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Sample records for alkenone sea surface

  1. Sea surface temperature proxies (alkenones, foraminiferal Mg/Ca, and planktonic foraminiferal assemblage) and their implications in the Okinawa Trough

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Ryoung Ah; Lee, Kyung Eun; Bae, Si Woong

    2015-12-01

    We reviewed three sea surface temperature (SST) proxies in the Okinawa Trough (OT): alkenones, planktonic foraminiferal Mg/Ca, and planktonic foraminiferal assemblages. The seasonal and vertical distribution patterns of each proxy-related organism in the water column were reviewed to confirm the applicability of each proxy. In addition, current SSTs (Japan Oceanographic Data Center dataset from 1906 to 2003) were compared with core-top sediment temperatures reconstructed using the proxies. Temperatures calculated using the alkenone unsaturation index represent annual mean SSTs, and temperatures calculated using Mg/Ca of Globigerinoides ruber capture summer to autumn (June-November) SSTs. Core-top August SSTs calculated from planktonic foraminiferal assemblages corresponded well with the observed SSTs, but core-top February temperatures were ~3.6 °C warmer than the observed SSTs. SST proxy estimates from marine sediments dating back to the late Holocene (0-3 cal ky BP) and the last glacial maximum (18-21 cal ky BP) were compared. Comparisons between proxy SST estimates show that foraminiferal assemblage-based August SSTs were the warmest. Alkenone-based temperature estimates were lower than Mg/Ca-based temperature estimates, probably because the alkenone-based temperature represents the annual mean temperature, whereas the Mg/Ca-based temperature represents the summer-autumn mean temperature. February assemblage SSTs seem to be greatly affected by the statistical technique and/or database used. These results suggest that seasonality should be considered in past SST reconstruction using alkenone and Mg/Ca in the OT. The planktonic foraminiferal assemblage technique does not appear to be promising with respect to accurately reconstructing past SSTs (especially winter) in the OT. Habitat depth may not be an issue because both alkenone producers and G. ruber live at the upper surface mixed layer in the area.

  2. Late Pliocene Sea Surface Temperature contrast in the Benguela upwelling as recorded by foraminiferal Mg/Ca and alkenones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leduc, G.; Garbe-Schoenberg, C.; Regenberg, M.; Schneider, R. R.

    2011-12-01

    Alkenone-based sea surface temperature (SST) in the Benguela region reveal quite warm and stable conditions between ~3.0 and 2.0 Ma, coinciding with a period of very high diatom production as revealed by mass accumulation rates (MAR) of biogenic opal (Marlow et al., 2000, Science; Etourneau et al., 2009, Geology). Such a pattern is difficult to believe with the general perception that high diatom productivity results from strong coastal upwelling associated with pronounced Surface Ocean cooling. Therefore we assessed whether different paleothermometers from the same sedimentary archive (i.e. ODP site 1082) provide different results for the Namibian upwelling system by performing a comparison between alkenone-derived temperatures and those from the planktonic foraminifera Globigerinoides bulloides, a species known to proliferate in upwelling regions. We used laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS) for multiple in situ determination of Mg/Ca in single tests of G. bulloides. These measurements allow monitoring of contaminant phases linked to Mg-rich clays (monitored by Al/Ca) and Mn-rich foraminiferal tests, which contain substantial high Mg (monitored by Mn/Ca) (Pena et al., 2005, G-cubed). Moreover, using LA-ICP-MS measurements for Mg/Ca ratios on single specimens allows estimating the range of seasonal or vertical temperature variability by considering the intra-sample variance in the SST estimated from different specimens and/or different chambers within the same specimen. When compared to the Pliocene alkenone SST record, the Mg/Ca-ratios imply SSTs colder by ~10°C. A similar contrast in SST estimates between these two proxies was reported for the last 20 ka in the same region (Farmer et al., 2005, Paleoceanography). Such discrepancy can be reconciled by assuming that the two SST proxies are either strongly skewed towards warm (non-upwelling) and cold (upwelling) conditions for alkenones and Mg/Ca SST, respectively, or by the

  3. The Gephyrocapsa Sea Surface Paleothermometer Put To The Test: Comparison With Alkenone and Foraminifera Proxies Off NW Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henderiks, J.; Bollmann, J.

    In Holocene deep-sea sediments, the relative abundance of different morphotypes within the coccolithophore genus Gephyrocapsa is closely correlated with sea sur- face temperature (Bollmann, 1997). Based on this relationship, a regional temperature transfer function was established using a set of 35 Holocene sediments from the NE Atlantic, covering a temperature range from 14C to 24C. Using this approach, ab- solute annual mean sea surface temperatures for a given location can be calculated from the relative abundance of two Gephyrocapsa morphotypes, Gephyrocapsa Cold and Gephyrocapsa Equatorial, with a standard deviation of +/-1.06C. A global regres- sion model (N=110) was applied as well, which calculates absolute mean sea surface temperatures from the relative abundance of three Gephyrocapsa morphotypes, with a standard deviation of +/-1.78C. Using both calibration models, we have estimated sea surface temperatures during the Last Glacial Maximum in a dispersed set of eigh- teen well-dated gravity cores off NW Africa (16-35N; 20-8W). The regional model revealed that annual mean temperatures during the LGM were 4 to 6C colder than today in the Canary Islands region, with lowest temperatures (14-15.5C) off-shore Morocco and south of the volcanic islands, likely due to intensified upwelling related to stronger trade winds. These values are consistent with estimates from the CLIMAP Project (1981) and other paleotemperature reconstructions for the same region. In con- trast, offshore Cape Blanc, our temperature estimates for the LGM are significantly warmer (Ttoday -LGM <4C) than proposed by CLIMAP (Ttoday -LGM 6-10C). Nevertheless, our results support temperature reconstructions based on alkenones that also indicate rather small temperature changes (Ttoday -LGM <3C) in this area (e.g. Zhao et al., 2000). Glacial sea surface temperature estimates derived from the global calibration are on average 1C warmer than those derived from the regional model. However, the

  4. Deglacial-Holocene variability of sea ice and surface water temperature in the Bering Sea: Reconstruction based on "IP25" and alkenone data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meheust, M.; Stein, R.; Fahl, K.

    2012-04-01

    Overall goal of our study of sediment material collected during RV Sonne Cruise 202 (INOPEX) in 2009 (Gersonde et al., Curise Report 2009), is the reconstruction of the short-term variability of sea-ice, sea-surface temperature (SST), primary productivity and terrigenous input in the subpolar North Pacific/Bering Sea and their relationship to global climate change, using organic-geochemical proxies (i.e. organic-geochemical bulk parameters and biomarkers such as: TOC, hydrogen indices; long-chain n-alkanes, sterols, alkenones; Uk37 and TEX86-Index; BIT-Index; HBIs, IP25, PIP25). In a first phase, these organic-geochemical proxies have been determined in surface sediments. The results show that the biomarker proxies reflect modern sea-ice and SST distributions as well as areas of increased primary productivity and increased input of terrigenous (organic) matter quite well. In a second phase of the project, the biomarkers have been determined in three selected sediment cores: Core SO 202-18-6 (Umnak Plateau/Bering Sea; 60.127°N, 179.444°W; water depth 1105 m; core length 7.21 m; age interval 0 to 14 kyr.BP). Core SO 202-07-6 (Detroit Seamount/western subpolar North Pacific; 51.272°N, 167.700°W; water depth 2340 m WD; core length 4.69 m; age interval MIS 1 to 3). Core SO 202-27-6 (Patton Seamount/eastern subpolar North Pacific; 54.296°N, 149.600°W; water depth 2919 m; core length 2.91 m: age interval MIS 1 to 3). Here, we concentrate especially on the variability of sea-ice cover and SST, using the newly developed sea-ice proxy "IP25" (Belt et al., 2007) and alkenone data, respectively, determined in the AMS14C-dated Core SO 202-18-6. Based on these biomarker records, sea-ice cover and SST changed significantly in the northern Bering Sea during Deglacial-Holocene times. The Younger Dryas interval is characterized by extended sea-ice cover, coinciding with a drop in SST to 2-4°C. With the end of the Younger Dryas, between 460 and 420 cmbsf, sea-ice cover

  5. The alkenone temperature signal in western North Atlantic surface waters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conte, M. H.; Weber, J. C.; King, L. L.; Wakeham, S. G.

    2001-12-01

    Haptophyte algae-derived long-chain C 37-C 39 alkenones and alkyl alkenoates were analyzed in euphotic zone particulate matter collected over a 7 yr period at the Oceanic Flux Program/Bermuda Atlantic Time Series (OFP/BATS) site in the western Sargasso Sea. Surface water temperatures at the site range annually from 19 to 29°C. Alkenone concentrations ranged from < 0.1 ng L -1 in summer to > 100 ng L -1 following the passage of storms. Highest seasonal concentrations occurred during the late winter and spring. Under stratified conditions, alkenone concentrations in the surface mixed layer (0-20 m) were generally 2 to 4 times higher than in the deep fluorescent maximum (75-110 m), consistent with Emiliania huxleyi concentration profiles (Haidar and Thierstein, 2001) and indicated that alkenone production primarily occurs within the upper euphotic zone in this region. Alkenone compound distributions and the temperature calibrations of C 37 and C 38 methyl and ethyl alkenone unsaturation (U 37K', U 38MeK, and U 38EtK, respectively) were remarkably similar to that observed in an E. huxleyi strain previously isolated from the same area (Conte et al., 1998), providing strong evidence that E. huxleyi is the predominant alkenone synthesizer and that characteristics exhibited by randomly isolated clones in culture are, in many cases, consistent with those of populations in the region of origin. The Bermuda calibration of U 37K' vs. water temperature (U 37K' = -1.9835 + 0.2004T - 0.0034T 2, r 2 = 0.95, n = 91) is nonlinear and falls along the same trendline as euphotic zone particulates from warm (> 15°C) waters of the eastern North Atlantic (Conte and Eglinton, 1993) and Mediterranean (Ternois et al., 1997). The combined North Atlantic temperature calibration (U 37K' = - 1.1365 + 0.1257T - 0.0018T 2, r 2 = 0.963, n = 134) differs significantly from published coretop sediment calibrations (Rosell-Melé et al., 1995; Müller et al., 1998) based on sea surface temperature

  6. Alkenone paleothermometry in the North Atlantic: A review and synthesis of surface sediment data and calibrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Filippova, A.; Kienast, M.; Frank, M.; Schneider, R. R.

    2016-04-01

    Despite a clear correlation of alkenone unsaturation and sea surface temperatures (SST) throughout most parts of the ocean, scatter of the regression for various calibration equations has been shown to increase significantly at low SSTs. In this study, we combine previously published (n = 101) and new (n = 51) surface sediment data from the northern North Atlantic to constrain uncertainties of alkenone paleothermometry at low SSTs and to discuss possible sources of the increased scatter in the regression. The correlation between alkenone unsaturation and SSTs is strongest, in particular at the cold end (SSTs < 10°C), when the tetra-unsaturated alkenones (C37:4) are included in the unsaturation index (expressed as U37K) and regressed against spring-summer temperature. Surface ocean salinity and sea ice cover are not correlated with U37K per se. However, samples located in regions of permanent winter sea ice cover exhibit a significant warm bias. Deviation from the linear regression is posited to be related to a number of additional non-exclusive factors, such as advection of allochthonous material, local temperature stratification, and uncertainty in the absolute age of surface sediment samples assumed to be equivalent to modern conditions. We conclude that alkenone unsaturation allows accurate reconstruction of SST records from many regions of the North Atlantic if the factors confounding alkenone paleothermometry detailed here can be excluded.

  7. Understanding Abrupt, Natural Climate Variability Post-Industrial Revolution from the Subtropical Eastern Pacific: A Novel High Resolution Alkenone-derived Sea Surface Temperature Record

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelly, C. S.; O'Mara, N. A.; Herbert, T.; Abella-Gutiérrez, J. L.; Herguera, J. C.

    2015-12-01

    Despite the ocean's importance in global biogeochemical feedbacks and heat storage, there is still a paucity of decadally-resolved sea surface temperature (SST) records to complement lacustrine and dendrological records of recent paleoclimate. Natural climate variability on multidecadal timescales is dominated by internal ocean circulation dynamics and feedbacks, and it is therefore imperative to employ marine proxies to reconstruct high resolution climate change. The timescales of this ocean-induced natural climate variability can be broken down into a few characteristic climate modes. Pressing questions about these modes include their stationarity in frequency and amplitude over time, in addition to the hypothesis that anthropogenic climate change has altered their behavior in comparison to natural variability. To pursue these questions, we must discern and analyze suitable climate archives in regions where modes of interest dominate modern climate variability. The region of Baja California, Mexico exhibits exceptional teleconnection to the El Niño Southern Oscillation (ENSO) and the Pacific Decadal Oscillation (PDO). Local, dramatic effects of ENSO and PDO on the marine biology and economy underline the importance of regional paleoclimate records from the Baja peninsula. Here, we present a high-resolution alkenone-derived SST reconstruction from the Industrial Revolution through the year 2000 by analysis of laminated box and Kasten sediment cores at Site PCM 00-78 (25.18°N, 112.66°W) in the subtropical eastern Pacific at a depth of 540 meters. Our SST record corresponds with NOAA extended reconstructed sea surface temperature, providing a robust basis for organic geochemical marine climatic reconstructions on timescales usually accessible only through speleothems, coral density bands, tree rings, and the like. Accordingly, based on this comparison to the historical data we expect our SST record may provide a more robust record of inter and multidecadal

  8. Changes of coastal upwelling systems in the Atlantic, Indian and Pacific oceans recorded from alkenone-derived sea surface temperatures and other multiproxy information

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El Ouahabi, Anuar; Martrat, Belen; Lopez, Jordi F.; Grimalt, Joan O.

    2014-05-01

    Upwelling regions have received limited attention in paleoceanography, particularly for what concerns their changes at high temporal resolution. Furthermore, they have generally been considered independently. The lack of integrated studies of the evolution of the main coastal upwelling systems has limited the present degree of understanding of the links between global ocean dynamics and intensity and geographic distribution of these highly productive sites. In the present study, an integrated assessment of sea surface temperature (SST) records based on literature available alkenone-data on the upwelling regions of North-West Africa, North-West Arabian Sea, Namibia and Peru encompassing the last 25 kyr is reported. Additionally, in order to consider the complex effects of regional processes literature-available multiproxy data (marine, ice cores and speleothems records; PIG2LIG-4FUTURE database; Geophysical Research Abstracts Vol. 14, EGU2012-13825) has also been used to constrain upwelling features. This approach has allowed the description of high resolution temporal and spatial upwelling patterns and the interdependences between ocean dynamics and upwelling shifts. The spatio-temporal SST-upwelling patterns during the deglaciation-Holocene stage have been discussed. Suitable proxies for the upwelling and advection processes, such as CaCO3, TOC and Opal, Nd and carbon isotopes, respectively have been studied. Temporal snapshots at approximately at 22 ka, 15 ka, 12 ka, 8 ka, and 5 ka BP have been identified. These transitions illustrate flips between contrasting states. Major environmental and climatic changes have been observed before and after this type of transition, e.g. the one at 5 ka BP. These observations provide interesting clues on mechanisms, location of forcings and sustainers. The high temporal resolution records examined provide good constraints on the timing and magnitude of oceanic processes related with upwelling change and therefore an assessment

  9. Alkenone Paleotemperature Determinations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herbert, T. D.

    2003-12-01

    The organic biomarker proxy for past sea surface temperatures ("U37k") came to paleoceanography from an unexpected direction. Nearly all paleoceanographic tools rely on some aspect of the fossilized hard parts of marine organisms. Thus, assemblages of calcareous microplankton such as foraminifera and coccoliths, or of siliceous plankton such as radiolaria and diatoms, provided the basis for the CLIMAP reconstruction of the Ice Age ocean (CLIMAP, 1976, 1981). Additionally, a host of chemical methods relies on the same hard parts to furnish isotopic and trace element signatures, and generally requires that skeletal material be well preserved. The alkenone method differs in several important ways. Individual molecules, extracted and separated from a matrix of hundreds to thousands of other organic compounds, are the targets. In most cases, the remnant alkenones and alkenoates that are the subject of this review constitute no more, and often considerably less, than a few percent of their initial flux that left the surface layer of the ocean and fell toward the sediments. Good preservation is thus not a major issue for use of the proxy. In addition, while many geochemical techniques assume that skeletal material is a passive recorder of isotopic and trace element composition of seawater, and that incorporation of paleo-environmental signals follows thermodynamic laws that can be modeled using nonbiogenic phases in the laboratory, the alkenone method assumes that the ratios of biomarkers measured were actively regulated by the producing organisms in life according to the temperature of the water in which they grew.Alkenone paleothermometry promises a direct estimate of near-surface ocean temperatures. Alkenones and the related alkenoates come exclusively from a few species of haptophyte algae. These organisms require sunlight, and they generally prefer the upper photic zone. The environmental information contained in their molecular fossils therefore is quite specific

  10. Alkenones, alkenoates, and organic matter in coastal environments of NW Scotland: Assessment of potential application for sea level reconstruction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bendle, James A. P.; Rosell-Melé, Antoni; Cox, Nicholas J.; Shennan, Ian

    2009-12-01

    Reconstruction of late Quaternary sea level history in areas of glacioisostatic uplift often relies on sediment archives from coastal isolation basins, natural coastal rock depressions previously isolated from or connected to the sea at different times. Proxy indicators for marine, brackish, or lacustrine conditions combined with precise dating can constrain the time when the sea crossed the sill threshold and isolated (or connected) the basin. The utility of isolation basins in investigations of sea level change is well known, but investigations have been mostly limited to microfossil proxies, the application of which can be limited by preservation and nonanalog problems. Here we investigate the potential of long-chain alkenones, alkenoates, and bulk organic parameters (TOC, Corg/N) for reconstructing past sea level changes in isolation basins in NW Scotland. We analyze organic biomarkers and bulk parameters from both modern basins (at different stages of isolation from the sea) and fossil basins (with sea level histories reconstructed from established proxies). Logit regression analysis was employed to find which of the biomarker metrics or bulk organic measurements could reliably characterize the sediment samples in terms of a marine/brackish or isolated/lacustrine origin. The results suggested a good efficiency for the alkenone index %C37:4 at predicting the depositional origin of the sediments. This study suggests that alkenones could be used as a novel proxy for sea level change in fossil isolation basins especially when microfossil preservation is poor.

  11. Bacterial Influence on Alkenones in Live Microalgae1

    PubMed Central

    Segev, Einat; Castañeda, Isla S.; Sikes, Elisabeth L.; Vlamakis, Hera; Kolter, Roberto

    2015-01-01

    The microalga Emiliania huxleyi produces alkenone lipids which are important proxies for estimating past sea surface temperatures. Field calibrations of this proxy are robust but highly variable results are obtained in culture. Here we present results suggesting that algal-bacterial interactions may be responsible for some of this variability. Co-cultures of E. huxleyi and the bacterium Phaeobacter inhibens resulted in a 2.5-fold decrease in algal alkenone-containing lipid bodies. In addition levels of unsaturated alkenones increase in co-cultures. These changes result in an increase in the reconstructed growth temperature of up to 2°C relative to axenic algal cultures. PMID:26987094

  12. GDGT and alkenone flux in the northern Gulf of Mexico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Richey, Julie; Tierney, Jessica E.

    2016-01-01

    This dataset is a weekly to bi-weekly resolution 4-year time series (2010-2014) of GDGT and alkenone flux in the northern Gulf of Mexico. The TEX86 and U37K' indices are also included, which are sea surface temperature proxies based on the distribution of GDGTs and alkenones, respectively. For further information regarding data collection and/or processing methods refer to Richey and Tierney (2016).Richey, J. N., and J. E. Tierney, 2016, GDGT and alkenone flux in the northern Gulf of Mexico: Implications for the TEX86 and U37K' paleothermometers, Paleoceanography, 31, doi:10.1002/2016PA003032.

  13. New alkenones and derivatives in haptophytes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rontani, J.-F.; Volkman, J. K.

    2003-04-01

    The alkenones comprise an unusual class of long-chain unsaturated methyl and ethyl ketones that are synthesized by a limited number of haptophyte microalgae. The relative abundance of the two main C37:2 and C37:3 alkenones expressed as the index [C37:2]/([C37:2] + [C37:3]) is now widely used for reconstructing sea surface paleotemperatures. A new technique involving NaBH4 reduction of alkenones to the corresponding alkenols and subsequent silylation was recently proposed for the characterisation and quantification of alkenones in natural samples (1). This reduction-silylation technique has proven to be very useful for the characterisation of previously unreported alkenones in microalgae, sediments and seawater. A re-examination of extracts of several haptophytes after this treatment allowed us to detect small amounts of C35-C38 monounsaturated alkenones. We could show that the double bonds of these compounds are present at w18 position instead of the expected w15 position. We have found large amounts of alkenols in extracts of some non-reduced sediments from Camargue (France); these compounds may result from a natural contribution of haptophytes or a non-selective bacterial reduction of alkenones under anoxic conditions. The possibility of a natural contribution of alkenols from haptophytes was tested and we were able to detect traces of alkenols in non-reduced extracts of Emiliania huxleyi, Gephyrocapsa oceanica and Isochrysis galbana. We examined also a benthic haptophyte Chrysotila lamellosa. The amounts of alkenols appeared to increase significantly during the senescence of C. lamellosa to reach 7% of the corresponding alkenones. In this species, we have also found non-negligible amounts of alkendiones and epoxyalkenones. LiAlD4 reduction of these compounds allowed us to characterise the positions of their additional keto and epoxy groups. Bacterial incubations under denitrifying conditions were also carried out in order to test the possibility of a bacterial

  14. Temperature calibration and phylogenetically distinct distributions for freshwater alkenones: Evidence from northern Alaskan lakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Longo, William M.; Theroux, Susanna; Giblin, Anne E.; Zheng, Yinsui; Dillon, James T.; Huang, Yongsong

    2016-05-01

    Alkenones are a class of unsaturated long-chain ketone biomarkers that have been used to reconstruct sea surface temperature and, more recently, continental temperature, by way of alkenone unsaturation indices (e.g. U37K and U37K‧). Alkenones are frequently found in brackish and saline lakes, however species effects confound temperature reconstructions when multiple alkenone-producing species with different temperature responses are present. Interestingly, available genetic data indicate that numerous freshwater lakes host a distinct phylotype of alkenone-producing haptophyte algae (the Group I or Greenland phylotype), providing evidence that species effects may be diminished in freshwater lakes. These findings encourage further investigation of alkenone paleotemperature proxies in freshwater systems. Here, we investigated lakes from northern Alaska (n = 35) and show that alkenones commonly occurred in freshwater lakes, where they featured distinct distributions, characterized by dominant C37:4 alkenones and a series of tri-unsaturated alkenone isomers. The distributions were characteristic of Group I-type alkenone distributions previously identified in Greenland and North America. Our analysis of suspended particulate matter from Toolik Lake (68° 38‧N, 149° 36‧W) yielded the first in situ freshwater U37K calibration (U37K = 0.021 * T - 0.68; r2 = 0.85; n = 52; RMSE = ±1.37 °C). We explored the environmental significance of the tri-unsaturated isomers using our northern Alaskan lakes dataset in conjunction with new data from haptophyte cultures and Canadian surface sediments. Our results show that these temperature-sensitive isomers are biomarkers for the Group I phylotype and indicators of multiple-species effects. Together, these findings highlight freshwater lakes as valuable targets for continental alkenone-based paleotemperature reconstructions and demonstrate the significance of the recently discovered tri-unsaturated isomers.

  15. 18S rDNA analysis of alkenone-producing haptophyte(s) preserved in surface sediments of Lake Toyoni, Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McColl, J. L.; Couto, J.; Bendle, J. A.; Henderson, A. C.; Seki, O.; Phoenix, V. R.; Toney, J. L.

    2013-12-01

    Alkenones (long chain ketones) are readily preserved in sedimentary archives and have the potential to provide quantitative reconstructions of past water temperature. Alkenones are produced by a limited number of haptophyte algae in the marine and also some lacustrine systems. However, lakes are heterogeneous: an individual lake will have a unique combination of ecological conditions, haptophyte species and seasonal alkenone production that contributes to the sedimentary record. Haptophyte algae species have different sensitivities to temperature; therefore identifying the alkenone producer(s) prior to down-core temperature reconstructions is critical before selecting the most appropriate temperature calibration. We present a study from Lake Toyoni, a freshwater lake in Hokkaido, Japan that has alkenones preserved in surface sediments. The aim of this study is to identify the alkenone producer(s) within the lake using 18S rDNA analyses. Preserved rDNA of planktonic phototrophic algae was extracted from surface sediments of Lake Toyoni and phylogenetic analyses of the rDNA sequences suggest alkenones are produced by a single haptophyte within the class Prymnesiophyceae (order Isochrysidales). The Lake Toyoni alkenone-producer shares a distinct phylotype with a haptophyte reported from water filter samples collected in Lake BrayaSø, Greenland (D'Andrea et al., 2006). Similarity between the 18S rDNA sequences from Lake Toyoni and Lake BrayaSø provides a basis for applying (and updating) the Greenland lake temperature calibration. Applying this temperature calibration (T°C = 40.8 [UK37] + 31.8, R2=0.96; n=34) to the surface sediment alkenone unsaturation index from Lake Toyoni gives an estimated lake surface temperature (LST) of 8°C. This is in line with observed LST at Lake Toyoni, which ranges between 7 - 22°C (Apr 2011 to Nov 2011). The occurrence and identification of a single alkenone producer in Lake Toyoni means problems posed by a mixture of haptophytes in

  16. Relating Phylogeny to Alkenone Distributions in Lacustrine Alkenone-Producing Haptophytes: Implications for Continental Paleotemperature Reconstructions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Theroux, S.; D'Andrea, W. J.; Toney, J. L.; Zettler, L. A.; Huang, Y.

    2008-12-01

    The alkenone unsaturation index (Uk'37) is a widely used surface water paleotemperature proxy in marine settings, but has seen limited use in lacustrine environments. On-going discovery of alkenone- containing lake sediments worldwide expand our ability to reconstruct continental paleotemperatures. However, disparate alkenone profiles among these lakes suggest a diversity of alkenone-producing organisms. The utility of the paleotemperature proxy is constrained by the accurate calibration of the Uk'37 against temperature for individual lakes. In this study, we report the findings from an 18S rRNA gene-based phylogenetic survey of globally distributed lakes containing alkenone-producing haptophyte algae to infer which haptophyte lineages likely possess common alkenone production pathways. Our phylogenetic analyses reveal that monophyletic groups of haptophytes possess similar lipid profiles. This correlation indicates the potential for applying a minimal number of calibrations to a multitude of diverse geographic settings. Furthermore, the expanded dataset of alkenone-containing lake sediments and robust phylogenetic analyses reflect the evolution of alkenone-producing haptophytes, and provide insights into the last common ancestor that was capable of alkenone production in the Cretaceous. The physiology, behavior, and culture conditions of a newly-isolated alkenone-producing haptophyte from polar waters possessing anomalous alkenone-concentrations, will also be discussed.

  17. Improving alkenone paleothermometry by incorporating cell response to environmental stress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prahl, F. G.; Wolfe, G. V.; Mix, A. C.; Sparrow, M. A.

    2003-04-01

    A linear, global coretop calibration now exists for the alkenone unsaturation index Uk’37 and mean annual SST (maSST). The calibration equation is statistically the same as that for a subarctic Pacific strain of Emiliania huxleyi (Ehux) grown exponentially under isothermal conditions in batch culture. Although the calibration has been applied widely for paleoSST reconstruction, uncertainty still exists, stemming from two key factors: genetic variability among strains, and physiologic response to stress and growth state. We will discuss in this talk the extent that Uk’37 and other aspects of cellular alkenone composition vary in response to nutrient depletion and light deprivation in isothermal (15^oC) batch cultures of Ehux isolated from three different ocean locations - a Norwegian fjord (CCMP370); the subarctic Pacific (CCMP1742) and the Sargasso Sea (CCMP 372). We will also present results from detailed alkenone compositional analysis in thirty surface sediments collected between ˜50^oS and 10^oS along the Chile-Peru margin in the SE Pacific Ocean. The Uk’37 - maSST relationship derived from this dataset is statistically indistinguishable from the global coretop calibration. But, comparison of other compositional properties shows that the alkenone signature preserved in the Chile-Peru margin sediments is also not consistent with that expressed by exponentially growing cells of any of the three cultured Ehux strains. Alkenone signatures preserved in sediments appear more like that in algal cells that have experienced some level of non-thermal, physiological stress such as nutrient and light limitation. Given our observations as a precedent, improved confidence in paleotemperature estimates derived from Uk’37 measurements may require interpretation of unsaturation patterns in full context with the overall alkenone composition preserved in the sediment.

  18. Evidence for differential degradation of alkenones under contrasting bottom water oxygen conditions: Implication for paleotemperature reconstruction

    SciTech Connect

    Gong, C.; Hollander, D.J.

    1999-02-01

    The successful reconstruction of sea surface temperatures using alkenone paleothermometry (U{sub 37}{sup k{prime}}) has relied on the premise that there is no significant differential degradation of alkenones with different states of unsaturation during diagenetic processes. To test this assumption, the authors conducted a comparative study of contemporary sediments in oxic and anoxic bottom waters from the Santa Monica Basin, offshore California. Long-chain alkenones were quantified and sea surface temperature were calculated using the calibrated U{sub 37}{sup k{prime}}-T relationship of Prahl et al. (1988). Results show that temperature record from the oxic sediments is higher by as much as 4 C compared to those from time-equivalent anoxic sediments as a result of differential degradation of long-chain unsaturated alkenones and bioturbation mixing in the oxic sediments. The differential degradation of C{sub 37:3} vs. C{sub 37:2} alone could account for up to 2.5 C difference between these two records. This finding has significant implication in the interpretation of paleo-sea surface temperature data using alkenone paleothermometry.

  19. New culturing studies of various haptophyte algae: The role of phylogeny on the alkenone paleothermometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walker Karega, I. I.; D'Andrea, W. J.; Juhl, A. R.

    2015-12-01

    Alkenone paleothermometry (via the Uk37and UK'37 indices) is widely used to reconstruct sea surface temperature and, more recently, lake water temperature. Genetic analyses indicate that there is a diversity of different alkenone-producing lacustrine haptophytes, and differences among UK37-temperature calibrations suggest that unique calibrations might be required to quantify past temperature variation from individual lakes. The only term needed to quantify UK37-inferred temperature relative to a reference period (e.g., modern temperature, or 20th Century mean temperature) is the slope of the calibration regression: UK37-temperature sensitivity (i.e., the change in UK37 per °C temperature change). Here, we present new data developed by culturing four different species of alkenone-producing haptophyte algae across a range of temperatures (6-30 °C) and light levels (20-200 mE). The simultaneous culture of four distinct species allows direct comparison of the absolute quantities of alkenones and alkenoates, as well as other lipids, produced by different species of haptophytes under identical environmental conditions. Our results indicate that algal growth rate, when controlled by light intensity, has no impact on values. As expected, we find that growth temperature controls both the degree of alkenone unsaturation and the relative production of alkenones vs. alkenoates in all four species. Importantly, comparison of the four UK37-temperature calibrations resulting from our experiments with preexisting calibrations supports the hypothesis that UK37-temperature sensitivity is controlled by phylogeny. Therefore, even in the absence of a site-specific calibration, this term can be used to quantify past temperature variation from lake sediments if the genetic identity of the lake's alkenone-producer is known.

  20. Large effect of irradiance on hydrogen isotope fractionation of alkenones in Emiliania huxleyi

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van der Meer, Marcel T. J.; Benthien, Albert; French, Katherine L.; Epping, Eric; Zondervan, Ingrid; Reichart, Gert-Jan; Bijma, Jelle; Sinninghe Damsté, Jaap S.; Schouten, Stefan

    2015-07-01

    The hydrogen isotopic (δD) composition of long-chain alkenones produced by certain haptophyte algae has been suggested as a potential proxy for reconstructing paleo sea surface salinity. However, environmental parameters other than salinity may also affect the δD of alkenones. We investigated the impact of the level of irradiance on hydrogen isotopic fractionation of alkenones versus growth water by cultivating two strains of the cosmopolitan haptophyte Emiliania huxleyi at different light intensities. The hydrogen isotope fractionation decreased by approximately 40‰ when irradiance was increased from 15 to 200 μmol photons m-2 s-1 above which it was relatively constant. The response is likely a direct effect of photosystem I and II activity as the relationship of the fractionation factor α versus light intensity can be described by an Eilers-Peeters photosynthesis model. This irradiance effect is in agreement with published δD data of alkenones derived from suspended particulate matter collected from different depths in the photic zone of the Gulf of California and the eastern tropical North Pacific. However, haptophyte algae tend to bloom at relatively high light intensities (>500 μmol photons m-2 s-1) occurring at the sea surface, at which hydrogen isotope fractionation is relatively constant and not affected by changes in light intensity. Alkenones accumulating in the sediment are likely mostly derived from these surface water haptophyte blooms, when the largest amount of biomass is produced. Therefore, the observed irradiance effect is unlikely to affect the applicability of the hydrogen isotopic composition of sedimentary long chain alkenones as a proxy for paleosalinity.

  1. Changes in C37 alkenones flux on the eastern continental shelf of the Bering Sea: the record of Emiliania huxleyi bloom over the past 100 years

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harada, N.; Sato, M.; Okazaki, Y.; Oguri, K.; Tadai, O.; Saito, S.; Konno, S.; Jordan, R. W.; Katsuki, K.; Shin, K.; Narita, H.

    2008-12-01

    Flourishes of coccolithophores can be detected by ocean color imagery with data from the satellite-borne Sea-viewing Wide Field-of-view sensor SeaWiFs that was launched in 1997. Thus, temporally and spatially large-scale blooms of Emiliania huxleyi (E. huxleyi) have been distinguished annually in the eastern continental shelf of the Bering Sea since 1997. In 1997, a combination of atmospheric mechanisms produced summer weather anomalies such as calm winds, clear skies, and warm air temperature over the Bering Sea and the weather anomalies caused depletion of the subpycnocline nutrient reservoir (Napp and Hunt, 2001). After depletion of nitrate and silicate, a sustained (more than 4-month-long) bloom of E. huxleyi was observed (Stockwell et al., 2001). Because of the speed and magnitude with which parts of the Bering Sea ecosystem responded to changes in atmospheric factors (Napp and Hunt, 2001) and because a bloom of the coccolithophorid, Coccolithus pelagicus has also been detected in the northeastern Atlantic Ocean off Iceland every year since 1997 (Ostermann, 2001), the appearance of an E. huxleyi bloom in the Bering Sea could be related to atmospherically forced decadal oscillations or global factors. We have investigated spatial expansion and temporal development of E. huxleyi bloom on the continental shelf in the Bering Sea by using a biomarker of E. huxleyi, C37 alkenones flux recorded in the sediments during the past 100 years. As a result, the E. huxleyi bloom had been prominent since 1970"fs at latest during the last 100 years. In this presentation, we will discuss the relationship between E. huxleyi bloom and activity of Aleutian low, and also changes in diatom assemblages. References Napp and Hunt, 2001, Fish Oceanogr., 10, 61-68. Ostermann, 2001, WHOI annual report, pp.17-18. Stockwell et al., 2001, Fish Oceanogr., 10, 99-116.

  2. Alkenone temperature and salinity: An evaluation of long chain C37 alkenone in Lake Qinghai, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, W.; Liu, Z.; Fu, M.; An, Z.

    2007-12-01

    In recently years, the alkenone unsaturation index (Uk'37=C37:.2/(C37:2+ C37:3)) has been used to reconstructed paleo-temperature for lacustrine sediments. However, few studies have addressed whether the relative abundance of the C37:4 alkenone to the total C37 production (C37:4 percent) can reflect surface salinity changes in lake systems. Here we present the distribution of C37 long chain alkenone of modern lake sediments in Qinghai Lake, Qing-Tibet Plateau, to evaluate significance of abundance change of long chain C37 alkenone as an indicator of lake paleo-enviromental evolution. A group of surface sediments from different locations in the lake have been analyzed in this study. The results of long chain C37 alkenone from 28 surface sediments analyses shown relative abundance of C37:4 alkenone to total C37 production (C37:4 percent) change from 14.5 to 48.6 percent and the abundance of C37:4 alkenone is increasing with decreasing salinity of lake water. For the salinity lake in land, we suggested the relative abundance of C37:4 alkenone in lake sediments may be a indicator of paleo-silinity; We have also found that Uk'37 values are weakly correlated with salinity and C37:4 percent changes, implying that potential minor contributions of temperature and salinity effects to C37:4 percent and Uk'37 respectively cannot be excluded in this study. However, since these contributions are weak, we suggest that the C37:4 percent proxy can be used to reconstruct paleo-salinity changes at a regional scale, especially in lake systems, while Uk'37 remains as a powerful tool for reconstructions of paleo-temperature changes in the lake systems.

  3. Factors influencing 14C concentrations of algal and archaeal lipids and their associated sea surface temperature proxies in the Black Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kusch, Stephanie; Rethemeyer, Janet; Hopmans, Ellen C.; Wacker, Lukas; Mollenhauer, Gesine

    2016-09-01

    Understanding the preservation and deposition history of organic molecules is crucial for the understanding of paleoenvironmental information contained in their abundance ratios such as Uk‧37 and TEX86 used as proxies for sea surface temperature (SST). Based on their relatively high refractivity, alkenones and glycerol dialkyl glycerol tetraethers (GDGTs) can survive postdepositional processes like lateral transport, potentially causing inferred SSTs to be misleading. Likewise, selective preservation of alkenones and GDGTs may cause biases of the SST proxies themselves and can lead to decoupling of both proxy records. Here we report compound-specific radiocarbon data of marine biomarkers including alkenones, GDGTs, and low molecular weight (LMW) n-fatty acids from Black Sea sediments deposited under different redox regimes to evaluate the potentially differential preservation of both biomarker classes and its effect on the SST indices Uk‧37 and TEX86. The decadal Δ14C values of alkenones, GDGTs, and LMW n-fatty acids indicate similar preservation under oxic, suboxic, and anoxic redox regimes and no contribution of pre-aged compounds, e.g., by lateral supply. Moreover, similar 14C concentrations of crenarchaeol, alkenones, and LMW n-fatty acids imply that the thaumarchaeotal GDGTs preserved in these sediments are produced in the euphotic zone rather than in subsurface/thermocline waters. However, we observe biomarker-based SSTs that strongly deviate (ΔSST up to 8.4 °C) from in situ measured mean annual SSTs in the Black Sea. This is not due to redox-dependent differential biomarker preservation as implied by their Δ14C values and spatial SST pattern. Since contributions from different sources can largely be excluded, the deviation of the Uk‧37 and TEX86 proxy-derived SSTs from in situ SSTs requires further study of phylogenetic and other yet unknown environmental controls on alkenone and GDGT lipid distributions in the Black Sea.

  4. Towards an organic palaeosalinity proxy: the effect of salinity, growth rate and growth phase on the hydrogen isotopic composition of alkenones produced by haptophyte algae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chivall, David; M'Boule, Daniela; Schouten, Stefan; Sinninghe Damsté, Jaap S.; van der Meer, Marcel T. J.

    2013-04-01

    Palaeosalinity is one of the most important oceanographic parameters which currently cannot be quantified with reasonable accuracy from sedimentary records. Schouten et al.1 established that the fractionation of hydrogen isotopes between growth water and alkenones produced by the haptophyte algae Emiliania huxleyi and Gephyrocapsa oceanica is salinity dependent. As such, the δD values of alkenones recovered from sediment cores can be used to reconstruct variations in palaeo- sea surface salinity.2 However, to accurately determine absolute palaeosalinity requires a better constraining of the relationship between this hydrogen fractionation, salinity and other parameters such as growth rate and growth phase. Here, we present results from our ongoing work to constrain the relationship between the fractionation factor αalkenone-water, salinity, growth rate and growth phase for the major alkenone-producing haptophytes. In batch cultures of different strains of the open-ocean haptophyte E. huxleyi sampled during the exponential growth phase, αC37alkenone-growthwater increases by between 0.0022 and 0.0033 per unit increase in salinity. A similar relationship is observed in batch cultures of the coastal haptophyte Isochrysis galbana, where α increases with each unit of salinity by 0.0019 - slightly less than for E. huxleyi. However, absolute αC37alkenone-growthwater values vary strongly between species suggesting that species composition has a strong impact on the δD value of alkenones. The fractionation factor for alkenones produced by batch cultures of I. galbana is affected by growth phase: the rate of change of αC37alkenone-growthwater with each unit of salinity decreases from 0.0019 in the exponential phase to 0.0010 during the stationary phase. We also show the effect of varying growth rate over the range 0.2-0.8 day-1 on the fractionation factor for alkenones produced by E. huxleyi grown in continuous culture. These data show that alkenone δD can be used to

  5. Does phylogeny control U37K -temperature sensitivity? Implications for lacustrine alkenone paleothermometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Andrea, William J.; Theroux, Susanna; Bradley, Raymond S.; Huang, Xiaohui

    2016-02-01

    Alkenone paleothermometry (via the U37K and U37K‧ indices) has long been used to reconstruct sea surface temperature and has more recently been proven effective in lacustrine settings. Genetic analyses indicate that there is a diversity of different alkenone-producing lacustrine haptophytes, and differences among U37K -temperature calibrations suggest that unique calibrations might be required to quantify past temperature variation from individual lakes. The only term necessary to quantify U37K -inferred temperature relative to a reference period (e.g., modern temperature 20th Century mean) is the slope of the calibration regression, the U37K -temperature sensitivity (i.e., the change in U37K per °C temperature change). Here, we bring together all of the existing U37K -temperature calibrations in order to compare the variability among U37K -temperature sensitivities. We also report a new in situ U37K -temperature calibration along with environmental genomic analysis based on the 18S rRNA gene of an alkenone producing haptophyte from lake Vikvatnet in Norway. We propose and test the hypothesis that U37K -temperature sensitivity is controlled by phylogeny and that this term can be used to quantify past temperature variation from lake sediments if the genetic identity of the lake's alkenone-producer is known. Using the existing calibration data sets, we determine four phylotype-specific U37K -temperature sensitivities for use in cases where in situ calibration is unavailable but the phylogeny of the alkenone producers is known.

  6. Concentrations and abundance ratios of long-chain alkenones and glycerol dialkyl glycerol tetraethers in sinking particles south of Java

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Wenwen; Mohtadi, Mahyar; Schefuß, Enno; Mollenhauer, Gesine

    2016-06-01

    In this study, we obtained concentrations and abundance ratios of long-chain alkenones and glycerol dialkyl glycerol tetraethers (GDGTs) in a one-year time-series of sinking particles collected with a sediment trap moored from December 2001 to November 2002 at 2200 m water depth south of Java in the eastern Indian Ocean. We investigate the seasonality of alkenone and GDGT fluxes as well as the potential habitat depth of the Thaumarchaeota producing the GDGTs entrained in sinking particles. The alkenone flux shows a pronounced seasonality and ranges from 1 μg m-2 d-1 to 35 μg m-2 d-1. The highest alkenone flux is observed in late September during the Southeast monsoon, coincident with high total organic carbon fluxes as well as high net primary productivity. Flux-weighted mean temperature for the high flux period using the alkenone-based sea-surface temperature (SST) index U37K‧ is 26.7 °C, which is similar to satellite-derived Southeast (SE) monsoon SST (26.4 °C). The GDGT flux displays a weaker seasonality than that of the alkenones. It is elevated during the SE monsoon period compared to the Northwest (NW) monsoon and intermonsoon periods (approximately 2.5 times), which is probably related to seasonal variation of the abundance of Thaumarchaeota, or to enhanced export of GDGTs by aggregation with sinking phytoplankton detritus. Flux-weighted mean temperature inferred from the GDGT-based TEX86H index is 26.2 °C, which is 1.8 °C lower than mean annual (ma) SST but similar to SE monsoon SST. As the time series of TEX86H temperature estimates, however, does not record a strong seasonal amplitude, we infer that TEX86H reflects ma upper thermocline temperature at approximately 50 m water depth.

  7. PRISM3 Pliocene Sea surface Temperature Reconstruction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dowsett, H.; Robinson, M.; Foley, K.; Caballero, R.

    2008-12-01

    The Pliocene Research, Interpretation and Synoptic Mapping (PRISM) Project provides a conceptual model and synoptic view of the earth during a considerably warmer than modern (2-3°C warmer global mean annual temperature) interval (mid-Piacenzian Age, Pliocene Epoch; ~3.3 to 3.0 Ma) through reconstruction of sea-surface temperature (SST) and other paleoenvironmental parameters. The PRISM3 SST fields include new equatorial Pacific and subpolar - polar North Atlantic components based upon multiproxy (faunal, alkenone and Mg/Ca) temperature analyses from new sites. These data are presented in 12 interpolated global fields with 2° spatial resolution representing monthly SST estimates. Results show a reduced longitudinal temperature gradient across the equatorial Pacific and extension of warm North Atlantic surface conditions into the eastern regions of the Arctic Ocean near Spitzbergen. These data are part of the PRISM3 paleoenvironmental reconstruction designed in part to provide climate modeling groups with new SST and alternative land cover reconstructions, 3-dimensional deep ocean temperature, topography and sea level. The PRISM3 reconstruction is the primary data source for the new Pliocene Climate Model Intercomparison Project (PlioMIP).

  8. Reevaluation of mid-Pliocene North Atlantic sea surface temperatures

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Robinson, Marci M.; Dowsett, Harry J.; Dwyer, Gary S.; Lawrence, Kira T.

    2008-01-01

    Multiproxy temperature estimation requires careful attention to biological, chemical, physical, temporal, and calibration differences of each proxy and paleothermometry method. We evaluated mid-Pliocene sea surface temperature (SST) estimates from multiple proxies at Deep Sea Drilling Project Holes 552A, 609B, 607, and 606, transecting the North Atlantic Drift. SST estimates derived from faunal assemblages, foraminifer Mg/Ca, and alkenone unsaturation indices showed strong agreement at Holes 552A, 607, and 606 once differences in calibration, depth, and seasonality were addressed. Abundant extinct species and/or an unrecognized productivity signal in the faunal assemblage at Hole 609B resulted in exaggerated faunal-based SST estimates but did not affect alkenone-derived or Mg/Ca–derived estimates. Multiproxy mid-Pliocene North Atlantic SST estimates corroborate previous studies documenting high-latitude mid-Pliocene warmth and refine previous faunal-based estimates affected by environmental factors other than temperature. Multiproxy investigations will aid SST estimation in high-latitude areas sensitive to climate change and currently underrepresented in SST reconstructions.

  9. Coretop Perspective on Alkenone Signatures Preserved Beneath Inland Waters of SE Alaska

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prahl, F. G.; Walinsky, S.; Sparrow, M. A.; Mix, A. C.

    2006-12-01

    In late summer 2004, 27 multicores were collected from coastal and inland water sites throughout SE Alaska (~55° to 61°N). Examination of coretops (0-2cm) revealed long-chain alkenones of haptophyte origin were only present significantly in organic carbon, biogenic silica-rich sediments depositing south of ~58°N, along the outer coastline of the Queen Charlotte and Baranof Islands. Contrary to our prior experience with marine sediment analysis, compositions in the 16 identified sites containing these biomarkers could only be reliably quantified if urea adduction was employed as an additional chemical clean- up step prior to alkenone analysis by gas chromatography with flame ionization detection. Water temperature estimates derived from `clean' U^{K'}37 signatures using a standard calibration equation (U^{K'}37 = 0.034 x T + 0.039) were remarkably uniform, averaging 11.7±0.9°C. The estimates are ~4°C `colder' than actual sea-surface temperatures (SST) measured at the time of core collection in overlying waters at each sampling site. These estimates consistently matched water temperature measured at ~20m depth by CTD casts. Nutrient determinations on collected samples showed surface waters at each of these sites were typically nitrate-depleted to a depth of ~20m, below which a steep nitricline existed. If the U^{K'}37-derived temperature estimates are accurate, at least some fraction of alkenone export to sediments in this region necessarily originates from subsurface production. Formal clarification of how alkenone export production from surface waters acts throughout an annual cycle to `paint' the U^{K'}37-based temperature record in modern sediments for this region will require further oceanographic study. Such effort would benefit the accurate use of U^{K'}37 analysis for purposes of regional paleoceanographic SST reconstruction.

  10. Mid-Piacenzian sea surface temperature record from ODP Site 1115 in the western equatorial Pacific

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stoll, Danielle

    2010-01-01

    Planktic foraminifer assemblages and alkenone unsaturation ratios have been analyzed for the mid-Piacen-zian (3.3 to 2.9 Ma) section of Ocean Drilling Program (ODP) Site 1115B, located in the western equatorial Pacific off the coast of New Guinea. Cold and warm season sea surface temperature (SST) estimates were determined using a modern analog technique. ODP Site 1115 is located just south of the transition between the planktic foraminifer tropical and subtropical faunal provinces and approximates the southern boundary of the western equatorial Pacific (WEP) warm pool. Comparison of the faunal and alkenone SST estimates (presented here) with an existing nannofossil climate proxy shows similar trends. Results of this analysis show increased seasonal variability during the middle of the sampled section (3.22 to 3.10 Ma), suggesting a possible northward migration of both the subtropical faunal province and the southern boundary of the WEP warm pool.

  11. Glacial-to-Holocene evolution of sea surface temperature and surface circulation in the subarctic northwest Pacific and the Western Bering Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meyer, Vera D.; Max, Lars; Hefter, Jens; Tiedemann, Ralf; Mollenhauer, Gesine

    2016-07-01

    It has been proposed that North Pacific sea surface temperature (SST) evolution was intimately linked to North Atlantic climate oscillations during the last glacial-interglacial transition. However, during the early deglaciation and the Last Glacial Maximum, the SST development in the subarctic northwest Pacific and the Bering Sea is poorly constrained as most existing deglacial SST records are based on alkenone paleothermometry, which is limited prior to 15 ka B.P. in the subarctic North Pacific realm. By applying the TEXL86 temperature proxy we obtain glacial-Holocene-SST records for the marginal northwest Pacific and the Western Bering Sea. Our TEXL86-based records and existing alkenone data suggest that during the past 15.5 ka, SSTs in the northwest Pacific and the Western Bering Sea closely followed millennial-scale climate fluctuations known from Greenland ice cores, indicating rapid atmospheric teleconnections with abrupt climate changes in the North Atlantic. Our SST reconstructions indicate that in the Western Bering Sea SSTs drop significantly during Heinrich Stadial 1 (HS1), similar to the known North Atlantic climate history. In contrast, progressively rising SST in the northwest Pacific is different to the North Atlantic climate development during HS1. Similarities between the northwest Pacific SST and climate records from the Gulf of Alaska point to a stronger influence of Alaskan Stream waters connecting the eastern and western basin of the North Pacific during this time. During the Holocene, dissimilar climate trends point to reduced influence of the Alaskan Stream in the northwest Pacific.

  12. Alkenone temperature records and biomarker flux at the subtropical front on the chatham rise, SW Pacific Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sikes, Elisabeth L.; O'Leary, Teresa; Nodder, Scott D.; Volkman, John K.

    2005-05-01

    Alkenones and a suite of sterol biomarkers were examined in two sediment trap arrays deployed at 300 m depth in subtropical and subantarctic waters to the east of New Zealand from late winter to autumn in 1996-1997. The two traps were located within 200 km of one another and the main difference between the two sites are the differential physical, chemical, and biological characteristics of the different water masses in which they were situated. The alkenone-based reconstructions of water temperatures (U37K') were compared to the COADS monthly averaged satellite and real-time weekly temperatures for the deployment period. The records correlate well with seasonal sea surface temperatures (SST) for the 9 months of the deployment, with temperature reconstructions within 2 °C of regional monthly averages for most of the year. There are a few short periods of poorer agreement where alkenone-based reconstructions deviate by up to 4 °C in both traps. Weekly averages of satellite SST obtained during the time of the deployment indicate that these deviations were not associated with short-term changes in surface temperatures overlying the traps. These instances of poor correlation are not due to lateral advection of particles, but rather seem to reflect differences in environmental controls on alkenone-derived SSTs in the two water masses. Subantarctic traps showed deviations only to warmer than average temperatures. These occurred in early winter and late summer, during times of low lipid fluxes, suggesting that slow growth associated with light limitation may have affected unsaturation levels in the alkenones. The subtropical traps showed deviations only to cooler temperatures, which occurred in the late summer to early autumn. These biases occurred during times of highest lipid fluxes and lowest nutrients in the surface mixed-layer. Alkenone temperatures during maximum flux periods were too cool to be caused by subsurface production alone, suggesting that nutrient

  13. GDGT and alkenone flux in the northern Gulf of Mexico: Implications for the TEX86 and UK137 paleothermometers

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Richey, Julie; Tierney, Jessica E.

    2016-01-01

    The TEX86 and molecular biomarker proxies have been broadly applied in down-core marine sediments to reconstruct past sea surface temperature (SST). Although both TEX86 and have been interpreted as proxies for mean annual SST throughout the global ocean, regional studies of GDGTs and alkenones in sinking particles are required to understand the influence of seasonality, depth distribution and diagenesis on downcore variability. We measure GDGT and alkenone flux, as well as the TEX86 and indices in a 4-year sediment trap time series (2010-2014) in the northern Gulf of Mexico (nGoM), and compare these data with core-top sediments at the same location. GDGT and alkenone fluxes do not show a consistent seasonal cycle, however the largest flux peaks for both occurs in winter. co-varies with SST over the 4-year sampling interval, but the -SST relationship in this data set implies a smaller slope or non-linearity at high temperatures when compared with existing calibrations. Furthermore, the flux-weighted value from sinking particles is significantly lower than that of underlying core-top sediments, suggesting preferential diagenetic loss of the tri-unsaturated alkenone in sediments. TEX86 does not co-vary with SST, suggesting production in the subsurface upper water column. The flux-weighted mean TEX86 matches that of core-top sediments, confirming that TEX86 in the nGoM reflects local planktonic production rather than allochthonous or in-situ sedimentary production. We explore potential sources of uncertainty in both proxies in the nGoM, but demonstrate that they show nearly identical trends in 20th century SST, despite these factors.

  14. Unusual ∆7,12,19 C35:3 Alkenone Produced by the Mutant Emiliania huxleyi strain CCMP2758 in Culture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Y.; Huang, Y.; Zhang, Y.; Dillon, J. T.

    2015-12-01

    Alkenones with chain length ranging from C37 to C40 are highly specific biomarkers for certain haptophyte algae in ocean and lake sediments and have been widely used for paleoclimate studies. Short chain alkenones (e.g., C35 and C36) have been found in environmental and culture samples but the origin and structures of these compounds are not fully understood. The benchmark marine alkenone producer, Emiliania huxleyi CCMP2758 strain (the mutant of strain CCMP1742, NEPCC55a) was reported to make 35:2 alkenone when cultured at 15 °C (Prahl et al., 2006). Here we show, when this strain is cultured at lower temperatures (e.g., 4°C), CCMP2758 produces large amount of 35:3 alkenone with unusual double bond positions of ∆7,12,19. We determined the double bond positions of the C35:3 methyl ketonee based on GC-MS analysis of cyclobutylimine derivatives and dimethyl disulfide derivatives respectively, and provide the first temperature calibrations based on the unsaturation ratios of C35 alkenones. Previous studies have found 35:2 alkenone with three methylene interruption in the Black Sea sediment, but it is the first time that an alkenone with a mixed three and five methylene interruption is found. The discovery of short chain alkenones with unusual double bond positions may shed new light to alkenone biosynthesis.

  15. Time-series of water column alkenones and 18S rRNA confirm that Uk'37 is a viable SST proxy in Narragansett Bay, RI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salacup, J.; Theroux, S.; Herbert, T.; Prell, W. L.

    2011-12-01

    Alkenones, produced in the sunlit mixed layer by specific Haptophyte algae, are a well-established and widely-applied proxy for sea surface temperature (SST) in the world's open-oceans. However, the proxy's utility in estuarine environments remains largely untested. A reliable SST proxy is needed to identify the estuary's sensitivity and response to past and present global change because SST can exert strong control on stratification and circulation patterns, and thus oxygenation and ecosystem health, in these shallow basins. Knowing the estuaries response should help local managers and policy-makers plan mitigation and adaptation strategies. Additionally, the rapid deposition of both marine and terrestrial organic and inorganic material in estuarine systems makes them potential archives of high-resolution paleo-environmental information. A previous investigation of estuarine alkenones suggested that the Uk'37 proxy may be sensitive to the composition of the alkenone-producing Haptophyte population, which may be affected by local nutrient and fresh water fluxes. In particular, low-salinity coastal Haptophytes such as Isochrysis galbana may have a different relationship to SST than higher-salinity open-ocean Haptophytes and their presence may complicate interpretations of the Uk'37 proxy in estuaries. To better understand how the alkenone-based Uk'37 SST proxy is produced in estuarine systems, we present a two-year time-series (monthly-to-thrice-weekly resolution) of alkenone concentrations in particulate organic matter from Narragansett Bay. Alkenone concentrations are coupled with 18S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) measurements to identify the alkenone-producing population. Highest concentrations of alkenones are detected at different times in the upper and lower Bay such that the highest alkenone concentrations occur in the winter-spring (upper Bay) and summer/fall (lower Bay). This result is consistent with the established seasonal blooms and seasonal changes in nutrient

  16. A cold and fresh ocean surface in the Nordic Seas during MIS 11: Significance for the future ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kandiano, Evgenia S.; Meer, Marcel T. J.; Bauch, Henning A.; Helmke, Jan; Damsté, Jaap S. Sinninghe; Schouten, Stefan

    2016-10-01

    Paleoceanographical studies of Marine Isotope Stage (MIS) 11 have revealed higher-than-present sea surface temperatures (SSTs) in the North Atlantic and in parts of the Arctic but lower-than-present SSTs in the Nordic Seas, the main throughflow area of warm water into the Arctic Ocean. We resolve this contradiction by complementing SST data based on planktic foraminiferal abundances with surface salinity changes using hydrogen isotopic compositions of alkenones in a core from the central Nordic Seas. The data indicate the prevalence of a relatively cold, low-salinity, surface water layer in the Nordic Seas during most of MIS 11. In spite of the low-density surface layer, which was kept buoyant by continuous melting of surrounding glaciers, warmer Atlantic water was still propagating northward at the subsurface thus maintaining meridional overturning circulation. This study can help to better constrain the impact of continuous melting of Greenland and Arctic ice on high-latitude ocean circulation and climate.

  17. Holocene hydrological and sea surface temperature changes in the northern coast of the South China Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Mong-Sin; Zong, Yongqiang; Mok, Ka-Man; Cheung, Ka-Ming; Xiong, Haixian; Huang, Guangqing

    2017-03-01

    In order to reconstruct the Holocene environmental history of a coastal site in the northern South China Sea, this study analysed the organic carbon isotope ratios (δ13Corg) and alkenone unsaturation ratios (UK‧37) from a 36.5 m-long sediment core drilled at seabed in the mouth region of the Pearl River estuary and generated a coupled hydrological and temperature record. This record reveals changes of monsoon-induced sediment discharge and sea surface temperature of the Holocene in four stages. In Stage I, the site was under fluvial conditions prior to postglacial marine transgression. Stage II saw an increase of sea surface temperature from c. 23.0 °C to 27.0 °C, associated with a strengthened summer monsoon from c. 10,350 to 8900 cal. years BP. This was also a period of rapid sea-level rise and marine transgression, during which the sea inundated the palaeo-incised channel, i.e. the lower part of the T-shape accommodation space created by the rising sea. In these 1500 years, fluvial discharge was strong and concentrated within the channel, and the high sedimentation rate (11.8 mm/year) was very close to the rate of sea-level rise. In the subsequent 2000 years (Stage III) sea level continued to rise and the sea flooded the broad seabed above the palaeo-incised channel, resulted in fluvial discharge spreading thinly across the wide accommodation space and a much reduced sedimentation rate (1.8 mm/year). Sea surface temperature in this stage reached 27.3 °C initially, but dropped sharply to 26.1 °C towards c. 8200 cal. years BP. The final stage covers the last 7000 years, and the site was under a stable sea level. Sedimentation in this stage varied a little, but averaged at 1.8 mm/year. Whilst fluvial discharge and sea surface temperature didn't change much, two short periods of hydrological and temperature change were observed, which are related to the climatic cooling events of c. 4200 cal. years ago and the Little Ice Age.

  18. Alkenone and Isotopic Records of Holocene Climatic and Environmental Change From Laminated West Greenland Lakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Andrea, W. J.; Huang, Y.

    2004-12-01

    Long chain alkenones (LCAs) are a key class of biomarkers for paleotemperature reconstructions. These compounds are ubiquitous in ocean sediments, but rare in lake sediments. Here we report the first discovery of LCAs in a downcore profile and surface sediments of five Greenland lakes. The concentrations of LCAs in surface sediments of these lakes are one to two orders of magnitude higher than those reported previously in other lake surface sediments around the world. Alkenones are present in five Greenland lakes with elevated salinity, but absent from five freshwater lakes. The alkenones have exceptionally low \\delta13C values ranging from -40 to -43\\permil, and are depleted by 10 to 15\\permil relative to short-chain fatty acids and sterols within the same samples. These \\delta13C values are the lowest ever reported for alkenones in a natural setting and have important implications for tracing the alkenone producers in lakes. Using the published calibration for lake sediments, the alkenone unsaturation indices in the surface sediments of the Greenland lakes record late spring/early summer temperature when algal blooms occur, suggesting the applicability of lacustrine alkenones as a paleotemperature proxy. LCA unsaturation indices and \\deltaD from sediment cores taken from these Greenland lakes will help elucidate the environmental controls on these sedimentary parameters, and will aid the reconstruction of Holocene climate variability in West Greenland. Ongoing work on the saline lakes includes determining high resolution alkenone unsaturation ratios/abundances and bulk/compound-specific isotopic values from sediment cores, algal culturing, and establishing microbial community structure in the saline lakes using DNA/RNA fingerprinting. Up-to-date results will be presented in the meeting.

  19. Phylogenetic diversity and evolutionary relatedness of alkenone-producing haptophyte algae in lakes: Implications for continental paleotemperature reconstructions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Theroux, Susanna; D'Andrea, William J.; Toney, Jaime; Amaral-Zettler, Linda; Huang, Yongsong

    2010-12-01

    Alkenones have been found in an increasing number of lakes around the world, making them a promising new tool for continental paleoclimate reconstruction. However, individual lakes may harbor different species of haptophyte algae with different sensitivities to temperature variations, thus presenting a significant challenge to the use of lacustrine alkenones for paleotemperature reconstructions. To explore the extent of lacustrine haptophyte diversity, we conducted the first comprehensive phylogenetic and geochemical survey of lacustrine alkenone producers. We sampled 15 alkenone-containing lake surface sediments from a variety of geographic locales and inferred identities of environmental sequences using 18S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) gene-based phylogenies. For two lakes, BrayaSø in southwest Greenland and Tso Ur on the Tibetan Plateau, we also analyzed both surface and downcore sediments to characterize haptophyte populations through time. In parallel with phylogenetic analyses, we determined the alkenone distributions (including C 37/C 38 ratios, and the presence/absence of C 38 methyl ketones and C 40 compounds) in all the samples. The resulting alkenone profiles from this study do not all align with traditional "marine" versus "coastal/lacustrine" alkenone profiles. Additionally, our genetic data indicate the presence of multiple haptophyte species from a single lake sediment sample; these distinct haptophyte populations could not be discerned from the alkenone profiles alone. These results show that alkenone profiles are not a reliable way to assess the haptophyte algae in lakes and that DNA fingerprinting is a preferred approach for species identification. Although closely related haptophyte species or subspecies may not warrant different temperature calibrations, our results emphasize the importance of genetic data for inferring haptophyte identities and eventually selecting alkenone-temperature calibrations for paleoclimate reconstructions.

  20. Holocene seasonal sea-surface temperature variations in the southern Adriatic Sea inferred from a multiproxy approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sangiorgi, Francesca; Capotondi, Lucilla; Combourieu Nebout, Nathalie; Vigliotti, Luigi; Brinkhuis, Henk; Giunta, Simona; Lotter, Andrè F.; Morigi, Caterina; Negri, Alessandra; Reichart, Gert-Jan

    2003-12-01

    Holocene cooling events have been reconstructed for the southern Adriatic Sea (central Mediterranean) by means of analyses of organic walled dinoflagellate cysts, planktonic foraminifera, oxygen isotopes, calcareous nanoplankton, alkenones and pollen from a sediment core. Two cooling events have been detected, during which sea-surface temperatures (SSTs) were ca. 2°C lower. Unravelling the SST signal into dominant seasonal components suggests maximum winter cooling of 2°C at around 6.0 ka, whereas the cooling at ca. 3.0 ka might be the result of a spring temperature cooling of 2-3°C. The events, lasting several hundred years, are apparently synchronous with those in the Aegean Sea, where they have been related to known cooling events from the Greenland ice-core record. A distinct interruption in Adriatic Sea sapropel S1 is not clearly accompanied by a local drop in winter temperatures, but seems to be forced by ventilation, which probably occurred earlier in the Aegean Sea and was subsequently transmitted to the Adriatic Sea. Copyright

  1. Subpolar gyre and radiative forcings moderate sea surface temperatures of the Norwegian Sea during the mid-Piacenzian

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bachem, Paul; Risebrobakken, Bjørg; McClymont, Erin

    2016-04-01

    The mid-Piacenzian age (ca. 3.3-3.0 Ma) of the Pliocene epoch has been proposed as a possible reference for future warm climate states. We have developed a new set of orbital-resolution alkenone-based sea surface temperature (SST) and ice rafted debris (IRD) records from the Norwegian Sea. SSTs in the Norwegian Sea were 2-3°C warmer in the mid-Piacenzian compared to the Holocene average. There is notable orbital-scale SST variability with a range of 4°C. The most likely cause of the average long-term warmth is a higher atmospheric CO2 concentration. A correlation of SST variability with the presence of Greenland-sourced IRD suggests a common climate forcing acting across the Nordic Seas region. The orbital-scale variability was in part caused by interplay of obliquity and precession, as low SSTs coincide with times of low northern summer insolation. Changes of the SST gradient between the Norwegian Sea and North Atlantic sites suggest that the subpolar gyre was at least of comparable strength as during the Holocene. The North Atlantic Current (NAC) influence on the Norwegian Sea SSTs does not appear to have been stronger than during the Holocene.

  2. Sea surface temperature variability in the Norwegian Sea during the late Pliocene linked to subpolar gyre strength and radiative forcing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bachem, Paul E.; Risebrobakken, Bjørg; McClymont, Erin L.

    2016-07-01

    The mid-Piacenzian warm period (3.264-3.025 Ma) of the Pliocene epoch has been proposed as a possible reference for future warm climate states. However, there is significant disagreement over the magnitude of high latitude warming between data and models for this period of time, raising questions about the driving mechanisms and responsible feedbacks. We have developed a new set of orbital-resolution alkenone-based sea surface temperature (SST) and ice rafted debris (IRD) records from the Norwegian Sea spanning 3.264-3.14 Ma. The SSTs in the Norwegian Sea were 2-3 °C warmer than the Holocene average, likely caused by the radiative effect of higher atmospheric CO2 concentrations. There is notable obliquity-driven SST variability with a range of 4 °C, shown by evolutive spectra. The correlation of SST variability with the presence of IRD suggests a common climate forcing acting across the Nordic Seas region. Changes of the SST gradient between the Norwegian Sea and North Atlantic sites suggest that the subpolar gyre was at least as strong as during the Holocene, and that the northward heat transport by the North Atlantic Current was comparable.

  3. Eastern tropical Pacific hydrologic changes during the past 27,000 years from D/H ratios in alkenones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pahnke, Katharina; Sachs, Julian P.; Keigwin, Lloyd; Timmermann, Axel; Xie, Shang-Ping

    2007-12-01

    The tropical Pacific plays a central role in the climate system by providing large diabatic heating that drives the global atmospheric circulation. Quantifying the role of the tropics in late Pleistocene climate change has been hampered by the paucity of paleoclimate records from this region and the lack of realistic transient climate model simulations covering this period. Here we present records of hydrogen isotope ratios (δD) of alkenones from the Panama Basin off the Colombian coast that document hydrologic changes in equatorial South America and the eastern tropical Pacific over the past 27,000 years (a) and the past 3 centuries in detail. Comparison of alkenone δD values with instrumental records of precipitation over the past ˜100 a suggests that δD can be used as a hydrologic proxy. On long timescales our records indicate reduced rainfall during the last glacial period that can be explained by a southward shift of the mean position of the Intertropical Convergence Zone and an associated reduction of Pacific moisture transport into Colombia. Precipitation increases at ˜17 ka in concert with sea surface temperature (SST) cooling in the North Atlantic and the eastern tropical Pacific. A regional coupled model, forced by negative SST anomalies in the Caribbean, simulates an intensification of northeasterly trade winds across Central America, increased evaporative cooling, and a band of increased rainfall in the northeastern tropical Pacific. These results are consistent with the alkenone SST and δD reconstructions that suggest increasing precipitation and SST cooling at the time of Heinrich event 1.

  4. Tightly linked zonal and meridional sea surface temperature gradients over the past five million years

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fedorov, Alexey V.; Burls, Natalie J.; Lawrence, Kira T.; Peterson, Laura C.

    2015-12-01

    The climate of the tropics and surrounding regions is defined by pronounced zonal (east-west) and meridional (equator to mid-latitudes) gradients in sea surface temperature. These gradients control zonal and meridional atmospheric circulations, and thus the Earth’s climate. Global cooling over the past five million years, since the early Pliocene epoch, was accompanied by the gradual strengthening of these temperature gradients. Here we use records from the Atlantic and Pacific oceans, including a new alkenone palaeotemperature record from the South Pacific, to reconstruct changes in zonal and meridional sea surface temperature gradients since the Pliocene, and assess their connection using a comprehensive climate model. We find that the reconstructed zonal and meridional temperature gradients vary coherently over this time frame, showing a one-to-one relationship between their changes. In our model simulations, we systematically reduce the meridional sea surface temperature gradient by modifying the latitudinal distribution of cloud albedo or atmospheric CO2 concentration. The simulated zonal temperature gradient in the equatorial Pacific adjusts proportionally. These experiments and idealized modelling indicate that the meridional temperature gradient controls upper-ocean stratification in the tropics, which in turn controls the zonal gradient along the equator, as well as heat export from the tropical oceans. We conclude that this tight linkage between the two sea surface temperature gradients posits a fundamental constraint on both past and future climates.

  5. Long chain diol index (LDI) as an organic-based sea surface temperature proxy in the Korean East Sea (NW Pacific)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gal, Jong-Ku; Kim, Jung-Hyun; Kang, Su-Jin; Lee, Dong-Hun; Shin, Kyung-Hoon

    2016-04-01

    Long chain diol index (LDI) was introduced as an organic-based sea surface temperature (SST) proxy. LDI is expressed as the C30 1,15-diol abundance relative to those of C28 1,13-, C30 1,13- and C30 1,15-diols. There were a few studies which accessed the potential of LDI based on the culture, core top sediments, suspended particulate organic matters, and down-core sediments. However it is still unknown about the source of the diols and robustness as the SST proxy in the various marine environments. In the current study, we examined the applicability of the LDI in the East Sea of Korea where productivity and thus sedimentation rates are high. We will compare the LDI data with those of alkenone-based UK'37 by analyzing two multicores covering the last 100 year.

  6. Reconstruction of the variability of surface water characteristics and terrigenous input in the North Pacific and Bering Sea: A biomarker approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meheust, M.; Fahl, K.; Stein, R. H.

    2011-12-01

    Overall goal of the present study of sediment material collected during RV Sonne Cruise 202 (INOPEX) in 2009, is the reconstruction of the variability of and linkages between surface-water characteristic and terrigenous input in the (sub-) polar North Pacific/Bering Sea and their relationship to global climate change, using organic-geochemical proxies (i.e. organic-geochemical bulk parameters and specific biomarkers (TOC, hydrogen indices; long-chain n-alkanes, sterols, alkenones; Uk37 and TEX86-Index; BIT-Index; HBIs, IP25). In Bering Sea surface sediment, both higher total organic carbon (TOC) values and maximum hydrogen index values are observed, suggesting deposition of significant amount of marine organic carbon. The deposition/preservation of marine organic matter in the surface sediments is caused by increased primary production, as reflected in increased chlorophyll a concentrations measured in the surface water. The distribution patterns of the phytoplankton biomarkers dinosterol and brassicasterol support these data as well. The alkenone-based sea-surface temperature (SST) varies between 6°C in the northern part of Bering Sea and 18°C in the North Pacific, close to the Japanese coast, and correlates quite well with the measured SST (extracted from the World Ocean Atlas 2001). From our data, we suggest that the based-alkenone SST mainly reflects summer SST. The alkenone-based SSTs have been compared to temperature estimates obtained with the so-called "TEX 86" Index. Both data sets show quite different temperature distribution patterns, i.e., TEX86 temperatures do not show any correlation with measured SSTs. These differences cannot be explained so far. In order to reconstruct the sea-ice cover, the newly developed so-called "IP25 Index" was used in surface sediment. The absence of IP25 in all studied surface sediments suggests dominantly open-water conditions in the study throughout the year today. The same bulk organic-geochemical and biomarker proxies

  7. Sea surface temperature variability in the central-western Mediterranean Sea during the last 2700 years: a multi-proxy and multi-record approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cisneros, Mercè; Cacho, Isabel; Frigola, Jaime; Canals, Miquel; Masqué, Pere; Martrat, Belen; Casado, Marta; Grimalt, Joan O.; Pena, Leopoldo D.; Margaritelli, Giulia; Lirer, Fabrizio

    2016-04-01

    This study presents the reconstructed evolution of sea surface conditions in the central-western Mediterranean Sea during the late Holocene (2700 years) from a set of multi-proxy records as measured on five short sediment cores from two sites north of Minorca (cores MINMC06 and HER-MC-MR3). Sea surface temperatures (SSTs) from alkenones and Globigerina bulloides Mg / Ca ratios are combined with δ18O measurements in order to reconstruct changes in the regional evaporation-precipitation (E-P) balance. We also revisit the G. bulloides Mg / Ca-SST calibration and re-adjusted it based on a set of core-top measurements from the western Mediterranean Sea. Modern regional oceanographic data indicate that Globigerina bulloides Mg / Ca is mainly controlled by seasonal spring SST conditions, related to the April-May primary productivity bloom in the region. In contrast, the alkenone-SST signal represents an integration of the annual signal. The construction of a robust chronological framework in the region allows for the synchronization of the different core sites and the construction of "stacked" proxy records in order to identify the most significant climatic variability patterns. The warmest sustained period occurred during the Roman Period (RP), which was immediately followed by a general cooling trend interrupted by several centennial-scale oscillations. We propose that this general cooling trend could be controlled by changes in the annual mean insolation. Even though some particularly warm SST intervals took place during the Medieval Climate Anomaly (MCA), the Little Ice Age (LIA) was markedly unstable, with some very cold SST events mostly during its second half. Finally, proxy records for the last centuries suggest that relatively low E-P ratios and cold SSTs dominated during negative North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO) phases, although SSTs seem to present a positive connection with the Atlantic Multidecadal Oscillation (AMO) index.

  8. Sea surface temperature variability in the central-western Mediterranean Sea during the last 2700 years: a multi-proxy and multi-record approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cisneros, M.; Cacho, I.; Frigola, J.; Canals, M.; Masqué, P.; Martrat, B.; Lirer, F.; Margaritelli, G.

    2015-11-01

    This study analyses the evolution of sea surface conditions during the last 2700 years in the central-western Mediterranean Sea based on six records as measured on five short sediment cores from two sites north of Minorca (cores MINMC06 and HER-MC-MR3). Sea Surface Temperatures (SSTs) were obtained from alkenones and Globigerina bulloides-Mg/Ca ratios combined with δ18O measurements to reconstruct changes in the regional Evaporation-Precipitation (E-P) balance. We reviewed the G. bulloides Mg/Ca-SST calibration and re-adjusted it based on a set of core top measurements from the western Mediterranean Sea. According to the regional oceanographic data, the estimated Mg/Ca-SSTs are interpreted to reflect spring seasonal conditions mainly related to the April-May primary productivity bloom. In contrast, the Alkenone-SSTs signal likely integrates the averaged annual signal. A combination of chronological tools allowed synchronizing the records in a common age model. Subsequently a single anomaly stack record was constructed for each proxy, thus easing to identify the most significant and robust patterns. The warmest SSTs occurred during the Roman Period (RP), which was followed by a general cooling trend interrupted by several centennial-scale oscillations. This general cooling trend could be controlled by changes in the annual mean insolation. Whereas some particularly warm SST intervals took place during the Medieval Climate Anomaly (MCA) the Little Ice Age (LIA) was markedly unstable with some very cold SST events mostly during its second half. The records of the last centuries suggest that relatively low E-P ratios and cold SSTs dominated during negative North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO) phases, although SST records seem to present a close positive connection with the Atlantic Multidecadal Oscillation index (AMO).

  9. Sea Surface Salinity

    NASA Video Gallery

    The heat of the sun also forces evaporation at the ocean's surface, which puts water vapor into the atmosphere but leaves minerals and salts behind, keeping the ocean salty. The salinity of the oce...

  10. Long-term sea surface temperature and climate change in the Australian-New Zealand region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barrows, Timothy T.; Juggins, Steve; de Deckker, Patrick; Calvo, Eva; Pelejero, Carles

    2007-06-01

    We compile and compare data for the last 150,000 years from four deep-sea cores in the midlatitude zone of the Southern Hemisphere. We recalculate sea surface temperature estimates derived from foraminifera and compare these with estimates derived from alkenones and magnesium/calcium ratios in foraminiferal carbonate and with accompanying sedimentological and pollen records on a common absolute timescale. Using a stack of the highest-resolution records, we find that first-order climate change occurs in concert with changes in insolation in the Northern Hemisphere. Glacier extent and inferred vegetation changes in Australia and New Zealand vary in tandem with sea surface temperatures, signifying close links between oceanic and terrestrial temperature. In the Southern Ocean, rapid temperature change of the order of 6°C occurs within a few centuries and appears to have played an important role in midlatitude climate change. Sea surface temperature changes over longer periods closely match proxy temperature records from Antarctic ice cores. Warm events correlate with Antarctic events A1-A4 and appear to occur just before Dansgaard-Oeschger events 8, 12, 14, and 17 in Greenland.

  11. GDGT and alkenone flux in the northern Gulf of Mexico: Implications for the TEX86 and UK'37 paleothermometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richey, Julie N.; Tierney, Jessica E.

    2016-12-01

    The TEX86 and U37K' molecular biomarker proxies have been broadly applied in downcore marine sediments to reconstruct past sea surface temperature (SST). Although both TEX86 and U37K' have been interpreted as proxies for mean annual SST throughout the global ocean, regional studies of glycerol dibiphytanyl glycerol tetraethers (GDGTs) and alkenones in sinking particles are required to understand the influence of seasonality, depth distribution, and diagenesis on downcore variability. We measure GDGT and alkenone flux, as well as the TEX86 and U37K' indices in a 4 year sediment trap time series (2010-2014) in the northern Gulf of Mexico (nGoM), and compare these data with core-top sediments at the same location. GDGT and alkenone fluxes do not show a consistent seasonal cycle; however, the largest flux peaks for both occurs in winter. U37K' covaries with SST over the 4 year sampling interval, but the U37K'-SST relationship in this data set implies a smaller slope or nonlinearity at high temperatures when compared with existing calibrations. Furthermore, the flux-weighted U37K' value from sinking particles is significantly lower than that of underlying core-top sediments, suggesting preferential diagenetic loss of the tri-unsaturated alkenone in sediments. TEX86 does not covary with SST, suggesting production in the subsurface upper water column. The flux-weighted mean TEX86 matches that of core-top sediments, confirming that TEX86 in the nGoM reflects local planktonic production rather than allochthonous or in situ sedimentary production. We explore potential sources of uncertainty in both proxies in the nGoM but demonstrate that they show nearly identical trends in twentieth century SST, despite these factors.

  12. Sea surface temperatures and environmental conditions during the ;warm Pliocene; interval ( 4.1-3.2 Ma) in the Eastern Mediterranean (Cyprus)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Athanasiou, M.; Bouloubassi, I.; Gogou, A.; Klein, V.; Dimiza, M. D.; Parinos, C.; Skampa, E.; Triantaphyllou, M. V.

    2017-03-01

    Organic geochemical (alkenones) and micropaleontological (nannofossil) data from the Pissouri South section (PPS) in the island of Cyprus provided a detailed description of the paleoclimatic (sea surface temperature-SST) and paleoenvironmental conditions during the ;warm Pliocene; (c. 4.1-3.25 Ma) in the Eastern Mediterranean. We found that the suite of sapropel events recorded in the studied interval took place under conditions of increased SST, enhanced water column stratification and development of a productive deep chlorophyll maximum (DCM), as witnessed by the dominance of Florisphaera profunda species. Such conditions are similar to those prevailing during Quaternary sapropel formation, triggered by freshwater discharges from the N. African margin due to insolation-driven intensification of the African monsoon. The absence of F. profunda in Pliocene sapropels from central Mediterranean records highlights the sensitive response of the eastern basin to freshwater perturbations. Comparisons between alkenone and calcareous nannofossil assemblage patterns infer Pseudoemiliania lacunosa as the main alkenone producer in sapropel layers; yet Reticulofenestra spp. contribution cannot be ruled out. The first Pliocene alkenone-SST record in the E. Mediterranean presented here documents the ;warm Pliocene; period ( 4.1-3.25 Ma) characterized by mean SST of c. 26 °C. Distinct SST minima at 3.9 Ma, 3.58 Ma and between 3.34 and 3.31 Ma, correspond to the MIS Gi16, MIS MG12 and MIS M2 global cooling episodes, before the onset of the Northern Hemisphere glaciation. Our findings imply that the peak of the MIS M2 cooling in the Eastern Mediterranean may be up to 40 kyrs older than the age attributed before to benthic stable oxygen isotopes records of this event.

  13. Sea surface temperature variability in the North Western Mediterranean Sea (Gulf of Lion) during the Common Era

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sicre, Marie-Alexandrine; Jalali, Bassem; Martrat, Belen; Schmidt, Sabine; Bassetti, Maria-Angela; Kallel, Nejib

    2016-12-01

    This study investigates the multidecadal-scale variability of sea surface temperatures (SSTs) in the convection region of the Gulf of Lion (NW Mediterranean Sea) over the full past 2000 yr (Common Era) using alkenone biomarkers. Our data show colder SSTs by 1.7 °C over most of the first millennium (200-800 AD) and by 1.3 °C during the Little Ice Age (LIA; 1400-1850 AD) than the 20th century mean (17.9 °C). Although on average warmer, those of the Medieval Climate Anomaly (MCA) (1000-1200 AD) were lower by 1 °C. We found a mean SST warming of 2 °C/100 yr over the last century in close agreement with the 0.22 and 0.26 °C/decade values calculated for the western Mediterranean Sea from in situ and satellite data, respectively. Our results also reveal strongly fluctuating SSTs characterized by cold extremes followed by abrupt warming during the LIA. We suggest that the coldest decades of the LIA were likely caused by prevailing negative EA states and associated anticyclone blocking over the North Atlantic resulting in cold continental northeasterly winds to blow over Western Europe and the Mediterranean region.

  14. Sea Surface Height 1993 - 2011

    NASA Video Gallery

    This animation depicts year-to-year variability in sea surface height, and chronicles two decades of El Niño and La Niña events. It was created using NASA ocean altimetry data from 1993 to 2011, ...

  15. Seasonal variations of alkenones and UK37 in the Chesapeake Bay water column

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mercer, J.L.; Zhao, M.; Colman, Steven M.

    2005-01-01

    Alkenone unsaturation indices (UK37 and U K???37) have long been used as proxies for surface water temperature in the open ocean. Recent studies have suggested that in other marine environments, variables other than temperature may affect both the production of alkenones and the values of the indices. Here, we present the results of a reconnaissance field study in which alkenones were extracted from particulate matter filtered from the water column in Chesapeake Bay during 2000 and 2001. A multivariate analysis shows a strong positive correlation between UK37 (and UK???37) values and temperature, and a significant negative correlation between UK37 (and UK???37) values and nitrate concentrations. However, temperature and nitrate concentrations also co-vary significantly. The temperature vs. UK37 relationships (UK37=0.018 (T)-0.162, R2=0.84, UK???37=0.013 (T)-0.04, R2=0.80) have lower slopes than the open-ocean equations of Prahl et al. [1988. Further evaluation of long-chain alkenones as indicators of paleoceanographic conditions. Geochimica et Cosmochimica Acta 52, 2303-2310] and Mu??ller et al. [1998. Calibration of the alkenone paleotemperature index UK???37 based on core-tops from the eastern South Atlantic and the global ocean (60??N-60??S). Geochimica et Cosmochimica Acta 62, 1757-1772], but are similar to the relationships found in controlled studies with elevated nutrient levels and higher nitrate:phosphate (N:P) ratios. This implies that high nutrient levels in Chesapeake Bay have either lowered the UK37 vs. temperature slope, or nutrient levels are the main controller of the U K37 index. In addition, particularly high abundances (>5% of total C37 alkenones) of the tetra-unsaturated ketone, C37:4, were found when water temperatures reached 25??C or higher, thus posing further questions about the controls on alkenone production as well as the biochemical roles of alkenones. ?? 2005 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. MODIS Global Sea Surface Temperature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    Every day the Moderate-resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) measures sea surface temperature over the entire globe with high accuracy. This false-color image shows a one-month composite for May 2001. Red and yellow indicates warmer temperatures, green is an intermediate value, while blues and then purples are progressively colder values. The new MODIS sea surface temperature product will be particularly useful in studies of temperature anomalies, such as El Nino, as well as research into how air-sea interactions drive changes in weather and climate patterns. In the high resolution image, notice the amazing detail in some of the regional current patterns. For instance, notice the cold water currents that move from Antarctica northward along South America's west coast. These cold, deep waters upwell along an equatorial swath around and to the west of the Galapagos Islands. Note the warm, wide currents of the Gulf Stream moving up the United States' east coast, carrying Caribbean warmth toward Newfoundland and across the Atlantic toward Western Europe. Note the warm tongue of water extending from Africa's east coast to well south of the Cape of Good Hope. MODIS was launched in December 1999 aboard NASA's Terra satellite. For more details on this and other MODIS data products, please see NASA Unveils Spectacular Suite of New Global Data Products from MODIS. Image courtesy MODIS Ocean Group, NASA GSFC, and the University of Miami

  17. Salinity changes in the Agulhas leakage area recorded by stable hydrogen isotopes of C37 alkenones during Termination I and II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kasper, S.; van der Meer, M. T. J.; Mets, A.; Zahn, R.; Sinninghe Damsté, J. S.; Schouten, S.

    2014-02-01

    At the southern tip of Africa, the Agulhas Current reflects back into the Indian Ocean causing so-called "Agulhas rings" to spin off and release relatively warm and saline water into the South Atlantic Ocean. Previous reconstructions of the dynamics of the Agulhas Current, based on paleo-sea surface temperature and sea surface salinity proxies, inferred that Agulhas leakage from the Indian Ocean to the South Atlantic was reduced during glacial stages as a consequence of shifted wind fields and a northwards migration of the subtropical front. Subsequently, this might have led to a buildup of warm saline water in the southern Indian Ocean. To investigate this latter hypothesis, we reconstructed sea surface salinity changes using alkenone δD, and paleo-sea surface temperature using TEXH86 and UK'37, from two sediment cores (MD02-2594, MD96-2080) located in the Agulhas leakage area during Termination I and II. Both UK'37 and TEXH86 temperature reconstructions indicate an abrupt warming during the glacial terminations, while a shift to more negative δDalkenone values of approximately 14‰ during glacial Termination I and II is also observed. Approximately half of the isotopic shift can be attributed to the change in global ice volume, while the residual isotopic shift is attributed to changes in salinity, suggesting relatively high salinities at the core sites during glacials, with subsequent freshening during glacial terminations. Approximate estimations suggest that δDalkenone represents a salinity change of ca. 1.7-1.9 during Termination I and Termination II. These estimations are in good agreement with the proposed changes in salinity derived from previously reported combined planktonic Foraminifera δ18O values and Mg/Ca-based temperature reconstructions. Our results confirm that the δD of alkenones is a potentially suitable tool to reconstruct salinity changes independent of planktonic Foraminifera δ18O.

  18. Deglacial Sea-Surface Temperatures off New Zealand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sachs, J. P.; Manighetti, B.

    2002-12-01

    Glacial geologic and geochronologic data from New Zealand indicate a re-advance of mountain glaciers synchronous with the Younger Dryas (YD) Chron. Yet pollen studies do not support any appreciable cooling at this time, suggesting that the glacial advances may have resulted from enhanced precipitation rather than decreased temperature. A paucity of detailed marine climate records from the region leave an uncertain picture of deglacial climate change in the vicinity of New Zealand. The question remains open whether abrupt deglacial climate changes so prominent in the North Atlantic region involved the southwest Pacific Ocean. Here we present a detailed record of deglacial and Holocene sea-surface temperatures (SSTs) off the north island of New Zealand using the alkenone paleotemperature technique and show evidence for cooling synchronous with the Younger Dryas Chron. Core MD97-2121 was recovered in 2314 m of water at 40°S, 178°E, southeast of Hawke Bay, New Zealand. The 35-m core contains a continuous record of sedimentation spanning the last 136 kyr. Age control for the deglacial period and the Holocene is provided by 26 radiocarbon dates on planktonic foraminifera and tephra layers. Exceptional rates of sedimentation averaging 36 cm/kyr during the last 25 kyr are maintained by large fluxes of terrigenous detritus from New Zealand resulting from pronounced seismicity, volcanism and continental weathering. Presently the site is under the influence of the southward-flowing East Cape Current, which transports 10-25 Sv of warm, salty, subtropical water. The northward flowing Wairarapa Coastal Current flows just west of the core site and transports 1.6 Sv of cool, low-salinity water derived from Australasian Subantarctic Water via the Southland Current. Although a relatively minor influence today, this cool, fresh current system may have influenced SSTs over the core site at times in the past. Late Holocene alkenone-derived SSTs of 17 deg C are consistent with atlas

  19. Novel Penta-Unsaturated Alkenones From Lake Fryxell, Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaraula, C. B.; Brassell, S. C.; Kenig, F.; Doran, P. T.

    2007-12-01

    Novel methyl octatriaconta-pentaen-one (C38:5m), methyl and ethyl nonatriaconta-pentaen-one (C39:5m and C39:5e, respectively) and methyl tetradec-pentaen-one (C40:5m) are identified from chromatographic and mass spectrometric properties of a bottom sediment sample from perennially ice-covered Lake Fryxell in Antarctica. The pentaunsaturated alkenones comprise 15%, 28% and 12% of the total C38, C39 and C40 homologous series. These alkenone biomarkers also consist of tetra , tri-, and diunsaturated methyl and ethyl ketones from C37 to C40. Low salinity and extremely cold conditions year round may have strongly influenced the number of unsaturations in the biomarkers and chain length of the alkenones. As also suggested by accompanying cholesterol and alkene biomarkers, these alkenones are key biomarkers of haptophycean algae of the Class Prymnesiophyceae, but the specific species that biosynthesizes these alkenones in the lake are still unknown.

  20. Analysis of sea level and sea surface temperature changes in the Black Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Betul Avsar, Nevin; Jin, Shuanggen; Kutoglu, Hakan; Erol, Bihter

    2016-07-01

    The Black Sea is a nearly closed sea with limited interaction with the Mediterranean Sea through the Turkish Straits. Measurement of sea level change will provide constraints on the water mass balance and thermal expansion of seawaters in response to climate change. In this paper, sea level changes in the Black Sea are investigated between January 1993 and December 2014 using multi-mission satellite altimetry data and sea surface temperature (SST) data. Here, the daily Maps of Sea Level Anomaly (MSLA) gridded with a 1/8°x1/8° spatial resolution from AVISO and the NOAA 1/4° daily Optimum Interpolation Sea Surface Temperature (OISST) Anomaly data set are used. The annual cycles of sea level and sea surface temperature changes reach the maximum values in November and January, respectively. The trend is 3.16±0.77 mm/yr for sea level change and -0.06±0.01°C/yr for sea surface temperature during the same 22-year period. The observed sea level rise is highly correlated with sea surface warming for the same time periods. In addition, the geographical distribution of the rates of the Black Sea level and SST changes between January 1993 and December 2014 are further analyzed, showing a good agreement in the eastern Black Sea. The rates of sea level rise and sea surface warming are larger in the eastern part than in the western part except in the northwestern Black Sea. Finally, the temporal correlation between sea level and SST time series are presented based on the Empirical Orthogonal Function (EOF) analysis.

  1. Sea Surface Salinity : Research Challenges and Opportunities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Halpern, David; Lagerloef, Gary; Font, Jordi

    2012-01-01

    Sea surface salinity (SSS) can be important in regulating sea surface temperature (SST). Two technological breakthrough satellite SSS missions, Aquarius and Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity (SMOS), are currently producing high-quality SSS data. This paper provides an overview of the importance of SSS for weather and climate applications and describes the Aquarius and SMOS missions. The newness of adequately sampled SSS data prompted a first-time at-sea field campaign devoted to improved understanding of SSS variations.

  2. Late Eocene sea surface cooling of the western North Atlantic (ODP Site 647A)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sliwinska, Kasia K.; Coxall, Helen K.; Schouten, Stefan

    2016-04-01

    The initial shift out of the early Cenozoic greenhouse and into a glacial icehouse climate occurred during the middle to late Eocene and culminated in the abrupt growth of a continental-scale ice cap on Antarctica, during an episode known as the Oligocene Isotope Event 1 (Oi-1) ˜33.7 Ma. Documenting the patterns of global and regional cooling prior to Oi-1 is crucial for understanding the driving force and feedback behind the switch in climate mode. Well-dated high-resolution temperature records, however, remain sparse and the climatic response in some of the most climatically sensitive regions of the Earth, including the high latitude North Atlantic (NA), where today large amounts of ocean heat are exchanged, are poorly known. Here we present a sea surface palaeotemperature record from the late Eocene to the early Oligocene (32.5 Ma to 35 Ma) of ODP Hole 647A based on archaeal tetraether lipids (TEX86H). The site is located in the western North Atlantic (Southern Labrador Sea) and is the most northerly located (53° N) open ocean site with a complete Eocene-Oligocene sequence which yields both calcareous and organic microfossils suitable for detailed proxy reconstructions. Our record agrees with the magnitude of temperature decrease (˜3 ° C sea surface cooling) recorded by alkenones and pollen data from the Greenland Sea, but our higher resolution study reveals that the high latitude NA cooling step occurred about 500 kyrs prior to the Oi-1 Antarctic glaciation, at around ˜34.4 Ma. This cooling can be explained by regional effects related to local NA tectonics including ocean gateways, known to have changed at the time, with potential to effect NA overturning circulation due to adjustments in the thermohaline density balance. Alternatively, the cooling itself may be due to changes in NA circulation, suggesting that global ocean circulation played a role in pre-conditioning the Earth for Antarctic glaciation.

  3. Sea surface temperature variability of the Peru-Chile Current during the previous four interglacials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caniupan, M.; Martinez-Mendez, G.; Lamy, F.; Hebbeln, D.; Mohtadi, M.

    2012-12-01

    There are several periods during the Quaternary that were characterized by warmer than present climate and higher sea level that serve as an analogue for future global warming scenarios. These include the Marine isotope Stage (MIS) 5.5, MIS 9.3, and MIS 11.3. Little is known about past sea surface temperatures (SST) during these intervals in the Southern Hemisphere, particularly in the Southeast Pacific. Here, we present a new alkenone-derived SST record from marine sediment core GeoB15016 located beneath the Peru-Chile Current (PCC). The PCC plays a critical role in the Southern Hemisphere surface circulation as it connects the low and high latitudes by transporting sub-polar water masses and thus, a high-latitude climate signal towards the tropics. Core GeoB15016 was recovered with the sea floor drill rig MARUM-MeBo at 956 m water depth off northern Chile (27°29.48'S; 71°07.58'W). We analyzed the uppermost ca 25 meters composite depth that extend back to ~400,000 years ago. Our record is the first Chilean margin record extending back to MIS 11. The stratigraphy is well constrained by correlating benthic oxygen isotope data to the global Lisiecki-Raymo stack. Glacial-interglacial SST amplitudes are in the order of 6°C. During MIS 5, 7, 9 and 11, the record reaches SST maxima of ca. 3°C warmer than present annual mean SST in this area. Our results suggest a substantial warming of the PCC over past interglacials that may reflect reduced advection of subantarctic surface water from the south and/or enhanced tropical influence and/or decreased upwelling intensity.

  4. Testing the D/H ratio of alkenones and palmitic acid as salinity proxies in the Amazon Plume

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Häggi, C.; Chiessi, C. M.; Schefuß, E.

    2015-08-01

    The stable hydrogen isotope composition of lipid biomarkers, such as alkenones, is a promising new tool for the improvement of paleosalinity reconstructions. Laboratory studies confirmed the correlation between lipid biomarker δD composition (δDLipid), water δD composition (δDH2O) and salinity. Yet, there is limited insight into the applicability of this proxy in oceanic environments. To fill this gap, we test the use of the δD composition of alkenones (δDC37) and palmitic acid (δDPA) as salinity proxies using samples of surface suspended material along the distinct salinity gradient induced by the Amazon Plume. Our results indicate a positive correlation between salinity and δDH2O, while the relationship between δDH2O and δDLipid is more complex: δDPA correlates strongly with δDH2O (r2 = 0.81) and shows a salinity dependent isotopic fractionation factor. δDC37 only correlates with δDH2O in samples with alkenone concentrations > 10 ng L-1 (r2 = 0.51). These findings are mirrored by alkenone based temperature reconstructions, which are inaccurate for samples with alkenone concentrations < 10 ng L-1. Deviations in δDC37 and temperature are likely to be caused by limited haptophyte algae growth due to low salinity and light limitation imposed by the Amazon Plume. Our study confirms the applicability of δDLipid as a salinity proxy in oceanic environments. But it raises a note of caution concerning regions where low alkenone production can be expected due to very low salinity conditions. To circumvent these limitations, we suggest the complementary use of δDC37 and δDPA.

  5. Testing the D / H ratio of alkenones and palmitic acid as salinity proxies in the Amazon Plume

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Häggi, C.; Chiessi, C. M.; Schefuß, E.

    2015-12-01

    The stable hydrogen isotope composition of lipid biomarkers, such as alkenones, is a promising new tool for the improvement of palaeosalinity reconstructions. Laboratory studies confirmed the correlation between lipid biomarker δD composition (δDLipid), water δD composition (δDH2O) and salinity; yet there is limited insight into the applicability of this proxy in oceanic environments. To fill this gap, we test the use of the δD composition of alkenones (δDC37) and palmitic acid (δDPA) as salinity proxies using samples of surface suspended material along the distinct salinity gradient induced by the Amazon Plume. Our results indicate a positive correlation between salinity and δDH2O, while the relationship between δDH2O and δDLipid is more complex: δDPAM correlates strongly with δDH2O (r2 = 0.81) and shows a salinity-dependent isotopic fractionation factor. δDC37 only correlates with δDH2O in a small number (n = 8) of samples with alkenone concentrations > 10 ng L-1, while there is no correlation if all samples are taken into account. These findings are mirrored by alkenone-based temperature reconstructions, which are inaccurate for samples with low alkenone concentrations. Deviations in δDC37 and temperature are likely to be caused by limited haptophyte algae growth due to low salinity and light limitation imposed by the Amazon Plume. Our study confirms the applicability of δDLipid as a salinity proxy in oceanic environments. But it raises a note of caution concerning regions where low alkenone production can be expected due to low salinity and light limitation, for instance, under strong riverine discharge.

  6. Mid-Piacensian mean annual sea surface temperature: an analysis for data-model comparisons

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dowsett, Harry J.; Robinson, Marci M.; Foley, Kevin M.; Stoll, Danielle K.

    2010-01-01

    Numerical models of the global climate system are the primary tools used to understand and project climate disruptions in the form of future global warming. The Pliocene has been identified as the closest, albeit imperfect, analog to climate conditions expected for the end of this century, making an independent data set of Pliocene conditions necessary for ground truthing model results. Because most climate model output is produced in the form ofmean annual conditions, we present a derivative of the USGS PRISM3 Global Climate Reconstruction which integrates multiple proxies of sea surface temperature (SST) into single surface temperature anomalies. We analyze temperature estimates from faunal and floral assemblage data,Mg/Ca values and alkenone unsaturation indices to arrive at a single mean annual SST anomaly (Pliocene minus modern) best describing each PRISM site, understanding that multiple proxies should not necessarily show concordance. The power of themultiple proxy approach lies within its diversity, as no two proxies measure the same environmental variable. This data set can be used to verify climate model output, to serve as a starting point for model inter-comparisons, and for quantifying uncertainty in Pliocene model prediction in perturbed physics ensembles.

  7. Mid-Pliocene equatorial Pacific sea surface temperature reconstruction: a multi-proxy perspective

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dowsett, Harry J.; Robinson, Marci M.

    2009-01-01

    The Mid-Pliocene is the most recent interval of sustained global warmth, which can be used to examine conditions predicted for the near future. An accurate spatial representation of the low-latitude Mid-Pliocene Pacific surface ocean is necessary to understand past climate change in the light of forecasts of future change. Mid-Pliocene sea surface temperature (SST) anomalies show a strong contrast between the western equatorial Pacific (WEP) and eastern equatorial Pacific (EEP) regardless of proxy (faunal, alkenone and Mg/Ca). All WEP sites show small differences from modern mean annual temperature, but all EEP sites show significant positive deviation from present-day temperatures by as much as 4.4°C. Our reconstruction reflects SSTs similar to modern in the WEP, warmer than modern in the EEP and eastward extension of the WEP warm pool. The east-west equatorial Pacific SST gradient is decreased, but the pole to equator gradient does not change appreciably. We find it improbable that increased greenhouse gases (GHG) alone would cause such a heterogeneous warming and more likely that the cause of Mid-Pliocene warmth is a combination of several forcings including both increased meridional heat transport and increased GHG.

  8. Mid-Pliocene equatorial Pacific sea surface temperature reconstruction: A multi-proxy perspective

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dowsett, H.J.; Robinson, M.M.

    2009-01-01

    The Mid-Pliocene is the most recent interval of sustained global warmth, which can be used to examine conditions predicted for the near future. An accurate spatial representation of the low-latitude Mid-Pliocene Pacific surface ocean is necessary to understand past climate change in the light of forecasts of future change. Mid-Pliocene sea surface temperature (SST) anomalies show a strong contrast between the western equatorial Pacific (WEP) and eastern equatorial Pacific (EEP) regardless of proxy (faunal, alkenone and Mg/Ca). All WEP sites show small differences from modern mean annual temperature, but all EEP sites show significant positive deviation from present-day temperatures by as much as 4.4??C. Our reconstruction reflects SSTs similar to modern in the WEP, warmer than modern in the EEP and eastward extension of the WEP warm pool. The east-west equatorial Pacific SST gradient is decreased, but the pole to equator gradient does not change appreciably. We find it improbable that increased greenhouse gases (GHG) alone would cause such a heterogeneous warming and more likely that the cause of Mid-Pliocene warmth is a combination of several forcings including both increased meridional heat transport and increased GHG. ?? 2008 The Royal Society.

  9. Aquarius Observations of Sea Surface Salinity

    NASA Video Gallery

    This visualization shows changes in global sea surface salinity, as measured by NASA’s Aquarius instrument aboard the Aquarius/SAC-D spacecraft, from December 2011 through December 2012. Red repr...

  10. Air-sea interactions in sea surface temperature frontal region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pianezze, Joris; Redelsperger, Jean-Luc; Ardhuin, Fabrice; Reynaud, Thierry; Marié, Louis; Bouin, Marie-Noelle; Garnier, Valerie

    2015-04-01

    Representation of air-sea exchanges in coastal, regional and global models represent a challenge firstly due to the small scale of acting turbulent processes comparatively to the resolved scales of these models. Beyond this subgrid parameterization issue, a comprehensive understanding of air-sea interactions at the turbulent process scales is still lacking. Many successful efforts are dedicated to measure the energy and mass exchanges between atmosphere and ocean, including the effect of surface waves. In comparison less efforts are brought to understand the interactions between the atmospheric boundary layer and the oceanic mixing layer. In this regard, we are developing research mainly based on ideal and realistic numerical simulations which resolve very small scales (horizontal resolutions from 1 to 100 meters) in using grid nesting technics and coupled ocean-wave-atmosphere models. As a first step, the impact of marked gradients in sea surface temperatures (SST) on air-sea exchanges has been explored through realistic numerical simulations at 100m horizontal resolution. Results from simulations of a case observed during the FROMVAR experiment will be shown. The talk will mainly focus on the marked impact of SST front on the atmospheric boundary layer (stability and winds), the air-sea exchanges and surface parameters (rugosity, drag coefficient) Results will be also shown on the strong impact on the simulated atmosphere of small scale variability of SST field.

  11. Holocene interdependences of changes in sea surface temperature, productivity, and fluvial inputs in the Iberian continental shelf (Tagus mud patch)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodrigues, Teresa; Grimalt, Joan O.; Abrantes, FáTima G.; Flores, Jose A.; Lebreiro, Susana M.

    2009-07-01

    Sea surface temperature (SST), marine productivity, and fluvial input have been reconstructed for the last 11.5 calendar (cal) ka B.P. using a high-resolution study of C37 alkenones, coccolithophores, iron content, and higher plant n-alkanes and n-alkan-1-ols in sedimentary sequences from the inner shelf off the Tagus River Estuary in the Portuguese Margin. The SST record is marked by a continuous decrease from 19°C, at 10.5 and 7 ka, to 15°C at present. This trend is interrupted by a fall from 18°C during the Roman and Medieval Warm Periods to 16°C in the Little Ice Age. River input was very low in the early Holocene but increased in the last 3 cal ka B.P. in association with an intensification of agriculture and deforestation and possibly the onset of the North Atlantic Oscillation/Atlantic Multidecadal Oscillation modes of variability. River influence must have reinforced the marine cooling trend relative to the lower amplitude in similar latitude sites of the eastern Atlantic. The total concentration of alkenones reflects river-induced productivity, being low in the early Holocene but increasing as river input became more important. Rapid cooling, of 1-2°C occurring in 250 years, is observed at 11.1, 10.6, 8.2, 6.9, and 5.4 cal ka B.P. The estimated age of these events matches the ages of equivalent episodes common in the NE Atlantic-Mediterranean region. This synchronicity reveals a common widespread climate feature, which considering the twentieth century analog between colder SSTs and negative North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO), is likely to reflect periods of strong negative NAO.

  12. Refining the alkenone-pCO2 method: The role of algal growth conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pearson, A.; Zhang, Y.; Huybers, P. J.; Pagani, M.

    2015-12-01

    The alkenone-pCO2 method based on carbon isotope fractionation during growth of haptophyte algae is one of the most widely used approaches to reconstruct atmospheric CO2 level in the Cenozoic. Based on the fractionation of stable carbon isotopes between dissolved CO2 and phytoplankton biomass, as represented by alkenone lipid biomarkers, this relationship (known as ɛp37:2) scales inversely with growth rate and cell volume to surface area ratio, and positively with CO2. Recently-published estimates for late Pleistocene CO2 levels, however, are poorly correlated with ice core CO2 records, suggesting that alkenone paleobarometry needs to be refined. Here we compiled published records over recent glacial-interglcial (G-IG) cycles and revised the relationship between algal growth rate, as expressed by the physiological parameter 'b', and dissolved phosphate concentration. We further show that the magnitude of change in ɛp37:2 over glacial-interglacial cycles at different sites is dependent on local nutrient conditions, highlighting the importance of constraining b for accurate CO2 estimates. The correlation between GDGT-2/3 ratio and back-calculated b at Ceara Rise (ODP Site 925) suggests that archaeal lipids could be used as proxies to calibrate b. Application of our variable-b method to reported data yields pCO2 estimates that are similar in both trends and magnitude to ice core-derived records.

  13. Sea surface temperature variability of the Peru-Chile Current during the previous ten interglacials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caniupan, M.; Martinez-Mendez, G.; Lamy, F.; Hebbeln, D.; Mohtadi, M.; Pantoja, S.

    2014-12-01

    There are several interglacial periods during the Quaternary that were characterized by climates warmer than present and higher sea level and thus may serve as analogues for future global warming scenarios. These include Marine Isotope Stages (MIS) 5e, 9c and 11c. Little is known about past sea surface temperatures (SST) during these warm intervals in the Southern Hemisphere, particularly along the Peru-Chile Current (PCC) which plays a critical role in the Southern Hemisphere surface circulation as it connects the low and high latitudes by transporting sub-polar water masses and thus, a high-latitude climate signal towards the tropics. Here, we present new high-resolution alkenone-derived SST records from marine sediment cores located beneath the PCC. Core GeoB15016 was recovered from off northern Chile (27.5°S; 71.1°W) with the seafloor drill rig MARUM-MeBo. We analyzed the ca. 60 meters composite depth complemented by gravity core GeoB3375-1 (27.5°S; 71.3°W) for the upper part to generate a continuous record that extends back to 970 ka BP. Our record is the first continuous SST reconstruction from the Chilean margin extending back to MIS 25. SST varies between ~8°C and ~20°C over the past ~970 ka. Glacial-interglacial SST amplitudes are in the order of 6°C (see Groeneveld's et al. contribution for Mg/Ca-derived Glacial SST estimations). During MIS 5e, 7e, 9c and 11c, the record reaches SST maxima which are ca. 3ºC warmer than present annual mean SST in the area. Our results suggest a substantial warming of the PCC over past interglacials that may reflect reduced advection of subantarctic surface water from the south and/or enhanced tropical influence from the north.

  14. Millennial-scale Atlantic/East Pacific sea surface temperature linkages during the last 100,000 years

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dubois, Nathalie; Kienast, Markus; Kienast, Stephanie S.; Timmermann, Axel

    2014-06-01

    Amplifying both internally generated variability and remote climate signals from the Atlantic Ocean via coupled air-sea instabilities, the eastern tropical Pacific (ETP) is well situated to detect past climate changes and variations in Central American wind systems that dynamically link the Atlantic and the Pacific. Here we compare new and previously published alkenone-based sea surface temperature (SST) reconstructions from diverse environments within the ETP, i.e. the Eastern Pacific Warm Pool (EPWP), the equatorial and the northern Peruvian Upwelling regions over the past 100,000 yr. Over this time period, a fairly constant meridional temperature gradient across the region is observed, indicating similar hydrographic conditions during glacial and interglacial periods. The data further reveal that millennial-scale cold events associated with massive iceberg surges in the North Atlantic (Heinrich events) generate cooling in the ETP from ∼8°N to ∼2°S. Data from Heinrich event 1, however, indicate that the response changes sign south of 2°S. These millennial-scale alterations of the SST pattern across diverse environments of the ETP support previous climate modeling experiments that suggested an Atlantic-Pacific connection caused by the intensification of the Central American gap winds, enhanced upwelling and mixing north of the equator and supported by positive air-sea feedbacks in the eastern tropical Pacific.

  15. Microwave Radiometric Measurement of Sea Surface Salinity.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-04-01

    potential problems of polution and urban water sup- plies. Although salinity can be measured from a surface vessel, economic consider- ations advocate...Washington, DC 20350 Commander Naval Sea System Commandaa ComAinder ATTN: Mr. C. Smith, NAVSEA 63R* Nval Air Development Center "’-’. "Washington, DC...20362 ATTN: Mr. R. Bollard, Code 2062% .’* Warminster, PA 18974 • .’.Commander CNaval Sea System CommandCoimCander Headquarters Naval Air Systems

  16. Enhanced stratification and seasonality in the Subarctic Pacific upon Northern Hemisphere Glaciation-New evidence from diatom-bound nitrogen isotopes, alkenones and archaeal tetraethers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Studer, Anja S.; Martínez-Garcia, Alfredo; Jaccard, Samuel L.; Girault, France E.; Sigman, Daniel M.; Haug, Gerald H.

    2012-10-01

    Coincident with the intensification of Northern Hemisphere Glaciation (NHG) around 2.73 million years (Ma) ago, sediment cores from both the open subarctic North Pacific and the Antarctic indicate a rapid decline in diatom opal accumulation flux to the seabed, representing one of the most abrupt and dramatic changes in the marine sediment record associated with the development of Pleistocene glacial cycles. In the North Pacific, bulk sediment nitrogen isotope data and alkenone-derived sea surface temperature (SST) estimates suggest that the productivity decline was driven by reduced exchange between surface and deep water, due to weaker wind-driven upwelling and/or a strengthening of the halocline (i.e. "stratification"). In this study of the 2.73 Ma transition at Ocean Drilling Program (ODP) Site 882 in the western subarctic North Pacific, diatom-bound nitrogen isotopes (δ15Ndb), alkenone mass accumulation rate, and alkenone- and archaeal tetraether-based SST reconstructions support the stratification hypothesis, indicating perennially lower export production, generally higher nitrate consumption, and greater inter-seasonal variation in SST after the 2.73 Ma transition. In addition, the δ15Ndb of large and small size fractions of Coscinodiscus spp. suggest that these diatoms grew mostly during the spring bloom during the late Pliocene, switching to their current fall-to-winter growth period at the 2.73 Ma transition; this view is consistent with their decline in dominance and provides further evidence for increased stratification (reduced vertical exchange) in the North Pacific after 2.73 Ma. The δ15Ndb data indicate that, over the ˜100 kyr period after the 2.73 Ma transition studied here, nitrate consumption did not reach late Pleistocene ice age levels and that nitrate consumption in post-2.73 Ma warm stages was similar to that before the transition, even though productivity was greatly reduced. We tentatively attribute this to relatively weak dust

  17. Precise orbit computation and sea surface modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wakker, Karel F.; Ambrosius, B. A. C.; Rummel, R.; Vermaat, E.; Deruijter, W. P. M.; Vandermade, J. W.; Zimmerman, J. T. F.

    1991-01-01

    The research project described below is part of a long-term program at Delft University of Technology aiming at the application of European Remote Sensing satellite (ERS-1) and TOPEX/POSEIDON altimeter measurements for geophysical purposes. This program started in 1980 with the processing of Seasat laser range and altimeter height measurements and concentrates today on the analysis of Geosat altimeter data. The objectives of the TOPEX/POSEIDON research project are the tracking of the satellite by the Dutch mobile laser tracking system MTLRS-2, the computation of precise TOPEX/POSEIDON orbits, the analysis of the spatial and temporal distribution of the orbit errors, the improvement of ERS-1 orbits through the information obtained from the altimeter crossover difference residuals for crossing ERS-1 and TOPEX/POSEIDON tracks, the combination of ERS-1 and TOPEX/POSEIDON altimeter data into a single high-precision data set, and the application of this data set to model the sea surface. The latter application will focus on the determination of detailed regional mean sea surfaces, sea surface variability, ocean topography, and ocean currents in the North Atlantic, the North Sea, the seas around Indonesia, the West Pacific, and the oceans around South Africa.

  18. Haptophyte alga from Greenland lakes offers unprecedented opportunity to decipher alkenone biosynthetic pathways and functionality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Theroux, S.; Amaral-Zettler, L.; Huang, Y.

    2009-12-01

    The alkenone unsaturation index is an invaluable tool for paleoclimate reconstructions—however, the physiological mechanism governing alkenone production remains unknown. We have identified and isolated a novel species of Haptophyte alga that produces anomalously high concentrations of alkenone lipids during a spring bloom period in southwestern Greenland lakes. We have confirmed that the extant blooming haptophyte ribosomal RNA (rRNA) gene sequences match those found in sediments dating back 6000 yrs. This species comprises a unique clade within the Isochrysidales, and forms macroscopic colonies during its bloom period, the only time when alkenone lipids are produced. Alkenones sampled in situ through the water column demonstrate a temperature-dependent control on unsaturation. Under nutrient-enriched ex situ culture conditions the alga discontinues alkenone biosynthesis. This finding is consistent with reported enhancement of alkenone production in Emiliania huxleyi under nutrient-deplete conditions. Extensive manipulation of culture conditions and simulation of bloom-period lake water conditions enables us to identify environmental triggers of alkenone production. In parallel with the culturing work, RNA samples taken before and during the lake bloom event also allow for a metatranscriptomic analysis to assay the genes involved in alkenone production. In combination, these samples give us a unique opportunity for annotating gene transcripts up- and down-regulated during alkenone biosynthesis. Identification of genes involved in alkenone biosynthesis will enable functional gene-based phylogenetic comparisons among Haptophtye algae, improving our understanding of the evolution of alkenone biosynthesis and the alkenone’s role in cellular function.

  19. Sea-surface salinity: the missing measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stocker, Erich F.; Koblinsky, Chester

    2003-04-01

    Even the youngest child knows that the sea is salty. Yet, routine, global information about the degree of saltiness and the distribution of the salinity is not available. Indeed, the sea surface salinity measurement is a key missing measurement in global change research. Salinity influences circulation and links the ocean to global change and the water-cycle. Space-based remote sensing of important global change ocean parameters such as sea-surface temperature and water-cycle parameters such as precipitation have been available to the research community but a space-based global sensing of salinity has been missing. In July 2002, the National Aeronautical and Space Administration (NASA) announced that the Aquarius mission, focused on the global measurement of sea surface salinity, is one of the missions approved under its ESSP-3 program. Aquarius will begin a risk-reduction phase during 2003. Aquarius will carry a multi-beam 1.4 GHz (L-band) radiometer used for retrieving salinity. It also will carry a 1.2 GHz (L-band) scatterometer used for measuring surface roughness. Aquarius is tentatively scheduled for a 2006 launch into an 8-day Sun-synchronous orbit. Aquarius key science data product will be a monthly, global surface salinity map at 100 km resolution with an accuracy of 0.2 practical salinity units. Aquarius will have a 3 year operational period. Among other things, global salinity data will permit estimates of sea surface density, or buoyancy, that drives the ocean's three-dimensional circulation.

  20. Mid-Pliocene Planktic Foraminifer Census Data and Alkenone Unsaturation Indices from Ocean Drilling Program Hole 677A

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Robinson, Marci; Caballero, Rocio; Pohlman, Emily; Herbert, Timothy; Peck, Victoria; Dowsett, Harry

    2008-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey is conducting a long-term study of mid-Pliocene climatic and oceanographic conditions. One of the key elements of the study involves the use of quantitative composition of planktic foraminifer assemblages in conjunction with other proxies to constrain estimates of sea-surface temperature (SST) and to identify major oceanographic boundaries and water masses. Raw census data are made available as soon as possible after analysis through a series of reports that provide the basic data for future work. In this report we present raw census data (table 1) for planktic foraminifer assemblages in 14 samples from Ocean Drilling Program (ODP) Hole 677A. We also present alkenone unsaturation index (UK'37) analyses for 89 samples from ODP Hole 677A (table 2). ODP Hole 677A is located in the Panama basin, due west of Ecuador at 1?12.138'N., 83?44.220'W., in 3461.2 meters of water (fig. 1). A variety of statistical methods have been developed to transform foraminiferal census data in Pliocene sequences into quantitative estimates of Pliocene SST. Details of statistical techniques, taxonomic groupings, and oceanographic interpretations are presented in more formal publications (Dowsett and Poore, 1990, 1991; Dowsett, 1991, 2007a,b; Dowsett and Robinson, 1998, 2007; Dowsett and others, 1996, 1999).

  1. Temperature calibration of lacustrine alkenones using in-situ sampling and growth cultures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Y.; Toney, J. L.; Andersen, R.; Fritz, S. C.; Baker, P. A.; Grimm, E. C.; Theroux, S.; Amaral Zettler, L.; Nyren, P. E.

    2010-12-01

    Sedimentary alkenones have been found in an increasing number of lakes around the globe. Studies using molecular biological tools, however, indicate that haptophyte species that produce lacustrine alkenones differ from the oceanic species. In order to convert alkenone unsaturation ratios measured in sediments into temperature, it is necessary to obtain an accurate calibration for individual lakes. Using Lake George, North Dakota, U.S. as an example, we have carried out temperature calibrations by both in-situ water column sampling and culture growth experiments. In-situ measured lake water temperatures in the lake show a strong correlation with the alkenone unsaturation indices (r-squared = 0.82), indicating a rapid equilibrium of alkenone distributions with the lake water temperature in the water column. We applied the in-situ calibration to down-core measurements for Lake George and generated realistic temperature estimates for the past 8 kyr. Algal isolation and culture growth, on the other hand, reveal the presence of two different types of alkenone producing haptophytes. The species making a predominant C37:4 alkenone (species A) produced much greater concentrations of alkenones per unit volume than the species that produced a predominant C37:3 alkenone (species B). It is the first time that a haptophyte species (species A) making a predominant C37:4 alkenone is cultured successfully and now replicated at four different growth temperatures. The distribution of alkeones in Lake George sediments matches extremely well with the alkenones produced by species A, indicating species A is likely the producer for the alkenones in the sediments. The alkenone unsaturation ratio of alkenones produced by species A haptophyte shows a primary dependence on growth temperature as expected, but the slope of change appears to vary depending on the growth stages. The implications of our findings for paleoclimate reconstructions using lacustrine alkenones will be discussed.

  2. Surface Drifter Study - Beaufort Sea, Alaska.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-07-01

    34._ MICROCOPY RESOLUTION TEST CHART NATIONAL BUREAU OF STANDARDS-1963-A I. REPORT NO: CG- C-33-82 C SURFACE DRIFTER STUDY - BEAUFORT SEA, ALASKA Ivan M. Lissauer ...6.Pefo~rmenq O, latzm, n Code _. Performing Orqanozat.on Report No. 7. AuANr’s) Ivan M. Lissauer 1 R Matthpwq CGRRDC 14/82 9. Pdfom4ing Oregaization...Springfield, Virginia. 63p. Hufford, G.L., I.M. Lissauer and J.P. Welsh, 1976. Movement of spilled oil over the Beaufort Sea Shelf - A forecast. United

  3. Satellite monitoring of sea surface pollution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fielder, G.; Telfer, D. J. (Principal Investigator)

    1979-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. Image processing techniques developed are well adapted to the exploration and isolation of local areas which exhibit small temperature differences between themselves and their surroundings. In the worst case of imagery of small areal extent of sea surface having no coastal boundary in the area, there is yet no method of distinguishing unambiguously an oil spill from fog, cloud, the effect produced by shallow sediments, or the effects of naturally occuring thermal fronts. In the case of uniform slicks of liquid North Sea oil in still air, laboratory simulation experiments show that, for oil thicknesses in excess of 1 or 2 mm, there is, under equilibrium conditions, little dependence of oil surface temperature on the thickness of the oil layer. The surface temperature of oil is consistently higher than that of water, the difference being about 1 K at low values of relative humidity, but tending to increase as the relative humidity increases.

  4. Droughts in the Miocene of the Black Sea region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasiliev, Iuliana; Reichart, Gert-Jan; Grothe, Arjen; Krijgsman, Wout

    2016-04-01

    Since Miocene the Black Sea has been highly sensitive to fluctuations in the hydrological cycle. These fluctuations were principally determined by Black Sea's recurrently restricted connections to the Open Ocean and by its specific paleogeographic location between the dry Mediterranean domain and more humid higher northern latitudes. To determine the nature of changes in the hydrological budget of the Black Sea occurring during the late Miocene we use compound-specific hydrogen isotope ratios on terrestrial and aquatic biomarkers extracted from two different locations: 1) the sedimentary succession of Zhelezniy Rog land based section of Taman in Russia and 2) the deep sea sedimentary succession recovered in 1975 from the Black Sea (DSDP 42B, Hole 380A). The carbon and hydrogen isotopic composition of n-alkanes as well as alkenones and palynology indicate large environmental changes in the Black Sea and/or in the sources of the water entering the Black Sea during the late Miocene. The hydrogen isotopes of alkenones, showing an enrichment of more than 80 ‰ at the end of the Miocene, imply a major shift in basin hydrology, possibly resulting in severely increased salinity. These changes in hydrogen isotopic composition of the alkenones concur both with sharp shifts in reconstructed sea surface temperature and palynological assemblages. Two intervals with negative water budget were identified, most likely caused by enhanced evaporation. The older and longer dry/evaporative phase predates the Maeotian/Pontian boundary (regional stages) at ~6.1 Ma. The younger negative water budget phase is partly coeval to the Messinian salinity crisis of Mediterranean. Both shifts to highly evaporative conditions are recorded in both Taman Peninsula (Russia) and DSDP 42B 380A locations. These recurrent dryer phases were, most likely, the result of important hydrological changes over a significantly larger area around the Black Sea area during the upper Miocene.

  5. Biogeochemical patchiness at the sea surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahadevan, A.; Campbell, J. W.

    2002-10-01

    The surface distributions of many tracers in the ocean are highly correlated in time and space on meso (~100 km) and smaller scales (Figure 1). However, their characteristic scales of variability differ. Some variables like sea surface chlorophyll (Chl) are very fine-scaled or patchy, while others like sea surface temperature (SST) are not. We characterize the patchiness of a distribution quantitatively by the dependence of the variance V on the length scale L as V ~ Lp; smaller p corresponds to greater patchiness. Using scaling and a numerical model we show that patchiness, p, varies with the characteristic response time τ of the tracer to processes that alter its concentration in the upper ocean as p ~ log τ. This suggests that sea surface Chl is more patchy (has smaller p) than SST at mesoscales because the characteristic time scale of phytoplankton growth in response to the availability of nutrients is less than that for the equilibration of temperature in response to heat fluxes. Similarly, sea surface dissolved oxygen (O2) exhibits more fine-scaled variability than total dissolved inorganic carbon (TCO2) because O2 equilibrates with the atmosphere much more rapidly than TCO2. Tracers that are more patchy require higher resolution to model and sample; the sampling or model grid spacing required scales as exp(-1/log τ). The quantitative relationship between p and τ can be used to relate various biogeochemical distributions, particularly to those that are remotely sensed, and to deduce biogeochemical response times of various tracers or plankton species from the characteristics of their distributions in space or time.

  6. [Multiple scattering of visible and infrared light by sea fog over wind driving rough sea surface].

    PubMed

    Sun, Xian-Ming; Wang, Hai-Hua; Lei, Cheng-Xin; Shen, Jin

    2013-08-01

    The present paper is concerned with computing the multiple scattering characteristics of a sea fog-sea surface couple system within this context. The single scattering characteristics of sea fog were studied by Mie theory, and the multiple scattering of sunlight by single sea fog layer was studied by radiative transfer theory. The reflection function of a statistically rough ocean surface was obtained using the standard Kirchhoff formulation, with shadowing effects taken into account. The reflection properties of the combined sea fog and ocean surface were obtained employing the adding method, and the results indicated that the reflected light intensity of sea fog increased with the sea background.

  7. Mid-Pliocene Sea Surface Temperature of the North Atlantic Subtropical Gyre

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lutz, B. P.

    2010-12-01

    The mid-Pliocene (~3.5-3.0 Ma) was a warm and variable period during which mean global surface temperatures were 2-3°C warmer than today despite similar external forcing. As the magnitude of this warming is similar to that which is projected for the late 21st century, the mid-Pliocene is considered a useful (albeit imperfect) analog for future climate change. It also provides a natural test bed for proxy data-climate model integration and the calibration of general circulation models (GCMs) used to predict future climate changes. Proxy data and GCM simulations have provided clear evidence that the mid-Pliocene ocean was characterized by reduced vertical and meridional temperature gradients, leading to the hypothesis that Atlantic meridional overturn circulation (AMOC) and associated tropical heat advection were more vigorous than today. The zone of maximum oceanic-atmospheric northward mass and energy transport in the Atlantic lies between ~15°N and ~35°N latitude. A detailed understanding of sea surface conditions in the North Atlantic Subtropical Gyre (NASG; ~15°-40° N latitude) is therefore critical to our understanding of tropical-extratropical heat fluxes during the mid-Pliocene. Because Atlantic Ocean circulation patterns were similar to today, planktic foraminifer assemblages and sea surface temperature (SST) reconstructions of the NASG can be used to further elucidate and partition the causes of mid-Pliocene warmth, better describe to role of ocean circulation in climate change, and understand changes in biogeography during a geologically recent warm period. As part of the U.S. Geological Survey’s Pliocene Research, Interpretation, and Synoptic Mapping (PRISM) project, this study provides a faunal analysis and multi-proxy (Mg/Ca-, alkenone-, and faunal assemblage-based) SST reconstruction of the NASG during the mid-Pliocene. Preliminary faunal results indicate that relative to modern conditions, gyre circulation was stronger (particularly the Gulf

  8. Air-sea fluxes and surface layer turbulence around a sea surface temperature front

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Friehe, C. A.; Shaw, W. J.; Davidson, K. L.; Rogers, D. P.; Large, W. G.; Stage, S. A.; Crescenti, G. H.; Khalsa, S. J. S.; Greenhut, G. K.; Li, F.

    1991-01-01

    The observed effects of sharp changes in sea surface temperature (SST) on the air-sea fluxes, surface roughness, and the turbulence structure in the surface layer and the marine atmospheric boundary layer are discussed. In situ flux and turbulence observations were carried out from three aircraft and two ships within the FASINEX framework. Three other aircraft used remote sensors to measure waves, microwave backscatter, and lidar signatures of cloud tops. Descriptions of the techniques, intercomparison of aircraft and ship flux data, and use of different methods for analyzing the fluxes from the aircraft data are described. Changing synoptic weather on three successive days yielded cases of wind direction both approximately parallel and perpendicular to a surface temperature front. For the wind perpendicular to the front, wind over both cold-to-warm and warm-to-cold surface temperatures occurred. Model results consistent with the observations suggest that an internal boundary layer forms at the SST.

  9. A global monthly sea surface temperature climatology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shea, Dennis J.; Trenberth, Kevin E.; Reynolds, Richard W.

    1992-01-01

    The paper presents a new global 2 deg x 2 deg monthly sea surface temperature (SST) climatology, referred here to as the Shea-Trenberth-Reynolds (STR) climatology, which was derived by modifying a 1950-1979-based SST climatology from the Climate Analysis Center (CAC), by using data from the Comprehensive Ocean-Atmosphere Data Set to improve the SST estimates in the regions of the Kuroshio and the Gulf Stream. A comparison of the STR climatology with the Alexander and Mobley SST climatology showed that the STR climatology is warmer in the Northern Hemisphere, and colder poleward of 45 deg S.

  10. Sea Surface Temperature and Vegetation Index

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    This is a composite MODIS image showing the 'green wave' of spring in North America and sea surface temperature in the ocean, collected over an 8-day period during the first week in April 2000. On land, the darker green pixels show where the most green foliage is being produced due to photosynthetic activity. Yellows on land show where there is little or no productivity and red is a boundary zone. In the ocean, orange and yellows show warmer waters and blues show colder values.

  11. Plastics on the Sargasso sea surface.

    PubMed

    Carpenter, E J; Smith, K L

    1972-03-17

    Plastic particles, in concentrations averaging 3500 pieces and 290 grams per square kilometer, are widespread in the western Sargasso Sea. Pieces are brittle, apparently due to the weathering of the plasticizers, and many are in a pellet shape about 0.25 to 0.5 centimeters in diameter. The particles are surfaces for the attachment of diatoms and hydroids. Increasing production of plastics, combined with present waste-disposal practices, will undoubtedly lead to increases in the concentration of these particles. Plastics could be a source of some of the polychlorinated biphenyls recently observed in oceanic organisms.

  12. Sea Surface Temperature from EUMETSAT Including Sentinel-3 SLSTR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Carroll, Anne; Bonekamp, Hans; Montagner, Francois; Santacesaria, Vincenzo; Tomazic, Igor

    2015-12-01

    The paper gives an overview of sea surface temperature (SST) activities at EUMETSAT including information on SST planned from the Sea and Land Surface Temperature Radiometer (SLSTR). Operational oceanography activities within the Marine Applications group at EUMETSAT continue with a focus on SST, sea surface winds, sea-ice products, radiative fluxes, significant wave height and sea surface topography. These are achieved through the mandatory, optional and third-party programmes, and for some products with the EUMETSAT Ocean and Sea-Ice Satellite Application Facility (OSI SAF). Progress towards products from sea-ice surface temperature, ocean colour products, turbidity and aerosol optical depth over water continue. Information on oceanography products from EUMETSAT can be found through the product navigator (http://navigator.eumetsat.int). EUMETSAT have been collaborating with ESA for a number of years on the development of SST for SLSTR.

  13. Statistical Seasonal Sea Surface based Prediction Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suarez, Roberto; Rodriguez-Fonseca, Belen; Diouf, Ibrahima

    2014-05-01

    The interannual variability of the sea surface temperature (SST) plays a key role in the strongly seasonal rainfall regime on the West African region. The predictability of the seasonal cycle of rainfall is a field widely discussed by the scientific community, with results that fail to be satisfactory due to the difficulty of dynamical models to reproduce the behavior of the Inter Tropical Convergence Zone (ITCZ). To tackle this problem, a statistical model based on oceanic predictors has been developed at the Universidad Complutense of Madrid (UCM) with the aim to complement and enhance the predictability of the West African Monsoon (WAM) as an alternative to the coupled models. The model, called S4CAST (SST-based Statistical Seasonal Forecast) is based on discriminant analysis techniques, specifically the Maximum Covariance Analysis (MCA) and Canonical Correlation Analysis (CCA). Beyond the application of the model to the prediciton of rainfall in West Africa, its use extends to a range of different oceanic, atmospheric and helth related parameters influenced by the temperature of the sea surface as a defining factor of variability.

  14. Modern average global sea-surface temperature

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schweitzer, Peter N.

    1993-01-01

    The data contained in this data set are derived from the NOAA Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer Multichannel Sea Surface Temperature data (AVHRR MCSST), which are obtainable from the Distributed Active Archive Center at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) in Pasadena, Calif. The JPL tapes contain weekly images of SST from October 1981 through December 1990 in nine regions of the world ocean: North Atlantic, Eastern North Atlantic, South Atlantic, Agulhas, Indian, Southeast Pacific, Southwest Pacific, Northeast Pacific, and Northwest Pacific. This data set represents the results of calculations carried out on the NOAA data and also contains the source code of the programs that made the calculations. The objective was to derive the average sea-surface temperature of each month and week throughout the whole 10-year series, meaning, for example, that data from January of each year would be averaged together. The result is 12 monthly and 52 weekly images for each of the oceanic regions. Averaging the images in this way tends to reduce the number of grid cells that lack valid data and to suppress interannual variability.

  15. Sea surface wind stress in stratified atmospheric flow

    SciTech Connect

    Myrhaug, D.; Slaattelid, O.H.

    1996-12-31

    The paper presents the wind shear stress on the sea surface as well as the velocity profile in stably stratified atmospheric boundary layer flow over wind waves by using similarity theory. For a given geostrophic velocity, Coriolis parameter, spectral peak period and stratification parameter the sea surface shear stress is determined. Further, the direction of the sea surface shear stress and the velocity profile are given. Parameterizations of the results are also presented. Finally, the engineering relevance of the results is discussed.

  16. Estimating the Ocean Flow Field From Combined Sea Surface Temperature and Sea Surface Height Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stammer, Detlef

    2000-01-01

    The primary focus of this project was on the estimation of the three-dimensional, absolute and time-evolving general circulation of the global ocean from a combined analysis of remotely sensed fields of sea surface temperature (SST) and sea surface height (SSH). The synthesis of those two fields was performed with other relevant physical data, and appropriate dynamical ocean models with emphasis on constraining ocean general circulation models by a combination of both SST and SSH data. This effort is directly related to an attempt to describe the mechanisms which give rise to observed SST and its variability on seasonal and inter-annual timescales, its relation to ocean-atmosphere interaction, and the dynamical coupling between the ocean mixed layer and the deep interior ocean. This is one of the fundamental climate related questions being pursued currently under the CLIVAR Program. Because of the strong turbulent mixing associated with atmospheric fluxes of momentum, heat and freshwater through the sea surface, the ocean forms a shallow surface boundary layer, the mixed layer which is largely homogeneous in its constituents. The relation between the temperature of the remotely sensed "skin" and the bulk of the mixed layer is largely understood (Reynolds and Smith 1994; Emery et al., 1995). However, because the surface mixed layer is effectively decoupled from the underlying ocean dynamics, an interpretation of satellite SST observations in isolation and in direct use for dynamical studies is very difficult. As a result, the impact of SST data on the understanding of ocean variability.

  17. Satellite Sensed Skin Sea Surface Temperature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Donlon, Craig

    1997-01-01

    Quantitative predictions of spatial and temporal changes the global climate rely heavily on the use of computer models. Unfortunately, such models cannot provide the basis for climate prediction because key physical processes are inadequately treated. Consequently, fine tuning procedures are often used to optimize the fit between model output and observational data and the validation of climate models using observations is essential if model based predictions of climate change are to be treated with any degree of confidence. Satellite Sea Surface Temperature (SST) observations provide high spatial and temporal resolution data which is extremely well suited to the initialization, definition of boundary conditions and, validation of climate models. In the case of coupled ocean-atmosphere models, the SST (or more correctly the 'Skin' SST (SSST)) is a fundamental diagnostic variable to consider in the validation process. Daily global SST maps derived from satellite sensors also provide adequate data for the detection of global patterns of change which, unlike any other SST data set, repeatedly extend into the southern hemisphere extra-tropical regions. Such data are essential to the success of the spatial 'fingerprint' technique, which seeks to establish a north-south asymmetry where warming is suppressed in the high latitude Southern Ocean. Some estimates suggest that there is a greater than 80% chance of directly detecting significant change (97.5 % confidence level) after 10-12 years of consistent global observations of mean sea surface temperature. However, these latter statements should be qualified with the assumption that a negligible drift in the observing system exists and that biases between individual instruments required to derive a long term data set are small. Given that current estimates for the magnitude of global warming of 0.015 K yr(sup -1) - 0.025 K yr(sup -1), satellite SST data sets need to be both accurate and stable if such a warming trend is to

  18. Shelf sea current profile measurements from the sea surface to the sea bed in autumn

    SciTech Connect

    Howarth, M.J.; Glorioso, P.D.

    1995-09-01

    Current profile measurements were obtained during the autumnal breakdown of stratification at a site in the northern North Sea where the tidal currents were weak and the water depth moderate (120 m). During the two month deployment period a succession of storms passed over the site, including one extreme event. An ADCP in a sea bed frame, a conventional current meter string and some near surface current meters were amongst the instruments deployed. The ADCP data were of high quality although the frame moved during the severest storm because of wave effects at the sea bed. Its depth coverage was from 14 to 94 m above the sea bed in 8 m cells. Comparison with the current meter string showed that the ADCP`s speeds were 20% too high (reason unknown), and that its directions were rotated by 7{degree} (perhaps due to the arrangement of the bottom frame). The value of the ADCP data at tidal, inertial and low frequencies is demonstrated and of the top cell as a reference point for the estimation of near surface shear, which was confined at most to the top 25 m. Wind-driven currents measured at 2 m depth were 0.75% of the wind speed and in a direction 25{degree} to the right of the wind.

  19. Evolution of Interhemispheric Sea-Surface Temperature Contrast in the Tropical Atlantic During Termination I

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, J.

    2001-12-01

    Meteorological and oceanographic studies show that interannual and decadal variability in tropical Atlantic sea-surface temperature (SST) strongly influences the climates over northeast Brazil, sub-Saharan Africa, as well as the Central American and Caribbean regions. In this context, it is worthwhile to reconstruct spatial temperature patterns for the longer-term tropical Atlantic SST history. In this study, a high-resolution alkenone-derived SST record from the subtropical eastern South Atlantic (core GeoB 1023-5) is compared with one from the tropical western North Atlantic (core M35003-4). This comparison reveals synchronous SST variations between both near equatorial Atlantic regions during the Heinrich Event 1 (H1) (18-15.5 cal kyr B.P.), but dipole-like SST variations during the Younger Dryas (YD) (13-11.5 cal kyr B.P.). To assess the relationship of SST variations between both regions, we calculated SST differences between cores GeoB 1023-5 and M35003-4, and compared it with the coccolithophorid Florisphaera profunda abundance record from the equatorial eastern Atlantic (core RC24-08) as an indicator of variations in intensity of south-easterly trade winds [McIntyre and Molfino, 1996]. This comparison suggests that synchronous warming in both regions during the H1 can be attributed to a reduced northward heat transport from the warm equatorial Atlantic to the cold high-latitude North Atlantic linked to the slowdown of thermohaline circulation overturning during cold events under full glacial conditions. However, dipole-like SST variations during the YD is probably more associated with strengthened south-easterly trade winds, which led to a strong upwelling-related cooling in the eastern South Atlantic region and concurrently enhanced advection of warm subtropical South Atlantic waters to the tropical western Atlantic during that time. Accordingly, a coupled oceanic-atmospheric process created a warm pool in the tropical western Atlantic and thus a dipole

  20. Middle Pliocene sea surface temperature variability

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dowsett, H.J.; Chandler, M.A.; Cronin, T. M.; Dwyer, G.S.

    2005-01-01

    Estimates of sea surface temperature (SST) based upon foraminifer, diatom, and ostracod assemblages from ocean cores reveal a warm phase of the Pliocene between about 3.3 and 3.0 Ma. Pollen records and plant megafossils, although not as well dated, show evidence for a warmer climate at about the same time. Increased greenhouse forcing and altered ocean heat transport are the leading candidates for the underlying cause of Pliocene global warmth. Despite being a period of global warmth, this interval encompasses considerable variability. Two new SST reconstructions are presented that are designed to provide a climatological error bar for warm peak phases of the Pliocene and to document the spatial distribution and magnitude of SST variability within the mid-Pliocene warm period. These data suggest long-term stability of low-latitude SST and document greater variability in regions of maximum warming. Copyright 2005 by the American Geophysical Union.

  1. Surface current observatons--Beaufort Sea, 1972

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Barnes, Peter; Garlow, Richard

    1975-01-01

    Sediment transport via water and ice in the Beaufort Sea off northern Alaska is related to the movement of the surficial waters. As development proceeds along the north slope of alaska, a knowledge of the potential drift trajectories of water, ice, sediment and pollutants will be needed. In an attempt to better define the probable paths and rates of transport, 4200 surface drift cards were dropped during the U.S. Coast Guard WEBSEC cruise of August and September, 1972. The results of this release are the subject of this report. Because the data presented here will be used primarily by those interested in solving problems of transport, the emphasis has been placed on data presentation rather than a detailed analysis of the circulation. (Sinha-OEIS)

  2. Sea surface temperatures from VAS MSI data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bates, J. J.

    1984-01-01

    A procedure is developed for estimating sea surface temperatures from multispectral image data acquired from the VISSR atmospheric sounder on the geostationary GOES satellites. Theoretical regression equations for two and three infrared window channels are empirically tuned using clear field of view satellite radiances matched with reports of SST from NOAA fixed environmental buoys. The empirical regression equations are then used to produce daily regional analyses of SST. Monthly mean SST's for the western North Atlantic and the eastern equatorial Pacific during March and July 1982 were produced for use in the SST Intercomparison Workshop Series. Workshop results showed VAS SST's have a scatter of 0.8-1.0 C and a slight warm bias with respect to the other measurements of SST. The VAS SST's show no discernible bias in the region of El Chichon volcanic aerosol cloud.

  3. Synthesis and analysis of an alkenone-free biodiesel from Isochrysis sp.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Some marine microalgae, such as Isochrysis sp., produce high-melting (~70 ºC) lipids known as long-chain alkenones that detrimentally affect biodiesel fuel quality. A method has been developed for the production of an alkenone-free Isochrysis biodiesel. This material was prepared on sufficient scale...

  4. A multispectral method of determining sea surface temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shenk, W. E.

    1972-01-01

    A multispectral method for determining sea surface temperatures is discussed. The specifications of the equipment and the atmospheric conditions required for successful multispectral data acquisition are described. Examples of data obtained in the North Atlantic Ocean are presented. The differences between the actual sea surface temperatures and the equivalent blackbody temperatures as determined by a radiometer are plotted.

  5. Spectral sea surface reflectance of skylight.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiaodong; He, Shuangyan; Shabani, Afshin; Zhai, Peng-Wang; Du, Keping

    2017-02-20

    In examining the dependence of the sea surface reflectance of skylight ρs on sky conditions, wind speed, solar zenith angle, and viewing geometry, Mobley [Appl. Opt.38, 7442 (1999).10.1364/AO.38.007442] assumed ρs is independent of wavelength. Lee et al. [Opt. Express18, 26313 (2010).10.1364/OE.18.026313] showed experimentally that ρs does vary spectrally due to the spectral difference of sky radiance coming from different directions, which was ignored in Mobley's study. We simulated ρs from 350 nm to 1000 nm by explicitly accounting for spectral variations of skylight distribution and Fresnel reflectance. Furthermore, we separated sun glint from sky glint because of significant differences in magnitude, spectrum and polarization state between direct sun light and skylight light. The results confirm that spectral variation of ρs(λ) mainly arises from the spectral distribution of skylight and would vary from slightly blueish due to normal dispersion of the refractive index of water, to neutral and then to reddish with increasing wind speeds and decreasing solar zenith angles. Polarization moderately increases sky glint by 8 - 20% at 400 nm but only by 0 - 10% at 1000 nm. Sun glint is inherently reddish and becomes significant (>10% of sky glint) when the sun is at the zenith with moderate winds or when the sea is roughened (wind speeds > 10 m s-1) with solar zenith angles < 20°. We recommend a two-step procedure by first correcting the glint due to direct sun light, which is unpolarized, followed by removing the glint due to diffused and polarized skylight. The simulated ρs(λ) as a function of wind speeds, sun angles and aerosol concentrations for currently recommended sensor-sun geometry, i.e., zenith angle = 40° and azimuthal angle relative to the sun = 45°, is available upon request.

  6. Synchronous tropical South China Sea SST change and Greenland warming during deglaciation.

    PubMed

    Kienast, M; Steinke, S; Stattegger, K; Calvert, S E

    2001-03-16

    The tropical ocean plays a major role in global climate. It is therefore crucial to establish the precise phase between tropical and high-latitude climate variability during past abrupt climate events in order to gain insight into the mechanisms of global climate change. Here we present alkenone sea surface temperature (SST) records from the tropical South China Sea that show an abrupt temperature increase of at least 1 degrees C at the end of the last glacial period. Within the recognized dating uncertainties, this SST increase is synchronous with the Bølling warming observed at 14.6 thousand years ago in the Greenland Ice Sheet Project 2 ice core.

  7. Estimating the Ocean Flow Field from Combined Sea Surface Temperature and Sea Surface Height Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stammer, Detlef; Lindstrom, Eric (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    This project was part of a previous grant at MIT that was moved over to the Scripps Institution of Oceanography (SIO) together with the principal investigator. The final report provided here is concerned only with the work performed at SIO since January 2000. The primary focus of this project was the study of the three-dimensional, absolute and time-evolving general circulation of the global ocean from a combined analysis of remotely sensed fields of sea surface temperature (SST) and sea surface height (SSH). The synthesis of those two fields was performed with other relevant physical data, and appropriate dynamical ocean models with emphasis on constraining ocean general circulation models by a combination of both SST and SSH data. The central goal of the project was to improve our understanding and modeling of the relationship between the SST and its variability to internal ocean dynamics, and the overlying atmosphere, and to explore the relative roles of air-sea fluxes and internal ocean dynamics in establishing anomalies in SST on annual and longer time scales. An understanding of those problems will feed into the general discussion on how SST anomalies vary with time and the extend to which they interact with the atmosphere.

  8. Zanclean/Piacenzian transition on Cyprus (SE Mediterranean): calcareous nannofossil and Sea Surface Temperatures evidence of sapropel formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Athanasiou, Maria; Triantaphyllou, Maria; Bouloubassi, Ioanna; Dimiza, Margarita; Gogou, Alexandra; Klein, Vincent; Parinos, Constantine; Theodoroyu, George

    2016-04-01

    Quantitative analyses of calcareous nannofossils in the sediments of Pissouri South section on the island of Cyprus have produced a paleoceanographic record reflecting the paleoclimatic conditions during Zanclean/Piacenzian transition. According to the performed calcareous nannofossil biostratigraphy the studied section is correlated with MNN14/15 and MNN16 calcareous nannofossil biozones and is astronomically dated between 4.065 and 3.217 Ma. Intervals of increased organic carbon content along with the positive values of Florisphaera profunda, Helicosphaera sellii, Discoaster spp. and the subsequent increase of stratification S-index correspond to the sapropel deposition during periods of wetter climate and intense continental runoff especially from the river Nile. These layers are alternating with grey marly intervals, featured by the increased values of small placoliths of Reticulofenestra and Gephyrocapsa species, which are indicative of eutrophic conditions during intense surface waters mixing. Pissouri South section comprises a SSTs sequence using alkenone unsaturation index (Uk 37) providing with the first continuous record from SE Mediterranean covering the Zanclean/Piacenzian (Pliocene) transition (~ 4.1-3.2 Ma). Correlation of the total alkenone concentration to the calcareous nannofossil assemblage and especially representatives among Noelaerhabdaceae family revealed that Pseudoemiliania lacunosa probably had similar temperature sensitivity to that of Emiliania huxleyi, currently producing alkenones in present day oceans.Our data support the prevalence of a generally warm phase characterized by the absence of high-frequency climate variations in the southeastern Mediterranean during the Zanclean/Piacenzian (Early/Late Pliocene) transition.

  9. Regional and global significance of Pliocene sea surface temperatures from the Gulf of Cadiz (Site U1387) and the Mediterranean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tzanova, Alexandrina; Herbert, Timothy D.

    2015-10-01

    The Atlantic-Mediterranean water exchange is a component of global ocean circulation capable of influencing deep water formation in the North Atlantic, yet it is poorly constrained for the time period preceding the intensification of Northern Hemisphere Glaciation (NHG). The sea surface temperature (SST) gradient between the Atlantic and Mediterranean sides of the Strait of Gibraltar can shed light on the communication between the two basins. IODP Site U1387 in the Gulf of Cadiz provides the first alkenone based reconstruction of SST for the Atlantic waters that flowed into the Mediterranean Sea during the Pliocene. This site reflects open ocean North Atlantic subtropical temperature trends while the published SST records from the Rossello composite section (Sicily) in the Mediterranean reflect the addition of regional, continentally-influenced signals from Europe and Northern Africa. The Mediterranean, in particular, may be influenced by high latitude Northern hemisphere climatic evolution. In the modern regime the sites discussed in this work have comparable SST and uninhibited surface connection; however, change in local heat loss/gain over the Mediterranean due to variability in latent heat loss and obstructed connection can result in a gradient between the sites in the Pliocene. The Pliocene surface waters of the Gulf of Cadiz and the Mediterranean Sea were as much as 7 °C warmer than the modern average of ~ 19-20 °C. The reconstructed temperatures show a ~ 1 °C cooling for the Atlantic side of the Strait of Gibraltar from ~ 6 Ma to ~ 2.7 Ma and increasingly cooler glacials. The long-term SST record from Site U1387 provides a basis for future studies into the hydrological balance of the Mediterranean and the temperature component of Mediterranean Outflow Water (MOW) density. We compared SST on either side of Gibraltar between ~ 3.4-2.7 Ma and found that between ~ 2.7 and ~ 3.1 Ma the Mediterranean and Atlantic surface waters show comparable average

  10. Stratospheric Impact of Varying Sea Surface Temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newman, Paul A.; Nash, Eric R.; Nielsen, Jon E.; Waugh, Darryn; Pawson, Steven

    2004-01-01

    The Finite-Volume General Circulation Model (FVGCM) has been run in 50 year simulations with the: 1) 1949-1999 Hadley Centre sea surface temperatures (SST), and 2) a fixed annual cycle of SSTs. In this presentation we first show that the 1949-1999 FVGCM simulation produces a very credible stratosphere in comparison to an NCEP/NCAR reanalysis climatology. In particular, the northern hemisphere has numerous major and minor stratospheric warming, while the southern hemisphere has only a few over the 50-year simulation. During the northern hemisphere winter, temperatures are both warmer in the lower stratosphere and the polar vortex is weaker than is found in the mid-winter southern hemisphere. Mean temperature differences in the lower stratosphere are shown to be small (less than 2 K), and planetary wave forcing is found to be very consistent with the climatology. We then will show the differences between our varying SST simulation and the fixed SST simulation in both the dynamics and in two parameterized trace gases (ozone and methane). In general, differences are found to be small, with subtle changes in planetary wave forcing that lead to reduced temperatures in the SH and increased temperatures in the NH.

  11. Assessment of Plio-Pleistocene Sea Surface Temperature Evolution Across Ocean Basins, Hemispheres, and Latitudes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peterson, L.; Lawrence, K. T.; Mauriello, H.; Wilson, J.; Holte, L.

    2015-12-01

    New sea surface temperature (SST) records from the southern Pacific and southern Atlantic Oceans allow assessment of similarities and differences in climate evolution across ocean basins, hemispheres, and latitudes over the last 5 million years. Our high-resolution, alkenone-derived SST records from ODP Sites 1088 (South Atlantic, 41°S) and 1125 (South Pacific, 42°S) share strong structural similarities. When compared with SST records from the mid-latitudes of the northern hemisphere, these records provide compelling evidence for broadly hemispherically symmetrical open-ocean temperature evolution in both ocean basins as tropical warm pools contracted over the Plio-Pleistocene. This symmetry in temperature evolution occurs despite strong asymmetries in the development of the cryosphere over this interval, which was marked by extensive northern hemisphere ice sheet growth. Parallel SST evolution across ocean basins and hemispheres suggests that on longterm (>105 yr) timescales, many regions of the world ocean are more sensitive to the global energy budget than to local or regional climate dynamics, although important exceptions include coastal upwelling zone SSTs, high latitude SSTs, and benthic δ18O. Our analysis further reveals that throughout the last 5 Ma, temperature evolution in the extra-tropical Pacific of both hemispheres is very similar to the evolution of SST in the eastern equatorial Pacific upwelling zone, revealing tight coupling between the growth of meridional and equatorial Pacific zonal temperature gradients over this interval as both the extra-tropics and the eastern equatorial Pacific cold tongue underwent cooling. Finally, while long term temperature evolution is broadly consistent across latitudes and ocean basins throughout the entire Plio-Pleistocene, we see evidence that climate coupling on orbital timescales strengthened significantly at 2.7 Ma, at which point obliquity-band coherence emerges among diverse SST records. We attribute this

  12. Comparisons between Patterns of Sea-Surface Temperature and Sub-Surface Parameters in the Western Tasman Sea.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-07-01

    EXTERNAL) No. 5/82 COMPARISONS BETWEEN PATTERNS OF SEA -SURFACE TEMPERATURE AND SUB-SURFACE PARAMETERS IN THE WESTERN TASMAN SEA (U) BY DTIC P. J. Ep~~3...PARAMETERS IN THE WESTERN TASMAN SEA (U) P.J.NULHARNAccession For P.J MLHERNNTIS GRA&I L and DTIC TAB L.J. HAMILTON Unannou ed QJustification...emperature, temperature at 250m, mixed-layer depth and dynamic height f the western Tasman Sea . Data are from ship cruises and aerial su a. It is shown by

  13. An alternative to reduction of surface pressure to sea level

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deardorff, J. W.

    1982-01-01

    The pitfalls of the present method of reducing surface pressure to sea level are reviewed, and an alternative, adjusted pressure, P, is proposed. P is obtained from solution of a Poisson equation over a continental region, using the simplest boundary condition along the perimeter or coastline where P equals the sea level pressure. The use of P would avoid the empiricisms and disadvantages of pressure reduction to sea level, and would produce surface pressure charts which depict the true geostrophic wind at the surface.

  14. Sea-ice and surface water circulation, Alaskan continental shelf

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wright, F. F.; Sharma, G. D.; Burns, J. J. (Principal Investigator)

    1973-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. Over 1500 water samples from surface and from standard hydrographic depths were collected during June and July 1973 from Bering Sea and Gulf of Alaska. The measurement of temperature, salinity, and productivity indicated that various distinct water masses cover the Bering Sea Shelf. The suspended load in surface waters will be correlated with the ERTS-1 imagery as it becomes available to delineate the surface water circulation. The movement of ice floes in the Bering Strait and Bering Sea indicated that movement of ice varies considerably and may depend on wind stress as well as ocean currents.

  15. The distribution of iodide at the sea surface.

    PubMed

    Chance, Rosie; Baker, Alex R; Carpenter, Lucy; Jickells, Tim D

    2014-08-01

    Recent studies have highlighted the impact of sea surface iodide concentrations on the deposition of ozone to the sea surface and the sea to air flux of reactive iodine. The use of models to predict this flux demands accurate, spatially distributed sea surface iodide concentrations, but to date, the observational data required to support this is sparse and mostly arises from independent studies conducted on small geographical and temporal scales. We have compiled the available measurements of sea surface iodide to produce a data set spanning latitudes from 69°S to 66°N, which reveals a coherent, large scale distribution pattern, with highest concentrations observed in tropical waters. Relationships between iodide concentration and more readily available parameters (chlorophyll, nitrate, sea surface temperature, salinity, mixed layer depth) are evaluated as tools to predict iodide concentration. Of the variables tested, sea surface temperature is the strongest predictor of iodide concentration. Nitrate was also strongly inversely associated with iodide concentration, but chlorophyll-a was not.

  16. Haptophyte DNA and alkenone signatures during a spring algal bloom event in Lake George, ND, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Theroux, S.; Huang, Y.; Amaral-Zettler, L.

    2012-12-01

    Lacustrine alkenone records have potential to be valuable sedimentary archives of continental paleotemperature. However, the use of the Uk37 paleotemperature proxy in lake environments is constrained by the genetic diversity of lake-dwelling, alkenone-producing haptophytes. Previous research in Lake George, ND revealed the presence of two alkenone-producing haptophyte species (Hap-A and Hap-B) whose individual contributions to the alkenone sediment record are unknown. To gauge the seasonal abundance of these multiple haptophyte species we used a high-throughput DNA sequencing approach. We collected bi-weekly water samples at three different depths in the photic zone (0m, 5m, 10m) from late April through bloom termination in early August. Using 18S rRNA gene sequences to determine species identity, we compared water sample microbial communities with water sample alkenone signatures. Additionally, we cultivated Lake George haptophyte isolates in pure and mixed cultures to define their Uk37 temperature calibrations. During the course of the seasonal cycle, total concentrations of alkenones demonstrated a distinct peak approximately five weeks after their first appearance in the water column. The peak bloom water samples were characterized by abundant tetraunsaturated (C37:4) alkenones in resemblance to the Lake George sediment records. As the bloom declined, the C37:4 alkenones declined in abundance. This variation in water column alkenone signature was reflected in the relative abundance of Hap-A and Hap-B, with Hap-B dominating during bloom peak. Our culture work determined that these multiple haptophyte isolates required individual Uk37 calibrations that differ from the Lake George in situ Uk37 calibration. Lake George sediment alkenone records are therefore composites of multiple, co-occurring haptophyte temperature records. This study is the first next-generation DNA sequencing effort to analyze the microbial community during a haptophyte bloom, and together with

  17. Improving the Bulk Formula for Sea-Surface Fluxes

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-03-14

    weak SST heterogeneity. J. Geophys. Res, 115, D11103,doi:10.1029/2009JD013161. Vickers D and L. Mahrt 2010: Sea-surface roughness lengths in the midlatitude coastal zone. Quart. J. Roy. Meterol. Soc. 136, 1089 -1093.

  18. Estimation of Sea Surface Wave Spectra Using Acoustic Tomography.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-09-01

    develops a new technique for estimating quasi- homogeneous and quasi-stationary sea surface wave frequency-direction spectra using acoustic tomog...problems for the homogeneous and quasi- homogeneous frequency-direction spectrum are introduced. The theory is ap- plied tosynthetic data which simulate...thesis introduces a technique that estimates the quasi-stationary and quasi- homogeneous sea surface wave frequency-direction spectrum from the spectra of

  19. Sea surface temperature of the coastal zones of France

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deschamps, P. Y.; Crepon, M.; Monget, J. M.; Verger, F. (Principal Investigator); Frouin, R.; Cassanet, J.; Wald, L.

    1980-01-01

    The various thermal gradients in the coastal zones of France were mapped with regard to natural phenomena and man made thermal effluents. The mesoscale thermal features of the English Channel, the Bay of Biscay, and the northwestern Mediterranean Sea were also studied. The evolution of the thermal gradients generated by the main estuaries of the French coastal zones was investigated along with the modeling of diurnal heating of the sea surface and its influence on the oceanic surface layers.

  20. Observation of Sea Ice Surface Thermal States Under Cloud Cover

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nghiem, S. V.; Perovich, D. K.; Gow, A. J.; Kwok, R.; Barber, D. G.; Comiso, J. C.; Zukor, Dorothy J. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Clouds interfere with the distribution of short-wave and long-wave radiations over sea ice, and thereby strongly affect the surface energy balance in polar regions. To evaluate the overall effects of clouds on climatic feedback processes in the atmosphere-ice-ocean system, the challenge is to observe sea ice surface thermal states under both clear sky and cloudy conditions. From laboratory experiments, we show that C-band radar (transparent to clouds) backscatter is very sensitive to the surface temperature of first-year sea ice. The effect of sea ice surface temperature on the magnitude of backscatter change depends on the thermal regimes of sea ice thermodynamic states. For the temperature range above the mirabilite (Na2SO4.10H20) crystallization point (-8.2 C), C-band data show sea ice backscatter changes by 8-10 dB for incident angles from 20 to 35 deg at both horizontal and vertical polarizations. For temperatures below the mirabilite point but above the crystallization point of MgCl2.8H2O (-18.0 C), relatively strong backwater changes between 4-6 dB are observed. These backscatter changes correspond to approximately 8 C change in temperature for both cases. The backscattering mechanism is related to the temperature which determines the thermodynamic distribution of brine volume in the sea ice surface layer. The backscatter is positively correlated to temperature and the process is reversible with thermodynamic variations such as diurnal insolation effects. From two different dates in May 1993 with clear and overcast conditions determined by the Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR), concurrent Earth Resources Satellite 1 (ERS-1) C-band ice observed with increases in backscatter over first-year sea ice, and verified by increases in in-situ sea ice surface temperatures measured at the Collaborative-Interdisciplinary Cryosphere Experiment (C-ICE) site.

  1. Results from IODP Leg 306: Long-term cooling trend in North Atlantic sea-surface temperatures during the last 5 Ma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naafs, David; Hefter, Jens; Stein, Ruediger; Haug, Gerald

    2010-05-01

    In the early Pliocene global surface temperatures were several degrees warmer than today and ice sheets in the Northern Hemisphere had a limited extent [e.g., Haywood et al., 2005; Zachos et al., 2001]. This changed during the intensification of Northern Hemisphere glaciation (INHG) between 3.4 and 2.5 Ma (with a major step around 2.7 Ma), when global climate cooled and ice sheets in the Northern Hemisphere became more extensive [e.g., Zachos et al., 2001]. Here we present results from the first orbitally resolved (~ 4 ka resolution) record of Uk'37 based sea-surface temperature (SST) in the North Atlantic spanning the last 5 Ma. We used samples from the recently drilled IODP Site U1313, which is located in the North Atlantic at 41 oN and is a re-drill of DSDP Site 607. Our results show that the long-term cooling of SST in the North Atlantic began in the Early Pliocene around 4.1 Ma, which is earlier than previously thought. During the Pleistocene SST continued to cool and at the beginning of the mid-Pleistocene transition (MIS 40) glacial SST show a sudden drop to temperatures comparable to the LGM. At the same time the C37:4 alkenone, an indicator for arctic water masses [e.g., McClymont et al., 2008], became more abundant. We relate this to the influence of Arctic waters reaching far into the North Atlantic as the Arctic Front moved south during the peak glacial conditions of the Middle to Late Pleistocene. References: Haywood, A. M., P. Dekens, A. C. Ravelo, and M. Williams (2005), Warmer tropics during the mid-Pliocene? Evidence from alkenone paleothermometry and a fully coupled ocean-atmosphere GCM, Geochem. Geophys. Geosyst., 6(3), doi:10.1029/2004GC000799. McClymont, E. L., A. Rosell-Melé, G. H. Haug, and J. M. Lloyd (2008), Expansion of subarctic water masses in the North Atlantic and Pacific oceans and implications for mid-Pleistocene ice sheet growth, Paleoceanography, 23. Zachos, J., M. Pagani, L. Sloan, E. Thomas, and K. Billups (2001), Trends

  2. Impact of sea surface temperature on satellite retrieval of sea surface salinity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Xuchen; Zhu, Qiankun; He, Xianqiang; Chen, Peng; Wang, Difeng; Hao, Zengzhou; Huang, Haiqing

    2016-10-01

    Currently, global sea surface salinity (SSS) can be retrieved by the satellite microwave radiometer onboard the satellite, such as the Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity(SMOS) and the Aqurius. SMOS is an Earth Explorer Opportunity Mission from the European Space Agency(ESA). It was launched at a sun-synchronous orbit in 2009 and one of the payloads is called MIRAS(Microwave Imaging Radiometer using Aperture Synthesis), which is the first interferometric microwave radiometer designed for observing SSS at L-band(1.41 GHz).The foundation of the salinity retrieval by microwave radiometer is that the sea surface radiance at L-band has the most suitable sensitivity with the variation of the salinity. It is well known that the sensitivity of brightness temperatures(TB) to SSS depends on the sea surface temperature (SST), but the quantitative impact of the SST on the satellite retrieval of the SSS is still poorly known. In this study, we investigate the impact of the SST on the accuracy of salinity retrieval from the SMOS. First of all, The dielectric constant model proposed by Klein and Swift has been used to estimate the vertically and horizontally polarized brightness temperatures(TV and TH) of a smooth sea water surface at L-band and derive the derivatives of TV and TH as a function of SSS to show the relative sensitivity at 45° incident angle. Then, we use the GAM(generalized additive model) method to evaluate the association between the satellite-measured brightness temperature and in-situ SSS at different SST. Moreover, the satellite-derived SSS from the SMOS is validated using the ARGO data to assess the RMSE(root mean squared error). We compare the SMOS SSS and ARGO SSS over two regions of Pacific ocean far from land and ice under different SST. The RMSE of retrieved SSS at different SST have been estimated. Our results showed that SST is one of the most significant factors affecting the accuracy of SSS retrieval. The satellite-measured brightness temperature has a

  3. Satellite-derived sea surface height and sea surface wind data fusion for spilled oil tracking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozai, Katsutoshi

    2003-12-01

    An attempt is made to estimate the trajectory of the spilled oil from the sunken tanker Nakhodka occurred on January 2, 1997 in the Japan Sea by fusing two microwave sensor data, namely ERS-2 altimeter and ADEOS/NSCAT scatterometer data. In this study 'fusion' is defined as the method of more reliable prediction for the trajectory of spilled oil than before. Geostrophic current vectors are derived from ERS-2 altimeter and wind-induced drift vectors are derived from ADEOS/NSCAT scatterometer data These two different satellite-derived vectors are 'fused' together in the surface current model to estimate and evaluate the trajectory of spilled oil from the sunken tanker Nakhodka. The distribution of component of spill vector is mostly accounted for by the distribution of geostrophic velocity component during the study period with some discrepancies during March, 1997.

  4. The impact of land and sea surface variations on the Delaware sea breeze at local scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hughes, Christopher P.

    The summertime climate of coastal Delaware is greatly influenced by the intensity, frequency, and location of the local sea breeze circulation. Sea breeze induced changes in temperature, humidity, wind speed, and precipitation influence many aspects of Delaware's economy by affecting tourism, farming, air pollution density, energy usage, and the strength, and persistence of Delaware's wind resource. The sea breeze front can develop offshore or along the coastline and often creates a near surface thermal gradient in excess of 5°C. The purpose of this dissertation is to investigate the dynamics of the Delaware sea breeze with a focus on the immediate coastline using observed and modeled components, both at high resolutions (~200m). The Weather Research and Forecasting model (version 3.5) was employed over southern Delaware with 5 domains (4 levels of nesting), with resolutions ranging from 18km to 222m, for June 2013 to investigate the sensitivity of the sea breeze to land and sea surface variations. The land surface was modified in the model to improve the resolution, which led to the addition of land surface along the coastline and accounted for recent urban development. Nine-day composites of satellite sea surface temperatures were ingested into the model and an in-house SST forcing dataset was developed to account for spatial SST variation within the inland bays. Simulations, which include the modified land surface, introduce a distinct secondary atmospheric circulation across the coastline of Rehoboth Bay when synoptic offshore wind flow is weak. Model runs using high spatial- and temporal-resolution satellite sea surface temperatures over the ocean indicate that the sea breeze landfall time is sensitive to the SST when the circulation develops offshore. During the summer of 2013 a field campaign was conducted in the coastal locations of Rehoboth Beach, DE and Cape Henlopen, DE. At each location, a series of eleven small, autonomous thermo-sensors (i

  5. Cooling Mediterranean Sea surface temperatures during the Late Miocene provide a climate context for evolutionary transitions in Africa and Eurasia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tzanova, Alexandrina; Herbert, Timothy D.; Peterson, Laura

    2015-06-01

    In the Late Miocene, grasslands proliferated, succulent plants diversified in the mid-latitudes, and the desert-like conditions appeared in the Sahara. Despite this major environmental change on land, the coeval deep-sea oxygen isotope record does not provide evidence for significant high latitude cooling or continental ice growth, making it difficult to relate widespread terrestrial environmental change to global climatic changes. A U37K‧ -derived sea surface temperature (SST) reconstruction spanning 13 to 6 Ma from uplifted hemipelagic sediments in Northern Italy provides the first continuous mid-latitude temperature record with which to compare the evolution of aridity and biotic events at similar latitudes in Northern Africa and Pakistan. Between 13 and 8.8 Ma, Mediterranean SST lay near the upper limit of the alkenone temperature proxy (∼28 °C), exceeding modern SST at the site by as much as 10 °C. Throughout the record, sapropel layers correspond to local SST maxima, suggesting that Late Miocene hydrological conditions in the Mediterranean responded to insolation forcing via mechanisms similar to those documented for the Plio-Pleistocene. Mediterranean SST cooled rapidly beginning at ∼8 Ma, with an episode of intense cooling to ∼19 °C between 7.2 Ma and 6.6 Ma, followed by a rebound to ∼25 °C preceding the Messinian Salinity Crisis at 5.9 Ma. These observations establish, for the first time, a direct relationship between increasing aridity in the Northern hemisphere mid-latitudes and significant cooling. Evidently, this cooling was not accompanied by significant growth in continental ice volume. The extreme warmth and subsequent cooling of the Mediterranean Sea are not well-represented in current Late Miocene climate models, which our results suggest underestimate regional warmth prior to the Late Miocene cooling. Evidence of secular cooling during the Late Miocene gives new support to the much-debated link between a possible decline in

  6. Fine-resolution simulation of surface current and sea ice in the Arctic Mediterranean Seas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xiying; Zhang, Xuehong; Yu, Rucong; Liu, Hailong; Li, Wei

    2007-04-01

    A fine-resolution model is developed for ocean circulation simulation in the National Key Laboratory of Numerical Modeling for Atmospheric Sciences and Geophysical Fluid Dynamics (LASG), Chinese Academy of Sciences, and is applied to simulate surface current and sea ice variations in the Arctic Mediterranean Seas. A dynamic sea ice model in elastic-viscous-plastic rheology and a thermodynamic sea ice model are employed. A 200-year simulation is performed and a dimatological average of a 10-year period (141st 150th) is presented with focus on sea ice concentration and surface current variations in the Arctic Mediterranean Seas. The model is able to simulate well the East Greenland Current, Beaufort Gyre and the Transpolar Drift, but the simulated West Spitsbergen Current is small and weak. In the March climatology, the sea ice coverage can be simulated well except for a bit more ice in east of Spitsbergen Island. The result is also good for the September scenario except for less ice concentration east of Greenland and greater ice concentration near the ice margin. The extra ice east of Spitsbergen Island is caused by sea ice current convergence forced by atmospheric wind stress.

  7. Paleogene biomarker records from the central Arctic Ocean (Integrated Ocean Drilling Program Expedition 302): Organic carbon sources, anoxia, and sea surface temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weller, Petra; Stein, Ruediger

    2008-03-01

    During Integrated Ocean Drilling Program Expedition 302 (Arctic Coring Expedition (ACEX)) a more than 200 m thick sequence of Paleogene organic carbon (OC)-rich (black shale type) sediments was drilled. Here we present new biomarker data determined in ACEX sediment samples to decipher processes controlling OC accumulation and their paleoenvironmental significance during periods of Paleogene global warmth and proposed increased freshwater discharge in the early Cenozoic. Specific source-related biomarkers including n-alkanes, fatty acids, isoprenoids, carotenoids, hopanes/hopenes, hopanoic acids, aromatic terpenoids, and long-chain alkenones show a high variability of components, derived from marine and terrestrial origin. The distribution of hopanoic acid isomers is dominated by compounds with the biological 17β(H), 21β(H) configuration indicating a low level of maturity. On the basis of the biomarker data the terrestrial OC supply was significantly enriched during the late Paleocene and part of the earliest Eocene, whereas increased aquatic contributions and euxinic conditions of variable intensity were determined for the Paleocene-Eocene thermal maximum and Eocene thermal maximum 2 events as well as the middle Eocene time interval. Furthermore, samples from the middle Eocene are characterized by the occurrence of long-chain alkenones, high proportions of lycopane, and high ratios (>0.6) of (n-C35 + lycopane)/n-C31. The occurrence of C37-alkenenones, which were first determined toward the end of the Azolla freshwater event, indicates that the OC becomes more marine in origin during the middle Eocene. Preliminary U37K'-based sea surface temperature (SST) values display a long-term temperature decrease of about 15°C during the time interval 49-44.5 Ma (25° to 10°C), coinciding with the global benthic δ18O cooling trend after the early Eocene climatic optimum. At about 46 Ma, parallel with onset of ice-rafted debris, SST (interpreted as summer temperatures

  8. Sea surface temperatures from the southern Benguela region from the Pliocene and Pleistocene: tracking Agulhas Current input into the SE Atlantic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrick, B. F.; McClymont, E.; Felder, S.; Lloyd, J. M.; Leng, M. J.

    2011-12-01

    The Pliocene and-Pleistocene epochs provide a way to understand the effect of past climate changes on key ocean currents. Here, we show results from ODP Site1087 (31.28'S, 15.19'E, 1374m water depth) to investigate changes in ocean circulation over the period of the mid-Pliocene warm period 3.0-3.5 Ma and compare these to the time of the 100 kyr Pleistocene glacial cycles. ODP 1087 is located in the South-eastern Atlantic Ocean, outside of the Benguela upwelling region; reconstructing the temperature history of the site will therefore provide an important data set from a part of the ocean that has few orbital-scale and continuous Pliocene temperature reconstructions. ODP 1087 can be used to investigate the history of the heat and salt transfer to the Atlantic Ocean from the Indian Ocean via the Agulhas Retroflection, which plays an important part in the global thermohaline circulation (Lutjeharms, 2007). Climate models and reconstructions for the most recent glacial-interglacial cycles have shown that changes to the strength of the heat transfer may cause major climatic changes and may play a role in transitions from glacial to interglacial events (Knorr & Lohmann, 2003). It is unknown how this transfer reacted to generally warmer global temperatures during the mid-Pliocene. Because the mid-Pliocene is seen as a model for future climate change it might provide a model for ocean circulations in a warmer world. Our approach is to apply several organic geochemistry proxies and foraminiferal analyses to reconstruct the history of ODP 1087. The UK37' index records differences in the unsaturated bonds in the C37 alkenones to reconstruct sea surface temperatures (Brassell et al., 1986). We present SSTs generated for the mid-Pliocene Warm period with a resolution of 4000 years. We compare this data to the time of the 100 kyr glacial cycles during the late Pleistocene. Even though ODP 1087 is located outside the Benguela upwelling system, it has lower Pliocene temperatures

  9. Remote sensing of the sea surface by millimeterwave SAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Essen, H.; Fuchs, H.-H.; Pagels, A.

    2006-09-01

    On several occasions the sea surface has been measured with the mmW radar MEMPHIS in SAR geometry. This research was mainly aimed to investigate the ability of SAR for imaging of disturbances of the water surface at mm-wave radar bands and to gather data on the statistical properties of sea clutter. It can be suspected, that the probability density functions for the reflectivity of sea clutter is as well dependent on the radar wavelength as on resolution, as different scattering processes may significantly contribute. While most of the available millimeterwave data have been collected with a resolution of 75 cm, improvements of the MEMPHIS radar now allow a resolution of about 20 cm. The paper describes the measurement set-up, the evaluation methods and discusses the influence of resolution and radar frequency on sea clutter characteristics as found during the experiments.

  10. Ring discretization of the wave spectrum for sea surface simulation.

    PubMed

    Varela, Jose Miguel; Guedes Soares, Carlos

    2014-01-01

    Although interactive computer-generated ocean scenes based on real wave spectra are impressively realistic, they usually don't exhibit the original sea state's statistical properties. This might be unacceptable for applications in which the sea surface height field's correctness is important, such as 3D ship simulators for training professionals. Researchers have developed a discretization of the wave spectrum that obtains a sea state statistically more equivalent to the original. This method can also improve the scene's visual realism and real-time performance.

  11. The PRISM palaeoclimate reconstruction and Pliocene sea-surface temperature

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dowsett, H.J.; ,

    2007-01-01

    In this paper, I present a summary of the Pliocene Research, Interpretation and Synoptic Mapping (PRISM) palaeoenvironmental reconstruction, with emphasis on its historical development and range of boundary condition datasets. Sea-surface temperature (SST), sea level, sea ice, land cover (vegetation and ice) and topography are discussed as well as many of the assumptions required to create an integrated global-scale reconstruction. New multiproxy research shows good general agreement on the magnitude of mid-Pliocene SST warming. Future directions, including maximum and minimum SST analyses and deep ocean temperature estimates aimed at a full three-dimensional reconstruction, are presented. ?? The Micropalaeontological Society 2007.

  12. An atlas of monthly mean distributions of GEOSAT sea surface height, SSMI surface wind speed, AVHRR/2 sea surface temperature, and ECMWF surface wind components during 1988

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Halpern, D.; Zlotnicki, V.; Newman, J.; Brown, O.; Wentz, F.

    1991-01-01

    Monthly mean global distributions for 1988 are presented with a common color scale and geographical map. Distributions are included for sea surface height variation estimated from GEOSAT; surface wind speed estimated from the Special Sensor Microwave Imager on the Defense Meteorological Satellite Program spacecraft; sea surface temperature estimated from the Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer on NOAA spacecrafts; and the Cartesian components of the 10m height wind vector computed by the European Center for Medium Range Weather Forecasting. Charts of monthly mean value, sampling distribution, and standard deviation value are displayed. Annual mean distributions are displayed.

  13. Changes in Sea Surface Temperature and North Atlantic Hurricane Activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nazari, R.; Mahani, S.; Khanbilvardi, R.

    2006-05-01

    People of United States from Maine to Texas in the years 1995 to 2005 experienced the highest level of North Atlantic hurricane activity in the reliable collected data and reports in compare with the generally low activity of the previous two decays (1970 to 1994). The greater activity might be a consequence of instantaneous changes in North Atlantic Sea Surface Temperature (SST) and air temperature. This thermal energy of increased Sea Surface Temperature (warm water) is known as tropical cyclone heat potential (TCHP) partly powers a hurricane and has been called hurricane fuel. In primary steps of this research we are trying to examine the association of variation of Sea Surface Temperature (SST), Sea Surface Height (SSH) and air temperature in the past decades with changes in hurricane number, duration and intensity. Preliminary analysis demonstrated that there is correlation between global warming and the occurrence of hurricanes because of the anticipated enhancement of energy available to the storms due to higher sea surface temperatures. The goal is to characterize and specify significant factors on tropical storms to improve the capability of predicting a hurricane and its damages to human lives and the economy. This information can be used to advise strategies for warning and also minimizing the magnitude of hurricane destruction, damages, and life losses.

  14. Land- and sea-surface impacts on local coastal breezes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veron, D. E.; Hughes, C.; Gilchrist, J.; Lodise, J.; Goldman, W.

    2014-12-01

    The state of Delaware has seen significant increases in population along the coastline in the past three decades. With this increase in population have come changes to the land surface, as forest and farmland has been converted to residential and commercial purposes, causing changes in the surface roughness, temperature, and land-atmosphere fluxes. There is also a semi-permanent upwelling center in the spring and summer outside the Delaware Bay mouth that significantly changes the structure of the sea surface temperature both inside and outside the Bay. Through a series of high resolution modeling and observational studies, we have determined that in cases of strong synoptic forcing, the impact of the land-surface on the boundary layer properties can be advected offshore, creating a false coastline and modifying the location and timing of the sea breeze circulation. In cases of weak synoptic forcing, the influence of the upwelling and the tidal circulation of the Delaware Bay waters can greatly change the location, strength, and penetration of the sea breeze. Understanding the importance of local variability in the surface-atmosphere interactions on the sea breeze can lead to improved prediction of sea breeze onset, penetration, and duration which is important for monitoring air quality and developing offshore wind power production.

  15. Satellite-derived sea surface height and sea surface wind data fusion for spilled oil tracking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozai, K.

    Data fusion is defined as a framework with the purpose of obtaining information of 'greater quality'. Within the framework tools are expressed for the alliance of data originating from different sources. The exact definition of 'greater quality' is stated in this context as more reliable prediction for the trajectory of spilled oil from two different microwave sensor data, namely ERS-2 altimeter and ADEOS/NSCAT scatterometer data. An example is presented in the case of trajectory of bow section and associated oil upwelling from the sunken tanker Nakhodka occurred from January to June in 1997 in Japan Sea. Spill distance is defined as a horizontal distance from the oil upwelling point to the location of sunken Nakhodka and a spill direction is defined as an angle made by the geographic north and the line corresponding to the spill distance. Geostrophic current vectors are derived from ERS-2 altimeter and wind-induced current vectors are derived from ADEOS/NSCAT scatterometer data. These two different satellite-derived vectors are 'fused' together in the surface current model to estimate and evaluate the trajectory of bow section and associated oil upwelling from the sunken tanker Nakhodka. Result of comparison between the estimated and the observed trajectory of bow section indicates that the estimated trajectory is agreed well with the observed one in the first half of drift period, while in the latter half of drift period the estimated trajectory is not agreed well with the observed one, which may be attributable to changes of wind directions within 24 hours from the satellite overpasses. Moreover the comparison between spill vector and 'fused' surface current vector shows the good correspondence in terms of direction when in situ wind accelerates the surface current vector, while the comparison between the twos shows the bad correspondence when the temporal changes of wind vector occurs.

  16. The interannual oscillation of sea surface temperature in the South China Sea

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou Faxiu; Yu Shenyu; Fu Gang; Wang Dongxiao

    1994-12-31

    The South China Sea (SCS) is located in the area of the Asia monsoons and is a quasi-closed deep basin near the tropical western Pacific. The sea surface temperature anomalies (SSTA) in the South China Sea have an influence on the precipitation in flood season in the South China. The anomalies of the Asia monsoons have great effect on SST in the SCS. This paper aims at finding the features of the interannual oscillation of SST and discussing the mechanism of the SST oscillation in the SCS.

  17. Interannual Variability of Sea Surface Height over the Black Sea: Relation to Climatic Patterns

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-01-01

    eastern and western basins, reflecting variations in the corresponding gyres. A joint examination of SSH and sea surface temperature (SST) indicates...available altimeter data. SSH variability reveals distinct maxima in the eastern and western basins, reflecting variations in the corresponding gyres. A...change resulted from variations in thermocline or mixed layer depth. One important factor is to determine whether sea level varia- tions are mainly

  18. Long-term changes in sea surface temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Parker, D.E.

    1994-12-31

    Historical observations of sea surface temperature since 1856 have been improved by applying corrections to compensate for the predominant use of uninsulated or partly insulated buckets until the Second World War. There are large gaps in coverage in the late nineteenth century and around the two world wars, but a range of statistical techniques suggest that these gaps do not severely prejudice estimates of global and regional climatic change. Nonetheless, to improve the analysis on smaller scales, many unused historical data are to be digitized and incorporated. For recent years, satellite-based sea surface temperatures have improved the coverage, after adjustments for their biases relative to in situ data. An initial version of a nominally globally complete sea ice and interpolated sea surface temperature data set, beginning in 1871, has been created for use in numerical simulations of recent climate. Long time series of corrected regional, hemispheric, and global sea surface temperatures are mostly consistent with corresponding night marine air temperature series, and confirm the regionally specific climatic changes portrayed in the Scientific Assessments of the intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change. The observations also show an El Nino-like oscillation on bidecadal and longer time scales.

  19. Calving seismicity from iceberg-sea surface interactions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bartholomaus, T.C.; Larsen, C.F.; O'Neel, S.; West, M.E.

    2012-01-01

    Iceberg calving is known to release substantial seismic energy, but little is known about the specific mechanisms that produce calving icequakes. At Yahtse Glacier, a tidewater glacier on the Gulf of Alaska, we draw upon a local network of seismometers and focus on 80 hours of concurrent, direct observation of the terminus to show that calving is the dominant source of seismicity. To elucidate seismogenic mechanisms, we synchronized video and seismograms to reveal that the majority of seismic energy is produced during iceberg interactions with the sea surface. Icequake peak amplitudes coincide with the emergence of high velocity jets of water and ice from the fjord after the complete submergence of falling icebergs below sea level. These icequakes have dominant frequencies between 1 and 3 Hz. Detachment of an iceberg from the terminus produces comparatively weak seismic waves at frequencies between 5 and 20 Hz. Our observations allow us to suggest that the most powerful sources of calving icequakes at Yahtse Glacier include iceberg-sea surface impact, deceleration under the influence of drag and buoyancy, and cavitation. Numerical simulations of seismogenesis during iceberg-sea surface interactions support our observational evidence. Our new understanding of iceberg-sea surface interactions allows us to reattribute the sources of calving seismicity identified in earlier studies and offer guidance for the future use of seismology in monitoring iceberg calving.

  20. Sea ice concentration temporal variability over the Weddell Sea and its relationship with tropical sea surface temperature

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Barreira, S.; Compagnucci, R.

    2007-01-01

    Principal Components Analysis (PCA) in S-Mode (correlation between temporal series) was performed on sea ice monthly anomalies, in order to investigate which are the main temporal patterns, where are the homogenous areas located and how are they related to the sea surface temperature (SST). This analysis provides 9 patterns (4 in the Amundsen and Bellingshausen Seas and 5 in the Weddell Sea) that represent the most important temporal features that dominated sea ice concentration anomalies (SICA) variability in the Weddell, Amundsen and Bellingshausen Seas over the 1979-2000 period. Monthly Polar Gridded Sea Ice Concentrations data set derived from satellite information generated by NASA Team algorithm and acquired from the National Snow and Ice Data Center (NSIDC) were used. Monthly means SST are provided by the National Center for Environmental Prediction reanalysis. The first temporal pattern series obtained by PCA has its homogeneous area located at the external region of the Weddell and Bellingshausen Seas and Drake Passage, mostly north of 60°S. The second region is centered in 30°W and located at the southeast of the Weddell. The third area is localized east of 30°W and north of 60°S. South of the first area, the fourth PC series has its homogenous region, between 30° and 60°W. The last area is centered at 0° W and south of 60°S. Correlation charts between the five Principal Components series and SST were performed. Positive correlations over the Tropical Pacific Ocean were found for the five PCs when SST series preceded SICA PC series. The sign of the correlation could relate the occurrence of an El Niño/Southern Oscillation (ENSO) warm (cold) event with posterior positive (negative) anomalies of sea ice concentration over the Weddell Sea.

  1. Sea surface temperature of the coastal zones of France

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deschamps, P. Y.; Crepon, M.; Monget, J. M.; Verger, F. (Principal Investigator); Frouin, R.; Cassanet, J.; Wald, L.

    1982-01-01

    Thermal gradients in French coastal zones for the period of one year were mapped in order to enable a coherent study of certain oceanic features detectable by the variations in the sea surface temperature field and their evolution in time. The phenomena examined were mesoscale thermal features in the English Channel, the Bay of Biscay, and the northwestern Mediterranean; thermal gradients generated by French estuary systems; and diurnal heating in the sea surface layer. The investigation was based on Heat Capacity Mapping Mission imagery.

  2. Sea level: measuring the bounding surfaces of the ocean

    PubMed Central

    Tamisiea, Mark E.; Hughes, Chris W.; Williams, Simon D. P.; Bingley, Richard M.

    2014-01-01

    The practical need to understand sea level along the coasts, such as for safe navigation given the spatially variable tides, has resulted in tide gauge observations having the distinction of being some of the longest instrumental ocean records. Archives of these records, along with geological constraints, have allowed us to identify the century-scale rise in global sea level. Additional data sources, particularly satellite altimetry missions, have helped us to better identify the rates and causes of sea-level rise and the mechanisms leading to spatial variability in the observed rates. Analysis of all of the data reveals the need for long-term and stable observation systems to assess accurately the regional changes as well as to improve our ability to estimate future changes in sea level. While information from many scientific disciplines is needed to understand sea-level change, this review focuses on contributions from geodesy and the role of the ocean's bounding surfaces: the sea surface and the Earth's crust. PMID:25157196

  3. Sea level: measuring the bounding surfaces of the ocean.

    PubMed

    Tamisiea, Mark E; Hughes, Chris W; Williams, Simon D P; Bingley, Richard M

    2014-09-28

    The practical need to understand sea level along the coasts, such as for safe navigation given the spatially variable tides, has resulted in tide gauge observations having the distinction of being some of the longest instrumental ocean records. Archives of these records, along with geological constraints, have allowed us to identify the century-scale rise in global sea level. Additional data sources, particularly satellite altimetry missions, have helped us to better identify the rates and causes of sea-level rise and the mechanisms leading to spatial variability in the observed rates. Analysis of all of the data reveals the need for long-term and stable observation systems to assess accurately the regional changes as well as to improve our ability to estimate future changes in sea level. While information from many scientific disciplines is needed to understand sea-level change, this review focuses on contributions from geodesy and the role of the ocean's bounding surfaces: the sea surface and the Earth's crust.

  4. Archaeal diversity in surface sediments of the South China Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, P.; Wei, Y.; Zhang, C.

    2010-12-01

    The South China Sea is one of the largest marginal seas on Earth and known to be one of the global hot spots of biodiversity. Yet, little is known about the abundance, diversity, and distribution of archaea in it. In this study the diversity and distribution of archaea in the surface sediments of the South China Sea were investigated. The samples were collected from seven sites from south to north of the sea with water depths ranging from 1455 m to 3697 m. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that the relative abundances of Euryarchaeota and Crenarchaeota species (OTUs at 2% cutoff) varied from site to site (Eury: 19.4%-67.6%, Cren: 32.4%-80.6%); however, they were about equal in species distribution (46.9% and 53.1%, respectively) for the total seven archaeal clone libraries. The Crenarchaeota predominates in MD05-2902 and MD05-2904 (80.6% and 70.4%); the Euryarchaeota predominates in MD05-2894 (67.6%). The archaeal groups MGI, MBGB, MCG and SAGMEG were dominant in most of the surface samples. MBGE was only dominant in MD05-2894 (64.7%). Overall, these results indicate that the community structures of archaea vary considerably in the surface sediments of the South China Sea.

  5. Plio-Pleistocene pCO2 - a Multiproxy Approach Using Alkenone and Boron Based Carbonate System Proxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foster, G. L.; Seki, O.; Schmidt, D. N.; Kawamura, K.; Pancost, R.

    2008-12-01

    The recent rapid rise in atmospheric CO2 is unprecedented in Earths history, and the current level (385 ppm) is higher than previously experienced for at least the last 650 kyr. Therefore in order to better understand the link between climate and CO2 it is desirable to examine times in the past that experienced similar or higher levels of CO2 compared to today. The Pliocene (2.6 to 5.3 Ma) is the most recent warm period and hence offers such an opportunity. Detailed reconstructions show that global temperatures were 2- 3°C higher ([1], 6°C at high latitudes) and the polar ice sheets were considerably smaller (sea level was 15-20 m higher; [2]) yet other boundary conditions, such as continental configuration, were similar at this time. Earlier studies, typically with low temporal resolution, have shown that at c.3 Ma pCO2 concentrations were in the range 300-400 ppm. A common assumption is that pCO2 dropped from this high value to pre-industrial values at a time coincident with the intensification of northern hemisphere glaciation (NHG) that occurred at c.2.7 Ma, although this has yet to be demonstrated. Here we present a continuous pCO2 record recovered from ocean sediments using a multiproxy approach based on the boron and alkenone carbonate system proxies. This new data allows both a determination of the magnitude of Pliocene pCO2 and for the fist time the Plio-Pleistocene evolution of pCO2 that accompanied the intensification of NHG. We developed continuous records of alkenone based ɛp values and foraminiferal δ11B and B/Ca ratios from ODP Sites 999 and 1000 in the Caribbean Sea and Site 1241 on the western side of the Panama Isthmus in the Eastern Equatorial Pacific spanning the last 5.3 Ma. Following a correction of the alkenone records for coccolith size, and accounting for changing growth rate where appropriate, the alkenone based ɛp record can be used to estimate [CO2]aq and hence pCO2 at the two sites. Similarly, using the core top calibration of [3

  6. Implication of biomarkers signatures of the Ulleung Basin, East Sea, during the Pleistocene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Jiyoung; Lee, Kyung Eun; Kim, Ji-Hoon; Bahk, Jang-Jun; Yoo, Dong-Geun

    2014-05-01

    In this study, the molecular distribution of the n-alkanes, alkenone and C/N ratio and δ13C of bulk sediment were used to assess changes in organic matter (OM) source and transport which could be related with paleoclimate change. The proxy records corresponding to the Pleistocene have been obtained from the well-studied the Ulleung Basin Gas Hydrate Expedition 2 (UBGH2) site 11 in the Ulleung Basin, East Sea. The distribution of carbon preference index (CPI) of n-alkane encountered in this study confirmed the importance of terrestrial OM in the marine sediment. Alkenone has been widely applied for sea surface temperature (SST) reconstruction. The data results show that CPI values generally increase with decreasing paleo-SST. Plot of C/N ratio versus δ13C shows a predominance of marine algae origin in the study area. It may indicate that the minimum CPI in warm period is related with the contribution of probably enhanced biodegradation, while the maximum CPI value in cold period result from restrain of OM input associated with sea level lowering. It is likely that the vertical variations of the biomarkers signature reflect the shifts in sedimentary environment and transportation related with change of ocean currents and sea level during the Pleistocene period.

  7. Sea surface microplastics in Slovenian part of the Northern Adriatic.

    PubMed

    Gajšt, Tamara; Bizjak, Tine; Palatinus, Andreja; Liubartseva, Svitlana; Kržan, Andrej

    2016-12-15

    Plastics are the most common material of marine litter and have become a global pollution concern. They are persistent in the environment where they gradually degrade into increasingly smaller particles-microplastics (MP). Our study presents results of sea-surface monitoring for MP in the Slovenian part of the Trieste Bay in the Northern Adriatic Sea. In 17 trawls conducted over a 20-month period we found a high average concentration of 406×10(3)MPparticles/km(2). Over 80% of the particles were identified as polyethylene. The significant variability of MP concentrations obtained on different sampling dates is explained by use of surface current maps and a recently developed Markov chain marine litter distribution model for the Adriatic Sea.

  8. Reduced-dimension reconstruction of the equatorial Pacific SST and zonal wind fields over the past 10,000 years using Mg/Ca and alkenone records

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gill, Emily C.; Rajagopalan, Balaji; Molnar, Peter; Marchitto, Thomas M.

    2016-07-01

    We develop a multiproxy, reduced-dimension methodology to blend magnesium-calcium (Mg/Ca) and alkenone (U37k) paleo sea surface temperature (SST) records from the eastern and western equatorial Pacific, to recreate snapshots of full field SSTs and zonal winds from 10 to 2 ka B.P. in 2000 year increments. Single-proxy reconstructions (Mg/Ca only versus U37K' only) reveal differences in the timing and duration of maximum cooling across the east-central equatorial Pacific. The largest zonal temperature differences (average west Pacific SST minus average east Pacific SST) occur at 6 ka B.P. for the Mg/Ca-only reconstruction (0.61°C) and at 10 and 4 ka for the U37K'-only reconstruction (0.55°C and 0.47°C, respectively). Disagreements between SST trends suggested by each proxy call for methods that can resolve the common patterns between each and have motivated the work presented in this study. In combining inferences from these proxies, we treat both Mg/Ca and U37K' reconstructions of SST as annual average values, but we recognize that they may be sensitive to different seasons. In the multiproxy reconstruction, the zonal SST difference is largest at 10 ka (0.26°C), with coldest SST anomalies of ˜ -0.9°C in the eastern equatorial Pacific and concurrent easterly maximum zonal wind anomalies of 7 m s-1 throughout the central Pacific. From 10 to 2 ka, the entire equatorial Pacific warms, but at a faster rate in the east than the west, and the average central Pacific easterly winds weaken gradually to approximately 2 m s-1. These patterns are broadly consistent with previous inferences of reduced El Niño-Southern Oscillation variability associated with a "La Niña-like" state during the early to middle Holocene.

  9. Tidal mixing signatures in the Indonesian seas from high-resolution sea surface temperature data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ray, Richard D.; Susanto, R. Dwi

    2016-08-01

    The presence of significant tidal mixing in the Indonesian seas is well established from both observations and numerical modeling. One indicator is a clear spring-neap cycle in satellite sea surface temperature (SST) measurements, as first shown by Ffield and Gordon. Their early results are here updated with SST data of considerably higher spatial and temporal resolution. The largest fortnightly signals are found to be localized to relatively small straits, channels, and sills, while the deep basin of the Banda Sea displays little significant signal. A broader region of somewhat enhanced signal surrounds the Seram Sea. The high resolution of the modern SST data is especially critical for mapping the complex fortnightly signals that arise in, and especially south of, the major straits of the Lesser Sunda Island chain.

  10. Prediction of sea surface temperatures in the western Mediterranean Sea by neural networks using satellite observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia-Gorriz, Elisa; Garcia-Sanchez, Joan

    2007-06-01

    We use artificial neural networks (ANNs) to predict sea surface temperatures (SSTs) in the western Mediterranean Sea. The ANNs are trained with meteorological variables as input and concurrent satellite-derived SSTs as target. The trained ANNs predict well both the seasonal and the interannual variability of SST in that region. We also reproduce the impact of the heat wave that occurred during the summer of 2003 on the SSTs of the western Mediterranean Sea. The ANN technique allows us to predict SST maps in the western Alboran Sea for time coordinates before SST satellite availability. The presence and later partial collapse of the western Alboran gyre throughout 1980 is detected with good agreement by both the ANN predictions and the concurrent results from a 3-D circulation model. The same methodology is used to reconstruct incomplete SST satellite images.

  11. The Aquarius Mission: Sea Surface Salinity from Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koblinsky, Chester; Chao, Y.; deCharon, A.; Edelstein, W.; Hildebrand, P.; Lagerloef, G.; LeVine, D.; Pellerano, F.; Rahmat-Samii, Y.; Ruf, C.

    2001-01-01

    Aquarius is a new satellite mission concept to study the impact of the global water cycle on the ocean, including the response of the ocean to buoyancy forcing and the subsequent feedback of the ocean on the climate. The measurement objective of Aquarius is sea surface salinity, which reflects the concentration of freshwater at the ocean surface. Salinity affects the dielectric constant of sea water and, consequently, the radiometric emission of the sea surface to space. Rudimentary space observations with an L-band radiometer were first made from Skylab in the mid-70s and numerous aircraft missions of increasing quality and improved technology have been conducted since then. Technology is now available to carry out a global mission, which includes both an accurate L band (1.413 Ghz) radiometer and radar system in space and a global array of in situ observations for calibration and validation, in order to address key NASA Earth Science Enterprise questions about the global cycling of water and the response of the ocean circulation to climate change. The key scientific objectives of Aquarius examine the cycling of water at the ocean's surface, the response of the ocean circulation to buoyancy forcing, and the impact of buoyancy forcing on the ocean's thermal feedback to the climate. Global surface salinity will also improve our ability to model the surface solubility chemistry needed to estimate the air-sea exchange of CO2. In order to meet these science objectives, the NASA Salinity Sea Ice Working Group over the past three years has concluded that the mission measurement goals should be better than 0.2 practical salinity units (psu) accuracy, 100 km resolution, and weekly to revisits. The Aquarius mission proposes to meet these measurement requirements through a real aperture dual-polarized L band radiometer and radar system. This system can achieve the less than 0.1 K radiometric temperature measurement accuracy that is required. A 3 m antenna at approx. 600km

  12. Lithospheric structure of South China Sea from surface wave tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, L.; Xue, M.; Le, K.; Yang, T.

    2011-12-01

    The South China Sea is one of the marginal seas of the West Pacific where the Eurasian Plate, Philippine Sea Plate, Pacific Plate and Indo-Australian Plate interact. In this study we give a 3D shear wave velocity structure of South China Sea using surface wave tomographic methods. We use earthquakes distributed on the periphery of the South China Sea and collect the earthquake data from 48 stations (IRIS stations, CDSN stations and four stations deployed in Vietnam by Tongji University) with rays up to ~ 3000. We first calculate the group velocity dispersion curves of fundamental mode for Rayleigh waves with periods from 14 sec to 130 sec using the multiple filter technique. After getting the dispersion curve between each station-to-source pair, we conduct an inversion to get group velocity at each grid point in the rectangular region of 14° s - 34° N and 86° E - 134° E with different grid spacing of 2° × 2° and 1° × 1°. This process is done by the fast marching method as the forward step and then subspace inversion step followed. When we get the group velocity of each grid point for corresponding periods, we can extract a dispersion curve for that point. Through the surface wave inversion which uses Knopoff's calculation method for layered medium as the forward step and the damped least square method as the inversion step followed, we can get an iterative model which carries the information of shear wave velocity and layer depth for each grid point. Finally we put all the shear wave velocity structures of all points together to obtain the three-dimensional shear wave structures. With checkboard tests indicating good resolution, we find that higher group velocities persistently show up in South China Sea Basin, West Philippine Sea Basin, and Celebes Sea Basin from periods of 20 sec to 60 sec, which reflect structures down to 20 - 60 km deep. Similar high shear velocity features also show up in depth slices from 30 km to 60 km. These high shear velocity

  13. Sea-surface and deep-magnetic data at Vavilov Seamount, Tyrrhenian Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muccini, Filippo; Cocchi, Luca; Locritani, Marina; Carmisciano, Cosmo

    2016-04-01

    Sea surface and deep magnetic data were acquired at Vavilov seamount, in the Tyrrhenian sea. Vavilov seamount is located in the central portion of the homonymous Vavilov basin. The seamount stands about 2800 meters above the seafloor at 3600 meters depth, with the top at about 800 meters below the sea level. Oceanization of the basin occurred during the Late Miocene-Early Pliocene. The magnetic data were collected in 2011 on board the Nave Ammiraglio Magnaghi by using a Marine Magnetics Seaspy magnetometer. The sea surface magnetic survey was realized with two different grids: the first regional one, with 13 parallel lines about 43 Km long, 3 Km spaced (104° N oriented) and 6 tie control lines about 40 Km long, 5 Km spaced (014° N oriented). The second one was realized to better define the volcanic structure of the seamount, and was achieved by acquiring 12 magnetic parallel lines (104° N), 18 Km long and 1 Km spaced. The deep magnetic data were collected by towing a magnetic sensor coupled with a L3 sidescan sonar Klein 3000. A set of 5 parallel lines were acquired in correspondence of the bathymetric top of the seamount with the sensor flying at about constant depth of 700 meters. These data represents the first near-bottom magnetic data collected for Vavilov seamount and it allows comparison between sea-surface and deep magnetic data.

  14. Remote sensing of the Dead Sea surface temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nehorai, R.; Lensky, I. M.; Lensky, N. G.; Shiff, S.

    2009-05-01

    The Dead Sea is a unique terminal lake located at the lowest place on Earth's surface. It has the highest surface temperature, salinity, and density among Earth's large water bodies, and its level is currently dropping at a rate of ˜1 m/a. Knowledge of the Dead Sea thermal and saline structure is based on meteorological and hydrological measurements from a single site at a time. In this study, we used satellite and in situ data to characterize the spatial and temporal variations of the Dead Sea sea surface temperature (SST) and to explore the causes for these variations. Sequences of almost continuous individual satellite images were transformed into a time series of parameters representing the spatial distribution of SST. Also used were in situ measured bulk SST, wind speed, solar radiation, and water temperature profiles with depth. Analysis of this data set shows strong diurnal and seasonal variations of the surface and vertical temperature field and the meteorological forcing. The temperature field is heterogeneous after noon, when radiation is high and wind speed is low and thermal layering develops. The temperature field is homogeneous during the nighttime, when solar radiation is absent and the high wind speed vertically mixes the upper layer.

  15. Loki Patera as the Surface of a Magma Sea

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Matson, D. L.; Davies, A. G.; Veeder, G. J.; Rathbun, J. A.; Johnson, T. V.

    2004-01-01

    Inspired by the finding of Schubert et al that Io's figure is consistent with a hydrostatic shape, we explore the consequences of modeling Loki Patera as the surface of a large magma sea. This model is attractive because of its sheer simplicity and its usefulness in interpreting and predicting observations. Here, we report on that work.

  16. Sea Surface Salinity: The Next Remote Sensing Challenge

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lagerloef, Gary S. E.; Swift, Calvin T.; LeVine, David M.

    1995-01-01

    A brief history of salinity remote sensing is presented. The role of sea surface salinity (SSS) in the far north Atlantic and the influence of salinity variations on upper ocean dynamics in the tropics are described. An assessment of the present state of the technology of the SSS satellite remote sensing is given.

  17. DNA Stratigraphy reveals Holocene Haptophyte Population Dynamics and Sources of Alkenones at the Species Level

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coolen, M. J. L.

    2003-04-01

    Lipid biomarkers provide information on the ancient microbiota of aquatic systems and, hence, can be used to reconstruct the palaeoenvironment. However, these biomarkers are often not very specific. The ultimate biomarkers would be ribosomal RNA (rRNA) genes, which are widely applied in phylogenetic studies. However, it was generally thought that DNA is rapidly degraded soon after burial within sediments. Using advanced molecular biological techniques we showed that DNA of planktonic photosynthetic bacteria and algae as well as zooplankton survived degradation in Holocene anoxic, sulfidic sediments of the permanently stratified, saline Ace Lake (Vestfold Hills, Antarctica). Alkenones were predominant biomarkers in the sediment layers and their source organisms (haptophytes) were identified based on the analysis of fossil 18S rRNA genes. The quantitative comparison of the individual 18S rRNA genes and the various alkenones allowed for the first time the identification of fossil organisms and their biomarkers at the species level. It was shown that all six identified haptophyte phylotypes are closer related to the alkenone-producing haptophyte genus Isochrysis than to the genera Emiliania and Gephyrocapsa. Subtle changes in the alkenone and alkenoate composition correlated with changes in the quantitative phylotype composition of haptophytes. Implications for alkenone stratigraphy will be discussed.

  18. A Computer Model for Bistatic Sea Surface Microwave Reflectivity

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-08-14

    surface for transmit and receive grazing angles less than 10 degrees and any relative geometry through 360 degrees. In the forward scatter region...microwave reflectivity of the sea surface. This report will only address low grazing angles, as encountered with shipboard radar systems, but include...both in-plane and out-of-plane geometries. Higher grazing angles as well as airborne or space- based radars will need additional models. In the

  19. Mean Sea Surface (mss) Model Determination for Malaysian Seas Using Multi-Mission Satellite Altimeter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yahaya, N. A. Z.; Musa, T. A.; Omar, K. M.; Din, A. H. M.; Omar, A. H.; Tugi, A.; Yazid, N. M.; Abdullah, N. M.; Wahab, M. I. A.

    2016-09-01

    The advancement of satellite altimeter technology has generated many evolutions to oceanographic and geophysical studies. A multi-mission satellite altimeter consists with TOPEX, Jason-1 and Jason-2, ERS-2, Envisat-1, CryoSat-2 and Saral are extracted in this study and has been processed using Radar Altimeter Database System (RADS) for the period of January 2005 to December 2015 to produce the sea surface height (hereinafter referred to SSH). The monthly climatology data from SSH is generated and averaged to understand the variation of SSH during monsoon season. Then, SSH data are required to determine the localised and new mean sea surface (MSS). The differences between Localised MSS and DTU13 MSS Global Model is plotted with root mean square error value is 2.217 metres. The localised MSS is important towards several applications for instance, as a reference for sea level variation, bathymetry prediction and derivation of mean dynamic topography.

  20. Organic biomarker records spanning the last 34,800 years from the southeastern Brazilian upper slope: links between sea surface temperature, displacement of the Brazil Current, and marine productivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lourenço, Rafael André; de Mahiques, Michel Michaelovitch; Wainer, Ilana Elazari Klein Coaracy; Rosell-Melé, Antoni; Bícego, Márcia Caruso

    2016-10-01

    Collective assessment of marine and terrigenous organic biomarkers was performed on a sediment core spanning the last 34,800 years on the upper slope southeast of Brazil to verify the signatures of climatic variations in sea surface temperature (SST), marine productivity, and the flux of terrigenous material in this region. This evaluation is based on marine and terrigenous proxies including alkenones, chlorins, aliphatic hydrocarbons, n-alcohols, and fatty acids. This first report of organic biomarker data for this region confirms a correlation between SST, changes in terrigenous organic matter flow into the ocean, and marine productivity over the last 34.8 ka as a response to the displacement of the Brazil Current. Conditions prevailing during marine isotopic stage (MIS) 3 may be considered intermediate between the last glacial maximum (LGM) and the Late Holocene. For MIS 2, a period of low relative sea level, it was verified that the lowest SSTs were associated with the LGM and higher marine productivity. SST increased by up to 4.4 °C between the LGM and the Holocene. This reveals synchronicity between SST on the southeastern Brazilian upper slope and the North Atlantic Ocean SST records reported in earlier studies.

  1. Temporal and spatial variability of the sea surface salinity in the Nordic Seas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Furevik, Tore; Bentsen, Mats; Drange, Helge; Johannessen, Johnny A.; Korablev, Alexander

    2002-12-01

    In this paper, the temporal and spatial variability of the sea surface salinity (SSS) in the Nordic Seas is investigated. The data include a Russian hydrographical database for the Nordic Seas and daily to weekly observations of salinity at Ocean Weather Station Mike (OWSM) (located at 66°N, 2°E in the Norwegian Sea). In addition, output from a medium-resolution version of the Miami Isopycnic Coordinate Ocean Model (MICOM), forced with daily National Center for Environmental Prediction/National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCEP/NCAR) reanalysis data, is used to complement the analysis of the temporal and spatial fields constructed from the observational data sets. The Nordic Seas show a strong seasonal variability in the vertical density stratification and the mixed layer (ML) depth, with a weak stratification and a several hundred meters deep ML during winter and a well-defined shallow ML confined to the upper few tens of meters during summer. The seasonal variability strongly influences the strength of the high-frequency variability and to what extent subsurface anomalies are isolated from the surface. High-frequency variability has been investigated in terms of standard deviation of daily SSS, calculated for the different months of the year. From observations at OWSM, typical winter values range from 0.03 to 0.04 psu and summer values range from 0.06 to 0.07 psu. Results from the model simulation show that highest variability is found in frontal areas and in areas with strong stratification and lowest variability in the less stratified areas in the central Norwegian Sea and south of Iceland. Investigation of the interannual variability over the last 50 years shows a marked freshening of the Atlantic Water in the Norwegian and Greenland Seas. Moreover, the strength of the southern sector of the Polar front, as defined by the 34.8-35.0 psu isohalines along the western boundary of the inflowing Atlantic Water, undergoes significant interannual variability

  2. Assimilation of sea surface temperature, sea ice concentration and sea ice drift in a model of the Southern Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barth, Alexander; Canter, Martin; Van Schaeybroeck, Bert; Vannitsem, Stéphane; Massonnet, François; Zunz, Violette; Mathiot, Pierre; Alvera-Azcárate, Aida; Beckers, Jean-Marie

    2015-09-01

    Current ocean models have relatively large errors and biases in the Southern Ocean. The aim of this study is to provide a reanalysis from 1985 to 2006 assimilating sea surface temperature, sea ice concentration and sea ice drift. In the following it is also shown how surface winds in the Southern Ocean can be improved using sea ice drift estimated from infrared radiometers. Such satellite observations are available since the late seventies and have the potential to improve the wind forcing before more direct measurements of winds over the ocean are available using scatterometry in the late nineties. The model results are compared to the assimilated data and to independent measurements (the World Ocean Database 2009 and the mean dynamic topography based on observations). The overall improvement of the assimilation is quantified, in particular the impact of the assimilation on the representation of the polar front is discussed. Finally a method to identify model errors in the Antarctic sea ice area is proposed based on Model Output Statistics techniques using a series of potential predictors. This approach provides new directions for model improvements.

  3. Assimilation of sea surface temperature, sea ice concentration and sea ice drift in a model of the Southern Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barth, Alexander; Canter, Martin; Van Schaeybroeck, Bert; Vannitsem, Stéphane; Massonnet, François; Zunz, Violette; Mathiot, Pierre; Alvera-Azcárate, Aida; Beckers, Jean-Marie

    2015-04-01

    Current ocean models have relatively large errors and biases in the Southern Ocean. The aim of this study is to provide a reanalysis from 1985 to 2006 assimilating sea surface temperature, sea ice concentration and sea ice drift. In the following it is also shown how surface winds in the Southern Ocean can be improved using sea ice drift estimated from infrared radiometers. Such satellite observations are available since the late seventies and have the potential to improve the wind forcing before more direct measurements of winds over the ocean are available using scatterometry in the late nineties. The model results are compared to the assimilated data and to independent measurements (the World Ocean Database 2009 and the mean dynamic topography based on observations). The overall improvement of the assimilation is quantified, in particular the impact of the assimilation on the representation of the polar front is discussed. Finally a method to identify model errors in the Antarctic sea ice area is proposed based on Model Output Statistics techniques using a series of potential predictors. This approach provides new directions for model improvements.

  4. Bay of Bengal Surface and Thermocline and the Arabian Sea

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-09-30

    to the atmosphere. How low the SSS gets in the Bay of Bengal or how high in the Arabian Sea, depends on the oceanic exchanges between them via a...potential impact on the SST. 3 Figure 1a: Sea surface temperature (SST) and salinity ( SSS ) relationship during ASIRI 2013 cruises. The left panel...shows the hull ADCP vector, color-coded for SSS . The SST/ SSS scatter falls along a line from the warm/salty southern regions to the cool/fresher

  5. An Arctic Sea Surface Temperature Climate Data Record

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Høyer, Jacob L.; Howe, Eva; Tonboe, Rasmus; Dybkjaer, Gorm

    2013-12-01

    Daily fields of gap-free sea surface temperature observations from 1982 to 2010 have been constructed using the DMI_OI processing method, satellite SST observations from the ARC and Pathfinder projects, together with OSI-SAF sea ice reanalysis and ICOADS 2.5 observations. A thorough validation of the data set shows the overall performance with biases within 0.1 oC and standard deviations about 0.6oC. The spatial and temporal validation shows small biases, with no apparent structures, except within the Marginal Ice Zone. Examples on regional SST time series are given, where the decadal warming is evident.

  6. SeaRover: An Emerging Technology for Sea Surface Sensor Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fong, T.; Kudela, R.; Curcio, J.; Davidson, K.; Darling, D.; Kirkwood, B.

    2005-12-01

    Introduction - SeaRover is envisioned as an autonomous surface vehicle (ASV) for coastal operations. It is intended to lower the cost of existing marine survey applications while enabling new science missions. The current conceptual design is a small vehicle with hull and propulsion system optimized to eliminate cavitation and EM noise. SeaRover will make significant advances over existing platforms by providing longer duration science missions, better positioning and mission control, larger power budgets for instrumentation and significantly lower operational costs than existing vehicles. Science Enabled by SeaRover - SeaRover's unique design and autonomous capability provides several advantages compared to traditional autonomous underwater vehicles (AUV's) and crewed surface vessels: (1) Near surface sampling: SeaRover can sample within the top 1-2 meters. This is difficult to do with crewed vessels because of draft and perturbations from the hull. (2) Adaptive monitoring of dynamic events: SeaRover will be capable of intelligent decision making, as well as real-time remote control. This will enable highly-responsive autonomous tracking of moving phenomena (e.g., algal bloom). (3) Long term monitoring: SeaRover can be deployed for extended periods of time, allowing it to be used for longitudinal baseline studies. SeaRover will represent an advance over existing platforms in terms of: (1) Mobility: operational range from 10-1000 km, GPS accuracy, trajectory control with meter precision, and launch in hours. (2) Duration: from days up to months. (3) Payload and Power: accommodate approximately 100 kg for a 6m hull. Its surface design will allow access to wind and sun energy. (4) Communication: radio, wireless, satellite, direct data return. (5) Operational Cost: target costs are $2K/day (24 hour operation), with no onboard operator. (6) Recovery/Reusability: autonomous return to safe harbor provides sample return and on-base maintenance. Large science and power

  7. Atmospheric response to variations in sea surface temperature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spar, J.; Atlas, R.

    1974-01-01

    An extended range prediction experiment was performed with the GISS atmospheric model on a global data to test the sensitivity of the model to sea surface temperature (SST) variation over a two-week forecast period. The use of an initial observed SST field in place of the climatological monthly mean sea temperatures for surface flux calculations in the model was found to have a significant effect on the predicted precipitation over the ocean, with enhanced convection computed over areas where moderately large warm SST anomalies are found. However, there was no detectable positive effect of the SST anomaly field on forecast quality. The influence of the SST anomalies on the daily predicted fields of pressure and geopotential is relatively insignificant up to about one week compared with the growth of prediction error, and is no greater over a two-week period than that resulting from random errors in the initial meteorological state. The 14-day average fields of sea level pressure and 500-mb height predicted by the model, appear to be similarly insensitive to anomalies of sea surface temperature.

  8. Sea surface temperature and salinity seasonal changes in the western Solomon and Bismarck Seas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delcroix, Thierry; Radenac, Marie-Hélène; Cravatte, Sophie; Alory, Gaël.; Gourdeau, Lionel; Léger, Fabien; Singh, Awnesh; Varillon, David

    2014-04-01

    We analyze mean and seasonal change of Sea Surface Temperature (SST) and Salinity (SSS) in the Solomon and Bismarck Seas, using 1977-2009 in situ data collected from Voluntary Observing Ships. Covariability of these two variables with surface wind, altimeter-derived and model-derived horizontal currents, precipitation, and Sepik River discharge are examined. SST and SSS show large annual oscillations in the Solomon Sea, with the coldest and saltiest waters occurring in July/August mainly due to horizontal advection. In contrast, they show large semiannual oscillations in the Bismarck Sea. There, the coldest and saltiest waters happen in January/February, when the northwest monsoon winds drive coastal upwelling, and in July/August, when the New Guinea Coastal Current advects cold and high-salinity waters from the Solomon Sea through Vitiaz Strait. The low SSS values observed in April/May, stuck between the January/February and July/August SSS maxima, are further enhanced by the Sepik River discharge annual maximum. A high-resolution model strengthens the conclusions we derive from observations. The impacts of ENSO on SST and SSS are also discussed with, for instance, saltier-than-average and fresher-than-average waters during the 2002-2003 El Niño and 2007-2008 La Niña, respectively.

  9. Sea surface temperature modelling in the Sea of Iroise: assessment of boundary conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guillou, Nicolas; Chapalain, Georges; Duvieilbourg, Eric

    2013-07-01

    The present study investigates the sensitivity of the COupled Hydrodynamical-Ecological model for REgioNal and Shelf seas (COHERENS) to predict sea surface temperature (SST) patterns in the Sea of Iroise (western end of French Brittany) in relation to the spatial and temporal resolutions of open boundary conditions (OBCs). Two sources of daily operational OBCs of temperature are considered, derived from (1) the Mercator Global Ocean and (2) the Iberian Biscay Irish analysis and forecasting systems delivering predictions at spatial resolutions of 1/12° and 1/36°, respectively. Coastal model performance is evaluated by comparing SST predictions with recently available field data collected (1) along the route of a vessel travelling between the coast and the isle of Ushant and (2) at two offshore stations. The comparison is extended to SST spatial distribution derived from remote-sensing observations. The influence of OBC spatial resolution is exhibited in the north-eastern area of the Sea of Iroise in relation to the intrusion of cold surface waters. OBC temporal resolution is found to have a lower impact advocating for the implementation of climatological temperature forcings to predict major SST patterns in the Sea of Iroise.

  10. Polarized reflectance and transmittance properties of windblown sea surfaces.

    PubMed

    Mobley, Curtis D

    2015-05-20

    Generation of random sea surfaces using wave variance spectra and Fourier transforms is formulated in a way that guarantees conservation of wave energy and fully resolves wave height and slope variances. Monte Carlo polarized ray tracing, which accounts for multiple scattering between light rays and wave facets, is used to compute effective Mueller matrices for reflection and transmission of air- or water-incident polarized radiance. Irradiance reflectances computed using a Rayleigh sky radiance distribution, sea surfaces generated with Cox-Munk statistics, and unpolarized ray tracing differ by 10%-18% compared with values computed using elevation- and slope-resolving surfaces and polarized ray tracing. Radiance reflectance factors, as used to estimate water-leaving radiance from measured upwelling and sky radiances, are shown to depend on sky polarization, and improved values are given.

  11. The effects of growth phase and salinity on the hydrogen isotopic composition of alkenones produced by coastal haptophyte algae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chivall, David; M'Boule, Daniela; Sinke-Schoen, Daniëlle; Sinninghe Damsté, Jaap S.; Schouten, Stefan; van der Meer, Marcel T. J.

    2014-09-01

    The isotopic fractionation of hydrogen during the biosynthesis of alkenones produced by marine haptophyte algae has been shown to depend on salinity and, as such, the hydrogen isotopic composition of alkenones is emerging as a palaeosalinity proxy. The relationship between fractionation and salinity has previously only been determined during exponential growth, whilst it is not yet known in which growth phases natural haptophyte populations predominantly exist. We have therefore determined the relationship between the fractionation factor, αalkenones-water, and salinity for C37 alkenones produced in different growth phases of batch cultures of the major alkenone-producing coastal haptophytes Isochrysis galbana (strain CCMP 1323) and Chrysotila lamellosa (strain CCMP 1307) over a range in salinity from ca. 10 to 35. αalkenones-water was similar in both species, ranging over 0.841-0.900 for I. galbana and 0.838-0.865 for C. lamellosa. A strong (0.85 ⩽ R2 ⩽ 0.97; p < 0.0001) relationship between salinity and fractionation factor was observed in both species at all growth phases investigated. This suggests that alkenone δD has the potential to be used as a salinity proxy in neritic areas where haptophyte communities are dominated by these coastal species. However, there was a marked difference in the sensitivity of αalkenones-water to salinity between different growth phases: in the exponential growth phase of I. galbana, αalkenones-water increased by 0.0019 per salinity unit (S-1), but was less sensitive at 0.0010 and 0.0008 S-1 during the stationary and decline phases, respectively. Similarly, in C. lamellosa αalkenones-water increased by 0.0010 S-1 in the early stationary phase and by 0.0008 S-1 during the late stationary phase. Assuming the shift in sensitivity of αalkenones-water to salinity observed at the end of exponential growth in I. galbana is similar in other alkenone-producing species, the predominant growth phase of natural populations of

  12. On model differences and skill in predicting sea surface temperature in the Nordic and Barents Seas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Langehaug, H. R.; Matei, D.; Eldevik, T.; Lohmann, K.; Gao, Y.

    2017-02-01

    The Nordic Seas and the Barents Sea is the Atlantic Ocean's gateway to the Arctic Ocean, and the Gulf Stream's northern extension brings large amounts of heat into this region and modulates climate in northwestern Europe. We have investigated the predictive skill of initialized hindcast simulations performed with three state-of-the-art climate prediction models within the CMIP5-framework, focusing on sea surface temperature (SST) in the Nordic Seas and Barents Sea, but also on sea ice extent, and the subpolar North Atlantic upstream. The hindcasts are compared with observation-based SST for the period 1961-2010. All models have significant predictive skill in specific regions at certain lead times. However, among the three models there is little consistency concerning which regions that display predictive skill and at what lead times. For instance, in the eastern Nordic Seas, only one model has significant skill in predicting observed SST variability at longer lead times (7-10 years). This region is of particular promise in terms of predictability, as observed thermohaline anomalies progress from the subpolar North Atlantic to the Fram Strait within the time frame of a couple of years. In the same model, predictive skill appears to move northward along a similar route as forecast time progresses. We attribute this to the northward advection of SST anomalies, contributing to skill at longer lead times in the eastern Nordic Seas. The skill at these lead times in particular beats that of persistence forecast, again indicating the potential role of ocean circulation as a source for skill. Furthermore, we discuss possible explanations for the difference in skill among models, such as different model resolutions, initialization techniques, and model climatologies and variance.

  13. Influence of surface kinematics on air-sea heat flux

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veron, Fabrice; Melville, Ken

    2004-11-01

    The top few meters of the oceanic boundary layer play a critical role in the transfers of momentum, gas, mass and heat between the atmosphere and the ocean. These exchanges must necessarily transfer through the surface, and presumably, the rates at which they do are influence by the dynamics of the surface layer. Heat flux in particular is regulated by the thin surface thermal layer which, at most, is only a few millimeter thick. We are specifically interested in the influence of small coherent structures of the surface turbulence on the heat flux. Using active and passive infrared imaging, we measured the evolution the surface velocity and temperature fields over small areas of a few square meters. High-resolution surface Eulerian velocity fields using cross-correlation techniques (PIV) are obtained. Using active marking of the surface with an infrared CO2 laser, we have not only shown that it is possible to directly recover the Langrangian surface velocity, but also, by marking appropriate patterns on the surface we have been able to measure the shear strain, vorticity, and surface divergence. With the penetration depth of infrared radiation at these wavelengths being a few microns, these techniques appear to be quite apt for direct measurements of ocean surface turbulence. We have also found that the flux of heat through the surface appears to be influenced by the surface wave field. We will discuss the results in the context of air sea heat flux and ocean surface turbulence.

  14. Interdecadal variability of the sea surface height around Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yasuda, Tamaki; Sakurai, Keizo

    2006-01-01

    The variability of the sea surface height (SSH) around Japan during 1960-2002 was investigated using an ocean general circulation model. The first EOF mode of the simulated SSH change has bidecadal variability and exhibits simultaneous variations around Japan that are in good agreement with the observed sea level changes along the Japanese coast. The variability is caused primarily by the meridional shift of the boundary between the subtropical and subpolar gyres due to shifting of the westerlies over the central North Pacific. The second mode of SSH change indicates a north-south dipole structure around Japan, that results from a change in the strength of the subtropical gyre due to a change in the magnitude of the westerlies. The rising (descending) trend of the sea level observed in the western (eastern) part of Japan in the past 40 years is determined by the increasing trend of the westerlies.

  15. Sea ice and surface water circulation, Alaskan continental shelf

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wright, F. F. (Principal Investigator); Sharma, G. D.; Burns, J. J.

    1973-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. Sediments contributed by the Copper River in the Gulf of Alaska are carried westward along the shore as a distinct plume. Oceanic water relatively poor in suspended material appears to intrude near Montague Island, and turbid water between Middleton Island and Kayak Island is the result of Ekman between transport. An anticlockwise surface water circulation is observed in this region. Ground truth data indicate striking similarity with ERTS-1 imagery obtained on October 12, 1972. Observations of ERTS-1 imagery reveal that various characteristics and distribution of sea ice in the Arctic Ocean can be easily studied. Formation of different types of sea ice and their movement is quite discrenible. Sea ice moves parallel to the cost in near shore areas and to the northerly direction away from the coast.

  16. Covariation of Mesoscale Ocean Color and Sea-Surface Temperature Patterns in the Sargasso Sea

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McGillicuddy, Dennis J., Jr.; Kosnyrev, V. K.; Ryan, J. P.; Yoder, J. A.

    2001-01-01

    During the lifetime of the Coastal Zone Color Scanner, there were 21 instances in which both satellite-derived ocean color and sea-surface temperature are simultaneously available over large areas of the Sargasso Sea. These images reveal close correspondence between mesoscale structures observed in temperature and pigment fields. In general, higher (lower) pigment biomass occurs in mesoscale features consisting of cold (warm) temperature anomalies. This relationship is consistent with the idea that upward displacement of isopycnals at the base of the euphotic zone by mesoscale eddies is an important mechanism of nutrient supply in the region.

  17. Feasibility Study Of Sea Surface Currents Measurements With Doppler Scatterometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fabry, P.; Recchia, A.; de Kloe, J.; Stoffelen, A.; Husson, R.; Collard, F.; Chapron, B.; Mouche, A.; Enjolras, V.; Johannessen, J.; Lin, C. C.; Fois, F.

    2013-12-01

    We present the activity carried out in the framework of the ESA GSP study called "Feasibility Investigation of Global Ocean Surface Current Mapping using ERS, MetOp and QuikScat Wind Scatterometer” (DOPSCAT). The study was aimed at assessing the potential of scatterometer instruments for sea surface current vector retrieval under the strong requirements of preserving both the swath and the surface wind vector estimation performances offered by the existing scatterometers. The paper describes the main results obtained during the DOPSCAT study and provides some recommendations for this new instrument concept.

  18. Geoid Profiles in the Baltic Sea Determined Using GPS and Sea Level Surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jürgenson, Harli; Liibusk, Aive; Ellmann, Artu

    2008-12-01

    The idea was to compare the geoid of sea areas by an independent method, like GPS levelling, on the mainland. On the earth surface we can compare the gravimetric geoid with GPS levelling to get an accuracy estimation and tilt information. On the sea we can do it by the GPS methodology and eliminating the current water tilt corrections and the sea surface topography effect. A modern GPS device on board a ferry can store data every second and determine heights with an accuracy of a few centimetres (using the kinematic method with the postprocessing of data obtained from several base stations close to the ferry line). As a result, it is possible to observe the current water level's relative profile in reference to the ellipsoid. Some areas close to Estonia, such as the eastern part of the Gulf of Finland, are not completely covered by gravity measurements. The Baltic Sea has been measured using airborne gravimetry with the accuracy of about 2 mGal. Therefore, the gravimetric geoid is not fully reliable for the region either. If we take into account the tilt of the water level at the moment of measurement, we can observe the relative change of the geoid using an independent methodology, which serves as a comparison to the gravimetric geoid solution. The main problem during the measurement campaign, of course, was how to eliminate a water tilt. Water placement in relation to level surface is a very complex issue; special studies of that were conducted as well.

  19. Interannual variations of surface winds over China marginal seas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Che; Yan, Xiaomei

    2012-11-01

    In a study of surface monsoon winds over the China marginal seas, Sun et al. (2012) use singular value decomposition method to identify regional dominant modes and analyze their interdecadal variability. This paper continues to evaluate the interannual variability of each dominant mode and its relation to various atmospheric, oceanic and land factors. The findings include: 1) The intensity of the winter monsoon over the East China Sea is highly correlated with the Siberian High intensity and anti-correlated with the latitudinal position of the Aleutian Low as well as the rainfall in eastern China, Korean Peninsula and Japan; 2) The western Pacific subtropical high is significantly correlated with the summer monsoon intensity over the East China Sea and anti-correlated with the summer monsoon over the South China Sea; 3) The winter monsoon in a broad zonal belt through the Luzon Strait is dominated by the ENSO signal, strengthening in the La Niña phase and weakening in the El Niño phase. This inverse relation exhibits interdecadal shift with a period of weak correlation in the 1980s; 4) Analysis of tidal records validates the interdecadal weakening of the East Asian summer monsoon and reveals an atmospheric bridge that conveys the ENSO signal into the South China Sea via the winter monsoon.

  20. Mean Sea Surface and Variability of the Gulf of Mexico Using Geosat Altimetry Data

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-03-15

    Geosat Exact Repeat Mission (ERM) altimetric measurements of the sea surface height in the Gulf of Mexico are used to determine the mean sea surface... Gulf of Mexico . Keywords: Altimetry; Mesoscale oceanography; Ocean forecasting; Reprints.

  1. Improving the WRF model's simulation over sea ice surface through coupling with a complex thermodynamic sea ice model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Y.; Huang, J.; Luo, Y.; Zhao, Z.

    2015-12-01

    Sea ice plays an important role in the air-ice-ocean interaction, but it is often represented simply in many regional atmospheric models. The Noah sea ice model, which has been widely used in the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model, exhibits cold bias in simulating the Arctic sea ice temperature when validated against the Surface Heat Budget of the Arctic Ocean (SHEBA) in situ observations. According to sensitivity tests, this bias is attributed not only to the simulation of snow depth and turbulent fluxes but also to the heat conduction within snow and ice. Compared with the Noah sea ice model, the high-resolution thermodynamic snow and ice model (HIGHTSI) has smaller bias in simulating the sea ice temperature. HIGHTSI is further coupled with the WRF model to evaluate the possible added value from better resolving the heat transport and solar penetration in sea ice from a complex thermodynamic sea ice model. The cold bias in simulating the surface temperature over sea ice in winter by the original Polar WRF is reduced when HIGHTSI rather than Noah is coupled with the WRF model, and this also leads to a better representation of surface upward longwave radiation and 2 m air temperature. A discussion on the impact of specifying sea ice thickness in the WRF model is presented. Consistent with previous research, prescribing the sea ice thickness with observational information would result in the best simulation among the available methods. If no observational information is available, using an empirical method based on the relationship between sea ice concentration and sea ice thickness could mimic the large-scale spatial feature of sea ice thickness. The potential application of a thermodynamic sea ice model in predicting the change in sea ice thickness in a RCM is limited by the lack of sea ice dynamic processes in the model and the coarse assumption on the initial value of sea ice thickness.

  2. Sea surface wind streaks in spaceborne synthetic aperture radar imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Yuan; Li, Xiao-Ming; Sha, Jin

    2016-09-01

    Wind streaks are often observed in Synthetic aperture radar (SAR) images. They are used to determine the sea surface wind direction for sea surface wind field retrievals. It is generally understood that visible wind streaks are caused by roll vortices in the marine atmospheric boundary layer. In this study, 227 X-band spaceborne SAR images of TerraSAR-X and TanDEM-X acquired from the three FiNO platforms in the North Sea and Baltic Sea were thoroughly analyzed for a comprehensive understanding of the manifestation of wind streaks in SAR images. Approximately 48.0% of the 227 SAR images displayed wind streaks, among which 67.3%, 20.0%, and 12.7% occurred under unstable, neutral, and stable atmospheric conditions, respectively. The proportions indicate that wind streaks are more likely to be generated from thermal convection. Further investigations suggest that the inflection point and the wind shear may be essential for the appearance of wind streaks in SAR images under stable atmospheric conditions.

  3. Sea surface temperature anomalies, planetary waves, and air-sea feedback in the middle latitudes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frankignoul, C.

    1985-01-01

    Current analytical models for large-scale air-sea interactions in the middle latitudes are reviewed in terms of known sea-surface temperature (SST) anomalies. The scales and strength of different atmospheric forcing mechanisms are discussed, along with the damping and feedback processes controlling the evolution of the SST. Difficulties with effective SST modeling are described in terms of the techniques and results of case studies, numerical simulations of mixed-layer variability and statistical modeling. The relationship between SST and diabatic heating anomalies is considered and a linear model is developed for the response of the stationary atmosphere to the air-sea feedback. The results obtained with linear wave models are compared with the linear model results. Finally, sample data are presented from experiments with general circulation models into which specific SST anomaly data for the middle latitudes were introduced.

  4. Sea surface salinity and temperature seasonal changes in the Solomon and Bismarck Seas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delcroix, Thierry; Radenac, Marie-Helene; Cravatte, Sophie; Gourdeau, Lionel; Alory, Gael

    2014-05-01

    Small SST and SSS (an indicator of iron-rich Papua New Guinea river outflows) changes in the Solomon and Bismarck Seas may be transported to the equatorial Pacific and have strong climatic and biological impacts. We analyze mean and seasonal change of SST and SSS in the Solomon and Bismarck Seas, using 1977-2009 in situ data collected from Voluntary Observing Ships. Co-variability of these two variables with surface wind, altimeter-derived current anomalies, precipitation, and Sepik river discharge is examined. SST and SSS show large annual oscillations in the Solomon Sea, with the coldest and saltiest waters occurring in July/August mainly due to horizontal advection. In contrast, they show large semi-annual oscillations in the Bismarck Sea. There, the coldest and saltiest waters happen in January/February, when the northwest monsoon winds drive coastal upwelling, and in July/August, when the New Guinea Coastal Current advects cold and high-salinity waters from the Solomon Sea through Vitiaz Strait. The low SSS values observed in April/May, stuck between the two SSS maxima, are further enhanced by the Sepik river discharge annual maximum. A high-resolution model strengthens the conclusions we derive from observations. The impacts of ENSO on SST and SSS are also discussed.

  5. Satellite-Derived Sea Surface Temperature: Workshop 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Njoku, E. G.

    1983-01-01

    Satellite measurements of sea surface temperature are now possible using a variety of sensors. The present accuracies of these methods are in the range of 0.5 to 2.0 C. This makes them potentially useful for synoptic studies of ocean currents and for global monitoring of climatological anomalies. To improve confidence in the satellite data, objective evaluations of sensor accuracies are necessary, and the conditions under which these accuracies degrade need to be understood. The Scanning Multichannel Microwave Radiometer (SMMR) on the Nimbus-7 satellite was studied. Sea surface temperatures, derived from November 1979 SMMR data, were compared globally against ship measurements and climatology, using facilities of the JPL Pilot Ocean Data System. Methods for improved data analysis and plans for additional workshops to incorporate data from other sensors were discussed.

  6. Simulation of Earthquake-Generated Sea-Surface Deformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vogl, Chris; Leveque, Randy

    2016-11-01

    Earthquake-generated tsunamis can carry with them a powerful, destructive force. One of the most well-known, recent examples is the tsunami generated by the Tohoku earthquake, which was responsible for the nuclear disaster in Fukushima. Tsunami simulation and forecasting, a necessary element of emergency procedure planning and execution, is typically done using the shallow-water equations. A typical initial condition is that using the Okada solution for a homogeneous, elastic half-space. This work focuses on simulating earthquake-generated sea-surface deformations that are more true to the physics of the materials involved. In particular, a water layer is added on top of the half-space that models the seabed. Sea-surface deformations are then simulated using the Clawpack hyperbolic PDE package. Results from considering the water layer both as linearly elastic and as "nearly incompressible" are compared to that of the Okada solution.

  7. Estimation of the sea surface's two-scale backscatter parameters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wentz, F. J.

    1978-01-01

    The relationship between the sea-surface normalized radar cross section and the friction velocity vector is determined using a parametric two-scale scattering model. The model parameters are found from a nonlinear maximum likelihood estimation. The estimation is based on aircraft scatterometer measurements and the sea-surface anemometer measurements collected during the JONSWAP '75 experiment. The estimates of the ten model parameters converge to realistic values that are in good agreement with the available oceanographic data. The rms discrepancy between the model and the cross section measurements is 0.7 db, which is the rms sum of a 0.3 db average measurement error and a 0.6 db modeling error.

  8. Satellite-Derived Sea Surface Temperature: Workshop-2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Njoku, E. G.

    1984-01-01

    Global accuracies and error characteristics of presently orbiting satellite sensors are examined. The workshops are intended to lead to a better understanding of present capabilities for sea surface temperature measurement and to improve measurement concepts for the future. Data from the Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer AVHRR and Scanning Multichannel Microwave Radiometer is emphasized. Some data from the High Resolution Infrared Sounder HIRS and AVHRR are also examined. Comparisons of satellite data with ship and eXpendable BathyThermograph XBT measurement show standard deviations in the range 0.5 to 1.3 C with biases of less than 0.4 C, depending on the sensor, ocean region, and spatial/temporal averaging. The Sea Surface Temperature SST anomaly maps show good agreement in some cases, but a number of sensor related problems are identified.

  9. Bay of Bengal Surface and Thermocline and the Arabian Sea

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-09-30

    oceanographic processes that exchange low salinity surface and upper thermocline water of the Bay of Bengal with the salty Arabian Sea and tropical Indian Ocean ...e.g. where do the eddies come from? 2. Investigating advective pathways, and the role of isopycnal mixing, exchanging upper ocean water between the...the tropical Indian Ocean water , including the Indonesian Throughflow. APPROACH In situ observational data collected as part of ASIRI and

  10. Japanese Whaling Ships' Sea Surface Temperatures 1946-84.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mierzejewska, Anna W.; Wu, Zhongxiang; Newell, Reginald E.; Miyashita, Tomio

    1997-03-01

    Japanese whaling ship data, a homogeneous dataset mainly covering the southern high-latitude oceans, may be used to fill in gaps in recent sea surface temperature datasets, contributing a fair number of additional observations in this area. The Japanese whaling ship data are treated separately here for the period 1946-84, and they show no significant temperature changes during this period in the main fishing region of 60°-70°S or in the west Pacific warm pool.

  11. Feasibility of microwave holography for imaging the sea surface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wells, W.

    1972-01-01

    The possibility of imaging the sea surface in three dimensions by means of microwave holography from a low-flying aircraft is considered. Data cover a brief feasibility study and a review of some computer experiments in which it was demonstrated that it is possible to compute three-dimensional images of objects from raw holographic data recorded on magnetic tape. These experiments used synthetic data.

  12. Unravelling air-sea interactions driven by photochemistry in the sea-surface microlayer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    George, Christian; Alpert, Peter; Tinel, Liselotte; Rossignol, Stéphanie; Perrier, Sébastien; Bernard, Francois; Ciuraru, Raluca; Hayeck, Nathalie

    2016-04-01

    Interfaces are ubiquitous in the environment, and in addition many atmospheric key processes, such as gas deposition, aerosol and cloud formation are, at one stage or the other, strongly impacted by physical- and chemical processes occurring at interfaces. Unfortunately, these processes have only been suggested and discussed but never fully addressed because they were beyond reach. We suggest now that photochemistry or photosensitized reactions exist at interfaces, and we will present and discuss their possible atmospheric implications. Obviously, one of the largest interface is the sea-surface microlayer (SML), which is a region lying at the uppermost tens to hundreds of micrometres of the water surface, with physical, chemical and biological properties that differ from those of the underlying sub-surface water. Organic film formation at the sea surface is made possible in the presence of an excess of surface-active material. Hydrophobic surfactant films are typically believed to play the role of a physical barrier to air-sea exchanges, especially at low wind speed. We will show that dissolved organic matter (DOM) can trigger photochemistry at the air-sea interface, releasing unsaturated, functionalized volatile organic compounds (VOCs), including isoprene,... acting as precursors for the formation of organic aerosols, that were thought, up to now, to be solely of biological origin! In addition, we suggest that when arranged at an air/water interface, hydrophobic surfactant can have weak chemical interactions among them, which can trigger the absorption of sunlight and can consequently induce photochemistry at such interfaces. A major question arises from such observations, namely: can the existence of such weak intra- or intermolecular interactions and the subsequent photochemistry be generalized to many other atmospheric objects such as aerosols? This topic will be presented and discussed.

  13. Alkenone δD as an ecological indicator: A culture and field study of physiologically-controlled chemical and hydrogen-isotopic variation in C37 alkenones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolhowe, Matthew D.; Prahl, Fredrick G.; Langer, Gerald; Oviedo, Angela Maria; Ziveri, Patrizia

    2015-08-01

    A combined culture and field study was conducted in order to (1) more firmly identify the physiological controls on hydrogen isotopic composition of C37 alkenones produced by open-ocean coccolithophores and (2) determine the degree to which these controls are manifested in a natural water column. Nutrient-limitation experiments in culture, combined with previously published data, show that net fractionation between the growth medium and alkenones (αK37) varies with cellular alkenone content and production rate, and, by extension, growth phase. It is hypothesized that the relationship of αK37 with cellular alkenone content and production rate is due to increased use of anabolic NADPH in response to high rates of lipid synthesis. Euphotic zone profiles of δDK37, measured in suspended material from the Gulf of California and Eastern Tropical North Pacific, decreased with depth and light availability, and did not correlate in any expected way with previously-suggested controls on αK37. It is possible that the field data are driven by behavior in light-limited cells that is not represented by the available, nutrient-limited culture data. If true, δDK37 may have utility as an indicator of production depth in settings prone to subsurface production maxima. Relationships between αK37, cell density, and the carbon-isotopic fractionation term εp, however, suggest that αK37 acts an indicator of growth rate, which in this setting is only partially dependent on light, consistent with our interpretation of the culture data. If this latter interpretation proves correct, δDK37 may be a powerful ecological proxy specific to these climatically-important, calcifying, temperature-encoding species.

  14. Mercury speciation in surface waters of the north sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coquery, M.; Cossa, D.

    Mercury speciation was determined in samples of surface waters of the North Sea. Seventeen stations were visited including coastal waters off the Thames, Humber, Scheldt, Rhine, Ems, Weser and Elbe estuaries. Mercury concentrations measured in the present study are significantly lower than previous estimates for the North Sea, but they are similar to concentrations recently determined in other coastal environments. Concentrations of total dissolved mercury ranged from 0.9 to 4.8 pM with 0.4 to 1.8 pM as dissolved reactive mercury, representing on average about 30% of the total dissolved mercury. Particulate mercury constituted between 13 and 82% of the total mercury (dissolved and particulate) depending on the distribution of suspended particulate matter, with the highest proportions found near the coasts in the southern North Sea. The mercury content of the seawater particles varied between 116 and 484 ng·g -1 with 6% on average as particulate monomethylmercury. A longitudinal profile was completed in the outer estuary of the Elbe river; mercury concentrations reached 16.4 pM for dissolved mercury and 595 pM for particulate mercury in the low salinity region, indicating that the Elbe estuary is contaminated with mercury. This is similar to the contamination measured recently in the Scheldt estuary. The net input of mercury from the Elbe river to the North Sea was estimated at 0.43 kmol·a -1 for dissolved mercury and 4.24 kmol·a -1 for particulate mercury. The mercury concentrations measured in the Elbe estuary are used to estimate the total mercury input from freshwaters to the North Sea. It is comparable to direct atmospheric inputs to the North Sea.

  15. AIRS Sea Surface Temperature and Pacific Decadal Oscillation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, L. L.

    2015-12-01

    Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) has been providing necessary measurements for long term atmospheric and surface processes aboard NASA' s Aqua polar orbiter since May 2002. Here, we use time series of AIRS sea surface temperature (SST) anomalies to show the time evolution of Pacific Decadal Oscillation (PDO) in the Gulf of Alaska (lon:-144.5, lat:54.5) from 2003 to 2014. PDO is connected to the first mode of North Pacific SST variability and is tele-connected to ENSO in the tropics. Further analysis of AIRS data can provide clarification of Pacific climate variability.

  16. Organic polar pollutants in surface waters of inland seas.

    PubMed

    Orlikowska, Anna; Fisch, Kathrin; Schulz-Bull, Detlef E

    2015-12-30

    Available data about contamination by polar substances are mostly reported for rivers and near-shore waters and only limited studies exists about their occurrence in marine waters. We present concentrations and distribution of several polar pesticides and UV-filters in surface waters of three inland seas, the Baltic, Black and Mediterranean Sea. Many of the investigated compounds were below detection limits, however, those found in off-shore waters raise a concern about their persistence and possible adverse effect on the ecosystem. Despite a longstanding EU-wide ban we were able to detect atrazine in the Mediterranean and the Baltic Sea. Concentrations in the Black Sea were substantially higher. Runoff from agricultural and urban areas was the main transport route to marine ecosystems for investigated compounds, though irgarol in Mediterranean waters was attributed to intense maritime traffic. 2-Phenylbenzimidazole-5-sulfonic acid was the only UV-filter detected in marine waters, while benzophenone-4 was observed in the estuaries. Occurrence of UV-filters was seasonal.

  17. SMOS sea surface salinity maps of the Arctic Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gabarro, Carolina; Olmedo, Estrella; Turiel, Antonio; Ballabrera-Poy, Joaquim; Martinez, Justino; Portabella, Marcos

    2016-04-01

    Salinity and temperature gradients drive the thermohaline circulation of the oceans, and play a key role in the ocean-atmosphere coupling. The strong and direct interactions between the ocean and the cryosphere (primarily through sea ice and ice shelves) is also a key ingredient of the thermohaline circulation. The ESA's Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity (SMOS) mission, launched in 2009, has the objective measuring soil moisture over the continents and sea surface salinity over the oceans. Although the mission was originally conceived for hydrological and oceanographic studies [1], SMOS is also making inroads in the cryospheric monitoring. SMOS carries an innovative L-band (1.4 GHz, or 21-cm wavelength), passive interferometric radiometer (the so-called MIRAS) that measures the electromagnetic radiation emitted by the Earth's surface, at about 50 km spatial resolution wide swath (1200-km), and with a 3-day revisit time at the equator, but a more frequent one at the poles. Although the SMOS radiometer operating frequency offers almost the maximum sensitivity of the brightness temperature (TB) to sea surface salinity (SSS) variations, this is rather low, , i.e.,: 90% of ocean SSS values span a range of brightness temperatures of only 5K at L-band. This sensitivity is particularly low in cold waters. This implies that the SSS retrieval requires high radiometric performance. Since the SMOS launch, SSS Level 3 maps have been distributed by several expert laboratories including the Barcelona Expert Centre (BEC). However, since the TB sensitivity to SSS decreases with decreasing sea surface temperature (SST), large retrieval errors had been reported when retrieving salinity values at latitudes above 50⁰N. Two new processing algorithms, recently developed at BEC, have led to a considerable improvement of the SMOS data, allowing for the first time to derive SSS maps in cold waters. The first one is to empirically characterize and correct the systematic biases with six

  18. Microwave emission measurements of sea surface roughness, soil moisture, and sea ice structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gloersen, P.; Wilheit, T. T.; Schmugge, T. J.

    1972-01-01

    In order to demonstrate the feasibility of the microwave radiometers to be carried aboard the Nimbus 5 and 6 satellites and proposed for one of the earth observatory satellites, remote measurements of microwave radiation at wavelengths ranging from 0.8 to 21 cm have been made of a variety of the earth's surfaces from the NASA CV-990 A/C. Brightness temperatures of sea water surfaces of varying roughness, of terrain with varying soil moisture, and of sea ice of varying structure were observed. In each case, around truth information was available for correlation with the microwave brightness temperature. The utility of passive microwave radiometry in determining ocean surface wind speeds, at least for values higher than 7 meters/second has been demonstrated. In addition, it was shown that radiometric signatures can be used to determine soil moisture in unvegetated terrain to within five percentage points by weight. Finally, it was demonstrated that first year thick, multi-year, and first year thin sea ice can be distinguished by observing their differing microwave emissivities at various wavelengths.

  19. Ciguatera fish poisoning and sea surface temperatures in the Caribbean Sea and the West Indies.

    PubMed

    Tester, Patricia A; Feldman, Rebecca L; Nau, Amy W; Kibler, Steven R; Wayne Litaker, R

    2010-10-01

    Ciguatera fish poisoning (CFP) is a circumtropical disease caused by ingestion of a variety of reef fish that bioaccumulate algal toxins. Distribution and abundance of the organisms that produce these toxins, chiefly dinoflagellates of the genus Gambierdiscus, are reported to correlate positively with water temperature. Consequently, there is growing concern that increasing temperatures associated with climate change could increase the incidence of CFP. This concern prompted experiments on the growth rates of six Gambierdiscus species at temperatures between 18 degrees C and 33 degrees C and the examination of sea surface temperatures in the Caribbean and West Indies for areas that could sustain rapid Gambierdiscus growth rates year-round. The thermal optimum for five of six Gambierdiscus species tested was >/=29 degrees C. Long-term SST data from the southern Gulf of Mexico indicate the number of days with sea surface temperatures >/=29 degrees C has nearly doubled (44 to 86) in the last three decades. To determine how the sea surface temperatures and Gambierdiscus growth data correlate with CFP incidences in the Caribbean, a literature review and a uniform, region-wide survey (1996-2006) of CFP cases were conducted. The highest CFP incidence rates were in the eastern Caribbean where water temperatures are warmest and least variable.

  20. Chemical characterization of dissolved organic compounds from coastal sea surface microlayers (Baltic Sea, Germany).

    PubMed

    van Pinxteren, Manuela; Müller, Conny; Iinuma, Yoshiteru; Stolle, Christian; Herrmann, Hartmut

    2012-10-02

    The physicochemical properties of the sea surface microlayer (SML), i.e. the boundary layer between the air and the sea, and its impact on air-sea exchange processes have been investigated for decades. However, a detailed description about these processes remains incomplete. In order to obtain a better chemical characterization of the SML, in a case study three pairs of SML and corresponding bulk water samples were taken in the southern Baltic Sea. The samples were analyzed for dissolved organic carbon and dissolved total nitrogen, as well as for several organic nitrogen containing compounds and carbohydrates, namely aliphatic amines, dissolved free amino acids, dissolved free monosaccharides, sugar alcohols, and monosaccharide anhydrates. Therefore, reasonable analytical procedures with respect to desalting and enrichment were established. All aliphatic amines and the majority of the investigated amino acids (11 out of 18) were found in the samples with average concentrations between 53 ng L(-1) and 1574 ng L(-1). The concentrations of carbohydrates were slightly higher, averaging 2900 ng L(-1). Calculation of the enrichment factor (EF) between the sea surface microlayer and the bulk water showed that dissolved total nitrogen was more enriched (EF: 1.1 and 1.2) in the SML than dissolved organic carbon (EF: 1.0 and 1.1). The nitrogen containing organic compounds were generally found to be enriched in the SML (EF: 1.9-9.2), whereas dissolved carbohydrates were not enriched or even depleted (EF: 0.7-1.2). Although the investigated compounds contributed on average only 0.3% to the dissolved organic carbon and 0.4% to the total dissolved nitrogen fraction, these results underline the importance of single compound analysis to determine SML structure, function, and its potential for a transfer of compounds into the atmosphere.

  1. Reaction kinetics of alkenone and n-alkane thermal alteration at seismic timescales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rabinowitz, H. S.; Polissar, P. J.; Savage, H. M.

    2017-01-01

    Recent experiments and field observations have indicated that biomarker molecules can react over short timescales relevant to seismic slip, thereby making these compounds a useful tool in studying temperature rise in fault zones. However, short-timescale biomarker reaction kinetics studies have previously focused on compounds that have already experienced burial heating. Here, we present a set of hydrous pyrolysis experiments on Pleistocene-aged shallow marine sediment to develop the reaction kinetics of long-chain alkenone destruction, change in the alkenone unsaturation ratio (U37k'), and change in the n-alkane chain length distribution. Our results show that biomarker thermal maturity provides a useful method for detecting temperature rise in the shallow reaches of faults, such as subduction zone trench environments. Through the course of our work, we also noted the alteration of total alkenone concentrations and U37k' values in crushed sediments stored dry at room temperature for durations of months to years but not in the solvent extracts of these materials. This result, though parenthetical for our work in fault zones, has important implications for proper storage of sedimentary samples to be used for alkenone paleotemperature and productivity analysis.

  2. Microwave Imager Measures Sea Surface Temperature Through Clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    This image was acquired over Tropical Atlantic and U.S. East Coast regions on Aug. 22 - Sept. 23, 1998. Cloud data were collected by the Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite (GOES). Sea Surface Temperature (SST) data were collected aboard the NASA/NASDA Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) satellite by The TRMM Microwave Imager (TMI). TMI is the first satellite microwave sensor capable of accurately measuring sea surface temperature through clouds, as shown in this scene. For years scientists have known there is a strong correlation between sea surface temperature and the intensity of hurricanes. But one of the major stumbling blocks for forecasters has been the precise measurement of those temperatures when a storm begins to form. In this scene, clouds have been made translucent to allow an unobstructed view of the surface. Notice Hurricane Bonnie approaching the Carolina Coast (upper left) and Hurricane Danielle following roughly in its path (lower right). The ocean surface has been falsely colored to show a map of water temperature--dark blues are around 75oF, light blues are about 80oF, greens are about 85oF, and yellows are roughly 90oF. A hurricane gathers energy from warm waters found at tropical latitudes. In this image we see Hurricane Bonnie cross the Atlantic, leaving a cooler trail of water in its wake. As Hurricane Danielle followed in Bonnie's path, the wind speed of the second storm dropped markedly, as available energy to fuel the storm dropped off. But when Danielle left Bonnie's wake, wind speeds increased due to temperature increases in surface water around the storm. As a hurricane churns up the ocean, it's central vortex draws surface heat and water into the storm. That suction at the surface causes an upwelling of deep water. At depth, tropical ocean waters are significantly colder than water found near the surface. As they're pulled up to meet the storm, those colder waters essentially leave a footprint in the storm's wake

  3. Analysis of characteristics in the sea surface temperature variability in the East/Japan Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yeh, Sang-Wook; Park, Young-Gyu; Min, HongSik; Kim, Cheol-Ho; Lee, Jae-Hak

    2010-06-01

    We examine the characteristics of sea surface temperature (SST) variability in the East/Japan Sea (EJS) for the period of 1891-2005 using 1°×1° latitude and longitude resolution datasets from the Japan Meteorological Agency and the Hadley Centre. A significant warming trend that manifests itself more strongly over the southern part of the sea is observed. In addition, it is found in the EJS that warming during the boreal winter is more significant than that during the summer. The EJS SST index, obtained from the time series of monthly SST anomaly averaged over the western half of the EJS, where large SST anomaly standard deviation is observed, has a primary spectral density at a frequency longer than a decade and a secondary peak at the annual frequency band. The variability of the low-frequency EJS SST, which is mostly explained by that during winter, is characterized by significant warming from the early 1940s to the late 1940s and from the mid-1980s to the present. Between the two warming periods, the EJS SST variability is dominated by decadal fluctuations. Finally, we discuss possible mechanisms of the low frequency EJS SST variability in conjunction with atmospheric variability. When the northwesterly winter monsoon becomes weaker (stronger), less (greater) amount of cold air is advected to the EJS. Sensible heat loss from the sea to the air becomes smaller (greater) producing a warm (cold) SST anomaly.

  4. Sea-surface altimetry airborne observations using synoptic GNSS reflectometry at the Baltic Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ribó, Serni; Fabra, Fran; Cardellach, Estel; Li, Weiqiang; Rius, Antonio; Praks, Jaan; Rouhe, Erkka; Seppänen, Jaakko; Martín-Neira, Manuel

    2016-04-01

    Recent GNSS-R (Global Navigation Satellite System-Reflections) observations over the Baltic Sea have been taken using the SPIR (Software PARIS Interferometric Receiver) from an airborne platform at 3 km altitude. This newly developed instrument is capable of acquiring GNSS signals transmitted by multiple satellites simultaneously that have been reflected of the sea-surface. Reflections are usually gathered in off-nadir configuration using the instrument's beam-forming capabilities, which results in an increase of the instrument's swath. In this way, this technique opens the door to densify in space and time sea-altimetry observations to enhance future mesoscale and sub-mesoscale ocean altimetry. The altimetric observations collected during the Baltic Sea campaign have been analysed in terms of their power spectral densities. We consider the sequence of observations as an ergodic process that has contributions from the actual true altimetry as well as the observation noise. In this way it is possible to relate the expected ground resolution of the observations with the obtainable altimetric uncertainty. Results will be presented.

  5. Late Cretaceous (late Campanian-Maastrichtian) sea-surface temperature record of the Boreal Chalk Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thibault, Nicolas; Harlou, Rikke; Schovsbo, Niels H.; Stemmerik, Lars; Surlyk, Finn

    2016-02-01

    The last 8 Myr of the Cretaceous greenhouse interval were characterized by a progressive global cooling with superimposed cool/warm fluctuations. The mechanisms responsible for these climatic fluctuations remain a source of debate that can only be resolved through multi-disciplinary studies and better time constraints. For the first time, we present a record of very high-resolution (ca. 4.5 kyr) sea-surface temperature (SST) changes from the Boreal epicontinental Chalk Sea (Stevns-1 core, Denmark), tied to an astronomical timescale of the late Campanian-Maastrichtian (74 to 66 Ma). Well-preserved bulk stable isotope trends and calcareous nannofossil palaeoecological patterns from the fully cored Stevns-1 borehole show marked changes in SSTs. These variations correlate with deep-water records of climate change from the tropical South Atlantic and Pacific oceans but differ greatly from the climate variations of the North Atlantic. We demonstrate that the onset and end of the early Maastrichtian cooling and of the large negative Campanian-Maastrichtian boundary carbon isotope excursion are coincident in the Chalk Sea. The direct link between SSTs and δ13C variations in the Chalk Sea reassesses long-term glacio-eustasy as the potential driver of carbon isotope and climatic variations in the Maastrichtian.

  6. Late Cretaceous (Late Campanian-Maastrichtian) sea surface temperature record of the Boreal Chalk Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thibault, N.; Harlou, R.; Schovsbo, N. H.; Stemmerik, L.; Surlyk, F.

    2015-11-01

    The last 8 Myr of the Cretaceous greenhouse interval were characterized by a progressive global cooling with superimposed cool/warm fluctuations. The mechanisms responsible for these climatic fluctuations remain a source of debate that can only be resolved through multi-disciplinary studies and better time constraints. For the first time, we present a record of very high-resolution (ca. 4.5 kyr) sea-surface temperature (SST) changes from the Boreal epicontinental Chalk Sea (Stevns-1 core, Denmark), tied to an astronomical time scale of the late Campanian-Maastrichtian (74 to 66 Myr). Well-preserved bulk stable isotope trends and calcareous nannofossil palaeoecological patterns from the fully cored Stevns-1 borehole show marked changes in SSTs. These variations correlate with deep-water records of climate change from the tropical South Atlantic and Pacific oceans but differ greatly from the climate variations of the North Atlantic. We demonstrate that the onset and end of the early Maastrichtian cooling and of the large negative Campanian-Maastrichtian boundary carbon isotope excursion are coincident in the Chalk Sea. The direct link between SSTs and δ13C variations in the Chalk Sea reassesses long-term glacio-eustasy as the potential driver of carbon isotope and climatic variations in the Maastrichtian.

  7. Interannual Trends in Southern Ocean Sea Surface Temperatures and Sea Level from Remote Sensing Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lebedev, S. A.

    As is shown in last years researches climate changes in Antarctic result in interannual increase trend of surface air temperature and decrease of ice thickness These tendencies are must try in the Southern Ocean hydrological regime For that next remote sensing data AVHRR MCSST data and satellite altimetry data merged data of mission ERS TOPEX Poseidon Jason-1 ENVISAT GFO-1 are used to this task which give information about sea surface temperature SST and sea level anomaly SLA correspondingly According to obtained results SST has positive trend more 0 01 oC yr for 23-yr record 1982-2005 within 300-1000 km northward Antarctic coast However on average for the Southern Ocean SST have negative trend about -0 018 -0 035 oC yr In area of Pacific-Antarctic Ridge and of southern part of Mid Atlantic Ridge decrease rate is more than -0 075 oC yr SLA increases in all area of the Southern Ocean and has average rate about 0 024 -0 026 cm yr for 12-yr record 1993-2005 Around Antarctic SST rate good correspond with the trend analysis of surface air temperature of 8722 0 042 - 0 067oC yr inferred from the satellite 20-yr record Comiso 2000 Nevertheless the observed cooling is intriguing especially since it is compatible with the observed trend in the sea ice cover In the sea ice regions the northernmost positions of the ice edge are shown to be influenced by alternating warm and cold anomalies around the continent This work was partly supported by the Russian Fund of Basic Research Grant 06-05-65061

  8. Spatial heterogeneity of ocean surface boundary conditions under sea ice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barthélemy, Antoine; Fichefet, Thierry; Goosse, Hugues

    2016-06-01

    The high heterogeneity of sea ice properties implies that its effects on the ocean are spatially variable at horizontal scales as small as a few meters. Previous studies have shown that taking this variability into account in models could be required to simulate adequately mixed layer processes and the upper ocean temperature and salinity structures. Although many advanced sea ice models include a subgrid-scale ice thickness distribution, potentially providing heterogeneous surface boundary conditions, the information is lost in the coupling with a unique ocean grid cell underneath. The present paper provides a thorough examination of boundary conditions at the ocean surface in the NEMO-LIM model, which can be used as a guideline for studies implementing subgrid-scale ocean vertical mixing schemes. Freshwater, salt, solar heat and non-solar heat fluxes are examined, as well as the norm of the surface stress. All of the thermohaline fluxes vary considerably between the open water and ice fractions of grid cells. To a lesser extent, this is also the case for the surface stress. Moreover, the salt fluxes in both hemispheres and the solar heat fluxes in the Arctic show a dependence on the ice thickness category, with more intense fluxes for thinner ice, which promotes further subgrid-scale heterogeneity. Our analysis also points out biases in the simulated open water fraction and in the ice thickness distribution, which should be investigated in more details in order to ensure that the latter is used to the best advantage.

  9. Sea surface and remotely sensed temperatures off Cape Mendocino, California

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Breaker, L. C.; Arvesen, J. C.; Frydenlund, D.; Myers, J. S.; Short, K.

    1985-01-01

    During September 3 to 5, 1979, a multisensor oceanographic experiment was conducted off Cape Mendocino, California. The purpose of this experiment was to validate the use of remote sensing techniques over an area along the U.S. west coast where coasted upwelling is known to be intense. Remotely sensed mutlispectral data, including thermal infrared imagery, were collected above an upwelling feature off Cape Mendocino. Data were acquired from the TIRNOS-N and NOAA-6 polar orbiting satellites, the NASA Ames Research Center's high altitude U-2 aircraft, and a U.S. Coast Guard C-130 aircraft. Supporting surface truth data over the same feature were collected aboard the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) ship, OCEANOGRAPHER. Atmospheric soundings were also taken aboard the ship. The results indicate that shipboard measurements of sea surface temperatures can be reproduction within 1 C or better through remote observation of absolute infrared radiance values (whether measured aboard the NOAA polar orbiting satellite, the U-2 aircraft, or the Coast Guard aircraft) by using appropriate atmospheric corrections. Also, the patterns of sea surface temperature which were derived independently from the various remote platforms provide a consistent interpretation of the surface temperature field.

  10. Sea surface conditions remotely sensed by upward-looking ADCPs

    SciTech Connect

    Visbeck, M.; Fischer, J.

    1995-02-01

    Surface data obtained from 153-kHz acoustic Doppler current profilers (ADCPs) deployed in the Greenland Sea at about 350-m depth during the winter of 1988/89 were investigated under several aspects. First a method is described to improve the instrument depth measurements using the binned backscattered energy profile near the surface. The accuracy of the depth estimates is found to be significantly better than 0.5 m. Further, improvements of wind speed estimates were found by using the ambient noise in the 150-kHz band in favor of the surface backscattered energy as suggested by Schott. Limitations of the ambient sound method at low wind speeds are presented when thermal noise overwhelms the wind-induced noise. Finally, a method to detect the presence of sea ice above ADCP is presented by cross correlating the surface backscatter strength and the magnitudes of all Doppler velocity components. The resulting time series of ice concentration are in overall good agreement with Special Sensor Microwave/Imager (SSM/I) estimates but allow for higher temporal resolution. Further, in the vicinity of the ice edge, enhanced high-frequency ambient noise in the 150-kHz band was observed.

  11. Radar optimization for sea surface and geodetic measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harger, R. O.

    1974-01-01

    The efficient estimation of geoid and sea state parameters is discussed, and the optimum processing structures, including maximum likelihood estimators, and their accuracy limits are given for a model. The model accounts for random surface reflectivity, sea height, and additive noise, and allows for arbitrary radar system parameters, based on the assumption the received signal is a sample function of a normal random process. The integral equation associated with the Gaussian signal in Gaussian noise inference problem was solved. It is shown that the optimum processing is generally a mixture of coherent and incoherent integrations which may be viewed as a weighted summation of received power of the match-filtered received data. When estimates are correlated, the strongest correlation appears between geoid and asymmetry estimates, and between wave height standard deviation and reflectivity estimates.

  12. Multisensor monitoring of sea surface state of the coastal zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lavrova, Olga; Mityagina, Marina; Bocharova, Tatina

    Results of many-year monitoring of the state of coastal zone based on a multisensor approach are presented. The monitoring is aimed at solving the following tasks: operational mapping of parameters characterizing the state and pollution (coastal, ship and biogenic) of water; analysis of meteorological state and its effect on the drift and spread of pollutants; study of coastal circulation patterns and their impact on the drift and spread of pollutants; deriving typical pollution distribution patterns in the coastal zone.Processing and analysis is performed using data in visual, infrared and microwave ranges from ERS-2 SAR, Envisat ASAR/MERIS, Terra and Aqua MODIS and NOAA AVHRR instruments. These are complimented with ground data from meteorological stations on the shore and results of satellite data processing of previous periods. The main regions of interest are the Russian sectors of the Black and Azov Seas, southeastern part of the Baltic Sea, and northern and central regions of the Caspian Sea. Adjacent coasts are extremely populated and have well-developed industry, agriculture and rapidly growing tourist sectors. The necessity of constant monitoring of the sea state there is obvious.The monitoring activities allow us to accumulate extensive material for the study of hydrodynamic processes in the regions, in particular water circulation. Detailing the occurrence, evolution and drift of smalland meso-scale vortex structures is crucial for the knowledge of the mechanisms determining mixing and circulation processes in the coastal zone. These mechanisms play an important role in ecological, hydrodynamic and meteorological status of a coastal zone. Special attention is paid to the sea surface state in the Kerch Strait, where a tanker catastrophe took place on November 11, 2007 causing a spillage of over 1.5 thousand tons of heavy oil. The Kerch Strait is characterized by a complex current system with current directions changing to their opposites depending on

  13. Albatrosses as Ocean Samplers of Sea Surface Temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaffer, S. A.; Kappes, M.; Tremblay, Y.; Costa, D. P.; Weber, R.; Weimerskirch, H.

    2006-12-01

    Albatrosses are unique ocean voyagers because they range so widely and travel at speeds exceeding 90 km per hour. Because they can integrate vast areas of open-ocean, albatrosses are ideal ocean samplers. Between 2003 and 2005 breeding seasons, 21 Laysan and 15 black-footed albatrosses (body mass 2.5 to 3.5 kg) were equipped with 6 g leg-mounted geolocation archival data loggers at Tern Island, French Frigate Shoals, Northwest Hawaiian Islands. The tags sampled environmental temperatures every 480 or 540 s and provided a single location per day for the duration of deployment. Whenever an albatross landed on the sea surface to feed or rest, the tag sampled sea surface temperature (SST). After nearly one year of deployment, 31 albatrosses were recaptured and 29 tags provided complete records. A total of 377,455 SST readings were obtained over 7,360 bird-days at sea. Given the location errors in the geolocation methodology (200 km) and the lack of temporal resolution (1 location per day), the SST measurements can only be used to characterize broad-scale correlates between albatross distribution and the ocean environment. However, in February 2006, we deployed 45 g GPS data loggers on 10 breeding albatrosses for 2-4 day deployments. The GPS loggers were attached to feathers on the albatrosses backs, they sampled every 10 s, and were accurate to within 10 m. One albatross was also equipped with the same leg-mounted archival tag that sampled SST every 8 s. This albatross collected 6,289 SST measurements with complementary GPS quality locations in 3 days at sea. These results highlight the efficacy of albatrosses as ocean samplers. Given that Laysan and black- footed albatrosses range throughout the North Pacific Ocean, it is conceivable that these seabirds could someday become sentinels of changing oceanic conditions. Moreover, these technologies provide exciting new information about the oceanic habitats of North Pacific albatrosses.

  14. Microwave Remote Sensing Modeling of Ocean Surface Salinity and Winds Using an Empirical Sea Surface Spectrum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yueh, Simon H.

    2004-01-01

    Active and passive microwave remote sensing techniques have been investigated for the remote sensing of ocean surface wind and salinity. We revised an ocean surface spectrum using the CMOD-5 geophysical model function (GMF) for the European Remote Sensing (ERS) C-band scatterometer and the Ku-band GMF for the NASA SeaWinds scatterometer. The predictions of microwave brightness temperatures from this model agree well with satellite, aircraft and tower-based microwave radiometer data. This suggests that the impact of surface roughness on microwave brightness temperatures and radar scattering coefficients of sea surfaces can be consistently characterized by a roughness spectrum, providing physical basis for using combined active and passive remote sensing techniques for ocean surface wind and salinity remote sensing.

  15. Modern Tasman Sea surface reservoir ages from deep-sea black corals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Komugabe, Aimée F.; Fallon, Stewart J.; Thresher, Ronald E.; Eggins, Stephen M.

    2014-01-01

    Marine reservoir ages are a key element in calculating and constraining uncertainty in radiocarbon age estimates and are also essential to better understand regional ocean circulation. In this study, we present a new method to reconstruct long-term, high-resolution sea surface reservoir ages based on analysis of the organic skeleton of deep-sea (560 m) black coral (Anthozoa, Antipatharia). Our results confirm that antipatharians are extremely slow growing (typical radial growth rate for a South Pacific specimen around 0.03 mm/yr). Coupled uranium series and radiocarbon measurements were made on black coral collected live from the Norfolk Ridge (north Tasman Sea) to provide the first modern reservoir ages for this region. At the Norfolk Ridge, the average reservoir age between 1790 AD and 1900 AD was ∼330 years. This was followed by a steep decrease over time of about 70 years to 1950 AD (our most modern value). This indicates an increase in surface ocean ventilation of water masses in this region. These results are consistent with observational studies for the early twentieth century, which suggest significant changes in regional circulation of the southwest pacific.

  16. Retrieval of eddy dynamics from SMOS sea surface salinity measurements in the Algerian Basin (Mediterranean Sea)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Isern-Fontanet, Jordi; Olmedo, Estrella; Turiel, Antonio; Ballabrera-Poy, Joaquim; García-Ladona, Emilio

    2016-06-01

    The circulation in the Algerian Basin is characterized by the presence of fresh-core eddies that propagate along the coast or at distances between 100 and 200 km from the coast. Enhancements in the processing of the Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity (SMOS) data have allowed to produce, for the first time, satellite sea surface salinity (SSS) maps in the Mediterranean Sea that capture the signature of Algerian eddies. SMOS data can be used to track them for long periods of time, especially during winter. SMOS SSS maps are well correlated with in situ measurements although the former has a smaller dynamical range. Despite this limitation, SMOS SSS maps capture the key dynamics of Algerian eddies allowing to retrieve velocities from SSS with the correct sign of vorticity.

  17. Homogenization methods for the Sea Surface Temperature Data over the South China Seas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, G. S.; Hou, M.; Li, Y.; Wang, H.; Fan, W. J.; Liu, K. X.; Gao, J.; Li, C.

    2017-01-01

    Based on the metadata, Monthly Sea Surface Temperature (SST) series from nine marine stations over the South China Sea (SCS) are homogeneity detection and correction by Penalized Maximum T Test (PMT) method. The reference stations are developed using surrounding meteorological stations. Correction results show that: (1) The homogeneity detection and correction of marine observation stations should be based on the metadata, meanwhile, fully consider the influence of regional climate change factors. (2) Correlation analysis found that, the air temperature series from the surrounding meteorological stations is currently the optimal reference series. (3) The marine stations has 1∼2 change points average, among them, changes of instrumentation and changes of location environment has great impact on the discontinuities. (4) The trend of the SST over SCS have a more pronounced warming trend during the past 52 years. Correction results indicate that the homogenization research in the SCS has an important meaning for the study of the SCS coast SST changes and climate change.

  18. South Atlantic sea surface temperature anomalies and air-sea interactions: stochastic models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dobrovolski, S. G.

    1994-09-01

    Data on the South Atlantic monthly sea surface temperature anomalies (SSTA) are analysed using the maximum-entropy method. It is shown that the Markov first-order process can describe, to a first approximation, SSTA series. The region of maximum SSTA values coincides with the zone of maximum residual white noise values (sub-Antarctic hydrological front). The theory of dynamic-stochastic climate models is applied to estimate the variability of South Atlantic SSTA and air-sea interactions. The Adem model is used as a deterministic block of the dynamic-stochastic model. Experiments show satisfactorily the SSTA intensification in the sub-Antarctic front zone, with appropriate standard deviations, and demonstrate the leading role of the abnormal drift currents in these processes.

  19. Molecular isotopic and dinoflagellate evidence for Late Holocene freshening of the Black Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van der Meer, Marcel T. J.; Sangiorgi, Francesca; Baas, Marianne; Brinkhuis, Henk; Sinninghe Damsté, Jaap S.; Schouten, Stefan

    2008-03-01

    The Black Sea is the world's largest anoxic basin with oxygen-free conditions below water depths of approximately 100 m resulting from strong density stratification. The salinity of its surface water likely varied substantially over time due to variations in freshwater input from large rivers and in the saline bottom water of Mediterranean origin coming across the shallow sill of the Bosporus. However, long-term reconstructions of surface water salinities are lacking. The invasion of the coccolithophorid Emiliania huxleyi in the Black Sea at approximately 2720 a, responsible for a marked change in sediment composition (lithology), has been commonly attributed to salinity levels rising above 11. We analyzed the δD values of long-chain alkenones produced by haptophyte algae, mainly E. huxleyi, in a core from the eastern basin of the Black Sea to reconstruct past variations in sea surface salinities, and combined this with relative salinity changes generated from organic-walled dinoflagellate cyst (dinocyst) distributions from the same core. Combined results indicate a substantial freshening of Black Sea surface waters in the last 3000 years, suggesting that sea surface salinity was substantially higher than the present-day salinity of approximately 18 at the time E. huxleyi invaded the Black Sea.

  20. Surface Heat Budgets and Sea Surface Temperature in the Pacific Warm Pool During TOGA COARE

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chou, Shu-Hsien; Zhao, Wenzhong; Chou, Ming-Dah

    1998-01-01

    The daily mean heat and momentum fluxes at the surface derived from the SSM/I and Japan's GMS radiance measurements are used to study the temporal and spatial variability of the surface energy budgets and their relationship to the sea surface temperature during the COARE intensive observing period (IOP). For the three time legs observed during the IOP, the retrieved surface fluxes compare reasonably well with those from the IMET buoy, RV Moana Wave, and RV Wecoma. The characteristics of surface heat and momentum fluxes are very different between the southern and northern warm pool. In the southern warm pool, the net surface heat flux is dominated by solar radiation which is, in turn, modulated by the two Madden-Julian oscillations. The surface winds are generally weak, leading to a shallow ocean mixed layer. The solar radiation penetrating through the bottom of the mixed layer is significant, and the change in the sea surface temperature during the IOP does not follow the net surface heat flux. In the northern warm pool, the northeasterly trade wind is strong and undergoes strong seasonal variation. The variation of the net surface heat flux is dominated by evaporation. The two westerly wind bursts associated with the Madden-Julian oscillations seem to have little effect on the net surface heat flux. The ocean mixed layer is deep, and the solar radiation penetrating through the bottom of the mixed layer is small. As opposed to the southern warm pool, the trend of the sea surface temperature in the northern warm pool during the IOP is in agreement with the variation of the net heat flux at the surface.

  1. Simulations of The Extreme Precipitation Event Enhanced by Sea Surface Temperature Anomaly over the Black Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hakan Doǧan, Onur; Önol, Barış

    2016-04-01

    Istanbul Technical University, Aeronautics and Astronautics Faculty, Meteorological Engineering, Istanbul, Turkey In this study, we examined the extreme precipitation case over the Eastern Black Sea region of Turkey by using regional climate model, RegCM4. The flood caused by excessive rain in August 26, 2010 killed 12 people and the landslides in Rize province have damaged many buildings. The station based two days total precipitation exceeds 200 mm. One of the usual suspects for this extreme event is positive anomaly of sea surface temperature (SST) over the Black Sea where the significant warming trend is clear in the last three decades. In August 2010, the monthly mean SST is higher than 3 °C with respect to the period of 1981-2010. We designed three sensitivity simulations with RegCM4 to define the effects of the Black Sea as a moisture source. The simulation domain with 10-km horizontal resolution covers all the countries bordering the Black Sea and simulation period is defined for entire August 2010. It is also noted that the spatial variability of the precipitation produced by the reference simulation (Sim-0) is consistent with the TRMM data. In terms of analysis of the sensitivity to SST, we forced the simulations by subtracting 1 °C (Sim-1), 2 °C (Sim-2) and 3 °C (Sim-3) from the ERA-Interim 6-hourly SST data (considering only the Black Sea). The sensitivity simulations indicate that daily total precipitation for all these simulations gradually decreased based on the reference simulation (Sim-0). 3-hourly maximum precipitation rates for Sim-0, Sim-1, Sim-2 and Sim-3 are 32, 25, 13 and 10.5 mm respectively over the hotspot region. Despite the fact that the simulations signal points out the same direction, degradation of the precipitation intensity does not indicate the same magnitude for all simulations. It is revealed that 2 °C (Sim-2) threshold is critical for SST sensitivity. We also calculated the humidity differences from the simulation and these

  2. Estimation of subsurface thermal structure using sea surface height and sea surface temperature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kang, Yong Q. (Inventor); Jo, Young-Heon (Inventor); Yan, Xiao-Hai (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    A method of determining a subsurface temperature in a body of water is disclosed. The method includes obtaining surface temperature anomaly data and surface height anomaly data of the body of water for a region of interest, and also obtaining subsurface temperature anomaly data for the region of interest at a plurality of depths. The method further includes regressing the obtained surface temperature anomaly data and surface height anomaly data for the region of interest with the obtained subsurface temperature anomaly data for the plurality of depths to generate regression coefficients, estimating a subsurface temperature at one or more other depths for the region of interest based on the generated regression coefficients and outputting the estimated subsurface temperature at the one or more other depths. Using the estimated subsurface temperature, signal propagation times and trajectories of marine life in the body of water are determined.

  3. Radio emission of sea surface at centimeter wavelengths and is fluctuations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tseytlin, N. M.; Shutko, A. M.; Zhislin, G. M.

    1981-01-01

    The eigen thermal radio emission of the sea was examined as well as the agitated surface of the sea when the reflection (scattering) is similar in nature to diffused scattering. The contribution of this emission to the total emission of the sea is practically constant in time, and the time fluctuations of the radio emissions of the sea are basically determined only by a change in the eigen emission of the sea, connected with the agitation.

  4. Joint variability of global runoff and global sea surface temperatures

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McCabe, G.J.; Wolock, D.M.

    2008-01-01

    Global land surface runoff and sea surface temperatures (SST) are analyzed to identify the primary modes of variability of these hydroclimatic data for the period 1905-2002. A monthly water-balance model first is used with global monthly temperature and precipitation data to compute time series of annual gridded runoff for the analysis period. The annual runoff time series data are combined with gridded annual sea surface temperature data, and the combined dataset is subjected to a principal components analysis (PCA) to identify the primary modes of variability. The first three components from the PCA explain 29% of the total variability in the combined runoff/SST dataset. The first component explains 15% of the total variance and primarily represents long-term trends in the data. The long-term trends in SSTs are evident as warming in all of the oceans. The associated long-term trends in runoff suggest increasing flows for parts of North America, South America, Eurasia, and Australia; decreasing runoff is most notable in western Africa. The second principal component explains 9% of the total variance and reflects variability of the El Ni??o-Southern Oscillation (ENSO) and its associated influence on global annual runoff patterns. The third component explains 5% of the total variance and indicates a response of global annual runoff to variability in North Aflantic SSTs. The association between runoff and North Atlantic SSTs may explain an apparent steplike change in runoff that occurred around 1970 for a number of continental regions.

  5. Spherical harmonic expansion of the Levitus Sea surface topography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Engelis, Theodossios

    1987-01-01

    Prior information for the stationary sea surface topography (SST) may be needed in altimetric solutions that intend to simultaneously improve the gravity field and determine the SST. For this purpose the oceanographically derived SST estimates are represented by a spherical harmonic expansion. The spherical harmonic coefficients are computed from a least squares adjustment of the data covering the majority of the oceanic regions of the world. Several tests are made to determine the optimum maximum degree of solution and the best configuration of the geometry of the data in order to obtain a solution that fits the data and also provides a good spectral representation of the SST.

  6. Sea Surface Temperature and Vegetation Index from MODIS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    This is a composite MODIS image showing the 'green wave' of spring in North America and sea surface temperature in the ocean, collected over an 8-day period during the first week in April 2000. On land, the darker green pixels show where the most green foliage is being produced due to photosynthetic activity. Yellows on land show where there is little or no productivity and red is a boundary zone. In the ocean, orange and yellows show warmer waters and blues show colder values. (MODIS Data Type: MODIS-PFM)

  7. Seasonal sea surface and sea ice signal in the fjords of Eastern Greenland from CryoSat-2 SARin altimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abulaitijiang, Adili; Baltazar Andersen, Ole; Stenseng, Lars

    2014-05-01

    Cryosat-2 offers the first ever possibility to perform coastal altimetric studies using SAR-Interferometry. This enabled qualified measurements of sea surface height (SST) in the fjords in Greenland. Scoresbysund fjord on the east coast of Greenland is the largest fjord in the world which is also covered by CryoSat-2 SAR-In mask making it a good test region. Also, the tide gauge operated by DTU Space is sitting in Scoresbysund bay, which provides solid ground-based sea level variation records throughout the year. We perform an investigation into sea surface height variation since the start of the Cryosat-2 mission using SAR-In L1B data processed with baseline B processing. We have employed a new develop method for projecting all SAR-In observations in the Fjord onto a centerline up the Fjord. Hereby we can make solid estimates of the annual and (semi-) annual signal in sea level/sea ice freeboard within the Fjord. These seasonal height variations enable us to derive sea ice freeboard changes in the fjord from satellite altimetry. Derived sea level and sea-ice freeboard can be validated by comparison with the tide gauge observations for sea level and output from the Microwave Radiometer derived observations of sea ice freeboard developed at the Danish Meteorological Institute.

  8. Fine-Resolution Satellite-Based Daily Sea Surface Temperatures over the Global Ocean

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-05-01

    MODAS with latitudinal extent limited to ±80. Note that only the RTG product includes SST in the Caspian Sea and the Sea of Azov . The plot masks SST...Fine-resolution satellite-based daily sea surface temperatures over the global ocean A. B. Kara1 and C. N. Barron1 Received 18 November 2006; revised...13 February 2007; accepted 27 February 2007; published 22 May 2007. [1] The accuracy and relative merits of two sets of daily global sea surface

  9. Accuracy of Sea Surface Topography with GPS Scattered Signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zuffada, C.; Zavorotny, V. U.; Lowe, S.

    2001-12-01

    The concept of using GPS reflected signals for ocean and land remote sensing is based on the use of one airborne (or space-based) GPS receiver working simultaneously with a constellation of several signal-transmitting GPS satellites. This would offer an advantage in terms of spatial coverage compared to a conventional monostatic radar system and possibly allow new scientific applications to be pursued. However, the limited power of GPS transmitters and a relatively low surface cross section would require either large receiving antennas or longer integration times to optimize the signal-to-noise ratio. Analogously to the case of a conventional radar altimeter, the reflected GPS signal acquired by the receiver is the average power versus time (a range measurement) and generally represents the contributions from surfaces which scatter incoherently. This waveform is derived as a function of viewing geometry, system parameters, surface roughness and dielectric properties of underlying covers. This work investigates the spatial-temporal coherence properties and statistics of the measured reflected GPS signal that describes variability from one sample to another. This information is needed to choose an optimal strategy for a successful signal processing. We examine the above-mentioned properties of the modeled received power as a function of surface state and scattering geometry. Its impact on the accuracy of sea surface topography, both from airborne and orbital platforms is addressed. A characterization of error and expected spatial resolution in relation to existing instruments is discussed. Furthermore, in examining the coherence time, we analyze the spectral behavior of the reflected signal versus sea state parameters, such as wind vector. In addition, we compare the predictions with data available from recent airplane measurements taken in the Pacific Ocean off the coast of Southern California obtaining preliminary validations of our models.

  10. The influence of global sea surface temperature variability on the large-scale land surface temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tyrrell, Nicholas L.; Dommenget, Dietmar; Frauen, Claudia; Wales, Scott; Rezny, Mike

    2015-04-01

    In global warming scenarios, global land surface temperatures () warm with greater amplitude than sea surface temperatures (SSTs), leading to a land/sea warming contrast even in equilibrium. Similarly, the interannual variability of is larger than the covariant interannual SST variability, leading to a land/sea contrast in natural variability. This work investigates the land/sea contrast in natural variability based on global observations, coupled general circulation model simulations and idealised atmospheric general circulation model simulations with different SST forcings. The land/sea temperature contrast in interannual variability is found to exist in observations and models to a varying extent in global, tropical and extra-tropical bands. There is agreement between models and observations in the tropics but not the extra-tropics. Causality in the land-sea relationship is explored with modelling experiments forced with prescribed SSTs, where an amplification of the imposed SST variability is seen over land. The amplification of to tropical SST anomalies is due to the enhanced upper level atmospheric warming that corresponds with tropical moist convection over oceans leading to upper level temperature variations that are larger in amplitude than the source SST anomalies. This mechanism is similar to that proposed for explaining the equilibrium global warming land/sea warming contrast. The link of the to the dominant mode of tropical and global interannual climate variability, the El Niño Southern Oscillation (ENSO), is found to be an indirect and delayed connection. ENSO SST variability affects the oceans outside the tropical Pacific, which in turn leads to a further, amplified and delayed response of.

  11. The mean sea surface height and geoid along the Geosat subtrack from Bermuda to Cape Cod

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kelly, Kathryn A.; Joyce, Terrence M.; Schubert, David M.; Caruso, Michael J.

    1991-01-01

    The mean sea-surface height and the gravitational geoid are presently estimated via near-surface velocity changes and concurrent sea-level changes along an ascending Geosat subtrack. The velocity measurements were made on three traverses, within ten days, of a Geosat subtrack, by means of an acoustic Doppler current profiler (ADCP). The mean sea-surface height was estimated as the difference between the instantaneous sea-surface height from ADCP and the Geosat residual sea level. In order to minimize mesoscale errors in the estimate, the along-track geoid estimate was computed as the difference between mean sea-level height from the Geosat Exact Repeat Mission and an estimate of the mean sea-surface height.

  12. Understanding and predicting changes in North Atlantic Sea Surface Temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yeager, S. G.

    The mechanisms associated with sea surface temperature variability in the North Atlantic are explored using observation-based reconstructions of the historical surface states of the atmosphere and ocean as well as simulations run with the Community Earth System Model, version 1 (CESM1). The relationship between air-sea heat flux and SST between 1948 and 2009 yields evidence of a positive heat flux feedback at work in the subpolar gyre region on quasi-decadal timescales. Warming of the high latitude Atlantic precedes an atmospheric response which resembles a negative NAO state. The historical flux data set is used to estimate temporal variations in North Atlantic deep water formation which suggest that NAO variations drove strong decadal changes in thermohaline circulation strength in the last half century. Model simulations corroborate the observation-based inferences that substantial changes in the strength of the Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation (AMOC) ensued as a result of NAO-driven water mass perturbations, and that changes in the large-scale ocean circulation played a significant role in modulating North Atlantic SST. Surface forcing perturbation experiments show that the simulated low-frequency AMOC variability is mainly driven by turbulent buoyancy forcing over the Labrador Sea region, and that the decadal ocean variability, in uncoupled experiments, derives from low-frequency variability in the overlying atmospheric state. Surface momentum forcing accounts for most of the interannual variability in AMOC at all latitudes, and also most of the decadal AMOC variability south of the Equator. We show that the latter relates to the trend in wind stress forcing of the Southern Ocean, but that Southern Ocean forcing explains very little of the North Atlantic signal. The sea surface height in the Labrador Sea is identified as a strongly buoyancy-forced observable which supports its use as a monitor of AMOC strength. The dynamics which characterize the

  13. Sea surface Ka-band radar cross-section from field observations in the Black Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yurovsky, Yury; Kudryavtsev, Vladimir; Grodsky, Semyon; Chapron, Bertrand

    2016-04-01

    An interest in Ka-band radar backscattering from the ocean surface is growing due to better spatial resolution and more accurate Doppler anomaly estimate. But, available empirical models of Ka-band cross-section are quite scarce and sometime controversial. Here we present multi-year (2009-2015) field measurements of Ka-band co-polarized (VV and HH) sea surface normalized radar cross-section (NRCS) from research platform in the Black sea collected in a wide range of observation and sea state conditions. The data are fitted by polynomial function of incidence angle, azimuth and wind speed with accounting for measured radar antenna pattern. This empirical NRCS is compared with published Ka- and Ku-band data. Our Ka-band NRCS is close to Ku-band, but is 5-7 dB higher than 'pioneer' measurements by Masuko et al. (1986). Following the two-scale Bragg paradigm, the NRCS is split into polarized (Bragg) and non-polarized components and analyzed in terms of polarization ratio (VV/HH) and polarization difference (VV-HH) to estimate wave spectra at the Bragg wave number. Non-polarized component dominates at low incidence angles <30° due to specular reflection from regular surface. At larger incidence angles, the relative non-polarized contribution decreases, but grows again at HH-polarization approaching 0.7-0.8 at 65° for 10 m/s wind speed, suggesting that backscattering from breaking waves dominates HH NRCS at low grazing angles. At high incidence angles (>60°) NRCS azimuth dependency is unimodal (upwind peak) for HH and bimodal (with up- and downwind peaks) for VV polarization. This again can be attributed to different backscattering mechanisms for VV and HH polarizations. With decreasing of incidence angle, up- to downwind ratio tends to 1, and under light wind conditions (4-6 m/s) can be less than 1. The same situation is observed for polarization difference, which reflects Bragg backscattering properties only. This effect can be explained by enhanced roughness on

  14. Spatio-temporal variability in sea surface temperatures for the Yellow Sea based on MODIS dataset

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Chunli; Sun, Qiwei; Xing, Qianguo; Liang, Zhenlin; Deng, Yue; Zhu, Lixin

    2017-02-01

    The spatio-temporal variabilities in sea surface temperature (SST) were analyzed using a time series of MODIS datasets for four separate regions in the Yellow Sea (YS) that were located along a north-south axis. The space variant temporal anomaly was further decomposed using an empirical orthogonal function (EOF) for estimating spatially distributed SST. The monthly SSTs showed similar temporal patterns in each region, which ranged from 2.4°C to 28.4°C in the study years 2011 to 2013, with seasonal cycles being stronger at the higher latitudes and weaker at the lower latitudes. Spatially, although there were no significant differences among the four regions (p < 0.05) in any year, the geographical distribution of SST was characterized by an obvious gradient whereby SST decreased along the north-south axis. The monthly thermal difference among regions was largest in winter since the SST in the southeast was mainly affected by the Yellow Sea Warm Currents. The EOF1 mode accounted for 56% of the total spatial variance and exhibited a warming signal during the study period. The EOF2 mode accounted for 8% of the total variance and indicated the warm current features in the YS. The EOF3 mode accounted for 6% of the total variance and indicated the topographical features. The methodology used in this study demonstrated the spatio-temporal variabilities in the YS.

  15. Spatio-temporal variability in sea surface temperatures for the Yellow Sea based on MODIS dataset

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Chunli; Sun, Qiwei; Xing, Qianguo; Liang, Zhenlin; Deng, Yue; Zhu, Lixin

    2017-03-01

    The spatio-temporal variabilities in sea surface temperature (SST) were analyzed using a time series of MODIS datasets for four separate regions in the Yellow Sea (YS) that were located along a north-south axis. The space variant temporal anomaly was further decomposed using an empirical orthogonal function (EOF) for estimating spatially distributed SST. The monthly SSTs showed similar temporal patterns in each region, which ranged from 2.4°C to 28.4°C in the study years 2011 to 2013, with seasonal cycles being stronger at the higher latitudes and weaker at the lower latitudes. Spatially, although there were no significant differences among the four regions ( p < 0.05) in any year, the geographical distribution of SST was characterized by an obvious gradient whereby SST decreased along the north-south axis. The monthly thermal difference among regions was largest in winter since the SST in the southeast was mainly affected by the Yellow Sea Warm Currents. The EOF1 mode accounted for 56% of the total spatial variance and exhibited a warming signal during the study period. The EOF2 mode accounted for 8% of the total variance and indicated the warm current features in the YS. The EOF3 mode accounted for 6% of the total variance and indicated the topographical features. The methodology used in this study demonstrated the spatio-temporal variabilities in the YS.

  16. Attributing extreme precipitation in the Black Sea region to sea surface warming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meredith, Edmund; Semenov, Vladimir; Maraun, Douglas; Park, Wonsun; Chernokulsky, Alexander

    2016-04-01

    Higher sea surface temperatures (SSTs) warm and moisten the overlying atmosphere, increasing the low-level atmospheric instability, the moisture available to precipitating systems and, hence, the potential for intense convective systems. Both the Mediterranean and Black Sea regions have seen a steady increase in summertime SSTs since the early 1980s, by over 2 K in places. This raises the question of how this SST increase has affected convective precipitation extremes in the region, and through which mechanisms any effects are manifested. In particular, the Black Sea town of Krymsk suffered an unprecedented precipitation extreme in July 2012, which may have been influenced by Black Sea warming, causing over 170 deaths. To address this question, we adopt two distinct modelling approaches to event attribution and compare their relative merits. In the first, we use the traditional probabilistic event attribution approach involving global climate model ensembles representative of the present and a counterfactual past climate where regional SSTs have not increased. In the second, we use the conditional event attribution approach, taking the 2012 Krymsk precipitation extreme as a showcase example. Under the second approach, we carry out ensemble sensitivity experiments of the Krymsk event at convection-permitting resolution with the WRF regional model, and test the sensitivity of the event to a range of SST forcings. Both experiments show the crucial role of recent Black Sea warming in amplifying the 2012 Krymsk precipitation extreme. In the conditional event attribution approach, though, the explicit simulation of convective processes provides detailed insight into the physical mechanisms behind the extremeness of the event, revealing the dominant role of dynamical (i.e. static stability and vertical motions) over thermodynamical (i.e. increased atmospheric moisture) changes. Additionally, the wide range of SST states tested in the regional setup, which would be

  17. Chlorinated hydrocarbons in the Sargasso sea atmosphere and surface water.

    PubMed

    Bidleman, T F; Olney, C E

    1974-02-08

    Polychlorinated biphenyls (PCB), DDT, and chlordane concentrations were measured in air sampled from a tower on the south shore of Bermuda and in Sargasso Sea surface water approximately 80 to 320 kilometers south of Bermuda. The atmospheric chlorinated hydrocarbons appeared to be gaseous, and the DDT concentration was two orders of magnitude higher than previously reported particulate values. The PCB and DDT were enriched in the surface microlayer (150 micrometers) relative to their concentrations in water at a depth of 30 centimeters. Atmospheric residence times for PCB and DDT of 40 to 50 days, calculated from the concentrations in the air and water, are 20 times shorter than values previously estimated for DDT from rainfall and DDT production data.

  18. Simulation of infrared emissivity and reflectivity of oil films on sea surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinel, Nicolas; Monnier, Goulven; Sergievskaya, Irina; Bourlier, Christophe

    2015-10-01

    In this paper, an efficient sea surface generation is described for the fast and realistic simulation of the infrared emissivity and reflectivity of clean and contaminated seas. The clean sea surface is modelled by the Elfouhaily et al. spectrum model. For describing the surface damping due to the oil film at the sea surface, the model of local balance (MLB) is used. Thus, these surface models are used as the basis for calculating the emissivity and reflectivity. The numerical efficient computation is tested by comparison with the reference statistical computation for its validation.

  19. Mean sea surface and gravity investigations using TOPEX/Poseidon altimeter data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rapp, Richard H.

    1991-01-01

    From a broad point of view, we will be concerned with studying global ocean circulation patterns on the basis of ocean surface determinations with geoid undulation information. In addition, we will study local variations of the gravity field implied by the altimeter data. These general goals are reflected in the title of our investigation. To meet our general goal, we have defined a number of specific objectives: (1) sea surface topography representation; (2) mean sea surface determination; (3) development of local geoid models; (4) mean sea surface comparisons; (5) sea surface topographic files; and (6) gravity anomaly determination.

  20. Emerita analoga recruit populations and correlations with sea surface temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pettway, J.; Quan, H.; Juarez, F.; Vicencio, M.; Ng, N.; Careers in Science Intern Program

    2010-12-01

    The Careers in Science program at the California Academy of Sciences is a science internship for students from groups traditionally under-represented in the sciences. Starting in 2003, interns have participated in the Farallones Marine Sanctuary Association's LiMPETS Sandy Beach Monitoring program, assessing populations of Emerita analoga, the Pacific mole crab. E. analoga, an inhabitant of intertidal swash zones along the coast from Alaska to Baja California, is an important species in the sandy beach intertidal food web. Weekly, during the months of June, July and August, a group of interns go to stairwell 18 of San Francisco’s Ocean Beach in Golden Gate National Recreational Area to systematically collect live E. analoga samples and data. Along a 50 meter sampling area, five transects with ten samples in the swash zone are taken and recorded. Collected E. analoga are sexed (male, female, female w/eggs, and recruit) and measured for carapace size. Newly settled E. analoga (recruit) populations have declined in recent years. However, beginning in 2009, recruit populations began to increase in number, particularly in 2010. Our group hypothesized that this increase in recruitment is correlated with increased sea surface temperature. It has been reported that some planktonic animals become more abundant in warmer waters after a major temperature shift. After examining the data, we did not find a correlation between sea surface temperature and recruit populations, leading us to further questions on the cause of this increase in E. analoga recruits.

  1. Assessing recent warming using instrumentally homogeneous sea surface temperature records

    PubMed Central

    Hausfather, Zeke; Cowtan, Kevin; Clarke, David C.; Jacobs, Peter; Richardson, Mark; Rohde, Robert

    2017-01-01

    Sea surface temperature (SST) records are subject to potential biases due to changing instrumentation and measurement practices. Significant differences exist between commonly used composite SST reconstructions from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration’s Extended Reconstruction Sea Surface Temperature (ERSST), the Hadley Centre SST data set (HadSST3), and the Japanese Meteorological Agency’s Centennial Observation-Based Estimates of SSTs (COBE-SST) from 2003 to the present. The update from ERSST version 3b to version 4 resulted in an increase in the operational SST trend estimate during the last 19 years from 0.07° to 0.12°C per decade, indicating a higher rate of warming in recent years. We show that ERSST version 4 trends generally agree with largely independent, near-global, and instrumentally homogeneous SST measurements from floating buoys, Argo floats, and radiometer-based satellite measurements that have been developed and deployed during the past two decades. We find a large cooling bias in ERSST version 3b and smaller but significant cooling biases in HadSST3 and COBE-SST from 2003 to the present, with respect to most series examined. These results suggest that reported rates of SST warming in recent years have been underestimated in these three data sets. PMID:28070556

  2. Calibration plan for the sea and land surface temperature radiometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, David L.; Nightingale, Tim J.; Mortimer, Hugh; Middleton, Kevin; Edeson, Ruben; Cox, Caroline V.; Mutlow, Chris T.; Maddison, Brian J.

    2013-10-01

    The Sea and Land Surface Temperature Radiometer (SLSTR) to be flown on ESA's Sentinel-3 mission is a multichannel scanning radiometer that will continue the 21-year datasets of the Along Track Scanning Radiometer (ATSR) series. As its name implies, measurements from SLSTR will be used to retrieve global sea surface temperatures to an uncertainty of <0.3K traced to international standards. To achieve these low uncertainties requires an end to end instrument calibration strategy that includes pre-launch calibration at subsystem and instrument level, on-board calibration systems and sustained post launch activities. The authors describe the preparations for the pre-launch calibration activities including the spectral response, instrument level alignment tests, solar and infrared radiometric calibration. A purpose built calibration rig has been designed and built at RAL space that will accommodate the SLSTR instrument, infrared calibration sources and alignment equipment. The calibration rig has been commissioned and results of these tests will be presented. Finally the authors will present the planning for the on-orbit monitoring and calibration activities to ensure that calibration is maintained. These activities include vicarious calibration techniques that have been developed through previous missions, and the deployment of ship-borne radiometers.

  3. A model of the tropical Pacific sea surface temperature climatology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seager, Richard; Zebiak, Stephen E.; Cane, Mark A.

    1988-01-01

    A model for the climatological mean sea surface temperature (SST) of the tropical Pacific Ocean is developed. The upper ocean response is computed using a time dependent, linear, reduced gravity model, with the addition of a constant depth frictional surface layer. The full three-dimensional temperature equation and a surface heat flux parameterization that requires specification of only wind speed and total cloud cover are used to evaluate the SST. Specification of atmospheric parameters, such as air temperature and humidity, over which the ocean has direct influence, is avoided. The model simulates the major features of the observed tropical Pacific SST. The seasonal evolution of these features is generally captured by the model. Analysis of the results demonstrates the control the ocean has over the surface heat flux from ocean to atmosphere and the crucial role that dynamics play in determining the mean SST in the equatorial Pacific. The sensitivity of the model to perturbations in the surface heat flux, cloud cover specification, diffusivity, and mixed layer depth is discussed.

  4. Monitoring the sea surface with a short pulse radar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Le Vine, D. M.

    1974-01-01

    A solution is presented for the scattering of short pulses from a stochastic, corrugated surface relative to the sea for the case of a narrow-beam transmitting antenna pointing near nadir. The spectrum of the received power and its time history are calculated and this solution is used to show that a measure of the variance of the surface ordinant can be obtained from the backscattered power. Included explicitly in the analysis is the finite nature of the source and the role of the small-scale wave structure (capillary wave range). It is shown that when sufficiently short pulses are transmitted, one can obtain a measure of the variance of the large scale surface ordinant from either the temporal spacing of the peaks in the returned power or from the envelope of the spectrum of the received power. Assuming an appropriate model for the statistics and spectrum of the surface ordinate, the variance can be used to compute the wind speed and the significant wave height of the surface.

  5. A multiproxy reconstruction of Hebridean Shelf Sea spring sea surface temperatures from 1805-2010 (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reynolds, D.; Butler, P.; Williams, S.; Scourse, J. D.; Richardson, C.; Wanamaker, A. D.; Austin, W.; Cage, A.; Sayer, M.

    2013-12-01

    We present a multiproxy reconstruction of Hebridean shelf sea (Tiree Passage; NW Scotland) spring sea surface temperatures (SSTs) for the period AD 1805-2010. The reconstruction is based on growth increment series from the first absolutely dated annually-resolved multi-centennial Glycymeris glycymeris bivalve mollusc sclerochronology and is coupled with previously published stable oxygen isotopes (δ18O) from benthic foraminifera sampled from a dated sediment core from nearby Loch Sunart. The independent series contain significant correlations with SSTs across complementary frequency domains. The low frequency component of the sedimentary archive was combined with the mid and high frequency components of the G. glycymeris chronology indices to create a single multiproxy series. Split calibration-verification statistics (reduction of error, RE, coefficient of efficiency, CE, and R2) indicate that the multiproxy record, calibrated to local instrumental sea surface temperatures, contains significant precision and skill at reconstructing spring SSTs (RE=0.59, CE=0.26, R2=0.54). These data demonstrate that bivalve sclerochronologies, when combined with low frequency proxies such as sediment archives, can facilitate statistically robust reconstructions of palaeoceanographic variability over the late Holocene for hydrographically-significant regions of the temperate marine system previously void of annually-resolved archives. The reconstructed SSTs contain a general warming trend of 0.60 ×0.14oC per century. Only four years in the reconstructed period (1999, 2000, 2002 and 2003) exceed temperatures greater than two standard deviations higher than the reconstructed mean SST (9.03oC), whilst just three years in the first half of the 19th century (1835, 1838 and 1840) fall more than 2σ below the reconstructed mean (6.80oC).

  6. Combining Satellite Altimetry, Tide Gauge Observations and an Oceanographic Model to Derive the Baltic Sea Mean Sea Surface Topography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Novotny, K.; Liebsch, G.; Lehmann, A.; Dietrich, R.

    2006-07-01

    Sea-level variability the Baltic Sea is dominated by meteorologically forced fluctuations with large seasonal and interannual variations. In addition to the observations of satellite altimeters, a high-resolution oceanographic model of the Baltic Sea provides sea level heights that largely reflect the high-frequency sea surface variations. This different information can be combined in such a way that the variance of the altimetric sea level heights can be substantially reduced. The resulting reduced altim eter time series form the basis for the estimation of mean sea surface heights. The application of a geoid model yields the mean sea surface topography (MSSTop). A high spatial resolution of the resulting MSSTop is achieved by the combination of different altimetric missions. Observations of ERS-2 and GFO are tied to the observations of TOPEX by minimizing the crossover point differences. This also provides information about the relative biases between the different altimeter missions. The final MSSTop can be estimated with an accuracy of 3 to 5 cm.

  7. Assessing the potential for dimethylsulfide enrichment at the sea surface and its influence on air-sea flux

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walker, Carolyn F.; Harvey, Mike J.; Smith, Murray J.; Bell, Thomas G.; Saltzman, Eric S.; Marriner, Andrew S.; McGregor, John A.; Law, Cliff S.

    2016-09-01

    The flux of dimethylsulfide (DMS) to the atmosphere is generally inferred using water sampled at or below 2 m depth, thereby excluding any concentration anomalies at the air-sea interface. Two independent techniques were used to assess the potential for near-surface DMS enrichment to influence DMS emissions and also identify the factors influencing enrichment. DMS measurements in productive frontal waters over the Chatham Rise, east of New Zealand, did not identify any significant gradients between 0.01 and 6 m in sub-surface seawater, whereas DMS enrichment in the sea-surface microlayer was variable, with a mean enrichment factor (EF; the concentration ratio between DMS in the sea-surface microlayer and in sub-surface water) of 1.7. Physical and biological factors influenced sea-surface microlayer DMS concentration, with high enrichment (EF > 1.3) only recorded in a dinoflagellate-dominated bloom, and associated with low to medium wind speeds and near-surface temperature gradients. On occasion, high DMS enrichment preceded periods when the air-sea DMS flux, measured by eddy covariance, exceeded the flux calculated using National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) Coupled-Ocean Atmospheric Response Experiment (COARE) parameterized gas transfer velocities and measured sub-surface seawater DMS concentrations. The results of these two independent approaches suggest that air-sea emissions may be influenced by near-surface DMS production under certain conditions, and highlight the need for further study to constrain the magnitude and mechanisms of DMS production in the sea-surface microlayer.

  8. Global monthly sea surface nitrate fields estimated from remotely sensed sea surface temperature, chlorophyll, and modeled mixed layer depth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arteaga, Lionel; Pahlow, Markus; Oschlies, Andreas

    2015-02-01

    Information about oceanic nitrate is crucial for making inferences about marine biological production and the efficiency of the biological carbon pump. While there are no optical properties that allow direct estimation of inorganic nitrogen, its correlation with other biogeochemical variables may permit its inference from satellite data. Here we report a new method for estimating monthly mean surface nitrate concentrations employing local multiple linear regressions on a global 1° by 1° resolution grid, using satellite-derived sea surface temperature, chlorophyll, and modeled mixed layer depth. Our method is able to reproduce the interannual variability of independent in situ nitrate observations at the Bermuda Atlantic Time Series, the Hawaii Ocean Time series, the California coast, and the southern New Zealand region. Our new method is shown to be more accurate than previous algorithms and thus can provide improved information on temporal and spatial nutrient variations beyond the climatological mean at regional and global scales.

  9. Interannual variability in stratiform cloudiness and sea surface temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Norris, J.R.; Leovy, C.B.

    1994-12-01

    Marine stratiform cloudiness (MSC)(stratus, stratocumulus, and fog) is widespread over subtropical oceans west of the continents and over midlatitude oceans during summer, the season when MSC has maximum influence on surface downward radiation and is most influenced by boundary-layer processes. Long-term datasets of cloudiness and sea surface teperature (SST) from surface observations from 1952 to 1981 are used to examine interannual variations in MSC and SST. Linear correlations of anomalies in seasonal MSC amount with seasonal SST anomalies are negative and significant in midlatitude and eastern subtropical oceans, especially during summer. Significant negative correlations between SST and nimbostratus and nonprecipitating midlevel cloudiness are also observed at midlatitudes during summer, suggesting that summer storm tracks shift from year to year following year-to-year meridional shifts in the SST gradient. Over the 30-yr period, there are significant upward trends in MSC amount over the northern midlatitude oceans and a significant downward trend off the coast of California. The highest correlations and trends occur where gradients in MSC and SST are strongest. During summer, correlations between SST and MSC anomalies peak at zero lag in midlatitudes where warm advection prevails, but SST lags MSC in subtropical regions where cold advection predominates. This difference is attributed to a tendency for anomalies in latent heat flux to compensate anomalies in surface downward radiation in warm advection regions but not in cold advection regions.

  10. Space-based observation of chlorophyll, sea surface temperature, nitrate, and sea surface height anomaly over the Bay of Bengal and Arabian Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarangi, R. K.; Devi, K. Nanthini

    2017-01-01

    Monthly chlorophyll and sea surface temperature (SST) images were generated using MODIS-Aqua data sets during 2014 and 2015 in the Bay of Bengal and Arabian Sea. The in situ data-based nitrate algorithm was used to generate nitrate images by using the satellite-derived chlorophyll and SST images. To link ocean productivity with the sea surface features and sea level anomaly, the Indo-French altimeter mission SARAL-ALTIKA-derived sea surface height anomaly (SSHa) data sets were processed and maps were generated. The monthly average chlorophyll concentration ranged from 0.001 to 3.0 mg m-3, SST ranged from 24 to 32 °C, nitrate concentration ranged from 0.01 to 6.0 μM, and overall SSH anomaly ranged from -52 to +40 cm. Nitrate concentration was observed to be high (3-5 μM) during December-January, possibly due to convective eddies and winter cooling as well as atmospheric aerosols and dust inducing ocean productivity. The nitrate concentration was observed to be associated more with chlorophyll than SST, as nitrate inherently enhances the ocean chlorophyll and productivity, acting as proxy. The SSH anomaly showed irregular features and depicting few eddies, upwelling, and ocean circulation features. The low SSHa was mostly due to high chlorophyll concentration. It was observed that the low SST (∼24-26 °C) is attributed to high chlorophyll concentration (1.5-3.0 mg m-3) over the study area. The lag phase and enhancement in chlorophyll mean during September was due to the decrease in average SST during August. The SSHa showed seasonal trend over the study area during the monsoon period with observation of negative anomaly. Arabian Sea was found to have more negative SSH anomaly monthly mean values than Bay of Bengal. The impact and interrelationship of SSHa indicated better relationship with chlorophyll than with nitrate and SST, as observed from multiple regression analysis. The analysis of variance (ANOVA) results between the 2-year monthly data showed that the

  11. Declining Atmospheric pCO2 During the Late Miocene and Early Pliocene: New Insights from Paired Alkenone and Coccolith Stable Isotope Barometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phelps, S. R.; Polissar, P. J.; deMenocal, P. B.; Swann, J. P.; Guo, M. Y.; Stoll, H. M.

    2015-12-01

    The relationship between atmospheric CO2 concentrations and climate is broadly understood for the Cenozoic era: warmer periods are associated with higher atmospheric carbon dioxide. This understanding is supported by atmospheric samples of the past 800,000 years from ice cores, which suggest CO2 levels play a key role in regulating global climate on glacial interglacial timescales as well. In this context, the late Miocene poses a challenge: sea-surface temperatures indicate substantial global warmth, though existing data suggest atmospheric CO2 concentrations were lower than pre-industrial values. Recent work using the stable carbon and oxygen isotopic composition of coccolith calcite has demonstrated these organisms began actively diverting inorganic carbon away from calcification and to the site of photosynthesis during the late Miocene. This process occurs in culture experiments in response to low aqueous CO2 concentrations, and suggests decreasing atmospheric pCO2 values during the late Miocene. Here we present new data from ODP Site 806 in the western equatorial Pacific Ocean that supports declining atmospheric CO2 across the late Miocene. Carbon isotope values of coccolith calcite from Site 806 demonstrate carbon limitation and re-allocation of inorganic carbon to photosynthesis starting between ~8 and 6 Ma. The timing of this limitation at Site 806 precedes shifts at other ODP sites, reflecting the higher mixed layer temperature and resultant lower CO2 solubility at Site 806. New measurements of carbon isotope values from alkenones at Site 806 show an increase in photosynthetic carbon fractionation (ɛp) accompanied the carbon limitation evident from coccolith calcite stable isotope data. While higher ɛp is typically interpreted as higher CO2 concentrations, at Site 806, our data suggest it reflects enhancement of chloroplast CO2 from active carbon transport by the coccolithophore algae in response to lower CO2 concentrations. Our new data from ODP Site

  12. Persistence of Rainfall Imprint on SMOS Sea Surface Salinity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boutin, Jacqueline; Reverdin, Gilles; Martin, Nicolas

    2015-04-01

    The Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity (SMOS) satellite mission monitors sea surface salinity (SSS) over the global ocean for more than 5 years. In previous studies, Boutin et al. (2014) have shown a clear freshening of SMOS SSS under rain cells of about -0.14pss/mm/hr at moderate wind speed (3-12m/s). This order of magnitude is compatible with in situ drifters observations taken at 45cm depth while SMOS SSS are at about 1cm depth and at a mean spatial resolution of 43km. Using Aquarius satellite SSS, Meissner and Wentz (2014) found a SSS decrease under rain cells of -0.12pss/mm/hr at 7 m/s wind speed, consistent with SMOS estimate considering the lower spatial resolution of Aquarius SSS (about 150km); Santos-Garcia et al. (2014) found an influence of the rain history preceding by a few hours the Aquarius measurement. In most cases, drifters observations also suggest that about half of the freshening observed locally disappears after one hour, likely because of mixing with surrounding waters. In this presentation, we will investigate the temporal and spatial evolution of SMOS SSS after a rain event. Rainfall information will be either derived from SSM/Is measurements (during periods when three SSM/Is satellites provide adequate sampling before and simultaneous to SMOS measurements) or from the NOAA CMORPH products. In order to separate instantaneous from historical effects, we distinguish two cases: 1) rainfall occurs at less than 30mn from SMOS observation but no rain occurred before; 2) rainfall occurred previous to SMOS observation (up to 3 hours before) but has stopped at least 30mn before SMOS acquisition. In addition to looking at the temporal evolution of SMOS SSS under the rain cell, since both vertical mixing and horizontal stirring may occur, we also investigate the size of the fresh SSS region relative to the size of the rain cell. Boutin, J., N. Martin, G. Reverdin, S. Morisset, X. Yin, L. Centurioni, and N. Reul (2014), Sea surface salinity under rain

  13. Experimental Protocol for Biodiesel Production with Isolation of Alkenones as Coproducts from Commercial Isochrysis Algal Biomass

    PubMed Central

    O'Neil, Gregory W.; Williams, John R.; Wilson-Peltier, Julia; Knothe, Gerhard; Reddy, Christopher M.

    2016-01-01

    The need to replace petroleum fuels with alternatives from renewable and more environmentally sustainable sources is of growing importance. Biomass-derived biofuels have gained considerable attention in this regard, however first generation biofuels from edible crops like corn ethanol or soybean biodiesel have generally fallen out of favor. There is thus great interest in the development of methods for the production of liquid fuels from domestic and superior non-edible sources. Here we describe a detailed procedure for the production of a purified biodiesel from the marine microalgae Isochrysis. Additionally, a unique suite of lipids known as polyunsaturated long-chain alkenones are isolated in parallel as potentially valuable coproducts to offset the cost of biodiesel production. Multi-kilogram quantities of Isochrysis are purchased from two commercial sources, one as a wet paste (80% water) that is first dried prior to processing, and the other a dry milled powder (95% dry). Lipids are extracted with hexanes in a Soxhlet apparatus to produce an algal oil ("hexane algal oil") containing both traditional fats (i.e., triglycerides, 46-60% w/w) and alkenones (16-25% w/w). Saponification of the triglycerides in the algal oil allows for separation of the resulting free fatty acids (FFAs) from alkenone-containing neutral lipids. FFAs are then converted to biodiesel (i.e., fatty acid methyl esters, FAMEs) by acid-catalyzed esterification while alkenones are isolated and purified from the neutral lipids by crystallization. We demonstrate that biodiesel from both commercial Isochrysis biomasses have similar but not identical FAME profiles, characterized by elevated polyunsaturated fatty acid contents (approximately 40% w/w). Yields of biodiesel were consistently higher when starting from the Isochrysis wet paste (12% w/w vs. 7% w/w), which can be traced to lower amounts of hexane algal oil obtained from the powdered Isochrysis product. PMID:27404113

  14. Long-chain alkenones and related compounds in the benthic haptophyte Chrysotila lamellosa Anand HAP 17.

    PubMed

    Rontani, Jean-François; Beker, Béatriz; Volkman, John K

    2004-01-01

    The neutral lipid compositions of the coastal haptophyte Chrysotila lamellosa HAP 17 grown in batch culture at 10 and 20 degrees C have been determined. A comparison was also made between the lipid compositions of cells harvested in early and late stationary phase. This species contains a suite of very long-chain C(37)-C(40) alkenones and alkenoates as found in a few microalgae from the Haptophyta. The distributions of these compounds show some differences to earlier reports of different strains of this alga, which are only in part attributable to culture conditions. A suite of long-chain alkenols, the reduced form of the alkenones, was characterized for the first time. The abundance of these compounds was only 1.5% of that of the corresponding alkenones, and the relative proportion of C(37)-C(38) constituents depended on growth temperature. These data show that haptophyte algae are a possible source of the alkenols found in some marine sediments, but the small amounts found suggest that other sources such as bacterial reduction of alkenones are more likely in highly reducing sediments. A mixture of C(29)-C(33) n-alkenes, dominated by the C(31:1) monoene, was found in marked contrast to previous analyses of other strains which reported only the presence of a C(31:2) diene. The sterol distribution included the common haptophyte sterol 24alpha-methylcholesta-5,22E-dien-3beta-ol (epi-brassicasterol) as well as significant amounts of Delta(5)- and Delta(5,22)-C(29) sterols.

  15. Modeling of Wind Direction Signals in Polarimetric Sea Surface Brightness Temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yueh, S. H.

    1995-01-01

    Sea surface brightness temperatures are the radiometric power measure of blackbody radiation from sea water. This radiation is the electromagnetic waves excited by the random thermal motion of charged particles in the sea water. The energy transmitted through the air- water interface produces a scattering of electromagnetic waves into the atmosphere. Polarimetric microwave emissions are investigated.

  16. Doppler shifts of radar return from the sea surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ermakov, S. A.; Kapustin, I. A.; Molkov, A. A.; Sergievskaya, I. A.; Shomina, O. V.

    2016-10-01

    Investigation of the Doppler shift of radar return from the sea surface is very important for better understanding of capabilities of exploitation of microwave radar for measuring velocities of marine currents. Here new field experiments carried out from a Platform on the Black Sea with a coherent X-band scatterometer, and a Doppler multifrequency (X- /C-/S-band) dual-polarized radar recently designed at IAP RAS are discussed. It is shown that the radar return contains both Bragg (polarized) and non polarized scattering components, presumably giving different contributions to radar Doppler shifts. Radar Doppler shifts were estimated using two different definitions as a) a frequency of the "centre of gravity" of an instantaneous radar return spectrum (ASIS) averaged over periods of dominant wind waves and b) the "centre of gravity" of the averaged over dominant wave periods spectrum (SAS). The ASIS and SAS values for both VV and HH-polarizations are shown to be different due to effects of radar backscatter modulation by dominant (long) wind waves. The radar Modulation Transfer Function (MTF) has been analyzed from experimental data and difference between SAS- and ASIS-values has been satisfactory explained using the measured MTF-values. It is obtained that experimental values of ASIS can be satisfactory described by the Bragg model despite the significant contribution of NP component to the radar backscatter. A physical explanation of the effect is given.

  17. The effects of sea surface temperature gradients on surface turbulent fluxes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steffen, John

    A positive correlation between sea surface temperature (SST) and wind stress perturbation near strong SST gradients (DeltaSST) has been observed in different parts of the world ocean, such as the Gulf Stream in the North Atlantic and the Kuroshio Extension east of Japan. These changes in winds and SSTs can modify near-surface stability, surface stress, and latent and sensible heat fluxes. In general, these small scale processes are poorly modeled in Numerical Weather Prediction (NWP) and climate models. Failure to account for these air--sea interactions produces inaccurate values of turbulent fluxes, and therefore a misrepresentation of the energy, moisture, and momentum budgets. Our goal is to determine the change in these surface turbulent fluxes due to overlooking the correlated variability in winds, SSTs, and related variables. To model these air--sea interactions, a flux model was forced with and without SST--induced changes to the surface wind fields. The SST modification to the wind fields is based on a baroclinic argument as implemented by the University of Washington Planetary Boundary-Layer (UWPBL) model. Other input parameters include 2-m air temperature, 2-m dew point temperature, surface pressure (all from ERA--interim), and Reynolds Daily Optimum Interpolation Sea Surface Temperature (OISST). Flux model runs are performed every 6 hours starting in December 2002 and ending in November 2003. From these model outputs, seasonal, monthly, and daily means of the difference between DeltaSST and no DeltaSST effects on sensible heat flux (SHF), latent heat flux (LHF), and surface stress are calculated. Since the greatest impacts occur during the winter season, six additional December-January-February (DJF) seasons were analyzed for 1987--1990 and 1999--2002. The greatest differences in surface turbulent fluxes are concentrated near strong SST fronts associated with the Gulf Stream and Kuroshio Extension. On average, 2002---2003 DJF seasonal differences in SHF

  18. Tropical cyclone rainfall area controlled by relative sea surface temperature

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Yanluan; Zhao, Ming; Zhang, Minghua

    2015-01-01

    Tropical cyclone rainfall rates have been projected to increase in a warmer climate. The area coverage of tropical cyclones influences their impact on human lives, yet little is known about how tropical cyclone rainfall area will change in the future. Here, using satellite data and global atmospheric model simulations, we show that tropical cyclone rainfall area is controlled primarily by its environmental sea surface temperature (SST) relative to the tropical mean SST (that is, the relative SST), while rainfall rate increases with increasing absolute SST. Our result is consistent with previous numerical simulations that indicated tight relationships between tropical cyclone size and mid-tropospheric relative humidity. Global statistics of tropical cyclone rainfall area are not expected to change markedly under a warmer climate provided that SST change is relatively uniform, implying that increases in total rainfall will be confined to similar size domains with higher rainfall rates. PMID:25761457

  19. Satellite-Derived Sea Surface Temperature: Workshop 3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1985-01-01

    This is the third of a series of three workshops, sponsored by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration, to investigate the state of the art in global sea surface temperature measurements from space. Three workshops were necessary to process and analyze sufficient data from which to draw conclusions on the accuracy and reliability of the satellite measurements. In this workshop, the final two (out of a total of four) months of satellite and in situ data chosen for study were processed and evaluated. Results from the AVHRR, HIRS, SMMR, and VAS sensors, in comparison with in situ data from ships, XBTs, and buoys, confirmed satellite rms accuracies in the 0.5 to 1.0 C range, but with variable biases. These accuracies may degrade under adverse conditions for specific sensors. A variety of color maps, plots, and statistical tables are provided for detailed study of the individual sensor SST measurements.

  20. Sea-surface temperature chart enhancement in frontal zones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aleksanin, A. I.; Kim, V.

    2016-12-01

    Infrared and microwave satellite images used for sea-surface temperature (SST) retrieval often have distortions such as noise and blurring of thermal front lines that decrease the quality of SST charts. In order to solve this problem, it is proposed to use an approach based on the Mumford-Shah model that approximates an image with a piecewise smooth function. In order to combine the advantages of the proposed approach and conventional methods for noise filtering and image restoration it is proposed to divide images into flat and frontal zones and process them separately. The SST quality is enhanced by the use of edge-preserving noise filtering and restoration algorithms. The latter use the features of radiometers and different stages of the SST construction procedure to improve their accuracy. The images obtained using the MTSAT/VISSR, METEOR-M/MSU-MR, and AQUA/AMSR-E radiometers are used for testing the developed approach.

  1. Sensitivity of tropical cyclone intensity to sea surface temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Evans, J.L. )

    1993-06-01

    Increased occurrence of more intense tropical storms intruding further poleward has been foreshadowed as one of the potential consequences of global warming. This scenario is based almost entirely on the general circulation model predictions of warmer sea surface temperature (SST) with increasing levels of atmospheric CO[sub 2] and some theories of tropical cyclone intensification that support the notion of more intense systems with warmer SST. Whether storms are able to achieve this theoretically determined more intense state depends on whether the temperature of the underlying water is the dominant factor in tropical cyclone intensification. An examination of the historical data record in a number of ocean basins is used to identify the relative importance of SST in the tropical cyclone intensification process. The results reveal that SST alone is an inadequate predictor of tropical cyclone intensity. Other factors known to affect tropical cyclone frequency and intensity are discussed. 16 refs., 6 figs., 3 tabs.

  2. Change point detection of the Persian Gulf sea surface temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shirvani, A.

    2017-01-01

    In this study, the Student's t parametric and Mann-Whitney nonparametric change point models (CPMs) were applied to detect change point in the annual Persian Gulf sea surface temperature anomalies (PGSSTA) time series for the period 1951-2013. The PGSSTA time series, which were serially correlated, were transformed to produce an uncorrelated pre-whitened time series. The pre-whitened PGSSTA time series were utilized as the input file of change point models. Both the applied parametric and nonparametric CPMs estimated the change point in the PGSSTA in 1992. The PGSSTA follow the normal distribution up to 1992 and thereafter, but with a different mean value after year 1992. The estimated slope of linear trend in PGSSTA time series for the period 1951-1992 was negative; however, that was positive after the detected change point. Unlike the PGSSTA, the applied CPMs suggested no change point in the Niño3.4SSTA time series.

  3. Enhancing the Arctic Mean Sea Surface and Mean Dynamic Topography with CryoSat-2 Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stenseng, Lars; Andersen, Ole B.; Knudsen, Per

    2014-05-01

    A reliable mean sea surface (MSS) is essential to derive a good mean dynamic topography (MDT) and for the estimation of short and long-term changes in the sea surface. The lack of satellite radar altimetry observations above 82 degrees latitude means that existing mean sea surface models have been unreliable in the Arctic Ocean. We here present the latest DTU mean sea surface and mean dynamic topography models that includes CryoSat-2 data to improve the reliability in the Arctic Ocean. In an attempt to extrapolate across the gap above 82 degrees latitude the previously models included ICESat data, gravimetrical geoids, ocean circulation models and various combinations hereof. Unfortunately cloud cover and the short periods of operation has a negative effect on the number of ICESat sea surface observations. DTU13MSS and DTU13MDT are the new generation of state of the art global high-resolution models that includes CryoSat-2 data to extend the satellite radar altimetry coverage up to 88 degrees latitude. Furthermore the SAR and SARin capability of CryoSat-2 dramatically increases the amount of useable sea surface returns in sea-ice covered areas compared to conventional radar altimeters like ENVISAT and ERS-1/2. With the inclusion of CryoSat-2 data the new mean sea surface is improved by more than 20 cm above 82 degrees latitude compared with the previous generation of mean sea surfaces.

  4. Impacts of Freshwater on the Seasonal Variations of Surface Salinity in the Caspian Sea

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-01-01

    surface salinity and circulation in the Caspian Sea A. Birol Karaa, Alan J. Wallcraft3*, E.Joseph Metzgera, Murat Gunduz5 * Oceanography Division...term climatic effects are of particular importance in the Caspian Sea as well. For example, Rodinov(1994) relates variations in sea level to cycles...much finer horizontal resolution products is of particular importance. In addition, the general circulation in the Caspian Sea is reported to be

  5. Investigation of Sea Surface Temperature (SST) anomalies over Cyprus area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Georgiou, Andreas; Akçit, Nuhcan

    2016-08-01

    The temperature of the sea surface has been identified as an important parameter of the natural environment, governing processes that occur in the upper ocean. This paper focuses on the analysis of the Sea Surface Temperature (SST) anomalies at the greater area of Cyprus. For that, SST data derived from MODerate-resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) instrument on board both Aqua and Terra sun synchronous satellites were used. A four year period was chosen as a first approach to address and describe this phenomenon. Geographical Information Systems (GIS) has been used as an integrated platform of analysis and presentation in addition of the support of MATLAB®. The methodology consists of five steps: (i) Collection of MODIS SST imagery, (ii) Development of the digital geo-database; (iii) Model and run the methodology in GIS as a script; (iv) Calculation of SST anomalies; and (v) Visualization of the results. The SST anomaly values have presented a symmetric distribution over the study area with an increase trend through the years of analysis. The calculated monthly and annual average SST anomalies (ASST) make more obvious this trend, with negative and positive SST changes to be distributed over the study area. In terms of seasons, the same increase trend presented during spring, summer, autumn and winter with 2013 to be the year with maximum ASST observed values. Innovative aspects comprise of straightforward integration and modeling of available tools, providing a versatile platform of analysis and semi-automation of the operation. In addition, the fine resolution maps that extracted from the analysis with a wide spatial coverage, allows the detail representation of SST and ASST respectively in the region.

  6. Sources of polyfluoroalkyl compounds in the North Sea, Baltic Sea and Norwegian Sea: Evidence from their spatial distribution in surface water.

    PubMed

    Ahrens, Lutz; Gerwinski, Wolfgang; Theobald, Norbert; Ebinghaus, Ralf

    2010-02-01

    The spatial distribution of 15 polyfluoroalkyl compounds (PFCs) in surface water was investigated in the North Sea, Baltic Sea and Norwegian Sea. In addition, an interlaboratory comparison of the sampling techniques and analysis was conducted. Highest concentration in the North Sea was found near the coast, whereas the summation operatorPFC concentration decreased rapidly from 18.4 to 0.07 ng l(-1) towards the open North Sea. The river Elbe could identify as a local input source for PFCs into the North Sea, whereas perfluorobutanoic acid (PFBA) was transported into the sampling area with the easterly current. In contrast to the North Sea, the distribution of PFCs in the Baltic Sea was relatively homogenous, where diffuse sources dominated. In general, the composition profile was influenced from local sources caused by human activities, whereas atmospheric depositions of here analysed PFCs were negligible, but it could have possibly an influence on low contaminated sites like the open North Sea or Norwegian Sea.

  7. Seasonal sea surface temperature anomaly prediction for coastal ecosystems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stock, Charles A.; Pegion, Kathy; Vecchi, Gabriel A.; Alexander, Michael A.; Tommasi, Desiree; Bond, Nicholas A.; Fratantoni, Paula S.; Gudgel, Richard G.; Kristiansen, Trond; O'Brien, Todd D.; Xue, Yan; Yang, Xiasong

    2015-09-01

    Sea surface temperature (SST) anomalies are often both leading indicators and important drivers of marine resource fluctuations. Assessment of the skill of SST anomaly forecasts within coastal ecosystems accounting for the majority of global fish yields, however, has been minimal. This reflects coarse global forecast system resolution and past emphasis on the predictability of ocean basin-scale SST variations. This paper assesses monthly to inter-annual SST anomaly predictions in coastal "Large Marine Ecosystems" (LMEs). We begin with an analysis of 7 well-observed LMEs adjacent to the United States and then examine how mechanisms responsible for prediction skill in these systems are reflected in predictions for LMEs globally. Historical SST anomaly estimates from the 1/4° daily Optimal Interpolation Sea Surface Temperature reanalysis (OISST.v2) were first found to be highly consistent with in-situ measurements for 6 of the 7 U.S. LMEs. Thirty years of retrospective forecasts from climate forecast systems developed at NOAA's Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory (CM2.5-FLOR) and the National Center for Environmental Prediction (CFSv2) were then assessed against OISST.v2. Forecast skill varied widely by LME, initialization month, and lead but there were many cases of high skill that also exceeded that of a persistence forecast, some at leads greater than 6 months. Mechanisms underlying skill above persistence included accurate simulation of (a) seasonal transitions between less predictable locally generated and more predictable basin-scale SST variability; (b) seasonal transitions between different basin-scale influences; (c) propagation of SST anomalies across seasons through sea ice; and (d) re-emergence of previous anomalies upon the breakdown of summer stratification. Globally, significant skill above persistence across many tropical systems arises via mechanisms (a) and (b). Combinations of all four mechanisms contribute to less prevalent but nonetheless

  8. Hydraulic exchange between a coral reef and surface sea water

    SciTech Connect

    Tribble, G.W.; Sansone, F.J.; Li, Yuan-Hui

    1992-10-01

    Hydraulic exchange between overlying sea water and the internal structure of a patch reef in Kaneohe Bay, Oahu, Hawaii, was studied with an array of wells, 1, 2, and 4 m deep. Two natural chemical tracers, radon, and salinity, were used to calculate the exchange rate between surface sea water and reef interstitial waters. Dissolved radon concentrations are substantially higher in interstitial waters than is surface water. The degree of radon enrichment is quantitatively related to the time elapsed since interstitial water had equilibrated with the atmosphere. Residence time estimates are 1-40 days, with deeper wells having slower exchange. The average residence time for 1-m-deep wells was 2.1 days. A rainstorm-induced dilution of the salinity of Kaneohe Bay provides the second tracer. Samples of surface and reef interstitial waters following this salinity perturbation are used to calculate an average residence time of 2.6 days at a depth of 1 m and 42 days at a depth of 2 m. Three types of physical forces thought to cause exchange between surface and interstitial water are considered by measurement of the forcing functions and reef permeability. Hydraulic conductivities are about 50 m/d, with lower values near the seaward side of the reef. Most exchange seems to be caused by high-frequency, wave-driven oscillatory pumping and by unidirectional hydraulic head gradients (of uncertain origin) that are stable for at least 3-4 days. Wave-driven mixing is probably more important shallower in the reef, whereas head-driven flow may dominate deeper in the reef. Tidal pumping does not seem to contribute to exchange. All methods indicate that exchange in the upper part of Checker Reef is primarily through vertical exchange. The best estimate for the residence time of water at a depth of 1 m is 2 days. Water at depths of 204 m probably has a residence time of weeks to months. 49 refs., 8 figs., 6 tabs.

  9. The mean sea surface height and geoid along the Geosat subtrack from Bermuda to Cape Cod

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelly, Kathryn A.; Joyce, Terrence M.; Schubert, David M.; Caruso, Michael J.

    1991-07-01

    Measurements of near-surface velocity and concurrent sea level along an ascending Geosat subtrack were used to estimate the mean sea surface height and the Earth's gravitational geoid. Velocity measurements were made on three traverses of a Geosat subtrack within 10 days, using an acoustic Doppler current profiler (ADCP). A small bias in the ADCP velocity was removed by considering a mass balance for two pairs of triangles for which expendable bathythermograph measurements were also made. Because of the large curvature of the Gulf Stream, the gradient wind balance was used to estimate the cross-track component of geostrophic velocity from the ADCP vectors; this component was then integrated to obtain the sea surface height profile. The mean sea surface height was estimated as the difference between the instantaneous sea surface height from ADCP and the Geosat residual sea level, with mesoscale errors reduced by low-pass filtering. The error estimates were divided into a bias, tilt, and mesoscale residual; the bias was ignored because profiles were only determined within a constant of integration. The calculated mean sea surface height estimate agreed with an independent estimate of the mean sea surface height from Geosat, obtained by modeling the Gulf Stream as a Gaussian jet, within the expected errors in the estimates: the tilt error was 0.10 m, and the mesoscale error was 0.044 m. To minimize mesoscale errors in the estimate, the alongtrack geoid estimate was computed as the difference between the mean sea level from the Geosat Exact Repeat Mission and an estimate of the mean sea surface height, rather than as the difference between instantaneous profiles of sea level and sea surface height. In the critical region near the Gulf Stream the estimated error reduction using this method was about 0.07 m. Differences between the geoid estimate and a gravimetric geoid were not within the expected errors: the rms mesoscale difference was 0.24 m rms.

  10. Relationships between near-surface plankton concentrations, hydrography, and satellite-measured sea surface temperature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, A. C.; Emery, W. J.

    1988-01-01

    Sea surface temperatures (SSTs) mapped by IR satellite images and in situ hydrographic measurements off the west coast of British Columbia for early-winter and midsummer periods were correlated with in situ measurements of surface chlorophyll and zooplankton concentration. Correlations between winter log(e) transformed zooplankton concentrations and SSTs demonstrated that IR satellite imagery could explain 49 percent of the sampled zooplankton concentration variance. A least-squares-fit nonlinear equation showed that satellite-measured SST patterns explained 72 percent of the log(e) transformed chlorophyll variance. However, summer zooplankton concentrations were not consistently related to satellite temperature patterns.

  11. A case study of sea breeze blocking regulated by sea surface temperature along the English south coast

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sweeney, J. K.; Chagnon, J. M.; Gray, S. L.

    2013-09-01

    The sensitivity of sea breeze structure to sea surface temperature (SST) and coastal orography is investigated in convection-permitting Met Office Unified Model simulations of a case study along the south coast of England. Changes in SST of 1 K are shown to significantly modify the structure of the sea breeze. On the day of the case study the sea breeze was partially blocked by coastal orography, particularly within Lyme Bay. The extent to which the flow is blocked depends strongly on the static stability of the marine boundary layer. In experiments with colder SST, the marine boundary layer is more stable, and the degree of blocking is more pronounced. The implications of prescribing fixed SST from climatology in numerical weather prediction model forecasts of the sea breeze are discussed.

  12. Sea Spray Effects on Surface Heat and Moisture Fluxes

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-06-07

    DeCosmo, J., 1991: Air-sea exchange of momentum, heat and water vapor over whitecap sea states. Ph.D. dissertation, University of Washington, Seattle...212 pp. DeCosmo, J., K. B. Katsaros, S. D. Smith, R. J. Anderson, W. A. Oost, K. Bumke and H. Chadwick, 1996: Air-sea exchange of water vapor and

  13. Biofilm-like properties of the sea surface and predicted effects on air-sea CO2 exchange

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wurl, Oliver; Stolle, Christian; Van Thuoc, Chu; The Thu, Pham; Mari, Xavier

    2016-05-01

    Because the sea surface controls various interactions between the ocean and the atmosphere, it has a profound function for marine biogeochemistry and climate regulation. The sea surface is the gateway for the exchange of climate-relevant gases, heat and particles. Thus, in order to determine how the ocean and the atmosphere interact and respond to environmental changes on a global scale, the characterization and understanding of the sea surface are essential. The uppermost part of the water column is defined as the sea-surface microlayer and experiences strong spatial and temporal dynamics, mainly due to meteorological forcing. Wave-damped areas at the sea surface are caused by the accumulation of surface-active organic material and are defined as slicks. Natural slicks are observed frequently but their biogeochemical properties are poorly understood. In the present study, we found up to 40 times more transparent exopolymer particles (TEP), the foundation of any biofilm, in slicks compared to the underlying bulk water at multiple stations in the North Pacific, South China Sea, and Baltic Sea. We found a significant lower enrichment of TEP (up to 6) in non-slick sea surfaces compared to its underlying bulk water. Moreover, slicks were characterized by a large microbial biomass, another shared feature with conventional biofilms on solid surfaces. Compared to non-slick samples (avg. pairwise similarity of 70%), the community composition of bacteria in slicks was increasingly (avg. pairwise similarity of 45%) different from bulk water communities, indicating that the TEP-matrix creates specific environments for its inhabitants. We, therefore, conclude that slicks can feature biofilm-like properties with the excessive accumulation of particles and microbes. We also assessed the potential distribution and frequency of slick-formation in coastal and oceanic regions, and their effect on air-sea CO2 exchange based on literature data. We estimate that slicks can reduce CO2

  14. Horizontal advection, diffusion and plankton spectra at the sea surface.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bracco, A.; Clayton, S.; Pasquero, C.

    2009-04-01

    Plankton patchiness is ubiquitous in the oceans, and various physical and biological processes have been proposed as its generating mechanisms. However, a coherent statement on the problem is missing, due to both a small number of suitable observations and to an incomplete understanding of the properties of reactive tracers in turbulent media. Abraham (1998) suggested that horizontal advection may be the dominant process behind the observed distributions of phytoplankton and zooplankton, acting to mix tracers with longer reaction times (Rt) down to smaller scales. Conversely, Mahadevan and Campbell (2002) attributed the relative distributions of sea surface temperature and phytoplankton to small scale upwelling, where tracers with longer Rt are able to homogenize more than those with shorter reaction times. Neither of the above mechanisms can explain simultaneously the (relative) spectral slopes of temperature, phytoplankton and zooplankton. Here, with a simple advection model and a large suite of numerical experiments, we concentrate on some of the physical processes influencing the relative distributions of tracers at the ocean surface, and we investigate: 1) the impact of the spatial scale of tracer supply; 2) the role played by coherent eddies on the distribution of tracers with different Rt; 3) the role of diffusion (so far neglected). We show that diffusion determines the distribution of temperature, regardless of the nature of the forcing. We also find that coherent structures together with differential diffusion of tracers with different Rt impact the tracer distributions. This may help in understanding the highly variable nature of observed plankton spectra.

  15. Reconciling Glacial Snow Lines With Tropical Sea Surface Temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lorenz, S. J.; Lohmann, G.

    Reconstructions of tropical snow lines during the last glacial maximum (LGM) 21,000 years ago are incompatible with the sea surface temperature (SST) reconstructions of the CLIMAP project, when assuming present day atmospheric lapse rates (e.g. Pe- teet and Rind 1985). Since proxy data for the vertical structure of the atmosphere during glacial times do not exist, numerical experiments with an atmospheric gen- eral circulation model for glacial and interglacial climates have been performed. Our model experiments reveal that slightly cooler tropical SSTs relative to the ones by CLIMAP (1981) are sufficient to simulate proper glacial freezing temperature levels. The depression of tropical snow lines in our LGM experiment can be attributed to two effects: Less moisture content provides an increased environmental lapse rate in the free atmosphere. This effect is strongest in the tropical middle troposphere where we observe an additional two degrees cooling. Secondly, the surface temperature near tropical glaciers is further cooled by a longer duration of snow cover. Our model result provides a consistent view of the last glacial maximum climate with much colder tem- peratures than today in the tropical mountains in concordance with moderate lowering of tropical SSTs.

  16. Sea, ice and surface water circulation, Alaskan continental shelf

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sharma, G. D.; Wright, F. F.; Burns, J. J. (Principal Investigator)

    1973-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. ERTS-1 imagery has been extremely useful in understanding the tidal water movements in a large estuary such as Cook Inlet. As more imagery obtained during various tidal stages become available it appears that complex and fast changing micro-circulation patterns develop in various regions of Cook Inlet during each advancing and receding tide. More ERTS-1 synoptic imagery is needed to fully understand the effect of the approach of tidal front on the water movements in the various regions through the estuary. The conventional onboard ship data gathered during various cruises although revealed the overall circulation pattern in Cook Inlet but failed to show micro-subgyres which develop in various regions during each tide which are discernible on ther ERTS-1 imagery. Suspended load distribution in the Bering Sea during summer varies significantly. In areas of phytoplankton bloom and at the river mouths the suspended load is higher than the 1 mg/1 which is found over most areas. The influence of major rivers on temperature, salinity, and suspended load in surface water as well as at shallow depth is apparent. On the Bering shelf a strong pycnocline generally at depth 10-20 m is formed by surface fresh water flow which retains sediment in suspension over extended periods.

  17. Long-Range Correlations of Global Sea Surface Temperature

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Lei; Zhao, Xia; Wang, Lu

    2016-01-01

    Scaling behaviors of the global monthly sea surface temperature (SST) derived from 1870–2009 average monthly data sets of Hadley Centre Sea Ice and SST (HadISST) are investigated employing detrended fluctuation analysis (DFA). The global SST fluctuations are found to be strong positively long-range correlated at all pertinent time-intervals. The value of scaling exponent is larger in the tropics than those in the intermediate latitudes of the northern and southern hemispheres. DFA leads to the scaling exponent α = 0.87 over the globe (60°S~60°N), northern hemisphere (0°N~60°N), and southern hemisphere (0°S~60°S), α = 0.84 over the intermediate latitude of southern hemisphere (30°S~60°S), α = 0.81 over the intermediate latitude of northern hemisphere (30°N~60°N) and α = 0.90 over the tropics 30°S~30°N [fluctuation F(s) ~ sα], which the fluctuations of monthly SST anomaly display long-term correlated behaviors. Furthermore, the larger the standard deviation is, the smaller long-range correlations (LRCs) of SST in the corresponding regions, especially in three distinct upwelling areas. After the standard deviation is taken into account, an index χ = α * σ is introduced to obtain the spatial distributions of χ. There exists an obvious change of global SST in central east and northern Pacific and the northwest Atlantic. This may be as a clue on predictability of climate and ocean variabilities. PMID:27100397

  18. Long-Range Correlations of Global Sea Surface Temperature.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Lei; Zhao, Xia; Wang, Lu

    2016-01-01

    Scaling behaviors of the global monthly sea surface temperature (SST) derived from 1870-2009 average monthly data sets of Hadley Centre Sea Ice and SST (HadISST) are investigated employing detrended fluctuation analysis (DFA). The global SST fluctuations are found to be strong positively long-range correlated at all pertinent time-intervals. The value of scaling exponent is larger in the tropics than those in the intermediate latitudes of the northern and southern hemispheres. DFA leads to the scaling exponent α = 0.87 over the globe (60°S~60°N), northern hemisphere (0°N~60°N), and southern hemisphere (0°S~60°S), α = 0.84 over the intermediate latitude of southern hemisphere (30°S~60°S), α = 0.81 over the intermediate latitude of northern hemisphere (30°N~60°N) and α = 0.90 over the tropics 30°S~30°N [fluctuation F(s) ~ sα], which the fluctuations of monthly SST anomaly display long-term correlated behaviors. Furthermore, the larger the standard deviation is, the smaller long-range correlations (LRCs) of SST in the corresponding regions, especially in three distinct upwelling areas. After the standard deviation is taken into account, an index χ = α * σ is introduced to obtain the spatial distributions of χ. There exists an obvious change of global SST in central east and northern Pacific and the northwest Atlantic. This may be as a clue on predictability of climate and ocean variabilities.

  19. Remotely sensed seasonality in the spatial distribution of sea-surface suspended particulate matter in the southern North Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eleveld, Marieke A.; Pasterkamp, Reinold; van der Woerd, Hendrik J.; Pietrzak, Julie D.

    2008-10-01

    An algorithm is presented for estimating near-surface SPM concentrations in the turbid Case 2 waters of the southern North Sea. The single band algorithm, named POWERS, was derived by parameterising Gordon's approximation of the radiative transfer model with measurements of Belgian and Dutch inherent optical properties. The algorithm was used to calculate near-surface SPM concentration from 491 SeaWiFS datasets for 2001. It was shown to be a robust algorithm for estimating SPM in the southern North Sea. Regression of annual geometric mean SPM concentration derived from remote sensing (SPM rs), against in situ (SPM is) data from 19 Dutch monitoring stations was highly significant with an r2 of 0.87. Further comparison and statistical testing against independent datasets for 2000 confirmed the consistency of this relationship. Moreover, time series of SPM rs concentrations derived from the POWERS algorithm, were shown to follow the same temporal trends as individual SPM is data recorded during 2001. Composites of annual, winter and summer SPM rs for 2001 highlight the three dominant water masses in the southern North Sea, as well as their winter-fall and spring-summer variability. The results indicate that wind induced wave action and mixing cause high surface SPM signals in winter in regions where the water column becomes well mixed, whereas in summer stratification leads to a lower SPM surface signal. The presented algorithm gives accurate near-surface SPM concentrations and could easily be adapted for other water masses and seas.

  20. Snow melt on sea ice surfaces as determined from passive microwave satellite data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, Mark R.

    1987-01-01

    SMMR data for the year 1979, 1980 and 1984 have been analyzed to determine the variability in the onset of melt for the Arctic seasonal sea ice zone. The results show melt commencing in either the Kara/Barents Seas or Chukchi Sea and progressing zonally towards the central Asian coast (Laptev Sea). Individual regions had interannual variations in melt onset in the 10-20 day range. To determine whether daily changes occur in the sea ice surface melt, the SMMR 18 and 37 GHz brightness temperature data are analyzed at day/night/twilight periods. Brightness temperatures illustrate diurnal variations in most regions during melt. In the East Siberian Sea, however, daily variations are observed in 1979, throughout the analysis period, well before any melt would usually have commenced. Understanding microwave responses to changing surface conditions during melt will perhaps give additional information about energy budgets during the winter to summer transition of sea ice.

  1. Global monitoring of Sea Surface Salinity with Aquarius

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lagerloef, G. S. E.; LeVine, D. M.; Chao, Yi; Colomb, R.; Nollmann, I.

    2005-01-01

    Aquarius is a microwave remote sensing system designed to obtain global maps of the surface salinity field of the oceans from space. It will be flown on the Aquarius/SAC-D mission, a partnership between the USA (NASA) and Argentina (CONAE) with launch scheduled for late in 2008. The objective of Aquarius is to monitor the seasonal and interannual variation of the large scale features of the surface salinity field in the open ocean. This will provide data to address scientific questions associated with ocean circulation and its impact on climate. For example, salinity is needed to understand the large scale thermohaline circulation, driven by buoyancy, which moves large masses of water and heat around the globe. Of the two variables that determine buoyancy (salinity and temperature), temperature is already being monitored. Salinity is the missing variable needed to understand this circulation. Salinity also has an important role in energy exchange between the ocean and atmosphere, for example in the development of fresh water lenses (buoyant water that forms stable layers and insulates water below from the atmosphere) which alter the air-sea coupling. Aquarius is a combination radiometer and scatterometer (radar) operating at L-band (1.413 GHz for the radiometer and 1.26 GHz for the scatterometer). The primary instrument,for measuring salinity is the radiometer which is able to detect salinity because of the modulation salinity produces on the thermal emission from sea water. This change is detectable at the long wavelength end of the microwave spectrum. The scatterometer will provide a correction for surface roughness (waves) which is one of the greatest unknowns in the retrieval. The sensor will be in a sun-synchronous orbit at about 650 km with equatorial crossings of 6am/6pm. The antenna for these two instruments is a 3 meter offset fed reflector with three feeds arranged in pushbroom fashion looking away from the sun toward the shadow side of the orbit to

  2. Aquarius: A Mission to Monitor Sea Surface Salinity from Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    LeVine, D. M.; Lagerloef, G. S. E.; Pellerano, F.; Yueh, S.; Colomb, R.

    2006-01-01

    Aquarius is a combination radiometer and scatterometer (radar) operating at L-band (1.413 GHz for the radiometer and 1.26 GHz for the scatterometer). The primary instrument for measuring salinity is the radiometer. The scatterometer will provide a correction for surface roughness (waves) which is one of the largest potential sources of error in the retrieval. Unique features of the sensor are the large reflector (2.5 meter offset fed reflector with three feeds), polarimetric operation, and the tight thermal control. The three feeds produce three beams arranged to image in pushbroom fashion looking to the side of the orbit away from the sun to avoid sunglint. Polarimetric operation is included to assist in correcting for Faraday rotation which can be important at L-band. The tight thermal control is necessary to meet stability requirements (less than 0.12K drift over 7 days) which have been imposed to assist in meeting the science requirements for the retrieval of surface salinity (0.2 psu). The sensor will be in a sun-synchronous orbit at about 650 km with equatorial crossings of 6ad6pm (ascending at 6 pm). The objective is to monitor the seasonal and interannual variation of the large scale features of the surface salinity field in the open ocean. To accomplish this, the measurement goals are a spatial resolution of 100 km and retrieval accuracy of 0.2 psu globally on a monthly basis. Aquarius is being developed by NASA and is a partnership between JPL and the Goddard Space Flight Center. The SAC-D mission is being developed by CONAE and will include the spacecraft and several additional instruments, including visible and infrared cameras and a microwave radiometer to monitor rain and wind velocity over the oceans, and sea ice.

  3. Mean sea surface and geoid gradient comparisons with TOPEX altimeter data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rapp, Richard H.; Yi, Yuchan; Wang, Yan Ming

    1994-01-01

    Cycles 4 to 54 of TOPEX data have been analyzed through comparisons with the mean sea surface given on the disturbed geophysical data record (GDR). Two inverted barometer correction procedures were considered for the data reduction. One used a constant atmospheric pressure for all data while the one adopted for use, for most computations, introduced a cycle average pressure. The maximum difference between the two estimates was 3.0 cm with a clear annual signal. With the modified correction the TOPEX sea surface was compared to The Ohio State University (OSU) mean sea surface, given on the GDR, to estimate three translations ( delta x = -2.3 cm; delta y = 25.0 cm; delta z = -0.3 cm) and a bias (43.3 cm) between the two surfaces. The only significant translation is delta y which indicates the reference frame of the TOPEX system differs from that used in the OSU mean sea surface system. The bias between the TOPEX mean sea surface and the OSU mean sea surface was used to estimate an equatorial radius of 6,378,136.55 m based on an 18-cm biased estimate of the TOPEX altimeter. Examination of the average difference, by cycle, between the TOPEX sea surface and the OSU mean sea surface suggested a bias change of 3.1 +/- 2.2 mm/yr with a positive sign indicating the average ocean surface is rising or the altimeter measured distance is decreasing. Models were implemented that solved directly for a bias, bias rate annual/semiannual, and tide correction terms. The computations indicated that a simultaneous solution for this bias, bias rate, and annual/semiannual terms gave the most accurate results. Nonsimultaneous solutions led to slightly different bias rate values. The root mean square difference between the TOPEX sea surface and OSU sea surface, after translation and bias correction, was +/- 17 cm for a typical cycle. Some locations were indentified where the difference could reach 2.3 cm and were repeated over several cycles indicating errors in the mean sea surface. Most

  4. Sea level and turbidity controls on mangrove soil surface elevation change

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lovelock, Catherine E.; Fernanda Adame, Maria; Bennion, Vicki; Hayes, Matthew; Reef, Ruth; Santini, Nadia; Cahoon, Donald R.

    2015-01-01

    Increases in sea level are a threat to seaward fringing mangrove forests if levels of inundation exceed the physiological tolerance of the trees; however, tidal wetlands can keep pace with sea level rise if soil surface elevations can increase at the same pace as sea level rise. Sediment accretion on the soil surface and belowground production of roots are proposed to increase with increasing sea level, enabling intertidal habitats to maintain their position relative to mean sea level, but there are few tests of these predictions in mangrove forests. Here we used variation in sea level and the availability of sediments caused by seasonal and inter-annual variation in the intensity of La Nina-El Nino to assess the effects of increasing sea level on surface elevation gains and contributing processes (accretion on the surface, subsidence and root growth) in mangrove forests. We found that soil surface elevation increased with mean sea level (which varied over 250 mm during the study) and with turbidity at sites where fine sediment in the water column is abundant. In contrast, where sediments were sandy, rates of surface elevation gain were high, but not significantly related to variation in turbidity, and were likely to be influenced by other factors that deliver sand to the mangrove forest. Root growth was not linked to soil surface elevation gains, although it was associated with reduced shallow subsidence, and therefore may contribute to the capacity of mangroves to keep pace with sea level rise. Our results indicate both surface (sedimentation) and subsurface (root growth) processes can influence mangrove capacity to keep pace with sea level rise within the same geographic location, and that current models of tidal marsh responses to sea level rise capture the major feature of the response of mangroves where fine, but not coarse, sediments are abundant.

  5. Sea level and turbidity controls on mangrove soil surface elevation change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lovelock, Catherine E.; Adame, Maria Fernanda; Bennion, Vicki; Hayes, Matthew; Reef, Ruth; Santini, Nadia; Cahoon, Donald R.

    2015-02-01

    Increases in sea level are a threat to seaward fringing mangrove forests if levels of inundation exceed the physiological tolerance of the trees; however, tidal wetlands can keep pace with sea level rise if soil surface elevations can increase at the same pace as sea level rise. Sediment accretion on the soil surface and belowground production of roots are proposed to increase with increasing sea level, enabling intertidal habitats to maintain their position relative to mean sea level, but there are few tests of these predictions in mangrove forests. Here we used variation in sea level and the availability of sediments caused by seasonal and inter-annual variation in the intensity of La Nina-El Nino to assess the effects of increasing sea level on surface elevation gains and contributing processes (accretion on the surface, subsidence and root growth) in mangrove forests. We found that soil surface elevation increased with mean sea level (which varied over 250 mm during the study) and with turbidity at sites where fine sediment in the water column is abundant. In contrast, where sediments were sandy, rates of surface elevation gain were high, but not significantly related to variation in turbidity, and were likely to be influenced by other factors that deliver sand to the mangrove forest. Root growth was not linked to soil surface elevation gains, although it was associated with reduced shallow subsidence, and therefore may contribute to the capacity of mangroves to keep pace with sea level rise. Our results indicate both surface (sedimentation) and subsurface (root growth) processes can influence mangrove capacity to keep pace with sea level rise within the same geographic location, and that current models of tidal marsh responses to sea level rise capture the major feature of the response of mangroves where fine, but not coarse, sediments are abundant.

  6. Fine-Resolution Satellite-Based Sea Surface Temperatures over the Global Ocean

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-05-22

    sea -ice the Sea of Azov . The plot masks SST in the Great Lakes that coverage. may otherwise included in RTG. [7] These differences between MODAS and...and relative merits of two sets of daily global sea surface temperature (SST) analyses are examined and compared. The 1/81 Modular Ocean Data Analysis...10.1029/2006JC004021, 2007 ore FuN Awtle Fine-resolution satellite-based daily sea surface f!Tr7 1 UTION STATENT-T!T A temperatures over the global

  7. SeaWIFS Postlaunch Technical Report Series. Volume 13; The SeaWiFS Photometer Revision for Incident Surface Measurement (SeaPRISM) Field Commissioning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hooker, Stanford B. (Editor); Zibordi, Giuseppe; Berthon, Jean-Francois; Bailey, Sean W.; Pietras, Christophe M.; Firestone, Elaine R. (Editor)

    2000-01-01

    This report documents the scientific activities that took place at the Acqua Alta Oceanographic Tower (AAOT) in the northern Adriatic Sea off the coast of Italy from 2-6 August 1999. The ultimate objective of the field campaign was to evaluate the capabilities of a new instrument called the SeaWiFS Photometer Revision for Incident Surface Measurements (SeaPRISM). SeaPRISM is based on a CE-318 sun photometer made by CIMEL Electronique (Paris, France). The CE-318 is an automated, robotic system which measures the direct sun irradiance plus the sky radiance in the sun plane and in the almucantar plane. The data are transmitted over a satellite link, and this remote operation capability has made the device very useful for atmospheric measurements. The revision to the CE-318 that makes the instrument potentially useful for SeaWiFS calibration and validation activities is to include a capability for measuring the radiance leaving the sea surface in wavelengths suitable for the determination of chlorophyll a concentration. The initial evaluation of this new capability involved above- and in-water measurement protocols. An intercomparison of the water-leaving radiances derived from SeaPRISM and an in-water system showed the overall spectral agreement was approximately 8.6%, but the blue-green channels intercompared at the 5% level. A blue-green band ratio comparison was at the 4% level.

  8. Analysis of variability of tropical Pacific sea surface temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davies, Georgina; Cressie, Noel

    2016-11-01

    Sea surface temperature (SST) in the Pacific Ocean is a key component of many global climate models and the El Niño-Southern Oscillation (ENSO) phenomenon. We shall analyse SST for the period November 1981-December 2014. To study the temporal variability of the ENSO phenomenon, we have selected a subregion of the tropical Pacific Ocean, namely the Niño 3.4 region, as it is thought to be the area where SST anomalies indicate most clearly ENSO's influence on the global atmosphere. SST anomalies, obtained by subtracting the appropriate monthly averages from the data, are the focus of the majority of previous analyses of the Pacific and other oceans' SSTs. Preliminary data analysis showed that not only Niño 3.4 spatial means but also Niño 3.4 spatial variances varied with month of the year. In this article, we conduct an analysis of the raw SST data and introduce diagnostic plots (here, plots of variability vs. central tendency). These plots show strong negative dependence between the spatial standard deviation and the spatial mean. Outliers are present, so we consider robust regression to obtain intercept and slope estimates for the 12 individual months and for all-months-combined. Based on this mean-standard deviation relationship, we define a variance-stabilizing transformation. On the transformed scale, we describe the Niño 3.4 SST time series with a statistical model that is linear, heteroskedastic, and dynamical.

  9. Indian Ocean Sea Surface Temperatures during the mid-Piacenzian

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stoll, D. K.; Robinson, M. M.; Dowsett, H. J.

    2010-12-01

    Mid-Pliocene (~3.3 to 3.0 Ma) climate is being reconstructed as part of the U.S. Geological Survey’s Pliocene Research, Interpretation, and Synoptic Mapping (PRISM) Project. The Pliocene sea surface temperature (SST) dataset is an integral piece of PRISM’s climate reconstruction and continually evolves over time as additional data are added and refined. The Indian Ocean has in the past been a region lacking PRISM SST data coverage, while it is also a region marked with interesting climate phenomena (e.g., the Indian Ocean Dipole). Questions over the existence of these modern oceanographic elements during the mid-Piacenzian have led to increased interest in the Indian Ocean. New data analyzed by PRISM provides insight on what Indian Ocean circulation and SST may have been like ~3 million years ago. Using planktic foraminifera sampled and analyzed from Indian Ocean ODP Sites 709, 716, 754, 758, and 763, PRISM is developing new mid-Pliocene SST estimates to better understand this region’s paleoceanography.

  10. The Effect of Ocean Currents on Sea Surface Temperature Anomalies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stammer, Detlef; Leeuwenburgh, Olwijn

    2000-01-01

    We investigate regional and global-scale correlations between observed anomalies in sea surface temperature and height. A strong agreement between the two fields is found over a broad range of latitudes for different ocean basins. Both time-longitude plots and wavenumber-frequency spectra suggest an advective forcing of SST anomalies by a first-mode baroclinic wave field on spatial scales down to 400 km and time scales as short as 1 month. Even though the magnitude of the mean background temperature gradient is determining for the effectiveness of the forcing, there is no obvious seasonality that can be detected in the amplitudes of SST anomalies. Instead, individual wave signatures in the SST can in some cases be followed over periods of two years. The phase relationship between SST and SSH anomalies is dependent upon frequency and wavenumber and displays a clear decrease of the phase lag toward higher latitudes where the two fields come into phase at low frequencies. Estimates of the damping coefficient are larger than generally obtained for a purely atmospheric feedback. From a global frequency spectrum a damping time scale of 2-3 month was found. Regionally results are very variable and range from 1 month near strong currents to 10 month at low latitudes and in the sub-polar North Atlantic. Strong agreement is found between the first global EOF modes of 10 day averaged and spatially smoothed SST and SSH grids. The accompanying time series display low frequency oscillations in both fields.

  11. Ultra Stable Microwave Radiometers for Future Sea Surface Salinity Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, William J.; Tanner, Alan B.; Pellerano, Fernando A.; Horgan, Kevin A.

    2005-01-01

    The NASA Earth Science System Pathfinder (ESSP) mission Aquarius will measure global sea surface salinity with 100-km spatial resolution every 8 days with an average monthly salinity accuracy of 0.2 psu (parts per thousand). This requires an L-band low-noise radiometer with the long-term calibration stability of less than 0.1 K over 8 days. This three-year research program on ultra stable radiometers has addressed the radiometer requirements and configuration necessary to achieve this objective for Aquarius and future ocean salinity missions. The system configuration and component performance have been evaluated with radiometer testbeds at both JPL and GSFC. The research has addressed several areas including component characterization as a function of temperature, a procedure for the measurement and correction for radiometer system non-linearity, noise diode calibration versus temperature, low noise amplifier performance over voltage, and temperature control requirements to achieve the required stability. A breadboard radiometer, utilizing microstrip-based technologies, has been built to demonstrate this long-term stability. This report also presents the results of the radiometer test program, a detailed radiometer noise model, and details of the operational switching sequence optimization that can be used to achieve the low noise and stability requirements. Many of the results of this research have been incorporated into the Aquarius radiometer design and will allow this instrument to achieve its goals.

  12. Effect of the accumulation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in the sea surface microlayer on their coastal air-sea exchanges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guitart, C.; García-Flor, N.; Miquel, J. C.; Fowler, S. W.; Albaigés, J.

    2010-01-01

    Several measurements of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in coastal marine compartments (viz. atmosphere, sea surface microlayer, subsurface seawater, sinking particles and sediments), made nearly simultaneously at two stations in the north-eastern Mediterranean, were used to estimate the transport fluxes of individual and total PAHs through the air-seawater-sediment system. Diffusive air-sea exchange fluxes were estimated using both subsurface water (SSW) and sea surface microlayer (SML) concentrations. The air-SML fluxes ranged from 411 to 12,292 ng m - 2 d - 1 (absorption) and from - 506 to -13,746 ng m - 2 d - 1 (volatilisation) for total PAHs (Σ15). Air-seawater column transport of particle-associated PAHs was estimated from the analysis of particulate atmospheric and sediment interceptor trap materials. Air-sea particle deposition fluxes of total PAHs ranged from 13 to 114 ng m - 2 d - 1 and seawater particle settling fluxes (upper 5 m water column) ranged from 184 to 323 ng m - 2 d - 1 . The results of this study indicate that both the magnitude and the direction of the calculated air-sea diffusive fluxes change when PAH concentrations in the SML are considered. As a result, PAHs accumulation in the SML could produce the so-called "flux capping effect". However, the high variability in the coastal air-sea PAHs flux estimations, mainly due to the parameters uncertainty, requires further experimental approaches, including improvement of parameterisations.

  13. Deglacial temperature patterns in the Arabian Sea and mechanisms for Indian monsoon failure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tierney, J. E.; Pausata, F. S. R.; deMenocal, P. B.

    2015-12-01

    Both paleoclimate data and climate model simulations demonstrate that the Indian monsoon system responds to remote coolings in the North Atlantic. The textbook examples are the stadial events associated with the last deglaciation — the Younger Dryas and Heinrich Stadial 1 — when the monsoon weakened dramatically and caused drying throughout the Indian Ocean rim. The mechanism by which the North Atlantic influences the monsoon system is not completely clear: locally cool SSTs, increases in continental albedo, and southward migration of the intertropical convergence zone have all been raised as possibilities. Here we synthesize biomarker and foraminiferal estimates of temperature to study the evolution of the Arabian Sea water column during the deglaciation and test hypotheses of monsoon failure during stadials. Alkenone and Mg/Ca data clearly indicate that the Arabian Sea cools during the YD and H1, although H1 cooling is partly obscured by the overall warming trend associated with orbital forcing and rising greenhouse gases. In contrast, TEX86 data record warmings during the YD and H1. The stark difference between the TEX86 response and the alkenone and foraminiferal data, as well as comparison with climate model simulations, indicates that TEX86 is most likely acting as a subsurface temperature proxy in the Arabian Sea over these timescales. Taken together, the paleoclimate data describe a pattern of surface cooling and subsurface warming in response to North Atlantic cooling. This oceanographic response is in excellent agreement with both timeslice and transient model simulations spanning the last deglaciation, and strongly supports the hypothesis that locally cool SSTs are a requisite for monsoon failure. Furthermore, subsurface warming causes a destratification of the Arabian Sea water column and provides a mechanism for previously observed reductions in productivity during stadial events.

  14. Holocene Sea Surface and Subsurface Water Mass Variability Reconstructed from Temperature and Sea-ice Proxies in Fram Strait

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Werner, Kirstin; Spielhagen, Robert F.; Müller, Juliane; Husum, Katrine; Kandiano, Evgenia S.; Polyak, Leonid

    2016-04-01

    In two high-resolution sediment cores from the West Spitsbergen continental margin we investigated planktic foraminiferal, biomarker and dinocyst proxy data in order to reconstruct surface and subsurface water mass variability during the Holocene. The two study sites are today influenced by northward flowing warm and saline Atlantic Water. Both foraminiferal and dinocyst (de Vernal et al., 2013) temperature reconstructions indicate a less-stratified, ice-free, nutrient-rich summer surface ocean with strong Atlantic Water advection between 10.6 and 8.5 cal ka BP, likely related to maximum July insolation during the early Holocene. Sea surface to subsurface water temperatures of up to 6°C prevailed until ca 5 cal ka BP. A weakened contribution of Atlantic Water is found when subsurface temperatures strongly decreased with minimum values between ca 4 and 3 cal ka BP. High planktic foraminifer shell fragmentation and increased oxygen isotope values of the subpolar planktic foraminifer species Turborotalita quinqueloba as well as increasing concentrations of the sea ice biomarker IP25 further indicate cool conditions. Indices associated with IP25 as well as dinocyst data suggest a sustained cooling and consequently sea-ice increase during the late Holocene. However, planktic foraminiferal data indicate a slight return of stronger subsurface influx of Atlantic Water since ca 3 cal ka BP. The observed decoupling of cooling surface and warming subsurface waters during the later Holocene might be attributed to a strong pycnocline layer separating cold sea-ice fed surface waters from enhanced subsurface Atlantic Water advection. Reference: de Vernal, A., Hillaire-Marcel, C., Rochon, A., Fréchette, B., Henry, M., Solignac, S., Bonnet, S., 2013. Dinocyst-based reconstructions of sea ice cover concentration during the Holocene in the Arctic Ocean, the northern North Atlantic Ocean and its adjacent seas. Quaternary Science Reviews 79, 111-121.

  15. Arctic Sea Salt Aerosol from Blowing Snow and Sea Ice Surfaces - a Missing Natural Source in Winter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frey, M. M.; Norris, S. J.; Brooks, I. M.; Nishimura, K.; Jones, A. E.

    2015-12-01

    Atmospheric particles in the polar regions consist mostly of sea salt aerosol (SSA). SSA plays an important role in regional climate change through influencing the surface energy balance either directly or indirectly via cloud formation. SSA irradiated by sunlight also releases very reactive halogen radicals, which control concentrations of ozone, a pollutant and greenhouse gas. However, models under-predict SSA concentrations in the Arctic during winter pointing to a missing source. It has been recently suggested that salty blowing snow above sea ice, which is evaporating, to be that source as it may produce more SSA than equivalent areas of open ocean. Participation in the 'Norwegian Young Sea Ice Cruise (N-ICE 2015)' on board the research vessel `Lance' allowed to test this hypothesis in the Arctic sea ice zone during winter. Measurements were carried out from the ship frozen into the pack ice North of 80º N during February to March 2015. Observations at ground level (0.1-2 m) and from the ship's crows nest (30 m) included number concentrations and size spectra of SSA (diameter range 0.3-10 μm) as well as snow particles (diameter range 50-500 μm). During and after blowing snow events significant SSA production was observed. In the aerosol and snow phase sulfate is fractionated with respect to sea water, which confirms sea ice surfaces and salty snow, and not the open ocean, to be the dominant source of airborne SSA. Aerosol shows depletion in bromide with respect to sea water, especially after sunrise, indicating photochemically driven release of bromine. We discuss the SSA source strength from blowing snow in light of environmental conditions (wind speed, atmospheric turbulence, temperature and snow salinity) and recommend improved model parameterisations to estimate regional aerosol production. N-ICE 2015 results are then compared to a similar study carried out previously in the Weddell Sea during the Antarctic winter.

  16. The impact of the Indonesian Throughflow and tidal mixing on the summertime sea surface temperature in the western Indonesian Seas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kida, Shinichiro; Wijffels, Susan

    2012-09-01

    A numerical model is used to investigate how the Indonesian Throughflow and tidal mixing are affecting the seasonal cycle of the sea surface temperature (SST) in the Indonesian Seas. The SST in these seas is considered to play a major role on the development of the Australian Summer Monsoon. Based on a quantitative assessment of the heat budget, the Indonesian Throughflow is found to affect the SST in the western Indonesian Seas primarily during Austral summer. The Throughflow advects the warm water from the Pacific and maintains the warm SST when the Northwestern Monsoonal wind induces coastal upwelling along the northern side of the Nusa Tenggara and cools the SST. Such balance is supported by observations. The hydrographic sections show the isotherms tilting upward toward the northern coast of the Nusa Tenggara when satellite observations show slight decrease of the SST in the region. Tidal mixing is found to cool the SST during summer the most. This is because the Northwest Monsoonal wind induces coastal upwelling near where strong tidal mixing above seamount occurs and brings the tidally well-mixed upper thermocline water to the surface. The surface Ekman flow also spreads this cool water around the Banda Sea where tidal mixing does not occur. The impact of tidal mixing on the SST is also found to come largely from that occurring above seamounts. The impact of tidal mixing on the continental shelves is limited to shelf-breaks because cold subsurface water is necessary for enhanced vertical mixing to cool the SST.

  17. Electromagnetic backscattering from one-dimensional drifting fractal sea surface II: Electromagnetic backscattering model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tao, Xie; William, Perrie; Shang-Zhuo, Zhao; He, Fang; Wen-Jin, Yu; Yi-Jun, He

    2016-07-01

    Sea surface current has a significant influence on electromagnetic (EM) backscattering signals and may constitute a dominant synthetic aperture radar (SAR) imaging mechanism. An effective EM backscattering model for a one-dimensional drifting fractal sea surface is presented in this paper. This model is used to simulate EM backscattering signals from the drifting sea surface. Numerical results show that ocean currents have a significant influence on EM backscattering signals from the sea surface. The normalized radar cross section (NRCS) discrepancies between the model for a coupled wave-current fractal sea surface and the model for an uncoupled fractal sea surface increase with the increase of incidence angle, as well as with increasing ocean currents. Ocean currents that are parallel to the direction of the wave can weaken the EM backscattering signal intensity, while the EM backscattering signal is intensified by ocean currents propagating oppositely to the wave direction. The model presented in this paper can be used to study the SAR imaging mechanism for a drifting sea surface. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 41276187), the Global Change Research Program of China (Grant No. 2015CB953901), the Priority Academic Program Development of Jiangsu Higher Education Institutions, China, the Program for the Innovation Research and Entrepreneurship Team in Jiangsu Province, China, the Canadian Program on Energy Research and Development, and the Canadian World Class Tanker Safety Service Program.

  18. Comparison of organic (UK'37, TEXH86, LDI) and faunal proxies (foraminiferal assemblages) for reconstruction of late Quaternary sea surface temperature variability from offshore southeastern Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopes dos Santos, Raquel A.; Spooner, Michelle I.; Barrows, Timothy T.; De Deckker, Patrick; Sinninghe Damsté, Jaap S.; Schouten, Stefan

    2013-09-01

    Several proxies have been developed to reconstruct past sea surface temperature (SST), but different proxies may reflect temperatures of different seasons and each proxy is characterized by certain uncertainties. Therefore, a multiproxy approach is preferred to precisely reconstruct SST. Here, we reconstruct SST of the ocean offshore southeastern Australia (Murray Canyons area) for the last ~135 ka using three independent organic proxies (TEXH86 based on glycerol dialkyl glycerol tetraethers (GDGTs), UK'37 based on alkenones, and LDI based on long-chain diols) in addition to foraminiferal faunal assemblages. The organic proxy records show similar trends, with the highest temperature (21°C for UK'37 and TEXH86, and 25°C for LDI) during the last interglacial and lowest temperature (8°C for TEXH86, 10°C for UK'37, and 12°C for LDI) during the Last Glacial Maximum. However, the differences in absolute SST estimates obtained by the organic proxies varied over time with differences of up to 9°C between LDI and TEXH86. The seasonal SST reconstructions based on the modern analogue of foraminiferal assemblages also show similar trends as the organic proxies with highest temperatures during the last interglacial (23°C for the warmest month SST, 20°C for mean annual, and 18°C for the coolest month) and lowest temperature during the Last Glacial Maximum (14°C for the warmest month, 11°C for mean annual, and 9°C for the coolest month). Down core comparison between the reconstructed SSTs of the organic and inorganic proxies shows that LDI-inferred temperatures compare well with the temperature of the warmest month, TEXH86 with the temperature of the coolest month, and UK'37 with mean annual temperature. An increase in TEXH86 SST estimates relative to those of other proxies during deglaciations and interglacials suggests that either winter temperatures rapidly warmed, possibly due to an invigoration of the Leeuwin Current over the core site, or there was a change in

  19. 50,000-year Late Quaternary Biogenic Sedimentation, Sea Surface Temperature, and Land Erosion Records From the Southern Papua New Guinea (IMAGES MD052928)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shiau, L.; Huh, C.; Yamamoto, M.; Liao, Y.; Chen, M.

    2007-12-01

    We present 50,000-year late Quaternary records of carbonate and total organic carbon (TOC), TEX86-SST and Uk'37-SST, and Branched Isoprenoid Tetraether (BIT) from core MD052928 (11°17.26Ś, 148°51.60É, water depth: 2250m) taken from the southeastern Papua New Guinea slope during the PECTEN cruise in 2005. The age model of the core is constructed by AMS-14C dating of planktic foraminifers, benthic foraminifer oxygen isotope stratigraphy, and paleomagnetic intensity. We found that the carbonate and TOC contents showed glacial-interglacial variations. The carbonate contents range between 15%- 50%, with higher contents in the Holocene and lower in MIS (Marine Isotope Stage) 2-3. The carbonate contents also show high frequency oscillations that mimic millennial-scale climate changes during the last deglaciation and MIS 2-3. The carbonate contents correlate well with the BIT index measured from the same core. Low carbonate events coincide with BIT indices that indicate more inputs of terrestrial organic matters, suggesting noticeable changes of soil erosion and terrestrial fluvial input on land nearby. The TOC contents range between 0.2%-0.4%, and show higher contents during MIS 2-3. High TOC contents are associated with BIT indices that reflect higher input of terrestrial organic matters. We have also conducted sea surface temperature (SST) analyses by testing two proxies: glycerol dibiphytanyl glycerol tetraether membrane lipid composition of marine crenarchaeota (TEX86) and alkenone (Uk'37). While both proxies yield similar SST during the LGM (27-28° C), SST in the Holocene derived from TEX86 is 2° C higher than that derived from Uk'37(31° C vs 29° C). Our records suggest that higher input of terrestrial organic matter is coupled to intensified soil erosion during cold periods. Whether our records implicate global climate (Antarctic vs. Arctic) or regional processes (e.g. land precipitation, high mountain glacier expansion) remains to be further investigated.

  20. Emiliania huxleyi Goes Viral: Dynamic Variation of Intact Polar Lipids and Alkenones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fulton, J. M.; Fredricks, H.; Vardi, A.; DiTullio, G. R.; Bidle, K. D.; Van Mooy, B.

    2012-12-01

    Viruses are an important component of marine ecosystems, shunting more than 25% of the organic carbon in algal biomass away from grazers to the dissolved organic carbon pool, fueling microbial foodwebs. Virus infection has long been implicated in the termination of Emiliania huxleyi blooms, and recent work demonstrated that EhV86, the type virus of E. huxleyi, is bound by a lipid membrane and employs an animal-like infection strategy, similar to the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). We add to this story by quantifying EhV86 and host (Ehux374) lipodomes before, during, and after infection in laboratory culture. We identified novel intact polar lipids (IPLs), and based on their structures and experimental results, we hypothesize that they are dynamic players in cell-virus interactions, not just structural membrane components. Alkenones also have an apparent role in viral infection as they are part of the EhV86 lipidome, their production increases during infection, and growth temperatures calculated from alkenone unsaturation in infected cultures are elevated relative to uninfected cultures. EhV86 carries genes for glycosphingolipid (GSL) synthesis, and production increases exponentially during infection, leading to a ca. 100-fold increase in GSL concentration per cell. We hypothesize that specific GSLs (1) promote viral attachment via a sialic acid headgroup and (2) induce programmed cell death and lysis. In response to infection, Ehux374 produces a diacylglycerolipid with a myriocin-like (ML) structure that inhibits GSL synthesis. Remarkably, the EhV86 lipidome contains an abundant ML, but with a different fatty acid distribution that apparently neutralizes its effect on the GSL synthesis pathway. The neutralized ML lipid is also common in lipid extracts from the North Atlantic, suggesting it may be found in other organisms as well. We propose that much of the lipid variability during infection occurs in lipid rafts, microdomains in the plasma membrane targeted by

  1. Polarimetric Doppler spectrum of backscattered echoes from nonlinear sea surface damped by natural slicks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Pengju; Guo, Lixin

    2016-11-01

    Based on the Lombardini et al. model that can predict the hydrodynamic damping of rough sea surfaces in the presence of monomolecular slicks and the "choppy wave" model (CWM) that can describe the nonlinear interactions between ocean waves, the modeling of time-varying nonlinear sea surfaces damped by natural or organic sea slicks is presented in this paper. The polarimetric scattering model of second-order small-slope approximation (SSA-II) with tapered wave incidence is utilized for evaluating co- and cross-polarized backscattered echoes from clean and contaminated CWM nonlinear sea surfaces. The influence of natural sea slicks on Doppler shift and spectral bandwidth of radar sea echoes is investigated in detail by comparing the polarimetric Doppler spectra of contaminated sea surfaces with those of clean sea surfaces. A narrowing of Doppler spectra in the presence of oil slicks is observed for both co- and cross-polarization, which is qualitatively consistent with wave-tank measurements. Simulation results also show that the Doppler shifts in slicks can increase or decrease, depending on incidence angles and polarizations.

  2. Terrestrial basking sea turtles are responding to spatio-temporal sea surface temperature patterns.

    PubMed

    Van Houtan, Kyle S; Halley, John M; Marks, Wendy

    2015-01-01

    Naturalists as early as Darwin observed terrestrial basking in green turtles (Chelonia mydas), but the distribution and environmental influences of this behaviour are poorly understood. Here, we examined 6 years of daily basking surveys in Hawaii and compared them with the phenology of local sea surface temperatures (SST). Data and models indicated basking peaks when SST is coolest, and we found this timeline consistent with bone stress markings. Next, we assessed the decadal SST profiles for the 11 global green turtle populations. Basking generally occurs when winter SST falls below 23°C. From 1990 to 2014, the SST for these populations warmed an average 0.04°C yr(-1) (range 0.01-0.09°C yr(-1)); roughly three times the observed global average over this period. Owing to projected future warming at basking sites, we estimated terrestrial basking in green turtles may cease globally by 2100. To predict and manage for future climate change, we encourage a more detailed understanding for how climate influences organismal biology.

  3. Terrestrial basking sea turtles are responding to spatio-temporal sea surface temperature patterns

    PubMed Central

    Van Houtan, Kyle S.; Halley, John M.; Marks, Wendy

    2015-01-01

    Naturalists as early as Darwin observed terrestrial basking in green turtles (Chelonia mydas), but the distribution and environmental influences of this behaviour are poorly understood. Here, we examined 6 years of daily basking surveys in Hawaii and compared them with the phenology of local sea surface temperatures (SST). Data and models indicated basking peaks when SST is coolest, and we found this timeline consistent with bone stress markings. Next, we assessed the decadal SST profiles for the 11 global green turtle populations. Basking generally occurs when winter SST falls below 23°C. From 1990 to 2014, the SST for these populations warmed an average 0.04°C yr−1 (range 0.01–0.09°C yr−1); roughly three times the observed global average over this period. Owing to projected future warming at basking sites, we estimated terrestrial basking in green turtles may cease globally by 2100. To predict and manage for future climate change, we encourage a more detailed understanding for how climate influences organismal biology. PMID:25589483

  4. Interaction Between Surface Heat Budgets, Sea Surface Temperature and Deep Convection in the Tropical Western Pacific

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chou, Shu-Hsien; Chou, Ming-Dah; Lin, Po-Hsiung; Starr, David OC. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The surface heat budgets, sea surface temperature (SST), clouds and winds in the tropical western Pacific are analyzed and compared for the periods April-June 1998 and 1999. The spring of 1998 is in the later phase of a strong El Nino, whereas the spring of 1999 is in a period of a La Nina. The surface shortwave (SW) and longwave (LW) radiative fluxes are retrieved from Japanese Geostationary Meteorological Satellite radiance measurements, while the surface turbulent fluxes (latent and sensible heat) are derived from SSM/I-Inferred surface air humidity and winds. The SST and sea-air temperature differences are taken from NCEP/NCAR reanalysis. Deep convection is inferred from the outgoing longwave radiation of NOAA's polar-orbiting satellites. The longitudinal shift in maximum SST, deep convection and winds during El Nino and La Nina have a large impact on the spatial distribution of surface heating. Changes in clouds between these two periods have a large impact on the monthly-mean radiative heating, exceeding 60 W m(exp -2) over large oceanic regions. Similarly, the differences in wind speeds and SST have a large impact on the latent cooling, exceeding 40 W m(exp -2) over large oceanic areas. However, the maximum impacts on radiative and latent heat fluxes occur in different regions. The regions of maximum impact on radiative fluxes coincide with the regions of maximum change in clouds, whereas regions of maximum impact on turbulent heat fluxes coincide with the regions of maximum change in trade winds. The time-evolution of SST in relation to that of surface heat fluxes and winds are investigated and compared between the two El Nino and La Nina periods. In regions where wind speeds (or wind stresses) are large, the change in SST agrees well with the change in the net surface heating, indicating a deep ocean mixed layer associated with strong trade winds. On the other hand, in regions where radiative fluxes are large, the change in SST does not agree well with the

  5. Black sea surface temperature anomaly on 5th August 1998 and the ozone layer thickness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manev, A.; Palazov, K.; Raykov, St.; Ivanov, V.

    2003-04-01

    BLACK SEA SURFACE TEMPERATURE ANOMALY ON 5th AUGUST 1998 AND THE OZONE LAYER THICKNESS A. Manev , K. Palazov , St. Raykov, V. Ivanov Solar Terrestrial Influences Laboratory, Bulgarian Academy of Sciences amanev@abv.bg This paper focuses on the peculiarities of the Black Sea surface temperature anomaly on 05.08.1998. Researching the daily temperature changes in a number of control fields in the course of 8-10 years, we have found hidden correlations and anomalous deviations in the sea surface temperatures on a global scale. Research proves the statistical reliability of the temperature anomaly on the entire Black Sea surface registered on 04.-05.08.1998. In the course of six days around these dates the temperatures are up to 2°C higher than the maximum temperatures in this period in the other seven years. A more detailed analysis of the dynamics of the anomaly required the investigation of five Black Sea surface characteristic zones of 75x75 km. The analysis covers the period 20 days - 10 days before and 10 days after the anomaly. Investigations aimed at interpreting the reasons for the anomalous heating of the surface waters. We have tried to analyze the correlation between sea surface temperature and the global ozone above the Black Sea by using simultaneously data from the two satellite systems NOAA and TOMS. Methods of processing and comparing the data from the two satellite systems are described. The correlation coefficients values for the five characteristic zones are very high and close, which proves that the character of the correlation ozone - sea surface temperature is the same for the entire Black Sea surface. Despite the high correlation coefficient, we have proved that causality between the two phenomena at the time of the anomaly does not exit.

  6. Saltier sea surface water conditions recorded by multiple mid-Holocene corals in the northern South China Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Yangrui; Deng, Wenfeng; Chen, Xuefei; Wei, Gangjian; Yu, Kefu; Zhao, Jian-xin

    2016-08-01

    The typical features of the mid-Holocene can be used to better understand present-day climate conditions and the potential trends of future climate change. The surface conditions, including sea surface temperature (SST) and sea surface salinity (SSS), of the South China Sea (SCS) are largely controlled by the East Asian monsoon system. Surface water conditions reconstructed from coral proxies can be used to study the evolution of the East Asian monsoon during the mid-Holocene. However, there are some discrepancies among existing coral-based studies regarding whether the mid-Holocene sea surface water was much saltier than the present day surface waters. Based on paired Sr/Ca and δ18O of modern and three fossil corals, this paper reconstructs the patterns of seasonal variation in SSS during the mid-Holocene in the northern SCS. The Δδ18O records (a proxy for SSS) derived from the three fossil corals were all heavier than that from the modern coral, which suggests the presence of more saline surface waters during the mid-Holocene in the northern SCS. These results are consistent with previous studies based on records reconstructed from coral and foraminifera, as well as from numerical simulations. Reduced rainfall caused by the strengthened Asian Monsoon and/or the northward shift of the intertropical convergence zone during the mid-Holocene would explain the increased salinity of the surface waters of the northern SCS. The findings presented here clarify the discrepancies among previous studies and confirm the existence of saltier surface waters in the northern SCS during the mid-Holocene.

  7. Surface and basal sea ice melt from autonomous buoy arrays during the 2014 sea ice retreat in the Beaufort/Chukchi Seas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maksym, T. L.; Wilkinson, J.; Hwang, P. B.

    2014-12-01

    As the Arctic continues its transition to a seasonal ice cover, the nature and role of the processes driving sea ice retreat are expected to change. Key questions revolve around how the coupling between dynamics and thermodynamic processes and potential changes in the role of melt ponds contribute to an accelerated seasonal ice retreat. To address these issues, 44 autonomous platforms were deployed in four arrays in the Beaufort Sea in March, 2014, with an additional array deployed in August in the Chukchi Sea to monitor the evolution of ice conditions during the seasonal sea ice retreat. Each "5-dice" array included four or five co-sited ice mass balance buoys (IMB) and wave buoys with digital cameras, and one automatic weather station (AWS) at the array center. The sensors on these buoys, combined with satellite imagery monitoring the large-scale evolution of the ice cover, provide a near-complete history of the processes involved in the seasonal melt of sea ice. We present a preliminary analysis of the contributions of several key processes to the seasonal ice decay. The evolution of surface ponding was observed at several sites with differing ice types and surface morphologies. The records of surface melt and ice thickness demonstrate a key role of ice type in driving the evolution of the ice cover. Analysis of the surface forcing and estimates of solar energy partitioning between the surface and upper ocean is compared to the surface and basal mass balance from the IMBs. The role of ice divergence and deformation in driving sea ice decay - in particular its role in accelerating thermodynamic melt processes - is discussed.

  8. Airborne Spectral Measurements of Surface-Atmosphere Anisotropy for Arctic Sea Ice and Tundra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arnold, G. Thomas; Tsay, Si-Chee; King, Michael D.; Li, Jason Y.; Soulen, Peter F.

    1999-01-01

    Angular distributions of spectral reflectance for four common arctic surfaces: snow-covered sea ice, melt-season sea ice, snow-covered tundra, and tundra shortly after snowmelt were measured using an aircraft based, high angular resolution (1-degree) multispectral radiometer. Results indicate bidirectional reflectance is higher for snow-covered sea ice than melt-season sea ice at all wavelengths between 0.47 and 2.3 pm, with the difference increasing with wavelength. Bidirectional reflectance of snow-covered tundra is higher than for snow-free tundra for measurements less than 1.64 pm, with the difference decreasing with wavelength. Bidirectional reflectance patterns of all measured surfaces show maximum reflectance in the forward scattering direction of the principal plane, with identifiable specular reflection for the melt-season sea ice and snow-free tundra cases. The snow-free tundra had the most significant backscatter, and the melt-season sea ice the least. For sea ice, bidirectional reflectance changes due to snowmelt were more significant than differences among the different types of melt-season sea ice. Also the spectral-hemispherical (plane) albedo of each measured arctic surface was computed. Comparing measured nadir reflectance to albedo for sea ice and snow-covered tundra shows albedo underestimated 5-40%, with the largest bias at wavelengths beyond 1 pm. For snow-free tundra, nadir reflectance underestimates plane albedo by about 30-50%.

  9. Trends and variability in the sea surface height, sea surface temperature and wind stress curl in the South Atlantic ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Porto da Silveira, Isabel; Ponzi Pezzi, Luciano; Buss de Souza, Ronald; Sennéchael, Nathalie; Provost, Christine

    2013-04-01

    Altimetry sea level anomalies (SLA), sea surface temperatures anomalies (SSTA) and wind stress curl (WSC) were analyzed and had their trends calculated and their variability studied for the South Atlantic ocean using the last 19 years of SALTO/DUACS altimeter data, ERSST data and ERA-INTERIM data. All data had their temporal resolution adjusted to the one of altimeter data. The trends were calculated between January, 1st 1993 and December, 31th 2011. The stronger and positive SLA trends occurred in the region of the Zapiola Ridge (14 mm/year) and in some places in the Drake Passage (10 mm/year). Negative trends were observed in the Southern part of Argentinian basin (-4 mm/year), next to the Confluence Brazil Malvinas (-8 mm/year) and to the southwest of the African coast (-6 mm/year). The SST trends were positive North of 40°S, and negative south of 60°S. They were also negative along the Argentinean continental slope along the path of the Malvinas Current. The WSC trend was also negative along the Argentine continental slope. In the Southeast Atlantic, the WSC trend had a zonal distribution with alternate signs. To understand the processes responsible for the trend patterns in the South Atlantic ocean, the high and the low frequencies were obtained applying successively a 25 week band pass filter followed by a 37 week band pass filter. The percentage of explained variance by the high frequency, low frequency and seasonal signals (hf/lf/ss) were compared for SLA, SSTA and WSC. The variance of SLA in the Southwestern Atlantic was explained by the proportion of (80%, 15%,5%), except along the Argentinean continental slope (15%, 50%, 35%), the inner part of the ZR (10%,65%,25%). The central part of the South Atlantic showed dominant low frequency variance (proportions of 15%, 80% and 5% (hf/lf/ss), respectively). The SSTA variance was dominated by the high frequency in the Uruguayan coast, around ZR, in the Drake Passage and in the Agulhas Leakage (60-80%), low

  10. Prediction of daily sea surface temperature using efficient neural networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patil, Kalpesh; Deo, Makaranad Chintamani

    2017-02-01

    Short-term prediction of sea surface temperature (SST) is commonly achieved through numerical models. Numerical approaches are more suitable for use over a large spatial domain than in a specific site because of the difficulties involved in resolving various physical sub-processes at local levels. Therefore, for a given location, a data-driven approach such as neural networks may provide a better alternative. The application of neural networks, however, needs a large experimentation in their architecture, training methods, and formation of appropriate input-output pairs. A network trained in this manner can provide more attractive results if the advances in network architecture are additionally considered. With this in mind, we propose the use of wavelet neural networks (WNNs) for prediction of daily SST values. The prediction of daily SST values was carried out using WNN over 5 days into the future at six different locations in the Indian Ocean. First, the accuracy of site-specific SST values predicted by a numerical model, ROMS, was assessed against the in situ records. The result pointed out the necessity for alternative approaches. First, traditional networks were tried and after noticing their poor performance, WNN was used. This approach produced attractive forecasts when judged through various error statistics. When all locations were viewed together, the mean absolute error was within 0.18 to 0.32 °C for a 5-day-ahead forecast. The WNN approach was thus found to add value to the numerical method of SST prediction when location-specific information is desired.

  11. Sahel Precipitation Variability and Global Sea Surface Temperature Forcing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bach, D. E.; Kushnir, Y.; Seager, R.; Goddard, L.; Giannini, A.

    2003-12-01

    In the last 50 years or so, the Sahel region in sub-Saharan Africa has experienced two multi-decadal wet and dry periods separated by a relatively sharp transition. The onset of the dry episode in the Sahel is associated with the start of a significant warming trend in Southern Hemisphere sea surface temperatures (SST) that persisted well into the late 1990's. It has been stipulated, based on general circulation model (GCM) experiments, that the SST rise in the southern ocean basins is the predominant driver of rainfall patterns over the Sahel. Here we support this notion by comparing the observed rate of change in Southern Hemisphere SST with that of Sahel summertime rainfall. We examine the variations in each ocean basin separately and find that the drought pattern is most prominently associated with SST changes in the Indian Ocean, which display maximum warming rates simultaneously with the wet to dry shift in the Sahel. We provide further support to the role of the Indian Ocean using results from GCM integrations forced with observed Indian Ocean SST values and climatological values elsewhere, which effectively recreate the dry Sahel rainfall pattern. While the variations in equatorial Pacific SST associated with El Ni¤o have been found to have an effect on Sahel rainfall during the summer months, their influence does not appear to be significantly connected with the prolonged drought episode. The dry period was accentuated by two severe droughts in the early 1970's and 1980s, which generated very different repercussions for the Sahelian people. The first drought resulted in widespread famine and death while the second more severe drought in 1983-84 generated very few casualties. The political and socioeconomic assessment of these episodes suggests that the extensive loss of life was due to inefficient transportation of supplies to the starving populations. International aid organizations initiated famine protection programs following the 1970's drought that

  12. Sea surface temperature associations with the Indian summer monsoon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terray, P.; Delecluse, P.; Labattu, S.; Terray, L.

    2003-04-01

    This paper uses recent gridded data and Atmospheric General Circulation Model (AGCM) simulations in order to assess the relationships between interannual variability of the Indian Summer Monsoon (ISM) and Sea Surface Temperature (SST) anomaly patterns over the Indian and Pacific oceans. Interannual variability of ISM rainfall and dynamical indices for the traditional summer monsoon season (June-September) are strongly influenced by rainfall and circulation anomalies observed during August and September, or the Late Indian Summer Monsoon (LISM). Southern Indian Ocean SST acts as a major boundary forcing for the LISM system. Strong (weak) LISMs are preceded by significant positive (negative) SST anomalies in the southeastern subtropical Indian Ocean, off Australia. These SST anomalies are highly persistent and affect the northwestward translation of the Mascarene high from austral to boreal summer. The southeastward (northwestward) shift of this subtropical high associated with cold (warm) SST anomalies off Australia causes a weakening (strengthening) of the whole monsoon circulation through a modulation of the local Hadley cell during the LISM. Furthermore, it is suggested that the Mascarene high interacts with the underlying SST anomalies through a positive dynamical feedback mechanism, maintaining its anomalous position during the LISM. Southeastern Indian Ocean SST anomalies during boreal winter are mainly linked to subtropical Indian Ocean dipole events, studied by Behera and Yamagata (2001), and to the El Niño-Southern Oscillation phenomenon. An El Niño event and the associated warm SST anomalies over the southeastern Indian Ocean during boreal winter may play a key role in the development of a strong ISM by strengthening the local Hadley circulation during the LISM. On the other hand, a developing La Niña event in boreal summer may also enhance the east-west Walker circulation and the monsoon.

  13. Sampling Errors in Satellite-derived Infrared Sea Surface Temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Y.; Minnett, P. J.

    2014-12-01

    Sea Surface Temperature (SST) measured from satellites has been playing a crucial role in understanding geophysical phenomena. Generating SST Climate Data Records (CDRs) is considered to be the one that imposes the most stringent requirements on data accuracy. For infrared SSTs, sampling uncertainties caused by cloud presence and persistence generate errors. In addition, for sensors with narrow swaths, the swath gap will act as another sampling error source. This study is concerned with quantifying and understanding such sampling errors, which are important for SST CDR generation and for a wide range of satellite SST users. In order to quantify these errors, a reference Level 4 SST field (Multi-scale Ultra-high Resolution SST) is sampled by using realistic swath and cloud masks of Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) and Advanced Along Track Scanning Radiometer (AATSR). Global and regional SST uncertainties are studied by assessing the sampling error at different temporal and spatial resolutions (7 spatial resolutions from 4 kilometers to 5.0° at the equator and 5 temporal resolutions from daily to monthly). Global annual and seasonal mean sampling errors are large in the high latitude regions, especially the Arctic, and have geographical distributions that are most likely related to stratus clouds occurrence and persistence. The region between 30°N and 30°S has smaller errors compared to higher latitudes, except for the Tropical Instability Wave area, where persistent negative errors are found. Important differences in sampling errors are also found between the broad and narrow swath scan patterns and between day and night fields. This is the first time that realistic magnitudes of the sampling errors are quantified. Future improvement in the accuracy of SST products will benefit from this quantification.

  14. Data-Model Comparison of Pliocene Sea Surface Temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dowsett, H. J.; Foley, K.; Robinson, M. M.; Bloemers, J. T.

    2013-12-01

    The mid-Piacenzian (late Pliocene) climate represents the most geologically recent interval of long-term average warmth and shares similarities with the climate projected for the end of the 21st century. As such, its fossil and sedimentary record represents a natural experiment from which we can gain insight into potential climate change impacts, enabling more informed policy decisions for mitigation and adaptation. We present the first systematic comparison of Pliocene sea surface temperatures (SST) between an ensemble of eight climate model simulations produced as part of PlioMIP (Pliocene Model Intercomparison Project) and the PRISM (Pliocene Research, Interpretation and Synoptic Mapping) Project mean annual SST field. Our results highlight key regional (mid- to high latitude North Atlantic and tropics) and dynamic (upwelling) situations where there is discord between reconstructed SST and the PlioMIP simulations. These differences can lead to improved strategies for both experimental design and temporal refinement of the palaeoenvironmental reconstruction. Scatter plot of multi-model-mean anomalies (squares) and PRISM3 data anomalies (large blue circles) by latitude. Vertical bars on data anomalies represent the variability of warm climate phase within the time-slab at each locality. Small colored circles represent individual model anomalies and show the spread of model estimates about the multi-model-mean. While not directly comparable in terms of the development of the means nor the meaning of variability, this plot provides a first order comparison of the anomalies. Encircled areas are a, PRISM low latitude sites outside of upwelling areas; b, North Atlantic coastal sequences and Mediterranean sites; c, large anomaly PRISM sites from the northern hemisphere. Numbers identify Ocean Drilling Program sites.

  15. Eliminating bias in satellite retrievals of sea surface temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merchant, Christopher John

    Sea surface temperature (SST) is a critical parameter for climate research, and needs to be measured with an absolute accuracy of ~0.3 K (average over ~100 km scale on a weekly to monthly time scale) and with a long term stability of 0.1 K per decade. These stringent requirements present a formidable challenge to satellite based SST measurement. The most promising satellite radiometer is the ATSR (and successors), but bias and spurious trends have arisen in the ATSR SST retrieval process. Eliminating such retrieval bias is the focus of this thesis. SSTs derived from the ATSR using the prelaunch retrieval scheme are biased by up to -1.5 K by stratospheric aerosol from the eruption of Mount Pinatubo shortly before launch. An "aerosol-robust" retrieval scheme is derived which has no detectable aerosol- related bias. Another bias of up to 0.5 K arising from a deficiency of the radiative transfer model used to develop the prelaunch retrieval scheme is resolved by implementing an updated parameterisation of water vapour continuum absorption. The new SSTs are shown to have an accuracy better than 0.3 K (error in a single retrieval over a -20 km spatial scale) and to be robust to aerosol effects, by a validation exercise against buoys measuring SST in situ. The validation data consist of 620 satellite-buoy coincidences in the tropical Pacific between September 1991 and May 1992, a region and period associated with high loadings of stratospheric aerosol and tropospheric water vapour. This is the first validation exercise to correct for the effects of the difference between bulk SSTs (measured by buoys) and skin SSTs (measured radiometrically). The factor now limiting accuracy is residual cloud contamination. The new retrieval scheme has been adopted for the reprocessing of all archived ATSR data to SST.

  16. Evaluating drivers of Pleistocene eastern tropical Pacific sea surface temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dyez, K. A.; Ravelo, A. C.; Mix, A. C.

    2016-08-01

    Sea surface temperature (SST) of the eastern equatorial Pacific is a key component of tropical oceanic and atmospheric circulation with global teleconnections. Forcing factors such as local and high-latitude insolation changes, ice sheet size and albedo feedbacks, and greenhouse gas radiation have been proposed as controls of long-term eastern tropical Pacific SST, though the precise role each mechanism plays is not fully known on glacial-interglacial or longer timescales. Here proposed mechanisms are evaluated by comparing orbital-scale records of eastern Pacific SST with forcing variability over the past 1.5 Ma. The primary SST records are a compilation of new and existing data from Ocean Drilling Program Site 1239 at the northeastern margin of the modern eastern Pacific cold tongue and Site 846 SST within the cold tongue. Using time series analysis, we test previously proposed mechanisms for control of long-term tropical SST change and SST gradients in the eastern Pacific. We find that within statistical uncertainties, in the precession band eastern Pacific SST is consistent with direct forcing by equatorial radiation changes in the tropical cold season (summer-fall) rather than inversely correlated as previously suggested. In the obliquity band high-latitude solar forcing leads or is in phase with eastern equatorial Pacific SST, while in the eccentricity band atmospheric greenhouse gas concentrations are closely associated with cold tongue SST. Pleistocene eastern Pacific SST gradients indicate that the gradient on the northern margin of the cold tongue strengthened through the mid-Pleistocene transition, a result compatible with the cold tongue becoming more focused at ~900-650 ka.

  17. Methane excess in Arctic surface water-triggered by sea ice formation and melting.

    PubMed

    Damm, E; Rudels, B; Schauer, U; Mau, S; Dieckmann, G

    2015-11-10

    Arctic amplification of global warming has led to increased summer sea ice retreat, which influences gas exchange between the Arctic Ocean and the atmosphere where sea ice previously acted as a physical barrier. Indeed, recently observed enhanced atmospheric methane concentrations in Arctic regions with fractional sea-ice cover point to unexpected feedbacks in cycling of methane. We report on methane excess in sea ice-influenced water masses in the interior Arctic Ocean and provide evidence that sea ice is a potential source. We show that methane release from sea ice into the ocean occurs via brine drainage during freezing and melting i.e. in winter and spring. In summer under a fractional sea ice cover, reduced turbulence restricts gas transfer, then seawater acts as buffer in which methane remains entrained. However, in autumn and winter surface convection initiates pronounced efflux of methane from the ice covered ocean to the atmosphere. Our results demonstrate that sea ice-sourced methane cycles seasonally between sea ice, sea-ice-influenced seawater and the atmosphere, while the deeper ocean remains decoupled. Freshening due to summer sea ice retreat will enhance this decoupling, which restricts the capacity of the deeper Arctic Ocean to act as a sink for this greenhouse gas.

  18. Methane excess in Arctic surface water- triggered by sea ice formation and melting

    PubMed Central

    Damm, E.; Rudels, B.; Schauer, U.; Mau, S.; Dieckmann, G.

    2015-01-01

    Arctic amplification of global warming has led to increased summer sea ice retreat, which influences gas exchange between the Arctic Ocean and the atmosphere where sea ice previously acted as a physical barrier. Indeed, recently observed enhanced atmospheric methane concentrations in Arctic regions with fractional sea-ice cover point to unexpected feedbacks in cycling of methane. We report on methane excess in sea ice-influenced water masses in the interior Arctic Ocean and provide evidence that sea ice is a potential source. We show that methane release from sea ice into the ocean occurs via brine drainage during freezing and melting i.e. in winter and spring. In summer under a fractional sea ice cover, reduced turbulence restricts gas transfer, then seawater acts as buffer in which methane remains entrained. However, in autumn and winter surface convection initiates pronounced efflux of methane from the ice covered ocean to the atmosphere. Our results demonstrate that sea ice-sourced methane cycles seasonally between sea ice, sea-ice-influenced seawater and the atmosphere, while the deeper ocean remains decoupled. Freshening due to summer sea ice retreat will enhance this decoupling, which restricts the capacity of the deeper Arctic Ocean to act as a sink for this greenhouse gas. PMID:26553610

  19. A case study of sea breeze blocking regulated by sea surface temperature along the English south coast

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sweeney, J. K.; Chagnon, J. M.; Gray, S. L.

    2014-05-01

    The sensitivity of sea breeze structure to sea surface temperature (SST) and coastal orography is investigated in convection-permitting Met Office Unified Model simulations of a case study along the south coast of England. Changes in SST of 1 K are shown to significantly modify the structure of the sea breeze immediately offshore. On the day of the case study, the sea breeze was partially blocked by coastal orography, particularly within Lyme Bay. The extent to which the flow is blocked depends strongly on the static stability of the marine boundary layer. In experiments with colder SST, the marine boundary layer is more stable, and the degree of blocking is more pronounced. Although a colder SST would also imply a larger land-sea temperature contrast and hence a stronger onshore wind - an effect which alone would discourage blocking - the increased static stability exerts a dominant control over whether blocking takes place. The implications of prescribing fixed SST from climatology in numerical weather prediction model forecasts of the sea breeze are discussed.

  20. A Sea-Surface Radiation Data Set for Climate Applications in the Tropical Western Pacific and South China Sea

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chou, Ming-Dah; Chan, Pui-King; Yan, Michael M.-H.

    2000-01-01

    The sea-surface shortwave and longwave radiative fluxes have been retrieved from the radiances measured by Japan's Geostationary Meteorological Satellite 5. The surface radiation data set covers the domain 40S-40N and 90E-170W. The temporal resolution is 1 day, and the spatial resolution is 0.5 deg x 0.5 deg latitude-longitude. The retrieved surface radiation have been validated with the radiometric measurements at the Atmospheric Radiation Measuring (ARM) site on Manus island in the equatorial western Pacific for a period of 15 months. It has also been validated with the measurements at the radiation site on Dungsha island in the South China Sea during the South China Sea Monsoon Experiment (SCSMEX) Intensive Observing Period (May and June 1998). The data set is used to study the effect of El Nino and East Asian Summer monsoon on the heating of the ocean in the tropical western Pacific and the South China Sea. Interannual variations of clouds associated with El Nino and the East Asian Summer monsoon have a large impact on the radiative heating of the ocean. It has been found that the magnitude of the interannual variation of the seasonal mean surface radiative heating exceeds 40 W/sq m over large areas. Together with the Clouds and the Earth's Radiant Energy System (CERES) shortwave fluxes at top of the atmosphere and the radiative transfer calculations of clear-sky fluxes, this surface radiation data set is also used to study the impact of clouds on the solar heating of the atmosphere. It is found that clouds enhance the atmospheric solar heating by approx. 20 W/sq m in the tropical western Pacific and the South China Sea. This result is important for evaluating the accuracy of solar flux calculations in clear and cloudy atmospheres.

  1. Enhanced Arctic Mean Sea Surface and Mean Dynamic Topography including retracked CryoSat-2 Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andersen, O. B.; Jain, M.; Stenseng, L.; Knudsen, P.

    2014-12-01

    A reliable mean sea surface (MSS) is essential to derive a good mean dynamic topography (MDT) and for the estimation of short and long-term changes in the sea surface. The lack of satellite radar altimetry observations above 82 degrees latitude means that existing mean sea surface models have been unreliable in the Arctic Ocean. We here present the latest DTU mean sea surface and mean dynamic topography models combining conventional altimetry with retracked CryoSat-2 data to improve the reliability in the Arctic Ocean. For the derivation of a mean dynamic topography the ESA GOCE derived geoid model have been used to constrain the longer wavelength. We present the retracking of C2 SAR data using various retrackes and how we have been able to combine data from various retrackers under various sea ice conditions. DTU13MSS and DTU13MDT are the newest state of the art global high-resolution models including CryoSat-2 data to extend the satellite radar altimetry coverage up to 88 degrees latitude and through combination with a GOCE geoid model completes coverage all the way to the North Pole. Furthermore the SAR and SARin capability of CryoSat-2 dramatically increases the amount of useable sea surface returns in sea-ice covered areas compared to conventional radar altimeters like ENVISAT and ERS-1/2. With the inclusion of CryoSat-2 data the new mean sea surface is improved by more than 20 cm above 82 degrees latitude compared with the previous generation of mean sea surfaces.

  2. Effect of surface mesoscale eddies on deep-sea currents and mixing in the northeastern South China Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yanwei; Liu, Zhifei; Zhao, Yulong; Li, Jianru; Liang, Xinfeng

    2015-12-01

    Recent studies suggest that deep-reaching surface-generated eddies result in anomalous current velocities in the deep sea, and ultimately lead to energy transfer from mesoscale to small-scale motions. Here we examine the influence of mesoscale eddies on deep-sea subinertial and near-inertial currents, and on possible enhanced oceanic mixing in the deep South China Sea (SCS). We analyzed current velocity data for nearly a full water column. Data were obtained using acoustic Doppler current profilers and recording current meters on a deep-sea mooring system at a depth of 2100 m in the northeastern SCS from October 2012 to May 2013. A highly nonlinear southwestward-propagating anticyclonic eddy was detected via a resolved sea-surface-level anomaly. This eddy induced pronounced subinertial currents with a characteristic time scale of 1-2 months and a maximum velocity of up to 0.2 m s-1 at the subsurface and 0.1 m s-1 at great depth. Near-inertial energy co-occurring with subinertial flows showed a distinctive vertical propagation trend during strong subinertial oscillations in the deep sea. During periods of strong subinertial and near-inertial kinetic energy, estimates of diapycnal diffusivity in the deep ocean showed approximately 10-fold enhancement, with a mean value of 1.2×10-3 m2 s-1 compared to the background value of 1.4×10-4 m2 s-1. The results provide observational evidence of the effect of surface-observed mesoscale motions on benthic currents and ocean mixing in the deep SCS.

  3. Photosynthetically available radiation on surface of the Black Sea based on ocean color data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suslin, V. V.; Korolev, S. N.; Kucheryaviy, A. A.; Churilova, T. Ya.; Krivenko, O. V.

    2015-11-01

    Long term (1996 - 2014) averaged annual dynamics of daily photosynthetically available radiation (PAR) incident on the surface of the Black Sea have been estimated for different degree of sky coverage by the cloudiness. To this aim PAR standard product of color scanners (OCTS, SeaWiFS, MODIS-Aqua/Terra) has been processed. The processing method was based on the assumption that temporal PAR dynamics over one day corresponded to PAR spatial variability in the Black Sea area scanned by satellite instruments during one overpass. PAR data could be applied for different researches of the Black Sea ecosystem, which is related to photo-physiological processes.

  4. Impact of Atlantic sea surface temperatures on the warmest global surface air temperature of 1998

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Riyu

    2005-03-01

    The year 1998 is the warmest year in the record of instrumental measurements. In this study, an atmospheric general circulation model is used to investigate the role of sea surface temperatures (SSTs) in this warmth, with a focus on the role of the Atlantic Ocean. The model forced with the observed global SSTs captures the main features of land surface air temperature anomalies in 1998. A sensitivity experiment shows that in comparison with the global SST anomalies, the Atlantic SST anomalies can explain 35% of the global mean surface air temperature (GMAT) anomaly, and 57% of the land surface air temperature anomaly in 1998. The mechanisms through which the Atlantic Ocean influences the GMAT are likely different from season to season. Possible detailed mechanisms involve the impact of SST anomalies on local convection in the tropical Atlantic region, the consequent excitation of a Rossby wave response that propagates into the North Atlantic and the Eurasian continent in winter and spring, and the consequent changes in tropical Walker circulation in summer and autumn that induce changes in convection over the tropical Pacific. This in turn affects climate in Asia and Australia. The important role of the Atlantic Ocean suggests that attention should be paid not only to the tropical Pacific Ocean, but also to the tropical Atlantic Ocean in understanding the GMAT variability and its predictability.

  5. The effect of monomolecular surface films on the microwave brightness temperature of the sea surface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alpers, W.; Blume, H.-J. C.; Garrett, W. D.; Huehnerfuss, H.

    1982-01-01

    It is pointed out that monomolecular surface films of biological origin are often encountered on the ocean surface, especially in coastal regions. The thicknesses of the monomolecular films are of the order of 3 x 10 to the -9th m. Huehnerfuss et al. (1978, 1981) have shown that monomolecular surface films damp surface waves quite strongly in the centimeter to decimeter wavelength regime. Other effects caused by films are related to the reduction of the gas exchange at the air-sea interface and the decrease of the wind stress. The present investigation is concerned with experiments which reveal an unexpectedly large response of the microwave brightness temperature to a monomolecular oleyl alcohol slick at 1.43 GHz. Brightness temperature is a function of the complex dielectric constant of thy upper layer of the ocean. During six overflights over an ocean area covered with an artificial monomolecular alcohol film, a large decrease of the brightness temperature at the L-band was measured, while at the S-band almost no decrease was observed.

  6. Moderate-resolution sea surface temperature data for the Arctic Ocean Ecoregions

    EPA Science Inventory

    Sea surface temperature (SST) is an important environmental characteristic in determining the suitability and sustainability of habitats for marine organisms. Of particular interest is the fate of the Arctic Ocean, which provides critical habitat to commercially important fish (M...

  7. Global measurements of sea surface temperature, wind speed and atmospheric water content from satellite microwave radiometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Njoku, E. G.; Swanson, L.

    1983-01-01

    The Scanning Multichannel Microwave Radiometer (SMMR) was launched on the Seasat and Nimbus 7 satellites in 1978. The SMMR has the ability to measure sea surface temperature and wind speed with the aid of microwaves. In addition, the instrument was designed to measure water vapor and cloud liquid water with better spatial resolution than previous microwave radiometers, and to make sea-ice measurements with higher precision. A description is presented of the results of global analyses of sea surface temperature, wind speed, water vapor, and cloud liquid water, taking into account data provided by the SMMR on the Seasat satellite. It is found that the SMMR data show good self-consistency, and can usefully measure global distributions of sea surface temperatures, surface winds, water vapor, and cloud liquid water.

  8. Moderate-Resolution Sea Surface Temperature Data for the Nearshore North Pacific

    EPA Science Inventory

    Coastal sea surface temperature (SST) is an important environmental characteristic defining habitat suitability for nearshore marine and estuarine organisms. The purpose of this publication is to provide access to an easy-to-use coastal SST dataset for ecologists, biogeographers...

  9. A Climatology of Monthly Mean Sea Surface Temperatures for the Gulf of Mexico,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1978-01-01

    This report presents monthly mean sea surface temperatures for the Gulf of Mexico in one degree quadrangles. It also includes a short discussion of the temperature data and the ocean currents in the Gulf of Mexico .

  10. Characterizing sea ice surface morphology using high-resolution IceBridge data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petty, Alek; Farrell, Sinead; Newman, Thomas; Kurtz, Nathan; Richter-Menge, Jacqueline; Tsamados, Michel; Feltham, Daniel

    2015-04-01

    Sea ice pressure ridges form when ice floes collide while drifting under the combined forces of atmospheric drag, oceanic drag and ice-ice interaction. Sea ice ridges, in-turn, affect the resultant form drag on the sea ice cover and thus impact the fluxes of momentum and heat between the atmosphere and ocean. Here we present initial results of a new sea ice ridge detection approach that utilizes high resolution, three-dimensional ice/snow surface elevation data from the NASA Operation IceBridge Airborne Topographic Mapper (ATM) laser altimeter merged with coincident high-resolution imagery from the Digital Mapping System (DMS). We derive novel information regarding sea ice deformation across a variety of ice types and regimes. Statistical information regarding sea ice ridges (height/frequency/orientation) and floe edges (freeboard height) are presented for several IceBridge flight lines. These novel characterizations of sea ice surface morphology will be used to validate and inform drag parameterizations in state-of-the-art sea ice models. Furthermore, they will advance our ability to quantify uncertainties introduced by pressure ridges in the estimation of sea ice freeboard/thickness from airborne and satellite altimeters.

  11. Characterizing sea ice surface morphology using high-resolution IceBridge data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petty, A.; Farrell, S. L.; Newman, T.; Kurtz, N. T.; Richter-Menge, J.; Tsamados, M.; Feltham, D. L.

    2014-12-01

    Sea ice pressure ridges form when ice floes collide while drifting under the combined forces of atmospheric drag, oceanic drag and ice-ice interaction. Sea ice ridges, in-turn, affect the resultant form drag on the sea ice cover and thus impact the fluxes of momentum and heat between the atmosphere and ocean. Here we present initial results of a new sea ice ridge detection approach that utilizes high resolution, three-dimensional ice/snow surface elevation data from the NASA Operation IceBridge Airborne Topographic Mapper (ATM) laser altimeter merged with coincident high-resolution imagery from the Digital Mapping System (DMS). We derive novel information regarding sea ice deformation across a variety of ice types and regimes. Statistical information regarding sea ice ridges (height/frequency/orientation) and floe edges (freeboard height) are presented for several IceBridge flight lines. These novel characterizations of sea ice surface morphology will be used to validate and inform drag parameterizations in state-of-the-art sea ice models. Furthermore, they will advance our ability to quantify uncertainties introduced by pressure ridges in the estimation of sea ice freeboard/thickness from airborne and satellite altimeters.

  12. Distribution and pollution assessment of heavy metals in surface sediments in the Yellow Sea.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Xin; Teng, Ankang; Xu, Wenzhe; Liu, Xiaoshou

    2014-06-15

    Heavy metal concentrations in surface sediments at 56 stations during two cruises in the Yellow Sea in summer and winter, 2011 were analyzed by inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry. The pollution status was assessed via the Geoaccumulation index and Hankanson potential ecological risk index. Higher concentrations of heavy metals (except for Mn) were found in the central Southern Yellow Sea and the western Northern Yellow Sea. The higher contents of Mn were much closer to Shandong Peninsula. Correlation analyses indicated that Pb, Cu, Fe, Ni, Zn and Co probably had the same origin and were controlled by grain size and total organic carbon. Pollution assessment showed that most areas of the Yellow Sea were not or lowly contaminated with the exception of the northwest and south parts of the Southern Yellow Sea showing Cd-contamination. The pollution status of the Yellow Sea in summer was worse than that in winter.

  13. Impacts of Freshwater on the Seasonal Variations of Surface Salinity and Circulation in the Caspian Sea

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-01-01

    ERA-40), the surface circulation from all simulations is mostly identical. This also indicates that the change in the forcing (i.e., P–E and rivers...Author’s personal copy Impacts of freshwater on the seasonal variations of surface salinity and circulation in the Caspian Sea A. Birol Kara a, Alan...addition to heat and momentum fluxes. Long-term climatic effects are of particular importance in the Caspian Sea as well. For example, Rodinov (1994

  14. Impact of surface roughness on L-band emissivity of the sea ice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miernecki, M.; Kaleschke, L.; Hendricks, S.; Søbjærg, S. S.

    2015-12-01

    In March 2014 a joint experiment IRO2/SMOSice was carried out in the Barents Sea. R/V Lance equipped with meteorological instruments, electromagnetic sea ice thickness probe and engine monitoring instruments, was performing a series of tests in different ice conditions in order to validate the ice route optimization (IRO) system, advising on his route through pack ice. In parallel cal/val activities for sea ice thickness product obtained from SMOS (Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity mission) L-band radiometer were carried out. Apart from helicopter towing the EMbird thickness probe, Polar 5 aircraft was serving the area during the experiment with L-band radiometer EMIRAD2 and Airborne Laser Scanner (ALS) as primary instruments. Sea ice Thickness algorithm using SMOS brightness temperature developed at University of Hamburg, provides daily maps of thin sea ice (up to 0.5-1 m) in polar regions with resolution of 35-50 km. So far the retrieval method was not taking into account surface roughness, assuming that sea ice is a specular surface. Roughness is a stochastic process that can be characterized by standard deviation of surface height σ and by shape of the autocorrelation function R to estimate it's vertical and horizontal scales respectively. Interactions of electromagnetic radiation with the surface of the medium are dependent on R and σ and they scales with respect to the incident wavelength. During SMOSice the radiometer was observing sea ice surface at two incidence angles 0 and 40 degrees and simultaneously the surface elevation was scanned with ALS with ground resolution of ~ 0.25 m. This configuration allowed us to calculate σ and R from power spectral densities of surface elevation profiles and quantify the effect of surface roughness on the emissivity of the sea ice. First results indicate that Gaussian autocorrelation function is suitable for deformed ice, for other ice types exponential function is the best fit.

  15. Evaluation of model simulated and MODIS-Aqua retrieved sea surface chlorophyll in the eastern Arabian Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chakraborty, Kunal; Gupta, Anubhav; Lotliker, Aneesh A.; Tilstone, Gavin

    2016-11-01

    In this study we assess the accuracy of sea surface Chlorophyll-a (Chla) retrieved from satellite (MODIS-Aqua), using standard OC3M algorithm, and from a Regional Ocean Modelling System (ROMS) biophysical model against in situ data, measured in surface waters of the eastern Arabian Sea, from April 2009 to December 2012. MODIS-Aqua OC3M Chla concentrations showed a high correlation with the in situ data with slope close to unity and low root mean square error. In comparison, the ROMS model underestimated Chla, though the correlation was significant indicating that the model is capable of reproducing the trend in in situ Chla. Time Series trends in Chla were examined against wind driven Upwelling Indices (UIW) from April 2009 to December 2012 in north-eastern (Gujarat) and south-eastern (Kochi) coastal waters of the Arabian Sea. The annual peak in Chla along the Kochi coast during the summer monsoon was adequately captured by the model. It is well known that the peak in surface Chla along the Kochi and Gujarat coasts during the summer monsoon is the result of coastal upwelling, which the ROMS model was able to reproduce accurately. The maximum surface Chla along the Gujarat coast during the winter monsoon is due to convective mixing, which was also significantly captured by ROMS biophysical model. There was a lag of approximately one week between the maximum surface Chla and the peak in the Upwelling Index.

  16. Characterization of Sea Lettuce Surface Functional Groups by Potentiometric Titrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ebling, A. M.; Schijf, J.

    2008-12-01

    In pursuit of our ultimate goal to better understand the prodigious capacity of the marine macroalga Ulva lactuca (sea lettuce) for adsorbing a broad range of dissolved trace metals from seawater, we performed an initial characterization of its surface functional groups. Specifically, the number of distinct functional groups as well as their individual bulk concentrations and acid dissociation constants (pKas) were determined by potentiometric titrations in NaCl solutions of various ionic strengths (I = 0.01-5.0 M), under inert nitrogen atmosphere at 25°C. Depending on the ionic strength, Ulva samples were manually titrated down to pH 2 or 3 with 1 N HCl and then up to pH 10 with 1 N NaOH in steps of 0.1-0.2 units, continuously monitoring pH with a glass combination electrode. Titrations of a dehydrated Ulva standard reference material (BCR-279) were compared with fresh Ulva tissue cultured in our laboratory. A titration in filtered natural seawater was also compared with one in an NaCl solution of equal ionic strength. Equilibrium constants for the ionization of water in NaCl solutions as a function of ionic strength were obtained from the literature. Fits to the titration data ([H]T vs. pH) were performed with the FITEQL4.0 computer code using non-electrostatic 3-, 4-, and 5-site models, either by fixing ionic strength at its experimental value or by allowing it to be extrapolated to zero, while considering all functional group pKas and bulk concentrations as adjustable parameters. Since pKas and bulk concentrations were found to be strongly correlated, the latter were also fixed in some cases to further constrain the pKas. Whereas these calculations are currently ongoing, preliminary results point to three, possibly four, functional groups with pKas of about 4.1, 6.3, and 9.5 at I = 0. Bulk concentrations of the three groups are very similar, about 5-6×10-4 mol/g based on dry weight, which suggests that all are homogeneously distributed over the surface and

  17. Verification of Geosat sea surface topography in the Gulf Stream extension with surface drifting buoys and hydrographic measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Willebrand, J.; KäSe, R. H.; Stammer, D.; Hinrichsen, H.-H.; Krauss, W.

    1990-03-01

    Altimeter data from Geosat have been analyzed in the Gulf Stream extension area. Horizontal maps of the sea surface height anomaly relative to an annual mean for various 17-day intervals were constructed using an objective mapping procedure. The mean sea level was approximated by the dynamic topography from climatological hydrographic data. Geostrophic surface velocities derived from the composite maps (mean plus anomaly) are significantly correlated with surface drifter velocities observed during an oceanographie experiment in the spring of 1987. The drifter velocities contain much energy on scales less than 100 km which are not resolved in the altimetric maps. It is shown that the composite sea surface height also agrees well with ground verification from hydrographic data along sections in a triangle between the Azores, Newfoundland, and Bermuda, except in regions of high mean gradients.

  18. Improving Streamflow Forecasts Using Predefined Sea Surface Temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalra, A.; Ahmad, S.

    2011-12-01

    With the increasing evidence of climate variability, water resources managers in the western United States are faced with greater challenges of developing long range streamflow forecast. This is further aggravated by the increases in climate extremes such as floods and drought caused by climate variability. Over the years, climatologists have identified several modes of climatic variability and their relationship with streamflow. These climate modes have the potential of being used as predictor in models for improving the streamflow lead time. With this as the motivation, the current research focuses on increasing the streamflow lead time using predefine climate indices. A data driven model i.e. Support Vector Machine (SVM) based on the statistical learning theory is used to predict annual streamflow volume 3-year in advance. The SVM model is a learning system that uses a hypothesis space of linear functions in a Kernel induced higher dimensional feature space, and is trained with a learning algorithm from the optimization theory. Annual oceanic-atmospheric indices, comprising of Pacific Decadal Oscillation (PDO), North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO), Atlantic Multidecadal Oscillation (AMO), El Niño-Southern Oscillations (ENSO), and a new Sea Surface Temperature (SST) data set of "Hondo" Region for a period of 1906-2005 are used to generate annual streamflow volumes. The SVM model is applied to three gages i.e. Cisco, Green River, and Lees Ferry in the Upper Colorado River Basin in the western United States. Based on the performance measures the model shows very good forecasts, and the forecast are in good agreement with measured streamflow volumes. Previous research has identified NAO and ENSO as main drivers for extending streamflow forecast lead-time in the UCRB. Inclusion of "Hondo Region" SST information further improve the model's forecasting ability. The overall results of this study revealed that the annual streamflow of the UCRB is significantly influenced by

  19. ENSO signature in the SMOS sea surface salinity maps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ballabrera, J.; Umbert, M.; Hoareau, N.; Turiel, A.; Font, J.

    2012-12-01

    Until recently, the role of salinity observations in the operational simulation and prediction of ENSO was neglected because of the historical lack of observations and because leading intermediate coupled models had significant predictive skill without directly accounting for salinity effects. In Ballabrera-Poy et al., (2002), the potential role of sea surface salinity (SSS) observations on the statistical predictions of ENSO was investigated. It was shown that, although SSS observations would play little role in statistical nowcasts of ENSO, they would provide a significant role in the 6-12 month predictions. The European Space Agency (ESA) Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity (SMOS) Earth Explorer opportunity mission was launched on November 2, 2009, becoming the first satellite mission addressing the challenge of measuring SSS from space with the help of MIRAS (Microwave Imaging Radiometer with Aperture Synthesis), a novel two-dimensional interferometer operating at L-band (1.4 GHz). Although the L-band frequency is the optimal for ocean salinity measurements, the retrieval of SSS information requires special care because of the low sensitivity of the brightness temperature to SSS: from 0.2-0.8 K per salinity unit. Maps of 10-day averages of SSS in 1x1 degree boxes are distributed by the SMOS Barcelona Expert Centre on Radiometric Calibration and Ocean Salinity (SMOS-BEC, http://www.smos-bec.icm.csic.es). These maps are derived from the SMOS reprocessing campaign released to the SMOS user community in March 2011, and span the period from January 2010 through December 2011. The current accuracy of these SSS maps ranges from 0.2-0.4, depending on the ocean region being considered (Umbert et al., 2012). During the period of the reprocessing campaign, the equatorial Pacific has been in a quasi-continuous La Niña state. During the cold phases of ENSO, positive anomalies of SSS are expected with a largest anomalous values in the western warm-fresh pool. The anomalies

  20. Sea Surface Temperature Forcing of the Late Indian Summer Monsoon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terray, P.; Delecluse, P.; Labattu, S.; Terray, L.; Cassou, C.

    2002-12-01

    This paper uses recent historical data and Atmospheric General Circulation Model (AGCM) simulations in order to assess the relationships between interannual variability of the Indian Summer Monsoon (ISM) and Sea Surface Temperature (SST) anomaly patterns over the Indian and Pacific oceans. The focus is on the predictability of ISM rainfall and circulation, and its links to local (Indian Ocean) and remote (Pacific Ocean) SST forcing. Interannual variability of ISM rainfall and dynamical indices for the traditional summer monsoon season (June-September) are strongly influenced by rainfall and circulation anomalies observed during August and September, or the Late Indian Summer Monsoon (LISM). Anomalous monsoons are linked to well-defined LISM rainfall and large-scale circulation anomalies. The whole three-dimensional monsoon circulation, i.e., the east-west Walker and local Hadley circulations, fluctuates during the LISM of anomalous ISM years. LISM circulation is weakened and shifted eastward during weak ISM years. Therefore, we focus on the predictability of the LISM in this study. It is found that southern Indian Ocean SST acts as a major boundary forcing for the LISM system. Strong (weak) LISMs are preceded by significant positive (negative) SST anomalies in the southeastern subtropical Indian Ocean, off Australia. These SST anomalies are highly persistent and affect the northwestward translation of the Mascarene high from austral to boreal summer. The southeastward (northwestward) shift of this subtropical high associated with cold (warm) SST anomalies off Australia causes a weakening (strengthening) of the whole monsoon circulation through a modulation of the local Hadley cell during the LISM. Furthermore, it is suggested that the Mascarene high interacts with the underlying SST anomalies through a positive dynamical feedback mechanism, maintaining its anomalous position during the LISM. Southeastern Indian Ocean SST anomalies during boreal winter are mainly

  1. An atlas of monthly mean distributions of SSMI surface wind speed, AVHRR/2 sea surface temperature, AMI surface wind velocity, TOPEX/POSEIDON sea surface height, and ECMWF surface wind velocity during 1993

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Halpern, D.; Fu, L.; Knauss, W.; Pihos, G.; Brown, O.; Freilich, M.; Wentz, F.

    1995-01-01

    The following monthly mean global distributions for 1993 are presented with a common color scale and geographical map: 10-m height wind speed estimated from the Special Sensor Microwave Imager (SSMI) on a United States (U.S.) Air Force Defense Meteorological Satellite Program (DMSP) spacecraft; sea surface temperature estimated from the Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR/2) on a U.S. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) satellite; 10-m height wind speed and direction estimated from the Active Microwave Instrument (AMI) on the European Space Agency (ESA) European Remote Sensing (ERS-1) satellite; sea surface height estimated from the joint U.S.-France Topography Experiment (TOPEX)/POSEIDON spacecraft; and 10-m height wind speed and direction produced by the European Center for Medium-Range Weather Forecasting (ECMWF). Charts of annual mean, monthly mean, and sampling distributions are displayed.

  2. Radiolarian ecology from plankton and surface sediments of the Sea of Okhotsk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abelmann, A.; Nimmergut, A.

    2003-04-01

    The Sea of Okhotsk (SOk), a marginal sea of the North Pacific, is characterized by a unique climatic situation that leads to a hydrography, which is suggested to present a modern analogue to glacial high latitude conditions. The hydrographic pattern is related to the expansion of polar air masses over the Sea of Okhotsk during winter that cause the formation of sea ice, and by the presence of warm summer seasons, which leads to a strong warming of the upper sea surface. This results in a pronounced sea-surface stratification. In spite of the extended sea-ice cover during winter and strong summer sea-surface stratification, the SOk is one of the most productive areas of the world ocean and characterized by a specific productivity regime. Radiolarians are part of the biological system in the SOk and indicators to reconstruct changes in the past productivity and hydrographic regimes. Baseline for such reconstructions is the ecological information concerning the production and depth habitat of living radiolarians. In the frame of the German/Russian cooperation KOMEX (Kurile -- Okhotsk Sea Marine Experiment) we studied the spatial distribution pattern of radiolarians in the upper 1000 m of the water column in the SOk during spring and late summer as well as the radiolarian distribution in surface sediments. We show that these investigations allow a better understanding of the environmental conditions and the related production of key species and thus will lead to considerable improvement of the reconstruction of the paleoceanographic conditions in the Sea of Okhotsk and in glacial high-latitude oceans.

  3. Processes controlling surface, bottom and lateral melt of Arctic sea ice in a state of the art sea ice model.

    PubMed

    Tsamados, Michel; Feltham, Daniel; Petty, Alek; Schroeder, David; Flocco, Daniela

    2015-10-13

    We present a modelling study of processes controlling the summer melt of the Arctic sea ice cover. We perform a sensitivity study and focus our interest on the thermodynamics at the ice-atmosphere and ice-ocean interfaces. We use the Los Alamos community sea ice model CICE, and additionally implement and test three new parametrization schemes: (i) a prognostic mixed layer; (ii) a three equation boundary condition for the salt and heat flux at the ice-ocean interface; and (iii) a new lateral melt parametrization. Recent additions to the CICE model are also tested, including explicit melt ponds, a form drag parametrization and a halodynamic brine drainage scheme. The various sea ice parametrizations tested in this sensitivity study introduce a wide spread in the simulated sea ice characteristics. For each simulation, the total melt is decomposed into its surface, bottom and lateral melt components to assess the processes driving melt and how this varies regionally and temporally. Because this study quantifies the relative importance of several processes in driving the summer melt of sea ice, this work can serve as a guide for future research priorities.

  4. Last Glacial Maximum sea surface temperature and sea-ice extent in the Pacific sector of the Southern Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benz, Verena; Esper, Oliver; Gersonde, Rainer; Lamy, Frank; Tiedemann, Ralf

    2016-08-01

    Sea surface temperatures and sea-ice extent are most critical variables to evaluate the Southern Ocean paleoceanographic evolution in relation to the development of the global carbon cycle, atmospheric CO2 and ocean-atmosphere circulation. Here we present diatom transfer function-based summer sea surface temperature (SSST) and winter sea-ice (WSI) estimates from the Pacific sector of the Southern Ocean to bridge a gap in information that has to date hampered a well-established reconstruction of the last glacial Southern Ocean at circum-Antarctic scale. We studied the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM) at the EPILOG time slice (19,000-23,000 calendar years before present) in 17 cores and consolidated our LGM picture of the Pacific sector taking into account published data from its warmer regions. Our data display a distinct east-west differentiation with a rather stable WSI edge north of the Pacific-Antarctic Ridge in the Ross Sea sector and a more variable WSI extent over the Amundsen Abyssal Plain. The zone of maximum cooling (>4 K) during the LGM is in the present Subantarctic Zone and bounded to its south by the 4 °C isotherm. The isotherm is in the SSST range prevailing at the modern Antarctic Polar Front, representing a circum-Antarctic feature, and marks the northern edge of the glacial Antarctic Circumpolar Current (ACC). The northward deflection of colder than modern surface waters along the South American continent led to a significant cooling of the glacial Humboldt Current surface waters (4-8 K), which affected the temperature regimes as far north as tropical latitudes. The glacial reduction of ACC temperatures may also have resulted in significant cooling in the Atlantic and Indian Southern Ocean, thus enhancing thermal differentiation of the Southern Ocean and Antarctic continental cooling. The comparison with numerical temperature and sea-ice simulations yields discrepancies, especially concerning the estimates of the sea-ice fields, but some simulations

  5. Holocene sea subsurface and surface water masses in the Fram Strait - Comparisons of temperature and sea-ice reconstructions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Werner, Kirstin; Müller, Juliane; Husum, Katrine; Spielhagen, Robert F.; Kandiano, Evgenia S.; Polyak, Leonid

    2016-09-01

    Two high-resolution sediment cores from eastern Fram Strait have been investigated for sea subsurface and surface temperature variability during the Holocene (the past ca 12,000 years). The transfer function developed by Husum and Hald (2012) has been applied to sediment cores in order to reconstruct fluctuations of sea subsurface temperatures throughout the period. Additional biomarker and foraminiferal proxy data are used to elucidate variability between surface and subsurface water mass conditions, and to conclude on the Holocene climate and oceanographic variability on the West Spitsbergen continental margin. Results consistently reveal warm sea surface to subsurface temperatures of up to 6 °C until ca 5 cal ka BP, with maximum seawater temperatures around 10 cal ka BP, likely related to maximum July insolation occurring at that time. Maximum Atlantic Water (AW) advection occurred at surface and subsurface between 10.6 and 8.5 cal ka BP based on both foraminiferal and dinocyst temperature reconstructions. Probably, a less-stratified, ice-free, nutrient-rich surface ocean with strong AW advection prevailed in the eastern Fram Strait between 10 and 9 cal ka BP. Weakened AW contribution is found after ca 5 cal ka BP when subsurface temperatures strongly decrease with minimum values between ca 4 and 3 cal ka BP. Cold late Holocene conditions are furthermore supported by high planktic foraminifer shell fragmentation and high δ18O values of the subpolar planktic foraminifer species Turborotalita quinqueloba. While IP25-associated indices as well as dinocyst data suggest a sustained cooling due to a decrease in early summer insolation and consequently sea-ice increase since about 7 cal ka BP in surface waters, planktic foraminiferal data including stable isotopes indicate a slight return of stronger subsurface AW influx since ca 3 cal ka BP. The observed decoupling of surface and subsurface waters during the later Holocene is most likely attributed to a strong

  6. Lightning in the Mediterranean and its relation with sea-surface temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kotroni, V.; Lagouvardos, K.

    2016-03-01

    Here we present the analysis of lightning activity over the Mediterranean, based on a 10 year long dataset (2005-2014) provided by the ZEUS long-range lightning detection system. The major hot-spots of lightning activity are identified, with a clear predominance during the warm period of the year over land in the vicinity of the major topographic features of the area. Special emphasis is also given on the discussion of the seasonal distribution of lightning. In addition, we investigate the relationship of lightning with sea-surface temperature, obtained by high-resolution satellite measurements and we conclude that the number of lightning strokes is positively correlated with the sea-surface temperature during autumn when also the maximum lightning activity over the sea is depicted. We suggest that higher sea surface temperature further destabilises the lower tropospheric layers, enhancing thus convection and therefore lightning.

  7. Surface roughness of sea ice in Fram Strait - A characteristic of the ice-atmosphere interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yearsley, W. A.; Herzfeld, U. C.; McDonald, B.; Wallin, B. F.; Maslanik, J. A.; Fladeland, M. M.; Long, D. G.; Crocker, R. I.

    2012-12-01

    Surface roughness is an important characteristic of the interface between the lower atmosphere and the sea ice. In this paper, we present observational and mathematical methods that yield surface roughness length at centimeter to kilometer scales along transects of several hundred kilometers in Fram Strait. During the Characterization of Arctic Sea Ice Experiment (CASIE, July-August 2009), centimeter-scale laser profilometer data and microASAR data were collected from unmanned aircraft, the SIERRA of NASA's Ames Research Center. After correction for altitude using GPS data, aerodynamic roughness length is derived using patial classification parameters and geometric surface properties. Statistical distributions of ridges in sea-ice are calculated. The roughness-based parameters have several uses in modeling energy flux between ocean, ice and boundary layer and in modeling ridging processes in sea ice.

  8. Experimental validation of the MODTRAN 5.3 sea surface radiance model using MIRAMER campaign measurements.

    PubMed

    Ross, Vincent; Dion, Denis; St-Germain, Daniel

    2012-05-01

    Radiometric images taken in mid-wave and long-wave infrared bands are used as a basis for validating a sea surface bidirectional reflectance distribution function (BRDF) being implemented into MODTRAN 5 (Berk et al. [Proc. SPIE5806, 662 (2005)]). The images were obtained during the MIRAMER campaign that took place in May 2008 in the Mediterranean Sea near Toulon, France. When atmosphere radiances are matched at the horizon to remove possible calibration offsets, the implementation of the BRDF in MODTRAN produces good sea surface radiance agreement, usually within 2% and at worst 4% from off-glint azimuthally averaged measurements. Simulations also compare quite favorably to glint measurements. The observed sea radiance deviations between model and measurements are not systematic, and are well within expected experimental uncertainties. This is largely attributed to proper radiative coupling between the surface and the atmosphere implemented using the DISORT multiple scattering algorithm.

  9. Sound scattering from rough bubbly ocean surface based on modified sea surface acoustic simulator and consideration of various incident angles and sub-surface bubbles' radii

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bolghasi, Alireza; Ghadimi, Parviz; Chekab, Mohammad A. Feizi

    2016-09-01

    The aim of the present study is to improve the capabilities and precision of a recently introduced Sea Surface Acoustic Simulator (SSAS) developed based on optimization of the Helmholtz-Kirchhoff-Fresnel (HKF) method. The improved acoustic simulator, hereby known as the Modified SSAS (MSSAS), is capable of determining sound scattering from the sea surface and includes an extended Hall-Novarini model and optimized HKF method. The extended Hall-Novarini model is used for considering the effects of sub-surface bubbles over a wider range of radii of sub-surface bubbles compared to the previous SSAS version. Furthermore, MSSAS has the capability of making a three-dimensional simulation of scattered sound from the rough bubbly sea surface with less error than that of the Critical Sea Tests (CST) experiments. Also, it presents scattered pressure levels from the rough bubbly sea surface based on various incident angles of sound. Wind speed, frequency, incident angle, and pressure level of the sound source are considered as input data, and scattered pressure levels and scattering coefficients are provided. Finally, different parametric studies were conducted on wind speeds, frequencies, and incident angles to indicate that MSSAS is quite capable of simulating sound scattering from the rough bubbly sea surface, according to the scattering mechanisms determined by Ogden and Erskine. Therefore, it is concluded that MSSAS is valid for both scattering mechanisms and the transition region between them that are defined by Ogden and Erskine.

  10. Trophic dynamics of deep-sea megabenthos are mediated by surface productivity.

    PubMed

    Tecchio, Samuele; van Oevelen, Dick; Soetaert, Karline; Navarro, Joan; Ramírez-Llodra, Eva

    2013-01-01

    Most deep-sea benthic ecosystems are food limited and, in the majority of cases, are driven by the organic matter falling from the surface or advected downslope. Species may adapt to this scarceness by applying a wide variety of responses, such as feeding specialisation, niche width variation, and reduction in metabolic rates. The Mediterranean Sea hosts a gradient of food availability at the deep seafloor over its wide longitudinal transect. In the Mediterranean, broad regional studies on trophic habits are almost absent, and the response of deep-sea benthos to different trophic conditions is still speculative. Here, we show that both primary and secondary production processes taking place at surface layers are key drivers of deep-sea food web structuring. By employing an innovative statistical tool, we interpreted bulk-tissue δ(13)C and δ(15)N isotope ratios in benthic megafauna, and associated surface and mesopelagic components from the 3 basins of the Mediterranean Sea at 3 different depths (1200, 2000, and 3000 m). The trophic niche width and the amplitude of primary carbon sources were positively correlated with both primary and secondary surface production indicators. Moreover, mesopelagic organic matter utilization processes showed an intermediate position between surface and deep benthic components. These results shed light on the understanding of deep-sea ecosystems functioning and, at the same time, they demand further investigation.

  11. Characterizing Surface Transport Barriers in the South China Sea

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-09-30

    location of submesoscale fronts in the South China Sea (SCS). OBJECTIVES The scientific objective is to test and develop novel methods, with a focus...transport prooperties of unsteady flows. Applications range from improved fundamental understanding of the relationship between submesoscale fronts

  12. Distinct modes of winter arctic sea ice motion and their associations with surface wind variability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Bingyi; Johnson, Mark A.

    2010-03-01

    Using monthly mean sea ice velocity data obtained from the International Arctic Buoy Programme (IABP) for the period of 1979-1998 and the monthly mean NCEP/NCAR re-analysis dataset (1960-2002), we investigated the spatiotemporal evolution of the leading sea ice motion mode (based on a complex correlation matrix constructed of normalized sea ice motion velocity) and their association with sea level pressure (SLP) and the predominant modes of surface wind field variability. The results indicate that the leading winter sea ice motion mode’s spatial evolution is characterized by two alternating and distinct sea ice modes, or their linear combination. One mode (M1) shows a nearly closed cyclonic or anti-cyclonic circulation anomaly in the Arctic Basin and its marginal seas, resembling to a large extent the response of sea ice motion to the Arctic Oscillation (AO), as many previous studies have revealed. The other mode (M2) displays a coherent cyclonic or anti-cyclonic circulation anomaly with its center close to the Laptev Sea, which has not been identified in previous observational studies. In fact, M1 and M2 respectively reflect the responses of sea ice motion to two predominant modes of winter surface wind variability north of 70°N, which well correspond, with slight differences, to the first two modes of EOF analysis of winter monthly mean SLP north of 70°N. These slight differences in SLP anomalies lead to a difference of M2 from the response of sea ice motion to the dipole anomaly. Although the AO significantly influences sea ice motion, it is not crucial for the existence of M1. The new sea ice motion mode (M2) has the largest variance and clearly differs from the response of winter monthly mean sea ice motion to the dipole anomaly in SLP fields, and corresponding SLP anomalies also show differences compared to the dipole anomaly. This study indicates that in the Arctic Basin and its marginal seas, slight differences in SLP anomaly patterns can force

  13. Simulation of a polarized laser beam reflected at the sea surface: modeling and validation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwenger, Frédéric

    2015-05-01

    A 3-D simulation of the polarization-dependent reflection of a Gaussian shaped laser beam on the dynamic sea surface is presented. The simulation considers polarized or unpolarized laser sources and calculates the polarization states upon reflection at the sea surface. It is suitable for the radiance calculation of the scene in different spectral wavebands (e.g. near-infrared, SWIR, etc.) not including the camera degradations. The simulation also considers a bistatic configuration of laser source and receiver as well as different atmospheric conditions. In the SWIR, the detected total power of reflected laser light is compared with data collected in a field trial. Our computer simulation combines the 3-D simulation of a maritime scene (open sea/clear sky) with the simulation of polarized or unpolarized laser light reflected at the sea surface. The basic sea surface geometry is modeled by a composition of smooth wind driven gravity waves. To predict the input of a camera equipped with a linear polarizer, the polarized sea surface radiance must be calculated for the specific waveband. The s- and p-polarization states are calculated for the emitted sea surface radiance and the specularly reflected sky radiance to determine the total polarized sea surface radiance of each component. The states of polarization and the radiance of laser light specularly reflected at the wind-roughened sea surface are calculated by considering the s- and p- components of the electric field of laser light with respect to the specular plane of incidence. This is done by using the formalism of their coherence matrices according to E. Wolf [1]. Additionally, an analytical statistical sea surface BRDF (bidirectional reflectance distribution function) is considered for the reflection of laser light radiances. Validation of the simulation results is required to ensure model credibility and applicability to maritime laser applications. For validation purposes, field measurement data (images and

  14. Sea Surface Temperature Seesaw between the Subpolar North Atlantic and the Norwegian Sea during the Late Holocene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miettinen, A.; Divine, D.; Koc, N.; Godtliebsen, F.; Hall, I. R.

    2012-12-01

    August sea surface temperature (aSST) record based on fossil diatom assemblages is generated from a 2800-year-long marine sediment core Rapid 21-COM from the Iceland Basin, in the northern subpolar North Atlantic. The record has a resolution of 2-10 years for interval 800-2004 AD representing the highest-resolution diatom SST reconstruction from the subpolar North Atlantic for this period, and 40 years for interval 800 BC-800 AD. The record is compared with the high-resolution aSST record from core CR948/2011 from the Vøring Plateau, in the Norwegian Sea, to explore the variability of the aSST gradient between these areas during the late Holocene. The aSST records show persistent opposite climate trends toward warming in the subpolar North Atlantic and cooling in the Norwegian Sea during the late Holocene. An apparent tendency to coherent antiphased aSST variations between the sites is also revealed for the shorter time scales implying an aSST seesaw between the northern subpolar North Atlantic and the Norwegian Sea to operate during the late Holocene. At the multicentennial scale of aSST variability of 600-900 years, the records are nearly in antiphase with warmer (colder) periods in the subpolar North Atlantic corresponding to the colder (warmer) periods in the Norwegian Sea. At the shorter time scale of 200-450 years, the records display a phase-locked behaviour with a tendency for the positive aSST anomalies in the Norwegian Sea to lead by ca. 30 years the negative aSST anomalies in the subpolar North Atlantic. This aSST seesaw might have had a strong effect on two major climate anomalies in the northwest Europe during the past Millennium: Medieval Warm Period (MWP) and the Little Ice Age (LIA). During the MWP warming of the sea surface in the Norwegian Sea occurred in parallel with cooling in the northern subpolar North Atlantic, whereas the opposite pattern emerged during the LIA. Coupled changes in aSST between the northern subpolar North Atlantic and the

  15. Biweekly Sea Surface Temperature over the South China Sea and its association with the Western North Pacific Summer Monsoon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaid, B. H.

    2017-02-01

    The association of the biweekly intraseasonal (BWI) oscillation in the Sea Surface Temperature (SST) over the South China Sea (SCS) and the Western North Pacific Summer Monsoon is authenticated using version 4 the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission Microwave Imager data (SST and rain) and heat fluxes from Ocean Atmosphere Flux project data during 1998-2012. The results suggest that the SCS involves ocean-atmosphere coupling on biweekly timescales. The positive biweekly SST anomalies lead the rain anomalies over the SCS by 3 days, with a significant correlation coefficient ( r = 0.6, at 99 % significance levels) between the SST-rain anomalies. It is evident from lead/lag correlation between biweekly SST and zonal wind shear that warm ocean surface induced by wind shear may contribute to a favorable condition of the convective activity over the SCS. The present study suggests that ocean-to-atmospheric processes induced by the BWI oscillation in the SCS SST results in enhanced sea level pressure and surface shortwave radiation flux during the summer monsoon. Besides, it is observed that the SCS BWI oscillation in the changes of SST causes a feedback in the atmosphere by modifying the atmospheric instability. This suggests that the active/break biweekly cycle of the SST over the SCS is related by sea level pressure, surface heat fluxes and atmospheric instability. The potential findings here indicate that the biweekly SST over the SCS play an important role in the eastward and the southward propagation of the biweekly anomalies in the Western North Pacific.

  16. Relationship Between Sea Surface Salinity from L-Band Radiometer and Optical Features in the East China Sea

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-01-01

    recently been put into orbit to monitor sea surface salmity ( SSS ). Previous studies have used the mixing of fluvial colored dissolved organic matter...CDOM) near coasts, where the mixing is approximately conservati\\e over short time scales, to estimate SSS . In this study, the usual relationship...between CDOM and salinity in the ECS has been used in reverse to estimate CDOM from remotely sensed SSS in the ECS and compare that CDOM with MODIS data

  17. Surface and sub-surface multi-proxy reconstruction of middle to late Holocene palaeoceanographic changes in Disko Bugt, West Greenland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moros, Matthias; Lloyd, Jeremy M.; Perner, Kerstin; Krawczyk, Diana; Blanz, Thomas; de Vernal, Anne; Ouellet-Bernier, Marie-Michele; Kuijpers, Antoon; Jennings, Anne E.; Witkowski, Andrzej; Schneider, Ralph; Jansen, Eystein

    2016-01-01

    We present new surface water proxy records of meltwater production (alkenone derived), relative sea surface temperature (diatom, alkenones) and sea ice (diatoms) changes from the Disko Bugt area off central West Greenland. We combine these new surface water reconstructions with published proxy records (benthic foraminifera - bottom water proxy; dinocyst assemblages - surface water proxy), along with atmospheric temperature from Greenland ice core and Greenland lake records. This multi-proxy approach allows us to reconstruct centennial scale middle to late Holocene palaeoenvironmental evolution of Disko Bugt and the Western Greenland coastal region with more detail than previously available. Combining surface and bottom water proxies identifies the coupling between ocean circulation (West Greenland Current conditions), the atmosphere and the Greenland Ice Sheet. Centennial to millennial scale changes in the wider North Atlantic region were accompanied by variations in the West Greenland Current (WGC). During periods of relatively warm WGC, increased surface air temperature over western Greenland led to ice sheet retreat and significant meltwater flux. In contrast, during periods of cold WGC, atmospheric cooling resulted in glacier advances. We also identify potential linkages between the palaeoceanography of the Disko Bugt region and key changes in the history of human occupation. Cooler oceanographic conditions at 3.5 ka BP support the view that the Saqqaq culture left Disko Bugt due to deteriorating climatic conditions. The cause of the disappearance of the Dorset culture is unclear, but the new data presented here indicate that it may be linked to a significant increase in meltwater flux, which caused cold and unstable coastal conditions at ca. 2 ka BP. The subsequent settlement of the Norse occurred at the same time as climatic amelioration during the Medieval Climate Anomaly and their disappearance may be related to harsher conditions at the beginning of the

  18. Simulation of laser beam reflection at the sea surface modeling and validation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwenger, Frédéric; Repasi, Endre

    2013-06-01

    A 3D simulation of the reflection of a Gaussian shaped laser beam on the dynamic sea surface is presented. The simulation is suitable for the pre-calculation of images for cameras operating in different spectral wavebands (visible, short wave infrared) for a bistatic configuration of laser source and receiver for different atmospheric conditions. In the visible waveband the calculated detected total power of reflected laser light from a 660nm laser source is compared with data collected in a field trial. Our computer simulation comprises the 3D simulation of a maritime scene (open sea/clear sky) and the simulation of laser beam reflected at the sea surface. The basic sea surface geometry is modeled by a composition of smooth wind driven gravity waves. To predict the view of a camera the sea surface radiance must be calculated for the specific waveband. Additionally, the radiances of laser light specularly reflected at the wind-roughened sea surface are modeled considering an analytical statistical sea surface BRDF (bidirectional reflectance distribution function). Validation of simulation results is prerequisite before applying the computer simulation to maritime laser applications. For validation purposes data (images and meteorological data) were selected from field measurements, using a 660nm cw-laser diode to produce laser beam reflection at the water surface and recording images by a TV camera. The validation is done by numerical comparison of measured total laser power extracted from recorded images with the corresponding simulation results. The results of the comparison are presented for different incident (zenith/azimuth) angles of the laser beam.

  19. The Sensitivity of African Easterly Waves to Eastern Tropical Atlantic Sea-Surface Temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Druyan, Leonard M.; Fulakeza, Matthew

    2011-01-01

    The results of two regional atmospheric model simulations are compared to assess the influence of the eastern tropical Atlantic sea-surface temperature maximum on local precipitation, transient easterly waves and the West African summer monsoon. Both model simulations were initialized with reanalysis 2 data (US National Center for Environmental Prediction and Department of Energy) on 15 May 2006 and extended through 6 October 2006, forced by synchronous reanalysis 2 lateral boundary conditions introduced four times daily. One simulation uses 2006 reanalysis 2 sea-surface temperatures, also updated four times daily, while the second simulation considers ocean forcing absent the sea-surface temperature maximum, achieved here by subtracting 3 K at every ocean grid point between 0 and 15 N during the entire simulation. The simulation with 2006 sea-surface temperature forcing produces a realistic distribution of June-September mean precipitation and realistic westward propagating swaths of maximum rainfall, based on validation against Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) estimates. The simulation without the sea-surface temperature maximum produces only 57% of the control June-September total precipitation over the eastern tropical Atlantic and about 83% of the Sahel precipitation. The simulation with warmer ocean temperatures generates generally stronger circulation, which in turn enhances precipitation by increasing moisture convergence. Some local precipitation enhancement is also attributed to lower vertical thermal stability above the warm water. The study shows that the eastern tropical Atlantic sea-surface temperature maximum enhances the strength of transient easterly waves and broadens the spatial extent of associated precipitation. However, large-scale circulation and its interaction with the African continent, and not sea-surface temperatures, control the timing and trajectories of the waves.

  20. Control of lithosphere structure on surface deformation in the Central Barents Sea: insights from dynamical modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gac, Sebastien; Faleide, Jan Inge

    2014-05-01

    The Barents Sea is located in the Northern European Arctic. The Eastern Barents Sea features one of the deepest sedimentary basins in the world whereas large parts of the Western Barents Sea is covered by a shallow sedimentary platform. Seismic tomography data (Levshin et al., 2007; Ritzmann and Faleide, 2009) show slower S-wave velocity in the upper mantle beneath the East Barents Sea compared to the West Barents Sea, indicating a steep deepening of the Lithosphere-Asthenosphere Boundary (LAB) in the Central Barents Sea from West to East. Additionally, the Central Barents Sea is marked by a South-North succession of regularly-spaced inverted structures (uplifted domes) such as the Fedinsky High and the Sentralbanken High. The origin of these inverted structures is under debate. The interpretation of recent seismic data in the Central Barents Sea suggests that part of the inversion is contemporaneous with the Late-Triassic-Early Jurassic westwards thrusting of Novaya Zemlya. This suggests that the origin of domes might be linked to compressional events on the eastern side of the Barents Sea. A 2D thermo-mechanical model of lithosphere shortening is used to explore the effect of LAB geometry on the surface deformation in the Central Barents Sea. The model is based on a Lagrangian finite element method (Gac et al., 2013). The model consists of a crust - mantle lithosphere characterized by non-linear temperature and pressure dependent visco-elastic-plastic rheologies. The mechanical model is coupled with a thermal model taking into account heat advection and diffusion. Sedimentation and gravity are also taken into account. Contractional boundary conditions are applied on vertical sides of the model resulting in buckling of the crust. Several models are run for different geometry of the LAB. Preliminary results are shown. 3D conceptual models are then proposed to explain the 3D distribution of inverted structures in the Central Barents Sea. REFERENCES: Gac, S

  1. The organic sea surface microlayer in the upwelling region off Peru and implications for air-sea exchange processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Engel, A.; Galgani, L.

    2015-07-01

    The sea surface microlayer (SML) is at the very surface of the ocean, linking the hydrosphere with the atmosphere, and central to a range of global biogeochemical and climate-related processes. The presence and enrichment of organic compounds in the SML have been suggested to influence air-sea gas exchange processes as well as the emission of primary organic aerosols. Among these organic compounds, primarily of plankton origin, are dissolved exopolymers, specifically polysaccharides and proteins, and gel particles, such as Transparent Exopolymer Particles (TEP) and Coomassie Stainable Particles (CSP). These organic substances often accumulate in the surface ocean when plankton productivity is high. Here, we report results obtained in December 2012 during the SOPRAN Meteor 91 cruise to the highly productive, coastal upwelling regime off Peru. Samples were collected from the SML and from ~ 20 cm below, and were analyzed for polysaccharidic and proteinaceous compounds, gel particles, total and dissolved organic carbon, bacterial and phytoplankton abundance. Our study provides insight to the physical and biological control of organic matter enrichment in the SML, and discusses the potential role of organic matter in the SML for air-sea exchange processes.

  2. Changing surface water conditions for the last 500 ka in the Southeast Atlantic:Tracking Agulhas leakage using UK37' and δD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrick, Benjamin; McClymont, Erin; van der Meer, Marcel; Marret, Fabienne

    2015-04-01

    The Southeast Atlantic Ocean is an important component of global ocean circulation, as it includes heat and salt transfer into the Atlantic through Agulhas Leakage. Here, we reconstruct sea surface temperatures (SSTs) and sea surface salinity from Ocean Drilling Program (ODP) Site 1087 in the Southeast Atlantic to investigate surface ocean circulation patterns during the late Pleistocene (0-500 ka). The alkenone-derived U37K'index and assemblages of dinoflagellate cysts are used to reconstruct SSTs. The hydrogen isotope composition of the alkenones (δDalkenone) is used to reconstruct changes in sea-surface salinity. The greatest amplitude of SST warming precedes decreases in benthic δ18O and therefore occurs early in the transition from glacials to interglacials. The timing of the early warming is consistent with previously published foraminifera reconstructions from the same site (Caley et al., 2012). However, δDalkenone decreases at the start of interglacials, suggesting that sea surface salinity increased earlier than the deglacial warmings, and indicating that the pattern of Agulhas leakage is more complex than suggested by SST proxies alone. Furthermore, the δDalkenonevalues indicate a strong salinity increases occurred before both MIS 11 and MIS 1, which are both periods where there is evidence of connection between increased Agulhas Leakage and a stronger Atlantic meridional overturning circulation (AMOC). Finally, the ODP site 1087 record shows an overall trend of increasing SSTs and δDalkenone towards the present day, suggesting that Agulhas leakage has strengthened since 500 ka, which may have impacted the intensity of the AMOC. Caley, T., Giraudeau, J., Malaize, B., Rossignol, L., Pierre, C., 2012. Agulhas leakage as a key process in the modes of Quaternary climate changes. Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. 109, 6835-6839. doi:10.1073/pnas.1115545109

  3. Reconstructing Variations of Global Sea-Surface Temperature during the Last Interglaciation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoffman, J. S.; Clark, P. U.; He, F.; Parnell, A. C.

    2015-12-01

    The last interglaciation (LIG; ~130-116 ka) was the most recent period in Earth history with higher-than-present global sea level (≥6 m) under similar-to-preindustrial concentrations of atmospheric CO2, suggesting additional feedbacks related to albedo, insolation, and ocean circulation in generating the apparent climatic differences between the LIG and present Holocene. However, our understanding of how much warmer the LIG sea surface was relative to the present interglaciation remains uncertain, with current estimates suggesting from 0°C to 2°C warmer than late-20thcentury average global temperatures. Moreover, the timing, spatial expression, and amplitude of regional and global sea surface temperature variability related to other climate forcing during the LIG are poorly constrained, largely due to uncertainties in age control and proxy temperature reconstructions. An accurate characterization of global and regional temperature change during the LIG can serve as a benchmark for paleoclimate modeling intercomparison projects and help improve understanding of sea-level sensitivity to temperature change. We will present a global compilation (~100 published records) of sea surface temperature (SST) and other climate reconstructions spanning the LIG. Using a Monte Carlo-enabled cross-correlation maximization algorithm to climatostratigraphically align proxy records and then account for both the resulting chronologic and proxy calibration uncertainties with Bayesian statistical inference, our results quantify the spatial timing, amplitude, and uncertainty in estimates of global and regional sea surface temperature change during the LIG and its relation to potential forcings.

  4. Sea, ice and surface water circulation, Alaskan continental shelf

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wright, F. F.; Sharma, G. D.; Burns, J. J. (Principal Investigator)

    1973-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. Salinity and temperature measurements in the Bering Sea indicate that the Yukon River outflow extends as far as 200 km from its mouth. The fresh water flow from the Yukon River flows north and east into Norton Sound. Various levels of suspended sediment concentration in waters have been successfully color coded using a VP-8 color density slicing image analyzer. The 70 mm negative transparencies have provided the best fit for the ground truth observations.

  5. The annual and interannual variabilities of precipitable water, surface wind speed, and sea surface temperature over the tropical Pacific

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, W. Timothy

    1989-01-01

    The Nimbus-7 Scanning Multichannel Microwave Radiometer (SSMR) provided simultaneous measurements of three geophysical parameters, each of which describing a certain aspect of the evolution of the 1982-1983 ENSO: the sea-surface temperature (T), precipitable water (W), and surface-wind speed (U). In this paper, values derived from the SSMR were compared with in situ measurements from ships, research buoys, and operational island stations in the tropical Pacific between January 1980 and October 1983, demonstrating the temporal and spatial coherence of the SSMR measurements. The results show that the variabilities of the surface convergence, sea surface temperature, and precipitable water are related. It was found that W anomalies were not always colocated with T anomalies, and that W anomalies were often associated with negative U anomalies, interpreted as surface convergence.

  6. Investigation on the GPS single scattering from a 2-D largescale sea surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Yiwen; Guo, Lixin

    2014-05-01

    Global positioning system (GPS) signals reflected from the ocean surface can be used for various remote sensing purposes. In this paper, we develop a facet model to simulate the received GPS single from a 2-D largescale sea surface. In this model, the sea surface is envisaged as a two-scale profile on which the long waves are locally approximated by planar facets. The microscopic profile within a facet is assumed to be represented by a set of sinusoidal ripple patches. The complex reflective function of each modified facet is evaluated by a modified formula of the original Bass and Fuks' two-scale model, in which the phase factor of each facet is with the capillary wave modification. The scattering field and the bistatic scattering coefficient of facet model is derived in detail. With received GPS single, we give a detail analysis of the polarization property, the scattering property of GPS scattering signal over the sea surface.

  7. North Atlantic sea surface temperature, solar activity and the climate of Northern Fennoscandia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogurtsov, M.; Lindholm, M.; Jalkanen, R.; Veretenenko, S. V.

    2017-02-01

    Seven proxies of summer temperature in Northern Fennoscandia, sea surface temperature in the North Atlantic and solar activity were analyzed over AD 1567-1986. A stable and significant positive correlation between summer temperatures in Northern Fennoscandia and sea surface temperature in the North Atlantic is shown to exist during the entire time interval. In addition, a significant correlation between solar activity and (a) summer temperature in Northern Fennoscandia as well as (b) surface temperature in the North Atlantic was found during AD 1715-1986. Throughout 1567-1715 correlation is less significant and has an opposite sign. Thus we show that the variation of sea surface temperature in the North Atlantic could be a physical agent, which transferred solar influence on Northern Fennoscandian temperature at least during AD 1715-1986.

  8. Evaporation and Solar Irradiance as Regulators of Sea Surface Temparature in Annual and Interrannual Changes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, W. Timothy

    1994-01-01

    After numerical studies showed that global climate is sensitive to small changes in sea surface temperature (Ts), considerabel effort has been devoted to examine the role of surface fluxes in changing upper ocean heat balance and Ts, particularly in the tropical Pacific where interannual signals, such as El Nino Southern Oscillation (ENSO), have major economic and ecological impacts.

  9. Investigation of electromagnetic backscattering from nearshore sea surfaces modulated by shoaling effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nie, D.; Zhang, M.; Li, J.

    2016-10-01

    The electromagnetic (EM) scattering features of radar scattered echoes from nearshore sea surfaces are investigated using the second-order small-slope approximation (SSA-II). The joint influences of wind fetch and water depth on the normalized radar cross section (NRCS) of and Doppler spectra for echoes from nearshore sea surfaces are mainly studied. The numerical results show that with a further increasing fetch, the excess of NRCS for small depth sea over that for deeper sea increases, and Doppler spectral features are also intensely influenced by nonlinear interactions between waves in the large wind fetch and small water depth marine environment. These both indicate that the effects of the finite depth are more prominent with increasing wind fetch, especially for HH polarization.

  10. Wind Direction Estimates from Synthetic Aperture Radar Imagery of the Sea Surface

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-06-07

    Wind Direction Estimates from Synthetic Aperture Radar Imagery of the Sea Surface George S. Young The Pennsylvania State University 503... directions with respect to the orientation of common microscale and mesoscale quasi-two dimensional phenomena seen in SAR imagery of the sea...and col regions on the wind direction -dependent retrieval of wind speed from SAR via CMOD-4. a. Use the results of this error analysis to

  11. Climate-scale sea surface height variability over the Northwest Atlantic slope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Guoqi; Chen, Nancy; Yen Kuo, Chun; Shum, Ck; Ma, Zhimin

    2016-04-01

    The Northwest Atlantic continental slope features strong interactions among the western boundary currents of the subpolar and subtropical gyres, and thus the sea level variability over the slope may have important implications for the large-scale ocean circulation. In this study, temporal and spatial sea level variability in the Northwest Atlantic continental slope has been investigated based on a merged satellite altimetry dataset and a monthly temperature and salinity dataset. The altimetric results are compared with steric height anomalies calculated from the temperature and salinity dataset. The study shows significant interannual and decadal sea level variability and secular change, with prominent regional differences and seemingly varying linkages to large-scale atmospheric and oceanic variability in the North Atlantic. The interannual sea level variability in the western Labrador Sea is negatively correlated with the North Atlantic Oscillation primarily via the wintertime deep convection; whereas that over the Laurentian Fan is positively correlated with the North Atlantic Oscillation. The thermosteric height anomalies are negatively (positively) correlated with the winter NAO index in the Labrador Sea (Laurentian Fan); while the halosteric height anomalies show opposite. The along-slope differences in the interannual and decadal variations and the secular trend of the sea surface height anomalies is compatible with an important interior pathway of the Labrador Sea Intermediate Water toward the central North Atlantic Basin reported in literature.

  12. Impact of Typhoon-induced sea surface cooling on the track of next Typhoon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ando, Y.; Horiguchi, M.; Kodera, K.; Tachibana, Y.; Yamazaki, K.

    2015-12-01

    Typhoons (TCs) MATMO, HALONG, and NAKRI (2014), which caused Japan catastrophic disaster, landed the western part of Japan. The TCs came to Japan one after another during late July to early August 2014. The tracks of these TCs were similar, i.e., the TCs followed the western edge of the subtropical northwestern Pacific high (SNPH). However, the tracks gradually reached to Japan, which were associated with weakening the westward expansion of the SNPH. It was found that the changes in westward expansion of the SNPH were associated with TC-induced sea surface cooling of previous Typhoon. It has previously been reported that TC-induced sea surface cooling is mainly caused by Ekman upwelling and vertical turbulent mixing. The TCs MATMO, HALONG, and NAKRI passed around the Philippines, and induced sea surface cooling of this area. The sea surface temperatures of this area are important for Pacific-Japan pattern, which was associated with the westward expansion of the SNPH. Consequently, previous Typhoon induced sea surface cooling around the Philippines, which weakening the westward expansion of the SNPH. Then, the tracks of next Typhoon were changed, and gradually reached to Japan.

  13. Influence of ice thickness and surface properties on light transmission through Arctic sea ice.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katlein, Christian; Arndt, Stefanie; Nicolaus, Marcel; Jakuba, Michael V.; Laney, Samuel; Elliott, Stephen; Whitcomb, Louis L.; McFarland, Christopher J.; Suman, Stefano; Gerdes, Rüdiger; Boetius, Antje; German, Christopher R.

    2015-04-01

    The observed changes in physical properties of sea ice such as decreased thickness and increased melt pond cover severely impact the energy balance of Arctic sea ice. Increased light transmission leads to increased deposition of solar energy and thus plays a crucial role for sea-ice-melt as well as for the amount and timing of under-ice primary production. Recent developments in underwater technology provide new opportunities to undertake challenging research at the largely inaccessible underside of sea ice. We measured spectral under-ice radiance and irradiance onboard the new Nereid Under-Ice (Nereid-UI) underwater robotic vehicle, during a cruise of the R/V Polarstern to 83°N 6°W in the Arctic Ocean in July 2014. Nereid-UI is a next generation hybrid remotely operated vehicle (H-ROV) designed for both remotely-piloted and autonomous surveys underneath fixed and moving sea ice. Here we present results from the first comprehensive scientific dive of Nereid-UI employing its interdisciplinary sensor suite. We combine under-ice optical measurements with three dimensional under-ice topography (multibeam sonar) and aerial images of the surface conditions. We investigate the influence of spatially varying ice-thickness and surface properties on the spatial variability of light transmittance on floe scale. Our results indicate that surface properties dominate the spatial distribution of the under-ice light field, while sea ice-thickness and snow-depth are most important for mean light levels.

  14. Reconstructing Holocene sea surface salinity changes in the Northern Aegean Sea: evidence from morphological variations of Emiliania huxleyi-coccoliths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herrle, Jens O.; Gebühr, Christina; Bollmann, Jörg; Giesenberg, Annika; Kranzdorf, Philip

    2013-04-01

    The Aegean Sea is a key area for our understanding of the impact of changes in the hydrological cycle on ocean circulation in the Mediterranean Sea. The Aegean Sea appears to be very sensitive to climate changes in Europe because of its small volume and the position between high- and low-latitude climate regimes. Therefore, it is assumed to record environmental change, especially changes in sea surface water salinity (SSS) without a significant time lag with respect to the forcing process (Rohling et al., 2002). However, up to date, SSS cannot be easily reconstructed from geological archives because several assumptions need to be made that lead to a significant error of the salinity estimates (e.g. Rohling, 2000). Here, we present the first high resolution SSS reconstruction from a Holocene sediment core based on a recently developed transfer function using the morphological variation of Emiliania huxleyi coccoliths (Bollmann & Herrle 2007, Bollmann et al., 2009). The core is located in the northern Aegean Sea (eastern Mediterranean Basin) and covers the time period 3 -11ka ago. Sea surface water salinity in the Aegean Sea has varied in concert with temperature oscillations as recorded in Greenland ice cores (iGISP2 ice core δ18O record) with a periodicity of about 900 years (Schulz & Paull, 2002). Four major SSS events can be identified at about 3.9, 4.7, 6.4, 7.4, and 8.2 ka in the northern Aegean Sea that correlate with increases in GISP2 δ18O (Schulz & Paull, 2002) as well as decreasing percentages of tree pollen studied at the same core expect for 3.9 ka (Kotthoff et al., 2008). The most prominent salinity increase occurred during the short-lived 8.2 kyr cold event (e.g., Rohling & Pälike, 2005), which was most likely triggered by a melt-water related perturbation of the Atlantic Meridional Overturning and associated decrease of ocean heat transport to the North Atlantic. We suggest that the salinity fluctuations in the northern Aegean Sea are related to

  15. Surfactant-Associated Bacteria in the Sea Surface Microlayer and their Effect on Remote Sensing Technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurata, N.; Vella, K.; Tartar, A.; Matt, S.; Shivji, M.; Perrie, W. A.; Soloviev, A.

    2012-12-01

    Synthetic aperture radar remote sensing captures various fine-scale features on the ocean surface such as coastal discharges, oil pollution, vessel traffic, algal blooms and sea slicks. Although numerous factors potentially affect the synthetic aperture radar imaging process, the influence of biogenic and anthropogenic surfactants has been suggested as one of the primary parameters, especially under relatively low wind conditions. Surfactants have a tendency to dampen the short gravity-capillary ocean waves causing the sea surface to smoothen, thus allowing the radar to detect areas of surfactants. Surfactants are found in sea slicks, which are the accumulation of organic material shaped as elongated bands on the ocean's surface. Sea slicks are often observable with the naked eye due to their glassy appearance and can also be seen on synthetic aperture radar images as dark scars. While the sources of surfactants can vary, some are known to be of marine bacteria origin. Countless numbers of marine bacteria are present in the oceanic environment, and their biogeochemical contributions cannot be overlooked. Not only does marine-bacteria produce surfactants, but they also play an important role in the transformation of surfactants. In this study, we profiled the surfactant-associated bacteria composition within the biogenic thin layer of the ocean surface more commonly referred as the sea surface microlayer. Bacterial samples were collected from the sea surface microlayer for comparative analysis from both within and outside of sea slick areas as well as the underlying subsurface water. The bacterial microlayer sampling coincided with synthetic aperture radar satellite, RADARSAT-2, overpasses to demonstrate the simultaneous in-situ measurements during a satellite image capture. The sea surface microlayer sampling method was designed to enable aseptic bacterial sampling. A 47 mm polycarbonate membrane was utilized at each sampling site to obtain a snapshot of the

  16. Sea Ice Remote Sensing Using Surface Reflected GPS Signals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Komjathy, Attila; Maslanik, James; Zavorotny, Valery U.; Axelrad, Penina; Katzberg, Stephen J.

    2000-01-01

    This paper describes a new research effort to extend the application of Global Positioning System (GPS) signal reflections, received by airborne instruments, to cryospheric remote sensing. Our experimental results indicate that reflected GPS signals have potential to provide information on the presence and condition of sea and freshwater ice as well as the freeze/thaw state of frozen ground. In this paper we show results from aircraft experiments over the ice pack near Barrow, Alaska indicating correlation between forward-scattered GPS returns and RADARSAT backscattered measurements.

  17. Parabolic equation modeling of high frequency acoustic transmission with an evolving sea surface.

    PubMed

    Senne, J; Song, A; Badiey, M; Smith, K B

    2012-09-01

    The present paper examines the temporal evolution of acoustic fields by modeling forward propagation subject to sea surface dynamics with time scales of less than a second to tens of seconds. A time-evolving rough sea surface model is combined with a rough surface formulation of a parabolic equation model for predicting time-varying acoustic fields. Surface waves are generated from surface wave spectra, and stepped in time using a Runge-Kutta integration technique applied to linear evolution equations. This evolving, range-dependent surface information is combined with other environmental parameters and input to the acoustic model, giving an approximation of the time-varying acoustic field. The wide-angle parabolic equation model manages the rough sea surfaces by molding them into the boundary conditions for calculations of the near-surface acoustic field. This merged acoustic model is validated using concurrently-collected acoustic and environmental information, including surface wave spectra. Data to model comparisons demonstrate that the model is able to approximate the ensemble-averaged acoustic intensity at ranges of about a kilometer for acoustic signals of around 15 kHz. Furthermore, the model is shown to capture variations due to surface fluctuations occurring over time scales of less than a second to tens of seconds.

  18. Seasonal and interannual patterns of sea surface temperature in Banda Sea as revealed by self-organizing map

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iskandar, Iskhaq

    2010-05-01

    Seasonal and interannual variations of sea surface temperature (SST) in the Banda Sea are studied for the period of January 1985 through December 2007. A neural network pattern recognition approach based on self-organizing map (SOM) has been applied to monthly SST from the Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) Oceans Pathfinder. The principal conclusions of this paper are outlined as follows. There are three different patterns associated with the variations in the monsoonal winds: the southeast and northwest monsoon patterns, and the monsoon-break patterns. The southeast monsoon pattern is characterized by low SST due to the prevailing southeasterly winds that drive Ekman upwelling. The northwest monsoon pattern, on the other hand, is one of high SST distributed uniformly in space. The monsoon-break pattern is a transitional pattern between the northwest and southeast monsoon patterns, which is characterized by moderate SST patterns. On interannual time-scale, the SST variations are significantly influenced by the El Niño-Southern Oscillation (ENSO) and Indian Ocean Dipole (IOD) phenomena. Low SST is observed during El Niño and/or positive IOD events, while high SST appears during La Niña event. Low SST in the Banda Sea during positive IOD event is induced by upwelling Kelvin waves generated in the equatorial Indian Ocean which propagate along the southern coast of Sumatra and Java before entering the Banda Sea through the Lombok and Ombai Straits as well as through the Timor Passage. On the other hand, during El Niño (La Niña) events, upwelling (downwelling) Rossby waves associated with off-equatorial divergence (convergence) in response to the equatorial westerly (easterly) winds in the Pacific, partly scattered into the Indonesian archipelago which in turn induce cool (warm) SST in the Banda Sea.

  19. Distribution and enantiomeric profiles of organochlorine pesticides in surface sediments from the Bering Sea, Chukchi Sea and adjacent Arctic areas.

    PubMed

    Jin, Meiqing; Fu, Jie; Xue, Bin; Zhou, Shanshan; Zhang, Lina; Li, An

    2017-03-01

    The spatial distribution, compositional profiles, and enantiomer fractions (EFs) of organochlorine pesticides (OCPs), including hexachlorocyclohexanes (HCHs), dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethanes (DDTs), and chlordanes (CHLs), in the surface sediments in the Bering Sea, Chukchi Sea and adjacent areas were investigated. The total concentrations of DDTs, HCHs and CHLs varied from 0.64 to 3.17 ng/g dw, 0.19-0.65 ng/g dw, and 0.03-0.16 ng/g dw, respectively. No significant difference was observed between the Bering Sea and Chukchi Sea for most pollutants except for trans-CHL, ΣCHLs (sum of trans- and cis-chlordane) and p,p'-DDD. Concentration ratios (e.g., α-HCH/γ-HCH, o,p'-DDT/p,p'-DDT) indicated that the contamination in the studied areas may result from inputs from multiple sources (e.g., historical usage of technical HCHs as well as new input of dicofol). Chiral analysis showed great variation in the enantioselective degradation of OCPs, resulting in excess of (+)-enantiomer for α-HCH in thirty of the 32 detectable samples, preferential depletion of (-)-enantiomer for o,p'-DDT in nineteen of the 35 detectable samples, and nonracemic in most samples for trans- and cis-chlordane. The ecological risks of the individual OCPs as well as the mixture were assessed based on the calculation of toxic units (TUs), and the results showed the predominance of DDT and γ-HCH in the mixture toxicity of the sediment. Overall, the TUs of OCPs in sediments from both the Bering and Chukchi Seas are less than one, indicating low ecological risk potential.

  20. Chemical Mapping of the Sea-Surface Microlayer: A System for Measurement of Spatial and Temporal Variations in Composition

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2002-09-30

    surface elasticity. To be published in Surface Slicks and Remote Sensing of Air-Sea Interactions, M. Gade, G. Korenowski, J . Scott and N. Thomas...slick materials. To be published in Surface Slicks and Remote Sensing of Air-Sea Interactions, M. Gade, G. Korenowski, J . Scott and N. Thomas (eds), Springer-Verlag.

  1. A GIS Approach to Wind,SST(Sea Surface Temperature) and CHL(Chlorophyll) variations in the Caspian Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mirkhalili, Seyedhamzeh

    2016-07-01

    Chlorophyll is an extremely important bio-molecule, critical in photosynthesis, which allows plants to absorb energy from light. At the base of the ocean food web are single-celled algae and other plant-like organisms known as Phytoplankton. Like plants on land, Phytoplankton use chlorophyll and other light-harvesting pigments to carry out photosynthesis. Where Phytoplankton grow depends on available sunlight, temperature, and nutrient levels. In this research a GIS Approach using ARCGIS software and QuikSCAT satellite data was applied to visualize WIND,SST(Sea Surface Temperature) and CHL(Chlorophyll) variations in the Caspian Sea.Results indicate that increase in chlorophyll concentration in coastal areas is primarily driven by terrestrial nutrients and does not imply that warmer SST will lead to an increase in chlorophyll concentration and consequently Phytoplankton abundance.

  2. Sea ice and surface water circulation, Alaskan Continental Shelf

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wright, F. F. (Principal Investigator); Sharma, G. D.; Burn, J. J.

    1973-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. The boundaries of land-fast ice, distribution of pack ice, and major polynya were studied in the vicinity of the Bering Strait. Movement of pack ice during 24 hours was determined by plotting the distinctly identifiable ice floes on ERTS-1 imagery obtained from two consecutive passes. Considerably large shallow area along the western Seward Peninsula just north of the Bering Strait is covered by land fast ice. This ice hinders the movement of ice formed in eastern Chukchi Sea southward through the Bering Strait. The movement of ice along the Russian coast is relatively faster. Plotting of some of the ice floes indicated movement of ice in excess of 30 km in and south of the Bering Strait between 6 and 7 March, 1973. North of the Bering Strait the movement approached 18 km. The movement of ice observed during March 6 and 7 considerably altered the distribution and extent of polynya. These features when continually plotted should be of considerable aid in navigation of ice breakers. The movement of ice will also help delineate the migration and distribution of sea mammals.

  3. Climate Variability in Coastal Ecosystems - Use of MODIS Land Surface and Sea Surface Temperature Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chintalapati, S.; Lakshmi, V.

    2007-12-01

    The intertidal zone, with its complex blend of marine and terrestrial environments, is one of the intensively studied ecosystems, in understanding the effects of climate change on species abundance and distribution. As climatic conditions change, the geographic limits of the intertidal species will likely move towards more tolerable coastal conditions. Traditionally, understanding climate change effects through species physiologic response have involved use of in situ measurements and thermal engineering models. But these approaches are constrained by their data intensive requirements and may not be suitable for predicting change patterns relevant to large scale species distributions. Satellite remote sensing provides an alternate approach, given the regular global coverage at moderate spatial resolutions. The present study uses six years of land surface temperature (LST) and sea surface temperature (SST) data from MODIS/Terra instrument along various coastlines around the globe - East and West Coast US, Southern Africa, Northern Japan and New Zealand. Apart from the dominant annual cycle in LST and SST, the other seasonal cycles vary from dominant semi-annual cycles in lower latitudes to 1.5 and 2 year cycles at higher latitudes. The monthly anomalies show strong spatial structure at lower latitudes when compared to higher latitudes, with the exception of US east coast, where the spatial structure extended almost along the whole coastline, indicating strong regulation from the Gulf Stream. The patterns along different coast lines are consistent with the atmospheric and ocean circulation patterns existing at those regions. These results suggest that the climatology at the coastal regions can be adequately represented using satellite-based temperature data, thus enabling further research in understanding the effects of climate change on species abundance and distribution at larger scales.

  4. Near-Surface Circulation in the Solomon Sea Derived from Lagrangian Drifter Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hristova, H. G.; Kessler, W. S.

    2010-12-01

    A low-latitude western boundary current in the Solomon Sea in the southwest Pacific Ocean carries waters from the subtropical gyre toward the tropics. Despite its importance as a major pathway connecting the subtropics to the equator, our knowledge about the Solomon Sea circulation remains incomplete and direct observations are sparse. Here, we use the Global Drifter Program (GDP) dataset to map out the near-surface circulation in the vicinity of the Solomon Sea. The analysis is based on pseudo-eulerian statistics computed from nearly 500 satellite-tracked drifting buoys drogued at 15m depth that have transited through the region during the 16-year period from 1994 to 2009. To the east of the Solomon Sea, the seasonally averaged velocity field outlines the changes in intensity and position of the main regional currents - the South Equatorial Current (SEC) and the South Equatorial CounterCurrent (SECC). Within the Solomon Sea, the drifters suggest a surface flow to the northwest that hugs the Papua New Guinea coast and exits equatorward through Vitiaz Strait. The flow is at its maximum during the austral winter, when the southeast monsoon winds are also at their strongest, while it is much weaker and undefined during the austral summer, reversing direction in the southeastern part of the basin at this time. The surface flow in Solomon Strait, the other major opening toward the equator, is to the southwest (into the sea) year around. Consistent with findings from altimetry data, the drifters single out the interior of the Solomon Sea as a region of enhanced eddy kinetic energy. The drifter-derived velocity field is compared with other observational climatologies, such as the CSIRO Atlas of the Regional Seas (CARS).

  5. Sea-surface temperature and salinity mapping from remote microwave radiometric measurements of brightness temperature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hans-Juergen, C. B.; Kendall, B. M.; Fedors, J. C.

    1977-01-01

    A technique to measure remotely sea surface temperature and salinity was demonstrated with a dual frequency microwave radiometer system. Accuracies in temperature of 1 C and in salinity of part thousand for salinity greater than 5 parts per thousand were attained after correcting for the influence of extraterrestrial background radiation, atmospheric radiation and attenuation, sea-surface roughness, and antenna beamwidth. The radiometers, operating at 1.43 and 2.65 GHz, comprise a third-generation system using null balancing and feedback noise injection. Flight measurements from an aircraft at an altitude of 1.4 km over the lower Chesapeake Bay and coastal areas of the Atlantic Ocean resulted in contour maps of sea-surface temperature and salinity with a spatial resolution of 0.5 km.

  6. Sea surface retracking and classification of CryoSat-2 altimetry observations in the Arctic Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stenseng, L.; Piccioni, G.; Andersen, O. B.; Knudsen, P.

    2015-12-01

    In this study we present the retracking and classification methods for CryoSat-2 SAR waveforms, developed for the determination of sea surface heights in the Arctic Ocean. The obtained sea surface heights (SSH) are used to decrease the gap in satellite observations from 82 degrees North to 88 degrees North in the DTU15 mean sea surface (MSS) and mean dynamic topography (MDT).Radar altimetry satellites has observed the sea surface for more than 25 years and thereby obtain data to determine accurate MSSs and estimate sea level trends related to climate changes. In combination with the improvements of global geoids it has furthermore provided an opportunity to improve the MDT related to ocean currents.After the launch of CryoSat-2 in 2010 the coverage was increased dramatically while the introduction of the synthetic aperture radar (SAR) and SAR interferometry (SARin) mode increased the amount of useful echoes in the Arctic Ocean. The new types of radar observation modes have been investigated and methods to retrack and classify the waveforms have been implemented in LARS the advanced retracking system (LARS). Finally the SSH observations obtained from CryoSat-2 with LARS is merged with previous satellite radar altimetry data to derive the DTU15 MSS.

  7. Simulated wind power off-shore using different parametrizations for the sea surface roughness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frank, Helmut P.; Larsen, Søren E.; Højstrup, Jørgen

    2000-04-01

    The equation for the dependence of the Charnock constant on wave age proposed by Johnson et al. (Journal of Physical Oceanography 1998; 28: 1702 - 1716) is extended to include conditions of very young waves or short fetches. The effect on the simulated average wind speed and average wind power density off a straight east coast in Denmark is investigated by numerical simulations. Calculations are also performed employing the classical Charnock relation and a constant roughness of the sea. The formulations with variable sea surface roughness are combined with the equation for a smooth water surface for low winds. The wind climate is calculated with the Karlsruhe Atmospheric Mesoscale Model (KAMM) in 84 classes of the geostrophic wind. The difference between the fetch-dependent and the fetch-independent formulation is very small. Even a constant sea surface roughness yields good results near the coast. The influence of stratification, i.e. temperature differences between sea and land, is much more important than the fetch dependence of the sea surface roughness.

  8. The impact of sea surface currents in wave power potential modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zodiatis, George; Galanis, George; Kallos, George; Nikolaidis, Andreas; Kalogeri, Christina; Liakatas, Aristotelis; Stylianou, Stavros

    2015-11-01

    The impact of sea surface currents to the estimation and modeling of wave energy potential over an area of increased economic interest, the Eastern Mediterranean Sea, is investigated in this work. High-resolution atmospheric, wave, and circulation models, the latter downscaled from the regional Mediterranean Forecasting System (MFS) of the Copernicus marine service (former MyOcean regional MFS system), are utilized towards this goal. The modeled data are analyzed by means of a variety of statistical tools measuring the potential changes not only in the main wave characteristics, but also in the general distribution of the wave energy and the wave parameters that mainly affect it, when using sea surface currents as a forcing to the wave models. The obtained results prove that the impact of the sea surface currents is quite significant in wave energy-related modeling, as well as temporally and spatially dependent. These facts are revealing the necessity of the utilization of the sea surface currents characteristics in renewable energy studies in conjunction with their meteo-ocean forecasting counterparts.

  9. EUMETSAT and OSI-SAF Sea Surface Temperature: Recent results and future developments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Carroll, Anne; Le Borgne, Pierre

    2014-05-01

    The European Organisation for the Exploitation of Meteorological Satellites (EUMETSAT) delivers operational weather and climate-related satellite data, images and products throughout all day and year. EUMETSAT also has commitments to operational oceanography and atmospheric composition monitoring. Activities over the next twenty years include the continuation of the Mandatory Programmes (MSG, EPS) and future (MTG, EPS-SG), which all include ocean observations of Sea Surface Temperature. The EUMETSAT Ocean and Sea-ice (OSI) Satellite Application Facility (SAF) is lead by Meteo-France with a consortium of institutes from EUMETSAT member states, and provides reliable and timely operational services related to meteorology, oceanography and the marine environment. The OSI-SAF delivers level-2 Sea Surface Temperature products in GHRSST format from a range of EUMETSAT data including Metop AVHRR, IASI; and SEVIRI. EUMETSAT is participating in Copernicus Sentinel-3 in partnership with ESA, where EUMETSAT will operate the satellite and will serve the marine user community. The operational Sea Surface Temperature product delivered by EUMETSAT for Sentinel-3 SLSTR will be in GHRSST L2P format. On-going work towards access to relevant data from third-parties with the preparation of agreements with ISRO, SOA and JAXA, will give EUMETSAT access to an enhanced ocean products catalogue. The presentation will give an overview of activities relating to Sea Surface Temperature at EUMETSAT and the OSI-SAF, and their support to GHRSST, focusing on recent results and future developments.

  10. Phytoplankton assemblages and lipid biomarkers indicate sea-surface warming and sea-ice decline in the Ross Sea during Marine Isotope sub-Stage 5e

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartman, Julian D.; Sangiorgi, Francesca; Peterse, Francien; Barcena, Maria A.; Albertazzi, Sonia; Asioli, Alessandra; Giglio, Federico; Langone, Leonardo; Tateo, Fabio; Trincardi, Fabio

    2016-04-01

    The Marine Isotope sub-Stage 5e (~ 125 - 119 kyrs BP), the last interglacial period before the present, is believed to have been globally warmer (~ 2°C) than today. Studying this time interval might therefore provide insights into near future climate state given the ongoing climate change and global temperature increase. Of particular interest are the expected changes in polar ice cover. One important aspect of the cryosphere is sea-ice, which influences albedo, deep and surface water currents, and phytoplankton production, and thus affects the global climate system. To investigate whether changes in sea-ice cover occurred in the Southern Ocean close to Antarctica during Marine Isotope sub-Stage 5e dinoflagellate and diatom assemblages have been analyzed in core AS05-10, drilled in the continental slope off the Drygalski basin (Ross Sea) at a water depth of 2377 m. The core was drilled within the frame of the PNRA 2009/A2.01 project, an Italian project with a multidisciplinary approach, and covers the interval from Present to Marine Isotope Stage (MIS) 7. The core stratigraphy is based on diatom bioevents and on the climate cyclicity provided by the variations of the diatom assemblages. For this study we focused on the interval from MIS7 to MIS5. A strong reduction of sea-ice-loving diatom taxa with respect to open water-loving diatom taxa is observed during MIS5. In general the production of phytoplankton increases at the base of MIS5 and then slowly decreases. Dinoflagellate cysts, particularly heterotrophic species, are abundant during MIS5e only. The sea surface temperature reconstruction based on the TEX86L, a proxy based on lipid biomarkers produced by Thaumarcheota, shows a 4°C temperature increase from MIS6 to MIS5e. A slightly smaller temperature increase is observed at the onset of MIS7, but this stage is barren of heterotrophic dinoflagellates. All proxies together seem to indicate that the retreat of the summer sea-ice in the Ross Sea during MIS5e was

  11. Wind-Driven Angular Dependence of Sea-Surface Reflectance Measured with an Airborne Doppler Lidar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tratt, David M.; Menzies, Robert T.; Cutten, Dean R.

    1998-01-01

    The effects of wind-stress on the optical properties of the ocean surface have been studied for several decades. In particular, the classic study by Cox and Munk (1954) linking sea-surface wind field to wave slope statistics provides a phenomenology by which the sea-surface wind velocity can be estimated from direct measurement of the wave-modulated surface reflectance. A limited number of studies along these lines have been conducted using airborne or spaceborne lidar systems. In these instances, truthing was provided by in situ ship reports or satellite microwave remote sensing instruments (e.g., ERS scatterometer, SSM/I). During the second deployment of the MACAWS Doppler wind lidar in the summer of 1996 measurements of sea-surface reflectance as a function of azimuth- and nadir-viewing angles were acquired off the California coast. MACAWS data products include directly measured winds, as well as calibrated backscatter/reflectance profiles, thus enabling comparison of the winds inferred from sea-surface reflectance measurements with those deriving from the Doppler-processed direct line-of-sight (LOS) estimates. Additional validation data was extracted from the ERS and SSM/I satellite microwave sensor archives maintained by the JPL Physical Oceanography Distributed Active Archive Center (PO- DAAC).

  12. Analyzing the Effects of Climate Change on Sea Surface Temperature in Monitoring Coral Reef Health in the Florida Keys Using Sea Surface Temperature Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Jason; Burbank, Renane; Billiot, Amanda; Schultz, Logan

    2011-01-01

    This presentation discusses use of 4 kilometer satellite-based sea surface temperature (SST) data to monitor and assess coral reef areas of the Florida Keys. There are growing concerns about the impacts of climate change on coral reef systems throughout the world. Satellite remote sensing technology is being used for monitoring coral reef areas with the goal of understanding the climatic and oceanic changes that can lead to coral bleaching events. Elevated SST is a well-documented cause of coral bleaching events. Some coral monitoring studies have used 50 km data from the Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) to study the relationships of sea surface temperature anomalies to bleaching events. In partnership with NOAA's Office of National Marine Sanctuaries and the University of South Florida's Institute for Marine Remote Sensing, this project utilized higher resolution SST data from the Terra's Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) and AVHRR. SST data for 2000-2010 was employed to compute sea surface temperature anomalies within the study area. The 4 km SST anomaly products enabled visualization of SST levels for known coral bleaching events from 2000-2010.

  13. Influence of ice thickness and surface properties on light transmission through Arctic sea ice.

    PubMed

    Katlein, Christian; Arndt, Stefanie; Nicolaus, Marcel; Perovich, Donald K; Jakuba, Michael V; Suman, Stefano; Elliott, Stephen; Whitcomb, Louis L; McFarland, Christopher J; Gerdes, Rüdiger; Boetius, Antje; German, Christopher R

    2015-09-01

    The observed changes in physical properties of sea ice such as decreased thickness and increased melt pond cover severely impact the energy budget of Arctic sea ice. Increased light transmission leads to increased deposition of solar energy in the upper ocean and thus plays a crucial role for amount and timing of sea-ice-melt and under-ice primary production. Recent developments in underwater technology provide new opportunities to study light transmission below the largely inaccessible underside of sea ice. We measured spectral under-ice radiance and irradiance using the new Nereid Under-Ice (NUI) underwater robotic vehicle, during a cruise of the R/V Polarstern to 83°N 6°W in the Arctic Ocean in July 2014. NUI is a next generation hybrid remotely operated vehicle (H-ROV) designed for both remotely piloted and autonomous surveys underneath land-fast and moving sea ice. Here we present results from one of the first comprehensive scientific dives of NUI employing its interdisciplinary sensor suite. We combine under-ice optical measurements with three dimensional under-ice topography (multibeam sonar) and aerial images of the surface conditions. We investigate the influence of spatially varying ice-thickness and surface properties on the spatial variability of light transmittance during summer. Our results show that surface properties such as melt ponds dominate the spatial distribution of the under-ice light field on small scales (<1000 m(2)), while sea ice-thickness is the most important predictor for light transmission on larger scales. In addition, we propose the use of an algorithm to obtain histograms of light transmission from distributions of sea ice thickness and surface albedo.

  14. Influence of ice thickness and surface properties on light transmission through Arctic sea ice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katlein, C.; Arndt, S.; Nicolaus, M.; Perovich, D. K.; Jakuba, M.; Suman, S.; Elliott, S.; Whitcomb, L. L.; McFarland, C.; Gerdes, R.; Boetius, A.

    2015-12-01

    The changes in physical properties of sea ice such as decreased thickness and increased melt pond cover observed over the last decades severely impact the energy budget of Arctic sea ice. Increased light transmission leads to increased deposition of solar energy in the upper ocean and thus plays a crucial role in the amount and timing of sea-ice-melt and under-ice primary production. Recent developments in underwater technology provide new opportunities to undertake challenging research at the largely inaccessible underside of sea ice. We measured spectral under-ice radiance and irradiance onboard the new Nereid Under-Ice (NUI) underwater robotic vehicle, during a cruise of the R/V Polarstern to 83°N 6°W in the Arctic Ocean in July 2014. NUI is a next generation hybrid remotely operated vehicle (H-ROV) designed for both remotely-piloted and autonomous surveys underneath land-fast and moving sea ice. Here we present results from one of the first comprehensive scientific dives of NUI employing its interdisciplinary sensor suite. We combine under-ice optical measurements with three-dimensional under-ice topography and aerial images of the surface conditions. We investigate the influence of spatially varying ice-thickness and surface properties during summer on the spatial variability of light transmittance. Results show that surface properties dominate the spatial distribution of the under-ice light field on small scales (<1000m²), while sea ice-thickness is the most important predictor for light transmission on larger scales. In addition, we suggest an algorithm to obtain histograms of light transmission from distributions of sea ice thickness and surface albedo.

  15. Annual variations in sea surface wind speed around Japan observed by ASCAT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takeyama, Y.; Shimada, S.; Ohsawa, T.; Kozai, K.; Kogaki, T.

    2015-12-01

    Sea surface wind speeds and these statistics can be applied for many marine industrial activities. For example, the averaged wind speed is crucial information for a site selection of an offshore wind farm. It has widely been recognized that a total amount of the offshore wind generation is strongly depended on the annual average wind speeds. A advanced scatterometer (ASCAT), which is a kind of scatterometer aboard METOP-A and B, has observed sea surface wind speeds at the height of 10 m above the sea surface approximately twice a day using active microwaves. The annual average wind speed can be calculated from the observed wind speed. For an actual use of the annual average wind speed, generalities and representativeness of the wind speed must be clarified. To investigate annual variations in sea surface wind speed around Japan (120°E to 165°E, 19°N to 49°N), the annual average wind speeds and these standard deviations are calculated from 5 years of ASCAT observations from 2010 through 2014. It is found that there are some sea areas where standard deviations are relatively higher than their surroundings. Annual average wind speed maps indicate that the high standard deviation is caused by strong winds from Eurasia in the winter of 2011 in part of North Pacific Ocean and Sea of Okhotsk. Additionally standard deviations for only winter are also higher than for summer in those sea areas. Therefore the strong wind speed in the winter of a particular year can easily affect to the annual average wind speed. Meanwhile off the coast of Niigata and Hokkaido, there are also higher standard deviation areas than their surroundings. Differences between monthly maximum wind speeds for the winter and minimum wind speeds for the summer in these areas are larger and the large differences seem to be a cause of the high standard deviations.

  16. Influence of ice thickness and surface properties on light transmission through Arctic sea ice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katlein, Christian; Arndt, Stefanie; Nicolaus, Marcel; Perovich, Donald K.; Jakuba, Michael V.; Suman, Stefano; Elliott, Stephen; Whitcomb, Louis L.; McFarland, Christopher J.; Gerdes, Rüdiger; Boetius, Antje; German, Christopher R.

    2015-09-01

    The observed changes in physical properties of sea ice such as decreased thickness and increased melt pond cover severely impact the energy budget of Arctic sea ice. Increased light transmission leads to increased deposition of solar energy in the upper ocean and thus plays a crucial role for amount and timing of sea-ice-melt and under-ice primary production. Recent developments in underwater technology provide new opportunities to study light transmission below the largely inaccessible underside of sea ice. We measured spectral under-ice radiance and irradiance using the new Nereid Under-Ice (NUI) underwater robotic vehicle, during a cruise of the R/V Polarstern to 83°N 6°W in the Arctic Ocean in July 2014. NUI is a next generation hybrid remotely operated vehicle (H-ROV) designed for both remotely piloted and autonomous surveys underneath land-fast and moving sea ice. Here we present results from one of the first comprehensive scientific dives of NUI employing its interdisciplinary sensor suite. We combine under-ice optical measurements with three dimensional under-ice topography (multibeam sonar) and aerial images of the surface conditions. We investigate the influence of spatially varying ice-thickness and surface properties on the spatial variability of light transmittance during summer. Our results show that surface properties such as melt ponds dominate the spatial distribution of the under-ice light field on small scales (<1000 m2), while sea ice-thickness is the most important predictor for light transmission on larger scales. In addition, we propose the use of an algorithm to obtain histograms of light transmission from distributions of sea ice thickness and surface albedo.

  17. Towards GPS Surface Reflection Remote Sensing of Sea Ice Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Komjathy, A.; Maslanik, J. A.; Zavorotny, V. U.; Axelrad, P.; Katzberg, S. J.

    2000-01-01

    This paper describes the research to extend the application of Global Positioning System (GPS) signal reflections, received by airborne instruments, to cryospheric remote sensing. The characteristics of the GPS signals and equipment afford the possibility of new measurements not possible with existing radar and passive microwave systems. In particular, the GPS receiving systems are small and light-weight, and as such are particularly well suited to be deployed on small aircraft or satellite platforms with minimal impact. Our preliminary models and experimental results indicate that reflected GPS signals have potential to provide information on the presence and condition of sea and fresh-water ice as well as the freeze/thaw state of frozen ground. In this paper we show results from aircraft experiments over the ice pack near Barrow, Alaska suggesting correlation between forward scattered GPS returns and RADARSAT backscattered signals.

  18. Temporal variability of remotely sensed suspended sediment and sea surface temperature patterns in Mobile Bay, Alabama

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rucker, J.B.; Stumpf, R.P.; Schroeder, W.W.

    1990-01-01

    Distribution patterns of suspended sediments and sea surface temperatures in, Mobile Bay were derived from algorithms using digital data from the visible, near infrared, and infrared channels of the Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) on the NOAA-TIROS-N satellite. Closely spaced AVHRR scenes for January 20, 24, and 29, 1982, were compared with available environmental information taken during the same period. A complex interaction between river discharge, winds, and astronomical tides controlled the distribution patterns of suspended sediments. These same variables, coupled with air temperatures, also governed the distribution patterns of sea surface temperatures. ?? 1990 Estuarine Research Federation.

  19. Production of global sea surface temperature fields for the Jet Propulsion Laboratory workshop comparisons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hilland, J. E.; Njoku, E. G.; Chelton, D. B.

    1985-01-01

    Sea surface temperature (SST) is measured from space by the advanced very high resolution radiometer (AVHRR), scanning multichannel microwave radiometer (SMMR), high resolution infrared sounder (HIRS) and VISSR atmospheric sounder (VAS). Typical accuracies have been reported from 0.5 C regionally to 2.0 C on a global basis. To evaluate the accuracy of the satellite-derived sea surface temperatures, a series of three workshops was organized to provide uniform data reduction and analysis. The analytical techniques used to intercompare satellite and in situ measurements are described in detail. Selected results showed the overall average rms errors were in the range 0.5-1.0 C.

  20. A statistical method to sense sea surface temperature from the Nimbus-7 scanning multichannel microwave radiometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prabhakara, C.; Wang, I.

    1983-01-01

    Among the five channels in the Scanning Multichannel Microwave Radiometer (SMMR), the brightness temperature measured at 6.6 GHz vertical polarization is least affected by the atmospheric water vapor and liquid water in clouds or rain. Furthermore, as the undisturbed sea surface emissivity at 6.6 GHz is nearly constant over the temperature range 275 to 300 K, this channel has the best sensitivity to sea surface temperature (SST). The 6.6 GHz channel on SMMR is specifically chosen for these reasons to measure SST.

  1. Freely decaying weak turbulence for sea surface gravity waves.

    PubMed

    Onorato, M; Osborne, A R; Serio, M; Resio, D; Pushkarev, A; Zakharov, V E; Brandini, C

    2002-09-30

    We study the long-time evolution of deep-water ocean surface waves in order to better understand the behavior of the nonlinear interaction processes that need to be accurately predicted in numerical models of wind-generated ocean surface waves. Of particular interest are those nonlinear interactions which are predicted by weak turbulence theory to result in a wave energy spectrum of the form of [k](-2.5). We numerically implement the primitive Euler equations for surface waves and demonstrate agreement between weak turbulence theory and the numerical results.

  2. Quantitative estimation of Holocene surface salinity variation in the Black Sea using dinoflagellate cyst process length

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mertens, Kenneth Neil; Bradley, Lee R.; Takano, Yoshihito; Mudie, Petra J.; Marret, Fabienne; Aksu, Ali E.; Hiscott, Richard N.; Verleye, Thomas J.; Mousing, Erik A.; Smyrnova, Ludmila L.; Bagheri, Siamak; Mansor, Mashhor; Pospelova, Vera; Matsuoka, Kazumi

    2012-04-01

    Reconstruction of salinity in the Holocene Black Sea has been an ongoing debate over the past four decades. Here we calibrate summer surface water salinity in the Black Sea, Sea of Azov and Caspian Sea with the process length of the dinoflagellate cyst Lingulodinium machaerophorum. We then apply this calibration to make a regional reconstruction of paleosalinity in the Black Sea, calculated by averaging out process length variation observed at four core sites from the Black Sea with high sedimentation rates and dated by multiple mollusk shell ages. Results show a very gradual change of salinity from ˜14 ± 0.91 psu around 9.9 cal ka BP to a minimum ˜12.3 ± 0.91 psu around 8.5 cal ka BP, reaching current salinities of ˜17.1 ± 0.91 psu around 4.1 cal ka BP. The resolution of our sampling is about 250 years, and it fails to reveal a catastrophic salinization event at ˜9.14 cal ka BP advocated by other researchers. The dinoflagellate cyst salinity-proxy does not record large Holocene salinity fluctuations, and after early Holocene freshening, it shows correspondence to the regional sea-level curve of Brückner et al. (2010) derived from Balabanov (2007).

  3. Lidar in-space technology experiment measurements of sea surface directional reflectance and the link to surface wind speed.

    PubMed

    Menzies, R T; Tratt, D M; Hunt, W H

    1998-08-20

    The dependence of sea surface directional reflectance on surface wind stress suggests a method for deriving surface wind speed from space-based lidar measurements of sea surface backscatter. In particular, lidar measurements in the nadir angle range from 10 degrees to 30 degrees appear to be most sensitive to surface wind-speed variability in the regime below 10 m/s. The Lidar In-space Technology Experiment (LITE) shuttle lidar mission of September 1994 provided a unique opportunity to measure directional backscatter at selected locations by use of the landmark track maneuver and to measure fixed-angle backscatter from the ocean surfaces on a global scale. During the landmark track maneuver the shuttle orbiter orientation and roll axis are adjusted continuously to maintain the lidar footprint at a fixed location for a duration of ~1 min. Several data sets were converted to calibrated reflectance units and compared with a surface reflectance model to deduce surface wind speeds. Comparisons were made with ERS-1 scatterometer data and surface measurements.

  4. The Last Interglacial Labrador Sea: A Pervasive Millennial Oscillation In Surface Water Conditions Without Labrador Sea Water Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hillaire-Marcel, C.; de Vernal, A.

    A multi-proxy approach was developed to document secular to millenial changes of potential density in surface, mesopelagic, and bottom waters of the Labrador Sea, thus allowing to reconstruct situations when winter convection with intermediate or deep water formation occurred in the basin. This approach relies on dinocyst-transfer functions providing estimates of sea-surface temperature and salinity that are used to calibrate past-relationships between oxygen 18 contents in calcite and potential density gradients. The oxygen isotope compositions of epipelagic (Globigerina bul- loides), deeper-dwelling (Neogloboquadrina pachyderma, left coiling), and benthic (Uvigerina peregrina and Cibicides wuellerstorfi) foraminifera, then allow to extrap- olate density gradients between the corresponding water layers. This approach has been tested in surface sediments in reference to modern hydrographic conditions at several sites from the NW North Atlantic, then used to reconstruct past conditions from high resolution studies of cores raised from the southern Greenland Rise (off Cape Farewell). Results indicate that the modern-like regime established during the early Holocene and full developed after 7 ka only. It is marked by weak density gradi- ents between the surface and intermediate water masses, allowing winter convection down to a lower pycnocline between intermediate and deep-water masses, thus the formation of intermediate Labrador Sea Water (LSW). Contrasting with the middle to late Holocene situation, since the last interglacial and throughout the last climatic cycle, a single and dense water mass seems to have occupied the water column below a generally low-density surface water layer, thus preventing deep convection. There- fore, the production of LSW seems to be feature specific to the present interglacial interval that could soon cease to exist, due to global warming, as suggested by recent ocean model experiments and by the fact that it never occurred during the

  5. Doppler Spectra of Bistatic Reverberation from the Sea Surface.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1979-05-08

    Doppler spectrum of surface scattered acoustic waves was performed by Liebermann [1-2]. Acoustic waves in air were scattered from capillary waves generated...scattered angle. Liebermann concluded that out of a broad spectrum of surface wave frequen- cies the wavelength most effective in scattering the acoustic... Liebermann , the theoretical prediction of a 1030 Hz Doppler shift was not in good agreement with the measured. It was suggested that nonlinear sur- face

  6. Culturing-based Temperature Calibration of a Genetically Distinct, Alkenone-producing Haptophyte Species isolated from Lake George, ND

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Y.; Andersen, R. A.; Huang, Y.; Amaral-Zettler, L. A.

    2014-12-01

    Lacustrine alkenones are rapidly becoming an important tool for continental paleoclimate reconstructions. However, DNA sequencing of 18S ribosomal RNA marker genes has uncovered multiple species of haptophytes in different lakes. To date, there are only two isolated lacustrine species Chrysotila lamellosa and Isochrysis galbana available for culture studies. In our study, we report the isolation of a new haptophyte species from Lake George (LG) that, based on analyses of partial large subunit rRNA gene sequences, is genetically distinct from both Chrysotila lamellosa and Isochrysis galbana. We examined alkenone unsaturation index UK37 values for the LG species at 4°C, 10°C, 15°C, 20°C and 25°C as a function of temperature in a culture experiment. The temperature sensitivity of the new species was significantly higher than previously cultured Isochrysis galbana and Chrysotila lamellosa strains, with a slope that was 25 to 100 % higher. We found that the best linear relationship was obtained when two double-bond alkenones were excluded from the calibration (we developed an index termed UK''37 = [C37:4] / [C37:3+C37:4]). In particular, UK''37 is more linear to the growth temperature than UK37 at low (4-10°C) and high (20-25°C) temperature ranges. Our experiments show that both UK37 and UK''37 of this new alkenone-produced species is strongly controlled by culture temperature and can be used for paleoclimate reconstruction. However, we recommend the use of UK''37 index to reconstruct temperature if the haptophyte's growing environment falls within temperature extremes (4-10°C and 20-25°C). This newly cultivated species broadens our ability of applying lacustrine haptophyte calibrations to continental paleothermometry.

  7. Enrichment of Fusobacteria in Sea Surface Oil Slicks from the Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill.

    PubMed

    Gutierrez, Tony; Berry, David; Teske, Andreas; Aitken, Michael D

    2016-07-27

    The Deepwater Horizon (DWH) oil spill led to rapid microbial community shifts in the Gulf of Mexico, including the formation of unprecedented quantities of marine oil snow (MOS) and of a massive subsurface oil plume. The major taxa that bloomed in sea surface oil slicks during the spill included Cycloclasticus, and to a lesser extent Halomonas, Alteromonas, and Pseudoalteromonas-organisms that grow and degrade oil hydrocarbons aerobically. Here, we show that sea surface oil slicks at DWH contained obligate and facultative anaerobic taxa, including members of the obligate anaerobic phylum Fusobacteria that are commonly found in marine sediment environments. Pyrosequencing analysis revealed that Fusobacteria were strongly selected for when sea surface oil slicks were allowed to develop anaerobically. These organisms have been found in oil-contaminated sediments in the Gulf of Mexico, in deep marine oil reservoirs, and other oil-contaminated sites, suggesting they have putative hydrocarbon-degrading qualities. The occurrence and strong selection for Fusobacteria in a lab-based incubation of a sea surface oil slick sample collected during the spill suggests that these organisms may have become enriched in anaerobic zones of suspended particulates, such as MOS. Whilst the formation and rapid sinking of MOS is recognised as an important mechanism by which a proportion of the Macondo oil had been transported to the sea floor, its role in potentially transporting microorganisms, including oil-degraders, from the upper reaches of the water column to the seafloor should be considered. The presence of Fusobacteria on the sea surface-a highly oxygenated environment-is intriguing, and may be explained by the vertical upsurge of oil that provided a carrier to transport these organisms from anaerobic/micro-aerophilic zones in the oil plume or seabed to the upper reaches of the water column. We also propose that the formation of rapidly-sinking MOS may have re-transported these

  8. Improving the Arctic Mean Sea Surface with CryoSat-2 Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stenseng, L.; Andersen, O. B.

    2013-12-01

    A fundamental basis for estimating short and long-term changes in the sea surface is a reliable mean sea surface (MSS). Existing MSS models, derived from satellite radar altimetry, generally lack observations above 82 degrees latitude making high Arctic sea surface change estimates unreliable. Most current MSS models use ICESat data, geoid models, ocean circulation models, or a combination of these to extrapolate the MSS above 82 degrees latitude. This approach makes the MSS models unsuited for deriving sea surface anomalies from short-term observations like airborne campaigns (e.g. operation IceBridge). The new state of the art DTU13MSS is a global high-resolution MSS that includes retracked CryoSat-2 data and thereby extends the polar data coverage up to 88 degrees latitude. Furthermore, in the sea-ice covered areas, the SAR and SARin feature of the altimeter on-board CryoSat-2 increases the amount of useable observations dramatically compared to conventional altimeters like ENVISAT and ERS-1/2. Finally the continuous time-series, below 82 degrees latitude, has been extended to cover more than 20 years compared to the 17 years use for the DTU10MSS model. A comparison between DTU13MSS and DTU10MSS show an improvement of more than 20 cm between 82 and 88 degrees latitude. For the first time the three years of retracked CryoSat-2 data will, in combination with DTU13MSS, allow reliable estimation of the trend and annual variations in the high Arctic Ocean sea surface height.

  9. Aquarius and Remote Sensing of Sea Surface Salinity from Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    LeVine, David M.; Lagerloef, G. S. E.; Torrusio, S.

    2012-01-01

    Aquarius is an L-band radiometer and scatterometer instrument combination designed to map the salinity field at the surface of the ocean from space. The instrument is designed to provide global salinity maps on a monthly basis with a spatial resolution of 150 km and an accuracy of 0.2 psu. The science objective is to monitor the seasonal and interannual variation of the large scale features of the surface salinity field in the open ocean. This data will promote understanding of ocean circulation and its role in the global water cycle and climate.

  10. A study of oceanic surface heat fluxes in the Greenland, Norwegian, and Barents Seas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hakkinen, Sirpa; Cavalieri, Donald J.

    1989-01-01

    This study examines oceanic surface heat fluxes in the Norwegian, Greenland, and Barents seas using the gridded Navy Fleet Numerical Oceanography Central surface analysis and the First GARP Global Experiment (FGGE) IIc cloudiness data bases. Monthly and annual means of net and turbulent heat fluxes are computed for the FGGE year 1979. The FGGE IIb data base consisting of individual observations provides particularly good data coverage in this region for a comparison with the gridded Navy winds and air temperatures. The standard errors of estimate between the Navy and FGGE IIb winds and air temperatures are 3.6 m/s and 2.5 C, respectively. The computations for the latent and sensible heat fluxes are based on bulk formulas with the same constant heat exchange coefficient of 0.0015. The results show extremely strong wintertime heat fluxes in the northern Greenland Sea and especially in the Barents Sea in contrast to previous studies.

  11. Quantifying surface water runoff from Wadi Arogut towards the Dead Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geyer, Stefan; Khayat, Saed; Marei, Amer

    2015-04-01

    The surrounded area of the Dead Sea, especially the west side suffers from many hydrological problems. While the Dead Sea level drop considered a major problem that affect the quality of the surrounded freshwater resources, a lot of the surface water flood from the adjacent Wadi are lost through direct run off without any exploitation. Therefore, it is necessary to maintain a type of balance between surface water exploitation through the Wadi and at the same time allow a sufficient amount of flow to the Dead Sea to ensure its sustainability. In this study, we choose one of the larger tributaries in the western side of the Dead Sea basin. The stream was modelled for runoff response to different rainfall amount and climate conditions (dry, normal, and wet seasons) which were chosen from the rainy seasons in the previous 30 years. Finally, the amount of surface water contribution from each of the three seasons of the Dead Sea was quantified. The outcome of the model shows the results from the normal rainy season, which is frequently reoccurs and common in the region. The model data show that such events normally contribute with about 18-22 MCM annually to the Dead Sea. The problem is with the recurrence of dry season such as 2005/2006, by which the amount of the surface water decrease and consequently has adverse effect on the Dead Sea. However, the presence of less frequent thunder storm season such as that one in 1991/1992 has also a positive effect on the Dead Sea level. In the rainy season 1991/1992 there was a higher amount of rainfall over the study area that reaches around 155 MCM. Despite the presence of this high amount most of the recharge lost to the ground as groundwater recharge. The high amount of rain increases the amount of inundated surface water out of the Wadi banks and covers more surfaces all over the study area, which in role promote more water loss to the ground. That is why the total loss (rather than surface runoff) was much higher (77

  12. The Effect of Sea-Surface Sun Glitter on Microwave Radiometer Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wentz, F. J.

    1981-01-01

    A relatively simple model for the microwave brightness temperature of sea surface Sun glitter is presented. The model is an accurate closeform approximation for the fourfold Sun glitter integral. The model computations indicate that Sun glitter contamination of on orbit radiometer measurements is appreciable over a large swath area. For winds near 20 m/s, Sun glitter affects the retrieval of environmental parameters for Sun angles as large as 20 to 25 deg. The model predicted biases in retrieved wind speed and sea surface temperature due to neglecting Sun glitter are consistent with those experimentally observed in SEASAT SMMR retrievals. A least squares retrieval algorithm that uses a combined sea and Sun model function shows the potential of retrieving accurate environmental parameters in the presence of Sun glitter so long as the Sun angles and wind speed are above 5 deg and 2 m/s, respectively.

  13. Application of Land Surface Data Assimilation to Simulations of Sea Breeze Circulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mackaro, Scott; Lapenta, William M.; Blackwell, Keith; Suggs, Ron; McNider, Richard T.; Jedlovec, Gary; Kimball, Sytske

    2003-01-01

    A technique has been developed for assimilating GOES-derived skin temperature tendencies and insolation into the surface energy budget equation of a mesoscale model so that the simulated rate of temperature change closely agrees with the satellite observations. A critical assumption of the technique is that the availability of moisture (either from the soil or vegetation) is the least known term in the model's surface energy budget. Therefore, the simulated latent heat flux, which is a function of surface moisture availability, is adjusted based upon differences between the modeled and satellite- observed skin temperature tendencies. An advantage of this technique is that satellite temperature tendencies are assimilated in an energetically consistent manner that avoids energy imbalances and surface stability problems that arise from direct assimilation of surface shelter temperatures. The fact that the rate of change of the satellite skin temperature is used rather than the absolute temperature means that sensor calibration is not as critical. The sea/land breeze is a well-documented mesoscale circulation that affects many coastal areas of the world including the northern Gulf Coast of the United States. The focus of this paper is to examine how the satellite assimilation technique impacts the simulation of a sea breeze circulation observed along the Mississippi/Alabama coast in the spring of 2001. The technique is implemented within the PSUNCAR MM5 V3-5 and applied at spatial resolutions of 12- and 4-km. It is recognized that even 4-km grid spacing is too coarse to explicitly resolve the detailed, mesoscale structure of sea breezes. Nevertheless, the model can forecast certain characteristics of the observed sea breeze including a thermally direct circulation that results from differential low-level heating across the land-sea interface. Our intent is to determine the sensitivity of the circulation to the differential land surface forcing produced via the

  14. Land Surface Data Assimilation and the Northern Gulf Coast Land/Sea Breeze

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lapenta, William M.; Blackwell, Keith; Suggs, Ron; McNider, Richard T.; Jedlovec, Gary; Kimball, Sytske; Arnold, James E. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    A technique has been developed for assimilating GOES-derived skin temperature tendencies and insolation into the surface energy budget equation of a mesoscale model so that the simulated rate of temperature change closely agrees with the satellite observations. A critical assumption of the technique is that the availability of moisture (either from the soil or vegetation) is the least known term in the model's surface energy budget. Therefore, the simulated latent heat flux, which is a function of surface moisture availability, is adjusted based upon differences between the modeled and satellite observed skin temperature tendencies. An advantage of this technique is that satellite temperature tendencies are assimilated in an energetically consistent manner that avoids energy imbalances and surface stability problems that arise from direct assimilation of surface shelter temperatures. The fact that the rate of change of the satellite skin temperature is used rather than the absolute temperature means that sensor calibration is not as critical. The sea/land breeze is a well-documented mesoscale circulation that affects many coastal areas of the world including the northern Gulf Coast of the United States. The focus of this paper is to examine how the satellite assimilation technique impacts the simulation of a sea breeze circulation observed along the Mississippi/Alabama coast in the spring of 2001. The technique is implemented within the PSU/NCAR MM5 V3-4 and applied on a 4-km domain for this particular application. It is recognized that a 4-km grid spacing is too coarse to explicitly resolve the detailed, mesoscale structure of sea breezes. Nevertheless, the model can forecast certain characteristics of the observed sea breeze including a thermally direct circulation that results from differential low-level heating across the land-sea interface. Our intent is to determine the sensitivity of the circulation to the differential land surface forcing produced via the

  15. Enrichment of Fusobacteria in Sea Surface Oil Slicks from the Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill

    PubMed Central

    Gutierrez, Tony; Berry, David; Teske, Andreas; Aitken, Michael D.

    2016-01-01

    The Deepwater Horizon (DWH) oil spill led to rapid microbial community shifts in the Gulf of Mexico, including the formation of unprecedented quantities of marine oil snow (MOS) and of a massive subsurface oil plume. The major taxa that bloomed in sea surface oil slicks during the spill included Cycloclasticus, and to a lesser extent Halomonas, Alteromonas, and Pseudoalteromonas—organisms that grow and degrade oil hydrocarbons aerobically. Here, we show that sea surface oil slicks at DWH contained obligate and facultative anaerobic taxa, including members of the obligate anaerobic phylum Fusobacteria that are commonly found in marine sediment environments. Pyrosequencing analysis revealed that Fusobacteria were strongly selected for when sea surface oil slicks were allowed to develop anaerobically. These organisms have been found in oil-contaminated sediments in the Gulf of Mexico, in deep marine oil reservoirs, and other oil-contaminated sites, suggesting they have putative hydrocarbon-degrading qualities. The occurrence and strong selection for Fusobacteria in a lab-based incubation of a sea surface oil slick sample collected during the spill suggests that these organisms may have become enriched in anaerobic zones of suspended particulates, such as MOS. Whilst the formation and rapid sinking of MOS is recognised as an important mechanism by which a proportion of the Macondo oil had been transported to the sea floor, its role in potentially transporting microorganisms, including oil-degraders, from the upper reaches of the water column to the seafloor should be considered. The presence of Fusobacteria on the sea surface—a highly oxygenated environment—is intriguing, and may be explained by the vertical upsurge of oil that provided a carrier to transport these organisms from anaerobic/micro-aerophilic zones in the oil plume or seabed to the upper reaches of the water column. We also propose that the formation of rapidly-sinking MOS may have re

  16. Influence of ice thickness and surface properties on light transmission through Arctic sea ice

    PubMed Central

    Arndt, Stefanie; Nicolaus, Marcel; Perovich, Donald K.; Jakuba, Michael V.; Suman, Stefano; Elliott, Stephen; Whitcomb, Louis L.; McFarland, Christopher J.; Gerdes, Rüdiger; Boetius, Antje; German, Christopher R.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The observed changes in physical properties of sea ice such as decreased thickness and increased melt pond cover severely impact the energy budget of Arctic sea ice. Increased light transmission leads to increased deposition of solar energy in the upper ocean and thus plays a crucial role for amount and timing of sea‐ice‐melt and under‐ice primary production. Recent developments in underwater technology provide new opportunities to study light transmission below the largely inaccessible underside of sea ice. We measured spectral under‐ice radiance and irradiance using the new Nereid Under‐Ice (NUI) underwater robotic vehicle, during a cruise of the R/V Polarstern to 83°N 6°W in the Arctic Ocean in July 2014. NUI is a next generation hybrid remotely operated vehicle (H‐ROV) designed for both remotely piloted and autonomous surveys underneath land‐fast and moving sea ice. Here we present results from one of the first comprehensive scientific dives of NUI employing its interdisciplinary sensor suite. We combine under‐ice optical measurements with three dimensional under‐ice topography (multibeam sonar) and aerial images of the surface conditions. We investigate the influence of spatially varying ice‐thickness and surface properties on the spatial variability of light transmittance during summer. Our results show that surface properties such as melt ponds dominate the spatial distribution of the under‐ice light field on small scales (<1000 m2), while sea ice‐thickness is the most important predictor for light transmission on larger scales. In addition, we propose the use of an algorithm to obtain histograms of light transmission from distributions of sea ice thickness and surface albedo. PMID:27660738

  17. Holocene Temperature Reconstructions from Arctic Lakes based on Alkenone Paleothermometry and Non-Destructive Scanning Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Andrea, W. J.; Balascio, N. L.; Bradley, R. S.; Bakke, J.; Gjerde, M.; Kaufman, D. S.; Briner, J. P.; von Gunten, L.

    2014-12-01

    Generating continuous, accurate and quantitative Holocene temperature estimates from the Arctic is an ongoing challenge. In many Arctic regions, tree ring-based approaches cannot be used and lake sediments provide the most valuable repositories for extracting paleotemperature information. Advances in lacustrine alkenone paleothermometry now allow for quantitative reconstruction of lake-water temperature based on the UK37 values of sedimentary alkenones. In addition, a recent study demonstrated the efficacy of non-destructive scanning reflectance spectroscopy in the visible range (VIS-RS) for high-resolution quantitative temperature reconstruction from arctic lake sediments1. In this presentation, I will report a new UK37-based temperature reconstruction and a scanning VIS-RS record (using the RABD660;670 index as a measure of sedimentary chlorin content) from Kulusuk Lake in southeastern Greenland (65.6°N, 37.1°W). The UK37 record reveals a ~3°C increase in summer lake water temperatures between ~10ka and ~7ka followed by sustained warmth until ~4ka and a gradual (~3°C) cooling until ~400 yr BP. The strong correlation between UK37 and RABD660;670 measured in the same sediment core provides further evidence that in arctic lakes where temperature regulates primary productivity, and thereby sedimentary chlorin content, these proxies can be combined to develop high-resolution quantitative temperature records. The Holocene temperature history of Kulusuk Lake determined using this approach corresponds to changes in the size of the glaciers adjacent to the lake, as inferred from sediment minerogenic properties measured with scanning XRF. Glaciers retreated during early Holocene warming, likely disappeared during the period of mid-Holocene warmth, and advanced after 4ka. I will also discuss new UK37 and RABD660;670 reconstructions from northwestern Svalbard and the central Brooks Range of Alaska within the framework of published regional temperature reconstructions and

  18. What controls the sea surface salinity variability in the equatorial Pacific?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qu, T.

    2015-12-01

    Results from a model of the Consortium for Estimating the Circulation and Climate of the Ocean (ECCO) indicate that the long-term averaged surface freshwater flux is well balanced by ocean dynamics, in which subsurface processes account for a major part. Both surface freshwater flux and ocean dynamics are at work in generating the sea surface salinity variability in the equatorial Pacific. Particular attention is paid to the vertical entrainment of high salinity water from below. Water of subtropical origin resurfaces in the equatorial Pacific, directly contributing to the sea surface salinity variability there. Both the volume and barycenter of the resurfacing subtropical water show a strong ENSO signal. Their possible role in ENSO evolution is discussed.

  19. Characteristics of 13.9 GHz radar scattering from oil films on the sea surface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, J. W.; Croswell, W. F.

    1982-01-01

    Aircraft microwave scatterometer measurements are presented, which were made in 1979 as part of a project to study the response of a number of active and passive microwave and optical remote sensors to an oil-covered sea surface conducted by NASA Langley Research Center. A 13.9-GHz Doppler scatterometer with a fan beam antenna and coherent detection was used to measure radar backscatter as a function of incidence angle. The radar scattering signature of the clear surface and signatures of the surface covered with various crude oil films are compared. Reductions in Ku band microwave backscatter up to 14 dB are observed for both treated and untreated LaRosa and Murban crude oil films deposited on the sea surface. Maximum Ku band sensitivity to the effects of the oil in terms of differential scatter is observed in the 25-35 deg incidence angle region.

  20. Improving the Altimeter Derived Geostrophic Currents Using High Resolution Sea Surface Temperature Images: A Feasibility Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rio, M.-H.; Santoleri, R.; Giffa, A.; Piterbarg, L.

    2015-12-01

    Accurate knowledge of spatial and temporal ocean surface currents at high resolution is essential for a variety of applications. The altimeter observing system, by providing global and repetitive measurements of the Sea Surface Height, has been by far the most exploited system to estimate ocean surface currents in the past 20 years. However it does not allow observing currents departing from the geostrophic equilibrium, nor is capable to resolve the shortest spatial scales of the currents. In order to go beyond these limits, we investigate how the high spatial and temporal resolution information from Sea Surface Temperature (SST) images can improve the altimeter currents by adapting a method first proposed by [1]. It consists in inverting the SST evolution equation for the velocity by prescribing the source and sink terms and by using the altimeter currents as background. The method feasibility is tested using simulated data based on the Mercator-Ocean system.

  1. Impact of surface wind biases on the Antarctic sea ice concentration budget in climate models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lecomte, O.; Goosse, H.; Fichefet, T.; Holland, P. R.; Uotila, P.; Zunz, V.; Kimura, N.

    2016-09-01

    We derive the terms in the Antarctic sea ice concentration budget from the output of three models, and compare them to observations of the same terms. Those models include two climate models from the 5th Coupled Model Intercomparison Project (CMIP5) and one ocean-sea ice coupled model with prescribed atmospheric forcing. Sea ice drift and wind fields from those models, in average over April-October 1992-2005, all exhibit large differences with the available observational or reanalysis datasets. However, the discrepancies between the two distinct ice drift products or the two wind reanalyses used here are sometimes even greater than those differences. Two major findings stand out from the analysis. Firstly, large biases in sea ice drift speed and direction in exterior sectors of the sea ice covered region tend to be systematic and consistent with those in winds. This suggests that sea ice errors in these areas are most likely wind-driven, so as errors in the simulated ice motion vectors. The systematic nature of these biases is less prominent in interior sectors, nearer the coast, where sea ice is mechanically constrained and its motion in response to the wind forcing more depending on the model rheology. Second, the intimate relationship between winds, sea ice drift and the sea ice concentration budget gives insight on ways to categorize models with regard to errors in their ice dynamics. In exterior regions, models with seemingly too weak winds and slow ice drift consistently yield a lack of ice velocity divergence and hence a wrong wintertime sea ice growth rate. In interior sectors, too slow ice drift, presumably originating from issues in the physical representation of sea ice dynamics as much as from errors in surface winds, leads to wrong timing of the late winter ice retreat. Those results illustrate that the applied methodology provides a valuable tool for prioritizing model improvements based on the ice concentration budget-ice drift biases-wind biases

  2. Surface water mass composition changes captured by cores of Arctic land-fast sea ice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, I. J.; Eicken, H.; Mahoney, A. R.; Van Hale, R.; Gough, A. J.; Fukamachi, Y.; Jones, J.

    2016-04-01

    In the Arctic, land-fast sea ice growth can be influenced by fresher water from rivers and residual summer melt. This paper examines a method to reconstruct changes in water masses using oxygen isotope measurements of sea ice cores. To determine changes in sea water isotope composition over the course of the ice growth period, the output of a sea ice thermodynamic model (driven with reanalysis data, observations of snow depth, and freeze-up dates) is used along with sea ice oxygen isotope measurements and an isotopic fractionation model. Direct measurements of sea ice growth rates are used to validate the output of the sea ice growth model. It is shown that for sea ice formed during the 2011/2012 ice growth season at Barrow, Alaska, large changes in isotopic composition of the ocean waters were captured by the sea ice isotopic composition. Salinity anomalies in the ocean were also tracked by moored instruments. These data indicate episodic advection of meteoric water, having both lower salinity and lower oxygen isotopic composition, during the winter sea ice growth season. Such advection of meteoric water during winter is surprising, as no surface meltwater and no local river discharge should be occurring at this time of year in that area. How accurately changes in water masses as indicated by oxygen isotope composition can be reconstructed using oxygen isotope analysis of sea ice cores is addressed, along with methods/strategies that could be used to further optimize the results. The method described will be useful for winter detection of meteoric water presence in Arctic fast ice regions, which is important for climate studies in a rapidly changing Arctic. Land-fast sea ice effective fractionation coefficients were derived, with a range of +1.82‰ to +2.52‰. Those derived effective fractionation coefficients will be useful for future water mass component proportion calculations. In particular, the equations given can be used to inform choices made when

  3. Optimizing Surface Winds using QuikSCAT Measurements in the Mediterranean Sea During 2000-2006

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-02-28

    r.com/ locate / jmarsysOptimizing surface winds using QuikSCAT measurements in the Mediterranean Sea during 2000–2006 A. Birol Kara a,⁎, Alan J...flux algorithms. J. Geophys. Res. 113, C04009. doi:10.1029/2007JC004324. Large, W.G., Danabasoglu, G., Doney, S.C., McWilliams , J.C., 1997

  4. Experimental evaluation of theoretical sea surface reflectance factors relevant to above-water radiometry.

    PubMed

    Zibordi, Giuseppe

    2016-03-21

    Determination of the water-leaving radiance LW through above-water radiometry requires knowledge of accurate reflectance factors ρ of the sea surface. Publicly available ρ relevant to above-water radiometry include theoretical data sets generated: i. by assuming a sky radiance distribution accounting for aerosols and multiple scattering, but neglecting polarization, and quantifying sea surface effects through Cox-Munk wave slope statistics; or differently ii. accounting for polarization, but assuming an ideal Rayleigh sky radiance distribution, and quantifying sea surface effects through modeled wave elevation and slope variance spectra. The impact on above-water data products of differences between those factors ρ was quantified through comparison of LW from the Ocean Color component of the Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET-OC) with collocated LW from in-water radiometry. Results from the analysis of radiance measurements from the sea performed with 40 degrees viewing angle and 90 degrees azimuth offset with respect to the sun plane, indicated a slightly better agreement between above- and in-water LW determined for wind speeds tentatively lower than 4 m s-1 with ρ computed accounting for aerosols, multiple scattering and Cox-Munk surfaces. Nevertheless, analyses performed by partitioning the investigated data set also indicated that actual ρ values would exhibit dependence on sun zenith comprised between those characterizing the two sets of reflectance factors.

  5. Remotely-sensed sea surface temperatuares (SST) of Northeaster Pacific Coastal Zones

    EPA Science Inventory

    Sea surface temperature (SST) is an important indicator of long-term trends and geographical temperature patterns; however there have been relatively few long-term records of SST in near-coastal habitats. In situ SST measurements are irregular in both space and time. Therefore, w...

  6. The influence of local sea surface temperatures on Australian east coast cyclones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pepler, Acacia S.; Alexander, Lisa V.; Evans, Jason P.; Sherwood, Steven C.

    2016-11-01

    Cyclones are a major cause of rainfall and extreme weather in the midlatitudes and have a preference for genesis and explosive development in areas where a warm western boundary current borders a continental landmass. While there is a growing body of work on how extratropical cyclones are influenced by the Gulf Stream and Kuroshio Current in the Northern Hemisphere, there is little understanding of similar regions in the Southern Hemisphere including the Australian east coast, where cyclones that develop close to the coast are the main cause of severe weather and coastal flooding. This paper quantifies the impact of east Australian sea surface temperatures (SSTs) on local cyclone activity and behavior, using three different sets of sea surface temperature boundary conditions during the period 2007-2008 in an ensemble of Weather Research and Forecasting Model physics parameterizations. Coastal sea surface temperatures are demonstrated to have a significant impact on the overall frequency of cyclones in this region, with warmer SSTs acting as a trigger for the intensification of weak or moderate cyclones, particularly those of a subtropical nature. However, sea surface temperatures play only a minor role in the most intense cyclones, which are dominated by atmospheric conditions.

  7. Ecoregional analysis of nearshore sea-surface temperature in the North Pacific

    EPA Science Inventory

    Aim Sea surface temperature (SST) has been a parameter widely-identified to be useful to the investigation of marine species distribution, migration, and invasion, especially as SSTs are predicted to be affected by climate change. Here we use a remotely-sensed dataset to focus on...

  8. Statistical Analysis of Spatio-temporal Variations of Sea Surface Height Observed by Topex Altimeter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fabrikant, A.; Glazman, R. E.; Greysukh, A.

    1994-01-01

    Using non-gridded Topex altimeter data, high resolution 2-d power spectra and spatio-temporal autocorrelation functions of sea surface height (SSH) variations are estimated and employed for studying anisotropic SSH fields varying in a broad range of scales.

  9. On the relationship between water vapor over the oceans and sea surface temperature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stephens, Graeme L.

    1990-01-01

    Monthly mean precipitable water data obtained from passive microwave radiometry were correlated with the National Meteorological Center (NMC) blended sea surface temperature data. It is shown that the monthly mean water vapor content of the atmosphere above the oceans can generally be prescribed from the sea surface temperature with a standard deviation of 0.36 g/sq cm. The form of the relationship between precipitable water and sea surface temperature in the range T (sub s) greater than 18 C also resembles that predicted from simple arguments based on the Clausius-Clapeyron relationship. The annual cycle of the globally integrated mass of Scanning Multichannel Microwave Radiometer (SMMR) water vapor is shown to differ from analyses of other water vapor data in both phase and amplitude and these differences point to a significant influence of the continents on water vapor. Regional scale analyses of water vapor demonstrate that monthly averaged water vapor data, when contrasted with the bulk sea surface temperature relationship developed in this study, reflect various known characteristics of the time mean large-scale circulation over the oceans. A water vapor parameter is introduced to highlight the effects of large-scale motion on atmospheric water vapor. Based on the magnitude of this parameter, it is shown that the effects of large-scale flow on precipitable water vapor are regionally dependent, but for the most part, the influence of circulation is generally less than about + or - 20 percent of the seasonal mean.

  10. On the relationship between water vapor over the oceans and sea surface temperature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stephens, Graeme L.

    1989-01-01

    Monthly mean precipitable water data obtained from passive microwave radiometry were correlated with the National Meteorological Center (NMC) blended sea surface temperature data. It is shown that the monthly mean water vapor content of the atmosphere above the oceans can generally be prescribed from the sea surface temperature with a standard deviation of 0.36 g/sq cm. The form of the relationship between precipitable water and sea surface temperature in the range T(sub s) greater than 18 C also resembles that predicted from simple arguments based on the Clausius-Clapeyron relationship. The annual cycle of the globally integrated mass of Scanning Multichannel Microwave Radiometer (SMMR) water vapor is shown to differ from analyses of other water vapor data in both phase and amplitude and these differences point to a significant influence of the continents on water vapor. Regional scale analyses of water vapor demonstrate that monthly averaged water vapor data, when contrasted with the bulk sea surface temperature relationship developed in this study, reflect various known characteristics of the time mean large-scale circulation over the oceans. A water vapor parameter is introduced to highlight the effects of large-scale motion on atmospheric water vapor. Based on the magnitude of this parameter, it is shown that the effects of large-scale flow on precipitable water vapor are regionally dependent, but for the most part, the influence of circulation is generally less than about + or - 20 percent of the seasonal mean.

  11. Six Pseudoalteromonas Strains Isolated from Surface Waters of Kabeltonne, Offshore Helgoland, North Sea

    PubMed Central

    Wichels, Antje; Sullivan, Matthew B.

    2016-01-01

    Draft genomes are presented for 6 Pseudoalteromonas sp. strains isolated from surface waters at Kabeltonne, Helgoland, a long-term ecological research station in the North Sea. These strains contribute knowledge of the genomic underpinnings of a developing model system to study phage-host dynamics of a particle-associated ocean copiotroph. PMID:26868390

  12. Nile River discharge and Eastern Mediterranean Sea surface freshening during sapropel S1 formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Menke, Valerie; Weldeab, Syee; Schmiedl, Gerhard

    2016-04-01

    Cyclically reoccurring sapropels, layers of organic rich deposits, found in the Eastern Mediterranean sediment record during the Holocene to Pliocene are manifestations of extreme oceanographic events. However, the driving forces that lead to severely reduced deep- water ventilation and the collapse of benthic ecosystems have not been sufficiently identified. The cease in circulation has long been considered a response to major surface water freshening episodes caused by enhanced riverine input from the surrounding continents, with the main source being the Nile River, the Black Sea outflow or a combination thereof. Here we generate a dataset of trace element and stable isotope measurements that record runoff and sea surface temperature (SST) and focus on the most recent Eastern Mediterranean Sea (EMS) sapropel to determine the main freshwater sources driving sapropel formation. Based on the sequence of events, we rule out a role of Black Sea outflow in triggering and sustaining the EMS Holocene surface freshening. Our results indicate that the timing and duration of the extreme events reflect a combined effect of significantly enhanced Nile River runoff and EMS surface warming during winter. We suggest that the coincidence of these factors arose due to concomitant strengthening of the East African summer monsoon and most likely persistently negative mode of the North Atlantic Oscillation, a meteorological phenomenon that has a strong impact on Eastern Mediterranean winter hydroclimate.

  13. Determination and analysis of the CSRMSS14 mean sea surface model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, H. J.; Tapley, B. D.; Ries, J. C.; Urban, T. J.

    2015-12-01

    As a pivotal role of various applications for ocean sciences, the mean sea surface (MSS) has been developed by merging the sea surface heights (SSH) data sets from different missions for decades. Prior to combining various satellite data, a data adjustment process is applied to make those data sets more homogeneous and consistent. This process is required because there are significant differences in the characteristics and qualities of the measurement corrections, orbit accuracy and systematic biases between the multiple satellite data sets. We have developed a more effective and efficient data adjustment procedure that reduces the long-wavelength errors and systematic biases. A new method is used to obtain an improved SSH data set for selected satellite missions by integrating the SSH gradients with constraints imposed by the Jason-1 mean SSH profile. Using this approach, a total of 5 different satellite SSH data sets (2-year Geosat Exact repeat mission, 6-year ERS-2, 10-year Topex/Poseidon, 8-year Envisat and ERS-1 geodetic mission) were adjusted to the 7-year Jason-1 mean SSH profile. As a result, a new mean sea surface (MSS), named CSRMSS14, was determined from these adjusted satellite data sets. The accuracy of the new MSS was evaluated by comparing with the recent DTU10 global mean sea surface model, and a somewhat independent analysis was performed by comparing Jason-2 altimeter SSH data with DTU10 and CSRMSS14. This presentation describes the approach and the results of the model intercomparisons.

  14. Radial orbit error reduction and sea surface topography determination using satellite altimetry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Engelis, Theodossios

    1987-01-01

    A method is presented in satellite altimetry that attempts to simultaneously determine the geoid and sea surface topography with minimum wavelengths of about 500 km and to reduce the radial orbit error caused by geopotential errors. The modeling of the radial orbit error is made using the linearized Lagrangian perturbation theory. Secular and second order effects are also included. After a rather extensive validation of the linearized equations, alternative expressions of the radial orbit error are derived. Numerical estimates for the radial orbit error and geoid undulation error are computed using the differences of two geopotential models as potential coefficient errors, for a SEASAT orbit. To provide statistical estimates of the radial distances and the geoid, a covariance propagation is made based on the full geopotential covariance. Accuracy estimates for the SEASAT orbits are given which agree quite well with already published results. Observation equations are develped using sea surface heights and crossover discrepancies as observables. A minimum variance solution with prior information provides estimates of parameters representing the sea surface topography and corrections to the gravity field that is used for the orbit generation. The simulation results show that the method can be used to effectively reduce the radial orbit error and recover the sea surface topography.

  15. Aquarius: An Instrument to Monitor Sea Surface Salinity from Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    LeVine, D. M.; Lagerloef, G. S .E.; Colomb, R.; Yueh, S.; Pellerano, F.

    2007-01-01

    Aquarius is a combined passive/active L-band microwave instrument that is being developed to map the salinity field at the surface of the ocean from space. The data will support studies of the coupling between ocean circulation, global water cycle, and climate. Aquarius is part of the Aquarius/SAC-D mission, which is a partnership between the U.S. (National Aeronautics and Space Administration) and Argentina (CONAE). The primary science objective of this mission is to monitor the seasonal and interannual variation of the large-scale features of the surface salinity field in the open ocean with a spatial resolution of 150 km and a retrieval accuracy of 0.2 psu globally on a monthly basis.

  16. Impact of Diurnal Warming on Assimilation of Satellite Observations of Sea Surface Temperature

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-09-09

    insolation in the southeast, and conditions can be significantly cooler to the north in the Aegean Sea, a region exposed to cold continental wind...independent SST observations from drifting buoys. While all in situ surface-only observations are withheld from the assimilative model forecasts and...Other, similarly withheld surface in-situ observations such as those from fixed buoy locations or shipboard observations might be used, but the drifting

  17. Comparison of measured and predicted sea surface spectra of short waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shemdin, O. H.; Hwang, P. A.

    1988-01-01

    Reliable sea surface slope time series, using a laseroptical receiver system deployed on a wave follower, are analyzed to yield slope frequency spectra of the ocean surface up to 300 Hz. The results show significant differences when compared with the Pierson and Stacy (1973) model. An epirical model is proposed in this paper that is consistent with the observed slope spectra. The newly proposed model is compared with other more recently advanced shortwave spectral models.

  18. Microwave radiometer and scatterometer design for the aquarius sea surface Salinity Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, William J.; Yueh, Simon H.; Pellerano, Fernando

    2004-01-01

    The measurement of sea surface salinity with L-band microwave radiometers is a very challenging task. Since the L-band brightness temperature variations associated with salinity changes are small, it is necessary to have a very sensitive and stable radiometer. In addition, the corrections for the ocean surface roughness require real time scatterometer measurements. The designs of the Aquarius radiometer and scatterometer are described in this paper.

  19. Statistical geometry of a small surface patch in a developed sea

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glazman, Roman E.; Weichman, Peter B.

    1989-01-01

    The fractal and marginal fractal regimes in surface geometry are studied. The basic notions of fractal geometry are applied to a small surface patch in a developed sea, corresponding to the equilibrium wave number spectrum. Topothesy, outer and inner boundaries of the fractal range, and a cascade pattern in surface geometry are discussed. Theoretical predictions of whitecap and foam coverage are presented. A fractal decomposition for a surface patch is developed based on the Karhunen-Loeve expansion. The resulting series formalizes the cascade process of constructing realization of a Gaussian random patch. The implications of the research for microwave remote sensing signatures are considered.

  20. Lithological and geochemical typification of surface bottom sediments in the Kara Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rusakov, V. Yu.; Kuzhmina, T. G.; Levitan, M. A.; Toropchenova, E. S.; Zhylkina, A. V.

    2017-01-01

    The Kara Sea is part of the Western Arctic shelf of Eurasia. The deposition of sediments in this shallow sea is largely determined by solid runoff from two great Siberian rivers (the Yenisei and Ob) and the glacial periods when the sea area repeatedly (during the Quaternary) dried up and was covered by continental glaciers. The rise of the World Ocean due to Holocene warming resulted in a significant expansion of the sea area to the south and complete degradation of the ice sheet. In this article, new data on the geochemical composition of the surface (0- to 2-cm) layer of sea-bottom sediments are considered, which reflects the spatial distribution of marine sediments during the maximum sea level. Cluster analysis of the variance for 24 chemical elements reveals sediment chemotypes, and critical analysis of their relationship with lithotypes is performed. The presented data have been collected on cruises of the R/V Akademik Boris Petrov in 2000, 2001, and 2003 and the R/V Akademik Mstislav Keldysh in 2015.

  1. Transport of contaminants by Arctic sea ice and surface ocean currents

    SciTech Connect

    Pfirman, S.

    1995-12-31

    Sea ice and ocean currents transport contaminants in the Arctic from source areas on the shelves, to biologically active regions often more than a thousand kilometers away. Coastal regions along the Siberian margin are polluted by discharges of agricultural, industrial and military wastes in river runoff, from atmospheric deposition and ocean dumping. The Kara Sea is of particular concern because of deliberate dumping of radioactive waste, as well as the large input of polluted river water. Contaminants are incorporated in ice during suspension freezing on the shelves, and by atmospheric deposition during drift. Ice releases its contaminant load through brine drainage, surface runoff of snow and meltwater, and when the floe disintegrates. The marginal ice zone, a region of intense biological activity, may also be the site of major contaminant release. Potentially contaminated ice from the Kara Sea is likely to influence the marginal ice zones of the Barents and Greenland seas. From studies conducted to date it appears that sea ice from the Kara Sea does not typically enter the Beaufort Gyre, and thus is unlikely to affect the northern Canadian and Alaskan margins.

  2. The impact of variable sea ice roughness on changes in Arctic Ocean surface stress: A model study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, Torge; Tsamados, Michel; Schroeder, David; Feltham, Daniel L.

    2016-03-01

    The Arctic sea ice cover is thinning and retreating, causing changes in surface roughness that in turn modify the momentum flux from the atmosphere through the ice into the ocean. New model simulations comprising variable sea ice drag coefficients for both the air and water interface demonstrate that the heterogeneity in sea ice surface roughness significantly impacts the spatial distribution and trends of ocean surface stress during the last decades. Simulations with constant sea ice drag coefficients as used in most climate models show an increase in annual mean ocean surface stress (0.003 N/m2 per decade, 4.6%) due to the reduction of ice thickness leading to a weakening of the ice and accelerated ice drift. In contrast, with variable drag coefficients our simulations show annual mean ocean surface stress is declining at a rate of -0.002 N/m2 per decade (3.1%) over the period 1980-2013 because of a significant reduction in surface roughness associated with an increasingly thinner and younger sea ice cover. The effectiveness of sea ice in transferring momentum does not only depend on its resistive strength against the wind forcing but is also set by its top and bottom surface roughness varying with ice types and ice conditions. This reveals the need to account for sea ice surface roughness variations in climate simulations in order to correctly represent the implications of sea ice loss under global warming.

  3. Rising Mediterranean Sea Surface Temperatures Amplify Extreme Summer Precipitation in Central Europe

    PubMed Central

    Volosciuk, Claudia; Maraun, Douglas; Semenov, Vladimir A.; Tilinina, Natalia; Gulev, Sergey K.; Latif, Mojib

    2016-01-01

    The beginning of the 21st century was marked by a number of severe summer floods in Central Europe associated with extreme precipitation (e.g., Elbe 2002, Oder 2010 and Danube 2013). Extratropical storms, known as Vb-cyclones, cause summer extreme precipitation events over Central Europe and can thus lead to such floodings. Vb-cyclones develop over the Mediterranean Sea, which itself strongly warmed during recent decades. Here we investigate the influence of increased Mediterranean Sea surface temperature (SST) on extreme precipitation events in Central Europe. To this end, we carry out atmosphere model simulations forced by average Mediterranean SSTs during 1970–1999 and 2000–2012. Extreme precipitation events occurring on average every 20 summers in the warmer-SST-simulation (2000–2012) amplify along the Vb-cyclone track compared to those in the colder-SST-simulation (1970–1999), on average by 17% in Central Europe. The largest increase is located southeast of maximum precipitation for both simulated heavy events and historical Vb-events. The responsible physical mechanism is increased evaporation from and enhanced atmospheric moisture content over the Mediterranean Sea. The excess in precipitable water is transported from the Mediterranean Sea to Central Europe causing stronger precipitation extremes over that region. Our findings suggest that Mediterranean Sea surface warming amplifies Central European precipitation extremes. PMID:27573802

  4. Rising Mediterranean Sea Surface Temperatures Amplify Extreme Summer Precipitation in Central Europe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Volosciuk, Claudia; Maraun, Douglas; Semenov, Vladimir A.; Tilinina, Natalia; Gulev, Sergey K.; Latif, Mojib

    2016-08-01

    The beginning of the 21st century was marked by a number of severe summer floods in Central Europe associated with extreme precipitation (e.g., Elbe 2002, Oder 2010 and Danube 2013). Extratropical storms, known as Vb-cyclones, cause summer extreme precipitation events over Central Europe and can thus lead to such floodings. Vb-cyclones develop over the Mediterranean Sea, which itself strongly warmed during recent decades. Here we investigate the influence of increased Mediterranean Sea surface temperature (SST) on extreme precipitation events in Central Europe. To this end, we carry out atmosphere model simulations forced by average Mediterranean SSTs during 1970–1999 and 2000–2012. Extreme precipitation events occurring on average every 20 summers in the warmer-SST-simulation (2000–2012) amplify along the Vb-cyclone track compared to those in the colder-SST-simulation (1970–1999), on average by 17% in Central Europe. The largest increase is located southeast of maximum precipitation for both simulated heavy events and historical Vb-events. The responsible physical mechanism is increased evaporation from and enhanced atmospheric moisture content over the Mediterranean Sea. The excess in precipitable water is transported from the Mediterranean Sea to Central Europe causing stronger precipitation extremes over that region. Our findings suggest that Mediterranean Sea surface warming amplifies Central European precipitation extremes.

  5. Rising Mediterranean Sea Surface Temperatures Amplify Extreme Summer Precipitation in Central Europe.

    PubMed

    Volosciuk, Claudia; Maraun, Douglas; Semenov, Vladimir A; Tilinina, Natalia; Gulev, Sergey K; Latif, Mojib

    2016-08-30

    The beginning of the 21st century was marked by a number of severe summer floods in Central Europe associated with extreme precipitation (e.g., Elbe 2002, Oder 2010 and Danube 2013). Extratropical storms, known as Vb-cyclones, cause summer extreme precipitation events over Central Europe and can thus lead to such floodings. Vb-cyclones develop over the Mediterranean Sea, which itself strongly warmed during recent decades. Here we investigate the influence of increased Mediterranean Sea surface temperature (SST) on extreme precipitation events in Central Europe. To this end, we carry out atmosphere model simulations forced by average Mediterranean SSTs during 1970-1999 and 2000-2012. Extreme precipitation events occurring on average every 20 summers in the warmer-SST-simulation (2000-2012) amplify along the Vb-cyclone track compared to those in the colder-SST-simulation (1970-1999), on average by 17% in Central Europe. The largest increase is located southeast of maximum precipitation for both simulated heavy events and historical Vb-events. The responsible physical mechanism is increased evaporation from and enhanced atmospheric moisture content over the Mediterranean Sea. The excess in precipitable water is transported from the Mediterranean Sea to Central Europe causing stronger precipitation extremes over that region. Our findings suggest that Mediterranean Sea surface warming amplifies Central European precipitation extremes.

  6. Aliased tidal errors in TOPEX/POSEIDON sea surface height data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schlax, Michael G.; Chelton, Dudley B.

    1994-01-01

    Alias periods and wavelengths for the M(sub 2, S(sub 2), N(sub 2), K(sub 1), O(sub 1), and P(sub 1) tidal constituents are calculated for TOPEX/POSEIDON. Alias wavelenghts calculated in previous studies are shown to be in error, and a correct method is presented. With the exception of the K(sub 1) constituent, all of these tidal aliases for TOPEX/POSEIDON have periods shorter than 90 days and are likely to be confounded with long-period sea surface height signals associated with real ocean processes. In particular, the correspondence between the periods and wavelengths of the M(sub 2) alias and annual baroclinic Rossby waves that plagued Geosat sea surface height data is avoided. The potential for aliasing residual tidal errors in smoothed estimates of sea surface height is calculated for the six tidal constituents. The potential for aliasing the lunar tidal constituents M(sub 2), N(sub 2) and O(sub 1) fluctuates with latitude and is different for estimates made at the crossovers of ascending and descending ground tracks than for estimates at points midway between crossovers. The potential for aliasing the solar tidal constituents S(sub 2), K(sub 1) and P(sub 1) varies smoothly with latitude. S(sub 2) is strongly aliased for latitudes within 50 degress of the equator, while K(sub 1) and P(sub 1) are only weakly aliased in that range. A weighted least squares method for estimating and removing residual tidal errors from TOPEX/POSEIDON sea surface height data is presented. A clear understanding of the nature of aliased tidal error in TOPEX/POSEIDON data aids the unambiguous identification of real propagating sea surface height signals. Unequivocal evidence of annual period, westward propagating waves in the North Atlantic is presented.

  7. Changes in snow distribution and surface topography following a snowstorm on Antarctic sea ice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trujillo, Ernesto; Leonard, Katherine; Maksym, Ted; Lehning, Michael

    2016-11-01

    Snow distribution over sea ice is an important control on sea ice physical and biological processes. We combine measurements of the atmospheric boundary layer and blowing snow on an Antarctic sea ice floe with terrestrial laser scanning to characterize a typical storm and its influence on the spatial patterns of snow distribution at resolutions of 1-10 cm over an area of 100 m × 100 m. The pre-storm surface exhibits multidirectional elongated snow dunes formed behind aerodynamic obstacles. Newly deposited dunes are elongated parallel to the predominant wind direction during the storm. Snow erosion and deposition occur over 62% and 38% of the area, respectively. Snow deposition volume is more than twice that of erosion (351 m3 versus 158 m3), resulting in a modest increase of 2 ± 1 cm in mean snow depth, indicating a small net mass gain despite large mass relocation. Despite significant local snow depth changes due to deposition and erosion, the statistical distributions of elevation and the two-dimensional correlation functions remain similar to those of the pre-storm surface. Pre-storm and post-storm surfaces also exhibit spectral power law relationships with little change in spectral exponents. These observations suggest that for sea ice floes with mature snow cover features under conditions similar to those observed in this study, spatial statistics and scaling properties of snow surface morphology may be relatively invariant. Such an observation, if confirmed for other ice types and conditions, may be a useful tool for model parameterizations of the subgrid variability of sea ice surfaces.

  8. The Impact of Dielectric Constant Model and Surface Reference on Differences Between SMOS and Aquarius Sea Surface Salinity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dinnat, E. P.; Boutin, J.; Yin, X.; LeVine, D. M.

    2014-01-01

    Two ongoing space missions share the scientific objective of mapping the global Sea Surface Salinity (SSS), yet their observations show significant discrepancies. ESA's Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity (SMOS) and NASA's Aquarius use L-band (1.4 GHz) radiometers to measure emission from the sea surface and retrieve SSS. Significant differences in SSS retrieved by both sensors are observed, with SMOS SSS being generally lower than Aquarius SSS, except for very cold waters where SMOS SSS is the highest overall. Figure 1 is an example of the difference between the SSS retrieved by SMOS and Aquarius averaged over one month and 1 degree in longitude and latitude. Differences are mostly between -1 psu and +1 psu (psu, practical salinity unit), with a significant regional and latitudinal dependence. We investigate the impact of the vicarious calibration and retrieval algorithm used by both mission on these differences.

  9. Surface Elevation, Carbon Sequestration Potential and Rising sea Levels in Estuarine Wetlands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodríguez, J. F.; Howe, A.; Saco, P. M.

    2007-12-01

    Estuarine wetlands are among the most productive ecosystems on Earth, providing habitat for commercially important fish species and migratory shorebirds, serving as nurseries for many other marine organisms and supporting the productivity of adjacent coastal waters. Typically, these wetlands are driven by tidal hydrodynamics and are net sinks for sediment and soil carbon. Their distribution in the tidal frame depends on a delicate balance between topographic gradient, the rate of vertical soil development, and the rate of sea level change. The complex interactions between hydrodynamics, ecology and soil processes that govern this balance produce positive feedbacks and system self-organization. As complex systems, these wetlands demonstrate resilience under a wide range of conditions but they have been observed to collapse or move to another equilibrium state above certain thresholds. Research at a wetland in the Hunter estuary, southeast Australia has tracked changes in relative sea level and surface elevation in mangrove and saltmarsh wetlands over a five year period (2002- 2006) and soil carbon over a two year period (2005-2006). Mangrove surface elevation was strongly correlated with relative sea level (R2=0.715, p=0.004) but there was no correlation between relative sea level and saltmarsh surface elevation (R2=0.093, p=0.424). Soil carbon levels were high in both vegetation types (% loss on ignition of 16.2% and 18.8% for mangrove and saltmarsh soils, respectively) and not significantly different (ANOVA F=1.36, p=0.270). A 16% increase in soil carbon was recorded in each vegetation type over the period 2005-2006. Mean annual sea level rose by 55 mm and net annual precipitation (rainfall minus evaporation) fell by 189 mm over the same period. The ability of mangrove to respond rapidly to changes in relative sea level and the indicative positive trend between soil carbon and relative sea level suggest that this wetland type is both resilient to future sea level

  10. Sea, ice and surface water circulation, Alaskan Continental Shelf

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wright, F. F. (Principal Inves