Science.gov

Sample records for alkanes alkenes aromatics

  1. Cracking and aromatization of C{sub 6}-C{sub 10} n-alkanes and n-alkenes on a zeolite-containing catalyst

    SciTech Connect

    Gairbekov, T.M.; Takaeva, M.I.; Khadzhiev, S.N.; Manovyan, A.K.

    1992-05-10

    Despite the extensive studies on catalysis on zeolites, the question of the mechanism of the reactions of cracking and aromatization of hydrocarbons is still debated. The classic Whitmore theory hypothesizes that cracking of alkanes and alkenes takes place through the formation of the same intermediate trivalent carbenium ions of the (C{sub n}H{sub 2n+1}){sup +} type. Ola`s protolytic mechanism hypothesizes nonclassic five- (four-)coordinated ions of the (C{sub n}H{sub 2n+3}){sup +} type for cracking of alkanes and classic carbenium ions for alkenes. When the classic mechanism occurs on zeolites, an analogous effect on the rate of the reactions of alkanes and alkenes with the molecular weight of the starting hydrocarbons and similar compositions of the products obtained should be predicted. The authors investigated the transformation of individual n-alkanes and n-1-alkenes of C{sub 6}-C{sub 10} composition in the presence of a catalyst synthesized by addition of 30 wt.% decationized ultrahigh-silicon zeolite of the ZSM type (Si/Al - 16) modified with 1 wt.% zinc on {gamma}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}. The experiment was conducted on a flow-type laboratory setup at 425{degrees}C in conditions of the minimum effect of diffusion factors with the method described in detail previously. 13 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  2. Alkanes and alkenes conversion to high octane gasoline

    SciTech Connect

    Harandi, M.N.; Owen, H.

    1989-07-25

    This patent describes a process for the conversion of lower alkane and alkene hydrocarbons to high octane gasoline. It comprises: contacting a hydrocarbon feedstock comprising lower alkanes and alkenes with a fluidized bed of acidic, shape selective metallosiliate catalyst in a first conversion zone under high temperature alkane conversion conditions wherein the feedstock contains an amount of lower alkene sufficient to provide an exotherm sufficient to maintain near isothermal reaction conditions whereby an effluent stream is produced comprising higher aliphatic hydrocarbons rich in aromatics; contacting the effluent stream with a fluidized bed of acidic, medium pore metallosilicate catalyst in a second conversion zone at moderate temperature under oligonerization and alkylation conditions whereby a C/sub 5/ + gasoline boiling range product is produced rich in alkylated aromatics.

  3. 40 CFR 721.4464 - Mixture of hydrofluoro alkanes and hydrofluoro alkene.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Mixture of hydrofluoro alkanes and... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.4464 Mixture of hydrofluoro alkanes and hydrofluoro alkene. (a) Chemical... as a mixture of hydrofluoro alkanes and hydrofluoro alkene (PMNs P-96-945/946/947/948) are subject...

  4. 40 CFR 721.4464 - Mixture of hydrofluoro alkanes and hydrofluoro alkene.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Mixture of hydrofluoro alkanes and... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.4464 Mixture of hydrofluoro alkanes and hydrofluoro alkene. (a) Chemical... as a mixture of hydrofluoro alkanes and hydrofluoro alkene (PMNs P-96-945/946/947/948) are subject...

  5. 40 CFR 721.4464 - Mixture of hydrofluoro alkanes and hydrofluoro alkene.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Mixture of hydrofluoro alkanes and... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.4464 Mixture of hydrofluoro alkanes and hydrofluoro alkene. (a) Chemical... as a mixture of hydrofluoro alkanes and hydrofluoro alkene (PMNs P-96-945/946/947/948) are subject...

  6. 40 CFR 721.4464 - Mixture of hydrofluoro alkanes and hydrofluoro alkene.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Mixture of hydrofluoro alkanes and... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.4464 Mixture of hydrofluoro alkanes and hydrofluoro alkene. (a) Chemical... as a mixture of hydrofluoro alkanes and hydrofluoro alkene (PMNs P-96-945/946/947/948) are subject...

  7. 40 CFR 721.4464 - Mixture of hydrofluoro alkanes and hydrofluoro alkene.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Mixture of hydrofluoro alkanes and... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.4464 Mixture of hydrofluoro alkanes and hydrofluoro alkene. (a) Chemical... as a mixture of hydrofluoro alkanes and hydrofluoro alkene (PMNs P-96-945/946/947/948) are subject...

  8. Reversible Interconversion between Alkanes, Alkenes, Alcohols and Ketones under Hydrothermal Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shipp, J.; Hartnett, H. E.; Gould, I. R.; Shock, E.; Williams, L. B.

    2011-12-01

    with the addition of methylbenzene products that are observed in a competing reaction, formed by dehydrogenation of the alkenes presumably via diene structures. The functional group interconversions were found to be completely reversible, with the exception of the methylbenzenes. Starting with these compounds gave no conversion to any other products. Significantly, we found that no carboxylic acids are formed, even though other products derived via carbon-carbon bond cleavage are observed. The experiments allow the stabilities and reactivities of the various functional groups to be inferred under these experimental conditions. The dienes are the least stable, followed by the alcohols, then the alkenes, the ketones, and finally the alkanes. The aromatic methylbenzenes are the least reactive and most stable under the experimental conditions. Therefore, using our reaction scheme and the relative reaction rate information, starting with any of the functional groups the direction(s) and most likely major products can be predicted.

  9. Fundamental Flame Velocities of Pure Hydrocarbons I : Alkanes, Alkenes, Alkynes Benzene, and Cyclohexane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gerstein, Melvin; Levine, Oscar; Wong, Edgar L

    1950-01-01

    The flame velocities of 37 pure hydrocarbons including normal and branched alkanes, alkenes, and alkynes; as well as benzene and cyclohexane, together with the experimental technique employed are presented. The normal alkanes have about the same flame velocity from ethane through heptane with methane being about 16 percent lower. Unsaturation increases the flame velocity in the order of alkanes, alkenes, and alkynes. Branching reduces the flame velocity.

  10. Upgrading light hydrocarbons via tandem catalysis: a dual homogeneous Ta/Ir system for alkane/alkene coupling.

    PubMed

    Leitch, David C; Lam, Yan Choi; Labinger, Jay A; Bercaw, John E

    2013-07-17

    Light alkanes and alkenes are abundant but are underutilized as energy carriers because of their high volatility and low energy density. A tandem catalytic approach for the coupling of alkanes and alkenes has been developed in order to upgrade these light hydrocarbons into heavier fuel molecules. This process involves alkane dehydrogenation by a pincer-ligated iridium complex and alkene dimerization by a Cp*TaCl2(alkene) catalyst. These two homogeneous catalysts operate with up to 60/30 cooperative turnovers (Ir/Ta) in the dimerization of 1-hexene/n-heptane, giving C13/C14 products in 40% yield. This dual system can also effect the catalytic dimerization of n-heptane (neohexene as the H2 acceptor) with cooperative turnover numbers of 22/3 (Ir/Ta).

  11. Sesquiterpene, alkene, and alkane hydrocarbons in virgin olive oils of different varieties and geographical origins.

    PubMed

    Bortolomeazzi, R; Berno, P; Pizzale, L; Conte, L S

    2001-07-01

    The hydrocarbon fraction of 30 virgin olive oils was analyzed, focusing in particular on the sesquiterpenes. The oil samples were of different geographical origins and obtained from different olive varieties. The hydrocarbon fraction was isolated by silica gel column chromatography of the unsaponifiable fraction of the oils. The sesquiterpene hydrocarbons were then fractionated, on the basis of their degree of unsaturation, by AgNO3 TLC and silica gel AgNO3 column chromatography. The composition of the sesquiterpenes was more complex than previously reported. Among the 31 sesquiterpenes detected, 24 have been tentatively identified, by comparison of the linear retention indices on two capillary columns of different polarities and mass spectra with those reported in the literature. The total concentration of the sesquiterpenes in the oils analyzed ranged from about 2 to 37 ppm. Among the sesquiterpenes the more abundant were alpha-farnesene, alpha-copaene, eremophyllene, and alpha-muurolene. The alkenes present in the hydrocarbon fraction were isolated by TLC AgNO3 and characterized by GC-MS of their dimethyl disulfide derivatives. The series of n-Delta9-alkenes from C22 to C27, 8-heptadecene, and 6,10-dimethyl-1-undecene were detected. Among the n-alkanes, those with an odd number of carbon atoms predominated in all of the analyzed oils, the most common being C23, C25, C27, and C29. The concentration of the n-alkenes ranged from about 0.5 to 2 ppm, whereas for the n-alkanes the range was from 30 to 177 ppm.

  12. 40 CFR 721.785 - Halogenated alkane aromatic compound (generic name).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Halogenated alkane aromatic compound... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.785 Halogenated alkane aromatic compound (generic name). (a) Chemical... as a halogenated alkane aromatic compound (PMN P-94-1747) is subject to reporting under this...

  13. 40 CFR 721.785 - Halogenated alkane aromatic compound (generic name).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Halogenated alkane aromatic compound... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.785 Halogenated alkane aromatic compound (generic name). (a) Chemical... as a halogenated alkane aromatic compound (PMN P-94-1747) is subject to reporting under this...

  14. 40 CFR 721.785 - Halogenated alkane aromatic compound (generic name).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Halogenated alkane aromatic compound... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.785 Halogenated alkane aromatic compound (generic name). (a) Chemical... as a halogenated alkane aromatic compound (PMN P-94-1747) is subject to reporting under this...

  15. 40 CFR 721.785 - Halogenated alkane aromatic compound (generic name).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Halogenated alkane aromatic compound... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.785 Halogenated alkane aromatic compound (generic name). (a) Chemical... as a halogenated alkane aromatic compound (PMN P-94-1747) is subject to reporting under this...

  16. Cobalt-catalyzed C-H olefination of aromatics with unactivated alkenes.

    PubMed

    Manoharan, Ramasamy; Sivakumar, Ganesan; Jeganmohan, Masilamani

    2016-08-18

    A cobalt-catalyzed C-H olefination of aromatic and heteroaromatic amides with unactivated alkenes, allyl acetates and allyl alcohols is described. This method offers an efficient route for the synthesis of vinyl and allyl benzamides in a highly stereoselective manner. It is observed that the ortho substituent on the benzamide moiety is crucial for the observation of allylated products in unactivated alkenes.

  17. Laboratory spectroscopic analyses of electron irradiated alkanes and alkenes in solar system ices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hand, K. P.; Carlson, R. W.

    2012-03-01

    We report results from laboratory experiments of 10 keV electron irradiation of thin ice films of water and short-chain hydrocarbons at ˜10-8 Torr and temperatures ranging from 70-100 K. Hydrocarbon mixtures include water with C3H8, C3H6, C4H10 (butane and isobutane), and C4H8, (1-butene and cis/trans-2-butene). The double bonds of the alkenes in our initial mixtures were rapidly destroyed or converted to single carbon bonds, covalent bonds with hydrogen, bonds with -OH (hydroxyl), bonds with oxygen (C-O), or double bonds with oxygen (carbonyl). Spectra resulting from irradiation of alkane and alkene ices are largely indistinguishable; the initial differences in film composition are destroyed and the resulting mixture includes long-chain, branched aliphatics, aldehydes, ketones, esters, and alcohols. Methane was observed as a product during radiolysis but CO was largely absent. We find that while some of the carbon is oxidized and lost to CO2 formation, some carbon is sequestered into highly refractory, long-chain aliphatic compounds that remain as a thin residue even after the ice film has been raised to standard temperature and pressure. We conclude that the high availability of hydrogen in our experiments leads to the formation of the formyl radical which then serves as the precursor for formaldehyde and polymerization of longer hydrocarbon chains.

  18. Products and Kinetics of the Reactions of an Alkane Monolayer and a Terminal Alkene Monolayer with NO₃ Radicals

    SciTech Connect

    Gross, Simone; Bertram, Allan K.

    2009-01-27

    The reactions of an alkanethiol and a terminal alkenethiol self-assembled monolayer with NO₃ radicals (in the presence of NO₂ and O₂) were studied. For the alkane monolayer, infrared (IR) spectroscopy and time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (ToF-SIMS) confirmed the formation of organonitrates (RONO₂). The observation of organonitrates is in contrast to the recent X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) data, which showed very little nitrogen-containing surface species. The identification of organonitrates may help explain why significant volatilization of the organic chain was not observed in recent studies of alkane monolayer oxidation by NO₃ radicals. The reactive uptake coefficient (g) of NO₃ on alkene monolayers determined in our study is higher than the values obtained in a recent study using liquid and solid alkene bulk films. A possible reason for this difference may be the location of the double bond at the interface. Using the g value determined in our studies, we show that under conditions where NO₃ is high the lifetime of an alkene monolayer in the atmosphere may be short (approximately 20 min). XPS, IR, and ToF-SIMS were used to identify surface functional groups after the oxidation of the alkene monolayers by NO₃. The results are consistent with the formation of C-O, aldehyde/ketone, carboxylic groups, and nitrogen containing species.

  19. Recent advances in the ruthenium-catalyzed hydroarylation of alkynes with aromatics: synthesis of trisubstituted alkenes.

    PubMed

    Manikandan, Rajendran; Jeganmohan, Masilamani

    2015-11-14

    The hydroarylation of alkynes with substituted aromatics in the presence of a metal catalyst via chelation-assisted C-H bond activation is a powerful method to synthesize trisubstituted alkenes. Chelation-assisted C-H bond activation can be done by two ways: (a) an oxidative addition pathway and (b) a deprotonation pathway. Generally, a mixture of cis and trans stereoisomeric as well as regioisomeric trisubstituted alkenes was observed in an oxidative addition pathway. In the deprotonation pathway, the hydroarylation reaction can be done in a highly regio- and stereoselective manner, and enables preparation of the expected trisubstituted alkenes in a highly selective manner. Generally, ruthenium, rhodium and cobalt complexes are used as catalysts in the reaction. In this review, a ruthenium-catalyzed hydroarylation of alkynes with substituted aromatics is covered completely. The hydroarylation reaction of alkynes with amide, azole, carbamate, phosphine oxide, amine, acetyl, sulfoxide and sulphur directed aromatics is discussed.

  20. Chronic toxicity of a mixture of chlorinated alkanes and alkenes in ICR mice.

    PubMed

    Wang, Fun-In; Kuo, Min-Liang; Shun, Chia-Tung; Ma, Yee-Chung; Wang, Jung-Der; Ueng, Tzuu-Huei

    2002-02-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the chronic toxicity of a mixture of chlorinated alkanes and alkenes (CA) consisting of chloroform, 1,1-dichloroethane, 1,1-dichloroethylene, 1,1,1-trichloroethane, trichloroethylene, and tetrachloroethylene. These chlorinated organic solvents were present in the underground water near an electronic appliances manufactory in Taoyuan, Taiwan. Male and female weanling ICR mice were treated with low-, medium-, and high-dose CA mixtures in drinking water for 16 and 18 mo, respectively. A significant number of male mice treated with the high-dose CA mixture developed tail alopecia and deformation, which was not prominent in CA-treated female mice. Medium- and high-dose CA mixtures induced marginal increases of liver and lung weights, blood urea nitrogen, and serum creatinine levels in male mice. In female mice, the high-dose CA mixture increased liver, kidney, and uterus and ovary total weights, without affecting serum biochemistry parameters. CA mixtures had no effects on the total glutathione content or the level of glutathione S-transferase activity in the livers and kid- neys of male and female mice. Treatments with CA mixtures produced a trend of increasing frequency of hepatocelluar neoplasms in male mice, compared to male and female controls and CA-treated female mice. The high-dose CA mixture induced a significantly higher incidence of mammary adenocarcinoma in female mice. The calculated odds ratios of mammary adenocarcinoma in female mice induced by low-, medium-, and high-dose CA mixtures were 1.14, 1.37, and 3.53 times that of the controls, respectively. The low-dose CA mixture induced a higher incidence of cysts and inflammation in and around the ovaries. This study has demonstrated that the CA mixture is a potential carcinogen to male and female mice. These animal toxicology data may be important in assessing the health effects of individuals exposed to the CA mixture.

  1. Inhibitory Potency of 4-Carbon Alkanes and Alkenes toward CYP2E1 Activity

    PubMed Central

    Hartman, Jessica H.; Miller, Grover P.; Boysen, Gunnar

    2016-01-01

    CYP2E1 has been implicated in the bioactivation of many small molecules into reactive metabolites which form adducts with proteins and DNA, and thus a better understanding of the molecular determinants of its selectivity are critical for accurate toxicological predictions. In this study, we determined the potency of inhibition of human CYP2E1 for various 4-carbon alkanes, alkenes and alcohols. In addition, known CYP2E1 substrates and inhibitors including 4-methylpyrazole, aniline, and dimethylnitrosamine were included to determine their relative potencies. Of the 1,3-butadiene-derived metabolites studied, 3,4-epoxy-1-butene was the strongest inhibitor with an IC50 of 110 μM compared to 1700 μM and 6600 μM for 1,2-butenediol and 1,2:3,4-diepoxybutane, respectively. Compared to known inhibitors, inhibitory potency of 3,4-epoxy-1-butene is between 4-methylpyrazole (IC50 = 1.8 μM) and dimethylnitrosamine (IC50 = 230 μM). All three butadiene metabolites inhibit CYP2E1 activity through a simple competitive mechanism. Among the 4-carbon compounds studied, the presence and location of polar groups seems to influence inhibitory potency. To further examine this notion, the investigation was extended to include structurally and chemically similar analogs, including propylene oxide and various butane alcohols. Those results demonstrated preferential recognition of CYP2E1 toward the type and location of polar and hydrophobic structural elements. Taken together, CYP2E1 metabolism may be modified in vivo by exposure to 4-carbon compounds, such as drugs, and nutritional constituents, a finding that highlights the complexity of exposure to mixtures. PMID:24561005

  2. Stable hydrogen and carbon isotopic compositions of long-chain (C21-C33) n-alkanes and n-alkenes in insects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chikaraishi, Yoshito; Kaneko, Masanori; Ohkouchi, Naohiko

    2012-10-01

    We report the molecular and stable isotopic (δD and δ13C) compositions of long-chain n-alkanes in common insects including the cabbage butterfly, swallowtail, wasp, hornet, grasshopper, and ladybug. Insect n-alkanes are potential candidates of the contamination of soil and sedimentary n-alkanes that are believed to be derived from vascular plant waxes. Long-chain n-alkanes (range C21-33; maximum C23-C29) are found to be abundant in the insects (31-781 μg/dry g), with a carbon preference index (CPI) of 5.1-31.5 and an average chain length (ACL) of 24.9-29.3. The isotopic compositions (mean ± 1σ, n = 33) of the n-alkanes are -195 ± 16‰ for hydrogen and -30.6 ± 2.4‰ for carbon. The insect n-alkanes are depleted in D by approximately 30-40‰ compared with wax n-alkanes from C3 (-155 ± 25‰) and C4 vascular plants (-167 ± 13‰), whereas their δ13C values fall between those of C3 (-36.2 ± 2.4‰) and C4 plants (-20.3 ± 2.4‰). Thus, the contribution of insect-derived n-alkanes to soil and sediment could potentially shift δD records of n-alkanes toward more negative values and potentially muddle the assumed original C3/C4 balance in the δ13C records of the soil and sedimentary n-alkanes. n-Alkenes are also found in three insects (swallowtail, wasp and hornet). They are more depleted in D relative to the same carbon numbered n-alkanes (δDn-alkene - δDn-alkane = -17 ± 16‰), but the δ13C values are almost identical to those of the n-alkanes (δ13Cn-alkene - δ13Cn-alkane = 0.1 ± 0.2‰). These results suggest that these n-alkenes are desaturated products of the same carbon numbered n-alkanes.

  3. Reprint of "Stable hydrogen and carbon isotopic compositions of long-chain (C21-C33) n-alkanes and n-alkenes in insects"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chikaraishi, Yoshito; Kaneko, Masanori; Ohkouchi, Naohiko

    2013-06-01

    We report the molecular and stable isotopic (δD and δ13C) compositions of long-chain n-alkanes in common insects including the cabbage butterfly, swallowtail, wasp, hornet, grasshopper, and ladybug. Insect n-alkanes are potential candidates of the contamination of soil and sedimentary n-alkanes that are believed to be derived from vascular plant waxes. Long-chain n-alkanes (range C21-33; maximum C23-C29) are found to be abundant in the insects (31-781 μg/dry g), with a carbon preference index (CPI) of 5.1-31.5 and an average chain length (ACL) of 24.9-29.3. The isotopic compositions (mean ± 1σ, n = 33) of the n-alkanes are -195 ± 16‰ for hydrogen and -30.6 ± 2.4‰ for carbon. The insect n-alkanes are depleted in D by approximately 30-40‰ compared with wax n-alkanes from C3 (-155 ± 25‰) and C4 vascular plants (-167 ± 13‰), whereas their δ13C values fall between those of C3 (-36.2 ± 2.4‰) and C4 plants (-20.3 ± 2.4‰). Thus, the contribution of insect-derived n-alkanes to soil and sediment could potentially shift δD records of n-alkanes toward more negative values and potentially muddle the assumed original C3/C4 balance in the δ13C records of the soil and sedimentary n-alkanes. n-Alkenes are also found in three insects (swallowtail, wasp and hornet). They are more depleted in D relative to the same carbon numbered n-alkanes (δDn-alkene - δDn-alkane = -17 ± 16‰), but the δ13C values are almost identical to those of the n-alkanes (δ13Cn-alkene - δ13Cn-alkane = 0.1 ± 0.2‰). These results suggest that these n-alkenes are desaturated products of the same carbon numbered n-alkanes.

  4. Modeling the Role of Alkanes, Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons, and Their Oligomers in Secondary Organic Aerosol Formation

    EPA Science Inventory

    A computationally efficient method to treat secondary organic aerosol (SOA) from various length and structure alkanes as well as SOA from polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) is implemented in the Community Multiscale Air Quality (CMAQ) model to predict aerosol concentrations ...

  5. Gas-Phase Reactions of Doubly Charged Lanthanide Cations with Alkanes and Alkenes. Trends in Metal(2+) Reactivity

    SciTech Connect

    Gibson, John K.; Marcalo, Joaquim; Santos, Marta; Pires de Matos, Antonio; Haire, Richard G.

    2008-12-08

    The gas-phase reactivity of doubly-charged lanthanide cations, Ln2+ (Ln = La, Ce, Pr, Nd, Sm, Eu, Gd, Tb, Dy, Ho, Er, Tm, Yb, Lu), with alkanes (methane, ethane, propane, n-butane) and alkenes (ethene, propene, 1-butene) was studied by Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry. The reaction products consisted of different combinations of doubly-charged organometallic ions?adducts or species formed via metal-ion-induced hydrogen, dihydrogen, alkyl, or alkane eliminations from the hydrocarbons?and singly-charged ions that resulted from electron, hydride, or methide transfers from the hydrocarbons to the metal ions. The only lanthanide cations capable of activating the hydrocarbons to form doubly-charged organometallic ions were La2+, Ce2+, Gd2+, and Tb2+, which have ground-state or low-lying d1 electronic configurations. Lu2+, with an accessible d1 electronic configuration but a rather high electron affinity, reacted only through transfer channels. The remaining Ln2+ reacted via transfer channels or adduct formation. The different accessibilities of d1 electronic configurations and the range of electron affinities of the Ln2+ cations allowed for a detailed analysis of the trends for metal(2+) reactivity and the conditions for occurrence of bond activation, adduct formation, and electron, hydride, and methide transfers.

  6. Implications of carbon isotope ratios of C27-C33 alkanes and C37 alkenes for the sources of organic matter in the southern ocean surface sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohkouchi, N.; Kawamura, K.; Takemoto, N.; Ikehara, M.; Nakatsuka, T.

    2000-01-01

    Carbon isotopic ratios (δ13C) of C27-C33 n-alkanes and C37 alkenes were measured in the surface sediments from Australian sector of Southern Ocean (47.6°-65.5°S). The δ13C of C31 n-alkane derived from higher plant wax shows little change along the latitude (-28.7±0.6 ‰), whereas δ13C of C37 alkenes derived from haptophyte algae decreases from -24.6±0.7 ‰ at 47.6°S to -32.1±1.2 ‰ at 63.9°S. Relatively heavy δ13C values of C31 n-alkane suggest significant contribution of C4 plant waxes or conifer resin whose δ13C of n-alkanes are significantly heavier than those of C3 plants. The δ13C of total organic carbon exhibits a latitudinal pattern similar to that of C37 alkenes, suggesting that organic carbon in the sediments is primarily of marine origin.

  7. Iridium complexes of new NCP pincer ligands: catalytic alkane dehydrogenation and alkene isomerization.

    PubMed

    Jia, Xiangqing; Zhang, Lei; Qin, Chuan; Leng, Xuebing; Huang, Zheng

    2014-09-28

    Iridium complexes of novel NCP pincer ligands containing pyridine and phosphinite arms have been synthesized. One Ir complex shows good catalytic activity for alkane dehydrogenation, and all complexes are highly active for olefin isomerization. A combination of the Ir complex and a (PNN)Fe pincer complex catalyzes the formation of linear alkylboronates selectively from internal olefins via sequential olefin isomerization-hydroboration.

  8. Optimization of H3O+/O2+ Dual-mode Ionization in PTR-MS for Simultaneous Detection of Alkanes, Olefins and Aromatic Compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amador-Muñoz, O.; Misztal, P. K.; Weber, R.; Drozd, G.; Worton, D. R.; Goldstein, A. H.

    2014-12-01

    Measurements of VOC composition from fossil fuels are analytically challenging because of the complex mixture of hydrocarbons (saturated, unsaturated, aromatics, etc). Speciated chemical measurements typically rely on relatively slow GC separation. Proton transfer reaction mass spectrometry (PTR-MS) is advantageous due to its fast response and high sensitivity. The most common ionization mechanism applied to VOC detection by PTR-MS is proton transfer from hydronium ion (H3O+). However, alkanes cannot be detected using H3O+ ionization chemistry because their proton affinities are too low. Ionization of alkanes is possible via electron transfer and/or hydride abstraction using O2+ or NO+. We used PTR-MS to analyze aromatic, alkene and alkane (linear, branched and cyclic) compounds simultaneously not by switching the ionization agents, but by adjusting the drift tube voltage and optimizing the ratio of H3O+/O2+ produced in the instrument's ion source. The highest detection sensitivity for aromatic and alkene compounds was produced by proton transfer from H3O+, while hydride abstraction by O2+ allowed detection of alkanes. For alkanes, sensitivities ranged from 1.1±0.01 cps/ppbv for n-decane to 74.7±0.25 cps/ppbv for decalin. Sensitivities in O2+ mode were from 6 (Adamantane) to 146 (4-Methyl nonane) times higher than those obtained in H3O+ mode under the same ion source and drift tube voltage conditions. Sensitivities for butyl benzene and 1-decene were 157±0.57 and 66.8±0.21 cps/ppbv, respectively. Sensitivity differences among C10 hydrocarbons are related to their structure, which affects their ionization energies (IE) and hence ease of hydride abstraction. Sensitivities at the parent ion mass were inversely correlated with IE (142 cps/ppbv/eV). This suggests higher electronic stability for cyclic non substituted compounds, followed by cyclic substituted, branch linear and linear C10 hydrocarbons. Although selectivity is a known shortcoming of quadrupole

  9. Iridium complexes of new NCP pincer ligands: catalytic alkane dehydrogenation and alkene isomerization.

    PubMed

    Jia, Xiangqing; Zhang, Lei; Qin, Chuan; Leng, Xuebing; Huang, Zheng

    2014-09-28

    Iridium complexes of novel NCP pincer ligands containing pyridine and phosphinite arms have been synthesized. One Ir complex shows good catalytic activity for alkane dehydrogenation, and all complexes are highly active for olefin isomerization. A combination of the Ir complex and a (PNN)Fe pincer complex catalyzes the formation of linear alkylboronates selectively from internal olefins via sequential olefin isomerization-hydroboration. PMID:25101950

  10. The role of minerals in the thermal alteration of organic matter. IV - Generation of n-alkanes, acyclic isoprenoids, and alkenes in laboratory experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huizinga, Bradley J.; Tannenbaum, Eli; Kaplan, Isaac R.

    1987-01-01

    The effect of common sedimentary minerals (illite, Na-montmorillonite, or calcite) under different water concentrations on the generation and release of n-alkanes, acyclic isoprenoids, and select alkenes from oil-prone kerogens was investigated. Matrices containing Green River Formation kerogen or Monterey Formation kerogen, alone or in the presence of minerals, were heated at 200 or 300 C for periods of up to 1000 hours, and the pyrolysis products were analyzed. The influence of the first two clay minerals was found to be critically dependent on the water content. Under the dry pyrolysis conditions, both minerals significantly reduced alkene formation; the C12+ n-alkanes and acyclic isoprenoids were mostly destroyed by montmorillonite, but underwent only minor alteration with illite. Under hydrous conditions (mineral/water of 2/1), the effects of both minerals were substantially reduced. Calcite had no significant effect on the thermal evolution of the hydrocarbons.

  11. Degradation of Hydrocarbons by Members of the Genus Candida II. Oxidation of n-Alkanes and 1-Alkenes by Candida lipolytica

    PubMed Central

    Klug, M. J.; Markovetz, A. J.

    1967-01-01

    Candida lipolytica ATCC 8661 was grown in a mineral-salts hydrocarbon medium. n-Alkanes and 1-alkenes with 14 through 18 carbon atoms were used as substrates. Ether extracts of culture fluids and cells obtained from cultures grown on the various substrates were analyzed by thin-layer and gas-liquid chromatography. Analyses of fluids from cultures grown on n-alkanes indicated a predominance of fatty acids and alcohols of the same chain length as the substrate. In addition, numerous other fatty acids and alcohols were present. Analyses of saponifiable and nonsaponifiable material obtained from the cells revealed essentially the same products. The presence of primary and secondary alcohols, as well as fatty acids, of the same chain length as the n-alkane substrate suggested that attack on both the methyl and α-methylene group was occurring. The significance of these two mechanisms in the degradation of n-alkanes by this organism was not evident from the data presented. Analyses of fluids from cultures grown on 1-alkenes indicated the presence of 1,2-diols, as well as ω-unsaturated fatty acids, of the same chain length as the substrate. Alcohols present were all unsaturated. Saponifiable and nonsaponifiable material obtained from cells contained essentially the same products. The presence of 1,2-diols and ω-unsaturated fatty acids of the same chain length as the substrate from cultures grown on 1-alkenes indicated that both the terminal methyl group and the terminal double bond were being attacked. PMID:6025303

  12. Copper-Catalyzed Oxidative Dehydrogenative Carboxylation of Unactivated Alkanes to Allylic Esters via Alkenes

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    We report copper-catalyzed oxidative dehydrogenative carboxylation (ODC) of unactivated alkanes with various substituted benzoic acids to produce the corresponding allylic esters. Spectroscopic studies (EPR, UV–vis) revealed that the resting state of the catalyst is [(BPI)Cu(O2CPh)] (1-O2CPh), formed from [(BPI)Cu(PPh3)2], oxidant, and benzoic acid. Catalytic and stoichiometric reactions of 1-O2CPh with alkyl radicals and radical probes imply that C–H bond cleavage occurs by a tert-butoxy radical. In addition, the deuterium kinetic isotope effect from reactions of cyclohexane and d12-cyclohexane in separate vessels showed that the turnover-limiting step for the ODC of cyclohexane is C–H bond cleavage. To understand the origin of the difference in products formed from copper-catalyzed amidation and copper-catalyzed ODC, reactions of an alkyl radical with a series of copper–carboxylate, copper–amidate, and copper–imidate complexes were performed. The results of competition experiments revealed that the relative rate of reaction of alkyl radicals with the copper complexes follows the trend Cu(II)–amidate > Cu(II)–imidate > Cu(II)–benzoate. Consistent with this trend, Cu(II)–amidates and Cu(II)–benzoates containing more electron-rich aryl groups on the benzamidate and benzoate react faster with the alkyl radical than do those with more electron-poor aryl groups on these ligands to produce the corresponding products. These data on the ODC of cyclohexane led to preliminary investigation of copper-catalyzed oxidative dehydrogenative amination of cyclohexane to generate a mixture of N-alkyl and N-allylic products. PMID:25389772

  13. Copper-catalyzed oxidative dehydrogenative carboxylation of unactivated alkanes to allylic esters via alkenes.

    PubMed

    Tran, Ba L; Driess, Matthias; Hartwig, John F

    2014-12-10

    We report copper-catalyzed oxidative dehydrogenative carboxylation (ODC) of unactivated alkanes with various substituted benzoic acids to produce the corresponding allylic esters. Spectroscopic studies (EPR, UV-vis) revealed that the resting state of the catalyst is [(BPI)Cu(O2CPh)] (1-O2CPh), formed from [(BPI)Cu(PPh3)2], oxidant, and benzoic acid. Catalytic and stoichiometric reactions of 1-O2CPh with alkyl radicals and radical probes imply that C-H bond cleavage occurs by a tert-butoxy radical. In addition, the deuterium kinetic isotope effect from reactions of cyclohexane and d12-cyclohexane in separate vessels showed that the turnover-limiting step for the ODC of cyclohexane is C-H bond cleavage. To understand the origin of the difference in products formed from copper-catalyzed amidation and copper-catalyzed ODC, reactions of an alkyl radical with a series of copper-carboxylate, copper-amidate, and copper-imidate complexes were performed. The results of competition experiments revealed that the relative rate of reaction of alkyl radicals with the copper complexes follows the trend Cu(II)-amidate > Cu(II)-imidate > Cu(II)-benzoate. Consistent with this trend, Cu(II)-amidates and Cu(II)-benzoates containing more electron-rich aryl groups on the benzamidate and benzoate react faster with the alkyl radical than do those with more electron-poor aryl groups on these ligands to produce the corresponding products. These data on the ODC of cyclohexane led to preliminary investigation of copper-catalyzed oxidative dehydrogenative amination of cyclohexane to generate a mixture of N-alkyl and N-allylic products. PMID:25389772

  14. Equilibrium 2H/ 1H fractionations in organic molecules. II: Linear alkanes, alkenes, ketones, carboxylic acids, esters, alcohols and ethers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Ying; Sessions, Alex L.; Nielsen, Robert J.; Goddard, William A., III

    2009-12-01

    Equilibrium 2H/ 1H fractionation factors (α eq) for various H positions in alkanes, alkenes, ketones, carboxylic acids, esters, alcohols, and ethers were calculated between 0 and 100 °C using vibrational frequencies from ab initio QM calculations (B3LYP/6-311G**). Results were then corrected using a temperature-dependent linear calibration curve based on experimental data for H α in ketones ( Wang et al., 2009). The total uncertainty in reported α eq values is estimated at 10-20‰. The effects of functional groups were found to increase the value of α eq for H next to electron-donating groups, e.g. sbnd OR, sbnd OH or sbnd O(C dbnd O)R, and to decrease the value of α eq for H next to electron-withdrawing groups, e.g. sbnd (C dbnd O)R or sbnd (C dbnd O)OR. Smaller but significant functional group effects are also observed for H β and sometimes H γ. By summing over individual H positions, we estimate the equilibrium fractionation relative to water to be -90‰ to -70‰ for n-alkanes and around -100‰ for pristane and phytane. The temperature dependence of these fractionations is very weak between 0 and 100 °C. Our estimates of α eq agree well with field data for thermally mature hydrocarbons (δ 2H values between -80‰ and -110‰ relative to water). Therefore the observed δ 2H increase of individual hydrocarbons and the disappearance of the biosynthetic δ 2H offset between n-alkyl and linear isoprenoid lipids during maturation of organic matter can be confidently attributed to H exchange towards an equilibrium state. Our results also indicate that many n-alkyl lipids are biosynthesized with δ 2H values that are close to equilibrium with water. In these cases, constant down-core δ 2H values for n-alkyl lipids cannot be reliably used to infer a lack of isotopic exchange.

  15. 40 CFR 721.785 - Halogenated alkane aromatic compound (generic name).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... (CONTINUED) TOXIC SUBSTANCES CONTROL ACT SIGNIFICANT NEW USES OF CHEMICAL SUBSTANCES Significant New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.785 Halogenated alkane aromatic compound (generic name). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified...

  16. Modeling SOA formation from alkanes and alkenes in chamber experiments: effect of gas/wall partitioning of organic vapors.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stéphanie La, Yuyi; Camredon, Marie; Ziemann, Paul; Ouzebidour, Farida; Valorso, Richard; Madronich, Sasha; Lee-Taylor, Julia; Hodzic, Alma; Aumont, Bernard

    2014-05-01

    Oxidation products of Intermediate Volatility Organic Compounds (IVOC) are expected to be the major precursors of secondary organic aerosols (SOA). Laboratory experiments were conducted this last decade in the Riverside APRC chamber to study IVOC oxidative mechanisms and SOA formation processes for a large set of linear, branched and cyclic aliphatic hydrocarbons (Ziemann, 2011). This dataset are used here to assess the explicit oxidation model GECKO-A (Generator for Explicit Chemistry and Kinetics of Organics in the Atmosphere) (Aumont et al., 2005). The simulated SOA yields agree with the general trends observed in the chamber experiments. They are (i) increasing with the increasing carbon number; (ii) decreasing with increasing methyl branch number; and (iii) increasing for cyclic compounds compared to their corresponding linear analogues. However, simulated SOA yields are systematically overestimated regardless of the precursors, suggesting missing processes in the model. In this study, we assess whether gas-to-wall partitioning of organic vapors can explain these model/observation mismatches (Matsunaga and Ziemann, 2010). First results show that GECKO-A outputs better match the observations when wall uptake of organic vapors is taken into account. Effects of gas/wall partitioning on SOA yields and composition will be presented. Preliminary results suggest that wall uptake is a major process influencing SOA production in the Teflon chambers. References Aumont, B., Szopa, S., Madronich, S.: Modelling the evolution of organic carbon during its gas-phase tropospheric oxidation: development of an explicit model based on a self generating approach. Atmos.Chem.Phys., 5, 2497-2517 (2005). P. J. Ziemann: Effects of molecular structure on the chemistry of aerosol formation from the OH-radical-initiated oxidation of alkanes and alkenes, Int. Rev.Phys.Chem., 30:2, 161-195 (2011). Matsunaga, A., Ziemann, P. J.: Gas-wall partitioning of organic compounds in a Teflon film

  17. Emission measurements of alkenes, alkanes, SO2, and NO2 from stationary sources in Southeast Texas over a 5 year period using SOF and mobile DOAS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johansson, John K. E.; Mellqvist, Johan; Samuelsson, Jerker; Offerle, Brian; Lefer, Barry; Rappenglück, Bernhard; Flynn, James; Yarwood, Greg

    2014-02-01

    A mobile platform for flux measurements of VOCs (alkanes and alkenes), SO2, and NO2 emissions using the Solar Occultation Flux (SOF) method and mobile differential optical absorption spectroscopy (DOAS) was used in four different studies to measure industrial emissions. The studies were carried out in several large conglomerates of oil refineries and petrochemical industries in Southeast and East Texas in 2006, 2009, 2011, and 2012. The measured alkane emissions from the Houston Ship Channel (HSC) have been fairly stable between 2006 and 2011, averaging about 11,500 kg/h, while the alkene emissions have shown greater variations. The ethene and propene emissions measured from the HSC were 1511 kg/h and 878 kg/h, respectively, in 2006, while dropping to roughly 600 kg/h for both species in 2009 and 2011. The results were compared to annual inventory emissions, showing that measured VOC emissions were typically 5-15 times higher, while for SO2 and NO2 the ratio was typically 0.5-2. AP-42 emission factors were used to estimate meteorological effects on alkane emissions from tanks, showing that these emissions may have been up to 35-45% higher during the studies than the annual average. A more focused study of alkene emissions from a petrochemical complex in Longview in 2012 identified two upset episodes, and the elevation of the total emissions during the measurement period due to the upsets was estimated to be approximately 20%. Both meteorological and upset effects were small compared to the factor of 5-15, suggesting that VOC emissions are systematically and substantially underestimated in current emission inventories.

  18. Ozonolysis of surface adsorbed methoxyphenols: kinetics of aromatic ring cleavage vs. alkene side-chain oxidation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Neill, E. M.; Kawam, A. Z.; Van Ry, D. A.; Hinrichs, R. Z.

    2013-07-01

    Lignin pyrolysis products, which include a variety of substituted methoxyphenols, constitute a major component of organics released by biomass combustion and may play a central role in the formation of atmospheric brown carbon. Understanding the atmospheric fate of these compounds upon exposure to trace gases is therefore critical to predicting the chemical and physical properties of biomass burning aerosol. We used diffuse reflectance infrared spectroscopy to monitor the heterogeneous ozonolysis of 4-propylguaiacol, eugenol, and isoeugenol adsorbed on NaCl and α-Al2O3 substrates. Adsorption of gaseous methoxyphenols onto these substrates produced near monolayer surface concentrations of 3 × 1018 molecules m-2. The subsequent dark heterogeneous ozonolysis of adsorbed 4-propylguaiacol cleaved the aromatic ring between the methoxy and phenol groups with the product conclusively identified by GC-MS and 1H-NMR. Kinetic analysis of eugenol and isoeugenol dark ozonolysis also suggested the formation of ring-cleaved products, although ozonolysis of the unsaturated substituent groups forming carboxylic acids and aldehydes was an order of magnitude faster. Average uptake coefficients for NaCl-adsorbed methoxyphenols were γ = 2.3 (±0.8) × 10-7 and 2 (±1) × 10-6 for ozonolysis of the aromatic ring and the unsaturated side chain, respectively, and reactions on α-Al2O3 were approximately two times slower. UV-visible radiation (λ>300 nm) enhanced eugenol ozonolysis of the aromatic ring by a factor of 4(±1) but had no effect on ozonolysis of the alkene side-chain.

  19. Impact of chamber wall loss of gaseous organic compounds on secondary organic aerosol formation: explicit modeling of SOA formation from alkane and alkene oxidation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    La, Y. S.; Camredon, M.; Ziemann, P. J.; Valorso, R.; Matsunaga, A.; Lannuque, V.; Lee-Taylor, J.; Hodzic, A.; Madronich, S.; Aumont, B.

    2016-02-01

    Recent studies have shown that low volatility gas-phase species can be lost onto the smog chamber wall surfaces. Although this loss of organic vapors to walls could be substantial during experiments, its effect on secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formation has not been well characterized and quantified yet. Here the potential impact of chamber walls on the loss of gaseous organic species and SOA formation has been explored using the Generator for Explicit Chemistry and Kinetics of the Organics in the Atmosphere (GECKO-A) modeling tool, which explicitly represents SOA formation and gas-wall partitioning. The model was compared with 41 smog chamber experiments of SOA formation under OH oxidation of alkane and alkene series (linear, cyclic and C12-branched alkanes and terminal, internal and 2-methyl alkenes with 7 to 17 carbon atoms) under high NOx conditions. Simulated trends match observed trends within and between homologous series. The loss of organic vapors to the chamber walls is found to affect SOA yields as well as the composition of the gas and the particle phases. Simulated distributions of the species in various phases suggest that nitrates, hydroxynitrates and carbonylesters could substantially be lost onto walls. The extent of this process depends on the rate of gas-wall mass transfer, the vapor pressure of the species and the duration of the experiments. This work suggests that SOA yields inferred from chamber experiments could be underestimated up a factor of 2 due to the loss of organic vapors to chamber walls.

  20. Impact of chamber wall loss of gaseous organic compounds on secondary organic aerosol formation: explicit modeling of SOA formation from alkane and alkene oxidation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    La, Y. S.; Camredon, M.; Ziemann, P. J.; Valorso, R.; Matsunaga, A.; Lannuque, V.; Lee-Taylor, J.; Hodzic, A.; Madronich, S.; Aumont, B.

    2015-09-01

    Recent studies have shown that low volatility gas-phase species can be lost onto the smog chamber wall surfaces. Although this loss of organic vapors to walls could be substantial during experiments, its effect on secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formation has not been well characterized and quantified yet. Here the potential impact of chamber walls on the loss of gaseous organic species and SOA formation has been explored using the Generator for Explicit Chemistry and Kinetics of the Organics in the Atmosphere (GECKO-A) modeling tool which explicitly represents SOA formation and gas/wall partitioning. The model was compared with 41 smog chamber experiments of SOA formation under OH oxidation of alkane and alkene series (linear, cyclic and C12-branched alkanes and terminal, internal and 2-methyl alkenes with 7 to 17 carbon atoms) under high NOx conditions. Simulated trends match observed trends within and between homologous series. The loss of organic vapors to the chamber walls is found to affect SOA yields as well as the composition of the gas and the particle phases. Simulated distributions of the species in various phases suggest that nitrates, hydroxynitrates and carbonylesters could substantially be lost onto walls. The extent of this process depends on the rate of gas/wall mass transfer, the vapor pressure of the species and the duration of the experiments. This work suggests that SOA yields inferred from chamber experiments could be underestimated up to 0.35 yield unit due to the loss of organic vapors to chamber walls.

  1. Impact of chamber wall loss of gaseous organic compounds on secondary organic aerosol formation: Explicit modeling of SOA formation from alkane and alkene oxidation

    DOE PAGES

    La, Y. S.; Camredon, M.; Ziemann, P. J.; Valorso, R.; Matsunaga, A.; Lannuque, V.; Lee-Taylor, J.; Hodzic, A.; Madronich, S.; Aumont, B.

    2016-02-08

    Recent studies have shown that low volatility gas-phase species can be lost onto the smog chamber wall surfaces. Although this loss of organic vapors to walls could be substantial during experiments, its effect on secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formation has not been well characterized and quantified yet. Here the potential impact of chamber walls on the loss of gaseous organic species and SOA formation has been explored using the Generator for Explicit Chemistry and Kinetics of the Organics in the Atmosphere (GECKO-A) modeling tool, which explicitly represents SOA formation and gas–wall partitioning. The model was compared with 41 smog chambermore » experiments of SOA formation under OH oxidation of alkane and alkene series (linear, cyclic and C12-branched alkanes and terminal, internal and 2-methyl alkenes with 7 to 17 carbon atoms) under high NOx conditions. Simulated trends match observed trends within and between homologous series. The loss of organic vapors to the chamber walls is found to affect SOA yields as well as the composition of the gas and the particle phases. Simulated distributions of the species in various phases suggest that nitrates, hydroxynitrates and carbonylesters could substantially be lost onto walls. The extent of this process depends on the rate of gas–wall mass transfer, the vapor pressure of the species and the duration of the experiments. Furthermore, this work suggests that SOA yields inferred from chamber experiments could be underestimated up a factor of 2 due to the loss of organic vapors to chamber walls.« less

  2. Properties of Ga-containing pentasils in aromatization of lower alkanes after repeated reaction-regeneration cycles

    SciTech Connect

    Vosmerikov, A.V.; Barbashin, Y.E.; Erofeev, V.I.

    1995-10-20

    Variation of catalytic and acidic properties of gallium-containing zeolite catalysts in aromatization of lower alkanes after several reaction-regeneration cycles has been examined. The catalytic activity only slightly decreases from cycle to cycle, and a relatively large number of oxidative regenerations can be performed.

  3. Thermodiffusion, molecular diffusion and Soret coefficients of aromatic+n-alkane binary mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larrañaga, Miren; Bou-Ali, M. Mounir; Lapeira, Estela; Lizarraga, Ion; Santamaría, Carlos

    2016-10-01

    In the present work, we have measured the thermodiffusion coefficient of 51 binary liquid mixtures at 25 oC. These mixtures correspond to the series of the aromatics toluene and 1-methylnaphthalene with n-alkanes nCi (i = 6, 8, 10, 12, and 14) at different mass fractions in the whole range. For that, we have used the thermogravitational technique. It is shown that the thermodiffusion coefficient is a linear function of the mass fraction in all the mixtures. Extrapolating the lines, we obtain the thermodiffusion coefficient in dilute solutions of n-alkanes for both toluene and 1-methylnaphthalene. These limiting values show a linear dependence with the inverse of the product of the molecular weights. In addition, we have measured the molecular diffusion coefficient of all the mixtures at 0.5 of mass fraction and at 25 oC, by the sliding symmetric tubes technique. It is observed that the product of this coefficient with the viscosity at the same concentrations takes a constant value for each of the series considered. Finally, we have also determined the Soret coefficient of the equimass mixtures by the combination of the measurements of thermodiffusion and molecular diffusion coefficients.

  4. Gas-phase reactions of doubly charged actinide cations with alkanes and alkenes--probing the chemical activity of 5f electrons from Th to Cm.

    PubMed

    Marçalo, Joaquim; Santos, Marta; Gibson, John K

    2011-11-01

    Small alkanes (methane, ethane, propane, n-butane) and alkenes (ethene, propene, 1-butene) were used to probe the gas-phase reactivity of doubly charged actinide cations, An(2+) (An = Th, Pa, U, Np, Pu, Am, Cm), by means of Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry. Different combinations of doubly and singly charged ions were observed as reaction products, comprising species formed via metal-ion induced eliminations of small molecules, simple adducts and ions resulting from electron, hydride or methide transfer channels. Th(2+), Pa(2+), U(2+) and Np(2+) preferentially yielded doubly charged products of hydrocarbon activation, while Pu(2+), Am(2+) and Cm(2+) reacted mainly through transfer channels. Cm(2+) was also capable of forming doubly charged products with some of the hydrocarbons whereas Pu(2+) and Am(2+) were not, these latter two ions conversely being the only for which adduct formation was observed. The product distributions and the reaction efficiencies are discussed in relation to the electronic configurations of the metal ions, the energetics of the reactions and similar studies previously performed with doubly charged lanthanide and transition metal cations. The conditions for hydrocarbon activation to occur as related to the accessibility of electronic configurations with one or two 5f and/or 6d unpaired electrons are examined and the possible chemical activity of the 5f electrons in these early actinide ions, particularly Pa(2+), is considered.

  5. Particulate polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and n-alkanes in recycled paper processing operations.

    PubMed

    Chalbot, Marie-Cecile; Vei, Ino; Lykoudis, Spyros; Kavouras, Ilias G

    2006-09-21

    The aliphatic and polycyclic aromatic fractions of dust collected in the vicinity of recycled paper processing operations were analyzed using gas chromatography/mass spectrometry. Total measured dust concentration (up to 8.73+/-2.02 mg/m3) fluctuated substantially in the different steps of paper manufacture. This was attributed to the type of the operation such as, the release of fibers and particles during paper cutting and the use of reactive chemicals and excessive water under high temperature and pressure during the bleaching and the water rinsing/drying step. Particulate polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) (from fluorene to benzo[ghi]perylene with mean concentrations from 3.8+/-0.5 to 41.4+/-0.4 ng/m3) and the unresolved mixture of branched, cyclic and unsaturated hydrocarbons (UCM) were measured in all samples while, n-alkanes from n-C20 to n-C27, were only observed in cutting and packaging areas (from 180.6+/-18.9 to 4297.9+/-794.9 ng/m3). The profile of occupational PAHs in bleaching and treatment of contaminated recycled raw paper was comparable to that observed for anthropogenic activities. The values of molecular diagnostic ratios indicated the contribution of oil residues and emissions from worklifts and other equipment used for pulp and paper handling. Total benzo[a]pyrene-equivalent (BaP) concentrations of particulate PAHs (varied from 323 up to 1104 pg/m3), provided evidence that workers were exposed to high quantities of PAHs as compared with exposures to urban air and other indoor settings, posing long-term threat to their health. PMID:16704897

  6. Ozonolysis of surface-adsorbed methoxyphenols: kinetics of aromatic ring cleavage vs. alkene side-chain oxidation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Neill, E. M.; Kawam, A. Z.; Van Ry, D. A.; Hinrichs, R. Z.

    2014-01-01

    Lignin pyrolysis products, which include a variety of substituted methoxyphenols, constitute a major component of organics released by biomass combustion, and may play a central role in the formation of atmospheric brown carbon. Understanding the atmospheric fate of these compounds upon exposure to trace gases is therefore critical to predicting the chemical and physical properties of biomass burning aerosol. We used diffuse reflectance infrared spectroscopy to monitor the heterogeneous ozonolysis of 4-propylguaiacol, eugenol, and isoeugenol adsorbed on NaCl and α-Al2O3 substrates. Adsorption of gaseous methoxyphenols onto these substrates produced near-monolayer surface concentrations of 3 × 1018 molecules m-2. The subsequent dark heterogeneous ozonolysis of adsorbed 4-propylguaiacol cleaved the aromatic ring between the methoxy and phenol groups with the product conclusively identified by GC-MS and 1H-NMR. Kinetic analysis of eugenol and isoeugenol dark ozonolysis also suggested the formation of ring-cleaved products, although ozonolysis of the unsaturated substituent groups forming carboxylic acids and aldehydes was an order of magnitude faster. Average uptake coefficients for NaCl-adsorbed methoxyphenols were γ = 2.3 (± 0.8) × 10-7 and 2 (± 1) × 10-6 for ozonolysis of the aromatic ring and the unsaturated side chain, respectively, and reactions on α-Al2O3 were approximately two times slower. UV-visible radiation (λ > 300 nm) enhanced eugenol ozonolysis of the aromatic ring by a factor of 4(± 1) but had no effect on ozonolysis of the alkene side chain.

  7. Particulate n-alkanes, n-alkanoic acids and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in the atmosphere of Algiers City Area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yassaa, Noureddine; Youcef Meklati, Brahim; Cecinato, Angelo; Marino, Fabio

    The concentrations of particulate organic matter were measured from May to September 1998 in urban area of Algiers and in municipal waste landfill of Oued Smar. For the sake of comparability, organic aerosols were also monitored at Montelibretti (Italy) in June of the same year. In addition to n-alkanes and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH), monocarboxylic n-alkanoic acids accounted for a large portion of identified organic compounds of aerosol at both Algerian sites. All these species were more abundant at Oued Smar than in downtown Algiers. At the urban site, concentration levels reached by n-alkanes and PAH highlighted the strong impact of motor vehicle emission resulting over the city area. Instead, at the Oued Smar landfill n-alkane and PAH contents depended upon the nature and account of the wastes burnt, and their behaviours were consistent with a pyrolytic origin. n-Alkanoic acids rather originated from the bacterial activity. By contrast, n-alkanes and n-alkanoic acids at Montelibretti seemed to be released by biogenic sources, whereas PAH presence was related to downwind transport of air parcels from Rome metropolitan area.

  8. SmoXYB1C1Z of Mycobacterium sp. Strain NBB4: a Soluble Methane Monooxygenase (sMMO)-Like Enzyme, Active on C2 to C4 Alkanes and Alkenes

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Kiri E.; Ozsvar, Jazmin

    2014-01-01

    Monooxygenase (MO) enzymes initiate the aerobic oxidation of alkanes and alkenes in bacteria. A cluster of MO genes (smoXYB1C1Z) of thus-far-unknown function was found previously in the genomes of two Mycobacterium strains (NBB3 and NBB4) which grow on hydrocarbons. The predicted Smo enzymes have only moderate amino acid identity (30 to 60%) to their closest homologs, the soluble methane and butane MOs (sMMO and sBMO), and the smo gene cluster has a different organization from those of sMMO and sBMO. The smoXYB1C1Z genes of NBB4 were cloned into pMycoFos to make pSmo, which was transformed into Mycobacterium smegmatis mc2-155. Cells of mc2-155(pSmo) metabolized C2 to C4 alkanes, alkenes, and chlorinated hydrocarbons. The activities of mc2-155(pSmo) cells were 0.94, 0.57, 0.12, and 0.04 nmol/min/mg of protein with ethene, ethane, propane, and butane as substrates, respectively. The mc2-155(pSmo) cells made epoxides from ethene, propene, and 1-butene, confirming that Smo was an oxygenase. Epoxides were not produced from larger alkenes (1-octene and styrene). Vinyl chloride and 1,2-dichloroethane were biodegraded by cells expressing Smo, with production of inorganic chloride. This study shows that Smo is a functional oxygenase which is active against small hydrocarbons. M. smegmatis mc2-155(pSmo) provides a new model for studying sMMO-like monooxygenases. PMID:25015887

  9. SmoXYB1C1Z of Mycobacterium sp. strain NBB4: a soluble methane monooxygenase (sMMO)-like enzyme, active on C2 to C4 alkanes and alkenes.

    PubMed

    Martin, Kiri E; Ozsvar, Jazmin; Coleman, Nicholas V

    2014-09-01

    Monooxygenase (MO) enzymes initiate the aerobic oxidation of alkanes and alkenes in bacteria. A cluster of MO genes (smoXYB1C1Z) of thus-far-unknown function was found previously in the genomes of two Mycobacterium strains (NBB3 and NBB4) which grow on hydrocarbons. The predicted Smo enzymes have only moderate amino acid identity (30 to 60%) to their closest homologs, the soluble methane and butane MOs (sMMO and sBMO), and the smo gene cluster has a different organization from those of sMMO and sBMO. The smoXYB1C1Z genes of NBB4 were cloned into pMycoFos to make pSmo, which was transformed into Mycobacterium smegmatis mc(2)-155. Cells of mc(2)-155(pSmo) metabolized C2 to C4 alkanes, alkenes, and chlorinated hydrocarbons. The activities of mc(2)-155(pSmo) cells were 0.94, 0.57, 0.12, and 0.04 nmol/min/mg of protein with ethene, ethane, propane, and butane as substrates, respectively. The mc(2)-155(pSmo) cells made epoxides from ethene, propene, and 1-butene, confirming that Smo was an oxygenase. Epoxides were not produced from larger alkenes (1-octene and styrene). Vinyl chloride and 1,2-dichloroethane were biodegraded by cells expressing Smo, with production of inorganic chloride. This study shows that Smo is a functional oxygenase which is active against small hydrocarbons. M. smegmatis mc(2)-155(pSmo) provides a new model for studying sMMO-like monooxygenases. PMID:25015887

  10. Isolation and characterization of different bacterial strains for bioremediation of n-alkanes and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons.

    PubMed

    Guermouche M'rassi, A; Bensalah, F; Gury, J; Duran, R

    2015-10-01

    Crude oil is a common environmental pollutant composed of a large number of both aromatic and aliphatic hydrocarbons. Biodegradation is carried out by microbial communities that are important in determining the fate of pollutants in the environment. The intrinsic biodegradability of the hydrocarbons and the distribution in the environment of competent degrading microorganisms are crucial information for the implementation of bioremediation processes. In the present study, the biodegradation capacities of various bacteria toward aliphatic and aromatic hydrocarbons were determined. The purpose of the study was to isolate and characterize hydrocarbon-degrading bacteria from contaminated soil of a refinery in Arzew, Algeria. A collection of 150 bacterial strains was obtained; the bacterial isolates were identified by 16S rRNA gene sequencing and their ability to degrade hydrocarbon compounds characterized. The isolated strains were mainly affiliated to the Gamma-Proteobacteria class. Among them, Pseudomonas spp. had the ability to metabolize high molecular weight hydrocarbon compounds such as pristane (C19) at 35.11 % by strain LGM22 and benzo[a] pyrene (C20) at 33.93 % by strain LGM11. Some strains were able to grow on all the hydrocarbons tested including octadecane, squalene, phenanthrene, and pyrene. Some strains were specialized degrading only few substrates. In contrast, the strain LGM2 designated as Pseudomonas sp. was found able to degrade both linear and branched alkanes as well as low and high poly-aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). The alkB gene involved in alkane degradation was detected in LGM2 and other Pseudomonas-related isolates. The capabilities of the isolated bacterial strains to degrade alkanes and PAHs should be of great practical significance in bioremediation of oil-contaminated environments.

  11. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and n-alkanes in Osilinus attratus from the coast of Tenerife (Canary Islands)

    SciTech Connect

    Pena, E.; Conde, J.E.; Montelongo, F.G.

    1996-12-31

    Anthropogenic compounds, derived from terrestrial and atmospheric sources, are subjected to physical/chemical/biological processes during their residence time in seawater ecosystems. These processes ultimately take part in the distribution and fate of contaminants in marine environments. In this way, sediment and particulate associated contaminants are available to aquatic plants and animals, which can accumulate petrogenic hydrocarbons from the marine environment in their lipid tissues even if pollutants are present at very low concentrations. This paper examines the content of n-alkanes and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in specimens of the marine winkle Osilinus attratus Wood, common and prized as a food. 15 refs., 2 figs., 4 tabs.

  12. Tubular metal-organic framework-based capillary gas chromatography column for separation of alkanes and aromatic positional isomers.

    PubMed

    Fang, Zhi-Li; Zheng, Sheng-Run; Tan, Jing-Bo; Cai, Song-Liang; Fan, Jun; Yan, Xia; Zhang, Wei-Guang

    2013-04-12

    In this work, a tubular metal-organic framework, MOF-CJ3, with a large one-dimensional channel was chosen as stationary phase to prepare a capillary gas chromatographic column via a verified dynamic coating procedure. The column offered good separations of linear and branched alkanes, as well as aromatic positional isomers (ethylbenzene, xylene, cresol, hydroquinone, dichlorobenzene, bromobenzonitrile, chloronitrobenzene, and nitrotoluene) based on a combination of host-guest interactions and adsorption effects. Elution sequence of most of the analytes followed an increasing order of their boiling points, except for the separation of n-heptanes/isooctane, cresol, and hydroquinone isomers. Separation behavior of the column upon different organic substances may be related to the tubular pore structure of MOF-CJ3, in which the van der Waals forces between the alkanes and the hydrophobic inner surfaces might have great effect on separation of n-heptanes and isooctane, whereas the separation of cresol and hydroquinone isomers were affected by (OH⋯O) hydrogen bonds formed between the analytes and the 1,3,5-benzenetricarboxylate ligands on the pore wall. The effects of temperature on separation of aromatic positional isomers were investigated to elucidate entropy and enthalpy controlling of the separation process. PMID:23473507

  13. Tubular metal-organic framework-based capillary gas chromatography column for separation of alkanes and aromatic positional isomers.

    PubMed

    Fang, Zhi-Li; Zheng, Sheng-Run; Tan, Jing-Bo; Cai, Song-Liang; Fan, Jun; Yan, Xia; Zhang, Wei-Guang

    2013-04-12

    In this work, a tubular metal-organic framework, MOF-CJ3, with a large one-dimensional channel was chosen as stationary phase to prepare a capillary gas chromatographic column via a verified dynamic coating procedure. The column offered good separations of linear and branched alkanes, as well as aromatic positional isomers (ethylbenzene, xylene, cresol, hydroquinone, dichlorobenzene, bromobenzonitrile, chloronitrobenzene, and nitrotoluene) based on a combination of host-guest interactions and adsorption effects. Elution sequence of most of the analytes followed an increasing order of their boiling points, except for the separation of n-heptanes/isooctane, cresol, and hydroquinone isomers. Separation behavior of the column upon different organic substances may be related to the tubular pore structure of MOF-CJ3, in which the van der Waals forces between the alkanes and the hydrophobic inner surfaces might have great effect on separation of n-heptanes and isooctane, whereas the separation of cresol and hydroquinone isomers were affected by (OH⋯O) hydrogen bonds formed between the analytes and the 1,3,5-benzenetricarboxylate ligands on the pore wall. The effects of temperature on separation of aromatic positional isomers were investigated to elucidate entropy and enthalpy controlling of the separation process.

  14. Separation of alkanes and aromatic compounds by packed column gas chromatography using functionalized multi-walled carbon nanotubes as stationary phases.

    PubMed

    Speltini, Andrea; Merli, Daniele; Quartarone, Eliana; Profumo, Antonella

    2010-04-23

    In the present work, we show a novel application of pristine and functionalized Multi-Walled Carbon Nanotubes (MWCNTs) as stationary phase in low-cost packed columns for the gas chromatographic separation of alkanes and aromatic hydrocarbons. The MWCNTs were deeply investigated by means of physical and chemical methods, like thermal analysis, IR and atomic force microscopy, and Inverse Gas Chromatography (IGC) in order to correlate the adsorption process and surface properties with the material purity level and functionalization degree. The derivatization process of the pristine nanotubes was a key factor to achieve a successful separation of both the light n-alkanes (C3-C5) and the related isomers (C4-C5 branched alkanes). Satisfactory results were similarly obtained in the case of separation of aromatic hydrocarbons (BTX).

  15. Role of defects in radiation chemistry of crystalline organic materials. 3. Geometrical and electronic structures of alkene radical anion and cation in alkene/n-alkane mixed crystals as studied by ESR spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Matsuura, Kaoru; Muto, Hachizo; Nunome, Keichi )

    1991-11-14

    An ESR study has been made in order to elucidate the electronic structures of alkene radical anions and cations, the former radicals being first detected in the hexene/n-hexene mixed crystals irradiated at 4.2 K along with the cation. The present work extended to the hexene and butene isomers has resulted in evidence that both anions with vinylene and vinylidene groups have pyramidal structures with {sigma}-character, which differ from the planar or twisted structures of corresponding cations. The proton hyperfine couplings of their anions were only about one-third as large as those for the cations: {vert bar}A{vert bar}(two {alpha}-H) = {vert bar}0.45, 0.1, {minus}0.25{vert bar} mT; a (two pairs of {beta}-H) = 1.38 and 0.56 mT for the 3-hexene anion, and a(two {alpha}-H) = 1.3 mT and a(two pairs of {beta}-H) = 4.6 and 2.9 mT for the cation. The differences in the geometrical structures and in the sizes of the proton couplings of the anion and cation radicals were discussed on the basis of a simple molecular orbital calculation. It has been found that the anion is stabilized by admixing {vert bar}2s;C> atomic orbitals (AO) with a lower core integral than {vert bar}2p;C> AO to the unpaired electron orbital and that the small {beta}-proton couplings mainly originate from low extent of hyperconjugation due to a wide energy separation of C{double bond}C {pi}-antibonding and C-H pseudo-{pi}-bonding orbitals.

  16. Alkane, terpene and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon geochemistry of the Mackenzie River and Mackenzie shelf: Riverine contributions to Beaufort Sea coastal sediment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yunker, Mark B.; Macdonald, Robie W.; Cretney, Walter J.; Fowler, Brian R.; McLaughlin, Fiona A.

    1993-07-01

    To study the largest source of river sediment to the Arctic Ocean, we have collected suspended particulates from the Mackenzie River in all seasons and sediments from the Mackenzie shelf between the river mouth and the shelf edge. These samples have been analyzed for alkanes, triterpenes and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). We found that naturally occurring hydrocarbons predominate in the river and on the shelf. These hydrocarbons include biogenic alkanes and triterpenes with a higher plant/peat origin, diagenetic PAHs from peat and plant detritus, petrogenic alkanes, triterpenes and PAHs from oil seeps and/or bitumens and combustion PAHs that are likely relict in peat deposits. Because these components vary independently, the season is found to strongly influence the concentration and composition of hydrocarbons in the Mackenzie River. While essentially the same pattern of alkanes, diagenetic hopanes and alkyl PAHs is observed in all river and most shelf sediment samples, alkane and triterpene concentration variations are strongly linked to the relative amount of higher plant/peat material. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon molecular-mass profiles also appear to be tied primarily to varying proportions of peat, with an additional petrogenic component which is most likely associated with lithic material mobilized by the Mackenzie River at freshet. Consistent with the general lack of alkyl PAHs in peat, the higher PAHs found in the river are probably derived from forest and tundra fires. A few anthropogenic/pyrogenic compounds are manifest only at the shelf edge, probably due to a weakening of the river influence. We take this observation of pyrogenic PAHs and the pronounced source differences between two sediment samples collected at the shelf edge as evidence of a transition from dominance by the Mackenzie River to the geochemistry prevalent in Arctic regions far removed from major rivers.

  17. Exhaust emissions of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, n-alkanes and phenols from vehicles coming within different European classes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perrone, Maria Grazia; Carbone, Claudio; Faedo, Davide; Ferrero, Luca; Maggioni, Angela; Sangiorgi, Giorgia; Bolzacchini, Ezio

    2014-01-01

    EU emission standards for vehicles do not include many particulate (PM) and gaseous species, despite their considerable impact on air pollution and health. Emission factors (EFs) were measured for unregulated species, i.e. polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and n-alkanes (ALKs) in the particle phase, and, for the first time, EFs for phenols in both particle and gas phases. Exhaust samples were collected under controlled operating conditions (chassis dynamometer tests) for in-service vehicles (private cars, PCs and light duty vehicles, LDVs) from different EURO classes. EFs of trace organics were highest for the old EURO 1 vehicles (the tested EURO 1 vehicles were without emission-control devices), and lowest for the more recent EURO 3 and 4 vehicles. ALKs (C20-C32) were the most abundant trace organic compounds found in PM vehicle exhaust, and their EF ranged between 2034 and 101 μg km-1 (Euro 1-4 LDVs). PM-phased phenols EFs were in the range 0.42-2.50 μg km-1, and 4-nitrophenol was the most abundant one. The highest EFs were measured for phenols in the gas phase (dominated by the presence of phenol) for gasoline EURO 1 (43.16 ± 9.99 μg km-1). Emissions of PAHs changed depending on the fuel used. The PAH EFs of diesel-driven PCs were 4-5 times higher than those of gasoline vehicles, with PAHs diesel exhaust being mainly enriched in low 4-ring PAHs (85%), while 5-6 ring PAHs were prevalent (55%) in gasoline vehicles. Results of source profiles from chassis dynamometer tests were compared with ambient data, and the traffic PAH source profile derived from a tunnel study (Milan) agreed with the estimated emissions from a mix of diesel and gasoline vehicles circulating in the same area. Moreover, the impact of EURO regulatory changes on exhaust emissions was calculated, and this made it possible to estimate the downward trend of PAH emissions in the Province of Milan in the period 2005-2020.

  18. CYP63A2, a catalytically versatile fungal P450 monooxygenase capable of oxidizing higher-molecular-weight polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, alkylphenols, and alkanes.

    PubMed

    Syed, Khajamohiddin; Porollo, Aleksey; Lam, Ying Wai; Grimmett, Paul E; Yadav, Jagjit S

    2013-04-01

    Cytochrome P450 monooxygenases (P450s) are known to oxidize hydrocarbons, albeit with limited substrate specificity across classes of these compounds. Here we report a P450 monooxygenase (CYP63A2) from the model ligninolytic white rot fungus Phanerochaete chrysosporium that was found to possess a broad oxidizing capability toward structurally diverse hydrocarbons belonging to mutagenic/carcinogenic fused-ring higher-molecular-weight polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (HMW-PAHs), endocrine-disrupting long-chain alkylphenols (APs), and crude oil aliphatic hydrocarbon n-alkanes. A homology-based three-dimensional (3D) model revealed the presence of an extraordinarily large active-site cavity in CYP63A2 compared to the mammalian PAH-oxidizing (CYP3A4, CYP1A2, and CYP1B1) and bacterial aliphatic-hydrocarbon-oxidizing (CYP101D and CYP102A1) P450s. This structural feature in conjunction with ligand docking simulations suggested potential versatility of the enzyme. Experimental characterization using recombinantly expressed CYP63A2 revealed its ability to oxidize HMW-PAHs of various ring sizes, including 4 rings (pyrene and fluoranthene), 5 rings [benzo(a)pyrene], and 6 rings [benzo(ghi)perylene], with the highest enzymatic activity being toward the 5-ring PAH followed by the 4-ring and 6-ring PAHs, in that order. Recombinant CYP63A2 activity yielded monohydroxylated PAH metabolites. The enzyme was found to also act as an alkane ω-hydroxylase that oxidized n-alkanes with various chain lengths (C9 to C12 and C15 to C19), as well as alkyl side chains (C3 to C9) in alkylphenols (APs). CYP63A2 showed preferential oxidation of long-chain APs and alkanes. To our knowledge, this is the first P450 identified from any of the biological kingdoms that possesses such broad substrate specificity toward structurally diverse xenobiotics (PAHs, APs, and alkanes), making it a potent enzyme biocatalyst candidate to handle mixed pollution (e.g., crude oil spills).

  19. Characterization of alkanes, hopanes, and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in tar-balls collected from the East Coast of Peninsular Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Chandru, Kuhan; Zakaria, Mohamad Pauzi; Anita, Sofia; Shahbazi, Azadeh; Sakari, Mahyar; Bahry, Pourya Shahpoury; Mohamed, Che Abd Rahim

    2008-05-01

    The East Coast of Peninsular Malaysia faces the South China Sea and is vulnerable to oil pollution because of intense petroleum production activities in the area. The South China Sea is also a favored route for supertankers carrying crude oil to the Far East. Consequently, oil spills can occur, causing pollution and contamination in the surrounding areas. Residual oil spills stranded on coastal beaches usually end up as tar-balls. Elucidating the sources of tar-balls using a molecular marker approach is essential in assessing environmental impacts and perhaps settling legal liabilities for affected parties. This study utilizes a multimodal molecular marker approach through the use of diagnostic ratios of alkanes, hopanes, and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) to determine the source, distribution and weathering of tar-balls. Hopane ratios (e.g., C29/C30, and summation C31-C35/C30 ratios) were used to identify the sources of tar-balls. The weathering effects were distinguished by using alkanes, namely the unresolved complex mixture (UCM) and low molecular weight/high molecular weight (L/H) ratios. Similarly, PAHs were also used for the determination of weathering processes undergone by the tar-balls. This multimodal molecular marker gave a very strong indication of the sources of tar-balls in this study. For example, 16 out of 17 samples originated from South East Asian Crude Oil (SEACO) with one sample from Merang, Terengganu originating from North Sea Oil (Troll). The TRME-2 sample may have come from a supertanker's ballast water discharge. The second possibility is that the tar-ball may have been transported via oceanographic currents. All 'weathered' sample characterizations were based on the presence of UCM and other ratios. The multimodal molecular marker approach applied in this study has enabled us to partially understand the transport behavior of tar-balls in the marine environment and has revealed insights into the weathering process of tar-balls.

  20. Integrated process for preparing a carboxylic acid from an alkane

    SciTech Connect

    Benderly, Abraham; Chadda, Nitin; Sevon, Douglass

    2011-12-20

    The present invention relates to an integrated process for producing unsaturated carboxylic acids from the corresponding C.sub.2-C.sub.4 alkane. The process begins with performance of thermally integrated dehydrogenation reactions which convert a C.sub.2-C.sub.4 alkane to its corresponding C.sub.2-C.sub.4 alkene, and which involve exothermically converting a portion of an alkane to its corresponding alkene by oxidative dehydrogenation in an exothermic reaction zone, in the presence of oxygen and a suitable catalyst, and then feeding the products of the exothermic reaction zone to an endothermic reaction zone wherein at least a portion of the remaining unconverted alkane is endothermically dehydrogenated to form an additional quantity of the same corresponding alkene, in the presence of carbon dioxide and an other suitable catalyst. The alkene products of the thermally integrated dehydrogenation reactions are then provided to a catalytic vapor phase partial oxidation process for conversion of the alkene to the corresponding unsaturated carboxylic acid or nitrile. Unreacted alkene and carbon dioxide are recovered from the oxidation product stream and recycled back to the thermally integrated dehydrogenation reactions.

  1. GC×GC measurements of C7-C11 aromatic and n-alkane hydrocarbons on Crete, in air from Eastern Europe during the MINOS campaign

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, X.; Williams, J.; Plass-Dülmer, C.; Berresheim, H.; Salisbury, G.; Lange, L.; Lelieveld, J.

    2003-03-01

    During the Mediterranean Intensive Oxidant Study (MINOS) campaign in August 2001 gas-phase organic compounds were measured using comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography (GC×GC) at the Finokalia ground station, Crete. In this paper, C7-C11 aromatic and n-alkane measurements are presented and interpreted. The mean mixing ratios of the hydrocarbons varied from 1+/-1 pptv (i-propylbenzene) to 43+/-36 pptv (toluene). The observed mixing ratios showed strong day-to-day variations and generally higher levels during the first half of the campaign. Mean diel profiles showed maxima at local midnight and late morning, and minima in the early morning and evening. Results from analysis using a simplified box model suggest that both the chemical sink (i.e. reaction with OH) and the variability of source strengths were the causes of the observed variations in hydrocarbon mixing ratios. The logarithms of hydrocarbon concentrations were negatively correlated with the OH concentrations integral over a day prior to the hydrocarbon measurements. Slopes of the regression lines derived from these correlations for different compounds are compared with literature rate constants for their reactions with OH. The slopes for most compounds agree reasonably well with the literature rate constants. A sequential reaction model has been applied to the interpretation of the relationship between ethylbenzene and two of its potential products, i.e. acetophenone and benzeneacetaldehyde. The model can explain the good correlation observed between [acetophenone]/[ethylbenzene] and [benzeneacetaldehyde]/[ethylbenzene]. The model results and field measurements suggest that the reactivity of benzeneacetaldehyde may lie between those of acetophenone and ethylbenzene and that the ratio between yields of acetophenone and benzeneacetaldehyde may be up to 28:1. Photochemical ages of trace gases sampled at Finokalia during the campaign are estimated using the sequential reaction model and related data

  2. GC×GC measurements of C7-C11 aromatic and n-alkane hydrocarbons on Crete, in air from Eastern Europe during the MINOS campaign

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, X.; Williams, C.; Plass-Dülmer, H.; Berresheim, H.; Salisbury, G.; Lange, L.; Lelieveld, J.

    2003-09-01

    During the Mediterranean Intensive Oxidant Study (MINOS) campaign in August 2001 gas-phase organic compounds were measured using comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography (GCxGC) at the Finokalia ground station, Crete. In this paper, C7-C11 aromatic and n-alkane measurements are presented and interpreted. The mean mixing ratios of the hydrocarbons varied from 1±1 pptv (i-propylbenzene) to 43±36 pptv (toluene). The observed mixing ratios showed strong day-to-day variations and generally higher levels during the first half of the campaign. Mean diel profiles showed maxima at local midnight and late morning, and minima in the early morning and evening. Results from analysis using a simplified box model suggest that both the chemical sink (i.e. reaction with OH) and the variability of source strengths were the causes of the observed variations in hydrocarbon mixing ratios. The logarithms of hydrocarbon concentrations were negatively correlated with the OH concentrations integral over a day prior to the hydrocarbon measurements. Slopes of the regression lines derived from these correlations for different compounds are compared with literature rate constants for their reactions with OH. The slopes for most compounds agree reasonably well with the literature rate constants. A sequential reaction model has been applied to the interpretation of the relationship between ethylbenzene and two of its potential products, i.e. acetophenone and benzeneacetaldehyde. The model can explain the good correlation observed between [acetophenone]/[ethylbenzene] and [benzeneacetaldehyde]/[ethylbenzene]. The model results and field measurements suggest that the reactivity of benzeneacetaldehyde may lie between those of acetophenone and ethylbenzene and that the ratio between yields of acetophenone and benzeneacetaldehyde may be up to 28:1. Photochemical ages of trace gases sampled at Finokalia during the campaign are estimated using the sequential reaction model and related data

  3. Peroxide promoted tunable decarboxylative alkylation of cinnamic acids to form alkenes or ketones under metal-free conditions.

    PubMed

    Ji, Jing; Liu, Ping; Sun, Peipei

    2015-05-01

    A tunable decarboxylative alkylation of cinnamic acids with alkanes was developed to form alkenes or ketones under transition metal-free conditions. In the presence of DTBP or DTBP/TBHP, the reaction gave alkenes and ketones respectively via a radical mechanism in moderate to good yields.

  4. Effects of gasoline aromatic content on emissions of volatile organic compounds and aldehydes from a four-stroke motorcycle.

    PubMed

    Yao, Yung-Chen; Tsai, Jiun-Horng

    2013-01-01

    A new four-stroke carburettor motorcycle engine without any engine adjustments was used to study the impact of fuel aromatic content on the exhaust emissions of organic air pollutants (volatile organic compounds and carbonyls). Three levels of aromatic content, i.e. 15, 25, and 50% (vol.) aromatics mixed with gasoline were tested. The emissions of aromatic fuel were compared with those of commercial unleaded gasoline. The results indicated that the A 15 (15 vol% aromatics in gasoline) fuel exhibited the greatest total organic emission improvement among these three aromatic fuels as compared with commercial gasoline, reaching 59%. The highest emission factors of alkanes, alkenes, and carbonyl groups appeared in the reference fuel (RF) among all of the test fuels. A 15 showed the highest emission reduction in alkanes (73%), aromatics (36%), and carbonyls (28%), as compared to those of the RF. The highest emission reduction ofalkenes was observed when using A25 as fuel. A reduction in fuel aromatic content from 50 to 25 and 15 vol% in gasoline decreased benzene and toluene emissions, but increased the aldehyde emissions. In general, the results showed that the highest emission reductions for the most of measured organic pollutants appeared when using A 15 as the fuel.

  5. Intermolecular Hydropyridylation of Unactivated Alkenes.

    PubMed

    Ma, Xiaoshen; Herzon, Seth B

    2016-07-20

    A general method for the hydropyridylation of unactivated alkenes is described. The transformation connects metal-mediated hydrogen atom transfer to alkenes and Minisci addition reactions. The reaction proceeds under mild conditions with high site-selectivities and allows for the construction of tertiary and quaternary centers from simple alkene starting materials. PMID:27384921

  6. Thermal decomposition of n-alkanes under supercritical conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, J.; Eser, S.

    1996-10-01

    The future aircraft fuel system may be operating at temperatures above the critical points of fuels. Currently there is very limited information on the thermal stability of hydrocarbon fuels under supercritical conditions. In this work, the thermal stressing experiments of n-decane, n-dodecane, n-tetradecane, their mixtures, and an n-paraffin mixture, Norpar-13, was carried out under supercritical conditions. The experimental results indicated that the thermal decomposition of n-alkanes can be represented well by the first-order kinetics. Pressure has significant effects on the first-order rate constant and product distribution in the near-critical region. The major products are a series of n-alkanes and 1-alkenes. The relative yields of n-alkanes and 1-alkenes depend on the reaction conditions. The first-order rate constants for the thermal decomposition of individual compounds in a mixture are different from those obtained for the decomposition of pure compounds.

  7. Hydrogen-transferring pyrolysis of long-chain alkanes and thermal stability improvement of jet fuels by hydrogen donors

    SciTech Connect

    Song, C.; Lai, W.C.; Schobert, H.H. . Fuel Science Program)

    1994-03-01

    Hydrogen-transferring pyrolysis refers to the thermal decomposition of hydrocarbons in the presence of hydrogen donors. Relative to the pyrolysis of pure n-tetradecane (C[sub 14]H[sub 28]) at 450 C, adding 10 vol % of H-donor tetralin suppressed n-C[sub 14] conversion by 68 % after 12 min of residence time, by about 66% after 21 min, and by 37% after 30 min. The presence of tetralin not only inhibited the n-C[sub 14] decomposition, but also altered the product distribution. The decomposition and isomerization of primary radicals are strongly suppressed, leading to a much higher ratio of the 1-alkene to n-alkane with 12 carbon atoms and slightly higher alkene/alkane ratio for the other product groups. The overall reaction mechanism for the initial stage of hydrogen-transferring pyrolysis is characterized by a one-step [beta]-scission of secondary radical followed by H-abstraction of the resulting primary radical. Moreover, desirable effects of the H-donor are also observed even after 240 min at 450 C, especially for inhibiting solid deposition. The authors also examined the effect of tetralin addition on the deposit formation from a paraffinic jet fuel JP-8 which is rich in C[sub 9]-C[sub 16] long-chain alkanes, and an aromatic compound, n-butylbenzene. Adding 10 vol % tetralin to a JP-8 jet fuel, n-C[sub 14], and n-butylbenzene reduced the formation of deposits by 90% (from 3.1 to 0.3 wt %), 77 % (from 3.0 to 0.7 wt %), and 54 % (from 5.6 to 2.6 wt %), respectively. These results suggest that, by taking advantage of H-transferring pyrolysis, hydrocarbon jet fuels may be used at high operating temperatures with little or no solid deposition.

  8. Biogenic Emissions of Light Alkenes from a Coniferous Forest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rhew, R. C.; Turnipseed, A. A.; Martinez, L.; Shen, S.; De Gouw, J. A.; Warneke, C.; Koss, A.; Lerner, B. M.; Miller, B. R.; Smith, J. N.; Guenther, A. B.

    2014-12-01

    Alkenes are reactive hydrocarbons that play important roles in the photochemical production of tropospheric ozone and in the formation of secondary organic aerosols. The light alkenes (C2-C4) originate from both biogenic and anthropogenic sources and include C2H4 (ethene), C3H6 (propene) and C4H8 (1-butene, 2-butene, 2-methylpropene). Light alkenes are used widely as chemical feedstocks because their double bond makes them versatile for industrial reactions. Their biogenic sources are poorly characterized, with most global emissions estimates relying on laboratory-based studies; net ecosystem emissions have been measured at only one site thus far. Here we report net ecosystem fluxes of light alkenes and isoprene from a semi-arid ponderosa pine forest in the Rocky Mountains of Colorado, USA. Canopy scale fluxes were measured using relaxed eddy accumulation (REA) techniques on the 28-meter NCAR tower in the Manitou Experimental Forest Observatory. Updrafts and downdrafts were determined by sonic anemometry and segregated into 'up' and 'down' reservoirs over the course of an hour. Samples were then measured on two separate automated gas chromatographs (GCs). The first GC measured light hydrocarbons (C2-C6 alkanes and C2-C5 alkenes) by flame ionization detection (FID). The second GC measured halocarbons (methyl chloride, CFC-12, and HCFC-22) by electron capture detection (ECD). Additional air measurements from the top of the tower included hydrocarbons and their oxidation products by Proton Transfer Reaction Mass Spectrometry (PTR-MS). Three field intensives were conducted during the summer of 2014. The REA flux measurements showed that ethene, propene and the butene emissions have significant diurnal cycles, with maximum emissions at midday. The light alkenes contribute significantly to the overall biogenic source of reactive hydrocarbons and have a temporal variability that may be associated with physical and biological parameters. These ecosystem scale measurements

  9. Diffusion of Benzene and Alkylbenzenes in n-Alkanes.

    PubMed

    Kowert, Bruce A; Register, Paul M

    2015-10-01

    The translational diffusion constants, D, of benzene and a series of alkylbenzenes have been determined in four n-alkanes at room temperature using capillary flow techniques. The alkylbenzenes are toluene, ethylbenzene, 1-phenylpropane, 1-phenylpentane, 1-phenyloctane, 1-phenylundecane, 1-phenyltetradecane, and 1-phenylheptadecane. The n-alkanes are n-nonane, n-decane, n-dodecane, and n-pentadecane. Ratios of the solutes' D values are independent of solvent and in general agreement with the predictions of diffusion models for cylinders and lollipops. For the latter, an alkylbenzene's phenyl ring is the lollipop's candy; the alkyl chain is its handle. A model that considers the solutes to be spheres with volumes determined by the van der Waals increments of their constituent atoms is not in agreement with experiment. The diffusion constants of 1-alkene and n-alkane solutes in n-alkane solvents also are compared with the cylinder model; reasonably good agreement is found. The n-alkanes are relatively extended, and this appears to be the case for the alkyl chains of the 1-alkenes and alkylbenzenes as well. PMID:26417941

  10. Alkane desaturation by concerted double hydrogen atom transfer to benzyne.

    PubMed

    Niu, Dawen; Willoughby, Patrick H; Woods, Brian P; Baire, Beeraiah; Hoye, Thomas R

    2013-09-26

    The removal of two vicinal hydrogen atoms from an alkane to produce an alkene is a challenge for synthetic chemists. In nature, desaturases and acetylenases are adept at achieving this essential oxidative functionalization reaction, for example during the biosynthesis of unsaturated fatty acids, eicosanoids, gibberellins and carotenoids. Alkane-to-alkene conversion almost always involves one or more chemical intermediates in a multistep reaction pathway; these may be either isolable species (such as alcohols or alkyl halides) or reactive intermediates (such as carbocations, alkyl radicals, or σ-alkyl-metal species). Here we report a desaturation reaction of simple, unactivated alkanes that is mechanistically unique. We show that benzynes are capable of the concerted removal of two vicinal hydrogen atoms from a hydrocarbon. The discovery of this exothermic, net redox process was enabled by the simple thermal generation of reactive benzyne intermediates through the hexadehydro-Diels-Alder cycloisomerization reaction of triyne substrates. We are not aware of any single-step, bimolecular reaction in which two hydrogen atoms are simultaneously transferred from a saturated alkane. Computational studies indicate a preferred geometry with eclipsed vicinal C-H bonds in the alkane donor.

  11. Enantioselective Intramolecular Hydroarylation of Alkenes via Directed C-H Bond Activation

    SciTech Connect

    Harada, Hitoshi; Thalji, Reema; Bergman, Robert; Ellman, Jonathan

    2008-05-22

    Highly enantioselective catalytic intramolecular ortho-alkylation of aromatic imines containing alkenyl groups tethered at the meta position relative to the imine directing group has been achieved using [RhCl(coe){sub 2}]{sub 2} and chiral phosphoramidite ligands. Cyclization of substrates containing 1,1- and 1,2-disubstituted as well as trisubstituted alkenes were achieved with enantioselectivities >90% ee for each substrate class. Cyclization of substrates with Z-alkene isomers proceeded much more efficiently than substrates with E-alkene isomers. This further enabled the highly stereoselective intramolecular alkylation of certain substrates containing Z/E-alkene mixtures via a Rh-catalyzed alkene isomerization with preferential cyclization of the Z-isomer.

  12. Palladium Catalyzed Intramolecular Acylcyanation of Alkenes Using α-Iminonitriles

    PubMed Central

    Rondla, Naveen R.; Ogilvie, Jodi M.; Pan, Zhongda

    2014-01-01

    Reported here is a palladium catalyzed intramolecular acylcyanation of alkenes using α-iminonitriles. Through this method, highly functionalized indanones are synthesized in moderate to high yields using Pd(PPh3)4, without need for any additional ligands, and a common Lewis acid (ZnCl2). Additionally, the reaction tolerates substitution at various positions on the aromatic ring including electron donating, and electron withdrawing groups. PMID:24980625

  13. Arene-Alkene Cycloaddition.

    PubMed

    Remy, Richard; Bochet, Christian G

    2016-09-14

    Cycloadditions are among the most efficient chemical processes, combining atom economy, stereospecificity, and the ability to generate molecular complexity in a single step. Aromatic rings would in principle be ideal reaction partners, as they contain, at least from the topological point of view, both olefinic and diene subunits; however, the stability of the conjugated aromatic system would be broken by cycloaddition reactions, which are therefore rarely applied, because kinetics and thermodynamics hinder the process. From that aspect, photochemical activation opens interesting perspectives, as one can selectively provide excess energy to one of the reactants but not to the product, thus preventing thermal back reaction. Indeed, aromatic rings show a rich photochemistry, ranging from isomerizations, substitutions, and additions to cycloadditions. In this review, we will focus on cycloadditions, covering literature from early observations up to the present.

  14. Microanalysis of Alkenes by Ozonolysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Luibrand, R. T.; Vollmer, J. J.

    1975-01-01

    Describes an undergraduate laboratory experiment in which the position of the double bond in an alkene is determined by identifying its ozonolysis products. This experiment can also be used to introduce the technique of gas chromatography. (MLH)

  15. Modular Synthesis of Pyrazolones Using an Alkene Aminocarbonylation Reaction.

    PubMed

    Lavergne, Kaitlyn; Bongers, Amanda; Betit, Lyanne; Beauchemin, André M

    2015-07-17

    A variety of pyrazolones were synthesized from enol ethers and hydrazones using a reaction sequence involving aminocarbonylation of enol ethers followed by nucleophile-induced aromatization of the azomethine imines intermediates. Using bases to catalyze the in situ formation of imino isocyanates allowed alkene aminocarbonylation to proceed under milder conditions with reactive substrates and enabled aminocarbonylation reactions of sensitive enol ethers. Aromatization of the azomethine imines could be induced by reduction using NaBH4, or by addition of NH2OH to afford the parent (β)N-H products. PMID:26126788

  16. Subnanometer-sized Pt/Sn alloy cluster catalysts for the dehydrogenation of linear alkanes.

    PubMed

    Hauser, Andreas W; Gomes, Joseph; Bajdich, Michal; Head-Gordon, Martin; Bell, Alexis T

    2013-12-21

    The reaction pathways for the dehydrogenation of ethane, propane, and butane, over Pt are analyzed using density functional theory (DFT). Pt nanoparticles are represented by a tetrahedral Pt4 cluster. The objectives of this work were to establish which step is rate limiting and which one controls the selectivity for forming alkenes as opposed to causing further dehydrogenation of adsorbed alkenes to produce precursors responsible for catalyst deactivation due to coking. Further objectives of this work are to identify the role of adsorbed hydrogen, derived from H2 fed together with the alkane, on the reaction pathway, and the role of replacing one of the four Pt atoms by a Sn atom. A comparison of Gibbs free energies shows that in all cases the rate-determining step is cleavage of a C-H bond upon alkane adsorption. The selectivity to alkene formation versus precursors to coking is dictated by the relative magnitudes of the activation energies for alkene desorption and dehydrogenation of the adsorbed alkene. The presence of an adsorbed H atom on the cluster facilitates alkene desorption relative to dehydrogenation of the adsorbed alkene. Substitution of a Sn atom in the cluster to produce a Pt3Sn cluster leads to a downward shift of the potential energy surface for the reaction and causes an increase of the activity of the catalyst as suggested by recent experiments due to the lower net activation barrier for the rate limiting step. However, the introduction of Sn does not alter the relative activation barriers for gas-phase alkene formation versus loss of hydrogen from the adsorbed alkene, the process leading to the formation of coke precursors. PMID:24196250

  17. Heterogeneity of Alkane Chain Length in Freshwater and Marine Cyanobacteria

    PubMed Central

    Shakeel, Tabinda; Fatma, Zia; Fatma, Tasneem; Yazdani, Syed Shams

    2015-01-01

    The potential utilization of cyanobacteria for the biological production of alkanes represents an exceptional system for the next generation of biofuels. Here, we analyzed a diverse group of freshwater and marine cyanobacterial isolates from Indian culture collections for their ability to produce both alkanes and alkenes. Among the 50 cyanobacterial isolates screened, 32 isolates; 14 freshwater and 18 marine isolates; produced predominantly alkanes. The GC-MS/MS profiles revealed a higher percentage of pentadecane and heptadecane production for marine and freshwater strains, respectively. Oscillatoria species were found to be the highest producers of alkanes. Among the freshwater isolates, Oscillatoria CCC305 produced the maximum alkane level with 0.43 μg/mg dry cell weight, while Oscillatoria formosa BDU30603 was the highest producer among the marine isolates with 0.13 μg/mg dry cell weight. Culturing these strains under different media compositions showed that the alkane chain length was not influenced by the growth medium but was rather an inherent property of the strains. Analysis of the cellular fatty acid content indicated the presence of predominantly C16 chain length fatty acids in marine strains, while the proportion of C18 chain length fatty acids increased in the majority of freshwater strains. These results correlated with alkane chain length specificity of marine and freshwater isolates indicating that alkane chain lengths may be primarily determined by the fatty acid synthesis pathway. Moreover, the phylogenetic analysis showed clustering of pentadecane-producing marine strains that was distinct from heptadecane-producing freshwater strains strongly suggesting a close association between alkane chain length and the cyanobacteria habitat. PMID:25853127

  18. Process for converting light alkanes to higher hydrocarbons

    DOEpatents

    Noceti, Richard P.; Taylor, Charles E.

    1988-01-01

    A process is disclosed for the production of aromatic-rich, gasoline boiling range hydrocarbons from the lower alkanes, particularly from methane. The process is carried out in two stages. In the first, alkane is reacted with oxygen and hydrogen chloride over an oxyhydrochlorination catalyst such as copper chloride with minor proportions of potassium chloride and rare earth chloride. This produces an intermediate gaseous mixture containing water and chlorinated alkanes. The chlorinated alkanes are contacted with a crystalline aluminosilicate catalyst in the hydrogen or metal promoted form to produce gasoline range hydrocarbons with a high proportion of aromatics and a small percentage of light hydrocarbons (C.sub.2 -C.sub.4). The light hydrocarbons can be recycled for further processing over the oxyhydrochlorination catalyst.

  19. Isolated CH stretching frequencies, bond lengths and dissociation energies in some haloalkanes and alkenes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mackenzie, M. W.

    Isolated CH stretching frequencies (ν isCH) have been obtained for a variety of haloalkanes and alkenes. These have been used to predict CH bond lengths, dissociation energies and force constants. Use of substituent effect S values from previous studies to predict ν isCH demonstrates that the effects of α- and β-substitution by halogens are approximately additive in the case of the haloalkenes but non-additive for the alkanes.

  20. Incorporation of chlorinated alkanes into fatty acids of hydrocarbon-utilizing mycobacteria.

    PubMed

    Murphy, G L; Perry, J J

    1983-12-01

    The cellular fatty acid composition of Mycobacterium vaccae JOB5 and Mycobacterium convolutum R22 was examined after growth on n-alkanes and compared with the fatty acids of the organisms after growth on 1-chlorohexadecane and 1-chlorooctadecane. Growth on n-alkanes resulted in normal fatty acid profiles. Mass spectral analyses indicated that, after growth on the terminally chlorinated n-alkanes, 75 to 86% of the fatty acids in M. convolutum and ca. 55% of the fatty acids in M. vaccae contained chlorine. Neither organism could utilize chloroacetate or 3-chloropropionate as sole source of carbon and energy. When these compounds were added to a growth medium with n-hexadecane as substrate, there was no evidence that chlorinated fatty acids were produced. Terminally chlorinated n-alkanes can be added to the list of n-alkanes, alkenes, and cyclohexylalkane derivatives that can be directly incorporated into cellular fatty acids of hydrocarbon-utilizing organisms.

  1. NOx analyser interefence from alkenes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bloss, W. J.; Alam, M. S.; Lee, J. D.; Vazquez, M.; Munoz, A.; Rodenas, M.

    2012-04-01

    Nitrogen oxides (NO and NO2, collectively NOx) are critical intermediates in atmospheric chemistry. NOx abundance controls the levels of the primary atmospheric oxidants OH, NO3 and O3, and regulates the ozone production which results from the degradation of volatile organic compounds. NOx are also atmospheric pollutants in their own right, and NO2 is commonly included in air quality objectives and regulations. In addition to their role in controlling ozone formation, NOx levels affect the production of other pollutants such as the lachrymator PAN, and the nitrate component of secondary aerosol particles. Consequently, accurate measurement of nitrogen oxides in the atmosphere is of major importance for understanding our atmosphere. The most widely employed approach for the measurement of NOx is chemiluminescent detection of NO2* from the NO + O3 reaction, combined with NO2 reduction by either a heated catalyst or photoconvertor. The reaction between alkenes and ozone is also chemiluminescent; therefore alkenes may contribute to the measured NOx signal, depending upon the instrumental background subtraction cycle employed. This interference has been noted previously, and indeed the effect has been used to measure both alkenes and ozone in the atmosphere. Here we report the results of a systematic investigation of the response of a selection of NOx analysers, ranging from systems used for routine air quality monitoring to atmospheric research instrumentation, to a series of alkenes ranging from ethene to the biogenic monoterpenes, as a function of conditions (co-reactants, humidity). Experiments were performed in the European Photoreactor (EUPHORE) to ensure common calibration, a common sample for the monitors, and to unequivocally confirm the alkene (via FTIR) and NO2 (via DOAS) levels present. The instrument responses ranged from negligible levels up to 10 % depending upon the alkene present and conditions used. Such interferences may be of substantial importance

  2. Evidence for significant C-5 alkene emissions from car traffic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schade, G. W.; Park, C.

    2010-12-01

    We present evidence from urban flux tower measurements in Houston, Texas, that a five carbon alkene, likely isoprene, is emitted from car traffic. Our GC-dual FID instrument setup measures VOC concentrations at 60 m above ground level from a lattice flux tower, and determines fluxes via a novel relaxed eddy accumulation technique. C-5 2-alkenes and isoprene, 2-methyl-1,3-butadiene, are not chromatographically separated by our method, but past VOC measurements suggest that isoprene, a biogenic hydrocarbon, generally dominates during the growing season. Our measured 2008 summertime C-5 alkene fluxes generally followed the expected, light and temperature driven emission pattern of isoprene from a significant density of oak trees in the tower’s footprint area. However, nighttime fluxes were significantly different from an expected zero biogenic flux, and morning rush hour fluxes were significantly higher than modeled biogenic fluxes. Wintertime measurements in January 2009 confirmed a small flux during the morning rush-hour was maintained, suggesting either an isoprene or C-5 2-alkene emission from car exhaust. While isoprene emissions from car traffic have been found several times before, emission rates have been found negligibly small compared to biogenic emissions. A quantitative comparison of our data to simultaneously measured toluene and benzene emissions however suggests that these C-5 alkene emissions may have increased relative to aromatics by a factor of ten since the 1990s. This notion is supported both by recent direct car exhaust measurements in Europe and Japan, and airborne isoprene measurements over Houston. Car exhaust measurements show that (i) the isoprene to toluene emission ratio for the newest car models is now around 1:10, similar to the ratio obtained from our data, and (ii) cold start alkene emissions are still an order of magnitude higher than regular emissions, consistent with a more prominent morning rush hour peak. If the identity of our

  3. The arene–alkene photocycloaddition

    PubMed Central

    Streit, Ursula

    2011-01-01

    Summary In the presence of an alkene, three different modes of photocycloaddition with benzene derivatives can occur; the [2 + 2] or ortho, the [3 + 2] or meta, and the [4 + 2] or para photocycloaddition. This short review aims to demonstrate the synthetic power of these photocycloadditions. PMID:21647263

  4. The aromatic ene reaction

    PubMed Central

    Niu, Dawen; Hoye, Thomas R.

    2014-01-01

    The ene reaction is a pericyclic process in which an alkene having an allylic hydrogen atom (the ene donor) reacts with a second unsaturated species (the enophile) to form a new product with a transposed π-bond. The aromatic ene reaction, in which the alkene component is embedded in an aromatic ring, has only been reported in a few (four) instances and has proceeded in low yield (≤6%). Here we show efficient aromatic ene reactions in which a thermally generated aryne engages a pendant m-alkylarene substituent to produce a dearomatized isotoluene, itself another versatile but rare reactive intermediate. Our experiments were guided by computational studies that revealed structural features conducive to the aromatic ene process. We proceeded to identify a cascade comprising three reactions: (i) hexadehydro-Diels-Alder (for aryne generation), (ii) intramolecular aromatic ene, and (iii) bimolecular Alder ene. The power of this cascade is evident from the structural complexity of the final products, the considerable scope, and the overall efficiency of these multi-stage, reagent- and byproduct-free, single-pot transformations. PMID:24345944

  5. Catalytic production of branched small alkanes from biohydrocarbons.

    PubMed

    Oya, Shin-ichi; Kanno, Daisuke; Watanabe, Hideo; Tamura, Masazumi; Nakagawa, Yoshinao; Tomishige, Keiichi

    2015-08-10

    Squalane, C30 algae-derived branched hydrocarbon, was successfully converted to smaller hydrocarbons without skeletal isomerization and aromatization over ruthenium on ceria (Ru/CeO2 ). The internal CH2 CH2 bonds located between branches are preferably dissociated to give branched alkanes with very simple distribution as compared with conventional methods using metal-acid bifunctional catalysts.

  6. Perfluoroalkylation of Unactivated Alkenes with Acid Anhydrides as the Perfluoroalkyl Source.

    PubMed

    Kawamura, Shintaro; Sodeoka, Mikiko

    2016-07-18

    An efficient perfluoroalkylation of unactivated alkenes with perfluoro acid anhydrides was developed. Copper salts play a crucial role as a catalyst to achieve allylic perfluoroalkylation with the in situ generated bis(perfluoroacyl) peroxides. Furthermore, carboperfluoroalkylation of alkene bearing an aromatic ring at an appropriate position on the carbon side chain was found to proceed under metal-free conditions to afford carbocycles or heterocycles bearing a perfluoroalkyl group. This method, which makes use of readily available perfluoroalkyl sources, offers a convenient and powerful tool for introducing a perfluoroalkyl group onto an sp(3) carbon to construct synthetically useful skeletons. PMID:27254318

  7. Whole-cell bacterial bioreporter for actively searching and sensing of alkanes and oil spills.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Dayi; He, Yi; Wang, Yun; Wang, Hui; Wu, Lin; Aries, Eric; Huang, Wei E

    2012-01-01

    Acinetobacter baylyi ADP1 was found to tolerate seawater and have a special ability of adhering to an oil-water interface of 10-80 µm emulsified mineral and crude oil droplets. These properties make ADP1 an ideal bacterial chassis for constructing bioreporters that are able to actively search and sense oil spill in water and soils. Acinetobacter baylyi bioreporter ADPWH_alk was developed and applied to the detection of alkanes and alkenes in water, seawater and soils. Bioreporter ADPWH_alk was able to detect a broad range of alkanes and alkenes with carbon chain length from C7 to C36. So far, ADPWH_alk is the only bioreporter that is able to detect alkane with carbon chain length greater than C18. This bioreporter responded to the alkanes in about 30 min and it was independent to the cell growth phase because of two point mutations in alkM promoter recognized by alkane regulatory protein ALKR. ADPWH_alk was applied to detect mineral oil, Brent, Chestnut and Sirri crude oils in water and seawater in the range 0.1-100 mg l(-1), showing that the bioreporter oil detection was semi-quantitative. This study demonstrates that ADPWH_alk is a rapid, sensitive and semi-quantitative bioreporter that can be useful for environmental monitoring and assessment of oil spills in seawater and soils.

  8. Nickel-Catalyzed Coupling Reactions of Alkenes

    PubMed Central

    Ng, Sze-Sze; Ho, Chun-Yu; Schleicher, Kristin D.; Jamison, Timothy F.

    2011-01-01

    Several reactions of simple, unactivated alkenes with electrophiles under nickel(0) catalysis are discussed. The coupling of olefins with aldehydes and silyl triflates provides allylic or homoallylic alcohol derivatives, depending on the supporting ligands and, to a lesser extent, the substrates employed. Reaction of alkenes with isocyanates yields N-alkyl acrylamides. In these methods, alkenes act as the functional equivalents of alkenyl- and allylmetal reagents. PMID:21814295

  9. Catalytic Enantioselective Functionalization of Unactivated Terminal Alkenes.

    PubMed

    Coombs, John R; Morken, James P

    2016-02-18

    Terminal alkenes are readily available functional groups which appear in α-olefins produced by the chemical industry, and they appear in the products of many contemporary synthetic reactions. While the organic transformations that apply to alkenes are amongst the most studied reactions in all of chemical synthesis, the number of reactions that apply to nonactivated terminal alkenes in a catalytic enantioselective fashion is small in number. This Minireview highlights the cases where stereocontrol in catalytic reactions of 1-alkenes is high enough to be useful for asymmetric synthesis. PMID:26764019

  10. Catalytic Enantioselective Functionalization of Unactivated Terminal Alkenes.

    PubMed

    Coombs, John R; Morken, James P

    2016-02-18

    Terminal alkenes are readily available functional groups which appear in α-olefins produced by the chemical industry, and they appear in the products of many contemporary synthetic reactions. While the organic transformations that apply to alkenes are amongst the most studied reactions in all of chemical synthesis, the number of reactions that apply to nonactivated terminal alkenes in a catalytic enantioselective fashion is small in number. This Minireview highlights the cases where stereocontrol in catalytic reactions of 1-alkenes is high enough to be useful for asymmetric synthesis.

  11. Towards preparative-scale, biocatalytic alkene reductions.

    PubMed

    Bougioukou, Despina J; Walton, Adam Z; Stewart, Jon D

    2010-12-01

    Simple strategies for using alkene reductase enzymes to produce gram-scale quantities of both (R)- and (S)-citronellal have been developed. The methodology is easily accessible to non-specialist laboratories, allowing alkene reductases to be added to the toolbox of routine synthetic transformations.

  12. Solar photothermochemical alkane reverse combustion

    PubMed Central

    Chanmanee, Wilaiwan; Islam, Mohammad Fakrul; Dennis, Brian H.; MacDonnell, Frederick M.

    2016-01-01

    A one-step, gas-phase photothermocatalytic process for the synthesis of hydrocarbons, including liquid alkanes, aromatics, and oxygenates, with carbon numbers (Cn) up to C13, from CO2 and water is demonstrated in a flow photoreactor operating at elevated temperatures (180–200 °C) and pressures (1–6 bar) using a 5% cobalt on TiO2 catalyst and under UV irradiation. A parametric study of temperature, pressure, and partial pressure ratio revealed that temperatures in excess of 160 °C are needed to obtain the higher Cn products in quantity and that the product distribution shifts toward higher Cn products with increasing pressure. In the best run so far, over 13% by mass of the products were C5+ hydrocarbons and some of these, i.e., octane, are drop-in replacements for existing liquid hydrocarbons fuels. Dioxygen was detected in yields ranging between 64% and 150%. In principle, this tandem photochemical–thermochemical process, fitted with a photocatalyst better matched to the solar spectrum, could provide a cheap and direct method to produce liquid hydrocarbons from CO2 and water via a solar process which uses concentrated sunlight for both photochemical excitation to generate high-energy intermediates and heat to drive important thermochemical carbon-chain-forming reactions. PMID:26903631

  13. Solar photothermochemical alkane reverse combustion.

    PubMed

    Chanmanee, Wilaiwan; Islam, Mohammad Fakrul; Dennis, Brian H; MacDonnell, Frederick M

    2016-03-01

    A one-step, gas-phase photothermocatalytic process for the synthesis of hydrocarbons, including liquid alkanes, aromatics, and oxygenates, with carbon numbers (Cn) up to C13, from CO2 and water is demonstrated in a flow photoreactor operating at elevated temperatures (180-200 °C) and pressures (1-6 bar) using a 5% cobalt on TiO2 catalyst and under UV irradiation. A parametric study of temperature, pressure, and partial pressure ratio revealed that temperatures in excess of 160 °C are needed to obtain the higher Cn products in quantity and that the product distribution shifts toward higher Cn products with increasing pressure. In the best run so far, over 13% by mass of the products were C5+ hydrocarbons and some of these, i.e., octane, are drop-in replacements for existing liquid hydrocarbons fuels. Dioxygen was detected in yields ranging between 64% and 150%. In principle, this tandem photochemical-thermochemical process, fitted with a photocatalyst better matched to the solar spectrum, could provide a cheap and direct method to produce liquid hydrocarbons from CO2 and water via a solar process which uses concentrated sunlight for both photochemical excitation to generate high-energy intermediates and heat to drive important thermochemical carbon-chain-forming reactions.

  14. Remote functionalization through alkene isomerization.

    PubMed

    Vasseur, Alexandre; Bruffaerts, Jeffrey; Marek, Ilan

    2016-03-01

    Exploiting the reactivity of one functional group within a molecule to generate a reaction at a different position is an ongoing challenge in organic synthesis. Effective remote functionalization protocols have the potential to provide access to almost any derivatives but are difficult to achieve. The difficulty is more pronounced for acyclic systems where flexible alkyl chains are present between the initiating functional group and the desired reactive centres. In this Review, we discuss the concept of remote functionalization of alkenes using metal complexes, leading to a selective reaction at a position distal to the initial double bond. We aim to show the vast opportunity provided by this growing field through selected and representative examples. Our aim is to demonstrate that using a double bond as a chemical handle, metal-assisted long-distance activation could be used as a powerful synthetic strategy. PMID:26892551

  15. Remote functionalization through alkene isomerization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasseur, Alexandre; Bruffaerts, Jeffrey; Marek, Ilan

    2016-03-01

    Exploiting the reactivity of one functional group within a molecule to generate a reaction at a different position is an ongoing challenge in organic synthesis. Effective remote functionalization protocols have the potential to provide access to almost any derivatives but are difficult to achieve. The difficulty is more pronounced for acyclic systems where flexible alkyl chains are present between the initiating functional group and the desired reactive centres. In this Review, we discuss the concept of remote functionalization of alkenes using metal complexes, leading to a selective reaction at a position distal to the initial double bond. We aim to show the vast opportunity provided by this growing field through selected and representative examples. Our aim is to demonstrate that using a double bond as a chemical handle, metal-assisted long-distance activation could be used as a powerful synthetic strategy.

  16. Remote functionalization through alkene isomerization.

    PubMed

    Vasseur, Alexandre; Bruffaerts, Jeffrey; Marek, Ilan

    2016-03-01

    Exploiting the reactivity of one functional group within a molecule to generate a reaction at a different position is an ongoing challenge in organic synthesis. Effective remote functionalization protocols have the potential to provide access to almost any derivatives but are difficult to achieve. The difficulty is more pronounced for acyclic systems where flexible alkyl chains are present between the initiating functional group and the desired reactive centres. In this Review, we discuss the concept of remote functionalization of alkenes using metal complexes, leading to a selective reaction at a position distal to the initial double bond. We aim to show the vast opportunity provided by this growing field through selected and representative examples. Our aim is to demonstrate that using a double bond as a chemical handle, metal-assisted long-distance activation could be used as a powerful synthetic strategy.

  17. Measuring long chain alkanes in diesel engine exhaust by thermal desorption PTR-MS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erickson, M. H.; Gueneron, M.; Jobson, B. T.

    2013-07-01

    A method using thermal desorption sampling and analysis by PTR-MS to measure long chain alkanes (C12-C18) and other larger organics associated with diesel engine exhaust emissions is described. Long chain alkanes undergo dissociative proton transfer reactions forming a series of fragment ions with formula CnH2n+1. The PTR-MS is insensitive to n-alkanes less than C8 but displays an increasing sensitivity for larger alkanes. Fragment ion distribution and sensitivity is a function of drift conditions. At 80 Td the most abundant ion fragments from C10 to C16 n-alkanes were m/z 57, 71 and 85. The mass spectrum of gasoline and diesel fuel at 80 Td displayed ion group patterns that can be related to known fuel constituents, such as alkanes, alkylbenzenes and cycloalkanes, and other compound groups that are inferred from molecular weight distributions such as dihydronapthalenes and naphthenic monoaromatics. It is shown that thermal desorption sampling of gasoline and diesel engine exhausts at 80 Td allows for discrimination against light alkanes and alkenes which are a major constituent of both exhausts, allowing for quantification of higher molecular weight alkanes from the abundance of CnH2n+1 fragment ions. Using this approach, the molar abundance of C12-C18 alkanes in diesel engine exhaust was found to be 75% that of the total C1-C4 alkylbenzene abundance. While the PTR-MS mass spectra of gasoline and diesel exhaust looked similar, the abundance of higher molecular weight compounds relative to that of C4-alkylbenzenes was much greater in diesel engine exhaust. The abundance patterns of compounds determined by thermal desorption sampling may allow for emission profiles to be developed to better quantify the relative contributions of diesel and gasoline exhaust emissions of larger organic compounds to urban air concentrations.

  18. Dehydrogenation of n-alkanes catalyzed by iridium ``pincer`` complexes: Regioselective formation of {alpha}-olefins

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, F.; Singh, B.; Goldman, A.S.; Pak, E.B.; Jensen, C.M.

    1999-04-28

    The development of methods for the functionalization of alkanes is of cardinal importance in catalytic chemistry. A specific functionalization of particularly great potential value is the conversion of n-alkanes to the corresponding 1-alkenes ({alpha}-olefins) since these serve as precursors for a wide range of commodity-scale chemicals (>2 {times} 10{sup 9} kg/yr). Such a conversion is also an intriguing challenge as viewed from a fundamental perspective. n-Alkanes are the simplest organic molecules with the potential to undergo regioselective transformations; {alpha}-olefins are the thermodynamically least stable of the corresponding double-bond isomers and any mechanism for their formation must presumably involve activation of the strongest bond (primary C-{single_bond}H) in the molecule.

  19. Electrochemical intramolecular aminooxygenation of unactivated alkenes.

    PubMed

    Xu, Fan; Zhu, Lin; Zhu, Shaobin; Yan, Xiaomei; Xu, Hai-Chao

    2014-09-26

    An electrochemical approach to the intramolecular aminooxygenation of unactivated alkenes has been developed. This process is based on the addition of nitrogen-centered radicals, generated through electrochemical oxidation, to alkenes followed by trapping of the cyclized radical intermediate with 2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidine-N-oxyl radical (TEMPO). Difunctionalization of a variety of alkenes with easily available carbamates/amides and TEMPO affords aminooxygenation products in high yields and with excellent trans selectivity for cyclic systems (d.r. up to>20:1). The approach provides a much-needed complementary route to existing cis-selective methods.

  20. Alkene anti-Dihydroxylation with Malonoyl Peroxides.

    PubMed

    Alamillo-Ferrer, Carla; Davidson, Stuart C; Rawling, Michael J; Theodoulou, Natalie H; Campbell, Matthew; Humphreys, Philip G; Kennedy, Alan R; Tomkinson, Nicholas C O

    2015-10-16

    Malonoyl peroxide 1, prepared in a single step from the commercially available diacid, is an effective reagent for the anti-dihydroxylation of alkenes. Reaction of 1 with an alkene in the presence of acetic acid at 40 °C followed by alkaline hydrolysis leads to the corresponding diol (35-92%) with up to 13:1 anti-selectivity. A mechanism consistent with experimental findings is proposed that accounts for the selectivity observed. PMID:26425839

  1. Light alkane conversion

    SciTech Connect

    Harandi, M.N.; Owen, H.

    1991-07-09

    This patent describes a process for the aromatization of an aliphatic feedstream. It comprises fluidizing finely divided solid particles in a combustion zone; charging oxygen-containing combustion gas and fuel to the combustion zone under combustion conditions; withdrawing a stream of finely divided particles from the combustion zone; flowing the withdrawn stream of finely divided particles above to a cracking/dehydrogenation zone; fluidizing the finely divided particles above in an aliphatic feedstream under conditions within the cracking/dehydrogenation zone controlled to at least partially crack and at least partially dehydrogenate the aliphatic feedstream to form an intermediate product stream containing a quantity of C{sub 4}-olefins such that the exothermic catalytic conversion of the C{sub 4}-olefins is sufficient to supply a portion of the endothermic heat of reaction for the endothermic catalytic conversion of paraffins contained in the intermediate feedstream to aromatics; contacting the intermediate product stream with an aromatization catalyst under aromatization conditions sufficient to evolve an aromatics-rich products stream.

  2. Palladium-catalyzed hydroaminocarbonylation of alkenes with amines: a strategy to overcome the basicity barrier imparted by aliphatic amines.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Guoying; Gao, Bao; Huang, Hanmin

    2015-06-22

    A novel and efficient palladium-catalyzed hydroaminocarbonylation of alkenes with aminals has been developed under mild reaction conditions, and allows the synthesis of a wide range of N-alkyl linear amides in good yields with high regioselectivity. On the basis of this method, a cooperative catalytic system operating by the synergistic combination of palladium, paraformaldehyde, and acid was established for promoting the hydroaminocarbonylation of alkenes with both aromatic and aliphatic amines, which do not react well under conventional palladium-catalyzed hydroaminocarbonylation.

  3. Aromatic hydrocarbons as ozone precursors before and after outbreak of the 2008 financial crisis in the Pearl River Delta region, south China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yanli; Wang, Xinming; Blake, Donald R.; Li, Longfeng; Zhang, Zhou; Wang, Shaoyi; Guo, Hai; Lee, Frank S. C.; Gao, Bo; Chan, Loyin; Wu, Dui; Rowland, F. Sherwood

    2012-08-01

    In the second half of 2008 China's highly industrialized Pearl River Delta (PRD) region was hard-hit by the financial crisis (FC). This study reports volatile organic compounds measured in the PRD during November-December in both 2007 before the FC and 2008 after the FC. While total mixing ratios of non-methane hydrocarbons (NMHCs) on average were only about 7% lower from 40.2 ppbv in 2007 to 37.5 ppbv in 2008, their ozone formation potentials (OFPs) dropped about 30%, resulting from about 55% plummet of aromatic hydrocarbons (AHs) against a greater than 20% increase of total alkanes/alkenes. The elevated alkanes and alkenes in 2008 could be explained by greater emissions from vehicle exhausts and LPG combustion due to rapid increase of vehicle numbers and LPG consumption; the drop of AHs could be explained by reduced emissions from industries using AH-containing solvents due to the influence of the FC, as indicated by much lower ratios of toluene to benzene and of xylenes/trichloroethylene/tetrachloroethylene to carbon monoxide (CO) in 2008. Source apportionment by positive matrix factorization (PMF) also revealed much less contribution of industry solvents to total anthropogenic NMHCs and particularly to toluene and xylenes in 2008 than in 2007. Based on PMF reconstructed source contributions, calculated OFPs by industrial emissions were responsible for 40.8% in 2007 in contrast to 18.4% in 2008. Further investigation into local industry output statistics suggested that the plummet of AHs in 2008 should be attributed to small enterprises, which contributed largely to ambient AHs due to their huge numbers and non-existent emission treatment, but were much more influenced by the FC.

  4. Metabolism of Hydrocarbons in n-Alkane-Utilizing Anaerobic Bacteria.

    PubMed

    Wilkes, Heinz; Buckel, Wolfgang; Golding, Bernard T; Rabus, Ralf

    2016-01-01

    The glycyl radical enzyme-catalyzed addition of n-alkanes to fumarate creates a C-C-bond between two concomitantly formed stereogenic carbon centers. The configurations of the two diastereoisomers of the product resulting from n-hexane activation by the n-alkane-utilizing denitrifying bacterium strain HxN1, i.e. (1-methylpentyl)succinate, were assigned as (2S,1'R) and (2R,1'R). Experiments with stereospecifically deuterated n-(2,5-2H2)hexanes revealed that exclusively the pro-S hydrogen atom is abstracted from C2 of the n-alkane by the enzyme and later transferred back to C3 of the alkylsuccinate formed. These results indicate that the alkylsuccinate-forming reaction proceeds with an inversion of configuration at the carbon atom (C2) of the n-alkane forming the new C-C-bond, and thus stereochemically resembles a SN2-type reaction. Therefore, the reaction may occur in a concerted manner, which may avoid the highly energetic hex-2-yl radical as an intermediate. The reaction is associated with a significant primary kinetic isotope effect (kH/kD ≥3) for hydrogen, indicating that the homolytic C-H-bond cleavage is involved in the first irreversible step of the reaction mechanism. The (1-methylalkyl)succinate synthases of n-alkane-utilizing anaerobic bacteria apparently have very broad substrate ranges enabling them to activate not only aliphatic but also alkyl-aromatic hydrocarbons. Thus, two denitrifiers and one sulfate reducer were shown to convert the nongrowth substrate toluene to benzylsuccinate and further to the dead-end product benzoyl-CoA. For this purpose, however, the modified β-oxidation pathway known from alkylbenzene-utilizing bacteria was not employed, but rather the pathway used for n-alkane degradation involving CoA ligation, carbon skeleton rearrangement and decarboxylation. Furthermore, various n-alkane- and alkylbenzene-utilizing denitrifiers and sulfate reducers were found to be capable of forming benzyl alcohols from diverse alkylbenzenes

  5. Hydroxy nitrate production in the OH-initiated oxidation of alkenes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teng, A. P.; Crounse, J. D.; Lee, L.; St. Clair, J. M.; Cohen, R. C.; Wennberg, P. O.

    2015-04-01

    Alkenes are oxidized rapidly in the atmosphere by addition of OH and subsequently O2 leading to the formation of β-hydroxy peroxy radicals. These peroxy radicals react with NO to form β-hydroxy nitrates with a branching ratio α. We quantify α for CM2-C8 alkenes at 295 K ± 3 and 993 hPa. The branching ratio can be expressed as α = (0.045 ± 0.016) × N - (0.11 ± 0.05) where N is the number of heavy atoms (excluding the peroxy moiety), and listed errors are 2σ. These branching ratios are larger than previously reported and are similar to those for peroxy radicals formed from H abstraction from alkanes. We find the isomer distributions of β-hydroxy nitrates formed under NO-dominated peroxy radical chemistry to be different than the isomer distribution of hydroxy hydroperoxides produced under HO2-dominated peroxy radical chemistry. Assuming unity yield for the hydroperoxides implies that the branching ratio to form β-hydroxy nitrates increases with substitution of RO2. Deuterium substitution enhances the branching ratio to form hydroxy nitrates in both propene and isoprene by a factor of ~ 1.5. The role of alkene chemistry in the Houston region is re-evaluated using the RONO2 branching ratios reported here. Small alkenes are found to play a significant role in present-day oxidant formation more than a decade (2013) after the 2000 Texas Air Quality Study identified these compounds as major contributors to photochemical smog in Houston.

  6. Copper-Catalyzed Oxyboration of Unactivated Alkenes.

    PubMed

    Itoh, Taisuke; Matsueda, Takumi; Shimizu, Yohei; Kanai, Motomu

    2015-11-01

    The first regiodivergent oxyboration of unactivated terminal alkenes is reported, using copper alkoxide as a catalyst, bis(pinacolato)diboron [(Bpin)2 ] as a boron source, and (2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidin-1-yl)oxyl (TEMPO) as an oxygen source. The reaction is compatible with various functional groups. Two regioisomers are selectively produced by selecting the appropriate ligands on copper. The products may be used as a linchpin precursor for various other functionalizations, and net processes such as carbooxygenation, aminooxygenation, and dioxygenation of alkenes can be achieved after C-B bond transformations. Mechanistic studies indicate that the reaction involves the following steps: 1) Transmetalation between CuOtBu and (Bpin)2 to generate a borylcopper species; 2) regiodivergent borylcupration of alkenes; 3) oxidation of the thus-generated C-Cu bond to give an alkyl radical; 4) trapping of the resulting alkyl radical by TEMPO. PMID:26376774

  7. Heterogeneous Catalysis: The Horiuti-Polanyi Mechanism and Alkene Hydrogenation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mattson, Bruce; Foster, Wendy; Greimann, Jaclyn; Hoette, Trisha; Le, Nhu; Mirich, Anne; Wankum, Shanna; Cabri, Ann; Reichenbacher, Claire; Schwanke, Erika

    2013-01-01

    The hydrogenation of alkenes by heterogeneous catalysts has been studied for 80 years. The foundational mechanism was proposed by Horiuti and Polanyi in 1934 and consists of three steps: (i) alkene adsorption on the surface of the hydrogenated metal catalyst, (ii) hydrogen migration to the beta-carbon of the alkene with formation of a delta-bond…

  8. 40 CFR 721.10508 - Alkene substituted Bis phenol (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Alkene substituted Bis phenol (generic... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10508 Alkene substituted Bis phenol (generic). (a) Chemical substance... alkene substituted bis phenol (PMN P-07-161) is subject to reporting under this section for...

  9. 40 CFR 721.10508 - Alkene substituted Bis phenol (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Alkene substituted Bis phenol (generic... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10508 Alkene substituted Bis phenol (generic). (a) Chemical substance... alkene substituted bis phenol (PMN P-07-161) is subject to reporting under this section for...

  10. [C. E. Alken (1909-1986) and the Alken-Prize].

    PubMed

    Konert, J

    2016-06-01

    C. E. Alken is regarded as the Nestor of German urology post World War II. His development path is given in brief and his specific contributions to the emancipation of the field are pointed out. In 1948 he received a teaching assignment in urology at Saarland State University Homburg, where in 1952, a Chair of Urology was established, and in 1958 he received the Ordinariat. The "Alken-Prize" which was named after him, is also presented.

  11. Alkene epoxidation employing metal nitro complexes

    DOEpatents

    Andrews, M.A.; Cheng, C.W.; Kelley, K.P.

    1982-07-15

    Process for converting alkenes to form epoxides utilizes transition metal nitro complexes of the formula: M(RCN)/sub 2/XNO/sub 2/ wherein M is palladium or platinum, R is an alkyl or aryl group containing up to 12 carbon atoms, and X is a monoanionic, monodentate ligand such as chlorine, optionally in the presence of molecular oxygen.

  12. Selective oxidation of alkanes and/or alkenes to valuable oxygenates

    DOEpatents

    Lin, Manhua; Pillai, Krishnan S.

    2011-02-15

    A catalyst, its method of preparation and its use for producing at least one of methacrolein and methacrylic acid, for example, by subjecting isobutane or isobutylene or a mixture thereof to a vapor phase catalytic oxidation in the presence of air or oxygen. In the case where isobutane alone is subjected to a vapor phase catalytic oxidation in the presence of air or oxygen, the product is at least one of isobutylene, methacrolein and methacrylic acid. The catalyst comprises a compound having the formula A.sub.aB.sub.bX.sub.xY.sub.yZ.sub.zO.sub.o wherein A is one or more elements selected from the group of Mo, W and Zr, B is one or more elements selected from the group of Bi, Sb, Se, and Te, X is one or more elements selected from the group of Al, Bi, Ca, Ce, Co, Fe, Ga, Mg, Ni, Nb, Sn, W and Zn, Y is one or more elements selected from the group of Ag, Au, B, Cr, Cs, Cu, K, La, Li, Mg, Mn, Na, Nb, Ni, P, Pb, Rb, Re, Ru, Sn, Te, Ti, V and Zr, and Z is one or more element from the X or Y groups or from the following: As, Ba, Pd, Pt, Sr, or mixtures thereof, and wherein a=1, 0.05

  13. Reactor system for conversion of alkanes to alkenes in a external fcc catalyst cooler

    SciTech Connect

    Harandi, M.N.; Owen, H.

    1991-05-28

    This patent describes a fluid catalytic cracking reactor system. It comprises: pressurized regenerator vessel means; first valved conduit means; dehydrogenation reactor means; fluid handling means; second valved conduit means; and third conduit means.

  14. Catalytic dehydroaromatization of n-alkanes by pincer-ligated iridium complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahuja, Ritu; Punji, Benudhar; Findlater, Michael; Supplee, Carolyn; Schinski, William; Brookhart, Maurice; Goldman, Alan S.

    2011-02-01

    Aromatic hydrocarbons are among the most important building blocks in the chemical industry. Benzene, toluene and xylenes are obtained from the high temperature thermolysis of alkanes. Higher alkylaromatics are generally derived from arene-olefin coupling, which gives branched products—that is, secondary alkyl arenes—with olefins higher than ethylene. The dehydrogenation of acyclic alkanes to give alkylaromatics can be achieved using heterogeneous catalysts at high temperatures, but with low yields and low selectivity. We present here the first catalytic conversion of n-alkanes to alkylaromatics using homogeneous or molecular catalysts—specifically ‘pincer’-ligated iridium complexes—and olefinic hydrogen acceptors. For example, the reaction of n-octane affords up to 86% yield of aromatic product, primarily o-xylene and secondarily ethylbenzene. In the case of n-decane and n-dodecane, the resulting alkylarenes are exclusively unbranched (that is, n-alkyl-substituted), with selectivity for the corresponding o-(n-alkyl)toluene.

  15. Using Molecular Modeling to Understand Some of the More Subtle Aspects of Aromaticity and Antiaromaticity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Box, Vernon G. S.

    2011-01-01

    pi-Electron delocalization exerts one of the most significant structure or energy influences in organic chemistry. Apart from determining the shapes of alkenes and alkynes, the planarity of aromatic molecules is a hallmark of pi-electron delocalization. Huckel's rules for aromaticity are easily applied in the teaching of undergraduates, but…

  16. Cross-Coupling Synthesis of Methylallyl Alkenes: Scope Extension and Mechanistic Study.

    PubMed

    Tabélé, Clémence; Curti, Christophe; Kabri, Youssef; Primas, Nicolas; Vanelle, Patrice

    2015-12-21

    Cross-coupling reactions between 2-methyl-2-propen-1-ol and various boronic acids are used to obtain aromatic-(2-methylallyl) derivatives. However, deboronation or isomerization side reactions may occur for several boronic acids. We describe herein the synthesis of original alkenes with good yields under mild reaction conditions that decrease these side reactions. The scope of this environmentally benign reaction is thereby extended to a wide variety of boronic acids. A mechanistic study was conducted and suggested a plausible catalytic cycle mechanism, pointing to the importance of the Lewis acidity of the boronic acid used.

  17. Efficient copper-catalyzed direct intramolecular aminotrifluoromethylation of unactivated alkenes with diverse nitrogen-based nucleophiles.

    PubMed

    Lin, Jin-Shun; Xiong, Ya-Ping; Ma, Can-Liang; Zhao, Li-Jiao; Tan, Bin; Liu, Xin-Yuan

    2014-01-27

    A mild, convenient, and step-economical intramolecular aminotrifluoromethylation of unactivated alkenes with a variety of electronically distinct, nitrogen-based nucleophiles in the presence of a simple copper salt catalyst, in the absence of extra ligands, is described. Many different nitrogen-based nucleophiles (e.g., basic primary aliphatic and aromatic amines, sulfonamides, carbamates, and ureas) can be employed in this new aminotrifluoromethylation reaction. The aminotrifluoromethylation process allows straightforward access to diversely substituted CF3-containing pyrrolidines or indolines, in good to excellent yields, through a direct difunctionalization strategy from the respective acyclic starting materials. Mechanistic studies were conducted and a plausible mechanism was proposed. PMID:24458913

  18. Liquid-liquid interfaces of semifluorinated alkane diblock copolymers with water, alkanes, and perfluorinated alkanes.

    SciTech Connect

    Perahia, Dvora, Dr.; Pierce, Flint; Tsige, Mesfin; Grest, Gary Stephen, Dr.

    2008-08-01

    The liquid-liquid interface between semifluorinated alkane diblock copolymers of the form F3C(CF2)n-1-(CH2)m-1CH3 and water, protonated alkanes, and perfluorinated alkanes are studied by fully atomistic molecular dynamics simulations. A modified version of the OPLS-AA (Optimized Parameter for Liquid Simulation All-Atom) force field of Jorgensen et al. has been used to study the interfacial behavior of semifluorinated diblocks. Aqueous interfaces are found to be sharp, with correspondingly large values of the interfacial tension. Due to the reduced hydrophobicity of the protonated block compared to the fluorinated block, hydrogen enhancement is observed at the interface. Water dipoles in the interfacial region are found to be oriented nearly parallel to the liquid-liquid interface. A number of protonated alkanes and perfluorinated alkanes are found to be mutually miscible with the semifluorinated diblocks. For these liquids, interdiffusion follows the expected Fickian behavior, and concentration-dependent diffusivities are determined.

  19. Pulse radiolysis of alkanes: A time-resolved electron paramagnetic resonance study

    SciTech Connect

    Shkrob, I.A.; Trifunac, A.D.

    1994-02-14

    Time-resolved spin-echo-detected electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) was applied to examine short-lived alkyl radicals formed in pulse radiolysis of liquid alkanes. It was found that the ratio of yields of penultimate and interior radicals in n-alkanes at the instant of their generation is temperature-independent and is ca. 1.25 times greater than the statistical quantity. This higher-than-statistical production of penultimate radicals indicates that the fast ion molecule reactions involving radical cations are a significant route of radical generation. The analysis of spin-echo kinetics in n-alkanes suggests that the alkyl radicals are emissively polarized in spur reactions. this initial polarization rapidly increases with shortening of the aliphatic chain. Another finding is that a long-chain structure of these radicals results in much higher rate of Heisenberg spin exchange relative to the recombination rate. The relative yields of hydrogen abstraction and fragmentation for various branched alkanes are estimated. It is concluded that the fragmentation occurs prior to the formation of radicals in an excited precursor species. Effects of phenolic and alkene additives in radiolysis of n-alkanes are examined. It is demonstrated that phenoxy radicals are produced in dissociative capture of electrons and alkane holes. Another route is a reaction of phenols with free hydrogen atoms. A rapid transfer of singlet correlation from the geminate radical ion pairs is responsible for unusual polarization patterns in the phenoxy and cyclohexadienyl radicals. The significance of these results in the context of cross-linking in polyethylene and higher paraffins is discussed. 56 refs.

  20. Five-membered cyclic metal carbyne: synthesis of osmapentalynes by the reactions of osmapentalene with allene, alkyne, and alkene.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Congqing; Yang, Yuhui; Wu, Jingjing; Luo, Ming; Fan, Jinglan; Zhu, Jun; Xia, Haiping

    2015-06-01

    The synthesis of small cyclic metal carbynes is challenging due to the large angle strain associated with the highly distorted nonlinear triple bonds. Herein, we report a general route for the synthesis of five-membered cyclic metal carbyne complexes, osmapentalynes, by the reactions of an osmapentalene derivative with allene, alkyne, and alkene. Experimental observations and theoretical calculations document the aromaticity in the fused five-membered rings of osmapentalynes. The realization of transforming osmapentalene to osmapentalyne through this general route would not only allow further exploration of metallapentalyne chemistry but also show promising applications of this novel aromatic system with broad absorption band and high molar absorption coefficient. PMID:25917530

  1. Regioselective and Stereospecific Dehydrogenative Annulation Utilizing Silylium Ion-Activated Alkenes.

    PubMed

    Arii, Hidekazu; Yano, Yuto; Nakabayashi, Kenichi; Yamaguchi, Syuhei; Yamamura, Masaki; Mochida, Kunio; Kawashima, Takayuki

    2016-08-01

    Treatment of dialkylbenzylsilanes (1) with trityl tetrakis(pentafluorophenyl)borate (TPFPB) afforded the corresponding silylium ions in equilibrium with their intra- or intermolecular π-complexes, which underwent dehydrogenative annulation with various alkenes to form 1,2,3,4-tetrahydro-2-silanaphthalenes (4) in up to 82% isolated yield. Sterically bulkier substituents on the silicon atom tended to increase the yield of cyclic products 4. The annulation products retained the stereochemistry in cases of the reactions using internal alkenes. The use of diisopropyl(1-naphthyl)silane (2) instead of 1 also resulted in annulation to obtain the 2,3-dihydro-1-sila-1H-phenalene derivatives 6. Electrophilic aromatic substitution at the 8-position was predominant, despite the two potentially reactive positions on the naphthyl group. The steric hindrance of the naphthyl group prevented addition of the cis-alkene to the silylium ion, which would considerably decrease yields of the desired products from 2 compared to those from 1. PMID:27404297

  2. Methods for direct alkene diamination, new & old

    PubMed Central

    de Jong, Sam; Nosal, Daniel G.; Wardrop, Duncan J.

    2012-01-01

    The 1,2-diamine moiety is a ubiquitous structural motif present in a wealth of natural products, including non-proteinogenic amino acids and numerous alkaloids, as well as in pharmaceutical agents, chiral ligands and organic reagents. The biological activity associated with many of these systems and their chemical utility in general has ensured that the development of methods for their preparation is of critical importance. While a wide range of strategies for the preparation of 1,2-diamines have been established, the diamination of alkenes offers a particularly direct and efficient means of accessing these systems. The purpose of this review is to provide an overview of all methods of direct alkene diamination, metal-mediated or otherwise. PMID:22888177

  3. Studies on reactions of ozone with alkenes.

    PubMed

    Protczak, Agnieszka; Trzeszczynski, Jerzy

    2002-01-01

    In the last years, a continuous increase of the O3 concentration has been recorded in the lower atmospheric layers. Photochemical reactions with NO(x), CO and organic compounds are the main sources of O3 in the troposphere. In this work, an attempt was made to determine the impact of alkenes on the O3 concentration in the troposphere. A study on the gas-phase reactions of 03 with 1-hexene, 1-heptene and 1-nonene was made. The reactions were carried out at room temperature under atmospheric pressure. Ozone was formed by the ultraviolet radiation emitted by a mercury lamp, in order to simulate the atmospheric conditions. The changes with time in the concentration of O3, 1-alkenes and formed aldehydes were investigated. Qualitative and quantitative analyses were done by means of the gas chromatography and colorimetry. The following products were identified: pentanal from 1-hexene; hexanal from 1-heptene; oktanal from 1-nonene. For each of the reactions, HCHO was also determined as a product. The reaction rate constants were calculated and obtained in units of 10(-17) cm(-3) molecule(-1) s(-1): 1.94-0.99 for 1-hexene, 5.54-4.51 for 1-heptene and 1.54-0.76 for 1-nonene. Based on the results obtained, an explanation of O3 concentration variations in the planetary boundary layer can be given. Last year a considerable increase of O3 concentration on the roads of Western Europe was recorded. This increase could have resulted from the decrease of alkene concentration in the air due to common use of the catalytic converters in cars. The unsaturated hydrocarbons rapidly oxidize on the catalyst. In Eastern Europe, where the amount of cars equipped with catalytic converters is smaller than in Western Europe, the alkene content in the exhaust fumes results in a decrease of the O3 concentration in the troposphere.

  4. Catalytic, stereospecific syn-dichlorination of alkenes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cresswell, Alexander J.; Eey, Stanley T.-C.; Denmark, Scott E.

    2015-02-01

    As some of the oldest organic chemical reactions known, the ionic additions of elemental halogens such as bromine and chlorine to alkenes are prototypical examples of stereospecific reactions, typically delivering vicinal dihalides resulting from anti-addition. Although the invention of enantioselective variants is an ongoing challenge, the ability to overturn the intrinsic anti-diastereospecificity of these transformations is also a largely unsolved problem. Here, we describe the first catalytic, syn-stereospecific dichlorination of alkenes, employing a group transfer catalyst based on a redox-active main group element (selenium). With diphenyl diselenide (PhSeSePh) (5 mol%) as the pre-catalyst, benzyltriethylammonium chloride (BnEt3NCl) as the chloride source and an N-fluoropyridinium salt as the oxidant, a wide variety of functionalized cyclic and acyclic 1,2-disubstituted alkenes, including simple allylic alcohols, deliver syn-dichlorides with exquisite stereocontrol. This methodology is expected to find applications in streamlining the synthesis of polychlorinated natural products such as the chlorosulfolipids.

  5. Catalytic, Stereospecific Syn-Dichlorination of Alkenes

    PubMed Central

    Cresswell, Alexander J.; Eey, Stanley T.-C.; Denmark, Scott E.

    2015-01-01

    As some of the oldest organic chemical reactions known, the ionic additions of elemental halogens such as bromine and chlorine to alkenes are prototypical examples of stereospecific reactions, typically delivering vicinal dihalides resulting from anti-addition. Whilst the invention of enantioselective variants is an ongoing challenge, the ability to overturn the intrinsic anti-diastereospecificity of these transformations is also a largely unsolved problem. In this Article, we describe the first catalytic, syn-stereospecific dichlorination of alkenes, employing a group transfer catalyst based on a redox-active main group element (i.e., selenium). Thus, with diphenyl diselenide (PhSeSePh) (5 mol %) as the pre-catalyst, benzyltriethylammonium chloride (BnEt3NCl) as the chloride source, and an N-fluoropyridinium salt as the oxidant, a wide variety of functionalized cyclic and acyclic 1,2-disubstituted alkenes, including simple allylic alcohols, deliver syn-dichlorides with exquisite stereocontrol. This methodology is expected to find applications in streamlining the synthesis of polychlorinated natural products such as the chlorosulfolipids. PMID:25615668

  6. Trifluoromethylation of alkenes by visible light photoredox catalysis.

    PubMed

    Iqbal, Naeem; Choi, Sungkyu; Kim, Eunjin; Cho, Eun Jin

    2012-12-21

    A method for trifluoromethylation of alkenes has been developed employing visible light photoredox catalysis with CF(3)I, Ru(Phen)(3)Cl(2), and DBU. This process works especially well for terminal alkenes to give alkenyl-CF(3) products with only E-stereochemistry. The mild reaction conditions enable the trifluoromethylation of a range of alkenes that bear various functional groups. PMID:23167602

  7. [C. E. Alken (1909-1986) and the Alken-Prize].

    PubMed

    Konert, J

    2016-06-01

    C. E. Alken is regarded as the Nestor of German urology post World War II. His development path is given in brief and his specific contributions to the emancipation of the field are pointed out. In 1948 he received a teaching assignment in urology at Saarland State University Homburg, where in 1952, a Chair of Urology was established, and in 1958 he received the Ordinariat. The "Alken-Prize" which was named after him, is also presented. PMID:27160773

  8. Anaerobic oxidation of long-chain n-alkanes by the hyperthermophilic sulfate-reducing archaeon, Archaeoglobus fulgidus

    PubMed Central

    Khelifi, Nadia; Amin Ali, Oulfat; Roche, Philippe; Grossi, Vincent; Brochier-Armanet, Céline; Valette, Odile; Ollivier, Bernard; Dolla, Alain; Hirschler-Réa, Agnès

    2014-01-01

    The thermophilic sulfate-reducing archaeon Archaeoglobus fulgidus strain VC-16 (DSM 4304), which is known to oxidize fatty acids and n-alkenes, was shown to oxidize saturated hydrocarbons (n-alkanes in the range C10–C21) with thiosulfate or sulfate as a terminal electron acceptor. The amount of n-hexadecane degradation observed was in stoichiometric agreement with the theoretically expected amount of thiosulfate reduction. One of the pathways used by anaerobic microorganisms to activate alkanes is addition to fumarate that involves alkylsuccinate synthase as a key enzyme. A search for genes encoding homologous enzymes in A. fulgidus identified the pflD gene (locus-tag AF1449) that was previously annotated as a pyruvate formate lyase. A phylogenetic analysis revealed that this gene is of bacterial origin and was likely acquired by A. fulgidus from a bacterial donor through a horizontal gene transfer. Based on three-dimensional modeling of the corresponding protein and molecular dynamic simulations, we hypothesize an alkylsuccinate synthase activity for this gene product. The pflD gene expression was upregulated during the growth of A. fulgidus on an n-alkane (C16) compared with growth on a fatty acid. Our results suggest that anaerobic alkane degradation in A. fulgidus may involve the gene pflD in alkane activation through addition to fumarate. These findings highlight the possible importance of hydrocarbon oxidation at high temperatures by A. fulgidus in hydrothermal vents and the deep biosphere. PMID:24763368

  9. Catalytic conversion of light alkanes

    SciTech Connect

    Lyons, J.E.

    1992-06-30

    The second Quarterly Report of 1992 on the Catalytic Conversion of Light Alkanes reviews the work done between April 1, 1992 and June 31, 1992 on the Cooperative Agreement. The mission of this work is to devise a new catalyst which can be used in a simple economic process to convert the light alkanes in natural gas to oxygenate products that can either be used as clean-burning, high octane liquid fuels, as fuel components or as precursors to liquid hydrocarbon uwspomdon fuel. During the past quarter we have continued to design, prepare, characterize and test novel catalysts for the mild selective reaction of light hydrocarbons with air or oxygen to produce alcohols directly. These catalysts are designed to form active metal oxo (MO) species and to be uniquely active for the homolytic cleavage of the carbon-hydrogen bonds in light alkanes producing intermediates which can form alcohols. We continue to investigate three molecular environments for the active catalytic species that we are trying to generate: electron-deficient macrocycles (PHASE I), polyoxometallates (PHASE II), and regular oxidic lattices including zeolites and related structures as well as other molecular surface structures having metal oxo groups (PHASE I).

  10. Ligand-Controlled Regiodivergent Copper-Catalyzed Alkylboration of Alkenes.

    PubMed

    Su, Wei; Gong, Tian-Jun; Lu, Xi; Xu, Meng-Yu; Yu, Chu-Guo; Xu, Zheng-Yang; Yu, Hai-Zhu; Xiao, Bin; Fu, Yao

    2015-10-26

    A novel copper-catalyzed regiodivergent alkylboration of alkenes with bis(pinacolato)diboron and alkyl halides has been developed. The regioselectivity of the alkylboration was controlled by subtle differences in the ligand structure. The reaction thus enables the practical, regiodivergent synthesis of two different alkyl boronic esters with complex structures from a single alkene. PMID:26338141

  11. Tritium labelled alkenes via the Shapiro reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Saljoughian, Manouchehr; Morimoto, Hiromi; Than, Chit; Williams, P.G.

    1995-12-31

    The authors report a simple synthesis of a variety of tritiated alkenes with high specific activity. The labelling steps involved in situ generation of the vinyllithium derivatives of the intermediate trisylhydrazone at low temperature, followed by quenching with high specific activity Tritiated water as an electrophile to generate the final tritiated alkenes. Several ketonic precursors with cyclopentanone and cyclohexanone rings, {alpha},{beta}-unsaturated and large ring cyclic ketones were selected and the corresponding trisylhydrazone derivatives were prepared. The Shapiro reaction conditions were optimized to work at a millimolar scale using deuteriated water as the electrophile. The successful reaction conditions were finally applied to the tritiation reactions. The chemical and radiochemical purity, and the specific radioactivity of the reaction products were determined by radio-hplc, gas chromatography and liquid scintillation counting as well as tritium NMR spectroscopy. The stereochemistry and specificity of tritium labelling was also established with tritium NMR spectroscopy. Application of different organolithium bases and the reaction mechanisms will be discussed.

  12. A Kinetic Modeling study on the Oxidation of Primary Reference Fuel?Toluene Mixtures Including Cross Reactions between Aromatics and Aliphatics

    SciTech Connect

    Sakai, Y; Miyoshi, A; Koshi, M; Pitz, W J

    2008-01-09

    A detailed chemical kinetic model for the mixtures of Primary Reference Fuel (PRF: n-heptane and iso-octane) and toluene has been proposed. This model is divided into three parts; a PRF mechanism [T. Ogura et al., Energy & Fuels 21 (2007) 3233-3239], toluene sub-mechanism and cross reactions between PRF and toluene. Toluene sub-mechanism includes the low temperature kinetics relevant to engine conditions. A chemical kinetic mechanism proposed by Pitz et al. [Proc. the 2nd Joint Meeting of the U.S. Combust. Institute (2001)] was used as a starting model and modified by updating rate coefficients. Theoretical estimations of rate coefficients were performed for toluene and benzyl radical reactions important at low temperatures. Cross-reactions between alkane, alkene, and aromatics were also included in order to account for the acceleration by the addition of toluene into iso-octane recently found in the shock tube study of the ignition delay [Y. Sakai et al, SAE 2007-01-4014 (2007)]. Validations of the model were performed with existing shock tube and flow tube data. The model well predicts the ignition characteristics of toluene and PRF/Toluene mixtures under the wide range of temperatures (500-1700 K) and pressures (2-50 atm). It is found that reactions of benzyl radical with oxygen molecule determine the reactivity of toluene at low temperature. Although the effect of toluene addition to iso-octane is not fully resolved, the reactions of alkene with benzyl radical have the possibility to account for the kinetic interactions between PRF and toluene.

  13. Changes in the concentration and relative abundance of alkanes and PAHs from the Deepwater Horizon oiling of coastal marshes.

    PubMed

    Turner, R E; Overton, E B; Meyer, B M; Miles, M S; Hooper-Bui, L

    2014-09-15

    We determined changes of 28 alkanes and 43 different PAHs in 418 wetland soil samples collected on ten sampling trips to three Louisiana estuaries before and after they were oiled from the 2010 Deepwater Horizon disaster. There was a significant decline in 22 of the 28 alkane analytes (0.42% day(-1)), no change in 6, over 2.5 years. The concentration of five aromatic petroleum hydrocarbons (PAHs) increased (range 0.25-0.70% day(-1)), whereas the total PAH pool did not change. Of these five, naphthalene and C-1-naphthalenes are suggested to be of higher toxicity than the other three because of their relatively higher volatility or solubility. The relative proportions of alkane analytes, but not PAHs, does not yet resemble that in the pre-oiled marshes after 3 years, The trajectories of nine indicators for degradation/weathering were either inconclusive or misleading (alkanes) or confirmed the relatively meager degradation of PAHs. PMID:25127500

  14. Comparative study of alkali-vapour cells with alkane-, alkeneand 1-nonadecylbenzene-based antirelaxation wall coatings

    SciTech Connect

    Balabas, M V; Tretiak, O Yu

    2013-12-31

    The dependence of both longitudinal and transverse relaxation times of ground-state magnetic polarisation in alkali atoms on the coating temperature is experimentally studied for the first time in a rubidium-vapour cell with 1-nonadecylbenzene antirelaxation coating of inner walls. The comparison of these times with the relaxation times in a caesium-vapour cell with alkane wall coatings is presented. It is found that within the studied temperature range (294 – 340K) the transverse relaxation time decreases with increasing temperature of alkene and 1-nonadecylbenzene coatings. For the alkane coating such a dependence was not explicitly found. The longitudinal relaxation time begins to decrease in all cases when passing a certain critical temperature of the coating material. It is found that the unsaturated radical structure of the coating material molecules strongly affects its antirelaxation properties. (optical pumping)

  15. Bioconjugation with strained alkenes and alkynes.

    PubMed

    Debets, Marjoke F; van Berkel, Sander S; Dommerholt, Jan; Dirks, A Ton J; Rutjes, Floris P J T; van Delft, Floris L

    2011-09-20

    The structural complexity of molecules isolated from biological sources has always served as an inspiration for organic chemists. Since the first synthesis of a natural product, urea, chemists have been challenged to prepare exact copies of natural structures in the laboratory. As a result, a broad repertoire of synthetic transformations has been developed over the years. It is now feasible to synthesize organic molecules of enormous complexity, and also molecules with less structural complexity but prodigious societal impact, such as nylon, TNT, polystyrene, statins, estradiol, XTC, and many more. Unfortunately, only a few chemical transformations are so mild and precise that they can be used to selectively modify biochemical structures, such as proteins or nucleic acids; these are the so-called bioconjugation strategies. Even more challenging is to apply a chemical reaction on or in living cells or whole organisms; these are the so-called bioorthogonal reactions. These fields of research are of particular importance because they not only pose a worthy challenge for chemists but also offer unprecedented possibilities for studying biological systems, especially in areas in which traditional biochemistry and molecular biology tools fall short. Recent years have seen tremendous growth in the chemical biology toolbox. In particular, a rapidly increasing number of bioorthogonal reactions has been developed based on chemistry involving strained alkenes or strained alkynes. Such strained unsaturated systems have the unique ability to undergo (3 + 2) and (4 + 2) cycloadditions with a diverse set of complementary reaction partners. Accordingly, chemistry centered around strain-promoted cycloadditions has been exploited to precisely modify biopolymers, ranging from nucleic acids to proteins to glycans. In this Account, we describe progress in bioconjugation centered around cycloadditions of these strained unsaturated systems. Being among the first to recognize the utility

  16. Synthesis of terminal alkenes from internal alkenes and ethylene via olefin metathesis

    DOEpatents

    Schrodi, Yann

    2015-09-22

    This invention relates generally to olefin metathesis, and more particularly relates to the synthesis of terminal alkenes from internal alkenes using a cross-metathesis reaction catalyzed by a selected olefin metathesis catalyst. In one embodiment of the invention, for example, a method is provided for synthesizing a terminal olefin, the method comprising contacting an olefinic substrate comprised of at least one internal olefin with ethylene, in the presence of a metathesis catalyst, wherein the catalyst is present in an amount that is less than about 1000 ppm relative to the olefinic substrate, and wherein the metathesis catalyst has the structure of formula (II) ##STR00001## wherein the various substituents are as defined herein. The invention has utility, for example, in the fields of catalysis, organic synthesis, and industrial chemistry.

  17. Synthesis of terminal alkenes from internal alkenes and ethylene via olefin metathesis

    DOEpatents

    Schrodi, Yann

    2011-11-29

    This invention relates generally to olefin metathesis, and more particularly relates to the synthesis of terminal alkenes from internal alkenes using a cross-metathesis reaction catalyzed by a selected olefin metathesis catalyst. In one embodiment of the invention, for example, a method is provided for synthesizing a terminal olefin, the method comprising contacting an olefinic substrate comprised of at least one internal olefin with ethylene, in the presence of a metathesis catalyst, wherein the catalyst is present in an amount that is less than about 1000 ppm relative to the olefinic substrate, and wherein the metathesis catalyst has the structure of formula (II) ##STR00001## wherein the various substituents are as defined herein. The invention has utility, for example, in the fields of catalysis, organic synthesis, and industrial chemistry.

  18. Synthesis of terminal alkenes from internal alkenes and ethylene via olefin metathesis

    DOEpatents

    Schrodi, Yann

    2013-07-09

    This invention relates generally to olefin metathesis, and more particularly relates to the synthesis of terminal alkenes from internal alkenes using a cross-metathesis reaction catalyzed by a selected olefin metathesis catalyst. In one embodiment of the invention, for example, a method is provided for synthesizing a terminal olefin, the method comprising contacting an olefinic substrate comprised of at least one internal olefin with ethylene, in the presence of a metathesis catalyst, wherein the catalyst is present in an amount that is less than about 1000 ppm relative to the olefinic substrate, and wherein the metathesis catalyst has the structure of formula (II) ##STR00001## wherein the various substituents are as defined herein. The invention has utility, for example, in the fields of catalysis, organic synthesis, and industrial chemistry.

  19. Synthesis of terminal alkenes from internal alkenes and ethylene via olefin metathesis

    DOEpatents

    Schrodi, Yann

    2016-02-09

    This invention relates generally to olefin metathesis, and more particularly relates to the synthesis of terminal alkenes from internal alkenes using a cross-metathesis reaction catalyzed by a selected olefin metathesis catalyst. In one embodiment of the invention, for example, a method is provided for synthesizing a terminal olefin, the method comprising contacting an olefinic substrate comprised of at least one internal olefin with ethylene, in the presence of a metathesis catalyst, wherein the catalyst is present in an amount that is less than about 1000 ppm relative to the olefinic substrate, and wherein the metathesis catalyst has the structure of formula (II) ##STR00001## wherein the various substituents are as defined herein. The invention has utility, for example, in the fields of catalysis, organic synthesis, and industrial chemistry.

  20. Biodegradation of variable-chain-length n-alkanes in Rhodococcus opacus R7 and the involvement of an alkane hydroxylase system in the metabolism

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Rhodococcus opacus R7 is a Gram-positive bacterium isolated from a polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon contaminated soil for its versatile metabolism; indeed the strain is able to grow on naphthalene, o-xylene, and several long- and medium-chain n-alkanes. In this work we determined the degradation of n-alkanes in Rhodococcus opacus R7 in presence of n-dodecane (C12), n-hexadecane (C16), n-eicosane (C20), n-tetracosane (C24) and the metabolic pathway in presence of C12. The consumption rate of C12 was 88%, of C16 was 69%, of C20 was 51% and of C24 it was 78%. The decrement of the degradation rate seems to be correlated to the length of the aliphatic chain of these hydrocarbons. On the basis of the metabolic intermediates determined by the R7 growth on C12, our data indicated that R. opacus R7 metabolizes medium-chain n-alkanes by the primary alcohol formation. This represents a difference in comparison with other Rhodococcus strains, in which a mixture of the two alcohols was observed. By GC-MSD analysis we also identified the monocarboxylic acid, confirming the terminal oxidation. Moreover, the alkB gene cluster from R. opacus R7 was isolated and its involvement in the n-alkane degradation system was investigated by the cloning of this genomic region into a shuttle-vector E. coli-Rhodococcus to evaluate the alkane hydroxylase activity. Our results showed an increased biodegradation of C12 in the recombinant strain R. erythropolis AP (pTipQT1-alkR7) in comparison with the wild type strain R. erythropolis AP. These data supported the involvement of the alkB gene cluster in the n-alkane degradation in the R7 strain. PMID:25401074

  1. Catalytic reversible alkene-nitrile interconversion through controllable transfer hydrocyanation.

    PubMed

    Fang, Xianjie; Yu, Peng; Morandi, Bill

    2016-02-19

    Nitriles and alkenes are important synthetic intermediates with complementary reactivity that play a central role in the preparation of materials, pharmaceuticals, cosmetics, and agrochemicals. Here, we report a nickel-catalyzed transfer hydrocyanation reaction between a wide range (60 examples) of alkyl nitriles and alkenes. This strategy not only overcomes the toxicity challenge posed by the use of HCN in traditional approaches, but also encompasses distinct chemical advances, including retro-hydrocyanation and anti-Markovnikov regioselectivity. In a broader context, this work highlights an approach to the reversible hydrofunctionalization of alkenes through thermodynamically controlled transfer reactions to circumvent the use of volatile and hazardous reagents in the laboratory. PMID:26912891

  2. Alkane-Based Urethane Potting Compounds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morris, D. E.

    1986-01-01

    New low viscosity urethanes easily mixed, molded, and outgassed. Alkane-based urethanes resist hydrolysis and oxidation and have excellent dielectric properties. Low-viscosity alkane-based urethane prepolymer prepared by one-step reaction of either isophorone diisocyanate or methyl-bis (4-cyclohexyl isocyanate) with hydrogenated, hydroxy-terminated polybutadiene (HTPBD).

  3. Generation of standard gas mixtures of halogenated, aliphatic, and aromatic compounds and prediction of the individual output rates based on molecular formula and boiling point.

    PubMed

    Thorenz, Ute R; Kundel, Michael; Müller, Lars; Hoffmann, Thorsten

    2012-11-01

    In this work, we describe a simple diffusion capillary device for the generation of various organic test gases. Using a set of basic equations the output rate of the test gas devices can easily be predicted only based on the molecular formula and the boiling point of the compounds of interest. Since these parameters are easily accessible for a large number of potential analytes, even for those compounds which are typically not listed in physico-chemical handbooks or internet databases, the adjustment of the test gas source to the concentration range required for the individual analytical application is straightforward. The agreement of the predicted and measured values is shown to be valid for different groups of chemicals, such as halocarbons, alkanes, alkenes, and aromatic compounds and for different dimensions of the diffusion capillaries. The limits of the predictability of the output rates are explored and observed to result in an underprediction of the output rates when very thin capillaries are used. It is demonstrated that pressure variations are responsible for the observed deviation of the output rates. To overcome the influence of pressure variations and at the same time to establish a suitable test gas source for highly volatile compounds, also the usability of permeation sources is explored, for example for the generation of molecular bromine test gases.

  4. Photochemical electron transfer mediated addition of naphthylamine derivatives to electron-deficient alkenes.

    PubMed

    Jahjah, Rabih; Gassama, Abdoulaye; Dumur, Frédéric; Marinković, Siniša; Richert, Sabine; Landgraf, Stephan; Lebrun, Aurélien; Cadiou, Cyril; Sellès, Patrice; Hoffmann, Norbert

    2011-09-01

    Using photochemical electron transfer, N,N-dimethylnaphthylamine derivatives are added to α,β-unsaturated carboxylates. The addition takes place exclusively in the α-position of electron-deficient alkenes and mainly in the 4-position of N,N-dimethylnaphthalen-1-amine. A minor regioisomer results from the addition in the 5-position of this naphthylamine. A physicochemical study reveals that the fluorescence quenching of N,N-dimethylnaphthalen-1-amine is diffusion-controlled and that the back electron transfer is highly efficient. Therefore no transformation is observed at lower concentrations. To overcome this limitation and to induce an efficient transformation, minor amounts of water or another proton donor as well as an excess of the naphthylamine derivative are necessary. A mechanism involving a contact radical ion pair is discussed. Isotopic labeling experiments reveal that no hydrogen is directly transferred between the substrates. The hydrogen transfer to the furanone moiety observed in the overall reaction therefore results from an exchange with the reaction medium. An electrophilic oxoallyl radical generated from the furanone reacts with the naphthylamine used in excess. Concerning some mechanistic details, the reaction is compared with radical and electrophilic aromatic substitutions. The transformation was carried out with a variety of electron-deficient alkenes. Sterically hindered furanone derivatives are less reactive under standard conditions. In a first experiment, such a compound was transformed using heterogeneous electron transfer photocatalysis with TiO(2).

  5. Ruthenium-Catalyzed Cross-Coupling of Maleimides with Alkenes.

    PubMed

    Morita, Tomohiro; Akita, Mitsutoshi; Satoh, Tetsuya; Kakiuchi, Fumitoshi; Miura, Masahiro

    2016-09-16

    The cross-coupling of maleimides with electron-deficient alkenes such as acrylates proceeds smoothly under ruthenium catalysis. This unique C-C coupling provides a simple, straightforward synthetic method for preparing alkylidene succinimide derivatives. PMID:27571229

  6. Copper-Catalyzed Intramolecular Oxidative Amination of Unactivated Internal Alkenes.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Peng; Xu, Fan; Qian, Xiang-Yang; Yohannes, Yared; Song, Jinshuai; Lu, Xin; Xu, Hai-Chao

    2016-03-18

    A copper-catalyzed oxidative amination of unactivated internal alkenes has been developed. The Wacker-type oxidative alkene amination reaction is traditionally catalyzed by a palladium through a mechanism involving aminopalladation and β-hydride elimination. Replacing the precious and scarce palladium with a cheap and abundant copper for this transformation has been challenging because of the difficulty associated with the aminocupration of internal alkenes. The combination of a simple copper salt, without additional ligand, as the catalyst and Dess-Martin periodinane as the oxidant, promotes efficiently the oxidative amination of allylic carbamates and ureas bearing di- and trisubstituted alkenes leading to oxazolidinones and imidazolidinones. Preliminary mechanistic studies suggested a hybrid radical-organometallic mechanism involving an amidyl radical cyclization to form the key C-N bond.

  7. Catalytic, Stereoselective Dihalogenation of Alkenes: Challenges and Opportunities.

    PubMed

    Cresswell, Alexander J; Eey, Stanley T-C; Denmark, Scott E

    2015-12-21

    Although recent years have witnessed significant advances in the development of catalytic, enantioselective halofunctionalizations of alkenes, the related dihalogenation of olefins to afford enantioenriched vicinal dihalide products remains comparatively underdeveloped. However, the growing number of complex natural products bearing halogen atoms at stereogenic centers has underscored this critical gap in the synthetic chemist's arsenal. This Review highlights the selectivity challenges inherent in the design of enantioselective dihalogenation processes, and formulates a mechanism-based classification of alkene dihalogenations, including those that may circumvent the "classical" haliranium (or alkene-dihalogen π-complex) intermediates. A variety of metal and main group halide reagents that have been used for the dichlorination or dibromination of alkenes are discussed, and the proposed mechanisms of these transformations are critically evaluated.

  8. Alkene dihydroxylation with malonoyl peroxides: catalysis using fluorinated alcohols.

    PubMed

    Picon, Sylvain; Rawling, Michael; Campbell, Matthew; Tomkinson, Nicholas C O

    2012-12-21

    The effect of fluorinated alcohols on the dihydroxylation of alkenes using cyclopropyl malonoyl peroxide is described. Addition of perfluoro-tert-butyl alcohol to a toluene solution of alkene and peroxide increases the rate of product formation and the stereoselectivity observed, providing a simple and effective method for acceleration of this important class of reaction. Basic hydrolysis of the crude reaction mixture provides access to syn-diols in high yield and stereoselectivity.

  9. Hydroaminations of alkenes: a radical, revised, and expanded version.

    PubMed

    Villa, Matteo; Jacobi von Wangelin, Axel

    2015-10-01

    Radical changes: The applicability of alkene hydroamination has recently been significantly expanded by the development of radical variants that are based on initial hydrogen atom transfer to the alkene. This Highlight assesses the current state of the art, focusing on an iron-catalyzed reaction that utilizes stable nitroarenes as the electrophilic N component and is based on the dual catalytic activation of both starting materials.

  10. A highly catalytic and selective conversion of carboxylic acids to 1-alkenes of one less carbon atom

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, J.A.; Nelson, J.A.; Byrne, M.P. )

    1993-01-01

    An equimolar mixture of a carboxylic acid and acetic anhydride produces a reagent combination that undergoes a highly efficient decarbonylation/dehydration at 250[degrees]C using either Pd- or Rh-based catalyst systems, affording excellent yields of the corresponding 1-alkenes and one less carbon atom. The stoichiometric and catalytic decarbonylation of aliphatic aldehydes and acid chlorides to alkanes and alkenes, respectively, by transition-metal complexes are well-known and synthetically useful transformations. Relatively little, however, has been reported concerning the analogous decarbonylation/dehydration of aliphatic carboxylic acids to olefins, with generally poor results achieved in terms of catalyst efficiency and selectivity toward terminal olefin formation in the product. For example, the decarbonylation/dehydration of stearic acid to heptadecane using a Rh-based catalyst was reported to proceed with a maximum catalyst turnover number (TON; moles of olefin product formed per mole of catalyst used) of ca. 250, with selectivities toward 1-heptadecene formation typically below 50%. Interestingly, results were presented in this work which suggested that the decarbonylation of stearic acid proceeded via intermediate formation of stearic anhydride. Use of a preformed, symmetrical anhydride is not desirable from an economic or synthetic viewpoint, particularly since its decarbonylation should result in the formation of equal amounts of olefin and carboxylic acid coproducts. The authors now report here that the use of a carboxylic acid substrate as an equimolar mixture with acetic anhydride (Ac[sub 2]O) produces a mixed anhydride system which undergoes an extremely facile decarbonylation reaction to provide a general and highly selective route to the corresponding 1-alkenes of one less carbon atom. 19 refs., 1 tab.

  11. Cobalt-catalyzed chelation assisted C-H allylation of aromatic amides with unactivated olefins.

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi, Takuma; Kommagalla, Yadagiri; Aihara, Yoshinori; Chatani, Naoto

    2016-08-01

    The cobalt-catalyzed chelation assisted ortho C-H allylation of aromatic amides with unactivated aliphatic alkenes is reported. The reaction proceeds in air under mild reaction conditions, providing allylated products in good to excellent yields with high E-selectivities. This operationally simple method shows a high functional group tolerance.

  12. Facile Sc(OTf)3-catalyzed generation and successive aromatization of isobenzofuran from o-dicarbonylbenzenes.

    PubMed

    Nishina, Yuta; Kida, Tatsuya; Ureshino, Tomonari

    2011-08-01

    Isobenzofuran can be prepared from o-phthalaldehyde using hydrosilane. The formed isobenzofuran is trapped by an alkene via a Diels-Alder reaction. Further dehydration proceeds to furnish the conjugated aromatic compound. This multistep reaction was promoted by catalytic amounts of Sc(OTf)(3).

  13. Supported organoiridium catalysts for alkane dehydrogenation

    SciTech Connect

    Baker, R. Thomas; Sattelberger, Alfred P.; Li, Hongbo

    2013-09-03

    Solid supported organoiridium catalysts, a process for preparing such solid supported organoiridium catalysts, and the use of such solid supported organoiridium catalysts in dehydrogenation reactions of alkanes is provided. The catalysts can be easily recovered and recycled.

  14. Reactions of FeOH/sup +/ and CoOH/sup +/ with alkanes in the gas phase

    SciTech Connect

    Cassady, C.J.; Freiser, B.S.

    1986-09-17

    The gas-phase reactions of FeOH/sup +/ and CoOH/sup +/ with aliphatic alkanes up to C/sub 6/H/sub 14/ were studied. As was the case in earlier studies on MH/sup +/ and MCH/sub 3//sup +/ (M = Fe, Co), FeOH/sup +/ is found to be less reactive than CoOH/sup +/. For aliphatic alkanes, CoOH/sup +/ reacts with species larger than ethane, while FeOH/sup +/ only reacts with branched alkanes and hexane. Following initial C-H insertion, H/sub 2/O loss dominates the FeOH/sup +/ reactions. For CoOH/sup +/, however, H/sub 2/O loss leads to an activated Co/sup +/-alkyl complex which decomposes further. In addition, dehydrogenation with no H/sub 2/O elimination also occurs in contrast to FeH/sup +/, CoH/sup +/, and CoCH/sub 3//sup +/ with alkanes, where complete loss of the initial ligand is seen. Initial C-C insertion is also a major pathway leading to M(OH)(alkene)/sup +/ species, and for FeOH/sup +/, pressure-dependent adduct formation is also observed with hexane and several branched alkanes. Both FeOH/sup +/ and CoOH/sup +/ react with cyclopropane and cyclobutane by initial C-C insertion. For cyclopentane and cyclohexane, CoOH/sup +/ reacts exclusively by C-H insertion, while FeOH/sup +/ is unreactive. As expected on the basis of thermodynamic calculations, the overall reactivity of MOH/sup +/ is intermediate to that of MH/sup +/ and MCH/sub 3//sup +/.

  15. Determining the Impact of Ligand and Alkene Substituents on Bonding in Gold(I)-Alkene Complexes Supported by N-Heterocyclic Carbenes: A Computational Study.

    PubMed

    York, John T

    2016-08-01

    The nature of the gold(I)-alkene bond in [(NHC)Au(alkene)](+) complexes (where NHC is the N-heterocyclic carbene 1,3-bis(2,6-dimethylphenyl)imidazole-2-ylidine and its derivatives) has been studied using density functional theory. By utilization of a series of electron-withdrawing and electron-donating substituents ranging from -NO2 to -NH2, an examination of substituent effects has been undertaken with 4-substituted NHC ligands, monosubstituted ethylene derivatives, and 4-substituted styrene derivatives. Natural population, natural bond orbital (NBO), molecular orbital, and bond energy decomposition analysis (EDA) methods have been used to quantify a number of important parameters, including the charge of the coordinated alkenes and the magnitude of alkene→[(NHC)Au](+) and [(NHC)Au](+)→alkene electron donation. EDA methods have also been used to quantify the strength of the [(NHC)Au](+)-(alkene) bond and the impact of both ligand and alkene substitution on different components of the interaction, including polarization, orbital, electrostatic, and Pauli repulsive contributions. Finally, molecular orbital analysis has been used to understand the activation of the alkenes in terms of orbital composition and stabilization within the [(NHC)Au(alkene)](+) complexes relative to the free alkenes. These results provide important insight into the fundamental nature of gold(I)-alkene bonding and the impact of both ligand and alkene substitution on the electronic structure of these complexes. PMID:27455390

  16. Determining the Impact of Ligand and Alkene Substituents on Bonding in Gold(I)-Alkene Complexes Supported by N-Heterocyclic Carbenes: A Computational Study.

    PubMed

    York, John T

    2016-08-01

    The nature of the gold(I)-alkene bond in [(NHC)Au(alkene)](+) complexes (where NHC is the N-heterocyclic carbene 1,3-bis(2,6-dimethylphenyl)imidazole-2-ylidine and its derivatives) has been studied using density functional theory. By utilization of a series of electron-withdrawing and electron-donating substituents ranging from -NO2 to -NH2, an examination of substituent effects has been undertaken with 4-substituted NHC ligands, monosubstituted ethylene derivatives, and 4-substituted styrene derivatives. Natural population, natural bond orbital (NBO), molecular orbital, and bond energy decomposition analysis (EDA) methods have been used to quantify a number of important parameters, including the charge of the coordinated alkenes and the magnitude of alkene→[(NHC)Au](+) and [(NHC)Au](+)→alkene electron donation. EDA methods have also been used to quantify the strength of the [(NHC)Au](+)-(alkene) bond and the impact of both ligand and alkene substitution on different components of the interaction, including polarization, orbital, electrostatic, and Pauli repulsive contributions. Finally, molecular orbital analysis has been used to understand the activation of the alkenes in terms of orbital composition and stabilization within the [(NHC)Au(alkene)](+) complexes relative to the free alkenes. These results provide important insight into the fundamental nature of gold(I)-alkene bonding and the impact of both ligand and alkene substitution on the electronic structure of these complexes.

  17. Intramolecular Alkene Aminocarbonylation Using Concerted Cycloadditions of Amino-Isocyanates.

    PubMed

    Ivanovich, Ryan A; Clavette, Christian; Vincent-Rocan, Jean-François; Roveda, Jean-Grégoire; Gorelsky, Serge I; Beauchemin, André M

    2016-06-01

    The ubiquity of nitrogen heterocycles in biologically active molecules challenges synthetic chemists to develop a variety of tools for their construction. While developing metal-free hydroamination reactions of hydrazine derivatives, it was discovered that carbazates and semicarbazides can also lead to alkene aminocarbonylation products if nitrogen-substituted isocyanates (N-isocyanates) are formed in situ as reactive intermediates. At first this reaction required high temperatures (150-200 °C), and issues included competing hydroamination and N-isocyanate dimerization pathways. Herein, improved conditions for concerted intramolecular alkene aminocarbonylation with N-isocyanates are reported. The use of βN-benzyl carbazate precursors allows the effective minimization of N-isocyanate dimerization. Diminished dimerization leads to higher yields of alkene aminocarbonylation products, to reactivity at lower temperatures, and to an improved scope for a reaction sequence involving alkene aminocarbonylation followed by 1,2-migration of the benzyl group. Furthermore, fine-tuning of the blocking (masking) group on the N-isocyanate precursor, and reaction conditions relying on base catalysis for N-isocyanate formation from simpler precursors resulted in room temperature reactivity, consequently minimizing the competing hydroamination pathway. Collectively, this work highlights that controlled reactivity of aminoisocyanates is possible, and provides a broadly applicable alkene aminocarbonylation approach to heterocycles possessing the β-aminocarbonyl motif. PMID:27112602

  18. Intramolecular Alkene Aminocarbonylation Using Concerted Cycloadditions of Amino-Isocyanates.

    PubMed

    Ivanovich, Ryan A; Clavette, Christian; Vincent-Rocan, Jean-François; Roveda, Jean-Grégoire; Gorelsky, Serge I; Beauchemin, André M

    2016-06-01

    The ubiquity of nitrogen heterocycles in biologically active molecules challenges synthetic chemists to develop a variety of tools for their construction. While developing metal-free hydroamination reactions of hydrazine derivatives, it was discovered that carbazates and semicarbazides can also lead to alkene aminocarbonylation products if nitrogen-substituted isocyanates (N-isocyanates) are formed in situ as reactive intermediates. At first this reaction required high temperatures (150-200 °C), and issues included competing hydroamination and N-isocyanate dimerization pathways. Herein, improved conditions for concerted intramolecular alkene aminocarbonylation with N-isocyanates are reported. The use of βN-benzyl carbazate precursors allows the effective minimization of N-isocyanate dimerization. Diminished dimerization leads to higher yields of alkene aminocarbonylation products, to reactivity at lower temperatures, and to an improved scope for a reaction sequence involving alkene aminocarbonylation followed by 1,2-migration of the benzyl group. Furthermore, fine-tuning of the blocking (masking) group on the N-isocyanate precursor, and reaction conditions relying on base catalysis for N-isocyanate formation from simpler precursors resulted in room temperature reactivity, consequently minimizing the competing hydroamination pathway. Collectively, this work highlights that controlled reactivity of aminoisocyanates is possible, and provides a broadly applicable alkene aminocarbonylation approach to heterocycles possessing the β-aminocarbonyl motif.

  19. Combinatorial metabolic engineering of Saccharomyces cerevisiae for terminal alkene production.

    PubMed

    Chen, Binbin; Lee, Dong-Yup; Chang, Matthew Wook

    2015-09-01

    Biological production of terminal alkenes has garnered a significant interest due to their industrial applications such as lubricants, detergents and fuels. Here, we engineered the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae to produce terminal alkenes via a one-step fatty acid decarboxylation pathway and improved the alkene production using combinatorial engineering strategies. In brief, we first characterized eight fatty acid decarboxylases to enable and enhance alkene production. We then increased the production titer 7-fold by improving the availability of the precursor fatty acids. We additionally increased the titer about 5-fold through genetic cofactor engineering and gene expression tuning in rich medium. Lastly, we further improved the titer 1.8-fold to 3.7 mg/L by optimizing the culturing conditions in bioreactors. This study represents the first report of terminal alkene biosynthesis in S. cerevisiae, and the abovementioned combinatorial engineering approaches collectively increased the titer 67.4-fold. We envision that these approaches could provide insights into devising engineering strategies to improve the production of fatty acid-derived biochemicals in S. cerevisiae.

  20. Structural insights into diversity and n-alkane biodegradation mechanisms of alkane hydroxylases

    PubMed Central

    Ji, Yurui; Mao, Guannan; Wang, Yingying; Bartlam, Mark

    2013-01-01

    Environmental microbes utilize four degradation pathways for the oxidation of n-alkanes. Although the enzymes degrading n-alkanes in different microbes may vary, enzymes functioning in the first step in the aerobic degradation of alkanes all belong to the alkane hydroxylases. Alkane hydroxylases are a class of enzymes that insert oxygen atoms derived from molecular oxygen into different sites of the alkane terminus (or termini) depending on the type of enzymes. In this review, we summarize the different types of alkane hydroxylases, their degrading steps, and compare typical enzymes from various classes with regard to their three-dimensional structures, in order to provide insights into how the enzymes mediate their different roles in the degradation of n-alkanes and what determines their different substrate ranges. Through the above analyzes, the degrading mechanisms of enzymes can be elucidated and molecular biological methods can be utilized to expand their catalytic roles in the petrochemical industry or in bioremediation of oil-contaminated environments. PMID:23519435

  1. New approach to the air oxidation of alkenes employing metal nitro complexes as catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Andrews, M.A.; Chang, T.C.T.; Cheng, C.W.F.; Kelley, K.P.

    1984-01-01

    Alkenes are stoichiometrically and, in the presence of air, catalytically oxidized by cis-bis(aceto-nitrile) chloronitropalladium(II). Oxidation of monosubstituted terminal alkenes and trans-cyclooctene yields the corresponding ketone, oxidation of cyclopentene and cyclohexene the corresponding allyl alcohol, and oxidation of bicyclic alkenes the corresponding epoxide, each with good selectivity for the respective product. Other alkenes give varying mixtures of the above products together with, in some cases, the ..cap alpha..,..beta..-unsaturated ketone. Vinyl ethers yield the corresponding ester while (trimethylsily)ethylene yields (trimethylsilyl)acetaldehyde. The selectivities are rationalized on the basis of ease of ..beta..-hydrogen elimination in observed intermediate heterometallacyclopentane complexes formed by nucleophilic attack of the nitro oxygen atom on the coordinated alkene in alkene nitro complexes. The general role of metallacycles in metal-mediated alkene oxidations and the advantages and disadvantages of intra-vs. intermolecular metal nitro catalyzed alkene oxidations are discussed. 50 references, 4 figures, 3 tables.

  2. Intramolecular Aminocyanation of Alkenes via N–CN Bond Cleavage**

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Zhongda; Pound, Sarah M.; Rondla, Naveen R.; Douglas, Christopher J.

    2014-01-01

    A metal-free, Lewis acid-promoted intramolecular aminocyanation of alkenes was developed. B(C6F5)3 activates N-sulfonyl cyanamides, leading an formal cleavage of the N-CN bonds in conjunction with vicinal addition of sulfonamide and nitrile groups across an alkene. This method enables atom-economical access to indolines and tetrahydroquinolines in excellent yields, and provides a complementary strategy for regioselective alkene difunctionalizations with sulfonamide and nitrile groups. Labeling experiments with 13C suggest a fully intramolecular cyclization pattern due to lack of label scrambling in double crossover experiments. Catalysis with Lewis acid is realized and the reaction can be conducted under air. PMID:24719371

  3. The Strongest Brønsted Acid: Protonation of Alkanes by H(CHB11F11) at Room Temperature**

    PubMed Central

    Nava, Matthew; Stoyanova, Irina V.; Cummings, Steven; Stoyanov, Evgenii S.

    2016-01-01

    What is the strongest acid? Can a simple Brønsted acid be prepared that can protonate an alkane at room temperature? Can that acid be free of the complicating effects of added Lewis acids that are typical of common, difficult-to-handle superacid mixtures? The carborane superacid H-(CHB11F11) is that acid. It is an extremely moisture-sensitive solid, prepared by treatment of anhydrous HCl with [Et3Si–H–SiEt3][CHB11F11]. It adds H2O to form [H3O][CHB11F11] and benzene to form the benzenium ion salt [C6H7][CHB11F11]. It reacts with butane to form a crystalline tBu+ salt and with n-hexane to form an isolable hexyl carbocation salt. Carbocations, which are thus no longer transient intermediates, react with NaH either by hydride addition to re-form an alkane or by deprotonation to form an alkene and H2. By protonating alkanes at room temperature, the reactivity of H(CHB11F11) opens up new opportunities for the easier study of acid-catalyzed hydrocarbon reforming. PMID:24339386

  4. The mechanism for iron-catalyzed alkene isomerization in solution

    SciTech Connect

    Sawyer, Karma R.; Glascoe, Elizabeth A.; Cahoon, James F.; Schlegel, Jacob P.; Harris, Charles B.

    2008-05-27

    Here we report nano- through microsecond time-resolved IR experiments of iron-catalyzed alkene isomerization in room-temperature solution. We have monitored the photochemistry of a model system, Fe(CO){sub 4}({eta}{sup 2}-1-hexene), in neat 1-hexene solution. UV-photolysis of the starting material leads to the dissociation of a single CO to form Fe(CO){sub 3}({eta}{sup 2}-1-hexene), in a singlet spin state. This CO loss complex shows a dramatic selectivity to form an allyl hydride, HFe(CO){sub 3}({eta}{sup 3}-C{sub 6}H{sub 11}), via an internal C-H bond-cleavage reaction in 5-25 ns. We find no evidence for the coordination of an alkene molecule from the bath to the CO loss complex, but do observe coordination to the allyl hydride, indicating that it is the key intermediate in the isomerization mechanism. Coordination of the alkene ligand to the allyl hydride leads to the formation of the bis-alkene isomers, Fe(CO){sub 3}({eta}{sup 2}-1-hexene)({eta}{sup 2}-2-hexene) and Fe(CO){sub 3}({eta}{sup 2}-1-hexene){sub 2}. Because of the thermodynamic stability of Fe(CO){sub 3}({eta}{sup 2}-1-hexene)({eta}{sup 2}-2-hexene) over Fe(CO){sub 3}({eta}{sup 2}-1-hexene){sub 2} (ca. 12 kcal/mol), nearly 100% of the alkene population will be 2-alkene. The results presented herein provide the first direct evidence for this mechanism in solution and suggest modifications to the currently accepted mechanism.

  5. New osmium-based reagent for the dihydroxylation of alkenes.

    PubMed

    Donohoe, Timothy J; Harris, Robert M; Butterworth, Sam; Burrows, Jeremy N; Cowley, Andrew; Parker, Jeremy S

    2006-06-01

    The cis dihydroxylation of alkenes is most efficiently accomplished by reaction with osmium tetroxide. Recently, the expense and toxicity of osmium tetroxide have led to a number of attempts to harness alternative osmium-based reagents, including microencapsulation and solid support techniques. We describe here the development of a new nonvolatile, stable, and recoverable osmium-based reagent devised for the stoichiometric cis dihydroxylation of alkenes. Although attempts to make this new dihydroxylation work with catalytic amounts of this reagent were unsuccessful, we did develop a sensitive test for free osmium tetroxide leached from the reagent in situ: this test may well have uses in probing future applications of derivatized osmium reagents.

  6. Alkenes with antioxidative activities from Murraya koenigii (L.) Spreng.

    PubMed

    Ma, Qin-Ge; Xu, Kun; Sang, Zhi-Pei; Wei, Rong-Rui; Liu, Wen-Min; Su, Ya-Lun; Yang, Jian-Bo; Wang, Ai-Guo; Ji, Teng-Fei; Li, Lu-Jun

    2016-02-01

    Four new alkenes (1-4), and six known alkenes (5-12) were isolated from Murraya koenigii (L.) Spreng. Their structures were elucidated on the basis of spectroscopic analyses and references. Compounds (1-12) were evaluated for antioxidative activities. Among them, compounds 1, 2, 4, and 7 exhibited significant antioxidative activities using 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) assay with IC50=21.4-49.5 μM. The known compounds (5-12) were isolated from this plant for the first time.

  7. Covalent attachment of 1-alkenes to oxidized platinum surfaces.

    PubMed

    Alonso, Jose Maria; Fabre, Bruno; Trilling, Anke K; Scheres, Luc; Franssen, Maurice C R; Zuilhof, Han

    2015-03-10

    We report the formation of covalently bound alkyl layers onto oxidized Pt (PtOx) substrates by reaction with 1-alkenes as a novel way to bind organic molecules to metal surfaces. The organic layers were characterized by static contact angle, infrared reflection absorption spectroscopy (IRRAS), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and atomic force microscopy (AFM). The grafted alkyl layers display a hydrolytic stability that is comparable to that of alkyl thiols on Au. PtOx-alkene attachment is compatible with terminal ester moieties enabling further anchoring of functional groups, such as redox-active ferrocene, and thus has great potential to extend monolayer chemistry on noble metals.

  8. Characterization of a Novel Rieske-Type Alkane Monooxygenase System in Pusillimonas sp. Strain T7-7

    PubMed Central

    Li, Ping; Wang, Lei

    2013-01-01

    The cold-tolerant bacterium Pusillimonas sp. strain T7-7 is able to utilize diesel oils (C5 to C30 alkanes) as a sole carbon and energy source. In the present study, bioinformatics, proteomics, and real-time reverse transcriptase PCR approaches were used to identify the alkane hydroxylation system present in this bacterium. This system is composed of a Rieske-type monooxygenase, a ferredoxin, and an NADH-dependent reductase. The function of the monooxygenase, which consists of one large (46.711 kDa) and one small (15.355 kDa) subunit, was further studied using in vitro biochemical analysis and in vivo heterologous functional complementation tests. The purified large subunit of the monooxygenase was able to oxidize alkanes ranging from pentane (C5) to tetracosane (C24) using NADH as a cofactor, with greatest activity on the C15 substrate. The large subunit also showed activity on several alkane derivatives, including nitromethane and methane sulfonic acid, but it did not act on any aromatic hydrocarbons. The optimal reaction condition of the large subunit is pH 7.5 at 30°C. Fe2+ can enhance the activity of the enzyme evidently. This is the first time that an alkane monooxygenase system belonging to the Rieske non-heme iron oxygenase family has been identified in a bacterium. PMID:23417490

  9. The hydrodeoxygenation of bioderived furans into alkanes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sutton, Andrew D.; Waldie, Fraser D.; Wu, Ruilian; Schlaf, Marcel; ‘Pete' Silks, Louis A.; Gordon, John C.

    2013-05-01

    The conversion of biomass into fuels and chemical feedstocks is one part of a drive to reduce the world's dependence on crude oil. For transportation fuels in particular, wholesale replacement of a fuel is logistically problematic, not least because of the infrastructure that is already in place. Here, we describe the catalytic defunctionalization of a series of biomass-derived molecules to provide linear alkanes suitable for use as transportation fuels. These biomass-derived molecules contain a variety of functional groups, including olefins, furan rings and carbonyl groups. We describe the removal of these in either a stepwise process or a one-pot process using common reagents and catalysts under mild reaction conditions to provide n-alkanes in good yields and with high selectivities. Our general synthetic approach is applicable to a range of precursors with different carbon content (chain length). This allows the selective generation of linear alkanes with carbon chain lengths between eight and sixteen carbons.

  10. The hydrodeoxygenation of bioderived furans into alkanes.

    PubMed

    Sutton, Andrew D; Waldie, Fraser D; Wu, Ruilian; Schlaf, Marcel; Silks, Louis A Pete; Gordon, John C

    2013-05-01

    The conversion of biomass into fuels and chemical feedstocks is one part of a drive to reduce the world's dependence on crude oil. For transportation fuels in particular, wholesale replacement of a fuel is logistically problematic, not least because of the infrastructure that is already in place. Here, we describe the catalytic defunctionalization of a series of biomass-derived molecules to provide linear alkanes suitable for use as transportation fuels. These biomass-derived molecules contain a variety of functional groups, including olefins, furan rings and carbonyl groups. We describe the removal of these in either a stepwise process or a one-pot process using common reagents and catalysts under mild reaction conditions to provide n-alkanes in good yields and with high selectivities. Our general synthetic approach is applicable to a range of precursors with different carbon content (chain length). This allows the selective generation of linear alkanes with carbon chain lengths between eight and sixteen carbons. PMID:23609095

  11. Anaerobic Coculture of Microalgae with Thermosipho globiformans and Methanocaldococcus jannaschii at 68°C Enhances Generation of n-Alkane-Rich Biofuels after Pyrolysis

    PubMed Central

    Matsuyama, Shigeru; Igarashi, Kensuke; Utsumi, Motoo; Shiraiwa, Yoshihiro; Kuwabara, Tomohiko

    2013-01-01

    We tested different alga-bacterium-archaeon consortia to investigate the production of oil-like mixtures, expecting that n-alkane-rich biofuels might be synthesized after pyrolysis. Thermosipho globiformans and Methanocaldococcus jannaschii were cocultured at 68°C with microalgae for 9 days under two anaerobic conditions, followed by pyrolysis at 300°C for 4 days. Arthrospira platensis (Cyanobacteria), Dunaliella tertiolecta (Chlorophyta), Emiliania huxleyi (Haptophyta), and Euglena gracilis (Euglenophyta) served as microalgal raw materials. D. tertiolecta, E. huxleyi, and E. gracilis cocultured with the bacterium and archaeon inhibited their growth and CH4 production. E. huxleyi had the strongest inhibitory effect. Biofuel generation was enhanced by reducing impurities containing alkanenitriles during pyrolysis. The composition and amounts of n-alkanes produced by pyrolysis were closely related to the lipid contents and composition of the microalgae. Pyrolysis of A. platensis and D. tertiolecta containing mainly phospholipids and glycolipids generated short-carbon-chain n-alkanes (n-tridecane to n-nonadecane) and considerable amounts of isoprenoids. E. gracilis also produced mainly short n-alkanes. In contrast, E. huxleyi containing long-chain (31 and 33 carbon atoms) alkenes and very long-chain (37 to 39 carbon atoms) alkenones, in addition to phospholipids and glycolipids, generated a high yield of n-alkanes of various lengths (n-tridecane to n-pentatriacontane). The gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) profiles of these n-alkanes were similar to those of native petroleum crude oils despite containing a considerable amount of n-hentriacontane. The ratio of phytane to n-octadecane was also similar to that of native crude oils. PMID:23183975

  12. Heuristical Strategies on the Study Theme "The Unsaturated Hydrocarbons -- Alkenes"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Naumescu, Adrienne Kozan; Pasca, Roxana-Diana

    2011-01-01

    The influence of heuristical strategies upon the level of two experimental classes is studied in this paper. The didactic experiment took place at secondary school in Cluj-Napoca, in 2008-2009 school year. The study theme "The Unsaturated Hydrocarbons--Alkenes" has been efficiently learned by using the most active methods: laboratory…

  13. Increased functionality of methyl oleate using alkene metathesis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A series of alkene cross metathesis reactions were performed using a homogeneous ruthenium based catalyst. Using this technology, a variety of functional groups can be incorporated into the biobased starting material, methyl oleate. Trans-stilbene, styrene, methyl cinnamate and hexen-3-ol were all s...

  14. 2-Alkenal-scavenging ability of m-diphenols.

    PubMed

    Hidalgo, Francisco J; Zamora, Rosario

    2014-10-01

    The reaction between m-diphenols (resorcinol, 2-methylresorcinol, 2,5-dimethylresorcinol, 3-methylphenol, orcinol, and phloroglucinol) and 2-alkenals (2-pentenal and 2-octenal) was studied in an attempt to understand the chemical pathways involved in the scavenging ability of m-diphenols for the 2-alkenals produced as a consequence of lipid oxidation. Phenols reacted chemically with 2-alkenals producing a number of 2H-chromenols, chromandiols, chromanols, and dihydropyrano[3,2-g]chromenes, which were isolated and identified by 1D and 2D nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy and mass spectrometry (MS). The identification of all these compounds resulted in the construction of a general pathway for these reactions. These results confirm that the 2-alkenal-scavenging ability of m-diphenols is a consequence of their structure. This is a complex reaction in which many different products are formed. The most stable products were the chromandiols. However, the main reaction products were the 2H-chromenols. These products were unstable and disappeared as a consequence of polymerisation and browning reactions. PMID:24799217

  15. Enzymes and genes involved in aerobic alkane degradation

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Wanpeng; Shao, Zongze

    2013-01-01

    Alkanes are major constituents of crude oil. They are also present at low concentrations in diverse non-contaminated because many living organisms produce them as chemo-attractants or as protecting agents against water loss. Alkane degradation is a widespread phenomenon in nature. The numerous microorganisms, both prokaryotic and eukaryotic, capable of utilizing alkanes as a carbon and energy source, have been isolated and characterized. This review summarizes the current knowledge of how bacteria metabolize alkanes aerobically, with a particular emphasis on the oxidation of long-chain alkanes, including factors that are responsible for chemotaxis to alkanes, transport across cell membrane of alkanes, the regulation of alkane degradation gene and initial oxidation. PMID:23755043

  16. Annulation of aromatic imines via directed C-H bond activation.

    PubMed

    Thalji, Reema K; Ahrendt, Kateri A; Bergman, Robert G; Ellman, Jonathan A

    2005-08-19

    A directed C-H bond activation approach to the synthesis of indans, tetralins, dihydrofurans, dihydroindoles, and other polycyclic aromatic compounds is presented. Cyclization of aromatic ketimines and aldimines containing alkenyl groups tethered at the meta position relative to the imine directing group has been achieved using (PPh3)3RhCl (Wilkinson's catalyst). The cyclization of a range of aromatic ketimines and aldimines provides bi- and tricyclic ring systems with good regioselectivity. Different ring sizes and substitution patterns can be accessed through the coupling of monosubstituted, 1,1- or 1,2-disubstituted, and trisubstituted alkenes bearing both electron-rich and electron-deficient functionality.

  17. An Easily Accessed Nickel Nanoparticle Catalyst for Alkene Hydrosilylation with Tertiary Silanes.

    PubMed

    Buslov, Ivan; Song, Fang; Hu, Xile

    2016-09-26

    The first efficient and non-precious nanoparticle catalyst for alkene hydrosilylation with commercially relevant tertiary silanes has been developed. The nickel nanoparticle catalyst was prepared in situ from a simple nickel alkoxide precatalyst Ni(O(t) Bu)2 ⋅x KCl. The catalyst exhibits high activity for anti-Markovnikov hydrosilylation of unactivated terminal alkenes and isomerizing hydrosilylation of internal alkenes. The catalyst can be applied to synthesize a single terminal alkyl silane from a mixture of internal and terminal alkene isomers, and to remotely functionalize an internal alkene derived from a fatty acid. PMID:27612210

  18. Improved Alkane Production in Nitrogen-Fixing and Halotolerant Cyanobacteria via Abiotic Stresses and Genetic Manipulation of Alkane Synthetic Genes.

    PubMed

    Kageyama, Hakuto; Waditee-Sirisattha, Rungaroon; Sirisattha, Sophon; Tanaka, Yoshito; Mahakhant, Aparat; Takabe, Teruhiro

    2015-07-01

    Cyanobacteria possess the unique capacity to produce alkane. In this study, effects of nitrogen deficiency and salt stress on biosynthesis of alkanes were investigated in three kinds of cyanobacteria. Intracellular alkane accumulation was increased in nitrogen-fixing cyanobacterium Anabaena sp. PCC7120, but decreased in non-diazotrophic cyanobacterium Synechococcus elongatus PCC7942 and constant in a halotolerant cyanobacterium Aphanothece halophytica under nitrogen-deficient condition. We also found that salt stress increased alkane accumulation in Anabaena sp. PCC7120 and A. halophytica. The expression levels of two alkane synthetic genes were not upregulated significantly under nitrogen deficiency or salt stress in Anabaena sp. PCC7120. The transformant Anabaena sp. PCC7120 cells with additional alkane synthetic gene set from A. halophytica increased intracellular alkane accumulation level compared to control cells. These results provide a prospect to improve bioproduction of alkanes in nitrogen-fixing halotolerant cyanobacteria via abiotic stresses and genetic engineering.

  19. Structure-Odor Relationships of (E)-3-Alkenoic Acids, (E)-3-Alken-1-ols, and (E)-3-Alkenals.

    PubMed

    Lorber, Katja; Buettner, Andrea

    2015-08-01

    (E)-3-Unsaturated volatile acids, alcohols, and aldehydes are commonly found as odorants or pheromones in foods and other natural sources, playing a vital role in not only the attractiveness of foods but also chemo-communication in the animal kingdom. However, a systematic elucidation of their aroma properties, especially for humans, has not been carried out until today. To close this gap, the odor thresholds in air and odor qualities of homologous series of (E)-3-alkenoic acids, (E)-3-alken-1-ols, and (E)-3-alkenals were determined by gas chromatography-olfactometry. In the series of (E)-3-alkenoic acids the odor quality changed successively from sweaty via plastic-like to sweaty and waxy. On the other hand, the odor qualities in the series of (E)-3-alken-1-ols and (E)-3-alkenals changed from grassy, green to an overall citrus-like, fresh, soapy, and coriander-like odor with increasing chain length. With regard to their odor potencies, the lowest thresholds in air were found for (E)-3-heptenoic acid, (E)-3-hexenoic acid, and (E)-3-hexenal. PMID:26165743

  20. Nitrated metalloporphyrins as catalysts for alkane oxidation

    DOEpatents

    Ellis, P.E. Jr.; Lyons, J.E.

    1994-01-18

    Compositions of matter comprising nitro-substituted metal complexes of porphyrins are catalysts for the oxidation of alkanes. The metal is iron, chromium, manganese, ruthenium, copper or cobalt. The porphyrin ring has nitro groups attached thereto in meso and/or [beta]-pyrrolic positions.

  1. Reflectance spectroscopy of organic compounds: 1. Alkanes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Clark, R.N.; Curchin, J.M.; Hoefen, T.M.; Swayze, G.A.

    2009-01-01

    Reflectance spectra of the organic compounds comprising the alkane series are presented from the ultraviolet to midinfrared, 0.35 to 15.5 /??m. Alkanes are hydrocarbon molecules containing only single carbon-carbon bonds, and are found naturally on the Earth and in the atmospheres of the giant planets and Saturn's moon, Titan. This paper presents the spectral properties of the alkanes as the first in a series of papers to build a spectral database of organic compounds for use in remote sensing studies. Applications range from mapping the environment on the Earth, to the search for organic molecules and life in the solar system and throughout the. universe. We show that the spectral reflectance properties of organic compounds are rich, with major diagnostic spectral features throughout the spectral range studied. Little to no spectral change was observed as a function of temperature and only small shifts and changes in the width of absorption bands were observed between liquids and solids, making remote detection of spectral properties throughout the solar system simpler. Some high molecular weight organic compounds contain single-bonded carbon chains and have spectra similar to alkanes even ' when they fall into other families. Small spectral differences are often present allowing discrimination among some compounds, further illustrating the need to catalog spectral properties for accurate remote sensing identification with spectroscopy.

  2. Nitrated metalloporphyrins as catalysts for alkane oxidation

    DOEpatents

    Ellis, Jr., Paul E.; Lyons, James E.

    1992-01-01

    Alkanes are oxidized by contact with oxygen-containing gas in the presence as catalyst of a metalloporphyrin in which hydrogen atoms in the porphyrin ring have been replaced with one or more nitro groups. Hydrogen atoms in the porphyrin ring may also be substituted with halogen atoms.

  3. Nitrated metalloporphyrins as catalysts for alkane oxidation

    DOEpatents

    Ellis, Jr., Paul E.; Lyons, James E.

    1994-01-01

    Compositions of matter comprising nitro-substituted metal complexes of porphyrins are catalysts for the oxidation of alkanes. The metal is iron, chromium, manganese, ruthenium, copper or cobalt. The porphyrin ring has nitro groups attached thereto in meso and/or .beta.-pyrrolic positions.

  4. Accelerated Molecular Dynamics Simulation of Alkane Desorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McLaughlin, Kelly; Fichthorn, Kristen

    2006-03-01

    Thermal desorption has been the focus of much surface science research. Studies of alkanes on graphite^1 and gold^2 have shown prefactors that are constant with alkane chain length but vary by over six orders of magnitude. Other studies on magnesium oxide^3 and gold^4 show a prefactor that increases with increasing chain length. We have developed an all-atom model to study alkane desorption from graphite. Transition state theory is used to obtain rate constants from the simulation. Accelerated MD is used to extend the desorption simulation to experimentally relevant temperatures. Our results show a prefactor that increases with increasing chain length. We predict that it will become constant as internal conformational changes occur significantly. We examine the effect of desorption environment through varying the alkane surface coverage. 1. K.R. Paserba and A.J. Gellman, J. Chem. Phys. 115, 6737 (2001). 2. S.M. Wetterer et al., J. Phys. Chem. 102, 9266 (1998). 3. S.L. Tait et al., J. Chem. Phys. 122, 164707 (2005). 4. K.A. Fichthorn and R.A. Miron, Phys. Rev. Lett. 89, 196103 (2002).

  5. Aromatic graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, D. K.; Sahoo, S.

    2016-04-01

    In recent years graphene attracts the scientific and engineering communities due to its outstanding electronic, thermal, mechanical and optical properties and many potential applications. Recently, Popov et al. [1] have studied the properties of graphene and proved that it is aromatic but without fragrance. In this paper, we present a theory to prepare graphene with fragrance. This can be used as scented pencils, perfumes, room and car fresheners, cosmetics and many other useful household substances.

  6. Mechanistic studies on the gas-phase dehydrogenation of alkanes at cyclometalated platinum complexes.

    PubMed

    Butschke, Burkhard; Schwarz, Helmut

    2012-10-29

    In the ion/molecule reactions of the cyclometalated platinum complexes [Pt(L-H)](+) (L=2,2'-bipyridine (bipy), 2-phenylpyridine (phpy), and 7,8-benzoquinoline (bq)) with linear and branched alkanes C(n)H(2n+2) (n=2-4), the main reaction channels correspond to the eliminations of dihydrogen and the respective alkenes in varying ratios. For all three couples [Pt(L-H)](+)/C(2)H(6), loss of C(2)H(4) dominates clearly over H(2) elimination; however, the mechanisms significantly differs for the reactions of the "rollover"-cyclometalated bipy complex and the classically cyclometalated phpy and bq complexes. While double hydrogen-atom transfer from C(2)H(6) to [Pt(bipy-H)](+), followed by ring rotation, gives rise to the formation of [Pt(H)(bipy)](+), for the phpy and bq complexes [Pt(L-H)](+), the cyclometalated motif is conserved; rather, according to DFT calculations, formation of [Pt(L-H)(H(2))](+) as the ionic product accounts for C(2)H(4) liberation. In the latter process, [Pt(L-H)(H(2))(C(2)H(4))](+) (that carries H(2) trans to the nitrogen atom of the heterocyclic ligand) serves, according to DFT calculation, as a precursor from which, due to the electronic peculiarities of the cyclometalated ligand, C(2)H(4) rather than H(2) is ejected. For both product-ion types, [Pt(H)(bipy)](+) and [Pt(L-H)(H(2))](+) (L=phpy, bq), H(2) loss to close a catalytic dehydrogenation cycle is feasible. In the reactions of [Pt(bipy-H)](+) with the higher alkanes C(n)H(2n+2) (n=3, 4), H(2) elimination dominates over alkene formation; most probably, this observation is a consequence of the generation of allyl complexes, such as [Pt(C(3)H(5))(bipy)](+). In the reactions of [Pt(L-H)](+) (L=phpy, bq) with propane and n-butane, the losses of the alkenes and dihydrogen are of comparable intensities. While in the reactions of "rollover"-cyclometalated [Pt(bipy-H)](+) with C(n)H(2n+2) (n=2-4) less than 15 % of the generated product ions are formed by C-C bond-cleavage processes, this value is

  7. Dehalogenation of aromatics by nucleophilic aromatic substitution.

    PubMed

    Sadowsky, Daniel; McNeill, Kristopher; Cramer, Christopher J

    2014-09-16

    Nucleophilic aromatic substitution has been implicated as a mechanism for both the biotic and abiotic hydrodehalogenation of aromatics. Two mechanisms for the aqueous dehalogenation of aromatics involving nucleophilic aromatic substitution with hydride as a nucleophile are investigated using a validated density functional and continuum solvation protocol. For chlorinated and brominated aromatics, nucleophilic addition ortho to carbon-halogen bonds via an anionic intermediate is predicted to be the preferred mechanism in the majority of cases, while concerted substitution is predicted to be preferred for most fluorinated aromatics. Nucleophilic aromatic substitution reactions with the hydroxide and hydrosulfide anions as nucleophiles are also investigated and compared.

  8. The origin of alkanes found in human skin surface lipids

    SciTech Connect

    Bortz, J.T.; Wertz, P.W.; Downing, D.T. )

    1989-12-01

    Lipids extracted from human skin contain variable amounts of paraffin hydrocarbons. Although the composition of these alkanes strongly resembles petroleum waxes, it has been proposed that they are biosynthetic products of human skin. To investigate this question, skin surface lipids from 15 normal subjects were analyzed for the amount and composition of alkanes, using quantitative thin-layer chromatography and quartz capillary gas chromatography. The alkanes were found to constitute 0.5% to 1.7% of the skin lipids. Subjects differed greatly in the chain length distribution of their alkanes between 15 and 35 carbon atoms, and in the relative amounts of normal alkanes (like those in petroleum waxes) and branched chain alkanes (like those in petroleum lubricating oils). In 6 subjects, the alkane content of cerumen from each ear was examined to investigate whether alkanes arrive at the skin surface by a systemic route or by direct contact with environmental surfaces. No trace of alkanes was found in 11 of the 12 cerumen samples. Using a tandem accelerator mass spectrometer for carbon-14 dating, a combined sample of the skin surface alkanes was found to have a theoretical age of 30,950 years, similar to that of a sample of petrolatum. These analyses indicate that the alkanes found on the surface of human skin are mixtures of a variety of petroleum distillation fractions that are acquired by direct contamination from the environment.

  9. Alkene metathesis - a tool for the synthesis of conjugated polymers.

    PubMed

    Bunz, Uwe H F; Mäker, Dominic; Porz, Michael

    2012-05-29

    Alkene metathesis is a superb methodology. We report the progress using alkene metathesis in the synthesis of polymeric organic semiconductors. Three classes of polymers have been synthesized using acyclic diene metathesis (ADMET) or ring opening metathesis polymerization (ROMP), viz., poly(acetylene)s (PA), poly(arylene-vinylene)s (PAV), and organometallic polymers. For PAs, ROMP of cyclooctatetraenes is best, whereas for PAV, both ADMET and indirect and direct ROMP are viable. Metathesis performs flawlessly with the correct monomers, as molybdenum and particularly the robust Ru carbenes demonstrate. When performing ROMP, one is often rewarded with structurally uniform polymers that can display very low polydispersities. Overall, metathesis is a powerful tool for the preparation of semiconducting polymers.

  10. Highly Selective Phosphinylphosphination of Alkenes with Tetraphenyldiphosphine Monoxide.

    PubMed

    Sato, Yuki; Kawaguchi, Shin-Ichi; Nomoto, Akihiro; Ogawa, Akiya

    2016-08-01

    In sharp contrast to tetraphenyldiphosphine, which does not add to carbon-carbon double bonds efficiently, its monoxide, [Ph2 P(O)PPh2 ] can engage in a radical addition to various alkenes, thus affording the corresponding 1-phosphinyl-2-phosphinoalkanes regioselectively, and they can be converted into their sulfides by treatment with elemental sulfur. The phosphinylphosphination proceeds by the homolytic cleavage of the P(V) (O)-P(III) single bond of Ph2 P(O)PPh2 , followed by selective attack of the phosphinyl radical at the terminal position of the alkenes, and selective trapping of the resulting carbon radical by the phosphino group. Furthermore, the phosphinylphosphination product could be converted directly into its platinum complex with a hemilabile P,O chelation. PMID:27374767

  11. Thermal functionalization of GaN surfaces with 1-alkenes.

    PubMed

    Schwarz, Stefan U; Cimalla, Volker; Eichapfel, Georg; Himmerlich, Marcel; Krischok, Stefan; Ambacher, Oliver

    2013-05-28

    A thermally induced functionalization process for gallium nitride surfaces with 1-alkenes is introduced. The resulting functionalization layers are characterized with atomic force microscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and compared to reference samples without and with a photochemically generated functionalization layer. The resulting layers show very promising characteristics as functionalization for GaN based biosensors. On the basis of the experimental results, important characteristics of the functionalization layers are estimated and a possible chemical reaction scheme is proposed. PMID:23617559

  12. Alkene Metathesis and Renewable Materials: Selective Transformations of Plant Oils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malacea, Raluca; Dixneuf, Pierre H.

    The olefin metathesis of natural oils and fats and their derivatives is the basis of clean catalytic reactions relevant to green chemistry processes and the production of generate useful chemicals from renewable raw materials. Three variants of alkene metathesis: self-metathesis, ethenolysis and cross-metathesis applied to plant oil derivatives will show new routes to fine chemicals, bifunctional products, polymer precursours and industry intermediates.

  13. Cl atom initiated oxidation of 1-alkenes under atmospheric conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walavalkar, M.; Sharma, A.; Alwe, H. D.; Pushpa, K. K.; Dhanya, S.; Naik, P. D.; Bajaj, P. N.

    2013-03-01

    In view of the importance of the oxidation pathways of alkenes in the troposphere, and the significance of Cl atom as an oxidant in marine boundary layer (MBL) and polluted industrial atmosphere, the reactions of four 1-alkenes (C6-C9) with Cl atoms are investigated. The rate coefficients at 298 K are measured to be (4.0 ± 0.5), (4.4 ± 0.7), (5.5 ± 0.9) and (5.9 ± 1.7) × 10-10 cm3 molecule-1 s-1 for 1-hexene, 1-heptene, 1-octene and 1-nonene, respectively. The quoted errors include the experimental 2σ, along with the error in the reference rate coefficients. From the systematic increase in the rate coefficients with the number of carbon atoms, an approximate value for the average rate coefficient for hydrogen abstraction per CH2 group in alkenes is estimated to be (4.9 ± 0.3) × 10-11 cm3 molecule-1 s-1. Based on these rate coefficients, the contribution of Cl atom reactions towards the degradation of these molecules is found to be comparable to that of OH radical reactions, under MBL conditions. The products identified in gas phase indicate that Cl atom addition occurs mainly at the terminal carbon, leading to the formation of 1-chloro-2-ketones and 1-chloro-2-ols. The major gas phase products from the alkenyl radicals (formed by H atom abstraction) are different positional isomers of long chain enols and enones. A preference for dissociation leading to an allyl radical, resulting in aldehydes, lower by three carbon atoms, is indicated. The observed relative yields suggest that in general, the increased contribution of the reactions of Cl atoms towards degradation of 1-alkenes in NOx free air does not result in an increase in the generation of small aldehydes (carbon number < 4), including chloroethanal, as compared to that in the reaction of 1-butene.

  14. Regioselective, Asymmetric Formal Hydroamination of Unactivated Internal Alkenes.

    PubMed

    Xi, Yumeng; Butcher, Trevor W; Zhang, Jing; Hartwig, John F

    2016-01-11

    We report the regioselective and enantioselective formal hydroamination of unsymmetrical internal alkenes catalyzed by a copper catalyst ligated by DTBM-SEGPHOS. The regioselectivity of the reaction is controlled by the electronic effects of ether, ester, and sulfonamide groups in the homoallylic position. The observed selectivity underscores the influence of inductive effects of remote substituents on the selectivity of catalytic processes occurring at hydrocarbyl groups, and the method provides direct access to various 1,3-aminoalcohol derivatives with high enantioselectivity. PMID:26592363

  15. Chemical characterization of organosulfates in secondary organic aerosol derived from the photooxidation of alkanes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riva, Matthieu; Da Silva Barbosa, Thais; Lin, Ying-Hsuan; Stone, Elizabeth A.; Gold, Avram; Surratt, Jason D.

    2016-09-01

    We report the formation of aliphatic organosulfates (OSs) in secondary organic aerosol (SOA) from the photooxidation of C10-C12 alkanes. The results complement those from our laboratories reporting the formation of OSs and sulfonates from gas-phase oxidation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). Both studies strongly support the formation of OSs from the gas-phase oxidation of anthropogenic precursors, as hypothesized on the basis of recent field studies in which aromatic and aliphatic OSs were detected in fine aerosol collected from several major urban locations. In this study, dodecane, cyclodecane and decalin, considered to be important SOA precursors in urban areas, were photochemically oxidized in an outdoor smog chamber in the presence of either non-acidified or acidified ammonium sulfate seed aerosol. Effects of acidity and relative humidity on OS formation were examined. Aerosols collected from all experiments were characterized by ultra performance liquid chromatography coupled to electrospray ionization high-resolution quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry (UPLC/ESI-HR-QTOFMS). Most of the OSs identified could be explained by formation of gaseous epoxide precursors with subsequent acid-catalyzed reactive uptake onto sulfate aerosol and/or heterogeneous reactions of hydroperoxides. The OSs identified here were also observed and quantified in fine urban aerosol samples collected in Lahore, Pakistan, and Pasadena, CA, USA. Several OSs identified from the photooxidation of decalin and cyclodecane are isobars of known monoterpene organosulfates, and thus care must be taken in the analysis of alkane-derived organosulfates in urban aerosol.

  16. Oxidative dehydrogenation of alkanes to unsaturated hydrocarbons

    DOEpatents

    Kung, Harold H.; Chaar, Mohamed A.

    1988-01-01

    Oxidative dehydrogenation of alkanes to unsaturated hydrocarbons is carried out over metal vanadate catalysts under oxidizing conditions. The vanadate catalysts are represented by the formulas M.sub.3 (VO.sub.4).sub.2 and MV.sub.2 O.sub.6, M representing Mg, Zn, Ca, Pb, or Cd. The reaction is carried out in the presence of oxygen, but the formation of oxygenate by-products is suppressed.

  17. Oxidative dehydrogenation of alkanes to unsaturated hydrocarbons

    DOEpatents

    Kung, H.H.; Chaar, M.A.

    1988-10-11

    Oxidative dehydrogenation of alkanes to unsaturated hydrocarbons is carried out over metal vanadate catalysts under oxidizing conditions. The vanadate catalysts are represented by the formulas M[sub 3](VO[sub 4])[sub 2] and MV[sub 2]O[sub 6], M representing Mg, Zn, Ca, Pb, or Cd. The reaction is carried out in the presence of oxygen, but the formation of oxygenate by-products is suppressed.

  18. Insights into the Anaerobic Biodegradation Pathway of n-Alkanes in Oil Reservoirs by Detection of Signature Metabolites

    PubMed Central

    Bian, Xin-Yu; Maurice Mbadinga, Serge; Liu, Yi-Fan; Yang, Shi-Zhong; Liu, Jin-Feng; Ye, Ru-Qiang; Gu, Ji-Dong; Mu, Bo-Zhong

    2015-01-01

    Anaerobic degradation of alkanes in hydrocarbon-rich environments has been documented and different degradation strategies proposed, of which the most encountered one is fumarate addition mechanism, generating alkylsuccinates as specific biomarkers. However, little is known about the mechanisms of anaerobic degradation of alkanes in oil reservoirs, due to low concentrations of signature metabolites and lack of mass spectral characteristics to allow identification. In this work, we used a multidisciplinary approach combining metabolite profiling and selective gene assays to establish the biodegradation mechanism of alkanes in oil reservoirs. A total of twelve production fluids from three different oil reservoirs were collected and treated with alkali; organic acids were extracted, derivatized with ethanol to form ethyl esters and determined using GC-MS analysis. Collectively, signature metabolite alkylsuccinates of parent compounds from C1 to C8 together with their (putative) downstream metabolites were detected from these samples. Additionally, metabolites indicative of the anaerobic degradation of mono- and poly-aromatic hydrocarbons (2-benzylsuccinate, naphthoate, 5,6,7,8-tetrahydro-naphthoate) were also observed. The detection of alkylsuccinates and genes encoding for alkylsuccinate synthase shows that anaerobic degradation of alkanes via fumarate addition occurs in oil reservoirs. This work provides strong evidence on the in situ anaerobic biodegradation mechanisms of hydrocarbons by fumarate addition. PMID:25966798

  19. Evidence that crude oil alkane activation proceeds by different mechanisms under sulfate-reducing and methanogenic conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aitken, C. M.; Jones, D. M.; Maguire, M. J.; Gray, N. D.; Sherry, A.; Bowler, B. F. J.; Ditchfield, A. K.; Larter, S. R.; Head, I. M.

    2013-05-01

    Fumarate addition has been widely proposed as an initial step in the anaerobic oxidation of both aromatic and aliphatic hydrocarbons. Alkyl and aryl succinates have been reported as metabolites of hydrocarbon degradation in laboratory studies with both pure and enrichment cultures of sulfate-, nitrate-, and iron-reducing bacteria. In addition these compounds have been reported in samples from environments such as hydrocarbon contaminated aquifers where, in addition to the above redox processes, hydrocarbon degradation linked to methanogenesis was observed. Here we report data from anaerobic crude oil degrading microcosms which revealed significant differences between the acid metabolite profiles of crude oil degraded under sulfate-reducing or methanogenic conditions. Under sulfate-reducing conditions fumarate addition and the formation of alkylsuccinate metabolites was the principal mechanism for the anaerobic degradation of n-alkanes and branched chain alkanes. Other than alkyl succinates that represent indigenous metabolites in the sediment inoculum, alkyl succinate metabolites were never detected in sediment microcosms where methane generation was quantitatively linked to n-alkane degradation. This indicates that alternative mechanisms of alkane activation may operate under methanogenic conditions.

  20. Insights into the Anaerobic Biodegradation Pathway of n-Alkanes in Oil Reservoirs by Detection of Signature Metabolites.

    PubMed

    Bian, Xin-Yu; Mbadinga, Serge Maurice; Liu, Yi-Fan; Yang, Shi-Zhong; Liu, Jin-Feng; Ye, Ru-Qiang; Gu, Ji-Dong; Mu, Bo-Zhong

    2015-05-13

    Anaerobic degradation of alkanes in hydrocarbon-rich environments has been documented and different degradation strategies proposed, of which the most encountered one is fumarate addition mechanism, generating alkylsuccinates as specific biomarkers. However, little is known about the mechanisms of anaerobic degradation of alkanes in oil reservoirs, due to low concentrations of signature metabolites and lack of mass spectral characteristics to allow identification. In this work, we used a multidisciplinary approach combining metabolite profiling and selective gene assays to establish the biodegradation mechanism of alkanes in oil reservoirs. A total of twelve production fluids from three different oil reservoirs were collected and treated with alkali; organic acids were extracted, derivatized with ethanol to form ethyl esters and determined using GC-MS analysis. Collectively, signature metabolite alkylsuccinates of parent compounds from C1 to C8 together with their (putative) downstream metabolites were detected from these samples. Additionally, metabolites indicative of the anaerobic degradation of mono- and poly-aromatic hydrocarbons (2-benzylsuccinate, naphthoate, 5,6,7,8-tetrahydro-naphthoate) were also observed. The detection of alkylsuccinates and genes encoding for alkylsuccinate synthase shows that anaerobic degradation of alkanes via fumarate addition occurs in oil reservoirs. This work provides strong evidence on the in situ anaerobic biodegradation mechanisms of hydrocarbons by fumarate addition.

  1. Alkane metathesis by tandem alkane-dehydrogenation-olefin-metathesis catalysis and related chemistry.

    PubMed

    Haibach, Michael C; Kundu, Sabuj; Brookhart, Maurice; Goldman, Alan S

    2012-06-19

    Methods for the conversion of both renewable and non-petroleum fossil carbon sources to transportation fuels that are both efficient and economically viable could greatly enhance global security and prosperity. Currently, the major route to convert natural gas and coal to liquids is Fischer-Tropsch catalysis, which is potentially applicable to any source of synthesis gas including biomass and nonconventional fossil carbon sources. The major desired products of Fischer-Tropsch catalysis are n-alkanes that contain 9-19 carbons; they comprise a clean-burning and high combustion quality diesel, jet, and marine fuel. However, Fischer-Tropsch catalysis also results in significant yields of the much less valuable C(3) to C(8)n-alkanes; these are also present in large quantities in oil and gas reserves (natural gas liquids) and can be produced from the direct reduction of carbohydrates. Therefore, methods that could disproportionate medium-weight (C(3)-C(8)) n-alkanes into heavy and light n-alkanes offer great potential value as global demand for fuel increases and petroleum reserves decrease. This Account describes systems that we have developed for alkane metathesis based on the tandem operation of catalysts for alkane dehydrogenation and olefin metathesis. As dehydrogenation catalysts, we used pincer-ligated iridium complexes, and we initially investigated Schrock-type Mo or W alkylidene complexes as olefin metathesis catalysts. The interoperability of the catalysts typically represents a major challenge in tandem catalysis. In our systems, the rate of alkane dehydrogenation generally limits the overall reaction rate, whereas the lifetime of the alkylidene complexes at the relatively high temperatures required to obtain practical dehydrogenation rates (ca. 125 -200 °C) limits the total turnover numbers. Accordingly, we have focused on the development and use of more active dehydrogenation catalysts and more stable olefin-metathesis catalysts. We have used thermally

  2. Methods of producing epoxides from alkenes using a two-component catalyst system

    DOEpatents

    Kung, Mayfair C.; Kung, Harold H.; Jiang, Jian

    2013-07-09

    Methods for the epoxidation of alkenes are provided. The methods include the steps of exposing the alkene to a two-component catalyst system in an aqueous solution in the presence of carbon monoxide and molecular oxygen under conditions in which the alkene is epoxidized. The two-component catalyst system comprises a first catalyst that generates peroxides or peroxy intermediates during oxidation of CO with molecular oxygen and a second catalyst that catalyzes the epoxidation of the alkene using the peroxides or peroxy intermediates. A catalyst system composed of particles of suspended gold and titanium silicalite is one example of a suitable two-component catalyst system.

  3. Terminal Olefin (1-Alkene) Biosynthesis by a Novel P450 Fatty Acid Decarboxylase from Jeotgalicoccus Species ▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Rude, Mathew A.; Baron, Tarah S.; Brubaker, Shane; Alibhai, Murtaza; Del Cardayre, Stephen B.; Schirmer, Andreas

    2011-01-01

    Terminal olefins (1-alkenes) are natural products that have important industrial applications as both fuels and chemicals. However, their biosynthesis has been largely unexplored. We describe a group of bacteria, Jeotgalicoccus spp., which synthesize terminal olefins, in particular 18-methyl-1-nonadecene and 17-methyl-1-nonadecene. These olefins are derived from intermediates of fatty acid biosynthesis, and the key enzyme in Jeotgalicoccus sp. ATCC 8456 is a terminal olefin-forming fatty acid decarboxylase. This enzyme, Jeotgalicoccus sp. OleT (OleTJE), was identified by purification from cell lysates, and its encoding gene was identified from a draft genome sequence of Jeotgalicoccus sp. ATCC 8456 using reverse genetics. Heterologous expression of the identified gene conferred olefin biosynthesis to Escherichia coli. OleTJE is a P450 from the cyp152 family, which includes bacterial fatty acid hydroxylases. Some cyp152 P450 enzymes have the ability to decarboxylate and to hydroxylate fatty acids (in α- and/or β-position), suggesting a common reaction intermediate in their catalytic mechanism and specific structural determinants that favor one reaction over the other. The discovery of these terminal olefin-forming P450 enzymes represents a third biosynthetic pathway (in addition to alkane and long-chain olefin biosynthesis) to convert fatty acid intermediates into hydrocarbons. Olefin-forming fatty acid decarboxylation is a novel reaction that can now be added to the catalytic repertoire of the versatile cytochrome P450 enzyme family. PMID:21216900

  4. Asymmetric Intramolecular Alkylation of Chiral Aromatic Imines via Catalytic C-H Bond Activation

    SciTech Connect

    Watzke, Anja; Wilson, Rebecca; O'Malley, Steven; Bergman, Robert; Ellman, Jonathan

    2007-04-16

    The asymmetric intramolecular alkylation of chiral aromatic aldimines, in which differentially substituted alkenes are tethered meta to the imine, was investigated. High enantioselectivities were obtained for imines prepared from aminoindane derivatives, which function as directing groups for the rhodium-catalyzed C-H bond activation. Initial demonstration of catalytic asymmetric intramolecular alkylation also was achieved by employing a sterically hindered achiral imine substrate and catalytic amounts of a chiral amine.

  5. Oxidations of alkenes and lignin model compounds in aqueous dispersions

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu, Weiming.

    1991-01-01

    The objective was to develop methods to oxidize water-immiscible alkenes and lignin model compounds with polymer colloid supported transition metal catalysts. The oxidations of organic compounds were carried out in aqueous phase with several water-soluble oxidants and dioxygen. Cationic polymer latexes were prepared by the emulsion copolymerization of vinylbenzyl chloride, divinylbenzene, and vinyl octadecyl ether, or styrene, or n-decyl methacrylate, and the subsequent quaternization of copolymers with trimethylamine. The latex particles were 44 nm to 71 nm in diameter. The latex bound Mn porphyrin catalysts were formed with MnTSPP [TSPP = meso-tetrakis(2,6-dichloro-3-sulfonatophenyl)porphyrin], which catalyzed the oxidation of cyclohexene, cycloocetene, allylbenzene, and 1-octene by sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl) and potassium peroxymonosulfate (KHSO[sub 5]). The latex bound porphyrin catalysts showed higher activity than MnTSPP in solution. Oxidations of 3,4-dimethoxybenzyl alcohol (DMBA), 4-hydroxy-3-methoxytoluene (HMT), and 3,4-dimethoxytoluene (DMT) were performed with either dioxygen or hydrogen peroxide and CoPcTS (PcTS = tetrasulfonatophthalocyanine), FePcTS, CuPcTS, NiPcTS, FeTCPP [TCPP = meso-tetrakis(4-carboxyphenyl)porphyrin], and MnTSPP. CoPcTS catalyzed the autoxidation of DMBA and HMT at 70-85[degrees]C and pH [ge] 8. All catalysts were active for the oxidation of DMBA, HMT, and DMT with H[sub 2]O[sub 2]. Aqueous solutions of KHSO[sub 5] oxidized water-immiscible alkenes at room temperature in the absence of organic solvent. The acidic pH [le] 1.7 solutions of commercial 2KHSO[sub 5][center dot]K[sub 2]SO[sub 4] in water produced diols from all reactive alkenes except cyclooctene. Adjustment of initial pH to [ge]6.7 with NaHCO[sub 3] enabled selective epoxidations.

  6. Copper-catalyzed stereoselective aminoboration of bicyclic alkenes.

    PubMed

    Sakae, Ryosuke; Hirano, Koji; Satoh, Tetsuya; Miura, Masahiro

    2015-01-01

    A copper-catalyzed aminoboration of bicyclic alkenes, including oxa- and azabenzonorbornadienes, has been developed. With this method, amine and boron moieties are simultaneously introduced at an olefin with exo selectivity. Subsequent stereospecific transformations of the boryl group can provide oxygen- and nitrogen-rich cyclic molecules with motifs that may be found in natural products or pharmaceutically active compounds. Moreover, a catalytic asymmetric variant of this transformation was realized by using a copper complex with a chiral bisphosphine ligand, namely (R,R)-Ph-BPE. PMID:25404258

  7. A biocompatible alkene hydrogenation merges organic synthesis with microbial metabolism.

    PubMed

    Sirasani, Gopal; Tong, Liuchuan; Balskus, Emily P

    2014-07-21

    Organic chemists and metabolic engineers use orthogonal technologies to construct essential small molecules such as pharmaceuticals and commodity chemicals. While chemists have leveraged the unique capabilities of biological catalysts for small-molecule production, metabolic engineers have not likewise integrated reactions from organic synthesis with the metabolism of living organisms. Reported herein is a method for alkene hydrogenation which utilizes a palladium catalyst and hydrogen gas generated directly by a living microorganism. This biocompatible transformation, which requires both catalyst and microbe, and can be used on a preparative scale, represents a new strategy for chemical synthesis that combines organic chemistry and metabolic engineering.

  8. A Biocompatible Alkene Hydrogenation Merges Organic Synthesis with Microbial Metabolism**

    PubMed Central

    Sirasani, Gopal; Tong, Liuchuan; Balskus, Emily P.

    2014-01-01

    Organic chemists and metabolic engineers use largely orthogonal technologies to construct essential small molecules like pharmaceuticals and commodity chemicals. While chemists have leveraged the unique capabilities of biological catalysts for small molecule production, metabolic engineers have not likewise integrated reactions from organic synthesis with the metabolism of living organisms. Here we report a method for alkene hydrogenation that utilizes a palladium catalyst and hydrogen gas generated directly by a living microorganism. This biocompatible transformation, which requires both catalyst and microbe and can be used on a preparative scale, represents a new strategy for chemical synthesis that combines organic chemistry and metabolic engineering. PMID:24916924

  9. Copper-catalyzed stereoselective aminoboration of bicyclic alkenes.

    PubMed

    Sakae, Ryosuke; Hirano, Koji; Satoh, Tetsuya; Miura, Masahiro

    2015-01-01

    A copper-catalyzed aminoboration of bicyclic alkenes, including oxa- and azabenzonorbornadienes, has been developed. With this method, amine and boron moieties are simultaneously introduced at an olefin with exo selectivity. Subsequent stereospecific transformations of the boryl group can provide oxygen- and nitrogen-rich cyclic molecules with motifs that may be found in natural products or pharmaceutically active compounds. Moreover, a catalytic asymmetric variant of this transformation was realized by using a copper complex with a chiral bisphosphine ligand, namely (R,R)-Ph-BPE.

  10. Osmium-catalyzed vicinal oxyamination of alkenes by N-(4-toluenesulfonyloxy)carbamates.

    PubMed

    Masruri; Willis, Anthony C; McLeod, Malcolm D

    2012-10-01

    N-(4-toluenesulfonyloxy)carbamates based on a range of common amine protecting groups serve as preformed nitrogen sources in the intermolecular osmium-catalyzed oxyamination reaction of a variety of mono-, di-, and trisubstituted alkenes. The reactions occur with low catalyst loadings and good yields and afford high regioselectivity for unsymmetrically substituted alkenes.

  11. Combination of a Cyano Migration Strategy and Alkene Difunctionalization: The Elusive Selective Azidocyanation of Unactivated Olefins.

    PubMed

    Wu, Zhen; Ren, Rongguo; Zhu, Chen

    2016-08-26

    A conceptually new, efficient, and metal-free approach for the challenging azidocyanation of unactivated alkenes is presented. The strategy of intramolecular distal cyano migration is combined with alkene difunctionalization for the first time. A variety of useful azido-substituted alkyl nitriles are prepared in good yields and, most importantly, with exquisite regio- and stereo-selectivities.

  12. Well-Defined and Robust Rhodium Catalysts for the Hydroacylation of Terminal and Internal Alkenes**

    PubMed Central

    Prades, Amparo; Fernández, Maitane; Pike, Sebastian D; Willis, Michael C; Weller, Andrew S

    2015-01-01

    A Rh-catalyst system based on the asymmetric ligand tBu2PCH2P(o-C6H4OMe)2 is reported that allows for the hydroacylation of challenging internal alkenes with β-substituted aldehydes. Mechanistic studies point to the stabilizing role of both excess alkene and the OMe-group. PMID:26069052

  13. Copper-catalyzed trifluoromethylation of alkenes with an electrophilic trifluoromethylating reagent

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xiao-Ping; Lin, Jin-Hong; Zhang, Cheng-Pan; Zheng, Xing

    2013-01-01

    Summary An efficient method for the copper-catalyzed trifluoromethylation of terminal alkenes with an electrophilic trifluoromethylating reagent has been developed. The reactions proceeded smoothly to give trifluoromethylated alkenes in good to excellent yields. The results provided a versatile approach for the construction of Cvinyl–CF3 bonds without using prefunctionalized substrates. PMID:24367428

  14. Reactions of volatile organic compounds in the atmosphere: Ozone-alkene reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fenske, Jill Denise

    2000-08-01

    Photochemical smog cannot form without sunlight, nitrogen oxides, and volatile organic compounds (VOC). This dissertation addresses several different aspects of VOC chemistry in the atmosphere. Aside from ambient levels of VOC outdoors, VOC are also present at moderate concentrations indoors. Many studies have measured indoor air concentrations of VOC, but only one considered the effects of human breath. The major VOC in the breath of healthy individuals are isoprene (12-580 ppb), acetone (1.2-1800 ppb), ethanol (13-1000 ppb), methanol (160-2000 ppb), and other alcohols. Human emissions of VOC are negligible on a regional (less than 4%) and global scale (less than 0.3%). However, in indoor air, under fairly crowded situations, human emissions of VOC may dominate other sources of VOC. An important class of VOC in the atmosphere is alkenes, due to their high reactivity. The ozone reaction with alkenes forms OH radicals, a powerful oxidizing agent in the troposphere. OH radical formation yields from the ozonolysis of several cycloalkenes were measured using small amounts of fast-reacting aromatics and aliphatic ethers to trace OH formation. The values are 0.62 +/- 0.15, 0.54 +/- 0.13, 0.36 +/- 0.08, and 0.91 +/- 0.20 for cyclopentene, cyclohexene, cycloheptene and 1-methylcyclohexene, respectively. Density functional theory calculations at the B3LYP/6-31 G(d,p) level are presented to aid in understanding the trends observed. The pressure dependence of OH radical yields may lend insight into the formation mechanism. We have made the first study of the pressure dependence of the OH radical yield for ethene, propene, 1-butene, trans-2-butene, and 2,3-dimethyl-2- butene over the range 20-760 Torr, and trans -3-hexene, and cyclopentene over the range 200-760 Torr. The OH yields from ozonolysis of ethene and propene were pressure dependent, while the other compounds had OH yields that were independent of pressure. Ozone-alkene reactions form vibrationally excited carbonyl

  15. Thermal conductivity of liquid n-alkanes

    SciTech Connect

    Calado, J.C.G.; Fareleira, J.M.N.A.; Mardolcar, U.V.; Nieto de Castro, C.A.

    1988-05-01

    The thermal conductivity of liquids has been shown in the past to be difficult to predict with a reasonable accuracy, due to the lack of accurate experimental data and reliable prediction schemes. However, data of a high accuracy, and covering wide density ranges, obtained recently in laboratories in Boulder, Lisbon, and London with the transient hot-wire technique, can be used to revise an existing correlation scheme and to develop a new universal predictive technique for the thermal conductivity of liquid normal alkanes. The proposed correlation scheme is constructed on a theoretically based treatment of the van der Waals model of a liquid, which permits the prediction of the density dependence and the thermal conductivity of liquid n-alkanes, methane to tridecane, for temperatures between 110 and 370 K and pressures up to 0.6 MPa, i.e., for 0.3 less than or equal to T/T/sub c/ less than or equal to 0.7 and 2.4 less than or equal to rho/rho/sub c/ less than or equal to 3.7, with an accuracy of +/-1%, given a known value of the thermal conductivity of the fluid at the desired temperature. A generalization of the hard-core volumes obtained, as a function of the number of carbon atoms, showed that it was possible to predict the thermal conductivity of pentane to tetradecane +/- 2%, without the necessity of available experimental measurements.

  16. Highly efficient molybdenum-based catalysts for enantioselective alkene metathesis

    PubMed Central

    Malcolmson, Steven J.; Meek, Simon J.; Sattely, Elizabeth S.; Schrock, Richard R.; Hoveyda, Amir H.

    2009-01-01

    Discovery of efficient catalysts is one of the most compelling objectives of modern chemistry. Chiral catalysts are in particularly high demand, as they facilitate synthesis of enantiomerically enriched small molecules that are critical to developments in medicine, biology and materials science1. Especially noteworthy are catalysts that promote—with otherwise inaccessible efficiency and selectivity levels—reactions demonstrated to be of great utility in chemical synthesis. Here we report a class of chiral catalysts that initiate alkene metathesis1 with very high efficiency and enantioselectivity. Such attributes arise from structural fluxionality of the chiral catalysts and the central role that enhanced electronic factors have in the catalytic cycle. The new catalysts have a stereogenic metal centre and carry only monodentate ligands; the molybdenum-based complexes are prepared stereoselectively by a ligand exchange process involving an enantiomerically pure aryloxide, a class of ligands scarcely used in enantioselective catalysis2,3. We demonstrate the application of the new catalysts in an enantioselective synthesis of the Aspidosperma alkaloid, quebrachamine, through an alkene metathesis reaction that cannot be promoted by any of the previously reported chiral catalysts. PMID:19011612

  17. Products of Chemistry: Alkanes: Abundant, Pervasive, Important, and Essential.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seymour, Raymond B.

    1989-01-01

    Discusses the history and commercialization of alkanes. Examines the nomenclature and uses of alkanes. Studies polymerization and several types of polyethylenes: low-density, high-density, low-molecular-weight, cross-linked, linear low-density, and ultrahigh-molecular-weight. Includes a glossary of hydrocarbon terms. (MVL)

  18. 40 CFR 721.536 - Halogenated phenyl alkane.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Halogenated phenyl alkane. 721.536 Section 721.536 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) TOXIC SUBSTANCES CONTROL ACT SIGNIFICANT NEW USES OF CHEMICAL SUBSTANCES Significant New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.536 Halogenated phenyl alkane....

  19. 40 CFR 721.535 - Halogenated alkane (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... CONTROL ACT SIGNIFICANT NEW USES OF CHEMICAL SUBSTANCES Significant New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.535 Halogenated alkane (generic). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as halogenated alkane (PMN P-01-433) is...

  20. 40 CFR 721.535 - Halogenated alkane (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... CONTROL ACT SIGNIFICANT NEW USES OF CHEMICAL SUBSTANCES Significant New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.535 Halogenated alkane (generic). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as halogenated alkane (PMN P-01-433) is...

  1. 40 CFR 721.536 - Halogenated phenyl alkane.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... CONTROL ACT SIGNIFICANT NEW USES OF CHEMICAL SUBSTANCES Significant New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.536 Halogenated phenyl alkane. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as halogenated phenyl alkane (PMN P-89-867)...

  2. 40 CFR 721.536 - Halogenated phenyl alkane.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... CONTROL ACT SIGNIFICANT NEW USES OF CHEMICAL SUBSTANCES Significant New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.536 Halogenated phenyl alkane. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as halogenated phenyl alkane (PMN P-89-867)...

  3. Genes involved in long-chain alkene biosynthesis in Micrococcus luteus

    SciTech Connect

    Beller, Harry R.; Goh, Ee-Been; Keasling, Jay D.

    2010-01-07

    Aliphatic hydrocarbons are highly appealing targets for advanced cellulosic biofuels, as they are already predominant components of petroleum-based gasoline and diesel fuels. We have studied alkene biosynthesis in Micrococcus luteus ATCC 4698, a close relative of Sarcina lutea (now Kocuria rhizophila), which four decades ago was reported to biosynthesize iso- and anteiso branched, long-chain alkenes. The underlying biochemistry and genetics of alkene biosynthesis were not elucidated in those studies. We show here that heterologous expression of a three-gene cluster from M. luteus (Mlut_13230-13250) in a fatty-acid overproducing E. coli strain resulted in production of long-chain alkenes, predominantly 27:3 and 29:3 (no. carbon atoms: no. C=C bonds). Heterologous expression of Mlut_13230 (oleA) alone produced no long-chain alkenes but unsaturated aliphatic monoketones, predominantly 27:2, and in vitro studies with the purified Mlut_13230 protein and tetradecanoyl-CoA produced the same C27 monoketone. Gas chromatography-time of flight mass spectrometry confirmed the elemental composition of all detected long-chain alkenes and monoketones (putative intermediates of alkene biosynthesis). Negative controls demonstrated that the M. luteus genes were responsible for production of these metabolites. Studies with wild-type M. luteus showed that the transcript copy number of Mlut_13230-13250 and the concentrations of 29:1 alkene isomers (the dominant alkenes produced by this strain) generally corresponded with bacterial population over time. We propose a metabolic pathway for alkene biosynthesis starting with acyl-CoA (or -ACP) thioesters and involving decarboxylative Claisen condensation as a key step, which we believe is catalyzed by OleA. Such activity is consistent with our data and with the homology (including the conserved Cys-His-Asn catalytic triad) of Mlut_13230 (OleA) to FabH (?-ketoacyl-ACP synthase III), which catalyzes decarboxylative Claisen condensation during

  4. Sophorolipids from Torulopsis bombicola: possible relation to alkane uptake.

    PubMed Central

    Ito, S; Inoue, S

    1982-01-01

    Torulopsis bombicola produces extracellular sophorolipids when it is grown on water-insoluble alkanes. Sophorolipids and related model compounds, which were not themselves used for growth, were found to stimulate markedly the growth of T. bombicola on alkanes. This stimulatory effect was restricted to growth on C10 to C20 alkanes, whereas no significantly influence was observed for growth on fatty alcohols, fatty acids, glucose, or glycerol. The nonionic methyl ester of the glycolipid supported the greatest cell yield. However, a number of synthetic nonionic surfactants were unable to replace the glycolipid. When organisms were grown on hexadecane, stimulation of growth by sophorolipids was observed almost exclusively with strains of Torulopsis yeasts. In contrast, the growth of other typical alkane-utilizing yeasts, such as candida and Pichia strains, was inhibited or not affected. It appears that sophorolipids are involved in alkane dissimilation by T. bombicola through an undetermined mechanism. PMID:7201782

  5. Alkanes in benthic organisms from the Buccaneer oil field

    SciTech Connect

    Middleditch, B.S.; Basile, B.

    1980-06-01

    About 200 g per day of alkanes are present in brine discharged from each of two production platforms in the Buccaneer oil field in the NW Gulf of Mexico. These alkanes disperse rapidly in the water column, so that seawater concentrations of petroleum alkanes in this region are generally very low. They can be taken up to some extent by plankton, fish, and barnacles, but the petroleum alkane concentrations in these organisms are also relatively low. The largest pool of petroleum alkanes is in the surficial sediments, where concentrations of up to 25 ppM are observed, with concentration gradients extending more than 20 m from the production platforms. Organisms are examined which are exposed to these sediments and, for comparison, other specimens from control sites around structures from which there are no discharges.

  6. Utilization of n-Alkanes by Cladosporium resinae

    PubMed Central

    Teh, J. S.; Lee, K. H.

    1973-01-01

    Four different isolates of Cladosporium resinae from Australian soils were tested for their ability to utilize liquid n-alkanes ranging from n-hexane to n-octadecane under standard conditions. The isolates were unable to make use of n-hexane, n-heptane, and n-octane for growth. In fact, these hydrocarbons, particularly n-hexane, exerted an inhibitory effect on spore germination and mycelial growth. All higher n-alkanes from n-nonane to n-octadecane were assimilated by the fungus, although only limited growth occurred on n-nonane and n-decane. The long chain n-alkanes (C14 to C18) supported good growth of all isolates, but there was no obvious correlation between cell yields and chain lengths of these n-alkanes. Variation in growth responses to individual n-alkane among the different isolates was also observed. The cause of this variation is unknown. PMID:4735447

  7. Source apportionment of PAHs and n-alkanes in respirable particles in Tehran, Iran by wind sector and vertical profile.

    PubMed

    Moeinaddini, Mazaher; Esmaili Sari, Abbas; Riyahi bakhtiari, Alireza; Chan, Andrew Yiu-Chung; Taghavi, Seyed Mohammad; Hawker, Darryl; Connell, Des

    2014-06-01

    The vertical concentration profiles and source contributions of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and n-alkanes in respirable particle samples (PM4) collected at 10, 100, 200 and 300-m altitude from the Milad Tower of Tehran, Iran during fall and winter were investigated. The average concentrations of total PAHs and total n-alkanes were 16.7 and 591 ng/m(3), respectively. The positive matrix factorization (PMF) model was applied to the chemical composition and wind data to apportion the contributing sources. The five PAH source factors identified were: 'diesel' (56.3% of total PAHs on average), 'gasoline' (15.5%), 'wood combustion, and incineration' (13%), 'industry' (9.2%), and 'road soil particle' (6.0%). The four n-alkane source factors identified were: 'petrogenic' (65% of total n-alkanes on average), 'mixture of petrogenic and biomass burning' (15%), 'mixture of biogenic and fossil fuel' (11.5%), and 'biogenic' (8.5%). Source contributions by wind sector were also estimated based on the wind sector factor loadings from PMF analysis. Directional dependence of sources was investigated using the conditional probability function (CPF) and directional relative strength (DRS) methods. The calm wind period was found to contribute to 4.4% of total PAHs and 5.0% of total n-alkanes on average. Highest average concentrations of PAHs and n-alkanes were found in the 10 and 100 m samples, reflecting the importance of contributions from local sources. Higher average concentrations in the 300 m samples compared to those in the 200 m samples may indicate contributions from long-range transport. The vertical profiles of source factors indicate the gasoline and road soil particle-associated PAHs, and the mixture from biogenic and fossil fuel source-associated n-alkanes were mostly from local emissions. The smaller average contribution of diesel-associated PAHs in the lower altitude samples also indicates that the restriction of diesel-fueled vehicle use in the central area

  8. Spectroscopy of the tilde A state of NO-alkane complexes (alkane = methane, ethane, propane, and n-butane)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tamé-Reyes, Victor M.; Gardner, Adrian M.; Harris, Joe P.; McDaniel, Jodie; Wright, Timothy G.

    2012-12-01

    We have recorded (1+1) resonance-enhanced multiphoton ionization spectra of complexes formed between NO and the alkanes: CH4, C2H6, C3H8, and n-C4H10. The spectra correspond to the tilde A ← tilde X transition, which is a NO-localized 3s ← 2pπ* transition. In line with previous work, the spectrum for NO-CH4 has well-defined structure, but this is only partially resolved for the other complexes. The spectra recorded in the NO+-alkane mass channels all show a slowly rising onset, followed by a sharp offset, which is associated with dissociation of NO-alkane, from which binding energies in the tilde X and tilde A states are deduced. Beyond this sharp offset, there is a further rise in signal, which is attributed to fragmentation of higher complexes, NO-(alkane)n. Analysis of these features allows binding energies for (NO-alkane) ... alkane to be estimated, and these suggest that in the NO-(alkane)2 complexes, the second alkane molecule is bound to the first, rather than to NO. Calculated structures for the 1:1 complexes are reported, as well as binding energies.

  9. Cobalt-mediated cyclic and linear 2:1 cooligomerization of alkynes with alkenes: a DFT study.

    PubMed

    Gandon, Vincent; Agenet, Nicolas; Vollhardt, K Peter C; Malacria, Max; Aubert, Corinne

    2006-07-01

    The mechanism of the cobalt-mediated [2 + 2 + 2] cycloaddition of two alkynes to one alkene to give CpCo-complexed 1,3-cyclohexadienes (cyclic oligomerization) has been studied by means of DFT computations. In contrast to the mechanism of alkyne cyclotrimerization, in which final alkyne inclusion into the common cobaltacyclopentadiene features a direct "collapse" pathway to the complexed arene, alkene incorporation proceeds via insertion into a Co-C sigma-bond rather than inter- or intramolecular [4 + 2] cycloaddition. The resulting seven-membered metallacycle 7 is a key intermediate which leads to either CpCo-complexed cyclohexadiene 5 or hexatriene 13. The latter transformation, particularly favorable for ethene, accounts, in part, for the linear oligomerization observed occasionally in these reactions. With aromatic double bonds, a C-H activation mechanism by the cobaltacyclopentadiene seems more advantageous in hexatriene product formation. Detailed investigations of high- and low-spin potential energy surfaces are presented. The reactivity of triplet cobalt species was found kinetically disfavored over that of their singlet counterparts. Moreover, it could not account for the formation of CpCo-complexed hexatrienes. However, triplet cobalt complexes cannot be ruled out since all unsaturated species appearing in this study were found to exhibit triplet ground states. Consequently, a reaction pathway that involves a mixing of both spin-state energy surfaces is also described (two-state reactivity). Support for such a pathway comes from the location of several low-lying minimum-energy crossing points (MECPs) of the two surfaces.

  10. High-order harmonic generation in alkanes

    SciTech Connect

    Altucci, C.; Velotta, R.; Heesel, E.; Springate, E.; Marangos, J. P.; Vozzi, C.; Benedetti, E.; Calegari, F.; Sansone, G.; Stagira, S.; Nisoli, M.; Tosa, V.

    2006-04-15

    We have investigated the process of high-order harmonic generation in light alkanes by using femtosecond laser pulses. We show the experimental results cannot be matched by a model that assumes a single active electron only in a hydrogenic s orbital. Clear evidences are shown of the important role played by the p-like character originating from the covalent C-H bond. By constructing a suitable mixture of s-type and p-type atomic wave functions, an excellent agreement between measurements in methane and simulations is found, thus confirming the validity of the developed method as a general tool for the analysis of high-order harmonic generation in complex molecules.

  11. Novel phase behavior in normal alkanes

    SciTech Connect

    Sirota, E.B.; King, H.E. Jr.; Hughes, G.J.; Wan, W.K. )

    1992-01-27

    X-ray scattering studies on aligned films of binary mixtures of the normal alkanes C{sub 23}H{sub 48} and C{sub 28}H{sub 58} reveal, for the first time in such materials, the existence of a new equilibrium phase having the symmetry of a smectic crystal, possibly a hexatic. This phase occurs between the hexagonally packed {ital R}{sub II} and the lower-temperature orthorhombic {ital R}{sub I}, plastic crystalline, layered, rotator phases. We argue that this loss of order is due to local distortion fluctuations in the hexagonal phase. Furthermore, we have identified an {ital ABC}-to-{ital ABAB} restacking transition within the ordered {ital R}{sub II} phase.

  12. Rhodium-catalysed syn-carboamination of alkenes via a transient directing group.

    PubMed

    Piou, Tiffany; Rovis, Tomislav

    2015-11-01

    Alkenes are the most ubiquitous prochiral functional groups--those that can be converted from achiral to chiral in a single step--that are accessible to synthetic chemists. For this reason, difunctionalization reactions of alkenes (whereby two functional groups are added to the same double bond) are particularly important, as they can be used to produce highly complex molecular architectures. Stereoselective oxidation reactions, including dihydroxylation, aminohydroxylation and halogenation, are well established methods for functionalizing alkenes. However, the intermolecular incorporation of both carbon- and nitrogen-based functionalities stereoselectively across an alkene has not been reported. Here we describe the rhodium-catalysed carboamination of alkenes at the same (syn) face of a double bond, initiated by a carbon-hydrogen activation event that uses enoxyphthalimides as the source of both the carbon and the nitrogen functionalities. The reaction methodology allows for the intermolecular, stereospecific formation of one carbon-carbon and one carbon-nitrogen bond across an alkene, which is, to our knowledge, unprecedented. The reaction design involves the in situ generation of a bidentate directing group and the use of a new cyclopentadienyl ligand to control the reactivity of rhodium. The results provide a new way of synthesizing functionalized alkenes, and should lead to the convergent and stereoselective assembly of amine-containing acyclic molecules.

  13. The vapor-particle partitioning of n-alkanes

    SciTech Connect

    Doskey, P.V.

    1994-04-01

    A mixed-phase partitioning model has been proposed to predict the distribution of n-alkanes between the vapor and particle phases in the atmosphere. n-Alkanes having terrestrial plant wax and petroleum origins are assumed to be associated with atmospheric particles as microcrystalline solids and subcooled liquids, respectively. The fraction of n-alkanes on atmospheric particles having plant wax and petroleum origins is estimated with carbon preference indices. Hypothetical terrestrial plant wax and petroleum mixtures are used to estimate the mole fractions of the n-alkanes in each phase and the molecular weights of the phases. Solid and subcooled liquid phase n-alkane vapor pressures are used in the model to predict the fraction of n-alkanes associated with particles in the atmosphere. Trends in the prediction of vapor-particle partitioning using these assumptions agree well with field observations. However, the fraction of particle phase n-alkanes predicted by the model was significantly different from the field observations.

  14. Long-chain alkane production by the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Buijs, Nicolaas A; Zhou, Yongjin J; Siewers, Verena; Nielsen, Jens

    2015-06-01

    In the past decade industrial-scale production of renewable transportation biofuels has been developed as an alternative to fossil fuels, with ethanol as the most prominent biofuel and yeast as the production organism of choice. However, ethanol is a less efficient substitute fuel for heavy-duty and maritime transportation as well as aviation due to its low energy density. Therefore, new types of biofuels, such as alkanes, are being developed that can be used as drop-in fuels and can substitute gasoline, diesel, and kerosene. Here, we describe for the first time the heterologous biosynthesis of long-chain alkanes by the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. We show that elimination of the hexadecenal dehydrogenase Hfd1 and expression of a redox system are essential for alkane biosynthesis in yeast. Deletion of HFD1 together with expression of an alkane biosynthesis pathway resulted in the production of the alkanes tridecane, pentadecane, and heptadecane. Our study provides a proof of principle for producing long-chain alkanes in the industrial workhorse S. cerevisiae, which was so far limited to bacteria. We anticipate that these findings will be a key factor for further yeast engineering to enable industrial production of alkane based drop-in biofuels, which can allow the biofuel industry to diversify beyond bioethanol.

  15. Long-chain alkane production by the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Buijs, Nicolaas A; Zhou, Yongjin J; Siewers, Verena; Nielsen, Jens

    2015-06-01

    In the past decade industrial-scale production of renewable transportation biofuels has been developed as an alternative to fossil fuels, with ethanol as the most prominent biofuel and yeast as the production organism of choice. However, ethanol is a less efficient substitute fuel for heavy-duty and maritime transportation as well as aviation due to its low energy density. Therefore, new types of biofuels, such as alkanes, are being developed that can be used as drop-in fuels and can substitute gasoline, diesel, and kerosene. Here, we describe for the first time the heterologous biosynthesis of long-chain alkanes by the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. We show that elimination of the hexadecenal dehydrogenase Hfd1 and expression of a redox system are essential for alkane biosynthesis in yeast. Deletion of HFD1 together with expression of an alkane biosynthesis pathway resulted in the production of the alkanes tridecane, pentadecane, and heptadecane. Our study provides a proof of principle for producing long-chain alkanes in the industrial workhorse S. cerevisiae, which was so far limited to bacteria. We anticipate that these findings will be a key factor for further yeast engineering to enable industrial production of alkane based drop-in biofuels, which can allow the biofuel industry to diversify beyond bioethanol. PMID:25545362

  16. Expanding the product profile of a microbial alkane biosynthetic pathway.

    PubMed

    Harger, Matthew; Zheng, Lei; Moon, Austin; Ager, Casey; An, Ju Hye; Choe, Chris; Lai, Yi-Ling; Mo, Benjamin; Zong, David; Smith, Matthew D; Egbert, Robert G; Mills, Jeremy H; Baker, David; Pultz, Ingrid Swanson; Siegel, Justin B

    2013-01-18

    Microbially produced alkanes are a new class of biofuels that closely match the chemical composition of petroleum-based fuels. Alkanes can be generated from the fatty acid biosynthetic pathway by the reduction of acyl-ACPs followed by decarbonylation of the resulting aldehydes. A current limitation of this pathway is the restricted product profile, which consists of n-alkanes of 13, 15, and 17 carbons in length. To expand the product profile, we incorporated a new part, FabH2 from Bacillus subtilis , an enzyme known to have a broader specificity profile for fatty acid initiation than the native FabH of Escherichia coli . When provided with the appropriate substrate, the addition of FabH2 resulted in an altered alkane product profile in which significant levels of n-alkanes of 14 and 16 carbons in length are produced. The production of even chain length alkanes represents initial steps toward the expansion of this recently discovered microbial alkane production pathway to synthesize complex fuels. This work was conceived and performed as part of the 2011 University of Washington international Genetically Engineered Machines (iGEM) project.

  17. Catalytic, Enantioselective Sulfenofunctionalisation of Alkenes: Mechanistic, Crystallographic, and Computational Studies

    PubMed Central

    Denmark, Scott E.; Hartmann, Eduard; Kornfilt, David J. P.; Wang, Hao

    2015-01-01

    The stereocontrolled introduction of vicinal heteroatomic substituents into organic molecules is one of the most powerful ways of adding value and function. Whereas many methods exist for the introduction of oxygen- and nitrogen-containing substituents, the number stereocontrolled methods for the introduction of sulfur-containing substituents pales by comparison. Previous reports from these laboratories have described the sulfenofunctionalization of alkenes that construct vicinal carbon-sulfur and carbon-oxygen, carbon-nitrogen as well as carbon-carbon bonds with high levels of diastereospecificity and enantioselectivity. This process is enabled by the concept of Lewis base activation of Lewis acids that provides activation of Group 16 electrophiles. To provide a foundation for expansion of substrate scope and improved selectivities, we have undertaken a comprehensive study of the catalytically active species. Insights gleaned from kinetic, crystallographic and computational methods have led to the introduction of a new family of sulfenylating agents that provide significantly enhanced selectivities. PMID:25411883

  18. Copper-Catalyzed Oxidative Amination and Allylic Amination of Alkenes

    PubMed Central

    Liwosz, Timothy W.; Chemler, Sherry R.

    2014-01-01

    Enamines and enamides are useful synthetic intermediates and common components of bioactive compounds. A new protocol for their direct synthesis by a net alkene C–H amination and allylic amination by using catalytic CuII in the presence of MnO2 is reported. Reactions between N-aryl sulfonamides and vinyl arenes furnish enamides, allylic amines, indoles, benzothiazine dioxides, and dibenzazepines directly and efficiently. Control experiments further showed that MnO2 alone can promote the reaction in the absence of a copper salt, albeit with lower efficiency. Mechanistic probes support the involvement of nitrogen-radical intermediates. This method is ideal for the synthesis of enamides from 1,1-disubstituted vinyl arenes, which are uncommon substrates in existing oxidative amination protocols. PMID:23878099

  19. Catalyst system for the polymerization of alkenes to polyolefins

    DOEpatents

    Miller, Stephen A.; Bercaw, John E.

    2004-02-17

    The invention provides metallocene catalyst systems for the controlled polymerization of alkenes to a wide variety of polyolefins and olefin coplymers. Catalyst systems are provided that specifically produce isotactic, syndiotactic and steroblock polyolefins. The type of polymer produced can be controlled by varying the catalyst system, specifically by varying the ligand substituents. Such catalyst systems are particularly useful for the polymerization of polypropylene to give elastomeric polypropylenes. The invention also provides novel elastomeric polypropylene polymers characterized by dyad (m) tacticities of about 55% to about 65%, pentad (mmmm) tacticities of about 25% to about 35%, molecular weights (M.sub.W) in the range of about 50,000 to about 2,000,000, and have mmrm+rrmr peak is less than about 5%.

  20. Catalyst system for the polymerization of alkenes to polyolefins

    DOEpatents

    Miller, Stephen A.; Bercaw, John E.

    2002-01-01

    The invention provides metallocene catalyst systems for the controlled polymerization of alkenes to a wide variety of polyolefins and olefin coplymers. Catalyst systems are provided that specifically produce isotactic, syndiotactic and steroblock polyolefins. The type of polymer produced can be controlled by varying the catalyst system, specifically by varying the ligand substituents. Such catalyst systems are particularly useful for the polymerization of polypropylene to give elastomeric polypropylenes. The invention also provides novel elastomeric polypropylene polymers characterized by dyad (m) tacticities of about 55% to about 65%, pentad (mmmm) tacticities of about 25% to about 35%, molecular weights (M.sub.w)in the range of about 50,000 to about 2,000,000, and have mmrm+rrmr peak is less than about 5%.

  1. New developments in gold-catalyzed manipulation of inactivated alkenes

    PubMed Central

    Chiarucci, Michel

    2013-01-01

    Summary Over the recent years, the nucleophilic manipulation of inactivated carbon–carbon double bonds has gained remarkable credit in the chemical community. As a matter of fact, despite lower reactivity with respect to alkynyl and allenyl counterparts, chemical functionalization of isolated alkenes, via carbon- as well as hetero atom-based nucleophiles, would provide direct access to theoretically unlimited added value of molecular motifs. In this context, homogenous [Au(I)] and [Au(III)] catalysis continues to inspire developments within organic synthesis, providing reliable responses to this interrogative, by combining crucial aspects such as chemical selectivity/efficiency with mild reaction parameters. This review intends to summarize the recent progresses in the field, with particular emphasis on mechanistic details. PMID:24367423

  2. Tandem ring-closing metathesis/transfer hydrogenation: practical chemoselective hydrogenation of alkenes.

    PubMed

    Connolly, Timothy; Wang, Zhongyu; Walker, Michael A; McDonald, Ivar M; Peese, Kevin M

    2014-09-01

    An operationally simple chemoselective transfer hydrogenation of alkenes using ruthenium metathesis catalysts is presented. Of great practicality, the transfer hydrogenation reagents can be added directly to a metathesis reaction and effect hydrogenation of the product alkene in a single pot at ambient temperature without the need to seal the vessel to prevent hydrogen gas escape. The reduction is applicable to a range of alkenes and can be performed in the presence of aryl halides and benzyl groups, a notable weakness of Pd-catalyzed hydrogenations. Scope and mechanistic considerations are presented. PMID:25140991

  3. Maturation of tergal gland alkene profiles in European honey bee queens,Apis mellifera L.

    PubMed

    Smith, R K; Spivak, M; Taylor, O R; Bennett, C; Smith, M L

    1993-01-01

    In a series of husbandry and stop-time chemical experiments with honey bee queens, the production of tergal gland alkenes was found to be stimulated by natural mating and not by instrumental insemination. Carbon dioxide, physical manipulation of the sting chamber and vagina, presence of sperm in the spermatheca, egg production, and chemicals transferred via drone semen are demonstrated to not initiate the synthesis of the tergal gland alkenes. The compounds probably do not function as sex pheromones. However, the circumstances and timing of the initiation of production of the tergal gland alkenes strongly suggests a communication role for the compounds within the hive.

  4. Tandem ring-closing metathesis/transfer hydrogenation: practical chemoselective hydrogenation of alkenes.

    PubMed

    Connolly, Timothy; Wang, Zhongyu; Walker, Michael A; McDonald, Ivar M; Peese, Kevin M

    2014-09-01

    An operationally simple chemoselective transfer hydrogenation of alkenes using ruthenium metathesis catalysts is presented. Of great practicality, the transfer hydrogenation reagents can be added directly to a metathesis reaction and effect hydrogenation of the product alkene in a single pot at ambient temperature without the need to seal the vessel to prevent hydrogen gas escape. The reduction is applicable to a range of alkenes and can be performed in the presence of aryl halides and benzyl groups, a notable weakness of Pd-catalyzed hydrogenations. Scope and mechanistic considerations are presented.

  5. Catalytic Selenium-Promoted Intermolecular Friedel-Crafts Alkylation with Simple Alkenes.

    PubMed

    Tang, E; Zhao, Yinjiao; Li, Wen; Wang, Weilin; Zhang, Meng; Dai, Xin

    2016-03-01

    A method for conducting selenium-promoted intermolecular Friedel-Crafts (F-C) alkylation reactions has been developed with simple alkenes using trimethylsilyl trifluoromethanesulfonate as a catalyst and N-phenylselenophthalimide as an efficient selenium source. Electron-rich arenes smoothly underwent F-C alkylation with a variety of alkenes to afford alkylated products in good yield and with high regioselectivity and diastereoselectivity. The regioselectivity and stereoselectivity of arenes and alkenes as well as a preliminary mechanism of the F-C alkylation reaction are discussed. PMID:26882088

  6. ORGANIC CHEMISTRY. Iron-catalyzed intermolecular [2+2] cycloadditions of unactivated alkenes.

    PubMed

    Hoyt, Jordan M; Schmidt, Valerie A; Tondreau, Aaron M; Chirik, Paul J

    2015-08-28

    Cycloadditions, such as the [4+2] Diels-Alder reaction to form six-membered rings, are among the most powerful and widely used methods in synthetic chemistry. The analogous [2+2] alkene cycloaddition to synthesize cyclobutanes is kinetically accessible by photochemical methods, but the substrate scope and functional group tolerance are limited. Here, we report iron-catalyzed intermolecular [2+2] cycloaddition of unactivated alkenes and cross cycloaddition of alkenes and dienes as regio- and stereoselective routes to cyclobutanes. Through rational ligand design, development of this base metal-catalyzed method expands the chemical space accessible from abundant hydrocarbon feedstocks.

  7. Photoredox-Catalyzed Stereoselective Conversion of Alkynes into Tetrasubstituted Trifluoromethylated Alkenes.

    PubMed

    Tomita, Ren; Koike, Takashi; Akita, Munetaka

    2015-10-26

    A regio- and stereoselective synthesis of trifluoromethylated alkenes bearing four different substituents has been developed. Stereocontrolled sulfonyloxytrifluoromethylation of unsymmetric internal alkynes with an electrophilic CF3 reagent, namely the triflate salt of the Yagupol'skii-Umemoto reagent, in the presence of an Ir photoredox catalyst under visible-light irradiation afforded trifluoromethylalkenyl triflates with well-predictable stereochemistry resulting from anti addition of the trifluoromethyl and triflate groups. Subsequent palladium-catalyzed cross-couplings led to tetrasubstituted trifluoromethylated alkenes in a highly stereoselective manner. The present method is the first example of a facile one-pot synthesis of tetrasubstituted trifluoromethylated alkenes from simple alkynes.

  8. Alkanes-filled photonic crystal fibers as sensor transducers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marć, P.; Przybysz, N.; Stasiewicz, K.; Jaroszewicz, L. R.

    2015-09-01

    In this paper we propose alkanes-filled PCFs as the new class of transducers for optical fiber sensors. We investigated experimentally thermo-optic properties of a commercially available LMA8 partially filled with different alkanes with a higher number of carbon atoms. A partially filled PCF spliced with standard SMFs constitutes one of the newest type transducer. We have selected a group of eight alkanes which have melting points in different temperatures. An analysis of temperature spectral characteristics of these samples will allow to design an optical fiber sensor with different temperature thresholds at specific wavelengths.

  9. Occurrence and mass loadings of n-alkanes in riverine runoff of the Pearl River Delta, South China: global implications for levels and inputs.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ji-Zhong; Ni, Hong-Gang; Guan, Yu-Feng; Zeng, Eddy Y

    2008-10-01

    Riverine runoff samples were collected monthly from March 2005 to February 2006 from the eight major outlets of the Pearl River Delta (PRD), South China, and analyzed to obtain the concentrations of n-alkanes in both the filtrate and particulate phases. The average concentrations of Sigma(C15-C34) (i.e., sum of C15 to C34 normal alkanes) ranged from 0.06 to 2.97 microg/L (mean, 0.64 microg/L) in filtrate samples and from 1.00 to 98.8 microg/g (average, 19.8 microg/g dry weight) in particulate samples. Compared to results from around the world, the levels of hydrocarbon compounds in the PRD were at the high end of the global range. Evaluation of compositional indices of n-alkanes indicated that petroleum-related sources are the main contributor of n-alkanes found in the PRD, with minor contributions from high plant wax. Regression analyses appeared to suggest that n-alkanes are transported into the aquatic environment of the PRD via various pathways, and the transport mechanisms also are considerably influenced by the complex hydrologic conditions in the PRD. The annual riverine input of Sigma(C15-C34) from the PRD to the coastal ocean was 360 tons/year, or the equivalent of approximately 8,800 tons/year of petroleum hydrocarbons. The emission of Sigma(C15-C34) from all sources in the PRD was estimated at 39,000 tons/year, or 2.4 g/day per capita. Overall, the PRD contributes approximately 0.2% of the annual global input of n-alkanes to the coastal oceans, similar to the contributions of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, further indicating that the PRD has been a significant source of hydrocarbon contamination to the global coastal marine environment. PMID:18476750

  10. Nickel-catalysed cyclopropanation of electron-deficient alkenes with diiodomethane and diethylzinc.

    PubMed

    Xu, Jin; Samsuri, Nazurah Binte; Duong, Hung A

    2016-02-25

    In the presence of a nickel catalyst, the cyclopropanation of electron-deficient alkenes with diiodomethane and diethylzinc is drastically accelerated. A wide range of cyclopropyl ketones, esters and amides can be accessed under these conditions. PMID:26879514

  11. Copper-catalyzed decarboxylative coupling of alkynyl carboxylates with 1,1-dibromo-1-alkenes.

    PubMed

    Huang, Zheng; Shang, Rui; Zhang, Zi-Rong; Tan, Xiao-Dan; Xiao, Xiao; Fu, Yao

    2013-05-01

    A copper-catalyzed decarboxylative coupling reaction of potassium alkynyl carboxylates with 1,1-dibromo-1-alkenes was developed for the synthesis of unsymmetrical 1,3-diyne and 1,3,5-triyne derivatives. Diverse aryl, alkenyl, alkynyl, and alkyl substituted 1,1-dibromo-1-alkenes can react smoothly with aryl and alkyl substituted propiolates to produce unsymmetrical 1,3-diynes and 1,3,5-triynes with high selectivity and good functional group compatibility.

  12. Diverse Asymmetric Hydrofunctionalization of Aliphatic Internal Alkenes through Catalytic Regioselective Hydroboration.

    PubMed

    Xi, Yumeng; Hartwig, John F

    2016-06-01

    We report a two-step strategy for diverse hydrofunctionalizations of aliphatic internal alkenes with high regioselectivity and enantioselectivity. This process comprises a copper-catalyzed asymmetric hydroboration and subsequent stereospecific derivatizations of the secondary boronates. By this strategy, a range of compounds, such as amides, alkyl fluorides and bromides, alcohols, aldehydes, arenes, and heteroarenes, were synthesized from an internal alkene with high regioselectivity and enantioselectivity. Computational studies provide insight into the origins of these selectivities. PMID:27167490

  13. Contribution of cyanobacterial alkane production to the ocean hydrocarbon cycle.

    PubMed

    Lea-Smith, David J; Biller, Steven J; Davey, Matthew P; Cotton, Charles A R; Perez Sepulveda, Blanca M; Turchyn, Alexandra V; Scanlan, David J; Smith, Alison G; Chisholm, Sallie W; Howe, Christopher J

    2015-11-01

    Hydrocarbons are ubiquitous in the ocean, where alkanes such as pentadecane and heptadecane can be found even in waters minimally polluted with crude oil. Populations of hydrocarbon-degrading bacteria, which are responsible for the turnover of these compounds, are also found throughout marine systems, including in unpolluted waters. These observations suggest the existence of an unknown and widespread source of hydrocarbons in the oceans. Here, we report that strains of the two most abundant marine cyanobacteria, Prochlorococcus and Synechococcus, produce and accumulate hydrocarbons, predominantly C15 and C17 alkanes, between 0.022 and 0.368% of dry cell weight. Based on global population sizes and turnover rates, we estimate that these species have the capacity to produce 2-540 pg alkanes per mL per day, which translates into a global ocean yield of ∼ 308-771 million tons of hydrocarbons annually. We also demonstrate that both obligate and facultative marine hydrocarbon-degrading bacteria can consume cyanobacterial alkanes, which likely prevents these hydrocarbons from accumulating in the environment. Our findings implicate cyanobacteria and hydrocarbon degraders as key players in a notable internal hydrocarbon cycle within the upper ocean, where alkanes are continually produced and subsequently consumed within days. Furthermore we show that cyanobacterial alkane production is likely sufficient to sustain populations of hydrocarbon-degrading bacteria, whose abundances can rapidly expand upon localized release of crude oil from natural seepage and human activities.

  14. Contribution of cyanobacterial alkane production to the ocean hydrocarbon cycle

    PubMed Central

    Lea-Smith, David J.; Biller, Steven J.; Davey, Matthew P.; Cotton, Charles A. R.; Perez Sepulveda, Blanca M.; Turchyn, Alexandra V.; Scanlan, David J.; Smith, Alison G.; Chisholm, Sallie W.; Howe, Christopher J.

    2015-01-01

    Hydrocarbons are ubiquitous in the ocean, where alkanes such as pentadecane and heptadecane can be found even in waters minimally polluted with crude oil. Populations of hydrocarbon-degrading bacteria, which are responsible for the turnover of these compounds, are also found throughout marine systems, including in unpolluted waters. These observations suggest the existence of an unknown and widespread source of hydrocarbons in the oceans. Here, we report that strains of the two most abundant marine cyanobacteria, Prochlorococcus and Synechococcus, produce and accumulate hydrocarbons, predominantly C15 and C17 alkanes, between 0.022 and 0.368% of dry cell weight. Based on global population sizes and turnover rates, we estimate that these species have the capacity to produce 2–540 pg alkanes per mL per day, which translates into a global ocean yield of ∼308–771 million tons of hydrocarbons annually. We also demonstrate that both obligate and facultative marine hydrocarbon-degrading bacteria can consume cyanobacterial alkanes, which likely prevents these hydrocarbons from accumulating in the environment. Our findings implicate cyanobacteria and hydrocarbon degraders as key players in a notable internal hydrocarbon cycle within the upper ocean, where alkanes are continually produced and subsequently consumed within days. Furthermore we show that cyanobacterial alkane production is likely sufficient to sustain populations of hydrocarbon-degrading bacteria, whose abundances can rapidly expand upon localized release of crude oil from natural seepage and human activities. PMID:26438854

  15. Intermolecular cope-type hydroamination of alkenes and alkynes using hydroxylamines.

    PubMed

    Moran, Joseph; Gorelsky, Serge I; Dimitrijevic, Elena; Lebrun, Marie-Eve; Bédard, Anne-Catherine; Séguin, Catherine; Beauchemin, André M

    2008-12-31

    The development of the Cope-type hydroamination as a method for the metal- and acid-free intermolecular hydroamination of hydroxylamines with alkenes and alkynes is described. Aqueous hydroxylamine reacts efficiently with alkynes in a Markovnikov fashion to give oximes and with strained alkenes to give N-alkylhydroxylamines, while unstrained alkenes are more challenging. N-Alkylhydroxylamines also display similar reactivity with strained alkenes and give modest to good yields with vinylarenes. Electron-rich vinylarenes lead to branched products while electron-deficient vinylarenes give linear products. A beneficial additive effect is observed with sodium cyanoborohydride, the extent of which is dependent on the structure of the hydroxylamine. The reaction conditions are found to be compatible with common protecting groups, free OH and NH bonds, as well as bromoarenes. Both experimental and theoretical results suggest the proton transfer step of the N-oxide intermediate is of vital importance in the intermolecular reactions of alkenes. Details are disclosed concerning optimization, reaction scope, limitations, and theoretical analysis by DFT, which includes a detailed molecular orbital description for the concerted hydroamination process and an exhaustive set of calculated potential energy surfaces for the reactions of various alkenes, alkynes, and hydroxylamines.

  16. Nazarov cyclization of divinyl ketones bearing an ester group at the β-position: a remarkable effect of α-substitution and alkene geometry on regioselectivity.

    PubMed

    Sudhakar, Gangarajula; Raghavaiah, Jakka; Mahesh, Gaddam; Singarapu, Kiran Kumar

    2016-03-14

    The Nazarov cyclization of divinyl ketones with an ester at the β-position was examined with particular reference to where the cyclic double bond forms. We observed unprecedented regioselectivity, dictated by the subtle substitution patterns at the α-position and alkene geometry of α,β and mostly, this selectivity is regardless of substitutions at α'- and β'-positions. The major implications of these observations are an aromatic group at the α-position with E-olefin geometry provides a cyclopentenone in which the double bond is not in conjugation with an ester, whereas Z-olefin provides a cyclopentenone in which the double bond is in conjugation with an ester; and divinyl ketones bearing an ester group at the β-position and an alkyl group at the α-position with E-olefin geometry provide a cyclopentenone in which the double bond is in conjugation with the ester. PMID:26864166

  17. A Comparison of the Monolayer Dynamics of the Branched Alkane Squalane and the Normal Alkane Tetracosane Adsorbed on Graphite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Enevoldsen, A. D.; Hansen, F. Y.; Diama, A.; Taub, H.

    2004-03-01

    Squalane is a branched alkane (C_30H_62) with 24 carbon atoms in its backbone, like the normal alkane tetracosane ( n-C_24H_50), and six symmetrically placed methyl side groups. In general, branched alkanes such as squalane are better lubricants than n-alkanes. We have studied the dynamics of the squalane and tetracosane monolayers by quasielastic neutron scattering and molecular dynamics (MD) simulations on two different time scales. Both experiments and simulations showed that diffusion at 260 K is about 2.5 times faster in the squalane than in the tetracosane system. It is somewhat surprising that the diffusion in a system with a branched alkane is faster than with a normal alkane. A possible explanation is that the squalane molecule does not bind as strongly to the surface as tetracosane, because the MD simulations have shown that the adsorbed molecules have a distorted backbone. This may also explain why the slow intramolecular motions associated with conformational changes are seen at lower temperatures in the squalane than the tetracosane monolayer where they are only observed near melting.

  18. Square Wave Voltammetry of TNT at Gold Electrodes Modified with Self-Assembled Monolayers Containing Aromatic Structures

    PubMed Central

    Trammell, Scott A.; Zabetakis, Dan; Moore, Martin; Verbarg, Jasenka; Stenger, David A.

    2014-01-01

    Square wave voltammetry for the reduction of 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene (TNT) was measured in 100 mM potassium phosphate buffer (pH 8) at gold electrodes modified with self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) containing either an alkane thiol or aromatic ring thiol structures. At 15 Hz, the electrochemical sensitivity (µA/ppm) was similar for all SAMs tested. However, at 60 Hz, the SAMs containing aromatic structures had a greater sensitivity than the alkane thiol SAM. In fact, the alkane thiol SAM had a decrease in sensitivity at the higher frequency. When comparing the electrochemical response between simulations and experimental data, a general trend was observed in which most of the SAMs had similar heterogeneous rate constants within experimental error for the reduction of TNT. This most likely describes a rate limiting step for the reduction of TNT. However, in the case of the alkane SAM at higher frequency, the decrease in sensitivity suggests that the rate limiting step in this case may be electron tunneling through the SAM. Our results show that SAMs containing aromatic rings increased the sensitivity for the reduction of TNT when higher frequencies were employed and at the same time suppressed the electrochemical reduction of dissolved oxygen. PMID:25549081

  19. Selective hydroxylation of alkanes by an extracellular fungal peroxygenase.

    PubMed

    Peter, Sebastian; Kinne, Matthias; Wang, Xiaoshi; Ullrich, René; Kayser, Gernot; Groves, John T; Hofrichter, Martin

    2011-10-01

    Fungal peroxygenases are novel extracellular heme-thiolate biocatalysts that are capable of catalyzing the selective monooxygenation of diverse organic compounds, using only H(2)O(2) as a cosubstrate. Little is known about the physiological role or the catalytic mechanism of these enzymes. We have found that the peroxygenase secreted by Agrocybe aegerita catalyzes the H(2)O(2)-dependent hydroxylation of linear alkanes at the 2-position and 3-position with high efficiency, as well as the regioselective monooxygenation of branched and cyclic alkanes. Experiments with n-heptane and n-octane showed that the hydroxylation proceeded with complete stereoselectivity for the (R)-enantiomer of the corresponding 3-alcohol. Investigations with a number of model substrates provided information about the route of alkane hydroxylation: (a) the hydroxylation of cyclohexane mediated by H(2)(18)(2) resulted in complete incorporation of (18)O into the hydroxyl group of the product cyclohexanol; (b) the hydroxylation of n-hexane-1,1,1,2,2,3,3-D(7) showed a large intramolecular deuterium isotope effect [(k(H)/k(D))(obs)] of 16.0 ± 1.0 for 2-hexanol and 8.9 ± 0.9 for 3-hexanol; and (c) the hydroxylation of the radical clock norcarane led to an estimated radical lifetime of 9.4 ps and an oxygen rebound rate of 1.06 × 10(11) s(-1). These results point to a hydrogen abstraction and oxygen rebound mechanism for alkane hydroxylation. The peroxygenase appeared to lack activity on long-chain alkanes (> C(16)) and highly branched alkanes (e.g. tetramethylpentane), but otherwise exhibited a broad substrate range. It may accordingly have a role in the bioconversion of natural and anthropogenic alkane-containing structures (including alkyl chains of complex biomaterials) in soils, plant litter, and wood. PMID:21812933

  20. Interplay between aromaticity and strain in double group transfer reactions to 1,2-benzyne.

    PubMed

    Fernández, Israel; Cossío, Fernando P

    2016-05-30

    Density Functional Theory calculations are used to explore the double hydrogen atom transfer from different alkanes to 1,2-benzyne. State-of-the-art calculations including the Activation Strain Model of reactivity, Energy Decomposition Analysis, and Valence Bond methods, reveal the origins of the relatively low activation barriers computed for these processes compared to the analogous reaction involving acetylene. In addition, the interplay between the in-plane aromaticity of the corresponding transition states and the variation of the π-aromaticity associated with the benzyne moiety as well as their influence on the barrier heights of the transformations are analyzed in detail.

  1. Synthesis of Z-alkenes from Rh(I)-catalyzed olefin isomerization of β,γ-unsaturated ketones.

    PubMed

    Zhuo, Lian-Gang; Yao, Zhong-Ke; Yu, Zhi-Xiang

    2013-09-20

    Developing olefin isomerization reactions to reach kinetically controlled Z-alkenes is challenging because formation of trans-alkenes is thermodynamically favored under the traditional catalytic conditions using acids, bases, or transition metals as the catalysts. A new synthesis of Z-alkenes from Rh(I)-catalyzed olefin isomerization of β,γ-unsaturated ketones to α,β-unsaturated ketones was developed, providing an easy and efficient way to access various Z-enones.

  2. Silver(I)-Mediated Phosphorylation/Cyclization Cascade of N-Cyanamide Alkenes for Divergent Access to Quinazolinones and Dihydroisoquinolinones.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Jing; Zhang, Yan; Wang, Dahai; Cui, Sunliang

    2016-04-15

    A silver(I)-mediated phosphorylation/cyclization radical cascade of N-cyanamide alkenes has been developed. The addition of in situ generated phosphorus radical to N-cyanamide alkenes triggers the cascade, resulting in late-stage cyclization toward divergent access to 4-quinazolinones and dihydroisoquinolinones. Both terminal and internal N-cyanamide alkenes are applicable in this protocol, and the cyclizations are consistent with Baldwin's rule.

  3. Recent applications in natural product synthesis of dihydrofuran and -pyran formation by ring-closing alkene metathesis.

    PubMed

    Jacques, Reece; Pal, Ritashree; Parker, Nicholas A; Sear, Claire E; Smith, Peter W; Ribaucourt, Aubert; Hodgson, David M

    2016-07-01

    In the past two decades, alkene metathesis has risen in prominence to become a significant synthetic strategy for alkene formation. Many total syntheses of natural products have used this transformation. We review the use, from 2003 to 2015, of ring-closing alkene metathesis (RCM) for the generation of dihydrofurans or -pyrans in natural product synthesis. The strategies used to assemble the RCM precursors and the subsequent use of the newly formed unsaturation will also be highlighted and placed in context. PMID:27108941

  4. [Determination of primary aromatic amines in crayons gas chromatography-mass spectrometry].

    PubMed

    Kang, Suyuan; Zhang, Qing; Bai, Hua; Wang, Chao; Lü, Qing

    2011-05-01

    A method for the determination of nine primary aromatic amines in crayon by solid phase extraction (SPE) and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) was developed. The alkanes in the sample were removed with n-hexane. Then the sample was extracted twice with ultrasonic extraction by methanol. The extract was evaporated, then the concentrated solution reacted with the reducing agent (sodium hydrosulfite) for 30 min at 70 degrees C. After the extraction with a diatomite SPE column, the aromatic amines were collected and separated on an HP-5M column, determined by MS. The nine primary aromatic amines can be separated and determined successfully. Under the optimized conditions, the detection limits were 5 mg/kg and the spiked recoveries of the samples were in the range of 86.02%-102.43%. The method is accurate and stable. It can be applied in the analysis of the primary aromatic amine of real crayon samples. PMID:21847976

  5. Variation in n-Alkane Distributions of Modern Plants: Questioning Applications of n-Alkanes in Chemotaxonomy and Paleoecology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bush, R. T.; McInerney, F. A.

    2010-12-01

    Long chain n-alkanes (n-C21 to n-C37) are synthesized as part of the epicuticular leaf wax of terrestrial plants and are among the most recognizable and widely used plant biomarkers. n-Alkane distributions have been utilized in previous studies on modern plant chemotaxonomy, testing whether taxa can be identified based on characteristic n-alkane profiles. Dominant n-alkanes (e.g. n-C27 or n-C31) have also been ascribed to major plant groups (e.g. trees or grasses respectively) and have been used in paleoecology studies to reconstruct fluctuations in plant functional types. However, many of these studies have been based on relatively few modern plant data; with the wealth of modern n-alkane studies, a more comprehensive analysis of n-alkanes in modern plants is now possible and can inform the usefulness of n-alkane distributions as paleoecological indicators. The work presented here is a combination of measurements made using plant leaves collected from the Chicago Botanic Garden and a compilation of published literature data from six continents. We categorized plants by type: angiosperms, gymnosperms, woody plants, forbs, grasses, ferns and pteridophytes, and mosses. We then quantified n-alkane distribution parameters such as carbon preference index (CPI), average chain length (ACL), and dispersion (a measure of the spread of the profile over multiple chain lengths) and used these to compare plant groups. Among all plants, one of the emergent correlations is a decrease in dispersion with increasing CPI. Within and among plant groups, n-alkane distributions show a very large range of variation, and the results show little or no correspondence between broad plant groups and a single dominant n-alkane or a ratio of n-alkanes. These findings are true both when data from six continents are combined and when plants from a given region are compared (North America). We also compared the n-alkane distributions of woody angiosperms, woody gymnosperms, and grasses with one

  6. Polymer - supported cobalt (II) catalysts for the oxidation of alkenes.

    PubMed

    Błaz, Edyta; Pielichowski, Jan

    2006-01-31

    Polymer-supported heterogeneous catalysts in a form of complexes of 8-hydroxy- quinoline with cobalt acetate were synthesized. Conjugated polymers - polyaniline (PANI), poly-o-toluidine (POT), poly-o-anisidine (POA) - were used as supports. Oxidation reactions of aliphatic and aromatic hydrocarbons were carried out in the presence of molecular oxygen at atmospheric pressure and epoxides or ketones were obtained as the main products with high selectivity.

  7. Surface freezing in binary alkane-alcohol mixtures

    SciTech Connect

    Ofer, E.; Sloutskin, E.; Tamam, L.; Deutsch, M.; Ocko, B. M.

    2006-08-15

    Surface freezing was detected and studied in mixtures of alcohol and alkane molecules, using surface tensiometry and surface-specific x-ray scattering methods. Considering that surface freezing in pure alkanes forms an ordered monolayer and in alcohols it forms an ordered bilayer, the length mismatch repulsion was minimized by varying the carbon number of the alkane component around 2n, where n is the carbon number of the alcohol molecule. A solutionlike behavior was found for all mixtures, where the ideal liquid mixture phase-separates upon freezing both in the bulk and the surface. The solid exhibits a herringbone crystalline phase below an alkane mole fraction {phi}{sub t}{approx_equal}0.8 and a rotator phase above it. The surface frozen film below {phi}{sub t} is an alkane monolayer exhibiting a next-nearest neighbor molecular tilt of a composition-dependent magnitude. Above {phi}{sub t}, no diffraction peaks were observed. This could be explained by the intrinsically shorter-range order of the rotator phase and a possible proliferation of defects.

  8. The Origin of Anti-Markovnikov Regioselectivity in Alkene Hydroamination Reactions Catalyzed by [Rh(DPEphos)](.).

    PubMed

    Couce-Rios, Almudena; Lledós, Agustí; Ujaque, Gregori

    2016-06-27

    The development of regioselective anti-Markovnikov alkene's hydroamination is a long-standing goal in catalysis. The [Rh(COD)(DPEphos)](+) complex is the most general and regioselective group 9 catalyst for such a process. The reaction mechanism for intermolecular hydroamination of alkenes catalyzed by [Rh(DPEphos)](+) complex is analyzed by means of DFT calculations. Hydroamination (alkene vs. amine activation routes) as well as oxidative amination pathways are analyzed. According to the computational results the operating mechanism can be generally described by alkene coordination, amine nucleophilic addition, proton transfer through the metal center and reductive elimination steps. The mechanism for the formation of the oxidative amination side product goes via a β-elimination after the nucleophilic addition and metal center protonation steps. The origin of the regioselectivity for the addition process (Markovnikov vs. anti-Markovnikov additions) is shown to be not charge but orbitally driven. Remarkably, η(2) to η(1) slippage degree on the alkene coordination mode is directly related to the regioselective outcome.

  9. Spectroscopic and Theoretical Identification of Two Thermal Isomerization Pathways for Bistable Chiral Overcrowded Alkenes.

    PubMed

    Kistemaker, Jos C M; Pizzolato, Stefano F; van Leeuwen, Thomas; Pijper, Thomas C; Feringa, Ben L

    2016-09-12

    Chiroptical molecular switches play an important role in responsive materials and dynamic molecular systems. Here we present the synthesis of four chiral overcrowded alkenes and the experimental and computational study of their photochemical and thermal behavior. By irradiation with UV light, metastable diastereoisomers with opposite helicity were generated through high yielding E-Z isomerizations. Kinetic studies on metastable 1-4 using CD spectroscopy and HPLC analysis revealed two pathways at higher temperatures for the thermal isomerization, namely a thermal E-Z isomerization (TEZI) and a thermal helix inversion (THI). These processes were also studied computationally whereby a new strategy was developed for calculating the TEZI barrier for second-generation overcrowded alkenes. To demonstrate that these overcrowded alkenes can be employed as bistable switches, photochromic cycling was performed, which showed that the alkenes display good selectivity and fatigue resistance over multiple irradiation cycles. In particular, switch 3 displayed the best performance in forward and backward photoswitching, while 1 excelled in thermal stability of the photogenerated metastable form. Overall, the alkenes studied showed a remarkable and unprecedented combination of switching properties including dynamic helicity, reversibility, selectivity, fatigue resistance, and thermal stability. PMID:27471009

  10. The Origin of Anti-Markovnikov Regioselectivity in Alkene Hydroamination Reactions Catalyzed by [Rh(DPEphos)](.).

    PubMed

    Couce-Rios, Almudena; Lledós, Agustí; Ujaque, Gregori

    2016-06-27

    The development of regioselective anti-Markovnikov alkene's hydroamination is a long-standing goal in catalysis. The [Rh(COD)(DPEphos)](+) complex is the most general and regioselective group 9 catalyst for such a process. The reaction mechanism for intermolecular hydroamination of alkenes catalyzed by [Rh(DPEphos)](+) complex is analyzed by means of DFT calculations. Hydroamination (alkene vs. amine activation routes) as well as oxidative amination pathways are analyzed. According to the computational results the operating mechanism can be generally described by alkene coordination, amine nucleophilic addition, proton transfer through the metal center and reductive elimination steps. The mechanism for the formation of the oxidative amination side product goes via a β-elimination after the nucleophilic addition and metal center protonation steps. The origin of the regioselectivity for the addition process (Markovnikov vs. anti-Markovnikov additions) is shown to be not charge but orbitally driven. Remarkably, η(2) to η(1) slippage degree on the alkene coordination mode is directly related to the regioselective outcome. PMID:27226329

  11. Spectroscopic and Theoretical Identification of Two Thermal Isomerization Pathways for Bistable Chiral Overcrowded Alkenes.

    PubMed

    Kistemaker, Jos C M; Pizzolato, Stefano F; van Leeuwen, Thomas; Pijper, Thomas C; Feringa, Ben L

    2016-09-12

    Chiroptical molecular switches play an important role in responsive materials and dynamic molecular systems. Here we present the synthesis of four chiral overcrowded alkenes and the experimental and computational study of their photochemical and thermal behavior. By irradiation with UV light, metastable diastereoisomers with opposite helicity were generated through high yielding E-Z isomerizations. Kinetic studies on metastable 1-4 using CD spectroscopy and HPLC analysis revealed two pathways at higher temperatures for the thermal isomerization, namely a thermal E-Z isomerization (TEZI) and a thermal helix inversion (THI). These processes were also studied computationally whereby a new strategy was developed for calculating the TEZI barrier for second-generation overcrowded alkenes. To demonstrate that these overcrowded alkenes can be employed as bistable switches, photochromic cycling was performed, which showed that the alkenes display good selectivity and fatigue resistance over multiple irradiation cycles. In particular, switch 3 displayed the best performance in forward and backward photoswitching, while 1 excelled in thermal stability of the photogenerated metastable form. Overall, the alkenes studied showed a remarkable and unprecedented combination of switching properties including dynamic helicity, reversibility, selectivity, fatigue resistance, and thermal stability.

  12. Microbial production of short-chain alkanes.

    PubMed

    Choi, Yong Jun; Lee, Sang Yup

    2013-10-24

    Increasing concerns about limited fossil fuels and global environmental problems have focused attention on the need to develop sustainable biofuels from renewable resources. Although microbial production of diesel has been reported, production of another much in demand transport fuel, petrol (gasoline), has not yet been demonstrated. Here we report the development of platform Escherichia coli strains that are capable of producing short-chain alkanes (SCAs; petrol), free fatty acids (FFAs), fatty esters and fatty alcohols through the fatty acyl (acyl carrier protein (ACP)) to fatty acid to fatty acyl-CoA pathway. First, the β-oxidation pathway was blocked by deleting the fadE gene to prevent the degradation of fatty acyl-CoAs generated in vivo. To increase the formation of short-chain fatty acids suitable for subsequent conversion to SCAs in vivo, the activity of 3-oxoacyl-ACP synthase (FabH), which is inhibited by unsaturated fatty acyl-ACPs, was enhanced to promote the initiation of fatty acid biosynthesis by deleting the fadR gene; deletion of the fadR gene prevents upregulation of the fabA and fabB genes responsible for unsaturated fatty acids biosynthesis. A modified thioesterase was used to convert short-chain fatty acyl-ACPs to the corresponding FFAs, which were then converted to SCAs by the sequential reactions of E. coli fatty acyl-CoA synthetase, Clostridium acetobutylicum fatty acyl-CoA reductase and Arabidopsis thaliana fatty aldehyde decarbonylase. The final engineered strain produced up to 580.8 mg l(-1) of SCAs consisting of nonane (327.8 mg l(-1)), dodecane (136.5 mg l(-1)), tridecane (64.8 mg l(-1)), 2-methyl-dodecane (42.8 mg l(-1)) and tetradecane (8.9 mg l(-1)), together with small amounts of other hydrocarbons. Furthermore, this platform strain could produce short-chain FFAs using a fadD-deleted strain, and short-chain fatty esters by introducing the Acinetobacter sp. ADP1 wax ester synthase (atfA) and the E. coli mutant

  13. Alkanes in shrimp from the Buccaneer Oil Field

    SciTech Connect

    Middleditch, B.S.; Basile, B.; Chang, E.S.

    1982-07-01

    A total of 36 samples of shrimp were examined from the region of the Buccaneer oil field, eighteen of which were representatives of the commercial species Penaeus aztecus and the rest were various other species: Penaeus duorarum (pink shrimp), Trachypenaeus duorarum (sugar shrimp), Squilla empusa (mantis shrimp), and Sicyonia dorsalis (chevron shrimp). The alkanes and deuteriated alkanes were completely separated by GC, so a mass spectrometer was not required for their detection and quantitation. To confirm the identities of individual compounds, however, some samples were examined by combined gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. Results show that only thirteen of the forty shrimp collected from the region of the Buccaneer oil field contained petroleum alkanes, and the majority of these were obtained from trawls immediately adjacent to the production platforms. It appears that shrimp caught in the region of the Buccaneer oil field are not appreciably tainted with hydrocarbons discharged from the production platforms. (JMT)

  14. Infrared Spectroscopic Investigation on CH Bond Acidity in Cationic Alkanes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsuda, Yoshiyuki; Xie, Min; Fujii, Asuka

    2016-06-01

    We have demonstrated large enhancements of CH bond acidities in alcohol, ether, and amine cations through infrared predissociation spectroscopy based on the vacuum ultraviolet photoionization detection. In this study, we investigate for the cationic alkanes (pentane, hexane, and heptane) with different alkyl chain lengths. The σ electrons are ejected in the ionization of alkanes, while nonbonding electrons are ejected in ionization of alcohols, ethers, and amines. Nevertheless, the acidity enhancements of CH in these cationic alkanes have also been demonstrated by infrared spectroscopy. The correlations of their CH bond acidities with the alkyl chain lengths as well as the mechanisms of their acidity enhancements will be discussed by comparison of infrared spectra and theoretical calculations.

  15. High Temperature Chemical Kinetic Combustion Modeling of Lightly Methylated Alkanes

    SciTech Connect

    Sarathy, S M; Westbrook, C K; Pitz, W J; Mehl, M

    2011-03-01

    Conventional petroleum jet and diesel fuels, as well as alternative Fischer-Tropsch (FT) fuels and hydrotreated renewable jet (HRJ) fuels, contain high molecular weight lightly branched alkanes (i.e., methylalkanes) and straight chain alkanes (n-alkanes). Improving the combustion of these fuels in practical applications requires a fundamental understanding of large hydrocarbon combustion chemistry. This research project presents a detailed high temperature chemical kinetic mechanism for n-octane and three lightly branched isomers octane (i.e., 2-methylheptane, 3-methylheptane, and 2,5-dimethylhexane). The model is validated against experimental data from a variety of fundamental combustion devices. This new model is used to show how the location and number of methyl branches affects fuel reactivity including laminar flame speed and species formation.

  16. Surface crystallization in normal-alkanes and alcohols

    SciTech Connect

    Deutsch, M.; Ocko, B.M.; Wu, X.Z. |; Sirota, E.B.; Sinha, S.K.

    1995-06-01

    A new, rare surface freezing, phenomenon is observed in molten normal-alkanes and their derivatives (alcohols, thiols, etc.). X-ray and surface tension measurements show the formation of a crystalline monolayer on the surface of the liquid alkane at temperatures up to 3 C above the bulk solidification temperature, T{sub f}. For alcohols, a single bilayer is formed. In both cases, the molecules in the layer are hexagonally packed and oriented normal to the surface for short chain lengths, and tilted for long ones. In both cases the single layer persists down to T{sub f}. In terms of wetting theory, this constitutes a very limited partial wetting of the liquid surface by the crystalline layer. The new surface phase is obtained only for chain lengths 14 < n {le} 50 in alkanes, and 16 < n < 30 in alcohols. The measurements are satisfactorily accounted for within a simple theory based on surface energy considerations.

  17. Catalytic, mild, and selective oxyfunctionalization of linear alkanes: current challenges.

    PubMed

    Bordeaux, Mélanie; Galarneau, Anne; Drone, Jullien

    2012-10-22

    Selective catalysts for sustainable oxidation of alkanes are highly demanded because of the abundance of these molecules in the environment, the possibility to transform them into higher-value compounds, such as chemicals or synthetic fuels, and the fact that, kinetically speaking, this is a difficult reaction. Numerous chemical and biological catalysts have been developed in the lasts decades for this purpose, rendering the overview over this field of chemistry difficult. After giving a definition of the ideal catalyst for alkane oxyfunctionalization, this review aims to present the catalysts available today that are closest to ideal.

  18. Assimilation of chlorinated alkanes by hydrocarbon-utilizing fungi

    SciTech Connect

    Murphy, G.L.; Perry, J.J.

    1984-12-01

    The fatty acid compositions of two filamentous fungi (Cunninghamella elegans and Penicillium zonatum) and a yeast (Candida lipolytica) were determined after the organisms were grown on 1-chlorohexadecane or 1-chlorooctadecane. These organisms utilized the chlorinated alkanes as sole sources of carbon and energy. Analyses of the fatty acids present after growth on the chlorinated alkanes indicated that 60 to 70% of the total fatty acids in C. elegans were chlorinated. Approximately 50% of the fatty acids in C. lipolytica were also chlorinated. P. zonatum contained 20% 1-chlorohexadecanoic acid after growth on either substrate but did not incorporate C/sub 18/ chlorinated fatty acids.

  19. Regioselective alkane hydroxylation with a mutant AlkB enzyme

    DOEpatents

    Koch, Daniel J.; Arnold, Frances H.

    2012-11-13

    AlkB from Pseudomonas putida was engineered using in-vivo directed evolution to hydroxylate small chain alkanes. Mutant AlkB-BMO1 hydroxylates propane and butane at the terminal carbon at a rate greater than the wild-type to form 1-propanol and 1-butanol, respectively. Mutant AlkB-BMO2 similarly hydroxylates propane and butane at the terminal carbon at a rate greater than the wild-type to form 1-propanol and 1-butanol, respectively. These biocatalysts are highly active for small chain alkane substrates and their regioselectivity is retained in whole-cell biotransformations.

  20. Modeling of alkane emissions from a wood stain

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, J.C.S.; Guo, Z.

    1993-01-01

    The article discusses full-scale residential house tests to evaluate the effects of organic emissions from a wood finishing product--wood stain--on indoor air quality (IAQ). The test house concentrations of three alkane species, nonane, decane, and undecane, were measured as a function of time after the application of the wood stain. It was found that the test house concentrations can be simulated by an integrated IAQ model which takes into consideration source, sink, and ventilation effects. The alkane emissions were controlled by an evaporation-like process.

  1. Metal-Free C–H Alkyliminylation and Acylation of Alkenes with Secondary Amides

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Pei-Qiang; Huang, Ying-Hong; Geng, Hui; Ye, Jian-Liang

    2016-01-01

    Carbon–carbon bond formation by metal-free cross-coupling of two reactants with low reactivity represents a challenge in organic synthesis. Secondary amides and alkenes are two classes of bench-stable compounds. The low electrophilicity of the former and low nucleophilicity of the latter make the direct coupling of these two partners challenging yet highly desirable. We report herein an unprecedented intermolecular reaction of secondary amides with alkenes to afford α,β-unsaturated ketimines or enones, which are versatile intermediates for organic synthesis and are prevalent in bioactive compounds and functional materials. Our strategy relies on the chemoselective activation of the secondary amide with trifluoromethanesulfonic anhydride (Tf2O)/2-fluoropyridine to generate a highly reactive nitrilium intermediate, which reacts efficiently with alkenes. This metal-free synthesis is characterized by its mild reaction conditions, excellent functional group tolerance and chemoselectivity, allowing the preparation of multi-functionalized compounds without using protecting groups. PMID:27356173

  2. Alkene Cleavage Catalysed by Heme and Nonheme Enzymes: Reaction Mechanisms and Biocatalytic Applications

    PubMed Central

    Mutti, Francesco G.

    2012-01-01

    The oxidative cleavage of alkenes is classically performed by chemical methods, although they display several drawbacks. Ozonolysis requires harsh conditions (−78°C, for a safe process) and reducing reagents in a molar amount, whereas the use of poisonous heavy metals such as Cr, Os, or Ru as catalysts is additionally plagued by low yield and selectivity. Conversely, heme and nonheme enzymes can catalyse the oxidative alkene cleavage at ambient temperature and atmospheric pressure in an aqueous buffer, showing excellent chemo- and regioselectivities in certain cases. This paper focuses on the alkene cleavage catalysed by iron cofactor-dependent enzymes encompassing the reaction mechanisms (in case where it is known) and the application of these enzymes in biocatalysis. PMID:22811656

  3. Metal-Free C-H Alkyliminylation and Acylation of Alkenes with Secondary Amides.

    PubMed

    Huang, Pei-Qiang; Huang, Ying-Hong; Geng, Hui; Ye, Jian-Liang

    2016-01-01

    Carbon-carbon bond formation by metal-free cross-coupling of two reactants with low reactivity represents a challenge in organic synthesis. Secondary amides and alkenes are two classes of bench-stable compounds. The low electrophilicity of the former and low nucleophilicity of the latter make the direct coupling of these two partners challenging yet highly desirable. We report herein an unprecedented intermolecular reaction of secondary amides with alkenes to afford α,β-unsaturated ketimines or enones, which are versatile intermediates for organic synthesis and are prevalent in bioactive compounds and functional materials. Our strategy relies on the chemoselective activation of the secondary amide with trifluoromethanesulfonic anhydride (Tf2O)/2-fluoropyridine to generate a highly reactive nitrilium intermediate, which reacts efficiently with alkenes. This metal-free synthesis is characterized by its mild reaction conditions, excellent functional group tolerance and chemoselectivity, allowing the preparation of multi-functionalized compounds without using protecting groups. PMID:27356173

  4. Titanocene(III)-Catalyzed Three-Component Reaction of Secondary Amides, Aldehydes, and Electrophilic Alkenes.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Xiao; He, Jiang; Li, Heng-Hui; Wang, Ao; Dai, Xi-Jie; Wang, Ai-E; Huang, Pei-Qiang

    2015-11-01

    An umpolung Mannich-type reaction of secondary amides, aliphatic aldehydes, and electrophilic alkenes has been disclosed. This reaction features the one-pot formation of C-N and C-C bonds by a titanocene-catalyzed radical coupling of the condensation products, from secondary amides and aldehydes, with electrophilic alkenes. N-substituted γ-amido-acid derivatives and γ-amido ketones can be efficiently prepared by the current method. Extension to the reaction between ketoamides and electrophilic alkenes allows rapid assembly of piperidine skeletons with α-amino quaternary carbon centers. Its synthetic utility has been demonstrated by a facile construction of the tricyclic core of marine alkaloids such as cylindricine C and polycitorol A.

  5. Photochemical Synthesis and Ligand Exchange Reactions of Ru(CO)[subscript 4] (Eta[superscript 2]-Alkene) Compounds

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cooke, Jason; Berry, David E.; Fawkes, Kelli L.

    2007-01-01

    The photochemical synthesis and subsequent ligand exchange reactions of Ru(CO)[subscript 4] (eta[superscript2]-alkene) compounds has provided a novel experiment for upper-level inorganic chemistry laboratory courses. The experiment is designed to provide a system in which the changing electronic properties of the alkene ligands could be easily…

  6. In tandem or alone: a remarkably selective transfer hydrogenation of alkenes catalyzed by ruthenium olefin metathesis catalysts.

    PubMed

    Zieliński, Grzegorz Krzysztof; Samojłowicz, Cezary; Wdowik, Tomasz; Grela, Karol

    2015-03-01

    A system for transfer hydrogenation of alkenes, composed of a ruthenium metathesis catalyst and HCOOH, is presented. This operationally simple system can be formed directly after a metathesis reaction to effect hydrogenation of the metathesis product in a single-pot. These hydrogenation conditions are applicable to a wide range of alkenes and offer remarkable selectivity. PMID:25586518

  7. In tandem or alone: a remarkably selective transfer hydrogenation of alkenes catalyzed by ruthenium olefin metathesis catalysts.

    PubMed

    Zieliński, Grzegorz Krzysztof; Samojłowicz, Cezary; Wdowik, Tomasz; Grela, Karol

    2015-03-01

    A system for transfer hydrogenation of alkenes, composed of a ruthenium metathesis catalyst and HCOOH, is presented. This operationally simple system can be formed directly after a metathesis reaction to effect hydrogenation of the metathesis product in a single-pot. These hydrogenation conditions are applicable to a wide range of alkenes and offer remarkable selectivity.

  8. An insight into the Lewis acid-catalyzed intramolecular aminocyanation and oxycyanation of alkenes: a concerted or stepwise mechanism.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Jiyang; Wang, Guoqiang; Li, Shuhua

    2015-10-28

    Density functional theory investigations reveal that the intramolecular additions of N-CN bonds to alkenes proceed in a novel asynchronous and concerted mechanism, while the intramolecular addition of O-CN bonds to alkenes may occur by both concerted and stepwise pathways.

  9. A General Approach to Catalytic Alkene Anti-Markovnikov Hydrofunctionalization Reactions via Acridinium Photoredox Catalysis.

    PubMed

    Margrey, Kaila A; Nicewicz, David A

    2016-09-20

    The development of methods for anti-Markovnikov alkene hydrofunctionalization has been a focal point of catalysis research for several decades. The vast majority of work on the control of regioselectivity for this reaction class has hinged on transition metal catalyst activation of olefin substrates. While progress has been realized, there are significant limitations to this approach, and a general solution for catalysis of anti-Markovnikov hydrofunctionalization reactions of olefins does not presently exist. In the past several years, this research lab has focused on alkene activation by single electron oxidation using organic photoredox catalysts to facilitate anti-Markovnikov hydrofunctionalization. By accessing reactive cation radical intermediates, we have realized a truly general approach to anti-Markovnikov olefin hydrofunctionalization reactions. We have identified a dual organic catalyst system consisting of an acridinium photooxidant, first reported by Fukuzumi, and a redox-active hydrogen atom donor that accomplishes a wide range of hydrofunctionalization reactions with complete anti-Markovnikov regiocontrol. This method relies on single electron oxidation of the alkene to reverse its polarity and results in the opposite regioselectivity for hydrofunctionalization. In 2012, we disclosed the anti-Markovnikov hydroetherification of alkenols employing an acridinium photocatalyst and a hydrogen atom donor that proceeds via interwoven polar and radical steps. This general catalyst system has enabled several important reactions in this area, including anti-Markovnikov alkene hydroacetoxylation, hydrolactonization, hydroamination, and hydrotrifluoromethylation reactions. More recently, we have also delineated conditions for intermolecular anti-Markovnikov hydroamination reactions of alkenes using either triflamide or nitrogen-containing heteroaromatic compounds such as pyrazole, indazole, imidazole, and 1,2,3-triazole. Further development led to a method for

  10. A new approach to ferrocene derived alkenes via copper-catalyzed olefination

    PubMed Central

    Muzalevskiy, Vasily M; Shastin, Aleksei V; Demidovich, Alexandra D; Shikhaliev, Namiq G; Magerramov, Abel M; Khrustalev, Victor N; Rakhimov, Rustem D; Vatsadze, Sergey Z

    2015-01-01

    Summary A new approach to ferrocenyl haloalkenes and bis-alkenes was elaborated. The key procedure involves copper catalyzed olefination of N-unsubstituted hydrazones, obtained from ferrocene-containing carbonyl compounds and hydrazine, with polyhaloalkanes. The procedure is simple, cheap and could be applied for the utilization of environmentally harmful polyhalocarbons. The cyclic voltammetry study of the representative examples of the synthesized ferrocenyl alkenes shows the strong dependence of the cathodic behavior on the amount of vinyl groups: while for the monoalkene containing molecules no reduction is seen, the divinyl products are reduced in several steps. PMID:26664627

  11. Oxidative Allylic Esterification of Alkenes by Cooperative Selenium-Catalysis Using Air as the Sole Oxidant.

    PubMed

    Ortgies, Stefan; Depken, Christian; Breder, Alexander

    2016-06-17

    A new metal-free catalysis protocol for the oxidative coupling of nonactivated alkenes with simple carboxylic acids has been established. This method is predicated on the cooperative interaction of a diselane and a photoredox catalyst, which allows for the use of ambient air or pure O2 as the terminal oxidant. Under the title conditions, a range of both functionalized and nonfunctionalized alkenes can be readily converted into the corresponding allylic ester products with good yields (up to 89%) and excellent regioselectivity as well as good functional group tolerance.

  12. Copper-catalyzed intermolecular trifluoromethylarylation of alkenes: mutual activation of arylboronic acid and CF3+ reagent.

    PubMed

    Wang, Fei; Wang, Dinghai; Mu, Xin; Chen, Pinhong; Liu, Guosheng

    2014-07-23

    A novel copper-catalyzed intermolecular trifluoromethylarylation of alkenes is developed using less active ether-type Togni's reagent under mild reaction conditions. Various alkenes and diverse arylboronic acids are compatible with these conditions. Preliminary mechanistic studies reveal that a mutual activation process between arylboronic acid and CF3(+) reagent is essential. In addition, the reaction might involve a rate-determining transmetalation, and the final aryl C-C bond is derived from reductive elimination of the aryl(alkyl)Cu(III) intermediate. PMID:24983408

  13. A General Approach to Catalytic Alkene Anti-Markovnikov Hydrofunctionalization Reactions via Acridinium Photoredox Catalysis.

    PubMed

    Margrey, Kaila A; Nicewicz, David A

    2016-09-20

    The development of methods for anti-Markovnikov alkene hydrofunctionalization has been a focal point of catalysis research for several decades. The vast majority of work on the control of regioselectivity for this reaction class has hinged on transition metal catalyst activation of olefin substrates. While progress has been realized, there are significant limitations to this approach, and a general solution for catalysis of anti-Markovnikov hydrofunctionalization reactions of olefins does not presently exist. In the past several years, this research lab has focused on alkene activation by single electron oxidation using organic photoredox catalysts to facilitate anti-Markovnikov hydrofunctionalization. By accessing reactive cation radical intermediates, we have realized a truly general approach to anti-Markovnikov olefin hydrofunctionalization reactions. We have identified a dual organic catalyst system consisting of an acridinium photooxidant, first reported by Fukuzumi, and a redox-active hydrogen atom donor that accomplishes a wide range of hydrofunctionalization reactions with complete anti-Markovnikov regiocontrol. This method relies on single electron oxidation of the alkene to reverse its polarity and results in the opposite regioselectivity for hydrofunctionalization. In 2012, we disclosed the anti-Markovnikov hydroetherification of alkenols employing an acridinium photocatalyst and a hydrogen atom donor that proceeds via interwoven polar and radical steps. This general catalyst system has enabled several important reactions in this area, including anti-Markovnikov alkene hydroacetoxylation, hydrolactonization, hydroamination, and hydrotrifluoromethylation reactions. More recently, we have also delineated conditions for intermolecular anti-Markovnikov hydroamination reactions of alkenes using either triflamide or nitrogen-containing heteroaromatic compounds such as pyrazole, indazole, imidazole, and 1,2,3-triazole. Further development led to a method for

  14. Trifluoromethylchlorosulfonylation of alkenes: evidence for an inner-sphere mechanism by a copper phenanthroline photoredox catalyst.

    PubMed

    Bagal, Dattatraya B; Kachkovskyi, Georgiy; Knorn, Matthias; Rawner, Thomas; Bhanage, Bhalchandra M; Reiser, Oliver

    2015-06-01

    A visible-light-mediated procedure for the unprecedented trifluoromethylchlorosulfonylation of unactivated alkenes is presented. It uses [Cu(dap)2]Cl as catalyst, and contrasts with [Ru(bpy)3]Cl2, [Ir(ppy)2(dtbbpy)]PF6, or eosin Y that exclusively give rise to trifluoromethylchlorination of the same alkenes. It is assumed that [Cu(dap)2]Cl plays a dual role, that is, acting both as an electron transfer reagent as well as coordinating the reactants in the bond forming processes. PMID:25926329

  15. Oxidative Allylic Esterification of Alkenes by Cooperative Selenium-Catalysis Using Air as the Sole Oxidant.

    PubMed

    Ortgies, Stefan; Depken, Christian; Breder, Alexander

    2016-06-17

    A new metal-free catalysis protocol for the oxidative coupling of nonactivated alkenes with simple carboxylic acids has been established. This method is predicated on the cooperative interaction of a diselane and a photoredox catalyst, which allows for the use of ambient air or pure O2 as the terminal oxidant. Under the title conditions, a range of both functionalized and nonfunctionalized alkenes can be readily converted into the corresponding allylic ester products with good yields (up to 89%) and excellent regioselectivity as well as good functional group tolerance. PMID:27257803

  16. Palladium-Catalyzed Alkene Carboamination Reactions of Electron-Poor Nitrogen Nucleophiles

    PubMed Central

    Peterson, Luke J.

    2015-01-01

    Modified reaction conditions that facilitate Pd-catalyzed alkene carboamination reactions of electron-deficient nitrogen nucleophiles are reported. Pent-4-enylamine derivatives bearing N-tosyl or N-trifluoroacetyl groups are coupled with aryl triflates to afford substituted pyrrolidines in good yield. These reactions proceed via a mechanism involving anti-aminopalladation of the alkene, which differs from previously reported analogous reactions of N-aryl and N-boc pentenylamines. The application of these conditions to a formal synthesis of (±)-aphanorphine is also described. PMID:26622222

  17. Diffusion of squalene in n-alkanes and squalane.

    PubMed

    Kowert, Bruce A; Watson, Michael B; Dang, Nhan C

    2014-02-27

    Squalene, an intermediate in the biosynthesis of cholesterol, has a 24-carbon backbone with six methyl groups and six isolated double bonds. Capillary flow techniques have been used to determine its translational diffusion constant, D, at room temperature in squalane, n-C16, and three n-C8-squalane mixtures. The D values have a weaker dependence on viscosity, η, than predicted by the Stokes-Einstein relation, D = kBT/(6πηr). A fit to the modified relation, D/T = ASE/η(p), gives p = 0.820 ± 0.028; p = 1 for the Stokes-Einstein limit. The translational motion of squalene appears to be much like that of n-alkane solutes with comparable chain lengths; their D values show similar deviations from the Stokes-Einstein model. The n-alkane with the same carbon chain length as squalene, n-C24, has a near-equal p value of 0.844 ± 0.018 in n-alkane solvents. The values of the hydrodynamic radius, r, for n-C24, squalene, and other n-alkane solutes decrease as the viscosity increases and have a common dependence on the van der Waals volumes of the solute and solvent. The possibility of studying squalene in lipid droplets and membranes is discussed.

  18. Cyano- and polycyanometallo-porphyrins as catalysts for alkane oxidation

    DOEpatents

    Ellis, P.E. Jr.; Lyons, J.E.

    1993-05-18

    New compositions of matter comprising cyano-substituted metal complexes of porphyrins are catalysts for the oxidation of alkanes. The metal is iron, chromium, manganese, ruthenium, copper or cobalt. The porphyrin ring has cyano groups attached thereto in meso- and/or [beta]-pyrrolic positions.

  19. Cyano- and polycyanometallo-porphyrins as catalysts for alkane oxidation

    DOEpatents

    Ellis, P.E. Jr.; Lyons, J.E.

    1995-01-17

    New compositions of matter comprising cyano-substituted metal complexes of porphyrins are catalysts for the oxidation of alkanes. The metal is iron, chromium, manganese, ruthenium, copper or cobalt. The porphyrin ring has cyano groups attached thereto in meso and/or [beta]-pyrrolic positions.

  20. Diffusion of squalene in n-alkanes and squalane.

    PubMed

    Kowert, Bruce A; Watson, Michael B; Dang, Nhan C

    2014-02-27

    Squalene, an intermediate in the biosynthesis of cholesterol, has a 24-carbon backbone with six methyl groups and six isolated double bonds. Capillary flow techniques have been used to determine its translational diffusion constant, D, at room temperature in squalane, n-C16, and three n-C8-squalane mixtures. The D values have a weaker dependence on viscosity, η, than predicted by the Stokes-Einstein relation, D = kBT/(6πηr). A fit to the modified relation, D/T = ASE/η(p), gives p = 0.820 ± 0.028; p = 1 for the Stokes-Einstein limit. The translational motion of squalene appears to be much like that of n-alkane solutes with comparable chain lengths; their D values show similar deviations from the Stokes-Einstein model. The n-alkane with the same carbon chain length as squalene, n-C24, has a near-equal p value of 0.844 ± 0.018 in n-alkane solvents. The values of the hydrodynamic radius, r, for n-C24, squalene, and other n-alkane solutes decrease as the viscosity increases and have a common dependence on the van der Waals volumes of the solute and solvent. The possibility of studying squalene in lipid droplets and membranes is discussed. PMID:24528091

  1. Improving alkane synthesis in Escherichia coli via metabolic engineering.

    PubMed

    Song, Xuejiao; Yu, Haiying; Zhu, Kun

    2016-01-01

    Concerns about energy security and global petroleum supply have made the production of renewable biofuels an industrial imperative. The ideal biofuels are n-alkanes in that they are chemically and structurally identical to the fossil fuels and can "drop in" to the transportation infrastructure. In this work, an Escherichia coli strain that produces n-alkanes was constructed by heterologous expression of acyl-acyl carrier protein (ACP) reductase (AAR) and aldehyde deformylating oxygenase (ADO) from Synechococcus elongatus PCC7942. The accumulation of alkanes ranged from 3.1 to 24.0 mg/L using different expressing strategies. Deletion of yqhD, an inherent aldehyde reductase in E. coli, or overexpression of fadR, an activator for fatty acid biosynthesis, exhibited a nearly twofold increase in alkane titers, respectively. Combining yqhD deletion and fadR overexpression resulted in a production titer of 255.6 mg/L in E. coli, and heptadecene was the most abundant product. PMID:26476644

  2. 40 CFR 721.10704 - Aryl-substituted alkane.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as an aryl-substituted alkane (PMN P-12-548) is subject to reporting under this section for the significant new uses described in paragraph (a)(2) of this... communication program. Requirements as specified in § 721.72(a), (b), (c), (d), (e) (concentration set at...

  3. MODELING OF ALKANE EMISSIONS FROM A WOOD STAIN

    EPA Science Inventory

    The article discusses full-scale residential house tests to evaluate the effects of organic emissions from a wood finishing product--wood stain--on indoor air quality (IAQ). The test house concentrations of three alkane species, nonane, decane, and undecane, were measured as a fu...

  4. Diverse alkane hydroxylase genes in microorganisms and environments

    PubMed Central

    Nie, Yong; Chi, Chang-Qiao; Fang, Hui; Liang, Jie-Liang; Lu, She-Lian; Lai, Guo-Li; Tang, Yue-Qin; Wu, Xiao-Lei

    2014-01-01

    AlkB and CYP153 are important alkane hydroxylases responsible for aerobic alkane degradation in bioremediation of oil-polluted environments and microbial enhanced oil recovery. Since their distribution in nature is not clear, we made the investigation among thus-far sequenced 3,979 microbial genomes and 137 metagenomes from terrestrial, freshwater, and marine environments. Hundreds of diverse alkB and CYP153 genes including many novel ones were found in bacterial genomes, whereas none were found in archaeal genomes. Moreover, these genes were detected with different distributional patterns in the terrestrial, freshwater, and marine metagenomes. Hints for horizontal gene transfer, gene duplication, and gene fusion were found, which together are likely responsible for diversifying the alkB and CYP153 genes adapt to the ubiquitous distribution of different alkanes in nature. In addition, different distributions of these genes between bacterial genomes and metagenomes suggested the potentially important roles of unknown or less common alkane degraders in nature. PMID:24829093

  5. Cyano- and polycyanometalloporphyrins as catalysts for alkane oxidation

    DOEpatents

    Ellis, Jr., Paul E.; Lyons, James E.

    1992-01-01

    Alkanes are oxidized by contact with oxygen-containing gas in the presence as catalyst of a metalloporphyrin in which hydrogen atoms in the porphyrin ring have been substituted with one or more cyano groups. Hydrogen atoms in the porphyrin ring may also be substituted with halogen atoms.

  6. Cyano- and polycyanometallo-porphyrins as catalysts for alkane oxidation

    DOEpatents

    Ellis, Jr., Paul E.; Lyons, James E.

    1995-01-01

    New compositions of matter comprising cyano-substituted metal complexes of porphyrins are catalysts for the oxidation of alkanes. The metal is iron, chromium, manganese, ruthenium, copper or cobalt. The porphyrin ring has cyano groups attached thereto in meso and/or .beta.-pyrrolic positions.

  7. Cyano- and polycyanometallo-porphyrins as catalysts for alkane oxidation

    DOEpatents

    Ellis, Jr., Paul E.; Lyons, James E.

    1993-01-01

    New compositions of matter comprising cyano-substituted metal complexes of porphyrins are catalysts for the oxidation of alkanes. The metal is iron, chromium, manganese, ruthenium, copper or cobalt. The porphyrin ring has cyano groups attached thereto in meso and/or .beta.-pyrrolic positions.

  8. Improving alkane synthesis in Escherichia coli via metabolic engineering.

    PubMed

    Song, Xuejiao; Yu, Haiying; Zhu, Kun

    2016-01-01

    Concerns about energy security and global petroleum supply have made the production of renewable biofuels an industrial imperative. The ideal biofuels are n-alkanes in that they are chemically and structurally identical to the fossil fuels and can "drop in" to the transportation infrastructure. In this work, an Escherichia coli strain that produces n-alkanes was constructed by heterologous expression of acyl-acyl carrier protein (ACP) reductase (AAR) and aldehyde deformylating oxygenase (ADO) from Synechococcus elongatus PCC7942. The accumulation of alkanes ranged from 3.1 to 24.0 mg/L using different expressing strategies. Deletion of yqhD, an inherent aldehyde reductase in E. coli, or overexpression of fadR, an activator for fatty acid biosynthesis, exhibited a nearly twofold increase in alkane titers, respectively. Combining yqhD deletion and fadR overexpression resulted in a production titer of 255.6 mg/L in E. coli, and heptadecene was the most abundant product.

  9. Catalytic oxidation of light alkanes in presence of a base

    DOEpatents

    Bhinde, Manoj V.; Bierl, Thomas W.

    1998-01-01

    The presence of a base in the reaction mixture in a metal-ligand catalyzed partial oxidation of alkanes results in sustained catalyst activity, and in greater percent conversion as compared with oxidation in the absence of base, while maintaining satisfactory selectivity for the desired oxidation, for example the oxidation of isobutane to isobutanol.

  10. Catalytic oxidation of light alkanes in presence of a base

    DOEpatents

    Bhinde, M.V.; Bierl, T.W.

    1998-03-03

    The presence of a base in the reaction mixture in a metal-ligand catalyzed partial oxidation of alkanes results in sustained catalyst activity, and in greater percent conversion as compared with oxidation in the absence of base, while maintaining satisfactory selectivity for the desired oxidation, for example the oxidation of isobutane to isobutanol. 1 fig.

  11. Modular and selective biosynthesis of gasoline-range alkanes.

    PubMed

    Sheppard, Micah J; Kunjapur, Aditya M; Prather, Kristala L J

    2016-01-01

    Typical renewable liquid fuel alternatives to gasoline are not entirely compatible with current infrastructure. We have engineered Escherichia coli to selectively produce alkanes found in gasoline (propane, butane, pentane, heptane, and nonane) from renewable substrates such as glucose or glycerol. Our modular pathway framework achieves carbon-chain extension by two different mechanisms. A fatty acid synthesis route is used to generate longer chains heptane and nonane, while a more energy efficient alternative, reverse-β-oxidation, is used for synthesis of propane, butane, and pentane. We demonstrate that both upstream (thiolase) and intermediate (thioesterase) reactions can act as control points for chain-length specificity. Specific free fatty acids are subsequently converted to alkanes using a broad-specificity carboxylic acid reductase and a cyanobacterial aldehyde decarbonylase (AD). The selectivity obtained by different module pairings provides a foundation for tuning alkane product distribution for desired fuel properties. Alternate ADs that have greater activity on shorter substrates improve observed alkane titer. However, even in an engineered host strain that significantly reduces endogenous conversion of aldehyde intermediates to alcohol byproducts, AD activity is observed to be limiting for all chain lengths. Given these insights, we discuss guiding principles for pathway selection and potential opportunities for pathway improvement.

  12. Pathway of n-Alkane Oxidation in Cladosporium resinae

    PubMed Central

    Walker, J. D.; Cooney, J. J.

    1973-01-01

    Pathways of initial oxidation of n-alkanes were examined in two strains of Cladosporium resinae. Cells grow on dodecane and hexadecane and their primary alcohol and monoic acid derivatives. The homologous aldehydes do not support growth but are oxidized by intact cells and by cell-free preparations. Hexane and its derivatives support little or no growth, but cell extracts oxidize hexane, hexanol, and hexanal. Alkane oxidation by extracts is stimulated by reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (phosphate). Alcohol and aldehyde oxidation are stimulated by nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (phosphate), and reduced coenzymes accumulate in the presence of cyanide or azide. Extracts supplied with 14C-hexadecane convert it to the alcohol, aldehyde, and acid. Therefore, the major pathway for initial oxidation of n-alkanes is via the primary alcohol, aldehyde, and monoic acid, and the system can act on short-, intermediate-, and long-chain substrates. Thus, filamentous fungi appear to oxidize n-alkanes by pathways similar to those used by bacteria and yeasts. PMID:4146874

  13. Two-stage process for conversion of alkanes to gasoline

    SciTech Connect

    Harandi, M.N.; Owen, H.

    1989-08-22

    This patent describes an improvement in a two-stage process for upgrading hydrocarbons in at least four reaction zones cooperating to produce gasoline range hydrocarbons from lower alkanes. The reaction zones comprising first reaction zone to crack gas oil range hydrocarbons utilizing a large pore cracking catalyst, a second reaction zone in which the large pore catalyst is oxidatively regenerated, a third reaction zone in which an external catalyst cooler autogeneously cools regenerated catalyst by dehydrogenation of the lower alkane stream to produce an olefinic effluent, and a fourth reaction zone in which the olefinic effluent is oligomerized to the gasoline range hydrocarbons. The improvement comprising: a first stage, comprising utilizing excess heat from the second reaction zone: contacting the hot fluid catalytic cracking catalyst with C/sub 3//sup +/ alkanes in the third reaction zone to provide conversion of the alkanes to olefins which leave the third reaction zone as the olefinic effluent separated from catalyst; returning a specified amount of separate fluid catalytic cracking catalyst from the third reaction zone directly to the first or second reaction zone; a second state comprising passing the olefinic effluent from the third reaction zone to a fourth reaction zone for oligomerizing olefins to gasoline range hydrocarbons contacting the olefinic effluent with a medium pore zeolite catalyst effective; recovering a gasoline range hydrocarbon stream from the effluent of the fourth reaction zone.

  14. Modular and selective biosynthesis of gasoline-range alkanes.

    PubMed

    Sheppard, Micah J; Kunjapur, Aditya M; Prather, Kristala L J

    2016-01-01

    Typical renewable liquid fuel alternatives to gasoline are not entirely compatible with current infrastructure. We have engineered Escherichia coli to selectively produce alkanes found in gasoline (propane, butane, pentane, heptane, and nonane) from renewable substrates such as glucose or glycerol. Our modular pathway framework achieves carbon-chain extension by two different mechanisms. A fatty acid synthesis route is used to generate longer chains heptane and nonane, while a more energy efficient alternative, reverse-β-oxidation, is used for synthesis of propane, butane, and pentane. We demonstrate that both upstream (thiolase) and intermediate (thioesterase) reactions can act as control points for chain-length specificity. Specific free fatty acids are subsequently converted to alkanes using a broad-specificity carboxylic acid reductase and a cyanobacterial aldehyde decarbonylase (AD). The selectivity obtained by different module pairings provides a foundation for tuning alkane product distribution for desired fuel properties. Alternate ADs that have greater activity on shorter substrates improve observed alkane titer. However, even in an engineered host strain that significantly reduces endogenous conversion of aldehyde intermediates to alcohol byproducts, AD activity is observed to be limiting for all chain lengths. Given these insights, we discuss guiding principles for pathway selection and potential opportunities for pathway improvement. PMID:26556131

  15. Crystallization features of normal alkanes in confined geometry.

    PubMed

    Su, Yunlan; Liu, Guoming; Xie, Baoquan; Fu, Dongsheng; Wang, Dujin

    2014-01-21

    How polymers crystallize can greatly affect their thermal and mechanical properties, which influence the practical applications of these materials. Polymeric materials, such as block copolymers, graft polymers, and polymer blends, have complex molecular structures. Due to the multiple hierarchical structures and different size domains in polymer systems, confined hard environments for polymer crystallization exist widely in these materials. The confined geometry is closely related to both the phase metastability and lifetime of polymer. This affects the phase miscibility, microphase separation, and crystallization behaviors and determines both the performance of polymer materials and how easily these materials can be processed. Furthermore, the size effect of metastable states needs to be clarified in polymers. However, scientists find it difficult to propose a quantitative formula to describe the transition dynamics of metastable states in these complex systems. Normal alkanes [CnH2n+2, n-alkanes], especially linear saturated hydrocarbons, can provide a well-defined model system for studying the complex crystallization behaviors of polymer materials, surfactants, and lipids. Therefore, a deeper investigation of normal alkane phase behavior in confinement will help scientists to understand the crystalline phase transition and ultimate properties of many polymeric materials, especially polyolefins. In this Account, we provide an in-depth look at the research concerning the confined crystallization behavior of n-alkanes and binary mixtures in microcapsules by our laboratory and others. Since 2006, our group has developed a technique for synthesizing nearly monodispersed n-alkane containing microcapsules with controllable size and surface porous morphology. We applied an in situ polymerization method, using melamine-formaldehyde resin as shell material and nonionic surfactants as emulsifiers. The solid shell of microcapsules can provide a stable three-dimensional (3-D

  16. Measurement and prediction of aromatic solute distribution coefficients for aqueous-organic solvent systems. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Campbell, J.R.; Luthy, R.G.

    1984-06-01

    Experimental and modeling activities were performed to assess techniques for measurement and prediction of distribution coefficients for aromatic solutes between water and immiscible organic solvents. Experiments were performed to measure distribution coefficients in both clean water and wastewater systems, and to assess treatment of a wastewater by solvent extraction. The theoretical portions of this investigation were directed towards development of techniques for prediction of solute-solvent/water distribution coefficients. Experiments were performed to assess treatment of a phenolic-laden coal conversion wastewater by solvent extraction. The results showed that solvent extraction for recovery of phenolic material offered several wastewater processing advantages. Distribution coefficients were measured in clean water and wastewater systems for aromatic solutes of varying functionality with different solvent types. It was found that distribution coefficients for these compounds in clean water systems were not statistically different from distribution coefficients determined in a complex coal conversion process wastewater. These and other aromatic solute distribution coefficient data were employed for evaluation of modeling techniques for prediction of solute-solvent/water distribution coefficients. Eight solvents were selected in order to represent various chemical classes: toluene and benzene (aromatics), hexane and heptane (alkanes), n-octanol (alcohols), n-butyl acetate (esters), diisopropyl ether (ethers), and methylisobutyl ketone (ketones). The aromatic solutes included: nonpolar compounds such as benzene, toluene and naphthalene, phenolic compounds such as phenol, cresol and catechol, nitrogenous aromatics such as aniline, pyridine and aminonaphthalene, and other aromatic solutes such as naphthol, quinolinol and halogenated compounds. 100 references, 20 figures, 34 tables.

  17. Preference of Ruthenium-Based Metathesis Catalysts toward Z- and E-Alkenes as a Guide for Selective Reactions to Alkene Stereoisomers.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jihong; Kim, Kyung Hwan; Lee, Ok Suk; Choi, Tae-Lim; Lee, Hee-Seung; Ihee, Hyotcherl; Sohn, Jeong-Hun

    2016-09-01

    As a guide for selective reactions toward either Z- or E-alkene in a metathesis reaction, the relative preference of metathesis Ru catalysts for each stereoisomer was determined by a method using time-dependent fluorescence quenching. We found that Ru-1 prefers the Z-isomer over the E-isomer, whereas Ru-2 prefers the E-isomer over the Z-isomer. The Z/E-alkene preference of the catalysts precisely predicted the Z/E isomeric selectivity in the metathesis reactions of diene substrates possessing combinations of Z/E-alkenes. For the diene substrates, the rate order of the reactions using Ru-1 was Z,Z-1,6-diene > Z,E-1,6-diene > E,E-1,6-diene, while the completely opposite order of E,E-1,6-diene > Z,E-1,6-diene > Z,Z-1,6-diene was exhibited in the case of Ru-2.

  18. Preference of Ruthenium-Based Metathesis Catalysts toward Z- and E-Alkenes as a Guide for Selective Reactions to Alkene Stereoisomers.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jihong; Kim, Kyung Hwan; Lee, Ok Suk; Choi, Tae-Lim; Lee, Hee-Seung; Ihee, Hyotcherl; Sohn, Jeong-Hun

    2016-09-01

    As a guide for selective reactions toward either Z- or E-alkene in a metathesis reaction, the relative preference of metathesis Ru catalysts for each stereoisomer was determined by a method using time-dependent fluorescence quenching. We found that Ru-1 prefers the Z-isomer over the E-isomer, whereas Ru-2 prefers the E-isomer over the Z-isomer. The Z/E-alkene preference of the catalysts precisely predicted the Z/E isomeric selectivity in the metathesis reactions of diene substrates possessing combinations of Z/E-alkenes. For the diene substrates, the rate order of the reactions using Ru-1 was Z,Z-1,6-diene > Z,E-1,6-diene > E,E-1,6-diene, while the completely opposite order of E,E-1,6-diene > Z,E-1,6-diene > Z,Z-1,6-diene was exhibited in the case of Ru-2. PMID:27463964

  19. Isolating the non-polar contributions to the intermolecular potential for water-alkane interactions.

    PubMed

    Ballal, Deepti; Venkataraman, Pradeep; Fouad, Wael A; Cox, Kenneth R; Chapman, Walter G

    2014-08-14

    Intermolecular potential models for water and alkanes describe pure component properties fairly well, but fail to reproduce properties of water-alkane mixtures. Understanding interactions between water and non-polar molecules like alkanes is important not only for the hydrocarbon industry but has implications to biological processes as well. Although non-polar solutes in water have been widely studied, much less work has focused on water in non-polar solvents. In this study we calculate the solubility of water in different alkanes (methane to dodecane) at ambient conditions where the water content in alkanes is very low so that the non-polar water-alkane interactions determine solubility. Only the alkane-rich phase is simulated since the fugacity of water in the water rich phase is calculated from an accurate equation of state. Using the SPC/E model for water and TraPPE model for alkanes along with Lorentz-Berthelot mixing rules for the cross parameters produces a water solubility that is an order of magnitude lower than the experimental value. It is found that an effective water Lennard-Jones energy ε(W)/k = 220 K is required to match the experimental water solubility in TraPPE alkanes. This number is much higher than used in most simulation water models (SPC/E-ε(W)/k = 78.2 K). It is surprising that the interaction energy obtained here is also higher than the water-alkane interaction energy predicted by studies on solubility of alkanes in water. The reason for this high water-alkane interaction energy is not completely understood. Some factors that might contribute to the large interaction energy, such as polarizability of alkanes, octupole moment of methane, and clustering of water at low concentrations in alkanes, are examined. It is found that, though important, these factors do not completely explain the anomalously strong attraction between alkanes and water observed experimentally. PMID:25134597

  20. Isolating the non-polar contributions to the intermolecular potential for water-alkane interactions.

    PubMed

    Ballal, Deepti; Venkataraman, Pradeep; Fouad, Wael A; Cox, Kenneth R; Chapman, Walter G

    2014-08-14

    Intermolecular potential models for water and alkanes describe pure component properties fairly well, but fail to reproduce properties of water-alkane mixtures. Understanding interactions between water and non-polar molecules like alkanes is important not only for the hydrocarbon industry but has implications to biological processes as well. Although non-polar solutes in water have been widely studied, much less work has focused on water in non-polar solvents. In this study we calculate the solubility of water in different alkanes (methane to dodecane) at ambient conditions where the water content in alkanes is very low so that the non-polar water-alkane interactions determine solubility. Only the alkane-rich phase is simulated since the fugacity of water in the water rich phase is calculated from an accurate equation of state. Using the SPC/E model for water and TraPPE model for alkanes along with Lorentz-Berthelot mixing rules for the cross parameters produces a water solubility that is an order of magnitude lower than the experimental value. It is found that an effective water Lennard-Jones energy ε(W)/k = 220 K is required to match the experimental water solubility in TraPPE alkanes. This number is much higher than used in most simulation water models (SPC/E-ε(W)/k = 78.2 K). It is surprising that the interaction energy obtained here is also higher than the water-alkane interaction energy predicted by studies on solubility of alkanes in water. The reason for this high water-alkane interaction energy is not completely understood. Some factors that might contribute to the large interaction energy, such as polarizability of alkanes, octupole moment of methane, and clustering of water at low concentrations in alkanes, are examined. It is found that, though important, these factors do not completely explain the anomalously strong attraction between alkanes and water observed experimentally.

  1. Nucleophilic Aromatic Substitution.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Avila, Walter B.; And Others

    1990-01-01

    Described is a microscale organic chemistry experiment which demonstrates one feasible route in preparing ortho-substituted benzoic acids and provides an example of nucleophilic aromatic substitution chemistry. Experimental procedures and instructor notes for this activity are provided. (CW)

  2. Trimerization of aromatic nitriles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hsu, L. C. (Inventor)

    1977-01-01

    Triazine compounds and cross-linked polymer compositions were made by heating aromatic nitriles to a temperature in the range of about 100 C to about 700 C, in the presence of a catalyst or mixture of catalysts. Aromatic nitrile-modified (terminated and/or appended) imide, benzimidazole, imidazopyrrolone, quinoxaline, and other condensation type prepolymers or their precopolymers were made which were trimerized with or without a filler by the aforementioned catalytic trimerization process.

  3. Kinetics of heterogeneous reactions of ozone with representative PAHs and an alkene at the air-ice interface at 258 and 188 K.

    PubMed

    Ray, D; Lišková, H; Klán, P

    2014-04-01

    The kinetics of the reaction of an alkene (E-stilbene) and three polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (perylene, anthracene and fluoranthene), as examples of environmental pollutants, with ozone on the surface of ice grains (also called "artificial snow"), produced by shock-freezing of aqueous solutions, was studied at submonolayer pollutant coverages (c = 1.5 × 10(-8) to 3 × 10(-10) mol kg(-1)) and two different temperatures (258 and 188 K). This work supports and extends our previous discovery of a remarkable increase in the apparent ozonation rates with decreasing temperature. The ozonation kinetic results were evaluated using the Langmuir-Hinshelwood model and, in one case, the Eley-Rideal kinetic model. It is shown that the apparent rate enhancement is related to the specific nature of the ice surface at different temperatures, which influences the availability of contaminants to gaseous ozone, and to inherent reactivities of the contaminants. The maximum pseudofirst-order rate constants and the lifetimes of the studied compounds are provided. At a typical atmospheric ozone concentration in polar areas (50 ppbv), the lifetimes were estimated to be on the order of hours (258 K) or tens of minutes (188 K) for alkenes, and hundreds (258 K) or tens (188 K) of days for PAHs, thus approximately of the same magnitude or longer than those found for the gas-phase reactions. We imply that this rate enhancement at lower temperatures is a general phenomenon, and we provide data to implement heterogeneous reactions in snow in models that predict the extent of chemical reactions occurring in cold environments.

  4. Aromatic Polyimide Foam

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weiser, Erik S. (Inventor); St.Clair, Terry L. (Inventor); Echigo, Yoshiaki (Inventor); Kaneshiro, Hisayasu (Inventor)

    2000-01-01

    A mechanically undensified aromatic polyimide foam is made from an aromatic polyimide precursor solid residuum and has the following combination of properties: a density according to ASTM D-3574A of about 0.5 pounds/cu.ft to about 20 pounds/cu.ft; a compression strength according to ASTM D-3574C of about 1.5 psi to about 1500 psi; and a limiting oxygen index according to ASTM D-2863 of about 35% oxygen to about 75% oxygen at atmospheric pressure. The aromatic polyimide foam has no appreciable solid inorganic contaminants which are residues of inorganic blowing agents. The aromatic polyimide which constitutes the aromatic polyimide foam has a glass transition temperature (Tg) by differential scanning calorimetry of about 235 C to about 400 C; and a thermal stability of 0 to about 1% weight loss at 204 C as determined by thermogravinietric analysis (TGA). The aromatic polyimide foam has utility as foam insulation and as structural foam, for example, for aeronautical, aerospace and maritime applications.

  5. A critical review of Henry's law constants for chemicals of environmental interest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mackay, Donald; Shiu, Wan Ying

    1981-10-01

    The Henry's law constants (air-water partition coefficients) of hydrophobic organic compounds of environmental concern are reviewed. An outline of the thermodynamic principles which govern the relationships between vapor pressure, solubility and Henry's law constant for solid and liquid compounds is presented and experimental techniques for obtaining these quantities with the required accuracy are discussed. Vapor pressure, solubility, and Henry's law constant data are tabulated and reviewed for a total of 150 compounds in 12 tables consisting of gaseous, liquid and solid alkanes, cycloalkanes, alkenes, alkynes, monoaromatics, polynuclear aromatics, halogenated alkanes, alkenes and aromatics, and selected pesticides.

  6. Presence of aliphatic and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in near-surface sediments of an oil spill area in Bohai Sea.

    PubMed

    Li, Shuanglin; Zhang, Shengyin; Dong, Heping; Zhao, Qingfang; Cao, Chunhui

    2015-11-15

    In order to determine the source of organic matter and the fingerprint of the oil components, 50 samples collected from the near-surface sediments of the oil spill area in Bohai Sea, China, were analyzed for grain size, total organic carbon, aliphatic hydrocarbons (AHs), and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). The concentrations of C15-35 n-alkanes and 16 United States Environmental Protection Agency (US EPA) priority pollutant PAHs were found in the ranges of 0.88-3.48μg g(-1) and 9.97-490.13ng/g, respectively. The terrestrial organic matters characterized by C27-C35 n-alkanes and PAHs, resulting from the combustion of higher plants, are dominantly contributed from the transportation of these plants by rivers. Marine organic matters produced from plankton and aquatic plants were represented by C17-C26 n-alkanes in AHs. Crude oil, characterized by C17-C21 n-alkanes, unresolved complex mixture (UCM) with a mean response factor of C19 n-alkanes, low levels of perylene, and a high InP/(InP+BghiP) ratio, seeped into the oceans from deep hydrocarbon reservoirs, as a result of geological faults.

  7. Presence of aliphatic and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in near-surface sediments of an oil spill area in Bohai Sea.

    PubMed

    Li, Shuanglin; Zhang, Shengyin; Dong, Heping; Zhao, Qingfang; Cao, Chunhui

    2015-11-15

    In order to determine the source of organic matter and the fingerprint of the oil components, 50 samples collected from the near-surface sediments of the oil spill area in Bohai Sea, China, were analyzed for grain size, total organic carbon, aliphatic hydrocarbons (AHs), and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). The concentrations of C15-35 n-alkanes and 16 United States Environmental Protection Agency (US EPA) priority pollutant PAHs were found in the ranges of 0.88-3.48μg g(-1) and 9.97-490.13ng/g, respectively. The terrestrial organic matters characterized by C27-C35 n-alkanes and PAHs, resulting from the combustion of higher plants, are dominantly contributed from the transportation of these plants by rivers. Marine organic matters produced from plankton and aquatic plants were represented by C17-C26 n-alkanes in AHs. Crude oil, characterized by C17-C21 n-alkanes, unresolved complex mixture (UCM) with a mean response factor of C19 n-alkanes, low levels of perylene, and a high InP/(InP+BghiP) ratio, seeped into the oceans from deep hydrocarbon reservoirs, as a result of geological faults. PMID:26375779

  8. Torsional Control of Stereoselectivities in Electrophilic Additions and Cycloadditions to Alkenes

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hao; Houk, K. N.

    2013-01-01

    Torsional effects control the π-facial stereoselectivities of a variety of synthetically important organic reactions. This review surveys theoretical calculations that have led to the understanding of the influence of the torsional effects on several types of stereoselective organic reactions, especially electrophilic additions and cycloadditions to alkenes. PMID:24409340

  9. Evolution of copper(II) as a new alkene amination promoter and catalyst

    PubMed Central

    Chemler, Sherry R.

    2010-01-01

    Copper(II) carboxylates and chiral copper(II) triflate·bis(oxazoline) complexes promote and catalyze intramolecular alkene carboamination, diamination and aminooxygenation reactions, creating an array of nitrogen heterocycles. High diastereoselectivity and enantioselectivity can be achieved in these transformations. This account reviews the discovery and development of these useful and interesting reactions. PMID:21379363

  10. Metal-free direct intramolecular carbotrifluoromethylation of alkenes to functionalized trifluoromethyl azaheterocycles.

    PubMed

    Li, Lei; Deng, Min; Zheng, Sheng-Cai; Xiong, Ya-Ping; Tan, Bin; Liu, Xin-Yuan

    2014-01-17

    The first example of a metal-free direct carbotrifluoromethylation of alkenes using inexpensive TMSCF3 as the CF3 source is described. The methodology not only exhibits high chemoselectivity for this transformation but also expands the substrate scope that is difficult to access by known transition-metal-catalyzed methods. PMID:24351111

  11. Products of the gas-phase reactions of O{sub 3} with alkenes

    SciTech Connect

    Atkinson, R.; Tuazon, E.C.; Aschmann, S.M.

    1995-12-01

    Selected products of the gas-phase reactions of a series of alkenes (1-pentene, 1-hexene, 1-heptene, 1-octene, 2,3-dimethyl-l-butene, cyclopentene and 1-methylcyclohexene) with O{sub 3} have been identified and quantified by gas chromatography and in situ Fourier transform infrared absorption spectroscopy. Because OH radicals are formed in these O{sub 3} reactions, experiments were carried out in the presence of sufficient cyclohexane or n-octane to scavenge > 90 % of the OH radicals formed. OH radical formation yields from the O{sub 3}-alkene reactions were derived from the amounts of cyclohexanone and cyclohexanol formed in O{sub 3}-alkene-cyclohexane-air mixtures. The molar yields of the carbonyls products R{sub 1}C(O)R{sub 2} plus HCHO from the O{sub 3} reactions with the five 1-alkenes (R{sub 1}R{sub 2}C=CH{sub 2}) studied were 1.1 {plus_minus} 0.1, as expected from the presently accepted reaction mechanism.

  12. Highly regio- and enantioselective multiple oxy- and amino-functionalizations of alkenes by modular cascade biocatalysis

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Shuke; Zhou, Yi; Wang, Tianwen; Too, Heng-Phon; Wang, Daniel I. C.; Li, Zhi

    2016-01-01

    New types of asymmetric functionalizations of alkenes are highly desirable for chemical synthesis. Here, we develop three novel types of regio- and enantioselective multiple oxy- and amino-functionalizations of terminal alkenes via cascade biocatalysis to produce chiral α-hydroxy acids, 1,2-amino alcohols and α-amino acids, respectively. Basic enzyme modules 1–4 are developed to convert alkenes to (S)-1,2-diols, (S)-1,2-diols to (S)-α-hydroxyacids, (S)-1,2-diols to (S)-aminoalcohols and (S)-α-hydroxyacids to (S)-α-aminoacids, respectively. Engineering of enzyme modules 1 & 2, 1 & 3 and 1, 2 & 4 in Escherichia coli affords three biocatalysts over-expressing 4–8 enzymes for one-pot conversion of styrenes to the corresponding (S)-α-hydroxyacids, (S)-aminoalcohols and (S)-α-aminoacids in high e.e. and high yields, respectively. The new types of asymmetric alkene functionalizations provide green, safe and useful alternatives to the chemical syntheses of these compounds. The modular approach for engineering multi-step cascade biocatalysis is useful for developing other new types of one-pot biotransformations for chemical synthesis. PMID:27297777

  13. Synthesis of insect pheromones belonging to the group of (Z)-trisubstituted alkenes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grigorieva, Natalia Ya; Tsiklauri, Paata G.

    2000-07-01

    Stereo- and regiocontrolled methods for the construction of a (Z)-trisubstituted C=C bond and for the regiospecific introduction of a chiral fragment are exemplified in total syntheses of insect pheromones belonging to (Z)-trisubstituted alkenes. The bibliography includes 113 references.

  14. Direct Synthesis of Alkenyl Boronic Esters from Unfunctionalized Alkenes: A Boryl-Heck Reaction.

    PubMed

    Reid, William B; Spillane, Jesse J; Krause, Sarah B; Watson, Donald A

    2016-05-01

    We report the first example of a boryl-Heck reaction using an electrophilic boron reagent. This palladium-catalyzed process allows for the conversion of terminal alkenes to trans-alkenyl boronic esters using commercially available catecholchloroborane (catBCl). In situ transesterification allows for rapid access to a variety of boronic esters, amides, and other alkenyl boron adducts. PMID:27104749

  15. Highly Regioselective Radical Amination of Allenes: Direct Synthesis of Allenamides and Tetrasubstituted Alkenes.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ge; Xiong, Tao; Wang, Zining; Xu, Guoxing; Wang, Xuedan; Zhang, Qian

    2015-10-19

    The first controllable, regioselective radical amination of allenes with N-fluoroarylsulfonimide is described to proceed under very mild reaction conditions. With this methodology, a general and straightforward route for the synthesis of both allenamides and fluorinated tetrasubstituted alkenes was realized from a wide range of terminal and internal allenes.

  16. Catalytic and asymmetric cyclopropanation of alkenes catalysed by rhenium(I) bipyridine and terpyridine tricarbonyl complexes.

    PubMed

    Yeung, Chi-Tung; Teng, Pang-Fei; Yeung, Ho-Lun; Wong, Wing-Tak; Kwong, Hoi-Lun

    2007-12-01

    Re(I) tricarbonyl bipyridine and terpyridine complexes catalyse stereospecific cyclopropanation of alkenes; high selectivity of cyclopropane vs coupling and an ee of 73% and 62% for cis- and trans-cyclopropanes of styrene respectively were achieved with the [Re(L)(CO)(3)(MeCN)]OTf complex (L = chiral C(2)-symmetric terpyridine ligand).

  17. Continuous flow hydrogenation of nitroarenes, azides and alkenes using maghemite-Pd nanocomposites

    EPA Science Inventory

    Maghemite-supported ultra-fine Pd (1-2 nm) nanoparticles, prepared by a simple co-precipitation method, find application in the catalytic continuous flow hydrogenation of nitroarenes, azides, and alkenes wherein they play an important role in reduction of various functional group...

  18. One-Pot Anti-Markovnikov Hydroamination of Unactivated Alkenes by Hydrozirconation and Amination

    PubMed Central

    Strom, Alexandra E.

    2013-01-01

    A one-pot hydroamination of alkenes is reported. The synthesis of primary and secondary amines from unactivated olefins was accomplished in the presence of a variety of functional groups. Hydrozirconation, followed by amination with nitrogen electrophiles, provides exclusive anti-Markovnikov selectivity, and most products are isolated in high yields without the use of column chromatography. PMID:23899320

  19. 40 CFR 721.445 - Substituted ethyl alken-a-mide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... SUBSTANCES CONTROL ACT SIGNIFICANT NEW USES OF CHEMICAL SUBSTANCES Significant New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.445 Substituted ethyl alken-a-mide. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as a substituted ethyl...

  20. 40 CFR 721.445 - Substituted ethyl alken-a-mide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... SUBSTANCES CONTROL ACT SIGNIFICANT NEW USES OF CHEMICAL SUBSTANCES Significant New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.445 Substituted ethyl alken-a-mide. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as a substituted ethyl...

  1. Tandem isomerization-decarboxylation for converting alkenoic fatty acids into alkenes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We report a facile Ru-catalyzed route to alkenes from alkenoic fatty acids via a readily accessible pre-catalyst [Ru(CO)2RCO2]n. The catalyst apparently functions in a tandem mode by dynamically isomerizing the positions of double bonds in an aliphatic chain and, subsequently, decarboxylating specif...

  2. Organometallic model complexes elucidate the active gallium species in alkane dehydrogenation catalysts based on ligand effects in Ga K-edge XANES

    SciTech Connect

    Getsoian, Andrew “Bean”; Das, Ujjal; Camacho-Bunquin, Jeffrey; Zhang, Guanghui; Gallagher, James R.; Hu, Bo; Cheah, Singfoong; Schaidle, Joshua A.; Ruddy, Daniel A.; Hensley, Jesse E.; Krause, Theodore R.; Curtiss, Larry A.; Miller, Jeffrey T.; Hock, Adam S.

    2016-01-01

    Gallium-modified zeolites are known catalysts for the dehydrogenation of alkanes, reactivity that finds industrial application in the aromatization of light alkanes by Ga-ZSM5. While the role of gallium cations in alkane activation is well known, the oxidation state and coordination environment of gallium under reaction conditions has been the subject of debate. Edge shifts in Ga K-edge XANES spectra acquired under reaction conditions have long been interpreted as evidence for reduction of Ga(III) to Ga(I). However, a change in oxidation state is not the only factor that can give rise to a change in the XANES spectrum. In order to better understand the XANES spectra of working catalysts, we have synthesized a series of molecular model compounds and grafted surface organometallic Ga species and compared their XANES spectra to those of gallium-based catalysts acquired under reducing conditions. We demonstrate that changes in the identity and number of gallium nearest neighbors can give rise to changes in XANES spectra similar to those attributed in literature to changes in oxidation state. Specifically, spectral features previously attributed to Ga(I) may be equally well interpreted as evidence for low-coordinate Ga(III) alkyl or hydride species. These findings apply both to gallium-impregnated zeolite catalysts and to silica-supported single site gallium catalysts, the latter of which is found to be active and selective for dehydrogenation of propane and hydrogenation of propylene.

  3. A sharp thermal transition of fast aromatic ring dynamics in ubiquitin

    PubMed Central

    Kasinath, Vignesh; Fu, Yinan; Sharp, Kim A.

    2015-01-01

    Aromatic amino acid side chains have a rich role within proteins and are often central to their structure and function. Suitable isotopic labelling strategies enable studies of sub-nanosecond aromatic ring dynamics using solution NMR relaxation methods. Surprisingly, we find that the three aromatic side chains in human ubiquitin show a sharp thermal dynamical transition at ~312 K. Hydrostatic pressure has little effect on the low temperature behaviour but decreases somewhat the amplitude of motion in the high temperature regime. Thus below the transition temperature ring motion is largely librational. Above it complete ring rotation that is most consistent with a continuous rotational diffusion not requiring transient creation of a large activated free volume occurs. Molecular dynamics simulations qualitatively corroborate this view and reinforce the notion that the dynamical character of the protein interior has a much more liquid alkane-like properties than previously appreciated. PMID:25476230

  4. Semifluorinated Alkanes at the Air-Water Interface: Tailoring Structure and Rheology at the Molecular Scale.

    PubMed

    Theodoratou, Antigoni; Jonas, Ulrich; Loppinet, Benoit; Geue, Thomas; Stangenberg, Rene; Keller, Rabea; Li, Dan; Berger, Rüdiger; Vermant, Jan; Vlassopoulos, Dimitris

    2016-04-01

    Semifluorinated alkanes form monolayers with interesting properties at the air-water interface due to their pronounced amphi-solvophobic nature and the stiffness of the fluorocarbons. In the present work, using a combination of structural and dynamic probes, we investigated how small molecular changes can be used to control the properties of such an interface, in particular its organization, rheology, and reversibility during compression-expansion cycles. Starting from a reference system perfluor(dodecyl)dodecane, we first retained the linear structure but changed the linkage groups between the alkyl chains and the fluorocarbons, by introducing either a phenyl group or two oxygens. Next, the molecular structure was changed from linear to branched, with four side chains (two fluorocarbons and two hydrocarbons) connected to extended aromatic cores. Neutron reflectivity at the air-water interface and scanning force microscopy on deposited films show how the changes in the molecular structure affect molecular arrangement relative to the interface. Rheological and compression-expansion measurements demonstrate the significant consequences of these changes in molecular structure and interactions on the interfacial properties. Remarkably, even with these simple molecules, a wide range of surface rheological behaviors can be engineered, from viscous over viscoelastic to brittle solids, for very similar values of the surface pressure.

  5. Aromatic amines and cancer.

    PubMed

    Vineis, P; Pirastu, R

    1997-05-01

    Epidemiological evidence on the relation between aromatic amines and cancer risk is reviewed. In particular, cancer risk in humans resulting from exposure to aromatic amines from occupational sources and tobacco smoking is assessed with reference to ecologic, cohort, and case-control studies. Seven arylamines have been classified by the International Agency for Research on Cancer: benzidine-based dyes and MOCA (4,4'-methylene bis 2-choloroaniline) were considered 'probably' carcinogenic, Group 2A, because of a high level of evidence in experimental animals; two occupational chemicals (2-naphthylamine and benzidine), one drug (Chlornaphazine), and two manufacturing processes (manufacture of auramine and magenta) were included in Group 1 on the basis of 'sufficient' evidence of carcinogenicity in humans. Occupational exposures to aromatic amines explain up to 25 percent of bladder cancers in some areas of Western countries; these estimates might be higher in limited areas of developing countries. Aromatic amines contaminate the ambient air as a component of environmental tobacco smoke. There is increasing evidence that the excess of bladder cancer in smokers is attributable to aromatic amines rather than to other contaminants of tobacco smoke such as polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH). A modulating role in the risk of bladder cancer associated with exposure to aromatic amines is played by metabolic polymorphisms, such as the N-acetyltransferase genotype, raising important social and ethical issues. The consistent observation of a difference between men and women in bladder cancer risk, after allowing for known risk factors, suggests consideration of gender-related biological determinants for future investigation.

  6. Irradiation of ethylene/styrene copolymers: evidence of sensitization of the aromatic moiety as counterpart of the radiation protection effect.

    PubMed

    Ferry, M; Bessy, E; Harris, H; Lutz, P J; Ramillon, J-M; Ngono-Ravache, Y; Balanzat, E

    2012-02-16

    Molecules containing aromatics systems are more stable in the presence of ionizing radiations than alkanes. In the same way, introducing aromatic rings into aliphatic compounds increases their stability. The protective effect is nonlocal and likely results from the transfer of energy and species from the aliphatic moiety to the aromatic one. For years, it was commonly assumed that the aromatic moiety, which is very radiation resistant, accommodates the extra energy remaining unaffected. The use of Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, online with high energy ion beam irradiation of ethylene/styrene random copolymers, allows us to bring experimental evidence that the benzene rings are sensitized by transfer reactions and consequently that this effect is more important in polymers with low benzene ring molar content. PMID:22236059

  7. Flash Points of Secondary Alcohol and n-Alkane Mixtures.

    PubMed

    Esina, Zoya N; Miroshnikov, Alexander M; Korchuganova, Margarita R

    2015-11-19

    The flash point is one of the most important characteristics used to assess the ignition hazard of mixtures of flammable liquids. To determine the flash points of mixtures of secondary alcohols with n-alkanes, it is necessary to calculate the activity coefficients. In this paper, we use a model that allows us to obtain enthalpy of fusion and enthalpy of vaporization data of the pure components to calculate the liquid-solid equilibrium (LSE) and vapor-liquid equilibrium (VLE). Enthalpy of fusion and enthalpy of vaporization data of secondary alcohols in the literature are limited; thus, the prediction of these characteristics was performed using the method of thermodynamic similarity. Additionally, the empirical models provided the critical temperatures and boiling temperatures of the secondary alcohols. The modeled melting enthalpy and enthalpy of vaporization as well as the calculated LSE and VLE flash points were determined for the secondary alcohol and n-alkane mixtures. PMID:26491811

  8. Influence of high biomass concentrations on alkane solubilities.

    PubMed

    Davison, B H; Barton, J W; Klasson, K T; Francisco, A B

    2000-05-01

    Alkane solubilities were measured experimentally for high-density biomass. The resulting Henry's law constants for propane were found to decrease significantly for both dense yeast suspensions and an actual propane-degrading biofilm consortium. At the biomass densities of a typical biofilm, propane solubility was about an order of magnitude greater than that in pure water. For example, a dense biofilm had a propane Henry's law constant of 0.09+/-0.04 atm m(3) mol(-1) compared to 0.6+/-0.1 atm m(3) mol(-1) measured in pure water. The results were modeled with mixing rules and compared with octanol-water mixtures. Hydrogels (agar) and salts decreased the alkane solubility. By considering a theoretical solubility of propane in dry biomass, estimates were made of intrinsic Henry's law constants for propane in pure yeast and biomass, which were 13+/-2 and 5+/-2 atm kg biomass mol(-1) for yeast and biofilm consortium, respectively.

  9. Site isolation in vanadium phosphorus oxide alkane oxidation

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, M R; Ebner, J R

    1991-06-01

    Single crystal X-ray diffraction studies of vanadyl pyrophosphate indicate that at least two polytypical structures exists for this active and selective alkane oxidation catalyst. The crystal structures of these materials differ with respect to the symmetry and direction of columns of vanadyl groups within the unit cell. Single crystals of vanadyl pyrophosphate have been generated at extreme temperatures not often experienced by microcrystalline catalysts. The crystallography of the system suggests that other crystalline modifications or disordered phases might also exist. Zeroth-order models of crystal surface termination of vanadyl pyrophosphate have been constructed which conceptually illustrate the ability of vanadyl pyrophosphate to accommodate varying amounts of surface phosphorus parallel to (1,0,0), (0,1,0) and (0,2,4). Pyrophosphate termination of surfaces parallel to (1,0,0) likely results in the isolation of clusters of reactive centers and limits overoxidation of the alkane substrate. 23 refs., 6 figs.

  10. Surface crystallization and thin film melting in normal alkanes

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, X.Z. |; Shao, H.H. |; Ocko, B.M.; Deutsch, M.; Sinha, S.K.; Kim, M.W.; King, H.E. Jr.; Sirota, E.B.

    1994-12-31

    Normal alkanes of carbon number n > 14 exhibit surface crystallization at their liquid-vapor interface. This has been investigated with x-ray reflectivity, grazing incidence scattering and surface tension measurements. The structure and thermodynamics of the surface layer is consistent with a monolayer of the bulk rotator phase occurring at the surface above the bulk melting temperature. On the other hand, thin films of alkanes on SiO{sub 2}, exhibit a reduction of the melting temperature. The surface crystalline phase is observed for carbon number n > 14. The vanishing of surface phase for small n may be due to a transition from surface freezing to surface melting behavior. These measurements can yield the relative surface energies of the various phases. 41 refs.

  11. Multi-stage conversion of alkanes to gasoline

    SciTech Connect

    Harandi, M.N.; Owen, H.

    1991-09-17

    This patent describes improvement in a facility for converting alkanes into gasoline, the facility including a fluid catalytic cracking system and an olefin oligomerization reactor. The improvement comprises: a first valved conduit means for withdrawing a controlled stream of the regenerated catalyst from the first regenerator means; a dehydrogenation reactor in valved communication with the first regenerator means, through the first valved conduit means the dehydrogenation reactor having a dehydrogenation zone at a temperature below those prevailing in the first regeneration zone, the dehydrogenation reactor being located externally relative to the fluid catalytic cracker reactor and first regenerator; means for introducing a lower alkane feedstream into the dehydrogenation zone in an amount sufficient to maintain hot withdrawn catalyst in a state of fluidization in the dehydrogenation reactor while the catalyst is being cooled therein; a second valved conduit means for transporting cooled catalyst from the dehydrogenation zone to the first regeneration zone.

  12. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in the atmospheres of Titan and Jupiter.

    PubMed

    Sagan, C; Khare, B N; Thompson, W R; McDonald, G D; Wing, M R; Bada, J L; Vo-Dinh, T; Arakawa, E T

    1993-09-01

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are important components of the interstellar medium and carbonaceous chondrites, but have never been identified in the reducing atmospheres of the outer solar system. Incompletely characterized complex organic solids (tholins) produced by irradiating simulated Titan atmospheres reproduce well the observed UV/visible/IR optical constants of the Titan stratospheric haze. Titan tholin and a tholin generated in a crude simulation of the atmosphere of Jupiter are examined by two-step laser desorption/multiphoton ionization mass spectrometry. A range of two- to four-ring PAHs, some with one to four alkylation sites are identified, with net abundance approximately 10(-4) g g-1 (grams per gram) of tholins produced. Synchronous fluorescence techniques confirm this detection. Titan tholins have proportionately more one- and two-ring PAHs than do Jupiter tholins, which in turn have more four-ring and larger PAHs. The four-ringed PAH chrysene, prominent in some discussions of interstellar grains, is found in Jupiter tholins. Solid state 13C NMR spectroscopy suggests approximately equal to 25% of the total C in both tholins is tied up in aromatic and/or aliphatic alkenes. IR spectra indicate an upper limit in both tholins of approximately equal to 6% by mass in benzenes, heterocyclics, and PAHs with more than four rings. Condensed PAHs may contribute at most approximately 10% to the observed detached limb haze layers on Titan. As with interstellar PAHs, the synthesis route of planetary PAHs is likely to be via acetylene addition reactions.

  13. At what chain length do unbranched alkanes prefer folded conformations?

    PubMed

    Byrd, Jason N; Bartlett, Rodney J; Montgomery, John A

    2014-03-01

    Short unbranched alkanes are known to prefer linear conformations, whereas long unbranched alkanes are folded. It is not known with certainty at what chain length the linear conformation is no longer the global minimum. To clarify this point, we use ab initio and density functional methods to compute the relative energies of the linear and hairpin alkane conformers for increasing chain lengths. Extensive electronic structure calculations are performed to obtain optimized geometries, harmonic frequencies, and accurate single point energies for the selected alkane conformers from octane through octadecane. Benchmark CCSD(T)/cc-pVTZ single point calculations are performed for chains through tetradecane, whereas approximate methods are required for the longer chains up to octadecane. Using frozen natural orbitals to unambiguously truncate the virtual orbital space, we are able to compute composite CCSD FNO(T) single point energies for all the chain lengths. This approximate composite method has significant computational savings compared to full CCSD(T) while retaining ∼0.15 kcal/mol accuracy compared to the benchmark results. More approximate dual-basis resolution-of-the-identity double-hybrid DFT calculations are also performed and shown to have reasonable 0.2-0.4 kcal/mol errors compared with our benchmark values. After including contributions from temperature dependent internal energy shifts, we find the preference for folded conformations to lie between hexadecane and octadecane, in excellent agreement with recent experiments [ Lüttschwager , N. O. ; Wassermann , T. N. ; Mata , R. A. ; Suhm , M. A. Angew. Chem. Int. Ed. 2013 , 52 , 463 ]. PMID:24524689

  14. Removal of alkanes from drinking water using membrane technologies

    SciTech Connect

    Fronk, C.A.

    1995-10-01

    Increasingly, the public is concerned about the quality of its drinking water. The chlorinated alkanes are saturated, aliphatic, synthetic organic compounds (SOC`s). When hydrocarbon feedstocks are chlorinated, a wide variety of chlorocarbons and chlorohydrocarbons are produced that are used as industrial solvents, degreasers and intermediaries. Because compounds such as Carbon Tetrachloride and 1,2-Dichloroethane are widely used, they often find their way into drinking water, particularly groundwaters. Surface waters are somewhat less affected bemuse of the high volatility of many chlorinated alkanes. The Drinking Water Research Division is responsible for evaluating various membrane technologies that may be feasible for meeting Maximum Contaminant Levels. Several membrane processes are under investigation to determine their effectiveness in removing SOC`s from drinking water. One study addressed the removal of a variety of alkanes from spiked groundwater by six reverse osmosis membranes: a cellulose acetate, a polyamide (hollow fiber), and four different types of thin-film composite membranes. Progressive chlorination of methanes, ethanes and propanes produces compounds that exhibit differing physicochemical properties. The differences in compound properties have an effect on the removal of these compounds by reverse osmosis membranes. For example only 25% of the methylene chloride (Dichloromethane) was removed by one thin-film composite versus 90% removal of the carbon tetrachloride. In addition, the various membranes are made of different polymeric materials and showed a wide range of removals. Generally, the thin-film composite membranes out performed the other membranes and the more highly chlorinated the compound the better the removal. Pervaporation is yet another membrane process that may prove effective in removal of alkanes and future studies will address its usefulness as a drinking water.

  15. Alkane production from biomass: chemo-, bio- and integrated catalytic approaches.

    PubMed

    Deneyer, Aron; Renders, Tom; Van Aelst, Joost; Van den Bosch, Sander; Gabriëls, Dries; Sels, Bert F

    2015-12-01

    Linear, branched and cyclic alkanes are important intermediates and end products of the chemical industry and are nowadays mainly obtained from fossil resources. In search for alternatives, biomass feedstocks are often presented as a renewable carbon source for the production of fuels, chemicals and materials. However, providing a complete market for all these applications seems unrealistic due to both financial and logistic issues. Despite the very large scale of current alkane-based fuel applications, biomass definitely has the potential to offer a partial solution to the fuel business. For the smaller market of chemicals and materials, a transition to biomass as main carbon source is more realistic and even probably unavoidable in the long term. The appropriate use and further development of integrated chemo- and biotechnological (catalytic) process strategies will be crucial to successfully accomplish this petro-to-bio feedstock transition. Furthermore, a selection of the most promising technologies from the available chemo- and biocatalytic tool box is presented. New opportunities will certainly arise when multidisciplinary approaches are further explored in the future. In an attempt to select the most appropriate biomass sources for each specific alkane-based application, a diagram inspired by van Krevelen is applied, taking into account both the C-number and the relative functionality of the product molecules.

  16. Alkane production from biomass: chemo-, bio- and integrated catalytic approaches.

    PubMed

    Deneyer, Aron; Renders, Tom; Van Aelst, Joost; Van den Bosch, Sander; Gabriëls, Dries; Sels, Bert F

    2015-12-01

    Linear, branched and cyclic alkanes are important intermediates and end products of the chemical industry and are nowadays mainly obtained from fossil resources. In search for alternatives, biomass feedstocks are often presented as a renewable carbon source for the production of fuels, chemicals and materials. However, providing a complete market for all these applications seems unrealistic due to both financial and logistic issues. Despite the very large scale of current alkane-based fuel applications, biomass definitely has the potential to offer a partial solution to the fuel business. For the smaller market of chemicals and materials, a transition to biomass as main carbon source is more realistic and even probably unavoidable in the long term. The appropriate use and further development of integrated chemo- and biotechnological (catalytic) process strategies will be crucial to successfully accomplish this petro-to-bio feedstock transition. Furthermore, a selection of the most promising technologies from the available chemo- and biocatalytic tool box is presented. New opportunities will certainly arise when multidisciplinary approaches are further explored in the future. In an attempt to select the most appropriate biomass sources for each specific alkane-based application, a diagram inspired by van Krevelen is applied, taking into account both the C-number and the relative functionality of the product molecules. PMID:26360875

  17. Modeling SOA production from the oxidation of intermediate volatility alkanes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aumont, B.; Mouchel-Vallon, C.; Camredon, M.; Lee-Taylor, J.; Madronich, S.

    2012-12-01

    Secondary Organic Aerosols (SOA) production and ageing is a multigenerational oxidation process involving the formation of successive organic compounds with higher oxidation degree and lower vapour pressure. This process was investigated using the explicit oxidation model GECKO-A (Generator for Explicit Chemistry and Kinetics of Organics in the Atmosphere). Results for the C8-C24 n-alkane series show the expected trends, i.e. (i) SOA yield grows with the carbon backbone of the parent hydrocarbon, (ii) SOA yields decreases with the decreasing pre-existing organic aerosol concentration, (iii) the number of generations required to describe SOA production increases when the pre-existing organic aerosol concentration decreases. Most SOA contributors were found to be not oxidized enough to be categorized as highly oxygenated organic aerosols (OOA) but reduced enough to be categorized as hydrocarbon like organic aerosols (HOA). Branched alkanes are more prone to fragment in the early stage of the oxidation than their corresponding linear analogues. Fragmentation is expected to alter both the yield and the mean oxidation state of the SOA. Here, GECKO-A is applied to generate highly detailed oxidation schemes for various series of branched and cyclised alkanes. Branching and cyclisation effects on SOA yields and oxidation states will be examined.

  18. Dielectric constant of liquid alkanes and hydrocarbon mixtures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sen, A. D.; Anicich, V. G.; Arakelian, T.

    1992-01-01

    The complex dielectric constants of n-alkanes with two to seven carbon atoms have been measured. The measurements were conducted using a slotted-line technique at 1.2 GHz and at atmospheric pressure. The temperature was varied from the melting point to the boiling point of the respective alkanes. The real part of the dielectric constant was found to decrease with increasing temperature and correlate with the change in the molar volume. An upper limit to all the loss tangents was established at 0.001. The complex dielectric constants of a few mixtures of liquid alkanes were also measured at room temperature. For a pentane-octane mixture the real part of the dielectric constant could be explained by the Clausius-Mosotti theory. For the mixtures of n-hexane-ethylacetate and n-hexane-acetone the real part of the dielectric constants could be explained by the Onsager theory extended to mixtures. The dielectric constant of the n-hexane-acetone mixture displayed deviations from the Onsager theory at the highest fractions of acetone. The dipole moments of ethylacetate and acetone were determined for dilute mixtures using the Onsager theory and were found to be in agreement with their accepted gas-phase values. The loss tangents of the mixtures exhibited a linear relationship with the volume fraction for low concentrations of the polar liquids.

  19. Dielectric constant of liquid alkanes and hydrocarbon mixtures.

    PubMed

    Sen, A D; Anicich, V G; Arakelian, T

    1992-01-01

    The complex dielectric constants of n-alkanes with two to seven carbon atoms have been measured. The measurements were conducted using a slotted-line technique at 1.2 GHz and at atmospheric pressure. The temperature was varied from the melting point to the boiling point of the respective alkanes. The real part of the dielectric constant was found to decrease with increasing temperature and correlate with the change in the molar volume. An upper limit to all the loss tangents was established at 0.001. The complex dielectric constants of a few mixtures of liquid alkanes were also measured at room temperature. For a pentane-octane mixture the real part of the dielectric constant could be explained by the Clausius-Mosotti theory. For the mixtures of n-hexane-ethylacetate and n-hexane-acetone the real part of the dielectric constants could be explained by the Onsager theory extended to mixtures. The dielectric constant of the n-hexane-acetone mixture displayed deviations from the Onsager theory at the highest fractions of acetone. The dipole moments of ethylacetate and acetone were determined for dilute mixtures using the Onsager theory and were found to be in agreement with their accepted gas-phase values. The loss tangents of the mixtures exhibited a linear relationship with the volume fraction for low concentrations of the polar liquids.

  20. Magnetic criteria of aromaticity.

    PubMed

    Gershoni-Poranne, Renana; Stanger, Amnon

    2015-09-21

    This review describes the current state of magnetic criteria of aromaticity. The introduction contains the fundamentals of ring currents in aromatic and antiaromatic systems, followed by a brief description of experimental and computational tools: NMR, diamagnetic susceptibility exaltation, current density analyses (CDA) and nucleus independent chemical shifts (NICS). This is followed by more comprehensive chapters: NMR - focusing on the work of R. Mitchell - NICS and CDA - describing the progress and development of the methods to their current state and presenting some examples of representative work. PMID:26035305

  1. Magnetic criteria of aromaticity.

    PubMed

    Gershoni-Poranne, Renana; Stanger, Amnon

    2015-09-21

    This review describes the current state of magnetic criteria of aromaticity. The introduction contains the fundamentals of ring currents in aromatic and antiaromatic systems, followed by a brief description of experimental and computational tools: NMR, diamagnetic susceptibility exaltation, current density analyses (CDA) and nucleus independent chemical shifts (NICS). This is followed by more comprehensive chapters: NMR - focusing on the work of R. Mitchell - NICS and CDA - describing the progress and development of the methods to their current state and presenting some examples of representative work.

  2. QUANTIFICATION OF FUGITIVE REACTIVE ALKENE EMISSIONS FROM PETROCHEMICAL PLANTS WITH PERFLUOROCARBON TRACERS.

    SciTech Connect

    SENUM,G.I.; DIETZ,R.N.

    2004-06-30

    Recent studies demonstrate the impact of fugitive emissions of reactive alkenes on the atmospheric chemistry of the Houston Texas metropolitan area (1). Petrochemical plants located in and around the Houston area emit atmospheric alkenes, such as ethene, propene and 1,3-butadiene. The magnitude of emissions is a major uncertainty in assessing their effects. Even though the petrochemical industry reports that fugitive emissions of alkenes have been reduced to less than 0.1% of daily production, recent measurement data, obtained during the TexAQS 2000 experiment indicates that emissions are perhaps a factor of ten larger than estimated values. Industry figures for fugitive emissions are based on adding up estimated emission factors for every component in the plant to give a total estimated emission from the entire facility. The dramatic difference between estimated and measured rates indicates either that calculating emission fluxes by summing estimates for individual components is seriously flawed, possibly due to individual components leaking well beyond their estimated tolerances, that not all sources of emissions for a facility are being considered in emissions estimates, or that there are known sources of emissions that are not being reported. This experiment was designed to confirm estimates of reactive alkene emissions derived from analysis of the TexAQS 2000 data by releasing perfluorocarbon tracers (PFTs) at a known flux from a petrochemical plant and sampling both the perfluorocarbon tracer and reactive alkenes downwind using the Piper-Aztec research aircraft operated by Baylor University. PFTs have been extensively used to determine leaks in pipelines, air infiltration in buildings, and to characterize the transport and dispersion of air parcels in the atmosphere. Over 20 years of development by the Tracer Technology Center (TTC) has produced a range of analysis instruments, field samplers and PFT release equipment that have been successfully deployed in a

  3. Relaxed specificity in aromatic prenyltransferases.

    PubMed

    Koehl, Patrice

    2005-07-01

    Prenylation represent a critical step in the biosynthesis of many natural products, A new study reveals how aromatic prenyltransferase enzymes tolerate diverse aromatic polyketides while still controlling the length of prenyl side chains.

  4. A simple and facile Heck-type arylation of alkenes with diaryliodonium salts using magnetically recoverable Pd-catalyst

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Heck-type arylation of alkenes was achieved in aqueous polyethylene glycol using a magnetically recoverable heterogenized palladium catalyst employing diaryliodonium salts under ambient conditions. The benign reaction medium and the stability of the catalyst are the salient f...

  5. Polybenzimidazole via aromatic nucleophilic displacement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Connell, John W. (Inventor); Hergenrother, Paul M. (Inventor); Smith, Joseph G. (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    Di(hydroxyphenyl)benzimidazole monomers were prepared from phenyl-4-hydroxybenzoate and aromatic bis(o-diamine)s. These monomers were used in the synthesis of soluble polybenzimidazoles. The reaction involved the aromatic nucleophilic displacement of various di(hydroxyphenyl)benzimidazole monomers with activated aromatic dihalides or activated aromatic dinitro compounds in the presence of an alkali metal base. These polymers exhibited lower glass transition temperatures, improved solubility, and better compression moldability over their commercial counterparts.

  6. Particulate PAHs and n-alkanes in the air over Southern and Eastern Mediterranean Sea.

    PubMed

    Romagnoli, Paola; Balducci, Catia; Perilli, Mattia; Perreca, Erica; Cecinato, Angelo

    2016-09-01

    Particulate polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, n-alkanes and polar organic compounds were investigated in the marine atmosphere of Southern and Eastern Mediterranean Sea, in the frame of the scientific cruise of Urania ship between 27 July and 11 August 2013. The PM10 fraction of aerosol to which most organic substances are associated, were collected daily; contemporarily, gaseous regulated toxicants (ozone, nitrogen oxides and carbon oxide) and carbonyls were recorded. Samplings were carried out in front of Palermo and Messina, respectively the start and end harbors, and along the cruise, both in movement (transects, N = 14) and at stops (N = 11). Total PAHs ranged from 0.06 ng/m(3) up to 1.8 ng/m(3), with the maximums observed close to harbors. Unlike total concentrations that were in general comparable, the percent composition of PAHs was distinct for harbors, transects and stops, which allowed to draw insights about the pollution sources impact. Concentrations of n-alkanes (C18-C35) ranging from 6.7 to 43 ng/m(3) were quantified. The carbonyls evaluation revealed relatively high concentrations of formaldehyde (∼4-24 μg/m(3)) and acetone (∼5-35 μg/m(3)) near harbors, and of acrolein (up to 12 μg/m(3)) offshore, while benzaldehyde was quite independent of the site type (≈0.5 μg/m(3)). Nicotine and caffeine were detected, at different extents (0.0-2.2 ng/m(3) and 0.01-0.17 ng/m(3), respectively), in ca. 70% and 100% of samples. Alkyl phthalates ranged from 2.7 to 67 ng/m(3) and showed variable percentages in the samples. Finally, traces of N,N-diethyl-meta-toluene amide (up to 0.4 ng/m(3)) were found at all sites. PMID:27341155

  7. Aliphatic and aromatic hydrocarbons in different sized aerosols over the Mediterranean Sea: Occurrence and origin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sicre, M. A.; Marty, J. C.; Saliot, A.; Aparicio, X.; Grimalt, J.; Albaiges, J.

    Marine aerosols were collected using a five-stage cascade impactor during the PHYCEMED II cruise in the Western Mediterranean Sea (October 1983). Their composition in aliphatic and aromatic hydrocarbons (HCs) was analyzed, representing the first time that concentrations of polynuclear aromatic HCs (PAH) are reported in relation to particle size for aerosols of remote marine areas. The HC concentrations were found to be dependent on the origin of the air masses. They were higher for air coming from North European countries than for air originating in the Atlantic and the South of Spain. The concentrations range between 7 and 14 ng m -3for n-alkanes and between 0.2 and 0.4 ng m -3for total PAH. Based on molecular criteria, several sources for these HCs have been identified: continental higher plant waxes, petroleum and pyrolysis (namely coal combustion and vehicular exhausts). Mass medium equivalent diameters (MMED) for the naturally derived n-alkanes are in the 1.79-2.53 μm range, indicating an origin related with the emission of large particles from higher plant waxes or from soil dusts. In contrast, MMED for the anthropogenic HCs, both aliphatic and aromatic, are smaller than the micron, suggesting initial emission of PAH through pyrolytic processes in the vapor phase followed by condensation onto larger sub-μm particles.

  8. Pd(Quinox)-Catalyzed Allylic Relay Suzuki Reactions of Secondary Homostyrenyl Tosylates via Alkene-Assisted Oxidative Addition.

    PubMed

    Stokes, Benjamin J; Bischoff, Amanda J; Sigman, Matthew S

    2014-06-01

    Pd-catalyzed allylic relay Suzuki cross-coupling reactions of secondary alkyl tosylates, featuring a sterically-hindered oxidative addition and precise control of β-hydride elimination, are reported. The identification of a linear free energy relationship between the relative rates of substrate consumption and the electronic nature of the substrate alkene suggests that the oxidative addition requires direct alkene involvement. A study of the effect of chain length on the reaction outcome supports a chelation-controlled oxidative addition.

  9. Palladium Catalyzed Intermolecular Aminoacetoxylation of Alkenes and the Influence of PhI(OAc)2 on Aminopalladation Stereoselectivity

    PubMed Central

    Martínez, Claudio; Wu, Yichen; Weinstein, Adam B.; Stahl, Shannon S.; Liu, Guosheng; Muñiz, Kilian

    2013-01-01

    A modified protocol has been identified for Pd-catalyzed intermolecular aminoacetoxylation of terminal and internal alkenes that enables the alkene to be used as the limiting reagent. The results prompt a reassessment of the stereochemical course of these reactions. X-ray crystallographic characterization of two of the products, together with isotopic labeling studies, show that the amidopalladation step switches from a cis-selective process under aerobic conditions to a trans-selective process in the presence of diacetoxyiodobenzene. PMID:23734834

  10. Towards a practical development of light-driven acceptorless alkane dehydrogenation.

    PubMed

    Chowdhury, Abhishek Dutta; Weding, Nico; Julis, Jennifer; Franke, Robert; Jackstell, Ralf; Beller, Matthias

    2014-06-16

    The efficient catalytic dehydrogenation of alkanes to olefins is one of the most investigated reactions in organic synthesis. In the coming years, an increased supply of shorter-chain alkanes from natural and shale gas will offer new opportunities for inexpensive carbon feedstock through such dehydrogenation processes. Existing methods for alkane dehydrogenation using heterogeneous catalysts require harsh reaction conditions and have a lack of selectivity, whereas homogeneous catalysis methods result in significant waste generation. A strong need exists for atom-efficient alkane dehydrogenations on a useful scale. Herein, we have developed improved acceptorless catalytic systems under optimal light transmittance conditions using trans-[Rh(PMe3)2(CO)Cl] as the catalyst with different additives. Unprecedented catalyst turnover numbers are obtained for the dehydrogenation of cyclic and linear (from C4) alkanes and liquid organic hydrogen carriers. These reactions proceed with unique conversion, thereby providing a basis for practical alkane dehydrogenations. PMID:24829085

  11. Alkene synthesis through transition metal-catalyzed cross-coupling of N-tosylhydrazones.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yan; Wang, Jianbo

    2012-01-01

    In this chapter, alkene synthesis based on the reaction of N-tosylhydrazones is described. The reactivity of tosylhydrazones is determined by either the acidity of α-proton and hydrazone proton or the electropositivity of the carbon of C=N bond. This leads to diverse reactivities and a series of N-tosylhydrazone-based olefination methodologies. Both non-catalytic and transition metal-catalyzed olefinations from N-tosylhydrazones are introduced in this chapter. Most of the transition metal-catalyzed reactions proceed via metal carbene transformations. The synthesis of alkenes through Pd-catalyzed cross-coupling reactions of N-tosylhydrazones is particularly attractive and will be discussed in detail.

  12. Engineering of TM1459 from Thermotoga maritima for Increased Oxidative Alkene Cleavage Activity

    PubMed Central

    Fink, Matthias; Trunk, Sarah; Hall, Mélanie; Schwab, Helmut; Steiner, Kerstin

    2016-01-01

    Oxidative cleavage of alkenes is a widely employed process allowing oxyfunctionalization to corresponding carbonyl compounds. Recently, a novel biocatalytic oxidative alkene cleavage activity on styrene derivatives was identified in TM1459 from Thermotoga maritima. In this work we engineered the enzyme by site-saturation mutagenesis of active site amino acids to increase its activity and to broaden its substrate scope. A high-throughput assay for the detection of the ketone products was successfully developed. Several variants with up to twofold improved conversion level of styrene derivatives were successfully identified. Especially, changes in or removal of the C-terminus of TM1459 increased the activity most significantly. These best variants also displayed a slightly enlarged substrate scope. PMID:27713741

  13. Metallacycle-Mediated Cross-Coupling with Substituted and Electronically Unactivated Alkenes

    PubMed Central

    Reichard, Holly A.

    2011-01-01

    This perspective surveys the history of- and recent advances in- metallacycle-mediated coupling chemistry of substituted alkenes. While the reaction of preformed metal–π complexes with ethylene was reported nearly 30 years ago, the generalization of this mode of bimolecular C–C bond formation to the regio- and stereoselective union of complex substrates has only recently begun to emerge. This perspective discusses early observations in this area, the challenges associated with controlling such processes, the evolution of a general strategy to overcome these challenges, and a summary of highly regio- and stereoselective convergent coupling reactions that are currently available by metallacycle-mediated cross-coupling with substituted alkenes. PMID:21436986

  14. Oxidative Decarboxylation of Short-Chain Fatty Acids to 1-Alkenes.

    PubMed

    Dennig, Alexander; Kuhn, Miriam; Tassoti, Sebastian; Thiessenhusen, Anja; Gilch, Stefan; Bülter, Thomas; Haas, Thomas; Hall, Mélanie; Faber, Kurt

    2015-07-20

    The enzymatic oxidative decarboxylation of linear short-chain fatty acids (C4:0-C9:0) employing the P450 monooxygenase OleT, O2 as the oxidant, and NAD(P)H as the electron donor gave the corresponding terminal C3 to C8  alkenes with product titers of up to 0.93 g L(-1) and TTNs of >2000. Key to this process was the construction of an efficient electron-transfer chain employing putidaredoxin CamAB in combination with NAD(P)H recycling at the expense of glucose, formate, or phosphite. This system allows for the biocatalytic production of industrially important 1-alkenes, such as propene and 1-octene, from renewable resources for the first time.

  15. Catalytic asymmetric carbon-carbon bond formation using alkenes as alkylmetal equivalents.

    PubMed

    Maksymowicz, Rebecca M; Roth, Philippe M C; Fletcher, Stephen P

    2012-08-01

    Catalytic asymmetric conjugate addition reactions with organometallic reagents are powerful reactions in synthetic chemistry. Procedures that use non-stabilized carbanions have been developed extensively, but these suffer from a number of limitations that prevent their use in many situations. Here, we report that alkylmetal species generated in situ from alkenes can be used in highly enantioselective 1,4-addition initiated by a copper catalyst. Using alkenes as starting materials is desirable because they are readily available and have favourable properties when compared to pre-made organometallics. High levels of enantioselectivity are observed at room temperature in a range of solvents, and the reaction tolerates functional groups that are not compatible with comparable methods-a necessary prerequisite for efficient and protecting-group-free strategies for synthesis. PMID:22824897

  16. Catalytic asymmetric carbon-carbon bond formation using alkenes as alkylmetal equivalents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maksymowicz, Rebecca M.; Roth, Philippe M. C.; Fletcher, Stephen P.

    2012-08-01

    Catalytic asymmetric conjugate addition reactions with organometallic reagents are powerful reactions in synthetic chemistry. Procedures that use non-stabilized carbanions have been developed extensively, but these suffer from a number of limitations that prevent their use in many situations. Here, we report that alkylmetal species generated in situ from alkenes can be used in highly enantioselective 1,4-addition initiated by a copper catalyst. Using alkenes as starting materials is desirable because they are readily available and have favourable properties when compared to pre-made organometallics. High levels of enantioselectivity are observed at room temperature in a range of solvents, and the reaction tolerates functional groups that are not compatible with comparable methods—a necessary prerequisite for efficient and protecting-group-free strategies for synthesis.

  17. Mechanistic interpretation of selective catalytic hydrogenation and isomerization of alkenes and dienes by ligand deactivated Pd nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Jie S.; Shon, Young-Seok

    2015-10-01

    Unsupported thiolate-capped palladium nanoparticle catalysts are found to be highly substrate-selective for alkene hydrogenation and isomerization. Steric and poisoning effects from thiolate ligands on the nanoparticle surface control reactivity and selectivity by influencing alkene adsorption and directing either di-σ or mono-σ bond formation. The presence of overlapping p orbitals and α protons in alkenes greatly influences the catalytic properties of deactivated palladium nanoparticles leading to easily predictable hydrogenation or isomerization products.Unsupported thiolate-capped palladium nanoparticle catalysts are found to be highly substrate-selective for alkene hydrogenation and isomerization. Steric and poisoning effects from thiolate ligands on the nanoparticle surface control reactivity and selectivity by influencing alkene adsorption and directing either di-σ or mono-σ bond formation. The presence of overlapping p orbitals and α protons in alkenes greatly influences the catalytic properties of deactivated palladium nanoparticles leading to easily predictable hydrogenation or isomerization products. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Supplementary figures, methods, materials, and characterization data. See DOI: 10.1039/c5nr05090a

  18. Photochemical dimerization and functionalization of alkanes, ethers, primary alcohols and silanes

    DOEpatents

    Crabtree, Robert H.; Brown, Stephen H.

    1988-01-01

    The space-time yield and/or the selectivity of the photochemical dimerization of alkanes, ethers, primary alcohols and tertiary silanes with Hg and U.V. light is enhanced by refluxing the substrate in the irradiated reaction zone at a temperature at which the dimer product condenses and remains condensed promptly upon its formation. Cross-dimerization of the alkanes, ethers and silanes with primary alcohols is disclosed, as is the functionalization to aldehydes of the alkanes with carbon monoxide.

  19. Photochemical dimerization and functionalization of alkanes, ethers, primary alcohols and silanes

    DOEpatents

    Crabtree, R.H.; Brown, S.H.

    1988-02-16

    The space-time yield and/or the selectivity of the photochemical dimerization of alkanes, ethers, primary alcohols and tertiary silanes with Hg and U.V. light is enhanced by refluxing the substrate in the irradiated reaction zone at a temperature at which the dimer product condenses and remains condensed promptly upon its formation. Cross-dimerization of the alkanes, ethers and silanes with primary alcohols is disclosed, as is the functionalization to aldehydes of the alkanes with carbon monoxide.

  20. Draft Genome Sequence of Gordonia sihwensis Strain 9, a Branched Alkane-Degrading Bacterium

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Lisa M.; Gunasekera, Thusitha S.; Striebich, Richard C.

    2016-01-01

    Gordonia sihwensis strain 9 is a Gram-positive bacterium capable of efficient aerobic degradation of branched and normal alkanes. The draft genome of G. sihwensis S9 is 4.16 Mb in size, with 3,686 coding sequences and 68.1% G+C content. Alkane monooxygenase and P-450 cytochrome genes required for alkane degradation are predicted in G. sihwensis S9. PMID:27340079

  1. Copper-catalyzed oxyamination of electron-deficient alkenes with N-acyloxyamines.

    PubMed

    Ren, Shichao; Song, Shengjin; Ye, Lu; Feng, Chao; Loh, Teck-Peng

    2016-08-16

    A Cu(i)-catalyzed direct intermolecular oxyamination of electron deficient alkenes is disclosed. This process is characterized by difunctionalization of a variety of α,β-unsaturated ketones with easily available N-acyloxyamine reagents as both amine and oxygen donors, which delivers ester derivatives of β-amino alcohols in good yields as well as with high regioselectivity. Control studies suggested the involvement of alkyl radical species on the way of product formation. PMID:27481485

  2. Radical product yields from the ozonolysis of short chain alkenes under atmospheric boundary layer conditions.

    PubMed

    Alam, Mohammed S; Rickard, Andrew R; Camredon, Marie; Wyche, Kevin P; Carr, Timo; Hornsby, Karen E; Monks, Paul S; Bloss, William J

    2013-11-27

    The gas-phase reaction of ozone with unsaturated volatile organic compounds (VOCs), alkenes, is an important source of the critical atmospheric oxidant OH, especially at night when other photolytic radical initiation routes cannot occur. Alkene ozonolysis is also known to directly form HO2 radicals, which may be readily converted to OH through reaction with NO, but whose formation is poorly understood. We report a study of the radical (OH, HO2, and RO2) production from a series of small alkenes (propene, 1-butene, cis-2-butene, trans-2-butene, 2-methylpropene, 2,3-dimethyl-2-butene (tetramethyl ethene, TME), and isoprene). Experiments were performed in the European Photoreactor (EUPHORE) atmospheric simulation chamber, with OH and HO2 levels directly measured by laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) and HO2 + ΣRO2 levels measured by peroxy-radical chemical amplification (PERCA). OH yields were found to be in good agreement with the majority of previous studies performed under comparable conditions (atmospheric pressure, long time scales) using tracer and scavenger approaches. HO2 yields ranged from 4% (trans-2-butene) to 34% (2-methylpropene), lower than previous experimental determinations. Increasing humidity further reduced the HO2 yields obtained, by typically 50% for an RH increase from 0.5 to 30%, suggesting that HOx production from alkene ozonolysis may be lower than current models suggest under (humid) ambient atmospheric boundary layer conditions. The mechanistic origin of the OH and HO2 production observed is discussed in the context of previous experimental and theoretical studies.

  3. Iron-catalyzed 1,2-addition of perfluoroalkyl iodides to alkynes and alkenes.

    PubMed

    Xu, Tao; Cheung, Chi Wai; Hu, Xile

    2014-05-01

    Iron catalysis has been developed for the intermolecular 1,2-addition of perfluoroalkyl iodides to alkynes and alkenes. The catalysis has a wide substrate scope and high functional-group tolerance. A variety of perfluoroalkyl iodides including CF3 I can be employed. The resulting perfluoroalkylated alkyl and alkenyl iodides can be further functionalized by cross-coupling reactions. This methodology provides a straightforward and streamlined access to perfluoroalkylated organic molecules.

  4. Alkenes as Chelating Groups in Diastereoselective Additions of Organometallics to Ketones

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Alkenes have been discovered to be chelating groups to Zn(II), enforcing highly stereoselective additions of organozincs to β,γ-unsaturated ketones. 1H NMR studies and DFT calculations provide support for this surprising chelation mode. The results expand the range of coordinating groups for chelation-controlled carbonyl additions from heteroatom Lewis bases to simple C–C double bonds, broadening the 60 year old paradigm. PMID:25328269

  5. Copper-catalyzed oxyamination of electron-deficient alkenes with N-acyloxyamines.

    PubMed

    Ren, Shichao; Song, Shengjin; Ye, Lu; Feng, Chao; Loh, Teck-Peng

    2016-08-16

    A Cu(i)-catalyzed direct intermolecular oxyamination of electron deficient alkenes is disclosed. This process is characterized by difunctionalization of a variety of α,β-unsaturated ketones with easily available N-acyloxyamine reagents as both amine and oxygen donors, which delivers ester derivatives of β-amino alcohols in good yields as well as with high regioselectivity. Control studies suggested the involvement of alkyl radical species on the way of product formation.

  6. A Cu/Pd Cooperative Catalysis for Enantioselective Allylboration of Alkenes.

    PubMed

    Jia, Tao; Cao, Peng; Wang, Bing; Lou, Yazhou; Yin, Xuemei; Wang, Min; Liao, Jian

    2015-11-01

    A cooperative Cu/Pd-catalyzed asymmetric three-component reaction of styrenes, B2(pin)2, and allyl carbonates was reported. This reaction, in the presence of chiral CuOAc/SOP and achiral Pd(dppf)Cl2 catalysts, occurs smoothly with high enantioselectivities (up to 97% ee) . The allylboration products, which contain alkene (or diene) unite and alkylboron group, are easily functionalized. The utility of this protocol was demonstrated through the synthesis of an antipsychotic drug, (-)-preclamol. PMID:26458555

  7. Asymmetric synthesis from terminal alkenes by diboration/cross-coupling cascades

    PubMed Central

    Mlynarski, Scott N.; Schuster, Christopher H.; Morken, James P.

    2013-01-01

    Amongst prospective starting materials for organic synthesis, terminal (monosubstituted) alkenes are ideal. In the form of α-olefins, they are manufactured on enormous scale and they are the core product features from many organic chemical reactions. While their latent reactivity can easily enable hydrocarbon chain extension, alkenes also have the attractive feature of being stable in the presence of many acids, bases, oxidants and reductants. In spite of these impressive attributes, relatively few catalytic enantioselective transformations have been developed that transform aliphatic α-olefins in >90% ee and, with the exception of site-controlled isotactic polymerization of α-olefins,1 none of these processes result in chain-extending C-C bond formation to the terminal carbon.2, 3, 4, 5, 6 Herein, we describe a strategy that directly addresses this gap in synthetic methodology and present a single-flask catalytic enantioselective conversion of terminal alkenes into a range of chiral products. These reactions are enabled by an unusual neighboring group participation effect that accelerates Pd-catalyzed cross-coupling of 1,2-bis(boronates) relative to nonfunctionalized alkyl boronate analogs. In tandem with enantioselective diboration, this reactivity feature connects abundant alkene starting materials to a diverse array of chiral products. Importantly with respect to synthesis utility, the tandem diboration/cross-coupling reaction (DCC reaction) generally provides products in high yield and high selectivity (>95:5 enantiomer ratio), employs low loadings (1–2 mol %) of commercially available catalysts and reagents, it offers an expansive substrate scope, and can address a broad range of alcohol and amine synthesis targets, many of which cannot be easily addressed with current technology. PMID:24352229

  8. Branch-Selective Alkene Hydroarylation by Cooperative Destabilization: Iridium-Catalyzed ortho-Alkylation of Acetanilides.

    PubMed

    Crisenza, Giacomo E M; Sokolova, Olga O; Bower, John F

    2015-12-01

    An iridium(I) catalyst system, modified with the wide-bite-angle and electron-deficient bisphosphine d(F) ppb (1,4-bis(di(pentafluorophenyl)phosphino)butane) promotes highly branch-selective hydroarylation reactions between diverse acetanilides and aryl- or alkyl-substituted alkenes. This provides direct and ortho-selective access to synthetically challenging anilines, and addresses long-standing issues associated with related Friedel-Crafts alkylations. PMID:26490739

  9. Alkene Chemoselectivity in Ruthenium-Catalyzed Z-Selective Olefin Metathesis

    PubMed Central

    Cannon, Jeffrey S.

    2013-01-01

    Chelated ruthenium catalysts have achieved highly chemoselective olefin metathesis reactions. Terminal and internal Z olefins were selectively reacted in the presence of internal E olefins. Products were produced in good yield and high stereoselectivity for formation of a new Z olefin. No products of metathesis with the internal E olefin were observed. Chemoselectivity for terminal olefins was also observed over both sterically hindered and electronically deactivated alkenes. PMID:23832646

  10. Versatile Enantioselective Synthesis of Functionalized Lactones via Copper-Catalyzed Radical Oxyfunctionalization of Alkenes.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Rong; Buchwald, Stephen L

    2015-07-01

    A versatile method for the rapid synthesis of diverse enantiomerically enriched lactones has been developed based on Cu-catalyzed enantioselective radical oxyfunctionalization of alkenes. The scope of this strategy encompasses a series of enantioselective difunctionalization reactions: oxyazidation, oxysulfonylation, oxyarylation, diacyloxylation, and oxyalkylation. These reactions provide straightforward access to a wide range of useful chiral lactone building blocks containing tetrasubstituted stereogenic centers, which are hard to access traditionally.

  11. Branch-Selective Alkene Hydroarylation by Cooperative Destabilization: Iridium-Catalyzed ortho-Alkylation of Acetanilides

    PubMed Central

    Crisenza, Giacomo E M; Sokolova, Olga O; Bower, John F

    2015-01-01

    An iridium(I) catalyst system, modified with the wide-bite-angle and electron-deficient bisphosphine dFppb (1,4-bis(di(pentafluorophenyl)phosphino)butane) promotes highly branch-selective hydroarylation reactions between diverse acetanilides and aryl- or alkyl-substituted alkenes. This provides direct and ortho-selective access to synthetically challenging anilines, and addresses long-standing issues associated with related Friedel–Crafts alkylations. PMID:26490739

  12. Molecular screening for alkane hydroxylase genes in Gram-negative and Gram-positive strains.

    PubMed

    Smits, T H; Röthlisberger, M; Witholt, B; van Beilen, J B

    1999-08-01

    We have developed highly degenerate oligonucleotides for polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification of genes related to the Pseudomonas oleovorans GPo1 and Acinetobacter sp. ADP1 alkane hydroxylases, based on a number of highly conserved sequence motifs. In all Gram-negative and in two out of three Gram-positive strains able to grow on medium- (C6-C11) or long-chain n-alkanes (C12-C16), PCR products of the expected size were obtained. The PCR fragments were cloned and sequenced and found to encode peptides with 43.2-93.8% sequence identity to the corresponding fragment of the P. oleovorans GPo1 alkane hydroxylase. Strains that were unable to grow on n-alkanes did not yield PCR products with homology to alkane hydroxylase genes. The alkane hydroxylase genes of Acinetobacter calcoaceticus EB104 and Pseudomonas putida P1 were cloned using the PCR products as probes. The two genes allow an alkane hydroxylase-negative mutant of Acinetobacter sp. ADP1 and an Escherichia coli recombinant containing all P. oleovorans alk genes except alkB, respectively, to grow on n-alkanes, showing that the cloned genes do indeed encode alkane hydroxylases. PMID:11207749

  13. Gas-Phase Reactions of Atomic Gold Cations with Linear Alkanes (C2-C9).

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ting; Li, Zi-Yu; Zhang, Mei-Qi; He, Sheng-Gui

    2016-06-30

    To develop proper ionization methods for alkanes, the reactivity of bare or ligated transition metal ions toward alkanes has attracted increasing interests. In this study, the reactions of the gold cations with linear alkanes from ethane up to nonane (CnH2n+2, n = 2-9) under mild conditions have been characterized by mass spectrometry and density functional theory calculations. When reacting with Au(+), small alkanes (n = 2-6) were confirmed to follow specific reaction channels of dehydrogenation for ethane and hydride transfer for others to generate product ions characteristic of the original alkanes, which indicates that Au(+) can act as a reagent ion to ionize alkanes from ethane to n-hexane. Strong dependence of the chain length of alkanes was observed for the rate constants and reaction efficiencies. Extensive fragmentation took place for larger alkanes (n > 6). Theoretical results show that the fragmentation induced by the hydride transfer occurs after the release of AuH. Moreover, the fragmentation of n-heptane was successfully avoided when the reaction took place in a high-pressure reactor. This implies that Au(+) is a potential reagent ion to ionize linear and even the branched alkanes. PMID:27266670

  14. Terminal alkenes as versatile chemical reporter groups for metabolic oligosaccharide engineering.

    PubMed

    Späte, Anne-Katrin; Schart, Verena F; Schöllkopf, Sophie; Niederwieser, Andrea; Wittmann, Valentin

    2014-12-01

    The Diels-Alder reaction with inverse electron demand (DAinv reaction) of 1,2,4,5-tetrazines with electron rich or strained alkenes was proven to be a bioorthogonal ligation reaction that proceeds fast and with high yields. An important application of the DAinv reaction is metabolic oligosaccharide engineering (MOE) which allows the visualization of glycoconjugates in living cells. In this approach, a sugar derivative bearing a chemical reporter group is metabolically incorporated into cellular glycoconjugates and subsequently derivatized with a probe by means of a bioorthogonal ligation reaction. Here, we investigated a series of new mannosamine and glucosamine derivatives with carbamate-linked side chains of varying length terminated by alkene groups and their suitability for labeling cell-surface glycans. Kinetic investigations showed that the reactivity of the alkenes in DAinv reactions increases with growing chain length. When applied to MOE, one of the compounds, peracetylated N-butenyloxycarbonylmannosamine, was especially well suited for labeling cell-surface glycans. Obviously, the length of its side chain represents the optimal balance between incorporation efficiency and speed of the labeling reaction. Sialidase treatment of the cells before the bioorthogonal labeling reaction showed that this sugar derivative is attached to the glycans in form of the corresponding sialic acid derivative and not epimerized to another hexosamine derivative to a considerable extent.

  15. Pressure-dependent OH yields in alkene + HO2 reactions: a theoretical study.

    PubMed

    Zádor, Judit; Klippenstein, Stephen J; Miller, James A

    2011-09-15

    The major bimolecular product of alkyl + O(2) reactions is alkene + hydroperoxyl radical (HO(2)), but in the reverse direction, the reactants are reformed to a very limited extent only. The most important products of the alkene + HO(2) reactions are alkylperoxy radical (ROO(•)), hydroxyl radical (OH) + cyclic ether, and the corresponding hydroperoxyalkyl ((•)QOOH) species. Moreover, abstraction of allylic hydrogens can compete with the addition, further complicating the possible outcome of this reaction type and its effect on low-temperature combustion chemistry. In this paper, six alkene + HO(2) reactions and the reaction between an unsaturated oxygenate and HO(2) are studied based on previously established potential energy surfaces. The studied unsaturated compounds are ethene, propene, 1-butene, trans-2-butene, isobutene, cyclohexene, and vinyl alcohol. Using multiwell master equations, temperature- (300-1200 K) and pressure-dependent rate coefficients and branching fractions are calculated for these reactions. The importance of this reaction type for the combustion of unsaturated compounds is also assessed, and we show that, to get reliable results, it is important to include the pressure-dependence of the rate coefficients in the calculations. PMID:21819062

  16. An ene reductase from Clavispora lusitaniae for asymmetric reduction of activated alkenes.

    PubMed

    Ni, Yan; Yu, Hui-Lei; Lin, Guo-Qiang; Xu, Jian-He

    2014-03-01

    A putative ene reductase gene from Clavispora lusitaniae was heterologously overexpressed in Escherichia coli, and the encoded protein (ClER) was purified and characterized for its biocatalytic properties. This NADPH-dependent flavoprotein was identified with reduction activities toward a diverse range of activated alkenes including conjugated enones, enals, maleimide derivative and α,β-unsaturated carboxylic esters. The purified ClER exhibited a relatively high activity of 7.3 U mg(prot)⁻¹ for ketoisophorone while a remarkable catalytic efficiency (k(cat)/K(m)=810 s⁻¹ mM⁻¹) was obtained for 2-methyl-cinnamaldehyde due to the high affinity. A series of prochiral activated alkenes were stereoselectively reduced by ClER furnishing the corresponding saturated products in up to 99% ee. The practical applicability of ClER was further evaluated for the production of (R)-levodione, a valuable chiral compound, from ketoisophorone. Using the crude enzyme of ClER and glucose dehydrogenase (GDH), 500 mM of ketoisophorone was efficiently converted to (R)-levodione with excellent stereoselectivity (98% ee) within 1h. All these positive features demonstrate a high synthetic potential of ClER in the asymmetric reduction of activated alkenes. PMID:24564901

  17. Mechanistic Analysis and Optimization of the Copper-Catalyzed Enantioselective Intramolecular Alkene Aminooxygenation

    PubMed Central

    Paderes, Monissa C.; Keister, Jerome B.; Chemler, Sherry R.

    2013-01-01

    The catalytic asymmetric aminooxygenation of alkenes provides an efficient and straightforward approach to prepare chiral vicinal amino alcohols. We have reported a copper(II)-catalyzed enantioselective intramolecular alkene aminooxygenation, using (2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidin-1-yl)oxyl (TEMPO) as the oxygen source, which results in the synthesis of chiral indolines and pyrrolidines. Herein we disclose that kinetics studies indicate the reaction is first order both in substrate and the [Cu(R,R)-Ph-bis(oxazoline)]OTf2 catalyst, and zero order in TEMPO. Furthermore, kinetic isotope effect studies support that the cis aminocupration step, the addition of N-Cu across the alkene, is the rate-limiting step. Subsequent formation of a carbon radical intermediate, and direct carbon radical trapping with TEMPO is the indicated mechanism for the C-O bond formation as suggested by a deuterium labeling experiment. A ligand screen revealed that C(4)-phenyl substitution on the bis(oxazoline) is optimal for high asymmetric induction. The size of the substrate’s N-sulfonyl group also influences the enantioselectivity of the reaction. The preparative scale catalytic aminooxygenation reaction (gram scale) was demonstrated and an unexpected dependence on reaction temperature was uncovered on the larger scale reaction. PMID:23244027

  18. Mechanistic analysis and optimization of the copper-catalyzed enantioselective intramolecular alkene aminooxygenation.

    PubMed

    Paderes, Monissa C; Keister, Jerome B; Chemler, Sherry R

    2013-01-18

    The catalytic asymmetric aminooxygenation of alkenes provides an efficient and straightforward approach to prepare chiral vicinal amino alcohols. We have reported a copper(II)-catalyzed enantioselective intramolecular alkene aminooxygenation, using (2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidin-1-yl)oxyl (TEMPO) as the oxygen source, which results in the synthesis of chiral indolines and pyrrolidines. Herein we disclose that kinetics studies indicate the reaction is first order both in substrate and the [Cu(R,R)-Ph-bis(oxazoline)]OTf(2) catalyst and zero order in TEMPO. Furthermore, kinetic isotope effect studies support that the cis-aminocupration step, the addition of N-Cu across the alkene, is the rate-limiting step. Subsequent formation of a carbon radical intermediate and direct carbon radical trapping with TEMPO is the indicated mechanism for the C-O bond formation as suggested by a deuterium labeling experiment. A ligand screen revealed that C(4)-phenyl substitution on the bis(oxazoline) is optimal for high asymmetric induction. The size of the substrate's N-sulfonyl group also influences the enantioselectivity of the reaction. The preparative-scale catalytic aminooxygenation reaction (gram scale) was demonstrated, and an unexpected dependence on reaction temperature was uncovered on the larger scale reaction. PMID:23244027

  19. Stereospecific Synthesis of Alkenes by Eliminative Cross-Coupling of Enantioenriched sp(3) -Hybridized Carbenoids.

    PubMed

    Wu, Zhenhua; Sun, Xun; Potter, Kristin; Cao, Yang; Zakharov, Lev N; Blakemore, Paul R

    2016-09-26

    1-Aryl-1,2-dialkylethenes were generated by a sequence of electrophilic substitution, 1,2-metalate rearrangement, and β-elimination initiated by the addition of enantioenriched α-(carbamoyloxy)alkylboronates to enantioenriched lithiated carbamates. The carbenoid stereochemical pairing [i.e., "like"=(S)+(S) or "unlike"=(S)+(R)] and the elimination mechanism (syn or anti), not substituent effects, determined the configuration of the trisubstituted alkene target. For example, (Z)-2,5-diphenyl-2-pentene was produced in 70 % yield with E/Z=5:95 by a like combination of Li and B carbenoids and syn (thermal) elimination whereas the E isomer was obtained in the same yield with E/Z>98:2 by an otherwise identical process involving an unlike stereochemical pairing. The concept elaborated overcomes an intrinsic limitation of traditional strategies for direct connective alkene synthesis, which cannot realize meaningful stereochemical bias unless the alkene substituents are strongly differentiated. PMID:27585188

  20. Cloning and expression of three ladA-type alkane monooxygenase genes from an extremely thermophilic alkane-degrading bacterium Geobacillus thermoleovorans B23.

    PubMed

    Boonmak, Chanita; Takahashi, Yasunori; Morikawa, Masaaki

    2014-05-01

    An extremely thermophilic bacterium, Geobacillus thermoleovorans B23, is capable of degrading a broad range of alkanes (with carbon chain lengths ranging between C11 and C32) at 70 °C. Whole-genome sequence analysis revealed that unlike most alkane-degrading bacteria, strain B23 does not possess an alkB-type alkane monooxygenase gene. Instead, it possesses a cluster of three ladA-type genes, ladAαB23, ladAβB23, and ladB B23, on its chromosome, whose protein products share significant amino acid sequence identities, 49.8, 34.4, and 22.7 %, respectively, with that of ladA alkane monooxygenase gene found on a plasmid of Geobacillus thermodetrificans NG 80-2. Each of the three genes, ladAαB23, ladAβB23, and ladB B23, was heterologously expressed individually in an alkB1 deletion mutant strain, Pseudomonas fluorescens KOB2Δ1. It was found that all three genes were functional in P. fluorescens KOB2Δ1, and partially restored alkane degradation activity. In this study, we suggest that G. thermoleovorans B23 utilizes multiple LadA-type alkane monooxygenases for the degradation of a broad range of alkanes.

  1. Identification and use of an alkane transporter plug-in for applications in biocatalysis and whole-cell biosensing of alkanes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grant, Chris; Deszcz, Dawid; Wei, Yu-Chia; Martínez-Torres, Rubéns Julio; Morris, Phattaraporn; Folliard, Thomas; Sreenivasan, Rakesh; Ward, John; Dalby, Paul; Woodley, John M.; Baganz, Frank

    2014-07-01

    Effective application of whole-cell devices in synthetic biology and biocatalysis will always require consideration of the uptake of molecules of interest into the cell. Here we demonstrate that the AlkL protein from Pseudomonas putida GPo1 is an alkane import protein capable of industrially relevant rates of uptake of C7-C16 n-alkanes. Without alkL expression, native E.coli n-alkane uptake was the rate-limiting step in both the whole-cell bioconversion of C7-C16 n-alkanes and in the activation of a whole-cell alkane biosensor by C10 and C11 alkanes. By coexpression of alkL as a transporter plug-in, specific yields improved by up to 100-fold for bioxidation of >C12 alkanes to fatty alcohols and acids. The alkL protein was shown to be toxic to the host when overexpressed but when expressed from a vector capable of controlled induction, yields of alkane oxidation were improved a further 10-fold (8 g/L and 1.7 g/g of total oxidized products). Further testing of activity on n-octane with the controlled expression vector revealed the highest reported rates of 120 μmol/min/g and 1 g/L/h total oxidized products. This is the first time AlkL has been shown to directly facilitate enhanced uptake of C10-C16 alkanes and represents the highest reported gain in product yields resulting from its use.

  2. Integrated reforming/aromatization process

    SciTech Connect

    Harandi, M.N.; Owen, H.

    1990-06-26

    This patent describes an integrated process for increasing the gasoline yield from a catalytic reforming process. It comprises: charging a naphtha boiling range feedstream to a catalytic reforming reaction zone under reforming conversion conditions; withdrawing a reactor effluent stream from the reforming reaction zone; separating the reactor effluent stream into a hydrogen-rich gas stream and an unstabilized reformate stream; further separating the unstabilized reformate in a fractionator into an overhead stream containing C{sub 4} - components and a bottom stream containing C{sub 6} + components; charging the fractionator overhead stream to a catalytic aromatization zone under aromatization conversion conditions; withdrawing an aromatization zone effluent stream from the aromatization zone; cooling the aromatization zone effluent stream; separating the cooled aromatization zone effluent steam into a C{sub 4} - stream and a C{sub 5} + stream; and refluxing the C{sub 5} + aromatic gasoline stream to the fractionation zone.

  3. The Adsorption of Saturated and Aromatic Hydrocarbon Vapors on Silicas with Chemically Grafted Perfluorohexyl Groups

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roshchina, T. M.; Shoniya, N. K.; Lagutova, M. S.; Fadeev, A. Yu.

    2008-03-01

    Regardless of the nature of the modifier (mono-, bi-, and trichlorosilanes with perfluorohexyl groups or monochlorooctylsilane), the modification of silica decreased retention volumes and adsorption values of both n-alkanes and aromatic hydrocarbons. The entropy factor can play a key role in adsorption intermolecular interactions on the surface of chemically modified silicas. The modification of the surface with bi- and trichloroperfluorohexylsilanes caused the appearance of new centers more active compared with those of the initial carrier. The most oleophobic and nonpolar coatings were obtained using monochlorosilane with perfluorohexyl groups as a modifier.

  4. Gas chromatographic-mass spectrometric characterization of all acyclic C5-C7 alkenes from fluid catalytic cracked gasoline using polydimethylsiloxane and squalane stationary phases.

    PubMed

    Soják, Ladislav; Addová, Gabriela; Kubinec, Róbert; Kraus, Angelika; Hu, Gengyuan

    2002-02-15

    Published retention indices of acyclic alkenes C5-C7 on squalane and polydimethylsiloxane as stationary phases were investigated, and reliable retention indices of alkenes from various sources were converted to separation systems used in a laboratory. Retention indices measured on available authentic commercial alkenes and on alkenic fraction of gasoline, published retention indices as well as means of GC-MS were used for verification of calculated retention indices. Retention of some gas chromatographic unseparated isomer pairs was obtained by mass spectrometric deconvolution using a specific single-ion monitoring. On the basis of these retention data, C5-C7 alkenes were identified and analyzed in the gasoline from fluid catalytic cracking. In the gasoline all 59 acyclic C5-C7 isomeric alkenes were determined at significantly different concentration levels.

  5. [Normal alkanes characteristic parameters of Jinzhou Bay surface sediments].

    PubMed

    Li, Ze-Li; Ma, Qi-Min; Cheng, Hai-Ou; Xu, Shao-Qing

    2011-11-01

    The concentration, composition and characteristic parameters of 18 surface sediment samples collected from Jinzhou Bay were studied. The samples were soxhlet-extracted with a mixture of 1: 1 (V/V) dichloromethane-hexane and analyzed by GC-MS after purification and concentration. Concentrations of n-alkanes vary from 1.9 to 4.2 microg x g(-1) with an average value of 2.6 microg x g(-1) dry weight. n-Alkanes distribution patterns of all positions were characterized by double peak-cluster, which means double sources from terrestrial and marine origin. The sum of nC25 to nC31 accounts for 20%-32% of the total n-alkanes, while the average value of L/H, C31/C19, TAR ratio are 0.67, 3.06, 2.02, respectively. All of these three indices suggest that the terrestrial contributions are higher than marine sources, especially for No. 2, 3 and 7 stations, which were influenced by riverinput nearby. Carbon Preference Index (CPI) ranges from 1.19 to 2.63 with an average value of 1.73, which is close to 1; the ratio of Pristane/Phytane (Pr/Ph) and unresolved/resolved compounds (U/R) range from 0.91 to 1.28, 2.2 to 4.3, respectively. All of these three parameters indicate that No. 13 and 15 stations are influenced by petroleum pollution. Comprehensive analysis of various parameters shows that Jinzhou Bay is threatened by both terrestrial inputs and petroleum hydrocarbons contaminations, which may relate to river discharging and port shipping in Jinzhou Bay. PMID:22295627

  6. Introducing copper as catalyst for oxidative alkane dehydrogenation.

    PubMed

    Conde, Ana; Vilella, Laia; Balcells, David; Díaz-Requejo, M Mar; Lledós, Agustí; Pérez, Pedro J

    2013-03-13

    The dehydrogenation of n-hexane and cycloalkanes giving n-hexene and cycloalkenes has been observed in the reaction of such hydrocarbons with hydrogen peroxide, in the presence of copper complexes bearing trispyrazolylborate ligands. This catalytic transformation provides the typical oxidation products (alcohol and ketones) with small amounts of the alkenes, a novel feature in this kind of oxidative processes. Experimental data exclude the participation of hydroxyl radicals derived from Fenton-like reaction mechanisms. DFT studies support a copper-oxo active species, which initiates the reaction by H abstraction. Spin crossover from the triplet to the singlet state, which is required to recover the catalyst, yields the major hydroxylation and minor dehydrogenation products. Further calculations suggested that the superoxo and hydroperoxo species are less reactive than the oxo. A complete mechanistic proposal in agreement with all experimental and computational data is proposed. PMID:23409843

  7. Introducing copper as catalyst for oxidative alkane dehydrogenation.

    PubMed

    Conde, Ana; Vilella, Laia; Balcells, David; Díaz-Requejo, M Mar; Lledós, Agustí; Pérez, Pedro J

    2013-03-13

    The dehydrogenation of n-hexane and cycloalkanes giving n-hexene and cycloalkenes has been observed in the reaction of such hydrocarbons with hydrogen peroxide, in the presence of copper complexes bearing trispyrazolylborate ligands. This catalytic transformation provides the typical oxidation products (alcohol and ketones) with small amounts of the alkenes, a novel feature in this kind of oxidative processes. Experimental data exclude the participation of hydroxyl radicals derived from Fenton-like reaction mechanisms. DFT studies support a copper-oxo active species, which initiates the reaction by H abstraction. Spin crossover from the triplet to the singlet state, which is required to recover the catalyst, yields the major hydroxylation and minor dehydrogenation products. Further calculations suggested that the superoxo and hydroperoxo species are less reactive than the oxo. A complete mechanistic proposal in agreement with all experimental and computational data is proposed.

  8. Preliminary assessment of halogenated alkanes as vapor-phase tracers

    SciTech Connect

    Adams, Michael C.; Moore, Joseph N.; Hirtz, Paul

    1991-01-01

    New tracers are needed to evaluate the efficiency of injection strategies in vapor-dominated environments. One group of compounds that seems to meet the requirements for vapor-phase tracing are the halogenated alkanes (HCFCs). HCFCs are generally nontoxic, and extrapolation of tabulated thermodynamic data indicate that they will be thermally stable and nonreactive in a geothermal environment. The solubilities and stabilities of these compounds, which form several homologous series, vary according to the substituent ratios of fluorine, chlorine, and hydrogen. Laboratory and field tests that will further define the suitability of HCFCs as vapor-phase tracers are under way.

  9. Characterization of sorbent properties of soil organic matter and carbonaceous geosorbents using n-alkanes and cycloalkanes as molecular probes

    SciTech Connect

    Satoshi Endo; Peter Grathwohl; Stefan B. Haderlein; Torsten C. Schmidt

    2009-01-15

    Nonspecific interactions and modes (i.e., adsorption vs absorption) of sorption by noncondensed, amorphous organic phases (here termed organic matter; OM) in soils and by rigid, aromatic, and condensed phases (termed carbonaceous geosorbents; CGs) were investigated using n-alkanes and cycloalkanes as molecular probes. Sorption isotherms of and cyclooctane from water for seven CGs (charcoal, lignite coke, activated carbon, graphite, partially oxidized graphite, diesel soot, bituminous coal), four sorbents with a predominance of OM (lignite, peat, two sapric soils), and two soils containing OM and high amounts of CGs were measured in batch systems. The peat and the sapric soils showed extensively linear sorption, while the CGs exhibited highly nonlinear and strong (K{sub oc} values being up to 105 times those for the OM-rich materials at low concentrations) sorption for the alkanes studied, showing that enhanced sorption by CGs can occur to completely apolar sorbates that do not undergo any specific interaction. The n-octane-to-cyclooctane sorption coefficient ratios for adsorption to CGs were {ge}1, being distinctly different from those for absorption to the OM-rich materials. The measured sorption isotherms and the CG compositions in the soils determined by quantitative petrography analysis suggest, however, that CGs occurring in soils may be far less effective sorbents than the reference CGs used in the sorption experiments at least for nonspecifically interacting sorbates, probably because of competitive sorption and/or pore blocking by natural OM. The presented approaches and results offer a basis for interpreting sorption data for other organic compounds, as nonspecific interactions and sorption modes are relevant for any compound. 47 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  10. Effect of alkane chain length and counterion on the freezing transition of cationic surfactant adsorbed film at alkane mixture - water interfaces.

    PubMed

    Tokiwa, Yuhei; Sakamoto, Hiroyasu; Takiue, Takanori; Aratono, Makoto; Matsubara, Hiroki

    2015-05-21

    Penetration of alkane molecules into the adsorbed film gives rise to a surface freezing transition of cationic surfactant at the alkane-water interface. To examine the effect of the alkane chain length and counterion on the surface freezing, we employed interfacial tensiometry and ellipsometry to study the interface of cetyltrimethylammonium bromide and cetyltrimethylammonium chloride aqueous solutions against dodecane, tetradecane, hexadecane, and their mixtures. Applying theoretical equations to the experimental results obtained, we found that the alkane molecules that have the same chain length as the surfactant adsorb preferentially into the surface freezing film. Furthermore, we demonstrated that the freezing transition temperature of cationic surfactant adsorbed film was independent of the kind of counterion. PMID:25932500

  11. Degradation of recalcitrant aliphatic and aromatic hydrocarbons by a dioxin-degrader Rhodococcus sp. strain p52.

    PubMed

    Yang, Hai-Yan; Jia, Rui-Bao; Chen, Bin; Li, Li

    2014-09-01

    This study investigates the ability of Rhodococcus sp. strain p52, a dioxin degrader, to biodegrade petroleum hydrocarbons. Strain p52 can use linear alkanes (tetradecane, tetracosane, and dotriacontane), branched alkane (pristane), and aromatic hydrocarbons (naphthalene and phenanthrene) as sole carbon and energy sources. Specifically, the strain removes 85.7 % of tetradecane within 48 h at a degradation rate of 3.8 mg h(-1) g(-1) dry cells, and 79.4 % of tetracosane, 66.4 % of dotriacontane, and 63.9 % of pristane within 9-11 days at degradation rates of 20.5, 14.7, and 20.3 mg day(-1) g(-1) dry cells, respectively. Moreover, strain p52 consumes 100 % naphthalene and 55.3 % phenanthrene within 9-11 days at respective degradation rates of 16 and 12.9 mg day(-1) g(-1) dry cells. Metabolites of the petroleum hydrocarbons by strain p52 were analyzed. Genes encoding alkane-hydroxylating enzymes, including cytochrome P450 (CYP450) enzyme (CYP185) and two alkane-1-monooxygenases, were amplified by polymerase chain reaction. The transcriptional activities of these genes in the presence of petroleum hydrocarbons were detected by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction. The results revealed potential of strain p52 to degrade petroleum hydrocarbons. PMID:24859700

  12. Multiple sources of alkanes in Quaternary oceanic sediment of Antarctica

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kvenvolden, K.A.; Rapp, J.B.; Golan-Bac, M.; Hostettler, F.D.

    1987-01-01

    Normal alkanes (n-C13n-C36), isoprenoid hydrocarbons (i-C15, i-C16, i-C18, i-C19, and i-C20) triterpanes (C27C32), and (C27C29) are present in low concentrations offshore Antarctica in near-surface, Quaternary sediment of the Wilkes Land continental margin and of the western Ross Sea. The distributions of these hydrocarbons are interpreted relative to possible sources and processes. The hydrocarbons appear to be mixtures of primary and recycled material from marine and terrigenous sources. The n-alkanes are most abundant and are characterized by two distinct populations, one of probable marine origin and the other likely from terrigenous, vascular plant sources. Because the continent of Antarctica today is devoid of higher plants, the plant-derived hydrocarbons in these offshore sediments probably came from wind-blown material and recycled Antarctic sediment that contains land-plant remains from an earlier period of time. Isoprenoid hydrocarbons are partially recycled and mainly of marine origin; the dominance of pristane over phytane suggests oxic paleoenvironmental conditions. Both modern and ancient triterpanes and steranes are present, and the distribution of these indicates a mixture of primary and recycled bacterial, algal, and possible higher-plant materials. Although the sampled sediments were deposited during the Quaternary, they apparently contain a significant component of hydrocarbons of pre-Quaternary age. ?? 1987.

  13. Gas-phase study of Fe sup + -benzyne with alkanes

    SciTech Connect

    Yongqing Huang; Freiser, B.S. )

    1989-03-29

    The unimolecular chemistry of Fe{sup +}-benzyne and its reactivity with small alkanes in the gas phase are studied by Fourier transform mass spectrometry (FTMS). Collision-induced dissociation of Fe{sup +}-benzyne yields benzyne loss exclusively. In contrast, photodissociation of Fe{sup +}-benzyne yields not only cleavage of benzyne from Fe{sup +}, but competitive loss of C{sub 2}H{sub 2} and C{sub 4}H{sub 2} as well. The Fe{sup +}-benzyne is formed from chlorobenzene by loss of HCl. This dehydrochlorination of chlorobenzene also occurs in secondary reactions up to six times forming products of the type Fe{sup +}-polyphenylene. Fe{sup +}-benzyne reacts with alkanes larger than methane to form a wide variety of product ions by mechanisms including hydrogenation and methanation of the benzyne ligand. All of the product ions can be explained by mechanisms based on Fe{sup +} insertion into either C-C or C-H bonds as the reaction-initiating step, followed by either alkyl or H migration from Fe{sup +} onto the benzyne ligand or, alternatively, by the migratory insertion of benzyne into a metal-carbon or metal-hydrogen bond. Photodissociation and ion-molecule reaction studies yield a value for the metal-ligand bond energy of D{degree} (Fe{sup +}-benzyne) = 76 {plus minus} 10 kcal/mol.

  14. Direct hydrodeoxygenation of raw woody biomass into liquid alkanes.

    PubMed

    Xia, Qineng; Chen, Zongjia; Shao, Yi; Gong, Xueqing; Wang, Haifeng; Liu, Xiaohui; Parker, Stewart F; Han, Xue; Yang, Sihai; Wang, Yanqin

    2016-03-30

    Being the only sustainable source of organic carbon, biomass is playing an ever-increasingly important role in our energy landscape. The conversion of renewable lignocellulosic biomass into liquid fuels is particularly attractive but extremely challenging due to the inertness and complexity of lignocellulose. Here we describe the direct hydrodeoxygenation of raw woods into liquid alkanes with mass yields up to 28.1 wt% over a multifunctional Pt/NbOPO4 catalyst in cyclohexane. The superior performance of this catalyst allows simultaneous conversion of cellulose, hemicellulose and, more significantly, lignin fractions in the wood sawdust into hexane, pentane and alkylcyclohexanes, respectively. Investigation on the molecular mechanism reveals that a synergistic effect between Pt, NbOx species and acidic sites promotes this highly efficient hydrodeoxygenation of bulk lignocellulose. No chemical pretreatment of the raw woody biomass or separation is required for this one-pot process, which opens a general and energy-efficient route for converting raw lignocellulose into valuable alkanes.

  15. Geologic seepage of methane and light alkanes in Los Angeles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doezema, L. A.; Chang, K.; Baril, R.; Nwachuku, I.; Contreras, P.; Marquez, A.; Howard, D.

    2013-12-01

    Natural geologic seepage of methane from underground oil and natural gas reservoirs has been suggested to be an underreported part of the global methane budget. Other light alkanes are also given off in combination with the methane seepage, making it possible that geologic seepage is also a potentially significant global source of these light alkanes. This study reports C1-C5 findings from geologic seepage made in the Los Angeles region. Microseepage, invisible escape of gases, was measured primarily at Kenneth Hahn Regional Park, while macroseepage, the visible release of gases, was measured at the La Brea Tar Pits. Samples were collected using stainless steel canisters and flux chambers and were analyzed using gas chromatography with flame ionization detectors (GC-FID). Average microseepage flux rates of 0.95 μg m-2 h-1 for ethane and 0.51 μg m-2 h-1 were found for propane, while average macroseepage rates for methane, ethane, and propane were 664, 19.8, and 18.1 mg m-2 h-1 respectively. Relationships between microseepage flux rate and location of underground oil and natural deposit and earthquake fault lines are presented. Additionally, the relative importance of findings in context with global budgets and local air quality is discussed.

  16. Direct hydrodeoxygenation of raw woody biomass into liquid alkanes.

    PubMed

    Xia, Qineng; Chen, Zongjia; Shao, Yi; Gong, Xueqing; Wang, Haifeng; Liu, Xiaohui; Parker, Stewart F; Han, Xue; Yang, Sihai; Wang, Yanqin

    2016-01-01

    Being the only sustainable source of organic carbon, biomass is playing an ever-increasingly important role in our energy landscape. The conversion of renewable lignocellulosic biomass into liquid fuels is particularly attractive but extremely challenging due to the inertness and complexity of lignocellulose. Here we describe the direct hydrodeoxygenation of raw woods into liquid alkanes with mass yields up to 28.1 wt% over a multifunctional Pt/NbOPO4 catalyst in cyclohexane. The superior performance of this catalyst allows simultaneous conversion of cellulose, hemicellulose and, more significantly, lignin fractions in the wood sawdust into hexane, pentane and alkylcyclohexanes, respectively. Investigation on the molecular mechanism reveals that a synergistic effect between Pt, NbOx species and acidic sites promotes this highly efficient hydrodeoxygenation of bulk lignocellulose. No chemical pretreatment of the raw woody biomass or separation is required for this one-pot process, which opens a general and energy-efficient route for converting raw lignocellulose into valuable alkanes. PMID:27025898

  17. Direct hydrodeoxygenation of raw woody biomass into liquid alkanes

    PubMed Central

    Xia, Qineng; Chen, Zongjia; Shao, Yi; Gong, Xueqing; Wang, Haifeng; Liu, Xiaohui; Parker, Stewart F.; Han, Xue; Yang, Sihai; Wang, Yanqin

    2016-01-01

    Being the only sustainable source of organic carbon, biomass is playing an ever-increasingly important role in our energy landscape. The conversion of renewable lignocellulosic biomass into liquid fuels is particularly attractive but extremely challenging due to the inertness and complexity of lignocellulose. Here we describe the direct hydrodeoxygenation of raw woods into liquid alkanes with mass yields up to 28.1 wt% over a multifunctional Pt/NbOPO4 catalyst in cyclohexane. The superior performance of this catalyst allows simultaneous conversion of cellulose, hemicellulose and, more significantly, lignin fractions in the wood sawdust into hexane, pentane and alkylcyclohexanes, respectively. Investigation on the molecular mechanism reveals that a synergistic effect between Pt, NbOx species and acidic sites promotes this highly efficient hydrodeoxygenation of bulk lignocellulose. No chemical pretreatment of the raw woody biomass or separation is required for this one-pot process, which opens a general and energy-efficient route for converting raw lignocellulose into valuable alkanes. PMID:27025898

  18. FTIR studies of titanium tetrachloride and magnesium dichloride complexes with aromatic esters relevant to Ziegler-Natta catalysts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solli, Kjell-Arne; Ystenes, Martin; Sobota, Piotr

    1992-03-01

    Esters of aromatic carboxylic acids and dicarboxylic acids show different effects when used as electron donors in the synthesis of milled MgCl2-supported Ziegler-Natta catalysts. Such Ziegler-Natta catalysts are synthesized by cogrinding anhydrous MgCl2 with the ester, then reacting the resulting support with TiCl4 followed by washing and drying. Alternatively, the catalyst may be synthesized by cogrinding MgCl2 with a TiCl4- aromatic ester complex. The catalyst is activated by a trialkyl aluminum in order to polymerize propene or other (alpha) -alkenes. Esters of the monoacids generally enhance the activity of the catalyst (relative to no ester), and the produced polypropene is also more isotactic. Esters of the diacids also enhance the isotacticity of the polymer produced somewhat, but the activity of the catalyst is lower.

  19. 40 CFR 721.2625 - Reaction product of alkane-diol and epichlorohydrin.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Reaction product of alkane-diol and... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.2625 Reaction product of alkane-diol and epichlorohydrin. (a) Chemical... as reaction product of alkanediol and epichlorohydrin (PMN P-89-760) is subject to reporting...

  20. 40 CFR 721.2625 - Reaction product of alkane-diol and epichlorohydrin.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Reaction product of alkane-diol and... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.2625 Reaction product of alkane-diol and epichlorohydrin. (a) Chemical... as reaction product of alkanediol and epichlorohydrin (PMN P-89-760) is subject to reporting...

  1. 40 CFR 721.2625 - Reaction product of alkane-diol and epichlorohydrin.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Reaction product of alkane-diol and... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.2625 Reaction product of alkane-diol and epichlorohydrin. (a) Chemical... as reaction product of alkanediol and epichlorohydrin (PMN P-89-760) is subject to reporting...

  2. 40 CFR 721.2625 - Reaction product of alkane-diol and epichlorohydrin.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Reaction product of alkane-diol and... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.2625 Reaction product of alkane-diol and epichlorohydrin. (a) Chemical... as reaction product of alkanediol and epichlorohydrin (PMN P-89-760) is subject to reporting...

  3. 40 CFR 721.2625 - Reaction product of alkane-diol and epichlorohydrin.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Reaction product of alkane-diol and... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.2625 Reaction product of alkane-diol and epichlorohydrin. (a) Chemical... as reaction product of alkanediol and epichlorohydrin (PMN P-89-760) is subject to reporting...

  4. Surfactant-induced phases in water-supported alkane monolayers: I. Thermodynamics.

    PubMed

    Yefet, Shai; Sloutskin, Eli; Tamam, Lilach; Sapir, Zvi; Cohen, Asaf; Deutsch, Moshe; Ocko, Benjamin M

    2014-07-15

    Alkanes longer than n = 6 carbons do not spread on the water surface, but condense in a macroscopic lens. However, adding trimethylammonium-based surfactants, C(m)TAB, in submillimolar concentrations causes the alkanes to spread and form a single Langmuir-Gibbs (LG) monolayer of mixed alkanes and surfactant tails, which coexists with the alkane lenses. Upon cooling, this LG film surface-freezes at a temperature T(s) above the bulk freezing temperature T(b). The thermodynamics of surface freezing (SF) of these LG films is studied by surface tension measurements for a range of alkanes (n = 12-21) and surfactant alkyl lengths (m = 14, 16, 18), at several concentrations c. The surface freezing range T(s)-T(b) observed is up to 25 °C, an order of magnitude larger than the temperature range of SF monolayers on the surface of pure alkane melts. The measured (n,T) surface phase diagram is accounted for well by a model based on mixtures' theory, which includes an interchange energy term ω. ω is found to be negative, implying attraction between unlike species, rather than the repulsion found for SF of binary alkane mixtures. Thus, the surfactant/alkane mixing is a necessary condition for the occurrence of SF in these LG films. The X-ray derived structure of the films is presented in an accompanying paper. PMID:24918482

  5. Identity and mechanisms of alkane-oxidizing metalloenzymes from deep-sea hydrothermal vents.

    PubMed

    Bertrand, Erin M; Keddis, Ramaydalis; Groves, John T; Vetriani, Costantino; Austin, Rachel Narehood

    2013-01-01

    Six aerobic alkanotrophs (organism that can metabolize alkanes as their sole carbon source) isolated from deep-sea hydrothermal vents were characterized using the radical clock substrate norcarane to determine the metalloenzyme and reaction mechanism used to oxidize alkanes. The organisms studied were Alcanivorax sp. strains EPR7 and MAR14, Marinobacter sp. strain EPR21, Nocardioides sp. strains EPR26w, EPR28w, and Parvibaculum hydrocarbonoclasticum strain EPR92. Each organism was able to grow on n-alkanes as the sole carbon source and therefore must express genes encoding an alkane-oxidizing enzyme. Results from the oxidation of the radical-clock diagnostic substrate norcarane demonstrated that five of the six organisms (EPR7, MAR14, EPR21, EPR26w, and EPR28w) used an alkane hydroxylase functionally similar to AlkB to catalyze the oxidation of medium-chain alkanes, while the sixth organism (EPR92) used an alkane-oxidizing cytochrome P450 (CYP)-like protein to catalyze the oxidation. DNA sequencing indicated that EPR7 and EPR21 possess genes encoding AlkB proteins, while sequencing results from EPR92 confirmed the presence of a gene encoding CYP-like alkane hydroxylase, consistent with the results from the norcarane experiments.

  6. Aromaticity Competition in Differentially Fused Borepin-Containing Polycyclic Aromatics.

    PubMed

    Messersmith, Reid E; Siegler, Maxime A; Tovar, John D

    2016-07-01

    This report describes the synthesis and characterization of a series of borepin-based polycyclic aromatics bearing two different arene fusions. The borepin synthesis features streamlined Ti-mediated alkyne reduction, leading to Z-olefins, followed by direct lithiation and borepin formation. These molecules allow for an assessment of aromatic competition between the fused rings and the central borepin core. Crystallographic, magnetic, and computational studies yielded insights about the aromaticity of novel, differentially fused [b,f]borepins and allowed for comparison to literature compounds. Multiple borepin motifs were also incorporated into polycyclic aromatics with five or six rings in the main backbone, and their properties were also evaluated.

  7. Selective thermal and photooxidation of hydrocarbons in zeolites by oxygen

    DOEpatents

    Frei, H.; Blatter, F.; Sun, H.

    1999-06-22

    A process is described for selective thermal oxidation or photooxidation of hydrocarbons adsorbed onto zeolite matrices. A highly selective thermal oxidation and photooxidation of unsubstituted or alkyl substituted alkanes, alkenes, aromatics and cycloalkyls in solvent free zeolites under dark thermal conditions or under irradiation with visible light. The process oxidizes hydrocarbons almost completely selectively without substantial production of byproducts. 19 figs.

  8. Selective thermal and photooxidation of hydrocarbons in zeolites by oxygen

    DOEpatents

    Frei, Heinz; Blatter, Fritz; Sun, Hai

    2001-01-01

    A process for a combined selective thermal oxidation and photooxidation of hydrocarbons adsorbed onto zeolite matrices. A highly combined selective thermal oxidation and photooxidation of unsubstituted or alkyl substituted alkanes, alkenes, aromatics and cycloalkyls in solvent free zeolites under dark thermal conditions or under irradiation with visible light. The process oxidizes hydrocarbons almost completely selectively without substantial production of byproducts.

  9. Selective thermal oxidation of hydrocarbons in zeolites by oxygen

    DOEpatents

    Frei, Heinz; Blatter, Fritz; Sun, Hai

    2000-01-01

    A process for selective thermal oxidation of hydrocarbons adsorbed onto zeolite matrices. A highly selective thermal oxidation of unsubstituted or alkyl substituted alkanes, alkenes, aromatics and cycloalkyls is carried out in solvent free zeolites under dark thermal conditions. The process oxidizes hydrocarbons almost completely selectively without substantial production of byproducts.

  10. Selective thermal and photooxidation of hydrocarbons in zeolites by oxygen

    DOEpatents

    Frei, Heinz; Blatter, Fritz; Sun, Hai

    1999-01-01

    A process for selective thermal oxidation or photooxidation of hydrocarbons adsorbed onto zeolite matrices. A highly selective thermal oxidation and photooxidation of unsubstituted or alkyl substituted alkanes, alkenes, aromatics and cycloalkyls in solvent free zeolites under dark thermal conditions or under irradiation with visible light. The process oxidizes hydrocarbons almost completely selectively without substantial production of byproducts.

  11. Geomicrobiological linkages between short-chain alkane consumption and sulfate reduction rates in seep sediments

    PubMed Central

    Bose, Arpita; Rogers, Daniel R.; Adams, Melissa M.; Joye, Samantha B.; Girguis, Peter R.

    2013-01-01

    Marine hydrocarbon seeps are ecosystems that are rich in methane, and, in some cases, short-chain (C2–C5) and longer alkanes. C2–C4 alkanes such as ethane, propane, and butane can be significant components of seeping fluids. Some sulfate-reducing microbes oxidize short-chain alkanes anaerobically, and may play an important role in both the competition for sulfate and the local carbon budget. To better understand the anaerobic oxidation of short-chain n-alkanes coupled with sulfate-reduction, hydrocarbon-rich sediments from the Gulf of Mexico (GoM) were amended with artificial, sulfate-replete seawater and one of four n-alkanes (C1–C4) then incubated under strict anaerobic conditions. Measured rates of alkane oxidation and sulfate reduction closely follow stoichiometric predictions that assume the complete oxidation of alkanes to CO2 (though other sinks for alkane carbon likely exist). Changes in the δ13C of all the alkanes in the reactors show enrichment over the course of the incubation, with the C3 and C4 incubations showing the greatest enrichment (4.4 and 4.5‰, respectively). The concurrent depletion in the δ13C of dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) implies a transfer of carbon from the alkane to the DIC pool (−3.5 and −6.7‰ for C3 and C4 incubations, respectively). Microbial community analyses reveal that certain members of the class Deltaproteobacteria are selectively enriched as the incubations degrade C1–C4 alkanes. Phylogenetic analyses indicate that distinct phylotypes are enriched in the ethane reactors, while phylotypes in the propane and butane reactors align with previously identified C3–C4 alkane-oxidizing sulfate-reducers. These data further constrain the potential influence of alkane oxidation on sulfate reduction rates (SRRs) in cold hydrocarbon-rich sediments, provide insight into their contribution to local carbon cycling, and illustrate the extent to which short-chain alkanes can serve as electron donors and govern microbial

  12. Polyimidazoles via aromatic nucleophilic displacement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Connell, John W. (Inventor); Hergenrother, Paul M. (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    Polyimidazoles (Pl) are prepared by the aromatic nucleophilic displacement reaction of di(hydroxyphenyl)imidazole monomers with activated aromatic dihalides or activated aromatic dinitro compounds. The reactions are carried out in polar aprotic solvents such as N,N-dimethylacetamide, sulfolane, N-methylpyrroldinone, dimethylsulfoxide, or diphenylsulfone using alkali metal bases such as potassium carbonate at elevated temperature under nitrogen. The di(hydroxyphenyl)imidazole monomers are prepared by reacting an aromatic aldehyde with a dimethoxybenzil or by reacting an aromatic dialdehyde with a methoxybenzil in the presence of ammonium acetate. The di(methoxyphenyl)imidazole is subsequently treated with aqueous hydrobromic acid to give the di(hydroxyphenyl)imidazole monomer. This synthetic route has provided high molecular weight Pl of new chemical structure, is economically and synthetically more favorable than other routes, and allows for facile chemical structure variation due to the availability of a large variety of activated aromatic dihalides and dinitro compounds.

  13. Polyimidazoles via aromatic nucleophilic displacement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Connell, John W. (Inventor); Hergenrother, Paul M. (Inventor)

    1992-01-01

    Polyimidazoles (PI) are prepared by the aromatic nucleophilic displacement reaction of di(hydroxyphenyl) imidazole monomers with activated aromatic dihalides or activated aromatic dinitro compounds. The reactions are carried out in polar aprotic solvents such as N,N-dimethyl acetamide, sulfolane, N-methylpyrrolidinone, dimethylsulfoxide, or diphenylsulfone using alkali metal bases such as potassium carbonate at elevated temperatures under nitrogen. The di(hydroxyphenyl) imidazole monomers are prepared by reacting an aromatic aldehyde with a dimethoxybenzil or by reacting an aromatic dialdehyde with a methoxybenzil in the presence of ammonium acetate. The di(methoxyphenyl) imidazole is subsequently treated with aqueous hydrobromic acid to give the di(hydroxphenyl) imidazole monomer. This synthetic route has provided high molecular weight PI of new chemical structure, is economically and synthetically more favorable than other routes, and allows for facile chemical structure variation due to the availability of a large variety of activated aromatic dihalides and dinitro compounds.

  14. Possible origin of n -alkanes with a remarkable even-to-odd predominance in recent marine sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishimura, Mitsugu; Baker, Earl W.

    1986-02-01

    N- alkane distributions with a remarkable even-to-odd predominance (C 16-C 24) were found in marine surface sediments. The previously proposed diagenetic reduction of the corresponding n- fatty acids could not be considered as a source for these N- alkane. Based on a comparison of compositional features of n- alkane, n- fatty acid and n- alcohol distributions, carbon isotope analyses, and other geochemical parameters, the data indicate that the even-predominant n- alkanes were derived directly from marine bacteria.

  15. Mechanistic Studies of Wacker-Type Intramolecular Aerobic Oxidative Amination of Alkenes Catalyzed by Pd(OAc)2/Pyridine

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Xuan; Liu, Guosheng; Popp, Brian V.; Stahl, Shannon S.

    2011-01-01

    Wacker-type oxidative cyclization reactions have been the subject of extensive research for several decades, but few systematic mechanistic studies of these reactions have been reported. The present study features experimental and DFT computational studies of Pd(OAc)2/pyridine-catalyzed intramolecular aerobic oxidative amination of alkenes. The data support a stepwise catalytic mechanism that consists of (1) steady-state formation of a PdII-amidate-alkene chelate with release of one equivalent of pyridine and AcOH from the catalyst center, (2) alkene insertion into a Pd–N bond, (3) reversible β-hydride elimination, (4) irreversible reductive elimination of AcOH, and (5) aerobic oxidation of palladium(0) to regenerate the active trans-Pd(OAc)2(py)2 catalyst. Evidence is obtained for two energetically viable pathways for the key C–N bond-forming step, featuring a pyridine-ligated and a pyridine-dissociated PdII species. Analysis of natural charges and bond lengths of the alkene-insertion transition state suggest that this reaction is best described as an intramolecular nucleophilic attack of the amidate ligand on the coordinated alkene. PMID:21250706

  16. Nickel and cobalt-catalyzed coupling of alkyl halides with alkenes via heck reactions and radical conjugate addition.

    PubMed

    Qian, Qun; Zang, Zhenhua; Chen, Yang; Tong, Weiqi; Gong, Hegui

    2013-05-01

    Cross-coupling of alkyl halides with alkenes leading to Heck-type and addition products is summarized. The development of Heck reaction with aliphatic halides although has made significant progress in the past decade and particularly recently, it was much less explored in comparison with the aryl halides. The use of Ni- and Co-catalyzed protocols allowed efficient Heck coupling of activated and unactivated alkenes with 1°, 2° and 3° alkyl halides. In addition, radical conjugate addition to activated alkenes has become a well-established method that has led to efficient construction of many natural products. The utilization of Ni- and Co-catalyzed strategies would avoid toxic tin reagents, and therefore worth exploring. The recent development of Ni- and Co-catalyzed addition of alkyl halides to alkenes displays much improved reactivity and functional group tolerance. In this mini-review, we also attempt to overview the mechanisms that are proposed in the reactions, aiming at providing insight into the nickel and cobalt-catalyzed coupling of alkyl halides with alkenes.

  17. Adsorption of proteins at the aqueous solution/alkane interface: Co-adsorption of protein and alkane.

    PubMed

    Miller, R; Aksenenko, E V; Zinkovych, I I; Fainerman, V B

    2015-08-01

    The equations of state, adsorption isotherms and functions of the distribution of protein molecules in liquid interfacial layers with respect to molar area and the equations for their viscoelastic behavior are presented. This theory was used to determine the adsorption characteristics of β-casein and β-lactoglobulin at water/oil interfaces. The experimental results are shown to be describable quite adequately by the proposed theory with consistent model parameters. The data analysis demonstrated that the β-casein molecule adsorbed at equilibrium conditions is more unfolded as compared with dynamic conditions, and this fact causes the significant increase of the adsorption equilibrium constant. The theory assumes the adsorption of protein molecules from the aqueous solution and a competitive adsorption of alkane molecules from the alkane phase. The comparison of the experimental equilibrium interfacial tension isotherms for β-lactoglobulin at the solution/hexane interface with data calculated using the proposed theoretical model demonstrates that the assumption of a competitive adsorption is essential, and the influence of the hexane molecules on the shape of the adsorption isotherm does in fact exist.

  18. Contorted polycyclic aromatics.

    PubMed

    Ball, Melissa; Zhong, Yu; Wu, Ying; Schenck, Christine; Ng, Fay; Steigerwald, Michael; Xiao, Shengxiong; Nuckolls, Colin

    2015-02-17

    CONSPECTUS: This Account describes a body of research in the design, synthesis, and assembly of molecular materials made from strained polycyclic aromatic molecules. The strain in the molecular subunits severely distorts the aromatic molecules away from planarity. We coined the term "contorted aromatics" to describe this class of molecules. Using these molecules, we demonstrate that the curved pi-surfaces are useful as subunits to make self-assembled electronic materials. We have created and continue to study two broad classes of these "contorted aromatics": discs and ribbons. The figure that accompanies this conspectus displays the three-dimensional surfaces of a selection of these "contorted aromatics". The disc-shaped contorted molecules have well-defined conformations that create concave pi-surfaces. When these disc-shaped molecules are substituted with hydrocarbon side chains, they self-assemble into columnar superstructures. Depending on the hydrocarbon substitution, they form either liquid crystalline films or macroscopic cables. In both cases, the columnar structures are photoconductive and form p-type, hole- transporting materials in field effect transistor devices. This columnar motif is robust, allowing us to form monolayers of these columns attached to the surface of dielectrics such as silicon oxide. We use ultrathin point contacts made from individual single-walled carbon nanotubes that are separated by a few nanometers to probe the electronic properties of short stacks of a few contorted discs. We find that these materials have high mobility and can sense electron-deficient aromatic molecules. The concave surfaces of these disc-shaped contorted molecules form ideal receptors for the molecular recognition and assembly with spherical molecules such as fullerenes. These interfaces resemble ball-and-socket joints, where the fullerene nests itself in the concave surface of the contorted disc. The tightness of the binding between the two partners can be

  19. Contorted polycyclic aromatics.

    PubMed

    Ball, Melissa; Zhong, Yu; Wu, Ying; Schenck, Christine; Ng, Fay; Steigerwald, Michael; Xiao, Shengxiong; Nuckolls, Colin

    2015-02-17

    CONSPECTUS: This Account describes a body of research in the design, synthesis, and assembly of molecular materials made from strained polycyclic aromatic molecules. The strain in the molecular subunits severely distorts the aromatic molecules away from planarity. We coined the term "contorted aromatics" to describe this class of molecules. Using these molecules, we demonstrate that the curved pi-surfaces are useful as subunits to make self-assembled electronic materials. We have created and continue to study two broad classes of these "contorted aromatics": discs and ribbons. The figure that accompanies this conspectus displays the three-dimensional surfaces of a selection of these "contorted aromatics". The disc-shaped contorted molecules have well-defined conformations that create concave pi-surfaces. When these disc-shaped molecules are substituted with hydrocarbon side chains, they self-assemble into columnar superstructures. Depending on the hydrocarbon substitution, they form either liquid crystalline films or macroscopic cables. In both cases, the columnar structures are photoconductive and form p-type, hole- transporting materials in field effect transistor devices. This columnar motif is robust, allowing us to form monolayers of these columns attached to the surface of dielectrics such as silicon oxide. We use ultrathin point contacts made from individual single-walled carbon nanotubes that are separated by a few nanometers to probe the electronic properties of short stacks of a few contorted discs. We find that these materials have high mobility and can sense electron-deficient aromatic molecules. The concave surfaces of these disc-shaped contorted molecules form ideal receptors for the molecular recognition and assembly with spherical molecules such as fullerenes. These interfaces resemble ball-and-socket joints, where the fullerene nests itself in the concave surface of the contorted disc. The tightness of the binding between the two partners can be

  20. Aromatic molecules as spintronic devices

    SciTech Connect

    Ojeda, J. H.; Orellana, P. A.; Laroze, D.

    2014-03-14

    In this paper, we study the spin-dependent electron transport through aromatic molecular chains attached to two semi-infinite leads. We model this system taking into account different geometrical configurations which are all characterized by a tight binding Hamiltonian. Based on the Green's function approach with a Landauer formalism, we find spin-dependent transport in short aromatic molecules by applying external magnetic fields. Additionally, we find that the magnetoresistance of aromatic molecules can reach different values, which are dependent on the variations in the applied magnetic field, length of the molecules, and the interactions between the contacts and the aromatic molecule.

  1. 40 CFR 721.10625 - Distillation bottoms, alkylated benzene by-product, brominated and bromo diphenyl alkane (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... benzene by-product, brominated and bromo diphenyl alkane (generic). 721.10625 Section 721.10625 Protection... Distillation bottoms, alkylated benzene by-product, brominated and bromo diphenyl alkane (generic). (a... generically as distillation bottoms, alkylated benzene by-product, brominated and bromo diphenyl alkane...

  2. 40 CFR 721.10625 - Distillation bottoms, alkylated benzene by-product, brominated and bromo diphenyl alkane (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... benzene by-product, brominated and bromo diphenyl alkane (generic). 721.10625 Section 721.10625 Protection... Distillation bottoms, alkylated benzene by-product, brominated and bromo diphenyl alkane (generic). (a... generically as distillation bottoms, alkylated benzene by-product, brominated and bromo diphenyl alkane...

  3. 40 CFR 721.10178 - Distillates (Fischer-Tropsch), hydroisomerized middle, C10-13-branched alkane fraction.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...), hydroisomerized middle, C10-13-branched alkane fraction. 721.10178 Section 721.10178 Protection of Environment...), hydroisomerized middle, C10-13-branched alkane fraction. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject... middle, C10-13-branched alkane fraction (PMN P-04-319; CAS No. 642928-30-1) is subject to reporting...

  4. 40 CFR 721.10178 - Distillates (Fischer-Tropsch), hydroisomerized middle, C10-13-branched alkane fraction.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...), hydroisomerized middle, C10-13-branched alkane fraction. 721.10178 Section 721.10178 Protection of Environment...), hydroisomerized middle, C10-13-branched alkane fraction. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject... middle, C10-13-branched alkane fraction (PMN P-04-319; CAS No. 642928-30-1) is subject to reporting...

  5. Copper-Catalyzed Intermolecular Amidation and Imidation of Unactivated Alkanes

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    We report a set of rare copper-catalyzed reactions of alkanes with simple amides, sulfonamides, and imides (i.e., benzamides, tosylamides, carbamates, and phthalimide) to form the corresponding N-alkyl products. The reactions lead to functionalization at secondary C–H bonds over tertiary C–H bonds and even occur at primary C–H bonds. [(phen)Cu(phth)] (1-phth) and [(phen)Cu(phth)2] (1-phth2), which are potential intermediates in the reaction, have been isolated and fully characterized. The stoichiometric reactions of 1-phth and 1-phth2 with alkanes, alkyl radicals, and radical probes were investigated to elucidate the mechanism of the amidation. The catalytic and stoichiometric reactions require both copper and tBuOOtBu for the generation of N-alkyl product. Neither 1-phth nor 1-phth2 reacted with excess cyclohexane at 100 °C without tBuOOtBu. However, the reactions of 1-phth and 1-phth2 with tBuOOtBu afforded N-cyclohexylphthalimide (Cy-phth), N-methylphthalimide, and tert-butoxycyclohexane (Cy-OtBu) in approximate ratios of 70:20:30, respectively. Reactions with radical traps support the intermediacy of a tert-butoxy radical, which forms an alkyl radical intermediate. The intermediacy of an alkyl radical was evidenced by the catalytic reaction of cyclohexane with benzamide in the presence of CBr4, which formed exclusively bromocyclohexane. Furthermore, stoichiometric reactions of [(phen)Cu(phth)2] with tBuOOtBu and (Ph(Me)2CO)2 at 100 °C without cyclohexane afforded N-methylphthalimide (Me-phth) from β-Me scission of the alkoxy radicals to form a methyl radical. Separate reactions of cyclohexane and d12-cyclohexane with benzamide showed that the turnover-limiting step in the catalytic reaction is the C–H cleavage of cyclohexane by a tert-butoxy radical. These mechanistic data imply that the tert-butoxy radical reacts with the C–H bonds of alkanes, and the subsequent alkyl radical combines with 1-phth2 to form the corresponding N-alkyl imide product

  6. Proximity effect: insight into the fundamental forces governing chemical reactivity of aromatic systems.

    PubMed

    Vidhani, Dinesh V; Krafft, Marie E

    2015-03-26

    The analysis of different layers of proximity effect in ortho-substituted aromatic compounds, using a DFT-level study, is reported. Polar and steric components of the proximity effect have been partitioned by applying multivariate regression analysis to an unusual six-electron heteroelectrocyclic reaction of the ortho-substituted nitrosostyrenes. The two pathways, 1,5- and 1,6-cyclizations, emanating from these substrates result into zwitterionic five-membered and neutral six-membered rings, respectively. The substituents at position 1, which are adjacent to the polar nitroso group, influenced the barrier primarily through electronic effect. Furthermore, a mechanistic shift from the 1,5 to 1,6 pathway, for certain substrates, is explained by the electronic repulsion. In contrast to position 1, the substituents on position 4 stereoelectronically interacted with a bulkier alkene moiety. Furthermore, unlike position 1, the position-4-substituted substrates are predicted to give only 1,5 products. A comparison of the two ortho positions with position 2, which is meta to the nitroso and para to the alkene, revealed an intriguing relationship between various electronic factors.

  7. Regioselective aerobic oxidative Heck reactions with electronically unbiased alkenes: efficient access to α-alkyl vinylarenes.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Changwu; Stahl, Shannon S

    2015-08-18

    Branched-selective oxidative Heck coupling reactions have been developed between arylboronic acids and electronically unbiased terminal alkenes. The reactions exhibit high catalyst-controlled regioselectivity favoring the less common branched isomer. The reactions employ a catalyst composed of Pd(TFA)2/dmphen (TFA = trifluoroacetate, dmphen = 2,9-dimethyl-1,10-phenanthroline) and proceed efficiently at 45-60 °C under 1 atm of O2 without requiring other additives. A broad array of functional groups, including aryl halide, allyl silane and carboxylic acids are tolerated.

  8. Cross-metathesis reaction of α- and β-vinyl C-glycosides with alkenes.

    PubMed

    Šnajdr, Ivan; Parkan, Kamil; Hessler, Filip; Kotora, Martin

    2015-01-01

    Cross-metathesis of α- and β-vinyl C-deoxyribosides and α-vinyl C-galactoside with various terminal alkenes under different conditions was studied. The cross-metathesis of the former proceeded with good yields of the corresponding products in ClCH2CH2Cl the latter required the presence of CuI in CH2Cl2 to achieve good yields of the products. A simple method for the preparation of α- and β-vinyl C-deoxyribosides was also developed. In addition, feasibility of deprotection and further transformations were briefly explored. PMID:26425194

  9. Manganese(IV)-mediated hydroperoxyarylation of alkenes with aryl hydrazines and dioxygen from air.

    PubMed

    Kindt, Stephanie; Jasch, Hannelore; Heinrich, Markus R

    2014-05-19

    We report a new carbooxygenation-type version of the Meerwein arylation in which the introduction of oxygen is achieved by using dioxygen from the air. In this way, hydroperoxides were obtained from activated as well as non-activated alkenes by oxidizing aryl hydrazines with manganese dioxide. The best results were obtained with α-substituted acrylates. Importantly, the aryl hydrazine has to be added slowly to the reaction mixture to allow sufficient uptake of dioxygen from the air. Competition and labeling experiments revealed hydroperoxyl radicals as novel oxygen-centered radical scavengers. PMID:24737215

  10. Regioselective and Stereospecific Copper-Catalyzed Deoxygenation of Epoxides to Alkenes.

    PubMed

    Yu, Jingxun; Zhou, Yu; Lin, Zhenyang; Tong, Rongbiao

    2016-09-16

    Two copper salts (Cu(CF3CO2)2 and IMesCuCl) were identified as earth-abundant, inexpensive, but effective metal catalysts together with diazo malonate for chemo-/regioselective and stereospecific deoxygenation of various epoxides with tolerance of common functional groups (alkene, ketone, ester, p-methoxybenzyl, benzyl, tert-butyldimethylsilyl, and triisopropylsilyl). In particular, the unprecedented regioselectivity allowed for the first time monodeoxygenation of diepoxides to alkenyl epoxides. Density functional theory mechanistic studies showed that the deoxygenation occurred by collapsing the free ylide, unfavoring the possible intuitive pathway via cycloreversion of possible oxetane. PMID:27596225

  11. α-Diazo-β-ketonitriles: uniquely reactive substrates for arene and alkene cyclopropanation.

    PubMed

    Nani, Roger R; Reisman, Sarah E

    2013-05-15

    An investigation of the intramolecular cyclopropanation reactions of α-diazo-β-ketonitriles is reported. These studies reveal that α-diazo-β-ketonitriles exhibit unique reactivity in their ability to undergo arene cyclopropanation reactions; other similar acceptor-acceptor-substituted diazo substrates instead produce mixtures of C-H insertion and dimerization products. α-Diazo-β-ketonitriles also undergo highly efficient intramolecular cyclopropanation of tri- and tetrasubstituted alkenes. In addition, the α-cyano-α-ketocyclopropane products are demonstrated to serve as substrates for SN2, SN2', and aldehyde cycloaddition reactions.

  12. Enantioselective CuH-catalyzed anti-Markovnikov hydroamination of 1,1-disubstituted alkenes.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Shaolin; Buchwald, Stephen L

    2014-11-12

    Enantioselective synthesis of β-chiral amines has been achieved via copper-catalyzed hydroamination of 1,1-disubstituted alkenes with hydroxylamine esters in the presence of a hydrosilane. This mild process affords a range of structurally diverse β-chiral amines, including β-deuterated amines, in excellent yields with high enantioselectivities. Furthermore, catalyst loading as low as 0.4 mol% could be employed to deliver product in undiminished yield and selectivity, demonstrating the practicality of this method for large-scale synthesis. PMID:25339089

  13. Intermolecular hydroaminoalkylation of alkenes and dienes using a titanium mono(formamidinate) catalyst.

    PubMed

    Dörfler, Jaika; Preuss, Till; Brahms, Christian; Scheuer, Dennis; Doye, Sven

    2015-07-21

    An easily accessible formamidinate ligand-bearing titanium complex initially synthesized by Eisen et al. is used as catalyst for intermolecular hydroaminoalkylation reactions of unactivated, sterically demanding 1,1- and 1,2-disubstituted alkenes and styrenes with secondary amines. The corresponding reactions, which have never been achieved with titanium catalysts before, take place with excellent regioselectivity (up to 99 : 1) and in addition, corresponding reactions of 1,3-butadienes with N-methylbenzylamine are also described for the first time.

  14. The chemistry of simple alkene molecules on Si(100)c(4 × 2): The mechanism of cycloaddition and their selectivities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akagi, Kazuto; Yoshinobu, Jun

    2016-10-01

    The chemistry of simple alkene molecules on the Si(100) surface is reviewed with the newly-produced visual presentation by theoretical calculations. The early pioneering studies by the Kyoto Group and Pittsburgh group reported the di-σ bond formation and the precursor-mediated chemisorption for acetylene and ethylene on Si(100), respectively. Thereafter, these studies have been stimulating various studies of organic molecules on Si surfaces. Our recent studies have observed the precursor states for alkene chemisorption and elucidated the microscopic mechanisms of the di-σ bond formation (cycloaddition) with the help of theoretical calculations; the site-, stereo- and regio-selective chemisorption of simple alkene molecules on Si(100)c(4 × 2) has been established.

  15. Microbial degradation of aromatics and saturates in Prudhoe Bay crude oil as determined by glass capillary gas chromatography.

    PubMed

    Fedorak, P M; Westlake, D W

    1981-04-01

    Water samples obtained from three different marine environments (including a commercial harbor, a pristine area, and an oil tanker dock area) from the coast of Washington State were challenged with Prudhoe Bay crude oil under shake-flask conditions at 8 degrees C. Replicate cultures were grown with and without nitrogen (NO3-, NH4+) and phosphate supplementation. After varying incubation periods, the residual oil was extracted and separated on silica gel columns into saturate aromatic fractions and these were analyzed by glass capillary gas chromatography to detect the degradation of various compounds. After 27 days of incubation, both the aromatic and saturate fractions were extensively degraded by the microorganisms from these environments when supplemented with nitrogen and phosphorus. Without nutrient supplementation, the aromatics were more readily attacked than the saturates by the populations from the pristine environment and from the commercial harbor area. Under these limited nutrient conditions, samples from near oil tanker docks showed moderate degradation of both the saturate and aromatic fractions. Time course studies, using nutrient-supplemented marine samples, showed that the simple aromatics (e.g., naphthalene and 2-methylnaphthalene) were more readily degraded than the n-alkanes. However, once the breakdown of these saturates commenced, these were quickly removed from the oil. The aromatic degradation continued to progress from lower molecular weight, less complex molecules to larger, more complex molecules in the approximate series C2 naphthalenes; phenanthrene and dibenzothiophene; C3 naphthalenes and methylphenathrenes; C2 phenanthrenes.

  16. "Carbo-aromaticity" and novel carbo-aromatic compounds.

    PubMed

    Cocq, Kévin; Lepetit, Christine; Maraval, Valérie; Chauvin, Remi

    2015-09-21

    While the concept of aromaticity is being more and more precisely delineated, the category of "aromatic compounds" is being more and more expanded. This is illustrated by an introductory highlight of the various types of "aromaticity" previously invoked, and by a focus on the recently proposed "aromatic character" of the "two-membered rings" of the acetylene and butatriene molecules. This serves as a general foundation for the definition of "carbo-aromaticity", the relevance of which is surveyed through recent results in the synthetic, physical, and theoretical chemistry of carbo-mers and in particular macrocyclic-polycyclic representatives constituting a natural family of "novel aromatic compounds". With respect to their parent molecules, carbo-mers are constitutionally defined as "carbon-enriched", and can also be functionally regarded as "π-electron-enriched". This is exemplified by recent experimental and theoretical results on functional, aromatic, rigid, σ,π-macrocyclic carbo-benzene archetypes of various substitution patterns, with emphasis on the quadrupolar pattern. For the purpose of comparison, several types of non-aromatic references of carbo-benzenes are then considered, i.e. freely rotating σ,π-acyclic carbo-n-butadienes and flexible σ-cyclic, π-acyclic carbo-cyclohexadienes, and to "pro-aromatic" congeners, i.e. rigid σ,π-macrocyclic carbo-quinoids. It is shown that functional carbo-mers are entering the field of "molecular materials" for properties such as linear or nonlinear optical properties (e.g. dichromism and two-photon absorption) and single molecule conductivity. Since total or partial carbo-mers of aromatic carbon-allotropes of infinite size such as graphene (graphynes and graphdiynes) and graphite ("graphitynes") have long been addressed at the theoretical or conceptual level, recent predictive advances on the electrical, optical and mechanical properties of such carbo-materials are surveyed. Very preliminary experimental results

  17. "Carbo-aromaticity" and novel carbo-aromatic compounds.

    PubMed

    Cocq, Kévin; Lepetit, Christine; Maraval, Valérie; Chauvin, Remi

    2015-09-21

    While the concept of aromaticity is being more and more precisely delineated, the category of "aromatic compounds" is being more and more expanded. This is illustrated by an introductory highlight of the various types of "aromaticity" previously invoked, and by a focus on the recently proposed "aromatic character" of the "two-membered rings" of the acetylene and butatriene molecules. This serves as a general foundation for the definition of "carbo-aromaticity", the relevance of which is surveyed through recent results in the synthetic, physical, and theoretical chemistry of carbo-mers and in particular macrocyclic-polycyclic representatives constituting a natural family of "novel aromatic compounds". With respect to their parent molecules, carbo-mers are constitutionally defined as "carbon-enriched", and can also be functionally regarded as "π-electron-enriched". This is exemplified by recent experimental and theoretical results on functional, aromatic, rigid, σ,π-macrocyclic carbo-benzene archetypes of various substitution patterns, with emphasis on the quadrupolar pattern. For the purpose of comparison, several types of non-aromatic references of carbo-benzenes are then considered, i.e. freely rotating σ,π-acyclic carbo-n-butadienes and flexible σ-cyclic, π-acyclic carbo-cyclohexadienes, and to "pro-aromatic" congeners, i.e. rigid σ,π-macrocyclic carbo-quinoids. It is shown that functional carbo-mers are entering the field of "molecular materials" for properties such as linear or nonlinear optical properties (e.g. dichromism and two-photon absorption) and single molecule conductivity. Since total or partial carbo-mers of aromatic carbon-allotropes of infinite size such as graphene (graphynes and graphdiynes) and graphite ("graphitynes") have long been addressed at the theoretical or conceptual level, recent predictive advances on the electrical, optical and mechanical properties of such carbo-materials are surveyed. Very preliminary experimental results

  18. Measurements of homogeneous nucleation in normal-alkanes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kraack, H.; Sirota, E. B.; Deutsch, M.

    2000-04-01

    The homogeneous nucleation of normal-alkanes with carbon numbers 15⩽n⩽60 is studied by scanning calorimetry, using the droplet technique. Pure, nonemulsified samples show near-zero undercoolings below the melting point, Tm, except for both ends of the n-range, where undercoolings ΔT of up to 2 °C are observed. The emulsions have much larger undercoolings. The relative undercoolings show three regimes: A fast decreasing one, up to n=17, an anomalously low constant one, ΔT/Tm≈0.04, for 17⩽n⩽30, and a gradually increasing one for 32⩽n⩽60. A value of ΔT/Tm≈0.086 is reached at n=60. The connections of these results with the bulk rotator phases and the recently discovered surface freezing effect are discussed. Strong intrinsic interrelations among these are indicated.

  19. Morphological Transformations in Solid Domains of Alkanes on Surfactant Solutions.

    PubMed

    Matsubara, Hiroki; Takaichi, Tetsumasa; Takiue, Takanori; Aratono, Makoto; Toyoda, Aya; Iimura, Kenichi; Ash, Philip A; Bain, Colin D

    2013-03-21

    Alkanes on surfactant solutions can form three distinct phases at the air-solution interface, a liquid phase (L), a solid monolayer phase (S1), and a hybrid bilayer phase (S2). Phase coexistence between any two, or all three, of these phases has been observed by Brewster angle microscopy of tetradecane, hexadecane, and their mixtures on solutions of tetradecyltrimethylammonium bromide. The morphologies of the domains depend on the competition between line tension and electrostatic interactions, which are essentially different depending on the pair of phases in contact. Domains of S1 in the L phase are long and thin; however, long, thin domains of L in an S1 phase are not stable but break up into a string of small circular domains. The bilayer S2 domains are always circular, owing to the dominance of line tension on the morphology. PMID:26291344

  20. Thermal analysis of n-alkane phase change material mixtures

    SciTech Connect

    Chio, Y.I.; Choi, E.; Lorsch, H.G.

    1991-03-31

    Tests were performed to characterize the thermal behavior of it number of n-alkanes to be used as phase change materials (PCMs) in district cooling applications. Hexadecane and tetradecane were mixed in different fractions, and their thermal behavior was experimentally evaluated. Test results for melting temperature and fusion energy for laboratory grade hexadecane and tetradecane showed good agreement with datain the literature. However, values for commercial grade hexadecane were found to be considerably lower. In the range of temperatures of interest for district cooling, mixtures of tetradecane and hexadecane can be treated as homogeneous substances. However, their heats of fusion are slightly lower than those of the pure substances. Their melting temperatures are also lower by an amount that can be predicted.

  1. Enantioselective Synthesis of Spirobarbiturate-Cyclohexenes through Phosphine-Catalyzed Asymmetric [4 + 2] Annulation of Barbiturate-Derived Alkenes with Allenoates.

    PubMed

    Liu, Honglei; Liu, Yang; Yuan, Chunhao; Wang, Guo-Peng; Zhu, Shou-Fei; Wu, Yang; Wang, Bo; Sun, Zhanhu; Xiao, Yumei; Zhou, Qi-Lin; Guo, Hongchao

    2016-03-18

    An enantioselective synthesis of pharmaceutically important spirobarbiturates has been achieved via spirocyclic chiral phosphine-catalyzed asymmetric [4 + 2] annulation of barbiturate-derived alkenes with allenoates. With the use of this tool, various spirobarbiturate-cyclohexenes are obtained in good to excellent yields with excellent diastereo- and enantioselectivities. A wide range of α-substituted allenoates and barbiturate-derived alkenes were tolerated.

  2. Sources of C₂-C₄ alkenes, the most important ozone nonmethane hydrocarbon precursors in the Pearl River Delta region.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yanli; Wang, Xinming; Zhang, Zhou; Lü, Sujun; Huang, Zhonghui; Li, Longfeng

    2015-01-01

    Surface ozone is becoming an increasing concern in China's megacities such as the urban centers located in the highly industrialized and densely populated Pearl River Delta (PRD) region, where previous studies suggested that ozone production is sensitive to VOC emissions with alkenes being important precursors. However, little was known about sources of alkenes. Here we present our monitoring of ambient volatile organic compounds at four representative urban, suburban and rural sites in the PRD region during November-December 2009, which experienced frequent ozone episodes. C2-C4 alkenes, whose total mixing ratios were 11-20% of non-methane hydrocarbons (NMHCs) quantified, accounted for 38-64% of ozone formation potentials (OFPs) and 30-50% of the total hydroxyl radical (OH) reactivity by NMHCs. Ethylene was the most abundant alkene, accounting for 8-15% in total mixing ratios of NMHCs and contributed 25-46% of OFPs. Correlations between C2-C4 alkenes and typical source tracers suggested that ethylene might be largely related to vehicle exhausts and industry activities, while propene and butenes were much more LPG-related. Positive Matrix Factorization (PMF) confirmed that vehicle exhaust and liquefied petroleum gas (LPG) were two major sources that altogether accounted for 52-62%, 58-77%, 73-83%, 68-79% and 73-84% for ethylene, propene, 1-butene, trans-2-butene and cis-2-butene, respectively. Vehicle exhausts alone contributed 32-49% ethylene and 35-41% propene. Industry activities contributed 13-23% ethylene and 7-20% propene. LPG instead contributed the most to butenes (38-65%) and substantially to propene (23-36%). Extensive tests confirmed high fractions of propene and butenes in LPG then used in Guangzhou and in LPG combustion plumes; therefore, limiting alkene contents in LPG would benefit regional ozone control.

  3. Products and mechanism of secondary organic aerosol formation from reactions of linear alkenes with NO3 radicals.

    PubMed

    Gong, Huiming; Matsunaga, Aiko; Ziemann, Paul J

    2005-05-19

    Secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formation from reactions of linear alkenes with NO(3) radicals was investigated in an environmental chamber using a thermal desorption particle beam mass spectrometer for particle analysis. A general chemical mechanism was developed to explain the formation of the observed SOA products. The major first-generation SOA products were hydroxynitrates, carbonylnitrates, nitrooxy peroxynitrates, dihydroxynitrates, and dihydroxy peroxynitrates. The major second-generation SOA products were hydroxy and oxo dinitrooxytetrahydrofurans, which have not been observed previously. The latter compounds were formed by a series of reactions in which delta-hydroxycarbonyls isomerize to cyclic hemiacetals, which then dehydrate to form substituted dihydrofurans (unsaturated compounds) that rapidly react with NO(3) radicals to form very low volatility products. For the approximately 1 ppmv alkene concentrations used here, aerosol formed only for alkenes C(7) or larger. SOA formed from C(7)-C(9) alkenes consisted only of second-generation products, whereas for larger alkenes first-generation products were also present and contributions increased with increasing carbon number apparently due to the formation of lower volatility products. The estimated mass fractions of first- and second-generation products were approximately 50:50, 30:70, 10:90, and 0:100, for 1-tetradecene, 1-dodecene, 1-decene, and 1-octene SOA, respectively. This study shows that delta-hydroxycarbonyls play a key role in the formation of SOA in alkene-NO(3) reactions and are likely to be important in other systems because delta-hydroxycarbonyls can also be formed from reactions of OH radicals and O(3) with hydrocarbons.

  4. Environmental chemistry and toxicology of polychlorinated n-alkanes.

    PubMed

    Tomy, G T; Fisk, A T; Westmore, J B; Muir, D C

    1998-01-01

    Polychlorinated-n-alkanes (PCAs) or chlorinated paraffins consist of C10 to C30 n-alkanes with chlorine content from 30% to 70% by mass. PCAs are used as high-temperature lubricants, plasticizers, flame retardants, and additives in adhesives, paints, rubber, and sealants. This review presents the existing data on the environmental chemistry and toxicology of PCAs and a preliminary exposure and risk assessment. There is limited information on the levels, fate, or biological effects of PCAs in the environment. This results both from the difficulty associated with quantifying PCAs, because of the complexity inherent to commercial formulations, and from the limited knowledge of their physicochemical properties and biodegradation rates. There are indications that PCAs are widespread environmental contaminants at ng/L levels in surface waters and ng/g (wet wt) levels in biota. However, environmental measurements of PCAs are very limited in the U.S. and Canada, and are only slightly more detailed in western Europe. Assuming that reported water concentrations are mainly caused by the short chain (C10-C13) compounds, aquatic organisms may be at risk from exposure to PCAs. Fugacity level II modeling for two representative PCAs, using the best available physicochemical property data and estimated degradation rates, suggested that C16C24Cl10 would achieve higher concentrations in biota, sediment, and soil than C12H20Cl6 because of slower degradation rates and lower water solubility. Environmental residence time of C16H24Cl10 is estimated to be 520 d compared to 210 d for C12H20Cl6. Future studies will require better analytical methods and reference materials certified for PCA content. Additional data are needed to evaluate exposure of biota to PCAs in the environment, particularly in light of their continued production and usage around the globe. PMID:9751033

  5. Electronic Structure Principles and Aromaticity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chattaraj, P. K.; Sarkar, U.; Roy, D. R.

    2007-01-01

    The relationship between aromaticity and stability in molecules on the basis of quantities such as hardness and electrophilicity is explored. The findings reveal that aromatic molecules are less energetic, harder, less polarizable, and less electrophilic as compared to antiaromatic molecules, as expected from the electronic structure principles.

  6. UV light-mediated difunctionalization of alkenes through aroyl radical addition/1,4-/1,2-aryl shift cascade reactions.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Lewei; Huang, Hongli; Yang, Chao; Xia, Wujiong

    2015-02-20

    UV light-mediated difunctionalization of alkenes through an aroyl radical addition/1,4-/1,2-aryl shift has been described. The resulted aroyl radical from a photocleavage reaction added to acrylamide compounds followed by cyclization led to the formation of oxindoles, whereas the addition to cinnamic amides aroused a unique 1,4-aryl shift reaction. Furthermore, the difunctionalization of alkenes of prop-2-en-1-ols was also achieved through aroyl radical addition and a sequential 1,2-aryl shift cascade reaction.

  7. Observation of an aromatic radical anion dimer: (C{sub 10}F{sub 8}){sub 2}{sm_bullet}{sub {minus}}

    SciTech Connect

    Werst, D.W.

    1994-03-01

    Radical cation dimers are observed for many alkenes and aromatic hydrocarbons as products of the reaction between monomer radical cation and neutral molecule. In most cases, the dimer radical anions, formed via reaction of the monomer radical anion with a neutral molecule, have not been observed. Here we report the observation of the dimer radical anion of octafluoronaphthalene, formed by reaction of C{sub 10}F{sub 8}{sup {center_dot}{minus}} with the neutral parent molecules in nonpolar solvents following pulse radiolysis. Both monomer and dimer ions have been characterized by EPR spectra obtained by the time-resolved fluorescence-detected magnetic resonance.

  8. Platinum-catalyzed intramolecular hydrohydrazination: evidence for alkene insertion into a Pt-N bond.

    PubMed

    Hoover, Jessica M; Dipasquale, Antonio; Mayer, James M; Michael, Forrest E

    2010-04-14

    Dicationic (bpy)Pt(II) complexes were found to catalyze the intramolecular hydrohydrazination of alkenes. Reaction optimization revealed Pt(bpy)Cl(2) (10 mol %) and AgOTf (20 mol %) in DMF-d(7) to be an effective catalyst system for the conversion of substituted hydrazides to five- and six-membered N-amino lactams (N-amino = N-acetamido at 120 degrees C, N-phthalimido at 80 degrees C, (-)OTf = trifluoromethanesulfonate). Of the four possible regioisomeric products, only the product of 5-exo cyclization at the proximal nitrogen is formed, without reaction at the distal nitrogen or 6-endo cyclization. The resting states were found to be a 2:1 Pt-amidate complex (25, for N-acetamido) of the deprotonated hydrazide and a Pt-alkyl complex of the cyclized pyrrolidinone (20 for N-phthalimido). Both complexes are catalytically competent. Catalysis using 25 as the precatalyst shows no rate dependence on added acid (HOTf) or base (2,6-lutidine). The available mechanistic data are all consistent with a mechanism involving N-H activation of the hydrazide, followed by insertion of the alkene into the Pt-N bond, and finally protonation of the resulting cyclized alkyl complex by hydrazide to release the hydrohydrazination product and regenerate the active Pt-amidate catalyst. PMID:20334376

  9. Mechanistic Insight into the Photoredox Catalysis of Anti-Markovnikov Alkene Hydrofunctionalization Reactions

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    We describe our efforts to understand the key mechanistic aspects of the previously reported alkene hydrofunctionalization reactions using 9-mesityl-10-methylacridinium (Mes-Acr+) as a photoredox catalyst. Importantly, we are able to detect alkene cation radical intermediates, and confirm that phenylthiyl radical is capable of oxidizing the persistent acridinyl radical in a fast process that unites the catalytic activity of the photoredox and hydrogen atom transfer (HAT) manifolds. Additionally, we present evidence that diphenyl disulfide ((PhS)2) operates on a common catalytic cycle with thiophenol (PhSH) by way of photolytic cleaveage of the disulfide bond. Transition structure analysis of the HAT step using DFT reveals that the activation barrier for H atom donation from PhSH is significantly lower than 2-phenylmalononitrile (PMN) due to structural reorganization. In the early stages of the reaction, Mes-Acr+ is observed to engage in off-cycle adduct formation, presumably as buildup of PhS− becomes significant. The kinetic differences between PhSH and (PhS)2 as HAT catalysts indicate that the proton transfer step may have significant rate limiting influence. PMID:25390821

  10. Light alkane conversion processes - Suprabiotic catalyst systems for selective oxidation of light alkane gases to fuel oxygenates.

    SciTech Connect

    Lyons, J.E.

    1992-07-01

    The objective of the work presented in this paper is to develop new, efficient catalysts for the selective transformation of the light alkanes in natural gas to alcohols for use as liquid transportation fuels, fuel precursors and chemical products. There currently exists no DIRECT one-step catalytic air-oxidation process to convert these substrates to alcohols. Such a one-step route would represent superior useful technology for the utilization of natural gas and similar refinery-derived light hydrocarbon streams. Processes for converting natural gas or its components (methane, ethane, propane, and the butanes) to alcohols for use as motor fuels, fuel additives or fuel precursors will not only add a valuable alternative to crude oil but will produce a clean-burning, high octane alternative to conventional gasoline.

  11. Light alkane conversion processes - Suprabiotic catalyst systems for selective oxidation of light alkane gases to fuel oxygenates

    SciTech Connect

    Lyons, J.E.

    1992-01-01

    The objective of the work presented in this paper is to develop new, efficient catalysts for the selective transformation of the light alkanes in natural gas to alcohols for use as liquid transportation fuels, fuel precursors and chemical products. There currently exists no DIRECT one-step catalytic air-oxidation process to convert these substrates to alcohols. Such a one-step route would represent superior useful technology for the utilization of natural gas and similar refinery-derived light hydrocarbon streams. Processes for converting natural gas or its components (methane, ethane, propane, and the butanes) to alcohols for use as motor fuels, fuel additives or fuel precursors will not only add a valuable alternative to crude oil but will produce a clean-burning, high octane alternative to conventional gasoline.

  12. Prototheca zopfii Kruger strain UMK-13 growth on acetate or n-alkanes

    SciTech Connect

    Koenig, D.W.; Ward, H.B.

    1983-01-01

    A new strain of Prototheca zopfii Kruger was grown on acetate or on pure n-alkanes. A maximum acetate-supported exponential growth of 12 divisions day/sup -1/ occurred at pH 5 and 30/sup 0/C. At 25/sup 0/C, growth on n-alkanes was almost as fast, but no growth occurred at 30/sup 0/C. After 3 days at 25/sup 0/C, 34 to 45% of the n-alkanes had been removed, whereas at 21/sup 0/C and slower growth, utilization was twofold greater after 15 days. Rates of growth and utilization increased markedly after a point of sudden emulsification.

  13. Photochemical dimerization and functionalization of alkanes, ethers, primary and secondary alcohols, phosphine oxides and silanes

    DOEpatents

    Crabtree, Robert H.; Brown, Stephen H.

    1989-01-01

    The space-time yield and/or the selectivity of the photochemical dimerization of alkanes, ethers, primary and secondary alcohols, phosphine oxides and primary, secondary and tertiary silanes with Hg and U.V. light is enhanced by refluxing the substrate in the irradiated reaction zone at a temperature at which the dimer product condenses and remains condensed promptly upon its formation. Cross-dimerization of the alkanes, ethers and silanes with primary alcohols is disclosed, as is the functionalization to aldehydes of the alkanes with carbon monoxide.

  14. Photochemical dimerization and functionalization of alkanes, ethers, primary and secondary alcohols, phosphine oxides and silanes

    DOEpatents

    Crabtree, R.H.; Brown, S.H.

    1989-10-17

    The space-time yield and/or the selectivity of the photochemical dimerization of alkanes, ethers, primary and secondary alcohols, phosphine oxides and primary, secondary and tertiary silanes with Hg and U.V. light is enhanced by refluxing the substrate in the irradiated reaction zone at a temperature at which the dimer product condenses and remains condensed promptly upon its formation. Cross-dimerization of the alkanes, ethers and silanes with primary alcohols is disclosed, as is the functionalization to aldehydes of the alkanes with carbon monoxide.

  15. Adsorption and dissociation kinetics of alkanes on CaO(100)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chakradhar, A.; Liu, Y.; Schmidt, J.; Kadossov, E.; Burghaus, U.

    2011-08-01

    The adsorption kinetics of ethane, butane, pentane, and hexane on CaO(100) have been studied by multi-mass thermal desorption (TDS) spectroscopy. The sample cleanliness was checked by Auger electron spectroscopy. A molecular and dissociative adsorption pathway was evident for the alkanes, except for ethane, which does not undergo bond activation. Two TDS peaks appeared when recording the parent mass, which are assigned to different adsorption sites/configurations of the molecularly adsorbed alkanes. Bond activation leads to desorption of hydrogen and several alkane fragments assigned to methane and ethylene formation. Only one TDS feature is seen in this case. Formation of carbon residuals was absent.

  16. Characterization of the Medium- and Long-Chain n-Alkanes Degrading Pseudomonas aeruginosa Strain SJTD-1 and Its Alkane Hydroxylase Genes

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Huan; Xu, Jing; Liang, Rubing; Liu, Jianhua

    2014-01-01

    A gram-negative aliphatic hydrocarbon-degrading bacterium SJTD-1 isolated from oil-contaminated soil was identified as Pseudomonas aeruginosa by comparative analyses of the 16S rRNA sequence, phenotype, and physiological features. SJTD-1 could efficiently mineralize medium- and long-chain n-alkanes (C12-C30) as its sole carbon source within seven days, showing the most optimal growth on n-hexadecane, followed by n-octadecane, and n-eicosane. In 36 h, 500 mg/L of tetradecane, hexadecane, and octadecane were transformed completely; and 2 g/L n-hexadecane was degraded to undetectable levels within 72 h. Two putative alkane-degrading genes (gene 3623 and gene 4712) were characterized and our results indicated that their gene products were rate-limiting enzymes involved in the synergetic catabolism of C12–C16 alkanes. On the basis of bioinformatics and transcriptional analysis, two P450 monooxygenases, along with a putative AlmA-like oxygenase, were examined. Genetically defective mutants lacking the characteristic alkane hydroxylase failed to degrade n-octadecane, thereby suggesting a different catalytic mechanism for the microbial transformation of alkanes with chain lengths over C18. PMID:25165808

  17. Characterization of the medium- and long-chain n-alkanes degrading Pseudomonas aeruginosa strain SJTD-1 and its alkane hydroxylase genes.

    PubMed

    Liu, Huan; Xu, Jing; Liang, Rubing; Liu, Jianhua

    2014-01-01

    A gram-negative aliphatic hydrocarbon-degrading bacterium SJTD-1 isolated from oil-contaminated soil was identified as Pseudomonas aeruginosa by comparative analyses of the 16S rRNA sequence, phenotype, and physiological features. SJTD-1 could efficiently mineralize medium- and long-chain n-alkanes (C12-C30) as its sole carbon source within seven days, showing the most optimal growth on n-hexadecane, followed by n-octadecane, and n-eicosane. In 36 h, 500 mg/L of tetradecane, hexadecane, and octadecane were transformed completely; and 2 g/L n-hexadecane was degraded to undetectable levels within 72 h. Two putative alkane-degrading genes (gene 3623 and gene 4712) were characterized and our results indicated that their gene products were rate-limiting enzymes involved in the synergetic catabolism of C12-C16 alkanes. On the basis of bioinformatics and transcriptional analysis, two P450 monooxygenases, along with a putative AlmA-like oxygenase, were examined. Genetically defective mutants lacking the characteristic alkane hydroxylase failed to degrade n-octadecane, thereby suggesting a different catalytic mechanism for the microbial transformation of alkanes with chain lengths over C18. PMID:25165808

  18. Particulate Fluxes of Aliphatic and Aromatic Hydrocarbons in Near-shore Waters to the Northwestern Mediterranean Sea, and the Effect of Continental Runoff

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raoux, C.; Boyona, J. M.; Miquel, J.-C.; Teyssie, J.-L.; Fowler, S. W.; Albaigés, J.

    1999-05-01

    Particulate fluxes of aliphatic and aromatic hydrocarbons were measured with a sediment trap moored at 80m depth offshore Monaco (200m water column) during an 18-month period. The highest fluxes of n -alkanes and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) ( c . 300 and 10μg m -2day -1, respectively) were noted following a strong rainfall event (March-April 1989) and were mostly accounted for by continental runoff and river outflows. Fluxes during periods of low precipitation (August 1989-August 1990) were one order of magnitude lower for PAHs (1·51±1·40μg m -2day -1) or two orders of magnitude lower for n -alkanes (4·79±3·3μg m -2day -1) than during the earlier period (March-April 1989). The total PAH and total particle fluxes exhibited a positive linear correlation during the entire sampling period ( r =0·87, N =31, P< 0·05) underscoring the strong affinity of PAHs for particles. Examination of the seasonal variability of fecal pellet content, associated parameters (total organic carbon, total carbon, nitrogen), and individual hydrocarbon content of particles by Principal Component Analysis (PCA) showed that aliphatic and aromatic hydrocarbons were clustered in several subgroups in the PCA loading plots according to their origin. n -Alkanes were grouped in two clusters: (i) lower molecular weight ( n -C 16-19) and (ii) the higher molecular weight alkanes ( n -C 20-38) suggesting different pathways into the coastal zone (i.e. runoff vs atmospheric deposition). The distribution of lycopane, pristane and phytane indicated multiple origins. However, the closer location of the two isoprenoids, lycopane and pristane to fecal pellets, suggests a zooplanktonic origin but phytane to fossil fuel source. PAHs exhibited a variety of pyrolytic sources and only fluoranthene and pyrene were not grouped with the remaining PAHs suggesting multiple sources of pollution in these waters.

  19. Synthesis of aromatic secondary diamines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wolfe, J. F.; Greenwood, T. D.; Kahley, R. A.

    1979-01-01

    A series of N-methyl substituted aromatic polyamides derived from the secondary aromatic diamines, 4,4'-bis(methylamino)diphenylmethane, 3,3'-bis(methylamino) diphenylmethane, 4,4'-bis(methylamino)benzophenone or 3,3'-bis(methylamino)benzophenone and isophthaloyl dichloride, terphthaloyl dichloride or 3,3'diphenylmethane dicarboxylic acid dichloride was prepared by high temperature solution polymerization in s-tetrachloroethane. Compared to analogous unsubstituted and partially N-methylated aromatic polyamides, the full N-methylated polyamides exhibited significantly lower glass transition temperatures, reduced crystallinity, improved thermal stability and good solubility in chlorinated solvents.

  20. Liquid alkanes with targeted molecular weights from biomass-derived carbohydrates.

    PubMed

    West, Ryan M; Liu, Zhen Y; Peter, Maximilian; Dumesic, James A

    2008-01-01

    Liquid transportation fuels must burn cleanly and have high energy densities, criteria that are currently fulfilled by petroleum, a non-renewable resource, the combustion of which leads to increasing levels of atmospheric CO(2). An attractive approach for the production of transportation fuels from renewable biomass resources is to convert carbohydrates into alkanes with targeted molecular weights, such as C(8)-C(15) for jet-fuel applications. Targeted n-alkanes can be produced directly from fructose by an integrated process involving first the dehydration of this C(6) sugar to form 5-hydroxymethylfurfural, followed by controlled formation of C-C bonds with acetone to form C(9) and C(15) compounds, and completed by hydrogenation and hydrodeoxygenation reactions to form the corresponding n-alkanes. Analogous reactions are demonstrated starting with 5-methylfurfural or 2-furaldehyde, with the latter leading to C(8) and C(13) n-alkanes. PMID:18702136

  1. Photocatalytic acceptorless alkane dehydrogenation: scope, mechanism, and conquering deactivation with carbon dioxide.

    PubMed

    Chowdhury, Abhishek Dutta; Julis, Jennifer; Grabow, Kathleen; Hannebauer, Bernd; Bentrup, Ursula; Adam, Martin; Franke, Robert; Jackstell, Ralf; Beller, Matthias

    2015-01-01

    Alkane dehydrogenation is of special interest for basic science but also offers interesting opportunities for industry. The existing dehydrogenation methodologies make use of heterogeneous catalysts, which suffer from harsh reaction conditions and a lack of selectivity, whereas homogeneous methodologies rely mostly on unsolicited waste generation from hydrogen acceptors. Conversely, acceptorless photochemical alkane dehydrogenation in the presence of trans-Rh(PMe3 )2 (CO)Cl can be regarded as a more benign and atom efficient alternative. However, this methodology suffers from catalyst deactivation over time. Herein, we provide a detailed investigation of the trans-Rh(PMe3 )2 (CO)Cl-photocatalyzed alkane dehydrogenation using spectroscopic and theoretical investigations. These studies inspired us to utilize CO2 to prevent catalyst deactivation, which leads eventually to improved catalyst turnover numbers in the dehydrogenation of alkanes that include liquid organic hydrogen carriers. PMID:25346450

  2. Draft Genome Sequence of the Versatile Alkane-Degrading Bacterium Aquabacterium sp. Strain NJ1

    PubMed Central

    Shiwa, Yuh; Yoshikawa, Hirofumi; Zylstra, Gerben J.

    2014-01-01

    The draft genome sequence of a soil bacterium, Aquabacterium sp. strain NJ1, capable of utilizing both liquid and solid alkanes, was deciphered. This is the first report of an Aquabacterium genome sequence. PMID:25477416

  3. Alkane oxidation with porphyrins and metal complexes thereof having haloalkyl side chains

    DOEpatents

    Wijesekera, Tilak; Lyons, James E.; Ellis, Jr., Paul E.; Bhinde, Manoj V.

    1998-01-01

    Transition metal complexes of meso-haloalkylporphyrins, wherein the haloalkyl groups contain 2 to 8 carbon atoms have been found to be highly effective catalysts for oxidation of alkanes and for the decomposition of hydroperoxides.

  4. Alkane oxidation with porphyrins and metal complexes thereof having haloalkyl side chains

    DOEpatents

    Wijesekera, T.; Lyons, J.E.; Ellis, P.E. Jr.; Bhinde, M.V.

    1998-06-23

    Transition metal complexes of meso-haloalkylporphyrins are disclosed, wherein the haloalkyl groups contain 2 to 8 carbon atoms have been found to be highly effective catalysts for oxidation of alkanes and for the decomposition of hydroperoxides. 7 figs.

  5. Conformational problem of alkanes in liquid crystals by NMR spectroscopy: a mini-review.

    PubMed

    Weber, Adrian C J; Chen, Daniel H J

    2014-10-01

    Recent discoveries of the role of alkane flexibility in determining liquid-crystal behaviour are surveyed. With the impetus for understanding the alkane conformational problem established, recent model dependent (1)H NMR work on the topic will be reviewed where progress is made but the need to circumvent models eventually becomes evident. A closer look at the rigid basic units of alkanes will provide the way forward where it is shown that the orientational ordering and anisotropic potentials of these molecules dissolved in liquid crystals scale with each other. Once this relationship is established, a series of works using anisotropic and isotropic (1)H NMR spectroscopy to study alkane conformational statistics will be covered, wherein the influence of the gas, isotropic condensed and anisotropic condensed phases will be described. PMID:25142124

  6. Application of two methods of calculation of solvation descriptor L to estimate C5 -C7 alkenes retention.

    PubMed

    Jirkal, Štěpán; Ševčík, Jiří G K

    2015-07-01

    The solvation descriptor L for 59 isomers of all C5 -C7 alkenes was calculated using two methods based on additive contributions of particular fragments in the molecule by the method of Havelec and Ševčík and the method of Platts and Butina. These descriptors were used to estimate the gas chromatography retention of alkenes on squalane and polydimethylsiloxane stationary phases. The retention was described better by the Platts-Butina method. Modification of the Havelec-Ševčík method by omitting the contribution for interaction of the cis isomers led to a substantial improvement in the estimation ability of the model. The modified Havelec-Ševčík method was found to be preferable for estimation of the descriptor L compared to the Platts-Butina method. A more comprehensive description of the retention of alkenes was achieved by inclusion of an additional descriptor E. This model with the descriptors L and E yielded better estimation for alkenes compared to the model with a single descriptor.

  7. Selective partial hydrogenation of alkynes to (Z)-alkenes with ionic liquid-doped nickel nanocatalysts at near ambient conditions.

    PubMed

    Konnerth, Hannelore; Prechtl, Martin H G

    2016-07-12

    A selective hydrogenation method for forming (Z)-alkenes from alkynes has been developed using a catalyst system of cheap Ni-NPs in a nitrile functionalised imidazolium based ionic liquid (IL) operating under very mild reaction conditions of 30-50 °C and 1-4 bar H2 pressure.

  8. Magnetic Fe@g-C3N4: A Photoactive Catalyst for the Hydrogenation of Alkenes and Alkynes

    EPA Science Inventory

    A photoactive catalyst, Fe@g-C3N4, has been developed for the hydrogenation of alkenes and alkynes using hydrazine hydrate as a source of hydrogen. The magnetically separable Fe@g-C3N4 eliminates the use of high pressure hydrogenation and the reaction can be accomplished using vi...

  9. Polar Addition to C=C Group: Why Is Anti-Markovnikov Hydroboration-Oxidation of Alkenes Not "Anti-"?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ilich, Predrag-Peter; Rickertsen, Lucas S.; Becker, Erienne

    2006-01-01

    For 137 years Markovnikov's rule has been extensively used in organic chemical education and research to describe the regioselectivity in electrophilic addition reactions to alkenes and alkynes. When the structures of the final reaction products are used as reference, the rule requests that certain polar addition reactions be termed…

  10. Nickel-catalyzed three-component domino reactions of aryl Grignard reagents, alkynes, and aryl halides producing tetrasubstituted alkenes.

    PubMed

    Xue, Fei; Zhao, Jin; Hor, T S Andy; Hayashi, Tamio

    2015-03-11

    Three-component reaction of aryl Grignard reagents, alkynes, and aryl halides in the presence of 1 mol % of NiCl2 proceeded sequentially through carbomagnesiation of the alkyne followed by cross-coupling of the resulting alkenyl Grignard reagent with aryl halide to give tetrasubstituted alkenes in high yields. PMID:25714497

  11. Regioselective Hydration of an Alkene and Analysis of the Alcohol Product by Remote Access NMR: A Classroom Demonstration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Maureen E.; Johnson, Sara L.; Masterson, Douglas S.

    2013-01-01

    A two-part demonstration was conducted in our first-semester organic chemistry course designed to introduce students to the formation of alcohols, regioselective reactions, and analysis of organic products by NMR analysis. This demonstration utilized the oxymercuration-demercuration sequence to prepare an alcohol from an alkene in a Markovnikov…

  12. FORMATION OF BETA-HYDROXYCARBONYLS FROM THE OH RADICAL-INITIATED REACTIONS OF SELECTED ALKENES (R825252)

    EPA Science Inventory

    -Hydroxycarbonyls can be formed from the gas-phase
    reactions of alkenes with the OH radical, both in the presence
    and in the absence of NO. To date, because of analytical
    difficulties, few data have been r...

  13. A general synthesis of fluoroalkylated alkenes by palladium-catalyzed Heck-type reaction of fluoroalkyl bromides.

    PubMed

    Feng, Zhang; Min, Qiao-Qiao; Zhao, Hai-Yang; Gu, Ji-Wei; Zhang, Xingang

    2015-01-19

    An efficient palladium-catalyzed Heck-type reaction of fluoroalkyl halides, including perfluoroalkyl bromides, trifluoromethyl iodides, and difluoroalkyl bromides, has been developed. The reaction proceeds under mild reaction conditions with high efficiency and broad substrate scope, and provides a general and straightforward access to fluoroalkylated alkenes which are of interest in life and material sciences.

  14. Direct Catalytic Synthesis of Unprotected 2-Amino-1-Phenylethanols from Alkenes by Using Iron(II) Phthalocyanine.

    PubMed

    Legnani, Luca; Morandi, Bill

    2016-02-01

    Aryl-substituted amino alcohols are privileged scaffolds in medicinal chemistry and natural products. Herein, we report that an exceptionally simple and inexpensive Fe(II) complex efficiently catalyzes the direct transformation of simple alkenes into unprotected amino alcohols in good yield and perfect regioselectivity. This new catalytic method was applied in the expedient synthesis of bioactive molecules and could be extended to aminoetherification.

  15. Selective access to trisubstituted macrocyclic E- and Z-alkenes from the ring-closing metathesis of vinylsiloxanes.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yikai; Jimenez, Miguel; Sheehan, Patrick; Zhong, Cheng; Hung, Alvin W; Tam, Chun Pong; Young, Damian W

    2013-03-15

    Macrocyclic (E)-alkenylsiloxanes, obtained from E-selective ring-closing metathesis reactions, can be converted to the corresponding (Z)-alkenyl bromides and (E)-alkenyl iodides allowing access to both E- and Z-trisubstituted macrocyclic alkenes. The reaction conditions and substrate scope of these stereoselective transformations are explored.

  16. Total synthesis of debromoflustramines B and E based on the intramolecular carbamoylketene-alkene [2 + 2] cycloaddition.

    PubMed

    Ozawa, Tsukasa; Kanematsu, Makoto; Yokoe, Hiromasa; Yoshida, Masahiro; Shishido, Kozo

    2012-10-19

    Total synthesis of debromoflustramines B and E has been accomplished by using a platinum-catalyzed addition reaction of o-aminophenylboronic acid with the allene and an intramolecular carbamoylketene-alkene [2 + 2] cycloaddition for the construction of the basic carbon framework of the target alkaloids as the key steps.

  17. UV light-mediated difunctionalization of alkenes with CF3SO2Na: synthesis of trifluoromethyl phenanthrene and anthrone derivatives.

    PubMed

    Li, Bing; Fan, Dan; Yang, Chao; Xia, Wujiong

    2016-06-21

    A metal-free and cost-effective protocol for UV light-mediated difunctionalization of alkenes with CF3SO2Na was developed. This strategy realized the direct formation of Csp(3)-CF3 and C-C bonds through a proposed tandem radical cyclization process, which produced a variety of phenanthrene and anthrone derivatives in moderate yields. PMID:27206267

  18. Efficient alkene epoxidation catalyzed by molybdenyl acetylacetonate supported on aminated UiO-66 metal−organic framework

    SciTech Connect

    Kardanpour, Reihaneh; Tangestaninejad, Shahram; Mirkhani, Valiollah; Moghadam, Majid; Mohammadpoor-Baltork, Iraj; Zadehahmadi, Farnaz

    2015-03-15

    Metal–organic frameworks (MOFs) containing Mo Schiff base complexes were prepared by post-synthesis method and applied as efficient catalysts in the epoxidation of alkenes with tert-BuOOH. In this manner, UiO-66-NH{sub 2} (UiO=University of Oslo) MOF was reacted with salicylaldehyde and thiophene-2-carbaldehyde to produce bidentate Schiff bases. Then, the Schiff base ligands were used for immobilization of molybdenyl acetylacetonate. These new catalysts were characterized by FT-IR, UV–vis spectroscopic techniques, X-ray diffraction (XRD), BET, inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectroscopy (ICP-AES) and field emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM). These catalytic systems showed excellent activity in the epoxidation of alkenes such as cyclic and linear ones with tert-butyl hydroperoxide (TBHP) in 1,2-dichloroethane, and reused several times without any appreciable loss of their activity. - Graphical abstract: Efficient alkene epoxidation with TBHP catalyzed by heterogeneous and reusable molybdenum base catalysts is reported. - Highlights: • UiO-66-NH{sub 2} was modified with salicylaldehyde and thiophene-2-carbaldehyde. • The Schiff base groups were used for immobilization of MoO{sub 2}(acac){sub 2}. • The heterogeneous catalysts were prepared. • The prepared catalysts were used for epoxidation of alkenes. • Compared to other catalyst, our catalysts were more efficient and forceful.

  19. Regulation of the Alkane Hydroxylase CYP153 Gene in a Gram-Positive Alkane-Degrading Bacterium, Dietzia sp. Strain DQ12-45-1b

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Jie-Liang; JiangYang, Jing-Hong

    2015-01-01

    CYP153, one of the most common medium-chain n-alkane hydroxylases belonging to the cytochrome P450 superfamily, is widely expressed in n-alkane-degrading bacteria. CYP153 is also thought to cooperate with AlkB in degrading various n-alkanes. However, the mechanisms regulating the expression of the protein remain largely unknown. In this paper, we studied CYP153 gene transcription regulation by the potential AraC family regulator (CypR) located upstream of the CYP153 gene cluster in a broad-spectrum n-alkane-degrading Gram-positive bacterium, Dietzia sp. strain DQ12-45-1b. We first identified the transcriptional start site and the promoter of the CYP153 gene cluster. Sequence alignment of upstream regions of CYP153 gene clusters revealed high conservation in the −10 and −35 regions in Actinobacteria. Further analysis of the β-galactosidase activity in the CYP153 gene promoter-lacZ fusion cell indicated that the CYP153 gene promoter was induced by n-alkanes comprised of 8 to 14 carbon atoms, but not by derived decanol and decanic acid. Moreover, we constructed a cypR mutant strain and found that the CYP153 gene promoter activities and CYP153 gene transcriptional levels in the mutant strain were depressed compared with those in the wild-type strain in the presence of n-alkanes, suggesting that CypR served as an activator for the CYP153 gene promoter. By comparing CYP153 gene arrangements in Actinobacteria and Proteobacteria, we found that the AraC family regulator is ubiquitously located upstream of the CYP153 gene, suggesting its universal regulatory role in CYP153 gene transcription. We further hypothesize that the observed mode of CYP153 gene regulation is shared by many Actinobacteria. PMID:26567302

  20. The Number of High-Energy Bands in the Photoelectron Spectrum of Alkanes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merris, Russell; Gutman, Ivan

    2000-12-01

    It was observed that within the Bieri-Dill-Heilbronner-Schmelzer model for the calculation of the ion-ization energies of alkanes CnH2n+2, there are exactly n C2s -electron energy levels lying below the degenerate α-ß manifold. We now show that, indeed, this regularity is obeyed by practically all alkane species. Exceptions do exist, but they must possess a (chemically infeasible) group of more than six mutually connected quaternary carbon atoms.