mM), suggesting that the same enzyme oxidizes MTBE in cells grown on each n-alkane. All growth-supporting n-alkanes (C5 to C8) inhibited MTBE oxidation by resting n-pentane-grown cells. Propane (Ki = 53 μM) and n-butane (Ki = 16 μM) also inhibited MTBE oxidation, and both gases were also consumed by cells during growth on n-pentane. Cultures grown on C5 to C8 n-alkanes also exhibited up to twofold-higher levels of growth in the presence of propane or n-butane, whereas no growth stimulation was observed with methane, ethane, MTBE, TBA, or formaldehyde. The results are discussed in terms of their impacts on our understanding of MTBE biodegradation and cometabolism. PMID:14660389

  4. Chain length dependence of the thermodynamic properties of linear and cyclic alkanes and polymers.

    PubMed

    Huang, Dinghai; Simon, Sindee L; McKenna, Gregory B

    2005-02-22

    The specific heat capacity was measured with step-scan differential scanning calorimetry for linear alkanes from pentane (C(5)H(12)) to nonadecane (C(19)H(40)), for several cyclic alkanes, for linear and cyclic polyethylenes, and for a linear and a cyclic polystyrene. For the linear alkanes, the specific heat capacity in the equilibrium liquid state decreases as chain length increases; above a carbon number N of 10 (decane) the specific heat asymptotes to a constant value. For the cyclic alkanes, the heat capacity in the equilibrium liquid state is lower than that of the corresponding linear chains and increases with increasing chain length. At high enough molecular weights, the heat capacities of cyclic and linear molecules are expected to be equal, and this is found to be the case for the polyethylenes and polystyrenes studied. In addition, the thermal properties of the solid-liquid and the solid-solid transitions are examined for the linear and cyclic alkanes; solid-solid transitions are observed only in the odd-numbered alkanes. The thermal expansion coefficients and the specific volumes of the linear and cyclic alkanes are also calculated from literature data and compared with the trends in the specific heats.

  5. MIR and NIR group spectra of n-alkanes and 1-chloroalkanes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwaśniewicz, Michał; Czarnecki, Mirosław A.

    2015-05-01

    Numerous attempts were undertaken to resolve the absorption originating from different parts of alkanes. The separation of the contributions from the terminal and midchain methylene units was observed only in the spectra of solid alkanes at low temperatures. On the other hand, for liquid alkanes this effect was not reported as yet. In this study, ATR-IR, Raman and NIR spectra of eight n-alkanes and seven 1-chloroalkanes in the liquid phase were measured from 1000 to 12,000 cm-1. The spectra were analyzed by using two-dimensional (2D) correlation approach and chemometrics methods. It was shown that in 2D asynchronous contour plots, constructed from the spectra of n-alkanes and 1-chloroalkanes, the methylene band was resolved into two components. These two components were assigned to the terminal and midchain methylene groups. For the first time, the contributions from these two molecular fragments were resolved in the spectra of liquid n-alkanes and 1-chloroalkanes. MCR-ALS resolved these spectra into two components that were assigned to the ethyl and midchain methylene groups. These components represent the group spectra that can be used for assignment, spectral analysis and prediction of unknown spectra. The spectral prediction based on the group spectra provides very good results for n-alkanes, especially in the first and second overtone regions.

  6. Oxidation of Alkanes to Internal Monoalkenes by a Nocardia1

    PubMed Central

    Abbott, Bernard J.; Casida, L. E.

    1968-01-01

    A suspension of glucose-grown resting cells of Nocardia salmonicolor PSU-N-18 oxidized hexadecane to a mixture of internal monohexadecenes. The latter exhibited a cis configuration, and the mixture consisted of the following: 7-hexadecene, 80%; 8-hexadecene, 18%; and 6-hexadecene, 2%. Alkanes other than hexadecane also were unsaturated by the resting cells, and the composition of the monoalkenes resulting from octadecane dehydrogenation was 9-octadecene, 91%; 8-octadecene, 2 to 3%; 7-octadecene, 1 to 2%; and 6- and 5-octadecenes, trace amounts. Only minute quantities of unsaturated hydrocarbons accumulated during growth on hexadecane and during resting-cell incubation of hexadecane-grown cells with hexadecane. The dehydrogenation of hydrocarbons did not appear to be related to the formation of unsaturated fatty acids. It is postulated that double bond insertion may represent an early step in a new pathway of aliphatic hydrocarbon degradation. PMID:5686017

  7. Communication: Stiffening of dilute alcohol and alkane mixtures with water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ashbaugh, Henry S.; Wesley Barnett, J.; Saltzman, Alexander; Langrehr, Mae E.; Houser, Hayden

    2016-11-01

    We probe the anomalous compressibilities of dilute mixtures of alcohols and alkane gases in water using molecular simulations. The response to increasing solute concentration depends sensitively on temperature, with the compressibility decreasing upon solute addition at low temperatures and increasing at elevated temperatures. The thermodynamic origin of stiffening is directly tied to the solute's partial compressibility, which is negative at low temperatures and rises above water's compressibility with increasing temperature. Hydration shell waters concurrently tilt towards clathrate-like structures at low temperatures that fade with heating. Kirkwood-Buff theory traces the solute's partial compressibility to changes in the solute-water association volume upon heating and incongruous packing of waters at the boundary between the more structured hydration shell and bulk water.

  8. Modeling of Alkane Oxidation Using Constituents and Species

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bellan, Jasette; Harstad, Kenneth G.

    2010-01-01

    It is currently not possible to perform simulations of turbulent reactive flows due in particular to complex chemistry, which may contain thousands of reactions and hundreds of species. This complex chemistry results in additional differential equations, making the numerical solution of the equation set computationally prohibitive. Reducing the chemical kinetics mathematical description is one of several important goals in turbulent reactive flow modeling. A chemical kinetics reduction model is proposed for alkane oxidation in air that is based on a parallel methodology to that used in turbulence modeling in the context of the Large Eddy Simulation. The objective of kinetic modeling is to predict the heat release and temperature evolution. This kinetic mechanism is valid over a pressure range from atmospheric to 60 bar, temperatures from 600 K to 2,500 K, and equivalence ratios from 0.125 to 8. This range encompasses diesel, HCCI, and gas-turbine engines, including cold ignition. A computationally efficient kinetic reduction has been proposed for alkanes that has been illustrated for n-heptane using the LLNL heptane mechanism. This model is consistent with turbulence modeling in that scales were first categorized into either those modeled or those computed as progress variables. Species were identified as being either light or heavy. The heavy species were decomposed into defined 13 constituents, and their total molar density was shown to evolve in a quasi-steady manner. The light species behave either in a quasi-steady or unsteady manner. The modeled scales are the total constituent molar density, Nc, and the molar density of the quasi-steady light species. The progress variables are the total constituent molar density rate evolution and the molar densities of the unsteady light species. The unsteady equations for the light species contain contributions of the type gain/loss rates from the heavy species that are modeled consistent with the developed mathematical

  9. Thermal analysis of n-alkane phase change material mixtures

    SciTech Connect

    Chio, Y.I.; Choi, E.; Lorsch, H.G.

    1991-03-31

    Tests were performed to characterize the thermal behavior of it number of n-alkanes to be used as phase change materials (PCMs) in district cooling applications. Hexadecane and tetradecane were mixed in different fractions, and their thermal behavior was experimentally evaluated. Test results for melting temperature and fusion energy for laboratory grade hexadecane and tetradecane showed good agreement with datain the literature. However, values for commercial grade hexadecane were found to be considerably lower. In the range of temperatures of interest for district cooling, mixtures of tetradecane and hexadecane can be treated as homogeneous substances. However, their heats of fusion are slightly lower than those of the pure substances. Their melting temperatures are also lower by an amount that can be predicted.

  10. Radical Socioeducational Analysis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sigmon, Scott B.

    This book describes an interactive-interdisciplinary way of looking at the social conditions which impinge upon schooling, and which impact upon the social facts of life. It examines current schooling problems from the perspective of radical social democratic thought. The book is organized into four major sections. Part 1 provides an overview and…

  11. Against Radical Multiculturalism.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zorn, Jeff

    This essay presents two strands of arguments against radical or critical emancipatory multiculturalism. In strand 1, "'Culture' is...whatever..." the looseness of the core concept of "culture," which can refer to anything at all concerning a social group that itself may exist only theoretically, is shown. In strand 2, "From ideology to leveling,…

  12. Beyond Radical Educational Cynicism.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wood, George H.

    1982-01-01

    An alternative is presented to counter current radical arguments that the schools cannot bring about social change because they are instruments of capitalism. The works of Samuel Bowles, Herbert Gintis, and Louis Althusser are discussed. Henry Giroux's "Ideology, Culture and the Process of Schooling" provides an alternative to cynicism.…

  13. Radical School Reform.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gross, Beatrice, Ed.; Gross, Ronald, Ed.

    This book provides a comprehensive examination of the nature of the school crisis and the ways in which radical thinkers and educators are dealing with it. Excerpts from the writings of Jonathan Kozol, John Holt, Kenneth Clark, and others are concerned with the realities of education in ghettos and suburbs. Paul Goodman, Marshall McLuhan, Sylvia…

  14. Hydrogen isotope exchange between n-alkanes and water under hydrothermal conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reeves, Eoghan P.; Seewald, Jeffrey S.; Sylva, Sean P.

    2012-01-01

    To investigate the extent of hydrogen isotope (2H and 1H) exchange between hydrocarbons and water under hydrothermal conditions, we performed experiments heating C1-C5n-alkanes in aqueous solutions of varying initial 2H/1H ratios in the presence of a pyrite-pyrrhotite-magnetite redox buffer at 323 °C and 35-36 MPa. Extensive and reversible incorporation of water-derived hydrogen into C2-C5n-alkanes was observed on timescales of months. In contrast, comparatively minor exchange was observed for CH4. Isotopic exchange is facilitated by reversible equilibration of n-alkanes and their corresponding n-alkenes with H2 derived from the disproportionation of water. Rates of δ2H variation in C3+n-alkanes decreased with time, a trend that is consistent with an asymptotic approach to steady state isotopic compositions regulated by alkane-water isotopic equilibrium. Substantially slower δ2H variation was observed for ethane relative to C3-C5n-alkanes, suggesting that the greater stability of C3+ alkenes and isomerization reactions may dramatically enhance rates of 2H/1H exchange in C3+n-alkanes. Thus, in reducing aqueous environments, reversible reaction of alkanes and their corresponding alkenes facilitates rapid 2H/1H exchange between water and alkyl-bound hydrogen on relatively short geological timescales at elevated temperatures and pressures. The proximity of some thermogenic and purported abiogenic alkane δ2H values to those predicted for equilibrium 2H/1H fractionation with ambient water suggests that this process may regulate the δ2H signatures of some naturally occurring hydrocarbons.

  15. CYP153A6, a Soluble P450 Oxygenase Catalyzing Terminal-Alkane Hydroxylation

    PubMed Central

    Funhoff, Enrico G.; Bauer, Ulrich; García-Rubio, Inés; Witholt, Bernard; van Beilen, Jan B.

    2006-01-01

    The first and key step in alkane metabolism is the terminal hydroxylation of alkanes to 1-alkanols, a reaction catalyzed by a family of integral-membrane diiron enzymes related to Pseudomonas putida GPo1 AlkB, by a diverse group of methane, propane, and butane monooxygenases and by some membrane-bound cytochrome P450s. Recently, a family of cytoplasmic P450 enzymes was identified in prokaryotes that allow their host to grow on aliphatic alkanes. One member of this family, CYP153A6 from Mycobacterium sp. HXN-1500, hydroxylates medium-chain-length alkanes (C6 to C11) to 1-alkanols with a maximal turnover number of 70 min−1 and has a regiospecificity of ≥95% for the terminal carbon atom position. Spectroscopic binding studies showed that C6-to-C11 aliphatic alkanes bind in the active site with Kd values varying from ∼20 nM to 3.7 μM. Longer alkanes bind more strongly than shorter alkanes, while the introduction of sterically hindering groups reduces the affinity. This suggests that the substrate-binding pocket is shaped such that linear alkanes are preferred. Electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy in the presence of the substrate showed the formation of an enzyme-substrate complex, which confirmed the binding of substrates observed in optical titrations. To rationalize the experimental observations on a molecular scale, homology modeling of CYP153A6 and docking of substrates were used to provide the first insight into structural features required for terminal alkane hydroxylation. PMID:16816194

  16. Biodegradation of variable-chain-length alkanes at low temperatures by a psychrotrophic Rhodococcus sp.

    SciTech Connect

    Whyte, L.G.; Hawari, J.; Zhou, E.; Bourbonniere, L.; Greer, C.W.; Inniss, W.E.

    1998-07-01

    The psychrotroph Rhodococcus sp. strain Q15 was examined for its ability to degrade individual n-alkanes and diesel fuel at low temperatures, and its alkane catabolic pathway was investigated by biochemical and genetic techniques. At 0 and 5 C, Q15 mineralized the short-chain alkanes dodecane and hexadecane to a greater extent than that observed for the long-chain alkanes octacosane and dotriacontane. Q15 utilized a broad range of aliphatics (C{sub 10} to C{sub 21} alkanes, branched alkanes, and a substituted cyclohexane) present in diesel fuel at 5 C. Mineralization of hexadecane at 5 C was significantly greater in both hydrocarbon-contaminated and pristine soil microcosms seeded with Q15 cells than in uninoculated control soil microcosms. The detection of hexadecane and dodecane metabolic intermediates (1-hexadecanol and 2-hexadecanol and 1-do-decanol and 2-dodecanone, respectively) by solid-phase microextraction-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry and the utilization of potential metabolic intermediates indicated that Q15 oxidizes alkanes by both the terminal oxidation pathway and the subterminal oxidation pathway. Genetic characterization by PCR and nucleotide sequence analysis indicated that Q15 possesses an aliphatic aldehyde dehydrogenase gene highly homologous to the Rhodococcus erythropolis thcA gene. Rhodococcus sp. strain Q15 possessed two large plasmids of approximately 90 and 115 kb (shown to mediate Cd resistance) which were not required for alkane mineralization, although the 90-kb plasmid enhanced mineralization of some alkanes and growth on diesel oil at both 5 and 25 C.

  17. Biodegradation of Variable-Chain-Length Alkanes at Low Temperatures by a Psychrotrophic Rhodococcus sp.

    PubMed Central

    Whyte, Lyle G.; Hawari, Jalal; Zhou, Edward; Bourbonnière, Luc; Inniss, William E.; Greer, Charles W.

    1998-01-01

    The psychrotroph Rhodococcus sp. strain Q15 was examined for its ability to degrade individual n-alkanes and diesel fuel at low temperatures, and its alkane catabolic pathway was investigated by biochemical and genetic techniques. At 0 and 5°C, Q15 mineralized the short-chain alkanes dodecane and hexadecane to a greater extent than that observed for the long-chain alkanes octacosane and dotriacontane. Q15 utilized a broad range of aliphatics (C10 to C21 alkanes, branched alkanes, and a substituted cyclohexane) present in diesel fuel at 5°C. Mineralization of hexadecane at 5°C was significantly greater in both hydrocarbon-contaminated and pristine soil microcosms seeded with Q15 cells than in uninoculated control soil microcosms. The detection of hexadecane and dodecane metabolic intermediates (1-hexadecanol and 2-hexadecanol and 1-dodecanol and 2-dodecanone, respectively) by solid-phase microextraction–gas chromatography-mass spectrometry and the utilization of potential metabolic intermediates indicated that Q15 oxidizes alkanes by both the terminal oxidation pathway and the subterminal oxidation pathway. Genetic characterization by PCR and nucleotide sequence analysis indicated that Q15 possesses an aliphatic aldehyde dehydrogenase gene highly homologous to the Rhodococcus erythropolis thcA gene. Rhodococcus sp. strain Q15 possessed two large plasmids of approximately 90 and 115 kb (shown to mediate Cd resistance) which were not required for alkane mineralization, although the 90-kb plasmid enhanced mineralization of some alkanes and growth on diesel oil at both 5 and 25°C. PMID:9647833

  18. n-alkane profiles of engine lubricating oil and particulate matter by molecular sieve extraction.

    PubMed

    Caravaggio, Gianni A; Charland, Jean-Pierre; Macdonald, Penny; Graham, Lisa

    2007-05-15

    As part of the Canadian Atmospheric Fine Particle Research Program to obtain reliable primary source emission profiles, a molecular sieve method was developed to reliably determine n-alkanes in lubricating oils, vehicle emissions, and mobile source dominated ambient particulate matter (PM). This work was also initiated to better calculate carbon preference index values (CPI: the ratio of the sums of odd over even n-alkanes), a parameter for estimating anthropogenic versus biogenic contributions in PM. n-Alkanes in lubricating oil and mobile source dominated PM are difficult to identify and quantify by gas chromatography due to the presence of similar components that cannot be fully resolved. This results in a hump, the unresolved complex mixture (UCM) that leads to incorrect n-alkane concentrations and CPI values. The sieve method yielded better chromatography, unambiguous identification of n-alkanes and allowed examination of differences between n-alkane profiles in light (LDV) and heavy duty vehicle (HDV) lubricating oils that would have been otherwise difficult. These profile differences made it possible to relate the LDV profile to that of the PM samples collected during a tunnel study in August 2001 near Vancouver (British Columbia, Canada). The n-alkane PM data revealed that longer sampling times result in a negative artifact, i.e., the desorption of the more volatile n-alkanes from the filters. Furthermore, the sieve procedure yielded n-alkane data that allowed calculation of accurate CPI values for lubricating oils and PM samples. Finally, this method may prove helpful in estimating the respective diesel and gasoline contributions to ambient PM.

  19. CYP153A6, a soluble P450 oxygenase catalyzing terminal-alkane hydroxylation.

    PubMed

    Funhoff, Enrico G; Bauer, Ulrich; García-Rubio, Inés; Witholt, Bernard; van Beilen, Jan B

    2006-07-01

    The first and key step in alkane metabolism is the terminal hydroxylation of alkanes to 1-alkanols, a reaction catalyzed by a family of integral-membrane diiron enzymes related to Pseudomonas putida GPo1 AlkB, by a diverse group of methane, propane, and butane monooxygenases and by some membrane-bound cytochrome P450s. Recently, a family of cytoplasmic P450 enzymes was identified in prokaryotes that allow their host to grow on aliphatic alkanes. One member of this family, CYP153A6 from Mycobacterium sp. HXN-1500, hydroxylates medium-chain-length alkanes (C6 to C11) to 1-alkanols with a maximal turnover number of 70 min(-1) and has a regiospecificity of > or =95% for the terminal carbon atom position. Spectroscopic binding studies showed that C6-to-C11 aliphatic alkanes bind in the active site with Kd values varying from approximately 20 nM to 3.7 microM. Longer alkanes bind more strongly than shorter alkanes, while the introduction of sterically hindering groups reduces the affinity. This suggests that the substrate-binding pocket is shaped such that linear alkanes are preferred. Electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy in the presence of the substrate showed the formation of an enzyme-substrate complex, which confirmed the binding of substrates observed in optical titrations. To rationalize the experimental observations on a molecular scale, homology modeling of CYP153A6 and docking of substrates were used to provide the first insight into structural features required for terminal alkane hydroxylation.

  20. Activated aluminum oxide selectively retaining long chain n-alkanes. Part I, description of the retention properties.

    PubMed

    Fiselier, Katell; Fiorini, Dennis; Grob, Koni

    2009-02-16

    Aluminum oxide activated by heating to 350-400 degrees C retains n-alkanes with more than about 20 carbon atoms, whereas iso-alkanes largely pass the column non-retained. Retention of n-alkanes is strong with n-pentane or n-hexane as mobile phase, but weak or negligible with cyclohexane or iso-octane. It is strongly reduced with increasing column temperature. Even small amounts of polar components, such as modifiers or impurities in the mobile phase, cause the retention of n-alkanes to irreversibly collapse. Since n-alkanes are not more polar than iso-alkanes and long chain n-alkanes not more polar than those of shorter chains, retention by a mechanism based on steric properties is assumed. The sensitivity to deactivation by polar components indicates that polar components and n-alkanes are retained by the same sites. The capacity for retaining n-alkanes is low, with the effect that the retention of n-alkanes depends on the load with retained paraffins. These retention properties are useful for the pre-separation of hydrocarbons in the context of the analysis of mineral oil paraffins in foodstuffs and tissue, where plant n-alkanes, typically ranging from C(23) to C(33), may severely disturb the analysis (subject of Part II).

  1. Detection of free radicals from low temperature ozone-olefin reactions by ESR spin trapping: evidence that the radical precursor is a trioxide

    SciTech Connect

    Pryor, W.A.; Prier, D.G.; Church, D.F.

    1983-05-04

    Free radicals are detected fom the low-temperature ozonation of a series of olefins by using an electron spin resonance (ESR) spin-trap method. The technique involves ozonation at -78/sup 0/C in Freon-11, blowing out the ozone with an inert gas, adding the spin trap at -78/sup 0/C, and then warming the solution while in the probe of the ESR spectrometer. A series of small olefins was examined, and tetramethylethylene (TME) and 2-methyl-2-pentene (2-MP) gave the highest yield of radicals. However, even thse two olefins give yields of radicals that are less than 1% on the basis of ozone consumed. Thus, our data indicate that while the nonradical Criegee ozonation process is the principal reaction for monoolefins, radical production is a significant side reaction. The temperature dependence of the appearance of spin adducts from both TME and 2-MP shows that the radical precursor in this case is a trioxidic species; specifically, we suggest that it is an alkyl hydrotroxide, ROOOH. We propose the ROOOH is formed by allylic hydride abstraction from the olefin by ozone to give a pair of caged ions that combine to form the trioxide. (Benson has proposed a similar hydride abstraction for alkanes and several other types of compounds.) The reaction may proceed through a charge-transfer complex of the olefin and ozone as an intermediate.

  2. Effect of n-alkanes on asphaltene structuring in petroleum oils.

    PubMed

    Stachowiak, Christian; Viguié, Jean-Romain; Grolier, Jean-Pierre E; Rogalski, Marek

    2005-05-24

    The interactions between asphaltenes and short- to medium-chain n-alkanes were studied using titration microcalorimetry and inverse chromatography. The exothermic heat effects observed upon mixing of asphaltenes and n-alkanes were interpreted in terms of assembling of the two types of compounds into mixed structures. We show that the energy of the interactions between n-alkanes and the asphaltene hydrocarbon chains is close to the energy of the interactions between the asphaltene chains. We propose that the latter interactions are responsible for the formation of the asphaltene aggregates and are the driving force of the aggregate assembly into higher structures.

  3. [Respiratory activity of bacteria Acinetobacter calcoaceticus TM-31 during assimilation of alkane hydrocarbons].

    PubMed

    Ignatov, O V; Grechkina, E V; Muratova, A Iu; Turkovskaia, O V; Ignatov, V V

    2000-01-01

    The respiratory activity of Acinetobacter calcoaceticus TM-31 with resect to alkane hydrocarbons was studied. The dynamics of oxygen consumption by the cells while assimilating n-hexadecane was assayed by a modified technique using an oxygen electrode. The dependence of cell respiratory activity on the amount of n-hexadecane within the concentration range of 0.03-0.66% was determined. It was demonstrated that the cells also displayed respiratory activity towards other medium-chain n-alkanes: hexane, octane, decane, tridecane, and heptadecane. Thus, we demonstrated the possibility of determining alkanes by measuring the respiratory activities of microorganisms.

  4. Photochemical dimerization and functionalization of alkanes, ethers, primary and secondary alcohols, phosphine oxides and silanes

    DOEpatents

    Crabtree, R.H.; Brown, S.H.

    1989-10-17

    The space-time yield and/or the selectivity of the photochemical dimerization of alkanes, ethers, primary and secondary alcohols, phosphine oxides and primary, secondary and tertiary silanes with Hg and U.V. light is enhanced by refluxing the substrate in the irradiated reaction zone at a temperature at which the dimer product condenses and remains condensed promptly upon its formation. Cross-dimerization of the alkanes, ethers and silanes with primary alcohols is disclosed, as is the functionalization to aldehydes of the alkanes with carbon monoxide.

  5. Photochemical dimerization and functionalization of alkanes, ethers, primary and secondary alcohols, phosphine oxides and silanes

    DOEpatents

    Crabtree, Robert H.; Brown, Stephen H.

    1989-01-01

    The space-time yield and/or the selectivity of the photochemical dimerization of alkanes, ethers, primary and secondary alcohols, phosphine oxides and primary, secondary and tertiary silanes with Hg and U.V. light is enhanced by refluxing the substrate in the irradiated reaction zone at a temperature at which the dimer product condenses and remains condensed promptly upon its formation. Cross-dimerization of the alkanes, ethers and silanes with primary alcohols is disclosed, as is the functionalization to aldehydes of the alkanes with carbon monoxide.

  6. Molecular structure, optical and magnetic properties of metal-free phthalocyanine radical anions in crystalline salts (H2Pc˙-)(cryptand[2,2,2][Na(+)])·1.5C6H4Cl2 and (H2Pc˙-)(TOA+)·C6H4Cl2 (TOA+ is tetraoctylammonium cation).

    PubMed

    Konarev, Dmitri V; Zorina, Leokadiya V; Khasanov, Salavat S; Litvinov, Aleksey L; Otsuka, Akihiro; Yamochi, Hideki; Saito, Gunzi; Lyubovskaya, Rimma N

    2013-05-21

    Ionic compounds containing radical anions of metal-free phthalocyanine (H2Pc˙(-)): (H2Pc˙(-))(cryptand[2,2,2][Na(+)])·1.5C6H4Cl2 (1) and (H2Pc˙(-))(TOA(+))·C6H4Cl2 (2) have been obtained as single crystals for the first time. Their crystal structures have been determined, and optical and magnetic properties have been investigated. The H2Pc˙(-) radical anions have a slightly bowl-like shape with four pyrrole nitrogen atoms located below the molecular plane, while four phenylene substituents are located above this plane. Changes in the average length of N-C and C-C bonds in H2Pc˙(-) in comparison with those in neutral H2Pc indicate that negative charge is mainly delocalized over the 24-atom phthalocyanine ring rather than the phenylene substituents. The H2Pc˙(-) formation is accompanied by a shift of up to 10 cm(-1) and disappearance of some intense IR-active bands whereas the band of the N-H stretching mode is shifted by 21-27 cm(-1) to larger wavenumbers. New bands attributed to H2Pc˙(-) appear in the NIR spectra of the salts with maxima at 1033 and 1028 nm for 1 and 2, respectively. The formation of H2Pc˙(-) is accompanied by the splitting of the Soret and Q-bands of H2Pc into several bands and their blue-shift up to 32 nm. Narrow EPR signals with g = 2.0033 and linewidth of 0.16-0.24 mT at room temperature in the spectra of the salts were attributed to the H2Pc˙(-) radical anions. According to SQUID measurements they have S = 1/2 spin states with effective magnetic moments of 1.73 (1) and 1.78 (2) μB at 300 K. Magnetic behavior of 1 and 2 follows the Curie-Weiss law with negative Weiss temperatures of -0.9 and -0.5 K, respectively, indicating weak antiferromagnetic interactions of spins. The EPR signal splits into two lines below 120 and 80 K for 1 and 2, respectively and these lines are noticeably broadened below 25 K.

  7. Characterization of the medium- and long-chain n-alkanes degrading Pseudomonas aeruginosa strain SJTD-1 and its alkane hydroxylase genes.

    PubMed

    Liu, Huan; Xu, Jing; Liang, Rubing; Liu, Jianhua

    2014-01-01

    A gram-negative aliphatic hydrocarbon-degrading bacterium SJTD-1 isolated from oil-contaminated soil was identified as Pseudomonas aeruginosa by comparative analyses of the 16S rRNA sequence, phenotype, and physiological features. SJTD-1 could efficiently mineralize medium- and long-chain n-alkanes (C12-C30) as its sole carbon source within seven days, showing the most optimal growth on n-hexadecane, followed by n-octadecane, and n-eicosane. In 36 h, 500 mg/L of tetradecane, hexadecane, and octadecane were transformed completely; and 2 g/L n-hexadecane was degraded to undetectable levels within 72 h. Two putative alkane-degrading genes (gene 3623 and gene 4712) were characterized and our results indicated that their gene products were rate-limiting enzymes involved in the synergetic catabolism of C12-C16 alkanes. On the basis of bioinformatics and transcriptional analysis, two P450 monooxygenases, along with a putative AlmA-like oxygenase, were examined. Genetically defective mutants lacking the characteristic alkane hydroxylase failed to degrade n-octadecane, thereby suggesting a different catalytic mechanism for the microbial transformation of alkanes with chain lengths over C18.

  8. Light alkane conversion processes - Suprabiotic catalyst systems for selective oxidation of light alkane gases to fuel oxygenates

    SciTech Connect

    Lyons, J.E.

    1992-01-01

    The objective of the work presented in this paper is to develop new, efficient catalysts for the selective transformation of the light alkanes in natural gas to alcohols for use as liquid transportation fuels, fuel precursors and chemical products. There currently exists no DIRECT one-step catalytic air-oxidation process to convert these substrates to alcohols. Such a one-step route would represent superior useful technology for the utilization of natural gas and similar refinery-derived light hydrocarbon streams. Processes for converting natural gas or its components (methane, ethane, propane, and the butanes) to alcohols for use as motor fuels, fuel additives or fuel precursors will not only add a valuable alternative to crude oil but will produce a clean-burning, high octane alternative to conventional gasoline.

  9. Light alkane conversion processes - Suprabiotic catalyst systems for selective oxidation of light alkane gases to fuel oxygenates.

    SciTech Connect

    Lyons, J.E.

    1992-07-01

    The objective of the work presented in this paper is to develop new, efficient catalysts for the selective transformation of the light alkanes in natural gas to alcohols for use as liquid transportation fuels, fuel precursors and chemical products. There currently exists no DIRECT one-step catalytic air-oxidation process to convert these substrates to alcohols. Such a one-step route would represent superior useful technology for the utilization of natural gas and similar refinery-derived light hydrocarbon streams. Processes for converting natural gas or its components (methane, ethane, propane, and the butanes) to alcohols for use as motor fuels, fuel additives or fuel precursors will not only add a valuable alternative to crude oil but will produce a clean-burning, high octane alternative to conventional gasoline.

  10. Infrared spectroscopy and theory of the formaldehyde cation and its hydroxymethylene isomer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mauney, D. T.; Mosley, J. D.; Madison, L. R.; McCoy, A. B.; Duncan, M. A.

    2016-11-01

    Pulsed discharges in supersonic expansions containing the vapor of different precursors (formaldehyde, methanol) produce the m/z = 30 cations with formula [H2,C,O]+. The corresponding [H2,C,O]+ Ar complexes are produced under similar conditions with argon added to the expansion gas. These ions are mass selected in a time-of-flight spectrometer and studied with infrared laser photodissociation spectroscopy. Spectra in the 2300-3000 cm-1 region produce very different vibrational patterns for the ions made from different precursors. Computational studies with harmonic methods and various forms of anharmonic theory allow detailed assignment of these spectra to two isomeric species. Discharges containing formaldehyde produce primarily the corresponding formaldehyde radical cation, CH2O+, whereas those with methanol produce exclusively the cis- and trans-hydroxymethylene cations, HCOH+. The implications for the interstellar chemistry of these cations are discussed.

  11. Lidocaine: an inhibitor in the free-radical-induced hemolysis of erythrocytes.

    PubMed

    Tang, You-Zhi; Liu, Zai-Qun; Wu, Di

    2009-01-01

    Lidocaine was reported to protect erythrocytes from hemolysis induced by 2,2'-azobis(2-amidinopropane) dihydrochloride (AAPH). Since AAPH-induced hemolysis was a convenient in vitro experimental system to mimic erythrocytes undergoing peroxyl radicals attack, the aim of this work was to investigate the antioxidant effect of lidocaine on AAPH-induced hemolysis by chemical kinetics. As a result, one molecule of lidocaine can only trap 0.37 radical, much lower than melatonin. Meanwhile, lidocaine cannot protect erythrocytes from hemolysis induced by hemin, which the mechanism of hemolysis was due to the erythrocyte membrane destroyed by hemin. Accordingly, lidocaine protected erythrocytes by scavenging radicals preferentially rather than by stabilizing membrane. Moreover, the interactions of lidocaine with two radical species, including 2,2'-azinobis(3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulfonate) radical cation (ABTS(+*)) and 2,2'-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH), indicated that lidocaine can reduce ABTS(+*) with 260 microM as the 50% inhibition concentration (IC(50)) and cannot react with DPPH. Thus, lidocaine served as a reductant rather than a hydrogen donor to interact with radicals. Finally, the quantum calculation proved that, compared with the melatonin radical, the stabilization of N-centered radical of lidocaine was higher than the amide-type N-centered radical but lower than the indole-type N-centered radical in melatonin. These results provided basic information for lidocaine to be an antiradical drug.

  12. Numerical and experimental studies of ethanol flames and autoignition theory for higher alkanes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saxena, Priyank

    oxides of nitrogen and other potential pollutants in similar partially premixed flames of ethanol and other fuels for comparison purposes. The computational results with the present mechanism are in reasonable agreement with experiment and perform as well as or better than predictions of other, generally much larger, mechanisms available in the literature. Further research is, however, warranted for providing additional and more stringent tests of the mechanism and its predictions, especially for condition at higher pressures. The second part of the dissertation consists of analytical study of autoignition of higher alkane fuels. It is shown that, above about 1000 K, ignition delay times for propane and all higher alkanes, as well as for a number of other fuels, can be calculated well by employing rate parameters of only three types of elementary steps, namely CmHn+HO2→C mHn-1+H2O2, H2O2+M→2OH+M and 2HO2→H2O2+O2, only the first of which is fuel-specific, the other two clearly being common to all fuels. The prediction of this remarkably simple result relies on a steady-state approximation for HO2, as well as steady states for more active radicals during induction. The resulting approximation to the chemistry exhibits a slow, finite-rate buildup of H2O2 and removal of fuel during the induction period. The criterion employed for termination of the induction period is the complete depletion of the original fuel subject to the approximations introduced. Numerical comparisons of the ignition-time formula with the experiments show that the predictions work well not only for higher alkanes but also for propene and JP-10. The analytical approximation thus produces reasonable results for a wide range of fuels. These results provide a new perspective on high-temperature autoignition chemistry and a general means of easily estimating ignition times of the large number of fuels of practical importance.

  13. Thermochemistry of C7H16 to C10H22 alkane isomers: primary, secondary, and tertiary C-H bond dissociation energies and effects of branching.

    PubMed

    Hudzik, Jason M; Bozzelli, Joseph W; Simmie, John M

    2014-10-09

    Standard enthalpies of formation (ΔH°f 298) of methyl, ethyl, primary and secondary propyl, and n-butyl radicals are evaluated and used in work reactions to determine internal consistency. They are then used to calculate the enthalpy of formation for the tert-butyl radical. Other thermochemical properties including standard entropies (S°(T)), heat capacities (Cp(T)), and carbon-hydrogen bond dissociation energies (C-H BDEs) are reported for n-pentane, n-heptane, 2-methylhexane, 2,3-dimethylpentane, and several branched higher carbon number alkanes and their radicals. ΔH°f 298 and C-H BDEs are calculated using isodesmic work reactions at the B3LYP (6-31G(d,p) and 6-311G(2d,2p) basis sets), CBS-QB3, CBS-APNO, and G3MP2B3 levels of theory. Structures, moments of inertia, vibrational frequencies, and internal rotor potentials are calculated at the B3LYP/6-31G(d,p) level for contributions to entropy and heat capacities. Enthalpy calculations for these hydrocarbon radical species are shown to have consistency with the CBS-QB3 and CBS-APNO methods using all work reactions. Our recommended ideal gas phase ΔH°f 298 values are from the average of all CBS-QB3, CBS-APNO, and for G3MP2B3, only where the reference and target radical are identical types, and are compared with literature values. Calculated values show agreement between the composite calculation methods and the different work reactions. Secondary and tertiary C-H bonds in the more highly branched alkanes are shown to have bond energies that are several kcal mol(-1) lower than the BDEs in corresponding smaller molecules often used as reference species. Entropies and heat capacities are calculated and compared to literature values (when available) when all internal rotors are considered.

  14. Toward Radicalizing Community Service Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sheffield, Eric C.

    2015-01-01

    This article advocates a radicalized theoretical construction of community service learning. To accomplish this radicalization, I initially take up a discussion of traditional understandings of CSL rooted in pragmatic/progressive thought. I then suggest that this traditional structural foundation can be radicalized by incorporating Deborah…

  15. Free radical scavengers from the medicinal mushroom Inonotus xeranticus and their proposed biogenesis.

    PubMed

    Lee, In-Kyoung; Jung, Jin-Young; Seok, Soon-Ja; Kim, Wan-Gyu; Yun, Bong-Sik

    2006-11-01

    New free radical scavengers, inoscavin D (1) and methylinoscavin D (2), were isolated from the methanolic extract of the fruiting bodies of Inonotus xeranticus (Hymenochaetaceae), along with the known compounds phelligridin D (3), 3,4-dihydroxybenzaldehyde (4), and 3,4-dihydroxybenzoic acid (5). Their structures were established by various spectroscopic analyses. Compounds 1 and 3 were proposed to be biosynthesized from the oxidative coupling of the precursor hispidin with 3,4-dihydroxybenzaldehyde and 3,4-dihydroxybenzoic acid, respectively. These compounds exhibited significant scavenging activity against the ABTS radical cation, and compounds 2 and 4 displayed moderate superoxide radical scavenging activity.

  16. Characterization of the hyperline of D1/D0 conical intersections between the maleic acid and fumaric acid anion radicals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takahashi, Ohgi; Sumita, Masato

    2004-10-01

    The cation and anion radicals of symmetrical 1,2-disubstituted ethylenes are expected to have a symmetry-allowed conical intersection (CI) between the ground doublet state (D0) and the lowest excited doublet state (D1) near a 90°-twisted geometry. By the complete active space self-consistent field method, we characterized the hyperline formed by D1/D0 CIs between the anion radicals of maleic acid (cis) and fumaric acid (trans). An implication of the results for the known one-way cis→trans photoisomerization of the maleic acid anion radical and other related ion radicals is presented.

  17. Effect of n-alkanes on lipid bilayers depending on headgroups.

    PubMed

    Hishida, Mafumi; Endo, Asami; Nakazawa, Koyomi; Yamamura, Yasuhisa; Saito, Kazuya

    2015-05-01

    Phase behavior and structural properties were examined for phospholipid bilayers having different headgroups (DMPC, DMPS and DMPE) with added n-alkanes to study effect of flexible additives. Change in the temperatures of main transition of the lipid/alkane mixtures against the length of added alkanes depends largely on the headgroup. Theoretical analysis of the change of the temperature of transition indicates that the headgroup dependence is dominantly originated in the strong dependence of total enthalpy on the headgroups. The results of X-ray diffraction show that the enthalpic stabilization due to enhanced packing of acyl chains of the lipid by alkanes in the gel phase causes the headgroup-dependent change in the phase transition behavior. The enhanced packing in the gel phase also leads to easy emergence of the subgel phase with very short relaxation time at room temperature in the DMPE-based bilayers.

  18. Photocatalytic acceptorless alkane dehydrogenation: scope, mechanism, and conquering deactivation with carbon dioxide.

    PubMed

    Chowdhury, Abhishek Dutta; Julis, Jennifer; Grabow, Kathleen; Hannebauer, Bernd; Bentrup, Ursula; Adam, Martin; Franke, Robert; Jackstell, Ralf; Beller, Matthias

    2015-01-01

    Alkane dehydrogenation is of special interest for basic science but also offers interesting opportunities for industry. The existing dehydrogenation methodologies make use of heterogeneous catalysts, which suffer from harsh reaction conditions and a lack of selectivity, whereas homogeneous methodologies rely mostly on unsolicited waste generation from hydrogen acceptors. Conversely, acceptorless photochemical alkane dehydrogenation in the presence of trans-Rh(PMe3 )2 (CO)Cl can be regarded as a more benign and atom efficient alternative. However, this methodology suffers from catalyst deactivation over time. Herein, we provide a detailed investigation of the trans-Rh(PMe3 )2 (CO)Cl-photocatalyzed alkane dehydrogenation using spectroscopic and theoretical investigations. These studies inspired us to utilize CO2 to prevent catalyst deactivation, which leads eventually to improved catalyst turnover numbers in the dehydrogenation of alkanes that include liquid organic hydrogen carriers.

  19. Draft Genome Sequence of the Versatile Alkane-Degrading Bacterium Aquabacterium sp. Strain NJ1.

    PubMed

    Masuda, Hisako; Shiwa, Yuh; Yoshikawa, Hirofumi; Zylstra, Gerben J

    2014-12-04

    The draft genome sequence of a soil bacterium, Aquabacterium sp. strain NJ1, capable of utilizing both liquid and solid alkanes, was deciphered. This is the first report of an Aquabacterium genome sequence.

  20. Alkane oxidation with porphyrins and metal complexes thereof having haloalkyl side chains

    DOEpatents

    Wijesekera, T.; Lyons, J.E.; Ellis, P.E. Jr.; Bhinde, M.V.

    1998-06-23

    Transition metal complexes of meso-haloalkylporphyrins are disclosed, wherein the haloalkyl groups contain 2 to 8 carbon atoms have been found to be highly effective catalysts for oxidation of alkanes and for the decomposition of hydroperoxides. 7 figs.