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Sample records for alkoxyacetic acid metabolites

  1. Decrease of intracellular pH as possible mechanism of embryotoxicity of glycol ether alkoxyacetic acid metabolites

    SciTech Connect

    Louisse, Jochem; Verwei, Miriam; Sandt, Johannes J.M. van de; Rietjens, Ivonne M.C.M.

    2010-06-01

    Embryotoxicity of glycol ethers is caused by their alkoxyacetic acid metabolites, but the mechanism underlying the embryotoxicity of these acid metabolites is so far not known. The present study investigates a possible mechanism underlying the embryotoxicity of glycol ether alkoxyacetic acid metabolites using the methoxyacetic acid (MAA) metabolite of ethylene glycol monomethyl ether as the model compound. The results obtained demonstrate an MAA-induced decrease of the intracellular pH (pH{sub i}) of embryonic BALB/c-3T3 cells as well as of embryonic stem (ES)-D3 cells, at concentrations that affect ES-D3 cell differentiation. These results suggest a mechanism for MAA-mediated embryotoxicity similar to the mechanism of embryotoxicity of the drugs valproic acid and acetazolamide (ACZ), known to decrease the pH{sub i}in vivo, and therefore used as positive controls. The embryotoxic alkoxyacetic acid metabolites ethoxyacetic acid, butoxyacetic acid and phenoxyacetic acid also caused an intracellular acidification of BALB/c-3T3 cells at concentrations that are known to inhibit ES-D3 cell differentiation. Two other embryotoxic compounds, all-trans-retinoic acid and 5-fluorouracil, did not decrease the pH{sub i} of embryonic cells at concentrations that affect ES-D3 cell differentiation, pointing at a different mechanism of embryotoxicity of these compounds. MAA and ACZ induced a concentration-dependent inhibition of ES-D3 cell differentiation, which was enhanced by amiloride, an inhibitor of the Na{sup +}/H{sup +}-antiporter, corroborating an important role of the pH{sub i} in the embryotoxic mechanism of both compounds. Together, the results presented indicate that a decrease of the pH{sub i} may be the mechanism of embryotoxicity of the alkoxyacetic acid metabolites of the glycol ethers.

  2. Serum albumin complexation of acetylsalicylic acid metabolites.

    PubMed

    Jurkowski, Wiktor; Porebski, Grzegorz; Obtułowicz, Krystyna; Roterman, Irena

    2009-06-01

    One possible origin of the type I hypersensitivity reaction is reaction of drugs such as acetylsalicylic acid and its metabolites being complexed with human serum albumin. Albumin, being transporting molecule abundant in blood plasma is able to bind large array of ligands varying from small single carbon particles to long hydrophobic tailed lipidic acids (e.g. myristic acid). This non specificity is possible because of multi domain scaffold and large flexibility of inter-domain loops, which results in serious reorientation of domains. Hypothesis that acetylsalicylic acid metabolites may play indirect role in activation of allergic reaction has been tested. Binding of acetylsalicylic acid metabolites in intra-domain space causes significant increase of liability of domains IIIA and IIIB. One of metabolites, salicyluric acid, once is bound causes distortion and partial unfolding of helices in domains IA, IIB and IIIB. Changed are both directions and amplitude of relative motions as well as intra-domain distances. In result albumin is able to cross-link of adjacent IgE receptors which subsequently starts allergic reaction. PMID:19689242

  3. Efficient Syntheses of Vitamin K Chain-Shortened Acid Metabolites

    PubMed Central

    Teitelbaum, Aaron M.; Scian, Michele; Nelson, Wendel L.; Rettie, Allan E.

    2015-01-01

    Vitamin K sequentially undergoes ω-oxidation followed by successive rounds of β-oxidation to ultimately produce two chain-shortened carboxylic acid metabolites, vitamin K acid 1 and vitamin K acid 2. Two facile syntheses of these acid metabolites are described, each starting from commercially available menadione-cyclopentadiene adduct 3. Vitamin K acid 1 was synthesized in five steps via alkylation with a geranyl halide followed by subsequent oxidation reactions, while fully retaining the trans configuration of the side chain 2’,3’-double bond. Vitamin K acid 2 was synthesized in 5 steps from 3 via alkylation with dimethylallyl chloride and subsequent oxidation reactions. PMID:27003951

  4. ANALYSIS OF ARACHIDONIC ACID METABOLITE AND PLATELET ACTIVATING FACTOR PRODUCTION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Metabolites of arachidonic acid ("eicosanoids") and platelet activating factor are important bioactive lipids that may be involved in the pathobiological alterations in animals induced by pollutant exposure. nalysis of these substances in biological tissue and fluids is important...

  5. The role of nicotinic acid metabolites in flushing and hepatotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Stern, Ralph H

    2007-07-01

    Flushing and hepatotoxicity are important adverse effects of nicotinic acid. This article reviews the role of metabolism of nicotinic acid in the production of these side effects. The suggestion that nicotinic acid (NUA) formation produces flushing is traced to a correlation of flushing with NUA C(max) (maximal concentration) and the observation that aspirin inhibits NUA formation and flushing. The former does not establish causation and the latter can be explained by inhibition of prostaglandin formation. Recent characterization of the GPR109A receptor that mediates prostaglandin release by Langerhans cells to produce flushing has shown nicotinic acid, not NUA, is responsible. The suggestion that nicotinamide metabolites produce hepatotoxicity is not supported by any data. The mechanism of hepatotoxicity is unknown and a toxic metabolite of nicotinic acid has not been identified. Different nicotinic acid formulations produce different metabolite patterns due to nonlinear pharmacokinetics, but there is no evidence that these differences have any clinical importance. PMID:21291680

  6. 3-ketocholanoic acid is the major in vitro human hepatic microsomal metabolite of lithocholic acid.

    PubMed

    Deo, Anand K; Bandiera, Stelvio M

    2009-09-01

    3alpha-Hydroxy-5 beta-cholan-24-oic (lithocholic) acid is a relatively minor component of hepatic bile acids in humans but is highly cytotoxic. Hepatic microsomal oxidation offers a potential mechanism for effective detoxification and elimination of bile acids. The aim of the present study was to investigate the biotransformation of lithocholic acid by human hepatic microsomes and to assess the contribution of cytochrome P450 (P450) enzymes in human hepatic microsomes using human recombinant P450 enzymes and chemical inhibitors. Metabolites were identified, and metabolite formation was quantified using a liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry-based assay. Incubation of lithocholic acid with human liver microsomes resulted in the formation of five metabolites, which are listed in order of their rates of formation: 3-oxo-5 beta-cholan-24-oic (3-ketocholanoic) acid, 3 alpha,6 alpha-dihydroxy-5 beta-cholan-24-oic (hyodeoxycholic) acid, 3 alpha,7 beta-dihydroxy-5 beta-cholan-24-oic (ursodeoxycholic) acid, 3 alpha,6 beta-dihydroxy-5 beta-cholan-24-oic (murideoxycholic) acid, and 3 alpha-hydroxy-6-oxo-5 beta-cholan-24-oic (6-ketolithocholic) acid. 3-Ketocholanoic acid was the major metabolite, exhibiting apparent K(m) and V(max) values of 22 muM and 336 pmol/min/mg protein, respectively. Incubation of lithocholic acid with a of human recombinant P450 enzymes revealed that all five metabolites were formed by recombinant CYP3A4. Chemical inhibition studies with human liver microsomes and recombinant P450 enzymes confirmed that CYP3A4 was the predominant enzyme involved in hepatic microsomal biotransformation of lithocholic acid. In summary, the results indicate that oxidation of the third carbon of the cholestane ring is the preferred position of oxidation by P450 enzymes for lithocholic acid biotransformation in humans and suggest that formation of lithocholic acid metabolites leads to enhanced hepatic detoxification and elimination. PMID:19487251

  7. Metabolite

    MedlinePlus

    A metabolite is any substance produced during metabolism (digestion or other bodily chemical processes). The term metabolite may also refer to the product that remains after a drug is broken down (metabolized) by the body.

  8. Gut Microbial Fatty Acid Metabolites Reduce Triacylglycerol Levels in Hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Nanthirudjanar, Tharnath; Furumoto, Hidehiro; Zheng, Jiawen; Kim, Young-Il; Goto, Tsuyoshi; Takahashi, Nobuyuki; Kawada, Teruo; Park, Si-Bum; Hirata, Akiko; Kitamura, Nahoko; Kishino, Shigenobu; Ogawa, Jun; Hirata, Takashi; Sugawara, Tatsuya

    2015-11-01

    Hydroxy and oxo fatty acids were recently found to be produced as intermediates during gut microbial fatty acid metabolism. Lactobacillus plantarum produces these fatty acids from unsaturated fatty acids such as linoleic acid. In this study, we investigated the effects of these gut microbial fatty acid metabolites on the lipogenesis in liver cells. We screened their effect on sterol regulatory element binding protein-1c (SREBP-1c) expression in HepG2 cells treated with a synthetic liver X receptor α (LXRα) agonist (T0901317). The results showed that 10-hydroxy-12(Z)-octadecenoic acid (18:1) (HYA), 10-hydroxy-6(Z),12(Z)-octadecadienoic acid (18:2) (γHYA), 10-oxo-12(Z)-18:1 (KetoA), and 10-oxo-6(Z),12(Z)-18:2 (γKetoA) significantly decreased SREBP-1c mRNA expression induced by T0901317. These fatty acids also downregulated the mRNA expression of lipogenic genes by suppressing LXRα activity and inhibiting SREBP-1 maturation. Oral administration of KetoA, which effectively reduced triacylglycerol accumulation and acetyl-CoA carboxylase 2 (ACC2) expression in HepG2 cells, for 2 weeks significantly decreased Srebp-1c, Scd-1, and Acc2 expression in the liver of mice fed a high-sucrose diet. Our findings suggest that the hypolipidemic effect of the fatty acid metabolites produced by L. plantarum can be exploited in the treatment of cardiovascular diseases or dyslipidemia. PMID:26399511

  9. Ursolic acid (UA): A metabolite with promising therapeutic potential.

    PubMed

    Kashyap, Dharambir; Tuli, Hardeep Singh; Sharma, Anil K

    2016-02-01

    Plants are known to produce a variety of bioactive metabolites which are being used to cure various life threatening and chronic diseases. The molecular mechanism of action of such bioactive molecules, may open up new avenues for the scientific community to develop or improve novel therapeutic approaches to tackle dreadful diseases such as cancer and cardiovascular and neurodegenerative disorders. Ursolic acid (UA) is one among the categories of such plant-based therapeutic metabolites having multiple intracellular and extracellular targets that play role in apoptosis, metastasis, angiogenesis and inflammatory processes. Moreover, the synthetic derivatives of UA have also been seen to be involved in a range of pharmacological applications, which are associated with prevention of diseases. Evidences suggest that UA could be used as a potential candidate to develop a comprehensive competent strategy towards the treatment and prevention of health disorders. The review article herein describes the possible therapeutic effects of UA along with putative mechanism of action. PMID:26775565

  10. Response of Cultured Maize Cells to (+)-Abscisic Acid, (-)-Abscisic Acid, and Their Metabolites.

    PubMed Central

    Balsevich, J. J.; Cutler, A. J.; Lamb, N.; Friesen, L. J.; Kurz, E. U.; Perras, M. R.; Abrams, S. R.

    1994-01-01

    The metabolism and effects of (+)-S- and (-)-R-abscisic acid (ABA) and some metabolites were studied in maize (Zea mays L. cv Black Mexican Sweet) suspension-cultured cells. Time-course studies of metabolite formation were performed in both cells and medium via analytical high-performance liquid chromatography. Metabolites were isolated and identified using physical and chemical methods. At 10 [mu]M concentration and 28[deg] C, (+)-ABA was metabolized within 24 h, yielding natural (-)-phaseic acid [(-)-PA] as the major product. The unnatural enantiomer (-)-ABA was less than 50% metabolized within 24 h and gave primarily (-)-7[prime]-hydroxyABA [(-)-7[prime]-HOABA], together with (+)-PA and ABA glucose ester. The distribution of metabolites in cells and medium was different, reflecting different sites of metabolism and membrane permeabilities of conjugated and nonconjugated metabolites. The results imply that (+)-ABA was oxidized to (-)-PA inside the cell, whereas (-)-ABA was converted to (-)-7[prime]-HOABA at the cell surface. Growth of maize cells was inhibited by both (+)- and (-)-ABA, with only weak contributions from their metabolites. The concentration of (+)-ABA that caused a 50% inhibition of growth of maize cells was approximately 1 [mu]M, whereas that for its metabolite (-)-PA was approximately 50 [mu]M. (-)-ABA was less active than (+)-ABA, with 50% growth inhibition observed at about 10 [mu]M. (-)-7[prime]-HOABA was only weakly active, with 50% inhibition caused by approximately 500 [mu]M. Time-course studies of medium pH indicated that (+)-ABA caused a transient pH increase (+0.3 units) at 6 h after addition that was not observed in controls or in samples treated with (-)-PA. The effect of (-)-ABA on medium Ph was marginal. No racemization at C-1[prime] of (+)-ABA, (-)-ABA, or metabolites was observed during the studies. PMID:12232311

  11. Novel Omega-3 Fatty Acid Epoxygenase Metabolite Reduces Kidney Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Amit; Khan, Md. Abdul Hye; Levick, Scott P.; Lee, Kin Sing Stephen; Hammock, Bruce D.; Imig, John D.

    2016-01-01

    Cytochrome P450 (CYP) monooxygenases epoxidize the omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA) docosahexaenoic acid into novel epoxydocosapentaenoic acids (EDPs) that have multiple biological actions. The present study determined the ability of the most abundant EDP regioisomer, 19,20-EDP to reduce kidney injury in an experimental unilateral ureteral obstruction (UUO) renal fibrosis mouse model. Mice with UUO developed kidney tubular injury and interstitial fibrosis. UUO mice had elevated kidney hydroxyproline content and five-times greater collagen positive fibrotic area than sham control mice. 19,20-EDP treatment to UUO mice for 10 days reduced renal fibrosis with a 40%–50% reduction in collagen positive area and hydroxyproline content. There was a six-fold increase in kidney α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA) positive area in UUO mice compared to sham control mice, and 19,20-EDP treatment to UUO mice decreased α-SMA immunopositive area by 60%. UUO mice demonstrated renal epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) with reduced expression of the epithelial marker E-cadherin and elevated expression of multiple mesenchymal markers (FSP-1, α-SMA, and desmin). Interestingly, 19,20-EDP treatment reduced renal EMT in UUO by decreasing mesenchymal and increasing epithelial marker expression. Overall, we demonstrate that a novel omega-3 fatty acid metabolite 19,20-EDP, prevents UUO-induced renal fibrosis in mice by reducing renal EMT. PMID:27213332

  12. Targeted lipidomics strategies for oxygenated metabolites of polyunsaturated fatty acids

    PubMed Central

    Astarita, Giuseppe; Kendall, Alexandra C.; Dennis, Edward A.; Nicolaou, Anna

    2014-01-01

    Oxidation of polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) through enzymatic or non-enzymatic free radical-mediated reactions can yield an array of lipid metabolites including eicosanoids, octadecanoids, docosanoids and related species. In mammals, these oxygenated PUFA mediators play prominent roles in the physiological and pathological regulation of many key biological processes in the cardiovascular, renal, reproductive and other systems including their pivotal contribution to inflammation. Mass spectrometry-based technology platforms have revolutionized our ability to analyze the complex mixture of lipid mediators found in biological samples, with increased numbers of metabolites that can be simultaneously quantified from a single sample in few analytical steps. The recent development of high-sensitivity and high-throughput analytical tools for lipid mediators affords a broader view of these oxygenated PUFA species, and facilitates research into their role in health and disease. In this review, we illustrate current analytical approaches for a high-throughput lipidomic analysis of eicosanoids and related mediators in biological samples. PMID:25486530

  13. Aggression and personality: association with amino acids and monoamine metabolites.

    PubMed

    Møller, S E; Mortensen, E L; Breum, L; Alling, C; Larsen, O G; Bøge-Rasmussen, T; Jensen, C; Bennicke, K

    1996-03-01

    Associations in 52 normal individuals were examined between plasma and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) concentrations of tryptophan (Trp) and tyrosine, and concentrations of monoamine metabolites in the CSF, and scores on an aggression questionnaire, the Kinsey Institute Reaction List II, and the Eysenck Personality Questionnaire. There was a significantly positive correlation between CSF 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid (5-HIAA) levels and extroverted aggression scores, and a significantly negative correlation between CSF 5-HIAA levels and introverted aggression scores. Males showed higher plasma Trp concentrations than females, and significantly positive correlations between plasma Trp concentrations and scores on extroverted aggression and the Eysenck E scale. Males, furthermore, showed a significantly negative correlation between CSF Trp levels and scores on the Eysenck P scale, and a significantly positive correlation between concentrations of 3-methoxy-4-hydroxy-phenylglycol in CSF and scores on moral aggression. These results suggest that central serotonin influences aggression in normal individuals through effects on personality. PMID:8685288

  14. Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Identification of New Sulfonic Acid Metabolites of Chloroacetanilide Herbicides

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Morton, M.D.; Walters, F.H.; Aga, D.S.; Thurman, E.M.; Larive, C.K.

    1997-01-01

    The detection of the sulfonic acid metabolites of the chloroacetanilide herbicides acetochlor, alachlor, butachlor, propachlor, and, more recently, metolachlor in surface and ground water suggests that a common mechanism for dechlorination exists via the glutathione conjugation pathway. The identification of these herbicides and their metabolites is important due to growing public awareness and concern about pesticide levels in drinking water. Although these herbicides are regulated, little is known about the fate of their metabolites in soil. The sulfonic acid metabolites were synthesized by reaction of the parent compounds with an excess of sodium sulfite. Acetochlor, alachlor, butachlor, metolachlor, and propachlor and their sulfonic acid metabolites were studied by nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy and fast atom bombardment mass spectrometry. This paper provides a direct method for the preparation and characterization of these compounds that will be useful in the analysis and study of chloracetanilide herbicides and their metabolites.

  15. NMR identification of endogenous metabolites interacting with fatted and non-fatted human serum albumin in blood plasma: Fatty acids influence the HSA-metabolite interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jupin, Marc; Michiels, Paul J.; Girard, Frederic C.; Spraul, Manfred; Wijmenga, Sybren S.

    2013-03-01

    Metabolites and their concentrations are direct reporters on body biochemistry. Thanks to technical developments metabolic profiling of body fluids, such as blood plasma, by for instance NMR has in the past decade become increasingly accurate enabling successful clinical diagnostics. Human Serum Albumin (HSA) is the main plasma protein (˜60% of all plasma protein) and responsible for the transport of endogenous (e.g. fatty acids) and exogenous metabolites, which it achieves thanks to its multiple binding sites and its flexibility. HSA has been extensively studied with regard to its binding of drugs (exogenous metabolites), but only to a lesser extent with regard to its binding of endogenous (non-fatty acid) metabolites. To obtain correct NMR measured metabolic profiles of blood plasma and/or potentially extract information on HSA and fatty acids content, it is necessary to characterize these endogenous metabolite/plasma protein interactions. Here, we investigate these metabolite-HSA interactions in blood plasma and blood plasma mimics. The latter contain the roughly twenty metabolites routinely detected by NMR (also most abundant) in normal relative concentrations with fatted or non-fatted HSA added or not. First, we find that chemical shift changes are small and seen only for a few of the metabolites. In contrast, a significant number of the metabolites display reduced resonance integrals and reduced free concentrations in the presence of HSA or fatted HSA. For slow-exchange (or strong) interactions, NMR resonance integrals report the free metabolite concentration, while for fast exchange (weak binding) the chemical shift reports on the binding. Hence, these metabolites bind strongly to HSA and/or fatted HSA, but to a limited degree because for most metabolites their concentration is smaller than the HSA concentration. Most interestingly, fatty acids decrease the metabolite-HSA binding quite significantly for most of the interacting metabolites. We further find

  16. Molecular structure of terrecyclodiol: a derivative of the antifungal metabolite terrecyclic acid A from Aspergillus terreus.

    PubMed

    Almassi, F; Ghisalberti, E L; Skelton, B W; White, A H

    1996-01-01

    A strain of Aspergillus terreus, which was isolated from organic mulch and inhibited the growth of the plant pathogen Phytophthora cinnamomi, produces an antifungal metabolite when grown in liquid culture. This metabolite was isolated by bioassay-guided fractionation and identified as terrecyclic acid A (1). X-ray diffraction studies and spectroscopic details of the derived terrecyclodiol (2) are described. PMID:8984154

  17. Simultaneous determination of tricarboxylic acid cycle metabolites by high-performance liquid chromatography with ultraviolet detection.

    PubMed

    Shurubor, Yevgeniya I; Cooper, Arthur J L; Isakova, Elena P; Deryabina, Yulia I; Beal, M Flint; Krasnikov, Boris F

    2016-06-15

    Here we describe a simple high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) procedure for the simultaneous detection and quantitation in standard solutions of 13 important metabolites of cellular energy metabolism, including 9 tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle components and 4 additional metabolites. The metabolites are detected by their absorbance at 210 nm. The procedure does not require prior derivatization, and an analysis can be carried out at ambient temperature within 15 min. The significance of the current work is that the current HPLC procedure should motivate the development of simplified TCA cycle enzyme assays, isotopomer analysis, and determination of selected TCA metabolite levels in plasma/tissues. PMID:27001310

  18. The Role of Long Chain Fatty Acids and Their Epoxide Metabolites in Nociceptive Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Wagner, Karen; Vito, Steve; Inceoglu, Bora; Hammock, Bruce D.

    2014-01-01

    Lipid derived mediators contribute to inflammation and the sensing of pain. The contributions of omega-6 derived prostanoids in enhancing inflammation and pain sensation are well known. Less well explored are the opposing anti-inflammatory and analgesic effects of the omega-6 derived epoxyeicosatrienoic acids. Far less has been described about the epoxidized metabolites derived from omega-3 long chain fatty acids. The epoxide metabolites are turned over rapidly with enzymatic hydrolysis by the soluble epoxide hydrolase being the major elimination pathway. Despite this, the overall understanding of the role of lipid mediators in the pathology of chronic pain is growing. Here we review the role of long chain fatty acids and their metabolites in alleviating both acute and chronic pain conditions. We focus specifically on the epoxidized metabolites of omega-6 and omega-3 long chain fatty acids as well as a novel strategy to modulate their activity in vivo. PMID:25240260

  19. Synthesis and antiaggregant properties of Stabilized analogues of polyunsaturated fatty acid metabolites.

    PubMed

    Hachem, Ali; Roussel, Patrick; Ménager, Eric; Grée, Danielle; Le Floc'h, Yves; Grée, René; Cerletti, Chiara; Rolland, Yves; Simonet, Serge; Verbeuren, Tony

    2002-09-16

    New aromatic and heteroaromatic analogues of polyunsaturated fatty acid metabolites have been prepared using short and versatile strategies. Preliminary studies of their activity as inhibitors of platelet aggregation are reported. PMID:12182849

  20. Chronic Arachidonic Acid Administration Decreases Docosahexaenoic Acid- and Eicosapentaenoic Acid-Derived Metabolites in Kidneys of Aged Rats

    PubMed Central

    Katakura, Masanori; Hashimoto, Michio; Inoue, Takayuki; Mamun, Abdullah Al; Tanabe, Yoko; Arita, Makoto; Shido, Osamu

    2015-01-01

    Arachidonic acid (ARA) metabolites produced by cyclo-oxygenase and lipoxygenase are important mediators maintaining physiological renal function. However, the effects of exogenous ARA on kidney function in vivo remain unknown. This study examined the effects of long-term oral ARA administration on normal renal function as well as inflammation and oxidative stress in aged rats. In addition, we measured levels of renal eicosanoids and docosanoids using liquid chromatography–tandem mass spectrometry. Control or ARA oil (240 mg/kg body weight/day) was orally administered to 21-month-old Wistar rats for 13 weeks. Levels of plasma creatinine, blood urea nitrogen, inflammatory and anti-inflammatory cytokines, reactive oxygen species, and lipid peroxidation were not significantly different between the two groups. The ARA concentration in the plasma, kidney, and liver increased in the ARA-administered group. In addition, levels of free-form ARA, prostaglandin E2, and 12- and 15-hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid increased in the ARA-administered group, whereas renal concentration of docosahexaenoic acid and eicosapentaenoic acid decreased in the ARA-administered group. Levels of docosahexaenoic acid-derived protectin D1, eicosapentaenoic acid-derived 5-, and 18-hydroxyeicosapentaenoic acids, and resolvin E2 and E3 decreased in the ARA-administered group. Our results indicate that long-term ARA administration led to no serious adverse reactions under normal conditions and to a decrease in anti-inflammatory docosahexaenoic acid- and eicosapentaenoic acid-derived metabolites in the kidneys of aged rats. These results indicate that there is a possibility of ARA administration having a reducing anti-inflammatory effect on the kidney. PMID:26485038

  1. Chronic Arachidonic Acid Administration Decreases Docosahexaenoic Acid- and Eicosapentaenoic Acid-Derived Metabolites in Kidneys of Aged Rats.

    PubMed

    Katakura, Masanori; Hashimoto, Michio; Inoue, Takayuki; Mamun, Abdullah Al; Tanabe, Yoko; Arita, Makoto; Shido, Osamu

    2015-01-01

    Arachidonic acid (ARA) metabolites produced by cyclo-oxygenase and lipoxygenase are important mediators maintaining physiological renal function. However, the effects of exogenous ARA on kidney function in vivo remain unknown. This study examined the effects of long-term oral ARA administration on normal renal function as well as inflammation and oxidative stress in aged rats. In addition, we measured levels of renal eicosanoids and docosanoids using liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. Control or ARA oil (240 mg/kg body weight/day) was orally administered to 21-month-old Wistar rats for 13 weeks. Levels of plasma creatinine, blood urea nitrogen, inflammatory and anti-inflammatory cytokines, reactive oxygen species, and lipid peroxidation were not significantly different between the two groups. The ARA concentration in the plasma, kidney, and liver increased in the ARA-administered group. In addition, levels of free-form ARA, prostaglandin E2, and 12- and 15-hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid increased in the ARA-administered group, whereas renal concentration of docosahexaenoic acid and eicosapentaenoic acid decreased in the ARA-administered group. Levels of docosahexaenoic acid-derived protectin D1, eicosapentaenoic acid-derived 5-, and 18-hydroxyeicosapentaenoic acids, and resolvin E2 and E3 decreased in the ARA-administered group. Our results indicate that long-term ARA administration led to no serious adverse reactions under normal conditions and to a decrease in anti-inflammatory docosahexaenoic acid- and eicosapentaenoic acid-derived metabolites in the kidneys of aged rats. These results indicate that there is a possibility of ARA administration having a reducing anti-inflammatory effect on the kidney. PMID:26485038

  2. Bacterial dynamics and metabolite changes in solid-state acetic acid fermentation of Shanxi aged vinegar.

    PubMed

    Li, Sha; Li, Pan; Liu, Xiong; Luo, Lixin; Lin, Weifeng

    2016-05-01

    Solid-state acetic acid fermentation (AAF), a natural or semi-controlled fermentation process driven by reproducible microbial communities, is an important technique to produce traditional Chinese cereal vinegars. Highly complex microbial communities and metabolites are involved in traditional Chinese solid-state AAF, but the association between microbiota and metabolites during this process are still poorly understood. In this study, we performed amplicon 16S rRNA gene sequencing on the Illumina MiSeq platform, PCR-denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis, and metabolite analysis to trace the bacterial dynamics and metabolite changes under AAF process. A succession of bacterial assemblages was observed during the AAF process. Lactobacillales dominated all the stages. However, Acetobacter species in Rhodospirillales were considerably accelerated during AAF until the end of fermentation. Quantitative PCR results indicated that the biomass of total bacteria showed a "system microbe self-domestication" process in the first 3 days, and then peaked at the seventh day before gradually decreasing until the end of AAF. Moreover, a total of 88 metabolites, including 8 organic acids, 16 free amino acids, and 66 aroma compounds were detected during AAF. Principal component analysis and cluster analyses revealed the high correlation between the dynamics of bacterial community and metabolites. PMID:26754813

  3. Effect of Insulin Sensitizer Therapy on Amino Acids and their Metabolites

    PubMed Central

    Irving, B.A.; Carter, R.E.; Soop, M.; Weymiller, A.; Syed, H.; Karakelides, H.; Bhagra, S.; Short, K.R.; Tatpati, L.; Barazzoni, R.; Nair, K.S.

    2015-01-01

    Aims Prior studies have reported that elevated concentrations of several plasma amino acids (AA) in plasma, particularly branched chain (BCAA) and aromatic AA predict the onset of type 2 diabetes. We sought to test the hypothesis that circulating BCAA, aromatic AA and related AA metabolites decline in response to the use of insulin sensitizing agents in overweight/obese adults with impaired fasting glucose or untreated diabetes. Methods We performed a secondary analysis of a randomized, double-blind, placebo, controlled study conducted in twenty five overweight/obese (BMI~30 kg/m2) adults with impaired fasting glucose or untreated diabetes. Participants were randomized to three months of pioglitazone (45 mg per day) plus metformin (1000 mg twice per day, N = 12 participants) or placebo (N = 13). We measured insulin sensitivity by the euglycemic-hyperinsulinemic clamp and fasting concentrations of AA and AA metabolites using ultra-pressure liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry before and after the three-month intervention. Results Insulin sensitizer therapy that significantly enhanced insulin sensitivity reduced 9 out of 33 AA and AA metabolites measured compared to placebo treatment. Moreover, insulin sensitizer therapy significantly reduced three functionally clustered AA and metabolite pairs: i) phenylalanine/tyrosine, ii) citrulline/arginine, and iii) lysine/α-aminoadipic acid. Conclusions Reductions in plasma concentrations of several AA and AA metabolites in response to three months of insulin sensitizer therapy support the concept that reduced insulin sensitivity alters AA and AA metabolites. PMID:25733201

  4. Cytochrome P450-generated metabolites derived from ω-3 fatty acids attenuate neovascularization

    PubMed Central

    Yanai, Ryoji; Mulki, Lama; Hasegawa, Eiichi; Takeuchi, Kimio; Sweigard, Harry; Suzuki, Jun; Gaissert, Philipp; Vavvas, Demetrios G.; Sonoda, Koh-Hei; Rothe, Michael; Schunck, Wolf-Hagen; Miller, Joan W.; Connor, Kip M.

    2014-01-01

    Ocular neovascularization, including age-related macular degeneration (AMD), is a primary cause of blindness in individuals of industrialized countries. With a projected increase in the prevalence of these blinding neovascular diseases, there is an urgent need for new pharmacological interventions for their treatment or prevention. Increasing evidence has implicated eicosanoid-like metabolites of long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids (LCPUFAs) in the regulation of neovascular disease. In particular, metabolites generated by the cytochrome P450 (CYP)–epoxygenase pathway have been shown to be potent modulators of angiogenesis, making this pathway a reasonable previously unidentified target for intervention in neovascular ocular disease. Here we show that dietary supplementation with ω-3 LCPUFAs promotes regression of choroidal neovessels in a well-characterized mouse model of neovascular AMD. Leukocyte recruitment and adhesion molecule expression in choroidal neovascular lesions were down-regulated in mice fed ω-3 LCPUFAs. The serum of these mice showed increased levels of anti-inflammatory eicosanoids derived from eicosapentaenoic acid and docosahexaenoic acid. 17,18-epoxyeicosatetraenoic acid and 19,20-epoxydocosapentaenoic acid, the major CYP-generated metabolites of these primary ω-3 LCPUFAs, were identified as key lipid mediators of disease resolution. We conclude that CYP-derived bioactive lipid metabolites from ω-3 LCPUFAs are potent inhibitors of intraocular neovascular disease and show promising therapeutic potential for resolution of neovascular AMD. PMID:24979774

  5. Separation and detection of amino acid metabolites of Escherichia coli in microbial fuel cell with CE.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wei; Ma, Lihong; Lin, Ping; Xu, Kaixuan

    2016-07-01

    In this work, CE-LIF was employed to investigate the amino acid metabolites produced by Escherichia coli (E. coli) in microbial fuel cell (MFC). Two peptides, l-carnosine and l-alanyl-glycine, together with six amino acids, cystine, alanine, lysine, methionine, tyrosine, arginine were separated and detected in advance by a CE-LIF system coupled with a homemade spontaneous injection device. The injection device was devised to alleviate the effect of electrical discrimination for analytes during sample injection. All analytes could be completely separated within 8 min with detection limits of 20-300 nmol/L. Then this method was applied to analyze the substrate solution containing amino acid metabolites produced by E. coli. l-carnosine, l-alanyl-glycine, and cystine were used as the carbon, nitrogen, and sulfur source for the E. coli culture in the MFC to investigate the amino acid metabolites during metabolism. Two MFCs were used to compare the activity of metabolism of the bacteria. In the sample collected at the running time 200 h of MFC, the amino acid methionine was discovered as the metabolite with the concentrations 23.3 μg/L. PMID:27121957

  6. Synthesis and discovery of phytofurans: metabolites of α-linolenic acid peroxidation.

    PubMed

    Cuyamendous, C; Leung, K S; Durand, T; Lee, J C-Y; Oger, C; Galano, J-M

    2015-11-01

    Phytofurans are novel metabolites produced by non-enzymatic peroxidation of α-linolenic acid. An unprecedented Payne rearrangement-cyclization of a C2-symmetric bis-epoxide permitted construction of the core 3-hydroxy-2,5-disubstituted tetrahydrofuran. LC-MS/MS investigation provided evidence for the presence of phytofurans in nuts and seeds for the first time. PMID:26364843

  7. Microbial diversity and metabolite composition of Belgian red-brown acidic ales.

    PubMed

    Snauwaert, Isabel; Roels, Sanne P; Van Nieuwerburg, Filip; Van Landschoot, Anita; De Vuyst, Luc; Vandamme, Peter

    2016-03-16

    Belgian red-brown acidic ales are sour and alcoholic fermented beers, which are produced by mixed-culture fermentation and blending. The brews are aged in oak barrels for about two years, after which mature beer is blended with young, non-aged beer to obtain the end-products. The present study evaluated the microbial community diversity of Belgian red-brown acidic ales at the end of the maturation phase of three subsequent brews of three different breweries. The microbial diversity was compared with the metabolite composition of the brews at the end of the maturation phase. Therefore, mature brew samples were subjected to 454 pyrosequencing of the 16S rRNA gene (bacteria) and the internal transcribed spacer region (yeasts) and a broad range of metabolites was quantified. The most important microbial species present in the Belgian red-brown acidic ales investigated were Pediococcus damnosus, Dekkera bruxellensis, and Acetobacter pasteurianus. In addition, this culture-independent analysis revealed operational taxonomic units that were assigned to an unclassified fungal community member, Candida, and Lactobacillus. The main metabolites present in the brew samples were L-lactic acid, D-lactic acid, and ethanol, whereas acetic acid was produced in lower quantities. The most prevailing aroma compounds were ethyl acetate, isoamyl acetate, ethyl hexanoate, and ethyl octanoate, which might be of impact on the aroma of the end-products. PMID:26802571

  8. Amino Acid-Derived Metabolites from the Ascidian Aplidium sp.

    PubMed

    Won, Tae Hyung; Kim, Chang-Kwon; Lee, So-Hyoung; Rho, Boon Jo; Lee, Sang Kook; Oh, Dong-Chan; Oh, Ki-Bong; Shin, Jongheon

    2015-06-01

    Four new iodobenzene-containing dipeptides (1-4), a related bromotryptophan-containing dipeptide (5), and an iodophenethylamine (6) were isolated from the ascidian Aplidium sp. collected off the coast of Chuja-do, Korea. The structures of these novel compounds, designated as apliamides A-E (1-5) and apliamine A (6) were determined via combined spectroscopic analyses. The absolute configuration of the amino acid residue in 1 was determined by advanced Marfey's analysis. Several of these compounds exhibited moderate cytotoxicity and significant inhibition against Na+/K+-ATPase (4). PMID:26087023

  9. Metabolite Profiling of Sugarcane Genotypes and Identification of Flavonoid Glycosides and Phenolic Acids.

    PubMed

    Coutinho, Isabel D; Baker, John M; Ward, Jane L; Beale, Michael H; Creste, Silvana; Cavalheiro, Alberto J

    2016-06-01

    Sugarcane is an important agricultural crop in the economy of tropical regions, and Brazil has the largest cultivated acreage in the world. Sugarcane accumulates high levels of sucrose in its stalks. Other compounds produced by sugarcane are currently not of economic importance. To explore potential coproducts, we have studied the chemical diversity of sugarcane genotypes, via metabolite profiling of leaves by NMR and LC-DAD-MS. Metabolites were identified via in-house and public databases. From the analysis of 60 HPLC-fractionated extracts, LC-DAD-MS detected 144 metabolites, of which 56 were identified (MS-MS and (1)H NMR), including 19 phenolics and 25 flavones, with a predominance of isomeric flavone C-glycosides. Multivariate analysis of the profiles from genotypes utilized in Brazilian breeding programs revealed clustering according to sugar, phenolic acid, and flavone contents. PMID:27152527

  10. Transcript and metabolite alterations increase ganoderic acid content in Ganoderma lucidum using acetic acid as an inducer.

    PubMed

    Ren, Ang; Li, Xiong-Biao; Miao, Zhi-Gang; Shi, Liang; Jaing, Ai-Liang; Zhao, Ming-Wen

    2014-12-01

    Acetic acid at 5-8 mM increased ganoderic acid (GA) accumulation in Ganoderma lucidum. After optimization by the response surface methodology, the GA content reached 5.5/100 mg dry weight, an increase of 105% compared with the control. The intermediate metabolites of GA biosynthesis, lanosterol and squalene also increased to 47 and 15.8 μg/g dry weight, respectively, in response to acetic acid. Acetic acid significantly induced transcription levels of sqs, lano, hmgs and cyp51 in the GA biosynthesis pathway. An acetic acid-unregulated acetyl coenzyme A synthase (acs) gene was selected from ten candidate homologous acs genes. The results indicate that acetic acid alters the expression of genes related to acetic acid assimilation and increases GA biosynthesis and the metabolic levels of lanosterol, squalene and GA-a, thereby resulting in GA accumulation. PMID:25216642

  11. Signalling diacylglycerol pyrophosphate, a new phosphatidic acid metabolite.

    PubMed

    van Schooten, Bas; Testerink, Christa; Munnik, Teun

    2006-02-01

    Diacylglycerol pyrophosphate (DGPP) is a novel phospholipid that has been found in plants and yeast but not in higher animals. It is produced through phosphorylation of phosphatidic acid (PA) by the novel enzyme PA kinase (PAK). In plants, DGPP is virtually absent in non-stimulated cells but its concentration increases within minutes in response to various stimuli, including osmotic stress and pathogen attack, implying a role in stress signalling. DGPP is broken down by the enzyme DGPP phosphatase (DPP). DPP-encoding genes have been cloned from Arabidopsis thaliana and Saccharomyces cerevisiae (DPP1). In S. cerevisiae, the expression of DPP1 is regulated coordinately with the majority of genes encoding enzymes involved in phospholipid biosynthesis. PMID:16469533

  12. Determination of nine catecholamine metabolites and 5-hydroxyindolacetic acid in urine by capillary gas chromatography.

    PubMed

    de Jong, E B; Horsten, B P; Goldschmidt, H M

    1983-11-25

    A method is described for the simultaneous determination of nine urinary acidic and alcoholic catecholamine metabolites and urinary 5-hydroxyindolacetic acid. Incubation of a urine sample in the presence of ascorbic acid, glucuronidase and acylase and subsequent extraction with ethyl acetate precedes derivatization to trimethylsilyl compounds, capillary gas chromatographic separation and flame-ionization detection. The automated dual injection procedure and the analytical characteristics of the proposed method are reported in detail. Special attention is paid to problems that occur in analysis on a routine basis. PMID:6200488

  13. Identification of mebeverine acid as the main circulating metabolite of mebeverine in man.

    PubMed

    Stockis, Arnel; Guelen, P J M; de Vos, D

    2002-06-20

    The intestinal spasmolytic drug mebeverine is known to undergo fast in vivo enzymatic hydrolysis into mebeverine alcohol and veratric acid. A reversed-phase HPLC method with coulometric detection was developed in order to assay the hitherto unidentified secondary metabolite mebeverine acid. After intake of a single oral dose of 405 mg mebeverine hydrochloride in four healthy human volunteers, peak plasma concentrations of mebeverine acid were found to be 1000-fold higher than those of mebeverine alcohol, i.e. approximately 3 microg/ml versus 3 ng/ml. The appearance of mebeverine acid in plasma (median T(max)=1.25 h) as well as its disappearance (median apparent t(1/2)=1.1 h) were rapid. The urinary excretion of mebeverine acid within the first 4 h after dosing amounted to 67% of the mebeverine dose (median range: 23-107%). Mebeverine acid appears to be a valuable marker of oral exposure to mebeverine. PMID:12062694

  14. Itaconic Acid: The Surprising Role of an Industrial Compound as a Mammalian Antimicrobial Metabolite.

    PubMed

    Cordes, Thekla; Michelucci, Alessandro; Hiller, Karsten

    2015-01-01

    Itaconic acid is well known as a precursor for polymer synthesis and has been involved in industrial processes for decades. In a recent surprising discovery, itaconic acid was found to play a role as an immune-supportive metabolite in mammalian immune cells, where it is synthesized as an antimicrobial compound from the citric acid cycle intermediate cis-aconitic acid. Although the immune-responsive gene 1 protein (IRG1) has been associated to immune response without a mechanistic function, the critical link to itaconic acid production through an enzymatic function of this protein was only recently revealed. In this review, we highlight the history of itaconic acid as an industrial and antimicrobial compound, starting with its biotechnological synthesis and ending with its antimicrobial function in mammalian immune cells. PMID:25974697

  15. Occurrence and fate of the human pharmaceutical metabolite ritalinic acid in the aquatic system.

    PubMed

    Letzel, Marion; Weiss, Klaus; Schüssler, Walter; Sengl, Manfred

    2010-12-01

    To investigate the occurrence and fate of ritalinic acid - the main human metabolite of the psychostimulant drug methylphenidate - in the aquatic environment, a HPLC-electrospray-MS/MS method for the quantification of ritalinic acid in wastewater, surface water and bank filtrate was developed. Carbamazepine known as very stable in the aquatic environment was analyzed as anthropogenic marker in parallel. Furthermore, the removal of ritalinic acid was studied in a sewage treatment plant using an activated sludge system during a field study and in lab-scale plants. In good agreement between lab-scale and field studies a low removal rate of 13% and 23%, respectively, was determined. As a consequence, the concentration of ritalinic acid in the wastewater effluents were in the range of <50-170 ngL(-1) which corresponds to a mean specific load per capita of 17.7 μgd(-1). Ritalinic acid has further been detected in German rivers at concentrations of 4-23 ngL(-1) and in bank filtrate samples in 100-850 m distance from the river up to 5 ngL(-1) demonstrating the widespread occurrence of this stable metabolite in the aquatic environment. A comparison to available sales data shows that a significant amount of methylphenidate applied can be found in waters as ritalinic acid. PMID:20932550

  16. The effect of temperature on L-lactic acid production and metabolite distribution of Lactobacillus casei.

    PubMed

    Qin, Hao; Gong, Sai-Sai; Ge, Xiang-Yang; Zhang, Wei-Guo

    2012-01-01

    The effect of temperature on the growth and L-lactic acid production of Lactobacillus casei G-03 was investigated in a 7-L bioreactor. It was found that the maximum specific growth rate (0.27 hr⁻¹) and L-lactic acid concentration (160.2 g L⁻¹) were obtained at a temperature of 41°C. Meanwhile, the maximum L-lactic acid yield, productivity, and dry cell weight were up to 94.1%, 4.44 g L⁻¹ hr⁻¹, and 4.30 g L⁻¹, respectively. At lower or higher temperature, the Lactobacillus casei G-03 showed lower acid production and biomass. Moreover, the main metabolite distribution of strain G-03 response to variations in temperatures was studied. The results suggested that temperature has a remarkable effect on metabolite distribution, and the maximum carbon flux toward lactic acid at the pyruvate node was obtained at 41°C, which had the minimum carbon flux toward acetic acid. PMID:23030467

  17. Aerobic biodegradation of 2,2'-dithiodibenzoic acid produced from dibenzothiophene metabolites

    SciTech Connect

    Young, R.F.; Cheng, S.M.; Fedorak, P.M.

    2006-01-15

    Dibenzothiophene is a sulfur heterocycle found in crude oils and coal. The biodegradation of dibenzothiophene through the Kodama pathway by Pseudomonas sp. strain BT1d leads to the formation of three disulfides: 2-oxo-2-(2-thiophenyl)ethanoic acid disulfide, 2-oxo-2-(2-thiophenyl)ethanoic acid-2-benzoic acid disulfide, and 2,2'-dithiodibenzoic acid. When provided as the carbon and sulfur source in liquid medium, 2,2'-dithiodibenzoic acid was degraded by soil enrichment cultures. Two bacterial isolates, designated strains RM1 and RM6, degraded 2,2'-dithiodibenzoic acid when combined in the medium. Isolate RM6 was found to have an absolute requirement for vitamin B{sub 12}, and it degraded 2,2'-dithiodibenzoic acid in pure culture when the medium was supplemented with this vitamin. Isolate RM6 also degraded 2,2'-dithiodibenzoic acid in medium containing sterilized supernatants from cultures of isolate RM1 grown on glucose or benzoate. Isolate RM6 was identified as a member of the genus Variovorax using the Biolog system and 16S rRNA gene analysis. Although the mechanism of disulfide metabolism could not be determined, benzoic acid was detected as a transient metabolite of 2,2'-dithiodibenzoic acid biodegradation by Variovorax sp. strain RM6. In pure culture, this isolate mineralized 2,2'-dithiodibenzoic acid, releasing 59% of the carbon as carbon dioxide and 88% of the sulfur as sulfate.

  18. Association between Circulating Vitamin D Metabolites and Fecal Bile Acid Concentrations.

    PubMed

    Jacobs, Elizabeth T; Haussler, Mark R; Alberts, David S; Kohler, Lindsay N; Lance, Peter; Martínez, María Elena; Roe, Denise J; Jurutka, Peter W

    2016-07-01

    Although hydrophobic bile acids have been demonstrated to exhibit cytotoxic and carcinogenic effects in the colorectum, ursodeoxycholic acid (UDCA) has been investigated as a potential chemopreventive agent. Vitamin D has been shown to play a role in both bile acid metabolism and in the development of colorectal neoplasia. Using a cross-sectional design, we sought to determine whether baseline circulating concentrations of the vitamin D metabolites 25(OH)D and 1,25(OH)2D were associated with baseline fecal bile acid concentrations in a trial of UDCA for the prevention of colorectal adenoma recurrence. We also prospectively evaluated whether vitamin D metabolite concentrations modified the effect of UDCA on adenoma recurrence. After adjustment for age, sex, BMI, physical activity, and calcium intake, adequate concentrations of 25(OH)D (≥30 ng/mL) were statistically significantly associated with reduced odds for high levels of total [OR, 0.61; 95% confidence interval (CI), 0.38-0.97], and primary (OR, 0.61; 95% CI, 0.38-0.96) bile acids, as well as individually with chenodeoxycholic acid (OR, 0.39; 95% CI, 0.24-0.63) and cholic acid (OR, 0.56; 95% CI, 0.36-0.90). No significant associations were observed for 1,25(OH)2D and high versus low fecal bile acid concentrations. In addition, neither 25(OH)D nor 1,25(OH)2D modified the effect of UDCA on colorectal adenoma recurrence. In conclusion, this is the first study to demonstrate an inverse relationship between circulating levels of 25(OH)D and primary fecal bile acid concentrations. These results support prior data demonstrating that vitamin D plays a key role in bile acid metabolism, and suggest a potential mechanism of action for 25(OH)D in colorectal cancer prevention. Cancer Prev Res; 9(7); 589-97. ©2016 AACR. PMID:27138789

  19. Role of arachidonic acid lipoxygenase metabolites in acetylcholine-induced relaxations of mouse arteries.

    PubMed

    Gauthier, Kathryn M; Goldman, Daniel H; Aggarwal, Nitin T; Chawengsub, Yuttana; Falck, J R; Campbell, William B

    2011-03-01

    Arachidonic acid (AA) metabolites function as EDHFs in arteries of many species. They mediate cyclooxygenase (COX)- and nitric oxide (NO)-independent relaxations to acetylcholine (ACh). However, the role of AA metabolites as relaxing factors in mouse arteries remains incompletely defined. ACh caused concentration-dependent relaxations of the mouse thoracic and abdominal aorta and carotid, femoral, and mesentery arteries (maximal relaxation: 57 ± 4%, 72 ± 4%, 82 ± 3%, 80 ± 3%, and 85 ± 3%, respectively). The NO synthase inhibitor nitro-L-arginine (L-NA; 30 μM) blocked relaxations in the thoracic aorta, and L-NA plus the COX inhibitor indomethacin (10 μM) inhibited relaxations in the abdominal aorta and carotid, femoral, and mesenteric arteries (maximal relaxation: 31 ± 10%, 33 ± 5%, 41 ± 8%, and 73 ± 3%, respectively). In mesenteric arteries, NO- and COX-independent relaxations to ACh were inhibited by the lipoxygenase (LO) inhibitors nordihydroguaiaretic acid (NDGA; 10 μM) and BW-755C (200 μM), the K(+) channel inhibitor apamin (1 μM), and 60 mM KCl and eliminated by endothelium removal. They were not altered by the cytochrome P-450 inhibitor N-methylsulfonyl-6-(2-propargyloxyphenyl)hexanamide (20 μM) or the epoxyeicosatrienoic acid antagonist 14,15-epoxyeicosa-5(Z)-enoic acid (10 μM). AA relaxations were attenuated by NDGA or apamin and eliminated by 60 mM KCl. Reverse-phase HPLC analysis revealed arterial [(14)C]AA metabolites that comigrated with prostaglandins, trihydroxyeicosatrienoic acids (THETAs), hydroxyepoxyeicosatrienoic acids (HEETAs), and hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acids (HETEs). Epoxyeicosatrienoic acids were not observed. Mass spectrometry confirmed the identity of 6-keto-PGF(1α), PGE(2), 12-HETE, 15-HETE, HEETAs, 11,12,15-THETA, and 11,14,15-THETA. AA metabolism was blocked by NDGA and endothelium removal. 11(R),12(S),15(S)-THETA relaxations (maximal relaxation: 73 ± 3%) were endothelium independent and blocked by 60 mM KCl. Western

  20. Ion-pair chromatography of acidic drug metabolites and endogenic compounds.

    PubMed

    Fransson, B; Wahlund, K G; Johansson, I M; Schill, G

    1976-09-29

    Liquid-liquid chromatographic systems based on ion-pair partition with silica microparticles as the support for the stationary phase have been used for the separation of anionic compounds of biochemical and pharmacological interest. A high separating efficiency can be obtained with both aqueous and organic mobile phases and the retention is easily regulated by the nature and the concentration of the quaternary ammonium counter ion, present in the aqueous phase. The influence of the composition of the liquid phases on the selectivity and separating efficiency has been studied, as well as equilibration methods and the stability of the systems. Examples are given of separations of sulphonamides, barbiturates, glucuronic and sulphuric acid conjugates of steroidal compounds and phenols glycine conjugates of carboxylic acids (hippuric, nicotinuric and salicyluric acid) and anionic metabolites of biogenic amines (indoleacetic, benzoic, mandelic and phenylacetic acid derivatives). PMID:10314

  1. γ-aminobutyric acid as a metabolite: Interpreting magnetic resonance spectroscopy experiments.

    PubMed

    Myers, James Fm; Nutt, David J; Lingford-Hughes, Anne R

    2016-05-01

    The current rise in the prevalence of magnetic resonance spectroscopy experiments to measure γ-aminobutyric acid in the living human brain is an exciting and productive area of research. As research spreads into clinical populations and cognitive research, it is important to fully understand the source of the magnetic resonance spectroscopy signal and apply appropriate interpretation to the results of the experiments. γ-aminobutyric acid is present in the brain not only as a neurotransmitter, but also in high intracellular concentrations, both as a transmitter precursor and a metabolite. γ-aminobutyric acid concentrations measured by magnetic resonance spectroscopy are not necessarily implicated in neurotransmission and therefore may reflect a very different brain activity to that commonly suggested. In this perspective, we examine some of the considerations to be taken in the interpretation of any γ-aminobutyric acid signal measured by magnetic resonance spectroscopy. PMID:27005308

  2. Determination of acetylsalicylic acid and its major metabolites in bovine urine using ultra performance liquid chromatography.

    PubMed

    Castillo-García, M L; Aguilar-Caballos, M P; Gómez-Hens, A

    2015-03-15

    A new method based on ultra high performance liquid chromatography (UPLC) with photometric and fluorometric detection for the determination of acetylsalicylic acid and its main metabolites, namely gentisic, salicylic and salicyluric acids, in bovine urine samples is reported. Photometric detection was used for acetylsalicylic acid determination, whereas the native fluorescence of the metabolites was monitored using fluorometric detection. The separation was performed under isocratic conditions, using acetonitrile-phosphate solution (3.5mM, pH 3.5) (26:74, v/v) as the mobile phase. The retention times of the four compounds were lower than 2min, which are shorter than those achieved using conventional HPLC. Under the optimum separation conditions, the dynamic ranges and detection limits (ngmL(-1)) were: 0.2-2500, 0.09 for gentisic acid; 0.2-2500, 0.08 for salicylic acid and 2.5-15,000, 1.1 for salicyluric acid, using fluorescence detection, and 10-25,000, 2.2 for acetylsalicylic acid, using UV detection. Intra-day and inter-day precision data were assessed at two levels of concentration of each analyte using both detection systems. The selectivity of the method was checked by assaying different drugs of veterinary use showing that most of them did not interfere with the determination of the analytes. The method has been applied to the analysis of bovine urine samples, which only required a simple clean up step of the samples prior to injection in the UPLC system. A recovery study was performed, which provided values in the range of 80-100%. This fact proves the practical usefulness of this method as an ultrafast analytical tool for the therapeutic control of acetylsalicylic acid administration in bovine animals intended for food production. PMID:25660719

  3. Identification of a new sulfonic acid metabolite of metolachlor in soil

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Aga, D.S.; Thurman, E.M.; Yockel, M.E.; Zimmerman, L.R.; Williams, T.D.

    1996-01-01

    An ethanesulfonic acid metabolite of metolachlor (metolachlor ESA) was identified in soil-sample extracts by negative-ion, fast-atom bombardment mass spectrometry (FAB-MS) and FAB tandem mass spectrometry (FAB-MS/MS). Production fragments from MS/MS analysis of the deprotonated molecular ion of metolachlor ESA in the soil extract can be reconciled with the structure of the synthesized standard. The elemental compositions of the (M - H)- ions of the metolachlor ESA standard and the soil-sample extracts were confirmed by high-resolution mass spectrometry. A dissipation study revealed that metolachlor ESA is formed in soil under field conditions corresponding to a decrease in the concentration of the parent herbicide, metolachlor. The identification of the sulfonated metabolite of metolachlor suggests that the glutathione conjugation pathway is a common detoxification pathway shared by chloroacetanilide herbicides.

  4. From Dietary Fiber to Host Physiology: Short-Chain Fatty Acids as Key Bacterial Metabolites.

    PubMed

    Koh, Ara; De Vadder, Filipe; Kovatcheva-Datchary, Petia; Bäckhed, Fredrik

    2016-06-01

    A compelling set of links between the composition of the gut microbiota, the host diet, and host physiology has emerged. Do these links reflect cause-and-effect relationships, and what might be their mechanistic basis? A growing body of work implicates microbially produced metabolites as crucial executors of diet-based microbial influence on the host. Here, we will review data supporting the diverse functional roles carried out by a major class of bacterial metabolites, the short-chain fatty acids (SCFAs). SCFAs can directly activate G-coupled-receptors, inhibit histone deacetylases, and serve as energy substrates. They thus affect various physiological processes and may contribute to health and disease. PMID:27259147

  5. Identification of 14,20-dihydroxy-docosahexaenoic acid as a novel anti-inflammatory metabolite.

    PubMed

    Yokokura, Yoshiyuki; Isobe, Yosuke; Matsueda, Shinnosuke; Iwamoto, Ryo; Goto, Tomomi; Yoshioka, Takeshi; Urabe, Daisuke; Inoue, Masayuki; Arai, Hiroyuki; Arita, Makoto

    2014-12-01

    Docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) exhibits anti-inflammatory activity related to some of its oxygenated metabolites, such as D-series resolvins, protectin and maresin. Here, we analysed the lipids in inflammatory exudates using liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry and identified a novel DHA metabolite, 14,20-dihydroxy-DHA (14,20-diHDHA) and showed that it is biosynthesized by eosinophils through the 12/15-lipoxygenase pathway. The chemical structure of the dominant 14,20-diHDHA isomer, which is endogenously biosynthesized by eosinophils, was identified as 14S,20R-diHDHA using chemically synthesized stereoisomers. Nanogram doses of 14,20-diHDHA displayed a potent anti-inflammatory action by limiting neutrophil infiltration in zymosan-induced peritonitis. The in vivo formation and potent anti-inflammatory action of 14,20-diHDHA may contribute to the protective effects of DHA. PMID:25012818

  6. Aromatic amino acids as precursors of antimicrobial metabolites in Geotrichum candidum.

    PubMed

    Naz, Saima; Gueguen-Minerbe, Marielle; Cretenet, Marina; Vernoux, Jean-Paul

    2013-07-01

    Geotrichum candidum ATCC 204307 was previously found to generate phenyllactic acid (PLA) and indoleacetic acid (ILA) in complex culture media. In this study, a relationship between concentrations of PLA, ILA, and hydroxy PLA (OH-PLA) and initial concentrations of phenylalanine, tryptophan, and tyrosine, added respectively as unique sources of nitrogen in synthetic medium, was established. Phenylpyruvic acid (PPA), an intermediate compound of PLA metabolism, was able to induce not only PLA but also phenylethyl alcohol (PEA) production when used separately as initial substrate. Under pH, temperature, and salt concentrations used for cheese-making, phenylalanine was found to be the most efficient substrate for antimicrobial metabolite production. In excess of substrate, different yeast strains of Geotrichum candidum, Yarrowia lipolytica, Candida natalensis, and Candida catenulata were shown here to produce 1.6 ± 0.5-5.0 ± 0.2 mM of PLA from phenylalanine, 5.0 ± 0.1-10.9 ± 0.3 mM of ILA from tryptophan, and 1.3 ± 0.3-7.0 ± 0.02 of PLA and 0.1 ± 0.0-2.22 ± 0.09 mM of PEA from PPA. Geotrichum candidum ATCC 204307 was the highest producer. This is the first time these antimicrobial metabolites PLA, OH-PLA, ILA, and PEA are being reported as the reaction products of aromatic amino acids catabolism in G. candidum. PMID:23590565

  7. Cytochrome P450-dependent eicosapentaenoic acid metabolites are novel BK channel activators.

    PubMed

    Lauterbach, Birgit; Barbosa-Sicard, Eduardo; Wang, Mong-Heng; Honeck, Horst; Kärgel, Eva; Theuer, Jürgen; Schwartzman, Michal L; Haller, Hermann; Luft, Friedrich C; Gollasch, Maik; Schunck, Wolf-Hagen

    2002-02-01

    P450-dependent arachidonic acid (AA) metabolites regulate arterial tone by modulating calcium-activated (BK) potassium channels in vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC). Because eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) has been reported to improve vascular function, we tested the hypothesis that P450-dependent epoxygenation of EPA produces alternative vasoactive compounds. We synthesized the 5 regioisomeric epoxyeicosattrienoic acids (EETeTr) and examined them for effects on K(+) currents in rat cerebral artery VSMCs with the patch-clamp technique. 11(R),12(S)-epoxyeicosatrienoic acid (50 nmol/L) was used for comparison and stimulated K(+) currents 6-fold at +60 mV. However, 17(R),18(S)-EETeTr elicited a more than 14-fold increase. 17(S),18(R)-EET and the remaining four regioisomers were inactive. The effect of 17(R),18(S)-EETeTr was blocked by tetraethylammonium but not by 4-aminopyridine. VSMCs expressed P450s 4A1 and 4A3. Recombinant P450 4A1 hydroxylated EPA at C-19 and C-20 and epoxygenated the 17,18-double bond, yielding the R, S- and S, R-enantiomers in a ratio of 64:36. We conclude that 17(R),18(S)-EETeTr represents a novel, potent activator of BK potassium channels. Furthermore, this metabolite can be directly produced in VSMCs. We suggest that 17(R),18(S)-EETeTr may function as an important hyperpolarizing factor, particularly with EPA-rich diets. PMID:11882617

  8. Zaragozic acids: a family of fungal metabolites that are picomolar competitive inhibitors of squalene synthase.

    PubMed

    Bergstrom, J D; Kurtz, M M; Rew, D J; Amend, A M; Karkas, J D; Bostedor, R G; Bansal, V S; Dufresne, C; VanMiddlesworth, F L; Hensens, O D

    1993-01-01

    Three closely related fungal metabolites, zaragozic acids A, B, and C, that are potent inhibitors of squalene synthase have been isolated and characterized. Zaragozic acids A, B, and C were produced from an unidentified sterile fungal culture, Sporormiella intermedia, and Leptodontium elatius, respectively. The structures of the zaragozic acids and their trimethyl esters were determined by a combination of physical and chemical techniques. The zaragozic acids are characterized by a novel 2,8-dioxobicyclo[3.2.1]octane-4,6,7- trihydroxyl-3,4,5-tricarboxylic acid core and differ from each other in the structures of the 6-acyl and 1-alkyl side chains. They were found to be potent competitive inhibitors of rat liver squalene synthase with apparent Ki values of 78 pM, 29 pM, and 45 pM, respectively. They inhibited cholesterol synthesis in Hep G2 cells, and zaragozic acid A was an inhibitor of acute hepatic cholesterol synthesis in the mouse (50% inhibitory dose of 200 micrograms/kg of body weight). Inhibition of squalene synthase in cells and in vivo was accompanied by an accumulation of label from [3H]mevalonate into farnesyl diphosphate, farnesol, and organic acids. These data indicate that the zaragozic acids are a previously unreported class of therapeutic agents with potential for the treatment of hypercholesterolemia. PMID:8419946

  9. Amino Acid and Secondary Metabolite Production in Embryogenic and Non-Embryogenic Callus of Fingerroot Ginger (Boesenbergia rotunda).

    PubMed

    Ng, Theresa Lee Mei; Karim, Rezaul; Tan, Yew Seong; Teh, Huey Fang; Danial, Asma Dazni; Ho, Li Sim; Khalid, Norzulaani; Appleton, David Ross; Harikrishna, Jennifer Ann

    2016-01-01

    Interest in the medicinal properties of secondary metabolites of Boesenbergia rotunda (fingerroot ginger) has led to investigations into tissue culture of this plant. In this study, we profiled its primary and secondary metabolites, as well as hormones of embryogenic and non-embryogenic (dry and watery) callus and shoot base, Ultra Performance Liquid Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry together with histological characterization. Metabolite profiling showed relatively higher levels of glutamine, arginine and lysine in embryogenic callus than in dry and watery calli, while shoot base tissue showed an intermediate level of primary metabolites. For the five secondary metabolites analyzed (ie. panduratin, pinocembrin, pinostrobin, cardamonin and alpinetin), shoot base had the highest concentrations, followed by watery, dry and embryogenic calli. Furthermore, intracellular auxin levels were found to decrease from dry to watery calli, followed by shoot base and finally embryogenic calli. Our morphological observations showed the presence of fibrils on the cell surface of embryogenic callus while diphenylboric acid 2-aminoethylester staining indicated the presence of flavonoids in both dry and embryogenic calli. Periodic acid-Schiff staining showed that shoot base and dry and embryogenic calli contained starch reserves while none were found in watery callus. This study identified several primary metabolites that could be used as markers of embryogenic cells in B. rotunda, while secondary metabolite analysis indicated that biosynthesis pathways of these important metabolites may not be active in callus and embryogenic tissue. PMID:27258536

  10. Amino Acid and Secondary Metabolite Production in Embryogenic and Non-Embryogenic Callus of Fingerroot Ginger (Boesenbergia rotunda)

    PubMed Central

    Ng, Theresa Lee Mei; Karim, Rezaul; Tan, Yew Seong; Teh, Huey Fang; Danial, Asma Dazni; Ho, Li Sim; Khalid, Norzulaani; Appleton, David Ross; Harikrishna, Jennifer Ann

    2016-01-01

    Interest in the medicinal properties of secondary metabolites of Boesenbergia rotunda (fingerroot ginger) has led to investigations into tissue culture of this plant. In this study, we profiled its primary and secondary metabolites, as well as hormones of embryogenic and non-embryogenic (dry and watery) callus and shoot base, Ultra Performance Liquid Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry together with histological characterization. Metabolite profiling showed relatively higher levels of glutamine, arginine and lysine in embryogenic callus than in dry and watery calli, while shoot base tissue showed an intermediate level of primary metabolites. For the five secondary metabolites analyzed (ie. panduratin, pinocembrin, pinostrobin, cardamonin and alpinetin), shoot base had the highest concentrations, followed by watery, dry and embryogenic calli. Furthermore, intracellular auxin levels were found to decrease from dry to watery calli, followed by shoot base and finally embryogenic calli. Our morphological observations showed the presence of fibrils on the cell surface of embryogenic callus while diphenylboric acid 2-aminoethylester staining indicated the presence of flavonoids in both dry and embryogenic calli. Periodic acid-Schiff staining showed that shoot base and dry and embryogenic calli contained starch reserves while none were found in watery callus. This study identified several primary metabolites that could be used as markers of embryogenic cells in B. rotunda, while secondary metabolite analysis indicated that biosynthesis pathways of these important metabolites may not be active in callus and embryogenic tissue. PMID:27258536

  11. Biological Significance of Urolithins, the Gut Microbial Ellagic Acid-Derived Metabolites: The Evidence So Far

    PubMed Central

    Espín, Juan Carlos; Larrosa, Mar; García-Conesa, María Teresa; Tomás-Barberán, Francisco

    2013-01-01

    The health benefits attributed to pomegranate have been associated with its high content in polyphenols, particularly ellagitannins. This is also the case for other ellagitannin-containing fruits and nuts including strawberry, raspberry, blackberry, walnuts, and muscadine grapes. The bioavailability of ellagitannins and ellagic acid is however very low. These molecules suffer extensive metabolism by the gut microbiota to produce urolithins that are much better absorbed. Urolithins circulate in plasma as glucuronide and sulfate conjugates at concentrations in the range of 0.2–20 μM. It is therefore conceivable that the health effects of ellagitannin-containing products can be associated with these gut-produced urolithins, and thus the evaluation of the biological effects of these metabolites is essential. Recent research, mostly based on in vitro testing, has shown preliminary evidence of the anti-inflammatory, anticarcinogenic, antiglycative, antioxidant, and antimicrobial effects of urolithins, supporting their potential contribution to the health effects attributed to pomegranate and ellagitannin-rich foods. The number of in vivo studies is still limited, but they show preventive effects of urolithins on gut and systemic inflammation that encourage further research. Both in vivo and mechanistic studies are necessary to clarify the health effects of these metabolites. Attention should be paid when designing these mechanistic studies in order to use the physiologically relevant metabolites (urolithins in gut models and their conjugated derivatives in systemic models) at concentrations that can be reached in vivo. PMID:23781257

  12. Synthesis and effects of 3-methylthiopropanoyl thiolesters of lipoic acid, methional metabolite mimics.

    PubMed

    Courvoisier, Celine; Paret, Marie Julie; Chantepie, Jacqueline; Goré, Jacques; Fournet, Guy; Quash, Gerard

    2006-02-01

    6S,8S-Bis(3-methylthiopropanoyl) thiolesters of lipoic acid were synthesized with the carboxyl moiety of lipoate modified as methyl or water soluble choline esters. Evaluation on different cell lines in culture showed that they possessed modest antiproliferative activity. However, the 6-fold decrease in IC50 (from 270 to 45 microM) observed with the water soluble 6S,8S-bis(3-methylthiopropenoyl) thiolester dehydro derivative on a human epithelial prostate cancer cell line (DU145) argues in favor of 3-methylthiopropanoyl metabolites as endogenous growth regulatory (apoptogenic) compounds derived from methionine. PMID:16387348

  13. Glucuronidation of the aspirin metabolite salicylic acid by expressed UDP-glucuronosyltransferases and human liver microsomes.

    PubMed

    Kuehl, Gwendolyn E; Bigler, Jeannette; Potter, John D; Lampe, Johanna W

    2006-02-01

    Acetylsalicylic acid (aspirin) is a common nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug used for treatment of pain and arthritis. In the body, acetylsalicylic acid is rapidly deacetylated to form salicylic acid. Both compounds have been proposed as anti-inflammatory agents. Major metabolites of salicylic acid are its acyl and phenolic glucuronide conjugates. Formation of these conjugates, catalyzed by UDP-glucuronosyltransferases (UGTs), decreases the amount of pharmacologically active salicylic acid present. We aimed to identify the UGTs catalyzing the glucuronidation of salicylic acid using both heterologously expressed enzymes and pooled human liver microsomes (HLMs) and to develop a liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry method to quantify glucuronidation activity of UGTs 1A1, 1A3, 1A4, 1A6, 1A7, 1A8, 1A9, 1A10, 2B4, 2B7, 2B15, and 2B17 Supersomes. All UGTs tested, except 1A4, 2B15, and 2B17, catalyzed salicylic acid phenolic and acyl glucuronidation. Ratios of salicylic acid phenolic to acyl glucuronide formation varied more than 12-fold from 0.5 for UGT1A6 to 6.1 for UGT1A1. These results suggest that all UGTs except 1A4, 2B15, and 2B17 might be involved in the glucuronidation of salicylic acid in vivo. From comparisons of apparent Km values determined in pooled HLMs and in expressed UGTs, UGT2B7 was suggested as a likely catalyst of salicylic acid acyl glucuronidation, whereas multiple UGTs were suggested as catalysts of phenolic glucuronidation. The results of this UGT screening may help target future evaluation of the effects of UGT polymorphisms on response to aspirin in clinical and population-based studies. PMID:16258079

  14. Regulation of polyunsaturated fatty acid biosynthesis by seaweed fucoxanthin and its metabolite in cultured hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Aki, Tsunehiro; Yamamoto, Masaya; Takahashi, Toshiaki; Tomita, Kohki; Toyoura, Rieko; Iwashita, Kazuhiro; Kawamoto, Seiji; Hosokawa, Masashi; Miyashita, Kazuo; Ono, Kazuhisa

    2014-02-01

    The effects of a seaweed carotenoid, fucoxanthin, and its physiological metabolite, fucoxanthinol, on the biosynthesis of polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) were investigated using cultured rat hepatoma BRL-3A. The metabolism of α-linolenic acid (18:3n-3) was suppressed by the addition of these carotenoids, resulting in a decrease in the content of eicosapentaenoic acid (20:5n-3), which suggested a down-regulation of metabolic enzymes such as fatty acid desaturase and elongase. An increase in the content of docosahexaenoic acid (22:6n-3), as observed in previous studies in vivo, might be a buffering action to maintain the membrane fluidity. The suppressive effect of fucoxanthinol on ∆6 fatty acid desaturase was not at the level of gene expression but due to specific modifications of the protein via a ubiquitin-proteasome system. A proteomic analysis revealed several factors such as phosphatidylethanolamine-binding protein that might be involved in the observed action of fucoxanthin. These findings will contribute to studies on the elucidation of the precise molecular mechanisms underlying the regulation of PUFA biosynthesis by fucoxanthin. PMID:24174374

  15. Role of omega-3 fatty acids and their metabolites in asthma and allergic diseases.

    PubMed

    Miyata, Jun; Arita, Makoto

    2015-01-01

    Omega-3 fatty acids, docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) and eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA), are found naturally in fish oil and are commonly thought to be anti-inflammatory nutrients, with protective effects in inflammatory diseases including asthma and allergies. The mechanisms of these effects remain mostly unknown but are of great interest for their potential therapeutic applications. Large numbers of epidemiological and observational studies investigating the effect of fish intake or omega-3 fatty acid supplementation during pregnancy, lactation, infancy, childhood, and adulthood on asthmatic and allergic outcomes have been conducted. They mostly indicate protective effects and suggest a causal relationship between decreased intake of fish oil in modernized diets and an increasing number of individuals with asthma or other allergic diseases. Specialized pro-resolving mediators (SPM: protectins, resolvins, and maresins) are generated from omega-3 fatty acids such as EPA and DHA via several enzymatic reactions. These mediators counter-regulate airway eosinophilic inflammation and promote the resolution of inflammation in vivo. Several reports have indicated that the biosynthesis of SPM is impaired, especially in severe asthma, which suggests that chronic inflammation in the lung might result from a resolution defect. This article focuses on the beneficial aspects of omega-3 fatty acids and offers recent insights into their bioactive metabolites including resolvins and protectins. PMID:25572556

  16. Screening of central functions of amino acids and their metabolites for sedative and hypnotic effects using chick models.

    PubMed

    Furuse, Mitsuhiro

    2015-09-01

    The chick has a practical advantage in the screening process in that chicks require only small quantities of drugs. The chick separation stress paradigm has traditionally been recognized as a valid form of anxiolytic screening. Further, chick behavior involving standing motionless with eyes closed or sitting motionless with head drooped is nearly always associated with electrophysiological sleep. When centrally administered, some DNA-encoded L-α-amino acids, as well as some DNA-non-encoded amino acids, such as metabolites of L-α-amino acids, D-amino acid and β-amino acid, have shown sedative and/or hypnotic effects in chicks. The effects of some of these amino acids have subsequently been confirmed in humans. In conclusion, the chick model is convenient and useful for screening central functions of amino acids and their metabolites for hypnosis and sedation. PMID:26101060

  17. Lichen secondary metabolite evernic acid as potential quorum sensing inhibitor against Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Gökalsın, Barış; Sesal, Nüzhet Cenk

    2016-09-01

    Cystic Fibrosis is a genetic disease and it affects the respiratory and digestive systems. Pseudomonas aeruginosa infections in Cystic Fibrosis are presented as the main cause for high mortality and morbidity rates. Pseudomonas aeruginosa populations can regulate their virulence gene expressions via the bacterial communication system: quorum sensing. Inhibition of quorum sensing by employing quorum sensing inhibitors can leave the bacteria vulnerable. Therefore, determining natural sources to obtain potential quorum sensing inhibitors is essential. Lichens have ethnobotanical value for their medicinal properties and it is possible that their secondary metabolites have quorum sensing inhibitor properties. This study aims to investigate an alternative treatment approach by utilizing lichen secondary metabolite evernic acid to reduce the expressions of Pseudomonas aeruginosa virulence factors by inhibiting quorum sensing. For this purpose, fluorescent monitor strains were utilized for quorum sensing inhibitor screens and quantitative reverse-transcriptase PCR analyses were conducted for comparison. Results indicate that evernic acid is capable of inhibiting Pseudomonas aeruginosa quorum sensing systems. PMID:27465850

  18. Protective Effects of Dihydrocaffeic Acid, a Coffee Component Metabolite, on a Focal Cerebral Ischemia Rat Model.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kyungjin; Lee, Beom-Joon; Bu, Youngmin

    2015-01-01

    We recently reported the protective effects of chlorogenic acid (CGA) in a transient middle cerebral artery occlusion (tMCAo) rat model. The current study further investigated the protective effects of the metabolites of CGA and dihydrocaffeic acid (DHCA) was selected for further study after screening using the same tMCAo rat model. In the current study, tMCAo rats (2 h of MCAo followed by 22 h of reperfusion) were injected with various doses of DHCA at 0 and 2 h after onset of ischemia. We assessed brain damage, functional deficits, brain edema, and blood-brain barrier damage at 24 h after ischemia. For investigating the mechanism, in vitro zymography and western blotting analysis were performed to determine the expression and activation of matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-2 and -9. DHCA (3, 10, and 30 mg/kg, i.p.) dose-dependently reduced brain infarct volume, behavioral deficits, brain water content, and Evans Blue (EB) leakage. DHCA inhibited expression and activation of MMP-2 and MMP-9. Therefore, DHCA might be one of the important metabolites of CGA and of natural products, including coffee, with protective effects on ischemia-induced neuronal damage and brain edema. PMID:26133759

  19. Total Synthesis of the Aristolochic Acids, Their Major Metabolites, and Related Compounds

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Plants from the Aristolochia genus have been recommended for the treatment of a variety of human ailments since the time of Hippocrates. However, many species produce the highly toxic aristolochic acids (AAs), which are both nephrotoxic and carcinogenic. For the purposes of extensive biological studies, a versatile approach to the synthesis of the AAs and their major metabolites was devised based primarily on a Suzuki–Miyaura coupling reaction. The key to success lies in the preparation of a common ring-A precursor, namely, the tetrahydropyranyl ether of 2-nitromethyl-3-iodo-4,5-methylendioxybenzyl alcohol (27), which was generated in excellent yield by oxidation of the aldoxime precursor 26. Suzuki–Miyaura coupling of 27 with a variety of benzaldehyde 2-boronates was accompanied by an aldol condensation/elimination reaction to give the desired phenanthrene intermediate directly. Deprotection of the benzyl alcohol followed by two sequential oxidation steps gave the desired phenanthrene nitrocarboxylic acids. This approach was used to synthesize AAs I–IV and several other related compounds, including AA I and AA II bearing an aminopropyloxy group at position-6, which were required for further conversion to fluorescent biological probes. Further successful application of the Suzuki–Miyaura coupling reaction to the synthesis of the N-hydroxyaristolactams of AA I and AA II then allowed the synthesis of the putative, but until now elusive, N-acetoxy- and N-sulfonyloxy-aristolactam metabolites. PMID:24877584

  20. Potential of selected lactic acid bacteria to produce food compatible antifungal metabolites.

    PubMed

    De Muynck, Cassandra; Leroy, Annelies I J; De Maeseneire, Sofie; Arnaut, Filip; Soetaert, Wim; Vandamme, Erick J

    2004-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the potential of lactic acid bacteria to inhibit the outgrowth of some common food-spoiling fungi. Culture supernatants of 17 Lactic acid bacterial strains as well as of three commercial probiotic cultures were evaluated for antifungal activity using an agar-diffusion method. The method parameters were chosen in order to reveal compounds for potential use in food (bio)preservation. Thirteen strains showed antifungal activity of which five strains were very promising: Lactobacillus acidophilus LMG 9433, L. amylovorus DSM 20532, L. brevis LMG 6906, L. coryniformis subsp. coryniformis LMG 9196 and L. plantarum LMG 6907. Four of these five strains were further examined; it was found that the produced antifungal metabolites were pH-dependent. The exact chemical nature of these substances has not been revealed yet. PMID:15646380

  1. Hypoxia optimises tumour growth by controlling nutrient import and acidic metabolite export.

    PubMed

    Parks, Scott K; Cormerais, Yann; Marchiq, Ibtissam; Pouyssegur, Jacques

    2016-01-01

    In their quest for survival and successful growth, cancer cells optimise their cellular processes to enable them to outcompete normal cells in their microenvironment. In essence cancer cells: (i) enhance uptake of nutrients/metabolites, (ii) utilise nutrients more efficiently via metabolic alterations and (iii) deal with the metabolic waste products in a way that furthers their progression while hampering the survival of normal tissue. Hypoxia Inducible Factors (HIFs) act as essential drivers of these adaptations via the promotion of numerous membrane proteins including glucose transporters (GLUTs), monocarboxylate transporters (MCTs), amino-acid transporters (LAT1, xCT), and acid-base regulating carbonic anhydrases (CAs). In addition to a competitive growth advantage for tumour cells, these HIF-regulated proteins are implicated in metastasis, cancer 'stemness' and the immune response. Current research indicates that combined targeting of these HIF-regulated membrane proteins in tumour cells will provide promising therapeutic strategies in the future. PMID:26724171

  2. Epoxygenase metabolites of arachidonic acid inhibit vasopressin response in toad bladder

    SciTech Connect

    Schlondorff, D.; Petty, E.; Oates, J.A.; Jacoby, M.; Levine, S.D. Vanderbilt Univ., Nashville, TN )

    1987-09-01

    In addition to cyclooxygenase and lipoxygenase pathways, the kidney can also metabolize arachidonic acid by a NADPH-dependent cytochrome P-450 enzyme to epoxyeicosatrienoic acids (EETs); furthermore, 5,6-EET has been shown to alter electrolyte transport across isolated renal tubules. The authors examined the effects of three ({sup 14}C-labeled)-EETs (5,6-, 11,12-, and 14,15-EET) on osmotic water flow across toad urinary bladder. All three EETs reversibly inhibited vasopressin-stimulated osmotic water flow with 5,6- and 11,12-EET being the most potent. The effects appeared to be independent of prostaglandins EETs inhibited the water flow response to forskolin but not the response to adenosine 3{prime},5{prime}-cyclic monophosphate (cAMP) or 8-BrcAMP, consistent with an effect on cAMP generation. To determine whether these effects were due to the EETs or to products of their metabolism, they examined the effects of their vicinal diol hydrolysis products, the dihydroxyeicosatrienoic acids. Nonenzymatic conversion of labeled 5,6-EET to its vicinal diol occurred rapidly in the buffer, whereas 11,12-EET was hydrolyzed in a saturable manner only when incubated in the presence of bladder tissue. The dihydroxyeicosatrienoic acids formed inhibited water flow in a manner paralleling that of the EETs. The data support the hypothesis that EETs and their physiologically active dihydroxyeicosatrienoic acid metabolites inhibit vasopressin-stimulated water flow predominantly via inhibition of adenylate cyclase.

  3. Studies on the Biotransformation of Veratric Acid, a Human Metabolite of Mebeverine, by Using the Incubated Hen's Egg.

    PubMed

    Kiep, L; Göhl, M; Schmidt, J; Seifert, K

    2015-09-01

    Metabolism studies with selected test substances have shown that a model on the basis of the incubated hen's egg is suitable as a supplement to animal experimentation. Because of its 3,4-dimethoxyphenyl structure veratric acid (3,4-dimethoxybenzoic acid), a known human metabolite of mebeverine, was chosen as model substance for the present investigations and the parent compound as well as 4-hydroxy-3-methoxybenzoic acid were identified as main metabolites. The absence of 3-hydroxy-4-methoxybenzoic acid lets conclude that the O-demethylation takes place exclusively at the p-methoxyl function. In addition, 3,3',4,4'-tetramethoxy-l-ornithuric acid (2,5-bis-(3,4-dimethoxybenzoylamino)pentanoic acid) and its O-desmethyl derivative could be characterized as further metabolites. So far an amino acid conjugate has not been described after veratric acid administration in a vertebrate. There were no indications for the appearance of 3,4-dihydroxybenzoic acid in the veratric acid metabolism. This was confirmed by corresponding studies having the isomeric guaiacol acids as precursor. Furthermore, it could be proved that in ovo the O-methylation of 3,4-dihydroxybenzoic acid occurs regioselective at the m-hydroxyl group. The results which broaden the knowledge on the metabolic fate of veratric acid are discussed in comparison with those in mammals. The metabolites were identified by GC-MS, ESI-HRMS and LC/ESI-MS/MS. The structure of the synthesized reference substance was confirmed by MS, (1)H and (13)C NMR spectral data. PMID:25310250

  4. DEVELOPMENT OF ENZYME-LINKED IMMUNOSORBENT ASSAYS FOR ISOCUPRESSIC ACID AND SERUM METABOLITES OF ISOCUPRESSIC ACID

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The consumption of ponderosa pine (Pinus ponderosa), lodgepole pine (Pinus contorta), common juniper (Juniperus communis) and Monterey cypress (Cupressus macrocarpa) causes abortions in pregnant cattle. Recent studies have identified isocupressic acid as the primary abortifacient compound in these ...

  5. Polyunsaturated fatty acids and their metabolites in the pathobiology of schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Das, Undurti N

    2013-04-01

    Schizophrenia can be considered as a low-grade systemic inflammatory disease with its origins in the perinatal period. It is likely that genetic, environmental, and nutritional factors interact to induce excess production of pro-inflammatory cytokines that, in turn, damage fetal neurons leading to the adult onset of schizophrenia. Polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) and their metabolites such as lipoxins, resolvins, protectins, maresins and nitrolipids not only have potent neuroprotective action but also are capable of inhibiting the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines. Decreased formation of PUFAs as a result of low activity of Δ(6) and Δ(5) desaturases can result in an increase in the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines due to the absence of negative control exerted by PUFAs and their anti-inflammatory metabolites that, in turn, may predispose to neuronal damage and development of schizophrenia in adult life. Furthermore, PUFAs are essential for brain growth and development. If this proposal is correct, this implies that perinatal and adult supplementation of PUFAs not only prevents but also helps in the treatment of schizophrenia. Furthermore, synthetic analogs of lipoxins, resolvins, and protectins may be of significant benefit in schizophrenia. PMID:22735394

  6. Formation and transport of the sulfonic acid metabolites of alachlor and metolachlor in soil

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Aga, D.S.; Thurman, E.M.

    2001-01-01

    Alachlor and metolachlor are dechlorinated and transformed into their corresponding ethane sulfonic acid (ESA) metabolites in soil. In a field-disappearance study, it was shown that alachlor ESA was formed at a faster rate and at concentrations 2-4 times higher than metolachlor ESA, conforming with the observed longer disappearance half-life of metolachlor (15.5 d) in the field as compared to alachlor (8 d). Runoff data also showed higher concentrations of alachlor ESA as compared to metolachlor ESA, even though they were applied at the same levels. Data from soil cores showed transport of the ESA compounds in soil to as far down as 75-90 cm below the surface, at concentrations ranging from less than 0.5 ??g/L to about 50 ??g/L. In contrast, no parent herbicide was detected at these depths. This observation correlates with the higher log KOC values for alachlor (3.33) and metolachlor (3.01) relative to their corresponding ESA metabolites, alachlor ESA (2.26), and metolachlor ESA (2.29).

  7. A potential new metabolite of gamma-hydroxybutyrate: sulfonated gamma-hydroxybutyric acid.

    PubMed

    Hanisch, Stephanie; Stachel, Nicole; Skopp, Gisela

    2016-03-01

    Detection of gamma-hydroxybutyric acid (GHB) became crucial in many clinical and forensic settings due to its increasing use for recreational purposes and drug-facilitated sexual assault. Its narrow window of detection of about 3-12 h in urine represents a major problem. Analogous to ethyl glucuronide, the recently identified GHB-glucuronide exhibits a longer window of detection than the parent drug. It appeared reasonable that a sulfonated metabolite of GHB (GHB-SUL) will also be formed. Due to the lack of an appropriate standard, GHB was incubated with a human liver cytosolic fraction to produce GHB-SUL. Following development of a liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) assay to measure GHB and GHB-SUL, authentic urine samples (n = 5) were tested for GHB-SUL. These investigations revealed detectable signals of both GHB and GHB-SUL, strongly indicating that GHB is not only glucuronidated but also sulfonated. Given that sulfonated metabolites generally have longer half-life times than the corresponding free drugs, GHB-SUL may serve as a biomarker of GHB misuse along with its glucuronide. PMID:26210636

  8. The ex vivo antiplatelet activation potential of fruit phenolic metabolite hippuric acid.

    PubMed

    Santhakumar, Abishek Bommannan; Stanley, Roger; Singh, Indu

    2015-08-01

    Polyphenol-rich fruit and vegetable intake has been associated with reduction in platelet hyperactivity, a significant contributor to thrombus formation. This study was undertaken to investigate the possible role of hippuric acid, a predominant metabolite of plant cyclic polyols, phenolic acids and polyphenols, in reduction of platelet activation-related thrombogenesis. Fasting blood samples were collected from 13 healthy subjects to analyse the effect of varying concentrations of hippuric acid (100 μM, 200 μM, 500 μM, 1 mM and 2 mM) on activation-dependant platelet surface-marker expression. Procaspase activating compound-1 (PAC-1) and P-selectin/CD62P monoclonal antibodies were used to evaluate platelet activation-related conformational changes and α-granule release respectively using flow cytometry. Platelets were stimulated ex vivo via the P2Y1/P2Y12- adenosine diphosphate (ADP) pathway of platelet activation. Hippuric acid at a concentration of 1 mM and 2 mM significantly reduced P-selectin/CD62P expression (p = 0.03 and p < 0.001 respectively) induced by ADP. Hippuric acid at 2 mM concentration also inhibited PAC-1 activation-dependant antibody expression (p = 0.03). High ex vivo concentrations of hippuric acid can therefore significantly reduce P-selectin and PAC-1 expression thus reducing platelet activation and clotting potential. However, although up to 11 mM of hippuric acid can be excreted in the urine per day following consumption of fruit, hippuric acid is actively excreted with a recorded Cmax for hippuric acid in human plasma at 250-300 μM. This is lower than the blood concentration of 1-2 mM shown to be bioactive in this research. The contribution of hippuric acid to the protective effects of fruit and vegetable intake against vascular disorders by the pathways measured is therefore low but could be synergistic with lowered doses of antiplatelet drugs and help reduce risk of thrombosis in current antiplatelet drug sensitive populations. PMID

  9. Mycosporine-like amino acids: relevant secondary metabolites. Chemical and ecological aspects.

    PubMed

    Carreto, Jose I; Carignan, Mario O

    2011-01-01

    Taxonomically diverse marine, freshwater and terrestrial organisms have evolved the capacity to synthesize, accumulate and metabolize a variety of UV-absorbing substances called mycosporine-like amino acids (MAAs) as part of an overall strategy to diminish the direct and indirect damaging effects of environmental ultraviolet radiation (UVR). Whereas the enzymatic machinery to synthesize MAAs was probably inherited from cyanobacteria ancestors via the endosymbionts hypothesis, metazoans lack this biochemical pathway, but can acquire and metabolize these compounds by trophic transference, symbiotic or bacterial association. In this review we describe the structure and physicochemical properties of MAAs, including the recently discovered compounds and the modern methods used for their isolation and identification, updating previous reviews. On this basis, we review the metabolism and distribution of this unique class of metabolites among marine organism. PMID:21556168

  10. Mycosporine-Like Amino Acids: Relevant Secondary Metabolites. Chemical and Ecological Aspects

    PubMed Central

    Carreto, Jose I.; Carignan, Mario O.

    2011-01-01

    Taxonomically diverse marine, freshwater and terrestrial organisms have evolved the capacity to synthesize, accumulate and metabolize a variety of UV-absorbing substances called mycosporine-like amino acids (MAAs) as part of an overall strategy to diminish the direct and indirect damaging effects of environmental ultraviolet radiation (UVR). Whereas the enzymatic machinery to synthesize MAAs was probably inherited from cyanobacteria ancestors via the endosymbionts hypothesis, metazoans lack this biochemical pathway, but can acquire and metabolize these compounds by trophic transference, symbiotic or bacterial association. In this review we describe the structure and physicochemical properties of MAAs, including the recently discovered compounds and the modern methods used for their isolation and identification, updating previous reviews. On this basis, we review the metabolism and distribution of this unique class of metabolites among marine organism. PMID:21556168

  11. Newly Identified Targets of Aspirin and Its Primary Metabolite, Salicylic Acid.

    PubMed

    Klessig, Daniel F

    2016-04-01

    Salicylic acid (SA) is a plant hormone, which influences several physiological processes, and is a critical modulator of multiple levels of immunity in plants. Several high-throughput screens, which were developed to identify SA-binding proteins through which SA mediates its many physiological effects in plants, uncovered several novel targets of aspirin and its primary metabolite, SA, in humans. These include glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) and high mobility group box 1 (HMGB1), two proteins associated with some of the most prevalent and devastating human diseases. In addition, natural and synthetic SA derivatives were discovered, which are much more potent than SA at inhibiting the disease-associated activities of these targets. PMID:26954428

  12. Inhibition of Poly(ADP-Ribose) Polymerase by Nucleic Acid Metabolite 7-Methylguanine

    PubMed Central

    Nilov, D. K.; Tararov, V. I.; Kulikov, A. V.; Zakharenko, A. L.; Gushchina, I. V.; Mikhailov, S. N.; Lavrik, O. I.; Švedas, V. K.

    2016-01-01

    The ability of 7-methylguanine, a nucleic acid metabolite, to inhibit poly(ADP-ribose)polymerase-1 (PARP-1) and poly(ADP-ribose)polymerase-2 (PARP-2) has been identified in silico and studied experimentally. The amino group at position 2 and the methyl group at position 7 were shown to be important substituents for the efficient binding of purine derivatives to PARPs. The activity of both tested enzymes, PARP-1 and PARP-2, was suppressed by 7-methylguanine with IC50 values of 150 and 50 μM, respectively. At the PARP inhibitory concentration, 7-methylguanine itself was not cytotoxic, but it was able to accelerate apoptotic death of BRCA1-deficient breast cancer cells induced by cisplatin and doxorubicin, the widely used DNA-damaging chemotherapeutic agents. 7-Methylguanine possesses attractive predictable pharmacokinetics and an adverse-effect profile and may be considered as a new additive to chemotherapeutic treatment. PMID:27437145

  13. Enhanced L-lactic acid production in Lactobacillus paracasei by exogenous proline addition based on comparative metabolite profiling analysis.

    PubMed

    Tian, Xiwei; Wang, Yonghong; Chu, Ju; Zhuang, Yingping; Zhang, Siliang

    2016-03-01

    This study investigated cell physiological and metabolic responses of Lactobacillus paracasei to osmotic stresses. Both cellular fatty acid composition and metabolite profiling were responded by increasing unsaturated and epoxy-fatty acid proportions, as well as accumulating some specific intracellular metabolites. Simultaneously, metabolite profiling was adopted to rationally and systematically discover potential osmoprotectants. Consequently, exogenous addition of proline or aspartate was validated to be a feasible and efficacious approach to improve cell growth under hyperosmotic stress in shake flasks. Particularly, with 5-L cultivation system, L-lactic acid concentration increased from 108 to 150 g/L during the following 16-h fermentation in 2 g/L proline addition group, while it only increased from 110 to 140 g/L in no proline addition group. Moreover, glucose consumption rate with proline addition reached 3.49 g/L/h during this phase, 35.8 % higher than that with no proline addition. However, extreme high osmotic pressure would significantly limit the osmoprotection of proline, and the osmolality threshold for L. paracasei was approximately 3600 mOsm/kg. It was suggested that proline principally played a role as a compatible solute accumulated in the cell for hyperosmotic preservation. The strategies of exploiting osmotic protectant with metabolite profiling and enhancing L-lactic acid production by osmoprotectant addition would be potential to provide a new insight for other microorganisms and organic acids production. PMID:26658821

  14. Effects of Fruit Ellagitannin Extracts, Ellagic Acid, and Their Colonic Metabolite, Urolithin A, on Wnt Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Meenakshi; Li, Liya; Celver, Jeremy; Killian, Caroline; Kovoor, Abraham; Seeram, Navindra P.

    2010-01-01

    Recent data suggest that ellagitannins (ETs), a class of hydrolyzable tannins found in some fruits and nuts, may have beneficial effects against colon cancer. In the stomach and gut, ETs hydrolyze to release ellagic acid (EA) and are converted by gut microbiota to urolithin-A (UA; 3,8-dihydroxy-6H-dibenzopyran-6-one) type metabolites which may persist in the colon through enterohepatic circulation. However, little is known about the mechanisms of action of either the native compounds or their metabolites on colon carcinogenesis. Components of Wnt signaling pathways are known to play a pivotal role in human colon carcinogenesis and inappropriate activation of the signaling cascade is observed in 90% of colorectal cancers. Here we investigated the effects of UA, EA, and ET rich fruit extracts on Wnt signaling in a human 293T cell line using a luciferase reporter of canonical Wnt pathway-mediated transcriptional activation. The ET extracts were obtained from strawberry (Fragaria annassa), Jamun berry (Eugenia jambolana), and pomegranate (Punica granatum) fruit and were all standardized to phenolic content (as gallic acid equivalents, GAEs, by the Folin Ciocalteau method) and to EA content (by high performance liquid chromatography methods): strawberry=20.5% GAE, 5.0% EA; Jamun berry= 20.5% GAE, 4.2% EA; pomegranate= 55% GAE, 3.5% EA. The ET-extracts (IC50=28.0-30.0 μg/mL), EA (IC50=19.0 μg/mL; 63 μM) and UA (IC50=9.0 μg/mL; 39 μM) inhibited Wnt signaling suggesting that ET-rich foods have potential against colon carcinogenesis and that urolithins are relevant bioactive constituents in the colon. PMID:20014760

  15. Novel correlations between microbial taxa and amino acid metabolites in mouse cecal contents

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Gut microbes share a bi-directional relationship with thousands of metabolites in their environment. Many of these microbes and metabolites are associated with human diseases including obesity, cancer, and inflammatory diseases. Further understanding of how microbes affect metabolite concentration i...

  16. The omega-3 fatty acid DHA dose-dependently reduces atherosclerosis: a putative role for F4-neuroprostanes a specific class of peroxidized metabolites

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Objective. Consumption of long chain omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids is associated with reduced risks of cardiovascular disease but the role of their oxygenated metabolites remains unclear. We hypothesized that peroxidized metabolites of docosahexaenoic acid (DHA, 22:6 n-3) could play a role in ...

  17. Flavonoid metabolite 3-(3-hydroxyphenyl)propionic acid formed by human microflora decreases arterial blood pressure in rats.

    PubMed

    Najmanová, Iveta; Pourová, Jana; Vopršalová, Marie; Pilařová, Veronika; Semecký, Vladimír; Nováková, Lucie; Mladěnka, Přemysl

    2016-05-01

    There are reports of positive effects of quercetin on cardiovascular pathologies, however, mainly due to its low biovailability, the mechanism remains elusive. Here, we report that one metabolite formed by human microflora (3-(3-hydroxyphenyl)propionic acid)relaxed isolated rat aorta and decreased arterial blood pressure in rats. PMID:26790841

  18. Glucuronic acid and the ethanol metabolite ethyl-glucuronide cause toll-like receptor 4 activation and enhanced pain.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Susannah S; Hutchinson, Mark R; Zhang, Yingning; Hund, Dana K; Maier, Steven F; Rice, Kenner C; Watkins, Linda R

    2013-05-01

    We have previously observed that the non-opioid morphine metabolite, morphine-3-glucuronide, enhances pain via a toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) dependent mechanism. The present studies were undertaken to determine whether TLR4-dependent pain enhancement generalizes to other classes of glucuronide metabolites. In silico modeling predicted that glucuronic acid alone and ethyl glucuronide, a minor but long-lasting ethanol metabolite, would dock to the same MD-2 portion of the TLR4 receptor complex previously characterized as the docking site for morphine-3-glucuronide. Glucuronic acid, ethyl glucuronide and ethanol all caused an increase in TLR4-dependent reporter protein expression in a cell line transfected with TLR4 and associated co-signaling molecules. Glucuronic acid-, ethyl glucuronide-, and ethanol-induced increases in TLR4 signaling were blocked by the TLR4 antagonists LPS-RS and (+)-naloxone. Glucuronic acid and ethyl glucuronide both caused allodynia following intrathecal injection in rats, which was blocked by intrathecal co-administration of the TLR4 antagonist LPS-RS. The finding that ethyl glucuronide can cause TLR4-dependent pain could have implications for human conditions such as hangover headache and alcohol withdrawal hyperalgesia, as well as suggesting that other classes of glucuronide metabolites could have similar effects. PMID:23348028

  19. Glucuronic acid and the ethanol metabolite ethyl-glucuronide cause Toll-like receptor 4 activation and enhanced pain

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, Susannah S.; Hutchinson, Mark R.; Zhang, Yingning; Hund, Dana K.; Maier, Steven F.; Rice, Kenner C.; Watkins, Linda R.

    2013-01-01

    We have previously observed that the non-opioid morphine metabolite, morphine-3-glucuronide, enhances pain via a toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) dependent mechanism. The present studies were undertaken to determine whether TLR4-dependent pain enhancement generalizes to other classes of glucuronide metabolites. In silico modeling predicted that glucuronic acid alone and ethyl glucuronide, a minor but long-lasting ethanol metabolite, would dock to the same MD-2 portion of the TLR4 receptor complex previously characterized as the docking site for morphine-3-glucuronide. Glucuronic acid, ethyl glucuronide and ethanol all caused an increase in TLR4-dependent reporter protein expression in a cell line transfected with TLR4 and associated co-signaling molecules. Glucuronic acid-, ethyl glucuronide-, and ethanol-induced increases in TLR4 signaling were blocked by the TLR4 antagonists LPS-RS and (+)-naloxone. Glucuronic acid and ethyl glucuronide both caused allodynia following intrathecal injection in rats, which was blocked by intrathecal co-administration of the TLR4 antagonist LPS-RS. The finding that ethyl glucuronide can cause TLR4-dependent pain could have implications for human conditions such as hangover headache and alcohol withdrawal hyperalgesia, as well as suggesting that other classes of glucuronide metabolites could have similar effects. PMID:23348028

  20. [Effect of phenibut on the content of monoamines, their metabolites, and neurotransmitter amino acids in rat brain structures].

    PubMed

    Borodkina, L E; Kudrin, V S; Klodt, P M; Narkevich, V B; Tiurenkov, I N

    2009-01-01

    Effects of the nootropic drug phenibut, which is a structural analog of gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA), on the content of monoamines, their metabolites, and neurotransmitter amino acids in brain structures have been studied on Wistar rats. It is established that a single administration of phenibut in a dose of 25 mg/kg (i.p.) produces a statistically significant increase in the content of dopamine metabolite (3,4-dioxyphenylacetic acid) and the retarding amino acid taurine in striatum. At the same time, phenibut did not significantly influence the levels of GABA, serotonin, and dopamine in various brain structures and produce a moderate decrease in the level of norepinephrine in the hippocampus. PMID:19334514

  1. Human immunodeficiency virus glycoprotein (gp120) induction of monocyte arachidonic acid metabolites and interleukin 1.

    PubMed Central

    Wahl, L M; Corcoran, M L; Pyle, S W; Arthur, L O; Harel-Bellan, A; Farrar, W L

    1989-01-01

    This study reports on the direct effect of the envelope glycoprotein (gp120) of the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) on human monocyte function. Addition of preparations of purified gp120 from the HIV-1 to human monocytes resulted in the production of interleukin 1 (IL-1) and arachidonic acid metabolites from the cyclooxygenase and lipoxygenase pathways. Quantification of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) and IL-1 revealed an increase in both mediators with 50 ng of gp120 per ml and an increase of 12- and 30- to 40-fold with 200-400 ng of gp120 per ml, respectively. Unlike native gp120, the recombinant nonglycosylated gp120 fragments PB1-RF and PB1-IIIB, as well as one of the core structural proteins of HIV-1, p24, did not increase arachidonic acid metabolism or IL-1 activity. Cytofluorometric analysis revealed that gp120 blocked the binding of OKT4A to the CD4 on monocytes, whereas OKT4 binding was unaffected. Involvement of the CD4 in signal transduction was further demonstrated by the ability of OKT4 and OKT4A monoclonal antibodies to increase monocyte PGE2, IL-1 activity, and nanogram amounts of IL-1 beta. PMID:2536171

  2. Polycyclic Aromatic Acids Are Primary Metabolites of Alkyl-PAHs-A Case Study with Nereis diversicolor.

    PubMed

    Malmquist, Linus M V; Selck, Henriette; Jørgensen, Kåre B; Christensen, Jan H

    2015-05-01

    Although concentrations of alkylated polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (alkyl-PAHs) in oil-contaminated sediments are higher than those of unsubstituted PAHs, only little attention has been given to metabolism and ecotoxicity of alkyl-PAHs. In this study we demonstrated that metabolism of alkyl-PAHs primarily forms polycyclic aromatic acids (PAAs). We generalize this to other alkyl-PAHs, based on literature and the present study of the metabolism of 1-methylphenanthrene, 3,6-dimethylphenanthrene, and 1-, 2-, 3-, and 6-methylchrysene related to their unsubstituted parent PAHs. Also, we observed that body burdens and production of PAAs was related to the position of the methyl group, showing the same isomer specific preferences as for microbial degradation of alkyl-PAHs. We detected a high production of PAAs, and larger metabolism of alkyl-PAHs than their unsubstituted parent PAHs. We therefore propose that carboxylic acid metabolites of alkyl-PAHs have the potential of constituting a new class of contaminants in marine waters that needs attention in relation to ecological risk assessments. PMID:25827176

  3. Valproic acid: brain and plasma levels of the drug and its metabolites, anticonvulsant effects and gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) metabolism in the mouse.

    PubMed

    Nau, H; Löscher, W

    1982-03-01

    The slow onset and carry-over effect of valproic acid (VPA) therapy observed in some clinical as well as experimental animal studies have been examined by parallel pharmacokinetic and pharmacological investigations in a mouse model. VPA was rapidly transferred into brain and was cleared from that tissue with rates which exceeded plasma clearance rates. Of several VPA metabolites present in plasma, only one could be found in the brain: 2-propyl-2-pentenoic acid. This metabolite was cleared from plasma and from brain slower than the parent drug. gamma-Aminobutyric acid (GABA) concentrations were increased within 15 min after VPA injection and remained significantly elevated for at least 8 h. A similar time course was found in regard to the increase of the electroconvulsive threshold (maximal seizures) induced by VPA administration. The activity of glutamic acid decarboxylase rose parallel to the elevation of brain GABA levels, whereas the activity of GABA aminotransferase was not affected. Whereas the rapid onset of the effect on electroconvulsive threshold and on GABA metabolism can be explained by the rapid entrance of VPA into brain, the carry-over effects observed correlated with the kinetics of the metabolite 2-propyl-2-pentenoic acid better than with those of VPA due to the persistence of this metabolite in brain. PMID:6801254

  4. Identification of glucuronides as in vivo liver conjugates of seven cannabinoids and some of their hydroxy and acid metabolites.

    PubMed

    Harvey, D J; Martin, B R; Paton, W D

    1977-02-01

    Glucuronide conjugates of cannabidiol (CBD), 7-hydroxy-CBD, propyl-CBD, cannabinol (CBN), 7-hydroxy-CBN, CBN-7-oic acid, propyl CBN and cannabichromene have been identified as major metabolites of CBD, CBN and their propyl homologues and of cannabichromene in mouse liver. Trace amounts of the glucuronide conjugates of delta1- and delta1(6)-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) were also detected. Identification was made by combined gas-liquid chromatographic and mass spectrometric studies of the trimethylsilyl (TMS), d9-TMS and methyl ester-TMS derivatives of the glucuronides and the TMS derivatives of the product of the reduction of the metabolites with lithium aluminium deuteride. PMID:847285

  5. CYP epoxygenase metabolites of docosahexaenoic acid protect HL-1 cardiac cells against LPS-induced cytotoxicity through SIRT1

    PubMed Central

    Samokhvalov, V; Jamieson, K L; Vriend, J; Quan, S; Seubert, J M

    2015-01-01

    Bacterial LPS is an environmental toxin capable of promoting various cardiac complications. Current evidence suggests that LPS-induced myocardial dysfunction emerges as a consequence of compromised quality of cardiac mitochondria. Docosahexaenoic acid (DHA, 22:6n3) is an n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA), which produces a broad spectrum of intrinsic physiological effects including regulation of cell survival and death mechanisms. Although, numerous studies revealed fundamentally beneficial effects of DHA on cardiovascular system, it remains unknown whether these effects were produced by DHA or one of its possibly more potent metabolites. Emerging evidence indicates that cytochrome P450 (CYP) epoxygenase metabolites of DHA, epoxydocosapentaenoic acids (EDPs), produce more potent biological activity compared to its precursor DHA. In this study, we investigated whether DHA and its metabolite 19,20-EDP could protect HL-1 cardiac cells against LPS-induced cytotoxicity. We provide evidence that exogenously added or DHA-derived EDPs promote mitochondrial biogenesis and function in HL-1 cardiac cells. Our results illustrate the CYP epoxygenase metabolite of DHA, 19,20-EDP, confers extensive protection to HL-1 cardiac cells against LPS-induced cytotoxicity via activation of SIRT1. PMID:27182450

  6. A Novel Function for Kojic Acid, a Secondary Metabolite from Aspergillus Fungi, as Antileishmanial Agent

    PubMed Central

    Rodrigues, Ana Paula D.; Farias, Luis Henrique S.; Carvalho, Antonio Sérgio C.; Santos, Alberdan S.; do Nascimento, José Luiz M.; Silva, Edilene O.

    2014-01-01

    Kojic acid (KA) is a fungal metabolite used as a topical treatment skin-whitening cosmetic agent for melasma in humans; however its potential as an anti-leishmanial agent is unknown. Chemotherapy is one of the most effective treatments for Leishmaniasis. However, the drugs available are expensive, invasive, require long-term treatment and have severe side effects. Thus, the development of new effective leishmanicidal agents is a necessity. In this study we investigated the anti-leishmanial effect of KA on L. amazonensis, following in vitro and in vivo infections. KA (50 μg/mL) was found to decrease the growth by 62% (IC50 34 μg/mL) and 79% (IC50 27.84 μg/mL) of promastigotes and amastigotes in vitro, respectively. Ultrastructural analysis of KA-treated amastigotes showed the presence of vesicles bodies into the flagellar pocket, and an intense intracellular vacuolization and swelling of the mitochondrion. During the in vitro interaction of parasites and the host cell, KA reverses the superoxide anions (O2-) inhibitory mechanism promoted by parasite. In addition, 4 weeks after KA-topical formulation treatment of infected animals, a healing process was observed with a high production of collagen fibers and a decrease in parasite burden. Thus, these results demonstrated the great potential of KA as an anti-leishmanial compound. PMID:24621481

  7. Mutagenicity evaluation of phthalic acid esters and metabolites in Salmonella typhimurium cultures

    SciTech Connect

    Agarwal, D.K.; Lawrence, W.H.; Nunez, L.J.; Autian, J.

    1985-01-01

    The mutagenic potential of dimethyl phthalate (DMP), diethyl phthalate (DEP), dibutyl phthalate (DBP) and di-2-ethylhexyl phthalate (DEPH), as well as metabolites of DEHP - i.e., mono-2-ethylhexyl phthalate (MEHP), 2-ethylhexanol (2-EH), and phthalic acid (PA) - were tested in Salmonella typhimurium cultures using the Ames test procedure. The compounds were tested on strains TA98, TA100, TA1535, TA1537, TA1538, and TA2637 for base-pair substitution or frameshift-type mutations. Spot tests yielded negative responses for all compounds with the strains tested. Each compound was tested for a dose-effect relationship in the TA98, TA100, TA1535, and TA1538 systems. DEP and DBP exhibited a mildly positive response in both TA100 and TA1535 cultures, and DMP showed a similar response in TA1535. Normalization of the data for cytotoxicity of DMP suggests TA100 has a mildly positive effect. The higher doses of these compounds exhibited some cytotoxic effects. The mutagenic effects were apparently abolished by the addition of S9 fraction in TA100 and TA1535 cultures, while no effect, other than cytotoxicity, was observed in the TA98 and TA1538 systems. DEHP, MEHP, 2-EH, and PA exhibited no mutagenicity in any of the strains of Salmonella, typhimurium tested, with or without S9 metabolic activation. MEHP and 2-EH, however, exhibited a moderate cytotoxic effect in most cultures.

  8. Anti-inflammatory effects of chronic aspirin on brain arachidonic acid metabolites.

    PubMed

    Basselin, Mireille; Ramadan, Epolia; Chen, Mei; Rapoport, Stanley I

    2011-01-01

    Pro-inflammatory and anti-inflammatory mediators derived from arachidonic acid (AA) modulate peripheral inflammation and its resolution. Aspirin (ASA) is a unique non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug, which switches AA metabolism from prostaglandin E₂ (PGE₂) and thromboxane B₂ (TXB₂) to lipoxin A₄ (LXA₄) and 15-epi-LXA₄. However, it is unknown whether chronic therapeutic doses of ASA are anti-inflammatory in the brain. We hypothesized that ASA would dampen increases in brain concentrations of AA metabolites in a rat model of neuroinflammation, produced by a 6-day intracerebroventricular infusion of bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS). In rats infused with LPS (0.5 ng/h) and given ASA-free water to drink, concentrations in high-energy microwaved brain of PGE₂, TXB₂ and leukotriene B₄ (LTB₄) were elevated. In rats infused with artificial cerebrospinal fluid, 6 weeks of treatment with a low (10 mg/kg/day) or high (100 mg/kg/day) ASA dose in drinking water decreased brain PGE₂, but increased LTB₄, LXA₄ and 15-epi-LXA₄ concentrations. Both doses attenuated the LPS effects on PGE₂, and TXB₂. The increments in LXA₄ and 15-epi-LXA₄ caused by high-dose ASA were significantly greater in LPS-infused rats. The ability of ASA to increase anti-inflammatory LXA₄ and 15-epi-LXA₄ and reduce pro-inflammatory PGE₂ and TXB₂ suggests considering aspirin further for treating clinical neuroinflammation. PMID:20981485

  9. Growth Hormone Enhances Arachidonic Acid Metabolites in a Growth Hormone Transgenic Mouse

    PubMed Central

    Oberbauer, A. M.; German, J. B.; Murray, J. D.

    2016-01-01

    In a transgenic growth hormone (GH) mouse model, highly elevated GH increases overall growth and decreases adipose depots while low or moderate circulating GH enhances adipose deposition with differential effects on body growth. Using this model, the effects of low, moderate, and high chronic GH on fatty acid composition were determined for adipose and hepatic tissue and the metabolites of 20:4n-6 (arachidonic acid) were characterized to identify metabolic targets of action of elevated GH. The products of Δ-9 desaturase in hepatic, but not adipose, tissue were reduced in response to elevated GH. Proportional to the level of circulating GH, the products of Δ-5 and Δ-6 were increased in both adipose and hepatic tissue for the omega-6 lipids (e.g., 20:4n-6), while only the hepatic tissues showed an increase for omega-3 lipids (e.g., 22:6n-3). The eicosanoids, PGE2 and 12-HETE, were elevated with high GH but circulating thromboxane was not. Hepatic PTGS1 and 2 (COX1 and COX 2), SOD1, and FADS2 (Δ-6 desaturase) mRNAs were increased with elevated GH while FAS mRNA was reduced; SCD1 (ste-aroyl-coenzyme A desaturase) and SCD2 mRNA did not significantly differ. The present study showed that GH influences the net flux through various aspects of lipid metabolism and especially the desaturase metabolic processes. The combination of altered metabolism and tissue specificity suggest that the regulation of membrane composition and its effects on signaling pathways, including the production and actions of eicosanoids, can be mediated by the GH regulatory axis. PMID:21442273

  10. Aspirin's Active Metabolite Salicylic Acid Targets High Mobility Group Box 1 to Modulate Inflammatory Responses.

    PubMed

    Choi, Hyong Woo; Tian, Miaoying; Song, Fei; Venereau, Emilie; Preti, Alessandro; Park, Sang-Wook; Hamilton, Keith; Swapna, G V T; Manohar, Murli; Moreau, Magali; Agresti, Alessandra; Gorzanelli, Andrea; De Marchis, Francesco; Wang, Huang; Antonyak, Marc; Micikas, Robert J; Gentile, Daniel R; Cerione, Richard A; Schroeder, Frank C; Montelione, Gaetano T; Bianchi, Marco E; Klessig, Daniel F

    2015-01-01

    Salicylic acid (SA) and its derivatives have been used for millennia to reduce pain, fever and inflammation. In addition, prophylactic use of acetylsalicylic acid, commonly known as aspirin, reduces the risk of heart attack, stroke and certain cancers. Because aspirin is rapidly de-acetylated by esterases in human plasma, much of aspirin's bioactivity can be attributed to its primary metabolite, SA. Here we demonstrate that human high mobility group box 1 (HMGB1) is a novel SA-binding protein. SA-binding sites on HMGB1 were identified in the HMG-box domains by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopic studies and confirmed by mutational analysis. Extracellular HMGB1 is a damage-associated molecular pattern molecule (DAMP), with multiple redox states. SA suppresses both the chemoattractant activity of fully reduced HMGB1 and the increased expression of proinflammatory cytokine genes and cyclooxygenase 2 (COX-2) induced by disulfide HMGB1. Natural and synthetic SA derivatives with greater potency for inhibition of HMGB1 were identified, providing proof-of-concept that new molecules with high efficacy against sterile inflammation are attainable. An HMGB1 protein mutated in one of the SA-binding sites identified by NMR chemical shift perturbation studies retained chemoattractant activity, but lost binding of and inhibition by SA and its derivatives, thereby firmly establishing that SA binding to HMGB1 directly suppresses its proinflammatory activities. Identification of HMGB1 as a pharmacological target of SA/aspirin provides new insights into the mechanisms of action of one of the world's longest and most used natural and synthetic drugs. It may also provide an explanation for the protective effects of low-dose aspirin usage. PMID:26101955

  11. Arachidonic acid metabolites do not mediate toluene diisocyanate-induced airway hyperresponsiveness in guinea pigs

    SciTech Connect

    Gordon, T.; Thompson, J.E.; Sheppard, D.

    1988-05-01

    Arachidonic acid metabolites have previously been demonstrated to mediate the airway hyperresponsiveness observed in guinea pigs and dogs after exposure to ozone. Guinea pigs were treated with indomethacin (a cyclooxygenase inhibitor), U-60,257 (piriprost, a 5-lipoxygenase inhibitor), or BW775c (a lipoxygenase and cyclooxygenase inhibitor) and exposed to air or 3 ppm TDI. Airway responsiveness to acetylcholine aerosol was examined 2 h after exposure. In control animals, the provocative concentration of acetylcholine which caused a 200% increase in pulmonary resistance over baseline (PC200) was significantly less (p less than 0.05) after exposure to TDI (8.6 +/- 2.0 mg/ml, geometric mean + geometric SE, n = 10) than after exposure to air (23.9 + 2.5 mg/ml, n = 14). The airway responsiveness to acetylcholine in animals treated with indomethacin or piriprost and exposed to TDI was not different from that of control animals exposed to TDI. Treatment with BW755c enhanced the airway hyperresponsiveness observed in animals exposed to TDI without altering the PC200 of animals exposed to air. The PC200 of animals treated with BW755c and exposed to TDI (2.3 + 0.8 mg/ml, n = 8) was significantly lower than the PC200 of control animals exposed to TDI (p less than 0.025). These results suggest that products of arachidonic acid metabolism are not responsible for TDI-induced airway hyperresponsiveness in guinea pigs. BW755c, however, appears to potentiate the TDI-induced airway hyperresponsiveness to acetylcholine by an as yet unidentified mechanism.

  12. Metabolites derived from omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids are important for cardioprotection.

    PubMed

    Gilbert, Kim; Malick, Mandy; Madingou, Ness; Touchette, Charles; Bourque-Riel, Valérie; Tomaro, Leandro; Rousseau, Guy

    2015-12-15

    Although controversial, some data suggest that omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) are beneficial to cardiovascular diseases, and could reduce infarct size. In parallel, we have reported that the administration of Resolvin D1 (RvD1), a metabolite of docosahexaenoic acid, an omega-3 PUFA, can reduce infarct size. The present study was designed to determine if the inhibition of two important enzymes involved in the formation of RvD1 from omega-3 PUFA could reduce the cardioprotective effect of omega-3 PUFA. Sprague-Dawley rats were fed with a diet rich in omega-3 PUFA during 10 days before myocardial infarction (MI). Two days before MI, rats received a daily dose of Meloxicam, an inhibitor of cyclooxygenase-2, PD146176, an inhibitor of 15-lipoxygenase, both inhibitors or vehicle. MI was induced by the occlusion of the left coronary artery for 40min followed by reperfusion. Infarct size and neutrophil accumulation were evaluated after 24h of reperfusion while caspase-3, -8 and Akt activities were assessed at 30min of reperfusion. Rats receiving inhibitors, alone or in combination, showed a larger infarct size than those receiving omega-3 PUFA alone. Caspase-3 and -8 activities are higher in ischemic areas with inhibitors while Akt activity is diminished in groups treated with inhibitors. Moreover, the study showed that RvD1 restores cardioprotection when added to the inhibitors. Results from this study indicate that the inhibition of the metabolism of Omega-3 PUFA attenuate their cardioprotective properties. Then, resolvins seem to be an important mediator in the cardioprotection conferred by omega-3 PUFA in our experimental model of MI. PMID:26550951

  13. Trimethylbenzoic acids as metabolite signatures in the biogeochemical evolution of an aquifer contaminated with jet fuel hydrocarbons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Namocatcat, J. A.; Fang, J.; Barcelona, M. J.; Quibuyen, A. T. O.; Abrajano, T. A.

    2003-12-01

    Evolution of trimethylbenzoic acids in the KC-135 aquifer at the former Wurtsmith Air Force Base (WAFB), Oscoda, MI was examined to determine the functionality of trimethylbenzoic acids as key metabolite signatures in the biogeochemical evolution of an aquifer contaminated with JP-4 fuel hydrocarbons. Changes in the composition of trimethylbenzoic acids and the distribution and concentration profiles exhibited by 2,4,6- and 2,3,5-trimethylbenzoic acids temporally and between multilevel wells reflect processes indicative of an actively evolving contaminant plume. The concentration levels of trimethylbenzoic acids were 3-10 orders higher than their tetramethylbenzene precursors, a condition attributed to slow metabolite turnover under sulfidogenic conditions. The observed degradation of tetramethylbenzenes into trimethylbenzoic acids obviates the use of these alkylbenzenes as non-labile tracers for other degradable aromatic hydrocarbons, but provides rare field evidence on the range of high molecular weight alkylbenzenes and isomeric assemblages amenable to anaerobic degradation in situ. The coupling of actual tetramethylbenzene loss with trimethylbenzoic acid production and the general decline in the concentrations of these compounds demonstrate the role of microbially mediated processes in the natural attenuation of hydrocarbons and may be a key indicator in the overall rate of hydrocarbon degradation and the biogeochemical evolution of the KC-135 aquifer.

  14. Spectrofluorimetric determination of 3-methylflavone-8-carboxylic acid, the main active metabolite of flavoxate hydrochloride in human urine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaazaa, Hala E.; Mohamed, Afaf O.; Hawwam, Maha A.; Abdelkawy, Mohamed

    2015-01-01

    A simple, sensitive and selective spectrofluorimetric method has been developed for the determination of 3-methylflavone-8-carboxylic acid as the main active metabolite of flavoxate hydrochloride in human urine. The proposed method was based on the measurement of the native fluorescence of the metabolite in methanol at an emission wavelength 390 nm, upon excitation at 338 nm. Moreover, the urinary excretion pattern has been calculated using the proposed method. Taking the advantage that 3-methylflavone-8-carboxylic acid is also the alkaline degradate, the proposed method was applied to in vitro determination of flavoxate hydrochloride in tablets dosage form via the measurement of its corresponding degradate. The method was validated in accordance with the ICH requirements and statistically compared to the official method with no significant difference in performance.

  15. N-lactoyl-amino acids are ubiquitous metabolites that originate from CNDP2-mediated reverse proteolysis of lactate and amino acids

    PubMed Central

    Jansen, Robert S.; Addie, Ruben; Merkx, Remco; Fish, Alexander; Mahakena, Sunny; Bleijerveld, Onno B.; Altelaar, Maarten; IJlst, Lodewijk; Wanders, Ronald J.; Borst, P.; van de Wetering, Koen

    2015-01-01

    Despite technological advances in metabolomics, large parts of the human metabolome are still unexplored. In an untargeted metabolomics screen aiming to identify substrates of the orphan transporter ATP-binding cassette subfamily C member 5 (ABCC5), we identified a class of mammalian metabolites, N-lactoyl-amino acids. Using parallel protein fractionation in conjunction with shotgun proteomics on fractions containing N-lactoyl-Phe–forming activity, we unexpectedly found that a protease, cytosolic nonspecific dipeptidase 2 (CNDP2), catalyzes their formation. N-lactoyl-amino acids are ubiquitous pseudodipeptides of lactic acid and amino acids that are rapidly formed by reverse proteolysis, a process previously considered to be negligible in vivo. The plasma levels of these metabolites strongly correlate with plasma levels of lactate and amino acid, as shown by increased levels after physical exercise and in patients with phenylketonuria who suffer from elevated Phe levels. Our approach to identify unknown metabolites and their biosynthesis has general applicability in the further exploration of the human metabolome. PMID:25964343

  16. Synthesis of new optically active propargylic fluorides and application to the enantioselective synthesis of monofluorinated analogues of fatty acid metabolites.

    PubMed

    Prakesch, M; Grée, D; Grée, R

    2001-05-01

    A new approach to obtain optically active unsaturated or polyunsaturated systems with a single fluorine atom in an allylic or propargylic position is reported. Central to this strategy is the high regio- and stereocontrol observed during the fluorination of propargylic alcohols allowing a short and efficient synthesis of 1. Further, simple functional group transformations gave the enals 2 and 3. These three key intermediates were used for the preparation of optically active monofluorinated analogues of fatty acid metabolites. PMID:11325281

  17. A Gut Microbial Metabolite of Linoleic Acid, 10-Hydroxy-cis-12-octadecenoic Acid, Ameliorates Intestinal Epithelial Barrier Impairment Partially via GPR40-MEK-ERK Pathway*

    PubMed Central

    Miyamoto, Junki; Mizukure, Taichi; Park, Si-Bum; Kishino, Shigenobu; Kimura, Ikuo; Hirano, Kanako; Bergamo, Paolo; Rossi, Mauro; Suzuki, Takuya; Arita, Makoto; Ogawa, Jun; Tanabe, Soichi

    2015-01-01

    Gut microbial metabolites of polyunsaturated fatty acids have attracted much attention because of their various physiological properties. Dysfunction of tight junction (TJ) in the intestine contributes to the pathogenesis of many disorders such as inflammatory bowel disease. We evaluated the effects of five novel gut microbial metabolites on tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α-induced barrier impairment in Caco-2 cells and dextran sulfate sodium-induced colitis in mice. 10-Hydroxy-cis-12-octadecenoic acid (HYA), a gut microbial metabolite of linoleic acid, suppressed TNF-α and dextran sulfate sodium-induced changes in the expression of TJ-related molecules, occludin, zonula occludens-1, and myosin light chain kinase. HYA also suppressed the expression of TNF receptor 2 (TNFR2) mRNA and protein expression in Caco-2 cells and colonic tissue. In addition, HYA suppressed the protein expression of TNFR2 in murine intestinal epithelial cells. Furthermore, HYA significantly up-regulated G protein-coupled receptor (GPR) 40 expression in Caco-2 cells. It also induced [Ca2+]i responses in HEK293 cells expressing human GPR40 with higher sensitivity than linoleic acid, its metabolic precursor. The barrier-recovering effects of HYA were abrogated by a GPR40 antagonist and MEK inhibitor in Caco-2 cells. Conversely, 10-hydroxyoctadacanoic acid, which is a gut microbial metabolite of oleic acid and lacks a carbon-carbon double bond at Δ12 position, did not show these TJ-restoring activities and down-regulated GPR40 expression. Therefore, HYA modulates TNFR2 expression, at least partially, via the GPR40-MEK-ERK pathway and may be useful in the treatment of TJ-related disorders such as inflammatory bowel disease. PMID:25505251

  18. Metabolite profiling of barley grain subjected to induced drought stress: responses of free amino acids in differently adapted cultivars.

    PubMed

    Lanzinger, Alexandra; Frank, Thomas; Reichenberger, Gabriela; Herz, Markus; Engel, Karl-Heinz

    2015-04-29

    To investigate cultivar-specific metabolite changes upon drought stress in barley grain, differently adapted cultivars were field-grown under drought conditions using a rain-out shelter and under normal weather conditions (2010-2012). The grain was subjected to a gas chromatography-mass spectrometry-based metabolite profiling approach allowing the analyses of a broad spectrum of lipophilic and hydrophilic low molecular weight constituents. Multi- and univariate analyses demonstrated that there are grain metabolites which were significantly changed upon drought stress, either decreased or increased in all cultivars. On the other hand, for proteinogenic free amino acids increased concentrations were consistently observed in all seasons only in cultivars for which no drought resistance/tolerance had been described. Consistent decreases were seen only in the group of stress tolerant/resistant cultivars. These cultivar-specific correlations were particularly pronounced for branched-chain amino acids. The results indicate that free amino acids may serve as potential markers for cultivars differently adapted to drought stress. PMID:25867895

  19. Human GAPDH Is a Target of Aspirin's Primary Metabolite Salicylic Acid and Its Derivatives.

    PubMed

    Choi, Hyong Woo; Tian, Miaoying; Manohar, Murli; Harraz, Maged M; Park, Sang-Wook; Schroeder, Frank C; Snyder, Solomon H; Klessig, Daniel F

    2015-01-01

    The plant hormone salicylic acid (SA) controls several physiological processes and is a key regulator of multiple levels of plant immunity. To decipher the mechanisms through which SA's multiple physiological effects are mediated, particularly in immunity, two high-throughput screens were developed to identify SA-binding proteins (SABPs). Glyceraldehyde 3-Phosphate Dehydrogenase (GAPDH) from plants (Arabidopsis thaliana) was identified in these screens. Similar screens and subsequent analyses using SA analogs, in conjunction with either a photoaffinity labeling technique or surface plasmon resonance-based technology, established that human GAPDH (HsGAPDH) also binds SA. In addition to its central role in glycolysis, HsGAPDH participates in several pathological processes, including viral replication and neuronal cell death. The anti-Parkinson's drug deprenyl has been shown to suppress nuclear translocation of HsGAPDH, an early step in cell death and the resulting cell death induced by the DNA alkylating agent N-methyl-N'-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine. Here, we demonstrate that SA, which is the primary metabolite of aspirin (acetyl SA) and is likely responsible for many of its pharmacological effects, also suppresses nuclear translocation of HsGAPDH and cell death. Analysis of two synthetic SA derivatives and two classes of compounds from the Chinese medicinal herb Glycyrrhiza foetida (licorice), glycyrrhizin and the SA-derivatives amorfrutins, revealed that they not only appear to bind HsGAPDH more tightly than SA, but also exhibit a greater ability to suppress translocation of HsGAPDH to the nucleus and cell death. PMID:26606248

  20. Anti-inflammatory effects of chronic aspirin on brain arachidonic acid metabolites

    PubMed Central

    Basselin, Mireille; Ramadan, Epolia; Chen, Mei; Rapoport, Stanley I.

    2010-01-01

    Pro-inflammatory and anti-inflammatory mediators derived from arachidonic acid (AA) modulate peripheral inflammation and its resolution. Aspirin (ASA) is a unique non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug, which switches AA metabolism from prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) and thromboxane B2 (TXB2) to lipoxin A4 (LXA4) and 15-epi-LXA4. However it is unknown whether chronic therapeutic doses of ASA are anti-inflammatory in the brain. We hypothesized that ASA would dampen increases in brain concentrations of AA metabolites in a rat model of neuroinflammation, produced by a 6-day intracerebroventricular infusion of bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS). In rats infused with LPS (0.5 ng/h) and given ASA-free water to drink, concentrations in high-energy microwaved brain of PGE2, TXB2 and leukotriene B4 (LTB4) were elevated. In rats infused with artificial cerebrospinal fluid, 6 weeks of treatment with a low (10 mg/kg/day) or high (100 mg/kg/day) ASA dose in drinking water decreased brain PGE2, but increased LTB4, LXA4 and 15-epi-LXA4 concentrations. Both doses attenuated the LPS effects on PGE2, and TXB2. The increments in LXA4 and 15-epi-LXA4 caused by high-dose ASA were significantly greater in LPS-infused rats. The ability of ASA to increase anti-inflammatory LXA4 and 15-epi-LXA4 and reduce pro-inflammatory PGE2 and TXB2 suggests considering aspirin further for treating clinical neuroinflammation. PMID:20981485

  1. Human GAPDH Is a Target of Aspirin’s Primary Metabolite Salicylic Acid and Its Derivatives

    PubMed Central

    Manohar, Murli; Harraz, Maged M.; Park, Sang-Wook; Schroeder, Frank C.; Snyder, Solomon H.; Klessig, Daniel F.

    2015-01-01

    The plant hormone salicylic acid (SA) controls several physiological processes and is a key regulator of multiple levels of plant immunity. To decipher the mechanisms through which SA’s multiple physiological effects are mediated, particularly in immunity, two high-throughput screens were developed to identify SA-binding proteins (SABPs). Glyceraldehyde 3-Phosphate Dehydrogenase (GAPDH) from plants (Arabidopsis thaliana) was identified in these screens. Similar screens and subsequent analyses using SA analogs, in conjunction with either a photoaffinity labeling technique or surface plasmon resonance-based technology, established that human GAPDH (HsGAPDH) also binds SA. In addition to its central role in glycolysis, HsGAPDH participates in several pathological processes, including viral replication and neuronal cell death. The anti-Parkinson’s drug deprenyl has been shown to suppress nuclear translocation of HsGAPDH, an early step in cell death and the resulting cell death induced by the DNA alkylating agent N-methyl-N’-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine. Here, we demonstrate that SA, which is the primary metabolite of aspirin (acetyl SA) and is likely responsible for many of its pharmacological effects, also suppresses nuclear translocation of HsGAPDH and cell death. Analysis of two synthetic SA derivatives and two classes of compounds from the Chinese medicinal herb Glycyrrhiza foetida (licorice), glycyrrhizin and the SA-derivatives amorfrutins, revealed that they not only appear to bind HsGAPDH more tightly than SA, but also exhibit a greater ability to suppress translocation of HsGAPDH to the nucleus and cell death. PMID:26606248

  2. Characterization of metabolites in rats after intravenous administration of salvianolic acid for injection by ultra-performance liquid chromatography coupled with quadrupole-time-of-flight mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Miao, Jingzhuo; Sun, Wanyang; Huang, Jingyi; Liu, Xiaolin; Li, Shuming; Han, Xiaoping; Tong, Ling; Sun, Guoxiang

    2016-09-01

    It is an essential requirement to clarify the metabolites of traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) injections, which contain numerous ingredients, to assess their safe and effective use in clinic. Salvianolic acid for injection (SAFI), made from hydrophilic phenolic acids in Salvia miltiorrhiza Bunge, has been widely used for the treatment of cerebrovascular diseases, but information on its metabolites in vivo is still lacking. In the present study, we aimed to holistically characterize the metabolites of the main active ingredients in rat plasma, bile, urine and feces following intravenous administration of SAFI. An ultra-performance liquid chromatography coupled with quadrupole-time-of-flight mass spectrometry (UPLC/Q-TOF-MS) method was developed. Combining information on retention behaviors, multistage mass spectra and literature data, a total of eight prototypes and 52 metabolites were tentatively characterized. Metabolites originated from rosmarinic acid and salvianolic acid B comprised the majority of identified compounds. Meanwhile, four metabolites derived from salvianolic acid D and five from salvianolic acid B are reported for the first time. This study revealed that methylation, sulfation and glucuronidation were the major metabolic pathways of phenolic acids in SAFI in vivo. Furthermore, the developed UPLC/Q-TOF-MS method could also benefit the metabolic investigation of extracts and preparations in TCM with hydrophilic ingredients. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:26910272

  3. NMR metabolomics profiling of blood plasma mimics shows that medium- and long-chain fatty acids differently release metabolites from human serum albumin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jupin, M.; Michiels, P. J.; Girard, F. C.; Spraul, M.; Wijmenga, S. S.

    2014-02-01

    Metabolite profiling by NMR of body fluids is increasingly used to successfully differentiate patients from healthy individuals. Metabolites and their concentrations are direct reporters of body biochemistry. However, in blood plasma the NMR-detected free-metabolite concentrations are also strongly affected by interactions with the abundant plasma proteins, which have as of yet not been considered much in metabolic profiling. We previously reported that many of the common NMR-detected metabolites in blood plasma bind to human serum albumin (HSA) and many are released by fatty acids present in fatted HSA. HSA is the most abundant plasma protein and main transporter of endogenous and exogenous metabolites. Here, we show by NMR how the two most common fatty acids (FAs) in blood plasma - the long-chain FA, stearate (C18:0) and medium-chain FA, myristate (C14:0) - affect metabolite-HSA interaction. Of the set of 18 common NMR-detected metabolites, many are released by stearate and/or myristate, lactate appearing the most strongly affected. Myristate, but not stearate, reduces HSA-binding of phenylalanine and pyruvate. Citrate signals were NMR invisible in the presence of HSA. Only at high myristate-HSA mole ratios 11:1, is citrate sufficiently released to be detected. Finally, we find that limited dilution of blood-plasma mimics releases HSA-bound metabolites, a finding confirmed in real blood plasma samples. Based on these findings, we provide recommendations for NMR experiments for quantitative metabolite profiling.

  4. Semisynthesis of radiolabeled amino acid and lipid brevetoxin metabolites and their blood elimination kinetics in C57BL/6 mice.

    PubMed

    Leighfield, Tod A; Muha, Noah; Miles, Christopher O; Ramsdell, John S

    2013-06-17

    Brevetoxin B (BTX-B), produced by dinoflagellates of the species Karenia, is a highly reactive molecule, due in part to an α,β-unsaturated aldehyde group at the terminal side chain, leading to the production of metabolites in shellfish by reduction, oxidation, and conjugation. We have investigated in mice the blood elimination of three common bioactive brevetoxin metabolites found in shellfish, which have been semisynthesized from BTX-B in radioactive forms. BTX-B was reduced at C42 to yield [(3)H] dihydro-BTX-B. [(3)H] S-desoxy-BTX-B2 (cysteine brevetoxin B) was semisynthesized from BTX-B by the conjugation of cysteine at the C50 olefinic group then [(3)H] radiolabeled by C42 aldehyde reduction. [(14)C] N-Palmitoyl-S-desoxy-BTX-B2 was prepared using S-desoxy-BTX-B2 as the starting material with addition of the [(14)C] radiolabeled fatty acid via cysteine-amide linkage. The elimination of intravenously administered [(3)H] S-desoxy-BTX-B2, [(14)C] N-palmitoyl-S-desoxy-BTX-B2, or [(3)H] dihydro-BTX-B was measured in blood collected from C57BL/6 mice over a 48 h period. Each brevetoxin metabolite tested exhibited biexponential elimination kinetics and fit a two-compartment model of elimination that was applied to generate toxicokinetic parameters. The rate of transfer between the central compartment (i.e., blood) and the peripheral compartment (e.g., tissue) for each brevetoxin differed substantially, with dihydro-BTX-B exchanging rapidly with the peripheral compartment, S-desoxy-BTX-B2 eliminating rapidly from the central compartment, and N-palmitoyl-S-desoxy-BTX-B2 eliminating slowly from the central compartment. Toxicokinetic parameters were analyzed in the context of the unique structure of each brevetoxin metabolite resulting from a reduction, amino acid conjugation, or fatty acid addition to BTX-B. PMID:23642029

  5. Long-Chain Fatty Acid Combustion Rate Is Associated with Unique Metabolite Profiles in Skeletal Muscle Mitochondria

    PubMed Central

    Seifert, Erin L.; Fiehn, Oliver; Bezaire, Véronic; Bickel, David R.; Wohlgemuth, Gert; Adams, Sean H.; Harper, Mary-Ellen

    2010-01-01

    Background/Aim Incomplete or limited long-chain fatty acid (LCFA) combustion in skeletal muscle has been associated with insulin resistance. Signals that are responsive to shifts in LCFA β-oxidation rate or degree of intramitochondrial catabolism are hypothesized to regulate second messenger systems downstream of the insulin receptor. Recent evidence supports a causal link between mitochondrial LCFA combustion in skeletal muscle and insulin resistance. We have used unbiased metabolite profiling of mouse muscle mitochondria with the aim of identifying candidate metabolites within or effluxed from mitochondria and that are shifted with LCFA combustion rate. Methodology/Principal Findings Large-scale unbiased metabolomics analysis was performed using GC/TOF-MS on buffer and mitochondrial matrix fractions obtained prior to and after 20 min of palmitate catabolism (n = 7 mice/condition). Three palmitate concentrations (2, 9 and 19 µM; corresponding to low, intermediate and high oxidation rates) and 9 µM palmitate plus tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle and electron transport chain inhibitors were each tested and compared to zero palmitate control incubations. Paired comparisons of the 0 and 20 min samples were made by Student's t-test. False discovery rate were estimated and Type I error rates assigned. Major metabolite groups were organic acids, amines and amino acids, free fatty acids and sugar phosphates. Palmitate oxidation was associated with unique profiles of metabolites, a subset of which correlated to palmitate oxidation rate. In particular, palmitate oxidation rate was associated with distinct changes in the levels of TCA cycle intermediates within and effluxed from mitochondria. Conclusions/Significance This proof-of-principle study establishes that large-scale metabolomics methods can be applied to organelle-level models to discover metabolite patterns reflective of LCFA combustion, which may lead to identification of molecules linking muscle fat

  6. Mixture toxicity of the antiviral drug Tamiflu((R)) (oseltamivir ethylester) and its active metabolite oseltamivir acid.

    PubMed

    Escher, Beate I; Bramaz, Nadine; Lienert, Judit; Neuwoehner, Judith; Straub, Jürg Oliver

    2010-02-18

    Tamiflu (oseltamivir ethylester) is an antiviral agent for the treatment of influenza A and B. The pro-drug Tamiflu is converted in the human body to the pharmacologically active metabolite, oseltamivir acid, with a yield of 75%. Oseltamivir acid is indirectly photodegradable and slowly biodegradable in sewage works and sediment/water systems. A previous environmental risk assessment has concluded that there is no bioaccumulation potential of either of the compounds. However, little was known about the ecotoxicity of the metabolite. Ester hydrolysis typically reduces the hydrophobicity and thus the toxicity of a compound. In this case, a zwitterionic, but overall neutral species is formed from the charged parent compound. If the speciation and predicted partitioning into biological membranes is considered, the metabolite may have a relevant contribution to the overall toxicity. These theoretical considerations triggered a study to investigate the toxicity of oseltamivir acid (OA), alone and in binary mixtures with its parent compound oseltamivir ethylester (OE). OE and OA were found to be baseline toxicants in the bioluminescence inhibition test with Vibrio fischeri. Their mixture effect lay between predictions for concentration addition and independent action for the mixture ratio excreted in urine and nine additional mixture ratios of OE and OA. In contrast, OE was an order of magnitude more toxic than OA towards algae, with a more pronounced effect when the direct inhibition of photosystem II was used as toxicity endpoint opposed to the 24h growth rate endpoint. The binary mixtures in this assay yielded experimental mixture effects that agreed with predictions for independent action. This is consistent with the finding that OE exhibits slightly enhanced toxicity, while OA acts as baseline toxicant. Therefore, with respect to mixture classification, the two compounds can be considered as acting according to different modes of toxic action, although there are

  7. Quantitation of arachidonic acid metabolites in small tissue biopsies by reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography.

    PubMed

    Eberhard, J; Jepsen, S; Albers, H K; Açil, Y

    2000-05-01

    Arachidonic acid metabolites exert a variety of distinct biological effects on the initiation and resolution of inflammatory diseases and their measurements in tissue can be critical to evaluate their regulatory function during the course of inflammation and to supplement in vitro experiments. The aim of this study was the detection and quantitative analysis of four arachidonic acid metabolites in small-sized biopsies of human periodontal tissues. The biopsies were homogenized and injected directly into a single analytical column of a RP-HPLC system. Detection was performed by a photodiode array detector. Calibration was established by dilutions of authentic standards of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2), leukotriene B4 (LTB4), 12(R)-hydroxy-5,8,10,14-eicosatetraenoic acid (12-HETE), and 15(S)-hydroxy-5,8,11,13-eicosatetraenoic acid (15-HETE). A total of 38 specimens weighing between 19 and 191 mg (wet tissue) were analyzed (mean = 59.9 +/- 30.2 mg). The detection limits were 1 pg for LTB4 and 12-HETE, 0.5 pg for 15-HETE, and 10 ng for PGE2. The concentrations of PGE2 and LTB4 were significantly higher in inflamed than in healthy periodontal tissues (P = 0.0079; P = 0. 0114). 12-HETE was detected in one biopsy (30 pg/g); 15-HETE was not detected. This method of homogenization, extraction, and analysis of arachidonic acid metabolites by RP-HPLC appears to be well suited for studies of human oral biopsies. Only small tissue samples and minimal laboratory equipment were required for a sensitive analysis. PMID:10790308

  8. Simultaneous determination of glucuronic acid and sulfuric acid conjugated metabolites of daidzein and genistein in human plasma by high-performance liquid chromatography.

    PubMed

    Hosoda, Kaori; Furuta, Takashi; Ishii, Kazuo

    2010-03-01

    Isoflavone aglycones daidzein (Dein) and genistein (Gein) are mainly present as glucuronides and sulfates in human plasma, and small amounts of the intact aglycones are also detected. In the present study, we have developed a high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC)-UV-diode-array detector (DAD) method for the determination of intact 16 metabolites of Dein and Gein in plasma, especially focusing on highly polar conjugated metabolites at both 4' and 7 positions on the isoflavone ring with glucuronic acid and/or sulfuric acid (7-glucuronide-4'-sulfates and 4',7-diglucuronides). Luteolin-3',7-di-O-glucoside was used as an internal standard. Solid-phase extraction was performed on an Oasis HLB cartridge (60 mg, 3 cm(3)) with a recovery of >ca. 80%. The HPLC assay was performed on a Hydrosphere C18 column (100 mm x 4.6 mm I.D., particle size 3 microm). The mobile phase consisted of a mixture of 10 mM ammonium acetate solution and acetonitrile run under gradient mode at a flow rate of 1.5 ml/min. The UV detection wavelength was set at 250 nm. For UV spectral analysis, the diode-array detection wavelength was set at 220-360 nm. All HPLC analyses were performed at 45 degrees C. Each calibration for the determination of 16 metabolites gave a linear signal (r>0.997) over a concentration range of 5-5000 ng/ml. The lower limits of quantification of these metabolites were 21.1-23.4 ng/ml and the lower limits of detection were 7.9-9.4 ng/ml. This method was used in a preliminary experiment to determine the plasma concentration of intact 16 metabolites after oral administration of kinako (baked soybean powder) to a healthy volunteer. The present HPLC-UV-DAD method should be useful for the metabolic and pharmacokinetic investigations of isoflavones in humans. PMID:20149762

  9. Eicosapentaenoic acid is converted via ω-3 epoxygenation to the anti-inflammatory metabolite 12-hydroxy-17,18-epoxyeicosatetraenoic acid.

    PubMed

    Kubota, Tadafumi; Arita, Makoto; Isobe, Yosuke; Iwamoto, Ryo; Goto, Tomomi; Yoshioka, Takeshi; Urabe, Daisuke; Inoue, Masayuki; Arai, Hiroyuki

    2014-02-01

    Eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) has beneficial effects in many inflammatory disorders. In this study, dietary EPA was converted to 17,18-epoxyeicosatetraenoic acid (17,18-EpETE) by ω-3 epoxygenation in the mouse peritoneal cavity. Mediator lipidomics revealed a series of novel oxygenated metabolites of 17,18-EpETE, and one of the major metabolites, 12-hydroxy-17,18-epoxyeicosatetraenoic acid (12-OH-17,18-EpETE), displayed a potent anti-inflammatory action by limiting neutrophil infiltration in murine zymosan-induced peritonitis. 12-OH-17,18-EpETE inhibited leukotriene B4-induced neutrophil chemotaxis and polarization in vitro in a low nanomolar range (EC50 0.6 nM). The complete structures of two natural isomers were assigned as 12S-OH-17R,18S-EpETE and 12S-OH-17S,18R-EpETE, using chemically synthesized stereoisomers. These natural isomers displayed potent anti-inflammatory action, whereas the unnatural stereoisomers were essentially devoid of activity. These results demonstrate that 17,18-EpETE derived from dietary EPA is converted to a potent bioactive metabolite 12-OH-17,18-EpETE, which may generate an endogenous anti-inflammatory metabolic pathway. PMID:24128889

  10. Novel nonadride, heptadride and maleic acid metabolites from the byssochlamic acid producer Byssochlamys fulva IMI 40021 - an insight into the biosynthesis of maleidrides.

    PubMed

    Szwalbe, Agnieszka J; Williams, Katherine; O'Flynn, Daniel E; Bailey, Andrew M; Mulholland, Nicholas P; Vincent, Jason L; Willis, Christine L; Cox, Russell J; Simpson, Thomas J

    2015-12-14

    The filamentous fungus Byssochlamys fulva strain IMI 40021 produces (+)-byssochlamic acid 1, its novel dihydroanalogue 2 and four related secondary metabolites. Agnestadrides A, 17 and B, 18 constitute a novel class of seven-membered ring, maleic anhydride-containing (hence termed heptadride) natural products. The putative maleic anhydride precursor 5 for both nonadride and heptadride biosynthesis was isolated as a fermentation product for the first time and its structure confirmed by synthesis. Acid 5 undergoes facile decarboxylation to anhydride 6. The generic term maleidrides is proposed to encompass biosynthetically-related compounds containing maleic anhydride moieties fused to an alicyclic ring, varying in size and substituents. PMID:26452099

  11. Eoxins are proinflammatory arachidonic acid metabolites produced via the 15-lipoxygenase-1 pathway in human eosinophils and mast cells.

    PubMed

    Feltenmark, Stina; Gautam, Narinder; Brunnström, Asa; Griffiths, William; Backman, Linda; Edenius, Charlotte; Lindbom, Lennart; Björkholm, Magnus; Claesson, Hans-Erik

    2008-01-15

    Human eosinophils contain abundant amounts of 15-lipoxygenase (LO)-1. The biological role of 15-LO-1 in humans, however, is unclear. Incubation of eosinophils with arachidonic acid led to formation of a product with a UV absorbance maximum at 282 nm and shorter retention time than leukotriene (LT)C4 in reverse-phase HPLC. Analysis with positive-ion electrospray tandem MS identified this eosinophil metabolite as 14,15-LTC4. This metabolite could be metabolized to 14,15-LTD4 and 14,15-LTE4 in eosinophils. Because eosinophils are such an abundant source of these metabolites and to avoid confusion with 5-LO-derived LTs, we suggest the names eoxin (EX)C4, -D4, and -E4 instead of 14,15-LTC4, -D4, and -E4, respectively. Cord blood-derived mast cells and surgically removed nasal polyps from allergic subjects also produced EXC4. Incubation of eosinophils with arachidonic acid favored the production of EXC4, whereas challenge with calcium ionophore led to exclusive formation of LTC4. Eosinophils produced EXC4 after challenge with the proinflammatory agents LTC4, prostaglandin D2, and IL-5, demonstrating that EXC4 can be synthesized from the endogenous pool of arachidonic acid. EXs induced increased permeability of endothelial cell monolayer in vitro, indicating that EXs can modulate and enhance vascular permeability, a hallmark of inflammation. In this model system, EXs were 100 times more potent than histamine and almost as potent as LTC4 and LTD4. Taken together, this article describes the formation of proinflammatory EXs, in particular in human eosinophils but also in human mast cells and nasal polyps. PMID:18184802

  12. Accumulated Metabolites of Hydroxybutyric Acid Serve as Diagnostic and Prognostic Biomarkers of Ovarian High-Grade Serous Carcinomas.

    PubMed

    Hilvo, Mika; de Santiago, Ines; Gopalacharyulu, Peddinti; Schmitt, Wolfgang D; Budczies, Jan; Kuhberg, Marc; Dietel, Manfred; Aittokallio, Tero; Markowetz, Florian; Denkert, Carsten; Sehouli, Jalid; Frezza, Christian; Darb-Esfahani, Silvia; Braicu, Elena Ioana

    2016-02-15

    Ovarian cancer is a heterogeneous disease of low prevalence, but poor survival. Early diagnosis is critical for survival, but it is often challenging because the symptoms of ovarian cancer are subtle and become apparent only during advanced stages of the disease. Therefore, the identification of robust biomarkers of early disease is a clinical priority. Metabolomic profiling is an emerging diagnostic tool enabling the detection of biomarkers reflecting alterations in tumor metabolism, a hallmark of cancer. In this study, we performed metabolomic profiling of serum and tumor tissue from 158 patients with high-grade serous ovarian cancer (HGSOC) and 100 control patients with benign or non-neoplastic lesions. We report metabolites of hydroxybutyric acid (HBA) as novel diagnostic and prognostic biomarkers associated with tumor burden and patient survival. The accumulation of HBA metabolites caused by HGSOC was also associated with reduced expression of succinic semialdehyde dehydrogenase (encoded by ALDH5A1), and with the presence of an epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition gene signature, implying a role for these metabolic alterations in cancer cell migration and invasion. In conclusion, our findings represent the first comprehensive metabolomics analysis in HGSOC and propose a new set of metabolites as biomarkers of disease with diagnostic and prognostic capabilities. PMID:26685161

  13. Accumulated metabolites of hydroxybutyric acid serve as diagnostic and prognostic biomarkers of ovarian high-grade serous carcinomas

    PubMed Central

    Hilvo, Mika; de Santiago, Ines; Gopalacharyulu, Peddinti; Schmitt, Wolfgang D.; Budczies, Jan; Kuhberg, Marc; Dietel, Manfred; Aittokallio, Tero; Markowetz, Florian; Denkert, Carsten; Sehouli, Jalid; Frezza, Christian

    2016-01-01

    Ovarian cancer is a heterogeneous disease of low prevalence, but poor survival. Early diagnosis is critical for survival, but is often challenging because the symptoms of ovarian cancer are subtle and become apparent only during advanced stages of the disease. Therefore, the identification of robust biomarkers of early disease is a clinical priority. Metabolomic profiling is an emerging diagnostic tool enabling the detection of biomarkers reflecting alterations in tumor metabolism, a hallmark of cancer. In this study, we performed metabolomic profiling of serum and tumor tissue from 158 patients with high-grade serous ovarian cancer (HGSOC) and 100 control patients with benign or non-neoplastic lesions. We report metabolites of hydroxybutyric acid (HBA) as novel diagnostic and prognostic biomarkers associated with tumor burden and patient survival. The accumulation of HBA metabolites caused by HGSOC was also associated with reduced expression of succinic semialdehyde dehydrogenase (encoded by ALDH5A1), and with the presence of an epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) gene signature, implying a role for these metabolic alterations in cancer cell migration and invasion. In conclusion, our findings represent the first comprehensive metabolomics analysis in HGSOC and propose a new set of metabolites as biomarkers of disease with diagnostic and prognostic capabilities. PMID:26685161

  14. Abortion after deliberate Arthrotec® addition to food. Mass spectrometric detection of diclofenac, misoprostol acid, and their urinary metabolites.

    PubMed

    Watzer, Bernhard; Lusthof, Klaas J; Schweer, Horst

    2015-07-01

    Arthrotec(®) (AT) is a combination of diclofenac, a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID), and misoprostol (MP), a synthetic analogue of prostaglandin E1 (PGE1). MP is a lipophilic methyl ester prodrug. It is readily metabolized to the biologically active misoprostol acid (MPA). During the last few years, medical studies exhibited MP to be an excellent abortive. In this paper, we describe a rare criminal case of MP abortion, initiated by the expectant father. After the abortion, samples of vomit and urine were collected. Systemic exposure to MP is difficult to prove, because both MP and the active metabolite MPA are hardly excreted in urine. Therefore, in addition to routine toxicological analysis, we used slightly modified, well-established liquid and gas chromatographic/tandem mass spectrometric (LC/MS/MS and GC/MS/MS) methods, for the direct and the indirect detection of MPA and its metabolites. In this case, we were able to demonstrate the presence of the major MP metabolites 2,3-dinor-MPA and 2,3,4,5-tetranor-MPA in the urine of the victim. We also detected paracetamol, 3-methoxyparacetamol and diclofenac-glucuronide in the urine. In the vomit of the victim, we detected diclofenac and MPA. These results, combined with the criminal investigations, showed that the accused had mixed MP into the food of his pregnant girlfriend. Finally, these investigations contributed to a confession of the accused. PMID:25524762

  15. Tissue distribution and urinary excretion of dimethylated arsenic and its metabolites in dimethylarsinic acid- or arsenate-treated rats

    SciTech Connect

    Adair, Blakely M.; Moore, Tanya; Conklin, Sean D.; Creed, John T.; Wolf, Douglas C.; Thomas, David J. . E-mail: thomas.david@epa.gov

    2007-07-15

    Adult female Fisher 344 rats received drinking water containing 0, 4, 40, 100, or 200 parts per million of dimethylarsinic acid or 100 parts per million of arsenate for 14 days. Urine was collected during the last 24 h of exposure. Tissues were then taken for analysis of dimethylated and trimethylated arsenicals; urines were analyzed for these arsenicals and their thiolated derivatives. In dimethylarsinic acid-treated rats, highest concentrations of dimethylated arsenic were found in blood. In lung, liver, and kidney, concentrations of dimethylated arsenic exceeded those of trimethylated species; in urinary bladder and urine, trimethylated arsenic predominated. Dimethylthioarsinic acid and trimethylarsine sulfide were present in urine of dimethylarsinic acid-treated rats. Concentrations of dimethylated arsenicals were similar in most tissues of dimethylarsinic acid- and arsenate-treated rats, including urinary bladder which is the target for dimethylarsinic acid-induced carcinogenesis in the rat. Mean concentration of dimethylated arsenic was significantly higher (P < 0.05) in urine of dimethylarsinic acid-treated rats than in arsenate-treated rats, suggesting a difference between treatment groups in the flux of dimethylated arsenic through urinary bladder. Concentrations of trimethylated arsenic concentrations were consistently higher in dimethylarsinic acid-treated rats than in arsenate-treated rats; these differences were significant (P < 0.05) in liver, urinary bladder, and urine. Concentrations of dimethylthioarsinic acid and trimethylarsine sulfide were higher in urine from dimethylarsinic acid-treated rats than from arsenate-treated rats. Dimethylarsinic acid is extensively metabolized in the rat, yielding significant concentrations of trimethylated species and of thiolated derivatives. One or more of these metabolites could be the species causing alterations of cellular function that lead to tumors in the urinary bladder.

  16. From microbe to man: the role of microbial short chain fatty acid metabolites in host cell biology.

    PubMed

    Natarajan, Niranjana; Pluznick, Jennifer L

    2014-12-01

    Recent studies have highlighted a myriad of ways in which the activity and composition of the gut microbiota can affect the host organism. A primary way in which the gut microbiota affect host physiology is by the production of metabolites, such as short-chain fatty acids (SCFAs), which are subsequently absorbed into the bloodstream of the host. Although recent studies have begun to unravel the ways in which gut microbial SCFAs affect host physiology, less is understood regarding the underlying cell biological mechanisms. In this review, we will outline the known receptors and transporters for SCFAs, and review what is known about the cell biological effects of microbial SCFAs. PMID:25273884

  17. Not flavone-8-acetic acid (FAA) but its murine metabolite 6-OH-FAA exhibits remarkable antivascular activities in vitro.

    PubMed

    Pham, Minh Hien; Dauzonne, Daniel; Chabot, Guy G

    2016-06-01

    Flavone-8-acetic acid (FAA) has been proved to be a potent vascular-disrupting agent in mice. Unfortunately, FAA did not produce any anticancer activity in clinical trials. Previously, we had reported that FAA is metabolized by mouse microsomes into six metabolites, whereas it was poorly metabolized by human microsomes, with fewer metabolites formed in lesser amounts. Especially, 6-OH-FAA was not formed by human microsomes. In this work, two major available metabolites, 4'-OH-FAA and 6-OH-FAA, were tested and compared with the parent compound FAA for their potential antivascular activities in vitro. The ability of the products to induce morphological changes, disrupt preformed capillaries of EA.hy926 endothelial cells and inhibit tubulin polymerization in vitro was assessed. The action mechanism was determined using the RhoA and Rac1 inhibitors. At 25 µg/ml, 6-OH-FAA induced morphological changes and membrane blebbing, whereas 300 µg/ml of FAA and 4'-OH-FAA slightly changed the morphology without inducing membrane blebbing. At 300 µg/ml, 6-OH-FAA produced morphological changes that were 2.1-6.9-fold greater than that produced by FAA and 4'-OH-FAA, an effect that was consistent with its much greater inhibitory effect on tubulin polymerization compared with FAA and 4'-OH-FAA. 6-OH-FAA significantly disrupted the EA.hy926 cell capillaries. 6-OH-FAA activities were prevented in EA.hy926 cells pretreated with RhoA, but not Rac1, inhibitor. In this short communication we report for the first time that, in vitro, 6-OH-FAA, a mouse-specific FAA metabolite, exhibits significantly stronger antivascular activities compared with FAA and 4'-OH-FAA, which are mediated through the RhoA kinase pathway. PMID:26901071

  18. Effect of alpha Ni3S2 on arachidonic acid metabolites in cultured human lung cells (L132 cell line).

    PubMed

    Shirali, P; Teissier, E; Marez, T; Hildebrand, H F; Haguenoer, J M

    1994-04-01

    Our previous investigations have shown evidence of an interaction between alpha Ni3S2 and membranous and cellular lipids of lung cells with a significant increase in the linoleic, linolenic and arachidonic acid pool. The present work is designed to follow the metabolic fate of arachidonic acid in alpha Ni3S2-exposed human embryonic pulmonary epithelial cells (L132) in culture (50 microM alpha Ni3S2 for 3 days). The metabolites of arachidonic acid were assessed by HPLC determination coupled with UV or electrochemical detection. We determined malondialdehyde (MDA), hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid (HETE), leukotrienes (LT) and reduced glutathione (GSH). In exposed cells we observed a significant increase of MDA, which is a breakdown product of lipid peroxidation. In addition, we noted significant increases of 5-HETE and 15-HETE in L132 cells resulting from the enzymatic reduction of 5-HPETE and 15-HPETE respectively. There was also a simultaneous decrease of GSH--confirmed by a strong decrease of GSH in exposed cells with respect to controls. 5-HPETE is furthermore converted to epoxides such as leukotriene A4 and we also quantified in exposed cells a significant increase of its subsequent catabolites LTB4, LTC4 and LTE4. These investigations show clearly that exposure of L132 cells to alpha Ni3S2 enhances lipid peroxidation based upon direct measurements of MDA and other metabolites of arachidonic acid. This lipid peroxidation is an autocatalytic free-radical process and could be responsible for DNA damage. PMID:8149492

  19. Effects of intermediate metabolite carboxylic acids of TCA cycle on Microcystis with overproduction of phycocyanin.

    PubMed

    Bai, Shijie; Dai, Jingcheng; Xia, Ming; Ruan, Jing; Wei, Hehong; Yu, Dianzhen; Li, Ronghui; Jing, Hongmei; Tian, Chunyuan; Song, Lirong; Qiu, Dongru

    2015-04-01

    Toxic Microcystis species are the main bloom-forming cyanobacteria in freshwaters. It is imperative to develop efficient techniques to control these notorious harmful algal blooms (HABs). Here, we present a simple, efficient, and environmentally safe algicidal way to control Microcystis blooms, by using intermediate carboxylic acids from the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle. The citric acid, alpha-ketoglutaric acid, succinic acid, fumaric acid, and malic acid all exhibited strong algicidal effects, and particularly succinic acid could cause the rapid lysis of Microcystis in a few hours. It is revealed that the Microcystis-lysing activity of succinic acid and other carboxylic acids was due to their strong acidic activity. Interestingly, the acid-lysed Microcystis cells released large amounts of phycocyanin, about 27-fold higher than those of the control. On the other hand, the transcription of mcyA and mcyD of the microcystin biosynthesis operon was not upregulated by addition of alpha-ketoglutaric acid and other carboxylic acids. Consider the environmental safety of intermediate carboxylic acids. We propose that administration of TCA cycle organic acids may not only provide an algicidal method with high efficiency and environmental safety but also serve as an applicable way to produce and extract phycocyanin from cyanobacterial biomass. PMID:25342454

  20. The Oxidized Linoleic Acid Metabolite-Cytochrome P450 System is Active in Biopsies from Patients with Inflammatory Dental Pain

    PubMed Central

    Ruparel, Shivani; Hargreaves, Kenneth M.; Eskander, Michael; Rowan, Spencer; de Almeida, Jose F.A.; Roman, Linda; Henry, Michael A.

    2013-01-01

    Endogenous TRPV1 agonists such as oxidized linoleic acid metabolites (OLAMs) and the enzymes releasing them [e.g., cytochrome P450 (CYP)], are up-regulated following inflammation in the rat. However, it is not known if such agonists are elevated in human inflammatory pain conditions. Since TRPV1 is expressed in human dental pulp nociceptors, we hypothesized that OLAM-CYP machinery is active in this tissue type and is increased under painful inflammatory conditions such as irreversible pulpitis (IP). The aim of this study was to compare CYP expression and linoleic acid (LA) metabolism in normal versus inflamed human dental pulp. Our data showed that exogenous LA metabolism was significantly increased in IP tissues compared to normal tissues and that pretreatment with a CYP inhibitor, ketoconazole, significantly inhibited LA metabolism. Additionally, extracts obtained from LA-treated inflamed tissues, evoked significant inward currents in TG neurons, and were blocked by pretreatment with the TRPV1 antagonist, IRTX. Moreover, extracts obtained from ketoconazole-pretreated inflamed tissues significantly reduced inward currents in TG neurons. These data suggest that LA metabolites produced in human inflamed tissues act as TRPV1 agonists and that the metabolite production can be targeted by CYP inhibition. In addition, immunohistochemical analysis of two CYP isoforms, CYP2J and CYP3A1, were shown to be predominately expressed in immune cells infiltrating the inflamed dental pulp, emphasizing the paracrine role of CYP enzymes in OLAM regulation. Collectively, our data indicates that the machinery responsible for OLAM production is up-regulated during inflammation and can be targeted to develop potential analgesics for inflammatory-induced dental pain. PMID:23867730

  1. Aflatoxin metabolism in humans: detection of metabolites and nucleic acid adducts in urine by affinity chromatography

    SciTech Connect

    Groopman, J.D.; Donahue, P.R.; Zhu, J.Q.; Chen, J.S.; Wogan, G.N.

    1985-10-01

    A high-affinity IgM monoclonal antibody specific for aflatoxins was covalently bound to Sepharose 4B and used as a preparative column to isolate aflatoxin derivatives from the urine of people and experimental animals who had been exposed to the carcinogen environmentally or under laboratory conditions. Aflatoxin levels were quantified by radioimmunoassay and high-performance liquid chromatography after elution from the affinity column. In studies on rats injected with ( UC)aflatoxin B1, the authors identified the major aflatoxin-DNA adduct, 2,3-dihydro-2-(N7-guanyl)-3-hydroxy-aflatoxin B1 (AFB1-N7-Gua), and the oxidative metabolites M1 and P1 as the major aflatoxin species present in the urine. When this methodology was applied to human urine samples obtained from people from the Guangxi Province of China exposed to aflatoxin B1 through dietary contamination, the aflatoxin metabolites detected were also AFB1-N7-Gua and aflatoxins M1 and P1. Therefore, affinity chromatography using a monoclonal antibody represents a useful and rapid technique with which to isolate this carcinogen and its metabolites in biochemical epidemiology and for subsequent quantitative measurements, providing exposure information that can be used for risk assessment.

  2. Metabologenomics: Correlation of Microbial Gene Clusters with Metabolites Drives Discovery of a Nonribosomal Peptide with an Unusual Amino Acid Monomer

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    For more than half a century the pharmaceutical industry has sifted through natural products produced by microbes, uncovering new scaffolds and fashioning them into a broad range of vital drugs. We sought a strategy to reinvigorate the discovery of natural products with distinctive structures using bacterial genome sequencing combined with metabolomics. By correlating genetic content from 178 actinomycete genomes with mass spectrometry-enabled analyses of their exported metabolomes, we paired new secondary metabolites with their biosynthetic gene clusters. We report the use of this new approach to isolate and characterize tambromycin, a new chlorinated natural product, composed of several nonstandard amino acid monomeric units, including a unique pyrrolidine-containing amino acid we name tambroline. Tambromycin shows antiproliferative activity against cancerous human B- and T-cell lines. The discovery of tambromycin via large-scale correlation of gene clusters with metabolites (a.k.a. metabologenomics) illuminates a path for structure-based discovery of natural products at a sharply increased rate. PMID:27163034

  3. Fatty Acid Amide Hydrolase-Dependent Generation of Antinociceptive Drug Metabolites Acting on TRPV1 in the Brain

    PubMed Central

    Blomgren, Anders; Simonsen, Charlotte; Daulhac, Laurence; Libert, Frédéric; Chapuy, Eric; Etienne, Monique; Högestätt, Edward D.; Zygmunt, Peter M.; Eschalier, Alain

    2013-01-01

    The discovery that paracetamol is metabolized to the potent TRPV1 activator N-(4-hydroxyphenyl)-5Z,8Z,11Z,14Z-eicosatetraenamide (AM404) and that this metabolite contributes to paracetamol’s antinociceptive effect in rodents via activation of TRPV1 in the central nervous system (CNS) has provided a potential strategy for developing novel analgesics. Here we validated this strategy by examining the metabolism and antinociceptive activity of the de-acetylated paracetamol metabolite 4-aminophenol and 4-hydroxy-3-methoxybenzylamine (HMBA), both of which may undergo a fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH)-dependent biotransformation to potent TRPV1 activators in the brain. Systemic administration of 4-aminophenol and HMBA led to a dose-dependent formation of AM404 plus N-(4-hydroxyphenyl)-9Z-octadecenamide (HPODA) and arvanil plus olvanil in the mouse brain, respectively. The order of potency of these lipid metabolites as TRPV1 activators was arvanil = olvanil>>AM404> HPODA. Both 4-aminophenol and HMBA displayed antinociceptive activity in various rodent pain tests. The formation of AM404, arvanil and olvanil, but not HPODA, and the antinociceptive effects of 4-aminophenol and HMBA were substantially reduced or disappeared in FAAH null mice. The activity of 4-aminophenol in the mouse formalin, von Frey and tail immersion tests was also lost in TRPV1 null mice. Intracerebroventricular injection of the TRPV1 blocker capsazepine eliminated the antinociceptive effects of 4-aminophenol and HMBA in the mouse formalin test. In the rat, pharmacological inhibition of FAAH, TRPV1, cannabinoid CB1 receptors and spinal 5-HT3 or 5-HT1A receptors, and chemical deletion of bulbospinal serotonergic pathways prevented the antinociceptive action of 4-aminophenol. Thus, the pharmacological profile of 4-aminophenol was identical to that previously reported for paracetamol, supporting our suggestion that this drug metabolite contributes to paracetamol’s analgesic activity via activation

  4. A sensitive GC-EIMS method for simultaneous detection and quantification of JWH-018 and JWH-073 carboxylic acid and hydroxy metabolites in urine.

    PubMed

    Paul, Buddha D; Bosy, Thomas

    2015-04-01

    Synthetic cannabinoids, including JWH-018 and JWH-073, belong to a class of aminoalkylindoles (AAIs) that are smoked to produce an effect similar to tetrahydrocannabinol. Compounds in this class are often collectively known as 'Spice'. After ingestion, these compounds are extensively metabolized to their hydroxy and carboxylic acid metabolites. During forensic analysis, detection of these metabolites in urine is an indication of past exposure to the parent compounds. The analytical process involved hydrolysis of conjugated metabolites by glucuronidase, solvent extraction, derivatization by trifluoroacetic anhydride and hexafluoroisopropanol and GC-EIMS detection. Identification of the unknown was based on the criteria of GC retention time within ±2% and mass spectral ion ratio within ±20% of that of a standard. Deuterated internal standards of the carboxylic acid metabolites were used for quantification. The acid (JWH-018-COOH, JWH-073-COOH) and hydroxy (JWH-018-OH, JWH-073-OH) metabolites were linear over the concentration range of 0.1-10 and 0.2-10 ng/mL, respectively, with a correlation coefficient-square, R(2) > 0.999 (N = 5). Extraction recoveries of the metabolites were within 79 and 87%. The method was applied to 17 urine specimens collected as part of a military law enforcement investigation. Nine of the specimens tested positive for one or more of the metabolites. When the procedure was extended to screen other AAI compounds, two of the specimens were found to contain JWH-210, JWH-250 (JWH-302 or JWH-201) and JWH-250 (C4 isomers). The GC-EIMS method presented here was found to be suitable for detecting JWH-018 and JWH-073 metabolites and other AAI compounds in urine. PMID:25691387

  5. A modified acidic approach for DNA extraction from plant species containing high levels of secondary metabolites.

    PubMed

    Cavallari, M M; Siqueira, M V B M; Val, T M; Pavanelli, J C; Monteiro, M; Grando, C; Pinheiro, J B; Zucchi, M I; Gimenes, M A

    2014-01-01

    Purified genomic DNA can be difficult to obtain from some plant species because of the presence of impurities such as polysaccharides, which are often co-extracted with DNA. In this study, we developed a fast, simple, and low-cost protocol for extracting DNA from plants containing high levels of secondary metabolites. This protocol does not require the use of volatile toxic reagents such as mercaptoethanol, chloroform, or phenol and allows the extraction of high-quality DNA from wild and cultivated tropical species. PMID:25158268

  6. 5-Hydroxyquinoline-2-Carboxylic Acid, a Dead-End Metabolite from the Bacterial Oxidation of 5-Aminonaphthalene-2-Sulfonic Acid

    PubMed Central

    Nörtemann, Bernd; Glässer, Andrea; Machinek, Reinhard; Remberg, Gerd; Knackmuss, Hans-Joachim

    1993-01-01

    5-Aminonaphthalene-2-sulfonate (5A2NS) is converted by strain BN6 into 5-hydroxyquinoline-2-carboxylate (5H2QC). The authenticity of this new compound is confirmed by nuclear magnetic resonance and mass spectrometry. Its formation is explained by a spontaneous cyclization of the hypothetical metabolite 6′-amino-2′-hydroxybenzalpyruvate. The formation of 5H2QC as a dead-end product of 5A2NS prevents NADH regeneration so that 5A2NS oxidation is limited by the internal NADH pool. PMID:16348967

  7. Generation of novel metabolites of dietary linoleic acid (18:2n6) by guinea pig epidermis

    SciTech Connect

    Chapkin, R.S.; Ziboh, V.A.

    1986-03-05

    Although the authors have demonstrated the inability of rat and guinea pig (GP) skin enzyme preparations to desaturate 18:2n6 into gammalinolenic acid (18:3n6) using an in vitro microsomal system, the fate of this dietary essential fatty acid in the GP epidermis is unknown. To explore the fate of 18:2n6, intact tissue slices from GP epidermis were incubated with (1-/sup 14/C)18:2n6. After incubation, the extracted lipids were transesterified using methanolic-HCL. The fatty acid methyl esters were analyzed using a combination of (i) argentation TLC, scanned using a proportional TLC radioscanner, and (ii) reverse phase HPLC, equipped with a flow through radioscanner. The results indicate that the intact epidermis metabolized /sup 14/C-18:2n6 to a group of novel products more polar than 18:2n6. In subsequent experiments, /sup 14/C-18:2n6 was either incubated with the 800 xg supernatant, the 105,000 xg pellet or supernatant from GP epidermis. Metabolism of 18:2n6 by the high speed supernatant resulted in the generation of polar products with chromatographic properties of not greater than 2 double bonds. These results indicate that although the GP epidermis lacks the capacity to desaturate 18:2n6 to 18:3n6, it can convert dietary 18:2n6 into a group of novel polar metabolites via a cytosolic mediated process. The function of these metabolites in the GP integumentary system remains to be determined.

  8. Plasma amino acid and metabolite signatures tracking diabetes progression in the UCD-T2DM rat model.

    PubMed

    Piccolo, Brian D; Graham, James L; Stanhope, Kimber L; Fiehn, Oliver; Havel, Peter J; Adams, Sean H

    2016-06-01

    Elevations of plasma concentrations of branched-chain amino acids (BCAAs) are observed in human insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM); however, there has been some controversy with respect to the passive or causative nature of the BCAA phenotype. Using untargeted metabolomics, plasma BCAA and other metabolites were assessed in lean control Sprague-Dawley rats (LC) and temporally during diabetes development in the UCD-T2DM rat model, i.e., prediabetic (PD) and 2 wk (D2W), 3 mo (D3M), and 6 mo (D6M) post-onset of diabetes. Plasma leucine, isoleucine, and valine concentrations were elevated only in D6M rats compared with D2W rats (by 28, 29, and 30%, respectively). This was in contrast to decreased plasma concentrations of several other amino acids in D3M and/or D6M relative to LC rats (Ala, Arg, Glu, Gln, Met, Ser, Thr, and Trp). BCAAs were positively correlated with fasting glucose and negatively correlated with plasma insulin, total body weight, total adipose tissue weight, and gastrocnemius muscle weight in the D3M and D6M groups. Multivariate analysis revealed that D3M and D6M UCD-T2DM rats had lower concentrations of amino acids, amino acid derivatives, 1,5-anhydroglucitol, and conduritol-β-opoxide and higher concentrations of uronic acids, pantothenic acids, aconitate, benzoic acid, lactate, and monopalmitin-2-glyceride relative to PD and D2W UCD-T2DM rats. The UCD-T2DM rat does not display elevated plasma BCAA concentrations until 6 mo post-onset of diabetes. With the acknowledgement that this is a rodent model of T2DM, the results indicate that elevated plasma BCAA concentrations are not necessary or sufficient to elicit an insulin resistance or T2DM onset. PMID:27094034

  9. Prey-induced changes in the accumulation of amino acids and phenolic metabolites in the leaves of Drosera capensis L.

    PubMed

    Kováčik, Jozef; Klejdus, Bořivoj; Stork, František; Hedbavny, Josef

    2012-04-01

    Effect of prey feeding (ants Formica fusca) on the quantitative changes in the accumulation of free amino acids, soluble proteins, phenolic metabolites and mineral nutrients in the leaves of carnivorous plant Drosera capensis was studied. Arginine was the most abundant compound in Drosera leaves, while proline was abundant in ants. The amount of the majority of amino acids and their sum were elevated in the fed leaves after 3 and 21 days, and the same, but with further enhancement after 21 days, was observed in ants. Accumulation of amino acids also increased in young non-fed leaves of fed plants. Soluble proteins decreased in ants, but were not enhanced in fed leaves. This confirms the effectiveness of sundew's enzymatic machinery in digestion of prey and suggests that amino acids are not in situ deposited, but rather are allocated within the plant. The content of total soluble phenols, flavonoids and two selected flavonols (quercetin and kaempferol) was not affected by feeding in Drosera leaves, indicating that their high basal level was sufficient for the plant's metabolism and prey-induced changes were mainly N based. The prey also showed to be an important source of other nutrients besides N, and a stimulation of root uptake of some mineral nutrients is assumed (Mg, Cu, Zn). Accumulation of Ca and Na was not affected by feeding. PMID:21140278

  10. 18-HEPE, an n-3 fatty acid metabolite released by macrophages, prevents pressure overload-induced maladaptive cardiac remodeling.

    PubMed

    Endo, Jin; Sano, Motoaki; Isobe, Yosuke; Fukuda, Keiichi; Kang, Jing X; Arai, Hiroyuki; Arita, Makoto

    2014-07-28

    N-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) have potential cardiovascular benefit, although the mechanisms underlying this effect remain poorly understood. Fat-1 transgenic mice expressing Caenorhabditis elegans n-3 fatty acid desaturase, which is capable of producing n-3 PUFAs from n-6 PUFAs, exhibited resistance to pressure overload-induced inflammation and fibrosis, as well as reduced cardiac function. Lipidomic analysis revealed selective enrichment of eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) in fat-1 transgenic bone marrow (BM) cells and EPA-metabolite 18-hydroxyeicosapentaenoic acid (18-HEPE) in fat-1 transgenic macrophages. BM transplantation experiments revealed that fat-1 transgenic BM cells, but not fat-1 transgenic cardiac cells, contributed to the antiremodeling effect and that the 18-HEPE-rich milieu in the fat-1 transgenic heart was generated by BM-derived cells, most likely macrophages. 18-HEPE inhibited macrophage-mediated proinflammatory activation of cardiac fibroblasts in culture, and in vivo administration of 18-HEPE reproduced the fat-1 mice phenotype, including resistance to pressure overload-induced maladaptive cardiac remodeling. PMID:25049337

  11. Chiral quizalofop-ethyl and its metabolite quizalofop-acid in soils: Enantioselective degradation, enzymes interaction and toxicity to Eisenia foetida.

    PubMed

    Ma, Lin; Liu, Hui; Qu, Han; Xu, Yangguang; Wang, Peng; Sun, Mingjing; Zhou, Zhiqiang; Liu, Donghui

    2016-06-01

    An enantioselective chromatographic method to analyze enantiomers of quizalofop-ethyl and its metabolite quizalofop-acid was established using a high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) on (R, R) Whelk-O 1 column. The enantioselective degradation kinetics of quizalofop-ethyl and quizalofop-acid in three soils were investigated. Moreover, the interaction with urease and catalase in the soils and the acute toxicity to Eisenia foetida of quizalofop-ethyl were also determined in order to assess their metabolism mechanism and environmental risk. From the results, quizalofop-ethyl was configurationally stable and was hydrolyzed rapidly to quizalofop-acid, which also degraded enantioselectively but slowly, and the inversion of the S-(-)-quizalofop-acid into the R-(+)-quizalofop-acid was observed in Xinxiang soil. In addition, quizalofop-ethyl and quizalofop-acid enantioselectively affected urease activity but not catalase. The acute toxicity assays to earthworm indicated that the racemic quizalofop-ethyl and quizalofop-acid were more toxic than quizalofop-p-ethyl and quizalofop-p-acid respectively, dramatically, the toxicity of the metabolite was much higher than the parent compound. These results revealed the enantioselective degradation of quizalofop-ethyl and quizalofop-acid, and the differences of toxicity among the enantiomers of the parent compound and the metabolite, which should be considered in future environmental risk evaluation. PMID:26971169

  12. Toxicological properties of the thiolated inorganic arsenic and arsenosugar metabolite thio-dimethylarsinic acid in human bladder cells.

    PubMed

    Ebert, Franziska; Leffers, Larissa; Weber, Till; Berndt, Svenia; Mangerich, Aswin; Beneke, Sascha; Bürkle, Alexander; Schwerdtle, Tanja

    2014-04-01

    Thio-dimethylarsinic acid (thio-DMA(V)) has recently been identified as human metabolite after exposure toward both the human carcinogen inorganic arsenic and arsenosugars, which are the major arsenical constituents of marine algae. This study aims to get further insight in the toxic modes of action of thio-DMA(V) in cultured human urothelial cells. Among others effects of thio-DMA(V) on eight cell death related endpoints, cell cycle distribution, genotoxicity, cellular bioavailability as well as for the first time its impact on DNA damage induced poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation were investigated and compared to effects induced by arsenite. The data indicate that thio-DMA(V) exerts its cellular toxicity in a similar or even lower concentration range, however most likely via different mechanisms, than arsenite. Most interestingly, thio-DMA(V) decreased damage-induced cellular poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation by 35,000-fold lower concentrations than arsenite. The inhibition of this essential DNA-damage induced and DNA-repair related signaling reaction might contribute to inorganic arsenic induced toxicity, at least in the bladder. Therefore, and also because thio-DMA(V) is to date by far the most toxic human metabolite identified after arsenosugar intake, thio-DMA(V) should contemporary be fully (also in vivo) toxicologically characterized, to assess risks to human health related to inorganic arsenic but especially arsenosugar dietary intake. PMID:23994116

  13. Covariation Analysis of Serumal and Urinary Metabolites Suggests Aberrant Glycine and Fatty Acid Metabolism in Chronic Hepatitis B

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Xue; Kong, Xiangliang; Cao, Zhiwei; Zhang, Yongyu; Hu, Yiyang; Tang, Kailin

    2016-01-01

    Background Chronic hepatitis b (CHB) is one of the most serious viral diseases threatening human health by putting patients at lifelong risk of cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Although some proofs of altered metabolites in CHB were accumulated, its metabolic mechanism remains poorly understood. Analyzing covariations between metabolites may provide new hints toward underlying metabolic pathogenesis in CHB patients. Methods The present study collected paired urine and serum samples from the same subjects including 145 CHB and 23 healthy controls. A large-scale analysis of metabolites’ covariation within and across biofluids was systematically done to explore the underlying biological evidences for reprogrammed metabolism in CHB. Randomization and relative ranking difference were introduced to reduce bias caused by different sample size. More importantly, functional indication was interpreted by mapping differentially changed covariations to known metabolic pathways. Results Our results suggested reprogrammed pathways related to glycine metabolism, fatty acids metabolism and TCA cycle in CHB patients. With further improvement, the covariation analysis combined with network association study would pave new alternative way to interpret functional clues in clinical multi-omics data. PMID:27228119

  14. Genetically engineering Synechocystis sp. Pasteur Culture Collection 6803 for the sustainable production of the plant secondary metabolite p-coumaric acid.

    PubMed

    Xue, Yong; Zhang, Yan; Cheng, Dan; Daddy, Soumana; He, Qingfang

    2014-07-01

    p-Coumaric acid is the precursor of phenylpropanoids, which are plant secondary metabolites that are beneficial to human health. Tyrosine ammonia lyase catalyzes the production of p-coumaric acid from tyrosine. Because of their photosynthetic ability and biosynthetic versatility, cyanobacteria are promising candidates for the production of certain plant metabolites, including phenylpropanoids. Here, we produced p-coumaric acid in a strain of transgenic cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. Pasteur Culture Collection 6803 (hereafter Synechocystis 6803). Whereas a strain of Synechocystis 6803 genetically engineered to express sam8, a tyrosine ammonia lyase gene from the actinomycete Saccharothrix espanaensis, accumulated little or no p-coumaric acid, a strain that both expressed sam8 and lacked slr1573, a native hypothetical gene shown here to encode a laccase that oxidizes polyphenols, produced ∼82.6 mg/L p-coumaric acid, which was readily purified from the growth medium. PMID:24927550

  15. Genetically engineering Synechocystis sp. Pasteur Culture Collection 6803 for the sustainable production of the plant secondary metabolite p-coumaric acid

    PubMed Central

    Xue, Yong; Zhang, Yan; Cheng, Dan; Daddy, Soumana; He, Qingfang

    2014-01-01

    p-Coumaric acid is the precursor of phenylpropanoids, which are plant secondary metabolites that are beneficial to human health. Tyrosine ammonia lyase catalyzes the production of p-coumaric acid from tyrosine. Because of their photosynthetic ability and biosynthetic versatility, cyanobacteria are promising candidates for the production of certain plant metabolites, including phenylpropanoids. Here, we produced p-coumaric acid in a strain of transgenic cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. Pasteur Culture Collection 6803 (hereafter Synechocystis 6803). Whereas a strain of Synechocystis 6803 genetically engineered to express sam8, a tyrosine ammonia lyase gene from the actinomycete Saccharothrix espanaensis, accumulated little or no p-coumaric acid, a strain that both expressed sam8 and lacked slr1573, a native hypothetical gene shown here to encode a laccase that oxidizes polyphenols, produced ∼82.6 mg/L p-coumaric acid, which was readily purified from the growth medium. PMID:24927550

  16. Metabolic profile of mephedrone: Identification of nor-mephedrone conjugates with dicarboxylic acids as a new type of xenobiotic phase II metabolites.

    PubMed

    Linhart, Igor; Himl, Michal; Židková, Monika; Balíková, Marie; Lhotková, Eva; Páleníček, Tomáš

    2016-01-01

    Metabolic profile of mephedrone (4-methylmethcathinone, 4-MMC), a frequently abused recreational drug, was determined in rats in vivo. The urine of rats dosed with a subcutaneous bolus dose of 20mg 4-MMC/kg was analysed by LC/MS. Ten phase I and five phase II metabolites were identified by comparison of their retention times and MS(2) spectra with those of authentic reference standards and/or with the MS(2) spectra of previously identified metabolites. The main metabolic pathway was N-demethylation leading to normephedrone (4-methylcathinone, 4-MC) which was further conjugated with succinic, glutaric and adipic acid. Other phase I metabolic pathways included oxidation of the 4-methyl group, carbonyl reduction leading to dihydro-metabolites and ω-oxidation at the position 3'. Five of the metabolites detected, namely, 4-carboxynormephedrone (4-carboxycathinone, 4-CC), 4-carboxydihydronormephedrone (4-carboxynorephedrine, 4-CNE), hydroxytolyldihydro-normephedrone (4-hydroxymethylnorephedrine, 4-OH-MNE) and conjugates of 4-MC with glutaric and adipic acid, have not been reported as yet. The last two conjugates represent a novel, hitherto unexploited, type of phase II metabolites in mammals together with an analogous succinic acid conjugate of 4-MC identified by Pozo et al. (2015). These conjugates might be potentially of great importance in the metabolism of other psychoactive amines. PMID:26541208

  17. Valorization of biodiesel derived glycerol as a carbon source to obtain added-value metabolites: Focus on polyunsaturated fatty acids.

    PubMed

    Abad, Sergi; Turon, Xavier

    2012-01-01

    The amount of glycerol derived from the biodiesel industry is exponentially increasing. The valorization of glycerol has acquired attention and resources with an obvious economic and environmental interest. Glycerol has the potential to improve the profitability of biodiesel in a biorefinery scenario. Added-value metabolites obtained from glycerol-based fermentations are the target of multiple research studies, primarily chemicals and biopolymers. Pigments and polyunsaturated fatty acids are exceptional examples as they have market presence as nutraceuticals. Most of the studies reviewed have been based on microalgae cultures. Depending on the strain and the engineering aspects of such cultures the final yield suffers notable variations. This is an emerging field which shows great potential from the perspective of a byproduct usage and the increasing yields (value) obtained from the bioprocess. PMID:22261015

  18. Role of arachidonic acid metabolites in the action of a beta adrenergic agonist on human monocyte phagocytosis.

    PubMed

    Borda, E S; Tenenbaum, A; Sales, M E; Rumi, L; Sterin-Borda, L

    1998-02-01

    The mechanisms by which beta adrenergic stimulation regulates phagocytosis of Candida albicans by human peripheral monocytes (HPM) are characterized. Isoproterenol (ISO) inhibits phagocytosis in a concentration-dependent manner. This effect was blunted by propranolol, inhibitors of phospholipase A2 (PLA2), cyclooxygenase and verapamil, pointing to a participation of arachidonic acid (AA) metabolites and calcium in the phenomenon. Prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) and dibutyryl cyclic AMP (db-cAMP) also exerted the same inhibitory effect on phagocytosis. ISO interacts with beta adrenergic receptors of HPM increasing PGE2 and cAMP. We conclude that the mechanisms by which beta adrenergic stimulation regulates phagocytosis of Candida albicans by HPM appear to be secondary to beta adrenoceptor-mediated hydrolysis of AA accompanied by an increase in PGE2 generation and cAMP production. Both PGE2 and cAMP could act as mediators of the inhibitory action of beta agonists on the HPM-phagocytosis process. PMID:9578144

  19. Changes in plasma metabolites and glucose homeostasis during omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid supplementation in women with polycystic ovary syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Karakas, Sidika E.; Perroud, Bertrand; Kind, Tobias; Palazoglu, Mine; Fiehn, Oliver

    2016-01-01

    Background Both fish (FO) and flaxseed oils (FLX) are n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA). Fish oil contains long chain while FLX contains essential n-3 PUFA. We demonstrated that FO altered insulin secretion and resistance in polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) women but FLX did not. Surprisingly, the effects of FO were similar to those of the n-6 PUFA-rich soybean oil (SBO). Since increased branched chain (BCAA) and aromatic amino acids (AA) affect insulin secretion and resistance, we investigated whether FO, FLX and /or SBO affect plasma metabolites, especially AA. Methods and findings In this six-week, randomized, 3-parallel arm, double-blinded study, 54 women received 3.5 g/day FO, FLX or SBO. In 51 completers (17 from each arm), fasting plasma metabolites were measured at the beginning and at the end. As compared to FLX, FO and SBO increased insulin response and resistance as well as several BCAA and aromatic AA. Pathway analysis indicated that FO exerted the largest biochemical impact, affecting AA degradation and biosynthesis, amine, polyamine degradation and alanine, glycine, l-carnitine biosynthesis and TCA cycle, while FLX had minimal impact affecting only alanine biosynthesis and l-cysteine degradation. Conclusion Effects of FO and SBO on plasma AA were similar and differed significantly from those of the FLX. The primary target of dietary PUFA is not known. Dietary PUFA may influence insulin secretion and resistance directly and alter plasma AA indirectly. Alternatively, as a novel concept, dietary PUFA may directly affect AA metabolism and the changes in insulin secretion and resistance may be secondary. PMID:27182493

  20. Prevalence and impact of single-strain starter cultures of lactic acid bacteria on metabolite formation in sourdough.

    PubMed

    Ravyts, Frédéric; De Vuyst, Luc

    2011-09-01

    Flavour of type II sourdoughs is influenced by the ingredients, processing conditions, and starter culture composition. It is, however, not fully clear to what extent different sourdough lactic acid bacteria (LAB) contribute to flavour. Therefore, two types of flour (rye and wheat) and different LAB starter culture strains were used to prepare sourdoughs, thereby leaving the yeast microbiota uncontrolled. All LAB starter culture strains tested were shown to be prevalent and to acidify the flour/water mixture to pH values between 3.1 and 3.9 after 24h of fermentation. Multiple aldehydes, alcohols, ketones, and carboxylic acids were produced by the sourdough-associated microbiota throughout the fermentation period. Based on the organoleptic evaluation of breads produced with these sourdoughs, five LAB strains were selected to perform prolonged wheat and rye fermentations as to their capacity to result in an acidic (Lactobacillus fermentum IMDO 130101, Lactobacillus plantarum IMDO 130201, and Lactobacillus crustorum LMG 23699), buttermilk-like (Lactobacillus amylovorus DCE 471), or fruity flavour (Lactobacillus sakei CG1). Upon prolonged fermentation, higher metabolite concentrations were produced. For instance, L. sakei CG1 produced the highest amounts of 3-methyl-1-butanol, which was further converted into 3-methylbutyl acetate. The latter compound resulted in a fruity banana flavour after 48h of fermentation, probably due to yeast interference. Rye fermentations resulted in sourdoughs richer in volatiles than wheat, including 3-methyl-1-butanol, 2-phenylethanol, and ethyl acetate. PMID:21645811

  1. Simultaneous quantitation of acetylsalicylic acid and clopidogrel along with their metabolites in human plasma using liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Chhonker, Yashpal S; Pandey, Chandra P; Chandasana, Hardik; Laxman, Tulsankar Sachin; Prasad, Yarra Durga; Narain, V S; Dikshit, Madhu; Bhatta, Rabi S

    2016-03-01

    The interest in therapeutic drug monitoring has increased over the last few years. Inter- and intra-patient variability in pharmacokinetics, plasma concentration related toxicity and success of therapy have stressed the need of frequent therapeutic drug monitoring of the drugs. A sensitive, selective and rapid liquid chromatography coupled with tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) method was developed for the simultaneous quantification of acetylsalicylic acid (aspirin), salicylic acid, clopidogrel and carboxylic acid metabolite of clopidogrel in human plasma. The chromatographic separations were achieved on Waters Symmetry Shield(TM) C18 column (150 × 4.6 mm, 5 µm) using 3.5 mm ammonium acetate (pH 3.5)-acetonitrile (10:90, v/v) as mobile phase at a flow rate of 0.75 mL/min. The present method was successfully applied for therapeutic drug monitoring of aspirin and clopidogrel in 67 patients with coronary artery disease. PMID:26230053

  2. Metabolite changes during natural and lactic acid bacteria fermentations in pastes of soybeans and soybean-maize blends.

    PubMed

    Ng'ong'ola-Manani, Tinna Austen; Ostlie, Hilde Marit; Mwangwela, Agnes Mbachi; Wicklund, Trude

    2014-11-01

    The effect of natural and lactic acid bacteria (LAB) fermentation processes on metabolite changes in pastes of soybeans and soybean-maize blends was studied. Pastes composed of 100% soybeans, 90% soybeans and 10% maize, and 75% soybeans and 25% maize were naturally fermented (NFP), and were fermented by lactic acid bacteria (LFP). LAB fermentation processes were facilitated through back-slopping using a traditional fermented gruel, thobwa as an inoculum. Naturally fermented pastes were designated 100S, 90S, and 75S, while LFP were designated 100SBS, 90SBS, and 75SBS. All samples, except 75SBS, showed highest increase in soluble protein content at 48 h and this was highest in 100S (49%) followed by 90SBS (15%), while increases in 100SBS, 90S, and 75S were about 12%. Significant (P < 0.05) increases in total amino acids throughout fermentation were attributed to cysteine in 100S and 90S; and methionine in 100S and 90SBS. A 3.2% increase in sum of total amino acids was observed in 75SBS at 72 h, while decreases up to 7.4% in 100SBS at 48 and 72 h, 6.8% in 100S at 48 h and 4.7% in 75S at 72 h were observed. Increases in free amino acids throughout fermentation were observed in glutamate (NFP and 75SBS), GABA and alanine (LFP). Lactic acid was 2.5- to 3.5-fold higher in LFP than in NFP, and other organic acids detected were acetate and succinate. Maltose levels were the highest among the reducing sugars and were two to four times higher in LFP than in NFP at the beginning of the fermentation, but at 72 h, only fructose levels were significantly (P < 0.05) higher in LFP than in NFP. Enzyme activities were higher in LFP at 0 h, but at 72 h, the enzyme activities were higher in NFP. Both fermentation processes improved nutritional quality through increased protein and amino acid solubility and degradation of phytic acid (85% in NFP and 49% in LFP by 72 h). PMID:25493196

  3. Metabolite changes during natural and lactic acid bacteria fermentations in pastes of soybeans and soybean–maize blends

    PubMed Central

    Ng'ong'ola-Manani, Tinna Austen; Østlie, Hilde Marit; Mwangwela, Agnes Mbachi; Wicklund, Trude

    2014-01-01

    The effect of natural and lactic acid bacteria (LAB) fermentation processes on metabolite changes in pastes of soybeans and soybean–maize blends was studied. Pastes composed of 100% soybeans, 90% soybeans and 10% maize, and 75% soybeans and 25% maize were naturally fermented (NFP), and were fermented by lactic acid bacteria (LFP). LAB fermentation processes were facilitated through back-slopping using a traditional fermented gruel, thobwa as an inoculum. Naturally fermented pastes were designated 100S, 90S, and 75S, while LFP were designated 100SBS, 90SBS, and 75SBS. All samples, except 75SBS, showed highest increase in soluble protein content at 48 h and this was highest in 100S (49%) followed by 90SBS (15%), while increases in 100SBS, 90S, and 75S were about 12%. Significant (P < 0.05) increases in total amino acids throughout fermentation were attributed to cysteine in 100S and 90S; and methionine in 100S and 90SBS. A 3.2% increase in sum of total amino acids was observed in 75SBS at 72 h, while decreases up to 7.4% in 100SBS at 48 and 72 h, 6.8% in 100S at 48 h and 4.7% in 75S at 72 h were observed. Increases in free amino acids throughout fermentation were observed in glutamate (NFP and 75SBS), GABA and alanine (LFP). Lactic acid was 2.5- to 3.5-fold higher in LFP than in NFP, and other organic acids detected were acetate and succinate. Maltose levels were the highest among the reducing sugars and were two to four times higher in LFP than in NFP at the beginning of the fermentation, but at 72 h, only fructose levels were significantly (P < 0.05) higher in LFP than in NFP. Enzyme activities were higher in LFP at 0 h, but at 72 h, the enzyme activities were higher in NFP. Both fermentation processes improved nutritional quality through increased protein and amino acid solubility and degradation of phytic acid (85% in NFP and 49% in LFP by 72 h). PMID:25493196

  4. Changes in Metabolite Levels in Kalanchoë daigremontiana and the Regulation of Malic Acid Accumulation in Crassulacean Acid Metabolism.

    PubMed

    Cockburn, W; McAulay, A

    1977-03-01

    Changes in glucose-6-P, fructose-6-P, fructose-1,6-diP, 6-phospho-gluconate, phosphoenolpyruvate, 3-phosphoglycerate, and pyruvate levels in the leaves of the Crassulacean plant Kalanchoë daigremontiana Hammet et Perrier were measured enzymically during transitions from CO(2)-free air to air, air to CO(2)-free air, and throughout the course of acid accumulation in darkness. The data are discussed in terms of the involvement of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase in malic acid synthesis and in terms of the regulation of the commencement of malic acid synthesis and accumulation through the effects of CO(2) on storage carbohydrate mobilization and its termination through the effects of malic acid on phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase activity. PMID:16659872

  5. Potential bile acid metabolites. XVIII. Synthesis of stereoisomeric 3,6,12 alpha-trihydroxy-5 beta-cholanoic acids.

    PubMed

    Iida, T; Tamaru, T; Chang, F C; Goto, J; Nambara, T

    1991-04-01

    Two new 6-hydroxylated bile acids, 3 beta, 6 alpha, 12 alpha- and 3 beta, 6 beta, 12 alpha-trihydroxy-5 beta-cholanoic acids, were synthesized from deoxycholic acid. In addition, their C-3 epimers, 3 alpha, 6 alpha, 12 alpha- and 3 alpha, 6 beta, 12 alpha-trihydroxy acids, were prepared by a new route. The principal reactions used were 1) 6 beta-hydroxylation of 3-methoxy-3,5-dienes with m-chloroperbenzoic acid in aqueous dioxane; 2) catalytic hydrogenation of the resulting 6 beta-hydroxy-3-oxo-4-enes to the 6 beta-hydroxy-3-oxo-5 beta compounds with palladium on calcium carbonate catalyst in ethanol; and 3) stereoselective reduction of appropriate 3-oxo derivatives with potassium tri-sec-butylborohydride and tert-butylamine-borane complex. The thin-layer chromatographic, gas-liquid chromatographic, and high performance liquid chromatographic mobilities, and 1H- and 13C-nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopic data of the four stereoisomers are presented. With this work all the 6-hydroxylated derivatives of lithocholic, deoxycholic, chenodeoxycholic, ursodeoxycholic, and cholic acids in the 5 beta series are now known and have been synthesized. PMID:1856610

  6. The effects of dietary omega fatty acids on pregnancy rate, plasma prostaglandin metabolite levels, serum progesterone levels, and milk fatty-acid profile in beef cows.

    PubMed

    Richardson, Gavin F; McNiven, Mary A; Petit, Hélène V; Duynisveld, John L

    2013-10-01

    The objectives were to determine the effects of feeding supplements rich in omega-6 or omega-3 fatty acids (FA) during the late gestation to the early postpartum and breeding periods on reproduction and milk FA profile in beef cows. For each of two years, at the beginning of period 1 (mid-December), 72 beef cows, calving in January or February, were assigned to diets supplemented with roasted flaxseed (Flax) or roasted soybean (Soybean). For each of two years, after 11 wk (end of period 1), 18 cows of 36 in the Flax group were switched to the soybean supplement and 18 cows of 36 in the Soybean group were switched to the flax supplement (start of Period 2). Cows were bred by timed artificial insemination (TAI) in week 5 of period 2. The FA composition of the milk reflected the FA profile of the oilseed supplements. There were no differences in pregnancy rates among the 4 groups. The treatments had no effect on plasma prostaglandin metabolite levels or ratios at 4 to 11 d postpartum. At 5 to 6 d post- TAI, pregnant cows fed Flax in period 1 had lower (P < 0.05) plasma prostaglandin F metabolite (PGFM) levels and PGFM to prostaglandin E metabolite (PGEM) ratio than cows fed Soybean, but there were no significant differences at 19 to 20 d post-TAI. Cows pregnant from TAI and fed Flax in period 2 had higher (P < 0.05) serum progesterone levels at 5 to 6 d post-TAI than cows fed Soybean, but there was no difference at 19 to 20 d post-TAI. The dietary treatments had no effect on pregnancy rates, but there were some effects on plasma PGFM levels, PGFM to PGEM ratios, and serum progesterone levels. The FA supplements influenced the FA composition of milk. PMID:24124276

  7. Inhibition of Human Hepatic Bile Acid Transporters by Tolvaptan and Metabolites: Contributing Factors to Drug-Induced Liver Injury?

    PubMed

    Slizgi, Jason R; Lu, Yang; Brouwer, Kenneth R; St Claire, Robert L; Freeman, Kimberly M; Pan, Maxwell; Brock, William J; Brouwer, Kim L R

    2016-01-01

    Tolvaptan is a vasopressin V(2)-receptor antagonist that has shown promise in treating Autosomal Dominant Polycystic Kidney Disease (ADPKD). Tolvaptan was, however, associated with liver injury in some ADPKD patients. Inhibition of bile acid transporters may be contributing factors to drug-induced liver injury. In this study, the ability of tolvaptan and two metabolites, DM-4103 and DM-4107, to inhibit human hepatic transporters (NTCP, BSEP, MRP2, MRP3, and MRP4) and bile acid transport in sandwich-cultured human hepatocytes (SCHH) was explored. IC(50) values were determined for tolvaptan, DM-4103 and DM-4107 inhibition of NTCP (∼41.5, 16.3, and 95.6 μM, respectively), BSEP (31.6, 4.15, and 119 μM, respectively), MRP2 (>50, ∼51.0, and >200 μM, respectively), MRP3 (>50, ∼44.6, and 61.2 μM, respectively), and MRP4 (>50, 4.26, and 37.9 μM, respectively). At the therapeutic dose of tolvaptan (90 mg), DM-4103 exhibited a C(max)/IC(50) value >0.1 for NTCP, BSEP, MRP2, MRP3, and MRP4. Tolvaptan accumulation in SCHH was extensive and not sodium-dependent; intracellular concentrations were ∼500 μM after a 10-min incubation duration with tolvaptan (15 μM). The biliary clearance of taurocholic acid (TCA) decreased by 43% when SCHH were co-incubated with tolvaptan (15 μM) and TCA (2.5 μM). When tolvaptan (15 μM) was co-incubated with 2.5 μM of chenodeoxycholic acid, taurochenodeoxycholic acid, or glycochenodeoxycholic acid in separate studies, the cellular accumulation of these bile acids increased by 1.30-, 1.68-, and 2.16-fold, respectively. Based on these data, inhibition of hepatic bile acid transport may be one of the biological mechanisms underlying tolvaptan-associated liver injury in patients with ADPKD. PMID:26507107

  8. Docosapentaenoic acid derived metabolites and mediators - The new world of lipid mediator medicine in a nutshell.

    PubMed

    Weylandt, Karsten-H

    2016-08-15

    Recent years have seen the description and elucidation of a new class of anti-inflammatory and pro-resolving lipid mediators. The arachidonic acid (AA)-derived compounds in this class are called lipoxins and have been described in great detail since their discovery thirty years ago. The new players are mediators derived from fish oil omega-3 fatty acids eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), called resolvins, protectins and maresins. Taken together, these mediators are also called specialized pro-resolution mediators (SPMs). As compared to the AA/EPA/DHA-derived compounds, research regarding mediators formed from the n-3 and n-6 docosapentaenoic acids (DPAn-3 and DPAn-6) is sparse. However, mono- di- and trihydroxy derivates of the DPAs have anti-inflammatory properties as well, even though mechanisms of their anti-inflammatory action have not been fully elucidated. This review aims to summarize current knowledge regarding the DPA-derived SPMs and their actions. PMID:26546723

  9. A PHYSIOLOGICALLY-BASED PHARMACOKINETIC MODEL FOR INTRAVENOUS AND INHALATION-ROUTE PHARMACOKINETICS OF BUTYL ACETATE AND METABOLITES N-BUTANOL AND N-BUTYRIC ACID

    EPA Science Inventory

    Risk assessment for n-butyl acetate and metabolites n-butanol and n-butyric acid (the butyl series) can be accomplished with limited toxicity data and pharmacokinetic data for each compound through application of the "family approach" (Barton et al., 2000). The necessary quantita...

  10. Scavenging of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species by the prodrug sulfasalazine and its metabolites 5-aminosalicylic acid and sulfapyridine.

    PubMed

    Couto, Diana; Ribeiro, Daniela; Freitas, Marisa; Gomes, Ana; Lima, José L F C; Fernandes, Eduarda

    2010-01-01

    Sulfasalazine is a prodrug composed by a molecule of 5-aminosalicylic acid (5-ASA) and sulfapyridine (SP), linked by an azo bond, which has been shown to be effective in the therapy of inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD) such as ulcerative colitis and Crohn's disease, as well as of rheumatic diseases, such as rheumatoid arthritis and ankylosing spondylitis. The precise mechanism of action of sulfasalazine and/or its metabolites has not been completely elucidated, though its antioxidant effects are well established and are probably due to its scavenging effects against reactive oxygen and nitrogen species (ROS and RNS), as well as metal chelating properties, in association to its inhibitory effects over neutrophil oxidative burst. The present work was focused on screening and comparing the potential scavenging activity for an array of ROS (O(2)(•-), H(2)O(2), (1)O(2), ROO(•) and HOCl) and RNS ((•)NO and ONOO(-)), mediated by sulfasalazine and its metabolites 5-ASA and SP, using validated in vitro screening systems. The results showed that both 5-ASA and sulfasalazine were able to scavenge all the tested ROS while SP was practically ineffective in all the assays. For HOCl, (1)O(2), and ROO(•), 5-ASA showed the best scavenging effects. A new and important finding of the present study was the strong scavenging effect of 5-ASA against (1)O(2). 5-ASA was shown to be a strong scavenger of (•)NO and ONOO(-). Sulfasalazine was also able to scavenge these RNS, although with a much lower potency than 5-ASA. SP was unable to scavenge (•)NO in the tested concentrations but was shown to scavenge ONOO(-), with a higher strength when the assay was performed in the presence of 25 mM bicarbonate, suggesting further scavenging of oxidizing carbonate radical. In conclusion, the ROS- and RNS-scavenging effects of sulfasalazine and its metabolites shown in this study may contribute to the anti-inflammatory effects mediated by sulfasalazine through the prevention of the

  11. Root jasmonic acid synthesis and perception regulate folivore-induced shoot metabolites and increase Nicotiana attenuata resistance.

    PubMed

    Fragoso, Variluska; Rothe, Eva; Baldwin, Ian T; Kim, Sang-Gyu

    2014-06-01

    While jasmonic acid (JA) signaling is widely accepted as mediating plant resistance to herbivores, and the importance of the roots in plant defenses is recently being recognized, the role of root JA in the defense of above-ground parts remains unstudied. To restrict JA impairment to the roots, we micrografted wildtype Nicotiana attenuata shoots to the roots of transgenic plants impaired in JA signaling and evaluated ecologically relevant traits in the glasshouse and in nature. Root JA synthesis and perception are involved in regulating nicotine production in roots. Strikingly, systemic root JA regulated local leaf JA and abscisic acid (ABA) concentrations, which were associated with differences in nicotine transport from roots to leaves via the transpiration stream. Root JA signaling also regulated the accumulation of other shoot metabolites; together these account for differences in resistance against a generalist, Spodoptera littoralis, and a specialist herbivore, Manduca sexta. In N. attenuata's native habitat, silencing root JA synthesis increased the shoot damage inflicted by Empoasca leafhoppers, which are able to select natural jasmonate mutants. Silencing JA perception in roots also increased damage by Tupiocoris notatus. We conclude that attack from above-ground herbivores recruits root JA signaling to launch the full complement of plant defense responses. PMID:24580101

  12. Effects of ethylene glycol monomethyl ether and its metabolite, 2-methoxyacetic acid, on organogenesis stage mouse limbs in vitro.

    PubMed

    Dayan, Caroline; Hales, Barbara F

    2014-06-01

    Exposure to ethylene glycol monomethyl ether (EGME), a glycol ether compound found in numerous industrial products, or to its active metabolite, 2-methoxyacetic acid (2-MAA), increases the incidence of developmental defects. Using an in vitro limb bud culture system, we tested the hypothesis that the effects of EGME on limb development are mediated by 2-MAA-induced alterations in acetylation programming. Murine gestation day 12 embryonic forelimbs were exposed to 3, 10, or 30 mM EGME or 2-MAA in culture for 6 days to examine effects on limb morphology; limbs were cultured for 1 to 24 hr to monitor effects on the acetylation of histones (H3K9 and H4K12), a nonhistone protein, p53 (p53K379), and markers for cell cycle arrest (p21) and apoptosis (cleaved caspase-3). EGME had little effect on limb morphology and no significant effects on the acetylation of histones or p53 or on biomarkers for cell cycle arrest or apoptosis. In contrast, 2-MAA exposure resulted in a significant concentration-dependent increase in limb abnormalities. 2-MAA induced the hyperacetylation of histones H3K9Ac and H4K12Ac at all concentrations tested (3, 10, and 30 mM). Exposure to 10 or 30 mM 2-MAA significantly increased acetylation of p53 at K379, p21 expression, and caspase-3 cleavage. Thus, 2-MAA, the proximate metabolite of EGME, disrupts limb development in vitro, modifies acetylation programming, and induces biomarkers of cell cycle arrest and apoptosis. PMID:24798094

  13. Concentrations of the urinary pyrethroid metabolite 3-phenoxybenzoic acid in farm worker families in the MICASA study

    SciTech Connect

    Trunnelle, Kelly J.; Bennett, Deborah H.; Ahn, Ki Chang; Schenker, Marc B.; Tancredi, Daniel J.; Gee, Shirley J.; Stoecklin-Marois, Maria T.; Hammock, Bruce D.

    2014-05-01

    Indoor pesticide exposure is a growing concern, particularly from pyrethroids, a commonly used class of pesticides. Pyrethroid concentrations may be especially high in homes of immigrant farm worker families who often live in close proximity to agricultural fields, and are faced with poor housing conditions, causing higher pest infestation and more pesticide use. We investigate exposure of farm worker families to pyrethroids in a study of mothers and children living in Mendota, CA within the population-based Mexican Immigration to California: Agricultural Safety and Acculturation (MICASA) Study. We present pyrethroid exposure based on an ELISA analysis of urinary metabolite 3-phenoxybenzoic acid (3PBA) levels among 105 women and 103 children. The median urinary 3PBA levels (children=2.56 ug/g creatinine, mothers=1.46 ug/g creatinine) were higher than those reported in population based studies for the United States general population, but similar to or lower than studies with known high levels of pyrethroid exposure. A positive association was evident between poor housing conditions and the urinary metabolite levels, showing that poor housing conditions are a contributing factor to the higher levels of 3PBA seen in the urine of these farm worker families. Further research is warranted to fully investigate sources of exposure. - Highlights: • We investigate exposure of farm worker families to pyrethroids. • We present pyrethroid exposure based on an ELISA analysis of urinary 3PBA levels. • 3PBA levels were higher than those reported for the U.S. general population. • Poor housing conditions may be associated with pyrethroid exposure.

  14. Effects of calcineurin inhibitors on pharmacokinetics of mycophenolic acid and its glucuronide metabolite during the maintenance period following renal transplantation.

    PubMed

    Naito, Takafumi; Shinno, Kazuko; Maeda, Toshio; Kagawa, Yoshiyuki; Hashimoto, Hisakuni; Otsuka, Atsushi; Takayama, Tatsuya; Ushiyama, Tomomi; Suzuki, Kazuo; Ozono, Seiichiro

    2006-02-01

    Mycophenolic acid (MPA), the active metabolite of mycophenolate mofetil (MMF) has been introduced into renal transplant immunosuppressant protocols in combination with calcineurin inhibitors (CNIs) and steroids. This study compared the pharmacokinetic profiles of MPA and its major metabolite MPA glucuronide (MPAG) in combination with tacrolimus (TAC) or cyclosporine (CyA) during the maintenance period (>6 months) following renal transplantation. There was no difference between TAC and CyA-treated groups in MPA plasma concentration before drug administration (C(0)). MPA C(0) in TAC and CyA-treated patients did not differ from that in patients who were not treated with a CNI. In patients treated with a CNI, MPAG C(0) was significantly greater in those treated with CyA compared with TAC. The MPAG/MPA ratio in CyA-treated patients was significantly greater than that in the TAC-treated group. We observed that C(0) of MPA was negatively correlated with that of TAC and CyA. Positive correlation between MPA C(0), MPAG C(0) and serum creatinine was stronger in patients treated with CyA compared with TAC. Our study suggests that CyA, but not TAC, inhibits enterohepatic circulation of MPAG as a secondary excretion pathway, and that renal function makes a major contribution to elimination of MPA and MPAG. We indicate that it may be necessary to estimate biliary excretion of MPAG to avoid the risk of intestinal injury in patients receiving combination therapy with TAC during the maintenance period. PMID:16462031

  15. Monoamine acid metabolites and cerebrospinal fluid dynamics in normal pressure hydrocephalus: preliminary results.

    PubMed Central

    Maira, G; Bareggi, S R; Di Rocco, C; Calderini, G; Morselli, P L

    1975-01-01

    Lumbar and ventricular CSF concentration of homovanillic acid (HVA) and 5-hydroxy-indole-acetic acid (5-HIAA) have been determined in 13 patients admitted to hospital for suspected normal pressure hydrocephalus. Low values of HVA in lumbar CSF were found in all patients with reduced CSF absorption and CSF flow inversion. The HVA lumbar concentration remained low after shunt procedure; it increased if obstruction of the shunt occurred. The ventricular CSF concentration of HVA was normal before surgery; it became higher, in two cases, after surgery. No important variations were found in the lumbar and ventricular CSF concentration of 5-HIAA. The possible mechanisms and diagnostic value of these findings are discussed. PMID:1151392

  16. 5-Lipoxygenase metabolite 4-HDHA is a mediator of the antiangiogenic effect of ω-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids.

    PubMed

    Sapieha, Przemyslaw; Stahl, Andreas; Chen, Jing; Seaward, Molly R; Willett, Keirnan L; Krah, Nathan M; Dennison, Roberta J; Connor, Kip M; Aderman, Christopher M; Liclican, Elvira; Carughi, Arianna; Perelman, Dalia; Kanaoka, Yoshihide; Sangiovanni, John Paul; Gronert, Karsten; Smith, Lois E H

    2011-02-01

    Lipid signaling is dysregulated in many diseases with vascular pathology, including cancer, diabetic retinopathy, retinopathy of prematurity, and age-related macular degeneration. We have previously demonstrated that diets enriched in ω-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) effectively reduce pathological retinal neovascularization in a mouse model of oxygen-induced retinopathy, in part through metabolic products that suppress microglial-derived tumor necrosis factor-α. To better understand the protective effects of ω-3 PUFAs, we examined the relative importance of major lipid metabolic pathways and their products in contributing to this effect. ω-3 PUFA diets were fed to four lines of mice deficient in each key lipid-processing enzyme (cyclooxygenase 1 or 2, or lipoxygenase 5 or 12/15), retinopathy was induced by oxygen exposure; only loss of 5-lipoxygenase (5-LOX) abrogated the protection against retinopathy of dietary ω-3 PUFAs. This protective effect was due to 5-LOX oxidation of the ω-3 PUFA lipid docosahexaenoic acid to 4-hydroxy-docosahexaenoic acid (4-HDHA). 4-HDHA directly inhibited endothelial cell proliferation and sprouting angiogenesis via peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPARγ), independent of 4-HDHA's anti-inflammatory effects. Our study suggests that ω-3 PUFAs may be profitably used as an alternative or supplement to current anti-vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) treatment for proliferative retinopathy and points to the therapeutic potential of ω-3 PUFAs and metabolites in other diseases of vasoproliferation. It also suggests that cyclooxygenase inhibitors such as aspirin and ibuprofen (but not lipoxygenase inhibitors such as zileuton) might be used without losing the beneficial effect of dietary ω-3 PUFA. PMID:21307302

  17. Metabolomics approach to assessing plasma 13- and 9-hydroxy-octadecadienoic acid and linoleic acid metabolite responses to 75-km cycling.

    PubMed

    Nieman, David C; Shanely, R Andrew; Luo, Beibei; Meaney, Mary Pat; Dew, Dustin A; Pappan, Kirk L

    2014-07-01

    Bioactive oxidized linoleic acid metabolites (OXLAMs) include 13- and 9-hydroxy-octadecadienoic acid (13-HODE + 9-HODE) and have been linked to oxidative stress, inflammation, and numerous pathological and physiological states. The purpose of this study was to measure changes in plasma 13-HODE + 9-HODE following a 75-km cycling bout and identify potential linkages to linoleate metabolism and established biomarkers of oxidative stress (F2-isoprostanes) and inflammation (cytokines) using a metabolomics approach. Trained male cyclists (N = 19, age 38.0 ± 1.6 yr, wattsmax 304 ± 10.5) engaged in a 75-km cycling time trial on their own bicycles using electromagnetically braked cycling ergometers (2.71 ± 0.07 h). Blood samples were collected preexercise, immediately post-, 1.5 h post-, and 21 h postexercise, and analyzed for plasma cytokines (IL-6, IL-8, IL-10, tumor necrosis factor-α, monocyte chemoattractant protein-1, granulocyte colony-stimulating factor), F2-isoprostanes, and shifts in metabolites using global metabolomics procedures with gas chromatography mass spectrometry (GC-MS) and liquid chromatography mass spectrometry (LC-MS). 13-HODE + 9-HODE increased 3.1-fold and 1.7-fold immediately post- and 1.5 h postexercise (both P < 0.001) and returned to preexercise levels by 21-h postexercise. Post-75-km cycling plasma levels of 13-HODE + 9-HODE were not significantly correlated with increases in plasma cytokines but were positively correlated with postexercise F2-isoprostanes (r = 0.75, P < 0.001), linoleate (r = 0.54, P = 0.016), arachidate (r = 0.77, P < 0.001), 12,13-dihydroxy-9Z-octadecenoate (12,13-DiHOME) (r = 0.60, P = 0.006), dihomo-linolenate (r = 0.57, P = 0.011), and adrenate (r = 0.56, P = 0.013). These findings indicate that prolonged and intensive exercise caused a transient, 3.1-fold increase in the stable linoleic acid oxidation product 13-HODE + 9-HODE and was related to increases in F2-isoprostanes, linoleate, and fatty acids in the linoleate

  18. Development and Validation of an HPLC Method for Simultaneous Quantification of Clopidogrel Bisulfate, Its Carboxylic Acid Metabolite, and Atorvastatin in Human Plasma: Application to a Pharmacokinetic Study

    PubMed Central

    Croitoru, Octavian; Spiridon, Adela-Maria; Belu, Ionela; Turcu-Ştiolică, Adina; Neamţu, Johny

    2015-01-01

    A simple, sensitive, and specific reversed phase liquid chromatographic method was developed and validated for simultaneous quantification of clopidogrel, its carboxylic acid metabolite, and atorvastatin in human serum. Plasma samples were deproteinized with acetonitrile and ibuprofen was chosen as internal standard. Chromatographic separation was performed on an BDS Hypersil C18 column (250 × 4.6 mm; 5 μm) via gradient elution with mobile phase consisting of 10 mM phosphoric acid (sodium) buffer solution (pH = 2.6 adjusted with 85% orthophosphoric acid) : acetonitrile : methanol with flow rate of 1 mL·min−1. Detection was achieved with PDA detector at 220 nm. The method was validated in terms of linearity, sensitivity, precision, accuracy, limit of quantification, and stability tests. Calibration curves of the analytes were found to be linear in the range of 0.008–2 μg·mL−1 for clopidogrel, 0.01–4 μg·mL−1 for its carboxylic acid metabolite, and 0.005–2.5 μg·mL−1 for atorvastatin. The results of accuracy (as recovery) with ibuprofen as internal standard were in the range of 96–98% for clopidogrel, 94–98% for its carboxylic acid metabolite, and 90–99% for atorvastatin, respectively. PMID:26839733

  19. Development and Validation of an HPLC Method for Simultaneous Quantification of Clopidogrel Bisulfate, Its Carboxylic Acid Metabolite, and Atorvastatin in Human Plasma: Application to a Pharmacokinetic Study.

    PubMed

    Croitoru, Octavian; Spiridon, Adela-Maria; Belu, Ionela; Turcu-Ştiolică, Adina; Neamţu, Johny

    2015-01-01

    A simple, sensitive, and specific reversed phase liquid chromatographic method was developed and validated for simultaneous quantification of clopidogrel, its carboxylic acid metabolite, and atorvastatin in human serum. Plasma samples were deproteinized with acetonitrile and ibuprofen was chosen as internal standard. Chromatographic separation was performed on an BDS Hypersil C18 column (250 × 4.6 mm; 5 μm) via gradient elution with mobile phase consisting of 10 mM phosphoric acid (sodium) buffer solution (pH = 2.6 adjusted with 85% orthophosphoric acid) : acetonitrile : methanol with flow rate of 1 mL·min(-1). Detection was achieved with PDA detector at 220 nm. The method was validated in terms of linearity, sensitivity, precision, accuracy, limit of quantification, and stability tests. Calibration curves of the analytes were found to be linear in the range of 0.008-2 μg·mL(-1) for clopidogrel, 0.01-4 μg·mL(-1) for its carboxylic acid metabolite, and 0.005-2.5 μg·mL(-1) for atorvastatin. The results of accuracy (as recovery) with ibuprofen as internal standard were in the range of 96-98% for clopidogrel, 94-98% for its carboxylic acid metabolite, and 90-99% for atorvastatin, respectively. PMID:26839733

  20. DEVELOPMENT OF A PHYSIOLOGICALLY BASED PHARMACOKINETIC MODEL FOR ETHYLENE GLYCOL AND ITS MAJOR METABOLITE, GLYCOLIC ACID, IN RATS AND HUMANS

    SciTech Connect

    Corley, Rick A.; Bartels, M J.; Carney, E W.; Weitz, Karl K.; Soelberg, Jolen J.; Gies, Richard A.; Thrall, Karla D.

    2005-05-19

    An extensive database on the toxicity and modes of action of the major industrial chemical, ethylene glycol (EG), has been developed over the past several decades. These studies have consistently identified the kidney as a primary target organ, with rats being more sensitive than mice and males more sensitive than females following chronic exposure. Renal toxicity has been associated with the terminal metabolite, oxalic acid which can precipitate with calcium to form crystals. EG also induces developmental toxicity, although these effects appear to require high-doses or accelerated dose-rates, and have been reported only in rats and mice. The developmental toxicity of EG has been attributed to the intermediate metabolite, glycolic acid (GA). The developmental toxicity of EG has been the subject of extensive research and regulatory review in recent years. Therefore, a physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model was developed to integrate the extensive mode of action and pharmacokinetic data on EG and GA for use in developmental risk assessment. Metabolic rate constants and partition coefficients for EG and GA were estimated from in vitro studies. Other biochemical constants were optimized from appropriate in vivo pharmacokinetic studies. The resulting PBPK model includes inhalation, oral, dermal, intravenous and subcutaneous routes of administration. Metabolism of EG and GA were described in the liver with elimination via the kidneys. Several rat and human metabolism studies were used to validate the resulting PBPK model. Consistent with these studies, simulations indicated that the metabolism of EG to GA was essentially first-order (linear) up to 2500 mg/kg/day while the metabolism of GA saturated between bolus ethylene glycol doses of 200 and 1000 mg/kg/day. This saturation results in non-linear increases in blood GA concentrations, correlating with the developmental toxicity of EG. Pregnancy had no effect on maternal EG and GA kinetics over a broad dose

  1. Reactivity of partially reduced arylhydroxylamine and nitrosoarene metabolites of 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene (TNT) toward biomass and humic acids.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, Farrukh; Hughes, Joseph B

    2002-10-15

    Sequential anaerobic/aerobic treatment of 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene (TNT) generally results in the incorporation of residues into biomass and natural organic matter fractions of a system. To better understand the potential contribution of hydroxylamine and nitroso moieties in these reactions, studies were conducted using model systems taking advantage of the biocatalytic-activity of Clostridium acetobutylicum that does not produce aminated TNT derivatives. To evaluate binding to biomass only, systems containing cell-free extracts of C. acetobutylicum and molecular hydrogen as a reductant were employed. At the end of treatment, mass balance studies showed that 10% of the total 14C was associated with an insoluble protein-containing precipitate that could not be extracted with organic solvents. Model reactions were conducted between a mixture of 2,4-dihydroxylamino-6-nitrotoluene (DHA6NT) and 4-hydroxylamino-2,6-dinitrotoluene (4HADNT) and 1-thioglycerol to test the involvement of the nitroso-thiol reaction in binding to biomass. It was demonstrated that DHA6NT formed a new and relatively polar product with 1-thioglycerol only in the presence of oxygen. The oxygen requirement confirmed that the nitroso functionality was responsible for the binding reaction. The reactivity of arylhydroxylamino and nitrosoarene functionalities toward International Humic Substance Society (IHSS) peat humic acid was evaluated under anaerobic and aerobic conditions, respectively. 4HADNT showed no appreciable reactivity toward peat humic acid. Conversely, the nitrosoarene compound, nitrosobenzene, showed rapid reactivity with peat humic acid (50% removal in 48 h). When tested with two other humic acids (selected on the basis of their protein content), it became apparent that the proteinaceous fraction was responsible at least in part for the nitrosoarene's removal from solution. Furthermore, the pretreatment of the humic acids with a selective thiol derivatizing agent had a considerable effect

  2. Protective Effects of Chlorogenic Acid and its Metabolites on Hydrogen Peroxide-Induced Alterations in Rat Brain Slices: A Comparative Study with Resveratrol.

    PubMed

    Gul, Zulfiye; Demircan, Celaleddin; Bagdas, Deniz; Buyukuysal, Rifat Levent

    2016-08-01

    The effectiveness of chlorogenic acid and its main metabolites, caffeic and quinic acids, against oxidative stress was investigated. Resveratrol, another natural phenolic compound, was also tested for comparison. Rat cortical slices were incubated with 200 μM H2O2 for 1 h, and alterations in oxidative stress parameters, such as 2, 3, 5-triphenyltetrazolium chloride (TTC) staining and the production of both malondialdehyde (MDA) and reactive oxygen species (ROS), were assayed in the absence or presence of phenolic compounds. Additionally, the effectiveness of chlorogenic acid and other compounds on H2O2-induced increases in fluorescence intensities were also compared in slice-free incubation medium. Although quinic acid failed, chlorogenic and caffeic acids significantly ameliorated the H2O2-induced decline in TTC staining intensities. Although resveratrol also caused an increase in staining intensity, its effect was not dose-dependent; the high concentrations of resveratrol tested in the present study (10 and 100 μM) further lessened the staining of the slices. Additionally, all phenolic compounds significantly attenuated the H2O2-induced increases in MDA and ROS levels in cortical slices. When the IC50 values were compared to H2O2-induced alterations, chlorogenic acid was more potent than either its metabolites or resveratrol for all parameters studied under these experimental conditions. In slice-free experimental conditions, on the other hand, chlorogenic and caffeic acids significantly attenuated the fluorescence emission enhanced by H2O2 with a similar order of potency to that obtained in slice-containing physiological medium. These results indicate that chlorogenic acid is a more potent phenolic compound than resveratrol and its main metabolites caffeic and quinic acids against H2O2-induced alterations in oxidative stress parameters in rat cortical slices. PMID:27161374

  3. Gut microbial metabolites of polyunsaturated fatty acids correlate with specific fecal bacteria and serum markers of metabolic syndrome in obese women.

    PubMed

    Druart, Céline; Dewulf, Evelyne M; Cani, Patrice D; Neyrinck, Audrey M; Thissen, Jean-Paul; Delzenne, Nathalie M

    2014-04-01

    The aim of this human study was to assess the influence of prebiotic-induced gut microbiota modulation on PUFA-derived bacterial metabolites production. Therefore, we analyzed the circulating fatty acid profile including CLA/CLnA in obese women treated during 3 months with inulin-type fructan prebiotics. In these patients, we had already determined gut microbiota composition by phylogenetic microarray and qPCR analysis of 16S rDNA. Some PUFA-derived bacterial metabolites were detected in the serum of obese patients. Despite the prebiotic-induced modulation of gut microbiota, including changes in CLA/CLnA-producing bacteria, the treatment did not impact significantly on the circulating level of these metabolites. However, some PUFA-derived bacterial metabolites were positively correlated with specific fecal bacteria (Bifidobacterium spp., Eubacterium ventriosum and Lactobacillus spp.) and inversely correlated with serum cholesterol (total, LDL, HDL). These correlations suggest a potential beneficial effect of some of these metabolites but this remains to be confirmed by further investigation. PMID:24473752

  4. The highly abundant urinary metabolite urobilin interferes with the bicinchoninic acid assay.

    PubMed

    Sampson, D L; Chng, Y L; Upton, Z; Hurst, C P; Parker, A W; Parker, T J

    2013-11-01

    Estimation of total protein concentration is an essential step in any protein- or peptide-centric analysis pipeline. This study demonstrates that urobilin, a breakdown product of heme and a major constituent of urine, interferes considerably with the bicinchoninic acid (BCA) assay. This interference is probably due to the propensity of urobilin to reduce cupric ions (Cu(2+)) to cuprous ions (Cu(1+)), thus mimicking the reduction of copper by proteins, which the assay was designed to do. In addition, it is demonstrated that the Bradford assay is more resistant to the influence of urobilin and other small molecules. As such, urobilin has a strong confounding effect on the estimate of total protein concentrations obtained by BCA assay and thus this assay should not be used for urinary protein quantification. It is recommended that the Bradford assay be used instead. PMID:23911526

  5. Maternal dietary imbalance between omega-6 and omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids impairs neocortical development via epoxy metabolites.

    PubMed

    Sakayori, Nobuyuki; Kikkawa, Takako; Tokuda, Hisanori; Kiryu, Emiko; Yoshizaki, Kaichi; Kawashima, Hiroshi; Yamada, Tetsuya; Arai, Hiroyuki; Kang, Jing X; Katagiri, Hideki; Shibata, Hiroshi; Innis, Sheila M; Arita, Makoto; Osumi, Noriko

    2016-02-01

    Omega-6 (n-6) and omega-3 (n-3) polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) are essential nutrients. Although several studies have suggested that a balanced dietary n-6:n-3 ratio is essential for brain development, the underlying cellular and molecular mechanism is poorly understood. Here, we found that feeding pregnant mice an n-6 excess/n-3 deficient diet, which reflects modern human diets, impairsed neocortical neurogenesis in the offspring. This impaired neurodevelopment occurs through a precocious fate transition of neural stem cells from the neurogenic to gliogenic lineage. A comprehensive mediator lipidomics screen revealed key mediators, epoxy metabolites, which were confirmed functionally using a neurosphere assay. Importantly, although the offspring were raised on a well-balanced n-6:n-3 diet, they exhibited increased anxiety-related behavior in adulthood. These findings provide compelling evidence that excess maternal consumption of n-6 PUFAs combined with insufficient intake of n-3 PUFAs causes abnormal brain development that can have long-lasting effects on the offspring's mental state. PMID:26580686

  6. DNA-strand breaks induced by dimethylarsinic acid, a metabolite of inorganic arsenics, are strongly enhanced by superoxide anion radicals.

    PubMed

    Rin, K; Kawaguchi, K; Yamanaka, K; Tezuka, M; Oku, N; Okada, S

    1995-01-01

    We previously reported that dimethylarsinic acid (DMAA), a major metabolite of inorganic arsenics, induced DNA single-strand breaks (ssb) both in vivo and in cultured alveolar type II (L-132) cells in vitro, possibly via the production of dimethylarsenic peroxyl radicals. Here, the interaction of superoxide anion radicals (O2-) in the induction of ssb in L-132 cells was investigated using paraquat, an O2(-)-producing agent. A significant enhancement of ssb formation was observed in the DMAA-exposed cells when coexposed to paraquat. This enhancement occurred even when post-exposed to DMAA after washing, suggesting that the DMAA exposure caused some modification of DNA such as DNA-adducts, which was recognized by active oxygens to form ssb. An experiment with UV-irradiation, which was likely to induce ssb at the modified region, supported the possibility of DNA modification by DMAA exposure. An ESR study indicated that O2- produced by paraquat in DMAA-exposed cells was more consumed than in non-exposed cells, assumingly through the reaction with the dimethylarsenic-modified region of DNA. The species of active oxygens were estimated by using diethyldithiocarbamate, aminotriazole, diethylmaleate, hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), gamma-irradiation and ethanol. O2- but neither H2O2 nor hydroxyl radicals was very likely to contribute to the ssb-enhancing action of paraquat. PMID:7735248

  7. Microfluidic study of the chemotactic response of Escherichia coli to amino acids, signaling molecules and secondary metabolites.

    PubMed

    Nagy, Krisztina; Sipos, Orsolya; Valkai, Sándor; Gombai, Éva; Hodula, Orsolya; Kerényi, Ádám; Ormos, Pál; Galajda, Péter

    2015-07-01

    Quorum sensing and chemotaxis both affect bacterial behavior on the population level. Chemotaxis shapes the spatial distribution of cells, while quorum sensing realizes a cell-density dependent gene regulation. An interesting question is if these mechanisms interact on some level: Does quorum sensing, a density dependent process, affect cell density itself via chemotaxis? Since quorum sensing often spans across species, such a feedback mechanism may also exist between multiple species. We constructed a microfluidic platform to study these questions. A flow-free, stable linear chemical gradient is formed in our device within a few minutes that makes it suitable for sensitive testing of chemoeffectors: we showed that the amino acid lysine is a weak chemoattractant for Escherichia coli, while arginine is neutral. We studied the effect of quorum sensing signal molecules of Pseudomonas aeruginosa on E. coli chemotaxis. Our results show that N-(3-oxododecanoyl)-homoserine lactone (oxo-C12-HSL) and N-(butryl)-homoserine lactone (C4-HSL) are attractants. Furthermore, we tested the chemoeffector potential of pyocyanin and pyoverdine, secondary metabolites under a quorum sensing control. Pyocyanin is proved to be a weak attractant while pyoverdine are repellent. We demonstrated the usability of the device in co-culturing experiments, where we showed that various factors released by P. aeruginosa affect the dynamic spatial rearrangement of a neighboring E. coli population, while surface adhesion of the cells is also modulated. PMID:26339306

  8. Interactions of valproic acid with carbamazepine and its metabolites' concentrations, concentrations ratios, and level/dose ratios in epileptic children.

    PubMed

    Liu, H; Delgado, M R; Browne, R H

    1995-02-01

    In two groups of epileptic children receiving carbamazepine (CBZ) therapy with or without valproic acid (VPA) comedication, we investigate the drug interactions of VPA on serum CBZ and its metabolites' concentrations, concentration ratios, and level/dose ratios. Serum total and free CBZ-10, 11-epoxide (CBZ-E) concentrations are significantly increased in patients taking CBZ plus VPA, together with higher CBZ-E/CBZ concentration ratios and CBZ-E level/dose ratios. These results reflect the accumulation of CBZ-E. The decreased concentration ratios of trans-10, 11-dihydroxy-10, 11-dihydro-CBZ (CBZ-H)/CBZ-E observed in patients taking CBZ plus VPA suggest an inhibition in the biotransformation from CBZ-E to CBZ-H. Significant negative correlations are found between serum VPA level and CBZ-H/CBZ-E concentration ratios, indicating that the inhibition of CBZ-E hydrolysis by VPA may depend on the concentration of VPA (total or free CBZ-H/CBZ-E concentration ratio = [formula: see text], respectively). VPA concentration also shows significant positive correlations with CBZ-E and CBZ level/dose ratios. Patients taking CBZ plus VPA have significant higher free fractions of CBZ and CBZ-E than do patients on CBZ alone, suggesting a protein-binding displacement by VPA. PMID:8665529

  9. Is 2-propyl-4-pentenoic acid, a hepatotoxic metabolite of valproate, responsible for valproate-induced hyperammonemia?

    PubMed

    Kondo, T; Ishida, M; Kaneko, S; Hirano, T; Otani, K; Fukushima, Y; Muranaka, H; Koide, N; Yokoyama, M; Nakata, S

    1992-01-01

    To investigate the association between valproate metabolism (VPA) and VPA-induced hyperammonemia together with the contribution of VPA hepatotoxicity risk factors such as young age, polypharmacy, and high serum VPA levels to VPA-induced hyperammonemia, plasma ammonia (NH3) levels, serum levels of VPA and its metabolites, and biochemical parameters were determined in 98 patients treated with VPA (53 monopharmacy cases and 45 polypharmacy cases). In monopharmacy patients, plasma NH3 levels did not depend on age, VPA dosage or serum levels. Serum level of 2-propyl-4-pentenoic acid (4-en) showed a negative correlation with plasma NH3 level in the monopharmacy group. In polypharmacy patients, plasma NH3 levels, serum glutamic pyruvic transaminase, and gamma-glutamyl-transpeptidase were significantly higher, while level/dose VPA ratio, 2-en-VPA serum level, and bilirubin were significantly lower than those in monopharmacy patients. These results suggest that young age and relatively high VPA serum levels within the therapeutic range were unlikely to be risk factors for common hyperammonemia associated with VPA therapy and that 4-en was not causally related to this adverse effect. The decreased serum level of 2-en-VPA in polypharmacy patients may be a reflection of a certain mitochondrial dysfunction, which might be a mechanism of the increased NH3 levels. The changes in biochemical parameters in polypharmacy patients were considered results of the enzyme-inducing activity of coadministered antiepileptic drugs (AEDs). PMID:1350534

  10. Mutagenicity and DNA-damaging potential of clenbuterol and its metabolite 4-amino-3,5-dichlorobenzoic acid in vitro.

    PubMed

    Vulić, Ana; Durgo, Ksenija; Pleadin, Jelka; Herceg, Luka; Kopjar, Nevenka

    2015-03-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate in vitro toxicity of clenbuterol and its metabolite 4-amino-3,5-dichlorobenzoic acid. Cytotoxicity and pro-oxidative effect of both compounds were studied on human colon adenocarcinoma cell line SW 480. No significant cytotoxic effect of either compound was observed. Results of an Ames test on Salmonella typhimurium did not indicate mutagenic activity of clenbuterol on TA 98 and TA 100 strains, regardless of metabolic activation. Potential mutagenic effects of the highest clenbuterol concentration (2500 ng/ml) were observed on the TA 1535 strain. The obtained results of alkaline comet assay on isolated human lymphocytes suggested that both compounds induced an increase of primary DNA damage in a concentration-dependent manner. 4-ADBA was a slightly more potent inducer of primary DNA damage as compared to clenbuterol. Chromosomal aberration analysis showed that clenbuterol caused a statistically significant increase in the total number of aberrant cells only at the highest concentration tested (3% vs. 0.7% in the negative control). The results of this study might represent a solid frame for designing and planning future studies with both compounds, which should further clarify their mechanisms of action and genotoxic/cytogenetic effects relevant for human risk assessment. PMID:25595371

  11. Reactive metabolites and agranulocytosis.

    PubMed

    Uetrecht, J P

    1996-01-01

    Central to most hypotheses of the mechanism of idiosyncratic drug-induced blood dyscrasias is the involvement of reactive metabolites. In view of the reactive nature of the majority of such metabolites, it is likely that they are formed by, or in close proximity to the blood cells affected. The major oxidative system of neutrophils generates hypochlorous acid. We have demonstrated that the drugs associated with the highest incidence of agranulocytosis are oxidized to reactive metabolites by hypochlorous acid and/or activated neutrophils. There are many mechanisms by which such reactive metabolites could induce agranulocytosis. In the case of aminopyrine-induced agranulocytosis, most cases appear to involve drug-dependent anti-neutrophil antibodies, and these are likely to be induced by cell membrane antigens modified by the reactive metabolite of aminopyrine. The target of agranulocytosis associated with many other drugs is usually neutrophil precursors and may involve cytotoxicity or a cell-mediated immune reaction induced by a reactive metabolite. In the case of aplastic anaemia, there is evidence in some cases for involvement of cytotoxic T cells, which could either be induced by metabolites generated by neutrophils, or more likely, by reactive metabolites generated by stem cells. PMID:8987247

  12. Changes in the levels of major sulfur metabolites and free amino acids in pea cotyledons recovering from sulfur deficiency

    SciTech Connect

    Macnicol, P.K.; Randall, P.J.

    1987-02-01

    Changes in levels of sulfur metabolites and free amino acids were followed in cotyledons of sulfur-deficient, developing pea seeds (Pisum sativum L.) for 24 hours after resupply of sulfate, during which time the legumin mRNA levels returned almost to normal. Two recovery situations were studied: cultured seeds, with sulfate added to the medium, and seeds attached to the intact plant, with sulfate added to the roots. In both situations the levels of cysteine, glutathione, and methionine rose rapidly, glutathione exhibiting an initial lag. In attached but not cultured seeds methionine markedly overshot the level normally found in sulfur-sufficient seeds. In the cultured seed S-adenosylmethionine (AdoMet), but not S-methylmethionine, showed a sustained rise; in the attached seed the changes were slight. The composition of the free amino acid pool did not change substantially in either recovery situation. In the cultured seed the large rise in AdoMet level occurred equally in nonrecovering seeds. It was accompanied by 6-fold and 10-fold increases in ..gamma..-aminobutyrate and alanine, respectively. These effects are attributed to wounding resulting from excision of the seed. /sup 35/S-labeling experiments showed that there was no significant accumulation of label in unidentified sulfur-containing amino compounds in either recovery situation. It was concluded from these results and those of other workers that, at the present level of knowledge, the most probable candidate for a signal compound, eliciting recovery of legumin mRNA level in response to sulfur-feeding, is cysteine.

  13. Aspirin’s Active Metabolite Salicylic Acid Targets High Mobility Group Box 1 to Modulate Inflammatory Responses

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Hyong Woo; Tian, Miaoying; Song, Fei; Venereau, Emilie; Preti, Alessandro; Park, Sang-Wook; Hamilton, Keith; Swapna, G V T; Manohar, Murli; Moreau, Magali; Agresti, Alessandra; Gorzanelli, Andrea; De Marchis, Francesco; Wang, Huang; Antonyak, Marc; Micikas, Robert J; Gentile, Daniel R; Cerione, Richard A; Schroeder, Frank C; Montelione, Gaetano T; Bianchi, Marco E; Klessig, Daniel F

    2015-01-01

    Salicylic acid (SA) and its derivatives have been used for millennia to reduce pain, fever and inflammation. In addition, prophylactic use of acetylsalicylic acid, commonly known as aspirin, reduces the risk of heart attack, stroke and certain cancers. Because aspirin is rapidly de-acetylated by esterases in human plasma, much of aspirin’s bioactivity can be attributed to its primary metabolite, SA. Here we demonstrate that human high mobility group box 1 (HMGB1) is a novel SA-binding protein. SA-binding sites on HMGB1 were identified in the HMG-box domains by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopic studies and confirmed by mutational analysis. Extracellular HMGB1 is a damage-associated molecular pattern molecule (DAMP), with multiple redox states. SA suppresses both the chemoattractant activity of fully reduced HMGB1 and the increased expression of proinflammatory cytokine genes and cyclooxygenase 2 (COX-2) induced by disulfide HMGB1. Natural and synthetic SA derivatives with greater potency for inhibition of HMGB1 were identified, providing proof-of-concept that new molecules with high efficacy against sterile inflammation are attainable. An HMGB1 protein mutated in one of the SA-binding sites identified by NMR chemical shift perturbation studies retained chemoattractant activity, but lost binding of and inhibition by SA and its derivatives, thereby firmly establishing that SA binding to HMGB1 directly suppresses its proinflammatory activities. Identification of HMGB1 as a pharmacological target of SA/aspirin provides new insights into the mechanisms of action of one of the world’s longest and most used natural and synthetic drugs. It may also provide an explanation for the protective effects of low-dose aspirin usage. PMID:26101955

  14. Concentration distribution of the marijuana metabolite Delta9-tetrahydrocannabinol-9-carboxylic acid and the cocaine metabolite benzoylecgonine in the department of defense urine drug-testing program.

    PubMed

    Jemionek, John F; Copley, Curtis L; Smith, Michael L; Past, Marilyn R

    2008-01-01

    Urine drug testing has been employed for punitive purposes by the Department of Defense since December 1981 (Memorandum 62884, Deputy Secretary of Defense Frank C. Carlucci). Federal Workplace Drug Testing Programs were initiated in response to Executive Order 12564 issued on September 15, 1986, that required Drug-Free Federal Workplaces be established. In their respective programs, a positive urine drug test may be referred to a military court martial or to an administrative board. To address safety and insurance requirements, the testing of civilians has expanded beyond Federal Programs to include pre-employment and post-accident urine drug testing. During adjudication, an Expert Toxicologist may be asked to opine what can be discerned from the concentration of drug or drug metabolite found in the urine. Little can be opined with certainty from a positive urine drug test as to the amount of drug ingested, when the drug was ingested, and in most instances, whether the individual felt the effects of the drug, or was under the influence of the drug found in the urine. What may be useful to both the Expert and to the Trier-of-Facts is the frequency that a particular urine drug concentration is encountered in positive drug tests. The finding that 50% of all positive marijuana and cocaine urine metabolite concentrations in the military testing program over the three-year period of October 1, 2004 through September 30, 2007, are below a median value of 65 and 968 ng/mL, respectively, provide reference points. A median drug concentration combined with the percentile or frequency that a particular urine drug concentration occurs may provide evaluative information for a determination of the facts and the outcome of judicial or administrative proceedings. This may be especially useful to jurors when the concentration of marijuana or cocaine metabolite is perceptibly low. The information would also be applicable to medical review officers, medical examiners, drug treatment

  15. Structure-dependent activities of polybrominated diphenyl ethers and hydroxylated metabolites on zebrafish retinoic acid receptor.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Jing; Zhu, Xiangwei; Xu, Ting; Yin, Daqiang

    2015-02-01

    Polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs), a group of potential endocrine-disrupting chemicals (EDCs) have been shown to disrupt retinoid homeostasis in different species in both laboratory and field studies. However, the molecular mechanisms of interactions with the retinoic acid receptor (RAR) are not fully understood. Zebrafish have proven useful for investigating mechanisms of chemical toxicity. In the present study, a reporter gene assay was used to investigate the activities of 11 PBDEs and six OH-PBDEs with different degrees of bromination on zebrafish RAR. All tested OH-PBDEs induced RAR transcriptional activity; however, of the 11 PBDEs examined, only BDE28 and BDE154 affected the RAR transcriptional activity. Homology modeling and molecular docking were employed to simulate the interactions of PBDEs/OH-PBDEs with zebrafish RARs and to identify binding affinities to analyze the specialization of the interaction between RARs and PBDEs/OH-PBDEs. The results showed that although these compounds could bind with RARs, the effects of PBDEs/OH-PBDEs on RAR transcriptional activity did not depend on their RAR-binding abilities. The present study is the first attempt to demonstrate that OH-PBDEs could induce RAR transcriptional activity by binding directly with RAR; these effects are possibly related to the structure of the compounds, especially their hydroxylation and bromination. Most of the PBDEs could not directly interact with the RAR. PMID:25077655

  16. High throughput volatile fatty acid skin metabolite profiling by thermal desorption secondary electrospray ionisation mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Martin, Helen J; Reynolds, James C; Riazanskaia, Svetlana; Thomas, C L Paul

    2014-09-01

    The non-invasive nature of volatile organic compound (VOC) sampling from skin makes this a priority in the development of new screening and diagnostic assays. Evaluation of recent literature highlights the tension between the analytical utility of ambient ionisation approaches for skin profiling and the practicality of undertaking larger campaigns (higher statistical power), or undertaking research in remote locations. This study describes how VOC may be sampled from skin and recovered from a polydimethylsilicone sampling coupon and analysed by thermal desorption (TD) interfaced to secondary electrospray ionisation (SESI) time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MS) for the high throughput screening of volatile fatty acids (VFAs) from human skin. Analysis times were reduced by 79% compared to gas chromatography-mass spectrometry methods (GC-MS) and limits of detection in the range 300 to 900 pg cm(-2) for VFA skin concentrations were obtained. Using body odour as a surrogate model for clinical testing 10 Filipino participants, 5 high and 5 low odour, were sampled in Manilla and the samples returned to the UK and screened by TD-SESI-MS and TD-GC-MS for malodour precursors with greater than >95% agreement between the two analytical techniques. Eight additional VFAs were also identified by both techniques with chains 4 to 15 carbons long being observed. TD-SESI-MS appears to have significant potential for the high throughput targeted screening of volatile biomarkers in human skin. PMID:24992564

  17. Effects of cytochrome P-450 metabolites of arachidonic acid on the epithelial sodium channel (ENaC)

    PubMed Central

    Pavlov, Tengis S.; Ilatovskaya, Daria V.; Levchenko, Vladislav; Mattson, David L.; Roman, Richard J.

    2011-01-01

    Sodium reabsorption via the epithelial Na+ channel (ENaC) in the aldosterone-sensitive distal nephron plays a central role in the regulation of body fluid volume. Previous studies have indicated that arachidonic acid (AA) and its metabolite 11,12-EET but not other regioisomers of EETs inhibit ENaC activity in the collecting duct. The goal of this study was to investigate the endogenous metabolism of AA in cultured mpkCCDc14 principal cells and the effects of these metabolites on ENaC activity. Liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry analysis of the mpkCCDc14 cells indicated that these cells produce prostaglandins, 8,9-EET, 11,12-EET, 14,15-EET, 5-HETE, 12/8-HETE, and 15-HETE, but not 20-HETE. Single-channel patch-clamp experiments revealed that 8,9-EET, 14,15-EET, and 11,12-EET all decrease ENaC activity. Neither 5-, 12-, nor 15-HETE had any effect on ENaC activity. Diclofenac and ibuprofen, inhibitors of cyclooxygenase, decreased transepithelial Na+ transport in the mpkCCDc14 cells. Inhibition of cytochrome P-450 (CYP450) with MS-PPOH activated ENaC-mediated sodium transport when cells were pretreated with AA and diclofenac. Coexpression of CYP2C8, but not CYP4A10, with ENaC in Chinese hamster ovary cells significantly decreased ENaC activity in whole-cell experiments, whereas 11,12-EET mimicked this effect. Thus both endogenously formed EETs and their exogenous application decrease ENaC activity. Downregulation of ENaC activity by overexpression of CYP2C8 was PKA dependent and was prevented by myristoylated PKI treatment. Biotinylation experiments and single-channel analysis revealed that long-term treatment with 11,12-EET and overexpression of CYP2C8 decreased the number of channels in the membrane. In contrast, the acute inhibitory effects are mediated by a decrease in the open probability of the ENaC. We conclude that 11,12-EET, 8,9-EET, and 14,15-EET are endogenously formed eicosanoids that modulate ENaC activity in the collecting duct. PMID:21697242

  18. 10-oxo-12(Z)-octadecenoic acid, a linoleic acid metabolite produced by gut lactic acid bacteria, potently activates PPARγ and stimulates adipogenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Goto, Tsuyoshi; Kim, Young-Il; Furuzono, Tomoya; Takahashi, Nobuyuki; Yamakuni, Kanae; Yang, Ha-Eun; Li, Yongjia; Ohue, Ryuji; Nomura, Wataru; Sugawara, Tatsuya; Yu, Rina; Kitamura, Nahoko; and others

    2015-04-17

    Our previous study has shown that gut lactic acid bacteria generate various kinds of fatty acids from polyunsaturated fatty acids such as linoleic acid (LA). In this study, we investigated the effects of LA and LA-derived fatty acids on the activation of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs) which regulate whole-body energy metabolism. None of the fatty acids activated PPARδ, whereas almost all activated PPARα in luciferase assays. Two fatty acids potently activated PPARγ, a master regulator of adipocyte differentiation, with 10-oxo-12(Z)-octadecenoic acid (KetoA) having the most potency. In 3T3-L1 cells, KetoA induced adipocyte differentiation via the activation of PPARγ, and increased adiponectin production and insulin-stimulated glucose uptake. These findings suggest that fatty acids, including KetoA, generated in gut by lactic acid bacteria may be involved in the regulation of host energy metabolism. - Highlights: • Most LA-derived fatty acids from gut lactic acid bacteria potently activated PPARα. • Among tested fatty acids, KetoA and KetoC significantly activated PPARγ. • KetoA induced adipocyte differentiation via the activation of PPARγ. • KetoA enhanced adiponectin production and glucose uptake during adipogenesis.

  19. Peripheral Aromatic L-Amino Acids Decarboxylase Inhibitor in Parkinsonism. I. EFFECT ON O-METHYLATED METABOLITES OF L-DOPA-2-14C

    PubMed Central

    Messiha, F. S.; Hsu, T. H.; Bianchine, J. R.

    1972-01-01

    The effects of MK-486, an inhibitor of peripheral aromatic L-amino acids decarboxylase, on the urinary metabolites derived from orally administered L-Dopa-2-14C were studied in three Parkinsonian patients. Treatment with MK-486 before L-Dopa-2-14C markedly reduced radioactivity found in catecholamines fraction by 70-80% during 48 hr, but increased 3-O-methyldopa fraction by threefold, as compared with a nonpretreated base line value. Pretreatment with MK-486 for a period of 1 wk resulted in less inhibition of O-methylated amine and acid metabolite fractions than that measured after a single dose of the inhibitor. PMID:5009125

  20. Analysis of cytochrome P450 metabolites of arachidonic acid by stable isotope probe labeling coupled with ultra high-performance liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Quan-Fei; Hao, Yan-Hong; Liu, Ming-Zhou; Yue, Jiang; Ni, Jian; Yuan, Bi-Feng; Feng, Yu-Qi

    2015-09-01

    Cytochrome P450 metabolites of arachidonic acid (AA) belong to eicosanoids and are potent lipid mediators of inflammation. It is well-known that eicosanoids play an important role in numerous pathophysiological processes. Therefore, quantitative analysis of cytochrome P450 metabolites of AA, including hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acids (HETEs), epoxyeicosatreinoic acids (EETs), and dihydroxyeicosatrienoic acids (DHETs) can provide crucial information to uncover underlying mechanisms of cytochrome P450 metabolites of AA related diseases. Herein, we developed a highly sensitive method to identify and quantify HETEs, EETs, and DHETs in lipid extracts of biological samples based on stable isotope probe labeling coupled with ultra high-performance liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry. To this end, a pair of stable isotope probes, 2-dimethylaminoethylamine (DMED) and d4-2-dimethylaminoethylamine (d4-DMED), were utilized to facilely label eicosanoids. The heavy labeled eicosanoid standards were prepared and used as internal standards for quantification to minimize the matrix and ion suppression effects in mass spectrometry analysis. In addition, the detection sensitivities of DMED labeled eicosanoids improved by 3-104 folds in standard solution and 5-138 folds in serum matrix compared with unlabeled analytes. Moreover, a good separation of eicosanoids isomers was achieved upon DMED labeling. The established method provided substantial sensitivity (limit of quantification at sub-picogram), high specificity, and broad linear dynamics range (3 orders of magnitude). We further quantified cytochrome P450 metabolites of AA in rat liver, heart, brain tissues and human serum using the developed method. The results showed that 19 eicosanoids could be distinctly detected and the contents of 11-, 15-, 16-, 20-HETE, 5,6-EET, and 14,15-EET in type 2 diabetes mellitus patients and 5-, 11-, 12-, 15-, 16-, 20-HETE, 8,9-EET, and 5,6-DHET in myeloid leukemia patients had significant changes

  1. Degradation of chloroacetanilide herbicides: The prevalence of sulfonic and oxanilic acid metabolites in Iowa groundwaters and surface waters

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kalkhoff, S.J.; Kolpin, D.W.; Thurman, E.M.; Ferrer, I.; Barcelo, D.

    1998-01-01

    Water samples were collected from 88 municipal wells throughout Iowa during the summer and were collected monthly at 12 stream sites in eastern Iowa from March to December 1996 to study the occurrence of the sulfonic and oxanilic metabolites of acetochlor, alachlor, and metolachlor. The sulfonic and oxanilic metabolites were present in almost 75% of the groundwater samples and were generally present from 3 to 45 times more frequently than their parent compounds. In groundwater, the median value of the summed concentrations of acetochlor, alachlor, and metolachlor was less than 0.05 μg/L, and the median value of the summed concentrations of the six metabolites was 1.2 μg/L. All surface water samples contained at least one detectable metabolite compound. Individual metabolites were detected from 2 to over 100 times more frequently than the parent compounds. In surface water, the median value of the summed concentrations of the three parent compounds was 0.13 μg/L, and the median value of the summed concentrations of the six metabolites was 6.4 μg/L. These data demonstrate the importance of analyzing both parent compounds and metabolites to more fully understand the environmental fate and transport of herbicides in the hydrologic system.

  2. A liquid chromatography/mass spectrometric method for simultaneous analysis of arachidonic acid and its endogenous eicosanoid metabolites prostaglandins, dihydroxyeicosatrienoic acids, hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acids, and epoxyeicosatrienoic acids in rat brain tissue.

    PubMed

    Yue, Hongfei; Jansen, Susan A; Strauss, Kenneth I; Borenstein, Michael R; Barbe, Mary F; Rossi, Luella J; Murphy, Elise

    2007-02-19

    A sensitive, specific, and robust liquid chromatography/mass spectrometric (LC/MS) method was developed and validated that allows simultaneous analysis of arachidonic acid (AA) and its cyclooxygenase, cytochrome P450, and lipoxygenase pathway metabolites prostaglandins (PGs), dihydroxyeicosatrienoic acids (DiHETrEs), hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acids (HETEs) and epoxyeicosatrienoic acids (EETs), including PGF(2alpha), PGE(2), PGD(2), PGJ(2), 14,15-DiHETrE, 11,12-DiHETrE, 8,9-DiHETrE, 5,6-DiHETrE, 20-HETE, 15-HETE, 12-HETE, 9-HETE, 8-HETE, 5-HETE, 14,15-EET, 11,12-EET, 8,9-EET, and 5,6-EET in rat brain tissues. Deuterium labeled PGF(2alpha)-d(4), PGD(2)-d(4), 15(S)-HETE-d(8), 14,15-EET-d(8), 11,12-EET-d(8), 8,9-EET-d(8), and AA-d(8) were used as internal standards. Solid phase extraction was used for sample preparation. A gradient LC/MS method using a C18 column and electrospray ionization source under negative ion mode was optimized for the best sensitivity and separation within 35 min. The method validation, including LC/MS instrument qualification, specificity, calibration model, accuracy, precision (without brain matrix and with brain matrix), and extraction efficiency were performed. The linear ranges of the calibration curves were 2-1000 pg for PGs, DiHETrEs, HETEs, and EETs, 10-2400 pg for PGE(2) and PGD(2), and 20-2000 ng for AA, respectively. PMID:17125954

  3. Metabolite Control Overrides Circadian Regulation of Phosphoenolpyruvate Carboxylase Kinase and CO(2) Fixation in Crassulacean Acid Metabolism.

    PubMed

    Borland; Hartwell; Jenkins; Wilkins; Nimmo

    1999-11-01

    Phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPc) catalyzes the primary fixation of CO(2) in Crassulacean acid metabolism plants. Flux through the enzyme is regulated by reversible phosphorylation. PEPc kinase is controlled by changes in the level of its translatable mRNA in response to a circadian rhythm. The physiological significance of changes in the levels of PEPc-kinase-translatable mRNA and the involvement of metabolites in control of the kinase was investigated by subjecting Kalanchoë daigremontiana leaves to anaerobic conditions at night to modulate the magnitude of malate accumulation, or to a rise in temperature at night to increase the efflux of malate from vacuole to cytosol. Changes in CO(2) fixation and PEPc kinase activity reflected those in kinase mRNA. The highest rates of CO(2) fixation and levels of kinase mRNA were observed in leaves subjected to anaerobic treatment for the first half of the night and then transferred to ambient air. In leaves subjected to anaerobic treatment overnight and transferred to ambient air at the start of the day, PEPc-kinase-translatable mRNA and activity, the phosphorylation state of PEPc, and fixation of atmospheric CO(2) were significantly higher than those for control leaves for the first 3 h of the light period. A nighttime temperature increase from 19 degrees C to 27 degrees C led to a rapid reduction in kinase mRNA and activity; however, this was not observed in leaves in which malate accumulation had been prevented by anaerobic treatment. These data are consistent with the hypothesis that a high concentration of malate reduces both kinase mRNA and the accumulation of the kinase itself. PMID:10557237

  4. Agonistic effect of polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) and its metabolites on brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) through molecular docking simulation

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is a potent neurotrophic factor that is implicated in the regulation of food intake and body weight. Polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) localised in cell membranes have been shown to alter the levels of BDNF in the brain, suggesting that PUFAs and BDNF could have physical interaction with each other. To decipher the molecular mechanism through which PUFAs modulates BDNF’s activity, molecular docking was performed for BDNF with PUFAs and its metabolites, with 4-Methyl Catechol as a control. Results Inferring from molecular docking studies, lipoxin A4 (LXA4), and a known anti-inflammatory bioactive metabolite derived from PUFAs, with a binding energy of −3.98 Kcal/mol and dissociation constant of 1.2mM showed highest binding affinity for BDNF in comparison to other PUFAs and metabolites considered in the study. Further, the residues Lys 18, Thr 20, Ala 21, Val 22, Phe 46, Glu 48, Lys 50, Lys 58, Thr 75, Gln 77, Arg 97 and Ile 98 form hot point motif, which on interaction enhances BDNF’s function. Conclusion These results suggest that PUFAs and their metabolites especially, LXA4, modulate insulin resistance by establishing a physical interaction with BDNF. Similar interaction(s) was noted between BDNF and resolvins and protectins but were of lesser intensity compared to LXA4. PMID:22943296

  5. Enhanced metabolite generation

    DOEpatents

    Chidambaram, Devicharan

    2012-03-27

    The present invention relates to the enhanced production of metabolites by a process whereby a carbon source is oxidized with a fermentative microbe in a compartment having a portal. An electron acceptor is added to the compartment to assist the microbe in the removal of excess electrons. The electron acceptor accepts electrons from the microbe after oxidation of the carbon source. Other transfers of electrons can take place to enhance the production of the metabolite, such as acids, biofuels or brewed beverages.

  6. Identification of monovinyl tripropionic acid porphyrins and metabolites from faeces of patients with hereditary coproporphyria by high-performance liquid chromatography/electrospray ionization quadrupole time-of-flight tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Danton, Malcolm; Lim, Chang Kee

    2004-01-01

    Harderoporphyrin (2-vinyl-4,6,7-tripropionic acid porphyrin) and its metabolites in faeces of patients with hereditary coproporphyria (HCP) have been separated and characterized by high-performance liquid chromatography/electrospray ionization quadrupole time-of-flight tandem mass spectrometry (HPLC/ESI-Q-TOFMS/MS). The metabolites identified were 2-ethyl-4,6,7-tripropionic acid porphyrin, 2-hydro-4,6,7-tripropionic acid porphyrin, 2-methoxyethyl-4,6,7-tripropionic acid porphyrin and 2-acetyl-4,6,7-tripropionic acid porphyrin. Isomers of harderoporphyrin derived from isomerization of harderoporphyrinogen were also detected. PMID:15384152

  7. Identification of combined conjugation of nabumetone phase I metabolites with glucuronic acid and glycine in minipig biotransformation using coupling high-performance liquid chromatography with electrospray ionization mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Česlová, Lenka; Holčapek, Michal; Nobilis, Milan

    2014-01-01

    High-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) coupled with electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) was applied for the analysis of nabumetone metabolites during the biotransformation in minipigs. In addition to known phase I metabolites, the identification of phase II metabolites was achieved on the basis of their full-scan mass spectra and subsequent MS(n) analysis using both positive-ion and negative-ion ESI mode. Some phase I metabolites are conjugated with both glucuronide acid and glycine, which is quite unusual type of phase II metabolite not presented so far for nabumetone. These metabolites were found in small intestine content, but they were absent in minipigs urine. PMID:24083957

  8. An Interspecies Signaling System Mediated by Fusaric Acid Has Parallel Effects on Antifungal Metabolite Production by Pseudomonas protegens Strain Pf-5 and Antibiosis of Fusarium spp.

    PubMed Central

    Quecine, Maria Carolina; Kidarsa, Teresa A.; Goebel, Neal C.; Shaffer, Brenda T.; Henkels, Marcella D.; Zabriskie, T. Mark

    2015-01-01

    Pseudomonas protegens strain Pf-5 is a rhizosphere bacterium that suppresses soilborne plant diseases and produces at least seven different secondary metabolites with antifungal properties. We derived mutants of Pf-5 with single and multiple mutations in biosynthesis genes for seven antifungal metabolites: 2,4-diacetylphoroglucinol (DAPG), pyrrolnitrin, pyoluteorin, hydrogen cyanide, rhizoxin, orfamide A, and toxoflavin. These mutants were tested for inhibition of the pathogens Fusarium verticillioides and Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. pisi. Rhizoxin, pyrrolnitrin, and DAPG were found to be primarily responsible for fungal antagonism by Pf-5. Previously, other workers showed that the mycotoxin fusaric acid, which is produced by many Fusarium species, including F. verticillioides, inhibited the production of DAPG by Pseudomonas spp. In this study, amendment of culture media with fusaric acid decreased DAPG production, increased pyoluteorin production, and had no consistent influence on pyrrolnitrin or orfamide A production by Pf-5. Fusaric acid also altered the transcription of biosynthetic genes, indicating that the mycotoxin influenced antibiotic production by Pf-5 at the transcriptional level. Addition of fusaric acid to the culture medium reduced antibiosis of F. verticillioides by Pf-5 and derivative strains that produce DAPG but had no effect on antibiosis by Pf-5 derivatives that suppressed F. verticillioides due to pyrrolnitrin or rhizoxin production. Our results demonstrated the importance of three compounds, rhizoxin, pyrrolnitrin, and DAPG, in suppression of Fusarium spp. by Pf-5 and confirmed that an interspecies signaling system mediated by fusaric acid had parallel effects on antifungal metabolite production and antibiosis by the bacterial biological control organism. PMID:26655755

  9. Cyclodextrin-modified MEKC method for quantification of selected acidic metabolites of catecholamines in the presence of various biogenic amines. Application to diagnosis of neuroblastoma.

    PubMed

    Miękus, Natalia; Kowalski, Piotr; Olędzka, Ilona; Plenis, Alina; Bień, Ewa; Miękus, Aleksandra; Krawczyk, Małgorzata; Adamkiewicz-Drożyńska, Elżbieta; Bączek, Tomasz

    2015-10-15

    The main aim of the presented study was to develop a reliable and non-time-consuming method for the simultaneous separation of biogenic amines (BAs) like noradrenalin, adrenalin, dopamine and their main metabolites - homovanillic acid (HVA), vanillylmandelic acid (VMA), 3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetic acid (DOPAC) - in urine samples. To achieve this, the validated α-cyclodextrin (α-CD)-modified micellar electrokinetic chromatography method with DAD was proposed. The optimized separation parameters were as follows: background electrolyte was composed of 10mM sodium tetraborate decahydrate, 30mM SDS, 15% (v/v) methanol and 25mM α-CD, adjusted to pH 9.36 with 1N NaOH; uncoated fused silica capillary (75μm i.d.×60.2cm length); λ=200nm; injection time 5s, applied voltage 25kV; temperature 25 (±0.1)°C. Next, the developed MEKC method was practically applied to evaluate the levels of selected acidic metabolites of catecholamines like HVA, VMA and DOPAC in urine samples collected from patients diagnosed with neuroblastoma (NB), melanotic neuroectodermal tumor of infancy (MNTI). PMID:26402573

  10. Sequential determination of metabolites involved in the biosynthesis of aromatic amino acids after ultrasound-assisted extraction from plants and reverse LC separation.

    PubMed

    Alcaide-Molina, Miguel; Priego-Capote, Feliciano; Luque de Castro, María Dolores

    2013-02-15

    A dual method is proposed for the determination of metabolites involved in the shikimate pathway which are biomarkers of the effects of glyphosate action on plants exposed to this herbicide. Extraction of the target metabolites (phenylalanine, tryptophan, tyrosine and shikimic acid) from a wheat model plant was accelerated by ultrasound energy. After centrifugation and micro-filtration, 1 μL of extract was injected into the chromatograph in an isocratic regime for 4 min to determine shikimate by absorption at 254 nm. In the mean time, a 130 μL aliquot of extract was subjected to derivatization with o-phthaldialdehyde and 2-mercaptoethanol for 1 min, the reaction stopped and 1 μL of the solution chromatographied in a gradient regime prior to laser-induced fluorescence detection of the derivatized amino acids. The characterization of the dual method provided limits of detection around 0.03 μg mL(-1) for the aromatic amino acids and 1.52 μg mL(-1) for shikimate, whereas the limits of quantitation ranged between 0.084 and 0.093 μg mL(-1) for amino acids and was of 4.56 μg mL(-1) for shikimate. The suitability of the method was checked by application to Triticum aestivum (wheat) plants grown under controlled conditions, sprayed with different doses of glyphosate and collected at different times after exposition to the herbicide. PMID:23598041

  11. Effects of Chromium Methionine Supplementation on Blood Metabolites and Fatty Acid Profile of Beef during Late Fattening Period in Holstein Steers

    PubMed Central

    Nejad, Jalil Ghassemi; Lee, Bae-Hun; Kim, Byong-Wan; Ohh, Sang-Jip; Sung, Kyung Il

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the effects of chromium methionine (Cr-Met) chelate supplementation on blood metabolites and fatty acid profile of beef from Holstein steers during late fattening period. Fifteen Holstein steers were allotted randomly into two groups including the control (non Cr-Met feeding, NCM, ave. body weight [BW] = 483±25.7 kg) and the treatment (Cr-Met feeding for 4 months, 4CM, ave. BW = 486±27.5 kg) group. The feeding amount of Cr-Met to animals was limited to 400 ppb/cow/d and was supplemented to total mixed ration. No difference in blood albumin, alkaline phosphatase, urea-nitrogen, calcium, creatine, glucose, total protein, triglyceride, and cholesterol were observed between the treatment groups (p>0.05). The level of high density lipoprotein was higher in the 4CM group than the NCM group, whereas low density lipoprotein was lower in the 4CM group (p<0.05). The fatty acid composition (caprate, laurate, myristate, pentadecanoate, palmitate, palmitoleate, margarate, cis-11 heptadodecanoate, stearate, oleate, trans-vaccenate, linoleate, cis-11 eicosenoate, docosa hexaenoic acid, and docosa pentaenoic acid) of the beef showed no difference between the two groups (p>0.05). The arachidonic acid level tended to be higher in the 4CM than the NCM group (p = 0.07). Cr-Met had no influence (p>0.05) on the ratio of saturated, unsaturated, unsaturated/saturated, monounsaturated/saturated and polyunsaturated/saturated fatty acids whereas the ratio of polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) in the 4CM group was comparatively higher than the NCM group (p<0.05). This study concluded that feeding Cr-Met supplementation in 400 ppb/d to Holstein steers for 4 months during late fattening period can improve some blood metabolites and beef quality by increasing PUFA and gamma-linoleate compositions of beef. PMID:26950869

  12. Effects of Chromium Methionine Supplementation on Blood Metabolites and Fatty Acid Profile of Beef during Late Fattening Period in Holstein Steers.

    PubMed

    Nejad, Jalil Ghassemi; Lee, Bae-Hun; Kim, Byong-Wan; Ohh, Sang-Jip; Sung, Kyung Il

    2016-03-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the effects of chromium methionine (Cr-Met) chelate supplementation on blood metabolites and fatty acid profile of beef from Holstein steers during late fattening period. Fifteen Holstein steers were allotted randomly into two groups including the control (non Cr-Met feeding, NCM, ave. body weight [BW] = 483±25.7 kg) and the treatment (Cr-Met feeding for 4 months, 4CM, ave. BW = 486±27.5 kg) group. The feeding amount of Cr-Met to animals was limited to 400 ppb/cow/d and was supplemented to total mixed ration. No difference in blood albumin, alkaline phosphatase, urea-nitrogen, calcium, creatine, glucose, total protein, triglyceride, and cholesterol were observed between the treatment groups (p>0.05). The level of high density lipoprotein was higher in the 4CM group than the NCM group, whereas low density lipoprotein was lower in the 4CM group (p<0.05). The fatty acid composition (caprate, laurate, myristate, pentadecanoate, palmitate, palmitoleate, margarate, cis-11 heptadodecanoate, stearate, oleate, trans-vaccenate, linoleate, cis-11 eicosenoate, docosa hexaenoic acid, and docosa pentaenoic acid) of the beef showed no difference between the two groups (p>0.05). The arachidonic acid level tended to be higher in the 4CM than the NCM group (p = 0.07). Cr-Met had no influence (p>0.05) on the ratio of saturated, unsaturated, unsaturated/saturated, monounsaturated/saturated and polyunsaturated/saturated fatty acids whereas the ratio of polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) in the 4CM group was comparatively higher than the NCM group (p<0.05). This study concluded that feeding Cr-Met supplementation in 400 ppb/d to Holstein steers for 4 months during late fattening period can improve some blood metabolites and beef quality by increasing PUFA and gamma-linoleate compositions of beef. PMID:26950869

  13. Growth Inhibitory Effect of Polyunsaturated Fatty Acids (PUFAs) on Colon Cancer Cells via Their Growth Inhibitory Metabolites and Fatty Acid Composition Changes

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Chengcheng; Yu, Haining; Ni, Xiaofeng; Shen, Shengrong; Das, Undurti N.

    2015-01-01

    Background Colorectal cancer is common. Polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) exert growth-inhibitory and pro-apoptotic effects on colon cancer cells. Metabolites of PUFAs such as prostaglandins (PGs), leukotrienes (LTs) and lipoxins (LXs) play a significant role in colon cancer. Methods Human colon cancer LoVo and RKO cells were cultured with different concentration of PUFAs and 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) in vitro. Cell morphological changes, fatty acid composition, formation of PGE2, LTB4 and LXA4 and expression of COX-2, ALOX5, PGD synthase (PGDS), microsomal prostaglandin E synthase (mPGES) were assessed in LoVo and RKO cells when supplemented with PUFAs and 5-FU. Results PUFAs and 5-FU inhibited growth of LoVo and RKO cells to the same extent at the doses used and produced significant alterations in their shape. As expected, higher concentrations of supplemented PUFAs were noted in the cells compared to control. LA, GLA, AA, ALA and EPA supplementation to LoVo cells suppressed production of PGE2, LTB4,and ALOX5, mPGES expression, but enhanced that of LXA4; whereas DHA enhanced PGE2 and LXA4 synthesis but decreased LTB4 formation and COX-2, ALOX5, mPGES expression. In contrast, 5-FU enhanced formation of PGE2, LTB4 and mPGES expression, but suppressed LXA4 synthesis and COX-2 expression. PGE2, LTB4 synthesis and ALOX5 expression was suppressed by LA, GLA, ALA and DHA; whereas AA, EPA and 5-FU enhanced PGE2 but paradoxically AA decreased and EPA and 5-FU enhanced LTB4 synthesis in RKO cells. All the PUFAs tested enhanced, while 5-FU decreased LXA4 formation in RKO cells; whereas GLA, AA, and 5-FU augmented while LA, ALA, EPA and DHA enhanced COX-2 expression in RKO cells. Conclusions Tumoricidal action of PUFAs on colorectal LoVo and RKO cancer cells in vitro was associated with increased formation of LXA4, decreased synthesis of PGE2 and LTB4 and suppressed expression of COX-2, ALOX5, mPGES, whereas 5-FU produced contrasting actions on these indices. PMID:25886460

  14. Solid phase extraction of phosphorus-containing amino acid-type herbicides and their metabolites from human blood with titania for determination by capillary electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Ishiwata, Tetsuya; Ishijima, Chiho; Ohashi, Akira; Okada, Haruki; Ohashi, Kousaburo

    2007-06-01

    Phosphorus-containing amino acid-type herbicides (PAAHs) and their metabolites in human plasma and whole blood were extracted with titania and determined by capillary electrophoresis (CE). The recoveries of glyphosate (GLYP), aminomethylphosphonic acid (AMPA), gluphosinate (GLUF), and 3-methylphosphonico-propionic acid (MPPA) from human plasma were 84.6, 76.8, 90.4, and 89.6%, respectively. The recoveries of GLYP, AMPA, GLUF, and MPPA from whole blood were 79.6, 84.4, 36.9, and 31.8%, respectively. The low recoveries of GLUF and MPPA from whole blood were improved by the dilution of whole blood with water to 4-fold. PMID:17575364

  15. Cytochrome P450 2C8 ω3-Long-Chain Polyunsaturated Fatty Acid Metabolites Increase Mouse Retinal Pathologic Neovascularization—Brief Report

    PubMed Central

    Shao, Zhuo; Fu, Zhongjie; Stahl, Andreas; Joyal, Jean-Sébastien; Hatton, Colman; Juan, Aimee; Hurst, Christian; Evans, Lucy; Cui, Zhenghao; Pei, Dorothy; Gong, Yan; Xu, Dan; Tian, Katherine; Bogardus, Hannah; Edin, Matthew L.; Lih, Fred; Sapieha, Przemyslaw; Chen, Jing; Panigrahy, Dipak; Hellstrom, Ann; Zeldin, Darryl C.; Smith, Lois E.H.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Regulation of angiogenesis is critical for many diseases. Specifically, pathological retinal neovascularization, a major cause of blindness, is suppressed with dietary ω3-long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids (ω3LCPUFAs) through antiangiogenic metabolites of cyclooxygenase and lipoxygenase. Cytochrome P450 epoxygenases (CYP2C8) also metabolize LCPUFAs, producing bioactive epoxides, which are inactivated by soluble epoxide hydrolase (sEH) to transdihydrodiols. The effect of these enzymes and their metabolites on neovascularization is unknown. Approach and Results The mouse model of oxygen-induced retinopathy was used to investigate retinal neovascularization. We found that CYP2C (localized in wild-type monocytes/macrophages) is upregulated in oxygen-induced retinopathy, whereas sEH is suppressed, resulting in an increased retinal epoxide:diol ratio. With a ω3LCPUFA-enriched diet, retinal neovascularization increases in Tie2-driven human-CYP2C8–overexpressing mice (Tie2-CYP2C8-Tg), associated with increased plasma 19,20-epoxydocosapentaenoic acid and retinal epoxide:diol ratio. 19,20-Epoxydocosapentaenoic acids and the epoxide:diol ratio are decreased with overexpression of sEH (Tie2-sEH-Tg). Overexpression of CYP2C8 or sEH in mice does not change normal retinal vascular development compared with their wild-type littermate controls. The proangiogenic role in retina of CYP2C8 with both ω3LCPUFA and ω6LCPUFA and antiangiogenic role of sEH in ω3LCPUFA metabolism were corroborated in aortic ring assays. Conclusions Our results suggest that CYP2C ω3LCPUFA metabolites promote retinal pathological angiogenesis. CYP2C8 is part of a novel lipid metabolic pathway influencing retinal neovascularization. PMID:24458713

  16. Cyclohexane-1,2-dicarboxylic acid diisononyl ester and metabolite effects on rat epididymal stromal vascular fraction differentiation of adipose tissue.

    PubMed

    Campioli, Enrico; Duong, Tam B; Deschamps, François; Papadopoulos, Vassilios

    2015-07-01

    Plastics are generally mixed with additives like plasticizers to enhance their flexibility, pliability, and elasticity proprieties. Plasticizers are easily released into the environment and are absorbed mainly through ingestion, dermal contact, and inhalation. One of the main classes of plasticizers, phthalates, has been associated with endocrine and reproductive diseases. In 2002, 1,2-cyclohexane dicarboxylic acid diisononyl ester (DINCH) was introduced in the market for use in plastic materials and articles intended to come into contact with food, and it received final approval from the European Food Safety Authority in 2006. At present, there is limited knowledge about the safety and potential metabolic and endocrine-disrupting properties of DINCH and its metabolites. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the biological effects of DINCH and its active metabolites, cyclohexane-1,2-dicarboxylic acid (CHDA) and cyclohexane-1,2-dicarboxylic acid mono isononyl ester (MINCH), on rat primary stromal vascular fraction (SVF) of adipose tissue. DINCH and its metabolite, CHDA, were not able to directly affect SVF differentiation. However, exposure of SVF to 50 μM and 100 μM concentrations of MINCH affected the expression of Cebpa and Fabp4, thus inducing SVF preadipocytes to accumulate lipids and fully differentiate into mature adipocytes. The effect of MINCH was blocked by the specific peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR)-α antagonist, GW6471. Taken together, these results suggest that MINCH is a potent PPAR-α agonist and a metabolic disruptor, capable of inducing SVF preadipocyte differentiation, that may interfere with the endocrine system in mammals. PMID:25863588

  17. Cyclohexane-1,2-dicarboxylic acid diisononyl ester and metabolite effects on rat epididymal stromal vascular fraction differentiation of adipose tissue

    SciTech Connect

    Campioli, Enrico; Duong, Tam B.; Deschamps, François; Papadopoulos, Vassilios

    2015-07-15

    Plastics are generally mixed with additives like plasticizers to enhance their flexibility, pliability, and elasticity proprieties. Plasticizers are easily released into the environment and are absorbed mainly through ingestion, dermal contact, and inhalation. One of the main classes of plasticizers, phthalates, has been associated with endocrine and reproductive diseases. In 2002, 1,2-cyclohexane dicarboxylic acid diisononyl ester (DINCH) was introduced in the market for use in plastic materials and articles intended to come into contact with food, and it received final approval from the European Food Safety Authority in 2006. At present, there is limited knowledge about the safety and potential metabolic and endocrine-disrupting properties of DINCH and its metabolites. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the biological effects of DINCH and its active metabolites, cyclohexane-1,2-dicarboxylic acid (CHDA) and cyclohexane-1,2-dicarboxylic acid mono isononyl ester (MINCH), on rat primary stromal vascular fraction (SVF) of adipose tissue. DINCH and its metabolite, CHDA, were not able to directly affect SVF differentiation. However, exposure of SVF to 50 μM and 100 μM concentrations of MINCH affected the expression of Cebpa and Fabp4, thus inducing SVF preadipocytes to accumulate lipids and fully differentiate into mature adipocytes. The effect of MINCH was blocked by the specific peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR)-α antagonist, GW6471. Taken together, these results suggest that MINCH is a potent PPAR-α agonist and a metabolic disruptor, capable of inducing SVF preadipocyte differentiation, that may interfere with the endocrine system in mammals. - Highlights: • DINCH and CHDA did not affect the adipogenesis of the SVF. • MINCH affected the adipogenesis of the SVF. • MINCH effect was blocked by the specific PPAR-α antagonist GW6471. • MINCH exerted a similar effect as MEHP on SVF adipogenesis. • DINCH/MINCH are potential metabolic

  18. Detection of the marijuana metabolite 11-nor-Delta9-tetrahydrocannabinol-9-carboxylic acid in oral fluid specimens and its contribution to positive results in screening assays.

    PubMed

    Moore, Christine; Ross, Wayne; Coulter, Cynthia; Adams, Laura; Rana, Sumandeep; Vincent, Michael; Soares, James

    2006-09-01

    The detection of the marijuana metabolite 11-nor-Delta(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol-9-carboxylic acid (THC-COOH) in oral fluid specimens is described, and its contribution to an immunoassay for the detection of cannabinoids is investigated. Oral fluid specimens, screened using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent immunoassay (ELISA), were carried forward to confirmation for both tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) and THC-COOH using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). One hundred and fifty-three specimens were analyzed, of which 143 screened positive for cannabinoids. Ninety-five (66.4%) of these specimens were positive for both THC and THC-COOH; 14 (9.7%) were positive for THC-COOH only, and 27 (18.8%) were positive for THC only. The GC-MS assay for the detection of THC-COOH in oral fluid was linear to 160 pg/mL with a limit of quantitation of 2 pg/mL. The detection of the marijuana metabolite, THC-COOH, in 76.2% of oral fluid specimens screening positive for cannabinoids is reported. As a potential defense against passive exposure claims, proposed SAMHSA regulations may require the simultaneous collection of a urine sample when oral fluid samples are used. The detection of the metabolite, THC-COOH, is a significant alternative to this approach because its presence in oral fluid minimizes the argument for passive exposure to marijuana in drug testing cases. PMID:16959132

  19. In vivo relevant mixed urolithins and ellagic acid inhibit phenotypic and molecular colon cancer stem cell features: A new potentiality for ellagitannin metabolites against cancer.

    PubMed

    Núñez-Sánchez, María Ángeles; Karmokar, Ankur; González-Sarrías, Antonio; García-Villalba, Rocío; Tomás-Barberán, Francisco A; García-Conesa, María Teresa; Brown, Karen; Espín, Juan Carlos

    2016-06-01

    Colon cancer stem cells (CSCs) offer a novel paradigm for colorectal cancer (CRC) treatment and dietary polyphenols may contribute to battle these cells. Specifically, polyphenol-derived colon metabolites have the potential to interact with and affect colon CSCs. We herein report the effects against colon CSCs of two mixtures of ellagitannin (ET) metabolites, ellagic acid (EA) and the gut microbiota-derived urolithins (Uro) at concentrations detected in the human colon tissues following the intake of ET-containing products (pomegranate, walnuts). These mixtures reduce phenotypic and molecular features in two models of colon CSCs: Caco-2 cells and primary tumour cells from a patient with CRC. The mixture containing mostly Uro-A (85% Uro-A, 10% Uro-C, 5% EA) was most effective at inhibiting the number and size of colonospheres and aldehyde dehydrogenase activity (ALDH, a marker of chemoresistance) whereas the mixture containing less Uro-A but IsoUro-A and Uro-B (30% Uro-A, 50% IsoUro-A, 10% Uro-B, 5% Uro-C, 5% EA) had some effects on the number and size of colonospheres but not on ALDH. These data support a role for polyphenols metabolites in the control of colon cancer chemoresistance and relapse and encourage the research on the effects of polyphenols against CSCs. PMID:26995228

  20. Lipid Profiling following Intake of the Omega 3 Fatty Acid DHA Identifies the Peroxidized Metabolites F4-Neuroprostanes as the Best Predictors of Atherosclerosis Prevention

    PubMed Central

    Gladine, Cécile; Newman, John W.; Durand, Thierry; Pedersen, Theresa L.; Galano, Jean-Marie; Demougeot, Céline; Berdeaux, Olivier; Pujos-Guillot, Estelle; Mazur, Andrzej; Comte, Blandine

    2014-01-01

    Abstract The anti-atherogenic effects of omega 3 fatty acids, namely eicosapentaenoic (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acids (DHA) are well recognized but the impact of dietary intake on bioactive lipid mediator profiles remains unclear. Such a profiling effort may offer novel targets for future studies into the mechanism of action of omega 3 fatty acids. The present study aimed to determine the impact of DHA supplementation on the profiles of polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) oxygenated metabolites and to investigate their contribution to atherosclerosis prevention. A special emphasis was given to the non-enzymatic metabolites knowing the high susceptibility of DHA to free radical-mediated peroxidation and the increased oxidative stress associated with plaque formation. Atherosclerosis prone mice (LDLR−/−) received increasing doses of DHA (0, 0.1, 1 or 2% of energy) during 20 weeks leading to a dose-dependent reduction of atherosclerosis (R2 = 0.97, p = 0.02), triglyceridemia (R2 = 0.97, p = 0.01) and cholesterolemia (R2 = 0.96, p<0.01). Targeted lipidomic analyses revealed that both the profiles of EPA and DHA and their corresponding oxygenated metabolites were substantially modulated in plasma and liver. Notably, the hepatic level of F4-neuroprostanes, a specific class of DHA peroxidized metabolites, was strongly correlated with the hepatic DHA level. Moreover, unbiased statistical analysis including correlation analyses, hierarchical cluster and projection to latent structure discriminate analysis revealed that the hepatic level of F4-neuroprostanes was the variable most negatively correlated with the plaque extent (p<0.001) and along with plasma EPA-derived diols was an important mathematical positive predictor of atherosclerosis prevention. Thus, oxygenated n-3 PUFAs, and F4-neuroprostanes in particular, are potential biomarkers of DHA-associated atherosclerosis prevention. While these may contribute to the anti-atherogenic effects of DHA

  1. Extractionless determination of 6-methoxy-2-naphthylacetic acid, a major metabolite of nabumetone, in human plasma by high-performance liquid chromatography.

    PubMed

    de Jager, A D; Hundt, H K; Hundt, A F; Swart, K J; Knight, M; Roberts, J

    2000-04-14

    Following oral administration of the prodrug nabumetone, the major metabolite 6-methoxy-2-naphthylacetic acid (6-MNA) was determined in human plasma. Minimal sample preparation was followed by reversed-phase liquid chromatography and UV detection, affording high sample throughput. The lower limit of quantification (LLOQ) was 70 ng/ml, at a signal-to-noise ratio of 8:1. The assay method displayed good correlation (r=0.997), and can be readily employed in pharmacokinetic and bioequivalence studies. PMID:10821411

  2. Urinary excretion of the acrylonitrile metabolite 2-cyanoethylmercapturic acid is correlated with a variety of biomarkers of tobacco smoke exposure and consumption

    PubMed Central

    Minet, Emmanuel; Cheung, Francis; Errington, Graham; Sterz, Katharina; Scherer, Gerhard

    2011-01-01

    Acrylonitrile is an IARC class 2B carcinogen present in cigarette smoke. Urinary 2-cyanoethylmercapturic acid (CEMA) is an acrylonitrile metabolite and a potential biomarker for acrylonitrile exposure. The objective of this work was to study the dose response of CEMA in urine of non-smokers and smokers of different ISO tar yield cigarettes. We observed that smokers excreted >100-fold higher amounts of urinary CEMA than non-smokers. The CEMA levels in smokers were significantly correlated with ISO tar yield, daily cigarette consumption, and urinary biomarkers of smoke exposure. In conclusion, urinary CEMA is a suitable biomarker for assessing smoking-related exposure to acrylonitrile. PMID:21108560

  3. Induction of Lipid and Oleosin Biosynthesis by (+)-Abscisic Acid and Its Metabolites in Microspore-Derived Embryos of Brassica napus L.cv Reston (Biological Responses in the Presence of 8[prime]-Hydroxyabscisic Acid).

    PubMed Central

    Zou, J.; Abrams, G. D.; Barton, D. L.; Taylor, D. C.; Pomeroy, M. K.; Abrams, S. R.

    1995-01-01

    Microspore-derived (MD) embryos of Brassica napus L. cv Reston were used to test the effects of (+)-abscisic acid ([(+)-ABA]) and its metabolites, 8[prime]-hydroxyabscisic acid (8[prime]-OH ABA) and (-)-phaseic acid (PA), on the accumulation of very long-chain monounsaturated fatty acids (VLCMFAs) and induction of genes encoding a 19-kD oleosin protein and a [delta]15 desaturase during embryogenesis. Developing early to mid-cotyledonary MD embryos at 16 to 19 d in culture were treated with 10 [mu]M hormone/metabolite for 4 d. At various times during incubation, embryos and medium were analyzed to determine levels of hormone/metabolite, VLCMFAs, and oleosin or [delta]15 desaturase transcripts. The VLCMFAs, 20:1 and 22:1, primarily in triacylglycerols, increased by 200% after 72 h in the presence of (+)-ABA and 8[prime]-OH ABA relative to the control. In contrast, treatment with PA for 72 h had little effect (20% increase) on the level of VLCMFAs. The first 24 to 72 h of (+)-ABA treatment were critical in the induction of VLCMFA biosynthesis, with 8[prime]-OH ABA lagging slightly behind (+)-ABA in promoting this response. The accumulation of VLCMFAs was positively correlated with an increase in elongase activity. (+)-ABA and its 8[prime]-OH ABA metabolite induced the accumulation of a 19-kD oleosin transcript within 2 to 4 h in culture. In addition, both (+)-ABA and 8[prime]-OH ABA induced the same level of [delta]15 desaturase transcript by 8 h. PA had no effect on the induction of either oleosin or [delta]15 desaturase transcripts. To our knowledge, this is the first report of the biological activity of 8[prime]-OH ABA and of stimulatory effects of (+)-ABA and 8[prime]-OH ABA on lipid and oleosin biosynthesis. PMID:12228493

  4. Application of a combined effect compartment and binding model for gastric acid inhibition of AR-HO47108: a potassium competitive acid blocker, and its active metabolite AR-HO47116 in the dog.

    PubMed

    Abelö, Angela; Andersson, Magdalena; Holmberg, Ann Aurell; Karlsson, Mats O

    2006-10-01

    The effect of AR-HO47108, a potassium competitive acid blocker, and its active metabolite AR-HO47116 was studied in Heidenhain pouch dogs following administration of single oral and intravenous doses of the two compounds. The histamine-stimulated acid secretion was measured in different periods after dose up to 24h. All data obtained in the different studies was pooled and analyzed by non-linear mixed effects modelling. It was found that there is a delay between the plasma concentration-time peak and the maximum inhibitory effect and that the effect persisted longer than anticipated from the plasma concentration half-lives of the compounds. In addition, it was found that the peak effect was reached earlier at higher doses. The effect data was well described by a combined effect compartment and binding model and both distribution to the biophase i.e. the canaliculus of the parietal cell and a rate limiting binding interaction between drug and enzyme appear to contribute to the observed delay. In addition, a secretion rate dependent washout from the biophase may contribute. Furthermore, because the parent compound and metabolite bind to the same enzyme, the effect is determined by competition between the two for the same enzyme. The metabolite was found to be less potent than the parent compound, with Kd values of the combined model of 125 and 11.2 nM for the metabolite and parent compound, respectively. However, the metabolite is generated in high concentrations that rapidly exceed the concentration of parent compound after oral administration of parent compound, and this together with its longer plasma half-life will make its contribution to the overall effect increase with time and slightly prolong the duration of the effect. PMID:16831536

  5. Characterization of in vitro and in vivo metabolites of carnosic acid, a natural antioxidant, by high performance liquid chromatography coupled with tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Song, Yuelin; Yan, Haixia; Chen, Jinfeng; Wang, Yitao; Jiang, Yong; Tu, Pengfei

    2014-02-01

    Carnosic acid (CA) is a widely employed antioxidant and the main active component in rosemary and sage, but its metabolism remains largely unknown. The present study investigated the metabolism of CA in vitro and in vivo for the first time, using high performance liquid chromatography coupled with hybrid triple quadrupole-linear ion trap mass spectrometry (HPLC-Q-trap-MS). A couple of scan modes were adopted in mass spectrometer domain, including Q1 full scan, neutral loss scan-information dependent acquisition-enhanced product ion (NL-IDA-EPI) and precursor ion scan-information dependent acquisition-enhanced product ion (PI-IDA-EPI). In particular, a prediction was carried out on the basis of in vitro metabolism results, and gave birth to a multiple ion monitoring-information dependent acquisition-enhanced product ion (MIM-IDA-EPI) mode aiming to detect the trace metabolites in CA-treated biological samples. A total of ten metabolites (M4-13), along with three degradative products (M1-3), were identified for CA from in vitro metabolism models, including liver microsomes of human and rats (HLMs and RLMs), human intestinal microsomes (HIMs) and two species of Cunninghamella elegans. Twelve (U1-12) and six (F1-6) metabolites were detected from CA-treated urine and feces, respectively. In addition, five metabolites (SM2-6) in vivo were purified and definitely identified using NMR spectroscopy. The results of both in vitro and in vivo metabolism studies indicated poor metabolic stability for CA, and the glucuronidation and oxidation metabolisms extensively occurred for CA in vitro, while oxidation, glucuronidation and methylation were the main metabolic pathways observed in vivo. PMID:24291799

  6. Age- and Islet Autoimmunity–Associated Differences in Amino Acid and Lipid Metabolites in Children at Risk for Type 1 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Pflueger, Maren; Seppänen-Laakso, Tuulikki; Suortti, Tapani; Hyötyläinen, Tuulia; Achenbach, Peter; Bonifacio, Ezio; Orešič, Matej; Ziegler, Anette-G.

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Islet autoimmunity precedes type 1 diabetes and often initiates in childhood. Phenotypic variation in islet autoimmunity relative to the age of its development suggests heterogeneous mechanisms of autoimmune activation. To support this notion, we examined whether serum metabolite profiles differ between children with respect to islet autoantibody status and the age of islet autoantibody development. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS The study analyzed 29 metabolites of amino acid metabolism and 511 lipids assigned to 12 lipid clusters in children, with a type 1 diabetic parent, who first developed autoantibodies at age 2 years or younger (n = 13), at age 8 years or older (n = 22), or remained autoantibody-negative, and were matched for age, date of birth, and HLA genotypes (n = 35). Ultraperformance liquid chromatography and mass spectroscopy were used to measure metabolites and lipids quantitatively in the first autoantibody-positive and matched autoantibody-negative serum samples and in a second sample after 1 year of follow-up. RESULTS Differences in the metabolite profiles were observed relative to age and islet autoantibody status. Independent of age-related differences, autoantibody-positive children had higher levels of odd-chain triglycerides and polyunsaturated fatty acid–containing phospholipids than autoantibody-negative children and independent of age at first autoantibody appearance (P < 0.0001). Consistent with our hypothesis, children who developed autoantibodies by age 2 years had twofold lower concentration of methionine compared with those who developed autoantibodies in late childhood or remained autoantibody-negative (P < 0.0001). CONCLUSIONS Distinct metabolic profiles are associated with age and islet autoimmunity. Pathways that use methionine are potentially relevant for developing islet autoantibodies in early infancy. PMID:22025777

  7. Treatment of mice with 2,3,7,8-Tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin markedly increases the levels of a number of cytochrome P450 metabolites of omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids in the liver and lung

    PubMed Central

    Yang, J.; Solaimani, P.; Dong, H; Hammock, B.D.; Hankinson, O.

    2014-01-01

    We previously reported that 2,3,7,8-Tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) increased the levels of several cytochrome P450 metabolites of the omega-6 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs), arachidonic acid (ARA) and linoleic acid in the serum, liver, lung and spleen of C57BL/6 mice in an aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR)-dependent fashion. These increases correlated with increased levels of CYP1A1, CYP1A2 and/or CYP1B1. In the current study, we measured 77 oxylipins, including 59 that we had not measured previously, and demonstrate that TCDD also markedly increases the levels of many epoxide and diol metabolites of the omega-3 PUFAs, α-linolenic acid, eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docasahexaenoic acid (DHA) in these mice. Since these epoxide metabolites have been reported to have opposite effects on angiogenesis, tumor growth and tumor metastasis compared with the equivalent metabolites of omega-6 PUFA, these observations have important implications with regard to the potential involvement of the cytochrome P450 metabolites of PUFAs in mediating the biological effects of TCDD and other agonists of AHR. PMID:24213002

  8. Arsenic Metabolites, Including N-Acetyl-4-hydroxy-m-arsanilic Acid, in Chicken Litter from a Roxarsone-Feeding Study Involving 1600 Chickens.

    PubMed

    Yang, Zonglin; Peng, Hanyong; Lu, Xiufen; Liu, Qingqing; Huang, Rongfu; Hu, Bin; Kachanoski, Gary; Zuidhof, Martin J; Le, X Chris

    2016-07-01

    The poultry industry has used organoarsenicals, such as 3-nitro-4-hydroxyphenylarsonic acid (Roxarsone, ROX), to prevent disease and to promote growth. Although previous studies have analyzed arsenic species in chicken litter after composting or after application to agricultural lands, it is not clear what arsenic species were excreted by chickens before biotransformation of arsenic species during composting. We describe here the identification and quantitation of arsenic species in chicken litter repeatedly collected on days 14, 24, 28, 30, and 35 of a Roxarsone-feeding study involving 1600 chickens of two strains. High performance liquid chromatography separation with simultaneous detection by both inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry and electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry provided complementary information necessary for the identification and quantitation of arsenic species. A new metabolite, N-acetyl-4-hydroxy-m-arsanilic acid (N-AHAA), was identified, and it accounted for 3-12% of total arsenic. Speciation analyses of litter samples collected from ROX-fed chickens on days 14, 24, 28, 30, and 35 showed the presence of N-AHAA, 3-amino-4-hydroxyphenylarsonic acid (3-AHPAA), inorganic arsenite (As(III)), arsenate (As(V)), monomethylarsonic acid (MMA(V)), dimethylarsinic acid (DMA(V)), and ROX. 3-AHPAA accounted for 3-19% of the total arsenic. Inorganic arsenicals (the sum of As(III) and As(V)) comprised 2-6% (mean 3.5%) of total arsenic. Our results on the detection of inorganic arsenicals, methylarsenicals, 3-AHPAA, and N-AHAA in the chicken litter support recent findings that ROX is actually metabolized by the chicken or its gut microbiome. The presence of the toxic metabolites in chicken litter is environmentally relevant as chicken litter is commonly used as fertilizer. PMID:26876684

  9. Formation of phenolic microbial metabolites and short-chain fatty acids from rye, wheat, and oat bran and their fractions in the metabolical in vitro colon model.

    PubMed

    Nordlund, Emilia; Aura, Anna-Marja; Mattila, Ismo; Kössö, Tuija; Rouau, Xavier; Poutanen, Kaisa

    2012-08-22

    Rye bran and aleurone, wheat bran and aleurone, and oat bran and cell wall concentrate were compared in their in vitro gut fermentation patterns of individual phenolic acids and short-chain fatty acids, preceded by enzymatic in vitro digestion mimicking small intestinal events. The formation of phenolic metabolites was the most pronounced from the wheat aleurone fraction. Phenylpropionic acids, presumably derived from ferulic acid (FA), were the major phenyl metabolites formed from all bran preparations. The processed rye, wheat, and oat bran fractions contained more water-extractable dietary fiber (DF) and had smaller particle sizes and were thus more easily fermentable than the corresponding brans. Rye aleurone and bran had the highest fermentation rate and extent probably due to high fructan and water-extractable arabinoxylan content. Oat samples also had a high content of water-extractable DF, β-glucan, but their fermentation rate was lower. Enzymatic digestion prior to in vitro colon fermentation changed the structure of oat cell walls as visualized by microscopy and increased the particle size, which is suggested to have retarded the fermentability of oat samples. Wheat bran was the most slowly fermentable among the studied samples, presumably due to the high proportion of water-unextractable DF. The in vitro digestion reduced the fructan content of wheat samples, thus also decreasing their fermentability. Among the studied short-chain fatty acids, acetate dominated the profiles. The highest and lowest production of propionate was from the oat and wheat samples, respectively. Interestingly, wheat aleurone generated similar amounts of butyrate as the rye fractions even without rapid gas production. PMID:22731123

  10. Valproic acid in amygdala-kindled rats: alterations in anticonvulsant efficacy, adverse effects and drug and metabolite levels in various brain regions during chronic treatment.

    PubMed

    Löscher, W; Fisher, J E; Nau, H; Hönack, D

    1989-09-01

    Amygdala-kindled rats were treated with valproic acid (VPA; administered as its sodium salt) 3 times daily at 200 mg/kg i.p. for 6 weeks, and anticonvulsant and adverse effects during this period were studied. Groups of nonkindled rats were treated in parallel for determination of VPA and its major active metabolites in various brain regions after different durations of treatment. After the first injection of VPA, 200 mg/kg, seizure severity, seizure duration and duration of electrical afterdischarges recorded from the stimulated amygdala were reduced significantly, but only one of nine animals was protected completely from kindled seizures. At day 3 of chronic treatment, the anticonvulsant activity of VPA had increased markedly so that seven of nine animals were totally protected from seizures. However, this potent anticonvulsant effect was only transitory so that after 1 week of treatment the anticonvulsant effect of the medication was similar to that obtained after the first dosing. The effect of VPA remained at this level for the subsequent weeks, but there was a second, more permanent increase in the number of protected animals after 4 to 6 weeks. Plasma and brain levels of VPA and its metabolites remained relatively constant throughout the chronic treatment although there was a moderate accumulation of some metabolites, e.g., trans isomer of 2-propyl-2-pentenoic acid, in specific brain nuclei. The most prominent adverse effects of VPA were ataxia, muscle relaxation, wet-dog shake behavior and an increase in body temperature. Except for body temperature, tolerance developed to these adverse effects, but escape from wet-dog shake behavior occurred much more rapidly than reduction of other adverse effects. Pathohistological examination of liver sections from animals treated with VPA for 6 weeks showed no indication of any hepatotoxic effects. After drug withdrawal, kindled seizure parameters returned toward control values without evidence of significant carry

  11. In vitro inhibition and enhancement of liver microsomal S-777469 metabolism by long-chain fatty acids and serum albumin: insight into in vitro and in vivo discrepancy of metabolite formation in humans.

    PubMed

    Sekiguchi, Kazutaka; Kanazu, Takushi; Murayama, Norie; Yamazaki, Hiroshi; Yamaguchi, Yoshitaka

    2016-06-01

    1. It was previously demonstrated that 10% of S-777469, a cannabinoid receptor 2 selective agonist, is metabolized to its carboxylic acid metabolite (S-777469 5-carboxylic acid, 5-CA) in humans in vivo, while the formation of 5-CA is extremely low in human cryopreserved hepatocytes and liver microsomes (HLMs). In this study, factors causing the different metabolite formation rates of S-777469 in vitro and in vivo were investigated. 2. Formation of 5-CA and S-777469 5-hydroxymethyl (5-HM), a precursor metabolite of 5-CA, was catalyzed by CYP2C9. Arachidonic acid, α-linolenic acid, oleic acid and myristic acid, which have been reported to exist in liver microsomes, inhibited S-777469 oxidation by CYP2C9, but serum albumin enhanced this reactions. 3. The IC50 values of these fatty acids for 5-CA formation from 5-HM were lower than those of 5-HM formation from S-777469. Serum albumin extensively enhanced 5-CA formation from 5-HM in comparison to 5-HM formation from S-777469. 4. CYP2C9 was the enzyme responsible for S-777469 oxidation in human livers. The suppressive effects of several fatty acids and enhancing action of serum albumin in vitro are likely to be the causal factors for the apparently different rates of in vitro and in vivo metabolite formation of S-777469. PMID:26677906

  12. A novel study of screening and confirmation of modafinil, adrafinil and their metabolite modafinilic acid under EI-GC-MS and ESI-LC-MS-MS ionization

    PubMed Central

    Dubey, S.; Ahi, S.; Reddy, I. M.; Kaur, T.; Beotra, A.; Jain, S.

    2009-01-01

    Objective: Adrafinil and modafinil have received wide publicity and have become controversial in the sporting world when several athletes were discovered allegedly using these drugs as doping agents. By acknowledging the facts, the World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA) banned these drugs in sports since 2004. The present study explores the possibility of differentiating adrafinil and modafinil and their major metabolites under electron impact ionization in gas chromatograph–mass spectrometer (GC-MSD) and electrospray ionization in liquid chromatograph–mass spectrometer (LC-MS/MS) by studying the fragmentation pattern of these drugs. Materials and Methods: Adrafinil, modafinil and their major metabolite, modafinilic acid were analyzed on EI-GC-MSD and ESI-LC-MS/MS using various individual parameters on both the instruments. The analytical technique and equipment used in the analysis were an Agilent 6890N GC with 5973 mass selective detector for the GC-MSD analysis and an Agilent 1100 HPLC with API-3200 Triple quadrupole mass spectrometer for the LC-MS/MS analysis. Validation of both methods was performed using six replicates at different concentrations. Result and Discussion: The results show that adrafinil, modafinil and their major metabolite modafinilic acid could be detected as a single artifact without differentiation under EI-GC-MSD analysis. However, all drugs could be detected and differentiated under ESI-LCMS/MS analysis without any artifaction. The GC-MSD analysis gives a single artifact for both the drugs without differentiation and thus can be used as a marker for screening purposes. Further, the Multiple Reaction Monitoring (MRM) method developed under LC-MS/MS is fit for the purpose for confirmation of suspicious samples in routine sports testing and in forensic and clinical analysis. PMID:20407560

  13. Direct Analysis of Leucine and Its Metabolites β-Hydroxy-β-methylbutyric Acid, α-Ketoisocaproic Acid, and α-Hydroxyisocaproic Acid in Human Breast Milk by Liquid Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Ehling, Stefan; Reddy, Todime M

    2015-09-01

    A direct, quantitative, and confirmatory method based on stable isotope dilution liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry was developed and validated for the analysis of leucine and metabolites β-hydroxy-β-methylbutyric acid (HMB), α-ketoisocaproic acid (KIC), and α-hydroxyisocaproic acid (HICA) in human breast milk. Chromatographic resolution was achieved between isobaric leucine and isoleucine. Accuracy and intermediate precision were 89-117% and <10% relative standard deviation (RSD) across three validation runs. Limits of quantitation for HMB, KIC, HICA, and leucine in human breast milk were 20 μg/L, 20 μg/L, 10 μg/L, and 1 mg/L. Measured concentrations of HMB, KIC, HICA, and free leucine in human breast milk from six donors at various stages of lactation were 42-164 μg/L, < 20-1057 μg/L, < 10 μg/L, and 2.1-88.5 mg/L. HMB and KIC were confirmed in human breast milk by orthogonal hydrophilic interaction chromatography (HILIC). This work provides a tool for further study of human breast milk composition and its effect on protein turnover in developing infants. PMID:26271627

  14. Metabolic characteristics of 13-cis-retinoic acid (isotretinoin) and anti-tumour activity of the 13-cis-retinoic acid metabolite 4-oxo-13-cis-retinoic acid in neuroblastoma

    PubMed Central

    Sonawane, Poonam; Cho, Hwang Eui; Tagde, Ashujit; Verlekar, Dattesh; Yu, Alice L; Reynolds, C Patrick; Kang, Min H

    2014-01-01

    Background and Purpose Isotretinoin (13-cis-retinoic acid; 13-cRA) is a differentiation inducer used to treat minimal residual disease after myeloablative therapy for high-risk neuroblastoma. However, more than 40% of children develop recurrent disease during or after 13-cRA treatment. The plasma concentrations of 13-cRA in earlier studies were considered subtherapeutic while 4-oxo-13-cis-RA (4-oxo-13-cRA), a metabolite of 13-cRA considered by some investigators as inactive, were greater than threefold higher than 13-cRA. We sought to define the metabolic pathways of 13-cRA and investigated the anti-tumour activity of its major metabolite, 4-oxo-13-cRA. Experimental Approach Effects of 13-cRA and 4-oxo-13-cRA on human neuroblastoma cell lines were assessed by DIMSCAN and flow cytometry for cell proliferation, MYCN down-regulation by reverse transcription PCR and immunoblotting, and neurite outgrowth by confocal microscopy. 13-cRA metabolism was determined using tandem MS in human liver microsomes and in patient samples. Key Results Six major metabolites of 13-cRA were identified in patient samples. Of these, 4-oxo-13-cRA was the most abundant, and 4-oxo-13-cRA glucuronide was also detected at a higher level in patients. CYP3A4 was shown to play a major role in catalysing 13-cRA to 4-oxo-13-cRA. In human neuroblastoma cell lines, 4-oxo-13-cRA and 13-cRA were equi-effective at inducing neurite outgrowth, inhibiting proliferation, decreasing MYCN mRNA and protein, and increasing the expression of retinoic acid receptor-β mRNA and protein levels. Conclusions and Implications We showed that 4-oxo-13-cRA is as active as 13-cRA against neuroblastoma cell lines. Plasma levels of both 13-cRA and 4-oxo-13-cRA should be evaluated in pharmacokinetic studies of isotretinoin in neuroblastoma. PMID:25039756

  15. Metabolic engineering of Pseudomonas sp. strain VLB120 as platform biocatalyst for the production of isobutyric acid and other secondary metabolites

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Over the recent years the production of Ehrlich pathway derived chemicals was shown in a variety of hosts such as Escherichia coli, Corynebacterium glutamicum, and yeast. Exemplarily the production of isobutyric acid was demonstrated in Escherichia coli with remarkable titers and yields. However, these examples suffer from byproduct formation due to the fermentative growth mode of the respective organism. We aim at establishing a new aerobic, chassis for the synthesis of isobutyric acid and other interesting metabolites using Pseudomonas sp. strain VLB120, an obligate aerobe organism, as host strain. Results The overexpression of kivd, coding for a 2-ketoacid decarboxylase from Lactococcus lactis in Ps. sp. strain VLB120 enabled for the production of isobutyric acid and isobutanol via the valine synthesis route (Ehrlich pathway). This indicates the existence of chromosomally encoded alcohol and aldehyde dehydrogenases catalyzing the reduction and oxidation of isobutyraldehyde. In addition we showed that the strain possesses a complete pathway for isobutyric acid metabolization, channeling the compound via isobutyryl-CoA into valine degradation. Three key issues were addressed to allow and optimize isobutyric acid synthesis: i) minimizing isobutyric acid degradation by host intrinsic enzymes, ii) construction of suitable expression systems and iii) streamlining of central carbon metabolism finally leading to production of up to 26.8 ± 1.5 mM isobutyric acid with a carbon yield of 0.12 ± 0.01 g gglc-1. Conclusion The combination of an increased flux towards isobutyric acid using a tailor-made expression system and the prevention of precursor and product degradation allowed efficient production of isobutyric acid in Ps. sp. strain VLB120. This will be the basis for the development of a continuous reaction process for this bulk chemicals. PMID:24397404

  16. Simultaneous Determination and Pharmacokinetic Study of Protocatechuic Aldehyde and Its Major Active Metabolite Protocatechuic Acid in Rat Plasma by Liquid Chromatography-Tandem Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiangyang; Yan, Kaijing; Ma, Xiaohui; Li, Wei; Chu, Yang; Guo, Jiahua; Li, Shuming; Zhou, Shuiping; Zhu, Yonghong; Liu, Changxiao

    2016-05-01

    A very simple and selective high-performance liquid chromatography electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS-MS) method was developed for simultaneous determination and pharmacokinetic study of protocatechuic aldehyde (PAL) and its active metabolite protocatechuic acid (PCA). The method involves a simple liquid-liquid extraction with ethyl acetate. The separation was performed on a Hypersil GOLD C18column (2.1 × 150 mm, 3.0 µm; particle, Thermo, USA) with isocratic elution using a mobile phase consisted of methanol and water (containing 0.1% formic acid) at a flow rate of 0.2 mL/min. The detection of target compounds was done by using low-energy collision dissociation tandem mass spectrometry (CID-MS-MS) using the selective reaction monitoring scan mode. The method was linear for all analytes over the investigated range for all correlation coefficients greater than 0.9950. The lower limits of quantification were 2.0 ng/mL for PAL and PCA. The intra- and interday precisions (relative standard deviation, RSD %) were <6.84 and 5.54%, and the accuracy (relative error, RE %) was between -2.85 and 0.74% (n= 6). The developed method was applied to study the pharmacokinetics of PAL and its major active metabolite PCA in rat plasma after oral and intravenous administration of PAL. PMID:26969682

  17. QUANTITATION OF MERCAPTURIC ACID CONJUGATES OF 4-HYDROXY-2-NONENAL AND 4-OXO-2-NONENAL METABOLITES IN A SMOKING CESSATION STUDY

    PubMed Central

    Kuiper, Heather C.; Langsdorf, Brandi L.; Miranda, Cristobal L.; Joss, Jacqueline; Jubert, Carole; Mata, John E.; Stevens, Jan F.

    2009-01-01

    The breakdown of polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) under conditions of oxidative stress results in the formation of lipid peroxidation (LPO) products. These LPO products such as 4-hydroxy-2-nonenal (HNE) and 4-oxo-2-nonenal (ONE) can contribute to the development of cardiovascular and neurodegenerative diseases and cancer. Conjugation with glutathione, followed by further metabolism to mercapturic acid (MA) conjugates, can mitigate the effects of these LPO products in disease development by facilitating their excretion from the body. We have developed a quantitative method to simultaneously assess levels of 4-oxo-2-nonen-1-ol (ONO)-MA, HNE-MA, and 1,4-dihydroxy-2-nonene (DHN)-MA in human urine samples utilizing isotope-dilution mass spectrometry. We are also able to detect 4-hydroxy-2-nonenoic acid (HNA)-MA, 4-hydroxy-2-nonenoic acid lactone (HNAL)-MA, and 4-oxo-2-nonenoic acid (ONA)-MA with this method. The detection of ONO-MA and ONA-MA in humans is significant because it demonstrates that HNE/ONE branching occurs in the breakdown of PUFAs and suggests that ONO may contribute to the harmful effects currently associated with HNE. We were able to show significant decreases in HNE-MA, DHN-MA, and total LPO-MA in a group of seven smokers upon smoking cessation. These data demonstrate the value of HNE and ONE metabolites as in vivo markers of oxidative stress. PMID:19819328

  18. Liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization-tandem mass spectrometry for simultaneous analysis of chlorogenic acids and their metabolites in human plasma.

    PubMed

    Matsui, Yuji; Nakamura, Shun; Kondou, Naoki; Takasu, Yoshio; Ochiai, Ryuji; Masukawa, Yoshinori

    2007-10-15

    A method using liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-ESI-MS/MS) was developed for the simultaneous analysis of nine chlorogenic acids (CGAs), three isomers each of caffeoylquinic acids (CQAs), feruloylquinic acids (FQAs) and dicaffeoylquinic acids (dCQAs), and their two metabolites, caffeic acid (CA) and ferulic acid (FA), in human plasma. In simultaneous multiple reaction monitoring (MRM) measurements using ESI-MS/MS with a negative ion mode, a deprotonated molecular ion derived from each of the 11 molecules was used as a precursor ion while three diagnostic product ions characteristic for each were selected for the qualitative analysis. To obtain maximal intensities for all diagnostic product ions, the collision energy was optimized for each one. LC separation was achieved under conditions of a reversed-phase Inertsil ODS-2 column combined with a gradient elution system using 50mM acetic acid with 3% acetonitrile aqueous solution and 50 mM acetic acid with 100% acetonitrile. In the quantitative analysis, one of the three diagnostic product ions for each of the 11 molecules was selected. Application of simultaneous LC-ESI-MS/MS MRM measurements to analyze the 11 standards spiked into blank human plasma indicated that all diagnostic product ions were detected without any interference, and that the sensitivity, linearity and recovery of this method were acceptable. When using this method to analyze those 11 molecules in the plasma after oral ingestion of 250 ml of a drink containing a green coffee bean extract (300 mg CGAs), all 11 molecules were identified and CQAs, FQAs and FA were quantified. CQAs, FQAs and dCQAs in human plasma were detected for the first time. This method should be useful to understand the biological and pharmacological effects of CGAs, such as improvement of human hypertension. PMID:17766198

  19. Induction of CYP26A1 by Metabolites of Retinoic Acid: Evidence That CYP26A1 Is an Important Enzyme in the Elimination of Active Retinoids

    PubMed Central

    Topletz, Ariel R.; Tripathy, Sasmita; Foti, Robert S.; Shimshoni, Jakob A.; Nelson, Wendel L.

    2015-01-01

    All-trans-retinoic acid (atRA), the active metabolite of vitamin A, induces gene transcription via binding to nuclear retinoic acid receptors (RARs). The primary hydroxylated metabolites formed from atRA by CYP26A1, and the subsequent metabolite 4-oxo-atRA, bind to RARs and potentially have biologic activity. Hence, CYP26A1, the main atRA hydroxylase, may function either to deplete bioactive retinoids or to form active metabolites. This study aimed to determine the role of CYP26A1 in modulating RAR activation via formation and elimination of active retinoids. After treatment of HepG2 cells with atRA, (4S)-OH-atRA, (4R)-OH-atRA, 4-oxo-atRA, and 18-OH-atRA, mRNAs of CYP26A1 and RARβ were increased 300- to 3000-fold, with 4-oxo-atRA and atRA being the most potent inducers. However, >60% of the 4-OH-atRA enantiomers were converted to 4-oxo-atRA in the first 12 hours of treatment, suggesting that the activity of the 4-OH-atRA was due to 4-oxo-atRA. In human hepatocytes, atRA, 4-OH-atRA, and 4-oxo-atRA induced CYP26A1 and 4-oxo-atRA formation was observed from 4-OH-atRA. In HepG2 cells, 4-oxo-atRA formation was observed even in the absence of CYP26A1 activity and this formation was not inhibited by ketoconazole. In human liver microsomes, 4-oxo-atRA formation was supported by NAD+, suggesting that 4-oxo-atRA formation is mediated by a microsomal alcohol dehydrogenase. Although 4-oxo-atRA was not formed by CYP26A1, it was depleted by CYP26A1 (Km = 63 nM and intrinsic clearance = 90 μl/min per pmol). Similarly, CYP26A1 depleted 18-OH-atRA and the 4-OH-atRA enantiomers. These data support the role of CYP26A1 to clear bioactive retinoids, and suggest that the enzyme forming active 4-oxo-atRA may be important in modulating retinoid action. PMID:25492813

  20. Determination of acetylsalicylic acid and its major metabolite, salicylic acid, in human plasma using liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry: application to pharmacokinetic study of Astrix in Korean healthy volunteers.

    PubMed

    Bae, Soo Kyung; Seo, Kyung Ah; Jung, Eun Ji; Kim, Ho-Sook; Yeo, Chang-Woo; Shon, Ji-Hong; Park, Kyung-Mi; Liu, Kwang-Hyeon; Shin, Jae-Gook

    2008-06-01

    The first liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC/MS/MS) method for determination of acetylsalicylic acid (aspirin, ASA) and one of its major metabolites, salicylic acid (SA), in human plasma using simvastatin as an internal standard has been developed and validated. For ASA analysis, a plasma sample containing potassium fluoride was extracted using a mixture of ethyl acetate and diethyl ether in the presence of 0.5% formic acid. SA, a major metabolite of ASA, was extracted from plasma using protein precipitation with acetonitrile. The compounds were separated on a reversed-phase column with an isocratic mobile phase consisting of acetonitrile and water containing 0.1% formic acid (8:2, v/v). The ion transitions recorded in multiple reaction monitoring mode were m/z 179 --> 137, 137 --> 93 and 435 --> 319 for ASA, SA and IS, respectively. The coefficient of variation of the assay precision was less than 9.3%, and the accuracy exceeded 86.5%. The lower limits of quantification for ASA and SA were 5 and 50 ng/mL, respectively. The developed assay method was successfully applied for the evaluation of pharmacokinetics of ASA and SA after single oral administration of Astrix (entero-coated pellet, 100 mg of aspirin) to 10 Korean healthy male volunteers. PMID:18254152

  1. The enteric bacterial metabolite propionic acid alters brain and plasma phospholipid molecular species: further development of a rodent model of autism spectrum disorders

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Gastrointestinal symptoms and altered blood phospholipid profiles have been reported in patients with autism spectrum disorders (ASD). Most of the phospholipid analyses have been conducted on the fatty acid composition of isolated phospholipid classes following hydrolysis. A paucity of information exists on how the intact phospholipid molecular species are altered in ASD. We applied ESI/MS to determine how brain and blood intact phospholipid species were altered during the induction of ASD-like behaviors in rats following intraventricular infusions with the enteric bacterial metabolite propionic acid. Animals were infused daily for 8 days, locomotor activity assessed, and animals killed during the induced behaviors. Propionic acid infusions increased locomotor activity. Lipid analysis revealed treatment altered 21 brain and 30 blood phospholipid molecular species. Notable alterations were observed in the composition of brain SM, diacyl mono and polyunsaturated PC, PI, PS, PE, and plasmalogen PC and PE molecular species. These alterations suggest that the propionic acid rat model is a useful tool to study aberrations in lipid metabolism known to affect membrane fluidity, peroxisomal function, gap junction coupling capacity, signaling, and neuroinflammation, all of which may be associated with the pathogenesis of ASD. PMID:22747852

  2. Effect of Exposure to Atmospheric Ultrafine Particles on Production of Free Fatty Acids and Lipid Metabolites in the Mouse Small Intestine

    PubMed Central

    Li, Rongsong; Navab, Kaveh; Hough, Greg; Daher, Nancy; Zhang, Min; Mittelstein, David; Lee, Katherine; Pakbin, Payam; Saffari, Arian; Bhetraratana, May; Sulaiman, Dawoud; Beebe, Tyler; Wu, Lan; Jen, Nelson; Wine, Eytan; Tseng, Chi-Hong; Araujo, Jesus A.; Fogelman, Alan; Sioutas, Constantinos; Navab, Mohamed

    2014-01-01

    Background: Exposure to ambient ultrafine particulate matter (UFP) is a well-recognized risk factor for cardiovascular and respiratory diseases. However, little is known about the effects of air pollution on gastrointestinal disorders. Objective: We sought to assess whether exposure to ambient UFP (diameter < 180 nm) increased free fatty acids and lipid metabolites in the mouse small intestine. Methods: Ldlr-null mice were exposed to filtered air (FA) or UFP collected at an urban Los Angeles, California, site that was heavily affected by vehicular emissions; the exposure was carried out for 10 weeks in the presence or absence of D-4F, an apolipoprotein A-I mimetic peptide with antioxidant and anti-inflammation properties on a high-fat or normal chow diet. Results: Compared with FA, exposure to UFP significantly increased intestinal hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acids (HETEs), including 15-HETE, 12-HETE, 5-HETE, as well as hydroxyoctadecadienoic acids (HODEs), including 13-HODE and 9-HODE. Arachidonic acid (AA) and prostaglandin D2 (PGD2) as well as some of the lysophosphatidic acids (LPA) in the small intestine were also increased in response to UFP exposure. Administration of D-4F significantly reduced UFP-mediated increase in HETEs, HODEs, AA, PGD2, and LPA. Although exposure to UFP further led to shortened villus length accompanied by prominent macrophage and neutrophil infiltration into the intestinal villi, administration of D-4F mitigated macrophage infiltration. Conclusions: Exposure to UFP promotes lipid metabolism, villus shortening, and inflammatory responses in mouse small intestine, whereas administration of D-4F attenuated these effects. Our findings provide a basis to further assess the mechanisms underlying UFP-mediated lipid metabolism in the digestive system with clinical relevance to gut homeostasis and diseases. Citation: Li R, Navab K, Hough G, Daher N, Zhang M, Mittelstein D, Lee K, Pakbin P, Saffari A, Bhetraratana M, Sulaiman D, Beebe T, Wu L, Jen

  3. A photophysical and photochemical study of 6-methoxy-2-naphthylacetic acid, the major metabolite of the phototoxic nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drug nabumetone.

    PubMed

    Boscá, F; Canudas, N; Marín, M L; Miranda, M A

    2000-02-01

    Nabumetone is a phototoxic nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drug used for the treatment of osteoarthritis. However, nabumetone is considered a prodrug with its metabolite 6-methoxy-2-naphthylacetic acid the active form. Photophysical and photochemical studies on this metabolite have been undertaken. It undergoes photodecarboxylation in aerated aqueous and organic solvents. In addition to the accepted photodegradation pathway for related molecules, a new mechanism that implies generation of the naphthalene radical cation from the excited singlet and addition of O2 prior to the decarboxylation process has been demonstrated. Evidence for the involvement of the excited singlet state in this mechanism have been obtained by steady-state and time-resolved fluorescence experiments. The fluorescence quenching by O2 and the shorter singlet lifetime in aerated solvents support this assignment. Laser flash photolysis also supports this mechanism by showing the noninvolvement of the triplet in the formation of the naphthalene radical cation. Finally, the well-known electron acceptor CCl4 acts as an efficient singlet quencher, enhancing the route leading to the radical cation, preventing intersystem crossing to the triplet and thus resulting in a dramatic increase in the yield of 6-methoxy-2-naphthaldehyde, the major oxidative decarboxylation product; this constitutes unambiguous proof in favor of the new mechanistic proposals. PMID:10687391

  4. Determination of alachlor and its sulfonic acid metabolite in water by solid-phase extraction and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Aga, D.S.; Thurman, E.M.; Pomes, M.L.

    1994-01-01

    Solid-phase extraction (SPE) and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) were combined for the trace analysis of the herbicide alachlor and its major soil metabolite, ethanesulfonic acid (ESA). The anti-alachlor antibody cross-reacted with ESA, which produced false-positive detections of alachlor in water samples by immunoassay screens. Alachlor and ESA were isolated from water by SPE on a C18 resin and eluted sequentially with ethyl acetate and methanol. Alachlor is soluble in ethyl acetate while the anionic ESA is not. Thus ESA remained adsorbed on the C18 resin and was eluted later with methanol. The combination of SPE with ELISA effectivety separated and quantified both alachlor and ESA using the same antibody for two ELISA methods. The general method may have applicability for the separation of other herbicides and their ionic metabolites. The SPE-ELISA method has a, detection limit of 0.01 ??g/L for alachlor and 0.05 ??g/L for ESA, with a precision of ?? 10%. Analyses of surface and ground water samples were confirmed by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry and high-performance liquid chromatography with photodiode-array detection. Results showed widespread occurrence of ESA in surface and ground water of the midwestern United States, with concentrations ranging from 10 ??g/L.

  5. Simultaneous determination of phenoxyethanol and its major metabolite, phenoxyacetic acid, in rat biological matrices by LC-MS/MS with polarity switching: Application to ADME studies.

    PubMed

    Kim, Tae Hwan; Kim, Min Gi; Kim, Min Gyu; Shin, Beom Soo; Kim, Kyu-Bong; Lee, Jong Bong; Paik, Soo Heui; Yoo, Sun Dong

    2015-11-01

    This study describes the development of a simple LC-ESI-MS/MS method with polarity switching for the simultaneous analysis of phenoxyethanol (PE) and its major metabolite, phenoxyacetic acid (PAA), in rat plasma, urine, and 7 different tissues. The assay was validated to demonstrate the linearity, precision, accuracy, LLOQ, recovery, and stability by using the matrix matched QC samples. The assay achieved the LLOQ of 10 and 20 ng/mL of PE and PAA, respectively, for plasma samples and the LLOQ of 20 and 50 ng/mL of PE and PAA, respectively, for urine and tissue samples. This method was successfully applied to the percutaneous absorption, distribution, metabolism, and excretion studies in rats. The absolute topical bioavailability of PE was 75.4% and 76.0% for emulsion and lotion, respectively. Conversion of PE to PAA was extensive, with the average AUCPAA-to-AUCPE ratio being 4.4 and 5.3 for emulsion and lotion, respectively. The steady-state tissue-to-plasma PE concentration ratio (Kp) was higher than unity for kidney, spleen, heart, brain, and testis and was lower (≤0.6) for lung and liver, while the metabolite Kp ratio was higher than unity for kidney, liver, lung, and testis and was lower (≤0.3) for other tissues. Findings of this study may be useful to evaluate the relationship between exposure and toxic potential of PE in risk assessment. PMID:26452788

  6. Salicylic acid treatment reduces the rot of postharvest citrus fruit by inducing the accumulation of H2O2, primary metabolites and lipophilic polymethoxylated flavones.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Feng; Chen, Jiajing; Xiao, Xue; Zhang, Mingfei; Yun, Ze; Zeng, Yunliu; Xu, Juan; Cheng, Yunjiang; Deng, Xiuxin

    2016-09-15

    To comprehensively analyze the effects of salicylic acid (SA) on the storability of Satsuma mandarin (Citrus unshiu), fruits were treated with 2mM SA. The disease incidence of control/SA-treated fruit at 50d and 120d after treatment was 23.3%/10% and 67.3%/23.3%, respectively, suggesting that SA treatment can significantly reduce the rot rate of postharvest citrus fruit. Fruit quality assays revealed that the treatment can maintain fruit firmness without affecting the inner quality. Furthermore, the contents of H2O2 and some defense-related metabolites, such as ornithine and threonine, in citrus pericarp, were significantly increased by SA treatment. Moreover, it was lipophilic polymethoxylated flavones, rather than flavanone glycosides, that accumulated in SA-treated fruits and these can directly inhibit pathogen development. These results suggest that the effects of SA on postharvest citrus fruit may be attributed to the accumulation of H2O2 and defense-related metabolites. PMID:27080881

  7. Extension of a PBPK model for ethylene glycol and glycolic acid to include the competitive formation and clearance of metabolites associated with kidney toxicity in rats and humans

    SciTech Connect

    Corley, R.A.; Saghir, S.A.; Bartels, M.J.; Hansen, S.C.; Creim, J.; McMartin, K.E.; Snellings, W.M.

    2011-02-01

    A previously developed PBPK model for ethylene glycol and glycolic acid was extended to include glyoxylic acid, oxalic acid, and the precipitation of calcium oxalate that is associated with kidney toxicity in rats and humans. The development and evaluation of the PBPK model was based upon previously published pharmacokinetic studies coupled with measured blood and tissue partition coefficients and rates of in vitro metabolism of glyoxylic acid to oxalic acid, glycine and other metabolites using primary hepatocytes isolated from male Wistar rats and humans. Precipitation of oxalic acid with calcium in the kidneys was assumed to occur only at concentrations exceeding the thermodynamic solubility product for calcium oxalate. This solubility product can be affected by local concentrations of calcium and other ions that are expressed in the model using an ion activity product estimated from toxicity studies such that calcium oxalate precipitation would be minimal at dietary exposures below the NOAEL for kidney toxicity in the sensitive male Wistar rat. The resulting integrated PBPK predicts that bolus oral or dietary exposures to ethylene glycol would result in typically 1.4-1.6-fold higher peak oxalate levels and 1.6-2-fold higher AUC's for calcium oxalate in kidneys of humans as compared with comparably exposed male Wistar rats over a dose range of 1-1000 mg/kg. The converse (male Wistar rats predicted to have greater oxalate levels in the kidneys than humans) was found for inhalation exposures although no accumulation of calcium oxalate is predicted to occur until exposures are well in excess of the theoretical saturated vapor concentration of 200 mg/m{sup 3}. While the current model is capable of such cross-species, dose, and route-of-exposure comparisons, it also highlights several areas of potential research that will improve confidence in such predictions, especially at low doses relevant for most human exposures.

  8. Secondary metabolites from Ganoderma.

    PubMed

    Baby, Sabulal; Johnson, Anil John; Govindan, Balaji

    2015-06-01

    Ganoderma is a genus of medicinal mushrooms. This review deals with secondary metabolites isolated from Ganoderma and their biological significance. Phytochemical studies over the last 40years led to the isolation of 431 secondary metabolites from various Ganoderma species. The major secondary compounds isolated are (a) C30 lanostanes (ganoderic acids), (b) C30 lanostanes (aldehydes, alcohols, esters, glycosides, lactones, ketones), (c) C27 lanostanes (lucidenic acids), (d) C27 lanostanes (alcohols, lactones, esters), (e) C24, C25 lanostanes (f) C30 pentacyclic triterpenes, (g) meroterpenoids, (h) farnesyl hydroquinones (meroterpenoids), (i) C15 sesquiterpenoids, (j) steroids, (k) alkaloids, (l) prenyl hydroquinone (m) benzofurans, (n) benzopyran-4-one derivatives and (o) benzenoid derivatives. Ganoderma lucidum is the species extensively studied for its secondary metabolites and biological activities. Ganoderma applanatum, Ganoderma colossum, Ganoderma sinense, Ganoderma cochlear, Ganoderma tsugae, Ganoderma amboinense, Ganoderma orbiforme, Ganoderma resinaceum, Ganoderma hainanense, Ganoderma concinna, Ganoderma pfeifferi, Ganoderma neo-japonicum, Ganoderma tropicum, Ganoderma australe, Ganoderma carnosum, Ganoderma fornicatum, Ganoderma lipsiense (synonym G. applanatum), Ganoderma mastoporum, Ganoderma theaecolum, Ganoderma boninense, Ganoderma capense and Ganoderma annulare are the other Ganoderma species subjected to phytochemical studies. Further phytochemical studies on Ganoderma could lead to the discovery of hitherto unknown biologically active secondary metabolites. PMID:25975187

  9. High throughput HPLC-ESI(-)-MS/MS methodology for mercapturic acid metabolites of 1,3-butadiene: Biomarkers of exposure and bioactivation.

    PubMed

    Kotapati, Srikanth; Esades, Amanda; Matter, Brock; Le, Chap; Tretyakova, Natalia

    2015-11-01

    1,3-Butadiene (BD) is an important industrial and environmental carcinogen present in cigarette smoke, automobile exhaust, and urban air. The major urinary metabolites of BD in humans are 2-(N-acetyl-L-cystein-S-yl)-1-hydroxybut-3-ene/1-(N-acetyl-L-cystein-S-yl)-2-hydroxybut-3-ene (MHBMA), 4-(N-acetyl-L-cystein-S-yl)-1,2-dihydroxybutane (DHBMA), and 4-(N-acetyl-L-cystein-S-yl)-1,2,3-trihydroxybutyl mercapturic acid (THBMA), which are formed from the electrophilic metabolites of BD, 3,4-epoxy-1-butene (EB), hydroxymethyl vinyl ketone (HMVK), and 3,4-epoxy-1,2-diol (EBD), respectively. In the present work, a sensitive high-throughput HPLC-ESI(-)-MS/MS method was developed for simultaneous quantification of MHBMA and DHBMA in small volumes of human urine (200 μl). The method employs a 96 well Oasis HLB SPE enrichment step, followed by isotope dilution HPLC-ESI(-)-MS/MS analysis on a triple quadrupole mass spectrometer. The validated method was used to quantify MHBMA and DHBMA in urine of workers from a BD monomer and styrene-butadiene rubber production facility (40 controls and 32 occupationally exposed to BD). Urinary THBMA concentrations were also determined in the same samples. The concentrations of all three BD-mercapturic acids and the metabolic ratio (MHBMA/(MHBMA+DHBMA+THBMA)) were significantly higher in the occupationally exposed group as compared to controls and correlated with BD exposure, with each other, and with BD-hemoglobin biomarkers. This improved high throughput methodology for MHBMA and DHBMA will be useful for future epidemiological studies in smokers and occupationally exposed workers. PMID:25727266

  10. Metabolomics uncovers dietary omega-3 fatty acid-derived metabolites implicated in anti-nociceptive responses after experimental spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Figueroa, J D; Cordero, K; Serrano-Illan, M; Almeyda, A; Baldeosingh, K; Almaguel, F G; De Leon, M

    2013-01-01

    Chronic neuropathic pain is a frequent comorbidity following spinal cord injury (SCI) and often fails to respond to conventional pain management strategies. Preventive administration of docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) or the consumption of a diet rich in omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (O3PUFAs) confers potent prophylaxis against SCI and improves functional recovery. The present study examines whether this novel dietary strategy provides significant antinociceptive benefits in rats experiencing SCI-induced pain. Rats were fed control chow or chow enriched with O3PUFAs for 8weeks before being subjected to sham or cord contusion surgeries, continuing the same diets after surgery for another 8 more weeks. The paw sensitivity to noxious heat was quantified for at least 8weeks post-SCI using the Hargreaves test. We found that SCI rats consuming the preventive O3PUFA-enriched diet exhibited a significant reduction in thermal hyperalgesia compared to those consuming the normal diet. Functional neurometabolomic profiling revealed a distinctive deregulation in the metabolism of endocannabinoids (eCB) and related N-acyl ethanolamines (NAEs) at 8weeks post-SCI. We found that O3PUFAs consumption led to a robust accumulation of novel NAE precursors, including the glycerophospho-containing docosahexaenoyl ethanolamine (DHEA), docosapentaenoyl ethanolamine (DPEA), and eicosapentaenoyl ethanolamine (EPEA). The tissue levels of these metabolites were significantly correlated with the antihyperalgesic phenotype. In addition, rats consuming the O3PUFA-rich diet showed reduced sprouting of nociceptive fibers containing CGRP and dorsal horn neuron p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) expression, well-established biomarkers of pain. The spinal cord levels of inositols were positively correlated with thermal hyperalgesia, supporting their role as biomarkers of chronic neuropathic pain. Notably, the O3PUFA-rich dietary intervention reduced the levels of these metabolites

  11. Cellular responses induced in vitro by pestheic acid, a fungal metabolite, in a gastric adenocarcinoma cell line (PG100).

    PubMed

    Sousa, J M C; Matos, L A; Alcântara, D F A; Ribeiro, H F; Santos, L S; Oliveira, M N; Brito-Junior, L C; Khayat, A S; Guimarães, A C; Cunha, L A; Burbano, R R; Bahia, M O

    2013-01-01

    There is a constant search for new cancer treatments that are less aggressive and economically affordable. In this context, natural products extracted from plants, fungi, and microorganisms are of great interest. Pestheic acid, or dihidromaldoxin, is a chlorinated diphenylic ether extracted from the phytopathogenic fungus Pestalotiopsis guepinii (Amphisphaeriaceae). We assessed the cytotoxic, cytostatic, and genotoxic effects of pestheic acid in a gastric adenocarcinoma cell line (PG100). A decrease in clonogenic survival was observed. Pestheic acid also induced significant increases in both micronucleus and nucleoplasmic bridge frequency. However, we did not observe changes in cell cycle kinetics or apoptosis induction. Reactive oxygen species induced by diphenylic ethers may explain the genotoxicity and mutagenicity of pestheic acid. The absence of repair checkpoints that we observed is probably due to the fact that the PG100 cell line lacks the TP53 gene, which is common in gastric cancers. Even though pestheic acid has had a clear cytotoxic effect, the minimal inhibitory concentration was high, which shows that pestheic acid is not an active anticancer compound under these conditions. PMID:24114206

  12. Recent advances in biosynthesis of fatty acids derived products in Saccharomyces cerevisiae via enhanced supply of precursor metabolites.

    PubMed

    Lian, Jiazhang; Zhao, Huimin

    2015-03-01

    Fatty acids or their activated forms, fatty acyl-CoAs and fatty acyl-ACPs, are important precursors to synthesize a wide variety of fuels and chemicals, including but not limited to free fatty acids (FFAs), fatty alcohols (FALs), fatty acid ethyl esters (FAEEs), and alkanes. However, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, an important cell factory, does not naturally accumulate fatty acids in large quantities. Therefore, metabolic engineering strategies were carried out to increase the glycolytic fluxes to fatty acid biosynthesis in yeast, specifically to enhance the supply of precursors, eliminate competing pathways, and bypass the host regulatory network. This review will focus on the genetic manipulation of both structural and regulatory genes in each step for fatty acids overproduction in S. cerevisiae, including from sugar to acetyl-CoA, from acetyl-CoA to malonyl-CoA, and from malonyl-CoA to fatty acyl-CoAs. The downstream pathways for the conversion of fatty acyl-CoAs to the desired products will also be discussed. PMID:25306882

  13. Drought and air warming affect the species-specific levels of stress-related foliar metabolites of three oak species on acidic and calcareous soil.

    PubMed

    Hu, Bin; Simon, Judy; Rennenberg, Heinz

    2013-05-01

    adjustment developed better on calcareous compared with acidic soil; however, this effect was metabolite- as well as species-specific. PMID:23619385

  14. Antibacterial activity of lichen secondary metabolite usnic acid is primarily caused by inhibition of RNA and DNA synthesis.

    PubMed

    Maciąg-Dorszyńska, Monika; Węgrzyn, Grzegorz; Guzow-Krzemińska, Beata

    2014-04-01

    Usnic acid, a compound produced by various lichen species, has been demonstrated previously to inhibit growth of different bacteria and fungi; however, mechanism of its antimicrobial activity remained unknown. In this report, we demonstrate that usnic acid causes rapid and strong inhibition of RNA and DNA synthesis in Gram-positive bacteria, represented by Bacillus subtilis and Staphylococcus aureus, while it does not inhibit production of macromolecules (DNA, RNA, and proteins) in Escherichia coli, which is resistant to even high doses of this compound. However, we also observed slight inhibition of RNA synthesis in a Gram-negative bacterium, Vibrio harveyi. Inhibition of protein synthesis in B. subtilis and S. aureus was delayed, which suggest indirect action (possibly through impairment of transcription) of usnic acid on translation. Interestingly, DNA synthesis was halted rapidly in B. subtilis and S. aureus, suggesting interference of usnic acid with elongation of DNA replication. We propose that inhibition of RNA synthesis may be a general mechanism of antibacterial action of usnic acid, with additional direct mechanisms, such as impairment of DNA replication in B. subtilis and S. aureus. PMID:24571086

  15. Blood risk factor metabolites associated with heart disease and myocardial fatty acids in copper-deficient male and female rats

    SciTech Connect

    Fields, M.; Lewis, C.; Beal, T. ); Berlin, E.; Kliman, P.G.; Peters, R.C. )

    1989-07-01

    Intact and castrated males and intact and ovariectomized female rats were fed a copper-deficient diet in order to establish whether the protection provided in females against cardiovascular pathology and mortality is due to endogenous sex hormones, and different levels of blood lipids and/or myocardial fatty acids. Seventy-three male and female rats were assigned to a copper-deficient diet (0.6 {mu}g of copper/g diet) containing 62% fructose for 8 weeks. Twelve of the male rats underwent castration and 12 of the females were ovariectomized. All animals exhibited high levels of plasma cholesterol, triglycerides, and uric acid, which were neither affected by the sex of the rat nor by the surgical treatment. The composition of fatty acids of the myocardium was similar in males and females. Except for those animals that were sacrificed by us, all other male rats died of heart pathology. In contrast, none of the female rats exhibited heart pathology and none died of the deficiency. It is suggested that heart pathology and mortality in copper deficiency are sex related and not due to high levels of plasma cholesterol, triglycerides, and uric acid or to differences in myocardial fatty acid composition.

  16. 15-Lipoxygenase metabolites of α-linolenic acid, [13-(S)-HPOTrE and 13-(S)-HOTrE], mediate anti-inflammatory effects by inactivating NLRP3 inflammasome

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Naresh; Gupta, Geetika; Anilkumar, Kotha; Fatima, Naireen; Karnati, Roy; Reddy, Gorla Venkateswara; Giri, Priyanka Voori; Reddanna, Pallu

    2016-01-01

    The ratio of ω-6 to ω-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) appears to be critical in the regulation of various pathophysiological processes and to maintain cellular homeostasis. While a high proportion of dietary intake of ω-6 PUFAs is associated with various inflammatory disorders, higher intake of ω-3 PUFAs is known to offer protection. It is now well established that beneficial effects of ω-3 PUFAs are mediated in part by their oxygenated metabolites mainly via the lipoxygenase (LOX) and cyclooxygenase (COX) pathways. However, the down-stream signaling pathways that are involved in these anti-inflammatory effects of ω-3 PUFAs have not been elucidated. The present study evaluates the effects of 15-LOX metabolites of α-linolenic acid (ALA, ω-3 PUFA) on lipopolysaccharide (LPS) induced inflammation in RAW 264.7 cells and peritoneal macrophages. Further, the effect of these metabolites on the survival of BALB/c mice in LPS mediated septic shock and also polymicrobial sepsis in Cecal Ligation and Puncture (CLP) mouse model was studied. These studies reveal the anti-inflammatory effects of 13-(S)-hydroperoxyoctadecatrienoic acid [13-(S)-HPOTrE] and 13-(S)-hydroxyoctadecatrienoic acid [13-(S)-HOTrE] by inactivating NLRP3 inflammasome complex through the PPAR-γ pathway. Additionally, both metabolites also deactivated autophagy and induced apoptosis. In mediating all these effects 13-(S)-HPOTrE was more potent than 13-(S)-HOTrE. PMID:27535180

  17. Anaplerotic Accumulation of Tricarboxylic Acid Cycle Intermediates as Well as Changes in Other Key Metabolites During Heterotopic Ossification

    PubMed Central

    Davis, Eleanor L.; Salisbury, Elizabeth A.; Olmsted‐Davis, Elizabeth

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Heterotopic ossification (HO) is the de novo formation of bone that occurs in soft tissue, through recruitment, expansion, and differentiation of multiple cells types including transient brown adipocytes, osteoblasts, chondrocytes, mast cells, and platelets to name a few. Much evidence is accumulating that suggests changes in metabolism may be required to accomplish this bone formation. Recent work using a mouse model of heterotopic bone formation reliant on delivery of adenovirus‐transduced cells expressing low levels of BMP2 showed the immediate expansion of a unique brown adipocyte‐like cell. These cells are undergoing robust uncoupled oxidative phosphorylation to a level such that oxygen in the microenvironment is dramatically lowered creating areas of hypoxia. It is unclear how these oxygen changes ultimately affect metabolism and bone formation. To identify the processes and changes occurring over the course of bone formation, HO was established in the mice, and tissues isolated at early and late times were subjected to a global metabolomic screen. Results show that there are significant changes in both glucose levels, as well as TCA cycle intermediates. Additionally, metabolites necessary for oxidation of stored lipids were also found to be significantly elevated. The complete results of this screen are presented here, and provide a unique picture of the metabolic changes occurring during heterotopic bone formation. J. Cell. Biochem. 117: 1044–1053, 2016. © 2015 The Authors. Journal of Cellular Biochemistry Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26627193

  18. In situ assay of fatty acid β-oxidation by metabolite profiling following permeabilization of cell membranes[S

    PubMed Central

    Ensenauer, Regina; Fingerhut, Ralph; Schriever, Sonja C.; Fink, Barbara; Becker, Marc; Sellerer, Nina C.; Pagel, Philipp; Kirschner, Andreas; Dame, Torsten; Olgemöller, Bernhard; Röschinger, Wulf; Roscher, Adelbert A.

    2012-01-01

    Quantitative analysis of mitochondrial FA β-oxidation (FAO) has drawn increasing interest for defining lipid-induced metabolic dysfunctions, such as in obesity-induced insulin resistance, and evaluating pharmacologic strategies to improve β-oxidation function. The aim was to develop a new assay to quantify β-oxidation function in intact mitochondria and with a low amount of cell material. Cell membranes of primary human fibroblasts were permeabilized with digitonin prior to a load with FFA substrate. Following 120 min of incubation, the various generated acylcarnitines were extracted from both cells and incubation medium by protein precipitation/desalting and subjected to solid-phase extraction. A panel of 30 acylcarnitines per well was quantified by MS/MS and normalized to citrate synthase activity to analyze mitochondrial metabolite flux. Pretreatment with bezafibrate and etomoxir revealed stimulating and inhibiting regulatory effects on β-oxidation function, respectively. In addition to the advantage of a much shorter assay time due to in situ permeabilization compared with whole-cell incubation systems, the method allows the detection of multiple acylcarnitines from an only limited amount of intact cells, particularly relevant to the use of primary cells. This novel approach facilitates highly sensitive, simple, and fast monitoring of pharmacological effects on FAO. PMID:22345709

  19. Beyond the classic eicosanoids: Peripherally-acting oxygenated metabolites of polyunsaturated fatty acids mediate pain associated with tissue injury and inflammation.

    PubMed

    Shapiro, Haim; Singer, Pierre; Ariel, Amiram

    2016-08-01

    Pain is a complex sensation that may be protective or cause undue suffering and loss of function, depending on the circumstances. Peripheral nociceptor neurons (PNs) innervate most tissues, and express ion channels, nocisensors, which depolarize the cell in response to intense stimuli and numerous substances. Inflamed tissues manifest inflammatory hyperalgesia in which the threshold for pain and the response to painful stimuli are decreased and increased, respectively. Constituents of the inflammatory milieu sensitize PNs, thereby contributing to hyperalgesia. Polyunsaturated fatty acids undergo enzymatic and free radical-mediated oxygenation into an array of bioactive metabolites, oxygenated polyunsaturated fatty acids (oxy-PUFAs), including the classic eicosanoids. Oxy-PUFA production is enhanced during inflammation. Pioneering studies by Vane and colleagues from the early 1970s first implicated classic eicosanoids in the pain associated with inflammation. Here, we review the production and action of oxy-PUFAs that are not classic eicosanoids, but nevertheless are produced in injured/ inflamed tissues and activate or sensitize PNs. In general, oxy-PUFAs that sensitize PNs may do so directly, by activation of nocisensors, ion channels or GPCRs expressed on the surface of PNs, or indirectly, by increasing the production of inflammatory mediators that activate or sensitize PNs. We focus on oxy-PUFAs that act directly on PNs. Specifically, we discuss the role of arachidonic acid-derived 12S-HpETE, HNE, ONE, PGA2, iso-PGA2 and 15d-PGJ2, 5,6-and 8,9-EET, PGE2-G and 8R,15S-diHETE, as well as the linoleic acid-derived 9-and 13-HODE in inducing acute nocifensive behavior and/or inflammatory hyperalgesia in rodents. The nocisensors TRPV1, TRPV4 and TRPA1, and putative Gαs-type GPCRs are the PN targets of these oxy-PUFAs. PMID:27067460

  20. Tissue Distribution and Urinary Excretion of Dimethylated Arsenic and Its Metabolites in Dimethylarsinic acid- or Arsenate-treated Rats - MCEARD

    EPA Science Inventory

    Adult female Fisher 344 rats received drinking water containing 0, 4, 40, 100, or 200 parts per million of dimethylarsinic acid or 100 parts per million of arsenate for 14 days. Urine was collected during the last 24 h of exposure. Tissues were then taken for analysis of dimethy...

  1. Physiological responses of glyphosate-resistant and glyphosate-sensitive soybean to aminomethylphosphonic acid a metabolite of glyphosate

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Aminomethylphosphonic acid (AMPA) is formed in glyphosate-treated glyphosate-resistant (GR) and glyphosate-sensitive (GS) soybean [Glycine max (L.) Merr.] plants and is known to cause yellowing in soybean. Although, AMPA is less phytotoxic than glyphosate, its mode of action is different from that o...

  2. Plasma amino acid and metabolite signatures tracking diabetes progression in the UCD-T2DM rat model

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Elevations of plasma concentrations of branched-chain amino acids (BCAAs) are observed in human insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM); however, there has been some controversy with respect to the passive or causative nature of the BCAA phenotype. Using untargeted metabolomics, plasm...

  3. Long-chain fatty acid combustion rate is associated with unique metabolite profiles in skeletal muscle mitochondria

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Incomplete or limited long-chain fatty acid (LCFA) combustion in skeletal muscle has been associated with insulin resistance. Signals that are responsive to shifts in LCFA beta-oxidation rate or degree of intramitochondrial catabolism are hypothesized to regulate second messenger systems downstream...

  4. Altered secretion of selected arachidonic acid metabolites during subclinical endometritis relative to estrous cycle stage and grade of fibrosis in mares.

    PubMed

    Gajos, Katarzyna; Kozdrowski, Roland; Nowak, Marcin; Siemieniuch, Marta J

    2015-08-01

    Mares that fail to become pregnant after repeated breeding, without showing typical signs of clinical endometritis, should be suspected of subclinical endometritis (SE). Contact with infectious agents results in altered synthesis and secretion of inflammatory mediators, including cytokines and arachidonic acid metabolites, and disturbs endometrial functional balance. To address the hypothesis that SE affects the immune endocrine status of the equine endometrium, spontaneous secretion of prostaglandin E(2) (PGE(2)), prostaglandin F(2α) (PGF(2α)), 6-keto-PGF(1α )(a metabolite of prostacyclin I(2)), leukotriene B(4) (LTB(4)), and leukotriene C(4) (LTC(4)) was examined. In addition, secretion of these factors was examined relative to the grade of inflammation, fibrosis, and estrous cycle stage. Eighty-two warmblood mares, of known breeding history, were enrolled in this study. On the basis of histopathologic assessment, mares were classified as suffering from first-grade SE, second-grade SE, or being healthy. The grade of fibrosis and the infiltration of endometrial tissue with polymorphonuclear leukocytes were examined by routine hematoxylin-eosin staining. In mares suffering from SE, the secretion profiles of PGE(2), 6-keto-PGF(1α), LTB(4), and LTC(4) were changed compared to mares that did not suffer from endometritis. The secretion of PGE(2) and 6-keto-PGF1α was increased, whereas that of LTB(4) and LTC(4) was decreased. Secretion of 6-keto-PGF(1α) was increased in first- and second-grade SE (P < 0.01). The concentration of PGI(2) metabolite was increased only in inflamed endometrium, independently of the inflammation grade, but was not affected by fibrosis. Prostaglandin E(2) secretion was increased in second-grade SE (P < 0.05). The secretion of LTB(4) decreased in both first- and second-grade SE (P < 0.05), whereas secretion of LTC(4) was decreased only in second-grade SE (P < 0.05). Fibrosis did not change the secretion profile of PGE(2), PGF(2α), and 6

  5. A comparative study on diurnal changes in metabolite levels in the leaves of three crassulacean acid metabolism (CAM) species, Ananas comosus, Kalanchoë daigremontiana and K. pinnata.

    PubMed

    Chen, Li-Song; Lin, Qin; Nose, Akihiro

    2002-02-01

    A comparative study on diurnal changes in metabolite levels associated with crassulacean acid metabolism (CAM) in the leaves of three CAM species, Ananas comosus (pineapple), a hexose-utilizing species, and Kalanchoë daigremontiana and K. pinnata, two starch-utilizing species, were made. All three CAM species showed a typical feature of CAM with nocturnal malate increase. In the two Kalanchoë species, isocitrate levels were higher than citrate levels; the reverse was the case in pineapple. In the two Kalanchoë species, a small nocturnal citrate increase was found and K. daigremontiana showed a small nocturnal isocitrate increase. Glucose 6-phosphate (G-6-P), fructose 6-phosphate (F-6-P) and glucose 1-phosphate (G-1-P) levels in the three CAM species rose rapidly during the first part of the dark period and decreased during the latter part of the dark period. The levels of the metabolites also decreased during the first 3 h of the light period, then, remained little changed through the rest of the light period. Absolute levels of G-6-P, F-6-P and G-1-P were higher in pineapple than in the two Kalanchoë species. Fructose 1,6-bisphosphate (F-1,6-P(2)) levels in the three CAM species increased during the dark period, then dramatically decreased during the first 3 h of the light period and remained unchanged through the rest of the light period. The extent of nocturnal F-1,6-P(2) increase was far greater in the two Kalanchoë species than in pineapple. Absolute levels of F-1,6-P(2) were higher in the two Kalanchoë species than in pineapple, especially during dark period. Diurnal changes in oxaloacetate (OAA), pyruvate (Pyr) and phosphoenolpyruvate (PEP) levels in the three CAM species were similar. PMID:11807138

  6. Enhancement of Anti-Inflammatory Activity of Aloe vera Adventitious Root Extracts through the Alteration of Primary and Secondary Metabolites via Salicylic Acid Elicitation

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Yun Sun; Ju, Hyun Kyoung; Kim, Yeon Jeong; Lim, Tae-Gyu; Uddin, Md Romij; Kim, Yeon Bok; Baek, Jin Hong; Kwon, Sung Won; Lee, Ki Won; Seo, Hak Soo; Park, Sang Un; Yang, Tae-Jin

    2013-01-01

    Aloe vera (Asphodeloideae) is a medicinal plant in which useful secondary metabolites are plentiful. Among the representative secondary metabolites of Aloe vera are the anthraquinones including aloe emodin and chrysophanol, which are tricyclic aromatic quinones synthesized via a plant-specific type III polyketide biosynthesis pathway. However, it is not yet clear which cellular responses can induce the pathway, leading to production of tricyclic aromatic quinones. In this study, we examined the effect of endogenous elicitors on the type III polyketide biosynthesis pathway and identified the metabolic changes induced in elicitor-treated Aloe vera adventitious roots. Salicylic acid, methyl jasmonate, and ethephon were used to treat Aloe vera adventitious roots cultured on MS liquid media with 0.3 mg/L IBA for 35 days. Aloe emodin and chrysophanol were remarkably increased by the SA treatment, more than 10–11 and 5–13 fold as compared with untreated control, respectively. Ultra-performance liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization mass spectrometry analysis identified a total of 37 SA-induced compounds, including aloe emodin and chrysophanol, and 3 of the compounds were tentatively identified as tricyclic aromatic quinones. Transcript accumulation analysis of polyketide synthase genes and gas chromatography mass spectrometry showed that these secondary metabolic changes resulted from increased expression of octaketide synthase genes and decreases in malonyl-CoA, which is the precursor for the tricyclic aromatic quinone biosynthesis pathway. In addition, anti-inflammatory activity was enhanced in extracts of SA-treated adventitious roots. Our results suggest that SA has an important role in activation of the plant specific-type III polyketide biosynthetic pathway, and therefore that the efficacy of Aloe vera as medicinal agent can be improved through SA treatment. PMID:24358188

  7. Abscisic acid induced changes in production of primary and secondary metabolites, photosynthetic capacity, antioxidant capability, antioxidant enzymes and lipoxygenase inhibitory activity of Orthosiphon stamineus Benth.

    PubMed

    Ibrahim, Mohd Hafiz; Jaafar, Hawa Z E

    2013-01-01

    An experiment was conducted to investigate and distinguish the relationships in the production of total phenolics, total flavonoids, soluble sugars, H2O2, O2-, phenylalanine ammonia lyase (PAL) activity, leaf gas exchange, antioxidant activity, antioxidant enzyme activity [ascorbate peroxidase (APX), catalase (CAT), superoxide dismutase (SOD) and Lipoxygenase inhibitory activity (LOX)] under four levels of foliar abscisic acid (ABA) application (0, 2, 4, 6 µM) for 15 weeks in Orthosiphon stamineus Benth. It was found that the production of plant secondary metabolites, soluble sugars, antioxidant activity, PAL activity and LOX inhibitory activity was influenced by foliar application of ABA. As the concentration of ABA was increased from 0 to 6 µM the production of total phenolics, flavonoids, sucrose, H2O2, O2-, PAL activity and LOX inhibitory activity was enhanced. It was also observed that the antioxidant capabilities (DPPH and ORAC) were increased. This was followed by increases in production of antioxidant enzymes APX, CAT and SOD. Under high application rates of ABA the net photosynthesis and stomatal conductance was found to be reduced. The production of primary and secondary metabolites displayed a significant positive relationship with H2O2 (total phenolics, r2 = 0.877; total flavonoids, r2 = 0.812; p ≤ 0.05) and O2- (total phenolics, r2 = 0.778; total flavonoids, r2 = 0.912; p ≤ 0.05). This indicated that increased oxidative stress at high application rates of ABA, improved the production of phytochemicals. PMID:23884129

  8. Improved production of poly(lactic acid)-like polyester based on metabolite analysis to address the rate-limiting step.

    PubMed

    Matsumoto, Ken'ichiro; Tobitani, Kota; Aoki, Shunsuke; Song, Yuyang; Ooi, Toshihiko; Taguchi, Seiichi

    2014-12-01

    The biosynthesis of poly(lactic acid) (PLA)-like polymers, composed of >99 mol% lactate and a trace amount of 3-hydroxybutyrate, in engineered Corynebacterium glutamicum consists of two steps; the generation of the monomer substrate lactyl-coenzyme A (CoA) and the polyhydroxyalkanoate (PHA) synthase-catalyzed polymerization of lactyl-CoA. In order to increase polymer productivity, we explored the rate-limiting step in PLA-like polymer synthesis based on quantitative metabolite analysis using liquid chromatography mass spectroscopy (LC-MS). A significant pool of lactyl-CoA was found during polymer synthesis. This result suggested that the rate-limitation occurred at the polymerization step. Accordingly, the expression level of PHA synthase was increased by means of codon-optimization of the corresponding gene that consequently led to an increase in polymer content by 4.4-fold compared to the control. Notably, the codon-optimization did not significantly affect the concentration of lactyl-CoA, suggesting that the polymerization reaction was still the rate-limiting step upon the overexpression of PHA synthase. Another important finding was that the generation of lactyl-CoA was concomitant with a decrease in the acetyl-CoA level, indicating that acetyl-CoA served as a CoA donor for lactyl-CoA synthesis. These results show that obtaining information on the metabolite concentrations is highly useful for improving PLA-like polymer production. This strategy should be applicable to a wide range of PHA-producing systems. PMID:26267112

  9. Longitudinal in vivo maturational changes of metabolites in the prefrontal cortex of rats exposed to polyinosinic-polycytidylic acid in utero.

    PubMed

    Vernon, Anthony C; So, Po-Wah; Lythgoe, David J; Chege, Winfred; Cooper, Jonathan D; Williams, Steven C R; Kapur, Shitij

    2015-12-01

    Proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy ((1)H MRS) studies in schizophrenia patients generally report decreased levels of N-acetyl-aspartate (NAA), glutamate and glutathione, particularly in frontal cortex. However, these data are inconsistent in part due to confounds associated with clinical samples. The lack of validated diagnostic biomarkers also hampers analysis of the neurodevelopmental trajectory of neurochemical abnormalities. Rodent models are powerful tools to address these issues, particularly when combined with (1)H MRS (clinically comparable technology). We investigated the trajectory of metabolic changes in the prefrontal cortex during brain maturation from adolescence to adulthood in vivo using (1)H MRS in rats exposed prenatally to polyinosinic-polycytidylic acid (POL), a rodent model of maternal immune activation (MIA), an epidemiological risk factor for several psychiatric disorders with a neurodevelopmental origin. Longitudinal in vivo (1)H MRS revealed a significant decrease in PFC levels of GSH and taurine in adult, but not adolescent rats. Significant age×MIA interactions for PFC levels of NAA were also observed. These data replicate some deficits observed in the PFC of patients with schizophrenia. There were no significant changes in the levels of glutamate or any other metabolite. These data suggest prenatal exposure to POL leads to subtle metabolic perturbations of the normal maturing PFC, which may be related to subsequent behavioural abnormalities. Further work is however required to examine any potential confound of shipping stress on the presumed imbalances in PFC metabolites in POL-exposed offspring. Testing the interactions between MIA with stress or genetic risk variants will also be an important advance. PMID:26475576

  10. Δ9-Tetrahydrocannabinolic acid synthase: The application of a plant secondary metabolite enzyme in biocatalytic chemical synthesis.

    PubMed

    Lange, Kerstin; Schmid, Andreas; Julsing, Mattijs K

    2016-09-10

    Δ(9)-Tetrahydrocannabinolic acid synthase (THCAS) from the secondary metabolism of Cannabis sativa L. catalyzes the oxidative formation of an intramolecular CC bond in cannabigerolic acid (CBGA) to synthesize Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinolic acid (THCA), which is the direct precursor of Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol (Δ(9)-THC). Aiming on a biotechnological production of cannabinoids, we investigated the potential of the heterologously produced plant oxidase in a cell-free system on preparative scale. THCAS was characterized in an aqueous/organic two-liquid phase setup in order to solubilize the hydrophobic substrate and to allow in situ product removal. Compared to the single phase aqueous setup the specific activity decreased by a factor of approximately 2 pointing to a substrate limitation of CBGA in the two-liquid phase system. However, the specific activity remained stable for at least 3h illustrating the benefit of the two-liquid phase setup. In a repeated-batch setup, THCAS showed only a minor loss of specific activity in the third batch pointing to a high intrinsic stability and high solvent tolerance of the enzyme. Maximal space-time-yields of 0.121gL(-1)h(-1) were reached proving the two-liquid phase concept suitable for biotechnological production of cannabinoids. PMID:27369551

  11. Effect of inulin supplementation and dietary fat source on performance, blood serum metabolites, liver lipids, abdominal fat deposition, and tissue fatty acid composition in broiler chickens.

    PubMed

    Velasco, S; Ortiz, L T; Alzueta, C; Rebolé, A; Treviño, J; Rodríguez, M L

    2010-08-01

    A study was conducted to evaluate the effect of adding inulin to diets containing 2 different types of fat as energy sources on performance, blood serum metabolites, liver lipids, and fatty acids of abdominal adipose tissue and breast and thigh meat. A total of 240 one-day-old female broiler chicks were randomly allocated into 1 of 6 treatments with 8 replicates per treatment and 5 chicks per pen. The experiment consisted of a 3 x 2 factorial arrangement of treatments including 3 concentrations of inulin (0, 5, and 10 g/kg of diet) and 2 types of fat [palm oil (PO) and sunflower oil (SO)] at an inclusion rate of 90 g/kg of diet. The experimental period lasted from 1 to 34 d. Dietary fat type did not affect BW gain but impaired feed conversion (P < 0.001) in birds fed the PO diets compared with birds fed the SO diets. The diets containing PO increased abdominal fat deposition and serum lipid and glucose concentrations. Triacylglycerol contents in liver were higher in the birds fed PO diets. Dietary fat type also modified fatty acids of abdominal and i.m. fat, resulting in a higher concentration of C16:0 and C18:1n-9 and a lower concentration of C18:2n-6 in the birds fed PO diets. The addition of inulin to diets modified (P = 0.017) BW gain quadratically without affecting feed conversion. Dietary inulin decreased the total lipid concentration in liver (P = 0.003) and that of triacylglycerols and very low density lipoprotein cholesterol (up to 31%) in blood serum compared with the control groups. The polyunsaturated fatty acid:saturated fatty acid ratio increased in abdominal and i.m. fat when inulin was included in the SO-containing diets. The results from the current study suggest that the addition of inulin to broiler diets has a beneficial effect on blood serum lipids by decreasing triacylglyceride concentrations The results also support the use of inulin to increase the capacity of SO for enhancing polyunsaturated fatty acid:saturated fatty acid ratio of i.m. fat

  12. Effect of heat stress on the serum concentrations of free amino acids and some of their metabolites in growing pigs.

    PubMed

    Morales, A; Cota, S E M; Ibarra, N O; Arce, N; Htoo, J K; Cervantes, M

    2016-07-01

    Exposure to heat stress (HS) may affect the intestinal epithelia of pigs, resulting in impaired digestive and absorptive capacity. The serum concentration (SC) of free AA in pigs can be used as indicators of their availability. This study was conducted with 12 crossbred (Landrace × Hampshire × Duroc) pigs (29.0 ± 2.8 kg initial BW) distributed into 2 groups to analyze the SC of free AA and some AA metabolites in pigs exposed to HS conditions. The treatments were pigs housed under natural HS conditions in a room with no ambient temperature control (23.6 to 37.6°C, HS) and pigs housed at thermoneutral conditions (24 ± 2°C), feed restricted to a level similar to that of their HS counterparts. All pigs received a wheat-soybean meal diet. Blood samples were collected at both the absorptive (2.5 h after a meal) and postabsorptive (10.0 h after a meal) phase. At the absorptive phase, the SC of free Arg, Leu, Lys, Phe, Thr, and Trp were lower ( < 0.05) and the SC of His, Val, Ala, Pro, Ser, and Tyr tended to be lower ( < 0.10) in HS pigs. At the postabsorptive phase, the SC of free Arg, His, Met, Asn, Gln, and Tyr were higher ( < 0.05) but the SC of Ala was lower ( < 0.01) and the SC of Pro tended to be lower ( < 0.10) in HS pigs. The absorptive SC of carnosine, ornithine (Orn), and Tau were lower ( < 0.05) and of citrulline (Cit), cystathionine, and urea tended to be lower ( < 0.10) in HS pigs. The postabsorptive SC of 3-methyl-His, homo-Cys, OH-Lys, and OH-Pro increased ( = 0.05) and of Cit tended to increase ( = 0.10) but that of carnosine and sarcosine ( < 0.05) decreased in HS pigs. The results of this study show a marked and differential effect of HS on the SC of AA. These data indicate that HS negatively affects the digestive and absorptive capacity of pigs and that the metabolism of some AA is modified in pigs to counteract the negative effects of the HS. PMID:27482670

  13. Simultaneous analysis of naproxen, nabumetone and its major metabolite 6-methoxy-2-naphthylacetic acid in pharmaceuticals and human urine by high-performance liquid chromatography.

    PubMed

    Mikami, E; Goto, T; Ohno, T; Matsumoto, H; Nishida, M

    2000-10-01

    A high-performance liquid chromatographic (HPLC) method for simultaneous determination of naproxen (NAP), nabumetone (NAB) and its major metabolite, 6-methoxy-2-naphthylacetic acid (6-MNA), was developed for the application to pharmaceuticals and human urine. Isocratic reversed-phase HPLC was employed for quantitative analysis using triethylamine and 1-heptanesulfonic acid sodium salt (HSA) as ion-pair reagents. Urine samples were purified by solid-phase extraction using Bond-Elut Certify II cartridges containing reversed-phase and anion exchange functionalities. The HPLC assay was carried out using a Wakosil ODS 5C18 column (5 microm, 150 x 4.6 mm, i.d.). The mobile phase consisted of 0.5 g of HSA dissolved in 1,000 ml of a mixture of acetonitrile, water and triethylamine (500:500:1, v/v) adjusted with phosphoric acid to pH 3. The calibration curves of NAP and NAB showed good linearity in the concentration range 32-160 microg/ml with UV detection (270 nm) for pharmaceuticals. In the low concentration ranges (8-96 ng of NAP per ml, 24-288 ng of NAB per ml and 5.6-67.2 ng of 6-MNA per ml), the calibration curves were also obtained with fluorimetric detection (excitation 280 nm, emission 350 nm) for biological fluids. The correlation coefficients were better than 0.999 in all cases. The lower limits of detection (defined as a signal-to-noise ratio of about 3) were approximately 0.3 ng for NAP, 1.5 ng for NAB and 0.2 ng for 6-MNA. The procedure described here is rapid, simple, selective, and is suitable for routine analysis of pharmaceuticals and pharmacokinetic studies in human urine samples. PMID:11022916

  14. Effects of chicory inulin on serum metabolites of uric acid, lipids, glucose, and abdominal fat deposition in quails induced by purine-rich diets.

    PubMed

    Lin, Zhijian; Zhang, Bing; Liu, Xiaoqing; Jin, Rui; Zhu, Wenjing

    2014-11-01

    Inulin, a group of dietary fibers, is reported to improve the metabolic disorders. In the present study, we investigated the effects of chicory inulin on serum metabolites of uric acid (UA), lipids, glucose, and abdominal fat deposition in quail model induced by a purine-rich diet. In this study, 60 male French quails were randomly allocated to five groups: CON (control group), MOD (model group), BEN (benzbromarone-treated group), CHI-H (high-dosage chicory inulin-treated group), and CHI-L (low-dosage chicory inulin-treated group). The serum UA level was significantly increased in the model group from days 7 to 28, as well as triglyceride (TG) and free fatty acid (FFA) increased later in the experimental period. The abdominal fat ratio was increased on day 28. Benzbromarone can decrease UA levels on days 14 and 28. The high and low dosage of chicory inulin also decreased serum UA levels on days 7, 14, and 28. The abdominal fat ratio, activity, and protein of acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACC) were decreased in chicory inulin-treated groups. The activities of xanthine oxidase (XOD) and fatty acid synthase (FAS) were increased in the model group and decreased in the benzbromarone and chicory inulin groups. This study evaluated a quail model of induced hyperuricemia with other metabolic disorders caused by a high-purine diet. The results indicated that a purine-rich diet might contribute to the development of hyperuricemia, hypertriglyceridemia, and abdominal obesity. Chicory inulin decreased serum UA, TG, and abdominal fat deposition in a quail model of hyperuricemia by altering the ACC protein expression and FAS and XOD activities. PMID:25314375

  15. Structural requirements for activation of the 5-oxo-6E,8Z, 11Z,14Z-eicosatetraenoic acid (5-oxo-ETE) receptor: identification of a mead acid metabolite with potent agonist activity.

    PubMed

    Patel, Pranav; Cossette, Chantal; Anumolu, Jaganmohan R; Gravel, Sylvie; Lesimple, Alain; Mamer, Orval A; Rokach, Joshua; Powell, William S

    2008-05-01

    The 5-lipoxygenase product 5-oxo-6E,8Z,11Z,14Z-eicosatetraenoic acid (5-oxo-ETE) is a potent chemoattractant for neutrophils and eosinophils, and its actions are mediated by the oxoeicosanoid (OXE) receptor, a member of the G protein-coupled receptor family. To define the requirements for activation of the OXE receptor, we have synthesized a series of 5-oxo-6E,8Z-dienoic acids with chain lengths between 12 and 20 carbons, as well as a series of 20-carbon 5-oxo fatty acids, either fully saturated or containing between one and five double bonds. The effects of these compounds on neutrophils (calcium mobilization, CD11b expression, and cell migration) and eosinophils (actin polymerization) were compared with those of 5-oxo-ETE. The C12 and C14 analogs were without appreciable activity, whereas the C16 5-oxo-dienoic acid was a weak partial agonist. In contrast, the corresponding C18 analog (5-oxo-18:2) was nearly as potent as 5-oxo-ETE. Among the C20 analogs, the fully saturated compound had virtually no activity, whereas 5-oxo-6E-eicosenoic acid had only weak agonist activity. In contrast, 5-oxo-6E,8Z,11Z-eicosatrienoic acid (5-oxo-20:3) and its 8-trans isomer were approximately equipotent with 5-oxo-ETE in activating granulocytes. Because of the potent effects of 5-oxo-20:3, we investigated its formation from Mead acid (5Z,8Z,11Z-eicosatrienoic acid), which accumulates in dietary essential fatty acid deficiency, by neutrophils. The main Mead acid metabolite identified was 5-hydroxy-6,8,11-eicosatrienoic acid, followed by 5-oxo-20:3 and two 6-trans isomers of leukotriene B(3). We conclude that optimal activation of the OXE receptor is achieved with 5-oxo-ETE, 5-oxo-18:2, and 5-oxo-20:3, and that the latter compound could potentially be formed under conditions of essential fatty acid deficiency. PMID:18292294

  16. Aspirin metabolites are GPR35 agonists.

    PubMed

    Deng, Huayun; Fang, Ye

    2012-07-01

    Aspirin is widely used as an anti-inflammatory, anti-platelet, anti-pyretic, and cancer-preventive agent; however, the molecular mode of action is unlikely due entirely to the inhibition of cyclooxygenases. Here, we report the agonist activity of several aspirin metabolites at GPR35, a poorly characterized orphan G protein-coupled receptor. 2,3,5-Trihydroxybenzoic acid, an aspirin catabolite, was found to be the most potent GPR35 agonist among aspirin metabolites. Salicyluric acid, the main metabolite of aspirin, was also active. These results suggest that the GPR35 agonist activity of certain aspirin metabolites may contribute to the clinical features of aspirin. PMID:22526472

  17. Effect of Alcohol Fermented Feed on Lactating Performance, Blood Metabolites, Milk Fatty Acid Profile and Cholesterol Content in Holstein Lactating Cows

    PubMed Central

    Li, X. Z.; Park, B. K.; Yan, C. G.; Choi, J. G.; Ahn, J. S.; Shin, J. S.

    2012-01-01

    A feeding experiment with 40 lactating Holstein cows and 4 dietary treatments was conducted to investigate supplementation with different levels of alcohol fermented feed to the TMR on lactating performance, blood metabolites, milk fatty acid profile and cholesterol concentration of blood and milk. Forty Holstein lactating cows (106±24 d post-partum; mean±SD) were distributed into four groups and randomly assigned to one of four treatments with each containing 10 cows per treatment. The treatment supplemented with TMR (DM basis) as the control (CON), and CON mixed with alcohol-fermented feeds (AFF) at a level of 5%, 10% and 15% of the TMR as T1, T2 and T3, respectively. Dry matter intake and milk yield were not affected by supplementation of AFF. An increased 4% FCM in the milk occurred in cows fed T3 diet compared with CON, while T1 and T2 diets decreased 4% FCM in a dose dependent manner. Supplementation of AFF increased the concentration of albumin, total protein (TP), ammonia, and high density lipoprotein-cholesterol in serum compared with CON. In contrast, supplementation with AFF clearly decreased concentration of blood urea nitrogen (BUN) and total cholesterol (TC) compare with CON. AFF supplementation increased the proportion of C18:1n9 and C18:2n6 compared to CON. A decrease in the concentration of saturated fatty acid (SFA) for T1, T2 and T3 resulted in an increased unsaturated fatty acid (USFA) to SFA ratio compared to CON. Concentration of cholesterol in milk fat was reduced in proportion to the supplemental level of AFF. Feeding a diet supplemented with a moderate level AFF to lactating cows could be a way to alter the feed efficiency and fatty acid profile of milk by increasing potentially human consumer healthy fatty acid without detrimental effects on feed intake and milk production. A substantially decreased cholesterol proportion in milk induced by supplementation AFF suggests that alcohol fermented feed may improve milk cholesterol levels

  18. Identification and quantitation of 11-nor-delta9-tetrahydrocannabivarin-9-carboxylic acid, a major metabolite of delta9-tetrahydrocannabivarin.

    PubMed

    ElSohly, M A; Feng, S; Murphy, T P; Warrington, A W; Ross, S; Nimrod, A; Mehmedic, Z; Fortner, N

    2001-09-01

    After incubation of delta9-tetrahydrocannabivarin with human hepatocytes, a major metabolic product was detected by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry that showed identical retention time and mass spectrum to the synthetic 11-nor-delta9-tetrahydrocannabivarin-9-carboxylic acid (11-nor-delta9-THCV-9-COOH). Analysis of human urine specimens from marijuana users and plasma samples from Marinol users showed that 11-nor-delta9-THCV-9-COOH was only present in urine specimens of marijuana users. These results supported the conclusion that identification of 11-nor-delta9-THCV-9-COOH in a donor's urine specimen indicates the use or ingestion of cannabis-related product(s) and would not explain the sole use of Marinol. PMID:11550824

  19. Volatile Metabolites

    PubMed Central

    Rowan, Daryl D.

    2011-01-01

    Volatile organic compounds (volatiles) comprise a chemically diverse class of low molecular weight organic compounds having an appreciable vapor pressure under ambient conditions. Volatiles produced by plants attract pollinators and seed dispersers, and provide defense against pests and pathogens. For insects, volatiles may act as pheromones directing social behavior or as cues for finding hosts or prey. For humans, volatiles are important as flavorants and as possible disease biomarkers. The marine environment is also a major source of halogenated and sulfur-containing volatiles which participate in the global cycling of these elements. While volatile analysis commonly measures a rather restricted set of analytes, the diverse and extreme physical properties of volatiles provide unique analytical challenges. Volatiles constitute only a small proportion of the total number of metabolites produced by living organisms, however, because of their roles as signaling molecules (semiochemicals) both within and between organisms, accurately measuring and determining the roles of these compounds is crucial to an integrated understanding of living systems. This review summarizes recent developments in volatile research from a metabolomics perspective with a focus on the role of recent technical innovation in developing new areas of volatile research and expanding the range of ecological interactions which may be mediated by volatile organic metabolites. PMID:24957243

  20. Omega-3 fatty acids protect renal functions by increasing docosahexaenoic acid-derived metabolite levels in SHR.Cg-Lepr(cp)/NDmcr rats, a metabolic syndrome model.

    PubMed

    Katakura, Masanori; Hashimoto, Michio; Inoue, Takayuki; Al Mamun, Abdullah; Tanabe, Yoko; Iwamoto, Ryo; Arita, Makoto; Tsuchikura, Satoru; Shido, Osamu

    2014-01-01

    The omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (ω-3 PUFAs) docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) and/or eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) protect against diabetic nephropathy by inhibiting inflammation. The aim of this study was to assess the effects of highly purified DHA and EPA or EPA only administration on renal function and renal eicosanoid and docosanoid levels in an animal model of metabolic syndrome, SHR.Cg-Lepr(cp)/NDmcr (SHRcp) rats. Male SHRcp rats were divided into 3 groups. Control (5% arabic gum), TAK-085 (300 mg/kg/day, containing 467 mg/g EPA and 365 mg/g DHA), or EPA (300 mg/kg/day) was orally administered for 20 weeks. The urinary albumin to creatinine ratio in the TAK-085-administered group was significantly lower than that in other groups. The glomerular sclerosis score in the TAK-085-administered group was significantly lower than that in the other groups. Although DHA levels were increased in total kidney fatty acids, the levels of nonesterified DHA were not significantly different among the 3 groups, whereas the levels of protectin D1, resolvin D1, and resolvin D2 were significantly increased in the TAK-085-administered group. The results show that the use of combination therapy with DHA and EPA in SHRcp rats improved or prevented renal failure associate with metabolic syndrome with decreasing triglyceride levels and increasing ω-3 PUFA lipid mediators. PMID:24642910

  1. Analytical procedure for the determination of the marijuana metabolite 11-nor-Delta9-tetrahydrocannabinol-9-carboxylic acid in oral fluid specimens.

    PubMed

    Moore, Christine; Coulter, Cynthia; Rana, Sumandeep; Vincent, Michael; Soares, James

    2006-09-01

    The determination of the marijuana metabolite 11-nor-Delta(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol-9-carboxylic acid (THCA) in oral fluid specimens is described for the first time using a Quantisal oral fluid collection device and gas chromatography with single-quadrupole mass spectrometric detection. Oral fluid specimens were confirmed for the presence of THCA using two-dimensional gas chromatography-mass spectrometry in order to achieve the low concentration levels previously reported to be present in oral fluid. The extraction efficiency for THCA from the oral fluid collection pad was determined to be 80% at a concentration of 10 pg/mL with a coefficient of variation of 8.23%. The intraday precision of the assay ranged from 3.4% to 7.9% over four concentrations; the interday precision ranged from 8.3% to 18.5%. The limit of quantitation was 2 pg/mL. The method was applied to oral fluid specimens collected from a frequent user of marijuana. Samples were collected almost immediately after the subject smoked and then at intervals of 15 and 45 min and 1, 2, and 8 h after smoking. THCA was present in all the specimens, even the initial specimen taken almost immediately after smoking. The presence of THCA minimizes the argument for passive exposure to marijuana in drug-testing cases. PMID:16959131

  2. High-throughput LC-MS/MS assay for 6-methoxy-2-naphthylacetic acid, an active metabolite of nabumetone in human plasma and its application to bioequivalence study.

    PubMed

    Patel, Bhavin N; Sharma, Naveen; Sanyal, Mallika; Prasad, Arpana; Shrivastav, Pranav S

    2008-11-01

    A simple, precise and accurate assay for the determination of 6-methoxy-2-naphthylacetic acid (6-MNA), an active metabolite of nabumetone in human plasma, was developed and validated using liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). The analyte (6-MNA) and propranolol (internal standard, IS) were extracted from 200 microL aliquot of human plasma via solid-phase extraction employing HLB Oasis cartridges and separated on a Discovery HS C18 (50 x 4.6 mm, 5 microm) column. Detection of analyte and IS was done by tandem mass spectrometry with a turbo ion spray interface operating in positive ion and multiple reaction monitoring acquisition mode. The total chromatographic runtime was 3.0 min with retention time for 6-MNA and IS at 1.97 and 1.26 min, respectively. The method was validated over a dynamic linear range of 0.20-60.00 microg/mL for 6-MNA with mean correlation coefficient r > or = 0.9986. The intra-batch and inter-batch precision (%CV) across five validation runs (lower limit of quantiation, low-, medium- and high-quality controls and upper limit of quantitation) was less than 7.5%. The accuracy determined at these levels was within -5.8 to +0.2% in terms of percentage bias. The method was successfully applied for a bioequivalence study of 750 mg nabumetone tablet formulation in 12 healthy Indian male subjects under fasted condition. PMID:18651608

  3. A comprehensive review of the published assays for the quantitation of the immunosuppressant drug mycophenolic acid and its glucuronidated metabolites in biological fluids.

    PubMed

    Syed, Muzeeb; Srinivas, Nuggehally R

    2016-05-01

    Therapeutic use of mycophenolic acid (MPA) is steadily on the rise in combination with other immunosuppressant drugs in transplantation patients. The biotransformation of MPA resulted in the formation of glucuronide metabolites, MPAG and AcMPAG. There are a plethora of assays validated for the analysis of MPA alone or with MPAG/AcMPAG in various biological specimens including plasma/serum, urine, ultrafiltrate, saliva, PBMC, dried blood spots, tissue extract, tumor biopsies and vitreous humor. Based on the need for experimental work, a proper choice of the assay and internal standard may be made using the choices in the literature. While the chemical methods involving high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) or LC coupled with triple quadrupole mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) are popular, enzymatic assays, in spite of their higher bias, have been used for the routine drug monitoring of MPA. The objectives of the present review are: (a) to provide a focused systematic compilation of the HPLC or LC-MS/MS methods for MPA, MPAG and/or AcMPAG published in the last decade (2005 to current) to enable visual comparison of the methods; (b) to compare and contrast a few enzymatic assays with those of the chemical methods; and (c) to discuss relevant issues/limitations and perspectives on select assays under various subheadings. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:26766308

  4. Effects of dietary n-3 fatty acids and vitamin C on semen characteristics, lipid composition of sperm and blood metabolites in fat-tailed Moghani rams.

    PubMed

    Jafaroghli, M; Abdi-Benemar, H; Zamiri, M J; Khalili, B; Farshad, A; Shadparvar, A A

    2014-06-10

    Sixteen fertile rams were randomly allotted to four groups and fed either of the four diets for 14 weeks: (1) control diet (COD) without fish oil (FO) and vitamin C (VC), (2) diet containing 2.5% FO (FOD), (3) diet containing 300 mg/kg DM VC (VCD), and (4) diet containing 2.5% FO and 300 mg/kg DM VC (FCD). Semen was collected at 14-d intervals from 1 April to 10 July (out of the physiologic breeding season in Iran). Semen volume and percentages of motile and progressively motile sperm were increased by FO and VC feeding. A significant interaction was also found between FOD and VCD on motility and progressive motility percentage (P<0.05). HOS-test and percentage of sperm with normal acrosome improved significantly by FO and VC. Rams fed FCD had better HOS-test and higher proportion of sperm with normal acrosome than rams in other groups (82.4 and 93.6%, respectively). Diets containing FO and FO and VC increased the proportion of docosahexaenoic acid in sperm (P<0.05). The activity of lactate dehydrogenase in the seminal fluid was significantly affected by VC and the interaction between FO and VC (P<0.05). Blood metabolites, except glucose, were affected positively by FO. The results showed that dietary supplementation with FO and VC improved seminal quality and may have beneficial effects on fertility in Moghani rams. PMID:24745668

  5. Development of a physiologically-based pharmacokinetic model of 2-phenoxyethanol and its metabolite phenoxyacetic acid in rats and humans to address toxicokinetic uncertainty in risk assessment.

    PubMed

    Troutman, John A; Rick, David L; Stuard, Sharon B; Fisher, Jeffrey; Bartels, Michael J

    2015-11-01

    2-Phenoxyethanol (PhE) has been shown to induce hepatotoxicity, renal toxicity, and hemolysis at dosages ≥ 400 mg/kg/day in subchronic and chronic studies in multiple species. To reduce uncertainty associated with interspecies extrapolations and to evaluate the margin of exposure (MOE) for use of PhE in cosmetics and baby products, a physiologically-based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model of PhE and its metabolite 2-phenoxyacetic acid (PhAA) was developed. The PBPK model incorporated key kinetic processes describing the absorption, distribution, metabolism and excretion of PhE and PhAA following oral and dermal exposures. Simulations of repeat dose rat studies facilitated the selection of systemic AUC as the appropriate dose metric for evaluating internal exposures to PhE and PhAA in rats and humans. Use of the PBPK model resulted in refinement of the total default UF for extrapolation of the animal data to humans from 100 to 25. Based on very conservative assumptions for product composition and aggregate product use, model-predicted exposures to PhE and PhAA resulting from adult and infant exposures to cosmetic products are significantly below the internal dose of PhE observed at the NOAEL dose in rats. Calculated MOEs for all exposure scenarios were above the PBPK-refined UF of 25. PMID:26188115

  6. 3,4-Dihydroxyphenylacetic acid, a microbiota-derived metabolite of quercetin, attenuates acetaminophen (APAP)-induced liver injury through activation of Nrf-2.

    PubMed

    Xue, Huiting; Xie, Wenyan; Jiang, Zhihui; Wang, Meng; Wang, Jian; Zhao, Hongqiong; Zhang, Xiaoying

    2016-10-01

    1. Acetaminophen (APAP) overdose leads to severe hepatotoxicity. 3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetic acid (DOPAC) is a scarcely studied microbiota-derived metabolite of quercetin. The aim of this study was to determine the protective effect of DOPAC against APAP-induced liver injury. 2. Mice were treated intragastrically with DOPAC (10, 20 or 50 mg/kg) for 3 days before APAP (300 mg/kg) injection. APAP alone caused increase in serum aminotransferase levels and changes in hepatic histopathology. APAP also promoted oxidative stress by increasing lipid peroxidation and decreasing anti-oxidant enzyme activities. These events led to hepatocellular necrosis and reduced liver function. DOPAC increased nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf-2) translocation to the nucleus and enhanced the expression of phase II enzymes and anti-oxidant enzymes, and thereby reduced APAP hepatotoxicity and enhanced anti-oxidant ability. 3. Our data provide evidence that DOPAC protected the liver against APAP-induced injury, which is involved in Nrf-2 activation, implying that DOPAC can be considered as a potential natural hepatoprotective agent. PMID:26931552

  7. LC-MS/MS for the simultaneous analysis of arachidonic acid and 32 related metabolites in human plasma: Basal plasma concentrations and aspirin-induced changes of eicosanoids.

    PubMed

    Shinde, Dhananjay D; Kim, Kwon-Bok; Oh, Kyung-Suk; Abdalla, Nagi; Liu, Kwang-Hyeon; Bae, Soo Kyung; Shon, Ji-Hong; Kim, Ho-Sook; Kim, Dong-Hyun; Shin, Jae Gook

    2012-12-12

    Eicosanoids play an important role in various biological responses and can be used as biomarkers for specific diseases. Therefore, we developed a highly selective, sensitive, and robust liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometric method to measure arachidonic acid and its 32 metabolites in human plasma. Sample preparation involved solid phase extraction, which efficiently removed sources of interference present in human plasma. Chromatographic separation was performed using a Luna C(8)-column with 0.5mM ammonium formate buffer and acetonitrile as the mobile phase under gradient conditions. Detection was performed using tandem mass spectrometry equipped with an electrospray ionization interface in negative ion mode. The matrix did not affect the reproducibility and reliability of the assay. All analytes showed good linearity over the investigated concentration range (r>0.997). The validated lower limit of quantitation for the analytes ranged from 10 to 400pg/mL. Intra- and inter-day precision (RDS%) over the concentration ranges for all eicosanoids were within 16.8%, and accuracy ranged between 88.1 and 108.2%. This assay was suitable for the determination of basal plasma levels of eicosanoids and the evaluation of effect of aspirin on eicosanoid plasma levels in healthy subjects. PMID:23217314

  8. Safety, tolerability and pharmacokinetics of 2-pyridylacetic acid, a major metabolite of betahistine, in a phase 1 dose escalation study in subjects with ADHD.

    PubMed

    Moorthy, Ganesh; Sallee, Floyd; Gabbita, Prasad; Zemlan, Frank; Sallans, Larry; Desai, Pankaj B

    2015-10-01

    Betahistine, a potent histamine H3 receptor antagonist, is being developed for the treatment of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) that manifests with symptoms such as hyperactivity, impulsivity and inattention. This study describes the pharmacokinetics of betahistine in ADHD subjects at doses higher than 50 mg. These assessments were made during a randomized, placebo-controlled, single blind, dose escalation study to determine the safety, tolerability and pharmacokinetics of once daily doses of 50 mg, 100 mg and 200 mg of betahistine in subjects with ADHD. Plasma levels of 2-pyridylacetic acid (2-PAA), a major metabolite of betahistine were quantified using a validated LC-MS/MS method and used for pharmacokinetic analysis and dose proportionality of betahistine. A linear relationship was observed in Cmax and AUC0-4 of 2-PAA with the betahistine dose (R2 0.9989 and 0.9978, respectively) and dose proportionality coefficients (β) for the power model were 0.8684 (Cmax) and 1.007 (AUC0-4). A population pharmacokinetic model with first-order absorption of betahistine and metabolism to 2-PAA, followed by a first-order elimination of 2-PAA provides estimates of clearance that underscored the linear increase in systemic exposure with dose. There were no serious adverse events reported in the study, betahistine was safe and well tolerated at all the dose levels tested. PMID:25904220

  9. Evaluation of 4-(N-methylnitrosamino)-4-(3-pyridyl)butyric acid as a potential monitor of endogenous nitrosation of nicotine and its metabolites.

    PubMed

    Tricker, A R; Scherer, G; Conze, C; Adlkofer, F; Pachinger, A; Klus, H

    1993-07-01

    The potential endogenous nitrosation of nicotine and cotinine to yield 4-(N-methylnitrosamino)-4-(3-pyridyl)butyric acid (Iso-NNAC) has been studied in smokers and non-smokers. Following i.v. administration of 100 micrograms Iso-NNAC to rats, excretion in urine (67.4 +/- 25.4%) and feces (6.1 +/- 1.6%) occurred within 24 h. The urinary excretion of nitrate, nicotine, cotinine and Iso-NNAC were determined in 24 h urine samples from 19 smokers and 10 non-smokers. Iso-NNAC excretion was found on four occasions (44, 65, 74 and 163 ng/day) in smokers; non-smokers did not excrete Iso-NNAC. Oral administration of nicotine (n = 8; 12-40 mg) and cotinine (n = 3; 40-60 mg) to abstinent smokers did not result in Iso-NNAC excretion, even after oral nitrate (150 mg) supplementation. However, Iso-NNAC was found in cigarette tobacco (10-330 ng/g) and mainstream cigarette smoke (1.1-5.5 ng/cig.). Our studies suggest that the occasional presence of Iso-NNAC in smokers' urine results from exogenous exposure to the preformed compound in mainstream cigarette smoke and not from endogenous nitrosation of nicotine and its metabolites. PMID:8330358

  10. Microbial production of primary metabolites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demain, Arnold L.

    1980-12-01

    Microbial production of primary metabolites contributes significantly to the quality of life. Through fermentation, microorganisms growing on inexpensive carbon sources can produce valuable products such as amino acids, nucleotides, organic acids, and vitamins which can be added to food to enhance its flavor or increase its nutritive value. The contribution of microorganisms will go well beyond the food industry with the renewed interest in solvent fermentations. Microorganisms have the potential to provide many petroleum-derived products as well as the ethanol necessary for liquid fuel. The role of primary metabolites and the microbes which produce them will certainly increase in importance.

  11. Allantoin, a stress-related purine metabolite, can activate jasmonate signaling in a MYC2-regulated and abscisic acid-dependent manner

    PubMed Central

    Takagi, Hiroshi; Ishiga, Yasuhiro; Watanabe, Shunsuke; Konishi, Tomokazu; Egusa, Mayumi; Akiyoshi, Nobuhiro; Matsuura, Takakazu; Mori, Izumi C.; Hirayama, Takashi; Kaminaka, Hironori; Shimada, Hiroshi; Sakamoto, Atsushi

    2016-01-01

    Allantoin is a metabolic intermediate of purine catabolism that often accumulates in stressed plants. Recently, we used Arabidopsis knockout mutants (aln) of ALLANTOINASE to show that this purine metabolite activates abscisic acid (ABA) production, thereby stimulating stress-related gene expression and enhancing seedling tolerance to abiotic stress. A detailed re-examination of the microarray data of an aln mutant (aln-1) confirmed the increased expression of ABA-related genes and also revealed altered expression of genes involved in jasmonic acid (JA) responses, probably under the control of MYC2, a master switch in the JA signaling pathway. Consistent with the transcriptome profiles, the aln-1 mutant displayed increased JA levels and enhanced responses to mechanical wounding and exogenous JA. Moreover, aln mutants demonstrated modestly increased susceptibility to Pseudomonas syringae and Pectobacterium carotovorum, probably reflecting the antagonistic action of MYC2 on the defense against these bacterial phytopathogens. Exogenously administered allantoin elicited the expression of JA-responsive genes, including MYC2, in wild-type plants, supporting the idea that allantoin might be responsible for the observed JA-related phenotypes of aln mutants. However, mutants deficient in bioactive JA (jar1-1), insensitive to JA (myc2-3), or deficient in ABA (aba2-1 and bglu18) suppressed the effect of exogenous allantoin. The suppression was further confirmed in aln-1 jar1-1 and aln-1 bglu18 double mutants. These results indicate that allantoin can activate the MYC2-regulated JA signaling pathway through ABA production. Overall, this study suggests a possible connection of purine catabolism with stress hormone homeostasis and signaling, and highlights the potential importance of allantoin in these interactions. PMID:26931169

  12. Quantification of free mycophenolic acid and its glucuronide metabolite in human plasma by liquid-chromatography using mass spectrometric and ultraviolet absorbance detection.

    PubMed

    Atcheson, Bronwyn; Taylor, Paul J; Mudge, David W; Johnson, David W; Pillans, Peter I; Tett, Susan E

    2004-01-01

    The immunosuppressant drug mycophenolic acid (MPA) and its major metabolite, mycophenolic acid glucuronide (MPAG), are highly bound to albumin. An HPLC-tandem-MS (HPLC/MS/MS) and an HPLC-UV assay were developed to measure free (unbound) concentrations of MPA and MPAG, respectively. Ultrafiltrate was prepared from plasma (500 microl) by ultrafiltration at 3000 x g for 20 min (20 degrees C). Both MPA and MPAG were isolated from ultrafiltrate (100 microl) by acidification and C18 solid-phase extraction. Free MPA was measured by electrospray tandem mass spectrometry using selected reactant monitoring (MPA: m/z 338.2--> 206.9) in positive ionisation mode. Chromatography was performed on a PFPP column (50 mm x 2 mm, 5 microm). Total analysis time was 7 min. The assay was linear over the range 1-200 microg/l with a limit of quantification of 1 microg/l. The inter-day accuracy and imprecision of quality controls (7.5, 40, 150 microg/l) were 94-99% and < 7%, respectively. Free MPAG was chromatographed on a C18 Nova-Pak column (150 mm x 3.9 mm, 5 microm) using a binary gradient over 20 min. The eluent was monitored at 254 nm. The assay was linear over the range 1-50 mg/l with the limit of quantification at 2.5 mg/l. The inter-day accuracy and imprecision of quality controls (5, 20, 45 mg/l) was 101-107% and < 8% (n = 4), respectively. For both methods no interfering substances were found in ultrafiltrate from patients not receiving MPA. The methods described have a suitable dynamic linear range to facilitate the investigation of free MPA and MPAG pharmacokinetics in transplant patients. Further, this is the first reported HPLC-UV method to determine free MPAG concentrations. PMID:14659448

  13. Changes in the levels of abscisic acid and its metabolites in excised leaf blades of Xanthium strumarium during and after water stress

    SciTech Connect

    Zeevaart, J.A.D.

    1980-10-01

    The time course of abscisic acid (ABA) accumulation during water stress and of degradation following rehydration was investigated by analyzing the levels of ABA and its metabolites phaseic acid (PA) and alkalihydrolyzable conjugated ABA in excised leaf blades of Xanthium strumarium. Initial purification was by reverse-phase, preparative, high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) which did not require prior partitioning. ABA and PA were purified further by analytical HPLC with a ..mu..Bondapak-NH/sub 2/ column, and quantified by GLC with an electron capture detector. The ABA content of stressed leaves increased for 4 to 5 hours and then leveled off due to a balance between synthesis and degradation. Since PA accumulated at a constant rate throughout the wilting period, it was concluded that the rate of ABA synthesis decreased after the first 4 to 5 hours stress. Conjugated ABA increased at a low rate during stress. This is interpreted to indicate that free ABA was converted to the conjugated form, rather than the reverse. Following rehydration of wilted leaves, the ABA level immediately ceased increasing; it remained constant for 1 hour and then declined rapidly to the prestress level over a 2- to 3-hour period with a concomitant rise in the PA level. In contrast to the rapid disappearance of ABA after relief of stress, the high PA content of rehydrated leaves declined only slowly. The level of conjugated ABA did not change following rehydration, indicating that conjugation of ABA was irreversible. Detached Xanthium leaves that were subjected to a wilting-recovery-rewilting cycle in darkness responded to the second wilting period by formation of the same amount of ABA as accumulated after the first stress period.

  14. Determination of lewisite metabolite 2-chlorovinylarsonous acid in urine by use of dispersive derivatization liquid-liquid microextraction followed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Naseri, Mohammad Taghi; Shamsipur, Mojtaba; Babri, Mehran; Saeidian, Hamid; Sarabadani, Mansour; Ashrafi, Davood; Taghizadeh, Naser

    2014-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop a sensitive and simple method, based on dispersive derivatization liquid-liquid microextraction-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (DDLLME-GC-MS) in scanning and selected-ion-monitoring (SIM) modes, for detection of 2-chlorovinylarsonous acid (CVAA) as a hydrolysis product and urinary metabolite of lewisite in urine samples. Chloroform (65 μL), methanol (500 μL), and ethanedithiol (10 μL) were used as extraction solvent, dispersive solvent, and derivatizing reagent, respectively. Critical conditions of the proposed method were optimized. The nucleophilic reactions of dithiol and monothiol compounds with CVAA were also studied using a competitive method. In view of the high affinity of trivalent arsenic for sulfhydryl groups, the interaction between CVAA and bis(2-chlorovinyl)arsonous acid (BCVAA) and free cysteine (Cys) was also investigated using liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (LC-ESI-MS). The interference of Cys, present in human urine, with the detection of CVAA was evaluated using dithiol and monothiol chemicals as derivatization agents. The developed method provided a preconcentration factor of 250, and limits of detection of 0.015 and 0.30 μg L(-1) in SIM and scanning modes, respectively. The calibration curves were linear over the concentration range of 1-400 μg L(-1) in full-scan mode. The relative standard deviation (RSD) values were calculated to be 5.5 and 3.2% at concentrations of 20 and 100 μg L(-1), respectively. Collision-induced dissociation studies of the major electron-impact (EI) ions were performed to confirm the proposed fragment structure of CVAA-dithiols derivatives. Results indicated that the developed method for analysis of CVAA is suitable not only for verification of human exposure to lewisite, but also for quantification of CVAA in urine samples. PMID:24677032

  15. Simultaneous determination of 4-methyl-piperazine-1-carbodithioc acid 3-cyano-3,3-diphenylpropyl ester hydrochloride and its major metabolite in rats by HPLC.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Xiaomei; Bai, Yihao; Ling, Xiaomei; Han, Fangbin; Li, Runtao; Cui, Jingrong

    2010-02-01

    A method for the simultaneous determination of TM208 and its major metabolite (sulfine 4-methyl-piperazine-1-carbodithioc acid 3-cyano-3,3-diphenylpropyl ester, TM208-SO) was developed and validated for the first time. The analytes were extracted from plasma samples by liquid-liquid extraction and analyzed using high-performance liquid chromatography. Flunarizine hydrochloride was used as the internal standard. Chromatographic separations were performed on a Diamonsil C(18) analytical column. The mobile phases consisted of 20 mM ammonium acetate adjusted to pH 4.20 with acetic acid (solvent A) and acetonitrile (solvent B). The analytes were detected at 254 nm after linear gradient elution. The flow rate was 0.8 mL/min. Linearity was obtained over the concentration range of 0.104-5.20 microg/mL for TM208 and 0.145-5.80 microg/mL for TM208-SO in rat plasma. The limit of quantification was 0.104 microg/mL for TM208 and 0.145 microg/mL for TM208-SO, respectively. The inter- and intra-day precision was less than 12.8% for TM208 and 14.1% for TM208-SO. And the accuracy was 96.2-111.1% for TM208 and 95.5-108.6% for TM208-SO. This analytic procedure was applied to a pharmacokinetic study of TM208 and TM208-SO in rats, and the pharmacokinetic parameters were calculated. PMID:20109290

  16. Allantoin, a stress-related purine metabolite, can activate jasmonate signaling in a MYC2-regulated and abscisic acid-dependent manner.

    PubMed

    Takagi, Hiroshi; Ishiga, Yasuhiro; Watanabe, Shunsuke; Konishi, Tomokazu; Egusa, Mayumi; Akiyoshi, Nobuhiro; Matsuura, Takakazu; Mori, Izumi C; Hirayama, Takashi; Kaminaka, Hironori; Shimada, Hiroshi; Sakamoto, Atsushi

    2016-04-01

    Allantoin is a metabolic intermediate of purine catabolism that often accumulates in stressed plants. Recently, we used Arabidopsis knockout mutants (aln) ofALLANTOINASEto show that this purine metabolite activates abscisic acid (ABA) production, thereby stimulating stress-related gene expression and enhancing seedling tolerance to abiotic stress. A detailed re-examination of the microarray data of analnmutant (aln-1) confirmed the increased expression of ABA-related genes and also revealed altered expression of genes involved in jasmonic acid (JA) responses, probably under the control of MYC2, a master switch in the JA signaling pathway. Consistent with the transcriptome profiles, thealn-1mutant displayed increased JA levels and enhanced responses to mechanical wounding and exogenous JA. Moreover,alnmutants demonstrated modestly increased susceptibility toPseudomonas syringaeandPectobacterium carotovorum, probably reflecting the antagonistic action of MYC2 on the defense against these bacterial phytopathogens. Exogenously administered allantoin elicited the expression of JA-responsive genes, includingMYC2, in wild-type plants, supporting the idea that allantoin might be responsible for the observed JA-related phenotypes ofalnmutants. However, mutants deficient in bioactive JA (jar1-1), insensitive to JA (myc2-3), or deficient in ABA (aba2-1andbglu18) suppressed the effect of exogenous allantoin. The suppression was further confirmed inaln-1 jar1-1andaln-1 bglu18double mutants. These results indicate that allantoin can activate the MYC2-regulated JA signaling pathway through ABA production. Overall, this study suggests a possible connection of purine catabolism with stress hormone homeostasis and signaling, and highlights the potential importance of allantoin in these interactions. PMID:26931169

  17. Effects of short-term oilseed supplementation on plasma fatty acid composition, progesterone and prostaglandin F metabolite in lactating beef cows.

    PubMed

    Scholljegerdes, E J; Lekatz, L A; Vonnahme, K A

    2014-05-01

    progesterone (P=0.18) or prostaglandin F metabolite (P=0.89). However, day after breeding had an effect on serum progesterone (P=0.01) with day 16 after timed AI being lower compared with other days. Feeding oilseeds during the time of estrous synchronization will not only increase the energy density of the diet but will provide key fatty acids around the time of maternal recognition of pregnancy. PMID:24572170

  18. Affordable and rapid HPTLC method for the simultaneous analysis of artemisinin and its metabolite artemisinic acid in Artemisia annua L.

    PubMed

    Khan, Shazia; Ali, Athar; Ahmad, Shahzad; Abdin, Malik Zainul

    2015-10-01

    Artemisinin (AN) and artemisinic acid (AA), valuable phyto-pharmaceutical molecules, are well known anti-malarials, but their activities against diseases like cancer, schistosomiasis, HIV, hepatitis-B and leishmaniasis are also being reported. For the simultaneous estimation of AN and AA in the callus and leaf extracts of A. annua L. plants, we embarked upon a simple, rapid, selective, reliable and fairly economical high performance thin layer chromatography (HPTLC) method. Experimental conditions such as band size, chamber saturation time, migration of solvent front and slit width were critically studied and the optimum conditions were selected. The separations were achieved using toluene-ethyl acetate, 9:1 (v/v) as mobile phase on pre-coated silica gel plates, G 60F254 . Good resolution was achieved with Rf values of 0.35 ± 0.02 and 0.26 ± 0.02 at 536 nm for AN and 626 nm for AA, respectively, in absorption-reflectance mode. The method displayed a linear relationship with r(2) value 0.992 and 0.994 for AN and AA, respectively, in the concentration range of 300-1500 ng for AN and 200-1000 ng for AA. The method was validated for specificity by obtaining in-situ UV overlay spectra and sensitivity by estimating limit of detection (30 ng for AN and 15 ng for AA) and limit of quantitation (80 ng for AN and 45 ng for AA) values. The accuracy was checked by the recovery studies conducted at three different levels with the known concentrations and the average percentage recovery was 101.99% for AN and 103.84% for AA. The precision was analyzed by interday and intraday precision and was 1.09 and 1.00% RSD for AN and 1.22 and 6.05% RSD for AA. The analysis of statistical data substantiates that this HPTLC method can be used for the simultaneous estimation of AN and AA in biological samples. PMID:25829259

  19. Physiological responses of glyphosate-resistant and glyphosate-sensitive soybean to aminomethylphosphonic acid, a metabolite of glyphosate.

    PubMed

    Ding, Wei; Reddy, Krishna N; Zablotowicz, Robert M; Bellaloui, Nacer; Arnold Bruns, H

    2011-04-01

    Aminomethylphosphonic acid (AMPA) is formed in glyphosate-treated glyphosate-resistant (GR) and glyphosate-sensitive (GS) soybean [Glycine max (L.) Merr.] plants and is known to cause yellowing in soybean. Although, AMPA is less phytotoxic than glyphosate, its mode of action is different from that of glyphosate and is still unknown. Greenhouse studies were conducted at Stoneville, MS to determine the effects of AMPA on plant growth, chlorophyll content, photosynthesis, nodulation, nitrogenase activity, nitrate reductase activity, and shoot nitrogen content in GR and GS soybeans. AMPA was applied to one- to two-trifoliolate leaf stage soybeans at 0.1 and 1.0 kg ha(-1), representing a scenario of 10% and 100% degradation of glyphosate (1.0 kg ae ha(-1) use rate) to AMPA, respectively. Overall, AMPA effects were more pronounced at 1.0 kg ha(-1) than at 0.1 kg ha(-1) rate. Visual plant injury (18-27%) was observed on young leaves within 3d after treatment (DAT) with AMPA at the higher rate regardless of soybean type. AMPA injury peaked to 46-49% at 14 DAT and decreased to 17-18% by 28 DAT, in both soybean types. AMPA reduced the chlorophyll content by 37%, 48%, 66%, and 23% in GR soybean, and 17%, 48%, 57%, and 22% in GS soybean at 3, 7, 14, and 28 DAT, respectively. AMPA reduced the photosynthesis rate by 65%, 85%, and 77% in GR soybean and 59%, 88%, and 69% in GS soybean at 3, 7, and 14 DAT, respectively, compared to non-treated plants. Similarly, AMPA reduced stomatal conductance to water vapor and transpiration rates at 3, 7, and 14 DAT compared to non-treated plants in both soybean types. Photosynthesis rate, stomatal conductance, and transpiration rate recovered to the levels of non-treated plants by 28 DAT. Plant height and shoot dry weight at 28 DAT; nodulation, nitrogenase activity at 10 DAT, and nitrate reductase activity at 3 and 14 DAT were unaffected by AMPA. AMPA reduced root respiration and shoot nitrogen content at 10 DAT. These results suggest that a

  20. Associations of prepartum plasma cortisol, haptoglobin, fecal cortisol metabolites, and nonesterified fatty acids with postpartum health status in Holstein dairy cows.

    PubMed

    Huzzey, J M; Nydam, D V; Grant, R J; Overton, T R

    2011-12-01

    The association between negative energy balance and health has led to the testing of blood analytes such as nonesterified fatty acids (NEFA) to identify opportunities for improving the management of transition dairy cows. The objective of this study was to evaluate whether prepartum analytes associated with stress (cortisol) or inflammation (haptoglobin) could also identify dairy cattle at increased risk for health complications after calving. Prepartum blood and fecal samples were collected once weekly from 412 Holstein dairy cows on 2 commercial dairy farms (at wk -3, -2, and -1 relative to calving) and analyzed for concentrations of NEFA, haptoglobin (Hp), and cortisol in plasma and cortisol metabolites in feces. Retained placenta (RP), displaced abomasum (DA), subclinical ketosis (SCK), high Hp concentration (HiHp), and death were recorded up to 30 d in milk (DIM), and animals were subsequently categorized into 3 health categories: (1) no disorder of interest (NDI); (2) one disorder (RP, DA, SCK, or HiHp); or (3) more than one disorder (RP, DA, SCK, HiHp) or death. With the exception of prepartum NEFA, no associations were detected between prepartum concentrations of our analytes of interest and the occurrence of one disorder (RP, DA, SCK, or HiHP) by 30 DIM. Haptoglobin concentration tended to be greater during wk -2 and -1 in cows that developed more than one disorder or that died by 30 DIM; however, when calving assistance was included as a covariate in the analysis prepartum, Hp was no longer a significant risk factor for this postpartum health outcome. Primiparous cows with plasma cortisol concentrations >22.2 nmol/L during wk -2 had reduced odds [odds ratio (OR) 0.41; 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.17-0.98] of developing more than one disorder or death by 30 DIM, whereas multiparous cows with plasma cortisol >34.1 nmol/L during wk -2 tended to have greater odds (OR 2.53; 95% CI 0.87-7.37) of developing more than one disorder or death by 30 DIM. Individual

  1. Identification of a Classical Mutant in the Industrial Host Aspergillus niger by Systems Genetics: LaeA Is Required for Citric Acid Production and Regulates the Formation of Some Secondary Metabolites

    PubMed Central

    Niu, Jing; Arentshorst, Mark; Nair, P. Deepa S.; Dai, Ziyu; Baker, Scott E.; Frisvad, Jens C.; Nielsen, Kristian F.; Punt, Peter J.; Ram, Arthur F.J.

    2015-01-01

    The asexual filamentous fungus Aspergillus niger is an important industrial cell factory for citric acid production. In this study, we genetically characterized a UV-generated A. niger mutant that was originally isolated as a nonacidifying mutant, which is a desirable trait for industrial enzyme production. Physiological analysis showed that this mutant did not secrete large amounts of citric acid and oxalic acid, thus explaining the nonacidifying phenotype. As traditional complementation approaches to characterize the mutant genotype were unsuccessful, we used bulk segregant analysis in combination with high-throughput genome sequencing to identify the mutation responsible for the nonacidifying phenotype. Since A. niger has no sexual cycle, parasexual genetics was used to generate haploid segregants derived from diploids by loss of whole chromosomes. We found that the nonacidifying phenotype was caused by a point mutation in the laeA gene. LaeA encodes a putative methyltransferase-domain protein, which we show here to be required for citric acid production in an A. niger lab strain (N402) and in other citric acid production strains. The unexpected link between LaeA and citric acid production could provide new insights into the transcriptional control mechanisms related to citric acid production in A. niger. Interestingly, the secondary metabolite profile of a ΔlaeA strain differed from the wild-type strain, showing both decreased and increased metabolite levels, indicating that LaeA is also involved in regulating the production of secondary metabolites. Finally, we show that our systems genetics approach is a powerful tool to identify trait mutations. PMID:26566947

  2. Identification of a classical mutant in the industrial host Aspergillus niger by systems genetics: LaeA is required for citric acid production and regulates the formation of some secondary metabolites

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Niu, Jing; Arentshorst, Mark; Nair, P. Deepa S.; Dai, Ziyu; Baker, Scott E.; Frisvad, Jens C.; Nielsen, Kristian F.; Punt, Peter J.; Ram, Arthur F. J.

    2015-11-13

    The asexual filamentous fungus Aspergillus niger is an important industrial cell factory for citric acid production. In this study, we genetically characterized a UV-generated A. niger mutant that was originally isolated as a nonacidifying mutant, which is a desirable trait for industrial enzyme production. Physiological analysis showed that this mutant did not secrete large amounts of citric acid and oxalic acid, thus explaining the nonacidifying phenotype. As traditional complementation approaches to characterize the mutant genotype were unsuccessful, we used bulk segregant analysis in combination with high-throughput genome sequencing to identify the mutation responsible for the nonacidifying phenotype. Since A. nigermore » has no sexual cycle, parasexual genetics was used to generate haploid segregants derived from diploids by loss of whole chromosomes. We found that the nonacidifying phenotype was caused by a point mutation in the laeA gene. LaeA encodes a putative methyltransferase-domain protein, which we show here to be required for citric acid production in an A. niger lab strain (N402) and in other citric acid production strains. The unexpected link between LaeA and citric acid production could provide new insights into the transcriptional control mechanisms related to citric acid production in A. niger. Interestingly, the secondary metabolite profile of a ΔlaeA strain differed from the wild-type strain, showing both decreased and increased metabolite levels, indicating that LaeA is also involved in regulating the production of secondary metabolites. As a result, we show that our systems genetics approach is a powerful tool to identify trait mutations.« less

  3. Identification of a classical mutant in the industrial host Aspergillus niger by systems genetics: LaeA is required for citric acid production and regulates the formation of some secondary metabolites

    SciTech Connect

    Niu, Jing; Arentshorst, Mark; Nair, P. Deepa S.; Dai, Ziyu; Baker, Scott E.; Frisvad, Jens C.; Nielsen, Kristian F.; Punt, Peter J.; Ram, Arthur F. J.

    2015-11-13

    The asexual filamentous fungus Aspergillus niger is an important industrial cell factory for citric acid production. In this study, we genetically characterized a UV-generated A. niger mutant that was originally isolated as a nonacidifying mutant, which is a desirable trait for industrial enzyme production. Physiological analysis showed that this mutant did not secrete large amounts of citric acid and oxalic acid, thus explaining the nonacidifying phenotype. As traditional complementation approaches to characterize the mutant genotype were unsuccessful, we used bulk segregant analysis in combination with high-throughput genome sequencing to identify the mutation responsible for the nonacidifying phenotype. Since A. niger has no sexual cycle, parasexual genetics was used to generate haploid segregants derived from diploids by loss of whole chromosomes. We found that the nonacidifying phenotype was caused by a point mutation in the laeA gene. LaeA encodes a putative methyltransferase-domain protein, which we show here to be required for citric acid production in an A. niger lab strain (N402) and in other citric acid production strains. The unexpected link between LaeA and citric acid production could provide new insights into the transcriptional control mechanisms related to citric acid production in A. niger. Interestingly, the secondary metabolite profile of a ΔlaeA strain differed from the wild-type strain, showing both decreased and increased metabolite levels, indicating that LaeA is also involved in regulating the production of secondary metabolites. As a result, we show that our systems genetics approach is a powerful tool to identify trait mutations.

  4. Ocotillol, a Majonoside R2 Metabolite, Ameliorates 2,4,6-Trinitrobenzenesulfonic Acid-Induced Colitis in Mice by Restoring the Balance of Th17/Treg Cells.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sang-Yun; Jeong, Jin-Ju; Le, Thi Hong Van; Eun, Su-Hyeon; Nguyen, Minh Duc; Park, Jeong Hill; Kim, Dong-Hyun

    2015-08-12

    In a preliminary experiment, majonoside R2 (MR2), isolated from Vietnamese ginseng (Panax vietnamensis Ha et Grushv.), inhibited differentiation to Th17 cells and was metabolized to ocotillol via pseudoginsenoside RT4 (PRT4) by gut microbiota. Therefore, we examined the inhibitory effects of MR2 and its metabolites PRT4 and ocotillol against Th17 cell differentiation. These ginsenosides significantly suppressed interleukin (IL)-6/tumor growth factor beta-induced differentiation of splenic CD4(+) T cells into Th17 cells and expression of IL-17 in vitro. Among these ginsenosides, ocotillol showed the highest inhibitory effect. We also examined the anti-inflammatory effect of ocotillol in mice with 2,4,6-trinitrobenzenesulfonic acid (TNBS)-induced colitis. Oral administration of ocotillol significantly suppressed TNBS-induced colon shortening, macroscopic score, myeloperoxidase activity, and production of nitric oxide and prostaglandin E2. Ocotillol treatment increased TNBS-suppressed expression of tight junction proteins ZO-1, occludin, and claudin-1 in the colon. Treatment with ocotillol inhibited TNBS-induced expression of tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α and IL-1β, as well as activation of NF-κB and MAPKs. Moreover, treatment with ocotillol inhibited TNBS- induced differentiation to Th17 cells in the lamina propria of colon, as well as expression of T-bet, RORγt, IL-17, and IL-23. Ocotillol treatment also increased Treg cell differentiation and Foxp3 and IL-10 expression. These findings suggest that orally administered MR2 may be metabolized to ocotillol in the intestine by gut microbiota and the transformed ocotillol may ameliorate inflammatory diseases such as colitis by restoring the balance of Th17/Treg cells. PMID:26194345

  5. Simultaneous characterization of bile acids and their sulfate metabolites in mouse liver, plasma, bile, and urine using LC-MS/MS.

    PubMed

    Huang, Jiangeng; Bathena, Sai Praneeth R; Csanaky, Iván L; Alnouti, Yazen

    2011-07-15

    Sulfation is a major metabolic pathway involved in the elimination and detoxification of bile acids (BAs). Several lines of evidence are available to support the role of sulfation as a defensive mechanism to attenuate the toxicity of accumulated BAs during hepatobiliary diseases. Individual BAs and their sulfate metabolites vary markedly in their physiological roles as well as their toxicities. Therefore, analytical techniques are required for the quantification of individual BAs and BA-sulfates in biological fluids and tissues. Here we report a simple, sensitive, and validated LC-MS/MS method for the simultaneous quantification of major BAs and BA-sulfates in mouse liver, plasma, bile, and urine. One-step sample preparation using solid-phase extraction (for bile and urine) or protein precipitation (for liver and plasma) was used to extract BAs and BA-sulfates. Base-line separation of all analytes (unsulfated- and sulfated BAs) was achieved in 25min with a limit of quantification of 1ng/ml. This LC-MS/MS method was applied to simultaneously quantify BAs and BA-sulfates in both male and female mouse tissues and fluids. Less than 3% of total BAs are present in the sulfate form in the mouse liver, plasma, and bile, which provides strong evidence that sulfation is a minor metabolic pathway of BA elimination and detoxification in mice. Furthermore, we report that the marked female-predominant expression of Sult2a1 is not reflected into a female-predominant pattern of BA-sulfation. PMID:21530128

  6. Diabetes Mellitus Reduces Activity of Human UDP-Glucuronosyltransferase 2B7 in Liver and Kidney Leading to Decreased Formation of Mycophenolic Acid Acyl-Glucuronide Metabolite

    PubMed Central

    Dostalek, Miroslav; Court, Michael H.; Hazarika, Suwagmani

    2011-01-01

    Mycophenolic acid (MPA) is an immunosuppressive agent commonly used after organ transplantation. Altered concentrations of MPA metabolites have been reported in diabetic kidney transplant recipients, although the reason for this difference is unknown. We aimed to compare MPA biotransformation and UDP-glucuronosyltransferase (UGT) expression and activity between liver (n = 16) and kidney (n = 8) from diabetic and nondiabetic donors. Glucuronidation of MPA, as well as the expression and probe substrate activity of UGTs primarily responsible for MPA phenol glucuronide (MPAG) formation (UGT1A1 and UGT1A9), and MPA acyl glucuronide (AcMPAG) formation (UGT2B7), was characterized. We have found that both diabetic and nondiabetic human liver microsomes and kidney microsomes formed MPAG with similar efficiency; however, AcMPAG formation was significantly lower in diabetic samples. This finding is supported by markedly lower glucuronidation of the UGT2B7 probe zidovudine, UGT2B7 protein, and UGT2B7 mRNA in diabetic tissues. UGT genetic polymorphism did not explain this difference because UGT2B7*2 or *1c genotype were not associated with altered microsomal UGT2B7 protein levels or AcMPAG formation. Furthermore, mRNA expression and probe activities for UGT1A1 or UGT1A9, both forming MPAG but not AcMPAG, were comparable between diabetic and nondiabetic tissues, suggesting the effect may be specific to UGT2B7-mediated AcMPAG formation. These findings suggest that diabetes mellitus is associated with significantly reduced UGT2B7 mRNA expression, protein level, and enzymatic activity of human liver and kidney, explaining in part the relatively low circulating concentrations of AcMPAG in diabetic patients. PMID:21123165

  7. Neuroprotective effects of vinpocetine and its major metabolite cis-apovincaminic acid on NMDA-induced neurotoxicity in a rat entorhinal cortex lesion model.

    PubMed

    Nyakas, Csaba; Felszeghy, Klára; Szabó, Róbert; Keijser, Jan N; Luiten, Paul G M; Szombathelyi, Zsolt; Tihanyi, Károly

    2009-01-01

    Vinpocetine (ethyl-apovincaminate, Cavinton), a synthetic derivative of the Vinca minor alkaloid vincamine, has been used now for decades for prevention and treatment of cerebrovascular diseases predisposing to development of dementia. Both vinpocetine and its main metabolite cis-apovincaminic acid (cAVA) exert a neuroprotective type of action. Bilateral N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA)-induced neurodegeneration in the entorhinal cortex of rat was used as a dementia model to confirm the neuroprotective action of these compounds in vivo. NMDA-lesioned rats were treated 60 min before lesion and throughout 3 postoperative days with a 10 mg/kg intraperitoneal dose of vinpocetine or cAVA. Behavioral tests started after termination of drug treatment and consisted of novel object recognition, social discrimination, and spontaneous alternation in a Y-maze, and spatial learning in the Morris water maze. At the end of behavioral testing brains were perfused with fixative and the size of the excitotoxic neuronal lesion and that of microglial activation around the lesion were assayed quantitatively on brain sections immunostained for neuron-specific nuclear protein (NeuN) and integrin CD11b, respectively. Entorhinal NMDA lesions impaired recognition of novel objects and the new social partner, and suppressed spontaneous alternation and spatial learning performance in the Morris maze. Both vinpocetine and cAVA effectively attenuated the behavioral deficits, and significantly decreased lesion size and the region of microglia activation. Both lesion-induced attention deficit and learning disabilities were markedly alleviated by vinpocetine and cAVA. The morphological findings corroborated the behavioral observations and indicated reduced lesion size and microglia activation especially after vinpocetine treatment which supports an in vivo neuroprotective mode of action of vinpocitine and a less potent action of cAVA. PMID:19492990

  8. In vitro characterization of the cytochrome P450 isoforms involved in the metabolism of 6-methoxy-2-napthylacetic acid, an active metabolite of the prodrug nabumetone.

    PubMed

    Matsumoto, Kaori; Nemoto, Eiichi; Hasegawa, Tetsuya; Akimoto, Masayuki; Sugibayashi, Kenji

    2011-01-01

    The cytochrome P450 (CYP) isoforms that catalyze the oxidation metabolism of 6-methoxy-2-napthylacetic acid (6-MNA), an active metabolite of nabumetone, were studied in rats and humans. Using an extractive reversed-phase HPLC assay with fluorescence detection, monophasic Michaelis-Menten kinetics was obtained for the formation of 6-hydroxy-2-naphthylacetic acid (6-HNA) in liver microsomes of rats and humans, and kinetic analysis showed that the K(m) and V(max) values for the formation of 6-HNA in humans and rats were 640.0 ± 30.9 and 722.9 ± 111.7 µM, and 1167.5 ± 33.0 and 1312.7 ± 73.8 pmol min⁻¹ mg protein⁻¹, respectively. The CYPs responsible for metabolism of 6-MNA in liver microsomes of rats and humans were identified using correlation study, recombinant CYP supersomes, and specific CYP inhibitors and antibodies. Recombinant human CYP2C9 exhibited appreciable catalytic activity with respect to 6-HNA formation from 6-MNA. Among 14 recombinant rat CYPs examined, CYP2C6, CYP2C11 and CYP1A2 were involved in the metabolism of 6-MNA. Sulfaphenazole (a selective inhibitor of CYP2C9) inhibited the formation of 6-HNA in pooled human microsomes by 89%, but failed to inhibit this reaction in rat liver microsomes. The treatment of pooled human liver microsomes with an antibody against CYP2C9 inhibited the formation of 6-HNA by about 80%. The antibody against CYP2C11 suppressed the activity by 20 to 30% in rat microsomes, whereas that of CYP1A2 microsomes did not show drastic inhibition. These findings suggest that CYP2C9 has the highest catalytic activity of 6-MNA metabolism in humans. In contrast, metabolism of 6-MNA is suggested to be mediated mainly by CYP2C6 and CYP2C11 in rats. PMID:21532165

  9. Online restricted-access material combined with high-performance liquid chromatography and tandem mass spectrometry for the simultaneous determination of vanillin and its vanillic acid metabolite in human plasma.

    PubMed

    Li, De-Qiang; Zhang, Zhi-Qing; Yang, Xiu-Ling; Zhou, Chun-Hua; Qi, Jin-Long

    2016-09-01

    An automated online solid-phase extraction with restricted-access material combined with high-performance liquid chromatography and tandem mass spectrometry was developed and validated for the simultaneous quantification of vanillin and its vanillic acid metabolite in human plasma. After protein precipitation by methanol, which contained the internal standards, the supernatant of plasma samples was injected to the system, the endogenous large molecules were flushed out, and target analytes were trapped and enriched on the adsorbent, resulting in a minimization of sample complexity and ion suppression effects. Calibration curves were linear over the concentrations of 5-1000 ng/mL for vanillin and 10-5000 ng/mL for vanillic acid with a coefficient of determination >0.999 for the determined compounds. The lower limits of quantification of vanillin and vanillic acid were 5.0 and 10.0 ng/mL, respectively. The intra- and inter-run precisions expressed as the relative standard deviation were 2.6-8.6 and 3.2-10.2%, respectively, and the accuracies expressed as the relative error were in the range of -6.1 to 7.3%. Extraction recoveries of analytes were between 89.5 and 97.4%. There was no notable matrix effect for any analyte concentration. The developed method was proved to be sensitive, repeatable, and accurate for the quantification of vanillin and its vanillic acid metabolite in human plasma. PMID:27384745

  10. Eicosapentaenoic Acid Inhibits Oxidation of ApoB-containing Lipoprotein Particles of Different Size In Vitro When Administered Alone or in Combination With Atorvastatin Active Metabolite Compared With Other Triglyceride-lowering Agents.

    PubMed

    Mason, R Preston; Sherratt, Samuel C R; Jacob, Robert F

    2016-07-01

    Eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) is a triglyceride-lowering agent that reduces circulating levels of the apolipoprotein B (apoB)-containing lipoprotein particles small dense low-density lipoprotein (sdLDL), very-low-density lipoprotein (VLDL), and oxidized low-density lipoprotein (LDL). These benefits may result from the direct antioxidant effects of EPA. To investigate this potential mechanism, these particles were isolated from human plasma, preincubated with EPA in the absence or presence of atorvastatin (active) metabolite, and subjected to copper-initiated oxidation. Lipid oxidation was measured as a function of thiobarbituric acid reactive substances formation. EPA inhibited sdLDL (IC50 ∼2.0 μM) and LDL oxidation (IC50 ∼2.5 μM) in a dose-dependent manner. Greater antioxidant potency was observed for EPA in VLDL. EPA inhibition was enhanced when combined with atorvastatin metabolite at low equimolar concentrations. Other triglyceride-lowering agents (fenofibrate, niacin, and gemfibrozil) and vitamin E did not significantly affect sdLDL, LDL, or VLDL oxidation compared with vehicle-treated controls. Docosahexaenoic acid was also found to inhibit oxidation in these particles but over a shorter time period than EPA. These data support recent clinical findings and suggest that EPA has direct antioxidant benefits in various apoB-containing subfractions that are more pronounced than those of other triglyceride-lowering agents and docosahexaenoic acid. PMID:26945158

  11. Eicosapentaenoic Acid Inhibits Oxidation of ApoB-containing Lipoprotein Particles of Different Size In Vitro When Administered Alone or in Combination With Atorvastatin Active Metabolite Compared With Other Triglyceride-lowering Agents

    PubMed Central

    Sherratt, Samuel C.R.; Jacob, Robert F.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract: Eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) is a triglyceride-lowering agent that reduces circulating levels of the apolipoprotein B (apoB)-containing lipoprotein particles small dense low-density lipoprotein (sdLDL), very–low-density lipoprotein (VLDL), and oxidized low-density lipoprotein (LDL). These benefits may result from the direct antioxidant effects of EPA. To investigate this potential mechanism, these particles were isolated from human plasma, preincubated with EPA in the absence or presence of atorvastatin (active) metabolite, and subjected to copper-initiated oxidation. Lipid oxidation was measured as a function of thiobarbituric acid reactive substances formation. EPA inhibited sdLDL (IC50 ∼2.0 μM) and LDL oxidation (IC50 ∼2.5 μM) in a dose-dependent manner. Greater antioxidant potency was observed for EPA in VLDL. EPA inhibition was enhanced when combined with atorvastatin metabolite at low equimolar concentrations. Other triglyceride-lowering agents (fenofibrate, niacin, and gemfibrozil) and vitamin E did not significantly affect sdLDL, LDL, or VLDL oxidation compared with vehicle-treated controls. Docosahexaenoic acid was also found to inhibit oxidation in these particles but over a shorter time period than EPA. These data support recent clinical findings and suggest that EPA has direct antioxidant benefits in various apoB-containing subfractions that are more pronounced than those of other triglyceride-lowering agents and docosahexaenoic acid. PMID:26945158

  12. Essential fatty acids and their metabolites could function as endogenous HMG-CoA reductase and ACE enzyme inhibitors, anti-arrhythmic, anti-hypertensive, anti-atherosclerotic, anti-inflammatory, cytoprotective, and cardioprotective molecules.

    PubMed

    Das, Undurti N

    2008-01-01

    Lowering plasma low density lipoprotein-cholesterol (LDL-C), blood pressure, homocysteine, and preventing platelet aggregation using a combination of a statin, three blood pressure lowering drugs such as a thiazide, a beta blocker, and an angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitor each at half standard dose; folic acid; and aspirin-called as polypill- was estimated to reduce cardiovascular events by approximately 80%. Essential fatty acids (EFAs) and their long-chain metabolites: gamma-linolenic acid (GLA), dihomo-GLA (DGLA), arachidonic acid, eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA), and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) and other products such as prostaglandins E1 (PGE1), prostacyclin (PGI2), PGI3, lipoxins (LXs), resolvins, protectins including neuroprotectin D1 (NPD1) prevent platelet aggregation, lower blood pressure, have anti-arrhythmic action, reduce LDL-C, ameliorate the adverse actions of homocysteine, show anti-inflammatory actions, activate telomerase, and have cytoprotective properties. Thus, EFAs and their metabolites show all the classic actions expected of the "polypill". Unlike the proposed "polypill", EFAs are endogenous molecules present in almost all tissues, have no significant or few side effects, can be taken orally for long periods of time even by pregnant women, lactating mothers, and infants, children, and adults; and have been known to reduce the incidence cardiovascular diseases including stroke. In addition, various EFAs and their long-chain metabolites not only enhance nitric oxide generation but also react with nitric oxide to yield their respective nitroalkene derivatives that produce vascular relaxation, inhibit neutrophil degranulation and superoxide formation, inhibit platelet activation, and possess PPAR-gamma ligand activity and release NO, thus prevent platelet aggregation, thrombus formation, atherosclerosis, and cardiovascular diseases. Based on these evidences, I propose that a rational combination of omega-3 and omega-6 fatty acids and the

  13. A predominate role of CYP1A2 for the metabolism of nabumetone to the active metabolite, 6-methoxy-2-naphthylacetic acid, in human liver microsomes.

    PubMed

    Turpeinen, Miia; Hofmann, Ute; Klein, Kathrin; Mürdter, Thomas; Schwab, Matthias; Zanger, Ulrich M

    2009-05-01

    Nabumetone, a widely used nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug, requires biotransformation into 6-methoxy-2-naphthylacetic acid (6-MNA), a close structural analog to naproxen, to achieve its analgesic and anti-inflammatory effects. Despite its wide use, the enzymes involved in metabolism have not been identified. In the present study, several in vitro approaches were used to identify the cytochrome P450 (P450) enzyme(s) responsible for 6-MNA formation. In human liver microsomes (HLMs) 6-MNA formation displayed monophasic Michaelis-Menten kinetics with apparent K(m) and V(max) values (mean +/- S.D.) of 75.1 +/- 15.3 microM and 1304 +/- 226 pmol/min/mg protein, respectively, and formation rate of 6-MNA varied approximately 5.5-fold (179-983 pmol/min/mg protein). 6-MNA activity correlated strongly with both CYP1A2-mediated phenacetin O-deethylation activity and CYP1A2 protein content (r = 0.85 and 0.74, respectively; p < 0.0001 for both). Additional correlations were found with model activities of CYP2C19 and CYP3A4. Of 11 cDNA-expressed recombinant P450s used, recombinant CYP1A2 was the major form catalyzing the 6-MNA formation with an apparent K(m) of 45 microM and V(max) of 8.7 pmol/min/pmol P450. Minor fractions were catalyzed by recombinant P450s CYP1A1, CYP2B6, CYP2C19, CYP2D6, and CYP2E1. Experiments with P450-selective chemical inhibitors and monoclonal anti-P450 antibodies showed that furafylline, a mechanism-based inhibitor CYP1A2, and anti-CYP1A2 antibody markedly inhibited 6-MNA formation, whereas inhibitors for other P450s did not show significant inhibitory effects. Taken together, these studies indicate that the formation of the active metabolite of nabumetone, 6-MNA, is predominantly catalyzed by CYP1A2 in HLMs with only minor contribution of other P450s. PMID:19204080

  14. Effects of pistachio by-products on digestibility, milk production, milk fatty acid profile and blood metabolites in Saanen dairy goats.

    PubMed

    Sedighi-Vesagh, R; Naserian, A A; Ghaffari, M H; Petit, H V

    2015-08-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the effects of pistachio by-products (PBP) on nutrient digestibility, blood metabolites and milk fatty acid (FA) profile in Saanen dairy goats. Nine multiparous lactating Saanen goats (on day 90 post-partum, 45 ± 2/kg BW) were randomly assigned to a 3 × 3 Latin square design with three treatment diets: 1) control diet (alfalfa hay based), 2) 32% PBP and 3) 32% PBP + polyethylene glycol (PEG-4000; 1 g/kg dry matter). Each period lasted 21 days, including 14 day for treatment adaptation and 7 day for data collection. Pistachio by-products significantly decreased (p < 0.01) crude protein (CP) digestibility compared with the control diet (64.4% vs. 58.7%), but PEG addition did not differ for CP digestibility of goats fed 32% PBP + PEG and those fed the two other diets. The digestibility of NDF tended (p = 0.06) to decrease for goats fed PBP compared with those fed the control diet. Yields of milk and 4% fat-corrected milk were not affected by dietary treatments. Compared with the control diet, PBP supplementation appreciably changed the proportions of almost all the milk FA measured; the main effects were decreases (p < 0.01) in FA from 8:0 to 16:0 and increases (p < 0.01) proportions of cis-9, trans-11 18:2 and trans-11 18:1, monounsaturated FA, polyunsaturated FA and long-chain FA. The saturated FA, short-chain FA and medium-chain FA proportions were lower (p < 0.01) in goats fed the two PBP supplemented diet than in those fed the control diet and PEG addition led to intermediate proportions of saturated FA, unsaturated and monounsaturated FA. Inclusion of PBP in the diet decreased (p < 0.01) plasma concentrations of glucose and urea nitrogen compared with the control diet. It was concluded that PBP can be used as forage in the diet of dairy goats without interfering with milk yield. Inclusion of 32% PBP in the diet of dairy goats had beneficial effects on milk FA profile but PEG addition to PBP

  15. Early modulation of the transcription factor Nrf2 in rodent striatal slices by quinolinic acid, a toxic metabolite of the kynurenine pathway.

    PubMed

    Colín-González, A L; Luna-López, A; Königsberg, M; Ali, S F; Pedraza-Chaverrí, J; Santamaría, A

    2014-02-28

    Nuclear factor (erythroid-derived 2)-like 2 (Nrf2) is a transcription factor involved in the orchestration of antioxidant responses. Although its pharmacological activation has been largely hypothesized as a promising tool to ameliorate the progression of neurodegenerative events, the actual knowledge about its modulation in neurotoxic paradigms remains scarce. In this study, we investigated the early profile of Nrf2 modulation in striatal slices of rodents incubated in the presence of the toxic kynurenine pathway metabolite, quinolinic acid (QUIN). Tissue slices from rats and mice were obtained and used throughout the experiments in order to compare inter-species responses. Nuclear Nrf2 protein levels and oxidative damage to lipids were compared. Time- and concentration-response curves of all markers were explored. Nrf2 nuclear activation was corroborated through phase 2 antioxidant protein expression. The effects of QUIN on Nrf2 modulation and oxidative stress were also compared between slices of wild-type (Nrf2(+/+)) and Nrf2 knock-out (Nrf2(-/-)) mice. The possible involvement of the N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor (NMDAr) in the Nrf2 modulation and lipid peroxidation was further explored in mice striatal slices. In rat striatal slices, QUIN stimulated the Nrf2 nuclear translocation. This effect was accompanied by augmented lipid peroxidation. In the mouse striatum, QUIN per se exerted an induction of Nrf2 factor only at 1h of incubation, and a concentration-response effect on lipid peroxidation after 3h of incubation. QUIN stimulated the striatal content of phase 2 enzymes. Nrf2(-/-) mice were slightly more responsive than Nrf2(+/+) mice to the QUIN-induced oxidative damage, and completely unresponsive to the NMDAr antagonist MK-801 when tested against QUIN. Findings of this study indicate that: (1) Nrf2 is modulated in rodent striatal tissue in response to QUIN; (2) Nrf2(-/-) striatal tissue was moderately more vulnerable to oxidative damage than the Wt

  16. Roles of P-glycoprotein and multidrug resistance protein in transporting para-aminosalicylic acid and its N-acetylated metabolite in mice brain

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Lan; Xu, Cong; O'Neal, Stefanie; Bi, Hui-chang; Huang, Min; Zheng, Wei; Zeng, Su

    2014-01-01

    Aim: Para-aminosalicylic acid (PAS) is effective in the treatment of manganism-induced neurotoxicity (manganism). In this study we investigated the roles of P-glycoprotein (MDR1a) and multidrug resistance protein (MRP) in transporting PAS and its N-acetylated metabolite AcPAS through blood-brain barrier. Methods: MDR1a-null or wild-type mice were intravenously injected with PAS (200 mg/kg). Thirty minutes after the injection, blood samples and brains were collected, and the concentrations of PAS and AcPAS in brain capillaries and parenchyma were measured using HPLC. Both MDCK-MDR1 and MDCK-MRP1 cells that overexpressed P-gp and MRP1, respectively, were used in two-chamber Transwell transport studies in vitro. Results: After injection of PAS, the brain concentration of PAS was substantially higher in MDR1a-null mice than in wild-type mice, but the brain concentration of AcPAS had no significant difference between MDR1a-null mice and wild-type mice. Concomitant injection of PAS with the MRP-specific inhibitor MK-571 (50 mg/kg) further increased the brain concentration of PAS in MDR1a-null mice, and increased the brain concentration of AcPAS in both MDR1a-null mice and wild-type mice. Two-chamber Transwell studies with MDCK-MDR1 cells demonstrated that PAS was not only a substrate but also a competitive inhibitor of P-gp, while AcPAS was not a substrate of P-gp. Two-chamber Transwell studies with the MDCK-MRP1 cells showed that MRP1 had the ability to transport both PAS and AcPAS across the BBB. Conclusion: P-gp plays a major role in the efflux of PAS from brain parenchyma into blood in mice, while MRP1 is involved in both PAS and AcPAS transport in the brain. PMID:25418377

  17. Liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry evaluation of the pharmacokinetics of a diacid metabolite of norcantharidin loaded in folic acid-targeted liposomes in mice.

    PubMed

    Liu, Min-Chen; Ma, Xiao-Qiong; Xu, Yong; Peng, Li-Hua; Han, Min; Gao, Jian-Qing

    2016-02-01

    A previous study has reported diacid metabolite (DM) as the stable form of norcantharidin (NCTD), which is almost 100% metabolized to DM-NCTD. However, the unreliable pharmacokinetic characteristics of DM-NCTD could result in low bioavailability, hindering the clinical use of DM-NCTD in the treatment of diseases. A liposomal drug delivery system could overcome the shortcomings of DM-NCTD by improving the relative bioavailability (Fr), reducing drug toxicity, and increasing the therapeutic efficacy. However, there are no data concerning the pharmacokinetics of a DM-NCTD-loaded liposomal drug delivery system in animals, which is required for assessing its safety profile. Therefore, a rapid and sensitive liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) method was developed and validated for the determination of DM-NCTD in mouse plasma. Standard curves were linear (r=0.9966) over the range 10.0-1.00×10(4)ng/ml in mouse plasma with a lower limit of quantification (LLOQ) of 10ng/ml. This study successfully investigated the pharmacokinetics of DM-NCTD and DM-NCTD encapsulated in polyethylene glycol (PEG)-Liposomes (DM-NCTD/PEG-Liposome) or folic acid (FA)-PEG-Liposomes (DM-NCTD/FA-PEG-Liposome) in Kunming mice after a single intravenous dose of 2mg/kg. The plasma profile data of the three groups adhered to a two-compartment model. Compared with the DM-NCTD group, the Liposome groups had longer circulation times following intravenous administration in mice, and the Fr of DM-NCTD increased significantly (P<0.05). Furthermore, the area under the concentration-time curve (AUC) declined with an increase in the volume of distribution (Vd) from the PEG-Liposome to the FA-PEG-Liposome groups, which indicates a more efficient removal of the drug from the plasma of the FA-PEG-Liposome group. This result suggests a possible increased risk of DM-NCTD intoxication in normal tissues with FA-PEG-Liposomes. Based on this study, further investigation of the biodistribution of DM

  18. Comprehensive profiling of mercapturic acid metabolites from dietary acrylamide as short-term exposure biomarkers for evaluation of toxicokinetics in rats and daily internal exposure in humans using isotope dilution ultra-high performance liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yu; Wang, Qiao; Cheng, Jun; Zhang, Jingshun; Xu, Jiaojiao; Ren, Yiping

    2015-09-24

    Mercapturic acid metabolites from dietary acrylamide are important short-term exposure biomarkers for evaluating the in vivo toxicity of acrylamide. Most of studies have focused on the measurement of two metabolites, N-acetyl-S-(2-carbamoylethyl)-L-cysteine (AAMA) and N-acetyl-S-(2-carbamoyl-2-hydroxyethyl)-L-cysteine (GAMA). Thus, the comprehensive profile of acrylamide urinary metabolites cannot be fully understood. We developed an isotope dilution ultra-high performance liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (UHPLC-MS/MS) method for the simultaneous determination of all four mercapturic acid adducts of acrylamide and its primary metabolite glycidamide under the electroscopy ionization negative (ESI-) mode in the present study. The limit of detection (LOD) and limit of quantification (LOQ) of the analytes ranged 0.1-0.3 ng/mL and 0.4-1.0 ng/mL, respectively. The recovery rates with low, intermediate and high spiking levels were calculated as 95.5%-105.4%, 98.2%-114.0% and 92.2%-108.9%, respectively. Acceptable within-laboratory reproducibility (RSD<7.0%) substantially supported the use of current method for robust analysis. Rapid pretreatment procedures and short run time (8 min per sample) ensured good efficiency of metabolism profiling, indicating a wide application for investigating short-term internal exposure of dietary acrylamide. Our proposed UHPLC-MS/MS method was successfully applied to the toxicokinetic study of acrylamide in rats. Meanwhile, results of human urine analysis indicated that the levels of N-acetyl-S-(2-carbamoylethyl)-L-cysteine-sulfoxide (AAMA-sul), which did not appear in the mercapturic acid metabolites in rodents, were more than the sum of GAMA and N-acetyl-S-(1-carbamoyl-2-hydroxyethyl)-L-cysteine (iso-GAMA). Thus, AAMA-sul may alternatively become a specific biomarker for investigating the acrylamide exposure in humans. Current proposed method provides a substantial methodology support for comprehensive profiling of

  19. An inter-species signaling system mediated by fusaric acid has parallel effects on antifungal metabolite production by Pseudomonas protegens Pf-5 and antibiosis of Fusarium spp.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Pseudomonas protegens strain Pf-5 is a rhizosphere bacterium that acts as a biocontrol agent of soilborne plant diseases, and produces at least seven different secondary metabolites with antifungal properties. We derived site-directed mutants of Pf-5 with single and multiple mutations in the biosynt...

  20. Identification of glyceollin metabolites derived from conjugation with glutathione and glucuronic acid in rats by on-line liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Glyceollin-related metabolites produced in rats following oral glyceollin administration were screened and identified by precursor and product ion scanning using liquid chromatography, coupled on-line with electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry (LC-ESI-MS/MS), to identify all glyceollin me...

  1. Apo-10'-lycopenoic acid, an enzymatic metabolite of lycopene, induces Nrf2-mediated expression of phase II detoxifying/antioxidant enzymes in human bronchial epithelial cells

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The chemopreventive effects of lycopene against certain types of cancers have been proposed to be mediated by its oxidative products/metabolites. Lycopene can be cleaved by carotene 9',10'-oxygenase at its 9',10' double bond to form apo-10'-lycopenoids, including apo-10'-lycopenal, -lycopenol and -...

  2. Apo-10'-lycopenoic acid, a lycopene 1 metabolite, increases sirtuin 1 mRNA and protein levels and decreases hepatic fat accumulation in ob/ob mice

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Lycopene has been shown to be beneficial in protecting against high-fat diet-induced fatty liver. The recent demonstration that lycopene can be converted by carotene 99,10’-oxygenase into a biologically active metabolite, ALA, led us to propose that the function of lycopene can be mediated by ALA. I...

  3. LC-MS and GC-MS metabolite profiling of nickel(II) complexes in the latex of the nickel-hyperaccumulating tree Sebertia acuminata and identification of methylated aldaric acid as a new nickel(II) ligand.

    PubMed

    Callahan, Damien L; Roessner, Ute; Dumontet, Vincent; Perrier, Nicolas; Wedd, Anthony G; O'Hair, Richard A J; Baker, Alan J M; Kolev, Spas D

    2008-01-01

    Targeted liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS) technology using size exclusion chromatography and metabolite profiling based on gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) were used to study the nickel-rich latex of the hyperaccumulating tree Sebertia acuminata. More than 120 compounds were detected, 57 of these were subsequently identified. A methylated aldaric acid (2,4,5-trihydroxy-3-methoxy-1,6-hexan-dioic acid) was identified for the first time in biological extracts and its structure was confirmed by 1D and 2D nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. After citric acid, it appears to be one of the most abundant small organic molecules present in the latex studied. Nickel(II) complexes of stoichiometry NiII:acid=1:2 were detected for these two acids as well as for malic, itaconic, erythronic, galacturonic, tartaric, aconitic and saccharic acids. These results provide further evidence that organic acids may play an important role in the transport and possibly in the storage of metal ions in hyperaccumulating plants. PMID:17765935

  4. Rapid and sensitive detection of fipronil and its metabolites in edible oils by solid-phase extraction based on humic acid bonded silica combined with gas chromatography with electron capture detection.

    PubMed

    Peng, Xi-Tian; Li, Yu-Nan; Xia, Hong; Peng, Li-Jun; Feng, Yu-Qi

    2016-06-01

    Solid-phase extraction based on humic acid bonded silica followed by gas chromatography with electron capture detection was developed to determine fipronil and its metabolites in edible oil. To achieve the best extraction performance, we systematically investigated a series of solid-phase extraction parameters. Under the optimized conditions, the method was validated according to linearity, recovery, and precision. Good linearities were obtained with R(2) more than 0.9996 for all analytes. The limits of detection were between 0.3 and 0.5 ng/g, and the recoveries ranged from 83.1 to 104.0% at three spiked concentrations with intra- and interday relative standard deviation values less than 8.7%. Finally, the proposed method was applied to determine fipronil and its metabolites in 11 edible oil samples taken from Wuhan markets. Fipronil was detectable in four samples with concentrations ranging from 3.0 to 5.2 ng/g. In China, the maximum residue limits of fipronil in some vegetables and maize are 20 and 100 ng/g (GB/T 2763-2014), respectively. The residues of fipronil and its metabolites in commercial edible oils might exhibit some potential threat to human health as a result of high consumption of edible oil as part of daily intake. PMID:27280701

  5. Synthesis of 9,12-dioxo-10(Z)-dodecenoic acid, a new fatty acid metabolite derived from 9-hydroperoxy-10,12-octadecadienoic acid in lentil seed (Lens culinaris Medik.)

    PubMed

    Gallasch, B A; Spiteller, G

    2000-09-01

    The previously unknown linoleic acid peroxidation product 9,12-dioxo-10(Z)-decenoic acid (Z5) was detected in lentil seed flour (Lens culinaris Medik.) by electron impact mass spectrometry (EI-MS) after derivatization with pentafluorobenzyl-hydroxylamine-hydrochloride, methylation of acidic groups with diazomethane, and protection of hydroxylic groups with N-methyl-N-trimethylsilyl-trifluoroacetamide. The structure of the natural product was confirmed by synthesis of Z5, 9,12-dioxo-l0(E)-decenoic acid, and derivatives. EI-MS, nuclear magnetic resonance and gas chromatographic data of these compounds and synthetic intermediates are discussed. PMID:11026615

  6. Spironolactone and its main metabolite canrenoic acid block hKv1.5, Kv4.3 and Kv7.1+minK channels

    PubMed Central

    Gómez, Ricardo; Núñez, Lucía; Caballero, Ricardo; Vaquero, Miguel; Tamargo, Juan; Delpón, Eva

    2005-01-01

    Both spironolactone (SP) and its main metabolite, canrenoic acid (CA), prolong cardiac action potential duration and decrease the Kv11.1 (HERG) current. We examined the effects of SP and CA on cardiac hKv1.5, Kv4.3 and Kv7.1+minK channels that generate the human IKur, Ito1 and IKs, which contribute to the control of human cardiac action potential duration. hKv1.5 currents were recorded in stably transfected mouse fibroblasts and Kv4.3 and Kv7.1+minK in transiently transfected Chinese hamster ovary cells using the whole-cell patch clamp. SP (1 μM) and CA (1 nM) inhibited hKv1.5 currents by 23.2±3.2 and 18.9±2.7%, respectively, shifted the midpoint of the activation curve to more negative potentials and delayed the time course of tail deactivation. SP (1 μM) and CA (1 nM) inhibited the total charge crossing the membrane through Kv4.3 channels at +50 mV by 27.1±6.4 and 27.4±5.7%, respectively, and accelerated the time course of current decay. CA, but not SP, shifted the inactivation curve to more hyperpolarised potentials (Vh−37.0±1.8 vs −40.8±1.6 mV, n=10, P<0.05). SP (10 μM) and CA (1 nM) also inhibited Kv7.1+minK currents by 38.6±2.3 and 22.1±1.4%, respectively, without modifying the voltage dependence of channel activation. SP, but not CA, slowed the time course of tail current decay. CA (1 nM) inhibited the IKur (29.2±5.5%) and the Ito1 (16.1±3.9%) recorded in mouse ventricular myocytes and the IK (21.8±6.9%) recorded in guinea-pig ventricular myocytes. A mathematical model of human atrial action potentials demonstrated that K+ blocking effects of CA resulted in a lengthening of action potential duration, both in normal and atrial fibrillation simulated conditions. The results demonstrated that both SP and CA directly block hKv1.5, Kv4.3 and Kv7.1+minK channels, CA being more potent for these effects. Since peak free plasma concentrations of CA ranged between 3 and 16 nM, these results indicated that blockade of these human

  7. Differential effects of deoxycholic acid versus selenium metabolite methylselenol on cell cycle, apoptosis, and MAP kinase pathway in HCT116 human colon cancer cells

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Introduction: A typical part of the Western diet is a high fat intake that leads to increased levels of fecal bile acids, and these bile acids, primarily deoxycholic acid (DCA) in humans, have been believed to be tumor promoters of colon cancer. The cell growth inhibition induced by bile acid deoxyc...

  8. Shift of the high-performance liquid chromatographic retention times of metabolites in relation to the original drug on an RP8 column with acidic mobile phase.

    PubMed

    Herre, S; Pragst, F

    1997-04-25

    The effect of the structural change in the metabolization of drugs on the HPLC retention time with an RP8 column with an acetonitrile-phosphate buffer (pH 2.3) as the mobile phase was investigated at model compound pairs of 29 functionalization reactions. A more or less typical region for T(M)=log(k'M/k'D) was found for each of these reactions (with k'M and k'D being the capacity factors of the metabolite and the drug, respectively), which can be explained by an increase or a decrease of the hydrophilic properties caused by the structural change. This effect is superimposed by an essential influence of the unchanged part of the molecule and in some cases by special intramolecular interactions like the hydrogen bond. Despite the more complicated structure of real drugs the results obtained at the model compound pairs were confirmed for most of the 55 metabolite/drug pairs. The practical use of the T(M) values as a support to distinguish between different metabolites in the HPLC-DAD analysis of intoxications is demonstrated with cases of poisoning with diphenhydramine, propafenone and methaqualone. PMID:9187390

  9. The Significance of Lichens and Their Metabolites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huneck, S.

    Lichens, symbiontic organisms of fungi and algae, synthesize numerous metabolites, the "lichen substances," which comprise aliphatic, cycloaliphatic, aromatic, and terpenic compounds. Lichens and their metabolites have a manifold biological activity: antiviral, antibiotic, antitumor, allergenic, plant growth inhibitory, antiherbivore, and enzyme inhibitory. Usnic acid, a very active lichen substance is used in pharmaceutical preparations. Large amounts of Pseudevernia furfuracea and Evernia prunastri are processed in the perfume industry, and some lichens are sensitive reagents for the evaluation of air pollution.

  10. Metabolites of cannabidiol identified in human urine.

    PubMed

    Harvey, D J; Mechoulam, R

    1990-03-01

    1. Urine from a dystonic patient treated with cannabidiol (CBD) was examined by g.l.c.-mass spectrometry for CBD metabolites. Metabolites were identified as their trimethylsilyl (TMS), [2H9]TMS, and methyl ester/TMS derivatives and as the TMS derivatives of the product of lithium aluminium deuteride reduction. 2. Thirty-three metabolites were identified in addition to unmetabolized CBD, and a further four metabolites were partially characterized. 3. The major metabolic route was hydroxylation and oxidation at C-7 followed by further hydroxylation in the pentyl and propenyl groups to give 1"-, 2"-, 3"-, 4"- and 10-hydroxy derivatives of CBD-7-oic acid. Other metabolites, mainly acids, were formed by beta-oxidation and related biotransformations from the pentyl side-chain and these were also hydroxylated at C-6 or C-7. The major oxidized metabolite was CBD-7-oic acid containing a hydroxyethyl side-chain. 4. Two 8,9-dihydroxy compounds, presumably derived from the corresponding epoxide were identified. 5. Also present were several cyclized cannabinoids including delta-6- and delta-1-tetrahydrocannabinol and cannabinol. 6. This is the first metabolic study of CBD in humans; most observed metabolic routes were typical of those found for CBD and related cannabinoids in other species. PMID:2336840

  11. Novel nonadride, heptadride and maleic acid metabolites from the byssochlamic acid producer Byssochlamys fulva IMI 40021 – an insight into the biosynthesis of maleidrides† †Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Details of any supplementary information available should be included here. See DOI: 10.1039/c5cc06988b Click here for additional data file.

    PubMed Central

    Szwalbe, Agnieszka J.; Williams, Katherine; O'Flynn, Daniel E.; Bailey, Andrew M.; Mulholland, Nicholas P.; Vincent, Jason L.; Willis, Christine L.

    2015-01-01

    The filamentous fungus Byssochlamys fulva strain IMI 40021 produces (+)-byssochlamic acid 1, its novel dihydroanalogue 2 and four related secondary metabolites. Agnestadrides A, 17 and B, 18 constitute a novel class of seven-membered ring, maleic anhydride-containing (hence termed heptadride) natural products. The putative maleic anhydride precursor 5 for both nonadride and heptadride biosynthesis was isolated as a fermentation product for the first time and its structure confirmed by synthesis. Acid 5 undergoes facile decarboxylation to anhydride 6. The generic term maleidrides is proposed to encompass biosynthetically-related compounds containing maleic anhydride moieties fused to an alicyclic ring, varying in size and substituents. PMID:26452099

  12. Validation of UHPLC-MS/MS methods for the determination of kaempferol and its metabolite 4-hydroxyphenyl acetic acid, and application to in vitro blood-brain barrier and intestinal drug permeability studies.

    PubMed

    Moradi-Afrapoli, Fahimeh; Oufir, Mouhssin; Walter, Fruzsina R; Deli, Maria A; Smiesko, Martin; Zabela, Volha; Butterweck, Veronika; Hamburger, Matthias

    2016-09-01

    Sedative and anxiolytic-like properties of flavonoids such as kaempferol and quercetin, and of some of their intestinal metabolites, have been demonstrated in pharmacological studies. However, routes of administration were shown to be critical for observing in vivo activity. Therefore, the ability to cross intestinal and blood-brain barriers was assessed in cell-based models for kaempferol (KMF), and for the major intestinal metabolite of KMF, 4-hydroxyphenylacetic acid (4-HPAA). Intestinal transport studies were performed with Caco-2 cells, and blood-brain barrier transport studies with an immortalized monoculture human model and a primary triple-co-culture rat model. UHPLC-MS/MS methods for KMF and 4-HPAA in Ringer-HEPES buffer and in Hank's balanced salt solution were validated according to industry guidelines. For all methods, calibration curves were fitted by least-squares quadratic regression with 1/X(2) as weighing factor, and mean coefficients of determination (R(2)) were >0.99. Data obtained with all barrier models showed high intestinal and blood-brain barrier permeation of KMF, and no permeability of 4-HPAA, when compared to barrier integrity markers. PMID:27281582

  13. Deoxycholic Acid and Selenium Metabolite Methylselenol Exert Common and Distinct Effects on Cell Cycle, Apoptosis, and MAP Kinase Pathway in HCT116 Human Colon Cancer Cells

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Bile acid deoxycholic acid (DCA) is a known tumor promoter in colon tumor development. The cell growth inhibition induced by DCA may cause compensatory hyperproliferation of colonic epithelial cells and provide selection for subpopulations of cells resistant to DCA’s inhibitory effect. These survivi...

  14. Deoxycholic acid and selenium metabolite methylselenol exert common and distinct effects on cell cycle, apoptosis, and MAP kinase pathway in HCT116 human colon cancer cells

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The cell growth inhibition induced by bile acid deoxycholic acid (DCA) may cause compensatory hyperproliferation of colonic epithelial cells, and consequently increase colon cancer risk. On the other hand, there is increasing evidence for the efficacy of certain forms of selenium (Se) as anticancer ...

  15. The effect of non-starch polysaccharide supplementation on circulating bile acids, hormone and metabolite levels following a fat meal in human subjects.

    PubMed

    Morgan, L M; Tredger, J A; Shavila, Y; Travis, J S; Wright, J

    1993-09-01

    The effects of guar gum, sugar-beet fibre (SBF) and wheat bran supplementation of a high-fat test meal were compared with an NSP-free control meal and a meal containing an equivalent amount of the ion-exchange resin cholestyramine in healthy non-obese human volunteers. Their effects on gastric emptying, postprandial circulating bile acids, triacylglycerols and gastrointestinal hormone levels were studied. The in vitro binding of NSP and cholestyramine to [1-14C]glycocholic acid was measured and compared with their in vivo effect. Guar gum and cholestyramine supplementation significantly lowered circulating postprandial bile acid, triacylglycerol and gastric inhibitory polypeptide concentrations, but sugar-beet fibre and wheat bran were without effect. Liquid gastric emptying, as assessed by circulating paracetamol levels, was slightly accelerated in the guar gum-supplemented meal. Glycocholic acid bound strongly to the insoluble fraction of cholestyramine and the soluble fraction of guar gum. The insoluble fractions of SBF and wheat bran bound only small quantities of glycocholate; no bile acid binding was detected in the soluble fractions of these NSP. The study demonstrates that measurement of postprandial bile acids enables an indirect measurement to be made of bile acid binding to NSP in vivo. The results support the hypothesis that the hypocholesterolaemic action of guar gum is largely mediated via interruption of the enterohepatic bile acid circulation, but indicate that the hypocholesterolaemic action of SBF is mediated by another mechanism. PMID:8260476

  16. Synthesis Of Labeled Metabolites

    DOEpatents

    Martinez, Rodolfo A.; Silks, III, Louis A.; Unkefer, Clifford J.; Atcher, Robert

    2004-03-23

    The present invention is directed to labeled compounds, for example, isotopically enriched mustard gas metabolites including: [1,1',2,2'-.sup.13 C.sub.4 ]ethane, 1,1'-sulfonylbis[2-(methylthio); [1,1',2,2'-.sup.13 C.sub.4 ]ethane, 1-[[2-(methylsulfinyl)ethyl]sulfonyl]-2-(methylthio); [1,1',2,2'-.sup.13 C.sub.4 ]ethane, 1,1'-sulfonylbis[2-(methylsulfinyl)]; and, 2,2'-sulfinylbis([1,2-.sup.13 C.sub.2 ]ethanol of the general formula ##STR1## where Q.sup.1 is selected from the group consisting of sulfide (--S--), sulfone (--S(O)--), sulfoxide (--S(O.sub.2)--) and oxide (--O--), at least one C* is .sup.13 C, X is selected from the group consisting of hydrogen and deuterium, and Z is selected from the group consisting of hydroxide (--OH), and --Q.sup.2 --R where Q.sup.2 is selected from the group consisting of sulfide (--S--), sulfone(--S(O)--), sulfoxide (--S(O.sub.2)--) and oxide (--O--), and R is selected from the group consisting of hydrogen, a C.sub.1 to C.sub.4 lower alkyl, and amino acid moieties, with the proviso that when Z is a hydroxide and Q.sup.1 is a sulfide, then at least one X is deuterium.

  17. Familial resemblance for serum metabolite concentrations.

    PubMed

    Draisma, Harmen H M; Beekman, Marian; Pool, René; van Ommen, Gert-Jan B; Adamski, Jerzy; Prehn, Cornelia; Vaarhorst, Anika A M; de Craen, Anton J M; Willemsen, Gonneke; Slagboom, P Eline; Boomsma, Dorret I

    2013-10-01

    Metabolomics is the comprehensive study of metabolites, which are the substrates, intermediate, and end products of cellular metabolism. The heritability of the concentrations of circulating metabolites bears relevance for evaluating their suitability as biomarkers for disease. We report aspects of familial resemblance for the concentrations in human serum of more than 100 metabolites, measured using a targeted metabolomics platform. Age- and sex-corrected monozygotic twin correlations, midparent-offspring regression coefficients, and spouse correlations in subjects from two independent cohorts (Netherlands Twin Register and Leiden Longevity Study) were estimated for each metabolite. In the Netherlands Twin Register subjects, who were largely fasting, we found significant monozygotic twin correlations for 121 out of 123 metabolites. Heritability was confirmed by midparent-offspring regression. For most detected metabolites, the correlations between spouses were considerably lower than those between twins, indicating a contribution of genetic effects to familial resemblance. Remarkably high heritability was observed for free carnitine (monozygotic twin correlation 0.66), for the amino acids serine (monozygotic twin correlation 0.77) and threonine (monozygotic twin correlation 0.64), and for phosphatidylcholine acyl-alkyl C40:3 (monozygotic twin correlation 0.77). For octenoylcarnitine, a consistent point estimate of approximately 0.50 was found for the spouse correlations in the two cohorts as well as for the monozygotic twin correlation, suggesting that familiality for this metabolite is explained by shared environment. We conclude that for the majority of metabolites targeted by the used metabolomics platform, the familial resemblance of serum concentrations is largely genetic. Our results contribute to the knowledge of the heritability of fasting serum metabolite concentrations, which is relevant for biomarker research. PMID:23985338

  18. Human urinary metabolites of 3-(2',4',5'-triethoxybenzoyl)propionic acid, a new biliary smooth muscle relaxant with choleretic activity.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, T; Kanai, Y; Tanayama, S

    1978-12-01

    Biotransformation of 3-(2',4',5'-triethoxybenzoyl)propionic acid (tri-, ethoxybenzoylpropionate) was studied in man using isotopic cluster technique. From the 24 h urine of a male volunteer given an equimolar mixture of non-labelled and pentadeuterium-labelled triethoxybenzoylpropionate (1 mg/kg) orally, the parent drug, 3-(2',5'-diethoxy-4'-hydroxybenzoyl)propionic acid (4'-phenol) and 3-(2',4'-diethoxy-5'-hydroxybenzoyl)propionic acid (5'-phenol) were isolated and identified by g.l.c.-mass spectrometry. 2. Urinary components were also quantified by mass chromatography: the parent drug (67.4% of dose) and 4'- and 5'-phenols in a mixture (20.3%). More than 80% of urinary triethoxybenzoylpropionate was present as its glucuronic acid ester, as evidenced by using beta-glucuronidase and saccharo-1,4-lactone, a specific inhibitor of the enzyme. Almost all of 4'- and 5'-phenols appeared as conjugates with glucuronic acid and/or sulphuric acid. These findings indicated that in man triethoxybenzoylpropionate was largely conjugated with glucuronic acid and in part underwent deethylation followed by conjugation for elimination mainly in urine. PMID:726517

  19. Metabolite profiles during oral glucose challenge.

    PubMed

    Ho, Jennifer E; Larson, Martin G; Vasan, Ramachandran S; Ghorbani, Anahita; Cheng, Susan; Rhee, Eugene P; Florez, Jose C; Clish, Clary B; Gerszten, Robert E; Wang, Thomas J

    2013-08-01

    To identify distinct biological pathways of glucose metabolism, we conducted a systematic evaluation of biochemical changes after an oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) in a community-based population. Metabolic profiling was performed on 377 nondiabetic Framingham Offspring cohort participants (mean age 57 years, 42% women, BMI 30 kg/m(2)) before and after OGTT. Changes in metabolite levels were evaluated with paired Student t tests, cluster-based analyses, and multivariable linear regression to examine differences associated with insulin resistance. Of 110 metabolites tested, 91 significantly changed with OGTT (P ≤ 0.0005 for all). Amino acids, β-hydroxybutyrate, and tricarboxylic acid cycle intermediates decreased after OGTT, and glycolysis products increased, consistent with physiological insulin actions. Other pathways affected by OGTT included decreases in serotonin derivatives, urea cycle metabolites, and B vitamins. We also observed an increase in conjugated, and a decrease in unconjugated, bile acids. Changes in β-hydroxybutyrate, isoleucine, lactate, and pyridoxate were blunted in those with insulin resistance. Our findings demonstrate changes in 91 metabolites representing distinct biological pathways that are perturbed in response to an OGTT. We also identify metabolite responses that distinguish individuals with and without insulin resistance. These findings suggest that unique metabolic phenotypes can be unmasked by OGTT in the prediabetic state. PMID:23382451

  20. Advances in metabolite identification.

    PubMed

    Wishart, David S

    2011-08-01

    One of the central challenges to metabolomics is metabolite identification. Regardless of whether one uses so-called 'targeted' or 'untargeted' metabolomics, eventually all paths lead to the requirement of identifying (and quantifying) certain key metabolites. Indeed, without metabolite identification, the results of any metabolomic analysis are biologically and chemically uninterpretable. Given the chemical diversity of most metabolomes and the character of most metabolomic data, metabolite identification is intrinsically difficult. Consequently a great deal of effort in metabolomics over the past decade has been focused on making metabolite identification better, faster and cheaper. This review describes some of the newly emerging techniques or technologies in metabolomics that are making metabolite identification easier and more robust. In particular, it focuses on advances in metabolite identification that have occurred over the past 2 to 3 years concerning the technologies, methodologies and software as applied to NMR, MS and separation science. The strengths and limitations of some of these approaches are discussed along with some of the important trends in metabolite identification. PMID:21827274

  1. Effect of acetic acid feeding on the circadian changes in glycogen and metabolites of glucose and lipid in liver and skeletal muscle of rats.

    PubMed

    Fushimi, Takashi; Sato, Yuzo

    2005-11-01

    The aim of the present study is to investigate the effect of acetic acid feeding on the circadian changes in glycogen concentration in liver and skeletal muscle. Rats were provided meal once daily (09.00-13.00 hours) for 10 d. On the 11th day, they were either killed immediately or given 9 g diet containing either 0 (control) or 0.7 g/kg-diet acetic acid beginning at 09.00 hours for 4 h, as in the previous regimen. Rats in the fed group were killed at 4, 8 or 24 h after the start of feeding. At 4 h after the start of feeding, the acetic acid group had significantly greater liver and gastrocnemius muscle glycogen concentrations (P<0.05). Also, at this same point, liver xylulose-5-phosphate, a key stimulator of glycolysis, the ratio of fructose-1,6-bisphosphate to fructose-6-phosphate in skeletal muscle, which reflects phosphofructokinase-1 activity, and liver malonyl-CoA, an allosteric inhibitor of carnitine palmitoyl-transferase, were significantly lower in the acetic acid group than in the control group (P<0.05). In addition, the acetic acid group had a significantly lower serum lactate concentration and lower ratio of insulin to glucagon than the control group at the same point (P<0.05). We conclude that a diet containing acetic acid may enhance glycogen repletion but not induce supercompensation, a large increase in the glycogen level that is beneficial in improving performance, in liver and skeletal muscle by transitory inhibition of glycolysis. Further, we indicate the possibility of a transient enhancement of fatty acid oxidation in liver by acetic acid feeding. PMID:16277773

  2. Synthesis of an Albendazole Metabolite: Characterization and HPLC Determination

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mahler, Graciela; Davyt, Danilo; Gordon, Sandra; Incerti, Marcelo; Nunez, Ivana; Pezaroglo, Horacio; Scarone, Laura; Serra, Gloria; Silvera, Mauricio; Manta, Eduardo

    2008-01-01

    In this laboratory activity, students are introduced to the synthesis of an albendazole metabolite obtained by a sulfide oxidation reaction. Albendazole as well as its metabolite, albendazole sulfoxide, are used as anthelmintic drugs. The oxidation reagent is H[subscript 2]O[subscript 2] in acetic acid. The reaction is environmental friendly,…

  3. Aspirin-triggered metabolites of EFAs.

    PubMed

    Makriyannis, Alexandros; Nikas, Spyros P

    2011-10-28

    Aspirin triggers the biosynthesis of oxygenated metabolites from arachidonic, eicosapentaenoic, and docosahexaenoic (DHA) acids. In a preceding issue, Serhan et al. (2011) describe a novel aspirin-triggered DHA pathway for the biosynthesis of a potent anti-inflammatory and proresolving molecule. PMID:22035788

  4. Metabolite specific proton magnetic resonance imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Hurd, R.E.; Freeman, D.M.

    1989-06-01

    An imaging method is described that makes use of proton double quantum nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) to construct images based on selected metabolites such as lactic acid. The optimization of the method is illustrated in vitro, followed by in vivo determination of lactic acid distribution in a solid tumor model. Water suppression and editing of lipid signals are such that two-dimensional spectra of lactic acid may be obtained from a radiation-induced fibrosarcoma (RIF-1) tumor in under 1 min and lactic acid images from the same tumor in under 1 hr at 2.0 T. This technique provides a fast and reproducible method at moderate magnetic field strength for mapping biologically relevant metabolites.

  5. Lycopene metabolite, apo-10'-lycopenoic acid, inhibits diethylnitrosamine-initiated, high fat diet-promoted hepatic inflammation and tumorigenesis in mice

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Obesity is associated with increased risk in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) development and mortality. An important disease control strategy is the prevention of obesity-related hepatic inflammation and tumorigenesis by dietary means. Here, we report that apo-10'-lycopenoic acid (APO10LA), a cleavag...

  6. Plasma amino acid and metabolite signatures tracking diabetes progression in the UCD-T2DM rat model of type 2 diabetes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Elevations of plasma concentrations of branched-chain amino acids (BCAAs) are observed in human insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM); however, there has been some controversy with respect to the passive or causative nature of the BCAA phenotype. Using untargeted metabolomics, plasm...

  7. Effects Of Haloacetic Acids and their major metabolites in a Mouse Embryonic Stem Cell Adherent Cell Differentiation and Cytotoxicity (ACDC) Assay

    EPA Science Inventory

    The haloacetic acids (HAAs) are a class of chemicals produced by disinfection of drinking water. Many of the HAAs are developmental toxicants when administered to rodents producing a variety of developmental effects. We have previously shown that the HAAs can produce direct effec...

  8. Influence of dietary fat on metabolism of (14-/sup 14/C)erucic acid in the perfused rat liver. Distribution of metabolites in lipid classes

    SciTech Connect

    Holmer, G.; Ronneberg, R.

    1986-06-01

    Two groups of rats were fed diets containing 20% by weight of either partially hydrogenated marine oil supplemented with sunflower seed oil (PHMO) or palm oil (PO) for 8 wk. Using a liver perfusion system, the effect of dietary long chain monoenoic fatty acids on the uptake and metabolism of (14-/sup 14/C)erucic acid was studied. The perfusion times were 15 and 60 min, respectively. The two groups showed equal ability for erucic acid uptake in the liver but differed in the channeling of the fatty acids into various metabolic pathways. A higher metabolic turnover of 22:1 in the PHMO livers relative to the PO livers was demonstrated by an increased recovery of total (/sup 14/C)labeling in the triglyceride (TG) and phospholipid (PL) fractions, already evident after 15 min of perfusion. The chain-shortening capacity was highest in the PHMO group, reflected by a higher (/sup 14/C)18:1 incorporation in both TG and PL, and increasing from 15 to 60 min of perfusion. The amount of (/sup 14/C)18:1 found in PL and TG after 60 min of perfusion of livers from rats fed PO corresponded to that shown for the PHMO group after 15 min. The PL demonstrated a discrimination against 22:1 compared to TG, and, when available, 18:1 was highly preferred for PL-synthesis. The total fatty acid distribution in the TG, as determined by gas liquid chromatography (GLC), reflected the composition of the dietary fats. In the total liver PL, 22:1 and 20:1 were present in negligible amounts, although the PHMO diet contained 12-13% of both 22:1 and 20:1. In the free fatty acid fraction (FFA), the major part of the radioactivity (approximately 80%) was (14-/sup 14/C)erucic acid, and only small amounts of (/sup 14/C)18:1 (less than 2%) were present, even after 60 min of perfusion. The shortened-chain 18:1 was readily removed from the FFA pool and preferentially used for lipid esterification.

  9. Simultaneous Qualitative Assessment and Quantitative Analysis of Metabolites (Phenolics, Nucleosides and Amino Acids) from the Roots of Fresh Gastrodia elata Using UPLC-ESI-Triple Quadrupole Ion MS and ESI- Linear Ion Trap High-Resolution MS.

    PubMed

    Chen, Sha; Liu, Jun Qiu; Xiao, Hui; Zhang, Jun; Liu, An

    2016-01-01

    A sensitive, effective and optimized method, based on ultra performance liquid chromatography (UPLC) coupled with ESI-triple quadrupole ion MS and ESI-linear ion trap high-resolution MS, has been developed for the simultaneous quantitative and qualitative determination of phenolics, nucleosides and amino acids in the roots of fresh Gastrodia elata. Optimization of the analytical method provided higher separation efficiency and better peak resolution for the targeted compounds. The simultaneous separation protocols were also optimized by routinely using accurate mass measurements, within 5 ppm error, for each molecular ion and the subsequent fragment ions. In total, 31 compounds, including 23 phenolics, two nucleosides, four amino acids, one gastrodin and one other compound were identified or tentatively characterized. Mono-substituted parishin glucoside (9), methoxy mono-substituted parishin (13), methyl parishin (26), p-hydroxybenzyl di-substituted parishin (29), and p-hydroxybenzyl parishin (31) were tentatively identified as new compounds. Principal metabolite content analysis and the composition of eight representative G. elata cultivars of various species indicated that geographic insulation was the main contributor to clustering. PMID:26954012

  10. Simultaneous Qualitative Assessment and Quantitative Analysis of Metabolites (Phenolics, Nucleosides and Amino Acids) from the Roots of Fresh Gastrodia elata Using UPLC-ESI-Triple Quadrupole Ion MS and ESI- Linear Ion Trap High-Resolution MS

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Sha; Liu, Jun Qiu; Xiao, Hui; Zhang, Jun; Liu, An

    2016-01-01

    A sensitive, effective and optimized method, based on ultra performance liquid chromatography (UPLC) coupled with ESI-triple quadrupole ion MS and ESI-linear ion trap high-resolution MS, has been developed for the simultaneous quantitative and qualitative determination of phenolics, nucleosides and amino acids in the roots of fresh Gastrodia elata. Optimization of the analytical method provided higher separation efficiency and better peak resolution for the targeted compounds. The simultaneous separation protocols were also optimized by routinely using accurate mass measurements, within 5 ppm error, for each molecular ion and the subsequent fragment ions. In total, 31 compounds, including 23 phenolics, two nucleosides, four amino acids, one gastrodin and one other compound were identified or tentatively characterized. Mono-substituted parishin glucoside (9), methoxy mono-substituted parishin (13), methyl parishin (26), p-hydroxybenzyl di-substituted parishin (29), and p-hydroxybenzyl parishin (31) were tentatively identified as new compounds. Principal metabolite content analysis and the composition of eight representative G. elata cultivars of various species indicated that geographic insulation was the main contributor to clustering. PMID:26954012

  11. Urinary pesticide metabolites in school students from northern Thailand.

    PubMed

    Panuwet, Parinya; Prapamontol, Tippawan; Chantara, Somporn; Barr, Dana B

    2009-05-01

    We evaluated exposure to pesticides among secondary school students aged 12-13 years old in Chiang Mai Province, Thailand. Pesticide-specific urinary metabolites were used as biomarkers of exposure for a variety of pesticides, including organophosphorus insecticides, synthetic pyrethroid insecticides and selected herbicides. We employed a simple solid-phase extraction with analysis using isotope dilution high-performance liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (HPLC-MS/MS). A total of 207 urine samples from Thai students were analyzed for 18 specific pesticide metabolites. We found 14 metabolites in the urine samples tested; seven of them were detected with a frequency > or=17%. The most frequently detected metabolites were 2-[(dimethoxyphosphorothioyl) sulfanyl] succinic acid (malathion dicarboxylic acid), para-nitrophenol (PNP), 3,5,6-trichloro-2-pyridinol (TPCY; metabolite of chlorpyrifos), 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D), cis- and trans-3-(2,2-dichlorovinyl)-2,2-dimethylcyclopropane-1-carboxylic acids (c-DCCA and t-DCCA; metabolite of permethrin) and 3-phenoxybenzoic acid (3-PBA; metabolite of pyrethroids). The students were classified into 4 groups according to their parental occupations: farmers (N=60), merchants and traders (N=39), government and company employees (N=52), and laborers (N=56). Children of farmers had significantly higher urinary concentrations of pyrethroid insecticide metabolites than did other children (p<0.05). Similarly, children of agricultural families had significantly higher pyrethroid metabolite concentrations. Males had significantly higher values of PNP (Mann-Whitney test, p=0.009); however, no other sex-related differences were observed. Because parental occupation and agricultural activities seemed to have little influence on pesticide levels, dietary sources were the likely contributors to the metabolite levels observed. PMID:18760967

  12. Antimycobacterial activity of lichen metabolites in vitro.

    PubMed

    Ingólfsdóttir, K; Chung, G A; Skúlason, V G; Gissurarson, S R; Vilhelmsdóttir, M

    1998-04-01

    Several compounds, whose structures represent the most common chemical classes of lichen metabolites, were screened for in vitro activity against Mycobacterium aurum, a non-pathogenic organism with a similar sensitivity profile to M. tuberculosis. Of the compounds tested, usnic acid from Cladonia arbuscula exhibited the highest activity with an MIC value of 32 microg/ml. Atranorin and lobaric acid, both isolated from Stereocaulon alpinum, salazinic acid from Parmelia saxatilis and protolichesterinic acid from Cetraria islandica all showed MIC values >/=125 microg/ml. PMID:9795033

  13. Different environmental temperatures affect amino acid metabolism in the eurytherm teleost Senegalese sole (Solea senegalensis Kaup, 1858) as indicated by changes in plasma metabolites.

    PubMed

    Costas, Benjamín; Aragão, Cláudia; Ruiz-Jarabo, Ignacio; Vargas-Chacoff, Luis; Arjona, Francisco J; Mancera, Juan M; Dinis, Maria T; Conceição, Luís E C

    2012-07-01

    Senegalese sole (Solea senegalensis) is a eurytherm teleost that under natural conditions can be exposed to annual water temperature fluctuations between 12 and 26°C. This study assessed the effects of temperature on sole metabolic status, in particular in what concerns plasma free amino acid changes during thermal acclimation. Senegalese sole maintained at 18°C were acclimated to either cold (12°C) or warm (26°C) environmental temperatures for 21 days. Fish maintained at 18°C served as control. Plasma concentrations of cortisol, glucose, lactate, triglycerides, proteins, and free amino acids were assessed. Cold acclimation influenced interrenal responses of sole by increasing cortisol release. Moreover, plasma glucose and lactate concentrations increased linearly with temperature, presumably reflecting a higher metabolic activity of sole acclimated to 26°C. Acclimation temperature affected more drastically plasma concentrations of dispensable than that of indispensable amino acids, and different acclimation temperatures induced different responses. Asparagine, glutamine and ornithine seem to be of particular importance for ammonia detoxification mechanisms, synthesis of triglycerides that may be used during homeoviscous adaptation and, to a lesser extent, as energetic substrates in specimens acclimated to 12°C. When sole is acclimated to 26°C taurine, glutamate, GABA and glycine increased, which may suggest important roles as antioxidant defences, in osmoregulatory processes and/or for energetic purposes at this thermal regimen. In conclusion, acclimation to different environmental temperatures induces several metabolic changes in Senegalese sole, suggesting that amino acids may be important for thermal acclimation. PMID:21947601

  14. Photosensitizing properties of 6-methoxy-2-naphthylacetic acid, the major metabolite of the phototoxic non-steroidal anti-inflammatory and analgesic drug nabumetone.

    PubMed

    Canudas, N; Zamora, D; Villamizar, J E; Fuentes, J; Castelli, C; Taddei, A

    2005-08-01

    The photobiological properties of 6-methoxy-2-naphthylacetic acid (6-MNAA) were studied using a variety of in vitro phototoxicity assays: photohemolysis, photoperoxidation of linoleic acid, photosensitized degradation of histidine and thymine and the Candida phototoxicity test. 6-MNAA was phototoxic in vitro. 6-MNAA reduced nitro blue tetrazolium (NBT) when irradiated with lambda > or = 300 nm in deoxygenated aqueous buffer solution (pH 7.4). NBT can be reduced by reaction with the excited state of 6-MNAA subject to interference with molecular oxygen. The photohemolysis rate was inhibited by the presence of 1,4-diazabicyclo[2.2.2]octane (DABCO), sodium azide (NaN3) and reduced glutathione (GSH). Photoperoxidation of linoleic acid and photosensitized degradation of histidine and thymine were significantly inhibited by sodium azide and reduced glutathione. 6-MNAA was phototoxic to C. albicans, C. lipolytica and C. tropicalis. A mechanism involving singlet oxygen, radicals, and electron transfer reactions is suggested for the observed phototoxicity. PMID:16124404

  15. Protein synthesis in isolated rabbit forelimb muscles. The possible role of metabolites of arachidonic acid in the response to intermittent stretching.

    PubMed Central

    Smith, R H; Palmer, R M; Reeds, P J

    1983-01-01

    Protein synthesis was measured in isolated intact rabbit muscles by the incorporation of [3H]phenylalanine added at a high concentration (2.5 mM) to the incubation medium. Intermittent mechanical stretching substantially increased the rate of protein synthesis relative to that in control muscles incubated under a constant tension. Indomethacin and meclofenamic acid, inhibitors of the enzyme cyclo-oxygenase, which converts free arachidonic acid into the prostaglandins, prostacyclins and thromboxanes, decreased the rate of protein synthesis in intermittently stretched muscles, but had no effect on synthesis rates in the unstimulated controls. Arachidonic acid at concentrations of 0.2 and 1.0 microM gave a highly significant increase in the rate of protein synthesis in muscles incubated under a constant tension. The ability of arachidonic acid to increase protein-synthesis rates was abolished by the addition of indomethacin. Activation of protein synthesis by intermittent stretching persisted for 10-20 min after the stretch stimulation had ceased. Indomethacin, added either during the initial incubation with intermittent stretching or during the subsequent period when protein synthesis was measured after stimulation had ceased, decreased protein-synthesis rates. This decrease was similar whether indomethacin was present during the initial, final or entire incubation period. In experiments analogous with those in (4) above, when Ca2+ was withheld and EGTA added for the entire incubation, rates of protein synthesis were again decreased. The rates of protein synthesis observed when Ca2+ was present during either an initial stimulation phase or a final, unstimulated, measurement phase were similar, and were intermediate between control rates and those in muscles incubated without Ca2+ for the whole experiment. Two prostaglandins, F2 alpha (2.8 microM) and A1 (28 microM), increased rates of protein synthesis in unstimulated muscles, but prostaglandins E2 and D2 and the

  16. Effect of dietary sugar concentration and sunflower seed supplementation on lactation performance, ruminal fermentation, milk fatty acid profile, and blood metabolites of dairy cows.

    PubMed

    Razzaghi, A; Valizadeh, R; Naserian, A A; Mesgaran, M Danesh; Carpenter, A J; Ghaffari, M H

    2016-05-01

    Previous research has shown that both sunflower seed (SF) and sucrose (SC) supplementation can result in variation in milk fat concentration and composition, possibly due to altered fermentation patterns and biohydrogenation of fatty acids in the rumen. The objective of this study was to determine the effects of different sugar concentrations with or without SF supplementation on lactation performance, ruminal fermentation, and milk fatty acid profile in lactating dairy cows. Eight multiparous Holstein dairy cows (body weight=620±15kg, 60±10 d in milk, mean ± standard deviation) were randomly assigned to treatments in a replicated 4×4 Latin square design with a 2×2 factorial arrangement of treatments. Each 21-d period consisted of a 14-d diet adaptation period and 7-d collection period. Dairy cows were fed 1 of the following 4 diets: (1) no additional SC without SF supplementation (NSC-SF), (2) no additional SC with SF supplementation (NSC+SF), (3) SC without SF supplementation (SC-SF), and (4) SC with SF supplementation (SC+SF). The diets contained the same amount of forages (corn silage and alfalfa hay). Four isonitrogenous and isoenergetic diets were formulated by replacing corn grain with SC and SF and balanced using change in proportions of canola meal and sugar beet pulp. No interaction was detected between SC and SF supplementation with respect to dry matter intake, milk yield, and composition. A tendency was found for an interaction between inclusion of SC and SF on energy-corrected milk with the highest amount in the SC-SF diet. Ruminal pH and the molar proportion of acetate were affected by SC inclusion, with an increase related to the SC-SF diet. Diets containing SF decreased the concentrations of short-chain fatty acids (4:0 to 10:0) and medium-chain fatty acids (12:0 to 16:0) in milk fat. The addition of SC tended to decrease the concentration of total trans-18:1. These data provide evidence that exchanging SC for corn at 4% of dietary dry matter

  17. Synthesis of (+) and (-)-phaselic acid

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    (2S)-Phaselic acid (2S-O-caffeoylmalate) is a common plant metabolite belonging to the o-diphenol subclass of phenolic secondary metabolites. Our interest in this metabolite stems from previous studies showing that the presence of (2S)-phaselic acid in red clover is crucial to the preservation of ut...

  18. Synthesis of (+)- and (-)-phaselic acid

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    (2S)-Phaselic acid (2S-O-caffeoylmalate) is a common plant metabolite belonging to the o-diphenol subclass of phenolic secondary metabolites. Our interest in this metabolite stems from previous studies showing that the presence of (2S)-phaselic acid in red clover is crucial to the preservation of ut...

  19. Reduced folate and serum vitamin metabolites in patients with rectal carcinoma: an open-label feasibility study of pemetrexed with folic acid and vitamin B12 supplementation

    PubMed Central

    Odin, Elisabeth A.; Carlsson, Göran U.; Kurlberg, Göran K.; Björkqvist, Hillevi G.; Tångefjord, Maria T.; Gustavsson, Bengt G.

    2016-01-01

    The objectives of this single-center, open-label, phase II study were to evaluate (a) the feasibility and safety of neoadjuvant administration of pemetrexed with oral folic acid and vitamin B12 (FA/B12) in newly diagnosed patients with resectable rectal cancer and (b) intracellular and systemic vitamin metabolism. Patients were treated with three cycles of pemetrexed (500 mg/m2, every 3 weeks) and FA/B12 before surgery. The reduced folates tetrahydrofolate, 5-methyltetrahydrofolate, and 5,10-methylenetetrahydrofolate were evaluated from biopsies in tumor tissue and in adjacent mucosa. Serum levels of homocysteine, cystathionine, and methylmalonic acid were also measured. All 37 patients received three cycles of pemetrexed; 89.2% completed their planned dosage within a 9-week feasibility time frame. Neither dose reductions nor study drug-related serious adverse events were reported. Reduced folate levels were significantly higher in tumor tissue compared with adjacent mucosa at baseline. After FA/B12 administration, tissue levels of reduced folates increased significantly and remained high during treatment in both tumor and mucosa until surgery. Serum levels of cystathionine increased significantly compared with baseline after FA/B12 administration, but then decreased, fluctuating cyclically during pemetrexed therapy. Homocysteine and methylmalonic acid levels decreased significantly after FA/B12 administration, and remained below baseline levels during the study. These results indicate that administration of three neoadjuvant cycles of single-agent pemetrexed, every 3 weeks, with FA/B12 in patients with resectable rectal cancer is feasible and tolerable. Tissue and serum vitamin metabolism results demonstrate the influence of pemetrexed and FA/B12 on vitamin metabolism and warrant further study. PMID:26825869

  20. Reduced folate and serum vitamin metabolites in patients with rectal carcinoma: an open-label feasibility study of pemetrexed with folic acid and vitamin B12 supplementation.

    PubMed

    Stoffregen, Clemens C; Odin, Elisabeth A; Carlsson, Göran U; Kurlberg, Göran K; Björkqvist, Hillevi G; Tångefjord, Maria T; Gustavsson, Bengt G

    2016-06-01

    The objectives of this single-center, open-label, phase II study were to evaluate (a) the feasibility and safety of neoadjuvant administration of pemetrexed with oral folic acid and vitamin B12 (FA/B12) in newly diagnosed patients with resectable rectal cancer and (b) intracellular and systemic vitamin metabolism. Patients were treated with three cycles of pemetrexed (500 mg/m, every 3 weeks) and FA/B12 before surgery. The reduced folates tetrahydrofolate, 5-methyltetrahydrofolate, and 5,10-methylenetetrahydrofolate were evaluated from biopsies in tumor tissue and in adjacent mucosa. Serum levels of homocysteine, cystathionine, and methylmalonic acid were also measured. All 37 patients received three cycles of pemetrexed; 89.2% completed their planned dosage within a 9-week feasibility time frame. Neither dose reductions nor study drug-related serious adverse events were reported. Reduced folate levels were significantly higher in tumor tissue compared with adjacent mucosa at baseline. After FA/B12 administration, tissue levels of reduced folates increased significantly and remained high during treatment in both tumor and mucosa until surgery. Serum levels of cystathionine increased significantly compared with baseline after FA/B12 administration, but then decreased, fluctuating cyclically during pemetrexed therapy. Homocysteine and methylmalonic acid levels decreased significantly after FA/B12 administration, and remained below baseline levels during the study. These results indicate that administration of three neoadjuvant cycles of single-agent pemetrexed, every 3 weeks, with FA/B12 in patients with resectable rectal cancer is feasible and tolerable. Tissue and serum vitamin metabolism results demonstrate the influence of pemetrexed and FA/B12 on vitamin metabolism and warrant further study. PMID:26825869

  1. Probing the Active Site of MIO-dependent Aminomutases, Key Catalysts in the Biosynthesis of amino Acids Incorporated in Secondary Metabolites

    SciTech Connect

    Cooke, H.; Bruner, S

    2010-01-01

    The tyrosine aminomutase SgTAM produces (S)-{beta}-tyrosine from L-tyrosine in the biosynthesis of the enediyne antitumor antibiotic C-1027. This conversion is promoted by the methylideneimidazole-5-one (MIO) prosthetic group. MIO was first identified in the homologous family of ammonia lyases, which deaminate aromatic amino acids to form {alpha},{beta}-unsaturated carboxylates. Studies of substrate specificity have been described for lyases but there have been limited reports in altering the substrate specificity of aminomutases. Furthermore, it remains unclear as to what structural properties are responsible for catalyzing the presumed readdition of the amino group into the {alpha},{beta}-unsaturated intermediates to form {beta}-amino acids. Attempts to elucidate specificity and mechanistic determinants of SgTAM have also proved to be difficult as it is recalcitrant to perturbations to the active site via mutagenesis. An X-ray cocrystal structure of the SgTAM mutant of the catalytic base with L-tyrosine verified important substrate binding residues as well as the enzymatic base. Further mutagenesis revealed that removal of these crucial interactions renders the enzyme inactive. Proposed structural determinants for mutase activity probed via mutagenesis, time-point assays and X-ray crystallography revealed a complicated role for these residues in maintaining key quaternary structure properties that aid in catalysis.

  2. Experimental colitis in mice is attenuated by changes in the levels of endocannabinoid metabolites induced by selective inhibition of fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH)

    PubMed Central

    Sałaga, M; Mokrowiecka, A; Zakrzewski, P K; Cygankiewicz, A; Leishman, E; Sobczak, M; Zatorski, H; Małecka-Panas, E; Kordek, R; Storr, M; Krajewska, W M; Bradshaw, H B; Fichna, J

    2014-01-01

    Background and aims Pharmacological treatment and/or maintenance of remission in inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD) is currently one of the biggest challenge in the field of gastroenterology. Available therapies are mostly limited to overcoming the symptoms, but not the cause of the disease. Recently, the endocannabinoid system has been proposed as a novel target in the treatment of IBD. Here we aimed to assess the anti-inflammatory action of the novel fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH) inhibitor PF-3845 and its effect on the endocannabinoid and related lipid metabolism during the course of experimental colitis. Methods We used two models of experimental colitis in mice (TNBS- and DSS-induced) and additionally, we employed LC/MS/MS spectrometry to determine the changes in biolipid levels in the mouse colon during inflammation. Results We showed that the FAAH inhibitor PF-3845 reduced experimental TNBS-induced colitis in mice and its anti-inflammatory action is associated with altering the levels of selected biolipids (arachidonic and oleic acid derivatives, prostaglandins and biolipids containing glycine in the mouse colon). Conclusions We show that FAAH is a promising pharmacological target and the FAAH-dependent biolipids play a major role in colitis. Our results highlight and promote therapeutic strategy based on targeting FAAH-dependent metabolic pathways in order to alleviate intestinal inflammation. PMID:24530133

  3. INTRACELLULAR ANTIOXIDANT ACTIVITY OF A STREPTOMYCES SP. 8812 SECONDARY METABOLITE, 6,7-DIHYDROXY-3,4-DIHYDROISOQINO- LINE-3-CARBOXYLIC ACID, AND ITS SYNTHETIC DERIVATIVES.

    PubMed

    Guśpiel, Adam; Ziemska, Joanna; Cześcik, Agnieszka; Kawecki, Robert; Solecka, Jolanta

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the antioxidant properties of 6,7-dihydroxy-3,4-dihydroiso- quinoline-3-carboxylic acid (1) and its derivatives in living cells against reactive forms of oxygen and nitrogen, i.e., hydrogen peroxide and nitric oxide. Four of tested compounds scavenged the reactive form of nitrogen more efficiently or similarly to Trolox (EC50 = 55.80 µM). Two compounds exhibited antioxidant activity against reactive oxygen species better than Trolox (EC50 = 51.88 µM). The most active derivative of 1 was the compound containing an iodine atom at position 8 (6,7-dihydroxy-8-iodo-3,4-dihydroisoquinoline-3-carboxylic acid). Our studies showed that some of the derivatives had the ability to cross the cell membrane and scavenge free radicals inside living cells. Thus, they are able to protect DNA and other cellular structures from the dam- aging effects of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species. In addition, some molecular descriptors of the tested compounds were determined with the use of ICM Pro (Molsoft L.L.C.). PMID:27476282

  4. Probing the active site of MIO-dependent aminomutases, key catalysts in the biosynthesis of beta-amino acids incorporated in secondary metabolites.

    PubMed

    Cooke, Heather A; Bruner, Steven D

    2010-09-01

    The tyrosine aminomutase SgTAM produces (S)-ss-tyrosine from L-tyrosine in the biosynthesis of the enediyne antitumor antibiotic C-1027. This conversion is promoted by the methylideneimidazole-5-one (MIO) prosthetic group. MIO was first identified in the homologous family of ammonia lyases, which deaminate aromatic amino acids to form alpha,ss-unsaturated carboxylates. Studies of substrate specificity have been described for lyases but there have been limited reports in altering the substrate specificity of aminomutases. Furthermore, it remains unclear as to what structural properties are responsible for catalyzing the presumed readdition of the amino group into the alpha,ss-unsaturated intermediates to form ss-amino acids. Attempts to elucidate specificity and mechanistic determinants of SgTAM have also proved to be difficult as it is recalcitrant to perturbations to the active site via mutagenesis. An X-ray cocrystal structure of the SgTAM mutant of the catalytic base with L-tyrosine verified important substrate binding residues as well as the enzymatic base. Further mutagenesis revealed that removal of these crucial interactions renders the enzyme inactive. Proposed structural determinants for mutase activity probed via mutagenesis, time-point assays and X-ray crystallography revealed a complicated role for these residues in maintaining key quaternary structure properties that aid in catalysis. PMID:20577998

  5. Tryptophan metabolite analog, N-(3,4-dimethoxycinnamonyl) anthranilic acid, ameliorates acute graft-versus-host disease through regulating T cell proliferation and polarization.

    PubMed

    Xu, Jinhuan; Wei, Jia; Huang, Min; Zhu, Xianmin; Guan, Jun; Yin, Jin; Xiao, Yi; Zhang, Yicheng

    2013-11-01

    Local catabolism of tryptophan (Trp) by indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO) is considered an important mechanism of regulating T cell immunity. N-(3,4-dimethoxycinnamonyl) anthranilic acid (3,4-DAA) is an active synthetic anthranilic acid derivative which was proved to be effective to treat type1helper T lymphocyte (Th1) mediated autoimmune diseases such as multiple sclerosis. In this report, we investigated the effects of 3,4-DAA on the acute graft versus host disease (aGVHD) following allogeneic bone marrow transplantation (allo-BMT) and its potential mechanism of action. We established a murine aGVHD model, 3,4-DAA was injected intraperitoneally at 200mg/kg/day per mouse immediately after allo-BMT or at the onset of aGVHD for 14 consecutive days; the signs of aGVHD and the survival were recorded periodically. We revealed that administration of 3,4-DAA after allo-BMT significantly reduced the severity and the histological score of aGVHD; the survival for mice receiving 3,4-DAA prophylaxis and treatment was prolonged in comparison to the vehicle control mice. The plasma levels of IFN-γ, TNF-α, IL-12 and IL-2 in 3,4-DAA treatment group were found to be decreased, while the IDO activity, CD4(+)/CD25(+) Treg cells, and the IL-10, IL-5 and IL-4 levels elevated in these mice. In consistent with the in vivo results, 3,4-DAA also inhibited IFN-γ and IL-2 production of spleen T lymphocytes in vitro. Our findings suggest that 3,4-DAA can diminish the murine experimental aGVHD through regulating T cell proliferation and polarization; this property makes it a potential alternative agent for prevention and treatment of GVHD in the clinic. PMID:23993943

  6. Pre- and neonatal exposure to lipopolysaccharide or the enteric metabolite, propionic acid, alters development and behavior in adolescent rats in a sexually dimorphic manner.

    PubMed

    Foley, Kelly A; Ossenkopp, Klaus-Peter; Kavaliers, Martin; Macfabe, Derrick F

    2014-01-01

    Alterations in the composition of the gut microbiome and/or immune system function may have a role in the development of autism spectrum disorders (ASD). The current study examined the effects of prenatal and early life administration of lipopolysaccharide (LPS), a bacterial mimetic, and the short chain fatty acid, propionic acid (PPA), a metabolic fermentation product of enteric bacteria, on developmental milestones, locomotor activity, and anxiety-like behavior in adolescent male and female offspring. Pregnant Long-Evans rats were subcutaneously injected once a day with PPA (500 mg/kg) on gestation days G12-16, LPS (50 µg/kg) on G15-16, or vehicle control on G12-16 or G15-16. Male and female offspring were injected with PPA (500 mg/kg) or vehicle twice a day, every second day from postnatal days (P) 10-18. Physical milestones and reflexes were monitored in early life with prenatal PPA and LPS inducing delays in eye opening. Locomotor activity and anxiety were assessed in adolescence (P40-42) in the elevated plus maze (EPM) and open-field. Prenatal and postnatal treatments altered behavior in a sex-specific manner. Prenatal PPA decreased time spent in the centre of the open-field in males and females while prenatal and postnatal PPA increased anxiety behavior on the EPM in female rats. Prenatal LPS did not significantly influence those behaviors. Evidence for the double hit hypothesis was seen as females receiving a double hit of PPA (prenatal and postnatal) displayed increased repetitive behavior in the open-field. These results provide evidence for the hypothesis that by-products of enteric bacteria metabolism such as PPA may contribute to ASD, altering development and behavior in adolescent rats similar to that observed in ASD and other neurodevelopmental disorders. PMID:24466331

  7. Regulation of Phosphoenolpyruvate Carboxylase Phosphorylation by Metabolites and Abscisic Acid during the Development and Germination of Barley Seeds1[C][W

    PubMed Central

    Feria, Ana-Belén; Alvarez, Rosario; Cochereau, Ludivine; Vidal, Jean; García-Mauriño, Sofía; Echevarría, Cristina

    2008-01-01

    During barley (Hordeum vulgare) seed development, phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPC) activity increased and PEPC-specific antibodies revealed housekeeping (103-kD) and inducible (108-kD) subunits. Bacterial-type PEPC fragments were immunologically detected in denatured protein extracts from dry and imbibed conditions; however, on nondenaturing gels, the activity of the recently reported octameric PEPC (in castor [Ricinus communis] oil seeds) was not detected. The phosphorylation state of the PEPC, as judged by l-malate 50% inhibition of initial activity values, phosphoprotein chromatography, and immunodetection of the phosphorylated N terminus, was found to be high between 8 and 18 d postanthesis (DPA) and during imbibition. In contrast, the enzyme appeared to be in a low phosphorylation state from 20 DPA up to dry seed. The time course of 32/36-kD, Ca2+-independent PEPC kinase activity exhibited a substantial increase after 30 DPA that did not coincide with the PEPC phosphorylation profile. This kinase was found to be inhibited by l-malate and not by putative protein inhibitors, and the PEPC phosphorylation status correlated with high glucose-6-phosphate to malate ratios, thereby suggesting an in vivo metabolic control of the kinase. PEPC phosphorylation was also regulated by photosynthate supply at 11 DPA. In addition, when fed exogenously to imbibing seeds, abscisic acid significantly increased PEPC kinase activity. This was further enhanced by the cytosolic protein synthesis inhibitor cycloheximide but blocked by protease inhibitors, thereby suggesting that the phytohormone acts on the stability of the kinase. We propose that a similar abscisic acid-dependent effect may contribute to produce the increase in PEPC kinase activity during desiccation stages. PMID:18753284

  8. Enteric Bacterial Metabolites Propionic and Butyric Acid Modulate Gene Expression, Including CREB-Dependent Catecholaminergic Neurotransmission, in PC12 Cells - Possible Relevance to Autism Spectrum Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Nankova, Bistra B.; Agarwal, Raj; MacFabe, Derrick F.; La Gamma, Edmund F.

    2014-01-01

    Alterations in gut microbiome composition have an emerging role in health and disease including brain function and behavior. Short chain fatty acids (SCFA) like propionic (PPA), and butyric acid (BA), which are present in diet and are fermentation products of many gastrointestinal bacteria, are showing increasing importance in host health, but also may be environmental contributors in neurodevelopmental disorders including autism spectrum disorders (ASD). Further to this we have shown SCFA administration to rodents over a variety of routes (intracerebroventricular, subcutaneous, intraperitoneal) or developmental time periods can elicit behavioral, electrophysiological, neuropathological and biochemical effects consistent with findings in ASD patients. SCFA are capable of altering host gene expression, partly due to their histone deacetylase inhibitor activity. We have previously shown BA can regulate tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) mRNA levels in a PC12 cell model. Since monoamine concentration is known to be elevated in the brain and blood of ASD patients and in many ASD animal models, we hypothesized that SCFA may directly influence brain monoaminergic pathways. When PC12 cells were transiently transfected with plasmids having a luciferase reporter gene under the control of the TH promoter, PPA was found to induce reporter gene activity over a wide concentration range. CREB transcription factor(s) was necessary for the transcriptional activation of TH gene by PPA. At lower concentrations PPA also caused accumulation of TH mRNA and protein, indicative of increased cell capacity to produce catecholamines. PPA and BA induced broad alterations in gene expression including neurotransmitter systems, neuronal cell adhesion molecules, inflammation, oxidative stress, lipid metabolism and mitochondrial function, all of which have been implicated in ASD. In conclusion, our data are consistent with a molecular mechanism through which gut related environmental signals such as

  9. Pre- and Neonatal Exposure to Lipopolysaccharide or the Enteric Metabolite, Propionic Acid, Alters Development and Behavior in Adolescent Rats in a Sexually Dimorphic Manner

    PubMed Central

    Foley, Kelly A.; Ossenkopp, Klaus-Peter; Kavaliers, Martin; MacFabe, Derrick F.

    2014-01-01

    Alterations in the composition of the gut microbiome and/or immune system function may have a role in the development of autism spectrum disorders (ASD). The current study examined the effects of prenatal and early life administration of lipopolysaccharide (LPS), a bacterial mimetic, and the short chain fatty acid, propionic acid (PPA), a metabolic fermentation product of enteric bacteria, on developmental milestones, locomotor activity, and anxiety-like behavior in adolescent male and female offspring. Pregnant Long-Evans rats were subcutaneously injected once a day with PPA (500 mg/kg) on gestation days G12–16, LPS (50 µg/kg) on G15–16, or vehicle control on G12–16 or G15–16. Male and female offspring were injected with PPA (500 mg/kg) or vehicle twice a day, every second day from postnatal days (P) 10–18. Physical milestones and reflexes were monitored in early life with prenatal PPA and LPS inducing delays in eye opening. Locomotor activity and anxiety were assessed in adolescence (P40–42) in the elevated plus maze (EPM) and open-field. Prenatal and postnatal treatments altered behavior in a sex-specific manner. Prenatal PPA decreased time spent in the centre of the open-field in males and females while prenatal and postnatal PPA increased anxiety behavior on the EPM in female rats. Prenatal LPS did not significantly influence those behaviors. Evidence for the double hit hypothesis was seen as females receiving a double hit of PPA (prenatal and postnatal) displayed increased repetitive behavior in the open-field. These results provide evidence for the hypothesis that by-products of enteric bacteria metabolism such as PPA may contribute to ASD, altering development and behavior in adolescent rats similar to that observed in ASD and other neurodevelopmental disorders. PMID:24466331

  10. Chemical synthesis of the 3-sulfooxy-7-N-acetylglucosaminyl-24-amidated conjugates of 3beta,7beta-dihydroxy-5-cholen-24-oic acid, and related compounds: unusual, major metabolites of bile acid in a patient with Niemann-Pick disease type C1.

    PubMed

    Iida, Takashi; Kakiyama, Genta; Hibiya, Yohei; Miyata, Shohei; Inoue, Takehiko; Ohno, Kohsaku; Goto, Takaaki; Mano, Nariyasu; Goto, Junichi; Nambara, Toshio; Hofmann, Alan F

    2006-01-01

    The chemical synthesis of 3beta,7beta-dihydroxy-5-cholen-24-oic acid, triply conjugated by sulfuric acid at C-3, by N-acetylglucosamine (GlcNAc) at C-7, and by glycine or taurine at C-24, is described. These are unusual, major metabolites of bile acid found to be excreted in the urine of a patient with Niemann-Pick disease type C1. Analogous double-conjugates of 3beta-hydroxy-7-oxo-5-cholen-24-oic acid were also prepared. The principal reactions involved were: (1) beta-d-N-acetylglucosaminidation at C-7 of methyl 3beta-tert-butyldimethylsilyloxy (TBDMSi)-7beta-hydroxy-5-cholen-24-oate with 2-acetamido-1alpha-chloro-1,2-dideoxy-3,4,6-tri-O-acetyl-d-glucopyranose in the presence of CdCO(3) in boiling toluene; (2) sulfation at C-3 of the resulting 3beta-TBDMSi-7beta-GlcNAc with sulfur trioxide-trimethylamine complex in pyridine; and (3) direct amidation at C-24 of the 3beta-sulfooxy-7beta-GlcNAc conjugate with glycine methyl ester hydrochloride (or taurine) using 4-(4,6-dimethoxy-1,3,5-triazin-2-yl)-4-methylmorpholinium chloride as a coupling agent in DMF. The structures of the multi-conjugated bile acids were characterized by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry with an electrospray ionization probe under the positive and negative ionization modes. PMID:16197972

  11. Secondary metabolites in fungus-plant interactions

    PubMed Central

    Pusztahelyi, Tünde; Holb, Imre J.; Pócsi, István

    2015-01-01

    Fungi and plants are rich sources of thousands of secondary metabolites. The genetically coded possibilities for secondary metabolite production, the stimuli of the production, and the special phytotoxins basically determine the microscopic fungi-host plant interactions and the pathogenic lifestyle of fungi. The review introduces plant secondary metabolites usually with antifungal effect as well as the importance of signaling molecules in induced systemic resistance and systemic acquired resistance processes. The review also concerns the mimicking of plant effector molecules like auxins, gibberellins and abscisic acid by fungal secondary metabolites that modulate plant growth or even can subvert the plant defense responses such as programmed cell death to gain nutrients for fungal growth and colonization. It also looks through the special secondary metabolite production and host selective toxins of some significant fungal pathogens and the plant response in form of phytoalexin production. New results coming from genome and transcriptional analyses in context of selected fungal pathogens and their hosts are also discussed. PMID:26300892

  12. 20-O-β-D-glucopyranosyl-20(S)-protopanaxadiol, a metabolite of ginsenoside Rb1, enhances the production of hyaluronic acid through the activation of ERK and Akt mediated by Src tyrosin kinase in human keratinocytes.

    PubMed

    Lim, Tae-Gyu; Jeon, Ae Ji; Yoon, Ji Hye; Song, Dasom; Kim, Jong-Eun; Kwon, Jung Yeon; Kim, Jong Rhan; Kang, Nam Joo; Park, Jun-Seong; Yeom, Myeong Hun; Oh, Deok-Kun; Lim, Yoongho; Lee, Charles C; Lee, Chang Yong; Lee, Ki Won

    2015-05-01

    The aim of the present study was to determine the mechanisms through which 20-O-β-D-glucopyranosyl-20(S)-protopanaxadiol (20GPPD) promotes the production of hyaluronic acid (HA) in human keratinocytes. 20GPPD is the primary bioactive metabolite of Rb1, a major ginsenoside found in ginseng (Panax ginseng). We sought to elucidate the underlying mechanisms behind the 20GPPD-induced production of HA. We found that 20GPPD induced an increase in HA production by elevating hyaluronan synthase 2 (HAS2) expression in human keratinocytes. The phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) and Akt was also enhanced by 20GPPD in a dose-dependent manner. The pharmacological inhibition of ERK (using U0126) or Akt (using LY294002) suppressed the 20GPPD-induced expression of HAS2, whereas treatment with an epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) inhibitor (AG1478) or an intracellular Ca2+ chelator (BAPTA/AM) did not exert any observable effects. The increased Src phosphorylation was also confirmed following treatment with 20GPPD in the human keratinocytes. Following pre-treatment with the Src inhibitor, PP2, both HA production and HAS2 expression were attenuated. Furthermore, the 20GPPD-enhanced ERK and Akt signaling decreased following treatment with PP2. Taken together, our results suggest that Src kinase plays a critical role in the 20GPPD-induced production of HA by acting as an upstream modulator of ERK and Akt activity in human keratinocytes. PMID:25738334

  13. Regulation of Vascular and Renal Function by Metabolite Receptors.

    PubMed

    Peti-Peterdi, János; Kishore, Bellamkonda K; Pluznick, Jennifer L

    2016-01-01

    To maintain metabolic homeostasis, the body must be able to monitor the concentration of a large number of substances, including metabolites, in real time and to use that information to regulate the activities of different metabolic pathways. Such regulation is achieved by the presence of sensors, termed metabolite receptors, in various tissues and cells of the body, which in turn convey the information to appropriate regulatory or positive or negative feedback systems. In this review, we cover the unique roles of metabolite receptors in renal and vascular function. These receptors play a wide variety of important roles in maintaining various aspects of homeostasis-from salt and water balance to metabolism-by sensing metabolites from a wide variety of sources. We discuss the role of metabolite sensors in sensing metabolites generated locally, metabolites generated at distant tissues or organs, or even metabolites generated by resident microbes. Metabolite receptors are also involved in various pathophysiological conditions and are being recognized as potential targets for new drugs. By highlighting three receptor families-(a) citric acid cycle intermediate receptors, (b) purinergic receptors, and PMID:26667077

  14. Effect of L- or DL-methionine Supplementation on Nitrogen Retention, Serum Amino Acid Concentrations and Blood Metabolites Profile in Starter Pigs.

    PubMed

    Tian, Q Y; Zeng, Z K; Zhang, Y X; Long, S F; Piao, X S

    2016-05-01

    The objective of the current study was to evaluate the effect of supplementation of either L-methionine (L-Met) or DL-methionine (DL-Met) to diets of starter pigs on nitrogen (N) balance, metabolism, and serum amino acid profile. Eighteen crossbred (Duroc×Landrace×Yorkshire) barrows weighing 15.45±0.88 kg were randomly allotted to 1 of 3 diets with 6 pigs per treatment. The diets included a basal diet (Met-deficient diet) containing 0.24% standardized ileal digestibility Met with all other essential nutrients meeting the pig's requirements. The other two diets were produced by supplementing the basal diet with 0.12% DL-Met or L-Met. The experiment lasted for 18 days, consisting of a 13-day adaptation period to the diets followed by a 5-day experimental period. Pigs were fed ad libitum and free access to water throughout the experiment. Results showed that the supplementation of either L-Met or DL-Met improved N retention, and serum methionine concentration, and decreased N excretion compared with basal diet (p<0.01). The N retention of pigs fed diets supplemented with the same inclusion levels of DL-Met or L-Met were not different (p>0.05). In conclusion, on equimolar basis DL-Met and L-Met are equally bioavailable as Met sources for starter pigs. PMID:26954214

  15. Effect of L- or DL-methionine Supplementation on Nitrogen Retention, Serum Amino Acid Concentrations and Blood Metabolites Profile in Starter Pigs

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Q. Y.; Zeng, Z. K.; Zhang, Y. X.; Long, S. F.; Piao, X. S.

    2016-01-01

    The objective of the current study was to evaluate the effect of supplementation of either L-methionine (L-Met) or DL-methionine (DL-Met) to diets of starter pigs on nitrogen (N) balance, metabolism, and serum amino acid profile. Eighteen crossbred (Duroc×Landrace×Yorkshire) barrows weighing 15.45±0.88 kg were randomly allotted to 1 of 3 diets with 6 pigs per treatment. The diets included a basal diet (Met-deficient diet) containing 0.24% standardized ileal digestibility Met with all other essential nutrients meeting the pig’s requirements. The other two diets were produced by supplementing the basal diet with 0.12% DL-Met or L-Met. The experiment lasted for 18 days, consisting of a 13-day adaptation period to the diets followed by a 5-day experimental period. Pigs were fed ad libitum and free access to water throughout the experiment. Results showed that the supplementation of either L-Met or DL-Met improved N retention, and serum methionine concentration, and decreased N excretion compared with basal diet (p<0.01). The N retention of pigs fed diets supplemented with the same inclusion levels of DL-Met or L-Met were not different (p>0.05). In conclusion, on equimolar basis DL-Met and L-Met are equally bioavailable as Met sources for starter pigs. PMID:26954214

  16. Gene Expression and Metabolite Profiling of Developing Highbush Blueberry Fruit Indicates Transcriptional Regulation of Flavonoid Metabolism and Activation of Abscisic Acid Metabolism1[W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Zifkin, Michael; Jin, Alena; Ozga, Jocelyn A.; Zaharia, L. Irina; Schernthaner, Johann P.; Gesell, Andreas; Abrams, Suzanne R.; Kennedy, James A.; Constabel, C. Peter

    2012-01-01

    Highbush blueberry (Vaccinium corymbosum) fruits contain substantial quantities of flavonoids, which are implicated in a wide range of health benefits. Although the flavonoid constituents of ripe blueberries are known, the molecular genetics underlying their biosynthesis, localization, and changes that occur during development have not been investigated. Two expressed sequence tag libraries from ripening blueberry fruit were constructed as a resource for gene identification and quantitative real-time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction primer design. Gene expression profiling by quantitative real-time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction showed that flavonoid biosynthetic transcript abundance followed a tightly regulated biphasic pattern, and transcript profiles were consistent with the abundance of the three major classes of flavonoids. Proanthocyanidins (PAs) and corresponding biosynthetic transcripts encoding anthocyanidin reductase and leucoanthocyanidin reductase were most concentrated in young fruit and localized predominantly to the inner fruit tissue containing the seeds and placentae. Mean PA polymer length was seven to 8.5 subunits, linked predominantly via B-type linkages, and was relatively constant throughout development. Flavonol accumulation and localization patterns were similar to those of the PAs, and the B-ring hydroxylation pattern of both was correlated with flavonoid-3′-hydroxylase transcript abundance. By contrast, anthocyanins accumulated late in maturation, which coincided with a peak in flavonoid-3-O-glycosyltransferase and flavonoid-3′5′-hydroxylase transcripts. Transcripts of VcMYBPA1, which likely encodes an R2R3-MYB transcriptional regulator of PA synthesis, were prominent in both phases of development. Furthermore, the initiation of ripening was accompanied by a substantial rise in abscisic acid, a growth regulator that may be an important component of the ripening process and contribute to the regulation

  17. Gene expression and metabolite profiling of developing highbush blueberry fruit indicates transcriptional regulation of flavonoid metabolism and activation of abscisic acid metabolism.

    PubMed

    Zifkin, Michael; Jin, Alena; Ozga, Jocelyn A; Zaharia, L Irina; Schernthaner, Johann P; Gesell, Andreas; Abrams, Suzanne R; Kennedy, James A; Constabel, C Peter

    2012-01-01

    Highbush blueberry (Vaccinium corymbosum) fruits contain substantial quantities of flavonoids, which are implicated in a wide range of health benefits. Although the flavonoid constituents of ripe blueberries are known, the molecular genetics underlying their biosynthesis, localization, and changes that occur during development have not been investigated. Two expressed sequence tag libraries from ripening blueberry fruit were constructed as a resource for gene identification and quantitative real-time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction primer design. Gene expression profiling by quantitative real-time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction showed that flavonoid biosynthetic transcript abundance followed a tightly regulated biphasic pattern, and transcript profiles were consistent with the abundance of the three major classes of flavonoids. Proanthocyanidins (PAs) and corresponding biosynthetic transcripts encoding anthocyanidin reductase and leucoanthocyanidin reductase were most concentrated in young fruit and localized predominantly to the inner fruit tissue containing the seeds and placentae. Mean PA polymer length was seven to 8.5 subunits, linked predominantly via B-type linkages, and was relatively constant throughout development. Flavonol accumulation and localization patterns were similar to those of the PAs, and the B-ring hydroxylation pattern of both was correlated with flavonoid-3'-hydroxylase transcript abundance. By contrast, anthocyanins accumulated late in maturation, which coincided with a peak in flavonoid-3-O-glycosyltransferase and flavonoid-3'5'-hydroxylase transcripts. Transcripts of VcMYBPA1, which likely encodes an R2R3-MYB transcriptional regulator of PA synthesis, were prominent in both phases of development. Furthermore, the initiation of ripening was accompanied by a substantial rise in abscisic acid, a growth regulator that may be an important component of the ripening process and contribute to the regulation of

  18. 3-iodothyroacetic acid, a metabolite of thyroid hormone, induces itch and reduces threshold to noxious and to painful heat stimuli in mice

    PubMed Central

    Laurino, Annunziatina; De Siena, Gaetano; Resta, Francesco; Masi, Alessio; Musilli, Claudia; Zucchi, Riccardo; Raimondi, Laura

    2015-01-01

    Background and purpose Itch is associated with increased sensitization to nociceptive stimuli. We investigated whether 3-iodothyroacetic acid (TA1), by releasing histamine, induces itch and increases sensitization to noxious and painful heat stimuli. Experimental Approach Itch was evaluated after s.c. administration of TA1 (0.4, 1.32 and 4 μg·kg−1). Mice threshold to noxious (NHT) and to painful heat stimuli were evaluated by the increasing-temperature hot plate (from 45.5 to 49.5°C) or by the hot plate (51.5°C) test, respectively, 15 min after i.p. injection of TA1 (0.4, 1.32 and 4 μg·kg−1). Itch, NHT and pain threshold evaluation were repeated in mice pretreated with pyrilamine. Itch and NHT were also measured in HDC+/+ and HDC−/− following injection of saline or TA1 (1.32, 4 and 11 μg·kg−1; s.c. and i.p.). pERK1/2 levels were determined by Western blot in dorsal root ganglia (DRG) isolated from CD1 mice 15 min after they received (i.p.): saline, saline and noxious heat stimulus (46.5°C), TA1 (0.1, 0.4, 1.32, 4 μg·kg−1) or TA1 1.32 μg·kg−1 and noxious heat stimulus. Key Results TA1 0.4 and 1.32 μg·kg−1 induced itch and reduced NHT; pyrilamine pretreatment prevented both of these effects. TA1 4 μg·kg−1 (i.p.) reduced pain threshold without inducing itch or modifying NHT. In HDC−/− mice, TA1 failed to induce itch and to reduce NHT. In DRG, pERK1/2 levels were significantly increased by noxious heat stimuli and by TA1 0.1, 0.4 and 1.32 μg·kg−1; i.p. Conclusions and Implications Increased TA1 levels induce itch and an enhanced sensitivity to noxious heat stimuli suggesting that TA1 might represent a potential cause of itch in thyroid diseases. PMID:25439265

  19. Cytotoxic Cytochalasins and Other Metabolites from Xylariaceae sp. FL0390, a Fungal Endophyte of Spanish Moss.

    PubMed

    Xu, Ya-Ming; Bashyal, Bharat P; Liu, Mangping X; Espinosa-Artiles, Patricia; U'Ren, Jana M; Arnold, A Elizabeth; Gunatilaka, A A Leslie

    2015-10-01

    Two new metabolites, 6-oxo-12-norcytochalasin D (1) and 4,5-di-isobutyl-2(1H)-pyrimidinone (2), together with seven known metabolites, cytochalasins D (3), Q (4), and N (5), 12-hydroxyzygosporin G (6), heptelidic acid chlorohydrin (7), (+)-heptelidic acid (8), and trichoderonic acid A (9), were isolated from Xylariaceae sp. FL0390, a fungal endophyte inhabiting Spanish moss, Tillandsia usneoides. Metabolite 1 is the first example of a 12-norcytochalasin. All metabolites, except 2 and 9, showed cytotoxic activity in a panel of five human tumor cell lines with IC50S of 0.2-5.0 μM. PMID:26669096

  20. Effect of extruded linseeds alone or in combination with fish oil on intake, milk production, plasma metabolite concentrations and milk fatty acid composition in lactating goats.

    PubMed

    Bernard, L; Leroux, C; Rouel, J; Delavaud, C; Shingfield, K J; Chilliard, Y

    2015-05-01

    Based on the potential benefits for long-term human health, there is interest in developing sustainable nutritional strategies for lowering medium-chain saturated fatty acids (FA) and increasing specific unsaturated FA in ruminant milk. Dietary supplements of extruded linseeds (EL), fish oil (FO) or a mixture of EL and FO increase cis-9,trans-11 CLA and long-chain n-3 polyunsaturated FA in bovine milk. Supplements of FO cause milk fat depression in lactating cows, but information for dairy goats is limited. A total of 14 Alpine goats were used in a replicated 3×3 Latin square with 28-days experimental periods to examine the effects of EL alone or in combination with FO on animal performance, milk fat synthesis and milk FA composition. Treatments comprised diets based on natural grassland hay supplemented with no additional oil (control), 530 of EL or 340 g/day of EL and 39 g/day of FO (ELFO). Compared with the control, ELFO tended (P=0.08) to lower milk fat yield, whereas EL increased (P<0.01) milk fat content and yield (15% and 10%, respectively). Relative to EL, ELFO decreased (P<0.01) milk fat content and yield (19% and 17%, respectively). Relative to the control and ELFO, EL decreased (P<0.05) milk 10:0 to 16:0 and odd- and branched-chain FA content and increased 18:0, cis-18:1, trans-13 18:1 (and their corresponding ∆-9 (desaturase products), trans-12,cis-14 CLA, cis-13,trans-15 CLA, cis-12,trans-14 CLA and trans-11,cis-13 CLA and 18:3n-3 concentrations. ELFO was more effective for enriching (P<0.05) milk cis-9, trans-11 CLA and trans-11 18:1 concentrations (up to 5.4- and 7.1-fold compared with the control) than EL (up to 1.7- and 2.5-fold increases). Furthermore, ELFO resulted in a substantial increase in milk trans-10 18:1 concentration (5.4% total FA), with considerable variation between individual animals. Relative to the control and EL, milk fat responses to ELFO were characterized by increases (P<0.05) in milk trans-16:1 (Δ9 to 11), trans-18:1 (Δ6

  1. Metabolites of a blocked chloramphenicol producer.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Elizabeth A; Adamek, Tamara L; Vining, Leo C; White, Robert L

    2003-01-01

    Addition of p-aminophenylalanine (4), an advanced biosynthetic precursor of the antibiotic chloramphenicol (5), to a Streptomyces venezuelae pabAB mutant (VS629) restored chloramphenicol production and led to formation of the non-chlorinated analogue corynecin II (6) and four acetanilide derivatives: p-(acetylamino)phenylalanine (7), p-(acetylamino)benzyl alcohol (13), p-(acetylamino)benzoic acid (14), and p-(acetylamino)phenol (acetaminophen, 16). Metabolite structures were deduced from NMR and MS-MS data and established by chromatographic and spectroscopic comparisons with authentic samples. Reference compound 13 was synthesized by reducing the acid chloride of 14. Shunt pathways are proposed to account for the formation of the metabolites from p-aminophenylalanine. PMID:12542347

  2. Pryogalloloestrogens -- a new group of oestrogen metabolites.

    PubMed

    Stubenrauch, G; Gelbke, H P; Knuppen, R

    1976-01-01

    After incubation of radioactive catecholoestrogen monomethyl ethers with rat liver slices the following well known metabolic pathways were observed: 1) demethylation, 2) 16alpha-hydroxylation, 3) oxidoreduction at C-atom 17, and 4) conjugation with glutathione, sulphuric acid and glucuronic acid. In addition, for the first time a further aromatic ortho-hydroxylation, leading to pyrogalloloestrogen derivatives, was detected. Thus, the incubation of 2-methoxyoestrone yielded 2,4-dihydroxyoestrone 2-methyl ether as the main metabolite of the lipophile fraction. Under the same conditions, 4-methoxyoestrone was converted to 2,4-dihydroxyoestrone 4-methyl ether and 2,4-dihydroxyoestradiol-17beta 4-methyl ether; these compounds were the quantitatively most important metabolites not only in the lipophile but also in the sulphate and glucuronide fractions. The identity of these new metabolic products was established by chromatography, microchemical reactions and recrystallisation to constant specific radioactivity. PMID:1248801

  3. Determination of sulphasalazine and its main metabolite sulphapyridine and 5-aminosalicylic acid in human plasma by liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry and its application to a pharmacokinetic study.

    PubMed

    Gu, Guang-Zhi; Xia, Hui-Min; Pang, Zhi-Qing; Liu, Zhong-Yang; Jiang, Xin-Guo; Chen, Jun

    2011-02-15

    A simple and sensitive liquid chromatography/positive-ion electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (LC-ESI-MS/MS) method has been developed for the simultaneous determination of sulphasalazine (SASP) and its main metabolite sulphapyridine (SP) and 5-aminosalicylic acid (5-ASA) with 100 μL of human plasma using dimenhydrinate as the internal standard (I.S.). The API-3000 LC-MS/MS was operated under the multiple reaction-monitoring mode (MRM) using the electrospray ionization technique. Protein precipitation process was used to extract SASP, SP, 5-ASA and I.S. from human plasma. The total run time was 9.0 min and the elution of SASP, SP and 5-ASA was at 4.8 min, 2.5 min and 2.0 min, respectively. The separation was achieved with a mobile phase consisting of 0.2% formic acid, 2 mM ammonium acetate in water (mobile phase A) and 0.2% formic acid, 2 mM ammonium acetate in methanol (mobile phase B) by using gradient elution on a XBP Phenyl column (100 mm × 2.1 mm, 5 μm). The developed method was validated in human plasma with a lower limit of quantitation of 10 ng/mL for SASP, SP and 5-ASA, respectively. A linear response function was established for the range of concentrations 10-10,000 ng/mL (r>0.99) for SASP and 10-1000 ng/mL (r>0.99) for SP and 5-ASA. The intra and inter-day precision values for SASP, SP and 5-ASA met the acceptance as per FDA guidelines. SASP, SP and 5-ASA were stable during stability studies, i.e., long term, auto-sampler and freeze/thaw cycles. The method was successfully applied for the evaluation of pharmacokinetics of SASP, SP and 5-ASA after single oral doses of 250 mg SASP to 10 healthy volunteers. PMID:21251889

  4. Understanding and Classifying Metabolite Space and Metabolite-Likeness

    PubMed Central

    Peironcely, Julio E.; Reijmers, Theo; Coulier, Leon; Bender, Andreas; Hankemeier, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    While the entirety of ‘Chemical Space’ is huge (and assumed to contain between 1063 and 10200 ‘small molecules’), distinct subsets of this space can nonetheless be defined according to certain structural parameters. An example of such a subspace is the chemical space spanned by endogenous metabolites, defined as ‘naturally occurring’ products of an organisms' metabolism. In order to understand this part of chemical space in more detail, we analyzed the chemical space populated by human metabolites in two ways. Firstly, in order to understand metabolite space better, we performed Principal Component Analysis (PCA), hierarchical clustering and scaffold analysis of metabolites and non-metabolites in order to analyze which chemical features are characteristic for both classes of compounds. Here we found that heteroatom (both oxygen and nitrogen) content, as well as the presence of particular ring systems was able to distinguish both groups of compounds. Secondly, we established which molecular descriptors and classifiers are capable of distinguishing metabolites from non-metabolites, by assigning a ‘metabolite-likeness’ score. It was found that the combination of MDL Public Keys and Random Forest exhibited best overall classification performance with an AUC value of 99.13%, a specificity of 99.84% and a selectivity of 88.79%. This performance is slightly better than previous classifiers; and interestingly we found that drugs occupy two distinct areas of metabolite-likeness, the one being more ‘synthetic’ and the other being more ‘metabolite-like’. Also, on a truly prospective dataset of 457 compounds, 95.84% correct classification was achieved. Overall, we are confident that we contributed to the tasks of classifying metabolites, as well as to understanding metabolite chemical space better. This knowledge can now be used in the development of new drugs that need to resemble metabolites, and in our work particularly for assessing the metabolite

  5. Three new metabolites from Botrytis cinerea.

    PubMed

    Wang, Tian-Shan; Zhou, Jin-Yan; Tan, Hong

    2008-01-01

    Three new metabolites, gamma-abscisolactone (1), botrytisic acids A (3) and B (4) were isolated from the fermentation broth of Botrytis cinerea TB-3-H8. Their structures were elucidated on the basis of MS, IR, UV, and NMR spectroscopic data. Compound 2 was isolated from natural resource for the first time. The structure of 1 was further confirmed by single-crystal X-ray diffraction (CCDC-265897). PMID:19003608

  6. Microalgal metabolites: a new perspective.

    PubMed

    Shimizu, Y

    1996-01-01

    Occurrence of secondary metabolites in microalgae (protoctista) is discussed with respect to the phylogenic or taxonomic relationships of organisms. Biosynthetic mechanisms of certain metabolites such as paralytic shellfish poisoning toxins and polyether toxins are also discussed, and genetic aspects of the secondary metabolite production as well. PMID:8905087

  7. Metabolite Damage and Metabolite Damage Control in Plants.

    PubMed

    Hanson, Andrew D; Henry, Christopher S; Fiehn, Oliver; de Crécy-Lagard, Valérie

    2016-04-29

    It is increasingly clear that (a) many metabolites undergo spontaneous or enzyme-catalyzed side reactions in vivo, (b) the damaged metabolites formed by these reactions can be harmful, and (c) organisms have biochemical systems that limit the buildup of damaged metabolites. These damage-control systems either return a damaged molecule to its pristine state (metabolite repair) or convert harmful molecules to harmless ones (damage preemption). Because all organisms share a core set of metabolites that suffer the same chemical and enzymatic damage reactions, certain damage-control systems are widely conserved across the kingdoms of life. Relatively few damage reactions and damage-control systems are well known. Uncovering new damage reactions and identifying the corresponding damaged metabolites, damage-control genes, and enzymes demands a coordinated mix of chemistry, metabolomics, cheminformatics, biochemistry, and comparative genomics. This review illustrates the above points using examples from plants, which are at least as prone to metabolite damage as other organisms. PMID:26667673

  8. Increased plasma serotonin metabolite 5-hydroxyindole acetic acid concentrations are associated with impaired systolic and late diastolic forward flows during cardiac cycle and elevated resistive index at popliteal artery and renal insufficiency in type 2 diabetic patients with microalbuminuria.

    PubMed

    Saito, Jun; Suzuki, Eiji; Tajima, Yoshitaka; Takami, Kazuhisa; Horikawa, Yukio; Takeda, Jun

    2016-01-01

    Although lower extremity arterial disease is frequently accompanied by diabetes mellitus, the association of circulating biomarkers with flow components during the cardiac cycle in lower-leg arteries has yet to be fully elucidated. We enrolled 165 type 2 diabetic patients with normal ankle-brachial index (ABI 1.0-1.4), comprising 106 normoalbuminuric and 59 microalbuminuric patients, and 40 age-matched nondiabetic subjects consecutively admitted to our hospital. Serum high sensitivity C-reactive protein (hsCRP) level and plasma von Willebrand factor ristocetin cofactor activity (VWF) and vasoconstrictor serotonin metabolite 5-hydroxyindole acetic acid (5-HIAA) concentrations were measured. An automatic device was used to measure ABI and brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity (baPWV). Flow components during the cardiac cycle, total flow volume, and resistive index at popliteal artery were evaluated using gated magnetic resonance imaging. Although estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR), early diastolic flow reversal, heart rate, and ABI were similar between the groups, diabetic patients had higher log hsCRP (p<0.001), VWF (p<0.001), 5-HIAA (p=0.002), resistive index (p<0.001) and baPWV (p<0.001) and lower systolic (p=0.026) and late diastolic (p<0.001) forward flows and total flow volume (p<0.001) than nondiabetic subjects. Multivariate analyses demonstrated that 5-HIAA in microalbuminuric patients showed higher associations with systolic and late diastolic forward flows during the cardiac cycle, total flow volume and resistive index at popliteal artery, and eGFR compared to normoalbuminuric patients. In microalbuminuric patients, 5-HIAA was a significant independent determinant among these factors. Thus, increased plasma 5-HIAA levels are involved in the pathogenesis of impaired blood flow in lower extremities and renal insufficiency in diabetic patients with microalbuminuria. PMID:26567921

  9. Profiling Reactive Metabolites via Chemical Trapping and Targeted Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Chang, Jae Won; Lee, Gihoon; Coukos, John S; Moellering, Raymond E

    2016-07-01

    Metabolomic profiling studies aim to provide a comprehensive, quantitative, and dynamic portrait of the endogenous metabolites in a biological system. While contemporary technologies permit routine profiling of many metabolites, intrinsically labile metabolites are often improperly measured or omitted from studies due to unwanted chemical transformations that occur during sample preparation or mass spectrometric analysis. The primary glycolytic metabolite 1,3-bisphosphoglyceric acid (1,3-BPG) typifies this class of metabolites, and, despite its central position in metabolism, has largely eluded analysis in profiling studies. Here we take advantage of the reactive acylphosphate group in 1,3-BPG to chemically trap the metabolite with hydroxylamine during metabolite isolation, enabling quantitative analysis by targeted LC-MS/MS. This approach is compatible with complex cellular metabolome, permits specific detection of the reactive (1,3-) instead of nonreactive (2,3-) BPG isomer, and has enabled direct analysis of dynamic 1,3-BPG levels resulting from perturbations to glucose processing. These studies confirmed that standard metabolomic methods misrepresent cellular 1,3-BPG levels in response to altered glucose metabolism and underscore the potential for chemical trapping to be used for other classes of reactive metabolites. PMID:27314642

  10. Growth promoting effects of some lichen metabolites on probiotic bacteria.

    PubMed

    Gaikwad, Subhash; Verma, Neeraj; Sharma, B O; Behera, B C

    2014-10-01

    In the present study, the extract of four natural lichen species Canoparmelia eruptens, Everniastrum cirrhatum, Parmotrema austrosinense and Rimelia cetrata were studied for the source of natural antioxidant and their purified secondary metabolites were evaluated for growth promoting effects on probiotic bacteria Lactobacillus casei. The methanolic fraction of lichen species showed moderate to high antioxidant activity in the order P. austrosinense > E. cirrhatum > C. eruptens > R. cetrata. The lichen metabolites showed antioxidant activity with an IC50 values (μg/ml); lecanoric acid 79-95, salazinic 88-108, atranorin 100-116 and consalazinic acid 119-125. As far as the growth promoting effects of lichen metabolites on L. casei is concerned, lecanoric acid at 100 μg/ml conc. showed high growth stimulating activity in terms of increased dry matter of biomass (56.08 mg) of L. casei. Other lichen metabolites; salazinic acid, atranorin and consalazinic acid produced relatively less dry biomass 43.98 mg, 41.1 mg, 40.68 mg, respectively. However, standard antioxidants butylated hydroxyanisole (BHA), butylated hydroxytoluene (BHT) and Trolox after 36 h produced 39.04-47.81 mg dry biomass. At lower pH the growth promoting activity of lichen metabolites was found stable. PMID:25328204

  11. Modulation of antimicrobial metabolites production by the fungus Aspergillus parasiticus

    PubMed Central

    Bracarense, Adriana A.P.; Takahashi, Jacqueline A.

    2014-01-01

    Biosynthesis of active secondary metabolites by fungi occurs as a specific response to the different growing environments. Changes in this environment alter the chemical and biological profiles leading to metabolites diversification and consequently to novel pharmacological applications. In this work, it was studied the influence of three parameters (fermentation length, medium composition and aeration) in the biosyntheses of antimicrobial metabolites by the fungus Aspergillus parasiticus in 10 distinct fermentation periods. Metabolism modulation in two culturing media, CYA and YES was evaluated by a 22 full factorial planning (ANOVA) and on a 23 factorial planning, role of aeration, medium composition and carbohydrate concentration were also evaluated. In overall, 120 different extracts were prepared, their HPLC profiles were obtained and the antimicrobial activity against A. flavus, C. albicans, E. coli and S. aureus of all extracts was evaluated by microdilution bioassay. Yield of kojic acid, a fine chemical produced by the fungus A. parasiticus was determined in all extracts. Statistical analyses pointed thirteen conditions able to modulate the production of bioactive metabolites by A. parasiticus. Effect of carbon source in metabolites diversification was significant as shown by the changes in the HPLC profiles of the extracts. Most of the extracts presented inhibition rates higher than that of kojic acid as for the extract obtained after 6 days of fermentation in YES medium under stirring. Kojic acid was not the only metabolite responsible for the activity since some highly active extracts showed to possess low amounts of this compound, as determined by HPLC. PMID:24948950

  12. CYP2C8- and CYP3A-mediated C-demethylation of (3-{[(4-tert-butylbenzyl)-(pyridine-3-sulfonyl)-amino]-methyl}-phenoxy)-acetic acid (CP-533,536), an EP2 receptor-selective prostaglandin E2 agonist: characterization of metabolites by high-resolution liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry and liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry-nuclear magnetic resonance.

    PubMed

    Prakash, Chandra; Wang, Weiwei; O'Connell, Thomas; Johnson, Kim A

    2008-10-01

    CP-533,536, (3-{[(4-tert-butyl-benzyl)-(pyridine-3-sulfonyl)-amino]-methyl}-phenoxy)-acetic acid (1), an EP2 receptor-selective prostaglandin E2 agonist, is being developed to aid in the healing of bone fractures. To support the development of this program, in vitro metabolism of 1 was investigated in human liver microsomes and major recombinant human cytochrome P450 (P450) isoforms. 1 was metabolized in vitro by at least three recombinant human P450s: CYP3A4, CYP3A5, and CYP2C8. The turnover of 1 was NADPH-dependent and was completely inhibited by ketoconazole and quercetin in the CYP3A4/5 and CYP2C8 incubations, respectively. The major metabolic pathways were caused by oxidation of the tert-butyl moiety to form the omega-hydroxy metabolite (M4), oxidation of the pyridine moiety, and/or N-dealkylation of the methylphenoxy acetic acid moiety. The alcohol metabolite M4 was further oxidized to the corresponding carboxylic acid M3. In addition to these pathways, three unusual metabolites (M22, M23, and M26) resulting from C-demethylation of the tert-butyl group were identified using high-resolution liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry and liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry/NMR. The C-demethylated metabolites were not detected on incubation of carboxylic acid metabolite M3 with either human liver microsomes or CYP3A/2C8 isoforms, suggesting that these metabolites were not derived from decarboxylation of M3. A possible mechanism for C-demethylation may involve the oxidation of M4 to form an aldehyde metabolite (M24), followed by P450-mediated deformylation, to give an unstable carbon-centered radical and formic acid. The carbon-centered radical intermediate then undergoes either oxygen rebound to form an alcohol metabolite M23 or hydrogen abstraction leading to an olefin metabolite M26. PMID:18653741

  13. Quantification of sarin and cyclosarin metabolites isopropyl methylphosphonic acid and cyclohexyl methylphosphonic acid in minipig plasma using isotope-dilution and liquid chromatography- time-of-flight mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Evans, R A; Jakubowski, E M; Muse, W T; Matson, K; Hulet, S W; Mioduszewski, R J; Thomson, S A; Totura, A L; Renner, J A; Crouse, C L

    2008-01-01

    An analysis method for determining isopropyl methylphosphonic acid (IMPA) and cyclohexyl methylphosphonic acid (CMPA), the metabolic hydrolysis products of toxic organophosphorus nerve agents isopropyl methylphosphonofluoridate (sarin, GB) and cyclohexyl methylphosphonofluoridate (cyclosarin, GF), respectively, has been developed and validated using high-performance liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry with negative ion electrospray ionization with time-of-flight detection (LC-ESI-MS-TOF). The linear range of quantitation was 5 to 125 ng/mL in plasma with a method detection limit of 2 ng/mL for each compound. This method was developed to determine the amount of metabolic hydrolysis that was formed during and after nerve agent exposure in minipigs to account for a major pathway of GB and GF elimination that had not been previously characterized in the bloodstream, particularly during low-level whole-body inhalation experiments. Metabolic hydrolysis accounted for 70% to 90% of the recoverable agent in the bloodstream during exposure, when compared to both unbound and cholinesterase bound agent recovered by fluoride ion reactivation analysis for the same samples. The estimated half-life of IMPA and CMPA in plasma was determined to be 44 and 61 min, respectively. The method utilizes the mass selectivity of LC-ESI-MS-TOF using a bench-top instrument to achieve a detection limit that is consistent with reported LC-MS-MS methods analyzing blood samples. PMID:18269798

  14. Reevaluating the hype: four bacterial metabolites under scrutiny

    PubMed Central

    Mayerhofer, R.; Holzer, P.

    2015-01-01

    With microbiome research being a fiercely contested playground in science, new data are being published at tremendous pace. The review at hand serves to critically revise four microbial metabolites widely applied in research: butyric acid, flagellin, lipoteichoic acid, and propionic acid. All four metabolites are physiologically present in healthy humans. Nevertheless, all four are likewise involved in pathologies ranging from cancer to mental retardation. Their inflammatory potential is equally friend and foe. The authors systematically analyze positive and negative attributes of the aforementioned substances, indicating chances and dangers with the use of pre- and probiotic therapeutics. Furthermore, the widespread actions of microbial metabolites on distinct organs and diseases are reconciled. Moreover, the review serves as critical discourse on scientific methods commonly employed in microbiome research and comparability as well as reproducibility issues arising thereof. PMID:25883790

  15. Exploring antagonistic metabolites of established biocontrol agent of marine origin.

    PubMed

    Rane, Makarand Ramesh; Sarode, Prashant Diwakar; Chaudhari, Bhushan Liladhar; Chincholkar, Sudhir Bhaskarrao

    2008-12-01

    Biocontrol ability of Pseudomonas aeruginosa ID 4365, a biocontrol agent of groundnut phytopathogens from marine origin, was previously attributed to the production of pyoverdin type of siderophores. However, pyoverdin-rich supernatants of this organism showed better antifungal activity compared to equivalent amount of purified pyoverdin indicating presence of undetected metabolite(s) in pyoverdin rich supernatants. On the basis of observation that antagonistic activity was iron-dependent and iron-independent, an attempt was made to detect the presence of additional metabolites. In addition to pyoverdin, strain produced additional siderophores, viz. pyochelin and salicylic acid. Two broad spectrum antifungal compounds, viz. pyocyanin and phenazine-1-carboxylic acid, were detected, characterized, and activity against phytopathogens was demonstrated. Iron- and phosphate-dependent co-production of siderophores and phenazines was confirmed. Strain showed additional features like production of hydrogen cyanide, indol-3-acetic acid, and phosphate solubilization. PMID:18626581

  16. Signaling by small metabolites in systemic acquired resistance.

    PubMed

    Shah, Jyoti; Chaturvedi, Ratnesh; Chowdhury, Zulkarnain; Venables, Barney; Petros, Robby A

    2014-08-01

    Plants can retain the memory of a prior encounter with a pest. This memory confers upon a plant the ability to subsequently activate defenses more robustly when challenged by a pest. In plants that have retained the memory of a prior, localized, foliar infection by a pathogen, the pathogen-free distal organs develop immunity against subsequent infections by a broad-spectrum of pathogens. The long-term immunity conferred by this mechanism, which is termed systemic acquired resistance (SAR), is inheritable over a few generations. Signaling mediated by the phenolic metabolite salicylic acid (SA) is critical for the manifestation of SAR. Recent studies have described the involvement of additional small metabolites in SAR signaling, including methyl salicylate, the abietane diterpenoid dehydroabietinal, the lysine catabolite pipecolic acid, a glycerol-3-phosphate-dependent factor and the dicarboxylic acid azelaic acid. Many of these metabolites can be systemically transported through the plant and probably facilitate communication by the primary infected tissue with the distal tissues, which is essential for the activation of SAR. Some of these metabolites have been implicated in the SAR-associated rapid activation of defenses in response to subsequent exposure to the pathogen, a mechanism termed priming. Here, we summarize the role of these signaling metabolites in SAR, and the relationship between them and SA signaling in SAR. PMID:24506415

  17. In vitro cytotoxicity of BTEX metabolites in HeLa cells.

    PubMed

    Shen, Y

    1998-04-01

    Fuel leakage from underground storage tanks is a major source of groundwater contamination. Although the toxicity of regulated compounds such as benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, and xylene (BTEX) are well recognized, the cytotoxicity of their metabolites has not been studied extensively. In this study, Hela cells, propagated at 37 degrees C in an atmosphere of 5% CO2-95% air, served as a target for evaluation of cytotoxicity of BTEX metabolites 3-methylcatechol, 4-methylcatechol, 4-hydroxybenzoic acid, and 4-hydroxy-3-methoxybenzoic acid. The cells were exposed to different concentrations of the metabolites, which subsequently showed inhibition of cell growth and produced dose-related decreases in cell viability and cell protein content. The BTEX metabolites affected the levels of the polyamines spermidine, spermine, and putrescine, which are known to be important in cell proliferation. The cytotoxic effects for these BTEX metabolites to Hela cells were 3-methylcatechol > 4-methylcatechol > 4-hydroxy-3-methoxybenzoic acid > 4-hydroxybenzoic acid. PMID:9504968

  18. Multiple tyrosine metabolites are GPR35 agonists

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Huayun; Hu, Haibei; Fang, Ye

    2012-01-01

    Both kynurenic acid and 2-acyl lysophosphatidic acid have been postulated to be the endogenous agonists of GPR35. However, controversy remains whether alternative endogenous agonists exist. The molecular targets accounted for many nongenomic actions of thyroid hormones are mostly unknown. Here we report the agonist activity of multiple tyrosine metabolites at the GPR35. Tyrosine metabolism intermediates that contain carboxylic acid and/or catechol functional groups were first selected. Whole cell dynamic mass redistribution (DMR) assays enabled by label-free optical biosensor were then used to characterize their agonist activity in native HT-29. Molecular assays including β-arrestin translocation, ERK phosphorylation and receptor internalization confirmed that GPR35 functions as a receptor for 5,6-dihydroxyindole-2-carboxylic acid, 3,3′,5′-triiodothyronine, 3,3′,5-triiodothyronine, gentisate, rosmarinate, and 3-nitrotyrosine. These results suggest that multiple tyrosine metabolites are alternative endogenous ligands of GPR35, and GPR35 may represent a druggable target for treating certain diseases associated with abnormality of tyrosine metabolism. PMID:22523636

  19. [Antiviral properties of basidiomycetes metabolites].

    PubMed

    Avtonomova, A V; Krasnopolskaya, L M

    2014-01-01

    The data on the antiviral action of the Ganoderma lucidum, Lentinus edodes, Grifola frondosa, Agaricus brasiliensis and other basidiomycetes metabolites are summurized. The metabolites of these species of basidiomycetes exhibit a direct antiviral effect on herpes simplex virus types I and II, human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), hepatitis B virus, vesicular stomatitis virus, influenza virus, Epstein-Barr virus, and others. Moreover, metabolites of basidiomycetes increased antiviral immunity. PMID:25975107

  20. Simultaneous determination of lovastatin and its metabolite lovastatin acid in rat plasma using UPLC-MS/MS with positive/negative ion-switching electrospray ionization: Application to a pharmacokinetic study of lovastatin nanosuspension.

    PubMed

    Guo, Mengran; Zhao, Longshan; Li, Mo; Fu, Qiang; Pu, Xiaohui; Liu, Bingyang; He, Zhonggui; Yang, Li

    2016-06-15

    Lovastatin (LOV) is an antihyperlipidemic agent which exhibits low bioavailability due to its poor solubility. Therefore, a nanosuspension (NS) was developed as an efficient strategy to improve its oral bioavailability. To evaluate the pharmacokinetics of LOV-NS, a novel, sensitive, and rapid UPLC-MS/MS method was developed and validated for the simultaneous determination of LOV and its metabolite lovastatin acid (LOVA) in rat plasma. Simvastatin (IS) was chosen as the internal standard, and a liquid-liquid extraction method was used to isolate LOV and LOVA from biological matrices. The analytes were analyzed on an Acquity UPLC BEH C18 column, and a gradient program was applied at a flow rate of 0.2mL/min. Then, a tandem quadrupole mass spectrometer coupled with a positive/negative ion-switching electrospray ionization interface was employed to detect the analytes. Quantitation of the analytes was performed in the multiple reaction monitoring mode to monitor the transitions of m/z 427.1→325.0 for LOV and m/z 441.1→325.0 for IS in the positive ion mode and m/z 421.0→101.0 for LOVA in the negative ion mode, respectively. The method was validated over the concentration range 0.25-500ng/mL (r(2)≥0.99) for both LOV and LOVA. The intra-day and inter-day precision (RSD%) of LOV and LOVA were less than 12.87% and the accuracy (RE%) was less than 5.22%. The average extraction recoveries were 90.1% and 91.9% for LOV and LOVA, and the matrix effects were found to be between 85% and 115%. The stability study showed that both analytes were stable during the experiment. Finally, this method has been successfully applied to a pharmacokinetic study in rats following a single oral dose of 10mg/kg LOV-NS. PMID:27200472

  1. In the brain of mice, 3-iodothyronamine (T1AM) is converted into 3-iodothyroacetic acid (TA1) and it is included within the signaling network connecting thyroid hormone metabolites with histamine.

    PubMed

    Laurino, Annunziatina; De Siena, Gaetano; Saba, Alessandro; Chiellini, Grazia; Landucci, Elisa; Zucchi, Riccardo; Raimondi, Laura

    2015-08-15

    3-iodothyronamine (T1AM) and its oxidative product, 3-iodotyhyroacetic acid (TTA1A), are known to stimulate learning and induce hyperalgesia in mice. We investigated whether i)TA1 may be generated in vivo from T1AM, ii) T1AM shares with TA1 the ability to activate the histaminergic system. Tandem mass spectrometry was used to measure TA1 and T1AM levels in i) the brain of mice following intracerebroventricular (i.c.v.) injection of T1AM (11μgkg(-1)), with or without pretreatment with clorgyline, (2.5mgkg(-1) i.p.), a monoamine oxidase inhibitor; ii) the medium of organotypic hippocampal slices exposed to T1AM (50nM). In addition, learning and pain threshold were evaluated by the light-dark box task and the hot plate test, respectively, in mice pre-treated subcutaneously with pyrilamine (10mgkg(-1)) or zolantidine (5mgkg(-1)), 20min before i.c.v. injection of T1AM (1.32 and 11μgkg(-1)). T1AM-induced hyperalgesia (1.32 and 11μgkg(-1)) was also evaluated in histidine decarboxylase (HDC(-/-)) mice. T1AM and TA1 brain levels increased in parallel in mice injected with T1AM with the TA1/T1AM averaging 1.7%. Clorgyline pre-treatment reduced the increase in both T1AM and TA1. TA1 was the main T1AM metabolite detected in the hippocampal preparations. Pretreatment with pyrilamine or zolantidine prevented the pro-learning effect of 1.32 and 4μgkg(-1) T1AM while hyperalgesia was conserved at the dose of 11μgkg(-1) T1AM. T1AM failed to induce hyperalgesia in HDC(-/-) mice at all the doses. In conclusion, TA1 generated from T1AM, but also T1AM, appears to act by modulating the histaminergic system. PMID:25941083

  2. Derivation of a human equivalent concentration for n-butanol using a physiologically based pharmacokinetic model for n-butyl acetate and metabolites n-butanol and n-butyric acid

    SciTech Connect

    Teeguarden, Justin G.; Deisinger, P. J.; Poet, Torka S.; English, J C.; Faber, W D.; Barton, H. A.; Corley, Rick A.; Clewell, III, H. J.

    2005-05-01

    The metabolic series (family) approach for risk assessment uses a dosimetry-based analysis to develop toxicity information for a group of metabolically linked compounds using pharmacokinetic (PK) data for each compound and toxicity data for the parent compound. An initial physiologically-based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model was developed to support the implementation of the metabolic series approach for n-butyl acetate and its subsequent metabolites, n-butanol, and n-butyric acid (the butyl series) (Barton et al. 2000). In conjunction with pilot pharmacokinetic studies, the model was used to design the definitive intravenous (i.v.) PK studies. Rats were implanted with dual indwelling cannulae and administered test compounds by i.v. bolus dose, i.v. infusion, or by inhalation in a recirculating closed chamber. Hepatic, vascular and extravascular metabolic constants for metabolism were estimated by fitting the model to the blood time course data from these experiments. The respiratory bioavailability of n-butyl acetate and n-butanol was estimated from closed chamber inhalation studies and measured ventilation rates. The resulting butyl series PBPK model successfully reproduces the blood time course of these compounds following i.v. administration, and inhalation exposure to n-butyl acetate and n-butanol. A fully scaled human version of the model successfully reproduces arterial blood n-butanol kinetics following inhalation exposure to n-butanol. These validated i.v (rat) and inhalation route models (rat, butyl acetate, n-butanol; human, butanol only) can be used to support species and dose-route extrapolations required for risk assessment of butyl series family of compounds. Further, this work demonstrates the usefulness of i.v. kinetic data for parameterization of systemic metabolism and the value of collaboration between experimentalists and kineticists in the development of PBPK models. The product of this effort, validated rat and human PBPK models for the butyl

  3. The metabolite profiling of coastal coccolithophorid species Pleurochrysis carterae (Haptophyta)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Chengxu; Luo, Jie; Ye, Yangfang; Yan, Xiaojun; Liu, Baoning; Wen, Xin

    2015-11-01

    Pleurochrysis carterae is a calcified coccolithophorid species that usually blooms in the coastal area and causes aquaculture losses. The cellular calcification, blooming and many other critical species specific eco-physiological processes are closely related to various metabolic pathways. The purpose of this study is to apply the unbiased and non-destructive method of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) to detect the unknown holistic metabolite of P. carterae. The results show that NMR spectroscopic method is practical in the analysis of metabolites of phytoplankton. The metabolome of P. carterae was dominated by 26 metabolites involved in a number of different primary and secondary metabolic pathways. Organic acids and their derivatives, amino acids, sugars, nucleic aides were mainly detected. The abundant metabolites are that closely related to the process of cellular osmotic adjustment, which possibly reflect the active ability of P. carterae to adapt to the versatile coastal niche. DMSP (dimethylsulphoniopropionate) was the most dominant metabolite in P. carterae, up to 2.065±0.278 mg/g lyophilized cells, followed by glutamate and lactose, the contents were 0.349±0.035 and 0.301±0.073 mg/g lyophilized cells respectively. Other metabolites that had the content ranged between 0.1-0.2 mg/g lyophilized cells were alanine, isethionate and arabinose. Amino acid (valine, phenylalanine, isoleucine, tyrosine), organic acid salts (lactate, succinate), scyllitol and uracil had content ranged from 0.01 to below 0.1 mg/g lyophilized cells. Trigonelline, fumarate and formate were detected in very low content (only thousandths of 1 mg per gram of lyophilized cells or below). Our results of the holistic metabolites of P. carterae are the basic references for the further studies when multiple problems will be addressed to this notorious blooming calcifying species.

  4. The metabolite profiling of coastal coccolithophorid species Pleurochrysis carterae (Haptophyta)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Chengxu; Luo, Jie; Ye, Yangfang; Yan, Xiaojun; Liu, Baoning; Wen, Xin

    2016-07-01

    Pleurochrysis carterae is a calcified coccolithophorid species that usually blooms in the coastal area and causes aquaculture losses. The cellular calcification, blooming and many other critical species specific eco-physiological processes are closely related to various metabolic pathways. The purpose of this study is to apply the unbiased and non-destructive method of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) to detect the unknown holistic metabolite of P. carterae. The results show that NMR spectroscopic method is practical in the analysis of metabolites of phytoplankton. The metabolome of P. carterae was dominated by 26 metabolites involved in a number of different primary and secondary metabolic pathways. Organic acids and their derivatives, amino acids, sugars, nucleic aides were mainly detected. The abundant metabolites are that closely related to the process of cellular osmotic adjustment, which possibly reflect the active ability of P. carterae to adapt to the versatile coastal niche. DMSP (dimethylsulphoniopropionate) was the most dominant metabolite in P. carterae, up to 2.065±0.278 mg/g lyophilized cells, followed by glutamate and lactose, the contents were 0.349±0.035 and 0.301±0.073 mg/g lyophilized cells respectively. Other metabolites that had the content ranged between 0.1-0.2 mg/g lyophilized cells were alanine, isethionate and arabinose. Amino acid (valine, phenylalanine, isoleucine, tyrosine), organic acid salts (lactate, succinate), scyllitol and uracil had content ranged from 0.01 to below 0.1 mg/g lyophilized cells. Trigonelline, fumarate and formate were detected in very low content (only thousandths of 1 mg per gram of lyophilized cells or below). Our results of the holistic metabolites of P. carterae are the basic references for the further studies when multiple problems will be addressed to this notorious blooming calcifying species.

  5. Metabolic regulation and overproduction of primary metabolites

    PubMed Central

    Sanchez, Sergio; Demain, Arnold L.

    2008-01-01

    Summary Overproduction of microbial metabolites is related to developmental phases of microorganisms. Inducers, effectors, inhibitors and various signal molecules play a role in different types of overproduction. Biosynthesis of enzymes catalysing metabolic reactions in microbial cells is controlled by well‐known positive and negative mechanisms, e.g. induction, nutritional regulation (carbon or nitrogen source regulation), feedback regulation, etc. The microbial production of primary metabolites contributes significantly to the quality of life. Fermentative production of these compounds is still an important goal of modern biotechnology. Through fermentation, microorganisms growing on inexpensive carbon and nitrogen sources produce valuable products such as amino acids, nucleotides, organic acids and vitamins which can be added to food to enhance its flavour, or increase its nutritive values. The contribution of microorganisms goes well beyond the food and health industries with the renewed interest in solvent fermentations. Microorganisms have the potential to provide many petroleum‐derived products as well as the ethanol necessary for liquid fuel. Additional applications of primary metabolites lie in their impact as precursors of many pharmaceutical compounds. The roles of primary metabolites and the microbes which produce them will certainly increase in importance as time goes on. In the early years of fermentation processes, development of producing strains initially depended on classical strain breeding involving repeated random mutations, each followed by screening or selection. More recently, methods of molecular genetics have been used for the overproduction of primary metabolic products. The development of modern tools of molecular biology enabled more rational approaches for strain improvement. Techniques of transcriptome, proteome and metabolome analysis, as well as metabolic flux analysis. have recently been introduced in order to identify new and

  6. Secondary Metabolites from Higher Fungi: Discovery, Bioactivity, and Bioproduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhong, Jian-Jiang; Xiao, Jian-Hui

    Medicinal higher fungi such as Cordyceps sinensis and Ganoderma lucidum have been used as an alternative medicine remedy to promote health and longevity for people in China and other regions of the world since ancient times. Nowadays there is an increasing public interest in the secondary metabolites of those higher fungi for discovering new drugs or lead compounds. Current research in drug discovery from medicinal higher fungi involves a multifaceted approach combining mycological, biochemical, pharmacological, metabolic, biosynthetic and molecular techniques. In recent years, many new secondary metabolites from higher fungi have been isolated and are more likely to provide lead compounds for new drug discovery, which may include chemopreventive agents possessing the bioactivity of immunomodulatory, anticancer, etc. However, numerous challenges of secondary metabolites from higher fungi are encountered including bioseparation, identification, biosynthetic metabolism, and screening model issues, etc. Commercial production of secondary metabolites from medicinal mushrooms is still limited mainly due to less information about secondary metabolism and its regulation. Strategies for enhancing secondary metabolite production by medicinal mushroom fermentation include two-stage cultivation combining liquid fermentation and static culture, two-stage dissolved oxygen control, etc. Purification of bioactive secondary metabolites, such as ganoderic acids from G. lucidum, is also very important to pharmacological study and future pharmaceutical application. This review outlines typical examples of the discovery, bioactivity, and bioproduction of secondary metabolites of higher fungi origin.

  7. Accumulation in murine amniotic fluid of halothane and its metabolites.

    PubMed

    Danielsson, B R; Ghantous, H; Dencker, L

    1984-11-01

    The distribution of radioactivity in pregnant mice was registered at 0, 4, and 24 hrs after a 10 min. period of inhalation of 14C-halothane. Autoradiographic methods were used to allow to distinguish between the distribution of volatile (non-metabolize) halothane, water-soluble metabolites, and firmly tissue-bound metabolites. While volatile radioactivity was seen predominantly at short survival intervals, e.g. in body fat, blood, brain and liver, metabolites accumulated with time. Peak values occurred at 4 hrs in most organs (measured with liquid scintillation as well). The most remarkable findings were the high concentrations of radioactivity in amniotic fluid (and the ocular fluids of adults) with peak values at 4 hrs and rather high concentrations still prevailing at 24 hrs after inhalation. It is assumed that this activity represents only partly volaile halothane and mostly non-volatile metabolites. High activity of metabolites was seen in the neuroepithelium of the embryo in early gestation. Firmly tissue-bound metabolites, still remaining after washing the tissues with trichloroacetic acid and organic solvents, were found in the nasal mucosa, trachea and bronchial tree and in (presumably centrilobular) zones of the liver of adults after inhalation and 5-day old mice after intraperitoneal injection, indicating the formation of reactive metabolites in these organs. Firmly tissue-bound activity was not observed in the corresponding foetal organs. PMID:6528811

  8. Lichen secondary metabolites as DNA-interacting agents.

    PubMed

    Plsíkova, J; Stepankova, J; Kasparkova, J; Brabec, V; Backor, M; Kozurkova, M

    2014-03-01

    A series of lichen secondary metabolites (parietin, atranorin, usnic and gyrophoric acid) and their interactions with calf thymus DNA were investigated using molecular biophysics and biochemical methods. The binding constants K were estimated to range from 4.3×10(5) to 2.4×10(7)M(-1) and the percentage of hypochromism was found to be 16-34% (from spectral titration). The results of spectral measurement indicate that the compounds act as effective DNA-interacting agents. Electrophoretic separation studies prove that from all the metabolites tested in this study, only gyrophoric acid exhibited an inhibitory effect on Topo I (25μM). PMID:24269500

  9. Exposure to benzene metabolites causes oxidative damage in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Raj, Abhishek; Nachiappan, Vasanthi

    2016-06-01

    Hydroquinone (HQ) and benzoquinone (BQ) are known benzene metabolites that form reactive intermediates such as reactive oxygen species (ROS). This study attempts to understand the effect of benzene metabolites (HQ and BQ) on the antioxidant status, cell morphology, ROS levels and lipid alterations in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. There was a reduction in the growth pattern of wild-type cells exposed to HQ/BQ. Exposure of yeast cells to benzene metabolites increased the activity of the anti-oxidant enzymes catalase, superoxide dismutase and glutathione peroxidase but lead to a decrease in ascorbic acid and reduced glutathione. Increased triglyceride level and decreased phospholipid levels were observed with exposure to HQ and BQ. These results suggest that the enzymatic antioxidants were increased and are involved in the protection against macromolecular damage during oxidative stress; presumptively, these enzymes are essential for scavenging the pro-oxidant effects of benzene metabolites. PMID:27016252

  10. Spatio-temporal distribution and natural variation of metabolites in citrus fruits.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shouchuang; Tu, Hong; Wan, Jian; Chen, Wei; Liu, Xianqing; Luo, Jie; Xu, Juan; Zhang, Hongyan

    2016-05-15

    To study the natural variation and spatio-temporal accumulation of citrus metabolites, liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS) based metabolome analysis was performed on four fruit tissues (flavedo, albedo, segment membrane and juice sacs) and different Citrus species (lemon, pummelo and grapefruit, sweet orange and mandarin). Using a non-targeted metabolomics approach, more than 2000 metabolite signals were detected, from which more than 54 metabolites, including amino acids, flavonoids and limonoids, were identified/annotated. Differential accumulation patterns of both primary metabolites and secondary metabolites in various tissues and species were revealed by our study. Further investigation indicated that flavedo accumulates more flavonoids while juice sacs contain more amino acids. Besides this, cluster analysis based on the levels of metabolites detected in 47 individual Citrus accessions clearly grouped them into four distinct clusters: pummelos and grapefruits, lemons, sweet oranges and mandarins, while the cluster of pummelos and grapefruits lay distinctly apart from the other three species. PMID:26775938

  11. Severe drought stress is affecting selected primary metabolites, polyphenols, and volatile metabolites in grapevine leaves (Vitis vinifera cv. Pinot noir).

    PubMed

    Griesser, Michaela; Weingart, Georg; Schoedl-Hummel, Katharina; Neumann, Nora; Becker, Manuel; Varmuza, Kurt; Liebner, Falk; Schuhmacher, Rainer; Forneck, Astrid

    2015-03-01

    Extreme weather conditions with prolonged dry periods and high temperatures as well as heavy rain events can severely influence grapevine physiology and grape quality. The present study evaluates the effects of severe drought stress on selected primary metabolites, polyphenols and volatile metabolites in grapevine leaves. Among the 11 primary metabolites, 13 polyphenols and 95 volatiles which were analyzed, a significant discrimination between control and stressed plants of 7 primary metabolites, 11 polyphenols and 46 volatile metabolites was observed. As single parameters are usually not specific enough for the discrimination of control and stressed plants, an unsupervised (PCA) and a supervised (PLS-DA) multivariate approach were applied to combine results from different metabolic groups. In a first step a selection of five metabolites, namely citric acid, glyceric acid, ribose, phenylacetaldehyde and 2-methylbutanal were used to establish a calibration model using PLS regression to predict the leaf water potential. The model was strong enough to assign a high number of plants correctly with a correlation of 0.83. The PLS-DA provides an interesting approach to combine data sets and to provide tools for the specific evaluation of physiological plant stresses. PMID:25602440

  12. Identification of Microbial Metabolites Elevating Vitamin Contents in Barley Seeds.

    PubMed

    Yousaf, Anam; Qadir, Abdul; Anjum, Tehmina; Ahmad, Aqeel

    2015-08-19

    The current investigation analyzes metabolites of Acetobacter aceti to explore chemical compounds responsible for the induction of vitamins in barley seeds. A bioactivity guided assay of bacterial extracts and chromatographic analyses of barley produce revealed 13 chemical compounds, which were subjected to principal component analysis (PCA). PCA determined four chemical compounds (i.e., quinolinic acid, pyridoxic acid, p-aminobenzoate, and α-oxobutanoic acid) highly associated with increased quantities of vitamins. Further experimentations confirmed that quinolinic acid and p-aminobenzoate were the most efficient vitamin inducers. The results indicated chloroform/ethanol (4:1) as the best solvent system for the extraction of active compounds from crude metabolites of A. aceti. Significant quantities of mevalonic acid were detected in the extracted fraction, indicating the possible induction of the isoprenoid pathway. Altogether, the current investigation broadens the frontiers in plant-microbe interaction. PMID:26173019

  13. Urinary metabolites of 14C-labeled thyroxine in man

    PubMed Central

    Pittman, Constance S.; Buck, Melvin W.; Chambers, Joseph B.

    1972-01-01

    Studies were carried out to determine the chemical structures of thyroxine metabolites after total deiodination. Normal subjects were given thyroxine labeled with 14C on the nonphenolic ring and the alanine side chain, 8-11 μg/day for 10 days. By paper chromatography of fresh urine, six or more 14C-labeled compounds were separated. The 14C-labeled metabolites were concentrated by passing the urine through a nonionic polymeric adsorbent. Two major thyroxine metabolites were identified. The identification was made by three different methods: (a) chromatography, (b) synthesis of derivatives, and (c) recrystallization to constant specific activity. One 14C-labeled metabolite was identified as thyroacetic acid or 4-phenoxy-(4′-hydroxy) phenyl-acetic acid. Another one was identified as thyronine. Of the total urinary 14C radioactivity, 43.7% was recovered as thyroacetic acid and 19.8% was recovered as thyronine. Approximately one-fifth of each of these metabolites was present in the urine in bound form which released the free metabolites during acid hydrolysis. The average daily excretion of thyroacetic acid was 13.7% of the renal disposal rate of thyroxine, or approximately 7.5 μg/day. The average daily excretion of thyronine was 6.5% of the renal disposal rate of thyroxine or approximately 3.9 μg/day while the urinary iodide made up 64.7% of the renal disposal rate of thyroxine. Our findings provide the needed proof that the major metabolic pathways of thyroxine remove the iodine atoms by substituting hydrogen for iodine and leave the diphenyl ether nucleus intact. PMID:5032524

  14. [Study on secondary metabolites of endophytic fungi Penicillium dangeardii].

    PubMed

    Lv, Hai-ning; Ding, Guang-zhi; Liu, Yun-bao; Qu, Jing

    2015-05-01

    Endophytic fungi Penicillium dangeardii, isolated from Lysidice rhodostegia Hance root, was fermented and the secondary metabolites were studied. By means of Sephadex LH-20 column chromatography, ODS column chromatography and PHPLC over the fermented culture, 5 compounds were isolated. By using ESI-MS and NMR, the structures of the compounds were determined as N-[9-(β- D-ribofuranosyl)-9H-purin-6-yl]-L-aspartic acid (1), 3-caffeoylquinic acid (2), 4-caffeoylquinic acid (3), and 5-caffeoylquinic acid (4), 3-hydroxy-benzoic acid-4-O-β-D-glucopyranoside (5). PMID:26323144

  15. Sun, shade, and secondary metabolites

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    My research program focuses on understanding plant primary and secondary metabolites. Grape secondary metabolites, such as phenolics, have long been valuable for the organoleptic properties they impart to fruit and wine, and, more recently, for their possible health benefits. These compounds develop...

  16. The pharmacokinetics of anthocyanins and their metabolites in humans

    PubMed Central

    de Ferrars, R M; Czank, C; Zhang, Q; Botting, N P; Kroon, P A; Cassidy, A; Kay, C D

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE Anthocyanins are phytochemicals with reported vasoactive bioactivity. However, given their instability at neutral pH, they are presumed to undergo significant degradation and subsequent biotransformation. The aim of the present study was to establish the pharmacokinetics of the metabolites of cyanidin-3-glucoside (C3G), a widely consumed dietary phytochemical with potential cardioprotective properties. EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH A 500 mg oral bolus dose of 6,8,10,3′,5′-13C5-C3G was fed to eight healthy male participants, followed by a 48 h collection (0, 0.5, 1, 2, 4, 6, 24, 48 h) of blood, urine and faecal samples. Samples were analysed by HPLC-ESI-MS/MS with elimination kinetics established using non-compartmental pharmacokinetic modelling. KEY RESULTS Seventeen 13C-labelled compounds were identified in the serum, including 13C5-C3G, its degradation products, protocatechuic acid (PCA) and phloroglucinaldehyde (PGA), 13 metabolites of PCA and 1 metabolite derived from PGA. The maximal concentrations of the phenolic metabolites (Cmax) ranged from 10 to 2000 nM, between 2 and 30 h (tmax) post-consumption, with half-lives of elimination observed between 0.5 and 96 h. The major phenolic metabolites identified were hippuric acid and ferulic acid, which peaked in the serum at approximately 16 and 8 h respectively. CONCLUSIONS AND IMPLICATIONS Anthocyanins are metabolized to a structurally diverse range of metabolites that exhibit dynamic kinetic profiles. Understanding the elimination kinetics of these metabolites is key to the design of future studies examining their utility in dietary interventions or as therapeutics for disease risk reduction. PMID:24602005

  17. Endogenous cross-talk of fungal metabolites

    PubMed Central

    Sheridan, Kevin J.; Dolan, Stephen K.; Doyle, Sean

    2015-01-01

    Non-ribosomal peptide (NRP) synthesis in fungi requires a ready supply of proteogenic and non-proteogenic amino acids which are subsequently incorporated into the nascent NRP via a thiotemplate mechanism catalyzed by NRP synthetases. Substrate amino acids can be modified prior to or during incorporation into the NRP, or following incorporation into an early stage amino acid-containing biosynthetic intermediate. These post-incorporation modifications involve a range of additional enzymatic activities including but not exclusively, monooxygenases, methyltransferases, epimerases, oxidoreductases, and glutathione S-transferases which are essential to effect biosynthesis of the final NRP. Likewise, polyketide biosynthesis is directly by polyketide synthase megaenzymes and cluster-encoded ancillary decorating enzymes. Additionally, a suite of additional primary metabolites, for example: coenzyme A (CoA), acetyl CoA, S-adenosylmethionine, glutathione (GSH), NADPH, malonyl CoA, and molecular oxygen, amongst others are required for NRP and polyketide synthesis (PKS). Clearly these processes must involve exquisite orchestration to facilitate the simultaneous biosynthesis of different types of NRPs, polyketides, and related metabolites requiring identical or similar biosynthetic precursors or co-factors. Moreover, the near identical structures of many natural products within a given family (e.g., ergot alkaloids), along with localization to similar regions within fungi (e.g., conidia) suggests that cross-talk may exist, in terms of biosynthesis and functionality. Finally, we speculate if certain biosynthetic steps involved in NRP and PKS play a role in cellular protection or environmental adaptation, and wonder if these enzymatic reactions are of equivalent importance to the actual biosynthesis of the final metabolite. PMID:25601857

  18. Analysis of selected herbicide metabolites in surface and ground water of the United States

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Scribner, E.A.; Thurman, E.M.; Zimmerman, L.R.

    2000-01-01

    One of the primary goals of the US Geological Survey (USGS) Laboratory in Lawrence, Kansas, is to develop analytical methods for the analysis of herbicide metabolites in surface and ground water that are vital to the study of herbicide fate and degradation pathways in the environment. Methods to measure metabolite concentrations from three major classes of herbicides - triazine, chloroacetanilide and phenyl-urea - have been developed. Methods for triazine metabolite detection cover nine compounds: six compounds are detected by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry; one is detected by high-performance liquid chromatography with diode-array detection; and eight are detected by liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry. Two metabolites of the chloroacetanilide herbicides - ethane sulfonic acid and oxanilic acid - are detected by high-performance liquid chromatography with diode-array detection and liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry. Alachlor ethane sulfonic acid also has been detected by solid-phase extraction and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Six phenylurea metabolites are all detected by liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry; four of the six metabolites also are detected by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry. Additionally, surveys of herbicides and their metabolites in surface water, ground water, lakes, reservoirs, and rainfall have been conducted through the USGS laboratory in Lawrence. These surveys have been useful in determining herbicide and metabolite occurrence and temporal distribution and have shown that metabolites may be useful in evaluation of non-point-source contamination. Copyright (C) 2000 Elsevier Science B.V.

  19. The effects of GA and ABA treatments on metabolite profile of germinating barley.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yuqing; Cai, Shengguan; Ye, Lingzhen; Hu, Hongliang; Li, Chengdao; Zhang, Guoping

    2016-02-01

    Sugar degradation during grain germination is important for malt quality. In malting industry, gibberellin (GA) is frequently used for improvement of malting quality. In this study, the changes of metabolite profiles and starch-degrading enzymes during grain germination, and as affected by GA and abscisic acid (ABA) were investigated using two wild barley accessions XZ72 and XZ95. Totally fifty-two metabolites with known structures were detected and the change of metabolite during germination was time- and genotype dependent. Sugars and amino acids were the most dramatically changed compounds. Addition of GA enhanced the activities of starch-degrading enzymes, and increased most metabolites, especially sugars and amino acids, whereas ABA had the opposite effect. The effect varied with the barley accessions. The current study is the first attempt in investigating the effect of hormones on metabolite profiles in germinating barley grain, being helpful for identifying the factors affecting barley germination or malt quality. PMID:26304431

  20. Childhood Psychosis and Monoamine Metabolites in Spinal Fluid.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gillberg, Christopher; And Others

    1983-01-01

    Analysis of cerebrospinal fluid of 22 psychotic children, 22 normal controls, and Ss with mental retardation, progressive encephalopathy, or meningitis revealed that psychotic Ss had raised levels of homovanillic acid. Thirteen Ss diagnosed as autistic showed isolated inrease of this metabolite. Increased concentration of mongamines was not…

  1. Effects of Controlled Atmospheres on Production of Sesquiterpenoid Stress Metabolites by White Potato Tuber

    PubMed Central

    Alves, Leo M.; Heisler, Edward G.; Kissinger, John C.; Patterson, Joseph M.; Kalan, Edwin B.

    1979-01-01

    Levels of katahdinone (solavetivone), lubimin, rishitin, and phytuberin, sesquiterpenoid stress metabolites of white potato (Solanum tuberosum), were monitored in tuber slices which were challenged with an extract of Phytophthora infestans and incubated under controlled atmospheres. A mixture of ethylene in air enhanced stress metabolite production. This enhancement was amplified by higher partial pressures of oxygen. Stress metabolite production was inhibited by salicylhydroxamic acid. These results suggest the involvement of cyanide-resistant respiration in the production of potato stress metabolites, compounds which may serve as phytoalexins. PMID:16660728

  2. Concurrent quantification of tryptophan and its major metabolites

    PubMed Central

    Lesniak, Wojciech G.; Jyoti, Amar; Mishra, Manoj K.; Louissaint, Nicolette; Romero, Roberto; Chugani, Diane C.; Kannan, Sujatha; Kannan, Rangaramanujam M.

    2014-01-01

    An imbalance in tryptophan (TRP) metabolites is associated with several neurological and inflammatory disorders. Therefore, analytical methods allowing for simultaneous quantification of TRP and its major metabolites would be highly desirable, and may be valuable as potential biomarkers. We have developed a HPLC method for concurrent quantitative determination of tryptophan, serotonin, 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid, kynurenine, and kynurenic acid in tissue and fluids. The method utilizes the intrinsic spectroscopic properties of TRP and its metabolites that enable UV absorbance and fluorescence detection by HPLC, without additional labeling. The origin of the peaks related to analytes of interest was confirmed by UV–Vis spectral patterns using a PDA detector and mass spectrometry. The developed methods were validated in rabbit fetal brain and amniotic fluid at gestational day 29. Results are in excellent agreement with those reported in the literature for the same regions. This method allows for rapid quantification of tryptophan and four of its major metabolites concurrently. A change in the relative ratios of these metabolites can provide important insights in predicting the presence and progression of neuroinflammation in disorders such as cerebral palsy, autism, multiple sclerosis, Alzheimer disease, and schizophrenia. PMID:24036037

  3. Metabolite Profile Changes in Xylem Sap and Leaf Extracts of Strategy I Plants in Response to Iron Deficiency and Resupply

    PubMed Central

    Rellán-Álvarez, Rubén; El-Jendoubi, Hamdi; Wohlgemuth, Gert; Abadía, Anunciación; Fiehn, Oliver; Abadía, Javier; Álvarez-Fernández, Ana

    2011-01-01

    The metabolite profile changes induced by Fe deficiency in leaves and xylem sap of several Strategy I plant species have been characterized. We have confirmed that Fe deficiency causes consistent changes both in the xylem sap and leaf metabolite profiles. The main changes in the xylem sap metabolite profile in response to Fe deficiency include consistent decreases in amino acids, N-related metabolites and carbohydrates, and increases in TCA cycle metabolites. In tomato, Fe resupply causes a transitory flush of xylem sap carboxylates, but within 1 day the metabolite profile of the xylem sap from Fe-deficient plants becomes similar to that of Fe-sufficient controls. The main changes in the metabolite profile of leaf extracts in response to Fe deficiency include consistent increases in amino acids and N-related metabolites, carbohydrates and TCA cycle metabolites. In leaves, selected pairs of amino acids and TCA cycle metabolites show high correlations, with the sign depending of the Fe status. These data suggest that in low photosynthesis, C-starved Fe-deficient plants anaplerotic reactions involving amino acids can be crucial for short-term survival. PMID:22645546

  4. Identification of Penicillin G Metabolites under Various Environmental Conditions Using UHPLC-MS/MS.

    PubMed

    Aldeek, Fadi; Canzani, Daniele; Standland, Matthew; Crosswhite, Mark R; Hammack, Walter; Gerard, Ghislain; Cook, Jo-Marie

    2016-08-10

    In this work, we investigate the stability of penicillin G in various conditions including acidic, alkaline, natural acidic matrices and after treatment of citrus trees that are infected with citrus greening disease. The identification, confirmation, and quantitation of penicillin G and its various metabolites were evaluated using two UHPLC-MS/MS systems with variable capabilities (i.e., Thermo Q Exactive Orbitrap and Sciex 6500 QTrap). Our data show that under acidic and alkaline conditions, penicillin G at 100 ng/mL degrades quickly, with a determined half-life time of approximately 2 h. Penillic acid, penicilloic acid, and penilloic acid are found to be the most abundant metabolites of penicillin G. These major metabolites, along with isopenillic acid, are found when penicillin G is used for treatment of citrus greening infected trees. The findings of this study will provide insight regarding penicillin G residues in agricultural and biological applications. PMID:26906275

  5. Seed coat color and seed weight contribute differential responses of targeted metabolites in soybean seeds.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jinwook; Hwang, Young-Sun; Kim, Sun Tae; Yoon, Won-Byong; Han, Won Young; Kang, In-Kyu; Choung, Myoung-Gun

    2017-01-01

    The distribution and variation of targeted metabolites in soybean seeds are affected by genetic and environmental factors. In this study, we used 192 soybean germplasm accessions collected from two provinces of Korea to elucidate the effects of seed coat color and seeds dry weight on the metabolic variation and responses of targeted metabolites. The effects of seed coat color and seeds dry weight were present in sucrose, total oligosaccharides, total carbohydrates and all measured fatty acids. The targeted metabolites were clustered within three groups. These metabolites were not only differently related to seeds dry weight, but also responded differentially to seed coat color. The inter-relationship between the targeted metabolites was highly present in the result of correlation analysis. Overall, results revealed that the targeted metabolites were diverged in relation to seed coat color and seeds dry weight within locally collected soybean seed germplasm accessions. PMID:27507473

  6. Tentative identification of new metabolites of epimedin C by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Liu, Minyan; Zhao, Shaohua; Wang, Zongquan; Wang, Hongtao; Shi, Xiaowei; Lü, Ziming; Xu, Honghui; Wang, Hairong; Du, Yingfeng; Zhang, Lantong

    2011-11-01

    Epimedin C is one of the major bioactive constituents of Herba Epimedii. The aim of this study is to characterize and elucidate the structure of metabolites in the rat after administration of epimedin C. Metabolite identification was performed using a predictive multiple reaction monitoring-information dependent acquisition-enhanced product ion (pMRM-IDA-EPI) scan in positive ion mode on a hybrid triple quadrupole-linear ion trap mass spectrometer. A total of 18 metabolites were characterized by the changes in their protonated molecular masses, their MS/MS spectrum and their retention times compared with those of the parent drug. The results reveal possible metabolite profiles of epimedin C in rats; the metabolic pathways including hydrolysis, hydroxylation, dehydrogenation, demethylation and conjugation with glucuronic acid and different sugars were observed. This study provides a practical approach for rapidly identifying complicated metabolites, a methodology that could be widely applied for the structural characterization of metabolites of other compounds. PMID:22012680

  7. Phytotoxic metabolites from Neofusicoccum parvum, a pathogen of Botryosphaeria dieback of grapevine.

    PubMed

    Abou-Mansour, Eliane; Débieux, Jean-Luc; Ramírez-Suero, Montserrat; Bénard-Gellon, Mélanie; Magnin-Robert, Maryline; Spagnolo, Alessandro; Chong, Julie; Farine, Sibylle; Bertsch, Christohpe; L'Haridon, Floriane; Serrano, Mario; Fontaine, Florence; Rego, Cecilia; Larignon, Philippe

    2015-07-01

    Liquid chromatography-diode array screening of the organic extract of the cultures of 13 isolates of the fungus Neofusicoccum parvum, the main causal agent of botryosphaeria dieback of grapevine, showed similar metabolites. One strain was selected for further chemical studies and led to the isolation and characterisation of 13 metabolites. Structures were elucidated through spectroscopic analyses, including one- and two-dimensional NMR and mass spectrometry, and through comparison to literature data. The isolated compounds belong to four different chemical families: five metabolites, namely, (-)-terremutin (1), (+)-terremutin hydrate (2), (+)-epi-sphaeropsidone (3) (-)-4-chloro-terremutin hydrate (4) and(+)-4-hydroxysuccinate-terremutin hydrate (5), belong to the family of dihydrotoluquinones; two metabolites, namely, (6S,7R) asperlin (6) and (6R,7S)-dia-asperlin (7), belong to the family of epoxylactones; four metabolites, namely, (R)-(-)-mellein (8), (3R,4R)-4-hydroxymellein (9), (3R,4S)-4-hydroxymellein (10) (R)(-)-3-hydroxymellein (11), belong to the family of dihydroisocoumarins; and two of the metabolites, namely, 6-methyl-salicylic acid (12) and 2-hydroxypropyl salicylic acid (13), belong to the family of hydroxybenzoic acids. We determined the phytotoxic activity of the isolated metabolites through a leaf disc assay and the expression of defence-related genes in Vitis vinifera cells cv. Chardonnay cultured with (-)-terremutin (1), the most abundant metabolite. Finally, analysis of the brown stripes of grapevine wood from plants showing botryosphaeria dieback symptoms revealed the presence of two of the isolated phytotoxins. PMID:25747381

  8. The diet-microbiota-metabolite axis regulates the host physiology.

    PubMed

    Yamada, Takahiro; Takahashi, Daisuke; Hase, Koji

    2016-07-01

    The intestinal microbiota has been implicated in a wide range of diseases, including inflammatory bowel disease, obesity and cancer. Food ingredients are considered a major determinant of gut microbial composition, as exemplified by high-fat diet-induced dysbiosis that can affect host physiology. Accumulating studies show that microbial metabolites are key regulators of the intestinal epithelial barrier and gut immunity. In particular, short-chain fatty acids produced by bacterial fermentation of indigestible polysaccharides have profound impacts on host physiology beyond the gut. In this review, we describe the influences of the diet-microbiota-metabolite axis on host physiology, and especially on the immune and metabolic systems. PMID:26970281

  9. Cytochrome c adducts with PCB quinoid metabolites.

    PubMed

    Li, Miao; Teesch, Lynn M; Murry, Daryl J; Pope, R Marshal; Li, Yalan; Robertson, Larry W; Ludewig, Gabriele

    2016-02-01

    Polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) are a group of 209 individual congeners widely used as industrial chemicals. PCBs are found as by-products in dye and paint manufacture and are legacy, ubiquitous, and persistent as human and environmental contaminants. PCBs with fewer chlorine atoms may be metabolized to hydroxy- and dihydroxy-metabolites and further oxidized to quinoid metabolites both in vitro and in vivo. Specifically, quinoid metabolites may form adducts on nucleophilic sites within cells. We hypothesized that the PCB-quinones covalently bind to cytochrome c and, thereby, cause defects in the function of cytochrome c. In this study, synthetic PCB quinones, 2-(4'-chlorophenyl)-1,4-benzoquinone (PCB3-pQ), 4-4'-chlorophenyl)-1,2-benzoquinone (PCB3-oQ), 2-(3', 5'-dichlorophenyl)-1,4-benzoquinone, 2-(3',4', 5'-trichlorophenyl)-1,4-benzoquinone, and 2-(4'-chlorophenyl)-3,6-dichloro-1,4-benzoquinone, were incubated with cytochrome c, and adducts were detected by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS) and matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI TOF). Sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) was employed to separate the adducted proteins, while trypsin digestion and liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) were applied to identify the amino acid binding sites on cytochrome c. Conformation change of cytochrome c after binding with PCB3-pQ was investigated by SYBYL-X simulation and cytochrome c function was examined. We found that more than one molecule of PCB-quinone may bind to one molecule of cytochrome c. Lysine and glutamic acid were identified as the predominant binding sites. Software simulation showed conformation changes of adducted cytochrome c. Additionally, cross-linking of cytochrome c was observed on the SDS-PAGE gel. Cytochrome c was found to lose its function as electron acceptor after incubation with PCB quinones. These data provide evidence that the covalent

  10. Classification of terverticillate penicillia based on profiles of mycotoxins and other secondary metabolites.

    PubMed Central

    Frisvad, J C; Filtenborg, O

    1983-01-01

    Strains of available terverticillate penicillium species and varieties were analyzed for profiles of known mycotoxins and other secondary metabolites produced on Czapek yeast autolysate agar (intracellular metabolites) and yeast extract-sucrose agar (extracellular metabolites) by using simple thin-layer chromatography screening techniques. These strains (2,473 in all) could be classified into 29 groups based on profiles of secondary metabolites. Most of these profiles of secondary metabolites were distinct, containing several biosynthetically different mycotoxins and unknown metabolites characterized by distinct colors and retardation factors on thin-layer chromatography plates. Some species (P. italicum and P. atramentosum) only produced one or two metabolites by the simple screening methods. The 29 groups based on profiles of secondary metabolites were known species or subgroups thereof. These species and subgroups were independently identifiable by using morphological and physiological criteria. The species accepted, the number of isolates in each species investigated, and the mycotoxins they produced were: P. atramentosum, 4; P. aurantiogriseum, 510 (group I: penicillic acid and S-toxin and group II: penicillic acid, penitrem A [low frequency], terrestric acid [low frequency], viomellein, and xanthomegnin); P. brevicompactum, 81 (brevianamid A and mycophenolic acid); P. camembertii group I, 38, and group II, 114 (cyclopiazonic acid); P. chrysogenum, 87 (penicillin, roquefortine C, and PR-toxin); P. claviforme, 4 (patulin and roquefortine C); P. clavigerum, 4 (penitrem A); P. concentricum group I, 10 (griseofulvin and roquefortine C), and group II, 3 (patulin and roquefortine C); P. crustosum, 123 (penitrem A, roquefortine C, and terrestric acid); P. echinulatum, 13; P. expansum, 91 (citrinin, patulin, and roquefortine C); P. granulatum, 6 (patulin, penitrem A, and roquefortine C [traces]); P. griseofulvum, 21 (cyclopiazonic acid, griseofulvin, patulin, and

  11. Intestinal Microbial Metabolites Are Linked to Severity of Myocardial Infarction in Rats.

    PubMed

    Lam, Vy; Su, Jidong; Hsu, Anna; Gross, Garrett J; Salzman, Nita H; Baker, John E

    2016-01-01

    Intestinal microbiota determine severity of myocardial infarction in rats. We determined whether low molecular weight metabolites derived from intestinal microbiota and transported to the systemic circulation are linked to severity of myocardial infarction. Plasma from rats treated for seven days with the non-absorbed antibiotic vancomycin or a mixture of streptomycin, neomycin, polymyxin B and bacitracin was analyzed using mass spectrometry-based metabolite profiling platforms. Antibiotic-induced changes in the abundance of individual groups of intestinal microbiota dramatically altered the host's metabolism. Hierarchical clustering of dissimilarities separated the levels of 284 identified metabolites from treated vs. untreated rats; 193 were altered by the antibiotic treatments with a tendency towards decreased metabolite levels. Catabolism of the aromatic amino acids phenylalanine, tryptophan and tyrosine was the most affected pathway comprising 33 affected metabolites. Both antibiotic treatments decreased the severity of an induced myocardial infarction in vivo by 27% and 29%, respectively. We then determined whether microbial metabolites of the amino acids phenylalanine, tryptophan and tyrosine were linked to decreased severity of myocardial infarction. Vancomycin-treated rats were administered amino acid metabolites prior to ischemia/reperfusion studies. Oral or intravenous pretreatment of rats with these amino acid metabolites abolished the decrease in infarct size conferred by vancomycin. Inhibition of JAK-2 (AG-490, 10 μM), Src kinase (PP1, 20 μM), Akt/PI3 kinase (Wortmannin, 100 nM), p44/42 MAPK (PD98059, 10 μM), p38 MAPK (SB203580, 10 μM), or KATP channels (glibenclamide, 3 μM) abolished cardioprotection by vancomycin, indicating microbial metabolites are interacting with cell surface receptors to transduce their signals through Src kinase, cell survival pathways and KATP channels. These inhibitors have no effect on myocardial infarct size in

  12. Metabolic Networks and Metabolites Underlie Associations Between Maternal Glucose During Pregnancy and Newborn Size at Birth.

    PubMed

    Scholtens, Denise M; Bain, James R; Reisetter, Anna C; Muehlbauer, Michael J; Nodzenski, Michael; Stevens, Robert D; Ilkayeva, Olga; Lowe, Lynn P; Metzger, Boyd E; Newgard, Christopher B; Lowe, William L

    2016-07-01

    Maternal metabolites and metabolic networks underlying associations between maternal glucose during pregnancy and newborn birth weight and adiposity demand fuller characterization. We performed targeted and nontargeted gas chromatography/mass spectrometry metabolomics on maternal serum collected at fasting and 1 h following glucose beverage consumption during an oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) for 400 northern European mothers at ∼28 weeks' gestation in the Hyperglycemia and Adverse Pregnancy Outcome Study. Amino acids, fatty acids, acylcarnitines, and products of lipid metabolism decreased and triglycerides increased during the OGTT. Analyses of individual metabolites indicated limited maternal glucose associations at fasting, but broader associations, including amino acids, fatty acids, carbohydrates, and lipids, were found at 1 h. Network analyses modeling metabolite correlations provided context for individual metabolite associations and elucidated collective associations of multiple classes of metabolic fuels with newborn size and adiposity, including acylcarnitines, fatty acids, carbohydrates, and organic acids. Random forest analyses indicated an improved ability to predict newborn size outcomes by using maternal metabolomics data beyond traditional risk factors, including maternal glucose. Broad-scale association of fuel metabolites with maternal glucose is evident during pregnancy, with unique maternal metabolites potentially contributing specifically to newborn birth weight and adiposity. PMID:27207545

  13. Identification of novel metoclopramide metabolites in humans: in vitro and in vivo studies.

    PubMed

    Argikar, Upendra A; Gomez, Javier; Ung, Din; Parkman, Henry P; Nagar, Swati

    2010-08-01

    Metoclopramide (MCP) is frequently used to treat gastroparesis. Previous studies have documented MCP metabolism, but systematic structural identification of metabolites has not been performed. The aim of this study was to better understand MCP metabolism in humans. For examination of in vivo metabolism, a single oral 20-mg MCP dose was administered to eight healthy male volunteers, followed by complete urine collection over 24 h. In vitro incubations were performed in human liver microsomes (HLM) to characterize metabolism via cytochromes P450 and UDP-glucuronosyltransferases and in human liver cytosol for metabolism via sulfotransferases. Urine and subcellular incubations were analyzed for MCP metabolites on a mass spectrometer with accurate mass measurement capability. Five MCP metabolites were detected in vivo, and five additional metabolites were detected in vitro. The five metabolites of MCP identified both in vitro and in vivo were an N-O-glucuronide (M1), an N-sulfate (M2), a des-ethyl metabolite (M3), a hydroxylated metabolite (M4), and an oxidative deaminated metabolite (M5). To our knowledge, metabolites M1 and M4 have not been reported previously. M2 urinary levels varied 22-fold and M3 levels varied 16-fold among eight subjects. In vitro studies in HLM revealed the following additional metabolites: two ether glucuronides (M6 and M8), possibly on the phenyl ring after oxidation, an N-glucuronide (M7), a carbamic acid (M9), and a nitro metabolite (M10). Metabolites M6 to M10 have not been reported previously. In conclusion, this study describes the identification of MCP metabolites in vivo and in vitro in humans. PMID:20423954

  14. Plant chemical defenses: are all constitutive antimicrobial metabolites phytoanticipins?

    PubMed

    Pedras, M Soledade C; Yaya, Estifanos E

    2015-01-01

    A critical perspective on phytoanticipins, constitutive plant secondary metabolites with defensive roles against microbes is presented. This mini-review focuses on the chemical groups and structural types of defensive plant metabolites thus far not reviewed from the phytoanticipin perspective: i) fatty acid derivatives and polyketides, ii) terpenoids, iii) shikimates, phenylpropanoids and derivatives, and iv) benzylisoquinoline and pyrrolizidine alkaloids. The more traditional groups of phytoanticipins are briefly summarized, with particular focus on the latest results: i) benzoxazinoids, ii) cyanogenic glycosides, iii) glucosinolates and their metabolic products, and iv) saponins. Current evidence suggests that a better understanding of the functions of plant metabolites will drive their application to protect crops against microbial diseases. PMID:25920246

  15. [Occurrence of indole alkaloids among secondary metabolites of soil Aspergillus].

    PubMed

    Vinokurova, N G; Khmel'nitskaia, I I; Baskunov, B P; Arinbasarov, M U

    2003-01-01

    The occurrence of indole alkaloids among secondary fungal metabolites was studied in species of the genus Aspergillus, isolated from soils that were sampled in various regions of Russia (a total of 102 isolates of the species A. niger, A. phoenicis, A. fumigatus, A. flavus, A. versicolor, A. ustus, A. clavatus, and A. ochraceus). Clavine alkaloids were represented by fumigaclavine, which was formed by A. fumigatus. alpha-Cyclopiazonic acid was formed by isolates of A. fumigatus, A. flavus, A. versicolor, A. phoenicis, and A. clavatus. The occurrence of indole-containing diketopiperazine alkaloids was documented for isolates of A. flavus, A. fumigatus, A. clavatus, and A. ochraceus. No indole-containing metabolites were found among the metabolites of A. ustus or A. niger. PMID:12722658

  16. Quantitating Metabolites in Protein Precipitated Serum Using NMR Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Quantitative NMR-based metabolite profiling is challenged by the deleterious effects of abundant proteins in the intact blood plasma/serum, which underscores the need for alternative approaches. Protein removal by ultrafiltration using low molecular weight cutoff filters thus represents an important step. However, protein precipitation, an alternative and simple approach for protein removal, lacks detailed quantitative assessment for use in NMR based metabolomics. In this study, we have comprehensively evaluated the performance of protein precipitation using methanol, acetonitrile, perchloric acid, and trichloroacetic acid and ultrafiltration approaches using 1D and 2D NMR, based on the identification and absolute quantitation of 44 human blood metabolites, including a few identified for the first time in the NMR spectra of human serum. We also investigated the use of a “smart isotope tag,” 15N-cholamine for further resolution enhancement, which resulted in the detection of a number of additional metabolites. 1H NMR of both protein precipitated and ultrafiltered serum detected all 44 metabolites with comparable reproducibility (average CV, 3.7% for precipitation; 3.6% for filtration). However, nearly half of the quantified metabolites in ultrafiltered serum exhibited 10–74% lower concentrations; specifically, tryptophan, benzoate, and 2-oxoisocaproate showed much lower concentrations compared to protein precipitated serum. These results indicate that protein precipitation using methanol offers a reliable approach for routine NMR-based metabolomics of human blood serum/plasma and should be considered as an alternative to ultrafiltration. Importantly, protein precipitation, which is commonly used by mass spectrometry (MS), promises avenues for direct comparison and correlation of metabolite data obtained from the two analytical platforms to exploit their combined strength in the metabolomics of blood. PMID:24796490

  17. Determination of XLR-11 and its metabolites in hair by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Park, Meejung; Yeon, Seonghoon; Lee, Jaesin; In, Sangwhan

    2015-10-10

    Analysis of drugs in hair is often used as a routine method to obtain detailed information about drug ingestion. However, few studies have been conducted on disposition of synthetic cannabinoids including cyclopropylindoles (UR-144 and XLR-11) and their metabolites in hair. XLR-11 has been widely abused in South Korea recently. Identification of metabolites in hair can be an important proof of synthetic cannabinoids use because it can exclude the possibility of passive smoke exposure. In this study, we described a quantitative analytical method of XLR-11 and its metabolites (UR-144, UR-144 N-5-hydroxypentyl metabolite, UR-144 N-4-hydroxypentyl metabolite, UR-144 N-pentanoic acid metabolite and XLR-11 N-4-hydroxypentyl metabolite) in hair by liquid chromatography with ESI-MS/MS. The target analytes were extracted with methanol from washed and cut hair samples and the extracts were evaporated, filtered and analyzed by LC-MS/MS with electrospray ion source in positive-ionization mode. JWH-018-d9 and JWH-018 N-5-hydroxypentyl metabolite-d5 were used as internal standards. Chromatographic separation was completed within 15 min. No interferences were detected in 10 blank hair samples. In intra- and inter-assay precision and accuracy study, CV (%) and bias (%) were below 12. The limit of detection (LOD) was 0.1∼2 pg/mg and the limit of quantification (LOQ) was 0.2-2 pg/mg, respectively. The validation results proved that the method was selective, accurate and precise with acceptable linearity within calibration range. No significant variation was observed by different sources of matrices. This method was applied to hair samples from 14 individual suspects of XLR-11 use. In this result, XLR-11, UR-144, UR-144 N-5-hydroxypentyl metabolite and UR-144 N-pentanoic acid metabolite, XLR-11 N-4-hydroxypentyl metabolite were detected. The concentration of XLR-11 as a parent drug was much higher than other metabolites. UR-144 N-5-hydroxy metabolite and UR-144 N-pentanoic acid

  18. STUDIES OF METABOLITE-PROTEIN INTERACTIONS: A REVIEW

    PubMed Central

    Matsuda, Ryan; Bi, Cong; Anguizola, Jeanethe; Sobansky, Matthew; Rodriquez, Elliot; Badilla, John Vargas; Zheng, Xiwei; Hage, Benjamin; Hage, David S.

    2014-01-01

    The study of metabolomics can provide valuable information about biochemical pathways and processes at the molecular level. There have been many reports that have examined the structure, identity and concentrations of metabolites in biological systems. However, the binding of metabolites with proteins is also of growing interest. This review examines past reports that have looked at the binding of various types of metabolites with proteins. An overview of the techniques that have been used to characterize and study metabolite-protein binding is first provided. This is followed by examples of studies that have investigated the binding of hormones, fatty acids, drugs or other xenobiotics, and their metabolites with transport proteins and receptors. These examples include reports that have considered the structure of the resulting solute-protein complexes, the nature of the binding sites, the strength of these interactions, the variations in these interactions with solute structure, and the kinetics of these reactions. The possible effects of metabolic diseases on these processes, including the impact of alterations in the structure and function of proteins, are also considered. PMID:24321277

  19. Toxicological significance of dihydrodiol metabolites

    SciTech Connect

    Hsia, M.T.

    1982-01-01

    Dihydrodiols are often found as the major organic-extractable metabolites of various olefinic or aromatic xenobiotics in many biological samples. Studies on the chemistry of dihydrodiol metabolites have provided insight into the pharmacokinetic behavior and the mode of action of the parent compound. The toxicology of dihydrodiol is more complex than what can be deduced solely on the basis of diminished bioavailability of the epoxide precursor, and the increased hydrophilicity associated with the dihydrodiol moiety. Dihydrodiols can be intrinsically toxic and may even represent metabolically activated species. Some of the dihydrodiol metabolites may still retain sufficient lipophilic character to serve again as substrates for microsomal oxygenases. Because of the tremendous chemical and biological diversity that existed among the various dihydrodiols, more mechanistic studies are needed to examine the toxicological properties of these compounds. It may be premature to conclude dihydrodiol formation as purely a detoxification route for xenobioties.

  20. Deleterious effects of reactive metabolites

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    A number of drugs have been withdrawn from the market or severely restricted in their use because of unexpected toxicities that become apparent only after the launch of new drug entities. Circumstantial evidence suggests that, in most cases, reactive metabolites are responsible for these unexpected toxicities. In this review, a general overview of the types of reactive metabolites and the consequences of their formation are presented. The current approaches to evaluate bioactivation potential of new compounds with particular emphasis on the advantages and limitation of these procedures will be discussed. Reasonable reasons for the excellent safety record of certain drugs susceptible to bioactivation will also be explored and should provide valuable guidance in the use of reactive-metabolite assessments when nominating drug candidates for development. This will, in turn, help us to design and bring safer drugs to the market. PMID:20972370

  1. Investigating associations between milk metabolite profiles and milk traits of Holstein cows.

    PubMed

    Melzer, N; Wittenburg, D; Hartwig, S; Jakubowski, S; Kesting, U; Willmitzer, L; Lisec, J; Reinsch, N; Repsilber, D

    2013-03-01

    In the field of dairy cattle research, it is of great interest to improve the detection and prevention of diseases (e.g., mastitis and ketosis) and monitor specific traits related to the state of health and management. During the standard milk performance test, traditional milk traits are monitored, and quality and quantity are screened. In addition to the standard test, it is also now possible to analyze milk metabolites in a high-throughput manner and to consider them in connection with milk traits to identify functionally important metabolites that can also serve as biomarker candidates. We present a study in which 190 milk metabolites and 14 milk traits of 1,305 Holstein cows on 18 commercial farms were investigated to characterize interrelations of milk metabolites between each other, to milk traits from the milk standard performance test, and to influencing factors such as farm and sire effect (half-sib structure). The effect of influencing factors (e.g., farm) varied among metabolites and traditional milk traits. The investigations of associations between metabolites and milk traits revealed groups of metabolites that show, for example, positive correlations to protein and casein, and negative correlations to lactose and pH. On the other hand, groups of metabolites jointly associated with the investigated milk traits can be identified and functionally discussed. To enable a multivariate investigation, 2 machine learning methods were applied to detect important metabolites that are highly correlated with the investigated traditional milk traits. For somatic cell score, uracil, lactic acid, and 9 other important metabolites were detected. Lactic acid has already been proposed as a biomarker candidate for mastitis in the recent literature. In conclusion, we found sets of metabolites eligible to predict milk traits, enabling the analysis of milk traits from a metabolic perspective and discussion of the possible functional background for some of the detected

  2. Absorption properties of micellar lipid metabolites into Caco2 cells.

    PubMed

    Tsuzuki, Wakako

    2007-07-01

    To elucidate the absorption characteristics of dietary lipids in the human intestine, we investigated the cellular uptake of lipid metabolites using a differential monolayer of the Caco2 cells. As lipid metabolites, several free fatty acids and 2-monoacylglycerols, were formed a mixed micelle by bile salts and lysophospholipids and they were supplied to the Caco2 cells. To estimate the effect of the mixed micelles on the permeability of cells' membranes during incubation with the mixed micelles, the transepitherial electrical resistance (TEER) value was monitored, and no pronounced changes of TEER was detected. This suggested that mixed micelles did not affect their cellular properties of the barrier measured by TEER. The lipid metabolites transferred from the mixed micelle into the Caco2 cells were determined quantitatively by an enzymatic colorimetric method and were done by thin layer chromatography (TLC) for a species of acylglycerols. These highly sensitive methods enabled us to monitor the transepithelial transports of various kinds of non-isotope-labeled various lipid metabolites. Newly re-synthesized triacylglycerols were accumulated in Caco2 cells after 30 min incubation with the mixed micelles, and their amounts increased gradually for 4 h. The secretion of re-esterified triacylglycerols into a basolateral medium from the Caco2 cells began at 2 h after the mixed micelles were added to the apical medium. The intake of external lipid metabolites by the Caco2 cells were evaluated by an initial 2-h incubation with the mixed micelles. For example, 2-monomyristin and 2-monopalmitin were more rapidly transferred into the Caco2 cells from the mixed micelles than 2-monocaprin was. On the other hand, the absorption rates of capric acid, lauric acid and myristic acid by the cells were larger than those of stearic acid and oleic acid. It revealed that the side-chain structure of these lipid metabolites affected their absorption by the Caco2 cells. The results of this

  3. Metabolite production by different Ulocladium species.

    PubMed

    Andersen, Birgitte; Hollensted, Morten

    2008-08-15

    Ulocladium, which is phylogenetically related to Alternaria, contains species that are food spoilers and plant pathogens, but also species that have potential as enzyme producers and bio-control agents. Ulocladium spp. are often found on dead vegetation, in soil, air and dust, but also on food and feedstuffs and on water-damaged building materials. The aim was to study the morphological and chemical diversity within the genus Ulocladium. Cultures of 52 Ulocladium strains were identified morphologically, and then extracted and analyzed using automated Chemical Image Analysis. Production of individual metabolites was correlated to species identity and source of isolation (substratum). Chemical analyses corroborated the morphological identifications and showed the existence of several species species-specific metabolites, of which most were known compounds. The production of curvularins was specific to Ulocladium atrum, while most species produced infectopyrones and derivatives of altertoxin I. None of the 52 Ulocladium strains produced alternariols, tenuazonic acid, altersolanols or macrosporin, which are common in species of Alternaria. PMID:18599140

  4. Cholesterol metabolites exported from human brain.

    PubMed

    Iuliano, Luigi; Crick, Peter J; Zerbinati, Chiara; Tritapepe, Luigi; Abdel-Khalik, Jonas; Poirot, Marc; Wang, Yuqin; Griffiths, William J

    2015-07-01

    The human brain contains approximately 25% of the body's cholesterol. The brain is separated from the circulation by the blood brain barrier. While cholesterol will not passes this barrier, oxygenated forms of cholesterol can cross the barrier. Here by measuring the difference in the oxysterol content of blood plasma in the jugular vein and in a forearm vein by mass spectrometry (MS) we were able to determine the flux of more than 20 cholesterol metabolites between brain and the circulation. We confirm that 24S-hydroxycholesterol is exported from brain at a rate of about 2-3mg/24h. Gas chromatography (GC)-MS data shows that the cholesterol metabolites 5α-hydroxy-6-oxocholesterol (3β,5α-dihydroxycholestan-6-one), 7β-hydroxycholesterol and 7-oxocholesterol, generally considered to be formed through reactive oxygen species, are similarly exported from brain at rates of about 0.1, 2 and 2mg/24h, respectively. Although not to statistical significance both GC-MS and liquid chromatography (LC)-MS methods indicate that (25R)26-hydroxycholesterol is imported to brain, while LC-MS indicates that 7α-hydroxy-3-oxocholest-4-enoic acid is exported from brain. PMID:25668615

  5. Identification of di-2-ethylhexyl terephthalate (DEHTP) metabolites using human liver microsomes for biomonitoring applications.

    PubMed

    Silva, Manori J; Samandar, Ella; Calafat, Antonia M; Ye, Xiaoyun

    2015-06-01

    Di-2-ethylhexyl terephthalate (DEHTP), a structural isomer of the plasticizer di-2-ethylhexyl phthalate (DEHP), is used in food packaging and medical devices, among other applications, and is a potential replacement for DEHP and other ortho-phthalate plasticizers. Identifying sensitive and specific biomarkers of DEHTP is necessary to assess humans' background exposure to DEHTP. Using mass spectrometry, we investigated the metabolism of DEHTP by human liver microsomes to identify in vitro DEHTP metabolites. We unequivocally identified terephthalic acid (TPA) and mono-2-ethylhydroxyhexyl terephthalate (MEHHTP), using authentic standards, and tentatively identified mono-2-ethylhexyl terephthalate (MEHTP) and two other oxidative metabolites of DEHTP: mono-2-ethyloxohexyl terephthalate (MEOHTP), and mono-2-ethyl-5-carboxypentyl terephthalate (MECPTP) from their mass spectrometry fragmentation patterns. We also evaluated the formation of in vitro metabolites of DEHP. DEHTP and DEHP produced similar metabolites, but their metabolite profiles differed considerably. DEHTP metabolized to form TPA, a metabolite of several terephthalates, as the major in vitro metabolite, followed by MEHTP, MEHHTP, MEOHTP and MECPTP. MEHTP, MEHHTP, MEOHTP and MECPTP, which are specific metabolites of DEHTP, may be suitable biomarkers for assessing exposure to DEHTP. Nonetheless, data on the urinary excretion fraction and temporal stability of these metabolites, among other considerations, are needed to demonstrate their utility as exposure biomarkers. PMID:25687528

  6. Tissue metabolite profiling identifies differentiating and prognostic biomarkers for prostate carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Jung, Klaus; Reszka, Regina; Kamlage, Beate; Bethan, Bianca; Stephan, Carsten; Lein, Michael; Kristiansen, Glen

    2013-12-15

    Metabolomic research offers a deeper insight into biochemical changes in cancer metabolism and is a promising tool for identifying novel biomarkers. We aimed to evaluate the diagnostic and prognostic potential of metabolites in prostate cancer (PCa) tissue after radical prostatectomy. In matched malignant and nonmalignant prostatectomy samples from 95 PCa patients, aminoadipic acid, cerebronic acid, gluconic acid, glycerophosphoethanolamine, 2-hydroxybehenic acid, isopentenyl pyrophosphate, maltotriose, 7-methylguanine and tricosanoic acid were determined within a global metabolite profiling study using gas chromatography/liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry. The data were related to clinicopathological variables like prostate volume, tumor stage, Gleason score, preoperative prostate-specific antigen and disease recurrence in the follow-up. All nine metabolites showed higher concentrations in malignant than in nonmalignant samples except for gluconic acid and maltotriose, which had lower levels in tumors. Receiver -operating characteristics analysis demonstrated a significant discrimination for all metabolites between malignant and nonmalignant tissue with a maximal area under the curve of 0.86 for tricosanoic acid, whereas no correlation was observed between the metabolite levels and the Gleason score or tumor stage except for gluconic acid. Univariate Cox regression and Kaplan-Meier analyses showed that levels of aminoadipic acid, gluconic acid and maltotriose were associated with the biochemical tumor recurrence (prostate-specific antigen > 0.2 ng/mL). In multivariate Cox regression analyses, aminoadipic acid together with tumor stage and Gleason score remained in a model as independent marker for prediction of biochemical recurrence. This study proved that metabolites in PCa tissue can be used, in combination with traditional clinicopathological factors, as promising diagnostic and prognostic tools. PMID:23737455

  7. Sphingolipid metabolites in inflammatory disease

    PubMed Central

    Maceyka, Michael; Spiegel, Sarah

    2015-01-01

    Sphingolipids are ubiquitous building blocks of eukaryotic cell membranes. Progress in our understanding of sphingolipid metabolism, state-of-the-art sphingolipidomic approaches and animal models have generated a large body of evidence demonstrating that sphingolipid metabolites, particularly ceramide and sphingosine-1-phosphate, are signalling molecules that regulate a diverse range of cellular processes that are important in immunity, inflammation and inflammatory disorders. Recent insights into the molecular mechanisms of action of sphingolipid metabolites and new perspectives on their roles in regulating chronic inflammation have been reported. The knowledge gained in this emerging field will aid in the development of new therapeutic options for inflammatory disorders. PMID:24899305

  8. Metabolite profiling of sucrose effect on the metabolism of Melissa officinalis by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sooah; Shin, Min Hye; Hossain, Md Aktar; Yun, Eun Ju; Lee, Hojoung; Kim, Kyoung Heon

    2011-04-01

    The effect of sugar on plant metabolism, which is known to be similar to hormone-like signaling, was metabolomically studied using Melissa officinalis (lemon balm). The metabolite profiles of M. officinalis treated with sucrose were analyzed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) and principal component analysis (PCA). A total of 64 metabolites from various chemical classes including alcohols, amines, amino acids, fatty acids, inorganic acids, organic acids, phosphates, and sugars were identified by GC-MS. Three groups treated with different sucrose concentrations were clearly separated by PCA of their metabolite profiles, indicating changes in the levels of many metabolites depending on the sucrose concentration. Metabolite profiling revealed that treatment with a higher sucrose level caused an increase in the levels of metabolites such as sugars, sugar alcohols, and sugar phosphates, which are related to the glycolytic pathway of M. officinalis. Furthermore, proline and succinic acid, which are associated with the proline-linked pentose phosphate pathway, the shikimic acid pathway, and the biosynthesis of phenylpropanoids, also increased with increasing sucrose concentration. Therefore, these metabolic changes induced by sucrose ultimately led to the increased production of flavonoids such as caffeic acid via the biosynthetic pathway of phenylpropanoids. This study demonstrated that the abundance changes in some primary and secondary metabolites were somewhat interlocked with each other in response to sucrose. PMID:21301821

  9. Reactive Arrays of Colorimetric Sensors for Metabolite and Steroid Identification.

    PubMed

    Batres, Gary; Jones, Talia; Johnke, Hannah; Wilson, Mark; Holmes, Andrea E; Sikich, Sharmin

    2014-12-31

    The work described herein examines a rapid mix-and-measure method called DETECHIP suitable for screening of steroids and metabolites. The addition of steroids and metabolites to reactive arrays of colorimetric sensors generated characteristic color "fingerprints" that were used to identify the analyte. A color analysis tool was used to identify the analyte pool that now includes biologically relevant analytes. The mix-and-measure arrays allowed the detection of disease metabolites, orotic acid and argininosuccinic acid; and the steroids androsterone, 1,4-androstadiene, testosterone, stanozolol, and estrone. The steroid 1,4-androstadiene was also detected by this method while dissolved in synthetic urine. Some of the steroids, such as androstadiene, stanozolol, and androsterone were co-dissolved with (2-hydroxypropyl)-β-cyclodextrin in order to increase solubility in aqueous buffered solutions. The colorimetric arrays do not intend to eliminate ELISA or mass spectroscopy based screening, but to possibly provide an alternative analytical detection method for steroids and metabolites. PMID:25019034

  10. The impact of zinc sulfate addition on the dynamic metabolic profiling of Saccharomyces cerevisiae subjected to long term acetic acid stress treatment and identification of key metabolites involved in the antioxidant effect of zinc.

    PubMed

    Wan, Chun; Zhang, Mingming; Fang, Qing; Xiong, Liang; Zhao, Xinqing; Hasunuma, Tomohisa; Bai, Fengwu; Kondo, Akihiko

    2015-02-01

    The mechanisms of how zinc protects the cells against acetic acid toxicity and acts as an antioxidant are still not clear. Here we present results of the metabolic profiling of the eukaryotic model yeast species Saccharomyces cerevisiae subjected to long term high concentration acetic acid stress treatment in the presence and absence of zinc supplementation. Zinc addition decreased the release of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in the presence of chronic acetic acid stress. The dynamic changes in the accumulation of intermediates in central carbon metabolism were observed, and higher contents of intracellular alanine, valine and serine were observed by zinc supplementation. The most significant change was observed in alanine content, which is 3.51-fold of that of the control culture in cells in the stationary phase. Subsequently, it was found that 0.5 g L(-1) alanine addition resulted in faster glucose consumption in the presence of 5 g L(-1) acetic acid, and apparently decreased ROS accumulation in zinc-supplemented cells. This indicates that alanine exerted its antioxidant effect at least partially through the detoxification of acetic acid. In addition, intracellular glutathione (GSH) accumulation was enhanced by zinc addition, which is related to the protection of yeast cells from the oxidative injury caused by acetic acid. Our studies revealed for the first time that zinc modulates cellular amino acid metabolism and redox balance, especially biosynthesis of alanine and glutathione to exert its antioxidant effect. PMID:25554248

  11. Biological activities of conjugated fatty acids: conjugated eicosadienoic (conj. 20:2delta(c11,t13/t12,c14)), eicosatrienoic (conj. 20:3delta(c8,t12,c14)), and heneicosadienoic (conj. 21:2delta(c12,t14/c13,t15)) acids and other metabolites of conjugated linoleic acid.

    PubMed

    Park, Yeonhwa; Storkson, Jayne M; Albright, Karen J; Liu, Wei; Pariza, Michael W

    2005-02-21

    The elongated form of conjugated linoleic acid (CLA), conjugated eicosadienoic acid (CEA, conj. 20:2delta(c11,t13/t12,c14)), was generated from CLA by liver microsomal fractions. Subsequent testing showed that dietary CEA significantly reduced body fat, and increased lean mass similar to CLA when compared to controls. CEA also decreased lipoprotein lipase activity and triacylglyceride, and increased glycerol release in 3T3-L1 adipocytes, correlated with the trans-12,cis-14 isomer, but CEA required a longer incubation period than cells treated with CLA. Based on the fact that CEA fed animals had CLA in tissue, we suggest that the effect of CEA is due to the CLA converted from CEA in the system. The delta-6 desaturated and elongated form of trans-10,cis-12 CLA (conjugated eicosatrienoic acid, CETA, conj. 20:3delta(c8,t12,c14)) inhibited LPL activity and increased glycerol release but was less active than trans-10,cis-12 CLA or CEA. The 21-carbon conjugated fatty acid, conjugated heneicosadienoic acid (CHDA, conj. 21:2delta(c12,t14/c13,t15)), was not active on LPL inhibition, triacylglyceride, or glycerol release in 3T3-L1 adipocytes. We also provide evidence that CLA was metabolized to conjugated dodecadienoic acid (conj. 12:2delta(c3,t5/t4,c6)). In addition, there were indications of the presence of conjugated tetradecadienoic acid (conj. 14:2delta(c5,t7/t6,c8)), suggesting that CLA can be metabolized through fatty acid beta-oxidation. This is the first work to report the presence of conjugated 12 and 14 carbon fatty acids, originated from CLA, and the biological activities of CEA, CETA and CHDA. PMID:15708360

  12. Primary expectations of secondary metabolites

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Plant secondary metabolites (e.g., phenolics) are important for human health, in addition to the organoleptic properties they impart to fresh and processed foods. Consumer expectations such as appearance, taste, or texture influence their purchasing decisions. Thorough identification of phenolic com...

  13. Natural products: Hunting microbial metabolites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, Eric W.

    2015-05-01

    Symbiotic bacteria synthesize many specialized small molecules; however, establishing the role these chemicals play in human health and disease has been difficult. Now, the chemical structure and mechanism of the Escherichia coli product colibactin provides insight into the link between this secondary metabolite and colorectal cancer.

  14. Automated analysis of oxidative metabolites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Furner, R. L. (Inventor)

    1974-01-01

    An automated system for the study of drug metabolism is described. The system monitors the oxidative metabolites of aromatic amines and of compounds which produce formaldehyde on oxidative dealkylation. It includes color developing compositions suitable for detecting hyroxylated aromatic amines and formaldehyde.

  15. METABOLITE PROFILING OF ECHINACEA GENOTYPES

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Echinacea extracts have historically been used as herbal remedies to treat colds, coughs and snake bites. Echinacea products are currently sold as a popular herbal-remedy used for general enhancement of the immune system. However, the genetic variation in metabolites has not been systematically ch...

  16. Understanding Boswellia papyrifera tree secondary metabolites through bark spectral analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Girma, Atkilt; Skidmore, Andrew K.; de Bie, C. A. J. M.; Bongers, Frans

    2015-07-01

    Decision makers are concerned whether to tap or rest Boswellia Papyrifera trees. Tapping for the production of frankincense is known to deplete carbon reserves from the tree leading to production of less viable seeds, tree carbon starvation and ultimately tree mortality. Decision makers use traditional experience without considering the amount of metabolites stored or depleted from the stem-bark of the tree. This research was designed to come up with a non-destructive B. papyrifera tree metabolite estimation technique relevant for management using spectroscopy. The concentration of biochemicals (metabolites) found in the tree bark was estimated through spectral analysis. Initially, a random sample of 33 trees was selected, the spectra of bark measured with an Analytical Spectral Device (ASD) spectrometer. Bark samples were air dried and ground. Then, 10 g of sample was soaked in Petroleum ether to extract crude metabolites. Further chemical analysis was conducted to quantify and isolate pure metabolite compounds such as incensole acetate and boswellic acid. The crude metabolites, which relate to frankincense produce, were compared to plant properties (such as diameter and crown area) and reflectance spectra of the bark. Moreover, the extract was compared to the ASD spectra using partial least square regression technique (PLSR) and continuum removed spectral analysis. The continuum removed spectral analysis were performed, on two wavelength regions (1275-1663 and 1836-2217) identified through PLSR, using absorption features such as band depth, area, position, asymmetry and the width to characterize and find relationship with the bark extracts. The results show that tree properties such as diameter at breast height (DBH) and the crown area of untapped and healthy trees were strongly correlated to the amount of stored crude metabolites. In addition, the PLSR technique applied to the first derivative transformation of the reflectance spectrum was found to estimate the

  17. A review of pharmacological and toxicological potentials of marine cyanobacterial metabolites.

    PubMed

    Nagarajan, M; Maruthanayagam, V; Sundararaman, M

    2012-03-01

    Novel toxic metabolites from marine cyanobacteria have been thoroughly explored. Biologically active and chemically diverse compounds that could be hepatotoxic, neurotoxic or cytotoxic, such as cyclic peptides, lipopeptides, fatty acid amides, alkaloids and saccharides, have been produced from marine cyanobacteria. Many reports have revealed that biosynthesis of active metabolites is predominant during cyanobacterial bloom formation. Marine cyanobacterial toxic metabolites exhibit important biological properties, such as interfering in signal transduction either by activation or blockage of sodium channels or by targeting signaling proteins; inducing apoptosis by disrupting cytoskeletal proteins; and inhibiting membrane transporters, receptors, serine proteases and topoisomerases. The pharmacological importance of these metabolites resides in their proliferation and growth-controlling abilities towards cancer cell lines and disease-causing potent microbial agents (bacteria, virus, fungi and protozoa). Besides their toxic and pharmacological potentials, the present review discusses structural and functional resemblance of marine cyanobacterial metabolites to marine algae, sponges and mollusks. PMID:21910132

  18. AN IMPROVED HPLC-MS/MS METHOD FOR DETERMINATION OF ISOXAFLUTOLE (BALANCE) AND ITS METABOLITES IN SOILS AND FORAGE PLANTS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    An analytical method using turbo-spray and heat-nebulizer high-performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (HPLC-MS/MS) was developed for the analysis of isoxaflutole (IXF) and its two metabolites, diketonitrile (DKN) and the benzoic acid metabolite (BA), at sub 'g/kg levels in soil a...

  19. Identification of Epoxide-Derived Metabolite(s) of Benzbromarone.

    PubMed

    Wang, Kai; Wang, Hui; Peng, Ying; Zheng, Jiang

    2016-04-01

    Benzbromarone (BBR) is a benzofuran derivative that has been quite useful for the treatment of gout; however, it was withdrawn from European markets in 2003 because of reported serious incidents of drug-induced liver injury. BBR-induced hepatotoxicity has been suggested to be associated with the formation of a quinone intermediate. The present study reported epoxide-derived intermediate(s) of BBR. An N-acetylcysteine (NAC) conjugate derived from epoxide metabolite(s) was detected in both microsomal incubations of BBR and urine samples of mice treated with BBR. The NAC conjugate was identified as 6-NAC BBR. Ketoconazole suppressed the bioactivation of BBR to the epoxide intermediate(s), and the CYP3A subfamily was the primary enzyme responsible for the formation of the epoxide(s). The present study provided new information on metabolic activation of BBR. PMID:26792818

  20. Targeted Metabolomics Identifies Reliable and Stable Metabolites in Human Serum and Plasma Samples

    PubMed Central

    Breier, Michaela; Wahl, Simone; Prehn, Cornelia; Fugmann, Marina; Ferrari, Uta; Weise, Michaela; Banning, Friederike; Seissler, Jochen; Grallert, Harald; Adamski, Jerzy; Lechner, Andreas

    2014-01-01

    Background Information regarding the variability of metabolite levels over time in an individual is required to estimate the reproducibility of metabolite measurements. In intervention studies, it is critical to appropriately judge changes that are elicited by any kind of intervention. The pre-analytic phase (collection, transport and sample processing) is a particularly important component of data quality in multi-center studies. Methods Reliability of metabolites (within-and between-person variance, intraclass correlation coefficient) and stability (shipment simulation at different temperatures, use of gel-barrier collection tubes, freeze-thaw cycles) were analyzed in fasting serum and plasma samples of 22 healthy human subjects using a targeted LC-MS approach. Results Reliability of metabolite measurements was higher in serum compared to plasma samples and was good in most saturated short-and medium-chain acylcarnitines, amino acids, biogenic amines, glycerophospholipids, sphingolipids and hexose. The majority of metabolites were stable for 24 h on cool packs and at room temperature in non-centrifuged tubes. Plasma and serum metabolite stability showed good coherence. Serum metabolite concentrations were mostly unaffected by tube type and one or two freeze-thaw cycles. Conclusion A single time point measurement is assumed to be sufficient for a targeted metabolomics analysis of most metabolites. For shipment, samples should ideally be separated and frozen immediately after collection, as some amino acids and biogenic amines become unstable within 3 h on cool packs. Serum gel-barrier tubes can be used safely for this process as they have no effect on concentration in most metabolites. Shipment of non-centrifuged samples on cool packs is a cost-efficient alternative for most metabolites. PMID:24586991

  1. Global Perspectives of Fungal Secondary Metabolite Research

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Fungi produce a wide range of unusual metabolites, termed secondary metabolites because they play no role in the normal, basic metabolic pathways used for growth and energy production, etc. Some of these secondary metabolites have antibiotic properties; others are potent toxins that are dangerous w...

  2. Serum and Urine Metabolite Profiling Reveals Potential Biomarkers of Human Hepatocellular Carcinoma*

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Tianlu; Xie, Guoxiang; Wang, Xiaoying; Fan, Jia; Qiu, Yunping; Zheng, Xiaojiao; Qi, Xin; Cao, Yu; Su, Mingming; Wang, Xiaoyan; Xu, Lisa X.; Yen, Yun; Liu, Ping; Jia, Wei

    2011-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is a common malignancy in the world with high morbidity and mortality rate. Identification of novel biomarkers in HCC remains impeded primarily because of the heterogeneity of the disease in clinical presentations as well as the pathophysiological variations derived from underlying conditions such as cirrhosis and steatohepatitis. The aim of this study is to search for potential metabolite biomarkers of human HCC using serum and urine metabolomics approach. Sera and urine samples were collected from patients with HCC (n = 82), benign liver tumor patients (n = 24), and healthy controls (n = 71). Metabolite profiling was performed by gas chromatography time-of-flight mass spectrometry and ultra performance liquid chromatography-quadrupole time of flight mass spectrometry in conjunction with univariate and multivariate statistical analyses. Forty three serum metabolites and 31 urinary metabolites were identified in HCC patients involving several key metabolic pathways such as bile acids, free fatty acids, glycolysis, urea cycle, and methionine metabolism. Differentially expressed metabolites in HCC subjects, such as bile acids, histidine, and inosine are of great statistical significance and high fold changes, which warrant further validation as potential biomarkers for HCC. However, alterations of several bile acids seem to be affected by the condition of liver cirrhosis and hepatitis. Quantitative measurement and comparison of seven bile acids among benign liver tumor patients with liver cirrhosis and hepatitis, HCC patients with liver cirrhosis and hepatitis, HCC patients without liver cirrhosis and hepatitis, and healthy controls revealed that the abnormal levels of glycochenodeoxycholic acid, glycocholic acid, taurocholic acid, and chenodeoxycholic acid are associated with liver cirrhosis and hepatitis. HCC patients with alpha fetoprotein values lower than 20 ng/ml was successfully differentiated from healthy controls with an

  3. The Metabolite Transporters of the Plastid Envelope: An Update

    PubMed Central

    Facchinelli, Fabio; Weber, Andreas P. M.

    2011-01-01

    The engulfment of a photoautotrophic cyanobacterium by a primitive mitochondria-bearing eukaryote traces back to more than 1.2 billion years ago. This single endosymbiotic event not only provided the early petroalgae with the metabolic capacity to perform oxygenic photosynthesis, but also introduced a plethora of other metabolic routes ranging from fatty acids and amino acids biosynthesis, nitrogen and sulfur assimilation to secondary compounds synthesis. This implicated the integration and coordination of the newly acquired metabolic entity with the host metabolism. The interface between the host cytosol and the plastidic stroma became of crucial importance in sorting precursors and products between the plastid and other cellular compartments. The plastid envelope membranes fulfill different tasks: they perform important metabolic functions, as they are involved in the synthesis of carotenoids, chlorophylls, and galactolipids. In addition, since most genes of cyanobacterial origin have been transferred to the nucleus, plastidial proteins encoded by nuclear genes are post-translationally transported across the envelopes through the TIC–TOC import machinery. Most importantly, chloroplasts supply the photoautotrophic cell with photosynthates in form of reduced carbon. The innermost bilayer of the plastidic envelope represents the permeability barrier for the metabolites involved in the carbon cycle and is literally stuffed with transporter proteins facilitating their transfer. The intracellular metabolite transporters consist of polytopic proteins containing membrane spans usually in the number of four or more α-helices. Phylogenetic analyses revealed that connecting the plastid with the host metabolism was mainly a process driven by the host cell. In Arabidopsis, 58% of the metabolite transporters are of host origin, whereas only 12% are attributable to the cyanobacterial endosymbiont. This review focuses on the metabolite transporters of the inner envelope

  4. Cerebrospinal Fluid Levels of Monoamine Metabolites in the Epileptic Baboon

    PubMed Central

    Szabó, C. Ákos; Patel, Mayuri; Uteshev, Victor V.

    2016-01-01

    The baboon represents a natural model for genetic generalized epilepsy and sudden unexpected death in epilepsy (SUDEP). In this retrospective study, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) monoamine metabolites and scalp electroencephalography (EEG) were evaluated in 263 baboons of a pedigreed colony. CSF monoamine abnormalities have been linked to reduced seizure thresholds, behavioral abnormalities and SUDEP in various animal models of epilepsy. The levels of 3-hydroxy-4-methoxyphenylglycol, 5-hydroxyindolacetic acid and homovanillic acid in CSF samples drawn from the cisterna magna were analyzed using high-performance liquid chromatography. These levels were compared between baboons with seizures (SZ), craniofacial trauma (CFT) and asymptomatic, control (CTL) baboons, between baboons with abnormal and normal EEG studies. We hypothesized that the CSF levels of major monoaminergic metabolites (i.e., dopamine, serotonin and norepinephrine) associate with the baboons’ electroclinical status and thus can be used as clinical biomarkers applicable to seizures/epilepsy. However, despite apparent differences in metabolite levels between the groups, usually lower in SZ and CFT baboons and in baboons with abnormal EEG studies, we did not find any statistically significant differences using a logistic regression analysis. Significant correlations between the metabolite levels, especially between 5-HIAA and HVA, were preserved in all electroclinical groups. While we were not able to demonstrate significant differences in monoamine metabolites in relation to seizures or EEG markers of epilepsy, we cannot exclude the monoaminergic system as a potential source of pathogenesis in epilepsy and SUDEP. A prospective study evaluating serial CSF monoamine levels in baboons with recently witnessed seizures, and evaluation of abnormal expression and function of monoaminergic receptors and transporters within epilepsy-related brain regions, may impact the electroclinical status. PMID:26924854

  5. Circadian variations in the liver metabolites of medaka (Oryzias latipes).

    PubMed

    Fujisawa, Koichi; Takami, Taro; Kimoto, Yoshitaka; Matsumoto, Toshihiko; Yamamoto, Naoki; Terai, Shuji; Sakaida, Isao

    2016-01-01

    Circadian rhythms are biological rhythms with a period of around 24 hours. In this study, we compared the metabolome of the liver of medaka during the day and night. To comprehensively analyze the circadian variations in the levels of metabolites in the liver, livers were isolated from Zeitgeber time (ZT)4 and ZT16, and the variations in metabolite levels were evaluated. Inosinemonophosphate (IMP) and uridinemonophosphate (UMP) were found to be increased at night, indicating that nucleotide synthesis is most active during the night. Furthermore, the levels of metabolites of the tricarboxylic acid cycle were also reduced at night. In addition, the levels of many amino acids were reduced during the night, suggesting that the amino acids had been degraded. Moreover, the citrulline/ornithine ratio, which is related to arginine consumption, was lower during the day than at night. This pattern suggests that the urea cycle is activated during the day, whereas large amounts of nitric oxide and citrulline may be produced from arginine via nitric oxide synthase during the night. The results of this metabolomic analysis may be useful in future fundamental research to provide insight into chronobiology as well as applied research on drug evaluations using medaka as a model species. PMID:26862003

  6. Circadian variations in the liver metabolites of medaka (Oryzias latipes)

    PubMed Central

    Fujisawa, Koichi; Takami, Taro; Kimoto, Yoshitaka; Matsumoto, Toshihiko; Yamamoto, Naoki; Terai, Shuji; Sakaida, Isao

    2016-01-01

    Circadian rhythms are biological rhythms with a period of around 24 hours. In this study, we compared the metabolome of the liver of medaka during the day and night. To comprehensively analyze the circadian variations in the levels of metabolites in the liver, livers were isolated from Zeitgeber time (ZT)4 and ZT16, and the variations in metabolite levels were evaluated. Inosinemonophosphate (IMP) and uridinemonophosphate (UMP) were found to be increased at night, indicating that nucleotide synthesis is most active during the night. Furthermore, the levels of metabolites of the tricarboxylic acid cycle were also reduced at night. In addition, the levels of many amino acids were reduced during the night, suggesting that the amino acids had been degraded. Moreover, the citrulline/ornithine ratio, which is related to arginine consumption, was lower during the day than at night. This pattern suggests that the urea cycle is activated during the day, whereas large amounts of nitric oxide and citrulline may be produced from arginine via nitric oxide synthase during the night. The results of this metabolomic analysis may be useful in future fundamental research to provide insight into chronobiology as well as applied research on drug evaluations using medaka as a model species. PMID:26862003

  7. Profiling of metabolites in oil palm mesocarp at different stages of oil biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Neoh, Bee Keat; Teh, Huey Fang; Ng, Theresa Lee Mei; Tiong, Soon Huat; Thang, Yin Mee; Ersad, Mohd Amiron; Mohamed, Mohaimi; Chew, Fook Tim; Kulaveerasingam, Harikrishna; Appleton, David R

    2013-02-27

    Oil palm is one of the most productive oil producing crops and can store up to 90% oil in its fruit mesocarp. However, the biosynthetic regulation and drivers of palm mesocarp development are still not well understood. Multiplatform metabolomics technology was used to profile palm metabolites during six critical stages of fruit development in order to better understand lipid biosynthesis. Significantly higher amino acid levels were observed in palm mesocarp preceding lipid biosynthesis. Nucleosides were found to be in high concentration during lipid biosynthesis, whereas levels of metabolites involved in the tricarboxylic acid cycle were more concentrated during early fruit development. Apart from insights into the regulation of metabolites during fruit development in oil palm, these results provide potentially useful metabolite yield markers and genes of interest for use in breeding programs. PMID:23384169

  8. Differential Metabolite Profiles during Fruit Development in High-Yielding Oil Palm Mesocarp

    PubMed Central

    Teh, Huey Fang; Neoh, Bee Keat; Hong, May Ping Li; Low, Jaime Yoke Sum; Ng, Theresa Lee Mei; Ithnin, Nalisha; Thang, Yin Mee; Mohamed, Mohaimi; Chew, Fook Tim; Yusof, Hirzun Mohd.; Kulaveerasingam, Harikrishna; Appleton, David R.

    2013-01-01

    To better understand lipid biosynthesis in oil palm mesocarp, in particular the differences in gene regulation leading to and including de novo fatty acid biosynthesis, a multi-platform metabolomics technology was used to profile mesocarp metabolites during six critical stages of fruit development in comparatively high- and low-yielding oil palm populations. Significantly higher amino acid levels preceding lipid biosynthesis and nucleosides during lipid biosynthesis were observed in a higher yielding commercial palm population. Levels of metabolites involved in glycolysis revealed interesting divergence of flux towards glycerol-3-phosphate, while carbon utilization differences in the TCA cycle were proven by an increase in malic acid/citric acid ratio. Apart from insights into the regulation of enhanced lipid production in oil palm, these results provide potentially useful metabolite yield markers and genes of interest for use in breeding programmes. PMID:23593468

  9. Differential metabolite profiles during fruit development in high-yielding oil palm mesocarp.

    PubMed

    Teh, Huey Fang; Neoh, Bee Keat; Hong, May Ping Li; Low, Jaime Yoke Sum; Ng, Theresa Lee Mei; Ithnin, Nalisha; Thang, Yin Mee; Mohamed, Mohaimi; Chew, Fook Tim; Yusof, Hirzun Mohd; Kulaveerasingam, Harikrishna; Appleton, David R

    2013-01-01

    To better understand lipid biosynthesis in oil palm mesocarp, in particular the differences in gene regulation leading to and including de novo fatty acid biosynthesis, a multi-platform metabolomics technology was used to profile mesocarp metabolites during six critical stages of fruit development in comparatively high- and low-yielding oil palm populations. Significantly higher amino acid levels preceding lipid biosynthesis and nucleosides during lipid biosynthesis were observed in a higher yielding commercial palm population. Levels of metabolites involved in glycolysis revealed interesting divergence of flux towards glycerol-3-phosphate, while carbon utilization differences in the TCA cycle were proven by an increase in malic acid/citric acid ratio. Apart from insights into the regulation of enhanced lipid production in oil palm, these results provide potentially useful metabolite yield markers and genes of interest for use in breeding programmes. PMID:23593468

  10. Reactive oxygen metabolites and colitis: a disturbed balance between damage and protection. A selective review.

    PubMed

    Verspaget, H W; Mulder, T P; van der Sluys Veer, A; Peña, A S; Lamers, C B

    1991-01-01

    Enhanced local production of reactive oxygen metabolites has been found in association with colitis, both experimentally and in humans. Cellular and biochemical systems involved have been identified, and 5-aminosalicylic acid-containing drugs but, more effectively, specific scavengers have been found to reduce the intestinal inflammatory process. The multitude of reactions in which oxygen metabolites participate provides a new area of research in intestinal inflammation. These basic studies might bring related clinical studies in an era of new anti-inflammatory drugs for inflammatory bowel disease specifically designed to scavenge toxic oxygen metabolites. PMID:1663660

  11. RELTIVE POTENCIES OF SELECTED DIHALOACETATES AND THEIR MAJOR METABOLITES IN RODENT WHOLE EMBRYO CULTURE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Relative potencies of selected dihaloacetic acids and their major metabolites in rodent whole embryo culture.

    S. Hunter, M. Blanton, E. Rogers
    RTD, NHEERL, ORD, US EPA, RTP, NC, 27711

    Haloacetic acids (HAA) are produced by disinfection and present in tap water. S...

  12. Antileishmanial Metabolites from Geosmithia langdonii

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Antileishmanial bioassay guided fractionation of Geosmithia langdonii has resulted in the isolation and identification of two new compounds (1 and 2) together with 10 known compounds (3–12). The structures of the isolated metabolites were elucidated based on comprehensive 1D and 2D NMR spectroscopic data as well as mass spectrometry. The absolute configuration at C4, C5, and C6 of 2 was determined as R using a modified Mosher esterification method and NOESY correlations. The extracts and the isolated metabolites were evaluated for their antileishmanial activities. Compounds 3, 9, 11, and 12 were found to be active against Leishmania donovani with IC50 values of 6.9, 3.3, 8.5, and 9.2 μM, respectively, while compounds 1, 5, and 10 showed lower activities against L. donovani with IC50 values of 13.0, 47.3, and 34.0 μM, respectively. PMID:25084548

  13. Marine-Derived Metabolites of S-Adenosylmethionine as Templates for New Anti-Infectives

    PubMed Central

    Sufrin, Janice R.; Finckbeiner, Steven; Oliver, Colin M.

    2009-01-01

    S-Adenosylmethionine (AdoMet) is a key biochemical co-factor whose proximate metabolites include methylated macromolecules (e.g., nucleic acids, proteins, phospholipids), methylated small molecules (e.g., sterols, biogenic amines), polyamines (e.g., spermidine, spermine), ethylene, and N-acyl-homoserine lactones. Marine organisms produce numerous AdoMet metabolites whose novel structures can be regarded as lead compounds for anti-infective drug design. PMID:19841722

  14. Rapid analysis of fungal cultures and dried figs for secondary metabolites by LC/TOF-MS.

    PubMed

    Senyuva, Hamide Z; Gilbert, John; Oztürkoğlu, Sebnem

    2008-06-01

    A liquid chromatography-time-of-flight mass spectrometry (LC/TOF-MS) method has been developed for profiling fungal metabolites. The performance of the procedure in terms of mass accuracy, selectivity (specificity) and repeatability was established by spiking aflatoxins, ochratoxins, trichothecenes and other metabolites into blank growth media. After extracting, and carrying out LC/TOF-MS analysis, the standards were correctly identified by searching a specially constructed database of 465 secondary metabolites. To demonstrate the viability of this approach 11 toxigenic and four non-toxigenic fungi from reference collections were grown on various media, for 7-14 days. The method was also applied to two toxigenic fungi, A. flavus (200-138) and A. parasiticus (2999-465) grown on gamma radiation sterilised dried figs, for 7-14 days. The fungal hyphae plus a portion of growth media or portions of dried figs were solvent extracted and analysed by LC/TOF-MS using a rapid resolution microbore LC column. Data processing based on cluster analysis, showed that electrospray ionization (ESI)-TOF-MS could be used to unequivocally identify metabolites in crude extracts. Using the elemental metabolite database, it was demonstrated that from culture collection isolates, anticipated metabolites. The speed and simplicity of the method has meant that levels of these metabolites could be monitored daily in sterilised figs. Over a 14-day period, levels of aflatoxins and kojic acid maximised at 5-6 days, whilst levels of 5-methoxysterigmatocystin remained relatively constant. In addition to the known metabolites expected to be produced by these fungi, roquefortine A, fumagillin, fumigaclavine B, malformins (peptides), aspergillic acid, nigragillin, terrein, terrestric acid and penicillic acid were also identified. PMID:18486645

  15. Recent advances in the analysis of the site-specific isotopic fractionation of metabolites such as fatty acids using anisotropic natural-abundance 2H NMR spectroscopy: application to conjugated linolenic methyl esters.

    PubMed

    Lesot, Philippe; Serhan, Zeinab; Billault, Isabelle

    2011-01-01

    The full elucidation of the enzymatic mechanisms leading to polyunsaturated ω-3 to ω-5 fatty acids (PUFAs) occurring in plants or microorganisms by analyzing their site-specific isotopic fractionation profiles is a challenging task. Isotropic SNIF-NMR® method is an historical, powerful tool for the determination of ((2)H/(1)H) ratios. However, the absence of accessible isotopic data on the enantiotopic hydrogen sites (CH(2) groups) prevents the study of the enzymatic reaction stereoselectivity. Natural-abundance deuterium (NAD) 2D NMR experiment using chiral liquid crystals (CLC) as solvent is a new tool in this field, overcoming this limitation. In this work, we have explored various possibilities for optimizing the enantio-discrimination properties of CLC by changing the nature of the polypeptide and/or increasing the polarity of the organic co-solvents. We report also the first applications of TMU as co-solvent for preparing enantio-discriminating, homogenous polypeptide mesophases. The various experimental NAD NMR results recorded at an optimal sample temperature are discussed and compared in terms of number of discriminated (2)H sites and magnitude of spectral separation for different PUFAs such as the linoleic and linolenic acids. The comparison of all NMR results shows that optimal results are obtained when CLC mixtures made of poly-γ-benzyl-L-glutamate (PBLG) and high polarity co-solvents are used. As new challenging examples of applications, we report the preliminary analytical results obtained from two ω-5 conjugated linolenic acids: the α-eleostearic acid (9Z, 11E, 13E) and the punicic acid (9Z, 11E, 13Z). NMR data are discussed in terms of molecular orientational ordering parameters and isotopic distribution. PMID:21107978

  16. [Neurochemical study of effects of the new anxiolytic drugs afobazol and ladasten on the synthesis and metabolism of monoamines and their metabolites in the brain structures of Wistar rat on the model of monoamine synthesis blockade induced by aromatic amino acid decarboxylase inhibitor NSD-1015].

    PubMed

    Davydova, A I; Klodt, P M; Kudrin, V S; Kuznetsova, E A; Narkevich, V B

    2010-03-01

    Results of a neurochemical study of the effects of the new anxiolytic drugs afobazole and ladasten on the synthesis and metabolism of monoamines and their metabolites determined by HPLC on the model of monoamine synthesis blockade induced by NSD-1015 (aromatic L-amino acid decarboxylase) in the brain structures of Wistar rats are reported. A decrease in the levels of DOPAC in hypothalamus and HVA in striatum after afobazole injection may be evidence of an inhibitory action of this drug on the activity of monoamine oxidase (MAO-A), which is the main enzyme involved in dopamine biodegradation. Afobazole was also found to increase the content of serotonin (5-HT) as well as its precursor (5-OTP) and its main metabolite (5-HIAA) in hypothalamus by up to 50, 60 and 50%, respectively, which confirms a hypothesis that this anxiolytic drug can modulate the activity of tryptophan hydroxylase (5-OTP synthesis enzyme). In contrast to afobazole, ladasten demonstrated the ability to increase the level of L-DOPA (a dopamine precursor) in virtually all functional structures of the brain (except for hippocamp), which may support the hypothesis suggestion concerning a predominant action of this drug on the activity of tyrosine hydroxylase. Ladasten exhibited selectivity with respect to the dopaminergic system and affected only parameters of the dopamine metabolism, in particular, by increasing the HVA content in nucleus accumbens and decreasing it in the hypothalamus. The drug also affected the dopamine turnover parameters, producing an increase in both HVA/dopamine ratio in nucleus accumbens and DOPAC/dopamine ratio in hippocamp. PMID:20408420

  17. Association between Metabolite Profiles, Metabolic Syndrome and Obesity Status

    PubMed Central

    Allam-Ndoul, Bénédicte; Guénard, Frédéric; Garneau, Véronique; Cormier, Hubert; Barbier, Olivier; Pérusse, Louis; Vohl, Marie-Claude

    2016-01-01

    Underlying mechanisms associated with the development of abnormal metabolic phenotypes among obese individuals are not yet clear. Our aim is to investigate differences in plasma metabolomics profiles between normal weight (NW) and overweight/obese (Ov/Ob) individuals, with or without metabolic syndrome (MetS). Mass spectrometry-based metabolite profiling was used to compare metabolite levels between each group. Three main principal components factors explaining a maximum of variance were retained. Factor 1’s (long chain glycerophospholipids) metabolite profile score was higher among Ov/Ob with MetS than among Ov/Ob and NW participants without MetS. This factor was positively correlated to plasma total cholesterol (total-C) and triglyceride levels in the three groups, to high density lipoprotein -cholesterol (HDL-C) among participants without MetS. Factor 2 (amino acids and short to long chain acylcarnitine) was positively correlated to HDL-C and negatively correlated with insulin levels among NW participants. Factor 3’s (medium chain acylcarnitines) metabolite profile scores were higher among NW participants than among Ov/Ob with or without MetS. Factor 3 was negatively associated with glucose levels among the Ov/Ob with MetS. Factor 1 seems to be associated with a deteriorated metabolic profile that corresponds to obesity, whereas Factors 2 and 3 seem to be rather associated with a healthy metabolic profile. PMID:27240400

  18. Metabolites identification of bioactive licorice compounds in rats.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qi; Qian, Yi; Wang, Qing; Yang, Yan-Fang; Ji, Shuai; Song, Wei; Qiao, Xue; Guo, De-An; Liang, Hong; Ye, Min

    2015-11-10

    Licorice (Glycyrrhiza uralensis Fisch.) is one of the most popular herbal medicines worldwide. This study aims to identify the metabolites of seven representative bioactive licorice compounds in rats. These compounds include 22β-acetoxyl glycyrrhizin (1), licoflavonol (2), licoricidin (3), licoisoflavanone (4), isoglycycoumarin (5), semilicoisoflavone B (6), and 3-methoxy-9-hydroxy-pterocarpan (7). After oral administration of 250mg/kg of 1 or 40mg/kg of 2-7 to rats, a total of 16, 43 and 31 metabolites were detected in the plasma, urine and fecal samples, respectively. The metabolites were characterized by HPLC/DAD/ESI-MS(n) and LC/IT-TOF-MS analyses. Particularly, two metabolites of 1 were unambiguously identified by comparing with reference standards, and 22β-acetoxyl glycyrrhizin-6″-methyl ester (1-M2) is a new compound. Compound 1 could be readily hydrolyzed to eliminate the glucuronic acid residue. The phenolic compounds (4-7) mainly undertook phase II metabolism (glucuronidation or sulfation). Most phenolic compounds with an isoprenyl group (chain or cyclized, 2-5) could also undertake hydroxylation reaction. This is the first study on in vivo metabolism of these licorice compounds. PMID:26311472

  19. Metabolic Profiling and Antioxidant Assay of Metabolites from Three Radish Cultivars (Raphanus sativus).

    PubMed

    Park, Chang Ha; Baskar, Thanislas Bastin; Park, Soo-Yun; Kim, Sun-Ju; Valan Arasu, Mariadhas; Al-Dhabi, Naif Abdullah; Kim, Jae Kwang; Park, Sang Un

    2016-01-01

    A total of 13 anthocyanins and 33 metabolites; including organic acids, phenolic acids, amino acids, organic compounds, sugar acids, sugar alcohols, and sugars, were profiled in three radish cultivars by using high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) and gas chromatography time-of-flight mass spectrometry (GC-TOFMS)-based metabolite profiling. Total phenolics and flavonoids and their in vitro antioxidant activities were assessed. Pelargonidins were found to be the major anthocyanin in the cultivars studied. The cultivar Man Tang Hong showed the highest level of anthocyanins (1.89 ± 0.07 mg/g), phenolics (0.0664 ± 0.0033 mg/g) and flavonoids (0.0096 ± 0.0004 mg/g). Here; the variation of secondary metabolites in the radishes is described, as well as their association with primary metabolites. The low-molecular-weight hydrophilic metabolite profiles were subjected to principal component analysis (PCA), hierarchical clustering analysis (HCA), Pearson's correlation analysis. PCA fully distinguished the three radish cultivars tested. The polar metabolites were strongly correlated between metabolites that participate in the TCA cycle. The chemometrics results revealed that TCA cycle intermediates and free phenolic acids as well as anthocyanins were higher in the cultivar Man Tang Hong than in the others. Furthermore; superoxide radical scavenging activities and 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) radical scavenging were investigated to elucidate the antioxidant activity of secondary metabolites in the cultivars. Man Tang Hong showed the highest superoxide radical scavenging activity (68.87%) at 1000 μg/mL, and DPPH activity (20.78%), followed by Seo Ho and then Hong Feng No. 1. The results demonstrate that GC-TOFMS-based metabolite profiling, integrated with chemometrics, is an applicable method for distinguishing phenotypic variation and determining biochemical reactions connecting primary and secondary metabolism. Therefore; this study might provide

  20. Pharmacokinetics, Tissue Distribution, and Anti-Lipogenic/Adipogenic Effects of Allyl-Isothiocyanate Metabolites

    PubMed Central

    Ahn, Jiyun; Chung, Woo-Jae; Jang, Young Jin; Seong, Ki-Seung; Moon, Jae-Hak; Ha, Tae Youl; Jung, Chang Hwa

    2015-01-01

    Allyl-isothiocyanate (AITC) is an organosulfur phytochemical found in abundance in common cruciferous vegetables such as mustard, wasabi, and cabbage. Although AITC is metabolized primarily through the mercapturic acid pathway, its exact pharmacokinetics remains undefined and the biological function of AITC metabolites is still largely unknown. In this study, we evaluated the inhibitory effects of AITC metabolites on lipid accumulation in vitro and elucidated the pharmacokinetics and tissue distribution of AITC metabolites in rats. We found that AITC metabolites generally conjugate with glutathione (GSH) or N-acetylcysteine (NAC) and are distributed in most organs and tissues. Pharmacokinetic analysis showed a rapid uptake and complete metabolism of AITC following oral administration to rats. Although AITC has been reported to exhibit anti-tumor activity in bladder cancer, the potential bioactivity of its metabolites has not been explored. We found that GSH-AITC and NAC-AITC effectively inhibit adipogenic differentiation of 3T3-L1 preadipocytes and suppress expression of PPAR-γ, C/EBPα, and FAS, which are up-regulated during adipogenesis. GSH-AITC and NAC-AITC also suppressed oleic acid-induced lipid accumulation and lipogenesis in hepatocytes. Our findings suggest that AITC is almost completely metabolized in the liver and rapidly excreted in urine through the mercapturic acid pathway following administration in rats. AITC metabolites may exert anti-obesity effects through suppression of adipogenesis or lipogenesis. PMID:26317351

  1. Profiling of plasma metabolites in postmenopausal women with metabolic syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Iida, Miho; Harada, Sei; Kurihara, Ayako; Fukai, Kota; Kuwabara, Kazuyo; Sugiyama, Daisuke; Takeuchi, Ayano; Okamura, Tomonori; Akiyama, Miki; Nishiwaki, Yuji; Suzuki, Asako; Hirayama, Akiyoshi; Sugimoto, Masahiro; Soga, Tomoyoshi; Tomita, Masaru; Banno, Kouji; Aoki, Daisuke; Takebayashi, Toru

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Objective: The aim of the study was to investigate the associations of amino acids and other polar metabolites with metabolic syndrome (MetS) in postmenopausal women in a lean Asian population. Methods: The participants were 1,422 female residents enrolled in a cohort study from April to August 2012. MetS was defined according to the National Cholesterol Education Program Adult Treatment Panel III modified for Japanese women. Associations were examined between MetS and 78 metabolites assayed in fasting plasma samples using capillary electrophoresis-mass spectrometry. Replication analysis was performed to confirm the robustness of the results in a separate population created by random allocation. Results: Analysis was performed for 877 naturally postmenopausal women, including 594 in the original population and 283 in the replication population. The average age, body mass index, and levels of high- and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol of the entire population were 64.6 years, 23.0 kg/m2, 72.1 mg/dL, and 126.1 mg/dL, respectively. There was no significant difference in low-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels between women with and without MetS. Thirteen metabolites were significantly related to MetS: multiple plasma amino acids were elevated in women with MetS, including branched-chain amino acids, alanine, glutamate, and proline; and alpha-aminoadipate, which is generated by lysine degradation, was also significantly increased. Conclusions: Our large-scale metabolomic profiling indicates that Japanese postmenopausal women with MetS have abnormal polar metabolites, suggesting altered catabolic pathways. These results may help to understand metabolic disturbance, including in persons with normal body mass index and relatively high levels of high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, and may have clinical utility based on further studies. PMID:27070805

  2. A high fat, high choleststerol diet leads to changes in metabolite patterns in pigs – a metabolomic study

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Jianghao; Monagas, Maria; Jang, Saebyeol; Molokin, Aleksey; Harnly, James M.; Urban, Joseph F.; Solano-Aguilar, Gloria; Chen, Pei

    2014-01-01

    Non-targeted metabolite profiling can identify biological markers of dietary exposure that lead to a better understanding of interactions between diet and health. In this study, pigs were used as an animal model to discover changes in metabolic profiles between regular basal and high fat/high cholesterol diets. Extracts of plasma, fecal and urine samples from pigs fed high fat or basal regular diets for 11 weeks were analyzed using ultra-high performance liquid chromatography with high-resolution mass spectrometry (UHPLC-HRMS) and chemometric analysis. Cloud plots from XCMS online were used for class separation of the most discriminatory metabolites. The major metabolites contributing to the discrimination were identified as bile acids (BAs), lipid metabolites, fatty acids, amino acids and phosphatidic acid (PAs), phosphatidylglycerol (PGs), glycerophospholipids (PI), phosphatidylcholines (PCs) and tripeptides. These results suggest the developed approach can be used to identify biomarkers associated with specific feeding diets and possible metabolic disorders related to diet. PMID:25466009

  3. A high fat, high cholesterol diet leads to changes in metabolite patterns in pigs--a metabolomic study.

    PubMed

    Sun, Jianghao; Monagas, Maria; Jang, Saebyeol; Molokin, Aleksey; Harnly, James M; Urban, Joseph F; Solano-Aguilar, Gloria; Chen, Pei

    2015-04-15

    Non-targeted metabolite profiling can identify biological markers of dietary exposure that lead to a better understanding of interactions between diet and health. In this study, pigs were used as an animal model to discover changes in metabolic profiles between regular basal and high fat/high cholesterol diets. Extracts of plasma, fecal and urine samples from pigs fed high fat or basal regular diets for 11 weeks were analysed using ultra-high performance liquid chromatography with high-resolution mass spectrometry (UHPLC-HRMS) and chemometric analysis. Cloud plots from XCMS online were used for class separation of the most discriminatory metabolites. The major metabolites contributing to the discrimination were identified as bile acids (BAs), lipid metabolites, fatty acids, amino acids and phosphatidic acid (PAs), phosphatidylglycerol (PGs), glycerophospholipids (PI), phosphatidylcholines (PCs) and tripeptides. These results suggest the developed approach can be used to identify biomarkers associated with specific feeding diets and possible metabolic disorders related to diet. PMID:25466009

  4. Cerebrospinal fluid monoamine metabolites and suicide.

    PubMed

    Jokinen, Jussi; Nordström, Anna-Lena; Nordström, Peter

    2009-01-01

    Prospective studies of the serotonergic system and suicide report that low 5-hydroxyindolacetic acid (5-HIAA) in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and a history of attempted suicide predict suicide risk. Low CSF homovanillic acid (HVA) is reported to be associated with past and future lethality of suicide attempts but not with suicide. The interrelationships between monoamine metabolites, violent method, suicide intent and lethality of suicidal behaviour are complex. We hypothesized that CSF 5-HIAA and HVA levels are related to suicide intent, violence and lethality of suicidal behaviour. Fifteen male suicide attempters admitted to a psychiatric ward at the Karolinska University Hospital and eight healthy male volunteers were submitted to lumbar puncture and CSF 5-HIAA and HVA were assayed. Suicide intent with the Beck Suicide Intent Scale (SIS), lethality and violence of suicidal behaviour were assessed. All patients were followed up for causes of death. Six suicides and one fatal accident were identified with death certificates. Mean CSF 5-HIAA but not CSF HVA differed between suicides and survivors. Violent suicides had higher suicide intent and CSF 5-HIAA than non-violent suicides. In violent suicides, CSF 5-HIAA levels were negatively correlated with SIS. Greater suicide intent may be associated with greater aggressive intent and predicts a violent suicide method. PMID:19034712

  5. Screening botanical extracts for quinoid metabolites.

    PubMed

    Johnson, B M; Bolton, J L; van Breemen, R B

    2001-11-01

    Botanical dietary supplements represent a significant share of the growing market for alternative medicine in the USA, where current regulations do not require assessment of their safety. To help ensure the safety of such products, an in vitro assay using pulsed ultrafiltration and LC-MS-MS has been developed to screen botanical extracts for the formation of electrophilic and potentially toxic quinoid species upon bioactivation by hepatic cytochromes P450. Rat liver microsomes were trapped in a flow-through chamber by an ultrafiltration membrane, and samples containing botanical extracts, GSH and NADP(H), were flow-injected into the chamber. Botanical compounds that were metabolized to reactive intermediates formed stable GSH adducts mimicking a common in vivo detoxification pathway. If present in the ultrafiltrate, GSH conjugates were detected using LC-MS-MS with precursor ion scanning followed by additional characterization using product ion scanning and comparison to standard compounds. As expected, no GSH adducts of reactive metabolites were found in extracts of Trifolium pratense L. (red clover), which are under investigation as botanical dietary supplements for the management of menopause. However, extracts of Sassafras albidum (Nutt.) Nees (sassafras), Symphytum officinale L. (comfrey), and Rosmarinus officinalis L. (rosemary), all of which are known to contain compounds that are either carcinogenic or toxic to mammals, produced GSH adducts during this screening assay. Several compounds that formed GSH conjugates including novel metabolites of rosmarinic acid were identified using database searching and additional LC-MS-MS studies. This assay should be useful as a preliminary toxicity screen during the development of botanical dietary supplements. A positive test suggests that additional toxicological studies are warranted before human consumption of a botanical product. PMID:11712913

  6. Novel rapid liquid chromatography tandem masspectrometry method for vemurafenib and metabolites in human plasma, including metabolite concentrations at steady state.

    PubMed

    Vikingsson, Svante; Strömqvist, Malin; Svedberg, Anna; Hansson, Johan; Höiom, Veronica; Gréen, Henrik

    2016-08-01

    A novel, rapid and sensitive liquid chromatography tandem-mass spectrometry method for quantification of vemurafenib in human plasma, that also for the first time allows for metabolite semi-quantification, was developed and validated to support clinical trials and therapeutic drug monitoring. Vemurafenib was analysed by precipitation with methanol followed by a 1.9 min isocratic liquid chromatography tandem masspectrometry analysis using an Acquity BEH C18 column with methanol and formic acid using isotope labelled internal standards. Analytes were detected in multireaction monitoring mode on a Xevo TQ. Semi-quantification of vemurafenib metabolites was performed using the same analytical syste