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Sample records for alkanolamine solvent systems

  1. Heat of Dissolution Measurements for CO2 in Mixed Alkanolamine Solvents

    SciTech Connect

    Vinayak Kabadi

    2007-03-17

    The main objective of this research was to measure heat of dissolution of CO{sub 2} in carefully mixed alkanolamine solvent systems, and provide such directly measured data that might be used for efficient design of CO{sub 2} capture process, and for better understanding of the thermodynamics of CO{sub 2}-Alkanolamine systems. An experimental set-up has been designed using the Isothermal Micro Calorimeter for measuring the solubilities and enthalpies of CO{sub 2} in mixed solvents made of MEA, MDEA, PZ, KF and water. All the measurements were done at temperatures 15, 40, and 75 C by maintaining a constant pressure of 100 psig. A detailed study has been done on the variation of solubilities and enthalpies over a wide range of temperatures, pressures and concentrations, by extracting the information from the literature.

  2. Heat of Dissolution Measurements for CO2 in Mixed Alkanolamine Solvents

    SciTech Connect

    Vinayak N. Kabadi

    2006-05-29

    The main objective of this project is to measure heat of dissolution of CO{sub 2} in carefully selected mixed alkanolamine solvent systems, and provide such directly measured data that might be used for efficient design of CO{sub 2} capture processes, or for better understanding of thermodynamics of CO{sub 2}-alkanolamine systems. Carbon dioxide is one of the major greenhouse gases, and the need for stabilization of its composition in earth's atmosphere is vital for the future of mankind. Although technologies are available for capture and storage of CO{sub 2}, these technologies are far too expensive for economical commercialization. Reduction of cost would require research for refinement of the technology. For more economical CO{sub 2} capture and regeneration, there is a need for development of more efficient solvent systems. In this project we will extend the thermodynamic database by measuring heat of solution data of CO{sub 2} in mixed solvents made of MEA (monoethanolamine), MDEA (methyldiethanolamine), piperazine, and water. Mixed solvents of different compositions will be selected and in each case data will be measured at temperatures 40 and 80C and various partial pressures of CO{sub 2}. At the end of the project, observations, conclusions, and recommendations will be derived for the choice of mixed solvents for efficient CO{sub 2} capture with potential for commercialization.

  3. HEAT OF DISSOLUTION MEASUREMENTS FOR CO2 IN MIXED ALKANOLAMINE SOLVENTS

    SciTech Connect

    Vinayak N. Kabadi

    2004-04-27

    The main objective of this project is to measure heat of dissolution of CO{sub 2} in carefully selected mixed alkanolamine solvent systems, and provide such directly measured data that might be used for efficient design of CO{sub 2} capture processes, or for better understanding of thermodynamics of CO{sub 2}-alkanolamine systems. Carbon dioxide is one of the major greenhouse gases, and the need for stabilization of its composition in earth's atmosphere is vital for the future of mankind. Although technologies are available for capture and storage of CO{sub 2}, these technologies are far too expensive for economical commercialization. Reduction of cost would require research for refinement of the technology. For more economical CO{sub 2} capture and regeneration, there is a need for development of more efficient solvent systems. In this project we will extend the thermodynamic database by measuring heat of solution data of CO{sub 2} in mixed solvents made of MEA (monoethanolamine), MDEA (methyldiethanolamine), piperazine, and water. Mixed solvents of different compositions will be selected and in each case data will be measured at temperatures 40 and 80 C and various partial pressures of CO{sub 2}. At the end of the project, observations, conclusions, and recommendations will be derived for the choice of mixed solvents for efficient CO{sub 2} capture with potential for commercialization.

  4. HEAT OF DISSOLUTION MEASUREMENTS FOR CO2 IN MIXED ALKANOLAMINE SOLVENTS

    SciTech Connect

    Vinayak N. Kabadi

    2005-05-23

    The main objective of this project is to measure heat of dissolution of CO{sub 2} in carefully selected mixed alkanolamine solvent systems, and provide such directly measured data that might be used for efficient design of CO{sub 2} capture processes, or for better understanding of thermodynamics of CO{sub 2}-alkanolamine systems. Carbon dioxide is one of the major greenhouse gases, and the need for stabilization of its composition in earth's atmosphere is vital for the future of mankind. Although technologies are available for capture and storage of CO{sub 2}, these technologies are far too expensive for economical commercialization. Reduction of cost would require research for refinement of the technology. For more economical CO{sub 2} capture and regeneration, there is a need for development of more efficient solvent systems. In this project we will extend the thermodynamic database by measuring heat of solution data of CO{sub 2} in mixed solvents made of MEA (monoethanolamine), MDEA (methyldiethanolamine), piperazine, and water. Mixed solvents of different compositions will be selected and in each case data will be measured at temperatures 40 and 80C and various partial pressures of CO{sub 2}. At the end of the project, observations, conclusions, and recommendations will be derived for the choice of mixed solvents for efficient CO{sub 2} capture with potential for commercialization.

  5. Heat of Dissolution Measurements for CO2 in Mixed Alkanolamine Solvents

    SciTech Connect

    Vinayak N. Kabadi

    2007-03-31

    The main objective of this project is to measure heat of dissolution of CO{sub 2} in carefully selected mixed alkanolamine solvent systems, and provide such directly measured data that might be used for efficient design of CO{sub 2} capture processes, or for better understanding of thermodynamics of CO{sub 2}- alkanolamine systems. Carbon dioxide is one of the major greenhouse gases, and the need for stabilization of its composition in earth's atmosphere is vital for the future of mankind. Although technologies are available for capture and storage of CO{sub 2}, these technologies are far too expensive for economical commercialization. Reduction of cost would require research for refinement of the technology. For more economical CO{sub 2} capture and regeneration, there is a need for development of more efficient solvent systems. In this project we will extend the thermodynamic database by measuring heat of solution data of CO{sub 2} in mixed solvents made of MEA (monoethanolamine), MDEA (methyldiethanolamine), piperazine, and water. Mixed solvents of different compositions will be selected and in each case data will be measured at temperatures 40 and 80C and various partial pressures of CO{sub 2}. At the end of the project, observations, conclusions, and recommendations will be derived for the choice of mixed solvents for efficient CO{sub 2} capture with potential for commercialization.

  6. Heat of Dissolution Measurements for CO2 in Mixed Alkanolamine Solvents

    SciTech Connect

    Vinayak N. Kabadi

    2005-12-01

    The main objective of this project is to measure heat of dissolution of CO{sub 2} in carefully selected mixed alkanolamine solvent systems, and provide such directly measured data that might be used for efficient design of CO{sub 2} capture processes, or for better understanding of thermodynamics of CO{sub 2}- alkanolamine systems. Carbon dioxide is one of the major greenhouse gases, and the need for stabilization of its composition in earth's atmosphere is vital for the future of mankind. Although technologies are available for capture and storage of CO{sub 2}, these technologies are far too expensive for economical commercialization. Reduction of cost would require research for refinement of the technology. For more economical CO{sub 2} capture and regeneration, there is a need for development of more efficient solvent systems. In this project we will extend the thermodynamic database by measuring heat of solution data of CO{sub 2} in mixed solvents made of MEA (monoethanolamine), MDEA (methyldiethanolamine), piperazine, and water. Mixed solvents of different compositions will be selected and in each case data will be measured at temperatures 40 and 80C and various partial pressures of CO{sub 2}. At the end of the project, observations, conclusions, and recommendations will be derived for the choice of mixed solvents for efficient CO{sub 2} capture with potential for commercialization.

  7. Heat of Dissolution Measurements for CO2 in Mixed Alkanolamine Solvents

    SciTech Connect

    Vinayak N. Kabadi

    2006-09-30

    The main objective of this project is to measure heat of dissolution of CO{sub 2} in carefully selected mixed alkanolamine solvent systems, and provide such directly measured data that might be used for efficient design of CO{sub 2} capture processes, or for better understanding of thermodynamics of CO{sub 2}-alkanolamine systems. Carbon dioxide is one of the major greenhouse gases, and the need for stabilization of its composition in earth's atmosphere is vital for the future of mankind. Although technologies are available for capture and storage of CO{sub 2}, these technologies are far too expensive for economical commercialization. Reduction of cost would require research for refinement of the technology. For more economical CO{sub 2} capture and regeneration, there is a need for development of more efficient solvent systems. In this project we will extend the thermodynamic database by measuring heat of solution data of CO{sub 2} in mixed solvents made of MEA (monoethanolamine), MDEA (methyldiethanolamine), piperazine, and water. Mixed solvents of different compositions will be selected and in each case data will be measured at temperatures 40 and 80C and various partial pressures of CO{sub 2}. At the end of the project, observations, conclusions, and recommendations will be derived for the choice of mixed solvents for efficient CO{sub 2} capture with potential for commercialization.

  8. HEAT OF DISSOLUTION MEASUREMENTS FOR CO2 IN MIXED ALKANOLAMINE SOLVENTS

    SciTech Connect

    Vinayak N. Kabadi

    2004-11-15

    The main objective of this project is to measure heat of dissolution of CO{sub 2} in carefully selected mixed alkanolamine solvent systems, and provide such directly measured data that might be used for efficient design of CO{sub 2} capture processes, or for better understanding of thermodynamics of CO{sub 2}-alkanolamine systems. Carbon dioxide is one of the major greenhouse gases, and the need for stabilization of its composition in earth's atmosphere is vital for the future of mankind. Although technologies are available for capture and storage of CO{sub 2}, these technologies are far too expensive for economical commercialization. Reduction of cost would require research for refinement of the technology. For more economical CO{sub 2} capture and regeneration, there is a need for development of more efficient solvent systems. In this project we will extend the thermodynamic database by measuring heat of solution data of CO{sub 2} in mixed solvents made of MEA (monoethanolamine), MDEA (methyldiethanolamine), piperazine, and water. Mixed solvents of different compositions will be selected and in each case data will be measured at temperatures 40 and 80 C and various partial pressures of CO{sub 2}. At the end of the project, observations, conclusions, and recommendations will be derived for the choice of mixed solvents for efficient CO{sub 2} capture with potential for commercialization.

  9. A Comparative Study of the CO2 Absorption in Some Solvent-Free Alkanolamines and in Aqueous Monoethanolamine (MEA).

    PubMed

    Barzagli, Francesco; Mani, Fabrizio; Peruzzini, Maurizio

    2016-07-01

    The neat secondary amines 2-(methylamino)ethanol, 2-(ethylamino)ethanol, 2-(isopropylamino)ethanol, 2-(benzylamino)ethanol and 2-(butylamino)ethanol react with CO2 at 50-60 °C and room pressure yielding liquid carbonated species without their dilution with any additional solvent. These single-component absorbents have the theoretical CO2 capture capacity of 0.50 (mol CO2/mol amine) due to the formation of the corresponding amine carbamates and protonated amines that were identified by the (13)C NMR analysis. These single-component absorbents were used for CO2 capture (15% and 40% v/v in air) in two series of different procedures: (1) batch experiments aimed at investigating the efficiency and the rate of CO2 capture; (2) continuous cycles of absorption-desorption carried out in packed columns with absorption temperatures brought at 50-60 °C and desorption temperatures at 100-120 °C at room pressure. A number of different amines and experimental setups gave CO2 capture efficiency greater than 90%. For comparison purposes, 30 wt % aqueous MEA was used for CO2 capture under the same operational conditions described for the solvent-free amines. The potential advantages of solvent-free alkanolamines over aqueous MEA in the CO2 capture process were discussed. PMID:27294832

  10. Collection of VLE data for acid gas-alkanolamine systems using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Bullin, J.A.; Frazier, R.E.

    1991-09-01

    The industrial standard process for the purification of natural gas is to remove acid gases, mainly hydrogen sulfide and carbon dioxide, by the absorption and reaction of these gases with alkanolamines. Inadequate data for vapor -- liquid equilibrium (VLE) hinder the industry from converting operations to more energy efficient amine mixtures and conserving energy. Some energy reductions have been realized in the past decade by applying such amine systems as hindered'' amines, methyldiethanolamine (MDEA), and MDEA based amine mixtures. However, the lack of reliable and accurate fundamental VLE data impedes the commercial application of these more efficient alkanolamine systems. The first project objective is to improve the accuracy of vapor -- liquid equilibrium measurements at low hydrogen sulfide concentrations. The second project objective is to measure the VLE for amine mixtures. By improving the accuracy of the VLE measurements on MDEA and mixtures with other amines, energy saving can be quickly and confidently implemented in the many existing absorption units already in use. If about 25% of the existing 95.3 billion SCFD gas purification capacity is converted to these new amine systems, the energy savings are estimated to be about 3 {times} 10{sup 14} BTU/yr.

  11. Corrosion control in alkanolamine gas treating: Absorber corrosion

    SciTech Connect

    Helle, H.P.E.

    1995-12-01

    Even in 1980, when corrosion in alkanolamine units was rampant, over 50% of all acid gas purification systems was based on alkanolamine absorbents. Over the years the control of corrosion has gradually become firmer. This paper examines the reasons for corrosion and provides insight in one particular aspect of corrosion in alkanolamine units, absorber corrosion. Three factors are identified, solvent degradation, local stagnancy and exceeding the units capacity. Solvent degradation increases the corrosivity of the solvent proper by the formation of complexing compounds such as diamines. Local stagnancy allows the solvent loading level to approach equilibrium which creates a corrosive environment. Exceeding the unit`s capacity will achieve essentially the same but on a larger scale. The corrosion enhancement by interaction of a total of 12 factors is made visual and clarified. The paper examines step by step the means to prevent a number of the factors arising. Guidelines are given for design of the absorber and absorber internals, the molarity of the solvent, inhibition and the benefits and handicaps of filming inhibitors.

  12. Performance evaluation of carbon dioxide-alkanolamine- water system by equation of state/excess Gibbs energy models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suleman, H.; Maulud, A. S.; Man, Z.

    2016-06-01

    Numerous thermodynamic techniques have been applied to correlate carbon dioxide- alkanolamine-water systems, with varying accuracy and complexity. With advent of high pressure carbon dioxide absorption in industry, the development of high pressure thermodynamic models have became an exigency. Equation of state/excess Gibbs energy models promises a substantial improvement in this field. Many researchers have shown application of these models to high pressure vapour liquid equilibria of said system with good correlation. However, no study shows the range of application of these models in presence of other competitive techniques. Therefore, this study quantitatively describes the range of application of equation of state/excess Gibbs energy models to carbon dioxide-alkanolamine systems. The model uses Linear Combination of Vidal and Michelsen mixing rule for correlation of carbon dioxide absorption in single aqueous monoethanolamine, diethanolamine and methyldiethanolamine mixtures. The results show that correlation of equation of state/excess Gibbs energy models show a transient change at carbon dioxide loadings of 0.8. Therefore, these models are applicable to the above mentioned system for carbon dioxide loadings beyond 0.8 mol/mol and higher. The observations are similar in behaviour for all tested alkanolamines and are therefore generalized for the system.

  13. Why metals volubility may not be a good indicator of corrosion in alkanolamine systems

    SciTech Connect

    Rooney, P.C.; DuPart, M.S.

    1999-11-01

    Although it is generally believed that Fe, Cr and Ni content in alkanolamine gas treating solutions reflects the corrosivity of the solution, the authors have found that this is not necessarily the case. Comparison of metals volubility by inductively coupled plasma (ICP) with carbon steel and stainless steel weight loss coupons of various alkanolamines heated in an autoclave showed that low metals volubility does not necessarily mean low coupon corrosivity. High metals volubility also did not necessarily mean high coupon corrosivity. One plant having very high metals volubility was found to have very low corrosion upon a thorough plant inspection. Another plant had severe localized corrosion that could not have been predicted based upon the low (200ppm) Fe in the alkanolamine compared to the total surface area of carbon steel in this plant.

  14. Ultrasound-assisted low-density solvent dispersive liquid-liquid extraction for the determination of alkanolamines and alkylamines in cosmetics with ion chromatography.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Zhixiong; Li, Gongke; Zhong, Xiuhua; Luo, Zhibin; Zhu, Binghui

    2013-10-15

    A new one-step sample preparation technique termed ultrasound-assisted low-density solvent dispersive liquid-liquid extraction (UA-LDS-DLLE) coupled with ion chromatography (IC) was developed for the determination of three alkanolamines and two alkylamines in complex samples. Sample matrices were rapidly dissolved and dispersed to form cloudy solutions by using two solvents, where target analytes were transferred into acid solutions, while liposoluble substances were dissolved in cyclohexane. The obtained extracts could be used directly for injection analysis without any additional purification because the potential matrix interferences had been effectively eliminated in extraction process. The extraction efficiency could be markedly enhanced and the extraction could be quickly accomplished within 13 min under the synergistic effects of ultrasound radiation, vibration and heating. Various parameters influencing extraction efficiency were evaluated using orthogonal array experimental design. The extraction performance of the approach was demonstrated for the determination of target analytes in 15 commercial cosmetics covering very different matrices. Linearity ranges of 0.3-50 mg L(-1) and limits of detection varying from 0.072 to 0.12 mg L(-1) were achieved. The recoveries ranged from 86.9-108.5% with the relative standard deviations (RSDs) of 1.2-6.2%. The method was proved to be a simple and effective extraction technique that provided an attractive alternative to the analysis of trace amounts of target analytes in large numbers of cosmetics.

  15. Collection of VLE data for acid gas---alkanolamine systems using fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. [Vapor-liquid equilibrium

    SciTech Connect

    Bullin, J.A.; Frazier, R.E.

    1992-01-01

    The industrial standard process for the purification of natural gas is to remove acid gases, mainly hydrogen sulfide and carbon dioxide, by the absorption and reaction of these gases with alkanolamines. Inadequate data for vapor--liquid equilibrium (VLE) hinder the industry from converting operations to more energy efficient amine mixtures and conserving energy. Some energy reductions have been realized in the past decade by applying such amine systems as hindered'' amines, methyldiethanolamine (MDEA), and MDEA based amine mixtures. However, the lack of reliable and accurate fundamental VLE data impedes the commercial application of these more efficient alkanolamine systems. The first project objective is to improve the accuracy of vapor--liquid equilibrium measurements at low hydrogen sulfide concentrations. The second project objective is to measure the VLE for amine mixtures. By improving the accuracy of the VLE measurements on MDEA and mixtures with other amines, energy saving can be quickly and confidently implemented in the many existing absorption units already in use. If about 25% of the existing 95.3 billion SCFD gas purification capacity is converted to these new amine systems, the energy savings are estimated to be about 3 [times] 10[sup 14] BTU/yr.

  16. A Transferable Force Field for Primary, Secondary, and Tertiary Alkanolamines.

    PubMed

    Orozco, Gustavo A; Lachet, Véronique; Nieto-Draghi, Carlos; Mackie, Allan D

    2013-04-01

    Due to the importance of alkanolamines as solvents in several industrial processes and the absence of a dedicated transferable force field for them, we have developed an anisotropic united-atom (AUA4) force field for primary, secondary, and tertiary alkanolamines. In addition to correctly reproducing the experimental densities, additional properties for six different molecules have been verified at different temperatures including vaporization enthalpies, vapor pressures, normal boiling points, critical temperatures, and critical densities. A qualitative analysis of the radial distribution function of pure monoethanolamine has also been carried out. Furthermore, the viscosity coefficients were also calculated as a function of temperature and found to be in good agreement with experimental data. Finally, and perhaps most strikingly, the prediction of the excess enthalpies of alkanolamines in aqueous solutions has been found to be in excellent qualitative agreement with experimental data. PMID:26583556

  17. Collection of VLE data for acid gas-alkanolamine systems using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. Phase 1, September 29, 1990--September 30, 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Bullin, J.A.; Frazier, R.E.

    1991-09-01

    The industrial standard process for the purification of natural gas is to remove acid gases, mainly hydrogen sulfide and carbon dioxide, by the absorption and reaction of these gases with alkanolamines. Inadequate data for vapor -- liquid equilibrium (VLE) hinder the industry from converting operations to more energy efficient amine mixtures and conserving energy. Some energy reductions have been realized in the past decade by applying such amine systems as ``hindered`` amines, methyldiethanolamine (MDEA), and MDEA based amine mixtures. However, the lack of reliable and accurate fundamental VLE data impedes the commercial application of these more efficient alkanolamine systems. The first project objective is to improve the accuracy of vapor -- liquid equilibrium measurements at low hydrogen sulfide concentrations. The second project objective is to measure the VLE for amine mixtures. By improving the accuracy of the VLE measurements on MDEA and mixtures with other amines, energy saving can be quickly and confidently implemented in the many existing absorption units already in use. If about 25% of the existing 95.3 billion SCFD gas purification capacity is converted to these new amine systems, the energy savings are estimated to be about 3 {times} 10{sup 14} BTU/yr.

  18. Collection of VLE data for acid gas---alkanolamine systems using fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. Phase 2, October 1, 1991--September 30, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Bullin, J.A.; Frazier, R.E.

    1992-12-01

    The industrial standard process for the purification of natural gas is to remove acid gases, mainly hydrogen sulfide and carbon dioxide, by the absorption and reaction of these gases with alkanolamines. Inadequate data for vapor--liquid equilibrium (VLE) hinder the industry from converting operations to more energy efficient amine mixtures and conserving energy. Some energy reductions have been realized in the past decade by applying such amine systems as ``hindered`` amines, methyldiethanolamine (MDEA), and MDEA based amine mixtures. However, the lack of reliable and accurate fundamental VLE data impedes the commercial application of these more efficient alkanolamine systems. The first project objective is to improve the accuracy of vapor--liquid equilibrium measurements at low hydrogen sulfide concentrations. The second project objective is to measure the VLE for amine mixtures. By improving the accuracy of the VLE measurements on MDEA and mixtures with other amines, energy saving can be quickly and confidently implemented in the many existing absorption units already in use. If about 25% of the existing 95.3 billion SCFD gas purification capacity is converted to these new amine systems, the energy savings are estimated to be about 3 {times} 10{sup 14} BTU/yr.

  19. Collection of VLE data for acid gas-alkanolamine systems using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. Technical report, October 1, 1994--July 31, 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Bullin, J.A.; Rogers, W.J.

    1995-08-01

    The industrial standard process for the purification of natural gas is to remove acid gases, mainly hydrogen sulfide and carbon dioxide, by the absorption and reaction of these gases with alkanolamines. The natural gas industry requires vapor-liquid equilibrium (VLE) data to develop more energy efficient amine mixtures. Some energy reductions have been realized in the past decade by applying such amine systems as hindered amines, methyldiethanolamine (MDEA), and MDEA based amine mixtures. However, the lack of reliable and accurate VLE data impedes the commercial application of these more efficient alkanolamine systems. The first objective of this project is to improve the accuracy of vapor-liquid equilibrium measurements at low hydrogen sulfide concentrations. The second objective is to make VLE measurements for amine mixtures. By improving the accuracy of the VLE data on MDEA and other amines, energy savings can be implemented in the many existing absorption units already in use. If about 25% of the existing 95.3 billion SCFD gas purification capacity is converted to these new amine systems, the energy saved is estimated to be 3 {times} 10{sup 14} BTU/yr. 14 refs., 31 figs., 12 tabs.

  20. Collection of VLE data for acid gas - alkanolamine systems using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. Final report, September 29, 1990--September 30, 1996

    SciTech Connect

    Bullin, J.A.; Rogers, W.J.

    1996-11-01

    This report describes research from September 29, 1990 through September 30, 1996, involving the development a novel Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopic apparatus and method for measuring vapor - liquid equilibrium (VLE) systems of carbon dioxide and hydrogen sulfide with aqueous alkanolamine solutions. The original apparatus was developed and modified as it was used to collect VLE data on acid gas systems. Vapor and liquid calibrations were performed for spectral measurements of hydrogen sulfide and carbon dioxide in the vapor and in solution with aqueous diethanolamine (DEA) and methyldiethanolamine (MDEA). VLE measurements were made of systems of hydrogen sulfide and carbon dioxide in 20 wt % DEA at 50{degrees}C and 40{degrees}C. VLE measurements were made of systems of hydrogen sulfide and carbon dioxide in 50 wt% and 23 wt% MDEA at 40{degrees}C and in 23 wt% MDEA at 50{degrees}C. VLE measurements were made of systems of hydrogen sulfide and carbon dioxide in 35 wt% MDEA + 5 wt% DEA and in 35 wt% MDEA + 10 wt% DEA at 40{degrees}C and 50{degrees}C. Measurements were made of residual amounts of carbon dioxide in each VLE system. The new FTIR spectrometer is now a consistently working and performing apparatus.

  1. Continuous countercurrent membrane column for the separation of solute/solvent and solvent/solvent systems

    DOEpatents

    Nerad, Bruce A.; Krantz, William B.

    1988-01-01

    A reverse osmosis membrane process or hybrid membrane - complementary separator process for producing enriched product or waste streams from concentrated and dilute feed streams for both solvent/solvent and solute/solvent systems is described.

  2. 40 CFR 721.10384 - Substituted alkanolamine phenol (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Substituted alkanolamine phenol... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10384 Substituted alkanolamine phenol (generic). (a) Chemical substance... substituted alkanolamine phenol (PMN P-10-332) is subject to reporting under this section for the...

  3. 40 CFR 721.10384 - Substituted alkanolamine phenol (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Substituted alkanolamine phenol... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10384 Substituted alkanolamine phenol (generic). (a) Chemical substance... substituted alkanolamine phenol (PMN P-10-332) is subject to reporting under this section for the...

  4. 40 CFR 721.10384 - Substituted alkanolamine phenol (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Substituted alkanolamine phenol... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10384 Substituted alkanolamine phenol (generic). (a) Chemical substance... substituted alkanolamine phenol (PMN P-10-332) is subject to reporting under this section for the...

  5. Advanced integrated solvent extraction systems

    SciTech Connect

    Horwitz, E.P.; Dietz, M.L.; Leonard, R.A.

    1997-10-01

    Advanced integrated solvent extraction systems are a series of novel solvent extraction (SX) processes that will remove and recover all of the major radioisotopes from acidic-dissolved sludge or other acidic high-level wastes. The major focus of this effort during the last 2 years has been the development of a combined cesium-strontium extraction/recovery process, the Combined CSEX-SREX Process. The Combined CSEX-SREX Process relies on a mixture of a strontium-selective macrocyclic polyether and a novel cesium-selective extractant based on dibenzo 18-crown-6. The process offers several potential advantages over possible alternatives in a chemical processing scheme for high-level waste treatment. First, if the process is applied as the first step in chemical pretreatment, the radiation level for all subsequent processing steps (e.g., transuranic extraction/recovery, or TRUEX) will be significantly reduced. Thus, less costly shielding would be required. The second advantage of the Combined CSEX-SREX Process is that the recovered Cs-Sr fraction is non-transuranic, and therefore will decay to low-level waste after only a few hundred years. Finally, combining individual processes into a single process will reduce the amount of equipment required to pretreat the waste and therefore reduce the size and cost of the waste processing facility. In an ongoing collaboration with Lockheed Martin Idaho Technology Company (LMITCO), the authors have successfully tested various segments of the Advanced Integrated Solvent Extraction Systems. Eichrom Industries, Inc. (Darien, IL) synthesizes and markets the Sr extractant and can supply the Cs extractant on a limited basis. Plans are under way to perform a test of the Combined CSEX-SREX Process with real waste at LMITCO in the near future.

  6. Solvent recovery system provides timely compliance solution

    SciTech Connect

    1996-11-01

    Hoechst Celanese Corp. (Coventry, Rhode Island) faced the challenge of meeting an Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) deadline for solvent recovery within one year. The company also had to ensure that a new solvent recovery system would satisfy Rhode Island state requirements. An initial search for the required technology was fruitless. Finally, MG Industries (Saint Charles, Missouri), an industrial gas supplier, was chosen for the job. Using CRYOSOLV, as the waste stream cools in the cryogenic condenser (heat exchanger), the solvents condense at temperatures below the dewpoint. The recovered solvent can be recycled into the process, while clean gas is vented to the atmosphere.

  7. Solvent cleaning system and method for removing contaminants from solvent used in resin recycling

    DOEpatents

    Bohnert, George W.; Hand, Thomas E.; DeLaurentiis, Gary M.

    2009-01-06

    A two step solvent and carbon dioxide based system that produces essentially contaminant-free synthetic resin material and which further includes a solvent cleaning system for periodically removing the contaminants from the solvent so that the solvent can be reused and the contaminants can be collected and safely discarded in an environmentally safe manner.

  8. Accurate pKa calculation of the conjugate acids of alkanolamines, alkaloids and nucleotide bases by quantum chemical methods.

    PubMed

    Gangarapu, Satesh; Marcelis, Antonius T M; Zuilhof, Han

    2013-04-01

    The pKa of the conjugate acids of alkanolamines, neurotransmitters, alkaloid drugs and nucleotide bases are calculated with density functional methods (B3LYP, M08-HX and M11-L) and ab initio methods (SCS-MP2, G3). Implicit solvent effects are included with a conductor-like polarizable continuum model (CPCM) and universal solvation models (SMD, SM8). G3, SCS-MP2 and M11-L methods coupled with SMD and SM8 solvation models perform well for alkanolamines with mean unsigned errors below 0.20 pKa units, in all cases. Extending this method to the pKa calculation of 35 nitrogen-containing compounds spanning 12 pKa units showed an excellent correlation between experimental and computational pKa values of these 35 amines with the computationally low-cost SM8/M11-L density functional approach.

  9. Hazardous Solvent Substitution Data System tutorial

    SciTech Connect

    Twitchell, K.E.; Skinner, N.L.

    1993-07-01

    This manual is the tutorial for the Hazardous Solvent Substitution Data System (HSSDS), an online, comprehensive system of information on alternatives to hazardous solvents and related subjects. The HSSDS data base contains product information, material safety data sheets, toxicity reports, usage reports, biodegradable data, product chemical element lists, and background information on solvents. HSSDS use TOPIC{reg_sign} to search for information based on a query defined by the user. TOPIC provides a full text retrieval of unstructured source documents. In this tutorial, a series of lessons is provided that guides the user through basic steps common to most queries performed with HSSDS. Instructions are provided for both window-based and character-based applications.

  10. Interfacial chemistry in solvent extraction systems

    SciTech Connect

    Neuman, R.D.

    1992-01-01

    Research last year emphasized the nature of microscopic interfaces, i. e., reversed micelles and other association microstructures, which form in both practical and simplified acidic organophosphorus extraction systems associated with Ni, Co and Na in order to improve on a recently proposed model for aggregation of metal-extractant complexes. Also, the macroscopic interfacial behavior of extractant molecules and their interactions with metal ions which occur in hydrometallurgical solvent extraction systems were further investigated.

  11. Solubility of nitrous oxide in alkanolamine aqueous solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Tsai, T.C.; Ko, J.J.; Wang, H.M.; Lin, C.Y.; Li, M.H.

    2000-04-01

    The solubility of nitrous oxide (N{sub 2}O) in alkanolamine aqueous solutions has been measured at (30, 35, and 40) C. The systems studied are monoethanolamine, diethanolamine, diisopropanolamine, triethanolamine, and 2-amino-2-methyl-1-propanol aqueous solutions. The concentration of amine for monoethanolamine ranges from (1 to 6) kmol/m{sup 3} and for other amines from (0.5 to 3) kmol/m{sup 3}. The accuracy of the measurement is estimated to be {+-}2%. A semiempirical model of the excess Henry's constant proposed by Wang et al. (1992) was used to correlate the solubility of N{sub 2}O in amine solutions. The parameters of the correlation were determined from the measured solubility data and the available data in the open literature. For a wide temperature range from (15 to 75) C, the obtained correlation has been shown to represent reasonably the solubility of N{sub 2}O in six amine aqueous solutions: MEA, DEA, DIPA, TEA, MDEA, and AMP. For the purpose of process design, the obtained correlations are, in general, satisfactory for estimating the solubility of N{sub 2}O in amine solutions, which in turn can be used to estimate the correct free-gas solubility of CO{sub 2} in amines.

  12. Rigorous modeling of the acid gas heat of absorption in alkanolamine solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Emilie Blanchon le Bouhelec; Pascal Mougin; Alain Barreau; Roland Solimando

    2007-08-15

    In this work, we are interested in the estimation of CO{sub 2} and H{sub 2}S heats of absorption in aqueous solutions of alkanolamine: monoethanolamine (MEA), diethanolamine (DEA), and methyldiethanolamine (MDEA). Two methods can be used to calculate the heat release during the absorption phenomenon. The easier which consists of applying the integration of the Gibbs-Helmholtz expression remains inaccurate. The second one, more rigorous, evaluates the heat transfer through an internal energy balance for an open system. The balance expression contains partial molar enthalpies of species in the liquid phase which are calculated from the electrolyte nonrandom-two-liquid (NRTL) excess Gibbs energy model. The calculations carried out in this method can be considered as predictive regarding the NRTL model because its interaction parameters were previously and solely fitted on vapor-liquid equilibrium (VLE) data and not on experimental heat of absorption data. The comparison between both methods and experimental data for the three alkanolamines shows the contribution of this rigorous calculation to better estimate both properties (i.e., solubility and heat) and its usefulness to improve processes. Heats of absorption calculated with the second method can be used in addition to VLE data to fit NRTL parameters. This procedure leads to less-correlated parameters and allows extrapolating the model with more confidence. 63 refs., 10 figs., 6 tabs.

  13. Qualitative and quantitative evaluation of solvent systems for countercurrent separation.

    PubMed

    Friesen, J Brent; Ahmed, Sana; Pauli, Guido F

    2015-01-16

    Rational solvent system selection for countercurrent chromatography and centrifugal partition chromatography technology (collectively known as countercurrent separation) studies continues to be a scientific challenge as the fundamental questions of comparing polarity range and selectivity within a solvent system family and between putative orthogonal solvent systems remain unanswered. The current emphasis on metabolomic investigations and analysis of complex mixtures necessitates the use of successive orthogonal countercurrent separation (CS) steps as part of complex fractionation protocols. Addressing the broad range of metabolite polarities demands development of new CS solvent systems with appropriate composition, polarity (π), selectivity (σ), and suitability. In this study, a mixture of twenty commercially available natural products, called the GUESSmix, was utilized to evaluate both solvent system polarity and selectively characteristics. Comparisons of GUESSmix analyte partition coefficient (K) values give rise to a measure of solvent system polarity range called the GUESSmix polarity index (GUPI). Solvatochromic dye and electrical permittivity measurements were also evaluated in quantitatively assessing solvent system polarity. The relative selectivity of solvent systems were evaluated with the GUESSmix by calculating the pairwise resolution (αip), the number of analytes found in the sweet spot (Nsw), and the pairwise resolution of those sweet spot analytes (αsw). The combination of these parameters allowed for both intra- and inter-family comparison of solvent system selectivity. Finally, 2-dimensional reciprocal shifted symmetry plots (ReSS(2)) were created to visually compare both the polarities and selectivities of solvent system pairs. This study helps to pave the way to the development of new solvent systems that are amenable to successive orthogonal CS protocols employed in metabolomic studies. PMID:25542704

  14. 40 CFR 721.8085 - Reaction product of substituted aromatic diol, formaldehyde and alkanolamine, propoxylated...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Reaction product of substituted... Reaction product of substituted aromatic diol, formaldehyde and alkanolamine, propoxylated (generic). (a... generically as reaction product of substituted aromatic diol, formaldehyde and alkanolamine, propoxylated...

  15. 40 CFR 721.8085 - Reaction product of substituted aromatic diol, formaldehyde and alkanolamine, propoxylated...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Reaction product of substituted... Reaction product of substituted aromatic diol, formaldehyde and alkanolamine, propoxylated (generic). (a... generically as reaction product of substituted aromatic diol, formaldehyde and alkanolamine, propoxylated...

  16. 40 CFR 721.10251 - Fatty acids, reaction products with alkanolamine (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Fatty acids, reaction products with... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10251 Fatty acids, reaction products with alkanolamine (generic). (a... generically as fatty acids, reaction products with alkanolamine (PMN P-09-366) is subject to reporting...

  17. 40 CFR 721.10251 - Fatty acids, reaction products with alkanolamine (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Fatty acids, reaction products with... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10251 Fatty acids, reaction products with alkanolamine (generic). (a... generically as fatty acids, reaction products with alkanolamine (PMN P-09-366) is subject to reporting...

  18. 40 CFR 721.10464 - Fatty acid, reaction products with alkanolamine (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Fatty acid, reaction products with... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10464 Fatty acid, reaction products with alkanolamine (generic). (a... generically as fatty acid, reaction products with alkanolamine (PMN P-03-461) is subject to reporting...

  19. 40 CFR 721.8085 - Reaction product of substituted aromatic diol, formaldehyde and alkanolamine, propoxylated...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Reaction product of substituted... Reaction product of substituted aromatic diol, formaldehyde and alkanolamine, propoxylated (generic). (a... generically as reaction product of substituted aromatic diol, formaldehyde and alkanolamine, propoxylated...

  20. 40 CFR 721.8085 - Reaction product of substituted aromatic diol, formaldehyde and alkanolamine, propoxylated...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Reaction product of substituted... Reaction product of substituted aromatic diol, formaldehyde and alkanolamine, propoxylated (generic). (a... generically as reaction product of substituted aromatic diol, formaldehyde and alkanolamine, propoxylated...

  1. 40 CFR 721.8085 - Reaction product of substituted aromatic diol, formaldehyde and alkanolamine, propoxylated...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Reaction product of substituted... Reaction product of substituted aromatic diol, formaldehyde and alkanolamine, propoxylated (generic). (a... generically as reaction product of substituted aromatic diol, formaldehyde and alkanolamine, propoxylated...

  2. 40 CFR 721.10251 - Fatty acids, reaction products with alkanolamine (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Fatty acids, reaction products with... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10251 Fatty acids, reaction products with alkanolamine (generic). (a... generically as fatty acids, reaction products with alkanolamine (PMN P-09-366) is subject to reporting...

  3. 40 CFR 721.10464 - Fatty acid, reaction products with alkanolamine (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Fatty acid, reaction products with... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10464 Fatty acid, reaction products with alkanolamine (generic). (a... generically as fatty acid, reaction products with alkanolamine (PMN P-03-461) is subject to reporting...

  4. Electrospinning of Grooved Polystyrene Fibers: Effect of Solvent Systems.

    PubMed

    Liu, Wanjun; Huang, Chen; Jin, Xiangyu

    2015-12-01

    Secondary surface texture is of great significance to morphological variety and further expands the application areas of electrospun nanofibers. This paper presents the possibility of directly electrospinning grooved polystyrene (PS) fibers using both single and binary solvent systems. Solvents were classified as low boiling point solvent (LBPS): dichloromethane (DCM), acetone (ACE), and tetrahydrofuran (THF); high boiling point solvent (HBPS): N,N-dimethylformamide (DMF) and cyclohexanone (CYCo); and non-solvent (NS): 1-butanol (BuOH). By the systematic selection and combination of these solvents at given parameters, we found that single solvent systems produced non-grooved fibers. LBPS/DMF solvent systems resulted in fibers with different grooved textures, while LBPS/CYCo led to fibers with double grooved texture. Grooved fibers can also be fabricated from LBPS/LBPS, NS/LBPS, and NS/HBPS systems under specific conditions. The results indicated that the difference of evaporation rate (DER) between the two solvents played a key role in the formation of grooved texture. The formation of this unique texture should be attributed to three separate mechanisms, namely void-based elongation, wrinkle-based elongation, and collapsed jet-based elongation. Our findings can serve as guidelines for the preparation of ultrafine fibers with grooved secondary texture. PMID:26055481

  5. Electrospinning of Grooved Polystyrene Fibers: Effect of Solvent Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Wanjun; Huang, Chen; Jin, Xiangyu

    2015-05-01

    Secondary surface texture is of great significance to morphological variety and further expands the application areas of electrospun nanofibers. This paper presents the possibility of directly electrospinning grooved polystyrene (PS) fibers using both single and binary solvent systems. Solvents were classified as low boiling point solvent (LBPS): dichloromethane (DCM), acetone (ACE), and tetrahydrofuran (THF); high boiling point solvent (HBPS): N, N-dimethylformamide (DMF) and cyclohexanone (CYCo); and non-solvent (NS): 1-butanol (BuOH). By the systematic selection and combination of these solvents at given parameters, we found that single solvent systems produced non-grooved fibers. LBPS/DMF solvent systems resulted in fibers with different grooved textures, while LBPS/CYCo led to fibers with double grooved texture. Grooved fibers can also be fabricated from LBPS/LBPS, NS/LBPS, and NS/HBPS systems under specific conditions. The results indicated that the difference of evaporation rate (DER) between the two solvents played a key role in the formation of grooved texture. The formation of this unique texture should be attributed to three separate mechanisms, namely void-based elongation, wrinkle-based elongation, and collapsed jet-based elongation. Our findings can serve as guidelines for the preparation of ultrafine fibers with grooved secondary texture.

  6. Crystal growth in fused solvent systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ulrich, D. R.; Noone, M. J.; Spear, K. E.; White, W. B.; Henry, E. C.

    1973-01-01

    Research is reported on the growth of electronic ceramic single crystals from solution for the future growth of crystals in a microgravity environment. Work included growth from fused or glass solvents and aqueous solutions. Topics discussed include: crystal identification and selection; aqueous solution growth of triglycine sulphate (TGS); and characterization of TGS.

  7. Evaluation of alkanolamine solutions for carbon dioxide removal in cross-flow rotating packed beds.

    PubMed

    Lin, Chia-Chang; Lin, Yu-Hong; Tan, Chung-Sung

    2010-03-15

    The removal of CO(2) from a 10 vol% CO(2) gas by chemical absorption with 30 wt% alkanolamine solutions containing monoethanolamine (MEA), piperazine (PZ), and 2-amino-2-methyl-1-propanol (AMP) in the cross-flow rotating packed bed (RPB) was investigated. The CO(2) removal efficiency increased with rotor speed, liquid flow rate and inlet liquid temperature. However, the CO(2) removal efficiency decreased with gas flow rate. Also, the CO(2) removal efficiency was independent of inlet gas temperature. The 30 wt% alkanolamine solutions containing PZ with MEA were the appropriate absorbents compared with the single alkanolamine (MEA, AMP) and the mixed alkanolamine solutions containing AMP with MEA. A higher portion of PZ in alkanolamine solutions was more favorable to CO(2) removal. Owing to less contact time in the cross-flow RPB, alkanolamines having high reaction rates with CO(2) are suggested to be used. For the mixed alkanolamine solution containing 12 wt% PZ and 18 wt% MEA, the highest gas flow rate allowed to achieve the CO(2) removal efficiency more than 90% at a liquid flow rate of 0.54 L/min was of 29 L/min. The corresponding height of a transfer unit (HTU) was found to be less than 5.0 cm, lower than that in the conventional packed bed.

  8. Computational polymer physics: Hard-sphere chain in solvent systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gautam, Avinash; Gavazzi, Daniel; Taylor, Mark

    2009-10-01

    In this work we present results for chain conformation in two simple chain-in-solvent systems constructed from hard-sphere monomers of diameter D. The first system consists of a flexible chain of fused hard spheres (i.e., bond length L=D) in a monomeric hard-sphere solvent. The second system consists of a flexible tangent hard-sphere chain (L=D) in a dimeric hard-sphere solvent with L=D. These systems are studied using Monte Carlo simulations which employ both single-site crankshaft and multi-site pivot moves to sample the configuration space of the chain. We report chain structure, in terms of site-site probability functions, as a function of solvent density. In all cases, increasing solvent density leads to an overall compression of the chain. At high solvent density the chain conformation is closely coupled to the local solvent structure and we speculate that incommensurate structures may lead to interesting conformational transitions.

  9. Local composition in solvent + polymer or biopolymer systems.

    PubMed

    Shulgin, Ivan L; Ruckenstein, Eli

    2008-03-13

    The focus of this paper is on the application of the Kirkwood-Buff (KB) fluctuation theory to the analysis of the local composition in systems composed of a low molecular weight solvent and a high molecular weight polymer or protein. A key quantity in the calculation of the local composition is the excess (or deficit) of any species i around a central molecule j in a binary mixture. A new expression derived by the authors (J. Phys. Chem. B 2006, 110, 12707) for the excess (deficit) is used in the present paper. First, the literature regarding the local composition in such systems is reviewed. It is shown that the frequently used Zimm cluster integral provides incorrect results because it is based on an incorrect expression for the excess (or deficit). In the present paper, our new expression is applied to solvent + macromolecule systems to predict the local composition around both a solvent and a macromolecule central molecule. Five systems (toluene + polystyrene, water + collagen, water + serum albumin, water + hydroxypropyl cellulose, and water + Pluronic P105) were selected for this purpose. The results revealed that for water + collagen and water + serum albumin mixtures, the solvent was in deficit around a central solvent molecule and that for the other three mixtures, the opposite was true. In contrast, the solvent was always in excess around the macromolecule for all mixtures investigated. In the dilute range of the solvent, the excesses are due mainly to the different solvent and macromolecule sizes. However, in the dilute range of the macromolecule, the intermolecular interactions between solvent and macromolecule are mainly responsible for the excess. The obtained results shed some light on protein hydration.

  10. Coupled diffusion in aqueous weak acid + alkanolamine absorbents

    SciTech Connect

    Leaist, D.G.; Li, Y.; Poissant, R.

    1998-11-01

    Taylor dispersion and differential refractometry are used to measure ternary interdiffusion coefficients (D{sub ik}) for aqueous solutions of acetic acid + triethanolamine (TEA) and aqueous solutions of oxalic acid + TEA at 25 C. The D{sub ik} coefficients give the coupled fluxes of acid and TEA driven by the gradient in the concentration of each solute. Ternary Fick equations with variable D{sub ik} coefficients are integrated numerically to calculate accurate concentration profiles and the moving reaction front produced by the interdiffusion of TEA and acetic or oxalic acid. Ternary diffusion coefficients are also used to predict the rate of dissolution of oxalic acid in 1.00 mol/dm{sup 3} aqueous TEA, a process analogous to the absorption of a diprotic acid gas by an alkanolamine absorbent. The diffusion of oxalic acid drives a significant counterflow of TEA. The resulting buildup of TEA at the surface of the dissolving acid increases the interfacial concentration of TEA from 1.00 to 1.20 mol/dm{sup 3}, which in turn increases the solubility of the acid by 0.20 mol/dm{sup 3}. Nernst-Planck equations are used to predict D{sub ik} coefficients for aqueous weak acid + alkanolamine solutions. The fluxes of these solutes are shown to be strongly coupled by the electric field that is generated by the diffusing ions.

  11. Difference between Chitosan Hydrogels via Alkaline and Acidic Solvent Systems

    PubMed Central

    Nie, Jingyi; Wang, Zhengke; Hu, Qiaoling

    2016-01-01

    Chitosan (CS) has generated considerable interest for its desirable properties and wide applications. Hydrogel has been proven to be a major and vital form in the applications of CS materials. Among various types of CS hydrogels, physical cross-linked CS hydrogels are popular, because they avoided the potential toxicity and sacrifice of intrinsic properties caused by cross-linking or reinforcements. Alkaline solvent system and acidic solvent system are two important solvent systems for the preparation of physical cross-linked CS hydrogels, and also lay the foundations of CS hydrogel-based materials in many aspects. As members of physical cross-linked CS hydrogels, gel material via alkaline solvent system showed significant differences from that via acidic solvent system, but the reasons behind are still unexplored. In the present work, we studied the difference between CS hydrogel via alkaline system and acidic system, in terms of gelation process, hydrogel structure and mechanical property. In-situ/pseudo in-situ studies were carried out, including fluorescent imaging of gelation process, which provided dynamic visualization. Finally, the reasons behind the differences were explained, accompanied by the discussion about design strategy based on gelation behavior of the two systems. PMID:27786262

  12. Hazardous Solvent Substitution Data System reference manual. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect

    Branham-Haar, K.A.; Twitchell, K.E.

    1993-07-01

    Concern for the environment, in addition to Federal regulation, mandate the replacement of hazardous solvents with safer cleaning agents. Manufacturers are working to produce these replacement solvents. As these products are developed, potential users need to be informed of their availability. To promote the use of these new products instead of traditional solvents, the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) has developed the Hazardous Solvent Substitution Data System (HSSDS). The HSSDS provides a comprehensive system of information on alternatives to hazardous solvents and related subjects, and it makes that information available to solvent users, industrial hygienists, and process engineers. The HSSDS uses TOPIC{reg_sign}, a text retrieval system produced by Verity, Inc., to allow a user to search for information on a particular subject. TOPIC{reg_sign} produces a listing of the retrieved documents and allows the use to examine the documents individually and to use the information contained in them. This reference manual does not replace the comprehensive TOPIC{reg_sign} user documentation (available from Verity, Inc.), or the HSSDS Tutorial (available from the INEL). The purpose of this reference manual is to provide enough instruction on TOPIC{reg_sign} so the user may begin accessing the data contained in the HSSDS.

  13. Evaluation of Solvent Alternatives for Cleaning of Oxygen Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beeson, Harold; Biesinger, Paul; Delgado, Rafael; Antin, Neil

    1999-01-01

    The NASA White Sands Test Facility (WSTF) in a joint program with the Naval Sea Systems Command has evaluated a number of solvents as alternatives to the use of chlorofluorocarbons currently utilized for cleaning of oxygen systems. Particular attention has been given to the cleaning of gauges and instrumentation used in oxygen service, since there have been no identified aqueous alternatives. The requirements identified as selection criteria, include toxicity, physical properties consistent with application, flammability, oxygen compatibility, and cleaning ability. This paper provides a summary of results and recommendations for solvents evaluated to date.

  14. Apparatus and method for removing solvent from carbon dioxide in resin recycling system

    DOEpatents

    Bohnert, George W.; Hand, Thomas E.; DeLaurentiis, Gary M.

    2009-01-06

    A two-step resin recycling system and method solvent that produces essentially contaminant-free synthetic resin material. The system and method includes one or more solvent wash vessels to expose resin particles to a solvent, the solvent contacting the resin particles in the one or more solvent wash vessels to substantially remove contaminants on the resin particles. A separator is provided to separate the solvent from the resin particles after removal from the one or more solvent wash vessels. The resin particles are next exposed to carbon dioxide in a closed loop carbon dioxide system. The closed loop system includes a carbon dioxide vessel where the carbon dioxide is exposed to the resin, substantially removing any residual solvent remaining on the resin particles after separation. A separation vessel is also provided to separate the solvent from the solvent laden carbon dioxide. Both the carbon dioxide and the solvent are reused after separation in the separation vessel.

  15. Interfacial chemistry in solvent extraction systems

    SciTech Connect

    Neuman, R.D.

    1993-01-01

    Research this past year continued to emphasize characterization of the physicochemical nature of the microscopic interfaces, i.e., reversed micelles and other association microstructures, which form in both practical and simplified acidic organophosphorus extraction systems associated with Ni, Co, and Na in order to improve on the model for aggregation of metal-extractant complexes. Also, the macroscopic interfacial behavior of model extractant (surfactant) molecules was further investigated. 1 fig.

  16. Solvent refined coal reactor quench system

    DOEpatents

    Thorogood, R.M.

    1983-11-08

    There is described an improved SRC reactor quench system using a condensed product which is recycled to the reactor and provides cooling by evaporation. In the process, the second and subsequent reactors of a series of reactors are cooled by the addition of a light oil fraction which provides cooling by evaporation in the reactor. The vaporized quench liquid is recondensed from the reactor outlet vapor stream. 1 fig.

  17. Solvent refined coal reactor quench system

    DOEpatents

    Thorogood, Robert M.

    1983-01-01

    There is described an improved SRC reactor quench system using a condensed product which is recycled to the reactor and provides cooling by evaporation. In the process, the second and subsequent reactors of a series of reactors are cooled by the addition of a light oil fraction which provides cooling by evaporation in the reactor. The vaporized quench liquid is recondensed from the reactor outlet vapor stream.

  18. Dissolution state of cellulose in aqueous systems. 2. Acidic solvents.

    PubMed

    Alves, Luis; Medronho, Bruno; Antunes, Filipe E; Topgaard, Daniel; Lindman, Björn

    2016-10-20

    Cellulose is insoluble in water but can be dissolved in strong acidic or alkaline conditions. How well dissolved cellulose is in solution and how it organizes are key questions often neglected in literature. The typical low pH required for dissolving cellulose in acidic solvents limits the use of typical characterization techniques. In this respect, Polarization Transfer Solid State NMR (PT ssNMR) emerges as a reliable alternative. In this work, combining PT ssNMR, microscopic techniques and X-ray diffraction, a set of different acidic systems (phosphoric acid/water, sulfuric acid/glycerol and zinc chloride/water) is investigated. The studied solvent systems are capable to efficiently dissolve cellulose, although degradation occurs to some extent. PT ssNMR is capable to identify the liquid and solid fractions of cellulose, the degradation products and it is also sensitive to gelation. The materials regenerated from the acidic dopes were found to be highly sensitive to the solvent system and to the presence of amphiphilic additives in solution. PMID:27474617

  19. Ion-solvent interactions in lanthanum(III) chloride and D-glucose-water mixed solvent systems: An ultrasonic study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dash, J. K.; Kamila, Susmita

    2015-09-01

    Acoustic parameters such as isentropic compressibility, βs, intermolecular free length, Lf, apparent molar volume (ϕv), solvation number, Sn, viscosity B coefficients of Jones-Dole equation etc., have been evaluated from the measured values of ultrasonic velocity, density and viscosity for the solutions of lanthanum(III) chloride in d-glucose (dextrose)-water mixed solvent system of various proportions at 303.15 K temperature and atmospheric pressure. The results are discussed in the light of ion-solvent interactions and the structural effect of the solute on the solvent in the solution.

  20. A carbohydrate-anion recognition system in aprotic solvents.

    PubMed

    Ren, Bo; Dong, Hai; Ramström, Olof

    2014-05-01

    A carbohydrate-anion recognition system in nonpolar solvents is reported, in which complexes form at the B-faces of β-D-pyranosides with H1-, H3-, and H5-cis patterns similar to carbohydrate-π interactions. The complexation effect was evaluated for a range of carbohydrate structures; it resulted in either 1:1 carbohydrate-anion complexes, or 1:2 complex formation depending on the protection pattern of the carbohydrate. The interaction was also evaluated with different anions and solvents. In both cases it resulted in significant binding differences. The results indicate that complexation originates from van der Waals interactions or weak CH⋅⋅⋅A(-) hydrogen bonds between the binding partners and is related to electron-withdrawing groups of the carbohydrates as well as increased hydrogen-bond-accepting capability of the anions. PMID:24616327

  1. Advanced integrated solvent extraction and ion exchange systems

    SciTech Connect

    Horwitz, P.

    1996-10-01

    Advanced integrated solvent extraction (SX) and ion exchange (IX) systems are a series of novel SX and IX processes that extract and recover uranium and transuranics (TRUs) (neptunium, plutonium, americium) and fission products {sup 90}Sr, {sup 99}Tc, and {sup 137}Cs from acidic high-level liquid waste and that sorb and recover {sup 90}Sr, {sup 99}Tc, and {sup 137}Cs from alkaline supernatant high-level waste. Each system is based on the use of new selective liquid extractants or chromatographic materials. The purpose of the integrated SX and IX processes is to minimize the quantity of waste that must be vitrified and buried in a deep geologic repository by producing raffinates (from SX) and effluent streams (from IX) that will meet the specifications of Class A low-level waste.

  2. Systemic sclerosis associated with cutaneous exposure to solvent: case report and review of the literature

    SciTech Connect

    Brasington, R.D. Jr.; Thorpe-Swenson, A.J. )

    1991-05-01

    Sclerodermatous skin changes and systemic sclerosis have been reported to occur as a result of contact with several different organic solvents. We describe a 41-year-old man who developed systemic sclerosis after working for 15 years in a foundry, where he had extensive cutaneous contact with multiple organic solvents (trichloroethane, xylene, trimethylbenzene, and naphthalene). Cutaneous exposure to organic solvents may be a factor in the etiology of some cases of systemic sclerosis.15 references.

  3. Density Changes in the Optimized CSSX Solvent System

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, D.D.

    2002-11-25

    Density increases in caustic-side solvent extraction (CSSX) solvent have been observed in separate experimental programs performed by different groups of researchers. Such changes indicate a change in chemical composition. Increased density adversely affects separation of solvent from denser aqueous solutions present in the CSSX process. Identification and control of factors affecting solvent density are essential for design and operation of the centrifugal contactors. The goals of this research were to identify the factors affecting solvent density (composition) and to develop correlations between easily measured solvent properties (density and viscosity) and the chemical composition of the solvent, which will permit real-time determination and adjustment of the solvent composition. In evaporation experiments, virgin solvent was subjected to evaporation under quiescent conditions at 25, 35, and 45 C with continuously flowing dry air passing over the surface of the solvent. Density and viscosity were measured periodically, and chemical analysis was performed on the solvent samples. Chemical interaction tests were completed to determine if any chemical reaction takes place over extended contact time that changes the composition and/or physical properties. Solvent and simulant, solvent and strip solution, and solvent and wash solution were contacted continuously in agitated flasks. They were periodically sampled and the density measured (viscosity was also measured on some samples) and then submitted to the Chemical Sciences Division of Oak Ridge National Laboratory for analysis by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectrometry and high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) using the virgin solvent as the baseline. Chemical interaction tests showed that solvent densities and viscosities did not change appreciably during contact with simulant, strip, or wash solution. No effects on density and viscosity and no chemical changes in the solvent were noted within

  4. Neutron Polarization Analysis for Biphasic Solvent Extraction Systems

    DOE PAGES

    Motokawa, Ryuhei; Endo, Hitoshi; Nagao, Michihiro; Heller, William T.

    2016-06-16

    Here we performed neutron polarization analysis (NPA) of extracted organic phases containing complexes, comprised of Zr(NO3)4 and tri-n-butyl phosphate, which enabled decomposition of the intensity distribution of small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) into the coherent and incoherent scattering components. The coherent scattering intensity, containing structural information, and the incoherent scattering compete over a wide range of magnitude of scattering vector, q, specifically when q is larger than q* ≈ 1/Rg, where Rg is the radius of gyration of scatterer. Therefore, it is important to determine the incoherent scattering intensity exactly to perform an accurate structural analysis from SANS data when Rgmore » is small, such as the aforementioned extracted coordination species. Although NPA is the best method for evaluating the incoherent scattering component for accurately determining the coherent scattering in SANS, this method is not used frequently in SANS data analysis because it is technically challenging. In this study, we successfully demonstrated that experimental determination of the incoherent scattering using NPA is suitable for sample systems containing a small scatterer with a weak coherent scattering intensity, such as extracted complexes in biphasic solvent extraction systems.« less

  5. ODC-Free Solvent Implementation Issues for Vulcanized Rubber and Bond Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hodgson, James R.; McCool, Alex (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Thiokol Propulsion has worked extensively to replace 1,1,1-trichloroethane (TCA) with ozone depleting chemicals (ODC)-free solvents for use in the manufacture of the Reusable Solid Rocket Motor (RSRM) for the Space Shuttle Program. As Thiokol has transitioned from sub-scale to full-scale testing and implementation of these new solvents, issues have been discovered which have required special attention. The original intent of Thiokol's solvent replacement strategy was to replace TCA with a single drop-in solvent for all equivalent applications. We have learned that a single candidate does not exist for replacing TCA. Solvent incompatibility with process materials has caused us to seek for niche solvents and/or processing changes that provide an ODC-free solution for special applications. This paper addresses some of the solvent incompatibilities, which have lead to processes changes and possible niche solvent usage. These incompatibilities were discovered during full-scale testing of ODC-free solvents and relate to vulcanized rubber and bond systems in the RSRM. Specifically, the following items are presented: (1) Cure effects of d-limonene based solvents on Silica Filled Ethylene Propylene Diene Monomer (SF-EPDM) rubber. During full-scale test operations, Thiokol discovered that d-limonene (terpene) based solvents inhibit the cure of EPDM rubber. Subsequent testing showed the same issue with Nitrile Butadiene Rubber (NBR). Also discussed are efforts to minimize uncured rubber exposure to solvents; and (2) Cured bond system sensitivity to ODC-free solvents. During full scale testing it was discovered that a natural rubber to steel vulcanized bond could degrade after prolonged exposure to ODC-free solvents. Follow on testing showed that low vapor pressure and residence time seemed to be most likely cause for failure.

  6. Crystal growth in fused solvent systems. [in space environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ulrich, D. R.; Noval, B. A.; White, W. B.; Spear, K. E.; Henry, E. C.

    1974-01-01

    The successful nucleation of bismuth germanate, B12GeO20 on a high quality seed and the growth of regions of single crystals of the same orientation of the seed are reported. Lead germanate, Pb5Ge3O11 was also identified as a ferroelectric crystal with large electrooptic and nonlinear optic constants. Solvent criteria, solvent/development, and crystal growth are discussed, and recommendations for future studies are included.

  7. In vitro assessment of solvent evaporation from commercial adhesive systems compared to experimental systems.

    PubMed

    Nihi, Fabio Mitugui; Fabre, Hebert Samuel Carafa; Garcia, Georges; Fernandes, Karen Barros Parron; Ferreira, Flaviana Bombarda de Andrade; Wang, Linda

    2009-01-01

    Solvents should be properly evaporated after application to dental substrates. The aim of this study was to assess the evaporation of commercial, experimental and neat solvents. The tested null hypotheses were that there are no differences in solvent evaporation regardless of its formulation and over time. Evaporation from commercial adhesive systems (Scotchbond Multipurpose Primer, Scotchbond Multipurpose Adhesive, Prime & Bond NT, Multi Bond, Excite, Single Bond 2, Adhese Primer, Adhese Bond, Xeno III A and Xeno III B) and experimental primers (35% HEMA plus 65% acetone or ethanol or water v/v) were compared to neat solvents (acetone, ethanol and water). Samples (10 microL) of these products were dripped into glass containers placed on a digital precision balance. Evaporation was assessed at 0, 5, 10, 15, 30, 60, 120, 300 and 600 s times to calculate mass loss. Data were analyzed statistically by ANOVA and Bonferroni's correction (a=0.05). Acetone-based products exhibited a remarkable capacity to evaporate spontaneously over time. Neat acetone evaporated significantly more than the HEMA-mixtures and the commercial formulations (p<0.05). The incorporation of monomers and other ingredients in the commercial formulations seem to reduce the evaporation capacity. Solvent evaporation was time and material-dependent. PMID:20126908

  8. Distribution coefficients of vitamin B2 in hydrophilic organic solvent-aqueous salt solution systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korenman, Ya. I.; Mokshina, N. Ya.; Zykov, A. V.

    2010-03-01

    Distribution coefficients of vitamin B2 in hydrophilic solvent ( n-butanol, isopropanol, acetone, ethyl acetate, and their mixtures)-aqueous salt (potassium chloride, sodium fluoride, and ammonium sulfate salting-out agents) solution systems were calculated. The synergic effect and optimum proportions of components in the solvent mixture for efficient extraction of vitamin B2 from aqueous solutions were established.

  9. Measurement and prediction of aromatic solute distribution coefficients for aqueous-organic solvent systems. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Campbell, J.R.; Luthy, R.G.

    1984-06-01

    Experimental and modeling activities were performed to assess techniques for measurement and prediction of distribution coefficients for aromatic solutes between water and immiscible organic solvents. Experiments were performed to measure distribution coefficients in both clean water and wastewater systems, and to assess treatment of a wastewater by solvent extraction. The theoretical portions of this investigation were directed towards development of techniques for prediction of solute-solvent/water distribution coefficients. Experiments were performed to assess treatment of a phenolic-laden coal conversion wastewater by solvent extraction. The results showed that solvent extraction for recovery of phenolic material offered several wastewater processing advantages. Distribution coefficients were measured in clean water and wastewater systems for aromatic solutes of varying functionality with different solvent types. It was found that distribution coefficients for these compounds in clean water systems were not statistically different from distribution coefficients determined in a complex coal conversion process wastewater. These and other aromatic solute distribution coefficient data were employed for evaluation of modeling techniques for prediction of solute-solvent/water distribution coefficients. Eight solvents were selected in order to represent various chemical classes: toluene and benzene (aromatics), hexane and heptane (alkanes), n-octanol (alcohols), n-butyl acetate (esters), diisopropyl ether (ethers), and methylisobutyl ketone (ketones). The aromatic solutes included: nonpolar compounds such as benzene, toluene and naphthalene, phenolic compounds such as phenol, cresol and catechol, nitrogenous aromatics such as aniline, pyridine and aminonaphthalene, and other aromatic solutes such as naphthol, quinolinol and halogenated compounds. 100 references, 20 figures, 34 tables.

  10. Physical solubility of carbon dioxide in aqueous alkanolamines via nitrous oxide analogy

    SciTech Connect

    Browning, G.J.; Weiland, R.H. . Dept. of Chemical Engineering)

    1994-10-01

    In the petrochemical and natural gas industry, the removal of carbon dioxide and hydrogen sulfide from process gas streams is commonly achieved by reacting these impurities with aqueous alkanolamines. Van Krevelen coefficients for protonated monoethanolamine (MEA), diethanolamine (DEA), and methyldiethanolamine (MDEA), the carbamates of MEA and DEA, and the bicarbonate ion have been determined experimentally from measurements of the solubility of N[sub 2]O at 25 C and atmospheric pressure in aqueous solutions of these ions. Measured values different significantly from values recommended by others in the absence of experimental data. By analogy with N[sub 2]O, the solubility of carbon dioxide in the same solutions can be estimated.

  11. The Search for Nonflammable Solvent Alternatives for Cleaning Aerospace Oxygen Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mitchell, Mark A.; Lowrey, Nikki

    2012-01-01

    To obtain a high degree of cleanliness without risk of corrosion or hazardous reactivity, hydrochlorofluorocarbon (HCFC)-225 is used for cleaning and cleanliness verification of oxygen system components used on NASA fs bipropellant launch vehicles, associated test stands and support equipment. HCFC-225 is a Class II Ozone Depleting Substance (ODS ]II) that was introduced to replace chlorofluorocarbon (CFC)-113, a Class I ODS solvent that is now banned. To meet environmental regulations to eliminate the use of ozone depleting substances, a replacement solvent is required for HCFC ]225 that is effective at removing oils, greases, and particulate from large oxygen system components, is compatible with materials used in the construction of these systems, and is nonflammable and non ]reactive in enriched oxygen environments. A solvent replacement is also required for aviator fs breathing oxygen systems and other related equipment currently cleaned and verified with HCFC ]225 and stockpiled CFC -113. Requirements and challenges in the search for nonflammable replacement solvents are discussed.

  12. GREEN CATALYZED OXIDATION OF HYDROCARBONS IN ALTERNATIVE SOLVENT SYSTEMS GENERATED BY PARIS II

    EPA Science Inventory

    Green Catalyzed Oxidation of Hydrocarbons in Alternative Solvent Systems Generated by PARIS II

    Michael A. Gonzalez*, Thomas M. Becker, and Paul F. Harten; Sustainable Technology Division, Office of Research and Development; United States Environmental Protection Agency, 26...

  13. Effects of solvent on solution prepregging of the resin system LaRC{trademark}-IAX-2

    SciTech Connect

    Cano, R.J.; Massey, C.P.; St. Clair, T.L.

    1996-12-31

    This work assesses the feasibility of using an alternative solvent for the production of composites from polyimide resin systems via solution prepregging. Previous work on solution prepregging of polyimide systems at NASA Langley Research Center has concentrated on the use of the solvent N-methylpyrrolidinone. An alternative solvent with a similar boiling point, -{gamma}-Butyrolactone, was used to prepare the poly(amide acid) version of LaRC{trademark}-IAX-2. These solutions were subsequently used to prepare prepreg and graphite-reinforced composites. Mechanical properties are presented for the resin system LaRC{trademark}-IAX-2 (4% and 5% offset in stoichiometry and endcapped with phthalic anhydride) impregnated onto Hercules IM7 carbon fiber. Results from this work were compared to data obtained on the same resin system which had been solution prepregged with the solvent N-methylpyrrolidinone.

  14. Probing effect of solvent concentration on glass transition and sub-Tg structural relaxation in polymer solvent mixtures: The case of polystyrene-toluene system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pierleoni, Davide; Scherillo, Giuseppe; Minelli, Matteo; Mensitieri, Giuseppe; Doghieri, Ferruccio

    2016-05-01

    A novel experimental method for the analysis of volume relaxation induced by solvents in glassy polymers is presented. A gravimetric technique is used to evaluate the isothermal solvent mass uptake at controlled increasing/decreasing solvent pressure at constant rate. Fundamental properties of the solvent/polymer system can be obtained directly, and models can be applied, combining both nonequilibrium thermodynamics and mechanics of volume relaxation contribution. The fundamental case of polystyrene and toluene mixtures are thus accounted for, and various experimental conditions have been explored, varying the temperature, and spanning over different pressure increase/decrease rates. The results obtained allowed to evaluate the isothermal second order transition induced by solvent sorption, as well as the determination of the effect of the pressure rate. Therefore, this work proposes a new standard for the characterization and the understanding of the relaxational behavior of glassy polymers.

  15. CO2 capture in alkanolamine-RTIL blends via carbamate crystallization: route to efficient regeneration.

    PubMed

    Hasib-ur-Rahman, Muhammad; Larachi, Faïçal

    2012-10-16

    One of the major drawbacks of aqueous alkanolamine based CO(2) capture processes is the requirement of significantly higher energy of regeneration. This weakness can be overcome by separating the CO(2)-captured product to regenerate the corresponding amine, thus avoiding the consumption of redundant energy. Replacing aqueous phase with more stable and practically nonvolatile imidazolium based room-temperature ionic liquid (RTIL) provided a viable approach for carbamate to crystallize out as supernatant solid. In the present study, regeneration capabilities of solid carbamates have been investigated. Diethanolamine (DEA) carbamate as well as 2-amino-2-methyl-1-propanol (AMP) carbamate were obtained in crystalline form by bubbling CO(2) in alkanolamine-RTIL mixtures. Hydrophobic RTIL, 1-hexyl-3-methylimidazolium bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide ([hmim][Tf(2)N]), was used as aqueous phase substituent. Thermal behavior of the carbamates was observed by differential scanning calorimetry and thermogravimetric analysis, while the possible regeneration mechanism has been proposed through (13)C NMR and FTIR analyses. The results showed that decomposition of DEA-carbamate commenced at lower temperature (∼55 °C), compared to that of AMP-carbamate (∼75 °C); thus promising easy regeneration. The separation of carbamate as solid phase can offer two-way advantage by letting less volume to regenerate as well as by narrowing the gap between CO(2) capture and amine regeneration temperatures.

  16. GREEN CATALYZED OXIDATION OF HYDROCARBONS IN ALTERNATIVE SOLVENT SYSTEMS GENERATED BY PARIS II DECHEMA; GREEN SOLVENTS FOR CATALYSIS - ENVIRONMENTALLY BENIGN REACTION MEDIA

    EPA Science Inventory

    Green catalyzed oxidation of hydrocarbons in alternative solvent systems generated by PARIS II
    Thomas M. Becker, Michael A. Gonzalez, Paul F. Harten; Sustainable Technology Division, Office of Research and Development; United States Environmental Protection Agency, 26 West Mar...

  17. Evaluating transformational solvent systems for post-combustion CO2 separations

    SciTech Connect

    Heldebrant, David J.; Glezakou, Vassiliki Alexandra; Koech, Phillip K.; Mathias, Paul M.; Cantu Cantu, David; Rousseau, Roger J.; Malhotra, Deepika; Bhakta, Mukund; Bearden, Mark D.; Freeman, Charles J.; Zheng, Feng

    2014-01-06

    Broad research is underway on developing transformational solvents that can capture of CO2 from flue gas with lower energy compared to aqueous amines. Water-lean, or non-aqueous, solvents are being considered as a class of transformational solvents due to the prospect of lower energy duties by not having to heat and condense water. To date, little is known about the real world performance of water-lean solvent systems compared to commercial aqueous amine technologies, and whether or not they can utilize existing or at least similar processing infrastructure. This paper provides the key results from a comprehensive three-year study of the water-lean CO2-Binding Organic Liquids (CO2BOL) solvent platform coupled with Polarity-Swing Assisted Regeneration (PSAR). We present here thermodynamic, kinetic, and bench-scale data, followed by Aspen Plus projections of full-scale process performance for three CO2BOL/PSAR cases. This paper also provides discussions on materials performance and identifies viscosity as a critical property that most greatly limits the viability of water-lean solvent platforms. We provide results from a new effort spanning molecular modeling and synthesis and experimental testing to decipher the critical material properties needed to address this challenge. We conclude with implications for development of other water-lean solvent systems

  18. Knowledge based system for runtime controlling of multiscale model of ion-exchange solvent extraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Macioł, Piotr; Gotfryd, Leszek; Macioł, Andrzej

    2012-09-01

    The hereby paper concerns the issue of solution of runtime controlling of multiscale model of ion-exchange solvent extraction. It is based on cooperation of a framework applying Agile Multiscale Modeling Methodology (AM3), and the REBIT Knowledge Based System. Ion-exchange solvent extraction has been shortly introduced. Design assumptions of AM3 and theoretical basis of REBIT have been described. Designed workflows and rules for simple laminar/ turbulent flow and extraction processes have been shown.

  19. Solvent dependence of Stokes shift for organic solute-solvent systems: A comparative study by spectroscopy and reference interaction-site model-self-consistent-field theory.

    PubMed

    Nishiyama, Katsura; Watanabe, Yasuhiro; Yoshida, Norio; Hirata, Fumio

    2013-09-01

    The Stokes shift magnitudes for coumarin 153 (C153) in 13 organic solvents with various polarities have been determined by means of steady-state spectroscopy and reference interaction-site model-self-consistent-field (RISM-SCF) theory. RISM-SCF calculations have reproduced experimental results fairly well, including individual solvent characteristics. It is empirically known that in some solvents, larger Stokes shift magnitudes are detected than anticipated on the basis of the solvent relative permittivity, ɛr. In practice, 1,4-dioxane (ɛr = 2.21) provides almost identical Stokes shift magnitudes to that of tetrahydrofuran (THF, ɛr = 7.58), for C153 and other typical organic solutes. In this work, RISM-SCF theory has been used to estimate the energetics of C153-solvent systems involved in the absorption and fluorescence processes. The Stokes shift magnitudes estimated by RISM-SCF theory are ∼5 kJ mol(-1) (400 cm(-1)) less than those determined by spectroscopy; however, the results obtained are still adequate for dipole moment comparisons, in a qualitative sense. We have also calculated the solute-solvent site-site radial distributions by this theory. It is shown that solvation structures with respect to the C-O-C framework, which is common to dioxane and THF, in the near vicinity (∼0.4 nm) of specific solute sites can largely account for their similar Stokes shift magnitudes. In previous works, such solute-solvent short-range interactions have been explained in terms of the higher-order multipole moments of the solvents. Our present study shows that along with the short-range interactions that contribute most significantly to the energetics, long-range electrostatic interactions are also important. Such long-range interactions are effective up to 2 nm from the solute site, as in the case of a typical polar solvent, acetonitrile.

  20. Solvent dependence of Stokes shift for organic solute-solvent systems: A comparative study by spectroscopy and reference interaction-site model-self-consistent-field theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishiyama, Katsura; Watanabe, Yasuhiro; Yoshida, Norio; Hirata, Fumio

    2013-09-01

    The Stokes shift magnitudes for coumarin 153 (C153) in 13 organic solvents with various polarities have been determined by means of steady-state spectroscopy and reference interaction-site model-self-consistent-field (RISM-SCF) theory. RISM-SCF calculations have reproduced experimental results fairly well, including individual solvent characteristics. It is empirically known that in some solvents, larger Stokes shift magnitudes are detected than anticipated on the basis of the solvent relative permittivity, ɛr. In practice, 1,4-dioxane (ɛr = 2.21) provides almost identical Stokes shift magnitudes to that of tetrahydrofuran (THF, ɛr = 7.58), for C153 and other typical organic solutes. In this work, RISM-SCF theory has been used to estimate the energetics of C153-solvent systems involved in the absorption and fluorescence processes. The Stokes shift magnitudes estimated by RISM-SCF theory are ˜5 kJ mol-1 (400 cm-1) less than those determined by spectroscopy; however, the results obtained are still adequate for dipole moment comparisons, in a qualitative sense. We have also calculated the solute-solvent site-site radial distributions by this theory. It is shown that solvation structures with respect to the C-O-C framework, which is common to dioxane and THF, in the near vicinity (˜0.4 nm) of specific solute sites can largely account for their similar Stokes shift magnitudes. In previous works, such solute-solvent short-range interactions have been explained in terms of the higher-order multipole moments of the solvents. Our present study shows that along with the short-range interactions that contribute most significantly to the energetics, long-range electrostatic interactions are also important. Such long-range interactions are effective up to 2 nm from the solute site, as in the case of a typical polar solvent, acetonitrile.

  1. Solvent effect on reaction rates: Reaction between sodium ethoxide and methyl iodide in ethanol + cyclohexane solvent systems

    SciTech Connect

    Papanastasiou, G.; Papoutsis, A.; Tsirtou, M.; Ziogas, I.

    1996-02-01

    The kinetics of the reaction between sodium ethoxide and methyl iodide has been studied at 25{degrees}C in various cyclohexane-ethanol solvent mixtures with a cyclohexane content of 10 to 50% per volume. The determination of the rate constants at t=0 were carried out by a new iterative method proposed in this investigation. The obtained results show that the reaction rate decreases with the increasing cyclohexane content. This behavior can be attributed to various solute-solvent interactions of electrostatic nature. On the other hand, the variation of ion and ion pairs rate constants with solvent composition permits the various solvation effects to be taken into account.

  2. New analytical technique for carbon dioxide absorption solvents

    SciTech Connect

    Pouryousefi, F.; Idem, R.O.

    2008-02-15

    The densities and refractive indices of two binary systems (water + MEA and water + MDEA) and three ternary systems (water + MEA + CO{sub 2}, water + MDEA + CO{sub 2}, and water + MEA + MDEA) used for carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) capture were measured over the range of compositions of the aqueous alkanolamine(s) used for CO{sub 2} absorption at temperatures from 295 to 338 K. Experimental densities were modeled empirically, while the experimental refractive indices were modeled using well-established models from the known values of their pure-component densities and refractive indices. The density and Gladstone-Dale refractive index models were then used to obtain the compositions of unknown samples of the binary and ternary systems by simultaneous solution of the density and refractive index equations. The results from this technique have been compared with HPLC (high-performance liquid chromatography) results, while a third independent technique (acid-base titration) was used to verify the results. The results show that the systems' compositions obtained from the simple and easy-to-use refractive index/density technique were very comparable to the expensive and laborious HPLC/titration techniques, suggesting that the refractive index/density technique can be used to replace existing methods for analysis of fresh or nondegraded, CO{sub 2}-loaded, single and mixed alkanolamine solutions.

  3. Density and viscosity of some partially carbonated aqueous alkanolamine solutions and their blends

    SciTech Connect

    Weiland, R.H.; Dingman, J.C.; Cronin, D.B.; Browning, G.J.

    1998-05-01

    Very little information is available concerning the effect of acid gas loading on the physical properties of amine-treating solutions flowing through the absorption and regeneration columns used in gas processing. The densities and viscosities of partially carbonated monoethanolamine (MEA), diethanolamine (DEA), and N-methyldiethanolamine (MDEA) solutions were measured at 298 K. With increasing carbon dioxide loadings, significant increases in both density and viscosity were observed. These results were combined with literature data to produce correlations for alkanolamine solution density and viscosity as a function of amine concentration, carbon dioxide loading, and temperature. The resulting single-amine correlations were used to predict the densities and viscosities of DEA + MDEA and MEA + MDEA blends. Predictions are compared with data measured for these blends.

  4. Solubility of carbon dioxide in aqueous mixtures of alkanolamines

    SciTech Connect

    Dawodu, O.F.; Meisen, A. . Dept. of Chemical Engineering)

    1994-07-01

    The solubility of CO[sub 2] in water + N-methyldiethanolamine + monoethanolamine (MDEA + MEA) and water + N-methyldiethanolamine + diethanolamine (MDEA + DEA) are reported at two compositions of 3.4 M MDEA + 0.8 M MEA or DEA and 2.1 M MDEA + 2.1 M MEA or DEA at temperatures from 70 to 180 C and CO[sub 2] partial pressures from 100 to 3,850 kPa. The solubility of CO[sub 2] in the blends decreased with an increase in temperature but increased with an increase in CO[sub 2] partial pressure. At low partial pressures of CO[sub 2] and the same total amine concentration, the equilibrium CO[sub 2] loadings were in the order MDEA + MEA > MDEA + DEA > MDEA. However, at high CO[sub 2] partial pressures, the equilibrium CO[sub 2] loadings in the MDEA solutions were higher than those of the MDEA + MEA and MDEA + DEA blends of equal molar strengths due to the stoichiometric loading limitations of MEA and DEA. The nonadditivity of the equilibrium loadings for single amine systems highlights the need for independent measurements on amine blends.

  5. The Search for Nonflammable Solvent Alternatives for Cleaning Aerospace Oxygen Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mitchell, Mark; Lowrey, Nikki

    2012-01-01

    Oxygen systems are susceptible to fires caused by particle and nonvolatile residue (NVR) contaminants, therefore cleaning and verification is essential for system safety. . Cleaning solvents used on oxygen system components must be either nonflammable in pure oxygen or complete removal must be assured for system safety. . CFC -113 was the solvent of choice before 1996 because it was effective, least toxic, compatible with most materials of construction, and non ]reactive with oxygen. When CFC -113 was phased out in 1996, HCFC -225 was selected as an interim replacement for cleaning propulsion oxygen systems at NASA. HCFC-225 production phase-out date is 01/01/2015. HCFC ]225 (AK ]225G) is used extensively at Marshall Space Flight Center and Stennis Space Center for cleaning and NVR verification on large propulsion oxygen systems, and propulsion test stands and ground support equipment. . Many components are too large for ultrasonic agitation - necessary for effective aqueous cleaning and NVR sampling. . Test stand equipment must be cleaned prior to installation of test hardware. Many items must be cleaned by wipe or flush in situ where complete removal of a flammable solvent cannot be assured. The search for a replacement solvent for these applications is ongoing.

  6. Neutral [2]rotaxane host systems that recognise halide anions in aqueous solvent mixtures.

    PubMed

    Mercurio, James M; Tyrrell, Fergus; Cookson, James; Beer, Paul D

    2013-11-28

    Four pyridine N-oxide axle containing [2]rotaxanes have been synthesised via an anion templated threading-followed-by-stoppering strategy and shown to be the first examples of neutral interlocked host systems capable of recognising halide anions in aqueous solvent mixtures.

  7. REMOVAL OF PCBS FROM A CONTAMINATED SOIL USING CF-SYSTEMS SOLVENT EXTRACTION PROCESS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The US EPA's START team in cooperation with EPA's SITE program evaluated a pilot scale solvent extraction process developed by CF-Systems. This process uses liquified propane to extract organic contaminants from soils, sludges, and sediments. A pilot-scale evaluation was conducte...

  8. Solvent extraction of PCB-contaminated soils using the Terra-Kleen system

    SciTech Connect

    Engle, S.W.; Kosco, B.; Cash, A.; Meckes, M.

    1994-12-31

    Removal of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCB) from soils has been difficult to implement on a full-scale, cost-effective basis. The Terra-Kleen solvent extraction system has overcome many of the soil handling, contaminant removal, and regulatory restrictions which have made implementing a cost-effective PCB soil treatment system difficult. The Terra-Kleen system uses a proprietary solvent to extract organic contaminants from soils. This batch process operates at ambient temperatures and employs a solvent regeneration system which concentrates the extracted contaminants and permits reuse of the extraction solvent. Following treatment, the treatment soils are returned to the land, and concentrated contaminant is removed off site for disposal. Terra-Kleen demonstrated the technology during a treatability study in October 1993 and a pilot-scale demonstration in May 1994. In October 1993, PRC obtained 1-ton batches of soil from each of three PCB-contaminated sites and shipped them to Terra-Kleen`s testing facility in Okmulgee, Oklahoma. Two sites were located at Naval Air Station North Island (NASNI) near San Diego, California. The third site was located in Anchorage, Alaska. Analysis of all demonstration soils revealed that Aroclor 1260 was the only PCB mixture present. Successful removal of PCBs below target treatment levels during the treatability study lead to a pilot-scale demonstration in May 1994 at NASNI.

  9. Fuzzy Systems Modeling of In Situ Bioremediation of Chlorinated Solvents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faybishenko, B.; Hazen, T. C.

    2001-12-01

    A large-scale vadose zone-groundwater bioremediation demonstration was conducted at the Savannah River Site (SRS) by injecting several types of gases (ambient air, methane, and nitrous oxide and triethyl phosphate mixtures) through a horizontal well in the groundwater at a 175 ft depth. Simultaneously, soil gas was extracted through a parallel horizontal well in the vadose zone at a 80 ft depth Monitoring revealed a wide range of spatial and temporal variations of concentrations of VOCs, enzymes, and biomass in groundwater and vadose zone monitoring boreholes over the field site. One of the powerful modern approaches to analyze uncertain and imprecise data chemical data is based on the use of methods of fuzzy systems modeling. Using fuzzy modeling we analyzed the spatio-temporal TCE and PCE concentrations and methanotroph densities in groundwater to assess the effectiveness of different campaigns of air stripping and bioremediation, and to determine the fuzzy relationship between these compounds. Our analysis revealed some details about the processes involved in remediation, which were not identified in the previous studies of the SRS demonstration. We also identified some future directions for using fuzzy systems modeling, such as the evaluation of the mass balance of the vadose zone - groundwater system, and the development of fuzzy-ruled methods for optimization of managing remediation activities, predictions, and risk assessment.

  10. Deep eutectic solvents as efficient solvent system for the extraction of κ-carrageenan from Kappaphycus alvarezii.

    PubMed

    Das, Arun Kumar; Sharma, Mukesh; Mondal, Dibyendu; Prasad, Kamalesh

    2016-01-20

    Three different deep eutectic solvents (DESs) prepared by the complexation of choline chloride with urea, ethylene glycol and glycerol along with their hydrated counterparts were used for the selective extraction of κ-carrageenan from Kappaphycus alvarezii. Upon comparison of the quality of the polysaccharide with the one obtained using water as extraction media as well as the one extracted using widely practiced conventional method, it was found that, the physicochemical as well as rheological properties of κ-carrageenan obtained using DESs as solvents was at par to the one obtained using conventional method and was superior in quality when compared to κ-carrageenan obtained using water as solvent. Considering the tedious nature of the extraction method employed in conventional extraction process, the DESs can be considered as suitable alternative solvents for the facile extraction of the polysaccharide directly from the seaweed. However, among the hydrated and non-hydrated DESs, the hydrated ones were found to be more effective in comparison to their non-hydrated counterparts. PMID:26572431

  11. Vapor-liquid equilibria for copolymer+solvent systems: Effect of intramolecular repulsion

    SciTech Connect

    Gupta, R.B.; Prausnitz, J.M.

    1995-03-01

    Role of intramolecular interactions in blend miscibility is well documented for polymer+copolymer mixtures. Some copolymer+polymer mixtures are miscible although their corresponding homopolymers are not miscible; for example, over a range of acrylonitrile content, styrene/acrylonitrile copolymers are miscible with poly(methyl methacrylate) but neither polystyrene nor polyacrylonitrile is miscible with poly(methyl methacrylate). Similarly, over a composition range, butadiene/acrylonitrile copolymers are miscible with poly(vinyl chloride) while none of the binary combinations of the homopolymers [polybutadiene, polyacrylonitrile, and poly(vinyl chloride)] are miscible. This behavior has been attributed to ``intramolecular repulsion`` between unlike copolymer segments. We have observed similar behavior in vapor-liquid equilibria (VLE) of copolymer+solvent systems. We find that acrylonitrile/butadiene copolymers have higher affinity for acetonitrile solvent than do polyacrylonitrile or polybutadiene. We attribute this non-intuitive behavior to ``intramolecular repulsion`` between unlike segments of the copolymer. This repulsive interaction is weakened when acetonitrile molecules are in the vicinity of unlike copolymer segments, favoring copolymer+solvent miscibility. We find similar behavior when acetonitrile is replaced by methyl ethyl ketone. To best knowledge, this effect has not been reported previously for VLE. We have obtained VLE data for mixtures containing a solvent and a copolymer as a function of copolymer composition. It appears that, at a given solvent partial pressure, there may be copolymer composition that yields maximum absorption of the solvent. This highly non-ideal VLE phase behavior may be useful for optimum design of a membrane for a separation process.

  12. Replacement of HCFC-225 Solvent for Cleaning NASA Propulsion Oxygen Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mitchell, Mark A.; Lowrey, Nikki M.

    2015-01-01

    Since the 1990's, when the Class I Ozone Depleting Substance (ODS) chlorofluorocarbon-113 (CFC-113) was banned, NASA's rocket propulsion test facilities at Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) and Stennis Space Center (SSC) have relied upon hydrochlorofluorocarbon-225 (HCFC-225) to safely clean and verify the cleanliness of large scale propulsion oxygen systems. Effective January 1, 2015, the production, import, export, and new use of HCFC-225, a Class II ODS, was prohibited by the Clean Air Act. In 2012 through 2014, leveraging resources from both the NASA Rocket Propulsion Test Program and the Defense Logistics Agency - Aviation Hazardous Minimization and Green Products Branch, test labs at MSFC, SSC, and Johnson Space Center's White Sands Test Facility (WSTF) collaborated to seek out, test, and qualify a replacement for HCFC-225 that is both an effective cleaner and safe for use with oxygen systems. Candidate solvents were selected and a test plan was developed following the guidelines of ASTM G127, Standard Guide for the Selection of Cleaning Agents for Oxygen Systems. Solvents were evaluated for materials compatibility, oxygen compatibility, cleaning effectiveness, and suitability for use in cleanliness verification and field cleaning operations. Two solvents were determined to be acceptable for cleaning oxygen systems and one was chosen for implementation at NASA's rocket propulsion test facilities. The test program and results are summarized. This project also demonstrated the benefits of cross-agency collaboration in a time of limited resources.

  13. Morphology of Organically-Modified Layered Silicates (ols) in Binary Solvents: Model System for Polymer Nanocomposites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaia, Richard; Farmer, Barry; Lui, Weidong; Bharadwaj, Rishi

    2001-03-01

    Critical to forwarding nanocomposite technology is development of a detailed understanding of the spatial distribution of the various constituents (inorganic, polymeric and additives) and associated influence on thermodynamic and kinetic (rheological) aspects of the system. With regard to these issues, in-situ small angle x-ray scattering, associated scattering models, coarse grain simulations, and rheology have been used to examine the phase behavior of organically modified layered silicates (OLS) suspended in pure and binary solvent mixtures. These serve as model systems for examining aspects of morphology development and phase behavior in thermoset and thermoplastic nanocomposites. The phase structure of solvent - OLS system is qualitatively described by Onsager arguments modified to include a crystal-solvate (intercalated phase) and a gelation point. Ternary behavior (binary solvent mixtures) provides evidence for preferential segregation of the polar component to the inorganic surface. The chemical structure of the organic surfactant modifier has a negligible influence on the structure of the intercalated phase, but has a marked effect on the extent and concentration of the dispersed phase. These studies provide insight into the use of polar activators for organosilicate rheolgical control agents and additives to enhance nanocomposite formation (e.g. H20 addition for optimal exfoliated PDMS nanocomposites and incorporation of malic anhydride to produce polypropylene nanocomposites).

  14. Peptide synthesis of aspartame precursor using organic-solvent-stable PST-01 protease in monophasic aqueous-organic solvent systems.

    PubMed

    Tsuchiyama, Shotaro; Doukyu, Noriyuki; Yasuda, Masahiro; Ishimi, Kosaku; Ogino, Hiroyasu

    2007-01-01

    The PST-01 protease is a metalloprotease that has zinc ion at the active center and is very stable in the presence of water-soluble organic solvents. The reaction rates and the equilibrium yields of the aspartame precursor N-carbobenzoxy-L-aspartyl-L-phenylalanine methyl ester (Cbz-Asp-Phe-OMe) synthesis from N-carbobenzoxy-L-aspartic acid (Cbz-Asp) and L-phenylalanine methyl ester (Phe-OMe) in the presence of water-soluble organic solvents were investigated under various conditions. Higher reaction rate and yield of Cbz-Asp-Phe-OMe were attained by the PST-01 protease when 30 mM Cbz-Asp and 500 mM Phe-OMe were used. The maximum reaction rate was obtained pH 8.0 and 37 degrees C. In the presence of dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO), glycerol, methanol, and ethylene glycol, higher reaction rates were obtained. The equilibrium yield was the highest in the presence of DMSO. The equilibrium yield of Cbz-Asp-Phe-OMe using the PST-01 protease attained 83% in the presence of 50% (v/v) DMSO.

  15. Singlet oxygen-sensitized delayed emissions from hydrogen peroxide/gallic acid/potassium ferricyanide systems containing organic solvents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishii, Hiroshi; Tsukino, Kazuo; Sekine, Masahiko; Nakata, Munetaka

    2009-06-01

    Fourier-transform chemiluminescence spectra of H 2O 2/gallic acid/K 3[Fe(CN) 6] systems containing organic solvents were measured. Emission bands with peaks around 530 and 700 nm were observed in systems containing solvents with a carbonyl group such as N, N-dimethylformamide, and those with a hydroxyl group such as methanol, respectively. The relative band intensities depended strongly on the concentration of these organic solvents. The emission species are attributed to gallic acid-ferricyanide complexes excited by energy transfer from singlet oxygen dimol, ( 1O 2) 2. The effects of organic solvents are interpreted in terms of intermolecular interactions of gallic acid-ferricyanide complexes, water molecules and organic solvents.

  16. Surface area generation and droplet size control in solvent extraction systems utilizing high intensity electric fields

    DOEpatents

    Scott, Timothy C.; Wham, Robert M.

    1988-01-01

    A method and system for solvent extraction where droplets are shattered by a high intensity electric field. These shattered droplets form a plurality of smaller droplets which have a greater combined surface area than the original droplet. Dispersion, coalescence and phase separation are accomplished in one vessel through the use of the single pulsing high intensity electric field. Electric field conditions are chosen so that simultaneous dispersion and coalescence are taking place in the emulsion formed in the electric field. The electric field creates a large amount of interfacial surface area for solvent extraction when the droplet is disintegrated and is capable of controlling droplet size and thus droplet stability. These operations take place in the presence of a counter current flow of the continuous phase.

  17. Nanoparticle infiltration to prepare solvent-free controlled drug delivery systems.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Cruz, Isabel M; Domínguez-Delgado, Clara L; Escobar-Chávez, Jose J; Leyva-Gómez, Gerardo; Ganem-Quintanar, Adriana; Quintanar-Guerrero, David

    2009-04-17

    The purpose of this work was to propose a drug delivery system based on a biodegradable porous membrane, whose surface is covered by a nanoparticle film, thus achieving a controlled drug release rate. Furthermore, due to the fact that the assembly of the system is performed in aqueous medium, contact with organic solvents is avoided. The method is performed in two steps: (i) preparation of biodegradable porous membranes (by a solvent casting and particulate leaching technique) and biodegradable nanoparticles (by the emulsification-diffusion method), extensively eliminating the solvent in both of them; (ii) infiltration into membranes of an aqueous solution of a model drug (carbamazepine) and a nanoparticle dispersion. In both cases, poly(DL-lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA 50:50) was used as a biodegradable polymer. Carbamazepine adsorbed onto biodegradable porous membranes shows an immediate release behavior (95% released in <15 min). Infiltration of different amounts of nanoparticles (50, 100, 400 and 600 mg of nanoparticles/0.625 g of membrane) into biodegradable porous membranes shows a Fickian diffusion according to Peppas model, and fits Higuchi's model. This behavior was attributed to the diffusional barrier constituted by the nanoparticle film. As expected, the carbamazepine release rate was dependent on the amount of infiltrated/adsorbed nanoparticles into biodegradable porous membrane. DSC studies show molecular dispersion of the drug throughout the membrane.

  18. Improved solvent collection system for a dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction of organochlorine pesticides from water using low-density organic solvent.

    PubMed

    Chang, Chu-Chi; Wei, Shuo-Yang; Huang, Shang-Da

    2011-04-01

    In this study, the organochlorine pesticides (OCPs) levels in lake and tap water samples were determined by a dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction method using a low-density organic solvent and an improved solvent collection system (DLLME-ISCS). This method used a very small volume of a solvent of low toxicity (11  μL of 1-nonanol and 400  μL of methanol) to extract OCPs from 10  mL water samples prior to the analysis by GC. After centrifugation in the dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction, there was a liquid organic drop floating between the water surface and the glass wall of the centrifuge tube. The liquid organic drop (with some water phase) was transferred into a microtube (3  mm×15  mm) with a syringe. The organic and aqueous phases were separated in the microtube immediately. Then, 1  μL of the organic solvent (which was in the upper portion of liquid in the microtube) was easily collected by a syringe and injected into the GC-ECD system for the analysis. Under optimum conditions, the linear range of this method was 5-5000  ng/L for most of the analytes. The correlation coefficient was higher than 0.997. Enrichment factors ranged from 1309 to 3629. The relative recoveries ranged from 73 to 119% for lake water samples. The LODs of the method ranged from 0.7 to 9.4  ng/L. The precision of the method ranged from 1.0 to 10.8% for lake water.

  19. Physical solubility of hydrogen sulfide and carbon dioxide in alkanolamine solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Abu-Arabi, M.K.

    1988-01-01

    The study was undertaken to develop a method that would make direct measurements of acid gases, hydrogen sulfide and carbon dioxide, physical solubilities in aqueous alkanolamine solutions possible. Hydrogen sulfide and carbon dioxide physical solubilities in 20, 35, and 50% by weight diethanolamine aqueous solutions were measured. The solubility measurements were made at acid gas partial pressure up to 1000 psia and temperatures of 80, 150, 240 F. The solubility of nitrous oxide in water and in protonated diethanolamine solution was also determined at 80 F. A method that allows for direct measurements of acid gases physical solubilities has been developed. The method eliminates amines reactivity with acid gases by protonating the amines prior to their contact with acid gases. CO{sub 2} physical solubility in aqueous DEA solutions occurs mainly in the water portion of the solution. Therefore, the physical solubility of CO{sub 2} in an aqueous amine solution must be corrected based on the fraction of water in the solution. However, H{sub 2}S physical solubility in aqueous DEA solutions is the same as H{sub 2}S solubility in water. At any acid gas partial pressure, the physical solubility of H{sub 2}S is higher than that of CO{sub 2} for the same solution concentration and for the same temperature. This is also true for their solubilities is pure water. The ratio of CO{sub 2} to H{sub 2}S physical solubility to N{sub 2}O solubility in aqueous DEA solutions is not the same as their ratio in pure water.

  20. Abiotic systems for the catalytic treatment of solvent-contaminated water

    SciTech Connect

    Betterton, E.A.; Arnold, R.G.; Liu, Zhijie; Hollan, N.

    1996-12-31

    Three abiotic systems are described that catalyze the reductive dehalogenation of heavily halogenated environmental pollutants, including carbon tetrachloride, trichloroethene, and perchloroethene. These systems include (a) an electrolytic reactor in which the potential on the working electrode (cathode) is fixed by using a potentiostat, (b) a light-driven system consisting of a semiconductor and (covalently attached) macrocycle that can accept light transmitted via an optical fiber, and a light-driven, two-solvent (isopropanol/acetone) system that promotes dehalogenation reactions via an unknown mechanism. Each is capable of accelerating reductive dehalogenation reactions to very high rates under laboratory conditions. Typically, millimolar concentrations of aqueous-phase targets can be dehalogenated in minutes to hours. The description of each system includes the elements of reaction mechanism (to the extent known), typical kinetic data, and a discussion of the feasibility of applying this technology for the in situ destruction of hazardous compounds. 14 refs., 11 figs., 2 tabs.

  1. TIGER2 with solvent energy averaging (TIGER2A): An accelerated sampling method for large molecular systems with explicit representation of solvent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xianfeng; Snyder, James A.; Stuart, Steven J.; Latour, Robert A.

    2015-10-01

    The recently developed "temperature intervals with global exchange of replicas" (TIGER2) accelerated sampling method is found to have inaccuracies when applied to systems with explicit solvation. This inaccuracy is due to the energy fluctuations of the solvent, which cause the sampling method to be less sensitive to the energy fluctuations of the solute. In the present work, the problem of the TIGER2 method is addressed in detail and a modification to the sampling method is introduced to correct this problem. The modified method is called "TIGER2 with solvent energy averaging," or TIGER2A. This new method overcomes the sampling problem with the TIGER2 algorithm and is able to closely approximate Boltzmann-weighted sampling of molecular systems with explicit solvation. The difference in performance between the TIGER2 and TIGER2A methods is demonstrated by comparing them against analytical results for simple one-dimensional models, against replica exchange molecular dynamics (REMD) simulations for sampling the conformation of alanine dipeptide and the folding behavior of (AAQAA)3 peptide in aqueous solution, and by comparing their performance in sampling the behavior of hen egg-white lysozyme in aqueous solution. The new TIGER2A method solves the problem caused by solvent energy fluctuations in TIGER2 while maintaining the two important characteristics of TIGER2, i.e., (1) using multiple replicas sampled at different temperature levels to help systems efficiently escape from local potential energy minima and (2) enabling the number of replicas used for a simulation to be independent of the size of the molecular system, thus providing an accelerated sampling method that can be used to efficiently sample systems considered too large for the application of conventional temperature REMD.

  2. Experimental Measurement and Thermodynamic Modeling of the Solubility of Carbon Dioxide in Aqueous Alkanolamine Solutions in the High Gas Loading Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suleman, Humbul; Maulud, Abdulhalim Shah; Man, Zakaria

    2016-09-01

    The solubility of carbon dioxide in aqueous alkanolamine solutions was investigated in the high gas loading region based on experimental measurements and thermodynamic modeling. An experimental phase equilibrium study was performed to evaluate the absorption of carbon dioxide in aqueous solutions of five representative alkanolamines, including monoethanolamine, diethanolamine, N-methyldiethanolamine, 2-amino-2-methyl-1-propanol and piperazine. The carbon dioxide loadings of these solutions were determined for a wide range of pressures (62.5 kPa to 4150 kPa), temperatures (303.15 K to 343.15 K) and alkanolamine concentrations (2 M to 4 M). The results were found to be largely consistent with those previously reported in the literature. Furthermore, a hybrid Kent-Eisenberg model was developed for the correlation of the experimental data points. This new model incorporated an equation of state/excess Gibbs energy model for determining the solubility of carbon dioxide in the high-pressure-high gas loading region. This approach also used a single correction parameter, which was a function of the alkanolamine concentration. The results of this model were in excellent agreement with our experimental results. Most notably, this model was consistent with other reported values from the literature.

  3. [Study of Lavoisier morphine chlorhydrate stability in different active perfusion systems after reconstitution in different solvents].

    PubMed

    Truelle-Hugon, B; Tourrette, G; Couineaux, B; Gache-Charrette, C

    1997-01-01

    The stability of morphine chlorhydrate injectable solutions with no preservative used for drug delivery system (PCA) was investigated. Many concentrations of morphine chlorhydrate were prepared using different solvents and in several containers: PCA cartridges and plastic syringes stored at 37 degrees C. Assays of drug substance and of degradation products were determined at different time within 14 days. In such conditions, morphine chlorhydrate solutions were stable: degradation products were quantitated less than the usual normal i.e. 2% of the theoric concentration of the drug.

  4. Run-time Ink Stability in Pneumatic Aerosol Jet Printing Using a Split Stream Solvent Add Back System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wadhwa, Arjun

    Aerosol Jet printing is a non-contact process capable of printing nano-ink patterns on conformal and flexible surfaces. Aqueous or solvent nano-inks are pneumatically atomized by the flow of nitrogen gas. The flow of atomizing gas into and out of the cup leads to evaporation and removal of volatile solvent(s). As the solid loading fraction of the ink increases, the rheological changes eventually lead to instabilities in print output. A potential solution to this problem is to moisten the atomizing ink by running it through a bubbler. In this study, neat co-solvent solutions of ethanol and ethylene glycol at 85: 15 and 30:70 mixing ratios were atomized using nitrogen flow rates ranging from 600 to 1000 ccm. It was observed that ethanol, being the more volatile solvent, was depleted from the neat solution. When using a bubbler solvent add-back system, an excessive amount of ethanol was returned to the neat solution. The rate of solvent loss from an ethanol rich neat solution (80%) was higher compared to an ethylene glycol rich neat solution. A mixture of dry and wet (ethanol moistened) nitrogen gas was used to equalize the rate of ethanol evaporation. Ethanol equilibrium in neat solutions with higher ethylene glycol loading (70%) was achieved with a 40-60% wet nitrogen component while neat solutions with higher ethanol loading (85%) were stable with 85 -90% wet nitrogen gas. The results were validated with copper nano ink with similar co-solvent ratios. The solid content of the ink remained constant over four hours of printing when the optimal dry: wet nitrogen gas ratios were used. Copper ink with 85% ethanol being atomized at 1000 ccm exhibited increase in copper loading (3%) despite the dry: wet solvent add back system.

  5. A simple method to optimize the HSCCC two-phase solvent system by predicting the partition coefficient for target compound.

    PubMed

    Han, Quan-Bin; Wong, Lina; Yang, Nian-Yun; Song, Jing-Zheng; Qiao, Chun-Feng; Yiu, Hillary; Ito, Yoichiro; Xu, Hong-Xi

    2008-04-01

    A simple method was developed to optimize the solvent ratio of the two-phase solvent system used in the high-speed counter-current chromatography (HSCCC) separation. Some mathematic equations, such as the exponential and the power equations, were established to describe the relationship between the solvent ratio and the partition coefficient. Using this new method, the two-phase solvent system was easily optimized to obtain a proper partition coefficient for the CCC separation of the target compound. Furthermore, this method was satisfactorily applied in determining the two-phase solvent system for the HSCCC preparation of pseudolaric acid B from the Chinese herb Pseudolarix kaempferi Gordon (Pinaceae). The two-phase solvent system of n-hexane/EtOAc/MeOH/H(2)O (5:5:5:5 by volume) was used with a good partition coefficient K = 1.08. As a result, 232.05 mg of pseudolaric acid B was yielded from 0.5 g of the crude extract with a purity of 97.26% by HPLC analysis.

  6. Analytical Methods Development in Support of the Caustic Side Solvent Extraction System

    SciTech Connect

    Maskarinec, M.P.

    2001-07-17

    The goal of the project reported herein was to develop and apply methods for the analysis of the major components of the solvent system used in the Caustic-Side Solvent Extraction Process (CSSX). These include the calix(4)arene, the modifier, 1-(2,2,3,3- tetrafluoropropoxy)-3-(4-sec-butylphenoxy)-2-propanol and tri-n-octylamine. In addition, it was an objective to develop methods that would allow visualization of other components under process conditions. These analyses would include quantitative laboratory methods for each of the components, quantitative analysis of expected breakdown products (4-see-butylphenol and di-n-octylamine), and qualitative investigations of possible additional breakdown products under a variety of process extremes. These methods would also provide a framework for process analysis should a pilot facility be developed. Two methods were implemented for sample preparation of aqueous phases. The first involves solid-phase extraction and produces quantitative recovery of the solvent components and degradation products from the various aqueous streams. This method can be automated and is suitable for use in radiation shielded facilities. The second is a variation of an established EPA liquid-liquid extraction procedure. This method is also quantitative and results in a final extract amenable to virtually any instrumental analysis. Two HPLC methods were developed for quantitative analysis. The first is a reverse-phase system with variable wavelength W detection. This method is excellent from a quantitative point of view. The second method is a size-exclusion method coupled with dual UV and evaporative light scattering detectors. This method is much faster than the reverse-phase method and allows for qualitative analysis of other components of the waste. For tri-n-octylamine and other degradation products, a GC method was developed and subsequently extended to GUMS. All methods have precision better than 5%. The combination of these methods

  7. Benchtop fabrication of microfluidic systems based on curable polymers with improved solvent compatibility.

    PubMed

    Hashimoto, Michinao; Langer, Robert; Kohane, Daniel S

    2013-01-21

    This paper describes a general scheme to fabricate microchannels from curable polymers on a laboratory benchtop. Using the scheme described here, benchtop fabrication of SU-8 microfluidic systems was demonstrated for the first time, and their compatibility with organic solvents was demonstrated. The fabrication process has three major stages: 1) transferring patterns of microchannels to polymer films by molding, 2) releasing the patterned film and creating inlets and outlets for fluids, and 3) sealing two films together to create a closed channel system. Addition of a PDMS slab supporting the polymer film provided structural integrity during and after fabrication, allowing manipulation of the polymer films without fracturing or deformation. SU-8 channels fabricated according to this scheme exhibited solvent compatibility against continuous exposure to acetone and ethylacetate, which are incompatible with native PDMS. Using the SU-8 channels, continuous generation of droplets of ethylacetate, and templated synthesis of poly (lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) microparticles, both with stable size, were demonstrated continuously over 24 h, and at intervals over 75 days. PMID:23192674

  8. Applicability evaluation of Deep Eutectic Solvents-Cellulase system for lignocellulose hydrolysis.

    PubMed

    Gunny, Ahmad Anas Nagoor; Arbain, Dachyar; Nashef, Enas Muen; Jamal, Parveen

    2015-04-01

    Deep Eutectic Solvents (DESs) have recently emerged as a new generation of ionic liquids for lignocellulose pretreatment. However, DESs contain salt components which tend to inactivate cellulase in the subsequent saccharification process. To alleviate this problem, it is necessary to evaluate the applicability of the DESs-Cellulase system. This was accomplished in the present study by first studying the stability of cellulase in the presence of selected DESs followed by applicability evaluation based on glucose production, energy consumption and kinetic performance. Results showed that the cellulase was able to retain more than 90% of its original activity in the presence of 10% (v/v) for glycerol based DES (GLY) and ethylene glycol based DES (EG). Furthermore, both DESs system exhibited higher glucose percentage enhancement and lower energy consumption as compared to diluted alkali system. Among the two DESs studied, EG showed comparatively better kinetic performance. PMID:25661309

  9. Applicability evaluation of Deep Eutectic Solvents-Cellulase system for lignocellulose hydrolysis.

    PubMed

    Gunny, Ahmad Anas Nagoor; Arbain, Dachyar; Nashef, Enas Muen; Jamal, Parveen

    2015-04-01

    Deep Eutectic Solvents (DESs) have recently emerged as a new generation of ionic liquids for lignocellulose pretreatment. However, DESs contain salt components which tend to inactivate cellulase in the subsequent saccharification process. To alleviate this problem, it is necessary to evaluate the applicability of the DESs-Cellulase system. This was accomplished in the present study by first studying the stability of cellulase in the presence of selected DESs followed by applicability evaluation based on glucose production, energy consumption and kinetic performance. Results showed that the cellulase was able to retain more than 90% of its original activity in the presence of 10% (v/v) for glycerol based DES (GLY) and ethylene glycol based DES (EG). Furthermore, both DESs system exhibited higher glucose percentage enhancement and lower energy consumption as compared to diluted alkali system. Among the two DESs studied, EG showed comparatively better kinetic performance.

  10. Screening of lipase carriers for reactions in water, biphasic and pure organic solvent systems.

    PubMed

    Hrydziuszko, Zofia; Dmytryk, Agnieszka; Majewska, Paulina; Szymańska, Katarzyna; Liesiene, Jolanta; Jarzębski, Andrzej; Bryjak, Jolanta

    2014-01-01

    In bioprocesses lipases are typically used in immobilized form, irrespective of type of reaction systems, to ensure an even distribution of catalysts in water restricted media and/or to facilitate separation and reuse. In these studies we report on the selection of appropriate enzyme-carrier preparation for hydrolysis reaction in aqueous and biphasic systems and transesterification in organic solvent. For this Candida rugosa lipase was bound by adsorption or covalent attachment onto various carriers to give 24 preparations. Selection of proper preparation was based on reactivity, thermal stability (4 h at 60°C), possibility of drying and operational stability in 17-23 successive batch processes of 4-nitrophenyl palmitate hydrolysis in water. Activity of preparations varied from 20 to 5100 U∙mL(-1) but the most stable preparations were those of moderate activity: bound by adsorption or covalent attachment to NH₂-Kieselgel or acrylic carrier (retained activity over 90%). Selected preparations were used for hydrolysis of ethyl (1-butyryloxyethyl)-phenylphosphinate in biphasic system, and, after drying, in ethyl (1-hydroxyethyl)-phenyl-phosphinate transesterification. In this study operational stability was the principal criterion of selection. In water system, lipase covalently bound to NH₂-Kieselgel was the best - preserved 50% of initial activity in consecutive batch processes. In biphasic system and lipase covalently bound to acrylic and NH₂-Kieselgel the values were 90 or 77%, respectively, whereas in organic solvent, when lipase was immobilized on NH₂-Kieselgel by adsorption, it was 50%. Thus, NH₂-Kieselgel appears to be an universal matrix for investigated lipase immobilization and can be used in all reaction systems.

  11. Replacement solvent identification for the laundry and decontamination drycleaning system (LADDs). Final report, October 1991-March 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Goydan, R.; Cheney, J.H.; Massucco, A.A.

    1992-10-01

    A comprehensive industry search was carried out for the U.S. Army Natick Research, Development and Engineering Center (Natick) to identify potential solvent alternatives for use in present prototypes and future versions of Natick Laundry and Decontamination Drycleaning System (LADDS). The present LADDS prototype used 1,1,2-trichloro- 1,2,2-trifluoroethane, a chlorofluorocarbon compound known as CFC-113, as the drycleaning solvent. However, CFC-113 has been identified as a ozone-depleting compound and its production and use are scheduled for phaseout under U.S. and international regulations to protect the stratospheric ozone layer. Consequently, Natick needs to identify alternative solvents available for use in the LADDS as well as to understand the engineering design changes that may be necessary in order to use the types of solvents that will be available for future LADDS.

  12. Tracing explosive in solvent using quantum cascade laser with pulsed electric discharge system

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Seong-Wook; Tian, Chao; Martini, Rainer; Chen, Gang; Chen, I-chun Anderson

    2014-11-03

    We demonstrated highly sensitive detection of explosive dissolved in solvent with a portable spectroscopy system (Q-MACS) by tracing the explosive byproduct, N{sub 2}O, in combination with a pulsed electric discharge system for safe explosive decomposition. Using Octahydro-1,3,5,7-tetranitro-1,3,5,7-tetrazocine (HMX), the gas was monitored and analyzed by Q-MACS and the presence of the dissolved explosive clearly detected. While HMX presence could be identified directly in the air above the solutions even without plasma, much better results were achieved under the decomposition. The experiment results give an estimated detection limit of 10 ppb, which corresponds to a 15 pg of HMX.

  13. Modelling of acid-base equilibria in binary-solvent systems: A comparative study.

    PubMed

    Pilarski, Bogusław; Dobkowska, Agnieszka; Foks, Henryk; Michałowski, Tadeusz

    2010-01-15

    A new approach to modelling of some binary (hydro-organic, HL/H(2)O+B) acid-base systems with organic co-solvent B fully miscible with water, is suggested and applied for the determination of acidity parameters pK for some weak acids HL. The models are designed to get the pK=pK(x) relationships (x-mole fraction of B in H(2)O+B) from results of pH titrations made in such systems and for the determination of pK(B)=pK(1) for HL in pure B. The Redlich-Kister equation, together with its asymmetric extensions, and the Legendre functions with orthogonal polynomials, appeared to be suitable for such purposes.

  14. Optimization of conjugated linoleic acid triglycerides via enzymatic esterification in no-solvent system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yi, Dan; Sun, Xiuqin; Li, Guangyou; Liu, Fayi; Lin, Xuezheng; Shen, Jihong

    2009-09-01

    We compared four esterifiable enzymes. The lipase Novozym 435 possessed the highest activity for the conjugated linoleic acid esterification during the synthesis of triglycerides. The triglycerides were synthesized by esterification of glycerol and conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) in a no-solvent system using lipase catalysis. We investigated the effects of temperature, enzyme concentration, water content, and time on esterification. Enzyme and water concentrations of up to 1% of the total reaction volume and a system temperature of 60°C proved optimal for esterification. Similarly, when the esterification was carried out for 24 h, the reaction ratio improved to 94.11%. The esterification rate of the rotating screen basket remained high (87.28%) when the enzyme was re-used for the 5th time. We evaluated the substrate selectivity of lipase (NOVO 435) and determined that this lipase prefers the 10,12-octadacadienoic acid to the 9,11-octadecadienoic acid.

  15. Tracing explosive in solvent using quantum cascade laser with pulsed electric discharge system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Seong-Wook; Chen, Gang; Chen, I.-chun Anderson; Tian, Chao; Martini, Rainer

    2014-11-01

    We demonstrated highly sensitive detection of explosive dissolved in solvent with a portable spectroscopy system (Q-MACS) by tracing the explosive byproduct, N2O, in combination with a pulsed electric discharge system for safe explosive decomposition. Using Octahydro-1,3,5,7-tetranitro-1,3,5,7-tetrazocine (HMX), the gas was monitored and analyzed by Q-MACS and the presence of the dissolved explosive clearly detected. While HMX presence could be identified directly in the air above the solutions even without plasma, much better results were achieved under the decomposition. The experiment results give an estimated detection limit of 10 ppb, which corresponds to a 15 pg of HMX.

  16. Tailoring the grooved texture of electrospun polystyrene nanofibers by controlling the solvent system and relative humidity

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    In this study, we have successfully fabricated electrospun polystyrene (PS) nanofibers having a diameter of 326 ± 50 nm with a parallel grooved texture using a mixed solvent of tetrahydrofuran (THF) and N,N-dimethylformamide (DMF). We discovered that solvent system, solution concentration, and relative humidity were the three key factors to the formation of grooved texture and the diameter of nanofibers. We demonstrated that grooved nanofibers with desired properties (e.g., different numbers of grooves, widths between two adjacent grooves, and depths of grooves) could be electrospun under certain conditions. When THF/DMF ratio was higher than 2:1, the formation mechanism of single grooved texture should be attributed to the formation of voids on the jet surface at the early stage of electrospinning and subsequent elongation and solidification of the voids into a line surface structure. When THF/DMF ratio was 1:1, the formation mechanism of grooved texture should be ascribed to the formation of wrinkled surface on the jet surface at the early stage of electrospinning and subsequent elongation into a grooved texture. Such findings can serve as guidelines for the preparation of grooved nanofibers with desired secondary morphology. PMID:25114643

  17. MODULAR CAUSTIC SIDE SOLVENT EXTRACTION UNIT GAMMA MONITORS SYSTEM FINAL REPORT

    SciTech Connect

    Casella, V

    2007-06-25

    The Department of Energy (DOE) selected Caustic-Side Solvent Extraction (CSSX) as the preferred technology for the removal of radioactive cesium from High-Level Waste (HLW) at the Savannah River Site (SRS). Before the full-scale Salt Waste Processing Facility (SWPF) becomes operational, the liquid Waste Organization (LWO) plans to process a portion of dissolved saltcake waste through a Modular CSSX Unit (MCU). This work was derived from Technical Task Request SP-TTR-2004-00013, ''Gamma Monitor for MCU.'' The deliverables for this task are the hardware and software for the gamma monitors and a report summarizing the testing and acceptance of this equipment for use in the MCU. Revision of this report is a deliverable in Technical Task Report SP-TTR-2006-00010, ''NaI Shield Box Testing.'' Gamma-ray monitors were developed to: {lg_bullet} Measure the Cs-137 concentration in the decontaminated salt solution before entering the DSS (Decontaminated Salt Solution) Hold Tank, {lg_bullet} Measure the Cs-137 concentration in the strip effluent before entering the Strip Effluent Hold Tank, {lg_bullet} Verify proper operation of the solvent extraction system by verifying material balance within the process (The DSS Hold Tank Cs-137 concentration will be very low and the Cs-137 concentration in the Strip Effluent Hold Tank will be approximately fifteen times higher than the Cs-137 concentration in the Feed Tank.)

  18. The initial and final states of electron and energy transfer processes: Diabatization as motivated by system-solvent interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Subotnik, Joseph E.; Cave, Robert J.; Steele, Ryan P.; Shenvi, Neil

    2009-06-21

    For a system which undergoes electron or energy transfer in a polar solvent, we define the diabatic states to be the initial and final states of the system, before and after the nonequilibrium transfer process. We consider two models for the system-solvent interactions: A solvent which is linearly polarized in space and a solvent which responds linearly to the system. From these models, we derive two new schemes for obtaining diabatic states from ab initio calculations of the isolated system in the absence of solvent. These algorithms resemble standard approaches for orbital localization, namely, the Boys and Edmiston-Ruedenberg (ER) formalisms. We show that Boys localization is appropriate for describing electron transfer [Subotnik et al., J. Chem. Phys. 129, 244101 (2008)] while ER describes both electron and energy transfer. Neither the Boys nor the ER methods require definitions of donor or acceptor fragments and both are computationally inexpensive. We investigate one chemical example, the case of oligomethylphenyl-3, and we provide attachment/detachment plots whereby the ER diabatic states are seen to have localized electron-hole pairs.

  19. Caustic-Side Solvent-Extraction Modeling for Hanford Interim Pretreatment System

    SciTech Connect

    Moyer, B.A.; Birdwell, J.F.; Delmau, L. H.; McFarlane, J.

    2008-06-01

    The purpose of this work is to examine the applicability of the Caustic-Side Solvent Extraction (CSSX) process for the removal of cesium from Hanford tank-waste supernatant solutions in support of the Hanford Interim Pretreatment System (IPS). The Hanford waste types are more challenging than those at the Savannah River Site (SRS) in that they contain significantly higher levels of potassium, the chief competing ion in the extraction of cesium. It was confirmed by use of the CSSX model that the higher levels of potassium depress the cesium distribution ratio (DCs), as validated by measurement of DCs values for four of eight specified Hanford waste-simulant compositions. The model predictions were good to an apparent standard error of ±11%. It is concluded from batch distribution experiments, physical-property measurements, equilibrium modeling, flowsheet calculations, and contactor sizing that the CSSX process as currently employed for cesium removal from alkaline salt waste at the SRS is capable of treating similar Hanford tank feeds. For the most challenging waste composition, 41 stages would be required to provide a cesium decontamination factor (DF) of 5000 and a concentration factor (CF) of 5. Commercial contacting equipment with rotor diameters of 10 in. for extraction and 5 in. for stripping should have the capacity to meet throughput requirements, but testing will be required to confirm that the needed efficiency and hydraulic performance are actually obtainable. Markedly improved flowsheet performance was calculated for a new solvent formulation employing the more soluble cesium extractant BEHBCalixC6 used with alternative scrub and strip solutions, respectively 0.1 M NaOH and 10 mM boric acid. The improved system can meet minimum requirements (DF = 5000 and CF = 5) with 17 stages or more ambitious goals (DF = 40,000 and CF = 15) with 19 stages. Potential benefits of further research and development are identified that would lead to reduced costs, greater

  20. Solvent systems combining neutral and acidic extractants for separating trivalent lanthanides from the transuranic elements.

    SciTech Connect

    Lumetta, G. J.; Gelis, A. V.; Vandegrift, G. F.; Chemical Sciences and Engineering Division; PNL

    2010-01-01

    This paper is a review of recent publications that have focused on combined extractant systems for separating trivalent actinides from the lanthanides. These mixed solvent systems combine an acidic extractant with a neutral extractant to achieve the actinide/lanthanide separation. Depending on the neutral extractant used, three categorizations of systems can be considered, including combinations of acidic extractants with 1 diamides, 2 carbamoylmethylphosphine oxides, and 3 polydentate nitrogen-donor ligands. This review of relevant publications indicates that, although there is significant potential for practical exploitation of mixed neutral/acidic extractant systems to achieve a single-step separation of trivalent actinides from acidic high-level waste solutions, the fundamental chemistry underlying these combined systems is not yet well understood. For example, although there is strong evidence suggesting that adducts form between the neutral and acidic extractants, the nature of these adducts generally is not known. Likewise, the structures of the mixed complexes formed between the metal ions and the two different extractants are not fully understood. Research into these basic phenomena likely will provide clues about how to design practical mixed-extractant systems that can be used to efficiently separate the transuranic elements from the lanthanides and other components of irradiated fuel.

  1. Homogeneous bubble nucleation in binary systems of liquid solvent and dissolved gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Němec, Tomáš

    2016-03-01

    A formulation of the classical nucleation theory (CNT) is developed for bubble nucleation in a binary system composed of a liquid solvent and a dissolved gas. The theoretical predictions are compared to the experimental nucleation data of four binary mixtures, i.e. diethylether - nitrogen, propane - carbon dioxide, isobutane - carbon dioxide, and R22 (chlorodifluoromethane) - carbon dioxide. The presented CNT formulation is found to improve the precision of the simpler theoretical method of Ward et al. [J. Basic Eng. 92 (10), 71-80, 1970] based on the weak-solution approximation. By analyzing the available experimental nucleation data, an inconsistency in the data reported by Mori et al. [Int. J. Heat Mass Transfer, 19 (10), 1153-1159, 1976] for propane - carbon dioxide and R22 - carbon dioxide is identified.

  2. Physical and reactive extraction equilibria of penicillin G in a hydrogen-bond acceptor solvent system.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sang Cheol

    2006-01-01

    Physical and reactive extraction equilibria of penicillin G were investigated experimentally and theoretically in the existence of n-butyl acetate as a hydrogen-bond acceptor solvent. Physical extraction equilibrium experiments were carried out varying the pH of aqueous phase and overall penicillin concentration. We compared the experimental data with the calculated results from four physical extraction equilibrium models suggested here and obtained the most reasonable model. Also, penicillin G was reactively extracted using Amberlite LA-2 in n-butyl acetate. The experimental variables were pH of the aqueous phase, overall amine concentration, and overall penicillin concentration. A combined equilibrium model including our physical extraction equilibrium expression and the reactive extraction equilibrium expression suggested by Reschke and Schügerl was used so as to analyze the current reactive extraction equilibrium system. The calculated results from the reactive extraction equilibrium model were in good agreement with the experimental data.

  3. Characterization of Acid-neutralizing Basic Monomers in Co-solvent Systems by NMR

    PubMed Central

    Laurence, Jennifer S.; Nelson, Benjamin N.; Ye, Qiang; Park, Jonggu; Spencer, Paulette

    2014-01-01

    Metabolic activity of the oral microbiota leads to acidification of the microenvironment and promotes demineralization of tooth structure at the margin of composite restorations. The pathogenic impact of the biofilm at the margin of the composite restoration could be reduced by engineering novel dentin adhesives that neutralize the acidic micro-environment. Integrating basic moieties into methacrylate derivatives has the potential to buffer against acid-induced degradation, and we are investigating basic monomers for this purpose. These monomers must be compatible with existing formulations, which are hydrophobic and marginally miscible with water. As such, cosolvent systems may be required to enable analysis of monomer function and chemical properties. Here we present an approach for examining the neutralizing capacity of basic methacrylate monomers in a water/ethanol co-solvent system using NMR spectroscopy. NMR is an excellent tool for monitoring the impact of co-solvent effects on pKa and buffering capacity of basic monomers because chemical shift is extremely sensitive to small changes that most other methods cannot detect. Because lactic acid (LA) is produced by oral bacteria and is prevalent in this microenvironment, LA was used to analyze the effectiveness of basic monomers to neutralize acid. The 13C chemical shift of the carbonyl in lactic acid was monitored as a function of ethanol and monomer concentration and each was correlated with pH to determine the functional buffering range. This study shows that the buffering capacity of even very poorly water-soluble monomers can be analyzed using NMR. PMID:25400302

  4. Association constants and distribution functions for ion pairs in binary solvent mixtures: Application to a cyanine dye system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Odinokov, A. V.; Basilevsky, M. V.; Nikitina, E. A.

    2011-10-01

    The computations of the association constants Kass were performed at the microscopic level for the ion pair Cy+I- composed of the complex cyanine dye cation Cy+ coupled to the negative iodine counterion. The wide array of Kass values is arranged by a variation of the composition of the binary solvent mixtures toluene/dimethylsulfoxide with the accompanying change of the solvent polarity. The potentials of mean force (PMFs) are calculated for a set of interionic separations R in the Cy+I- by a methodology which combines the quantum-chemical techniques for the treatment of the electronic structure of the Cy+I- system with the recent dielectric continuum approach which accounts for the solvation effects. For a given solute/solvent system the probability function P(R), which describes the distribution of interionic separations, is constructed in terms of the PMFs and implemented for the evaluation of the Kass.

  5. Using quantitative structure activity relationship models to predict an appropriate solvent system from a common solvent system family for countercurrent chromatography separation.

    PubMed

    Marsden-Jones, Siân; Colclough, Nicola; Garrard, Ian; Sumner, Neil; Ignatova, Svetlana

    2015-06-12

    Countercurrent chromatography (CCC) is a form of liquid-liquid chromatography. It works by running one immiscible solvent (mobile phase) over another solvent (stationary phase) being held in a CCC column using centrifugal force. The concentration of compound in each phase is characterised by the partition coefficient (Kd), which is the concentration in the stationary phase divided by the concentration in the mobile phase. When Kd is between approximately 0.2 and 2, it is most likely that optimal separation will be achieved. Having the Kd in this range allows the compound enough time in the column to be separated without resulting in a broad peak and long run time. In this paper we report the development of quantitative structure activity relationship (QSAR) models to predict logKd. The QSAR models use only the molecule's 2D structure to predict the molecular property logKd.

  6. Pharmaceutical microparticle engineering with electrospraying: the role of mixed solvent systems in particle formation and characteristics.

    PubMed

    Bohr, Adam; Wan, Feng; Kristensen, Jakob; Dyas, Mark; Stride, Eleanor; Baldursdottír, Stefania; Edirisinghe, Mohan; Yang, Mingshi

    2015-02-01

    Microparticles of Celecoxib, dispersed in a matrix of poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA), were prepared by electrospraying using different solvent mixtures to investigate the influence upon particle formation and the resulting particle characteristics. Mixtures consisting of a good solvent, acetone, and an anti-solvent, methanol, for PLGA were studied in different ratios. Properties of the spraying solutions were examined and the resulting microparticles were characterized with regard to size, morphology, porosity, solid state form, surface chemistry and drug release. Particle formation was strongly influenced by the polymer molecular conformation during droplet formation and by the anti-solvent concentration during droplet drying. A strong correlation was found between particle morphology and the solubility of the polymer in the solvent mixtures. The lack of chain entanglements in droplets containing anti-solvent resulted in compact polymer conformation and grain-like particle morphology. Further, the early precipitation of polymer and low chain interaction with increasing content of anti-solvent resulted in surface enrichment of drug (from 10 and 20% up to 41 and 57% respectively), also demonstrated by the increasingly higher drug release rates. The results demonstrate the importance of solvent composition in particle preparation and indicate potential for exploiting this dependence to improve pharmaceutical particle design and performance.

  7. Dynamics of proteins in different solvent systems: analysis of essential motion in lipases.

    PubMed Central

    Peters, G H; van Aalten, D M; Edholm, O; Toxvaerd, S; Bywater, R

    1996-01-01

    We have investigated the effect of different solvents on the dynamics of Rhizomucor miehei lipase. Molecular dynamics simulations were performed in water, methyl hexanoate, and cyclohexane. Analysis of the 400-ps trajectories showed that the solvent has a pronounced effect on the geometrical properties of the protein. The radius of gyration and total accessibility surface decrease in organic solvents, whereas the number of hydrogen bonds increases. The essential motions of the protein in different solvents can be described in a low-dimensional "essential subspace," and the dynamic behavior in this subspace correlates with the polarity of the solvent. Methyl hexanoate, which is a substrate for R. miehei lipase, significantly increases the fluctuations in the active-site loop. During the simulation, a methyl hexanoate entered the active-site groove. This observation provides insight into the possible docking mechanism of the substrate. Images FIGURE 1 FIGURE 5 FIGURE 9 FIGURE 10 FIGURE 11 PMID:8913568

  8. MODULAR CAUSTIC SIDE SOLVENT EXTRACTION UNIT (MCU) GAMMA MONITORS SYSTEM FINAL REPORT

    SciTech Connect

    Casella, V

    2005-12-15

    The Department of Energy (DOE) selected Caustic-Side Solvent Extraction (CSSX) as the preferred technology for the removal of radioactive cesium from High-Level Waste (HLW) at the Savannah River Site (SRS). Before the full-scale Salt Waste Processing Facility (SWPF) becomes operational, the Closure Business Unit (CBU) plans to process a portion of dissolved saltcake waste through a Modular CSSX Unit (MCU). This work was derived from Technical Task Request SP-TTR-2004-00013, ''Gamma Monitor for MCU''. The deliverables for this task are the hardware and software for the gamma monitors and a report summarizing the testing and acceptance of this equipment for use in the MCU. Gamma-ray monitors are required to: (1) Measure the Cs-137 concentration in the decontaminated salt solution before entering the DSS (Decontaminated Salt Solution) Hold Tank, (2) Measure the Cs-137 concentration in the strip effluent before entering the Strip Effluent Hold Tank, (3) Verify proper operation of the solvent extraction system by verifying material balance within the process (The DSS Hold Tank Cs-137 concentration will be very low and the Cs-137 concentration in the Strip Effluent Hold Tank will be fifteen times higher than the Cs-137 concentration in the Feed Tank.) Sodium iodide monitors are used to measure the Cs-137 concentration in the piping before the DSS Hold tank, while GM monitors are used for Cs-137 measurements before the Strip Effluent Hold Tank. Tungsten shields were designed using Monte Carlo calculations and fabricated to reduce the process background radiation at the detector positions. These monitors were calibrated with NIST traceable standards that were specially made to be the same as the piping being monitored. Since this gamma ray monitoring system is unique, specially designed software was written and acceptance tested by Savannah River National Laboratory personnel. The software is a LabView-based application that serves as a unified interface for controlling

  9. Solvent viscosity influence on the chemiexcitation efficiency of inter and intramolecular chemiluminescence systems.

    PubMed

    Khalid, Muhammad; Souza, Sergio P; Ciscato, Luiz F M L; Bartoloni, Fernando H; Baader, Wilhelm J

    2015-07-01

    The effects of the medium viscosity on the chemiexcitation quantum yields of the induced decomposition of 1,2-dioxetanes (highly efficient intramolecular CIEEL system) and the catalyzed decomposition of diphenoyl peroxide and a 1,2-dioxetanone derivative (model systems for the intermolecular CIEEL mechanism, despite their low efficiency) are compared in this work. Quantum yields of the rubrene catalyzed decomposition of diphenoyl peroxide and spiro-adamantyl-1,2-dioxetanone as well as the fluoride induced decomposition of a phenoxy-substituted 1,2-dioxetane derivative are shown to depend on the composition of the binary solvent mixture toluene/diphenyl ether, which possess similar polarity parameters but different viscosities. Correlations of the quantum yield data with the medium viscosity using the diffusional and the frictional (free-volume) models indicate that the induced 1,2-dioxetane decomposition indeed occurs by an entirely intramolecular process and the low efficiency of the intermolecular chemiluminescence systems (catalyzed decomposition of diphenoyl peroxide and 1,2-dioxetanone derivative) is not primarily due to the cage escape of radical ion species. PMID:26067192

  10. A system coefficient approach for quantitative assessment of the solvent effects on membrane absorption from chemical mixtures.

    PubMed

    Xia, X R; Baynes, R E; Monteiro-Riviere, N A; Riviere, J E

    2007-01-01

    A system coefficient approach is proposed for quantitative assessment of the solvent effects on membrane absorption from chemical mixtures. The complicated molecular interactions are dissected into basic molecular interaction forces via Abraham's linear solvation energy relationship (LSER). The molecular interaction strengths of a chemical are represented by a set of solute descriptors, while those of a membrane/chemical mixture system are represented by a set of system coefficients. The system coefficients can be determined by using a set of probe compounds with known solute descriptors. Polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) membrane-coated fibres and 32 probe compounds were used to demonstrate the proposed approach. When a solvent was added into the chemical mixture, the system coefficients were altered and detected by the system coefficient approach. The system coefficients of the PDMS/water system were (0.09, 0.49, -1.11, -2.36, -3.78, 3.50). When 25% ethanol was added into the PDMS/water system, the system coefficients were altered significantly (0.38, 0.41, -1.18, -2.07, -3.40, 2.81); and the solvent effect was quantitatively described by the changes in the system coefficients (0.29, -0.08, -0.07, 0.29, 0.38, -0.69). The LSER model adequately described the experimental data with a correlation coefficient (r(2)) of 0.995 and F-value of 1056 with p-value less than 0.0001.

  11. Production of low-density poly (4-methyl-1-pentene) foam via phase inversion from binary solvent/nonsovent systems

    SciTech Connect

    Simandl, R.F.; Robinson, D.N.; Bolinger, W.L.; Davis, W.E.

    1991-11-01

    Phase inversion from durene/naphthalene, durene/tmpdo, and durene/hexadecanol binary solvent/nonsolvent systems produced well interconnected, radiographically homogeneous, open-celled poly (4- methyl-1-pentene) or pmp foams. These foams ranged in density from 5 to 50 mg/cm{sup 2}. Foam homogeneity and casting efficiency were dependent on casting scheme, durene quality, solvent-to-nonsolvent ratio, and quench temperature. Foam density tracked linearly with dissolved-polymer content. Homogeneous, ultralow-density (5 to 6 mg/cm{sup 3}) foams were produced by using a 49/51 durene/naphthalene solvent eutectic. Foam hardness or firmness tracked somewhat linearly with foam density. Foams with densities above 20 mg/cm{sup 3} were too fragile to handle without damage.

  12. ORGANIC-HIGH IONIC STRENGTH AQUEOUS SOLVENT SYSTEMS FOR SPIRAL COUNTER-CURRENT CHROMATOGRAPHY: GRAPHIC OPTIMIZATION OF PARTITION COEFFICIENT

    PubMed Central

    Zeng, Yun; Liu, Gang; Ma, Ying; Chen, Xiaoyuan; Ito, Yoichiro

    2012-01-01

    A new series of organic-high ionic strength aqueous two-phase solvents systems was designed for separation of highly polar compounds by spiral high-speed counter-current chromatography. A total of 21 solvent systems composed of 1-butanol-ethanol-saturated ammonium sulfate-water at various volume ratios are arranged according to an increasing order of polarity. Selection of the two-phase solvent system for a single compound or a multiple sample mixture can be achieved by two steps of partition coefficient measurements using a graphic method. The capability of the method is demonstrated by optimization of partition coefficient for seven highly polar samples including tartrazine (K=0.77), tryptophan (K=1.00), methyl green (K= 0.93), tyrosine (0.81), metanephrine (K=0.89), tyramine (K=0.98), and normetanephrine (K=0.96). Three sulfonic acid components in D&C Green No. 8 were successfully separated by HSCCC using the graphic selection of the two-phase solvent system. PMID:23467197

  13. Enzymatic conversion of sunflower oil to biodiesel in a solvent-free system: process optimization and the immobilized system stability.

    PubMed

    Ognjanovic, Nevena; Bezbradica, Dejan; Knezevic-Jugovic, Zorica

    2009-11-01

    The feasibility of using the commercial immobilized lipase from Candida antarctica (Novozyme 435) to synthesize biodiesel from sunflower oil in a solvent-free system has been proved. Using methanol as an acyl acceptor and the response surface methodology as an optimization technique, the optimal conditions for the transesterification has been found to be: 45 degrees C, 3% of enzyme based on oil weight, 3:1 methanol to oil molar ratio and with no added water in the system. Under these conditions, >99% of oil conversion to fatty acid methyl ester (FAME) has been achieved after 50 h of reaction, but the activity of the immobilized lipase decreased markedly over the course of repeated runs. In order to improve the enzyme stability, several alternative acyl acceptors have been tested for biodiesel production under solvent-free conditions. The use of methyl acetate seems to be of great interest, resulting in high FAME yield (95.65%) and increasing the half-life of the immobilized lipase by about 20.1 times as compared to methanol. The reaction has also been verified in the industrially feasible reaction system including both a batch stirred tank reactor and a packed bed reactor. Although satisfactory performance in the batch stirred tank reactor has been achieved, the kinetics in a packed bed reactor system seems to have a slightly better profile (93.6+/-3.75% FAME yield after 8-10 h), corresponding to the volumetric productivity of 48.5 g/(dm(3) h). The packed bed reactor has operated for up to 72 h with almost no loss in productivity, implying that the proposed process and the immobilized system could provide a promising solution for the biodiesel synthesis at the industrial scale.

  14. Control of Evaporation Behavior of an Inkjet-Printed Dielectric Layer Using a Mixed-Solvent System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Hak Soon; Kang, Byung Ju; Oh, Je Hoon

    2016-01-01

    In this study, the evaporation behavior and the resulting morphology of inkjet-printed dielectric layers were controlled using a mixed-solvent system to fabricate uniform poly-4-vinylphenol (PVP) dielectric layers without any pinholes. The mixed-solvent system consisted of two different organic solvents: 1-hexanol and ethanol. The effects of inkjet-printing variables such as overlap condition, substrate temperature, and different printing sequences (continuous and interlacing printing methods) on the inkjet-printed dielectric layer were also investigated. Increasing volume fraction of ethanol (VFE) is likely to reduce the evaporation rate gradient and the drying time of the inkjet-printed dielectric layer; this diminishes the coffee stain effect and thereby improves the uniformity of the inkjet-printed dielectric layer. However, the coffee stain effect becomes more severe with an increase in the substrate temperature due to the enhanced outward convective flow. The overlap condition has little effect on the evaporation behavior of the printed dielectric layer. In addition, the interlacing printing method results in either a stronger coffee stain effect or wavy structures of the dielectric layers depending on the VFE of the PVP solution. All-inkjet-printed capacitors without electrical short circuiting can be successfully fabricated using the optimized PVP solution (VFE = 0.6); this indicates that the mixed-solvent system is expected to play an important role in the fabrication of high-quality inkjet-printed dielectric layers in various printed electronics applications.

  15. Effect of sodium chloride on solute-solvent interactions in aqueous polyethylene glycol-sodium sulfate two-phase systems.

    PubMed

    da Silva, Nuno R; Ferreira, Luisa A; Madeira, Pedro P; Teixeira, José A; Uversky, Vladimir N; Zaslavsky, Boris Y

    2015-12-18

    Partition behavior of eight small organic compounds and six proteins was examined in poly(ethylene glycol)-8000-sodium sulfate aqueous two-phase systems containing 0.215M NaCl and 0.5M osmolyte (sorbitol, sucrose, TMAO) and poly(ethylene glycol)-10000-sodium sulfate-0.215M NaCl system, all in 0.01M sodium phosphate buffer, pH 6.8. The differences between the solvent properties of the coexisting phases (solvent dipolarity/polarizability, hydrogen bond donor acidity, and hydrogen bond acceptor basicity) were characterized with solvatochromic dyes using the solvatochromic comparison method. Differences between the electrostatic properties of the phases were determined by analysis of partitioning of sodium salts of dinitrophenylated (DNP-) amino acids with aliphatic alkyl side-chain. The partition coefficients of all compounds examined (including proteins) were described in terms of solute-solvent interactions. The results obtained in the study show that solute-solvent interactions of nonionic organic compounds and proteins in polyethylene glycol-sodium sulfate aqueous two-phase system change in the presence of NaCl additive. PMID:26615710

  16. Effect of sodium chloride on solute-solvent interactions in aqueous polyethylene glycol-sodium sulfate two-phase systems.

    PubMed

    da Silva, Nuno R; Ferreira, Luisa A; Madeira, Pedro P; Teixeira, José A; Uversky, Vladimir N; Zaslavsky, Boris Y

    2015-12-18

    Partition behavior of eight small organic compounds and six proteins was examined in poly(ethylene glycol)-8000-sodium sulfate aqueous two-phase systems containing 0.215M NaCl and 0.5M osmolyte (sorbitol, sucrose, TMAO) and poly(ethylene glycol)-10000-sodium sulfate-0.215M NaCl system, all in 0.01M sodium phosphate buffer, pH 6.8. The differences between the solvent properties of the coexisting phases (solvent dipolarity/polarizability, hydrogen bond donor acidity, and hydrogen bond acceptor basicity) were characterized with solvatochromic dyes using the solvatochromic comparison method. Differences between the electrostatic properties of the phases were determined by analysis of partitioning of sodium salts of dinitrophenylated (DNP-) amino acids with aliphatic alkyl side-chain. The partition coefficients of all compounds examined (including proteins) were described in terms of solute-solvent interactions. The results obtained in the study show that solute-solvent interactions of nonionic organic compounds and proteins in polyethylene glycol-sodium sulfate aqueous two-phase system change in the presence of NaCl additive.

  17. Solvent effect on the size of platinum nanoparticle synthesized in microemulsion systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salabat, Alireza; Far, Mina Rahmati

    2012-05-01

    In this research work, the effect of solvent on the size of paltinum nanoparticles synthesized by microemulsion method was investigated. Platinum nanoparticles have been prepared by the reduction of H2PtCl6 with hydrazine in water-in-oil (w/o) microemulsions consisting of sodium bis(2-ethylhexyl) sulfo-succinate (AOT) and solvents n-hexane, cyclohexane and n-nonane. The size of the platinum nanoparticles was measured using transmission electron microscopy (TEM). It was verified that, for reduction of H2PtCl6 by hydrazine in microemulsion with different organic solvents, the solvents are arranged by their influence on nanoparticle sizes as follows: n-nonane > cyclohexane > n-hexane.

  18. Cellulose esters synthesized using a tetrabutylammonium acetate and dimethylsulfoxide solvent system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Yongqi; Miao, Jiaojiao; Jiang, Zeming; Sun, Haibo; Zhang, Liping

    2016-07-01

    Cellulose acetate (CA) and cellulose acetate propionate (CAP) were homogeneously synthesized in a novel tetrabutylammonium acetate/dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) solvent system, without any catalyst, at temperatures below 70 °C. The molecular structures of the cellulose esters (CEs) and distributions of the substituents in the anhydroglucose repeating units were determined using 13C cross-polarization magic angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, and the degree of substitution (DS) values were determined using 1H nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. The structures of the CEs, regenerated cellulose (RC), and pulp were determined using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. The thermal properties of the products were determined using thermogravimetric analysis. The temperatures of initial decomposition of the CEs were up to 40 °C higher than those of the RC and pulp. All the CEs were highly soluble in DMSO, but were insoluble in acetone. CAs with DS values less than 2.6 swelled or were poorly dissolved in CHCl3, but those with DS values above 2.9 dissolved rapidly. CAPs with DS values above 2.6 had good solubilities in ethyl acetate.

  19. Conversion of glucose into furans in the presence of AlCl3 in an ethanol-water solvent system.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yu; Hu, Changwei; Abu-Omar, Mahdi M

    2012-07-01

    Glucose was converted into furans (5-hydroxymethylfurfural and 5-ethoxymethylfurfural) in the presence of AlCl(3) in an ethanol-water solvent system. The system showed high activity for the conversion of glucose into furans but low activity for the subsequent formation of LAs (levulinic acid and ethyl levulinate). High furans yield of 57% with low LAs yield of 11% can be obtained at 160 °C within 15 min. Glucose-based disaccharides (sucrose, maltose and cellobiose) and polysaccharides (starch but not cellulose) can also be converted to furans effectively under the same condition. AlCl(3) can be used to prepare furans from biomass-derived compounds in ethanol-water, a green solvent system. PMID:22609675

  20. Novel Solvent System for Post Combustion CO{sub 2} Capture

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, Alfred; Brown, Nathan

    2013-09-30

    The purpose of this project was to evaluate the performance of ION’s lead solvent and determine if ION’s solvent candidate could potentially meet DOE’s target of achieving 90% CO{sub 2} Capture from a 550 MWe Pulverized Coal Plant without resulting in an increase in COE greater than 35%. In this project, ION’s lead solvent demonstrated a 65% reduction in regeneration energy and a simultaneous 35% reduction in liquid to gas ratio (L/G) in comparison to aqMEA at 90% CO{sub 2} capture using actual flue gas at 0.2 MWe. Results have clearly demonstrated that the ION technology is in line with DOE performance expectations and has the potential to meet DOE’s performance targets in larger scale testing environments.

  1. In vitro dissolution of curium oxide using a phagolysosomal simulant solvent system

    SciTech Connect

    Helfinstine, S.Y.; Guilmette, R.A. ); Schlapper, G.A. )

    1992-07-01

    Detailed study of actinide oxide behavior in alveolar macrophages (AM) in vitro is limited because of the short life span of these cells in culture. We created an in vitro dissolution system that could mimic the acidic phagolysosomal environment for the actinide and be maintained for an indefinite period so that dissolution of more insoluble materials could be measured. The dissolution system for this investigation, consisting of nine different solutions of HCl and the chelating agent diethylenetriamine pentaacetate (DTPA) in distilled water, is called the phagolysosomal simulant solvent (PSS). In this system, both the pH and the amount of DTPA were varied. We could observe the effect of altering pH within a range of 4.0-6.0 (similar to that of the phagolysosome) and the effect of the molar ratio of DTPA to curium at 1000: 1, 100;1, or 10:1. We chose curium sesquioxide ([sup 244]Cm[sub 2]O[sub 3]) to validate the PSS for actinide dissolution versus that occurring in AM in vitro because it dissolves significantly in less than 1 week. The polydisperse [sup 244]Cm[sub 2]O[sub 3] aerosol was generated, collected on filters, resuspended, and added to the PSS solutions and to cultured canine AM. By comparing dissolution in the two systems directly, we hoped to arrive at an optimum PSS for future dissolution studies. PSS and cell culture samples were taken daily for 7 days after exposure and tested for the solubilized curium. The amount of soluble material was determined by ultracentrifugation to separate the insoluble CM[sub 2]O[sub 3] from the soluble curium in the PSS solutions and filtration for the cell-containing material. After separating the soluble and insoluble fractions, the samples were analyzed using alpha liquid scintillation counting. Time-dependent dissolution measurements from the PSS/AM showed that the CM[sub 2]O[sub 3] dissolution was similar for both the PSS solutions and the cultured AM. 13 refs., 4 tabs.

  2. Morphology manipulation of α-Fe 2O 3 in the mixed solvent system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Ranbo; Li, Zhenmin; Wang, Dan; Lai, Xiaoyong; Xing, Chaojian; Xing, Xianran

    2009-12-01

    By using simple mixed solvents, the morphologies of hematite (α-Fe 2O 3) particles could be manipulated, and the spherical, mulberry-like, nanospherical and top-like products could be controllably obtained. The as-obtained products were characterized by X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, and vibrating sample magnetometer. The results indicated that the morphology manipulation could be achieved by systematically adjusting the polarity of the mixed solvent via the ratio control. And the magnetic properties of the products were critically affected by their grain size and assembly morphologies.

  3. Degree of conversion of simplified contemporary adhesive systems as influenced by extended air-activated or passive solvent volatilization modes.

    PubMed

    Borges, Boniek C D; Souza-Junior, Eduardo Jose; Brandt, William C; Loguercio, Alessandro D; Montes, Marcos A J R; Puppin-Rontani, Regina M; Sinhoreti, Mario Alexandre Coelho

    2012-01-01

    This study evaluated the effect of five methods of solvent volatilization on the degree of conversion (DC) of nine one-bottle adhesive systems using Fourier transform infrared/attenuated total reflectance (FTIR/ATR) analysis. Nine adhesives were tested: Adper Single Bond 2 (SB), Adper Easy One (EO), One Up Bond F Plus (OUP), One Coat Bond SL (OC), XP Bond (XP), Ambar (AM), Natural Bond (NB), GO, and Stae. The adhesive systems were applied to a zinc-selenide pellet and 1) cured without solvent volatilization, 2) left undisturbed for 10 seconds before curing, 3) left undisturbed for 60 seconds before curing, 4) air-dried with an air stream for 10 seconds before curing, and 5) air-dried with an air stream for 60 seconds before curing. FTIR/ATR spectra were obtained, and the DC was calculated by comparing the aliphatic bonds/reference peaks before and after light activation for 10 seconds (FlashLite 1401). The DC means of each material were analyzed by one-way analysis of variance and post hoc Tukey test (p<0.05). The DC of GO and Stae adhesive systems was not affected by the five evaporation conditions. Air-drying for 60 seconds before curing yielded the highest DC for SB, EO, and OC. Extended solvent volatilization time (60 seconds) either with or without air-drying before curing provided the highest DC for AM, NB, XP, and OUP. Thus, the monomer conversion of adhesive systems was material dependent. In general, the 60-second passive or active air-drying modes to volatilize solvents before curing enhanced the degree of conversion for the one-bottle simplified adhesive systems. PMID:22313268

  4. Binary Mutual Diffusion Coefficients of Polymer/Solvent Systems Using Compressible Regular Solutions Theory and Free Volume Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farajnezhad, Arsalan; Asef Afshar, Orang; Asgarpour Khansary, Milad; Shirazian, Saeed

    2016-07-01

    The free volume theory has found practical application for prediction of diffusional behavior of polymer/solvent systems. In this paper, reviewing free volume theory, binary mutual diffusion coefficients in some polymer/solvent systems have been systematically presented through chemical thermodynamic modeling in terms of both activity coefficients and fugacity coefficients models. Here chemical thermodynamic model of compressible regular solution (CRS) was used for evaluation of diffusion coefficients calculations as the pure component properties would be required only. Four binary polymeric solutions of cyclohexane/polyisobutylene, n-pentane/polyisobutylene, toluene/polyisobutylene and chloroform/polyisobutylene were considered. The agreement between calculated data and the experimentally collected data was desirable and no considerable error propagation in approximating mutual diffusion coefficients has been observed.

  5. Results of the Test Program for Replacement of AK-225G Solvent for Cleaning NASA Propulsion Oxygen Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lowrey, Nikki M.; Mitchell, Mark A.

    2016-01-01

    Since the 1990's, when the Class I Ozone Depleting Substance chlorofluorocarbon-113 was banned, NASA's propulsion test facilities at Marshall Space Flight Center and Stennis Space Center have relied upon the solvent Asahiklin AK-225 (hydrochlorofluorocarbon-225ca/cb or HCFC-225ca/cb) and, more recently AK-225G (the single isomer form, HCFC-225cb) to safely clean and verify the cleanliness of large scale propulsion oxygen systems. Effective January 1, 2015, the production, import, export, and new use of Class II Ozone Depleting Substances, including AK-225G, was prohibited in the United States by the Clean Air Act. In 2012 through 2014, NASA test labs at MSFC, SSC, and Johnson Space Center's White Sands Test Facility collaborated to seek out, test, and qualify a solvent replacement for AK-225G that is both an effective cleaner and safe for use with oxygen systems. This paper summarizes the tests performed, results, and lessons learned.

  6. Alternative Green Solvents Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maloney, Phillip R.

    2012-01-01

    Necessary for safe and proper functioning of equipment. Mainly halogenated solvents. Tetrachloride, Trichloroethylene (TCE), CFC-113. No longer used due to regulatory/safety concerns. Precision Cleaning at KSC: Small % of total parts. Used for liquid oxygen (LOX) systems. Dual solvent process. Vertrel MCA (decafluoropentane (DFP) and trons-dichloroethylene) HFE-7100. DFP has long term environmental concerns. Project Goals: a) Identify potential replacements. b) 22 wet chemical processes. c) 3 alternative processes. d) Develop test procedures. e) Contamination and cleaning. f) Analysis. g) Use results to recommend alternative processes. Conclusions: a) No alternative matched Vertrel in this study. b) No clear second place solvent. c) Hydrocarbons- easy; Fluorinated greases- difficult. d) Fluorinated component may be needed in replacement solvent. e) Process may need to make up for shortcoming of the solvent. f) Plasma and SCC02 warrant further testing.

  7. Solvent substitution

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-01-01

    The DOE Environmental Restoration and Waste Management Office of Technology Development and the Air Force Engineering and Services Center convened the First Annual International Workshop on Solvent Substitution on December 4--7, 1990. The primary objectives of this joint effort were to share information and ideas among attendees in order to enhance the development and implementation of required new technologies for the elimination of pollutants associated with industrial use of hazardous and toxic solvents; and to aid in accelerating collaborative efforts and technology transfer between government and industry for solvent substitution. There were workshop sessions focusing on Alternative Technologies, Alternative Solvents, Recovery/Recycling, Low VOC Materials and Treatment for Environmentally Safe Disposal. The 35 invited papers presented covered a wide range of solvent substitution activities including: hardware and weapons production and maintenance, paint stripping, coating applications, printed circuit boards, metal cleaning, metal finishing, manufacturing, compliance monitoring and process control monitoring. This publication includes the majority of these presentations. In addition, in order to further facilitate information exchange and technology transfer, the US Air Force and DOE solicited additional papers under a general Call for Papers.'' These papers, which underwent review and final selection by a peer review committee, are also included in this combined Proceedings/Compendium. For those involved in handling, using or managing hazardous and toxic solvents, this document should prove to be a valuable resource, providing the most up-to-date information on current technologies and practices in solvent substitution. Individual papers are abstracted separated.

  8. Efficient and Specific Trypsin Digestion of Microgram to Nanogram Quantities of Proteins in Organic-Aqueous Solvent Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Strader, Michael B; Tabb, Dave L; Hervey, IV, William Judson; Pan, Chongle; Hurst, Gregory {Greg} B

    2006-01-01

    Mass spectrometry-based identification of the components of multiprotein complexes often involves solution-phase proteolytic digestion of the complex. The affinity purification of individual protein complexes often yields nanogram to low-microgram amounts of protein, which poses several challenges for enzymatic digestion and protein identification. We tested different solvent systems to optimize trypsin digestions of samples containing limited amounts of protein for subsequent analysis by LC-MS-MS. Data collected from digestion of 10-, 2-, 1-, and 0.2- g portions of a protein standard mixture indicated that an organicaqueous solvent system containing 80% acetonitrile consistently provided the most complete digestion, producing more peptide identifications than the other solvent systems tested. For example, a 1-h digestion in 80% acetonitrile yielded over 52% more peptides than the overnight digestion of 1 g of a protein mixture in purely aqueous buffer. This trend was also observed for peptides from digested ribosomal proteins isolated from Rhodopseudomonas palustris. In addition to improved digestion efficiency, the shorter digestion times possible with the organic solvent also improved trypsin specificity, resulting in smaller numbers of semitryptic peptides than an overnight digestion protocol using an aqueous solvent. The technique was also demonstrated for an affinityisolated protein complex, GroEL. To our knowledge, this report is the first using mass spectrometry data to show a linkage between digestion solvent and trypsin specificity. Mass spectrometry (MS) has become a widely used method for studying proteins, protein complexes, and whole proteomes because of innovations in soft ionization techniques, bioinformatics, and chromatographic separation techniques.1-7 An example of a high-throughput mass spectrometry strategy commonly used for this purpose is a variation of the "shotgun" approach, involving in-solution digestion of a protein complex followed by

  9. Improvement of extraction capability of magnetic molecularly imprinted polymer beads in aqueous media via dual-phase solvent system.

    PubMed

    Hu, Yuling; Liu, Ruijin; Zhang, Yi; Li, Gongke

    2009-08-15

    In this study, a novel and simple dual-phase solvent system for the improvement of extraction capability of magnetic molecularly imprinted polymer (MIP) beads in aqueous sample was proposed. The method integrated MIP extraction and micro-liquid-liquid extraction (micro-LLE) into only one step. A magnetic MIP beads using atrazine as template was synthesized, and was applied to aqueous media by adding micro-volume of n-hexane to form a co-extraction system. The magnetic MIP beads preferred to suspend in the organic phase, which shielded them from the disturbance of water molecule. The target analytes in the water sample was extracted into the organic phase by micro-LLE and then further bound to the solid-phase of magnetic MIP beads. The beads specificity was significantly improved with the imprinting efficiency of template increasing from 0.5 to 4.4, as compared with that in pure aqueous media. The extraction capacity, equilibration process and cross-selectivity of the MIP dual-phase solvent extraction system were investigated. The proposed method coupled with high-performance liquid chromatography was applied to the analysis of atrazine, simazine, propazine, simetryn, prometryne, ametryn and terbutryn in complicated sample such as tomato, strawberry juice and milk. The method is selective, sensitive and low organic solvent-consuming, and has potential to broaden the range of MIP application in biological and environmental sample.

  10. Ethyl acetate-n-butanol gradient solvent system for high-speed countercurrent chromatography to screen bioactive substances in okra.

    PubMed

    Ying, Hao; Jiang, Heyuan; Liu, Huan; Chen, Fangjuan; Du, Qizhen

    2014-09-12

    High-speed countercurrent chromatographic separation (HSCCC) possesses the property of zero-loss of sample, which is very useful for the screening of bioactive components. In the present study, the ethyl acetate-n-butanol gradient HSCCC solvent system composed of n-hexane-ethyl acetate-n-butanol-water was investigated for the screening of bioactive substances. To screen the antiproliferative compounds in okra extract, we used the stationary phase ethyl acetate-n-butanol-water (1:1:10) as the stationary phase, and eluted the antiproliferative components by 6-steps of gradient using mobile phases n-hexane-ethyl acetate (1:2), n-hexane-ethyl acetate (1:4), n-hexane-ethyl acetate (0:4), n-butanol-ethyl acetate (1:4) n-butanol-ethyl acetate (1:2), n-butanol-ethyl acetate (2:2), and n-butanol-ethyl acetate (2:1). The fractions collected from HSCCC separation with the gradient solvent system were assayed for antiproliferative activity against cancer cells. Bioactive components were identified: a major anti-cancer compound, 4'-hydroxy phenethyl trans-ferulate, with middle activity, and a minor anti-cancer compound, carolignan, with strong activity. The result shows that the gradient solvent system is potential for the screening of bioactive compounds from natural products.

  11. Ethyl acetate-n-butanol gradient solvent system for high-speed countercurrent chromatography to screen bioactive substances in okra.

    PubMed

    Ying, Hao; Jiang, Heyuan; Liu, Huan; Chen, Fangjuan; Du, Qizhen

    2014-09-12

    High-speed countercurrent chromatographic separation (HSCCC) possesses the property of zero-loss of sample, which is very useful for the screening of bioactive components. In the present study, the ethyl acetate-n-butanol gradient HSCCC solvent system composed of n-hexane-ethyl acetate-n-butanol-water was investigated for the screening of bioactive substances. To screen the antiproliferative compounds in okra extract, we used the stationary phase ethyl acetate-n-butanol-water (1:1:10) as the stationary phase, and eluted the antiproliferative components by 6-steps of gradient using mobile phases n-hexane-ethyl acetate (1:2), n-hexane-ethyl acetate (1:4), n-hexane-ethyl acetate (0:4), n-butanol-ethyl acetate (1:4) n-butanol-ethyl acetate (1:2), n-butanol-ethyl acetate (2:2), and n-butanol-ethyl acetate (2:1). The fractions collected from HSCCC separation with the gradient solvent system were assayed for antiproliferative activity against cancer cells. Bioactive components were identified: a major anti-cancer compound, 4'-hydroxy phenethyl trans-ferulate, with middle activity, and a minor anti-cancer compound, carolignan, with strong activity. The result shows that the gradient solvent system is potential for the screening of bioactive compounds from natural products. PMID:25069743

  12. High-throughput determination of quantitative structure-property relationships using a resonant multisensor system: solvent resistance of bisphenol a polycarbonate copolymers.

    PubMed

    Potyrailo, Radislav A; McCloskey, Patrick J; Wroczynski, Ronald J; Morris, William G

    2006-05-01

    Polymers are important materials for sensor, microfluidic, and other demanding applications. High-throughput screening methodology has been applied for the evaluation of the solvent resistance of a family of polycarbonate copolymers prepared from the reaction of bisphenol A (BPA), hydroquinone (HQ), and resorcinol (RS) in different solvents of practical importance, such as chloroform, tetrahydrofuran (THF), and methyl ethyl ketone (MEK). We employed a 24-channel acoustic-wave sensor system that provided previously unavailable capabilities for parallel evaluation of polymer solvent resistance. This high-throughput polymer evaluation approach assisted in construction of detailed solvent-resistance maps of polycarbonate copolymers and in determination of quantitative structure-property relationships. The best absolute solvent resistance of all studied copolymers was achieved in MEK, followed by chloroform and THF. A D-optimal mixture design was employed to explore the relationship between the copolymer compositions and their solvent resistance. The applied special cubic model for each solvent took into account the primary mixture terms such as BPA, HQ, and RS; binary interaction terms such as BPA-HQ, BPA-RS, and HQ-RS; and a ternary interaction term BPA-HQ-RS. A combination of the normal distribution of the model residuals and the very high values of adjusted R2 (0.97-0.99) demonstrated a good quality of the model. At a HQ concentration of 40 mol %, the solvent resistance was the highest for all tested solvents, and different concentrations of BPA (40 and 60 mol %) and RS (0 and 20 mol %) did not affect the solvent resistance. Without HQ, solvent resistance was decreasing with an increase of RS and decrease of BPA. Overall, with an increase of HQ concentration from 0 to 40 mol %, the solvent resistance of BPA-HQ-RS copolymers was improved by up to 3 times in THF, by 21 times in chloroform, and by 32 times in MEK.

  13. Systematic and practical solvent system selection strategy based on the nonrandom two-liquid segment activity coefficient model for real-life counter-current chromatography separation.

    PubMed

    Ren, Da-Bing; Yi, Lun-Zhao; Qin, Yan-Hua; Yun, Yong-Huan; Deng, Bai-Chuan; Lu, Hong-Mei; Chen, Xiao-Qing; Liang, Yi-Zeng

    2015-05-01

    Solvent system selection is the first step toward a successful counter-current chromatography (CCC) separation. This paper introduces a systematic and practical solvent system selection strategy based on the nonrandom two-liquid segment activity coefficient (NRTL-SAC) model, which is efficient in predicting the solute partition coefficient. Firstly, the application of the NRTL-SAC method was extended to the ethyl acetate/n-butanol/water and chloroform/methanol/water solvent system families. Moreover, the versatility and predictive capability of the NRTL-SAC method were investigated. The results indicate that the solute molecular parameters identified from hexane/ethyl acetate/methanol/water solvent system family are capable of predicting a large number of partition coefficients in several other different solvent system families. The NRTL-SAC strategy was further validated by successfully separating five components from Salvia plebeian R.Br. We therefore propose that NRTL-SAC is a promising high throughput method for rapid solvent system selection and highly adaptable to screen suitable solvent system for real-life CCC separation.

  14. An Improved Approach for Analyzing the Oxygen Compatibility of Solvents and other Oxygen-Flammable Materials for Use in Oxygen Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harper, Susan A.; Juarez, Alfredo; Peralta, Stephen F.; Stoltzfus, Joel; Arpin, Christina Pina; Beeson, Harold D.

    2016-01-01

    Solvents used to clean oxygen system components must be assessed for oxygen compatibility, as incompatible residue or fluid inadvertently left behind within an oxygen system can pose a flammability risk. The most recent approach focused on solvent ignition susceptibility to assess the flammability risk associated with these materials. Previous evaluations included Ambient Pressure Liquid Oxygen (LOX) Mechanical Impact Testing (ASTM G86) and Autogenous Ignition Temperature (AIT) Testing (ASTM G72). The goal in this approach was to identify a solvent material that was not flammable in oxygen. As environmental policies restrict the available options of acceptable solvents, it has proven difficult to identify one that is not flammable in oxygen. A more rigorous oxygen compatibility approach is needed in an effort to select a new solvent for NASA applications. NASA White Sands Test Facility proposed an approach that acknowledges oxygen flammability, yet selects solvent materials based on their relative oxygen compatibility ranking, similar to that described in ASTM G63-99. Solvents are selected based on their ranking with respect to minimal ignition susceptibility, damage and propagation potential, as well as their relative ranking when compared with other solvent materials that are successfully used in oxygen systems. Test methods used in this approach included ASTM G86 (Ambient Pressure LOX Mechanical Impact Testing and Pressurized Gaseous Oxygen (GOX) Mechanical Impact Testing), ASTM G72 (AIT Testing), and ASTM D240 (Heat of Combustion (HOC) Testing). Only four solvents were tested through the full battery of tests for evaluation of oxygen compatibility: AK-225G as a baseline comparison, Solstice PF, L-14780, and Vertrel MCA. Baseline solvent AK-225G exhibited the lowest HOC and highest AIT of solvents tested. Nonetheless, Solstice PF, L-14780, and Vertrel MCA HOCs all fell well within the range of properties that are associated with proven oxygen system materials

  15. Morphological evolution of Cu2O based on a solvent effect in a microwave-assisted system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Xiao-Lin; Wang, Min-Juan; Chen, Yashao

    2015-12-01

    Evolution of Cu2O morphology, from a cubic aggregate to a mono-dispersed cube, then to a {100} planes etched cube, with respect to solvent composition is presented in the microwave-assisted system. The solvent composition has a great impact on crystallization kinetics and oxidation etching. A series of contrast experiments were designed to reveal the critical parameters in the etching process according to the oxidation reaction equation of Cu2O. {100} planes etched Cu2O cubes exhibit preferable absorbability on methyl orange in the dark, whereas Cu2O polycrystals show better photo-catalytic activity because of the highly active apexes and edges exposed on the surface.

  16. Evaluation of solvent system for the enzymatic synthesis of ethanol-based biodiesel from sludge palm oil (SPO).

    PubMed

    Nasaruddin, Ricca Rahman; Alam, Md Zahangir; Jami, Mohammed Saedi

    2014-02-01

    A green technology of biodiesel production focuses on the use of enzymes as the catalyst. In enzymatic biodiesel synthesis, suitable solvent system is very essential to reduce the inhibition effects of the solvent to the enzymes. This study produced ethanol-based biodiesel from a low-cost sludge palm oil (SPO) using locally-produced Candida cylindracea lipase from fermentation of palm oil mill effluent (POME) based medium. The optimum levels of ethanol-to-SPO molar ratio and enzyme loading were found to be 4:1 and 10 U/25 g of SPO respectively with 54.4% w/w SPO yield of biodiesel and 21.7% conversion of free fatty acid (FFA) into biodiesel. Addition of tert-butanol at 2:1 tert-butanol-to-SPO molar ratio into the ethanol-solvent system increased the yield of biodiesel to 71.6% w/w SPO and conversion of FFA into biodiesel to 28.8%. The SPO and ethanol have promising potential for the production of renewable biodiesel using enzymatic-catalyzed esterification and transesterification.

  17. Nonlocal contributions to the thermodynamics of inhomogeneous homopolymer-solvent systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McMullen, William E.

    1991-12-01

    We derive several recent approximation schemes for the thermodynamics of inhomogeneous homopolymer solutions by functionally expanding the nonideal part of the free energy about the local density. The functional expansion contains all orders in the gradients of the monomer density even when truncated at low order. When applied to systems with slowly varying densities, it reduces to a widely used square-gradient theory of homopolymers and blends. We also recover the so-called Roe functional by considering infinitely long Gaussian chains. However, this result only applies to a small region near the center of the interface. We employ a one-parameter, exponential decay trial function and the variational theorem to obtain estimates of the surface tension between two coexisting homopolymer-solvent phases. This particular trial function facilitates a comparison of the numerically evaluated nonlocal free energy functional, the analytic summation of the full gradient expansion, the square-gradient approximation, and the Roe functional. Within the scope of a Gaussian-chain model and a Flory-Huggins local free energy, we compare the various approximations with regards to their predictions for the surface tension, the nonlocal free energy density, and the interfacial profiles. The full gradient expansion does not converge to a useful result near the center of the interface of moderately segregated phases or when the interface becomes narrow as for strongly segregated homopolymer solutions. The square-gradient theory overestimates the free energy density in the wings of the interface but underestimates this quantity near the interface's center. These two errors partially cancel, and the square-gradient theory provides an accurate estimate of the surface tension of moderately segregated homopolymer solutions. Unlike many other theories of interfaces which derive from considerations of two-body correlations in a homogeneous reference phase, the lowest nontrivial contribution of

  18. Acid gas treating by aqueous alkanolamines. Annual report, January-December 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Sandall, O.C.; Rinker, E.B.; Ashour, S.

    1993-12-01

    The objective of the work is to investigate the simultaneous absorption or desorption of CO2 and H2S into and from a mixed aqueous amine solvent consisting of methyldiethanolamine (MDEA) and diethanolamine (DEA). In work completed thus far, density, viscosity, gas diffusivity, gas solubility, surface tension, and amine solution vapor pressure have been measured for aqueous MDEA, DEA, and MDEA/DEA mixtures over the temperature range 20 to 100 deg. C and for concentrations up to 50 weight %. A mathematical model, based on the penetration theory, for the simultaneous absorption (desorption) of CO2 and H2S into (from) aqueous solutions of MDEA and DEA has been developed.

  19. Acid gas treating by aqueous alkanolamines. Annual report, July-December 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Sandall, O.C.; Rinker, E.B.; Tamimi, A.; Davis, R.A.; Oelschlager, D.W.

    1992-12-01

    The objective of the work is to investigate the simultaneous absorption or desorption of CO2 and H2S into and from a mixed aqueous amine solvent consisting of methyldiethanolamine (MDEA) and diethanolamine (DEA). In work completed thus far models have been developed for single gas (either H2S or CO2) absorption into a single amine solution (MDEA or DEA). Density and viscosity measurements have been made for aqueous MDEA, DEA and MDEA/DEA mixtures over the temperature range 20 to 100 C and for concentrations up to 50 weight %.

  20. Size effects of solvent molecules on the phase behavior and effective interaction of colloidal systems with the bridging attraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Jie; Wang, Xuewu; Kline, Steven R.; Liu, Yun

    2016-11-01

    There has been much recent research interest towards understanding the phase behavior of colloidal systems interacting with a bridging attraction, where the small solvent particles and large solute colloidal particles can be reversibly associated with each other. These systems show interesting phase behavior compared to the more widely studied depletion attraction systems. Here, we use Baxter’s two-component sticky hard sphere model with a Percus-Yevick closure to solve the Ornstein-Zernike equation and study the size effect on colloidal systems with bridging attractions. The spinodal decomposition regions, percolation transition boundaries and binodal regions are systematically investigated as a function of the relative size of the small solvent and large solute particles as well as the attraction strength between the small and large particles. In the phase space determined by the concentrations of small and large particles, the spinodal and binodal regions form isolated islands. The locations and shapes of the spinodal and binodal regions sensitively depend on the relative size of the small and large particles and the attraction strength between them. The percolation region shrinks by decreasing the size ratio, while the binodal region slightly expands with the decrease of the size ratio. Our results are very important in understanding the phase behavior for a bridging attraction colloidal system, a model system that provides insight into oppositely charged colloidal systems, protein phase behavior, and colloidal gelation mechanisms.

  1. Size effects of solvent molecules on the phase behavior and effective interaction of colloidal systems with the bridging attraction.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jie; Wang, Xuewu; Kline, Steven R; Liu, Yun

    2016-11-16

    There has been much recent research interest towards understanding the phase behavior of colloidal systems interacting with a bridging attraction, where the small solvent particles and large solute colloidal particles can be reversibly associated with each other. These systems show interesting phase behavior compared to the more widely studied depletion attraction systems. Here, we use Baxter's two-component sticky hard sphere model with a Percus-Yevick closure to solve the Ornstein-Zernike equation and study the size effect on colloidal systems with bridging attractions. The spinodal decomposition regions, percolation transition boundaries and binodal regions are systematically investigated as a function of the relative size of the small solvent and large solute particles as well as the attraction strength between the small and large particles. In the phase space determined by the concentrations of small and large particles, the spinodal and binodal regions form isolated islands. The locations and shapes of the spinodal and binodal regions sensitively depend on the relative size of the small and large particles and the attraction strength between them. The percolation region shrinks by decreasing the size ratio, while the binodal region slightly expands with the decrease of the size ratio. Our results are very important in understanding the phase behavior for a bridging attraction colloidal system, a model system that provides insight into oppositely charged colloidal systems, protein phase behavior, and colloidal gelation mechanisms. PMID:27617866

  2. Knock-Limited Power Outputs from a CFR Engine Using Internal Coolants. 3; Four Alkyl Amines, Three Alkanolamines, Six Amides, and Eight Heterocyclic Compounds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Imming, Harry S.; Bellman, Donald R.

    1947-01-01

    An investigation of the antiknock effectiveness of various additive-water solutions when used as internal coolants has been conducted at the NACA Cleveland laboratory. Nine compounds have been previously run in a CFR engine and the results are presented. In an effort to find a good anti-knock-coolant additive with more desirable physical properties than those of the nine compounds previously investigated, water solutions of four alkyl amines, three alkanolamines, six amides, and eight heterocyclic compounds were investigated and the results are presented.

  3. Solvent substitution for electronic products

    SciTech Connect

    Benkovich, M.K.

    1992-01-01

    Allied-Signal Inc., Kansas City Division (KCD), manufactures the electrical, electrochemical, mechanical, and plastic components for nuclear weapons. The KCD has made a commitment to eliminate the use of chlorohydrocarbon (CHC) and chlorofluorocarbon (CFC) solvents to the greatest technical extent possible consistent with nuclear safety and stockpile reliability requirements. Current cleaning processes in the production departments use trichloroethylene, 1,1,1-trichloroethane, and various CFC-113 based solvents. Several non-halogenated solvents (Solvent A - an aqueous solvent based on N,N-dimethylacetamide, Solvent B - an aqueous mixture of ethanol amines, Solvent C - a hydrocarbon solvent based on octadecyl acetate, Solvent D - a terpene (d-limonene) hydrocarbon solvent combined with emulsifiers, Solvent E - a terpene (d-limonene) hydrocarbon solvent combined with a separation agent, d-limonene, and isopropyl alcohol) were evaluated to determine the most effective, non-chlorinated, non-fluorinated, alternate solvent cleaning system. All of these solvents were evaluated using current manual spray cleaning processes. The solvents were evaluated for their effectiveness in removing a rosin based RMA solder flux, a particular silicone mold release, and oils, greases, mold releases, resins, etc. The Meseran Surface Analyzer was used to measure organic contamination on the samples before and after cleaning. An Omega Meter Model 600 was also used to detect solder flux residues. Solvents C, D, E and d-limonene the best alternatives to trichloroethylene for removing all of the contaminants tested. For this particular electronic assembly, d-limonene was chosen as the alternate because of material compatibility and long-term reliability concerns.

  4. Acid gas treating by aqueous alkanolamines. Annual report, January-December 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Sandall, O.C.; Rinker, E.B.; Ashour, S.

    1994-12-01

    The objective of this work is to investigate the simulateneous absorption or desorption of CO2 and H2S into and from a mixed aqueous amine solvent consisting of methyldiethanolamine (MDEA) and diethanolamine (DEA). In work completed this year the authors have measured the density, viscosity and surface tension of pure MDEA and DEA over a range in temperatures. The diffusivity of N2O was measured in aqueous blends of MDEA and DEA at 50 wt% total amine for various ratios of DEA to MDEA over the temperature range 20 to 80 deg. C. A theoretically-based model has been developed for the correlation of the physical solubility of N2O in aqueous amine solutions. A penetration theory type model which was developed to describe acid gas absorption in aqueous amine solutions was used to carry out a sensitivity analysis for the various parameters affecting the rate of absorption of CO2 in MDEA solutions.

  5. Solvent substitutes

    SciTech Connect

    Evanoff, S.P.

    1995-09-01

    The environmental and industrial hygiene regulations promulgated since 1980, most notably the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (SARA), the Hazardous and Solid Waste Amendments to the Resources Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA), and the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990, have brought about an increased emphasis on user exposure, hazardous waste generation, and air emissions. As a result, industry is performing a fundamental reassessment of cleaning solvents, processes, and procedures. The more progressive organizations have made their goal the elimination of solvents that may pose significant potential human health and environmental hazards. This chapter discusses solvent cleaning in metal-finishing, metal-manufacturing, and industrial maintenance applications; precision cleaning; and electronics manufacturing. Nonmetallic cleaning, adhesives, coatings, inks, and aerosols also will be addressed, but in a more cursory manner.

  6. Automated determination of the pKa values of 4-hydroxybenzoic acid in cosolvent-water mixtures and related solvent effects using a modified HPLC system.

    PubMed

    Miklautz, H; Keller, D; Lopez Holguin, F; Woloszczak, R

    2006-03-01

    An automated spectrophotometric method based on an HPLC system with a diode array detector was used to determine the pK(a) values of compounds with low water solubility in a universal buffer containing acetonitrile as cosolvent. The column of the system was replaced with a capillary connecting the injection system and the diode array detector. Specific solvent effects were corrected for using the dielectric constants of the mixed solvent and pure water. The method was tested using 4-hydroxybenzoic acid and the results were compared with those obtained with a spectrophotometer. Linear regression lines with different slopes were obtained from spectrophotometric measurements of different cosolvent-water mixtures. These effects were shown to depend upon the polarity of the solvent-water mixture, and they were explained by the solvatochromic behavior of the 4-hydroxybenzoic acid in the solvent-water mixture.

  7. Selective extraction of free astaxanthin from Haematococcus culture using a tandem organic solvent system.

    PubMed

    Kang, Chang Duk; Sim, Sang Jun

    2007-01-01

    A novel tandem solvent process of dodecane and methanol was developed for the selective extraction of free astaxanthin from red encysted Haematococcus culture. The process consists of dodecane extraction for astaxanthin mixture from the culture (stage 1) and methanol extraction for free astaxanthin from the dodecane extract (stage 2). In the first stage, astaxanthin mixture was directly extracted to dodecane from the culture broth without cell harvest process, followed by a rapid separation of the dodecane extract and the culture medium containing cell debris by simple settling. In the second stage, free astaxanthin was selectively collected to methanol from the dodecane extract, accompanied with saponification of astaxanthin-esters by the addition of NaOH to methanol. During saponification, use of the optimum NaOH concentration (0.02 M) and low temperature (4 degrees C) reaction minimized the degradation of free astaxanthin, resulting in a total recovery yield of free astaxanthin of over 85%. The free-astaxanthin-containing methanol extract was also simply separated from dodecane by gravity settling, after which the astaxanthin-free dodecane was effectively recycled to the first stage, yielding a stable extractability of astaxanthin mixture during repeated extraction. Our results indicate the potential of the proposed tandem solvent process as an alternative extraction technology for the high-value antioxidant Haematococcus astaxanthin.

  8. Solid lipid nanoparticles prepared by solvent diffusion method in a nanoreactor system.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Hong; Huang, Ling-Fei; Du, Yong-Zhong; Ying, Xiao-Ying; You, Jian; Hu, Fu-Qiang; Zeng, Su

    2008-02-15

    In this study, water-in-oil (W/O) miniemulsion was used as nanoreactor to prepare solid lipid nanoparticles (SLN) by solvent diffusion method. n-Hexane, Tween 80 and Span 80 were used as the oil phase and surfactant combination for preparation of W/O miniemulsion, respectively. The stable miniemulsion with the particle size of 27.1+/-7.6 nm was obtained when the composition of water/Tween 80/Span 80/n-hexane was 1 ml/18 mg/200 mg/10 ml. Clobetasol propionate (CP) was used as a model drug. The physicochemical properties of the SLN, such as particle size, zeta potential, surface morphology, drug entrapment efficiency, drug loading capacity and in vitro drug release behaviors were investigated, comparing with those of SLN prepared by conventional aqueoethod. The SLN prepared by the novel method displayed smaller particles size and higher dus solvent diffusion mrug entrapment efficiency than those of SLN prepared by the conventional method. The drug entrapment efficiency decreased with increasing of charged amount of drug, and 15.9% of drug loading was achieved as the charged amount of drug was 20%. The in vitro drug release tests indicated that the drug release rate was faster than that of SLN prepared by the conventional method, and the drug content in SLN did not affect the in vitro drug release profile.

  9. Influence of specific and non-specific solvent effects on frontal MO of DMABI system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kampars, V.; Pastors, P.; Ornicane, G.

    2012-08-01

    Derivatives of 2-(4'-dimethylaminobenzylidene)-1,3-indandione (DMABI) are classical push-pull chromophores containing carbonyl groups like numerous other non-linear chromophores for electro-optical devices. The energy of the intramolecular charge transfer exciton of DMABI is determined by the difference of HOMO-LUMO energies and can be varied in width range by chemical modifications of the DMABI structure or by the nonspecific and specific solvent effects if the chromophore is incorporated into condensed environment. The condensed medium in a thin film (polymer or molecular glass) exhibits a solid state solvation effect similar to the effect of the organic solvents in a solution. The value of the medium effect depends on specific and non-specific interactions between the chromophore and medium. The main purpose of this work is to evaluate the specific effects. The chromophores often contain few centres for specific interaction, and thus we have synthesised and investigated UV-Vis spectra of three derivatives of DMABI and also three derivatives of 4-aza-DMABI in solutions with strong H-bond donor properties. The experimentally obtained results show that the strong H-bond with carbonyl group lowers the intramolecular charge-transfer energy by 900 cm-1, the strong H-bond with carbonyl group and heterocyclic nitrogen in 4-aza-DMABI by 1500 cm-1 and the protonation of heterocyclic nitrogen in 4-aza-DMABI by 3250 cm-1 respectivelly.

  10. CO2 Absorption in an Alcoholic Solution of Heavily Hindered Alkanolamine: Reaction Mechanism of 2-(tert-Butylamino)ethanol with CO2 Revisited.

    PubMed

    Xie, Hong-Bin; Wei, Xiaoxuan; Wang, Pan; He, Ning; Chen, Jingwen

    2015-06-18

    To advance the optimal design of amines for postcombustion CO2 capture, a sound mechanistic understanding of the chemical process of amines with good CO2 capture performance is advantageous. A sterically hindered alkanolamine, 2-(tert-butylamino)ethanol (TBAE), in ethylene glycol (EG) solution was recently reported to have better CO2 capture performance and unusual reactivity toward CO2, in comparison with those of the prototypical alkanolamines. However, the reaction mechanism of TBAE with CO2 in EG solution is unclear. Here, various quantum chemistry methods were employed to probe the reaction mechanism of TBAE with CO2 in EG and aqueous solution. Six reaction pathways involving three kinds of possible reactive centers of TBAE solution were considered. The results indicated that the formation of anionic hydroxyethyl carbonate by the attack of -OH of EG on CO2 is the most favorable, which is confirmed by complementary high-resolution mass spectrum experiments. This clarified that the speculated zwitterionic carbonate species is not the main product in EG solution. The reaction process of TBAE in aqueous solution is similar to that in EG solution, leading to bicarbonate, which agrees with experimental observations. On the basis of the unveiled reaction mechanisms of TBAE + CO2, the role of the key tert-butyl functional group of TBAE was revealed. PMID:25993508

  11. Molecular Aspects of the Interaction of Iminium and Alkanolamine Forms of the Anticancer Alkaloid Chelerythrine with Plasma Protein Bovine Serum Albumin.

    PubMed

    Bhuiya, Sutanwi; Pradhan, Ankur Bikash; Haque, Lucy; Das, Suman

    2016-01-14

    The interaction between a quaternary benzophenanthridine alkaloid chelerythrine (herein after, CHL) and bovine serum albumin (herein after, BSA) was probed by employing various spectroscopic tools and isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC). Fluorescence studies revealed that the binding affinity of the alkanolamine form of the CHL is higher compared to the iminium counterpart. This was further established by fluorescence polarization anisotropy measurement and ITC. Fluorescence quenching study along with time-resolved fluorescence measurements establish that both forms of CHL quenched the fluorescence intensity of BSA through the mechanism of static quenching. Site selective binding and molecular modeling studies revealed that the alkaloid binds predominantly in the BSA subdomain IIA by electrostatic and hydrophobic forces. From Forster resonance energy transfer (FRET) studies, the average distances between the protein donor and the alkaloid acceptor were found to be 2.71 and 2.30 nm between tryptophan (Trp) 212 (donor) and iminium and alkanolamine forms (acceptor), respectively. Circular dichroism (CD) study demonstrated that the α-helical organization of the protein is reduced due to binding with CHL along with an increase in the coiled structure. This is indicative of a small but definitive partial unfolding of the protein. Thermodynamic parameters obtained from ITC experiments revealed that the interaction is favored by negative enthalpy change and positive entropy change. PMID:26653994

  12. Recent Progress on Nazarov Cyclizations: The Use of Iron Salts as Catalysts in Ionic Liquid Solvent Systems.

    PubMed

    Itoh, Toshiyuki; Nokami, Toshiki; Kawatsura, Motoi

    2016-06-01

    Nazarov cyclization is an important and versatile method for the synthesis of five-membered carbocycles, and extensive studies have been conducted to optimize the reaction. Among recent studies, several trends are recognized. One is the combination of different reactions with Nazarov cyclization in a one-pot reaction system which enables the preparation of unique cyclization products. The second is the use of a transition-metal catalyst, though Lewis or Brønsted acids have generally been used for the reaction. The third is the realization of the asymmetric Nazarov cyclization. The fourth is the base-catalyzed Nazarov cyclization. Furthermore, several useful protocols for realizing Nazarov cyclization have also been developed. The recent progress on Nazarov cyclizations is summarized in Section 2. Section 3 is our chronicle in this field. We focused on the use of iron as the catalyst in Nazarov cyclizations and ionic liquids as solvents: Nazarov cyclization of thiophene derivatives using FeCl3 as the catalyst was accomplished and we succeeded in demonstrating the first example of an iron-catalyzed asymmetric Nazarov reaction. We next established Nazarov cyclization of pyrrole or indole derivatives using Fe(ClO4 )3 ·Al2 O3 as the catalyst with high trans selectivities in excellent yields. Since the cyclized product was reacted with a vinyl ketone in the presence of the same iron salt, the system allowed realization of the sequential type of Nazarov/Michael reaction of pyrrole derivatives. Furthermore, we demonstrated the recyclable use of the iron catalyst and obtained the desired Nazarov/Michael reaction products in good yields for five repetitions of the reactions without any addition of the catalyst using an ionic liquid, [bmim][NTf2 ], as the solvent. We expect that the iron-catalyzed Nazarov cyclization, in particular, in an ionic liquid solvent might become a useful method to synthesize functional molecules that include cycloalkene moieties. PMID:27219324

  13. LLNL solvent substitution

    SciTech Connect

    Benkovitch, M.G.

    1992-12-01

    Allied-Signal Inc., Kansas City Division (KCD), manufactures the electrical, electromechanical, mechanical, and plastic components for nuclear weapons. The KCD has made a commitment to eliminate the use of chlorohydrocarbon (CHC) and chlorofluorocarbon (CFC) solvents to the greatest technical extent possible consistent with nuclear safety and stockpile reliability requirements by July 1993. Several non-halogenated solvents (Exxate 1000, Bioact EC-7, Bioact EC-7R, d-limonene, ACT-100, Kester 5769, and isopropyl alcohol) were evaluated to determine the most effective, non-chlorinated non-fluorinated, alternate solvent cleaning system for a particular electronic assembly in lieu of the current trichloroethylenefisopropyl alcohol baseline cleaning process. All of these solvents were evaluated using current manual spray cleaning processes. The solvents were evaluated for their effectiveness in removing a rosin based RMA solder flux, a particular silicone mold release, and a wide variety of general contaminants (oils, greases, mold releases, resins, etc.) normally found in production departments. A DI water/isopropyl alcohol spray cleaning process was also evaluated for removing two organic acid fluxes. Test samples were contaminated, spray cleaned with the appropriate solvent, and then analyzed for cleanliness. The Meseran Surface Analyzer was used to measure,, organic contamination on the samples before and after cleaning. An Omega Meter Model 600 was also used to detect solder flux residues.

  14. Mesoscopic simulation of phase behaviors and structures in an amphiphile-solvent system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamada, Kohtaro; Yasuno, Emiko; Kawabata, Youhei; Okuzono, Tohru; Kato, Tadashi

    2014-06-01

    We have performed a three-dimensional simulation of mesoscopic structures in a mixture of AB amphiphilic molecule and C solvent by employing the density-functional theory under the conditions that (i) the size of the AB is much larger than C and (ii) the affinity between A and B is much larger than the affinity between B and C. First, we have calculated the free energy of five periodic structures, i.e., the lamellar phase, hexagonally packed cylinders, body-centered-cubic spheres, face-centered-cubic spheres, and gyroid phase for different sets of the concentration of AB (ϕ¯AB) and the χ parameter (χAC). By comparing the free energies for these structures, the χAC-ϕ ¯AB phase diagram has been obtained. In addition to these periodic structures, it has been shown that nonperiodic structures such as spherical and rodlike micelles can be obtained although they might be metastable phase.

  15. Tacky COC: a solvent bonding technique for fabrication of microfluidic systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keller, Nico; Nargang, Tobias M.; Helmer, Dorothea; Rapp, Bastian E.

    2016-03-01

    The academic community knows cyclic olefin copolymer (COC) as a well suited material for microfluidic applications because COC has numerous interesting properties such as high transmittance, good chemical resistance and good biocompatibility. Here we present a fast and cost-effective method for bonding of two COC substrates: exposure to appropriate solvents gives a tacky COC surface which when brought in contact with untreated COC forms a strong and optical clear bond. The bonding process is carried out at room temperature and takes less than three minutes which makes it significantly faster than currently described methods: This method does not require special lab equipment such as hot plates or hydraulic presses. The mild conditions of the bond process also allow for such "tacky COC" lids to be used for sealing of microfluidic chips containing immobilized protein patterns which is of high interest for immunodiagnostic testing inside microfluidic chips.

  16. Lichen Permelia perlata: a novel system for biodegradation and detoxification of disperse dye Solvent Red 24.

    PubMed

    Kulkarni, Ashwini N; Kadam, Avinash A; Kachole, Manvendra S; Govindwar, Sanjay P

    2014-07-15

    Lichen is a self-supporting symbiotic association of fungi and algae which was not yet explored for its bioremediation potential. Lichen Permelia perlata showed potential of decolorization and biodegradation of Solvent Red 24 (SR24). Optimum pH and temperature for decolorization was found to be 8 and 50°C, respectively. Induction in the activity of laccase in P. perlata during biodegradation of SR24 showed their involvement. HPTLC, FTIR and GC-HRMS analysis confirmed biodegradation of SR24 in to metabolites such as naphthalen-1-yldiazene, naphthalene, 1-(2-methylphenyl)-2-phenyldiazene and diphenyldiazene. Phytotoxicity and genotoxicity analysis revealed the reduction in toxicity of SR24 after its biodegradation.

  17. Optimization of mono and diacylglycerols production from enzymatic glycerolysis in solvent-free systems.

    PubMed

    Valério, Alexsandra; Rovani, Suzimara; Treichel, Helen; de Oliveira, Débora; Oliveira, J Vladimir

    2010-09-01

    This work reports solvent-free enzymatic glycerolysis of olive oil with an immobilized lipase (Novozym 435) using Tween 40, Tween 65, Tween 80, Tween 85, Triton X-100, and soy lecithin as surfactants. The first step was the screening of two potential surfactants for Monoacylglycerol (MAG) and Diacylglycerol (DAG) production with a pre-established operating condition and 2 h of reaction time. Afterwards, a sequential experimental design strategy was carried out in order to optimize MAG and DAG production using Tween 65 and Triton X-100 as surfactants. The operating conditions that optimized MAG and DAG yields were 70 degrees C, stirring rate of 600 rpm, glycerol:olive oil molar ratio of 6:1, 16 wt% of surfactant Tween 65 and 9.0 wt% of Novozym 435, leading to a content of 26 and 17 wt% of MAG and DAG, respectively.

  18. Synthetic Catalysts for CO2 Storage: Catalytic Improvement of Solvent Capture Systems

    SciTech Connect

    2010-08-15

    IMPACCT Project: LLNL is designing a process to pull CO2 out of the exhaust gas of coal-fired power plants so it can be transported, stored, or utilized elsewhere. Human lungs rely on an enzyme known as carbonic anhydrase to help separate CO2 from our blood and tissue as part of the normal breathing process. LLNL is designing a synthetic catalyst with the same function as this enzyme. The catalyst can be used to quickly capture CO2 from coal exhaust, just as the natural enzyme does in our lungs. LLNL is also developing a method of encapsulating chemical solvents in permeable microspheres that will greatly increase the speed of binding of CO2. The goal of the project is an industry-ready chemical vehicle that can withstand the harsh environments found in exhaust gas and enable new, simple process designs requiring less capital investment.

  19. Whole-cell based solvent-free system for one-pot production of biodiesel from waste grease.

    PubMed

    Li, Aitao; Ngo, Thao P N; Yan, Jinyong; Tian, Kaiyuan; Li, Zhi

    2012-06-01

    A whole-cell based solvent-free system was developed for efficient conversion of waste grease to biodiesel via one-pot esterification and transesterification. By isolation and screening of lipase-producing strains from soil, Serratia marcescens YXJ-1002 was discovered for the biotransformation of grease to biodiesel. The lipase (SML) from this strain was cloned and expressed in Escherichia coli as an intracellular enzyme, showing 6 times higher whole-cell based hydrolysis activity than that of wild type strain. The recombinant cells were used for biodiesel production from waste grease in one-pot reactions containing no solvent with the addition of methanol in several small portions, and 97% yield of biodiesel (FAME) was achieved under optimized conditions. In addition, the whole-cell biocatalysts showed excellent reusability, retaining 74% productivity after 4 cycles. The developed system, biocatalyst, and process enable the efficient, low-cost, and green production of biodiesel from waste grease, providing with a potential industrial application. PMID:22483351

  20. Results of the Test Program for Replacement of AK-225G Solvent for Cleaning NASA Propulsion Oxygen Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lowrey, Nikki M.; Mitchell, Mark A.

    2016-01-01

    Since the 1990's, when the Class I Ozone Depleting Substance (ODS) chlorofluorocarbon-113 (CFC-113) was banned, NASA's propulsion test facilities at Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) and Stennis Space Center (SSC) have relied upon the solvent AsahiKlin AK-225 (hydrochlorofluorocarbon-225ca/cb or HCFC-225ca/cb) and, more recently AK-225G (the single isomer form, HCFC-225cb) to safely clean and verify the cleanliness of large scale propulsion oxygen systems. Effective January 1, 2015, the production, import, export, and new use of Class II Ozone Depleting Substances, including AK-225G, was prohibited in the United States by the Clean Air Act. In 2012 through 2014, NASA test labs at MSFC, SSC, and Johnson Space Center's White Sands Test Facility (WSTF) collaborated to seek out, test, and qualify a solvent replacement for AK-225G that is both an effective cleaner and safe for use with oxygen systems. This paper summarizes the tests performed, results, and lessons learned.

  1. Replacement of Hydrochlorofluorocarbon (HCFC) -225 Solvent for Cleaning and Verification Sampling of NASA Propulsion Oxygen Systems Hardware, Ground Support Equipment, and Associated Test Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mitchell, Mark A.; Lowrey, Nikki M.

    2015-01-01

    Since the 1990's, when the Class I Ozone Depleting Substance (ODS) chlorofluorocarbon-113 (CFC-113) was banned, NASA's rocket propulsion test facilities at Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) and Stennis Space Center (SSC) have relied upon hydrochlorofluorocarbon-225 (HCFC-225) to safely clean and verify the cleanliness of large scale propulsion oxygen systems. Effective January 1, 2015, the production, import, export, and new use of HCFC-225, a Class II ODS, was prohibited by the Clean Air Act. In 2012 through 2014, leveraging resources from both the NASA Rocket Propulsion Test Program and the Defense Logistics Agency - Aviation Hazardous Minimization and Green Products Branch, test labs at MSFC, SSC, and Johnson Space Center's White Sands Test Facility (WSTF) collaborated to seek out, test, and qualify a replacement for HCFC-225 that is both an effective cleaner and safe for use with oxygen systems. Candidate solvents were selected and a test plan was developed following the guidelines of ASTM G127, Standard Guide for the Selection of Cleaning Agents for Oxygen Systems. Solvents were evaluated for materials compatibility, oxygen compatibility, cleaning effectiveness, and suitability for use in cleanliness verification and field cleaning operations. Two solvents were determined to be acceptable for cleaning oxygen systems and one was chosen for implementation at NASA's rocket propulsion test facilities. The test program and results are summarized. This project also demonstrated the benefits of cross-agency collaboration in a time of limited resources.

  2. Substitution of carcinogenic solvent dichloromethane for the extraction of volatile compounds in a fat-free model food system.

    PubMed

    Cayot, Nathalie; Lafarge, Céline; Bou-Maroun, Elias; Cayot, Philippe

    2016-07-22

    Dichloromethane is known as a very efficient solvent, but, as other halogenated solvents, is recognized as a hazardous product (CMR substance). The objective of the present work is to propose substitution solvent for the extraction of volatile compounds. The most important physico-chemical parameters in the choice of an appropriate extraction solvent of volatile compounds are reviewed. Various solvents are selected on this basis and on their hazard characteristics. The selected solvents, safer than dichloromethane, are compared using the extraction efficiency of volatile compounds from a model food product able to interact with volatile compounds. Volatile compounds with different hydrophobicity are used. High extraction yields were positively correlated with high boiling points and high Log Kow values of volatile compounds. Mixtures of solvents such as azeotrope propan-2-one/cyclopentane, azeotrope ethyl acetate/ethanol, and mixture ethyl acetate/ethanol (3:1, v/v) gave higher extraction yields than those obtained with dichloromethane.

  3. Substitution of carcinogenic solvent dichloromethane for the extraction of volatile compounds in a fat-free model food system.

    PubMed

    Cayot, Nathalie; Lafarge, Céline; Bou-Maroun, Elias; Cayot, Philippe

    2016-07-22

    Dichloromethane is known as a very efficient solvent, but, as other halogenated solvents, is recognized as a hazardous product (CMR substance). The objective of the present work is to propose substitution solvent for the extraction of volatile compounds. The most important physico-chemical parameters in the choice of an appropriate extraction solvent of volatile compounds are reviewed. Various solvents are selected on this basis and on their hazard characteristics. The selected solvents, safer than dichloromethane, are compared using the extraction efficiency of volatile compounds from a model food product able to interact with volatile compounds. Volatile compounds with different hydrophobicity are used. High extraction yields were positively correlated with high boiling points and high Log Kow values of volatile compounds. Mixtures of solvents such as azeotrope propan-2-one/cyclopentane, azeotrope ethyl acetate/ethanol, and mixture ethyl acetate/ethanol (3:1, v/v) gave higher extraction yields than those obtained with dichloromethane. PMID:27320380

  4. Development of green betaine-based deep eutectic solvent aqueous two-phase system for the extraction of protein.

    PubMed

    Li, Na; Wang, Yuzhi; Xu, Kaijia; Huang, Yanhua; Wen, Qian; Ding, Xueqin

    2016-05-15

    Six kinds of new type of green betaine-based deep eutectic solvents (DESs) have been synthesized. Deep eutectic solvent aqueous two-phase systems (DES-ATPS) were established and successfully applied in the extraction of protein. Betaine-urea (Be-U) was selected as the suitable extractant. Single factor experiments were carried out to determine the optimum conditions of the extraction process, such as the salt concentration, the mass of DES, the separation time, the amount of protein, the temperature and the pH value. The extraction efficiency could achieve to 99.82% under the optimum conditions. Mixed sample and practical sample analysis were discussed. The back extraction experiment was implemented and the back extraction efficiency could reach to 32.66%. The precision experiment, repeatability experiment and stability experiment were investigated. UV-vis, FT-IR and circular dichroism (CD) spectra confirmed that the conformation of protein was not changed during the process of extraction. The mechanisms of extraction were researched by dynamic light scattering (DLS), the measurement of the conductivity and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). DES-protein aggregates and embraces phenomenon play considerable roles in the separation process. All of these results indicated that betaine-based DES-ATPS may provide a potential substitute new method for the separation of proteins. PMID:26992491

  5. Synthesis of silicon-germanium axial nanowire heterostructures in a solvent vapor growth system using indium and tin catalysts.

    PubMed

    Mullane, E; Geaney, H; Ryan, K M

    2015-03-14

    Here we describe a relatively facile synthetic protocol for the formation of Si-Ge and Si-Ge-Si1-xGex axial nanowire heterostructures. The wires are grown directly on substrates with an evaporated catalytic layer placed in the vapour zone of a high boiling point solvent with the silicon and germanium precursors injected as liquids sequentially. We show that these heterostructures can be formed using either indium or tin as the catalyst seeds which form in situ during the thermal anneal. There is a direct correlation between growth time and segment length allowing good control over the wire composition. The formation of axial heterostructures of Si-Ge-Si1-xGex nanowires using a triple injection is further discussed with the alloyed Si1-xGex third component formed due to residual Ge precursor and its greater reactivity in comparison to silicon. It was found that the degree of tapering at each hetero-interface varied with both the catalyst type and composition of the NW. The report shows the versatility of the solvent vapour growth system for the formation of complex Si-Ge NW heterostructures. PMID:25676188

  6. Enzyme-catalyzed production of biodiesel by ultrasound-assisted ethanolysis of soybean oil in solvent-free system.

    PubMed

    Trentin, Claudia M; Popiolki, Ariana S; Batistella, Luciane; Rosa, Clarissa Dalla; Treichel, Helen; de Oliveira, Débora; Oliveira, J Vladimir

    2015-03-01

    This work reports the transesterification of soybean oil with ethanol using a commercial immobilized lipase, Novozym 435, under the influence of ultrasound irradiation, in a solvent-free s. The experiments were performed in an ultrasonic water bath, following a sequence of experimental designs to evaluate the effects of temperature, enzyme and water concentrations, oil to ethanol molar ratio and output irradiation power on the reaction yield. Besides, a kinetic study varying the substrates molar ratio and enzyme concentration was also carried out. Results show that ultrasound-assisted lipase-catalyzed transesterification of soybean oil with ethanol in solvent-free system might be a potential alternative route to conventional alkali-catalyzed and/or traditional enzymatic methods, as high reaction yields (~78 wt%) were obtained at mild irradiation power supply (~132 W), and temperature (63 °C) in a relatively short reaction time, 1 h. Additionally, a study regarding the enzyme reuse was carried out at the experimental condition that afforded the best reaction yield. PMID:25362889

  7. Mesoscopic simulation of phase behaviors and structures in an amphiphile-solvent system.

    PubMed

    Yamada, Kohtaro; Yasuno, Emiko; Kawabata, Youhei; Okuzono, Tohru; Kato, Tadashi

    2014-06-01

    We have performed a three-dimensional simulation of mesoscopic structures in a mixture of AB amphiphilic molecule and C solvent by employing the density-functional theory under the conditions that (i) the size of the AB is much larger than C and (ii) the affinity between A and B is much larger than the affinity between B and C. First, we have calculated the free energy of five periodic structures, i.e., the lamellar phase, hexagonally packed cylinders, body-centered-cubic spheres, face-centered-cubic spheres, and gyroid phase for different sets of the concentration of AB (ϕ[over ¯]_{AB}) and the χ parameter (χ_{AC}). By comparing the free energies for these structures, the χ_{AC}-ϕ[over ¯]_{AB} phase diagram has been obtained. In addition to these periodic structures, it has been shown that nonperiodic structures such as spherical and rodlike micelles can be obtained although they might be metastable phase. PMID:25019779

  8. Solvent extraction study of the thorium nitrate, nitric acid, and tributyl phosphate-dodecane system: density and acidity relationships

    SciTech Connect

    Weinberger, A.J.; Marley, J.L.; Costanzo, D.A.

    1980-05-01

    A solvent extraction study to determine equilibrium conditions of thorium nitrate-nitric acid with 30% tributyl phosphate in normal dodecane has been completed. Experimental conditions studied were 30 to 60{sup 0}C, 0.05 to 1.5 M Th(NO{sub 3}){sub 4}, and 0.0 to 3.0 M HNO{sub 3}. The extractant concentration was constant at 30% tributyl phosphate. The equilibrium experiments have produced data which demonstrate that thorium nitrate concentration, free acid, and density are related in equilibrium behavior between the aqueous and organic phases from 30 to 60{sup 0}C in the 30% tributyl phosphate-dodecane solvent extraction system. The concentration interactions apply to both the two- and three-phase regions. A linear correlation was observed for the density (D) of the aqueous or organic phase and the concentration of thorium and free acid. The general form of the equation is D = a(C/sub Th/ + bC/sub H/) + c, where a is the slope, b is the constant, c is the intercept, and C/sub Th/ and C/sub H/ are the molar concentrations of thorium and free acid respectively. The relationship of temperature, thorium nitrate, and free acid makes possible the definitions of the boundaries between the two- and three-phase regions. This dependence, in turn, permits operational control or simulation studies of the system within the two-phase region. The data demonstrate the interactions of the components of the Thorex system and can be used to improve the mathematical description of equilibrium in the SEPHIS-Thorex computer program.

  9. Rust-preventing agent for aqueous systems and rust-inhibiting lubricating compositions

    SciTech Connect

    Brandolese, E.

    1981-06-16

    Rust-inhibiting compounds, especially for aqueous systems such as tool-lubricating emulsions for machine tools and which consist of amine salts of a number of monoaminoalkylene dicarboxylic acids are disclosed. These rust-inhibitors are used in combination with water and an alkanolamine. Examples and test results are given.

  10. Use of dilute hydrofluoric acid and deep eutectic solvent systems for back end of line cleaning in integrated circuit fabrication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Padmanabhan Ramalekshmi Thanu, Dinesh

    Fabrication of current generation integrated circuits involves the creation of multilevel copper/low-k dielectric structures during the back end of line processing. This is done by plasma etching of low-k dielectric layers to form vias and trenches, and this process typically leaves behind polymer-like post etch residues (PER) containing copper oxides, copper fluorides and fluoro carbons, on underlying copper and sidewalls of low-k dielectrics. Effective removal of PER is crucial for achieving good adhesion and low contact resistance in the interconnect structure, and this is accomplished using wet cleaning and rinsing steps. Currently, the removal of PER is carried out using semi-aqueous fluoride based formulations. To reduce the environmental burden and meet the semiconductor industry's environmental health and safety requirements, there is a desire to completely eliminate solvents in the cleaning formulations and explore the use of organic solvent-free formulations. The main objective of this work is to investigate the selective removal of PER over copper and low-k (Coral and Black DiamondRTM) dielectrics using all-aqueous dilute HF (DHF) solutions and choline chloride (CC) -- urea (U) based deep eutectic solvent (DES) system. Initial investigations were performed on plasma oxidized copper films. Copper oxide and copper fluoride based PER films representative of etch products were prepared by ashing g-line and deep UV photoresist films coated on copper in CF4/O2 plasma. PER removal process was characterized using scanning electron microscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and verified using electrochemical impedance spectroscopy measurements. A PER removal rate of ~60 A/min was obtained using a 0.2 vol% HF (pH 2.8). Deaeration of DHF solutions improved the selectivity of PER over Cu mainly due to reduced Cu removal rate. A PER/Cu selectivity of ~20:1 was observed in a 0.05 vol% deaerated HF (pH 3). DES systems containing 2:1 U/CC removed PER at a rate of

  11. Insight into the Local Solvent Environment of Biologically Relevant Iron-nitroysl Systems through Two-Dimensional Infrared Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brookes, Jennifer Faith

    Iron-nitrosyl systems, particularly in the form of heme proteins, with their iron metal active sites play an important role in biological systems. Heme proteins act as storage, transporters, and receptors for nitric oxide (NO), a signaling molecule that is important in immune, nervous, and cardiovascular systems of mammals. By better understanding the local environment of the active site of NO binding heme proteins we can gain insight into disease in which the NO pathways have been implicated. This is an important step to being able to develop pharmaceuticals targeting NO pathways in humans. Sodium nitroprusside ((SNP, Na2[Fe(CN)5is NO]·2H 2O) investigated as a model system for the active site of nitric oxide binding heme proteins. Using two-dimensional infrared spectroscopy (2D IR) to obtain dephasing dynamics of the nitrosyl stretch (nuNO) in a series of solvents we are able to better understand the local environment of the more complicated metalloproteins. Rigorous line shape analysis is performed by using nonlinear response theory to simulate 2D IR spectra which are then fit to experimental data in an iterative process to extract frequency-frequency correlation functions (FFCFs). The time scales obtained are then correlated to empirical solvent polarity parameters. The analysis of the 2D IR lineshapes reveal that the spectral diffusion timescale of the nuNO in SNP varies from 0.8 -- 4 ps and is negatively correlated with the empirical solvent polarity scales. We continue to investigate NO binding of metalloproteins through 2D IR experiments on nitrophorin 4 (NP4). NP4 is a pH-sensitive NO transporter protein present in the salivary gland of the blood sucking insect Rhodius prolixus which undergoes a pH sensitive structural change between a closed and open conformation allowing for the storage and delivery of NO. The two structures are observed spectroscopically as two distinct pH-dependent nu NO frequencies at ~1904 and ~1917 cm-1. We obtain FFCFs by globally

  12. Selective Single-Step Separation of a Mixture of Three Metal Ions by a Triphasic Ionic-Liquid-Water-Ionic-Liquid Solvent Extraction System.

    PubMed

    Vander Hoogerstraete, Tom; Blockx, Jonas; De Coster, Hendrik; Binnemans, Koen

    2015-08-10

    In a conventional solvent extraction system, metal ions are distributed between two immiscible phases, typically an aqueous and an organic phase. In this paper, the proof-of-principle is given for the distribution of metal ions between three immiscible phases, two ionic liquid phases with an aqueous phase in between them. Three-liquid-phase solvent extraction allows separation of a mixture of three metal ions in a single step, whereas at least two steps are required to separate three metals in the case of two-liquid-phase solvent extraction. In the triphasic system, the lower organic phase is comprised of the ionic liquid betainium- or choline bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide, whereas the upper organic phase is comprised of the ionic liquid trihexyl(tetradecyl)phosphonium bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide. The triphasic system was used for the separation of a mixture of tin(II), yttrium(III), and scandium(III) ions. PMID:26178665

  13. Lipase-Catalyzed Glycerolysis of Soybean and Canola Oils in a Free Organic Solvent System Assisted by Ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Remonatto, Daniela; Santin, Claudia M Trentin; Valério, Alexsandra; Lerin, Lindomar; Batistella, Luciane; Ninow, Jorge Luiz; de Oliveira, J Vladimir; de Oliveira, Débora

    2015-06-01

    This work shows new and promising experimental data of soybean oil and canola oil glycerolysis using Novozym 435 enzyme as catalyst in a solvent-free system using ultrasound bath for the emulsifier, monoglyceride (MAG), and diacylglycerol (DAG) production. The experiments were conducted in batch mode to study the influence of process variables as temperature (40 to 70 °C), immobilized enzyme content (2.5 to 10 wt%, relative to substrates), molar ratio glycerol/oil (0.8:1 to 3:1), agitation (0 to 1200 rpm) and ultrasound intensity (0 to 132 W cm(-2)). Highest yields of DAG+MAG (75 wt%) were obtained with molar ratio glycerol/canola oil 0.8:1, 70 °C, 900 rpm, 120 min of reaction time, 10 wt% of enzyme concentration, and 52.8 W cm(-2) of ultrasound intensity. When soybean oil was used, the best results in terms of DAG+MAGs (65 wt%) were using molar ratio of glycerol/soybean oil 0.8:1, 70 °C, 900 rpm, 90 min of reaction time, 10 wt% of enzyme content, and 40 % of ultrasound intensity (52.8 W cm(-2)). The results showed that the lipase-catalyzed glycerolysis in a solvent-free system with ultrasound bath can be a potential route for high content production of DAGs and MAGs.

  14. Lipase-Catalyzed Glycerolysis of Soybean and Canola Oils in a Free Organic Solvent System Assisted by Ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Remonatto, Daniela; Santin, Claudia M Trentin; Valério, Alexsandra; Lerin, Lindomar; Batistella, Luciane; Ninow, Jorge Luiz; de Oliveira, J Vladimir; de Oliveira, Débora

    2015-06-01

    This work shows new and promising experimental data of soybean oil and canola oil glycerolysis using Novozym 435 enzyme as catalyst in a solvent-free system using ultrasound bath for the emulsifier, monoglyceride (MAG), and diacylglycerol (DAG) production. The experiments were conducted in batch mode to study the influence of process variables as temperature (40 to 70 °C), immobilized enzyme content (2.5 to 10 wt%, relative to substrates), molar ratio glycerol/oil (0.8:1 to 3:1), agitation (0 to 1200 rpm) and ultrasound intensity (0 to 132 W cm(-2)). Highest yields of DAG+MAG (75 wt%) were obtained with molar ratio glycerol/canola oil 0.8:1, 70 °C, 900 rpm, 120 min of reaction time, 10 wt% of enzyme concentration, and 52.8 W cm(-2) of ultrasound intensity. When soybean oil was used, the best results in terms of DAG+MAGs (65 wt%) were using molar ratio of glycerol/soybean oil 0.8:1, 70 °C, 900 rpm, 90 min of reaction time, 10 wt% of enzyme content, and 40 % of ultrasound intensity (52.8 W cm(-2)). The results showed that the lipase-catalyzed glycerolysis in a solvent-free system with ultrasound bath can be a potential route for high content production of DAGs and MAGs. PMID:25875788

  15. Picosecond time-resolved emission studies. I. Real-time measurements of solvent-solute interactions. II. Kinetics of energy flow in a photosynthetic antenna system. [4-aminophthalimide

    SciTech Connect

    Yeh, S.W.

    1985-11-01

    Using a picosecond fluorimeter, the dynamics of solvation of electronically excited 4-aminophthalimide in a variety of solvents is measured. The solvation process is manifested by a time-dependent red shift in the emission spectrum in certain solvents. This red shift is time-resolved using a streak camera system. The time constant of the relaxation is found to correlate strongly with the longitudinal dielectric relaxation rate of the solvent. The correlation holds for changes in solvent, for isotopic substitution of a solvent, and for changes in temperature. Never before have direct measurements of excited-state solvation dynamics been shown to correlate with dielectric relaxation over such a wide range of experimental conditions. Emission from certain photosynthetic antenna complexes, phycobilisomes, and from the building blocks of phycobilisomes, phycobiliproteins, has also been studied using the streak camera system. Both the rising and filling portions of the time-resolved emission profiles of the fluorescing chromophores in these structures are studied. The rates of energy transfer between structural domains of the antenna complex and within the isolated biliprotein complexes are deduced from these studies. Comparison of emission profiles from a series of structurally distinct phycobilisomes isolated from three related strains of cyanobacteria have provided new insights into the correlation of the energy transfer function and macromolecular structure in these light-harvesting antenna systems. 133 refs., 58 figs., 14 tabs.

  16. Comparison of rapid solvent extraction systems for the GC–MS/MS characterization of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in aged, contaminated soil

    PubMed Central

    Haleyur, Nagalakshmi; Shahsavari, Esmaeil; Mansur, Abdulatif A.; Koshlaf, Eman; Morrison, Paul D.; Osborn, A. Mark; Ball, Andrew S.

    2016-01-01

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are a major class of organic hydrocarbons with high molecular weight that originate from both natural and anthropogenic sources. Sixteen PAHs are included in the U.S Environmental Protection agency list of priority pollutants due to their mutagenic, carcinogenic, toxic and teratogenic properties. In this study, the development and optimization of a simplified and rapid solvent extraction for the characterisation of 16 USEPA priority poly aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in aged contaminated soils was established with subsequent analysis by GC–MS/MS. • Five different extraction solvent systems: dichloromethane: acetone, chloroform: methanol, dichloromethane, acetone: hexane and hexane were assessed in terms of their ability to extract PAHs from aged PAH-contaminated soils. • Highest PAH concentrations were extracted using acetone: hexane and chloroform: methanol. Given the greater toxicity associated with chloroform: methanol, acetone: hexane appears the best choice of solvent extraction system. • This protocol enables efficient extraction of PAHs from aged weathered soils. PMID:27200269

  17. Comparison of rapid solvent extraction systems for the GC-MS/MS characterization of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in aged, contaminated soil.

    PubMed

    Haleyur, Nagalakshmi; Shahsavari, Esmaeil; Mansur, Abdulatif A; Koshlaf, Eman; Morrison, Paul D; Osborn, A Mark; Ball, Andrew S

    2016-01-01

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are a major class of organic hydrocarbons with high molecular weight that originate from both natural and anthropogenic sources. Sixteen PAHs are included in the U.S Environmental Protection agency list of priority pollutants due to their mutagenic, carcinogenic, toxic and teratogenic properties. In this study, the development and optimization of a simplified and rapid solvent extraction for the characterisation of 16 USEPA priority poly aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in aged contaminated soils was established with subsequent analysis by GC-MS/MS. •Five different extraction solvent systems: dichloromethane: acetone, chloroform: methanol, dichloromethane, acetone: hexane and hexane were assessed in terms of their ability to extract PAHs from aged PAH-contaminated soils.•Highest PAH concentrations were extracted using acetone: hexane and chloroform: methanol. Given the greater toxicity associated with chloroform: methanol, acetone: hexane appears the best choice of solvent extraction system.•This protocol enables efficient extraction of PAHs from aged weathered soils.

  18. Injectable in situ forming depot systems: PEG-DAE as novel solvent for improved PLGA storage stability.

    PubMed

    Schoenhammer, K; Petersen, H; Guethlein, F; Goepferich, A

    2009-04-17

    Injectable in situ forming depots (ISFD) that contain a peptide or a protein within a polymeric solution comprise an attractive, but challenging application system. Beyond chemical compatibility, local tolerability and acute toxicity, an important factor for an ISFD is its storage stability as a liquid. In this study, poly(D,L-lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA) degradation in the presence of poly(ethyleneglycol) (PEG) as biocompatible solvent was investigated as a function of storage temperature and water content. The PLGA molecular weight (Mw) was determined by gel permeation chromatography (GPC), and monitored by NMR during degradation. Rapid PLGA degradation of 75% at 25 degrees C storage temperature was shown to be the result of a transesterification using conventional PEG as solvent. A significant improvement with only 3% Mw loss was obtained by capping the PEG hydroxy- with an alkyl- endgroup to have poly(ethyleneglycol) dialkylether (PEG-DAE). The formation of PEG-PLGA block co-polymers was confirmed by NMR, only for PEG300. Reaction rate constants were used to compare PLGA degradation dissolved in conventional and alkylated PEGs. The degradation kinetics in PEG-DAE were almost completely insensitive to 1% additional water in the solution. The transesterification of the hydroxy endgroups of PEG with PLGA was the major degradation mechanism, even under hydrous conditions. The use of PEG-DAE for injectable polymeric solutions, showed PLGA stability under the chosen conditions for at least 2 months. Based on the results obtained here, PEG-DAE appears to be a promising excipient for PLGA-based, parenteral ISFD. PMID:19135512

  19. Organic Solvent Effects in Biomass Conversion Reactions.

    PubMed

    Shuai, Li; Luterbacher, Jeremy

    2016-01-01

    Transforming lignocellulosic biomass into fuels and chemicals has been intensely studied in recent years. A large amount of work has been dedicated to finding suitable solvent systems, which can improve the transformation of biomass into value-added chemicals. These efforts have been undertaken based on numerous research results that have shown that organic solvents can improve both conversion and selectivity of biomass to platform molecules. We present an overview of these organic solvent effects, which are harnessed in biomass conversion processes, including conversion of biomass to sugars, conversion of sugars to furanic compounds, and production of lignin monomers. A special emphasis is placed on comparing the solvent effects on conversion and product selectivity in water with those in organic solvents while discussing the origins of the differences that arise. We have categorized results as benefiting from two major types of effects: solvent effects on solubility of biomass components including cellulose and lignin and solvent effects on chemical thermodynamics including those affecting reactants, intermediates, products, and/or catalysts. Finally, the challenges of using organic solvents in industrial processes are discussed from the perspective of solvent cost, solvent stability, and solvent safety. We suggest that a holistic view of solvent effects, the mechanistic elucidation of these effects, and the careful consideration of the challenges associated with solvent use could assist researchers in choosing and designing improved solvent systems for targeted biomass conversion processes.

  20. Organic Solvent Effects in Biomass Conversion Reactions.

    PubMed

    Shuai, Li; Luterbacher, Jeremy

    2016-01-01

    Transforming lignocellulosic biomass into fuels and chemicals has been intensely studied in recent years. A large amount of work has been dedicated to finding suitable solvent systems, which can improve the transformation of biomass into value-added chemicals. These efforts have been undertaken based on numerous research results that have shown that organic solvents can improve both conversion and selectivity of biomass to platform molecules. We present an overview of these organic solvent effects, which are harnessed in biomass conversion processes, including conversion of biomass to sugars, conversion of sugars to furanic compounds, and production of lignin monomers. A special emphasis is placed on comparing the solvent effects on conversion and product selectivity in water with those in organic solvents while discussing the origins of the differences that arise. We have categorized results as benefiting from two major types of effects: solvent effects on solubility of biomass components including cellulose and lignin and solvent effects on chemical thermodynamics including those affecting reactants, intermediates, products, and/or catalysts. Finally, the challenges of using organic solvents in industrial processes are discussed from the perspective of solvent cost, solvent stability, and solvent safety. We suggest that a holistic view of solvent effects, the mechanistic elucidation of these effects, and the careful consideration of the challenges associated with solvent use could assist researchers in choosing and designing improved solvent systems for targeted biomass conversion processes. PMID:26676907

  1. Versatile solvent systems for the separation of betalains from processed Beta vulgaris L. juice using counter-current chromatography.

    PubMed

    Spórna-Kucab, Aneta; Ignatova, Svetlana; Garrard, Ian; Wybraniec, Sławomir

    2013-12-15

    Two mixtures of decarboxylated and dehydrogenated betacyanins from processed red beet roots (Beta vulgaris L.) juice were fractionated by high performance counter-current chromatography (HPCCC) producing a range of isolated components. Mixture 1 contained mainly betacyanins, 14,15-dehydro-betanin (neobetanin) and their decarboxylated derivatives while mixture 2 consisted of decarboxy- and dehydro-betacyanins. The products of mixture 1 arose during thermal degradation of betanin/isobetanin in mild conditions while the dehydro-betacyanins of mixture 2 appeared after longer heating of the juice from B. vulgaris L. Two solvent systems were found to be effective for the HPCCC. A highly polar, high salt concentration system of 1-PrOH-ACN-(NH4)2SO4 (satd. soln)-water (v/v/v/v, 1:0.5:1.2:1) (tail-to-head mode) enabled the purification of 2-decarboxy-betanin/-isobetanin, 2,17-bidecarboxy-betanin/-isobetanin and neobetanin (all from mixture 1) plus 17-decarboxy-neobetanin, 2,15,17-tridecarboxy-2,3-dehydro-neobetanin, 2-decarboxy-neobetanin and 2,15,17-tridecarboxy-neobetanin (from mixture 2). The other solvent system included heptafluorobutyric acid (HFBA) as ion-pair reagent and consisted of tert-butyl methyl ether (TBME)-1-BuOH-ACN-water (acidified with 0.7% HFBA) (2:2:1:5, v/v/v/v) (head-to-tail mode). This system enabled the HPCCC purification of 2,17-bidecarboxy-betanin/-isobetanin and neobetanin (from mixture 1) plus 2,15,17-tridecarboxy-2,3-dehydro-neobetanin, 2,17-bidecarboxy-2,3-dehydro-neobetanin and 2,15,17-tridecarboxy-neobetanin (mixture 2). The results of this research are crucial in finding effective isolation methods of betacyanins and their derivatives which are meaningful compounds due their colorant properties and potential health benefits regarding antioxidant and cancer prevention. The pigments were detected by LC-DAD and LC-MS/MS techniques.

  2. Versatile solvent systems for the separation of betalains from processed Beta vulgaris L. juice using counter-current chromatography.

    PubMed

    Spórna-Kucab, Aneta; Ignatova, Svetlana; Garrard, Ian; Wybraniec, Sławomir

    2013-12-15

    Two mixtures of decarboxylated and dehydrogenated betacyanins from processed red beet roots (Beta vulgaris L.) juice were fractionated by high performance counter-current chromatography (HPCCC) producing a range of isolated components. Mixture 1 contained mainly betacyanins, 14,15-dehydro-betanin (neobetanin) and their decarboxylated derivatives while mixture 2 consisted of decarboxy- and dehydro-betacyanins. The products of mixture 1 arose during thermal degradation of betanin/isobetanin in mild conditions while the dehydro-betacyanins of mixture 2 appeared after longer heating of the juice from B. vulgaris L. Two solvent systems were found to be effective for the HPCCC. A highly polar, high salt concentration system of 1-PrOH-ACN-(NH4)2SO4 (satd. soln)-water (v/v/v/v, 1:0.5:1.2:1) (tail-to-head mode) enabled the purification of 2-decarboxy-betanin/-isobetanin, 2,17-bidecarboxy-betanin/-isobetanin and neobetanin (all from mixture 1) plus 17-decarboxy-neobetanin, 2,15,17-tridecarboxy-2,3-dehydro-neobetanin, 2-decarboxy-neobetanin and 2,15,17-tridecarboxy-neobetanin (from mixture 2). The other solvent system included heptafluorobutyric acid (HFBA) as ion-pair reagent and consisted of tert-butyl methyl ether (TBME)-1-BuOH-ACN-water (acidified with 0.7% HFBA) (2:2:1:5, v/v/v/v) (head-to-tail mode). This system enabled the HPCCC purification of 2,17-bidecarboxy-betanin/-isobetanin and neobetanin (from mixture 1) plus 2,15,17-tridecarboxy-2,3-dehydro-neobetanin, 2,17-bidecarboxy-2,3-dehydro-neobetanin and 2,15,17-tridecarboxy-neobetanin (mixture 2). The results of this research are crucial in finding effective isolation methods of betacyanins and their derivatives which are meaningful compounds due their colorant properties and potential health benefits regarding antioxidant and cancer prevention. The pigments were detected by LC-DAD and LC-MS/MS techniques. PMID:24184837

  3. Zebrafish as a Model for Systems Medicine R&D: Rethinking the Metabolic Effects of Carrier Solvents and Culture Buffers Determined by (1)H NMR Metabolomics.

    PubMed

    Akhtar, Muhammad T; Mushtaq, Mian Y; Verpoorte, Robert; Richardson, Michael K; Choi, Young H

    2016-01-01

    Zebrafish is a frequently employed model organism in systems medicine and biomarker discovery. A crosscutting fundamental question, and one that has been overlooked in the field, is the "system-wide" (omics) effects induced in zebrafish by metabolic solvents and culture buffers. Indeed, any bioactivity or toxicity test requires that the target compounds are dissolved in an appropriate nonpolar solvent or aqueous media. It is important to know whether the solvent or the buffer itself has an effect on the zebrafish model organism. We evaluated the effects of two organic carrier solvents used in research with zebrafish, as well as in drug screening: dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) and ethanol, and two commonly used aqueous buffers (egg water and Hank's balanced salt solution). The effects of three concentrations (0.01, 0.1, and 1%) of DMSO and ethanol were tested in the 5-day-old zebrafish embryo using proton nuclear magnetic resonance ((1)H NMR) based metabolomics. DMSO (1% and 0.1%, but not 0.01%) exposure significantly decreased the levels of adenosine triphosphate (ATP), betaine, alanine, histidine, lactate, acetate, and creatine (p < 0.05). By contrast, ethanol exposure did not alter the embryos' metabolome at any concentration tested. The two different aqueous media noted above impacted the zebrafish embryo metabolome as evidenced by changes in valine, alanine, lactate, acetate, betaine, glycine, glutamate, adenosine triphosphate, and histidine. These results show that DMSO has greater effects on the embryo metabolome than ethanol, and thus is used with caution as a carrier solvent in zebrafish biomarker research and oral medicine. Moreover, the DMSO concentration should not be higher than 0.01%. Careful attention is also warranted for the use of the buffers egg water and Hank's balanced salt solution in zebrafish. In conclusion, as zebrafish is widely used as a model organism in life sciences, metabolome changes induced by solvents and culture buffers warrant further

  4. SAGE SOLVENT ALTERNATIVES GUIDE: SYSTEM IMPROVEMENTS FOR SELECTING INDUSTRIAL SURFACE CLEANING ALTERNATIVES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The paper describes computer software, called SAGE, that can provide not only cleaning recommendations but also general information on various surface cleaning options. In short, it is an advisory system which can provide users with vital information on the cleaning process optio...

  5. Analysis of partitioning of organic compounds and proteins in aqueous polyethylene glycol-sodium sulfate aqueous two-phase systems in terms of solute-solvent interactions.

    PubMed

    da Silva, Nuno R; Ferreira, Luisa A; Madeira, Pedro P; Teixeira, José A; Uversky, Vladimir N; Zaslavsky, Boris Y

    2015-10-01

    Partition behavior of nine small organic compounds and six proteins was examined in poly(ethylene glycol)-8000-sodium sulfate aqueous two-phase systems containing 0.5M osmolyte (sorbitol, sucrose, trehalose, TMAO) and poly(ethylene glycol)-10000-sodium sulfate system, all in 0.01M sodium phosphate buffer, pH 6.8. The differences between the solvent properties of the coexisting phases (solvent dipolarity/polarizability, hydrogen bond donor acidity, and hydrogen bond acceptor basicity) were characterized with solvatochromic dyes using the solvatochromic comparison method. Differences between the electrostatic properties of the phases were determined by analysis of partitioning of sodium salts of dinitrophenylated (DNP-) amino acids with aliphatic alkyl side-chain. It was found out that the partition coefficient of all compounds examined (including proteins) may be described in terms of solute-solvent interactions. The results obtained in the study show that solute-solvent interactions of nonionic organic compounds and proteins in polyethylene glycol-sodium sulfate aqueous two-phase system differ from those in polyethylene glycol-dextran system. PMID:26342872

  6. Interfacial chemistry in solvent extraction systems. Progress report, June 1, 1992--May 31, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Neuman, R.D.

    1993-01-01

    Research this past year continued to emphasize characterization of the physicochemical nature of the microscopic interfaces, i.e., reversed micelles and other association microstructures, which form in both practical and simplified acidic organophosphorus extraction systems associated with Ni, Co, and Na in order to improve on the model for aggregation of metal-extractant complexes. Also, the macroscopic interfacial behavior of model extractant (surfactant) molecules was further investigated. 1 fig.

  7. Organic solvent topical report

    SciTech Connect

    COWLEY, W.L.

    1999-05-13

    This report provides the basis for closing the organic solvent safety issue. Sufficient information is presented to conclude that risk posed by an organic solvent fire is within risk evaluation guidelines. This report updates information contained in Analysis of Consequences of Postulated Solvent Fires in Hanford Site Waste Tanks. WHC-SD-WM-CN-032. Rev. 0A (Cowley et al. 1996). However, this document will not replace Cowley et al (1996) as the primary reference for the Basis for Interim Operation (BIO) until the recently submitted BIO amendment (Hanson 1999) is approved by the US Department of Energy. This conclusion depends on the use of controls for preventing vehicle fuel fires and for limiting the use of flame cutting in areas where hot metal can fall on the waste surface.The required controls are given in the Tank Waste Remediation System Technical Safety Requirements (Noorani 1997b). This is a significant change from the conclusions presented in Revision 0 of this report. Revision 0 of this calcnote concluded that some organic solvent fire scenarios exceeded risk evaluation guidelines, even with controls imposed.

  8. Enzyme activation by denaturants in organic solvent systems with a low water content.

    PubMed

    Garza-Ramos, G; Fernández-Velasco, D A; Ramírez, L; Shoshani, L; Darszon, A; Tuena de Gómez-Puyou, M; Gómez-Puyou, A

    1992-04-15

    The effect of urea and guanidine hydrochloride (GdmCl) on the activity of heart lactate dehydrogenase, glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase, hexokinase, inorganic pyrophosphatase, and glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase was studied in low-water systems. Most of the experiments were made in a system formed with toluene, phospholipids, Triton X-100, and water in a range that varied over 1.0-6.5% (by vol.) [Garza-Ramos, G., Darszon, A., Tuena de Gómez-Puyou, M. & Gómez-Puyou, A. (1990) Biochemistry 29, 751-757]. In such conditions at saturating substrate concentrations, the activity of the enzymes was more than 10 times lower than in all-water media. However the activity of the first four aforementioned enzymes was increased between 4 and 20 times by the denaturants. The most marked activating effect was found with lactate dehydrogenase; with 3.8% (by vol.) water maximal activation was observed with 1.5 M GdmCl (about 20-fold); 4 M urea activated, but to a lower extent. Activation by guanidine thiocyanate was lower than with GdmCl. The activating and inactivating effects of GdmCl on lactate dehydrogenase depended on the amount of water; as the amount of water was increased from 2.0% to 6.0% (by vol.), activation and inactivation took place with progressively lower GdmCl concentrations. When activity was measured as a function of the volume of 1.5 M GdmCl solution, a bell-shaped activation curve was observed. In a low-water system formed with n-octane, hexanol, cetyltrimethylammonium bromide and 3.0% water, a similar activation of lactate dehydrogenase by GdmCl and urea was observed. The water solubility diagrams were modified by GdmCl and urea, and this could reflect on enzyme activity. However, from a comparison of denaturant concentrations on the activity of the enzymes studied, it would seem that, independently of their effect on the characteristics of the low-water systems, denaturants bring about activation through their known mechanism of action on the

  9. Solvent accessible surface representation in a database system for protein docking

    SciTech Connect

    Seidl, T.; Kriegel, H.P.

    1995-12-31

    Protein docking is a new and challenging application for query processing in database systems. Our architecture for an efficient support of docking queries is based on the multistep query processing paradigm, a technique well-known from spatial database systems. Along with physicochemical parameters, the geometry of the molecules plays a fundamental role for docking retrieval. Thus, 3D structures and 3D surfaces of molecules are basic objects in molecular databases. We specify a molecular surface representation based on topology, define a class of neighborhood queries, and sketch some applications with respect to the docking problem. We suggest a patch-based data structure called the TriEdge structure, first, to efficiently support topological query processing, and second, to save space in comparison to common planar graph representations such as the quad-edge structure. In analogy to the quad-edge structure, the TriEdge structure has an algebraic interface and is implemented via complex pointers. However, we achieve a reduction of the space requirement by a factor of four. Finally, we investigate the time performance of our prototype.

  10. Replacement of HCFC-225 Solvent for Cleaning NASA Propulsion Oxygen Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lowrey, Nikki M.; Mitchell, Mark A.

    2015-01-01

    Since the 1990's, when the Class I Ozone Depleting Substance (ODS) chlorofluorocarbon-113 (CFC-113) was banned, NASA's propulsion test facilities at Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) and Stennis Space Center (SSC) have relied upon hydrochlorofluorocarbon-225 (HCFC-225) to safely clean and verify the cleanliness of large scale propulsion oxygen systems. Effective January 1, 2015, the production, import, export, and new use of HCFC-225, a Class II ODS, was prohibited by the Clean Air Act. In 2012 through 2014, leveraging resources from both NASA and the Defense Logistics Agency - Aviation Hazardous Minimization and Green Products Branch, test labs at MSFC, SSC, and Johnson Space Center's White Sands Test Facility (WSTF) collaborated to seek out, test, and qualify a replacement for HCFC-225 that is both an effective cleaner and safe for use with oxygen systems. This presentation summarizes the tests performed, results, and lessons learned. It also demonstrates the benefits of cross-agency collaboration in a time of limited resources.

  11. Method and system for optical figuring by imagewise heating of a solvent

    SciTech Connect

    Rushford, Michael C.

    2005-08-30

    A method and system of imagewise etching the surface of a substrate, such as thin glass, in a parallel process. The substrate surface is placed in contact with an etchant solution which increases in etch rate with temperature. A local thermal gradient is then generated in each of a plurality of selected local regions of a boundary layer of the etchant solution to imagewise etch the substrate surface in a parallel process. In one embodiment, the local thermal gradient is a local heating gradient produced at selected addresses chosen from an indexed array of addresses. The activation of each of the selected addresses is independently controlled by a computer processor so as to imagewise etch the substrate surface at region-specific etch rates. Moreover, etching progress is preferably concurrently monitored in real time over the entire surface area by an interferometer so as to deterministically control the computer processor to image-wise figure the substrate surface where needed.

  12. Factors influencing phase-disengagement rates in solvent-extraction systems employing tertiary amine extractants

    SciTech Connect

    Moyer, B.A.; McDowell, W.J.

    1981-01-01

    The primary purpose of the present investigation was to examine the effects of amine size and structure on phase disengagement. Nine commercial tertiary amines were tested together with four laboratory-quality amines for uranium extraction and both organic-continuous (OC) and aqueous-continuous (AC) phase disengagement under Amex-type conditions. Synthetic acid sulfate solutions with and without added colloidal silica and actual ore leach solutions were used as the aqueous phases. Phase disengagement results were correlated with amine size and branching and solution wetting behavior on a silicate (glass) surface. The results suggest that the performance of some Amex systems may be improved by using branched chain tertiary amine extractants of higher molecular weight than are now normally used.

  13. SUPERFUND TREATABILITY CLEARINGHOUSE: FINAL REPORT: DEVELOPMENT OF OPTIMUM TREATMENT SYSTEM FOR WASTEWATER LAGOONS PHASE II - SOLVENT EXTRACTION LABORATORY TESTING

    EPA Science Inventory

    The U.S. Army surveyed innovative treatment techniques for restoration of hazardous waste lagoons and selected solvent extraction as cost-effective restoration for further study. This treatability study focuses on treatment of organic (explosive) contaminated lagoon sediments w...

  14. Determination of Quantitative Structure-Property Relationships of Solvent Resistance of Polycarbonate Copolymers Using a Resonant Multisensor System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Potyrailo, Radislav A.; Wroczynski, Ronald J.; McCloskey, Patrick J.; Morris, William G.

    In sensor and microfluidic applications, the need is to have an adequate solvent resistance of polymers to prevent degradation of the substrate surface upon deposition of sensor formilations, to prevent contamination of the solvent-containing sensor formulations or contamination of organic liquid reactions in microfluidic channels. Unfortunately, no comprehensive quantitative reference solubility data of unstressed copolymers is available to date. In this study, we evaluate solvent-resistance of several polycarbonate copolymers prepared from the reaction of hydroquinone (HQ), resorcinol (RS), and bisphenol A (BPA). Our high-throughput polymer evaluation approach permitted the construction of detailed solvent-resistance maps, the development of quantitative structure-property relationships for BPA-HQ-RS copolymers and provided new knowledge for the further development of the polymeric sensor and microfluidic components.

  15. Photophysics of Diphenylbutadiynes in Water, Acetonitrile-Water, and Acetonitrile Solvent Systems: Application to Single Component White Light Emission.

    PubMed

    Pati, Avik Kumar; Jana, Rounak; Gharpure, Santosh J; Mishra, Ashok K

    2016-07-28

    Diacetylenes have been the subject of current research because of their interesting optoelectronic properties. Herein, we report that substituted diphenylbutadiynes exhibit locally excited (LE) and excimer emissions in water and multiple emissions from the LE, excimer, and intramolecular charge transfer (ICT) states in acetonitrile-water solvent systems. The LE, excimer, and ICT emissions are clearly distinguishable for a diphenylbutadiynyl derivative with push (-NMe2)-pull (-CN) substituents and those are closely overlapped for non-push-pull analogues. In neat acetonitrile, the excimer emission disappears and the LE and ICT emissions predominate. In the case of the push (-NMe2)-pull (-CN) diphenylbutadiyne, the intensity of the ICT emission increases with increasing the fluorophore concentration. This suggests that the ICT emission accompanies with intermolecular CT emission which is of exciplex type. As the LE and exciplex emissions of the push-pull diphenylbutadiyne together cover the visible region (400-700 nm) in acetonitrile, a control of the fluorophore concentration makes the relative intensities of the LE and exciplex emissions such that pure white light emission is achieved. The white light emission is not observed in those diphenylbutadiynyl analogues in which the peripheral substituents of the phenyl rings do not possess strong push-pull character. PMID:27379734

  16. Characterization and Monitoring of Natural Attenuation of Chlorinated Solvents in Ground Water: A Systems Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cutshall, N. H.; Gilmore, T.; Looney, B. B.; Vangelas, K. M.; Adams, K. M.; Sink, C. H.

    2006-05-01

    the attenuation capacity. The mass balance approach is controlled by a combination of boundary conditions (e.g., water inputs and outputs), flow dynamics, and contaminant concentrations. As a result, long term monitoring might be improved while reducing costs by measuring fewer point concentrations and simultaneously adding large-scale measurements of boundary conditions, using weather data, remote sensing of evapotranspiration, stream-flow monitoring, etc. Because there are no specific regulatory drivers for performance-monitoring, regulators are not accustomed to participating in monitoring system design. A partnership with the Interstate Technology Regulatory Council (ITRC) has been formed to promote communication and develop advanced guidance for MNA. Early and continued communication among technology developers, end users, regulators and the public has been essential to this progress.

  17. Dipolar correlations in structured solvents under nanoconfinement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buyukdagli, Sahin; Blossey, Ralf

    2014-06-01

    We study electrostatic correlations in structured solvents confined to nanoscale systems. We derive variational equations of Netz-Orland type for a model liquid composed of finite size dipoles. These equations are solved for both dilute solvents and solvents at physiological concentrations in a slit nanopore geometry. Correlation effects are of major importance for the dielectric reduction and anisotropy of the solvent resulting from dipole image interactions and also lead to a reduction of van der Waals attractions between low dielectric bodies. Finally, by comparison with other recently developed self-consistent theories and experiments, we scrutinize the effect of solvent-membrane interactions on the differential capacitance of the charged liquid in contact with low dielectric substrates. The interfacial solvent depletion driven by solvent-image interactions plays the major role in the observed low values of the experimental capacitance data, while non-locality associated with the extended charge structure of solvent molecules only brings a minor contribution.

  18. Dipolar correlations in structured solvents under nanoconfinement.

    PubMed

    Buyukdagli, Sahin; Blossey, Ralf

    2014-06-21

    We study electrostatic correlations in structured solvents confined to nanoscale systems. We derive variational equations of Netz-Orland type for a model liquid composed of finite size dipoles. These equations are solved for both dilute solvents and solvents at physiological concentrations in a slit nanopore geometry. Correlation effects are of major importance for the dielectric reduction and anisotropy of the solvent resulting from dipole image interactions and also lead to a reduction of van der Waals attractions between low dielectric bodies. Finally, by comparison with other recently developed self-consistent theories and experiments, we scrutinize the effect of solvent-membrane interactions on the differential capacitance of the charged liquid in contact with low dielectric substrates. The interfacial solvent depletion driven by solvent-image interactions plays the major role in the observed low values of the experimental capacitance data, while non-locality associated with the extended charge structure of solvent molecules only brings a minor contribution. PMID:24952564

  19. Dipolar correlations in structured solvents under nanoconfinement.

    PubMed

    Buyukdagli, Sahin; Blossey, Ralf

    2014-06-21

    We study electrostatic correlations in structured solvents confined to nanoscale systems. We derive variational equations of Netz-Orland type for a model liquid composed of finite size dipoles. These equations are solved for both dilute solvents and solvents at physiological concentrations in a slit nanopore geometry. Correlation effects are of major importance for the dielectric reduction and anisotropy of the solvent resulting from dipole image interactions and also lead to a reduction of van der Waals attractions between low dielectric bodies. Finally, by comparison with other recently developed self-consistent theories and experiments, we scrutinize the effect of solvent-membrane interactions on the differential capacitance of the charged liquid in contact with low dielectric substrates. The interfacial solvent depletion driven by solvent-image interactions plays the major role in the observed low values of the experimental capacitance data, while non-locality associated with the extended charge structure of solvent molecules only brings a minor contribution.

  20. Acetone-based cellulose solvent.

    PubMed

    Kostag, Marc; Liebert, Tim; Heinze, Thomas

    2014-08-01

    Acetone containing tetraalkylammonium chloride is found to be an efficient solvent for cellulose. The addition of an amount of 10 mol% (based on acetone) of well-soluble salt triethyloctylammonium chloride (Et3 OctN Cl) adjusts the solvent's properties (increases the polarity) to promote cellulose dissolution. Cellulose solutions in acetone/Et3 OctN Cl have the lowest viscosity reported for comparable aprotic solutions making it a promising system for shaping processes and homogeneous chemical modification of the biopolymer. Recovery of the polymer and recycling of the solvent components can be easily achieved.

  1. Comprehensive separation of secondary metabolites in natural products by high-speed counter-current chromatography using a three-phase solvent system.

    PubMed

    Yanagida, Akio; Yamakawa, Yutaka; Noji, Ryoko; Oda, Ako; Shindo, Heisaburo; Ito, Yoichiro; Shibusawa, Yoichi

    2007-06-01

    High-speed counter-current chromatography (HSCCC) using the three-phase solvent system n-hexane-methyl acetate-acetonitrile-water at a volume ratio of 4:4:3:4 was applied to the comprehensive separation of secondary metabolites in several natural product extracts. A wide variety of secondary metabolites in each natural product was effectively extracted with the three-phase solvent system, and the filtered extract was directly submitted to the HSCCC separation using the same three-phase system. In the HSCCC profiles of crude natural drugs listed in the Japanese Pharmacopoeia, several physiologically active compounds were clearly separated from other components in the extracts. The HSCCC profiles of several tea products, each manufactured by a different process, clearly showed their compositional difference in main compounds such as catechins, caffeine, and pigments. These HSCCC profiles also provide useful information about hydrophobic diversity of whole components present in each natural product.

  2. Combined effects of raw materials and solvent systems on the preparation and properties of regenerated cellulose fibers.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jinghuan; Guan, Ying; Wang, Kun; Zhang, Xueming; Xu, Feng; Sun, Runcang

    2015-09-01

    To investigate the combined effects of materials and solvents on the preparation, structural and mechanical properties of regenerated cellulose fibers, four cellulosic materials (microcrystalline cellulose, cotton linter pulp, bamboo pulp and bleached softwood sulfite dissolving pulp) and six non-derivative solvents (NaOH/urea aqueous solution, N,N-dimethylacetamide/lithium chloride, N-methyl-morpholine-N-oxide, 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium chloride, 1-allyl-3-methylimidazolium chloride and 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium acetate) were used to prepare fibers with wet spinning method. The results showed that the dissolvability of solvent was the determining factor in cellulose dissolution, and the dissolving time was influenced by the raw materials' properties, such as molecular weight, exposed area and hemicellulose content. The crystallinity and elongation at break of the fibers were almost fixed and not affected by the materials and solvents. However, the tensile strength of the fibers was directly proportional to the molecular weight of the raw materials, and varied with the type of solvents through cellulose degradation. PMID:26005150

  3. Combined effects of raw materials and solvent systems on the preparation and properties of regenerated cellulose fibers.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jinghuan; Guan, Ying; Wang, Kun; Zhang, Xueming; Xu, Feng; Sun, Runcang

    2015-09-01

    To investigate the combined effects of materials and solvents on the preparation, structural and mechanical properties of regenerated cellulose fibers, four cellulosic materials (microcrystalline cellulose, cotton linter pulp, bamboo pulp and bleached softwood sulfite dissolving pulp) and six non-derivative solvents (NaOH/urea aqueous solution, N,N-dimethylacetamide/lithium chloride, N-methyl-morpholine-N-oxide, 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium chloride, 1-allyl-3-methylimidazolium chloride and 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium acetate) were used to prepare fibers with wet spinning method. The results showed that the dissolvability of solvent was the determining factor in cellulose dissolution, and the dissolving time was influenced by the raw materials' properties, such as molecular weight, exposed area and hemicellulose content. The crystallinity and elongation at break of the fibers were almost fixed and not affected by the materials and solvents. However, the tensile strength of the fibers was directly proportional to the molecular weight of the raw materials, and varied with the type of solvents through cellulose degradation.

  4. Solvent wash solution

    DOEpatents

    Neace, James C.

    1986-01-01

    Process for removing diluent degradation products from a solvent extraction solution, which has been used to recover uranium and plutonium from spent nuclear fuel. A wash solution and the solvent extraction solution are combined. The wash solution contains (a) water and (b) up to about, and including, 50 volume percent of at least one-polar water-miscible organic solvent based on the total volume of the water and the highly-polar organic solvent. The wash solution also preferably contains at least one inorganic salt. The diluent degradation products dissolve in the highly-polar organic solvent and the organic solvent extraction solvent do not dissolve in the highly-polar organic solvent. The highly-polar organic solvent and the extraction solvent are separated.

  5. Solvent wash solution

    DOEpatents

    Neace, J.C.

    1984-03-13

    A process is claimed for removing diluent degradation products from a solvent extraction solution, which has been used to recover uranium and plutonium from spent nuclear fuel. A wash solution and the solvent extraction solution are combined. The wash solution contains (a) water and (b) up to about, and including, 50 vol % of at least one-polar water-miscible organic solvent based on the total volume of the water and the highly-polar organic solvent. The wash solution also preferably contains at least one inorganic salt. The diluent degradation products dissolve in the highly-polar organic solvent and the organic solvent extraction solvent do not dissolve in the highly-polar organic solvent. The highly-polar organic solvent and the extraction solvent are separated.

  6. Role of solvent on protein-matrix coupling in MbCO embedded in water-saccharide systems: a Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy study.

    PubMed

    Giuffrida, Sergio; Cottone, Grazia; Cordone, Lorenzo

    2006-08-01

    Embedding protein in sugar systems of low water content enables one to investigate the protein dynamic-structure function in matrixes whose rigidity is modulated by varying the content of residual water. Accordingly, studying the dynamics and structure thermal evolution of a protein in sugar systems of different hydration constitutes a tool for disentangling solvent rigidity from temperature effects. Furthermore, studies performed using different sugars may give information on how the detailed composition of the surrounding solvent affects the internal protein dynamics and structural evolution. In this work, we compare Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy measurements (300-20 K) on MbCO embedded in trehalose, sucrose, maltose, raffinose, and glucose matrixes of different water content. At all the water contents investigated, the protein-solvent coupling was tighter in trehalose than in the other sugars, thus suggesting a molecular basis for the trehalose peculiarity. These results are in line with the observation that protein-matrix phase separation takes place in lysozyme-lactose, whereas it is absent in lysozyme-trehalose systems; indeed, these behaviors may respectively be due to the lack or presence of suitable water-mediated hydrogen-bond networks, which match the protein surface to the surroundings. The above processes might be at the basis of pattern recognition in crowded living systems; indeed, hydration shells structural and dynamic matching is first needed for successful come together of interacting biomolecules.

  7. Role of Solvent on Protein-Matrix Coupling in MbCO Embedded in Water-Saccharide Systems: A Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy Study

    PubMed Central

    Giuffrida, Sergio; Cottone, Grazia; Cordone, Lorenzo

    2006-01-01

    Embedding protein in sugar systems of low water content enables one to investigate the protein dynamic-structure function in matrixes whose rigidity is modulated by varying the content of residual water. Accordingly, studying the dynamics and structure thermal evolution of a protein in sugar systems of different hydration constitutes a tool for disentangling solvent rigidity from temperature effects. Furthermore, studies performed using different sugars may give information on how the detailed composition of the surrounding solvent affects the internal protein dynamics and structural evolution. In this work, we compare Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy measurements (300–20 K) on MbCO embedded in trehalose, sucrose, maltose, raffinose, and glucose matrixes of different water content. At all the water contents investigated, the protein-solvent coupling was tighter in trehalose than in the other sugars, thus suggesting a molecular basis for the trehalose peculiarity. These results are in line with the observation that protein-matrix phase separation takes place in lysozyme-lactose, whereas it is absent in lysozyme-trehalose systems; indeed, these behaviors may respectively be due to the lack or presence of suitable water-mediated hydrogen-bond networks, which match the protein surface to the surroundings. The above processes might be at the basis of pattern recognition in crowded living systems; indeed, hydration shells structural and dynamic matching is first needed for successful come together of interacting biomolecules. PMID:16714349

  8. Replacement of Hydrochlorofluorocarbon (HCFC) -225 Solvent for Cleaning and Verification Sampling of NASA Propulsion Oxygen Systems Hardware, Ground Support Equipment, and Associated Test Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burns, H. D.; Mitchell, M. A.; McMillian, J. H.; Farner, B. R.; Harper, S. A.; Peralta, S. F.; Lowrey, N. M.; Ross, H. R.; Juarez, A.

    2015-01-01

    Since the 1990's, NASA's rocket propulsion test facilities at Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) and Stennis Space Center (SSC) have used hydrochlorofluorocarbon-225 (HCFC-225), a Class II ozone-depleting substance, to safety clean and verify the cleanliness of large scale propulsion oxygen systems and associated test facilities. In 2012 through 2014, test laboratories at MSFC, SSC, and Johnson Space Center-White Sands Test Facility collaborated to seek out, test, and qualify an environmentally preferred replacement for HCFC-225. Candidate solvents were selected, a test plan was developed, and the products were tested for materials compatibility, oxygen compatibility, cleaning effectiveness, and suitability for use in cleanliness verification and field cleaning operations. Honewell Soltice (TradeMark) Performance Fluid (trans-1-chloro-3,3, 3-trifluoropropene) was selected to replace HCFC-225 at NASA's MSFC and SSC rocket propulsion test facilities.

  9. Aminosilicone solvents for CO(2) capture.

    PubMed

    Perry, Robert J; Grocela-Rocha, Teresa A; O'Brien, Michael J; Genovese, Sarah; Wood, Benjamin R; Lewis, Larry N; Lam, Hubert; Soloveichik, Grigorii; Rubinsztajn, Malgorzata; Kniajanski, Sergei; Draper, Sam; Enick, Robert M; Johnson, J Karl; Xie, Hong-bin; Tapriyal, Deepak

    2010-08-23

    This work describes the first report of the use of an aminosilicone solvent mix for the capture of CO(2). To maintain a liquid state, a hydroxyether co-solvent was employed which allowed enhanced physisorption of CO(2) in the solvent mixture. Regeneration of the capture solvent system was demonstrated over 6 cycles and absorption isotherms indicate a 25-50 % increase in dynamic CO(2) capacity over 30 % MEA. In addition, proof of concept for continuous CO(2) absorption was verified. Additionally, modeling to predict heats of reaction of aminosilicone solvents with CO(2) was in good agreement with experimental results.

  10. INFLUENCE OF SOLVENT AND SORBENT CHARACTERISTICS ON DISTRIBUTION OF PENTACHLOROPHENOL IN OCTANOL-WATER AND SOIL-WATER SYSTEMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Sorbent and solvent characteristics influencing sorption of pentachlorophenol (PCP) were investigated. Analysis of aqueous sorption data for several sorbents over a broad pH range suggested hydrophobic sorption of neutral PCP predominates at pH 7. At pH > 7, sorption of the penta...

  11. Effects of solvent, pH, salts and resin fatty acids on the dechlorination of pentachlorophenol using magnesium-silver and magnesium-palladium bimetallic systems.

    PubMed

    Patel, Upendra D; Suresh, Sumathi

    2008-08-15

    The effects of pH, organic co-solvent, salts such as sodium chloride, sodium sulfate, and co-pollutants, resin and fatty acids (RFAs) on the dechlorination of pentachlorophenol (PCP) by magnesium/silver (Mg/Ag) and magnesium/palladium (Mg/Pd) systems were examined in the present investigations. Such studies provide relevant information about the applicability of bimetallic systems for remediation of raw wastewaters (such as pulp bleaching effluents) or groundwater. Removal efficiencies of 10 mg L(-1) PCP by Mg/Pd and Mg/Ag systems at the end of 1 h reaction were 93% and 78%, respectively, in the presence of acetone (1% v/v). On the other hand, the removal efficiencies were 86% and 70% for reactions conducted in alcoholic solvents (1% v/v) using Mg/Pd and Mg/Ag systems, respectively. The efficiencies of PCP removal by the two bimetallic systems could be correlated to the dipole moments of co-solvents used. The second order reaction rate constant for PCP removal by Mg/Ag system was highest (0.03 L mg(-1) min(-1)) in the absence of any pH-control mechanism. Optimum pH for the dechlorination of PCP by Mg/Pd system was found to be approximately 5.5 and >92% of the compound was removed within 15 min of reaction. Presence of chlorinated and non-chlorinated resin fatty acids (RFAs) resulted in substantial reduction in the rate and extent of PCP removal by Mg/Ag system whereas dechlorination by Mg/Pd remained unaffected. Presence of sodium sulfate or sodium chloride in the reaction phase reduced the rate and extent of PCP removal by Mg/Ag system. PCP dechlorination by Mg/Pd system was adversely impacted by the addition of sodium chloride and unaffected by the presence of sodium sulfate.

  12. New solvent systems for gradient counter-current chromatography in separation of betanin and its derivatives from processed Beta vulgaris L. juice.

    PubMed

    Spórna-Kucab, Aneta; Garrard, Ian; Ignatova, Svetlana; Wybraniec, Sławomir

    2015-02-01

    Betalains, natural plant pigments, are beneficial compounds due to their antioxidant and possible chemoprotective properties. A mixture of betalains: betanin/isobetanin, decarboxybetanins and neobetanin from processed red beet roots (Beta vulgaris L.) juice was separated in food-grade, gradient solvent systems using high-performance counter-current chromatography (HPCCC). The decarboxylated and dehydrogenated betanins were obtained by thermal degradation of betanin/isobetanin from processed B. vulgaris L. juice under mild conditions. Two solvent systems (differing in their composition by phosphoric acid and ethanol volume gradient) consisting of BuOH-EtOH-NaClsolution-H2O-H3PO4 (v/v/v/v/v, 1300:200-1000:1300:700:2.5-10) in the 'tail-to-head' mode were run. The flow rate of the mobile phase (organic phase) was 1.0 or 2.0 ml/min and the column rotation speed was 1,600 rpm (20°C). The retention of the solvent system stationary phase (aqueous phase) was ca. 80%. The system with the acid and ethanol volume gradient consisting of BuOH-EtOH-NaClsolution-H2O-H3PO4 (v/v/v/v/v, 1300:200-240:1300:700:2.5-4.5) pumped at 2.0 ml/min was the most effective for a separation of betanin/isobetanin, 17-decarboxy-betanin/-isobetanin, 2-decarboxy-betanin/-isobetanin, 2,17-bidecarboxy-betanin/-isobetanin pairs as well as neobetanin. The pigments were detected by LC-DAD and LC-MS. The results are crucial in the application of completely food-grade solvent systems in separation of food-grade compounds as well, and the systems can possibly be extended to other ionizable and polar compounds with potential health benefits. In particular, the method is applicable for the isolation and purification of betalains present in such rich sources as B. vulgaris L. roots as well as cacti fruits and Amaranthaceae flowering plants due to modification possibilities of the solvent systems polarity.

  13. New solvent systems for gradient counter-current chromatography in separation of betanin and its derivatives from processed Beta vulgaris L. juice.

    PubMed

    Spórna-Kucab, Aneta; Garrard, Ian; Ignatova, Svetlana; Wybraniec, Sławomir

    2015-02-01

    Betalains, natural plant pigments, are beneficial compounds due to their antioxidant and possible chemoprotective properties. A mixture of betalains: betanin/isobetanin, decarboxybetanins and neobetanin from processed red beet roots (Beta vulgaris L.) juice was separated in food-grade, gradient solvent systems using high-performance counter-current chromatography (HPCCC). The decarboxylated and dehydrogenated betanins were obtained by thermal degradation of betanin/isobetanin from processed B. vulgaris L. juice under mild conditions. Two solvent systems (differing in their composition by phosphoric acid and ethanol volume gradient) consisting of BuOH-EtOH-NaClsolution-H2O-H3PO4 (v/v/v/v/v, 1300:200-1000:1300:700:2.5-10) in the 'tail-to-head' mode were run. The flow rate of the mobile phase (organic phase) was 1.0 or 2.0 ml/min and the column rotation speed was 1,600 rpm (20°C). The retention of the solvent system stationary phase (aqueous phase) was ca. 80%. The system with the acid and ethanol volume gradient consisting of BuOH-EtOH-NaClsolution-H2O-H3PO4 (v/v/v/v/v, 1300:200-240:1300:700:2.5-4.5) pumped at 2.0 ml/min was the most effective for a separation of betanin/isobetanin, 17-decarboxy-betanin/-isobetanin, 2-decarboxy-betanin/-isobetanin, 2,17-bidecarboxy-betanin/-isobetanin pairs as well as neobetanin. The pigments were detected by LC-DAD and LC-MS. The results are crucial in the application of completely food-grade solvent systems in separation of food-grade compounds as well, and the systems can possibly be extended to other ionizable and polar compounds with potential health benefits. In particular, the method is applicable for the isolation and purification of betalains present in such rich sources as B. vulgaris L. roots as well as cacti fruits and Amaranthaceae flowering plants due to modification possibilities of the solvent systems polarity. PMID:25595533

  14. Solute-solvent and solvent-solvent interactions in the preferential solvation of 4-[4-(dimethylamino)styryl]-1-methylpyridinium iodide in 24 binary solvent mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bevilaqua, Tharly; Gonçalves, Thaini F.; Venturini, Cristina de G.; Machado, Vanderlei G.

    2006-11-01

    The molar transition energy ( ET) polarity values for the dye 4-[4-(dimethylamino)styryl]-1-methylpyridinium iodide were collected in binary mixtures comprising a hydrogen-bond accepting (HBA) solvent (acetone, acetonitrile, dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO), and N, N-dimethylformamide (DMF)) and a hydrogen-bond donating (HBD) solvent (water, methanol, ethanol, propan-2-ol, and butan-1-ol). Data referring to mixtures of water with alcohols were also analyzed. These data were used in the study of the preferential solvation of the probe, in terms of both solute-solvent and solvent-solvent interactions. These latter interactions are of importance in explaining the synergistic behavior observed for many mixed solvent systems. All data were successfully fitted to a model based on solvent-exchange equilibria. The ET values of the dye dissolved in the solvents show that the position of the solvatochromic absorption band of the dye is dependent on the medium polarity. The solvation of the dye in HBA solvents occurs with a very important contribution from ion-dipole interactions. In HBD solvents, the hydrogen bonding between the dimethylamino group in the dye and the OH group in the solvent plays an important role in the solvation of the dye. The interaction of the hydroxylic solvent with the other component in the mixture can lead to the formation of hydrogen-bonded complexes, which solvate the dye using a lower polar moiety, i.e. alkyl groups in the solvents. The dye has a hydrophobic nature and a dimethylamino group with a minor capability for hydrogen bonding with the medium in comparison with the phenolate group present in Reichardt's pyridiniophenolate. Thus, the probe is able to detect solvent-solvent interactions, which are implicit to the observed synergistic behavior.

  15. Fabrication of porous ethyl cellulose microspheres based on the acetone-glycerin-water ternary system: Controlling porosity via the solvent-removal mode.

    PubMed

    Murakami, Masahiro; Matsumoto, Akihiro; Watanabe, Chie; Kurumado, Yu; Takama, Masashi

    2015-08-01

    Porous ethyl cellulose (EC) microspheres were prepared from the acetone-glycerin-water ternary system using an oil/water (O/W)-type emulsion solvent extraction method. The O/ W type emulsion was prepared using acetone dissolved ethyl cellulose as an oil phase and aqueous glycerin as a water phase. The effects of the different solvent extraction modes on the porosity of the microspheres were investigated. The specific surface area of the porous EC microspheres was estimated by the gas adsorption method. When the solvent was extracted rapidly by mixing the emulsion with water instantaneously, porous EC microspheres with a maximum specific surface area of 40.7±2.1 m2/g were obtained. On the other hand, when water was added gradually to the emulsion, the specific surface area of the fabricated microspheres decreased rapidly with an increase in the infusion period, with the area being 25-45% of the maximum value. The results of an analysis of the ternary phase diagram of the system suggested that the penetration of water and glycerin from the continuous phase to the dispersed phase before solidification affected the porosity of the fabricated EC microspheres.

  16. On-line micro-volume introduction system developed for lower density than water extraction solvent and dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction coupled with flame atomic absorption spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Anthemidis, Aristidis N; Mitani, Constantina; Balkatzopoulou, Paschalia; Tzanavaras, Paraskevas D

    2012-07-01

    A simple and fast preconcentration/separation dispersive liquid-liquid micro extraction (DLLME) method for metal determination based on the use of extraction solvent with lower density than water has been developed. For this purpose a novel micro-volume introduction system was developed enabling the on-line injection of the organic solvent into flame atomic absorption spectrometry (FAAS). The effectiveness and efficiency of the proposed system were demonstrated for lead and copper preconcentration in environmental water samples using di-isobutyl ketone (DBIK) as extraction solvent. Under the optimum conditions the enhancement factor for lead and copper was 187 and 310 respectively. For a sample volume of 10 mL, the detection limit (3 s) and the relative standard deviation were 1.2 μg L(-1) and 3.3% for lead and 0.12 μg L(-1) and 2.9% for copper respectively. The developed method was evaluated by analyzing certified reference material and it was applied successfully to the analysis of environmental water samples.

  17. Solvent systems for countercurrent chromatography: an aqueous two phase liquid system based on a room temperature ionic liquid.

    PubMed

    Ruiz-Angel, Maria Jose; Pino, Veronica; Carda-Broch, Samuel; Berthod, Alain

    2007-06-01

    A new aqueous two phase liquid system (ATPS) based on the ionic liquid 1-butyl-3-methyl imidazolium chloride (BMIM Cl), potassium dibasic phosphate (K(2)HPO(4)) and water was recently proposed in the literature. The full phase diagram of this ATPS was prepared and some tie lines were fully determined. It was compared to classical ATPSs based on polyethylene glycol with an average molecular mass of 1000 (PEG 1000) and 10,000 (PEG 10000) and K(2)HPO(4). Two countercurrent chromatography (CCC) columns, a hydrostatic Sanki and a J type hydrodynamic CCC columns were used to test the liquid phase retention of these ATPSs in all possible configurations. It was found that the BMIM Cl ATPS liquid phases were much easier to retain in the two CCC columns than the PEG 1000 ATPS phases. Using protein and alcohol solutes, it was established that the BMIM Cl ATPS has a polarity completely different from that of the PEG 1000 ATPS. For example, ovalbumin partitions equally between the two phases of the PEG 1000 ATPS (K(D)=1.4) when it is completely located in the BMIM Cl upper phase of the ionic liquid ATPS (K(D)=180). The discrimination factor of the ionic liquid system and its intrinsic hydrophobicity were respectively found three times higher and ten times lower than the respective values of the PEG 1000 ATPS. PMID:17166506

  18. FULL-SCALE TESTING OF A CAUSTIC SIDE SOLVENT EXTRACTION SYSTEM TO REMOVE CESIUM FROM SAVANNAH RIVER SITE RADIOACTIVE WASTE

    SciTech Connect

    Poirier, M; Thomas Peters, T; Earl Brass, E; Stanley Brown, S; Mark Geeting, M; Lcurtis Johnson, L; Charles02 Coleman, C; S Crump, S; Mark Barnes, M; Samuel Fink, S

    2007-10-15

    Savannah River Site (SRS) personnel have completed construction and assembly of the Modular Caustic Side Solvent Extraction Unit (MCU) facility. Following assembly, they conducted testing to evaluate the ability of the process to remove non-radioactive cesium and to separate the aqueous and organic phases. They conducted tests at salt solution flow rates of 3.5, 6.0, and 8.5 gpm. During testing, the MCU Facility collected samples and submitted them to Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) personnel for analysis of cesium, Isopar{reg_sign} L, and Modifier [1-(2,2,3,3-tetrafluoropropoxy)-3-(4-sec-butylphenoxy)-2-propanol]. SRNL personnel analyzed the aqueous samples for cesium by Inductively-Coupled Plasma Mass Spectroscopy (ICP-MS) and the solvent samples for cesium using a Parr Bomb Digestion followed by ICP-MS. They analyzed aqueous samples for Isopar{reg_sign} L and Modifier by gas chromatography (GC).

  19. Separation and purification of isorhamnetin 3-sulphate from Flaveria bidentis (L.) Kuntze by counter-current chromatography comparing two kinds of solvent systems.

    PubMed

    Xie, Qianqian; Yin, Li; Zhang, Guoliang; Wei, Yun

    2012-01-01

    The first preparative separation of a flavonoid sulphate isorhamnetin 3-sulphate from Flaveria bidentis (L.) Kuntze by counter-current chromatography (CCC) was presented. Two kinds of solvent systems were used. A conventional organic/aqueous solvent system n-butanol-ethyl acetate-water (4:1:5, v/v) was used, yielding isorhamnetin 3-sulphate 2.0 mg with a purity of 93.4% from 83 mg of pre-enriched crude extract obtained from 553 mg ethanol extract by macroporous resin. A one-component organic/salt-containing system composed of n-butanol-0.25% sodium chloride aqueous solution (1:1, v/v) was also used, and the LC column packed with macroporous resin has been employed for desalination of the target compound purified from CCC. As a result, 2.1 mg of isorhamnetin 3-sulphate with a purity of over 97% has been isolated from 402 mg of crude extract without pre-enrichment. Compared with the conventional organic/aqueous system, the one-component organic/salt-containing aqueous system was more suitable for the separation of isorhamnetin 3-sulphate, and purer target compound was obtained from the crude extract without pre-enrichment using the new solvent system. The chemical structure was confirmed by ESI-MS and (1)H, (13)C NMR. In summary, our results indicated that CCC using one-component organic/salt-containing aqueous solution is very promising and powerful for high-throughput purification of isorhamnetin 3-sulphate from Flaveria bidentis (L.) Kuntze.

  20. NEPTUNIUM SOLVENT EXTRACTION PROCESS

    DOEpatents

    Dawson, L.R.; Fields, P.R.

    1959-10-01

    The separation of neptunium from an aqueous solution by solvent extraction and the extraction of neptunium from the solvent solution are described. Neptunium is separated from an aqueous solution containing tetravalent or hexavalent neptunium nitrate, nitric acid, and a nitrate salting out agent, such as sodium nitrate, by contacting the solution with an organic solvent such as diethyl ether. Subsequently, the neptunium nitrate is extracted from the organic solvent extract phase with water.

  1. Use of plant toxicity assays to evaluate a mobile solvent extraction system for remediation of soil from a hazardous waste site

    SciTech Connect

    Meier, J.R.; Chang, L.; Meckes, M.

    1995-11-01

    Soil from a site heavily contaminated with polychlorinated biphenyls and several other organic and inorganic compounds was treated with a full-scale, mobile solvent extraction system, which is being evaluated by the USEPA`s Superfund Innovative Technology Evaluation (SITE) program. The present study employed several plant bioassays to examine the genotoxicity and acute toxicity of the soil before and after the treatment. The toxicity endpoints were mitotic alterations in root tip cells of Allium cepa (common onion), micronuclei in pollen mother cells of Tradescantia, and seed germination and root elongation in oats and lettuce. Bulbs or inflorescences of Allium and Tradescantia, respectively, were exposed to aqueous extracts (20% w/v) of the soils at three concentrations (undiluted, 1/2, or 1/4). Oat and lettuce seeds were exposed to the soils mixed with sand at concentrations from 25 to 100% (w/w). The results were as follows: (1) no evidence of genotoxicity for either the untreated or treated soils in Tradescantia; (2) dose-related increases in chromosomal aberrations for both soils in Allium; (3) inhibition of seed germination for lettuce but not oats for both soils; (4) inhibition of root elongation for both lettuce and oats for the treated soil. The toxicity and genotoxicity remaining after treatment appears to be due to residual solvent introduced during the solvent extraction treatment process, or to inorganic contaminants not removed by the treatment.

  2. Computational comparison of oxidation stability: Solvent/salt monomers vs solvent-solvent/salt pairs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Dong Young; Park, Min Sik; Lim, Younhee; Kang, Yoon-Sok; Park, Jin-Hwan; Doo, Seok-Gwang

    2015-08-01

    A fundamental understanding of the anodic stabilities of electrolytes is important for the development of advanced high-voltage electrolytes. In this study, we calculated and systematically compared the oxidation stabilities of monomeric solvents and anions, and bimolecular solvent-solvent and anion-solvent systems that are considered to be high-voltage electrolyte components, using ab initio calculations. Oxidation stabilities of solvent or anion monomers without considering specific solvation molecules cannot represent experimental oxidation stabilities. The oxidation of electrolytes usually forms neutral or cationic radicals, which immediately undergo further reactions stabilizing the products. Oxidatively driven intermolecular reactions are the main reason for the lower oxidation stabilities of electrolytes compared with those of monomeric compounds. Electrolyte components such as tetramethylene sulfone (TMS), ethyl methyl sulfone (EMS), bis(oxalate)borate (BOB-), and bis(trifluoromethane)sulfonamide (TFSI-) that minimize such intermolecular chemical reactions on oxidation can maintain the oxidation stabilities of monomers. In predictions of the theoretical oxidation stabilities of electrolytes, simple comparisons of highest occupied molecular orbital energies can be misleading, even if microsolvation or bulk clusters are considered. Instead, bimolecular solvent complexes with a salt anion should be at least considered in oxidation calculations. This study provides important information on fundamental and applied aspects of the development of electrolytes.

  3. Solvent system selectivities in countercurrent chromatography using Salicornia gaudichaudiana metabolites as practical example with off-line electrospray mass-spectrometry injection profiling.

    PubMed

    Costa, Fernanda das Neves; Jerz, Gerold; Figueiredo, Fabiana de Souza; Winterhalter, Peter; Leitão, Gilda Guimarães

    2015-03-13

    For the development of an efficient two-stage isolation process for high-speed countercurrent chromatography (HSCCC) with focus on principal metabolites from the ethyl acetate extract of the halophyte plant Salicornia gaudichaudiana, separation selectivities of two different biphasic solvent systems with similar polarities were evaluated using the elution and extrusion approach. Efficiency in isolation of target compounds is determined by the solvent system selectivity and their chronological use in multiple separation steps. The system n-hexane-ethyl acetate-methanol-water (0.5:6:0.5:6, v/v/v/v) resulted in a comprehensive separation of polyphenolic glycosides. The system n-hexane-n-butanol-water (1:1:2, v/v/v) was less universal but was highly efficient in the fractionation of positional isomers such as di-substituted cinnamic acid quinic acid derivatives. Multiple metabolite detection performed on recovered HSCCC tube fractions was done with rapid mass-spectrometry profiling by sequential off-line injections to electrospray mass-spectrometry (ESI-MS/MS). Selective ion traces of metabolites delivered reconstituted preparative HSCCC runs. Molecular weight distribution of target compounds in single HSCCC tube fractions and MS/MS fragment data were available. Chromatographic areas with strong co-elution effects and fractions of pure recoverable compounds were visualized. In total 11 metabolites have been identified and monitored. Result of this approach was a fast isolation protocol for S. gaudichaudiana metabolites using two solvent systems in a strategic sequence. The process could easily be scaled-up to larger lab-scale or industrial recovery.

  4. Use of an in vitro model for the assessment of muscle damage from intramuscular injections: in vitro-in vivo correlation and predictability with mixed solvent systems.

    PubMed

    Brazeau, G A; Fung, H L

    1989-09-01

    The potential of binary mixtures of propylene glycol-water, ethanol-water, and polyethylene glycol 400-water to cause skeletal muscle damage (myotoxicity) following intramuscular injection was examined with an in vitro model using the isolated rat muscle. At moderate concentrations (20-40%, v/v) of the organic cosolvent, the order of myotoxicity was propylene glycol greater than ethanol much greater than polyethylene glycol 400. The in vitro results were then compared with in vivo toxicity in rabbits after injection of normal saline, 40% (v/v) polyethylene glycol 400, 40% (v/v) propylene glycol, indocyanine green in normal saline, and indocyanine green in 40% (v/v) propylene glycol. Employing the area under the creatine kinase activity curve from 0 to 72 hr as the index of skeletal muscle damage, an excellent in vitro-in vivo correlation was observed. The basic myotoxicity relationships obtained from the binary cosolvent systems were then used to examine the myotoxicity of ternary organic cosolvent mixtures. Several mixed solvent systems with the same theoretical molar solubilization power for a model compound, diazepam, were selected to determine (1) if myotoxicity can be reduced by changing the composition of the ternary mixtures and (2) if myotoxicity of the individual components is additive. For the solvent systems containing propylene glycol, ethanol, and water, the total myotoxicity equaled the sum of the individual myotoxicity of each component. In contrast, for the solvent systems containing polyethylene glycol 400, the total myotoxicity was only half of the sum of individual toxicities. These results suggest that polyethylene glycol 400 in mixed cosolvent systems might have a protective effect on the myotoxicity generated by intramuscular injections.

  5. Solvents safety handbook

    SciTech Connect

    De Renzo, D.J.

    1986-01-01

    Know solvents and how to protect yourself from dangerous exposure to them. Instant information for decision-making regarding industrial solvents in everyday use, is provided in this handbook which is a compilation of data on 335 hazardous and frequently-used solvents.

  6. The effect of pressure, isotopic (H/D) substitution, and other variables on miscibility in polymer-solvent systems. The nature of the demixing process; dynamic light scattering and small angle neutron scattering studies. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Van Hook, W.A.

    2000-01-01

    A research program examining the effects of pressure, isotope substitution and other variables on miscibility in polymer solvent systems is described. The techniques employed included phase equilibrium measurements and dynamic light scattering and small angle neutron scattering.

  7. Improved Supercritical-Solvent Extraction of Coal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Compton, L.

    1982-01-01

    Raw coal upgraded by supercritical-solvent extraction system that uses two materials instead of one. System achieved extraction yields of 20 to 49 weight percent. Single-solvent yields are about 25 weight percent. Experimental results show extraction yields may be timedependent. Observed decreases in weight of coal agreed well with increases in ash content of residue.

  8. CO2-Binding Organic Liquids Gas Capture with Polarity-Swing-Assisted Regeneration Full Technology Feasibility Study B1 - Solvent-based Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Heldebrant, David J

    2014-08-31

    PNNL, Fluor Corporation and Queens University (Kingston, ON) successfully completed a three year comprehensive study of the CO2BOL water-lean solvent platform with Polarity Swing Assisted Regeneration (PSAR). This study encompassed solvent synthesis, characterization, environmental toxicology, physical, thermodynamic and kinetic property measurements, Aspen Plus™ modeling and bench-scale testing of a candidate CO2BOL solvent molecule. Key Program Findings The key program findings are summarized as follows: • PSAR favorably reduced stripper duties and reboiler temperatures with little/no impact to absorption column • >90% CO2 capture was achievable at reasonable liquid-gas ratios in the absorber • High rich solvent viscosities (up to 600 cP) were successfully demonstrated in the bench-scale system. However, the projected impacts of high viscosity to capital cost and operational limits compromised the other levelized cost of electricity benefits. • Low thermal conductivity of organics significantly increased the required cross exchanger surface area, and potentially other heat exchange surfaces. • CO2BOL had low evaporative losses during bench-scale testing • There was no evidence of foaming during bench scale testing • Current CO2BOL formulation costs project to be $35/kg • Ecotoxicity (Water Daphnia) was comparable between CO2BOL and MEA (169.47 versus 103.63 mg/L) • Full dehydration of the flue gas was determined to not be economically feasible. However, modest refrigeration (13 MW for the 550 MW reference system) was determined to be potentially economically feasible, and still produce a water-lean condition for the CO2BOLs (5 wt% steady-state water loading). • CO2BOLs testing with 5 wt% water loading did not compromise anhydrous performance behavior, and showed actual enhancement of CO2 capture performance. • Mass transfer of CO2BOLs was not greatly impeded by viscosity • Facile separation of antisolvent from lean CO2BOL was

  9. Solvents and sustainable chemistry

    PubMed Central

    Welton, Tom

    2015-01-01

    Solvents are widely recognized to be of great environmental concern. The reduction of their use is one of the most important aims of green chemistry. In addition to this, the appropriate selection of solvent for a process can greatly improve the sustainability of a chemical production process. There has also been extensive research into the application of so-called green solvents, such as ionic liquids and supercritical fluids. However, most examples of solvent technologies that give improved sustainability come from the application of well-established solvents. It is also apparent that the successful implementation of environmentally sustainable processes must be accompanied by improvements in commercial performance. PMID:26730217

  10. Solvent recycle/recovery

    SciTech Connect

    Paffhausen, M.W.; Smith, D.L.; Ugaki, S.N.

    1990-09-01

    This report describes Phase I of the Solvent Recycle/Recovery Task of the DOE Chlorinated Solvent Substitution Program for the US Air Force by the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, EG G Idaho, Inc., through the US Department of Energy, Idaho Operations Office. The purpose of the task is to identify and test recovery and recycling technologies for proposed substitution solvents identified by the Biodegradable Solvent Substitution Program and the Alternative Solvents/Technologies for Paint Stripping Program with the overall objective of minimizing hazardous wastes. A literature search to identify recycle/recovery technologies and initial distillation studies has been conducted. 4 refs.

  11. The Development of Methodologies and Solvent Systems to Replace CFC-113 in the Validation of Large-Scale Spacecraft Hardware

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clausen, Christian A., III

    1996-01-01

    Liquid oxygen is used as the oxidizer for the liquid fueled main engines during the launch of the space shuttle. Any hardware that comes into contact with pure oxygen either during servicing of the shuttle or in the operation of the shuttle must be validated as being free of nonvolatile residue (NVR). This is a safety requirement to prevent spontaneous combustion of carbonaceous NVR if it was to come into contact with pure oxygen. Previous NVR validation testing of space hardware used Freon (CFC-113) as the test solvent. Because CFC-113 no longer can be used, a program was conducted to develop a NVR test procedure that uses a safe environmentally friendly solvent. The solvent that has been used in the new NVR test procedure is water. Work that has been conducted over the past three years has served to demonstrate that when small parts are subjected to ultrasound in a water bath and NVR is present a sufficient quantity is dispersed into the water to analyze for its concentration by the TOC method. The work that is described in this report extends the water wash NVR validation test to large-scale parts; that is, parts too large to be subjected to ultrasound. The method consists of concentrating the NVR in the water wash onto a bed of silica gel. The total adsorbent bed is then analyzed for TOC content by using a solid sample probe. Work that has been completed thus far has demonstrated that hydrocarbon based NVR's can be detected at levels of less than 0.1 mg per square foot of part's surface area by using a simple water wash.

  12. Predicting the Solubility of Pharmaceutical Cocrystals in Solvent/Anti-Solvent Mixtures.

    PubMed

    Lange, Linda; Heisel, Stefan; Sadowski, Gabriele

    2016-01-01

    In this work, the solubilities of pharmaceutical cocrystals in solvent/anti-solvent systems were predicted using PC-SAFT in order to increase the efficiency of cocrystal formation processes. Modeling results and experimental data were compared for the cocrystal system nicotinamide/succinic acid (2:1) in the solvent/anti-solvent mixtures ethanol/water, ethanol/acetonitrile and ethanol/ethyl acetate at 298.15 K and in the ethanol/ethyl acetate mixture also at 310.15 K. The solubility of the investigated cocrystal slightly increased when adding small amounts of anti-solvent to the solvent, but drastically decreased for high anti-solvent amounts. Furthermore, the solubilities of nicotinamide, succinic acid and the cocrystal in the considered solvent/anti-solvent mixtures showed strong deviations from ideal-solution behavior. However, by accounting for the thermodynamic non-ideality of the components, PC-SAFT is able to predict the solubilities in all above-mentioned solvent/anti-solvent systems in good agreement with the experimental data. PMID:27164075

  13. Hazardous solvent source reduction

    SciTech Connect

    Callahan, M.S.; Green, B.

    1995-09-01

    This book is written for the managers, production leaders, and operations staff tasked with the job of eliminating hazardous cleaning solvents from their workplace. Information regarding the location, evaluation, and implementation of environmentally preferred cleaning technologies is offered for a broad range of applications. These include: removal of grease and grime from a piece of equipment during maintenance, cleaning small parts before assembly, defluxing printed circuit boards and assemblies, and stripping paint from field vehicles and aircraft. Moving beyond the limits of source reduction alone, this book provides complete information on the planning, staffing, and execution of a pollution prevention program, alternative and in-use cleaner testing, waste recycling and treatment, air emission control, replacement system design, and system economics. For the environmental specialist, this book helps to bridge the gap between regulatory requirements and shop-floor constraints.

  14. Optical microinterferometry method for evaluation of phase state and diffusion in ternary systems: phase separation in cellulose/N-Methylmorpholine-N-oxide/non-solvent mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makarova, V. V.; Antonov, S. V.; Anokhina, T. A.; Volkov, V. V.

    2016-09-01

    Microinterferometry technique was used to evaluate the phase state and diffusion of cellulose solutions N-Methylmorpholine-N-oxide upon contact with non-solvents (water and aqueous solutions of isopropyl alcohol). The method was helpful in visualization of the structure of the forming cellulose film in connection with the diffusivity of the components of the systems. The interdiffusion coefficient were determined. Isopropyl alcohol addition to water slows down the diffusion of the coagulant into the cellulose solution thus delaying cellulose precipitation. Increase of temperature leads to formation of less dense cellulose film morphology with large vacuoles.

  15. Supramolecular aggregates of oligosaccharides with co-solvents in ternary systems for the solubilizing approach of triamcinolone.

    PubMed

    de Medeiros, Arthur S A; Zoppi, Ariana; Barbosa, Euzébio G; Oliveira, Jonas I N; Fernandes-Pedrosa, Matheus F; Longhi, Marcela R; da Silva-Júnior, Arnóbio A

    2016-10-20

    A second compound is generally associated with oligosaccharides as a strategy to maximize the solubilizing effect for nonpolar compounds. This study elucidated the role and the mechanism whereby liquid compounds interact in these supramolecular aggregates in the solubilization of triamcinolone. Three different oligosaccharides (beta-cyclodextrin, 2-hydroxipropil-beta-cyclodextrin, and randomly methylated beta-cyclodextrin) and two potent co-solvents (triethanolamine and N-methyl pyrrolidone) were carefully evaluated by using three distinct experimental approaches. Incredibly stable complexes were formed with cyclodextrins (CDs). The structure of the complexes was elucidated by magnetic resonance spectra 2D-ROESY. The interactions of the protons of ring "A" of the drug with H(3) and H(5) protons of the CD cavity observed in the binary complexes remained in both ternary complexes. Unlike the observed ternary associations with triethanolamine, N-methyl pyrrolidone competed with the triamcinolone CD cavity and considerably decreased the stability of the complex and the solubility of the drug. The molecular dynamics (MD) and quantum mechanics:molecular mechanics (QM:MM) calculations supported that triethanolamine stabilized the drug-CD interactions for the conformer identified in the 2D-ROESY experiments, improving the quality and uniformity of the formed complex. The role played by the co-solvent in the ternary complexes depends on its specific ability to interact with the CD cavity in the presence of the drug, which can be predicted in theoretical studies to select the best candidate. PMID:27474653

  16. Theoretical Insights into the Role of Water in the Dissolution of Cellulose Using IL/Water Mixed Solvent Systems.

    PubMed

    Parthasarathi, Ramakrishnan; Balamurugan, Kanagasabai; Shi, Jian; Subramanian, Venkatesan; Simmons, Blake A; Singh, Seema

    2015-11-12

    The use of certain ionic liquids (ILs) as pretreatment solvents for lignocellulosic biomass has gained great interest in recent years due to the IL's capacity for efficient cellulose dissolution in aqueous solution as compared to other common pretreatment techniques. A fundamental understanding on how these ILs in aqueous environments act on cellulose, particularly at lower IL concentrations with water as a cosolvent, is essential for optimizing pretreatment efficiency, lowering pretreatment cost, and improving IL recyclability. The IL 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium acetate ([C2C1Im][OAc]) is one of the most efficient cellulose solvents known, greatly altering cellulose structure for improved enzymatic saccharification. To understand the role of water as a cosolvent with [C2C1Im][OAc], we investigated the dissolution mechanism of microcrystalline cellulose, type Iβ, in different [C2C1Im][OAc]:water ratios at room (300 K) and pretreatment (433 K) temperatures using all atom molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. These simulations show that 80:20 ratios of [C2C1Im][OAc]:water should be considered as "the tipping point" above which [C2C1Im][OAc]:water mixtures are equally effective on decrystallization of cellulose by disrupting the interchain hydrogen bonding interactions. Simulations also reveal that the resulting decrystallized cellulose from 100% [C2C1Im][OAc] begins to repack in the presence of water but into a less crystalline, or more amorphous, form. PMID:26407132

  17. Theoretical Insights into the Role of Water in the Dissolution of Cellulose Using IL/Water Mixed Solvent Systems.

    PubMed

    Parthasarathi, Ramakrishnan; Balamurugan, Kanagasabai; Shi, Jian; Subramanian, Venkatesan; Simmons, Blake A; Singh, Seema

    2015-11-12

    The use of certain ionic liquids (ILs) as pretreatment solvents for lignocellulosic biomass has gained great interest in recent years due to the IL's capacity for efficient cellulose dissolution in aqueous solution as compared to other common pretreatment techniques. A fundamental understanding on how these ILs in aqueous environments act on cellulose, particularly at lower IL concentrations with water as a cosolvent, is essential for optimizing pretreatment efficiency, lowering pretreatment cost, and improving IL recyclability. The IL 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium acetate ([C2C1Im][OAc]) is one of the most efficient cellulose solvents known, greatly altering cellulose structure for improved enzymatic saccharification. To understand the role of water as a cosolvent with [C2C1Im][OAc], we investigated the dissolution mechanism of microcrystalline cellulose, type Iβ, in different [C2C1Im][OAc]:water ratios at room (300 K) and pretreatment (433 K) temperatures using all atom molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. These simulations show that 80:20 ratios of [C2C1Im][OAc]:water should be considered as "the tipping point" above which [C2C1Im][OAc]:water mixtures are equally effective on decrystallization of cellulose by disrupting the interchain hydrogen bonding interactions. Simulations also reveal that the resulting decrystallized cellulose from 100% [C2C1Im][OAc] begins to repack in the presence of water but into a less crystalline, or more amorphous, form.

  18. Solid phase extraction in tandem with GC/MS for the determination of semi-volatile organic substances extracted from pharmaceutical packaging/delivery systems via aqueous solvent systems.

    PubMed

    Zdravkovic, Steven A

    2015-08-10

    An extractable survey is one of several studies performed on a pharmaceutical storage/delivery system as part of the process of demonstrating that the system is suitable for its intended use. In this paper, a solid phase extraction method for the preparation of aqueous extracts generated during an extractable survey is presented. The method offers a convenient means to isolate semi-volatile organic extractable compounds from aqueous extraction solvents for analysis by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry. Following the solid phase extraction procedure, derivatization is performed to convert problematic functionalities (such as amines and acids) into appropriate chromatographically friendly derivatives. Demonstration of method performance is achieved in three ways using a set of 31 commonly observed extractable substances as model compounds. First, a breakthrough experiment was performed with a 2 solvent system consisting of water and 10/90 isopropanol/water over a range of 6 mL to 100 mL. Results from this experiment show only caprolactam possessed a significant level of breakthrough in either solvent over the range of volumes evaluated. Second, a formal accuracy/precision study was conducted using a three solvent system consisting of water, 10/90 isopropanol/water and 1% polysorbate 80. This experiment demonstrates the quantitative ability of the method at levels ranging from 20 ng/mL to 50 μg/mL. Recovery values of 70% to 130% of the theoretical concentration, with relative standard deviation values of less than 15% for replicate preparations, are obtained for a majority of the compounds evaluated. Finally, a case study involving the extraction of an intravenous drug delivery bag with multiple aqueous solvent systems further demonstrates the viability of solid phase extraction for use in an extractables survey.

  19. DOE solvent handbook information sheet

    SciTech Connect

    Chavez, A.A.

    1992-01-01

    Solvents and cleaners are used in the Department of Defense (DOD) and the Department of Energy-Defense Program (DOE-DP) maintenance facilities for removing wax, grease, oil, carbon, machining fluids, solder fluxes, mold releases, and other contaminants before repairing or electroplating parts. Private industry also uses cleaners and degreasers for surface preparation of various metals. Growing environmental and worker safety concerns have brought attention to these solvents and cleaners, most of which are classified as toxic. Tightening government regulations have already excluded the use of some chemicals, and restrict the use of various halogenated hydrocarbons because of their atmospheric-ozone depleting effects, as well as their cancer-related risks. As a result, a program was established to develop an efficient, easily accessible, electronic solvent utilization handbook. This is being accomplished by: (1) identifying solvents (alternatives) that are not currently restricted by government regulations for use DOE-DP facilities, and private industry, (2) evaluating their cleaning performance, (3) evaluating their corrosivity, (4) evaluating their air emissions, (5) evaluating the possibility of recycling or recovering all or portions of the alternative degreasers, (6) testing substitute solvents compatibility with non-metallic materials, (7) inputting all of the data gathered (including previous biodegradability information) into a database, and (8) developing a methodology for efficient, widespread access to the data base information system.

  20. DOE solvent handbook information sheet

    SciTech Connect

    Chavez, A.A.

    1992-05-01

    Solvents and cleaners are used in the Department of Defense (DOD) and the Department of Energy-Defense Program (DOE-DP) maintenance facilities for removing wax, grease, oil, carbon, machining fluids, solder fluxes, mold releases, and other contaminants before repairing or electroplating parts. Private industry also uses cleaners and degreasers for surface preparation of various metals. Growing environmental and worker safety concerns have brought attention to these solvents and cleaners, most of which are classified as toxic. Tightening government regulations have already excluded the use of some chemicals, and restrict the use of various halogenated hydrocarbons because of their atmospheric-ozone depleting effects, as well as their cancer-related risks. As a result, a program was established to develop an efficient, easily accessible, electronic solvent utilization handbook. This is being accomplished by: (1) identifying solvents (alternatives) that are not currently restricted by government regulations for use DOE-DP facilities, and private industry, (2) evaluating their cleaning performance, (3) evaluating their corrosivity, (4) evaluating their air emissions, (5) evaluating the possibility of recycling or recovering all or portions of the alternative degreasers, (6) testing substitute solvents compatibility with non-metallic materials, (7) inputting all of the data gathered (including previous biodegradability information) into a database, and (8) developing a methodology for efficient, widespread access to the data base information system.

  1. The separation of flavonoids from Pongamia pinnata using combination columns in high-speed counter-current chromatography with a three-phase solvent system.

    PubMed

    Yin, Hao; Zhang, Si; Long, Lijuan; Yin, Hang; Tian, Xinpeng; Luo, Xiongming; Nan, Haihan; He, Sha

    2013-11-01

    The mangrove plant Pongamia pinnata (Leguminosae) is well known as a plant pesticide. Previous studies have indicated that the flavonoids are responsible of the biological activities of the plant. A new high-speed counter-current chromatography (HSCCC) method for the separation of three flavonoids, karanjin (1), pinnatin (2), and pongaflavone (3), from P. pinnata was developed in the present study. The lower and intermediate phase (LP and IP) of a new three-phase solvent system, n-hexane-acetonitrile-dichloromethane-water, at a volume ratio of 5:5:1:5, were used as the stationary phases, while the upper phase (UP) was used as the mobile phase, and the volume ratio between the stationary phases in the CCC column could be tuned by varying the initial pumped volume ratio of the stationary phases. The CCC columns containing all three phases of the solvent system were considered combination columns. According to the theories of combination column, it is possible to optimize the retention time of the target compounds by varying the volume ratio of the stationary phases in the HSCCC combination columns, as well as the suitable volume ratios of the stationary phases for the separation of the target compounds were predicted from the partition coefficients of the compounds in the three-phase solvent system. Then, three HSCCC separations using the combination columns with initial pumped LP:IP volume ratios of 1:0, 0.9:0.1, and 0.7:0.3 were performed separately based on the prediction. Three target compounds were prepared with high purity when the initial pumped volume ratio of the stationary phases was 0.9:0.1. The baseline separation of compounds 2 and 3 was achieved on the combination column with an initial pumped volume ratio of 0.7:0.3. Furthermore, the three experiments clearly demonstrated that the retentions and resolutions of the target compounds increased with an increasing volume ratio of IP, which is consistent with the prediction for the retention times for the

  2. The separation of flavonoids from Pongamia pinnata using combination columns in high-speed counter-current chromatography with a three-phase solvent system.

    PubMed

    Yin, Hao; Zhang, Si; Long, Lijuan; Yin, Hang; Tian, Xinpeng; Luo, Xiongming; Nan, Haihan; He, Sha

    2013-11-01

    The mangrove plant Pongamia pinnata (Leguminosae) is well known as a plant pesticide. Previous studies have indicated that the flavonoids are responsible of the biological activities of the plant. A new high-speed counter-current chromatography (HSCCC) method for the separation of three flavonoids, karanjin (1), pinnatin (2), and pongaflavone (3), from P. pinnata was developed in the present study. The lower and intermediate phase (LP and IP) of a new three-phase solvent system, n-hexane-acetonitrile-dichloromethane-water, at a volume ratio of 5:5:1:5, were used as the stationary phases, while the upper phase (UP) was used as the mobile phase, and the volume ratio between the stationary phases in the CCC column could be tuned by varying the initial pumped volume ratio of the stationary phases. The CCC columns containing all three phases of the solvent system were considered combination columns. According to the theories of combination column, it is possible to optimize the retention time of the target compounds by varying the volume ratio of the stationary phases in the HSCCC combination columns, as well as the suitable volume ratios of the stationary phases for the separation of the target compounds were predicted from the partition coefficients of the compounds in the three-phase solvent system. Then, three HSCCC separations using the combination columns with initial pumped LP:IP volume ratios of 1:0, 0.9:0.1, and 0.7:0.3 were performed separately based on the prediction. Three target compounds were prepared with high purity when the initial pumped volume ratio of the stationary phases was 0.9:0.1. The baseline separation of compounds 2 and 3 was achieved on the combination column with an initial pumped volume ratio of 0.7:0.3. Furthermore, the three experiments clearly demonstrated that the retentions and resolutions of the target compounds increased with an increasing volume ratio of IP, which is consistent with the prediction for the retention times for the

  3. Solvent vapor recovery by pressure swing adsorption. 3: Comparison of simulation with experiment for the butane-activated carbon system

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, J.; Holland, C.E.; Ritter, J.A.

    1999-06-01

    A fully predictive (no adjustable parameters), nonisothermal, multicomponent mathematical model was developed and used to simulate a pressure swing adsorption (PSA) process designed for the separation and recovery of concentrated butane vapor from nitrogen using BAX activated carbon. Nearly quantitative agreement with experiment was realized with this model over a wide range of process conditions, and for both the transient and periodic state process dynamics and the periodic state process performance. The model also verified some unique characteristics of this PSA process, and it revealed some of the subtleties associated with accurately simulating a PSA-solvent vapor recovery (SVR) process. These subtleties included the need to account for the adsorbate heat capacity and the temperature dependence of the gas-phase physical properties. No PSA models in the literature have included both of these features, which were critical to the accurate prediction of the heat effects in this PSA-SVR process.

  4. Analytical validation applied to simultaneous determination of solvents dichloromethane (DCM), methyl isobutyl ketone (MIBK), tetrahydrofuran (THF) and toluene (TOL) in urine by headspace extraction and injection on chromatographic system with a flame ionization detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muna, E. D. M.; Pereira, R. P.

    2016-07-01

    The determination of the volatile organic solvents dichloromethane (DCM), methyl isobutyl ketone (MIBK), tetrahydrofuran (THF) and toluene (TOL) is applied on toxicological monitoring of employees in various industrial activities. The gas chromatography technique with flame ionization detector and headspace injection system has been applied. The analytical procedure developed allows the simultaneous determination of the above-mentioned solvents and the accuracy of the method was tested following the INMETRO guidelines through the DOQ-CGRE 008 Rev.04-July/2011.

  5. The use of solvent extractions and solubility theory to discern hydrocarbon associations in coal, with application to the coal-supercritical CO2 system

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kolak, Jonathan J.; Burruss, Robert A.

    2014-01-01

    Samples of three high volatile bituminous coals were subjected to parallel sets of extractions involving solvents dichloromethane (DCM), carbon disulfide (CS2), and supercritical carbon dioxide (CO2) (40 °C, 100 bar) to study processes affecting coal–solvent interactions. Recoveries of perdeuterated surrogate compounds, n-hexadecane-d34 and four polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), added as a spike prior to extraction, provided further insight into these processes. Soxhlet-DCM and Soxhlet-CS2 extractions yielded similar amounts of extractable organic matter (EOM) and distributions of individual hydrocarbons. Supercritical CO2 extractions (40 °C, 100 bar) yielded approximately an order of magnitude less EOM. Hydrocarbon distributions in supercritical CO2 extracts generally mimicked distributions from the other solvent extracts, albeit at lower concentrations. This disparity increased with increasing molecular weight of target hydrocarbons. Five- and six-ring ring PAHs generally were not detected and no asphaltenes were recovered in supercritical CO2 extractions conducted at 40 °C and 100 bar. Supercritical CO2 extraction at elevated temperature (115 °C) enhanced recovery of four-ring and five-ring PAHs, dibenzothiophene (DBT), and perdeuterated PAH surrogate compounds. These results are only partially explained through comparison with previous measurements of hydrocarbon solubility in supercritical CO2. Similarly, an evaluation of extraction results in conjunction with solubility theory (Hildebrand and Hansen solubility parameters) does not fully account for the hydrocarbon distributions observed among the solvent extracts. Coal composition (maceral content) did not appear to affect surrogate recovery during CS2 and DCM extractions but might affect supercritical CO2 extractions, which revealed substantive uptake (partitioning) of PAH surrogates into the coal samples. This uptake was greatest in the sample (IN-1) with the highest vitrinite content. These

  6. Three-phase solvent systems for the comprehensive separation of a wide variety of compounds from Dicranostigma leptopodum by high-speed counter-current chromatography.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yanjuan; Chen, Xiaofen; Liu, JunXi; Di, Duolong

    2015-06-01

    A three-phase solvent system was efficiently applied for high-speed counter-current chromatography to separate secondary metabolites with a wide range of hydrophobicity in Dicranostigma leptopodum. The three-phase solvent system of n-hexane/methyl tert-butyl ether/acetonitrile/0.5% triethylamine (2:2:3:2, v/v/v/v) was selected for high-speed counter-current chromatography separation. The separation was initiated by filling the column with a mixture of intermediate phase and lower phase as a stationary phase followed by elution with upper phase to separate the hydrophobic compounds. Then the mobile phase was switched to the intermediate phase to elute the moderately hydrophobic compounds, and finally the polar compounds still retained in the column were fractionated by eluting the column with the lower phase. In this research, 12 peaks were eluted out in one-step operation within 110 min, among them, eight compounds with acceptable purity were obtained and identified. The purities of β-sitosterol, protopine, allocryptopine, isocorydione, isocorydine, coptisine, berberrubine, and berberine were 94.7, 96.5, 97.9, 86.6, 98.9, 97.6, 95.7, and 92.8%, respectively.

  7. Capturing CO2 into the precipitate of a phase-changing solvent after absorption.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Shudong; Tao, Mengna; Liu, Qing; Ning, Liqi; He, Yi; Shi, Yao

    2014-01-01

    The major drawback of aqueous alkanolamine-based CO2 capture processes is the high energy penalty for regeneration. To overcome this weakness, we studied the absorption of CO2 with amines dissolved in nonaqueous solvents. It was observed that triethylenetetramine (TETA) dissolved in ethanol produces a solid precipitate after absorption, which can then be easily separated and regenerated. As a comparison, a TETA/water solution does not form any precipitate after absorbing CO2. The TETA/ethanol solution offers several advantages for CO2 capture in absorption rate, absorption capacity, and absorbent regenerability. Both the rate and capacity of CO2 absorption with the TETA/ethanol solution were significantly higher than with a TETA/water solution, because ethanol not only promotes the solubility of CO2 in the liquid phase but also facilitates the chemical reaction between TETA and CO2. This approach was able to capture 81.8% of the absorbed CO2 in the solid phase as TETA-carbamate. In addition, results show that the decomposition of TETA-carbamate can be completed at 90 °C. Moreover, the cycling absorption/regeneration runs of the TETA/ethanol solution display a relatively stable absorption performance.

  8. The Ideal Solvent for Paper Chromatography of Food Dyes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Markow, Peter G.

    1988-01-01

    Uses paper chromatography with food dyes to provide a simple and inexpensive basis for teaching chromatography. Provides experimental methodology and tabled results. Includes a solvent system comparison (Rf) for seven dyes and twenty-two solvents. (MVL)

  9. Enzymatically catalyzed synthesis of anti-blooming agent 1,3-dibehenoyl-2-oleoyl glycerol in a solvent-free system: optimization by response surface methodology.

    PubMed

    Meng, Zong; Geng, Wen-Xin; Li, Jin-Wei; Yang, Zhao-Qi; Jiang, Jiang; Wang, Xing-Guo; Liu, Yuan-Fa

    2013-11-13

    Products rich in 1,3-dibehenoyl-2-oleoyl glycerol (BOB) triglyceride (TAG) were produced by enzymatic interesterification of high oleic acid sunflower oil (HOSO) and behenic acid methyl ester (BME) by 1,3-regiospecific lipase Lipozyme RM IM in a solvent-free system. The impact factors of enzyme load, substrate molar ratio of BME to HOSO (BME/HOSO), reaction time, reaction temperature, and pre-equilibration water activity of the enzyme on BOB content and BME conversions were investigated by single-factor experiments and then optimized using the response surface methodology (RSM). The optimum conditions were as follows: reaction temperature, 72 °C; reaction time, 7.99 h; substrate molar ratio, 2.5:1; enzyme load, 10%; and pre-equilibration water activities of the enzyme, 0.28. The results from the experiments conducted according to the predicted optimal conditions were as follows: the content of BOB was 32.76%, and the conversion of BME was 65.16%. The experimental values agreed with the predicted values, which verified the sufficiency of the quadratic regression models. After purification under the optimal short-range molecular distillation and two-step solvent fractionation, the content of BOB in the target product can reach 77.14%, indicating the great potential for industrial production of the anti-blooming agent. PMID:24147905

  10. Development and mechanical characterization of solvent-cast polymeric films as potential drug delivery systems to mucosal surfaces.

    PubMed

    Boateng, Joshua S; Stevens, Howard N E; Eccleston, Gillian M; Auffret, Anthony D; Humphrey, Michael J; Matthews, Kerr H

    2009-08-01

    Solvent-cast films from three polymers, carboxymethylcellulose (CMC), sodium alginate (SA), and xanthan gum, were prepared by drying the polymeric gels in air. Three methods, (a) passive hydration, (b) vortex hydration with heating, and (c) cold hydration, were investigated to determine the most effective means of preparing gels for each of the three polymers. Different drying conditions [relative humidity - RH (6-52%) and temperature (3-45 degrees C)] were investigated to determine the effect of drying rate on the films prepared by drying the polymeric gels. The tensile properties of the CMC films were determined by stretching dumbbell-shaped films to breaking point, using a Texture Analyser. Glycerol was used as a plasticizer, and its effects on the drying rate, physical appearance, and tensile properties of the resulting films were investigated. Vortex hydration with heating was the method of choice for preparing gels of SA and CMC, and cold hydration for xanthan gels. Drying rates increased with low glycerol content, high temperature, and low relative humidity. The residual water content of the films increased with increasing glycerol content and high relative humidity and decreased at higher temperatures. Generally, temperature affected the drying rate to a greater extent than relative humidity. Glycerol significantly affected the toughness (increased) and rigidity (decreased) of CMC films. CMC films prepared at 45 degrees C and 6% RH produced suitable films at the fastest rate while films containing equal quantities of glycerol and CMC possessed an ideal balance between flexibility and rigidity. PMID:19365780

  11. Liquid phase esterification of acetic acid over WO3 promoted β-SiC in a solvent free system.

    PubMed

    Mishra, Gopa; Behera, Gobinda C; Singh, S K; Parida, K M

    2012-12-21

    A series of tungstate promoted β-SiC catalysts was synthesized by a wetness impregnation method. The as synthesized catalysts were unambiguously characterized by XRD, Raman, FTIR, XPS, UV-Vis DRS, TEM, BET surface areas and FE-SEM, and simultaneously the total amount of the acidity of the catalysts was estimated by NH(3)-TPD. The catalytic activities of the synthesized materials were tested in the liquid phase esterification of acetic acid with n-butanol in a solvent free medium. The reaction parameters were optimized to a temperature of 120 °C, molar ratio of butanol and acetic acid of 1:2 and a reaction time of 6 h after performing a number of experiments. Under the optimum conditions, the catalytic esterification revealed a significant effect of 88% conversion with 100% selectivity to butyl acetate in 20 wt% WO(3)/β-SiC. This is the first report on the effective utilization of β-SiC as a catalyst support for liquid phase esterification of acetic acid.

  12. Design and synthesis of two luminescent Zn(II)-based coordination polymers with different structures regulated by different solvent system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Wei-Ping; Wen, Gui-Lin; Liao, Yi; Wang, Jun; Lu, Lu; Wu, Yu; Xie, Bin

    2016-08-01

    Two new coordination polymers (CPs) [Zn(HL)(H2O)]n (1) and [Zn3(L)2(H2O)2]n·(H2O)n (2), based on a multifunctional ligand combined carboxylate groups and a nitrogen donor group 5-(6-carboxypyridin-2-yl)isophthalic acid (H3L), have been synthesized under different solvent media and fully characterized by powder X-ray diffraction (PXRD), infrared (IR) spectra, elemental analyses (EA) and thermogravimetric analyses (TGA). Single-crystal X-ray diffraction analysis reveals that 1 shows 1D dimeric chain structure, while 2 gives a 3D dense packing framework. Topology analysis illustrates that 2 can be simplified as a 3-nodal net (4, 5, 6-connected net) with the point symbol of {44·62}{46·64}2{48·66·8}. In addition, solid state luminescent properties of two complexes have also been studied in detail, which may act as the potential optical materials.

  13. Solvent-free synthesis

    EPA Science Inventory

    This chapter gives a brief introduction about solvent-free reactions whose importance can be gauged by the increasing number of publications every year during the last decade. The mechanistic aspects of the reactions under solvent-free conditions have been highlighted. Our observ...

  14. SOLVENT EXTRACTION OF NEPTUNIUM

    DOEpatents

    Butler, J.P.

    1958-08-12

    A process is described for the recovery of neptuniunn from dissolver solutions by solvent extraction. The neptunium containing solution should be about 5N, in nitric acid.and about 0.1 M in ferrous ion. The organic extracting agent is tributyl phosphate, and the neptuniunn is recovered from the organic solvent phase by washing with water.

  15. SOLVENT EXTRACTION PROCESS

    DOEpatents

    Jonke, A.A.

    1957-10-01

    In improved solvent extraction process is described for the extraction of metal values from highly dilute aqueous solutions. The process comprises contacting an aqueous solution with an organic substantially water-immiscible solvent, whereby metal values are taken up by a solvent extract phase; scrubbing the solvent extract phase with an aqueous scrubbing solution; separating an aqueous solution from the scrubbed solvent extract phase; and contacting the scrubbed solvent phase with an aqueous medium whereby the extracted metal values are removed from the solvent phase and taken up by said medium to form a strip solution containing said metal values, the aqueous scrubbing solution being a mixture of strip solution and an aqueous solution which contains mineral acids anions and is free of the metal values. The process is particularly effective for purifying uranium, where one starts with impure aqueous uranyl nitrate, extracts with tributyl phosphate dissolved in carbon tetrachloride, scrubs with aqueous nitric acid and employs water to strip the uranium from the scrubbed organic phase.

  16. Dinuclear dysprosium SMMs bridged by a neutral bipyrimidine ligand: two crystal systems that depend on different lattice solvents lead to a distinct slow relaxation behaviour.

    PubMed

    Sun, Wen-Bin; Yan, Bing; Jia, Li-Hui; Wang, Bing-Wu; Yang, Qian; Cheng, Xin; Li, Hong-Feng; Chen, Peng; Wang, Zhe-Ming; Gao, Song

    2016-06-01

    Two dinuclear dysprosium complexes with the Dy(iii) ions bridged by the neutral bipyrimidine (BPYM) ligand were synthesized and magnetically characterized. They crystallized in a monoclinic and triclinic crystal system, respectively, with almost the same structural core, only differing in the lattice solvent molecules. Alternating current (ac) susceptibility measurements revealed that they exhibit significant slow relaxation of magnetization until 25 K in the absence of a dc field. The single and double relaxation processes were assigned to one and two types of Dy(iii) environments in the two dimmers, respectively, with barriers of 266 and 345 K under zero field conditions. The magnetic hysteresis loops of 1 and 2 were both observed up to 2.5 K. PMID:27143486

  17. Role of solvent permittivity in estimation of electrolyte activity coefficients for systems with ion pairing on the basis of the mean spherical approximation. Technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Tikanen, A.C.; Fawcett, R.R.

    1996-10-01

    Mean ionic activity coefficient for aqueous solutions of CdCl2, CuCl2, MgCl2, Na2SO4 and CdSO4, systems for which dielectric relaxation data have recently been obtained, can be estimated accurately on the basis of a modified version of the mean spherical approximation (MSA) for electrolyte solutions with consideration of ion pairing. The modification makes use of the actual solution permittivity rather than the permittivity of the pure solvent. Reasonable ion pairing association constants, Kas, have been determined by fitting the theoretically determined mean ionic activity coefficients to experimentally measured values in the range of concentration for which the dielectric permittivity data exist using one additional adjustable parameter, namely, the restricted diameter for all species involved.

  18. Functionalization of non-activated C-H bonds of alkanes: an effective and recyclable catalytic system based on fluorinated silver catalysts and solvents.

    PubMed

    Fuentes, M Ángeles; Muñoz, Bianca K; Jacob, Kane; Vendier, Laure; Caballero, Ana; Etienne, Michel; Pérez, Pedro J

    2013-01-21

    The complexes F(n)-Tp(4Bo,3Rf)Ag(L) (F(n)-Tp(4Bo,3Rf)=a perfluorinated hydrotris(indazolyl) borate ligand; L=acetone or tetrahydrofuran) efficiently catalyze the functionalization of non-activated alkanes such as hexane, 2,3-dimethylbutane, or 2-methylpentane by insertion of CHCO(2)Et units (from N(2)CHCO(2)Et, ethyl diazoacetate, EDA) into their C-H bonds. The reactions are quantitative (EDA-based), with no byproducts derived from diazo coupling being formed. In the case of hexane, the functionalization of the methyl C-H bonds has been achieved with the highest regioselectivity known to date with this diazo compound. This catalytic system also operates under biphasic conditions by using fluorous solvents such as Fomblin or perfluorophenanthrene. Several cycles of catalyst recovery and reuse have been performed, with identical chemo- and regioselectivities.

  19. Dinuclear dysprosium SMMs bridged by a neutral bipyrimidine ligand: two crystal systems that depend on different lattice solvents lead to a distinct slow relaxation behaviour.

    PubMed

    Sun, Wen-Bin; Yan, Bing; Jia, Li-Hui; Wang, Bing-Wu; Yang, Qian; Cheng, Xin; Li, Hong-Feng; Chen, Peng; Wang, Zhe-Ming; Gao, Song

    2016-06-01

    Two dinuclear dysprosium complexes with the Dy(iii) ions bridged by the neutral bipyrimidine (BPYM) ligand were synthesized and magnetically characterized. They crystallized in a monoclinic and triclinic crystal system, respectively, with almost the same structural core, only differing in the lattice solvent molecules. Alternating current (ac) susceptibility measurements revealed that they exhibit significant slow relaxation of magnetization until 25 K in the absence of a dc field. The single and double relaxation processes were assigned to one and two types of Dy(iii) environments in the two dimmers, respectively, with barriers of 266 and 345 K under zero field conditions. The magnetic hysteresis loops of 1 and 2 were both observed up to 2.5 K.

  20. Solvent Design Methodology to Recycle Chamber Parts and Recover Platinum by Highly Selective Wet Treatment for Ni-Pt Sputtering System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Futase, Takuya; Sabae, Yoshichika; Tanimoto, Hisanori

    2013-11-01

    In this paper, we describe a methodology of solvent design for selective removal of nickel-platinum (Ni-Pt) alloy film deposited on the surface of stainless-steel (SUS) chamber parts, based on electrochemistry. Several removal treatments were compared, such as sandblast-based physical treatment, pre sprayed aluminum lift-off treatment, and a newly proposed dilute-acid treatment. When using dilute acid with a redox potential between 0.75-0.85 V for Ni-Pt removal, no obvious damage was observed on the chamber parts after the treatment. The recycled parts were adequately worked in the sputtering chamber for mass production without causing the particle problem. Furthermore, we acquired losses of only 1.1% for platinum recovery efficiency in the Ni-Pt sputtering system.

  1. Remediating pesticide contaminated soils using solvent extraction

    SciTech Connect

    Sahle-Demessie, E.; Meckes, M.C.; Richardson, T.L.

    1996-12-31

    Bench-scale solvent extraction studies were performed on soil samples obtained from a Superfund site contaminated with high levels of p,p{prime}-DDT, p,p{prime}-DDE and toxaphene. The effectiveness of the solvent extraction process was assessed using methanol and 2-propanol as solvents over a wide range of operating conditions. It was demonstrated that a six-stage methanol extraction using a solvent-to-soil ratio of 1.6 can decrease pesticide levels in the soil by more than 99% and reduce the volume of material requiring further treatment by 25 times or more. The high solubility of the pesticides in methanol resulted in rapid extraction rates, with the system reaching quasi-equilibrium state in 30 minutes. The extraction efficiency was influenced by the number of extraction stages, the solvent-to-soil ratio, and the soil moisture content. Various methods were investigated to regenerate and recycle the solvent. Evaporation and solvent stripping are low cost and reliable methods for removing high pesticide concentrations from the solvent. For low concentrations, GAC adsorption may be used. Precipitating and filtering pesticides by adding water to the methanol/pesticide solution was not successful when tested with soil extracts. 26 refs., 10 figs., 6 tabs.

  2. Solvent alternatives guide

    SciTech Connect

    Elion, J.M.; Monroe, K.R.; Hill, E.A.

    1996-06-01

    It is no longer legal to manufacture or import chlorofluorocarbon 113 or methyl chloroform solvents, and companies that currently clean their parts with either material are now required to implement environmentally safe substitutes. To help find alternative methods, Research Triangle Institute`s Surface Cleaning Technology Program has designed a Solvent Alternatives Guide (SAGE), an online tool that enables access to practical information and recommendations for acceptable solvents. Developed in partnership with the US Environmental Protection Agency, SAGE is available free of charge on the Internet`s World Wide Web.

  3. Vanadium Oxide Electrochemical Capacitors: An Investigation into Aqueous Capacitive Degradation, Alternate Electrolyte-Solvent Systems, Whole Cell Performance and Graphene Oxide Composite Electrodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Engstrom, Allison Michelle

    Vanadium oxide has emerged as a potential electrochemical capacitor material due to its attractive pseudocapacitive performance; however, it is known to suffer from capacitive degradation upon sustained cycling. In this work, the electrochemical cycling behavior of anodically electrodeposited vanadium oxide films with various surface treatments in aqueous solutions is investigated at different pH. Quantitative compositional analysis and morphological studies provide additional insight into the mechanism responsible for capacitive degradation. Furthermore, the capacitance and impedance behavior of vanadium oxide electrochemical capacitor electrodes is compared for both aqueous and nonaqueous electrolyte-solvent systems. Alkali metal chloride and bromide electrolytes were studied in aqueous systems, and nonaqueous systems containing alkali metal bromides were studied in polar aprotic propylene carbonate (PC) or dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) solvents. The preferred aqueous and nonaqueous systems identified in the half-cell studies were utilized in symmetric vanadium oxide whole-cells. An aqueous system utilizing a 3.0 M NaCl electrolyte at pH 3.0 exhibited an excellent 96% capacitance retention over 3000 cycles at 10 mV s-1. An equivalent system tested at 500 mV s-1 displayed an increase in capacitance over the first several thousands of cycles, and eventually stabilized over 50,000 cycles. Electrodes cycled in nonaqueous 1.0 M LiBr in PC exhibited mostly non-capacitive charge-storage, and electrodes cycled in LiBr-DMSO exhibited a gradual capacitive decay over 10,000 cycles at 500 mV s-1. Morphological and compositional analyses, as well as electrochemical impedance modeling, provide additional insight into the cause of the cycing behavior. Lastly, reduced graphene oxide and vanadium oxide nanowire composites have been successfully synthesized using electrophoretic deposition for electrochemical capacitor electrodes. The composite material was found to perform with a

  4. CHLORINATED SOLVENT PLUME CONTROL

    EPA Science Inventory

    This lecture will cover recent success in controlling and assessing the treatment of shallow ground water plumes of chlorinated solvents, other halogenated organic compounds, and methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE).

  5. SOLVENT WASTE REDUCTION ALTERNATIVES

    EPA Science Inventory

    This publication contains edited versions of presentations on this subject made at five Technology Transfer seminars in 1988. Chapters are included on land disposal regulations and requirements; waste solvent disposal alternatives from various industries such as process equipment...

  6. Supercritical solvent coal extraction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Compton, L. E. (Inventor)

    1984-01-01

    Yields of soluble organic extract are increased up to about 50% by the supercritical extraction of particulate coal at a temperature below the polymerization temperature for coal extract fragments (450 C.) and a pressure from 500 psig to 5,000 psig by the conjoint use of a solvent mixture containing a low volatility, high critical temperature coal dissolution catalyst such as phenanthrene and a high volatility, low critical temperature solvent such as toluene.

  7. SOLVENT EXTRACTION OF RUTHENIUM

    DOEpatents

    Hyman, H.H.; Leader, G.R.

    1959-07-14

    The separation of rathenium from aqueous solutions by solvent extraction is described. According to the invention, a nitrite selected from the group consisting of alkali nitrite and alkaline earth nitrite in an equimolecular quantity with regard to the quantity of rathenium present is added to an aqueous solution containing ruthenium tetrantrate to form a ruthenium complex. Adding an organic solvent such as ethyl ether to the resulting mixture selectively extracts the rathenium complex.

  8. Development of a microfluidic-chip system for liquid-phase microextraction based on two immiscible organic solvents for the extraction and preconcentration of some hormonal drugs.

    PubMed

    Asl, Yousef Abdossalami; Yamini, Yadollah; Seidi, Shahram

    2016-11-01

    In the present study, for the first time, an on-chip liquid phase microextraction (LPME) coupled with high performance liquid chromatography was introduced for the analysis of levonorgestrel (Levo), dydrogesterone (Dydo) and medroxyprogesterone (Medo) as the model analytes in biological samples. The chip-based LPME set-up was composed of two polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) plates with microfabricated channels and a microporous membrane sandwiched between them to separate the sample solution and acceptor phase. These channels were used as a flow path for the sample solution and a thin compartment for the acceptor phase, respectively. In this system, two immiscible organic solvents were used as supported liquid membrane (SLM) and acceptor phase, respectively. During extraction, the model analytes in the sample solution were transported through the SLM (n-dodecane) into the acceptor organic solvent (methanol). The new set-up provided effective and reproducible extractions using low volumes of the sample solution. The effective parameters on the extraction efficiency of the model analytes were optimized using one variable at a time method. Under the optimized conditions, the new set-up provided good linearity in the range of 5.0-500µgL(-1) for the model analytes with the coefficients of determination (r(2)) higher than 0.9909. The relative standard deviations (RSDs%) and limits of detection (LODs) values were less than 6.5% (n=5) and 5.0µgL(-1), respectively. The preconcentration factors (PFs) were obtained using 1.0mL of the sample solution and 20.0µL of the acceptor solution higher than 19.9-fold. Finally, the proposed method was successfully applied for the extraction and determination of the model analytes in urine samples.

  9. Development of a microfluidic-chip system for liquid-phase microextraction based on two immiscible organic solvents for the extraction and preconcentration of some hormonal drugs.

    PubMed

    Asl, Yousef Abdossalami; Yamini, Yadollah; Seidi, Shahram

    2016-11-01

    In the present study, for the first time, an on-chip liquid phase microextraction (LPME) coupled with high performance liquid chromatography was introduced for the analysis of levonorgestrel (Levo), dydrogesterone (Dydo) and medroxyprogesterone (Medo) as the model analytes in biological samples. The chip-based LPME set-up was composed of two polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) plates with microfabricated channels and a microporous membrane sandwiched between them to separate the sample solution and acceptor phase. These channels were used as a flow path for the sample solution and a thin compartment for the acceptor phase, respectively. In this system, two immiscible organic solvents were used as supported liquid membrane (SLM) and acceptor phase, respectively. During extraction, the model analytes in the sample solution were transported through the SLM (n-dodecane) into the acceptor organic solvent (methanol). The new set-up provided effective and reproducible extractions using low volumes of the sample solution. The effective parameters on the extraction efficiency of the model analytes were optimized using one variable at a time method. Under the optimized conditions, the new set-up provided good linearity in the range of 5.0-500µgL(-1) for the model analytes with the coefficients of determination (r(2)) higher than 0.9909. The relative standard deviations (RSDs%) and limits of detection (LODs) values were less than 6.5% (n=5) and 5.0µgL(-1), respectively. The preconcentration factors (PFs) were obtained using 1.0mL of the sample solution and 20.0µL of the acceptor solution higher than 19.9-fold. Finally, the proposed method was successfully applied for the extraction and determination of the model analytes in urine samples. PMID:27591655

  10. Dual-component system dimethyl sulfoxide/LiCl as a solvent and catalyst for homogeneous ring-opening grafted polymerization of ε-caprolactone onto xylan.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xue-Qin; Chen, Ming-Jie; Liu, Chuan-Fu; Sun, Run-Cang

    2014-01-22

    The preparation of xylan-graft-poly(ε-caprolactone) (xylan-g-PCL) copolymers was investigated by homogeneous ring-opening polymerization (ROP) in a dual-component system containing Lewis base LiCl and strong polar aprotic solvent dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO). DMSO/LiCl acted as solvent, base, and catalyst for the ROP reaction. The effects of the parameters, including the reaction temperature, molar ratio of ε-caprolactone (ε-CL) to anhydroxylose units (AXU) in xylan, and reaction time, on the degree of substitution (DS) and weight percent of PCL side chain (WPCL) were investigated. The results showed that xylan-g-PCL copolymers with low DS in the range of 0.03-0.39 were obtained under the given conditions. The Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), (1)H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), (13)C NMR, (1)H-(1)H correlation spectroscopy (COSY), and (1)H-(13)C correlation two-dimensional (2D) NMR [heteronuclear single-quantum coherence (HSQC)] characterization provided more evidence of the attachment of side chains onto xylan. Only one ε-CL was confirmed to be attached onto xylan with each side chain. Integration of resonances assigned to the substituted C2 and C3 in the HSQC spectrum also indicated 69.23 and 30.77% of PCL side chains attached to AXU at C3 and C2 positions, respectively. Although the attachment of PCL onto xylan led to the decreased thermal stability of xylan, the loss of unrecovered xylan fractions with low molecular weight because of the high solubility of xylan in DMSO/LiCl resulted in the increased thermal stability of the samples. This kind of xylan derivative has potential application in environmentally friendly and biodegradable materials considering the good biodegradability of xylan and PCL. PMID:24387806

  11. Cleaning without chlorinated solvents

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, L.M.; Simandl, R.F.

    1994-12-31

    Because of health and environmental concerns, many regulations have been passed in recent years regarding the use of chlorinated solvents. The Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant has had an active program to find alternatives for these solvents used in cleaning applications for the past 7 years. During this time frame, the quantity of solvents purchased has been reduced by 92%. The program has been a twofold effort. Vapor degreasers used in batch cleaning-operations have been replaced by ultrasonic cleaning with aqueous detergent, and other organic solvents have been identified for use in hand-wiping or specialty operations. In order to qualify these alternatives for use, experimentation was conducted on cleaning ability as well as effects on subsequent operations such as welding, painting and bonding. Cleaning ability was determined using techniques such as X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR) which are capable of examining monolayer levels of contamination on a surface. Solvents have been identified for removal of rust preventative oils, lapping oils, machining coolants, lubricants, greases, and mold releases. Solvents have also been evaluated for cleaning urethane foam spray guns, swelling of urethanes and swelling of epoxies.

  12. Cleaning without chlorinated solvents

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, L. M.; Simandl, R. F.

    1995-01-01

    Because of health and environmental concerns, many regulations have been passed in recent years regarding the use of chlorinated solvents. The Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant has had an active program to find alternatives for these solvents used in cleaning applications for the past 7 years. During this time frame, the quantity of solvents purchased has been reduced by 92 percent. The program has been a twofold effort. Vapor degreasers used in batch cleaning operations have been replaced by ultrasonic cleaning with aqueous detergent, and other organic solvents have been identified for use in hand-wiping or specialty operations. In order to qualify these alternatives for use, experimentation was conducted on cleaning ability as well as effects on subsequent operations such as welding, painting, and bonding. Cleaning ability was determined using techniques such as x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) which are capable of examining monolayer levels of contamination on a surface. Solvents have been identified for removal of rust preventative oils, lapping oils, machining coolants, lubricants, greases, and mold releases. Solvents have also been evaluated for cleaning urethane foam spray guns, swelling of urethanes, and swelling of epoxies.

  13. Neurotoxicity of solvents.

    PubMed

    Sainio, Markku Alarik

    2015-01-01

    Worldwide, several hundred million tons of organic solvents are used annually in household, industry, and other occupational settings. Millions of workers are regularly exposed to organic solvents considered neurotoxic. Acute neurotoxicity due to high exposure of solvent is usually evident, but the nature of long-term effects, such as chronic solvent encephalopathy (CSE), has raised uncertainty even among experts. Earlier studies were criticized for their methodology, mainly epidemiologic studies or investigations of exposed groups with many possible confounders and inadequate exposure assessment. However, an increasing number of studies have been performed since, also on workers with defined CSE based on differential diagnostics. During the last decade, evidence has emerged to enable identification of CSE, a necessity for the early recognition and prevention of progression of dysfunction and disability. Selected chemicals are presented here due to their widespread use, neurotoxic potential, and ability to cause solvent encephalopathy. Constant introduction of new chemicals may introduce new hazardous chemicals or known chemicals may reveal new health effects. It is important to keep an open mind for new findings of solvent-related neurobehavioral effects. PMID:26563785

  14. Diffusion in mixed solvents - On the viscosity question

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carapellucci, P. A.

    1975-01-01

    Linear plots of reaction rate vs reciprocal of solvent viscosity are generally used as the classifying criteria for diffusion controlled reactions in fluid solutions and to determine reaction mechanisms in mixed hydroxylic solvents like glycerol and water. This paper presents data which shows that the above-mentioned criteria are insufficient in many cases where nonideal mixed solvent systems are used to increase solvent viscosity. Data correlations suggest that the excess functions determine the variation in reaction rate constants. Kinetic parameters are presented for sucrose-water and methanol-water solvent systems for a reaction involving Fe(CN)6 and zinc uroporphyrin.

  15. Reduction of solvent emissions from vapor degreasing

    SciTech Connect

    Buresh, P.

    1989-12-31

    Hutchinson Tehnology, Inc. (HTI) implemented a number of low cost, low technology procedures to reduce emissions and prevent solvent loss from two open-top freon (CFC-113) vapor degreasers (Branson No. 1 and No. 2). HTI is a computer components manufacturer that uses freon vapor degreasing systems to remove fluxes and other residues remaining on the flexible printed circuits from the soldering process. With relatively minor changes in operation, solvent emissions were reduced by an average of 2.8 gallons per day (GDP) for both degreasers combined. It is anticipated that HTI will follow through with installation of an automatic cover, which can result in further solvent emissions reduction.

  16. Organic Solvent Tolerant Lipases and Applications

    PubMed Central

    Kanwar, Shamsher S.

    2014-01-01

    Lipases are a group of enzymes naturally endowed with the property of performing reactions in aqueous as well as organic solvents. The esterification reactions using lipase(s) could be performed in water-restricted organic media as organic solvent(s) not only improve(s) the solubility of substrate and reactant in reaction mixture but also permit(s) the reaction in the reverse direction, and often it is easy to recover the product in organic phase in two-phase equilibrium systems. The use of organic solvent tolerant lipase in organic media has exhibited many advantages: increased activity and stability, regiospecificity and stereoselectivity, higher solubility of substrate, ease of products recovery, and ability to shift the reaction equilibrium toward synthetic direction. Therefore the search for organic solvent tolerant enzymes has been an extensive area of research. A variety of fatty acid esters are now being produced commercially using immobilized lipase in nonaqueous solvents. This review describes the organic tolerance and industrial application of lipases. The main emphasis is to study the nature of organic solvent tolerant lipases. Also, the potential industrial applications that make lipases the biocatalysts of choice for the present and future have been presented. PMID:24672342

  17. DeltaG(CH2) as solvent descriptor in polymer/polymer aqueous two-phase systems.

    PubMed

    Madeira, Pedro P; Teixeira, José A; Macedo, Eugénia A; Mikheeva, Larissa M; Zaslavsky, Boris Y

    2008-03-21

    Phase diagrams were determined for aqueous two-phase systems (ATPSs) formed by different paired combinations of Dextran (Dex-75), Ficoll-70, polyethylene glycol (PEG-8000), hydroxypropyl starch (PES-100), and Ucon50HB5100 (a random copolymer of ethylene glycol and propylene glycol) all containing 0.15M NaCl in 0.01M phosphate buffer, pH 7.4, at 23 degrees C. Partition coefficients of a series of dinitrophenylated (DNP) amino acids with aliphatic side-chains were studied in all the ATPSs at particular polymer concentrations. Free energies of transfer of a methylene group between the coexisting phases, DeltaG(CH(2)), were determined as measures of the difference between the hydrophobic character of the phases. Furthermore, partition coefficients of tryptophan (Trp) and its di- and tri-peptides and a set of p-nitrophenyl (NP)-monosaccharides were measured in all the two-phase systems, and the data obtained compared with the DeltaG(CH(2)) values obtained in the systems. It was established that for eight out of 10 of two-phase systems of different polymer compositions the partition coefficients for Trp peptides correlate well with the DeltaG(CH(2)) values. Similar correlations for NP-monosaccharides were valid for seven out of 10 two-phase systems. These observations indicate that the difference between the hydrophobic characters of the coexisting phases represented by the DeltaG(CH(2)) value cannot be used as a single universal measure for comparison of the ATPSs of different polymer compositions.

  18. Water as a Solvent for Life

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pohorille, Andrew; Pratt, Lawrence R.

    2015-01-01

    "Follow the water" is our basic strategy in searching for life in the universe. The universality of water as the solvent for living systems is usually justified by arguing that water supports the rich organic chemistry that seeds life, but alternative chemistries are possible in other organic solvents. Here, other, essential criteria for life that have not been sufficiently considered so far, will be discussed.

  19. Solvent extraction behaviour of thiocyanic acid.

    PubMed

    Jurriaanse, A; Kemp, D M

    1968-11-01

    The solvent extraction behaviour of thiocyanic acid with isobutyl methyl ketone and xylene as solvents is described. In the ketone system the thiocyanic acid is solvated in the organic phase to give a complex with a proposed composition of HSCN. 2IBMK. Deviations from ideal behaviour, which can be attributed to variations in the activity coefficient of the acid in the aqueous phase, are shown.

  20. Separation of chemical constituents from three plant medicines by counter-current chromatography using a three-phase solvent system at a novel ratio.

    PubMed

    Wu, Xiaoyi; Chao, Zhimao; Wang, Chun; Yu, Li

    2015-03-01

    A solvent system of n-hexane, methyl acetate, acetonitrile, and water at a novel volume ratio of 4:3:4:4 forms three layers, i.e. upper phase (UP), middle phase (MP), and lower phase (LP), with a volume ratio of 1:1.20:1.42 at room temperature (25°C). All three two-phases from this three-phase solvent system were successfully used to separate some chemical constituents from three plant medicines with counter-current chromatography (CCC). Eight coumarins (B1-B8) were obtained from petroleum ether extract of fresh roots of Angelica dahurica (Baizhi) with a stationary phase of UP and a mobile phase of LP. Six diarylheptanoids (L1-L6) were obtained from petroleum ether extract of dried rhizomes of Alpinia officinarum (Liangjiang) with a stationary phase of UP and a mobile phase of MP. Three chemical constituents (Z1-Z3) were obtained from ethyl acetate extract of fresh rhizomes of Anemarrhena asphodeloides (Zhimu) with a stationary phase of MP and a mobile phase of LP. Preparative HPLC was used for further purification if necessary. Seventeen chemical constituents were identified as oxypeucedanin hydrate (B1), byakangelicin (B2), byakangelicol (B3), bergapten (B4), oxypeucedanin (B5), imperatorin (B6), phellopterin (B7), isoimperatorin (B8), 5-hydroxy-7-(4-hydroxy-3-methoxyphenyl)-1-phenyl-3-heptanone (L1), 7-(4-hydroxy-3-methoxyphenyl)-1-phenyl-4E-en-3-heptanone (L2), 5-hydroxy-1,7-diphenyl-3-heptanone (L3), 1,7-diphenyl-4E-en-3-heptanone (L4), 5-hydroxy-1,7-diphenyl-4E,6E-dien-3-heptanone (L5), isomers of 1,7-diphenyl-3,5-heptandione and 5-hydroxy-1,7-diphenyl-4E-en-3-heptanone (L6), mangiferin (Z1), timosaponin A-III (Z2), and 2,6,4'-trihydroxy-4-methoxy-benzophenone (Z3) by means of MS, (1)H and (13)C NMR studies. Five compounds of B3, L3, L5, L6, and Z3 were isolated by CCC for the first time.

  1. Theoretical and experimental study of mixed solvent electrolytes. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    P.T. Cummings; J.P. O'Connell

    1995-01-31

    The goals of the research program evolved into six areas: Molecular simulation of phase equilibria in aqueous and mixed solvent electrolyte solutions. Molecular simulation of solvation and structure in supercritical aqueous systems. Extension of experimental database on mixed solvent electrolytes. Analysis of the thermodynamic properties of mixed solvent electrolyte solutions and mixed electrolyte solutions using fluctuation solution theory. Development of analytic expressions for thermodynamic properties of mixed solvent electrolyte solutions using analytically solved integral equation approximations. Fundamental modeling of mixed solvent electrolytes using numerically solved integral equation approximation theories.

  2. Interaction of organic solvents with the green alga Chlorella pyrenoidosa

    SciTech Connect

    Stratton, G.W.; Smith, T.M. )

    1988-06-01

    Solvents are often a component of bioassay systems when water-insoluble toxicants are being tested. These solvents must also be considered as xenobiotics and therefore, as potential toxicants in the bioassay. However, the effects of solvents on the organisms being tested and their possible interaction with the test compound are often overlooked by researchers. The purpose of the present study was to compare the inhibitory effects of six solvents commonly used in pesticide bioassays towards growth of the common green alga Chlorella pyrenoidosa, and to examine the occurrence of solvent-pesticide interactions with this organism.

  3. Halogenated solvent remediation

    DOEpatents

    Sorenson, Kent S.

    2004-08-31

    Methods for enhancing bioremediation of ground water contaminated with nonaqueous halogenated solvents are disclosed. A preferred method includes adding a composition to the ground water wherein the composition is an electron donor for microbe-mediated reductive dehalogenation of the halogenated solvents and enhances mass transfer of the halogenated solvents from residual source areas into the aqueous phase of the ground water. Illustrative compositions effective in these methods include surfactants such as C.sub.2 -C.sub.4 carboxylic acids and hydroxy acids, salts thereof, esters of C.sub.2 -C.sub.4 carboxylic acids and hydroxy acids, and mixtures thereof. Especially preferred compositions for use in these methods include lactic acid, salts of lactic acid, such as sodium lactate, lactate esters, and mixtures thereof. The microbes are either indigenous to the ground water, or such microbes can be added to the ground water in addition to the composition.

  4. Halogenated solvent remediation

    DOEpatents

    Sorenson, Jr., Kent S.

    2008-11-11

    Methods for enhancing bioremediation of ground water contaminated with nonaqueous halogenated solvents are disclosed. An illustrative method includes adding an electron donor for microbe-mediated anaerobic reductive dehalogenation of the halogenated solvents, which electron donor enhances mass transfer of the halogenated solvents from residual source areas into the aqueous phase of the ground water. Illustrative electron donors include C.sub.2-C.sub.4 carboxylic acids and hydroxy acids, salts thereof, esters of C.sub.2-C.sub.4 carboxylic acids and hydroxy acids, and mixtures thereof, of which lactic acid, salts of lactic acid--such as sodium lactate, lactate esters, and mixtures thereof are particularly illustrative. The microbes are either indigenous to the ground water, or such microbes can be added to the ground water in addition to the electron donor.

  5. Separation by solvent extraction

    DOEpatents

    Holt, Jr., Charles H.

    1976-04-06

    17. A process for separating fission product values from uranium and plutonium values contained in an aqueous solution, comprising adding an oxidizing agent to said solution to secure uranium and plutonium in their hexavalent state; contacting said aqueous solution with a substantially water-immiscible organic solvent while agitating and maintaining the temperature at from -1.degree. to -2.degree. C. until the major part of the water present is frozen; continuously separating a solid ice phase as it is formed; separating a remaining aqueous liquid phase containing fission product values and a solvent phase containing plutonium and uranium values from each other; melting at least the last obtained part of said ice phase and adding it to said separated liquid phase; and treating the resulting liquid with a new supply of solvent whereby it is practically depleted of uranium and plutonium.

  6. Breathing with chlorinated solvents

    SciTech Connect

    McCarty, P.L.

    1997-06-06

    Chlorinated solvents are effective cleaners and in the past dirted solvents were dumped into landfills, stored in tanks that often leaked, or spilled. As a result the most common contaminants of organic groundwater at hazardous waste sites are the two major chlorinated solvents - tetrachloroethylene (PCE) and trichloroethylene (TCE). Both are suspected carcinogens and both are highly resistant to biodegradation. Now however, there is a report of a bacterium that can remove all of the chlorine atoms from both by halorespiration to form ethene, an innocuous end product. This article goes on to discuss the background of biodegradation of chlorinated compounds, why it is so difficult, and what the future is in this area. 9 refs., 1 fig.

  7. Safe battery solvents

    DOEpatents

    Harrup, Mason K.; Delmastro, Joseph R.; Stewart, Frederick F.; Luther, Thomas A.

    2007-10-23

    An ion transporting solvent maintains very low vapor pressure, contains flame retarding elements, and is nontoxic. The solvent in combination with common battery electrolyte salts can be used to replace the current carbonate electrolyte solution, creating a safer battery. It can also be used in combination with polymer gels or solid polymer electrolytes to produce polymer batteries with enhanced conductivity characteristics. The solvents may comprise a class of cyclic and acyclic low molecular weight phosphazenes compounds, comprising repeating phosphorus and nitrogen units forming a core backbone and ion-carrying pendent groups bound to the phosphorus. In preferred embodiments, the cyclic phosphazene comprises at least 3 phosphorus and nitrogen units, and the pendent groups are polyethers, polythioethers, polyether/polythioethers or any combination thereof, and/or other groups preferably comprising other atoms from Group 6B of the periodic table of elements.

  8. Effects on gelation transition by tuning the interaction of solvent-solute molecules in a bridging system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Guangcui; Luo, Junhua; Han, Charles C.; Liu, Yun

    A mixed suspension of large hard spheres and small soft microgels with well-defined bridging interaction is used to construct a new short-range attractive system. Soft poly (N-isopropylacrylamide) microgels (R = 80 nm) are absorbable to the surface of hard polystyrene spheres (R = 960 nm) in aqueous solution. For a constant volume fraction of hard spheres (ΦMS) , gradually increasing amount of microgels (ΦMG) leads to a liquid-gel-liquid transitions through bridging and steric stabilized mechanisms. Rheological measurements were performed on suspensions with ΦMS ranging up to 0.35 to carefully identify the transition boundaries between liquid-like and solid-like behaviors triggered by ΦMG . Meanwhile, neutron scattering technique with Baxter's sticky hard-sphere potential fit was used to investigate the effective interparticle potential at and around the gelation boundaries. By exhibiting a set of experimental results from this explicit model system and comparing with the theoretical data, we try to clarify a debate issue about the relative position of the gel line and the liquid-gas coexistence line in the potential U - Φ plane. This work is supported by the Chinese National Science Foundation (Project 21474121).

  9. Phase formation during supercritical solvent deashing of solvent-refined coal. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Henry, J.D. Jr.; Verhoff, F.H.

    1982-11-01

    A constant volume high temperature - pressure phase contacting cell was used in conjunction with an x-ray measurement technique to experimentally determine the volumes of the phases that are formed when supercritical solvents are contacted with solvent refined coal. A material balance technique is used in conjunction with the x-ray data to determine the mass of the phases. The constant volume technique can be used to independently vary temperature and pressure. In addition to temperature pressure variation, the ratio of solvent to solvent refined coal was a major parameter in this investigation. Solvent/W. SRC ratios of 2, 3 and 4 were investigated. Experiments were conducted on the following five systems: Wilsonville Solvent Refined Coal (W. SRC) - Heptane, W. SRC - Toluene, W. SRC - Pyridine, Asphaltene - Toluene and Preasphaltene - Toluene. Pyridine dissolved virtually all of the solvent refined coal. Toluene dissolved intermediate quantities and Heptane dissolved the least. A solubility maximum was observed with the W. SRC - Toluene system. The maximum solubility occurred significantly below the critical point of toluene and at temperatures above the critical point, dissolved solutes were rejected. Qualitatively the same behavior was observed with the asphaltene - toluene system. Toluene did not dissolve preasphaltenes. The maximum solubility with the W. SRC - Toluene system was found to be pressure insensitive at a toluene/W. SRC ratio of 3:1. At a ratio of 4:1 the maximum solubility was more pressure sensitive. 50 figures, 45 tables.

  10. Preparation of CdS microtrumpets from a solvent extraction system by a two-phase approach

    SciTech Connect

    Geng, Aifang; Liu, Yubing; Liao, Wuping

    2011-10-15

    Highlights: {yields} CdS microtrumpets were prepared from an extraction system by a two-phase approach. {yields} Triethanolamine plays a crucial role in the formation of the trumpets. {yields} Some micro-lotus seedpods can also be obtained with trihydroxymethyl aminomethane. -- Abstract: CdS microtrumpets with the length being of about 4 {mu}m and the bell wall being of 100 nm have been prepared using a cadmium di-(2-ethylhexyl) phosphoric acid chelate as the precursor by a two-phase thermal approach. The products were characterized by powder X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and UV-vis spectroscopy. The effects of temperature, reaction time, and co-surfactant on the morphology were also examined. It was found that the co-surfactant triethanolamine plays a crucial role in the formation of the cubic phase trumpet-like CdS microstructures.

  11. Biological monitoring of chlorinated hydrocarbon solvents

    SciTech Connect

    Monster, A.C.

    1986-08-01

    The possibility of biological monitoring of exposure to some volatile, halogenated hydrocarbons will be discussed. Most of these agents are widely used as solvents. All agents act on the nervous system as narcotics and differ widely in toxicity. Most of the solvents undergo biotransformation to metabolites. This allows biological assessment of exposure by measurement of the solvent and/or metabolites in exhaled air, blood, and/or urine. However, the same metabolites may occur with exposure to different chlorinated hydrocarbons, eg, trichloroethanol and trichloroacetic acid from exposure to trichloroethene, tetrachloroethene, and 1,1,1-trichloroethane. On the other hand, these agents differ widely in the percentage that is metabolized. There are large gaps in our knowledge, however, and much research will have to be carried out before even tentative data can be established for most of the solvents.

  12. United States Air Force Wipe Solvent Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hornung, Steven D.; Beeson, Harold D.

    2000-01-01

    The Wright-Patterson Air Force Base (WPAFB), as part of the Air Force Material Command, requested that NASA Johnson Space Center (JSC) White Sands Test Facility (WSTF) conduct testing and analyses in support of the United States Air Force Wipe Solvent Development Project. The purpose of the wipe solvent project is to develop an alternative to be used by Air Force flight line and maintenance personnel for the wipe cleaning of oxygen equipment. This report provides material compatibility, liquid oxygen (LOX) mechanical impact, autogenous ignition temperature (AIT), and gauge cleaning test data for some of the currently available solvents that may be used to replace CFC-113 and methyl chloroform. It provides data from previous WSTF test programs sponsored by the Naval Sea Systems Command, the Kennedy Space Center, and other NASA programs for the purpose of assisting WP AFB in identifying the best alternative solvents for validation testing.

  13. Interfacial chemistry in solvent extraction systems. Final report for the period June 1, 1994 - May 31, 1998

    SciTech Connect

    Neuman, Ronald D.

    2000-03-01

    The interfacial chemistry that occurs in the liquid/liquid extraction of metals ions still remains very incompletely understood at the molecular level. The objective of this comprehensive research program has been to further the fundamental understanding of this complex chemistry by systematically investigating the interfacial behavior of extraction reagents and their interactions with metal ions at both macroscopic (liquid/liquid) and microscopic (reversed micelles) interfaces. Although the importance of the macroscopic interface is well recognized, it is less appreciated that microscopic interfaces, i.e., association microstructure such as reversed micelles, are often present under practical conditions and play a key role in liquid/liquid extraction. An improved knowledge of the interfacial behavior of extractant molecules is of the utmost importance as it relates to the efficacy (extent, selectivity and rate) of the extraction process. During the recent grant period the authors have more intensively investigated the physicochemical nature of metal-extractant aggregates (or microscopic interfaces) in the organic phase of acidic organophosphorus extraction systems from the perspective of colloid and surface science. Since industrial extraction systems are very complex, the authors emphasized the study of the aggregation behavior in model extraction systems of pure metal salts of bis(2-ethylhexyl)phosphoric acid (HDEHP) (e.g., NaDEHP, Ni(DEHP){sub 2} CO(DEHP){sub 2}) or bis(2-ethylhexyl) sulfosuccinate, whose sodium salt (AOT) is the classical surfactant used often in studies of the structure and properties of reversed micelles, to eliminate any possible uncertainty in the metal-extractant complex composition. This approach evolved into a new initiative that utilized molecular modeling in order to clarify the molecular structure of metal-extractant micellar aggregates for which information is very difficult to obtain from direct experimental measurements

  14. Dual response surface-optimized synthesis of L-menthyl conjugated linoleate in solvent-free system by Candida rugosa lipase.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhen; Wang, Yulun; Li, Jia; Wang, Ping; Wei, Wei; Gao, Yang; Fu, Chenyin; Dong, Wenqi

    2010-02-01

    Lipase-catalyzed synthesis of L-menthyl conjugated linoleate in solvent-free system was studied in this paper. Duel response surface methodology was employed to explore the factors which would influence the reaction conversion by a range of independent experiments. The conditions of reaction temperature, reaction time, enzyme amount, substrate molar ratio and water content were symmetrically investigated. When the substrates were 1 mmol CLA and 1 mmol L-menthol, the maximum conversion (79.1+/-0.8%) was obtained at 30 degrees C, Candida rugosa lipase of 33.7% (w/w by weight of L-menthol), water content of 32% (w/w by weight of L-menthol), reaction time of 43 h. The product isomers (9Z,11E-/10E,12Z-=63/37) were analyzed by GC/MS. The similarity between the oleic acid and 9Z,11E-CLA conformations which were obtained by molecular modeling could account for the specific catalyzed by C. rugosa lipase. PMID:19833506

  15. Production of Diacylglycerol-enriched Oil by Glycerolysis of Soybean Oil using a Bubble Column Reactor in a Solvent-free System.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ning; Yang, Xue; Fu, Junning; Chen, Qiong; Song, Ziliang; Wang, Yong

    2016-01-01

    In this study, diacylglycerol-enriched soybean oil (DESO) was synthesized through Lipozyme 435-catalyzed glycerolysis of soybean oil (SO) in a solvent-free system using a modified bubble column reactor. The effects of enzyme load, mole ratio of glycerol to soybean oil, reaction temperature, gas flow and reaction time on DAG production were investigated. The selected conditions were established as being enzyme load of 4 wt% (mass of substrates), glycerol/soybean oil mole ratio of 20:1, reaction temperature of 80°C, gas flow of 10.6 cm/min, and a reaction time of 2.5 h, obtaining the DAG content of 49.4±0.5 wt%. The reusability of Lipozyme 435 was evaluated by monitoring the contents of DAG, monoacylglycerol (MAG) and triacylglycerol (TAG) in 10 consecutive runs. After purified by one-step molecular distillation, the DAG content of 63.5±0.3 wt% was achieved in DESO. The mole ratio of 1, 3-DAG to 1, 2-DAG was 2:1 and the fatty acid composition had no significant difference from that of soybean oil. However, the thermal properties of DESO and SO had considerable differences. Polymorphic form of DESO were mainly the β form and minor amounts of the β' form. Granular aggregation and round-shaped crystals were detected in DESO. PMID:26876674

  16. Drug solubility in phospholipid carrier as a predictive parameter for drug recovery in microparticles produced by the aerosol solvent extraction system (ASES) process.

    PubMed

    Sarisuta, Narong; Kunastitchai, Sarinnate; Pichert, Lars; Müller, Bernd W

    2007-09-01

    The solubility of various drugs in a constant ratio of phosphatidylcholine-cholesterol carrier were studied to investigate their influence on drug recovery in drug-lipid microparticles produced by the aerosol solvent extraction system (ASES) process. Solubility of the drugs in such lipid carrier were determined by using differential scanning calorimetry and confirmed by X-ray powder diffraction study. The results showed that drug possessing relatively high solubility in the lipid carrier used could lead to a higher amount of drug recovered in the drug-lipid microparticles produced. However, too high amount of dissolved drug imposed an adverse effect on the solidification of the lipid carrier during ASES processing, which led to partial film formation in the production column and hence a lower yield of microparticles. Such adverse effect was not the case for the drugs with low solubility in the carrier but there was an incomplete recovery of drug in the produced microparticles due to the partial extraction by the supercritical gas instead. The maximum amount of drug recovered in the ASES-prepared microparticles was found to correlate to the solubility of drug in the lipid carrier so that it might be utilized as a predictive parameter for determining the amount of drug to be incorporated into the microparticles.

  17. Immobilization of Pseudomonas fluorescens lipase on hydrophobic supports and application in biodiesel synthesis by transesterification of vegetable oils in solvent-free systems.

    PubMed

    Lima, Lionete N; Oliveira, Gladson C; Rojas, Mayerlenis J; Castro, Heizir F; Da Rós, Patrícia C M; Mendes, Adriano A; Giordano, Raquel L C; Tardioli, Paulo W

    2015-04-01

    This work describes the preparation of biocatalysts for ethanolysis of soybean and babassu oils in solvent-free systems. Polystyrene, Amberlite (XAD-7HP), and octyl-silica were tested as supports for the immobilization of Pseudomonas fluorescens lipase (PFL). The use of octyl-silica resulted in a biocatalyst with high values of hydrolytic activity (650.0 ± 15.5 IU/g), immobilization yield (91.3 ± 0.3 %), and recovered activity (82.1 ± 1.5 %). PFL immobilized on octyl-silica was around 12-fold more stable than soluble PFL, at 45 °C and pH 8.0, in the presence of ethanol at 36 % (v/v). The biocatalyst provided high vegetable oil transesterification yields of around 97.5 % after 24 h of reaction using babassu oil and around 80 % after 48 h of reaction using soybean oil. The PFL-octyl-silica biocatalyst retained around 90 % of its initial activity after five cycles of transesterification of soybean oil. Octyl-silica is a promising support that can be used to immobilize PFL for subsequent application in biodiesel synthesis.

  18. Molecular dynamics simulations of the free and inhibitor-bound cruzain systems in aqueous solvent: insights on the inhibition mechanism in acidic pH.

    PubMed

    Hoelz, L V B; Leal, V F; Rodrigues, C R; Pascutti, P G; Albuquerque, M G; Muri, E M F; Dias, L R S

    2016-09-01

    The major cysteine protease of Trypanosoma cruzi, cruzain (CRZ), has been described as a therapeutic target for Chagas' disease, which affects millions of people worldwide. Thus, a series of CRZ inhibitors has been studied, including a new competitive inhibitor, Nequimed176 (NEQ176). Nevertheless, the structural and dynamic basis for CRZ inhibition remains unclear. Hoping to contribute to this ever-growing understanding of timescale dynamics in the CRZ inhibition mechanism, we have performed the first study using 100 ns of molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of two CRZ systems in an aqueous solvent under pH 5.5: CRZ in the apo form (ligand free) and CRZ complexed to NEQ176. According to the MD simulations, the enzyme adopts an open conformation in the apo form and a closed conformation in the NEQ176-CRZ complex. We also suggest that this closed conformation is related to the hydrogen-bonding interactions between NEQ176 and CRZ, which occurs through key residues, mainly Gly66, Met68, Asn69, and Leu160. In addition, the cross-correlation analysis shows evidence of the correlated motions among Ala110-Asp140, Leu160-Gly189, and Glu190-Gly215 subdomains, as well as, the movements related to Ala1-Thr59 and Asp60-Pro90 regions seem to be crucial for CRZ activity.

  19. Production of Diacylglycerol-enriched Oil by Glycerolysis of Soybean Oil using a Bubble Column Reactor in a Solvent-free System.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ning; Yang, Xue; Fu, Junning; Chen, Qiong; Song, Ziliang; Wang, Yong

    2016-01-01

    In this study, diacylglycerol-enriched soybean oil (DESO) was synthesized through Lipozyme 435-catalyzed glycerolysis of soybean oil (SO) in a solvent-free system using a modified bubble column reactor. The effects of enzyme load, mole ratio of glycerol to soybean oil, reaction temperature, gas flow and reaction time on DAG production were investigated. The selected conditions were established as being enzyme load of 4 wt% (mass of substrates), glycerol/soybean oil mole ratio of 20:1, reaction temperature of 80°C, gas flow of 10.6 cm/min, and a reaction time of 2.5 h, obtaining the DAG content of 49.4±0.5 wt%. The reusability of Lipozyme 435 was evaluated by monitoring the contents of DAG, monoacylglycerol (MAG) and triacylglycerol (TAG) in 10 consecutive runs. After purified by one-step molecular distillation, the DAG content of 63.5±0.3 wt% was achieved in DESO. The mole ratio of 1, 3-DAG to 1, 2-DAG was 2:1 and the fatty acid composition had no significant difference from that of soybean oil. However, the thermal properties of DESO and SO had considerable differences. Polymorphic form of DESO were mainly the β form and minor amounts of the β' form. Granular aggregation and round-shaped crystals were detected in DESO.

  20. The use of novel ionic liquid-in-water microemulsion without the addition of organic solvents in a capillary electrophoretic system.

    PubMed

    Cao, Jun; Qu, Haibin; Cheng, Yiyu

    2010-10-01

    In this work, a new ionic liquid-in-water (IL/W) microemulsion without requiring toxic organic solvents was investigated as a pseudostationary phase (PSP) in CE. As observed during the IL/W microemulsion system, a fast and an efficient separation of eight phenolic acids was achieved using 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolivmhexa fluorophosphate (bmimPF(6)) as oil drops, Tween 20 as the surfactant, and borate as the BGE. The effects of oil phase, surfactant, buffer and pH on the separation were explored in detail to evaluate the novel PSP. In contrast, the detection efficiency of these same analytes was markedly decreased using oil-in-water (O/W) MEEKC. We have also validated the practicality of the IL/W microemulsion method by quantitative determination of acidic compounds in pharmaceutical injection. The results obtained indicated that an additional association between the IL cations and analytes tested seemed to play a prominent role in the separation mechanism exhibited by this novel PSP compared with the conventional O/W MEEKC. PMID:20922759

  1. Organic solvent topical report

    SciTech Connect

    Cowley, W.L.

    1998-04-30

    This report is the technical basis for the accident and consequence analyses used in the Hanford Tank Farms Basis for Interim Operation. The report also contains the scientific and engineering information and reference material needed to understand the organic solvent safety issue. This report includes comments received from the Chemical Reactions Subcommittee of the Tank Advisory Panel.

  2. ONSITE SOLVENT RECOVERY

    EPA Science Inventory

    This study evaluated the product quality, waste reduction/pollution prevention, and economic aspects of three technologies for onsite solvent recovery. The technologies were (1) atmospheric batch distillation, (2) vacuum heat-pump distillation, and (3) low-emission vapor degreas...

  3. DESIGNING GREENER SOLVENTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Computer-aided design of chemicals and chemical mixtures provides a powerful tool to help engineers identify cleaner process designs and more-benign alternatives to toxic industrial solvents. Three software programs are discussed: (1) PARIS II (Program for Assisting the Replaceme...

  4. Solvent vapor collector

    DOEpatents

    Ellison, Kenneth; Whike, Alan S.

    1979-01-30

    A solvent vapor collector is mounted on the upstream inlet end of an oven having a gas-circulating means and intended for curing a coating applied to a strip sheet metal at a coating station. The strip sheet metal may be hot and solvent vapors are evaporated at the coating station and from the strip as it passes from the coating station to the oven. Upper and lower plenums within a housing of the collector are supplied with oven gases or air from the gas-circulating means and such gases or air are discharged within the collector obliquely in a downstream direction against the strip passing through that collector to establish downstream gas flows along the top and under surfaces of the strip so as, in turn, to induct solvent vapors into the collector at the coating station. A telescopic multi-piece shroud is usefully provided on the housing for movement between an extended position in which it overlies the coating station to collect solvent vapors released thereat and a retracted position permitting ready cleaning and adjustment of that coating station.

  5. Diffusion in mixed solvents. II - The heat of mixing parameter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carapellucci, P. A.

    1975-01-01

    Correlation of second-order rate constants for many reactions involving electron transfer between organic molecules, solvated electron reactions, iodine diffusion coefficients, and triplet state electron transfer reactions has been made with the heat of mixing parameter (HMP) for the aqueous binary solvent systems. The aqueous binary solvents studied are those containing methanol or ethanol (type I solvent); 1-propanol or tert-butyl alcohol (type II solvent); or sucrose or glycerol (type III solvent). A plot of the HMP vs. the diffusion parameter for each reaction yields superimposable curves for these reactions in a particular solvent mixture over the entire solvent mixture range, irrespective of the value of the reaction's rate constant or diffusion coefficient in water.

  6. Solvent-Ion Interactions in Salt Water: A Simple Experiment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Willey, Joan D.

    1984-01-01

    Describes a procedurally quick, simple, and inexpensive experiment which illustrates the magnitude and some effects of solvent-ion interactions in aqueous solutions. Theoretical information, procedures, and examples of temperature, volume and hydration number calculations are provided. (JN)

  7. Carving a 1D Co(II)-carboranylcarboxylate system by using organic solvents to create stable trinuclear molecular analogues: complete structural and magnetic studies.

    PubMed

    Fontanet, Mònica; Rodríguez, Montserrat; Fontrodona, Xavier; Romero, Isabel; Teixidor, Francesc; Viñas, Clara; Aliaga-Alcalde, Núria

    2016-07-01

    This work presents a straightforward methodology to achieve small linear trinuclear molecules based on the Co(II)-carboranylcarboxylate system obtained by carving a 1D polynuclear analogous system with the use of diethylether. The reaction of the carboranylcarboxylic ligand, 1-CH3-2-CO2H-1,2-closo-C2B10H10 (LH) with different cobalt salts leads to the polynuclear compound [Co2(μ-H2O)(1-CH3-2-CO2-1,2-closo-C2B10H10)4(THF)4], and the polymeric [Co(μ-H2O)(1-CH3-2-CO2-1,2-closo-C2B10H10)2]n(H2O)n. This latter 1D chain has been obtained by an unprecedented synthetic strategy for the isolation of cobalt(ii) compounds. [Co3(μ-H2O)2(1-CH3-2-CO2-1,2-closo-C2B10H10)6(H2O)2(C4H10O)2], is formed by the dissociation of the polymeric structure that forms when a mild coordinating solvent such as diethylether is added. These compounds have been characterized by analytical and spectroscopic techniques. X-ray analysis of and revealed that presents a dinuclear structure whereas is trinuclear; in both cases a six-coordinated Co(II) compound with water molecules bridging each of the two Co(II) centres has been observed. The magnetic properties of and show a weak antiferromagnetic behaviour, respectively, between the Co(II) centres mediated by two carboxylate ligands and a molecule of water. PMID:27301436

  8. The impact of low-temperature seasonal aquifer thermal energy storage (SATES) systems on chlorinated solvent contaminated groundwater: modeling of spreading and degradation.

    PubMed

    Zuurbier, Koen G; Hartog, Niels; Valstar, Johan; Post, Vincent E A; van Breukelen, Boris M

    2013-04-01

    Groundwater systems are increasingly used for seasonal aquifer thermal energy storage (SATES) for periodic heating and cooling of buildings. Its use is hampered in contaminated aquifers because of the potential environmental risks associated with the spreading of contaminated groundwater, but positive side effects, such as enhanced contaminant remediation, might also occur. A first reactive transport study is presented to assess the effect of SATES on the fate of chlorinated solvents by means of scenario modeling, with emphasis on the effects of transient SATES pumping and applicable kinetic degradation regime. Temperature effects on physical, chemical, and biological reactions were excluded as calculations and initial simulations showed that the small temperature range commonly involved (ΔT<15 °C) only caused minor effects. The results show that a significant decrease of the contaminant mass and (eventually) plume volume occurs when degradation is described as sediment-limited with a constant rate in space and time, provided that dense non-aqueous phase liquid (DNAPL) is absent. However, in the presence of DNAPL dissolution, particularly when the dissolved contaminant reaches SATES wells, a considerably larger contaminant plume is created, depending on the balance between DNAPL dissolution and mass removal by degradation. Under conditions where degradation is contaminant-limited and degradation rates depend on contaminant concentrations in the aquifer, a SATES system does not result in enhanced remediation of a contaminant plume. Although field data are lacking and existing regulatory constraints do not yet permit the application of SATES in contaminated aquifers, reactive transport modeling provides a means of assessing the risks of SATES application in contaminated aquifers. The results from this study are considered to be a first step in identifying the subsurface conditions under which SATES can be applied in a safe or even beneficial manner.

  9. DESIGNING ENVIRONMENTALLY BENIGN SOLVENT SUBSTITUTES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Since the signing of 1987 Montreal Protocol, reducing and eliminating the use of harmful solvents has become an internationally imminent environmental protection mission. Solvent substitution is an effective way to achieve this goal. The Program for Assisting the Replacement of...

  10. Solvent dewaxing of lubricating oils

    SciTech Connect

    Sequeira, A. Jr.

    1991-04-09

    This paper describes improvement in a process for producing a dewaxed lubricating oil from a wax-bearing mineral oil by the steps comprising; mixing the oil with a dewaxing solvent thereby forming an oil-solvent mixture, chilling the oil-solvent mixture to a dewaxing temperature thereby crystallizing the wax and forming an oil-solvent crystalline wax mixture, separating the oil-solvent-crystalline wax mixture to form a dewaxed oil-solvent mixture and crystalline wax, steam stripping the dewaxed oil-solvent mixture at a temperature of 300{degrees}F to 600{degrees}F and pressure of 1 atm to 3 atm, to yield a solvent free dewaxed oil.

  11. Solvent Immersion Imprint Lithography

    SciTech Connect

    Vasdekis, Andreas E.; Wilkins, Michael J.; Grate, Jay W.; Kelly, Ryan T.; Konopka, Allan; Xantheas, Sotiris S.; Chang, M. T.

    2014-06-21

    The mechanism of polymer disolution was explored for polymer microsystem prototyping, including microfluidics and optofluidics. Polymer films are immersed in a solvent, imprinted and finally brought into contact with a non-modified surface to permanently bond. The underlying polymer-solvent interactions were experimentally and theoretically investigated, and enabled rapid polymer microsystem prototyping. During imprinting, small molecule integration in the molded surfaces was feasible, a principle applied to oxygen sensing. Polystyrene (PS) was employed for microbiological studies at extreme environmental conditions. The thermophile anaerobe Clostridium Thermocellum was grown in PS pore-scale micromodels, revealing a double mean generation lifetime than under ideal culture conditions. Microsystem prototyping through directed polymer dissolution is simple and accessible, while simultaneous patterning, bonding, and surface/volume functionalization are possible in less than one minute.

  12. Theoretical and experimental study of mixed solvent electrolytes

    SciTech Connect

    Cummings, P.T.; O'Connell, J.P.

    1990-01-01

    In the original proposal to study mixed solvent electrolyte solutions, four major goals were formulated: fundamental modeling of mixed solvent electrolytes using numerically solved integral equation approximation theories; evaluation of intermolecular pair potential models by computer simulation of selected systems for comparison with experiment and the numerical integral equation studies; development of fundamentally based correlations for the thermodynamic properties of mixed solvent electrolyte solutions using analytically solvable statistical mechanical models; and extension of experimental database on mixed solvent electrolytes by performing vapor-liquid equilibrium measurements on selected systems. This paper discusses the progress on these goals.

  13. PARIS II: DESIGNING GREENER SOLVENTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    PARIS II (the program for assisting the replacement of industrial solvents, version II), developed at the USEPA, is a unique software tool that can be used for customizing the design of replacement solvents and for the formulation of new solvents. This program helps users avoid ...

  14. Hazardous solvent substitution

    SciTech Connect

    Twitchell, K.E.

    1995-11-01

    Eliminating hazardous solvents is good for the environment, worker safety, and the bottom line. However, even though we are motivated to find replacements, the big question is `What can we use as replacements for hazardous solvents?`You, too, can find replacements for your hazardous solvents. All you have to do is search for them. Search through the vendor literature of hundreds of companies with thousands of products. Ponder the associated material safety data sheets, assuming of course that you can obtain them and, having obtained them, that you can read them. You will want to search the trade magazines and other sources for product reviews. You will want to talk to users about how well the product actually works. You may also want to check US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and other government reports for toxicity and other safety information. And, of course, you will want to compare the product`s constituent chemicals with the many hazardous constituency lists to ensure the safe and legal use of the product in your workplace.

  15. Optimisation and Characterisation of Lipase-Catalysed Synthesis of a Kojic Monooleate Ester in a Solvent-Free System by Response Surface Methodology

    PubMed Central

    Jumbri, Khairulazhar; Al-Haniff Rozy, Mohd Fahruddin; Ashari, Siti Efliza; Mohamad, Rosfarizan; Basri, Mahiran; Fard Masoumi, Hamid Reza

    2015-01-01

    Kojic acid is widely used to inhibit the browning effect of tyrosinase in cosmetic and food industries. In this work, synthesis of kojic monooleate ester (KMO) was carried out using lipase-catalysed esterification of kojic acid and oleic acid in a solvent-free system. Response Surface Methodology (RSM) based on central composite rotatable design (CCRD) was used to optimise the main important reaction variables, such as enzyme amount, reaction temperature, substrate molar ratio, and reaction time along with immobilised lipase from Candida Antarctica (Novozym 435) as a biocatalyst. The RSM data indicated that the reaction temperature was less significant in comparison to other factors for the production of a KMO ester. By using this statistical analysis, a quadratic model was developed in order to correlate the preparation variable to the response (reaction yield). The optimum conditions for the enzymatic synthesis of KMO were as follows: an enzyme amount of 2.0 wt%, reaction temperature of 83.69°C, substrate molar ratio of 1:2.37 (mmole kojic acid:oleic acid) and a reaction time of 300.0 min. Under these conditions, the actual yield percentage obtained was 42.09%, which is comparably well with the maximum predicted value of 44.46%. Under the optimal conditions, Novozym 435 could be reused for 5 cycles for KMO production percentage yield of at least 40%. The results demonstrated that statistical analysis using RSM can be used efficiently to optimise the production of a KMO ester. Moreover, the optimum conditions obtained can be applied to scale-up the process and minimise the cost. PMID:26657030

  16. Optimisation and Characterisation of Lipase-Catalysed Synthesis of a Kojic Monooleate Ester in a Solvent-Free System by Response Surface Methodology.

    PubMed

    Jumbri, Khairulazhar; Al-Haniff Rozy, Mohd Fahruddin; Ashari, Siti Efliza; Mohamad, Rosfarizan; Basri, Mahiran; Fard Masoumi, Hamid Reza

    2015-01-01

    Kojic acid is widely used to inhibit the browning effect of tyrosinase in cosmetic and food industries. In this work, synthesis of kojic monooleate ester (KMO) was carried out using lipase-catalysed esterification of kojic acid and oleic acid in a solvent-free system. Response Surface Methodology (RSM) based on central composite rotatable design (CCRD) was used to optimise the main important reaction variables, such as enzyme amount, reaction temperature, substrate molar ratio, and reaction time along with immobilised lipase from Candida Antarctica (Novozym 435) as a biocatalyst. The RSM data indicated that the reaction temperature was less significant in comparison to other factors for the production of a KMO ester. By using this statistical analysis, a quadratic model was developed in order to correlate the preparation variable to the response (reaction yield). The optimum conditions for the enzymatic synthesis of KMO were as follows: an enzyme amount of 2.0 wt%, reaction temperature of 83.69°C, substrate molar ratio of 1:2.37 (mmole kojic acid:oleic acid) and a reaction time of 300.0 min. Under these conditions, the actual yield percentage obtained was 42.09%, which is comparably well with the maximum predicted value of 44.46%. Under the optimal conditions, Novozym 435 could be reused for 5 cycles for KMO production percentage yield of at least 40%. The results demonstrated that statistical analysis using RSM can be used efficiently to optimise the production of a KMO ester. Moreover, the optimum conditions obtained can be applied to scale-up the process and minimise the cost. PMID:26657030

  17. A simple, efficient and environmentally benign synthetic protocol for the synthesis of spirooxindoles using choline chloride-oxalic acid eutectic mixture as catalyst/solvent system.

    PubMed

    Khandelwal, Sarita; Rajawat, Anshu; Tailor, Yogesh Kumar; Kumar, Mahendra

    2014-01-01

    An efficient and environmentally benign domino protocol has been presented for the synthesis of structurally diverse spirooxindoles spiroannulated with pyranopyridopyrimidines, indenopyridopyrimidines, and chromenopyridopyrimidines involving three-component reaction of aminouracils, isatins and cyclic carbonyl compounds in deep eutectic solvent (choline chloride-oxalic acid: 1:1) which acts as efficient catalyst and environmentally benign reaction medium. The present protocol offers several advantages such as operational simplicity with easy workup, shorter reaction times excellent yields with superior atom economy and environmentally benign reaction conditions with the use of cost-effective, recyclable, non-toxic and bio-degradable DES as catalyst/solvent.

  18. A simple, efficient and environmentally benign synthetic protocol for the synthesis of spirooxindoles using choline chloride-oxalic acid eutectic mixture as catalyst/solvent system.

    PubMed

    Khandelwal, Sarita; Rajawat, Anshu; Tailor, Yogesh Kumar; Kumar, Mahendra

    2014-01-01

    An efficient and environmentally benign domino protocol has been presented for the synthesis of structurally diverse spirooxindoles spiroannulated with pyranopyridopyrimidines, indenopyridopyrimidines, and chromenopyridopyrimidines involving three-component reaction of aminouracils, isatins and cyclic carbonyl compounds in deep eutectic solvent (choline chloride-oxalic acid: 1:1) which acts as efficient catalyst and environmentally benign reaction medium. The present protocol offers several advantages such as operational simplicity with easy workup, shorter reaction times excellent yields with superior atom economy and environmentally benign reaction conditions with the use of cost-effective, recyclable, non-toxic and bio-degradable DES as catalyst/solvent. PMID:25329839

  19. Automated spray cleaning using flammable solvents in a glovebox

    SciTech Connect

    Garcia, P.; Meirans, L.

    1998-05-01

    The phase-out of the ozone-depleting solvents has forced industry to look to solvents such as alcohol, terpenes and other flammable solvents to perform the critical cleaning processes. These solvents are not as efficient as the ozone-depleting solvents in terms of soil loading, cleaning time and drying when used in standard cleaning processes such as manual sprays or ultrasonic baths. They also require special equipment designs to meet part cleaning specifications and operator safety requirements. This paper describes a cleaning system that incorporates the automated spraying of flammable solvents to effectively perform precision cleaning processes. Key to the project`s success was the development of software that controls the robotic system and automatically generates robotic cleaning paths from three dimensional CAD models of the items to be cleaned.

  20. Metal Complexes as Color Indicators for Solvent Parameters.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Soukup, Rudolf W.; Schmid, Roland

    1985-01-01

    Although indicators are omnipresent tools in aqueous chemistry, they have not been used extensively to assign solvent properties in nonaqueous systems. Therefore, recent research into a system of metal complexes that can be used to assign donor and acceptor numbers to nonaqueous solvents is summarized. Pertinent experiments are also described. (JN)

  1. SAGE 2.0 SOLVENT ALTERNATIVES GUIDE - USER'S GUIDE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The guide provides instruction for using the SAGE (Solvent Alternatives Guide) software system, version 2.O. It assumes that the user is familiar with the fundamentals of operating a personal computer under the Microsoft disk operating system (MS-DOS). AGE recommends solvent repl...

  2. SAGE 2.1: SOLVENT ALTERNATIVES GUIDE: USER'S GUIDE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The guide provides instruction for using the SAGE (Solvent Alternatives GuidE) software system, version 2.1. SAGE recommends solvent replacements in cleaning and degreasing operations. It leads the user through a question-and-answer session. The user's responses allow the system ...

  3. Solvent Reaction Field Potential inside an Uncharged Globular Protein: A Bridge between Implicit and Explicit Solvent Models?

    PubMed Central

    Baker, Nathan A.; McCammon, J. Andrew

    2008-01-01

    The solvent reaction field potential of an uncharged protein immersed in Simple Point Charge/Extended (SPC/E) explicit solvent was computed over a series of molecular dynamics trajectories, intotal 1560 ns of simulation time. A finite, positive potential of 13 to 24 kbTec−1 (where T = 300K), dependent on the geometry of the solvent-accessible surface, was observed inside the biomolecule. The primary contribution to this potential arose from a layer of positive charge density 1.0 Å from the solute surface, on average 0.008 ec/Å3, which we found to be the product of a highly ordered first solvation shell. Significant second solvation shell effects, including additional layers of charge density and a slight decrease in the short-range solvent-solvent interaction strength, were also observed. The impact of these findings on implicit solvent models was assessed by running similar explicit-solvent simulations on the fully charged protein system. When the energy due to the solvent reaction field in the uncharged system is accounted for, correlation between per-atom electrostatic energies for the explicit solvent model and a simple implicit (Poisson) calculation is 0.97, and correlation between per-atom energies for the explicit solvent model and a previously published, optimized Poisson model is 0.99. PMID:17949217

  4. Hazardous solvents: Innovative alternatives offer choices

    SciTech Connect

    Melody, M.

    1993-01-01

    Use of hazardous solvents pose various problems for industry, including contributing to depletion of the stratospheric ozone layer, creating hazardous wastes and exposing workers to dangerous chemicals. Several environmental laws regulate the use of hazardous solvents, but only mandated phaseouts have prompted action by businesses. The CAA Amendments and the Montreal Protocol on Substances That Deplete the Ozone Layer are generating industry response, because they order the phaseout of two popular solvents -- CFCs and 1,1,1-trichloroethane. Regulations and hazardous waste disposal costs are the major factors influencing companies to switch to alternative cleaning solvents and technologies. Another factor contributing to the demand for alternative cleaners and processes is increased awareness of risks associated with hazardous solvents. Although most alternative cleaners do not have hazardous characteristics, the contaminants they remove may be hazardous. Vendors, therefore, are cautious about discussing waste disposal. Many facilities switching to aqueous and semi-aqueous systems need to install or modify wastewater treatment facilities, add a filtration system to recycle water, or buy water evaporators.

  5. Solvent replacement for green processing.

    PubMed Central

    Sherman, J; Chin, B; Huibers, P D; Garcia-Valls, R; Hatton, T A

    1998-01-01

    The implementation of the Montreal Protocol, the Clean Air Act, and the Pollution Prevention Act of 1990 has resulted in increased awareness of organic solvent use in chemical processing. The advances made in the search to find "green" replacements for traditional solvents are reviewed, with reference to solvent alternatives for cleaning, coatings, and chemical reaction and separation processes. The development of solvent databases and computational methods that aid in the selection and/or design of feasible or optimal environmentally benign solvent alternatives for specific applications is also discussed. Images Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:9539018

  6. SOLVENT FIRE BY-PRODUCTS

    SciTech Connect

    Walker, D; Samuel Fink, S

    2006-05-22

    Southwest Research Institute (SwRI) conducted a burn test of the Caustic-Side Solvent Extraction (CSSX) solvent to determine the combustion products. The testing showed hydrogen fluoride gas is not a combustion product from a solvent fire when up to 70% of the solvent is consumed. The absence of HF in the combustion gases may reflect concentration of the modifier containing the fluoride groups in the unburned portion. SwRI reported results for other gases (CO, HCN, NOx, formaldehyde, and hydrocarbons). The results, with other supporting information, can be used for evaluating the consequences of a facility fire involving the CSSX solvent inventory.

  7. Using a Simulated Industrial Setting for the Development of an Improved Solvent System for the Recrystallization of Benzoic Acid: A Student-Centered Project

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hightower, Timothy R.; Heeren, Jay D.

    2006-01-01

    Recrystallization of benzoic acid is an excellent way to remove insoluble impurities. In a traditional organic laboratory experiment, insoluble impurities are removed through the recrystallization of benzoic acid utilizing water as the recrystallization solvent. It was our goal to develop a peer-led, problem-solving organic laboratory exercise…

  8. System development for linked-fermentation production of solvents from algal biomass. [Dunaliella tertiolecta, D. primolecta, D. parva, D. bardawil, D. salina

    SciTech Connect

    Nakas, J.P.; Schaedele, M.; Parkinsan, C.M.; Coonley, C.E.; Tanenbaum, S.W.

    1983-11-01

    Five species of the genus Dunaliella (D. tertiolecta, D. primolecta, D. parva, D. bardawil, and D. salina) were examined for glycerol accumulation, growth rate, cell density, and protein and chlorophyll content. The suitability of each algal species for use as a fermentation substrate was judged according to glycerol accumulation and quantities of neutral solvents produced after sequential bacterial fermentations. When grown in 2 M NaCl, with 24 mM NaHCO3 or 3% CO2 at 28 degrees C and with 10,000 to 15,000 lx of incident light on two sides of a glass aquarium, four of the five species tested produced ca. 10 to 20 mg of glycerol per liter of culture. Clostridium pasteurianum was found to convert an algal biomass mixture supplemented with 4% glycerol to ca. 16 g of mixed solvents (n-butanol, 1,3-propanediol, and ethanol) per liter. Acetone was not detected. Additionally, it has been demonstrated that Dunaliella concentrates of up to 300-fold can be directly fermented to an identical pattern of mixed solvents. Overall solvent yields were reduced by more than 50% when fermentations were performed in the presence of 2% NaCl. These results are discussed in terms of practical application in tropical coastal zones.

  9. Nonflammable, Nonaqueous, Low Atmospheric Impact, High Performance Cleaning Solvents

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dhooge, P. M.; Glass, S. M.; Nimitz, J. S.

    2001-01-01

    For many years, chlorofluorocarbon (CFC) and chlorocarbon solvents have played an important part in aerospace operations. These solvents found extensive use as cleaning and analysis (EPA) solvents in precision and critical cleaning. However, CFCs and chlorocarbon solvents have deleterious effects on the ozone layer, are relatively strong greenhouse gases, and some are suspect or known carcinogens. Because of their ozone-depletion potential (ODP), the Montreal Protocol and its amendments, as well as other environmental regulations, have resulted in the phaseout of CFC-113 and 1,1,1-trichloroethane (TCA). Although alternatives have been recommended, they do not perform as well as the original solvents. In addition, some analyses, such as the infrared analysis of extracted hydrocarbons, cannot be performed with the substitute solvents that contain C-H bonds. CFC-113 solvent has been used for many critical aerospace applications. CFC-113, also known as Freon (registered) TF, has been used extensively in NASA's cleaning facilities for precision and critical cleaning, in particular the final rinsing in Class 100 areas, with gas chromatography analysis of rinse residue. While some cleaning can be accomplished by other processes, there are certain critical applications where CFC-113 or a similar solvent is highly cost-effective and ensures safety. Oxygen system components are one example where a solvent compatible with oxygen and capable of removing fluorocarbon grease is needed. Electronic components and precision mechanical components can also be damaged by aggressive cleaning solvents.

  10. Degradation of chlorinated organic solvents in aqueous percarbonate system using zeolite supported nano zero valent iron (Z-nZVI) composite.

    PubMed

    Danish, Muhammad; Gu, Xiaogang; Lu, Shuguang; Naqvi, Muhammad

    2016-07-01

    Chlorinated organic solvents (COSs) are extensively detected in contaminated soil and groundwater that pose long-term threats to human life and environment. In order to degrade COSs effectively, a novel catalytic composite of natural zeolite-supported nano zero valent iron (Z-nZVI) was synthesized in this study. The performance of Z-nZVI-catalyzed sodium percarbonate (SPC) in a heterogeneous Fenton-like system was investigated for the degradation of COSs such as 1,1,1-trichloroethane (1,1,1-TCA) and trichloroethylene (TCE). The surface characteristics and morphology of the Z-nZVI composite were tested using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Total pore volume, specific surface area, and pore size of the natural zeolite and the Z-nZVI composite were measured using Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) method. SEM and TEM analysis showed significant elimination of aggregation and well dispersion of iron nano particles on the framework of natural zeolite. The BET N2 measurement analysis indicated that the surface area of the Z-nZVI composite was 72.3 m(2)/g, much larger than that of the natural zeolite (0.61 m(2)/g). For the contaminant analysis, the samples were extracted with n-hexane and analyzed through gas chromatograph. The degradation of 1,1,1-TCA and TCE in the Z-nZVI-catalyzed percarbonate system were 48 and 39 % respectively, while strong augmentation was observed up to 83 and 99 %, respectively, by adding the reducing agent (RA), hydroxyl amine (NH2OH•HCl). Probe tests validated the presence of OH(●) and O2 (●-) which were responsible for 1,1,1-TCA and TCE degradation, whereas both free radicals were strengthened with the addition of RA. In conclusion, the Z-nZVI/SPC oxidation with reducing agent shows potential technique for degradation of groundwater contaminated by 1,1,1-TCA and TCE. PMID:27023817

  11. Degradation of chlorinated organic solvents in aqueous percarbonate system using zeolite supported nano zero valent iron (Z-nZVI) composite.

    PubMed

    Danish, Muhammad; Gu, Xiaogang; Lu, Shuguang; Naqvi, Muhammad

    2016-07-01

    Chlorinated organic solvents (COSs) are extensively detected in contaminated soil and groundwater that pose long-term threats to human life and environment. In order to degrade COSs effectively, a novel catalytic composite of natural zeolite-supported nano zero valent iron (Z-nZVI) was synthesized in this study. The performance of Z-nZVI-catalyzed sodium percarbonate (SPC) in a heterogeneous Fenton-like system was investigated for the degradation of COSs such as 1,1,1-trichloroethane (1,1,1-TCA) and trichloroethylene (TCE). The surface characteristics and morphology of the Z-nZVI composite were tested using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Total pore volume, specific surface area, and pore size of the natural zeolite and the Z-nZVI composite were measured using Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) method. SEM and TEM analysis showed significant elimination of aggregation and well dispersion of iron nano particles on the framework of natural zeolite. The BET N2 measurement analysis indicated that the surface area of the Z-nZVI composite was 72.3 m(2)/g, much larger than that of the natural zeolite (0.61 m(2)/g). For the contaminant analysis, the samples were extracted with n-hexane and analyzed through gas chromatograph. The degradation of 1,1,1-TCA and TCE in the Z-nZVI-catalyzed percarbonate system were 48 and 39 % respectively, while strong augmentation was observed up to 83 and 99 %, respectively, by adding the reducing agent (RA), hydroxyl amine (NH2OH•HCl). Probe tests validated the presence of OH(●) and O2 (●-) which were responsible for 1,1,1-TCA and TCE degradation, whereas both free radicals were strengthened with the addition of RA. In conclusion, the Z-nZVI/SPC oxidation with reducing agent shows potential technique for degradation of groundwater contaminated by 1,1,1-TCA and TCE.

  12. Occupational solvent exposure and cognition

    PubMed Central

    Sabbath, E.L.; Glymour, M.M.; Berr, C.; Singh-Manoux, A.; Zins, M.; Goldberg, M.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: Chronic occupational solvent exposure is associated with long-term cognitive deficits. Cognitive reserve may protect solvent-exposed workers from cognitive impairment. We tested whether the association between chronic solvent exposure and cognition varied by educational attainment, a proxy for cognitive reserve. Methods: Data were drawn from a prospective cohort of French national gas and electricity (GAZEL) employees (n = 4,134). Lifetime exposure to 4 solvent types (chlorinated solvents, petroleum solvents, benzene, and nonbenzene aromatic solvents) was assessed using a validated job-exposure matrix. Education was dichotomized at less than secondary school or below. Cognitive impairment was defined as scoring below the 25th percentile on the Digit Symbol Substitution Test at mean age 59 (SD 2.8; 88% of participants were retired at testing). Log-binomial regression was used to model risk ratios (RRs) for poor cognition as predicted by solvent exposure, stratified by education and adjusted for sociodemographic and behavioral factors. Results: Solvent exposure rates were higher among less-educated patients. Within this group, there was a dose-response relationship between lifetime exposure to each solvent type and RR for poor cognition (e.g., for high exposure to benzene, RR = 1.24, 95% confidence interval 1.09–1.41), with significant linear trends (p < 0.05) in 3 out of 4 solvent types. Recency of solvent exposure also predicted worse cognition among less-educated patients. Among those with secondary education or higher, there was no significant or near-significant relationship between any quantification of solvent exposure and cognition. Conclusions: Solvent exposure is associated with poor cognition only among less-educated individuals. Higher cognitive reserve in the more-educated group may explain this finding. PMID:22641403

  13. Epidemiology of organic solvents and connective tissue disease

    PubMed Central

    Garabrant, David H; Dumas, Constantine

    2000-01-01

    Case reports suggest that solvents are associated with various connective tissue diseases (systemic sclerosis, scleroderma, undifferentiated connective tissue disease, systemic lupus erythematosis, and rheumatoid arthritis), particularly systemic sclerosis. A small number of epidemiological studies have shown statistically significant but weak associations between solvent exposure, systemic sclerosis, and undifferentiated connective tissue disease. However, the interpretation of these positive findings is tempered by a lack of replication, an inability to specify which solvents convey risk, and an absence of increasing risk with increasing exposure. Existing studies, on aggregate, do not show conclusively that solvents (either as a group of chemicals or individual chemicals) are causally associated with any connective tissue disease. Further investigations should be carried out to replicate the positive existing findings and to specify the solvents and circumstances of exposure that carry risk. PMID:11094414

  14. Method for destroying halocarbon compositions using a critical solvent

    DOEpatents

    Ginosar, Daniel M.; Fox, Robert V.; Janikowski, Stuart K.

    2006-01-10

    A method for destroying halocarbons. Halocarbon materials are reacted in a dehalogenation process wherein they are combined with a solvent in the presence of a catalyst. A hydrogen-containing solvent is preferred which functions as both a solvating agent and hydrogen donor. To augment the hydrogen donation capacity of the solvent if needed (or when non-hydrogen-containing solvents are used), a supplemental hydrogen donor composition may be employed. In operation, at least one of the temperature and pressure of the solvent is maintained near, at, or above a critical level. For example, the solvent may be in (1) a supercritical state; (2) a state where one of the temperature or pressure thereof is at or above critical; or (3) a state where at least one of the temperature and pressure thereof is near-critical. This system provides numerous benefits including improved reaction rates, efficiency, and versatility.

  15. Solvent effect modelling of isocyanuric products synthesis by chemometric methods

    PubMed Central

    Havet, Jean-Louis; Billiau-Loreau, Myriam; Delacroix, Alain

    2002-01-01

    Chemometric tools were used to generate the modelling of solvent e¡ects on the N-alkylation of an isocyanuric acid salt. The method proceeded from a central composite design applied on the Carlson solvent classification using principal components analysis. The selectivity of the reaction was studied from the production of different substituted isocyanuric derivatives. Response graphs were obtained for each compound and used to devise a strategy for solvent selection. The prediction models were validated and used to search for the best selectivity for the reaction system. The solvent most often selected as the best for the reaction is the N,N-dimethylformamide. PMID:18924731

  16. In situ bioremediation of chlorinated solvent with natural gas

    SciTech Connect

    Rabold, D.E.

    1996-12-31

    A bioremediation system for the removal of chlorinated solvents from ground water and sediments is described. The system involves the the in-situ injection of natural gas (as a microbial nutrient) through an innovative configuration of horizontal wells.

  17. Negative corona discharge-ion mobility spectrometry as a detection system for low density extraction solvent-based dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction.

    PubMed

    Ebrahimi, Amir; Jafari, Mohammad T

    2015-03-01

    This paper deals with a method based on negative corona discharge ionization ion mobility spectrometry (NCD-IMS) for the analysis of ethion (as an organophosphorus pesticide). The negative ions such as O2(-) and NO(x)(-) were eliminated from the background spectrum to increase the instrument sensitivity. The method was used to specify the sample extracted via dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction (DLLME) based on low density extraction solvent. The ion mobility spectrum of ethion in the negative mode and the reduced mobility value for its ion peak are firstly reported and compared with those of the positive mode. In order to combine the low density solvent DLLME directly with NCD-IMS, cyclohexane was selected as the extraction solvent, helping us to have a direct injection up to 20 µL solution, without any signal interference. The method was exhaustively validated in terms of sensitivity, enrichment factor, relative recovery, and repeatability. The linear dynamic range of 0.2-100.0 µg L(-1), detection limit of 0.075 µg L(-1), and the relative standard deviation (RSD) of about 5% were obtained for the analysis of ethion through this method. The average recoveries were calculated about 68% and 92% for the grape juice and underground water, respectively. Finally, some real samples were analyzed and the feasibility of the proposed method was successfully verified by the efficient extraction of the analyte using DLLME before the analysis by NCD-IMS.

  18. Solvent Blending Strategy to Upgrade MCU CSSX Solvent to Equivalent Next-Generation CSSX Solvent

    SciTech Connect

    Delmau, Laetitia Helene; Moyer, Bruce A

    2012-12-01

    The results of the present study have validated an equal-volume blending strategy for upgrading freshly prepared CSSX solvent to a blended solvent functionally equivalent to NG-CSSX solvent. It is shown that blending fresh CSSX solvent as currently used in MCU with an equal volume of an NG-CSSX solvent concentrate of appropriate composition yields a blended solvent composition (46.5 mM of MaxCalix, 3.5 mM of BOBCalixC6, 0.5 M of Cs-7SB, 3 mM of guanidine suppressor, and 1.5 mM of TOA in Isopar L) that exhibits equivalent batch ESS performance to that of the NG-CSSX solvent containing 50 mM of MaxCalix, 0.5 M of Cs-7SB, and 3 mM of guanidine suppressor in Isopar L. The solvent blend composition is robust to third-phase formation. Results also show that a blend containing up to 60% v/v of CSSX solvent could be accommodated with minimal risk. Extraction and density data for the effect of solvent concentration mimicking diluent evaporation or over-dilution of the equal-volume blended solvent are also given, providing input for setting operational limits. Given that the experiments employed all pristine chemicals, the results do not qualify a blended solvent starting with actual used MCU solvent, which can be expected to have undergone some degree of degradation. Consequently, further work should be considered to evaluate this risk and implement appropriate remediation if needed.

  19. Green Solvents for Precision Cleaning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grandelli, Heather; Maloney, Phillip; DeVor, Robert; Surma, Jan; Hintze, Paul

    2013-01-01

    Aerospace machinery used in liquid oxygen (LOX) fuel systems must be precision cleaned to achieve a very low level of non-volatile residue (< 1 mg0.1 m2), especially flammable residue. Traditionally chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs) have been used in the precision cleaning of LOX systems, specifically CFC 113 (C2Cl3F3). CFCs have been known to cause the depletion of ozone and in 1987, were banned by the Montreal Protocol due to health, safety and environmental concerns. This has now led to the development of new processes in the precision cleaning of aerospace components. An ideal solvent-replacement is non-flammable, environmentally benign, non-corrosive, inexpensive, effective and evaporates completely, leaving no residue. Highlighted is a green precision cleaning process, which is contaminant removal using supercritical carbon dioxide as the environmentally benign solvent. In this process, the contaminant is dissolved in carbon dioxide, and the parts are recovered at the end of the cleaning process completely dry and ready for use. Typical contaminants of aerospace components include hydrocarbon greases, hydraulic fluids, silicone fluids and greases, fluorocarbon fluids and greases and fingerprint oil. Metallic aerospace components range from small nuts and bolts to much larger parts, such as butterfly valves 18 in diameter. A fluorinated grease, Krytox, is investigated as a model contaminant in these preliminary studies, and aluminum coupons are employed as a model aerospace component. Preliminary studies are presented in which the experimental parameters are optimized for removal of Krytox from aluminum coupons in a stirred-batch process. The experimental conditions investigated are temperature, pressure, exposure time and impeller speed. Temperatures of 308 - 423 K, pressures in the range of 8.3 - 41.4 MPa, exposure times between 5 - 60 min and impeller speeds of 0 - 1000 rpm were investigated. Preliminary results showed up to 86 cleaning efficiency with the

  20. A 3D-RISM-SCF method with dual solvent boxes for a highly polarized system: application to 1,6-anhydrosugar formation reaction of phenyl α- and β-D-glucosides under basic conditions.

    PubMed

    Aono, Shinji; Hosoya, Takashi; Sakaki, Shigeyoshi

    2013-05-01

    One of the difficulties in application of the usual reference interaction site model self-consistent field (RISM-SCF) method to a highly polarized and bulky system arises from the approximate evaluation of electrostatic potential (ESP) with pure point charges. To improve this ESP evaluation, the ESP near a solute is directly calculated with a solute electronic wavefunction, that distant from a solute is approximately calculated with solute point charges, and they are connected with a switching function. To evaluate the fine solvation structure near the solute by incorporating the long-range solute-solvent Coulombic interaction with low computational cost, we introduced the dual solvent box protocol; one small box with the fine spacing is employed for the first and the second solvation shells and the other large box with the normal spacing is employed for long-range solute-solvent interaction. The levoglucosan formation from phenyl α- and β-d-glucosides under basic conditions is successfully inspected by this 3D-RISM-SCF method at the MP2 and SCS-MP2 levels, though the 1D-RISM-SCF could not be applied to this reaction due to the presence of highly polarized and bulky species. This 3D-RISM-SCF calculation reproduces the experimentally reported higher reactivity of the β-anomer. The 3D-RISM-SCF-calculated activation free energy for the β-anomer is closer to the experimental value than the PCM-calculated one. Interestingly, the solvation effect increases the difference in reactivity between these two anomers. The reason is successfully elucidated with 3D-RISM-SCF-calculated microscopic solvation structure and decomposition analysis of solute-solvent interaction.

  1. Solvent screening and crystal habit of metformin hydrochloride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benmessaoud, Ibtissem; Koutchoukali, Ouahiba; Bouhelassa, Mohamed; Nouar, Abderrahim; Veesler, Stéphane

    2016-10-01

    A multi-well setup with video-microscopy was used to study the influence of solvent on solubility, nucleation, and crystallization of an Active Pharmaceutical Ingredient (API): metformin hydrochloride (MET.HCl). Starting with 13 solvents covering a wide variety of polarity and proticity, we found 63 crystallization medium for MET.HCl solid generation: good solvents, good co-solvents and anti-solvent systems. For toxicological reasons, we limited the number of crystallization medium to 18: 3 good solvents (class 3), 3 good co-solvent systems and 12 anti-solvent systems. In order to study the influence of crystallization medium on nucleation temperature, crystal habit and polymorphism of MET.HCl, crystallization was studied by a cooling temperature method. Different crystal habits were observed by optical and scanning electron microscopies, and solid phase were characterized by X-ray powder diffraction, indicating that all the crystals correspond to the thermodynamic stable polymorphic form A of MET.HCl. Finally, the enthalpy of fusion and the melting temperature of MET.HCl were determined by DSC and confirmed the X-ray powder diffraction results.

  2. SOLVENT EXTRACTION OF URANIUM VALUES

    DOEpatents

    Feder, H.M.; Ader, M.; Ross, L.E.

    1959-02-01

    A process is presented for extracting uranium salt from aqueous acidic solutions by organic solvent extraction. It consists in contacting the uranium bearing solution with a water immiscible dialkylacetamide having at least 8 carbon atoms in the molecule. Mentioned as a preferred extractant is dibutylacetamide. The organic solvent is usually used with a diluent such as kerosene or CCl/sub 4/.

  3. Supercritical multicomponent solvent coal extraction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Corcoran, W. H.; Fong, W. S.; Pichaichanarong, P.; Chan, P. C. F.; Lawson, D. D. (Inventor)

    1983-01-01

    The yield of organic extract from the supercritical extraction of coal with larger diameter organic solvents such as toluene is increased by use of a minor amount of from 0.1 to 10% by weight of a second solvent such as methanol having a molecular diameter significantly smaller than the average pore diameter of the coal.

  4. Solvent changeouts without plant shutdown

    SciTech Connect

    Vickery, D.J.; Campbell, S.W. )

    1988-01-01

    For reasons of greater selectivity, lower regeneration energy requirements, reduced corrosivity and possible greater amine stability, MDEA continues to replace DEA in numerous selective H/sub 2/S removal applications. Solvent changeouts from DEA to MDEA often require no equipment modification, yet they are generally achieved by shutting down the plant, draining the old solvent, cleaning, and finally recharging with MDEA. However, in at least one plant, solvent changeout was done on the fly simply by periodically making up normal DEA losses with MDEA until the plant was finally operating on MDEA alone. Gradual solvent changeouts have the advantages of no lost production, no disposal problems with the environmentally-hazardous old solvent, no use and subsequent disposal of cleaning agents, and no additional manpower requirements. An advanced flowsheet simulation capability can suggest when such a procedure is feasible and, when it is, plant simulation can help to ensure that the solvent changeout is done reliably and with no production or cost penalties. GASPLANT-PLUS(TM) is currently the only commercial simulator having formulated solvent (mixed amine) capabilities within a fully flexible flowsheeting environment. After highlighting its technical foundations, they will compare GASPLANT-PLUS predictions with some commercial plant data and, through examples, they will show how solvent changeouts can be done gradually, without plant shutdown.

  5. Opportunities for Bio-Based Solvents Created as Petrochemical and Fuel Products Transition towards Renewable Resources.

    PubMed

    Clark, James H; Farmer, Thomas J; Hunt, Andrew J; Sherwood, James

    2015-07-28

    The global bio-based chemical market is growing in size and importance. Bio-based solvents such as glycerol and 2-methyltetrahydrofuran are often discussed as important introductions to the conventional repertoire of solvents. However adoption of new innovations by industry is typically slow. Therefore it might be anticipated that neoteric solvent systems (e.g., ionic liquids) will remain niche, while renewable routes to historically established solvents will continue to grow in importance. This review discusses bio-based solvents from the perspective of their production, identifying suitable feedstocks, platform molecules, and relevant product streams for the sustainable manufacturing of conventional solvents.

  6. Opportunities for Bio-Based Solvents Created as Petrochemical and Fuel Products Transition towards Renewable Resources.

    PubMed

    Clark, James H; Farmer, Thomas J; Hunt, Andrew J; Sherwood, James

    2015-01-01

    The global bio-based chemical market is growing in size and importance. Bio-based solvents such as glycerol and 2-methyltetrahydrofuran are often discussed as important introductions to the conventional repertoire of solvents. However adoption of new innovations by industry is typically slow. Therefore it might be anticipated that neoteric solvent systems (e.g., ionic liquids) will remain niche, while renewable routes to historically established solvents will continue to grow in importance. This review discusses bio-based solvents from the perspective of their production, identifying suitable feedstocks, platform molecules, and relevant product streams for the sustainable manufacturing of conventional solvents. PMID:26225963

  7. Opportunities for Bio-Based Solvents Created as Petrochemical and Fuel Products Transition towards Renewable Resources

    PubMed Central

    Clark, James H.; Farmer, Thomas J.; Hunt, Andrew J.; Sherwood, James

    2015-01-01

    The global bio-based chemical market is growing in size and importance. Bio-based solvents such as glycerol and 2-methyltetrahydrofuran are often discussed as important introductions to the conventional repertoire of solvents. However adoption of new innovations by industry is typically slow. Therefore it might be anticipated that neoteric solvent systems (e.g., ionic liquids) will remain niche, while renewable routes to historically established solvents will continue to grow in importance. This review discusses bio-based solvents from the perspective of their production, identifying suitable feedstocks, platform molecules, and relevant product streams for the sustainable manufacturing of conventional solvents. PMID:26225963

  8. Solvent degradation products in nuclear fuel processing solvents

    SciTech Connect

    Shook, H.E. Jr.

    1988-06-01

    The Savannah River Plant uses a modified Purex process to recover enriched uranium and separate fission products. This process uses 7.5% tri-n-butyl phosphate (TBP) dissolved in normal paraffin hydrocarbons for the solvent extraction of a nitric acid solution containing the materials to be separated. Periodic problems in product decontamination result from solvent degradation. A study to improve process efficiency has identified certain solvent degradation products and suggested mitigation measures. Undecanoic acid, lauric acid, and tridecanoic acid were tentatively identified as diluent degradation products in recycle solvent. These long-chain organic acids affect phase separation and lead to low decontamination factors. Solid phase extraction (SPE) was used to concentrate the organic acids in solvent prior to analysis by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). SPE and HPLC methods were optimized in this work for analysis of decanoic acid, undecanoic acid, and lauric acid in solvent. Accelerated solvent degradation studies with 7.5% TBP in normal paraffin hydrocarbons showed that long-chain organic acids and long-chain alkyl butyl phosphoric acids are formed by reactions with nitric acid. Degradation of both tributyl phosphate and hydrocarbon can be minimized with purified normal paraffin replacing the standard grade presently used. 12 refs., 1 fig., 3 tabs.

  9. COMPUTER AIDED SOLVENT DESIGN FOR THE ENVIRONMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    Solvent substitution is an effective and useful means of eliminating the use of harmful solvents, but finding substitute solvents which are less harmful and as effective as currently used solvents presents significant difficulties. Solvent substitution is a form of reverse engin...

  10. Neurotoxic effects of solvent exposure on sewage treatment workers

    SciTech Connect

    Kraut, A.; Lilis, R.; Marcus, M.; Valciukas, J.A.; Wolff, M.S.; Landrigan, P.J.

    1988-07-01

    Nineteen Sewage Treatment Workers (STWs) exposed to industrial sewage that contained benzene, toluene, and other organic solvents at a primary sewage treatment plant in New York City (Plant A) were examined for evidence of solvent toxicity. Fourteen (74%) complained of central nervous system (CNS) symptoms consistent with solvent exposure, including lightheadedness, fatigue, increased sleep requirement, and headache. The majority of these symptoms resolved with transfer from the plant. Men working less than 1 yr at Plant A were more likely to complain of two or more CNS symptoms than men who were working there longer than 1 yr (p = .055). Objective abnormalities in neurobehavioral testing were found in all 4 men working longer than 9 yr at this plant, but in only 5 of 15 employed there for a shorter period (p = .03). These results are consistent with the known effects of solvent exposure. Occupational health personnel must be aware that STWs can be exposed to solvents and other industrial wastes.

  11. Behaviour of a solvent trapped in a physical molecular gel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morfin, I.; Spagnoli, S.; Rambaud, C.; Longeville, S.; Plazanet, M.

    2016-03-01

    Physical gels formed by amphiphilic molecules, namely in this study Methyl-4,6-O-benzylidene-? -D-mannopyranoside, can be form either in polar and protic liquid-like water or in organic apolar solvent such as toluene. The solvent, that influences the supramolecular organization of the gelators, plays an important role in the stability and formation of the gel phase. Gelator-solvent interactions govern not only the assembly but also the solvent diffusion in the material. We present here measurements of neutron scattering (Time of Flight and Neutron Spin Echo) characterizing this microscopic behaviour. In addition, we show that transient grating spectroscopy provides valuable information through the characterization of the longitudinal acoustic wave propagating in the system. Opposite effects on the speed of sound in the gels are observed for the two solvents investigated, being relevant of the interactions between the gelators and the surrounding liquid.

  12. Theoretical and experimental study of mixed solvent electrolytes

    SciTech Connect

    Cummings, P.T.; O'Connell, J.P.

    1991-07-01

    The goals of the research program have evolved into the following: Molecular simulation of phase equilibria in aqueous and mixed solvent electrolyte solutions; molecular simulation of solvation and structure in supercritical aqueous systems; extension of experimental database on mixed solvent electrolytes; analysis of the thermodynamic properties of mixed solvent electrolyte solutions and mixed electrolyte solutions using fluctuation solution theory; development of analytic expressions for thermodynamic properties of mixed solvent electrolyte solutions using analytically solved integral equation approximations; and fundamental modeling of mixed solvent electrolytes using numerically solved integral equation approximation theories. We report and evaluate our progress during the period of the grant in light of these six goals in detail in this paper.

  13. EVALUATION OF ALTERNATIVES TO CHLORINATED SOLVENTS FOR METAL CLEANING

    EPA Science Inventory

    This project report details results of investigations into alternatives to chlorinated solvents used for metal degreasing. Three companies participated in this project. The results reported for one company document a situation where the conversion to an aqueous cleaning system ha...

  14. NOVEL POLYMERIC MEMBRANE FOR DEHYDRATION OF ORGANIC SOLVENTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Pervaporation has emerged as an economically viable alternative technology for dehydration of organic solvents, removal of organic compounds and organic/organic separations. Development of a membrane system with suitable flux and selectivity characteristics plays a critical role...

  15. HOMOGENEOUS CATALYTIC OXIDATION OF HYDROCARBONS IN ALTERNATIVE SOLVENTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Homogeneous Catalytic Oxidations of Hydrocarbons in Alternative Solvent Systems

    Michael A. Gonzalez* and Thomas M. Becker, Sustainable Technology Division, Office of Research and Development; United States Environmental Protection Agency, 26 West Martin Luther King Drive, ...

  16. EXPERIENCES IN DESIGNING SOLVENTS FOR THE ENVIRONMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    To meet the great need of replacing many harmful solvents commonly used by industry and the public with environmentally benign substitute solvents, the PARIS II solvent design software has been developed. Although the difficulty of successfully finding replacements increases with...

  17. Swelling of lignites in organic solvents

    SciTech Connect

    R.G. Makitra; D.V. Bryk

    2008-10-15

    Data on the swelling of Turkish lignites can be summarized using linear multiparameter equations that take into account various properties of solvents. Factors responsible for the amounts of absorbed solvents are the basicity and cohesion energy density of the solvents.

  18. Caustic-Side Solvent Extraction Solvent-Composition Recommendation

    SciTech Connect

    Klatt, L.N.

    2002-05-09

    The U.S. Department of Energy has selected caustic-side solvent extraction as the preferred cesium removal technology for the treatment of high-level waste stored at the Savannah River Site. Data for the solubility of the extractant, calix[4]arene-bis(tert-octyl benzo-crown-6), acquired and reported for the Salt Processing Program down-select decision, showed the original solvent composition to be supersaturated with respect to the extractant. Although solvent samples have been observed for approximately 1 year without any solids formation, work was completed to define a new solvent composition that was thermodynamically stable with respect to solids formation and to expand the operating temperature with respect to third-phase formation. Chemical and physical data as a function of solvent component concentrations were collected. The data included calix[4]arene-bis(tert-octyl benzo-crown-6) solubility; cesium distribution ratio under extraction, scrub, and strip conditions; flow sheet robustness; temperature range of third-phase formation; dispersion numbers for the solvent against waste simulant, scrub and strip acids, and sodium hydroxide wash solutions; solvent density; viscosity; and surface and interfacial tension. These data were mapped against a set of predefined performance criteria. The composition of 0.007 M calix[4]arene-bis(tert-octyl benzo-crown-6), 0.75 M 1-(2,2,3,3-tetrafluoropropoxy)-3-(4-sec-butylphenoxy)-2-propanol, and 0.003 M tri-n-octylamine in the diluent Isopar{reg_sign} L provided the best match between the measured properties and the performance criteria. Therefore, it is recommended as the new baseline solvent composition.

  19. ACTIVE EFFLUX OF ORGANIC SOLVENTS BY PSEUDOMONAS PUTIDA S12 IS INDUCED BY SOLVENTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Induction of the membrane-associated organic solvent efflux system SrpABC of Pseudomonas putida S12 was examined by cloning a 312-bp DNA fragment, containing the srp promoter, in the broad-host-range reporter vector pKRZ-1. Compounds that are capable of inducing expression of the...

  20. A novel aqueous two phase system composed of a thermo-separating polymer and an organic solvent for purification of thermo-acidic amylase enzyme from red pitaya (Hylocereus polyrhizus) peel.

    PubMed

    Amid, Mehrnoush; Manap, Yazid; Zohdi, Nor Khanani

    2014-01-01

    The purification of thermo-acidic amylase enzyme from red pitaya (Hylocereus polyrhizus) peel for the first time was investigated using a novel aqueous two-phase system (ATPS) consisting of a thermo-separating copolymer and an organic solvent. The effectiveness of different parameters such as molecular weight of the thermo-separating ethylene oxide-propylene oxide (EOPO) copolymer and type and concentration of organic solvent on the partitioning behavior of amylase was investigated. In addition, the effects of phase components, volume ratio (VR), pH and crude load of purification factor and yield of amylase were evaluated to achieve the optimum partition conditions of the enzyme. In the novel ATPS method, the enzyme was satisfactorily partitioned into the polymer-rich top phase in the system composed of 30% (w/w) EOPO 2500 and 15% (w/w) 2-propanol, at a volume ratio of 1.94 and with a crude load scale of 25% (w/w) at pH 5.0. Recovery and recycling of components was also measured in each successive step of the ATPS process. The enzyme was successfully recovered by the method with a high purification factor of 14.3 and yield of 96.6% and copolymer was also recovered and recycled at a rate above 97%, making the method was more economical than the traditional ATPS method. PMID:24858097

  1. A novel aqueous two phase system composed of a thermo-separating polymer and an organic solvent for purification of thermo-acidic amylase enzyme from red pitaya (Hylocereus polyrhizus) peel.

    PubMed

    Amid, Mehrnoush; Manap, Yazid; Zohdi, Nor Khanani

    2014-05-22

    The purification of thermo-acidic amylase enzyme from red pitaya (Hylocereus polyrhizus) peel for the first time was investigated using a novel aqueous two-phase system (ATPS) consisting of a thermo-separating copolymer and an organic solvent. The effectiveness of different parameters such as molecular weight of the thermo-separating ethylene oxide-propylene oxide (EOPO) copolymer and type and concentration of organic solvent on the partitioning behavior of amylase was investigated. In addition, the effects of phase components, volume ratio (VR), pH and crude load of purification factor and yield of amylase were evaluated to achieve the optimum partition conditions of the enzyme. In the novel ATPS method, the enzyme was satisfactorily partitioned into the polymer-rich top phase in the system composed of 30% (w/w) EOPO 2500 and 15% (w/w) 2-propanol, at a volume ratio of 1.94 and with a crude load scale of 25% (w/w) at pH 5.0. Recovery and recycling of components was also measured in each successive step of the ATPS process. The enzyme was successfully recovered by the method with a high purification factor of 14.3 and yield of 96.6% and copolymer was also recovered and recycled at a rate above 97%, making the method was more economical than the traditional ATPS method.

  2. SOLV-DB: Solvents Data

    DOE Data Explorer

    SOLV-DB provides a specialized mix of information on commercially available solvents. The development of the database was funded under the Strategic Environmental Research and Development Program (SERDP) with funds from EPA and DOE's Office of Industrial Technologies in EE. The information includes: • Health and safety considerations involved in choosing and using solvents • Chemical and physical data affecting the suitability of a particular solvent for a wide range of potential applications • Regulatory responsibilities, including exposure and effluent limits, hazard classification status with respect to several key statutes, and selected reporting requirements • Environmental fate data, to indicate whether a solvent is likely to break down or persist in air or water, and what types of waste treatment techniques may apply to it • CAS numbers (from Chemical Abstracts Service) and Sax Numbers (from Sax, et.al., Dangerous Properties of Industrial Materials) Supplier Information See help information at http://solvdb.ncms.org/welcome.htm (Specialized Interface)

  3. ON-SITE SOLVENT RECOVERY

    EPA Science Inventory

    This study evaluated the product quality, waste reduction/pollution prevention, and economic aspects of three technologies for onsite solvent recovery: atmospheric batch distillation, vacuum heat-pump distillation, and low-emission vapor degreasing. The atmospheric and vacuum ...

  4. Solvents and supporting electrolytes for vanadium acetylacetonate flow batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shinkle, Aaron A.; Pomaville, Timothy J.; Sleightholme, Alice E. S.; Thompson, Levi T.; Monroe, Charles W.

    2014-02-01

    Properties of supporting electrolytes and solvents were examined for use with vanadium acetylacetonate - a member of the class of metal(β-diketonate) active species - in non-aqueous redox flow batteries. Twenty supporting-electrolyte/solvent combinations were screened for ionic conductivity and supporting-electrolyte solubility. Hexane, tetrahydrofuran, and dimethylcarbonate solvents did not meet minimal conductivity and solubility criteria for any of the electrolytes used, which included tetraethylammonium tetrafluoroborate, tetrabutylammonium tetrafluoroborate, tetrabutylammonium hexafluorophosphate, and (1-butyl, 3-methyl)imidazolium bis(trifluoromethanesulfonyl)imide. Ionic conductivities and solubilities for solutions of these electrolytes passed screening criteria in acetonitrile and dimethylformamide solvents, in which maximum supporting-electrolyte and active-species solubilities were determined. Active-species electrochemistry was found to be reversible in several solvent/support systems; for some systems the voltammetric signatures of unwanted side reactions were suppressed. Correlations between supporting-solution properties and performance metrics suggest that an optimal solvent for a vanadium acetylacetonate RFB should have a low solvent molar volume for active-species solubility, and a high Hansen polarity for conductivity.

  5. Green chemistry: reversible nonpolar-to-polar solvent.

    PubMed

    Jessop, Philip G; Heldebrant, David J; Li, Xiaowang; Eckert, Charles A; Liotta, Charles L

    2005-08-25

    Imagine a smart solvent that can be switched reversibly from a liquid with one set of properties to another that has very different properties, upon command. Here we create such a system, in which a non-ionic liquid (an alcohol and an amine base) converts to an ionic liquid (a salt in liquid form) upon exposure to an atmosphere of carbon dioxide, and then reverts back to its non-ionic form when exposed to nitrogen or argon gas. Such switchable solvents should facilitate organic syntheses and separations by eliminating the need to remove and replace solvents after each reaction step. PMID:16121169

  6. Solvent vapors controlled by pre-concentration, incineration

    SciTech Connect

    Sundberg, R.E.

    1996-01-01

    Concentration of solvent vapors in ventilation air exhausted from the workplace often is too dilute for efficient destruction or recovery. Several techniques are being developed to pre-concentrate the vapors before treating them in a catalytic incinerator. Molnbacka Industri AB (Forshaga, Sweden) has developed a system to control volatile organic compound emissions by using activated carbon adsorbers to pre-concentrate the solvent vapors. The technology uses carbon adsorption and desorption to concentrate dilute solvent vapors to a much smaller air stream for efficient destruction in a catalytic incinerator.

  7. Green chemistry: Reversible nonpolar-to-polar solvent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jessop, Philip G.; Heldebrant, David J.; Li, Xiaowang; Eckert, Charles A.; Liotta, Charles L.

    2005-08-01

    Imagine a smart solvent that can be switched reversibly from a liquid with one set of properties to another that has very different properties, upon command. Here we create such a system, in which a non-ionic liquid (an alcohol and an amine base) converts to an ionic liquid (a salt in liquid form) upon exposure to an atmosphere of carbon dioxide, and then reverts back to its non-ionic form when exposed to nitrogen or argon gas. Such switchable solvents should facilitate organic syntheses and separations by eliminating the need to remove and replace solvents after each reaction step.

  8. The hydration and solvent polarization effects of nucleotide bases.

    PubMed

    Gao, J

    1994-08-01

    A combined Monte Carlo quantum mechanical and molecular mechanical (QM/MM) simulation method is used to determine the free energy of hydration and the solvent polarization effect for the nucleotide bases. In the present AM1/TIP3P model, the solute molecule is characterized by valence electrons and effective nucleus cores with Hartree-Fock molecular orbital theory incorporating a solute-solvent interaction Hamiltonian. It is found that polarization energy contributes up to 37%-61% of the total solute-solvent interaction for the systems considered. The computed free energies of hydration are compared with previous theoretical results.

  9. Stoddard solvent poisoning

    MedlinePlus

    ... swelling NERVOUS SYSTEM Burning sensations Convulsions Dizziness Fever Memory problems Nervousness Numbness in arms and legs Unconsciousness SKIN Burns Irritation Holes in the skin or underlying tissues

  10. Solvent/Non-Solvent Sintering To Make Microsphere Scaffolds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Laurencin, Cato T.; Brown, Justin L.; Nair, Lakshmi

    2011-01-01

    A solvent/non-solvent sintering technique has been devised for joining polymeric microspheres to make porous matrices for use as drug-delivery devices or scaffolds that could be seeded with cells for growing tissues. Unlike traditional sintering at elevated temperature and pressure, this technique is practiced at room temperature and pressure and, therefore, does not cause thermal degradation of any drug, protein, or other biochemical with which the microspheres might be loaded to impart properties desired in a specific application. Also, properties of scaffolds made by this technique are more reproducible than are properties of comparable scaffolds made by traditional sintering. The technique involves the use of two miscible organic liquids: one that is and one that is not a solvent for the affected polymer. The polymeric microspheres are placed in a mold having the size and shape of the desired scaffold, then the solvent/non-solvent mixture is poured into the mold to fill the void volume between the microspheres, then the liquid mixture is allowed to evaporate. Some of the properties of the resulting scaffold can be tailored through choice of the proportions of the liquids and the diameter of the microspheres.

  11. A new application of an aqueous diphase solvent system in one-step preparation of polysaccharide from the crude water extract of Radix Astragali by high-speed counter-current chromatography.

    PubMed

    Yin, Jun-Yi; Jiang, Zhi-Hong; Yu, Hua; Xie, Ming-Yong; Hsiao, Wen-Luan; Lu, Ai-Ping; Han, Quan-Bin

    2012-11-01

    Polysaccharide's purification remains challenge to separation technology. Conventional methods involve time-consuming and complicated operations and always cause significant variation in the isolates' chemistry. This paper reports an aqueous diphase solvent system, namely PEG1000-MgSO(4)-H(2)O, which succeeded in one-step CCC separation of a polysaccharide (43 mg) from the water extract (1.67 g) of Radix Astragali. The solvent composition was set as 12:16:72 (w/w/w) of which the lower phase was used as the mobile phase at a flow rate of 0.8 mL/min in a 1000 mL column. The purified polysaccharide bears an average molecular weight of 1095 kDa and consists of galacturonic acid (76.5%), galactose (7.7%), arabinose (4.2%) and glucose (5.0%). Methylation analysis result showed it was composed of 58.4% of 1,4-linked Glcp, 11.8% of T-linked Araf, 10.5% of T-linked Glcp, 9.1% of 1,4,6-linked Galp and 5.1% of 1,3,6-linked Galp, etc. This success shows a short way between the crude water extract and purified polysaccharides, which minimizes the chemical variation caused by purification methods.

  12. Analytical applications of partitioning in aqueous two-phase systems: Exploring protein structural changes and protein-partner interactions in vitro and in vivo by solvent interaction analysis method.

    PubMed

    Zaslavsky, Boris Y; Uversky, Vladimir N; Chait, Arnon

    2016-05-01

    This review covers the fundamentals of protein partitioning in aqueous two-phase systems (ATPS). Included is a review of advancements in the analytical application of solute partitioning in ATPS over the last two decades, with multiple examples of experimental data providing evidence that phase-forming polymers do not interact with solutes partitioned in ATPS. The partitioning of solutes is governed by the differences in solute interactions with aqueous media in the two phases. Solvent properties of the aqueous media in these two phases may be characterized and manipulated. The solvent interaction analysis (SIA) method, based on the solute partitioning in ATPS, may be used for characterization and analysis of individual proteins and their interactions with different partners. The current state of clinical proteomics regarding the discovery and monitoring of new protein biomarkers is discussed, and it is argued that the protein expression level in a biological fluid may be not the optimal focus of clinical proteomic research. Multiple examples of application of the SIA method for discovery of changes in protein structure and protein-partner interactions in biological fluids are described. The SIA method reveals new opportunities for discovery and monitoring structure-based protein biomarkers.

  13. Gamma Ray Radiolysis of the FPEX Solvent

    SciTech Connect

    B. J. Mincher; S. P. Mezyk; D. R. Peterman

    2006-09-01

    Slide presentation. FPEX contains a calixarene for Cs extraction, a crown ether for Sr extraction, Cs7SB modifier, and TOA to aid in stripping, in Isopar L diluent. The radiation stability FPEX must be evaluated prior to process use. Radiolytic degradation of species in solution are due to reaction with the direct radiolysis products of the diluent. In Isopar L, the reactive species produced include e-, •H and alkane radicals, resulting in a reducing environment. However, in nitric acid, oxidizing hydroxyl (•OH) and nitro (•NO2) radicals dominate system chemistry. Thus, the nature of diluent and the presence of radical scavengers affect the results of irradiation. We report the preliminary results of a new program to investigate the radiolysis of FPEX using the 60Co irradiation of FPEX neat solvent, acid pre-equilibrated solvent and mixed aerated phases. The Cs and Sr distribution ratios were used as metrics.

  14. Effect of Solvent System on Extractability of Lipidic Components of Scenedesmus obliquus (M2-1) and Gloeothece sp. on Antioxidant Scavenging Capacity Thereof

    PubMed Central

    Amaro, Helena M.; Fernandes, Fátima; Valentão, Patrícia; Andrade, Paula B.; Sousa-Pinto, I.; Malcata, F. Xavier; Guedes, A. Catarina

    2015-01-01

    Microalgae are well known for their biotechnological potential, namely with regard to bioactive lipidic components—especially carotenoids and polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA), well-known for therapeutic applications based on their antioxidant capacity. The aim of this work was to evaluate the influence of four distinct food-grade solvents upon extractability of specific lipidic components, and on the antioxidant capacity exhibited against both synthetic (2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH•) and 2,2′-azinobis-(3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulfonic acid (ABTS+•)) and biological reactive species (O2•− and •NO−). A eukaryotic microalga (Scenedesmus obliquus (M2-1)) and a prokaryotic one (Gloeothece sp.) were used as case studies. Concerning total antioxidant capacity, the hexane:isopropanol (3:2) and acetone extracts of Sc. obliquus (M2-1) were the most effective against DPPH• and ABTS+•, respectively. Gloeothece sp. ethanol extracts were the most interesting scavengers of O2•−, probably due the high content of linolenic acid. On the other hand, acetone and hexane:isopropanol (3:2) extracts were the most interesting ones in •NO− assay. Acetone extract exhibited the best results for the ABTS assay, likely associated to its content of carotenoids, in both microalgae. Otherwise, ethanol stood out in PUFA extraction. Therefore, profiles of lipidic components extracted are critical for evaluating the antioxidant performance—which appears to hinge, in particular, on the balance between carotenoids and PUFAs. PMID:26492257

  15. Coal liquefaction process with enhanced process solvent

    DOEpatents

    Givens, Edwin N.; Kang, Dohee

    1984-01-01

    In an improved coal liquefaction process, including a critical solvent deashing stage, high value product recovery is improved and enhanced process-derived solvent is provided by recycling second separator underflow in the critical solvent deashing stage to the coal slurry mix, for inclusion in the process solvent pool.

  16. Improved Detection Technique for Solvent Rinse Cleanliness Verification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hornung, S. D.; Beeson, H. D.

    2001-01-01

    The NASA White Sands Test Facility (WSTF) has an ongoing effort to reduce or eliminate usage of cleaning solvents such as CFC-113 and its replacements. These solvents are used in the final clean and cleanliness verification processes for flight and ground support hardware, especially for oxygen systems where organic contaminants can pose an ignition hazard. For the final cleanliness verification in the standard process, the equivalent of one square foot of surface area of parts is rinsed with the solvent, and the final 100 mL of the rinse is captured. The amount of nonvolatile residue (NVR) in the solvent is determined by weight after the evaporation of the solvent. An improved process of sampling this rinse, developed at WSTF, requires evaporation of less than 2 mL of the solvent to make the cleanliness verification. Small amounts of the solvent are evaporated in a clean stainless steel cup, and the cleanliness of the stainless steel cup is measured using a commercially available surface quality monitor. The effectiveness of this new cleanliness verification technique was compared to the accepted NVR sampling procedures. Testing with known contaminants in solution, such as hydraulic fluid, fluorinated lubricants, and cutting and lubricating oils, was performed to establish a correlation between amount in solution and the process response. This report presents the approach and results and discusses the issues in establishing the surface quality monitor-based cleanliness verification.

  17. Protein structure, stability and solubility in water and other solvents.

    PubMed Central

    Pace, C Nick; Treviño, Saul; Prabhakaran, Erode; Scholtz, J Martin

    2004-01-01

    Proteins carry out the most difficult tasks in living cells. They do so by interacting specifically with other molecules. This requires that they fold to a unique, globular conformation that is only marginally more stable than the large ensemble of unfolded states. The folded state is stabilized mainly by the burial and tight packing of over 80% of the peptide groups and non-polar side chains. If life as we know it is to exist in a solvent other than water, the folded state must be stable and soluble in the new solvent. Our analysis suggests that proteins will be unstable in most polar solvents such as ethanol, extremely stable in non-polar solvents such as cyclohexane, and even more stable in a vacuum. Our solubility studies suggest that protein solubility will be markedly lower in polar solvents such as ethanol and that proteins will be essentially insoluble in non-polar solvents such as cyclohexane. For these and other reasons it seems unlikely that the life we know could exist in any solvent system other than water. PMID:15306378

  18. Implicit electrostatic solvent model with continuous dielectric permittivity function.

    PubMed

    Basilevsky, Mikhail V; Grigoriev, Fedor V; Nikitina, Ekaterina A; Leszczynski, Jerzy

    2010-02-25

    The modification of the electrostatic continuum solvent model considered in the present work is based on the exact solution of the Poisson equation, which can be constructed provided that the dielectric permittivity epsilon of the total solute and solvent system is an isotropic and continuous spatial function. This assumption allows one to formulate a numerically efficient and universal computational scheme that covers the important case of a variable epsilon function inherent to the solvent region. The obtained type of solution is unavailable for conventional dielectric continuum models such as the Onsager and Kirkwood models for spherical cavities and the polarizable continuum model (PCM) for solute cavities of general shape, which imply that epsilon is discontinuous on the boundary confining the excluded volume cavity of the solute particle. Test computations based on the present algorithm are performed for water and several nonaqueous solvents. They illustrate specific features of this approach, called the "smooth boundary continuum model" (SBCM), as compared to the PCM procedure, and suggest primary tentative results of its parametrization for different solvents. The calculation for the case of a binary solvent mixture with variable epsilon in the solvent space region demonstrates the applicability of this approach to a novel application field covered by the SBCM.

  19. Alternative Solvents and Technologies for Precision Cleaning of Aerospace Components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grandelli, Heather; Maloney, Phillip; DeVor, Robert; Hintze, Paul

    2014-01-01

    Precision cleaning solvents for aerospace components and oxygen fuel systems, including currently used Vertrel-MCA, have a negative environmental legacy, high global warming potential, and have polluted cleaning sites. Thus, alternative solvents and technologies are being investigated with the aim of achieving precision contamination levels of less than 1 mg/sq ft. The technologies being evaluated are ultrasonic bath cleaning, plasma cleaning and supercritical carbon dioxide cleaning.

  20. Solvent-dependent cation exchange in metal-organic frameworks.

    PubMed

    Brozek, Carl K; Bellarosa, Luca; Soejima, Tomohiro; Clark, Talia V; López, Núria; Dincă, Mircea

    2014-06-01

    We investigated which factors govern the critical steps of cation exchange in metal-organic frameworks by studying the effect of various solvents on the insertion of Ni(2+) into MOF-5 and Co(2+) into MFU-4l. After plotting the extent of cation insertion versus different solvent parameters, trends emerge that offer insight into the exchange processes for both systems. This approach establishes a method for understanding critical aspects of cation exchange in different MOFs and other materials.

  1. Stochastic level-set variational implicit-solvent approach to solute-solvent interfacial fluctuations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Shenggao; Sun, Hui; Cheng, Li-Tien; Dzubiella, Joachim; Li, Bo; McCammon, J. Andrew

    2016-08-01

    Recent years have seen the initial success of a variational implicit-solvent model (VISM), implemented with a robust level-set method, in capturing efficiently different hydration states and providing quantitatively good estimation of solvation free energies of biomolecules. The level-set minimization of the VISM solvation free-energy functional of all possible solute-solvent interfaces or dielectric boundaries predicts an equilibrium biomolecular conformation that is often close to an initial guess. In this work, we develop a theory in the form of Langevin geometrical flow to incorporate solute-solvent interfacial fluctuations into the VISM. Such fluctuations are crucial to biomolecular conformational changes and binding process. We also develop a stochastic level-set method to numerically implement such a theory. We describe the interfacial fluctuation through the "normal velocity" that is the solute-solvent interfacial force, derive the corresponding stochastic level-set equation in the sense of Stratonovich so that the surface representation is independent of the choice of implicit function, and develop numerical techniques for solving such an equation and processing the numerical data. We apply our computational method to study the dewetting transition in the system of two hydrophobic plates and a hydrophobic cavity of a synthetic host molecule cucurbit[7]uril. Numerical simulations demonstrate that our approach can describe an underlying system jumping out of a local minimum of the free-energy functional and can capture dewetting transitions of hydrophobic systems. In the case of two hydrophobic plates, we find that the wavelength of interfacial fluctuations has a strong influence to the dewetting transition. In addition, we find that the estimated energy barrier of the dewetting transition scales quadratically with the inter-plate distance, agreeing well with existing studies of molecular dynamics simulations. Our work is a first step toward the inclusion of

  2. Stochastic level-set variational implicit-solvent approach to solute-solvent interfacial fluctuations.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Shenggao; Sun, Hui; Cheng, Li-Tien; Dzubiella, Joachim; Li, Bo; McCammon, J Andrew

    2016-08-01

    Recent years have seen the initial success of a variational implicit-solvent model (VISM), implemented with a robust level-set method, in capturing efficiently different hydration states and providing quantitatively good estimation of solvation free energies of biomolecules. The level-set minimization of the VISM solvation free-energy functional of all possible solute-solvent interfaces or dielectric boundaries predicts an equilibrium biomolecular conformation that is often close to an initial guess. In this work, we develop a theory in the form of Langevin geometrical flow to incorporate solute-solvent interfacial fluctuations into the VISM. Such fluctuations are crucial to biomolecular conformational changes and binding process. We also develop a stochastic level-set method to numerically implement such a theory. We describe the interfacial fluctuation through the "normal velocity" that is the solute-solvent interfacial force, derive the corresponding stochastic level-set equation in the sense of Stratonovich so that the surface representation is independent of the choice of implicit function, and develop numerical techniques for solving such an equation and processing the numerical data. We apply our computational method to study the dewetting transition in the system of two hydrophobic plates and a hydrophobic cavity of a synthetic host molecule cucurbit[7]uril. Numerical simulations demonstrate that our approach can describe an underlying system jumping out of a local minimum of the free-energy functional and can capture dewetting transitions of hydrophobic systems. In the case of two hydrophobic plates, we find that the wavelength of interfacial fluctuations has a strong influence to the dewetting transition. In addition, we find that the estimated energy barrier of the dewetting transition scales quadratically with the inter-plate distance, agreeing well with existing studies of molecular dynamics simulations. Our work is a first step toward the inclusion of

  3. Stochastic level-set variational implicit-solvent approach to solute-solvent interfacial fluctuations.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Shenggao; Sun, Hui; Cheng, Li-Tien; Dzubiella, Joachim; Li, Bo; McCammon, J Andrew

    2016-08-01

    Recent years have seen the initial success of a variational implicit-solvent model (VISM), implemented with a robust level-set method, in capturing efficiently different hydration states and providing quantitatively good estimation of solvation free energies of biomolecules. The level-set minimization of the VISM solvation free-energy functional of all possible solute-solvent interfaces or dielectric boundaries predicts an equilibrium biomolecular conformation that is often close to an initial guess. In this work, we develop a theory in the form of Langevin geometrical flow to incorporate solute-solvent interfacial fluctuations into the VISM. Such fluctuations are crucial to biomolecular conformational changes and binding process. We also develop a stochastic level-set method to numerically implement such a theory. We describe the interfacial fluctuation through the "normal velocity" that is the solute-solvent interfacial force, derive the corresponding stochastic level-set equation in the sense of Stratonovich so that the surface representation is independent of the choice of implicit function, and develop numerical techniques for solving such an equation and processing the numerical data. We apply our computational method to study the dewetting transition in the system of two hydrophobic plates and a hydrophobic cavity of a synthetic host molecule cucurbit[7]uril. Numerical simulations demonstrate that our approach can describe an underlying system jumping out of a local minimum of the free-energy functional and can capture dewetting transitions of hydrophobic systems. In the case of two hydrophobic plates, we find that the wavelength of interfacial fluctuations has a strong influence to the dewetting transition. In addition, we find that the estimated energy barrier of the dewetting transition scales quadratically with the inter-plate distance, agreeing well with existing studies of molecular dynamics simulations. Our work is a first step toward the inclusion of

  4. Acid Base Titrations in Nonaqueous Solvents and Solvent Mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barcza, Lajos; Buvári-Barcza, Ágnes

    2003-07-01

    The acid base determination of different substances by nonaqueous titrations is highly preferred in pharmaceutical analyses since the method is quantitative, exact, and reproducible. The modern interpretation of the reactions in nonaqueous solvents started in the last century, but several inconsistencies and unsolved problems can be found in the literature. The acid base theories of Brønsted Lowry and Lewis as well as the so-called solvent theory are outlined first, then the promoting (and leveling) and the differentiating effects are discussed on the basis of the hydrogen-bond concept. Emphasis is put on the properties of formic acid and acetic anhydride since their importance is increasing.

  5. Wafer-scale synthesis of thickness-controllable MoS2 films via solution-processing using a dimethylformamide/n-butylamine/2-aminoethanol solvent system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Jaehyun; Gu, Yeahyun; Lee, Eunha; Lee, Hyangsook; Park, Sang Han; Cho, Mann-Ho; Kim, Yong Ho; Kim, Yong-Hoon; Kim, Hyoungsub

    2015-05-01

    The wafer-scale synthesis of two-dimensional molybdenum disulfide (MoS2) films, with high layer-controllability and uniformity, remains a significant challenge in the fields of nano and optoelectronics. Here, we report the highly thickness controllable growth of uniform MoS2 thin films on the wafer-scale via a spin-coating route. Formulation of a dimethylformamide-based MoS2 precursor solution mixed with additional amine- and amino alcohol-based solvents (n-butylamine and 2-aminoethanol) allowed for the formation of a uniform coating of MoS2 thin films over a 2 inch wafer-scale SiO2/Si substrate. In addition, facile control of the average number of stacking layers is demonstrated by simply manipulating the concentration of the precursor solution. Various characterization results reveal that the synthesized MoS2 film has wafer-scale homogeneity with excellent crystalline quality and a stoichiometric chemical composition. To further demonstrate possible device applications, a mostly penta-layered MoS2 thin film was integrated into a top-gated field-effect transistor as the channel layer and we also successfully transferred our films onto transparent/flexible substrates.The wafer-scale synthesis of two-dimensional molybdenum disulfide (MoS2) films, with high layer-controllability and uniformity, remains a significant challenge in the fields of nano and optoelectronics. Here, we report the highly thickness controllable growth of uniform MoS2 thin films on the wafer-scale via a spin-coating route. Formulation of a dimethylformamide-based MoS2 precursor solution mixed with additional amine- and amino alcohol-based solvents (n-butylamine and 2-aminoethanol) allowed for the formation of a uniform coating of MoS2 thin films over a 2 inch wafer-scale SiO2/Si substrate. In addition, facile control of the average number of stacking layers is demonstrated by simply manipulating the concentration of the precursor solution. Various characterization results reveal that the

  6. Molecular microenvironments: Solvent interactions with nucleic acid bases and ions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Macelroy, R. D.; Pohorille, A.

    1986-01-01

    The possibility of reconstructing plausible sequences of events in prebiotic molecular evolution is limited by the lack of fossil remains. However, with hindsight, one goal of molecular evolution was obvious: the development of molecular systems that became constituents of living systems. By understanding the interactions among molecules that are likely to have been present in the prebiotic environment, and that could have served as components in protobiotic molecular systems, plausible evolutionary sequences can be suggested. When stable aggregations of molecules form, a net decrease in free energy is observed in the system. Such changes occur when solvent molecules interact among themselves, as well as when they interact with organic species. A significant decrease in free energy, in systems of solvent and organic molecules, is due to entropy changes in the solvent. Entropy-driven interactioins played a major role in the organization of prebiotic systems, and understanding the energetics of them is essential to understanding molecular evolution.

  7. Selecting water-alcohol mixed solvent for synthesis of polydopamine nano-spheres using solubility parameter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Xiaoli; Wang, Yinling; Li, Maoguo

    2014-08-01

    The solvent plays an important role in a given chemical reaction. Since most reaction in nature occur in the mixed-solvent systems, a comprehensive principle for solvent optimization was required. By calculating the Hansen solubility parameters (HSP) distance Ra, we designed a model experiment to explore the influence of mixed solvents on the chemical synthesis. The synthesis of polydopamine (PDA) in the water-alcohol system was chosen as model. As predicted, the well-dispersed PDA spheres were obtained in selected solvents with smaller Ra values: methanol/water, ethanol/water and 2-propanol/water. In addition, the mixed solvent with smaller Ra values gave a higher conversion of dopamine. The strategy for mixed solvent selection is might be useful to choose optimal reaction media for efficient chemical synthesis.

  8. Selecting water-alcohol mixed solvent for synthesis of polydopamine nano-spheres using solubility parameter

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Xiaoli; Wang, Yinling; Li, Maoguo

    2014-01-01

    The solvent plays an important role in a given chemical reaction. Since most reaction in nature occur in the mixed-solvent systems, a comprehensive principle for solvent optimization was required. By calculating the Hansen solubility parameters (HSP) distance Ra, we designed a model experiment to explore the influence of mixed solvents on the chemical synthesis. The synthesis of polydopamine (PDA) in the water-alcohol system was chosen as model. As predicted, the well-dispersed PDA spheres were obtained in selected solvents with smaller Ra values: methanol/water, ethanol/water and 2-propanol/water. In addition, the mixed solvent with smaller Ravalues gave a higher conversion of dopamine. The strategy for mixed solvent selection is might be useful to choose optimal reaction media for efficient chemical synthesis. PMID:25317902

  9. An improved AMBER force field for α,α-dialkylated peptides: intrinsic and solvent-induced conformational preferences of model systems.

    PubMed

    Grubišić, Sonja; Brancato, Giuseppe; Barone, Vincenzo

    2013-10-28

    α,α-Dialkylated amino acid residues have acquired considerable importance as effective means for introducing backbone conformation constraints in synthetic peptides. The prototype of such a class of residues, namely Aib (α-aminoisobutyric acid), appears to play a dominant role in determining the preferred conformations of host proteins. We have recently introduced into the standard AMBER force field some new parameters, fitted against high-level quantum mechanical (QM) data, for simulating peptides containing α,α-dialkylated residues with cyclic side chains, such as TOAC (TOAC, 2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidine-1-oxyl-4-amino-4-carboxylic acid) and Ac6c (Ac6c = 1-aminocyclohexaneacetic acid). Here, we show that in order to accurately reproduce the observed conformational geometries and structural fluctuations of linear α,α-dialkylated peptides based on Aib, further improvements of the non-bonding and side chain torsion potential parameters have to be considered, due to the expected larger structural flexibility of linear residues with respect to cyclic ones. To this end, we present an extended set of parameters, which have been optimized by fitting the energies of multiple conformations of the Aib dipeptide analogue to corresponding QM calculations that properly account for dispersion interactions (B3LYP-D3). The quality, transferability and size-consistency of the proposed force field have been assessed both by considering a series of poly-Aib peptides, modeled at the same QM level, and by performing molecular dynamics simulations in solvents with high and low polarity. As a result, the present parameters allow one to reproduce with good reliability the available QM and experimental data, thus representing a notable improvement over current force field especially in the description of the α/310-helix conformational equilibria of α,α-dialkylated peptides with linear and cyclic side chains.

  10. Enzymes from solvent-tolerant microbes: useful biocatalysts for non-aqueous enzymology.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Anshu; Khare, S K

    2009-01-01

    Solvent-tolerant microbes are a newly emerging class that possesses the unique ability to thrive in the presence of organic solvents. Their enzymes adapted to mediate cellular and metabolic processes in a solvent-rich environment and are logically stable in the presence of organic solvents. Enzyme catalysis in non-aqueous/low-water media is finding increasing applications for the synthesis of industrially important products, namely peptides, esters, and other trans-esterification products. Solvent stability, however, remains a prerequisite for employing enzymes in non-aqueous systems. Enzymes, in general, get inactivated or give very low rates of reaction in non-aqueous media. Thus, early efforts, and even some recent ones, have aimed at stabilization of enzymes in organic media by immobilization, surface modifications, mutagenesis, and protein engineering. Enzymes from solvent-tolerant microbes appear to be the choicest source for studying solvent-stable enzymes because of their unique ability to survive in the presence of a range of organic solvents. These bacteria circumvent the solvent's toxic effects by virtue of various adaptations, e.g. at the level of the cytoplasmic membrane, by degradation and transformation of solvents, and by active excretion of solvents. The recent screening of these exotic microbes has generated some naturally solvent-stable proteases, lipases, cholesterol oxidase, cholesterol esterase, cyclodextrin glucanotransferase, and other important enzymes. The unique properties of these novel biocatalysts have great potential for applications in non-aqueous enzymology for a range of industrial processes.

  11. Effects of Solvent Composition on the Assembly and Relaxation of Triblock Copolymer-Based Polyelectrolyte Gels

    SciTech Connect

    Henderson, Kevin J.; Shull, Kenneth R.

    2012-03-26

    The role of solvent selectivity has been explored extensively with regard to its role in the phase behavior of block copolymer assemblies. Traditionally, thermally induced phase separation is employed for generating micelles upon cooling a block copolymer dissolved in a selective solvent. However few amphiphilic, polyelectrolyte-containing block copolymers demonstrate a thermally accessible route of micellization, and solvent exchange routes are frequently employed instead. Here, we describe the use of mixed solvents for obtaining thermoreversible gelation behavior of poly(methyl methacrylate)-poly(methacrylic acid)-poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA-PMAA-PMMA) triblock copolymers. One solvent component (dimethyl sulfoxide) is a good solvent for both blocks, and the second solvent component (water) is a selective solvent for the polymer midblock. Rheological frequency sweeps at variable solvent compositions and temperatures demonstrate an adherence to time-temperature-composition superposition, so that changes in the solvent composition are analogous to changes in the Flory-Huggins interaction parameter between end block and solvent. Shift factors used for this superposition are related to the effective activation energy describing the viscosity and stress relaxation response of the triblock copolymer gels. The effectiveness of solvent exchange processes for producing hydrogels with this system is shown to originate from the ability of a small amount of added water to greatly increase the relaxation times of the self-assembled polymer gels that are formed by this process.

  12. In-situ transesterification of seeds of invasive Chinese tallow trees (Triadica sebifera L.) in a microwave batch system (GREEN(3)) using hexane as co-solvent: Biodiesel production and process optimization.

    PubMed

    Barekati-Goudarzi, Mohamad; Boldor, Dorin; Nde, Divine B

    2016-02-01

    In-situ transesterification (simultaneous extraction and transesterification) of Chinese tallow tree seeds into methyl esters using a batch microwave system was investigated in this study. A high degree of oil extraction and efficient conversion of oil to biodiesel were found in the proposed range. The process was further optimized in terms of product yields and conversion rates using Doehlert optimization methodology. Based on the experimental results and statistical analysis, the optimal production yield conditions for this process were determined as: catalyst concentration of 1.74wt.%, solvent ratio about 3 (v/w), reaction time of 20min and temperature of 58.1°C. H(+)NMR was used to calculate reaction conversion. All methyl esters produced using this method met ASTM biodiesel quality specifications. PMID:26638139

  13. Solvent reorganization of electron transitions in viscous solvents

    SciTech Connect

    Ghorai, Pradip K.; Matyushov, Dmitry V.

    2006-04-14

    We develop a model of electron transfer reactions at conditions of nonergodicity when the time of solvent relaxation crosses the observation time window set up by the reaction rate. Solvent reorganization energy of intramolecular electron transfer in a charge-transfer molecule dissolved in water and acetonitrile is studied by molecular dynamics simulations at varying temperatures. We observe a sharp decrease of the reorganization energy at a temperature identified as the temperature of structural arrest due to cage effect, as discussed by the mode-coupling theory. This temperature also marks the onset of the enhancement of translational diffusion relative to rotational relaxation signaling the breakdown of the Stokes-Einstein relation. The change in the reorganization energy at the transition temperature reflects the dynamical arrest of the slow, collective relaxation of the solvent related to the relaxation of the solvent dipolar polarization. An analytical theory proposed to describe this effect agrees well with both the simulations and experimental Stokes shift data. The theory is applied to the analysis of charge-transfer kinetics in a low-temperature glass former. We show that the reorganization energy is substantially lower than its equilibrium value for the low-temperature portion of the data. The theory predicts the possibility of discontinuous changes in the dependence of the electron transfer rate on the free energy gap when the reaction switches between ergodic and nonergodic regimes.

  14. DEMONSTRATION OF THE NEXT-GENERATION CAUSTIC-SIDE SOLVENT EXTRACTION SOLVENT WITH 2-CM CENTRIGUGAL CONTRACTORS USING TANK 49H WASTE AND WASTE SIMULANT

    SciTech Connect

    Pierce, R.; Peters, T.; Crowder, M.; Pak, D.; Fink, S.; Blessing, R.; Washington, A.; Caldwell, T.

    2011-11-29

    Researchers successfully demonstrated the chemistry and process equipment of the Caustic-Side Solvent Extraction (CSSX) flowsheet using MaxCalix for the decontamination of high level waste (HLW). The demonstration was completed using a 12-stage, 2-cm centrifugal contactor apparatus at the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL). This represents the first CSSX process demonstration of the MaxCalix solvent system with Savannah River Site (SRS) HLW. Two tests lasting 24 and 27 hours processed non-radioactive simulated Tank 49H waste and actual Tank 49H HLW, respectively. A solvent extraction system for removal of cesium from alkaline solutions was developed utilizing a novel solvent invented at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). This solvent consists of a calix[4]arene-crown-6 extractant dissolved in an inert hydrocarbon matrix. A modifier is added to the solvent to enhance the extraction power of the calixarene and to prevent the formation of a third phase. An additional additive is used to improve stripping performance and to mitigate the effects of any surfactants present in the feed stream. The process that deploys this solvent system is known as Caustic Side Solvent Extraction (CSSX). The solvent system has been deployed at the Savannah River Site (SRS) in the Modular CSSX Unit (MCU) since 2008.

  15. Deep eutectic solvents in countercurrent and centrifugal partition chromatography.

    PubMed

    Roehrer, Simon; Bezold, Franziska; García, Eva Marra; Minceva, Mirjana

    2016-02-19

    Deep eutectic solvents (DESs) were evaluated as solvents in centrifugal partition chromatography, a liquid-liquid chromatography separation technology. To this end, the partition coefficients of ten natural compounds of different hydrophobicity were determined in non-aqueous biphasic systems containing DES. The influence of the composition of DESs and the presence of water in the biphasic system on the partition coefficient were also examined. In addition, several process relevant physical properties of the biphasic system, such as the density and viscosity of the phases, were measured. A mixture of three to four hydrophobic compounds was successfully separated in a centrifugal partition extractor using a heptane/ethanol/DES biphasic system.

  16. Solvent selection for the extraction of ethanol from aqueous solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Koullas, D.P.; Umealu, O.S.; Koukios, E.G.

    1999-08-01

    Several organic solvents were examined as potential separating agents for ethanol recovery from aqueous solutions by liquid-liquid extraction. Phase composition determinations for five promising ethanol-water-solvent systems at 20 and 40 C and two solvent-to-feed ratios show that isoamyl acetate (IAA) and isooctyl alcohol (IOA) along with n-butyl acetate (BA) present a greater potential than dibutyl ether and dibutyl oxalate. Tie-line liquid-liquid equilibrium data at 25 C for the three promising solvents (IAA, IOA, and BA) were collected and analyzed. Both IAA and IOA were found to be very good separating agents, exhibiting ethanol distribution coefficients greater than 1, and separation factors in Bancroft coordinates of the order of 70 and 2,000, respectively.

  17. Polymeric nanoparticle formation by non-solvent introduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foster, Dona; Yang, Zhengnan; Dhinojwala, Ali

    2014-03-01

    Polymeric nanoparticles have found use in applications as diverse as coatings, microelectronics and drug delivery. Formation of a consistent particle with narrow tolerances offers even greater possibilities and diversity of application. This work focuses on a better understanding of the multiphase nanoparticle formation process. Physical interactions among polymer, solvent and non-solvent influence size, shape, distribution, and ease of nanoparticle formation and separation. The initial concentration of polymer in solvent is shown to correlate to the size and size distribution of particles. Adopting a continuous flow system broadens the array of design parameters to include temperature, solvent combination and flow conditions. Design parameters are correlated to nanostructure in order to control and optimize particle formation based on the specific physical properties desired.

  18. Which solvent for olfactory testing?

    PubMed

    Philpott, C M; Goodenough, P C; Wolstenholme, C R; Murty, G E

    2004-12-01

    The physical properties of any carrier can deteriorate over time and thus alter the results in any olfactory test. The aim of this study was to evaluate clinically potential solvents as a clean odourless carrier for olfactory testing. Sweet almond oil, pure coconut oil, pure peach kernel oil, dipropylene glycol, monopropylene glycol, mineral oil and silicone oil were studied. The experimentation was conducted in two parts. First, an olfactory device was used to conduct air through the solvents on a weekly basis using a cohort of six volunteers to assess the perceived odour of each solvent at weekly intervals. Secondly a cross-reference test was performed using small bottled solutions of phenylethyl-alcohol and 1-butanol in 10-fold dilutions to compare any perceived difference in concentrations over a period of 8 weeks. We concluded that mineral oil is the most suitable carrier for the purpose of olfactory testing, possessing many desirable characteristics of an olfactory solvent, and that silicone oil may provide a suitable alternative for odorants with which it is miscible.

  19. Control of Chemical Equilibrium by Solvent: A Basis for Teaching Physical Chemistry of Solutions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Prezhdo, Oleg V.; Craig, Colleen F.; Fialkov, Yuriy; Prezhdo, Victor V.

    2007-01-01

    The study demonstrates that the solvent present in a system can highly alter and control the chemical equilibrium of a system. The results show that the dipole moment and polarizibility of a system can be highly altered by using different mixed solvents.

  20. Solubility of gold nanoparticles as a function of ligand shell and alkane solvent.

    PubMed

    Lohman, Brandon C; Powell, Jeffrey A; Cingarapu, Sreeram; Aakeroy, Christer B; Chakrabarti, Amit; Klabunde, Kenneth J; Law, Bruce M; Sorensen, Christopher M

    2012-05-14

    The solubility of ca. 5.0 nm gold nanoparticles was studied systematically as a function of ligand shell and solvent. The ligands were octane-, decane-, dodecane- and hexadecanethiols; the solvents were the n-alkanes from hexane to hexadecane and toluene. Supernatant concentrations in equilibrium with precipitated superclusters of nanoparticles were measured at room temperature (23 °C) with UV-Vis spectrophotometry. The solubility of nanoparticles ligated with decane- and dodecanethiol was greatest in n-decane and n-dodecane, respectively. In contrast, the solubility of nanoparticles ligated with octane- and hexadecanethiol showed decreasing solubility with increasing solvent chain length. In addition the solubility of the octanethiol ligated system showed a nonmonotonic solvent carbon number functionality with even numbered solvents being better solvents than neighboring odd numbered solvents. PMID:22456604

  1. Solubility of gold nanoparticles as a function of ligand shell and alkane solvent.

    PubMed

    Lohman, Brandon C; Powell, Jeffrey A; Cingarapu, Sreeram; Aakeroy, Christer B; Chakrabarti, Amit; Klabunde, Kenneth J; Law, Bruce M; Sorensen, Christopher M

    2012-05-14

    The solubility of ca. 5.0 nm gold nanoparticles was studied systematically as a function of ligand shell and solvent. The ligands were octane-, decane-, dodecane- and hexadecanethiols; the solvents were the n-alkanes from hexane to hexadecane and toluene. Supernatant concentrations in equilibrium with precipitated superclusters of nanoparticles were measured at room temperature (23 °C) with UV-Vis spectrophotometry. The solubility of nanoparticles ligated with decane- and dodecanethiol was greatest in n-decane and n-dodecane, respectively. In contrast, the solubility of nanoparticles ligated with octane- and hexadecanethiol showed decreasing solubility with increasing solvent chain length. In addition the solubility of the octanethiol ligated system showed a nonmonotonic solvent carbon number functionality with even numbered solvents being better solvents than neighboring odd numbered solvents.

  2. Replacement solvents for use in chemical synthesis

    DOEpatents

    Molnar, Linda K.; Hatton, T. Alan; Buchwald, Stephen L.

    2001-05-15

    Replacement solvents for use in chemical synthesis include polymer-immobilized solvents having a flexible polymer backbone and a plurality of pendant groups attached onto the polymer backbone, the pendant groups comprising a flexible linking unit bound to the polymer backbone and to a terminal solvating moiety. The polymer-immobilized solvent may be dissolved in a benign medium. Replacement solvents for chemical reactions for which tetrahydrofuran or diethyl may be a solvent include substituted tetrahydrofurfuryl ethers and substituted tetrahydro-3-furan ethers. The replacement solvents may be readily recovered from the reaction train using conventional methods.

  3. Diffusion of Small Solute Particles in Viscous Liquids: Cage Diffusion, a Result of Decoupling of Solute-Solvent Dynamics, Leads to Amplification of Solute Diffusion.

    PubMed

    Acharya, Sayantan; Nandi, Manoj K; Mandal, Arkajit; Sarkar, Sucharita; Bhattacharyya, Sarika Maitra

    2015-08-27

    We study the diffusion of small solute particles through solvent by keeping the solute-solvent interaction repulsive and varying the solvent properties. The study involves computer simulations, development of a new model to describe diffusion of small solutes in a solvent, and also mode coupling theory (MCT) calculations. In a viscous solvent, a small solute diffuses via coupling to the solvent hydrodynamic modes and also through the transient cages formed by the solvent. The model developed can estimate the independent contributions from these two different channels of diffusion. Although the solute diffusion in all the systems shows an amplification, the degree of it increases with solvent viscosity. The model correctly predicts that when the solvent viscosity is high, the solute primarily diffuses by exploiting the solvent cages. In such a scenario the MCT diffusion performed for a static solvent provides a correct estimation of the cage diffusion.

  4. STABILITY OF A CYLINDRICAL SOLUTE-SOLVENT INTERFACE: EFFECT OF GEOMETRY, ELECTROSTATICS, AND HYDRODYNAMICS*

    PubMed Central

    LI, BO; SUN, HUI; ZHOU, SHENGGAO

    2015-01-01

    The solute-solvent interface that separates biological molecules from their surrounding aqueous solvent characterizes the conformation and dynamics of such molecules. In this work, we construct a solvent fluid dielectric boundary model for the solvation of charged molecules and apply it to study the stability of a model cylindrical solute-solvent interface. The motion of the solute-solvent interface is defined to be the same as that of solvent fluid at the interface. The solvent fluid is assumed to be incompressible and is described by the Stokes equation. The solute is modeled simply by the ideal-gas law. All the viscous force, hydrostatic pressure, solute-solvent van der Waals interaction, surface tension, and electrostatic force are balanced at the solute-solvent interface. We model the electrostatics by Poisson’s equation in which the solute-solvent interface is treated as a dielectric boundary that separates the low-dielectric solute from the high-dielectric solvent. For a cylindrical geometry, we find multiple cylindrically shaped equilibrium interfaces that describe polymodal (e.g., dry and wet) states of hydration of an underlying molecular system. These steady-state solutions exhibit bifurcation behavior with respect to the charge density. For their linearized systems, we use the projection method to solve the fluid equation and find the dispersion relation. Our asymptotic analysis shows that, for large wavenumbers, the decay rate is proportional to wavenumber with the proportionality half of the ratio of surface tension to solvent viscosity, indicating that the solvent viscosity does affect the stability of a solute-solvent interface. Consequences of our analysis in the context of biomolecular interactions are discussed. PMID:26877555

  5. The effect of solvent grade on thin layer chromatographic analysis of writing inks.

    PubMed

    Barker, Julia; Ramotowski, Robert; Nwokoye, Jennie

    2016-09-01

    The effects on the separation of writing ink dyes and the repeatability of the Rf values from using different grades of chemicals used in solvent system I (SSI) and solvent system II (SSII) for thin-layer chromatographic (TLC) ink analysis were studied. Solvent system I consists of a 70:35:30 mixture of ethyl acetate, ethanol, and water. Solvent system II consists of a 50:10:15 mixture of ethanol, water, and n-butanol. Since 1991, the ASTM International Guideline E 1422 has recommended that the purity of solvents should be "reagent grade" and that water quality should be "distilled or equivalent." A total of 25 blue and 25 black inks were selected for analysis. Thirteen of each color ink were ballpoint and the remainder were non-ballpoint. The observations show that there is a solvent grade effect on both the separation and clarity of the ink dyes and the repeatability of their Rf values. These results indicate that the grades and manufacturers of solvents used in solvent systems for thin-layer chromatography must be consistent. This is especially critical for searching TLC plates against those from a large ink library in casework. Overall, the combination of solvents that produced the best results for solvent system I consisted of denatured ethanol, HPLC grade water, and ACS grade ethyl acetate. There was no consensus for the best combination of solvent grades for solvent system II; however, it was shown that different grades did have an effect on the separation of ink components. PMID:27262685

  6. The effect of solvent grade on thin layer chromatographic analysis of writing inks.

    PubMed

    Barker, Julia; Ramotowski, Robert; Nwokoye, Jennie

    2016-09-01

    The effects on the separation of writing ink dyes and the repeatability of the Rf values from using different grades of chemicals used in solvent system I (SSI) and solvent system II (SSII) for thin-layer chromatographic (TLC) ink analysis were studied. Solvent system I consists of a 70:35:30 mixture of ethyl acetate, ethanol, and water. Solvent system II consists of a 50:10:15 mixture of ethanol, water, and n-butanol. Since 1991, the ASTM International Guideline E 1422 has recommended that the purity of solvents should be "reagent grade" and that water quality should be "distilled or equivalent." A total of 25 blue and 25 black inks were selected for analysis. Thirteen of each color ink were ballpoint and the remainder were non-ballpoint. The observations show that there is a solvent grade effect on both the separation and clarity of the ink dyes and the repeatability of their Rf values. These results indicate that the grades and manufacturers of solvents used in solvent systems for thin-layer chromatography must be consistent. This is especially critical for searching TLC plates against those from a large ink library in casework. Overall, the combination of solvents that produced the best results for solvent system I consisted of denatured ethanol, HPLC grade water, and ACS grade ethyl acetate. There was no consensus for the best combination of solvent grades for solvent system II; however, it was shown that different grades did have an effect on the separation of ink components.

  7. Solvent containing processes and work practices: environmental observations.

    PubMed

    Kalliokoski, P

    1986-01-01

    Even though there has been a shift toward water-based or fully solid systems, organic solvents still comprise a significant occupational health hazard. Fortunately, exposure levels can nowadays be effectively controlled by proper enclosures and ventilation in most remaining applications of organic solvents, and, generally taken, the development of occupational health conditions has been favorable on the workplaces using organic solvents. When as many as 24.2% of the 2639 solvent measurements carried out by the Institute of Occupational Health in Finland exceeded the occupational health standards between 1971 and 1976, such non-compliance levels were detected only in 3.0% of the 2823 samples taken between 1977 and 1980 (Skyttä, 1978; Kokko, 1982). The persons dealing with occupational health problems in workplaces should also be aware of the possible existence of solvent misuse. This may not develop into the level of solvent sniffing, but into a milder addiction. The workers adopt working habits that cause unnecessary exposure. Repeatedly found exceptionally high concentration levels in biological exposure tests are an indication of a possible abuse.

  8. Genetic and biochemical analysis of solvent formation in Clostridium acetobutylicum

    SciTech Connect

    Bennett, G.N.; Rudolph, F.B.

    1998-05-01

    The anaerobic organism Clostridium acetobutylicum has been used for commercial production of important organic solvents due to its ability to convert a wide variety of crude substrates to acids and alcohols. Current knowledge concerning the molecular genetics, cell regulation and metabolic engineering of this organism is still rather limited. The objectives are to improve the knowledge of the molecular genetics and enzymology of Clostridia in order to make genetic alterations which will more effectively channel cell metabolism toward production of desired products. Two factors that limit butanol production in continuous cultures are: (1) The degeneration of the culture, with an increase in the proportion of cells which are incapable of solvent production. Currently isolated degenerate strains are being evaluated to analyze the molecular mechanism of degeneration to determine if it is due to a genetic loss of solvent related genes, loss of a regulatory element, or an increase in general mutagenesis. Recent studies show two general types of degenerates, one which seems to have lost essential solvent pathway genes and another which has not completely lost all solvent production capability and retains the DNA bearing solvent pathway genes. (2) The production of hydrogen which uses up reducing equivalents in the cell. If the reducing power were more fully directed to the reduction reactions involved in butanol production, the process would be more efficient. The authors have studied oxidation reduction systems related to this process. These studies focus on ferredoxin and rubredoxin and their oxidoreductases.

  9. Solvent containing processes and work practices: environmental observations

    SciTech Connect

    Kalliokoski, P.

    1986-01-01

    Even though there has been a shift toward water-based or fully solid systems, organic solvents still comprise a significant occupational health hazard. Fortunately, exposure levels can nowadays be effectively controlled by proper enclosures and ventilation in most remaining applications of organic solvents, and, generally taken, the development of occupational health conditions has been favorable on the workplaces using organic solvents. When as many as 24.2% of the 2639 solvent measurements carried out by the Institute of Occupational Health in Finland exceeded the occupational health standards between 1971 and 1976, such non-compliance levels were detected only in 3.0% of the 2823 samples taken between 1977 and 1980. The persons dealing with occupational health problems in workplaces should also be aware of the possible existence of solvent misuse. This may not develop into the level of solvent sniffing, but into a milder addiction. The workers adopt working habits that cause unnecessary exposure. Repeatedly found exceptionally high concentration levels in biological exposure tests are an indication of a possible abuse. 25 references.

  10. Ultrasonic cleaning as a replacement for chlorinated solvents

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, L.M.; Eichholtz, R.L.

    1993-04-12

    Chlorinated solvents have long been used in industry for cleaning purposes. These solvents were non-flammable, thought to be relatively of low toxicity, and worked. However, these solvents are now thought to cause environmental and health problems. Methyl chloroform (1,1,1-trichloroethane or TCA) and trichlorotrifluoroethane (CFC-113) are considered ozone depleting substances and are being regulated as such. The United States is a signatory to the Montreal Protocol and its amendments which call for a phase-out of the production of CFC-113 by the year 2000 and TCA by the year 2005. There is a move afoot to change these phase-out dates to December 31, 1995, although at this time there has been no official action taken. Other chlorinated solvents such as methylene chloride and perchloroethylene (perk) have been labeled as suspect carcinogens. Due to these health concerns, the Occupational Health and Safety Administration (OSHA) has issued proposals to lower the permissible exposure levels of these substances. All of these solvents are also considered Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) wastes. Thus, the wastes must be handled under strict guidelines. Due to all of these concerns, finding alternatives for these solvents has become attractive. Personnel at the Martin Marietta Energy Systems Y-12 Plant in Oak Ridge, Tennessee, conducted numerous studies which investigated the use of ultrasonic cleaning with aqueous detergent as a substitute for vapor degreasing with chlorinated solvents. The first ultrasonic cleaner was installed in the plant in 1984 and numerous other cleaners have followed. Because of the success of this substitution program, personnel at the United States Army Environmental Center have funded a project to investigate the use of ultrasonics with aqueous detergent as a substitute for chlorinated solvents used in cleaning operations at the Army depots.

  11. Ultrasonic cleaning as a replacement for chlorinated solvents

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, L.M. ); Eichholtz, R.L. )

    1993-04-12

    Chlorinated solvents have long been used in industry for cleaning purposes. These solvents were non-flammable, thought to be relatively of low toxicity, and worked. However, these solvents are now thought to cause environmental and health problems. Methyl chloroform (1,1,1-trichloroethane or TCA) and trichlorotrinuoroethane (CFC-113) are considered ozone depleting substances and are being regulated as such. The United States is a signatory to the Montreal Protocol and its amendments which call for a phase-out of the production of CFC-113 by the year 2000 and TCA by the year 2005. There is a move afoot to change these phase-out dates to December 31, 1995, although at this time there has been no official action taken. Other chlorinated solvents such as methylene chloride and perchloroethylene (perk) have been labeled as suspect carcinogens. Due to these health concerns, the Occupational Health and Safety Administration (OSHA) has issued proposals to lower the permissible exposure levels of these substances. All of these solvents are also considered Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) wastes. thus, the wastes must be handled under strict guidelines. Due to all of these concerns, finding alternatives for these solvents has become attractive. Personnel at the Martin Marietta Energy Systems Y-12 Plant in Oak Ridge, Tennessee, conducted numerous studies which investigated the use of ultrasonic cleaning with aqueous detergent as a substitute for vapor degreasing with chlorinated solvents. The first ultrasonic cleaner was installed in the plant in 1984 and numerous other cleaners have followed. Because of the success of this substitution program, personnel at the United States Army Environmental Center have funded a project to investigate the use of ultrasonics with aqueous detergent as a substitute for chlorinated solvents used in cleaning operations at the Army depots.

  12. Non-Ideal Behavior in Solvent Extraction

    SciTech Connect

    Peter Zalupski

    2011-09-01

    This report presents a summary of the work performed to meet FCR&D level 3 milestone M31SW050801, 'Complete the year-end report summarizing FY11 experimental and modeling activities.' This work was carried out under the auspices of the Non-Ideality in Solvent Extraction Systems FCR&D work package. The report summarizes our initial considerations of potential influences that non-ideal chemistry may impose on computational prediction of outcomes in solvent extraction systems. The report is packaged into three separate test cases where a robustness of the prediction by SXFIT program is under scrutiny. The computational exercises presented here emphasize the importance of accurate representation of both an aqueous and organic mixtures when modeling liquid-liquid distribution systems. Case No.1 demonstrates that non-ideal behavior of HDEHP in aliphatic diluents, such as n-dodecane, interferes with the computation. Cases No.2 and No.3 focus on the chemical complexity of aqueous electrolyte mixtures. Both exercises stress the need for an improved thermodynamic model of an aqueous environment present in the europium distribution experiments. Our efforts for year 2 of this project will focus on the improvements of aqueous and non-aqueous solution models using fundamental physical properties of mixtures acquired experimentally in our laboratories.

  13. Carbon dioxide-based supercritical fluids as IC manufacturing solvents

    SciTech Connect

    Rubin, J.B.; Davenhall, L.B.; Taylor, C.M.V.; Sivils, L.D.; Pierce, T.; Tiefert, K.

    1999-05-11

    The production of integrated circuits (IC's) involves a number of discrete steps which utilize hazardous or regulated solvents and generate large waste streams. ES&H considerations associated with these chemicals have prompted a search for alternative, more environmentally benign solvent systems. An emerging technology for conventional solvent replacement is the use of supercritical fluids based on carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}). Research work, conducted at Los Alamos in conjunction with the Hewlett-Packard Company, has lead to the development of a CO{sub 2}-based supercritical fluid treatment system for the stripping of hard-baked photoresists. This treatment system, known as Supercritical CO{sub 2} Resist Remover, or CORR, uses a two-component solvent composed of a nonhazardous, non-regulated compound, dissolved in supercritical CO{sub 2}. The solvent/treatment system has been successfully tested on metallized Si wafers coated with negative and positive photoresist, the latter both before and after ion-implantation. A description of the experimental data will be presented. Based on the initial laboratory results, the project has progressed to the design and construction of prototype, single-wafer photoresist-stripping equipment. The integrated system involves a closed-loop, recirculating cycle which continuously cleans and regenerates the CO{sub 2}, recycles the dissolved solvent, and separates and concentrates the spent resist. The status of the current design and implementation strategy of a treatment system to existing IC fabrication facilities will be discussed. Additional remarks will be made on the use of a SCORR-type system for the cleaning of wafers prior to processing.

  14. How membrane permeation is affected by donor delivery solvent.

    PubMed

    Binks, Bernard P; Fletcher, Paul D I; Johnson, Andrew J; Elliott, Russell P

    2012-11-28

    We investigate theoretically and experimentally how the rate and extent of membrane permeation is affected by switching the donor delivery solvent from water to squalane for different permeants and membranes. In a model based on rate-limiting membrane diffusion, we derive explicit equations showing how the permeation extent and rate depend mainly on the membrane-donor and membrane-receiver partition coefficients of the permeant. Permeation results for systems containing all combinations of hydrophilic or hydrophobic donor solvents (aqueous solution or squalane), permeants (caffeine or testosterone) and polymer membranes (cellulose or polydimethylsiloxane) have been measured using a cell with stirred donor and re-circulating receiver compartments and continuous monitoring of the permeant concentration in the receiver phase. Relevant partition coefficients are also determined. Quantitative comparison of model and experimental results for the widely-differing permeation systems successfully enables the systematic elucidation of all possible donor solvent effects in membrane permeation. For the experimental conditions used here, most of the permeation systems are in agreement with the model, demonstrating that the model assumptions are valid. In these cases, the dominant donor solvent effects arise from changes in the relative affinities of the permeant for the donor and receiver solvents and the membrane and are quantitatively predicted using the separately measured partition coefficients. We also show how additional donor solvent effects can arise when switching the donor solvent causes one or more of the model assumptions to be invalid. These effects include a change in rate-limiting step, permeant solution non-ideality and others.

  15. Initial field trials of the site characterization and analysis penetrometer system (SCAPS). Reconnaissance of Jacksonville Naval Air Station waste oil and solvents disposal site. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Cooper, S.S.; Douglas, D.H.; Sharp, M.K.; Olsen, R.A.; Comes, G.D.

    1993-12-01

    At the request of the Naval Facilities Engineering Command (NAVFAC), Southern Division, Charleston, SC, the U.S. Army Engineer Waterways Experiment Station (WES) conducted the initial field trial of the Site Characterization and Analysis Penetrometer System (SCAPS) at Jacksonville Naval Air Station (NAS), Jacksonville FL. This work was carried out by a field crew consisting of personnel from WES and the Naval Ocean Systems Center during the period of 16 July 1990 to 14 August 1990. The SCAPS investigation at the Jacksonville NAS has two primary objectives: (a) to provide data that could be useful in formulating remediation plans for the facility and (b) to provide for the initial field trial of the SCAPS currently under development by WES for the U.S. Army Toxic and Hazardous Materials Agency (USATHAMA), now the U.S. Army Environmental Center. The original concepts for the SCAPS was to develop an integrated site screening characterization system whose capabilities would include (a) surface mapping, (b) geophysical surveys using magnetic, induced electromagnetic, and radar instruments, (c) measurements of soil strength, soil electrical resistivity, and laser-induced soil fluorometry Cone penetrometer, Site Characterization and Analysis Laser Induced Fluorescence(LIF), Penetrometer System(SCAPS) POL Contamination, using screening instrumentation mounted in a soil penetrometer, (d) soil and fluid samplers, and (e) computerized data acquisition, interpretation, and visualization. The goal of the SCAPS program is to provide detailed, rapid, and cost-effective surface and subsurface data for input to site assessment/remediation efforts.

  16. The solvent component of macromolecular crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Weichenberger, Christian X.; Kantardjieff, Katherine; Rupp, Bernhard

    2015-04-30

    On average, the mother liquor or solvent and its constituents occupy about 50% of a macromolecular crystal. Ordered as well as disordered solvent components need to be accurately accounted for in modelling and refinement, often with considerable complexity. The mother liquor from which a biomolecular crystal is grown will contain water, buffer molecules, native ligands and cofactors, crystallization precipitants and additives, various metal ions, and often small-molecule ligands or inhibitors. On average, about half the volume of a biomolecular crystal consists of this mother liquor, whose components form the disordered bulk solvent. Its scattering contributions can be exploited in initial phasing and must be included in crystal structure refinement as a bulk-solvent model. Concomitantly, distinct electron density originating from ordered solvent components must be correctly identified and represented as part of the atomic crystal structure model. Herein, are reviewed (i) probabilistic bulk-solvent content estimates, (ii) the use of bulk-solvent density modification in phase improvement, (iii) bulk-solvent models and refinement of bulk-solvent contributions and (iv) modelling and validation of ordered solvent constituents. A brief summary is provided of current tools for bulk-solvent analysis and refinement, as well as of modelling, refinement and analysis of ordered solvent components, including small-molecule ligands.

  17. Solvent Extraction of Furfural From Biomass

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Humphrey, M. F.

    1984-01-01

    Solvent-extraction method reduces energy required to remove furfural produced during acid hydrolysis of biomass. Acid hydrolysis performed in vessel containing both solvents and reacting ingredients. With intimate contact between solvents and aqueous hydrolyis liqour, furfural removed form liquor almost as fast as it forms.

  18. The hype with ionic liquids as solvents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kunz, Werner; Häckl, Katharina

    2016-09-01

    In this mini review, we give our personal opinion about the present state of the art concerning Ionic Liquids, proposed as alternative solvents. In particular, we consider their different drawbacks and disadvantages and discuss the critical aspects of the research of Ionic Liquids as solvents. Finally, we point out some aspects on potentially promising Ionic Liquid solvents.

  19. Firing of pulverized solvent refined coal

    DOEpatents

    Derbidge, T. Craig; Mulholland, James A.; Foster, Edward P.

    1986-01-01

    An air-purged burner for the firing of pulverized solvent refined coal is constructed and operated such that the solvent refined coal can be fired without the coking thereof on the burner components. The air-purged burner is designed for the firing of pulverized solvent refined coal in a tangentially fired boiler.

  20. Introducing deep eutectic solvents as biorenewable media for Au(I)-catalysed cycloisomerisation of γ-alkynoic acids: an unprecedented catalytic system.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Álvarez, María J; Vidal, Cristian; Díez, Josefina; García-Álvarez, Joaquín

    2014-11-01

    Cycloisomerisation of γ-alkynoic acids into cyclic enol-lactones was conveniently performed, for the first time, in the eutectic mixture 1ChCl/2Urea under standard bench experimental conditions (at room temperature, under air and in the absence of co-catalysts) by using a new iminophosphorane-Au(I) complex as the catalyst. Furthermore, the catalytic system could be recycled up to four runs. PMID:25215857

  1. Introducing deep eutectic solvents as biorenewable media for Au(I)-catalysed cycloisomerisation of γ-alkynoic acids: an unprecedented catalytic system.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Álvarez, María J; Vidal, Cristian; Díez, Josefina; García-Álvarez, Joaquín

    2014-11-01

    Cycloisomerisation of γ-alkynoic acids into cyclic enol-lactones was conveniently performed, for the first time, in the eutectic mixture 1ChCl/2Urea under standard bench experimental conditions (at room temperature, under air and in the absence of co-catalysts) by using a new iminophosphorane-Au(I) complex as the catalyst. Furthermore, the catalytic system could be recycled up to four runs.

  2. A strategy for the separation of diterpenoid isomers from the root of Aralia continentalis by countercurrent chromatography: The distribution ratio as a substitute for the partition coefficient and a three-phase solvent system.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kyoung Jin; Song, Kwang Ho; Choi, Wonmin; Kim, Yeong Shik

    2015-08-01

    Aralia continentalis (Araliaceae) is widely used as a medicinal plant in East Asia. Previous studies have indicated that diterpenoid isomers (kaurenoic acid, continentalic acid, and ent-continentalic acid) are the major bioactive compounds of this plant. A new strategy was developed to alleviate difficulties in the separation of these isomers from this plant. A three-phase solvent system was applied to separate the isomers, and furthermore, the distribution ratio (Kc) was introduced as a substitute for the partition coefficient (KD). For compounds exhibiting a single equilibrium, their distributions in two immiscible phases were only affected by the partition coefficient of each solute. However, compounds that have a dissociating functional group (e.g., -COOH) are involved in two types of equilibrium in the two-phase system. In this case, the partitioning behaviors of the solutes are greatly affected by the pH of the solution. A mathematical prediction was applied for adjusting the solutions to the proper pH values. To prevent non-used phase (medium phase) waste, both the stationary phase (upper phase) and mobile phase (lower phase) were prepared on-demand without pre-saturation with the application of (1)H NMR. Each fraction obtained was collected and dried, yielding the following diterpenoid isomers from the 50mg injected sample: kaurenoic acid (19.7mg, yield: 39%) and ent-continentalic acid (21.3mg, yield: 42%).

  3. Solvent viscosity dependence for enzymatic reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sitnitsky, A. E.

    2008-09-01

    A mechanism for relationship of solvent viscosity with reaction rate constant at enzyme action is suggested. It is based on fluctuations of electric field in enzyme active site produced by thermally equilibrium rocking (crankshaft motion) of the rigid plane (in which the dipole moment ≈3.6 D lies) of a favourably located and oriented peptide group (or may be a few of them). Thus the rocking of the plane leads to fluctuations of the electric field of the dipole moment. These fluctuations can interact with the reaction coordinate because the latter in its turn has transition dipole moment due to separation of charges at movement of the reacting system along it. The rocking of the plane of the peptide group is sensitive to the microviscosity of its environment in protein interior and the latter is a function of the solvent viscosity. Thus we obtain an additional factor of interrelationship for these characteristics with the reaction rate constant. We argue that due to the properties of the crankshaft motion the frequency spectrum of the electric field fluctuations has a sharp resonance peak at some frequency and the corresponding Fourier mode can be approximated as oscillations. We employ a known result from the theory of thermally activated escape with periodic driving to obtain the reaction rate constant and argue that it yields reliable description of the pre-exponent where the dependence on solvent viscosity manifests itself. The suggested mechanism is shown to grasp the main feature of this dependence known from the experiment and satisfactorily yields the upper limit of the fractional index of a power in it.

  4. The model membrane system. Egg lecithin + myelin protein (N-2). Effect of solvent density variation on the X-ray scattering.

    PubMed Central

    Brady, G W; Birnbaum, P S; Moscarello, M A

    1979-01-01

    The electron density contrast method has been applied to the membrane system egg lecithin + myelin protein (N-2). The case treated here is for a low protein concentration. As theory predicts, the scattering from the different regions of the membrane (protein, hydrocarbon, and polar head group regions) are modulated differently by changing the contrast. It is then possible to separate out the electron pair correlation functions for the different regions, and from these to determine the membrane election density distribution for an external electron density p0 = 0. PMID:263629

  5. FTIR Imaging Coupled with Multivariate Analysis for Study of Initial Diffusion of Different Solvents in Cellulose Acetate Butyrate Films

    SciTech Connect

    Lindblad, M.S.; Keyes, B.; Gedvilas, L.; Kelley, S.S.

    2008-01-01

    Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopic imaging was used to study the initial diffusion of different solvents in cellulose acetate butyrate (CAB) films containing different amounts of acetyl and butyryl substituents. Different solvents and solvent/non-solvent mixtures were also studied. The FTIR imaging system allowed acquisition of sequential images of the CAB films as solvent penetration proceeded without disturbing the system. The interface between the non-swollen polymer and the initial swelling front could be identified using multivariate data analysis tools. For a series of ketone solvents the initial diffusion coefficients and diffusion rates could be quantified and were found to be related to the polar and hydrogen interaction parameters in the Hansen solubility parameters of the solvents. For the solvent/non-solvent system the initial diffusion rate decreased less than linearly with the weight-percent of non-solvent present in the solution, which probably was due to the swelling characteristic of the non-solvent. For a given solvent, increasing the butyryl content of the CAB increased the initial diffusion rate. Increasing the butyryl content from 17 wt.% butyryl to 37 wt.% butyryl produced a considerably larger increase in initial diffusion rate compared to an increase in butyryl content from 37 wt.% to 50 wt.% butyryl.

  6. Oil recovery from petroleum sludge through ultrasonic assisted solvent extraction.

    PubMed

    Hu, Guangji; Li, Jianbing; Huang, Shuhui; Li, Yubao

    2016-09-18

    The effect of ultrasonic assisted extraction (UAE) process on oil recovery from refinery oily sludge was examined in this study. Two types of UAE treatment including UAE probe (UAEP) system and UAE bath (UAEB) system were investigated. Their oil recovery efficiencies were compared to that of mechanical shaking extraction (MSE). Three solvents including cyclohexane (CHX), ethyl acetate (EA), and methyl ethyl ketone (MEK) were examined as the extraction solvents. The influence of experimental factors on oil and solvent recovery was investigated using an orthogonal experimental design. Results indicated that solvent type, solvent-to-sludge (S/S) ratio, and treatment duration could have significant effects on oil recovery in UAE treatment. Under the optimum conditions, UAEP treatment can obtain an oil recovery of 68.8% within 20 s, which was higher than that (i.e., 62.0%) by MSE treatment after 60 min' extraction. UAEB treatment can also obtain a promising oil recovery within shorter extraction duration (i.e., 15 min) than MSE. UAE was thus illustrated as an effective and improved approach for oily sludge recycling. PMID:27294566

  7. Hypothesis: exposure to solvents may cause fibrosing alveolitis.

    PubMed

    Billings, C G; Howard, P

    1994-06-01

    The incidence of fibrosing alveolitis, which can be caused by many agents, is increasing. In a proportion of patients, the aetiology is unknown (cryptogenic fibrosing alveolitis), but it has been suggested that environmental factors may play an important, but unrecognized, role in its pathogenesis. A review of the literature suggests that there may be a link between exposure to solvents, widespread occupational pollutants, and fibrosing alveolitis. Experimental work in animals has shown that exposure to solvents produces changes in the lung similar to those found in fibrosing alveolitis. Occupational exposure to a wide number of solvents has been associated with the development of systemic sclerosis. Pulmonary involvement in systemic sclerosis is morphologically indistinguishable from fibrosing alveolitis, and a close relationship between the two diseases seems to exist. This close relationship and the experimental work linking solvent exposure to fibrosing alveolitis suggest that solvent exposure may be one cause of cryptogenic fibrosing alveolitis. Determination of any occupational exposure of patients with cryptogenic fibrosing alveolitis may help in the understanding and prevention of this disease.

  8. Acute toxicity of organic solvents on Artemia salina

    SciTech Connect

    Barahona-Gomariz, M.V.; Sanz-Barrera, F.; Sanchez-Fortun, S. )

    1994-05-01

    Organic solvents can make their way into the environment as industrial wastes and components of pesticide formulation. In laboratory bioassays, the use of organic formulations. In laboratory bioassays, the use of organic solvents is often unavoidable, since many pesticides and organic pollutants have low water solubility and must be dissolved in organic solvents prior to addition into experimental systems. In the toxicant bioassays, invertebrates with special reference to aquatic arthropod species are of recent interest as test models due to the need for developing nonmammalian test systems. Toxic effects of organic solvents have been tested with a few aquatic species, but information on the comparative toxicity of solvents towards Artemia salina is not available. Artemia salina have, within recent years, gained popularity as test organisms for short-term toxicity testing. Because Artemia salina exhibit rapid development and growth within 48 hr after hatch, their potential as a model organism for toxicology screening has been considered. To do this, synchronous populations of Artemia salina at different development intervals must be available.

  9. Batch extracting process using magneticparticle held solvents

    DOEpatents

    Nunez, Luis; Vandergrift, George F.

    1995-01-01

    A process for selectively removing metal values which may include catalytic values from a mixture containing same, wherein a magnetic particle is contacted with a liquid solvent which selectively dissolves the metal values to absorb the liquid solvent onto the magnetic particle. Thereafter the solvent-containing magnetic particles are contacted with a mixture containing the heavy metal values to transfer metal values into the solvent carried by the magnetic particles, and then magnetically separating the magnetic particles. Ion exchange resins may be used for selective solvents.

  10. Water as a solvent for life

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pohorille, Andrew

    2015-08-01

    “Follow the water” is our basic strategy in searching for life in the universe. The universality of water as the solvent for living systems is usually justified by arguing that water supports the rich organic chemistry that seeds life, but alternative chemistries are possible in other organic solvents. Here, other, essential criteria for life that have not been sufficiently considered so far, will be discussed.Life is based on non-covalent interactions. They might be either specific (enzyme-substrate interactions, selective ion transport) or nonspecific (lipid-lipid or lipid-protein interactions). Their strength needs to be properly tuned, and this is mediated by the solvent. If interactions are too weak, there might be undesired response to natural fluctuations of physical and chemical parameters. If they are too strong it could impede kinetics and energetics of cellular processes. Thus, the solvent must allow for balancing these interactions, which provides strong constraints for life.Water exhibits a remarkable trait that it promotes both solvophobic and solvophilic interactions. Solvophobic (hydrophobic in the case of water) interactions are necessary for self-organization of matter. They are responsible, among others, for the formation of membranes and protein folding. The diversity of structures supported by hydrophobic interactions is the hallmark of terrestrial life responsible for its diversity, evolution and the ability to survive environmental changes. Solvophilic interactions, in turn, are needed to ensure solubility of polar species. Water offers a large temperature domain of stable liquid and the characteristic hydrophobic effects are a consequence of the temperature insensitivity of essential properties of its liquid state. Water, however, might not be the only liquid with these properties. Properties of water and other pure liquids or their mixtures that have a high dielectric constant and simultaneously support self-organization will be

  11. Fabrication of nanoporous block copolymer films using highly selective solvents and non-solvent extraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, Changhuai; Vogt, Bryan

    Nanoporous polymeric films with high porosity are necessary for some applications, such as anti-reflective coating. A simple and relatively environmental benign method is developed to fabricate nanoporous block copolymer thin film with tunable porosity up to 69% based on selective solvent swelling of the majority phase and subsequent rapid extraction with a miscible non-solvent (water). Poly(butylnorbornene)-block-poly(hydroxyhexafluoroisopropyl norbornene) (BuHFA) is used to generate these porous thin films due to its high Tg (>300 °C) and the selectivity of primary alcohols towards HFA. The porosity of these nanoporous films is highly dependent on the solvent quality for HFA. The modulus of the as-prepared nanoporous BuHFA thin films with the porosity from 0% to 69% was investigated by surface wrinkling and a scaling law of modulus versus density was obtained. These nanoporous thin films act as anti-reflective coatings and an increase in transmittance from approximately 92% to 99.1% (average for the full range of visible light) was obtained for double-side coated glass slides. This methodology is simple and highly tunable; extension to other block copolymer systems is likely possible if sufficient solubility contrast between segments exists.

  12. Spectrophotometric determination of the dissociation constants of methyl yellow in mixed protic solvents.

    PubMed

    Fan, J; Shen, X; Wang, J

    1999-07-12

    The concentration dissociation constants (pK(a)) of methyl yellow, MY (H(+)In) in mixed aqueous solvents of methanol, ethanol, iso-propanol, tert-butanol have been accurately determined from spectrophotometric measurements at 25 degrees C and a constant ionic strength of 0.1 mol l(-1). It has been shown that in these solvents, the pK(a) values decrease with increasing composition of the organic co-solvent. A linear relationship between pK(a) and the mole fraction (x(2)) of the co-solvent was observed in a limited range of the compositions for each of the solvent systems. The results have been discussed in the light of transfer thermodynamic properties of the species existing in the dissociation equilibrium, solvent basicity and solute-solvent interactions. Furthermore, it was also observed that with the change of the solvents, the absorption spectra of MY shifted apparently and the color transition changed accordingly. The solvent effect on the spectra has been attributed to the isomerization equilibria of MY. A simple application of MY was also shown to the sodium acetate-hydrochloric acid titrations in the mixed solvents.

  13. Enantioselective, continuous (R)- and (S)-2-butanol synthesis: achieving high space-time yields with recombinant E. coli cells in a micro-aqueous, solvent-free reaction system.

    PubMed

    Erdmann, Vanessa; Mackfeld, Ursula; Rother, Dörte; Jakoblinnert, Andre

    2014-12-10

    The stereoselective production of (R)- or (S)-2-butanol is highly challenging. A potent synthesis strategy is the biocatalytic asymmetric reduction of 2-butanone applying alcohol dehydrogenases. However, due to a time-dependent racemisation process, high stereoselectivity is only obtained at incomplete conversion after short reaction times. Here, we present a solution to this problem: by using a continuous process, high biocatalytic selectivity can be achieved while racemisation is suppressed successfully. Furthermore, high conversion was achieved by applying recombinant, lyophilised E. coli cells hosting Lactobacillus brevis alcohol dehydrogenase in a micro-aqueous solvent-free continuous reaction system. The optimisation of residence time (τ) and 2-butanone concentration boosted both conversion (>99%) and enantiomeric excess (ee) of (R)-2-butanol (>96%). When a residence time of only τ=3.1 min was applied, productivity was extraordinary with a space-time yield of 2278±29g/(L×d), thus exceeding the highest values reported to date by a factor of more than eight. The use of E. coli cells overexpressing an ADH of complementary stereoselectivity yielded a synthesis strategy for (S)-2-butanol with an excellent ee (>98%). Although conversion was only moderate (up to 46%), excellent space-time yields of up to 461g/(L×d) were achieved. The investigated concept represents a synthesis strategy that can also be applied to other biocatalytic processes where racemisation poses a challenge.

  14. Solvent mediated self-assembly of solids

    SciTech Connect

    De Yoreo, J.; Wilson, W.D.; Palmore, T.

    1997-12-12

    Solvent-mediated crystallization represents a robust approach to self-assembly of nanostructures and microstructures. In organic systems, the relative ease with which the structure of hydrogen- bonded molecules can be manipulated allows for generation of a wide variety of nanoscale crystal structures. In living organisms, control over the micron-to-millimeter form of inorganic crystals is achieved through introduction of bio-organic molecules. The purpose of this proposal is to understand the interplay between solution chemistry, molecular structure, surface chemistry, and the processes of nucleation and crystal growth in solvent-mediated systems, with the goal of developing the atomic and molecular basis of a solvent-mediated self-assembly technology. We will achieve this purpose by: (1) utilizing an atomic force microscopy (AFM) approach that provides in situ, real time imaging during growth from solutions, (2) by modifying kinetic Monte Carlo (KMC) models to include solution-surface kinetics, (3) by introducing quantum chemistry (QC) calculations of the potentials of the relevant chemical species and the near-surface structure of the solution, and (4) by utilizing molecular dynamics (MD) simulations to identify the minimum energy pathways to the solid state. Our work will focus on two systems chosen to address both the manometer and micron-to-millimeter length scales of assembly, the family of 2,5- diketopiperazines (X-DKPs) and the system of CaCO{sub 3} with amino acids. Using AFM, we will record the evolution of surface morphology, critical lengths, step speeds, and step-step interactions as a function of supersaturation and temperature. In the case of the X-DKPs, these measurements will be repeated as the molecular structure of the growth unit is varied. In the case of CaCO{sub 3}, they will be performed as a function of solution chemistry including pH, ionic strength, and amino acid content. In addition, we will measure nucleation rates and orientations of

  15. Reversible switching from antiferro- to ferromagnetic behavior by solvent-mediated, thermally-induced phase transitions in a trimorphic MOF-based magnetic sponge system.

    PubMed

    Wriedt, Mario; Yakovenko, Andrey A; Halder, Gregory J; Prosvirin, Andrey V; Dunbar, Kim R; Zhou, Hong-Cai

    2013-03-13

    Hydrothermal reactions of copper(II) acetate, tetrazolate-5-carboxylate (tzc), and the neutral N-donor spacer ligand 1,3-di(4-pyridyl)propane (dpp) lead in a single reaction vial to the simultaneous formation of three different single-crystalline solvates [Cu(tzc)(dpp)]n·0.5C6H14·0.5H2O (1), [Cu(tzc)(dpp)]n·4.5H2O (2), and [Cu(tzc)(dpp)]n·1.25C6H14 (3). All three structures were characterized by single crystal X-ray diffraction. None of these solvates can be prepared as phase-pure bulk materials, but reaction conditions similar to those used for single crystal synthesis yield a phase-pure polycrystalline bulk material of an additional forth solvate phase [Cu(tzc)(dpp)]n·2H2O (4). Investigations of its thermal properties by in situ temperature-dependent synchrotron-based powder diffraction experiments have shown interesting phase transitions upon heating in a helium stream. Initially, the precursor dihydrate 4 transforms to an anhydrous phase [Cu(tzc)(dpp)]n (6I) via the intermediate monohydrate phase [Cu(tzc)(dpp)]n·H2O (5). Upon further heating, phase 6I transforms to a new anhydrous polymorph 6II, which transforms upon cooling to a further new phase 6III. Thermogravimetric measurements performed in tandem with differential scanning calorimetry as well as infrared spectroscopic investigations are in agreement with these findings. The de/resolvation behavior is accompanied by a dramatic change in their magnetic properties: The dihydrate phase shows antiferromagnetic exchange interactions, whereas ferromagnetic properties are observed for the trimorphic anhydrate system. This magnetic sponge-like behavior can be reversibly cycled upon de/resolvation of the material. PMID:23414430

  16. Toxic effects of organic solvents on the growth of chlorella vulgaris and Selenastrum capicornutum

    SciTech Connect

    El Jay, A.

    1996-10-01

    Organic solvents can make their way into the environment as industrial wastes and components of pesticide formulations. In laboratory bioassays, the use of organic solvents is unavoidable since many pesticides and organic pollutants have low water solubilities and need to be dissolved in organic solvents prior to addition into experimental systems. So, one area of concern with laboratory bioassays is the stress imposed on test organisms by organic solvents. Most reports on the comparative toxicity of solvents towards test organisms deals with the effects of solvents on fish and aquatic invertebrates with some data available for blue-green algae and green algae. The US Environmental Protection Agency recommends maximum allowable limits of 0.05% solvent for acute tests and 0.01% for chronic tests but, in the literature, the nature of the solvent and the final concentration used vary among the different authors and are often higher than EPA limits due to problems associated with the use of small test volumes and toxicant solubility. Organic solvents can cause toxic effects on their own, but it has been also reported that they can interact with pesticides to alter toxicity. The first step in choosing a solvent for use in bioassays should be a detailed screening to identify solvents with inherently low toxicity to the test organism, followed by an interaction study (pesticide and solvent interactions) to choose the best concentration to use. The purpose of this study is to compare the inhibitory effects of our solvents used in pesticide bioassays towards the growth of two green algae. 18 refs., 4 figs., 1 tabs.

  17. SOLVENT EXTRACTION PROCESS FOR PLUTONIUM

    DOEpatents

    Seaborg, G.T.

    1959-04-14

    The separation of plutonium from aqueous inorganic acid solutions by the use of a water immiscible organic extractant liquid is described. The plutonium must be in the oxidized state, and the solvents covered by the patent include nitromethane, nitroethane, nitropropane, and nitrobenzene. The use of a salting out agents such as ammonium nitrate in the case of an aqueous nitric acid solution is advantageous. After contacting the aqueous solution with the organic extractant, the resulting extract and raffinate phases are separated. The plutonium may be recovered by any suitable method.

  18. Conformation of a flexible chain in explicit solvent: exact solvation potentials for short Lennard-Jones chains.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Mark P; Adhikari, Shishir R

    2011-07-28

    The average conformation of a flexible chain molecule in solution is coupled to the local solvent structure. In a dense solvent, local chain structure often mirrors the pure solvent structure, whereas, in a dilute solvent, the chain can strongly perturb the solvent structure which, in turn, can lead to either chain expansion or compression. Here we use Monte Carlo (MC) simulation to study such solvent effects for a short Lennard-Lones (LJ) chain in monomeric LJ solvent. For an n-site chain molecule in solution these many-body solvent effects can be formally mapped to an n-body solvation potential. We have previously shown that for hard-sphere and square-well chain-in-solvent systems this n-body potential can be decomposed into a set of two-body potentials. Here, we show that this decomposition is also valid for the LJ system. Starting from high precision MC results for the n = 5 LJ chain-in-solvent system, we use a Boltzmann inversion technique to compute numerically exact sets of two-body solvation potentials which map the many-body chain-in-solvent problem to a few-body single-chain problem. We have carried out this mapping across the full solvent phase diagram including the dilute vapor, dense liquid, and supercritical regions and find that these sets of solvation potentials are able to encode the complete range of solvent effects found in the LJ chain-in-solvent system. We also show that these two-site solvation potentials can be used to obtain accurate multi-site intramolecular distribution functions and we discuss the application of these exact short chain potentials to the study of longer chains in solvent. PMID:21806157

  19. Neurobehavioral and health-related deficits in solvent-exposed painters.

    PubMed

    Grosch, J W; Neale, A V; Demers, R Y

    1996-11-01

    The health status of 133 solvent-exposed painters was evaluated using the Neurobehavioral Evaluation System (NES) and blood test results from a physical exam. The comparison group consisted of 51 sheetmetal workers, minimally exposed to solvents. Degree of solvent exposure was calculated using three different indices derived from questionnaire responses. Multivariate analyses, adjusted for age, alcohol consumption, and smoking, indicated that painters performed less well on the symbol digit learning and vocabulary tasks. Evidence was also found for a dose-effect relationship, particularly when several features of the work environment were considered in estimating exposure. Degree of solvent exposure predicted levels of serum lead, BUN, and SGOT. These findings indicate that questionnaire-based measures of solvent exposure can be useful predictors of neurobehavioral and health-related deficits. Verbal ability, often used by researchers as a measure of premorbid functioning, may be adversely affected by solvent exposure. PMID:8909612

  20. Nonequilibrium solvent effects in Born-Oppenheimer molecular dynamics for ground and excited electronic states.

    PubMed

    Bjorgaard, J A; Velizhanin, K A; Tretiak, S

    2016-04-21

    The effects of solvent on molecular processes such as excited state relaxation and photochemical reaction often occurs in a nonequilibrium regime. Dynamic processes such as these can be simulated using excited statemolecular dynamics. In this work, we describe methods of simulating nonequilibrium solvent effects in excited statemolecular dynamics using linear-response time-dependent density functional theory and apparent surface charge methods. These developments include a propagation method for solvent degrees of freedom and analytical energy gradients for the calculation of forces. Molecular dynamics of acetaldehyde in water or acetonitrile are demonstrated where the solute-solvent system is out of equilibrium due to photoexcitation and emission. PMID:27389206

  1. Nonequilibrium solvent effects in Born-Oppenheimer molecular dynamics for ground and excited electronic states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bjorgaard, J. A.; Velizhanin, K. A.; Tretiak, S.

    2016-04-01

    The effects of solvent on molecular processes such as excited state relaxation and photochemical reaction often occurs in a nonequilibrium regime. Dynamic processes such as these can be simulated using excited state molecular dynamics. In this work, we describe methods of simulating nonequilibrium solvent effects in excited state molecular dynamics using linear-response time-dependent density functional theory and apparent surface charge methods. These developments include a propagation method for solvent degrees of freedom and analytical energy gradients for the calculation of forces. Molecular dynamics of acetaldehyde in water or acetonitrile are demonstrated where the solute-solvent system is out of equilibrium due to photoexcitation and emission.

  2. Solvent-induced current-voltage hysteresis and negative differential resistance in molecular junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dzhioev, Alan A.; Kosov, D. S.

    2012-01-01

    We consider a single molecule circuit embedded into solvent. The Born dielectric solvation model is combined with Keldysh nonequilibrium Green's functions to describe the electron-transport properties of the system. Depending on the dielectric constant, the solvent induces multiple nonequilibrium steady states with corresponding hysteresis in molecular current-voltage characteristics as well as negative differential resistance. We identify the physical range of solvent and molecular parameters where the effects are present. The position of the negative differential resistance peak can be controlled by the dielectric constant of the solvent.

  3. [Generic method for determination of volatile organic solvents in cosmetics].

    PubMed

    Da, Jing; Huang, Xianglu; Wang, Gangli; Cao, Jin; Zhang, Qingsheng

    2014-11-01

    A generic screening, confirmation and determination method was established based on 36 commonly used volatile organic solvents in cosmetics by headspace gas chromatography- mass spectrometry (GC-MS). This method included a database for pilot screening and identifi- cation of those solvents and their quantitative method. Pilot screening database was composed by two sections, one was household section built by two columns with opposite polarities (col- umn VF-1301 ms and DB-5 ms) using retention index in different column systems as qualitative parameter, and the other was NIST MS search version 2.0. Meanwhile, the determination method of the 36 volatile solvents was developed with GC-MS. Cosmetic samples were dissolved in water and transferred to a headspace vial. After 30 min equilibration at 60 °C, the samples were analyzed by GC-MS equipped with a capillary chromatographic column VF-1301 ms. The external calibration was used for quantification. The limits of detection were from 0.01 to 3.3 μg/g, and the recoveries were from 60.77% to 126.6%. This study provided a generic method for pilot screening, identification, and quantitation of volatile organic solvents in cosmetics, and may solve the problem that different analytical methods need to be developed for different targeted compounds and pilot screening for potential candidate solvent residues.

  4. Neurotoxicity of industrial solvents: a review of the literature

    SciTech Connect

    Baker, E.L. Jr.; Smith, T.J.; Landrigan, P.J.

    1985-01-01

    Organic solvents, particularly stryrene, are used widely in boatbuilding. They may be absorbed by workers either through the respiratory tract or the skin. Uptake is influenced by level and duration of exposure, work load, and specific physiochemical features of each solvent, as well as by work practices and use of protective equipment. Kinetics of metabolism and excretion kinetics are highly variable among compounds. Metabolites can be measured in blood, urine, or exhaled breath and may serve as indirect indices of absorption. Acute high-dose exposure to organic solvents can produce a transient narcotic effect on the central nervous system. This effect occurs in proportion to brain dose, which in turn is determined by intensity and duration of exposure. Additionally, chronic exposures to organic solvents have been reported to produce an increased frequency of neurologic signs and symptoms. These findings include peripheral neuropathies and toxic encephalopathies. The latter are characterized by alterations in affect, memory loss, and impaired cognition. Concern exists that prolonged excessive exposure to organic solvents may lead to premature and persistent dementia in certain workers. 65 references.

  5. The solvent component of macromolecular crystals

    PubMed Central

    Weichenberger, Christian X.; Afonine, Pavel V.; Kantardjieff, Katherine; Rupp, Bernhard

    2015-01-01

    The mother liquor from which a biomolecular crystal is grown will contain water, buffer molecules, native ligands and cofactors, crystallization precipitants and additives, various metal ions, and often small-molecule ligands or inhibitors. On average, about half the volume of a biomolecular crystal consists of this mother liquor, whose components form the disordered bulk solvent. Its scattering contributions can be exploited in initial phasing and must be included in crystal structure refinement as a bulk-solvent model. Concomitantly, distinct electron density originating from ordered solvent components must be correctly identified and represented as part of the atomic crystal structure model. Herein, are reviewed (i) probabilistic bulk-solvent content estimates, (ii) the use of bulk-solvent density modification in phase improvement, (iii) bulk-solvent models and refinement of bulk-solvent contributions and (iv) modelling and validation of ordered solvent constituents. A brief summary is provided of current tools for bulk-solvent analysis and refinement, as well as of modelling, refinement and analysis of ordered solvent components, including small-molecule ligands. PMID:25945568

  6. Influence of binary swelling solvents: Mechanism of action

    SciTech Connect

    Ding, R.; Tucker, D.; Kispert, L.D.

    1995-12-31

    This study addresses the dramatic up-take of a poor swelling solvent in Argonne Premium Coal Samples (APCS), Illinois No. 6, Beulah-Zap and Lewiston-Stockton when such a solvent is spiked with various amounts of the strong swelling solvent, pyridine. The unexpected up-take can be explained in terms of four different processes: (1) disruption of weak hydrogen bonds which isolate the interconnected micropore system; (2) disruption of weak hydrogen bonds which protect individual micropores; (3) competition of pyridine for the active sites involved in the hydrogen bonds or the {open_quotes}poisoning{close_quotes} of active sites; and (4) disruption of stronger hydrogen bonds within the macromolecules which causes an opening of the structure. When more than 5% pyridine is used, no additional disruption of the hydrogen-bonded network occurs. The structural changes were monitored by spin probe incorporation which was measured by EPR spectroscopy.

  7. Interaction between Mo132 nanocluster polyoxometalate and solvents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ostroushko, A. A.; Safronov, A. P.; Tonkushina, M. O.; Korotaev, V. Yu.; Barkov, A. Yu.

    2014-12-01

    The interaction between solid Mo132 nanocluster polyoxometalate with the structure of a keplerate and solvents of different natures (e.g., water, alcohols, hexane, and tetrachloromethane) is studied thermochemically. NMR spectroscopy is used to analyze interactions in solid polyoxometalate-organic compound systems in a gaseous medium. Data are collected on sorption interactions between a Mo132 nanocluster and camphor.

  8. Acidic solvent extraction of gossypol from cottonseed meal

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In order to expand the use of cottonseed meal in animal feeding, extraction of the meal gossypol was studied with acetic acetone- and ethanol-based solutions. Phosphoric acid was added to hydrolyze and release gossypol bound within the meal. Both solvent systems were effective at reducing gossypo...

  9. SITE TECHNOLOGY CAPSULE: TERRA-KLEEN SOLVENT EXTRACTION TECHNOLOGY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Remediation of PCBs in soils has been difficult to implement on a full-scale, cost-effective basis. The Terra-Kleen solvent extraction system has overcome many of the soil handling, contaminant removal, and regulatory restrictions that have made it difficult to implement a cost-e...

  10. Is Water a Universal Solvent for Life?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pohorill, Andrew

    2012-01-01

    There are strong reasons to believe that the laws, principles and constraints of physics and chemistry are universal. It is much less clear how this universality translates into our understanding of the origins of life. Conventionally, discussions of this topic focus on chemistry that must be sufficiently rich to seed life. Although this is clearly a prerequisite for the emergence of living systems, I propose to focus instead on self-organization of matter into functional structures capable of reproduction, evolution and responding to environmental changes. In biology, most essential functions are largely mediated by noncovalent interactions (interactions that do not involve making or breaking chemical bonds). Forming chemical bonds is only a small part of what living systems do. There are specific implications of this point of view for universality. I will concentrate on one of these implications. Strength of non-covalent interactions must be properly tuned. If they were too weak, the system would exhibit undesired, uncontrolled response to natural fluctuations of physical and chemical parameters. If they were too strong kinetics of biological processes would be slow and energetics costly. This balance, however, is not a natural property of complex chemical systems. Instead, it has to be achieved with the aid of an appropriate solvent for life. In particular, potential solvents for life must be characterized by a high dielectric constant to ensure solubility of polar species and sufficient flexibility of biological structures stabilized by electrostatic interactions. Among these solvents, water exhibits a remarkable trait that it also promotes solvophobic (hydrophobic) interactions between non-polar species, typically manifested by a tendency of these species to aggregate and minimize their contacts with the aqueous solvent. Hydrophobic interactions are responsible, at least in part, for many self-organization phenomena in biological systems, such as the formation

  11. SOLVENT EXTRACTION FOR URANIUM MOLYBDENUM ALLOY DISSOLUTION FLOWSHEET

    SciTech Connect

    Visser, A; Robert Pierce, R

    2007-06-07

    H-Canyon Engineering requested the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) to perform two solvent extraction experiments using dissolved Super Kukla (SK) material. The SK material is an uranium (U)-molybdenum (Mo) alloy material of 90% U/10% Mo by weight with 20% 235U enrichment. The first series of solvent extraction tests involved a series of batch distribution coefficient measurements with 7.5 vol % tributylphosphate (TBP)/n-paraffin for extraction from 4-5 M nitric acid (HNO{sub 3}), using 4 M HNO{sub 3}-0.02 M ferrous sulfamate (Fe(SO3NH2)2) scrub, 0.01 M HNO3 strip steps with particular emphasis on the distribution of U and Mo in each step. The second set of solvent extraction tests determined whether the 2.5 wt % sodium carbonate (Na2CO3) solvent wash change frequency would need to be modified for the processing of the SK material. The batch distribution coefficient measurements were performed using dissolved SK material diluted to 20 g/L (U + Mo) in 4 M HNO{sub 3} and 5 M HNO{sub 3}. In these experiments, U had a distribution coefficient greater than 2.5 while at least 99% of the nickel (Ni) and greater than 99.9% of the Mo remained in the aqueous phase. After extraction, scrub, and strip steps, the aqueous U product from the strip contains nominally 7.48 {micro}g Mo/g U, significantly less than the maximum allowable limit of 800 {micro}g Mo/g U. Solvent washing experiments were performed to expose a 2.5 wt % Na2CO3 solvent wash solution to the equivalent of 37 solvent wash cycles. The low Mo batch distribution coefficient in this solvent extraction system yields only 0.001-0.005 g/L Mo extracted to the organic. During the solvent washing experiments, the Mo appears to wash from the organic.

  12. PERTURBATION OF VOLTAGE-SENSITIVE CALCIUM FUNCTION IN PHEOCHROMOCYTOMA CELLS BY VOLATILE ORGANIC SOLVENTS.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Volatile organic solvents such as toluene (TOL) and trichloroethylene perturb nervous system function and share characteristic effects with other central nervous system depressants such as anesthetic gasses, ethanol, benzodiazepines and barbiturates. Recently, mechanistic studies...

  13. DEMONSTRATION BULLETIN: TERRA KLEEN SOLVENT EXTRACTION TECHNOLOGY - TERRA-KLEEN RESPONSE GROUP, INC.

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Terra-Kleen Solvent Extraction Technology was developed by Terra-Kleen Response Group, Inc., to remove polychlorinated biphenyls (PCB) and other organic constituents from contaminated soil. This batch process system uses a proprietary solvent at ambient temperatures to treat ...

  14. [Chlorinate solvents natural biodegradation in shallow groundwater].

    PubMed

    He, Jiang-tao; Li, Ye; Liu, Shi; Chen, Hong-han

    2005-03-01

    Chlorinated solvents contaminations are most popular in shallow groundwater. A serious local groundwater contamination of chlorinated solvents is founded in a north city of China during the organic pollution investigation. On the basis of the available data and the determining methods of chlorinated solvents biodegradation in groundwater under natural conditions, research on chlorinated solvents biodegrading potential is carried out. The results show that the ground water environment parameters, Eh and pH of the groundwater, indirect sign of biodegradation, i.e. NO3- changing, and concentration variation of biodegradation intermediate products of PCE and TCE all proved that chlorinated solvents can be degraded by microorganism in groundwater. The results of simulating experiment also reveal that, co-metabolism biodegradation of chlorinated solvent was possible under the groundwater circumstances in this sample. Therefore, admitting there is biotransformation from PCE to TCE can explain the present situation more reasonably.

  15. Solvent signal as an NMR concentration reference.

    PubMed

    Mo, Huaping; Raftery, Daniel

    2008-12-15

    We propose that the NMR solvent signal be utilized as a universal concentration reference because most solvents can be observed by NMR and solvent concentrations can be readily calculated or determined independently. In particular, a highly protonated solvent such as water can serve as a primary concentration standard for its stability, availability, and ease of observation. The potential problems of radiation damping associated with a strong NMR signal can be alleviated by small pulse angle excitation. The solvent signal then can be detected by the NMR receiver with the same efficiency as a dilute analyte. We demonstrated that the analyte's proton concentration can be accurately determined from 4 microM to more than 100 M, referenced by solvent (water) protons of concentrations more than 10 M. The proposed method is robust and indifferent to probe tuning and does not require any additional concentration standard.

  16. Aryne Compatible Solvents are not Always Innocent.

    PubMed

    Suh, Sung-Eun; Chenoweth, David M

    2016-08-19

    Arynes are important and versatile intermediates in a variety of transformations. Commonly used solvents for aryne chemistry include acetonitrile and dichloromethane. Although rarely reported, the reactive nature of aryne intermediates makes them prone to side reactions, which sometimes involve solvent participation. Acetonitrile and dichloromethane are not always innocent solvents and can participate in aryne-based reactions. These results are presented in the context of ongoing mechanistic investigations of the triple aryne-tetrazine reaction. PMID:27486792

  17. Solvent-less repair inks for color filters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Huang-Ming P.; Tang, Feng-Chin; Li, Chi-Hsin; Hsieh, Wen-Jen; Lin, Yu-Chuan

    2011-03-01

    Color filter (CF), one of the key components for liquid crystal display (LCD), is costly to make from repeated lithography processes. The defects may be created during the repeated lithography processes. The recycling defect CF panels are environmental unfriendly and not cost-effective process. CF repairing is an important cost-effective technical process to improve product yield. In this study, a solvent-less repaired ink system was studied. The optimized formulas of red, green, blue, and black inks have passed the quality control, reliability, and life-time tests. The new solvent-free ink system possesses the balance characteristics in liquid fluidic, UV reactivity, and color saturation. The energy has been conserved without high temperature process for removing organic solvent. The new system exhibits the state-ofthe- art fabrication process without unnecessary energy waste. As a result, the solvent-less CF repair inks offer a promising result for contributing to a low carbon process in the near future.

  18. Modeling Solvent Broadening on the Vibronic Spectra of a Series of Coumarin Dyes. From Implicit to Explicit Solvent Models.

    PubMed

    Cerezo, Javier; Avila Ferrer, Francisco J; Prampolini, Giacomo; Santoro, Fabrizio

    2015-12-01

    We present a protocol to estimate the solvent-induced broadening of electronic spectra based on a model that explicitly takes into account the environment embedding the solute. Starting from a classical approximation of the solvent contribution to the spectrum, the broadening arises from the spread of the excitation energies due to the fluctuation of the solvent coordinates, and it is represented as a Gaussian line shape that convolutes the vibronic spectrum of the solute. The latter is computed in harmonic approximation at room temperature with a time-dependent approach. The proposed protocol for the computation of spectral broadening exploits molecular dynamics (MD) simulations performed on the solute-solvent system, keeping the solute degrees of freedom frozen, followed by the computation of the excitation properties with a quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics (QM/MM) approach. The factors that might influence each step of the protocol are analyzed in detail, including the selection of the empirical force field (FF) adopted in the MD simulations and the QM/MM partition of the system to compute the excitation energies. The procedure is applied to a family of coumarin dyes, and the results are compared with experiments and with the predictions of a very recent work (Cerezo et al., Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys. 2015, 17, 11401-11411), where an implicit model was adopted for the solvent. The final spectra of the considered coumarins were obtained without including ad hoc phenomenological parameters and indicate that the broadenings computed with explicit and implicit models both follow the experimental trend, increasing as the polarity change from the initial to the final state increases. More in detail, the implicit model provides larger estimations of the broadening that are closer to the experimental evidence, while explicit models appear to better capture relative differences arising from different solvents or different solutes. Possible inaccuracies of the adopted

  19. Process for hydrogenating coal and coal solvents

    DOEpatents

    Tarrer, Arthur R.; Shridharani, Ketan G.

    1983-01-01

    A novel process is described for the hydrogenation of coal by the hydrogenation of a solvent for the coal in which the hydrogenation of the coal solvent is conducted in the presence of a solvent hydrogenation catalyst of increased activity, wherein the hydrogenation catalyst is produced by reacting ferric oxide with hydrogen sulfide at a temperature range of 260.degree. C. to 315.degree. C. in an inert atmosphere to produce an iron sulfide hydrogenation catalyst for the solvent. Optimally, the reaction temperature is 275.degree. C. Alternately, the reaction can be conducted in a hydrogen atmosphere at 350.degree. C.

  20. MCU MATERIALS COMPATIBILITY WITH CSSX SOLVENT

    SciTech Connect

    Fondeur, F

    2006-01-13

    The Modular Caustic-Side Solvent Extraction (CSSX) Unit (MCU) plans to use several new materials of construction not previously used with CSSX solvent. SRNL researchers tested seven materials proposed for service in seal and gasket applications. None of the materials leached detectable amounts of components into the CSSX solvent during 96 hour tests. All are judged acceptable for use based on their effect on the solvent. However, some of the materials adsorbed solvent or changed dimensions during contact with solvent. Consultation with component and material vendors with regard to performance impact and in-use testing of the materials is recommended. Polyetheretherketone (PEEK), a material selected for use in contactor bearing seals, did not gain weight or change dimensions on contact with CSSX solvent. Analysis of the solvent contacted with this material showed no impurities and the standard dispersion test gave acceptable phase separation results. The material contains a leachable hydrocarbon substance, detectable on exposed surfaces, that did not adversely contaminate the solvent within the limits of the testing. We recommend contacting the vendor to determine the source and purpose of this component, or, alternatively, pursue the infrared analysis of the PEEK in an effort to better define potential impacts.

  1. Solvents and Parkinson disease: A systematic review of toxicological and epidemiological evidence

    PubMed Central

    Lock, Edward A.; Zhang, Jing; Checkoway, Harvey

    2013-01-01

    Parkinson disease (PD) is a debilitating neurodegenerative motor disorder, with its motor symptoms largely attributable to loss of dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra. The causes of PD remain poorly understood, although environmental toxicants may play etiologic roles. Solvents are widespread neurotoxicants present in the workplace and ambient environment. Case reports of parkinsonism, including PD, have been associated with exposures to various solvents, most notably trichloroethylene (TCE). Animal toxicology studies have been conducted on various organic solvents, with some, including TCE, demonstrating potential for inducing nigral system damage. However, a confirmed animal model of solvent-induced PD has not been developed. Numerous epidemiologic studies have investigated potential links between solvents and PD, yielding mostly null or weak associations. An exception is a recent study of twins indicating possible etiologic relations with TCE and other chlorinated solvents, although findings were based on small numbers, and dose–response gradients were not observed. At present, there is no consistent evidence from either the toxicological or epidemiologic perspective that any specific solvent or class of solvents is a cause of PD. Future toxicological research that addresses mechanisms of nigral damage from TCE and its metabolites, with exposure routes and doses relevant to human exposures, is recommended. Improvements in epidemiologic research, especially with regard to quantitative characterization of long-term exposures to specific solvents, are needed to advance scientific knowledge on this topic. PMID:23220449

  2. Solvent Carryover Characterization and Recovery for a 10-inch Single Stage Centrifugal Contactor

    SciTech Connect

    Lentsch, R.D.; Stephens, A.B.; Leung, D.T.; Baffling, K.E.; Harmon, H.D.; Suggs, P.C.

    2006-07-01

    A test program has been performed to characterize the organic solvent carryover and recovery from centrifugal contactors in the Caustic-side Solvent Extraction (CSSX) process. CSSX is the baseline design for removing cesium from salt solutions for Department of Energy (DOE) Savannah River Site's Salt Waste Processing Facility. CSSX uses a custom solvent to extract cesium from the salt solution in a series of single stage centrifugal contactors. Meeting the Waste Acceptance Criteria at the Defense Waste Processing Facility and Saltstone, as well as plant economics, dictate that solvent loss should be kept to a minimum. Solvent droplet size distribution in the aqueous outlet streams of the CSSX contactors is of particular importance to the design of solvent recovery equipment. Because insufficient solvent droplet size data existed to form a basis for the recovery system design, DOE funded the CSSX Solvent Carryover Characterization and Recovery Test (SCCRT). This paper presents the droplet size distribution of solvent and concentration in the contactor aqueous outlet streams as a function of rotor speed, bottom plate type, and flow rate. It also presents the performance data of a prototype coalescer. (authors)

  3. Partition efficiencies of newly fabricated universal high-speed counter-current chromatograph for separation of two different types of sugar derivatives with organic-aqueous two-phase solvent systems

    PubMed Central

    Shinomiya, Kazufusa; Sato, Kazuki; Yoshida, Kazunori; Tokura, Koji; Maruyama, Hiroshi; Yanagidaira, Kazuhiro; Ito, Yoichiro

    2013-01-01

    Universal high-speed counter-current chromatograph (HSCCC) was newly designed and fabricated in our laboratory. It holds a set of four column holders symmetrically around the rotary frame at a distance of 11.2 cm from the central axis. By engaging the stationary gear on the central axis of the centrifuge to the planetary gears on the column holder shaft through a set of idle gears, two pairs of diagonally located column holders simultaneously rotate about their own axes in the opposite directions: one forward (type-J planetary motion) and the other backward (type-I planetary motion) each synchronously with the revolution. Using the eccentric coil assembly, partition efficiencies produced by these two planetary motions were compared on the separation of two different types of sugar derivatives (4-methylumbelliferyl and 5-bromo-4-chloro-3-indoxyl sugar derivatives) using organic-aqueous two-phase solvent systems composed of n-hexane/ethyl acetate/1-butanol/methanol/water and aqueous 0.1 M sodium tetraborate, respectively. With lower phase mobile, better peak resolution was obtained by the type-J forward rotation for both samples probably due to higher retention of the stationary phase. With upper phase mobile, however, similar peak resolutions were obtained between these two planetary motions for both sugar derivatives. The overall results indicate that the present universal HSCCC is useful for counter-current chromatographic separation since each planetary motion has its specific applications: e.g., vortex CCC by the type-I planetary motion and HSCCC by the type-J planetary motion both for separation of various natural and synthetic products. PMID:24267319

  4. Partition efficiencies of newly fabricated universal high-speed counter-current chromatograph for separation of two different types of sugar derivatives with organic-aqueous two-phase solvent systems.

    PubMed

    Shinomiya, Kazufusa; Sato, Kazuki; Yoshida, Kazunori; Tokura, Koji; Maruyama, Hiroshi; Yanagidaira, Kazuhiro; Ito, Yoichiro

    2013-12-27

    A new design of universal high-speed counter-current chromatograph (HSCCC) was fabricated in our laboratory. It holds a set of four column holders symmetrically around the rotary frame at a distance of 11.2cm from the central axis. By engaging the stationary gear on the central axis of the centrifuge to the planetary gears on the column holder shaft through a set of idle gears, two pairs of diagonally located column holders simultaneously rotate about their own axes in the opposite directions: one forward (type-J planetary motion) and the other backward (type-I planetary motion) each synchronously with the revolution. Using the eccentric coil assembly, partition efficiencies produced by these two planetary motions were compared on the separation of two different types of sugar derivatives (4-methylumbelliferyl and 5-bromo-4-chloro-3-indoxyl sugar derivatives) using organic-aqueous two-phase solvent systems composed of n-hexane/ethyl acetate/1-butanol/methanol/water and aqueous 0.1M sodium tetraborate, respectively. With lower phase mobile, better peak resolution was obtained by the type-J forward rotation for both samples probably due to higher retention of the stationary phase. With upper phase mobile, however, similar peak resolutions were obtained between these two planetary motions for both sugar derivatives. The overall results indicate that the present universal HSCCC is useful for counter-current chromatographic separation since each planetary motion has its specific applications: e.g., vortex CCC by the type-I planetary motion and HSCCC by the type-J planetary motion both for separation of various natural and synthetic products.

  5. Single polymer chains in poor solvent: Using the bond fluctuation method with explicit solvent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jentzsch, Christoph; Werner, Marco; Sommer, Jens-Uwe

    2013-03-01

    We use the bond fluctuation model with explicit solvent to study single polymer chains under poor solvent conditions. Static and dynamic properties of the bond fluctuation model with explicit solvent are compared with the implicit solvent model, and the Θ-temperatures are determined for both solvent models. We show that even in the very poor solvent regime, dynamics is not frozen for the explicit solvent model. We investigate some aspects of the structure of a single collapsed globule and show that rather large chain lengths are necessary to reach the scaling regime of a dense sphere. The force-extension curve of a single polymer chain under poor solvent conditions in the fixed end-to-end distance ensemble is analyzed. We find that the transition of the tadpole conformation to the stretched chain conformation is rather smooth because of fluctuation effects, which is in agreement with recent experimental results.

  6. Wide electrochemical window solvents for use in electrochemical devices and electrolyte solutions incorporating such solvents

    DOEpatents

    Angell, Charles Austen; Zhang, Sheng-Shui; Xu, Kang

    1998-01-01

    The present invention relates to electrolyte solvents for use in liquid or rubbery electrolyte solutions. Specifically, this invention is directed to boron-containing electrolyte solvents and boron-containing electrolyte solutions.

  7. Silk fibroin gelation via non-solvent induced phase separation.

    PubMed

    Kasoju, Naresh; Hawkins, Nicholas; Pop-Georgievski, Ognen; Kubies, Dana; Vollrath, Fritz

    2016-03-01

    Tissue engineering benefits from novel materials with precisely tunable physical, chemical and mechanical properties over a broad range. Here we report a practical approach to prepare Bombyx mori silk fibroin hydrogels using the principle of non-solvent induced phase separation (NIPS). A combination of reconstituted silk fibroin (RSF) and methanol (non-solvent), with a final concentration of 2.5% w/v and 12.5% v/v respectively, maintained at 22 °C temperature turned into a hydrogel within 10 hours. Freeze-drying of this gel gave a foam with a porosity of 88%, a water uptake capacity of 89% and a swelling index of 8.6. The gelation kinetics and the loss tangent of the gels were investigated by rheometry. The changes in the morphology of the porous foams were visualized by SEM. The changes in RSF chemical composition and the relative fraction of its secondary structural elements were analyzed by ATR-FTIR along with Fourier self-deconvolution. And, the changes in the glass transition temperature, specific heat capacity and the relative fraction of crystallinity of RSF were determined by TM-DSC. Data suggested that RSF-water-methanol behaved as a polymer-solvent-non-solvent ternary phase system, wherein the demixing of the water-methanol phases altered the thermodynamic equilibrium of RSF-water phases and resulted in the desolvation and eventual separation of the RSF phase. Systematic analysis revealed that both gelation time and the properties of hydrogels and porous foams could be controlled by the ratios of RSF and non-solvent concentration as well as by the type of non-solvent and incubation temperature. Due to the unique properties we envisage that the herein prepared NIPS induced RSF hydrogels and porous foams can possibly be used for the encapsulation of cells and/or for the controlled release of both hydrophilic and hydrophobic drugs. PMID:26730413

  8. STUDY OF SOLVENT AND CATALYST INTERACTIONS IN DIRECT COAL LIQUEFACTION

    SciTech Connect

    Michael T. Klein; William H. Calkins; Jasna Tomic

    2000-10-04

    To provide a better understanding of the roles of a solid catalyst and the solvent in Direct Coal Liquefaction, a small reactor was equipped with a porous-walled basket which was permeable to the solvent but was not permeable to the coal or solid catalyst. With this equipment and a high volatile bituminous coal it was found that direct contact between the catalyst in the basket and the coal outside the basket is not required for catalyzed coal liquefaction. The character of the solvent in this system makes a significant difference in the conversion of the coal, the better solvents being strong donor solvents. Because of the extensive use of thermogravimetric analysis in this laboratory, it was noted that the peak temperature for volatiles evolution from coal was a reliable measure of coal rank. Because of this observation, a variety of coals of a range of ranks was investigated. It was shown in this work that measuring the peak temperature for volatiles evolution was a quite precise indicator of rank and correlated closely with the rank value obtained by measuring vitrinite reflectance, a more difficult measurement to make. This prompted the desire to know the composition of the volatile material evolved as a function of coal rank. This was then measured by coupling a TGA to a mass spectrometer using laser activation and photoionization detection TG-PI-MS. The predominant species in volatiles of low rank coal turned out to be phenols with some alkenes. As the rank increases, the relative amounts of alkene and aromatic hydrocarbons increases and the oxygenated species decrease. It was shown that these volatiles were actually pyrolytic products and not volatilization products of the coal. Solvent extraction experiments coupled with Thermogravimetric-photoionization-mass spectrometry (TG-PI-MS) indicated that the low boiling and more extractable material are essentially similar in chemical types to the non-extractable portions but apparently higher molecular weight

  9. Standard test method for nonvolatile residue of volatile cleaning solvents using the solvent purity meter

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-01-01

    This method covers the determination of nonvolatile residue of volatile cleaning solvents using a solvent purity meter. The residue is concentrated in aerosol form by evaporation of the more volatile solvents. The volume of the concentrated aerosol is passed by a forward light scattering photometer. Experimentally devised curves relating photometer output to nonvolatile residue concentration are used to obtain parts per million of nonvolatile residue content of the cleaning solvents.

  10. The role of the solvent in PMMA gel polymer electrolytes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vondrák, J.; Musil, M.; Sedlaříková, M.; Kořínek, R.; Bartušek, K.; Fedorková, A.

    2016-03-01

    Ionic mobility and solvent vapor pressure were studied on gels containing sodium perchlorate, polymethylmethacrylate and sulfolane as a solvent. The excess of solvent increases markedly the mobility of ions and is indicated by solvent evaporation at elevated temperature. The solvent is bonded similarly as in the liquid solution of sodium salt. The heat of solvent evaporation from gels is near to that of pure solvents.

  11. A practical approach to choosing a substitute solvent

    SciTech Connect

    Howell, S.G.; Springer, J.; Marquis, E.T.

    1995-10-01

    Organic solvents have a multitude of uses in industrial processes, and, although there is some progress being made in replacing them with aqueous systems, many applications still require them. Many cleaning operations which require merely removal of light soils and easily emulsified oil or grease have been changed to aqueous systems with excellent results. Other applications, such as paint removal, cleaning of easily corrodible metal surfaces, removing polymer coatings, or baked on carbon, still may require application of an aggressive solvent. This paper will focus on coating removal, or paint stripping, and consider several instances where substitutes were chosen, and attempt to explain why (or why not) these substitutes performed well. A major use of organic solvents is in the formulation of solvent coatings such as paints, enamels, varnishes, and lacquers. This is an extremely broad and specialized field, and will not be covered in this brief discussion. Instead, we will discuss the other end of the spectrum, that is, removing coatings which have reached the end of their useful life.

  12. Solvent enhanced block copolymer ordering in thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Misner, Matthew J.

    Diblock copolymer self-assembly of materials is emerging as a key element in the fabrication of functional nanostructured materials. By solvent casting or solvent annealing block copolymer thin films, we have demonstrated methods to produce diblock copolymer films with highly oriented, close-packed arrays of nanoscopic cylindrical domains with a high degree of long-range lateral order with few defects. The solvent imparts a high degree of mobility in the microphase-separated copolymer that enables a rapid removal of defects and a high degree of lateral order. Though the use of a selective cosolvent during solvent casting, it was found that the microdomain size and spacing could be increased, leading to a size-tunable system. Additionally, the presence of water also led to the ability to control the microdomain orientation during solvent annealing. Ionic complexation within cylinder-forming PS- b-EO block copolymer thin films was also investigated, where added salts bind PEO block as the minor component. Small amounts of added salts, on the order a few ions per chain, show large effects on the ordering of the copolymer films during solvent annealing. By using gold or cobalt salts, well-organized patterns of nanoparticles can be generated in the copolymer microdomains. Topographically and chemically patterned surfaces were used as a route to sectorizing and controlling the lattice orientation of copolymer films. Topographically patterned surfaces allow well-defined boundaries to confine the copolymer microdomains on a surface and effectively direct the ordering and grain orientation of the copolymer microdomains. Chemically patterned surfaces provide a route to direct the block copolymer ordering on completely flat surface, which may have advantages in applications where adding additional topography may be undesirable. To generate nanoporous templates from PS-b-PEO bases materials several routs were followed. The first route was through the addition and selective

  13. Incineration of contaminated organic solvents in a fluidized-bed calciner

    SciTech Connect

    Schindler, R.E.

    1980-01-01

    The reprocessing of expended reactor fuels at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant (ICPP) generates contaminated organic solvents. An evaluation of potential management alternatives shows that several are suitable for management of contaminated solvents containing tri-butyl phosphate (TBP): the solvent could be burned in a commercially-available burner which absorbs the phosphorus on a fluidized-bed of limestone leaving a solid product for burial; the solvent could be burned in a small fluidized-bed calciner which solidifies non-radioactive feed by in-bed combustion of the contaminated solvent. The fluidized-bed absorbs the phosphate forming a solid product for burial; the solvents could be solidified with a gel or sorbant for burial if the reprocessing system were modified to reduce the solvent volume; and the contaminated solvent could be burned in an existing fluidized-bed calciner designed for solidifying high-level aqueous wastes. Burning the solvent in the existing calciner was selected for process verification because it provides an existing burner, off-gas system, and solids transfer and storage system. No additional wastes are generated. A set of four pilot-plant tests verified the absence of adverse effects from the phosphorus in the fuel when calcining simulated ICPP aqueous wastes. Essentially all of the phosphorus remained in the calcined solids with only a neglegible quantity remaining in the scrubbed off-gas. Combustion efficiency was high (93 to 96%). There were no observable adverse effects on solids in the scrubbing system, corrosion rates, or solids flowability (for retrieval). Conclusions of general applicability are: alternative technologies are available for disposal of contaminated solvents, and the use of an existing fuel-using facility, e.g., calciner or incinerator - designed for contaminated wastes will usually be cost effective.

  14. SCENARIOS EVALUATION TOOL FOR CHLORINATED SOLVENT MNA

    SciTech Connect

    Vangelas, K; Brian02 Looney, B; Michael J. Truex; Charles J. Newell

    2006-08-16

    Over the past three decades, much progress has been made in the remediation of chlorinated solvents from the subsurface. Yet these pervasive contaminants continue to present a significant challenge to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), other federal agencies, and other public and private organizations. The physical and chemical properties of chlorinated solvents make it difficult to rapidly reach the low concentrations typically set as regulatory limits. These technical challenges often result in high costs and long remediation time frames. In 2003, the DOE through the Office of Environmental Management funded a science-based technical project that uses the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's technical protocol (EPA, 1998) and directives (EPA, 1999) on Monitored Natural Attenuation (MNA) as the foundation on which to introduce supporting concepts and new scientific developments that will support remediation of chlorinated solvents based on natural attenuation processes. This project supports the direction in which many site owners want to move to complete the remediation of their site(s), that being to complete the active treatment portion of the remedial effort and transition into MNA. The overarching objective of the effort was to examine environmental remedies that are based on natural processes--remedies such as Monitored Natural Attenuation (MNA) or Enhanced Attenuation (EA). The research program did identify several specific opportunities for advances based on: (1) mass balance as the central framework for attenuation based remedies, (2) scientific advancements and achievements during the past ten years, (3) regulatory and policy development and real-world experience using MNA, and (4) exploration of various ideas for integrating attenuation remedies into a systematic set of ''combined remedies'' for contaminated sites. These opportunities are summarized herein and are addressed in more detail in referenced project documents and journal articles, as well

  15. EXPERIENCES IN DESIGNING SOLVENTS FOR THE ENVIRONMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    Solvents used throughout industry are chosen to meet specific technological requirements such as solute solubility, cleaning and degreasing, or being a medium for paints and coatings. With the increasing awareness of the human health effects and environmental tisks of solvent use...

  16. EXPERIENCES IN DESIGNING SOLVENTS FOR THE ENVIRONMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    Solvents used throughout industry are chosen to meet specific technological requirements such as solute solubility, cleaning and degreasing, or being a medium for paints and coatings. With the increasing awareness of the human health effects and environmental risks of solvent use...

  17. Supercritical-Multiple-Solvent Extraction From Coal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Corcoran, W.; Fong, W.; Pichaichanarong, P.; Chan, P.; Lawson, D.

    1983-01-01

    Large and small molecules dissolve different constituents. Experimental apparatus used to test supercritical extraction of hydrogen rich compounds from coal in various organic solvents. In decreasing order of importance, relevant process parameters were found to be temperature, solvent type, pressure, and residence time.

  18. SOLVENT-FREE ORGANIC SYNTHESES USING MICROWAVES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The latest results on microwave-expedited solvent-free approach as applied to the assembly of organic molecules will be presented. The salient features of this expeditious methodology such as solvent conservation and ease of manipulation etc. will be described in the context of r...

  19. SOLVENT DESIGN UNDER VARYING ENVIRONMENTAL REQUIREMENTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    There is currently a great need to replace many solvents that are commonly used by industry and the public, but whose continued use entails a number of human health and environmental risks. One issue hampering solvent replacement is the general thought that replacement, particul...

  20. Classification of Solvents according to Interaction Mechanisms.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ahmed, Wasi

    1979-01-01

    Presented is a model for solvent effects based on the observation that the excitation energy of all-trans-N-Retinylidenmethyl-n-butylammonium iodide is directly related to the dielectric constant of a series of aromatic and aliphatic solvents as the dielectric constant (e) ranges from 2 to 10.5. (BT)