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Sample records for alkanes ethers primary

  1. Photochemical dimerization and functionalization of alkanes, ethers, primary alcohols and silanes

    DOEpatents

    Crabtree, Robert H.; Brown, Stephen H.

    1988-01-01

    The space-time yield and/or the selectivity of the photochemical dimerization of alkanes, ethers, primary alcohols and tertiary silanes with Hg and U.V. light is enhanced by refluxing the substrate in the irradiated reaction zone at a temperature at which the dimer product condenses and remains condensed promptly upon its formation. Cross-dimerization of the alkanes, ethers and silanes with primary alcohols is disclosed, as is the functionalization to aldehydes of the alkanes with carbon monoxide.

  2. Photochemical dimerization and functionalization of alkanes, ethers, primary alcohols and silanes

    DOEpatents

    Crabtree, R.H.; Brown, S.H.

    1988-02-16

    The space-time yield and/or the selectivity of the photochemical dimerization of alkanes, ethers, primary alcohols and tertiary silanes with Hg and U.V. light is enhanced by refluxing the substrate in the irradiated reaction zone at a temperature at which the dimer product condenses and remains condensed promptly upon its formation. Cross-dimerization of the alkanes, ethers and silanes with primary alcohols is disclosed, as is the functionalization to aldehydes of the alkanes with carbon monoxide.

  3. Photochemical dimerization and functionalization of alkanes, ethers, primary and secondary alcohols, phosphine oxides and silanes

    DOEpatents

    Crabtree, Robert H.; Brown, Stephen H.

    1989-01-01

    The space-time yield and/or the selectivity of the photochemical dimerization of alkanes, ethers, primary and secondary alcohols, phosphine oxides and primary, secondary and tertiary silanes with Hg and U.V. light is enhanced by refluxing the substrate in the irradiated reaction zone at a temperature at which the dimer product condenses and remains condensed promptly upon its formation. Cross-dimerization of the alkanes, ethers and silanes with primary alcohols is disclosed, as is the functionalization to aldehydes of the alkanes with carbon monoxide.

  4. Photochemical dimerization and functionalization of alkanes, ethers, primary and secondary alcohols, phosphine oxides and silanes

    DOEpatents

    Crabtree, R.H.; Brown, S.H.

    1989-10-17

    The space-time yield and/or the selectivity of the photochemical dimerization of alkanes, ethers, primary and secondary alcohols, phosphine oxides and primary, secondary and tertiary silanes with Hg and U.V. light is enhanced by refluxing the substrate in the irradiated reaction zone at a temperature at which the dimer product condenses and remains condensed promptly upon its formation. Cross-dimerization of the alkanes, ethers and silanes with primary alcohols is disclosed, as is the functionalization to aldehydes of the alkanes with carbon monoxide.

  5. Microstructure of High Pressure Polyolefin/n-Alkane & Dimethyl Ether Solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Zanten, John; McHugh, Mark; Li, Dan; Guney-Altay, Ozge; Dinoia, Todd; Kermis, Thomas; Park, Il-Hyun

    2003-03-01

    A series of dilute and semi-dilute poly(ethylene-co-1-butene)/n-alkane and dimethyl ether (DME) solutions have been investigated with high pressure small angle neutron scattering and dynamic light scattering. The n-alkane solvents considered in these investigations were ethane, propane, butane and pentane. The solutions have been examined at 110-150 °C and at pressures up to ˜2500 bar. In the semi-dilute concentration range, the classic high concentration isotopic labeling technique is used in conjunction with small angle neutron scattering to determine both the solution correlation length and coil dimensions for poly(ethylene-co-1-butene) dissolved in either ethane, pentane or DME. Chain collapse is observed upon approach to the phase boundary in n-alkane solutions but is absent in DME solutions. For the dilute solution regime, solutions of varying concentration in all of the n-alkanes and DME are considered in order to determine both the polymer diffusion coefficient at infinite dilution as well as the dynamic second viral coefficient which is primarily dominated by the second osmotic virial coefficient. The polymer coil hydrodynamic radii behavior in dilute solutions is essentially the same as that observed for the semi-dilute solutions. Coil behavior in the dilute and semi-dilute concentration regimes is compared and contrasted.

  6. RNAi silencing of a cytochrome P450 monooxygenase disrupts the ability of a filamentous fungus, Graphium sp. to grow on short-chain gaseous alkanes and ethers

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Graphium sp. (ATCC 58400), a filamentous fungus, is one of the few eukaryotes that grows on short-chain alkanes and ethers. In this study, we investigated the genetic underpinnings that enable this fungus to catalyze the first step in the alkane and ether oxidation pathway. A gene, CYP52L1, was iden...

  7. 40 CFR 721.10381 - Cyclic carboxylic acid, polymer with dihydroxy dialkyl ether, hydroxy substituted alkane and...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Cyclic carboxylic acid, polymer with dihydroxy dialkyl ether, hydroxy substituted alkane and carboxylic acid anhydride, methacrylate terminated... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10381 Cyclic carboxylic acid, polymer with dihydroxy dialkyl...

  8. 40 CFR 721.10381 - Cyclic carboxylic acid, polymer with dihydroxy dialkyl ether, hydroxy substituted alkane and...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Cyclic carboxylic acid, polymer with dihydroxy dialkyl ether, hydroxy substituted alkane and carboxylic acid anhydride, methacrylate terminated... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10381 Cyclic carboxylic acid, polymer with dihydroxy dialkyl...

  9. 40 CFR 721.10381 - Cyclic carboxylic acid, polymer with dihydroxy dialkyl ether, hydroxy substituted alkane and...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Cyclic carboxylic acid, polymer with dihydroxy dialkyl ether, hydroxy substituted alkane and carboxylic acid anhydride, methacrylate terminated... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10381 Cyclic carboxylic acid, polymer with dihydroxy dialkyl...

  10. Mass spectra of cyclic ethers formed in the low-temperature oxidation of a series of n-alkanes

    PubMed Central

    Herbinet, Olivier; Bax, Sarah; Glaude, Pierre-Alexandre; Carré, Vincent; Battin-Leclerc, Frédérique

    2013-01-01

    Cyclic ethers are important intermediate species formed during the low-temperature oxidation of hydrocarbons. Along with ketones and aldehydes, they could consequently represent a significant part of the heavy oxygenated pollutants observed in the exhaust gas of engines. Apart a few of them such as ethylene oxide and tetrahydrofuran, cyclic ethers have not been much studied and very few of them are available for calibration and identification. Electron impact mass spectra are available for very few of them, making their detection in the exhaust emissions of combustion processes very difficult. The main goal of this study was to complete the existing set of mass spectra for this class of molecules. Thus cyclic ethers have been analyzed in the exhaust gases of a jet-stirred reactor in which the low-temperature oxidation of a series of n-alkanes was taking place. Analyzes were performed by gas chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry and to MS/MS. The second goal of this study was to derive some rules for the fragmentation of cyclic ethers in electron impact mass spectrometry and allow the identification of these species when no mass spectrum is available. PMID:24092947

  11. Mass spectra of cyclic ethers formed in the low-temperature oxidation of a series of n-alkanes.

    PubMed

    Herbinet, Olivier; Bax, Sarah; Glaude, Pierre-Alexandre; Carré, Vincent; Battin-Leclerc, Frédérique

    2011-02-01

    Cyclic ethers are important intermediate species formed during the low-temperature oxidation of hydrocarbons. Along with ketones and aldehydes, they could consequently represent a significant part of the heavy oxygenated pollutants observed in the exhaust gas of engines. Apart a few of them such as ethylene oxide and tetrahydrofuran, cyclic ethers have not been much studied and very few of them are available for calibration and identification. Electron impact mass spectra are available for very few of them, making their detection in the exhaust emissions of combustion processes very difficult. The main goal of this study was to complete the existing set of mass spectra for this class of molecules. Thus cyclic ethers have been analyzed in the exhaust gases of a jet-stirred reactor in which the low-temperature oxidation of a series of n-alkanes was taking place. Analyzes were performed by gas chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry and to MS/MS. The second goal of this study was to derive some rules for the fragmentation of cyclic ethers in electron impact mass spectrometry and allow the identification of these species when no mass spectrum is available. PMID:24092947

  12. Transferable potentials for phase equilibria-united atom description of five- and six-membered cyclic alkanes and ethers.

    PubMed

    Keasler, Samuel J; Charan, Sophia M; Wick, Collin D; Economou, Ioannis G; Siepmann, J Ilja

    2012-09-13

    While the transferable potentials for phase equilibria-united atom (TraPPE-UA) force field has generally been successful at providing parameters that are highly transferable between different molecules, the polarity and polarizability of a given functional group can be significantly perturbed in small cyclic structures, which limits the transferability of parameters obtained for linear molecules. This has motivated us to develop a version of the TraPPE-UA force field specifically for five- and six-membered cyclic alkanes and ethers. The Lennard-Jones parameters for the methylene group obtained from cyclic alkanes are transferred to the ethers for each ring size, and those for the oxygen atom are common to all compounds for a given ring size. However, the partial charges are molecule specific and parametrized using liquid-phase dielectric constants. This model yields accurate saturated liquid densities and vapor pressures, critical temperatures and densities, normal boiling points, heat capacities, and isothermal compressibilities for the following molecules: cyclopentane, tetrahydrofuran, 1,3-dioxolane, cyclohexane, oxane, 1,4-dioxane, 1,3-dioxane, and 1,3,5-trioxane. The azeotropic behavior and separation factor for the binary mixtures of 1,3-dioxolane/cyclohexane and ethanol/1,4-dioxane are qualitively reproduced. PMID:22900670

  13. Rate Constants for the Reactions of Hydroxyl Radical with Several Alkanes, Cycloalkanes, and Dimethyl Ether

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DeMore, W.; Bayes, K.

    1998-01-01

    Relative rate experiements were used to measure rate constants and temperature denpendencies of the reactions of OH with propane, n-butane, n-pentane, n-hexane, cyclopropane, cyclobutane, cyclopentane, and dimethyl ether.

  14. Equilibrium 2H/ 1H fractionations in organic molecules. II: Linear alkanes, alkenes, ketones, carboxylic acids, esters, alcohols and ethers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Ying; Sessions, Alex L.; Nielsen, Robert J.; Goddard, William A., III

    2009-12-01

    Equilibrium 2H/ 1H fractionation factors (α eq) for various H positions in alkanes, alkenes, ketones, carboxylic acids, esters, alcohols, and ethers were calculated between 0 and 100 °C using vibrational frequencies from ab initio QM calculations (B3LYP/6-311G**). Results were then corrected using a temperature-dependent linear calibration curve based on experimental data for H α in ketones ( Wang et al., 2009). The total uncertainty in reported α eq values is estimated at 10-20‰. The effects of functional groups were found to increase the value of α eq for H next to electron-donating groups, e.g. sbnd OR, sbnd OH or sbnd O(C dbnd O)R, and to decrease the value of α eq for H next to electron-withdrawing groups, e.g. sbnd (C dbnd O)R or sbnd (C dbnd O)OR. Smaller but significant functional group effects are also observed for H β and sometimes H γ. By summing over individual H positions, we estimate the equilibrium fractionation relative to water to be -90‰ to -70‰ for n-alkanes and around -100‰ for pristane and phytane. The temperature dependence of these fractionations is very weak between 0 and 100 °C. Our estimates of α eq agree well with field data for thermally mature hydrocarbons (δ 2H values between -80‰ and -110‰ relative to water). Therefore the observed δ 2H increase of individual hydrocarbons and the disappearance of the biosynthetic δ 2H offset between n-alkyl and linear isoprenoid lipids during maturation of organic matter can be confidently attributed to H exchange towards an equilibrium state. Our results also indicate that many n-alkyl lipids are biosynthesized with δ 2H values that are close to equilibrium with water. In these cases, constant down-core δ 2H values for n-alkyl lipids cannot be reliably used to infer a lack of isotopic exchange.

  15. Expression of an alkane monooxygenase (alkB) gene and methyl tert-butyl ether co-metabolic oxidation in Pseudomonas citronellolis.

    PubMed

    Bravo, Ana Luisa; Sigala, Juan Carlos; Le Borgne, Sylvie; Morales, Marcia

    2015-04-01

    Pseudomonas citronellolis UAM-Ps1 co-metabolically transforms methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE) to tert-butyl alcohol with n-pentane (2.6 mM), n-octane (1.5 mM) or dicyclopropylketone (DCPK) (4.4 mM), a gratuitous inducer of alkane hydroxylase (AlkB) activity. The reverse transcription quantitative real-time PCR was used to quantify the alkane monooxygenase (alkB) gene expression. The alkB gene was expressed in the presence of n-alkanes and DCPK and MTBE oxidation occurred only in cultures when alkB was transcribed. A correlation between the number of alkB transcripts and MTBE consumption was found (ΜΤΒΕ consumption in μmol = 1.44e(-13) x DNA copies, R(2) = 0.99) when MTBE (0.84 mM) was added. Furthermore, alkB was cloned and expressed into Escherichia coli and the recombinant AlkB had a molecular weight of 42 kDa. This is the first report where the expression of alkB is related to the co-metabolic oxidation of MTBE. PMID:25432418

  16. Expression of an alkane monooxygenase (alkB) gene and methyl tert-butyl ether co-metabolic oxidation in Pseudomonas citronellolis.

    PubMed

    Bravo, Ana Luisa; Sigala, Juan Carlos; Le Borgne, Sylvie; Morales, Marcia

    2015-04-01

    Pseudomonas citronellolis UAM-Ps1 co-metabolically transforms methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE) to tert-butyl alcohol with n-pentane (2.6 mM), n-octane (1.5 mM) or dicyclopropylketone (DCPK) (4.4 mM), a gratuitous inducer of alkane hydroxylase (AlkB) activity. The reverse transcription quantitative real-time PCR was used to quantify the alkane monooxygenase (alkB) gene expression. The alkB gene was expressed in the presence of n-alkanes and DCPK and MTBE oxidation occurred only in cultures when alkB was transcribed. A correlation between the number of alkB transcripts and MTBE consumption was found (ΜΤΒΕ consumption in μmol = 1.44e(-13) x DNA copies, R(2) = 0.99) when MTBE (0.84 mM) was added. Furthermore, alkB was cloned and expressed into Escherichia coli and the recombinant AlkB had a molecular weight of 42 kDa. This is the first report where the expression of alkB is related to the co-metabolic oxidation of MTBE.

  17. Mineralization of methyl tert-butyl ether and other gasoline oxygenates by Pseudomonads using short n-alkanes as growth source.

    PubMed

    Morales, Marcia; Nava, Verónica; Velásquez, Elia; Razo-Flores, Elías; Revah, Sergio

    2009-04-01

    Biodegradation of methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE) by cometabolism has shown to produce recalcitrant metabolic intermediates that often accumulate. In this work, a consortium containing Pseudomonads was studied for its ability to fully degrade oxygenates by cometabolism. This consortium mineralized MTBE and TBA with C3-C7 n-alkanes. The highest degradation rates for MTBE (75 +/- 5 mg g(protein) (-1) h(-1)) and TBA (86.9 +/- 7.3 mg g(protein) (-1) h(-1)) were obtained with n-pentane and n-propane, respectively. When incubated with radiolabeled MTBE and n-pentane, it converted more than 96% of the added MTBE to (14)C-CO(2). Furthermore, the consortium degraded tert-amyl methyl ether, tert-butyl alcohol (TBA), tert-amyl alcohol, ethyl tert-butyl ether (ETBE) when n-pentane was used as growth source. Three Pseudomonads were isolated but only two showed independent MTBE degradation activity. The maximum degradation rates were 101 and 182 mg g(protein) (-1) h(-1) for Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Pseudomonas citronellolis, respectively. The highest specific affinity (a degrees (MTBE)) value of 4.39 l g(protein) (-1) h(-1) was obtained for Pseudomonas aeruginosa and complete mineralization was attained with a MTBE: n-pentane ratio (w/w) of 0.7. This is the first time that Pseudomonads have been reported to fully mineralize MTBE by cometabolic degradation. PMID:18814038

  18. Densities and excess volumes of methyl 1,1-dimethylpropyl ether + benzene, or cyclohexane, or an alkane (C{sub 6}--C{sub 16}) at 298.15 K

    SciTech Connect

    Witek, M.; Goldon, A.; Hofman, T.; Domanska, U.

    1997-01-01

    Densities and excess volumes of {l_brace}methyl 1,1-dimethylpropyl ether (TAME) + (benzene or cyclohexane or hexane or octane or decane or dodecane or tetradecane or hexadecane){r_brace} at 298.15 K are presented. The observed influence of the n-alkane length can be predicted qualitatively by the Flory equation of state.

  19. Solubility of anthracene in binary alkane + methyl tert-butyl ether solvent mixtures at 298.15 K

    SciTech Connect

    McHale, M.E.R.; Kauppila, A.S.M.; Acree, W.E. Jr.

    1996-09-01

    Experimental solubilities are reported for anthracene dissolved in seven binary mixtures containing methyl tert-butyl ether (also called 2-methoxy-2-methylpropane) with hexane, heptane, octane, cyclohexane, methylcyclohexane, 2,2,4-trimethylpentane, and tert-butylcyclohexane (also called (1,1-dimethylethyl)-cyclohexane) at 25 C. Results of these measurements are used to test two mathematical representations based upon the combined nearly ideal binary solvent (NIBS)/Redlich-Kister equation and modified Wilson model. For the seven systems studied, both equations were found to provide an accurate mathematical representation of the experimental data, with an overall average absolute deviation between measured and calculated values being on the order of 0.5%.

  20. Propenyl ether monomers for photopolymerization

    DOEpatents

    Crivello, James V.

    1996-01-01

    Propenyl ether monomers of formula V A(OCH.dbd.CHCH.sub.3).sub.n wherein n is an integer from one to six and A is selected from cyclic ethers, polyether and alkanes are disclosed. The monomers are readily polymerized in the presence of cationic photoinitiators, when exposed to actinic radiation, to form poly(propenyl ethers) that are useful for coatings, sealants, varnishes and adhesives. Compositions for preparing polymeric coatings comprising the compounds of formula V together with particular cationic photoinitiators are also disclosed, as are processes for making the monomers from allyl halides and readily available alcohols. The process involves rearranging the resulting allyl ethers to propenyl ethers.

  1. Propenyl ether monomers for photopolymerization

    DOEpatents

    Crivello, J.V.

    1996-10-22

    Propenyl ether monomers of formula A(OCH{double_bond}CHCH{sub 3}){sub n} wherein n is an integer from one to six and A is selected from cyclic ethers, polyether and alkanes are disclosed. The monomers are readily polymerized in the presence of cationic photoinitiators, when exposed to actinic radiation, to form poly(propenyl ethers) that are useful for coatings, sealants, varnishes and adhesives. Compositions for preparing polymeric coatings comprising the compounds of the above formula together with particular cationic photoinitiators are also disclosed, as are processes for making the monomers from allyl halides and readily available alcohols. The process involves rearranging the resulting allyl ethers to propenyl ethers.

  2. Enantioseparations of primary amino compounds by high-performance liquid chromatography using chiral crown ether-based chiral stationary phase.

    PubMed

    Hyun, Myung Ho

    2013-01-01

    Liquid chromatographic resolution of racemic compounds containing a primary amino group has been known to be most successful when chiral crown ether-based chiral stationary phases (CSPs) are used. Among various crown ether-based CSPs, the stationary phase based on (+)-(18-crown-6)-2,3,11,12-tetracarboxylic acid covalently bonded to silica gel has been successfully applied in the resolution of various racemic compounds containing primary amino groups. In this chapter, the preparation of the CSP based on (+)-(18-crown-6)-2,3,11,12-tetracarboxylic acid covalently bonded to silica gel and examples for the application to the enantioseparation of racemic compounds including α-amino acids, cyclic amines, amino alcohols, and chiral drugs are described.

  3. Enantioseparations of primary amino compounds by high-performance liquid chromatography using chiral crown ether-based chiral stationary phase.

    PubMed

    Hyun, Myung Ho

    2013-01-01

    Liquid chromatographic resolution of racemic compounds containing a primary amino group has been known to be most successful when chiral crown ether-based chiral stationary phases (CSPs) are used. Among various crown ether-based CSPs, the stationary phase based on (+)-(18-crown-6)-2,3,11,12-tetracarboxylic acid covalently bonded to silica gel has been successfully applied in the resolution of various racemic compounds containing primary amino groups. In this chapter, the preparation of the CSP based on (+)-(18-crown-6)-2,3,11,12-tetracarboxylic acid covalently bonded to silica gel and examples for the application to the enantioseparation of racemic compounds including α-amino acids, cyclic amines, amino alcohols, and chiral drugs are described. PMID:23283776

  4. Polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) in dust from primary schools in South East Queensland, Australia.

    PubMed

    Toms, Leisa-Maree L; Mazaheri, Mandana; Brommer, Sandra; Clifford, Samuel; Drage, Daniel; Mueller, Jochen F; Thai, Phong; Harrad, Stuart; Morawska, Lidia; Harden, Fiona A

    2015-10-01

    PBDE concentrations are higher in children compared to adults with exposure suggested to include dust ingestion. Besides the home environment, children spend a great deal of time in school classrooms which may be a source of exposure. As part of the "Ultrafine Particles from Traffic Emissions and Children's Health (UPTECH)" project, dust samples (n=28) were obtained in 2011/12 from 10 Brisbane, Australia metropolitan schools and analysed using GC and LC-MS for polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) -17, -28, -47, -49, -66, -85, -99, -100, -154, -183, and -209. Σ11PBDEs ranged from 11-2163 ng/g dust; with a mean and median of 600 and 469 ng/g dust, respectively. BDE-209 (range n.d. -2034 ng/g dust; mean (median) 402 (217)ng/g dust) was the dominant congener in most classrooms. Frequencies of detection were 96%, 96%, 39% and 93% for BDE-47, -99, -100 and -209, respectively. No seasonal variations were apparent and from each of the two schools where XRF measurements were carried out, only two classroom items had detectable bromine. PBDE intake for 8-11 year olds can be estimated at 0.094 ng/day BDE-47; 0.187 ng/day BDE-99 and 0.522ng/day BDE-209 as a result of ingestion of classroom dust, based on mean PBDE concentrations. The 97.5% percentile intake is estimated to be 0.62, 1.03 and 2.14 ng/day for BDEs-47, -99 and -209, respectively. These PBDE concentrations in dust from classrooms, which are higher than in Australian homes, may explain some of the higher body burden of PBDEs in children compared to adults when taking into consideration age-dependant behaviours which increase dust ingestion.

  5. Polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) in dust from primary schools in South East Queensland, Australia.

    PubMed

    Toms, Leisa-Maree L; Mazaheri, Mandana; Brommer, Sandra; Clifford, Samuel; Drage, Daniel; Mueller, Jochen F; Thai, Phong; Harrad, Stuart; Morawska, Lidia; Harden, Fiona A

    2015-10-01

    PBDE concentrations are higher in children compared to adults with exposure suggested to include dust ingestion. Besides the home environment, children spend a great deal of time in school classrooms which may be a source of exposure. As part of the "Ultrafine Particles from Traffic Emissions and Children's Health (UPTECH)" project, dust samples (n=28) were obtained in 2011/12 from 10 Brisbane, Australia metropolitan schools and analysed using GC and LC-MS for polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) -17, -28, -47, -49, -66, -85, -99, -100, -154, -183, and -209. Σ11PBDEs ranged from 11-2163 ng/g dust; with a mean and median of 600 and 469 ng/g dust, respectively. BDE-209 (range n.d. -2034 ng/g dust; mean (median) 402 (217)ng/g dust) was the dominant congener in most classrooms. Frequencies of detection were 96%, 96%, 39% and 93% for BDE-47, -99, -100 and -209, respectively. No seasonal variations were apparent and from each of the two schools where XRF measurements were carried out, only two classroom items had detectable bromine. PBDE intake for 8-11 year olds can be estimated at 0.094 ng/day BDE-47; 0.187 ng/day BDE-99 and 0.522ng/day BDE-209 as a result of ingestion of classroom dust, based on mean PBDE concentrations. The 97.5% percentile intake is estimated to be 0.62, 1.03 and 2.14 ng/day for BDEs-47, -99 and -209, respectively. These PBDE concentrations in dust from classrooms, which are higher than in Australian homes, may explain some of the higher body burden of PBDEs in children compared to adults when taking into consideration age-dependant behaviours which increase dust ingestion. PMID:26142718

  6. Infrared Spectroscopic Investigation on CH Bond Acidity in Cationic Alkanes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsuda, Yoshiyuki; Xie, Min; Fujii, Asuka

    2016-06-01

    We have demonstrated large enhancements of CH bond acidities in alcohol, ether, and amine cations through infrared predissociation spectroscopy based on the vacuum ultraviolet photoionization detection. In this study, we investigate for the cationic alkanes (pentane, hexane, and heptane) with different alkyl chain lengths. The σ electrons are ejected in the ionization of alkanes, while nonbonding electrons are ejected in ionization of alcohols, ethers, and amines. Nevertheless, the acidity enhancements of CH in these cationic alkanes have also been demonstrated by infrared spectroscopy. The correlations of their CH bond acidities with the alkyl chain lengths as well as the mechanisms of their acidity enhancements will be discussed by comparison of infrared spectra and theoretical calculations.

  7. Process for making propenyl ethers and photopolymerizable compositions containing them

    DOEpatents

    Crivello, James V.

    1996-01-01

    Propenyl ether monomers of formula V A(OCH.dbd.CHCH.sub.3).sub.n wherein n is an integer from one to six and A is selected from cyclic ethers, polyether and alkanes are disclosed. The monomers are readily polymerized in the presence of cationic photoinitiators, when exposed to actinic radiation, to form poly(propenyl ethers) that are useful for coatings, sealants, varnishes and adhesives. Compositions for preparing polymeric coatings comprising the compounds of formula V together with particular cationic photoinitiators are also disclosed, as are processes for making the monomers from allyl halides and readily available alcohols. The process involves rearranging the resulting allyl ethers to propenyl ethers.

  8. Process for making propenyl ethers and photopolymerizable compositions containing them

    DOEpatents

    Crivello, J.V.

    1996-01-23

    Propenyl ether monomers of formula A(OCH{double_bond}CHCH{sub 3}){sub n} (V) wherein n is an integer from one to six and A is selected from cyclic ethers, polyether, and alkanes are disclosed. The monomers are readily polymerized in the presence of cationic photoinitiators, when exposed to actinic radiation, to form poly(propenyl ethers) that are useful for coatings, sealants, varnishes and adhesives. Compositions for preparing polymeric coatings comprising the compounds of formula V together with particular cationic photoinitiators are also disclosed, as are processes for making the monomers from allyl halides and readily available alcohols. The process involves rearranging the resulting allyl ethers to propenyl ethers.

  9. A colorimetric chiral sensor based on chiral crown ether for the recognition of the two enantiomers of primary amino alcohols and amines.

    PubMed

    Cho, Eun Na Rae; Li, Yinan; Kim, Hee Jin; Hyun, Myung Ho

    2011-04-01

    A new colorimetric chiral sensor material consisting of three different functional sites such as chromophore (2,4-dinitrophenylazophenol dye), binding site (crown ether), and chiral barrier (3,3'-diphenyl-1,1'-binaphthyl group) was prepared and applied to the recognition of the two enantiomers of primary amino alcohols and amines. Among five primary amino alcohols and two primary amines tested, the two enantiomers of phenylalaninol show the highest difference in the absorption maximum wavelength (Δλ(max)=43.5 nm) and in the association constants (K(S)/K(R)=2.51) upon complexation with the colorimetric chiral sensor material and, consequently, the two enantiomers of phenylalaninol were clearly distinguished from each other by the color difference. PMID:21384440

  10. System-size corrections for self-diffusion coefficients calculated from molecular dynamics simulations: The case of CO2, n-alkanes, and poly(ethylene glycol) dimethyl ethers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moultos, Othonas A.; Zhang, Yong; Tsimpanogiannis, Ioannis N.; Economou, Ioannis G.; Maginn, Edward J.

    2016-08-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations were carried out to study the self-diffusion coefficients of CO2, methane, propane, n-hexane, n-hexadecane, and various poly(ethylene glycol) dimethyl ethers (glymes in short, CH3O-(CH2CH2O)n-CH3 with n = 1, 2, 3, and 4, labeled as G1, G2, G3, and G4, respectively) at different conditions. Various system sizes were examined. The widely used Yeh and Hummer [J. Phys. Chem. B 108, 15873 (2004)] correction for the prediction of diffusion coefficient at the thermodynamic limit was applied and shown to be accurate in all cases compared to extrapolated values at infinite system size. The magnitude of correction, in all cases examined, is significant, with the smallest systems examined giving for some cases a self-diffusion coefficient approximately 15% lower than the infinite system-size extrapolated value. The results suggest that finite size corrections to computed self-diffusivities must be used in order to obtain accurate results.

  11. System-size corrections for self-diffusion coefficients calculated from molecular dynamics simulations: The case of CO2, n-alkanes, and poly(ethylene glycol) dimethyl ethers.

    PubMed

    Moultos, Othonas A; Zhang, Yong; Tsimpanogiannis, Ioannis N; Economou, Ioannis G; Maginn, Edward J

    2016-08-21

    Molecular dynamics simulations were carried out to study the self-diffusion coefficients of CO2, methane, propane, n-hexane, n-hexadecane, and various poly(ethylene glycol) dimethyl ethers (glymes in short, CH3O-(CH2CH2O)n-CH3 with n = 1, 2, 3, and 4, labeled as G1, G2, G3, and G4, respectively) at different conditions. Various system sizes were examined. The widely used Yeh and Hummer [J. Phys. Chem. B 108, 15873 (2004)] correction for the prediction of diffusion coefficient at the thermodynamic limit was applied and shown to be accurate in all cases compared to extrapolated values at infinite system size. The magnitude of correction, in all cases examined, is significant, with the smallest systems examined giving for some cases a self-diffusion coefficient approximately 15% lower than the infinite system-size extrapolated value. The results suggest that finite size corrections to computed self-diffusivities must be used in order to obtain accurate results. PMID:27544089

  12. Assessment of the neurotoxic mechanisms of decabrominated diphenyl ether (PBDE-209) in primary cultured neonatal rat hippocampal neurons includes alterations in second messenger signaling and oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jingsi; Liufu, Chun; Sun, Weiwen; Sun, Xiaofang; Chen, Dunjin

    2010-02-15

    2',2',3',3',4',4',5',5',6',6',-decabrominated diphenyl ether (PBDE-209) is the most widely used polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) globally. Some animal experiments have found that PBDE-209 caused developmental neurotoxicity. But detailed mechanisms are less well understood. Our experiments were conducted to research the potential neurotoxic mechanisms of PBDE-209 in primary cultured neonatal rat hippocampal neurons by measuring cell viability, apoptotic rate, expression of P38 mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs), calcium ion concentration, oxidative stress, nitrous oxide (NO) content, and global gene DNA methylation levels. The neurons were exposed to different PBDE-209 concentrations (0, 10, 30 and 50 microg/ml). The difference between the experimental groups and control groups was significant (P<0.05). PBDE-209 increased the rate of apoptosis, expression of P38 MAPK, calcium ion concentration, reactive oxygen species (ROS) level, malondialdehyde (MDA) content and NO content (P<0.05). In addition, PBDE-209 deceased cell viability, activity of superoxide dismutase (SOD) and the levels of global gene DNA methylation (P<0.05). The results suggested that PBDE-209 could affect secondary messengers, cause oxidative stress and decrease global gene DNA methylation levels. These actions may contribute to the mechanism of PBDE-209 neurotoxicity. PMID:19948212

  13. Ether production

    SciTech Connect

    Harandi, M.N.; Owen, H.

    1991-05-14

    This patent describes a multistage process for etherifying a mixed C{sub 4} + olefinic hydrocarbon feedstock containing isoalkene. It comprises: contacting the olefinic feedstock and aliphatic alcohol in a first reaction stage under partial etherification conditions with a regenerable inorganic metal oxide acid solid catalyst to convert a major amount of the isoalkene to C{sub 5} + tertiary-alkyl ether; recovering a reactant effluent from the first stage containing ether product, unreacted alcohol and unreacted olefin including isoalkene; charging the first stage effluent to a second stage catalytic distillation column containing solid acid resin etherification catalyst in a plurality of fixed bed catalysis-distillation zones to complete substantially full etherification of isoalkene; recovering C{sub 5} + ether as a liquid from the catalytic distillation column; regenerating the first stage catalyst to remove feedstock impurity and coke and to acid activity; and continuing ether production with regenerated catalyst.

  14. The breakdown of vinyl ethers as a two-center synchronous reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pokidova, T. S.; Shestakov, A. F.

    2009-11-01

    The experimental data on the molecular decomposition of vinyl ethers of various structures to alkanes and the corresponding aldehydes or ketones in the gas phase were analyzed using the method of intersecting parabolas. The enthalpies and kinetic parameters of decomposition were calculated for 17 reactions. The breakdown of ethers is a two-center concerted reaction characterized by a very high classical potential barrier to the thermally neutral reaction (180-190 kJ/mol). The kinetic parameters (activation energies and rate constants) of back reactions of the formation of vinyl ethers in the addition of aldehydes or ketones to alkanes were calculated using the method of intersecting parabolas. The factors that influenced the activation energy of the decomposition and formation of ethers were discussed. Quantum-chemical calculations of several vinyl ether decomposition reactions were performed. Ether formation reactions were compared with the formation of unsaturated alcohols as competitive reactions, which can occur in the interaction of carbonyl compounds with alkenes.

  15. 40 CFR 721.3435 - Butoxy-substituted ether alkane.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...), (f), (g)(1)(ix), (g)(2)(i), (g)(2)(v), and (g)(5). In addition, the human health hazard statements shall include a statement that this substance may cause systemic toxicity and blood effects. (iii... gloves may be exposed in the work area. There must be no permeation of the gloves by the...

  16. 40 CFR 721.3435 - Butoxy-substituted ether alkane.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...), (f), (g)(1)(ix), (g)(2)(i), (g)(2)(v), and (g)(5). In addition, the human health hazard statements shall include a statement that this substance may cause systemic toxicity and blood effects. (iii... gloves may be exposed in the work area. There must be no permeation of the gloves by the...

  17. 40 CFR 721.3435 - Butoxy-substituted ether alkane.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...), (f), (g)(1)(ix), (g)(2)(i), (g)(2)(v), and (g)(5). In addition, the human health hazard statements shall include a statement that this substance may cause systemic toxicity and blood effects. (iii... gloves may be exposed in the work area. There must be no permeation of the gloves by the...

  18. 40 CFR 721.3435 - Butoxy-substituted ether alkane.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...), (f), (g)(1)(ix), (g)(2)(i), (g)(2)(v), and (g)(5). In addition, the human health hazard statements shall include a statement that this substance may cause systemic toxicity and blood effects. (iii... gloves may be exposed in the work area. There must be no permeation of the gloves by the...

  19. 40 CFR 721.3435 - Butoxy-substituted ether alkane.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...), (f), (g)(1)(ix), (g)(2)(i), (g)(2)(v), and (g)(5). In addition, the human health hazard statements shall include a statement that this substance may cause systemic toxicity and blood effects. (iii... gloves may be exposed in the work area. There must be no permeation of the gloves by the...

  20. Tetrabromodiphenyl ether

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Tetrabromodiphenyl ether ; CASRN 40088 - 47 - 9 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncar

  1. Pentabromodiphenyl ether

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Pentabromodiphenyl ether ; CASRN 32534 - 81 - 9 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncar

  2. Hexabromodiphenyl ether

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Hexabromodiphenyl ether ; CASRN 36483 - 60 - 0 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarc

  3. Ethyl ether

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Ethyl ether ; CASRN 60 - 29 - 7 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcinogenic Effect

  4. Octabromodiphenyl ether

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Octabromodiphenyl ether ; CASRN 32536 - 52 - 0 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarc

  5. Tribromodiphenyl ether

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Tribromodiphenyl ether ; CASRN 49690 - 94 - 0 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarci

  6. Nonabromodiphenyl ether

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Nonabromodiphenyl ether ; CASRN 63936 - 56 - 1 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarc

  7. Degradation of Hydrocarbons by Members of the Genus Candida II. Oxidation of n-Alkanes and 1-Alkenes by Candida lipolytica

    PubMed Central

    Klug, M. J.; Markovetz, A. J.

    1967-01-01

    Candida lipolytica ATCC 8661 was grown in a mineral-salts hydrocarbon medium. n-Alkanes and 1-alkenes with 14 through 18 carbon atoms were used as substrates. Ether extracts of culture fluids and cells obtained from cultures grown on the various substrates were analyzed by thin-layer and gas-liquid chromatography. Analyses of fluids from cultures grown on n-alkanes indicated a predominance of fatty acids and alcohols of the same chain length as the substrate. In addition, numerous other fatty acids and alcohols were present. Analyses of saponifiable and nonsaponifiable material obtained from the cells revealed essentially the same products. The presence of primary and secondary alcohols, as well as fatty acids, of the same chain length as the n-alkane substrate suggested that attack on both the methyl and α-methylene group was occurring. The significance of these two mechanisms in the degradation of n-alkanes by this organism was not evident from the data presented. Analyses of fluids from cultures grown on 1-alkenes indicated the presence of 1,2-diols, as well as ω-unsaturated fatty acids, of the same chain length as the substrate. Alcohols present were all unsaturated. Saponifiable and nonsaponifiable material obtained from cells contained essentially the same products. The presence of 1,2-diols and ω-unsaturated fatty acids of the same chain length as the substrate from cultures grown on 1-alkenes indicated that both the terminal methyl group and the terminal double bond were being attacked. PMID:6025303

  8. Effects on 2,2’,4,4’-Tetrabromodiphenyl ether (BDE 47) on Thyroxine Metabolism and Transport in Primary Rat and Human Hepatocytes

    EPA Science Inventory

    Polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs), a major class of brominated flame retardants, are used in consumer products including furniture, electronics, textiles, and plastics. PBDEs bioaccumulate in wildlife and humans; BDE 47 is the predominant PBDE congener detected and typicall...

  9. Primary role of cytochrome P450 2B6 in the oxidative metabolism of 2,2',4,4',6-pentabromodiphenyl ether (BDE-100) to hydroxylated BDEs.

    PubMed

    Gross, Michael S; Butryn, Deena M; McGarrigle, Barbara P; Aga, Diana S; Olson, James R

    2015-04-20

    Human exposure to polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) through various routes poses deleterious health effects. PBDEs are biotransformed into hydroxylated metabolites (OH-BDEs) via cytochrome P450s (P450s), which may add to their neurotoxic effects. This study characterizes the in vitro metabolism of 2,2',4,4',6-pentabromodiphenyl ether (BDE-100), one of the most abundant PBDE congeners found in humans, by recombinant human P450s and pooled human liver microsomes (HLMs). Ten recombinant P450s were individually incubated with BDE-100 to monitor P450-specific metabolism. P450 2B6 was found to be the predominant enzyme responsible for nearly all formation of six mono-OH-pentaBDE and two di-OH-pentaBDE metabolites. Four metabolites were identified as 3-hydroxy-2,2',4,4',6-pentabromodiphenyl ether (3-OH-BDE-100), 5'-hydroxy-2,2',4,4',6-pentabromodiphenyl ether (5'-OH-BDE-100), 6'-hydroxy-2,2',4,4',6-pentabromodiphenyl ether (6'-OH-BDE-100), and 4'-hydroxy-2,2',4,5',6-pentabromodiphenyl ether (4'-OH-BDE-103) through use of reference standards. The two remaining mono-OH-pentaBDE metabolites were hypothesized using mass spectral fragmentation characteristics of derivatized OH-BDEs, which allowed prediction of an ortho-OH-pentaBDE and a para-OH-pentaBDE positional isomer. Additional information based on theoretical boiling point calculations using COnductor-like Screening MOdel for Realistic Solvents (COSMO-RS) and experimental chromatographic retention times were used to identify the hypothesized metabolites as 2'-hydroxy-2,3',4,4',6-pentabromodiphenyl ether (2'-OH-BDE-119) and 4-hydroxy-2,2',4',5,6-pentabromodiphenyl ether (4-OH-BDE-91), respectively. Kinetic studies of BDE-100 metabolism using P450 2B6 and HLMs revealed Km values ranging from 4.9 to 7.0 μM and 6-10 μM, respectively, suggesting a high affinity toward the formation of OH-BDEs. Compared to the metabolism of 2,2',4,4'-tetrabromodiphenyl ether (BDE-47) and 2,2',4,4',5-pentabromodiphenyl ether (BDE-99

  10. Liquid-liquid interfaces of semifluorinated alkane diblock copolymers with water, alkanes, and perfluorinated alkanes.

    SciTech Connect

    Perahia, Dvora, Dr.; Pierce, Flint; Tsige, Mesfin; Grest, Gary Stephen, Dr.

    2008-08-01

    The liquid-liquid interface between semifluorinated alkane diblock copolymers of the form F3C(CF2)n-1-(CH2)m-1CH3 and water, protonated alkanes, and perfluorinated alkanes are studied by fully atomistic molecular dynamics simulations. A modified version of the OPLS-AA (Optimized Parameter for Liquid Simulation All-Atom) force field of Jorgensen et al. has been used to study the interfacial behavior of semifluorinated diblocks. Aqueous interfaces are found to be sharp, with correspondingly large values of the interfacial tension. Due to the reduced hydrophobicity of the protonated block compared to the fluorinated block, hydrogen enhancement is observed at the interface. Water dipoles in the interfacial region are found to be oriented nearly parallel to the liquid-liquid interface. A number of protonated alkanes and perfluorinated alkanes are found to be mutually miscible with the semifluorinated diblocks. For these liquids, interdiffusion follows the expected Fickian behavior, and concentration-dependent diffusivities are determined.

  11. Metabolism of Hydrocarbons in n-Alkane-Utilizing Anaerobic Bacteria.

    PubMed

    Wilkes, Heinz; Buckel, Wolfgang; Golding, Bernard T; Rabus, Ralf

    2016-01-01

    The glycyl radical enzyme-catalyzed addition of n-alkanes to fumarate creates a C-C-bond between two concomitantly formed stereogenic carbon centers. The configurations of the two diastereoisomers of the product resulting from n-hexane activation by the n-alkane-utilizing denitrifying bacterium strain HxN1, i.e. (1-methylpentyl)succinate, were assigned as (2S,1'R) and (2R,1'R). Experiments with stereospecifically deuterated n-(2,5-2H2)hexanes revealed that exclusively the pro-S hydrogen atom is abstracted from C2 of the n-alkane by the enzyme and later transferred back to C3 of the alkylsuccinate formed. These results indicate that the alkylsuccinate-forming reaction proceeds with an inversion of configuration at the carbon atom (C2) of the n-alkane forming the new C-C-bond, and thus stereochemically resembles a SN2-type reaction. Therefore, the reaction may occur in a concerted manner, which may avoid the highly energetic hex-2-yl radical as an intermediate. The reaction is associated with a significant primary kinetic isotope effect (kH/kD ≥3) for hydrogen, indicating that the homolytic C-H-bond cleavage is involved in the first irreversible step of the reaction mechanism. The (1-methylalkyl)succinate synthases of n-alkane-utilizing anaerobic bacteria apparently have very broad substrate ranges enabling them to activate not only aliphatic but also alkyl-aromatic hydrocarbons. Thus, two denitrifiers and one sulfate reducer were shown to convert the nongrowth substrate toluene to benzylsuccinate and further to the dead-end product benzoyl-CoA. For this purpose, however, the modified β-oxidation pathway known from alkylbenzene-utilizing bacteria was not employed, but rather the pathway used for n-alkane degradation involving CoA ligation, carbon skeleton rearrangement and decarboxylation. Furthermore, various n-alkane- and alkylbenzene-utilizing denitrifiers and sulfate reducers were found to be capable of forming benzyl alcohols from diverse alkylbenzenes

  12. Pathway of n-Alkane Oxidation in Cladosporium resinae

    PubMed Central

    Walker, J. D.; Cooney, J. J.

    1973-01-01

    Pathways of initial oxidation of n-alkanes were examined in two strains of Cladosporium resinae. Cells grow on dodecane and hexadecane and their primary alcohol and monoic acid derivatives. The homologous aldehydes do not support growth but are oxidized by intact cells and by cell-free preparations. Hexane and its derivatives support little or no growth, but cell extracts oxidize hexane, hexanol, and hexanal. Alkane oxidation by extracts is stimulated by reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (phosphate). Alcohol and aldehyde oxidation are stimulated by nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (phosphate), and reduced coenzymes accumulate in the presence of cyanide or azide. Extracts supplied with 14C-hexadecane convert it to the alcohol, aldehyde, and acid. Therefore, the major pathway for initial oxidation of n-alkanes is via the primary alcohol, aldehyde, and monoic acid, and the system can act on short-, intermediate-, and long-chain substrates. Thus, filamentous fungi appear to oxidize n-alkanes by pathways similar to those used by bacteria and yeasts. PMID:4146874

  13. Lessons from the polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs): precautionary principle, primary prevention, and the value of community-based body-burden monitoring using breast milk.

    PubMed Central

    Hooper, Kim; She, Jianwen

    2003-01-01

    Levels of chemicals in humans (body burdens) are useful indicators of environmental quality and of community health. Chemical body burdens are easily monitored using breast milk samples collected from first-time mothers (primiparae) with infants 2-8 weeks of age. Currently, there is no body-burden monitoring program using breast milk in the United States, although ad hoc systems operate successfully in several European countries. In this article we describe the value of such monitoring and important considerations of how it might be accomplished, drawing from our experiences with pilot monitoring projects. Breast milk has several advantages as a sampling matrix: It is simple and noninvasive, with samples collected by the mother. It monitors body burdens in reproductive-age women and it estimates in utero and nursing-infant exposures, all important to community health. Time-trend data from breast milk monitoring serve as a warning system that identifies chemicals whose body burdens and human exposures are increasing. Time trends also serve as a report card on how well past regulatory actions have reduced environmental chemical exposures. Body-burden monitoring using breast milk should include educational programs that encourage breast-feeding. Finally, and most important, clean breast milk matters to people and leads to primary prevention--the limiting of chemical exposures. We illustrate these advantages with polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs), a formerly obscure group of brominated flame retardants that rose to prominence and were regulated in Sweden when residue levels were found to be rapidly increasing in breast milk. A community-based body-burden monitoring program using breast milk could be set up in the United States in collaboration with the Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants, and Children (WIC). WIC has a large number of lactating first-time mothers: It has 6,000 clinics nationwide and serves almost half (47%) the infants born in

  14. Conversion of alkanes to linear alkylsilanes using an iridium-iron-catalysed tandem dehydrogenation-isomerization-hydrosilylation.

    PubMed

    Jia, Xiangqing; Huang, Zheng

    2016-02-01

    The conversion of inexpensive, saturated hydrocarbon feedstocks into value-added speciality chemicals using regiospecific, catalytic functionalization of alkanes is a major goal of organometallic chemistry. Linear alkylsilanes represent one such speciality chemical-they have a wide range of applications, including release coatings, silicone rubbers and moulding products. Direct, selective, functionalization of alkanes at primary C-H bonds is difficult and, to date, methods for catalytically converting alkanes into linear alkylsilanes are unknown. Here, we report a well-defined, dual-catalyst system for one-pot, two-step alkane silylations. The system comprises a pincer-ligated Ir catalyst for alkane dehydrogenation and an Fe catalyst that effects a subsequent tandem olefin isomerization-hydrosilylation. This method exhibits exclusive regioselectivity for the production of terminally functionalized alkylsilanes. This dual-catalyst strategy has also been applied to regioselective alkane borylations to form linear alkylboronate esters. PMID:26791899

  15. Conversion of alkanes to linear alkylsilanes using an iridium-iron-catalysed tandem dehydrogenation-isomerization-hydrosilylation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jia, Xiangqing; Huang, Zheng

    2016-02-01

    The conversion of inexpensive, saturated hydrocarbon feedstocks into value-added speciality chemicals using regiospecific, catalytic functionalization of alkanes is a major goal of organometallic chemistry. Linear alkylsilanes represent one such speciality chemical—they have a wide range of applications, including release coatings, silicone rubbers and moulding products. Direct, selective, functionalization of alkanes at primary C-H bonds is difficult and, to date, methods for catalytically converting alkanes into linear alkylsilanes are unknown. Here, we report a well-defined, dual-catalyst system for one-pot, two-step alkane silylations. The system comprises a pincer-ligated Ir catalyst for alkane dehydrogenation and an Fe catalyst that effects a subsequent tandem olefin isomerization-hydrosilylation. This method exhibits exclusive regioselectivity for the production of terminally functionalized alkylsilanes. This dual-catalyst strategy has also been applied to regioselective alkane borylations to form linear alkylboronate esters.

  16. Catalytic conversion of light alkanes

    SciTech Connect

    Lyons, J.E.

    1992-06-30

    The second Quarterly Report of 1992 on the Catalytic Conversion of Light Alkanes reviews the work done between April 1, 1992 and June 31, 1992 on the Cooperative Agreement. The mission of this work is to devise a new catalyst which can be used in a simple economic process to convert the light alkanes in natural gas to oxygenate products that can either be used as clean-burning, high octane liquid fuels, as fuel components or as precursors to liquid hydrocarbon uwspomdon fuel. During the past quarter we have continued to design, prepare, characterize and test novel catalysts for the mild selective reaction of light hydrocarbons with air or oxygen to produce alcohols directly. These catalysts are designed to form active metal oxo (MO) species and to be uniquely active for the homolytic cleavage of the carbon-hydrogen bonds in light alkanes producing intermediates which can form alcohols. We continue to investigate three molecular environments for the active catalytic species that we are trying to generate: electron-deficient macrocycles (PHASE I), polyoxometallates (PHASE II), and regular oxidic lattices including zeolites and related structures as well as other molecular surface structures having metal oxo groups (PHASE I).

  17. Millisecond Oxidation of Alkanes

    SciTech Connect

    Scott Han

    2011-09-30

    This project was undertaken in response to the Department of Energy's call to research and develop technologies 'that will reduce energy consumption, enhance economic competitiveness, and reduce environmental impacts of the domestic chemical industry.' The current technology at the time for producing 140 billion pounds per year of propylene from naphtha and Liquified Petroleum Gas (LPG) relied on energy- and capital-intensive steam crackers and Fluidized Catalytic Cracking (FCC) units. The propylene is isolated from the product stream in a costly separation step and subsequently converted to acrylic acid and other derivatives in separate production facilities. This project proposed a Short Contact Time Reactor (SCTR)-based catalytic oxydehydrogenation process that could convert propane to propylene and acrylic acid in a cost-effective and energy-efficient fashion. Full implementation of this technology could lead to sizeable energy, economic and environmental benefits for the U. S. chemical industry by providing up to 45 trillion BTUs/year, cost savings of $1.8 billion/year and a combined 35 million pounds/year reduction in environmental pollutants such as COx, NOx, and SOx. Midway through the project term, the program directive changed, which approval from the DOE and its review panel, from direct propane oxidation to acrylic acid at millisecond contact times to a two-step process for making acrylic acid from propane. The first step was the primary focus, namely the conversion of propane to propylene in high yields assisted by the presence of CO2. The product stream from step one was then to be fed directly into a commercially practiced propylene-to-acrylic acid tandem reactor system.

  18. Alkane-Based Urethane Potting Compounds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morris, D. E.

    1986-01-01

    New low viscosity urethanes easily mixed, molded, and outgassed. Alkane-based urethanes resist hydrolysis and oxidation and have excellent dielectric properties. Low-viscosity alkane-based urethane prepolymer prepared by one-step reaction of either isophorone diisocyanate or methyl-bis (4-cyclohexyl isocyanate) with hydrogenated, hydroxy-terminated polybutadiene (HTPBD).

  19. Poly(arylene ether)s containing pendent ethynyl groups

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hergenrother, Paul M. (Inventor); Jensen, Brian J. (Inventor)

    1996-01-01

    Poly(arylene ether)s containing pendent ethynyl and substituted ethynyl groups and poly(arylene ether) copolymers containing pendent ethynyl and substituted ethynyl groups are readily prepared from bisphenols containing ethynyl and substituted ethynyl groups. The resulting polymers are cured up to 350.degree. C. to provide crosslinked poly(arylene ether)s with good solvent resistance, high strength and modulus.

  20. Supported organoiridium catalysts for alkane dehydrogenation

    SciTech Connect

    Baker, R. Thomas; Sattelberger, Alfred P.; Li, Hongbo

    2013-09-03

    Solid supported organoiridium catalysts, a process for preparing such solid supported organoiridium catalysts, and the use of such solid supported organoiridium catalysts in dehydrogenation reactions of alkanes is provided. The catalysts can be easily recovered and recycled.

  1. Crown ethers in graphene

    SciTech Connect

    Guo, Junjie; Lee, Jaekwang; Contescu, Cristian I.; Gallego, Nidia C.; Pantelides, Sokrates T.; Pennycook, Stephen J.; Moyer, Bruce A.; Chisholm, Matthew F.

    2014-11-13

    Crown ethers, introduced by Pedersen1, are at their most basic level neutral rings constructed of oxygen atoms linked by two- or three-carbon chains. They have attracted special attention for their ability to selectively incorporate various atoms2 or molecules within the cavity formed by the ring3-6. This property has led to the use of crown ethers and their compounds in a wide range of chemical and biological applications7,8. However, crown ethers are typically highly flexible, frustrating efforts to rigidify them for many uses that demand higher binding affinity and selectivity9,10. In this Letter, we report atomic-resolution images of the same basic structures of the original crown ethers embedded in graphene. This arrangement constrains the crown ethers to be rigid and planar and thus uniquely suited for the many applications that crown ethers are known for. First-principles calculations show that the close similarity of the structures seen in graphene with those of crown ether molecules also extends to their selectivity towards specific metal cations depending on the ring size. Atoms (or molecules) incorporated within the crown ethers in graphene offer a simple environment that can be easily and systematically probed and modeled. Thus, we expect that this discovery will introduce a new wave of investigations and applications of chemically functionalized graphene.

  2. Crown ethers in graphene

    DOE PAGES

    Guo, Junjie; Lee, Jaekwang; Contescu, Cristian I.; Gallego, Nidia C.; Pantelides, Sokrates T.; Pennycook, Stephen J.; Moyer, Bruce A.; Chisholm, Matthew F.

    2014-11-13

    Crown ethers, introduced by Pedersen1, are at their most basic level neutral rings constructed of oxygen atoms linked by two- or three-carbon chains. They have attracted special attention for their ability to selectively incorporate various atoms2 or molecules within the cavity formed by the ring3-6. This property has led to the use of crown ethers and their compounds in a wide range of chemical and biological applications7,8. However, crown ethers are typically highly flexible, frustrating efforts to rigidify them for many uses that demand higher binding affinity and selectivity9,10. In this Letter, we report atomic-resolution images of the same basicmore » structures of the original crown ethers embedded in graphene. This arrangement constrains the crown ethers to be rigid and planar and thus uniquely suited for the many applications that crown ethers are known for. First-principles calculations show that the close similarity of the structures seen in graphene with those of crown ether molecules also extends to their selectivity towards specific metal cations depending on the ring size. Atoms (or molecules) incorporated within the crown ethers in graphene offer a simple environment that can be easily and systematically probed and modeled. Thus, we expect that this discovery will introduce a new wave of investigations and applications of chemically functionalized graphene.« less

  3. Solar photothermochemical alkane reverse combustion

    PubMed Central

    Chanmanee, Wilaiwan; Islam, Mohammad Fakrul; Dennis, Brian H.; MacDonnell, Frederick M.

    2016-01-01

    A one-step, gas-phase photothermocatalytic process for the synthesis of hydrocarbons, including liquid alkanes, aromatics, and oxygenates, with carbon numbers (Cn) up to C13, from CO2 and water is demonstrated in a flow photoreactor operating at elevated temperatures (180–200 °C) and pressures (1–6 bar) using a 5% cobalt on TiO2 catalyst and under UV irradiation. A parametric study of temperature, pressure, and partial pressure ratio revealed that temperatures in excess of 160 °C are needed to obtain the higher Cn products in quantity and that the product distribution shifts toward higher Cn products with increasing pressure. In the best run so far, over 13% by mass of the products were C5+ hydrocarbons and some of these, i.e., octane, are drop-in replacements for existing liquid hydrocarbons fuels. Dioxygen was detected in yields ranging between 64% and 150%. In principle, this tandem photochemical–thermochemical process, fitted with a photocatalyst better matched to the solar spectrum, could provide a cheap and direct method to produce liquid hydrocarbons from CO2 and water via a solar process which uses concentrated sunlight for both photochemical excitation to generate high-energy intermediates and heat to drive important thermochemical carbon-chain-forming reactions. PMID:26903631

  4. Solar photothermochemical alkane reverse combustion.

    PubMed

    Chanmanee, Wilaiwan; Islam, Mohammad Fakrul; Dennis, Brian H; MacDonnell, Frederick M

    2016-03-01

    A one-step, gas-phase photothermocatalytic process for the synthesis of hydrocarbons, including liquid alkanes, aromatics, and oxygenates, with carbon numbers (Cn) up to C13, from CO2 and water is demonstrated in a flow photoreactor operating at elevated temperatures (180-200 °C) and pressures (1-6 bar) using a 5% cobalt on TiO2 catalyst and under UV irradiation. A parametric study of temperature, pressure, and partial pressure ratio revealed that temperatures in excess of 160 °C are needed to obtain the higher Cn products in quantity and that the product distribution shifts toward higher Cn products with increasing pressure. In the best run so far, over 13% by mass of the products were C5+ hydrocarbons and some of these, i.e., octane, are drop-in replacements for existing liquid hydrocarbons fuels. Dioxygen was detected in yields ranging between 64% and 150%. In principle, this tandem photochemical-thermochemical process, fitted with a photocatalyst better matched to the solar spectrum, could provide a cheap and direct method to produce liquid hydrocarbons from CO2 and water via a solar process which uses concentrated sunlight for both photochemical excitation to generate high-energy intermediates and heat to drive important thermochemical carbon-chain-forming reactions.

  5. Metabolism and Cometabolism of Cyclic Ethers by a Filamentous Fungus, a Graphium sp.▿

    PubMed Central

    Skinner, Kristin; Cuiffetti, Lynda; Hyman, Michael

    2009-01-01

    The filamentous fungus Graphium sp. (ATCC 58400) grows on gaseous n-alkanes and diethyl ether. n-Alkane-grown mycelia of this strain also cometabolically oxidize the gasoline oxygenate methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE). In this study, we characterized the ability of this fungus to metabolize and cometabolize a range of cyclic ethers, including tetrahydrofuran (THF) and 1,4-dioxane (14D). This strain grew on THF and other cyclic ethers, including tetrahydropyran and hexamethylene oxide. However, more vigorous growth was consistently observed on the lactones and terminal diols potentially derived from these ethers. Unlike the case in all previous studies of microbial THF oxidation, a metabolite, γ-butyrolactone, was observed during growth of this fungus on THF. Growth on THF was inhibited by the same n-alkenes and n-alkynes that inhibit growth of this fungus on n-alkanes, while growth on γ-butyrolactone or succinate was unaffected by these inhibitors. Propane and THF also behaved as mutually competitive substrates, and propane-grown mycelia immediately oxidized THF, without a lag phase. Mycelia grown on propane or THF exhibited comparable high levels of hemiacetal-oxidizing activity that generated methyl formate from mixtures of formaldehyde and methanol. Collectively, these observations suggest that THF and n-alkanes may initially be oxidized by the same monooxygenase and that further transformation of THF-derived metabolites involves the activity of one or more alcohol dehydrogenases. Both propane- and THF-grown mycelia also slowly cometabolically oxidized 14D, although unlike THF oxidation, this reaction was not sustainable. Specific rates of THF, 14D, and MTBE degradation were very similar in THF- and propane-grown mycelia. PMID:19581469

  6. Comparison of removal of endodontic smear layer using ethylene glycol bis (beta-amino ethyl ether)-N, N, N', N'-tetraacetic acid and citric acid in primary teeth: A scanning electron microscopic study

    PubMed Central

    Hegde, Rahul J.; Bapna, Kavita

    2016-01-01

    Background: Root canal irrigants are considered momentous in their tissue dissolving property, eliminating microorganisms, and removing smear layer. The present study was aimed to compare the removal of endodontic smear layer using ethylene glycol bis (beta-amino ethyl ether)-N, N, N', N'-tetraacetic acid (EGTA) and citric acid solutions with saline as a control in primary anterior teeth. Materials and Methods: Thirty primary anterior teeth were chosen for the study. The teeth were distributed into three groups having ten teeth each. Following instrumentation, root canals of the first group were treated with 17% EGTA and the second group with 6% citric acid. Only saline was used as an irrigant for the control group. Then, the teeth were subjected to scanning electron microscopy (SEM) study. The scale given by Rome et al. for the smear layer removal was used in the present study. Results: The pictures from the SEM showed that among the tested irrigants, 17% EGTA + 5% sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl) group showed the best results when compared to other groups. Conclusion: The results advocate that the sequential irrigation of the pulp canal walls with 17% EGTA followed by 5% NaOCl produced efficacious and smear-free root canal walls. PMID:27307670

  7. Rapid ether and alcohol C-O bond hydrogenolysis catalyzed by tandem high-valent metal triflate + supported Pd catalysts.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhi; Assary, Rajeev S; Atesin, Abdurrahman C; Curtiss, Larry A; Marks, Tobin J

    2014-01-01

    The thermodynamically leveraged conversion of ethers and alcohols to saturated hydrocarbons is achieved efficiently with low loadings of homogeneous M(OTf)n + heterogeneous Pd tandem catalysts (M = transition metal; OTf = triflate; n = 4). For example, Hf(OTf)4 mediates rapid endothermic ether ⇌ alcohol and alcohol ⇌ alkene equilibria, while Pd/C catalyzes the subsequent, exothermic alkene hydrogenation. The relative C-O cleavage rates scale as 3° > 2° > 1°. The reaction scope extends to efficient conversion of biomass-derived ethers, such as THF derivatives, to the corresponding alkanes. PMID:24354599

  8. Structural insights into diversity and n-alkane biodegradation mechanisms of alkane hydroxylases

    PubMed Central

    Ji, Yurui; Mao, Guannan; Wang, Yingying; Bartlam, Mark

    2013-01-01

    Environmental microbes utilize four degradation pathways for the oxidation of n-alkanes. Although the enzymes degrading n-alkanes in different microbes may vary, enzymes functioning in the first step in the aerobic degradation of alkanes all belong to the alkane hydroxylases. Alkane hydroxylases are a class of enzymes that insert oxygen atoms derived from molecular oxygen into different sites of the alkane terminus (or termini) depending on the type of enzymes. In this review, we summarize the different types of alkane hydroxylases, their degrading steps, and compare typical enzymes from various classes with regard to their three-dimensional structures, in order to provide insights into how the enzymes mediate their different roles in the degradation of n-alkanes and what determines their different substrate ranges. Through the above analyzes, the degrading mechanisms of enzymes can be elucidated and molecular biological methods can be utilized to expand their catalytic roles in the petrochemical industry or in bioremediation of oil-contaminated environments. PMID:23519435

  9. Catalytic oxidation of dimethyl ether

    DOEpatents

    Zelenay, Piotr; Wu, Gang; Johnston, Christina M.; Li, Qing

    2016-05-10

    A composition for oxidizing dimethyl ether includes an alloy supported on carbon, the alloy being of platinum, ruthenium, and palladium. A process for oxidizing dimethyl ether involves exposing dimethyl ether to a carbon-supported alloy of platinum, ruthenium, and palladium under conditions sufficient to electrochemically oxidize the dimethyl ether.

  10. Biodegradation of variable-chain-length n-alkanes in Rhodococcus opacus R7 and the involvement of an alkane hydroxylase system in the metabolism

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Rhodococcus opacus R7 is a Gram-positive bacterium isolated from a polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon contaminated soil for its versatile metabolism; indeed the strain is able to grow on naphthalene, o-xylene, and several long- and medium-chain n-alkanes. In this work we determined the degradation of n-alkanes in Rhodococcus opacus R7 in presence of n-dodecane (C12), n-hexadecane (C16), n-eicosane (C20), n-tetracosane (C24) and the metabolic pathway in presence of C12. The consumption rate of C12 was 88%, of C16 was 69%, of C20 was 51% and of C24 it was 78%. The decrement of the degradation rate seems to be correlated to the length of the aliphatic chain of these hydrocarbons. On the basis of the metabolic intermediates determined by the R7 growth on C12, our data indicated that R. opacus R7 metabolizes medium-chain n-alkanes by the primary alcohol formation. This represents a difference in comparison with other Rhodococcus strains, in which a mixture of the two alcohols was observed. By GC-MSD analysis we also identified the monocarboxylic acid, confirming the terminal oxidation. Moreover, the alkB gene cluster from R. opacus R7 was isolated and its involvement in the n-alkane degradation system was investigated by the cloning of this genomic region into a shuttle-vector E. coli-Rhodococcus to evaluate the alkane hydroxylase activity. Our results showed an increased biodegradation of C12 in the recombinant strain R. erythropolis AP (pTipQT1-alkR7) in comparison with the wild type strain R. erythropolis AP. These data supported the involvement of the alkB gene cluster in the n-alkane degradation in the R7 strain. PMID:25401074

  11. Benzylic Phosphates in Friedel-Crafts Reactions with Activated and Unactivated Arenes: Access to Polyarylated Alkanes.

    PubMed

    Pallikonda, Gangaram; Chakravartya, Manab

    2016-03-01

    Easily reachable electron-poor/rich primary and secondary benzylic phosphates are suitably used as substrates for Friedel-Crafts benzylation reactions with only 1.2 equiv activated/deactivated arenes (no additional solvent) to access structurally and electronically diverse polyarylated alkanes with excellent yields and selectivities at room temperature. Specifically, diversely substituted di/triarylmethanes are generated within 2-30 min using this approach. A wide number of electron-poor polyarylated alkanes are easily accomplished through this route by just tuning the phosphates. PMID:26835977

  12. Some polybrominated diphenyl ether (PBDE) flame retardants with wide environmental distribution inhibit TCDD-induced EROD activity in primary cultured carp (Cyprinus carpio) hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Kuiper, R V; Bergman, A; Vos, J G; van den Berg, M

    2004-06-10

    Ethoxyresorufin-O-deethylase (EROD) activity, a catalytic function of the cytochrome P450 1A (CYP1A) microsomal oxygenase subfamily, is a popular biomarker for exposure to xenobiotics, polyhalogenated aromatic hydrocarbons (PHAHs) in particular. It has found wide use in aquatic pollution assessment both in vivo and in vitro. In such studies, subjects are often exposed to complex mixtures where various constituents can interfere with EROD-activity, possibly resulting in inadequate estimation of toxic hazard or biological response. The present study investigates the effects of polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs), a relatively new and increasingly detected group of environmental contaminants, on the validity of EROD activity as exposure marker in carp (Cyprinus carpio) hepatocytes. Freshly isolated hepatocytes of a genetically uniform strain of male carp were co-exposed to 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) at concentrations of 0, 1, 3, 10, 30, and 100 pM, and one of the highly purified PBDE/PCB congeners (at concentrations of 0, 0.25, and 2.5 microM) or cleaned-up and untreated DE-71 samples (0, 0.1, and 1 microM). PBDEs were selected from the 209 possible congeners based on their relative abundance in environmental samples: BDE-47, BDE-99, BDE-100, and BDE-153. A tentative metabolite of BDE-47, 6OH-BDE-47, was also included. In addition, a commercial pentabrominated dipenylether mixture (DE-71) was tested for interference with EROD activity both with and without clean-up by carbon fractionating which removed possible planar contaminants. Polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB)-153, a reported inhibitor of EROD activity in flounder, was included for comparison. Cells were cultured for a total period of 8 days; exposure started at day 3 after cell isolation. After 5 days of exposure, cell pellets were frozen before EROD activity was determined. Upon exposure to TCDD, the cells responded with increased EROD activity as expected. Significant reduction of TCDD

  13. Multiple sources of alkanes in Quaternary oceanic sediment of Antarctica

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kvenvolden, K.A.; Rapp, J.B.; Golan-Bac, M.; Hostettler, F.D.

    1987-01-01

    Normal alkanes (n-C13n-C36), isoprenoid hydrocarbons (i-C15, i-C16, i-C18, i-C19, and i-C20) triterpanes (C27C32), and (C27C29) are present in low concentrations offshore Antarctica in near-surface, Quaternary sediment of the Wilkes Land continental margin and of the western Ross Sea. The distributions of these hydrocarbons are interpreted relative to possible sources and processes. The hydrocarbons appear to be mixtures of primary and recycled material from marine and terrigenous sources. The n-alkanes are most abundant and are characterized by two distinct populations, one of probable marine origin and the other likely from terrigenous, vascular plant sources. Because the continent of Antarctica today is devoid of higher plants, the plant-derived hydrocarbons in these offshore sediments probably came from wind-blown material and recycled Antarctic sediment that contains land-plant remains from an earlier period of time. Isoprenoid hydrocarbons are partially recycled and mainly of marine origin; the dominance of pristane over phytane suggests oxic paleoenvironmental conditions. Both modern and ancient triterpanes and steranes are present, and the distribution of these indicates a mixture of primary and recycled bacterial, algal, and possible higher-plant materials. Although the sampled sediments were deposited during the Quaternary, they apparently contain a significant component of hydrocarbons of pre-Quaternary age. ?? 1987.

  14. n-Alkane distributions as indicators of novel ecosystem development in western boreal forest soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Norris, Charlotte; Dungait, Jennifer; Quideau, Sylvie

    2013-04-01

    Novel ecosystem development is occurring within the western boreal forest of Canada due to land reclamation following surface mining in the Athabasca Oil Sands Region. Sphagnum peat is the primary organic matter amendment used to reconstruct soils in the novel ecosystems. We hypothesised that ecosystem recovery would be indicated by an increasing similarity in the biomolecular characteristics of novel reconstructed soil organic matter (SOM) derived from peat to those of natural boreal ecosystems. In this study, we evaluated the use of the homologous series of very long chain (>C20) n-alkanes with odd-over-even predominance as biomarker signatures to monitor the re-establishment of boreal forests on reconstructed soils. The lipids were extracted from dominant vegetation inputs and SOM from a series of natural and novel ecosystem reference plots. We observed unique very long n-alkane signatures of the source vegetation, e.g. Sphagnum sp. was dominated by C31 and aspen (Populus tremuloides Michx.) leaves by C25. Greater concentrations of very long chain n-alkanes were extracted from natural than novel ecosystem SOM (p<0.01), and their distribution differed between the two systems (p<0.001) and reflected the dominant vegetation input. Our results indicate that further research is required to clarify the influence of vegetation or disturbance on the signature of very long chain n-alkanes in SOM; however, the use of n-alkanes as biomarkers of ecosystem development is a promising method.

  15. Dehydrogenation of n-alkanes catalyzed by iridium ``pincer`` complexes: Regioselective formation of {alpha}-olefins

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, F.; Singh, B.; Goldman, A.S.; Pak, E.B.; Jensen, C.M.

    1999-04-28

    The development of methods for the functionalization of alkanes is of cardinal importance in catalytic chemistry. A specific functionalization of particularly great potential value is the conversion of n-alkanes to the corresponding 1-alkenes ({alpha}-olefins) since these serve as precursors for a wide range of commodity-scale chemicals (>2 {times} 10{sup 9} kg/yr). Such a conversion is also an intriguing challenge as viewed from a fundamental perspective. n-Alkanes are the simplest organic molecules with the potential to undergo regioselective transformations; {alpha}-olefins are the thermodynamically least stable of the corresponding double-bond isomers and any mechanism for their formation must presumably involve activation of the strongest bond (primary C-{single_bond}H) in the molecule.

  16. The hydrodeoxygenation of bioderived furans into alkanes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sutton, Andrew D.; Waldie, Fraser D.; Wu, Ruilian; Schlaf, Marcel; ‘Pete' Silks, Louis A.; Gordon, John C.

    2013-05-01

    The conversion of biomass into fuels and chemical feedstocks is one part of a drive to reduce the world's dependence on crude oil. For transportation fuels in particular, wholesale replacement of a fuel is logistically problematic, not least because of the infrastructure that is already in place. Here, we describe the catalytic defunctionalization of a series of biomass-derived molecules to provide linear alkanes suitable for use as transportation fuels. These biomass-derived molecules contain a variety of functional groups, including olefins, furan rings and carbonyl groups. We describe the removal of these in either a stepwise process or a one-pot process using common reagents and catalysts under mild reaction conditions to provide n-alkanes in good yields and with high selectivities. Our general synthetic approach is applicable to a range of precursors with different carbon content (chain length). This allows the selective generation of linear alkanes with carbon chain lengths between eight and sixteen carbons.

  17. The hydrodeoxygenation of bioderived furans into alkanes.

    PubMed

    Sutton, Andrew D; Waldie, Fraser D; Wu, Ruilian; Schlaf, Marcel; Silks, Louis A Pete; Gordon, John C

    2013-05-01

    The conversion of biomass into fuels and chemical feedstocks is one part of a drive to reduce the world's dependence on crude oil. For transportation fuels in particular, wholesale replacement of a fuel is logistically problematic, not least because of the infrastructure that is already in place. Here, we describe the catalytic defunctionalization of a series of biomass-derived molecules to provide linear alkanes suitable for use as transportation fuels. These biomass-derived molecules contain a variety of functional groups, including olefins, furan rings and carbonyl groups. We describe the removal of these in either a stepwise process or a one-pot process using common reagents and catalysts under mild reaction conditions to provide n-alkanes in good yields and with high selectivities. Our general synthetic approach is applicable to a range of precursors with different carbon content (chain length). This allows the selective generation of linear alkanes with carbon chain lengths between eight and sixteen carbons. PMID:23609095

  18. Enzymes and genes involved in aerobic alkane degradation

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Wanpeng; Shao, Zongze

    2013-01-01

    Alkanes are major constituents of crude oil. They are also present at low concentrations in diverse non-contaminated because many living organisms produce them as chemo-attractants or as protecting agents against water loss. Alkane degradation is a widespread phenomenon in nature. The numerous microorganisms, both prokaryotic and eukaryotic, capable of utilizing alkanes as a carbon and energy source, have been isolated and characterized. This review summarizes the current knowledge of how bacteria metabolize alkanes aerobically, with a particular emphasis on the oxidation of long-chain alkanes, including factors that are responsible for chemotaxis to alkanes, transport across cell membrane of alkanes, the regulation of alkane degradation gene and initial oxidation. PMID:23755043

  19. Improved Alkane Production in Nitrogen-Fixing and Halotolerant Cyanobacteria via Abiotic Stresses and Genetic Manipulation of Alkane Synthetic Genes.

    PubMed

    Kageyama, Hakuto; Waditee-Sirisattha, Rungaroon; Sirisattha, Sophon; Tanaka, Yoshito; Mahakhant, Aparat; Takabe, Teruhiro

    2015-07-01

    Cyanobacteria possess the unique capacity to produce alkane. In this study, effects of nitrogen deficiency and salt stress on biosynthesis of alkanes were investigated in three kinds of cyanobacteria. Intracellular alkane accumulation was increased in nitrogen-fixing cyanobacterium Anabaena sp. PCC7120, but decreased in non-diazotrophic cyanobacterium Synechococcus elongatus PCC7942 and constant in a halotolerant cyanobacterium Aphanothece halophytica under nitrogen-deficient condition. We also found that salt stress increased alkane accumulation in Anabaena sp. PCC7120 and A. halophytica. The expression levels of two alkane synthetic genes were not upregulated significantly under nitrogen deficiency or salt stress in Anabaena sp. PCC7120. The transformant Anabaena sp. PCC7120 cells with additional alkane synthetic gene set from A. halophytica increased intracellular alkane accumulation level compared to control cells. These results provide a prospect to improve bioproduction of alkanes in nitrogen-fixing halotolerant cyanobacteria via abiotic stresses and genetic engineering.

  20. Detailed chemical kinetic models for large n-alkanes and iso-alkanes found in conventional and F-T diesel fuels

    SciTech Connect

    Westbrook, C K; Pitz, W J; Mehl, M; Curran, H J

    2009-03-09

    n-Hexadecane and 2,2,4,4,6,8,8-heptamethylnonane represent the primary reference fuels for diesel that are used to determine cetane number, a measure of the ignition property of diesel fuel. With the development of chemical kinetics models for both primary reference fuels, a new capability is now available to model diesel fuel ignition. Additionally, we have developed chemical kinetic models for a whole series of large n-alkanes and a large iso-alkane to represent these chemical classes in fuel surrogates for conventional and future fuels. These chemical kinetic models are used to predict the effect of the aforementioned fuel components on ignition characteristics under conditions found in internal combustion engines.

  1. Nitrated metalloporphyrins as catalysts for alkane oxidation

    DOEpatents

    Ellis, P.E. Jr.; Lyons, J.E.

    1994-01-18

    Compositions of matter comprising nitro-substituted metal complexes of porphyrins are catalysts for the oxidation of alkanes. The metal is iron, chromium, manganese, ruthenium, copper or cobalt. The porphyrin ring has nitro groups attached thereto in meso and/or [beta]-pyrrolic positions.

  2. Reflectance spectroscopy of organic compounds: 1. Alkanes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Clark, R.N.; Curchin, J.M.; Hoefen, T.M.; Swayze, G.A.

    2009-01-01

    Reflectance spectra of the organic compounds comprising the alkane series are presented from the ultraviolet to midinfrared, 0.35 to 15.5 /??m. Alkanes are hydrocarbon molecules containing only single carbon-carbon bonds, and are found naturally on the Earth and in the atmospheres of the giant planets and Saturn's moon, Titan. This paper presents the spectral properties of the alkanes as the first in a series of papers to build a spectral database of organic compounds for use in remote sensing studies. Applications range from mapping the environment on the Earth, to the search for organic molecules and life in the solar system and throughout the. universe. We show that the spectral reflectance properties of organic compounds are rich, with major diagnostic spectral features throughout the spectral range studied. Little to no spectral change was observed as a function of temperature and only small shifts and changes in the width of absorption bands were observed between liquids and solids, making remote detection of spectral properties throughout the solar system simpler. Some high molecular weight organic compounds contain single-bonded carbon chains and have spectra similar to alkanes even ' when they fall into other families. Small spectral differences are often present allowing discrimination among some compounds, further illustrating the need to catalog spectral properties for accurate remote sensing identification with spectroscopy.

  3. Nitrated metalloporphyrins as catalysts for alkane oxidation

    DOEpatents

    Ellis, Jr., Paul E.; Lyons, James E.

    1992-01-01

    Alkanes are oxidized by contact with oxygen-containing gas in the presence as catalyst of a metalloporphyrin in which hydrogen atoms in the porphyrin ring have been replaced with one or more nitro groups. Hydrogen atoms in the porphyrin ring may also be substituted with halogen atoms.

  4. Nitrated metalloporphyrins as catalysts for alkane oxidation

    DOEpatents

    Ellis, Jr., Paul E.; Lyons, James E.

    1994-01-01

    Compositions of matter comprising nitro-substituted metal complexes of porphyrins are catalysts for the oxidation of alkanes. The metal is iron, chromium, manganese, ruthenium, copper or cobalt. The porphyrin ring has nitro groups attached thereto in meso and/or .beta.-pyrrolic positions.

  5. Accelerated Molecular Dynamics Simulation of Alkane Desorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McLaughlin, Kelly; Fichthorn, Kristen

    2006-03-01

    Thermal desorption has been the focus of much surface science research. Studies of alkanes on graphite^1 and gold^2 have shown prefactors that are constant with alkane chain length but vary by over six orders of magnitude. Other studies on magnesium oxide^3 and gold^4 show a prefactor that increases with increasing chain length. We have developed an all-atom model to study alkane desorption from graphite. Transition state theory is used to obtain rate constants from the simulation. Accelerated MD is used to extend the desorption simulation to experimentally relevant temperatures. Our results show a prefactor that increases with increasing chain length. We predict that it will become constant as internal conformational changes occur significantly. We examine the effect of desorption environment through varying the alkane surface coverage. 1. K.R. Paserba and A.J. Gellman, J. Chem. Phys. 115, 6737 (2001). 2. S.M. Wetterer et al., J. Phys. Chem. 102, 9266 (1998). 3. S.L. Tait et al., J. Chem. Phys. 122, 164707 (2005). 4. K.A. Fichthorn and R.A. Miron, Phys. Rev. Lett. 89, 196103 (2002).

  6. The origin of alkanes found in human skin surface lipids

    SciTech Connect

    Bortz, J.T.; Wertz, P.W.; Downing, D.T. )

    1989-12-01

    Lipids extracted from human skin contain variable amounts of paraffin hydrocarbons. Although the composition of these alkanes strongly resembles petroleum waxes, it has been proposed that they are biosynthetic products of human skin. To investigate this question, skin surface lipids from 15 normal subjects were analyzed for the amount and composition of alkanes, using quantitative thin-layer chromatography and quartz capillary gas chromatography. The alkanes were found to constitute 0.5% to 1.7% of the skin lipids. Subjects differed greatly in the chain length distribution of their alkanes between 15 and 35 carbon atoms, and in the relative amounts of normal alkanes (like those in petroleum waxes) and branched chain alkanes (like those in petroleum lubricating oils). In 6 subjects, the alkane content of cerumen from each ear was examined to investigate whether alkanes arrive at the skin surface by a systemic route or by direct contact with environmental surfaces. No trace of alkanes was found in 11 of the 12 cerumen samples. Using a tandem accelerator mass spectrometer for carbon-14 dating, a combined sample of the skin surface alkanes was found to have a theoretical age of 30,950 years, similar to that of a sample of petrolatum. These analyses indicate that the alkanes found on the surface of human skin are mixtures of a variety of petroleum distillation fractions that are acquired by direct contamination from the environment.

  7. Chloromethyl methyl ether (CMME)

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Chloromethyl methyl ether ( CMME ) ; CASRN 107 - 30 - 2 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments fo

  8. Triethylene glycol monoethyl ether

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Triethylene glycol monoethyl ether ; CASRN 112 - 50 - 5 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments fo

  9. Triethylene glycol monobutyl ether

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Triethylene glycol monobutyl ether ; CASRN 143 - 22 - 6 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments fo

  10. p-Bromodiphenyl ether

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    p - Bromodiphenyl ether ; CASRN 101 - 55 - 3 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcin

  11. Propylene glycol monoethyl ether

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Propylene glycol monoethyl ether ; CASRN 52125 - 53 - 8 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments fo

  12. Oxidative dehydrogenation of alkanes to unsaturated hydrocarbons

    DOEpatents

    Kung, Harold H.; Chaar, Mohamed A.

    1988-01-01

    Oxidative dehydrogenation of alkanes to unsaturated hydrocarbons is carried out over metal vanadate catalysts under oxidizing conditions. The vanadate catalysts are represented by the formulas M.sub.3 (VO.sub.4).sub.2 and MV.sub.2 O.sub.6, M representing Mg, Zn, Ca, Pb, or Cd. The reaction is carried out in the presence of oxygen, but the formation of oxygenate by-products is suppressed.

  13. Oxidative dehydrogenation of alkanes to unsaturated hydrocarbons

    DOEpatents

    Kung, H.H.; Chaar, M.A.

    1988-10-11

    Oxidative dehydrogenation of alkanes to unsaturated hydrocarbons is carried out over metal vanadate catalysts under oxidizing conditions. The vanadate catalysts are represented by the formulas M[sub 3](VO[sub 4])[sub 2] and MV[sub 2]O[sub 6], M representing Mg, Zn, Ca, Pb, or Cd. The reaction is carried out in the presence of oxygen, but the formation of oxygenate by-products is suppressed.

  14. Metabolism of Diethyl Ether and Cometabolism of Methyl tert-Butyl Ether by a Filamentous Fungus, a Graphium sp

    PubMed Central

    Hardison, L. K.; Curry, S. S.; Ciuffetti, L. M.; Hyman, M. R.

    1997-01-01

    In this study, evidence for two novel metabolic processes catalyzed by a filamentous fungus, Graphium sp. strain ATCC 58400, is presented. First, our results indicate that this Graphium sp. can utilize the widely used solvent diethyl ether (DEE) as the sole source of carbon and energy for growth. The kinetics of biomass accumulation and DEE consumption closely followed each other, and the molar growth yield on DEE was indistinguishable from that with n-butane. n-Butane-grown mycelia also immediately oxidized DEE without the extracellular accumulation of organic oxidation products. This suggests a common pathway for the oxidation of both compounds. Acetylene, ethylene, and other unsaturated gaseous hydrocarbons completely inhibited the growth of this Graphium sp. on DEE and DEE oxidation by n-butane-grown mycelia. Second, our results indicate that gaseous n-alkane-grown Graphium mycelia can cometabolically degrade the gasoline oxygenate methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE). The degradation of MTBE was also completely inhibited by acetylene, ethylene, and other unsaturated hydrocarbons and was strongly influenced by n-butane. Two products of MTBE degradation, tert-butyl formate (TBF) and tert-butyl alcohol (TBA), were detected. The kinetics of product formation suggest that TBF production temporally precedes TBA accumulation and that TBF is hydrolyzed both biotically and abiotically to yield TBA. Extracellular accumulation of TBA accounted for only a maximum of 25% of the total MTBE consumed. Our results suggest that both DEE oxidation and MTBE oxidation are initiated by cytochrome P-450-catalyzed reactions which lead to scission of the ether bonds in these compounds. Our findings also suggest a potential role for gaseous n-alkane-oxidizing fungi in the remediation of MTBE contamination. PMID:16535667

  15. Alkane metathesis by tandem alkane-dehydrogenation-olefin-metathesis catalysis and related chemistry.

    PubMed

    Haibach, Michael C; Kundu, Sabuj; Brookhart, Maurice; Goldman, Alan S

    2012-06-19

    Methods for the conversion of both renewable and non-petroleum fossil carbon sources to transportation fuels that are both efficient and economically viable could greatly enhance global security and prosperity. Currently, the major route to convert natural gas and coal to liquids is Fischer-Tropsch catalysis, which is potentially applicable to any source of synthesis gas including biomass and nonconventional fossil carbon sources. The major desired products of Fischer-Tropsch catalysis are n-alkanes that contain 9-19 carbons; they comprise a clean-burning and high combustion quality diesel, jet, and marine fuel. However, Fischer-Tropsch catalysis also results in significant yields of the much less valuable C(3) to C(8)n-alkanes; these are also present in large quantities in oil and gas reserves (natural gas liquids) and can be produced from the direct reduction of carbohydrates. Therefore, methods that could disproportionate medium-weight (C(3)-C(8)) n-alkanes into heavy and light n-alkanes offer great potential value as global demand for fuel increases and petroleum reserves decrease. This Account describes systems that we have developed for alkane metathesis based on the tandem operation of catalysts for alkane dehydrogenation and olefin metathesis. As dehydrogenation catalysts, we used pincer-ligated iridium complexes, and we initially investigated Schrock-type Mo or W alkylidene complexes as olefin metathesis catalysts. The interoperability of the catalysts typically represents a major challenge in tandem catalysis. In our systems, the rate of alkane dehydrogenation generally limits the overall reaction rate, whereas the lifetime of the alkylidene complexes at the relatively high temperatures required to obtain practical dehydrogenation rates (ca. 125 -200 °C) limits the total turnover numbers. Accordingly, we have focused on the development and use of more active dehydrogenation catalysts and more stable olefin-metathesis catalysts. We have used thermally

  16. Ether and hydrocarbon production

    SciTech Connect

    Harandi, M.N.; Owen, H.

    1991-03-19

    This patent describes a continuous process for converting lower aliphatic alkanol and olefinic hydrocarbon to alkyl tertiary-alkyl ethers and C{sub 5} + gasoline boiling range hydrocarbons. It comprises contacting alkanol and a light olefinic hydrocarbon stream rich in isobutylene and other C{sub 4} isomeric hydrocarbons under iso-olefin etherification conditions in an etherification reaction zone containing acid etherification catalyst; separating etherification effluent to recover a light stream comprising unreacted alkanol and light olefinic hydrocarbon and a liquid product stream containing alkyl tertiary-butyl ether; and contacting the light stream with acidic, medium pore metallosilicate catalyst under alkanol and hydrocarbon conversion conditions whereby C{sub 5} + gasoline boiling range hydrocarbons are produced.

  17. Crown Ethers in Nonaqueous Electrolytes for Lithium/Air Batteries

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Wu; Xiao, Jie; Wang, Deyu; Zhang, Jian; Zhang, Jiguang

    2010-02-04

    The effects of three crown ethers, 12-crown-4, 15-crown-5, and 18-crown-6, as additives and co-solvents in non-aqueous electrolytes on the cell performance of primary Li/air batteries operated in a dry air environment were investigated. Crown ethers have large effects on the discharge performance of non-aqueous electrolytes in Li/air batteries. A small amount (normally less than 10% by weight or volume in electrolytes) of 12-Crown-4 and 15-crown-5 reduces the battery performance and a minimum discharge capacity appears at the crown ether content of ca. 5% in the electrolytes. However, when the content increases to about 15%, both crown ethers improve the capacity of Li/air cells by about 28% and 16%, respectively. 15-Crown-5 based electrolytes even show a maximum discharge capacity in the crown ether content range from 10% to 15%. On the other hand, the increase of 18-crown-6 amount in the electrolytes continuously lowers of the cell performance. The different battery performances of these three crown ethers in electrolytes are explained by the combined effects from the electrolytes’ contact angle, oxygen solubility, viscosity, ionic conductivity, and the stability of complexes formed between crown ether molecules and lithium ions.

  18. Copper-Catalyzed Intermolecular Amidation and Imidation of Unactivated Alkanes

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    We report a set of rare copper-catalyzed reactions of alkanes with simple amides, sulfonamides, and imides (i.e., benzamides, tosylamides, carbamates, and phthalimide) to form the corresponding N-alkyl products. The reactions lead to functionalization at secondary C–H bonds over tertiary C–H bonds and even occur at primary C–H bonds. [(phen)Cu(phth)] (1-phth) and [(phen)Cu(phth)2] (1-phth2), which are potential intermediates in the reaction, have been isolated and fully characterized. The stoichiometric reactions of 1-phth and 1-phth2 with alkanes, alkyl radicals, and radical probes were investigated to elucidate the mechanism of the amidation. The catalytic and stoichiometric reactions require both copper and tBuOOtBu for the generation of N-alkyl product. Neither 1-phth nor 1-phth2 reacted with excess cyclohexane at 100 °C without tBuOOtBu. However, the reactions of 1-phth and 1-phth2 with tBuOOtBu afforded N-cyclohexylphthalimide (Cy-phth), N-methylphthalimide, and tert-butoxycyclohexane (Cy-OtBu) in approximate ratios of 70:20:30, respectively. Reactions with radical traps support the intermediacy of a tert-butoxy radical, which forms an alkyl radical intermediate. The intermediacy of an alkyl radical was evidenced by the catalytic reaction of cyclohexane with benzamide in the presence of CBr4, which formed exclusively bromocyclohexane. Furthermore, stoichiometric reactions of [(phen)Cu(phth)2] with tBuOOtBu and (Ph(Me)2CO)2 at 100 °C without cyclohexane afforded N-methylphthalimide (Me-phth) from β-Me scission of the alkoxy radicals to form a methyl radical. Separate reactions of cyclohexane and d12-cyclohexane with benzamide showed that the turnover-limiting step in the catalytic reaction is the C–H cleavage of cyclohexane by a tert-butoxy radical. These mechanistic data imply that the tert-butoxy radical reacts with the C–H bonds of alkanes, and the subsequent alkyl radical combines with 1-phth2 to form the corresponding N-alkyl imide product

  19. The idiosyncrasies of (BBIM-alkane)DB30C10 MIMs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosh, Sabari; Chaudhuri, Tandrima; Padmanaban, E.; Mukhopadhyay, Chhanda

    2015-10-01

    In this present study we explore the mechanically interlocked molecules (MIMs) resulting from the combination of the BBIM(bis-benzimidazolium)-alkane systems with DB30C10 (Dibenzo-30-crown-10) in solvent acetonitrile. The (BBIM-alkane)DB30C10 systems chosen for the study are (BBIM)DB30C10, (BBIM-methane)DB30C10, (BBIM-ethane)DB30C10, (BBIM-propane)DB30C10 and (BBIM-butane)DB30C10. 1H NMR, 2D-NMR (COSY and NOESY), Monte Carlo calculations and HRMS have been done on the studied assemblies. Even though (BBIM)DB30C10 and (BBIM-methane)DB30C10 form normal threaded structures, in (BBIM-ethane)DB30C10, (BBIM-propane)DB30C10 and (BBIM-butane)DB30C10 systems the respective axles are cradled inside the crown ether. That is, the axles BBIM-ethane, BBIM-propane and BBIM-butane are cradled inside the boat-like cavity of DB30C10.

  20. Poly(arylene ether)s That Resist Atomic Oxygen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Connell, John W.; Hergenrother, Paul; Smith, Joseph G., Jr.

    1994-01-01

    Novel poly(arylene ether)s containing phosphine oxide (PAEPO's) made via aromatic nucleophilic displacement reactions of activated aromatic dihalides (or, in some cases, activated aromatic dinitro compounds) with new bisphenol monomers containing phosphine oxide. Exhibited favorable combination of physical and mechanical properties and resistance to monatomic oxygen in oxygen plasma environment. Useful as adhesives, coatings, films, membranes, moldings, and composite matrices.

  1. Isothermal behavior of the Soret effect in nonionic microemulsions: size variation by using different n-alkanes.

    PubMed

    Naumann, Philipp; Datta, Sascha; Sottmann, Thomas; Arlt, Bastian; Frielinghaus, Henrich; Wiegand, Simone

    2014-03-27

    In this work we investigate the thermodiffusion behavior of microemulsion droplets of the type H2O/n-alkane/C12E5 (pentaethylene glycol monododecyl ether) using the n-alkanes: n-octane, n-decane, n-dodecane, and n-tetradecane. In order to determine the thermodiffusion behavior of these microemulsion droplets, we apply the infrared thermal diffusion forced Rayleigh scattering (IR-TDFRS) technique. We measure the Soret coefficient (ST) as function of the structure upon approaching the emulsification failure boundary (efb) and as a function of the radius of the spherical o/w microemulsion droplets close to the efb. By varying the chain length of the n-alkanes, we are able to study the thermodiffusion behavior of spherical o/w microemulsion droplets of different sizes at the same temperature. In the investigated range a linear dependence of the Soret coefficient as function of the radius was found. By use of a proposed relationship between the Soret coefficient and the temperature dependence of the interfacial tension, the transition layer l could be determined for the first time. Additionally, small angle neutron scattering (SANS) experiments are performed to determine the size and to prove that the shape of the microemulsion droplets is spherical close to the efb. Accordingly, the scattering curves could be quantitatively described by a combination of a spherical core-shell form factor and sticky hard sphere structure factor. PMID:24568715

  2. Intracluster ion-molecule reactions of Ti+ with ether clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koo, Young-Mi; Kim, Min-Kyung; Jung, Kwang-Woo

    2005-05-01

    The intracluster ion-molecule reactions of Ti+(CH3OR)n (R = CH3, n-C3H7, n-C4H9, t-C4H9) complexes produced by the mixing of laser-vaporized plasmas and pulsed supersonic beams were investigated using a reflectron time-of-flight mass spectrometer (RTOFMS). The reactions of Ti+ with dimethyl ether clusters were found to be dominated by the CH3 elimination reaction, which produces Ti+(OCH3)m(CH3OCH3)n clusters (m = 1-3). The mass spectra resulting from the reactions of Ti+ with the other ether clusters indicate the formation of major sequences of heterocluster ions with the formula Ti+(OCH3)x(OR)y(CH3OR)n, where x = 1-3 and y = 0-2. These sequences are attributed to the insertion of Ti+ ions into the CO bonds of the ether molecules within the heteroclusters, followed by alkyl radical elimination. The prevalence of radical elimination of longer alkyl groups rather than of CH3 radicals suggests that R elimination from the [CH3OTi+R] intermediate is the preferred decomposition pathway after the selective insertion of a Ti+ ion into the CO bond of an OR group. Our results also indicate that consecutive insertions of a Ti+ ion can occur for up to three precursor molecules. The experiments also show that the molecular eliminations of H2 and alkanes, resulting from CH and CC bond insertion, respectively, play an increasingly important role as the size of the alkyl group (R) in the ether molecule increases. The reaction energetics and the formation mechanisms of the observed heterocluster ions are also discussed.

  3. Thermal conductivity of liquid n-alkanes

    SciTech Connect

    Calado, J.C.G.; Fareleira, J.M.N.A.; Mardolcar, U.V.; Nieto de Castro, C.A.

    1988-05-01

    The thermal conductivity of liquids has been shown in the past to be difficult to predict with a reasonable accuracy, due to the lack of accurate experimental data and reliable prediction schemes. However, data of a high accuracy, and covering wide density ranges, obtained recently in laboratories in Boulder, Lisbon, and London with the transient hot-wire technique, can be used to revise an existing correlation scheme and to develop a new universal predictive technique for the thermal conductivity of liquid normal alkanes. The proposed correlation scheme is constructed on a theoretically based treatment of the van der Waals model of a liquid, which permits the prediction of the density dependence and the thermal conductivity of liquid n-alkanes, methane to tridecane, for temperatures between 110 and 370 K and pressures up to 0.6 MPa, i.e., for 0.3 less than or equal to T/T/sub c/ less than or equal to 0.7 and 2.4 less than or equal to rho/rho/sub c/ less than or equal to 3.7, with an accuracy of +/-1%, given a known value of the thermal conductivity of the fluid at the desired temperature. A generalization of the hard-core volumes obtained, as a function of the number of carbon atoms, showed that it was possible to predict the thermal conductivity of pentane to tetradecane +/- 2%, without the necessity of available experimental measurements.

  4. Products of Chemistry: Alkanes: Abundant, Pervasive, Important, and Essential.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seymour, Raymond B.

    1989-01-01

    Discusses the history and commercialization of alkanes. Examines the nomenclature and uses of alkanes. Studies polymerization and several types of polyethylenes: low-density, high-density, low-molecular-weight, cross-linked, linear low-density, and ultrahigh-molecular-weight. Includes a glossary of hydrocarbon terms. (MVL)

  5. 40 CFR 721.536 - Halogenated phenyl alkane.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Halogenated phenyl alkane. 721.536 Section 721.536 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) TOXIC SUBSTANCES CONTROL ACT SIGNIFICANT NEW USES OF CHEMICAL SUBSTANCES Significant New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.536 Halogenated phenyl alkane....

  6. 40 CFR 721.535 - Halogenated alkane (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... CONTROL ACT SIGNIFICANT NEW USES OF CHEMICAL SUBSTANCES Significant New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.535 Halogenated alkane (generic). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as halogenated alkane (PMN P-01-433) is...

  7. 40 CFR 721.535 - Halogenated alkane (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... CONTROL ACT SIGNIFICANT NEW USES OF CHEMICAL SUBSTANCES Significant New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.535 Halogenated alkane (generic). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as halogenated alkane (PMN P-01-433) is...

  8. 40 CFR 721.536 - Halogenated phenyl alkane.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... CONTROL ACT SIGNIFICANT NEW USES OF CHEMICAL SUBSTANCES Significant New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.536 Halogenated phenyl alkane. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as halogenated phenyl alkane (PMN P-89-867)...

  9. 40 CFR 721.536 - Halogenated phenyl alkane.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... CONTROL ACT SIGNIFICANT NEW USES OF CHEMICAL SUBSTANCES Significant New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.536 Halogenated phenyl alkane. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as halogenated phenyl alkane (PMN P-89-867)...

  10. An ESR and NMR study of the radiolysis of n-alkanes: Crystal structure dependence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toriyama, K.; Okazaki, M.; Nunome, K.; Matsuura, K.

    The process of radiation damage for long-chain n-alkanes was investigated to elucidate that for polyethylene. Chain-end alkyl radicals were preferentially formed not only through primary C-H scission but also through a hydrogen atom reaction in odd- n-alkane, as was shown by analysis of the ESR spectra for isotopic mixtures of tridecane- h28/tridecane- d28 and nonadecane- h40/nonadecane- d40. To elucidate the mode of alkyl radical migration in solids through intermolecular hydrogen atom abstraction, D/H exchange was detected in mixed crystals of eicosane- d42/eicosane- h42. The chain-end region was found to be more reactive than the inner region for radical site migration. In addition, formation of a microscopic amorphous island by destruction of the crystal lattice was also detected. The influences of molecular packing were large in all cases.

  11. Sophorolipids from Torulopsis bombicola: possible relation to alkane uptake.

    PubMed Central

    Ito, S; Inoue, S

    1982-01-01

    Torulopsis bombicola produces extracellular sophorolipids when it is grown on water-insoluble alkanes. Sophorolipids and related model compounds, which were not themselves used for growth, were found to stimulate markedly the growth of T. bombicola on alkanes. This stimulatory effect was restricted to growth on C10 to C20 alkanes, whereas no significantly influence was observed for growth on fatty alcohols, fatty acids, glucose, or glycerol. The nonionic methyl ester of the glycolipid supported the greatest cell yield. However, a number of synthetic nonionic surfactants were unable to replace the glycolipid. When organisms were grown on hexadecane, stimulation of growth by sophorolipids was observed almost exclusively with strains of Torulopsis yeasts. In contrast, the growth of other typical alkane-utilizing yeasts, such as candida and Pichia strains, was inhibited or not affected. It appears that sophorolipids are involved in alkane dissimilation by T. bombicola through an undetermined mechanism. PMID:7201782

  12. Alkanes in benthic organisms from the Buccaneer oil field

    SciTech Connect

    Middleditch, B.S.; Basile, B.

    1980-06-01

    About 200 g per day of alkanes are present in brine discharged from each of two production platforms in the Buccaneer oil field in the NW Gulf of Mexico. These alkanes disperse rapidly in the water column, so that seawater concentrations of petroleum alkanes in this region are generally very low. They can be taken up to some extent by plankton, fish, and barnacles, but the petroleum alkane concentrations in these organisms are also relatively low. The largest pool of petroleum alkanes is in the surficial sediments, where concentrations of up to 25 ppM are observed, with concentration gradients extending more than 20 m from the production platforms. Organisms are examined which are exposed to these sediments and, for comparison, other specimens from control sites around structures from which there are no discharges.

  13. Utilization of n-Alkanes by Cladosporium resinae

    PubMed Central

    Teh, J. S.; Lee, K. H.

    1973-01-01

    Four different isolates of Cladosporium resinae from Australian soils were tested for their ability to utilize liquid n-alkanes ranging from n-hexane to n-octadecane under standard conditions. The isolates were unable to make use of n-hexane, n-heptane, and n-octane for growth. In fact, these hydrocarbons, particularly n-hexane, exerted an inhibitory effect on spore germination and mycelial growth. All higher n-alkanes from n-nonane to n-octadecane were assimilated by the fungus, although only limited growth occurred on n-nonane and n-decane. The long chain n-alkanes (C14 to C18) supported good growth of all isolates, but there was no obvious correlation between cell yields and chain lengths of these n-alkanes. Variation in growth responses to individual n-alkane among the different isolates was also observed. The cause of this variation is unknown. PMID:4735447

  14. Spectroscopy of the tilde A state of NO-alkane complexes (alkane = methane, ethane, propane, and n-butane)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tamé-Reyes, Victor M.; Gardner, Adrian M.; Harris, Joe P.; McDaniel, Jodie; Wright, Timothy G.

    2012-12-01

    We have recorded (1+1) resonance-enhanced multiphoton ionization spectra of complexes formed between NO and the alkanes: CH4, C2H6, C3H8, and n-C4H10. The spectra correspond to the tilde A ← tilde X transition, which is a NO-localized 3s ← 2pπ* transition. In line with previous work, the spectrum for NO-CH4 has well-defined structure, but this is only partially resolved for the other complexes. The spectra recorded in the NO+-alkane mass channels all show a slowly rising onset, followed by a sharp offset, which is associated with dissociation of NO-alkane, from which binding energies in the tilde X and tilde A states are deduced. Beyond this sharp offset, there is a further rise in signal, which is attributed to fragmentation of higher complexes, NO-(alkane)n. Analysis of these features allows binding energies for (NO-alkane) ... alkane to be estimated, and these suggest that in the NO-(alkane)2 complexes, the second alkane molecule is bound to the first, rather than to NO. Calculated structures for the 1:1 complexes are reported, as well as binding energies.

  15. High-order harmonic generation in alkanes

    SciTech Connect

    Altucci, C.; Velotta, R.; Heesel, E.; Springate, E.; Marangos, J. P.; Vozzi, C.; Benedetti, E.; Calegari, F.; Sansone, G.; Stagira, S.; Nisoli, M.; Tosa, V.

    2006-04-15

    We have investigated the process of high-order harmonic generation in light alkanes by using femtosecond laser pulses. We show the experimental results cannot be matched by a model that assumes a single active electron only in a hydrogenic s orbital. Clear evidences are shown of the important role played by the p-like character originating from the covalent C-H bond. By constructing a suitable mixture of s-type and p-type atomic wave functions, an excellent agreement between measurements in methane and simulations is found, thus confirming the validity of the developed method as a general tool for the analysis of high-order harmonic generation in complex molecules.

  16. Novel phase behavior in normal alkanes

    SciTech Connect

    Sirota, E.B.; King, H.E. Jr.; Hughes, G.J.; Wan, W.K. )

    1992-01-27

    X-ray scattering studies on aligned films of binary mixtures of the normal alkanes C{sub 23}H{sub 48} and C{sub 28}H{sub 58} reveal, for the first time in such materials, the existence of a new equilibrium phase having the symmetry of a smectic crystal, possibly a hexatic. This phase occurs between the hexagonally packed {ital R}{sub II} and the lower-temperature orthorhombic {ital R}{sub I}, plastic crystalline, layered, rotator phases. We argue that this loss of order is due to local distortion fluctuations in the hexagonal phase. Furthermore, we have identified an {ital ABC}-to-{ital ABAB} restacking transition within the ordered {ital R}{sub II} phase.

  17. The vapor-particle partitioning of n-alkanes

    SciTech Connect

    Doskey, P.V.

    1994-04-01

    A mixed-phase partitioning model has been proposed to predict the distribution of n-alkanes between the vapor and particle phases in the atmosphere. n-Alkanes having terrestrial plant wax and petroleum origins are assumed to be associated with atmospheric particles as microcrystalline solids and subcooled liquids, respectively. The fraction of n-alkanes on atmospheric particles having plant wax and petroleum origins is estimated with carbon preference indices. Hypothetical terrestrial plant wax and petroleum mixtures are used to estimate the mole fractions of the n-alkanes in each phase and the molecular weights of the phases. Solid and subcooled liquid phase n-alkane vapor pressures are used in the model to predict the fraction of n-alkanes associated with particles in the atmosphere. Trends in the prediction of vapor-particle partitioning using these assumptions agree well with field observations. However, the fraction of particle phase n-alkanes predicted by the model was significantly different from the field observations.

  18. Long-chain alkane production by the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Buijs, Nicolaas A; Zhou, Yongjin J; Siewers, Verena; Nielsen, Jens

    2015-06-01

    In the past decade industrial-scale production of renewable transportation biofuels has been developed as an alternative to fossil fuels, with ethanol as the most prominent biofuel and yeast as the production organism of choice. However, ethanol is a less efficient substitute fuel for heavy-duty and maritime transportation as well as aviation due to its low energy density. Therefore, new types of biofuels, such as alkanes, are being developed that can be used as drop-in fuels and can substitute gasoline, diesel, and kerosene. Here, we describe for the first time the heterologous biosynthesis of long-chain alkanes by the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. We show that elimination of the hexadecenal dehydrogenase Hfd1 and expression of a redox system are essential for alkane biosynthesis in yeast. Deletion of HFD1 together with expression of an alkane biosynthesis pathway resulted in the production of the alkanes tridecane, pentadecane, and heptadecane. Our study provides a proof of principle for producing long-chain alkanes in the industrial workhorse S. cerevisiae, which was so far limited to bacteria. We anticipate that these findings will be a key factor for further yeast engineering to enable industrial production of alkane based drop-in biofuels, which can allow the biofuel industry to diversify beyond bioethanol.

  19. Long-chain alkane production by the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Buijs, Nicolaas A; Zhou, Yongjin J; Siewers, Verena; Nielsen, Jens

    2015-06-01

    In the past decade industrial-scale production of renewable transportation biofuels has been developed as an alternative to fossil fuels, with ethanol as the most prominent biofuel and yeast as the production organism of choice. However, ethanol is a less efficient substitute fuel for heavy-duty and maritime transportation as well as aviation due to its low energy density. Therefore, new types of biofuels, such as alkanes, are being developed that can be used as drop-in fuels and can substitute gasoline, diesel, and kerosene. Here, we describe for the first time the heterologous biosynthesis of long-chain alkanes by the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. We show that elimination of the hexadecenal dehydrogenase Hfd1 and expression of a redox system are essential for alkane biosynthesis in yeast. Deletion of HFD1 together with expression of an alkane biosynthesis pathway resulted in the production of the alkanes tridecane, pentadecane, and heptadecane. Our study provides a proof of principle for producing long-chain alkanes in the industrial workhorse S. cerevisiae, which was so far limited to bacteria. We anticipate that these findings will be a key factor for further yeast engineering to enable industrial production of alkane based drop-in biofuels, which can allow the biofuel industry to diversify beyond bioethanol. PMID:25545362

  20. Expanding the product profile of a microbial alkane biosynthetic pathway.

    PubMed

    Harger, Matthew; Zheng, Lei; Moon, Austin; Ager, Casey; An, Ju Hye; Choe, Chris; Lai, Yi-Ling; Mo, Benjamin; Zong, David; Smith, Matthew D; Egbert, Robert G; Mills, Jeremy H; Baker, David; Pultz, Ingrid Swanson; Siegel, Justin B

    2013-01-18

    Microbially produced alkanes are a new class of biofuels that closely match the chemical composition of petroleum-based fuels. Alkanes can be generated from the fatty acid biosynthetic pathway by the reduction of acyl-ACPs followed by decarbonylation of the resulting aldehydes. A current limitation of this pathway is the restricted product profile, which consists of n-alkanes of 13, 15, and 17 carbons in length. To expand the product profile, we incorporated a new part, FabH2 from Bacillus subtilis , an enzyme known to have a broader specificity profile for fatty acid initiation than the native FabH of Escherichia coli . When provided with the appropriate substrate, the addition of FabH2 resulted in an altered alkane product profile in which significant levels of n-alkanes of 14 and 16 carbons in length are produced. The production of even chain length alkanes represents initial steps toward the expansion of this recently discovered microbial alkane production pathway to synthesize complex fuels. This work was conceived and performed as part of the 2011 University of Washington international Genetically Engineered Machines (iGEM) project.

  1. Polyarylene Ethers with Improved Properties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hergenrother, P. M. (Inventor); Jensen, B. J. (Inventor); Havens, S. J. (Inventor)

    1986-01-01

    This invention relates to novel polyarylene ethers which possess the combination of high strength, toughness, and high use temperature with ease of extrusion and formation into complex objects. These polyarylene ethers are suitable for use in adhesives, coatings, films, membranes, and composite matrices. The polyarylene ethers of this invention are the polycondensation products from the reaction of either 1,3-bis (4-chloro or fluorobenzoyl) benzene with any one of the following bisphenolic compounds: bis (3-hydroxyphenyl) methane; bis (4-hydroxyphenyl) methane; 1,1-dimethyl-bis (4-hydroxyphenyl)methane, or 9,9-bis (4-hydroxyphenyl) fluorene. Random and block copolymers are also comprehended.

  2. Biodegradation of gasoline ether oxygenates.

    PubMed

    Hyman, Michael

    2013-06-01

    Ether oxygenates such as methyl tertiary butyl ether (MTBE) are added to gasoline to improve fuel combustion and decrease exhaust emissions. Ether oxygenates and their tertiary alcohol metabolites are now an important group of groundwater pollutants. This review highlights recent advances in our understanding of the microorganisms, enzymes and pathways involved in both the aerobic and anaerobic biodegradation of these compounds. This review also aims to illustrate how these microbiological and biochemical studies have guided, and have helped refine, molecular and stable isotope-based analytical approaches that are increasingly being used to detect and quantify biodegradation of these compounds in contaminated environments.

  3. Heterogeneity of Alkane Chain Length in Freshwater and Marine Cyanobacteria

    PubMed Central

    Shakeel, Tabinda; Fatma, Zia; Fatma, Tasneem; Yazdani, Syed Shams

    2015-01-01

    The potential utilization of cyanobacteria for the biological production of alkanes represents an exceptional system for the next generation of biofuels. Here, we analyzed a diverse group of freshwater and marine cyanobacterial isolates from Indian culture collections for their ability to produce both alkanes and alkenes. Among the 50 cyanobacterial isolates screened, 32 isolates; 14 freshwater and 18 marine isolates; produced predominantly alkanes. The GC-MS/MS profiles revealed a higher percentage of pentadecane and heptadecane production for marine and freshwater strains, respectively. Oscillatoria species were found to be the highest producers of alkanes. Among the freshwater isolates, Oscillatoria CCC305 produced the maximum alkane level with 0.43 μg/mg dry cell weight, while Oscillatoria formosa BDU30603 was the highest producer among the marine isolates with 0.13 μg/mg dry cell weight. Culturing these strains under different media compositions showed that the alkane chain length was not influenced by the growth medium but was rather an inherent property of the strains. Analysis of the cellular fatty acid content indicated the presence of predominantly C16 chain length fatty acids in marine strains, while the proportion of C18 chain length fatty acids increased in the majority of freshwater strains. These results correlated with alkane chain length specificity of marine and freshwater isolates indicating that alkane chain lengths may be primarily determined by the fatty acid synthesis pathway. Moreover, the phylogenetic analysis showed clustering of pentadecane-producing marine strains that was distinct from heptadecane-producing freshwater strains strongly suggesting a close association between alkane chain length and the cyanobacteria habitat. PMID:25853127

  4. Spiroborate ester-mediated asymmetric synthesis of beta-hydroxy ethers and its conversion to highly enantiopure beta-amino ethers.

    PubMed

    Huang, Kun; Ortiz-Marciales, Margarita; Correa, Wildeliz; Pomales, Edgardo; López, Xaira Y

    2009-06-01

    Borane-mediated reduction of aryl and alkyl ketones with alpha-aryl- and alpha-pyridyloxy groups affords beta-hydroxy ethers in high enantiomeric purity (up to 99% ee) and in good yield, using as catalyst 10 mol % of spiroborate ester 1 derived from (S)-diphenylprolinol. Representative beta-hydroxy ethers are successfully converted to beta-amino ethers, with minor epimerization, by phthalimide substitution under Mitsunobu's conditions followed by hydrazinolysis to obtain primary amino ethers or by imide reduction with borane to afford beta-2,3-dihydro-1H-isoindol ethers. Nonracemic Mexiletine and nAChR analogues with potential biological activity are also synthesized in excellent yield by mesylation of key beta-hydroxy pyridylethers and substitution with five-, six-, and seven-membered ring heterocyclic amines. PMID:19413288

  5. Alkanes-filled photonic crystal fibers as sensor transducers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marć, P.; Przybysz, N.; Stasiewicz, K.; Jaroszewicz, L. R.

    2015-09-01

    In this paper we propose alkanes-filled PCFs as the new class of transducers for optical fiber sensors. We investigated experimentally thermo-optic properties of a commercially available LMA8 partially filled with different alkanes with a higher number of carbon atoms. A partially filled PCF spliced with standard SMFs constitutes one of the newest type transducer. We have selected a group of eight alkanes which have melting points in different temperatures. An analysis of temperature spectral characteristics of these samples will allow to design an optical fiber sensor with different temperature thresholds at specific wavelengths.

  6. Enantioselective synthesis of primary 1-(aryl)alkylamines by nucleophilic 1,2-addition of organolithium reagents to hydroxyoxime ethers and application to asymmetric synthesis of G-protein-coupled receptor ligands.

    PubMed

    Atobe, Masakazu; Yamazaki, Naoki; Kibayashi, Chihiro

    2004-08-20

    (E)-Arylaldehyde oxime ethers bearing a (1S)-2-hydroxy-1-phenylethyl or (2R)-1-hydroxy-2-phenylethyl group as a chiral auxiliary, both derived from a single precursor, methyl (R)-mandelate, underwent nucleophilic addition with organolithium reagents via six-membered chelates to give the diastereomerically enriched (R)- and (S)-adducts, respectively, which, after chiral auxiliary removal by reductive N-O bond cleavage, led to the corresponding (R)- and (S)-1-(aryl)ethylamines. This organolithium addition protocol using methyllithium was applied in an enantiodivergent fashion to the preparation of both enantiomers of 1-(2-hydroxyphenyl)ethylamine, which has been previously used as an efficient chiral auxiliary for the synthesis of natural products in this laboratory. The synthetic utility of this methodology involving diastereoselective methyl addition was demonstrated by further application to the asymmetric synthesis of a new type of calcium receptor agonist (calcimimetics), (R)-(+)-NPS R-568 and its thio analogue. Furthermore, diastereoselective vinylation was accomplished by application of the hydroxy oxime ether-based protocol using vinyllithium, which allowed the development of the enantioselective synthesis of the NK-1 receptor antagonists, (+)-CP-99,994 and (+)-CP-122,721.

  7. Chemoselective Deprotection of Triethylsilyl Ethers

    PubMed Central

    Chandra, Tilak; Broderick, William E.; Broderick, Joan B.

    2009-01-01

    An efficient and selective method was developed for the deprotection of triethylsilyl (TES) ethers using formic acid in methanol (5–10%) or in methylene chloride 2–5%) with excellent yields. TES ethers are selectively deprotected to the corresponding alcohols in high yields using formic acid in methanol under mild reaction conditions. Other hydroxyl protecting groups like t-butyldimethylsilyl (TBDMS) remain unaffected. PMID:20183570

  8. Imide/arylene ether copolymers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jensen, Brian J. (Inventor); Hergenrother, Paul M. (Inventor); Bass, Robert G. (Inventor)

    1992-01-01

    Imide/arylene ether block copolymers are prepared by reacting anhydride terminated poly(amic acids) with amine terminated poly(arylene ethers) in polar aprotic solvents and by chemically or thermally cyclodehydrating the resulting intermediate poly(amic acids). The resulting block copolymers have one glass transition temperature or two, depending upon the particular structure and/or the compatibility of the block units. Most of these block copolymers form tough, solvent resistant films with high tensile properties.

  9. Rearrangements of Cycloalkenyl Aryl Ethers.

    PubMed

    Törincsi, Mercedesz; Nagy, Melinda; Bihari, Tamás; Stirling, András; Kolonits, Pál; Novak, Lajos

    2016-01-01

    Rearrangement reactions of cycloalkenyl phenol and naphthyl ethers and the acid-catalyzed cyclization of the resulting product were investigated. Claisen rearrangement afforded 2-substituted phenol and naphthol derivatives. Combined Claisen and Cope rearrangement resulted in the formation of 4-substituted phenol and naphthol derivatives. In the case of cycloocthylphenyl ether the consecutive Claisen and Cope rearrangements were followed by an alkyl migration. The mechanism of this novel rearrangement reaction is also discussed. PMID:27104504

  10. Process for converting light alkanes to higher hydrocarbons

    DOEpatents

    Noceti, Richard P.; Taylor, Charles E.

    1988-01-01

    A process is disclosed for the production of aromatic-rich, gasoline boiling range hydrocarbons from the lower alkanes, particularly from methane. The process is carried out in two stages. In the first, alkane is reacted with oxygen and hydrogen chloride over an oxyhydrochlorination catalyst such as copper chloride with minor proportions of potassium chloride and rare earth chloride. This produces an intermediate gaseous mixture containing water and chlorinated alkanes. The chlorinated alkanes are contacted with a crystalline aluminosilicate catalyst in the hydrogen or metal promoted form to produce gasoline range hydrocarbons with a high proportion of aromatics and a small percentage of light hydrocarbons (C.sub.2 -C.sub.4). The light hydrocarbons can be recycled for further processing over the oxyhydrochlorination catalyst.

  11. Space, Time, Ether, and Kant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wong, Wing-Chun Godwin

    This dissertation focused on Kant's conception of physical matter in the Opus postumum. In this work, Kant postulates the existence of an ether which fills the whole of space and time with its moving forces. Kant's arguments for the existence of an ether in the so-called Ubergang have been acutely criticized by commentators. Guyer, for instance, thinks that Kant pushes the technique of transcendental deduction too far in trying to deduce the empirical ether. In defense of Kant, I held that it is not the actual existence of the empirical ether, but the concept of the ether as a space-time filler that is subject to a transcendental deduction. I suggested that Kant is doing three things in the Ubergang: First, he deduces the pure concept of a space-time filler as a conceptual hybrid of the transcendental object and permanent substance to replace the category of substance in the Critique. Then he tries to prove the existence of such a space-time filler as a reworking of the First Analogy. Finally, he takes into consideration the empirical determinations of the ether by adding the concept of moving forces to the space -time filler. In reconstructing Kant's proofs, I pointed out that Kant is absolutely committed to the impossibility of action-at-a-distance. If we add this new principle of no-action-at-a-distance to the Third Analogy, the existence of a space-time filler follows. I argued with textual evidence that Kant's conception of ether satisfies the basic structure of a field: (1) the ether is a material continuum; (2) a physical quantity is definable on each point in the continuum; and (3) the ether provides a medium to support the continuous transmission of action. The thrust of Kant's conception of ether is to provide a holistic ontology for the transition to physics, which can best be understood from a field-theoretical point of view. This is the main thesis I attempted to establish in this dissertation.

  12. Contribution of cyanobacterial alkane production to the ocean hydrocarbon cycle.

    PubMed

    Lea-Smith, David J; Biller, Steven J; Davey, Matthew P; Cotton, Charles A R; Perez Sepulveda, Blanca M; Turchyn, Alexandra V; Scanlan, David J; Smith, Alison G; Chisholm, Sallie W; Howe, Christopher J

    2015-11-01

    Hydrocarbons are ubiquitous in the ocean, where alkanes such as pentadecane and heptadecane can be found even in waters minimally polluted with crude oil. Populations of hydrocarbon-degrading bacteria, which are responsible for the turnover of these compounds, are also found throughout marine systems, including in unpolluted waters. These observations suggest the existence of an unknown and widespread source of hydrocarbons in the oceans. Here, we report that strains of the two most abundant marine cyanobacteria, Prochlorococcus and Synechococcus, produce and accumulate hydrocarbons, predominantly C15 and C17 alkanes, between 0.022 and 0.368% of dry cell weight. Based on global population sizes and turnover rates, we estimate that these species have the capacity to produce 2-540 pg alkanes per mL per day, which translates into a global ocean yield of ∼ 308-771 million tons of hydrocarbons annually. We also demonstrate that both obligate and facultative marine hydrocarbon-degrading bacteria can consume cyanobacterial alkanes, which likely prevents these hydrocarbons from accumulating in the environment. Our findings implicate cyanobacteria and hydrocarbon degraders as key players in a notable internal hydrocarbon cycle within the upper ocean, where alkanes are continually produced and subsequently consumed within days. Furthermore we show that cyanobacterial alkane production is likely sufficient to sustain populations of hydrocarbon-degrading bacteria, whose abundances can rapidly expand upon localized release of crude oil from natural seepage and human activities.

  13. Contribution of cyanobacterial alkane production to the ocean hydrocarbon cycle

    PubMed Central

    Lea-Smith, David J.; Biller, Steven J.; Davey, Matthew P.; Cotton, Charles A. R.; Perez Sepulveda, Blanca M.; Turchyn, Alexandra V.; Scanlan, David J.; Smith, Alison G.; Chisholm, Sallie W.; Howe, Christopher J.

    2015-01-01

    Hydrocarbons are ubiquitous in the ocean, where alkanes such as pentadecane and heptadecane can be found even in waters minimally polluted with crude oil. Populations of hydrocarbon-degrading bacteria, which are responsible for the turnover of these compounds, are also found throughout marine systems, including in unpolluted waters. These observations suggest the existence of an unknown and widespread source of hydrocarbons in the oceans. Here, we report that strains of the two most abundant marine cyanobacteria, Prochlorococcus and Synechococcus, produce and accumulate hydrocarbons, predominantly C15 and C17 alkanes, between 0.022 and 0.368% of dry cell weight. Based on global population sizes and turnover rates, we estimate that these species have the capacity to produce 2–540 pg alkanes per mL per day, which translates into a global ocean yield of ∼308–771 million tons of hydrocarbons annually. We also demonstrate that both obligate and facultative marine hydrocarbon-degrading bacteria can consume cyanobacterial alkanes, which likely prevents these hydrocarbons from accumulating in the environment. Our findings implicate cyanobacteria and hydrocarbon degraders as key players in a notable internal hydrocarbon cycle within the upper ocean, where alkanes are continually produced and subsequently consumed within days. Furthermore we show that cyanobacterial alkane production is likely sufficient to sustain populations of hydrocarbon-degrading bacteria, whose abundances can rapidly expand upon localized release of crude oil from natural seepage and human activities. PMID:26438854

  14. Sulfonimide-containing poly(arylene ether)s and poly(arylene ether sulfone)s, methods for producing the same, and uses thereof

    DOEpatents

    Hofmann, Michael A.

    2006-11-14

    The present invention is directed to sulfonimide-containing polymers, specifically sulfonimide-containing poly(arylene ether)s and sulfonimide-containing poly(arylene ether sulfone)s, and processes for making the sulfonimide-containing poly(arylene ether)s and sulfonimide-containing poly(arylene ether sulfone)s, for use conductive membranes and fuel cells.

  15. A Comparison of the Monolayer Dynamics of the Branched Alkane Squalane and the Normal Alkane Tetracosane Adsorbed on Graphite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Enevoldsen, A. D.; Hansen, F. Y.; Diama, A.; Taub, H.

    2004-03-01

    Squalane is a branched alkane (C_30H_62) with 24 carbon atoms in its backbone, like the normal alkane tetracosane ( n-C_24H_50), and six symmetrically placed methyl side groups. In general, branched alkanes such as squalane are better lubricants than n-alkanes. We have studied the dynamics of the squalane and tetracosane monolayers by quasielastic neutron scattering and molecular dynamics (MD) simulations on two different time scales. Both experiments and simulations showed that diffusion at 260 K is about 2.5 times faster in the squalane than in the tetracosane system. It is somewhat surprising that the diffusion in a system with a branched alkane is faster than with a normal alkane. A possible explanation is that the squalane molecule does not bind as strongly to the surface as tetracosane, because the MD simulations have shown that the adsorbed molecules have a distorted backbone. This may also explain why the slow intramolecular motions associated with conformational changes are seen at lower temperatures in the squalane than the tetracosane monolayer where they are only observed near melting.

  16. Ether resistance in Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Deery, B J; Parsons, P A

    1972-01-01

    Strains set up from single inseminated females of D. melanogaster from the wild differ in their resistance to the anaesthetics, ether and chloroform. The main differences between four selected extreme strains could be explained by additive genes, which in the case of ether resistance were located to regions of chromosomes 2 and 3. The lack of correspondence between ether and chloroform resistance between strains indicates that although the type of genetic architecture controlling the traits is similar, the actual genes differ, which is reasonable in view of their differing chemical structures. Quite high heritabilities were found for resistance to ether based on five inbred strains. No significant associations between resistance to ether and body weight, developmental rate or longevity were found.It is clear that resistance to both anaesthetics would be amenable to more detailed genetic analyses. It is pointed out that the general conclusions reached from such studies will have implications with respect to the effect of chemicals such as insecticides, not naturally present in nature.

  17. Synthesis of cinnamyl ethers from α-vinylbenzyl alcohol using iodine as catalyst.

    PubMed

    Kasashima, Yoshio; Uzawa, Atsushi; Hashimoto, Kahoko; Nishida, Tadasuke; Murakami, Keiko; Mino, Takashi; Sakamoto, Masami; Fujita, Tsutomu

    2010-01-01

    Reactions of α-vinylbenzyl alcohol with other alcohols using iodine as a catalyst were investigated. The corresponding cinnamyl ethers were obtained as products. This suggested that α-vinylbenzyl alcohol was converted to cinnamyl ethers via 1-phenylallyl cation. Cinnamyl ethyl ether was obtained in 75% yield by the reaction of α-vinylbenzyl alcohol and ethanol in acetonitrile with iodine under the following conditions: temperature = 50 °C, molar ratio of α-vinylbenzyl alcohol:ethanol:iodine = 1:3.0:0.2, and time period = 6 h. Generally, the yields of the reactions using primary alcohols were higher than those using secondary and tertiary alcohols. Ether interchange also occurred by the reaction of α-vinylbenzyl alcohol and iodine, but proceeded smoothly only when an allyl group was used as the other substituent of the starting ether.

  18. Selective hydroxylation of alkanes by an extracellular fungal peroxygenase.

    PubMed

    Peter, Sebastian; Kinne, Matthias; Wang, Xiaoshi; Ullrich, René; Kayser, Gernot; Groves, John T; Hofrichter, Martin

    2011-10-01

    Fungal peroxygenases are novel extracellular heme-thiolate biocatalysts that are capable of catalyzing the selective monooxygenation of diverse organic compounds, using only H(2)O(2) as a cosubstrate. Little is known about the physiological role or the catalytic mechanism of these enzymes. We have found that the peroxygenase secreted by Agrocybe aegerita catalyzes the H(2)O(2)-dependent hydroxylation of linear alkanes at the 2-position and 3-position with high efficiency, as well as the regioselective monooxygenation of branched and cyclic alkanes. Experiments with n-heptane and n-octane showed that the hydroxylation proceeded with complete stereoselectivity for the (R)-enantiomer of the corresponding 3-alcohol. Investigations with a number of model substrates provided information about the route of alkane hydroxylation: (a) the hydroxylation of cyclohexane mediated by H(2)(18)(2) resulted in complete incorporation of (18)O into the hydroxyl group of the product cyclohexanol; (b) the hydroxylation of n-hexane-1,1,1,2,2,3,3-D(7) showed a large intramolecular deuterium isotope effect [(k(H)/k(D))(obs)] of 16.0 ± 1.0 for 2-hexanol and 8.9 ± 0.9 for 3-hexanol; and (c) the hydroxylation of the radical clock norcarane led to an estimated radical lifetime of 9.4 ps and an oxygen rebound rate of 1.06 × 10(11) s(-1). These results point to a hydrogen abstraction and oxygen rebound mechanism for alkane hydroxylation. The peroxygenase appeared to lack activity on long-chain alkanes (> C(16)) and highly branched alkanes (e.g. tetramethylpentane), but otherwise exhibited a broad substrate range. It may accordingly have a role in the bioconversion of natural and anthropogenic alkane-containing structures (including alkyl chains of complex biomaterials) in soils, plant litter, and wood. PMID:21812933

  19. Variation in n-Alkane Distributions of Modern Plants: Questioning Applications of n-Alkanes in Chemotaxonomy and Paleoecology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bush, R. T.; McInerney, F. A.

    2010-12-01

    Long chain n-alkanes (n-C21 to n-C37) are synthesized as part of the epicuticular leaf wax of terrestrial plants and are among the most recognizable and widely used plant biomarkers. n-Alkane distributions have been utilized in previous studies on modern plant chemotaxonomy, testing whether taxa can be identified based on characteristic n-alkane profiles. Dominant n-alkanes (e.g. n-C27 or n-C31) have also been ascribed to major plant groups (e.g. trees or grasses respectively) and have been used in paleoecology studies to reconstruct fluctuations in plant functional types. However, many of these studies have been based on relatively few modern plant data; with the wealth of modern n-alkane studies, a more comprehensive analysis of n-alkanes in modern plants is now possible and can inform the usefulness of n-alkane distributions as paleoecological indicators. The work presented here is a combination of measurements made using plant leaves collected from the Chicago Botanic Garden and a compilation of published literature data from six continents. We categorized plants by type: angiosperms, gymnosperms, woody plants, forbs, grasses, ferns and pteridophytes, and mosses. We then quantified n-alkane distribution parameters such as carbon preference index (CPI), average chain length (ACL), and dispersion (a measure of the spread of the profile over multiple chain lengths) and used these to compare plant groups. Among all plants, one of the emergent correlations is a decrease in dispersion with increasing CPI. Within and among plant groups, n-alkane distributions show a very large range of variation, and the results show little or no correspondence between broad plant groups and a single dominant n-alkane or a ratio of n-alkanes. These findings are true both when data from six continents are combined and when plants from a given region are compared (North America). We also compared the n-alkane distributions of woody angiosperms, woody gymnosperms, and grasses with one

  20. Ethereal embodiment of cancer patients.

    PubMed

    van der Riet, P

    1999-10-01

    Ethereal embodiment is the attending and focusing on the body through discourses such as meditation, visualisation and massage, and the experiencing a new sense of the embodied being as balanced, connected, centred and of being made whole. This paper continues a previous article titled 'Massaged embodiment of cancer patients'. Data from my doctoral studies are analysed utilising crucial concepts of poststructuralism such as subjectivity, discourse, power and history to examine ethereal embodiment. This paper will address the advantages of visualisation and discusses the link between spirituality, embodiment, and memory.

  1. Grignard Reactions in "Wet" Ether

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, David H.

    1999-10-01

    A small laboratory ultrasonic bath can be used to initiate the Grignard reaction of alkyl or aryl bromides in regular laboratory-quality, undried, diethyl ether and in simple undried test tubes. The reaction typically starts within 30 to 45 seconds and is self-sustaining. Yields and products are the same as obtained with carefully dried ether and equipment. We normally run this reaction at the 1.5-gram scale, but the procedure can be scaled up to at least 10 g of the bromide.

  2. Reaction Pathways and Energetics of Etheric C–O Bond Cleavage Catalyzed by Lanthanide Triflates

    SciTech Connect

    Assary, Rajeev S.; Atesin, Abdurrahman C.; Li, Zhi; Curtiss, Larry A.; Marks, Tobin J.

    2013-09-06

    Efficient and selective cleavage of etheric C-O bonds is crucial for converting biomass into platform chemicals and liquid transportation fuels. In this contribution, computational methods at the DFT B3LYP level of theory are employed to understand the efficacy of lanthanide triflate catalysts (Ln(OTf)3, Ln = La, Ce, Sm, Gd, Yb, and Lu) in cleaving etheric C-O bonds. In agreement with experiment, the calculations indicate that the reaction pathway for C-O cleavage occurs via a C-H → O-H proton transfer in concert with weakening of the C-O bond of the coordinated ether substrate to ultimately yield a coordinated alkenol. The activation energy for this process falls as the lanthanide ionic radius decreases, reflecting enhanced metal ion electrophilicity. Details of the reaction mechanism for Yb(OTf)3-catalyzed ring opening are explored in depth, and for 1-methyl-d3-butyl phenyl ether, the computed primary kinetic isotope effect of 2.4 is in excellent agreement with experiment (2.7), confirming that etheric ring-opening pathway involves proton transfer from the methyl group alpha to the etheric oxygen atom, which is activated by the electrophilic lanthanide ion. Calculations of the catalytic pathway using eight different ether substrates indicate that the more rapid cleavage of acyclic versus cyclic ethers is largely due to entropic effects, with the former C-O bond scission processes increasing the degrees of freedom/particles as the transition state is approached.

  3. Additional chain-branching pathways in the low-temperature oxidation of branched alkanes

    DOE PAGES

    Wang, Zhandong; Zhang, Lidong; Moshammer, Kai; Popolan-Vaida, Denisia M.; Shankar, Vijai Shankar Bhavani; Lucassen, Arnas; Hemken, Christian; Taatjes, Craig A.; Leone, Stephen R.; Kohse-Hoinghaus, Katharina; et al

    2015-12-31

    Chain-branching reactions represent a general motif in chemistry, encountered in atmospheric chemistry, combustion, polymerization, and photochemistry; the nature and amount of radicals generated by chain-branching are decisive for the reaction progress, its energy signature, and the time towards its completion. In this study, experimental evidence for two new types of chain-branching reactions is presented, based upon detection of highly oxidized multifunctional molecules (HOM) formed during the gas-phase low-temperature oxidation of a branched alkane under conditions relevant to combustion. The oxidation of 2,5-dimethylhexane (DMH) in a jet-stirred reactor (JSR) was studied using synchrotron vacuum ultra-violet photoionization molecular beam mass spectrometry (SVUV-PI-MBMS).more » Specifically, species with four and five oxygen atoms were probed, having molecular formulas of C8H14O4 (e.g., diketo-hydroperoxide/keto-hydroperoxy cyclic ether) and C8H16O5 (e.g., keto-dihydroperoxide/dihydroperoxy cyclic ether), respectively. The formation of C8H16O5 species involves alternative isomerization of OOQOOH radicals via intramolecular H-atom migration, followed by third O2 addition, intramolecular isomerization, and OH release; C8H14O4 species are proposed to result from subsequent reactions of C8H16O5 species. The mechanistic pathways involving these species are related to those proposed as a source of low-volatility highly oxygenated species in Earth's troposphere. At the higher temperatures relevant to auto-ignition, they can result in a net increase of hydroxyl radical production, so these are additional radical chain-branching pathways for ignition. Furthermore, the results presented herein extend the conceptual basis of reaction mechanisms used to predict the reaction behavior of ignition, and have implications on atmospheric gas-phase chemistry and the oxidative stability of organic substances.« less

  4. Diffusion of Benzene and Alkylbenzenes in n-Alkanes.

    PubMed

    Kowert, Bruce A; Register, Paul M

    2015-10-01

    The translational diffusion constants, D, of benzene and a series of alkylbenzenes have been determined in four n-alkanes at room temperature using capillary flow techniques. The alkylbenzenes are toluene, ethylbenzene, 1-phenylpropane, 1-phenylpentane, 1-phenyloctane, 1-phenylundecane, 1-phenyltetradecane, and 1-phenylheptadecane. The n-alkanes are n-nonane, n-decane, n-dodecane, and n-pentadecane. Ratios of the solutes' D values are independent of solvent and in general agreement with the predictions of diffusion models for cylinders and lollipops. For the latter, an alkylbenzene's phenyl ring is the lollipop's candy; the alkyl chain is its handle. A model that considers the solutes to be spheres with volumes determined by the van der Waals increments of their constituent atoms is not in agreement with experiment. The diffusion constants of 1-alkene and n-alkane solutes in n-alkane solvents also are compared with the cylinder model; reasonably good agreement is found. The n-alkanes are relatively extended, and this appears to be the case for the alkyl chains of the 1-alkenes and alkylbenzenes as well. PMID:26417941

  5. Surface freezing in binary alkane-alcohol mixtures

    SciTech Connect

    Ofer, E.; Sloutskin, E.; Tamam, L.; Deutsch, M.; Ocko, B. M.

    2006-08-15

    Surface freezing was detected and studied in mixtures of alcohol and alkane molecules, using surface tensiometry and surface-specific x-ray scattering methods. Considering that surface freezing in pure alkanes forms an ordered monolayer and in alcohols it forms an ordered bilayer, the length mismatch repulsion was minimized by varying the carbon number of the alkane component around 2n, where n is the carbon number of the alcohol molecule. A solutionlike behavior was found for all mixtures, where the ideal liquid mixture phase-separates upon freezing both in the bulk and the surface. The solid exhibits a herringbone crystalline phase below an alkane mole fraction {phi}{sub t}{approx_equal}0.8 and a rotator phase above it. The surface frozen film below {phi}{sub t} is an alkane monolayer exhibiting a next-nearest neighbor molecular tilt of a composition-dependent magnitude. Above {phi}{sub t}, no diffraction peaks were observed. This could be explained by the intrinsically shorter-range order of the rotator phase and a possible proliferation of defects.

  6. Alkane desaturation by concerted double hydrogen atom transfer to benzyne.

    PubMed

    Niu, Dawen; Willoughby, Patrick H; Woods, Brian P; Baire, Beeraiah; Hoye, Thomas R

    2013-09-26

    The removal of two vicinal hydrogen atoms from an alkane to produce an alkene is a challenge for synthetic chemists. In nature, desaturases and acetylenases are adept at achieving this essential oxidative functionalization reaction, for example during the biosynthesis of unsaturated fatty acids, eicosanoids, gibberellins and carotenoids. Alkane-to-alkene conversion almost always involves one or more chemical intermediates in a multistep reaction pathway; these may be either isolable species (such as alcohols or alkyl halides) or reactive intermediates (such as carbocations, alkyl radicals, or σ-alkyl-metal species). Here we report a desaturation reaction of simple, unactivated alkanes that is mechanistically unique. We show that benzynes are capable of the concerted removal of two vicinal hydrogen atoms from a hydrocarbon. The discovery of this exothermic, net redox process was enabled by the simple thermal generation of reactive benzyne intermediates through the hexadehydro-Diels-Alder cycloisomerization reaction of triyne substrates. We are not aware of any single-step, bimolecular reaction in which two hydrogen atoms are simultaneously transferred from a saturated alkane. Computational studies indicate a preferred geometry with eclipsed vicinal C-H bonds in the alkane donor.

  7. 21 CFR 868.5420 - Ether hook.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Ether hook. 868.5420 Section 868.5420 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5420 Ether hook. (a) Identification. An ether hook is a...

  8. 21 CFR 868.5420 - Ether hook.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Ether hook. 868.5420 Section 868.5420 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5420 Ether hook. (a) Identification. An ether hook is a...

  9. 21 CFR 868.5420 - Ether hook.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Ether hook. 868.5420 Section 868.5420 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5420 Ether hook. (a) Identification. An ether hook is a...

  10. 21 CFR 868.5420 - Ether hook.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Ether hook. 868.5420 Section 868.5420 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5420 Ether hook. (a) Identification. An ether hook is a...

  11. 21 CFR 868.5420 - Ether hook.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Ether hook. 868.5420 Section 868.5420 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5420 Ether hook. (a) Identification. An ether hook is a...

  12. 40 CFR 721.3364 - Aliphatic ether.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Aliphatic ether. 721.3364 Section 721... Aliphatic ether. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as an aliphatic ether (PMN P-93-1381) is subject to reporting under...

  13. 40 CFR 721.3374 - Alkylenediolalkyl ether.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Alkylenediolalkyl ether. 721.3374... Substances § 721.3374 Alkylenediolalkyl ether. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified as an alkylenediolalkyl ether (PMN P-93-362) is subject...

  14. 40 CFR 721.3374 - Alkylenediolalkyl ether.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Alkylenediolalkyl ether. 721.3374... Substances § 721.3374 Alkylenediolalkyl ether. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified as an alkylenediolalkyl ether (PMN P-93-362) is subject...

  15. 40 CFR 721.3437 - Dialkyl ether.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Dialkyl ether. 721.3437 Section 721... Dialkyl ether. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as dialkyl ether (PMN P-93-1308) is subject to reporting under this...

  16. 40 CFR 721.3380 - Anilino ether.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Anilino ether. 721.3380 Section 721... Anilino ether. (a) Chemical substances and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as anilino ether (P-83-910) is subject to reporting under this section...

  17. 40 CFR 721.3364 - Aliphatic ether.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Aliphatic ether. 721.3364 Section 721... Aliphatic ether. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as an aliphatic ether (PMN P-93-1381) is subject to reporting under...

  18. 40 CFR 721.3380 - Anilino ether.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Anilino ether. 721.3380 Section 721... Anilino ether. (a) Chemical substances and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as anilino ether (P-83-910) is subject to reporting under this section...

  19. 40 CFR 721.3437 - Dialkyl ether.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Dialkyl ether. 721.3437 Section 721... Dialkyl ether. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as dialkyl ether (PMN P-93-1308) is subject to reporting under this...

  20. Microbial production of short-chain alkanes.

    PubMed

    Choi, Yong Jun; Lee, Sang Yup

    2013-10-24

    Increasing concerns about limited fossil fuels and global environmental problems have focused attention on the need to develop sustainable biofuels from renewable resources. Although microbial production of diesel has been reported, production of another much in demand transport fuel, petrol (gasoline), has not yet been demonstrated. Here we report the development of platform Escherichia coli strains that are capable of producing short-chain alkanes (SCAs; petrol), free fatty acids (FFAs), fatty esters and fatty alcohols through the fatty acyl (acyl carrier protein (ACP)) to fatty acid to fatty acyl-CoA pathway. First, the β-oxidation pathway was blocked by deleting the fadE gene to prevent the degradation of fatty acyl-CoAs generated in vivo. To increase the formation of short-chain fatty acids suitable for subsequent conversion to SCAs in vivo, the activity of 3-oxoacyl-ACP synthase (FabH), which is inhibited by unsaturated fatty acyl-ACPs, was enhanced to promote the initiation of fatty acid biosynthesis by deleting the fadR gene; deletion of the fadR gene prevents upregulation of the fabA and fabB genes responsible for unsaturated fatty acids biosynthesis. A modified thioesterase was used to convert short-chain fatty acyl-ACPs to the corresponding FFAs, which were then converted to SCAs by the sequential reactions of E. coli fatty acyl-CoA synthetase, Clostridium acetobutylicum fatty acyl-CoA reductase and Arabidopsis thaliana fatty aldehyde decarbonylase. The final engineered strain produced up to 580.8 mg l(-1) of SCAs consisting of nonane (327.8 mg l(-1)), dodecane (136.5 mg l(-1)), tridecane (64.8 mg l(-1)), 2-methyl-dodecane (42.8 mg l(-1)) and tetradecane (8.9 mg l(-1)), together with small amounts of other hydrocarbons. Furthermore, this platform strain could produce short-chain FFAs using a fadD-deleted strain, and short-chain fatty esters by introducing the Acinetobacter sp. ADP1 wax ester synthase (atfA) and the E. coli mutant

  1. Bis(chloroethyl)ether (BCEE)

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Bis ( chloroethyl ) ether ( BCEE ) ; CASRN 111 - 44 - 4 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments fo

  2. p,p\\'-Dibromodiphenyl ether

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    p , p ' - Dibromodiphenyl ether ; CASRN 2050 - 47 - 7 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for

  3. Bis(chloromethyl)ether (BCME)

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Bis ( chloromethyl ) ether ( BCME ) ; CASRN 542 - 88 - 1 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments f

  4. Propylene glycol monomethyl ether (PGME)

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Propylene glycol monomethyl ether ( PGME ) ; CASRN 107 - 98 - 2 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assess

  5. Lacinilene C 7-methyl ether

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Lacinilene C 7-methyl ether is an antimicrobial compound produced by the cotton plant in response to attack by pathogens. For the first time, we now report the crystal structure of this compound. This may prove useful in studies on the interaction of the compound with pathogenic fungal cells....

  6. Desoxyhemigossypol-6-methyl-ether

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Desoxyhemigossypol-6-methyl ether is an antimicrobial compound produced by the cotton plant in response to attack by pathogens. For the first time, we now report the crystal structure of this compound. This may prove useful in studies on the interaction of the compound with pathogenic fungal cells...

  7. Alkanes in shrimp from the Buccaneer Oil Field

    SciTech Connect

    Middleditch, B.S.; Basile, B.; Chang, E.S.

    1982-07-01

    A total of 36 samples of shrimp were examined from the region of the Buccaneer oil field, eighteen of which were representatives of the commercial species Penaeus aztecus and the rest were various other species: Penaeus duorarum (pink shrimp), Trachypenaeus duorarum (sugar shrimp), Squilla empusa (mantis shrimp), and Sicyonia dorsalis (chevron shrimp). The alkanes and deuteriated alkanes were completely separated by GC, so a mass spectrometer was not required for their detection and quantitation. To confirm the identities of individual compounds, however, some samples were examined by combined gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. Results show that only thirteen of the forty shrimp collected from the region of the Buccaneer oil field contained petroleum alkanes, and the majority of these were obtained from trawls immediately adjacent to the production platforms. It appears that shrimp caught in the region of the Buccaneer oil field are not appreciably tainted with hydrocarbons discharged from the production platforms. (JMT)

  8. High Temperature Chemical Kinetic Combustion Modeling of Lightly Methylated Alkanes

    SciTech Connect

    Sarathy, S M; Westbrook, C K; Pitz, W J; Mehl, M

    2011-03-01

    Conventional petroleum jet and diesel fuels, as well as alternative Fischer-Tropsch (FT) fuels and hydrotreated renewable jet (HRJ) fuels, contain high molecular weight lightly branched alkanes (i.e., methylalkanes) and straight chain alkanes (n-alkanes). Improving the combustion of these fuels in practical applications requires a fundamental understanding of large hydrocarbon combustion chemistry. This research project presents a detailed high temperature chemical kinetic mechanism for n-octane and three lightly branched isomers octane (i.e., 2-methylheptane, 3-methylheptane, and 2,5-dimethylhexane). The model is validated against experimental data from a variety of fundamental combustion devices. This new model is used to show how the location and number of methyl branches affects fuel reactivity including laminar flame speed and species formation.

  9. Thermal decomposition of n-alkanes under supercritical conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, J.; Eser, S.

    1996-10-01

    The future aircraft fuel system may be operating at temperatures above the critical points of fuels. Currently there is very limited information on the thermal stability of hydrocarbon fuels under supercritical conditions. In this work, the thermal stressing experiments of n-decane, n-dodecane, n-tetradecane, their mixtures, and an n-paraffin mixture, Norpar-13, was carried out under supercritical conditions. The experimental results indicated that the thermal decomposition of n-alkanes can be represented well by the first-order kinetics. Pressure has significant effects on the first-order rate constant and product distribution in the near-critical region. The major products are a series of n-alkanes and 1-alkenes. The relative yields of n-alkanes and 1-alkenes depend on the reaction conditions. The first-order rate constants for the thermal decomposition of individual compounds in a mixture are different from those obtained for the decomposition of pure compounds.

  10. Surface crystallization in normal-alkanes and alcohols

    SciTech Connect

    Deutsch, M.; Ocko, B.M.; Wu, X.Z. |; Sirota, E.B.; Sinha, S.K.

    1995-06-01

    A new, rare surface freezing, phenomenon is observed in molten normal-alkanes and their derivatives (alcohols, thiols, etc.). X-ray and surface tension measurements show the formation of a crystalline monolayer on the surface of the liquid alkane at temperatures up to 3 C above the bulk solidification temperature, T{sub f}. For alcohols, a single bilayer is formed. In both cases, the molecules in the layer are hexagonally packed and oriented normal to the surface for short chain lengths, and tilted for long ones. In both cases the single layer persists down to T{sub f}. In terms of wetting theory, this constitutes a very limited partial wetting of the liquid surface by the crystalline layer. The new surface phase is obtained only for chain lengths 14 < n {le} 50 in alkanes, and 16 < n < 30 in alcohols. The measurements are satisfactorily accounted for within a simple theory based on surface energy considerations.

  11. Alkanes and alkenes conversion to high octane gasoline

    SciTech Connect

    Harandi, M.N.; Owen, H.

    1989-07-25

    This patent describes a process for the conversion of lower alkane and alkene hydrocarbons to high octane gasoline. It comprises: contacting a hydrocarbon feedstock comprising lower alkanes and alkenes with a fluidized bed of acidic, shape selective metallosiliate catalyst in a first conversion zone under high temperature alkane conversion conditions wherein the feedstock contains an amount of lower alkene sufficient to provide an exotherm sufficient to maintain near isothermal reaction conditions whereby an effluent stream is produced comprising higher aliphatic hydrocarbons rich in aromatics; contacting the effluent stream with a fluidized bed of acidic, medium pore metallosilicate catalyst in a second conversion zone at moderate temperature under oligonerization and alkylation conditions whereby a C/sub 5/ + gasoline boiling range product is produced rich in alkylated aromatics.

  12. Induction of Methyl Tertiary Butyl Ether (MTBE)-Oxidizing Activity in Mycobacterium vaccae JOB5 by MTBE

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Erika L.; Smith, Christy A.; O'Reilly, Kirk T.; Hyman, Michael R.

    2004-01-01

    Alkane-grown cells of Mycobacterium vaccae JOB5 cometabolically degrade the gasoline oxygenate methyl tertiary butyl ether (MTBE) through the activities of an alkane-inducible monooxygenase and other enzymes in the alkane oxidation pathway. In this study we examined the effects of MTBE on the MTBE-oxidizing activity of M. vaccae JOB5 grown on diverse nonalkane substrates. Carbon-limited cultures were grown on glycerol, lactate, several sugars, and tricarboxylic acid cycle intermediates, both in the presence and absence of MTBE. In all MTBE-containing cultures, MTBE consumption occurred and tertiary butyl alcohol (TBA) and tertiary butyl formate accumulated in the culture medium. Acetylene, a specific inactivator of alkane- and MTBE-oxidizing activities, fully inhibited MTBE consumption and product accumulation but had no other apparent effects on culture growth. The MTBE-dependent stimulation of MTBE-oxidizing activity in fructose- and glycerol-grown cells was saturable with respect to MTBE concentration (50% saturation level = 2.4 to 2.75 mM), and the onset of MTBE oxidation in glycerol-grown cells was inhibited by both rifampin and chloramphenicol. Other oxygenates (TBA and tertiary amyl methyl ether) also induced the enzyme activity required for their own degradation in glycerol-grown cells. Presence of MTBE also promoted MTBE oxidation in cells grown on organic acids, compounds that are often found in anaerobic, gasoline-contaminated environments. Experiments with acid-grown cells suggested induction of MTBE-oxidizing activity by MTBE is subject to catabolite repression. The results of this study are discussed in terms of their potential implications towards our understanding of the role of cometabolism in MTBE and TBA biodegradation in gasoline-contaminated environments. PMID:14766585

  13. Silver-Mediated Oxidative Trifluoromethylation of Alcohols to Alkyl Trifluoromethyl Ethers.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jian-Bo; Xu, Xiu-Hua; Qing, Feng-Ling

    2015-10-16

    The development of an efficient and practical method for the preparation of alkyl trifluoromethyl ethers is urgently demanding. The silver-mediated oxidative O-trifluoromethylation of primary, secondary, and tertiary alcohols with TMSCF3 under mild reaction conditions is established to provide a novel approach to a broad range of alkyl trifluoromethyl ethers. Further, this method is applied to the late-stage O-trifluoromethylation of complex natural products and prescribed pharmaceutical agents.

  14. Catalytic, mild, and selective oxyfunctionalization of linear alkanes: current challenges.

    PubMed

    Bordeaux, Mélanie; Galarneau, Anne; Drone, Jullien

    2012-10-22

    Selective catalysts for sustainable oxidation of alkanes are highly demanded because of the abundance of these molecules in the environment, the possibility to transform them into higher-value compounds, such as chemicals or synthetic fuels, and the fact that, kinetically speaking, this is a difficult reaction. Numerous chemical and biological catalysts have been developed in the lasts decades for this purpose, rendering the overview over this field of chemistry difficult. After giving a definition of the ideal catalyst for alkane oxyfunctionalization, this review aims to present the catalysts available today that are closest to ideal.

  15. Assimilation of chlorinated alkanes by hydrocarbon-utilizing fungi

    SciTech Connect

    Murphy, G.L.; Perry, J.J.

    1984-12-01

    The fatty acid compositions of two filamentous fungi (Cunninghamella elegans and Penicillium zonatum) and a yeast (Candida lipolytica) were determined after the organisms were grown on 1-chlorohexadecane or 1-chlorooctadecane. These organisms utilized the chlorinated alkanes as sole sources of carbon and energy. Analyses of the fatty acids present after growth on the chlorinated alkanes indicated that 60 to 70% of the total fatty acids in C. elegans were chlorinated. Approximately 50% of the fatty acids in C. lipolytica were also chlorinated. P. zonatum contained 20% 1-chlorohexadecanoic acid after growth on either substrate but did not incorporate C/sub 18/ chlorinated fatty acids.

  16. Regioselective alkane hydroxylation with a mutant AlkB enzyme

    DOEpatents

    Koch, Daniel J.; Arnold, Frances H.

    2012-11-13

    AlkB from Pseudomonas putida was engineered using in-vivo directed evolution to hydroxylate small chain alkanes. Mutant AlkB-BMO1 hydroxylates propane and butane at the terminal carbon at a rate greater than the wild-type to form 1-propanol and 1-butanol, respectively. Mutant AlkB-BMO2 similarly hydroxylates propane and butane at the terminal carbon at a rate greater than the wild-type to form 1-propanol and 1-butanol, respectively. These biocatalysts are highly active for small chain alkane substrates and their regioselectivity is retained in whole-cell biotransformations.

  17. Modeling of alkane emissions from a wood stain

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, J.C.S.; Guo, Z.

    1993-01-01

    The article discusses full-scale residential house tests to evaluate the effects of organic emissions from a wood finishing product--wood stain--on indoor air quality (IAQ). The test house concentrations of three alkane species, nonane, decane, and undecane, were measured as a function of time after the application of the wood stain. It was found that the test house concentrations can be simulated by an integrated IAQ model which takes into consideration source, sink, and ventilation effects. The alkane emissions were controlled by an evaporation-like process.

  18. Radiation chemistry of alternative fuel oxygenates -- Substituted ethers

    SciTech Connect

    Mezyk, S. P.; Cooper, W. J.; Bartels, D. M.; Tobien, T.; O'Shea, K. E.

    1999-11-15

    The electron beam process, an advanced oxidation and reduction technology, is based in the field of radiation chemistry. Fundamental to the development of treatment processes is an understanding of the underlying chemistry. The authors have previously evaluated the bimolecular rate constants for the reactions of methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE) and with this study have extended their studies to include ethyl tert-butyl ether (ETBE), di-isopropyl ether (DIPE) and tert-amyl methyl ether (TAME) with the hydroxyl radical, hydrogen atom and solvated electron using pulse radiolysis. For all of the oxygenates the reaction with the hydroxyl radical appears to be of primary interest in the destruction of the compounds in water. The rates with the solvated electron are limiting values as the rates appear to be relatively low. The hydrogen atom rate constants are relatively low, coupled with the low yield in radiolysis, they concluded that these are of little significance in the destruction of the alternative fuel oxygenates (and MTBE).

  19. Preparation and evaluation of novel chiral stationary phases based on quinine derivatives comprising crown ether moieties.

    PubMed

    Wang, Dongqiang; Zhao, Jianchao; Wu, Haixia; Wu, Haibo; Cai, Jianfeng; Ke, Yanxiong; Liang, Xinmiao

    2015-01-01

    The C9-position of quinine was modified by meta- or para-substituted benzo-18-crown-6, and immobilized on 3-mercaptopropyl-modified silica gel through the radical thiol-ene addition reaction. These two chiral stationary phases were evaluated by chiral acids, amino acids, and chiral primary amines. The crown ether moiety on the quinine anion exchanger provided a ligand-exchange site for primary amino groups, which played an important role in the retention and enantioselectivity for chiral compounds containing primary amine groups. These two stationary phases showed good selectivity for some amino acids. The complex interaction between crown ether and protonated primary amino group was investigated by the addition of inorganic salts such as LiCl, NH4Cl, NaCl, and KCl to the mobile phase. The resolution results showed that the simultaneous interactions between two function moieties (quinine and crown ether) and amino acids were important for the chiral separation.

  20. 40 CFR 721.785 - Halogenated alkane aromatic compound (generic name).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Halogenated alkane aromatic compound... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.785 Halogenated alkane aromatic compound (generic name). (a) Chemical... as a halogenated alkane aromatic compound (PMN P-94-1747) is subject to reporting under this...

  1. 40 CFR 721.785 - Halogenated alkane aromatic compound (generic name).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Halogenated alkane aromatic compound... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.785 Halogenated alkane aromatic compound (generic name). (a) Chemical... as a halogenated alkane aromatic compound (PMN P-94-1747) is subject to reporting under this...

  2. 40 CFR 721.785 - Halogenated alkane aromatic compound (generic name).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Halogenated alkane aromatic compound... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.785 Halogenated alkane aromatic compound (generic name). (a) Chemical... as a halogenated alkane aromatic compound (PMN P-94-1747) is subject to reporting under this...

  3. 40 CFR 721.785 - Halogenated alkane aromatic compound (generic name).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Halogenated alkane aromatic compound... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.785 Halogenated alkane aromatic compound (generic name). (a) Chemical... as a halogenated alkane aromatic compound (PMN P-94-1747) is subject to reporting under this...

  4. 40 CFR 721.4464 - Mixture of hydrofluoro alkanes and hydrofluoro alkene.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Mixture of hydrofluoro alkanes and... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.4464 Mixture of hydrofluoro alkanes and hydrofluoro alkene. (a) Chemical... as a mixture of hydrofluoro alkanes and hydrofluoro alkene (PMNs P-96-945/946/947/948) are subject...

  5. 40 CFR 721.4464 - Mixture of hydrofluoro alkanes and hydrofluoro alkene.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Mixture of hydrofluoro alkanes and... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.4464 Mixture of hydrofluoro alkanes and hydrofluoro alkene. (a) Chemical... as a mixture of hydrofluoro alkanes and hydrofluoro alkene (PMNs P-96-945/946/947/948) are subject...

  6. 40 CFR 721.4464 - Mixture of hydrofluoro alkanes and hydrofluoro alkene.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Mixture of hydrofluoro alkanes and... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.4464 Mixture of hydrofluoro alkanes and hydrofluoro alkene. (a) Chemical... as a mixture of hydrofluoro alkanes and hydrofluoro alkene (PMNs P-96-945/946/947/948) are subject...

  7. 40 CFR 721.4464 - Mixture of hydrofluoro alkanes and hydrofluoro alkene.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Mixture of hydrofluoro alkanes and... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.4464 Mixture of hydrofluoro alkanes and hydrofluoro alkene. (a) Chemical... as a mixture of hydrofluoro alkanes and hydrofluoro alkene (PMNs P-96-945/946/947/948) are subject...

  8. 40 CFR 721.4464 - Mixture of hydrofluoro alkanes and hydrofluoro alkene.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Mixture of hydrofluoro alkanes and... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.4464 Mixture of hydrofluoro alkanes and hydrofluoro alkene. (a) Chemical... as a mixture of hydrofluoro alkanes and hydrofluoro alkene (PMNs P-96-945/946/947/948) are subject...

  9. A new alternative to expandable pedicle screws: Expandable poly-ether-ether-ketone shell.

    PubMed

    Demir, Teyfik

    2015-05-01

    Screw pullout is a very common problem in the fixation of sacrum with pedicle screws. The principal cause of this problem is that the cyclic micro motions in the fixation of sacrum are higher than the other regions of the vertebrae that limit the osteo-integration between bone and screw. In addition to that, the bone quality is very poor at sacrum region. This study investigated a possible solution to the pullout problem without the expandable screws' handicaps. Newly designed poly-ether-ether-ketone expandable shell and classical pedicle screws were biomechanically compared. Torsion test, pullout tests, fatigue tests, flexion/extension moment test, axial gripping capacity tests and torsional gripping capacity tests were conducted in accordance with ASTM F543, F1798 and F1717. Standard polyurethane foam and calf vertebrae were used as embedding medium for pullout tests. Classical pedicle screw pullout load on polyurethane foam was 564.8 N compared to the failure load for calf vertebrae's 1264 N. Under the same test conditions, expandable poly-ether-ether-ketone shell system's pullout loads from polyurethane foam and calf vertebrae were 1196.3 and 1890 N, respectively. The pullout values for expandable poly-ether-ether-ketone shell were 33% and 53% higher than classical pedicle screw on polyurethane foam and calf vertebrae, respectively. The expandable poly-ether-ether-ketone shell exhibited endurance on its 90% of yield load. Contrary to poly-ether-ether-ketone shell, classical pedicle screw exhibited endurance on 70% of its yield load. Expandable poly-ether-ether-ketone shell exhibited much higher pullout performance than classical pedicle screw. Fatigue performance of expandable poly-ether-ether-ketone shell is also higher than classical pedicle screw due to damping the micro motion capacity of the poly-ether-ether-ketone. Expandable poly-ether-ether-ketone shell is a safe alternative to all other expandable pedicle screw systems on mechanical perspective.

  10. A new alternative to expandable pedicle screws: Expandable poly-ether-ether-ketone shell.

    PubMed

    Demir, Teyfik

    2015-05-01

    Screw pullout is a very common problem in the fixation of sacrum with pedicle screws. The principal cause of this problem is that the cyclic micro motions in the fixation of sacrum are higher than the other regions of the vertebrae that limit the osteo-integration between bone and screw. In addition to that, the bone quality is very poor at sacrum region. This study investigated a possible solution to the pullout problem without the expandable screws' handicaps. Newly designed poly-ether-ether-ketone expandable shell and classical pedicle screws were biomechanically compared. Torsion test, pullout tests, fatigue tests, flexion/extension moment test, axial gripping capacity tests and torsional gripping capacity tests were conducted in accordance with ASTM F543, F1798 and F1717. Standard polyurethane foam and calf vertebrae were used as embedding medium for pullout tests. Classical pedicle screw pullout load on polyurethane foam was 564.8 N compared to the failure load for calf vertebrae's 1264 N. Under the same test conditions, expandable poly-ether-ether-ketone shell system's pullout loads from polyurethane foam and calf vertebrae were 1196.3 and 1890 N, respectively. The pullout values for expandable poly-ether-ether-ketone shell were 33% and 53% higher than classical pedicle screw on polyurethane foam and calf vertebrae, respectively. The expandable poly-ether-ether-ketone shell exhibited endurance on its 90% of yield load. Contrary to poly-ether-ether-ketone shell, classical pedicle screw exhibited endurance on 70% of its yield load. Expandable poly-ether-ether-ketone shell exhibited much higher pullout performance than classical pedicle screw. Fatigue performance of expandable poly-ether-ether-ketone shell is also higher than classical pedicle screw due to damping the micro motion capacity of the poly-ether-ether-ketone. Expandable poly-ether-ether-ketone shell is a safe alternative to all other expandable pedicle screw systems on mechanical perspective

  11. Diffusion of squalene in n-alkanes and squalane.

    PubMed

    Kowert, Bruce A; Watson, Michael B; Dang, Nhan C

    2014-02-27

    Squalene, an intermediate in the biosynthesis of cholesterol, has a 24-carbon backbone with six methyl groups and six isolated double bonds. Capillary flow techniques have been used to determine its translational diffusion constant, D, at room temperature in squalane, n-C16, and three n-C8-squalane mixtures. The D values have a weaker dependence on viscosity, η, than predicted by the Stokes-Einstein relation, D = kBT/(6πηr). A fit to the modified relation, D/T = ASE/η(p), gives p = 0.820 ± 0.028; p = 1 for the Stokes-Einstein limit. The translational motion of squalene appears to be much like that of n-alkane solutes with comparable chain lengths; their D values show similar deviations from the Stokes-Einstein model. The n-alkane with the same carbon chain length as squalene, n-C24, has a near-equal p value of 0.844 ± 0.018 in n-alkane solvents. The values of the hydrodynamic radius, r, for n-C24, squalene, and other n-alkane solutes decrease as the viscosity increases and have a common dependence on the van der Waals volumes of the solute and solvent. The possibility of studying squalene in lipid droplets and membranes is discussed.

  12. Catalytic production of branched small alkanes from biohydrocarbons.

    PubMed

    Oya, Shin-ichi; Kanno, Daisuke; Watanabe, Hideo; Tamura, Masazumi; Nakagawa, Yoshinao; Tomishige, Keiichi

    2015-08-10

    Squalane, C30 algae-derived branched hydrocarbon, was successfully converted to smaller hydrocarbons without skeletal isomerization and aromatization over ruthenium on ceria (Ru/CeO2 ). The internal CH2 CH2 bonds located between branches are preferably dissociated to give branched alkanes with very simple distribution as compared with conventional methods using metal-acid bifunctional catalysts.

  13. Cyano- and polycyanometallo-porphyrins as catalysts for alkane oxidation

    DOEpatents

    Ellis, P.E. Jr.; Lyons, J.E.

    1993-05-18

    New compositions of matter comprising cyano-substituted metal complexes of porphyrins are catalysts for the oxidation of alkanes. The metal is iron, chromium, manganese, ruthenium, copper or cobalt. The porphyrin ring has cyano groups attached thereto in meso- and/or [beta]-pyrrolic positions.

  14. Cyano- and polycyanometallo-porphyrins as catalysts for alkane oxidation

    DOEpatents

    Ellis, P.E. Jr.; Lyons, J.E.

    1995-01-17

    New compositions of matter comprising cyano-substituted metal complexes of porphyrins are catalysts for the oxidation of alkanes. The metal is iron, chromium, manganese, ruthenium, copper or cobalt. The porphyrin ring has cyano groups attached thereto in meso and/or [beta]-pyrrolic positions.

  15. Diffusion of squalene in n-alkanes and squalane.

    PubMed

    Kowert, Bruce A; Watson, Michael B; Dang, Nhan C

    2014-02-27

    Squalene, an intermediate in the biosynthesis of cholesterol, has a 24-carbon backbone with six methyl groups and six isolated double bonds. Capillary flow techniques have been used to determine its translational diffusion constant, D, at room temperature in squalane, n-C16, and three n-C8-squalane mixtures. The D values have a weaker dependence on viscosity, η, than predicted by the Stokes-Einstein relation, D = kBT/(6πηr). A fit to the modified relation, D/T = ASE/η(p), gives p = 0.820 ± 0.028; p = 1 for the Stokes-Einstein limit. The translational motion of squalene appears to be much like that of n-alkane solutes with comparable chain lengths; their D values show similar deviations from the Stokes-Einstein model. The n-alkane with the same carbon chain length as squalene, n-C24, has a near-equal p value of 0.844 ± 0.018 in n-alkane solvents. The values of the hydrodynamic radius, r, for n-C24, squalene, and other n-alkane solutes decrease as the viscosity increases and have a common dependence on the van der Waals volumes of the solute and solvent. The possibility of studying squalene in lipid droplets and membranes is discussed. PMID:24528091

  16. Improving alkane synthesis in Escherichia coli via metabolic engineering.

    PubMed

    Song, Xuejiao; Yu, Haiying; Zhu, Kun

    2016-01-01

    Concerns about energy security and global petroleum supply have made the production of renewable biofuels an industrial imperative. The ideal biofuels are n-alkanes in that they are chemically and structurally identical to the fossil fuels and can "drop in" to the transportation infrastructure. In this work, an Escherichia coli strain that produces n-alkanes was constructed by heterologous expression of acyl-acyl carrier protein (ACP) reductase (AAR) and aldehyde deformylating oxygenase (ADO) from Synechococcus elongatus PCC7942. The accumulation of alkanes ranged from 3.1 to 24.0 mg/L using different expressing strategies. Deletion of yqhD, an inherent aldehyde reductase in E. coli, or overexpression of fadR, an activator for fatty acid biosynthesis, exhibited a nearly twofold increase in alkane titers, respectively. Combining yqhD deletion and fadR overexpression resulted in a production titer of 255.6 mg/L in E. coli, and heptadecene was the most abundant product. PMID:26476644

  17. 40 CFR 721.10704 - Aryl-substituted alkane.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as an aryl-substituted alkane (PMN P-12-548) is subject to reporting under this section for the significant new uses described in paragraph (a)(2) of this... communication program. Requirements as specified in § 721.72(a), (b), (c), (d), (e) (concentration set at...

  18. MODELING OF ALKANE EMISSIONS FROM A WOOD STAIN

    EPA Science Inventory

    The article discusses full-scale residential house tests to evaluate the effects of organic emissions from a wood finishing product--wood stain--on indoor air quality (IAQ). The test house concentrations of three alkane species, nonane, decane, and undecane, were measured as a fu...

  19. Diverse alkane hydroxylase genes in microorganisms and environments

    PubMed Central

    Nie, Yong; Chi, Chang-Qiao; Fang, Hui; Liang, Jie-Liang; Lu, She-Lian; Lai, Guo-Li; Tang, Yue-Qin; Wu, Xiao-Lei

    2014-01-01

    AlkB and CYP153 are important alkane hydroxylases responsible for aerobic alkane degradation in bioremediation of oil-polluted environments and microbial enhanced oil recovery. Since their distribution in nature is not clear, we made the investigation among thus-far sequenced 3,979 microbial genomes and 137 metagenomes from terrestrial, freshwater, and marine environments. Hundreds of diverse alkB and CYP153 genes including many novel ones were found in bacterial genomes, whereas none were found in archaeal genomes. Moreover, these genes were detected with different distributional patterns in the terrestrial, freshwater, and marine metagenomes. Hints for horizontal gene transfer, gene duplication, and gene fusion were found, which together are likely responsible for diversifying the alkB and CYP153 genes adapt to the ubiquitous distribution of different alkanes in nature. In addition, different distributions of these genes between bacterial genomes and metagenomes suggested the potentially important roles of unknown or less common alkane degraders in nature. PMID:24829093

  20. Cyano- and polycyanometalloporphyrins as catalysts for alkane oxidation

    DOEpatents

    Ellis, Jr., Paul E.; Lyons, James E.

    1992-01-01

    Alkanes are oxidized by contact with oxygen-containing gas in the presence as catalyst of a metalloporphyrin in which hydrogen atoms in the porphyrin ring have been substituted with one or more cyano groups. Hydrogen atoms in the porphyrin ring may also be substituted with halogen atoms.

  1. Cyano- and polycyanometallo-porphyrins as catalysts for alkane oxidation

    DOEpatents

    Ellis, Jr., Paul E.; Lyons, James E.

    1995-01-01

    New compositions of matter comprising cyano-substituted metal complexes of porphyrins are catalysts for the oxidation of alkanes. The metal is iron, chromium, manganese, ruthenium, copper or cobalt. The porphyrin ring has cyano groups attached thereto in meso and/or .beta.-pyrrolic positions.

  2. Cyano- and polycyanometallo-porphyrins as catalysts for alkane oxidation

    DOEpatents

    Ellis, Jr., Paul E.; Lyons, James E.

    1993-01-01

    New compositions of matter comprising cyano-substituted metal complexes of porphyrins are catalysts for the oxidation of alkanes. The metal is iron, chromium, manganese, ruthenium, copper or cobalt. The porphyrin ring has cyano groups attached thereto in meso and/or .beta.-pyrrolic positions.

  3. Improving alkane synthesis in Escherichia coli via metabolic engineering.

    PubMed

    Song, Xuejiao; Yu, Haiying; Zhu, Kun

    2016-01-01

    Concerns about energy security and global petroleum supply have made the production of renewable biofuels an industrial imperative. The ideal biofuels are n-alkanes in that they are chemically and structurally identical to the fossil fuels and can "drop in" to the transportation infrastructure. In this work, an Escherichia coli strain that produces n-alkanes was constructed by heterologous expression of acyl-acyl carrier protein (ACP) reductase (AAR) and aldehyde deformylating oxygenase (ADO) from Synechococcus elongatus PCC7942. The accumulation of alkanes ranged from 3.1 to 24.0 mg/L using different expressing strategies. Deletion of yqhD, an inherent aldehyde reductase in E. coli, or overexpression of fadR, an activator for fatty acid biosynthesis, exhibited a nearly twofold increase in alkane titers, respectively. Combining yqhD deletion and fadR overexpression resulted in a production titer of 255.6 mg/L in E. coli, and heptadecene was the most abundant product.

  4. Catalytic oxidation of light alkanes in presence of a base

    DOEpatents

    Bhinde, Manoj V.; Bierl, Thomas W.

    1998-01-01

    The presence of a base in the reaction mixture in a metal-ligand catalyzed partial oxidation of alkanes results in sustained catalyst activity, and in greater percent conversion as compared with oxidation in the absence of base, while maintaining satisfactory selectivity for the desired oxidation, for example the oxidation of isobutane to isobutanol.

  5. Catalytic oxidation of light alkanes in presence of a base

    DOEpatents

    Bhinde, M.V.; Bierl, T.W.

    1998-03-03

    The presence of a base in the reaction mixture in a metal-ligand catalyzed partial oxidation of alkanes results in sustained catalyst activity, and in greater percent conversion as compared with oxidation in the absence of base, while maintaining satisfactory selectivity for the desired oxidation, for example the oxidation of isobutane to isobutanol. 1 fig.

  6. Integrated process for preparing a carboxylic acid from an alkane

    SciTech Connect

    Benderly, Abraham; Chadda, Nitin; Sevon, Douglass

    2011-12-20

    The present invention relates to an integrated process for producing unsaturated carboxylic acids from the corresponding C.sub.2-C.sub.4 alkane. The process begins with performance of thermally integrated dehydrogenation reactions which convert a C.sub.2-C.sub.4 alkane to its corresponding C.sub.2-C.sub.4 alkene, and which involve exothermically converting a portion of an alkane to its corresponding alkene by oxidative dehydrogenation in an exothermic reaction zone, in the presence of oxygen and a suitable catalyst, and then feeding the products of the exothermic reaction zone to an endothermic reaction zone wherein at least a portion of the remaining unconverted alkane is endothermically dehydrogenated to form an additional quantity of the same corresponding alkene, in the presence of carbon dioxide and an other suitable catalyst. The alkene products of the thermally integrated dehydrogenation reactions are then provided to a catalytic vapor phase partial oxidation process for conversion of the alkene to the corresponding unsaturated carboxylic acid or nitrile. Unreacted alkene and carbon dioxide are recovered from the oxidation product stream and recycled back to the thermally integrated dehydrogenation reactions.

  7. Modular and selective biosynthesis of gasoline-range alkanes.

    PubMed

    Sheppard, Micah J; Kunjapur, Aditya M; Prather, Kristala L J

    2016-01-01

    Typical renewable liquid fuel alternatives to gasoline are not entirely compatible with current infrastructure. We have engineered Escherichia coli to selectively produce alkanes found in gasoline (propane, butane, pentane, heptane, and nonane) from renewable substrates such as glucose or glycerol. Our modular pathway framework achieves carbon-chain extension by two different mechanisms. A fatty acid synthesis route is used to generate longer chains heptane and nonane, while a more energy efficient alternative, reverse-β-oxidation, is used for synthesis of propane, butane, and pentane. We demonstrate that both upstream (thiolase) and intermediate (thioesterase) reactions can act as control points for chain-length specificity. Specific free fatty acids are subsequently converted to alkanes using a broad-specificity carboxylic acid reductase and a cyanobacterial aldehyde decarbonylase (AD). The selectivity obtained by different module pairings provides a foundation for tuning alkane product distribution for desired fuel properties. Alternate ADs that have greater activity on shorter substrates improve observed alkane titer. However, even in an engineered host strain that significantly reduces endogenous conversion of aldehyde intermediates to alcohol byproducts, AD activity is observed to be limiting for all chain lengths. Given these insights, we discuss guiding principles for pathway selection and potential opportunities for pathway improvement.

  8. Two-stage process for conversion of alkanes to gasoline

    SciTech Connect

    Harandi, M.N.; Owen, H.

    1989-08-22

    This patent describes an improvement in a two-stage process for upgrading hydrocarbons in at least four reaction zones cooperating to produce gasoline range hydrocarbons from lower alkanes. The reaction zones comprising first reaction zone to crack gas oil range hydrocarbons utilizing a large pore cracking catalyst, a second reaction zone in which the large pore catalyst is oxidatively regenerated, a third reaction zone in which an external catalyst cooler autogeneously cools regenerated catalyst by dehydrogenation of the lower alkane stream to produce an olefinic effluent, and a fourth reaction zone in which the olefinic effluent is oligomerized to the gasoline range hydrocarbons. The improvement comprising: a first stage, comprising utilizing excess heat from the second reaction zone: contacting the hot fluid catalytic cracking catalyst with C/sub 3//sup +/ alkanes in the third reaction zone to provide conversion of the alkanes to olefins which leave the third reaction zone as the olefinic effluent separated from catalyst; returning a specified amount of separate fluid catalytic cracking catalyst from the third reaction zone directly to the first or second reaction zone; a second state comprising passing the olefinic effluent from the third reaction zone to a fourth reaction zone for oligomerizing olefins to gasoline range hydrocarbons contacting the olefinic effluent with a medium pore zeolite catalyst effective; recovering a gasoline range hydrocarbon stream from the effluent of the fourth reaction zone.

  9. Modular and selective biosynthesis of gasoline-range alkanes.

    PubMed

    Sheppard, Micah J; Kunjapur, Aditya M; Prather, Kristala L J

    2016-01-01

    Typical renewable liquid fuel alternatives to gasoline are not entirely compatible with current infrastructure. We have engineered Escherichia coli to selectively produce alkanes found in gasoline (propane, butane, pentane, heptane, and nonane) from renewable substrates such as glucose or glycerol. Our modular pathway framework achieves carbon-chain extension by two different mechanisms. A fatty acid synthesis route is used to generate longer chains heptane and nonane, while a more energy efficient alternative, reverse-β-oxidation, is used for synthesis of propane, butane, and pentane. We demonstrate that both upstream (thiolase) and intermediate (thioesterase) reactions can act as control points for chain-length specificity. Specific free fatty acids are subsequently converted to alkanes using a broad-specificity carboxylic acid reductase and a cyanobacterial aldehyde decarbonylase (AD). The selectivity obtained by different module pairings provides a foundation for tuning alkane product distribution for desired fuel properties. Alternate ADs that have greater activity on shorter substrates improve observed alkane titer. However, even in an engineered host strain that significantly reduces endogenous conversion of aldehyde intermediates to alcohol byproducts, AD activity is observed to be limiting for all chain lengths. Given these insights, we discuss guiding principles for pathway selection and potential opportunities for pathway improvement. PMID:26556131

  10. Reversible Interconversion between Alkanes, Alkenes, Alcohols and Ketones under Hydrothermal Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shipp, J.; Hartnett, H. E.; Gould, I. R.; Shock, E.; Williams, L. B.

    2011-12-01

    Many transformation reactions involving hydrocarbons that occur in deep sedimentary systems and determine petroleum compositions occur in the presence of H2O. Hydrothermal transformations of organic material are thought to provide carbon sources for microbes in deep ocean sediments. Hydrothermal conditions may also mimic the conditions where life developed on an early Earth. Nevertheless, much remains to be learned about the mechanisms of hydrothermal organic reactions, including ways in which various reactions are interrelated and how reactions compete with each other. It can be argued that metastable equilibrium states develop over geological timescales and at geochemically relevant temperatures, suggesting that reactions occur under thermodynamic rather than kinetic control. The extent to which reactions are reversible, and how product distributions are determined, are primary tests of the metastable equilibrium model. Seewald (2001, GCA 65, 1641-1664) showed that under hydrothermal conditions and in the presence of a redox buffer, simple alkanes and alkenes undergo oxidation, reduction, and hydration reactions. He proposed a reaction scheme where alkanes interconvert with alkenes, followed by stepwise hydration of alkenes to alcohols, oxidation to ketones, and finally conversion to carboxylic acids, which can undergo decarboxylation. Here we describe experiments that further develop the scope of these functional group interconversions, determine relative reaction kinetics, and provide insight into competing reactions. Hydrothermal experiments were performed at 300°C and 100 MPa in gold capsules for 12 to 144 hours. The reactant structures were based on cyclohexane with one and two methyl groups that served as regio- and stereochemical markers for the reactions. Starting with the alkanes, the observed products include the corresponding alkenes, alcohols, ketones and enones, in support of the Seewald reaction scheme. Our experiments add a branch to this scheme

  11. Crystallization features of normal alkanes in confined geometry.

    PubMed

    Su, Yunlan; Liu, Guoming; Xie, Baoquan; Fu, Dongsheng; Wang, Dujin

    2014-01-21

    How polymers crystallize can greatly affect their thermal and mechanical properties, which influence the practical applications of these materials. Polymeric materials, such as block copolymers, graft polymers, and polymer blends, have complex molecular structures. Due to the multiple hierarchical structures and different size domains in polymer systems, confined hard environments for polymer crystallization exist widely in these materials. The confined geometry is closely related to both the phase metastability and lifetime of polymer. This affects the phase miscibility, microphase separation, and crystallization behaviors and determines both the performance of polymer materials and how easily these materials can be processed. Furthermore, the size effect of metastable states needs to be clarified in polymers. However, scientists find it difficult to propose a quantitative formula to describe the transition dynamics of metastable states in these complex systems. Normal alkanes [CnH2n+2, n-alkanes], especially linear saturated hydrocarbons, can provide a well-defined model system for studying the complex crystallization behaviors of polymer materials, surfactants, and lipids. Therefore, a deeper investigation of normal alkane phase behavior in confinement will help scientists to understand the crystalline phase transition and ultimate properties of many polymeric materials, especially polyolefins. In this Account, we provide an in-depth look at the research concerning the confined crystallization behavior of n-alkanes and binary mixtures in microcapsules by our laboratory and others. Since 2006, our group has developed a technique for synthesizing nearly monodispersed n-alkane containing microcapsules with controllable size and surface porous morphology. We applied an in situ polymerization method, using melamine-formaldehyde resin as shell material and nonionic surfactants as emulsifiers. The solid shell of microcapsules can provide a stable three-dimensional (3-D

  12. From Alkanes to Carboxylic Acids: Terminal Oxygenation by a Fungal Peroxygenase.

    PubMed

    Olmedo, Andrés; Aranda, Carmen; Del Río, José C; Kiebist, Jan; Scheibner, Katrin; Martínez, Angel T; Gutiérrez, Ana

    2016-09-26

    A new heme-thiolate peroxidase catalyzes the hydroxylation of n-alkanes at the terminal position-a challenging reaction in organic chemistry-with H2 O2 as the only cosubstrate. Besides the primary product, 1-dodecanol, the conversion of dodecane yielded dodecanoic, 12-hydroxydodecanoic, and 1,12-dodecanedioic acids, as identified by GC-MS. Dodecanal could be detected only in trace amounts, and 1,12-dodecanediol was not observed, thus suggesting that dodecanoic acid is the branch point between mono- and diterminal hydroxylation. Simultaneously, oxygenation was observed at other hydrocarbon chain positions (preferentially C2 and C11). Similar results were observed in reactions of tetradecane. The pattern of products formed, together with data on the incorporation of (18) O from the cosubstrate H2 (18) O2 , demonstrate that the enzyme acts as a peroxygenase that is able to catalyze a cascade of mono- and diterminal oxidation reactions of long-chain n-alkanes to give carboxylic acids.

  13. Controlling Morphology and Molecular Packing of Alkane Substituted Phthalocyanine Blend Bulk Heterojunction Solar Cells†

    PubMed Central

    Jurow, Matthew J.; Hageman, Brian A.; Nam, Chang-Yong; Pabon, Cesar; Black, Charles T.

    2013-01-01

    Systematic changes in the exocyclic substiution of core phthalocyanine platform tune the absorption properties to yield commercially viable dyes that function as the primary light absorbers in organic bulk heterojunction solar cells. Blends of these complementary phthalocyanines absorb a broader portion of the solar spectrum compared to a single dye, thereby increasing solar cell performance. We correlate grazing incidence small angle x-ray scattering structural data with solar cell performance to elucidate the role of nanomorphology of active layers composed of blends of phthalocyanines and a fullerene derivative. A highly reproducible device architecture is used to assure accuracy and is relevant to films for solar windows in urban settings. We demonstrate that the number and structure of the exocyclic motifs dictate phase formation, hierarchical organization, and nanostructure, thus can be employed to tailor active layer morphology to enhance exciton dissociation and charge collection efficiencies in the photovoltaic devices. These studies reveal that disordered films make better solar cells, short alkanes increase the optical density of the active layer, and branched alkanes inhibit unproductive homogeneous molecular alignment. PMID:23589766

  14. From Alkanes to Carboxylic Acids: Terminal Oxygenation by a Fungal Peroxygenase.

    PubMed

    Olmedo, Andrés; Aranda, Carmen; Del Río, José C; Kiebist, Jan; Scheibner, Katrin; Martínez, Angel T; Gutiérrez, Ana

    2016-09-26

    A new heme-thiolate peroxidase catalyzes the hydroxylation of n-alkanes at the terminal position-a challenging reaction in organic chemistry-with H2 O2 as the only cosubstrate. Besides the primary product, 1-dodecanol, the conversion of dodecane yielded dodecanoic, 12-hydroxydodecanoic, and 1,12-dodecanedioic acids, as identified by GC-MS. Dodecanal could be detected only in trace amounts, and 1,12-dodecanediol was not observed, thus suggesting that dodecanoic acid is the branch point between mono- and diterminal hydroxylation. Simultaneously, oxygenation was observed at other hydrocarbon chain positions (preferentially C2 and C11). Similar results were observed in reactions of tetradecane. The pattern of products formed, together with data on the incorporation of (18) O from the cosubstrate H2 (18) O2 , demonstrate that the enzyme acts as a peroxygenase that is able to catalyze a cascade of mono- and diterminal oxidation reactions of long-chain n-alkanes to give carboxylic acids. PMID:27573441

  15. Isolating the non-polar contributions to the intermolecular potential for water-alkane interactions.

    PubMed

    Ballal, Deepti; Venkataraman, Pradeep; Fouad, Wael A; Cox, Kenneth R; Chapman, Walter G

    2014-08-14

    Intermolecular potential models for water and alkanes describe pure component properties fairly well, but fail to reproduce properties of water-alkane mixtures. Understanding interactions between water and non-polar molecules like alkanes is important not only for the hydrocarbon industry but has implications to biological processes as well. Although non-polar solutes in water have been widely studied, much less work has focused on water in non-polar solvents. In this study we calculate the solubility of water in different alkanes (methane to dodecane) at ambient conditions where the water content in alkanes is very low so that the non-polar water-alkane interactions determine solubility. Only the alkane-rich phase is simulated since the fugacity of water in the water rich phase is calculated from an accurate equation of state. Using the SPC/E model for water and TraPPE model for alkanes along with Lorentz-Berthelot mixing rules for the cross parameters produces a water solubility that is an order of magnitude lower than the experimental value. It is found that an effective water Lennard-Jones energy ε(W)/k = 220 K is required to match the experimental water solubility in TraPPE alkanes. This number is much higher than used in most simulation water models (SPC/E-ε(W)/k = 78.2 K). It is surprising that the interaction energy obtained here is also higher than the water-alkane interaction energy predicted by studies on solubility of alkanes in water. The reason for this high water-alkane interaction energy is not completely understood. Some factors that might contribute to the large interaction energy, such as polarizability of alkanes, octupole moment of methane, and clustering of water at low concentrations in alkanes, are examined. It is found that, though important, these factors do not completely explain the anomalously strong attraction between alkanes and water observed experimentally. PMID:25134597

  16. Isolating the non-polar contributions to the intermolecular potential for water-alkane interactions.

    PubMed

    Ballal, Deepti; Venkataraman, Pradeep; Fouad, Wael A; Cox, Kenneth R; Chapman, Walter G

    2014-08-14

    Intermolecular potential models for water and alkanes describe pure component properties fairly well, but fail to reproduce properties of water-alkane mixtures. Understanding interactions between water and non-polar molecules like alkanes is important not only for the hydrocarbon industry but has implications to biological processes as well. Although non-polar solutes in water have been widely studied, much less work has focused on water in non-polar solvents. In this study we calculate the solubility of water in different alkanes (methane to dodecane) at ambient conditions where the water content in alkanes is very low so that the non-polar water-alkane interactions determine solubility. Only the alkane-rich phase is simulated since the fugacity of water in the water rich phase is calculated from an accurate equation of state. Using the SPC/E model for water and TraPPE model for alkanes along with Lorentz-Berthelot mixing rules for the cross parameters produces a water solubility that is an order of magnitude lower than the experimental value. It is found that an effective water Lennard-Jones energy ε(W)/k = 220 K is required to match the experimental water solubility in TraPPE alkanes. This number is much higher than used in most simulation water models (SPC/E-ε(W)/k = 78.2 K). It is surprising that the interaction energy obtained here is also higher than the water-alkane interaction energy predicted by studies on solubility of alkanes in water. The reason for this high water-alkane interaction energy is not completely understood. Some factors that might contribute to the large interaction energy, such as polarizability of alkanes, octupole moment of methane, and clustering of water at low concentrations in alkanes, are examined. It is found that, though important, these factors do not completely explain the anomalously strong attraction between alkanes and water observed experimentally.

  17. Measuring exposures to glycol ethers.

    PubMed Central

    Clapp, D E; Zaebst, D D; Herrick, R F

    1984-01-01

    In 1981, NIOSH began investigating the potential reproductive health effects resulting from exposures to a class of organic solvents known generically as glycol ethers (GE). This research was begun as a result of the NIOSH criteria document development program which revealed little data available on the health effects of glycol ether exposure. Toxicologic research was begun by NIOSH and other researchers which suggested substantial reproductive effects in animals. These animal data motivated a study of human exposures in the occupational setting. In 1981 and 1982 NIOSH conducted several walk-through surveys which included preliminary measurements of exposures in a variety of industries including painting trades, coal mining, production blending and distribution facilities, aircraft fueling, and communications equipment repair facilities. The human exposure data from these surveys is summarized in this paper with most results well below 1 parts per million (ppm) and only a few values approaching 10 ppm. Blood samples were collected at one site resulting in GE concentrations below the limit of detection. Exposures to airborne glycol ethers, in the industries investigated during the collection of this data, revealed several problems in reliably sampling GE at low concentrations. It became apparent, from the data and observations of work practices, that air monitoring alone provided an inadequate index of GE exposure. Further field studies of exposure to GE are anticipated, pending location of additional groups of exposed workers and development of more reliable methods for characterizing exposure, especially biological monitoring. PMID:6499824

  18. A Detailed Chemical Kinetic Reaction Mechanism for n-Alkane Hydrocarbons From n-Octane to n-Hexadecane

    SciTech Connect

    Westbrook, C K; Pitz, W J; Herbinet, O; Curran, H J; Silke, E J

    2008-02-08

    Detailed chemical kinetic reaction mechanisms have been developed to describe the pyrolysis and oxidation of nine n-alkanes larger than n-heptane, including n-octane (n-C{sub 8}H{sub 18}), n-nonane (n-C{sub 9}H{sub 20}), n-decane (n-C{sub 10}H{sub 22}), n-undecane (n-C{sub 11}H{sub 24}), n-dodecane (n-C{sub 12}H{sub 26}), n-tridecane (n-C{sub 13}H{sub 28}), n-tetradecane (n-C{sub 14}H{sub 30}), n-pentadecane (n-C{sub 15}H{sub 32}), and n-hexadecane (n-C{sub 16}H{sub 34}). These mechanisms include both high temperature and low temperature reaction pathways. The mechanisms are based on our previous mechanisms for the primary reference fuels n-heptane and iso-octane, using the reaction class mechanism construction first developed for n-heptane. Individual reaction class rules are as simple as possible in order to focus on the parallelism between all of the n-alkane fuels included in the mechanisms, and these mechanisms will be refined further in the future to incorporate greater levels of accuracy and predictive capability. These mechanisms are validated through extensive comparisons between computed and experimental data from a wide variety of different sources. In addition, numerical experiments are carried out to examine features of n-alkane combustion in which the detailed mechanisms can be used to compare reactivities of different n-alkane fuels. The mechanisms for all of these n-alkanes are presented as a single detailed mechanism, which can be edited to produce efficient mechanisms for any of the n-alkanes included, and the entire mechanism, with supporting thermochemical and transport data, together with an explanatory glossary explaining notations and structural details, will be available for download from our web page.

  19. A comprehensive detailed chemical kinetic reaction mechanism for combustion of n-alkane hydrocarbons from n-octane to n-hexadecane

    SciTech Connect

    Westbrook, Charles K.; Pitz, William J.; Herbinet, Olivier; Silke, Emma J.; Curran, Henry J.

    2009-01-15

    Detailed chemical kinetic reaction mechanisms have been developed to describe the pyrolysis and oxidation of nine n-alkanes larger than n-heptane, including n-octane (n-C{sub 8}H{sub 18}), n-nonane (n-C{sub 9}H{sub 20}), n-decane (n-C{sub 10}H{sub 22}), n-undecane (n-C{sub 11}H{sub 24}), n-dodecane (n-C{sub 12}H{sub 26}), n-tridecane (n-C{sub 13}H{sub 28}), n-tetradecane (n-C{sub 14}H{sub 30}), n-pentadecane (n-C{sub 15}H{sub 32}), and n-hexadecane (n-C{sub 16}H{sub 34}). These mechanisms include both high temperature and low temperature reaction pathways. The mechanisms are based on previous mechanisms for the primary reference fuels n-heptane and iso-octane, using the reaction classes first developed for n-heptane. Individual reaction class rules are as simple as possible in order to focus on the parallelism between all of the n-alkane fuels included in the mechanisms. These mechanisms are validated through extensive comparisons between computed and experimental data from a wide variety of different sources. In addition, numerical experiments are carried out to examine features of n-alkane combustion in which the detailed mechanisms can be used to compare reactivities of different n-alkane fuels. The mechanisms for these n-alkanes are presented as a single detailed mechanism, which can be edited to produce efficient mechanisms for any of the n-alkanes included, and the entire mechanism, with supporting thermochemical and transport data, together with an explanatory glossary explaining notations and structural details, is available for download from our web page. (author)

  20. Polyphenylene ethers with imide linking groups

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    St.clair, T. L.; Burks, H. D. (Inventor)

    1984-01-01

    Novel polyphenylene ethers with imide linking units are disclosed. These polymers incorporate the solvent and thermal resistance of polyimides and the processability of polyphenylene ethers. Improved physical properties over those of the prior art are obtained by incorporating meta linked ethers and/or polyphenylene oxides into the polymer backbone. A novel process for making polymers of this type is also disclosed. The process is unique in that the expected need of high process temperatures and/or special atmospheres are eliminated.

  1. Aza crown ether compounds as anion receptors

    DOEpatents

    Lee, H.S.; Yang, X.O.; McBreen, J.

    1998-08-04

    A family of aza-ether based compounds including linear, multi-branched and aza-crown ethers is provided. When added to non-aqueous battery electrolytes, the new family of aza-ether based compounds acts as neutral receptors to complex the anion moiety of the electrolyte salt thereby increasing the conductivity and the transference number of LI{sup +} ion in alkali metal batteries. 3 figs.

  2. Aza crown ether compounds as anion receptors

    DOEpatents

    Lee, Hung Sui; Yang, Xiao-Oing; McBreen, James

    1998-08-04

    A family of aza-ether based compounds including linear, multi-branched and aza-crown ethers is provided. When added to non-aqueous battery electrolytes, the new family of aza-ether based compounds acts as neutral receptors to complex the anion moiety of the electrolyte salt thereby increasing the conductivity and the transference number of LI.sup.+ ion in alkali metal batteries.

  3. Poly(hydroxy amino ethers): Novel high-barrier thermoplastics

    SciTech Connect

    Silvis, H.C.; Brown, C.N.; Kram, S.L.; White, J.E.

    1995-12-31

    A visible trend in the area of food and beverage packaging is the ever increasing substitution of plastics for materials such as glass and metal. This research details the synthesis and properties of a new class of high barrier thermoplastics, namely poly(hydroxy amino ethers) (PHAE) prepared from stoichiometric reactions of primary amines or bis-sec-diamines with aromatic diglycidyl ethers in solution or in the melt. These polymers are true high molecular weight thermoplastics that can be fabricated by a variety of conventional processing techniques. The oxygen transmission rates of these polymers range from moderate (<5 BU) to very low (<0.1 BU), depending on the backbone structure of the PHAE in question. These extraordinary barrier properties are the consequence of a high degree of interchain cohesion due to hydrogen bonding interactions. The effect of polymer structure on oxygen transmission rate, glass transition temperature, and physical properties has been studied in detail.

  4. Synthesis of Ethers via Reaction of Carbanions and Monoperoxyacetals

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Although transfer of electrophilic alkoxyl (“RO+”) from organic peroxides to organometallics offers a complement to traditional methods for etherification, application has been limited by constraints associated with peroxide reactivity and stability. We now demonstrate that readily prepared tetrahydropyranyl monoperoxyacetals react with sp3 and sp2 organolithium and organomagnesium reagents to furnish moderate to high yields of ethers. The method is successfully applied to the synthesis of alkyl, alkenyl, aryl, heteroaryl, and cyclopropyl ethers, mixed O,O-acetals, and S,S,O-orthoesters. In contrast to reactions of dialkyl and alkyl/silyl peroxides, the displacements of monoperoxyacetals provide no evidence for alkoxy radical intermediates. At the same time, the high yields observed for transfer of primary, secondary, or tertiary alkoxides, the latter involving attack on neopentyl oxygen, are inconsistent with an SN2 mechanism. Theoretical studies suggest a mechanism involving Lewis acid promoted insertion of organometallics into the O–O bond. PMID:26560686

  5. Hydrogen isotope composition of leaf wax n-alkanes in glaucous and non-glaucous varieties of wheat (Triticum spp.)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pedentchouk, Nikolai; Eley, Yvette; Frizell-Armitage, Amelia; Uauy, Cristobal

    2015-04-01

    The use of the 2H/1H composition of terrestrial plants in climate and ecology studies depends on fundamental understanding of the processes within the plant that control fractionation of these two isotopes. Little is currently known about the extent of 2H/1H fractionation at different steps of biosynthesis, after the initial H uptake following leaf water photolysis. Knowing this effect is particularly important when seeking to interpret the 2H/1H composition of leaf wax biomarkers from plants that differ in the amount and type of individual compound classes in their leaf waxes. The purpose of this study was to investigate the link between the quantity and distribution of n-alkyl lipids in leaf waxes and their isotopic composition. We used a genetic approach to suppress glaucousness in 2 varieties of wheat (Alchemy and Malacca), which resulted in glaucous and non-glaucous phenotypes of both varieties. Both phenotypes were then grown outdoors under identical environmental conditions in central Norfolk, UK. At the end of the growing season, the plants were sampled for soil water, leaf water, and leaf wax isotopic measurements. Comparison of the leaf wax composition of the non-glaucous and glaucous phenotypes revealed that the non-glaucous varieties were characterised by the absence of diketones and a greater concentration of n-alkanes and primary alcohols.. Our results showed very small differences between glaucous and non-glaucous varieties with regard to soil (mean values, <2 per mil) and leaf (<1 per mil) water 2H/1H. Conversely, there was 15-20 and 10-15 per mil 2H-depletion in the C29 and C31 n-alkanes, respectively, from the non-glaucous phenotype. This 2H-depletion in the non-glaucous phenotype demonstrated that the suppression of diketone production and the increase in n-alkane and primary alcohol concentrations are linked with a shift in the 2H/1H composition of n-alkanes. The initial results of this work suggest that plants using the same environmental water

  6. Flow-Induced Crystallization of Poly(ether ether ketone)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nazari, Behzad; Rhoades, Alicyn; Colby, Ralph

    The effects of an interval of shear above the melting temperature Tm on subsequent isothermal crystallization below Tm is reported for the premier engineering thermoplastic, poly(ether ether ketone) (PEEK). The effect of shear on the crystallization rate of PEEK is investigated by means of rheological techniques and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) under a protocol of imposing shear in a rotational cone and plate rheometer and monitoring crystallization after quenching. The rate of crystallization at 320 °C was not affected by shear for shear rates <7 s-1 at 350 °C, whereas intervals of adequate shear at higher shear rates prior to the quench to 320 °C accelerated crystallization significantly. As the duration of the interval of shear above 7 s-1 is increased, the crystallization time decreases but at each shear rate eventually saturates once the applied specific work exceeds ~120 MPa. The annealing of the flow-induced precursors was also investigated. The nuclei were fairly persistent at temperatures close to 350 °C, however very unstable at temperatures above 375 °C. This suggests that the nanostructures formed under shear might be akin to crystalline lamellae of greater thickness, compared to quiescently crystallized lamellae.

  7. Vibrational Study Of Poly(Ether Ether Ketone).

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dosiere, M.

    1989-12-01

    The medium infrared region (4000-400cm-1) has been widely used to study crystallinity because differences could be observed in the vibrational spectrum of several polymers which could be related to crystallinity as determined by X-ray diffraction, differential scanning calorimetry and density measurements. However, as crystallinity is concerned with packing of chains and interactions between neighboor chains, the absorption bands arising from such vibrations appear therefore at wavenumbers below 400 cm -1. Poly-(oxy-1,4-phenyleneoxy-1,4-phenylenecarbonyl-1,4-phenylene) or poly(aryl ether ether ketone) (PEEK),commercially introduced by ICI1, has been attracting increasing interest. It is a semicrystalline polymer with an unusual combination of properties such as high chemical resistance, excellent thermal stability as good mechanical properties. Taking into account of its high temperature high strength characteristics and melt processability, PEEK is generating interest for applications such as reinforced composites, coatings, electrical connectors, impeller housings... Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy is a quick and powerful tool to investigate orientation and/or crystallinity in polymeric materials.

  8. Process for conversion of light paraffins to alkylate in the production of tertiary alkyl ether rich gasoline

    SciTech Connect

    Harandi, M.N.; Owen, H.

    1992-04-21

    This patent describes a continuous integrated process for producing hydrocarbon streams comprising C{sub 5} + gasoline rich in alkyl tertiary alkyl ether and C{sub 5} + alkylated aromatic rich gasoline. It comprises contacting alkanol and C{sub 3} + aliphatic hydrocarbon stream containing alkanes and alkenes rich in iso-olefins with acid etherification catalyst under iso-olefin etherification conditions in an etherification reaction zone; separating etherification effluent to recover an overhead stream comprising unreacted alkanol plus C{sub 4} {minus} aliphatic hydrocarbons and a liquid product stream comprising C{sub 5} + gasoline containing alkyl tertiary-alkyl ether; contacting the overhead stream and a feedstream containing light aromatic hydrocarbons in an alkylation reactor containing acidic, medium pore metallosilicate catalyst under alkylation conditions and conversion conditions sufficient to convert alkanol, alkane and alkene to higher hydrocarbons the conditions comprising a temperature of about 200{degrees} C to 400{degrees} C and a pressure about above 3400 kPa; and separating step (c) reaction products and recovering the C{sub 5} + alkylated aromatic rich gasoline and a stream comprising C{sub 4} {minus} hydrocarbons.

  9. Flash Points of Secondary Alcohol and n-Alkane Mixtures.

    PubMed

    Esina, Zoya N; Miroshnikov, Alexander M; Korchuganova, Margarita R

    2015-11-19

    The flash point is one of the most important characteristics used to assess the ignition hazard of mixtures of flammable liquids. To determine the flash points of mixtures of secondary alcohols with n-alkanes, it is necessary to calculate the activity coefficients. In this paper, we use a model that allows us to obtain enthalpy of fusion and enthalpy of vaporization data of the pure components to calculate the liquid-solid equilibrium (LSE) and vapor-liquid equilibrium (VLE). Enthalpy of fusion and enthalpy of vaporization data of secondary alcohols in the literature are limited; thus, the prediction of these characteristics was performed using the method of thermodynamic similarity. Additionally, the empirical models provided the critical temperatures and boiling temperatures of the secondary alcohols. The modeled melting enthalpy and enthalpy of vaporization as well as the calculated LSE and VLE flash points were determined for the secondary alcohol and n-alkane mixtures. PMID:26491811

  10. Influence of high biomass concentrations on alkane solubilities.

    PubMed

    Davison, B H; Barton, J W; Klasson, K T; Francisco, A B

    2000-05-01

    Alkane solubilities were measured experimentally for high-density biomass. The resulting Henry's law constants for propane were found to decrease significantly for both dense yeast suspensions and an actual propane-degrading biofilm consortium. At the biomass densities of a typical biofilm, propane solubility was about an order of magnitude greater than that in pure water. For example, a dense biofilm had a propane Henry's law constant of 0.09+/-0.04 atm m(3) mol(-1) compared to 0.6+/-0.1 atm m(3) mol(-1) measured in pure water. The results were modeled with mixing rules and compared with octanol-water mixtures. Hydrogels (agar) and salts decreased the alkane solubility. By considering a theoretical solubility of propane in dry biomass, estimates were made of intrinsic Henry's law constants for propane in pure yeast and biomass, which were 13+/-2 and 5+/-2 atm kg biomass mol(-1) for yeast and biofilm consortium, respectively.

  11. Site isolation in vanadium phosphorus oxide alkane oxidation

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, M R; Ebner, J R

    1991-06-01

    Single crystal X-ray diffraction studies of vanadyl pyrophosphate indicate that at least two polytypical structures exists for this active and selective alkane oxidation catalyst. The crystal structures of these materials differ with respect to the symmetry and direction of columns of vanadyl groups within the unit cell. Single crystals of vanadyl pyrophosphate have been generated at extreme temperatures not often experienced by microcrystalline catalysts. The crystallography of the system suggests that other crystalline modifications or disordered phases might also exist. Zeroth-order models of crystal surface termination of vanadyl pyrophosphate have been constructed which conceptually illustrate the ability of vanadyl pyrophosphate to accommodate varying amounts of surface phosphorus parallel to (1,0,0), (0,1,0) and (0,2,4). Pyrophosphate termination of surfaces parallel to (1,0,0) likely results in the isolation of clusters of reactive centers and limits overoxidation of the alkane substrate. 23 refs., 6 figs.

  12. Surface crystallization and thin film melting in normal alkanes

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, X.Z. |; Shao, H.H. |; Ocko, B.M.; Deutsch, M.; Sinha, S.K.; Kim, M.W.; King, H.E. Jr.; Sirota, E.B.

    1994-12-31

    Normal alkanes of carbon number n > 14 exhibit surface crystallization at their liquid-vapor interface. This has been investigated with x-ray reflectivity, grazing incidence scattering and surface tension measurements. The structure and thermodynamics of the surface layer is consistent with a monolayer of the bulk rotator phase occurring at the surface above the bulk melting temperature. On the other hand, thin films of alkanes on SiO{sub 2}, exhibit a reduction of the melting temperature. The surface crystalline phase is observed for carbon number n > 14. The vanishing of surface phase for small n may be due to a transition from surface freezing to surface melting behavior. These measurements can yield the relative surface energies of the various phases. 41 refs.

  13. Multi-stage conversion of alkanes to gasoline

    SciTech Connect

    Harandi, M.N.; Owen, H.

    1991-09-17

    This patent describes improvement in a facility for converting alkanes into gasoline, the facility including a fluid catalytic cracking system and an olefin oligomerization reactor. The improvement comprises: a first valved conduit means for withdrawing a controlled stream of the regenerated catalyst from the first regenerator means; a dehydrogenation reactor in valved communication with the first regenerator means, through the first valved conduit means the dehydrogenation reactor having a dehydrogenation zone at a temperature below those prevailing in the first regeneration zone, the dehydrogenation reactor being located externally relative to the fluid catalytic cracker reactor and first regenerator; means for introducing a lower alkane feedstream into the dehydrogenation zone in an amount sufficient to maintain hot withdrawn catalyst in a state of fluidization in the dehydrogenation reactor while the catalyst is being cooled therein; a second valved conduit means for transporting cooled catalyst from the dehydrogenation zone to the first regeneration zone.

  14. Enhanced cometabolic degradation of methyl tert-butyl ether by a Pseudomonas sp. strain grown on n-pentane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, S. S.; Wang, S.; Yan, W.

    2016-08-01

    When methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE) is added as oxygenates it increases the octane number and decreases the release of nitric oxide from the incomplete combustion of reformulated gasoline. The extensive use of MTBE allowed it to be detectable as a pollutant in both ground-level and underground water worldwide. The present study focuses on the isolation and characterization of MTB-degrading microorganisms by cometabolism based on the results of growth on different carbon sources. It also focuses on the kinetic analysis and the continuous degradation of MTBE. A bacterial strain WL1 that can grow on both n-alkanes (C5-C8) and aromatics was isolated and named Pseudomonas sp. WL1 according to the 16S rDNA sequencing analysis. Strain WL1 could cometabolically degrade MTBE in the presence of n-alkanes with a desirable degradation rate. Diverse n-alkanes with different lengths of carbon chains showed significant influence on the degradation rate of MTBE and accumulation of tert-butyl alcohol (TBA). When strain WL1 cometabolically degraded MTBE in the presence of n-pentane, higher MTBE-degrading rate and lower TBA-accumulation were observed (Vmax = 38.1 nmol/min/mgprotei, Ks = 6.8 mmol/L). In the continuous degrading experiment, the removal efficiency of MTBE by Pseudomonas sp. WL1 did not show any obvious decrease after five subsequent additions.

  15. At what chain length do unbranched alkanes prefer folded conformations?

    PubMed

    Byrd, Jason N; Bartlett, Rodney J; Montgomery, John A

    2014-03-01

    Short unbranched alkanes are known to prefer linear conformations, whereas long unbranched alkanes are folded. It is not known with certainty at what chain length the linear conformation is no longer the global minimum. To clarify this point, we use ab initio and density functional methods to compute the relative energies of the linear and hairpin alkane conformers for increasing chain lengths. Extensive electronic structure calculations are performed to obtain optimized geometries, harmonic frequencies, and accurate single point energies for the selected alkane conformers from octane through octadecane. Benchmark CCSD(T)/cc-pVTZ single point calculations are performed for chains through tetradecane, whereas approximate methods are required for the longer chains up to octadecane. Using frozen natural orbitals to unambiguously truncate the virtual orbital space, we are able to compute composite CCSD FNO(T) single point energies for all the chain lengths. This approximate composite method has significant computational savings compared to full CCSD(T) while retaining ∼0.15 kcal/mol accuracy compared to the benchmark results. More approximate dual-basis resolution-of-the-identity double-hybrid DFT calculations are also performed and shown to have reasonable 0.2-0.4 kcal/mol errors compared with our benchmark values. After including contributions from temperature dependent internal energy shifts, we find the preference for folded conformations to lie between hexadecane and octadecane, in excellent agreement with recent experiments [ Lüttschwager , N. O. ; Wassermann , T. N. ; Mata , R. A. ; Suhm , M. A. Angew. Chem. Int. Ed. 2013 , 52 , 463 ]. PMID:24524689

  16. Removal of alkanes from drinking water using membrane technologies

    SciTech Connect

    Fronk, C.A.

    1995-10-01

    Increasingly, the public is concerned about the quality of its drinking water. The chlorinated alkanes are saturated, aliphatic, synthetic organic compounds (SOC`s). When hydrocarbon feedstocks are chlorinated, a wide variety of chlorocarbons and chlorohydrocarbons are produced that are used as industrial solvents, degreasers and intermediaries. Because compounds such as Carbon Tetrachloride and 1,2-Dichloroethane are widely used, they often find their way into drinking water, particularly groundwaters. Surface waters are somewhat less affected bemuse of the high volatility of many chlorinated alkanes. The Drinking Water Research Division is responsible for evaluating various membrane technologies that may be feasible for meeting Maximum Contaminant Levels. Several membrane processes are under investigation to determine their effectiveness in removing SOC`s from drinking water. One study addressed the removal of a variety of alkanes from spiked groundwater by six reverse osmosis membranes: a cellulose acetate, a polyamide (hollow fiber), and four different types of thin-film composite membranes. Progressive chlorination of methanes, ethanes and propanes produces compounds that exhibit differing physicochemical properties. The differences in compound properties have an effect on the removal of these compounds by reverse osmosis membranes. For example only 25% of the methylene chloride (Dichloromethane) was removed by one thin-film composite versus 90% removal of the carbon tetrachloride. In addition, the various membranes are made of different polymeric materials and showed a wide range of removals. Generally, the thin-film composite membranes out performed the other membranes and the more highly chlorinated the compound the better the removal. Pervaporation is yet another membrane process that may prove effective in removal of alkanes and future studies will address its usefulness as a drinking water.

  17. Alkane production from biomass: chemo-, bio- and integrated catalytic approaches.

    PubMed

    Deneyer, Aron; Renders, Tom; Van Aelst, Joost; Van den Bosch, Sander; Gabriëls, Dries; Sels, Bert F

    2015-12-01

    Linear, branched and cyclic alkanes are important intermediates and end products of the chemical industry and are nowadays mainly obtained from fossil resources. In search for alternatives, biomass feedstocks are often presented as a renewable carbon source for the production of fuels, chemicals and materials. However, providing a complete market for all these applications seems unrealistic due to both financial and logistic issues. Despite the very large scale of current alkane-based fuel applications, biomass definitely has the potential to offer a partial solution to the fuel business. For the smaller market of chemicals and materials, a transition to biomass as main carbon source is more realistic and even probably unavoidable in the long term. The appropriate use and further development of integrated chemo- and biotechnological (catalytic) process strategies will be crucial to successfully accomplish this petro-to-bio feedstock transition. Furthermore, a selection of the most promising technologies from the available chemo- and biocatalytic tool box is presented. New opportunities will certainly arise when multidisciplinary approaches are further explored in the future. In an attempt to select the most appropriate biomass sources for each specific alkane-based application, a diagram inspired by van Krevelen is applied, taking into account both the C-number and the relative functionality of the product molecules.

  18. Alkane production from biomass: chemo-, bio- and integrated catalytic approaches.

    PubMed

    Deneyer, Aron; Renders, Tom; Van Aelst, Joost; Van den Bosch, Sander; Gabriëls, Dries; Sels, Bert F

    2015-12-01

    Linear, branched and cyclic alkanes are important intermediates and end products of the chemical industry and are nowadays mainly obtained from fossil resources. In search for alternatives, biomass feedstocks are often presented as a renewable carbon source for the production of fuels, chemicals and materials. However, providing a complete market for all these applications seems unrealistic due to both financial and logistic issues. Despite the very large scale of current alkane-based fuel applications, biomass definitely has the potential to offer a partial solution to the fuel business. For the smaller market of chemicals and materials, a transition to biomass as main carbon source is more realistic and even probably unavoidable in the long term. The appropriate use and further development of integrated chemo- and biotechnological (catalytic) process strategies will be crucial to successfully accomplish this petro-to-bio feedstock transition. Furthermore, a selection of the most promising technologies from the available chemo- and biocatalytic tool box is presented. New opportunities will certainly arise when multidisciplinary approaches are further explored in the future. In an attempt to select the most appropriate biomass sources for each specific alkane-based application, a diagram inspired by van Krevelen is applied, taking into account both the C-number and the relative functionality of the product molecules. PMID:26360875

  19. Modeling SOA production from the oxidation of intermediate volatility alkanes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aumont, B.; Mouchel-Vallon, C.; Camredon, M.; Lee-Taylor, J.; Madronich, S.

    2012-12-01

    Secondary Organic Aerosols (SOA) production and ageing is a multigenerational oxidation process involving the formation of successive organic compounds with higher oxidation degree and lower vapour pressure. This process was investigated using the explicit oxidation model GECKO-A (Generator for Explicit Chemistry and Kinetics of Organics in the Atmosphere). Results for the C8-C24 n-alkane series show the expected trends, i.e. (i) SOA yield grows with the carbon backbone of the parent hydrocarbon, (ii) SOA yields decreases with the decreasing pre-existing organic aerosol concentration, (iii) the number of generations required to describe SOA production increases when the pre-existing organic aerosol concentration decreases. Most SOA contributors were found to be not oxidized enough to be categorized as highly oxygenated organic aerosols (OOA) but reduced enough to be categorized as hydrocarbon like organic aerosols (HOA). Branched alkanes are more prone to fragment in the early stage of the oxidation than their corresponding linear analogues. Fragmentation is expected to alter both the yield and the mean oxidation state of the SOA. Here, GECKO-A is applied to generate highly detailed oxidation schemes for various series of branched and cyclised alkanes. Branching and cyclisation effects on SOA yields and oxidation states will be examined.

  20. Dielectric constant of liquid alkanes and hydrocarbon mixtures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sen, A. D.; Anicich, V. G.; Arakelian, T.

    1992-01-01

    The complex dielectric constants of n-alkanes with two to seven carbon atoms have been measured. The measurements were conducted using a slotted-line technique at 1.2 GHz and at atmospheric pressure. The temperature was varied from the melting point to the boiling point of the respective alkanes. The real part of the dielectric constant was found to decrease with increasing temperature and correlate with the change in the molar volume. An upper limit to all the loss tangents was established at 0.001. The complex dielectric constants of a few mixtures of liquid alkanes were also measured at room temperature. For a pentane-octane mixture the real part of the dielectric constant could be explained by the Clausius-Mosotti theory. For the mixtures of n-hexane-ethylacetate and n-hexane-acetone the real part of the dielectric constants could be explained by the Onsager theory extended to mixtures. The dielectric constant of the n-hexane-acetone mixture displayed deviations from the Onsager theory at the highest fractions of acetone. The dipole moments of ethylacetate and acetone were determined for dilute mixtures using the Onsager theory and were found to be in agreement with their accepted gas-phase values. The loss tangents of the mixtures exhibited a linear relationship with the volume fraction for low concentrations of the polar liquids.

  1. Dielectric constant of liquid alkanes and hydrocarbon mixtures.

    PubMed

    Sen, A D; Anicich, V G; Arakelian, T

    1992-01-01

    The complex dielectric constants of n-alkanes with two to seven carbon atoms have been measured. The measurements were conducted using a slotted-line technique at 1.2 GHz and at atmospheric pressure. The temperature was varied from the melting point to the boiling point of the respective alkanes. The real part of the dielectric constant was found to decrease with increasing temperature and correlate with the change in the molar volume. An upper limit to all the loss tangents was established at 0.001. The complex dielectric constants of a few mixtures of liquid alkanes were also measured at room temperature. For a pentane-octane mixture the real part of the dielectric constant could be explained by the Clausius-Mosotti theory. For the mixtures of n-hexane-ethylacetate and n-hexane-acetone the real part of the dielectric constants could be explained by the Onsager theory extended to mixtures. The dielectric constant of the n-hexane-acetone mixture displayed deviations from the Onsager theory at the highest fractions of acetone. The dipole moments of ethylacetate and acetone were determined for dilute mixtures using the Onsager theory and were found to be in agreement with their accepted gas-phase values. The loss tangents of the mixtures exhibited a linear relationship with the volume fraction for low concentrations of the polar liquids.

  2. Additional chain-branching pathways in the low-temperature oxidation of branched alkanes

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Zhandong; Zhang, Lidong; Moshammer, Kai; Popolan-Vaida, Denisia M.; Shankar, Vijai Shankar Bhavani; Lucassen, Arnas; Hemken, Christian; Taatjes, Craig A.; Leone, Stephen R.; Kohse-Hoinghaus, Katharina; Hansen, Nils; Dagaut, Philippe; Sarathy, S. Mani

    2015-12-31

    Chain-branching reactions represent a general motif in chemistry, encountered in atmospheric chemistry, combustion, polymerization, and photochemistry; the nature and amount of radicals generated by chain-branching are decisive for the reaction progress, its energy signature, and the time towards its completion. In this study, experimental evidence for two new types of chain-branching reactions is presented, based upon detection of highly oxidized multifunctional molecules (HOM) formed during the gas-phase low-temperature oxidation of a branched alkane under conditions relevant to combustion. The oxidation of 2,5-dimethylhexane (DMH) in a jet-stirred reactor (JSR) was studied using synchrotron vacuum ultra-violet photoionization molecular beam mass spectrometry (SVUV-PI-MBMS). Specifically, species with four and five oxygen atoms were probed, having molecular formulas of C8H14O4 (e.g., diketo-hydroperoxide/keto-hydroperoxy cyclic ether) and C8H16O5 (e.g., keto-dihydroperoxide/dihydroperoxy cyclic ether), respectively. The formation of C8H16O5 species involves alternative isomerization of OOQOOH radicals via intramolecular H-atom migration, followed by third O2 addition, intramolecular isomerization, and OH release; C8H14O4 species are proposed to result from subsequent reactions of C8H16O5 species. The mechanistic pathways involving these species are related to those proposed as a source of low-volatility highly oxygenated species in Earth's troposphere. At the higher temperatures relevant to auto-ignition, they can result in a net increase of hydroxyl radical production, so these are additional radical chain-branching pathways for ignition. Furthermore, the results presented herein extend the conceptual basis of reaction mechanisms used to predict the reaction behavior of ignition, and have

  3. Purification of aqueous cellulose ethers

    SciTech Connect

    Bartscherer, K.A.; de Pablo, J.J.; Bonnin, M.C.; Prausnitz, J.M.

    1990-07-01

    Manufacture of cellulose ethers usually involves high amounts of salt by-products. For application of the product, salt must be removed. In this work, we have studied the injection of high-pressure CO{sub 2} into an aqueous polymer-salt solution; we find that upon addition of isopropanol in addition to CO{sub 2}, the solution separates into two phases. One phase is rich in polymer and water, and the other phase contains mostly isopropanol, water and CO{sub 2}. The salt distributes between the two phases, thereby offering interesting possibilities for development of a new purification process for water-soluble polymers. This work presents experimental phase-equilibrium data for hydroxyethyl cellulose and sodium carboxymethyl cellulose with sodium acetate and potassium sulfate, respectively, in the region 40{degree}C and 30 to 80 bar. Based on these data, we suggest a process for the manufacture and purification of water-soluble cellulose ethers. 15 refs., 14 figs., 9 tabs.

  4. 27 CFR 21.108 - Ethyl ether.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Ethyl ether. 21.108 Section 21.108 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE BUREAU, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY LIQUORS FORMULAS FOR DENATURED ALCOHOL AND RUM Specifications for Denaturants § 21.108 Ethyl ether. (a) Odor. Characteristic odor....

  5. 27 CFR 21.108 - Ethyl ether.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Ethyl ether. 21.108 Section 21.108 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE BUREAU, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY ALCOHOL FORMULAS FOR DENATURED ALCOHOL AND RUM Specifications for Denaturants § 21.108 Ethyl ether. (a) Odor. Characteristic odor....

  6. 27 CFR 21.108 - Ethyl ether.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Ethyl ether. 21.108 Section 21.108 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE BUREAU, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY ALCOHOL FORMULAS FOR DENATURED ALCOHOL AND RUM Specifications for Denaturants § 21.108 Ethyl ether. (a) Odor. Characteristic odor....

  7. 27 CFR 21.108 - Ethyl ether.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Ethyl ether. 21.108 Section 21.108 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE BUREAU, DEPARTMENT....108 Ethyl ether. (a) Odor. Characteristic odor. (b) Specific gravity at 15.56 °/15.56 °C. Not...

  8. 27 CFR 21.108 - Ethyl ether.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Ethyl ether. 21.108 Section 21.108 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE BUREAU, DEPARTMENT....108 Ethyl ether. (a) Odor. Characteristic odor. (b) Specific gravity at 15.56 °/15.56 °C. Not...

  9. An expedient synthesis of linden ether.

    PubMed

    Serra, Stefano; Cominetti, Alessandra A

    2014-03-01

    We here describe a comprehensive study on the preparation of the intensive flavor 3,9-epoxy-p-mentha-1,4(8)-diene (1). Key steps of the presented synthesis are the selective addition of MeLi to the keto-ester 7, the regioselective cyclization of the obtained triol to give the ethers 4 and 8 and the selective dehydration of ether 4 through the use of POCI3 and pyridine. It is worth noting that the presented synthesis represents the first expedient and reliable entry to ether 1. Being present in linden honey, 1 is also known as linden ether and it has been regarded as a potential marker for the authentication of the linden honey origin. Therefore, ether 1 can be used as a useful reference standard for the analysis of the natural flavors, as we demonstrated by means of its identification in a sample ofunifloral linden honey.

  10. Biodegradation of Methyl tert-Butyl Ether by Co-Metabolism with a Pseudomonas sp. Strain.

    PubMed

    Li, Shanshan; Wang, Shan; Yan, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Co-metabolic bioremediation is supposed to be an impressive and promising approach in the elimination technology of methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE), which was found to be a common pollutant worldwide in the ground or underground water in recent years. In this paper, bacterial strain DZ13 (which can co-metabolically degrade MTBE) was isolated and named as Pseudomonas sp. DZ13 based on the result of 16S rRNA gene sequencing analysis. Strain DZ13 could grow on n-alkanes (C₅-C₈), accompanied with the co-metabolic degradation of MTBE. Diverse n-alkanes with different carbon number showed a significant influence on the degradation rate of MTBE and accumulation of tert-butyl alcohol (TBA). When Pseudomonas sp. DZ13 co-metabolically degraded MTBE with n-pentane as the growth substrate, a higher MTBE-degrading rate (Vmax = 38.1 nmol/min/mgprotein, Ks = 6.8 mmol/L) and lower TBA-accumulation was observed. In the continuous degradation experiment, the removal efficiency of MTBE by Pseudomonas sp. Strain DZ13 did not show an obvious decrease after five times of continuous addition. PMID:27608032

  11. Biodegradation of Methyl tert-Butyl Ether by Co-Metabolism with a Pseudomonas sp. Strain

    PubMed Central

    Li, Shanshan; Wang, Shan; Yan, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Co-metabolic bioremediation is supposed to be an impressive and promising approach in the elimination technology of methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE), which was found to be a common pollutant worldwide in the ground or underground water in recent years. In this paper, bacterial strain DZ13 (which can co-metabolically degrade MTBE) was isolated and named as Pseudomonas sp. DZ13 based on the result of 16S rRNA gene sequencing analysis. Strain DZ13 could grow on n-alkanes (C5-C8), accompanied with the co-metabolic degradation of MTBE. Diverse n-alkanes with different carbon number showed a significant influence on the degradation rate of MTBE and accumulation of tert-butyl alcohol (TBA). When Pseudomonas sp. DZ13 co-metabolically degraded MTBE with n-pentane as the growth substrate, a higher MTBE-degrading rate (Vmax = 38.1 nmol/min/mgprotein, Ks = 6.8 mmol/L) and lower TBA-accumulation was observed. In the continuous degradation experiment, the removal efficiency of MTBE by Pseudomonas sp. Strain DZ13 did not show an obvious decrease after five times of continuous addition. PMID:27608032

  12. Towards a practical development of light-driven acceptorless alkane dehydrogenation.

    PubMed

    Chowdhury, Abhishek Dutta; Weding, Nico; Julis, Jennifer; Franke, Robert; Jackstell, Ralf; Beller, Matthias

    2014-06-16

    The efficient catalytic dehydrogenation of alkanes to olefins is one of the most investigated reactions in organic synthesis. In the coming years, an increased supply of shorter-chain alkanes from natural and shale gas will offer new opportunities for inexpensive carbon feedstock through such dehydrogenation processes. Existing methods for alkane dehydrogenation using heterogeneous catalysts require harsh reaction conditions and have a lack of selectivity, whereas homogeneous catalysis methods result in significant waste generation. A strong need exists for atom-efficient alkane dehydrogenations on a useful scale. Herein, we have developed improved acceptorless catalytic systems under optimal light transmittance conditions using trans-[Rh(PMe3)2(CO)Cl] as the catalyst with different additives. Unprecedented catalyst turnover numbers are obtained for the dehydrogenation of cyclic and linear (from C4) alkanes and liquid organic hydrogen carriers. These reactions proceed with unique conversion, thereby providing a basis for practical alkane dehydrogenations. PMID:24829085

  13. Draft Genome Sequence of Gordonia sihwensis Strain 9, a Branched Alkane-Degrading Bacterium

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Lisa M.; Gunasekera, Thusitha S.; Striebich, Richard C.

    2016-01-01

    Gordonia sihwensis strain 9 is a Gram-positive bacterium capable of efficient aerobic degradation of branched and normal alkanes. The draft genome of G. sihwensis S9 is 4.16 Mb in size, with 3,686 coding sequences and 68.1% G+C content. Alkane monooxygenase and P-450 cytochrome genes required for alkane degradation are predicted in G. sihwensis S9. PMID:27340079

  14. Fundamental Flame Velocities of Pure Hydrocarbons I : Alkanes, Alkenes, Alkynes Benzene, and Cyclohexane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gerstein, Melvin; Levine, Oscar; Wong, Edgar L

    1950-01-01

    The flame velocities of 37 pure hydrocarbons including normal and branched alkanes, alkenes, and alkynes; as well as benzene and cyclohexane, together with the experimental technique employed are presented. The normal alkanes have about the same flame velocity from ethane through heptane with methane being about 16 percent lower. Unsaturation increases the flame velocity in the order of alkanes, alkenes, and alkynes. Branching reduces the flame velocity.

  15. Experimental investigation on the soil sorption properties and hydrophobicity of polymethoxylated, polyhydroxylated diphenyl ethers and methoxylated-, hydroxylated-polychlorinated diphenyl ethers.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xuesheng; Zeng, Xiaolan; Qin, Li; Qu, Ruijuan; Shi, Jiaqi; Wei, Zhongbo; Yang, Shaogui; Wang, Zunyao

    2015-09-01

    In the present study, twenty-six types of polymethoxylated diphenyl ethers (PMeODEs), twenty types of polyhydroxylated diphenyl ethers (PHODEs), seven types of methoxylated-polychlorinated diphenyl ethers (MeO-PCDEs) and seven types of hydroxylated-polychlorinated diphenyl ethers (HO-PCDEs) were synthesized. The logKow and logKoc values of all of the synthesized compounds were then determined using HPLC. The soil sorption properties of five types of selected substituted diphenyl ethers (DEs) were investigated. Sorption behavior studies suggested that rapid sorption played a primary role in the sorption process of the selected DEs and their sorption isotherms were fitted the Freundlich logarithmic model. For PMeODEs and PHODEs, with the increase in the number of substituents, both logKow and logKoc values exhibited linearly decreasing trends. Unlike PMeODEs and PHODEs, both logKow and logKoc values of MeO/HO-PCDEs were decreased linearly with the increasing number of chlorine atoms. The reason maybe that both methoxy and hydroxyl are hydrophilic groups, whereas the chlorine atom is hydrophobic group. Linear relationships were observed for the logKow and logKoc of all studied DEs. Moreover, the logKow of PMeODEs, PHODEs, MeO- and HO-PCDEs and their corresponding PCDEs showed good linearity.

  16. Hydrogen-transferring pyrolysis of long-chain alkanes and thermal stability improvement of jet fuels by hydrogen donors

    SciTech Connect

    Song, C.; Lai, W.C.; Schobert, H.H. . Fuel Science Program)

    1994-03-01

    Hydrogen-transferring pyrolysis refers to the thermal decomposition of hydrocarbons in the presence of hydrogen donors. Relative to the pyrolysis of pure n-tetradecane (C[sub 14]H[sub 28]) at 450 C, adding 10 vol % of H-donor tetralin suppressed n-C[sub 14] conversion by 68 % after 12 min of residence time, by about 66% after 21 min, and by 37% after 30 min. The presence of tetralin not only inhibited the n-C[sub 14] decomposition, but also altered the product distribution. The decomposition and isomerization of primary radicals are strongly suppressed, leading to a much higher ratio of the 1-alkene to n-alkane with 12 carbon atoms and slightly higher alkene/alkane ratio for the other product groups. The overall reaction mechanism for the initial stage of hydrogen-transferring pyrolysis is characterized by a one-step [beta]-scission of secondary radical followed by H-abstraction of the resulting primary radical. Moreover, desirable effects of the H-donor are also observed even after 240 min at 450 C, especially for inhibiting solid deposition. The authors also examined the effect of tetralin addition on the deposit formation from a paraffinic jet fuel JP-8 which is rich in C[sub 9]-C[sub 16] long-chain alkanes, and an aromatic compound, n-butylbenzene. Adding 10 vol % tetralin to a JP-8 jet fuel, n-C[sub 14], and n-butylbenzene reduced the formation of deposits by 90% (from 3.1 to 0.3 wt %), 77 % (from 3.0 to 0.7 wt %), and 54 % (from 5.6 to 2.6 wt %), respectively. These results suggest that, by taking advantage of H-transferring pyrolysis, hydrocarbon jet fuels may be used at high operating temperatures with little or no solid deposition.

  17. Cutaneous metabolism of glycol ethers.

    PubMed

    Lockley, David J; Howes, Douglas; Williams, Faith M

    2005-03-01

    The toxicity of glycol ethers is associated with their oxidation to the corresponding aldehyde and alkoxyacetic acid by cytosolic alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH; EC 1.1.1.1.) and aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH; 1.2.1.3). Dermal exposure to these compounds can result in localised or systemic toxicity including skin sensitisation and irritancy, reproductive, developmental and haemotological effects. It has previously been shown that skin has the capacity for local metabolism of applied chemicals. Therefore, there is a requirement to consider metabolism during dermal absorption of these compounds in risk assessment for humans. Cytosolic fractions were prepared from rat liver, and whole and dermatomed skin by differential centrifugation. Rat skin cytosolic fractions were also prepared following multiple dermal exposure to dexamethasone, ethanol or 2-butoxyethanol (2-BE). The rate of ethanol, 2-ethoxyethanol (2-EE), ethylene glycol, 2-phenoxyethanol (2-PE) and 2-BE conversion to alkoxyacetic acid by ADH/ALDH in these fractions was continuously monitored by UV spectrophotometry via the conversion of NAD+ to NADH at 340 nm. Rates of ADH oxidation by rat liver cytosol were greatest for ethanol followed by 2-EE >ethylene glycol >2-PE >2-BE. However, the order of metabolism changed to 2-BE >2-PE >ethylene glycol >2-EE >ethanol using whole and dermatomed rat skin cytosolic fractions, with approximately twice the specific activity in dermatomed skin cytosol relative to whole rat skin. This suggests that ADH and ALDH are localised in the epidermis that constitutes more of the protein in dermatomed skin than whole skin cytosol. Inhibition of ADH oxidation in rat liver cytosol by pyrazole was greatest for ethanol followed by 2-EE >ethylene glycol >2-PE >2-BE, but it only inhibited ethanol metabolism by 40% in skin cytosol. Disulfiram completely inhibited alcohol and glycol ether metabolism in the liver and skin cytosolic fractions. Although ADH1, ADH2 and ADH3 are expressed at the

  18. Molecular screening for alkane hydroxylase genes in Gram-negative and Gram-positive strains.

    PubMed

    Smits, T H; Röthlisberger, M; Witholt, B; van Beilen, J B

    1999-08-01

    We have developed highly degenerate oligonucleotides for polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification of genes related to the Pseudomonas oleovorans GPo1 and Acinetobacter sp. ADP1 alkane hydroxylases, based on a number of highly conserved sequence motifs. In all Gram-negative and in two out of three Gram-positive strains able to grow on medium- (C6-C11) or long-chain n-alkanes (C12-C16), PCR products of the expected size were obtained. The PCR fragments were cloned and sequenced and found to encode peptides with 43.2-93.8% sequence identity to the corresponding fragment of the P. oleovorans GPo1 alkane hydroxylase. Strains that were unable to grow on n-alkanes did not yield PCR products with homology to alkane hydroxylase genes. The alkane hydroxylase genes of Acinetobacter calcoaceticus EB104 and Pseudomonas putida P1 were cloned using the PCR products as probes. The two genes allow an alkane hydroxylase-negative mutant of Acinetobacter sp. ADP1 and an Escherichia coli recombinant containing all P. oleovorans alk genes except alkB, respectively, to grow on n-alkanes, showing that the cloned genes do indeed encode alkane hydroxylases. PMID:11207749

  19. Gas-Phase Reactions of Atomic Gold Cations with Linear Alkanes (C2-C9).

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ting; Li, Zi-Yu; Zhang, Mei-Qi; He, Sheng-Gui

    2016-06-30

    To develop proper ionization methods for alkanes, the reactivity of bare or ligated transition metal ions toward alkanes has attracted increasing interests. In this study, the reactions of the gold cations with linear alkanes from ethane up to nonane (CnH2n+2, n = 2-9) under mild conditions have been characterized by mass spectrometry and density functional theory calculations. When reacting with Au(+), small alkanes (n = 2-6) were confirmed to follow specific reaction channels of dehydrogenation for ethane and hydride transfer for others to generate product ions characteristic of the original alkanes, which indicates that Au(+) can act as a reagent ion to ionize alkanes from ethane to n-hexane. Strong dependence of the chain length of alkanes was observed for the rate constants and reaction efficiencies. Extensive fragmentation took place for larger alkanes (n > 6). Theoretical results show that the fragmentation induced by the hydride transfer occurs after the release of AuH. Moreover, the fragmentation of n-heptane was successfully avoided when the reaction took place in a high-pressure reactor. This implies that Au(+) is a potential reagent ion to ionize linear and even the branched alkanes. PMID:27266670

  20. Cloning and expression of three ladA-type alkane monooxygenase genes from an extremely thermophilic alkane-degrading bacterium Geobacillus thermoleovorans B23.

    PubMed

    Boonmak, Chanita; Takahashi, Yasunori; Morikawa, Masaaki

    2014-05-01

    An extremely thermophilic bacterium, Geobacillus thermoleovorans B23, is capable of degrading a broad range of alkanes (with carbon chain lengths ranging between C11 and C32) at 70 °C. Whole-genome sequence analysis revealed that unlike most alkane-degrading bacteria, strain B23 does not possess an alkB-type alkane monooxygenase gene. Instead, it possesses a cluster of three ladA-type genes, ladAαB23, ladAβB23, and ladB B23, on its chromosome, whose protein products share significant amino acid sequence identities, 49.8, 34.4, and 22.7 %, respectively, with that of ladA alkane monooxygenase gene found on a plasmid of Geobacillus thermodetrificans NG 80-2. Each of the three genes, ladAαB23, ladAβB23, and ladB B23, was heterologously expressed individually in an alkB1 deletion mutant strain, Pseudomonas fluorescens KOB2Δ1. It was found that all three genes were functional in P. fluorescens KOB2Δ1, and partially restored alkane degradation activity. In this study, we suggest that G. thermoleovorans B23 utilizes multiple LadA-type alkane monooxygenases for the degradation of a broad range of alkanes.

  1. Identification and use of an alkane transporter plug-in for applications in biocatalysis and whole-cell biosensing of alkanes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grant, Chris; Deszcz, Dawid; Wei, Yu-Chia; Martínez-Torres, Rubéns Julio; Morris, Phattaraporn; Folliard, Thomas; Sreenivasan, Rakesh; Ward, John; Dalby, Paul; Woodley, John M.; Baganz, Frank

    2014-07-01

    Effective application of whole-cell devices in synthetic biology and biocatalysis will always require consideration of the uptake of molecules of interest into the cell. Here we demonstrate that the AlkL protein from Pseudomonas putida GPo1 is an alkane import protein capable of industrially relevant rates of uptake of C7-C16 n-alkanes. Without alkL expression, native E.coli n-alkane uptake was the rate-limiting step in both the whole-cell bioconversion of C7-C16 n-alkanes and in the activation of a whole-cell alkane biosensor by C10 and C11 alkanes. By coexpression of alkL as a transporter plug-in, specific yields improved by up to 100-fold for bioxidation of >C12 alkanes to fatty alcohols and acids. The alkL protein was shown to be toxic to the host when overexpressed but when expressed from a vector capable of controlled induction, yields of alkane oxidation were improved a further 10-fold (8 g/L and 1.7 g/g of total oxidized products). Further testing of activity on n-octane with the controlled expression vector revealed the highest reported rates of 120 μmol/min/g and 1 g/L/h total oxidized products. This is the first time AlkL has been shown to directly facilitate enhanced uptake of C10-C16 alkanes and represents the highest reported gain in product yields resulting from its use.

  2. Synthesis of 1-octanol and 1,1-dioctyl ether from biomass-derived platform chemicals.

    PubMed

    Julis, Jennifer; Leitner, Walter

    2012-08-20

    The happy medium: A new catalytic pathway for the synthesis of the linear primary C(8) alcohol products 1-octanol and dioctyl ether from furfural and acetone has been developed using retrosynthetic analysis. This opens a general strategy for the synthesis of medium-chain-length alcohols from carbohydrate feedstock. PMID:22778056

  3. REDUCTIVE ACTIVATION OF DIOXYGEN FOR DEGRADATION OF METHYL TERT-BUTYL ETHER BY BIFUNCTION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Bifunctional aluminum is prepared by sulfating aluminum metal with sulfuric acid. The use of bifunctional aluminum to degrade methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE) in the presence of dioxygen has been examined using batch systems. Primary degradation products were tert-butyl alcohol, ...

  4. REFINED PBPK MODEL OF AGGREGATE EXPOSURE TO METHYL TERTIARY-BUTYL ETHER

    EPA Science Inventory

    Aggregate (multiple pathway) exposures to methyl tertiary-butyl ether (MTBE) in air and water occur via dermal, inhalation, and oral routes. Previously, physiologically-based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) models have been used to quantify the kinetic behavior of MTBE and its primary met...

  5. [Normal alkanes characteristic parameters of Jinzhou Bay surface sediments].

    PubMed

    Li, Ze-Li; Ma, Qi-Min; Cheng, Hai-Ou; Xu, Shao-Qing

    2011-11-01

    The concentration, composition and characteristic parameters of 18 surface sediment samples collected from Jinzhou Bay were studied. The samples were soxhlet-extracted with a mixture of 1: 1 (V/V) dichloromethane-hexane and analyzed by GC-MS after purification and concentration. Concentrations of n-alkanes vary from 1.9 to 4.2 microg x g(-1) with an average value of 2.6 microg x g(-1) dry weight. n-Alkanes distribution patterns of all positions were characterized by double peak-cluster, which means double sources from terrestrial and marine origin. The sum of nC25 to nC31 accounts for 20%-32% of the total n-alkanes, while the average value of L/H, C31/C19, TAR ratio are 0.67, 3.06, 2.02, respectively. All of these three indices suggest that the terrestrial contributions are higher than marine sources, especially for No. 2, 3 and 7 stations, which were influenced by riverinput nearby. Carbon Preference Index (CPI) ranges from 1.19 to 2.63 with an average value of 1.73, which is close to 1; the ratio of Pristane/Phytane (Pr/Ph) and unresolved/resolved compounds (U/R) range from 0.91 to 1.28, 2.2 to 4.3, respectively. All of these three parameters indicate that No. 13 and 15 stations are influenced by petroleum pollution. Comprehensive analysis of various parameters shows that Jinzhou Bay is threatened by both terrestrial inputs and petroleum hydrocarbons contaminations, which may relate to river discharging and port shipping in Jinzhou Bay. PMID:22295627

  6. Preliminary assessment of halogenated alkanes as vapor-phase tracers

    SciTech Connect

    Adams, Michael C.; Moore, Joseph N.; Hirtz, Paul

    1991-01-01

    New tracers are needed to evaluate the efficiency of injection strategies in vapor-dominated environments. One group of compounds that seems to meet the requirements for vapor-phase tracing are the halogenated alkanes (HCFCs). HCFCs are generally nontoxic, and extrapolation of tabulated thermodynamic data indicate that they will be thermally stable and nonreactive in a geothermal environment. The solubilities and stabilities of these compounds, which form several homologous series, vary according to the substituent ratios of fluorine, chlorine, and hydrogen. Laboratory and field tests that will further define the suitability of HCFCs as vapor-phase tracers are under way.

  7. Physiological, numerical and molecular characterization of alkyl ether-utilizing rhodococci.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yong-Hak; Engesser, Karl-Heinrich; Kim, Sang-Jong

    2007-06-01

    Twenty-seven Gram-positive strains were characterized physiologically and numerically and classified them into four groups according to their specific activities for utilization of linear alkyl ethers (AEs), cyclic AEs, monoalkoxybenzenes and 1,4-diethoxybenzene. The comparative analysis of the 16S ribosomal RNA gene and 16S-23S intergenic spacer region showed that they belonged to the genera Rhodococcus and Gordonia. Alkyl ether-utilizing rhodococci appeared to involve various and diverse cytochromes P450 of the families CYP116 (25 positive strains from 27), CYP153 (5/27), CYP249 (1/27) and a new family P450RR1 (27/27). The presence of P450RR1 was strongly related to the specific activity for utilization of 2-methoxyphenol and 2-ethoxyphenol. In addition, 26 of 27 strains contained multiple alkB genes coding for probable non-haem iron containing alkane monooxygenases and hydroxylases. Similar DNA fragments coding for a tetrahydrofuran monooxygenase A subunit (ThmA) were found in all cyclic AE-utilizing strains and nearly identical DNA fragments coding for likely orthologues of a propane monooxygenase A subunit (PrmA) in all linear AE-utilizing strains. The substrate availability in the degradation of aryl AEs, cyclic AEs and linear AEs agreed with the molecular probing of the respective genes encoding cytochrome P450RR1, ThmA and PrmA.

  8. Phenylethynl-terminated poly(arylene ethers)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jensen, Brian J. (Inventor); Bryant, Robert G. (Inventor); Hergenrother, Paul M. (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    Phenylethynyl-terminated poly(arylene ethers) are prepared in a wide range of molecular weights by adjusting monomer ratio and adding an appropriate amount of 4-fluoro- 4'-phenylethynyl benzophenone during polymer synthesis. The resulting phenylethynyl-terminated poly(arylene ethers) react and crosslink upon curing for one hour at 350 C to provide materials with improved solvent resistance, higher modulus, and better high temperature properties than the linear, uncrosslinked polymers.

  9. Effect of alkane chain length and counterion on the freezing transition of cationic surfactant adsorbed film at alkane mixture - water interfaces.

    PubMed

    Tokiwa, Yuhei; Sakamoto, Hiroyasu; Takiue, Takanori; Aratono, Makoto; Matsubara, Hiroki

    2015-05-21

    Penetration of alkane molecules into the adsorbed film gives rise to a surface freezing transition of cationic surfactant at the alkane-water interface. To examine the effect of the alkane chain length and counterion on the surface freezing, we employed interfacial tensiometry and ellipsometry to study the interface of cetyltrimethylammonium bromide and cetyltrimethylammonium chloride aqueous solutions against dodecane, tetradecane, hexadecane, and their mixtures. Applying theoretical equations to the experimental results obtained, we found that the alkane molecules that have the same chain length as the surfactant adsorb preferentially into the surface freezing film. Furthermore, we demonstrated that the freezing transition temperature of cationic surfactant adsorbed film was independent of the kind of counterion. PMID:25932500

  10. Gas-phase study of Fe sup + -benzyne with alkanes

    SciTech Connect

    Yongqing Huang; Freiser, B.S. )

    1989-03-29

    The unimolecular chemistry of Fe{sup +}-benzyne and its reactivity with small alkanes in the gas phase are studied by Fourier transform mass spectrometry (FTMS). Collision-induced dissociation of Fe{sup +}-benzyne yields benzyne loss exclusively. In contrast, photodissociation of Fe{sup +}-benzyne yields not only cleavage of benzyne from Fe{sup +}, but competitive loss of C{sub 2}H{sub 2} and C{sub 4}H{sub 2} as well. The Fe{sup +}-benzyne is formed from chlorobenzene by loss of HCl. This dehydrochlorination of chlorobenzene also occurs in secondary reactions up to six times forming products of the type Fe{sup +}-polyphenylene. Fe{sup +}-benzyne reacts with alkanes larger than methane to form a wide variety of product ions by mechanisms including hydrogenation and methanation of the benzyne ligand. All of the product ions can be explained by mechanisms based on Fe{sup +} insertion into either C-C or C-H bonds as the reaction-initiating step, followed by either alkyl or H migration from Fe{sup +} onto the benzyne ligand or, alternatively, by the migratory insertion of benzyne into a metal-carbon or metal-hydrogen bond. Photodissociation and ion-molecule reaction studies yield a value for the metal-ligand bond energy of D{degree} (Fe{sup +}-benzyne) = 76 {plus minus} 10 kcal/mol.

  11. Direct hydrodeoxygenation of raw woody biomass into liquid alkanes.

    PubMed

    Xia, Qineng; Chen, Zongjia; Shao, Yi; Gong, Xueqing; Wang, Haifeng; Liu, Xiaohui; Parker, Stewart F; Han, Xue; Yang, Sihai; Wang, Yanqin

    2016-03-30

    Being the only sustainable source of organic carbon, biomass is playing an ever-increasingly important role in our energy landscape. The conversion of renewable lignocellulosic biomass into liquid fuels is particularly attractive but extremely challenging due to the inertness and complexity of lignocellulose. Here we describe the direct hydrodeoxygenation of raw woods into liquid alkanes with mass yields up to 28.1 wt% over a multifunctional Pt/NbOPO4 catalyst in cyclohexane. The superior performance of this catalyst allows simultaneous conversion of cellulose, hemicellulose and, more significantly, lignin fractions in the wood sawdust into hexane, pentane and alkylcyclohexanes, respectively. Investigation on the molecular mechanism reveals that a synergistic effect between Pt, NbOx species and acidic sites promotes this highly efficient hydrodeoxygenation of bulk lignocellulose. No chemical pretreatment of the raw woody biomass or separation is required for this one-pot process, which opens a general and energy-efficient route for converting raw lignocellulose into valuable alkanes.

  12. Geologic seepage of methane and light alkanes in Los Angeles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doezema, L. A.; Chang, K.; Baril, R.; Nwachuku, I.; Contreras, P.; Marquez, A.; Howard, D.

    2013-12-01

    Natural geologic seepage of methane from underground oil and natural gas reservoirs has been suggested to be an underreported part of the global methane budget. Other light alkanes are also given off in combination with the methane seepage, making it possible that geologic seepage is also a potentially significant global source of these light alkanes. This study reports C1-C5 findings from geologic seepage made in the Los Angeles region. Microseepage, invisible escape of gases, was measured primarily at Kenneth Hahn Regional Park, while macroseepage, the visible release of gases, was measured at the La Brea Tar Pits. Samples were collected using stainless steel canisters and flux chambers and were analyzed using gas chromatography with flame ionization detectors (GC-FID). Average microseepage flux rates of 0.95 μg m-2 h-1 for ethane and 0.51 μg m-2 h-1 were found for propane, while average macroseepage rates for methane, ethane, and propane were 664, 19.8, and 18.1 mg m-2 h-1 respectively. Relationships between microseepage flux rate and location of underground oil and natural deposit and earthquake fault lines are presented. Additionally, the relative importance of findings in context with global budgets and local air quality is discussed.

  13. Direct hydrodeoxygenation of raw woody biomass into liquid alkanes.

    PubMed

    Xia, Qineng; Chen, Zongjia; Shao, Yi; Gong, Xueqing; Wang, Haifeng; Liu, Xiaohui; Parker, Stewart F; Han, Xue; Yang, Sihai; Wang, Yanqin

    2016-01-01

    Being the only sustainable source of organic carbon, biomass is playing an ever-increasingly important role in our energy landscape. The conversion of renewable lignocellulosic biomass into liquid fuels is particularly attractive but extremely challenging due to the inertness and complexity of lignocellulose. Here we describe the direct hydrodeoxygenation of raw woods into liquid alkanes with mass yields up to 28.1 wt% over a multifunctional Pt/NbOPO4 catalyst in cyclohexane. The superior performance of this catalyst allows simultaneous conversion of cellulose, hemicellulose and, more significantly, lignin fractions in the wood sawdust into hexane, pentane and alkylcyclohexanes, respectively. Investigation on the molecular mechanism reveals that a synergistic effect between Pt, NbOx species and acidic sites promotes this highly efficient hydrodeoxygenation of bulk lignocellulose. No chemical pretreatment of the raw woody biomass or separation is required for this one-pot process, which opens a general and energy-efficient route for converting raw lignocellulose into valuable alkanes. PMID:27025898

  14. Direct hydrodeoxygenation of raw woody biomass into liquid alkanes

    PubMed Central

    Xia, Qineng; Chen, Zongjia; Shao, Yi; Gong, Xueqing; Wang, Haifeng; Liu, Xiaohui; Parker, Stewart F.; Han, Xue; Yang, Sihai; Wang, Yanqin

    2016-01-01

    Being the only sustainable source of organic carbon, biomass is playing an ever-increasingly important role in our energy landscape. The conversion of renewable lignocellulosic biomass into liquid fuels is particularly attractive but extremely challenging due to the inertness and complexity of lignocellulose. Here we describe the direct hydrodeoxygenation of raw woods into liquid alkanes with mass yields up to 28.1 wt% over a multifunctional Pt/NbOPO4 catalyst in cyclohexane. The superior performance of this catalyst allows simultaneous conversion of cellulose, hemicellulose and, more significantly, lignin fractions in the wood sawdust into hexane, pentane and alkylcyclohexanes, respectively. Investigation on the molecular mechanism reveals that a synergistic effect between Pt, NbOx species and acidic sites promotes this highly efficient hydrodeoxygenation of bulk lignocellulose. No chemical pretreatment of the raw woody biomass or separation is required for this one-pot process, which opens a general and energy-efficient route for converting raw lignocellulose into valuable alkanes. PMID:27025898

  15. 40 CFR 721.2625 - Reaction product of alkane-diol and epichlorohydrin.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Reaction product of alkane-diol and... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.2625 Reaction product of alkane-diol and epichlorohydrin. (a) Chemical... as reaction product of alkanediol and epichlorohydrin (PMN P-89-760) is subject to reporting...

  16. 40 CFR 721.2625 - Reaction product of alkane-diol and epichlorohydrin.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Reaction product of alkane-diol and... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.2625 Reaction product of alkane-diol and epichlorohydrin. (a) Chemical... as reaction product of alkanediol and epichlorohydrin (PMN P-89-760) is subject to reporting...

  17. 40 CFR 721.2625 - Reaction product of alkane-diol and epichlorohydrin.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Reaction product of alkane-diol and... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.2625 Reaction product of alkane-diol and epichlorohydrin. (a) Chemical... as reaction product of alkanediol and epichlorohydrin (PMN P-89-760) is subject to reporting...

  18. 40 CFR 721.2625 - Reaction product of alkane-diol and epichlorohydrin.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Reaction product of alkane-diol and... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.2625 Reaction product of alkane-diol and epichlorohydrin. (a) Chemical... as reaction product of alkanediol and epichlorohydrin (PMN P-89-760) is subject to reporting...

  19. 40 CFR 721.2625 - Reaction product of alkane-diol and epichlorohydrin.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Reaction product of alkane-diol and... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.2625 Reaction product of alkane-diol and epichlorohydrin. (a) Chemical... as reaction product of alkanediol and epichlorohydrin (PMN P-89-760) is subject to reporting...

  20. Surfactant-induced phases in water-supported alkane monolayers: I. Thermodynamics.

    PubMed

    Yefet, Shai; Sloutskin, Eli; Tamam, Lilach; Sapir, Zvi; Cohen, Asaf; Deutsch, Moshe; Ocko, Benjamin M

    2014-07-15

    Alkanes longer than n = 6 carbons do not spread on the water surface, but condense in a macroscopic lens. However, adding trimethylammonium-based surfactants, C(m)TAB, in submillimolar concentrations causes the alkanes to spread and form a single Langmuir-Gibbs (LG) monolayer of mixed alkanes and surfactant tails, which coexists with the alkane lenses. Upon cooling, this LG film surface-freezes at a temperature T(s) above the bulk freezing temperature T(b). The thermodynamics of surface freezing (SF) of these LG films is studied by surface tension measurements for a range of alkanes (n = 12-21) and surfactant alkyl lengths (m = 14, 16, 18), at several concentrations c. The surface freezing range T(s)-T(b) observed is up to 25 °C, an order of magnitude larger than the temperature range of SF monolayers on the surface of pure alkane melts. The measured (n,T) surface phase diagram is accounted for well by a model based on mixtures' theory, which includes an interchange energy term ω. ω is found to be negative, implying attraction between unlike species, rather than the repulsion found for SF of binary alkane mixtures. Thus, the surfactant/alkane mixing is a necessary condition for the occurrence of SF in these LG films. The X-ray derived structure of the films is presented in an accompanying paper. PMID:24918482

  1. Identity and mechanisms of alkane-oxidizing metalloenzymes from deep-sea hydrothermal vents.

    PubMed

    Bertrand, Erin M; Keddis, Ramaydalis; Groves, John T; Vetriani, Costantino; Austin, Rachel Narehood

    2013-01-01

    Six aerobic alkanotrophs (organism that can metabolize alkanes as their sole carbon source) isolated from deep-sea hydrothermal vents were characterized using the radical clock substrate norcarane to determine the metalloenzyme and reaction mechanism used to oxidize alkanes. The organisms studied were Alcanivorax sp. strains EPR7 and MAR14, Marinobacter sp. strain EPR21, Nocardioides sp. strains EPR26w, EPR28w, and Parvibaculum hydrocarbonoclasticum strain EPR92. Each organism was able to grow on n-alkanes as the sole carbon source and therefore must express genes encoding an alkane-oxidizing enzyme. Results from the oxidation of the radical-clock diagnostic substrate norcarane demonstrated that five of the six organisms (EPR7, MAR14, EPR21, EPR26w, and EPR28w) used an alkane hydroxylase functionally similar to AlkB to catalyze the oxidation of medium-chain alkanes, while the sixth organism (EPR92) used an alkane-oxidizing cytochrome P450 (CYP)-like protein to catalyze the oxidation. DNA sequencing indicated that EPR7 and EPR21 possess genes encoding AlkB proteins, while sequencing results from EPR92 confirmed the presence of a gene encoding CYP-like alkane hydroxylase, consistent with the results from the norcarane experiments.

  2. Geomicrobiological linkages between short-chain alkane consumption and sulfate reduction rates in seep sediments

    PubMed Central

    Bose, Arpita; Rogers, Daniel R.; Adams, Melissa M.; Joye, Samantha B.; Girguis, Peter R.

    2013-01-01

    Marine hydrocarbon seeps are ecosystems that are rich in methane, and, in some cases, short-chain (C2–C5) and longer alkanes. C2–C4 alkanes such as ethane, propane, and butane can be significant components of seeping fluids. Some sulfate-reducing microbes oxidize short-chain alkanes anaerobically, and may play an important role in both the competition for sulfate and the local carbon budget. To better understand the anaerobic oxidation of short-chain n-alkanes coupled with sulfate-reduction, hydrocarbon-rich sediments from the Gulf of Mexico (GoM) were amended with artificial, sulfate-replete seawater and one of four n-alkanes (C1–C4) then incubated under strict anaerobic conditions. Measured rates of alkane oxidation and sulfate reduction closely follow stoichiometric predictions that assume the complete oxidation of alkanes to CO2 (though other sinks for alkane carbon likely exist). Changes in the δ13C of all the alkanes in the reactors show enrichment over the course of the incubation, with the C3 and C4 incubations showing the greatest enrichment (4.4 and 4.5‰, respectively). The concurrent depletion in the δ13C of dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) implies a transfer of carbon from the alkane to the DIC pool (−3.5 and −6.7‰ for C3 and C4 incubations, respectively). Microbial community analyses reveal that certain members of the class Deltaproteobacteria are selectively enriched as the incubations degrade C1–C4 alkanes. Phylogenetic analyses indicate that distinct phylotypes are enriched in the ethane reactors, while phylotypes in the propane and butane reactors align with previously identified C3–C4 alkane-oxidizing sulfate-reducers. These data further constrain the potential influence of alkane oxidation on sulfate reduction rates (SRRs) in cold hydrocarbon-rich sediments, provide insight into their contribution to local carbon cycling, and illustrate the extent to which short-chain alkanes can serve as electron donors and govern microbial

  3. Incorporation of chlorinated alkanes into fatty acids of hydrocarbon-utilizing mycobacteria.

    PubMed

    Murphy, G L; Perry, J J

    1983-12-01

    The cellular fatty acid composition of Mycobacterium vaccae JOB5 and Mycobacterium convolutum R22 was examined after growth on n-alkanes and compared with the fatty acids of the organisms after growth on 1-chlorohexadecane and 1-chlorooctadecane. Growth on n-alkanes resulted in normal fatty acid profiles. Mass spectral analyses indicated that, after growth on the terminally chlorinated n-alkanes, 75 to 86% of the fatty acids in M. convolutum and ca. 55% of the fatty acids in M. vaccae contained chlorine. Neither organism could utilize chloroacetate or 3-chloropropionate as sole source of carbon and energy. When these compounds were added to a growth medium with n-hexadecane as substrate, there was no evidence that chlorinated fatty acids were produced. Terminally chlorinated n-alkanes can be added to the list of n-alkanes, alkenes, and cyclohexylalkane derivatives that can be directly incorporated into cellular fatty acids of hydrocarbon-utilizing organisms.

  4. Possible origin of n -alkanes with a remarkable even-to-odd predominance in recent marine sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishimura, Mitsugu; Baker, Earl W.

    1986-02-01

    N- alkane distributions with a remarkable even-to-odd predominance (C 16-C 24) were found in marine surface sediments. The previously proposed diagenetic reduction of the corresponding n- fatty acids could not be considered as a source for these N- alkane. Based on a comparison of compositional features of n- alkane, n- fatty acid and n- alcohol distributions, carbon isotope analyses, and other geochemical parameters, the data indicate that the even-predominant n- alkanes were derived directly from marine bacteria.

  5. Adsorption of proteins at the aqueous solution/alkane interface: Co-adsorption of protein and alkane.

    PubMed

    Miller, R; Aksenenko, E V; Zinkovych, I I; Fainerman, V B

    2015-08-01

    The equations of state, adsorption isotherms and functions of the distribution of protein molecules in liquid interfacial layers with respect to molar area and the equations for their viscoelastic behavior are presented. This theory was used to determine the adsorption characteristics of β-casein and β-lactoglobulin at water/oil interfaces. The experimental results are shown to be describable quite adequately by the proposed theory with consistent model parameters. The data analysis demonstrated that the β-casein molecule adsorbed at equilibrium conditions is more unfolded as compared with dynamic conditions, and this fact causes the significant increase of the adsorption equilibrium constant. The theory assumes the adsorption of protein molecules from the aqueous solution and a competitive adsorption of alkane molecules from the alkane phase. The comparison of the experimental equilibrium interfacial tension isotherms for β-lactoglobulin at the solution/hexane interface with data calculated using the proposed theoretical model demonstrates that the assumption of a competitive adsorption is essential, and the influence of the hexane molecules on the shape of the adsorption isotherm does in fact exist.

  6. Ether lipid generating enzyme AGPS alters the balance of structural and signaling lipids to fuel cancer pathogenicity.

    PubMed

    Benjamin, Daniel I; Cozzo, Alyssa; Ji, Xiaodan; Roberts, Lindsay S; Louie, Sharon M; Mulvihill, Melinda M; Luo, Kunxin; Nomura, Daniel K

    2013-09-10

    Aberrant lipid metabolism is an established hallmark of cancer cells. In particular, ether lipid levels have been shown to be elevated in tumors, but their specific function in cancer remains elusive. We show here that the metabolic enzyme alkylglyceronephosphate synthase (AGPS), a critical step in the synthesis of ether lipids, is up-regulated across multiple types of aggressive human cancer cells and primary tumors. We demonstrate that ablation of AGPS in cancer cells results in reduced cell survival, cancer aggressiveness, and tumor growth through altering the balance of ether lipid, fatty acid, eicosanoid, and fatty acid-derived glycerophospholipid metabolism, resulting in an overall reduction in the levels of several oncogenic signaling lipids. Taken together, our results reveal that AGPS, in addition to maintaining ether lipids, also controls cellular utilization of fatty acids, favoring the generation of signaling lipids necessary for promoting the aggressive features of cancer. PMID:23980144

  7. 40 CFR 721.10625 - Distillation bottoms, alkylated benzene by-product, brominated and bromo diphenyl alkane (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... benzene by-product, brominated and bromo diphenyl alkane (generic). 721.10625 Section 721.10625 Protection... Distillation bottoms, alkylated benzene by-product, brominated and bromo diphenyl alkane (generic). (a... generically as distillation bottoms, alkylated benzene by-product, brominated and bromo diphenyl alkane...

  8. 40 CFR 721.10625 - Distillation bottoms, alkylated benzene by-product, brominated and bromo diphenyl alkane (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... benzene by-product, brominated and bromo diphenyl alkane (generic). 721.10625 Section 721.10625 Protection... Distillation bottoms, alkylated benzene by-product, brominated and bromo diphenyl alkane (generic). (a... generically as distillation bottoms, alkylated benzene by-product, brominated and bromo diphenyl alkane...

  9. 40 CFR 721.10178 - Distillates (Fischer-Tropsch), hydroisomerized middle, C10-13-branched alkane fraction.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...), hydroisomerized middle, C10-13-branched alkane fraction. 721.10178 Section 721.10178 Protection of Environment...), hydroisomerized middle, C10-13-branched alkane fraction. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject... middle, C10-13-branched alkane fraction (PMN P-04-319; CAS No. 642928-30-1) is subject to reporting...

  10. 40 CFR 721.10178 - Distillates (Fischer-Tropsch), hydroisomerized middle, C10-13-branched alkane fraction.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...), hydroisomerized middle, C10-13-branched alkane fraction. 721.10178 Section 721.10178 Protection of Environment...), hydroisomerized middle, C10-13-branched alkane fraction. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject... middle, C10-13-branched alkane fraction (PMN P-04-319; CAS No. 642928-30-1) is subject to reporting...

  11. Conformations and Barriers to Methyl Group Internal Rotation in Two Asymmetric Ethers: Propyl Methyl Ether and Butyl Methyl Ether

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Long, B. E.; Dechirico, F.; Cooke, S. A.

    2012-06-01

    The conformational preferences of the O-C-C-C unit are important in many biological systems with the unit generally preferring a gauche configuration compared to an anti configuration. Butyl methyl ether and propyl methyl ether provide very simple systems for this phenomenom to manifest. Pure rotational spectra of the title molecules have been recorded using chirped pulse Fourier transform microwave spectroscopy (CP-FTMW). In the case of butyl methyl ether, only one conformer has been observed. This conformer has torsional angles of COCC = 180°, OCCC = 62° and CCCC = 180° (anti-gauche-anti) and rotational constants of A = 10259.4591(33) MHz, B = 1445.6470(13) MHz, and C = 1356.2944(14) MHz. The rotational spectrum was doubled and has been analyzed to produce an effective barrier to methyl group internal rotation of 780(35) cm-1. A prior rotational spectroscopic study on propyl methyl ether had focused only on the high energy anti-anti conformer. We have analyzed spectra from the lowest energy anti-gauche conformer and the spectroscopic constants will be presented. A summary of the differences in conformational energies and methyl group internal rotation barriers for the class of aliphatic asymmetric ethers will be presented. K. N. Houk, J. E. Eksterowicz, Y.-D. Wu, C. D. Fuglesang, D. B. Mitchell. J. Am. Chem. Soc. 115 (4170), 1993. Hiroshi Kato, Jun Nakagawa, Michiro Hayashi. J. Mol. Spectrosc. 80 (272), 1980.

  12. Dissociative Photoionization of Diethyl Ether.

    PubMed

    Voronova, Krisztina; Mozaffari Easter, Chrissa M; Covert, Kyle J; Bodi, Andras; Hemberger, Patrick; Sztáray, Bálint

    2015-10-29

    The dissociative photoionization of internal energy selected diethyl ether ions was investigated by imaging photoelectron photoion coincidence spectroscopy. In a large, 5 eV energy range Et2O(+) cations decay by two parallel and three sequential dissociative photoionization channels, which can be modeled well using statistical theory. The 0 K appearance energies of the CH3CHOCH2CH3(+) (H-loss, m/z = 73) and CH3CH2O═CH2(+) (methyl-loss, m/z = 59) fragment ions were determined to be 10.419 ± 0.015 and 10.484 ± 0.008 eV, respectively. The reemergence of the hydrogen-loss ion above 11 eV is attributed to transition-state (TS) switching, in which the second, outer TS is rate-determining at high internal energies. At 11.81 ± 0.05 eV, a secondary fragment of the CH3CHOCH2CH3(+) (m/z = 73) ion, protonated acetaldehyde, CH3CH═OH(+) (m/z = 45) appears. On the basis of the known thermochemical onset of this fragment, a reverse barrier of 325 meV was found. Two more sequential dissociation reactions were examined, namely, ethylene and formaldehyde losses from the methyl-loss daughter ion. The 0 K appearance energies of 11.85 ± 0.07 and 12.20 ± 0.08 eV, respectively, indicate no reverse barrier in these processes. The statistical model of the dissociative photoionization can also be used to predict the fractional ion abundances in threshold photoionization at large temperatures, which could be of use in, for example, combustion diagnostics. PMID:26444101

  13. Reactions of C{sub 2}(a {sup 3} product {sub u}) with selected saturated alkanes: A temperature dependence study

    SciTech Connect

    Hu Renzhi; Zhang Qun; Chen Yang

    2010-04-28

    We present a temperature dependence study on the gas phase reactions of the C{sub 2}(a {sup 3} product {sub u}) radical with a selected series of saturated alkanes (C{sub 2}H{sub 6}, C{sub 3}H{sub 8}, n-C{sub 4}H{sub 10}, i-C{sub 4}H{sub 10}, and n-C{sub 6}H{sub 14}) by means of pulsed laser photolysis/laser-induced fluorescence technique. The bimolecular rate constants for these reactions were obtained between 298 and 673 K. A pronounced negative temperature effect was observed for n-C{sub 4}H{sub 10}, i-C{sub 4}H{sub 10}, and n-C{sub 6}H{sub 14} and interpreted in terms of steric hindrance of the more reactive secondary or tertiary C-H bonds by less reactive CH{sub 3} groups. Detailed analysis of our experimental results reveals quantitatively the temperature dependence of reactivities for the primary, secondary, and tertiary C-H bonds in these saturated alkanes and further lends support to a mechanism of hydrogen abstraction.

  14. Measurements of homogeneous nucleation in normal-alkanes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kraack, H.; Sirota, E. B.; Deutsch, M.

    2000-04-01

    The homogeneous nucleation of normal-alkanes with carbon numbers 15⩽n⩽60 is studied by scanning calorimetry, using the droplet technique. Pure, nonemulsified samples show near-zero undercoolings below the melting point, Tm, except for both ends of the n-range, where undercoolings ΔT of up to 2 °C are observed. The emulsions have much larger undercoolings. The relative undercoolings show three regimes: A fast decreasing one, up to n=17, an anomalously low constant one, ΔT/Tm≈0.04, for 17⩽n⩽30, and a gradually increasing one for 32⩽n⩽60. A value of ΔT/Tm≈0.086 is reached at n=60. The connections of these results with the bulk rotator phases and the recently discovered surface freezing effect are discussed. Strong intrinsic interrelations among these are indicated.

  15. Morphological Transformations in Solid Domains of Alkanes on Surfactant Solutions.

    PubMed

    Matsubara, Hiroki; Takaichi, Tetsumasa; Takiue, Takanori; Aratono, Makoto; Toyoda, Aya; Iimura, Kenichi; Ash, Philip A; Bain, Colin D

    2013-03-21

    Alkanes on surfactant solutions can form three distinct phases at the air-solution interface, a liquid phase (L), a solid monolayer phase (S1), and a hybrid bilayer phase (S2). Phase coexistence between any two, or all three, of these phases has been observed by Brewster angle microscopy of tetradecane, hexadecane, and their mixtures on solutions of tetradecyltrimethylammonium bromide. The morphologies of the domains depend on the competition between line tension and electrostatic interactions, which are essentially different depending on the pair of phases in contact. Domains of S1 in the L phase are long and thin; however, long, thin domains of L in an S1 phase are not stable but break up into a string of small circular domains. The bilayer S2 domains are always circular, owing to the dominance of line tension on the morphology. PMID:26291344

  16. Thermal analysis of n-alkane phase change material mixtures

    SciTech Connect

    Chio, Y.I.; Choi, E.; Lorsch, H.G.

    1991-03-31

    Tests were performed to characterize the thermal behavior of it number of n-alkanes to be used as phase change materials (PCMs) in district cooling applications. Hexadecane and tetradecane were mixed in different fractions, and their thermal behavior was experimentally evaluated. Test results for melting temperature and fusion energy for laboratory grade hexadecane and tetradecane showed good agreement with datain the literature. However, values for commercial grade hexadecane were found to be considerably lower. In the range of temperatures of interest for district cooling, mixtures of tetradecane and hexadecane can be treated as homogeneous substances. However, their heats of fusion are slightly lower than those of the pure substances. Their melting temperatures are also lower by an amount that can be predicted.

  17. Environmental chemistry and toxicology of polychlorinated n-alkanes.

    PubMed

    Tomy, G T; Fisk, A T; Westmore, J B; Muir, D C

    1998-01-01

    Polychlorinated-n-alkanes (PCAs) or chlorinated paraffins consist of C10 to C30 n-alkanes with chlorine content from 30% to 70% by mass. PCAs are used as high-temperature lubricants, plasticizers, flame retardants, and additives in adhesives, paints, rubber, and sealants. This review presents the existing data on the environmental chemistry and toxicology of PCAs and a preliminary exposure and risk assessment. There is limited information on the levels, fate, or biological effects of PCAs in the environment. This results both from the difficulty associated with quantifying PCAs, because of the complexity inherent to commercial formulations, and from the limited knowledge of their physicochemical properties and biodegradation rates. There are indications that PCAs are widespread environmental contaminants at ng/L levels in surface waters and ng/g (wet wt) levels in biota. However, environmental measurements of PCAs are very limited in the U.S. and Canada, and are only slightly more detailed in western Europe. Assuming that reported water concentrations are mainly caused by the short chain (C10-C13) compounds, aquatic organisms may be at risk from exposure to PCAs. Fugacity level II modeling for two representative PCAs, using the best available physicochemical property data and estimated degradation rates, suggested that C16C24Cl10 would achieve higher concentrations in biota, sediment, and soil than C12H20Cl6 because of slower degradation rates and lower water solubility. Environmental residence time of C16H24Cl10 is estimated to be 520 d compared to 210 d for C12H20Cl6. Future studies will require better analytical methods and reference materials certified for PCA content. Additional data are needed to evaluate exposure of biota to PCAs in the environment, particularly in light of their continued production and usage around the globe. PMID:9751033

  18. Measuring long chain alkanes in diesel engine exhaust by thermal desorption PTR-MS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erickson, M. H.; Gueneron, M.; Jobson, B. T.

    2013-07-01

    A method using thermal desorption sampling and analysis by PTR-MS to measure long chain alkanes (C12-C18) and other larger organics associated with diesel engine exhaust emissions is described. Long chain alkanes undergo dissociative proton transfer reactions forming a series of fragment ions with formula CnH2n+1. The PTR-MS is insensitive to n-alkanes less than C8 but displays an increasing sensitivity for larger alkanes. Fragment ion distribution and sensitivity is a function of drift conditions. At 80 Td the most abundant ion fragments from C10 to C16 n-alkanes were m/z 57, 71 and 85. The mass spectrum of gasoline and diesel fuel at 80 Td displayed ion group patterns that can be related to known fuel constituents, such as alkanes, alkylbenzenes and cycloalkanes, and other compound groups that are inferred from molecular weight distributions such as dihydronapthalenes and naphthenic monoaromatics. It is shown that thermal desorption sampling of gasoline and diesel engine exhausts at 80 Td allows for discrimination against light alkanes and alkenes which are a major constituent of both exhausts, allowing for quantification of higher molecular weight alkanes from the abundance of CnH2n+1 fragment ions. Using this approach, the molar abundance of C12-C18 alkanes in diesel engine exhaust was found to be 75% that of the total C1-C4 alkylbenzene abundance. While the PTR-MS mass spectra of gasoline and diesel exhaust looked similar, the abundance of higher molecular weight compounds relative to that of C4-alkylbenzenes was much greater in diesel engine exhaust. The abundance patterns of compounds determined by thermal desorption sampling may allow for emission profiles to be developed to better quantify the relative contributions of diesel and gasoline exhaust emissions of larger organic compounds to urban air concentrations.

  19. Production of liquid hydrocarbon and ether mixtures

    SciTech Connect

    Harandi, M.N.; Owen, H.

    1989-05-16

    An integrated process is described for the production of ether-rich liquid fuels, comprising: (a) etherifying a mixture of excess lower alkyl alcohol and aliphatic hydrocarbon feedstock rich in C/sub 4/+isoalkenes in the presence of acid etherification catalyst whereby lower alkyl tertiary alkyl ethers are produced; (b) separating etherification effluent from step(a) to provide a gasoline stream rich in C/sub 5/+ ethers and a stream comprising unreacted alcohol and alkenes; (c) contacting the unreacted alcohol and alkenes with an acidic metallosilicate zeolite conversion catalyst under olefinic and oxygenates conversion conditions at a temperature of at least 200/sup 0/C (392/sup 0/F) whereby a conversion effluent stream rich in C/sub 4/+ isoalkenes is produced; (d) recycling at least a portion of the conversion effluent stream to step (a) for etherification.

  20. Light alkane conversion processes - Suprabiotic catalyst systems for selective oxidation of light alkane gases to fuel oxygenates.

    SciTech Connect

    Lyons, J.E.

    1992-07-01

    The objective of the work presented in this paper is to develop new, efficient catalysts for the selective transformation of the light alkanes in natural gas to alcohols for use as liquid transportation fuels, fuel precursors and chemical products. There currently exists no DIRECT one-step catalytic air-oxidation process to convert these substrates to alcohols. Such a one-step route would represent superior useful technology for the utilization of natural gas and similar refinery-derived light hydrocarbon streams. Processes for converting natural gas or its components (methane, ethane, propane, and the butanes) to alcohols for use as motor fuels, fuel additives or fuel precursors will not only add a valuable alternative to crude oil but will produce a clean-burning, high octane alternative to conventional gasoline.

  1. Light alkane conversion processes - Suprabiotic catalyst systems for selective oxidation of light alkane gases to fuel oxygenates

    SciTech Connect

    Lyons, J.E.

    1992-01-01

    The objective of the work presented in this paper is to develop new, efficient catalysts for the selective transformation of the light alkanes in natural gas to alcohols for use as liquid transportation fuels, fuel precursors and chemical products. There currently exists no DIRECT one-step catalytic air-oxidation process to convert these substrates to alcohols. Such a one-step route would represent superior useful technology for the utilization of natural gas and similar refinery-derived light hydrocarbon streams. Processes for converting natural gas or its components (methane, ethane, propane, and the butanes) to alcohols for use as motor fuels, fuel additives or fuel precursors will not only add a valuable alternative to crude oil but will produce a clean-burning, high octane alternative to conventional gasoline.

  2. Prototheca zopfii Kruger strain UMK-13 growth on acetate or n-alkanes

    SciTech Connect

    Koenig, D.W.; Ward, H.B.

    1983-01-01

    A new strain of Prototheca zopfii Kruger was grown on acetate or on pure n-alkanes. A maximum acetate-supported exponential growth of 12 divisions day/sup -1/ occurred at pH 5 and 30/sup 0/C. At 25/sup 0/C, growth on n-alkanes was almost as fast, but no growth occurred at 30/sup 0/C. After 3 days at 25/sup 0/C, 34 to 45% of the n-alkanes had been removed, whereas at 21/sup 0/C and slower growth, utilization was twofold greater after 15 days. Rates of growth and utilization increased markedly after a point of sudden emulsification.

  3. Adsorption and dissociation kinetics of alkanes on CaO(100)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chakradhar, A.; Liu, Y.; Schmidt, J.; Kadossov, E.; Burghaus, U.

    2011-08-01

    The adsorption kinetics of ethane, butane, pentane, and hexane on CaO(100) have been studied by multi-mass thermal desorption (TDS) spectroscopy. The sample cleanliness was checked by Auger electron spectroscopy. A molecular and dissociative adsorption pathway was evident for the alkanes, except for ethane, which does not undergo bond activation. Two TDS peaks appeared when recording the parent mass, which are assigned to different adsorption sites/configurations of the molecularly adsorbed alkanes. Bond activation leads to desorption of hydrogen and several alkane fragments assigned to methane and ethylene formation. Only one TDS feature is seen in this case. Formation of carbon residuals was absent.

  4. Characterization of the Medium- and Long-Chain n-Alkanes Degrading Pseudomonas aeruginosa Strain SJTD-1 and Its Alkane Hydroxylase Genes

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Huan; Xu, Jing; Liang, Rubing; Liu, Jianhua

    2014-01-01

    A gram-negative aliphatic hydrocarbon-degrading bacterium SJTD-1 isolated from oil-contaminated soil was identified as Pseudomonas aeruginosa by comparative analyses of the 16S rRNA sequence, phenotype, and physiological features. SJTD-1 could efficiently mineralize medium- and long-chain n-alkanes (C12-C30) as its sole carbon source within seven days, showing the most optimal growth on n-hexadecane, followed by n-octadecane, and n-eicosane. In 36 h, 500 mg/L of tetradecane, hexadecane, and octadecane were transformed completely; and 2 g/L n-hexadecane was degraded to undetectable levels within 72 h. Two putative alkane-degrading genes (gene 3623 and gene 4712) were characterized and our results indicated that their gene products were rate-limiting enzymes involved in the synergetic catabolism of C12–C16 alkanes. On the basis of bioinformatics and transcriptional analysis, two P450 monooxygenases, along with a putative AlmA-like oxygenase, were examined. Genetically defective mutants lacking the characteristic alkane hydroxylase failed to degrade n-octadecane, thereby suggesting a different catalytic mechanism for the microbial transformation of alkanes with chain lengths over C18. PMID:25165808

  5. Characterization of the medium- and long-chain n-alkanes degrading Pseudomonas aeruginosa strain SJTD-1 and its alkane hydroxylase genes.

    PubMed

    Liu, Huan; Xu, Jing; Liang, Rubing; Liu, Jianhua

    2014-01-01

    A gram-negative aliphatic hydrocarbon-degrading bacterium SJTD-1 isolated from oil-contaminated soil was identified as Pseudomonas aeruginosa by comparative analyses of the 16S rRNA sequence, phenotype, and physiological features. SJTD-1 could efficiently mineralize medium- and long-chain n-alkanes (C12-C30) as its sole carbon source within seven days, showing the most optimal growth on n-hexadecane, followed by n-octadecane, and n-eicosane. In 36 h, 500 mg/L of tetradecane, hexadecane, and octadecane were transformed completely; and 2 g/L n-hexadecane was degraded to undetectable levels within 72 h. Two putative alkane-degrading genes (gene 3623 and gene 4712) were characterized and our results indicated that their gene products were rate-limiting enzymes involved in the synergetic catabolism of C12-C16 alkanes. On the basis of bioinformatics and transcriptional analysis, two P450 monooxygenases, along with a putative AlmA-like oxygenase, were examined. Genetically defective mutants lacking the characteristic alkane hydroxylase failed to degrade n-octadecane, thereby suggesting a different catalytic mechanism for the microbial transformation of alkanes with chain lengths over C18. PMID:25165808

  6. Crystalline imide/arylene ether copolymers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jensen, Brian J. (Inventor); Hergenrother, Paul M. (Inventor); Bass, Robert G. (Inventor)

    1995-01-01

    Crystalline imide/arylene ether block copolymers are prepared by reacting anhydride terminated poly(amic acids) with amine terminated poly)arylene ethers) in polar aprotic solvents and chemically or thermally cyclodehydrating the resulting intermediate poly(amic acids). The block copolymers of the invention have one glass transition temperature or two, depending on the particular structure and/or the compatibility of the block units. Most of these crystalline block copolymers for tough, solvent resistant films with high tensile properties. While all of the copolymers produced by the present invention are crystalline, testing reveals that copolymers with longer imide blocks or higher imide content have increased crystallinity.

  7. 37. BUILDING NO. 519, ETHER AND ALCOHOL RECOVERY HOUSE, NORTHWEST ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    37. BUILDING NO. 519, ETHER AND ALCOHOL RECOVERY HOUSE, NORTHWEST CORNER OF BUILDING. BUILDING NO. 521 (ETHER VAULT) IN BACKGROUND LEFT. - Picatinny Arsenal, 500 Area, Powder Factory & Power House, State Route 15 near I-80, Dover, Morris County, NJ

  8. 41. LOOKING WEST AT BUILDING NO. 519, ETHER AND ALCOHOL ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    41. LOOKING WEST AT BUILDING NO. 519, ETHER AND ALCOHOL RECOVERY HOUSE, (LEFT) AND BUILDING NO. 521, ETHER VAULT, (RIGHT) IN FOREGROUND - Picatinny Arsenal, 500 Area, Powder Factory & Power House, State Route 15 near I-80, Dover, Morris County, NJ

  9. Vinyl ethers containing an epoxy group. XVI. Reaction of glycidol vinyloxyethyl ether with acetals

    SciTech Connect

    Nedolya, N.A.; Khil'ko, M.Ya.; Trofimov, B.A.; Sigalov, M.V.

    1988-10-10

    In order to obtain branched acetals with epoxide groups (prospective monomers and intermediates) the authors investigated the reaction of acetaldehyde diethyl and di(1,1,3-trihydrotetrafluoropropyl) acetals with glycidol vinyloxyethyl ether. The addition of acetals to vinyl epoxy ethers was realized, and the first representative of compounds of this type, i.e., 9-glycidyloxy-6-ethoxy-4-methyl-3,7-dioxanonane, was obtained. It was also impossible to add a fluoroacetal to butyl vinyl ether (0.08-1.00 wt. % of catalyst CF/sub 3/COOH, BF/sub 3//times/ OEt/sub 2/, 20-80/degree/C, 0.5-3 h).

  10. P(MeNCH2CH2)3N: an efficient catalyst for the desilylation of tert-butyldimethylsilyl ethers

    PubMed

    Yu; Verkade

    2000-04-01

    tert-Butyldimethylsilyl (TBDMS) ethers of primary, secondary, and tertiary alcohols and phenolic TBDMS ethers are desilylated to their corresponding alcohols and phenols, respectively, in DMSO, at 80 degrees C, in 68-94% yield in the presence of 0.2-0.4 equiv of P(MeNCH2CH2)3N. Using P(i-PrNCH2-CH2)3N as the catalyst, 85-97% yields of desilylated alcohols were obtained from TBDMS ethers of 1-octanol, 2-phenoxyethanol, and racemic alpha-phenyl ethanol. These are the first examples of desilylations of silyl ethers catalyzed by nonionic bases. Both catalysts were much less effective for the desilylation of tert-butyldiphenylsilyl (TBDPS) ethers (22-45% yield) under the same conditions as used for TBDMS ethers. Possible pathways involving nucleophilic attack of the anion of the solvent molecule (generated by the catalyst) at the Si-O bond of silyl ether or a prior activation of the silyl ether by the catalyst via a P-Si interaction followed by nucleophilic attack of the solvent anion are proposed on the basis of 1H and 31P NMR experimental data.

  11. 40 CFR 721.10669 - Tertiary amine alkyl ether (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Tertiary amine alkyl ether (generic... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10669 Tertiary amine alkyl ether (generic). (a) Chemical substance and... alkyl ether (PMN P-13-78) is subject to reporting under this section for the significant new...

  12. 40 CFR 721.10385 - Phenoxy alkyl ether (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Phenoxy alkyl ether (generic). 721... Substances § 721.10385 Phenoxy alkyl ether (generic). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as phenoxy alkyl ether (PMN...

  13. 40 CFR 721.10385 - Phenoxy alkyl ether (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Phenoxy alkyl ether (generic). 721... Substances § 721.10385 Phenoxy alkyl ether (generic). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as phenoxy alkyl ether (PMN...

  14. 40 CFR 721.10385 - Phenoxy alkyl ether (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Phenoxy alkyl ether (generic). 721... Substances § 721.10385 Phenoxy alkyl ether (generic). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as phenoxy alkyl ether (PMN...

  15. 40 CFR 721.10453 - Polyglycerin alkyl ether (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Polyglycerin alkyl ether (generic... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10453 Polyglycerin alkyl ether (generic). (a) Chemical substance and... alkyl ether (PMN P-02-796) is subject to reporting under this section for the significant new...

  16. 40 CFR 721.10453 - Polyglycerin alkyl ether (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Polyglycerin alkyl ether (generic... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10453 Polyglycerin alkyl ether (generic). (a) Chemical substance and... alkyl ether (PMN P-02-796) is subject to reporting under this section for the significant new...

  17. 40 CFR 721.10669 - Tertiary amine alkyl ether (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Tertiary amine alkyl ether (generic... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10669 Tertiary amine alkyl ether (generic). (a) Chemical substance and... alkyl ether (PMN P-13-78) is subject to reporting under this section for the significant new...

  18. 21 CFR 520.1846 - Polyoxyethylene (23) lauryl ether blocks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... Polyoxyethylene (23) lauryl ether blocks. (a) Specifications. Each molasses-based block contains 2.2 percent polyoxyethylene (23) lauryl ether. (b) Sponsor. See No. 067949 in § 510.600(c) of this chapter. (c) Conditions of... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Polyoxyethylene (23) lauryl ether blocks....

  19. 21 CFR 520.1846 - Polyoxyethylene (23) lauryl ether blocks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... Polyoxyethylene (23) lauryl ether blocks. (a) Specifications. Each molasses-based block contains 2.2 percent polyoxyethylene (23) lauryl ether. (b) Sponsor. See No. 067949 in § 510.600(c) of this chapter. (c) Conditions of... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Polyoxyethylene (23) lauryl ether blocks....

  20. 21 CFR 520.1846 - Polyoxyethylene (23) lauryl ether blocks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... Polyoxyethylene (23) lauryl ether blocks. (a) Specifications. Each molasses-based block contains 2.2 percent polyoxyethylene (23) lauryl ether. (b) Sponsor. See No. 067949 in § 510.600(c) of this chapter. (c) Conditions of... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Polyoxyethylene (23) lauryl ether blocks....

  1. 21 CFR 520.1846 - Polyoxyethylene (23) lauryl ether blocks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... Polyoxyethylene (23) lauryl ether blocks. (a) Specifications. Each molasses-based block contains 2.2 percent polyoxyethylene (23) lauryl ether. (b) Sponsor. See No. 067949 in § 510.600(c) of this chapter. (c) Conditions of... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Polyoxyethylene (23) lauryl ether blocks....

  2. 21 CFR 520.1846 - Polyoxyethylene (23) lauryl ether blocks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... Polyoxyethylene (23) lauryl ether blocks. (a) Specifications. Each molasses-based block contains 2.2 percent polyoxyethylene (23) lauryl ether. (b) Sponsor. See No. 067949 in § 510.600(c) of this chapter. (c) Conditions of... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Polyoxyethylene (23) lauryl ether blocks....

  3. 39. BUILDING NO. 519, ETHER AND ALCOHOL RECOVERY HOUSE, LOOKING ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    39. BUILDING NO. 519, ETHER AND ALCOHOL RECOVERY HOUSE, LOOKING AT SOUTHWEST CORNER WITH BUILDING NO. 521, ETHER VAULT, AND BUILDING NO. 519-A, ETHER & ALOCOHL STORAGE TANKS, IN BACKGROUND RIGHT. - Picatinny Arsenal, 500 Area, Powder Factory & Power House, State Route 15 near I-80, Dover, Morris County, NJ

  4. 40 CFR 721.10069 - Ether amine phosphonate (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Ether amine phosphonate (generic). 721... Substances § 721.10069 Ether amine phosphonate (generic). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as ether amine phosphonate (PMN...

  5. 40 CFR 721.3440 - Haloalkyl substituted cyclic ethers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Haloalkyl substituted cyclic ethers... Substances § 721.3440 Haloalkyl substituted cyclic ethers. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substances haloalkyl substituted cyclic ethers (PMN P-85-368 and...

  6. 40 CFR 721.3486 - Polyglycerin mono(4-nonylphenyl) ether.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Polyglycerin mono(4-nonylphenyl) ether... Substances § 721.3486 Polyglycerin mono(4-nonylphenyl) ether. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses...-nonylphenyl) ether (PMN P-94-2230) is subject to reporting under this section for the significant new...

  7. 40 CFR 721.3480 - Halogenated biphenyl glycidyl ethers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Halogenated biphenyl glycidyl ethers... Substances § 721.3480 Halogenated biphenyl glycidyl ethers. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses... ethers (PMNs P-90-1844, P-90-1845, and P-90-1846) are subject to reporting under this section for...

  8. 40 CFR 721.3440 - Haloalkyl substituted cyclic ethers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Haloalkyl substituted cyclic ethers... Substances § 721.3440 Haloalkyl substituted cyclic ethers. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substances haloalkyl substituted cyclic ethers (PMN P-85-368 and...

  9. 40 CFR 721.3480 - Halogenated biphenyl glycidyl ethers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Halogenated biphenyl glycidyl ethers... Substances § 721.3480 Halogenated biphenyl glycidyl ethers. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses... ethers (PMNs P-90-1844, P-90-1845, and P-90-1846) are subject to reporting under this section for...

  10. 40 CFR 721.10069 - Ether amine phosphonate (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Ether amine phosphonate (generic). 721... Substances § 721.10069 Ether amine phosphonate (generic). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as ether amine phosphonate (PMN...

  11. 40 CFR 721.3500 - Perhalo alkoxy ether.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Perhalo alkoxy ether. 721.3500 Section... Substances § 721.3500 Perhalo alkoxy ether. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as perhalo alkoxy ether (PMN P-83-1227)...

  12. 40 CFR 721.3420 - Brominated arylalkyl ether.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Brominated arylalkyl ether. 721.3420... Substances § 721.3420 Brominated arylalkyl ether. (a) Chemical substances and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as brominated arylalkyl ether (P-83-906)...

  13. 40 CFR 721.3465 - Stilbene diglycidyl ether.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Stilbene diglycidyl ether. 721.3465... Substances § 721.3465 Stilbene diglycidyl ether. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified as stilbene diglycidyl ether (PMN P-96-1427) is subject...

  14. 40 CFR 721.3465 - Stilbene diglycidyl ether.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Stilbene diglycidyl ether. 721.3465... Substances § 721.3465 Stilbene diglycidyl ether. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified as stilbene diglycidyl ether (PMN P-96-1427) is subject...

  15. 40 CFR 721.3438 - Chlorohydroxyalkyl butyl ether (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Chlorohydroxyalkyl butyl ether... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.3438 Chlorohydroxyalkyl butyl ether (generic). (a) Chemical substance... chlorohydroxyalkyl butyl ether (PMN P-99-1295) is subject to reporting under this section for the significant new...

  16. 40 CFR 721.3500 - Perhalo alkoxy ether.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Perhalo alkoxy ether. 721.3500 Section... Substances § 721.3500 Perhalo alkoxy ether. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as perhalo alkoxy ether (PMN P-83-1227)...

  17. 40 CFR 721.3430 - 4-Bromophenyl phenyl ether.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false 4-Bromophenyl phenyl ether. 721.3430... Substances § 721.3430 4-Bromophenyl phenyl ether. (a) Chemical substance and significant new use subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance 4-bromophenyl phenyl ether (CAS No. 101-55-3) is subject to...

  18. 40 CFR 721.3520 - Aliphatic polyglycidyl ether.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Aliphatic polyglycidyl ether. 721.3520... Substances § 721.3520 Aliphatic polyglycidyl ether. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance aliphatic polyglycidyl ether (PMN P-89-1036) is subject...

  19. 40 CFR 721.3486 - Polyglycerin mono(4-nonylphenyl) ether.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Polyglycerin mono(4-nonylphenyl) ether... Substances § 721.3486 Polyglycerin mono(4-nonylphenyl) ether. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses...-nonylphenyl) ether (PMN P-94-2230) is subject to reporting under this section for the significant new...

  20. 40 CFR 721.3550 - Dipropylene glycol dimethyl ether.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Dipropylene glycol dimethyl ether. 721... Substances § 721.3550 Dipropylene glycol dimethyl ether. (a) Chemical substances and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified as dipropylene glycol dimethyl ether (PMN...

  1. 40 CFR 721.3420 - Brominated arylalkyl ether.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Brominated arylalkyl ether. 721.3420... Substances § 721.3420 Brominated arylalkyl ether. (a) Chemical substances and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as brominated arylalkyl ether (P-83-906)...

  2. 40 CFR 721.3438 - Chlorohydroxyalkyl butyl ether (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Chlorohydroxyalkyl butyl ether... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.3438 Chlorohydroxyalkyl butyl ether (generic). (a) Chemical substance... chlorohydroxyalkyl butyl ether (PMN P-99-1295) is subject to reporting under this section for the significant new...

  3. 40 CFR 721.3520 - Aliphatic polyglycidyl ether.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Aliphatic polyglycidyl ether. 721.3520... Substances § 721.3520 Aliphatic polyglycidyl ether. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance aliphatic polyglycidyl ether (PMN P-89-1036) is subject...

  4. 40 CFR 721.3550 - Dipropylene glycol dimethyl ether.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Dipropylene glycol dimethyl ether. 721... Substances § 721.3550 Dipropylene glycol dimethyl ether. (a) Chemical substances and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified as dipropylene glycol dimethyl ether (PMN...

  5. 40 CFR 721.3430 - 4-Bromophenyl phenyl ether.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false 4-Bromophenyl phenyl ether. 721.3430... Substances § 721.3430 4-Bromophenyl phenyl ether. (a) Chemical substance and significant new use subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance 4-bromophenyl phenyl ether (CAS No. 101-55-3) is subject to...

  6. 40 CFR 721.10551 - Bisphenol S mono ether (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Bisphenol S mono ether (generic). 721... Substances § 721.10551 Bisphenol S mono ether (generic). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as bisphenol S mono ether (PMN...

  7. 40 CFR 721.10551 - Bisphenol S mono ether (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Bisphenol S mono ether (generic). 721... Substances § 721.10551 Bisphenol S mono ether (generic). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as bisphenol S mono ether (PMN...

  8. Liquid alkanes with targeted molecular weights from biomass-derived carbohydrates.

    PubMed

    West, Ryan M; Liu, Zhen Y; Peter, Maximilian; Dumesic, James A

    2008-01-01

    Liquid transportation fuels must burn cleanly and have high energy densities, criteria that are currently fulfilled by petroleum, a non-renewable resource, the combustion of which leads to increasing levels of atmospheric CO(2). An attractive approach for the production of transportation fuels from renewable biomass resources is to convert carbohydrates into alkanes with targeted molecular weights, such as C(8)-C(15) for jet-fuel applications. Targeted n-alkanes can be produced directly from fructose by an integrated process involving first the dehydration of this C(6) sugar to form 5-hydroxymethylfurfural, followed by controlled formation of C-C bonds with acetone to form C(9) and C(15) compounds, and completed by hydrogenation and hydrodeoxygenation reactions to form the corresponding n-alkanes. Analogous reactions are demonstrated starting with 5-methylfurfural or 2-furaldehyde, with the latter leading to C(8) and C(13) n-alkanes. PMID:18702136

  9. Photocatalytic acceptorless alkane dehydrogenation: scope, mechanism, and conquering deactivation with carbon dioxide.

    PubMed

    Chowdhury, Abhishek Dutta; Julis, Jennifer; Grabow, Kathleen; Hannebauer, Bernd; Bentrup, Ursula; Adam, Martin; Franke, Robert; Jackstell, Ralf; Beller, Matthias

    2015-01-01

    Alkane dehydrogenation is of special interest for basic science but also offers interesting opportunities for industry. The existing dehydrogenation methodologies make use of heterogeneous catalysts, which suffer from harsh reaction conditions and a lack of selectivity, whereas homogeneous methodologies rely mostly on unsolicited waste generation from hydrogen acceptors. Conversely, acceptorless photochemical alkane dehydrogenation in the presence of trans-Rh(PMe3 )2 (CO)Cl can be regarded as a more benign and atom efficient alternative. However, this methodology suffers from catalyst deactivation over time. Herein, we provide a detailed investigation of the trans-Rh(PMe3 )2 (CO)Cl-photocatalyzed alkane dehydrogenation using spectroscopic and theoretical investigations. These studies inspired us to utilize CO2 to prevent catalyst deactivation, which leads eventually to improved catalyst turnover numbers in the dehydrogenation of alkanes that include liquid organic hydrogen carriers. PMID:25346450

  10. Draft Genome Sequence of the Versatile Alkane-Degrading Bacterium Aquabacterium sp. Strain NJ1

    PubMed Central

    Shiwa, Yuh; Yoshikawa, Hirofumi; Zylstra, Gerben J.

    2014-01-01

    The draft genome sequence of a soil bacterium, Aquabacterium sp. strain NJ1, capable of utilizing both liquid and solid alkanes, was deciphered. This is the first report of an Aquabacterium genome sequence. PMID:25477416

  11. Alkane oxidation with porphyrins and metal complexes thereof having haloalkyl side chains

    DOEpatents

    Wijesekera, Tilak; Lyons, James E.; Ellis, Jr., Paul E.; Bhinde, Manoj V.

    1998-01-01

    Transition metal complexes of meso-haloalkylporphyrins, wherein the haloalkyl groups contain 2 to 8 carbon atoms have been found to be highly effective catalysts for oxidation of alkanes and for the decomposition of hydroperoxides.

  12. Alkane oxidation with porphyrins and metal complexes thereof having haloalkyl side chains

    DOEpatents

    Wijesekera, T.; Lyons, J.E.; Ellis, P.E. Jr.; Bhinde, M.V.

    1998-06-23

    Transition metal complexes of meso-haloalkylporphyrins are disclosed, wherein the haloalkyl groups contain 2 to 8 carbon atoms have been found to be highly effective catalysts for oxidation of alkanes and for the decomposition of hydroperoxides. 7 figs.

  13. Modeling the Role of Alkanes, Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons, and Their Oligomers in Secondary Organic Aerosol Formation

    EPA Science Inventory

    A computationally efficient method to treat secondary organic aerosol (SOA) from various length and structure alkanes as well as SOA from polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) is implemented in the Community Multiscale Air Quality (CMAQ) model to predict aerosol concentrations ...

  14. Conformational problem of alkanes in liquid crystals by NMR spectroscopy: a mini-review.

    PubMed

    Weber, Adrian C J; Chen, Daniel H J

    2014-10-01

    Recent discoveries of the role of alkane flexibility in determining liquid-crystal behaviour are surveyed. With the impetus for understanding the alkane conformational problem established, recent model dependent (1)H NMR work on the topic will be reviewed where progress is made but the need to circumvent models eventually becomes evident. A closer look at the rigid basic units of alkanes will provide the way forward where it is shown that the orientational ordering and anisotropic potentials of these molecules dissolved in liquid crystals scale with each other. Once this relationship is established, a series of works using anisotropic and isotropic (1)H NMR spectroscopy to study alkane conformational statistics will be covered, wherein the influence of the gas, isotropic condensed and anisotropic condensed phases will be described. PMID:25142124

  15. Synthesis and characterizations of electrospun sulfonated poly (ether ether ketone) SPEEK nanofiber membrane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hasbullah, N.; Sekak, K. A.; Ibrahim, I.

    2016-07-01

    A novel electrospun polymer electrolyte membrane (PEM) based on Sulfonated Poly (ether ether ketone) were prepared and characterized. The poly (ether ether ketone) PEEK was sulfonated using concentrated sulfuric acid at room temperature for 60 hours reaction time. The degree sulfonation (DS) of the SPEEK are 58% was determined by H1 NMR using area under the peak of the hydrogen shielding at aromatic ring of the SPEEK. Then, the functional group of the SPEEK was determined using Fourier transfer infrared (FTIR) showed O-H vibration at 3433 cm-1 of the sulfonated group (SO2-OH). The effect of the solvent and polymer concentration toward the electrospinning process was investigated which, the DMAc has electrospun ability compared to the DMSO. While, at 20 wt.% of the polymer concentration able to form a fine and uniform nanofiber, this was confirmed by FESEM that shown electrospun fiber mat SPEEK surface at nano scale diameter.

  16. Regulation of the Alkane Hydroxylase CYP153 Gene in a Gram-Positive Alkane-Degrading Bacterium, Dietzia sp. Strain DQ12-45-1b

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Jie-Liang; JiangYang, Jing-Hong

    2015-01-01

    CYP153, one of the most common medium-chain n-alkane hydroxylases belonging to the cytochrome P450 superfamily, is widely expressed in n-alkane-degrading bacteria. CYP153 is also thought to cooperate with AlkB in degrading various n-alkanes. However, the mechanisms regulating the expression of the protein remain largely unknown. In this paper, we studied CYP153 gene transcription regulation by the potential AraC family regulator (CypR) located upstream of the CYP153 gene cluster in a broad-spectrum n-alkane-degrading Gram-positive bacterium, Dietzia sp. strain DQ12-45-1b. We first identified the transcriptional start site and the promoter of the CYP153 gene cluster. Sequence alignment of upstream regions of CYP153 gene clusters revealed high conservation in the −10 and −35 regions in Actinobacteria. Further analysis of the β-galactosidase activity in the CYP153 gene promoter-lacZ fusion cell indicated that the CYP153 gene promoter was induced by n-alkanes comprised of 8 to 14 carbon atoms, but not by derived decanol and decanic acid. Moreover, we constructed a cypR mutant strain and found that the CYP153 gene promoter activities and CYP153 gene transcriptional levels in the mutant strain were depressed compared with those in the wild-type strain in the presence of n-alkanes, suggesting that CypR served as an activator for the CYP153 gene promoter. By comparing CYP153 gene arrangements in Actinobacteria and Proteobacteria, we found that the AraC family regulator is ubiquitously located upstream of the CYP153 gene, suggesting its universal regulatory role in CYP153 gene transcription. We further hypothesize that the observed mode of CYP153 gene regulation is shared by many Actinobacteria. PMID:26567302

  17. New ways to synthesize lead sulfide nanosheets-substituted alkanes direct the growth of 2D nanostructures.

    PubMed

    Bielewicz, Thomas; Klein, Eugen; Klinke, Christian

    2016-09-01

    Two-dimensional colloidal nanosheets represent very attractive optoelectronic materials. They combine good lateral conductivity with solution-processability and geometry-tunable electronic properties. In the case of PbS nanosheets, so far synthesis has been driven by the addition of chloroalkanes as coligands. Here, we demonstrate how to synthesize two-dimensional lead sulfide nanostructures using other halogen alkanes and primary amines. Further, we show that at a reaction temperature of 170 °C a coligand is not even necessary and the only ligand, oleic acid, controls the anisotropic growth of the two-dimensional structures. Also, using thiourea as a sulfide source, nanosheets with lateral dimensions of over 10 μm are possible.

  18. New ways to synthesize lead sulfide nanosheets—substituted alkanes direct the growth of 2D nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bielewicz, Thomas; Klein, Eugen; Klinke, Christian

    2016-09-01

    Two-dimensional colloidal nanosheets represent very attractive optoelectronic materials. They combine good lateral conductivity with solution-processability and geometry-tunable electronic properties. In the case of PbS nanosheets, so far synthesis has been driven by the addition of chloroalkanes as coligands. Here, we demonstrate how to synthesize two-dimensional lead sulfide nanostructures using other halogen alkanes and primary amines. Further, we show that at a reaction temperature of 170 °C a coligand is not even necessary and the only ligand, oleic acid, controls the anisotropic growth of the two-dimensional structures. Also, using thiourea as a sulfide source, nanosheets with lateral dimensions of over 10 μm are possible.

  19. Selective homogeneous and heterogeneous catalytic conversion of methanol/dimethyl ether to triptane.

    PubMed

    Hazari, Nilay; Iglesia, Enrique; Labinger, Jay A; Simonetti, Dante A

    2012-04-17

    The demand for specific fuels and chemical feed-stocks fluctuates, and as a result, logistical mismatches can occur in the supply of their precursor raw materials such as coal, biomass, crude oil, and methane. To overcome these challenges, industry requires a versatile and robust suite of conversion technologies, many of which are mediated by synthesis gas (CO + H(2)) or methanol/dimethyl ether (DME) intermediates. One such transformation, the conversion of methanol/DME to triptane (2,2,3-trimethylbutane) has spurred particular research interest. Practically, triptane is a high-octane, high-value fuel component, but this transformation also raises fundamental questions: how can such a complex molecule be generated from such a simple precursor with high selectivity? In this Account, we present studies of this reaction carried out in two modes: homogeneously with soluble metal halide catalysts and heterogeneously over solid microporous acid catalysts. Despite their very different compositions, reaction conditions, provenance, and historical scientific context, both processes lead to remarkably similar products and mechanistic interpretations. In both cases, hydrocarbon chains grow by successive methylation in a carbocation-based mechanism. The relative rates of competitive processes-chain growth by methylation, chain termination by hydrogen transfer, isomerization, and cracking-systematically depend upon the structure of the various hydrocarbons produced, strongly favoring the formation of the maximally branched C(7) alkane, triptane. The two catalysts also show parallels in their dependence on acid strength. Stronger acids exhibit higher methanol/DME conversion but also tend to favor chain termination, isomerization, and cracking relative to chain growth, decreasing the preference for triptane. Hence, in both modes, there will be an optimal range: if the acid strength is too low, activity will be poor, but if it is too high, selectivity will be poor. A related

  20. Dimensionally Stable Ether-Containing Polyimide Copolymers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fay, Catharine C. (Inventor); St.Clair, Anne K. (Inventor)

    1999-01-01

    Novel polyimide copolymers containing ether linkages were prepared by the reaction of an equimolar amount of dianhydride and a combination of diamines. The polyimide copolymers described herein possess the unique features of low moisture uptake, dimensional stability, good mechanical properties, and moderate glass transition temperatures. These materials have potential application as encapsulants and interlayer dielectrics.

  1. Elastic electron scattering by ethyl vinyl ether

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khakoo, M. A.; Hong, L.; Kim, B.; Winstead, C.; McKoy, V.

    2010-02-01

    We report measured and calculated results for elastic scattering of low-energy electrons by ethyl vinyl ether (ethoxyethene), a prototype system for studying indirect dissociative attachment processes that may play a role in DNA damage. The integral cross section displays the expected π* shape resonance. The agreement between the calculated and measured cross sections is generally good.

  2. POLYBROMINATED DIPHENYL ETHERS IN SOUTHERN MISSISSIPPI CATFISH

    EPA Science Inventory

    Polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) are used as flame retardants in a wide variety of consumer products. Concerns surrounding these compounds are primarily due do their ubiquitous presence in the environment as well as in human tissue, such as milk, coupled with evidence indi...

  3. Methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE)

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Methyl tert - butyl ether ( MTBE ) ; CASRN 1634 - 04 - 4 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments f

  4. Bis(2-chloro-1-methylethyl) ether

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Bis ( 2 - chloro - 1 - methylethyl ) ether ; CASRN 108 - 60 - 1 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assess

  5. Ethylene glycol monobutyl ether (EGBE) (2-Butoxyethanol)

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Ethylene glycol monobutyl ether ( EGBE ) ( 2 - Butoxyethanol ) ; CASRN 111 - 76 - 2 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I (

  6. Orphan enzymes in ether lipid metabolism.

    PubMed

    Watschinger, Katrin; Werner, Ernst R

    2013-01-01

    Ether lipids are an emerging class of lipids which have so far not been investigated and understood in every detail. They have important roles as membrane components of e.g. lens, brain and testis, and as mediators such as platelet-activating factor. The metabolic enzymes for biosynthesis and degradation have been investigated to some extent. As most involved enzymes are integral membrane proteins they are tricky to handle in biochemical protocols. The sequence of some ether lipid metabolising enzymes has only recently been reported and other sequences still remain obscure. Defined enzymes without assigned sequence are known as orphan enzymes. One of these enzymes with uncharacterised sequence is plasmanylethanolamine desaturase, a key enzyme for the biosynthesis of one of the most abundant phospholipids in our body, the plasmalogens. This review aims to briefly summarise known functions of ether lipids, give an overview on their metabolism including the most prominent members, platelet-activating factor and the plasmalogens. A special focus is set on the description of orphan enzymes in ether lipid metabolism and on the successful strategies how four previous orphans have recently been assigned a sequence. Only one of these four was characterised by classical protein purification and sequencing, whereas the other three required alternative strategies such as bioinformatic candidate gene selection and recombinant expression or development of an inhibitor and multidimensional metabolic profiling.

  7. Imide/arylene ether block copolymers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jensen, B. J.; Hergenrother, P. M.; Bass, R. G.

    1991-01-01

    Two series of imide/arylene either block copolymers were prepared using an arylene ether block and either an amorphous or semi-crystalline imide block. The resulting copolymers were characterized and selected physical and mechanical properties were determined. These results, as well as comparisons to the homopolymer properties, are discussed.

  8. "Crown Ether" Synthesis: An Organic Laboratory Experiment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Field, Kurt W.; And Others

    1979-01-01

    This experiment is designed to acquaint the student with a macromolecular synthesis of a crown ether type compound. The starting materials are readily available and the product, a cyclic polyether, belongs to a class of compounds that has aroused the interest of chemist and biologist alike. (Author/BB)

  9. POLYBROMINATED DIPHENYL ETHERS IN US SOILS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Chemical analysis of thirty-three soil samples from 15 US states reveals Polybrominated Diphenyl Ethers (PBDEs), in every sample.PBDE concentrations rangefrom 0.09 to 1200 parts per billion by mass. These data are the first analysis of soil concentrations of PBDEs in soils from a...

  10. The Number of High-Energy Bands in the Photoelectron Spectrum of Alkanes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merris, Russell; Gutman, Ivan

    2000-12-01

    It was observed that within the Bieri-Dill-Heilbronner-Schmelzer model for the calculation of the ion-ization energies of alkanes CnH2n+2, there are exactly n C2s -electron energy levels lying below the degenerate α-ß manifold. We now show that, indeed, this regularity is obeyed by practically all alkane species. Exceptions do exist, but they must possess a (chemically infeasible) group of more than six mutually connected quaternary carbon atoms.

  11. Measuring long chain alkanes in diesel engine exhaust by thermal desorption PTR-MS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erickson, M. H.; Gueneron, M.; Jobson, B. T.

    2014-01-01

    A method using thermal desorption sampling and analysis by proton transfer reaction mass spectrometry (PTR-MS) to measure long chain alkanes (C12-C18) and other larger organics associated with diesel engine exhaust emissions is described. Long chain alkanes undergo dissociative proton transfer reactions forming a series of fragment ions with formula CnH2n+1. The PTR-MS is insensitive to n-alkanes less than C8 but displays an increasing sensitivity for larger alkanes. Fragment ion distribution and sensitivity is a function of drift conditions. At 80 Td the most abundant ion fragments from C10 to C16 n-alkanes were m/z 57, 71 and 85. The mass spectrum of gasoline and diesel fuel at 80 Td displayed ion group patterns that can be related to known fuel constituents, such as alkanes, alkylbenzenes and cycloalkanes, and other compound groups that are inferred from molecular weight distributions such as dihydronapthalenes and naphthenic monoaromatics. It is shown that thermal desorption sampling of gasoline and diesel engine exhausts at 80 Td allows for discrimination against volatile organic compounds, allowing for quantification of long chain alkanes from the abundance of CnH2n+1 fragment ions. The total abundance of long chain alkanes in diesel engine exhaust was measured to be similar to the total abundance of C1-C4 alkylbenzene compounds. The abundance patterns of compounds determined by thermal desorption sampling may allow for emission profiles to be developed to better quantify the relative contributions of diesel and gasoline exhaust emissions on organic compounds concentrations in urban air.

  12. Determination of the thermal stability of perfluoropolyalkyl ethers by tensimetry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Helmick, Larry A.; Jones, William R., Jr.

    1992-01-01

    The thermal decomposition temperatures of several perfluoropolyalkyl ether fluids were determined with a computerized tensimeter. In general, the decomposition temperatures of the commercial fluids were all similar and significantly higher than those for noncommercial fluids. Correlation of the decomposition temperatures with the molecular structures of the primary components of the commercial fluids revealed that the stability of the fluids was not affected by carbon chain length, branching, or adjacent difluoroformal groups. Instead, stability was limited by the presence of small quantities of thermally unstable material and/or chlorine-containing material arising from the use of chlorine containing solvents during synthesis. Finally, correlation of decomposition temperatures with molecular weights for two fluids supports a chain cleavage reaction mechanism for one and an unzipping reaction mechanism for the other.

  13. Two distinct monooxygenases for alkane oxidation in Nocardioides sp. strain CF8.

    PubMed

    Hamamura, N; Yeager, C M; Arp, D J

    2001-11-01

    Alkane monooxygenases in Nocardioides sp. strain CF8 were examined at the physiological and genetic levels. Strain CF8 can utilize alkanes ranging in chain length from C(2) to C(16). Butane degradation by butane-grown cells was strongly inhibited by allylthiourea, a copper-selective chelator, while hexane-, octane-, and decane-grown cells showed detectable butane degradation activity in the presence of allylthiourea. Growth on butane and hexane was strongly inhibited by 1-hexyne, while 1-hexyne did not affect growth on octane or decane. A specific 30-kDa acetylene-binding polypeptide was observed for butane-, hexane-, octane-, and decane-grown cells but was absent from cells grown with octane or decane in the presence of 1-hexyne. These results suggest the presence of two monooxygenases in strain CF8. Degenerate primers designed for PCR amplification of genes related to the binuclear-iron-containing alkane hydroxylase from Pseudomonas oleovorans were used to clone a related gene from strain CF8. Reverse transcription-PCR and Northern blot analysis showed that this gene encoding a binuclear-iron-containing alkane hydroxylase was expressed in cells grown on alkanes above C(6). These results indicate the presence of two distinct monooxygenases for alkane oxidation in Nocardioides sp. strain CF8. PMID:11679317

  14. Marine hydrocarbonoclastic bacteria as whole-cell biosensors for n-alkanes.

    PubMed

    Sevilla, Emma; Yuste, Luis; Rojo, Fernando

    2015-07-01

    Whole-cell biosensors offer potentially useful, cost-effective systems for the in-situ monitoring of seawater for hydrocarbons derived from accidental spills. The present work compares the performance of a biosensor system for the detection of alkanes in seawater, hosted in either Escherichia coli (commonly employed in whole-cell biosensors but not optimized for alkane assimilation) or different marine bacteria specialized in assimilating alkanes. The sensor system was based on the Pseudomonas putida AlkS regulatory protein and the PalkB promoter fused to a gene encoding the green fluorescent protein. While the E. coli sensor provided the fastest response to pure alkanes (25-fold induction after 2 h under the conditions used), a sensor based on Alcanivorax borkumensis was slower, requiring 3-4 h to reach similar induction values. However, the A. borkumensis sensor showed a fourfold lower detection threshold for octane (0.5 μM), and was also better at sensing the alkanes present in petrol. At petrol concentrations of 0.0125%, the A. borkumensis sensor rendered a sevenfold induction, while E. coli sensor showed no response. We discuss possible explanations to this behaviour in terms of the cellular adaptations to alkane uptake and the basal fluorescence produced by each bacterial strain, which was lowest for A. borkumensis. PMID:25874658

  15. Alkanes in flower surface waxes of Momordica cochinchinensis influence attraction to Aulacophora foveicollis Lucas (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae).

    PubMed

    Mukherjee, A; Sarkar, N; Barik, A

    2013-08-01

    Extraction, thin-layer chromatography, and gas chromatography-mass spectrophotometry analyses revealed 15 alkanes representing 97.14% of the total alkanes in the surface waxes of Momordica cochinchinensis Spreng flowers. Nonacosane was the prevailing alkane followed by hexatriacontane, nonadecane, heptacosane, and hentriacontane, accounting for 39.08%, 24.24%, 13.52%, 6.32%, and 5.12%, respectively. The alkanes from flower surface waxes followed by a synthetic mixture of alkanes mimicking alkanes of flower surface waxes elicited attraction of the female insect, Aulacophora foveicollis Lucas (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae) between 2 and 10-μg/mL concentrations in a Y-shaped glass tube olfactometer bioassay under laboratory conditions. Synthetic nonadecane from 178.28-891.37 ng, heptacosane from 118.14-590.72 ng, and nonacosane at 784.73 ng showed attraction of the insect. A synthetic mixture of 534.82 ng nonadecane, 354.43 ng heptacosane, and 2,354.18 ng nonacosane elicited highest attraction of A. foveicollis. PMID:23949856

  16. Alkanes in flower surface waxes of Momordica cochinchinensis influence attraction to Aulacophora foveicollis Lucas (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae).

    PubMed

    Mukherjee, A; Sarkar, N; Barik, A

    2013-08-01

    Extraction, thin-layer chromatography, and gas chromatography-mass spectrophotometry analyses revealed 15 alkanes representing 97.14% of the total alkanes in the surface waxes of Momordica cochinchinensis Spreng flowers. Nonacosane was the prevailing alkane followed by hexatriacontane, nonadecane, heptacosane, and hentriacontane, accounting for 39.08%, 24.24%, 13.52%, 6.32%, and 5.12%, respectively. The alkanes from flower surface waxes followed by a synthetic mixture of alkanes mimicking alkanes of flower surface waxes elicited attraction of the female insect, Aulacophora foveicollis Lucas (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae) between 2 and 10-μg/mL concentrations in a Y-shaped glass tube olfactometer bioassay under laboratory conditions. Synthetic nonadecane from 178.28-891.37 ng, heptacosane from 118.14-590.72 ng, and nonacosane at 784.73 ng showed attraction of the insect. A synthetic mixture of 534.82 ng nonadecane, 354.43 ng heptacosane, and 2,354.18 ng nonacosane elicited highest attraction of A. foveicollis.

  17. Marine hydrocarbonoclastic bacteria as whole-cell biosensors for n-alkanes

    PubMed Central

    Sevilla, Emma; Yuste, Luis; Rojo, Fernando

    2015-01-01

    Whole-cell biosensors offer potentially useful, cost-effective systems for the in-situ monitoring of seawater for hydrocarbons derived from accidental spills. The present work compares the performance of a biosensor system for the detection of alkanes in seawater, hosted in either Escherichia coli (commonly employed in whole-cell biosensors but not optimized for alkane assimilation) or different marine bacteria specialized in assimilating alkanes. The sensor system was based on the Pseudomonas putida AlkS regulatory protein and the PalkB promoter fused to a gene encoding the green fluorescent protein. While the E. coli sensor provided the fastest response to pure alkanes (25-fold induction after 2 h under the conditions used), a sensor based on Alcanivorax borkumensis was slower, requiring 3–4 h to reach similar induction values. However, the A. borkumensis sensor showed a fourfold lower detection threshold for octane (0.5 μM), and was also better at sensing the alkanes present in petrol. At petrol concentrations of 0.0125%, the A. borkumensis sensor rendered a sevenfold induction, while E. coli sensor showed no response. We discuss possible explanations to this behaviour in terms of the cellular adaptations to alkane uptake and the basal fluorescence produced by each bacterial strain, which was lowest for A. borkumensis. PMID:25874658

  18. Marine hydrocarbonoclastic bacteria as whole-cell biosensors for n-alkanes.

    PubMed

    Sevilla, Emma; Yuste, Luis; Rojo, Fernando

    2015-07-01

    Whole-cell biosensors offer potentially useful, cost-effective systems for the in-situ monitoring of seawater for hydrocarbons derived from accidental spills. The present work compares the performance of a biosensor system for the detection of alkanes in seawater, hosted in either Escherichia coli (commonly employed in whole-cell biosensors but not optimized for alkane assimilation) or different marine bacteria specialized in assimilating alkanes. The sensor system was based on the Pseudomonas putida AlkS regulatory protein and the PalkB promoter fused to a gene encoding the green fluorescent protein. While the E. coli sensor provided the fastest response to pure alkanes (25-fold induction after 2 h under the conditions used), a sensor based on Alcanivorax borkumensis was slower, requiring 3-4 h to reach similar induction values. However, the A. borkumensis sensor showed a fourfold lower detection threshold for octane (0.5 μM), and was also better at sensing the alkanes present in petrol. At petrol concentrations of 0.0125%, the A. borkumensis sensor rendered a sevenfold induction, while E. coli sensor showed no response. We discuss possible explanations to this behaviour in terms of the cellular adaptations to alkane uptake and the basal fluorescence produced by each bacterial strain, which was lowest for A. borkumensis.

  19. Characterization of phospholipid+semifluorinated alkane vesicle system.

    PubMed

    Sabín, Juan; Ruso, Juan M; González-Pérez, Alfredo; Prieto, Gerardo; Sarmiento, Félix

    2006-01-15

    The aim of this study is to characterize vesicles obtained by the incorporation of the semifluorinated alkane, (perfluoro-n-hexyl)ethane (diblock F6H2) to a standard lipid, egg yolk phosphatidylcholine (PC). Large unilamellar vesicles (LUVs), prepared by extrusion, were characterized by fluorescence spectroscopy, zeta potential (zeta-potential) and light scattering. By using the fluorescence spectroscopy technique, the anisotropy of l,6-diphenyl-l,3,5-hexatriene (DPH) probe at different temperatures was determined. It was demonstrated that F6H2 is placed inside of the lipid bilayer and that the hydrocarbon acyl chain in the bilayers has higher viscosity in the presence of fluoroalkane. The zeta-potential of the PC-F6H2 system is negative and increases (in absolute value) from -10 to -19 mV when the temperature rises from 10 to 25 degrees C, this last value keeping practically constant with a further increase of temperature. The adsorption of K+ ions on the liposome surface was measured by zeta-potential. This adsorption originates a sudden increase of the initial zeta-potential followed by a slight decrease with K+ concentration. The application of the DLVO theory of colloidal stability showed a growing dependence of the DLVO potential with K+ concentration and consequently a increasing stability.

  20. Alkane functionalization at ([mu]-Oxo)diiron(III) centers

    SciTech Connect

    Leising, R.A.; Kim, J.; Perez, M.A.; Que, L. Jr. )

    1993-10-20

    The reactivity of ([mu]-oxo)diferric complexes with [sup t]BuOOH (TBHP) for the functionalization of alkanes in CH[sub 3]CN has been investigated as part of our efforts to model dinuclear sites in nonheme iron enzymes. [Fe[sub 2](TPA)[sub 2]O(OAc)](CIO[sub 4])[sub 3] (1) (TPA = tris(2-pyridylmethyl)amine, OAc = acetate) is an efficient catalyst for cyclohexane oxidation, affording cyclohexanol (A, 9 equiv), cyclohexanone (K, 11 equiv), and (tert-butylperoxy)cyclohexane (P, 16 equiv) in 0.25 h at ambient temperature and pressure under an argon atmosphere. The catalyst is remarkably robust, as indicated by the [sup 1]H NMR and UV-vis spectra of the reaction mixture during the catalytic reaction and by its ability to maintain its turnover efficiency with subsequent additions of oxidant. The catalytic mechanism for TBHP utilization was explored by observing the effects of varying the tripodal ligands on the ([mu]-oxo)([mu]-carboxylato)diferric catalysts and varying the bridge on Fe[sub 2]O(TPA)[sub 2] catalysts. The (A + K)/P ratio increased as the ligands became more electron donating. Solvent also played an important role in determining the partitioning of products between A + K and P, with benzonitrile favoring hydroxylated products at the expense of P and pyridine having the opposite effect. 49 refs., 2 figs., 3 tabs.

  1. Certain glycol ethers eliminated from toxic chemical release reporting requirements

    SciTech Connect

    1994-09-01

    Effective June 28, 1994, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) eliminated high molecular weight glycol ethers from the reporting requirements of section 313 of the Emergency Planning and Community Right-To-Know Act of 1986 (EPCRA). EPCRA (42 U.S.C. 11023) is also referred to as Title III of the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (SARA) of 1986. EPA redefined the glycol ethers category list of chemicals subject to reporting based on an EPA review of available human health data on short-chain glycol ethers. EPA is removing only the surfactant glycol ethers, which are high molecular weight glycol ethers, i.e., those with pendant alkyl groups and that typically have eight or more carbon atoms. The redefinition retains certain glycol ethers (i.e., ethylene glycol ethers where there are 1,2, or 3 repeating ethylene oxide groups) in the category. These are reasonably anticipated to cause adverse human health effects.

  2. Debromination of polybrominated diphenyl ethers by nanoscale zerovalent iron: pathways, kinetics, and reactivity.

    PubMed

    Zhuang, Yuan; Ahn, Sungwoo; Luthy, Richard G

    2010-11-01

    The debromination of selected polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) by nanoscale zerovalent iron particles (nZVI) was studied to investigate the degradation pathways and the reaction kinetics of the PBDEs. The primary PBDE investigated was 2,3,4-tribromodiphenyl ether (BDE 21) to assess degradation pathways. nZVI could effectively debrominate the selected PBDEs into lower brominated compounds and diphenyl ether, a completely debrominated form of PBDEs. The susceptibility of the meta-bromine by nZVI was observed from the debromination tests for PBDEs with single-flanked (2,3-diBDE and 3,4-diBDE) and unflanked (three mono-BDEs) bromines. The stepwise debromination from n-bromo- to (n-1)-bromodiphenyl ether was observed as the dominant reaction process, although simultaneous multistep debromination seemed to be plausible for di-BDEs having two bromines adjacent on the same phenyl ring. The reaction rate constants were estimated by assuming the reaction between PBDEs and nZVI was a pseudo-first-order reaction and the rates decreased with fewer bromine substituents. The reaction rate constants were correlated with the heat of formation and the energy of the lowest unoccupied molecular orbital of the corresponding compounds, and these appear to be useful descriptors of relative reaction rates among PBDE homologue groups. PMID:20923154

  3. Predicting autoxidation stability of ether- and amide-based electrolyte solvents for Li-air batteries.

    PubMed

    Bryantsev, Vyacheslav S; Faglioni, Francesco

    2012-07-01

    Finding suitable solvents remains one of the most elusive challenges in rechargeable, nonaqueous Li-air battery technology. Although ether and amides are identified as stable classes of aprotic solvents against nucleophilic attack by superoxide, many of them are prone to autoxidation under oxygen atmosphere. In this work, we use density functional theory calculations coupled with an implicit solvent model to investigate the autoxidative stability of ether- and N,N-dialkylamide-based solvents. The change in the activation free energy for the C-H bond cleavage by O(2) is consistent with the extent of peroxide production for each class of solvent. Conversely, the thermodynamic stability alone is not sufficient to account for the observed variation in solvent reactivity toward O(2). A detailed understanding of the factors influencing the autoxidative stability provides several strategies for designing molecules with enhanced air/O(2) stability, comparable or superior to that of structurally related hydrocarbons. The mechanism of superoxide-mediated oxidation of hydroperoxides derived from ethers and amides is presented. The degradation mechanism accounts for the primary decomposition products (esters and carboxylates) observed in the Li-air battery with ether-based electrolytes. The identification of solvents having resistance to autoxidation is critical for the development of rechargeable Li-air batteries with long cycle life. PMID:22681046

  4. Predicting autoxidation stability of ether- and amide-based electrolyte solvents for Li-air batteries.

    PubMed

    Bryantsev, Vyacheslav S; Faglioni, Francesco

    2012-07-01

    Finding suitable solvents remains one of the most elusive challenges in rechargeable, nonaqueous Li-air battery technology. Although ether and amides are identified as stable classes of aprotic solvents against nucleophilic attack by superoxide, many of them are prone to autoxidation under oxygen atmosphere. In this work, we use density functional theory calculations coupled with an implicit solvent model to investigate the autoxidative stability of ether- and N,N-dialkylamide-based solvents. The change in the activation free energy for the C-H bond cleavage by O(2) is consistent with the extent of peroxide production for each class of solvent. Conversely, the thermodynamic stability alone is not sufficient to account for the observed variation in solvent reactivity toward O(2). A detailed understanding of the factors influencing the autoxidative stability provides several strategies for designing molecules with enhanced air/O(2) stability, comparable or superior to that of structurally related hydrocarbons. The mechanism of superoxide-mediated oxidation of hydroperoxides derived from ethers and amides is presented. The degradation mechanism accounts for the primary decomposition products (esters and carboxylates) observed in the Li-air battery with ether-based electrolytes. The identification of solvents having resistance to autoxidation is critical for the development of rechargeable Li-air batteries with long cycle life.

  5. [Sources, Migration and Conversion of Dissolved Alkanes, Dissolved Fatty Acids in a Karst Underground River Water, in Chongqing Area].

    PubMed

    Liang, Zuo-bing; Sun, Yu-chuan; Wang, Zun-bo; Shi, Yang; Jiang, Ze-li; Zhang, Mei; Xie, Zheng-Lan; Liao, Yu

    2015-09-01

    Dissolved alkanes and dissolved fatty acids were collected from Qingmuguan underground river in July, October 2013. By gas chromatography-mass spectrometer (GC-MS), alkanes and fatty acids were quantitatively analyzed. The results showed that average contents of alkanes and fatty acids were 1 354 ng.L-1, 24203 ng.L-1 in July, and 667 ng.L-1, 2526 ng.L-1 in October respectively. With the increasing migration distance of dissolved alkanes and dissolved fatty acids in underground river, their contents decreased. Based on the molecular characteristic indices of alkanes, like CPI, OEP, Paq and R, dissolved alkanes were mainly originated from microorganisms in July, and aquatic plants in October. Saturated straight-chain fatty acid had the highest contents in all samples with the dominant peak in C16:0, combined with the characteristics of carbon peak, algae or bacteria might be the dominant source of dissolved fatty acids. PMID:26717680

  6. Berberine cation: A fluorescent chemosensor for alkanes and other low-polarity compounds. An explanation of this phenomenon

    PubMed

    Cossio; Arrieta; Cebolla; Membrado; Vela; Garriga; Domingo

    2000-07-27

    Alkanes in the presence of berberine sulfate provide an enhancement of fluorescent signal, which depends on alkane concentration and structure, when the system is irradiated with monochromatic UV light. Computational analysis suggests that an ion-induced dipole between alkanes and berberine sulfate is responsible for this phenomenon. This interaction can properly model the experimentally obtained fluorescent response. The proposed explanation allows other interacting systems to be designed, which have been experimentally confirmed. PMID:10930271

  7. Berberine cation: A fluorescent chemosensor for alkanes and other low-polarity compounds. An explanation of this phenomenon

    PubMed

    Cossio; Arrieta; Cebolla; Membrado; Vela; Garriga; Domingo

    2000-07-27

    Alkanes in the presence of berberine sulfate provide an enhancement of fluorescent signal, which depends on alkane concentration and structure, when the system is irradiated with monochromatic UV light. Computational analysis suggests that an ion-induced dipole between alkanes and berberine sulfate is responsible for this phenomenon. This interaction can properly model the experimentally obtained fluorescent response. The proposed explanation allows other interacting systems to be designed, which have been experimentally confirmed.

  8. The anaerobic degradation of gaseous, nonmethane alkanes — From in situ processes to microorganisms

    PubMed Central

    Musat, Florin

    2015-01-01

    The short chain, gaseous alkanes ethane, propane, n- and iso-butane are released in significant amounts into the atmosphere, where they contribute to tropospheric chemistry and ozone formation. Biodegradation of gaseous alkanes by aerobic microorganisms, mostly bacteria and fungi isolated from terrestrial environments, has been known for several decades. The first indications for short chain alkane anaerobic degradation were provided by geochemical studies of deep-sea environments around hydrocarbon seeps, and included the uncoupling of the sulfate-reduction and anaerobic oxidation of methane rates, the consumption of gaseous alkanes in anoxic sediments, or the enrichment in 13C of gases in interstitial water vs. the source gas. Microorganisms able to degrade gaseous alkanes were recently obtained from deep-sea and terrestrial sediments around hydrocarbon seeps. Up to date, only sulfate-reducing pure or enriched cultures with ethane, propane and n-butane have been reported. The only pure culture presently available, strain BuS5, is affiliated to the Desulfosarcina–Desulfococcus cluster of the Deltaproteobacteria. Other phylotypes involved in gaseous alkane degradation have been identified based on stable-isotope labeling and whole-cell hybridization. Under anoxic conditions, propane and n-butane are activated similar to the higher alkanes, by homolytic cleavage of the C—H bond of a subterminal carbon atom, and addition of the ensuing radical to fumarate, yielding methylalkylsuccinates. An additional mechanism of activation at the terminal carbon atoms was demonstrated for propane, which could in principle be employed also for the activation of ethane. PMID:25904994

  9. The anaerobic degradation of gaseous, nonmethane alkanes - From in situ processes to microorganisms.

    PubMed

    Musat, Florin

    2015-01-01

    The short chain, gaseous alkanes ethane, propane, n- and iso-butane are released in significant amounts into the atmosphere, where they contribute to tropospheric chemistry and ozone formation. Biodegradation of gaseous alkanes by aerobic microorganisms, mostly bacteria and fungi isolated from terrestrial environments, has been known for several decades. The first indications for short chain alkane anaerobic degradation were provided by geochemical studies of deep-sea environments around hydrocarbon seeps, and included the uncoupling of the sulfate-reduction and anaerobic oxidation of methane rates, the consumption of gaseous alkanes in anoxic sediments, or the enrichment in (13)C of gases in interstitial water vs. the source gas. Microorganisms able to degrade gaseous alkanes were recently obtained from deep-sea and terrestrial sediments around hydrocarbon seeps. Up to date, only sulfate-reducing pure or enriched cultures with ethane, propane and n-butane have been reported. The only pure culture presently available, strain BuS5, is affiliated to the Desulfosarcina-Desulfococcus cluster of the Deltaproteobacteria. Other phylotypes involved in gaseous alkane degradation have been identified based on stable-isotope labeling and whole-cell hybridization. Under anoxic conditions, propane and n-butane are activated similar to the higher alkanes, by homolytic cleavage of the C-H bond of a subterminal carbon atom, and addition of the ensuing radical to fumarate, yielding methylalkylsuccinates. An additional mechanism of activation at the terminal carbon atoms was demonstrated for propane, which could in principle be employed also for the activation of ethane. PMID:25904994

  10. Cyclic ethers adsorbed on Ru(001)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walczak, M. M.; Thiel, P. A.

    1990-11-01

    The three cyclic ethers 1,3-dioxane. 1,4-dioxane and 1,3,5-trioxane all exhibit multiple desorption states from Ru(001) between 200 and 310 K, in addition to the multilayer and metastable states at lower temperature. Most distinctive are the two low-temperature α-states. which are similar in shape, position, and relative population for all three compounds. This suggests that these states are associated with configurations which are accessible to all three molecules. The data also indicate that there is some molecular decomposition to gaseous CO and H 2. 1,4-Dioxane yields the largest amounts of these decomposition products, suggesting that this molecule is most susceptible to surface-catalyzed decomposition. The desorption data for the three cyclic ethers are grossly similar to each other, and also to the straight-chain diethers which we have previously studied.

  11. Ether bridge formation in loline alkaloid biosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Juan; Bhardwaj, Minakshi; Faulkner, Jerome R.; Nagabhyru, Padmaja; Charlton, Nikki D.; Higashi, Richard M.; Miller, Anne-Frances; Young, Carolyn A.; Grossman, Robert B.; Schardl, Christopher L.

    2014-01-01

    Lolines are potent insecticidal agents produced by endophytic fungi of cool-season grasses. These alkaloids are composed of a pyrrolizidine ring system and an uncommon ether bridge linking carbons 2 and 7. Previous results indicated that 1-aminopyrrolizidine was a pathway intermediate. We used RNA interference to knock down expression of lolO, resulting in the accumulation of a novel alkaloid identified as exo-1-acetamidopyrrolizidine based on high-resolution MS and NMR. Genomes of endophytes differing in alkaloid profiles were sequenced, revealing that those with mutated lolO accumulated exo-1-acetamidopyrrolizidine but no lolines. Heterologous expression of wild-type lolO complemented a lolO mutant, resulting in the production of N-acetylnorloline. These results indicated that the non-heme iron oxygenase, LolO, is required for ether bridge formation, probably through oxidation of exo-1-acetamidopyrrolizidine. PMID:24374065

  12. Synthesis and utility of fluorogenic acetoxymethyl ethers.

    PubMed

    Lavis, Luke D; Chao, Tzu-Yuan; Raines, Ronald T

    2011-01-01

    Phenolic fluorophores such as fluorescein, Tokyo Green, resorufin, and their derivatives are workhorses of biological science. Acylating the phenolic hydroxyl group(s) in these fluorophores masks their fluorescence. The ensuing ester is a substrate for cellular esterases, which can restore fluorescence. These esters are, however, notoriously unstable to hydrolysis, severely compromising their utility. The acetoxymethyl (AM) group is an esterase-sensitive motif that can mask polar functionalities in small molecules. Here, we report on the use of AM ether groups to mask phenolic fluorophores. The resulting profluorophores have a desirable combination of low background fluorescence, high chemical stability, and high enzymatic reactivity, both in vitro and in cellulo. These simple phenyl ether-based profluorophores could supplement or supplant the use of phenyl esters for imaging biochemical and biological systems.

  13. Photochemical properties of some Cl-containing halogenated alkanes.

    PubMed

    Orkin, V L; Khamaganov, V G; Kasimovskaya, E E; Guschin, A G

    2013-07-01

    Rate constants for the gas-phase reactions of OH radicals with three partially halogenated alkanes, CH3Cl (kMC), CHFClCFCl2 (k122a), and CH2FCFCl2 (k132c), were measured using a discharge flow-electron paramagnetic resonance technique over the temperature range from 298 to 460 K. The temperature dependences of the rate constants can be represented by the expressions kMC(298-460 K) = (3.09 ± 0.94) × 10(-12) exp[-(1411 ± 85)/T] cm(3) molecule(-1) s(-1), k122a(298-460 K) = (1.26 ± 0.24) × 10(-12) exp[-(1298 ± 66)/T] cm(3) molecule(-1) s(-1), and k132c(298-370 K) = (8.1 ± 2.2) × 10(-13) exp[-(1247 ± 89)/T] cm(3) molecule(-1) s(-1). The atmospheric lifetimes of CH3Cl, CHFClCFCl2, and CH2FCFCl2 due to their reaction with OH were estimated to be 1.6, 3.5, and 4.5 years, respectively. The UV absorption cross sections of halogenated ethanes, CHFClCFCl2, and CH2FCFCl2, were measured at T = 295 K between 190 and 240 nm, as were those for CHCl2CF2Cl (HCFC-122), CHCl2CF3 (HCFC-123), CHFClCF2Cl (HCFC-123a), and CH3CFCl2 (HCFC-141b). The atmospheric lifetimes due to stratospheric photolysis were also estimated. PMID:23725515

  14. Poly(Arylene Ether Imidazole) Surface Films

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Connell, John W.; Towell, Timothy W.; Tompkins, Stephen S.

    1993-01-01

    Films adhere well to some substrates, provide smooth surfaces, and facilitate release from molds. Thin films of thermoplastic poly(arylene ether imidazole)s (PAEI's) particularly suitable for use as surface modifiers for graphite/epoxy or graphite/bismaleimide composite panels. Molecule of PAEI includes imidazole groups along its backbone that co-cure with epoxies or bismaleimides during processing. Films thermally stable and resistant to bombardment by energetic electrons.

  15. Rhodium-Catalyzed Dehydrogenative Silylation of Acetophenone Derivatives: Formation of Silyl Enol Ethers versus Silyl Ethers.

    PubMed

    Garcés, Karin; Lalrempuia, Ralte; Polo, Víctor; Fernández-Alvarez, Francisco J; García-Orduña, Pilar; Lahoz, Fernando J; Pérez-Torrente, Jesús J; Oro, Luis A

    2016-10-01

    A series of rhodium-NSiN complexes (NSiN=bis (pyridine-2-yloxy)methylsilyl fac-coordinated) is reported, including the solid-state structures of [Rh(H)(Cl)(NSiN)(PCy3 )] (Cy=cyclohexane) and [Rh(H)(CF3 SO3 )(NSiN)(coe)] (coe=cis-cyclooctene). The [Rh(H)(CF3 SO3 )(NSiN)(coe)]-catalyzed reaction of acetophenone with silanes performed in an open system was studied. Interestingly, in most of the cases the formation of the corresponding silyl enol ether as major reaction product was observed. However, when the catalytic reactions were performed in closed systems, formation of the corresponding silyl ether was favored. Moreover, theoretical calculations on the reaction of [Rh(H)(CF3 SO3 )(NSiN)(coe)] with HSiMe3 and acetophenone showed that formation of the silyl enol ether is kinetically favored, while the silyl ether is the thermodynamic product. The dehydrogenative silylation entails heterolytic cleavage of the Si-H bond by a metal-ligand cooperative mechanism as the rate-determining step. Silyl transfer from a coordinated trimethylsilyltriflate molecule to the acetophenone followed by proton transfer from the activated acetophenone to the hydride ligand results in the formation of H2 and the corresponding silyl enol ether.

  16. Rhodium-Catalyzed Dehydrogenative Silylation of Acetophenone Derivatives: Formation of Silyl Enol Ethers versus Silyl Ethers.

    PubMed

    Garcés, Karin; Lalrempuia, Ralte; Polo, Víctor; Fernández-Alvarez, Francisco J; García-Orduña, Pilar; Lahoz, Fernando J; Pérez-Torrente, Jesús J; Oro, Luis A

    2016-10-01

    A series of rhodium-NSiN complexes (NSiN=bis (pyridine-2-yloxy)methylsilyl fac-coordinated) is reported, including the solid-state structures of [Rh(H)(Cl)(NSiN)(PCy3 )] (Cy=cyclohexane) and [Rh(H)(CF3 SO3 )(NSiN)(coe)] (coe=cis-cyclooctene). The [Rh(H)(CF3 SO3 )(NSiN)(coe)]-catalyzed reaction of acetophenone with silanes performed in an open system was studied. Interestingly, in most of the cases the formation of the corresponding silyl enol ether as major reaction product was observed. However, when the catalytic reactions were performed in closed systems, formation of the corresponding silyl ether was favored. Moreover, theoretical calculations on the reaction of [Rh(H)(CF3 SO3 )(NSiN)(coe)] with HSiMe3 and acetophenone showed that formation of the silyl enol ether is kinetically favored, while the silyl ether is the thermodynamic product. The dehydrogenative silylation entails heterolytic cleavage of the Si-H bond by a metal-ligand cooperative mechanism as the rate-determining step. Silyl transfer from a coordinated trimethylsilyltriflate molecule to the acetophenone followed by proton transfer from the activated acetophenone to the hydride ligand results in the formation of H2 and the corresponding silyl enol ether. PMID:27553810

  17. Cyclooctane metathesis catalyzed by silica-supported tungsten pentamethyl [(≡SiO)W(Me)5]: distribution of macrocyclic alkanes.

    PubMed

    Riache, Nassima; Callens, Emmanuel; Samantaray, Manoja K; Kharbatia, Najeh M; Atiqullah, Muhammad; Basset, Jean-Marie

    2014-11-10

    Metathesis of cyclic alkanes catalyzed by the new surface complex [(≡SiO)W(Me)5] affords a wide distribution of cyclic and macrocyclic alkanes. The major products with the formula C(n)H(2n) are the result of either a ring contraction or ring expansion of cyclooctane leading to lower unsubstituted cyclic alkanes (5≤n≤7) and to an unprecedented distribution of unsubstituted macrocyclic alkanes (12≤n≤40), respectively, identified by GC/MS and by NMR spectroscopies.

  18. [Distribution Characteristics and Source Apportionment of n-Alkanes in Water from Yellow River in Henan Section].

    PubMed

    Feng, Jing-lan; Xi, Nan-nan; Zhang, Fei; Liu, Shu-hui; Sun, Jian-hui

    2016-03-15

    To investigate the distributions and possible sources of n-alkanes in water and suspended particulate matter from Yellow River in Henan section, 26 water and suspended particulate matter samples were collected in August 2010 and 22 n-alkanes (C₁₄-C₃₆) were quantitatively determined by gas chromatography-mass spectrometer (GC-MS). Potential sources of n-alkanes were analyzed using different characteristic parameters. The results indicated that total concentrations of 22 n-alkanes were 521-5,843 ng · L⁻¹ with a mean concentration of 1,409 ng · L⁻¹, while the total amounts of n-alkanes in the suspended particulate matter were 463-11,142 ng · L⁻¹ with a mean value of 1,951 ng · L⁻¹. The composition profiles of n-alkanes in water showed unimodal distribution with a peak at C₂₅ in water. However, the composition characteristics of n-alkanes in SPM were of bimodal type, but still with the advantage of high carbon hydrocarbons peak at C₂₅. Results of characteristic parameters including CPI, TAR, OEP and % WaxCn showed that n-alkanes in the studied area were derived mainly from combustion of fossil fuel, while terrestrial higher plant played a role in the existence of n-alkanes in water and suspended particulate matter from Yellow River in Henan section. PMID:27337879

  19. Nikola Tesla, the Ether and his Telautomaton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milar, Kendall

    2014-03-01

    In the nineteenth century physicists' understanding of the ether changed dramatically. New developments in thermodynamics, energy physics, and electricity and magnetism dictated new properties of the ether. These have traditionally been examined from the perspective of the scientists re-conceptualizing the ether. However Nikola Tesla, a prolific inventor and writer, presents a different picture of nineteenth century physics. Alongside the displays that showcased his inventions he presented alternative interpretations of physical, physiological and even psychical research. This is particularly evident in his telautomaton, a radio remote controlled boat. This invention and Tesla's descriptions of it showcase some of his novel interpretations of physical theories. He offered a perspective on nineteenth century physics that focused on practical application instead of experiment. Sometimes the understanding of physical theories that Tesla reached was counterproductive to his own inventive work; other times he offered new insights. Tesla's utilitarian interpretation of physical theories suggests a more scientifically curious and invested inventor than previously described and a connection between the scientific and inventive communities.

  20. Promoting environmentally sound management of polybrominated diphenyl ethers in Asia.

    PubMed

    Li, Jinhui; Zhao, Nana; Liu, Xue; Wu, Xiaoyang

    2014-06-01

    Polybrominated diphenyl ethers with persistent organic pollutant properties are required to be controlled by the Stockholm Convention. Recently, polybrominated diphenyl ether contamination has become widespread in Asia, mainly because of the disposal and recycling processes of polybrominated diphenyl ether-containing wastes. The management status, production, usage, import/export, treatment, and disposal, as well as implementation deficiencies for the environmentally sound management of polybrominated diphenyl ethers and polybrominated diphenyl ether-containing materials in ten Asian countries were investigated and assessed in this study. This information could help the participating countries implement the Stockholm Convention and could promote the regional environmentally sound management of polybrominated diphenyl ether-containing articles and products. The results obtained were as follows. (1) Most of the countries studied lacked environmental policies and regulations, or even standards of polybrominated diphenyl ether pollution management and emission control actions. Accurate data on the consumption and importation of polybrominated diphenyl ether-containing materials, however, were not available for all the participating countries. In addition, there were no special treatment or disposal systems for polybrominated diphenyl ether-containing materials, or emission-cutting measures for the treatment of waste in these countries, owing to the lack of sufficient funding or technologies. (2) The improper dismantling of e-waste is a major source of polybrominated diphenyl ether emissions in these countries. (3) Proper e-waste management could result in a breakthrough in the environmentally sound management of this major polybrominated diphenyl ether-containing material flow, and could significantly reduce polybrominated diphenyl ether emissions. Finally, based on the study results, this article puts forward some recommendations for improving the environmentally

  1. Leaf wax n-alkane distributions in and across modern plants: Implications for paleoecology and chemotaxonomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bush, Rosemary T.; McInerney, Francesca A.

    2013-09-01

    Long chain (C21 to C37) n-alkanes are among the most long-lived and widely utilized terrestrial plant biomarkers. Dozens of studies have examined the range and variation of n-alkane chain-length abundances in modern plants from around the world, and n-alkane distributions have been used for a variety of purposes in paleoclimatology and paleoecology as well as chemotaxonomy. However, most of the paleoecological applications of n-alkane distributions have been based on a narrow set of modern data that cannot address intra- and inter-plant variability. Here, we present the results of a study using trees from near Chicago, IL, USA, as well as a meta-analysis of published data on modern plant n-alkane distributions. First, we test the conformity of n-alkane distributions in mature leaves across the canopy of 38 individual plants from 24 species as well as across a single growing season and find no significant differences for either canopy position or time of leaf collection. Second, we compile 2093 observations from 86 sources, including the new data here, to examine the generalities of n-alkane parameters such as carbon preference index (CPI), average chain length (ACL), and chain-length ratios for different plant groups. We show that angiosperms generally produce more n-alkanes than do gymnosperms, supporting previous observations, and furthermore that CPI values show such variation in modern plants that it is prudent to discard the use of CPI as a quantitative indicator of n-alkane degradation in sediments. We also test the hypotheses that certain n-alkane chain lengths predominate in and therefore can be representative of particular plant groups, namely, C23 and C25 in Sphagnum mosses, C27 and C29 in woody plants, and C31 in graminoids (grasses). We find that chain-length distributions are highly variable within plant groups, such that chemotaxonomic distinctions between grasses and woody plants are difficult to make based on n-alkane abundances. In contrast

  2. Ubiquitous Presence and Novel Diversity of Anaerobic Alkane Degraders in Cold Marine Sediments

    PubMed Central

    Gittel, Antje; Donhauser, Johanna; Røy, Hans; Girguis, Peter R.; Jørgensen, Bo B.; Kjeldsen, Kasper U.

    2015-01-01

    Alkanes are major constituents of crude oil and are released to the marine environment by natural seepage and from anthropogenic sources. Due to their chemical inertness, their removal from anoxic marine sediments is primarily controlled by the activity of anaerobic alkane-degrading microorganisms. To facilitate comprehensive cultivation-independent surveys of the diversity and distribution of anaerobic alkane degraders, we designed novel PCR primers that cover all known diversity of the 1-methylalkyl succinate synthase gene (masD/assA), which catalyzes the initial activation of alkanes. We studied masD/assA gene diversity in pristine and seepage-impacted Danish coastal sediments, as well as in sediments and alkane-degrading enrichment cultures from the Middle Valley (MV) hydrothermal vent system in the Pacific Northwest. MasD/assA genes were ubiquitously present, and the primers captured the diversity of both known and previously undiscovered masD/assA gene diversity. Seepage sediments were dominated by a single masD/assA gene cluster, which is presumably indicative of a substrate-adapted community, while pristine sediments harbored a diverse range of masD/assA phylotypes including those present in seepage sediments. This rare biosphere of anaerobic alkane degraders will likely increase in abundance in the event of seepage or accidental oil spillage. Nanomolar concentrations of short-chain alkanes (SCA) were detected in pristine and seepage sediments. Interestingly, anaerobic alkane degraders closely related to strain BuS5, the only SCA degrader in pure culture, were found in mesophilic MV enrichments, but not in cold sediments from Danish waters. We propose that the new masD/assA gene lineages in these sediments represent novel phylotypes that are either fueled by naturally occurring low levels of SCA or that metabolize medium- to long-chain alkanes. Our study highlights that masD/assA genes are a relevant diagnostic marker to identify seepage and microseepage, e

  3. Ubiquitous Presence and Novel Diversity of Anaerobic Alkane Degraders in Cold Marine Sediments.

    PubMed

    Gittel, Antje; Donhauser, Johanna; Røy, Hans; Girguis, Peter R; Jørgensen, Bo B; Kjeldsen, Kasper U

    2015-01-01

    Alkanes are major constituents of crude oil and are released to the marine environment by natural seepage and from anthropogenic sources. Due to their chemical inertness, their removal from anoxic marine sediments is primarily controlled by the activity of anaerobic alkane-degrading microorganisms. To facilitate comprehensive cultivation-independent surveys of the diversity and distribution of anaerobic alkane degraders, we designed novel PCR primers that cover all known diversity of the 1-methylalkyl succinate synthase gene (masD/assA), which catalyzes the initial activation of alkanes. We studied masD/assA gene diversity in pristine and seepage-impacted Danish coastal sediments, as well as in sediments and alkane-degrading enrichment cultures from the Middle Valley (MV) hydrothermal vent system in the Pacific Northwest. MasD/assA genes were ubiquitously present, and the primers captured the diversity of both known and previously undiscovered masD/assA gene diversity. Seepage sediments were dominated by a single masD/assA gene cluster, which is presumably indicative of a substrate-adapted community, while pristine sediments harbored a diverse range of masD/assA phylotypes including those present in seepage sediments. This rare biosphere of anaerobic alkane degraders will likely increase in abundance in the event of seepage or accidental oil spillage. Nanomolar concentrations of short-chain alkanes (SCA) were detected in pristine and seepage sediments. Interestingly, anaerobic alkane degraders closely related to strain BuS5, the only SCA degrader in pure culture, were found in mesophilic MV enrichments, but not in cold sediments from Danish waters. We propose that the new masD/assA gene lineages in these sediments represent novel phylotypes that are either fueled by naturally occurring low levels of SCA or that metabolize medium- to long-chain alkanes. Our study highlights that masD/assA genes are a relevant diagnostic marker to identify seepage and microseepage, e

  4. Biogeographic variation of foliar n-alkanes of Juniperus communis var. saxatilis Pallas from the Balkans.

    PubMed

    Rajčević, Nemanja; Janaćković, Pedja; Dodoš, Tanja; Tešević, Vele; Marin, Petar D

    2014-12-01

    The composition of the epicuticular n-alkanes isolated from the leaves of ten populations of Juniperus communis L. var. saxatilis Pallas from central (continental) and western (coastal) areas of the Balkan Peninsula was characterized by GC-FID and GC/MS analyses. In the leaf waxes, 14 n-alkane homologues with chain-lengths ranging from C22 to C35 were identified. All samples were dominated by n-tritriacontane (C33 ), but differences in two other dominant n-alkanes allowed separating the coastal from the continental populations. Several statistical methods (ANOVA, principal component, discriminant, and cluster analyses as well as the Mantel test) were deployed to analyze the diversity and variability of the epicuticular-leaf-n-alkane patterns of the ten natural populations of J. communis var. saxatilis and their relation to different geographic and bioclimatic parameters. Cluster analysis showed a high correlation of the leaf-n-alkane patterns with the geographical distribution of the investigated samples, differentiating the coastal from the continental populations of this taxon. Several bioclimatic parameters related to aridity were highly correlated with this differentiation.

  5. Toward aldehyde and alkane production by removing aldehyde reductase activity in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Rodriguez, Gabriel M.; Atsumi, Shota

    2015-01-01

    Advances in synthetic biology and metabolic engineering have enabled the construction of novel biological routes to valuable chemicals using suitable microbial hosts. Aldehydes serve as chemical feedstocks in the synthesis of rubbers, plastics, and other larger molecules. Microbial production of alkanes is dependent on the formation of a fatty aldehyde intermediate which is converted to an alkane by an aldehyde deformylating oxygenase (ADO). However, microbial hosts such as Escherichia coli are plagued by many highly active endogenous aldehyde reductases (ALRs) that convert aldehydes to alcohols, which greatly complicates strain engineering for aldehyde and alkane production. It has been shown that the endogenous ALR activity outcompetes the ADO enzyme for fatty aldehyde substrate. The large degree of ALR redundancy coupled with an incomplete database of ALRs represents a significant obstacle in engineering E. coli for either aldehyde or alkane production. In this study, we identified 44 ALR candidates encoded in the E. coli genome using bioinformatics tools, and undertook a comprehensive screening by measuring the ability of these enzymes to produce isobutanol. From the pool of 44 candidates, we found five new ALRs using this screening method (YahK, DkgA, GldA, YbbO, and YghA). Combined deletions of all 13 known ALRs resulted in a 90–99% reduction in endogenous ALR activity for a wide range of aldehyde substrates (C2–C12). Elucidation of the ALRs found in E. coli could guide one in reducing competing alcohol formation during alkane or aldehyde production. PMID:25108218

  6. Second virial coefficients, critical temperatures, and the molecular shapes of long n-alkanes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vega, Carlos; López Rodríguez, Antonio

    1996-09-01

    The second virial coefficient for a molecular model of n-alkanes with up to 200 carbon atoms has been computed for temperatures in the range of 1000 Kalkanes. The Boyle temperature of n-alkanes is not much affected by the length of the chain for n-alkanes with more than 100 carbon atoms. According to the Flory theory, for infinitely long chains the Boyle temperature and the critical temperature, denoted as the θ temperature are the same. On this basis using the present model we find θ=1620 K as the critical temperature of polymethylene. Scaling laws for the square of the end-to-end distance and for the radius of gyration at several temperatures are analyzed. For high temperatures, the scaling laws correspond to good solvent conditions whereas at the θ temperature the scaling laws are those of an ideal chain. The shape of long n-alkanes at several temperatures is also analyzed. We find that the polymethylene chains present an anisotropy similar to that of a parallelepiped with a ratio of sizes of 1:1.7:3.6.

  7. Whole-cell bacterial bioreporter for actively searching and sensing of alkanes and oil spills.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Dayi; He, Yi; Wang, Yun; Wang, Hui; Wu, Lin; Aries, Eric; Huang, Wei E

    2012-01-01

    Acinetobacter baylyi ADP1 was found to tolerate seawater and have a special ability of adhering to an oil-water interface of 10-80 µm emulsified mineral and crude oil droplets. These properties make ADP1 an ideal bacterial chassis for constructing bioreporters that are able to actively search and sense oil spill in water and soils. Acinetobacter baylyi bioreporter ADPWH_alk was developed and applied to the detection of alkanes and alkenes in water, seawater and soils. Bioreporter ADPWH_alk was able to detect a broad range of alkanes and alkenes with carbon chain length from C7 to C36. So far, ADPWH_alk is the only bioreporter that is able to detect alkane with carbon chain length greater than C18. This bioreporter responded to the alkanes in about 30 min and it was independent to the cell growth phase because of two point mutations in alkM promoter recognized by alkane regulatory protein ALKR. ADPWH_alk was applied to detect mineral oil, Brent, Chestnut and Sirri crude oils in water and seawater in the range 0.1-100 mg l(-1), showing that the bioreporter oil detection was semi-quantitative. This study demonstrates that ADPWH_alk is a rapid, sensitive and semi-quantitative bioreporter that can be useful for environmental monitoring and assessment of oil spills in seawater and soils.

  8. ClogP(alk): a method for predicting alkane/water partition coefficient.

    PubMed

    Kenny, Peter W; Montanari, Carlos A; Prokopczyk, Igor M

    2013-05-01

    Alkane/water partition coefficients (P(alk)) are less familiar to the molecular design community than their 1-octanol/water equivalents and access to both data and prediction tools is much more limited. A method for predicting alkane/water partition coefficient from molecular structure is introduced. The basis for the ClogP(alk) model is the strong (R² = 0.987) relationship between alkane/water partition coefficient and molecular surface area (MSA) that was observed for saturated hydrocarbons. The model treats a molecule as a perturbation of a saturated hydrocarbon molecule with the same MSA and uses increments defined for functional groups to quantify the extent to which logP(alk) is perturbed by the introduction each functional group. Interactions between functional groups, such as intramolecular hydrogen bonds are also parameterized within a perturbation framework. The functional groups and interactions between them are specified substructurally in a transparent and reproducible manner using SMARTS notation. The ClogP(alk) model was parameterized using data measured for structurally prototypical compounds that dominate the literature on alkane/water partition coefficients and then validated using an external test set of 100 alkane/water logP measurements, the majority of which were for drugs.

  9. Effects of fuel properties on the burning characteristics of collision-merged alkane/water droplets

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, C.H.; Pan, K.L.; Huang, W.C.; Wen, H.C.; Yang, J.Y.; Law, C.K.

    2008-04-15

    The combustion characteristics of freely falling droplets, individually generated by the merging of colliding alkane and water droplets, were experimentally investigated. The outcome of the collision droplets was first studied and then the subsequent burning processes such as the flame appearance, ignition and burning behaviors were recorded, through either visual observation or microphotography with the aid of stroboscopic lighting. If the merged droplets were exhibited in an insertive manner, while the water droplet inserted into the alkane droplet, these yield the burning behaviors prior to the end of flame were very much similar to that of pure alkane. The burning was ended with droplet extinction for lower-C alkane, and with either droplet ''flash vaporization'' or extinction for hexadecane. And if the merged droplets were in adhesive manner, for hexadecane with large water content, they either could not be ignited for the large merged droplets, or be ignited with a much prolonged ignition delay, followed by a soot-reducing flame and an ending of droplet extinction for the small merged droplets. ''Homogeneous'' explosion was not observed in any of the tests, and ''heterogeneous'' explosion, induced by trapped air bubbles, occasionally occurred for merged droplets with C-atom in alkane is higher than dodecane. And the sudden disappearance of droplet definitely decreased the burning time and thus enhanced the burning intensity. Besides, the fuel mass consumption rates were increased, even in the cases that having droplet extinction, because of the enlargement of the surface area due to the stuffing of water droplet. (author)

  10. Chemistry and adhesive properties of poly(arylene ether)s containing heterocyclic units

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Connell, John W.

    1991-01-01

    Novel poly(arylene ether)s containing heterocyclic units were prepared, characterized, and evaluated as adhesives and composite matrices. The polymers were prepared by reacting a heterocyclic bisphenol with an activated aromatic dihalide in a polar aprotic solvent, using potassium carbonate. The polymerizations were generally carried out in N,N-dimethylacetamide at 155 C. In some cases, where the polymers were semicrystalline, higher temperatures and thus higher boiling solvents were necessary to keep the polymers in solution. Heterocyclic rings incorporated into the poly(arylene ether) backbone include phenylquinoxaline, phenylimidazole, benzimidazole, benzoxazole, 1,3,4-oxadiazole, and 1,2,4-triazole. The polymers were characterized by differential scanning calorimetry, solution viscosity, X-ray diffraction, thin film, and adhesive and (in some cases) composite properties. The glass transition temperatures, crystalline melt temperature, solubility, and mechanical properties varied depending upon the heterocyclic ring. The chemistry and properties of these materials are discussed.

  11. Occurrence and Sources of Triterpenoid Methyl Ethers and Acetates in Sediments of the Cross-River System, Southeast Nigeria

    PubMed Central

    Oyo-Ita, Orok E.; Ekpo, Bassey O.; Oros, Daniel R.; Simoneit, Bernd R. T.

    2010-01-01

    Pentacyclic triterpenol methyl ethers (PTMEs), germanicol methyl ether (miliacin), 3-methoxyfern-9(11)-ene (arundoin), β-amyrin methyl ether (iso-sawamilletin), and 3-methoxytaraxer-14-ene (sawamilletin or crusgallin) were characterized in surface sediments of the Cross-River system using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). Triterpenol esters (mainly α- and β-amyrinyl acetates and hexanoates, and lupeyl acetate and hexanoate) were also found. These distinct compounds are useful for assessing diagenesis that can occur during river transport of organic detritus. Poaceae, mainly Gramineae and Elaeis guineensis higher plant species, are proposed as primary sources for the PTMEs and esters in the sediments. PTMEs are biomarkers of specific higher plant subspecies, while the triterpenol esters are indicators of early diagenetic alteration of higher plant detritus. PMID:20414350

  12. Azidated Ether-Butadiene-Ether Block Copolymers as Binders for Solid Propellants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cappello, Miriam; Lamia, Pietro; Mura, Claudio; Polacco, Giovanni; Filippi, Sara

    2016-07-01

    Polymeric binders for solid propellants are usually based on hydroxyl-terminated polybutadiene (HTPB), which does not contribute to the overall energy output. Azidic polyethers represent an interesting alternative but may have poorer mechanical properties. Polybutadiene-polyether copolymers may combine the advantages of both. Four different ether-butadiene-ether triblock copolymers were prepared and azidated starting from halogenated and/or tosylated monomers using HTPB as initiator. The presence of the butadiene block complicates the azidation step and reduces the storage stability of the azidic polymer. Nevertheless, the procedure allows modifying the binder properties by varying the type and lengths of the energetic blocks.

  13. Anaerobic oxidation of short-chain alkanes in hydrothermal sediments: potential influences on sulfur cycling and microbial diversity

    SciTech Connect

    Adams, MM; Hoarfrost, AL; Bose, A; Joye, SB; Girguis, PR

    2013-05-14

    Short-chain alkanes play a substantial role in carbon and sulfur cycling at hydrocarbon-rich environments globally, yet few studies have examined the metabolism of ethane (C-2), propane (C-3), and butane (C-4) in anoxic sediments in contrast to methane (C-1). In hydrothermal vent systems, short-chain alkanes are formed over relatively short geological time scales via thermogenic processes and often exist at high concentrations. The sediment-covered hydrothermal vent systems at Middle Valley (MV Juan de Fuca Ridge) are an ideal site for investigating the anaerobic oxidation of C-1-C-4 alkanes, given the elevated temperatures and dissolved hydrocarbon species characteristic of these metalliferous sediments. We examined whether MV microbial communities oxidized C-1-C-4 alkanes under mesophilic to thermophilic sulfate-reducing conditions. Here we present data from discrete temperature (25, 55, and 75 degrees C) anaerobic batch reactor incubations of MV sediments supplemented with individual alkanes. Co-registered alkane consumption and sulfate reduction (SR) measurements provide clear evidence for C-1-C-4 alkane oxidation linked to SR over time and across temperatures. In these anaerobic batch reactor sediments, 16S ribosomal RNA pyrosequencing revealed that Deltaproteobacteria, particularly a novel sulfate-reducing lineage, were the likely phylotypes mediating the oxidation of C-2-C-4 alkanes. Maximum C-1-C-4 alkane oxidation rates occurred at 55 degrees C, which reflects the mid-core sediment temperature profile and corroborates previous studies of rate maxima for the anaerobic oxidation of methane (AOM). Of the alkanes investigated, C-3 was oxidized at the highest rate over time, then C-4, C-2, and C-1, respectively. The implications of these results are discussed with respect to the potential competition between the anaerobic oxidation of C-2-C(4)alkanes with AOM for available oxidants and the influence on the fate of C-1 derived from these hydrothermal systems.

  14. 40 CFR 721.10067 - Ether amine phosphonate salt (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Ether amine phosphonate salt (generic... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10067 Ether amine phosphonate salt (generic). (a) Chemical substances... ether amine phosphonate salt (PMNs P-05-57, P-05-58, P-05-59, P-05-61, P-05-62, P-05-63, P-05-64, and...

  15. 40 CFR 721.10067 - Ether amine phosphonate salt (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Ether amine phosphonate salt (generic... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10067 Ether amine phosphonate salt (generic). (a) Chemical substances... ether amine phosphonate salt (PMNs P-05-57, P-05-58, P-05-59, P-05-61, P-05-62, P-05-63, P-05-64, and...

  16. 40 CFR 721.10067 - Ether amine phosphonate salt (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Ether amine phosphonate salt (generic... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10067 Ether amine phosphonate salt (generic). (a) Chemical substances... ether amine phosphonate salt (PMNs P-05-57, P-05-58, P-05-59, P-05-61, P-05-62, P-05-63, P-05-64, and...

  17. 40 CFR 721.10067 - Ether amine phosphonate salt (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Ether amine phosphonate salt (generic... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10067 Ether amine phosphonate salt (generic). (a) Chemical substances... ether amine phosphonate salt (PMNs P-05-57, P-05-58, P-05-59, P-05-61, P-05-62, P-05-63, P-05-64, and...

  18. 40 CFR 721.10067 - Ether amine phosphonate salt (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Ether amine phosphonate salt (generic... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10067 Ether amine phosphonate salt (generic). (a) Chemical substances... ether amine phosphonate salt (PMNs P-05-57, P-05-58, P-05-59, P-05-61, P-05-62, P-05-63, P-05-64, and...

  19. n-Alkanes in surficial sediments of Visakhapatnam harbour, east coast of India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Punyu, V. R.; Harji, R. R.; Bhosle, N. B.; Sawant, S. S.; Venkat, K.

    2013-04-01

    Surface sediments collected from 19 stations along Visakhapatnam harbour were analysed for organic carbon (OC), δ 13Coc, total lipids (TL), total hydrocarbon (THC), n-alkane concentration and composition. OC, δ 13Coc, TL and THC ranged from 0.6% to 7.6%, -29.3 to -23.8‰, 300 to 14,948 \\upmu g g - 1 dw, and 0.2 to 2,277 \\upmu g g - 1 dw, respectively. Predominance of even carbon numbers n-alkanes C12-C21 with carbon preference index (CPI) of <1 suggests major microbial influence. Fair abundance of odd carbon number n-alkanes in the range of C15-C22 and C23-C33 indicates some input from phytoplankton and terrestrial sources, respectively. Petrogenic input was evident from the presence of hopanes and steranes. The data suggest that organic matter (OM) sources varied spatially and were mostly derived from mixed source.

  20. The synergetic effect of starch and alpha amylase on the biodegradation of n-alkanes.

    PubMed

    Karimi, M; Biria, D

    2016-06-01

    The impact of adding soluble starch on biodegradation of n-alkanes (C10-C14) by Bacillus subtilis TB1 was investigated. Gas chromatography was employed to measure the residual hydrocarbons in the system. It was observed that the efficiency of biodegradation improved with the presence of starch and the obtained residual hydrocarbons in the system were 53% less than the samples without starch. The produced bacterial enzymes were studied through electrophoresis and reverse zymography for explaining the observations. The results indicated that the produced amylase by the bacteria can degrade hydrocarbons and the same was obtained by the application of a commercial alpha amylase sample. In addition, in silico docking of alpha-amylase with n-alkanes with different molecular weights was studied by Molegro virtual docker which showed high negative binding energies and further substantiated the experimental observations. Overall, the findings confirmed the catalytic effect of alpha amylase on n-alkanes degradation.

  1. Catalytic dehydroaromatization of n-alkanes by pincer-ligated iridium complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahuja, Ritu; Punji, Benudhar; Findlater, Michael; Supplee, Carolyn; Schinski, William; Brookhart, Maurice; Goldman, Alan S.

    2011-02-01

    Aromatic hydrocarbons are among the most important building blocks in the chemical industry. Benzene, toluene and xylenes are obtained from the high temperature thermolysis of alkanes. Higher alkylaromatics are generally derived from arene-olefin coupling, which gives branched products—that is, secondary alkyl arenes—with olefins higher than ethylene. The dehydrogenation of acyclic alkanes to give alkylaromatics can be achieved using heterogeneous catalysts at high temperatures, but with low yields and low selectivity. We present here the first catalytic conversion of n-alkanes to alkylaromatics using homogeneous or molecular catalysts—specifically ‘pincer’-ligated iridium complexes—and olefinic hydrogen acceptors. For example, the reaction of n-octane affords up to 86% yield of aromatic product, primarily o-xylene and secondarily ethylbenzene. In the case of n-decane and n-dodecane, the resulting alkylarenes are exclusively unbranched (that is, n-alkyl-substituted), with selectivity for the corresponding o-(n-alkyl)toluene.

  2. Distribution, activity and function of short-chain alkane degrading phylotypes in hydrothermal vent sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adams, M. M.; Joye, S. B.; Hoarfrost, A.; Girguis, P. R.

    2012-12-01

    Global geochemical analyses suggest that C2-C4 short chain alkanes are a common component of the utilizable carbon pool in deep-sea sediments worldwide and have been found in diverse ecosystems. From a thermodynamic standpoint, the anaerobic microbial oxidation of these aliphatic hydrocarbons is more energetically yielding than the anaerobic oxidation of methane (AOM). Therefore, the preferential degradation of these hydrocarbons may compete with AOM for the use of oxidants such as sulfate, or other potential oxidants. Such processes could influence the fate of methane in the deep-sea. Sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) from hydrocarbon seep sediments of the Gulf of Mexico and Guaymas Basin have previously been enriched that anaerobically oxidize short chain alkanes to generate CO2 with the preferential utilization of 12C-enriched alkanes (Kniemeyer et al. 2007). Different temperature regimens along with multiple substrates were tested and a pure culture (deemed BuS5) was isolated from mesophilic enrichments with propane or n-butane as the sole carbon source. Through comparative sequence analysis, strain BuS5 was determined to cluster with the metabolically diverse Desulfosarcina / Desulfococcus cluster, which also contains the SRB found in consortia with anaerobic, methane-oxidizing archaea in seep sediments. Enrichments from a terrestrial, low temperature sulfidic hydrocarbon seep also corroborated that propane degradation occurred with most bacterial phylotypes surveyed belonging to the Deltaproteobacteria, particularly Desulfobacteraceae (Savage et al. 2011). To date, no microbes capable of ethane oxidation or anaerobic C2-C4 alkane oxidation at thermophilic temperature have been isolated. The sediment-covered, hydrothermal vent systems found at Middle Valley (Juan de Fuca Ridge, eastern Pacific Ocean) are a prime environment for investigating mesophilic to thermophilic anaerobic oxidation of short-chain alkanes, given the elevated temperatures and dissolved

  3. The synergetic effect of starch and alpha amylase on the biodegradation of n-alkanes.

    PubMed

    Karimi, M; Biria, D

    2016-06-01

    The impact of adding soluble starch on biodegradation of n-alkanes (C10-C14) by Bacillus subtilis TB1 was investigated. Gas chromatography was employed to measure the residual hydrocarbons in the system. It was observed that the efficiency of biodegradation improved with the presence of starch and the obtained residual hydrocarbons in the system were 53% less than the samples without starch. The produced bacterial enzymes were studied through electrophoresis and reverse zymography for explaining the observations. The results indicated that the produced amylase by the bacteria can degrade hydrocarbons and the same was obtained by the application of a commercial alpha amylase sample. In addition, in silico docking of alpha-amylase with n-alkanes with different molecular weights was studied by Molegro virtual docker which showed high negative binding energies and further substantiated the experimental observations. Overall, the findings confirmed the catalytic effect of alpha amylase on n-alkanes degradation. PMID:26971168

  4. Mie potentials for phase equilibria calculations: application to alkanes and perfluoroalkanes.

    PubMed

    Potoff, Jeffrey J; Bernard-Brunel, Damien A

    2009-11-01

    Transferable united-atom force fields, based on n - 6 Lennard-Jones potentials, are presented for normal alkanes and perfluorocarbons. It is shown that by varying the repulsive exponent the range of the potential can be altered, leading to improved predictions of vapor pressures while also reproducing saturated liquid densities to high accuracy. Histogram-reweighting Monte Carlo simulations in the grand canonical ensemble are used to determine the vapor liquid coexistence curves, vapor pressures, heats of vaporization, and critical points for normal alkanes methane through tetradecane, and perfluorocarbons perfluoromethane through perfluorooctane. For all molecules studied, saturated liquid densities are reproduced to within 1% of experiment. Vapor pressures for normal alkanes and perfluorocarbons were predicted to within 3% and 6% of experiment, respectively. Calculations performed for binary mixture vapor-liquid equilibria for propane + pentane show excellent agreement with experiment, while slight deviations are observed for the ethane + perfluoroethane mixture.

  5. Diffusion Coefficients of n-Alkanes and Polyethylenes Filled with Zinc Oxide Nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ozisik, Rahmi; Mattice, Wayne L.; von Meerwall, Ernst

    2003-03-01

    The diffusion coefficients of various n-alkane and polyethylene samples filled with zinc oxide nanoparticles were measured with pulsed-gradient spin-echo (PGSE) NMR technique. The n-alkanes used in this study had carbon numbers ranging between 12 and 60. The number average molecular weights of the two polyethylene samples were 6200 and 13900 g/mol. The different size of zinc oxide used with spherical geometry. The experiments were performed with three different zinc oxide nanoparticles that had differing sizes. This study investigates the effects of the nanoparticle size and the molecular weight on the diffusion coefficient of the polymer chains. The results account for the restriction to diffusion due to detour and tortuosity effects, which differ for n-alkanes and polyethylene. Because the effective diffusion distance in the PGSE NMR experiments is larger than the size of the nanoparticles, the observed diffusivities represent asymptotic averages over multiple encounters between the diffusing molecules and the nanoparticles.

  6. Antioxidant activity of alkyl hydroxytyrosyl ethers in unsaturated lipids.

    PubMed

    Cert, Rosa; Madrona, Andrés; Espartero, José Luis; Pérez-Camino, M Carmen

    2015-06-01

    The antioxidant activity of ethyl and octyl hydroxytyrosyl ethers toward lipids was determined using the Rancimat and open cup methods at high temperatures and 50 °C, respectively. The effect of the unsaturation of the matrix was evaluated using sunflower, soya, and fish refined oils. The antioxidant activities of alkyl hydroxytyrosyl ethers (HTy ethers), hydroxytyrosyl esters, and free hydroxytyrosol are similar, and are much higher than that of α-tocopherol at the same millimolar concentration. The relationship between the induction period and the concentration of the HTy ethers is a sigmoidal curve; an accurate concentration of HTy ethers is necessary to achieve maximum activity, as it increases with the level of matrix unsaturation. The presence of tocopherols in commercial oils affects the antioxidant effect of HTy ethers. Thus, the addition of a low concentration of HTy ethers results in a positive effect, whereas the effect of the addition of high amounts of ethers is slightly less than that of the phenol alone. The addition of HTy ethers to commercial refined oils increases the stability of the oils and preserves tocopherols and polyunsaturated fatty acids from oxidation, enabling the oils to maintain their nutritional properties for longer periods of time.

  7. Divinyl ether synthase gene, and protein and uses thereof

    DOEpatents

    Howe, Gregg A.; Itoh, Aya

    2006-12-26

    The present invention relates to divinyl ether synthase genes, proteins, and methods of their use. The present invention encompasses both native and recombinant wild-type forms of the synthase, as well as mutants and variant forms, some of which possess altered characteristics relative to the wild-type synthase. The present invention also relates to methods of using divinyl ether synthase genes and proteins, including in their expression in transgenic organisms and in the production of divinyl ether fatty acids, and to methods of suing divinyl ether fatty acids, including in the protection of plants from pathogens.

  8. Divinyl ether synthase gene and protein, and uses thereof

    DOEpatents

    Howe, Gregg A.; Itoh, Aya

    2011-09-13

    The present invention relates to divinyl ether synthase genes, proteins, and methods of their use. The present invention encompasses both native and recombinant wild-type forms of the synthase, as well as mutants and variant forms, some of which possess altered characteristics relative to the wild-type synthase. The present invention also relates to methods of using divinyl ether synthase genes and proteins, including in their expression in transgenic organisms and in the production of divinyl ether fatty acids, and to methods of suing divinyl ether fatty acids, including in the protection of plants from pathogens.

  9. Pulse radiolysis of alkanes: A time-resolved electron paramagnetic resonance study

    SciTech Connect

    Shkrob, I.A.; Trifunac, A.D.

    1994-02-14

    Time-resolved spin-echo-detected electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) was applied to examine short-lived alkyl radicals formed in pulse radiolysis of liquid alkanes. It was found that the ratio of yields of penultimate and interior radicals in n-alkanes at the instant of their generation is temperature-independent and is ca. 1.25 times greater than the statistical quantity. This higher-than-statistical production of penultimate radicals indicates that the fast ion molecule reactions involving radical cations are a significant route of radical generation. The analysis of spin-echo kinetics in n-alkanes suggests that the alkyl radicals are emissively polarized in spur reactions. this initial polarization rapidly increases with shortening of the aliphatic chain. Another finding is that a long-chain structure of these radicals results in much higher rate of Heisenberg spin exchange relative to the recombination rate. The relative yields of hydrogen abstraction and fragmentation for various branched alkanes are estimated. It is concluded that the fragmentation occurs prior to the formation of radicals in an excited precursor species. Effects of phenolic and alkene additives in radiolysis of n-alkanes are examined. It is demonstrated that phenoxy radicals are produced in dissociative capture of electrons and alkane holes. Another route is a reaction of phenols with free hydrogen atoms. A rapid transfer of singlet correlation from the geminate radical ion pairs is responsible for unusual polarization patterns in the phenoxy and cyclohexadienyl radicals. The significance of these results in the context of cross-linking in polyethylene and higher paraffins is discussed. 56 refs.

  10. Structure and Mass Transport Characteristics at the Intrinsic Liquid-Vapor Interfaces of Alkanes.

    PubMed

    Chilukoti, Hari Krishna; Kikugawa, Gota; Ohara, Taku

    2016-07-28

    In this paper, an instantaneous interface definition has been used to study the intrinsic structure and self-diffusion coefficient in the vicinity of the liquid-vapor interfaces of decane and tetracosane at three different temperatures using molecular dynamics simulations, and the results have been compared with those obtained on the basis of the conventional Gibbs dividing surface (time- and space-averaged interface). The alkane molecules were modeled using the united atom NERD force field. Partial layered structures of alkane molecules at the liquid-vapor interface are observed as a pinned structure of alkane liquids based on the intrinsic interface. This kind of characteristic has not been observed in the density profiles obtained based on the Gibbs dividing surface. By examining the orientation order parameter and radius of gyration of the alkane molecules, it was observed that the alkane molecules were preferentially oriented to be more parallel to the intrinsic interface than to the Gibbs dividing surface, and the shape of the alkane molecules is slightly changed in the vicinity of the liquid-vapor interfaces. The self-diffusion coefficient parallel to the intrinsic interface was examined using the Green-Kubo relation, where the projection of the velocity in the parallel direction to the local intrinsic interface is used in the velocity correlation function. It was found that the self-diffusion coefficient in the direction parallel to the intrinsic interface changes as the position approaches the interface in a more obvious manner as compared with the self-diffusion coefficient obtained with respect to the Gibbs dividing surface. These results suggest that the use of an instantaneous interface definition allowed us to capture sharp variations in transport properties which are originating due to steeper structure at the liquid-vapor interfaces.

  11. Structure and Mass Transport Characteristics at the Intrinsic Liquid-Vapor Interfaces of Alkanes.

    PubMed

    Chilukoti, Hari Krishna; Kikugawa, Gota; Ohara, Taku

    2016-07-28

    In this paper, an instantaneous interface definition has been used to study the intrinsic structure and self-diffusion coefficient in the vicinity of the liquid-vapor interfaces of decane and tetracosane at three different temperatures using molecular dynamics simulations, and the results have been compared with those obtained on the basis of the conventional Gibbs dividing surface (time- and space-averaged interface). The alkane molecules were modeled using the united atom NERD force field. Partial layered structures of alkane molecules at the liquid-vapor interface are observed as a pinned structure of alkane liquids based on the intrinsic interface. This kind of characteristic has not been observed in the density profiles obtained based on the Gibbs dividing surface. By examining the orientation order parameter and radius of gyration of the alkane molecules, it was observed that the alkane molecules were preferentially oriented to be more parallel to the intrinsic interface than to the Gibbs dividing surface, and the shape of the alkane molecules is slightly changed in the vicinity of the liquid-vapor interfaces. The self-diffusion coefficient parallel to the intrinsic interface was examined using the Green-Kubo relation, where the projection of the velocity in the parallel direction to the local intrinsic interface is used in the velocity correlation function. It was found that the self-diffusion coefficient in the direction parallel to the intrinsic interface changes as the position approaches the interface in a more obvious manner as compared with the self-diffusion coefficient obtained with respect to the Gibbs dividing surface. These results suggest that the use of an instantaneous interface definition allowed us to capture sharp variations in transport properties which are originating due to steeper structure at the liquid-vapor interfaces. PMID:27387788

  12. Facile cleavage of triethylsilyl (TES) ethers using o-iodoxybenzoic acid (IBX) without affecting tert-butyldimethylsilyl (TBS) ethers.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yikang; Huang, Jia-Hui; Shen, Xin; Hu, Qi; Tang, Chao-Jun; Li, Liang

    2002-06-27

    [reaction: see text] In DMSO cleavage of triethylsilyl (TES) ethers by o-iodoxybenzoic acid (IBX) was significantly faster than cleavage of tert-butyldimethylsilyl (TBS) ethers or further oxidation into carbonyl compounds. In most cases, TES protecting groups could be removed in good to excellent yields within 1 h, whereas similar TBS protecting groups remained intact under the same conditions. The procedure also could be adapted for direct one-pot conversion of TES ethers into carbonyl compounds.

  13. Self-assembly of long chain alkanes and their derivatives on graphite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Teng; Berber, Savas; Tománek, David; Liu, Jun-Fu; Miller, Glen P.

    2008-03-01

    We combine scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) measurements with ab initio calculations to study the self-assembly of long chain alkanes and related alcohol and carboxylic acid molecules on graphite. For each system, we identify the optimum adsorption geometry and explain the energetic origin of the domain formation observed in the STM images. Our results for the hierarchy of adsorbate-adsorbate and adsorbate-substrate interactions provide a quantitative basis to understand the ordering of long chain alkanes in self-assembled monolayers and ways to modify it using alcohol and acid functional groups.

  14. Monocarboxylic acids from oxidation of acyclic isoprenoid alkanes by Mycobacterium fortuitum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cox, R. E.; Maxwell, J. R.; Myers, R. N.

    1976-01-01

    Mycobacterium fortuitum utilizes certain stereoisomeric mixtures of individual multimethyl branched alkanes as sole carbon source, including 2,6(R), 10(S), 14(RS)-tetramethylhexadecane; 2,6(R), 10(S), 14(RS)-tetramethylheptadecane; 2,6(RS), 10(RS)-trimethyltetradecane, and 2,6(R), 10(S)-trimethylpentadecane. Products of oxidation isolated from the bacterial lipids were acids derived predominantly from oxidation of the isopropyl terminus of each alkane, except in the case of 2,6(RS), 10(RS)-trimethyltetradecane. With the latter, acids from oxidation at either terminus were detected in comparable proportions.

  15. Self-assembly of long chain alkanes and their derivatives on graphite.

    PubMed

    Yang, Teng; Berber, Savas; Liu, Jun-Fu; Miller, Glen P; Tománek, David

    2008-03-28

    We combine scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) measurements with ab initio calculations to study the self-assembly of long chain alkanes and related alcohol and carboxylic acid molecules on graphite. For each system, we identify the optimum adsorption geometry and explain the energetic origin of the domain formation observed in the STM images. Our results for the hierarchy of adsorbate-adsorbate and adsorbate-substrate interactions provide a quantitative basis to understand the ordering of long chain alkanes in self-assembled monolayers and ways to modify it using alcohol and acid functional groups.

  16. Mass effect on the Soret coefficient in n-alkane mixtures.

    PubMed

    Alonso de Mezquia, David; Bou-Ali, M Mounir; Madariaga, J Antonio; Santamaría, Carlos

    2014-02-28

    We have determined the Soret coefficient of different equimolar and non equimolar n-alkane mixtures from measurements of the molecular diffusion and thermal diffusion coefficients. It is shown that equimolar mixtures behave as isotopic-like mixtures in which only the mass effect contributes to the Soret effect. In non equimolar mixtures, a small linear dependence with the molar fraction is observed. Finally, we have obtained a new correlation, which allows the determination of the Soret coefficient of n-alkane mixtures using the data of viscosity, the thermal expansion coefficient of the pure components, and the density of the equimolar mixture. PMID:24588181

  17. Regioselective alkane hydroxylation with a mutant CYP153A6 enzyme

    DOEpatents

    Koch, Daniel J.; Arnold, Frances H.

    2013-01-29

    Cytochrome P450 CYP153A6 from Myobacterium sp. strain HXN1500 was engineered using in-vivo directed evolution to hydroxylate small-chain alkanes regioselectively. Mutant CYP153A6-BMO1 selectively hydroxylates butane and pentane at the terminal carbon to form 1-butanol and 1-pentanol, respectively, at rates greater than wild-type CYP153A6 enzymes. This biocatalyst is highly active for small-chain alkane substrates and the regioselectivity is retained in whole-cell biotransformations.

  18. Mass effect on the Soret coefficient in n-alkane mixtures

    SciTech Connect

    Alonso de Mezquia, David; Mounir Bou-Ali, M.; Madariaga, J. Antonio; Santamaría, Carlos

    2014-02-28

    We have determined the Soret coefficient of different equimolar and non equimolar n-alkane mixtures from measurements of the molecular diffusion and thermal diffusion coefficients. It is shown that equimolar mixtures behave as isotopic-like mixtures in which only the mass effect contributes to the Soret effect. In non equimolar mixtures, a small linear dependence with the molar fraction is observed. Finally, we have obtained a new correlation, which allows the determination of the Soret coefficient of n-alkane mixtures using the data of viscosity, the thermal expansion coefficient of the pure components, and the density of the equimolar mixture.

  19. 40 CFR 721.10145 - Modified reaction products of alkyl alcohol, halogenated alkane, substituted epoxide, and amino...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Modified reaction products of alkyl... Modified reaction products of alkyl alcohol, halogenated alkane, substituted epoxide, and amino compound... identified generically as modified reaction products of alkyl alcohol, halogenated alkane,...

  20. 40 CFR 721.10145 - Modified reaction products of alkyl alcohol, halogenated alkane, substituted epoxide, and amino...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Modified reaction products of alkyl... Modified reaction products of alkyl alcohol, halogenated alkane, substituted epoxide, and amino compound... identified generically as modified reaction products of alkyl alcohol, halogenated alkane,...

  1. 40 CFR 721.10145 - Modified reaction products of alkyl alcohol, halogenated alkane, substituted epoxide, and amino...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Modified reaction products of alkyl... Modified reaction products of alkyl alcohol, halogenated alkane, substituted epoxide, and amino compound... identified generically as modified reaction products of alkyl alcohol, halogenated alkane,...

  2. 40 CFR 721.10145 - Modified reaction products of alkyl alcohol, halogenated alkane, substituted epoxide, and amino...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Modified reaction products of alkyl... Modified reaction products of alkyl alcohol, halogenated alkane, substituted epoxide, and amino compound... identified generically as modified reaction products of alkyl alcohol, halogenated alkane,...

  3. 40 CFR 721.10145 - Modified reaction products of alkyl alcohol, halogenated alkane, substituted epoxide, and amino...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Modified reaction products of alkyl... Modified reaction products of alkyl alcohol, halogenated alkane, substituted epoxide, and amino compound... identified generically as modified reaction products of alkyl alcohol, halogenated alkane,...

  4. 40 CFR 721.10103 - Naphtha (Fischer-Tropsch), C4-11-alkane, branched and linear.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Naphtha (Fischer-Tropsch), C4-11... Significant New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10103 Naphtha (Fischer-Tropsch), C4-11-alkane... substance identified as naphtha (fischer-tropsch), C4-11-alkane, branched and linear (PMN P-04-235; CAS...

  5. 40 CFR 721.10103 - Naphtha (Fischer-Tropsch), C4-11-alkane, branched and linear.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Naphtha (Fischer-Tropsch), C4-11... Significant New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10103 Naphtha (Fischer-Tropsch), C4-11-alkane... substance identified as naphtha (fischer-tropsch), C4-11-alkane, branched and linear (PMN P-04-235; CAS...

  6. 40 CFR 721.10103 - Naphtha (Fischer-Tropsch), C4-11-alkane, branched and linear.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Naphtha (Fischer-Tropsch), C4-11... Significant New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10103 Naphtha (Fischer-Tropsch), C4-11-alkane... substance identified as naphtha (fischer-tropsch), C4-11-alkane, branched and linear (PMN P-04-235; CAS...

  7. 40 CFR 721.10103 - Naphtha (Fischer-Tropsch), C4-11-alkane, branched and linear.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Naphtha (Fischer-Tropsch), C4-11... Significant New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10103 Naphtha (Fischer-Tropsch), C4-11-alkane... substance identified as naphtha (fischer-tropsch), C4-11-alkane, branched and linear (PMN P-04-235; CAS...

  8. Brominated-chlorinated diphenyl ethers formed by thermolysis of polybrominated diphenyl ethers at low temperatures.

    PubMed

    Rupp, Silke; Metzger, Jörg W

    2005-09-01

    Polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) are a group of brominated flame retardants (BFRs) used mainly as additives in different kinds of plastic material. Various PBDEs are found in all environmental compartments as well as in tissue and blood serum of animals and humans due to their persistence and tendency to bioaccumulate. Emission of PBDEs into the environment can occur during recycling of PBDE-containing plastic material or during their uncontrolled or insufficient combustion as e.g. in accidental fires or landfill fires. Under these circumstances, PBDEs can also function as precursor molecules for the formation of polybrominated dibenzodioxins (PBDDs) and dibenzofurans (PBDFs). In this study, we qualitatively investigated the reaction of two PBDE congeners, 2,2',4,4'-tetrabromo diphenyl ether (BDE 47) and 2,2',4,4',5,5'-hexabromo diphenyl ether (BDE 153), as well as hexabromobenzene (HBB), a flame retardant used in the past, when exposed to temperatures between 250 degrees C and 500 degrees C. The formed reaction products were analysed by high resolution gas chromatography-low resolution mass spectrometry (HRGC-LRMS). Among others brominated-chlorinated diphenyl ethers were formed by chlorodebromination of the PBDEs. In addition, thermolysis of BDE 47 and BDE 153 in the presence of tetrachloromethane as model substance for an organic chlorine source was studied. Thermal treatment of HBB resulted in the formation of brominated-chlorinated benzenes. PMID:16083771

  9. Antifungal ether diglycosides from Matayba guianensis Aublet.

    PubMed

    de Assis, Polyana A; Theodoro, Phellipe N E T; de Paula, José E; Araújo, Ana J; Costa-Lotufo, Letícia V; Michel, Sylvie; Grougnet, Raphaël; Kritsanida, Marina; Espindola, Laila S

    2014-03-01

    Since the 1960s, fungal infections have become a major worldwide public health problem. Antifungal treatments have many limitations, such as toxicity and resistance. Matayba guianensis Aublet (Sapindaceae) was chemically investigated as part of our ongoing search for lead molecules against fungi in the Brazilian Cerrado biome. The ethanolic extract of M. guianensis root bark revealed the presence of two previously unreported ether diglycosides: matayoside E (1) and F (2) with anti Candida activity, along with two known compounds: cupanioside (3) and stigmasterol (4).

  10. Antifungal activity of some diaryl ethers.

    PubMed

    Xu, Hui; Jian, Kun-Zhong; Guan, Qiu; Ye, Fei; Lv, Min

    2007-12-01

    Several diaryl ethers were synthesized and tested in vitro against seven phytopathogenic fungi, namely Fusarium graminearum, Alternaria alternate, Helminthosporium sorokinianum, Pyricularia oryzae, Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. vasinfectum, Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. cucumarinum and Alternaria brassicae. Compared to a commercial agricultural fungicide, hymexazol, especially compounds a, b, e, g and k were found to be more effective at 50 mug/ml against F. graminearum, F. oxysporum f. sp. vasinfectum and F. oxysporum f. sp. cucumarinum. Meantime, some structure-activity relationships were also observed. PMID:18057754

  11. Enhanced Translocation and Growth of Rhodococcus erythropolis PR4 in the Alkane Phase of Aqueous-Alkane Two Phase Cultures Were Mediated by GroEL2 Overexpression

    PubMed Central

    Takihara, Hayato; Ogihara, Jun; Yoshida, Takao; Okuda, Shujiro; Nakajima, Mutsuyasu; Iwabuchi, Noriyuki; Sunairi, Michio

    2014-01-01

    We previously reported that R. erythropolis PR4 translocated from the aqueous to the alkane phase, and then grew in two phase cultures to which long-chain alkanes had been added. This was considered to be beneficial for bioremediation. In the present study, we investigated the proteins involved in the translocation of R. erythropolis PR4. The results of our proteogenomic analysis suggested that GroEL2 was upregulated more in cells that translocated inside of the pristane (C19) phase than in those located at the aqueous-alkane interface attached to the n-dodecane (C12) surface. PR4 (pK4-EL2-1) and PR4 (pK4-ΔEL2-1) strains were constructed to confirm the effects of the upregulation of GroEL2 in translocated cells. The expression of GroEL2 in PR4 (pK4-EL2-1) was 15.5-fold higher than that in PR4 (pK4-ΔEL2-1) in two phase cultures containing C12. The growth and cell surface lipophilicity of PR4 were enhanced by the introduction of pK4-EL2-1. These results suggested that the plasmid overexpression of groEL2 in PR4 (pK4-EL2-1) led to changes in cell localization, enhanced growth, and increased cell surface lipophilicity. Thus, we concluded that the overexpression of GroEL2 may play an important role in increasing the organic solvent tolerance of R. erythropolis PR4 in aqueous-alkane two phase cultures. PMID:25311591

  12. Alkane dehydrogenation catalyzed by rhodium(I) phosphine complexes. Observation of the stoichiometric alkane-to-rhodium hydrogen-transfer step

    SciTech Connect

    Shih, K.C.; Goldman, A.S. )

    1993-09-01

    RhL[sub 2]Cl (L = P[sup t]Pr[sub 3]) is found to dehydrogenate cyclooctane to give H[sub 2]RhL[sub 2]Cl and cyclooctene; this represents the first observation of the key hydrogen-transfer step proposed for related, catalytic alkane transfer-dehydrogenation systems. Using norbornene as a hydrogen acceptor, transfer-dehydrogenation is catalyzed but turnover numbers are low. 18 refs., 1 tab.

  13. 77 FR 39236 - Nanomaterial Case Study: A Comparison of Multiwalled Carbon Nanotubes and Decabromodiphenyl Ether...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-02

    ... AGENCY Nanomaterial Case Study: A Comparison of Multiwalled Carbon Nanotubes and Decabromodiphenyl Ether... Study: A Comparison of Multiwalled Carbon Nanotubes and Decabromodiphenyl Ether Flame-Retardant Coatings... ``Nanomaterial Case Study: A Comparison of Multiwalled Carbon Nanotubes and Decabromodiphenyl Ether...

  14. Adiabatic Coupling Constant of Nitrobenzene- n-Alkane Critical Mixtures. Evidence from Ultrasonic Spectra and Thermodynamic Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mirzaev, Sirojiddin Z.; Kaatze, Udo

    2016-09-01

    Ultrasonic spectra of mixtures of nitrobenzene with n-alkanes, from n-hexane to n-nonane, are analyzed. They feature up to two Debye-type relaxation terms with discrete relaxation times and, near the critical point, an additional relaxation term due to the fluctuations in the local concentration. The latter can be well represented by the dynamic scaling theory. Its amplitude parameter reveals the adiabatic coupling constant of the mixtures of critical composition. The dependence of this thermodynamic parameter upon the length of the n-alkanes corresponds to that of the slope in the pressure dependence of the critical temperature and is thus taken another confirmation of the dynamic scaling model. The change in the variation of the coupling constant and of several other mixture parameters with alkane length probably reflects a structural change in the nitrobenzene- n-alkane mixtures when the number of carbon atoms per alkane exceeds eight.

  15. Classification of vegetable oils according to their botanical origin using n-alkane profiles established by GC-MS.

    PubMed

    Troya, F; Lerma-García, M J; Herrero-Martínez, J M; Simó-Alfonso, E F

    2015-01-15

    n-Alkane profiles established by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) were used to classify vegetable oils according to their botanical origin. The n-alkanes present in corn, grapeseed, hazelnut, olive, peanut and sunflower oils were isolated by means of alkaline hydrolysis followed by silica gel column chromatography of the unsaponifiable fractions. The n-alkane fraction was constituted mainly of n-alkanes in the range C8-C35, although only those most abundant (15 n-alkanes, from 21 to 35 carbon No.) were used as original variables to construct linear discriminant analysis (LDA) models. Ratios of the peak areas selected by pairs were used as predictors. All the oils were correctly classified according to their botanical origin, with assignment probabilities higher than 95%, using an LDA model.

  16. Short and stereoselective total synthesis of furano lignans (+/-)-dihydrosesamin, (+/-)-lariciresinol dimethyl ether, (+/-)-acuminatin methyl ether, (+/-)-sanshodiol methyl ether, (+/-)-lariciresinol, (+/-)-acuminatin, and (+/-)-lariciresinol monomethyl ether and furofuran lignans (+/-)-sesamin, (+/-)-eudesmin, (+/-)-piperitol methyl ether, (+/-)-pinoresinol, (+/-)-piperitol, and (+/-)-pinoresinol monomethyl ether by radical cyclization of epoxides using a transition-metal radical source.

    PubMed

    Roy, Subhas Chandra; Rana, Kalyan Kumar; Guin, Chandrani

    2002-05-17

    Intramolecular radical cyclization of suitably substituted epoxy ethers 4a-g using bis(cyclopentadienyl)titanium(III) chloride as the radical source resulted in trisubstituted tetrahydrofurano lignans and 2,6-diaryl-3,7-dioxabicyclo[3.3.0]octane lignans depending on the reaction conditions. The titanium(III) species was prepared in situ from commercially available titanocene dichloride and activated zinc dust in THF. Upon radical cyclization followed by acidic workup, epoxy olefinic ethers 4a-g afforded furano lignans dihydrosesamin 1a, lariciresinol dimethyl ether 1b, acuminatin methyl ether 1e, and sanshodiol methyl ether 1g directly and lariciresinol 1h, acuminatin 1i, and lariciresinol monomethyl ether 1j after removal of the benzyl protecting group by controlled hydrogenolysis of the corresponding cyclized products. The furofuran lignans sesamin 2a, eudesmin 2b, and piperitol methyl ether 2e were also prepared directly by using the same precursors 4a-f on radical cyclization followed by treatment with iodine and pinoresinol 2h, piperitol 2i, and pinoresinol monomethyl ether 2j after controlled hydrogenolysis of the benzyl protecting group of the corresponding cyclized products. Two naturally occurring acyclic lignans, secoisolariciresinol 5h and secoisolariciresinol dimethyl ether 5b, have also been prepared by exhaustive hydrogenolysis of 2h and 2b, respectively.

  17. [Aerobic microbial degradation of polybrominated diphenyl ethers].

    PubMed

    Ding, Juan; Zhou, Juan; Jiang, Wei-Ying; Gao, Shi-Xiang

    2008-11-01

    The biodegradation of 4, 4'-dibromodipheny ether (BDE15) and decabromodiphenyl ether (BDE209) by white rot fungi under aerobic conditions was studied. Effects of non-ionic surfactant Tween 80 and beta-cyclodextrin as solubilizers on the apparent solubilities and biodegradation rates of BDE15 and BDE209 were also evaluated. The results showed that both BDE15 and BDE209 were efficiently degraded by white rot fungi. The degradation rates were 43.0% and 62.5% for BDE209 and BDE15, respectively, after 10 d incubation. The degradation of BDE209 was greatly enhanced by addition of Tween 80 (< or = 700 mg/L) and beta-cyclodextrin, which may own to their solubilization effects on BDE209. However, Tween 80 at a high concentration (900 mg/L) would restrain the fungal growth, thereby decrease the degradation of BDE209. Addition of Tween 80 and beta-cyclodextrin exhibited some negative effects on the degradation of BDE15, which may due to decreased concentration of free BDE15 in water solution resulted from inclusion function of Tween 80 micelles and beta-cyclodextrin cavity, although the apparent solubility of BDE15 was drastically increased by both of them. PMID:19186824

  18. Biosynthesis of archaeal membrane ether lipids

    PubMed Central

    Jain, Samta; Caforio, Antonella; Driessen, Arnold J. M.

    2014-01-01

    A vital function of the cell membrane in all living organism is to maintain the membrane permeability barrier and fluidity. The composition of the phospholipid bilayer is distinct in archaea when compared to bacteria and eukarya. In archaea, isoprenoid hydrocarbon side chains are linked via an ether bond to the sn-glycerol-1-phosphate backbone. In bacteria and eukarya on the other hand, fatty acid side chains are linked via an ester bond to the sn-glycerol-3-phosphate backbone. The polar head groups are globally shared in the three domains of life. The unique membrane lipids of archaea have been implicated not only in the survival and adaptation of the organisms to extreme environments but also to form the basis of the membrane composition of the last universal common ancestor (LUCA). In nature, a diverse range of archaeal lipids is found, the most common are the diether (or archaeol) and the tetraether (or caldarchaeol) lipids that form a monolayer. Variations in chain length, cyclization and other modifications lead to diversification of these lipids. The biosynthesis of these lipids is not yet well understood however progress in the last decade has led to a comprehensive understanding of the biosynthesis of archaeol. This review describes the current knowledge of the biosynthetic pathway of archaeal ether lipids; insights on the stability and robustness of archaeal lipid membranes; and evolutionary aspects of the lipid divide and the LUCA. It examines recent advances made in the field of pathway reconstruction in bacteria. PMID:25505460

  19. Imide/arylene ether copolymers with pendent trifluoromethyl groups

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jensen, Brian J.; Havens, Stephen J.

    1992-01-01

    A series of imide/arylene ether block copolymers were prepared using an arylene ether block containing a hexafluoroisopropylidene group and an imide block containing a hexafluoroisopropylidene and a trifluoromethyl group in the polymer backbone. The copolymers were characterized and mechanical properties were determined and compared to the homopolymers.

  20. Process for producing dimethyl ether from synthesis gas

    DOEpatents

    Pierantozzi, R.

    1985-06-04

    This invention pertains to a Fischer Tropsch process for converting synthesis gas to an oxygenated hydrocarbon with particular emphasis on dimethyl ether. Synthesis gas comprising carbon monoxide and hydrogen are converted to dimethyl ether by carrying out the reaction in the presence of an alkali metal-manganese-iron carbonyl cluster incorporated onto a zirconia-alumina support.

  1. 40 CFR 721.3485 - Hydrofluorocarbon alkyl ether.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Hydrofluorocarbon alkyl ether. 721... Substances § 721.3485 Hydrofluorocarbon alkyl ether. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as a hydrofluorocarbon alkyl...

  2. 40 CFR 721.3485 - Hydrofluorocarbon alkyl ether.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Hydrofluorocarbon alkyl ether. 721... Substances § 721.3485 Hydrofluorocarbon alkyl ether. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as a hydrofluorocarbon alkyl...

  3. 40 CFR 721.3485 - Hydrofluorocarbon alkyl ether.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Hydrofluorocarbon alkyl ether. 721... Substances § 721.3485 Hydrofluorocarbon alkyl ether. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as a hydrofluorocarbon alkyl...

  4. 40 CFR 721.3485 - Hydrofluorocarbon alkyl ether.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Hydrofluorocarbon alkyl ether. 721... Substances § 721.3485 Hydrofluorocarbon alkyl ether. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as a hydrofluorocarbon alkyl...

  5. 40 CFR 721.3485 - Hydrofluorocarbon alkyl ether.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Hydrofluorocarbon alkyl ether. 721... Substances § 721.3485 Hydrofluorocarbon alkyl ether. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as a hydrofluorocarbon alkyl...

  6. Responsive supramolecular gels constructed by crown ether based molecular recognition.

    PubMed

    Ge, Zhishen; Hu, Jinming; Huang, Feihe; Liu, Shiyong

    2009-01-01

    Responsive supramolecular gels were constructed from crown ether terminated four-arm star poly(epsilon-caprolactone) (PCL-DB24C8) and dibenzylammonium-terminated two-arm PCL-DBAS (see scheme), exploiting the formation of pseudorotaxane linkages between crown ether and ammonium moieties. The resultant supramolecular gels exhibit thermo- and pH-induced reversible gel-sol transition.

  7. Preparation of highly fluorinated diols containing ether linkages.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rochow, S. E.; Stump, E. C., Jr.

    1970-01-01

    Hydroxy-terminated perfluoroethers and polyurethane resins derived from ethers have outstanding chemical resistance and good thermal properties. They can be used as potting compounds, coatings, and seals. The hydroxy-terminated ethers serve as intermediates in the synthesis of highly fluorinated elastomers and adhesives.

  8. IRIS Toxicological Review of Decabromodiphenyl Ether (2008 Final)

    EPA Science Inventory

    EPA is announcing the release of the final report, Toxicological Review of Decabromodiphenyl Ether: in support of the Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS). The updated Summary for Decabromodiphenyl Ether and accompanying Quickview have also been added to the IRIS Data...

  9. 47. BUILDING NO. 519, ETHER AND ALCOHOL RECOVERY HOUSE, INTERIOR, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    47. BUILDING NO. 519, ETHER AND ALCOHOL RECOVERY HOUSE, INTERIOR, 4TH LEVEL, LOOKING NORTH AT TOPS OF ALCOHOL AND ETHER DISTILLATION TOWERS. - Picatinny Arsenal, 500 Area, Powder Factory & Power House, State Route 15 near I-80, Dover, Morris County, NJ

  10. 48. BUILDING NO. 519, ETHER AND ALCOHOL RECOVERY HOUSE, INTERIOR, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    48. BUILDING NO. 519, ETHER AND ALCOHOL RECOVERY HOUSE, INTERIOR, 5TH LEVEL, LOOKING NORTH AT ETHER AND ALCOHOL CONDENSERS AT TOP OF TOWER. - Picatinny Arsenal, 500 Area, Powder Factory & Power House, State Route 15 near I-80, Dover, Morris County, NJ

  11. 46. BUILDING NO. 519, ETHER AND ALCOHOL RECOVERY HOUSE, INTERIOR, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    46. BUILDING NO. 519, ETHER AND ALCOHOL RECOVERY HOUSE, INTERIOR, CONTROL PANEL LEVEL (2ND DECK) OF ETHER AND ALCOHOL STILL BUILDING, LOOKING NORTH, SHOWING TWO ALCOHOL DISTILLATION TOWERS BEHIND 'MIXED SOLVENT UNIT' CONTROL PANEL. - Picatinny Arsenal, 500 Area, Powder Factory & Power House, State Route 15 near I-80, Dover, Morris County, NJ

  12. 29 CFR 1926.1106 - Methyl chloromethyl ether.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 8 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Methyl chloromethyl ether. 1926.1106 Section 1926.1106 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION... § 1926.1106 Methyl chloromethyl ether. Note: The requirements applicable to construction work under...

  13. 29 CFR 1915.1006 - Methyl chloromethyl ether.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 7 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Methyl chloromethyl ether. 1915.1006 Section 1915.1006 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION... Hazardous Substances § 1915.1006 Methyl chloromethyl ether. Note: The requirements applicable to...

  14. 29 CFR 1926.1106 - Methyl chloromethyl ether.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 8 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Methyl chloromethyl ether. 1926.1106 Section 1926.1106 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION... § 1926.1106 Methyl chloromethyl ether. Note: The requirements applicable to construction work under...

  15. 29 CFR 1910.1006 - Methyl chloromethyl ether.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 6 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Methyl chloromethyl ether. 1910.1006 Section 1910.1006 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION... Substances § 1910.1006 Methyl chloromethyl ether. See § 1910.1003, 13 carcinogens....

  16. 29 CFR 1910.1006 - Methyl chloromethyl ether.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 6 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Methyl chloromethyl ether. 1910.1006 Section 1910.1006 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION... Substances § 1910.1006 Methyl chloromethyl ether. See § 1910.1003, 13 carcinogens....

  17. 29 CFR 1910.1008 - bis-Chloromethyl ether.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 6 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false bis-Chloromethyl ether. 1910.1008 Section 1910.1008 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR... bis-Chloromethyl ether. See § 1910.1003, 13 carcinogens....

  18. 29 CFR 1910.1008 - bis-Chloromethyl ether.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 6 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false bis-Chloromethyl ether. 1910.1008 Section 1910.1008 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR... bis-Chloromethyl ether. See § 1910.1003, 13 carcinogens....

  19. 29 CFR 1915.1008 - bis-Chloromethyl ether.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 7 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false bis-Chloromethyl ether. 1915.1008 Section 1915.1008 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR... § 1915.1008 bis-Chloromethyl ether. Note: The requirements applicable to shipyard employment under...

  20. 29 CFR 1915.1006 - Methyl chloromethyl ether.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 7 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Methyl chloromethyl ether. 1915.1006 Section 1915.1006 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION... Hazardous Substances § 1915.1006 Methyl chloromethyl ether. Note: The requirements applicable to...

  1. 40 CFR 721.825 - Certain aromatic ether diamines.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Certain aromatic ether diamines. 721.825 Section 721.825 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) TOXIC... Substances § 721.825 Certain aromatic ether diamines. (a) Chemical substances and significant new...

  2. 29 CFR 1915.1008 - bis-Chloromethyl ether.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 7 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false bis-Chloromethyl ether. 1915.1008 Section 1915.1008 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR... § 1915.1008 bis-Chloromethyl ether. Note: The requirements applicable to shipyard employment under...

  3. 29 CFR 1926.1108 - bis-Chloromethyl ether.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 8 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false bis-Chloromethyl ether. 1926.1108 Section 1926.1108 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR...-Chloromethyl ether. Note: The requirements applicable to construction work under this section are identical...

  4. 29 CFR 1926.1108 - bis-Chloromethyl ether.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 8 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false bis-Chloromethyl ether. 1926.1108 Section 1926.1108 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR...-Chloromethyl ether. Note: The requirements applicable to construction work under this section are identical...

  5. The Ether Wind and the Global Positioning System.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Muller, Rainer

    2000-01-01

    Explains how students can perform a refutation of the ether theory using information from the Global Positioning System (GPS). Discusses the functioning of the GPS, qualitatively describes how position determination would be affected by an ether wind, and illustrates the pertinent ideas with a simple quantitative model. (WRM)

  6. 40 CFR 721.825 - Certain aromatic ether diamines.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Certain aromatic ether diamines. 721... Substances § 721.825 Certain aromatic ether diamines. (a) Chemical substances and significant new uses...,5-benzenetetracarboxylic acid, diethyl ester, compound with 4,4′- -2,5-diylbis(oxy)]bis (1:1) (PMN...

  7. Process for producing dimethyl ether form synthesis gas

    DOEpatents

    Pierantozzi, Ronald

    1985-01-01

    This invention pertains to a Fischer Tropsch process for converting synthesis gas to an oxygenated hydrocarbon with particular emphasis on dimethyl ether. Synthesis gas comprising carbon monoxide and hydrogen are converted to dimethyl ether by carrying out the reaction in the presence of an alkali metal-manganese-iron carbonyl cluster incorporated onto a zirconia-alumina support.

  8. Rate constants for OH with selected large alkanes : shock-tube measurements and an improved group scheme.

    SciTech Connect

    Sivaramakrishnan, R.; Michael, J. V.; Chemical Sciences and Engineering Division

    2009-04-30

    } molecule{sup -1} s{sup -1} (241-1287 K); k{sub OH+2,2,3,3-TMB} = 6.835 x 10{sup -17}T{sup 1.886} exp(-365 K/T) cm{sup 3} molecule{sup -1} s{sup -1} (290-1180 K); k{sub OH+n-pentane} = 2.495 x 10{sup -16}T{sup 1.649} exp(80 K/T) cm{sup 3} molecule{sup -1} s{sup -1} (224-1308 K); k{sub OH+n-hexane} = 3.959 x 10{sup -18}T{sup 2.218} exp(443 K/T) cm{sup 3} molecule{sup -1} s{sup -1} (292-1299 K); and k{sub OH+2,3-DMB} = 2.287 x 10{sup -17}T{sup 1.958} exp(365 K/T) cm{sup 3} molecule{sup -1} s{sup -1} (220-1292 K). The experimental data and the evaluations obtained for these five larger alkanes in the present work were used along with prior data/evaluations obtained in this laboratory for H abstractions by OH from a series of smaller alkanes (C{sub 3}?C{sub 5}) to devise rate rules for abstractions from various types of primary, secondary, and tertiary H atoms. Specifically, the current scheme was applied with good success to H abstractions by OH from a series of n-alkanes (n-octane through n-hexadecane). The total rate constants using this group scheme for reactions of OH with selected large alkanes are given as three-parameter fits in this article. The rate constants for the various abstraction channels in any large n-alkane can also be obtained using the groups listed in this article. The present group scheme serves to reduce the uncertainties in rate constants for OH + alkane reactions.

  9. 40 CFR 721.10148 - Acryloxy alkanoic alkane derivative with mixed metal oxides (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... with mixed metal oxides (generic). 721.10148 Section 721.10148 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... mixed metal oxides (generic). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as acryloxy alkanoic alkane derivative with mixed...

  10. 40 CFR 721.10148 - Acryloxy alkanoic alkane derivative with mixed metal oxides (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... with mixed metal oxides (generic). 721.10148 Section 721.10148 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... mixed metal oxides (generic). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as acryloxy alkanoic alkane derivative with mixed...

  11. Improved GC/MS method for quantitation of n-Alkanes in plant and fecal material

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC/MS) method for the quantitation of n-alkanes (carbon backbones ranging from 21 to 36 carbon atoms) in forage and fecal samples has been developed. Automated solid-liquid extraction using elevated temperature and pressure minimized extraction time to 30 min...

  12. Anaerobic biodegradation of long-chain n-alkanes under sulfate-reducing conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Caldwell, M.E.; Suflita, J.M.; Garrett, R.M.; Prince, R.C.

    1998-07-15

    The ability of anaerobic microorganisms to degrade a wide variety of crude oil components was investigated using chronically hydrocarbon-contaminated marine sediments as the source of inoculum. When sulfate reduction was the predominant electron-accepting process, gas chromatographic analysis revealed almost complete n-alkane removal (C{sub 15}-C{sub 34}) from a weathered oil within 201 d of incubation. No alteration of the oil was detected in sterile control incubations or when nitrate served as an alternate electron acceptor. The amount of sulfate reduced in the oil-amended nonsterile incubations was more than enough to account for the complete mineralization of the n-alkane fraction of the oil; no loss of this anion was observed in sterile control incubations. The mineralization of the alkanes was confirmed using {sup 14}C-14,15-octacosane (C{sub 28}H{sub 58}), with 97% of the radioactivity recovered as {sup 14}CO{sub 2}. These findings extend the range of hydrocarbons known to be amenable to anaerobic biodegradation. Moreover, the rapid and extensive alteration in the n-alkanes can no longer be considered a defining characteristic of aerobic oil biodegradation processes alone.

  13. Interrogation of Chesapeake Bay sediment microbial communities for intrinsic alkane-utilizing potential under anaerobic conditions.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Jamie M; Wawrik, Boris; Isom, Catherine; Boling, Wilford B; Callaghan, Amy V

    2015-02-01

    Based on the transient exposure of Chesapeake Bay sediments to hydrocarbons and the metabolic versatility of known anaerobic alkane-degrading microorganisms, it was hypothesized that distinct Bay sediment communities, governed by geochemical gradients, would have intrinsic alkane-utilizing potential under sulfate-reducing and/or methanogenic conditions. Sediment cores were collected along a transect of the Bay. Community DNA was interrogated via pyrosequencing of 16S rRNA genes, PCR of anaerobic hydrocarbon activation genes, and qPCR of 16S rRNA genes and genes involved in sulfate reduction/methanogenesis. Site sediments were used to establish microcosms amended with n-hexadecane under sulfate-reducing and methanogenic conditions. Sequencing of 16S rRNA genes indicated that sediments associated with hypoxic water columns contained significantly greater proportions of Bacteria and Archaea consistent with syntrophic degradation of organic matter and methanogenesis compared to less reduced sediments. Microbial taxa frequently associated with hydrocarbon-degrading communities were found throughout the Bay, and the genetic potential for hydrocarbon metabolism was demonstrated via the detection of benzyl-(bssA) and alkylsuccinate synthase (assA) genes. Although microcosm studies did not indicate sulfidogenic alkane degradation, the data suggested that methanogenic conversion of alkanes was occurring. These findings highlight the potential role that anaerobic microorganisms could play in the bioremediation of hydrocarbons in the Bay. PMID:25764556

  14. Interrogation of Chesapeake Bay sediment microbial communities for intrinsic alkane-utilizing potential under anaerobic conditions.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Jamie M; Wawrik, Boris; Isom, Catherine; Boling, Wilford B; Callaghan, Amy V

    2015-02-01

    Based on the transient exposure of Chesapeake Bay sediments to hydrocarbons and the metabolic versatility of known anaerobic alkane-degrading microorganisms, it was hypothesized that distinct Bay sediment communities, governed by geochemical gradients, would have intrinsic alkane-utilizing potential under sulfate-reducing and/or methanogenic conditions. Sediment cores were collected along a transect of the Bay. Community DNA was interrogated via pyrosequencing of 16S rRNA genes, PCR of anaerobic hydrocarbon activation genes, and qPCR of 16S rRNA genes and genes involved in sulfate reduction/methanogenesis. Site sediments were used to establish microcosms amended with n-hexadecane under sulfate-reducing and methanogenic conditions. Sequencing of 16S rRNA genes indicated that sediments associated with hypoxic water columns contained significantly greater proportions of Bacteria and Archaea consistent with syntrophic degradation of organic matter and methanogenesis compared to less reduced sediments. Microbial taxa frequently associated with hydrocarbon-degrading communities were found throughout the Bay, and the genetic potential for hydrocarbon metabolism was demonstrated via the detection of benzyl-(bssA) and alkylsuccinate synthase (assA) genes. Although microcosm studies did not indicate sulfidogenic alkane degradation, the data suggested that methanogenic conversion of alkanes was occurring. These findings highlight the potential role that anaerobic microorganisms could play in the bioremediation of hydrocarbons in the Bay.

  15. Cool-flame Extinction During N-Alkane Droplet Combustion in Microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nayagam, Vedha; Dietrich, Daniel L.; Hicks, Michael C.; Williams, Forman A.

    2014-01-01

    Recent droplet combustion experiments onboard the International Space Station (ISS) have revealed that large n-alkane droplets can continue to burn quasi-steadily following radiative extinction in a low-temperature regime, characterized by negative-temperaturecoefficient (NTC) chemistry. In this study we report experimental observations of n-heptane, n-octane, and n-decane droplets of varying initial sizes burning in oxygen/nitrogen/carbon dioxide and oxygen/helium/nitrogen environments at 1.0, 0.7, and 0.5 atmospheric pressures. The oxygen concentration in these tests varied in the range of 14% to 25% by volume. Large n-alkane droplets exhibited quasi-steady low-temperature burning and extinction following radiative extinction of the visible flame while smaller droplets burned to completion or disruptively extinguished. A vapor-cloud formed in most cases slightly prior to or following the "cool flame" extinction. Results for droplet burning rates in both the hot-flame and cool-flame regimes as well as droplet extinction diameters at the end of each stage are presented. Time histories of radiant emission from the droplet captured using broadband radiometers are also presented. Remarkably the "cool flame" extinction diameters for all the three n-alkanes follow a trend reminiscent of the ignition delay times observed in previous studies. The similarities and differences among the n-alkanes during "cool flame" combustion are discussed using simplified theoretical models of the phenomenon

  16. 40 CFR 721.10148 - Acryloxy alkanoic alkane derivative with mixed metal oxides (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... with mixed metal oxides (generic). 721.10148 Section 721.10148 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... mixed metal oxides (generic). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as acryloxy alkanoic alkane derivative with mixed...

  17. Iridium complexes of new NCP pincer ligands: catalytic alkane dehydrogenation and alkene isomerization.

    PubMed

    Jia, Xiangqing; Zhang, Lei; Qin, Chuan; Leng, Xuebing; Huang, Zheng

    2014-09-28

    Iridium complexes of novel NCP pincer ligands containing pyridine and phosphinite arms have been synthesized. One Ir complex shows good catalytic activity for alkane dehydrogenation, and all complexes are highly active for olefin isomerization. A combination of the Ir complex and a (PNN)Fe pincer complex catalyzes the formation of linear alkylboronates selectively from internal olefins via sequential olefin isomerization-hydroboration.

  18. Biosurfactant-mediated biodegradation of straight and methyl-branched alkanes by Pseudomonas aeruginosa ATCC 55925

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Accidental oil spills and waste disposal are important sources for environmental pollution. We investigated the biodegradation of alkanes by Pseudomonas aeruginosa ATCC 55925 in relation to a rhamnolipid surfactant produced by the same bacterial strain. Results showed that the linear C11-C21 compounds in a heating oil sample degraded from 6% to 100%, whereas the iso-alkanes tended to be recalcitrant unless they were exposed to the biosurfactant; under such condition total biodegradation was achieved. Only the biodegradation of the commercial C12-C19 alkanes could be demonstrated, ranging from 23% to 100%, depending on the experimental conditions. Pristane (a C19 branched alkane) only biodegraded when present alone with the biosurfactant and when included in an artificial mixture even without the biosurfactant. In all cases the biosurfactant significantly enhanced biodegradation. The electron scanning microscopy showed that cells depicted several adaptations to growth on hydrocarbons, such as biopolymeric spheres with embedded cells distributed over different layers on the spherical surfaces and cells linked to each other by extracellular appendages. Electron transmission microscopy revealed transparent inclusions, which were associated with hydrocarbon based-culture cells. These patterns of hydrocarbon biodegradation and cell adaptations depended on the substrate bioavailability, type and length of hydrocarbon. PMID:21906343

  19. 40 CFR 721.785 - Halogenated alkane aromatic compound (generic name).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... (CONTINUED) TOXIC SUBSTANCES CONTROL ACT SIGNIFICANT NEW USES OF CHEMICAL SUBSTANCES Significant New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.785 Halogenated alkane aromatic compound (generic name). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified...

  20. Immunogenecity of Modified Alkane Polymers Is Mediated through TLR1/2 Activation

    PubMed Central

    Crisi, Giovanna M.; Cobelli, Neil; Santambrogio, Laura

    2008-01-01

    Background With the advancement of biomedical technology, artificial materials have been developed to replace diseased, damaged or nonfunctional body parts. Among such materials, ultra high molecular weight alkane or modified alkyl polymers have been extensively used in heart valves, stents, pacemakers, ear implants, as well as total joint replacement devices. Although much research has been undertaken to design the most non-reactive biologically inert polyethylene derivatives, strong inflammatory responses followed by rejection and failure of the implant have been noted. Methodology/Principal Findings Purification of the alkane polymers from the site of inflammation revealed extensive “in vivo” oxidation as detected by fourier transformed infra-red spectroscopy. Herein, we report the novel observation that oxidized alkane polymers induced activation of TLR1/2 pathway as determined by ligand dependent changes in intrinsic tyrosine fluorescence intensity and NF-κΒ luciferase gene assays. Oxidized polymers were very effective in activating dendritic cells and inducing secretion of pro-inflammatory cytokines. Molecular docking of the oxidized alkanes designated ligand specificity and polymeric conformations fitting into the TLR1/2 binding grooves. Conclusion/Significance This is the first report of a synthetic polymer activating immune responses through TLR binding. PMID:18560588