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Sample records for alkanes alkenes alkynes

  1. Fundamental Flame Velocities of Pure Hydrocarbons I : Alkanes, Alkenes, Alkynes Benzene, and Cyclohexane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gerstein, Melvin; Levine, Oscar; Wong, Edgar L

    1950-01-01

    The flame velocities of 37 pure hydrocarbons including normal and branched alkanes, alkenes, and alkynes; as well as benzene and cyclohexane, together with the experimental technique employed are presented. The normal alkanes have about the same flame velocity from ethane through heptane with methane being about 16 percent lower. Unsaturation increases the flame velocity in the order of alkanes, alkenes, and alkynes. Branching reduces the flame velocity.

  2. Catalytic Aminohalogenation of Alkenes and Alkynes

    PubMed Central

    Chemler, Sherry R.; Bovino, Michael T.

    2013-01-01

    Catalytic aminohalogenation methods enable the regio- and stereoselective vicinal difunctionalization of alkynes, allenes and alkenes with amine and halogen moieties. A range of protocols and reaction mechanisms including organometallic, Lewis base, Lewis acid and Brønsted acid catalysis have been disclosed, enabling the regio- and stereoselective synthesis of halogen-functionalized acyclic amines and nitrogen heterocycles. Recent advances including aminofluorination and catalytic enantioselective aminohalogenation reactions are summarized in this review. PMID:23828735

  3. Reactions of strained hydrocarbons with alkene and alkyne metathesis catalysts.

    PubMed

    Carnes, Matthew; Buccella, Daniela; Siegrist, Theo; Steigerwald, Michael L; Nuckolls, Colin

    2008-10-29

    Here we describe the metathesis reactions of a strained eight-membered ring that contains both alkene and alkyne functionality. We find that the alkyne metathesis catalyst produces polymer through a ring-opening alkyne metathesis reaction that is driven by the strain release from the monomer. The strained monomer provides unusual reactivity with ruthenium-based alkene metathesis catalysts. We isolate a discrete trimeric species a Dewar benzene derivative that is locked in this form through an unsaturated cyclophane strap. PMID:18826219

  4. Bioconjugation with strained alkenes and alkynes.

    PubMed

    Debets, Marjoke F; van Berkel, Sander S; Dommerholt, Jan; Dirks, A Ton J; Rutjes, Floris P J T; van Delft, Floris L

    2011-09-20

    The structural complexity of molecules isolated from biological sources has always served as an inspiration for organic chemists. Since the first synthesis of a natural product, urea, chemists have been challenged to prepare exact copies of natural structures in the laboratory. As a result, a broad repertoire of synthetic transformations has been developed over the years. It is now feasible to synthesize organic molecules of enormous complexity, and also molecules with less structural complexity but prodigious societal impact, such as nylon, TNT, polystyrene, statins, estradiol, XTC, and many more. Unfortunately, only a few chemical transformations are so mild and precise that they can be used to selectively modify biochemical structures, such as proteins or nucleic acids; these are the so-called bioconjugation strategies. Even more challenging is to apply a chemical reaction on or in living cells or whole organisms; these are the so-called bioorthogonal reactions. These fields of research are of particular importance because they not only pose a worthy challenge for chemists but also offer unprecedented possibilities for studying biological systems, especially in areas in which traditional biochemistry and molecular biology tools fall short. Recent years have seen tremendous growth in the chemical biology toolbox. In particular, a rapidly increasing number of bioorthogonal reactions has been developed based on chemistry involving strained alkenes or strained alkynes. Such strained unsaturated systems have the unique ability to undergo (3 + 2) and (4 + 2) cycloadditions with a diverse set of complementary reaction partners. Accordingly, chemistry centered around strain-promoted cycloadditions has been exploited to precisely modify biopolymers, ranging from nucleic acids to proteins to glycans. In this Account, we describe progress in bioconjugation centered around cycloadditions of these strained unsaturated systems. Being among the first to recognize the utility

  5. Difluorocarbene Addition to Alkenes and Alkynes in Continuous Flow.

    PubMed

    Rullière, Pauline; Cyr, Patrick; Charette, André B

    2016-05-01

    The first in-flow difluorocarbene generation and addition to alkenes and alkynes is reported. The application of continuous flow technology allowed for the controlled generation of difluorocarbene from TMSCF3 and a catalytic quantity of NaI. The in situ generated electrophilic carbene reacts smoothly with a broad range of alkenes and alkynes, allowing the synthesis of the corresponding difluorocyclopropanes and difluorocyclopropenes. The reaction is complete within a 10 min residence time at high reaction concentrations. With a production flow rate of 1 mmol/min, continuous flow chemistry enables scale up of this process in a green, atom-economic, and safe manner. PMID:27119573

  6. 40 CFR 721.4464 - Mixture of hydrofluoro alkanes and hydrofluoro alkene.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... hydrofluoro alkene. 721.4464 Section 721.4464 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.4464 Mixture of hydrofluoro alkanes and hydrofluoro alkene. (a) Chemical... as a mixture of hydrofluoro alkanes and hydrofluoro alkene (PMNs P-96-945/946/947/948) are subject...

  7. 40 CFR 721.4464 - Mixture of hydrofluoro alkanes and hydrofluoro alkene.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... hydrofluoro alkene. 721.4464 Section 721.4464 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.4464 Mixture of hydrofluoro alkanes and hydrofluoro alkene. (a) Chemical... as a mixture of hydrofluoro alkanes and hydrofluoro alkene (PMNs P-96-945/946/947/948) are subject...

  8. 40 CFR 721.4464 - Mixture of hydrofluoro alkanes and hydrofluoro alkene.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... hydrofluoro alkene. 721.4464 Section 721.4464 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.4464 Mixture of hydrofluoro alkanes and hydrofluoro alkene. (a) Chemical... as a mixture of hydrofluoro alkanes and hydrofluoro alkene (PMNs P-96-945/946/947/948) are subject...

  9. 40 CFR 721.4464 - Mixture of hydrofluoro alkanes and hydrofluoro alkene.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... hydrofluoro alkene. 721.4464 Section 721.4464 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.4464 Mixture of hydrofluoro alkanes and hydrofluoro alkene. (a) Chemical... as a mixture of hydrofluoro alkanes and hydrofluoro alkene (PMNs P-96-945/946/947/948) are subject...

  10. 40 CFR 721.4464 - Mixture of hydrofluoro alkanes and hydrofluoro alkene.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... hydrofluoro alkene. 721.4464 Section 721.4464 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.4464 Mixture of hydrofluoro alkanes and hydrofluoro alkene. (a) Chemical... as a mixture of hydrofluoro alkanes and hydrofluoro alkene (PMNs P-96-945/946/947/948) are subject...

  11. Anaerobic 1-Alkene Metabolism by the Alkane- and Alkene-Degrading Sulfate Reducer Desulfatibacillum aliphaticivorans Strain CV2803T▿

    PubMed Central

    Grossi, Vincent; Cravo-Laureau, Cristiana; Méou, Alain; Raphel, Danielle; Garzino, Frédéric; Hirschler-Réa, Agnès

    2007-01-01

    The alkane- and alkene-degrading, marine sulfate-reducing bacterium Desulfatibacillum aliphaticivorans strain CV2803T, known to oxidize n-alkanes anaerobically by fumarate addition at C-2, was investigated for its 1-alkene metabolism. The total cellular fatty acids of this strain were predominantly C-(even number) (C-even) when it was grown on C-even 1-alkenes and predominantly C-(odd number) (C-odd) when it was grown on C-odd 1-alkenes. Detailed analyses of those fatty acids by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry after 6- to 10-week incubations allowed the identification of saturated 2- and 4-ethyl-, 2- and 4-methyl-, and monounsaturated 4-methyl-branched fatty acids with chain lengths that correlated with those of the 1-alkene. The growth of D. aliphaticivorans on (per)deuterated 1-alkenes provided direct evidence of the anaerobic transformation of these alkenes into the corresponding 1-alcohols and into linear as well as 10- and 4-methyl-branched fatty acids. Experiments performed with [13C]bicarbonate indicated that the initial activation of 1-alkene by the addition of inorganic carbon does not occur. These results demonstrate that D. aliphaticivorans metabolizes 1-alkene by the oxidation of the double bond at C-1 and by the subterminal addition of organic carbon at both ends of the molecule [C-2 and C-(ω-1)]. The detection of ethyl-branched fatty acids from unlabeled 1-alkenes further suggests that carbon addition also occurs at C-3. Alkylsuccinates were not observed as potential initial intermediates in alkene metabolism. Based on our observations, the first pathways for anaerobic 1-alkene metabolism in an anaerobic bacterium are proposed. Those pathways indicate that diverse initial reactions of 1-alkene activation can occur simultaneously in the same strain of sulfate-reducing bacterium. PMID:17965214

  12. Anaerobic 1-alkene metabolism by the alkane- and alkene-degrading sulfate reducer Desulfatibacillum aliphaticivorans strain CV2803T.

    PubMed

    Grossi, Vincent; Cravo-Laureau, Cristiana; Méou, Alain; Raphel, Danielle; Garzino, Frédéric; Hirschler-Réa, Agnès

    2007-12-01

    The alkane- and alkene-degrading, marine sulfate-reducing bacterium Desulfatibacillum aliphaticivorans strain CV2803(T), known to oxidize n-alkanes anaerobically by fumarate addition at C-2, was investigated for its 1-alkene metabolism. The total cellular fatty acids of this strain were predominantly C-(even number) (C-even) when it was grown on C-even 1-alkenes and predominantly C-(odd number) (C-odd) when it was grown on C-odd 1-alkenes. Detailed analyses of those fatty acids by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry after 6- to 10-week incubations allowed the identification of saturated 2- and 4-ethyl-, 2- and 4-methyl-, and monounsaturated 4-methyl-branched fatty acids with chain lengths that correlated with those of the 1-alkene. The growth of D. aliphaticivorans on (per)deuterated 1-alkenes provided direct evidence of the anaerobic transformation of these alkenes into the corresponding 1-alcohols and into linear as well as 10- and 4-methyl-branched fatty acids. Experiments performed with [(13)C]bicarbonate indicated that the initial activation of 1-alkene by the addition of inorganic carbon does not occur. These results demonstrate that D. aliphaticivorans metabolizes 1-alkene by the oxidation of the double bond at C-1 and by the subterminal addition of organic carbon at both ends of the molecule [C-2 and C-(omega-1)]. The detection of ethyl-branched fatty acids from unlabeled 1-alkenes further suggests that carbon addition also occurs at C-3. Alkylsuccinates were not observed as potential initial intermediates in alkene metabolism. Based on our observations, the first pathways for anaerobic 1-alkene metabolism in an anaerobic bacterium are proposed. Those pathways indicate that diverse initial reactions of 1-alkene activation can occur simultaneously in the same strain of sulfate-reducing bacterium. PMID:17965214

  13. Recent Developments in Metal-Catalyzed Additions of Oxygen Nucleophiles to Alkenes and Alkynes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hintermann, Lukas

    Progress in the field of metal-catalyzed redox-neutral additions of oxygen nucleophiles (water, alcohols, carboxylic acids, and others) to alkenes, alkynes, and allenes between 2001 and 2009 is critically reviewed. Major advances in reaction chemistry include development of chiral Lewis acid catalyzed asymmetric oxa-Michael additions and Lewis-acid catalyzed hydro-alkoxylations of nonactivated olefins, as well as further development of Markovnikov-selective cationic gold complex-catalyzed additions of alcohols or water to alkynes and allenes.

  14. Ru Catalyzed Alkene-Alkyne Coupling. Total Synthesis of Amphidinolide P

    PubMed Central

    Trost, Barry M.; Papillon, Julien P. N.; Nussbaumer, Thomas

    2008-01-01

    A coordinatively unsaturated ruthenium complex catalyzed the formation of a carbon-carbon bond between two judiciously chosen alkene and alkyne partners in good yield, and in a chemo- and regioselective fashion, in spite of the significant degree of unsaturation of the substrates. The resulting 1,4-diene forms the backbone of the cytotoxic marine natural product amphidinolide P. The alkene partner was rapidly assembled from (R)-glycidyl tosylate, which served as a linchpin in a one-flask, sequential three-components coupling process using vinyllithium and a vinyl cyanocuprate. The synthesis of the alkyne partner made use of an unusual anti-selective addition under chelation control conditions of an allyltin reagent derived from tiglic acid. In addition, a remarkably E-selective E2 process using the azodicarboxylate-triphenylphosphine system is featured. Also featured is the first example of the use of a β-lactone as a thermodynamic spring to effect macrolactonization. The oxetanone ring was thus used as a productive protecting group that increased the overall efficiency of this total synthesis. This work was also an opportunity to further probe the scope of the ruthenium-catalyzed alkene-alkyne coupling, in particular using enynes, and studies using various functionalized substrates are described. PMID:16351124

  15. Validating the alkene and alkyne hydrophosphonylation as an entry to organophosphonates.

    PubMed

    Dondoni, Alessandro; Marra, Alberto

    2015-02-28

    The first paper on the hydrophosphonylation of terminal alkenes was published in 1958 by Stiles and coworkers. Afterwards various papers described organometal-catalyzed and free-radical reactions leading to linear anti-Markovnikov adducts and/or branched Markovnikov products. In 1996 Han and Tanaka reported the first example of alkyne hydrophosphonylation catalyzed by a palladium complex. Further studies using other metal catalysts registered poor selectivity as mixtures of adducts were obtained in most of the cases examined. The first example of alkyne hydrophosphonylation by H-phosphonates under free-radical conditions leading to Z- and E-vinylphosphonates in a 1 : 1 ratio was reported by our group. Nevertheless, Z- to E-isomerization took place upon irradiation in the presence of a thiol. PMID:25609561

  16. The different roles of a cationic gold(i) complex in catalysing hydroarylation of alkynes and alkenes with a heterocycle.

    PubMed

    Mehrabi, Tahmineh; Ariafard, Alireza

    2016-08-01

    The mechanism of twofold hydroarylation of terminal alkynes with pyrrole catalyzed by a cationic gold(i) complex was investigated using DFT. It was found that while both the hydroarylation reactions proceed via a Friedel-Crafts-type mechanism, the first hydroarylation is directly promoted by gold(i) but the second hydroarylation by a proton released through interaction of the alkene product with gold-bound acidic organic species such as acetic acid and terminal alkynes. PMID:27377712

  17. Magnetic Fe@g-C3N4: A Photoactive Catalyst for the Hydrogenation of Alkenes and Alkynes

    EPA Science Inventory

    A photoactive catalyst, Fe@g-C3N4, has been developed for the hydrogenation of alkenes and alkynes using hydrazine hydrate as a source of hydrogen. The magnetically separable Fe@g-C3N4 eliminates the use of high pressure hydrogenation and the reaction can be accomplished using vi...

  18. Iron-copper cooperative catalysis in the reactions of alkyl Grignard reagents: exchange reaction with alkenes and carbometalation of alkynes.

    PubMed

    Shirakawa, Eiji; Ikeda, Daiji; Masui, Seiji; Yoshida, Masatoshi; Hayashi, Tamio

    2012-01-11

    Iron-copper cooperative catalysis is shown to be effective for an alkene-Grignard exchange reaction and alkylmagnesiation of alkynes. The Grignard exchange between terminal alkenes (RCH═CH(2)) and cyclopentylmagnesium bromide was catalyzed by FeCl(3) (2.5 mol %) and CuBr (5 mol %) in combination with PBu(3) (10 mol %) to give RCH(2)CH(2)MgBr in high yields. 1-Alkyl Grignard reagents add to alkynes in the presence of a catalyst system consisting of Fe(acac)(3), CuBr, PBu(3), and N,N,N',N'-tetramethylethylenediamine to give β-alkylvinyl Grignard reagents. The exchange reaction and carbometalation take place on iron, whereas copper assists with the exchange of organic groups between organoiron and organomagnesium species through transmetalation with these species. Sequential reactions consisting of the alkene-Grignard exchange and the alkylmagnesiation of alkynes were successfully conducted by adding an alkyne to a mixture of the first reaction. Isomerization of Grignard reagents from 2-alkyl to 1-alkyl catalyzed by Fe-Cu also is applicable as the first 1-alkyl Grignard formation step. PMID:22128888

  19. Z-Selective Copper(I)-Catalyzed Alkyne Semihydrogenation with Tethered Cu-Alkoxide Complexes.

    PubMed

    Pape, Felix; Thiel, Niklas O; Teichert, Johannes F

    2015-11-01

    A highly stereoselective alkyne semihydrogenation with copper(I) complexes is reported. Copper-N-heterocyclic carbene complex catalysts, bearing an intramolecular Cu-O bond, allow for the direct transfer of both hydrogen atoms from dihydrogen to the alkyne. The corresponding alkenes can be isolated with high Z selectivity and negligible overreduction to the alkane. PMID:26395782

  20. Five-membered cyclic metal carbyne: synthesis of osmapentalynes by the reactions of osmapentalene with allene, alkyne, and alkene.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Congqing; Yang, Yuhui; Wu, Jingjing; Luo, Ming; Fan, Jinglan; Zhu, Jun; Xia, Haiping

    2015-06-01

    The synthesis of small cyclic metal carbynes is challenging due to the large angle strain associated with the highly distorted nonlinear triple bonds. Herein, we report a general route for the synthesis of five-membered cyclic metal carbyne complexes, osmapentalynes, by the reactions of an osmapentalene derivative with allene, alkyne, and alkene. Experimental observations and theoretical calculations document the aromaticity in the fused five-membered rings of osmapentalynes. The realization of transforming osmapentalene to osmapentalyne through this general route would not only allow further exploration of metallapentalyne chemistry but also show promising applications of this novel aromatic system with broad absorption band and high molar absorption coefficient. PMID:25917530

  1. Tetrahydroxydiboron-Mediated Palladium-Catalyzed Transfer Hydrogenation and Deuteriation of Alkenes and Alkynes Using Water as the Stoichiometric H or D Atom Donor.

    PubMed

    Cummings, Steven P; Le, Thanh-Ngoc; Fernandez, Gilberto E; Quiambao, Lorenzo G; Stokes, Benjamin J

    2016-05-18

    There are few examples of catalytic transfer hydrogenations of simple alkenes and alkynes that use water as a stoichiometric H or D atom donor. We have found that diboron reagents efficiently mediate the transfer of H or D atoms from water directly onto unsaturated C-C bonds using a palladium catalyst. This reaction is conducted on a broad variety of alkenes and alkynes at ambient temperature, and boric acid is the sole byproduct. Mechanistic experiments suggest that this reaction is made possible by a hydrogen atom transfer from water that generates a Pd-hydride intermediate. Importantly, complete deuterium incorporation from stoichiometric D2O has also been achieved. PMID:27135185

  2. Alkanes and alkenes in Mediterranean volcanic-hydrothermal systems: origins and geothermometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fiebig, Jens; D'Alessandro, Walter; Tassi, Franco; Woodland, Alan

    2010-05-01

    It is still a matter of debate if nature provides conditions for abiogenic production of hydrocarbons. Methane (C1) and the C2+ alkanes emanating from ultramafic hydrothermal systems such as Lost City have been considered to be abiogenic in origin, mainly because of the occurrence of an isotopic reversal between methane and the C2+hydrocarbons and C1/C2+ ratios >1000 [1]. Abiogenic production of methane has been postulated to occur under the relatively oxidizing redox conditions of continental-hydrothermal systems, too. It was observed that temperatures received from the H2-H2O-CO-CO2-CH4 geoindicator were coincident with temperatures derived from carbon isotope partitioning between CO2 and CH4in gases released from the Mediterranean volcanic-hydrothermal systems of Nisyros (Greece), Vesuvio and Ischia (both Italy) [2]. Such equilibrium pattern, if not fortuitous, can only be obtained if mantle- and marine limestone-derived CO2 is reduced to CH4. At Nisyros, observed C1/C2+ ratios from 300-4000 are in agreement with an abiogenic origin of the methane. Ethane and propane, however, were shown to be non-genetic with CO2 and methane. C1/C2 and C2/C3 distribution ratios may point to the admixture of small amounts of hydrocarbons deriving from the thermal decomposition of organic matter along with abiogenically equilibrated methane essentially devoid of the higher hydrocarbons [3]. Here, we provide new isotopic and hydrocarbon concentration data on several Mediterranean volcanic-hydrothermal systems, including Nisyros, Vesuvio, Ischia, Vulcano, Solfatara and Pantelleria. Wherever possible, we have extended our data set for the hydrogen isotope composition of CH4 and H2, n-alkane- and alkene/alkane-distribution ratios. At Nisyros, measured alkene/alkane- and H2/H2O concentration ratios confirm the attainment of equilibrium between CO2 and CH4. CO2 and CH4 appear to have equilibrated in the liquid phase at temperatures of ~360° C and redox conditions closely corresponding

  3. Gas-Phase Tropospheric Chemistry of Volatile Organic Compounds: 1. Alkanes and Alkenes

    SciTech Connect

    Atkinson, R. |

    1997-03-01

    Literature data (through mid-1996) concerning the gas-phase reactions of alkanes and alkenes (including isoprene and monoterpenes) leading to their first generation products are reviewed and evaluated for tropospheric conditions. The recommendations of the most recent IUPAC evaluation [J. Phys. Chem. Ref. Data, {bold 26}, No. 3 (1997)] are used for the {le}C{sub 3} organic compounds, unless more recent data necessitates reevaluation. The most recent review and evaluation of Atkinson [J. Phys. Chem. Ref. Data, Monograph {bold 2}, 1 (1994)] concerning the kinetics of the reactions of OH radicals, NO{sub 3} radicals, and O{sub 3} is also updated for these two classes of volatile organic compounds. {copyright} {ital 1997 American Institute of Physics and American Chemical Society.} {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital American Institute of Physics and American Chemical Society}

  4. Laboratory spectroscopic analyses of electron irradiated alkanes and alkenes in solar system ices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hand, K. P.; Carlson, R. W.

    2012-03-01

    We report results from laboratory experiments of 10 keV electron irradiation of thin ice films of water and short-chain hydrocarbons at ˜10-8 Torr and temperatures ranging from 70-100 K. Hydrocarbon mixtures include water with C3H8, C3H6, C4H10 (butane and isobutane), and C4H8, (1-butene and cis/trans-2-butene). The double bonds of the alkenes in our initial mixtures were rapidly destroyed or converted to single carbon bonds, covalent bonds with hydrogen, bonds with -OH (hydroxyl), bonds with oxygen (C-O), or double bonds with oxygen (carbonyl). Spectra resulting from irradiation of alkane and alkene ices are largely indistinguishable; the initial differences in film composition are destroyed and the resulting mixture includes long-chain, branched aliphatics, aldehydes, ketones, esters, and alcohols. Methane was observed as a product during radiolysis but CO was largely absent. We find that while some of the carbon is oxidized and lost to CO2 formation, some carbon is sequestered into highly refractory, long-chain aliphatic compounds that remain as a thin residue even after the ice film has been raised to standard temperature and pressure. We conclude that the high availability of hydrogen in our experiments leads to the formation of the formyl radical which then serves as the precursor for formaldehyde and polymerization of longer hydrocarbon chains.

  5. Reductive dechlorination of chlorinated alkanes and alkenes by iron metal and metal mixtures

    SciTech Connect

    Orth, R.G.; McKenzie, D.E.

    1995-12-31

    Reductive dechlorination using zero valent metals such as iron has seen an increase in interest over the past few years with the extension of iron dechlorination to in-situ treatment of ground water using a process developed by Gillham and O`Hannes in 1994. Earlier applications included the use of metals for water treatment for the degradation of halogenated pesticides. This increased interest is demonstrated by the recent ACS symposium on zero valent metal dechlorination. The work that will be presented involves the reduction of selected chlorinated alkanes and alkenes beginning with chlorobutanes. The position of the chlorines on the carbon chain relative to each other was studied by determining the rates of the dechlorination processes. These studies were carried out in seated batch reactors so that loss of the chlorinated hydrocarbons was minimized and total carbon and chloride mass balances could be obtained. The goal of the studies was to understand the mechanism of the reaction that is believed to follow metal corrosion processes involving two electron transfer reactions.

  6. Molecular weight growth in Titan's atmosphere: branching pathways for the reaction of 1-propynyl radical (H3CC≡C˙) with small alkenes and alkynes.

    PubMed

    Kirk, Benjamin B; Savee, John D; Trevitt, Adam J; Osborn, David L; Wilson, Kevin R

    2015-08-28

    The reaction of small hydrocarbon radicals (i.e.˙CN, ˙C2H) with trace alkenes and alkynes is believed to play an important role in molecular weight growth and ultimately the formation of Titan's characteristic haze. Current photochemical models of Titan's atmosphere largely assume hydrogen atom abstraction or unimolecular hydrogen elimination reactions dominate the mechanism, in contrast to recent experiments that reveal significant alkyl radical loss pathways during reaction of ethynyl radical (˙C2H) with alkenes and alkynes. In this study, the trend is explored for the case of a larger ethynyl radical analogue, the 1-propynyl radical (H3CC[triple bond, length as m-dash]C˙), a likely product from the high-energy photolysis of propyne in Titan's atmosphere. Using synchrotron vacuum ultraviolet photoionization mass spectrometry, product branching ratios are measured for the reactions of 1-propynyl radical with a suite of small alkenes (ethylene and propene) and alkynes (acetylene and d4-propyne) at 4 Torr and 300 K. Reactions of 1-propynyl radical with acetylene and ethylene form single products, identified as penta-1,3-diyne and pent-1-en-3-yne, respectively. These products form by hydrogen atom loss from the radical-adduct intermediates. The reactions of 1-propynyl radical with d4-propyne and propene form products from both hydrogen atom and methyl loss, (-H = 27%, -CH3 = 73%) and (-H = 14%, -CH3 = 86%), respectively. Together, these results indicate that reactions of ethynyl radical analogues with alkenes and alkynes form significant quantities of products by alkyl loss channels, suggesting that current photochemical models of Titan over predict both hydrogen atom production as well as the efficiency of molecular weight growth in these reactions. PMID:26204935

  7. Metal Catalysis in Thiolation and Selenation Reactions of Alkynes Leading to Chalcogen‐Substituted Alkenes and Dienes

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Abstract This review covers recent achievements in metal‐catalyzed Z−H and Z−Z (Z=S, Se) bond addition to the triple bonds of alkynes—a convenient and atom‐efficient way to carbon‐element bond formation. Various catalytic systems (both homogeneous and heterogeneous) developed to date to obtain mono‐ and bis‐chalcogen‐substituted alkenes or dienes, as well as carbonyl compounds or heterocycles, starting from simple and available alkynes and chalcogenols or dichalcogenides are described. The right choice of metal and ligands allows us to perform these transformations with high selectivities under mild reaction conditions, thus tolerating unprotected functional groups in substrates and broadening ways of further modification of the products. The main aim of the review is to show the potential of the catalytic methods developed in synthetic organic chemistry. Thus, emphasis is made on the scope of reactions, types of products that can be selectively formed, convenience, and scalability of the catalytic procedures. A brief mechanistic description is also given to introduce new readers to the topic. PMID:27308193

  8. Chronic toxicity of a mixture of chlorinated alkanes and alkenes in ICR mice.

    PubMed

    Wang, Fun-In; Kuo, Min-Liang; Shun, Chia-Tung; Ma, Yee-Chung; Wang, Jung-Der; Ueng, Tzuu-Huei

    2002-02-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the chronic toxicity of a mixture of chlorinated alkanes and alkenes (CA) consisting of chloroform, 1,1-dichloroethane, 1,1-dichloroethylene, 1,1,1-trichloroethane, trichloroethylene, and tetrachloroethylene. These chlorinated organic solvents were present in the underground water near an electronic appliances manufactory in Taoyuan, Taiwan. Male and female weanling ICR mice were treated with low-, medium-, and high-dose CA mixtures in drinking water for 16 and 18 mo, respectively. A significant number of male mice treated with the high-dose CA mixture developed tail alopecia and deformation, which was not prominent in CA-treated female mice. Medium- and high-dose CA mixtures induced marginal increases of liver and lung weights, blood urea nitrogen, and serum creatinine levels in male mice. In female mice, the high-dose CA mixture increased liver, kidney, and uterus and ovary total weights, without affecting serum biochemistry parameters. CA mixtures had no effects on the total glutathione content or the level of glutathione S-transferase activity in the livers and kid- neys of male and female mice. Treatments with CA mixtures produced a trend of increasing frequency of hepatocelluar neoplasms in male mice, compared to male and female controls and CA-treated female mice. The high-dose CA mixture induced a significantly higher incidence of mammary adenocarcinoma in female mice. The calculated odds ratios of mammary adenocarcinoma in female mice induced by low-, medium-, and high-dose CA mixtures were 1.14, 1.37, and 3.53 times that of the controls, respectively. The low-dose CA mixture induced a higher incidence of cysts and inflammation in and around the ovaries. This study has demonstrated that the CA mixture is a potential carcinogen to male and female mice. These animal toxicology data may be important in assessing the health effects of individuals exposed to the CA mixture. PMID:11911491

  9. Coordination and insertion of alkenes and alkynes in Au(III) complexes: nature of the intermediates from a computational perspective.

    PubMed

    Balcells, David; Eisenstein, Odile; Tilset, Mats; Nova, Ainara

    2016-04-01

    The contribution of Au(III) species to catalysis is still debated due to the limited number of characterized intermediates with this oxidation state. In particular, the coordination of alkenes and alkynes to Au(III) followed by insertion into Au(III)-X bonds has been suggested but rarely proven experimentally. Here, these reactions are explored by means of DFT and CCSD(T) calculations considering [AuX3(L)] and [AuX2(L)2](+) complexes. In these complexes, L = ethylene and acetylene have been chosen as substrates of high interest and representative of any unsaturated organic substrate, whereas X is Cl, Me or H, as found in metal salts and as model for intermediates involved in catalysis. Isoelectronic Pt(II) complexes are also considered for comparison. Ethylene coordination occurs preferentially perpendicular for all X except H, whereas for acetylene, coordination takes place in-plane for all X except Cl. These coordination isomers can represent either minima (intermediates) or saddle points (transition states) on the potential energy surface, depending on X. NBO analysis shows how this variety of structures results from the combination of electronic (M-L donation and back-donation) and steric (cis L-X repulsion) effects. With the sole exception of [AuMe2(ethylene)2](+), rotation of the unsaturated ligand and insertion into a cis Au-X bond involve low to moderate energy barriers, ΔG(‡) = 2.5 to 23.5 kcal mol(-1), and are thermodynamically feasible, ΔG = 4.3 to -47.2 kcal mol(-1). The paucity of experimental observations for such reactions should thus be caused by other factors, like the participation of the intermediates and products in competitive side reactions including the reductive elimination of XCHnCHnX (n = 1 or 2). PMID:26905649

  10. Reprint of "Stable hydrogen and carbon isotopic compositions of long-chain (C21-C33) n-alkanes and n-alkenes in insects"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chikaraishi, Yoshito; Kaneko, Masanori; Ohkouchi, Naohiko

    2013-06-01

    We report the molecular and stable isotopic (δD and δ13C) compositions of long-chain n-alkanes in common insects including the cabbage butterfly, swallowtail, wasp, hornet, grasshopper, and ladybug. Insect n-alkanes are potential candidates of the contamination of soil and sedimentary n-alkanes that are believed to be derived from vascular plant waxes. Long-chain n-alkanes (range C21-33; maximum C23-C29) are found to be abundant in the insects (31-781 μg/dry g), with a carbon preference index (CPI) of 5.1-31.5 and an average chain length (ACL) of 24.9-29.3. The isotopic compositions (mean ± 1σ, n = 33) of the n-alkanes are -195 ± 16‰ for hydrogen and -30.6 ± 2.4‰ for carbon. The insect n-alkanes are depleted in D by approximately 30-40‰ compared with wax n-alkanes from C3 (-155 ± 25‰) and C4 vascular plants (-167 ± 13‰), whereas their δ13C values fall between those of C3 (-36.2 ± 2.4‰) and C4 plants (-20.3 ± 2.4‰). Thus, the contribution of insect-derived n-alkanes to soil and sediment could potentially shift δD records of n-alkanes toward more negative values and potentially muddle the assumed original C3/C4 balance in the δ13C records of the soil and sedimentary n-alkanes. n-Alkenes are also found in three insects (swallowtail, wasp and hornet). They are more depleted in D relative to the same carbon numbered n-alkanes (δDn-alkene - δDn-alkane = -17 ± 16‰), but the δ13C values are almost identical to those of the n-alkanes (δ13Cn-alkene - δ13Cn-alkane = 0.1 ± 0.2‰). These results suggest that these n-alkenes are desaturated products of the same carbon numbered n-alkanes.

  11. Stable hydrogen and carbon isotopic compositions of long-chain (C21-C33) n-alkanes and n-alkenes in insects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chikaraishi, Yoshito; Kaneko, Masanori; Ohkouchi, Naohiko

    2012-10-01

    We report the molecular and stable isotopic (δD and δ13C) compositions of long-chain n-alkanes in common insects including the cabbage butterfly, swallowtail, wasp, hornet, grasshopper, and ladybug. Insect n-alkanes are potential candidates of the contamination of soil and sedimentary n-alkanes that are believed to be derived from vascular plant waxes. Long-chain n-alkanes (range C21-33; maximum C23-C29) are found to be abundant in the insects (31-781 μg/dry g), with a carbon preference index (CPI) of 5.1-31.5 and an average chain length (ACL) of 24.9-29.3. The isotopic compositions (mean ± 1σ, n = 33) of the n-alkanes are -195 ± 16‰ for hydrogen and -30.6 ± 2.4‰ for carbon. The insect n-alkanes are depleted in D by approximately 30-40‰ compared with wax n-alkanes from C3 (-155 ± 25‰) and C4 vascular plants (-167 ± 13‰), whereas their δ13C values fall between those of C3 (-36.2 ± 2.4‰) and C4 plants (-20.3 ± 2.4‰). Thus, the contribution of insect-derived n-alkanes to soil and sediment could potentially shift δD records of n-alkanes toward more negative values and potentially muddle the assumed original C3/C4 balance in the δ13C records of the soil and sedimentary n-alkanes. n-Alkenes are also found in three insects (swallowtail, wasp and hornet). They are more depleted in D relative to the same carbon numbered n-alkanes (δDn-alkene - δDn-alkane = -17 ± 16‰), but the δ13C values are almost identical to those of the n-alkanes (δ13Cn-alkene - δ13Cn-alkane = 0.1 ± 0.2‰). These results suggest that these n-alkenes are desaturated products of the same carbon numbered n-alkanes.

  12. Pt/[Fe]ZSM-5 modified by Na and Cs cations: an active and selective catalyst for dehydrogenation of n-alkanes to n-alkenes.

    PubMed

    Li, Xuebing; Iglesia, Enrique

    2008-02-01

    Pt clusters within [Fe]ZSM-5 channels provide active and stable sites for the selective catalytic dehydrogenation of n-alkanes to n-alkenes. Cs and Na cations titrate acid sites and inhibit skeletal isomerization and cracking side reactions. PMID:18209800

  13. Gas-Phase Reactions of Doubly Charged Lanthanide Cations with Alkanes and Alkenes. Trends in Metal(2+) Reactivity

    SciTech Connect

    Gibson, John K.; Marcalo, Joaquim; Santos, Marta; Pires de Matos, Antonio; Haire, Richard G.

    2008-12-08

    The gas-phase reactivity of doubly-charged lanthanide cations, Ln2+ (Ln = La, Ce, Pr, Nd, Sm, Eu, Gd, Tb, Dy, Ho, Er, Tm, Yb, Lu), with alkanes (methane, ethane, propane, n-butane) and alkenes (ethene, propene, 1-butene) was studied by Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry. The reaction products consisted of different combinations of doubly-charged organometallic ions?adducts or species formed via metal-ion-induced hydrogen, dihydrogen, alkyl, or alkane eliminations from the hydrocarbons?and singly-charged ions that resulted from electron, hydride, or methide transfers from the hydrocarbons to the metal ions. The only lanthanide cations capable of activating the hydrocarbons to form doubly-charged organometallic ions were La2+, Ce2+, Gd2+, and Tb2+, which have ground-state or low-lying d1 electronic configurations. Lu2+, with an accessible d1 electronic configuration but a rather high electron affinity, reacted only through transfer channels. The remaining Ln2+ reacted via transfer channels or adduct formation. The different accessibilities of d1 electronic configurations and the range of electron affinities of the Ln2+ cations allowed for a detailed analysis of the trends for metal(2+) reactivity and the conditions for occurrence of bond activation, adduct formation, and electron, hydride, and methide transfers.

  14. Iridium complexes of new NCP pincer ligands: catalytic alkane dehydrogenation and alkene isomerization.

    PubMed

    Jia, Xiangqing; Zhang, Lei; Qin, Chuan; Leng, Xuebing; Huang, Zheng

    2014-09-28

    Iridium complexes of novel NCP pincer ligands containing pyridine and phosphinite arms have been synthesized. One Ir complex shows good catalytic activity for alkane dehydrogenation, and all complexes are highly active for olefin isomerization. A combination of the Ir complex and a (PNN)Fe pincer complex catalyzes the formation of linear alkylboronates selectively from internal olefins via sequential olefin isomerization-hydroboration. PMID:25101950

  15. The role of minerals in the thermal alteration of organic matter. IV - Generation of n-alkanes, acyclic isoprenoids, and alkenes in laboratory experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huizinga, Bradley J.; Tannenbaum, Eli; Kaplan, Isaac R.

    1987-01-01

    The effect of common sedimentary minerals (illite, Na-montmorillonite, or calcite) under different water concentrations on the generation and release of n-alkanes, acyclic isoprenoids, and select alkenes from oil-prone kerogens was investigated. Matrices containing Green River Formation kerogen or Monterey Formation kerogen, alone or in the presence of minerals, were heated at 200 or 300 C for periods of up to 1000 hours, and the pyrolysis products were analyzed. The influence of the first two clay minerals was found to be critically dependent on the water content. Under the dry pyrolysis conditions, both minerals significantly reduced alkene formation; the C12+ n-alkanes and acyclic isoprenoids were mostly destroyed by montmorillonite, but underwent only minor alteration with illite. Under hydrous conditions (mineral/water of 2/1), the effects of both minerals were substantially reduced. Calcite had no significant effect on the thermal evolution of the hydrocarbons.

  16. The upper explosion limit of lower alkanes and alkenes in air at elevated pressures and temperatures.

    PubMed

    Van den Schoor, F; Verplaetsen, F

    2006-01-16

    The upper explosion limit (UEL) of ethane-air, propane-air, n-butane-air, ethylene-air and propylene-air mixtures is determined experimentally at initial pressures up to 30 bar and temperatures up to 250 degrees C. The experiments are performed in a closed spherical vessel with an internal diameter of 200 mm. The mixtures are ignited by fusing a coiled tungsten wire, placed at the centre of the vessel, by electric current. Flame propagation is said to have taken place if there is a pressure rise of at least 1% of the initial pressure after ignition of the mixture. In the pressure-temperature range investigated, a linear dependence of UEL on temperature and a bilinear dependence on pressure are found except in the vicinity of the auto-ignition range. A comparison of the UEL data of the lower alkanes shows that the UEL expressed as equivalence ratio (the actual fuel/air ratio divided by the stoichiometric fuel/air ratio) increases with increasing carbon number in the homologous series of alkanes. PMID:16154265

  17. Multimetallic catalysed radical oxidative C(sp(3))-H/C(sp)-H cross-coupling between unactivated alkanes and terminal alkynes.

    PubMed

    Tang, Shan; Wang, Pan; Li, Haoran; Lei, Aiwen

    2016-01-01

    Radical involved transformations are now considered as extremely important processes in modern organic synthetic chemistry. According to the demand by atom-economic and sustainable chemistry, direct C(sp(3))-H functionalization through radical oxidative coupling represents an appealing strategy for C-C bond formations. However, the selectivity control of reactive radical intermediates is still a great challenge in these transformations. Here we show a selective radical oxidative C(sp(3))-H/C(sp)-H cross-coupling of unactivated alkanes with terminal alkynes by using a combined Cu/Ni/Ag catalytic system. It provides a new way to access substituted alkynes from readily available materials. Preliminary mechanistic studies suggest that this reaction proceeds through a radical process and the C(sp(3))-H bond cleavage is the rate-limiting step. This study may have significant implications for controlling selective C-C bond formation of reactive radical intermediates by using multimetallic catalytic systems. PMID:27339161

  18. Synthesis of rhenium-alkene complexes from the reaction of the heterobimetallic dihydride C sub 5 H sub 5 (CO) sub 2 HRe-PtH(PPh sub 3 ) sub 2 with alkynes

    SciTech Connect

    Casey, C.P.; Rutter, E.W. Jr. )

    1989-11-22

    Heterobimetallic compounds hold great promise as catalysts since the 2 different metals have the potential of acting cooperatively. The authors report that the new heterobimetallic dihydride C{sub 5}H{sub 5}(CO){sub 2}HRe-PtH(PPh{sub 3}){sub 2} (I){sup 2} acts as a catalyst for ethylene hydrogenation and reacts stoichiometrically with alkynes to produce rhenium-alkene complexes.

  19. Equilibrium 2H/ 1H fractionations in organic molecules. II: Linear alkanes, alkenes, ketones, carboxylic acids, esters, alcohols and ethers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Ying; Sessions, Alex L.; Nielsen, Robert J.; Goddard, William A., III

    2009-12-01

    Equilibrium 2H/ 1H fractionation factors (α eq) for various H positions in alkanes, alkenes, ketones, carboxylic acids, esters, alcohols, and ethers were calculated between 0 and 100 °C using vibrational frequencies from ab initio QM calculations (B3LYP/6-311G**). Results were then corrected using a temperature-dependent linear calibration curve based on experimental data for H α in ketones ( Wang et al., 2009). The total uncertainty in reported α eq values is estimated at 10-20‰. The effects of functional groups were found to increase the value of α eq for H next to electron-donating groups, e.g. sbnd OR, sbnd OH or sbnd O(C dbnd O)R, and to decrease the value of α eq for H next to electron-withdrawing groups, e.g. sbnd (C dbnd O)R or sbnd (C dbnd O)OR. Smaller but significant functional group effects are also observed for H β and sometimes H γ. By summing over individual H positions, we estimate the equilibrium fractionation relative to water to be -90‰ to -70‰ for n-alkanes and around -100‰ for pristane and phytane. The temperature dependence of these fractionations is very weak between 0 and 100 °C. Our estimates of α eq agree well with field data for thermally mature hydrocarbons (δ 2H values between -80‰ and -110‰ relative to water). Therefore the observed δ 2H increase of individual hydrocarbons and the disappearance of the biosynthetic δ 2H offset between n-alkyl and linear isoprenoid lipids during maturation of organic matter can be confidently attributed to H exchange towards an equilibrium state. Our results also indicate that many n-alkyl lipids are biosynthesized with δ 2H values that are close to equilibrium with water. In these cases, constant down-core δ 2H values for n-alkyl lipids cannot be reliably used to infer a lack of isotopic exchange.

  20. Copper-catalyzed oxidative dehydrogenative carboxylation of unactivated alkanes to allylic esters via alkenes.

    PubMed

    Tran, Ba L; Driess, Matthias; Hartwig, John F

    2014-12-10

    We report copper-catalyzed oxidative dehydrogenative carboxylation (ODC) of unactivated alkanes with various substituted benzoic acids to produce the corresponding allylic esters. Spectroscopic studies (EPR, UV-vis) revealed that the resting state of the catalyst is [(BPI)Cu(O2CPh)] (1-O2CPh), formed from [(BPI)Cu(PPh3)2], oxidant, and benzoic acid. Catalytic and stoichiometric reactions of 1-O2CPh with alkyl radicals and radical probes imply that C-H bond cleavage occurs by a tert-butoxy radical. In addition, the deuterium kinetic isotope effect from reactions of cyclohexane and d12-cyclohexane in separate vessels showed that the turnover-limiting step for the ODC of cyclohexane is C-H bond cleavage. To understand the origin of the difference in products formed from copper-catalyzed amidation and copper-catalyzed ODC, reactions of an alkyl radical with a series of copper-carboxylate, copper-amidate, and copper-imidate complexes were performed. The results of competition experiments revealed that the relative rate of reaction of alkyl radicals with the copper complexes follows the trend Cu(II)-amidate > Cu(II)-imidate > Cu(II)-benzoate. Consistent with this trend, Cu(II)-amidates and Cu(II)-benzoates containing more electron-rich aryl groups on the benzamidate and benzoate react faster with the alkyl radical than do those with more electron-poor aryl groups on these ligands to produce the corresponding products. These data on the ODC of cyclohexane led to preliminary investigation of copper-catalyzed oxidative dehydrogenative amination of cyclohexane to generate a mixture of N-alkyl and N-allylic products. PMID:25389772

  1. Copper-Catalyzed Oxidative Dehydrogenative Carboxylation of Unactivated Alkanes to Allylic Esters via Alkenes

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    We report copper-catalyzed oxidative dehydrogenative carboxylation (ODC) of unactivated alkanes with various substituted benzoic acids to produce the corresponding allylic esters. Spectroscopic studies (EPR, UV–vis) revealed that the resting state of the catalyst is [(BPI)Cu(O2CPh)] (1-O2CPh), formed from [(BPI)Cu(PPh3)2], oxidant, and benzoic acid. Catalytic and stoichiometric reactions of 1-O2CPh with alkyl radicals and radical probes imply that C–H bond cleavage occurs by a tert-butoxy radical. In addition, the deuterium kinetic isotope effect from reactions of cyclohexane and d12-cyclohexane in separate vessels showed that the turnover-limiting step for the ODC of cyclohexane is C–H bond cleavage. To understand the origin of the difference in products formed from copper-catalyzed amidation and copper-catalyzed ODC, reactions of an alkyl radical with a series of copper–carboxylate, copper–amidate, and copper–imidate complexes were performed. The results of competition experiments revealed that the relative rate of reaction of alkyl radicals with the copper complexes follows the trend Cu(II)–amidate > Cu(II)–imidate > Cu(II)–benzoate. Consistent with this trend, Cu(II)–amidates and Cu(II)–benzoates containing more electron-rich aryl groups on the benzamidate and benzoate react faster with the alkyl radical than do those with more electron-poor aryl groups on these ligands to produce the corresponding products. These data on the ODC of cyclohexane led to preliminary investigation of copper-catalyzed oxidative dehydrogenative amination of cyclohexane to generate a mixture of N-alkyl and N-allylic products. PMID:25389772

  2. Modeling SOA formation from alkanes and alkenes in chamber experiments: effect of gas/wall partitioning of organic vapors.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stéphanie La, Yuyi; Camredon, Marie; Ziemann, Paul; Ouzebidour, Farida; Valorso, Richard; Madronich, Sasha; Lee-Taylor, Julia; Hodzic, Alma; Aumont, Bernard

    2014-05-01

    Oxidation products of Intermediate Volatility Organic Compounds (IVOC) are expected to be the major precursors of secondary organic aerosols (SOA). Laboratory experiments were conducted this last decade in the Riverside APRC chamber to study IVOC oxidative mechanisms and SOA formation processes for a large set of linear, branched and cyclic aliphatic hydrocarbons (Ziemann, 2011). This dataset are used here to assess the explicit oxidation model GECKO-A (Generator for Explicit Chemistry and Kinetics of Organics in the Atmosphere) (Aumont et al., 2005). The simulated SOA yields agree with the general trends observed in the chamber experiments. They are (i) increasing with the increasing carbon number; (ii) decreasing with increasing methyl branch number; and (iii) increasing for cyclic compounds compared to their corresponding linear analogues. However, simulated SOA yields are systematically overestimated regardless of the precursors, suggesting missing processes in the model. In this study, we assess whether gas-to-wall partitioning of organic vapors can explain these model/observation mismatches (Matsunaga and Ziemann, 2010). First results show that GECKO-A outputs better match the observations when wall uptake of organic vapors is taken into account. Effects of gas/wall partitioning on SOA yields and composition will be presented. Preliminary results suggest that wall uptake is a major process influencing SOA production in the Teflon chambers. References Aumont, B., Szopa, S., Madronich, S.: Modelling the evolution of organic carbon during its gas-phase tropospheric oxidation: development of an explicit model based on a self generating approach. Atmos.Chem.Phys., 5, 2497-2517 (2005). P. J. Ziemann: Effects of molecular structure on the chemistry of aerosol formation from the OH-radical-initiated oxidation of alkanes and alkenes, Int. Rev.Phys.Chem., 30:2, 161-195 (2011). Matsunaga, A., Ziemann, P. J.: Gas-wall partitioning of organic compounds in a Teflon film

  3. Emission measurements of alkenes, alkanes, SO2, and NO2 from stationary sources in Southeast Texas over a 5 year period using SOF and mobile DOAS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johansson, John K. E.; Mellqvist, Johan; Samuelsson, Jerker; Offerle, Brian; Lefer, Barry; Rappenglück, Bernhard; Flynn, James; Yarwood, Greg

    2014-02-01

    A mobile platform for flux measurements of VOCs (alkanes and alkenes), SO2, and NO2 emissions using the Solar Occultation Flux (SOF) method and mobile differential optical absorption spectroscopy (DOAS) was used in four different studies to measure industrial emissions. The studies were carried out in several large conglomerates of oil refineries and petrochemical industries in Southeast and East Texas in 2006, 2009, 2011, and 2012. The measured alkane emissions from the Houston Ship Channel (HSC) have been fairly stable between 2006 and 2011, averaging about 11,500 kg/h, while the alkene emissions have shown greater variations. The ethene and propene emissions measured from the HSC were 1511 kg/h and 878 kg/h, respectively, in 2006, while dropping to roughly 600 kg/h for both species in 2009 and 2011. The results were compared to annual inventory emissions, showing that measured VOC emissions were typically 5-15 times higher, while for SO2 and NO2 the ratio was typically 0.5-2. AP-42 emission factors were used to estimate meteorological effects on alkane emissions from tanks, showing that these emissions may have been up to 35-45% higher during the studies than the annual average. A more focused study of alkene emissions from a petrochemical complex in Longview in 2012 identified two upset episodes, and the elevation of the total emissions during the measurement period due to the upsets was estimated to be approximately 20%. Both meteorological and upset effects were small compared to the factor of 5-15, suggesting that VOC emissions are systematically and substantially underestimated in current emission inventories.

  4. Impact of chamber wall loss of gaseous organic compounds on secondary organic aerosol formation: explicit modeling of SOA formation from alkane and alkene oxidation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    La, Y. S.; Camredon, M.; Ziemann, P. J.; Valorso, R.; Matsunaga, A.; Lannuque, V.; Lee-Taylor, J.; Hodzic, A.; Madronich, S.; Aumont, B.

    2016-02-01

    Recent studies have shown that low volatility gas-phase species can be lost onto the smog chamber wall surfaces. Although this loss of organic vapors to walls could be substantial during experiments, its effect on secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formation has not been well characterized and quantified yet. Here the potential impact of chamber walls on the loss of gaseous organic species and SOA formation has been explored using the Generator for Explicit Chemistry and Kinetics of the Organics in the Atmosphere (GECKO-A) modeling tool, which explicitly represents SOA formation and gas-wall partitioning. The model was compared with 41 smog chamber experiments of SOA formation under OH oxidation of alkane and alkene series (linear, cyclic and C12-branched alkanes and terminal, internal and 2-methyl alkenes with 7 to 17 carbon atoms) under high NOx conditions. Simulated trends match observed trends within and between homologous series. The loss of organic vapors to the chamber walls is found to affect SOA yields as well as the composition of the gas and the particle phases. Simulated distributions of the species in various phases suggest that nitrates, hydroxynitrates and carbonylesters could substantially be lost onto walls. The extent of this process depends on the rate of gas-wall mass transfer, the vapor pressure of the species and the duration of the experiments. This work suggests that SOA yields inferred from chamber experiments could be underestimated up a factor of 2 due to the loss of organic vapors to chamber walls.

  5. Impact of chamber wall loss of gaseous organic compounds on secondary organic aerosol formation: explicit modeling of SOA formation from alkane and alkene oxidation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    La, Y. S.; Camredon, M.; Ziemann, P. J.; Valorso, R.; Matsunaga, A.; Lannuque, V.; Lee-Taylor, J.; Hodzic, A.; Madronich, S.; Aumont, B.

    2015-09-01

    Recent studies have shown that low volatility gas-phase species can be lost onto the smog chamber wall surfaces. Although this loss of organic vapors to walls could be substantial during experiments, its effect on secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formation has not been well characterized and quantified yet. Here the potential impact of chamber walls on the loss of gaseous organic species and SOA formation has been explored using the Generator for Explicit Chemistry and Kinetics of the Organics in the Atmosphere (GECKO-A) modeling tool which explicitly represents SOA formation and gas/wall partitioning. The model was compared with 41 smog chamber experiments of SOA formation under OH oxidation of alkane and alkene series (linear, cyclic and C12-branched alkanes and terminal, internal and 2-methyl alkenes with 7 to 17 carbon atoms) under high NOx conditions. Simulated trends match observed trends within and between homologous series. The loss of organic vapors to the chamber walls is found to affect SOA yields as well as the composition of the gas and the particle phases. Simulated distributions of the species in various phases suggest that nitrates, hydroxynitrates and carbonylesters could substantially be lost onto walls. The extent of this process depends on the rate of gas/wall mass transfer, the vapor pressure of the species and the duration of the experiments. This work suggests that SOA yields inferred from chamber experiments could be underestimated up to 0.35 yield unit due to the loss of organic vapors to chamber walls.

  6. Beyond the use of modifiers in selective alkyne hydrogenation: silver and gold nanocatalysts in flow mode for sustainable alkene production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vilé, Gianvito; Pérez-Ramírez, Javier

    2014-10-01

    We report on the excellent stereo and chemoselectivity of nanosized silver and gold catalysts in the three-phase hydrogenation of acetylenic compounds under flow chemistry conditions. The materials featuring metal nanoparticles in the range of 2-21 nm were prepared by spray deposition or incipient wetness impregnation of silver nitrate and sol immobilisation of gold chloride on different carriers (Al2O3, SiO2, TiO2, and carbon), followed by activation in various atmospheres. The samples were characterised by ICP-OES, N2 sorption, XPS, HAADF-STEM, and HRTEM, and evaluated in a continuous-flow flooded-bed micro-reactor. Both metals display optimal activities for particles below 5 nm, enabling stable operation at T = 373 K and P = 10 bar. While the performance of the silver catalysts is less influenced by the support, the gold nanoparticles exhibit significant activity only when deposited on TiO2, likely due to the strong metal-support interaction. Hydrogenations of functionalised alkynes reveal that silver and gold match, and in some cases exceed, the selectivity of benchmark palladium-based catalysts. Furthermore, in contrast to Pd, the Ag and Au samples require no modifiers, which brings fundamental and practical simplifications for their understanding and large scale manufacture. Therefore, these materials could be advantageously used for the continuous production of olefinic intermediates in the fine chemical and pharmaceutical industries.We report on the excellent stereo and chemoselectivity of nanosized silver and gold catalysts in the three-phase hydrogenation of acetylenic compounds under flow chemistry conditions. The materials featuring metal nanoparticles in the range of 2-21 nm were prepared by spray deposition or incipient wetness impregnation of silver nitrate and sol immobilisation of gold chloride on different carriers (Al2O3, SiO2, TiO2, and carbon), followed by activation in various atmospheres. The samples were characterised by ICP-OES, N2 sorption

  7. Van der Waals molecular interactions in the organic functionalization of graphane, silicane, and germanane with alkene and alkyne molecules: a DFT-D2 study.

    PubMed

    Rubio-Pereda, Pamela; Takeuchi, Noboru

    2016-08-01

    Density functional theory with the addition of a semi-empirical dispersion potential was applied to the conventional Kohn-Sham energy to study the adsorption of alkene and alkyne molecules on hydrogen-terminated two-dimensional group IV systems (graphane, silicane, and germanane) by means of a radical-initiated reaction. In particular, we investigated the interactions of acetylene, ethylene, and styrene with those surfaces. Although we had studied these systems previously, we included van der Waals interactions in all of the cases examined in the present work. These forces, which are noncovalent interactions, can heavily influence different processes in molecular chemistry, such as the adsorption of organic molecules on semiconductor surfaces. This unified approach allowed us to perform a comparative study of the relative reactivities of the various organic molecule/surface systems. The results showed that the degree of covalency of the surface, the lattice size, and the partial charge distribution (caused by differences in electronegativity) are all key elements that determine the reactivity between the molecules and the surfaces tested in this work. The covalent nature of graphane gives rise to energetically favorable intermediate states, while the opposite polarities of the charge distributions of silicane and germanane with the organic molecules favor subsequent steps of the radical-initiated reaction. Finally, the lattice size is a factor that has important consequences due to steric effects present in the systems and the possibility of chain reaction continuation. The results obtained in this work show that careful selection of the substrate is very important. Calculated energy barriers, heats of adsorption, and optimized atomic structures show that the silicane system offers the best reactivity in organic functionalization. PMID:27383611

  8. Multimetallic catalysed radical oxidative C(sp3)–H/C(sp)–H cross-coupling between unactivated alkanes and terminal alkynes

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Shan; Wang, Pan; Li, Haoran; Lei, Aiwen

    2016-01-01

    Radical involved transformations are now considered as extremely important processes in modern organic synthetic chemistry. According to the demand by atom-economic and sustainable chemistry, direct C(sp3)–H functionalization through radical oxidative coupling represents an appealing strategy for C–C bond formations. However, the selectivity control of reactive radical intermediates is still a great challenge in these transformations. Here we show a selective radical oxidative C(sp3)–H/C(sp)–H cross-coupling of unactivated alkanes with terminal alkynes by using a combined Cu/Ni/Ag catalytic system. It provides a new way to access substituted alkynes from readily available materials. Preliminary mechanistic studies suggest that this reaction proceeds through a radical process and the C(sp3)–H bond cleavage is the rate-limiting step. This study may have significant implications for controlling selective C–C bond formation of reactive radical intermediates by using multimetallic catalytic systems. PMID:27339161

  9. Impact of chamber wall loss of gaseous organic compounds on secondary organic aerosol formation: Explicit modeling of SOA formation from alkane and alkene oxidation

    DOE PAGESBeta

    La, Y. S.; Camredon, M.; Ziemann, P. J.; Valorso, R.; Matsunaga, A.; Lannuque, V.; Lee-Taylor, J.; Hodzic, A.; Madronich, S.; Aumont, B.

    2016-02-08

    Recent studies have shown that low volatility gas-phase species can be lost onto the smog chamber wall surfaces. Although this loss of organic vapors to walls could be substantial during experiments, its effect on secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formation has not been well characterized and quantified yet. Here the potential impact of chamber walls on the loss of gaseous organic species and SOA formation has been explored using the Generator for Explicit Chemistry and Kinetics of the Organics in the Atmosphere (GECKO-A) modeling tool, which explicitly represents SOA formation and gas–wall partitioning. The model was compared with 41 smog chambermore » experiments of SOA formation under OH oxidation of alkane and alkene series (linear, cyclic and C12-branched alkanes and terminal, internal and 2-methyl alkenes with 7 to 17 carbon atoms) under high NOx conditions. Simulated trends match observed trends within and between homologous series. The loss of organic vapors to the chamber walls is found to affect SOA yields as well as the composition of the gas and the particle phases. Simulated distributions of the species in various phases suggest that nitrates, hydroxynitrates and carbonylesters could substantially be lost onto walls. The extent of this process depends on the rate of gas–wall mass transfer, the vapor pressure of the species and the duration of the experiments. Furthermore, this work suggests that SOA yields inferred from chamber experiments could be underestimated up a factor of 2 due to the loss of organic vapors to chamber walls.« less

  10. The soluble methane mono-oxygenase of Methylococcus capsulatus (Bath). Its ability to oxygenate n-alkanes, n-alkenes, ethers, and alicyclic, aromatic and heterocyclic compounds.

    PubMed Central

    Colby, J; Stirling, D I; Dalton, H

    1977-01-01

    1. Methane mono-oxygenase of Methylococcus capsulatus (Bath) catalyses the oxidation of various substituted methane derivatives including methanol. 2. It is a very non-specific oxygenase and, in some of its catalytic properties, apparently resembles the analogous enzyme from Methylomonas methanica but differs from those found in Methylosinus trichosporium and Methylomonas albus. 3. CO is oxidized to CO2. 4. C1-C8 n-alkanes are hydroxylated, yielding mixtures of the corresponding 1- and 2-alcohols; no 3- or 4-alcohols are formed. 5. Terminal alkenes yield the corresponding 1,2-epoxides. cis- or trans-but-2-ene are each oxidized to a mixture of 2,3-epoxybutane and but-2-en-1-ol with retention of the cis or trans configuration in both products; 2-butanone is also formed from cis-but-2-ene only. 6. Dimethyl ether is oxidized. Diethyl ether undergoes sub-terminal oxidation, yielding ethanol and ethanal in equimolar amounts. 7. Methane mono-oxygenase also hydroxylates cyclic alkanes and aromatic compounds. However, styrene yields only styrene epoxide and pyridine yields only pyridine N-oxide. 8. Of those compounds tested, only NADPH can replace NADH as electron donor. PMID:411486

  11. SmoXYB1C1Z of Mycobacterium sp. strain NBB4: a soluble methane monooxygenase (sMMO)-like enzyme, active on C2 to C4 alkanes and alkenes.

    PubMed

    Martin, Kiri E; Ozsvar, Jazmin; Coleman, Nicholas V

    2014-09-01

    Monooxygenase (MO) enzymes initiate the aerobic oxidation of alkanes and alkenes in bacteria. A cluster of MO genes (smoXYB1C1Z) of thus-far-unknown function was found previously in the genomes of two Mycobacterium strains (NBB3 and NBB4) which grow on hydrocarbons. The predicted Smo enzymes have only moderate amino acid identity (30 to 60%) to their closest homologs, the soluble methane and butane MOs (sMMO and sBMO), and the smo gene cluster has a different organization from those of sMMO and sBMO. The smoXYB1C1Z genes of NBB4 were cloned into pMycoFos to make pSmo, which was transformed into Mycobacterium smegmatis mc(2)-155. Cells of mc(2)-155(pSmo) metabolized C2 to C4 alkanes, alkenes, and chlorinated hydrocarbons. The activities of mc(2)-155(pSmo) cells were 0.94, 0.57, 0.12, and 0.04 nmol/min/mg of protein with ethene, ethane, propane, and butane as substrates, respectively. The mc(2)-155(pSmo) cells made epoxides from ethene, propene, and 1-butene, confirming that Smo was an oxygenase. Epoxides were not produced from larger alkenes (1-octene and styrene). Vinyl chloride and 1,2-dichloroethane were biodegraded by cells expressing Smo, with production of inorganic chloride. This study shows that Smo is a functional oxygenase which is active against small hydrocarbons. M. smegmatis mc(2)-155(pSmo) provides a new model for studying sMMO-like monooxygenases. PMID:25015887

  12. SmoXYB1C1Z of Mycobacterium sp. Strain NBB4: a Soluble Methane Monooxygenase (sMMO)-Like Enzyme, Active on C2 to C4 Alkanes and Alkenes

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Kiri E.; Ozsvar, Jazmin

    2014-01-01

    Monooxygenase (MO) enzymes initiate the aerobic oxidation of alkanes and alkenes in bacteria. A cluster of MO genes (smoXYB1C1Z) of thus-far-unknown function was found previously in the genomes of two Mycobacterium strains (NBB3 and NBB4) which grow on hydrocarbons. The predicted Smo enzymes have only moderate amino acid identity (30 to 60%) to their closest homologs, the soluble methane and butane MOs (sMMO and sBMO), and the smo gene cluster has a different organization from those of sMMO and sBMO. The smoXYB1C1Z genes of NBB4 were cloned into pMycoFos to make pSmo, which was transformed into Mycobacterium smegmatis mc2-155. Cells of mc2-155(pSmo) metabolized C2 to C4 alkanes, alkenes, and chlorinated hydrocarbons. The activities of mc2-155(pSmo) cells were 0.94, 0.57, 0.12, and 0.04 nmol/min/mg of protein with ethene, ethane, propane, and butane as substrates, respectively. The mc2-155(pSmo) cells made epoxides from ethene, propene, and 1-butene, confirming that Smo was an oxygenase. Epoxides were not produced from larger alkenes (1-octene and styrene). Vinyl chloride and 1,2-dichloroethane were biodegraded by cells expressing Smo, with production of inorganic chloride. This study shows that Smo is a functional oxygenase which is active against small hydrocarbons. M. smegmatis mc2-155(pSmo) provides a new model for studying sMMO-like monooxygenases. PMID:25015887

  13. INHIBITION OF GROWTH OF A GRAPHIUM SP. ON GASEOUS N-ALKANES BY GASEOUS N-ALKYNES AND N-ALKENES. (R825689C018)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The perspectives, information and conclusions conveyed in research project abstracts, progress reports, final reports, journal abstracts and journal publications convey the viewpoints of the principal investigator and may not represent the views and policies of ORD and EPA. Concl...

  14. Noble metal (Ru{sup III}, Pd{sup II}, Pt{sup II}) substituted {open_quotes}sandwich{close_quotes} type polyoxometalates: Preparation, characterization, and catalytic activity in oxidations of alkanes and alkenes by peroxides

    SciTech Connect

    Neumann, R.; Khenkin, A.M.

    1995-11-08

    The polyoxometalates substituted with noble metals, Pd(II), Pt(II) and Ru(III), K{sub 12}([WZnPd{sup II}{sub 2}(H{sub 2}O){sub 2}](ZnW{sub 9}O{sub 34}){sub 2}){center_dot}38H{sub 2}O, K{sub 12}[WZnPt{sup II}{sub 2}(H{sub 2}O){sub 2}][(ZnW{sub 9}O{sub 34}){sub 2}]{center_dot}36H{sub 2}O, and Na{sub 11}[WZnRu{sup III}{sub 2}(OH)(H{sub 2}O)][(ZnW{sub 9}O{sub 34}){sub 2}]{center_dot}42H{sub 2}O, were prepared by exchange of labile zinc atoms with noble metal atoms from the isostructural starting material, N{sub 12}-[WZn{sub 3}(H{sub 2}O){sub 2}][(ZnW{sub 9}O{sub 34}){sub 2}]{center_dot}46H{sub 2}O. Magnetic susceptibility studies as a function of temperature provide convincing evidence of two ruthenium (III) centers with no magnetic interaction between them. The catalytic activity of these compounds was tested for the oxidation of alkenes and alkanes using aqueous 30% hydrogen peroxide and 70% tert-butyl hydroperoxide as oxidants. The alkene oxidation proceeded in high reactivity and moderate selectivity to the epoxide product using 30% H{sub 2}O{sub 2}. Kinetic profiles as well as UV-vis and IR spectra before, during and after the reaction indicate that the catalysts are stable throughout the reaction. Formation of epoxides rather than ketonization in the reaction of terminal alkenes as well as low reactivity with iodosobenzene indicates that the reaction is tungsten centered and not noble metal centered. Oxidation of alkenes with tert-butyl hydroperoxide gave mostly allylic oxidation and/or addition of tert-butyl alcohol to the double bond. Oxidation of cyclic alkanes such as cyclohexane and adamantane was successful with tert-butyl hydroperoxide with catalytic activity 10 times higher than previously found for transition metal substituted Keggin compounds. Ratios of hydroxylation of adamantane at tertiary vs secondary positions indicates different active species in the palladium-, platinum-, and ruthenium substituted-polyoxometalates.

  15. Catalytic Hydration of Alkenes and Alkynes

    SciTech Connect

    Atwood, Jim, D.

    2003-03-18

    The fifteen years of DOE support have encompassed two different projects, electron-transfer reactions of metal carbonyl anions and water-soluble organometallic complexes. Each of these is related to homogeneous catalysis and will be described in separate sections. Electron Transfer--Twenty-one manuscripts resulted from our studies of electron-transfer reactions of metal carbonyl anions and acknowledge DOE support. Construction of an infrared stopped-flow system allowed us to measure rates of reactions for the extremely air-sensitive metal carbonyl anions. As for carbanions, both one-electron and two-electron processes occur for metal carbonyl anions. The most unexpected feature was examples of a very rapid two-electron process, followed by a much slower one-electron back transfer. The two-electron processes were accompanied by transfer of a ligand between two metals, M-X + M{prime}{sup -} {yields} M{sup -} + M{prime}-X with X groups of CO{sup 2}, H{sup +}, CH{sub 3}{sup +} and Br{sup +}. These transfers, which can be considered nucleophilic displacements, occurred when M{prime}{sup -} was more nucleophilic than M{sup -}. The 21 published manuscripts explore one- and two-electron processes for many such organometallic complexes. Water-Soluble Organometallic Complexes--The potential of water-soluble organometallic complexes in ''green chemistry'' intrigued us. Sixteen manuscripts acknowledging DOE support have appeared thus far in this field. Our research centered on sulfonated phosphine ligands, PPh{sub 2}(m-C{sub 6}H{sub 4}SO{sub 3}Na) and P(m-C{sub 6}H{sub 4}SO{sub 3}Na){sub 3}, to solubilize organometallic complexes in water. These analogues of PPH{sub 3} allowed us to synthesize complexes of Ir, Rh, Ru, Ni, Pd, Pt and Ag that are water-soluble and contain such common organometallic ligands as CO, H and CH{sub 3} in addition to halides and the phosphine ligands. These metal complexes show the ability to activate H{sub 2}, CO, C{sub 2}H{sub 4}, H{sub 2}O, SO{sub 2} etc. in aqueous solution. The primary conclusion is that water-soluble organometallic complexes can be prepared and show very similar reactivity in water to analogous compounds in organic solvents. Thus, organometallic complexes in aqueous solution do provide a ''green'' route to products currently prepared in organic solvents.

  16. Nickel-Catalyzed Stereoselective Dicarbofunctionalization of Alkynes.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhaodong; García-Domínguez, Andrés; Nevado, Cristina

    2016-06-01

    A nickel-catalyzed three-component reaction involving terminal alkynes, boronic acids, and alkyl halides is presented herein. Trisubstituted alkenes can be obtained in a highly regio- and stereocontrolled manner by the simultaneous addition of both aryl and alkyl groups across the triple bond in a radical-mediated process. The reaction, devoid of air- and moisture-sensitive organometallic reagents and catalysts, is operationally simple and offers a broad scope and functional-group tolerance. PMID:27111115

  17. Semi-hydrogenation of alkynes at single crystal, nanoparticle and biogenic nanoparticle surfaces: the role of defects in Lindlar-type catalysts and the origin of their selectivity.

    PubMed

    Attard, G A; Bennett, J A; Mikheenko, I; Jenkins, P; Guan, S; Macaskie, L E; Wood, J; Wain, A J

    2013-01-01

    For the first time, the method of shell-isolated nanoparticle Raman spectroscopy (SHINERS) is used in combination with cyclic voltammetry (CV) and reactivity studies to investigate the adsorption behaviour of a series of three alkynes undergoing hydrogenation on nanoparticle, single crystal and bacteria/graphite-supported platinum surfaces. It is found that a strong association of alkynes with defect sites to produce a long-lived di-sigma/pi-alkene surface complex allows for deep hydrogenation of this intermediate to the alkane product. In contrast, when platinum surface defect sites are blocked by either bismuth or polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) (and thus leaving behind only Pt{111} terrace adsorption sites), large increases in selectivity to the semi-hydrogenation product are observed for all three alkynes. This finding is consistent with SHINERS collected from both well-ordered and roughened Pt{111} electrodes which revealed that the di-sigma/pi-bonded surface intermediate is hardly formed at all on Pt{111} unless defect sites are introduced via electrochemical roughening. As a general method of producing selective catalysts, the elimination of toxic heavy metals from Lindlar-type catalyst, used commonly in organic chemistry, and their replacement by more benign, organic species adsorbed at defect sites is discussed. PMID:24015576

  18. Supported gold nanoparticles catalyzed cis-selective semihydrogenation of alkynes using ammonium formate as the reductant.

    PubMed

    Liang, Shengzong; Hammond, Gerald B; Xu, Bo

    2016-05-21

    TiO2 supported gold nanoparticles with low loading (0.5 mol%) are able to semihydrogenate non-fluorinated and gem-difluorinated alkynes to cis-alkenes with high selectivity, using cost-effective and easy-to-handle ammonium formate as the reductant. No over-reduction was observed. The good recyclability of Au/TiO2 allows for "green" semireduction of alkynes. A difluorinated pyran and α,β-unsaturated δ-lactone were easily prepared from the obtained gem-difluoro alkene building blocks. PMID:27063707

  19. Alkenes in [2+2+2] Cycloadditions.

    PubMed

    Domínguez, Gema; Pérez-Castells, Javier

    2016-05-10

    Participation of alkenes and allenes in [2+2+2] cycloaddition reactions has attracted much attention recently. This version of the well-established alkyne cyclotrimerization renders interesting products, such as cyclohexadienes and other polycycles, through cascade processes. Many mechanistic variations are observed when using certain metal complexes as catalysts. The frequent generation of stereogenic centers has prompted the development of efficient asymmetric versions. This Minireview summarizes the efforts reported to date on the use of double bonds as partners in [2+2+2] cyclotrimerizations. PMID:26918553

  20. Electron and Positron Scattering with a Few Alkyne Molecules - Theoretical Cross sections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patel, U. R.; Joshipura, K. N.; Kothari, H. N.

    2016-05-01

    Electron molecule scattering processes play an important role in the understanding of the electron driven physiochemical phenomena in diverse environments such as biological media, planetary atmospheres, interstellar clouds and plasmas. In modeling and simulating effects induced by electrons traversing through matter, the relevant cross section data are required as an input. An alternative probe, positron has also been used for the similar study of atoms, molecules and matter in bulk. Interaction of positrons with atoms and molecules differs from electron interactions due to opposite sign of charge and absence of exchange potential. In the present paper, our aim is to apply an identical theoretical method1,2 to electrons as well as positrons interacting with alkyne molecules like acetylene (HC ≡ CH), 1- Butyne (HC ≡ C- CH2 CH3) and Propyne (HC ≡ C- CH3) . We have carried out calculations of total scattering cross sections by starting with complex potential approach followed by the solution of the Schrodinger equation using numerical method. Ionization cross sections are deduced as in1,2. Comparisons have been made with available theoretical and experimental results for both electron (e-) and positron (e+) . The study will be extended to alkanes and alkenes.

  1. Integrated process for preparing a carboxylic acid from an alkane

    DOEpatents

    Benderly, Abraham; Chadda, Nitin; Sevon, Douglass

    2011-12-20

    The present invention relates to an integrated process for producing unsaturated carboxylic acids from the corresponding C.sub.2-C.sub.4 alkane. The process begins with performance of thermally integrated dehydrogenation reactions which convert a C.sub.2-C.sub.4 alkane to its corresponding C.sub.2-C.sub.4 alkene, and which involve exothermically converting a portion of an alkane to its corresponding alkene by oxidative dehydrogenation in an exothermic reaction zone, in the presence of oxygen and a suitable catalyst, and then feeding the products of the exothermic reaction zone to an endothermic reaction zone wherein at least a portion of the remaining unconverted alkane is endothermically dehydrogenated to form an additional quantity of the same corresponding alkene, in the presence of carbon dioxide and an other suitable catalyst. The alkene products of the thermally integrated dehydrogenation reactions are then provided to a catalytic vapor phase partial oxidation process for conversion of the alkene to the corresponding unsaturated carboxylic acid or nitrile. Unreacted alkene and carbon dioxide are recovered from the oxidation product stream and recycled back to the thermally integrated dehydrogenation reactions.

  2. Oxidation of gaseous and volatile hydrocarbons by selected alkene-utilizing bacteria. [Mycobacterium; Nocardia

    SciTech Connect

    van Ginkel, C.G.; Welten, H.G.J.; de Bont, J.A.M.

    1987-12-01

    Eleven strains of alkene-utilizing bacteria belonging to the genera Mycobacterium, Nocardia, and Xanthobacter were tested for their ability to grow with C/sub 1/ to C/sub 6/ alkanes, C/sub 2/ to C/sub 6/ alkenes, alkadienes, and monoterpenes furnished individually as sole sources of carbon and energy in a mineral salts medium. A limited number of alkenes and alkanes supported growth of the bacteria; some bacteria were unable to grow on any of the saturated hydrocarbons tested. Monoterpenes were frequently used as carbon and energy sources by alkene-utilizing bacteria belonging to the genera Mycobacterium and Nocardia. Washed cell suspensions of alkene-grown bacteria attack the whole range of alkenes tested, whereas only three strains were able to oxidize alkanes as well. The alkenes tested were oxidized either to water and carbon dioxide or to epoxyalkanes. Few epoxides accumulated in stoichiometric amounts from the corresponding alkenes, because most epoxides formed were further converted to other compounds like alkanediols.

  3. Formation of Ruthenium Carbenes by gem‐Hydrogen Transfer to Internal Alkynes: Implications for Alkyne trans‐Hydrogenation

    PubMed Central

    Leutzsch, Markus; Wolf, Larry M.; Gupta, Puneet; Fuchs, Michael; Thiel, Walter; Farès, Christophe

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Insights into the mechanism of the unusual trans‐hydrogenation of internal alkynes catalyzed by {Cp*Ru} complexes were gained by para‐hydrogen (p‐H2) induced polarization (PHIP) transfer NMR spectroscopy. It was found that the productive trans‐reduction competes with a pathway in which both H atoms of H2 are delivered to a single alkyne C atom of the substrate while the second alkyne C atom is converted into a metal carbene. This “geminal hydrogenation” mode seems unprecedented; it was independently confirmed by the isolation and structural characterization of a ruthenium carbene complex stabilized by secondary inter‐ligand interactions. A detailed DFT study shows that the trans alkene and the carbene complex originate from a common metallacyclopropene intermediate. Furthermore, the computational analysis and the PHIP NMR data concur in that the metal carbene is the major gateway to olefin isomerization and over‐reduction, which frequently interfere with regular alkyne trans‐hydrogenation. PMID:27478268

  4. Formation of Ruthenium Carbenes by gem-Hydrogen Transfer to Internal Alkynes: Implications for Alkyne trans-Hydrogenation

    PubMed Central

    Leutzsch, Markus; Wolf, Larry M; Gupta, Puneet; Fuchs, Michael; Thiel, Walter; Farès, Christophe; Fürstner, Alois

    2015-01-01

    Insights into the mechanism of the unusual trans-hydrogenation of internal alkynes catalyzed by {Cp*Ru} complexes were gained by para-hydrogen (p-H2) induced polarization (PHIP) transfer NMR spectroscopy. It was found that the productive trans-reduction competes with a pathway in which both H atoms of H2 are delivered to a single alkyne C atom of the substrate while the second alkyne C atom is converted into a metal carbene. This “geminal hydrogenation” mode seems unprecedented; it was independently confirmed by the isolation and structural characterization of a ruthenium carbene complex stabilized by secondary inter-ligand interactions. A detailed DFT study shows that the trans alkene and the carbene complex originate from a common metallacyclopropene intermediate. Furthermore, the computational analysis and the PHIP NMR data concur in that the metal carbene is the major gateway to olefin isomerization and over-reduction, which frequently interfere with regular alkyne trans-hydrogenation. PMID:26332643

  5. Regioselectivity and Enantioselectivity in Nickel-Catalysed Reductive Coupling Reactions of Alkynes

    PubMed Central

    Moslin, Ryan M.; Miller-Moslin, Karen; Jamison, Timothy F.

    2011-01-01

    Nickel-catalysed reductive coupling reactions of alkynes have emerged as powerful synthetic tools for the selective preparation of functionalized alkenes. One of the greatest challenges associated with these transformations is control of regioselectivity. Recent work from our laboratory has provided an improved understanding of several of the factors governing regioselectivity in these reactions, and related studies have revealed that the reaction mechanism can differ substantially depending on the ligand employed. A discussion of stereoselective transformations and novel applications of nickel catalysis in coupling reactions of alkynes is also included. PMID:17971951

  6. Roaming radical pathways for the decomposition of alkanes.

    SciTech Connect

    Harding, L. B.; Klippenstein, S. J.

    2010-01-01

    CASPT2 calculations predict the existence of roaming radical pathways for the decomposition of propane, n-butane, isobutane and neopentane. The roaming radical paths lead to the formation of an alkane and an alkene instead of the expected radical products. The predicted barriers for the roaming radical paths lie {approx}1 kcal/mol below the corresponding radical asymptotes.

  7. Siloxy alkynes in annulation reactions.

    PubMed

    Qian, Hui; Zhao, Wanxiang; Sun, Jianwei

    2014-12-01

    Siloxy alkynes are a family of versatile species in organic synthesis. This account reviews the annulation reactions of siloxy alkynes for the synthesis of a variety of carbo- and heterocyclic products. With various dipolarophiles or dipolarophile-like reaction partners, siloxy alkynes are capable of forming small (three- to six-membered) rings. Recently, we have expanded the scope to the synthesis of medium- and large-ring lactones, enabled by the design of new amphoteric molecules as well as a new ring-expansion strategy. These annulation reactions provide not only practically useful syntheses of cyclic molecules, but also important understanding of the fundamental reactivity of siloxy alkynes. PMID:25171137

  8. Polar Addition to C=C Group: Why Is Anti-Markovnikov Hydroboration-Oxidation of Alkenes Not "Anti-"?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ilich, Predrag-Peter; Rickertsen, Lucas S.; Becker, Erienne

    2006-01-01

    For 137 years Markovnikov's rule has been extensively used in organic chemical education and research to describe the regioselectivity in electrophilic addition reactions to alkenes and alkynes. When the structures of the final reaction products are used as reference, the rule requests that certain polar addition reactions be termed…

  9. Rhodium-Catalyzed Intramolecular [5+2] Cycloaddition of Inverted 3-Acyloxy-1,4-enyne and Alkyne: Experimental and Theoretical Studies.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiaoxun; Song, Wangze; Ke, Xiaona; Xu, Xiufang; Liu, Peng; Houk, K N; Zhao, Xian-Liang; Tang, Weiping

    2016-05-17

    By switching the position of the alkene and alkyne, a new type of 3-acyloxy-1,4-enyne (ACE) five-carbon building block was developed for Rh-catalyzed intramolecular [5+2] cycloaddition. An electron-withdrawing acyl group on the alkyne termini of the ACE was essential for a regioselective 1,2-acyloxy migration. This new method provided bicyclic [5.3.0]decatrienes that are different from previous methods because of the positions of the alkenes and the acyloxy group. Multiple mechanistic pathways become possible for this new [5+2] cycloaddition and they are investigated by computational studies. PMID:26990319

  10. Intermolecular Hydropyridylation of Unactivated Alkenes.

    PubMed

    Ma, Xiaoshen; Herzon, Seth B

    2016-07-20

    A general method for the hydropyridylation of unactivated alkenes is described. The transformation connects metal-mediated hydrogen atom transfer to alkenes and Minisci addition reactions. The reaction proceeds under mild conditions with high site-selectivities and allows for the construction of tertiary and quaternary centers from simple alkene starting materials. PMID:27384921

  11. Ligand-Enabled, Copper-Catalyzed Regio- and Stereoselective Synthesis of Trialkylsubstituted Alkenylboronates from Unactivated Internal Alkynes.

    PubMed

    Itoh, Taisuke; Shimizu, Yohei; Kanai, Motomu

    2016-06-22

    We report the first copper-catalyzed regio- and stereoselective borylalkylation of dialkylsubstituted internal alkynes with bis(pinacolato)diboron and alkyl halides. A catalytically generated borylcopper species containing a novel π-accepting N-heterocyclic carbene ligand chemoselectively reacted with unactivated internal alkynes over alkyl halides. The intermediate alkenylcopper species subsequently reacted with alkyl halides, affording the desired products. The copper catalyst differentiated steric demands between the two aliphatic substituents on the C≡C triple bond of the alkyne substrates to exhibit high regioselectivity from a wide range of alkyne/alkyl halide combinations. This method is useful for the straightforward synthesis of trialkylsubstituted alkenylboronates, i.e., versatile precursors for tetrasubstituted alkenes containing three or four different alkylsubstituents, which are difficult to synthesize by other methods. PMID:27269988

  12. Cyclic polymers from alkynes.

    PubMed

    Roland, Christopher D; Li, Hong; Abboud, Khalil A; Wagener, Kenneth B; Veige, Adam S

    2016-08-01

    Cyclic polymers have dramatically different physical properties compared with those of their equivalent linear counterparts. However, the exploration of cyclic polymers is limited because of the inherent challenges associated with their synthesis. Conjugated linear polyacetylenes are important materials for electrical conductivity, paramagnetic susceptibility, optical nonlinearity, photoconductivity, gas permeability, liquid crystallinity and chain helicity. However, their cyclic analogues are unknown, and therefore the ability to examine how a cyclic topology influences their properties is currently not possible. We have solved this challenge and now report a tungsten catalyst supported by a tetraanionic pincer ligand that can rapidly polymerize alkynes to form conjugated macrocycles in high yield. The catalyst works by tethering the ends of the polymer to the metal centre to overcome the inherent entropic penalty of cyclization. Gel-permeation chromatography, dynamic and static light scattering, viscometry and chemical tests are all consistent with theoretical predictions and provide unambiguous confirmation of a cyclic topology. Access to a wide variety of new cyclic polymers is now possible by simply choosing the appropriate alkyne monomer. PMID:27442285

  13. Cyclic polymers from alkynes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roland, Christopher D.; Li, Hong; Abboud, Khalil A.; Wagener, Kenneth B.; Veige, Adam S.

    2016-08-01

    Cyclic polymers have dramatically different physical properties compared with those of their equivalent linear counterparts. However, the exploration of cyclic polymers is limited because of the inherent challenges associated with their synthesis. Conjugated linear polyacetylenes are important materials for electrical conductivity, paramagnetic susceptibility, optical nonlinearity, photoconductivity, gas permeability, liquid crystallinity and chain helicity. However, their cyclic analogues are unknown, and therefore the ability to examine how a cyclic topology influences their properties is currently not possible. We have solved this challenge and now report a tungsten catalyst supported by a tetraanionic pincer ligand that can rapidly polymerize alkynes to form conjugated macrocycles in high yield. The catalyst works by tethering the ends of the polymer to the metal centre to overcome the inherent entropic penalty of cyclization. Gel-permeation chromatography, dynamic and static light scattering, viscometry and chemical tests are all consistent with theoretical predictions and provide unambiguous confirmation of a cyclic topology. Access to a wide variety of new cyclic polymers is now possible by simply choosing the appropriate alkyne monomer.

  14. Metathesis of alkanes and related reactions.

    PubMed

    Basset, Jean-Marie; Copéret, Christophe; Soulivong, Daravong; Taoufik, Mostafa; Cazat, Jean Thivolle

    2010-02-16

    The transformation of alkanes remains a difficult challenge because of the relative inertness of the C-H and C-C bonds. The rewards for asserting synthetic control over unfunctionalized, saturated hydrocarbons are considerable, however, because converting short alkanes into longer chain analogues is usually a value-adding process. Alkane metathesis is a novel catalytic and direct transformation of two molecules of a given alkane into its lower and higher homologues; moreover, the process proceeds at relatively low temperature (ambient conditions or higher). It was discovered through the use of a silica-supported tantalum hydride, ([triple bond]SiO)(2)TaH, a multifunctional catalyst with a single site of action. This reaction completes the story of the metathesis reactions discovered over the past 40 years: olefin metathesis, alkyne metathesis, and ene-yne cyclizations. In this Account, we examine the fundamental mechanistic aspects of alkane metathesis as well as the novel reactions that have been derived from its study. The silica-supported tantalum hydride catalyst was developed as the result of systematic and meticulous studies of the interaction between oxide supports and organometallic complexes, a field of study denoted surface organometallic chemistry (SOMC). A careful examination of this surface-supported tantalum hydride led to the later discovery of alumina-supported tungsten hydride, W(H)(3)/Al(2)O(3), which proved to be an even better catalyst for alkane metathesis. Supported tantalum and tungsten hydrides are highly unsaturated, electron-deficient species that are very reactive toward the C-H and C-C bonds of alkanes. They show a great versatility in various other reactions, such as cross-metathesis between methane and alkanes, cross-metathesis between toluene and ethane, or even methane nonoxidative coupling. Moreover, tungsten hydride exhibits a specific ability in the transformation of isobutane into 2,3-dimethylbutane as well as in the metathesis

  15. Biogenic Emissions of Light Alkenes from a Coniferous Forest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rhew, R. C.; Turnipseed, A. A.; Martinez, L.; Shen, S.; De Gouw, J. A.; Warneke, C.; Koss, A.; Lerner, B. M.; Miller, B. R.; Smith, J. N.; Guenther, A. B.

    2014-12-01

    Alkenes are reactive hydrocarbons that play important roles in the photochemical production of tropospheric ozone and in the formation of secondary organic aerosols. The light alkenes (C2-C4) originate from both biogenic and anthropogenic sources and include C2H4 (ethene), C3H6 (propene) and C4H8 (1-butene, 2-butene, 2-methylpropene). Light alkenes are used widely as chemical feedstocks because their double bond makes them versatile for industrial reactions. Their biogenic sources are poorly characterized, with most global emissions estimates relying on laboratory-based studies; net ecosystem emissions have been measured at only one site thus far. Here we report net ecosystem fluxes of light alkenes and isoprene from a semi-arid ponderosa pine forest in the Rocky Mountains of Colorado, USA. Canopy scale fluxes were measured using relaxed eddy accumulation (REA) techniques on the 28-meter NCAR tower in the Manitou Experimental Forest Observatory. Updrafts and downdrafts were determined by sonic anemometry and segregated into 'up' and 'down' reservoirs over the course of an hour. Samples were then measured on two separate automated gas chromatographs (GCs). The first GC measured light hydrocarbons (C2-C6 alkanes and C2-C5 alkenes) by flame ionization detection (FID). The second GC measured halocarbons (methyl chloride, CFC-12, and HCFC-22) by electron capture detection (ECD). Additional air measurements from the top of the tower included hydrocarbons and their oxidation products by Proton Transfer Reaction Mass Spectrometry (PTR-MS). Three field intensives were conducted during the summer of 2014. The REA flux measurements showed that ethene, propene and the butene emissions have significant diurnal cycles, with maximum emissions at midday. The light alkenes contribute significantly to the overall biogenic source of reactive hydrocarbons and have a temporal variability that may be associated with physical and biological parameters. These ecosystem scale measurements

  16. Mixed regiospecificity compromises alkene synthesis by a cytochrome P450 peroxygenase from Methylobacterium populi.

    PubMed

    Amaya, Jose A; Rutland, Cooper D; Makris, Thomas M

    2016-05-01

    Intensive interest has focused on enzymes that are capable of synthesizing hydrocarbons, alkenes and alkanes, for sustainable fuel production. A recently described cytochrome P450 (OleTJE) from the CYP152 family catalyzes an unusual carbon-carbon scission reaction, transforming Cn fatty acids to Cn-1 1-alkenes. Here, we show that a second CYP152, CYP-MP from Methylobacterium populi ATCC BAA 705, also catalyzes oxidative substrate decarboxylation. Alkene production is accompanied with the production of fatty alcohol products, underscoring the mechanistic similarity of the decarboxylation reaction with canonical P450 monooxygenation chemistry. The branchpoint of these two chemistries, and regiospecificity of oxidation products, is strongly chain length dependent, suggesting an importance of substrate coordination for regulating alkene production. PMID:26965726

  17. Diffusion of Benzene and Alkylbenzenes in n-Alkanes.

    PubMed

    Kowert, Bruce A; Register, Paul M

    2015-10-01

    The translational diffusion constants, D, of benzene and a series of alkylbenzenes have been determined in four n-alkanes at room temperature using capillary flow techniques. The alkylbenzenes are toluene, ethylbenzene, 1-phenylpropane, 1-phenylpentane, 1-phenyloctane, 1-phenylundecane, 1-phenyltetradecane, and 1-phenylheptadecane. The n-alkanes are n-nonane, n-decane, n-dodecane, and n-pentadecane. Ratios of the solutes' D values are independent of solvent and in general agreement with the predictions of diffusion models for cylinders and lollipops. For the latter, an alkylbenzene's phenyl ring is the lollipop's candy; the alkyl chain is its handle. A model that considers the solutes to be spheres with volumes determined by the van der Waals increments of their constituent atoms is not in agreement with experiment. The diffusion constants of 1-alkene and n-alkane solutes in n-alkane solvents also are compared with the cylinder model; reasonably good agreement is found. The n-alkanes are relatively extended, and this appears to be the case for the alkyl chains of the 1-alkenes and alkylbenzenes as well. PMID:26417941

  18. The vibrational spectrum of water in liquid alkanes.

    PubMed Central

    Conrad, M P; Strauss, H L

    1985-01-01

    The water wire hypothesis of hydrogen-ion transport in lipid bilayers has prompted a search for water aggregates in bulk hydrocarbons. The asymmetric stretching vibration of the water dissolved in n-decane and in a number of other alkanes and alkenes has been observed. The water band in the alkanes is very wide and fits to the results of a J-diffusion calculation for the water rotation. This implies that the water is freely rotating between collisions with the solvent and certainly not hydrogen bonded to anything. The existence of water aggregates is thus most unlikely. In contrast, water in an alkene is hydrogen bonded to the solvent molecules (although not to other water molecules) and shows an entirely different spectrum. PMID:4016205

  19. Odorless, One-Pot Regio- and Stereoselective Iodothiolation of Alkynes with Sodium Arenesulfinates under Metal-Free Conditions in Water.

    PubMed

    Lin, Ya-mei; Lu, Guo-ping; Cai, Chun; Yi, Wen-bin

    2015-07-01

    A newly developed regio- and stereoselective radical addition of alkyne under metal-free conidtions has been disclosed. This chemistry, in which odorless sodium arenesulfinates in place of thiols are used as the sulfur reagent, provides an efficient, one-pot approach for the generation of β-iodoalkenyl sulfides, which can be easily further functionalized to derive various alkenes and alkynyl sulfides rendering this methodology attractive to both synthetic and medicinal chemistry. PMID:26084011

  20. Rhodium-catalyzed annulative coupling of 3-phenylthiophenes with alkynes involving double C-H bond cleavages.

    PubMed

    Iitsuka, Tomonori; Hirano, Koji; Satoh, Tetsuya; Miura, Masahiro

    2014-01-01

    Double CH bond activation took place efficiently upon treatment of 3-phenylthiophenes with alkynes in the presence of a rhodium catalyst and a copper salt oxidant to form the corresponding naphthothiophene derivatives. Dehydrogenative coupling with alkenes was also found to occur on the phenyl moiety rather than the thiophene ring. These reactions provide straightforward synthetic methods for π-conjugated molecules involving a thiophene unit from readily available, simple building blocks. PMID:24288235

  1. Asymmetric fluorocyclizations of alkenes.

    PubMed

    Wolstenhulme, Jamie R; Gouverneur, Véronique

    2014-12-16

    CONSPECTUS: The vicinal fluorofunctionalization of alkenes is an attractive transformation that converts feedstock olefins into valuable cyclic fluorinated molecules for application in the pharmaceutical, agrochemical, medical, and material sectors. The challenges associated with asymmetric fluorocyclizations induced by F(+) reagents are distinct from other types of halocyclizations. Processes initiated by the addition of an F(+) reagent onto an alkene do not involve the reversible formation of bridged fluoronium ions but generate acyclic β-fluorocationic intermediates. This mechanistic feature implies that fluorocyclizations are not stereospecific. A discontinuity exists between the importance of this class of fluorocyclization and the activation modes currently available to implement successful catalysis. Progress toward fluorocyclization has been achieved by investing in neutral and cationic [NF] reagent development. The body of work on asymmetric fluorination using chiral cationic [NF](+) reagents prepared by fluorine transfer from the dicationic [NF](2+) reagent Selectfluor to quinuclidines, inspired the development of asymmetric F(+)-induced fluorocyclizations catalyzed by cinchona alkaloids; for catalysis, the use of N-fluorobenzenesulfonimide, which is less reactive than Selectfluor, ensures that the achiral F(+) source remains unreactive toward the alkene. These organocatalyzed enantioselective fluorocyclizations can be applied to indoles to install the fluorine on a quaternary benzylic stereogenic carbon center and to afford fluorinated analogues of natural products featuring the hexahydropyrrolo[2,3-b]indole or the tetrahydro-2H-furo[2,3-b]indole skeleton. In an alternative approach, the poor solubility of dicationic Selectfluor bis(tetrafluoroborate) in nonpolar solvent was exploited with anionic phase transfer catalysis as the operating activation mode. Exchange of the tetrafluoroborate ions of Selectfluor with bulky lipophilic chiral anions (e

  2. Microanalysis of Alkenes by Ozonolysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Luibrand, R. T.; Vollmer, J. J.

    1975-01-01

    Describes an undergraduate laboratory experiment in which the position of the double bond in an alkene is determined by identifying its ozonolysis products. This experiment can also be used to introduce the technique of gas chromatography. (MLH)

  3. Subnanometer-sized Pt/Sn alloy cluster catalysts for the dehydrogenation of linear alkanes.

    PubMed

    Hauser, Andreas W; Gomes, Joseph; Bajdich, Michal; Head-Gordon, Martin; Bell, Alexis T

    2013-12-21

    The reaction pathways for the dehydrogenation of ethane, propane, and butane, over Pt are analyzed using density functional theory (DFT). Pt nanoparticles are represented by a tetrahedral Pt4 cluster. The objectives of this work were to establish which step is rate limiting and which one controls the selectivity for forming alkenes as opposed to causing further dehydrogenation of adsorbed alkenes to produce precursors responsible for catalyst deactivation due to coking. Further objectives of this work are to identify the role of adsorbed hydrogen, derived from H2 fed together with the alkane, on the reaction pathway, and the role of replacing one of the four Pt atoms by a Sn atom. A comparison of Gibbs free energies shows that in all cases the rate-determining step is cleavage of a C-H bond upon alkane adsorption. The selectivity to alkene formation versus precursors to coking is dictated by the relative magnitudes of the activation energies for alkene desorption and dehydrogenation of the adsorbed alkene. The presence of an adsorbed H atom on the cluster facilitates alkene desorption relative to dehydrogenation of the adsorbed alkene. Substitution of a Sn atom in the cluster to produce a Pt3Sn cluster leads to a downward shift of the potential energy surface for the reaction and causes an increase of the activity of the catalyst as suggested by recent experiments due to the lower net activation barrier for the rate limiting step. However, the introduction of Sn does not alter the relative activation barriers for gas-phase alkene formation versus loss of hydrogen from the adsorbed alkene, the process leading to the formation of coke precursors. PMID:24196250

  4. Anaerobic biotransformation of chlorinated alkenes

    SciTech Connect

    Zhuang, P.

    1994-01-01

    Chlorinated alkenes are widely found in contaminated subsurface soil and groundwater. The highly chlorinated alkene (i.e., PCE) is not subject to aerobic biotransformation. The aim of this research was to explore the potential of using anaerobic processes (i.e., denitrification, sulfate-reduction and methanogenesis) for chlorinated alkenes biotransformation. Contaminated soil samples were used throughout this study. Soil microcosms simulating field anoxic conditions with various nutrients amendment, liquid microcosms as well as enrichment liquid cultures were developed to delineate the dechlorination process. The effect of biomass, chlorinated alkenes concentration and site specific conditions (e.g., temperature and pH) on the dechlorination and the primary metabolic process was investigated. The role of sorption and nutritional needs (i.e., electron donor) were also studied. A preliminary study revealed that denitrification was the least affected by low temperatures as compared to sulfate-reduction and methanogenesis. Although dechlorination took place under sequential denitrifying and methanogenic conditions and under sulfate-reducing conditions, further studies concluded that fermentative and methanogenic bacteria were responsible for the observed dechlorination. In most cases, dechlorination of PCE or TCE resulted in the accumulation of cDCE. However, a VC-producing culture was developed from the PCE-contaminated soil. In general, the dechlorination process could be enhanced by increasing electron donor and biomass concentration. At relatively low concentrations, the dechlorination rate was also increased with increasing chlorinated alkene concentration. Dechlorination even proceeded at high chlorinated alkene concentrations when methane production was inhibited. However, as the concentration of the chlorinated alkenes increased, severe toxicity eventually halted the dechlorination process.

  5. Photochemical alkene formation in seawater from dissolved organic carbon: Results from laboratory experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ratte, M.; Bujok, O.; Spitzy, A.; Rudolph, J.

    1998-03-01

    The production mechanism of light alkenes, alkanes, and isoprene was investigated in laboratory experiments by measuring their concentrations in natural seawater as a function of spectral range, exposure time and origin, and concentration of dissolved organic carbon (DOC). The production mechanism of alkanes and of isoprene could not be clarified. Ethene and propene are produced photochemically from DOC. The relevant spectral range is UV and short-wavelength visible light. Initial production rates (up to day 10 of exposure) were in the range of several pmol L-1 h-1 (mg DOC)-1; the corresponding mean quantum yields for the spectral range of 300-420 nm were about 10-8. Generally, the production rates and the quantum yields for ethene were about 2 times that of propene. The key factors in the total column integrated oceanic alkene production are the solar photon flux at sea surface, the penetration depth of the light into the ocean (especially the relation between different light absorbers, i.e., the extinction due to absorption of DOC), and the wavelength- and DOC-dependent quantum yields. As a result of the high variability of these parameters, actual local alkene production rates for a specific oceanic region may differ considerably from the globally averaged oceanic alkene production rates. The latter were estimated to be at most 5 Mt yr-1.

  6. NOx analyser interefence from alkenes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bloss, W. J.; Alam, M. S.; Lee, J. D.; Vazquez, M.; Munoz, A.; Rodenas, M.

    2012-04-01

    Nitrogen oxides (NO and NO2, collectively NOx) are critical intermediates in atmospheric chemistry. NOx abundance controls the levels of the primary atmospheric oxidants OH, NO3 and O3, and regulates the ozone production which results from the degradation of volatile organic compounds. NOx are also atmospheric pollutants in their own right, and NO2 is commonly included in air quality objectives and regulations. In addition to their role in controlling ozone formation, NOx levels affect the production of other pollutants such as the lachrymator PAN, and the nitrate component of secondary aerosol particles. Consequently, accurate measurement of nitrogen oxides in the atmosphere is of major importance for understanding our atmosphere. The most widely employed approach for the measurement of NOx is chemiluminescent detection of NO2* from the NO + O3 reaction, combined with NO2 reduction by either a heated catalyst or photoconvertor. The reaction between alkenes and ozone is also chemiluminescent; therefore alkenes may contribute to the measured NOx signal, depending upon the instrumental background subtraction cycle employed. This interference has been noted previously, and indeed the effect has been used to measure both alkenes and ozone in the atmosphere. Here we report the results of a systematic investigation of the response of a selection of NOx analysers, ranging from systems used for routine air quality monitoring to atmospheric research instrumentation, to a series of alkenes ranging from ethene to the biogenic monoterpenes, as a function of conditions (co-reactants, humidity). Experiments were performed in the European Photoreactor (EUPHORE) to ensure common calibration, a common sample for the monitors, and to unequivocally confirm the alkene (via FTIR) and NO2 (via DOAS) levels present. The instrument responses ranged from negligible levels up to 10 % depending upon the alkene present and conditions used. Such interferences may be of substantial importance

  7. The arene–alkene photocycloaddition

    PubMed Central

    Streit, Ursula

    2011-01-01

    Summary In the presence of an alkene, three different modes of photocycloaddition with benzene derivatives can occur; the [2 + 2] or ortho, the [3 + 2] or meta, and the [4 + 2] or para photocycloaddition. This short review aims to demonstrate the synthetic power of these photocycloadditions. PMID:21647263

  8. Facial Synthesis of o-Carborane-Substituted Alkenes and Allenes by a Regioselective Ene Reaction of 1,3-Dehydro-o-carborane.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Da; Zhang, Jiji; Xie, Zuowei

    2015-07-13

    1,3-Dehydro-o-carborane is a useful synthon for selective cage boron functionalization of o-carboranes. It reacts readily with alkenes or alkynes to give a variety of cage B(3)-alkenyl/allenyl o-carboranes by ene reactions in very high yields and excellent regioselectivity. This can be ascribed to the highly polarized cage C-B multiple bond, which lowers the activation barriers of the ene reaction. PMID:26074122

  9. Whole‐cell bacterial bioreporter for actively searching and sensing of alkanes and oil spills

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Dayi; He, Yi; Wang, Yun; Wang, Hui; Wu, Lin; Aries, Eric; Huang, Wei E.

    2012-01-01

    Summary Acinetobacter baylyi ADP1 was found to tolerate seawater and have a special ability of adhering to an oil–water interface of 10–80 µm emulsified mineral and crude oil droplets. These properties make ADP1 an ideal bacterial chassis for constructing bioreporters that are able to actively search and sense oil spill in water and soils. Acinetobacter baylyi bioreporter ADPWH_alk was developed and applied to the detection of alkanes and alkenes in water, seawater and soils. Bioreporter ADPWH_alk was able to detect a broad range of alkanes and alkenes with carbon chain length from C7 to C36. So far, ADPWH_alk is the only bioreporter that is able to detect alkane with carbon chain length greater than C18. This bioreporter responded to the alkanes in about 30 min and it was independent to the cell growth phase because of two point mutations in alkM promoter recognized by alkane regulatory protein ALKR. ADPWH_alk was applied to detect mineral oil, Brent, Chestnut and Sirri crude oils in water and seawater in the range 0.1–100 mg l−1, showing that the bioreporter oil detection was semi‐quantitative. This study demonstrates that ADPWH_alk is a rapid, sensitive and semi‐quantitative bioreporter that can be useful for environmental monitoring and assessment of oil spills in seawater and soils. PMID:21951420

  10. Nickel-Catalyzed Coupling Reactions of Alkenes

    PubMed Central

    Ng, Sze-Sze; Ho, Chun-Yu; Schleicher, Kristin D.; Jamison, Timothy F.

    2011-01-01

    Several reactions of simple, unactivated alkenes with electrophiles under nickel(0) catalysis are discussed. The coupling of olefins with aldehydes and silyl triflates provides allylic or homoallylic alcohol derivatives, depending on the supporting ligands and, to a lesser extent, the substrates employed. Reaction of alkenes with isocyanates yields N-alkyl acrylamides. In these methods, alkenes act as the functional equivalents of alkenyl- and allylmetal reagents. PMID:21814295

  11. Catalytic Enantioselective Functionalization of Unactivated Terminal Alkenes.

    PubMed

    Coombs, John R; Morken, James P

    2016-02-18

    Terminal alkenes are readily available functional groups which appear in α-olefins produced by the chemical industry, and they appear in the products of many contemporary synthetic reactions. While the organic transformations that apply to alkenes are amongst the most studied reactions in all of chemical synthesis, the number of reactions that apply to nonactivated terminal alkenes in a catalytic enantioselective fashion is small in number. This Minireview highlights the cases where stereocontrol in catalytic reactions of 1-alkenes is high enough to be useful for asymmetric synthesis. PMID:26764019

  12. Advances in Nucleophilic Phosphine Catalysis of Alkenes, Allenes, Alkynes, and MBHADs

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Yi Chiao

    2014-01-01

    In nucleophilic phosphine catalysis, tertiary phosphines undergo conjugate additions to activated carbon–carbon multiple bonds to form β-phosphonium enolates, β-phosphonium dienolates, β-phosphonium enoates, and vinyl phosphonium ylides as intermediates. When these reactive zwitterionic species react with nucleophiles and electrophiles, they may generate carbo- and heterocycles with multifarious molecular architectures. This Article describes the reactivities of these phosphonium zwitterions, the applications of phosphine catalysis in the syntheses of biologically active compounds and natural products, and recent developments in the enantioselective phosphine catalysis. PMID:24196409

  13. Thioamination of Alkenes with Hypervalent Iodine Reagents

    PubMed Central

    Mizar, Pushpak; Niebuhr, Rebecca; Hutchings, Matthew; Farooq, Umar; Wirth, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    An efficient thioamination of alkenes mediated by iodine(III) reagents is described. The use of different sulfur nucleophiles allows the flexible synthesis of 1,2-aminothiols from alkenes. By employing chiral iodine(III) reagents, a stereoselective version of the thioamination protocol has also been developed. PMID:26660291

  14. Dehydrogenation of n-alkanes catalyzed by iridium ``pincer`` complexes: Regioselective formation of {alpha}-olefins

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, F.; Singh, B.; Goldman, A.S.; Pak, E.B.; Jensen, C.M.

    1999-04-28

    The development of methods for the functionalization of alkanes is of cardinal importance in catalytic chemistry. A specific functionalization of particularly great potential value is the conversion of n-alkanes to the corresponding 1-alkenes ({alpha}-olefins) since these serve as precursors for a wide range of commodity-scale chemicals (>2 {times} 10{sup 9} kg/yr). Such a conversion is also an intriguing challenge as viewed from a fundamental perspective. n-Alkanes are the simplest organic molecules with the potential to undergo regioselective transformations; {alpha}-olefins are the thermodynamically least stable of the corresponding double-bond isomers and any mechanism for their formation must presumably involve activation of the strongest bond (primary C-{single_bond}H) in the molecule.

  15. Remote functionalization through alkene isomerization.

    PubMed

    Vasseur, Alexandre; Bruffaerts, Jeffrey; Marek, Ilan

    2016-03-01

    Exploiting the reactivity of one functional group within a molecule to generate a reaction at a different position is an ongoing challenge in organic synthesis. Effective remote functionalization protocols have the potential to provide access to almost any derivatives but are difficult to achieve. The difficulty is more pronounced for acyclic systems where flexible alkyl chains are present between the initiating functional group and the desired reactive centres. In this Review, we discuss the concept of remote functionalization of alkenes using metal complexes, leading to a selective reaction at a position distal to the initial double bond. We aim to show the vast opportunity provided by this growing field through selected and representative examples. Our aim is to demonstrate that using a double bond as a chemical handle, metal-assisted long-distance activation could be used as a powerful synthetic strategy. PMID:26892551

  16. Remote functionalization through alkene isomerization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasseur, Alexandre; Bruffaerts, Jeffrey; Marek, Ilan

    2016-03-01

    Exploiting the reactivity of one functional group within a molecule to generate a reaction at a different position is an ongoing challenge in organic synthesis. Effective remote functionalization protocols have the potential to provide access to almost any derivatives but are difficult to achieve. The difficulty is more pronounced for acyclic systems where flexible alkyl chains are present between the initiating functional group and the desired reactive centres. In this Review, we discuss the concept of remote functionalization of alkenes using metal complexes, leading to a selective reaction at a position distal to the initial double bond. We aim to show the vast opportunity provided by this growing field through selected and representative examples. Our aim is to demonstrate that using a double bond as a chemical handle, metal-assisted long-distance activation could be used as a powerful synthetic strategy.

  17. A mild preparation of alkynes from alkenyl triflates.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xiaowen; Wu, Dimin; Lu, Zhaohong; Sun, Hongbin; Li, Ang

    2016-06-28

    We report herein a protocol for preparing alkynes from alkenyl triflates. Stoichiometric LiCl promotes this transformation in DMF at ambient temperature. A range of terminal and internal alkynes were obtained smoothly. A one-pot procedure of alkyne formation/Cu-mediated Huisgen cycloaddition was developed, which may find use in synthesizing natural product-based probes. PMID:27030373

  18. Alkene anti-Dihydroxylation with Malonoyl Peroxides.

    PubMed

    Alamillo-Ferrer, Carla; Davidson, Stuart C; Rawling, Michael J; Theodoulou, Natalie H; Campbell, Matthew; Humphreys, Philip G; Kennedy, Alan R; Tomkinson, Nicholas C O

    2015-10-16

    Malonoyl peroxide 1, prepared in a single step from the commercially available diacid, is an effective reagent for the anti-dihydroxylation of alkenes. Reaction of 1 with an alkene in the presence of acetic acid at 40 °C followed by alkaline hydrolysis leads to the corresponding diol (35-92%) with up to 13:1 anti-selectivity. A mechanism consistent with experimental findings is proposed that accounts for the selectivity observed. PMID:26425839

  19. Toluene Monooxygenase-Catalyzed Epoxidation of Alkenes

    PubMed Central

    McClay, Kevin; Fox, Brian G.; Steffan, Robert J.

    2000-01-01

    Several toluene monooxygenase-producing organisms were tested for their ability to oxidize linear alkenes and chloroalkenes three to eight carbons long. Each of the wild-type organisms degraded all of the alkenes that were tested. Epoxides were produced during the oxidation of butene, butadiene, and pentene but not hexene or octadiene. A strain of Escherichia coli expressing the cloned toluene-4-monooxygenase (T4MO) of Pseudomonas mendocina KR1 was able to oxidize butene, butadiene, pentene, and hexene but not octadiene, producing epoxides from all of the substrates that were oxidized. A T4MO-deficient variant of P. mendocina KR1 oxidized alkenes that were five to eight carbons long, but no epoxides were detected, suggesting the presence of multiple alkene-degrading enzymes in this organism. The alkene oxidation rates varied widely (ranging from 0.01 to 0.33 μmol of substrate/min/mg of cell protein) and were specific for each organism-substrate pair. The enantiomeric purity of the epoxide products also varied widely, ranging from 54 to >90% of a single epoxide enantiomer. In the absence of more preferred substrates, such as toluene or alkenes, the epoxides underwent further toluene monooxygenase-catalyzed transformations, forming products that were not identified. PMID:10788354

  20. Tetrabutylammonium decatungstate-photosensitized alkylation of electrophilic alkenes: Convenient functionalization of aliphatic C-H bonds.

    PubMed

    Dondi, Daniele; Fagnoni, Maurizio; Albini, Angelo

    2006-05-15

    Tetrabutylammonium decatungstate (TBADT, 2 x 10(-3) m) is an effective photocatalyst for the alkylation of electrophilic alkenes (0.1 m, alpha,beta-unsaturated nitriles, esters, ketones) by alkanes, alcohols, and ethers. The products are in most cases obtained in >70 % isolated yields, through an experimentally very simple procedure. The kinetics of the radical processes following initial hydrogen abstraction by excited TBADT in deoxygenated MeCN have been studied. In the absence of a trap, back hydrogen transfer from reduced tungstate is the main pathway for alkyl radicals, while alpha-hydroxyalkyl radicals are oxidized to ketones by ground-state TBADT. With both radical types the reaction ceases at a few percent conversion. However, trapping by electrophilic alkenes is followed by reduction of the radical adduct and regeneration of the catalyst, which allows the alkylation to proceed up to complete alkene conversion with the mentioned good yields of products. With a nucleophilic (alpha-hydroxyalkyl) radical, alkylation is efficient (Phi = 0.58) and can also be carried out when degassing is omitted, the only difference being a short induction period. With a less reactive (cyclohexyl) radical, the quantum yield is lower (Phi = 0.06) and the reaction is considerably slowed in aerated solutions, but the chemical yield remains good. PMID:16521134

  1. Hydroxy nitrate production in the OH-initiated oxidation of alkenes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teng, A. P.; Crounse, J. D.; Lee, L.; St. Clair, J. M.; Cohen, R. C.; Wennberg, P. O.

    2015-04-01

    Alkenes are oxidized rapidly in the atmosphere by addition of OH and subsequently O2 leading to the formation of β-hydroxy peroxy radicals. These peroxy radicals react with NO to form β-hydroxy nitrates with a branching ratio α. We quantify α for CM2-C8 alkenes at 295 K ± 3 and 993 hPa. The branching ratio can be expressed as α = (0.045 ± 0.016) × N - (0.11 ± 0.05) where N is the number of heavy atoms (excluding the peroxy moiety), and listed errors are 2σ. These branching ratios are larger than previously reported and are similar to those for peroxy radicals formed from H abstraction from alkanes. We find the isomer distributions of β-hydroxy nitrates formed under NO-dominated peroxy radical chemistry to be different than the isomer distribution of hydroxy hydroperoxides produced under HO2-dominated peroxy radical chemistry. Assuming unity yield for the hydroperoxides implies that the branching ratio to form β-hydroxy nitrates increases with substitution of RO2. Deuterium substitution enhances the branching ratio to form hydroxy nitrates in both propene and isoprene by a factor of ~ 1.5. The role of alkene chemistry in the Houston region is re-evaluated using the RONO2 branching ratios reported here. Small alkenes are found to play a significant role in present-day oxidant formation more than a decade (2013) after the 2000 Texas Air Quality Study identified these compounds as major contributors to photochemical smog in Houston.

  2. Metalation of alkynes. 4. The methoxymercuration reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Bassetti, M.; Floris, B.; Spadafora, G. )

    1989-12-08

    Methoxymercuration of symmetrically and unsymmetrically substituted alkynes (4-octyne, 2-heptyne, 2-nonyne, 1,4-dimethoxy-2-butyne, 1,4-diacetoxy-2-butyne, methyl 2-octynoate, methyl phenylpropynoate, 1-phenylpropyne, 1-phenyl-1-pentyne, diphenylethyne) was investigated. The corresponding {alpha}-mercurated enol ethers were generally isolated and characterized, except for 4-octyne, 2-heptyne, and 2-nonyne, which yielded {alpha}-acetoxymercurio ketones. Methoxymercuration was investigated kinetically. The rate law is second order, first order in both alkyne and mercuric acetate. Arylalkynes are less reactive than alkyl derivatives and the reaction rate is decreased by electron-withdrawing substituents. Activation parameters were determined for selected substrates. The kinetic data are in agreement with an electrophilic associative rate-determining step. Product analysis results suggest the formation of a cationic intermediate, the nature of which may vary from an unsymmetrically bridged species to an open carbocation, depending on the substrate.

  3. Kinetically Trapped Tetrahedral Cages via Alkyne Metathesis.

    PubMed

    Lee, Semin; Yang, Anna; Moneypenny, Timothy P; Moore, Jeffrey S

    2016-02-24

    In dynamic covalent synthesis, kinetic traps are perceived as disadvantageous, hindering the system from reaching its thermodynamic equilibrium. Here we present the near-quantitative preparation of tetrahedral cages from simple tritopic precursors using alkyne metathesis. While the cages are the presumed thermodynamic sink, we experimentally demonstrate that the products no longer exchange their vertices once they have formed. The example reported here illustrates that kinetically trapped products may facilitate high yields of complex products from dynamic covalent synthesis. PMID:26854552

  4. Copper-Catalyzed Oxyboration of Unactivated Alkenes.

    PubMed

    Itoh, Taisuke; Matsueda, Takumi; Shimizu, Yohei; Kanai, Motomu

    2015-11-01

    The first regiodivergent oxyboration of unactivated terminal alkenes is reported, using copper alkoxide as a catalyst, bis(pinacolato)diboron [(Bpin)2 ] as a boron source, and (2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidin-1-yl)oxyl (TEMPO) as an oxygen source. The reaction is compatible with various functional groups. Two regioisomers are selectively produced by selecting the appropriate ligands on copper. The products may be used as a linchpin precursor for various other functionalizations, and net processes such as carbooxygenation, aminooxygenation, and dioxygenation of alkenes can be achieved after C-B bond transformations. Mechanistic studies indicate that the reaction involves the following steps: 1) Transmetalation between CuOtBu and (Bpin)2 to generate a borylcopper species; 2) regiodivergent borylcupration of alkenes; 3) oxidation of the thus-generated C-Cu bond to give an alkyl radical; 4) trapping of the resulting alkyl radical by TEMPO. PMID:26376774

  5. Alkenes as azido precursors for the one-pot synthesis of 1,2,3-triazoles catalyzed by copper nanoparticles on activated carbon.

    PubMed

    Alonso, Francisco; Moglie, Yanina; Radivoy, Gabriel; Yus, Miguel

    2013-05-17

    A one-pot protocol for the synthesis of 1,2,3-triazoles has been developed starting from inactivated alkenes and based on two click reactions: the azidosulfenylation of the carbon-carbon double bond and the copper-catalyzed azide-alkyne cycloaddition (CuAAC). High yields of the β-methylsulfanyl triazoles have been attained using CuNPs/C as catalyst, with other commercial copper catalysts being completely inactive. The versatility of the methylsulfanyl group has been demonstrated through a series of synthetic transformations, including direct access to 1-vinyl and 4-monosubstituted triazoles. PMID:23617398

  6. Alkyne Hydroacylation: Switching Regioselectivity by Tandem Ruthenium Catalysis

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Qing-An; Cruz, Faben A.; Dong, Vy M.

    2015-01-01

    By using tandem ruthenium-catalysis, internal alkynes can be coupled with aldehydes for the synthesis of β,γ-unsaturated ketones. The catalyst promotes alkyne transformations with high regioselectivity, with examples that include the differentiation of a methyl versus ethyl substituent on the alkyne. Mechanistic studies suggest that the regioselectivity results from a selective allene formation that is governed by allylic strain. PMID:25608143

  7. Heterogeneous Catalysis: The Horiuti-Polanyi Mechanism and Alkene Hydrogenation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mattson, Bruce; Foster, Wendy; Greimann, Jaclyn; Hoette, Trisha; Le, Nhu; Mirich, Anne; Wankum, Shanna; Cabri, Ann; Reichenbacher, Claire; Schwanke, Erika

    2013-01-01

    The hydrogenation of alkenes by heterogeneous catalysts has been studied for 80 years. The foundational mechanism was proposed by Horiuti and Polanyi in 1934 and consists of three steps: (i) alkene adsorption on the surface of the hydrogenated metal catalyst, (ii) hydrogen migration to the beta-carbon of the alkene with formation of a delta-bond…

  8. 40 CFR 721.10508 - Alkene substituted Bis phenol (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Alkene substituted Bis phenol (generic... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10508 Alkene substituted Bis phenol (generic). (a) Chemical substance... alkene substituted bis phenol (PMN P-07-161) is subject to reporting under this section for...

  9. 40 CFR 721.10508 - Alkene substituted Bis phenol (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Alkene substituted Bis phenol (generic... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10508 Alkene substituted Bis phenol (generic). (a) Chemical substance... alkene substituted bis phenol (PMN P-07-161) is subject to reporting under this section for...

  10. GC-{sup 13}C IRMS characterisation of extractable and covalently bound alkanes in petroleum source rocks to reveal compositional fractionation effects

    SciTech Connect

    Love, G.D.; Fallick, A.E.; Taylor, C.

    1995-12-31

    The application of a sequential extraction/degradation scheme to differentiate between molecular alkanes (both easily extractable and physically-trapped) and covalently-bound alkyl moieties to a number of vitrinite concentrates and petroleum source rocks has been reported previously. Gas chromatography-isotope ratio mass spectrometry GC-s{sup 13}C IRMS has now been applied to the different awe fractions to probe compositional fractionation effects that might occur from the different initial biological inputs. For a Turkish oil shale (Goynuk - Type I kerogen), inputs from diverse sources, including phytoplanktron, higher plants and bacteria were implied from analysis of solvent-extractable alkanes. However, the much larger quantities of covalently-bound alkanes had an isotopic signature typical of eukarytoic (freshwater) algae. The isotopic uniformity of alkanes/alkenes released from sequential hydropyrolysis of a torbanite (Duunet shale) confirmed that this sample was largely derived from the selective preservation of resistant aliphatic biopolymers found in Botryococcus cell walls.

  11. Alkene epoxidation employing metal nitro complexes

    DOEpatents

    Andrews, M.A.; Cheng, C.W.; Kelley, K.P.

    1982-07-15

    Process for converting alkenes to form epoxides utilizes transition metal nitro complexes of the formula: M(RCN)/sub 2/XNO/sub 2/ wherein M is palladium or platinum, R is an alkyl or aryl group containing up to 12 carbon atoms, and X is a monoanionic, monodentate ligand such as chlorine, optionally in the presence of molecular oxygen.

  12. Direct Alkynylation of 3H-Imidazo[4,5-b]pyridines Using gem-Dibromoalkenes as Alkynes Source.

    PubMed

    Aziz, Jessy; Baladi, Tom; Piguel, Sandrine

    2016-05-20

    C2 direct alkynylation of 3H-imidazo[4,5-b]pyridine derivatives is explored for the first time. Stable and readily available 1,1-dibromo-1-alkenes, electrophilic alkyne precursors, are used as coupling partners. The simple reaction conditions include an inexpensive copper catalyst (CuBr·SMe2 or Cu(OAc)2), a phosphine ligand (DPEphos) and a base (LiOtBu) in 1,4-dioxane at 120 °C. This C-H alkynylation method revealed to be compatible with a variety of substitutions on both coupling partners: heteroarenes and gem-dibromoalkenes. This protocol allows the straightforward synthesis of various 2-alkynyl-3H-imidazo[4,5-b]pyridines, a valuable scaffold in drug design. PMID:27111189

  13. STANDARD CHEMICAL THERMODYNAMIC PROPERTIES OF MULTICHLORO ALKANES AND ALKENES: A MODIFIED GROUP ADDITIVITY SCHEME. (R824970)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The perspectives, information and conclusions conveyed in research project abstracts, progress reports, final reports, journal abstracts and journal publications convey the viewpoints of the principal investigator and may not represent the views and policies of ORD and EPA. Concl...

  14. Selective oxidation of alkanes and/or alkenes to valuable oxygenates

    DOEpatents

    Lin, Manhua; Pillai, Krishnan S.

    2011-02-15

    A catalyst, its method of preparation and its use for producing at least one of methacrolein and methacrylic acid, for example, by subjecting isobutane or isobutylene or a mixture thereof to a vapor phase catalytic oxidation in the presence of air or oxygen. In the case where isobutane alone is subjected to a vapor phase catalytic oxidation in the presence of air or oxygen, the product is at least one of isobutylene, methacrolein and methacrylic acid. The catalyst comprises a compound having the formula A.sub.aB.sub.bX.sub.xY.sub.yZ.sub.zO.sub.o wherein A is one or more elements selected from the group of Mo, W and Zr, B is one or more elements selected from the group of Bi, Sb, Se, and Te, X is one or more elements selected from the group of Al, Bi, Ca, Ce, Co, Fe, Ga, Mg, Ni, Nb, Sn, W and Zn, Y is one or more elements selected from the group of Ag, Au, B, Cr, Cs, Cu, K, La, Li, Mg, Mn, Na, Nb, Ni, P, Pb, Rb, Re, Ru, Sn, Te, Ti, V and Zr, and Z is one or more element from the X or Y groups or from the following: As, Ba, Pd, Pt, Sr, or mixtures thereof, and wherein a=1, 0.05

  15. Merging rhodium-catalysed C-H activation and hydroamination in a highly selective [4+2] imine/alkyne annulation.

    PubMed

    Manan, Rajith S; Zhao, Pinjing

    2016-01-01

    Catalytic C-H activation and hydroamination represent two important strategies for eco-friendly chemical synthesis with high atom efficiency and reduced waste production. Combining both C-H activation and hydroamination in a cascade process, preferably with a single catalyst, would allow rapid access to valuable nitrogen-containing molecules from readily available building blocks. Here we report a single metal catalyst-based approach for N-heterocycle construction by tandem C-H functionalization and alkene hydroamination. A simple catalyst system of cationic rhodium(I) precursor and phosphine ligand promotes redox-neutral [4+2] annulation between N-H aromatic ketimines and internal alkynes to form multi-substituted 3,4-dihydroisoquinolines (DHIQs) in high chemoselectivity over competing annulation processes, exclusive cis-diastereoselectivity, and distinct regioselectivity for alkyne addition. This study demonstrates the potential of tandem C-H activation and alkene hydrofunctionalization as a general strategy for modular and atom-efficient assembly of six-membered heterocycles with multiple chirality centres. PMID:27321650

  16. Merging rhodium-catalysed C–H activation and hydroamination in a highly selective [4+2] imine/alkyne annulation

    PubMed Central

    Manan, Rajith S.; Zhao, Pinjing

    2016-01-01

    Catalytic C–H activation and hydroamination represent two important strategies for eco-friendly chemical synthesis with high atom efficiency and reduced waste production. Combining both C–H activation and hydroamination in a cascade process, preferably with a single catalyst, would allow rapid access to valuable nitrogen-containing molecules from readily available building blocks. Here we report a single metal catalyst-based approach for N-heterocycle construction by tandem C–H functionalization and alkene hydroamination. A simple catalyst system of cationic rhodium(I) precursor and phosphine ligand promotes redox-neutral [4+2] annulation between N–H aromatic ketimines and internal alkynes to form multi-substituted 3,4-dihydroisoquinolines (DHIQs) in high chemoselectivity over competing annulation processes, exclusive cis-diastereoselectivity, and distinct regioselectivity for alkyne addition. This study demonstrates the potential of tandem C–H activation and alkene hydrofunctionalization as a general strategy for modular and atom-efficient assembly of six-membered heterocycles with multiple chirality centres. PMID:27321650

  17. Alkenylation of Arenes and Heteroarenes with Alkynes.

    PubMed

    Boyarskiy, Vadim P; Ryabukhin, Dmitry S; Bokach, Nadezhda A; Vasilyev, Aleksander V

    2016-05-25

    This review is focused on the analysis of current data on new methods of alkenylation of arenes and heteroarenes with alkynes by transition metal catalyzed reactions, Bronsted/Lewis acid promoted transformations, and others. The synthetic potential, scope, limitations, and mechanistic problems of the alkenylation reactions are discussed. The insertion of an alkenyl group into aromatic and heteroaromatic rings by inter- or intramolecular ways provides a synthetic route to derivatives of styrene, stilbene, chalcone, cinnamic acid, various fused carbo- and heterocycles, etc. PMID:27111159

  18. Isomerization of alkanes on sulfated zirconia: Promotion by Pt and by adamantyl hydride transfer species

    SciTech Connect

    Iglesia, E.; Soled, S.L.; Kramer, G.M. )

    1993-11-01

    The work shows that hydride transfer species, such as adamantane, increase isomerization rates and inhibit C-C scission reactions. n-Heptane isomerization rates show positive hydrogen kinetic orders, suggesting that the reaction proceeds on Pt/ZrO[sub 2]-SO[sub 4] via chain transfer pathways, in which carbenium ions propagate, after a chain initiation step involvings loss of hydrogen from alkanes, by hydride transfer from neutral species to carbonations. These pathways contrast with those involved in the bifunctional (metal-acid) catalytic sequences usually required for alkane isomerization, in which metal sites catalyze alkane dehydrogenation and acid sites catalyze skeletal rearrangements of alkenes. Rate-limiting hydride transfer steps are consistent with the strong influence of molecular hydride transfer agents such as adamantane, which act as co-catalysts and increase isomerization rate and selectivity. The addition of small amounts of adamantane (0.1-0.8 wt%) to n-heptane increases isomerizations rates by a factor of 3 and inhibits undesirable cracking reactions. Adamantane increases hydride transfer and carbenium ion termination rates, thus reducing the surface residence time required for a catalytic turnover. As a result, desorption occurs before secondary cracking of isomerized carbenium ions. Less effective hydride transfer agents (n-alkanes, isoalkanes) also increase n-alkanes isomerization rate and selectivity, but require much higher concentrations than adamantane. Dihydrogen also acts as a hydride source in alkane isomerization catalysis, but it requires the additional presence of metals or reducible oxides, which catalyze H[sub 2] dissociation and the formation of hydridic and protonic forms of hydrogen. 40 refs., 10 figs., 4 tabs.

  19. Liquid-liquid interfaces of semifluorinated alkane diblock copolymers with water, alkanes, and perfluorinated alkanes.

    SciTech Connect

    Perahia, Dvora, Dr.; Pierce, Flint; Tsige, Mesfin; Grest, Gary Stephen, Dr.

    2008-08-01

    The liquid-liquid interface between semifluorinated alkane diblock copolymers of the form F3C(CF2)n-1-(CH2)m-1CH3 and water, protonated alkanes, and perfluorinated alkanes are studied by fully atomistic molecular dynamics simulations. A modified version of the OPLS-AA (Optimized Parameter for Liquid Simulation All-Atom) force field of Jorgensen et al. has been used to study the interfacial behavior of semifluorinated diblocks. Aqueous interfaces are found to be sharp, with correspondingly large values of the interfacial tension. Due to the reduced hydrophobicity of the protonated block compared to the fluorinated block, hydrogen enhancement is observed at the interface. Water dipoles in the interfacial region are found to be oriented nearly parallel to the liquid-liquid interface. A number of protonated alkanes and perfluorinated alkanes are found to be mutually miscible with the semifluorinated diblocks. For these liquids, interdiffusion follows the expected Fickian behavior, and concentration-dependent diffusivities are determined.

  20. Chemistry of a novel zerovalent ruthenium π-acidic alkene complex, Ru (η6-1,3,5-cyclooctatriene)(η2-dimethyl fumarate)2

    PubMed Central

    Mitsudo, Take-aki; Ura, Yasuyuki; Kondo, Teruyuki

    2007-01-01

    A novel zerovalent ruthenium complex with a π-acidic ligand, Ru(η6-cyclooctatriene)(η2-dimethyl fumarate)2 (1), was prepared from Ru(η4-cyclooctadiene)(η6-cyclooctatriene) [Ru(cod)(cot)]. Complex 1 or Ru(cod)(cot) catalyzes various new carbon-carbon bond-forming reactions that include the [2 + 2] cycloaddition of alkenes and alkynes via ruthenacycles, the creation of a new hydrocarbon, pentacyclo[6.6.0.02,6.03,13.010,14]tetradeca-4,11-diene [PCTD], by dimerization of 2,5-norbornadiene via C-C bond cleavage, and the codimerization of alkynes and/or alkenes. Complex 1 was shown to be an excellent mother complex for various zerovalent ruthenium complexes. Complex 1 reacts with amines, phosphines or water to give new zerovalent ruthenium complexes with the ligands. The resulting aqua complexes have a water ligand with an oxygen atom that is a chiral center, i.e., ruthenium complexes with a ‘chiral water’ ligand were prepared and fully characterized. PMID:24019585

  1. Reaction of alkyn-1-yl(diorganyl)silanes with 1-boraadamantane: Si-H-B bridges confirmed by the molecular structure in the solid state and in solution.

    PubMed

    Wrackmeyer, Bernd; Milius, Wolfgang; Tok, Oleg L

    2003-10-01

    1-Boraadamantane 1 was treated with alkyn-1-ylsilanes 2 containing one or two Si[bond]H functions. Under mild conditions, the reaction gave 4-methylene-3-borahomoadamantane derivatives 4 quantitatively and selectively by 1,1-organoboration. An electron deficient Si-H-B bridge was present in the product. The analogous reaction of 1 with an alkyn-1-yl-disilane 3 gave the corresponding alkene derivative 5, however, without the Si-H-B bridge. Evidence for the Si-H-B bridge in 4 was given by IR data, an extensive set of NMR spectroscopical data ((1)H, (11)B, (13)C, (29)Si NMR) including various unusual isotope effects on chemical shifts and coupling constants, as well as from the molecular structure of one example, 4 e, in the solid state. The precursor of 4 e, alkyne 2 e, Ph(2)Si(H)C[triple bond]CSi(H)Ph(2), was also studied by X-ray analysis. PMID:14566880

  2. Phosphidoboratabenzene-rhodium(i) complexes as precatalysts for the hydrogenation of alkenes at room temperature and atmospheric pressure.

    PubMed

    Perez, Viridiana; Audet, Pierre; Bi, Wenhua; Fontaine, Frédéric-Georges

    2016-02-01

    The di-tert-butylphosphido-boratabenzene ligand (DTBB) reacts with [(C2H4)2RhCl]2 yielding the dimeric species [(C2H4)Rh(DTBB)]2 (1). This species was fully characterized by multinuclear NMR and X-ray crystallography. Complex 1 readily dissociates ethylene in solution and upon exposure to 1 atm of H2 is capable of carrying out the hydrogenation of ethylene. The characterization of two Rh-H species by multinuclear NMR spectroscopy is provided. The reactivity of 1 towards the catalytic hydrogenation of alkenes and alkynes at room temperature and 1 atm of H2 is reported and compared to the activity of Wilkinson's catalyst under the same reaction conditions. PMID:26530277

  3. Methods for direct alkene diamination, new & old

    PubMed Central

    de Jong, Sam; Nosal, Daniel G.; Wardrop, Duncan J.

    2012-01-01

    The 1,2-diamine moiety is a ubiquitous structural motif present in a wealth of natural products, including non-proteinogenic amino acids and numerous alkaloids, as well as in pharmaceutical agents, chiral ligands and organic reagents. The biological activity associated with many of these systems and their chemical utility in general has ensured that the development of methods for their preparation is of critical importance. While a wide range of strategies for the preparation of 1,2-diamines have been established, the diamination of alkenes offers a particularly direct and efficient means of accessing these systems. The purpose of this review is to provide an overview of all methods of direct alkene diamination, metal-mediated or otherwise. PMID:22888177

  4. Rhodium-Catalyzed Alkene Difunctionalization with Nitrenes.

    PubMed

    Ciesielski, Jennifer; Dequirez, Geoffroy; Retailleau, Pascal; Gandon, Vincent; Dauban, Philippe

    2016-06-27

    The Rh(II) -catalyzed oxyamination and diamination of alkenes generate 1,2-amino alcohols and 1,2-diamines, respectively, in good to excellent yields and with complete regiocontrol. In the case of diamination, the intramolecular reaction provides an efficient method for the preparation of pyrrolidines, and the intermolecular reaction produces vicinal amines with orthogonal protecting groups. These alkene difunctionalizations proceed by aziridination followed by nucleophilic ring opening induced by an Rh-bound nitrene generated in situ, details of which were uncovered by both experimental and theoretical studies. In particular, DFT calculations show that the nitrogen atom of the putative [Rh]2 =NR metallanitrene intermediate is electrophilic and support an aziridine activation pathway by N⋅⋅⋅N=[Rh]2 bond formation, in addition to the N⋅⋅⋅[Rh]2 =NR coordination mode. PMID:27258005

  5. Base-Metal-Catalyzed Regiodivergent Alkene Hydrosilylations.

    PubMed

    Du, Xiaoyong; Zhang, Yanlu; Peng, Dongjie; Huang, Zheng

    2016-06-01

    A complementary set of base metal catalysts has been developed for regiodivergent alkene hydrosilylations: iron complexes of phosphine-iminopyridine are selective for anti-Markovnikov hydrosilylations (linear/branched up to >99:1), while the cobalt complexes bearing the same type of ligands provide an unprecedented high level of Markovnikov selectivity (branched/linear up to >99:1). Both systems exhibit high efficiency and wide functional group tolerance. PMID:27111001

  6. Catalytic, stereospecific syn-dichlorination of alkenes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cresswell, Alexander J.; Eey, Stanley T.-C.; Denmark, Scott E.

    2015-02-01

    As some of the oldest organic chemical reactions known, the ionic additions of elemental halogens such as bromine and chlorine to alkenes are prototypical examples of stereospecific reactions, typically delivering vicinal dihalides resulting from anti-addition. Although the invention of enantioselective variants is an ongoing challenge, the ability to overturn the intrinsic anti-diastereospecificity of these transformations is also a largely unsolved problem. Here, we describe the first catalytic, syn-stereospecific dichlorination of alkenes, employing a group transfer catalyst based on a redox-active main group element (selenium). With diphenyl diselenide (PhSeSePh) (5 mol%) as the pre-catalyst, benzyltriethylammonium chloride (BnEt3NCl) as the chloride source and an N-fluoropyridinium salt as the oxidant, a wide variety of functionalized cyclic and acyclic 1,2-disubstituted alkenes, including simple allylic alcohols, deliver syn-dichlorides with exquisite stereocontrol. This methodology is expected to find applications in streamlining the synthesis of polychlorinated natural products such as the chlorosulfolipids.

  7. Catalytic, Stereospecific Syn-Dichlorination of Alkenes

    PubMed Central

    Cresswell, Alexander J.; Eey, Stanley T.-C.; Denmark, Scott E.

    2015-01-01

    As some of the oldest organic chemical reactions known, the ionic additions of elemental halogens such as bromine and chlorine to alkenes are prototypical examples of stereospecific reactions, typically delivering vicinal dihalides resulting from anti-addition. Whilst the invention of enantioselective variants is an ongoing challenge, the ability to overturn the intrinsic anti-diastereospecificity of these transformations is also a largely unsolved problem. In this Article, we describe the first catalytic, syn-stereospecific dichlorination of alkenes, employing a group transfer catalyst based on a redox-active main group element (i.e., selenium). Thus, with diphenyl diselenide (PhSeSePh) (5 mol %) as the pre-catalyst, benzyltriethylammonium chloride (BnEt3NCl) as the chloride source, and an N-fluoropyridinium salt as the oxidant, a wide variety of functionalized cyclic and acyclic 1,2-disubstituted alkenes, including simple allylic alcohols, deliver syn-dichlorides with exquisite stereocontrol. This methodology is expected to find applications in streamlining the synthesis of polychlorinated natural products such as the chlorosulfolipids. PMID:25615668

  8. Trifluoromethylation of alkenes by visible light photoredox catalysis.

    PubMed

    Iqbal, Naeem; Choi, Sungkyu; Kim, Eunjin; Cho, Eun Jin

    2012-12-21

    A method for trifluoromethylation of alkenes has been developed employing visible light photoredox catalysis with CF(3)I, Ru(Phen)(3)Cl(2), and DBU. This process works especially well for terminal alkenes to give alkenyl-CF(3) products with only E-stereochemistry. The mild reaction conditions enable the trifluoromethylation of a range of alkenes that bear various functional groups. PMID:23167602

  9. Catalytic, Diastereoselective 1,2-Difluorination of Alkenes.

    PubMed

    Banik, Steven M; Medley, Jonathan William; Jacobsen, Eric N

    2016-04-20

    We describe a direct, catalytic approach to the 1,2-difluorination of alkenes. The method utilizes a nucleophilic fluoride source and an oxidant in conjunction with an aryl iodide catalyst and is applicable to alkenes with all types of substitution patterns. In general, the vicinal difluoride products are produced with high diastereoselectivities. The observed sense of stereoinduction implicates anchimeric assistance pathways in reactions of alkenes bearing neighboring Lewis basic functionality. PMID:27046019

  10. [C. E. Alken (1909-1986) and the Alken-Prize].

    PubMed

    Konert, J

    2016-06-01

    C. E. Alken is regarded as the Nestor of German urology post World War II. His development path is given in brief and his specific contributions to the emancipation of the field are pointed out. In 1948 he received a teaching assignment in urology at Saarland State University Homburg, where in 1952, a Chair of Urology was established, and in 1958 he received the Ordinariat. The "Alken-Prize" which was named after him, is also presented. PMID:27160773

  11. Anaerobic oxidation of long-chain n-alkanes by the hyperthermophilic sulfate-reducing archaeon, Archaeoglobus fulgidus

    PubMed Central

    Khelifi, Nadia; Amin Ali, Oulfat; Roche, Philippe; Grossi, Vincent; Brochier-Armanet, Céline; Valette, Odile; Ollivier, Bernard; Dolla, Alain; Hirschler-Réa, Agnès

    2014-01-01

    The thermophilic sulfate-reducing archaeon Archaeoglobus fulgidus strain VC-16 (DSM 4304), which is known to oxidize fatty acids and n-alkenes, was shown to oxidize saturated hydrocarbons (n-alkanes in the range C10–C21) with thiosulfate or sulfate as a terminal electron acceptor. The amount of n-hexadecane degradation observed was in stoichiometric agreement with the theoretically expected amount of thiosulfate reduction. One of the pathways used by anaerobic microorganisms to activate alkanes is addition to fumarate that involves alkylsuccinate synthase as a key enzyme. A search for genes encoding homologous enzymes in A. fulgidus identified the pflD gene (locus-tag AF1449) that was previously annotated as a pyruvate formate lyase. A phylogenetic analysis revealed that this gene is of bacterial origin and was likely acquired by A. fulgidus from a bacterial donor through a horizontal gene transfer. Based on three-dimensional modeling of the corresponding protein and molecular dynamic simulations, we hypothesize an alkylsuccinate synthase activity for this gene product. The pflD gene expression was upregulated during the growth of A. fulgidus on an n-alkane (C16) compared with growth on a fatty acid. Our results suggest that anaerobic alkane degradation in A. fulgidus may involve the gene pflD in alkane activation through addition to fumarate. These findings highlight the possible importance of hydrocarbon oxidation at high temperatures by A. fulgidus in hydrothermal vents and the deep biosphere. PMID:24763368

  12. Nucleophile-Assisted Alkene Activation: Olefins Alone Are Often Incompetent.

    PubMed

    Ashtekar, Kumar Dilip; Vetticatt, Mathew; Yousefi, Roozbeh; Jackson, James E; Borhan, Babak

    2016-07-01

    Emerging work on organocatalytic enantioselective halocyclizations naturally draws on conditions where both new bonds must be formed under delicate control, the reaction regime where the concerted nature of the AdE3 mechanism is of greatest importance. Without assistance, many simple alkene substrates react slowly or not at all with conventional halenium donors under synthetically relevant reaction conditions. As demonstrated earlier by Shilov, Cambie, Williams, Fahey, and others, alkenes can undergo a concerted AdE3-type reaction via nucleophile participation, which sets the configuration of the newly created stereocenters at both ends in one step. Herein, we explore the modulation of alkene reactivity and halocyclization rates by nucleophile proximity and basicity, through detailed analyses of starting material spectroscopy, addition stereopreferences, isotope effects, and nucleophile-alkene interactions, all obtained in a context directly relevant to synthesis reaction conditions. The findings build on the prior work by highlighting the reactivity spectrum of halocyclizations from stepwise to concerted, and suggest strategies for design of new reactions. Alkene reactivity is seen to span the range from the often overgeneralized "sophomore textbook" image of stepwise electrophilic attack on the alkene and subsequent nucleophilic bond formation, to the nucleophile-assisted alkene activation (NAAA) cases where electron donation from the nucleophilic addition partner activates the alkene for electrophilic attack. By highlighting the factors that control reactivity across this range, this study suggests opportunities to explain and control stereo-, regio-, and organocatalytic chemistry in this important class of alkene additions. PMID:27284808

  13. Adsorption of small hydrocarbons on rutile TiO2(110)

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Chen, Long; Smith, R. Scott; Kay, Bruce D.; Dohnalek, Zdenek

    2015-11-21

    Here, temperature programmed desorption and molecular beam scattering were used to study the adsorption and desorption of small hydrocarbons (n-alkanes, 1-alkenes and 1-alkynes of C1–C4) on rutile TiO2(110). We show that the sticking coefficients for all the hydrocarbons are close to unity (> 0.95) at an adsorption temperature of 60 K. The desorption energies for hydrocarbons of the same chain length increase from n-alkanes to 1-alkenes and to 1-alkynes. This trend is likely a consequence of additional dative bonding of the alkene and alkyne π system to the coordinatively unsaturated Ti5c sites. Similar to previous studies on the adsorption ofmore » n-alkanes on metal and metal oxide surfaces, we find that the desorption energies within each group (n-alkanes vs. 1-alkenes vs. 1-alkynes) from Ti5c sites increase linearly with the chain length. The absolute saturation coverages of each hydrocarbon on Ti5c sites were also determined. The saturation coverage of CH4, is found to be ~ 2/3 monolayer (ML). The saturation coverages of C2–C4 hydrocarbons are found nearly independent of the chain length with values of ~ 1/2 ML for n-alkanes and 1-alkenes and 2/3 ML for 1-alkynes. This result is surprising considering their similar sizes.« less

  14. Adsorption of small hydrocarbons on rutile TiO2(110)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Long; Smith, R. Scott; Kay, Bruce D.; Dohnálek, Zdenek

    2016-08-01

    Temperature programmed desorption and molecular beam scattering were used to study the adsorption and desorption of small hydrocarbons (n-alkanes, 1-alkenes and 1-alkynes of C1-C4) on rutile TiO2(110). We show that the sticking coefficients for all the hydrocarbons are close to unity (> 0.95) at an adsorption temperature of 60 K. The desorption energies for hydrocarbons of the same chain length increase from n-alkanes to 1-alkenes and to 1-alkynes. This trend is likely a consequence of additional dative bonding of the alkene and alkyne π system to the coordinatively unsaturated Ti5c sites. Similar to previous studies on the adsorption of n-alkanes on metal and metal oxide surfaces, we find that the desorption energies within each group (n-alkanes vs. 1-alkenes vs. 1-alkynes) from Ti5c sites increase linearly with the chain length. The absolute saturation coverages of each hydrocarbon on Ti5c sites were also determined. The saturation coverage of CH4, is found to be ~ 2/3 monolayer (ML). The saturation coverages of C2-C4 hydrocarbons are found nearly independent of the chain length with values of ~ 1/2 ML for n-alkanes and 1-alkenes and 2/3 ML for 1-alkynes. This result is surprising considering their similar sizes.

  15. An alkyne metathesis-based route toortho-dehydrobenzannulenes

    SciTech Connect

    Miljanic, Ognjen S.; Vollhardt, Peter C.; Whitener, Glenn D.

    2002-11-07

    An application of alkyne metathesis to 1,2-di(prop-1-ynyl)arenes, producing dehydrobenzannulenes, is described. An efficient method for selective Sonogashira couplings of bromoiodoarenes under conditions of microwave irradiation is also reported.

  16. Copper-Catalyzed Perfluoroalkylthiolation of Alkynes with Perfluoroalkanesulfenamides.

    PubMed

    Tlili, Anis; Alazet, Sébastien; Glenadel, Quentin; Billard, Thierry

    2016-07-11

    Copper-catalyzed direct perfluoroalkylthiolation of alkynes by using the corresponding perfluoroalkanesulfenamide reagent is reported. The selective mono- and bis-perfluoroalkylthiolation of alkynes can be conducted under very mild conditions (no base, room temperature) in very good to excellent yields. This approach, which uses a low toxicity, inexpensive copper catalyst that incorporates a commercially available ligand, is applied in the absence of any additional base. Preliminary mechanistic investigations shed some light on the nature of the unprecedented reactivity observed. PMID:27334703

  17. Rhodium-Catalyzed Enantioselective Hydroamination of Alkynes with Indolines

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Qing-An; Chen, Zhiwei; Dong, Vy M.

    2016-01-01

    The hydroamination of internal alkynes via tandem rhodium-catalysis gives branched N-allylic indolines with high regio- and enantioselectivity. An acid-switch provides access to the linear isomer in preference to the branched isomer by an isomerization mechanism. Mechanistic studies suggest formation of an allene intermediate, which undergoes hydroamination to generate allylic amines instead of the enamine or imine products typically observed in alkyne hydroaminations. PMID:26107923

  18. Ligand-Controlled Regiodivergent Copper-Catalyzed Alkylboration of Alkenes.

    PubMed

    Su, Wei; Gong, Tian-Jun; Lu, Xi; Xu, Meng-Yu; Yu, Chu-Guo; Xu, Zheng-Yang; Yu, Hai-Zhu; Xiao, Bin; Fu, Yao

    2015-10-26

    A novel copper-catalyzed regiodivergent alkylboration of alkenes with bis(pinacolato)diboron and alkyl halides has been developed. The regioselectivity of the alkylboration was controlled by subtle differences in the ligand structure. The reaction thus enables the practical, regiodivergent synthesis of two different alkyl boronic esters with complex structures from a single alkene. PMID:26338141

  19. Naturally Produced Defensive Alkenal Compounds Activate TRPA1.

    PubMed

    Blair, Nathaniel T; Philipson, Benjamin I; Richards, Paige M; Doerner, Julia F; Segura, Abraham; Silver, Wayne L; Clapham, David E

    2016-05-01

    (E)-2-alkenals are aldehydes containing an unsaturated bond between the alpha and beta carbons. 2-alkenals are produced by many organisms for defense against predators and secretions containing (E)-2-alkenals cause predators to stop attacking and allow the prey to escape. Chemical ecologists have described many alkenal compounds with 3-20 carbons common, having varied positions of double bonds and substitutions. How do these defensive alkenals act to deter predators? We have tested the effects of (E)-2-alkenals with 6-12 carbons on transient receptor potential channels (TRP) commonly found in sensory neurons. We find that (E)-2-alkenals activate transient receptor potential ankyrin subtype 1 (TRPA1) at low concentrations-EC50s 10-100 µM (in 0 added Ca(2+) external solutions). Other TRP channels were either weakly activated (TRPV1, TRPV3) or insensitive (TRPV2, TRPV4, TRPM8). (E)-2-alkenals may activate TRPA1 by modifying cysteine side chains. However, target cysteines include others beyond the 3 in the amino-terminus implicated in activation, as a channel with cysteines at 621, 641, 665 mutated to serine responded robustly. Related chemicals, including the aldehydes hexanal and decanal, and (E)-2-hexen-1-ol also activated TRPA1, but with weaker potency. Rat trigeminal nerve recordings and behavioral experiments showed (E)-2-hexenal was aversive. Our results suggest that TRPA1 is likely a major target of these commonly used defensive chemicals. PMID:26843529

  20. Catalytic conversion of light alkanes

    SciTech Connect

    Lyons, J.E.

    1992-06-30

    The second Quarterly Report of 1992 on the Catalytic Conversion of Light Alkanes reviews the work done between April 1, 1992 and June 31, 1992 on the Cooperative Agreement. The mission of this work is to devise a new catalyst which can be used in a simple economic process to convert the light alkanes in natural gas to oxygenate products that can either be used as clean-burning, high octane liquid fuels, as fuel components or as precursors to liquid hydrocarbon uwspomdon fuel. During the past quarter we have continued to design, prepare, characterize and test novel catalysts for the mild selective reaction of light hydrocarbons with air or oxygen to produce alcohols directly. These catalysts are designed to form active metal oxo (MO) species and to be uniquely active for the homolytic cleavage of the carbon-hydrogen bonds in light alkanes producing intermediates which can form alcohols. We continue to investigate three molecular environments for the active catalytic species that we are trying to generate: electron-deficient macrocycles (PHASE I), polyoxometallates (PHASE II), and regular oxidic lattices including zeolites and related structures as well as other molecular surface structures having metal oxo groups (PHASE I).

  1. Comparative study of alkali-vapour cells with alkane-, alkeneand 1-nonadecylbenzene-based antirelaxation wall coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balabas, M. V.; Tretiak, O. Yu

    2013-12-01

    The dependence of both longitudinal and transverse relaxation times of ground-state magnetic polarisation in alkali atoms on the coating temperature is experimentally studied for the first time in a rubidium-vapour cell with 1-nonadecylbenzene antirelaxation coating of inner walls. The comparison of these times with the relaxation times in a caesium-vapour cell with alkane wall coatings is presented. It is found that within the studied temperature range (294 - 340K) the transverse relaxation time decreases with increasing temperature of alkene and 1-nonadecylbenzene coatings. For the alkane coating such a dependence was not explicitly found. The longitudinal relaxation time begins to decrease in all cases when passing a certain critical temperature of the coating material. It is found that the unsaturated radical structure of the coating material molecules strongly affects its antirelaxation properties.

  2. Comparative study of alkali-vapour cells with alkane-, alkeneand 1-nonadecylbenzene-based antirelaxation wall coatings

    SciTech Connect

    Balabas, M V; Tretiak, O Yu

    2013-12-31

    The dependence of both longitudinal and transverse relaxation times of ground-state magnetic polarisation in alkali atoms on the coating temperature is experimentally studied for the first time in a rubidium-vapour cell with 1-nonadecylbenzene antirelaxation coating of inner walls. The comparison of these times with the relaxation times in a caesium-vapour cell with alkane wall coatings is presented. It is found that within the studied temperature range (294 – 340K) the transverse relaxation time decreases with increasing temperature of alkene and 1-nonadecylbenzene coatings. For the alkane coating such a dependence was not explicitly found. The longitudinal relaxation time begins to decrease in all cases when passing a certain critical temperature of the coating material. It is found that the unsaturated radical structure of the coating material molecules strongly affects its antirelaxation properties. (optical pumping)

  3. Alkane biohydroxylation: Interests, constraints and future developments.

    PubMed

    Soussan, Laurence; Pen, Nakry; Belleville, Marie-Pierre; Marcano, José Sanchez; Paolucci-Jeanjean, Delphine

    2016-03-20

    Alkanes constitute one of the vastest reserves of raw materials for the production of fine chemicals. This paper focuses on recent advances in alkane biohydroxylation, i.e. the bioactivation of alkanes into their corresponding alcohols. Enzyme and whole-cell biocatalysts have been reviewed. Process considerations to implement such biocatalysts in bioreactors at large scale by coupling the bioconversion with cofactor regeneration and product removal are also discussed. PMID:26853477

  4. Bacterial Genome Mining of Enzymatic Tools for Alkyne Biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Xuejun; Su, Michael; Manickam, Kadhirvel; Zhang, Wenjun

    2015-12-18

    The alkyne is an important functionality widely used in material science, pharmaceutical science, and chemical biology, but the importance of this functionality is contrasted by the very limited number of enzymes known to be involved in alkyne biosynthesis. We recently reported the first known carrier protein-dependent pathway for terminal alkyne formation, and in silico analysis suggested that this mechanism could be widespread in bacteria. In this paper, we screened additional homologous gene cassettes presumed to be involved in alkyne biosynthesis using both in vitro biochemical study and an E. coli-polyketide synthase (PKS) reporting system for in vivo analysis. We discovered and characterized a new terminal alkyne biosynthetic pathway comprised of TtuA, -B, and -C from Teredinibacter turnerae T7901. While the acyl-CoA ligase homologue (TtuA) demonstrated promiscuity in the activation and loading of medium-chain fatty acids onto the carrier protein (TtuC), the desaturase homologue (TtuB) showed stringent substrate specificity toward C10 fatty acyl moieties. In addition, TtuB was demonstrated to be a bifunctional desaturase/acetylenase that efficiently catalyzed two sequential O2-dependent dehydrogenation reactions. A novel terminal-alkyne bearing polyketide was further produced upon coexpression of ttuABC and a PKS gene in E. coli. The discovery and characterization of TtuA, -B, and -C provides us with a new bifunctional desaturase/acetylenase for mechanistic and structural study and expands the scarce enzyme inventory for the biosynthesis of the alkyne functionality, which has important applications in synthetic and chemical biology. PMID:26441143

  5. Bacterial genome mining of enzymatic tools for alkyne biosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Xuejun; Su, Michael; Manickam, Kadhirvel; Zhang, Wenjun

    2015-01-01

    The alkyne is an important functionality widely used in material science, pharmaceutical science, and chemical biology, but the importance of this functionality is contrasted by the very limited number of enzymes known to be involved in alkyne biosynthesis. We recently reported the first known carrier protein-dependent pathway for terminal alkyne formation, and in silico analysis suggested that this mechanism could be widespread in bacteria. In this paper, we screened additional homologous gene cassettes presumed to be involved in alkyne biosynthesis using both in vitro biochemical study and an E. coli-polyketide synthase (PKS) reporting system for in vivo analysis. We discovered and characterized a new terminal alkyne biosynthetic pathway comprised of TtuA, B, and C from Teredinibacter turnerae T7901. While the acyl-CoA ligase homolog (TtuA) demonstrated promiscuity in the activation and loading of medium-chain fatty acids onto the carrier protein (TtuC), the desaturase homolog (TtuB) showed stringent substrate specificity towards C10 fatty acyl moieties. In addition, TtuB was demonstrated to be a bifunctional desaturase/acetylenase that efficiently catalyzed two sequential O2-dependent dehydrogenation reactions. A novel terminal-alkyne bearing polyketide was further produced upon co-expression of ttuABC and a PKS gene in E. coli. The discovery and characterization of TtuA, B, and C provides us with a new bifunctional desaturase/acetylenase for mechanistic and structural study and expands the scarce enzyme inventory for the biosynthesis of the alkyne functionality, which has important applications in synthetic and chemical biology. PMID:26441143

  6. Synthesis of terminal alkenes from internal alkenes and ethylene via olefin metathesis

    DOEpatents

    Schrodi, Yann

    2011-11-29

    This invention relates generally to olefin metathesis, and more particularly relates to the synthesis of terminal alkenes from internal alkenes using a cross-metathesis reaction catalyzed by a selected olefin metathesis catalyst. In one embodiment of the invention, for example, a method is provided for synthesizing a terminal olefin, the method comprising contacting an olefinic substrate comprised of at least one internal olefin with ethylene, in the presence of a metathesis catalyst, wherein the catalyst is present in an amount that is less than about 1000 ppm relative to the olefinic substrate, and wherein the metathesis catalyst has the structure of formula (II) ##STR00001## wherein the various substituents are as defined herein. The invention has utility, for example, in the fields of catalysis, organic synthesis, and industrial chemistry.

  7. Synthesis of terminal alkenes from internal alkenes and ethylene via olefin metathesis

    DOEpatents

    Schrodi, Yann

    2016-02-09

    This invention relates generally to olefin metathesis, and more particularly relates to the synthesis of terminal alkenes from internal alkenes using a cross-metathesis reaction catalyzed by a selected olefin metathesis catalyst. In one embodiment of the invention, for example, a method is provided for synthesizing a terminal olefin, the method comprising contacting an olefinic substrate comprised of at least one internal olefin with ethylene, in the presence of a metathesis catalyst, wherein the catalyst is present in an amount that is less than about 1000 ppm relative to the olefinic substrate, and wherein the metathesis catalyst has the structure of formula (II) ##STR00001## wherein the various substituents are as defined herein. The invention has utility, for example, in the fields of catalysis, organic synthesis, and industrial chemistry.

  8. Synthesis of terminal alkenes from internal alkenes and ethylene via olefin metathesis

    DOEpatents

    Schrodi, Yann

    2013-07-09

    This invention relates generally to olefin metathesis, and more particularly relates to the synthesis of terminal alkenes from internal alkenes using a cross-metathesis reaction catalyzed by a selected olefin metathesis catalyst. In one embodiment of the invention, for example, a method is provided for synthesizing a terminal olefin, the method comprising contacting an olefinic substrate comprised of at least one internal olefin with ethylene, in the presence of a metathesis catalyst, wherein the catalyst is present in an amount that is less than about 1000 ppm relative to the olefinic substrate, and wherein the metathesis catalyst has the structure of formula (II) ##STR00001## wherein the various substituents are as defined herein. The invention has utility, for example, in the fields of catalysis, organic synthesis, and industrial chemistry.

  9. Synthesis of terminal alkenes from internal alkenes and ethylene via olefin metathesis

    DOEpatents

    Schrodi, Yann

    2015-09-22

    This invention relates generally to olefin metathesis, and more particularly relates to the synthesis of terminal alkenes from internal alkenes using a cross-metathesis reaction catalyzed by a selected olefin metathesis catalyst. In one embodiment of the invention, for example, a method is provided for synthesizing a terminal olefin, the method comprising contacting an olefinic substrate comprised of at least one internal olefin with ethylene, in the presence of a metathesis catalyst, wherein the catalyst is present in an amount that is less than about 1000 ppm relative to the olefinic substrate, and wherein the metathesis catalyst has the structure of formula (II) ##STR00001## wherein the various substituents are as defined herein. The invention has utility, for example, in the fields of catalysis, organic synthesis, and industrial chemistry.

  10. Reaction pathway for alkane dehydrocyclization

    SciTech Connect

    Shi, Buchang; Davis, B.H.

    1996-08-01

    Naphtha reforming to produce high octane gasoline is an important process. Many reaction mechanisms are involved in this process. For example, the study of the fundamentals of this process led to the concept of bi- or poly-functional catalysis. The results of this study provide additional mechanistic information about the dehydrocyclization of an n-alkane to produce aromatics. The reaction coordinate diagram advanced to account for the observation of irreversible adsorption should be modified to account for the present results. 32 refs., 1 fig.

  11. Anti-Markovnikov hydroimination of terminal alkynes in gold-catalyzed pyridine construction from ammonia.

    PubMed

    Wang, Liliang; Kong, Lingbing; Li, Yongxin; Ganguly, Rakesh; Kinjo, Rei

    2015-08-11

    Gold-catalyzed hydroimination of terminal alkynes, giving rise to anti-Markovnikov adducts concomitant with unstable Markovnikov adducts is described. The elementary step can be applied for the construction of pyridine derivatives from ammonia and alkynes. PMID:26144528

  12. Metal-catalyzed oxidation of 2-alkenals generates genotoxic 4-oxo-2-alkenals during lipid peroxidation.

    PubMed

    Nuka, Erika; Tomono, Susumu; Ishisaka, Akari; Kato, Yoji; Miyoshi, Noriyuki; Kawai, Yoshichika

    2016-10-01

    Lipid peroxidation products react with cellular molecules, such as DNA bases, to form covalent adducts, which are associated with aging and disease processes. Since lipid peroxidation is a complex process and occurs in multiple stages, there might be yet unknown reaction pathways. Here, we analyzed comprehensively 2'-deoxyguanosine (dG) adducts with oxidized arachidonic acid using liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry and found the formation of 7-(2-oxo-hexyl)-etheno-dG as one of the major unidentified adducts. The formation of this adduct was reproduced in the reaction of dG with 2-octenal and predominantly with 4-oxo-2-octenal (OOE). We also found that other 2-alkenals (with five or more carbons) generate corresponding 4-oxo-2-alkenal-type adducts. Importantly, it was found that transition metals enhanced the oxidation of C4-position of 2-octenal, leading to the formation of OOE-dG adduct. These findings demonstrated a new pathway for the formation of 4-oxo-2-alkenals during lipid peroxidation and might provide a mechanism for metal-catalyzed genotoxicity. PMID:27281652

  13. Enantioselective copper-catalyzed carboetherification of unactivated alkenes.

    PubMed

    Bovino, Michael T; Liwosz, Timothy W; Kendel, Nicole E; Miller, Yan; Tyminska, Nina; Zurek, Eva; Chemler, Sherry R

    2014-06-16

    Chiral saturated oxygen heterocycles are important components of bioactive compounds. Cyclization of alcohols onto pendant alkenes is a direct route to their synthesis, but few catalytic enantioselective methods enabling cyclization onto unactivated alkenes exist. Herein reported is a highly efficient copper-catalyzed cyclization of γ-unsaturated pentenols which terminates in C-C bond formation, a net alkene carboetherification. Both intra- and intermolecular C-C bond formations are demonstrated, thus yielding functionalized chiral tetrahydrofurans as well as fused-ring and bridged-ring oxabicyclic products. Transition-state calculations support a cis-oxycupration stereochemistry-determining step. PMID:24798697

  14. Iron-catalyzed diboration and carboboration of alkynes.

    PubMed

    Nakagawa, Naohisa; Hatakeyama, Takuji; Nakamura, Masaharu

    2015-03-01

    An iron-catalyzed diboration reaction of alkynes with bis(pinacolato)diboron (B2pin2) and external borating agents (MeOB(OR)2) affords diverse symmetrical or unsymmetrical cis-1,2-diborylalkenes. The simple protocol for the diboration reaction can be extended to the iron-catalyzed carboboration of alkynes with primary and, unprecedentedly, secondary alkyl halides, affording various tetrasubstituted monoborylalkenes in a highly stereoselective manner. DFT calculations indicate that a boryliron intermediate adds across the triple bond of an alkyne to afford an alkenyliron intermediate, which can react with the external trapping agents, borates and alkyl halides. In situ trapping experiments support the intermediacy of the alkenyl iron species using radical probe stubstrates. PMID:25631242

  15. Alkane-Based Urethane Potting Compounds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morris, D. E.

    1986-01-01

    New low viscosity urethanes easily mixed, molded, and outgassed. Alkane-based urethanes resist hydrolysis and oxidation and have excellent dielectric properties. Low-viscosity alkane-based urethane prepolymer prepared by one-step reaction of either isophorone diisocyanate or methyl-bis (4-cyclohexyl isocyanate) with hydrogenated, hydroxy-terminated polybutadiene (HTPBD).

  16. Rhodium(i)-catalysed intermolecular alkyne insertion into (2-pyridylmethylene)cyclobutenes.

    PubMed

    Matsuda, Takanori; Matsumoto, Takeshi

    2016-06-14

    Cyclobutenes with 2-pyridylmethylene groups at the 3 position underwent an intermolecular alkyne insertion reaction in the presence of a rhodium(i) catalyst at 170 °C to afford substituted benzenes. Among the different 2-pyridylmethylene groups examined, 3-methyl-2-pyridyl derivatives showed superior activity and readily coupled with various alkynes, including sterically demanding, heteroaromatic and terminal alkynes. PMID:27193826

  17. Colorimetric high-throughput assay for alkene epoxidation catalyzed by cytochrome P450 BM-3 variant 139-3.

    PubMed

    Alcalde, Miguel; Farinas, Edgardo T; Arnold, Frances H

    2004-03-01

    Cytochrome P450 BM-3 variant 139-3 is highly active in the hydroxylation of alkanes and fatty acids (AGlieder, ET Farinas, and FH Arnold, Nature Biotech 2002;20:1135-1139); it also epoxidizes various alkenes, including styrene. Here the authors describe a colorimetric, high-throughput assay suitable for optimizing this latter activity by directed evolution. The product of styrene oxidation by 139-3, styrene oxide, reacts with the nucleophile gamma-(4-nitrobenzyl)pyridine (NBP) to form a purple-colored precursor dye, which can be monitored spectrophotometrically in cell lysates. The sensitivity limit of this assay is 50-100 microM of product, and the detection limit for P450 BM-3 139-3 is ~0.2 microM of enzyme. To validate the assay, activities in a small library of random mutants were compared to those determined using an NADPH depletion assay for initial turnover rates. PMID:15006137

  18. Copper-Catalyzed Intramolecular Oxidative Amination of Unactivated Internal Alkenes.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Peng; Xu, Fan; Qian, Xiang-Yang; Yohannes, Yared; Song, Jinshuai; Lu, Xin; Xu, Hai-Chao

    2016-03-18

    A copper-catalyzed oxidative amination of unactivated internal alkenes has been developed. The Wacker-type oxidative alkene amination reaction is traditionally catalyzed by a palladium through a mechanism involving aminopalladation and β-hydride elimination. Replacing the precious and scarce palladium with a cheap and abundant copper for this transformation has been challenging because of the difficulty associated with the aminocupration of internal alkenes. The combination of a simple copper salt, without additional ligand, as the catalyst and Dess-Martin periodinane as the oxidant, promotes efficiently the oxidative amination of allylic carbamates and ureas bearing di- and trisubstituted alkenes leading to oxazolidinones and imidazolidinones. Preliminary mechanistic studies suggested a hybrid radical-organometallic mechanism involving an amidyl radical cyclization to form the key C-N bond. PMID:26878987

  19. Room Temperature Hydrosilylation of Silicon Nanocrystals with Bifunctional Terminal Alkenes

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Yixuan; Hessel, Colin M.; Bogart, Timothy; Panthani, Matthew G.; Rasch, Michael R.; Korgel, Brian A.

    2013-01-01

    H-terminated Si nanocrystals undergo room temperature hydrosilylation with bifunctional alkenes with distal polar moieties—ethyl-, methyl-ester or carboxylic acids—without the aid of light or added catalyst. The passivated Si nanocrystals exhibit bright photoluminescence (PL) and disperse in polar solvents, including water. We propose a reaction mechanism in which ester or carboxylic acid groups facilitate direct nucleophilic attack of the highly curved Si surface of the nanocrystals by the alkene. PMID:23312033

  20. Synthesis and structural characterization of the individual diastereoisomers of a cross-stapled alkene-bridged nisin DE-ring mimic.

    PubMed

    Slootweg, Jack C; Kemmink, Johan; Liskamp, Rob M J; Rijkers, Dirk T S

    2013-11-21

    Herein, we describe the synthesis, structural characterization, and synthetic use as an advanced intermediate of a cross-stapled alkene-bridged hexapeptide to mimic the DE-ring of the lantibiotic nisin. The linear precursor was cyclized by ring-closing metathesis to give the correctly folded bicyclic hexapeptide in a single step, and the four individual diastereoisomers were isolated, structurally assigned and characterized by HPLC, NMR and MS, respectively. The bicyclic hexapeptide was used as a versatile advanced synthon and was modified at its C- and N-terminus, among others, with an azide moiety to access a building block suitable for Cu(I)-catalyzed alkyne-azide cycloaddition-based ligation reactions. PMID:24081149

  1. A Hydration of an Alkyne Illustrating Steam and Vacuum Distillation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wasacz, J. P.; Badding, V. G.

    1982-01-01

    Reports on the conversion 2,5-dimethylhexyne-2,5-diol(I) to 2,2,5,5-tetramethyltetrahydrofuran-3-one(II) using aqueous mercuric sulfate without the use of acid. The experiment has been successfully performed in introductory organic chemistry laboratories demonstrating alkyne hydration, steam distillation, vacuum distillation, drying of organic…

  2. Method for transforming alkynes into (E)-dibromoalkenes.

    PubMed

    Xiang, Jiannan; Yuan, Rui; Wang, Ruijia; Yi, Niannian; Lu, Linghui; Zou, Huaxu; He, Weimin

    2014-12-01

    The highly stereoselective bromination of alkynes has been realized by using copper(II) bromide as both the reacting partner and the catalyst, offering a generally efficient synthesis of (E)-dibromoalkenes. The reaction conditions are exceptionally mild, and a wide range of functional groups are well tolerated. PMID:25407142

  3. Silver-catalysed intramolecular hydroamination of alkynes with trichloroacetimidates.

    PubMed

    Wong, Valerie H L; Hor, T S Andy; Hii, King Kuok Mimi

    2013-10-18

    Silver(I) complexes catalyse the intramolecular addition of trichloroacetimidates to alkynes. In the absence of a ligand, the selectivity of the reaction is dependent upon the nature of the counter-anion and solvent. The introduction of non-chelating nitrogeneous ligands suppresses competitive Brønsted acid catalysis, improving the yield and selectivity of the reaction. PMID:23999555

  4. Hydrogen isotope exchange between n-alkanes and water under hydrothermal conditions: implications for abiotic and thermogenic hydrocarbons in vent fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reeves, E. P.; Seewald, J.; Sylva, S.

    2010-12-01

    Stable isotopes are extensively utilized in studies of hydrocarbons in naturals fluids. However, factors controlling the hydrogen isotope (2H/1H) composition of dissolved hydrocarbons in hydrothermal fluids are still poorly understood despite interest in their 2H/1H signatures as indicators of abiogenesis. Due to its high activation energy for exchange, alkyl-bound hydrogen (H) is typically considered to be isotopically conservative. Incorporation of water-derived H under hydrothermal conditions may, however, obscure any primary signatures associated with abiotic polymerization. To examine this process, we conducted experiments to investigate 2H/1H exchange between aqueous n-alkanes and water using a Au-TiO2 flexible cell hydrothermal apparatus. C1-C5 n-alkanes were heated at 325°C and 350 bar in aqueous solutions of varying initial 2H/1H ratios (δ2H) in the presence of a pyrite-pyrrhotite-magnetite (PPM) mineral redox buffer. Extensive incorporation of water-derived H into C2-C5 n-alkanes was observed on timescales of months. In contrast, relatively minor incorporation was observed for CH4. Isotopic exchange is facilitated by reversible equilibration of n-alkanes and their corresponding alkenes by the reaction: CnH2n+2(aq) = CnH2n(aq) + H2(aq) Where H2(aq) is derived from water. The lack of substantial n-alkane decomposition on the timescale of observation, combined with an approach to steady-state isotopic compositions, indicate that n-alkane δD values likely reflect an approach to isotopic equilibrium rather than kinetically-controlled fractionation effects associated with degradation reactions. Substantially lower amounts of exchange were observed for ethane relative to C3-C5 n-alkanes, which suggests that alkene isomerization reactions may enhance incorporation of water-derived H in these compounds. Thus, reaction mechanisms exist in hydrothermal fluids that allow rapid 2H/1H exchange of alkyl-H with water on timescales comparable to crustal residence times

  5. Metabolism of alkenes and ketones by Candida maltosa and related yeasts

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Knowledge is scarce about the degradation of ketones in yeasts. For bacteria a subterminal degradation of alkanes to ketones and their further metabolization has been described which always involved Baeyer-Villiger monooxygenases (BVMOs). In addition, the question has to be clarified whether alkenes are converted to ketones, in particular for the oil degrading yeast Candida maltosa little is known. In this study we show the degradation of the aliphatic ketone dodecane-2-one by Candida maltosa and the related yeasts Candida tropicalis, Candida catenulata and Candida albicans as well as Trichosporon asahii and Yarrowia lipolytica. One pathway is initiated by the formation of decyl acetate, resulting from a Baeyer-Villiger-oxidation of this ketone. Beyond this, an initial reduction to dodecane-2-ol by a keto reductase was clearly shown. In addition, two different ways to metabolize dodec-1-ene were proposed. One involved the formation of dodecane-2-one and the other one a conversion leading to carboxylic and dicarboxylic acids. Furthermore the induction of ketone degrading enzymes by dodecane-2-one and dodec-1-ene was shown. Interestingly, with dodecane no subterminal degradation products were detected and it did not induce any enzymes to convert dodecane-2-one. PMID:25309846

  6. Determining the Impact of Ligand and Alkene Substituents on Bonding in Gold(I)-Alkene Complexes Supported by N-Heterocyclic Carbenes: A Computational Study.

    PubMed

    York, John T

    2016-08-01

    The nature of the gold(I)-alkene bond in [(NHC)Au(alkene)](+) complexes (where NHC is the N-heterocyclic carbene 1,3-bis(2,6-dimethylphenyl)imidazole-2-ylidine and its derivatives) has been studied using density functional theory. By utilization of a series of electron-withdrawing and electron-donating substituents ranging from -NO2 to -NH2, an examination of substituent effects has been undertaken with 4-substituted NHC ligands, monosubstituted ethylene derivatives, and 4-substituted styrene derivatives. Natural population, natural bond orbital (NBO), molecular orbital, and bond energy decomposition analysis (EDA) methods have been used to quantify a number of important parameters, including the charge of the coordinated alkenes and the magnitude of alkene→[(NHC)Au](+) and [(NHC)Au](+)→alkene electron donation. EDA methods have also been used to quantify the strength of the [(NHC)Au](+)-(alkene) bond and the impact of both ligand and alkene substitution on different components of the interaction, including polarization, orbital, electrostatic, and Pauli repulsive contributions. Finally, molecular orbital analysis has been used to understand the activation of the alkenes in terms of orbital composition and stabilization within the [(NHC)Au(alkene)](+) complexes relative to the free alkenes. These results provide important insight into the fundamental nature of gold(I)-alkene bonding and the impact of both ligand and alkene substitution on the electronic structure of these complexes. PMID:27455390

  7. Supported organoiridium catalysts for alkane dehydrogenation

    DOEpatents

    Baker, R. Thomas; Sattelberger, Alfred P.; Li, Hongbo

    2013-09-03

    Solid supported organoiridium catalysts, a process for preparing such solid supported organoiridium catalysts, and the use of such solid supported organoiridium catalysts in dehydrogenation reactions of alkanes is provided. The catalysts can be easily recovered and recycled.

  8. Combinatorial metabolic engineering of Saccharomyces cerevisiae for terminal alkene production.

    PubMed

    Chen, Binbin; Lee, Dong-Yup; Chang, Matthew Wook

    2015-09-01

    Biological production of terminal alkenes has garnered a significant interest due to their industrial applications such as lubricants, detergents and fuels. Here, we engineered the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae to produce terminal alkenes via a one-step fatty acid decarboxylation pathway and improved the alkene production using combinatorial engineering strategies. In brief, we first characterized eight fatty acid decarboxylases to enable and enhance alkene production. We then increased the production titer 7-fold by improving the availability of the precursor fatty acids. We additionally increased the titer about 5-fold through genetic cofactor engineering and gene expression tuning in rich medium. Lastly, we further improved the titer 1.8-fold to 3.7 mg/L by optimizing the culturing conditions in bioreactors. This study represents the first report of terminal alkene biosynthesis in S. cerevisiae, and the abovementioned combinatorial engineering approaches collectively increased the titer 67.4-fold. We envision that these approaches could provide insights into devising engineering strategies to improve the production of fatty acid-derived biochemicals in S. cerevisiae. PMID:26164646

  9. Intramolecular Alkene Aminocarbonylation Using Concerted Cycloadditions of Amino-Isocyanates.

    PubMed

    Ivanovich, Ryan A; Clavette, Christian; Vincent-Rocan, Jean-François; Roveda, Jean-Grégoire; Gorelsky, Serge I; Beauchemin, André M

    2016-06-01

    The ubiquity of nitrogen heterocycles in biologically active molecules challenges synthetic chemists to develop a variety of tools for their construction. While developing metal-free hydroamination reactions of hydrazine derivatives, it was discovered that carbazates and semicarbazides can also lead to alkene aminocarbonylation products if nitrogen-substituted isocyanates (N-isocyanates) are formed in situ as reactive intermediates. At first this reaction required high temperatures (150-200 °C), and issues included competing hydroamination and N-isocyanate dimerization pathways. Herein, improved conditions for concerted intramolecular alkene aminocarbonylation with N-isocyanates are reported. The use of βN-benzyl carbazate precursors allows the effective minimization of N-isocyanate dimerization. Diminished dimerization leads to higher yields of alkene aminocarbonylation products, to reactivity at lower temperatures, and to an improved scope for a reaction sequence involving alkene aminocarbonylation followed by 1,2-migration of the benzyl group. Furthermore, fine-tuning of the blocking (masking) group on the N-isocyanate precursor, and reaction conditions relying on base catalysis for N-isocyanate formation from simpler precursors resulted in room temperature reactivity, consequently minimizing the competing hydroamination pathway. Collectively, this work highlights that controlled reactivity of aminoisocyanates is possible, and provides a broadly applicable alkene aminocarbonylation approach to heterocycles possessing the β-aminocarbonyl motif. PMID:27112602

  10. Solar photothermochemical alkane reverse combustion

    PubMed Central

    Chanmanee, Wilaiwan; Islam, Mohammad Fakrul; Dennis, Brian H.; MacDonnell, Frederick M.

    2016-01-01

    A one-step, gas-phase photothermocatalytic process for the synthesis of hydrocarbons, including liquid alkanes, aromatics, and oxygenates, with carbon numbers (Cn) up to C13, from CO2 and water is demonstrated in a flow photoreactor operating at elevated temperatures (180–200 °C) and pressures (1–6 bar) using a 5% cobalt on TiO2 catalyst and under UV irradiation. A parametric study of temperature, pressure, and partial pressure ratio revealed that temperatures in excess of 160 °C are needed to obtain the higher Cn products in quantity and that the product distribution shifts toward higher Cn products with increasing pressure. In the best run so far, over 13% by mass of the products were C5+ hydrocarbons and some of these, i.e., octane, are drop-in replacements for existing liquid hydrocarbons fuels. Dioxygen was detected in yields ranging between 64% and 150%. In principle, this tandem photochemical–thermochemical process, fitted with a photocatalyst better matched to the solar spectrum, could provide a cheap and direct method to produce liquid hydrocarbons from CO2 and water via a solar process which uses concentrated sunlight for both photochemical excitation to generate high-energy intermediates and heat to drive important thermochemical carbon-chain-forming reactions. PMID:26903631

  11. Solar photothermochemical alkane reverse combustion.

    PubMed

    Chanmanee, Wilaiwan; Islam, Mohammad Fakrul; Dennis, Brian H; MacDonnell, Frederick M

    2016-03-01

    A one-step, gas-phase photothermocatalytic process for the synthesis of hydrocarbons, including liquid alkanes, aromatics, and oxygenates, with carbon numbers (Cn) up to C13, from CO2 and water is demonstrated in a flow photoreactor operating at elevated temperatures (180-200 °C) and pressures (1-6 bar) using a 5% cobalt on TiO2 catalyst and under UV irradiation. A parametric study of temperature, pressure, and partial pressure ratio revealed that temperatures in excess of 160 °C are needed to obtain the higher Cn products in quantity and that the product distribution shifts toward higher Cn products with increasing pressure. In the best run so far, over 13% by mass of the products were C5+ hydrocarbons and some of these, i.e., octane, are drop-in replacements for existing liquid hydrocarbons fuels. Dioxygen was detected in yields ranging between 64% and 150%. In principle, this tandem photochemical-thermochemical process, fitted with a photocatalyst better matched to the solar spectrum, could provide a cheap and direct method to produce liquid hydrocarbons from CO2 and water via a solar process which uses concentrated sunlight for both photochemical excitation to generate high-energy intermediates and heat to drive important thermochemical carbon-chain-forming reactions. PMID:26903631

  12. The Strongest Brønsted Acid: Protonation of Alkanes by H(CHB11F11) at Room Temperature**

    PubMed Central

    Nava, Matthew; Stoyanova, Irina V.; Cummings, Steven; Stoyanov, Evgenii S.

    2016-01-01

    What is the strongest acid? Can a simple Brønsted acid be prepared that can protonate an alkane at room temperature? Can that acid be free of the complicating effects of added Lewis acids that are typical of common, difficult-to-handle superacid mixtures? The carborane superacid H-(CHB11F11) is that acid. It is an extremely moisture-sensitive solid, prepared by treatment of anhydrous HCl with [Et3Si–H–SiEt3][CHB11F11]. It adds H2O to form [H3O][CHB11F11] and benzene to form the benzenium ion salt [C6H7][CHB11F11]. It reacts with butane to form a crystalline tBu+ salt and with n-hexane to form an isolable hexyl carbocation salt. Carbocations, which are thus no longer transient intermediates, react with NaH either by hydride addition to re-form an alkane or by deprotonation to form an alkene and H2. By protonating alkanes at room temperature, the reactivity of H(CHB11F11) opens up new opportunities for the easier study of acid-catalyzed hydrocarbon reforming. PMID:24339386

  13. DFT studies on the directing group dependent arene-alkene cross-couplings: arene activation vs. alkene activation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lei; Fang, De-Cai

    2015-08-01

    Due to its green-chemistry advantages, the dehydrogenative Heck reaction (DHR) has experienced enormous growth over the past few decades. In this work, two competing reaction channels were comparatively studied for the Pd(OAc)2-catalyzed DHRs of arenes with alkenes, referred to herein as the arene activation mechanism and the alkene activation mechanism, respectively, which mainly differ in the involvement of the reactants in the C-H activation step. Our calculations reveal that the commonly accepted arene activation mechanism is plausible for the desired arene-alkene cross-coupling; in contrast, the alternative alkene activation mechanism is kinetically inaccessible for the desired cross-coupling, but it is feasible for the homo-coupling of alkenes. The nature of directing groups on reactants could mainly determine the dominance of the two competing reaction routes, and therefore, influence the experimental yields. A wide range of directing groups experimentally used are examined by the density functional theory (DFT) method in this work, providing theoretical guidance for screening compatible reactants. PMID:26108375

  14. Intramolecular Aminocyanation of Alkenes via N–CN Bond Cleavage**

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Zhongda; Pound, Sarah M.; Rondla, Naveen R.; Douglas, Christopher J.

    2014-01-01

    A metal-free, Lewis acid-promoted intramolecular aminocyanation of alkenes was developed. B(C6F5)3 activates N-sulfonyl cyanamides, leading an formal cleavage of the N-CN bonds in conjunction with vicinal addition of sulfonamide and nitrile groups across an alkene. This method enables atom-economical access to indolines and tetrahydroquinolines in excellent yields, and provides a complementary strategy for regioselective alkene difunctionalizations with sulfonamide and nitrile groups. Labeling experiments with 13C suggest a fully intramolecular cyclization pattern due to lack of label scrambling in double crossover experiments. Catalysis with Lewis acid is realized and the reaction can be conducted under air. PMID:24719371

  15. Structural insights into diversity and n-alkane biodegradation mechanisms of alkane hydroxylases

    PubMed Central

    Ji, Yurui; Mao, Guannan; Wang, Yingying; Bartlam, Mark

    2013-01-01

    Environmental microbes utilize four degradation pathways for the oxidation of n-alkanes. Although the enzymes degrading n-alkanes in different microbes may vary, enzymes functioning in the first step in the aerobic degradation of alkanes all belong to the alkane hydroxylases. Alkane hydroxylases are a class of enzymes that insert oxygen atoms derived from molecular oxygen into different sites of the alkane terminus (or termini) depending on the type of enzymes. In this review, we summarize the different types of alkane hydroxylases, their degrading steps, and compare typical enzymes from various classes with regard to their three-dimensional structures, in order to provide insights into how the enzymes mediate their different roles in the degradation of n-alkanes and what determines their different substrate ranges. Through the above analyzes, the degrading mechanisms of enzymes can be elucidated and molecular biological methods can be utilized to expand their catalytic roles in the petrochemical industry or in bioremediation of oil-contaminated environments. PMID:23519435

  16. Use of n-hexadecane-1,2-{sup 13}C to understand the cracking mechanism and kinetics of normal alkanes in crude oils

    SciTech Connect

    Burnham, A.K.; Gregg, H.R.; Ward, R.L.; Knauss, K.G.

    1995-12-01

    Adjacent {sup 13}C atoms are rare in natural abundance, so their use as isotopic tracers provides a sensitive and selective method to follow reaction pathways of specific molecules in complex reaction matrices. N-hexadecane-1,2-{sup 13}C added to neat hexedecane and three distinctly different crude oils has enabled us to outline similarities and differences in the high-pressure alkane cracking reactions in these different matrices, with and without added water. Reaction progress was monitored by GC-MS (P+2) and {sup 13}C NMR ({open_quotes}INADEQUATE{close_quotes} pulse sequence). The overall cracking rate is 60% slower in real oils, apparently because more labile sources in the crude oil preferentially donate hydrogen to the alkyl radicals. The oil matrices also inhibit the formation of larger branched alkanes by alkyl addition of alkenes.

  17. Paleoclimate and Asian monsoon variability inferred from n-alkanes and their stable isotopes at lake Donggi Cona, NE Tibetan Plateau

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saini, Jeetendra; Guenther, Franziska; Mäusbacher, Roland; Gleixner, Gerd

    2015-04-01

    The Tibetan Plateau is one of the most extensive and sensitive region of elevated topography affecting global climate. The interplay between the Asian summer monsoon and the westerlies greatly influences the lake systems at the Tibetan Plateau. Despite a considerable number of research efforts in last decade, possible environmental reactions to change in monsoon dynamics are still not well understood. Here we present results from a sediment core of lake Donggi Cona, which dates back to late glacial period. Distinct organic geochemical proxies and stable isotopes are used to study the paleoenvironmental and hydrological changes in late glacial and Holocene period. Sedimentary n-alkanes of lake Donggi Cona are used as a proxy for paleoclimatic and monsoonal reconstruction. The hydrogen (δD) and carbon (δ13C) isotopes of n-alkanes are used as proxy for hydrological and phytoplankton productivity, respectively . Qualitative and quantitative analysis were performed for n-alkanes over the sediment core. δD proxy for sedimentary n-alkanes is used to infer lake water and rainfall signal. δD of (n-alkane C23) records the signal of the lake water, whereas δD of (n-alkane C29) record the precipitation signal, hence act as an appropriate proxy to track Asian monsoon. Long chain n-alkanes dominate over the sediment core while unsaturated mid chain n-alkenes have high abundance in some samples. From 18.4-13.8 cal ka BP, sample shows low organic productivity due to cold and arid climate. After 13.8-11.8 cal ka BP, slight increase in phytoplankton productivity indicate onset of weaker monsoon. From 11.8-6.8 cal ka BP, high content of organic matter indicates rise in productivity and strong monsoon with high inflow. After 6.8 cal ka BP, decrease in phytoplankton productivity indicating cooler climate and show terrestrial signal. Our results provide new insight into the variability of east Asian monsoon and changes in phytoplankton productivity for last 18.4 ka. Keywords: n-alkanes

  18. Joint toxic effects of the type-2 alkene electrophiles.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lihai; Geohagen, Brian C; Gavin, Terrence; LoPachin, Richard M

    2016-07-25

    Human populations are exposed to complex environmental mixtures of acrolein, methylvinyl ketone (MVK) and other type-2 alkenes. Many members of this chemical class are electrophiles that possess a common molecular mechanism of toxicity; i.e., protein inactivation via formation of stable cysteine adducts. Therefore, acute or chronic exposure to type-2 alkene mixtures could represent a health risk due to additive or synergistic interactions among component chemicals. Despite this risk, there is little experimental information regarding the joint effects of type-2 alkenes. In the present study we used sum of toxic units (TUsum = ∑TUi) to assess the relative toxicity of different type-2 alkene mixtures. These studies involved well characterized environmental type-2 alkene toxicants and included amide (acrylamide; ACR), ketone (methyl vinyl ketone; MVK), aldehyde (2-ethylacrolein; EA) and ester (methyl acrylate; MA) derivatives. In chemico analyses revealed that both binary and ternary mixtures could deplete thiol groups according to an additive joint effect at equitoxic and non-equitoxic ratios; i.e., TUsum = 1.0 ± 0.20. In contrast, analyses of joint effects in SNB19 cell cultures indicated that different permutations of type-2 alkene mixtures produced mostly synergistic joint effects with respect to cell lethality; i.e., TUsum < 0.80. A mixture of ACR and MA was shown to produce joint toxicity in a rat model. This mixture accelerated the onset and development of neurotoxicity relative to the effects of the individual toxicants. Synergistic effects in biological models might occur when different cellular proteomes are targeted, whereas additive effects develop when the mixtures encompasses a similar proteome. PMID:27288850

  19. The mechanism for iron-catalyzed alkene isomerization in solution

    SciTech Connect

    Sawyer, Karma R.; Glascoe, Elizabeth A.; Cahoon, James F.; Schlegel, Jacob P.; Harris, Charles B.

    2008-05-27

    Here we report nano- through microsecond time-resolved IR experiments of iron-catalyzed alkene isomerization in room-temperature solution. We have monitored the photochemistry of a model system, Fe(CO){sub 4}({eta}{sup 2}-1-hexene), in neat 1-hexene solution. UV-photolysis of the starting material leads to the dissociation of a single CO to form Fe(CO){sub 3}({eta}{sup 2}-1-hexene), in a singlet spin state. This CO loss complex shows a dramatic selectivity to form an allyl hydride, HFe(CO){sub 3}({eta}{sup 3}-C{sub 6}H{sub 11}), via an internal C-H bond-cleavage reaction in 5-25 ns. We find no evidence for the coordination of an alkene molecule from the bath to the CO loss complex, but do observe coordination to the allyl hydride, indicating that it is the key intermediate in the isomerization mechanism. Coordination of the alkene ligand to the allyl hydride leads to the formation of the bis-alkene isomers, Fe(CO){sub 3}({eta}{sup 2}-1-hexene)({eta}{sup 2}-2-hexene) and Fe(CO){sub 3}({eta}{sup 2}-1-hexene){sub 2}. Because of the thermodynamic stability of Fe(CO){sub 3}({eta}{sup 2}-1-hexene)({eta}{sup 2}-2-hexene) over Fe(CO){sub 3}({eta}{sup 2}-1-hexene){sub 2} (ca. 12 kcal/mol), nearly 100% of the alkene population will be 2-alkene. The results presented herein provide the first direct evidence for this mechanism in solution and suggest modifications to the currently accepted mechanism.

  20. Alkenes with antioxidative activities from Murraya koenigii (L.) Spreng.

    PubMed

    Ma, Qin-Ge; Xu, Kun; Sang, Zhi-Pei; Wei, Rong-Rui; Liu, Wen-Min; Su, Ya-Lun; Yang, Jian-Bo; Wang, Ai-Guo; Ji, Teng-Fei; Li, Lu-Jun

    2016-02-01

    Four new alkenes (1-4), and six known alkenes (5-12) were isolated from Murraya koenigii (L.) Spreng. Their structures were elucidated on the basis of spectroscopic analyses and references. Compounds (1-12) were evaluated for antioxidative activities. Among them, compounds 1, 2, 4, and 7 exhibited significant antioxidative activities using 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) assay with IC50=21.4-49.5 μM. The known compounds (5-12) were isolated from this plant for the first time. PMID:26777629

  1. 40 CFR 721.3780 - Substituted and disubstituted tetrafluoro alkenes (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... tetrafluoro alkenes (generic). 721.3780 Section 721.3780 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION... New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.3780 Substituted and disubstituted tetrafluoro alkenes... substance identified generically as substituted and disubstituted tetrafluoro alkene (PMN P-84-105)...

  2. 40 CFR 721.3780 - Substituted and disubstituted tetrafluoro alkenes (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... tetrafluoro alkenes (generic). 721.3780 Section 721.3780 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION... New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.3780 Substituted and disubstituted tetrafluoro alkenes... substance identified generically as substituted and disubstituted tetrafluoro alkene (PMN P-84-105)...

  3. 40 CFR 721.3780 - Substituted and disubstituted tetrafluoro alkenes (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... tetrafluoro alkenes (generic). 721.3780 Section 721.3780 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION... New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.3780 Substituted and disubstituted tetrafluoro alkenes... substance identified generically as substituted and disubstituted tetrafluoro alkene (PMN P-84-105)...

  4. 40 CFR 721.3780 - Substituted and disubstituted tetrafluoro alkenes (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... tetrafluoro alkenes (generic). 721.3780 Section 721.3780 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION... New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.3780 Substituted and disubstituted tetrafluoro alkenes... substance identified generically as substituted and disubstituted tetrafluoro alkene (PMN P-84-105)...

  5. 40 CFR 721.3780 - Substituted and disubstituted tetrafluoro alkenes (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... tetrafluoro alkenes (generic). 721.3780 Section 721.3780 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION... New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.3780 Substituted and disubstituted tetrafluoro alkenes... substance identified generically as substituted and disubstituted tetrafluoro alkene (PMN P-84-105)...

  6. Alkyne-tag Raman imaging of bio-active small molecules in live cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ando, Jun; Palonpon, Almar F.; Yamakoshi, Hiroyuki; Dodo, Kosuke; Kawata, Satoshi; Sodeoka, Mikiko; Fujita, Katsumasa

    2015-12-01

    Raman microscopy is useful for molecular imaging and analysis of biological specimens. Here, we used alkyne containing a carbon-carbon triple bond as a Raman tag for observing small molecules in live cells. Alkyne tags can maintain original properties of target molecules with providing high chemical specificity owing to its distinct peak in a Raman-silent window of biomolecules. For demonstrations, alkyne-tagged thymidine and coenzyme Q analogue in live cells were visualized with high-spatial resolution. We extended the application of alkyne-tag imaging to visualize cell organelles and specific lipid components in artificial monolayer membranes.

  7. Metal-Free Markovnikov-Type Alkyne Hydration under Mild Conditions.

    PubMed

    Liu, Wenbo; Wang, Haining; Li, Chao-Jun

    2016-05-01

    A Markovnikov-type alkyne hydration protocol is presented using 20% CF3SO3H (TfOH) as the catalyst under unprecedented mild conditions applicable to various alkynes, including terminal arylalkynes, terminal nonfunctionalized aliphatic alkynes, and internal alkynes with excellent regioselectivity in good to excellent yields (average yields >85%). The reaction procedure operates under mild conditions (25-70 °C), with broad functional group compatibility, and uses only slightly more than a stoichiometric amount of water in the absence of any transition metal. The success of this protocol hinges upon the utilization of trifluoroethanol as the solvent. PMID:27082159

  8. Enantioselective copper-catalyzed azide-alkyne click cycloaddition to desymmetrization of maleimide-based bis(alkynes).

    PubMed

    Song, Tao; Li, Li; Zhou, Wei; Zheng, Zhan-Jiang; Deng, Yuan; Xu, Zheng; Xu, Li-Wen

    2015-01-01

    A copper catalyst system derived from TaoPhos and CuF2 was used successfully for catalytic asymmetric Huisgen [3+2] cycloaddition of azides and alkynes to give optically pure products containing succinimide- and triazole-substituted quaternary carbon stereogenic centers. The desired products were obtained in good yields (60-80 %) and 85:15 to >99:1 enantiomeric ratio (e.r.) in this click cycloaddition reaction. PMID:25388524

  9. The hydrodeoxygenation of bioderived furans into alkanes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sutton, Andrew D.; Waldie, Fraser D.; Wu, Ruilian; Schlaf, Marcel; ‘Pete' Silks, Louis A.; Gordon, John C.

    2013-05-01

    The conversion of biomass into fuels and chemical feedstocks is one part of a drive to reduce the world's dependence on crude oil. For transportation fuels in particular, wholesale replacement of a fuel is logistically problematic, not least because of the infrastructure that is already in place. Here, we describe the catalytic defunctionalization of a series of biomass-derived molecules to provide linear alkanes suitable for use as transportation fuels. These biomass-derived molecules contain a variety of functional groups, including olefins, furan rings and carbonyl groups. We describe the removal of these in either a stepwise process or a one-pot process using common reagents and catalysts under mild reaction conditions to provide n-alkanes in good yields and with high selectivities. Our general synthetic approach is applicable to a range of precursors with different carbon content (chain length). This allows the selective generation of linear alkanes with carbon chain lengths between eight and sixteen carbons.

  10. The hydrodeoxygenation of bioderived furans into alkanes.

    PubMed

    Sutton, Andrew D; Waldie, Fraser D; Wu, Ruilian; Schlaf, Marcel; Silks, Louis A Pete; Gordon, John C

    2013-05-01

    The conversion of biomass into fuels and chemical feedstocks is one part of a drive to reduce the world's dependence on crude oil. For transportation fuels in particular, wholesale replacement of a fuel is logistically problematic, not least because of the infrastructure that is already in place. Here, we describe the catalytic defunctionalization of a series of biomass-derived molecules to provide linear alkanes suitable for use as transportation fuels. These biomass-derived molecules contain a variety of functional groups, including olefins, furan rings and carbonyl groups. We describe the removal of these in either a stepwise process or a one-pot process using common reagents and catalysts under mild reaction conditions to provide n-alkanes in good yields and with high selectivities. Our general synthetic approach is applicable to a range of precursors with different carbon content (chain length). This allows the selective generation of linear alkanes with carbon chain lengths between eight and sixteen carbons. PMID:23609095

  11. Increased functionality of methyl oleate using alkene metathesis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A series of alkene cross metathesis reactions were performed using a homogeneous ruthenium based catalyst. Using this technology, a variety of functional groups can be incorporated into the biobased starting material, methyl oleate. Trans-stilbene, styrene, methyl cinnamate and hexen-3-ol were all s...

  12. Heuristical Strategies on the Study Theme "The Unsaturated Hydrocarbons -- Alkenes"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Naumescu, Adrienne Kozan; Pasca, Roxana-Diana

    2011-01-01

    The influence of heuristical strategies upon the level of two experimental classes is studied in this paper. The didactic experiment took place at secondary school in Cluj-Napoca, in 2008-2009 school year. The study theme "The Unsaturated Hydrocarbons--Alkenes" has been efficiently learned by using the most active methods: laboratory…

  13. Copper-mediated oxidative trifluoromethylthiolation of unactivated terminal alkenes.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ke; Liu, Jian-Bo; Qing, Feng-Ling

    2014-11-25

    A general method to form a C(SP(3))-SCF3 bond via copper-mediated oxidative trifluoromethylthiolation of unactivated alkenes with stable nucleophilic AgSCF3 was developed. This protocol provides a direct and efficient access to a series of trifluoromethylthiolated allylic compounds with broad functional group tolerance. PMID:25277082

  14. Catalytic and Atom-Economic Intermolecular Amidoselenenylation of Alkenes.

    PubMed

    Tang, E; Wang, Weilin; Zhao, Yinjiao; Zhang, Meng; Dai, Xin

    2016-01-15

    A method for the simple, efficient, and atom-economic amidoselenenylation of simple alkenes under mild conditions using TiCl4 as a catalyst and N-(phenylseleno)phthalimide as both a nitrogen and selenium source was developed. A broad range of olefins can be applied to afford vicinal amidoselenides in good yield and with high regioselectivity and diastereoselectivity. PMID:26704901

  15. Evidence for significant C-5 alkene emissions from car traffic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schade, G. W.; Park, C.

    2010-12-01

    We present evidence from urban flux tower measurements in Houston, Texas, that a five carbon alkene, likely isoprene, is emitted from car traffic. Our GC-dual FID instrument setup measures VOC concentrations at 60 m above ground level from a lattice flux tower, and determines fluxes via a novel relaxed eddy accumulation technique. C-5 2-alkenes and isoprene, 2-methyl-1,3-butadiene, are not chromatographically separated by our method, but past VOC measurements suggest that isoprene, a biogenic hydrocarbon, generally dominates during the growing season. Our measured 2008 summertime C-5 alkene fluxes generally followed the expected, light and temperature driven emission pattern of isoprene from a significant density of oak trees in the tower’s footprint area. However, nighttime fluxes were significantly different from an expected zero biogenic flux, and morning rush hour fluxes were significantly higher than modeled biogenic fluxes. Wintertime measurements in January 2009 confirmed a small flux during the morning rush-hour was maintained, suggesting either an isoprene or C-5 2-alkene emission from car exhaust. While isoprene emissions from car traffic have been found several times before, emission rates have been found negligibly small compared to biogenic emissions. A quantitative comparison of our data to simultaneously measured toluene and benzene emissions however suggests that these C-5 alkene emissions may have increased relative to aromatics by a factor of ten since the 1990s. This notion is supported both by recent direct car exhaust measurements in Europe and Japan, and airborne isoprene measurements over Houston. Car exhaust measurements show that (i) the isoprene to toluene emission ratio for the newest car models is now around 1:10, similar to the ratio obtained from our data, and (ii) cold start alkene emissions are still an order of magnitude higher than regular emissions, consistent with a more prominent morning rush hour peak. If the identity of our

  16. Enzymes and genes involved in aerobic alkane degradation

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Wanpeng; Shao, Zongze

    2013-01-01

    Alkanes are major constituents of crude oil. They are also present at low concentrations in diverse non-contaminated because many living organisms produce them as chemo-attractants or as protecting agents against water loss. Alkane degradation is a widespread phenomenon in nature. The numerous microorganisms, both prokaryotic and eukaryotic, capable of utilizing alkanes as a carbon and energy source, have been isolated and characterized. This review summarizes the current knowledge of how bacteria metabolize alkanes aerobically, with a particular emphasis on the oxidation of long-chain alkanes, including factors that are responsible for chemotaxis to alkanes, transport across cell membrane of alkanes, the regulation of alkane degradation gene and initial oxidation. PMID:23755043

  17. Hydroboration of Alkynes with Zwitterionic Ruthenium-Borate Complexes: Novel Vinylborane Complexes.

    PubMed

    Anju, R S; Mondal, Bijan; Saha, Koushik; Panja, Subir; Varghese, Babu; Ghosh, Sundargopal

    2015-08-01

    Building upon previous studies on the synthesis of bis(sigma)borate and agostic complexes of ruthenium, the chemistry of nido-[(Cp*Ru)2 B3 H9] (1) with other ligand systems was explored. In this regard, mild thermolysis of nido-1 with 2-mercaptobenzothiazole (2-mbzt), 2-mercaptobenzoxazole (2-mbzo) and 2-mercaptobenzimidazole (2-mbzi) ligands were performed which led to the isolation of bis(sigma)borate complexes [Cp*RuBH3 L] (2 a-c) and β-agostic complexes [Cp*RuBH2 L2] (3 a-c; 2 a, 3 a: L=C7 H4 NS2 ; 2 b, 3 b: L=C7 H4 NSO; 2 c, 3 c: L=C7 H5 N2 S). Further, the chemistry of these novel complexes towards various diphosphine ligands was investigated. Room temperature treatment of 3 a with [PPh2 (CH2 )n PPh2 ] (n=1-3) yielded [Cp*Ru(PPh2 (CH2 )n PPh2 )-BH2 (L2)] (4 a-c; 4 a: n=1; 4 b: n=2; 4 c: n=3; L=C7 H4 NS2). Mild thermolysis of 2 a with [PPh2 (CH2)n PPh2 ] (n=1-3) led to the isolation of [Cp*Ru(PPh2 (CH2)n PPh2 )(L)] (L=C7 H4 NS2 5 a-c; 5 a: n=1; 5 b: n=2; 5 c: n=3). Treatment of 4 a with terminal alkynes causes a hydroboration reaction to generate vinylborane complexes [Cp*Ru(R-C=CH2 )BH(L2)] (6 and 7; 6: R=Ph; 7: R=COOCH3; L=C7 H4 NS2). Complexes 6 and 7 can also be viewed as η-alkene complexes of ruthenium that feature a dative bond to the ruthenium centre from the vinylinic double bond. In addition, DFT computations were performed to shed light on the bonding and electronic structures of the new compounds. PMID:26118549

  18. Structure-Odor Relationships of (E)-3-Alkenoic Acids, (E)-3-Alken-1-ols, and (E)-3-Alkenals.

    PubMed

    Lorber, Katja; Buettner, Andrea

    2015-08-01

    (E)-3-Unsaturated volatile acids, alcohols, and aldehydes are commonly found as odorants or pheromones in foods and other natural sources, playing a vital role in not only the attractiveness of foods but also chemo-communication in the animal kingdom. However, a systematic elucidation of their aroma properties, especially for humans, has not been carried out until today. To close this gap, the odor thresholds in air and odor qualities of homologous series of (E)-3-alkenoic acids, (E)-3-alken-1-ols, and (E)-3-alkenals were determined by gas chromatography-olfactometry. In the series of (E)-3-alkenoic acids the odor quality changed successively from sweaty via plastic-like to sweaty and waxy. On the other hand, the odor qualities in the series of (E)-3-alken-1-ols and (E)-3-alkenals changed from grassy, green to an overall citrus-like, fresh, soapy, and coriander-like odor with increasing chain length. With regard to their odor potencies, the lowest thresholds in air were found for (E)-3-heptenoic acid, (E)-3-hexenoic acid, and (E)-3-hexenal. PMID:26165743

  19. Improved Alkane Production in Nitrogen-Fixing and Halotolerant Cyanobacteria via Abiotic Stresses and Genetic Manipulation of Alkane Synthetic Genes.

    PubMed

    Kageyama, Hakuto; Waditee-Sirisattha, Rungaroon; Sirisattha, Sophon; Tanaka, Yoshito; Mahakhant, Aparat; Takabe, Teruhiro

    2015-07-01

    Cyanobacteria possess the unique capacity to produce alkane. In this study, effects of nitrogen deficiency and salt stress on biosynthesis of alkanes were investigated in three kinds of cyanobacteria. Intracellular alkane accumulation was increased in nitrogen-fixing cyanobacterium Anabaena sp. PCC7120, but decreased in non-diazotrophic cyanobacterium Synechococcus elongatus PCC7942 and constant in a halotolerant cyanobacterium Aphanothece halophytica under nitrogen-deficient condition. We also found that salt stress increased alkane accumulation in Anabaena sp. PCC7120 and A. halophytica. The expression levels of two alkane synthetic genes were not upregulated significantly under nitrogen deficiency or salt stress in Anabaena sp. PCC7120. The transformant Anabaena sp. PCC7120 cells with additional alkane synthetic gene set from A. halophytica increased intracellular alkane accumulation level compared to control cells. These results provide a prospect to improve bioproduction of alkanes in nitrogen-fixing halotolerant cyanobacteria via abiotic stresses and genetic engineering. PMID:25971893

  20. 40 CFR 721.10163 - Chloro fluoro alkane (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Chloro fluoro alkane (generic). 721... Substances § 721.10163 Chloro fluoro alkane (generic). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as chloro fluoro alkane (PMN...

  1. 40 CFR 721.10163 - Chloro fluoro alkane (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Chloro fluoro alkane (generic). 721... Substances § 721.10163 Chloro fluoro alkane (generic). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as chloro fluoro alkane (PMN...

  2. In situ detection of anaerobic alkane metabolites in subsurface environments

    PubMed Central

    Agrawal, Akhil; Gieg, Lisa M.

    2013-01-01

    Alkanes comprise a substantial fraction of crude oil and refined fuels. As such, they are prevalent within deep subsurface fossil fuel deposits and in shallow subsurface environments such as aquifers that are contaminated with hydrocarbons. These environments are typically anaerobic, and host diverse microbial communities that can potentially use alkanes as substrates. Anaerobic alkane biodegradation has been reported to occur under nitrate-reducing, sulfate-reducing, and methanogenic conditions. Elucidating the pathways of anaerobic alkane metabolism has been of interest in order to understand how microbes can be used to remediate contaminated sites. Alkane activation primarily occurs by addition to fumarate, yielding alkylsuccinates, unique anaerobic metabolites that can be used to indicate in situ anaerobic alkane metabolism. These metabolites have been detected in hydrocarbon-contaminated shallow aquifers, offering strong evidence for intrinsic anaerobic bioremediation. Recently, studies have also revealed that alkylsuccinates are present in oil and coal seam production waters, indicating that anaerobic microbial communities can utilize alkanes in these deeper subsurface environments. In many crude oil reservoirs, the in situ anaerobic metabolism of hydrocarbons such as alkanes may be contributing to modern-day detrimental effects such as oilfield souring, or may lead to more beneficial technologies such as enhanced energy recovery from mature oilfields. In this review, we briefly describe the key metabolic pathways for anaerobic alkane (including n-alkanes, isoalkanes, and cyclic alkanes) metabolism and highlight several field reports wherein alkylsuccinates have provided evidence for anaerobic in situ alkane metabolism in shallow and deep subsurface environments. PMID:23761789

  3. Hydrocarbons. Independent Learning Project for Advanced Chemistry (ILPAC). Unit O1.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Inner London Education Authority (England).

    This unit on hydrocarbons is one of 10 first year units produced by the Independent Learning Project for Advanced Chemistry (ILPAC). The unit is divided into sections dealing with alkanes, alkenes, alkynes, arenes, and several aspects of the petroleum industry. Two experiments, exercises (with answers), and pre- and post-tests are included.…

  4. Optimization of H3O+/O2+ Dual-mode Ionization in PTR-MS for Simultaneous Detection of Alkanes, Olefins and Aromatic Compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amador-Muñoz, O.; Misztal, P. K.; Weber, R.; Drozd, G.; Worton, D. R.; Goldstein, A. H.

    2014-12-01

    Measurements of VOC composition from fossil fuels are analytically challenging because of the complex mixture of hydrocarbons (saturated, unsaturated, aromatics, etc). Speciated chemical measurements typically rely on relatively slow GC separation. Proton transfer reaction mass spectrometry (PTR-MS) is advantageous due to its fast response and high sensitivity. The most common ionization mechanism applied to VOC detection by PTR-MS is proton transfer from hydronium ion (H3O+). However, alkanes cannot be detected using H3O+ ionization chemistry because their proton affinities are too low. Ionization of alkanes is possible via electron transfer and/or hydride abstraction using O2+ or NO+. We used PTR-MS to analyze aromatic, alkene and alkane (linear, branched and cyclic) compounds simultaneously not by switching the ionization agents, but by adjusting the drift tube voltage and optimizing the ratio of H3O+/O2+ produced in the instrument's ion source. The highest detection sensitivity for aromatic and alkene compounds was produced by proton transfer from H3O+, while hydride abstraction by O2+ allowed detection of alkanes. For alkanes, sensitivities ranged from 1.1±0.01 cps/ppbv for n-decane to 74.7±0.25 cps/ppbv for decalin. Sensitivities in O2+ mode were from 6 (Adamantane) to 146 (4-Methyl nonane) times higher than those obtained in H3O+ mode under the same ion source and drift tube voltage conditions. Sensitivities for butyl benzene and 1-decene were 157±0.57 and 66.8±0.21 cps/ppbv, respectively. Sensitivity differences among C10 hydrocarbons are related to their structure, which affects their ionization energies (IE) and hence ease of hydride abstraction. Sensitivities at the parent ion mass were inversely correlated with IE (142 cps/ppbv/eV). This suggests higher electronic stability for cyclic non substituted compounds, followed by cyclic substituted, branch linear and linear C10 hydrocarbons. Although selectivity is a known shortcoming of quadrupole

  5. Nitrated metalloporphyrins as catalysts for alkane oxidation

    DOEpatents

    Ellis, Jr., Paul E.; Lyons, James E.

    1994-01-01

    Compositions of matter comprising nitro-substituted metal complexes of porphyrins are catalysts for the oxidation of alkanes. The metal is iron, chromium, manganese, ruthenium, copper or cobalt. The porphyrin ring has nitro groups attached thereto in meso and/or .beta.-pyrrolic positions.

  6. Reflectance spectroscopy of organic compounds: 1. Alkanes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Clark, R.N.; Curchin, J.M.; Hoefen, T.M.; Swayze, G.A.

    2009-01-01

    Reflectance spectra of the organic compounds comprising the alkane series are presented from the ultraviolet to midinfrared, 0.35 to 15.5 /??m. Alkanes are hydrocarbon molecules containing only single carbon-carbon bonds, and are found naturally on the Earth and in the atmospheres of the giant planets and Saturn's moon, Titan. This paper presents the spectral properties of the alkanes as the first in a series of papers to build a spectral database of organic compounds for use in remote sensing studies. Applications range from mapping the environment on the Earth, to the search for organic molecules and life in the solar system and throughout the. universe. We show that the spectral reflectance properties of organic compounds are rich, with major diagnostic spectral features throughout the spectral range studied. Little to no spectral change was observed as a function of temperature and only small shifts and changes in the width of absorption bands were observed between liquids and solids, making remote detection of spectral properties throughout the solar system simpler. Some high molecular weight organic compounds contain single-bonded carbon chains and have spectra similar to alkanes even ' when they fall into other families. Small spectral differences are often present allowing discrimination among some compounds, further illustrating the need to catalog spectral properties for accurate remote sensing identification with spectroscopy.

  7. Nitrated metalloporphyrins as catalysts for alkane oxidation

    DOEpatents

    Ellis, Jr., Paul E.; Lyons, James E.

    1992-01-01

    Alkanes are oxidized by contact with oxygen-containing gas in the presence as catalyst of a metalloporphyrin in which hydrogen atoms in the porphyrin ring have been replaced with one or more nitro groups. Hydrogen atoms in the porphyrin ring may also be substituted with halogen atoms.

  8. Nitrated metalloporphyrins as catalysts for alkane oxidation

    DOEpatents

    Ellis, P.E. Jr.; Lyons, J.E.

    1994-01-18

    Compositions of matter comprising nitro-substituted metal complexes of porphyrins are catalysts for the oxidation of alkanes. The metal is iron, chromium, manganese, ruthenium, copper or cobalt. The porphyrin ring has nitro groups attached thereto in meso and/or [beta]-pyrrolic positions.

  9. Copper-Catalyzed Trifluoromethylazidation of Alkynes: Efficient Access to CF3-Substituted Azirines and Aziridines.

    PubMed

    Wang, Fei; Zhu, Na; Chen, Pinhong; Ye, Jinxing; Liu, Guosheng

    2015-08-01

    A novel method for convenient access to CF3-containing azirines has been developed, and involves a copper-catalyzed trifluoromethylazidation of alkynes and a photocatalyzed rearrangement. Both terminal and internal alkynes are compatible with the mild reaction conditions, thus delivering the CF3-containing azirines in moderate to good yields. The azirines can be converted into various CF3-substituted aziridines. PMID:26088360

  10. Palladium-Catalyzed Intermolecular Aerobic Annulation of o-Alkenylanilines and Alkynes for Quinoline Synthesis.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Jia; Li, Zun; Huang, Liangbin; Wu, Wanqing; Li, Jianxiao; Jiang, Huanfeng

    2016-08-01

    A new approach to construct 2,3-disubstituted quinolines is described via Pd-catalyzed oxidative cyclization of o-vinylanilines and alkynes with molecular oxygen. This transformation is supposed to undergo intermolecular amination of alkyne, insertion of the olefin, and oxidative cleavage of C-C bond sequence. PMID:27418021

  11. Chemo- and Regioselective Rhodium(I)-Catalyzed [2+2+2] Cycloaddition of Allenynes with Alkynes.

    PubMed

    Yasuda, Shigeo; Kawaguchi, Yasuaki; Okamoto, Yuta; Mukai, Chisato

    2016-08-16

    A highly chemo- and regioselective partially intramolecular rhodium(I)-catalyzed [2+2+2] cycloaddition of allenynes with alkynes is described. A range of diverse polysubstituted benzene derivatives could be synthesized in good to excellent yields, in which the allenynes served as synthetic equivalent to the diynes. A high regioselectivity could be observed when allenynes were treated with unsymmetrical alkynes. PMID:27436356

  12. Ruthenium-catalyzed cyclization of N-carbamoyl indolines with alkynes: an efficient route to pyrroloquinolinones.

    PubMed

    Manoharan, Ramasamy; Jeganmohan, Masilamani

    2015-09-21

    A regioselective synthesis of substituted pyrroloquinolinones via a ruthenium-catalyzed oxidative cyclization of substituted N-carbamoyl indolines with alkynes is described. The cyclization reaction was compatible with various symmetrical and unsymmetrical alkynes including substituted propiolates. Later, we performed the aromatization of pyrroloquinolinones into indole derivatives in the presence of 2,3-dichloro-5,6-dicyanobenzoquinone (DDQ). PMID:26228840

  13. Palladium-Catalyzed Regioselective Difluoroalkylation and Carbonylation of Alkynes.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qiang; He, Yu-Tao; Zhao, Jia-Hui; Qiu, Yi-Feng; Zheng, Lan; Hu, Jing-Yuan; Yang, Yu-Chen; Liu, Xue-Yuan; Liang, Yong-Min

    2016-06-01

    A novel, four-component synthetic strategy to synthesize a series of β-difluoroalkyl unsaturated esters/amides with high regioslectivity is described. This Pd-catalyzed difluoroalkylation and carbonylation reaction can be carried out with simple starting materials. Through this protocol, two new C-C bonds (including one C-CF2 bond) and one C-O(N) bond are constructed simultaneously in a single step. The synthetic utility of this reaction system has been certified by the applicability to a wide scope of alkynes and nucleophiles. Preliminary mechanistic studies suggest that the difluoroalkyl radical pathway is involved in this reaction. PMID:27191858

  14. Copper-Catalyzed Azide–Alkyne Click Chemistry for Bioconjugation

    PubMed Central

    Presolski, Stanislav I.; Hong, Vu Phong; Finn, M.G.

    2012-01-01

    The copper-catalyzed azide-alkyne cycloaddition reaction is widely used for the connection of molecular entities of all sizes. A protocol is provided here for the process with biomolecules. Ascorbate is used as reducing agent to maintain the required cuprous oxidation state. Since these convenient conditions produce reactive oxygen species, five equivalents of a copper-binding ligand is used with respect to metal. The ligand both accelerates the reaction and serves as a sacrificial reductant, protecting the biomolecules from oxidation. A procedure is also described for testing the efficiency of the reaction under desired conditions for purposes of optimization, before expensive biological reagents are used. PMID:22844652

  15. Highly Active Multidentate Ligand-Based Alkyne Metathesis Catalysts.

    PubMed

    Du, Ya; Yang, Haishen; Zhu, Chengpu; Ortiz, Michael; Okochi, Kenji D; Shoemaker, Richard; Jin, Yinghua; Zhang, Wei

    2016-06-01

    Alkyne metathesis catalysts composed of molybdenum(VI) propylidyne and multidentate tris(2-hydroxylbenzyl)methane ligands have been developed, which exhibit excellent stability (remains active in solution for months at room temperature), high activity, and broad functional-group tolerance. The homodimerization and cyclooligomerization of monopropynyl or dipropynyl substrates, including challenging heterocycle substrates (e.g., pyridine), proceed efficiently at 40-55 °C in a closed system. The ligand structure and catalytic activity relationship has been investigated, which shows that the ortho groups of the multidentate phenol ligands are critical to the stability and activity of such a catalyst system. PMID:27113640

  16. Fully Aromatic High Performance Thermoset via Sydnone-Alkyne Cycloaddition.

    PubMed

    Handa, Nisha V; Li, Shaoguang; Gerbec, Jeffrey A; Sumitani, Naoko; Hawker, Craig J; Klinger, Daniel

    2016-05-25

    We have developed an efficient synthetic platform for the preparation of a new class of high performance thermosets based on the 1,3-dipolar cycloaddition of a bifunctional sydnone with a trifunctional alkyne. These processable materials possess outstanding thermal stability, with Td5% of 520 °C and a weight loss of <0.1% per day at 225 °C (both in air). Key to this performance is the stability of the starting functional groups that allows for reactive B-staging via simple thermal activation to give fully aromatic and highly cross-linked polypyrazole-based thermosets. PMID:27180658

  17. Mechanistic studies on the gas-phase dehydrogenation of alkanes at cyclometalated platinum complexes.

    PubMed

    Butschke, Burkhard; Schwarz, Helmut

    2012-10-29

    In the ion/molecule reactions of the cyclometalated platinum complexes [Pt(L-H)](+) (L=2,2'-bipyridine (bipy), 2-phenylpyridine (phpy), and 7,8-benzoquinoline (bq)) with linear and branched alkanes C(n)H(2n+2) (n=2-4), the main reaction channels correspond to the eliminations of dihydrogen and the respective alkenes in varying ratios. For all three couples [Pt(L-H)](+)/C(2)H(6), loss of C(2)H(4) dominates clearly over H(2) elimination; however, the mechanisms significantly differs for the reactions of the "rollover"-cyclometalated bipy complex and the classically cyclometalated phpy and bq complexes. While double hydrogen-atom transfer from C(2)H(6) to [Pt(bipy-H)](+), followed by ring rotation, gives rise to the formation of [Pt(H)(bipy)](+), for the phpy and bq complexes [Pt(L-H)](+), the cyclometalated motif is conserved; rather, according to DFT calculations, formation of [Pt(L-H)(H(2))](+) as the ionic product accounts for C(2)H(4) liberation. In the latter process, [Pt(L-H)(H(2))(C(2)H(4))](+) (that carries H(2) trans to the nitrogen atom of the heterocyclic ligand) serves, according to DFT calculation, as a precursor from which, due to the electronic peculiarities of the cyclometalated ligand, C(2)H(4) rather than H(2) is ejected. For both product-ion types, [Pt(H)(bipy)](+) and [Pt(L-H)(H(2))](+) (L=phpy, bq), H(2) loss to close a catalytic dehydrogenation cycle is feasible. In the reactions of [Pt(bipy-H)](+) with the higher alkanes C(n)H(2n+2) (n=3, 4), H(2) elimination dominates over alkene formation; most probably, this observation is a consequence of the generation of allyl complexes, such as [Pt(C(3)H(5))(bipy)](+). In the reactions of [Pt(L-H)](+) (L=phpy, bq) with propane and n-butane, the losses of the alkenes and dihydrogen are of comparable intensities. While in the reactions of "rollover"-cyclometalated [Pt(bipy-H)](+) with C(n)H(2n+2) (n=2-4) less than 15 % of the generated product ions are formed by C-C bond-cleavage processes, this value is

  18. Metal-Free on-Surface Photochemical Homocoupling of Terminal Alkynes.

    PubMed

    Colazzo, Luciano; Sedona, Francesco; Moretto, Alessandro; Casarin, Maurizio; Sambi, Mauro

    2016-08-17

    On-surface synthesis involving the homocoupling of aryl-alkynes affords the buildup of bisacetylene derivatives directly at surfaces, which in turn may be further used as ingredients for the production of novel functional materials. Generally, homocoupling of terminal alkynes takes place by thermal activation of molecular precursors on metal surfaces. However, the interaction of alkynes with surface metal atoms often induces unwanted reaction pathways when thermal energy is provided to the system. In this contribution we report about light-induced metal-free homocoupling of terminal alkynes on highly oriented pyrolitic graphite (HOPG). The reaction occurred with high efficiency and selectivity within a self-assembled monolayer (SAM) of aryl-alkynes and led to the generation of large domains of ordered butadiynyl derivatives. Such a photochemical uncatalyzed pathway represents an original approach in the field of topological C-C coupling at the solid/liquid interface. PMID:27437555

  19. Highly Selective Phosphinylphosphination of Alkenes with Tetraphenyldiphosphine Monoxide.

    PubMed

    Sato, Yuki; Kawaguchi, Shin-Ichi; Nomoto, Akihiro; Ogawa, Akiya

    2016-08-01

    In sharp contrast to tetraphenyldiphosphine, which does not add to carbon-carbon double bonds efficiently, its monoxide, [Ph2 P(O)PPh2 ] can engage in a radical addition to various alkenes, thus affording the corresponding 1-phosphinyl-2-phosphinoalkanes regioselectively, and they can be converted into their sulfides by treatment with elemental sulfur. The phosphinylphosphination proceeds by the homolytic cleavage of the P(V) (O)-P(III) single bond of Ph2 P(O)PPh2 , followed by selective attack of the phosphinyl radical at the terminal position of the alkenes, and selective trapping of the resulting carbon radical by the phosphino group. Furthermore, the phosphinylphosphination product could be converted directly into its platinum complex with a hemilabile P,O chelation. PMID:27374767

  20. Green diacetoxylation of alkenes in a microchemical system.

    PubMed

    Park, Jeong Hyeon; Park, Chan Yi; Song, Hyun Seung; Huh, Yun Suk; Kim, Geon Hee; Park, Chan Pil

    2013-02-15

    The palladium-catalyzed diacetoxylation and trifluoromethanesulfonic acid-catalyzed diacetoxylation using inexpensive and environmentally friendly hydrogen peroxide and peracetic acid were successfully conducted with the help of microchemical technology. Excellent yield and selectivity were achieved in significantly shortened reaction times without the decomposition of explosive oxidants and further transformation of unstable products, offering a safe and efficient alternative to traditional methods for alkene diacetoxylation. PMID:23373522

  1. Alkene Metathesis and Renewable Materials: Selective Transformations of Plant Oils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malacea, Raluca; Dixneuf, Pierre H.

    The olefin metathesis of natural oils and fats and their derivatives is the basis of clean catalytic reactions relevant to green chemistry processes and the production of generate useful chemicals from renewable raw materials. Three variants of alkene metathesis: self-metathesis, ethenolysis and cross-metathesis applied to plant oil derivatives will show new routes to fine chemicals, bifunctional products, polymer precursours and industry intermediates.

  2. Directed, Regiocontrolled Hydroamination of Unactivated Alkenes via Protodepalladation.

    PubMed

    Gurak, John A; Yang, Kin S; Liu, Zhen; Engle, Keary M

    2016-05-11

    A directed, regiocontrolled hydroamination of unactivated terminal and internal alkenes is reported. The reaction is catalyzed by palladium(II) acetate and is compatible with a variety of nitrogen nucleophiles. A removable bidentate directing group is used to control the regiochemistry, prevent β-hydride elimination, and stabilize the nucleopalladated intermediate, facilitating a protodepalladation event. This method affords highly functionalized γ-amino acids in good yields with high regioselectivity. PMID:27093112

  3. Nickel-Catalyzed Coupling of Alkenes, Aldehydes, and Silyl Triflates

    PubMed Central

    Ng, Sze-sze; Ho, Chun-Yu; Jamison, Timothy F.

    2011-01-01

    A full account of two recently developed nickel-catalyzed coupling reactions of alkenes, aldehydes and silyl triflates is presented. These reactions provide either allylic alcohol or homoallylic alcohol derivatives selectively, depending on the ligand employed. These processes are believed to be mechanistically distinct from Lewis acid-catalyzed carbonyl-ene reactions, and several lines of evidence supporting this hypothesis are discussed. PMID:16939275

  4. Regioselective, Asymmetric Formal Hydroamination of Unactivated Internal Alkenes.

    PubMed

    Xi, Yumeng; Butcher, Trevor W; Zhang, Jing; Hartwig, John F

    2016-01-11

    We report the regioselective and enantioselective formal hydroamination of unsymmetrical internal alkenes catalyzed by a copper catalyst ligated by DTBM-SEGPHOS. The regioselectivity of the reaction is controlled by the electronic effects of ether, ester, and sulfonamide groups in the homoallylic position. The observed selectivity underscores the influence of inductive effects of remote substituents on the selectivity of catalytic processes occurring at hydrocarbyl groups, and the method provides direct access to various 1,3-aminoalcohol derivatives with high enantioselectivity. PMID:26592363

  5. Cl atom initiated oxidation of 1-alkenes under atmospheric conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walavalkar, M.; Sharma, A.; Alwe, H. D.; Pushpa, K. K.; Dhanya, S.; Naik, P. D.; Bajaj, P. N.

    2013-03-01

    In view of the importance of the oxidation pathways of alkenes in the troposphere, and the significance of Cl atom as an oxidant in marine boundary layer (MBL) and polluted industrial atmosphere, the reactions of four 1-alkenes (C6-C9) with Cl atoms are investigated. The rate coefficients at 298 K are measured to be (4.0 ± 0.5), (4.4 ± 0.7), (5.5 ± 0.9) and (5.9 ± 1.7) × 10-10 cm3 molecule-1 s-1 for 1-hexene, 1-heptene, 1-octene and 1-nonene, respectively. The quoted errors include the experimental 2σ, along with the error in the reference rate coefficients. From the systematic increase in the rate coefficients with the number of carbon atoms, an approximate value for the average rate coefficient for hydrogen abstraction per CH2 group in alkenes is estimated to be (4.9 ± 0.3) × 10-11 cm3 molecule-1 s-1. Based on these rate coefficients, the contribution of Cl atom reactions towards the degradation of these molecules is found to be comparable to that of OH radical reactions, under MBL conditions. The products identified in gas phase indicate that Cl atom addition occurs mainly at the terminal carbon, leading to the formation of 1-chloro-2-ketones and 1-chloro-2-ols. The major gas phase products from the alkenyl radicals (formed by H atom abstraction) are different positional isomers of long chain enols and enones. A preference for dissociation leading to an allyl radical, resulting in aldehydes, lower by three carbon atoms, is indicated. The observed relative yields suggest that in general, the increased contribution of the reactions of Cl atoms towards degradation of 1-alkenes in NOx free air does not result in an increase in the generation of small aldehydes (carbon number < 4), including chloroethanal, as compared to that in the reaction of 1-butene.

  6. Regioselective Intermolecular Diamination and Aminooxygenation of Alkenes with Saccharin.

    PubMed

    Martínez, Claudio; Pérez, Edwin G; Iglesias, Álvaro; Escudero-Adán, Eduardo C; Muñiz, Kilian

    2016-06-17

    Palladium catalysis enables the regioselective difunctionalization of alkenes using saccharin as the nitrogen source in the initial step of aminopalladation. Depending on the reaction conditions, diamination or aminooxygenation pathways can be accessed using hypervalent iodine reagents as the terminal oxidants. The aminooxygenation of allylic ethers originates from an unprecedented ambident behavior of saccharin. The participating palladium catalysts contain a palladium-saccharide unit. Two representative complexes of this type could be isolated and characterized. PMID:27266654

  7. Thermal functionalization of GaN surfaces with 1-alkenes.

    PubMed

    Schwarz, Stefan U; Cimalla, Volker; Eichapfel, Georg; Himmerlich, Marcel; Krischok, Stefan; Ambacher, Oliver

    2013-05-28

    A thermally induced functionalization process for gallium nitride surfaces with 1-alkenes is introduced. The resulting functionalization layers are characterized with atomic force microscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and compared to reference samples without and with a photochemically generated functionalization layer. The resulting layers show very promising characteristics as functionalization for GaN based biosensors. On the basis of the experimental results, important characteristics of the functionalization layers are estimated and a possible chemical reaction scheme is proposed. PMID:23617559

  8. Adsorption of small hydrocarbons on rutile TiO2(110)

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Long; Smith, R. Scott; Kay, Bruce D.; Dohnalek, Zdenek

    2015-11-21

    Here, temperature programmed desorption and molecular beam scattering were used to study the adsorption and desorption of small hydrocarbons (n-alkanes, 1-alkenes and 1-alkynes of C1–C4) on rutile TiO2(110). We show that the sticking coefficients for all the hydrocarbons are close to unity (> 0.95) at an adsorption temperature of 60 K. The desorption energies for hydrocarbons of the same chain length increase from n-alkanes to 1-alkenes and to 1-alkynes. This trend is likely a consequence of additional dative bonding of the alkene and alkyne π system to the coordinatively unsaturated Ti5c sites. Similar to previous studies on the adsorption of n-alkanes on metal and metal oxide surfaces, we find that the desorption energies within each group (n-alkanes vs. 1-alkenes vs. 1-alkynes) from Ti5c sites increase linearly with the chain length. The absolute saturation coverages of each hydrocarbon on Ti5c sites were also determined. The saturation coverage of CH4, is found to be ~ 2/3 monolayer (ML). The saturation coverages of C2–C4 hydrocarbons are found nearly independent of the chain length with values of ~ 1/2 ML for n-alkanes and 1-alkenes and 2/3 ML for 1-alkynes. This result is surprising considering their similar sizes.

  9. Cp2TiCl2-Catalyzed Regioselective Hydrocarboxylation of Alkenes with CO2.

    PubMed

    Shao, Peng; Wang, Sheng; Chen, Chao; Xi, Chanjuan

    2016-05-01

    Cp2TiCl2-catalyzed regioselective hydrocarboxylation of alkenes with CO2 to give carboxylic acids in high yields has been developed in the presence of (i)PrMgCl. The reaction proceeds with a wide range of alkenes under mild conditions. Styrene and its derivatives can transform to α-aryl carboxylic acids, and aliphatic alkenes can transform to form alkanoic acids. PMID:27097225

  10. The spontaneous formation of single-molecule junctions via terminal alkynes.

    PubMed

    Pla-Vilanova, Pepita; Aragonès, Albert C; Ciampi, Simone; Sanz, Fausto; Darwish, Nadim; Diez-Perez, Ismael

    2015-09-25

    Herein, we report the spontaneous formation of single-molecule junctions via terminal alkyne contact groups. Self-assembled monolayers that form spontaneously from diluted solutions of 1, 4-diethynylbenzene (DEB) were used to build single-molecule contacts and assessed using the scanning tunneling microscopy-break junction technique (STM-BJ). The STM-BJ technique in both its dynamic and static approaches was used to characterize the lifetime (stability) and the conductivity of a single-DEB wire. It is demonstrated that single-molecule junctions form spontaneously with terminal alkynes and require no electrochemical control or chemical deprotonation. The alkyne anchoring group was compared against typical contact groups exploited in single-molecule studies, i.e. amine (benzenediamine) and thiol (benzendithiol) contact groups. The alkyne contact showed a conductance magnitude comparable to that observed with amine and thiol groups. The lifetime of the junctions formed from alkynes were only slightly less than that of thiols and greater than that observed for amines. These findings are important as (a) they extend the repertoire of chemical contacts used in single-molecule measurements to 1-alkynes, which are synthetically accessible and stable and (b) alkynes have a remarkable affinity toward silicon surfaces, hence opening the door for the study of single-molecule transport on a semiconducting electronic platform. PMID:26314486

  11. Versatility of Alkyne-Modified Poly(Glycidyl Methacrylate) Layers for Click Reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Soto-Cantu, Dr. Erick; Lokitz, Bradley S; Hinestrosa Salazar, Juan Pablo; Deodhar, Chaitra; Messman, Jamie M; Ankner, John Francis; Kilbey, II, S Michael

    2011-01-01

    Functional soft interfaces are of interest for a variety of technologies. We describe three methods for preparing substrates with alkyne groups, which show versatility for 'click' chemistry reactions. Two of the methods have the same root: formation of thin, covalently attached, reactive interfacial layers of poly(glycidyl methacrylate) (PGMA) via spin coating onto silicon wafers followed by reactive modification with either propargylamine or 5-hexynoic acid. The amine or the carboxylic acid moieties react with the epoxy groups of PGMA, creating interfacial polymer layers decorated with alkyne groups. The third method consists of using copolymers comprising glycidyl methacrylate and propargyl methacrylate (pGP). The pGP copolymers are spin coated and covalently attached on silicon wafers. For each method, we investigate the factors that control film thickness and content of alkyne groups using ellipsometry, and study the nanophase structure of the films using neutron reflectometry. Azide-terminated polymers of methacrylic acid and 2-vinyl-4,4-dimethylazlactone synthesized via reversible addition-fragmentation chain transfer polymerization were attached to the alkyne-modified substrates using 'click' chemistry, and grafting densities in the range of 0.007-0.95 chains nm{sup -2} were attained. The maximum density of alkyne groups attained by functionalization of PGMA with propargylamine or 5-hexynoic acid was approximately 2 alkynes nm{sup -3}. The alkyne content obtained by the three decorating approaches was sufficiently high that it was not the limiting factor for the click reaction of azide-capped polymers.

  12. The spontaneous formation of single-molecule junctions via terminal alkynes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pla-Vilanova, Pepita; Aragonès, Albert C.; Ciampi, Simone; Sanz, Fausto; Darwish, Nadim; Diez-Perez, Ismael

    2015-09-01

    Herein, we report the spontaneous formation of single-molecule junctions via terminal alkyne contact groups. Self-assembled monolayers that form spontaneously from diluted solutions of 1, 4-diethynylbenzene (DEB) were used to build single-molecule contacts and assessed using the scanning tunneling microscopy-break junction technique (STM-BJ). The STM-BJ technique in both its dynamic and static approaches was used to characterize the lifetime (stability) and the conductivity of a single-DEB wire. It is demonstrated that single-molecule junctions form spontaneously with terminal alkynes and require no electrochemical control or chemical deprotonation. The alkyne anchoring group was compared against typical contact groups exploited in single-molecule studies, i.e. amine (benzenediamine) and thiol (benzendithiol) contact groups. The alkyne contact showed a conductance magnitude comparable to that observed with amine and thiol groups. The lifetime of the junctions formed from alkynes were only slightly less than that of thiols and greater than that observed for amines. These findings are important as (a) they extend the repertoire of chemical contacts used in single-molecule measurements to 1-alkynes, which are synthetically accessible and stable and (b) alkynes have a remarkable affinity toward silicon surfaces, hence opening the door for the study of single-molecule transport on a semiconducting electronic platform.

  13. Density functional steric analysis of linear and branched alkanes.

    PubMed

    Ess, Daniel H; Liu, Shubin; De Proft, Frank

    2010-12-16

    Branched alkane hydrocarbons are thermodynamically more stable than straight-chain linear alkanes. This thermodynamic stability is also manifest in alkane bond separation energies. To understand the physical differences between branched and linear alkanes, we have utilized a novel density functional theory (DFT) definition of steric energy based on the Weizäcker kinetic energy. Using the M06-2X functional, the total DFT energy was partitioned into a steric energy term (E(s)[ρ]), an electrostatic energy term (E(e)[ρ]), and a fermionic quantum energy term (E(q)[ρ]). This analysis revealed that branched alkanes have less (destabilizing) DFT steric energy than linear alkanes. The lower steric energy of branched alkanes is mitigated by an equal and opposite quantum energy term that contains the Pauli component of the kinetic energy and exchange-correlation energy. Because the steric and quantum energy terms cancel, this leaves the electrostatic energy term that favors alkane branching. Electrostatic effects, combined with correlation energy, explains why branched alkanes are more stable than linear alkanes. PMID:21086970

  14. Density Functional Steric Analysis of Linear and Branched Alkanes

    SciTech Connect

    Ess, Daniel H.; Liu, Shubin; De Proft, Frank

    2010-11-18

    Branched alkane hydrocarbons are thermodynamically more stable than straight-chain linear alkanes. This thermodynamic stability is also manifest in alkane bond separation energies. To understand the physical differences between branched and linear alkanes, we have utilized a novel density functional theory (DFT) definition of steric energy based on the Weizäcker kinetic energy. Using the M06-2X functional, the total DFT energy was partitioned into a steric energy term (Ee[[ρ]), an electrostatic energy term (Ee[ρ]), and a fermionic quantum energy term (Eq[[ρ]). This analysis revealed that branched alkanes have less (destabilizing) DFT steric energy than linear alkanes. The lower steric energy of branched alkanes is mitigated by an equal and opposite quantum energy term that contains the Pauli component of the kinetic energy and exchange-correlation energy. Because the steric and quantum energy terms cancel, this leaves the electrostatic energy term that favors alkane branching. Electrostatic effects, combined with correlation energy, explains why branched alkanes are more stable than linear alkanes.

  15. Oxidative dehydrogenation of alkanes to unsaturated hydrocarbons

    DOEpatents

    Kung, Harold H.; Chaar, Mohamed A.

    1988-01-01

    Oxidative dehydrogenation of alkanes to unsaturated hydrocarbons is carried out over metal vanadate catalysts under oxidizing conditions. The vanadate catalysts are represented by the formulas M.sub.3 (VO.sub.4).sub.2 and MV.sub.2 O.sub.6, M representing Mg, Zn, Ca, Pb, or Cd. The reaction is carried out in the presence of oxygen, but the formation of oxygenate by-products is suppressed.

  16. Oxidative dehydrogenation of alkanes to unsaturated hydrocarbons

    DOEpatents

    Kung, H.H.; Chaar, M.A.

    1988-10-11

    Oxidative dehydrogenation of alkanes to unsaturated hydrocarbons is carried out over metal vanadate catalysts under oxidizing conditions. The vanadate catalysts are represented by the formulas M[sub 3](VO[sub 4])[sub 2] and MV[sub 2]O[sub 6], M representing Mg, Zn, Ca, Pb, or Cd. The reaction is carried out in the presence of oxygen, but the formation of oxygenate by-products is suppressed.

  17. Production of stabilized Criegee intermediates and peroxides in the gas phase ozonolysis of alkenes: 2. Asymmetric and biogenic alkenes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hasson, Alam S.; Ho, Andy W.; Kuwata, Keith T.; Paulson, Suzanne E.

    2001-12-01

    Organic hydroperoxide, hydrogen peroxide, and >C1 carbonyl yields have been measured from the reaction of a set of structurally diverse and atmospherically significant terminal and exocyclic alkenes with ozone. Product yields were investigated for 1-butene, 1-pentene, 1-octene, methylene cyclohexane, β-pinene, camphene and isoprene for humidities from 0 to 80% using gas chromatography with flame ionization detection and high-performance liquid chromatography with fluorescence detection. The yields of these products were used to estimate the following stabilized Criegee intermediate yields: 1-butene (0.27), 1-pentene (0.29), 1-octene (0.36), methylene cyclohexane (0.18), β-pinene (0.28), camphene (0.31), and isoprene (0.27). The reaction of stabilized Criegee intermediates with water produces primarily hydroxymethyl hydroperoxide from CH2OO, and H2O2 and a carbonyl compound for larger Criegee intermediates; acid formation is expected to be low. The exception is camphene, for which the large Criegee intermediate generates the corresponding hydroxyalkyl hydroperoxide in its reaction with water. These results were used to develop a structure activity relationship to estimate stabilized Criegee intermediate yields and to demonstrate that this model is consistent with literature values for OH yields from these ozone-alkene reactions. The mechanisms of the formation of these products are discussed and a hypothesis for the decrease in OH formation with increasing chain length for terminal alkenes is provided. Finally, a parameterization of the reactions for incorporation into atmospheric models is developed.

  18. Methods of producing epoxides from alkenes using a two-component catalyst system

    DOEpatents

    Kung, Mayfair C.; Kung, Harold H.; Jiang, Jian

    2013-07-09

    Methods for the epoxidation of alkenes are provided. The methods include the steps of exposing the alkene to a two-component catalyst system in an aqueous solution in the presence of carbon monoxide and molecular oxygen under conditions in which the alkene is epoxidized. The two-component catalyst system comprises a first catalyst that generates peroxides or peroxy intermediates during oxidation of CO with molecular oxygen and a second catalyst that catalyzes the epoxidation of the alkene using the peroxides or peroxy intermediates. A catalyst system composed of particles of suspended gold and titanium silicalite is one example of a suitable two-component catalyst system.

  19. AN EFFICIENT AND ECOFRIENDLY OXIDATION OF ALKENES USING IRON NITRATE AND MOLECULAR OXYGEN

    EPA Science Inventory

    An environmentally friendly solventless oxidation of alkenes is accomplished efficiently using relatively benign iron nitrate as catalyst in the pressence of molecular oxygen under pressurized conditions.

  20. Branching Out: Rhodium-Catalyzed Allylation with Alkynes and Allenes.

    PubMed

    Koschker, Philipp; Breit, Bernhard

    2016-08-16

    We present a new and efficient strategy for the atom-economic transformation of both alkynes and allenes to allylic functionalized structures via a Rh-catalyzed isomerization/addition reaction which has been developed in our working group. Our methodology thus grants access to an important structural class valued in modern organic chemistry for both its versatility for further functionalization and the potential for asymmetric synthesis with the construction of a new stereogenic center. This new methodology, inspired by mechanistic investigations by Werner in the late 1980s and based on preliminary work by Yamamoto and Trost, offers an attractive alternative to other established methods for allylic functionalization such as allylic substitution or allylic oxidation. The main advantage of our methodology consists of the inherent atom economy in comparison to allylic oxidation or substitution, which both produce stoichiometric amounts of waste and, in case of the substitution reaction, require prefunctionalization of the starting material. Starting out with the discovery of a highly branched-selective coupling reaction of carboxylic acids with terminal alkynes using a Rh(I)/DPEphos complex as the catalyst system, over the past 5 years we were able to continuously expand upon this chemistry, introducing various (pro)nucleophiles for the selective C-O, C-S, C-N, and C-C functionalization of both alkynes and the double-bond isomeric allenes by choosing the appropriate rhodium/bidentate phosphine catalyst. Thus, valuable compounds such as branched allylic ethers, sulfones, amines, or γ,δ-unsaturated ketones were successfully synthesized in high yields and with a broad substrate scope. Beyond the branched selectivity inherent to rhodium, many of the presented methodologies display additional degrees of selectivity in regard to regio-, diastereo-, and enantioselective transformations, with one example even proceeding via a dynamic kinetic resolution. Many advances

  1. Co(III)-Catalyzed, Internal and Terminal Alkyne-Compatible Synthesis of Indoles.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Shuguang; Wang, Jinhu; Wang, Lili; Chen, Kehao; Song, Chao; Zhu, Jin

    2016-08-01

    A Co(III)-catalyzed, internal and terminal alkyne-compatible indole synthesis protocol is reported herein. The N-amino (hydrazine) group imparts distinct, diverse reactivity patterns for directed C-H functionalization/cyclization reactions. Notable synthetic features include regioselectivity for a meta-substituted arylhydrazine, regioselectivity for a chain-branched terminal alkyne, formal incorporation of an acetylenic unit through C2-desilylation on a C2-silylated indole derivative, formal inversion of regioselectivity through consecutive C3-derivatization and C2-desilylation processes, and formal bond migration for a linear-chain terminal alkyne. PMID:27434348

  2. Highly Chemo-, Regio-, and Stereoselective Cobalt-Catalyzed Markovnikov Hydrosilylation of Alkynes.

    PubMed

    Guo, Jun; Lu, Zhan

    2016-08-26

    A highly chemo-, regio- and stereoselective cobalt-catalyzed Markovnikov hydrosilylation of alkynes was developed. Various functionalized groups, such as halides, free alcohols, free aniline, ketones, esters, amides, and nitriles are tolerated, which may lead to further applications and late-stage derivatizations. To date, this is the most efficient cobalt catalytic system (TOF=65 520 h(-1) ; TOF=turnover frequency) for hydrosilylation of alkynes. The Hiyama-Denmark cross-coupling reactions of vinylsilanes with aryl iodides underwent smoothly to afford 1,1-diarylethenes. A unique regioselectivity-controllable hydrosilylation/hydroboration reaction of alkynes was also described. PMID:27440515

  3. Anomalous ligand effect in gold(I)-catalyzed intramolecular hydroamination of alkynes.

    PubMed

    Gaggioli, Carlo Alberto; Ciancaleoni, Gianluca; Biasiolo, Luca; Bistoni, Giovanni; Zuccaccia, Daniele; Belpassi, Leonardo; Belanzoni, Paola; Tarantelli, Francesco

    2015-04-01

    We analyzed the ligand electronic effect in a gold(I)-catalyzed intramolecular alkyne hydroamination, through a DFT and charge-displacement function (CDF) study. We found that, in the presence of π-electron conjugation between the alkyne and the nucleophilic functionality, electron poor ligands modify the coordination mode and the geometric parameters of the substrate in such a way that, contrary to expectations, the activation barrier of the nucleophilic attack increases. This remarkable effect is due to the competition between alkyne activation and nucleophile deactivation. The general relevance of these findings is highlighted. PMID:25738820

  4. Zinc-Catalyzed Dehydrogenative Cross-Coupling of Terminal Alkynes with Aldehydes: Access to Ynones.

    PubMed

    Tang, Shan; Zeng, Li; Liu, Yichang; Lei, Aiwen

    2015-12-21

    Because of the lack of redox ability, zinc has seldom been used as a catalyst in dehydrogenative cross-coupling reactions. Herein, a novel zinc-catalyzed dehydrogenative C(sp(2) )H/C(sp)H cross-coupling of terminal alkynes with aldehydes was developed, and provides a simple way to access ynones from readily available materials under mild reaction conditions. Good reaction selectivity can be achieved with a 1:1 ratio of terminal alkyne and aldehyde. Various terminal alkynes and aldehydes are suitable in this transformation. PMID:26564779

  5. Fluoroform-Derived CuCF3 for Trifluoromethylation of Terminal and TMS-Protected Alkynes.

    PubMed

    He, Lisi; Tsui, Gavin Chit

    2016-06-17

    An efficient trifluoromethylation reaction of alkynes using a fluoroform-derived CuCF3 reagent is described. The CF3 source is the inexpensive industrial waste fluoroform (CF3H). The air-stable CuCF3 reagent can be prepared in large quantities and is convenient to use. Synthetically useful trifluoromethylated alkynes containing a wide range of functional groups were successfully synthesized under mild conditions. Both terminal and TMS-protected alkynes gave the products in one step. The beneficial effect of a diamine ligand tetramethylethylenediamine (TMEDA) with the fluoroform-derived CuCF3 reagent was also demonstrated. PMID:27258390

  6. Terminal Olefin (1-Alkene) Biosynthesis by a Novel P450 Fatty Acid Decarboxylase from Jeotgalicoccus Species ▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Rude, Mathew A.; Baron, Tarah S.; Brubaker, Shane; Alibhai, Murtaza; Del Cardayre, Stephen B.; Schirmer, Andreas

    2011-01-01

    Terminal olefins (1-alkenes) are natural products that have important industrial applications as both fuels and chemicals. However, their biosynthesis has been largely unexplored. We describe a group of bacteria, Jeotgalicoccus spp., which synthesize terminal olefins, in particular 18-methyl-1-nonadecene and 17-methyl-1-nonadecene. These olefins are derived from intermediates of fatty acid biosynthesis, and the key enzyme in Jeotgalicoccus sp. ATCC 8456 is a terminal olefin-forming fatty acid decarboxylase. This enzyme, Jeotgalicoccus sp. OleT (OleTJE), was identified by purification from cell lysates, and its encoding gene was identified from a draft genome sequence of Jeotgalicoccus sp. ATCC 8456 using reverse genetics. Heterologous expression of the identified gene conferred olefin biosynthesis to Escherichia coli. OleTJE is a P450 from the cyp152 family, which includes bacterial fatty acid hydroxylases. Some cyp152 P450 enzymes have the ability to decarboxylate and to hydroxylate fatty acids (in α- and/or β-position), suggesting a common reaction intermediate in their catalytic mechanism and specific structural determinants that favor one reaction over the other. The discovery of these terminal olefin-forming P450 enzymes represents a third biosynthetic pathway (in addition to alkane and long-chain olefin biosynthesis) to convert fatty acid intermediates into hydrocarbons. Olefin-forming fatty acid decarboxylation is a novel reaction that can now be added to the catalytic repertoire of the versatile cytochrome P450 enzyme family. PMID:21216900

  7. Alkane metathesis by tandem alkane-dehydrogenation-olefin-metathesis catalysis and related chemistry.

    PubMed

    Haibach, Michael C; Kundu, Sabuj; Brookhart, Maurice; Goldman, Alan S

    2012-06-19

    Methods for the conversion of both renewable and non-petroleum fossil carbon sources to transportation fuels that are both efficient and economically viable could greatly enhance global security and prosperity. Currently, the major route to convert natural gas and coal to liquids is Fischer-Tropsch catalysis, which is potentially applicable to any source of synthesis gas including biomass and nonconventional fossil carbon sources. The major desired products of Fischer-Tropsch catalysis are n-alkanes that contain 9-19 carbons; they comprise a clean-burning and high combustion quality diesel, jet, and marine fuel. However, Fischer-Tropsch catalysis also results in significant yields of the much less valuable C(3) to C(8)n-alkanes; these are also present in large quantities in oil and gas reserves (natural gas liquids) and can be produced from the direct reduction of carbohydrates. Therefore, methods that could disproportionate medium-weight (C(3)-C(8)) n-alkanes into heavy and light n-alkanes offer great potential value as global demand for fuel increases and petroleum reserves decrease. This Account describes systems that we have developed for alkane metathesis based on the tandem operation of catalysts for alkane dehydrogenation and olefin metathesis. As dehydrogenation catalysts, we used pincer-ligated iridium complexes, and we initially investigated Schrock-type Mo or W alkylidene complexes as olefin metathesis catalysts. The interoperability of the catalysts typically represents a major challenge in tandem catalysis. In our systems, the rate of alkane dehydrogenation generally limits the overall reaction rate, whereas the lifetime of the alkylidene complexes at the relatively high temperatures required to obtain practical dehydrogenation rates (ca. 125 -200 °C) limits the total turnover numbers. Accordingly, we have focused on the development and use of more active dehydrogenation catalysts and more stable olefin-metathesis catalysts. We have used thermally

  8. Forming Stereogenic Centers in Acyclic Systems from Alkynes.

    PubMed

    Vabre, Roxane; Island, Biana; Diehl, Claudia J; Schreiner, Peter R; Marek, Ilan

    2015-08-17

    The combined carbometalation/zinc homologation followed by reactions with α-heterosubstituted aldehydes and imines proceed through a chair-like transition structure with the substituent of the incoming aldehyde residue preferentially occupying a pseudo-axial position to avoid the two gauche interactions. The heteroatom in the axial position produces a chelated intermediate (and not a Cornforth-Evans transition structure for α-chloro aldehydes and imines) leading to a face differentiation in the allylation reaction. This method provides access to functionalized products in which three new carbon-carbon bonds and two to three stereogenic centers, including a quaternary one, were created in acyclic systems in a single-pot operation from simple alkynes. PMID:26130570

  9. π Activation of Alkynes in Homogeneous and Heterogeneous Gold Catalysis.

    PubMed

    Bistoni, Giovanni; Belanzoni, Paola; Belpassi, Leonardo; Tarantelli, Francesco

    2016-07-14

    The activation of alkynes toward nucleophilic attack upon coordination to gold-based catalysts (neutral and positively charged gold clusters and gold complexes commonly used in homogeneous catalysis) is investigated to elucidate the role of the σ donation and π back-donation components of the Au-C bond (where we consider ethyne as prototype substrate). Charge displacement (CD) analysis is used to obtain a well-defined measure of σ donation and π back-donation and to find out how the corresponding charge flows affect the electron density at the electrophilic carbon undergoing the nucleophilic attack. This information is used to rationalize the activity of a series of catalysts in the nucleophilic attack step of a model hydroamination reaction. For the first time, the components of the Dewar-Chatt-Duncanson model, donation and back-donation, are put in quantitative correlation with the kinetic parameters of a chemical reaction. PMID:27119994

  10. Copper-catalysed selective hydroamination reactions of alkynes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Shi-Liang; Buchwald, Stephen L.

    2015-01-01

    The development of selective reactions that utilize easily available and abundant precursors for the efficient synthesis of amines is a long-standing goal of chemical research. Despite the centrality of amines in a number of important research areas, including medicinal chemistry, total synthesis and materials science, a general, selective and step-efficient synthesis of amines is still needed. Here, we describe a set of mild catalytic conditions utilizing a single copper-based catalyst that enables the direct preparation of three distinct and important amine classes (enamines, α-chiral branched alkylamines and linear alkylamines) from readily available alkyne starting materials with high levels of chemo-, regio- and stereoselectivity. This methodology was applied to the asymmetric synthesis of rivastigmine and the formal synthesis of several other pharmaceutical agents, including duloxetine, atomoxetine, fluoxetine and tolterodine.

  11. Copper-catalysed selective hydroamination reactions of alkynes.

    PubMed

    Shi, Shi-Liang; Buchwald, Stephen L

    2015-01-01

    The development of selective reactions that utilize easily available and abundant precursors for the efficient synthesis of amines is a long-standing goal of chemical research. Despite the centrality of amines in a number of important research areas, including medicinal chemistry, total synthesis and materials science, a general, selective and step-efficient synthesis of amines is still needed. Here, we describe a set of mild catalytic conditions utilizing a single copper-based catalyst that enables the direct preparation of three distinct and important amine classes (enamines, α-chiral branched alkylamines and linear alkylamines) from readily available alkyne starting materials with high levels of chemo-, regio- and stereoselectivity. This methodology was applied to the asymmetric synthesis of rivastigmine and the formal synthesis of several other pharmaceutical agents, including duloxetine, atomoxetine, fluoxetine and tolterodine. PMID:25515888

  12. Copper-catalyzed selective hydroamination reactions of alkynes

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Shi-Liang; Buchwald, Stephen L.

    2014-01-01

    The development of selective reactions that utilize easily available and abundant precursors for the efficient synthesis of amines is a longstanding goal of chemical research. Despite the centrality of amines in a number of important research areas, including medicinal chemistry, total synthesis and materials science, a general, selective, and step-efficient synthesis of amines is still needed. In this work we describe a set of mild catalytic conditions utilizing a single copper-based catalyst that enables the direct preparation of three distinct and important amine classes (enamines, α-chiral branched alkylamines, and linear alkylamines) from readily available alkyne starting materials with high levels of chemo-, regio-, and stereoselectivity. This methodology was applied to the asymmetric synthesis of rivastigmine and the formal synthesis of several other pharmaceutical agents, including duloxetine, atomoxetine, fluoxetine, and tolterodine. PMID:25515888

  13. Stimulation of Lipase Production During Bacterial Growth on Alkanes

    PubMed Central

    Breuil, Colette; Shindler, D. B.; Sijher, J. S.; Kushner, D. J.

    1978-01-01

    Acinetobacter lwoffi strain O16, a facultative psychrophile, can grow on crude oil, hexadecane, octadecane, and most alkanes when tested at 20 but not at 30°C. Growth occurred on a few alkanes at 30°C but after a longer lag than at 20°C. Cells grown on alkanes as sole carbon sources had high levels of cell-bound lipase. In contrast, previous work has shown that those grown on complex medium produced cell-free lipase and those grown on defined medium without alkanes produced little or no lipase. Low concentrations of the detergent Triton X-100 caused the liberation of most of the lipase activity of alkane-grown cells and increased total lipase activity. When ethanol and hexadecane were both present in a mineral medium, diauxic growth occurred; until the ethanol was completely used up, hexadecane was not utilized, and the lipase activity was very low. When growth on hexadecane began, lipase activity increased, reaching a level 50- to 100-fold higher than that of cells growing on ethanol. A similar pattern of lipase formation and hexadecane utilization was observed with Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Whenever A. lwoffi and other bacteria degraded alkanes they exhibited substantial lipase activity. Not all bacteria that produced lipase, however, could attack alkanes. Bacteria that could not produce lipase did not attack alkanes. The results suggest that a correlation may exist between lipase formation and alkane utilization. PMID:627533

  14. Radical cascade reaction of alkynes with N-fluoroarylsulfonimides and alcohols.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Guangfan; Li, Yan; Han, Jingjie; Xiong, Tao; Zhang, Qian

    2015-01-01

    Cascade reactions initiated by radical addition to alkynes are synthetically very attractive because they enable access to highly complex molecular skeletons in only few synthetic steps under usually mild conditions. Here we report a general radical cascade reaction of alkynes, N-fluoroarylsulfonimides and alcohols, enabling the efficient synthesis of important α-amino-α-aryl ketones from readily available starting materials via a single operation. During this process, the highly regioselective nitrogen-centred radical addition to internal and terminal alkynes generating vinyl radicals and the next explicit migration of aryl group from the nitrogen source lead the following efficient desulfonylation, oxygenation, and semi-pinacol rearrangement. In addition, the semi-pinacol rearrangement precursors, α-alkyloxyl-α,α-diaryl imines, could also be efficiently obtained under milder conditions. This methodology might open a new entry for designing intermolecular radical cascade reaction of alkynes. PMID:25901840

  15. Cobalt-Catalyzed Annulation of Salicylaldehydes and Alkynes to Form Chromones and 4-Chromanones.

    PubMed

    Yang, Junfeng; Yoshikai, Naohiko

    2016-02-01

    A unique cobalt(I)-diphosphine catalytic system has been identified for the coupling of salicylaldehyde (SA) and an internal alkyne affording a dehydrogenative annulation product (chromone) or a reductive annulation product (4-chromanone) depending on the alkyne substituents. Distinct from related rhodium(I)- and rhodium(III)-catalyzed reactions of SA and alkynes, these annulation reactions feature aldehyde C-H oxidative addition of SA and subsequent hydrometalation of the C=O bond of another SA molecule as common key steps. The reductive annulation to 4-chromanones also involves the action of Zn as a stoichiometric reductant. In addition to these mechanistic features, the Co(I) catalysis described herein is complementary to the Rh(I) - and Rh(III) -catalyzed reactions of SA and internal alkynes, particularly in the context of chromone synthesis. PMID:26804050

  16. Oxidations of alkenes and lignin model compounds in aqueous dispersions

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu, Weiming.

    1991-01-01

    The objective was to develop methods to oxidize water-immiscible alkenes and lignin model compounds with polymer colloid supported transition metal catalysts. The oxidations of organic compounds were carried out in aqueous phase with several water-soluble oxidants and dioxygen. Cationic polymer latexes were prepared by the emulsion copolymerization of vinylbenzyl chloride, divinylbenzene, and vinyl octadecyl ether, or styrene, or n-decyl methacrylate, and the subsequent quaternization of copolymers with trimethylamine. The latex particles were 44 nm to 71 nm in diameter. The latex bound Mn porphyrin catalysts were formed with MnTSPP [TSPP = meso-tetrakis(2,6-dichloro-3-sulfonatophenyl)porphyrin], which catalyzed the oxidation of cyclohexene, cycloocetene, allylbenzene, and 1-octene by sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl) and potassium peroxymonosulfate (KHSO[sub 5]). The latex bound porphyrin catalysts showed higher activity than MnTSPP in solution. Oxidations of 3,4-dimethoxybenzyl alcohol (DMBA), 4-hydroxy-3-methoxytoluene (HMT), and 3,4-dimethoxytoluene (DMT) were performed with either dioxygen or hydrogen peroxide and CoPcTS (PcTS = tetrasulfonatophthalocyanine), FePcTS, CuPcTS, NiPcTS, FeTCPP [TCPP = meso-tetrakis(4-carboxyphenyl)porphyrin], and MnTSPP. CoPcTS catalyzed the autoxidation of DMBA and HMT at 70-85[degrees]C and pH [ge] 8. All catalysts were active for the oxidation of DMBA, HMT, and DMT with H[sub 2]O[sub 2]. Aqueous solutions of KHSO[sub 5] oxidized water-immiscible alkenes at room temperature in the absence of organic solvent. The acidic pH [le] 1.7 solutions of commercial 2KHSO[sub 5][center dot]K[sub 2]SO[sub 4] in water produced diols from all reactive alkenes except cyclooctene. Adjustment of initial pH to [ge]6.7 with NaHCO[sub 3] enabled selective epoxidations.

  17. Selective hydrogenation of dienes and alkynes to alkenes in the presence of products of the reaction of bis-. pi. -allylpalladium chloride with amines

    SciTech Connect

    Cherkashin, G.M.; Shuikina, L.P.; Parenago, O.P.; Frolov, V.M.

    1987-06-01

    The authors have shown that the interaction of bis-..pi..-allylpalladium chloride with primary or secondary amines containing alkyl groups of substantial size (octyl- or dioctylamine) in toluene medium leads to the formation of palladium complexes active in the homogeneous catalytic hydrogenation of unsaturated hydrocarbons.

  18. Rare-earth metal π-complexes of reduced arenes, alkenes, and alkynes: bonding, electronic structure, and comparison with actinides and other electropositive metals.

    PubMed

    Huang, Wenliang; Diaconescu, Paula L

    2015-09-21

    Rare-earth metal complexes of reduced π ligands are reviewed with an emphasis on their electronic structure and bonding interactions. This perspective discusses reduced carbocyclic and acyclic π ligands; in certain categories, when no example of a rare-earth metal complex is available, a closely related actinide analogue is discussed. In general, rare-earth metals have a lower tendency to form covalent interactions with π ligands compared to actinides, mainly uranium. Despite predominant ionic interactions in rare-earth chemistry, covalent bonds can be formed with reduced carbocyclic ligands, especially multiply reduced arenes. PMID:26247323

  19. Rhodium-Catalyzed Cross-Cyclotrimerization and Dimerization of Allenes with Alkynes.

    PubMed

    Sakashita, Kazuki; Shibata, Yu; Tanaka, Ken

    2016-06-01

    It has been established that a cationic rhodium(I)/binap complex catalyzes the cross-cyclotrimerization of two molecules of a monosubstituted allene with one molecule of a functionalized alkyne to give 3,6-dialkylidenecyclohex-1-enes. In contrast, the reactions involving di- or trisubstituted allenes and/or unfunctionalized alkynes afforded cross-dimerization products, substituted dendralenes, through β-hydrogen elimination from the corresponding rhodacycles. PMID:27110668

  20. Nickel-catalyzed reductive arylation of activated alkynes with aryl iodides

    PubMed Central

    Dorn, Stephanie C. M.; Olsen, Andrew K; Kelemen, Rachel E.; Shrestha, Ruja; Weix, Daniel J.

    2015-01-01

    The direct, regioselective, and stereoselective arylation of activated alkynes with aryl iodides using a nickel catalyst and manganese reductant is described. The reaction conditions are mild (40 °C in MeOH, no acid or base) and an intermediate organomanganese reagent is unlikely. Functional groups tolerated include halides and pseudohalides, free and protected anilines, and a benzyl alcohol. Other activated alkynes including an amide and a ketone also reacted to form arylated products in good yields. PMID:26028781

  1. Copper-catalyzed trifluoromethylation of alkenes with an electrophilic trifluoromethylating reagent

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xiao-Ping; Lin, Jin-Hong; Zhang, Cheng-Pan; Zheng, Xing

    2013-01-01

    Summary An efficient method for the copper-catalyzed trifluoromethylation of terminal alkenes with an electrophilic trifluoromethylating reagent has been developed. The reactions proceeded smoothly to give trifluoromethylated alkenes in good to excellent yields. The results provided a versatile approach for the construction of Cvinyl–CF3 bonds without using prefunctionalized substrates. PMID:24367428

  2. Photocatalytic oxidation of alkenes and alcohols in water by a manganese(v) nitrido complex.

    PubMed

    Chen, Gui; Chen, Lingjing; Ma, Li; Kwong, Hoi-Ki; Lau, Tai-Chu

    2016-07-28

    Mn(v) nitrido complex [Mn(N)(CN)4](2-) is an efficient catalyst for visible-light induced oxidation of alkenes and alcohols in water using [Ru(bpy)3](2+) as a photosensitizer and [Co(NH3)5Cl](2+) as a sacrificial oxidant. Alkenes are oxidized to epoxides and alcohols to carbonyl compounds. PMID:27358025

  3. Combination of a Cyano Migration Strategy and Alkene Difunctionalization: The Elusive Selective Azidocyanation of Unactivated Olefins.

    PubMed

    Wu, Zhen; Ren, Rongguo; Zhu, Chen

    2016-08-26

    A conceptually new, efficient, and metal-free approach for the challenging azidocyanation of unactivated alkenes is presented. The strategy of intramolecular distal cyano migration is combined with alkene difunctionalization for the first time. A variety of useful azido-substituted alkyl nitriles are prepared in good yields and, most importantly, with exquisite regio- and stereo-selectivities. PMID:27490333

  4. Conformation of liquid N-alkanes.

    PubMed Central

    Goodsaid-Zalduondo, F; Engelman, D M

    1981-01-01

    The conformations of liquid n-alkanes have been studied using neutron scattering techniques to better understand the conformational forces present in membrane lipid interiors. We have studied hydrocarbon chains having lengths comparable to those found for esterified membrane lipid fatty acids, and find that the steric constraints of packing in the liquid state do not change the conformational distributions of hydrocarbon chains from those imposed by the intrachain forces present in the gas phase. It follows that the central region of membranes containing lipids in the disordered state should contain hydrocarbon chain conformations determined primarily by intrachain forces. PMID:7272453

  5. Copper-catalyzed azide alkyne cycloaddition polymer networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alzahrani, Abeer Ahmed

    The click reaction concept, introduced in 2001, has since spurred the rapid development and reexamination of efficient, high yield reactions which proceed rapidly under mild conditions. Prior to the discovery of facile copper catalysis in 2002, the thermally activated azide-alkyne or Huisgen cycloaddition reaction was largely ignored following its discovery in large part due to its slow kinetics, requirement for elevated temperature and limited selectivity. Now, arguably, the most prolific and capable of the click reactions, the copper-catalyzed azide alkyne cycloaddition (CuAAC) reaction is extremely efficient and affords exquisite control of the reaction. The orthogonally and chemoselectivity of this reaction enable its wide utility across varied scientific fields. Despite numerous inherent advantages and widespread use for small molecule synthesis and solution-based polymer chemistry, it has only recently and rarely been utilized to form polymer networks. This work focuses on the synthesis, mechanisms, and unique attributes of the CuAAC reaction for the fabrication of functional polymer networks. The photo-reduction of a series of copper(II)/amine complexes via ligand metal charge transfer was examined to determine their relative efficiency and selectivity in catalyzing the CuAAC reaction. The aliphatic amine ligands were used as an electron transfer species to reduce Cu(II) upon irradiation with 365 nm light while also functioning as an accelerating agent and as protecting ligands for the Cu(I) that was formed. Among the aliphatic amines studied, tertiary amines such as triethylamine (TEA), tetramethyldiamine (TMDA), N,N,N',N",N"-pentamethyldiethylenetriamine (PMDTA), and hexamethylenetetramine (HMTETA) were found to be the most effective. The reaction kinetics were accelerated by increasing the PMDETA : Cu(II) ratio with a ratio of ligand to Cu(II) of 4:1 yielding the maximum conversion in the shortest time. The sequential and orthogonal nature of the photo

  6. Enantioselective Intramolecular Hydroarylation of Alkenes via Directed C-H Bond Activation

    SciTech Connect

    Harada, Hitoshi; Thalji, Reema; Bergman, Robert; Ellman, Jonathan

    2008-05-22

    Highly enantioselective catalytic intramolecular ortho-alkylation of aromatic imines containing alkenyl groups tethered at the meta position relative to the imine directing group has been achieved using [RhCl(coe){sub 2}]{sub 2} and chiral phosphoramidite ligands. Cyclization of substrates containing 1,1- and 1,2-disubstituted as well as trisubstituted alkenes were achieved with enantioselectivities >90% ee for each substrate class. Cyclization of substrates with Z-alkene isomers proceeded much more efficiently than substrates with E-alkene isomers. This further enabled the highly stereoselective intramolecular alkylation of certain substrates containing Z/E-alkene mixtures via a Rh-catalyzed alkene isomerization with preferential cyclization of the Z-isomer.

  7. Genes involved in long-chain alkene biosynthesis in Micrococcus luteus

    SciTech Connect

    Beller, Harry R.; Goh, Ee-Been; Keasling, Jay D.

    2010-01-07

    Aliphatic hydrocarbons are highly appealing targets for advanced cellulosic biofuels, as they are already predominant components of petroleum-based gasoline and diesel fuels. We have studied alkene biosynthesis in Micrococcus luteus ATCC 4698, a close relative of Sarcina lutea (now Kocuria rhizophila), which four decades ago was reported to biosynthesize iso- and anteiso branched, long-chain alkenes. The underlying biochemistry and genetics of alkene biosynthesis were not elucidated in those studies. We show here that heterologous expression of a three-gene cluster from M. luteus (Mlut_13230-13250) in a fatty-acid overproducing E. coli strain resulted in production of long-chain alkenes, predominantly 27:3 and 29:3 (no. carbon atoms: no. C=C bonds). Heterologous expression of Mlut_13230 (oleA) alone produced no long-chain alkenes but unsaturated aliphatic monoketones, predominantly 27:2, and in vitro studies with the purified Mlut_13230 protein and tetradecanoyl-CoA produced the same C27 monoketone. Gas chromatography-time of flight mass spectrometry confirmed the elemental composition of all detected long-chain alkenes and monoketones (putative intermediates of alkene biosynthesis). Negative controls demonstrated that the M. luteus genes were responsible for production of these metabolites. Studies with wild-type M. luteus showed that the transcript copy number of Mlut_13230-13250 and the concentrations of 29:1 alkene isomers (the dominant alkenes produced by this strain) generally corresponded with bacterial population over time. We propose a metabolic pathway for alkene biosynthesis starting with acyl-CoA (or -ACP) thioesters and involving decarboxylative Claisen condensation as a key step, which we believe is catalyzed by OleA. Such activity is consistent with our data and with the homology (including the conserved Cys-His-Asn catalytic triad) of Mlut_13230 (OleA) to FabH (?-ketoacyl-ACP synthase III), which catalyzes decarboxylative Claisen condensation during

  8. Products of Chemistry: Alkanes: Abundant, Pervasive, Important, and Essential.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seymour, Raymond B.

    1989-01-01

    Discusses the history and commercialization of alkanes. Examines the nomenclature and uses of alkanes. Studies polymerization and several types of polyethylenes: low-density, high-density, low-molecular-weight, cross-linked, linear low-density, and ultrahigh-molecular-weight. Includes a glossary of hydrocarbon terms. (MVL)

  9. 40 CFR 721.535 - Halogenated alkane (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... CONTROL ACT SIGNIFICANT NEW USES OF CHEMICAL SUBSTANCES Significant New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.535 Halogenated alkane (generic). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as halogenated alkane (PMN P-01-433) is...

  10. 40 CFR 721.536 - Halogenated phenyl alkane.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... CONTROL ACT SIGNIFICANT NEW USES OF CHEMICAL SUBSTANCES Significant New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.536 Halogenated phenyl alkane. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as halogenated phenyl alkane (PMN P-89-867)...

  11. 40 CFR 721.535 - Halogenated alkane (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... CONTROL ACT SIGNIFICANT NEW USES OF CHEMICAL SUBSTANCES Significant New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.535 Halogenated alkane (generic). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as halogenated alkane (PMN P-01-433) is...

  12. Thomas Reiche Kuhn populations in alkanes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lazzeretti, P.; Caputo, M. C.; Ferraro, M. B.

    1999-07-01

    Atomic populations in a molecule have been defined via the Thomas-Reiche-Kuhn sum rule for oscillator strengths written within the acceleration gauge. These atomic populations are related to nuclear electric shieldings, i.e., to geometrical derivatives of electric dipole moment, and can therefore be connected with observable infrared intensities. A number of relationships can be considered to test a priori the quality of calculated electronic charges and to assess their physical meaning. It is shown via extended numerical tests on the first members of the alkane series that the Thomas-Reiche-Kuhn populations are consistent with a (small) polarity C +-H - of carbon-hydrogen bond in methane, for which a bond dipole moment can be exactly defined. Although the idea of bond dipole cannot be extended to the C-H fragments belonging to other alkane molecules in the absence of local C3 v symmetry, the calculations prove that the same electron charge polarization should characterize the whole homologous series.

  13. Cobalt-Catalyzed Oxidase C-H/N-H Alkyne Annulation: Mechanistic Insights and Access to Anticancer Agents.

    PubMed

    Mei, Ruhuai; Wang, Hui; Warratz, Svenja; Macgregor, Stuart A; Ackermann, Lutz

    2016-05-10

    Cp*-free cobalt-catalyzed alkyne annulations by C-H/N-H functionalizations were accomplished with molecular O2 as the sole oxidant. The user-friendly oxidase strategy proved viable with various internal and terminal alkynes through kinetically relevant C-H cobaltation, providing among others step-economical access to the anticancer topoisomerase-I inhibitor 21,22-dimethoxyrosettacin. DFT calculations suggest that electronic effects control the regioselectivity of the alkyne insertion step. PMID:26992149

  14. Catalytic boracarboxylation of alkynes with diborane and carbon dioxide by an N-heterocyclic carbene copper catalyst.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Liang; Cheng, Jianhua; Carry, Béatrice; Hou, Zhaomin

    2012-09-01

    By the use of an N-heterocyclic carbene copper(I) complex as a catalyst, the boracarboxylation of various alkynes (e.g., diaryl alkynes, aryl/alkyl alkynes, and phenylacetylene) with a diborane compound and carbon dioxide has been achieved for the first time, affording the α,β-unsaturated β-boralactone derivatives regio- and stereoselectively via a borylcupration/carboxylation cascade. Some important reaction intermediates were isolated and structurally characterized to clarify the reaction mechanism. PMID:22909063

  15. Alkanes in benthic organisms from the Buccaneer oil field

    SciTech Connect

    Middleditch, B.S.; Basile, B.

    1980-06-01

    About 200 g per day of alkanes are present in brine discharged from each of two production platforms in the Buccaneer oil field in the NW Gulf of Mexico. These alkanes disperse rapidly in the water column, so that seawater concentrations of petroleum alkanes in this region are generally very low. They can be taken up to some extent by plankton, fish, and barnacles, but the petroleum alkane concentrations in these organisms are also relatively low. The largest pool of petroleum alkanes is in the surficial sediments, where concentrations of up to 25 ppM are observed, with concentration gradients extending more than 20 m from the production platforms. Organisms are examined which are exposed to these sediments and, for comparison, other specimens from control sites around structures from which there are no discharges.

  16. Utilization of n-Alkanes by Cladosporium resinae

    PubMed Central

    Teh, J. S.; Lee, K. H.

    1973-01-01

    Four different isolates of Cladosporium resinae from Australian soils were tested for their ability to utilize liquid n-alkanes ranging from n-hexane to n-octadecane under standard conditions. The isolates were unable to make use of n-hexane, n-heptane, and n-octane for growth. In fact, these hydrocarbons, particularly n-hexane, exerted an inhibitory effect on spore germination and mycelial growth. All higher n-alkanes from n-nonane to n-octadecane were assimilated by the fungus, although only limited growth occurred on n-nonane and n-decane. The long chain n-alkanes (C14 to C18) supported good growth of all isolates, but there was no obvious correlation between cell yields and chain lengths of these n-alkanes. Variation in growth responses to individual n-alkane among the different isolates was also observed. The cause of this variation is unknown. PMID:4735447

  17. Sophorolipids from Torulopsis bombicola: possible relation to alkane uptake.

    PubMed Central

    Ito, S; Inoue, S

    1982-01-01

    Torulopsis bombicola produces extracellular sophorolipids when it is grown on water-insoluble alkanes. Sophorolipids and related model compounds, which were not themselves used for growth, were found to stimulate markedly the growth of T. bombicola on alkanes. This stimulatory effect was restricted to growth on C10 to C20 alkanes, whereas no significantly influence was observed for growth on fatty alcohols, fatty acids, glucose, or glycerol. The nonionic methyl ester of the glycolipid supported the greatest cell yield. However, a number of synthetic nonionic surfactants were unable to replace the glycolipid. When organisms were grown on hexadecane, stimulation of growth by sophorolipids was observed almost exclusively with strains of Torulopsis yeasts. In contrast, the growth of other typical alkane-utilizing yeasts, such as candida and Pichia strains, was inhibited or not affected. It appears that sophorolipids are involved in alkane dissimilation by T. bombicola through an undetermined mechanism. PMID:7201782

  18. Copper-catalyzed aerobic oxidative transformation of ketone-derived N-tosyl hydrazones: an entry to alkynes.

    PubMed

    Li, Xianwei; Liu, Xiaohang; Chen, Huoji; Wu, Wanqing; Qi, Chaorong; Jiang, Huanfeng

    2014-12-22

    A novel strategy involving Cu-catalyzed oxidative transformation of ketone-derived hydrazone moiety to various synthetic valuable internal alkynes and diynes has been developed. This method features inexpensive metal catalyst, green oxidant, good functional group tolerance, high regioselectivity and readily available starting materials. Oxidative deprotonation reactions were carried out to form internal alkynes and symmetrical diynes. Cross-coupling reactions of hydrazones with halides and terminal alkynes were performed to afford functionalized alkynes and unsymmetrical conjugated diynes. A mechanism proceeding through a Cu-carbene intermediate is proposed for the CC triple bond formation. PMID:25424976

  19. Spectroscopy of the tilde A state of NO-alkane complexes (alkane = methane, ethane, propane, and n-butane)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tamé-Reyes, Victor M.; Gardner, Adrian M.; Harris, Joe P.; McDaniel, Jodie; Wright, Timothy G.

    2012-12-01

    We have recorded (1+1) resonance-enhanced multiphoton ionization spectra of complexes formed between NO and the alkanes: CH4, C2H6, C3H8, and n-C4H10. The spectra correspond to the tilde A ← tilde X transition, which is a NO-localized 3s ← 2pπ* transition. In line with previous work, the spectrum for NO-CH4 has well-defined structure, but this is only partially resolved for the other complexes. The spectra recorded in the NO+-alkane mass channels all show a slowly rising onset, followed by a sharp offset, which is associated with dissociation of NO-alkane, from which binding energies in the tilde X and tilde A states are deduced. Beyond this sharp offset, there is a further rise in signal, which is attributed to fragmentation of higher complexes, NO-(alkane)n. Analysis of these features allows binding energies for (NO-alkane) ... alkane to be estimated, and these suggest that in the NO-(alkane)2 complexes, the second alkane molecule is bound to the first, rather than to NO. Calculated structures for the 1:1 complexes are reported, as well as binding energies.

  20. Reversible Alkene Insertion into the Pd–N Bond of Pd(II)-Sulfonamidates and Implications for Catalytic Amidation Reactions

    PubMed Central

    White, Paul B.; Stahl, Shannon S.

    2011-01-01

    Alkene insertion into Pd–N bonds is a key step in Pd-catalyzed oxidative amidation of alkenes. A series of well-defined Pd(II)-sulfonamidate complexes have been prepared and shown to react via insertion of a tethered alkene. The Pd–amidate and resulting Pd–alkyl species have been crystallographically characterized. The alkene insertion reaction is found to be reversible, but complete conversion to oxidative amination products is observed in the presence of O2. Electronic-effect studies reveal that alkene insertion into the Pd–N bond is favored kinetically and thermodynamically with electron-rich amidates. PMID:22007610

  1. A Near-Threshold Shape Resonance in the Valence-Shell Photoabsorption of Linear Alkynes.

    PubMed

    Jacovella, U; Holland, D M P; Boyé-Péronne, S; Gans, Bérenger; de Oliveira, N; Ito, K; Joyeux, D; Archer, L E; Lucchese, R R; Xu, Hong; Pratt, S T

    2015-12-17

    The room-temperature photoabsorption spectra of a number of linear alkynes with internal triple bonds (e.g., 2-butyne, 2-pentyne, and 2- and 3-hexyne) show similar resonances just above the lowest ionization threshold of the neutral molecules. These features result in a substantial enhancement of the photoabsorption cross sections relative to the cross sections of alkynes with terminal triple bonds (e.g., propyne, 1-butyne, 1-pentyne, ...). Based on earlier work on 2-butyne [ Xu et al., J. Chem. Phys. 2012, 136, 154303 ], these features are assigned to excitation from the neutral highest occupied molecular orbital (HOMO) to a shape resonance with g (l = 4) character and approximate π symmetry. This generic behavior results from the similarity of the HOMOs in all internal alkynes, as well as the similarity of the corresponding gπ virtual orbital in the continuum. Theoretical calculations of the absorption spectrum above the ionization threshold for the 2- and 3-alkynes show the presence of a shape resonance when the coupling between the two degenerate or nearly degenerate π channels is included, with a dominant contribution from l = 4. These calculations thus confirm the qualitative arguments for the importance of the l = 4 continuum near threshold for internal alkynes, which should also apply to other linear internal alkynes and alkynyl radicals. The 1-alkynes do not have such high partial waves present in the shape resonance. The lower l partial waves in these systems are consistent with the broader features observed in the corresponding spectra. PMID:26469080

  2. Alkyne-functionalized superstable graphitic silver nanoparticles for Raman imaging.

    PubMed

    Song, Zhi-Ling; Chen, Zhuo; Bian, Xia; Zhou, Li-Yi; Ding, Ding; Liang, Hao; Zou, Yu-Xiu; Wang, Shan-Shan; Chen, Long; Yang, Chao; Zhang, Xiao-Bing; Tan, Weihong

    2014-10-01

    Noble metals, especially gold, have been widely used in plasmon resonance applications. Although silver has a larger optical cross section and lower cost than gold, it has attracted much less attention because of its easy corrosion, thereby degrading plasmonic signals and limiting its applications. To circumvent this problem, we report the facile synthesis of superstable AgCu@graphene (ACG) nanoparticles (NPs). The growth of several layers of graphene onto the surface of AgCu alloy NPs effectively protects the Ag surface from contamination, even in the presence of hydrogen peroxide, hydrogen sulfide, and nitric acid. The ACG NPs have been utilized to enhance the unique Raman signals from the graphitic shell, making ACG an ideal candidate for cell labeling, rapid Raman imaging, and SERS detection. ACG is further functionalized with alkyne-polyethylene glycol, which has strong Raman vibrations in the Raman-silent region of the cell, leading to more accurate colocalization inside cells. In sum, this work provides a simple approach to fabricate corrosion-resistant, water-soluble, and graphene-protected AgCu NPs having a strong surface plasmon resonance effect suitable for sensing and imaging. PMID:25233109

  3. Multifunctional Single-Site Catalysts for Alkoxycarbonylation of Terminal Alkynes.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xingkun; Zhu, Hejun; Wang, Wenlong; Du, Hong; Wang, Tao; Yan, Li; Hu, Xiangping; Ding, Yunjie

    2016-09-01

    A multifunctional copolymer (PyPPh2 -SO3 H@porous organic polymers, POPs) was prepared by combining acidic groups and heterogeneous P,N ligands through the copolymerization of vinyl-functionalized 2-pyridyldiphenylphosphine (2-PyPPh2 ) and p-styrene sulfonic acid under solvothermal conditions. The morphology and chemical structure of the copolymer were evaluated using a series of characterization techniques. Compared with traditional homogeneous Pd(OAc)2 /2-PyPPh2 / p-toluenesulfonic acid catalyst, the copolymer supported palladium catalyst (Pd-PyPPh2 -SO3 H@POPs) exhibited higher activity for alkoxycarbonylation of terminal alkynes under the same conditions. This phenomenon could be attributed to the synergistic effect between the single-site Pd centers, 2-PyPPh2 ligands, and SO3 H groups, the outstanding swelling properties as well as the high enrichment of the reactant concentration by the porous catalyst. In addition, the catalyst could be reused at least 4 times without any apparent loss of activity. The excellent catalytic reactivity and good recycling properties make it an attractive catalyst for industrial applications. This work paves the way for advanced multifunctional porous organic polymers as a new type of platform for heterogeneous catalysis in the future. PMID:27530651

  4. Rh-Catalyzed Intermolecular Syn-Carboamination of Alkenes via a Transient Directing Group

    PubMed Central

    Piou, Tiffany; Rovis, Tomislav

    2015-01-01

    Alkenes are the most ubiquitous pro-chiral functional groups accessible to synthetic chemists. For this reason, difunctionalization reactions of alkenes are particularly important, as they can be used to access highly complex molecular architectures.1,2 Stereoselective oxidation reactions, including dihydroxylation, aminohydroxylation and halogenation reactions,3,4,5,6 are well-established methods for functionalizing alkenes. However, the intermolecular incorporation of both carbon- and nitrogen-based functionalities stereoselectively across an alkene has not been reported. In this manuscript, we describe the Rh(III)-catalyzed syn carboamination of alkenes initiated by a C–H activation event that uses enoxyphthalimides as the source of the carbon and the nitrogen functionalities. The reaction methodology allows for the stereospecific formation of one C–C and one C–N bond across an alkene in a fully intermolecular sense, which is unprecedented. The reaction design involves the in situ generation of a bidentate directing group and the use of a novel cyclopentadienyl ligand to control the reactivity of Rh(III). The results provide a new route to functionalized alkenes and are expected to lead to the more convergent and stereoselective assembly of amine-containing acyclic molecules. PMID:26503048

  5. Rhodium-catalysed syn-carboamination of alkenes via a transient directing group.

    PubMed

    Piou, Tiffany; Rovis, Tomislav

    2015-11-01

    Alkenes are the most ubiquitous prochiral functional groups--those that can be converted from achiral to chiral in a single step--that are accessible to synthetic chemists. For this reason, difunctionalization reactions of alkenes (whereby two functional groups are added to the same double bond) are particularly important, as they can be used to produce highly complex molecular architectures. Stereoselective oxidation reactions, including dihydroxylation, aminohydroxylation and halogenation, are well established methods for functionalizing alkenes. However, the intermolecular incorporation of both carbon- and nitrogen-based functionalities stereoselectively across an alkene has not been reported. Here we describe the rhodium-catalysed carboamination of alkenes at the same (syn) face of a double bond, initiated by a carbon-hydrogen activation event that uses enoxyphthalimides as the source of both the carbon and the nitrogen functionalities. The reaction methodology allows for the intermolecular, stereospecific formation of one carbon-carbon and one carbon-nitrogen bond across an alkene, which is, to our knowledge, unprecedented. The reaction design involves the in situ generation of a bidentate directing group and the use of a new cyclopentadienyl ligand to control the reactivity of rhodium. The results provide a new way of synthesizing functionalized alkenes, and should lead to the convergent and stereoselective assembly of amine-containing acyclic molecules. PMID:26503048

  6. Catalyst system for the polymerization of alkenes to polyolefins

    DOEpatents

    Miller, Stephen A.; Bercaw, John E.

    2004-02-17

    The invention provides metallocene catalyst systems for the controlled polymerization of alkenes to a wide variety of polyolefins and olefin coplymers. Catalyst systems are provided that specifically produce isotactic, syndiotactic and steroblock polyolefins. The type of polymer produced can be controlled by varying the catalyst system, specifically by varying the ligand substituents. Such catalyst systems are particularly useful for the polymerization of polypropylene to give elastomeric polypropylenes. The invention also provides novel elastomeric polypropylene polymers characterized by dyad (m) tacticities of about 55% to about 65%, pentad (mmmm) tacticities of about 25% to about 35%, molecular weights (M.sub.W) in the range of about 50,000 to about 2,000,000, and have mmrm+rrmr peak is less than about 5%.

  7. Catalyst system for the polymerization of alkenes to polyolefins

    DOEpatents

    Miller, Stephen A.; Bercaw, John E.

    2002-01-01

    The invention provides metallocene catalyst systems for the controlled polymerization of alkenes to a wide variety of polyolefins and olefin coplymers. Catalyst systems are provided that specifically produce isotactic, syndiotactic and steroblock polyolefins. The type of polymer produced can be controlled by varying the catalyst system, specifically by varying the ligand substituents. Such catalyst systems are particularly useful for the polymerization of polypropylene to give elastomeric polypropylenes. The invention also provides novel elastomeric polypropylene polymers characterized by dyad (m) tacticities of about 55% to about 65%, pentad (mmmm) tacticities of about 25% to about 35%, molecular weights (M.sub.w)in the range of about 50,000 to about 2,000,000, and have mmrm+rrmr peak is less than about 5%.

  8. New developments in gold-catalyzed manipulation of inactivated alkenes

    PubMed Central

    Chiarucci, Michel

    2013-01-01

    Summary Over the recent years, the nucleophilic manipulation of inactivated carbon–carbon double bonds has gained remarkable credit in the chemical community. As a matter of fact, despite lower reactivity with respect to alkynyl and allenyl counterparts, chemical functionalization of isolated alkenes, via carbon- as well as hetero atom-based nucleophiles, would provide direct access to theoretically unlimited added value of molecular motifs. In this context, homogenous [Au(I)] and [Au(III)] catalysis continues to inspire developments within organic synthesis, providing reliable responses to this interrogative, by combining crucial aspects such as chemical selectivity/efficiency with mild reaction parameters. This review intends to summarize the recent progresses in the field, with particular emphasis on mechanistic details. PMID:24367423

  9. Catalytic, Enantioselective Sulfenofunctionalisation of Alkenes: Mechanistic, Crystallographic, and Computational Studies

    PubMed Central

    Denmark, Scott E.; Hartmann, Eduard; Kornfilt, David J. P.; Wang, Hao

    2015-01-01

    The stereocontrolled introduction of vicinal heteroatomic substituents into organic molecules is one of the most powerful ways of adding value and function. Whereas many methods exist for the introduction of oxygen- and nitrogen-containing substituents, the number stereocontrolled methods for the introduction of sulfur-containing substituents pales by comparison. Previous reports from these laboratories have described the sulfenofunctionalization of alkenes that construct vicinal carbon-sulfur and carbon-oxygen, carbon-nitrogen as well as carbon-carbon bonds with high levels of diastereospecificity and enantioselectivity. This process is enabled by the concept of Lewis base activation of Lewis acids that provides activation of Group 16 electrophiles. To provide a foundation for expansion of substrate scope and improved selectivities, we have undertaken a comprehensive study of the catalytically active species. Insights gleaned from kinetic, crystallographic and computational methods have led to the introduction of a new family of sulfenylating agents that provide significantly enhanced selectivities. PMID:25411883

  10. Ruthenium-catalysed alkoxycarbonylation of alkenes with carbon dioxide.

    PubMed

    Wu, Lipeng; Liu, Qiang; Fleischer, Ivana; Jackstell, Ralf; Beller, Matthias

    2014-01-01

    Alkene carbonylations represent a major technology for the production of value-added bulk and fine chemicals. Nowadays, all industrial carbonylation processes make use of highly toxic and flammable carbon monoxide. Here we show the application of abundantly available carbon dioxide as C1 building block for the alkoxycarbonylations of industrially important olefins in the presence of a convenient and inexpensive ruthenium catalyst system. In our system, carbon dioxide works much better than the traditional combination of carbon monoxide and alcohols. The unprecedented in situ formation of carbon monoxide from carbon dioxide and alcohols permits an efficient synthesis of carboxylic acid esters, which can be used as detergents and polymer-building blocks. Notably, this transformation allows the catalytic formation of C-C bonds with carbon dioxide as C1 source and avoids the use of sensitive and/or expensive reducing agents (for example, Grignard reagents, diethylzinc or triethylaluminum). PMID:24518431

  11. Kinetic study of asphaltene dissolution in amphiphile/alkane solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Permsukarome, P.; Chang, C.; Fogler, H.S.

    1997-09-01

    The kinetics of dissolution of pentane-insoluble solid asphaltene precipitates by amphiphile/alkane solutions were investigated using a differential reactor flow system. Two amphiphiles, dodecylbenzenesulfonic acid and nonylphenol, and five alkane solvents, ranging from hexane to hexadecane, were used. Results showed that the rate of asphaltene dissolution in amphiphile/alkane fluids could be approximated with a first-order kinetics with respect to the undissolved asphaltene mass in solution. The specific dissolution rate constant, k, varied with the concentration of amphiphiles, the type of alkane solvents, the temperature, and the fluid flow rate. The rate of asphaltene dissolution displayed a Langmuir-Hinshelwood kinetics with respect to the concentration of amphiphiles. Increasing the temperature of amphiphile/alkane fluids also enhanced the rate of asphaltene dissolution. The apparent activation energy for asphaltene dissolution was approximated to be 4--7 kcal/mol. The rate of asphaltene dissolution was also greater in amphiphile solutions containing lighter alkanes, such as hexane, with lower viscosities. These trends suggest that both surface reaction and mass transfer processes are important to the rate of asphaltene dissolution in amphiphile/alkane fluids.

  12. Long-chain alkane production by the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Buijs, Nicolaas A; Zhou, Yongjin J; Siewers, Verena; Nielsen, Jens

    2015-06-01

    In the past decade industrial-scale production of renewable transportation biofuels has been developed as an alternative to fossil fuels, with ethanol as the most prominent biofuel and yeast as the production organism of choice. However, ethanol is a less efficient substitute fuel for heavy-duty and maritime transportation as well as aviation due to its low energy density. Therefore, new types of biofuels, such as alkanes, are being developed that can be used as drop-in fuels and can substitute gasoline, diesel, and kerosene. Here, we describe for the first time the heterologous biosynthesis of long-chain alkanes by the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. We show that elimination of the hexadecenal dehydrogenase Hfd1 and expression of a redox system are essential for alkane biosynthesis in yeast. Deletion of HFD1 together with expression of an alkane biosynthesis pathway resulted in the production of the alkanes tridecane, pentadecane, and heptadecane. Our study provides a proof of principle for producing long-chain alkanes in the industrial workhorse S. cerevisiae, which was so far limited to bacteria. We anticipate that these findings will be a key factor for further yeast engineering to enable industrial production of alkane based drop-in biofuels, which can allow the biofuel industry to diversify beyond bioethanol. PMID:25545362

  13. Maturation of tergal gland alkene profiles in European honey bee queens,Apis mellifera L.

    PubMed

    Smith, R K; Spivak, M; Taylor, O R; Bennett, C; Smith, M L

    1993-01-01

    In a series of husbandry and stop-time chemical experiments with honey bee queens, the production of tergal gland alkenes was found to be stimulated by natural mating and not by instrumental insemination. Carbon dioxide, physical manipulation of the sting chamber and vagina, presence of sperm in the spermatheca, egg production, and chemicals transferred via drone semen are demonstrated to not initiate the synthesis of the tergal gland alkenes. The compounds probably do not function as sex pheromones. However, the circumstances and timing of the initiation of production of the tergal gland alkenes strongly suggests a communication role for the compounds within the hive. PMID:24248518

  14. Alkanes-filled photonic crystal fibers as sensor transducers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marć, P.; Przybysz, N.; Stasiewicz, K.; Jaroszewicz, L. R.

    2015-09-01

    In this paper we propose alkanes-filled PCFs as the new class of transducers for optical fiber sensors. We investigated experimentally thermo-optic properties of a commercially available LMA8 partially filled with different alkanes with a higher number of carbon atoms. A partially filled PCF spliced with standard SMFs constitutes one of the newest type transducer. We have selected a group of eight alkanes which have melting points in different temperatures. An analysis of temperature spectral characteristics of these samples will allow to design an optical fiber sensor with different temperature thresholds at specific wavelengths.

  15. Abnormal carbon and hydrogen isotopes of alkane gases from the Qingshen gas field, Songliao Basin, China, suggesting abiogenic alkanes?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Quanyou; Dai, Jinxing; Jin, Zhijun; Li, Jian; Wu, Xiaoqi; Meng, Qingqiang; Yang, Chun; Zhou, Qinghua; Feng, Zihui; Zhu, Dongya

    2016-01-01

    It is great debate that the alkane gases of abiogenic origin would constitute a major portion of the commercial accumulation of the Qingshen gas field, Songliao Basin, China. In this study, abiogenic gases characterized by heavy δ13C1 values, reversal of the usual carbon isotopic trend of C1-C5 alkanes, very narrow variation in δ2HC1 values, and low CH4/3He ratios associated with high R/Ra values (>1) were identified. The hydrocarbon gas in the Qingshen gas field is a mixture of thermogenic alkanes derived from Cretaceous mudstone (type I kerogen) or Jurassic coal (type III kerogen) and abiogenic alkanes (mainly CH4) from mantle degassing. A quantitative estimation of abiogenic alkanes contribution to the Qingshen gas field is made based on a δ13C1 vs. δ13C2 plot: about 30-40% of alkane gases in the Qingshen gas field, along with its helium, are estimated to be derived from the mantle via magmatic activity. Particularly, the abiogenic formation of CH4 generated from the reduction of CO2 by hydrothermal activity may contribute. Our study suggests that abiogenic alkane gases in certain geological settings could be more widespread than previously thought, and may accumulate into economic reservoirs.

  16. A facile copper(I)-catalyzed homocoupling of terminal alkynes to 1,3-diynes with diaziridinone under mild conditions

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Yingguang; Shi, Yian

    2013-01-01

    A novel and efficient Cu(I)-catalyzed oxidative homocoupling of terminal alkynes with diaziridinone as oxidant is described. Various terminal alkynes can be transformed into the corresponding 1,3-diynes in good yields. The reaction process is base-free, operationally simple, and amenable to gram scale. PMID:24089251

  17. Scope and limitations of the dual-gold-catalysed hydrophenoxylation of alkynes

    PubMed Central

    Gómez-Suárez, Adrián; Oonishi, Yoshihiro; Martin, Anthony R

    2016-01-01

    Summary Due to the synthetic advantages presented by the dual-gold-catalysed hydrophenoxylation of alkynes, a thorough study of this reaction was carried out in order to fully define the scope and limitations of the methodology. The protocol tolerates a wide range of functional groups, such as nitriles, ketones, esters, aldehydes, ketals, naphthyls, allyls or polyphenols, in a milder and more efficient manner than the previously reported methodologies. We have also identified that while we are able to use highly steric hindered phenols, small changes on the steric bulk of the alkynes have a dramatic effect on the reactivity. More importantly, we have observed that the use of substrates that facilitate the formation of diaurated species such as gem-diaurated or σ,π-digold–acetylide species, hinder the catalytic activity. Moreover, we have identified that the use of directing groups in unsymmetrical alkynes can help to achieve high regioselectivity in the hydrophenoxylation. PMID:26977176

  18. A genetically encoded alkyne directs palladium-mediated protein labeling on live mammalian cell surface.

    PubMed

    Li, Nan; Ramil, Carlo P; Lim, Reyna K V; Lin, Qing

    2015-02-20

    The merging of site-specific incorporation of small bioorthogonal functional groups into proteins via amber codon suppression with bioorthogonal chemistry has created exciting opportunities to extend the power of organic reactions to living systems. Here we show that a new alkyne amino acid can be site-selectively incorporated into mammalian proteins via a known orthogonal pyrrolysyl-tRNA synthetase/tRNACUA pair and directs an unprecedented, palladium-mediated cross-coupling reaction-driven protein labeling on live mammalian cell surface. A comparison study with the alkyne-encoded proteins in vitro indicated that this terminal alkyne is better suited for the palladium-mediated cross-coupling reaction than the copper-catalyzed click chemistry. PMID:25347611

  19. A General Ligand Design for Gold Catalysis allowing Ligand-Directed Anti Nucleophilic Attack of Alkynes

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yanzhao; Wang, Zhixun; Li, Yuxue; Wu, Gongde; Cao, Zheng; Zhang, Liming

    2014-01-01

    Most homogenous gold catalyses demand ≥0.5 mol % catalyst loading. Due to the high cost of gold, these reactions are unlikely to be applicable in medium or large scale applications. Here we disclose a novel ligand design based on the privileged biphenyl-2-phosphine framework that offers a potentially general approach to dramatically lowering catalyst loading. In this design, an amide group at the 3’ position of the ligand framework directs and promotes nucleophilic attack at the ligand gold complex-activated alkyne, which is unprecedented in homogeneous gold catalysis considering the spatial challenge of using ligand to reach antiapproaching nucleophile in a linear P-Au-alkyne centroid structure. With such a ligand, the gold(I) complex becomes highly efficient in catalyzing acid addition to alkynes, with a turnover number up to 99,000. Density functional theory calculations support the role of the amide moiety in directing the attack of carboxylic acid via hydrogen bonding. PMID:24704803

  20. One-Pot Aminoethylation of Indoles/Pyrroles with Alkynes and Sulfonyl Azides.

    PubMed

    Rajasekar, Shanmugam; Yadagiri, Dongari; Anbarasan, Pazhamalai

    2015-11-16

    A general and efficient one-pot aminoethylation of substituted indoles/pyrroles was accomplished for the synthesis of various tryptamine derivatives employing a combination of alkynes and sulfonyl azides as readily accessible aminoethylating agents. The reaction features a successful integration of copper-catalyzed alkyne and azide cycloaddition to N-sulfonyl-1,2,3-triazole, rhodium-catalyzed selective insertion of α-iminocarbenes onto the C3-H bond of indoles, and reduction of the resultant enamides to tryptamine derivatives employing either NaCNBH3 or palladium catalyst, in one-pot. The reaction also showed excellent functional-group tolerance and allowed the synthesis of various substituted tryptamines in good to excellent yield. This transformation constitutes a one-pot formal regioselective functionalization of terminal alkynes. Utility of the synthesized tryptamine was further demonstrated in the synthesis of dihydro-β-carboline and tryptoline. PMID:26443500

  1. Copper catalysed azide-alkyne cycloaddition (CuAAC) in liquid ammonia.

    PubMed

    Ji, Pengju; Atherton, John H; Page, Michael I

    2012-10-21

    Copper(I) catalysed azide-alkyne cycloaddition reactions (CuAAC) occur smoothly in liquid ammonia (LNH(3)) at room temperature to give exclusively 1,4-substituted 1,2,3-triazoles with excellent yields (up to 99%). The CuAAC reactions in liquid ammonia require relatively small amounts of copper(I) catalyst (0.5 mole%) compared with that in conventional solvents. The product can be obtained conveniently by simply evaporation of ammonia, indicating its potential application in industry. The rate of the CuAAC reaction in liquid ammonia shows a second order dependence on the copper(I) concentration and the reaction occurs only with terminal alkynes. Deuterium exchange experiments with phenyl acetylene-d(1) show that the acidity of the alkyne is increased at least 1000-fold with catalytic amounts of copper(I) in liquid ammonia. The mechanism of the CuAAC reaction in liquid ammonia is discussed. PMID:22930181

  2. Scope and limitations of the dual-gold-catalysed hydrophenoxylation of alkynes.

    PubMed

    Gómez-Suárez, Adrián; Oonishi, Yoshihiro; Martin, Anthony R; Nolan, Steven P

    2016-01-01

    Due to the synthetic advantages presented by the dual-gold-catalysed hydrophenoxylation of alkynes, a thorough study of this reaction was carried out in order to fully define the scope and limitations of the methodology. The protocol tolerates a wide range of functional groups, such as nitriles, ketones, esters, aldehydes, ketals, naphthyls, allyls or polyphenols, in a milder and more efficient manner than the previously reported methodologies. We have also identified that while we are able to use highly steric hindered phenols, small changes on the steric bulk of the alkynes have a dramatic effect on the reactivity. More importantly, we have observed that the use of substrates that facilitate the formation of diaurated species such as gem-diaurated or σ,π-digold-acetylide species, hinder the catalytic activity. Moreover, we have identified that the use of directing groups in unsymmetrical alkynes can help to achieve high regioselectivity in the hydrophenoxylation. PMID:26977176

  3. Oxydifluoromethylation of Alkenes by Photoredox Catalysis: Simple Synthesis of CF2H-Containing Alcohols.

    PubMed

    Arai, Yusuke; Tomita, Ren; Ando, Gaku; Koike, Takashi; Akita, Munetaka

    2016-01-22

    We have developed a novel and simple protocol for the direct incorporation of a difluoromethyl (CF2 H) group into alkenes by visible-light-driven photoredox catalysis. The use of fac-[Ir(ppy)3] (ppy=2-pyridylphenyl) photocatalyst and shelf-stable Hu's reagent, N-tosyl-S-difluoromethyl-S-phenylsulfoximine, as a CF2 H source is the key to success. The well-designed photoredox system achieves synthesis of not only β-CF2 H-substituted alcohols but also ethers and an ester from alkenes through solvolytic processes. The present method allows a single-step and regioselective formation of C(sp(3))-CF2 H and C(sp(3))-O bonds from C=C moiety in alkenes, such as hydroxydifluoromethylation, regardless of terminal or internal alkenes. Moreover, this methodology tolerates a variety of functional groups. PMID:26639021

  4. Oxydifluoromethylation of Alkenes by Photoredox Catalysis: Simple Synthesis of CF2H‐Containing Alcohols

    PubMed Central

    Arai, Yusuke; Tomita, Ren; Ando, Gaku

    2015-01-01

    Abstract We have developed a novel and simple protocol for the direct incorporation of a difluoromethyl (CF2H) group into alkenes by visible‐light‐driven photoredox catalysis. The use of fac‐[Ir(ppy)3] (ppy=2‐pyridylphenyl) photocatalyst and shelf‐stable Hu's reagent, N‐tosyl‐S‐difluoromethyl‐S‐phenylsulfoximine, as a CF2H source is the key to success. The well‐designed photoredox system achieves synthesis of not only β‐CF2H‐substituted alcohols but also ethers and an ester from alkenes through solvolytic processes. The present method allows a single‐step and regioselective formation of C(sp3)–CF2H and C(sp3)−O bonds from C=C moiety in alkenes, such as hydroxydifluoromethylation, regardless of terminal or internal alkenes. Moreover, this methodology tolerates a variety of functional groups. PMID:26639021

  5. Process for converting light alkanes to higher hydrocarbons

    DOEpatents

    Noceti, Richard P.; Taylor, Charles E.

    1988-01-01

    A process is disclosed for the production of aromatic-rich, gasoline boiling range hydrocarbons from the lower alkanes, particularly from methane. The process is carried out in two stages. In the first, alkane is reacted with oxygen and hydrogen chloride over an oxyhydrochlorination catalyst such as copper chloride with minor proportions of potassium chloride and rare earth chloride. This produces an intermediate gaseous mixture containing water and chlorinated alkanes. The chlorinated alkanes are contacted with a crystalline aluminosilicate catalyst in the hydrogen or metal promoted form to produce gasoline range hydrocarbons with a high proportion of aromatics and a small percentage of light hydrocarbons (C.sub.2 -C.sub.4). The light hydrocarbons can be recycled for further processing over the oxyhydrochlorination catalyst.

  6. Peroxodisulfate-mediated selenoamination of alkenes yielding amidoselenide-containing sulfamides and azoles.

    PubMed

    Sun, Kai; Wang, Xin; Lv, Yunhe; Li, Gang; Jiao, Hezhen; Dai, Changwei; Li, Yangyang; Zhang, Chong; Liu, Lin

    2016-06-28

    A new protocol for C-Se and C-N bond formation by the direct difunctionalization of alkenes is reported. The protocol is operationally simple, has a wide substrate scope, and uses readily available amino sources. This reaction represents a significant addition to the limited number of intermolecular selenide difunctionalization reactions of alkenes and would find practical application in the synthesis of nitrogen- and selenium-containing molecules. PMID:27312114

  7. Iron-Catalyzed Regioselective Transfer Hydrogenative Couplings of Unactivated Aldehydes with Simple Alkenes.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Yan-Long; Liu, Yan-Yao; Wu, Yi-Mei; Wang, Yin-Xia; Lin, Yu-Tong; Ye, Mengchun

    2016-05-17

    An FeBr3 -catalyzed reductive coupling of various aldehydes with alkenes that proceeds through a direct hydride transfer pathway has been developed. With (i) PrOH as the hydrogen donor under mild conditions, previously challenging coupling reactions of unactivated alkyl and aryl aldehydes with simple alkenes, such as styrene derivatives and α-olefins, proceeded smoothly to furnish a diverse range of functionalized alcohols with complete linear regioselectivity. PMID:27072872

  8. Diverse Asymmetric Hydrofunctionalization of Aliphatic Internal Alkenes through Catalytic Regioselective Hydroboration.

    PubMed

    Xi, Yumeng; Hartwig, John F

    2016-06-01

    We report a two-step strategy for diverse hydrofunctionalizations of aliphatic internal alkenes with high regioselectivity and enantioselectivity. This process comprises a copper-catalyzed asymmetric hydroboration and subsequent stereospecific derivatizations of the secondary boronates. By this strategy, a range of compounds, such as amides, alkyl fluorides and bromides, alcohols, aldehydes, arenes, and heteroarenes, were synthesized from an internal alkene with high regioselectivity and enantioselectivity. Computational studies provide insight into the origins of these selectivities. PMID:27167490

  9. Gold-Catalyzed Anti-Markovnikov Selective Hydrothiolation of Unactivated Alkenes.

    PubMed

    Tamai, Taichi; Fujiwara, Keiko; Higashimae, Shinya; Nomoto, Akihiro; Ogawa, Akiya

    2016-05-01

    Despite the widespread use of transition-metal catalysts in organic synthesis, transition-metal-catalyzed reactions of organosulfur compounds, which are known as catalyst poisons, have been difficult. In particular, the transition-metal-catalyzed addition of organosulfur compounds to unactivated alkenes remains a challenge. A novel gold-catalyzed hydrothiolation of unactivated alkenes is presented, which proceeds effectively to give the anti-Markovnikov-selective adducts in good yields and in a regioselective manner. PMID:27057590

  10. Development of Zn-ProPhenol-Catalyzed Asymmetric Alkyne Addition: Synthesis of Chiral Propargylic Alcohols

    PubMed Central

    Trost, Barry M.; Bartlett, Mark J.; Weiss, Andrew H.; von Wangelin, Axel Jacobi; Chan, Vincent S.

    2013-01-01

    The development of a general and practical zinc-catalyzed enantioselective alkyne addition methodology is reported. Commercially available ProPhenol ligand (1) has facilitated the addition of a wide range of zinc alkynylides to aryl, aliphatic and α,β-unsaturated aldehydes in high yield and enantioselectivity. New insights into the mechanism of this reaction have resulted in a significant reduction in reagent stoichiometry, enabling the use of precious alkynes and avoiding the use of excess dimethylzinc. The enantioenriched propargylic alcohols from this reaction serve as versatile synthetic intermediates and have enabled efficient syntheses of several complex natural products. PMID:23097281

  11. Diversity Oriented Synthesis of Indoloazepinobenzimidazole and Benzimidazotriazolobenzodiazepine from N(1)-Alkyne-1,2-diamines.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Ravi; Arigela, Rajesh K; Samala, Srinivas; Kundu, Bijoy

    2015-12-14

    A one-pot protocol for the diversity oriented synthesis of two N-polyheterocycles indoloazepinobenzimidazole and benzimidazotriazolobenzodiazepine from a common N(1)-alkyne-1,2-diamine building block is described. The approach involves sequential formation of benzimidazole through cyclocondensation and oxidation, which is followed by the formation of either an azepine ring (through alkyne activation and 6-endo-dig cyclization, 1,2-migration with ring expansion, and re-aromatization), or diazepine and triazole rings through 1,3-dipolar cycloaddition. PMID:26525303

  12. Copper-catalysed azide-alkyne cycloadditions (CuAAC): an update.

    PubMed

    Haldón, Estela; Nicasio, M Carmen; Pérez, Pedro J

    2015-10-01

    The reactions of organic azides and alkynes catalysed by copper species represent the prototypical examples of click chemistry. The so-called CuAAC reaction (copper-catalysed azide-alkyne cycloaddition), discovered in 2002, has been expanded since then to become an excellent tool in organic synthesis. In this contribution the recent results described in the literature since 2010 are reviewed, classified according to the nature of the catalyst precursor: copper(I) or copper(II) salts or complexes, metallic or nano-particulated copper and several solid-supported copper systems. PMID:26284434

  13. Structure-property relationships of BaCeO perovskites for the oxidative dehydrogenation of alkanes

    SciTech Connect

    Nenoff, T.M.; Jackson, N.B.; Miller, J.E.; Sault, A.G.; Trudell, D.

    1997-12-01

    The oxidative dehydrogenation (ODH) reactions for the formation of two important organic feedstocks ethylene and propylene are of great interest because of the potential in capital and energy savings associated with these reactions. Theoretically, ODH can achieve high conversions of the starting materials (ethane and propane) at lower temperatures than conventional dehydrogenation reactions. The important focus in this study of ODH catalysts is the development of a structure-property relationship for catalyst with respect to selectivity, so as to avoid the more thermodynamically favorable combustion reaction. Catalysts for the ODH reaction generally consist of mixed metal oxides. Since for the most selective catalyst lattice oxygen is known to participate in the reaction, catalysts are sought with surface oxygen atoms that are labile enough to perform dehydrogenation, but not so plentiful or weakly bound as to promote complete combustion. Also, catalysts must be able to replenish surface oxygen by transport from the bulk. Perovskite materials are candidates to fulfill these requirements. The authors are studying BaCeO{sub 3} perovskites doped with elements such as Ca, Mg, and Sr. During the ODH of the alkanes at high temperatures, the perovskite structure is not retained and a mixture of carbonates and oxides is formed, as revealed by XRD. While the Ca doped materials showed enhanced total combustion activity below 600 C, they only showed enhanced alkene production at 700 C. Bulk structural and surface changes, as monitored by powder X-ray diffraction, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy are being correlated with activity in order to understand the factors affecting catalyst performance, and to modify catalyst formulations to improve conversion and selectivity.

  14. Contribution of cyanobacterial alkane production to the ocean hydrocarbon cycle.

    PubMed

    Lea-Smith, David J; Biller, Steven J; Davey, Matthew P; Cotton, Charles A R; Perez Sepulveda, Blanca M; Turchyn, Alexandra V; Scanlan, David J; Smith, Alison G; Chisholm, Sallie W; Howe, Christopher J

    2015-11-01

    Hydrocarbons are ubiquitous in the ocean, where alkanes such as pentadecane and heptadecane can be found even in waters minimally polluted with crude oil. Populations of hydrocarbon-degrading bacteria, which are responsible for the turnover of these compounds, are also found throughout marine systems, including in unpolluted waters. These observations suggest the existence of an unknown and widespread source of hydrocarbons in the oceans. Here, we report that strains of the two most abundant marine cyanobacteria, Prochlorococcus and Synechococcus, produce and accumulate hydrocarbons, predominantly C15 and C17 alkanes, between 0.022 and 0.368% of dry cell weight. Based on global population sizes and turnover rates, we estimate that these species have the capacity to produce 2-540 pg alkanes per mL per day, which translates into a global ocean yield of ∼ 308-771 million tons of hydrocarbons annually. We also demonstrate that both obligate and facultative marine hydrocarbon-degrading bacteria can consume cyanobacterial alkanes, which likely prevents these hydrocarbons from accumulating in the environment. Our findings implicate cyanobacteria and hydrocarbon degraders as key players in a notable internal hydrocarbon cycle within the upper ocean, where alkanes are continually produced and subsequently consumed within days. Furthermore we show that cyanobacterial alkane production is likely sufficient to sustain populations of hydrocarbon-degrading bacteria, whose abundances can rapidly expand upon localized release of crude oil from natural seepage and human activities. PMID:26438854

  15. Contribution of cyanobacterial alkane production to the ocean hydrocarbon cycle

    PubMed Central

    Lea-Smith, David J.; Biller, Steven J.; Davey, Matthew P.; Cotton, Charles A. R.; Perez Sepulveda, Blanca M.; Turchyn, Alexandra V.; Scanlan, David J.; Smith, Alison G.; Chisholm, Sallie W.; Howe, Christopher J.

    2015-01-01

    Hydrocarbons are ubiquitous in the ocean, where alkanes such as pentadecane and heptadecane can be found even in waters minimally polluted with crude oil. Populations of hydrocarbon-degrading bacteria, which are responsible for the turnover of these compounds, are also found throughout marine systems, including in unpolluted waters. These observations suggest the existence of an unknown and widespread source of hydrocarbons in the oceans. Here, we report that strains of the two most abundant marine cyanobacteria, Prochlorococcus and Synechococcus, produce and accumulate hydrocarbons, predominantly C15 and C17 alkanes, between 0.022 and 0.368% of dry cell weight. Based on global population sizes and turnover rates, we estimate that these species have the capacity to produce 2–540 pg alkanes per mL per day, which translates into a global ocean yield of ∼308–771 million tons of hydrocarbons annually. We also demonstrate that both obligate and facultative marine hydrocarbon-degrading bacteria can consume cyanobacterial alkanes, which likely prevents these hydrocarbons from accumulating in the environment. Our findings implicate cyanobacteria and hydrocarbon degraders as key players in a notable internal hydrocarbon cycle within the upper ocean, where alkanes are continually produced and subsequently consumed within days. Furthermore we show that cyanobacterial alkane production is likely sufficient to sustain populations of hydrocarbon-degrading bacteria, whose abundances can rapidly expand upon localized release of crude oil from natural seepage and human activities. PMID:26438854

  16. Genes Involved in Long-Chain Alkene Biosynthesis in Micrococcus luteus▿

    PubMed Central

    Beller, Harry R.; Goh, Ee-Been; Keasling, Jay D.

    2010-01-01

    Aliphatic hydrocarbons are highly appealing targets for advanced cellulosic biofuels, as they are already predominant components of petroleum-based gasoline and diesel fuels. We have studied alkene biosynthesis in Micrococcus luteus ATCC 4698, a close relative of Sarcina lutea (now Kocuria rhizophila), which 4 decades ago was reported to biosynthesize iso- and anteiso-branched, long-chain alkenes. The underlying biochemistry and genetics of alkene biosynthesis were not elucidated in those studies. We show here that heterologous expression of a three-gene cluster from M. luteus (Mlut_13230-13250) in a fatty acid-overproducing Escherichia coli strain resulted in production of long-chain alkenes, predominantly 27:3 and 29:3 (no. carbon atoms: no. C 000000000000 000000000000 000000000000 111111111111 000000000000 111111111111 000000000000 000000000000 000000000000 C bonds). Heterologous expression of Mlut_13230 (oleA) alone produced no long-chain alkenes but unsaturated aliphatic monoketones, predominantly 27:2, and in vitro studies with the purified Mlut_13230 protein and tetradecanoyl-coenzyme A (CoA) produced the same C27 monoketone. Gas chromatography-time of flight mass spectrometry confirmed the elemental composition of all detected long-chain alkenes and monoketones (putative intermediates of alkene biosynthesis). Negative controls demonstrated that the M. luteus genes were responsible for production of these metabolites. Studies with wild-type M. luteus showed that the transcript copy number of Mlut_13230-13250 and the concentrations of 29:1 alkene isomers (the dominant alkenes produced by this strain) generally corresponded with bacterial population over time. We propose a metabolic pathway for alkene biosynthesis starting with acyl-CoA (or-ACP [acyl carrier protein]) thioesters and involving decarboxylative Claisen condensation as a key step, which we believe is catalyzed by OleA. Such activity is consistent with our data and with the homology (including the

  17. Catalysis alkene and arene hydrogenation by thermally activated silica

    SciTech Connect

    Rajagopal, V.; Guthrie, R.D.; Davis, B.H.

    1995-12-31

    Bittner, Bockrath and Solar have reported that thermal activation of fumed silica at 320{degrees}C under argon flow introduces catalytic activity for the reactions H{sub 2} + D{sub 2} {yields} 2 HD and D{sub 2} + CH{sub 2}=CH{sub 2} {yields} CH{sub 2}DCH{sub 2}D {yields} CD{sub 3}CD{sub 3}. Using the Bittner catalyst in a glass-walled, tube reactor we hydrogenate bulk samples of alkenes and arenes using D{sub 2} at pressures of 10-14 MPa and >300{degrees}C. Activation is required. Compounds hydrogenated include, stilbene, nonene, anthracene and diphenylacetylene. The aromatic rings of naphthalene, biphenyl and bibenzyl are partially hydrogenated on prolonged treatment at 350{degrees}C. At threshold temperature for the hydrogenation of diphenylacetylene, the less-stable cis-stilbene is formed faster than it proceeds to the predominantly transequilibrium mixture. Surface OH groups on the silica undergo complete equilibration to OD under our reaction conditions. However, only a barely-measurable trace of D-atom addition occurs when D{sub 2}-equilibrated silica is heated with stilbene after D{sub 2} removal.

  18. Silver(I)-Mediated Phosphorylation/Cyclization Cascade of N-Cyanamide Alkenes for Divergent Access to Quinazolinones and Dihydroisoquinolinones.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Jing; Zhang, Yan; Wang, Dahai; Cui, Sunliang

    2016-04-15

    A silver(I)-mediated phosphorylation/cyclization radical cascade of N-cyanamide alkenes has been developed. The addition of in situ generated phosphorus radical to N-cyanamide alkenes triggers the cascade, resulting in late-stage cyclization toward divergent access to 4-quinazolinones and dihydroisoquinolinones. Both terminal and internal N-cyanamide alkenes are applicable in this protocol, and the cyclizations are consistent with Baldwin's rule. PMID:27026261

  19. Recent applications in natural product synthesis of dihydrofuran and -pyran formation by ring-closing alkene metathesis.

    PubMed

    Jacques, Reece; Pal, Ritashree; Parker, Nicholas A; Sear, Claire E; Smith, Peter W; Ribaucourt, Aubert; Hodgson, David M

    2016-07-01

    In the past two decades, alkene metathesis has risen in prominence to become a significant synthetic strategy for alkene formation. Many total syntheses of natural products have used this transformation. We review the use, from 2003 to 2015, of ring-closing alkene metathesis (RCM) for the generation of dihydrofurans or -pyrans in natural product synthesis. The strategies used to assemble the RCM precursors and the subsequent use of the newly formed unsaturation will also be highlighted and placed in context. PMID:27108941

  20. Iron-mediated oxidative C-H coupling of arenes and alkenes directed by sulfur: an expedient route to dihydrobenzofurans.

    PubMed

    Cavanagh, Craig W; Aukland, Miles H; Laurent, Quentin; Hennessy, Alan; Procter, David J

    2016-06-21

    A novel route to medicinally-relevant dihydrobenzofurans utilises a sulfur-directed C-H ortho-coupling of arenes and unactivated terminal alkenes mediated by iron, and a palladium-catalysed deallylation/heterocyclisation sequence. The iron-mediated coupling affords linear products of alkene chloroarylation in good yield and with complete regioselectivity. The coupling likely proceeds by redox-activation of the arene partner by iron(iii) and alkene addition to the resultant radical cation. PMID:27198174

  1. Storable N-Phenylcarbamate Palladacycles for Rapid Functionalization of An Alkyne-Encoded Protein

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Gang; Lim, Reyna K. V.; Ramil, Carlo P.

    2014-01-01

    Here we report the synthesis of storable N-phenyl-carbamate palladacycles that showed robust reactivity in the cross-coupling reaction with an alkyne-encoded protein with second-order rate constantapproaching 19 770 ± 930 M−1 s−1. PMID:25140915

  2. Copper(I)-Catalyzed Radical Addition of Acetophenones to Alkynes in Furan Synthesis.

    PubMed

    Manna, Srimanta; Antonchick, Andrey P

    2015-09-01

    A synthesis of multisubstituted furans from readily available acetophenones and electron-deficient alkynes via direct C(sp(3))-H bond functionalization under radical reaction conditions is described. The developed transformation is catalyzed by copper(I) salts using di-tert-butyl peroxide as an external oxidant. This method offers an efficient access to biologically important scaffolds from simple compounds. PMID:26277912

  3. Magnetically Recoverable Supported Ruthenium Catalyst for Hydrogenation of Alkynes and Transfer Hydrogenation of Carbonyl Compounds

    EPA Science Inventory

    A ruthenium (Ru) catalyst supported on magnetic nanoparticles (NiFe2O4) has been successfully synthesized and used for hydrogenation of alkynes at room temperature as well as transfer hydrogenation of a number of carbonyl compounds under microwave irradiation conditions. The cata...

  4. Cobalt-Catalyzed Alkyne Hydrosilylation and Sequential Vinylsilane Hydroboration with Markovnikov Selectivity.

    PubMed

    Zuo, Ziqing; Yang, Ji; Huang, Zheng

    2016-08-26

    A pyridinebis(oxazoline) cobalt complex is a very efficient precatalyst for the hydrosilylation of terminal alkynes with Ph2 SiH2 , providing α-vinylsilanes with high (Markovnikov) regioselectivity and broad functional-group tolerance. The vinylsilane products can be further converted into geminal borosilanes through Markovnikov hydroboration with pinacolborane and a bis(imino)pyridine cobalt catalyst. PMID:27479796

  5. Cu(I)-catalyzed direct addition and asymmetric addition of terminal alkynes to imines

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Chunmei; Mague, Joel T.; Li, Chao-Jun

    2004-01-01

    A Cu(I)-catalyzed direct addition of alkynes to imines was developed. The process is simple and provides a diverse range of propargylamines in high enantiomeric excess and good yield both in water and in toluene. The absolute configuration of such addition products has been determined by x-ray crystallography. PMID:15067132

  6. Ancillary ligand-free copper catalysed hydrohydrazination of terminal alkynes with NH2NH2.

    PubMed

    Peltier, Jesse L; Jazzar, Rodolphe; Melaimi, Mohand; Bertrand, Guy

    2016-02-14

    An efficient and selective Cu-catalysed hydrohydrazination of terminal alkynes with parent hydrazine is reported. The methodology tolerates a broad range of functional groups, allows for the synthesis of symmetrical and unsymmetrical azines, and can be extended to hydrazine derivatives and amines. PMID:26757745

  7. Vapor Phase Alkyne Coating of Pharmaceutical Excipients: Discrimination Enhancement of Raman Chemical Imaging for Tablets.

    PubMed

    Yamashita, Mayumi; Sasaki, Hiroaki; Moriyama, Kei

    2015-12-01

    Raman chemical imaging has become a powerful analytical tool to investigate the crystallographic characteristics of pharmaceutical ingredients in tablet. However, it is often difficult to discriminate some pharmaceutical excipients from each other by Raman spectrum because of broad and overlapping signals, limiting their detailed assessments. To overcome this difficulty, we developed a vapor phase coating method of excipients by an alkyne, which exhibits a distinctive Raman signal in the range of 2100-2300 cm(-1) . We found that the combination of two volatile reagents, propargyl bromide and triethylamine, formed a thin and nonvolatile coating on the excipient and observed the Raman signal of the alkyne at the surface. We prepared alkyne-coated cellulose by this method and formed a tablet. The Raman chemical imaging of the tablet cross-section using the alkyne peak area intensity of 2120 cm(-1) as the index showed a much clearer particle image of cellulose than using the peak area intensity of 1370 cm(-1) , which originated from the cellulose itself. Our method provides an innovative technique to analyze the solid-state characteristics of pharmaceutical excipients in tablets. PMID:26343262

  8. Biocompatible Azide-Alkyne "Click" Reactions for Surface Decoration of Glyco-Engineered Cells.

    PubMed

    Gutmann, Marcus; Memmel, Elisabeth; Braun, Alexandra C; Seibel, Jürgen; Meinel, Lorenz; Lühmann, Tessa

    2016-05-01

    Bio-orthogonal copper (I)-catalyzed azide-alkyne cycloaddition (CuAAC) has been widely used to modify azide- or alkyne-bearing monosaccharides on metabolic glyco-engineered mammalian cells. Here, we present a systematic study to elucidate the design space for the cytotoxic effects of the copper catalyst on NIH 3T3 fibroblasts and on HEK 293-F cells. Monitoring membrane integrity by flow cytometry and RT-PCR analysis with apoptotic and anti-apoptotic markers elucidated the general feasibility of CuAAC, with exposure time of the CuAAC reaction mixture having the major influence on biocompatibility. A high labeling efficiency of HEK 293-F cells with a fluorescent alkyne dye was rapidly achieved by CuAAC in comparison to copper free strain-promoted azide-alkyne cycloaddition (SPAAC). The study details effective and biocompatible conditions for CuAAC-based modification of glyco-engineered cells in comparison to its copper free alternative. PMID:26818821

  9. Ruthenium-Catalyzed C-H Alkynylation of Aromatic Amides with Hypervalent Iodine-Alkyne Reagents.

    PubMed

    Boobalan, Ramadoss; Gandeepan, Parthasarathy; Cheng, Chien-Hong

    2016-07-15

    An efficient C-H activation method for the ortho alkynylation of aromatic N-methoxyamides with hypervalent iodine-alkyne reagent using a ruthenium catalyst is described. The reaction proceeds under mild reaction conditions with broad substrate scope. A possible catalytic cycle involving a ruthenium carboxylate assisted C-H bond cleavage is proposed from the preliminary mechanistic evidence. PMID:27357724

  10. A HIGHLY STEREOSELECTIVE, NOVEL COUPLING REACTION BETWEEN ALKYNES WITH ALDEHYDES. (R828129)

    EPA Science Inventory

    In the presence of indium triflate or gallium chloride, a novel coupling between internal alkynes and aldehydes occurred to give unsaturated ketones and [4+1] annulation products.


    Graphical Abstrac...

  11. Quick and highly efficient copper-catalyzed cycloaddition of organic azides with terminal alkynes.

    PubMed

    Wang, Dong; Zhao, Mingming; Liu, Xiang; Chen, Yongxin; Li, Na; Chen, Baohua

    2012-01-14

    Good to excellent yields of 1,4-disubstituted 1,2,3-triazoles were obtained within 2-25 min when the Cu(I)-catalyzed azide-alkyne cycloaddition (CuAAC) reaction was carried out under solvent-free conditions, with [Cu(phen)(PPh(3))(2)]NO(3) (1mol%) as the catalyst. PMID:22024945

  12. Electrocatalytic activities of alkyne-functionalized copper nanoparticles in oxygen reduction in alkaline media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Ke; Song, Yang; Chen, Shaowei

    2014-12-01

    Stable alkyne-capped copper nanoparticles were prepared by chemical reduction of copper acetate with sodium borohydride in the presence of alkyne ligands. Transmission electron microscopic measurements showed that nanoparticles were well dispersed with a diameter in the range of 4-6 nm. FTIR and photoluminescence spectroscopic measurements confirmed the successful attachment of the alkyne ligands onto the nanoparticle surface most likely forming Cu-Ctbnd interfacial bonds. XPS measurements indicated the formation of a small amount of CuO in the nanoparticles with a satellite peak where the binding energy red-shifted with increasing Cu(II) concentration. Cu2O was also detected in the nanoparticles. Similar results were observed with commercial CuO nanoparticles. Electrochemical studies showed that the as-prepared alkyne-capped copper nanoparticles exhibited apparent electrocatalytic activity in oxygen reduction in alkaline media, a performance that was markedly better than those reported earlier with poly- or single-crystalline copper electrodes; and the fraction of peroxides in the final products decreased with decreasing concentration of oxide components in the nanoparticles.

  13. Copper on Chitosan: A Recyclable Heterogeneous Catalyst for Azide-alkyne Cycloaddition Reactions in Water

    EPA Science Inventory

    Copper sulfate is immobilized over chitosan by simply stirring an aqueous suspension of chitosan in water with copper sulfate; the ensuing catalyst has been utilized for the azide-alkyne cycloaddition in aqueous media and it can be recycled and reused many time without loosing it...

  14. Aerobic Oxidation in Nanomicelles of Aryl Alkynes, in Water at Room Temperature**

    PubMed Central

    Handa, Sachin; Fennewald, James C.; Rainey, Shane

    2014-01-01

    On the basis of the far higher solubility of oxygen gas inside the hydrocarbon core of nanomicelles, metal and peroxide free aerobic oxidation of aryl alkynes has been achieved in water at room temperature. Many examples are offered that illustrate broad functional group tolerance. The overall process is environmentally friendly, documented by the associated low E Factors. PMID:24616243

  15. On the Mechanism of Copper(I)-Catalyzed Azide-Alkyne Cycloaddition.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Lei; Brassard, Christopher J; Zhang, Xiaoguang; Guha, P M; Clark, Ronald J

    2016-06-01

    The copper(I)-catalyzed azide-alkyne cycloaddition (CuAAC) reaction regiospecifically produces 1,4-disubstituted-1,2,3-triazole molecules. This heterocycle formation chemistry has high tolerance to reaction conditions and substrate structures. Therefore, it has been practiced not only within, but also far beyond the area of heterocyclic chemistry. Herein, the mechanistic understanding of CuAAC is summarized, with a particular emphasis on the significance of copper/azide interactions. Our analysis concludes that the formation of the azide/copper(I) acetylide complex in the early stage of the reaction dictates the reaction rate. The subsequent triazole ring-formation step is fast and consequently possibly kinetically invisible. Therefore, structures of substrates and copper catalysts, as well as other reaction variables that are conducive to the formation of the copper/alkyne/azide ternary complex predisposed for cycloaddition would result in highly efficient CuAAC reactions. Specifically, terminal alkynes with relatively low pKa values and an inclination to engage in π-backbonding with copper(I), azides with ancillary copper-binding ligands (aka chelating azides), and copper catalysts that resist aggregation, balance redox activity with Lewis acidity, and allow for dinuclear cooperative catalysis are favored in CuAAC reactions. Brief discussions on the mechanistic aspects of internal alkyne-involved CuAAC reactions are also included, based on the relatively limited data that are available at this point. PMID:27216993

  16. Selective hydroxylation of alkanes by an extracellular fungal peroxygenase.

    PubMed

    Peter, Sebastian; Kinne, Matthias; Wang, Xiaoshi; Ullrich, René; Kayser, Gernot; Groves, John T; Hofrichter, Martin

    2011-10-01

    Fungal peroxygenases are novel extracellular heme-thiolate biocatalysts that are capable of catalyzing the selective monooxygenation of diverse organic compounds, using only H(2)O(2) as a cosubstrate. Little is known about the physiological role or the catalytic mechanism of these enzymes. We have found that the peroxygenase secreted by Agrocybe aegerita catalyzes the H(2)O(2)-dependent hydroxylation of linear alkanes at the 2-position and 3-position with high efficiency, as well as the regioselective monooxygenation of branched and cyclic alkanes. Experiments with n-heptane and n-octane showed that the hydroxylation proceeded with complete stereoselectivity for the (R)-enantiomer of the corresponding 3-alcohol. Investigations with a number of model substrates provided information about the route of alkane hydroxylation: (a) the hydroxylation of cyclohexane mediated by H(2)(18)(2) resulted in complete incorporation of (18)O into the hydroxyl group of the product cyclohexanol; (b) the hydroxylation of n-hexane-1,1,1,2,2,3,3-D(7) showed a large intramolecular deuterium isotope effect [(k(H)/k(D))(obs)] of 16.0 ± 1.0 for 2-hexanol and 8.9 ± 0.9 for 3-hexanol; and (c) the hydroxylation of the radical clock norcarane led to an estimated radical lifetime of 9.4 ps and an oxygen rebound rate of 1.06 × 10(11) s(-1). These results point to a hydrogen abstraction and oxygen rebound mechanism for alkane hydroxylation. The peroxygenase appeared to lack activity on long-chain alkanes (> C(16)) and highly branched alkanes (e.g. tetramethylpentane), but otherwise exhibited a broad substrate range. It may accordingly have a role in the bioconversion of natural and anthropogenic alkane-containing structures (including alkyl chains of complex biomaterials) in soils, plant litter, and wood. PMID:21812933

  17. Oxidative conversion of C1-C3 alkanes by vanadium oxide catalysts. DFT results and their accuracy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rozanska, Xavier; Sauer, Joachim

    Elementary steps in the oxidative conversion of methane, ethane, and propane by supported vanadium oxide species are studied by density functional theory, specifically B3LYP. Two models are adopted, namely O dbond V(OH)3 and O dbond VSi7O12H7, which yield similar energy profiles. The initial and rate-determining step is hydrogen abstraction. Within the C1-C3 series, energy barriers and reaction energies follow the same trend as the C bond H bond strength in the different alkanes. For methane, only methanol formation is possible whereas for ethane and propane, oxidative dehydrogenation yields the corresponding alkenes. Single point CCSD(T)/TZVP calculations are used to assess the B3LYP error. For the barrier of the initial hydrogen abstraction the B3LYP error is larger than usual, -40 to -60 kJ/mol. With the non-hybrid BP86 and PBE functionals even larger errors occur and the potential energy surface is qualitatively different.

  18. Variation in n-Alkane Distributions of Modern Plants: Questioning Applications of n-Alkanes in Chemotaxonomy and Paleoecology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bush, R. T.; McInerney, F. A.

    2010-12-01

    Long chain n-alkanes (n-C21 to n-C37) are synthesized as part of the epicuticular leaf wax of terrestrial plants and are among the most recognizable and widely used plant biomarkers. n-Alkane distributions have been utilized in previous studies on modern plant chemotaxonomy, testing whether taxa can be identified based on characteristic n-alkane profiles. Dominant n-alkanes (e.g. n-C27 or n-C31) have also been ascribed to major plant groups (e.g. trees or grasses respectively) and have been used in paleoecology studies to reconstruct fluctuations in plant functional types. However, many of these studies have been based on relatively few modern plant data; with the wealth of modern n-alkane studies, a more comprehensive analysis of n-alkanes in modern plants is now possible and can inform the usefulness of n-alkane distributions as paleoecological indicators. The work presented here is a combination of measurements made using plant leaves collected from the Chicago Botanic Garden and a compilation of published literature data from six continents. We categorized plants by type: angiosperms, gymnosperms, woody plants, forbs, grasses, ferns and pteridophytes, and mosses. We then quantified n-alkane distribution parameters such as carbon preference index (CPI), average chain length (ACL), and dispersion (a measure of the spread of the profile over multiple chain lengths) and used these to compare plant groups. Among all plants, one of the emergent correlations is a decrease in dispersion with increasing CPI. Within and among plant groups, n-alkane distributions show a very large range of variation, and the results show little or no correspondence between broad plant groups and a single dominant n-alkane or a ratio of n-alkanes. These findings are true both when data from six continents are combined and when plants from a given region are compared (North America). We also compared the n-alkane distributions of woody angiosperms, woody gymnosperms, and grasses with one

  19. Metabolism of Hydrocarbons in n-Alkane-Utilizing Anaerobic Bacteria.

    PubMed

    Wilkes, Heinz; Buckel, Wolfgang; Golding, Bernard T; Rabus, Ralf

    2016-01-01

    The glycyl radical enzyme-catalyzed addition of n-alkanes to fumarate creates a C-C-bond between two concomitantly formed stereogenic carbon centers. The configurations of the two diastereoisomers of the product resulting from n-hexane activation by the n-alkane-utilizing denitrifying bacterium strain HxN1, i.e. (1-methylpentyl)succinate, were assigned as (2S,1'R) and (2R,1'R). Experiments with stereospecifically deuterated n-(2,5-2H2)hexanes revealed that exclusively the pro-S hydrogen atom is abstracted from C2 of the n-alkane by the enzyme and later transferred back to C3 of the alkylsuccinate formed. These results indicate that the alkylsuccinate-forming reaction proceeds with an inversion of configuration at the carbon atom (C2) of the n-alkane forming the new C-C-bond, and thus stereochemically resembles a SN2-type reaction. Therefore, the reaction may occur in a concerted manner, which may avoid the highly energetic hex-2-yl radical as an intermediate. The reaction is associated with a significant primary kinetic isotope effect (kH/kD ≥3) for hydrogen, indicating that the homolytic C-H-bond cleavage is involved in the first irreversible step of the reaction mechanism. The (1-methylalkyl)succinate synthases of n-alkane-utilizing anaerobic bacteria apparently have very broad substrate ranges enabling them to activate not only aliphatic but also alkyl-aromatic hydrocarbons. Thus, two denitrifiers and one sulfate reducer were shown to convert the nongrowth substrate toluene to benzylsuccinate and further to the dead-end product benzoyl-CoA. For this purpose, however, the modified β-oxidation pathway known from alkylbenzene-utilizing bacteria was not employed, but rather the pathway used for n-alkane degradation involving CoA ligation, carbon skeleton rearrangement and decarboxylation. Furthermore, various n-alkane- and alkylbenzene-utilizing denitrifiers and sulfate reducers were found to be capable of forming benzyl alcohols from diverse alkylbenzenes

  20. Detailed chemical kinetic models for large n-alkanes and iso-alkanes found in conventional and F-T diesel fuels

    SciTech Connect

    Westbrook, C K; Pitz, W J; Curran, H J; Mehl, M

    2008-12-15

    Detailed chemical kinetic models are needed to simulate the combustion of current and future transportation fuels. These models should represent the various chemical classes in these fuels. Conventional diesel fuels are composed of n-alkanes, iso-alkanes, cycloalkanes and aromatics (Farrell et al. 2007). For future fuels, there is a renewed interest in Fischer-Tropsch (F-T) processes which can be used to synthesize diesel and other transportation fuels from biomass, coal and natural gas. F-T diesel fuels are expected to be similar to F-T jet fuels which are commonly comprised of iso-alkanes with some n-alkanes (Smith and Bruno, 2008). Thus, n-alkanes and iso-alkanes are common chemical classes in these conventional and future fuels. This paper reports on the development of chemical kinetic models of large n-alkanes and iso-alkanes to represent these chemical classes in conventional and future fuels. Two large iso-alkanes are 2,2,4,4,6,8,8-heptamethylnonane, which is a primary reference fuel for diesel, and isooctane, a primary reference fuel for gasoline. Other iso-alkanes are branched alkanes with a single methyl side chain, typical of most F-T fuels. The chemical kinetic models are then used to predict the effect of these fuel components on ignition characteristics under conditions found in internal combustion engines.

  1. Alkane inducible proteins in Geobacillus thermoleovorans B23

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Initial step of β-oxidation is catalyzed by acyl-CoA dehydrogenase in prokaryotes and mitochondria, while acyl-CoA oxidase primarily functions in the peroxisomes of eukaryotes. Oxidase reaction accompanies emission of toxic by-product reactive oxygen molecules including superoxide anion, and superoxide dismutase and catalase activities are essential to detoxify them in the peroxisomes. Although there is an argument about whether primitive life was born and evolved under high temperature conditions, thermophilic archaea apparently share living systems with both bacteria and eukaryotes. We hypothesized that alkane degradation pathways in thermophilic microorganisms could be premature and useful to understand their evolution. Results An extremely thermophilic and alkane degrading Geobacillus thermoleovorans B23 was previously isolated from a deep subsurface oil reservoir in Japan. In the present study, we identified novel membrane proteins (P16, P21) and superoxide dismutase (P24) whose production levels were significantly increased upon alkane degradation. Unlike other bacteria acyl-CoA oxidase and catalase activities were also increased in strain B23 by addition of alkane. Conclusion We first suggested that peroxisomal β-oxidation system exists in bacteria. This eukaryotic-type alkane degradation pathway in thermophilic bacterial cells might be a vestige of primitive living cell systems that had evolved into eukaryotes. PMID:19320977

  2. Assessment of ambient volatile hydrocarbons from tobacco smoke and from vehicle emissions.

    PubMed

    Barrefors, G; Petersson, G

    1993-07-23

    Quantitative proportions of C2-C8 alkenes, alkadienes, alkynes, alkanes and arenes were determined for indoor smoky air and for air inside a private car. Samples were taken on adsorbent cartridges and analysed by gas chromatography on an aluminium oxide column. The proportions of more than twenty reported alkenes, alkadienes and alkynes were demonstrated to be very similar in a smoky room and in sidestream cigarette smoke. Isoprene, ethene and propene are major components. Urban air polluted by petrol-fuelled vehicles differs mainly by having much lower proportions of isoprene and much higher proportions of petrol alkanes and alkylbenzenes. The total concentration of C2-C8 hydrocarbons was found to be similar in a smoky room and in a car in urban traffic. PMID:7689578

  3. The Origin of Anti-Markovnikov Regioselectivity in Alkene Hydroamination Reactions Catalyzed by [Rh(DPEphos)](.).

    PubMed

    Couce-Rios, Almudena; Lledós, Agustí; Ujaque, Gregori

    2016-06-27

    The development of regioselective anti-Markovnikov alkene's hydroamination is a long-standing goal in catalysis. The [Rh(COD)(DPEphos)](+) complex is the most general and regioselective group 9 catalyst for such a process. The reaction mechanism for intermolecular hydroamination of alkenes catalyzed by [Rh(DPEphos)](+) complex is analyzed by means of DFT calculations. Hydroamination (alkene vs. amine activation routes) as well as oxidative amination pathways are analyzed. According to the computational results the operating mechanism can be generally described by alkene coordination, amine nucleophilic addition, proton transfer through the metal center and reductive elimination steps. The mechanism for the formation of the oxidative amination side product goes via a β-elimination after the nucleophilic addition and metal center protonation steps. The origin of the regioselectivity for the addition process (Markovnikov vs. anti-Markovnikov additions) is shown to be not charge but orbitally driven. Remarkably, η(2) to η(1) slippage degree on the alkene coordination mode is directly related to the regioselective outcome. PMID:27226329

  4. Alkanes in shrimp from the Buccaneer Oil Field

    SciTech Connect

    Middleditch, B.S.; Basile, B.; Chang, E.S.

    1982-07-01

    A total of 36 samples of shrimp were examined from the region of the Buccaneer oil field, eighteen of which were representatives of the commercial species Penaeus aztecus and the rest were various other species: Penaeus duorarum (pink shrimp), Trachypenaeus duorarum (sugar shrimp), Squilla empusa (mantis shrimp), and Sicyonia dorsalis (chevron shrimp). The alkanes and deuteriated alkanes were completely separated by GC, so a mass spectrometer was not required for their detection and quantitation. To confirm the identities of individual compounds, however, some samples were examined by combined gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. Results show that only thirteen of the forty shrimp collected from the region of the Buccaneer oil field contained petroleum alkanes, and the majority of these were obtained from trawls immediately adjacent to the production platforms. It appears that shrimp caught in the region of the Buccaneer oil field are not appreciably tainted with hydrocarbons discharged from the production platforms. (JMT)

  5. High Temperature Chemical Kinetic Combustion Modeling of Lightly Methylated Alkanes

    SciTech Connect

    Sarathy, S M; Westbrook, C K; Pitz, W J; Mehl, M

    2011-03-01

    Conventional petroleum jet and diesel fuels, as well as alternative Fischer-Tropsch (FT) fuels and hydrotreated renewable jet (HRJ) fuels, contain high molecular weight lightly branched alkanes (i.e., methylalkanes) and straight chain alkanes (n-alkanes). Improving the combustion of these fuels in practical applications requires a fundamental understanding of large hydrocarbon combustion chemistry. This research project presents a detailed high temperature chemical kinetic mechanism for n-octane and three lightly branched isomers octane (i.e., 2-methylheptane, 3-methylheptane, and 2,5-dimethylhexane). The model is validated against experimental data from a variety of fundamental combustion devices. This new model is used to show how the location and number of methyl branches affects fuel reactivity including laminar flame speed and species formation.

  6. Kinetics and mechanisms of some atomic oxygen reactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cvetanovic, R. J.

    1987-01-01

    Mechanisms and kinetics of some reactions of the ground state of oxygen atoms, O(3P), are briefly summarized. Attention is given to reactions of oxygen atoms with several different types of organic and inorganic compounds such as alkanes, alkenes, alkynes, aromatics, and some oxygen, nitrogen, halogen and sulfur derivatives of these compounds. References to some recent compilations and critical evaluations of reaction rate constants are given.

  7. Annulation of thioimidates and vinyl carbodiimides to prepare 2-aminopyrimidines, competent nucleophiles for intramolecular alkyne hydroamination. Synthesis of (-)-crambidine.

    PubMed

    Perl, Nicholas R; Ide, Nathan D; Prajapati, Sudeep; Perfect, Hahdi H; Durón, Sergio G; Gin, David Y

    2010-02-17

    A convergent synthesis of (-)-crambidine is reported. The sequence capitalizes on two novel key transformations, including a [4+2] annulation of thioimidates with vinyl carbodiimides and an alkyne hydroamination employing 2-aminopyrimidine nucleophiles. PMID:20095555

  8. Cu-Catalyzed Alkynylation of Unactivated C(sp(3))-X Bonds with Terminal Alkynes through Directing Strategy.

    PubMed

    Luo, Fei-Xian; Xu, Xing; Wang, Ding; Cao, Zhi-Chao; Zhang, Yun-Fei; Shi, Zhang-Jie

    2016-05-01

    In this letter, we report an efficient and concise protocol for Cu-catalyzed cross-coupling of unactivated alkyl halides/peusudohalides with terminal alkynes to afford internal alkynes with the assistance of various amides as directing groups. Different alkyl halides/pseudohalides exhibited excellent reactivities, and the inactivated alkyl chlorides and sulfonates showed better reactivity than bromides/iodides. This is the first successful example to apply alkyl chlorides and sulfonates directly in cross-coupling with terminal alkynes in the absence of any additives. A Cu catalyst was found to be more effective than other transition metal catalysts. This reaction also exhibited a broad substrate scope with respect to terminal alkynes. PMID:27074521

  9. Double hydrophosphination of alkynes promoted by rhodium: the key role of an N-heterocyclic carbene ligand.

    PubMed

    Di Giuseppe, Andrea; De Luca, Roberto; Castarlenas, Ricardo; Pérez-Torrente, Jesús J; Crucianelli, Marcello; Oro, Luis A

    2016-04-25

    The regioselective double hydrophosphination of alkynes mediated by rhodium catalysts is presented. The distinctive stereoelectronic properties of the NHC ligand prevent the catalyst deactivation by diphosphine coordination thereby allowing for the closing of a productive catalytic cycle. PMID:27022648

  10. BIODEGRADATION AND GAS-EXCHANGE OF GASEOUS ALKANES IN MODEL ESTUARINE ECOSYSTEMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Gas exchange-biodegradation experiments conducted in model estuarine ecosystems indicate that the ease of degradation of gaseious normal alkanes increases with chain length. The behavior of gaseous perhalogenated alkanes can be explained by gas exchange alone with no degradation....

  11. Modeling of alkane emissions from a wood stain

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, J.C.S.; Guo, Z.

    1993-01-01

    The article discusses full-scale residential house tests to evaluate the effects of organic emissions from a wood finishing product--wood stain--on indoor air quality (IAQ). The test house concentrations of three alkane species, nonane, decane, and undecane, were measured as a function of time after the application of the wood stain. It was found that the test house concentrations can be simulated by an integrated IAQ model which takes into consideration source, sink, and ventilation effects. The alkane emissions were controlled by an evaporation-like process.

  12. Catalytic, mild, and selective oxyfunctionalization of linear alkanes: current challenges.

    PubMed

    Bordeaux, Mélanie; Galarneau, Anne; Drone, Jullien

    2012-10-22

    Selective catalysts for sustainable oxidation of alkanes are highly demanded because of the abundance of these molecules in the environment, the possibility to transform them into higher-value compounds, such as chemicals or synthetic fuels, and the fact that, kinetically speaking, this is a difficult reaction. Numerous chemical and biological catalysts have been developed in the lasts decades for this purpose, rendering the overview over this field of chemistry difficult. After giving a definition of the ideal catalyst for alkane oxyfunctionalization, this review aims to present the catalysts available today that are closest to ideal. PMID:22996726

  13. A nonequilibrium molecular dynamics study of the rheology of alkanes

    SciTech Connect

    Gupta, S.A.; Cui, S.T.; Cummings, P.T.; Cochran, H.D. |

    1996-05-01

    We examine the rheological properties of four different alkanes: n-decane, n-hexadecane, n-tetracosane, and squalane. Simulations of Couette flow are performed for a range of shear rates with 100 molecules in each case using a replicated data version of our code. Number of interaction sites ranges from 1000 to 3000. We have performed extremely long simulations required to obtain acceptable statistics at low shear rates. The alkanes show a transition from non-Newtonian to Newtonian behavior as the shear rate decreases to low values. 1 tab, 1 fig, 17 refs.

  14. Regioselective alkane hydroxylation with a mutant AlkB enzyme

    DOEpatents

    Koch, Daniel J.; Arnold, Frances H.

    2012-11-13

    AlkB from Pseudomonas putida was engineered using in-vivo directed evolution to hydroxylate small chain alkanes. Mutant AlkB-BMO1 hydroxylates propane and butane at the terminal carbon at a rate greater than the wild-type to form 1-propanol and 1-butanol, respectively. Mutant AlkB-BMO2 similarly hydroxylates propane and butane at the terminal carbon at a rate greater than the wild-type to form 1-propanol and 1-butanol, respectively. These biocatalysts are highly active for small chain alkane substrates and their regioselectivity is retained in whole-cell biotransformations.

  15. Assimilation of chlorinated alkanes by hydrocarbon-utilizing fungi

    SciTech Connect

    Murphy, G.L.; Perry, J.J.

    1984-12-01

    The fatty acid compositions of two filamentous fungi (Cunninghamella elegans and Penicillium zonatum) and a yeast (Candida lipolytica) were determined after the organisms were grown on 1-chlorohexadecane or 1-chlorooctadecane. These organisms utilized the chlorinated alkanes as sole sources of carbon and energy. Analyses of the fatty acids present after growth on the chlorinated alkanes indicated that 60 to 70% of the total fatty acids in C. elegans were chlorinated. Approximately 50% of the fatty acids in C. lipolytica were also chlorinated. P. zonatum contained 20% 1-chlorohexadecanoic acid after growth on either substrate but did not incorporate C/sub 18/ chlorinated fatty acids.

  16. Alkene Cleavage Catalysed by Heme and Nonheme Enzymes: Reaction Mechanisms and Biocatalytic Applications

    PubMed Central

    Mutti, Francesco G.

    2012-01-01

    The oxidative cleavage of alkenes is classically performed by chemical methods, although they display several drawbacks. Ozonolysis requires harsh conditions (−78°C, for a safe process) and reducing reagents in a molar amount, whereas the use of poisonous heavy metals such as Cr, Os, or Ru as catalysts is additionally plagued by low yield and selectivity. Conversely, heme and nonheme enzymes can catalyse the oxidative alkene cleavage at ambient temperature and atmospheric pressure in an aqueous buffer, showing excellent chemo- and regioselectivities in certain cases. This paper focuses on the alkene cleavage catalysed by iron cofactor-dependent enzymes encompassing the reaction mechanisms (in case where it is known) and the application of these enzymes in biocatalysis. PMID:22811656

  17. Metal-Free C–H Alkyliminylation and Acylation of Alkenes with Secondary Amides

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Pei-Qiang; Huang, Ying-Hong; Geng, Hui; Ye, Jian-Liang

    2016-01-01

    Carbon–carbon bond formation by metal-free cross-coupling of two reactants with low reactivity represents a challenge in organic synthesis. Secondary amides and alkenes are two classes of bench-stable compounds. The low electrophilicity of the former and low nucleophilicity of the latter make the direct coupling of these two partners challenging yet highly desirable. We report herein an unprecedented intermolecular reaction of secondary amides with alkenes to afford α,β-unsaturated ketimines or enones, which are versatile intermediates for organic synthesis and are prevalent in bioactive compounds and functional materials. Our strategy relies on the chemoselective activation of the secondary amide with trifluoromethanesulfonic anhydride (Tf2O)/2-fluoropyridine to generate a highly reactive nitrilium intermediate, which reacts efficiently with alkenes. This metal-free synthesis is characterized by its mild reaction conditions, excellent functional group tolerance and chemoselectivity, allowing the preparation of multi-functionalized compounds without using protecting groups. PMID:27356173

  18. Metal-Free C-H Alkyliminylation and Acylation of Alkenes with Secondary Amides.

    PubMed

    Huang, Pei-Qiang; Huang, Ying-Hong; Geng, Hui; Ye, Jian-Liang

    2016-01-01

    Carbon-carbon bond formation by metal-free cross-coupling of two reactants with low reactivity represents a challenge in organic synthesis. Secondary amides and alkenes are two classes of bench-stable compounds. The low electrophilicity of the former and low nucleophilicity of the latter make the direct coupling of these two partners challenging yet highly desirable. We report herein an unprecedented intermolecular reaction of secondary amides with alkenes to afford α,β-unsaturated ketimines or enones, which are versatile intermediates for organic synthesis and are prevalent in bioactive compounds and functional materials. Our strategy relies on the chemoselective activation of the secondary amide with trifluoromethanesulfonic anhydride (Tf2O)/2-fluoropyridine to generate a highly reactive nitrilium intermediate, which reacts efficiently with alkenes. This metal-free synthesis is characterized by its mild reaction conditions, excellent functional group tolerance and chemoselectivity, allowing the preparation of multi-functionalized compounds without using protecting groups. PMID:27356173

  19. Chemoenzymatic Epoxidation of Alkenes and Reusability Study of the Phenylacetic Acid

    PubMed Central

    Abdulmalek, Emilia; Mizan, Hanis Nabillah; Abdul Rahman, Mohd. Basyaruddin; Basri, Mahiran; Salleh, Abu Bakar

    2014-01-01

    Here, we focused on a simple enzymatic epoxidation of alkenes using lipase and phenylacetic acid. The immobilised Candida antarctica lipase B, Novozym 435 was used to catalyse the formation of peroxy acid instantly from hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) and phenylacetic acid. The peroxy phenylacetic acid generated was then utilised directly for in situ oxidation of alkenes. A variety of alkenes were oxidised with this system, resulting in 75–99% yield of the respective epoxides. On the other hand, the phenylacetic acid was recovered from the reaction media and reused for more epoxidation. Interestingly, the waste phenylacetic acid had the ability to be reused for epoxidation of the 1-nonene to 1-nonene oxide, giving an excellent yield of 90%. PMID:24587751

  20. Photochemical Synthesis and Ligand Exchange Reactions of Ru(CO)[subscript 4] (Eta[superscript 2]-Alkene) Compounds

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cooke, Jason; Berry, David E.; Fawkes, Kelli L.

    2007-01-01

    The photochemical synthesis and subsequent ligand exchange reactions of Ru(CO)[subscript 4] (eta[superscript2]-alkene) compounds has provided a novel experiment for upper-level inorganic chemistry laboratory courses. The experiment is designed to provide a system in which the changing electronic properties of the alkene ligands could be easily…

  1. Ammonium iodide-induced sulfonylation of alkenes with DMSO and water toward the synthesis of vinyl methyl sulfones.

    PubMed

    Gao, Xiaofang; Pan, Xiaojun; Gao, Jian; Huang, Huawen; Yuan, Gaoqing; Li, Yingwei

    2015-01-01

    A novel ammonium iodide-induced sulfonylation of alkenes with DMSO and water toward the synthesis of vinyl methyl sulfones is described. The process proceeded smoothly under metal-free conditions with high stereoselectivity and good functional group tolerance. The reaction mechanism was revealed to proceed through a domino reaction of oxidation and elimination after the radical addition to alkenes. PMID:25406694

  2. Phosphine-alkene ligand-mediated alkyl-alkyl and alkyl-halide elimination processes from palladium(II).

    PubMed

    Tuxworth, Luke; Baiget, Lise; Phanopoulos, Andreas; Metters, Owen J; Batsanov, Andrei S; Fox, Mark A; Howard, Judith A K; Dyer, Philip W

    2012-10-28

    N-Diphenylphosphino-7-aza-benzobicyclo[2.2.1]hept-2-ene (2) behaves as a chelating phosphine-alkene ligand for Pd(0) and Pd(II), promoting direct alkyl-alkyl and indirect alkyl-halide reductive elimination reactions due to the stabilisation of the resulting bis(phosphine-alkene)Pd(0) complex. PMID:22986447

  3. Surface electronic structure-catalytic activity correlation of partially reduced molybdenum oxide(s) for the isomerization of light alkenes and alkanes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Kandari, S.; Al-Kandari, H.; Al-Kharafi, F.; Katrib, A.

    2008-03-01

    Catalytic activity-surface electronic structure correlation was carried out using surface XPS-UPS techniques. In situ reduction by hydrogen, were carried out at similar experimental conditions to those employed for the catalytic reactions. In the case of MoO3 deposited on TiO2, the reduction to MoO2 state with the bifunctional MoO2(Hx)ac phase on its surface starts at 573 K and reaches a stable state at temperatures between 653-673 K. In the case of alumina support, a strong metal-support interaction takes place during the catalyst preparation, leading to Al2(MoO4)3 complex formation as characterized by XRD. The reduction process(s) of this complex by hydrogen as a function of temperature is different from what is observed in the case of titania support. The changes in the chemical structure of the sample surface in both systems were tested for the catalytic reactions of 1-pentene and n-pentane

  4. Self‐Assembly of Disorazole C1 through a One‐Pot Alkyne Metathesis Homodimerization Strategy†

    PubMed Central

    Ralston, Kevin J.; Ramstadius, H. Clinton; Brewster, Richard C.; Niblock, Helen S.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Alkyne metathesis is increasingly explored as a reliable method to close macrocyclic rings, but there are no prior examples of an alkyne‐metathesis‐based homodimerization approach to natural products. In this approach to the cytotoxic C2‐symmetric marine‐derived bis(lactone) disorazole C1, a highly convergent, modular strategy is employed featuring cyclization through an ambitious one‐pot alkyne cross‐metathesis/ring‐closing metathesis self‐assembly process. PMID:27346897

  5. Palladium-Catalyzed Synthesis of Alkynes via a Tandem Decarboxylation/Elimination of (E)-Enol Triflates.

    PubMed

    Munteanu, Charissa; Frantz, Doug E

    2016-08-19

    A mild catalytic synthesis of alkynes via a tandem Pd-catalyzed decarboxylation/elimination of enol triflates is described. Key attributes of the method include readily available starting materials, broad functional group tolerance, and the ability to access terminal, internal, and halogenated alkynes. The preliminary scope of the reaction is demonstrated on 25 different examples with yields ranging from 63% to 96%. PMID:27456435

  6. Copper-catalyzed intermolecular trifluoromethylarylation of alkenes: mutual activation of arylboronic acid and CF3+ reagent.

    PubMed

    Wang, Fei; Wang, Dinghai; Mu, Xin; Chen, Pinhong; Liu, Guosheng

    2014-07-23

    A novel copper-catalyzed intermolecular trifluoromethylarylation of alkenes is developed using less active ether-type Togni's reagent under mild reaction conditions. Various alkenes and diverse arylboronic acids are compatible with these conditions. Preliminary mechanistic studies reveal that a mutual activation process between arylboronic acid and CF3(+) reagent is essential. In addition, the reaction might involve a rate-determining transmetalation, and the final aryl C-C bond is derived from reductive elimination of the aryl(alkyl)Cu(III) intermediate. PMID:24983408

  7. Cascade Photoredox/Iodide Catalysis: Access to Difluoro-γ-lactams via Aminodifluoroalkylation of Alkenes.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Muliang; Li, Weipeng; Duan, Yingqian; Xu, Pan; Zhang, Songlin; Zhu, Chengjian

    2016-07-01

    The novel cascade photoredox/iodide catalytic system enables the alkene to serve as a radical acceptor capable of achieving aminodifluoroalkylation of alkenes. Cheap iodide salts play a vital role in this reaction, which could tune carbocation reactivity through reversible C-I bond formation for controlling reaction selectivity, and a series of competitive reactions are completely eliminated in the presence of multiple reactivity pathways. The present dual catalytic protocol affords a very convenient method for direct synthesis of various difluoro-γ-lactams from simple and readily available starting materials under mild reaction conditions. PMID:27337532

  8. Cobalt-Catalyzed, Aminoquinoline-Directed Coupling of sp2 C–H Bonds with Alkenes

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    A method for cobalt-catalyzed, aminoquinoline-directed ortho-functionalization of sp2 C–H bonds with alkenes has been developed. Reactions proceed at room temperature in trifluoroethanol solvent, use oxygen from air as an oxidant, and require Mn(OAc)3 as a cocatalyst. Benzoic, heteroaromatic, and acrylic acid aminoquinoline amides react with ethylene as well as mono- and disubstituted alkenes affording products in good yields. Excellent functional group tolerance is observed; halogen, nitro, ether, and unprotected alcohol functionalities are compatible with the reaction conditions. PMID:25146300

  9. Stereoselective Synthesis of Saturated Heterocycles via Pd-Catalyzed Alkene Carboetherification and Carboamination Reactions

    PubMed Central

    Wolfe, John P.

    2009-01-01

    The development of Pd-catalyzed carboetherification and carboamination reactions between aryl/alkenyl halides and alkenes bearing pendant heteroatoms is described. These transformations effect the stereoselective construction of useful heterocycles such as tetrahydrofurans, pyrrolidines, imidazolidin-2-ones, isoxazolidines, and piperazines. The scope, limitations, and applications of these reactions are presented, and current stereochemical models are described. The mechanism of product formation, which involves an unusual intramolecular syn-insertion of an alkene into a Pd-Heteroatom bond is also discussed in detail. PMID:19183704

  10. Nickel(0)-catalyzed intramolecular reductive coupling of alkenes and aldehydes or ketones with hydrosilanes.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Yukari; Hoshimoto, Yoichi; Kumar, Ravindra; Ohashi, Masato; Ogoshi, Sensuke

    2016-05-01

    A nickel(0)-catalyzed reductive coupling of aldehydes and simple alkenes with hydrosilanes has been developed. A variety of silyl-protected 1-indanol derivatives were prepared in a highly diastereoselective manner (up to >99 : 1 dr) by employing a combination of nickel(0)/N-heterocyclic carbene and triethylsilane. The present system was also applied to a reductive coupling with ketones. Preliminary results of a nickel(0)-catalyzed asymmetric three-component coupling reaction of an aldehyde, an alkene, and triethylsilane are also shown. PMID:27077829

  11. Asymmetric Palladium-Catalyzed Alkene Carboamination Reactions for the Synthesis of Cyclic Sulfamides.

    PubMed

    Garlets, Zachary J; Parenti, Kaia R; Wolfe, John P

    2016-04-18

    The synthesis of cyclic sulfamides by enantioselective Pd-catalyzed alkene carboamination reactions between N-allylsulfamides and aryl or alkenyl bromides is described. High levels of asymmetric induction (up to 95:5 e.r.) are achieved using a catalyst composed of [Pd2 (dba)3 ] and (S)-Siphos-PE. Deuterium-labelling studies indicate the reactions proceed through syn-aminopalladation of the alkene and suggest that the control of syn- versus anti-aminopalladation pathways is important for asymmetric induction. PMID:26968748

  12. Perfluoroalkylation of Unactivated Alkenes with Acid Anhydrides as the Perfluoroalkyl Source.

    PubMed

    Kawamura, Shintaro; Sodeoka, Mikiko

    2016-07-18

    An efficient perfluoroalkylation of unactivated alkenes with perfluoro acid anhydrides was developed. Copper salts play a crucial role as a catalyst to achieve allylic perfluoroalkylation with the in situ generated bis(perfluoroacyl) peroxides. Furthermore, carboperfluoroalkylation of alkene bearing an aromatic ring at an appropriate position on the carbon side chain was found to proceed under metal-free conditions to afford carbocycles or heterocycles bearing a perfluoroalkyl group. This method, which makes use of readily available perfluoroalkyl sources, offers a convenient and powerful tool for introducing a perfluoroalkyl group onto an sp(3) carbon to construct synthetically useful skeletons. PMID:27254318

  13. Oxidative Allylic Esterification of Alkenes by Cooperative Selenium-Catalysis Using Air as the Sole Oxidant.

    PubMed

    Ortgies, Stefan; Depken, Christian; Breder, Alexander

    2016-06-17

    A new metal-free catalysis protocol for the oxidative coupling of nonactivated alkenes with simple carboxylic acids has been established. This method is predicated on the cooperative interaction of a diselane and a photoredox catalyst, which allows for the use of ambient air or pure O2 as the terminal oxidant. Under the title conditions, a range of both functionalized and nonfunctionalized alkenes can be readily converted into the corresponding allylic ester products with good yields (up to 89%) and excellent regioselectivity as well as good functional group tolerance. PMID:27257803

  14. 40 CFR 721.785 - Halogenated alkane aromatic compound (generic name).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Halogenated alkane aromatic compound... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.785 Halogenated alkane aromatic compound (generic name). (a) Chemical... as a halogenated alkane aromatic compound (PMN P-94-1747) is subject to reporting under this...

  15. 40 CFR 721.785 - Halogenated alkane aromatic compound (generic name).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Halogenated alkane aromatic compound... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.785 Halogenated alkane aromatic compound (generic name). (a) Chemical... as a halogenated alkane aromatic compound (PMN P-94-1747) is subject to reporting under this...

  16. 40 CFR 721.785 - Halogenated alkane aromatic compound (generic name).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Halogenated alkane aromatic compound... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.785 Halogenated alkane aromatic compound (generic name). (a) Chemical... as a halogenated alkane aromatic compound (PMN P-94-1747) is subject to reporting under this...

  17. 40 CFR 721.785 - Halogenated alkane aromatic compound (generic name).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Halogenated alkane aromatic compound... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.785 Halogenated alkane aromatic compound (generic name). (a) Chemical... as a halogenated alkane aromatic compound (PMN P-94-1747) is subject to reporting under this...

  18. 40 CFR 721.785 - Halogenated alkane aromatic compound (generic name).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Halogenated alkane aromatic compound... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.785 Halogenated alkane aromatic compound (generic name). (a) Chemical... as a halogenated alkane aromatic compound (PMN P-94-1747) is subject to reporting under this...

  19. Metal-Free Intermolecular Azide-Alkyne Cycloaddition Promoted by Glycerol.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Rodríguez, Marta; Gras, Emmanuel; Pericàs, Miquel A; Gómez, Montserrat

    2015-12-14

    Metal-free intermolecular Huisgen cycloadditions using nonactivated internal alkynes have been successfully performed in neat glycerol, both under thermal and microwave dielectric heating. In sharp contrast, no reaction occurs in other protic solvents, such as water, ethanol, or diols. DFT calculations have shown that the BnN3/glycerol adduct promotes a more important stabilization of the corresponding LUMO than that produced in the analogous BnN3/alcohol adducts, favoring the reactivity with the alkyne in the first case. The presence of copper salts in the medium did not change the reaction pathway (Cu(I) acts as spectator), except for disubstituted silylalkynes, for which desilylation takes place in contrast to the metal-free system. PMID:26541267

  20. Regioselective C-H Hydroarylation of Internal Alkynes with Arenecarboxylates: Carboxylates as Deciduous Directing Groups.

    PubMed

    Huang, Liangbin; Biafora, Agostino; Zhang, Guodong; Bragoni, Valentina; Gooßen, Lukas J

    2016-06-01

    In the presence of catalytic [Ru(p-cym)I2 ]2 and the base guanidine carbonate, benzoic acids react with internal alkynes to give the corresponding 2-vinylbenzoic acids. This alkyne hydroarylation is generally applicable to diversely substituted electron-rich and electron-poor benzoic and acrylic acids. Aryl(alkyl)acetylenes react regioselectively with formation of the alkyl-branched hydroarylation products, and propargylic alcohols are converted into γ-alkylidene-δ-lactones. The hydroarylation can also be conducted decarboxylatively with a different choice of catalyst and reaction conditions. This reaction variant, which does not proceed via intermediate formation of 2-vinylbenzoic acids, opens up a regioselective, waste-minimized synthetic entry to vinylarenes. PMID:27112925

  1. Dimer Involvement and Origin of Crossover in Nickel-Catalyzed Aldehyde–Alkyne Reductive Couplings

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The mechanism of nickel(0)-catalyzed reductive coupling of aldehydes and alkynes has been studied. Extensive double-labeling crossover studies have been conducted. While previous studies illustrated that phosphine- and N-heterocyclic carbene-derived catalysts exhibited differing behavior, the origin of these effects has now been evaluated in detail. Many variables, including ligand class, sterics of the ligand and alkyne, temperature, and ring size being formed in intramolecular versions, all influence the extent of crossover observed. A computational evaluation of these effects suggests that dimerization of a key metallacyclic intermediate provides the origin of crossover. Protocols that proceed with crossover are typically less efficient than those without crossover given the thermodynamic stability and low reactivity of the dimeric metallacycles involved in crossover pathways. PMID:25401337

  2. Dinuclear thiazolylidene copper complex as highly active catalyst for azid–alkyne cycloadditions

    PubMed Central

    Schöffler, Anne L; Makarem, Ata; Rominger, Frank

    2016-01-01

    Summary A dinuclear N-heterocyclic carbene (NHC) copper complex efficiently catalyzes azide–alkyne cycloaddition (CuAAC) “click” reactions. The ancillary ligand comprises two 4,5-dimethyl-1,3-thiazol-2-ylidene units and an ethylene linker. The three-step preparation of the complex from commercially available starting compounds is more straightforward and cost-efficient than that of the previously described 1,2,4-triazol-5-ylidene derivatives. Kinetic experiments revealed its high catalytic CuAAC activity in organic solvents at room temperature. The activity increases upon addition of acetic acid, particularly for more acidic alkyne substrates. The modular catalyst design renders possible the exchange of N-heterocyclic carbene, linker, sacrificial ligand, and counter ion. PMID:27559407

  3. Further studies on hydration of alkynes by the PtCl4-CO catalyst

    SciTech Connect

    Israelsohn, Osnat; Vollhardt, K. Peter C.; Blum, Jochanan

    2002-01-18

    Under CO atmosphere, between 80 and 120 C, a glyme solution of PtCl{sub 4} forms a carbonyl compound that promotes hydration of internal as well as terminal alkynes to give aldehyde-free ketones. The catalytic process depends strongly on the electronic and steric nature of the substrates. Part of the carbonyl functions of the catalyst can be replaced by phosphine ligands. Chiral DIOP reacts with the PtCl{sub 4}-CO compound to give a catalyst that promotes partial kinetic resolution of a racemic alkyne. Replacement of part of the CO by polystyrene-bound diphenylphosphine enables to attach the catalyst to the polymeric support. Upon entrapment of the platinum compound in a silica sol-gel matrix, it reacts as a partially recyclable catalyst. A reformulated mechanism for the PdCl{sub 4}-CO catalyzed hydration is suggested on the basis of the present study.

  4. Lattice-Directed Formation of Covalent and Organometallic Molecular Wires by Terminal Alkynes on Ag Surfaces.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jing; Chen, Qiwei; Xiao, Lianghong; Shang, Jian; Zhou, Xiong; Zhang, Yajie; Wang, Yongfeng; Shao, Xiang; Li, Jianlong; Chen, Wei; Xu, Guo Qin; Tang, Hao; Zhao, Dahui; Wu, Kai

    2015-06-23

    Surface reactions of 2,5-diethynyl-1,4-bis(phenylethynyl)benzene on Ag(111), Ag(110), and Ag(100) were systematically explored and scrutinized by scanning tunneling microscopy, molecular mechanics simulations, and density functional theory calculations. On Ag(111), Glaser coupling reaction became dominant, yielding one-dimensional molecular wires formed by covalent bonds. On Ag(110) and Ag(100), however, the terminal alkynes reacted with surface metal atoms, leading to one-dimensional organometallic nanostructures. Detailed experimental and theoretical analyses revealed that such a lattice dependence of the terminal alkyne reaction at surfaces originated from the matching degree between the periodicities of the produced molecular wires and the substrate lattice structures. PMID:25990647

  5. Tunable Cascade Reactions of Alkynols with Alkynes under Combined Sc(OTf)3 and Rhodium Catalysis.

    PubMed

    Li, Deng Yuan; Chen, Hao Jie; Liu, Pei Nian

    2016-01-01

    Two tunable cascade reactions of alkynols and alkynes have been developed by combining Sc(OTf)3 and rhodium catalysis. In the absence of H2O, an endo-cycloisomerization/C-H activation cascade reaction provided 2,3-dihydronaphtho[1,2-b]furans in good to high yields. In the presence of H2O, the product of alkynol hydration underwent an addition/C-H activation cascade reaction with an alkyne, which led to the formation of 4,5-dihydro-3H-spiro[furan-2,1'-isochromene] derivatives in good yields under mild reaction conditions. Mechanistic studies of the cascade reactions indicated that the rate-determining step involves C-H bond cleavage and that the hydration of the alkynol plays a key role in switching between the two reaction pathways. PMID:26531133

  6. "Click" Chemistry: Application of Copper Metal in Cu-Catalyzed Azomethine Imine-Alkyne Cycloadditions.

    PubMed

    Pušavec Kirar, Eva; Grošelj, Uroš; Mirri, Giorgio; Požgan, Franc; Strle, Gregor; Štefane, Bogdan; Jovanovski, Vasko; Svete, Jurij

    2016-07-15

    A series of 16 copper-catalyzed azomethine imine-alkyne cycloaddition (CuAIAC) reactions between four pyrazolidinone-1-azomethine imines and four terminal ynones gave the corresponding fluorescent cycloadducts as bimane analogues in very high yields. The applicability of CuAIAC was demonstrated by the fluorescent labeling of functionalized polystyrene and by using Cu-C and Cu-Fe as catalysts. Experimental evidence, kinetic measurements, and correlation between a clean catalyst surface and the reaction rate are in agreement with a homotopic catalytic system with catalytic Cu(I)-acetylide formed from Cu(0) by "in situ" oxidation. The availability of azomethine imines, mild reaction conditions, simple workup, and scalability make CuAIAC a viable supplement to the Cu-catalyzed azide-alkyne cycloaddition reaction in "click" chemistry. PMID:27305104

  7. Evaluation of bicinchoninic acid as a ligand for copper(I)-catalyzed azide-alkyne bioconjugations.

    PubMed

    Christen, Erik H; Gübeli, Raphael J; Kaufmann, Beate; Merkel, Lars; Schoenmakers, Ronald; Budisa, Nediljko; Fussenegger, Martin; Weber, Wilfried; Wiltschi, Birgit

    2012-09-01

    The Cu(I)-catalyzed cycloaddition of terminal azides and alkynes (click chemistry) represents a highly specific reaction for the functionalization of biomolecules with chemical moieties such as dyes or polymer matrices. In this study we evaluate the use of bicinchoninic acid (BCA) as a ligand for Cu(I) under physiological reaction conditions. We demonstrate that the BCA-Cu(I)-complex represents an efficient catalyst for the conjugation of fluorophores or biotin to alkyne- or azide-functionalized proteins resulting in increased or at least equal reaction yields compared to commonly used catalysts like Cu(I) in complex with TBTA (tris[(1-benzyl-1H-1,2,3-triazol-4-yl)methyl]amine) or BPAA (bathophenanthroline disulfonic acid). The stabilization of Cu(I) with BCA represents a new strategy for achieving highly efficient bioconjugation reactions under physiological conditions in many application fields. PMID:22821135

  8. Dinuclear thiazolylidene copper complex as highly active catalyst for azid-alkyne cycloadditions.

    PubMed

    Schöffler, Anne L; Makarem, Ata; Rominger, Frank; Straub, Bernd F

    2016-01-01

    A dinuclear N-heterocyclic carbene (NHC) copper complex efficiently catalyzes azide-alkyne cycloaddition (CuAAC) "click" reactions. The ancillary ligand comprises two 4,5-dimethyl-1,3-thiazol-2-ylidene units and an ethylene linker. The three-step preparation of the complex from commercially available starting compounds is more straightforward and cost-efficient than that of the previously described 1,2,4-triazol-5-ylidene derivatives. Kinetic experiments revealed its high catalytic CuAAC activity in organic solvents at room temperature. The activity increases upon addition of acetic acid, particularly for more acidic alkyne substrates. The modular catalyst design renders possible the exchange of N-heterocyclic carbene, linker, sacrificial ligand, and counter ion. PMID:27559407

  9. Investigation of the Pyridinium Ylide--Alkyne Cycloaddition as a Fluorogenic Coupling Reaction.

    PubMed

    Bonte, Simon; Ghinea, Ioana Otilia; Dinica, Rodica; Baussanne, Isabelle; Demeunynck, Martine

    2016-01-01

    The cycloaddition of pyridinium ylides with alkynes was investigated under mild conditions. A series of 13 pyridinium salts was prepared by alkylation of 4-substituted pyridines. Their reactivity with propiolic ester or amide in various reaction conditions (different temperatures, solvents, added bases) was studied, and 11 indolizines, with three points of structural variation, were, thus, isolated and characterized. The highest yields were obtained when electron-withdrawing groups were present on both the pyridinium ylide, generated in situ from the corresponding pyridinium salt, and the alkyne (X, Z = ester, amide, CN, carbonyl, etc.). Electron-withdrawing substituents, lowering the acid dissociation constant (pKa) of the pyridinium salts, allow the cycloaddition to proceed at pH 7.5 in aqueous buffers at room temperature. PMID:26978335

  10. Comparative analysis of Cu (I)-catalyzed alkyne-azide cycloaddition (CuAAC) and strain-promoted alkyne-azide cycloaddition (SPAAC) in O-GlcNAc proteomics.

    PubMed

    Li, Shanshan; Zhu, He; Wang, Jiajia; Wang, Xiaomin; Li, Xu; Ma, Cheng; Wen, Liuqing; Yu, Bingchen; Wang, Yuehua; Li, Jing; Wang, Peng George

    2016-06-01

    O-linked β-N-acetylglucosamine (O-GlcNAc) is emerging as an essential protein post-translational modification in a range of organisms. It is involved in various cellular processes such as nutrient sensing, protein degradation, gene expression, and is associated with many human diseases. Despite its importance, identifying O-GlcNAcylated proteins is a major challenge in proteomics. Here, using peracetylated N-azidoacetylglucosamine (Ac4 GlcNAz) as a bioorthogonal chemical handle, we described a gel-based mass spectrometry method for the identification of proteins with O-GlcNAc modification in A549 cells. In addition, we made a labeling efficiency comparison between two modes of azide-alkyne bioorthogonal reactions in click chemistry: copper-catalyzed azide-alkyne cycloaddition (CuAAC) with Biotin-Diazo-Alkyne and stain-promoted azide-alkyne cycloaddition (SPAAC) with Biotin-DIBO-Alkyne. After conjugation with click chemistry in vitro and enrichment via streptavidin resin, proteins with O-GlcNAc modification were separated by SDS-PAGE and identified with mass spectrometry. Proteomics data analysis revealed that 229 putative O-GlcNAc modified proteins were identified with Biotin-Diazo-Alkyne conjugated sample and 188 proteins with Biotin-DIBO-Alkyne conjugated sample, among which 114 proteins were overlapping. Interestingly, 74 proteins identified from Biotin-Diazo-Alkyne conjugates and 46 verified proteins from Biotin-DIBO-Alkyne conjugates could be found in the O-GlcNAc modified proteins database dbOGAP (http://cbsb.lombardi.georgetown.edu/hulab/OGAP.html). These results suggested that CuAAC with Biotin-Diazo-Alkyne represented a more powerful method in proteomics with higher protein identification and better accuracy compared to SPAAC. The proteomics credibility was also confirmed by the molecular function and cell component gene ontology (GO). Together, the method we reported here combining metabolic labeling, click chemistry, affinity-based enrichment, SDS

  11. C-84 Selective Porphyrin Macrocycle with an Adaptable Cavity Constructed Through Alkyne Metathesis

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, C. X.; Long, H.; Zhang, W.

    2012-06-21

    A bisporphyrin macrocycle was constructed from a porphyrin-based diyne monomer in one step through alkyne metathesis. The fullerene binding studies (C{sub 60}, C{sub 70} and C{sub 84}) showed the highest binding affinity of the macrocycle for C{sub 84}, which is in great contrast to its bisporphyrin four-armed cage analogue that showed the strongest binding with C{sub 70}.

  12. Synthesis of 2-Alkynoates by Palladium(II)-Catalyzed Oxidative Carbonylation of Terminal Alkynes and Alcohols.

    PubMed

    Cao, Qun; Hughes, N Louise; Muldoon, Mark J

    2016-08-16

    A homogeneous Pd(II) catalyst, utilizing a simple and inexpensive amine ligand (TMEDA), allows 2-alkynoates to be prepared in high yields by an oxidative carbonylation of terminal alkynes and alcohols. The catalyst system overcomes many of the limitations of previous palladium carbonylation catalysts. It has an increased substrate scope, avoids large excesses of alcohol substrate and uses a desirable solvent. The catalyst employs oxygen as the terminal oxidant and can be operated under safer gas mixtures. PMID:27305489

  13. Copper-catalyzed 1,2-addition of α-carbonyl iodides to alkynes.

    PubMed

    Xu, Tao; Hu, Xile

    2015-01-19

    β,γ-Unsaturated ketones are an important class of organic molecules. Herein, copper catalysis has been developed for the synthesis of β-γ-unsaturated ketones through 1,2-addition of α-carbonyl iodides to alkynes. The reactions exhibit wide substrate scope and high functional group tolerance. The reaction products are versatile synthetic intermediates to complex small molecules. The method was applied for the formal synthesis of (±)-trichostatin A, a histone deacetylase inhibitor. PMID:25470461

  14. A Concomitant Allylic Azide Rearrangement/Intramolecular Azide–Alkyne Cycloaddition Sequence

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    An intramolecular Huisgen cycloaddition of an interconverting set of isomeric allylic azides with alkynes affords substituted triazoles in high yield. The stereoisomeric vinyl-substituted triazoloxazines formed depend on the rate of cycloaddition of the different allylic azide precursors when the reaction is carried out under thermal conditions. In contrast, dimerized macrocyclic products were obtained when the reaction was done using copper(I)-catalyzed conditions, demonstrating the ability to control the reaction products through changing conditions. PMID:24635056

  15. Cyclization of Alkyne-Azide with Isonitrile/CO via Self-Relay Rhodium Catalysis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhen; Xiao, Fan; Huang, Baoliang; Hu, Jincheng; Fu, Bin; Zhang, Zhenhua

    2016-03-01

    A self-relay rhodium(I)-catalyzed cyclization of alkyne-azides with two σ-donor/π-acceptor ligands (isonitriles and CO) to form sequentially multiple-fused heterocycle systems via tandem nitrene transformation and aza-Pauson-Khand cyclization has been developed. In this approach, an intriguing chemoselective insertion process of isonitriles superior to CO was observed. This reaction provides an alternative strategy to synthesize functionalized pyrrolo[2,3-b]indole scaffolds. PMID:26907671

  16. Alkyne-azide cycloaddition catalyzed by silver chloride and "abnormal" silver N-heterocyclic carbene complex.

    PubMed

    Ortega-Arizmendi, Aldo I; Aldeco-Pérez, Eugenia; Cuevas-Yañez, Erick

    2013-01-01

    A library of 1,2,3-triazoles was synthesized from diverse alkynes and azides using catalytic amounts of silver chloride instead of copper compounds. In addition, a novel "abnormal" silver N-heterocyclic carbene complex was tested as catalyst in this process. The results suggest that the reaction requires only 0.5% of silver complex, affording 1,2,3-triazoles in good yields. PMID:24307866

  17. Copper mediated stereoselective synthesis of C-glycosides from unactivated alkynes.

    PubMed

    Kusunuru, Anil Kumar; Tatina, Madhubabu; Yousuf, Syed Khalid; Mukherjee, Debaraj

    2013-10-01

    A highly stereoselective rapid C-glycosylation reaction has been developed between glycal and unactivated alkynes in the presence of coppertriflate and ascorbic acid at low catalyst loading and at room temperature. A wide variety of glycals and aryl acetylenes participate in the reaction smoothly. TfOH generated during the reduction of Cu(OTf)2 by ascorbic acid may be the active catalyst for the glycosylation. PMID:24049771

  18. 1,2,3-Triazoles from carbonyl azides and alkynes: filling the gap.

    PubMed

    Haldón, Estela; Álvarez, Eleuterio; Nicasio, M Carmen; Pérez, Pedro J

    2014-08-18

    Electron deficient azides are challenging substrates in CuAAC reactions. Particularly, when N-carbonyl azides are applied the formation of N-carbonyl triazoles has not yet been observed. We report herein the first example of this class of reaction, with a copper-based system that efficiently enables the synthesis of N-carbamoyl 1,2,3-triazoles by [3+2] cycloaddition of N-carbamoyl azides and alkynes. PMID:24980244

  19. Cyano- and polycyanometallo-porphyrins as catalysts for alkane oxidation

    DOEpatents

    Ellis, P.E. Jr.; Lyons, J.E.

    1993-05-18

    New compositions of matter comprising cyano-substituted metal complexes of porphyrins are catalysts for the oxidation of alkanes. The metal is iron, chromium, manganese, ruthenium, copper or cobalt. The porphyrin ring has cyano groups attached thereto in meso- and/or [beta]-pyrrolic positions.

  20. Cyano- and polycyanometallo-porphyrins as catalysts for alkane oxidation

    DOEpatents

    Ellis, Jr., Paul E.; Lyons, James E.

    1993-01-01

    New compositions of matter comprising cyano-substituted metal complexes of porphyrins are catalysts for the oxidation of alkanes. The metal is iron, chromium, manganese, ruthenium, copper or cobalt. The porphyrin ring has cyano groups attached thereto in meso and/or .beta.-pyrrolic positions.

  1. Cyano- and polycyanometallo-porphyrins as catalysts for alkane oxidation

    DOEpatents

    Ellis, P.E. Jr.; Lyons, J.E.

    1995-01-17

    New compositions of matter comprising cyano-substituted metal complexes of porphyrins are catalysts for the oxidation of alkanes. The metal is iron, chromium, manganese, ruthenium, copper or cobalt. The porphyrin ring has cyano groups attached thereto in meso and/or [beta]-pyrrolic positions.

  2. Cyano- and polycyanometallo-porphyrins as catalysts for alkane oxidation

    DOEpatents

    Ellis, Jr., Paul E.; Lyons, James E.

    1995-01-01

    New compositions of matter comprising cyano-substituted metal complexes of porphyrins are catalysts for the oxidation of alkanes. The metal is iron, chromium, manganese, ruthenium, copper or cobalt. The porphyrin ring has cyano groups attached thereto in meso and/or .beta.-pyrrolic positions.

  3. MODELING OF ALKANE EMISSIONS FROM A WOOD STAIN

    EPA Science Inventory

    The article discusses full-scale residential house tests to evaluate the effects of organic emissions from a wood finishing product--wood stain--on indoor air quality (IAQ). The test house concentrations of three alkane species, nonane, decane, and undecane, were measured as a fu...

  4. Analysis of the vibrational bandwidths of alkane-urea clathrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wood, Kurt A.; Snyder, Robert G.; Strauss, Herbert L.

    1989-11-01

    The only large amplitude motion possible for an n-alkane molecule in urea-inclusion compounds is libration-torsion about the long axis of the chain. We present a quantitative model that incorporates the effect of this motion on the widths of the alkane vibrational bands. This model explains the difference in the widths of the different vibrations of the alkanes and their temperature dependence. Two effects are combined: (1) a modulation of the angles between the components of the polarizability in the space and the molecule-fixed frames for Raman spectra or between the components of the dipole moment for the infrared spectra, and (2) a modulation of the frequency of the alkane vibration via anharmonic coupling terms with the libration-torsion. The first effect gives rise to a distinctly non-Lorentzian band shape, which is convoluted with the approximately Lorentzian band of the second effect to produce the final result. The libration-torsional motion is modeled as that of a Brownian harmonic oscillator. Most of the parameters that enter the calculation are obtained from data other than that involving the bandwidths themselves. The libration-torsion relaxation time of about 1 ps obtained from fitting the observed bandwidths agrees with the value obtained from recent quasielastic neutron scattering experiments. Other bandwidth mechanisms that have been proposed are evaluated and it is shown that site hopping is too slow to account for the observations.

  5. Diverse alkane hydroxylase genes in microorganisms and environments

    PubMed Central

    Nie, Yong; Chi, Chang-Qiao; Fang, Hui; Liang, Jie-Liang; Lu, She-Lian; Lai, Guo-Li; Tang, Yue-Qin; Wu, Xiao-Lei

    2014-01-01

    AlkB and CYP153 are important alkane hydroxylases responsible for aerobic alkane degradation in bioremediation of oil-polluted environments and microbial enhanced oil recovery. Since their distribution in nature is not clear, we made the investigation among thus-far sequenced 3,979 microbial genomes and 137 metagenomes from terrestrial, freshwater, and marine environments. Hundreds of diverse alkB and CYP153 genes including many novel ones were found in bacterial genomes, whereas none were found in archaeal genomes. Moreover, these genes were detected with different distributional patterns in the terrestrial, freshwater, and marine metagenomes. Hints for horizontal gene transfer, gene duplication, and gene fusion were found, which together are likely responsible for diversifying the alkB and CYP153 genes adapt to the ubiquitous distribution of different alkanes in nature. In addition, different distributions of these genes between bacterial genomes and metagenomes suggested the potentially important roles of unknown or less common alkane degraders in nature. PMID:24829093

  6. Improving alkane synthesis in Escherichia coli via metabolic engineering.

    PubMed

    Song, Xuejiao; Yu, Haiying; Zhu, Kun

    2016-01-01

    Concerns about energy security and global petroleum supply have made the production of renewable biofuels an industrial imperative. The ideal biofuels are n-alkanes in that they are chemically and structurally identical to the fossil fuels and can "drop in" to the transportation infrastructure. In this work, an Escherichia coli strain that produces n-alkanes was constructed by heterologous expression of acyl-acyl carrier protein (ACP) reductase (AAR) and aldehyde deformylating oxygenase (ADO) from Synechococcus elongatus PCC7942. The accumulation of alkanes ranged from 3.1 to 24.0 mg/L using different expressing strategies. Deletion of yqhD, an inherent aldehyde reductase in E. coli, or overexpression of fadR, an activator for fatty acid biosynthesis, exhibited a nearly twofold increase in alkane titers, respectively. Combining yqhD deletion and fadR overexpression resulted in a production titer of 255.6 mg/L in E. coli, and heptadecene was the most abundant product. PMID:26476644

  7. Cyano- and polycyanometalloporphyrins as catalysts for alkane oxidation

    DOEpatents

    Ellis, Jr., Paul E.; Lyons, James E.

    1992-01-01

    Alkanes are oxidized by contact with oxygen-containing gas in the presence as catalyst of a metalloporphyrin in which hydrogen atoms in the porphyrin ring have been substituted with one or more cyano groups. Hydrogen atoms in the porphyrin ring may also be substituted with halogen atoms.

  8. Modular and selective biosynthesis of gasoline-range alkanes.

    PubMed

    Sheppard, Micah J; Kunjapur, Aditya M; Prather, Kristala L J

    2016-01-01

    Typical renewable liquid fuel alternatives to gasoline are not entirely compatible with current infrastructure. We have engineered Escherichia coli to selectively produce alkanes found in gasoline (propane, butane, pentane, heptane, and nonane) from renewable substrates such as glucose or glycerol. Our modular pathway framework achieves carbon-chain extension by two different mechanisms. A fatty acid synthesis route is used to generate longer chains heptane and nonane, while a more energy efficient alternative, reverse-β-oxidation, is used for synthesis of propane, butane, and pentane. We demonstrate that both upstream (thiolase) and intermediate (thioesterase) reactions can act as control points for chain-length specificity. Specific free fatty acids are subsequently converted to alkanes using a broad-specificity carboxylic acid reductase and a cyanobacterial aldehyde decarbonylase (AD). The selectivity obtained by different module pairings provides a foundation for tuning alkane product distribution for desired fuel properties. Alternate ADs that have greater activity on shorter substrates improve observed alkane titer. However, even in an engineered host strain that significantly reduces endogenous conversion of aldehyde intermediates to alcohol byproducts, AD activity is observed to be limiting for all chain lengths. Given these insights, we discuss guiding principles for pathway selection and potential opportunities for pathway improvement. PMID:26556131

  9. Diffusion of squalene in n-alkanes and squalane.

    PubMed

    Kowert, Bruce A; Watson, Michael B; Dang, Nhan C

    2014-02-27

    Squalene, an intermediate in the biosynthesis of cholesterol, has a 24-carbon backbone with six methyl groups and six isolated double bonds. Capillary flow techniques have been used to determine its translational diffusion constant, D, at room temperature in squalane, n-C16, and three n-C8-squalane mixtures. The D values have a weaker dependence on viscosity, η, than predicted by the Stokes-Einstein relation, D = kBT/(6πηr). A fit to the modified relation, D/T = ASE/η(p), gives p = 0.820 ± 0.028; p = 1 for the Stokes-Einstein limit. The translational motion of squalene appears to be much like that of n-alkane solutes with comparable chain lengths; their D values show similar deviations from the Stokes-Einstein model. The n-alkane with the same carbon chain length as squalene, n-C24, has a near-equal p value of 0.844 ± 0.018 in n-alkane solvents. The values of the hydrodynamic radius, r, for n-C24, squalene, and other n-alkane solutes decrease as the viscosity increases and have a common dependence on the van der Waals volumes of the solute and solvent. The possibility of studying squalene in lipid droplets and membranes is discussed. PMID:24528091

  10. Catalytic oxidation of light alkanes in presence of a base

    DOEpatents

    Bhinde, Manoj V.; Bierl, Thomas W.

    1998-01-01

    The presence of a base in the reaction mixture in a metal-ligand catalyzed partial oxidation of alkanes results in sustained catalyst activity, and in greater percent conversion as compared with oxidation in the absence of base, while maintaining satisfactory selectivity for the desired oxidation, for example the oxidation of isobutane to isobutanol.

  11. Catalytic oxidation of light alkanes in presence of a base

    DOEpatents

    Bhinde, M.V.; Bierl, T.W.

    1998-03-03

    The presence of a base in the reaction mixture in a metal-ligand catalyzed partial oxidation of alkanes results in sustained catalyst activity, and in greater percent conversion as compared with oxidation in the absence of base, while maintaining satisfactory selectivity for the desired oxidation, for example the oxidation of isobutane to isobutanol. 1 fig.

  12. MODELING OF ALKANE EMISSIONS FROM A WOOD STAIN

    EPA Science Inventory

    The article discusses full-scale residential house tests to evaluate the effects of organic emissions from a wood finishing product--wood stain--on indoor air quality (IAQ). he test house concentrations of three alkane species, nonane, decane, and undecane, were measured as a fun...

  13. A superoleophobic textile repellent towards impacting drops of alkanes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Artus, Georg R. J.; Zimmermann, Jan; Reifler, Felix A.; Brewer, Stuart A.; Seeger, Stefan

    2012-02-01

    A commercially available polyester fabric has been rendered superoleophobic by coating with silicone nanofilaments and subsequent plasma fluorination. The treated samples show outstanding oil-repellency. They achieve the highest possible oil-repellency grade of 8, repel impacting drops of alkanes and show a plastron layer in hexadecane. The oil repellency is shown to depend on the topography of the silicone nanofilament coating.

  14. Preference of Ruthenium-Based Metathesis Catalysts toward Z- and E-Alkenes as a Guide for Selective Reactions to Alkene Stereoisomers.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jihong; Kim, Kyung Hwan; Lee, Ok Suk; Choi, Tae-Lim; Lee, Hee-Seung; Ihee, Hyotcherl; Sohn, Jeong-Hun

    2016-09-01

    As a guide for selective reactions toward either Z- or E-alkene in a metathesis reaction, the relative preference of metathesis Ru catalysts for each stereoisomer was determined by a method using time-dependent fluorescence quenching. We found that Ru-1 prefers the Z-isomer over the E-isomer, whereas Ru-2 prefers the E-isomer over the Z-isomer. The Z/E-alkene preference of the catalysts precisely predicted the Z/E isomeric selectivity in the metathesis reactions of diene substrates possessing combinations of Z/E-alkenes. For the diene substrates, the rate order of the reactions using Ru-1 was Z,Z-1,6-diene > Z,E-1,6-diene > E,E-1,6-diene, while the completely opposite order of E,E-1,6-diene > Z,E-1,6-diene > Z,Z-1,6-diene was exhibited in the case of Ru-2. PMID:27463964

  15. Ratiometric Fluorescence Azide-Alkyne Cycloaddition for Live Mammalian Cell Imaging.

    PubMed

    Fu, Hongxia; Li, Yanru; Sun, Lingbo; He, Pan; Duan, Xinrui

    2015-11-17

    Click chemistry with metabolic labeling has been widely used for selectively imaging biomacromolecules in cells. The first example of azide-alkyne cycloaddition for ratiometric fluorescent imaging of live cells is reported. The precursor of the azido fluorophore (cresyl violet) has a fluorescence emission peak at 620 nm. The electron-rich nitrogen of the azido group blue-shifts the emission peak to 566 nm. When the click reaction occurs, an emission peak appears at 620 nm due to the lower electronic density of the newly formed triazole ring, which allows us to ratiometrically record fluorescence signals. This emission shift was applied to ratiometric imaging of propargylcholine- and dibenzocyclooctyne-labeled human breast cancer cells MCF-7 under laser confocal microscopy. Two typical triazole compounds were isolated for photophysical parameter measurements. The emission spectra presented a fluorescence emission peak around 620 nm for both click products. The results further confirmed the emission wavelength change was the result of azide-alkyne cycloaddition reaction. Since nearly all biomolecules can be metabolically labeled by reported alkyne-functionalized derivatives of native metabolites, our method can be readily applied to image these biomacromolecules. PMID:26501208

  16. Disorder-to-order transition of diblock copolymers induced by alkyne/azide click chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Xinyu; Chen, Wei; Chen, Xiangji; Emrick, Todd; Russell, Thomas

    2010-03-01

    Alkyne/azide click chemistry is shown as a novel approach to induce the disorder-to-order transition (DOT) of diblock copolymers. A series of poly(ethylene oxide)-b-poly(n-butyl methacrylate-r-propargyl methacrylate) (PEO-b-P(nBMA-r-PgMA)) diblock copolymers were prepared and it is shown that the neat diblock copolymers are in the phase mixed state over the temperature range invetigated. Microphase separation was observed when the diblock copolymers were mixed with rhodamine B azide and annealed at elevated temperature. The azide molecule reacted with the terminal alkyne groups in P(nBMA-r-PgMA) block and attached to polymer backbone, resulting in a significant increase in the nonfavorable interaction between the two blocks. The DOT of these blends was observed both in the bulk and in thin films. The evolution of the morphology during the transition is determined by the mole ratio between alkyne and azide groups, annealing time and temperature, and interfacial energy.

  17. Development of Alkyne-Containing Pyrazolopyrimidines To Overcome Drug Resistance of Bcr-Abl Kinase.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xu; Kung, Alvin; Malinoski, Brock; Prakash, G K Surya; Zhang, Chao

    2015-12-10

    Despite the success of imatinib at inhibiting Bcr-Abl and treating chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML), resistance to the therapy occurs over time in patients. In particular, the resistance to imatinib caused by the gatekeeper mutation T315I in Bcr-Abl remains a challenge in the clinic. Inspired by the successful development of ponatinib to curb drug resistance, we hypothesize that the incorporation of an alkyne linker in other heterocyclic scaffolds can also achieve potent inhibition of Bcr-Abl(T315I) by allowing for simultaneous occupancy of both the active site and the allosteric pocket in the Abl kinase domain. Herein, we describe the design, synthesis, and characterization of a series of alkyne-containing pyrazolopyrimidines as Bcr-Abl inhibitors. Our results demonstrate that some alkyne-containing pyrazolopyrimidines potently inhibit not only Abl(T315I) in vitro but also Bcr-Abl(T315I) in cells. These pyrazolopyrimidines can serve as lead compounds for future development of novel targeted therapy to overcome drug resistance of CML. PMID:26562217

  18. The Role of Ate Complexes in the Copper-Mediated Trifluoromethylation of Alkynes.

    PubMed

    Weske, Sebastian; Schoop, Ramona; Koszinowski, Konrad

    2016-08-01

    Trifluoromethylation reactions have recently received increased attention because of the beneficial effect of the trifluoromethyl group on the pharmacological properties of numerous substances. A common method to introduce the trifluoromethyl group employs the Ruppert-Prakash reagent, that is, Si(CH3 )3 CF3 , together with a copper(I) halide. We have applied this method to the trifluoromethylation of aromatic alkynes and used electrospray-ionization mass spectrometry to investigate the mechanism of these reactions in tetrahydrofuran, dichloromethane, and acetonitrile as well as with and without added 1,10-phenanthroline. In the absence of the alkyne component, the homoleptic ate complexes [Cu(CF3 )2 ](-) and [Cu(CF3 )4 ](-) were observed. In the presence of the alkynes RH, the heteroleptic complexes [Cu(CF3 )3 R](-) were detected as well. Upon gas-phase fragmentation, these key intermediates released the cross-coupling products R-CF3 with perfect selectivity. Apparently, the [Cu(CF3 )3 R](-) complexes did not originate from homoleptic cuprate anions, but from unobservable neutral precursors. The present results moreover point to the involvement of oxygen as the oxidizing agent. PMID:27385188

  19. A novel alkyne cholesterol to trace cellular cholesterol metabolism and localization.

    PubMed

    Hofmann, Kristina; Thiele, Christoph; Schött, Hans-Frieder; Gaebler, Anne; Schoene, Mario; Kiver, Yuriy; Friedrichs, Silvia; Lütjohann, Dieter; Kuerschner, Lars

    2014-03-01

    Cholesterol is an important lipid of mammalian cells and plays a fundamental role in many biological processes. Its concentration in the various cellular membranes differs and is tightly regulated. Here, we present a novel alkyne cholesterol analog suitable for tracing both cholesterol metabolism and localization. This probe can be detected by click chemistry employing various reporter azides. Alkyne cholesterol is accepted by cellular enzymes from different biological species (Brevibacterium, yeast, rat, human) and these enzymes include cholesterol oxidases, hydroxylases, and acyl transferases that generate the expected metabolites in in vitro and in vivo assays. Using fluorescence microscopy, we studied the distribution of cholesterol at subcellular resolution, detecting the lipid in the Golgi and at the plasma membrane, but also in the endoplasmic reticulum and mitochondria. In summary, alkyne cholesterol represents a versatile, sensitive, and easy-to-use tool for tracking cellular cholesterol metabolism and localization as it allows for manifold detection methods including mass spectrometry, thin-layer chromatography/fluorography, and fluorescence microscopy. PMID:24334219

  20. Evaluation of alkyne-modified isoprenoids as chemical reporters of protein prenylation

    PubMed Central

    DeGraw, Amanda J.; Palsuledesai, Charuta; Ochocki, Joshua D.; Dozier, Jonathan K.; Lenevich, Stepan; Rashidian, Mohammad; Distefano, Mark D.

    2010-01-01

    Protein prenyltransferases catalyze the attachment of C15 (farnesyl) and C20 (geranylgeranyl) groups to proteins at specific sequences localized at or near the C-termini of specific proteins. Determination of the specific protein prenyltransferase substrates affected by the inhibition of these enzymes is critical for enhancing knowledge of the mechanism of such potential drugs. Here we investigate the utility of alkyne-containing isoprenoid analogues for chemical proteomics experiments by showing that these compounds readily penetrate mammalian cells in culture and become incorporated into proteins that are normally prenylated. Derivatization via Cu(I) catalyzed Click reaction with a fluorescent azide reagent allows the proteins to be visualized and their relative levels to be analyzed. Simultaneous treatment of cells with these probes and inhibitors of prenylation reveals decreases in the levels of some but not all of the labeled proteins. Two-dimensional electrophoretic separation of these labeled proteins followed by mass spectrometric analysis allowed several labeled proteins to be unambiguously identified. Docking experiments and DFT calculations suggest that the substrate specificity of PFTase may vary depending on whether azide- or alkyne-based isoprenoid analogues are employed. These results demonstrate the utility of alkyne-containing analogues for chemical proteomic applications. PMID:21040496

  1. Isolating the non-polar contributions to the intermolecular potential for water-alkane interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ballal, Deepti; Venkataraman, Pradeep; Fouad, Wael A.; Cox, Kenneth R.; Chapman, Walter G.

    2014-08-01

    Intermolecular potential models for water and alkanes describe pure component properties fairly well, but fail to reproduce properties of water-alkane mixtures. Understanding interactions between water and non-polar molecules like alkanes is important not only for the hydrocarbon industry but has implications to biological processes as well. Although non-polar solutes in water have been widely studied, much less work has focused on water in non-polar solvents. In this study we calculate the solubility of water in different alkanes (methane to dodecane) at ambient conditions where the water content in alkanes is very low so that the non-polar water-alkane interactions determine solubility. Only the alkane-rich phase is simulated since the fugacity of water in the water rich phase is calculated from an accurate equation of state. Using the SPC/E model for water and TraPPE model for alkanes along with Lorentz-Berthelot mixing rules for the cross parameters produces a water solubility that is an order of magnitude lower than the experimental value. It is found that an effective water Lennard-Jones energy ɛW/k = 220 K is required to match the experimental water solubility in TraPPE alkanes. This number is much higher than used in most simulation water models (SPC/E—ɛW/k = 78.2 K). It is surprising that the interaction energy obtained here is also higher than the water-alkane interaction energy predicted by studies on solubility of alkanes in water. The reason for this high water-alkane interaction energy is not completely understood. Some factors that might contribute to the large interaction energy, such as polarizability of alkanes, octupole moment of methane, and clustering of water at low concentrations in alkanes, are examined. It is found that, though important, these factors do not completely explain the anomalously strong attraction between alkanes and water observed experimentally.

  2. Secondary organic aerosol composition from C12 alkanes.

    PubMed

    Schilling Fahnestock, Katherine A; Yee, Lindsay D; Loza, Christine L; Coggon, Matthew M; Schwantes, Rebecca; Zhang, Xuan; Dalleska, Nathan F; Seinfeld, John H

    2015-05-14

    The effects of structure, NOx conditions, relative humidity, and aerosol acidity on the chemical composition of secondary organic aerosol (SOA) are reported for the photooxidation of three C12 alkanes: n-dodecane, cyclododecane, and hexylcyclohexane. Acidity was modified through seed particle composition: NaCl, (NH4)2SO4, and (NH4)2SO4 + H2SO4. Off-line analysis of SOA was carried out by solvent extraction and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC/MS) and direct analysis in real-time mass spectrometry. We report here 750 individual masses of SOA products identified from these three alkane systems and 324 isomers resolved by GC/MS analysis. The chemical compositions for each alkane system provide compelling evidence of particle-phase chemistry, including reactions leading to oligomer formation. Major oligomeric species for alkane SOA are peroxyhemiacetals, hemiacetals, esters, and aldol condensation products. Furans, dihydrofurans, hydroxycarbonyls, and their corresponding imine analogues are important participants in these oligomer-producing reactions. Imines are formed in the particle phase from the reaction of the ammonium sulfate seed aerosol with carbonyl-bearing compounds present in all the SOA systems. Under high-NO conditions, organonitrate products can lead to an increase of aerosol volume concentration by up to a factor of 5 over that in low-NO conditions. Structure was found to play a key role in determining the degree of functionalization and fragmentation of the parent alkane, influencing the mean molecular weight of the SOA produced and the mean atomic O:C ratio. PMID:24814371

  3. A STUDY OF FUNDAMENTAL REACTION PATHWAYS FOR TRANSITION METAL ALKYL COMPLEXES. I. THE REACTION OF A NICKEL METHYL COMPLEX WITH ALKYNES. II. THE MECHANISM OF ALDEHYDE FORMATION IN THE REACTION OF A MOLYBDENUM HYDRIDE WITH MOLYBDENUM ALKYLS

    SciTech Connect

    Huggins, John Mitchell

    1980-06-01

    I. This study reports the rapid reaction under mild conditions of internal or terminal alkynes with methyl (acetyl~ acetonato) (triphenylphosphine) nickel (1) in either aromatic or ether solvents. In all cases vinylnickel products 2 are formed by insertion of the alkyne into the nickel=methyl bond. These complexes may be converted into a variety of organic products (e.g. alkenes, esters, vinyl halides) by treatment with appropriate reagents. Unsymmetrical alkynes give selectively the one regioisomer with the sterically largest substituent next to the nickel atom. In order to investigate the stereochemistry of the initial insertion, a x-ray diffraction study of the reaction of 1 with diphenylacetylene was carried out. This showed that the vinylnickel complex formed by overall trans insertion was the product of the reaction. Furthermore, subsequent slow isomerization of this complex, to a mixture of it and the corresponding cis isomer, demonstrated that this trans addition product is the kinetic product of the reaction. In studies with other alkynes, the product of trans addition was not always exclusively (or even predominantly) formed, but the ratio of the stereoisomers formed kinetically was substantially different from the thermodynamic ratio. Isotope labeling, added phosphine, and other experiments have allowed us to conclude that the mechanism of this reaction does involve initial cis addition. However, a coordinatively unsaturated vinylnickel complex is initially formed which can undergo rapid, phosphine-catalyzed cis-trans isomerization in competition with its conversion to the isolable phosphine-substituted kinetic reaction products. II. The reaction of CpMo(CO){sub 3}H (1a) with CpMo(CO){sub 3}R (2, R= CH{sub 3}, C{sub 2}H{sub 5}) at 50{degrees} C in THF gives the aldehyde RCHO and the dimers [CpMo(CO){sub 3}]{sub 2} (3a) and [CpMo(CO){sub 2}]{sub 2} (4a). Labeling one of the reactants with a methylcyclopentadienyl ligand it was possible to show that the

  4. Metal-free direct intramolecular carbotrifluoromethylation of alkenes to functionalized trifluoromethyl azaheterocycles.

    PubMed

    Li, Lei; Deng, Min; Zheng, Sheng-Cai; Xiong, Ya-Ping; Tan, Bin; Liu, Xin-Yuan

    2014-01-17

    The first example of a metal-free direct carbotrifluoromethylation of alkenes using inexpensive TMSCF3 as the CF3 source is described. The methodology not only exhibits high chemoselectivity for this transformation but also expands the substrate scope that is difficult to access by known transition-metal-catalyzed methods. PMID:24351111

  5. Products of the gas-phase reactions of O{sub 3} with alkenes

    SciTech Connect

    Atkinson, R.; Tuazon, E.C.; Aschmann, S.M.

    1995-12-01

    Selected products of the gas-phase reactions of a series of alkenes (1-pentene, 1-hexene, 1-heptene, 1-octene, 2,3-dimethyl-l-butene, cyclopentene and 1-methylcyclohexene) with O{sub 3} have been identified and quantified by gas chromatography and in situ Fourier transform infrared absorption spectroscopy. Because OH radicals are formed in these O{sub 3} reactions, experiments were carried out in the presence of sufficient cyclohexane or n-octane to scavenge > 90 % of the OH radicals formed. OH radical formation yields from the O{sub 3}-alkene reactions were derived from the amounts of cyclohexanone and cyclohexanol formed in O{sub 3}-alkene-cyclohexane-air mixtures. The molar yields of the carbonyls products R{sub 1}C(O)R{sub 2} plus HCHO from the O{sub 3} reactions with the five 1-alkenes (R{sub 1}R{sub 2}C=CH{sub 2}) studied were 1.1 {plus_minus} 0.1, as expected from the presently accepted reaction mechanism.

  6. Catalytic production of sulfur heterocycles (dihydrobenzodithiins): a new application of ligand-based alkene reactivity.

    PubMed

    Harrison, Daniel J; Fekl, Ulrich

    2009-12-28

    Activation of bis-o-phenylene tetrasulfide to render it a practical benzodithiete equivalent for [4+2] cycloadditions with alkenes has been achieved with catalytic amounts of Mo(tfd)(2)(bdt) (tfd = S(2)C(2)(CF(3))(2); bdt = S(2)C(6)H(4)). Substituted 2,3-dihydro-1,4-benzodithiins are produced. PMID:20024283

  7. Tandem isomerization-decarboxylation for converting alkenoic fatty acids into alkenes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We report a facile Ru-catalyzed route to alkenes from alkenoic fatty acids via a readily accessible pre-catalyst [Ru(CO)2RCO2]n. The catalyst apparently functions in a tandem mode by dynamically isomerizing the positions of double bonds in an aliphatic chain and, subsequently, decarboxylating specif...

  8. Synthesis of insect pheromones belonging to the group of (Z)-trisubstituted alkenes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grigorieva, Natalia Ya; Tsiklauri, Paata G.

    2000-07-01

    Stereo- and regiocontrolled methods for the construction of a (Z)-trisubstituted C=C bond and for the regiospecific introduction of a chiral fragment are exemplified in total syntheses of insect pheromones belonging to (Z)-trisubstituted alkenes. The bibliography includes 113 references.

  9. The reactions of ozone with alkenes: An important source of HOx in the boundary layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paulson, Suzanne E.; Orlando, John J.

    The reactions of ozone with alkenes have been shown recently to lead to the direct production of OH radicals. Organic peroxy radicals (RO2) probably accompany the production of OH. In this paper, we draw attention to the potential importance of these reactions in the primary production of HOx (HOx = OH, HO2 and RO2) radicals in various regions of the boundary layer. The reactions of ozone with anthropogenic alkenes are shown to be the most important source of HOx in many urban settings during the day and evening, and a significant source at night. The majority of HOx comes from trace quantities of alkenes with internal double bonds. Reaction of O3 with isoprene and terpenes can be an important source of HOx in forested regions; we show that these reactions are the dominant radical source in the late afternoon and into the night. This additional HOx source is expected to increase predicted OH concentrations compared to those calculated by models that do not include the O3-alkene source.

  10. Photoredox-Catalyzed Bromodifluoromethylation of Alkenes with (Difluoromethyl)triphenylphosphonium Bromide.

    PubMed

    Lin, Qing-Yu; Ran, Yang; Xu, Xiu-Hua; Qing, Feng-Ling

    2016-05-20

    Under visible-light photoredox conditions, difluoromethyltriphenylphosphonium bromide was used as the precursor of the CF2H radical for bromodifluoromethylation of alkenes. The presence of catalytic CuBr2 resulted in the selective formation of the bromodifluoromethylated products. PMID:27136958

  11. Uranyl photochemistry with alkenes: Distinguishing between H-atom abstraction and electron transfer

    SciTech Connect

    McCleskey, T.M.; Burns, C.J.; Tumas, W.

    1999-12-13

    Recent studies with the uranyl ion (UO{sub 2{sup 2+}}) have shown that it has the potential to photocatalytically oxidize organic substrates in the presence of air. The excited-state UO{sub 2}{sup 2+}* is a potent oxidant (E{degree} = 2.6 V), and is quenched by a variety of organic substrates. The resulting U(V) species can then be oxidized back to UO{sub 2}{sup 2+} in the presence of oxygen. Previous studies with alcohols have shown, through kinetic isotope effects, that the quenching of the uranyl excited state occurs by hydrogen atom abstraction to give UO{sub 2}H{sup +} and an organic radical. The mechanism of quenching with alkenes has not been definitely determined. Proposals for quenching mechanisms with alkenes have included exciplex formation, H-atom abstraction, and electron transfer. The authors report here on a series of quenching studies between uranyl and a variety of alkene substrates that unequivocally demonstrate quenching of the uranyl excited state with alkenes occurs by electron transfer.

  12. Operationally simple hydrotrifluoromethylation of alkenes with sodium triflinate enabled by Ir photoredox catalysis.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Lei; Wang, Lian-Sheng; Li, Bojie; Fu, Boqiao; Zhang, Cheng-Pan; Li, Wei

    2016-05-11

    We report herein a single component Ir photoredox catalyst which is capable of catalyzing the hydrotrifluoromethylation of terminal alkenes and Michael acceptors with sodium triflinate (Langlois reagent) in methanol under irradiation at room temperature. Various synthetically useful functional groups, including ester, amide, ether, aldehyde, sulfone, ketone and aryl boronate, are well tolerated in this reaction. PMID:26996326

  13. 40 CFR 721.445 - Substituted ethyl alken-a-mide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... SUBSTANCES CONTROL ACT SIGNIFICANT NEW USES OF CHEMICAL SUBSTANCES Significant New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.445 Substituted ethyl alken-a-mide. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as a substituted ethyl...

  14. 40 CFR 721.445 - Substituted ethyl alken-a-mide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... SUBSTANCES CONTROL ACT SIGNIFICANT NEW USES OF CHEMICAL SUBSTANCES Significant New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.445 Substituted ethyl alken-a-mide. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as a substituted ethyl...

  15. Substituent-enabled oxidative dehydrogenative cross-coupling of 1,4-naphthoquinones with alkenes.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Chi; Wang, Meining; Fan, Zhoulong; Sun, Li-Ping; Zhang, Ao

    2014-08-15

    A Rh-catalyzed oxidative dehydrogenative cross-coupling of 1,4-naphthquinones with alkenes was achieved by using a substituent-enabled C(sp(2))-H functionalization (SEF) strategy. The method shows high functional group tolerance, broad substrate scope, and great potential for further functional transformations. PMID:25075553

  16. Continuous flow hydrogenation of nitroarenes, azides and alkenes using maghemite-Pd nanocomposites

    EPA Science Inventory

    Maghemite-supported ultra-fine Pd (1-2 nm) nanoparticles, prepared by a simple co-precipitation method, find application in the catalytic continuous flow hydrogenation of nitroarenes, azides, and alkenes wherein they play an important role in reduction of various functional group...

  17. Highly regio- and enantioselective multiple oxy- and amino-functionalizations of alkenes by modular cascade biocatalysis.

    PubMed

    Wu, Shuke; Zhou, Yi; Wang, Tianwen; Too, Heng-Phon; Wang, Daniel I C; Li, Zhi

    2016-01-01

    New types of asymmetric functionalizations of alkenes are highly desirable for chemical synthesis. Here, we develop three novel types of regio- and enantioselective multiple oxy- and amino-functionalizations of terminal alkenes via cascade biocatalysis to produce chiral α-hydroxy acids, 1,2-amino alcohols and α-amino acids, respectively. Basic enzyme modules 1-4 are developed to convert alkenes to (S)-1,2-diols, (S)-1,2-diols to (S)-α-hydroxyacids, (S)-1,2-diols to (S)-aminoalcohols and (S)-α-hydroxyacids to (S)-α-aminoacids, respectively. Engineering of enzyme modules 1 &2, 1 &3 and 1, 2 &4 in Escherichia coli affords three biocatalysts over-expressing 4-8 enzymes for one-pot conversion of styrenes to the corresponding (S)-α-hydroxyacids, (S)-aminoalcohols and (S)-α-aminoacids in high e.e. and high yields, respectively. The new types of asymmetric alkene functionalizations provide green, safe and useful alternatives to the chemical syntheses of these compounds. The modular approach for engineering multi-step cascade biocatalysis is useful for developing other new types of one-pot biotransformations for chemical synthesis. PMID:27297777

  18. Visible-light-induced photocatalytic azotrifluoromethylation of alkenes with aryldiazonium salts and sodium triflinate.

    PubMed

    Yu, Xing-Long; Chen, Jia-Rong; Chen, Dong-Zhen; Xiao, Wen-Jing

    2016-07-01

    The efficient visible light photocatalytic azotrifluoromethylation of alkenes with aryldiazonium salts and sodium triflinate is described, which gave the corresponding trifluoromethylated azo compounds in generally good yields. The trifluoromethylated azo products can be easily transformed into useful heterocycles and nitrogen-containing building blocks. PMID:27292589

  19. One-Pot Anti-Markovnikov Hydroamination of Unactivated Alkenes by Hydrozirconation and Amination

    PubMed Central

    Strom, Alexandra E.

    2013-01-01

    A one-pot hydroamination of alkenes is reported. The synthesis of primary and secondary amines from unactivated olefins was accomplished in the presence of a variety of functional groups. Hydrozirconation, followed by amination with nitrogen electrophiles, provides exclusive anti-Markovnikov selectivity, and most products are isolated in high yields without the use of column chromatography. PMID:23899320

  20. Lewis Acid-Promoted [2+2] Cycloadditions of Alkenes with Arylketenes

    PubMed Central

    Rigsbee, E. M.; Zhou, C.; Rasik, C. M.; Sptiz, A. Z.; Nichols, A. J.; Brown, M. K.

    2015-01-01

    A method for the [2+2] cycloaddition of arylketenes and alkenes is presented. The process involves the in situ generation of a ketene in the presence of a Lewis acid. The utility of products is demonstrated towards the synthesis of a common scaffold found in several natural product families. PMID:26419921

  1. Highly regio- and enantioselective multiple oxy- and amino-functionalizations of alkenes by modular cascade biocatalysis

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Shuke; Zhou, Yi; Wang, Tianwen; Too, Heng-Phon; Wang, Daniel I. C.; Li, Zhi

    2016-01-01

    New types of asymmetric functionalizations of alkenes are highly desirable for chemical synthesis. Here, we develop three novel types of regio- and enantioselective multiple oxy- and amino-functionalizations of terminal alkenes via cascade biocatalysis to produce chiral α-hydroxy acids, 1,2-amino alcohols and α-amino acids, respectively. Basic enzyme modules 1–4 are developed to convert alkenes to (S)-1,2-diols, (S)-1,2-diols to (S)-α-hydroxyacids, (S)-1,2-diols to (S)-aminoalcohols and (S)-α-hydroxyacids to (S)-α-aminoacids, respectively. Engineering of enzyme modules 1 & 2, 1 & 3 and 1, 2 & 4 in Escherichia coli affords three biocatalysts over-expressing 4–8 enzymes for one-pot conversion of styrenes to the corresponding (S)-α-hydroxyacids, (S)-aminoalcohols and (S)-α-aminoacids in high e.e. and high yields, respectively. The new types of asymmetric alkene functionalizations provide green, safe and useful alternatives to the chemical syntheses of these compounds. The modular approach for engineering multi-step cascade biocatalysis is useful for developing other new types of one-pot biotransformations for chemical synthesis. PMID:27297777

  2. Oxidation Products of Semi-volatile Alkanes by Hydroxyl Radicals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, H.; Worton, D. R.; Nah, T.; Goldstein, A. H.; Wilson, K. R.

    2013-12-01

    Alkanes are ubiquitous in the atmosphere and are important components that influence atmospheric chemistry. Semi-volatile alkanes are partitioned between the gas- and the particle-phases and can be readily oxidized in both phases. Previous studies have demonstrated that reaction rates and the products of OH oxidation are very different for organic compounds in the gas- and particle phases. In the present study, n-octadecane (C18H38), n-eicosane (C20H42), n-docosane (C22H46), n-tricosane (C24H50), and n-pentadecylcyclohexane (C21H42) were chosen as model compounds for semi-volatile alkanes to examine their OH-initiated oxidation reactions in a flow tube reactor. OH exposure was varied in the experiments, equivalent to oxidation of up to one week in the atmosphere. Oxidation products were collected on filters and analyzed using two-dimensional gas chromatography coupled to a high-resolution time-of-flight electron impact ionization and vacuum ultraviolet photoionization mass spectrometer. Most of the oxygenated higher molecular weight isomers were separated and quantified. Our results suggest that aerosol samples formed in the n-octadecane experiment were more oxidized than the other model compounds (i.e., functionalization products with three oxygen atoms per molecule compared to two oxygen atoms per molecule) at similar OH exposures and aerosol mass loadings. This is likely due to the concentration of n-octadecane in the gas phase where oxidation is more rapid. We find that the first-generation gas-phase oxidation products quickly partition to the particle phase after which higher-generation oxidation likely occurs in the particle phase. Interestingly, functionalized carbonyl isomers for the normal alkanes were only observed on the 4 carbon positions closest to the molecule end in all cases, which is in contrast to structure-reactivity relationship (SRR) predictions for gas-phase reactions. For n-octadecane, the concentrations of first-generation functionalization

  3. Site isolation in vanadium phosphorus oxide alkane oxidation

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, M R; Ebner, J R

    1991-06-01

    Single crystal X-ray diffraction studies of vanadyl pyrophosphate indicate that at least two polytypical structures exists for this active and selective alkane oxidation catalyst. The crystal structures of these materials differ with respect to the symmetry and direction of columns of vanadyl groups within the unit cell. Single crystals of vanadyl pyrophosphate have been generated at extreme temperatures not often experienced by microcrystalline catalysts. The crystallography of the system suggests that other crystalline modifications or disordered phases might also exist. Zeroth-order models of crystal surface termination of vanadyl pyrophosphate have been constructed which conceptually illustrate the ability of vanadyl pyrophosphate to accommodate varying amounts of surface phosphorus parallel to (1,0,0), (0,1,0) and (0,2,4). Pyrophosphate termination of surfaces parallel to (1,0,0) likely results in the isolation of clusters of reactive centers and limits overoxidation of the alkane substrate. 23 refs., 6 figs.

  4. Flash Points of Secondary Alcohol and n-Alkane Mixtures.

    PubMed

    Esina, Zoya N; Miroshnikov, Alexander M; Korchuganova, Margarita R

    2015-11-19

    The flash point is one of the most important characteristics used to assess the ignition hazard of mixtures of flammable liquids. To determine the flash points of mixtures of secondary alcohols with n-alkanes, it is necessary to calculate the activity coefficients. In this paper, we use a model that allows us to obtain enthalpy of fusion and enthalpy of vaporization data of the pure components to calculate the liquid-solid equilibrium (LSE) and vapor-liquid equilibrium (VLE). Enthalpy of fusion and enthalpy of vaporization data of secondary alcohols in the literature are limited; thus, the prediction of these characteristics was performed using the method of thermodynamic similarity. Additionally, the empirical models provided the critical temperatures and boiling temperatures of the secondary alcohols. The modeled melting enthalpy and enthalpy of vaporization as well as the calculated LSE and VLE flash points were determined for the secondary alcohol and n-alkane mixtures. PMID:26491811

  5. Adsorption of n-alkane vapours at the water surface.

    PubMed

    Biscay, Frédéric; Ghoufi, Aziz; Malfreyt, Patrice

    2011-06-21

    Monte Carlo simulations are reported here to predict the surface tension of the liquid-vapour interface of water upon adsorption of alkane vapours (methane to hexane). A decrease of the surface tension has been established from n-pentane. A correlation has been evidenced between the decrease of the surface tension and the absence of specific arrangement at the water surface for n-pentane and n-hexane. The thermodynamic stability of the adsorption layer and the absence of film for longer alkanes have been checked through the calculation of a potential of mean force. This complements the work recently published [Ghoufi et al., Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys., 2010, 12, 5203] concerning the adsorption of methane at the water surface. The decrease of the surface tension has been interpreted in terms of the degree of hydrogen bonding of water molecules at the liquid-vapour interface upon adsorption. PMID:21584320

  6. Alkane Biosynthesis Genes in Cyanobacteria and Their Transcriptional Organization

    PubMed Central

    Klähn, Stephan; Baumgartner, Desirée; Pfreundt, Ulrike; Voigt, Karsten; Schön, Verena; Steglich, Claudia; Hess, Wolfgang R.

    2014-01-01

    In cyanobacteria, alkanes are synthesized from a fatty acyl-ACP by two enzymes, acyl–acyl carrier protein reductase and aldehyde deformylating oxygenase. Despite the great interest in the exploitation for biofuel production, nothing is known about the transcriptional organization of their genes or the physiological function of alkane synthesis. The comparison of 115 microarray datasets indicates the relatively constitutive expression of aar and ado genes. The analysis of 181 available genomes showed that in 90% of the genomes both genes are present, likely indicating their physiological relevance. In 61% of them they cluster together with genes encoding acetyl-CoA carboxyl transferase and a short-chain dehydrogenase, strengthening the link to fatty acid metabolism and in 76% of the genomes they are located in tandem, suggesting constraints on the gene arrangement. However, contrary to the expectations for an operon, we found in Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 specific promoters for the two genes, sll0208 (ado) and sll0209 (aar), which give rise to monocistronic transcripts. Moreover, the upstream located ado gene is driven by a proximal as well as a second, distal, promoter, from which a third transcript, the ~160 nt sRNA SyR9 is transcribed. Thus, the transcriptional organization of the alkane biosynthesis genes in Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 is of substantial complexity. We verified all three promoters to function independently from each other and show a similar promoter arrangement also in the more distant Nodularia spumigena, Trichodesmium erythraeum, Anabaena sp. PCC 7120, Prochlorococcus MIT9313, and MED4. The presence of separate regulatory elements and the dominance of monocistronic mRNAs suggest the possible autonomous regulation of ado and aar. The complex transcriptional organization of the alkane synthesis gene cluster has possible metabolic implications and should be considered when manipulating the expression of these genes in cyanobacteria. PMID

  7. Hydroxylation of alkanes using sodium hypochlorite catalyzed by iron porphyrins

    SciTech Connect

    Sorokin, A.B.; Khenkin, A.M.

    1988-10-01

    This communication presents data about the oxidation of alkanes to alcohols with hypochlorite in the presence of Fe(III) phenylporphyrin derivatives in the system water-benzene. We used as catalysts the following compounds: tetraphenylporphyrin iron chloride, tetramesitylporphyrin iron chloride, tetra(2-fluorophenyl)porphyrin from chloride, and tetra (2-ntrophenyl)porphyrin iron chloride. The reaction products were analyzed by gas-liquid chromatography. The efficiency of the reaction was determined by the structure of the porphyrin used.

  8. Cyanobacterial alkane biosynthesis further expands the catalytic repertoire of the ferritin-like “di-iron-carboxylate” proteins

    PubMed Central

    Krebs, Carsten; Bollinger, J. Martin; Booker, Squire J.

    2011-01-01

    Summary Enzymes that activate dioxygen at carboxylate-bridged non-heme diiron clusters residing within ferritin-like, four-helix-bundle protein architectures have crucial roles in, among other processes, the global carbon cycle (e.g., soluble methane monooxygenase), fatty acid biosynthesis [plant fatty acyl-acyl carrier protein (ACP) desaturases], DNA biosynthesis [the R2 or β2 subunits of class Ia ribonucleotide reductases (RNRs)], and cellular iron trafficking (ferritins). Classic studies on class Ia RNRs showed long ago how this obligatorily oxidative di-iron/O2 chemistry can be used to activate an enzyme for even a reduction reaction, and more recent investigations of class Ib and Ic RNRs, coupled with earlier studies on dimanganese catalases, have shown that members of this protein family can also incorporate either one or two Mn ions and use them in place of iron for redox catalysis. These two strategies – oxidative activation for non-oxidative reactions and use of alternative metal ions – expand the catalytic repertoire of the family, probably to include activities that remain to be discovered. Indeed, a recent study has suggested that fatty aldehyde decarbonylases (ADs) from cyanobacteria, purported to catalyze a redox-neutral cleavage of a Cn aldehyde to the Cn−1 alkane (or alkene) and CO, also belong to this enzyme family and are most similar in structure to two other members with heterodinuclear (Mn-Fe) cofactors. Here, we first briefly review both the chemical principles underlying the O2-dependent oxidative chemistry of the “classical” di-iron-carboxylate proteins and the two aforementioned strategies that have expanded their functional range, and then consider what metal ion(s) and what chemical mechanism(s) might be employed by the newly discovered cyanobacterial ADs. PMID:21440485

  9. Modeling SOA production from the oxidation of intermediate volatility alkanes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aumont, B.; Mouchel-Vallon, C.; Camredon, M.; Lee-Taylor, J.; Madronich, S.

    2012-12-01

    Secondary Organic Aerosols (SOA) production and ageing is a multigenerational oxidation process involving the formation of successive organic compounds with higher oxidation degree and lower vapour pressure. This process was investigated using the explicit oxidation model GECKO-A (Generator for Explicit Chemistry and Kinetics of Organics in the Atmosphere). Results for the C8-C24 n-alkane series show the expected trends, i.e. (i) SOA yield grows with the carbon backbone of the parent hydrocarbon, (ii) SOA yields decreases with the decreasing pre-existing organic aerosol concentration, (iii) the number of generations required to describe SOA production increases when the pre-existing organic aerosol concentration decreases. Most SOA contributors were found to be not oxidized enough to be categorized as highly oxygenated organic aerosols (OOA) but reduced enough to be categorized as hydrocarbon like organic aerosols (HOA). Branched alkanes are more prone to fragment in the early stage of the oxidation than their corresponding linear analogues. Fragmentation is expected to alter both the yield and the mean oxidation state of the SOA. Here, GECKO-A is applied to generate highly detailed oxidation schemes for various series of branched and cyclised alkanes. Branching and cyclisation effects on SOA yields and oxidation states will be examined.

  10. Nanoscale Trapping and Squeeze-Out of Confined Alkane Monolayers.

    PubMed

    Gosvami, N N; O'Shea, S J

    2015-12-01

    We present combined force curve and conduction atomic force microscopy (AFM) data for the linear alkanes CnH2n+2 (n = 10, 12, 14, 16) confined between a gold-coated AFM tip and a graphite surface. Solvation layering is observed in the force curves for all liquids, and conduction AFM is used to study in detail the removal of the confined (mono)layer closest to the graphite surface. The squeeze-out behavior of the monolayer can be very different depending upon the temperature. Below the monolayer melting transition temperatures the molecules are in an ordered state on the graphite surface, and fast and complete removal of the confined molecules is observed. However, above the melting transition temperature the molecules are in a disordered state, and even at large applied pressure a few liquid molecules are trapped within the tip-sample contact zone. These findings are similar to a previous study for branched alkanes [ Gosvami Phys. Rev. Lett. 2008, 100, 076101 ], but the observation for the linear alkane homologue series demonstrates clearly the dependence of the squeeze-out and trapping on the state of the confined material. PMID:26529283

  11. Dielectric constant of liquid alkanes and hydrocarbon mixtures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sen, A. D.; Anicich, V. G.; Arakelian, T.

    1992-01-01

    The complex dielectric constants of n-alkanes with two to seven carbon atoms have been measured. The measurements were conducted using a slotted-line technique at 1.2 GHz and at atmospheric pressure. The temperature was varied from the melting point to the boiling point of the respective alkanes. The real part of the dielectric constant was found to decrease with increasing temperature and correlate with the change in the molar volume. An upper limit to all the loss tangents was established at 0.001. The complex dielectric constants of a few mixtures of liquid alkanes were also measured at room temperature. For a pentane-octane mixture the real part of the dielectric constant could be explained by the Clausius-Mosotti theory. For the mixtures of n-hexane-ethylacetate and n-hexane-acetone the real part of the dielectric constants could be explained by the Onsager theory extended to mixtures. The dielectric constant of the n-hexane-acetone mixture displayed deviations from the Onsager theory at the highest fractions of acetone. The dipole moments of ethylacetate and acetone were determined for dilute mixtures using the Onsager theory and were found to be in agreement with their accepted gas-phase values. The loss tangents of the mixtures exhibited a linear relationship with the volume fraction for low concentrations of the polar liquids.

  12. Alkane production from biomass: chemo-, bio- and integrated catalytic approaches.

    PubMed

    Deneyer, Aron; Renders, Tom; Van Aelst, Joost; Van den Bosch, Sander; Gabriëls, Dries; Sels, Bert F

    2015-12-01

    Linear, branched and cyclic alkanes are important intermediates and end products of the chemical industry and are nowadays mainly obtained from fossil resources. In search for alternatives, biomass feedstocks are often presented as a renewable carbon source for the production of fuels, chemicals and materials. However, providing a complete market for all these applications seems unrealistic due to both financial and logistic issues. Despite the very large scale of current alkane-based fuel applications, biomass definitely has the potential to offer a partial solution to the fuel business. For the smaller market of chemicals and materials, a transition to biomass as main carbon source is more realistic and even probably unavoidable in the long term. The appropriate use and further development of integrated chemo- and biotechnological (catalytic) process strategies will be crucial to successfully accomplish this petro-to-bio feedstock transition. Furthermore, a selection of the most promising technologies from the available chemo- and biocatalytic tool box is presented. New opportunities will certainly arise when multidisciplinary approaches are further explored in the future. In an attempt to select the most appropriate biomass sources for each specific alkane-based application, a diagram inspired by van Krevelen is applied, taking into account both the C-number and the relative functionality of the product molecules. PMID:26360875

  13. Biochemical studies on the metabolic activation of halogenated alkanes.

    PubMed Central

    Cheeseman, K H; Albano, E F; Tomasi, A; Slater, T F

    1985-01-01

    This paper reviews recent investigations by Slater and colleagues into the metabolic activation of halogenated alkanes in general and carbon tetrachloride in particular. It is becoming increasingly accepted that free radical intermediates are involved in the toxicity of many such compounds through mechanisms including lipid peroxidation, covalent binding, and cofactor depletion. Here we describe the experimental approaches that are used to establish that halogenated alkanes are metabolized in animal tissues to reactive free radicals. Electron spin resonance spectroscopy is used to identify free-radical products, often using spin-trapping compounds. The generation of specific free radicals by radiolytic methods is useful in the determination of the precise reactivity of radical intermediates postulated to be injurious to the cell. The enzymic mechanism of the production of such free radicals and their subsequent reactions with biological molecules is studied with specific metabolic inhibitors and free-radical scavengers. These combined techniques provide considerable insight into the process of metabolic activation of halogenated compounds. It is readily apparent, for instance, that the local oxygen concentration at the site of activation is of crucial importance to the subsequent reactions; the formation of peroxy radical derivatives from the primary free-radical product is shown to be of great significance in relation to carbon tetrachloride and may be of general importance. However, while these studies have provided much information on the biochemical mechanisms of halogenated alkane toxicity, it is clear that many problems remain to be solved. PMID:3007102

  14. QUANTIFICATION OF FUGITIVE REACTIVE ALKENE EMISSIONS FROM PETROCHEMICAL PLANTS WITH PERFLUOROCARBON TRACERS.

    SciTech Connect

    SENUM,G.I.; DIETZ,R.N.

    2004-06-30

    Recent studies demonstrate the impact of fugitive emissions of reactive alkenes on the atmospheric chemistry of the Houston Texas metropolitan area (1). Petrochemical plants located in and around the Houston area emit atmospheric alkenes, such as ethene, propene and 1,3-butadiene. The magnitude of emissions is a major uncertainty in assessing their effects. Even though the petrochemical industry reports that fugitive emissions of alkenes have been reduced to less than 0.1% of daily production, recent measurement data, obtained during the TexAQS 2000 experiment indicates that emissions are perhaps a factor of ten larger than estimated values. Industry figures for fugitive emissions are based on adding up estimated emission factors for every component in the plant to give a total estimated emission from the entire facility. The dramatic difference between estimated and measured rates indicates either that calculating emission fluxes by summing estimates for individual components is seriously flawed, possibly due to individual components leaking well beyond their estimated tolerances, that not all sources of emissions for a facility are being considered in emissions estimates, or that there are known sources of emissions that are not being reported. This experiment was designed to confirm estimates of reactive alkene emissions derived from analysis of the TexAQS 2000 data by releasing perfluorocarbon tracers (PFTs) at a known flux from a petrochemical plant and sampling both the perfluorocarbon tracer and reactive alkenes downwind using the Piper-Aztec research aircraft operated by Baylor University. PFTs have been extensively used to determine leaks in pipelines, air infiltration in buildings, and to characterize the transport and dispersion of air parcels in the atmosphere. Over 20 years of development by the Tracer Technology Center (TTC) has produced a range of analysis instruments, field samplers and PFT release equipment that have been successfully deployed in a

  15. A simple and facile Heck-type arylation of alkenes with diaryliodonium salts using magnetically recoverable Pd-catalyst

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Heck-type arylation of alkenes was achieved in aqueous polyethylene glycol using a magnetically recoverable heterogenized palladium catalyst employing diaryliodonium salts under ambient conditions. The benign reaction medium and the stability of the catalyst are the salient f...

  16. Syntheses of hydroxamic acid-containing bicyclic β-lactams via palladium-catalyzed oxidative amidation of alkenes.

    PubMed

    Jobbins, Maria O; Miller, Marvin J

    2014-02-21

    Palladium-catalyzed oxidative amidation has been used to synthesize hydroxamic acid-containing bicyclic β-lactam cores. Oxidative cleavage of the pendant alkene provides access to the carboxylic acid in one step. PMID:24483144

  17. Enantioselective Ruthenium Catalyzed Carbonyl Allylation via Alkyne-Alcohol C-C Bond Forming Transfer Hydrogenation: Allene Hydrometallation vs. Oxidative Coupling

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Tao; Nguyen, Khoa D.; Zhang, Wandi; Krische, Michael J.

    2015-01-01

    Chiral ruthenium(II) complexes modified by Josiphos ligands catalyze the reaction of alkynes with primary alcohols to form homoallylic alcohols with excellent control of regio-, diastereo- and enantioselectivity. These processes represent the first examples of enantioselective carbonyl allylation using alkynes as allylmetal equivalents. PMID:25734220

  18. Pyridine synthesis by reactions of allyl amines and alkynes proceeding through a Cu(OAc)2 oxidation and Rh(III)-catalyzed N-annulation sequence.

    PubMed

    Kim, Dong-Su; Park, Jung-Woo; Jun, Chul-Ho

    2012-11-28

    A new methodology has been developed for the synthesis of pyridines from allyl amines and alkynes, which involves sequential Cu(II)-promoted dehydrogenation of the allylamine and Rh(III)-catalyzed N-annulation of the resulting α,β-unsaturated imine and alkyne. PMID:23069867

  19. Versatile convergent synthesis of a three peptide loop containing protein mimic of whooping cough pertactin by successive Cu(I)-catalyzed azide alkyne cycloaddition on an orthogonal alkyne functionalized TAC-scaffold.

    PubMed

    Werkhoven, Paul R; van de Langemheen, Helmus; van der Wal, Steffen; Kruijtzer, John A W; Liskamp, Rob M J

    2014-04-01

    Synthetic mimics of discontinuous epitopes may have a wide range of potential applications, including synthetic vaccines and inhibition of protein-protein interactions. However, synthetic access to these relatively complex peptide molecular constructs is limited. This paper describes a versatile convergent strategy for the construction of protein mimics presenting three different cyclic peptides. Using an orthogonal alkyne protection strategy, peptide loops were introduced successively onto a triazacyclophane scaffold via Cu(I)-catalyzed azide alkyne cycloaddition. This method provides rapid access to protein mimics requiring different peptide segments for their interaction and activity. PMID:24599619

  20. Enrichment of O-GlcNAc-modified peptides using novel thiol-alkyne and thiol-disulfide exchange.

    PubMed

    Tsumoto, Hiroki; Ogasawara, Daisuke; Hashii, Noritaka; Suzuki, Takayoshi; Akimoto, Yoshihiro; Endo, Tamao; Miura, Yuri

    2015-07-01

    We have developed a selective method for the enrichment of O-linked β-N-acetylglucosamine (O-GlcNAc)-modified peptides, which uses a newly synthesized thiol-alkyne and a thiol-disulfide exchange. First, O-GlcNAc-modified peptides were enzymatically labeled with an azide-containing GalNAc analog. Then, the azide moiety was reacted with thiol-alkyne through a copper(I)-catalyzed azide-alkyne cycloaddition. The thiol-modified peptides were enriched with thiol-reactive resin through a thiol-disulfide exchange. At least 500fmol of O-GlcNAc-modified peptides was selectively isolated from α-crystallin tryptic peptides and detected by mass spectrometry. This novel enrichment strategy could be used for O-GlcNAcome analysis of biological samples. PMID:25980911

  1. Synthesis of 1,3-Amino Alcohols, 1,3-Diols, Amines, and Carboxylic Acids from Terminal Alkynes.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Mingshuo; Herzon, Seth B

    2015-09-01

    The half-sandwich ruthenium complexes 1-3 activate terminal alkynes toward anti-Markovnikov hydration and reductive hydration under mild conditions. These reactions are believed to proceed via addition of water to metal vinylidene intermediates (4). The functionalization of propargylic alcohols by metal vinylidene pathways is challenging owing to decomposition of the starting material and catalytic intermediates. Here we show that catalyst 2 can be employed to convert propargylic alcohols to 1,3-diols in high yield and with retention of stereochemistry at the propargylic position. The method is also amenable to propargylic amine derivatives, thereby establishing a route to enantioenriched 1,3-amino alcohol products. We also report the development of formal anti-Markovnikov reductive amination and oxidative hydration reactions to access linear amines and carboxylic acids, respectively, from terminal alkynes. This chemistry expands the scope of products that can be prepared from terminal alkynes by practical and high-yielding metal-catalyzed methods. PMID:26203776

  2. Carboxylation of terminal alkynes with CO2 using novel silver N-heterocyclic carbene complexes.

    PubMed

    Li, Shanshan; Sun, Jing; Zhang, Zhizhi; Xie, Ruixia; Fang, Xiangchen; Zhou, Mingdong

    2016-06-28

    Four novel N-heterocyclic carbene (NHC) silver complexes, , have been synthesized and characterized. The single X-ray crystal diffraction data indicate a dinuclear solid-state structure for and and a mononuclear structure for and . These complexes have been successfully used as efficient catalysts for the C-H activating carboxylation of terminal alkynes with CO2. A wide range of substrates with various functional groups afforded the corresponding aryl or alkyl substituted propiolic acids in good yields under mild conditions. Moreover, the role of bases and the reaction mechanism is thoroughly discussed. PMID:27263977

  3. Luminescent Alkyne-Bearing Terbium(III) Complexes and Their Application to Bioorthogonal Protein Labeling.

    PubMed

    O'Malley, William I; Abdelkader, Elwy H; Aulsebrook, Margaret L; Rubbiani, Riccardo; Loh, Choy-Theng; Grace, Michael R; Spiccia, Leone; Gasser, Gilles; Otting, Gottfried; Tuck, Kellie L; Graham, Bim

    2016-02-15

    Two new bifunctional macrocyclic chelate ligands that form luminescent terbium(III) complexes featuring an alkyne group for conjugation to (bio)molecules via the Cu(I)-catalyzed "click" reaction were synthesized. Upon ligation, the complexes exhibit a significant luminescent enhancement when excited at the λ(max) of the "clicked" products. To demonstrate the utility of the complexes for luminescent labeling, they were conjugated in vitro to E. coli aspartate/glutamate-binding protein incorporating a genetically encoded p-azido-L-phenylalanine or p-(azidomethyl)-L-phenylalanine residue. The complexes may prove useful for time-gated assay applications. PMID:26821062

  4. Preparation and reactions of sugar azides with alkynes: synthesis of sugar triazoles as antitubercular agents.

    PubMed

    Singh, Biswajit Kumar; Yadav, Amit Kumar; Kumar, Brijesh; Gaikwad, A; Sinha, Sudhir Kumar; Chaturvedi, Vinita; Tripathi, Rama Pati

    2008-05-19

    5-azido-5-deoxy-xylo-, ribo-, and arabinofuranoses were prepared by the reaction of the respective 5-O-(methanesulfonyl) or p-toluenesulfonyl derivatives with NaN3 in DMF. The intermediate 5-azido-5-deoxy glycofuranoses on 1,3-cycloaddition with different alkynes in the presence of CuSO4 and sodium ascorbate gave the corresponding sugar triazoles in very good yields. The synthesized sugar triazoles were evaluated for their antitubercular activity against Mycobacterium tuberculosis H37Rv, where one of the compounds displayed mild antitubercular activity in vitro with MIC 12.5 microg/mL. PMID:18346719

  5. Synthesis of Cyclic Porphyrin Trimers through Alkyne Metathesis Cyclooligomerization and Their Host-Guest Binding Study.

    PubMed

    Yu, Chao; Long, Hai; Jin, Yinghua; Zhang, Wei

    2016-06-17

    Cyclic porphyrin trimers were synthesized through one-step cyclooligomerization via alkyne metathesis from diyne monomers. These macrocycles show interesting host-guest binding interactions with fullerenes, selectively binding C70 (6 × 10(3) M(-1)) over C60 and C84 (no binding observed). The fullerene-encapsulated host-guest complex can undergo guest or host exchange in the presence of another guest (2,4,6-tri(4-pyridyl)-1,3,5-triazine) or host (cage COP5) molecule with higher binding affinity. PMID:27267936

  6. Synthesis of Porphyrin, Chlorin and Phthalocyanine Derivatives by Azide-Alkyne Click Chemistry.

    PubMed

    Acherar, Samir; Colombeau, Ludovic; Frochot, Céline; Vanderesse, Régis

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this review is to provide a summary of the use of copper-catalyzed azide-alkyne cycloaddition (CuAAC) in the synthesis of porphyrin, chlorin and phthalocyanine derivatives for different types of therapeutic applications. The click reaction is a powerful and versatile tool for scientists working on the synthesis of various symmetrically and asymmetrically substituted tetrapyrrolic derivatives. For example, click chemistry is widely used for the elaboration of photosensitizer conjugates for photodynamic therapy applications. Other biological applications are also described. PMID:26179994

  7. The Cycloaddition of the Benzimidazolium Ylides with Alkynes: New Mechanistic Insights

    PubMed Central

    Moldoveanu, Costel; Zbancioc, Gheorghita; Mantu, Dorina; Maftei, Dan; Mangalagiu, Ionel

    2016-01-01

    New insights concerning the reaction mechanism in the cycloaddition reaction of benzimidazolium ylides to activated alkynes are presented. The proposed pathway leading both to 2-(1H-pyrrol-1-yl)anilines and to pyrrolo[1,2-a]quinoxalin-4(5H)-ones involves an opening of the imidazole ring from the cycloaddition product, followed by a nucleophilic attack of the aminic nitrogen to a proximal carbonyl group and the elimination of a leaving group. The mechanistic considerations are fully supported by experimental data, including the XRD resolved structure of the key reaction intermediate. PMID:27224656

  8. Selective oxygenation of alkynes: a direct approach to diketones and vinyl acetate.

    PubMed

    Xia, Xiao-Feng; Gu, Zhen; Liu, Wentao; Wang, Ningning; Wang, Haijun; Xia, Yongmei; Gao, Haiyan; Liu, Xiang

    2014-12-28

    Arylalkynes can be converted into α-diketones with the use of a copper catalyst, and also be transformed into vinyl acetates under metal-free conditions, both in the presence of PhI(OAc)2 as an oxidant at room temperature. A series of substituted α-diketones were prepared in moderate to good yields. A variety of vinyl halides could be regio- and stereo-selectively synthesized under mild conditions, and I, Br and Cl could be all easily embedded into the alkynes. PMID:25356631

  9. An Alkyne Hydrosilylation-Oxidation Strategy for the Selective Installation of Oxygen Functionality

    PubMed Central

    Trost, Barry M.; Ball, Zachary T.; Laemmerhold, Kai M.

    2008-01-01

    Alkynes bearing propargylic, homopropargylic, and bis-homopropargylic hydroxyl groups are shown to serve as precursors for ketone or α-hydroxy ketone functionality. The approach hinges on the intermediacy of vinylsilanes created through regioselective hydrosilylation catalyzed by the complex [Cp*Ru(MeCN)3]PF6. Several oxidative pathways of linear and cyclic vinylsilanes are studied, and the possibility of diastereoselective epoxidation of cyclic vinylsilanes is demonstrated. The sequences constitute the equivalent of stereoselective aldol, homo-aldol, and bishomo-aldol type processes. The method is applied to a short synthesis of the piperidine alkaloid, spectaline. PMID:16011365

  10. Palladium-Catalyzed Annulation of Internal Alkynes: Direct Access to π-Conjugated Ullazines.

    PubMed

    Wan, Danyang; Li, Xiaoyu; Jiang, Ruyong; Feng, Boya; Lan, Jingbo; Wang, Ruilin; You, Jingsong

    2016-06-17

    A palladium-catalyzed cyclization reaction of 1-(2,6-dibromophenyl)-1H-pyrroles with alkynes has been developed to construct various π-conjugated indolizino[6,5,4,3-ija]quinolones (ullazines) with a reactive functional group tolerance. As illustrative examples, three new ullazine-based sensitizers are synthesized, and the performance of these dyes is examined in DSSC devices, which demonstrates the potential of direct C-H functionalization in the construction of organic optoelectronic materials. PMID:27227659

  11. The stereoselective synthesis of α-amino aldols starting from terminal alkynes.

    PubMed

    Miura, Tomoya; Nakamuro, Takayuki; Hiraga, Kentaro; Murakami, Masahiro

    2014-09-18

    A new procedure for the stereoselective synthesis of syn α-amino β-oxy ketones is reported. It consists of two steps; in the first step, α-amino silyl enol ethers having a (Z) geometry are prepared from 1-alkynes via 1-sulfonyl-1,2,3-triazoles. In the second step, the silyl enol ethers undergo the TiCl4-mediated Mukaiyama aldol reaction with aldehydes to produce α-amino β-oxy ketones with excellent syn-selectivity. PMID:25068433

  12. Amide-Directed Formation of Five-Coordinate Osmium Alkylidenes from Alkynes

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The amide-directed synthesis of five-coordinate osmium alkylidene derivatives from alkynes is reported. These types of complexes, which have been elusive until now because of the tendency of osmium to give hydride alkylidyne species, are prepared by reaction of the dihydride OsH2Cl2(PiPr3)2 (1) with terminal alkynes containing a distal amide group. Complex 1 reacts with N-phenylhex-5-ynamide and N-phenylhepta-6-ynamide to give OsCl2{=C(CH3)(CH2)nNH(CO)Ph}(PiPr3)2 (n = 3 (2), 4 (3)). The relative position of carbonyl and NH groups in the organic substrates has no influence on the reaction. Thus, treatment of 1 with N-(pent-4-yn-1-yl)benzamide leads to OsCl2{=C(CH3)(CH2)3NHC(O)Ph}(PiPr3)2 (4). The new compounds are intermediate species in the cleavage of the C–C triple bond of the alkynes. Under mild conditions, they undergo the rupture of the Cα–CH3 bond of the alkylidene, which comes from the alkyne triple bond, to afford six-coordinate hydride–alkylidyne derivatives. In dichloromethane, complex 2 gives a 10:7 mixture of OsHCl2{≡C(CH2)3C(O)NHPh}(PiPr3)2 (5) and OsHCl2{≡CCH(CH3)(CH2)2C(O)NHPh}(PiPr3)2 (6). The first complex contains a linear separation between the alkylidyne Cα atom and the amide group, whereas the spacer is branched in the second complex. In contrast to the case for 2, complex 4 selectively affords OsHCl2{≡C(CH2)3NHC(O)Ph}(PiPr3)2 (7). In spite of their instability, these compounds give the alkylidene–allene metathesis, being a useful entry to five-coordinate vinylidene complexes, including the dicarbon-disubstituted OsCl2(=C=CMe2)(PiPr3)2 (8) and the monosubstituted OsCl2(=C=CHCy)(PiPr3)2 (9). PMID:26877575

  13. General Method for the Preparation of Alkyne-Functionalized Oligopyridine Building Blocks.

    PubMed

    Ziessel, Raymond; Suffert, Jean; Youinou, Marie-Thérèse

    1996-09-20

    A large series of alkyne-substituted oligopyridines based on 2,2'-bipyridine, 1,10-phenanthroline, 2,2':6',2"-terpyridine, or 1,8-naphthyridine substrates has been synthesized and fully characterized. The palladium(0)-catalyzed coupling of bromo- or chloro-substituted derivatives with (trimethylsilyl)acetylene proceeds readily in diisopropylamine under ambient conditions giving good yields of the corresponding alkyne-substituted substrates oligoPy(C&tbd1;C)SiMe(3). The terminal monoynes oligoPyC&tbd1;CH become available upon treatment with K(2)CO(3) in methanol. Stepwise homologation of the acetylene function by Cadiot-Chodkiewicz coupling of oligoPyC&tbd1;CH with (bromoethynyl)triethylsilane (BrC&tbd1;CSiEt(3)) affords, in good yield, the silylated diynes oligoPy(C&tbd1;C)(2)SiEt(3), from which the terminal diynes oligoPy(C&tbd1;C)(2)H are formed by treatment with aqueous methanolic alkali. Reaction of oligoPy(C&tbd1;C)(2)H with BrC&tbd1;CSiEt(3) yields the silylated triynes oligoPy(C&tbd1;C)(3)SiEt(3) in modest yield. Further homologation is limited by nucleophilic attack of n-propylamine at the C-2 carbon of the alkyne chain, giving rise to a mixture of cis/cis (48%), cis/trans (33%), and trans/trans (19%) enaminediyne compounds 21a-c. Glaser oxidative self-coupling of the terminal diynes provides access to ditopic bipyridine or terpyridine ligands oligoPy(C&tbd1;C)(4)oligoPy comprising a tetrayne spacer. Quantitative formation of air-stable copper(I) complexes is described for the 6,6'-substituted ligands. A single crystal X-ray structure of complex 22a shows that the two ligands are interlocked around the copper(I) center in a pseudotetrahedral arrangement, similar to the structure deduced from NMR and FAB(+) data. The synthetic methods reported herein represent a valuable approach to the large-scale preparation of alkyne-functionalized oligopyridines. PMID:11667517

  14. Ni(II) salts and 2-propanol effect catalytic reductive coupling of epoxides and alkynes.

    PubMed

    Beaver, Matthew G; Jamison, Timothy F

    2011-08-01

    A Ni-catalyzed reductive coupling of alkynes and epoxides using Ni(II) salts and simple alcohol reducing agents is described. Whereas previously reported conditions relied on Ni(cod)(2) and Et(3)B, this system has several advantages including the use of air-stable and inexpensive Ni(II) precatalysts (e.g., NiBr(2)·3H(2)O) as the source of Ni(0) and simple alcohols (e.g., 2-propanol) as the reducing agent. Deuterium-labeling experiments are consistent with oxidative addition of an epoxide C-O bond that occurs with inversion of configuration. PMID:21718038

  15. Silver-Mediated anti-Markovnikov and Markovnikov-Selective Hydrotrifluoromethylthiolation of Terminal Alkynes.

    PubMed

    Wu, Wei; Dai, Wenpeng; Ji, Xinfei; Cao, Song

    2016-06-17

    The first example of direct hydrotrifluoromethylthiolation of terminal alkynes in the presence of AgSCF3 and K2S2O8 was established for the synthesis of a variety of vinyl trifluoromethyl thioethers. The anti-Markovnikov and Markovnikov adducts were obtained in moderate to good yields via two different reaction systems. Studies to probe the mechanism of the anti-Markovnikov addition reactions including the radical trapping experiments, kinetic isotope effect experiments, and deuterated experiments for determination of H-sources were conducted. PMID:27227878

  16. Highly selective Markovnikov hydroboration of alkyl-substituted terminal alkenes with a phosphine-copper(i) catalyst.

    PubMed

    Iwamoto, Hiroaki; Kubota, Koji; Ito, Hajime

    2016-05-21

    A new method has been developed for the Markovnikov hydroboration of alkyl-substituted terminal alkenes. Notably, the use of a bulky bisphosphine-copper(i) catalyst system resulted in high regioselectivity to afford secondary alkylboronates from the corresponding terminal alkenes (branch/linear = 92 : 8-97 : 3). This method also exhibited good functional group compatibility. PMID:26975671

  17. Inhibitory Effects of C2 to C10 1-Alkynes on Ammonia Oxidation in Two Nitrososphaera Species

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, K.; Tennigkeit, B.; Palatinszky, M.; Stieglmeier, M.; Myrold, D. D.; Schleper, C.; Wagner, M.; Bottomley, P. J.

    2015-01-01

    A previous study showed that ammonia oxidation by the Thaumarchaeota Nitrosopumilus maritimus (group 1.1a) was resistant to concentrations of the C8 1-alkyne, octyne, which completely inhibits activity by ammonia-oxidizing bacteria. In this study, the inhibitory effects of octyne and other C2 to C10 1-alkynes were evaluated on the nitrite production activity of two pure culture isolates from Thaumarchaeota group 1.1b, Nitrososphaera viennensis strain EN76 and Nitrososphaera gargensis. Both N. viennensis and N. gargensis were insensitive to concentrations of octyne that cause complete and irreversible inactivation of nitrite production by ammonia-oxidizing bacteria. However, octyne concentrations (≥20 μM) that did not inhibit N. maritimus partially inhibited nitrite production in N. viennensis and N. gargensis in a manner that did not show the characteristics of irreversible inactivation. In contrast to previous studies with an ammonia-oxidizing bacterium, Nitrosomonas europaea, octyne inhibition of N. viennensis was: (i) fully and immediately reversible, (ii) not competitive with NH4+, and (iii) without effect on the competitive interaction between NH4+ and acetylene. Both N. viennensis and N. gargensis demonstrated the same overall trend in regard to 1-alkyne inhibition as previously observed for N. maritimus, being highly sensitive to ≤C5 alkynes and more resistant to longer-chain length alkynes. Reproducible differences were observed among N. maritimus, N. viennensis, and N. gargensis in regard to the extent of their resistance/sensitivity to C6 and C7 1-alkynes, which may indicate differences in the ammonia monooxygenase binding and catalytic site(s) among the Thaumarchaeota. PMID:25576608

  18. Modeling the role of alkanes, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, and their oligomers in secondary organic aerosol formation.

    PubMed

    Pye, Havala O T; Pouliot, George A

    2012-06-01

    A computationally efficient method to treat secondary organic aerosol (SOA) from various length and structure alkanes as well as SOA from polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) is implemented in the Community Multiscale Air Quality (CMAQ) model to predict aerosol concentrations over the United States. Oxidation of alkanes is predicted to produce more aerosol than oxidation of PAHs driven by relatively higher alkane emissions. SOA from alkanes and PAHs, although small in magnitude, can be a substantial fraction of the SOA from anthropogenic hydrocarbons, particularly in winter, and could contribute more if emission inventories lack intermediate volatility alkanes (>C(13)) or if the vehicle fleet shifts toward diesel-powered vehicles. The SOA produced from oxidation of alkanes correlates well with ozone and odd oxygen in many locations, but the lower correlation of anthropogenic oligomers with odd oxygen indicates that models may need additional photochemically dependent pathways to low-volatility SOA. PMID:22568386

  19. Mechanistic interpretation of selective catalytic hydrogenation and isomerization of alkenes and dienes by ligand deactivated Pd nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Jie S.; Shon, Young-Seok

    2015-10-01

    Unsupported thiolate-capped palladium nanoparticle catalysts are found to be highly substrate-selective for alkene hydrogenation and isomerization. Steric and poisoning effects from thiolate ligands on the nanoparticle surface control reactivity and selectivity by influencing alkene adsorption and directing either di-σ or mono-σ bond formation. The presence of overlapping p orbitals and α protons in alkenes greatly influences the catalytic properties of deactivated palladium nanoparticles leading to easily predictable hydrogenation or isomerization products.Unsupported thiolate-capped palladium nanoparticle catalysts are found to be highly substrate-selective for alkene hydrogenation and isomerization. Steric and poisoning effects from thiolate ligands on the nanoparticle surface control reactivity and selectivity by influencing alkene adsorption and directing either di-σ or mono-σ bond formation. The presence of overlapping p orbitals and α protons in alkenes greatly influences the catalytic properties of deactivated palladium nanoparticles leading to easily predictable hydrogenation or isomerization products. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Supplementary figures, methods, materials, and characterization data. See DOI: 10.1039/c5nr05090a

  20. Alkoxy Hydrosilanes As Surrogates of Gaseous Silanes for Hydrosilylation of Alkenes.

    PubMed

    Buslov, Ivan; Keller, Sébastien Carlos; Hu, Xile

    2016-04-15

    Me2SiH2, MeSiH3, and SiH4 are gaseous and flammable silanes that are inconvenient to use in chemical reactions. Catalytic amounts of a nickel pincer complex and NaO(t)Bu are reported to allow the synthesis of alkyl hydrosilanes from alkenes and alkoxy hydrosilanes, leading to the replacement of Me2SiH2, MeSiH3, and SiH4 by Me2(MeO)SiH, Me(EtO)2SiH, and (MeO)3SiH in hydrosilylation reactions of alkenes. The scope and mechanism of the reactions are also described. PMID:27045341

  1. Stabilized borata-alkene formation: structural features, reactions and the role of the counter cation.

    PubMed

    Kohrt, Sonja; Dachwitz, Steffen; Daniliuc, Constantin G; Kehr, Gerald; Erker, Gerhard

    2015-12-28

    Dimethylbenzofulvene adds Piers' borane [HB(C6F5)2] at the indene double bond to give a mixture of regioisomeric boranes 8a,b. Subsequent isomerization under equilibrium conditions gives the isopropyl substituted 1H and 3H borylindenes 10a,b. Their treatment with the bulky LiTMP base under frustrated Lewis pair conditions resulted in a clean deprotonation reaction to give the borata-alkene 14. Its X-ray crystal structure analysis indicated a pronounced B[double bond, length as m-dash]C double bond character and thus a borata-benzofulvene description. The borata-alkene underwent (probably stepwise) [4 + 2] cycloaddition reactions with chalcone derivatives and a formal [6 + 2] cycloaddition with phenylmethylketene. Many products and derivatives were characterized by X-ray diffraction. PMID:26584629

  2. Catalytic asymmetric carbon-carbon bond formation using alkenes as alkylmetal equivalents.

    PubMed

    Maksymowicz, Rebecca M; Roth, Philippe M C; Fletcher, Stephen P

    2012-08-01

    Catalytic asymmetric conjugate addition reactions with organometallic reagents are powerful reactions in synthetic chemistry. Procedures that use non-stabilized carbanions have been developed extensively, but these suffer from a number of limitations that prevent their use in many situations. Here, we report that alkylmetal species generated in situ from alkenes can be used in highly enantioselective 1,4-addition initiated by a copper catalyst. Using alkenes as starting materials is desirable because they are readily available and have favourable properties when compared to pre-made organometallics. High levels of enantioselectivity are observed at room temperature in a range of solvents, and the reaction tolerates functional groups that are not compatible with comparable methods-a necessary prerequisite for efficient and protecting-group-free strategies for synthesis. PMID:22824897

  3. Catalytic asymmetric carbon-carbon bond formation using alkenes as alkylmetal equivalents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maksymowicz, Rebecca M.; Roth, Philippe M. C.; Fletcher, Stephen P.

    2012-08-01

    Catalytic asymmetric conjugate addition reactions with organometallic reagents are powerful reactions in synthetic chemistry. Procedures that use non-stabilized carbanions have been developed extensively, but these suffer from a number of limitations that prevent their use in many situations. Here, we report that alkylmetal species generated in situ from alkenes can be used in highly enantioselective 1,4-addition initiated by a copper catalyst. Using alkenes as starting materials is desirable because they are readily available and have favourable properties when compared to pre-made organometallics. High levels of enantioselectivity are observed at room temperature in a range of solvents, and the reaction tolerates functional groups that are not compatible with comparable methods—a necessary prerequisite for efficient and protecting-group-free strategies for synthesis.

  4. Regio- and Stereoselective Hydrosilylation of Unsymmetrical Alkynes Catalyzed by a Well-Defined, Low-Valent Cobalt Catalyst.

    PubMed

    Rivera-Hernández, Alejandro; Fallon, Brendan J; Ventre, Sandrine; Simon, Cédric; Tremblay, Marie-Hélène; Gontard, Geoffrey; Derat, Etienne; Amatore, Muriel; Aubert, Corinne; Petit, Marc

    2016-09-01

    Herein, the use of a well-defined low-valent cobalt(I) catalyst [HCo(PMe3)4] capable of performing the highly regio- and stereoselective hydrosilylation of internal alkynes is reported. The reaction can be applied to a variety of hydrosilanes, symmetrical and unsymmetrical alkynes, giving in many cases a single hydrosilylation isomer. Experimental and theoretical studies suggest the key step to be a hydro-cobaltation and that the reaction proceeds through a classical Chalk-Harrod mechanism. PMID:27552360

  5. Regioconvergent and Enantioselective Rhodium-Catalyzed Hydroamination of Internal and Terminal Alkynes: A Highly Flexible Access to Chiral Pyrazoles.

    PubMed

    Haydl, Alexander M; Hilpert, Lukas J; Breit, Bernhard

    2016-05-01

    The rhodium-catalyzed asymmetric N-selective coupling of pyrazole derivatives with internal and terminal alkynes features an utmost chemo-, regio-, and enantioselective access to enantiopure allylic pyrazoles, readily available for incorporation in small-molecule pharmaceuticals. This methodology is distinguished by a broad substrate scope, resulting in a remarkable compatability with a variety of different functional groups. It furthermore exhibits an intriguing case of regio-, position-, and enantioselectivity in just one step, underscoring the sole synthesis of just one out of up to six possible products in a highly flexible approach to allylated pyrazoles by emanating from various internal and terminal alkynes. PMID:26990445

  6. Transition metal-catalyzed couplings of alkynes to 1,3-enynes: modern methods and synthetic applications.

    PubMed

    Trost, Barry M; Masters, James T

    2016-04-21

    The metal-catalyzed coupling of alkynes is a powerful method for the preparation of 1,3-enynes, compounds that are of broad interest in organic synthesis. Numerous strategies have been developed for the homo- and cross coupling of alkynes to enynes via transition metal catalysis. In such reactions, a major issue is the control of regio-, stereo-, and, where applicable, chemoselectivity. Herein, we highlight prominent methods for the selective synthesis of these valuable compounds. Further, we illustrate the utility of these processes through specific examples of their application in carbocycle, heterocycle, and natural product syntheses. PMID:27086769

  7. Base-Free Direct Synthesis of Alkynylphosphonates from Alkynes and H-Phosphonates Catalyzed by Cu2O.

    PubMed

    Moglie, Yanina; Mascaró, Evangelina; Gutierrez, Victoria; Alonso, Francisco; Radivoy, Gabriel

    2016-03-01

    A simple and mild methodology for the direct synthesis of alkynylphosphonates is presented. The reaction of a variety of terminal alkynes with dialkyl phosphites in the presence Cu2O (14 mol %) led to the formation of the corresponding alkynylphosphonates in good to excellent yields. Reactions are performed under air, in acetonitrile as solvent, and in the absence of base or ligand additives. This new methodology is compatible with the presence of a wide variety of functional groups on the starting alkynes and can be scaled up to a gram scale. PMID:26839204

  8. Photochemical dimerization and functionalization of alkanes, ethers, primary alcohols and silanes

    DOEpatents

    Crabtree, Robert H.; Brown, Stephen H.

    1988-01-01

    The space-time yield and/or the selectivity of the photochemical dimerization of alkanes, ethers, primary alcohols and tertiary silanes with Hg and U.V. light is enhanced by refluxing the substrate in the irradiated reaction zone at a temperature at which the dimer product condenses and remains condensed promptly upon its formation. Cross-dimerization of the alkanes, ethers and silanes with primary alcohols is disclosed, as is the functionalization to aldehydes of the alkanes with carbon monoxide.

  9. Draft Genome Sequence of Gordonia sihwensis Strain 9, a Branched Alkane-Degrading Bacterium

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Lisa M.; Gunasekera, Thusitha S.; Striebich, Richard C.

    2016-01-01

    Gordonia sihwensis strain 9 is a Gram-positive bacterium capable of efficient aerobic degradation of branched and normal alkanes. The draft genome of G. sihwensis S9 is 4.16 Mb in size, with 3,686 coding sequences and 68.1% G+C content. Alkane monooxygenase and P-450 cytochrome genes required for alkane degradation are predicted in G. sihwensis S9. PMID:27340079

  10. Photochemical dimerization and functionalization of alkanes, ethers, primary alcohols and silanes

    DOEpatents

    Crabtree, R.H.; Brown, S.H.

    1988-02-16

    The space-time yield and/or the selectivity of the photochemical dimerization of alkanes, ethers, primary alcohols and tertiary silanes with Hg and U.V. light is enhanced by refluxing the substrate in the irradiated reaction zone at a temperature at which the dimer product condenses and remains condensed promptly upon its formation. Cross-dimerization of the alkanes, ethers and silanes with primary alcohols is disclosed, as is the functionalization to aldehydes of the alkanes with carbon monoxide.

  11. Branch-Selective Alkene Hydroarylation by Cooperative Destabilization: Iridium-Catalyzed ortho-Alkylation of Acetanilides

    PubMed Central

    Crisenza, Giacomo E M; Sokolova, Olga O; Bower, John F

    2015-01-01

    An iridium(I) catalyst system, modified with the wide-bite-angle and electron-deficient bisphosphine dFppb (1,4-bis(di(pentafluorophenyl)phosphino)butane) promotes highly branch-selective hydroarylation reactions between diverse acetanilides and aryl- or alkyl-substituted alkenes. This provides direct and ortho-selective access to synthetically challenging anilines, and addresses long-standing issues associated with related Friedel–Crafts alkylations. PMID:26490739

  12. Alkenes as Chelating Groups in Diastereoselective Additions of Organometallics to Ketones

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Alkenes have been discovered to be chelating groups to Zn(II), enforcing highly stereoselective additions of organozincs to β,γ-unsaturated ketones. 1H NMR studies and DFT calculations provide support for this surprising chelation mode. The results expand the range of coordinating groups for chelation-controlled carbonyl additions from heteroatom Lewis bases to simple C–C double bonds, broadening the 60 year old paradigm. PMID:25328269

  13. Radical product yields from the ozonolysis of short chain alkenes under atmospheric boundary layer conditions.

    PubMed

    Alam, Mohammed S; Rickard, Andrew R; Camredon, Marie; Wyche, Kevin P; Carr, Timo; Hornsby, Karen E; Monks, Paul S; Bloss, William J

    2013-11-27

    The gas-phase reaction of ozone with unsaturated volatile organic compounds (VOCs), alkenes, is an important source of the critical atmospheric oxidant OH, especially at night when other photolytic radical initiation routes cannot occur. Alkene ozonolysis is also known to directly form HO2 radicals, which may be readily converted to OH through reaction with NO, but whose formation is poorly understood. We report a study of the radical (OH, HO2, and RO2) production from a series of small alkenes (propene, 1-butene, cis-2-butene, trans-2-butene, 2-methylpropene, 2,3-dimethyl-2-butene (tetramethyl ethene, TME), and isoprene). Experiments were performed in the European Photoreactor (EUPHORE) atmospheric simulation chamber, with OH and HO2 levels directly measured by laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) and HO2 + ΣRO2 levels measured by peroxy-radical chemical amplification (PERCA). OH yields were found to be in good agreement with the majority of previous studies performed under comparable conditions (atmospheric pressure, long time scales) using tracer and scavenger approaches. HO2 yields ranged from 4% (trans-2-butene) to 34% (2-methylpropene), lower than previous experimental determinations. Increasing humidity further reduced the HO2 yields obtained, by typically 50% for an RH increase from 0.5 to 30%, suggesting that HOx production from alkene ozonolysis may be lower than current models suggest under (humid) ambient atmospheric boundary layer conditions. The mechanistic origin of the OH and HO2 production observed is discussed in the context of previous experimental and theoretical studies. PMID:24171583

  14. Copper-catalyzed oxyamination of electron-deficient alkenes with N-acyloxyamines.

    PubMed

    Ren, Shichao; Song, Shengjin; Ye, Lu; Feng, Chao; Loh, Teck-Peng

    2016-08-16

    A Cu(i)-catalyzed direct intermolecular oxyamination of electron deficient alkenes is disclosed. This process is characterized by difunctionalization of a variety of α,β-unsaturated ketones with easily available N-acyloxyamine reagents as both amine and oxygen donors, which delivers ester derivatives of β-amino alcohols in good yields as well as with high regioselectivity. Control studies suggested the involvement of alkyl radical species on the way of product formation. PMID:27481485

  15. Asymmetric synthesis from terminal alkenes by diboration/cross-coupling cascades

    PubMed Central

    Mlynarski, Scott N.; Schuster, Christopher H.; Morken, James P.

    2013-01-01

    Amongst prospective starting materials for organic synthesis, terminal (monosubstituted) alkenes are ideal. In the form of α-olefins, they are manufactured on enormous scale and they are the core product features from many organic chemical reactions. While their latent reactivity can easily enable hydrocarbon chain extension, alkenes also have the attractive feature of being stable in the presence of many acids, bases, oxidants and reductants. In spite of these impressive attributes, relatively few catalytic enantioselective transformations have been developed that transform aliphatic α-olefins in >90% ee and, with the exception of site-controlled isotactic polymerization of α-olefins,1 none of these processes result in chain-extending C-C bond formation to the terminal carbon.2, 3, 4, 5, 6 Herein, we describe a strategy that directly addresses this gap in synthetic methodology and present a single-flask catalytic enantioselective conversion of terminal alkenes into a range of chiral products. These reactions are enabled by an unusual neighboring group participation effect that accelerates Pd-catalyzed cross-coupling of 1,2-bis(boronates) relative to nonfunctionalized alkyl boronate analogs. In tandem with enantioselective diboration, this reactivity feature connects abundant alkene starting materials to a diverse array of chiral products. Importantly with respect to synthesis utility, the tandem diboration/cross-coupling reaction (DCC reaction) generally provides products in high yield and high selectivity (>95:5 enantiomer ratio), employs low loadings (1–2 mol %) of commercially available catalysts and reagents, it offers an expansive substrate scope, and can address a broad range of alcohol and amine synthesis targets, many of which cannot be easily addressed with current technology. PMID:24352229

  16. Studies on the formation of H 2O 2 in the ozonolysis of alkenes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becker, K. H.; Bechara, J.; Brockmann, K. J.

    The formation of H 2O 2 in the reactions of ozone with alkenes, isoprene and some terpenes has been studied with tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy. The measured yields of H 2O 2 were found to be considerably enhanced in the presence of water vapour. H 2O 2 is thought to be formed in the ozonolysis of the alkene with O 3 by direct reaction of an intermediate with water vapour. The yield of H 2O 2 relative to the reacted alkene in the ozonolysis of trans-2-butene in the presence of water vapour was also studied with long path FTIR spectroscopy. Irrespective of the analytical methods and reaction conditions applied, the H 2O 2 yields in the reaction of O 3 with the different alkenes in the presence of water vapour were found to be in the range of a few per cent or less. Under the assumption that the reactive species forming H 2O 2 in the ozonolysis is the Criegee biradical, the overall rate constants for the reactions of some biradicals with water vapour were measured relative to the rate constant of the biradical with SO 2. For the H 2COO biradical a rate constant of (5.8 ± 2.5) × 10 -17 cm 3 s -1 was determined and for the (CH 3) 2COO biradical (2.9 ± 1.5) × 10 -17 cm 3 s -1; in the latter case with the assumption that (CH 3) 2COO reacts with SO 2 as fast as CH 2COO.

  17. Base-Induced Radical Carboamination of Nonactivated Alkenes with Aryldiazonium Salts.

    PubMed

    Kindt, Stephanie; Wicht, Karina; Heinrich, Markus R

    2015-12-18

    A new transition-metal-free version of the Meerwein arylation has been developed. The key feature of this carboamination-type reaction is the slow base-controlled generation of aryl radicals from aryldiazonium tetrafluoroborates, so that a sufficient quantity of diazonium ions remains to enable efficient trapping of the alkyl radical adduct resulting from aryl radical addition to the alkene. Under strongly basic conditions, diazoanhydrides are likely to take over the role of the nitrogen-centered radical scavengers. PMID:26636470

  18. Copper-Catalyzed Amino Lactonization and Amino Oxygenation of Alkenes Using O-Benzoylhydroxylamines.

    PubMed

    Hemric, Brett N; Shen, Kun; Wang, Qiu

    2016-05-11

    A copper-catalyzed amino lactonization of unsaturated carboxylic acids has been achieved as well as the analogous intermolecular three-component amino oxygenation of olefins. The transformation features mild conditions and a remarkably broad substrate scope, offering a novel and efficient approach to construct a wide range of amino lactones as well as 1,2-amino alcohol derivatives. Mechanistic studies suggest that the reaction proceeds via a distinctive O-benzoylhydroxylamine-promoted electrophilic amination of alkenes. PMID:27114046

  19. Enantioselective CuH-Catalyzed Reductive Coupling of Aryl Alkenes and Activated Carboxylic Acids.

    PubMed

    Bandar, Jeffrey S; Ascic, Erhad; Buchwald, Stephen L

    2016-05-11

    A new method for the enantioselective reductive coupling of aryl alkenes with activated carboxylic acid derivatives via copper hydride catalysis is described. Dual catalytic cycles are proposed, with a relatively fast enantioselective hydroacylation cycle followed by a slower diastereoselective ketone reduction cycle. Symmetrical aryl carboxyclic anhydrides provide access to enantioenriched α-substituted ketones or alcohols with excellent stereoselectivity and functional group tolerance. PMID:27121395

  20. Asymmetric synthesis from terminal alkenes by cascades of diboration and cross-coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mlynarski, Scott N.; Schuster, Christopher H.; Morken, James P.

    2014-01-01

    Terminal, monosubstituted alkenes are ideal prospective starting materials for organic synthesis because they are manufactured on very large scales and can be functionalized via a broad range of chemical transformations. Alkenes also have the attractive feature of being stable in the presence of many acids, bases, oxidants and reductants. In spite of these attributes, relatively few catalytic enantioselective transformations have been developed that transform aliphatic α-olefins into chiral products with an enantiomeric excess greater then 90 per cent. With the exception of site-controlled isotactic polymerization of α-olefins, none of these catalytic enantioselective processes results in chain-extending carbon-carbon bond formation to the terminal carbon. Here we describe a strategy that directly addresses this gap in synthetic methodology, and present a single-flask, catalytic enantioselective conversion of terminal alkenes into a number of chiral products. These reactions are facilitated by a neighbouring functional group that accelerates palladium-catalysed cross-coupling of 1,2-bis(boronates) relative to non-functionalized alkyl boronate analogues. In tandem with enantioselective diboration, this reactivity feature transforms alkene starting materials into a diverse array of chiral products. We note that the tandem diboration/cross-coupling reaction generally provides products in high yield and high selectivity (>95:5 enantiomer ratio), uses low loadings (1-2 mol per cent) of commercially available catalysts and reagents, offers an expansive substrate scope, and can address a broad range of alcohol and amine synthesis targets, many of which cannot be easily addressed with current technology.