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Sample records for alkoxyacetic acid metabolites

  1. Serum albumin complexation of acetylsalicylic acid metabolites.

    PubMed

    Jurkowski, Wiktor; Porebski, Grzegorz; Obtułowicz, Krystyna; Roterman, Irena

    2009-06-01

    One possible origin of the type I hypersensitivity reaction is reaction of drugs such as acetylsalicylic acid and its metabolites being complexed with human serum albumin. Albumin, being transporting molecule abundant in blood plasma is able to bind large array of ligands varying from small single carbon particles to long hydrophobic tailed lipidic acids (e.g. myristic acid). This non specificity is possible because of multi domain scaffold and large flexibility of inter-domain loops, which results in serious reorientation of domains. Hypothesis that acetylsalicylic acid metabolites may play indirect role in activation of allergic reaction has been tested. Binding of acetylsalicylic acid metabolites in intra-domain space causes significant increase of liability of domains IIIA and IIIB. One of metabolites, salicyluric acid, once is bound causes distortion and partial unfolding of helices in domains IA, IIB and IIIB. Changed are both directions and amplitude of relative motions as well as intra-domain distances. In result albumin is able to cross-link of adjacent IgE receptors which subsequently starts allergic reaction.

  2. Serum albumin complexation of acetylsalicylic acid metabolites.

    PubMed

    Jurkowski, Wiktor; Porebski, Grzegorz; Obtułowicz, Krystyna; Roterman, Irena

    2009-06-01

    One possible origin of the type I hypersensitivity reaction is reaction of drugs such as acetylsalicylic acid and its metabolites being complexed with human serum albumin. Albumin, being transporting molecule abundant in blood plasma is able to bind large array of ligands varying from small single carbon particles to long hydrophobic tailed lipidic acids (e.g. myristic acid). This non specificity is possible because of multi domain scaffold and large flexibility of inter-domain loops, which results in serious reorientation of domains. Hypothesis that acetylsalicylic acid metabolites may play indirect role in activation of allergic reaction has been tested. Binding of acetylsalicylic acid metabolites in intra-domain space causes significant increase of liability of domains IIIA and IIIB. One of metabolites, salicyluric acid, once is bound causes distortion and partial unfolding of helices in domains IA, IIB and IIIB. Changed are both directions and amplitude of relative motions as well as intra-domain distances. In result albumin is able to cross-link of adjacent IgE receptors which subsequently starts allergic reaction. PMID:19689242

  3. Metabolite Profiles of Lactic Acid Bacteria in Grass Silage▿

    PubMed Central

    Broberg, Anders; Jacobsson, Karin; Ström, Katrin; Schnürer, Johan

    2007-01-01

    The metabolite production of lactic acid bacteria (LAB) on silage was investigated. The aim was to compare the production of antifungal metabolites in silage with the production in liquid cultures previously studied in our laboratory. The following metabolites were found to be present at elevated concentrations in silos inoculated with LAB strains: 3-hydroxydecanoic acid, 2-hydroxy-4-methylpentanoic acid, benzoic acid, catechol, hydrocinnamic acid, salicylic acid, 3-phenyllactic acid, 4-hydroxybenzoic acid, (trans, trans)-3,4-dihydroxycyclohexane-1-carboxylic acid, p-hydrocoumaric acid, vanillic acid, azelaic acid, hydroferulic acid, p-coumaric acid, hydrocaffeic acid, ferulic acid, and caffeic acid. Among these metabolites, the antifungal compounds 3-phenyllactic acid and 3-hydroxydecanoic acid were previously isolated in our laboratory from liquid cultures of the same LAB strains by bioassay-guided fractionation. It was concluded that other metabolites, e.g., p-hydrocoumaric acid, hydroferulic acid, and p-coumaric acid, were released from the grass by the added LAB strains. The antifungal activities of the identified metabolites in 100 mM lactic acid were investigated. The MICs against Pichia anomala, Penicillium roqueforti, and Aspergillus fumigatus were determined, and 3-hydroxydecanoic acid showed the lowest MIC (0.1 mg ml−1 for two of the three test organisms). PMID:17616609

  4. The role of nicotinic acid metabolites in flushing and hepatotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Stern, Ralph H

    2007-07-01

    Flushing and hepatotoxicity are important adverse effects of nicotinic acid. This article reviews the role of metabolism of nicotinic acid in the production of these side effects. The suggestion that nicotinic acid (NUA) formation produces flushing is traced to a correlation of flushing with NUA C(max) (maximal concentration) and the observation that aspirin inhibits NUA formation and flushing. The former does not establish causation and the latter can be explained by inhibition of prostaglandin formation. Recent characterization of the GPR109A receptor that mediates prostaglandin release by Langerhans cells to produce flushing has shown nicotinic acid, not NUA, is responsible. The suggestion that nicotinamide metabolites produce hepatotoxicity is not supported by any data. The mechanism of hepatotoxicity is unknown and a toxic metabolite of nicotinic acid has not been identified. Different nicotinic acid formulations produce different metabolite patterns due to nonlinear pharmacokinetics, but there is no evidence that these differences have any clinical importance. PMID:21291680

  5. Gut Microbial Fatty Acid Metabolites Reduce Triacylglycerol Levels in Hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Nanthirudjanar, Tharnath; Furumoto, Hidehiro; Zheng, Jiawen; Kim, Young-Il; Goto, Tsuyoshi; Takahashi, Nobuyuki; Kawada, Teruo; Park, Si-Bum; Hirata, Akiko; Kitamura, Nahoko; Kishino, Shigenobu; Ogawa, Jun; Hirata, Takashi; Sugawara, Tatsuya

    2015-11-01

    Hydroxy and oxo fatty acids were recently found to be produced as intermediates during gut microbial fatty acid metabolism. Lactobacillus plantarum produces these fatty acids from unsaturated fatty acids such as linoleic acid. In this study, we investigated the effects of these gut microbial fatty acid metabolites on the lipogenesis in liver cells. We screened their effect on sterol regulatory element binding protein-1c (SREBP-1c) expression in HepG2 cells treated with a synthetic liver X receptor α (LXRα) agonist (T0901317). The results showed that 10-hydroxy-12(Z)-octadecenoic acid (18:1) (HYA), 10-hydroxy-6(Z),12(Z)-octadecadienoic acid (18:2) (γHYA), 10-oxo-12(Z)-18:1 (KetoA), and 10-oxo-6(Z),12(Z)-18:2 (γKetoA) significantly decreased SREBP-1c mRNA expression induced by T0901317. These fatty acids also downregulated the mRNA expression of lipogenic genes by suppressing LXRα activity and inhibiting SREBP-1 maturation. Oral administration of KetoA, which effectively reduced triacylglycerol accumulation and acetyl-CoA carboxylase 2 (ACC2) expression in HepG2 cells, for 2 weeks significantly decreased Srebp-1c, Scd-1, and Acc2 expression in the liver of mice fed a high-sucrose diet. Our findings suggest that the hypolipidemic effect of the fatty acid metabolites produced by L. plantarum can be exploited in the treatment of cardiovascular diseases or dyslipidemia. PMID:26399511

  6. Ursolic acid (UA): A metabolite with promising therapeutic potential.

    PubMed

    Kashyap, Dharambir; Tuli, Hardeep Singh; Sharma, Anil K

    2016-02-01

    Plants are known to produce a variety of bioactive metabolites which are being used to cure various life threatening and chronic diseases. The molecular mechanism of action of such bioactive molecules, may open up new avenues for the scientific community to develop or improve novel therapeutic approaches to tackle dreadful diseases such as cancer and cardiovascular and neurodegenerative disorders. Ursolic acid (UA) is one among the categories of such plant-based therapeutic metabolites having multiple intracellular and extracellular targets that play role in apoptosis, metastasis, angiogenesis and inflammatory processes. Moreover, the synthetic derivatives of UA have also been seen to be involved in a range of pharmacological applications, which are associated with prevention of diseases. Evidences suggest that UA could be used as a potential candidate to develop a comprehensive competent strategy towards the treatment and prevention of health disorders. The review article herein describes the possible therapeutic effects of UA along with putative mechanism of action. PMID:26775565

  7. Mass spectrometric screening and identification of acidic metabolites in fulvic acid fractions of contaminated groundwater.

    PubMed

    Jobelius, Carsten; Frimmel, Fritz H; Zwiener, Christian

    2014-05-01

    The anaerobic microbial degradation of aromatic and heterocyclic compounds is a prevalent process in contaminated groundwater systems. The introduction of functional groups into the contaminant molecules often results in aromatic and heterocyclic and succinic acids. These metabolites can be used as indicators for prevailing degradation processes. Therefore, there is a strong interest in developing analytical methods for screening and identification of these metabolites. In this study, neutral loss scans (NLS) by liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization/tandem mass spectrometry with losses of CO2 (NL ∆m/z = 44) and C2H4(CO2)2 (NL ∆m/z = 116) were applied for the first time successfully to screen selectively for acidic and succinic metabolites of aromatic and heterocyclic contaminants in two fulvic acid fractions from a contaminated site and a downstream region of a tar oil-polluted groundwater. Identification of these preselected signals was performed by high-resolution mass spectrometry with a liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry instrument. High-resolution mass and mass fragmentation data were then compared with a list of known metabolites from a literature search or matched with chemical databases supported with in silico fragmentation. Based on authentic analytical standards, several compounds from NLS were identified (e.g., 4-hydroxy-3-methylbenzoic acid, benzylsuccinic acid, naphthyl-2-methylsuccinic acid, 2-carboxyindane, and 2-carboxybenzothiophene) and tentatively identified (e.g., benzofuranmethylsuccinic acid and dihydrocarboxybenzothiophene) as aromatic, phenolic, heterocyclic, and succinic acids. The acidic metabolites were found exclusively in the contaminated region of the aquifer which indicates active biodegradation processes and no relevant occurrence of acidic metabolites in the downstream region.

  8. Differential effects of linoleic Acid metabolites on cardiac sodium current.

    PubMed

    Harrell, Maddison D; Stimers, Joseph R

    2002-10-01

    9,10-Epoxy-12-octadecenoic acid (EOA), a metabolite of linoleic acid, causes cardiac arrest in dogs. Other metabolites of linoleic acid also have toxic effects. This study investigates the mechanism of action of four of these compounds on cardiac Na(+) current (I(Na)). The whole-cell patch-clamp technique was used to investigate the effects of EOA, 9,10-dihydroxy-12-octadecenoic acid (DHOA), and their corresponding methyl esters (9,10-epoxy-12-octadecenoic methyl ester, EOM; and 9,10-dihydroxy-12-octadecenoic methyl ester, DHOM) on I(Na) in isolated adult rat ventricular myocytes. Extracellular application of each compound elicited a concentration-dependent inhibition of I(Na). The dose-response curve yielded 50% inhibition concentrations of 301 +/- 117 microM for DHOA, 41 +/- 6 microM for DHOM, 34 +/- 5 microM for EOA, and 160 +/- 41 microM for EOM. Although there was no effect on activation, 50 microM DHOM, EOA, and EOM significantly hyperpolarized the steady-state inactivation curve by approximately -6 mV. Furthermore, EOM significantly increased the slope of the steady-state inactivation curve. These compounds also seemed to stabilize the inactivated state because the time for recovery from inactivation was significantly slowed from a control value of 12.9 +/- 0.5 ms to 30.5 +/- 3.3, 31.4 +/- 1.4, and 20.5 +/- 1.0 ms by 50 microM DHOM, EOA, and EOM, respectively. These compounds have multiple actions on Na(+) channels and that despite their structural similarities their actions differ from each other. The steady-state block of I(Na) suggests that either the pore is being blocked or the channels are prevented from gating to the open state. In addition, these compounds stabilize the inactivated state and promote increased population of a slower inactivated state. PMID:12235270

  9. Hydrophobic metabolites of 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D) in cultured coconut tissue.

    PubMed

    López-Villalobos, Arturo; Hornung, Roland; Dodds, Peter F

    2004-10-01

    Cultures of inflorescence and plumular tissues of coconut palm (Cocos nucifera L.) were maintained in the presence of the auxin, [14C]2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D), so that its metabolic fate could be studied. Thin layer chromatography of methanol extracts of the plumular tissue showed that four classes of metabolites, as well as the unchanged acid, were recovered in the extract. In inflorescence tissue, only the unchanged acid and the most polar class of metabolites (metabolite I) were recovered. Metabolite I was shown to consist mostly of a mixture of sugar conjugates and metabolite II (the next most polar) was an unidentified basic metabolite. Metabolites III and IV were both novel triacylglycerol analogues in which one of the natural fatty acids was replaced with a chain-elongated form of 2,4-D. Reversed-phase thin layer chromatography was used to identify the 2,4-D-derived acids and it was found that metabolite III contained the 2,4-dichlorophenoxy-moiety attached to a chain-length of between 2 and 12 carbons, whereas metabolite IV contained 12, 14 and 16 carbon chain lengths. In inflorescence tissue, and in plumular tissue at low sucrose or 2,4-D concentrations and after short periods in culture, metabolite I predominated. The other metabolites increased as a percentage when plumular culture was prolonged or when sucrose or 2,4-D concentrations were raised. These changes correlated with better development of the explant.

  10. Hydrophobic metabolites of 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D) in cultured coconut tissue.

    PubMed

    López-Villalobos, Arturo; Hornung, Roland; Dodds, Peter F

    2004-10-01

    Cultures of inflorescence and plumular tissues of coconut palm (Cocos nucifera L.) were maintained in the presence of the auxin, [14C]2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D), so that its metabolic fate could be studied. Thin layer chromatography of methanol extracts of the plumular tissue showed that four classes of metabolites, as well as the unchanged acid, were recovered in the extract. In inflorescence tissue, only the unchanged acid and the most polar class of metabolites (metabolite I) were recovered. Metabolite I was shown to consist mostly of a mixture of sugar conjugates and metabolite II (the next most polar) was an unidentified basic metabolite. Metabolites III and IV were both novel triacylglycerol analogues in which one of the natural fatty acids was replaced with a chain-elongated form of 2,4-D. Reversed-phase thin layer chromatography was used to identify the 2,4-D-derived acids and it was found that metabolite III contained the 2,4-dichlorophenoxy-moiety attached to a chain-length of between 2 and 12 carbons, whereas metabolite IV contained 12, 14 and 16 carbon chain lengths. In inflorescence tissue, and in plumular tissue at low sucrose or 2,4-D concentrations and after short periods in culture, metabolite I predominated. The other metabolites increased as a percentage when plumular culture was prolonged or when sucrose or 2,4-D concentrations were raised. These changes correlated with better development of the explant. PMID:15474562

  11. Cancer-generated lactic acid: a regulatory, immunosuppressive metabolite?

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Stephen Yiu Chuen; Collins, Colin C; Gout, Peter W; Wang, Yuzhuo

    2013-01-01

    The common preference of cancers for lactic acid-generating metabolic energy pathways has led to proposals that their reprogrammed metabolism confers growth advantages such as decreased susceptibility to hypoxic stress. Recent observations, however, suggest that it generates a novel way for cancer survival. There is increasing evidence that cancers can escape immune destruction by suppressing the anti-cancer immune response through maintaining a relatively low pH in their micro-environment. Tumours achieve this by regulating lactic acid secretion via modification of glucose/glutamine metabolisms. We propose that the maintenance by cancers of a relatively low pH in their micro-environment, via regulation of their lactic acid secretion through selective modification of their energy metabolism, is another major mechanism by which cancers can suppress the anti-cancer immune response. Cancer-generated lactic acid could thus be viewed as a critical, immunosuppressive metabolite in the tumour micro-environment rather than a ‘waste product’. This paradigm shift can have major impact on therapeutic strategy development. Copyright © 2013 Pathological Society of Great Britain and Ireland. Published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:23729358

  12. Novel Omega-3 Fatty Acid Epoxygenase Metabolite Reduces Kidney Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Amit; Khan, Md. Abdul Hye; Levick, Scott P.; Lee, Kin Sing Stephen; Hammock, Bruce D.; Imig, John D.

    2016-01-01

    Cytochrome P450 (CYP) monooxygenases epoxidize the omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA) docosahexaenoic acid into novel epoxydocosapentaenoic acids (EDPs) that have multiple biological actions. The present study determined the ability of the most abundant EDP regioisomer, 19,20-EDP to reduce kidney injury in an experimental unilateral ureteral obstruction (UUO) renal fibrosis mouse model. Mice with UUO developed kidney tubular injury and interstitial fibrosis. UUO mice had elevated kidney hydroxyproline content and five-times greater collagen positive fibrotic area than sham control mice. 19,20-EDP treatment to UUO mice for 10 days reduced renal fibrosis with a 40%–50% reduction in collagen positive area and hydroxyproline content. There was a six-fold increase in kidney α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA) positive area in UUO mice compared to sham control mice, and 19,20-EDP treatment to UUO mice decreased α-SMA immunopositive area by 60%. UUO mice demonstrated renal epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) with reduced expression of the epithelial marker E-cadherin and elevated expression of multiple mesenchymal markers (FSP-1, α-SMA, and desmin). Interestingly, 19,20-EDP treatment reduced renal EMT in UUO by decreasing mesenchymal and increasing epithelial marker expression. Overall, we demonstrate that a novel omega-3 fatty acid metabolite 19,20-EDP, prevents UUO-induced renal fibrosis in mice by reducing renal EMT. PMID:27213332

  13. Cancer-generated lactic acid: a regulatory, immunosuppressive metabolite?

    PubMed

    Choi, Stephen Yiu Chuen; Collins, Colin C; Gout, Peter W; Wang, Yuzhuo

    2013-08-01

    The common preference of cancers for lactic acid-generating metabolic energy pathways has led to proposals that their reprogrammed metabolism confers growth advantages such as decreased susceptibility to hypoxic stress. Recent observations, however, suggest that it generates a novel way for cancer survival. There is increasing evidence that cancers can escape immune destruction by suppressing the anti-cancer immune response through maintaining a relatively low pH in their micro-environment. Tumours achieve this by regulating lactic acid secretion via modification of glucose/glutamine metabolisms. We propose that the maintenance by cancers of a relatively low pH in their micro-environment, via regulation of their lactic acid secretion through selective modification of their energy metabolism, is another major mechanism by which cancers can suppress the anti-cancer immune response. Cancer-generated lactic acid could thus be viewed as a critical, immunosuppressive metabolite in the tumour micro-environment rather than a 'waste product'. This paradigm shift can have major impact on therapeutic strategy development.

  14. Targeted lipidomics strategies for oxygenated metabolites of polyunsaturated fatty acids

    PubMed Central

    Astarita, Giuseppe; Kendall, Alexandra C.; Dennis, Edward A.; Nicolaou, Anna

    2014-01-01

    Oxidation of polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) through enzymatic or non-enzymatic free radical-mediated reactions can yield an array of lipid metabolites including eicosanoids, octadecanoids, docosanoids and related species. In mammals, these oxygenated PUFA mediators play prominent roles in the physiological and pathological regulation of many key biological processes in the cardiovascular, renal, reproductive and other systems including their pivotal contribution to inflammation. Mass spectrometry-based technology platforms have revolutionized our ability to analyze the complex mixture of lipid mediators found in biological samples, with increased numbers of metabolites that can be simultaneously quantified from a single sample in few analytical steps. The recent development of high-sensitivity and high-throughput analytical tools for lipid mediators affords a broader view of these oxygenated PUFA species, and facilitates research into their role in health and disease. In this review, we illustrate current analytical approaches for a high-throughput lipidomic analysis of eicosanoids and related mediators in biological samples. PMID:25486530

  15. Aggression and personality: association with amino acids and monoamine metabolites.

    PubMed

    Møller, S E; Mortensen, E L; Breum, L; Alling, C; Larsen, O G; Bøge-Rasmussen, T; Jensen, C; Bennicke, K

    1996-03-01

    Associations in 52 normal individuals were examined between plasma and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) concentrations of tryptophan (Trp) and tyrosine, and concentrations of monoamine metabolites in the CSF, and scores on an aggression questionnaire, the Kinsey Institute Reaction List II, and the Eysenck Personality Questionnaire. There was a significantly positive correlation between CSF 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid (5-HIAA) levels and extroverted aggression scores, and a significantly negative correlation between CSF 5-HIAA levels and introverted aggression scores. Males showed higher plasma Trp concentrations than females, and significantly positive correlations between plasma Trp concentrations and scores on extroverted aggression and the Eysenck E scale. Males, furthermore, showed a significantly negative correlation between CSF Trp levels and scores on the Eysenck P scale, and a significantly positive correlation between concentrations of 3-methoxy-4-hydroxy-phenylglycol in CSF and scores on moral aggression. These results suggest that central serotonin influences aggression in normal individuals through effects on personality.

  16. Aggression and personality: association with amino acids and monoamine metabolites.

    PubMed

    Møller, S E; Mortensen, E L; Breum, L; Alling, C; Larsen, O G; Bøge-Rasmussen, T; Jensen, C; Bennicke, K

    1996-03-01

    Associations in 52 normal individuals were examined between plasma and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) concentrations of tryptophan (Trp) and tyrosine, and concentrations of monoamine metabolites in the CSF, and scores on an aggression questionnaire, the Kinsey Institute Reaction List II, and the Eysenck Personality Questionnaire. There was a significantly positive correlation between CSF 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid (5-HIAA) levels and extroverted aggression scores, and a significantly negative correlation between CSF 5-HIAA levels and introverted aggression scores. Males showed higher plasma Trp concentrations than females, and significantly positive correlations between plasma Trp concentrations and scores on extroverted aggression and the Eysenck E scale. Males, furthermore, showed a significantly negative correlation between CSF Trp levels and scores on the Eysenck P scale, and a significantly positive correlation between concentrations of 3-methoxy-4-hydroxy-phenylglycol in CSF and scores on moral aggression. These results suggest that central serotonin influences aggression in normal individuals through effects on personality. PMID:8685288

  17. Characterization of retinoyl beta-glucuronide as a minor metabolite of retinoic acid in bile.

    PubMed Central

    Zile, M H; Schnoes, H K; DeLuca, H F

    1980-01-01

    Several metabolites detected in the bile of rats given radioactive retinoic acid were separated by liquid/gel partition chromatography and purified by high-pressure liquid chromatography. One of these metabolites was found to be sensitive to beta-D-glucuronidase, yielding both 13-cis- and all-trans-retinoic acid. It had the characteristic ultraviolet absorption spectrum of retinoic acid esters. Trimethylsilyl ether and acetyl derivatives of the methylated metabolite were prepared and examined by mass spectrometry. The resulting mass spectra established the structure to be retinoyl beta-glucuronide. Retinoyl glucuronide was rapidly excreted into the bile: the excretion was complete by 12 hr after the administration of retinoic acid. At this time the metabolite represented 12% of bile radioactivity (10% of dose). These observations confirm the existence of retinoyl glucuronide but demonstrate that it represents only one of several retinoic acid metabolites in bile. PMID:6932017

  18. Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Identification of New Sulfonic Acid Metabolites of Chloroacetanilide Herbicides

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Morton, M.D.; Walters, F.H.; Aga, D.S.; Thurman, E.M.; Larive, C.K.

    1997-01-01

    The detection of the sulfonic acid metabolites of the chloroacetanilide herbicides acetochlor, alachlor, butachlor, propachlor, and, more recently, metolachlor in surface and ground water suggests that a common mechanism for dechlorination exists via the glutathione conjugation pathway. The identification of these herbicides and their metabolites is important due to growing public awareness and concern about pesticide levels in drinking water. Although these herbicides are regulated, little is known about the fate of their metabolites in soil. The sulfonic acid metabolites were synthesized by reaction of the parent compounds with an excess of sodium sulfite. Acetochlor, alachlor, butachlor, metolachlor, and propachlor and their sulfonic acid metabolites were studied by nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy and fast atom bombardment mass spectrometry. This paper provides a direct method for the preparation and characterization of these compounds that will be useful in the analysis and study of chloracetanilide herbicides and their metabolites.

  19. NMR identification of endogenous metabolites interacting with fatted and non-fatted human serum albumin in blood plasma: Fatty acids influence the HSA-metabolite interaction.

    PubMed

    Jupin, Marc; Michiels, Paul J; Girard, Frederic C; Spraul, Manfred; Wijmenga, Sybren S

    2013-03-01

    Metabolites and their concentrations are direct reporters on body biochemistry. Thanks to technical developments metabolic profiling of body fluids, such as blood plasma, by for instance NMR has in the past decade become increasingly accurate enabling successful clinical diagnostics. Human Serum Albumin (HSA) is the main plasma protein (∼60% of all plasma protein) and responsible for the transport of endogenous (e.g. fatty acids) and exogenous metabolites, which it achieves thanks to its multiple binding sites and its flexibility. HSA has been extensively studied with regard to its binding of drugs (exogenous metabolites), but only to a lesser extent with regard to its binding of endogenous (non-fatty acid) metabolites. To obtain correct NMR measured metabolic profiles of blood plasma and/or potentially extract information on HSA and fatty acids content, it is necessary to characterize these endogenous metabolite/plasma protein interactions. Here, we investigate these metabolite-HSA interactions in blood plasma and blood plasma mimics. The latter contain the roughly twenty metabolites routinely detected by NMR (also most abundant) in normal relative concentrations with fatted or non-fatted HSA added or not. First, we find that chemical shift changes are small and seen only for a few of the metabolites. In contrast, a significant number of the metabolites display reduced resonance integrals and reduced free concentrations in the presence of HSA or fatted HSA. For slow-exchange (or strong) interactions, NMR resonance integrals report the free metabolite concentration, while for fast exchange (weak binding) the chemical shift reports on the binding. Hence, these metabolites bind strongly to HSA and/or fatted HSA, but to a limited degree because for most metabolites their concentration is smaller than the HSA concentration. Most interestingly, fatty acids decrease the metabolite-HSA binding quite significantly for most of the interacting metabolites. We further find

  20. NMR identification of endogenous metabolites interacting with fatted and non-fatted human serum albumin in blood plasma: Fatty acids influence the HSA-metabolite interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jupin, Marc; Michiels, Paul J.; Girard, Frederic C.; Spraul, Manfred; Wijmenga, Sybren S.

    2013-03-01

    Metabolites and their concentrations are direct reporters on body biochemistry. Thanks to technical developments metabolic profiling of body fluids, such as blood plasma, by for instance NMR has in the past decade become increasingly accurate enabling successful clinical diagnostics. Human Serum Albumin (HSA) is the main plasma protein (˜60% of all plasma protein) and responsible for the transport of endogenous (e.g. fatty acids) and exogenous metabolites, which it achieves thanks to its multiple binding sites and its flexibility. HSA has been extensively studied with regard to its binding of drugs (exogenous metabolites), but only to a lesser extent with regard to its binding of endogenous (non-fatty acid) metabolites. To obtain correct NMR measured metabolic profiles of blood plasma and/or potentially extract information on HSA and fatty acids content, it is necessary to characterize these endogenous metabolite/plasma protein interactions. Here, we investigate these metabolite-HSA interactions in blood plasma and blood plasma mimics. The latter contain the roughly twenty metabolites routinely detected by NMR (also most abundant) in normal relative concentrations with fatted or non-fatted HSA added or not. First, we find that chemical shift changes are small and seen only for a few of the metabolites. In contrast, a significant number of the metabolites display reduced resonance integrals and reduced free concentrations in the presence of HSA or fatted HSA. For slow-exchange (or strong) interactions, NMR resonance integrals report the free metabolite concentration, while for fast exchange (weak binding) the chemical shift reports on the binding. Hence, these metabolites bind strongly to HSA and/or fatted HSA, but to a limited degree because for most metabolites their concentration is smaller than the HSA concentration. Most interestingly, fatty acids decrease the metabolite-HSA binding quite significantly for most of the interacting metabolites. We further find

  1. The nuclear receptor PPARγ individually responds to serotonin- and fatty acid-metabolites

    PubMed Central

    Waku, Tsuyoshi; Shiraki, Takuma; Oyama, Takuji; Maebara, Kanako; Nakamori, Rinna; Morikawa, Kosuke

    2010-01-01

    The nuclear receptor, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPARγ), recognizes various synthetic and endogenous ligands by the ligand-binding domain. Fatty-acid metabolites reportedly activate PPARγ through conformational changes of the Ω loop. Here, we report that serotonin metabolites act as endogenous agonists for PPARγ to regulate macrophage function and adipogenesis by directly binding to helix H12. A cyclooxygenase inhibitor, indomethacin, is a mimetic agonist of these metabolites. Crystallographic analyses revealed that an indole acetate functions as a common moiety for the recognition by the sub-pocket near helix H12. Intriguingly, a serotonin metabolite and a fatty-acid metabolite each bind to distinct sub-pockets, and the PPARγ antagonist, T0070907, blocked the fatty-acid agonism, but not that of the serotonin metabolites. Mutational analyses on receptor-mediated transcription and coactivator binding revealed that each metabolite individually uses coregulator and/or heterodimer interfaces in a ligand-type-specific manner. Furthermore, the inhibition of the serotonin metabolism reduced the expression of the endogenous PPARγ-target gene. Collectively, these results suggest a novel agonism, in which PPARγ functions as a multiple sensor in response to distinct metabolites. PMID:20717101

  2. A branched-chain amino acid metabolite drives vascular fatty acid transport and causes insulin resistance.

    PubMed

    Jang, Cholsoon; Oh, Sungwhan F; Wada, Shogo; Rowe, Glenn C; Liu, Laura; Chan, Mun Chun; Rhee, James; Hoshino, Atsushi; Kim, Boa; Ibrahim, Ayon; Baca, Luisa G; Kim, Esl; Ghosh, Chandra C; Parikh, Samir M; Jiang, Aihua; Chu, Qingwei; Forman, Daniel E; Lecker, Stewart H; Krishnaiah, Saikumari; Rabinowitz, Joshua D; Weljie, Aalim M; Baur, Joseph A; Kasper, Dennis L; Arany, Zoltan

    2016-04-01

    Epidemiological and experimental data implicate branched-chain amino acids (BCAAs) in the development of insulin resistance, but the mechanisms that underlie this link remain unclear. Insulin resistance in skeletal muscle stems from the excess accumulation of lipid species, a process that requires blood-borne lipids to initially traverse the blood vessel wall. How this trans-endothelial transport occurs and how it is regulated are not well understood. Here we leveraged PPARGC1a (also known as PGC-1α; encoded by Ppargc1a), a transcriptional coactivator that regulates broad programs of fatty acid consumption, to identify 3-hydroxyisobutyrate (3-HIB), a catabolic intermediate of the BCAA valine, as a new paracrine regulator of trans-endothelial fatty acid transport. We found that 3-HIB is secreted from muscle cells, activates endothelial fatty acid transport, stimulates muscle fatty acid uptake in vivo and promotes lipid accumulation in muscle, leading to insulin resistance in mice. Conversely, inhibiting the synthesis of 3-HIB in muscle cells blocks the ability of PGC-1α to promote endothelial fatty acid uptake. 3-HIB levels are elevated in muscle from db/db mice with diabetes and from human subjects with diabetes, as compared to those without diabetes. These data unveil a mechanism in which the metabolite 3-HIB, by regulating the trans-endothelial flux of fatty acids, links the regulation of fatty acid flux to BCAA catabolism, providing a mechanistic explanation for how increased BCAA catabolic flux can cause diabetes. PMID:26950361

  3. Phenolic acid metabolites derived from coffee consumption are unlikely to cross the blood-brain barrier.

    PubMed

    Lardeau, A; Poquet, L

    2013-03-25

    Coffee drinking is well known for its stimulating effects on the brain and on cognition. In addition to the most active component, caffeine, coffee contains phenolic acids, which may also have some activity. Dihydrocaffeoyl-3-O-sulfate, caffeoyl-3-O-sulfate, dihydroferuloyl-4-O-sulfate, as well as dihydroferulic, dihydrocaffeic, 5-O-feruloylquinic and 5-O-caffeoylquinic acids, the major phenolic acid metabolites circulating in human plasma after coffee ingestion, were tested for their potential to enter the brain using a validated in vitro model of the blood brain barrier made of endothelial cells from bovine brain capillaries. As expected, caffeine showed a high rate of permeation across this barrier, but the phenolic acid metabolites exhibited a very low rate of permeation. The data suggest that none of these phenolic acid metabolites can be considered as potential candidate to enter the brain in vivo and so are unlikely to affect cognitive processes directly as proposed for caffeine.

  4. Bioactive secondary metabolites from acid mine waste extremophiles.

    PubMed

    Stierle, Andrea A; Stierle, Donald B

    2014-07-01

    The extremophilic microbes of the Berkeley Pit Lake are a valuable source of new and interesting secondary metabolites. It is of particular interest that these acidophilic microbes produce small molecule inhibitors of pathways associated with low pH and high Eh. These same small molecules also inhibit molecular pathways induced by reactive oxygen species (ROS) and inflammation in mammalian cells. Low pH is a hallmark of inflammation and high Eh is one of ROS, so the suitability of this collection as a source of bioactive metabolites is actually quite biorational. Compound isolation was guided by inhibition of caspase-1 and matrix metalloproteinase-3, and active compounds were sent to the National Cancer Institute-Developmental Therapeutics Program and Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer center for evaluation as either antiproliferative or cytotoxic agents.

  5. Production of arachidonic and linoleic acid metabolites by guinea pig tracheal epithelial cells

    SciTech Connect

    Oosthuizen, M.J.; Engels, F.; Van Esch, B.; Henricks, P.A.; Nijkamp, F.P. )

    1990-08-01

    Pulmonary epithelial cells may be responsible for regulating airway smooth muscle function, in part by release of fatty acid-derived mediators. Incubation of isolated guinea pig tracheal epithelial cells with radiolabeled arachidonic acid (AA) leads to the production of 5- and 15-hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid (5- and 15-HETE) and smaller amounts of leukotriene (LT) B4 and C4 and 12-hydroxyheptadecatrienoic acid (HHT). Epithelial cells also are able to release linoleic acid (LA) metabolites. Incubation with radiolabeled linoleic acid leads to the formation of 9- and 13-hydroxyoctadecadienoic acid (9- and 13-HODE). The biological significance of these mediators produced by epithelial cells is discussed.

  6. Bacterial dynamics and metabolite changes in solid-state acetic acid fermentation of Shanxi aged vinegar.

    PubMed

    Li, Sha; Li, Pan; Liu, Xiong; Luo, Lixin; Lin, Weifeng

    2016-05-01

    Solid-state acetic acid fermentation (AAF), a natural or semi-controlled fermentation process driven by reproducible microbial communities, is an important technique to produce traditional Chinese cereal vinegars. Highly complex microbial communities and metabolites are involved in traditional Chinese solid-state AAF, but the association between microbiota and metabolites during this process are still poorly understood. In this study, we performed amplicon 16S rRNA gene sequencing on the Illumina MiSeq platform, PCR-denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis, and metabolite analysis to trace the bacterial dynamics and metabolite changes under AAF process. A succession of bacterial assemblages was observed during the AAF process. Lactobacillales dominated all the stages. However, Acetobacter species in Rhodospirillales were considerably accelerated during AAF until the end of fermentation. Quantitative PCR results indicated that the biomass of total bacteria showed a "system microbe self-domestication" process in the first 3 days, and then peaked at the seventh day before gradually decreasing until the end of AAF. Moreover, a total of 88 metabolites, including 8 organic acids, 16 free amino acids, and 66 aroma compounds were detected during AAF. Principal component analysis and cluster analyses revealed the high correlation between the dynamics of bacterial community and metabolites.

  7. Enzymic formation of dehydrogenated and hydroxylated metabolites from lysergic acid diethylamide by rat liver microsomes.

    PubMed

    Inoue, T; Niwaguchi, T; Murata, T

    1980-05-01

    1. The metabolism of lysergic acid diethylamide (LSD) was studied using rat liver microsomes, and two minor metabolites were obtained in addition to lysergic acid ethylamide and N6-desmethyl-lysergic acid diethylamide (nor-LSD) which were reported previously. 2. One of the metabolites was identified as lysergic acid ethylvinylamide, apparently formed by dehydrogenation of a diethylamide group in the side chain at the 8-position, and the other as the phenol 13-hydroxy-LSD. 3. The formation of both lysergic acid ethylamide and lysergic acid ethylvinylamide was similarly induced by pretreatment of rats with either phenobarbitone sodium or 3-methylcholanthrene, while nor-LSD formation was induced only by phenobarbitone and that of 13-hydroxy-LSD only by methylcholanthrene.

  8. Oxidative DNA damage induced by aminoacetone, an amino acid metabolite.

    PubMed

    Hiraku, Y; Sugimoto, J; Yamaguchi, T; Kawanishi, S

    1999-05-01

    We investigated DNA damage induced by aminoacetone, a metabolite of threonine and glycine. Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis revealed that aminoacetone caused cellular DNA cleavage. Aminoacetone increased the amount of 8-oxo-7,8-dihydro-2'-deoxyguanosine (8-oxodG) in human cultured cells in a dose-dependent manner. The formation of 8-oxodG in calf thymus DNA increased due to aminoacetone only in the presence of Cu(II). DNA ladder formation was observed at higher concentrations of aminoacetone than those causing DNA cleavage. Flow cytometry showed that aminoacetone enhanced the generation of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) in cultured cells. Aminoacetone caused damage to 32P-5'-end-labeled DNA fragments, obtained from the human c-Ha-ras-1 and p53 genes, at cytosine and thymine residues in the presence of Cu(II). Catalase and bathocuproine inhibited DNA damage, suggesting that H2O2 and Cu(I) were involved. Analysis of the products generated from aminoacetone revealed that aminoacetone underwent Cu(II)-mediated autoxidation in two different pathways: the major pathway in which methylglyoxal and NH+4 are generated and the minor pathway in which 2,5-dimethylpyrazine is formed through condensation of two molecules of aminoacetone. These findings suggest that H2O2 generated by the autoxidation of aminoacetone reacts with Cu(I) to form reactive species capable of causing oxidative DNA damage.

  9. Heat generates oxidized linoleic acid metabolites that activate TRPV1 and produce pain in rodents.

    PubMed

    Patwardhan, Amol M; Akopian, Armen N; Ruparel, Nikita B; Diogenes, Anibal; Weintraub, Susan T; Uhlson, Charis; Murphy, Robert C; Hargreaves, Kenneth M

    2010-05-01

    The transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) channel is the principal detector of noxious heat in the peripheral nervous system. TRPV1 is expressed in many nociceptors and is involved in heat-induced hyperalgesia and thermoregulation. The precise mechanism or mechanisms mediating the thermal sensitivity of TRPV1 are unknown. Here, we have shown that the oxidized linoleic acid metabolites 9- and 13-hydroxyoctadecadienoic acid (9- and 13-HODE) are formed in mouse and rat skin biopsies by exposure to noxious heat. 9- and 13-HODE and their metabolites, 9- and 13-oxoODE, activated TRPV1 and therefore constitute a family of endogenous TRPV1 agonists. Moreover, blocking these substances substantially decreased the heat sensitivity of TRPV1 in rats and mice and reduced nociception. Collectively, our results indicate that HODEs contribute to the heat sensitivity of TRPV1 in rodents. Because oxidized linoleic acid metabolites are released during cell injury, these findings suggest a mechanism for integrating the hyperalgesic and proinflammatory roles of TRPV1 and linoleic acid metabolites and may provide the foundation for investigating new classes of analgesic drugs.

  10. Harzianic acid, an antifungal and plant growth promoting metabolite from Trichoderma harzianum.

    PubMed

    Vinale, Francesco; Flematti, Gavin; Sivasithamparam, Krishnapillai; Lorito, Matteo; Marra, Roberta; Skelton, Brian W; Ghisalberti, Emilio L

    2009-11-01

    A Trichoderma harzianum strain, isolated from composted hardwood bark in Western Australia, was found to produce a metabolite with antifungal and plant growth promoting activity. The structure and absolute configuration of the fungal compound, harzianic acid (1), were determined by X-ray diffraction studies. Harzianic acid showed antibiotic activity against Pythium irregulare, Sclerotinia sclerotiorum, and Rhizoctonia solani. A plant growth promotion effect was observed at low concentrations of 1.

  11. Microbial diversity and metabolite composition of Belgian red-brown acidic ales.

    PubMed

    Snauwaert, Isabel; Roels, Sanne P; Van Nieuwerburg, Filip; Van Landschoot, Anita; De Vuyst, Luc; Vandamme, Peter

    2016-03-16

    Belgian red-brown acidic ales are sour and alcoholic fermented beers, which are produced by mixed-culture fermentation and blending. The brews are aged in oak barrels for about two years, after which mature beer is blended with young, non-aged beer to obtain the end-products. The present study evaluated the microbial community diversity of Belgian red-brown acidic ales at the end of the maturation phase of three subsequent brews of three different breweries. The microbial diversity was compared with the metabolite composition of the brews at the end of the maturation phase. Therefore, mature brew samples were subjected to 454 pyrosequencing of the 16S rRNA gene (bacteria) and the internal transcribed spacer region (yeasts) and a broad range of metabolites was quantified. The most important microbial species present in the Belgian red-brown acidic ales investigated were Pediococcus damnosus, Dekkera bruxellensis, and Acetobacter pasteurianus. In addition, this culture-independent analysis revealed operational taxonomic units that were assigned to an unclassified fungal community member, Candida, and Lactobacillus. The main metabolites present in the brew samples were L-lactic acid, D-lactic acid, and ethanol, whereas acetic acid was produced in lower quantities. The most prevailing aroma compounds were ethyl acetate, isoamyl acetate, ethyl hexanoate, and ethyl octanoate, which might be of impact on the aroma of the end-products. PMID:26802571

  12. Transcript and metabolite alterations increase ganoderic acid content in Ganoderma lucidum using acetic acid as an inducer.

    PubMed

    Ren, Ang; Li, Xiong-Biao; Miao, Zhi-Gang; Shi, Liang; Jaing, Ai-Liang; Zhao, Ming-Wen

    2014-12-01

    Acetic acid at 5-8 mM increased ganoderic acid (GA) accumulation in Ganoderma lucidum. After optimization by the response surface methodology, the GA content reached 5.5/100 mg dry weight, an increase of 105% compared with the control. The intermediate metabolites of GA biosynthesis, lanosterol and squalene also increased to 47 and 15.8 μg/g dry weight, respectively, in response to acetic acid. Acetic acid significantly induced transcription levels of sqs, lano, hmgs and cyp51 in the GA biosynthesis pathway. An acetic acid-unregulated acetyl coenzyme A synthase (acs) gene was selected from ten candidate homologous acs genes. The results indicate that acetic acid alters the expression of genes related to acetic acid assimilation and increases GA biosynthesis and the metabolic levels of lanosterol, squalene and GA-a, thereby resulting in GA accumulation.

  13. Phenolic acids in neem (Azadirachta indica): a major pre-existing secondary metabolites.

    PubMed

    Singh, U P; Maurya, S; Singh, D P

    2005-01-01

    High Performance Liquid Chromatographic (HPLC) analyses of various parts (fresh and dry bark of stem, mature and tender leaves, flower and different parts of fruit, i.e., raw and ripe fruit epicarp, mesocarp and seed) of neem (Azadirachta indica), which occupies an important place in socio-cultural-religious life in Indian communities, indicate that neem is rich in pre-existing secondary metabolites (phenolic acids). Dry bark showed only tannic acid but in fresh bark three phenolic acids were observed, i.e., gallic, tannic, and ferulic acids. In tender leaves only gallic and ferulic acids were detected, but the levels of these phenolic acids in mature leaves were about three times and fifty times greater, respectively. Flowers had only two phenolic acids in which gallic acid was maximum followed by chlorogenic acid. The level of phenolic acid was maximum in seeds followed by epicarp and pulp. In raw and ripe fruit seeds four phenolic acids were detected. Raw fruit seeds were rich in phenolic acids than ripe fruit seeds. Fruit epicarp was relatively richer than seed, seed pulp and flowers of the plants. Neem flowers were also rich in gallic and chlorogenic acids. PMID:16093234

  14. Lichen secondary metabolite evernic acid as potential quorum sensing inhibitor against Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Gökalsın, Barış; Sesal, Nüzhet Cenk

    2016-09-01

    Cystic Fibrosis is a genetic disease and it affects the respiratory and digestive systems. Pseudomonas aeruginosa infections in Cystic Fibrosis are presented as the main cause for high mortality and morbidity rates. Pseudomonas aeruginosa populations can regulate their virulence gene expressions via the bacterial communication system: quorum sensing. Inhibition of quorum sensing by employing quorum sensing inhibitors can leave the bacteria vulnerable. Therefore, determining natural sources to obtain potential quorum sensing inhibitors is essential. Lichens have ethnobotanical value for their medicinal properties and it is possible that their secondary metabolites have quorum sensing inhibitor properties. This study aims to investigate an alternative treatment approach by utilizing lichen secondary metabolite evernic acid to reduce the expressions of Pseudomonas aeruginosa virulence factors by inhibiting quorum sensing. For this purpose, fluorescent monitor strains were utilized for quorum sensing inhibitor screens and quantitative reverse-transcriptase PCR analyses were conducted for comparison. Results indicate that evernic acid is capable of inhibiting Pseudomonas aeruginosa quorum sensing systems.

  15. Occurrence and fate of the human pharmaceutical metabolite ritalinic acid in the aquatic system.

    PubMed

    Letzel, Marion; Weiss, Klaus; Schüssler, Walter; Sengl, Manfred

    2010-12-01

    To investigate the occurrence and fate of ritalinic acid - the main human metabolite of the psychostimulant drug methylphenidate - in the aquatic environment, a HPLC-electrospray-MS/MS method for the quantification of ritalinic acid in wastewater, surface water and bank filtrate was developed. Carbamazepine known as very stable in the aquatic environment was analyzed as anthropogenic marker in parallel. Furthermore, the removal of ritalinic acid was studied in a sewage treatment plant using an activated sludge system during a field study and in lab-scale plants. In good agreement between lab-scale and field studies a low removal rate of 13% and 23%, respectively, was determined. As a consequence, the concentration of ritalinic acid in the wastewater effluents were in the range of <50-170 ngL(-1) which corresponds to a mean specific load per capita of 17.7 μgd(-1). Ritalinic acid has further been detected in German rivers at concentrations of 4-23 ngL(-1) and in bank filtrate samples in 100-850 m distance from the river up to 5 ngL(-1) demonstrating the widespread occurrence of this stable metabolite in the aquatic environment. A comparison to available sales data shows that a significant amount of methylphenidate applied can be found in waters as ritalinic acid. PMID:20932550

  16. The effect of temperature on L-lactic acid production and metabolite distribution of Lactobacillus casei.

    PubMed

    Qin, Hao; Gong, Sai-Sai; Ge, Xiang-Yang; Zhang, Wei-Guo

    2012-01-01

    The effect of temperature on the growth and L-lactic acid production of Lactobacillus casei G-03 was investigated in a 7-L bioreactor. It was found that the maximum specific growth rate (0.27 hr⁻¹) and L-lactic acid concentration (160.2 g L⁻¹) were obtained at a temperature of 41°C. Meanwhile, the maximum L-lactic acid yield, productivity, and dry cell weight were up to 94.1%, 4.44 g L⁻¹ hr⁻¹, and 4.30 g L⁻¹, respectively. At lower or higher temperature, the Lactobacillus casei G-03 showed lower acid production and biomass. Moreover, the main metabolite distribution of strain G-03 response to variations in temperatures was studied. The results suggested that temperature has a remarkable effect on metabolite distribution, and the maximum carbon flux toward lactic acid at the pyruvate node was obtained at 41°C, which had the minimum carbon flux toward acetic acid. PMID:23030467

  17. Aerobic biodegradation of 2,2'-dithiodibenzoic acid produced from dibenzothiophene metabolites.

    PubMed

    Young, Rozlyn F; Cheng, Stephanie M; Fedorak, Phillip M

    2006-01-01

    Dibenzothiophene is a sulfur heterocycle found in crude oils and coal. The biodegradation of dibenzothiophene through the Kodama pathway by Pseudomonas sp. strain BT1d leads to the formation of three disulfides: 2-oxo-2-(2-thiophenyl)ethanoic acid disulfide, 2-oxo-2-(2-thiophenyl)ethanoic acid-2-benzoic acid disulfide, and 2,2'-dithiodibenzoic acid. When provided as the carbon and sulfur source in liquid medium, 2,2'-dithiodibenzoic acid was degraded by soil enrichment cultures. Two bacterial isolates, designated strains RM1 and RM6, degraded 2,2'-dithiodibenzoic acid when combined in the medium. Isolate RM6 was found to have an absolute requirement for vitamin B12, and it degraded 2,2'-dithiodibenzoic acid in pure culture when the medium was supplemented with this vitamin. Isolate RM6 also degraded 2,2'-dithiodibenzoic acid in medium containing sterilized supernatants from cultures of isolate RM1 grown on glucose or benzoate. Isolate RM6 was identified as a member of the genus Variovorax using the Biolog system and 16S rRNA gene analysis. Although the mechanism of disulfide metabolism could not be determined, benzoic acid was detected as a transient metabolite of 2,2'-dithiodibenzoic acid biodegradation by Variovorax sp. strain RM6. In pure culture, this isolate mineralized 2,2'-dithiodibenzoic acid, releasing 59% of the carbon as carbon dioxide and 88% of the sulfur as sulfate. PMID:16391083

  18. Aerobic biodegradation of 2,2'-dithiodibenzoic acid produced from dibenzothiophene metabolites

    SciTech Connect

    Young, R.F.; Cheng, S.M.; Fedorak, P.M.

    2006-01-15

    Dibenzothiophene is a sulfur heterocycle found in crude oils and coal. The biodegradation of dibenzothiophene through the Kodama pathway by Pseudomonas sp. strain BT1d leads to the formation of three disulfides: 2-oxo-2-(2-thiophenyl)ethanoic acid disulfide, 2-oxo-2-(2-thiophenyl)ethanoic acid-2-benzoic acid disulfide, and 2,2'-dithiodibenzoic acid. When provided as the carbon and sulfur source in liquid medium, 2,2'-dithiodibenzoic acid was degraded by soil enrichment cultures. Two bacterial isolates, designated strains RM1 and RM6, degraded 2,2'-dithiodibenzoic acid when combined in the medium. Isolate RM6 was found to have an absolute requirement for vitamin B{sub 12}, and it degraded 2,2'-dithiodibenzoic acid in pure culture when the medium was supplemented with this vitamin. Isolate RM6 also degraded 2,2'-dithiodibenzoic acid in medium containing sterilized supernatants from cultures of isolate RM1 grown on glucose or benzoate. Isolate RM6 was identified as a member of the genus Variovorax using the Biolog system and 16S rRNA gene analysis. Although the mechanism of disulfide metabolism could not be determined, benzoic acid was detected as a transient metabolite of 2,2'-dithiodibenzoic acid biodegradation by Variovorax sp. strain RM6. In pure culture, this isolate mineralized 2,2'-dithiodibenzoic acid, releasing 59% of the carbon as carbon dioxide and 88% of the sulfur as sulfate.

  19. Role of Polyunsaturated Fatty Acids and Their Metabolites on Stem Cell Proliferation and Differentiation.

    PubMed

    Rashid, Mohammad Abdur; Haque, Mahmuda; Akbar, Mohammed

    2016-01-01

    The nervous system is highly enriched with long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs). Essential fatty acids, namely, ω-6 (n - 6) and ω-3 (n - 3) PUFA, and their metabolites are critical components of cell structure and function and could therefore influence stem cell fate. The available supporting experimental data reveal that n - 6 and n - 3 PUFA and their metabolites can act through multiple mechanisms to promote the proliferation and differentiation of various stem cell types. PUFAs and their mediators regulate several processes within the brain, such as neurotransmission, cell survival and neuroinflammation, and thereby mood and cognition. PUFA levels and the signaling pathways that they regulate are altered in various neurological disorders, including Alzheimer's disease and major depression. Therefore, elucidating the role of PUFAs and their metabolites in stem cell fate regulation is important for stem cell biology as well as stem cell therapy. PUFA-based interventions to generate a positive environment for stem cell proliferation or differentiation might be a promising and practical approach to controlling stem cell fate for clinical applications. PMID:27651264

  20. Toxicity of the lichen secondary metabolite (+)-usnic acid in domestic sheep.

    PubMed

    Dailey, R N; Montgomery, D L; Ingram, J T; Siemion, R; Vasquez, M; Raisbeck, M F

    2008-01-01

    Toxicity following ingestion of the vagrant, foliose lichen Xanthoparmelia chlorochroa was identified as the putative etiology in the death of an estimated 400-500 elk on the Red Rim-Daley Wildlife Habitat Management Area in Wyoming during the winter of 2004. A single, unsubstantiated report in 1939 attributed toxicity of X. chlorochroa in cattle and sheep to usnic acid, a common lichen secondary metabolite. To test the hypothesis that usnic acid is the proximate cause of death in animals poisoned by lichen, domestic sheep were dosed PO with (+)-usnic acid. Clinical signs in symptomatic ewes included lethargy, anorexia, and signs indicative of abdominal discomfort. Serum creatine kinase, aspartate aminotransferase, and lactate dehydrogenase activities were considerably elevated in symptomatic sheep. Similarly, only symptomatic ewes exhibited appreciable postmortem lesions consisting of severe degenerative appendicular skeletal myopathy. The median toxic dose (ED(50)) of (+)-usnic acid in domestic sheep was estimated to be between 485 and 647 mg/kg/day for 7 days.

  1. Determination of acetylsalicylic acid and its major metabolites in bovine urine using ultra performance liquid chromatography.

    PubMed

    Castillo-García, M L; Aguilar-Caballos, M P; Gómez-Hens, A

    2015-03-15

    A new method based on ultra high performance liquid chromatography (UPLC) with photometric and fluorometric detection for the determination of acetylsalicylic acid and its main metabolites, namely gentisic, salicylic and salicyluric acids, in bovine urine samples is reported. Photometric detection was used for acetylsalicylic acid determination, whereas the native fluorescence of the metabolites was monitored using fluorometric detection. The separation was performed under isocratic conditions, using acetonitrile-phosphate solution (3.5mM, pH 3.5) (26:74, v/v) as the mobile phase. The retention times of the four compounds were lower than 2min, which are shorter than those achieved using conventional HPLC. Under the optimum separation conditions, the dynamic ranges and detection limits (ngmL(-1)) were: 0.2-2500, 0.09 for gentisic acid; 0.2-2500, 0.08 for salicylic acid and 2.5-15,000, 1.1 for salicyluric acid, using fluorescence detection, and 10-25,000, 2.2 for acetylsalicylic acid, using UV detection. Intra-day and inter-day precision data were assessed at two levels of concentration of each analyte using both detection systems. The selectivity of the method was checked by assaying different drugs of veterinary use showing that most of them did not interfere with the determination of the analytes. The method has been applied to the analysis of bovine urine samples, which only required a simple clean up step of the samples prior to injection in the UPLC system. A recovery study was performed, which provided values in the range of 80-100%. This fact proves the practical usefulness of this method as an ultrafast analytical tool for the therapeutic control of acetylsalicylic acid administration in bovine animals intended for food production.

  2. Determination of acetylsalicylic acid and its major metabolites in bovine urine using ultra performance liquid chromatography.

    PubMed

    Castillo-García, M L; Aguilar-Caballos, M P; Gómez-Hens, A

    2015-03-15

    A new method based on ultra high performance liquid chromatography (UPLC) with photometric and fluorometric detection for the determination of acetylsalicylic acid and its main metabolites, namely gentisic, salicylic and salicyluric acids, in bovine urine samples is reported. Photometric detection was used for acetylsalicylic acid determination, whereas the native fluorescence of the metabolites was monitored using fluorometric detection. The separation was performed under isocratic conditions, using acetonitrile-phosphate solution (3.5mM, pH 3.5) (26:74, v/v) as the mobile phase. The retention times of the four compounds were lower than 2min, which are shorter than those achieved using conventional HPLC. Under the optimum separation conditions, the dynamic ranges and detection limits (ngmL(-1)) were: 0.2-2500, 0.09 for gentisic acid; 0.2-2500, 0.08 for salicylic acid and 2.5-15,000, 1.1 for salicyluric acid, using fluorescence detection, and 10-25,000, 2.2 for acetylsalicylic acid, using UV detection. Intra-day and inter-day precision data were assessed at two levels of concentration of each analyte using both detection systems. The selectivity of the method was checked by assaying different drugs of veterinary use showing that most of them did not interfere with the determination of the analytes. The method has been applied to the analysis of bovine urine samples, which only required a simple clean up step of the samples prior to injection in the UPLC system. A recovery study was performed, which provided values in the range of 80-100%. This fact proves the practical usefulness of this method as an ultrafast analytical tool for the therapeutic control of acetylsalicylic acid administration in bovine animals intended for food production. PMID:25660719

  3. Identification of a new sulfonic acid metabolite of metolachlor in soil

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Aga, D.S.; Thurman, E.M.; Yockel, M.E.; Zimmerman, L.R.; Williams, T.D.

    1996-01-01

    An ethanesulfonic acid metabolite of metolachlor (metolachlor ESA) was identified in soil-sample extracts by negative-ion, fast-atom bombardment mass spectrometry (FAB-MS) and FAB tandem mass spectrometry (FAB-MS/MS). Production fragments from MS/MS analysis of the deprotonated molecular ion of metolachlor ESA in the soil extract can be reconciled with the structure of the synthesized standard. The elemental compositions of the (M - H)- ions of the metolachlor ESA standard and the soil-sample extracts were confirmed by high-resolution mass spectrometry. A dissipation study revealed that metolachlor ESA is formed in soil under field conditions corresponding to a decrease in the concentration of the parent herbicide, metolachlor. The identification of the sulfonated metabolite of metolachlor suggests that the glutathione conjugation pathway is a common detoxification pathway shared by chloroacetanilide herbicides.

  4. Aromatic amino acids as precursors of antimicrobial metabolites in Geotrichum candidum.

    PubMed

    Naz, Saima; Gueguen-Minerbe, Marielle; Cretenet, Marina; Vernoux, Jean-Paul

    2013-07-01

    Geotrichum candidum ATCC 204307 was previously found to generate phenyllactic acid (PLA) and indoleacetic acid (ILA) in complex culture media. In this study, a relationship between concentrations of PLA, ILA, and hydroxy PLA (OH-PLA) and initial concentrations of phenylalanine, tryptophan, and tyrosine, added respectively as unique sources of nitrogen in synthetic medium, was established. Phenylpyruvic acid (PPA), an intermediate compound of PLA metabolism, was able to induce not only PLA but also phenylethyl alcohol (PEA) production when used separately as initial substrate. Under pH, temperature, and salt concentrations used for cheese-making, phenylalanine was found to be the most efficient substrate for antimicrobial metabolite production. In excess of substrate, different yeast strains of Geotrichum candidum, Yarrowia lipolytica, Candida natalensis, and Candida catenulata were shown here to produce 1.6 ± 0.5-5.0 ± 0.2 mM of PLA from phenylalanine, 5.0 ± 0.1-10.9 ± 0.3 mM of ILA from tryptophan, and 1.3 ± 0.3-7.0 ± 0.02 of PLA and 0.1 ± 0.0-2.22 ± 0.09 mM of PEA from PPA. Geotrichum candidum ATCC 204307 was the highest producer. This is the first time these antimicrobial metabolites PLA, OH-PLA, ILA, and PEA are being reported as the reaction products of aromatic amino acids catabolism in G. candidum. PMID:23590565

  5. Amino Acid and Secondary Metabolite Production in Embryogenic and Non-Embryogenic Callus of Fingerroot Ginger (Boesenbergia rotunda)

    PubMed Central

    Ng, Theresa Lee Mei; Karim, Rezaul; Tan, Yew Seong; Teh, Huey Fang; Danial, Asma Dazni; Ho, Li Sim; Khalid, Norzulaani; Appleton, David Ross; Harikrishna, Jennifer Ann

    2016-01-01

    Interest in the medicinal properties of secondary metabolites of Boesenbergia rotunda (fingerroot ginger) has led to investigations into tissue culture of this plant. In this study, we profiled its primary and secondary metabolites, as well as hormones of embryogenic and non-embryogenic (dry and watery) callus and shoot base, Ultra Performance Liquid Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry together with histological characterization. Metabolite profiling showed relatively higher levels of glutamine, arginine and lysine in embryogenic callus than in dry and watery calli, while shoot base tissue showed an intermediate level of primary metabolites. For the five secondary metabolites analyzed (ie. panduratin, pinocembrin, pinostrobin, cardamonin and alpinetin), shoot base had the highest concentrations, followed by watery, dry and embryogenic calli. Furthermore, intracellular auxin levels were found to decrease from dry to watery calli, followed by shoot base and finally embryogenic calli. Our morphological observations showed the presence of fibrils on the cell surface of embryogenic callus while diphenylboric acid 2-aminoethylester staining indicated the presence of flavonoids in both dry and embryogenic calli. Periodic acid-Schiff staining showed that shoot base and dry and embryogenic calli contained starch reserves while none were found in watery callus. This study identified several primary metabolites that could be used as markers of embryogenic cells in B. rotunda, while secondary metabolite analysis indicated that biosynthesis pathways of these important metabolites may not be active in callus and embryogenic tissue. PMID:27258536

  6. Mechanism of angiotensin II-induced arachidonic acid metabolite release in aortic smooth muscle cells: involvement of phospholipase D.

    PubMed

    Shinoda, J; Kozawa, O; Suzuki, A; Watanabe-Tomita, Y; Oiso, Y; Uematsu, T

    1997-02-01

    In a previous study, we have shown that angiotensin II (Ang II) activates phosphatidylcholine-hydrolyzing phospholipase D due to Ang II-induced Ca2+ influx from extracellular space in subcultured rat aortic smooth muscle cells. In the present study, we have investigated the role of phospholipase D in Ang II-induced arachidonic acid (AA) metabolite release and prostacyclin synthesis in subcultured rat aortic smooth muscle cells. Ang II significantly stimulated AA metabolite release in a concentration-dependent manner in the range between 1 nmol/I and 0.1 mumol/I. D.L.-Propranolol hydrochloride (propranolol), an inhibitor of phosphatidic acid phosphohydrolase, significantly inhibited the Ang II-induced release of AA metabolites. The Ang II-induced AA metabolite release was reduced by chelating extracellular Ca2+ with EGTA. Genistein, an inhibitor of protein tyrosine kinases, significantly suppressed the Ang II-induced AA metabolite release. 1,6-Bis-(cyclohexyloximinocarbonylamino)-hexane (RHC-80267), a potent and selective inhibitor of diacylglycerol lipase, significantly inhibited the Ang II-induced AA metabolite release. Both propranolol and RHC-80267 inhibited the Ang II-induced synthesis of 6-keto-prostaglandin F1 alpha, a stable metabolite of prostacyclin. The synthesis was suppressed by genistein. These results strongly suggest that the AA metabolite release induced by Ang II is mediated, at least in part, through phosphatidylcholine hydrolysis by phospholipase D activation in aortic smooth muscle cells.

  7. Amino Acid and Secondary Metabolite Production in Embryogenic and Non-Embryogenic Callus of Fingerroot Ginger (Boesenbergia rotunda).

    PubMed

    Ng, Theresa Lee Mei; Karim, Rezaul; Tan, Yew Seong; Teh, Huey Fang; Danial, Asma Dazni; Ho, Li Sim; Khalid, Norzulaani; Appleton, David Ross; Harikrishna, Jennifer Ann

    2016-01-01

    Interest in the medicinal properties of secondary metabolites of Boesenbergia rotunda (fingerroot ginger) has led to investigations into tissue culture of this plant. In this study, we profiled its primary and secondary metabolites, as well as hormones of embryogenic and non-embryogenic (dry and watery) callus and shoot base, Ultra Performance Liquid Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry together with histological characterization. Metabolite profiling showed relatively higher levels of glutamine, arginine and lysine in embryogenic callus than in dry and watery calli, while shoot base tissue showed an intermediate level of primary metabolites. For the five secondary metabolites analyzed (ie. panduratin, pinocembrin, pinostrobin, cardamonin and alpinetin), shoot base had the highest concentrations, followed by watery, dry and embryogenic calli. Furthermore, intracellular auxin levels were found to decrease from dry to watery calli, followed by shoot base and finally embryogenic calli. Our morphological observations showed the presence of fibrils on the cell surface of embryogenic callus while diphenylboric acid 2-aminoethylester staining indicated the presence of flavonoids in both dry and embryogenic calli. Periodic acid-Schiff staining showed that shoot base and dry and embryogenic calli contained starch reserves while none were found in watery callus. This study identified several primary metabolites that could be used as markers of embryogenic cells in B. rotunda, while secondary metabolite analysis indicated that biosynthesis pathways of these important metabolites may not be active in callus and embryogenic tissue. PMID:27258536

  8. Rapid extraction of oxygenated metabolites of arachidonic acid from biological samples using octadecylsilyl silica.

    PubMed

    Powell, W S

    1980-11-01

    A rapid procedure for the efficient extraction of prostaglandins, thromboxanes and hydroxy fatty acids from urine, plasma and tissue homogenates has been developed. Fractions containing these substances are acidified and passed through a column of octadecylsilyl silica, which retains oxygenated metabolites of arachidonic acid. Phospholipids, proteins and very polar materials either are not retained or can be eluted with dilute aqueous ethanol. Nonpolar lipids and monohydroxy fatty acids are then eluted with petroleum ether or benzene. Subsequent elution of the column with methyl formate gives a fraction containing prostaglandins and thromboxanes which is much less contaminated with extraneous material than that obtained by conventional extraction of aqueous media with organic solvents. The methyl formate can be removed rapidly under a stream of nitrogen and the components of the sample purified directly by high pressure liquid chromatography (HPLC). An improved method for the purification of prostaglandins and TXB2 by HPLC on silica columns is reported.

  9. Urolithins, ellagic acid-derived metabolites produced by human colonic microflora, exhibit estrogenic and antiestrogenic activities.

    PubMed

    Larrosa, Mar; González-Sarrías, Antonio; García-Conesa, María Teresa; Tomás-Barberán, Francisco A; Espín, Juan Carlos

    2006-03-01

    Urolithins A and B (hydroxy-6H-dibenzo[b,d]pyran-6-one derivatives) are colonic microflora metabolites recently proposed as biomarkers of human exposure to dietary ellagic acid derivatives. Molecular models suggest that urolithins could display estrogenic and/or antiestrogenic activity. To this purpose, both urolithins and other known phytoestrogens (genistein, daidzein, resveratrol, and enterolactone) were assayed to evaluate the capacity to induce cell proliferation on the estrogen-sensitive human breast cancer MCF-7 cells as well as the ability to bind to alpha- and beta-estrogen receptors. Both urolithins A and B showed estrogenic activity in a dose-dependent manner even at high concentrations (40 microM), without antiproliferative or toxic effects, whereas the other phytoestrogens inhibited cell proliferation at high concentrations. Overall, urolithins showed weaker estrogenic activity than the other phytoestrogens. However, both urolithins displayed slightly higher antiestrogenic activity (antagonized the growth promotion effect of 17-beta-estradiol in a dose-dependent manner) than the other phytoestrogens. The IC(50) values for the ERalpha and ERbeta binding assays were 0.4 and 0.75 microM for urolithin A; 20 and 11 microM for urolithin B; 3 and 0.02 for genistein; and 2.3 and 1 for daidzein, respectively; no binding was detected for resveratrol and enterolactone. Urolithins A and B entered into MCF-7 cells and were metabolized to yield mainly urolithin-sulfate derivatives. These results, together with previous studies regarding absorption and metabolism of dietary ellagitannins and ellagic acid in humans, suggest that the gut microflora metabolites urolithins are potential endocrine-disrupting molecules, which could resemble other described "enterophytoestrogens" (microflora-derived metabolites with estrogenic/antiestrogenic activity). Further research is warranted to evaluate the possible role of ellagitannins and ellagic acid as dietary "pro-phytoestrogens".

  10. Biological Significance of Urolithins, the Gut Microbial Ellagic Acid-Derived Metabolites: The Evidence So Far

    PubMed Central

    Espín, Juan Carlos; Larrosa, Mar; García-Conesa, María Teresa; Tomás-Barberán, Francisco

    2013-01-01

    The health benefits attributed to pomegranate have been associated with its high content in polyphenols, particularly ellagitannins. This is also the case for other ellagitannin-containing fruits and nuts including strawberry, raspberry, blackberry, walnuts, and muscadine grapes. The bioavailability of ellagitannins and ellagic acid is however very low. These molecules suffer extensive metabolism by the gut microbiota to produce urolithins that are much better absorbed. Urolithins circulate in plasma as glucuronide and sulfate conjugates at concentrations in the range of 0.2–20 μM. It is therefore conceivable that the health effects of ellagitannin-containing products can be associated with these gut-produced urolithins, and thus the evaluation of the biological effects of these metabolites is essential. Recent research, mostly based on in vitro testing, has shown preliminary evidence of the anti-inflammatory, anticarcinogenic, antiglycative, antioxidant, and antimicrobial effects of urolithins, supporting their potential contribution to the health effects attributed to pomegranate and ellagitannin-rich foods. The number of in vivo studies is still limited, but they show preventive effects of urolithins on gut and systemic inflammation that encourage further research. Both in vivo and mechanistic studies are necessary to clarify the health effects of these metabolites. Attention should be paid when designing these mechanistic studies in order to use the physiologically relevant metabolites (urolithins in gut models and their conjugated derivatives in systemic models) at concentrations that can be reached in vivo. PMID:23781257

  11. Biological significance of urolithins, the gut microbial ellagic Acid-derived metabolites: the evidence so far.

    PubMed

    Espín, Juan Carlos; Larrosa, Mar; García-Conesa, María Teresa; Tomás-Barberán, Francisco

    2013-01-01

    The health benefits attributed to pomegranate have been associated with its high content in polyphenols, particularly ellagitannins. This is also the case for other ellagitannin-containing fruits and nuts including strawberry, raspberry, blackberry, walnuts, and muscadine grapes. The bioavailability of ellagitannins and ellagic acid is however very low. These molecules suffer extensive metabolism by the gut microbiota to produce urolithins that are much better absorbed. Urolithins circulate in plasma as glucuronide and sulfate conjugates at concentrations in the range of 0.2-20  μ M. It is therefore conceivable that the health effects of ellagitannin-containing products can be associated with these gut-produced urolithins, and thus the evaluation of the biological effects of these metabolites is essential. Recent research, mostly based on in vitro testing, has shown preliminary evidence of the anti-inflammatory, anticarcinogenic, antiglycative, antioxidant, and antimicrobial effects of urolithins, supporting their potential contribution to the health effects attributed to pomegranate and ellagitannin-rich foods. The number of in vivo studies is still limited, but they show preventive effects of urolithins on gut and systemic inflammation that encourage further research. Both in vivo and mechanistic studies are necessary to clarify the health effects of these metabolites. Attention should be paid when designing these mechanistic studies in order to use the physiologically relevant metabolites (urolithins in gut models and their conjugated derivatives in systemic models) at concentrations that can be reached in vivo.

  12. Identification of Protein Targets of Reactive Metabolites of Tienilic Acid in Human Hepatocytes

    PubMed Central

    Koen, Yakov M.; Sarma, Diganta; Williams, Todd D.; Galeva, Nadezhda A.; Obach, R. Scott; Hanzlik, Robert P.

    2012-01-01

    Tienilic acid (TA) is a uricosuric diuretic that was withdrawn from the market only months after its introduction because of reports of serious incidents of drug-induced liver injury including some fatalities. Its hepatotoxicity is considered to be primarily immunoallergic in nature. Like other thiophene compounds, TA undergoes biotransformation to a S-oxide metabolite which then reacts covalently with cellular proteins. To identify protein targets of TA metabolites, we incubated [14C]-TA with human hepatocytes, separated cellular proteins by 2D gel electrophoresis, and analyzed proteins in 36 radioactive spots by tryptic digestion followed by LC-MS/MS. Thirty one spots contained at least one identifiable protein. Sixteen spots contained only one of 14 non-redundant proteins which were thus considered to be targets of TA metabolites. Six of the 14 were also found in other radioactive spots that contained from 1 to 3 additional proteins. Eight of the 14 had not been reported to be targets for any reactive metabolite other than TA. The other 15 spots each contained from 2–4 identifiable proteins, many of which are known targets of other chemically reactive metabolites, but since adducted peptides were not observed, the identity of the adducted protein(s) in these spots is ambiguous. Interestingly, all the radioactive spots corresponded to proteins of low abundance, while many highly abundant proteins in the mixture showed no radioactivity. Furthermore, of approximately 16 previously reported protein targets of TA in rat liver (Methogo, R., Dansette, P. and Klarskov, K. (2007) Int. J. Mass Spectrom., 268, 284–295), only one (fumarylacetoacetase) is among the 14 targets identified in this work. One reason for this difference may be statistical, given that each study identified a small number of targets from among thousands present in hepatocytes. Another may be the species difference (i.e. rat vs. human), and still another may be the method of detection of adducted

  13. Cinnabarinic acid, an endogenous metabolite of the kynurenine pathway, activates type 4 metabotropic glutamate receptors.

    PubMed

    Fazio, F; Lionetto, L; Molinaro, G; Bertrand, H O; Acher, F; Ngomba, R T; Notartomaso, S; Curini, M; Rosati, O; Scarselli, P; Di Marco, R; Battaglia, G; Bruno, V; Simmaco, M; Pin, J P; Nicoletti, F; Goudet, C

    2012-05-01

    Cinnabarinic acid is an endogenous metabolite of the kynurenine pathway that meets the structural requirements to interact with glutamate receptors. We found that cinnabarinic acid acts as a partial agonist of type 4 metabotropic glutamate (mGlu4) receptors, with no activity at other mGlu receptor subtypes. We also tested the activity of cinnabarinic acid on native mGlu4 receptors by examining 1) the inhibition of cAMP formation in cultured cerebellar granule cells; 2) protection against excitotoxic neuronal death in mixed cultures of cortical cells; and 3) protection against 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine toxicity in mice after local infusion into the external globus pallidus. In all these models, cinnabarinic acid behaved similarly to conventional mGlu4 receptor agonists, and, at least in cultured neurons, the action of low concentrations of cinnabarinic acid was largely attenuated by genetic deletion of mGlu4 receptors. However, high concentrations of cinnabarinic acid were still active in the absence of mGlu4 receptors, suggesting that the compound may have off-target effects. Mutagenesis and molecular modeling experiments showed that cinnabarinic acid acts as an orthosteric agonist interacting with residues of the glutamate binding pocket of mGlu4. Accordingly, cinnabarinic acid did not activate truncated mGlu4 receptors lacking the N-terminal Venus-flytrap domain, as opposed to the mGlu4 receptor enhancer, N-phenyl-7-(hydroxyimino)cyclopropa[b]chromen-1a-carboxamide (PHCCC). Finally, we could detect endogenous cinnabarinic acid in brain tissue and peripheral organs by high-performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry analysis. Levels increased substantially during inflammation induced by lipopolysaccharide. We conclude that cinnabarinic acid is a novel endogenous orthosteric agonist of mGlu4 receptors endowed with neuroprotective activity. PMID:22311707

  14. Glucuronidation of the aspirin metabolite salicylic acid by expressed UDP-glucuronosyltransferases and human liver microsomes.

    PubMed

    Kuehl, Gwendolyn E; Bigler, Jeannette; Potter, John D; Lampe, Johanna W

    2006-02-01

    Acetylsalicylic acid (aspirin) is a common nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug used for treatment of pain and arthritis. In the body, acetylsalicylic acid is rapidly deacetylated to form salicylic acid. Both compounds have been proposed as anti-inflammatory agents. Major metabolites of salicylic acid are its acyl and phenolic glucuronide conjugates. Formation of these conjugates, catalyzed by UDP-glucuronosyltransferases (UGTs), decreases the amount of pharmacologically active salicylic acid present. We aimed to identify the UGTs catalyzing the glucuronidation of salicylic acid using both heterologously expressed enzymes and pooled human liver microsomes (HLMs) and to develop a liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry method to quantify glucuronidation activity of UGTs 1A1, 1A3, 1A4, 1A6, 1A7, 1A8, 1A9, 1A10, 2B4, 2B7, 2B15, and 2B17 Supersomes. All UGTs tested, except 1A4, 2B15, and 2B17, catalyzed salicylic acid phenolic and acyl glucuronidation. Ratios of salicylic acid phenolic to acyl glucuronide formation varied more than 12-fold from 0.5 for UGT1A6 to 6.1 for UGT1A1. These results suggest that all UGTs except 1A4, 2B15, and 2B17 might be involved in the glucuronidation of salicylic acid in vivo. From comparisons of apparent Km values determined in pooled HLMs and in expressed UGTs, UGT2B7 was suggested as a likely catalyst of salicylic acid acyl glucuronidation, whereas multiple UGTs were suggested as catalysts of phenolic glucuronidation. The results of this UGT screening may help target future evaluation of the effects of UGT polymorphisms on response to aspirin in clinical and population-based studies.

  15. Glucuronidation of the aspirin metabolite salicylic acid by expressed UDP-glucuronosyltransferases and human liver microsomes.

    PubMed

    Kuehl, Gwendolyn E; Bigler, Jeannette; Potter, John D; Lampe, Johanna W

    2006-02-01

    Acetylsalicylic acid (aspirin) is a common nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug used for treatment of pain and arthritis. In the body, acetylsalicylic acid is rapidly deacetylated to form salicylic acid. Both compounds have been proposed as anti-inflammatory agents. Major metabolites of salicylic acid are its acyl and phenolic glucuronide conjugates. Formation of these conjugates, catalyzed by UDP-glucuronosyltransferases (UGTs), decreases the amount of pharmacologically active salicylic acid present. We aimed to identify the UGTs catalyzing the glucuronidation of salicylic acid using both heterologously expressed enzymes and pooled human liver microsomes (HLMs) and to develop a liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry method to quantify glucuronidation activity of UGTs 1A1, 1A3, 1A4, 1A6, 1A7, 1A8, 1A9, 1A10, 2B4, 2B7, 2B15, and 2B17 Supersomes. All UGTs tested, except 1A4, 2B15, and 2B17, catalyzed salicylic acid phenolic and acyl glucuronidation. Ratios of salicylic acid phenolic to acyl glucuronide formation varied more than 12-fold from 0.5 for UGT1A6 to 6.1 for UGT1A1. These results suggest that all UGTs except 1A4, 2B15, and 2B17 might be involved in the glucuronidation of salicylic acid in vivo. From comparisons of apparent Km values determined in pooled HLMs and in expressed UGTs, UGT2B7 was suggested as a likely catalyst of salicylic acid acyl glucuronidation, whereas multiple UGTs were suggested as catalysts of phenolic glucuronidation. The results of this UGT screening may help target future evaluation of the effects of UGT polymorphisms on response to aspirin in clinical and population-based studies. PMID:16258079

  16. Role of omega-3 fatty acids and their metabolites in asthma and allergic diseases.

    PubMed

    Miyata, Jun; Arita, Makoto

    2015-01-01

    Omega-3 fatty acids, docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) and eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA), are found naturally in fish oil and are commonly thought to be anti-inflammatory nutrients, with protective effects in inflammatory diseases including asthma and allergies. The mechanisms of these effects remain mostly unknown but are of great interest for their potential therapeutic applications. Large numbers of epidemiological and observational studies investigating the effect of fish intake or omega-3 fatty acid supplementation during pregnancy, lactation, infancy, childhood, and adulthood on asthmatic and allergic outcomes have been conducted. They mostly indicate protective effects and suggest a causal relationship between decreased intake of fish oil in modernized diets and an increasing number of individuals with asthma or other allergic diseases. Specialized pro-resolving mediators (SPM: protectins, resolvins, and maresins) are generated from omega-3 fatty acids such as EPA and DHA via several enzymatic reactions. These mediators counter-regulate airway eosinophilic inflammation and promote the resolution of inflammation in vivo. Several reports have indicated that the biosynthesis of SPM is impaired, especially in severe asthma, which suggests that chronic inflammation in the lung might result from a resolution defect. This article focuses on the beneficial aspects of omega-3 fatty acids and offers recent insights into their bioactive metabolites including resolvins and protectins.

  17. Regulation of polyunsaturated fatty acid biosynthesis by seaweed fucoxanthin and its metabolite in cultured hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Aki, Tsunehiro; Yamamoto, Masaya; Takahashi, Toshiaki; Tomita, Kohki; Toyoura, Rieko; Iwashita, Kazuhiro; Kawamoto, Seiji; Hosokawa, Masashi; Miyashita, Kazuo; Ono, Kazuhisa

    2014-02-01

    The effects of a seaweed carotenoid, fucoxanthin, and its physiological metabolite, fucoxanthinol, on the biosynthesis of polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) were investigated using cultured rat hepatoma BRL-3A. The metabolism of α-linolenic acid (18:3n-3) was suppressed by the addition of these carotenoids, resulting in a decrease in the content of eicosapentaenoic acid (20:5n-3), which suggested a down-regulation of metabolic enzymes such as fatty acid desaturase and elongase. An increase in the content of docosahexaenoic acid (22:6n-3), as observed in previous studies in vivo, might be a buffering action to maintain the membrane fluidity. The suppressive effect of fucoxanthinol on ∆6 fatty acid desaturase was not at the level of gene expression but due to specific modifications of the protein via a ubiquitin-proteasome system. A proteomic analysis revealed several factors such as phosphatidylethanolamine-binding protein that might be involved in the observed action of fucoxanthin. These findings will contribute to studies on the elucidation of the precise molecular mechanisms underlying the regulation of PUFA biosynthesis by fucoxanthin. PMID:24174374

  18. Regulation of polyunsaturated fatty acid biosynthesis by seaweed fucoxanthin and its metabolite in cultured hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Aki, Tsunehiro; Yamamoto, Masaya; Takahashi, Toshiaki; Tomita, Kohki; Toyoura, Rieko; Iwashita, Kazuhiro; Kawamoto, Seiji; Hosokawa, Masashi; Miyashita, Kazuo; Ono, Kazuhisa

    2014-02-01

    The effects of a seaweed carotenoid, fucoxanthin, and its physiological metabolite, fucoxanthinol, on the biosynthesis of polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) were investigated using cultured rat hepatoma BRL-3A. The metabolism of α-linolenic acid (18:3n-3) was suppressed by the addition of these carotenoids, resulting in a decrease in the content of eicosapentaenoic acid (20:5n-3), which suggested a down-regulation of metabolic enzymes such as fatty acid desaturase and elongase. An increase in the content of docosahexaenoic acid (22:6n-3), as observed in previous studies in vivo, might be a buffering action to maintain the membrane fluidity. The suppressive effect of fucoxanthinol on ∆6 fatty acid desaturase was not at the level of gene expression but due to specific modifications of the protein via a ubiquitin-proteasome system. A proteomic analysis revealed several factors such as phosphatidylethanolamine-binding protein that might be involved in the observed action of fucoxanthin. These findings will contribute to studies on the elucidation of the precise molecular mechanisms underlying the regulation of PUFA biosynthesis by fucoxanthin.

  19. Lichen secondary metabolite evernic acid as potential quorum sensing inhibitor against Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Gökalsın, Barış; Sesal, Nüzhet Cenk

    2016-09-01

    Cystic Fibrosis is a genetic disease and it affects the respiratory and digestive systems. Pseudomonas aeruginosa infections in Cystic Fibrosis are presented as the main cause for high mortality and morbidity rates. Pseudomonas aeruginosa populations can regulate their virulence gene expressions via the bacterial communication system: quorum sensing. Inhibition of quorum sensing by employing quorum sensing inhibitors can leave the bacteria vulnerable. Therefore, determining natural sources to obtain potential quorum sensing inhibitors is essential. Lichens have ethnobotanical value for their medicinal properties and it is possible that their secondary metabolites have quorum sensing inhibitor properties. This study aims to investigate an alternative treatment approach by utilizing lichen secondary metabolite evernic acid to reduce the expressions of Pseudomonas aeruginosa virulence factors by inhibiting quorum sensing. For this purpose, fluorescent monitor strains were utilized for quorum sensing inhibitor screens and quantitative reverse-transcriptase PCR analyses were conducted for comparison. Results indicate that evernic acid is capable of inhibiting Pseudomonas aeruginosa quorum sensing systems. PMID:27465850

  20. Total Synthesis of the Aristolochic Acids, Their Major Metabolites, and Related Compounds

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Plants from the Aristolochia genus have been recommended for the treatment of a variety of human ailments since the time of Hippocrates. However, many species produce the highly toxic aristolochic acids (AAs), which are both nephrotoxic and carcinogenic. For the purposes of extensive biological studies, a versatile approach to the synthesis of the AAs and their major metabolites was devised based primarily on a Suzuki–Miyaura coupling reaction. The key to success lies in the preparation of a common ring-A precursor, namely, the tetrahydropyranyl ether of 2-nitromethyl-3-iodo-4,5-methylendioxybenzyl alcohol (27), which was generated in excellent yield by oxidation of the aldoxime precursor 26. Suzuki–Miyaura coupling of 27 with a variety of benzaldehyde 2-boronates was accompanied by an aldol condensation/elimination reaction to give the desired phenanthrene intermediate directly. Deprotection of the benzyl alcohol followed by two sequential oxidation steps gave the desired phenanthrene nitrocarboxylic acids. This approach was used to synthesize AAs I–IV and several other related compounds, including AA I and AA II bearing an aminopropyloxy group at position-6, which were required for further conversion to fluorescent biological probes. Further successful application of the Suzuki–Miyaura coupling reaction to the synthesis of the N-hydroxyaristolactams of AA I and AA II then allowed the synthesis of the putative, but until now elusive, N-acetoxy- and N-sulfonyloxy-aristolactam metabolites. PMID:24877584

  1. Total synthesis of the aristolochic acids, their major metabolites, and related compounds.

    PubMed

    Attaluri, Sivaprasad; Iden, Charles R; Bonala, Radha R; Johnson, Francis

    2014-07-21

    Plants from the Aristolochia genus have been recommended for the treatment of a variety of human ailments since the time of Hippocrates. However, many species produce the highly toxic aristolochic acids (AAs), which are both nephrotoxic and carcinogenic. For the purposes of extensive biological studies, a versatile approach to the synthesis of the AAs and their major metabolites was devised based primarily on a Suzuki-Miyaura coupling reaction. The key to success lies in the preparation of a common ring-A precursor, namely, the tetrahydropyranyl ether of 2-nitromethyl-3-iodo-4,5-methylendioxybenzyl alcohol (27), which was generated in excellent yield by oxidation of the aldoxime precursor 26. Suzuki-Miyaura coupling of 27 with a variety of benzaldehyde 2-boronates was accompanied by an aldol condensation/elimination reaction to give the desired phenanthrene intermediate directly. Deprotection of the benzyl alcohol followed by two sequential oxidation steps gave the desired phenanthrene nitrocarboxylic acids. This approach was used to synthesize AAs I-IV and several other related compounds, including AA I and AA II bearing an aminopropyloxy group at position-6, which were required for further conversion to fluorescent biological probes. Further successful application of the Suzuki-Miyaura coupling reaction to the synthesis of the N-hydroxyaristolactams of AA I and AA II then allowed the synthesis of the putative, but until now elusive, N-acetoxy- and N-sulfonyloxy-aristolactam metabolites. PMID:24877584

  2. Hypoxia optimises tumour growth by controlling nutrient import and acidic metabolite export.

    PubMed

    Parks, Scott K; Cormerais, Yann; Marchiq, Ibtissam; Pouyssegur, Jacques

    2016-01-01

    In their quest for survival and successful growth, cancer cells optimise their cellular processes to enable them to outcompete normal cells in their microenvironment. In essence cancer cells: (i) enhance uptake of nutrients/metabolites, (ii) utilise nutrients more efficiently via metabolic alterations and (iii) deal with the metabolic waste products in a way that furthers their progression while hampering the survival of normal tissue. Hypoxia Inducible Factors (HIFs) act as essential drivers of these adaptations via the promotion of numerous membrane proteins including glucose transporters (GLUTs), monocarboxylate transporters (MCTs), amino-acid transporters (LAT1, xCT), and acid-base regulating carbonic anhydrases (CAs). In addition to a competitive growth advantage for tumour cells, these HIF-regulated proteins are implicated in metastasis, cancer 'stemness' and the immune response. Current research indicates that combined targeting of these HIF-regulated membrane proteins in tumour cells will provide promising therapeutic strategies in the future.

  3. Screening of central functions of amino acids and their metabolites for sedative and hypnotic effects using chick models.

    PubMed

    Furuse, Mitsuhiro

    2015-09-01

    The chick has a practical advantage in the screening process in that chicks require only small quantities of drugs. The chick separation stress paradigm has traditionally been recognized as a valid form of anxiolytic screening. Further, chick behavior involving standing motionless with eyes closed or sitting motionless with head drooped is nearly always associated with electrophysiological sleep. When centrally administered, some DNA-encoded L-α-amino acids, as well as some DNA-non-encoded amino acids, such as metabolites of L-α-amino acids, D-amino acid and β-amino acid, have shown sedative and/or hypnotic effects in chicks. The effects of some of these amino acids have subsequently been confirmed in humans. In conclusion, the chick model is convenient and useful for screening central functions of amino acids and their metabolites for hypnosis and sedation.

  4. Chemopreventive mechanisms of α-keto acid metabolites of naturally occurring organoselenium compounds.

    PubMed

    Pinto, John T; Lee, Jeong-In; Sinha, Raghu; MacEwan, Melanie E; Cooper, Arthur J L

    2011-06-01

    Previous studies on the chemopreventive mechanisms of dietary selenium have focused on its incorporation into antioxidative selenoproteins, such as glutathione peroxidase and thioredoxin reductase. Several studies, however, have revealed that dietary selenium in the form of L-selenomethionine and the 21st amino acid, selenocysteine, also have intrinsic anti-cancer properties. Biochemical mechanisms previously investigated to contribute to their anticancer effects involve β- and γ-lyase reactions. Some pyridoxal 5'-phosphate (PLP)-containing enzymes can catalyze a β-lyase reaction with Se-methyl-L-selenocysteine (MSC) generating pyruvate and ammonia. Other PLP-enzymes can catalyze a γ-lyase reaction with L-selenomethionine (SM) generating α-ketobutyrate and ammonia. In both cases, a purported third product is methylselenol (CH(3)SeH). Although not directly quantifiable, as a result of its extreme hydrophobicity and high vapor pressure, CH(3)SeH has been indirectly observed to act through the alteration of protein-sulfhydryl moieties on redox-responsive signal and transcription factors, thereby maintaining a non-proliferative intracellular environment. We have considered the possibility that α-keto acid analogues of MSC (i.e., methylselenopyruvate; MSP) and SM (i.e., α-keto-γ-methylselenobutyrate; KMSB), generated via a transamination and/or L-amino acid oxidase reaction may also be chemoprotective. Indeed, these compounds were shown to increase the level of histone-H3 acetylation in human prostate and colon cancer cells. MSP and KMSB structurally resemble butyrate, an inhibitor of several histone deacetylases. Thus, the seleno α-keto acid metabolites of MSC and SM, along with CH(3)SeH derived from β- and γ-lyase reactions, may be potential direct-acting metabolites of organoselenium that lead to de-repression of silenced tumor suppressor proteins and/or regulation of genes and signaling molecules.

  5. Epoxygenase metabolites of arachidonic acid inhibit vasopressin response in toad bladder

    SciTech Connect

    Schlondorff, D.; Petty, E.; Oates, J.A.; Jacoby, M.; Levine, S.D. Vanderbilt Univ., Nashville, TN )

    1987-09-01

    In addition to cyclooxygenase and lipoxygenase pathways, the kidney can also metabolize arachidonic acid by a NADPH-dependent cytochrome P-450 enzyme to epoxyeicosatrienoic acids (EETs); furthermore, 5,6-EET has been shown to alter electrolyte transport across isolated renal tubules. The authors examined the effects of three ({sup 14}C-labeled)-EETs (5,6-, 11,12-, and 14,15-EET) on osmotic water flow across toad urinary bladder. All three EETs reversibly inhibited vasopressin-stimulated osmotic water flow with 5,6- and 11,12-EET being the most potent. The effects appeared to be independent of prostaglandins EETs inhibited the water flow response to forskolin but not the response to adenosine 3{prime},5{prime}-cyclic monophosphate (cAMP) or 8-BrcAMP, consistent with an effect on cAMP generation. To determine whether these effects were due to the EETs or to products of their metabolism, they examined the effects of their vicinal diol hydrolysis products, the dihydroxyeicosatrienoic acids. Nonenzymatic conversion of labeled 5,6-EET to its vicinal diol occurred rapidly in the buffer, whereas 11,12-EET was hydrolyzed in a saturable manner only when incubated in the presence of bladder tissue. The dihydroxyeicosatrienoic acids formed inhibited water flow in a manner paralleling that of the EETs. The data support the hypothesis that EETs and their physiologically active dihydroxyeicosatrienoic acid metabolites inhibit vasopressin-stimulated water flow predominantly via inhibition of adenylate cyclase.

  6. Polarography and artificial neural network for the simultaneous determination of nalidixic acid and its main metabolite (7-hydroxymethylnalidixic acid).

    PubMed

    Guiberteau, Agustina; Díaz, Teresa Galeano; Rodríguez Cáceres, María I; Ortiz Burguillos, Juan M; Merás, Isabel Durán; López, Francisco Salinas

    2004-02-01

    Nalidixic acid (NA) and its main metabolite, 7-hydroxymethylnalidixic acid (OH-NA), are simultaneously determined by applying artificial neural networks (ANNs), to their square wave voltammetric signals. The scores of a PCR model, built with the voltammetric data of a set of standard samples, recorded between -0.70 and -1.0V, are used as training set for the net for each compound. The trained nets (ANNs) are used for the simultaneous determination of NA and OH-NA in urine. The recovery values are comprised between 91 and 109% for NA and between 82 and 112% for OH-NA, being these results better than the results obtained by application of partial least squares (PLS) multivariate calibration.

  7. Studies on the Biotransformation of Veratric Acid, a Human Metabolite of Mebeverine, by Using the Incubated Hen's Egg.

    PubMed

    Kiep, L; Göhl, M; Schmidt, J; Seifert, K

    2015-09-01

    Metabolism studies with selected test substances have shown that a model on the basis of the incubated hen's egg is suitable as a supplement to animal experimentation. Because of its 3,4-dimethoxyphenyl structure veratric acid (3,4-dimethoxybenzoic acid), a known human metabolite of mebeverine, was chosen as model substance for the present investigations and the parent compound as well as 4-hydroxy-3-methoxybenzoic acid were identified as main metabolites. The absence of 3-hydroxy-4-methoxybenzoic acid lets conclude that the O-demethylation takes place exclusively at the p-methoxyl function. In addition, 3,3',4,4'-tetramethoxy-l-ornithuric acid (2,5-bis-(3,4-dimethoxybenzoylamino)pentanoic acid) and its O-desmethyl derivative could be characterized as further metabolites. So far an amino acid conjugate has not been described after veratric acid administration in a vertebrate. There were no indications for the appearance of 3,4-dihydroxybenzoic acid in the veratric acid metabolism. This was confirmed by corresponding studies having the isomeric guaiacol acids as precursor. Furthermore, it could be proved that in ovo the O-methylation of 3,4-dihydroxybenzoic acid occurs regioselective at the m-hydroxyl group. The results which broaden the knowledge on the metabolic fate of veratric acid are discussed in comparison with those in mammals. The metabolites were identified by GC-MS, ESI-HRMS and LC/ESI-MS/MS. The structure of the synthesized reference substance was confirmed by MS, (1)H and (13)C NMR spectral data. PMID:25310250

  8. Mapping of Saccharomyces cerevisiae metabolites in fermenting wheat straight-dough reveals succinic acid as pH-determining factor.

    PubMed

    Jayaram, Vinay B; Cuyvers, Sven; Lagrain, Bert; Verstrepen, Kevin J; Delcour, Jan A; Courtin, Christophe M

    2013-01-15

    Fermenting yeast does not merely cause dough leavening, but also contributes to the bread aroma and might alter dough rheology. Here, the yeast carbon metabolism was mapped during bread straight-dough fermentation. The concentration of most metabolites changed quasi linearly as a function of fermentation time. Ethanol and carbon dioxide concentrations reached up to 60 mmol/100g flour. Interestingly, high levels of glycerol (up to 10 mmol/100g flour) and succinic acid (up to 1.6 mmol/100g flour) were produced during dough fermentation. Further tests showed that, contrary to current belief, the pH decrease in fermenting dough is primarily caused by the production of succinic acid by the yeast instead of carbon dioxide dissolution or bacterial organic acids. Together, our results provide a comprehensive overview of metabolite production during dough fermentation and yield insight into the importance of some of these metabolites for dough properties.

  9. Formation and transport of the sulfonic acid metabolites of alachlor and metolachlor in soil

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Aga, D.S.; Thurman, E.M.

    2001-01-01

    Alachlor and metolachlor are dechlorinated and transformed into their corresponding ethane sulfonic acid (ESA) metabolites in soil. In a field-disappearance study, it was shown that alachlor ESA was formed at a faster rate and at concentrations 2-4 times higher than metolachlor ESA, conforming with the observed longer disappearance half-life of metolachlor (15.5 d) in the field as compared to alachlor (8 d). Runoff data also showed higher concentrations of alachlor ESA as compared to metolachlor ESA, even though they were applied at the same levels. Data from soil cores showed transport of the ESA compounds in soil to as far down as 75-90 cm below the surface, at concentrations ranging from less than 0.5 ??g/L to about 50 ??g/L. In contrast, no parent herbicide was detected at these depths. This observation correlates with the higher log KOC values for alachlor (3.33) and metolachlor (3.01) relative to their corresponding ESA metabolites, alachlor ESA (2.26), and metolachlor ESA (2.29).

  10. A potential new metabolite of gamma-hydroxybutyrate: sulfonated gamma-hydroxybutyric acid.

    PubMed

    Hanisch, Stephanie; Stachel, Nicole; Skopp, Gisela

    2016-03-01

    Detection of gamma-hydroxybutyric acid (GHB) became crucial in many clinical and forensic settings due to its increasing use for recreational purposes and drug-facilitated sexual assault. Its narrow window of detection of about 3-12 h in urine represents a major problem. Analogous to ethyl glucuronide, the recently identified GHB-glucuronide exhibits a longer window of detection than the parent drug. It appeared reasonable that a sulfonated metabolite of GHB (GHB-SUL) will also be formed. Due to the lack of an appropriate standard, GHB was incubated with a human liver cytosolic fraction to produce GHB-SUL. Following development of a liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) assay to measure GHB and GHB-SUL, authentic urine samples (n = 5) were tested for GHB-SUL. These investigations revealed detectable signals of both GHB and GHB-SUL, strongly indicating that GHB is not only glucuronidated but also sulfonated. Given that sulfonated metabolites generally have longer half-life times than the corresponding free drugs, GHB-SUL may serve as a biomarker of GHB misuse along with its glucuronide. PMID:26210636

  11. Inhibition of Poly(ADP-Ribose) Polymerase by Nucleic Acid Metabolite 7-Methylguanine

    PubMed Central

    Nilov, D. K.; Tararov, V. I.; Kulikov, A. V.; Zakharenko, A. L.; Gushchina, I. V.; Mikhailov, S. N.; Lavrik, O. I.; Švedas, V. K.

    2016-01-01

    The ability of 7-methylguanine, a nucleic acid metabolite, to inhibit poly(ADP-ribose)polymerase-1 (PARP-1) and poly(ADP-ribose)polymerase-2 (PARP-2) has been identified in silico and studied experimentally. The amino group at position 2 and the methyl group at position 7 were shown to be important substituents for the efficient binding of purine derivatives to PARPs. The activity of both tested enzymes, PARP-1 and PARP-2, was suppressed by 7-methylguanine with IC50 values of 150 and 50 μM, respectively. At the PARP inhibitory concentration, 7-methylguanine itself was not cytotoxic, but it was able to accelerate apoptotic death of BRCA1-deficient breast cancer cells induced by cisplatin and doxorubicin, the widely used DNA-damaging chemotherapeutic agents. 7-Methylguanine possesses attractive predictable pharmacokinetics and an adverse-effect profile and may be considered as a new additive to chemotherapeutic treatment. PMID:27437145

  12. Newly Identified Targets of Aspirin and Its Primary Metabolite, Salicylic Acid.

    PubMed

    Klessig, Daniel F

    2016-04-01

    Salicylic acid (SA) is a plant hormone, which influences several physiological processes, and is a critical modulator of multiple levels of immunity in plants. Several high-throughput screens, which were developed to identify SA-binding proteins through which SA mediates its many physiological effects in plants, uncovered several novel targets of aspirin and its primary metabolite, SA, in humans. These include glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) and high mobility group box 1 (HMGB1), two proteins associated with some of the most prevalent and devastating human diseases. In addition, natural and synthetic SA derivatives were discovered, which are much more potent than SA at inhibiting the disease-associated activities of these targets. PMID:26954428

  13. Newly Identified Targets of Aspirin and Its Primary Metabolite, Salicylic Acid.

    PubMed

    Klessig, Daniel F

    2016-04-01

    Salicylic acid (SA) is a plant hormone, which influences several physiological processes, and is a critical modulator of multiple levels of immunity in plants. Several high-throughput screens, which were developed to identify SA-binding proteins through which SA mediates its many physiological effects in plants, uncovered several novel targets of aspirin and its primary metabolite, SA, in humans. These include glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) and high mobility group box 1 (HMGB1), two proteins associated with some of the most prevalent and devastating human diseases. In addition, natural and synthetic SA derivatives were discovered, which are much more potent than SA at inhibiting the disease-associated activities of these targets.

  14. Mycosporine-Like Amino Acids: Relevant Secondary Metabolites. Chemical and Ecological Aspects

    PubMed Central

    Carreto, Jose I.; Carignan, Mario O.

    2011-01-01

    Taxonomically diverse marine, freshwater and terrestrial organisms have evolved the capacity to synthesize, accumulate and metabolize a variety of UV-absorbing substances called mycosporine-like amino acids (MAAs) as part of an overall strategy to diminish the direct and indirect damaging effects of environmental ultraviolet radiation (UVR). Whereas the enzymatic machinery to synthesize MAAs was probably inherited from cyanobacteria ancestors via the endosymbionts hypothesis, metazoans lack this biochemical pathway, but can acquire and metabolize these compounds by trophic transference, symbiotic or bacterial association. In this review we describe the structure and physicochemical properties of MAAs, including the recently discovered compounds and the modern methods used for their isolation and identification, updating previous reviews. On this basis, we review the metabolism and distribution of this unique class of metabolites among marine organism. PMID:21556168

  15. The ex vivo antiplatelet activation potential of fruit phenolic metabolite hippuric acid.

    PubMed

    Santhakumar, Abishek Bommannan; Stanley, Roger; Singh, Indu

    2015-08-01

    Polyphenol-rich fruit and vegetable intake has been associated with reduction in platelet hyperactivity, a significant contributor to thrombus formation. This study was undertaken to investigate the possible role of hippuric acid, a predominant metabolite of plant cyclic polyols, phenolic acids and polyphenols, in reduction of platelet activation-related thrombogenesis. Fasting blood samples were collected from 13 healthy subjects to analyse the effect of varying concentrations of hippuric acid (100 μM, 200 μM, 500 μM, 1 mM and 2 mM) on activation-dependant platelet surface-marker expression. Procaspase activating compound-1 (PAC-1) and P-selectin/CD62P monoclonal antibodies were used to evaluate platelet activation-related conformational changes and α-granule release respectively using flow cytometry. Platelets were stimulated ex vivo via the P2Y1/P2Y12- adenosine diphosphate (ADP) pathway of platelet activation. Hippuric acid at a concentration of 1 mM and 2 mM significantly reduced P-selectin/CD62P expression (p = 0.03 and p < 0.001 respectively) induced by ADP. Hippuric acid at 2 mM concentration also inhibited PAC-1 activation-dependant antibody expression (p = 0.03). High ex vivo concentrations of hippuric acid can therefore significantly reduce P-selectin and PAC-1 expression thus reducing platelet activation and clotting potential. However, although up to 11 mM of hippuric acid can be excreted in the urine per day following consumption of fruit, hippuric acid is actively excreted with a recorded Cmax for hippuric acid in human plasma at 250-300 μM. This is lower than the blood concentration of 1-2 mM shown to be bioactive in this research. The contribution of hippuric acid to the protective effects of fruit and vegetable intake against vascular disorders by the pathways measured is therefore low but could be synergistic with lowered doses of antiplatelet drugs and help reduce risk of thrombosis in current antiplatelet drug sensitive populations. PMID

  16. UV and MS identification of Urolithins and Nasutins, the bioavailable metabolites of ellagitannins and ellagic acid in different mammals.

    PubMed

    González-Barrio, Rocío; Truchado, Pilar; Ito, Hideyuki; Espín, Juan C; Tomás-Barberán, Francisco A

    2011-02-23

    Urolithins are microbial metabolites produced from ellagic acid after the intake of dietary ellagitannins by different animals. Urolithin metabolites have distinct UV spectra that enable their detection and differentiation by HPLC coupled with UV photodiode array detectors. Correlations between structural characteristics, including conjugation, with the UV spectra and retention times are established. The production of urolithin derivatives in different animals feeding on ellagitannins, including rodents (rats and mice), humans, pigs, squirrels, beavers, sheep, bull calves, birds, and insects, was investigated. All mammals produced urolithins, and their glucuronyl and sulfate conjugates were the main metabolites detected in plasma and urine. Unconjugated urolithins were detected in feces, ruminal content, and beaver castoreum. Different urolithin hydroxylation patterns were observed for different animal species, suggesting that the microbiota responsible for the metabolism of ellagitannins in each animal species produces dehydroxylases for the removal of specific hydroxyls from the ellagic acid residue. Metabolites were characterized using HR HPLC-TOF-MS and ion trap MS/MS. Insects and birds feeding on ellagitannin-containing foods did not produce urolithins, although they released ellagic acid. Beavers and pigs were able to produce dehydroxyellagic acid derivatives (nasutin A), showing that in some cases the removal of hydroxyl groups from the ellagic acid nucleus can be carried out before the lactone ring is opened to produce urolithins.

  17. UV and MS identification of Urolithins and Nasutins, the bioavailable metabolites of ellagitannins and ellagic acid in different mammals.

    PubMed

    González-Barrio, Rocío; Truchado, Pilar; Ito, Hideyuki; Espín, Juan C; Tomás-Barberán, Francisco A

    2011-02-23

    Urolithins are microbial metabolites produced from ellagic acid after the intake of dietary ellagitannins by different animals. Urolithin metabolites have distinct UV spectra that enable their detection and differentiation by HPLC coupled with UV photodiode array detectors. Correlations between structural characteristics, including conjugation, with the UV spectra and retention times are established. The production of urolithin derivatives in different animals feeding on ellagitannins, including rodents (rats and mice), humans, pigs, squirrels, beavers, sheep, bull calves, birds, and insects, was investigated. All mammals produced urolithins, and their glucuronyl and sulfate conjugates were the main metabolites detected in plasma and urine. Unconjugated urolithins were detected in feces, ruminal content, and beaver castoreum. Different urolithin hydroxylation patterns were observed for different animal species, suggesting that the microbiota responsible for the metabolism of ellagitannins in each animal species produces dehydroxylases for the removal of specific hydroxyls from the ellagic acid residue. Metabolites were characterized using HR HPLC-TOF-MS and ion trap MS/MS. Insects and birds feeding on ellagitannin-containing foods did not produce urolithins, although they released ellagic acid. Beavers and pigs were able to produce dehydroxyellagic acid derivatives (nasutin A), showing that in some cases the removal of hydroxyl groups from the ellagic acid nucleus can be carried out before the lactone ring is opened to produce urolithins. PMID:21265540

  18. Effects of Fruit Ellagitannin Extracts, Ellagic Acid, and Their Colonic Metabolite, Urolithin A, on Wnt Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Meenakshi; Li, Liya; Celver, Jeremy; Killian, Caroline; Kovoor, Abraham; Seeram, Navindra P.

    2010-01-01

    Recent data suggest that ellagitannins (ETs), a class of hydrolyzable tannins found in some fruits and nuts, may have beneficial effects against colon cancer. In the stomach and gut, ETs hydrolyze to release ellagic acid (EA) and are converted by gut microbiota to urolithin-A (UA; 3,8-dihydroxy-6H-dibenzopyran-6-one) type metabolites which may persist in the colon through enterohepatic circulation. However, little is known about the mechanisms of action of either the native compounds or their metabolites on colon carcinogenesis. Components of Wnt signaling pathways are known to play a pivotal role in human colon carcinogenesis and inappropriate activation of the signaling cascade is observed in 90% of colorectal cancers. Here we investigated the effects of UA, EA, and ET rich fruit extracts on Wnt signaling in a human 293T cell line using a luciferase reporter of canonical Wnt pathway-mediated transcriptional activation. The ET extracts were obtained from strawberry (Fragaria annassa), Jamun berry (Eugenia jambolana), and pomegranate (Punica granatum) fruit and were all standardized to phenolic content (as gallic acid equivalents, GAEs, by the Folin Ciocalteau method) and to EA content (by high performance liquid chromatography methods): strawberry=20.5% GAE, 5.0% EA; Jamun berry= 20.5% GAE, 4.2% EA; pomegranate= 55% GAE, 3.5% EA. The ET-extracts (IC50=28.0-30.0 μg/mL), EA (IC50=19.0 μg/mL; 63 μM) and UA (IC50=9.0 μg/mL; 39 μM) inhibited Wnt signaling suggesting that ET-rich foods have potential against colon carcinogenesis and that urolithins are relevant bioactive constituents in the colon. PMID:20014760

  19. Effects of fruit ellagitannin extracts, ellagic acid, and their colonic metabolite, urolithin A, on Wnt signaling.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Meenakshi; Li, Liya; Celver, Jeremy; Killian, Caroline; Kovoor, Abraham; Seeram, Navindra P

    2010-04-14

    Recent data suggest that ellagitannins (ETs), a class of hydrolyzable tannins found in some fruits and nuts, may have beneficial effects against colon cancer. In the stomach and gut, ETs hydrolyze to release ellagic acid (EA) and are converted by gut microbiota to urolithin A (UA; 3,8-dihydroxy-6H-dibenzopyran-6-one) type metabolites, which may persist in the colon through enterohepatic circulation. However, little is known about the mechanisms of action of either the native compounds or their metabolites on colon carcinogenesis. Components of Wnt signaling pathways are known to play a pivotal role in human colon carcinogenesis, and inappropriate activation of the signaling cascade is observed in 90% of colorectal cancers. This study investigated the effects of UA, EA, and ET-rich fruit extracts on Wnt signaling in a human 293T cell line using a luciferase reporter of canonical Wnt pathway-mediated transcriptional activation. The ET extracts were obtained from strawberry (Fragaria annassa), Jamun berry (Eugenia jambolana), and pomegranate (Punica granatum) fruit and were all standardized to phenolic content (as gallic acid equivalents, GAEs, by the Folin-Ciocalteu method) and to EA content (by high-performance liquid chromatography methods): strawberry = 20.5% GAE, 5.0% EA; Jamun berry = 20.5% GAE, 4.2% EA; pomegranate = 55% GAE, 3.5% EA. The ET extracts (IC(50) = 28.0-30.0 microg/mL), EA (IC(50) = 19.0 microg/mL; 63 microM), and UA (IC(50) = 9.0 microg/mL; 39 microM) inhibited Wnt signaling, suggesting that ET-rich foods have potential against colon carcinogenesis and that urolithins are relevant bioactive constituents in the colon.

  20. Novel correlations between microbial taxa and amino acid metabolites in mouse cecal contents

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Gut microbes share a bi-directional relationship with thousands of metabolites in their environment. Many of these microbes and metabolites are associated with human diseases including obesity, cancer, and inflammatory diseases. Further understanding of how microbes affect metabolite concentration i...

  1. In situ proteo-metabolomics reveals metabolite secretion by the acid mine drainage bio-indicator, Euglena mutabilis

    PubMed Central

    Halter, David; Goulhen-Chollet, Florence; Gallien, Sébastien; Casiot, Corinne; Hamelin, Jérôme; Gilard, Françoise; Heintz, Dimitri; Schaeffer, Christine; Carapito, Christine; Van Dorsselaer, Alain; Tcherkez, Guillaume; Arsène-Ploetze, Florence; Bertin, Philippe N

    2012-01-01

    Euglena mutabilis is a photosynthetic protist found in acidic aquatic environments such as peat bogs, volcanic lakes and acid mine drainages (AMDs). Through its photosynthetic metabolism, this protist is supposed to have an important role in primary production in such oligotrophic ecosystems. Nevertheless, the exact contribution of E. mutabilis in organic matter synthesis remains unclear and no evidence of metabolite secretion by this protist has been established so far. Here we combined in situ proteo-metabolomic approaches to determine the nature of the metabolites accumulated by this protist or potentially secreted into an AMD. Our results revealed that the secreted metabolites are represented by a large number of amino acids, polyamine compounds, urea and some sugars but no fatty acids, suggesting a selective organic matter contribution in this ecosystem. Such a production may have a crucial impact on the bacterial community present on the study site, as it has been suggested previously that prokaryotes transport and recycle in situ most of the metabolites secreted by E. mutabilis. Consequently, this protist may have an indirect but important role in AMD ecosystems but also in other ecological niches often described as nitrogen-limited. PMID:22237547

  2. Glucuronic acid and the ethanol metabolite ethyl-glucuronide cause Toll-like receptor 4 activation and enhanced pain

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, Susannah S.; Hutchinson, Mark R.; Zhang, Yingning; Hund, Dana K.; Maier, Steven F.; Rice, Kenner C.; Watkins, Linda R.

    2013-01-01

    We have previously observed that the non-opioid morphine metabolite, morphine-3-glucuronide, enhances pain via a toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) dependent mechanism. The present studies were undertaken to determine whether TLR4-dependent pain enhancement generalizes to other classes of glucuronide metabolites. In silico modeling predicted that glucuronic acid alone and ethyl glucuronide, a minor but long-lasting ethanol metabolite, would dock to the same MD-2 portion of the TLR4 receptor complex previously characterized as the docking site for morphine-3-glucuronide. Glucuronic acid, ethyl glucuronide and ethanol all caused an increase in TLR4-dependent reporter protein expression in a cell line transfected with TLR4 and associated co-signaling molecules. Glucuronic acid-, ethyl glucuronide-, and ethanol-induced increases in TLR4 signaling were blocked by the TLR4 antagonists LPS-RS and (+)-naloxone. Glucuronic acid and ethyl glucuronide both caused allodynia following intrathecal injection in rats, which was blocked by intrathecal co-administration of the TLR4 antagonist LPS-RS. The finding that ethyl glucuronide can cause TLR4-dependent pain could have implications for human conditions such as hangover headache and alcohol withdrawal hyperalgesia, as well as suggesting that other classes of glucuronide metabolites could have similar effects. PMID:23348028

  3. The omega-3 fatty acid DHA dose-dependently reduces atherosclerosis: a putative role for F4-neuroprostanes a specific class of peroxidized metabolites

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Objective. Consumption of long chain omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids is associated with reduced risks of cardiovascular disease but the role of their oxygenated metabolites remains unclear. We hypothesized that peroxidized metabolites of docosahexaenoic acid (DHA, 22:6 n-3) could play a role in ...

  4. Population dynamics and metabolite target analysis of lactic acid bacteria during laboratory fermentations of wheat and spelt sourdoughs.

    PubMed

    Van der Meulen, Roel; Scheirlinck, Ilse; Van Schoor, Ann; Huys, Geert; Vancanneyt, Marc; Vandamme, Peter; De Vuyst, Luc

    2007-08-01

    Four laboratory sourdough fermentations, initiated with wheat or spelt flour and without the addition of a starter culture, were prepared over a period of 10 days with daily back-slopping. Samples taken at all refreshment steps were used for determination of the present microbiota. Furthermore, an extensive metabolite target analysis of more than 100 different compounds was performed through a combination of various chromatographic methods including liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. The establishment of a stable microbial ecosystem occurred through a three-phase evolution within a week, as revealed by both microbiological and metabolite analyses. Strains of Lactobacillus plantarum, Lactobacillus fermentum, Lactobacillus rossiae, Lactobacillus brevis, and Lactobacillus paraplantarum were dominating some of the sourdough ecosystems. Although the heterofermentative L. fermentum was dominating one of the wheat sourdoughs, all other sourdoughs were dominated by a combination of obligate and facultative heterofermentative taxa. Strains of homofermentative species were not retrieved in the stable sourdough ecosystems. Concentrations of sugar and amino acid metabolites hardly changed during the last days of fermentation. Besides lactic acid, ethanol, and mannitol, the production of succinic acid, erythritol, and various amino acid metabolites, such as phenyllactic acid, hydroxyphenyllactic acid, and indolelactic acid, was shown during fermentation. Physiologically, they contributed to the equilibration of the redox balance. The biphasic approach of the present study allowed us to map some of the interactions taking place during sourdough fermentation and helped us to understand the fine-tuned metabolism of lactic acid bacteria, which allows them to dominate a food ecosystem.

  5. A branched chain amino acid metabolite drives vascular transport of fat and causes insulin resistance

    PubMed Central

    Jang, Cholsoon; Oh, Sungwhan F; Wada, Shogo; Rowe, Glenn C; Liu, Laura; Chan, Mun Chun; Rhee, James; Hoshino, Atsushi; Kim, Boa; Ibrahim, Ayon; Baca, Luisa G; Kim, Esl; Ghosh, Chandra C; Parikh, Samir M; Jiang, Aihua; Chu, Qingwei; Forman, Daniel E.; Lecker, Stewart H.; Krishnaiah, Saikumari; Rabinowitz, Joshua D; Weljie, Aalim M; Baur, Joseph A; Kasper, Dennis L; Arany, Zoltan

    2016-01-01

    Epidemiological and experimental data implicate branched chain amino acids (BCAAs) in the development of insulin resistance, but the mechanisms underlying this link remain unclear.1–3 Insulin resistance in skeletal muscle stems from excess accumulation of lipid species4, a process that requires blood-borne lipids to first traverse the blood vessel wall. Little is known, however, of how this trans-endothelial transport occurs or is regulated. Here, we leverage PGC-1α, a transcriptional coactivator that regulates broad programs of FA consumption, to identify 3-hydroxy-isobutyrate (3-HIB), a catabolic intermediate of the BCAA valine, as a novel paracrine regulator of trans-endothelial fatty acids (FA) transport. 3-HIB is secreted from muscle cells, activates endothelial FA transport, stimulates muscle FA uptake in vivo, and promotes muscle lipid accumulation and insulin resistance in animals. Conversely, inhibiting the synthesis of 3-HIB in muscle cells blocks the promotion of endothelial FA uptake. 3-HIB levels are elevated in muscle from db/db mice and from subjects with diabetes. These data thus unveil a novel mechanism that regulates trans-endothelial flux of FAs, revealing 3-HIB as a new bioactive signaling metabolite that links the regulation of FA flux to BCAA catabolism and provides a mechanistic explanation for how increased BCAA catabolic flux can cause diabetes. PMID:26950361

  6. Polycyclic Aromatic Acids Are Primary Metabolites of Alkyl-PAHs-A Case Study with Nereis diversicolor.

    PubMed

    Malmquist, Linus M V; Selck, Henriette; Jørgensen, Kåre B; Christensen, Jan H

    2015-05-01

    Although concentrations of alkylated polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (alkyl-PAHs) in oil-contaminated sediments are higher than those of unsubstituted PAHs, only little attention has been given to metabolism and ecotoxicity of alkyl-PAHs. In this study we demonstrated that metabolism of alkyl-PAHs primarily forms polycyclic aromatic acids (PAAs). We generalize this to other alkyl-PAHs, based on literature and the present study of the metabolism of 1-methylphenanthrene, 3,6-dimethylphenanthrene, and 1-, 2-, 3-, and 6-methylchrysene related to their unsubstituted parent PAHs. Also, we observed that body burdens and production of PAAs was related to the position of the methyl group, showing the same isomer specific preferences as for microbial degradation of alkyl-PAHs. We detected a high production of PAAs, and larger metabolism of alkyl-PAHs than their unsubstituted parent PAHs. We therefore propose that carboxylic acid metabolites of alkyl-PAHs have the potential of constituting a new class of contaminants in marine waters that needs attention in relation to ecological risk assessments.

  7. [Effects of ascorbic acid on the free radical formations of isoniazid and its metabolites].

    PubMed

    Matsuki, Y; Akazawa, M; Tsuchiya, K; Sakurai, H; Kiwada, H; Goromaru, T

    1991-10-01

    By the use of electron spin resonance (ESR) spectroscopy and of spin-trapping technique, the effects of ascorbic acid on the formation of the free radical intermediates due to isoniazid (INAH) and its metabolites were investigated with a microsomal system. When alpha-(4-pyridyl 1-oxide)-N-tert butylnitrone (4-POBN) was used as a spin trapping agent, the ESR signal due to hydrazine (Hy) was formed to be most intensive among others. Therefore, it was presumed that Hy is a potent intermediate to cause an INAH-induced hepatic injury. In the presence of ascorbic acid (AA), the free radical formation of Hy, INAH and acetyl hydrazine was significantly inhibited, suggesting that AA may affect the INAH-hepatitis. By the addition of inhibitors of cytochrome P-450 like metyrapone and CO, the generation of the radical from Hy decreased, confirming that the radical is formed by the cytochrome P-450 dependent microsome systems. The 4-POBN-trapped radical species generated from Hy was presumed to be the hydrazyl radical by the results of mass spectrometry.

  8. Field dissipation of trifloxystrobin and its metabolite trifloxystrobin acid in soil and apples.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chen; Wu, Junxue; Zhang, Yun; Wang, Kai; Zhang, Hongyan

    2015-01-01

    The dissipation of trifloxystrobin and its metabolite trifloxystrobin acid in apples and soil was studied, and the half-life (DT₅₀) was estimated in a field study carried out at three different locations for apples and four different locations for soil. Trifloxystrobin was sprayed on apples at 127 g a.i./ha for the dissipation study. Samples of apple and soil for the dissipation experiment were collected at time intervals of 0, 1, 3, 7, 14, 21, 30, and 45 days after treatment. The quantification of residues was done by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). The DT₅₀ of trifloxystrobin ranged from 0.54 to 8.8 and 4.8 to 9.5 days in soil and apples at different latitude sites. Photolysis may be the main dissipation pathway for trifloxystrobin, and the number of sunshine hours may be the main factor affecting the trifloxystrobin dissipation rate in the field. For trifloxystrobin acid residues in soil and apples, it first increased and then began decreasing. It was indicated that the risk of trifloxystrobin application in shorter sunshine hour area should be considered.

  9. CYP epoxygenase metabolites of docosahexaenoic acid protect HL-1 cardiac cells against LPS-induced cytotoxicity through SIRT1

    PubMed Central

    Samokhvalov, V; Jamieson, K L; Vriend, J; Quan, S; Seubert, J M

    2015-01-01

    Bacterial LPS is an environmental toxin capable of promoting various cardiac complications. Current evidence suggests that LPS-induced myocardial dysfunction emerges as a consequence of compromised quality of cardiac mitochondria. Docosahexaenoic acid (DHA, 22:6n3) is an n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA), which produces a broad spectrum of intrinsic physiological effects including regulation of cell survival and death mechanisms. Although, numerous studies revealed fundamentally beneficial effects of DHA on cardiovascular system, it remains unknown whether these effects were produced by DHA or one of its possibly more potent metabolites. Emerging evidence indicates that cytochrome P450 (CYP) epoxygenase metabolites of DHA, epoxydocosapentaenoic acids (EDPs), produce more potent biological activity compared to its precursor DHA. In this study, we investigated whether DHA and its metabolite 19,20-EDP could protect HL-1 cardiac cells against LPS-induced cytotoxicity. We provide evidence that exogenously added or DHA-derived EDPs promote mitochondrial biogenesis and function in HL-1 cardiac cells. Our results illustrate the CYP epoxygenase metabolite of DHA, 19,20-EDP, confers extensive protection to HL-1 cardiac cells against LPS-induced cytotoxicity via activation of SIRT1. PMID:27182450

  10. Preparation of sup 2 H- and sup 3 H-labeled phaseic acid and dihydrophaseic acid as standards for determination of abscisic acid metabolites in tomato fruit

    SciTech Connect

    Kubik, M.; Buta, J.G. )

    1990-05-01

    There have been reports that the level of abscisic acid (ABA) increases during the cold storage of tomatoes. However, the important ABA metabolites, phaseic acid (PA) and dihydrophaseic acid (DPA) were never quantitatively determined in such a system. In order to obtain the labeled standards for quantitative determination of those compounds by GC-MS-SIM, we fed bean plants with 6,6,6-({sup 2}H{sub 3})-ABA (mean isotopic enrichment 60%) with addition of about 10{sup 5} Bq per mg of ({sup 3}H)-ABA. After 100 hours the plants were harvested and extracted with acetone. The extract were purified by solvent partitioning and, Prep-Sep amino column and on an HPLC C{sub 18} reverse phase column. Two major radioactive metabolites of ABA were obtained and identified by GC-MS as PA and DPA. Some results on the quantitation of ABA, PA and DPA in tomato fruit after cold storage will be presented.

  11. Lichen metabolites. 2. Antiproliferative and cytotoxic activity of gyrophoric, usnic, and diffractaic acid on human keratinocyte growth.

    PubMed

    Kumar, K C; Müller, K

    1999-06-01

    The sensitivity of the human keratinocyte cell line HaCaT to several lichen metabolites isolated from Parmelia nepalensis and Parmelia tinctorum was evaluated. The tridepside gyrophoric acid (6), the dibenzofuran derivative (+)-usnic acid (1), and the didepside diffractaic acid (5) were potent antiproliferative agents and inhibited cell growth, with IC50 values of 1.7, 2.1, and 2.6 microM, respectively. Methyl beta-orcinolcarboxylate (2), ethyl hematommate (3), the didepside atranorin (4), and (+)-protolichesterinic acid (7) did not influence keratinocyte growth at concentrations of 5 microM. Keratinocytes were further tested for their susceptibility to the action of the potent antiproliferative agents on plasma membrane integrity. The release of lactate dehydrogenase activity into the culture medium was unchanged as compared to controls, documenting that the activity of gyrophoric acid (6), (+)-usnic acid (1), and diffractaic acid (5) was due to cytostatic rather than cytotoxic effects. PMID:10395495

  12. Identification of a new metabolite of GHB: gamma-hydroxybutyric acid glucuronide.

    PubMed

    Petersen, Ida Nymann; Tortzen, Christian; Kristensen, Jesper Langgaard; Pedersen, Daniel Sejer; Breindahl, Torben

    2013-06-01

    Gamma-hydroxybutyric acid (GHB) is an important analyte in clinical and forensic toxicology with a narrow detection window of 3-6 h. In the search of improved detection methods, the existence in vivo of a glucuronated GHB metabolite (GHB-GLUC) was hypothesized. Chemically pure standards of GHB-GLUC and a deuterated analogue for chromatography were synthesized. Liquid chromatography and tandem mass spectrometry were used for targeted analysis in anonymous clinical urine samples (n = 50). GHB-GLUC was found in concentrations ranging from 0.11 to 5.0 µg/mL (mean: 1.3 ± 1.2 µg/mL). Thus far, this is the first report of a GHB glucuronide detected in biological samples. Given that glucuronides generally have longer half-life values than their corresponding free drugs, GHB-GLUC should theoretically be a biomarker of GHB intoxication. It is also proposed that the hitherto unexplained reports of elevated GHB concentrations in some biological samples, which has caused the setting of a relatively high cutoff value (10 µg/mL), represent total GHB measurements (sum of free GHB and actively chemically hydrolyzed GHB-GLUC). To address these challenges, the present study must be followed by comprehensive pharmacokinetic and stability studies after the controlled administration of GHB.

  13. A Novel Function for Kojic Acid, a Secondary Metabolite from Aspergillus Fungi, as Antileishmanial Agent

    PubMed Central

    Rodrigues, Ana Paula D.; Farias, Luis Henrique S.; Carvalho, Antonio Sérgio C.; Santos, Alberdan S.; do Nascimento, José Luiz M.; Silva, Edilene O.

    2014-01-01

    Kojic acid (KA) is a fungal metabolite used as a topical treatment skin-whitening cosmetic agent for melasma in humans; however its potential as an anti-leishmanial agent is unknown. Chemotherapy is one of the most effective treatments for Leishmaniasis. However, the drugs available are expensive, invasive, require long-term treatment and have severe side effects. Thus, the development of new effective leishmanicidal agents is a necessity. In this study we investigated the anti-leishmanial effect of KA on L. amazonensis, following in vitro and in vivo infections. KA (50 μg/mL) was found to decrease the growth by 62% (IC50 34 μg/mL) and 79% (IC50 27.84 μg/mL) of promastigotes and amastigotes in vitro, respectively. Ultrastructural analysis of KA-treated amastigotes showed the presence of vesicles bodies into the flagellar pocket, and an intense intracellular vacuolization and swelling of the mitochondrion. During the in vitro interaction of parasites and the host cell, KA reverses the superoxide anions (O2-) inhibitory mechanism promoted by parasite. In addition, 4 weeks after KA-topical formulation treatment of infected animals, a healing process was observed with a high production of collagen fibers and a decrease in parasite burden. Thus, these results demonstrated the great potential of KA as an anti-leishmanial compound. PMID:24621481

  14. Anti-inflammatory effects of chronic aspirin on brain arachidonic acid metabolites.

    PubMed

    Basselin, Mireille; Ramadan, Epolia; Chen, Mei; Rapoport, Stanley I

    2011-01-01

    Pro-inflammatory and anti-inflammatory mediators derived from arachidonic acid (AA) modulate peripheral inflammation and its resolution. Aspirin (ASA) is a unique non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug, which switches AA metabolism from prostaglandin E₂ (PGE₂) and thromboxane B₂ (TXB₂) to lipoxin A₄ (LXA₄) and 15-epi-LXA₄. However, it is unknown whether chronic therapeutic doses of ASA are anti-inflammatory in the brain. We hypothesized that ASA would dampen increases in brain concentrations of AA metabolites in a rat model of neuroinflammation, produced by a 6-day intracerebroventricular infusion of bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS). In rats infused with LPS (0.5 ng/h) and given ASA-free water to drink, concentrations in high-energy microwaved brain of PGE₂, TXB₂ and leukotriene B₄ (LTB₄) were elevated. In rats infused with artificial cerebrospinal fluid, 6 weeks of treatment with a low (10 mg/kg/day) or high (100 mg/kg/day) ASA dose in drinking water decreased brain PGE₂, but increased LTB₄, LXA₄ and 15-epi-LXA₄ concentrations. Both doses attenuated the LPS effects on PGE₂, and TXB₂. The increments in LXA₄ and 15-epi-LXA₄ caused by high-dose ASA were significantly greater in LPS-infused rats. The ability of ASA to increase anti-inflammatory LXA₄ and 15-epi-LXA₄ and reduce pro-inflammatory PGE₂ and TXB₂ suggests considering aspirin further for treating clinical neuroinflammation. PMID:20981485

  15. Human GAPDH Is a Target of Aspirin's Primary Metabolite Salicylic Acid and Its Derivatives.

    PubMed

    Choi, Hyong Woo; Tian, Miaoying; Manohar, Murli; Harraz, Maged M; Park, Sang-Wook; Schroeder, Frank C; Snyder, Solomon H; Klessig, Daniel F

    2015-01-01

    The plant hormone salicylic acid (SA) controls several physiological processes and is a key regulator of multiple levels of plant immunity. To decipher the mechanisms through which SA's multiple physiological effects are mediated, particularly in immunity, two high-throughput screens were developed to identify SA-binding proteins (SABPs). Glyceraldehyde 3-Phosphate Dehydrogenase (GAPDH) from plants (Arabidopsis thaliana) was identified in these screens. Similar screens and subsequent analyses using SA analogs, in conjunction with either a photoaffinity labeling technique or surface plasmon resonance-based technology, established that human GAPDH (HsGAPDH) also binds SA. In addition to its central role in glycolysis, HsGAPDH participates in several pathological processes, including viral replication and neuronal cell death. The anti-Parkinson's drug deprenyl has been shown to suppress nuclear translocation of HsGAPDH, an early step in cell death and the resulting cell death induced by the DNA alkylating agent N-methyl-N'-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine. Here, we demonstrate that SA, which is the primary metabolite of aspirin (acetyl SA) and is likely responsible for many of its pharmacological effects, also suppresses nuclear translocation of HsGAPDH and cell death. Analysis of two synthetic SA derivatives and two classes of compounds from the Chinese medicinal herb Glycyrrhiza foetida (licorice), glycyrrhizin and the SA-derivatives amorfrutins, revealed that they not only appear to bind HsGAPDH more tightly than SA, but also exhibit a greater ability to suppress translocation of HsGAPDH to the nucleus and cell death.

  16. Biochemical and pharmacological effects of dipyrone and its metabolites in model systems related to arachidonic acid cascade.

    PubMed

    Weithmann, K U; Alpermann, H G

    1985-01-01

    The metabolites of dipyrone (metamizol, Novalgin) were compared with appropriate standard drugs for their influences on the pathways of the arachidonic acid metabolism. The drugs in this study had no significant effects on the lipoxygenase pathway in human neutrophils in vitro. The dipyrone metabolites 4-methylaminoantipyrine (MAAP) and 4-aminoantipyrine (AAP) inhibited prostaglandin synthesis in the 10(-3) to 10(-4) mol/l range thus being comparable to acetylsalicylic acid (ASA), whereas the two additional metabolites 4-acetylaminoantipyrine (AAAP) and 4-formylaminoantipyrine (FAAP) were practically inactive. This result is in accordance with the effects of the metabolites on the formation of oedema in the arthritis rat model, and supports published data showing that MAAP and AAP are the metabolites responsible for the clinical effects of dipyrone. Further systems in our study depending at least partially on the prostaglandin pathway were the release of antiaggregatory activity from rat aortae in vitro and the aggregation of human platelets induced by arachidonic acid in vitro. MAAP exhibits antiaggregatory activity (IC50 5 x 10(-6) mol/l), whereas the inhibitory effect on the vascular antiaggregatory release is much weaker. Compared to normals platelet aggregability ex vivo is enhanced in arthritic rats, but could significantly be lowered again by treatment of the rats with MAAP. A further system studied was the release of 6-keto-PGF1 alpha from rat mucosa in vitro and ex vivo. In vitro there is inhibition to be found with MAAP as well as with ASA. Ex vivo, however, dipyrone or MAAP slightly stimulates mucosal 6-keto-PGF1 alpha rather than inhibiting it, whereas ASA exerts inhibition, as expected.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  17. Aspirin's Active Metabolite Salicylic Acid Targets High Mobility Group Box 1 to Modulate Inflammatory Responses.

    PubMed

    Choi, Hyong Woo; Tian, Miaoying; Song, Fei; Venereau, Emilie; Preti, Alessandro; Park, Sang-Wook; Hamilton, Keith; Swapna, G V T; Manohar, Murli; Moreau, Magali; Agresti, Alessandra; Gorzanelli, Andrea; De Marchis, Francesco; Wang, Huang; Antonyak, Marc; Micikas, Robert J; Gentile, Daniel R; Cerione, Richard A; Schroeder, Frank C; Montelione, Gaetano T; Bianchi, Marco E; Klessig, Daniel F

    2015-01-01

    Salicylic acid (SA) and its derivatives have been used for millennia to reduce pain, fever and inflammation. In addition, prophylactic use of acetylsalicylic acid, commonly known as aspirin, reduces the risk of heart attack, stroke and certain cancers. Because aspirin is rapidly de-acetylated by esterases in human plasma, much of aspirin's bioactivity can be attributed to its primary metabolite, SA. Here we demonstrate that human high mobility group box 1 (HMGB1) is a novel SA-binding protein. SA-binding sites on HMGB1 were identified in the HMG-box domains by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopic studies and confirmed by mutational analysis. Extracellular HMGB1 is a damage-associated molecular pattern molecule (DAMP), with multiple redox states. SA suppresses both the chemoattractant activity of fully reduced HMGB1 and the increased expression of proinflammatory cytokine genes and cyclooxygenase 2 (COX-2) induced by disulfide HMGB1. Natural and synthetic SA derivatives with greater potency for inhibition of HMGB1 were identified, providing proof-of-concept that new molecules with high efficacy against sterile inflammation are attainable. An HMGB1 protein mutated in one of the SA-binding sites identified by NMR chemical shift perturbation studies retained chemoattractant activity, but lost binding of and inhibition by SA and its derivatives, thereby firmly establishing that SA binding to HMGB1 directly suppresses its proinflammatory activities. Identification of HMGB1 as a pharmacological target of SA/aspirin provides new insights into the mechanisms of action of one of the world's longest and most used natural and synthetic drugs. It may also provide an explanation for the protective effects of low-dose aspirin usage. PMID:26101955

  18. Aspirin's Active Metabolite Salicylic Acid Targets High Mobility Group Box 1 to Modulate Inflammatory Responses.

    PubMed

    Choi, Hyong Woo; Tian, Miaoying; Song, Fei; Venereau, Emilie; Preti, Alessandro; Park, Sang-Wook; Hamilton, Keith; Swapna, G V T; Manohar, Murli; Moreau, Magali; Agresti, Alessandra; Gorzanelli, Andrea; De Marchis, Francesco; Wang, Huang; Antonyak, Marc; Micikas, Robert J; Gentile, Daniel R; Cerione, Richard A; Schroeder, Frank C; Montelione, Gaetano T; Bianchi, Marco E; Klessig, Daniel F

    2015-06-18

    Salicylic acid (SA) and its derivatives have been used for millennia to reduce pain, fever and inflammation. In addition, prophylactic use of acetylsalicylic acid, commonly known as aspirin, reduces the risk of heart attack, stroke and certain cancers. Because aspirin is rapidly de-acetylated by esterases in human plasma, much of aspirin's bioactivity can be attributed to its primary metabolite, SA. Here we demonstrate that human high mobility group box 1 (HMGB1) is a novel SA-binding protein. SA-binding sites on HMGB1 were identified in the HMG-box domains by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopic studies and confirmed by mutational analysis. Extracellular HMGB1 is a damage-associated molecular pattern molecule (DAMP), with multiple redox states. SA suppresses both the chemoattractant activity of fully reduced HMGB1 and the increased expression of proinflammatory cytokine genes and cyclooxygenase 2 (COX-2) induced by disulfide HMGB1. Natural and synthetic SA derivatives with greater potency for inhibition of HMGB1 were identified, providing proof-of-concept that new molecules with high efficacy against sterile inflammation are attainable. An HMGB1 protein mutated in one of the SA-binding sites identified by NMR chemical shift perturbation studies retained chemoattractant activity, but lost binding of and inhibition by SA and its derivatives, thereby firmly establishing that SA binding to HMGB1 directly suppresses its proinflammatory activities. Identification of HMGB1 as a pharmacological target of SA/aspirin provides new insights into the mechanisms of action of one of the world's longest and most used natural and synthetic drugs. It may also provide an explanation for the protective effects of low-dose aspirin usage.

  19. Metabolites derived from omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids are important for cardioprotection.

    PubMed

    Gilbert, Kim; Malick, Mandy; Madingou, Ness; Touchette, Charles; Bourque-Riel, Valérie; Tomaro, Leandro; Rousseau, Guy

    2015-12-15

    Although controversial, some data suggest that omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) are beneficial to cardiovascular diseases, and could reduce infarct size. In parallel, we have reported that the administration of Resolvin D1 (RvD1), a metabolite of docosahexaenoic acid, an omega-3 PUFA, can reduce infarct size. The present study was designed to determine if the inhibition of two important enzymes involved in the formation of RvD1 from omega-3 PUFA could reduce the cardioprotective effect of omega-3 PUFA. Sprague-Dawley rats were fed with a diet rich in omega-3 PUFA during 10 days before myocardial infarction (MI). Two days before MI, rats received a daily dose of Meloxicam, an inhibitor of cyclooxygenase-2, PD146176, an inhibitor of 15-lipoxygenase, both inhibitors or vehicle. MI was induced by the occlusion of the left coronary artery for 40min followed by reperfusion. Infarct size and neutrophil accumulation were evaluated after 24h of reperfusion while caspase-3, -8 and Akt activities were assessed at 30min of reperfusion. Rats receiving inhibitors, alone or in combination, showed a larger infarct size than those receiving omega-3 PUFA alone. Caspase-3 and -8 activities are higher in ischemic areas with inhibitors while Akt activity is diminished in groups treated with inhibitors. Moreover, the study showed that RvD1 restores cardioprotection when added to the inhibitors. Results from this study indicate that the inhibition of the metabolism of Omega-3 PUFA attenuate their cardioprotective properties. Then, resolvins seem to be an important mediator in the cardioprotection conferred by omega-3 PUFA in our experimental model of MI.

  20. Arachidonic acid metabolites do not mediate toluene diisocyanate-induced airway hyperresponsiveness in guinea pigs

    SciTech Connect

    Gordon, T.; Thompson, J.E.; Sheppard, D.

    1988-05-01

    Arachidonic acid metabolites have previously been demonstrated to mediate the airway hyperresponsiveness observed in guinea pigs and dogs after exposure to ozone. Guinea pigs were treated with indomethacin (a cyclooxygenase inhibitor), U-60,257 (piriprost, a 5-lipoxygenase inhibitor), or BW775c (a lipoxygenase and cyclooxygenase inhibitor) and exposed to air or 3 ppm TDI. Airway responsiveness to acetylcholine aerosol was examined 2 h after exposure. In control animals, the provocative concentration of acetylcholine which caused a 200% increase in pulmonary resistance over baseline (PC200) was significantly less (p less than 0.05) after exposure to TDI (8.6 +/- 2.0 mg/ml, geometric mean + geometric SE, n = 10) than after exposure to air (23.9 + 2.5 mg/ml, n = 14). The airway responsiveness to acetylcholine in animals treated with indomethacin or piriprost and exposed to TDI was not different from that of control animals exposed to TDI. Treatment with BW755c enhanced the airway hyperresponsiveness observed in animals exposed to TDI without altering the PC200 of animals exposed to air. The PC200 of animals treated with BW755c and exposed to TDI (2.3 + 0.8 mg/ml, n = 8) was significantly lower than the PC200 of control animals exposed to TDI (p less than 0.025). These results suggest that products of arachidonic acid metabolism are not responsible for TDI-induced airway hyperresponsiveness in guinea pigs. BW755c, however, appears to potentiate the TDI-induced airway hyperresponsiveness to acetylcholine by an as yet unidentified mechanism.

  1. Trimethylbenzoic acids as metabolite signatures in the biogeochemical evolution of an aquifer contaminated with jet fuel hydrocarbons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Namocatcat, J. A.; Fang, J.; Barcelona, M. J.; Quibuyen, A. T. O.; Abrajano, T. A.

    2003-12-01

    Evolution of trimethylbenzoic acids in the KC-135 aquifer at the former Wurtsmith Air Force Base (WAFB), Oscoda, MI was examined to determine the functionality of trimethylbenzoic acids as key metabolite signatures in the biogeochemical evolution of an aquifer contaminated with JP-4 fuel hydrocarbons. Changes in the composition of trimethylbenzoic acids and the distribution and concentration profiles exhibited by 2,4,6- and 2,3,5-trimethylbenzoic acids temporally and between multilevel wells reflect processes indicative of an actively evolving contaminant plume. The concentration levels of trimethylbenzoic acids were 3-10 orders higher than their tetramethylbenzene precursors, a condition attributed to slow metabolite turnover under sulfidogenic conditions. The observed degradation of tetramethylbenzenes into trimethylbenzoic acids obviates the use of these alkylbenzenes as non-labile tracers for other degradable aromatic hydrocarbons, but provides rare field evidence on the range of high molecular weight alkylbenzenes and isomeric assemblages amenable to anaerobic degradation in situ. The coupling of actual tetramethylbenzene loss with trimethylbenzoic acid production and the general decline in the concentrations of these compounds demonstrate the role of microbially mediated processes in the natural attenuation of hydrocarbons and may be a key indicator in the overall rate of hydrocarbon degradation and the biogeochemical evolution of the KC-135 aquifer.

  2. Chromatographic and mass spectrometric methods for determination of lysergic acid diethylamide (LSD) and metabolites in body fluids.

    PubMed

    Nelson, C C; Foltz, R L

    1992-09-16

    Continued illicit use of the potent psychedelic drug lysergic acid diethylamide (LSD) has stimulated efforts to develop effective analytical methods for detection of the drug and its metabolites in body fluids from suspected LSD users. Recently reported methods based on gas and liquid chromatography, combined with single- and multiple-stage mass spectral analysis, now permit accurate detection and quantitation of LSD at sub-nanogram/milliliter concentrations.

  3. N-lactoyl-amino acids are ubiquitous metabolites that originate from CNDP2-mediated reverse proteolysis of lactate and amino acids

    PubMed Central

    Jansen, Robert S.; Addie, Ruben; Merkx, Remco; Fish, Alexander; Mahakena, Sunny; Bleijerveld, Onno B.; Altelaar, Maarten; IJlst, Lodewijk; Wanders, Ronald J.; Borst, P.; van de Wetering, Koen

    2015-01-01

    Despite technological advances in metabolomics, large parts of the human metabolome are still unexplored. In an untargeted metabolomics screen aiming to identify substrates of the orphan transporter ATP-binding cassette subfamily C member 5 (ABCC5), we identified a class of mammalian metabolites, N-lactoyl-amino acids. Using parallel protein fractionation in conjunction with shotgun proteomics on fractions containing N-lactoyl-Phe–forming activity, we unexpectedly found that a protease, cytosolic nonspecific dipeptidase 2 (CNDP2), catalyzes their formation. N-lactoyl-amino acids are ubiquitous pseudodipeptides of lactic acid and amino acids that are rapidly formed by reverse proteolysis, a process previously considered to be negligible in vivo. The plasma levels of these metabolites strongly correlate with plasma levels of lactate and amino acid, as shown by increased levels after physical exercise and in patients with phenylketonuria who suffer from elevated Phe levels. Our approach to identify unknown metabolites and their biosynthesis has general applicability in the further exploration of the human metabolome. PMID:25964343

  4. Metabolite profiling of barley grain subjected to induced drought stress: responses of free amino acids in differently adapted cultivars.

    PubMed

    Lanzinger, Alexandra; Frank, Thomas; Reichenberger, Gabriela; Herz, Markus; Engel, Karl-Heinz

    2015-04-29

    To investigate cultivar-specific metabolite changes upon drought stress in barley grain, differently adapted cultivars were field-grown under drought conditions using a rain-out shelter and under normal weather conditions (2010-2012). The grain was subjected to a gas chromatography-mass spectrometry-based metabolite profiling approach allowing the analyses of a broad spectrum of lipophilic and hydrophilic low molecular weight constituents. Multi- and univariate analyses demonstrated that there are grain metabolites which were significantly changed upon drought stress, either decreased or increased in all cultivars. On the other hand, for proteinogenic free amino acids increased concentrations were consistently observed in all seasons only in cultivars for which no drought resistance/tolerance had been described. Consistent decreases were seen only in the group of stress tolerant/resistant cultivars. These cultivar-specific correlations were particularly pronounced for branched-chain amino acids. The results indicate that free amino acids may serve as potential markers for cultivars differently adapted to drought stress.

  5. Metabolite profiling of barley grain subjected to induced drought stress: responses of free amino acids in differently adapted cultivars.

    PubMed

    Lanzinger, Alexandra; Frank, Thomas; Reichenberger, Gabriela; Herz, Markus; Engel, Karl-Heinz

    2015-04-29

    To investigate cultivar-specific metabolite changes upon drought stress in barley grain, differently adapted cultivars were field-grown under drought conditions using a rain-out shelter and under normal weather conditions (2010-2012). The grain was subjected to a gas chromatography-mass spectrometry-based metabolite profiling approach allowing the analyses of a broad spectrum of lipophilic and hydrophilic low molecular weight constituents. Multi- and univariate analyses demonstrated that there are grain metabolites which were significantly changed upon drought stress, either decreased or increased in all cultivars. On the other hand, for proteinogenic free amino acids increased concentrations were consistently observed in all seasons only in cultivars for which no drought resistance/tolerance had been described. Consistent decreases were seen only in the group of stress tolerant/resistant cultivars. These cultivar-specific correlations were particularly pronounced for branched-chain amino acids. The results indicate that free amino acids may serve as potential markers for cultivars differently adapted to drought stress. PMID:25867895

  6. A Gut Microbial Metabolite of Linoleic Acid, 10-Hydroxy-cis-12-octadecenoic Acid, Ameliorates Intestinal Epithelial Barrier Impairment Partially via GPR40-MEK-ERK Pathway*

    PubMed Central

    Miyamoto, Junki; Mizukure, Taichi; Park, Si-Bum; Kishino, Shigenobu; Kimura, Ikuo; Hirano, Kanako; Bergamo, Paolo; Rossi, Mauro; Suzuki, Takuya; Arita, Makoto; Ogawa, Jun; Tanabe, Soichi

    2015-01-01

    Gut microbial metabolites of polyunsaturated fatty acids have attracted much attention because of their various physiological properties. Dysfunction of tight junction (TJ) in the intestine contributes to the pathogenesis of many disorders such as inflammatory bowel disease. We evaluated the effects of five novel gut microbial metabolites on tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α-induced barrier impairment in Caco-2 cells and dextran sulfate sodium-induced colitis in mice. 10-Hydroxy-cis-12-octadecenoic acid (HYA), a gut microbial metabolite of linoleic acid, suppressed TNF-α and dextran sulfate sodium-induced changes in the expression of TJ-related molecules, occludin, zonula occludens-1, and myosin light chain kinase. HYA also suppressed the expression of TNF receptor 2 (TNFR2) mRNA and protein expression in Caco-2 cells and colonic tissue. In addition, HYA suppressed the protein expression of TNFR2 in murine intestinal epithelial cells. Furthermore, HYA significantly up-regulated G protein-coupled receptor (GPR) 40 expression in Caco-2 cells. It also induced [Ca2+]i responses in HEK293 cells expressing human GPR40 with higher sensitivity than linoleic acid, its metabolic precursor. The barrier-recovering effects of HYA were abrogated by a GPR40 antagonist and MEK inhibitor in Caco-2 cells. Conversely, 10-hydroxyoctadacanoic acid, which is a gut microbial metabolite of oleic acid and lacks a carbon-carbon double bond at Δ12 position, did not show these TJ-restoring activities and down-regulated GPR40 expression. Therefore, HYA modulates TNFR2 expression, at least partially, via the GPR40-MEK-ERK pathway and may be useful in the treatment of TJ-related disorders such as inflammatory bowel disease. PMID:25505251

  7. Human GAPDH Is a Target of Aspirin’s Primary Metabolite Salicylic Acid and Its Derivatives

    PubMed Central

    Manohar, Murli; Harraz, Maged M.; Park, Sang-Wook; Schroeder, Frank C.; Snyder, Solomon H.; Klessig, Daniel F.

    2015-01-01

    The plant hormone salicylic acid (SA) controls several physiological processes and is a key regulator of multiple levels of plant immunity. To decipher the mechanisms through which SA’s multiple physiological effects are mediated, particularly in immunity, two high-throughput screens were developed to identify SA-binding proteins (SABPs). Glyceraldehyde 3-Phosphate Dehydrogenase (GAPDH) from plants (Arabidopsis thaliana) was identified in these screens. Similar screens and subsequent analyses using SA analogs, in conjunction with either a photoaffinity labeling technique or surface plasmon resonance-based technology, established that human GAPDH (HsGAPDH) also binds SA. In addition to its central role in glycolysis, HsGAPDH participates in several pathological processes, including viral replication and neuronal cell death. The anti-Parkinson’s drug deprenyl has been shown to suppress nuclear translocation of HsGAPDH, an early step in cell death and the resulting cell death induced by the DNA alkylating agent N-methyl-N’-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine. Here, we demonstrate that SA, which is the primary metabolite of aspirin (acetyl SA) and is likely responsible for many of its pharmacological effects, also suppresses nuclear translocation of HsGAPDH and cell death. Analysis of two synthetic SA derivatives and two classes of compounds from the Chinese medicinal herb Glycyrrhiza foetida (licorice), glycyrrhizin and the SA-derivatives amorfrutins, revealed that they not only appear to bind HsGAPDH more tightly than SA, but also exhibit a greater ability to suppress translocation of HsGAPDH to the nucleus and cell death. PMID:26606248

  8. Human GAPDH Is a Target of Aspirin's Primary Metabolite Salicylic Acid and Its Derivatives.

    PubMed

    Choi, Hyong Woo; Tian, Miaoying; Manohar, Murli; Harraz, Maged M; Park, Sang-Wook; Schroeder, Frank C; Snyder, Solomon H; Klessig, Daniel F

    2015-01-01

    The plant hormone salicylic acid (SA) controls several physiological processes and is a key regulator of multiple levels of plant immunity. To decipher the mechanisms through which SA's multiple physiological effects are mediated, particularly in immunity, two high-throughput screens were developed to identify SA-binding proteins (SABPs). Glyceraldehyde 3-Phosphate Dehydrogenase (GAPDH) from plants (Arabidopsis thaliana) was identified in these screens. Similar screens and subsequent analyses using SA analogs, in conjunction with either a photoaffinity labeling technique or surface plasmon resonance-based technology, established that human GAPDH (HsGAPDH) also binds SA. In addition to its central role in glycolysis, HsGAPDH participates in several pathological processes, including viral replication and neuronal cell death. The anti-Parkinson's drug deprenyl has been shown to suppress nuclear translocation of HsGAPDH, an early step in cell death and the resulting cell death induced by the DNA alkylating agent N-methyl-N'-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine. Here, we demonstrate that SA, which is the primary metabolite of aspirin (acetyl SA) and is likely responsible for many of its pharmacological effects, also suppresses nuclear translocation of HsGAPDH and cell death. Analysis of two synthetic SA derivatives and two classes of compounds from the Chinese medicinal herb Glycyrrhiza foetida (licorice), glycyrrhizin and the SA-derivatives amorfrutins, revealed that they not only appear to bind HsGAPDH more tightly than SA, but also exhibit a greater ability to suppress translocation of HsGAPDH to the nucleus and cell death. PMID:26606248

  9. NMR metabolomics profiling of blood plasma mimics shows that medium- and long-chain fatty acids differently release metabolites from human serum albumin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jupin, M.; Michiels, P. J.; Girard, F. C.; Spraul, M.; Wijmenga, S. S.

    2014-02-01

    Metabolite profiling by NMR of body fluids is increasingly used to successfully differentiate patients from healthy individuals. Metabolites and their concentrations are direct reporters of body biochemistry. However, in blood plasma the NMR-detected free-metabolite concentrations are also strongly affected by interactions with the abundant plasma proteins, which have as of yet not been considered much in metabolic profiling. We previously reported that many of the common NMR-detected metabolites in blood plasma bind to human serum albumin (HSA) and many are released by fatty acids present in fatted HSA. HSA is the most abundant plasma protein and main transporter of endogenous and exogenous metabolites. Here, we show by NMR how the two most common fatty acids (FAs) in blood plasma - the long-chain FA, stearate (C18:0) and medium-chain FA, myristate (C14:0) - affect metabolite-HSA interaction. Of the set of 18 common NMR-detected metabolites, many are released by stearate and/or myristate, lactate appearing the most strongly affected. Myristate, but not stearate, reduces HSA-binding of phenylalanine and pyruvate. Citrate signals were NMR invisible in the presence of HSA. Only at high myristate-HSA mole ratios 11:1, is citrate sufficiently released to be detected. Finally, we find that limited dilution of blood-plasma mimics releases HSA-bound metabolites, a finding confirmed in real blood plasma samples. Based on these findings, we provide recommendations for NMR experiments for quantitative metabolite profiling.

  10. Oxymetazoline inhibits proinflammatory reactions: effect on arachidonic acid-derived metabolites.

    PubMed

    Beck-Speier, Ingrid; Dayal, Niru; Karg, Erwin; Maier, Konrad L; Schumann, Gabriele; Semmler, Manuela; Koelsch, Stephan M

    2006-02-01

    The nasal decongestant oxymetazoline effectively reduces rhinitis symptoms. We hypothesized that oxymetazoline affects arachidonic acid-derived metabolites concerning inflammatory and oxidative stress-dependent reactions. The ability of oxymetazoline to model pro- and anti-inflammatory and oxidative stress responses was evaluated in cell-free systems, including 5-lipoxygenase (5-LO) as proinflammatory, 15-lipoxygenase (15-LO) as anti-inflammatory enzymes, and oxidation of methionine by agglomerates of ultrafine carbon particles (UCPs), indicating oxidative stress. In a cellular approach using canine alveolar macrophages (AMs), the impact of oxymetazoline on phospholipase A(2) (PLA(2)) activity, respiratory burst and synthesis of prostaglandin E(2) (PGE(2)), 15(S)-hydroxy-eicosatetraenoic acid (15-HETE), leukotriene B(4) (LTB(4)), and 8-isoprostane was measured in the absence and presence of UCP or opsonized zymosan as particulate stimulants. In cell-free systems, oxymetazoline (0.4-1 mM) inhibited 5-LO but not 15-LO activity and did not alter UCP-induced oxidation of methionine. In AMs, oxymetazoline induced PLA(2) activity and 15-HETE at 1 mM, enhanced PGE(2) at 0.1 mM, strongly inhibited LTB(4) and respiratory burst at 0.4/0.1 mM (p < 0.05), but did not affect 8-isoprostane formation. In contrast, oxymetazoline did not alter UCP-induced PLA(2) activity and PGE(2) and 15-HETE formation in AMs but inhibited UCP-induced LTB(4) formation and respiratory burst at 0.1 mM and 8-isoprostane formation at 0.001 mM (p < 0.05). In opsonized zymosan-stimulated AMs, oxymetazoline inhibited LTB(4) formation and respiratory burst at 0.1 mM (p < 0.05). In conclusion, in canine AMs, oxymetazoline suppressed proinflammatory reactions including 5-LO activity, LTB(4) formation, and respiratory burst and prevented particle-induced oxidative stress, whereas PLA(2) activity and synthesis of immune-modulating PGE(2) and 15-HETE were not affected.

  11. Long-Chain Fatty Acid Combustion Rate Is Associated with Unique Metabolite Profiles in Skeletal Muscle Mitochondria

    PubMed Central

    Seifert, Erin L.; Fiehn, Oliver; Bezaire, Véronic; Bickel, David R.; Wohlgemuth, Gert; Adams, Sean H.; Harper, Mary-Ellen

    2010-01-01

    Background/Aim Incomplete or limited long-chain fatty acid (LCFA) combustion in skeletal muscle has been associated with insulin resistance. Signals that are responsive to shifts in LCFA β-oxidation rate or degree of intramitochondrial catabolism are hypothesized to regulate second messenger systems downstream of the insulin receptor. Recent evidence supports a causal link between mitochondrial LCFA combustion in skeletal muscle and insulin resistance. We have used unbiased metabolite profiling of mouse muscle mitochondria with the aim of identifying candidate metabolites within or effluxed from mitochondria and that are shifted with LCFA combustion rate. Methodology/Principal Findings Large-scale unbiased metabolomics analysis was performed using GC/TOF-MS on buffer and mitochondrial matrix fractions obtained prior to and after 20 min of palmitate catabolism (n = 7 mice/condition). Three palmitate concentrations (2, 9 and 19 µM; corresponding to low, intermediate and high oxidation rates) and 9 µM palmitate plus tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle and electron transport chain inhibitors were each tested and compared to zero palmitate control incubations. Paired comparisons of the 0 and 20 min samples were made by Student's t-test. False discovery rate were estimated and Type I error rates assigned. Major metabolite groups were organic acids, amines and amino acids, free fatty acids and sugar phosphates. Palmitate oxidation was associated with unique profiles of metabolites, a subset of which correlated to palmitate oxidation rate. In particular, palmitate oxidation rate was associated with distinct changes in the levels of TCA cycle intermediates within and effluxed from mitochondria. Conclusions/Significance This proof-of-principle study establishes that large-scale metabolomics methods can be applied to organelle-level models to discover metabolite patterns reflective of LCFA combustion, which may lead to identification of molecules linking muscle fat

  12. Detection of metabolites of lysergic acid diethylamide (LSD) in human urine specimens: 2-oxo-3-hydroxy-LSD, a prevalent metabolite of LSD.

    PubMed

    Poch, G K; Klette, K L; Hallare, D A; Manglicmot, M G; Czarny, R J; McWhorter, L K; Anderson, C J

    1999-03-01

    Seventy-four urine specimens previously found to contain lysergic acid diethylamide (LSD) by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) were analyzed by a new procedure for the LSD metabolite 2-oxo-3-hydroxy-LSD (O-H-LSD) using a Finnigan LC-MS-MS system. This procedure proved to be less complex, shorter to perform and provides cleaner chromatographic characteristics than the method currently utilized by the Navy Drug Screening Laboratories for the extraction of LSD from urine by GC-MS. All of the specimens used in the study screened positive for LSD by radioimmunoassay (Roche Abuscreen). Analysis by GC-MS revealed detectable amounts of LSD in all of the specimens. In addition, isolysergic diethylamide (iso-LSD), a byproduct of LSD synthesis, was quantitated in 64 of the specimens. Utilizing the new LC-MS-MS method, low levels of N-desmethyl-LSD (nor-LSD), another identified LSD metabolite, were detected in some of the specimens. However, all 74 specimens contained O-H-LSD at significantly higher concentrations than LSD, iso-LSD, or nor-LSD alone. The O-H-LSD concentration ranged from 732 to 112 831 pg/ml (mean, 16340 pg/ml) by quantification with an internal standard. The ratio of O-H-LSD to LSD ranged from 1.1 to 778.1 (mean, 42.9). The presence of O-H-LSD at substantially higher concentrations than LSD suggests that the analysis for O-H-LSD as the target analyte by employing LC-MS-MS will provide a much longer window of detection for the use of LSD than the analysis of the parent compound, LSD.

  13. Hydroxy-alkenals from the peroxidation of n-3 and n-6 fatty acids and urinary metabolites.

    PubMed

    Guichardant, M; Bacot, S; Molière, P; Lagarde, M

    2006-09-01

    4-Hydroxy-2E-hexenal (4-HHE) and 4-hydroxy-2E-nonenal (4-HNE) have been characterized as prominent by-products of n-3 and n-6 hydroperoxy derivatives of n-3 and n-6 fatty acids, respectively. We also have characterized the homolog 4-hydroxy-2E,6Z-dodecadienal (4-HDDE) as a specific by-product of the 12-lipoxygenase product of arachidonic acid 12-hydroperoxy-eicosatetraenoate (12-HpETE). The three hydroxy-alkenals have been found in human plasma with 4-HHE being the most prominent followed by 4-HNE. They were found increased in tissues submitted to oxidative stress, according to the fatty acid characteristic of those tissues, e.g., 4-HNE and 4-HDDE in blood platelets and 4-HHE in the retina. We have shown they covalently bind to the primary amine moiety of ethanolamine phospholipids (PE), especially the plasmalogen subclass, with the highest hydrophobic alkenal (4-HDDE) being the most reactive. Their carboxylic acid metabolites, 4-hydroxy-2E-hexenoic acid (4-HHA), 4-hydroxy-2E-nonenoic acid (4-HNA) and 4-hydroxy-2E,6Z-dodecadienoic acid (4-HDDA), respectively, were found in human urine and measured in higher amounts in situations in which oxidative stress has been reported such as aging and diabetes. As reported above with their hydroxy-alkenals precursors, 4-HHA proved to be the most prominent followed by 4-HNA. Altogether, the three hydroxy-alkenals, either in their free form or bound to membrane PE, may be considered as specific markers of lipid peroxidation able to discriminate between n-3 and n-6 fatty acids. This is corroborated by the measurement of their urinary carboxylic acid metabolites.

  14. Use of LC-MS/MS for the open detection of steroid metabolites conjugated with glucuronic acid.

    PubMed

    Fabregat, Andreu; Pozo, Oscar J; Marcos, Josep; Segura, Jordi; Ventura, Rosa

    2013-05-21

    In humans, conjugation with glucuronic acid is the most important phase II metabolic reaction of steroidal compounds. Glucuronoconjugated metabolites have been conventionally studied by using β-glucuronidase enzymes to release the phase I metabolites. It is well-known that hydrolysis with β-glucuronidase presents some limitations that may result in the underestimation of some conjugates. The aim of the present work was to develop and to evaluate liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) scan methods for the open detection of steroid glucuronides in urine samples. The mass spectrometric behavior of thirteen representative steroid glucuronides, used as model compounds, was studied. Characteristic ionization and collision induced dissociation behaviors were observed depending on the steroid glucuronide structure. Neutral loss (NL of 176, 194, 211, and 229 Da) and precursor ion (PI of m/z 141, 159, and 177, in positive mode and m/z 75, 85, and 113, in negative mode) scan methods were evaluated. The NL scan method was chosen for the open detection of glucuronoconjugated steroids due to its sensitivity and the structural information provided by this method. The application of the NL scan method to urine samples collected after testosterone (T) undecanoate administration revealed the presence of two T metabolites which remain conjugated as glucuronides after an enzymatic hydrolysis of the urine. 3α,6β-Dihydroxy-5α-androstan-17-one (6β-hydroxyandrosterone) glucuronide and 3α,6β-dihydroxy-5β-androstan-17-one (6β-hydroxyetiocholanolone) glucuronide were established as the structures for these metabolites, by comparing the structure of the steroids released after chemical hydrolysis with reference materials. An increase of 50-300-fold of these metabolites after oral administration of T undecanoate was observed, proving that their determination can be useful in the doping control field. Moreover, these results exemplify that significant information

  15. Lactic acid bacteria community dynamics and metabolite production of rye sourdough fermentations share characteristics of wheat and spelt sourdough fermentations.

    PubMed

    Weckx, Stefan; Van der Meulen, Roel; Maes, Dominique; Scheirlinck, Ilse; Huys, Geert; Vandamme, Peter; De Vuyst, Luc

    2010-12-01

    Four spontaneous rye sourdough fermentations were performed over a period of ten days with daily back-slopping. Samples taken at all refreshment steps were used for culture-dependent and culture-independent characterization of the microbiota present. Furthermore, an extensive metabolite target analysis was performed through a combination of various chromatographic methods, including liquid chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry (LC/MS) and gas chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry (GC/MS). Spearman's rank correlation coefficients were calculated and a principal component analysis (PCA) was performed on the data obtained in this study combined with data obtained previously for wheat and spelt sourdoughs. In general, the establishment of a stable microbial ecosystem occurred through a three-phase evolution, with mainly Lactobacillus plantarum and Lactobacillus fermentum dominating the rye sourdough ecosystems. PCA revealed that ornithine and mannitol were positively correlated with rye sourdoughs, contributing to bacterial competitiveness at the onset of sourdough production. Wheat and spelt sourdoughs showed a high degree of similarity, although certain compounds (e.g. indolelactic acid) appeared to be specific for spelt sourdoughs. The production of amino acid metabolites, mainly hydroxy acids (e.g. phenyllactic acid) and alcohols (e.g. 3-methyl-1-butanol), contributed to the equilibration of the redox balance and further enhanced the competitiveness of dominant species in stable sourdoughs.

  16. Abscisic acid metabolite profiling as indicators of plastic responses to drought in grasses from arid Patagonian Monte (Argentina).

    PubMed

    Cenzano, Ana M; Masciarelli, O; Luna, M Virginia

    2014-10-01

    The identification of hormonal and biochemical traits that play functional roles in the adaptation to drought is necessary for the conservation and planning of rangeland management. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of drought on i) the water content (WC) of different plant organs, ii) the endogenous level of abscisic acid (ABA) and metabolites (phaseic acid-PA, dihydrophaseic acid-DPA and abscisic acid conjugated with glucose ester-ABA-GE), iii) the total carotenoid concentration and iv) to compare the traits of two desert perennial grasses (Pappostipa speciosa and Poa ligularis) with contrasting morphological and functional drought resistance traits and life-history strategies. Both species were subjected to two levels of gravimetric soil moisture (the highest near field capacity during autumn-winter and the lowest corresponding to summer drought). Drought significantly increased the ABA and DPA levels in the green leaves of P. speciosa and P. ligularis. Drought decreased ABA in the roots of P. speciosa while it increased ABA in the roots of P. ligularis. P. ligularis had the highest ABA level and WC in green leaves. While P. speciosa had the highest DPA levels in leaves. In conclusion, we found the highest ABA level in the mesophytic species P. ligularis and the lowest ABA level in the xerophytic species P. speciosa, revealing that the ABA metabolite profile in each grass species is a plastic response to drought resistance. PMID:25245790

  17. ω-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids-derived lipid metabolites on angiogenesis, inflammation and cancer

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Weicang; Zhu, Julia; Lyu, Fei; Panigrahy, Dipak; Ferrara, Katherine W.; Hammock, Bruce; Zhang, Guodong

    2015-01-01

    Epidemiological and pre-clinical studies support the anti-tumor effects of ω-3 PUFAs; however, the results from human trials are mixed, making it difficult to provide dietary guidelines or recommendations of ω-3 PUFAs for disease prevention or treatment. Understanding the molecular mechanisms by which ω-3 PUFAs inhibit cancer could lead to better nutritional paradigms and human trials to clarify their health effects. The ω-3 PUFAs exert their biological activities mainly through the formation of bioactive lipid metabolites. Here we discuss the biology of cyclooxygenase, lipoxygenase and cytochrome P450 enzymes-derived ω-3-series lipid metabolites on angiogenesis, inflammation and cancer. PMID:25019221

  18. Metabolomic and mass isotopomer analysis of liver gluconeogenesis and citric acid cycle: II. Heterogeneity of metabolite labeling pattern.

    PubMed

    Yang, Lili; Kasumov, Takhar; Kombu, Rajan S; Zhu, Shu-Han; Cendrowski, Andrea V; David, France; Anderson, Vernon E; Kelleher, Joanne K; Brunengraber, Henri

    2008-08-01

    In this second of two companion articles, we compare the mass isotopomer distribution of metabolites of liver gluconeogenesis and citric acid cycle labeled from NaH(13)CO(3) or dimethyl [1,4-(13)C(2)]succinate. The mass isotopomer distribution of intermediates reveals the reversibility of the isocitrate dehydrogenase + aconitase reactions, even in the absence of a source of alpha-ketoglutarate. In addition, in many cases, a number of labeling incompatibilities were found as follows: (i) glucose versus triose phosphates and phosphoenolpyruvate; (ii) differences in the labeling ratios C-4/C-3 of glucose versus (glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate)/(dihydroxyacetone phosphate); and (iii) labeling of citric acid cycle intermediates in tissue versus effluent perfusate. Overall, our data show that gluconeogenic and citric acid cycle intermediates cannot be considered as sets of homogeneously labeled pools. This probably results from the zonation of hepatic metabolism and, in some cases, from differences in the labeling pattern of mitochondrial versus extramitochondrial metabolites. Our data have implications for the use of labeling patterns for the calculation of metabolic rates or fractional syntheses in liver, as well as for modeling liver intermediary metabolism.

  19. Accumulated metabolites of hydroxybutyric acid serve as diagnostic and prognostic biomarkers of ovarian high-grade serous carcinomas

    PubMed Central

    Hilvo, Mika; de Santiago, Ines; Gopalacharyulu, Peddinti; Schmitt, Wolfgang D.; Budczies, Jan; Kuhberg, Marc; Dietel, Manfred; Aittokallio, Tero; Markowetz, Florian; Denkert, Carsten; Sehouli, Jalid; Frezza, Christian

    2016-01-01

    Ovarian cancer is a heterogeneous disease of low prevalence, but poor survival. Early diagnosis is critical for survival, but is often challenging because the symptoms of ovarian cancer are subtle and become apparent only during advanced stages of the disease. Therefore, the identification of robust biomarkers of early disease is a clinical priority. Metabolomic profiling is an emerging diagnostic tool enabling the detection of biomarkers reflecting alterations in tumor metabolism, a hallmark of cancer. In this study, we performed metabolomic profiling of serum and tumor tissue from 158 patients with high-grade serous ovarian cancer (HGSOC) and 100 control patients with benign or non-neoplastic lesions. We report metabolites of hydroxybutyric acid (HBA) as novel diagnostic and prognostic biomarkers associated with tumor burden and patient survival. The accumulation of HBA metabolites caused by HGSOC was also associated with reduced expression of succinic semialdehyde dehydrogenase (encoded by ALDH5A1), and with the presence of an epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) gene signature, implying a role for these metabolic alterations in cancer cell migration and invasion. In conclusion, our findings represent the first comprehensive metabolomics analysis in HGSOC and propose a new set of metabolites as biomarkers of disease with diagnostic and prognostic capabilities. PMID:26685161

  20. Abortion after deliberate Arthrotec® addition to food. Mass spectrometric detection of diclofenac, misoprostol acid, and their urinary metabolites.

    PubMed

    Watzer, Bernhard; Lusthof, Klaas J; Schweer, Horst

    2015-07-01

    Arthrotec(®) (AT) is a combination of diclofenac, a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID), and misoprostol (MP), a synthetic analogue of prostaglandin E1 (PGE1). MP is a lipophilic methyl ester prodrug. It is readily metabolized to the biologically active misoprostol acid (MPA). During the last few years, medical studies exhibited MP to be an excellent abortive. In this paper, we describe a rare criminal case of MP abortion, initiated by the expectant father. After the abortion, samples of vomit and urine were collected. Systemic exposure to MP is difficult to prove, because both MP and the active metabolite MPA are hardly excreted in urine. Therefore, in addition to routine toxicological analysis, we used slightly modified, well-established liquid and gas chromatographic/tandem mass spectrometric (LC/MS/MS and GC/MS/MS) methods, for the direct and the indirect detection of MPA and its metabolites. In this case, we were able to demonstrate the presence of the major MP metabolites 2,3-dinor-MPA and 2,3,4,5-tetranor-MPA in the urine of the victim. We also detected paracetamol, 3-methoxyparacetamol and diclofenac-glucuronide in the urine. In the vomit of the victim, we detected diclofenac and MPA. These results, combined with the criminal investigations, showed that the accused had mixed MP into the food of his pregnant girlfriend. Finally, these investigations contributed to a confession of the accused.

  1. Accumulated Metabolites of Hydroxybutyric Acid Serve as Diagnostic and Prognostic Biomarkers of Ovarian High-Grade Serous Carcinomas.

    PubMed

    Hilvo, Mika; de Santiago, Ines; Gopalacharyulu, Peddinti; Schmitt, Wolfgang D; Budczies, Jan; Kuhberg, Marc; Dietel, Manfred; Aittokallio, Tero; Markowetz, Florian; Denkert, Carsten; Sehouli, Jalid; Frezza, Christian; Darb-Esfahani, Silvia; Braicu, Elena Ioana

    2016-02-15

    Ovarian cancer is a heterogeneous disease of low prevalence, but poor survival. Early diagnosis is critical for survival, but it is often challenging because the symptoms of ovarian cancer are subtle and become apparent only during advanced stages of the disease. Therefore, the identification of robust biomarkers of early disease is a clinical priority. Metabolomic profiling is an emerging diagnostic tool enabling the detection of biomarkers reflecting alterations in tumor metabolism, a hallmark of cancer. In this study, we performed metabolomic profiling of serum and tumor tissue from 158 patients with high-grade serous ovarian cancer (HGSOC) and 100 control patients with benign or non-neoplastic lesions. We report metabolites of hydroxybutyric acid (HBA) as novel diagnostic and prognostic biomarkers associated with tumor burden and patient survival. The accumulation of HBA metabolites caused by HGSOC was also associated with reduced expression of succinic semialdehyde dehydrogenase (encoded by ALDH5A1), and with the presence of an epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition gene signature, implying a role for these metabolic alterations in cancer cell migration and invasion. In conclusion, our findings represent the first comprehensive metabolomics analysis in HGSOC and propose a new set of metabolites as biomarkers of disease with diagnostic and prognostic capabilities. PMID:26685161

  2. Tissue distribution and urinary excretion of dimethylated arsenic and its metabolites in dimethylarsinic acid- or arsenate-treated rats

    SciTech Connect

    Adair, Blakely M.; Moore, Tanya; Conklin, Sean D.; Creed, John T.; Wolf, Douglas C.; Thomas, David J. . E-mail: thomas.david@epa.gov

    2007-07-15

    Adult female Fisher 344 rats received drinking water containing 0, 4, 40, 100, or 200 parts per million of dimethylarsinic acid or 100 parts per million of arsenate for 14 days. Urine was collected during the last 24 h of exposure. Tissues were then taken for analysis of dimethylated and trimethylated arsenicals; urines were analyzed for these arsenicals and their thiolated derivatives. In dimethylarsinic acid-treated rats, highest concentrations of dimethylated arsenic were found in blood. In lung, liver, and kidney, concentrations of dimethylated arsenic exceeded those of trimethylated species; in urinary bladder and urine, trimethylated arsenic predominated. Dimethylthioarsinic acid and trimethylarsine sulfide were present in urine of dimethylarsinic acid-treated rats. Concentrations of dimethylated arsenicals were similar in most tissues of dimethylarsinic acid- and arsenate-treated rats, including urinary bladder which is the target for dimethylarsinic acid-induced carcinogenesis in the rat. Mean concentration of dimethylated arsenic was significantly higher (P < 0.05) in urine of dimethylarsinic acid-treated rats than in arsenate-treated rats, suggesting a difference between treatment groups in the flux of dimethylated arsenic through urinary bladder. Concentrations of trimethylated arsenic concentrations were consistently higher in dimethylarsinic acid-treated rats than in arsenate-treated rats; these differences were significant (P < 0.05) in liver, urinary bladder, and urine. Concentrations of dimethylthioarsinic acid and trimethylarsine sulfide were higher in urine from dimethylarsinic acid-treated rats than from arsenate-treated rats. Dimethylarsinic acid is extensively metabolized in the rat, yielding significant concentrations of trimethylated species and of thiolated derivatives. One or more of these metabolites could be the species causing alterations of cellular function that lead to tumors in the urinary bladder.

  3. Effects of intermediate metabolite carboxylic acids of TCA cycle on Microcystis with overproduction of phycocyanin.

    PubMed

    Bai, Shijie; Dai, Jingcheng; Xia, Ming; Ruan, Jing; Wei, Hehong; Yu, Dianzhen; Li, Ronghui; Jing, Hongmei; Tian, Chunyuan; Song, Lirong; Qiu, Dongru

    2015-04-01

    Toxic Microcystis species are the main bloom-forming cyanobacteria in freshwaters. It is imperative to develop efficient techniques to control these notorious harmful algal blooms (HABs). Here, we present a simple, efficient, and environmentally safe algicidal way to control Microcystis blooms, by using intermediate carboxylic acids from the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle. The citric acid, alpha-ketoglutaric acid, succinic acid, fumaric acid, and malic acid all exhibited strong algicidal effects, and particularly succinic acid could cause the rapid lysis of Microcystis in a few hours. It is revealed that the Microcystis-lysing activity of succinic acid and other carboxylic acids was due to their strong acidic activity. Interestingly, the acid-lysed Microcystis cells released large amounts of phycocyanin, about 27-fold higher than those of the control. On the other hand, the transcription of mcyA and mcyD of the microcystin biosynthesis operon was not upregulated by addition of alpha-ketoglutaric acid and other carboxylic acids. Consider the environmental safety of intermediate carboxylic acids. We propose that administration of TCA cycle organic acids may not only provide an algicidal method with high efficiency and environmental safety but also serve as an applicable way to produce and extract phycocyanin from cyanobacterial biomass.

  4. Aflatoxin metabolism in humans: detection of metabolites and nucleic acid adducts in urine by affinity chromatography

    SciTech Connect

    Groopman, J.D.; Donahue, P.R.; Zhu, J.Q.; Chen, J.S.; Wogan, G.N.

    1985-10-01

    A high-affinity IgM monoclonal antibody specific for aflatoxins was covalently bound to Sepharose 4B and used as a preparative column to isolate aflatoxin derivatives from the urine of people and experimental animals who had been exposed to the carcinogen environmentally or under laboratory conditions. Aflatoxin levels were quantified by radioimmunoassay and high-performance liquid chromatography after elution from the affinity column. In studies on rats injected with ( UC)aflatoxin B1, the authors identified the major aflatoxin-DNA adduct, 2,3-dihydro-2-(N7-guanyl)-3-hydroxy-aflatoxin B1 (AFB1-N7-Gua), and the oxidative metabolites M1 and P1 as the major aflatoxin species present in the urine. When this methodology was applied to human urine samples obtained from people from the Guangxi Province of China exposed to aflatoxin B1 through dietary contamination, the aflatoxin metabolites detected were also AFB1-N7-Gua and aflatoxins M1 and P1. Therefore, affinity chromatography using a monoclonal antibody represents a useful and rapid technique with which to isolate this carcinogen and its metabolites in biochemical epidemiology and for subsequent quantitative measurements, providing exposure information that can be used for risk assessment.

  5. The Oxidized Linoleic Acid Metabolite-Cytochrome P450 System is Active in Biopsies from Patients with Inflammatory Dental Pain

    PubMed Central

    Ruparel, Shivani; Hargreaves, Kenneth M.; Eskander, Michael; Rowan, Spencer; de Almeida, Jose F.A.; Roman, Linda; Henry, Michael A.

    2013-01-01

    Endogenous TRPV1 agonists such as oxidized linoleic acid metabolites (OLAMs) and the enzymes releasing them [e.g., cytochrome P450 (CYP)], are up-regulated following inflammation in the rat. However, it is not known if such agonists are elevated in human inflammatory pain conditions. Since TRPV1 is expressed in human dental pulp nociceptors, we hypothesized that OLAM-CYP machinery is active in this tissue type and is increased under painful inflammatory conditions such as irreversible pulpitis (IP). The aim of this study was to compare CYP expression and linoleic acid (LA) metabolism in normal versus inflamed human dental pulp. Our data showed that exogenous LA metabolism was significantly increased in IP tissues compared to normal tissues and that pretreatment with a CYP inhibitor, ketoconazole, significantly inhibited LA metabolism. Additionally, extracts obtained from LA-treated inflamed tissues, evoked significant inward currents in TG neurons, and were blocked by pretreatment with the TRPV1 antagonist, IRTX. Moreover, extracts obtained from ketoconazole-pretreated inflamed tissues significantly reduced inward currents in TG neurons. These data suggest that LA metabolites produced in human inflamed tissues act as TRPV1 agonists and that the metabolite production can be targeted by CYP inhibition. In addition, immunohistochemical analysis of two CYP isoforms, CYP2J and CYP3A1, were shown to be predominately expressed in immune cells infiltrating the inflamed dental pulp, emphasizing the paracrine role of CYP enzymes in OLAM regulation. Collectively, our data indicates that the machinery responsible for OLAM production is up-regulated during inflammation and can be targeted to develop potential analgesics for inflammatory-induced dental pain. PMID:23867730

  6. An oxygenated metabolite of benzo[a]pyrene increases hepatic β-oxidation of fatty acids in chick embryos.

    PubMed

    Westman, Ola; Larsson, Maria; Venizelos, Nikolaos; Hollert, Henner; Engwall, Magnus

    2014-05-01

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are well-known carcinogens to humans and ecotoxicological effects have been shown in several studies. However, PAHs can also be oxidized into more water soluble-oxygenated metabolites (Oxy-PAHs). The first purpose of the present project was to (1) assess the effects of a mixture containing three parent PAHs: anthracene, benz[a]anthracene, and benzo[a]pyrene versus a mixture of their oxygenated metabolites, namely: anthracene-9,10-dione, benz[a]anthracene-7,12-dione, and 9,10-dihydrobenzo[a]pyrene-7-(8H)-one on the hepatic fatty acid β-oxidation in chicken embryos (Gallus gallus domesticus) exposed in ovo. The second and also main purpose of the project was to (2) assess the effects of the parent PAHs versus their oxy-PAHs analogues when injected individually, followed by (3) additional testing of the individual oxy-PAHs. The hepatic β-oxidation was measured using a tritium release assay with [9,10-(3)H]-palmitic acid (16:0) as substrate. The result from the first part (1) showed reduced hepatic β-oxidation after exposure in ovo to a mixture of three PAHs, however, increased after exposure to the mixture of three oxy-PAHs compared to control. The result from the second part (2) and also the follow-up experiment (3) showed that 9,10-dihydrobenzo[a]pyrene-7-(8H)-one was the causative oxy-PAH. The implication of this finding on the risk assessment of PAH metabolite exposure in avian wildlife remains to be determined. To the best of our knowledge, no similar studies have been reported.

  7. Metabologenomics: Correlation of Microbial Gene Clusters with Metabolites Drives Discovery of a Nonribosomal Peptide with an Unusual Amino Acid Monomer

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    For more than half a century the pharmaceutical industry has sifted through natural products produced by microbes, uncovering new scaffolds and fashioning them into a broad range of vital drugs. We sought a strategy to reinvigorate the discovery of natural products with distinctive structures using bacterial genome sequencing combined with metabolomics. By correlating genetic content from 178 actinomycete genomes with mass spectrometry-enabled analyses of their exported metabolomes, we paired new secondary metabolites with their biosynthetic gene clusters. We report the use of this new approach to isolate and characterize tambromycin, a new chlorinated natural product, composed of several nonstandard amino acid monomeric units, including a unique pyrrolidine-containing amino acid we name tambroline. Tambromycin shows antiproliferative activity against cancerous human B- and T-cell lines. The discovery of tambromycin via large-scale correlation of gene clusters with metabolites (a.k.a. metabologenomics) illuminates a path for structure-based discovery of natural products at a sharply increased rate. PMID:27163034

  8. Strawberry processing does not affect the production and urinary excretion of urolithins, ellagic acid metabolites, in humans.

    PubMed

    Truchado, Pilar; Larrosa, Mar; García-Conesa, María Teresa; Cerdá, Begoña; Vidal-Guevara, María Luisa; Tomás-Barberán, Francisco A; Espín, Juan Carlos

    2012-06-13

    The study of fruit and vegetable processing and its effects on the levels of health-promoting constituents and their bioavailability and metabolism is very relevant to understanding the role of these constituents in human health. Strawberry polyphenols, and particularly ellagitannins and ellagic acid, have been associated with the health benefits of this berry for humans. These compounds are transformed into urolithins by the gut microbiota, and these metabolites exert several biological activities that could be responsible for the health effects of strawberries. Processing potentially increases the extraction of ellagitannins from the strawberry achenes and the release of ellagic acid from ellagitannins. It is of interest to evaluate the effect of processing on strawberry ellagitannin microbial metabolism compared with fresh strawberries. This study shows that no significant differences in the production and excretion of urolithins were found between the intake of fresh strawberries and that of a thermally processed strawberry puree containing the same amount of strawberries. Processing increases the amount of free ellagic acid 2.5-fold, but this had no effect on the transformation in urolithins by the gut microbiota or in the excretion of urolithin metabolites (urolithin glucuronides) in urine, showing that the release of ellagic acid from ellagitannins is not a relevant factor affecting the microbial metabolism. All of the volunteers produced urolithin A, but only 3 of 20 volunteers produced and excreted urolithin B. It is confirmed that some volunteers were efficient producers of urolithins, whereas other produced much lower amounts. These results show that processing does not modify the potential health effects of strawberry polyphenols.

  9. The anthocyanin metabolites gallic acid, 3-O-methylgallic acid, and 2,4,6-trihydroxybenzaldehyde decrease human colon cancer cell viability by regulating pro-oncogenic signals.

    PubMed

    Forester, Sarah C; Choy, Ying Y; Waterhouse, Andrew L; Oteiza, Patricia I

    2014-06-01

    Anthocyanins are a class of polyphenols abundant in the skins of red grapes, and have been shown to have anti-cancer effects in models of colon cancer [Cooke et al. Int J Cancer 2006;119:2213-2220; Jing et al. J Agric Food Chem 2008;56:9391-9398]. Gut microflora metabolize anthocyanins to phenolic acids and aldehydes. These metabolites may explain the relationship between anthocyanin consumption and reduced incidence of colorectal cancer (CRC). Previously, gallic acid (Gal), 3-O-methylgallic acid (Megal), and 2,4,6-trihydroxybenzaldehyde (THBA) were found to decrease Caco-2 cell viability to a larger extent than other anthocyanin metabolites. To better understand the potential anti-CRC action of these compounds, this paper investigated their capacity to modulate the cell cycle, and induce apoptotic cell death. Dividing Caco-2 cells were incubated for 24-72 h in the presence of 10-100 µM Gal, Megal, THBA, and malvidin-3-glucoside (M3g). THBA reduced cell viability only at 100 µM, while Gal and Megal (10-100 µM) caused a time- and dose-dependent decrease in cell viability. After 72 h incubation, the metabolites caused cell cycle arrest at G0 /G1 . The activation of the apoptotic pathway by Megal, Gal, and THBA was evidenced by the activation of caspase-3. However, only Megal and Gal caused DNA fragmentation and nuclear condensation. Megal, Gal, and THBA inhibited transcription factors NF-κB, AP-1, STAT-1, and OCT-1 which are known to be activated in CRC. In conclusion, the anti-cancer effects of Megal and Gal occurs as a consequence of both the inhibition of cell proliferation and induction of apoptosis. The inhibition of transcription factors that promote cell proliferation and survival can in part underlie the observed effects.

  10. A modified acidic approach for DNA extraction from plant species containing high levels of secondary metabolites.

    PubMed

    Cavallari, M M; Siqueira, M V B M; Val, T M; Pavanelli, J C; Monteiro, M; Grando, C; Pinheiro, J B; Zucchi, M I; Gimenes, M A

    2014-08-25

    Purified genomic DNA can be difficult to obtain from some plant species because of the presence of impurities such as polysaccharides, which are often co-extracted with DNA. In this study, we developed a fast, simple, and low-cost protocol for extracting DNA from plants containing high levels of secondary metabolites. This protocol does not require the use of volatile toxic reagents such as mercaptoethanol, chloroform, or phenol and allows the extraction of high-quality DNA from wild and cultivated tropical species.

  11. A sensitive GC-EIMS method for simultaneous detection and quantification of JWH-018 and JWH-073 carboxylic acid and hydroxy metabolites in urine.

    PubMed

    Paul, Buddha D; Bosy, Thomas

    2015-04-01

    Synthetic cannabinoids, including JWH-018 and JWH-073, belong to a class of aminoalkylindoles (AAIs) that are smoked to produce an effect similar to tetrahydrocannabinol. Compounds in this class are often collectively known as 'Spice'. After ingestion, these compounds are extensively metabolized to their hydroxy and carboxylic acid metabolites. During forensic analysis, detection of these metabolites in urine is an indication of past exposure to the parent compounds. The analytical process involved hydrolysis of conjugated metabolites by glucuronidase, solvent extraction, derivatization by trifluoroacetic anhydride and hexafluoroisopropanol and GC-EIMS detection. Identification of the unknown was based on the criteria of GC retention time within ±2% and mass spectral ion ratio within ±20% of that of a standard. Deuterated internal standards of the carboxylic acid metabolites were used for quantification. The acid (JWH-018-COOH, JWH-073-COOH) and hydroxy (JWH-018-OH, JWH-073-OH) metabolites were linear over the concentration range of 0.1-10 and 0.2-10 ng/mL, respectively, with a correlation coefficient-square, R(2) > 0.999 (N = 5). Extraction recoveries of the metabolites were within 79 and 87%. The method was applied to 17 urine specimens collected as part of a military law enforcement investigation. Nine of the specimens tested positive for one or more of the metabolites. When the procedure was extended to screen other AAI compounds, two of the specimens were found to contain JWH-210, JWH-250 (JWH-302 or JWH-201) and JWH-250 (C4 isomers). The GC-EIMS method presented here was found to be suitable for detecting JWH-018 and JWH-073 metabolites and other AAI compounds in urine.

  12. 5-Hydroxyquinoline-2-Carboxylic Acid, a Dead-End Metabolite from the Bacterial Oxidation of 5-Aminonaphthalene-2-Sulfonic Acid

    PubMed Central

    Nörtemann, Bernd; Glässer, Andrea; Machinek, Reinhard; Remberg, Gerd; Knackmuss, Hans-Joachim

    1993-01-01

    5-Aminonaphthalene-2-sulfonate (5A2NS) is converted by strain BN6 into 5-hydroxyquinoline-2-carboxylate (5H2QC). The authenticity of this new compound is confirmed by nuclear magnetic resonance and mass spectrometry. Its formation is explained by a spontaneous cyclization of the hypothetical metabolite 6′-amino-2′-hydroxybenzalpyruvate. The formation of 5H2QC as a dead-end product of 5A2NS prevents NADH regeneration so that 5A2NS oxidation is limited by the internal NADH pool. PMID:16348967

  13. Arachidonic Acid Metabolite 19(S)-HETE Induces Vasorelaxation and Platelet Inhibition by Activating Prostacyclin (IP) Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Chennupati, Ramesh; Nüsing, Rolf M.; Offermanns, Stefan

    2016-01-01

    19(S)-hydroxy-eicosatetraenoic acid (19(S)-HETE) belongs to a family of arachidonic acid metabolites produced by cytochrome P450 enzymes, which play critical roles in the regulation of cardiovascular, renal and pulmonary functions. Although it has been known for a long time that 19(S)-HETE has vascular effects, its mechanism of action has remained unclear. In this study we show that 19(S)-HETE induces cAMP accumulation in the human megakaryoblastic leukemia cell line MEG-01. This effect was concentration-dependent with an EC50 of 520 nM, insensitive to pharmacological inhibition of COX-1/2 and required the expression of the G-protein Gs. Systematic siRNA-mediated knock-down of each G-protein coupled receptor (GPCR) expressed in MEG-01 followed by functional analysis identified the prostacyclin receptor (IP) as the mediator of the effects of 19(S)-HETE, and the heterologously expressed IP receptor was also activated by 19(S)-HETE in a concentration-dependent manner with an EC50 of 567 nM. Pretreatment of isolated murine platelets with 19(S)-HETE blocked thrombin-induced platelets aggregation, an effect not seen in platelets from mice lacking the IP receptor. Furthermore, 19(S)-HETE was able to relax mouse mesenteric artery- and thoracic aorta-derived vessel segments. While pharmacological inhibition of COX-1/2 enzymes had no effect on the vasodilatory activity of 19(S)-HETE these effects were not observed in vessels from mice lacking the IP receptor. These results identify a novel mechanism of action for the CYP450-dependent arachidonic acid metabolite 19(S)-HETE and point to the existence of a broader spectrum of naturally occurring prostanoid receptor agonists. PMID:27662627

  14. Generation of novel metabolites of dietary linoleic acid (18:2n6) by guinea pig epidermis

    SciTech Connect

    Chapkin, R.S.; Ziboh, V.A.

    1986-03-05

    Although the authors have demonstrated the inability of rat and guinea pig (GP) skin enzyme preparations to desaturate 18:2n6 into gammalinolenic acid (18:3n6) using an in vitro microsomal system, the fate of this dietary essential fatty acid in the GP epidermis is unknown. To explore the fate of 18:2n6, intact tissue slices from GP epidermis were incubated with (1-/sup 14/C)18:2n6. After incubation, the extracted lipids were transesterified using methanolic-HCL. The fatty acid methyl esters were analyzed using a combination of (i) argentation TLC, scanned using a proportional TLC radioscanner, and (ii) reverse phase HPLC, equipped with a flow through radioscanner. The results indicate that the intact epidermis metabolized /sup 14/C-18:2n6 to a group of novel products more polar than 18:2n6. In subsequent experiments, /sup 14/C-18:2n6 was either incubated with the 800 xg supernatant, the 105,000 xg pellet or supernatant from GP epidermis. Metabolism of 18:2n6 by the high speed supernatant resulted in the generation of polar products with chromatographic properties of not greater than 2 double bonds. These results indicate that although the GP epidermis lacks the capacity to desaturate 18:2n6 to 18:3n6, it can convert dietary 18:2n6 into a group of novel polar metabolites via a cytosolic mediated process. The function of these metabolites in the GP integumentary system remains to be determined.

  15. Prey-induced changes in the accumulation of amino acids and phenolic metabolites in the leaves of Drosera capensis L.

    PubMed

    Kováčik, Jozef; Klejdus, Bořivoj; Stork, František; Hedbavny, Josef

    2012-04-01

    Effect of prey feeding (ants Formica fusca) on the quantitative changes in the accumulation of free amino acids, soluble proteins, phenolic metabolites and mineral nutrients in the leaves of carnivorous plant Drosera capensis was studied. Arginine was the most abundant compound in Drosera leaves, while proline was abundant in ants. The amount of the majority of amino acids and their sum were elevated in the fed leaves after 3 and 21 days, and the same, but with further enhancement after 21 days, was observed in ants. Accumulation of amino acids also increased in young non-fed leaves of fed plants. Soluble proteins decreased in ants, but were not enhanced in fed leaves. This confirms the effectiveness of sundew's enzymatic machinery in digestion of prey and suggests that amino acids are not in situ deposited, but rather are allocated within the plant. The content of total soluble phenols, flavonoids and two selected flavonols (quercetin and kaempferol) was not affected by feeding in Drosera leaves, indicating that their high basal level was sufficient for the plant's metabolism and prey-induced changes were mainly N based. The prey also showed to be an important source of other nutrients besides N, and a stimulation of root uptake of some mineral nutrients is assumed (Mg, Cu, Zn). Accumulation of Ca and Na was not affected by feeding. PMID:21140278

  16. Prey-induced changes in the accumulation of amino acids and phenolic metabolites in the leaves of Drosera capensis L.

    PubMed

    Kováčik, Jozef; Klejdus, Bořivoj; Stork, František; Hedbavny, Josef

    2012-04-01

    Effect of prey feeding (ants Formica fusca) on the quantitative changes in the accumulation of free amino acids, soluble proteins, phenolic metabolites and mineral nutrients in the leaves of carnivorous plant Drosera capensis was studied. Arginine was the most abundant compound in Drosera leaves, while proline was abundant in ants. The amount of the majority of amino acids and their sum were elevated in the fed leaves after 3 and 21 days, and the same, but with further enhancement after 21 days, was observed in ants. Accumulation of amino acids also increased in young non-fed leaves of fed plants. Soluble proteins decreased in ants, but were not enhanced in fed leaves. This confirms the effectiveness of sundew's enzymatic machinery in digestion of prey and suggests that amino acids are not in situ deposited, but rather are allocated within the plant. The content of total soluble phenols, flavonoids and two selected flavonols (quercetin and kaempferol) was not affected by feeding in Drosera leaves, indicating that their high basal level was sufficient for the plant's metabolism and prey-induced changes were mainly N based. The prey also showed to be an important source of other nutrients besides N, and a stimulation of root uptake of some mineral nutrients is assumed (Mg, Cu, Zn). Accumulation of Ca and Na was not affected by feeding.

  17. Identification of 6-hydroxy-trans,trans-2,4-hexadienoic acid, a novel ring-opened urinary metabolite of benzene.

    PubMed Central

    Kline, S A; Robertson, J F; Grotz, V L; Goldstein, B D; Witz, G

    1993-01-01

    We studied the in vivo metabolism of benzene in mice to ring-opened compounds excreted in urine. Male CD-1 mice were treated intraperitoneally with benzene (110-440 mg/kg), [14C]benzene (220 mg/kg) or trans, trans-muconaldehyde (MUC; 4 mg/kg), a microsomal, hematotoxic metabolite of benzene. Urine, collected over 24 hr, was extracted and analyzed by HPLC with a diode-array detector and by scintillation counting. In addition to trans,trans-muconic acid, previously the only known ring-opened urinary benzene metabolite, a new metabolite, 6-hydroxy-trans,trans-2,4-hexadienoic acid, was detected in urine of mice treated with either benzene or MUC. We identified the new metabolite based on coelution of metabolites and UV spectral comparison with authentic standards in unmethylated and methylated urine extracts. Results presented here are consistent with the intermediacy of MUC in the in vivo metabolism of benzene to ring-opened metabolites. Images p310-a PMID:8275987

  18. Phenolic acid metabolites as biomarkers for tea- and coffee-derived polyphenol exposure in human subjects.

    PubMed

    Hodgson, Jonathan M; Chan, Shin Yee; Puddey, Ian B; Devine, Amanda; Wattanapenpaiboon, Naiyana; Wahlqvist, Mark L; Lukito, Widjaja; Burke, Valerie; Ward, Natalie C; Prince, Richard L; Croft, Kevin D

    2004-02-01

    Tea and coffee are rich in polyphenols with a variety of biological activities. Many of the demonstrated activities are consistent with favourable effects on the risk of chronic diseases. 4-O-methylgallic acid (4OMGA) and isoferulic acid are potential biomarkers of exposure to polyphenols derived from tea and coffee respectively. 4OMGA is derived from gallic acid in tea, and isoferulic acid is derived from chlorogenic acid in coffee. Our major objective was to explore the relationships of tea and coffee intake with 24 h urinary excretion of 4OMGA and isoferulic acid in human subjects. The relationships of long-term usual (111 participants) and contemporaneously recorded current (344 participants) tea and coffee intake with 24 h urinary excretion of 4OMGA and isoferulic acid were assessed in two populations. 4OMGA was related to usual (r 0.50, P<0.001) and current (r 0.57, P<0.001) tea intake, and isoferulic acid was related to usual (r 0.26, P=0.008) and current (r 0.18, P<0.001) coffee intake. Overall, our present results are consistent with the proposal that 4OMGA is a good biomarker for black tea-derived polyphenol exposure, but isoferulic acid may be of limited usefulness as a biomarker for coffee-derived polyphenol exposure.

  19. Toxicity and removal efficiency of pharmaceutical metabolite clofibric acid by Typha spp.--potential use for phytoremediation?

    PubMed

    Dordio, Ana V; Duarte, Cátia; Barreiros, Margarida; Carvalho, A J Palace; Pinto, A P; da Costa, Cristina Teixeira

    2009-02-01

    A study was conducted to assess Typha spp.'s ability to withstand and remove, from water, a metabolite of blood lipid regulator drugs, clofibric acid (CA). At a concentration of 20 microg L(-1), Typha had removed >50% of CA within the first 48h, reaching a maximum of 80% by the end of the assay. Experimental conditions assured that photodegradation, adsorption to vessel walls and microbial degradation did not contribute to the removal. Exposure to higher CA concentrations did not affect Typha's photosynthetic pigments but the overall increase in enzyme activity (ascorbate and guaiacol peroxidases, catalase, superoxide dismutase) indicates that both roots and leaves were affected by the xenobiotic. Eventually, Typha seemed able to cope with the CA's induced oxidative damage suggesting its ability for phytoremediation of CA contaminated waters.

  20. Metabolic profile of mephedrone: Identification of nor-mephedrone conjugates with dicarboxylic acids as a new type of xenobiotic phase II metabolites.

    PubMed

    Linhart, Igor; Himl, Michal; Židková, Monika; Balíková, Marie; Lhotková, Eva; Páleníček, Tomáš

    2016-01-01

    Metabolic profile of mephedrone (4-methylmethcathinone, 4-MMC), a frequently abused recreational drug, was determined in rats in vivo. The urine of rats dosed with a subcutaneous bolus dose of 20mg 4-MMC/kg was analysed by LC/MS. Ten phase I and five phase II metabolites were identified by comparison of their retention times and MS(2) spectra with those of authentic reference standards and/or with the MS(2) spectra of previously identified metabolites. The main metabolic pathway was N-demethylation leading to normephedrone (4-methylcathinone, 4-MC) which was further conjugated with succinic, glutaric and adipic acid. Other phase I metabolic pathways included oxidation of the 4-methyl group, carbonyl reduction leading to dihydro-metabolites and ω-oxidation at the position 3'. Five of the metabolites detected, namely, 4-carboxynormephedrone (4-carboxycathinone, 4-CC), 4-carboxydihydronormephedrone (4-carboxynorephedrine, 4-CNE), hydroxytolyldihydro-normephedrone (4-hydroxymethylnorephedrine, 4-OH-MNE) and conjugates of 4-MC with glutaric and adipic acid, have not been reported as yet. The last two conjugates represent a novel, hitherto unexploited, type of phase II metabolites in mammals together with an analogous succinic acid conjugate of 4-MC identified by Pozo et al. (2015). These conjugates might be potentially of great importance in the metabolism of other psychoactive amines.

  1. Disruption of mitochondrial activities in rabbit and human hepatocytes by a quinoxalinone anxiolytic and its carboxylic acid metabolite.

    PubMed

    Ulrich, R G; Bacon, J A; Cramer, C T; Petrella, D K; Sun, E L; Meglasson, M D; Holmuhamedov, E

    1998-11-01

    The quinoxalinone anxiolytic, panadiplon, was dropped from clinical development due to unexpected hepatic toxicity in human volunteers. Subsequent experimental studies in rabbits demonstrated a hepatic toxicity that resembled Reye's syndrome. In the present studies, we examined the effects of panadiplon and a metabolite, cyclopropane carboxylic acid (CPCA) on hepatic mitochondrial activities in vitro and ex vivo. Acute inhibition of beta-oidation of [14C]palmitate was observed in rabbit and human hepatocyte suspensions incubated with 100 microM panadiplon. Panadiplon (30 microM) also reduced mitochondrial uptake of rhodamine 123 (R123) in cultured rabbit and human, but not rat hepatocytes, following 18 h exposure. CPCA also impaired beta-oxidation and R123 uptake in rabbit and human hepatocytes. R123 uptake and beta-oxidation in cells from some donors was not impaired by either agent, and cell death was not observed in any experiment. Hepatocytes isolated from panadiplon-treated rabbits had reduced palmitate beta-oxidation rates and inhibited mitochondrial R123 uptake; R123 uptake remained inhibited until 48-72 h in culture. Rabbit mitochondrial respiration experiments revealed a slightly lower ratio of ATP formed/oxygen consumed in panadiplon-treated animals: direct exposure of normal rabbit liver mitochondria to panadiplon did not have this effect. Hepatocytes isolated from panadiplon-treated rabbits showed reduced respiratory control ratios and lower oxygen consumption compared to controls. Our results indicate that panadiplon induces a mitochondrial dysfunction in the liver, and suggest that this dysfunction may be attributed to the carboxylic acid metabolite.

  2. The Paralogous Pairs of Genes Involved in Clavulanic Acid and Clavam Metabolite Biosynthesis Are Differently Regulated in Streptomyces clavuligerus

    PubMed Central

    Tahlan, Kapil; Anders, Cecilia; Jensen, Susan E.

    2004-01-01

    Carboxyethylarginine synthase, encoded by the paralogous ceaS1 and ceaS2 genes, catalyzes the first reaction in the shared biosynthetic pathway leading to clavulanic acid and the other clavam metabolites in Streptomyces clavuligerus. The nutritional regulation of ceaS1 and ceaS2 expression was analyzed by reverse transcriptase PCR and by the use of the enhanced green fluorescent protein-encoding gene (egfp) as a reporter. ceaS1 was transcribed in complex soy medium only, whereas ceaS2 was transcribed in both soy and defined starch-asparagine (SA) media. The transcriptional start points of the two genes were also mapped to a C residue 98 bp upstream of ceaS1 and a G residue 51 bp upstream of the ceaS2 start codon by S1 nuclease protection and primer extension analyses. Furthermore, transcriptional mapping of the genes encoding the beta-lactam synthetase (bls1) and proclavaminate amidinohydrolase (pah1) isoenzymes from the paralogue gene cluster indicated that a single polycistronic transcript of ∼4.9 kb includes ceaS1, bls1, and pah1. The expression of ceaS1 and ceaS2 in a mutant strain defective in the regulatory protein CcaR was also examined. ceaS1 transcription was not affected in the ccaR mutant, whereas that of ceaS2 was greatly reduced compared to the wild-type strain. Overall, our results suggest that different mechanisms are involved in regulating the expression of ceaS1 and ceaS2, and presumably also of other paralogous genes that encode proteins involved in the early stages of clavulanic acid and clavam metabolite biosynthesis. PMID:15342599

  3. Simultaneous quantitation of acetylsalicylic acid and clopidogrel along with their metabolites in human plasma using liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Chhonker, Yashpal S; Pandey, Chandra P; Chandasana, Hardik; Laxman, Tulsankar Sachin; Prasad, Yarra Durga; Narain, V S; Dikshit, Madhu; Bhatta, Rabi S

    2016-03-01

    The interest in therapeutic drug monitoring has increased over the last few years. Inter- and intra-patient variability in pharmacokinetics, plasma concentration related toxicity and success of therapy have stressed the need of frequent therapeutic drug monitoring of the drugs. A sensitive, selective and rapid liquid chromatography coupled with tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) method was developed for the simultaneous quantification of acetylsalicylic acid (aspirin), salicylic acid, clopidogrel and carboxylic acid metabolite of clopidogrel in human plasma. The chromatographic separations were achieved on Waters Symmetry Shield(TM) C18 column (150 × 4.6 mm, 5 µm) using 3.5 mm ammonium acetate (pH 3.5)-acetonitrile (10:90, v/v) as mobile phase at a flow rate of 0.75 mL/min. The present method was successfully applied for therapeutic drug monitoring of aspirin and clopidogrel in 67 patients with coronary artery disease.

  4. Simultaneous quantitation of acetylsalicylic acid and clopidogrel along with their metabolites in human plasma using liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Chhonker, Yashpal S; Pandey, Chandra P; Chandasana, Hardik; Laxman, Tulsankar Sachin; Prasad, Yarra Durga; Narain, V S; Dikshit, Madhu; Bhatta, Rabi S

    2016-03-01

    The interest in therapeutic drug monitoring has increased over the last few years. Inter- and intra-patient variability in pharmacokinetics, plasma concentration related toxicity and success of therapy have stressed the need of frequent therapeutic drug monitoring of the drugs. A sensitive, selective and rapid liquid chromatography coupled with tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) method was developed for the simultaneous quantification of acetylsalicylic acid (aspirin), salicylic acid, clopidogrel and carboxylic acid metabolite of clopidogrel in human plasma. The chromatographic separations were achieved on Waters Symmetry Shield(TM) C18 column (150 × 4.6 mm, 5 µm) using 3.5 mm ammonium acetate (pH 3.5)-acetonitrile (10:90, v/v) as mobile phase at a flow rate of 0.75 mL/min. The present method was successfully applied for therapeutic drug monitoring of aspirin and clopidogrel in 67 patients with coronary artery disease. PMID:26230053

  5. The acid metabolite of ZD7114 is a partial agonist of lipolysis mediated by the rat beta 3-adrenoceptor.

    PubMed

    Mayers, R M; Quayle, S P; Thompson, A J; Grant, T L; Holloway, B R

    1996-01-11

    Experiments were performed to characterise the lipolytic effects of the acid metabolite, ZM215001, ((S)-4-[2-hydroxy-3-phenoxy-propylamino-ethoxy] phenoxyacetic acid) of the putative beta 3-adrenoceptor agonist, ZD7114 ((S)-4-[2-hydroxy-3-phenoxy-propylamino-ethoxy]-N-(2-methoxyethyl) phenoxyacetamide) on isolated rat white adipocytes. ZM215001 was used for these studies since it is the predominant moiety after in vivo administration of ZD7114. The agonist properties of ZM215001 were assessed in comparison to the standard nonselective beta-adrenoceptor agonist (+/-)-isoprenaline and the beta 3-adrenoceptor-selective agonist BRL 37344. Isoprenaline, BRL 37344 and ZM215001 all stimulated the rate of free fatty acid release from isolated adipocytes with the order of potency being BRL > isoprenaline > ZM215001. The maximum effect of BRL 37344 was equivalent to that of isoprenaline, but ZM215001 achieved only 30% of the maximum isoprenaline response. ZM215001 competitively antagonised the lipolytic response to BRL 37344 (pA2 = 7.26), whereas the agonist effects of BRL 37344 were not antagonised competitively by the selective antagonists ICI 118551 and CGP 20712A, at concentrations which would be expected to block beta 1- and beta 2-adrenoceptors respectively. These results indicate that ZM215001 has low intrinsic activity at the rat adipocyte beta 3-adrenoceptor, and is a partial agonist of lipolysis in rat white adipocytes. PMID:8720584

  6. Polyunsaturated fatty acids and their metabolites in brain function and disease.

    PubMed

    Bazinet, Richard P; Layé, Sophie

    2014-12-01

    The brain is highly enriched with fatty acids. These include the polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) arachidonic acid and docosahexaenoic acid, which are largely esterified to the phospholipid cell membrane. Once PUFAs are released from the membrane, they can participate in signal transduction, either directly or after enzymatic conversion to a variety of bioactive derivatives ('mediators'). PUFAs and their mediators regulate several processes within the brain, such as neurotransmission, cell survival and neuroinflammation, and thereby mood and cognition. PUFA levels and the signalling pathways that they regulate are altered in various neurological disorders, including Alzheimer's disease and major depression. Diet and drugs targeting PUFAs may lead to novel therapeutic approaches for the prevention and treatment of brain disorders.

  7. Neuroprotection comparison of chlorogenic acid and its metabolites against mechanistically distinct cell death-inducing agents in cultured cerebellar granule neurons.

    PubMed

    Taram, Faten; Winter, Aimee N; Linseman, Daniel A

    2016-10-01

    While the number of patients diagnosed with neurodegenerative disorders like Alzheimer's disease, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, and Parkinson's disease is increasing, there are currently no effective treatments that significantly limit the neuronal cell death underlying these diseases. Chlorogenic acid (CGA), a polyphenolic compound found in high concentration in coffee, is known to possess antioxidant and free radical scavenging activity. In this study, we investigated the neuroprotective effects of CGA and its major metabolites in primary cultures of rat cerebellar granule neurons. We show that CGA and caffeic acid displayed a dramatic protective effect against the nitric oxide donor, sodium nitroprusside. In marked contrast, ferulic acid and quinic acid had no protective effect against this nitrosative stress. While CGA and quinic acid had no protective effect against glutamate-induced cell death, caffeic acid and ferulic acid significantly protected neurons from excitotoxicity. Finally, caffeic acid was the only compound to display significant protective activity against hydrogen peroxide, proteasome inhibition, caspase-dependent intrinsic apoptosis, and endoplasmic reticulum stress. These results indicate that caffeic acid displays a much broader profile of neuroprotection against a diverse range of stressors than its parent polyphenol, CGA, or the other major metabolites, ferulic acid and quinic acid. We conclude that caffeic acid is a promising candidate for testing in pre-clinical models of neurodegeneration. PMID:27444557

  8. Metabolite changes during natural and lactic acid bacteria fermentations in pastes of soybeans and soybean–maize blends

    PubMed Central

    Ng'ong'ola-Manani, Tinna Austen; Østlie, Hilde Marit; Mwangwela, Agnes Mbachi; Wicklund, Trude

    2014-01-01

    The effect of natural and lactic acid bacteria (LAB) fermentation processes on metabolite changes in pastes of soybeans and soybean–maize blends was studied. Pastes composed of 100% soybeans, 90% soybeans and 10% maize, and 75% soybeans and 25% maize were naturally fermented (NFP), and were fermented by lactic acid bacteria (LFP). LAB fermentation processes were facilitated through back-slopping using a traditional fermented gruel, thobwa as an inoculum. Naturally fermented pastes were designated 100S, 90S, and 75S, while LFP were designated 100SBS, 90SBS, and 75SBS. All samples, except 75SBS, showed highest increase in soluble protein content at 48 h and this was highest in 100S (49%) followed by 90SBS (15%), while increases in 100SBS, 90S, and 75S were about 12%. Significant (P < 0.05) increases in total amino acids throughout fermentation were attributed to cysteine in 100S and 90S; and methionine in 100S and 90SBS. A 3.2% increase in sum of total amino acids was observed in 75SBS at 72 h, while decreases up to 7.4% in 100SBS at 48 and 72 h, 6.8% in 100S at 48 h and 4.7% in 75S at 72 h were observed. Increases in free amino acids throughout fermentation were observed in glutamate (NFP and 75SBS), GABA and alanine (LFP). Lactic acid was 2.5- to 3.5-fold higher in LFP than in NFP, and other organic acids detected were acetate and succinate. Maltose levels were the highest among the reducing sugars and were two to four times higher in LFP than in NFP at the beginning of the fermentation, but at 72 h, only fructose levels were significantly (P < 0.05) higher in LFP than in NFP. Enzyme activities were higher in LFP at 0 h, but at 72 h, the enzyme activities were higher in NFP. Both fermentation processes improved nutritional quality through increased protein and amino acid solubility and degradation of phytic acid (85% in NFP and 49% in LFP by 72 h). PMID:25493196

  9. [Simultaneous determination of clevidipine butyrate and its metabolite clevidipine acid in dog blood by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry].

    PubMed

    Wei, Hui-hui; Gu, Yuan; Liu, Yan-ping; Wei, Guang-li; Chen, Yong; Liu, Chang-xiao; Si, Duan-yun

    2015-10-01

    A rapid, sensitive and simple liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) method was developed and validated for the simultaneous determination of clevidipine butyrate and its primary metabolite clevidipine acid in dog blood. After one-step protein precipitation with methanol, the chromatographic separation was carried out on an Ecosil C18 column (150 mm x 4.6 mm, 5 µm) with a gradient mobile phase consisting of methanol and 5 mmol · L(-1) ammonium formate. A chromatographic total run time of 13.0 min was achieved. The quantitation analysis was performed using multiple reaction monitoring (MRM) at the specific ion transitions of m/z 454.1 [M-H]- --> m/z 234.1 for clevidipine butyrate, m/z 354.0 [M-H]- --> m/z 208.0 for clevidipine acid and m/z 256.1 [M-H]- --> m/z 227.1 for elofesalamide (internal standard, IS) in the negative ion mode with electrospray ionization (ESI) source. The linear calibration curves for clevidipine butyrate and clevidipine acid were obtained in the concentration ranges of 0.5-100 ng · mL and 1-200 ng · mL(-1), separately. The lower limit of quantification of clevidipine butyrate and clevidipine acid were 0.5 ng · mL(-1) and 1 ng · mL(-1). The intra and inter-assay precisions were all below 12.9%, the accuracies were all in standard ranges. Stability testing indicated that clevidipine butyrate and clevidipine acid in dog blood with the addition of denaturant methanol was stable under various processing and/or handling conditions. The validated method has been successfully applied to a pharmacokinetic study of clevidipine butyrate injection to 8 healthy Beagle dogs following intravenous infusion at a flow rate of 5 mg · h(-1) for 0.5 h.

  10. Acrylamide-functionalized graphene micro-solid-phase extraction coupled to high-performance liquid chromatography for the online analysis of trace monoamine acidic metabolites in biological samples.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xiaoting; Hu, Yufei; Li, Gongke; Zhang, Zhuomin

    2015-05-01

    Monoamine acidic metabolites in biological samples are essential biomarkers for the diagnosis of neurological disorders. In this work, acrylamide-functionalized graphene adsorbent was successfully synthesized by a chemical functionalization method and was packed in a homemade polyether ether ketone micro column as a micro-solid-phase extraction unit. This micro-solid-phase extraction unit was directly coupled to high-performance liquid chromatography to form an online system for the separation and analysis of three monoamine acidic metabolites including homovanillic acid, 5-hydroxyindole-3-acetic acid, and 3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetic acid in human urine and plasma. The online system showed high stability, permeability, and adsorption capacity toward target metabolites. The saturated extraction amount of this online system was 213.1, 107.0, and 153.4 ng for homovanillic acid, 5-hydroxyindole-3-acetic acid, and 3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetic acid, respectively. Excellent detection limits were achieved in the range of 0.08-0.25 μg/L with good linearity and reproducibility. It was interesting that three targets in urine and plasma could be actually quantified to be 0.94-3.93 μg/L in plasma and 7.15-19.38 μg/L in urine. Good recoveries were achieved as 84.8-101.4% for urine and 77.8-95.1% for plasma with the intra- and interday relative standard deviations less than 9.3 and 10.3%, respectively. This method shows great potential for online analysis of trace monoamine acidic metabolites in biological samples.

  11. Docosapentaenoic acid derived metabolites and mediators - The new world of lipid mediator medicine in a nutshell.

    PubMed

    Weylandt, Karsten-H

    2016-08-15

    Recent years have seen the description and elucidation of a new class of anti-inflammatory and pro-resolving lipid mediators. The arachidonic acid (AA)-derived compounds in this class are called lipoxins and have been described in great detail since their discovery thirty years ago. The new players are mediators derived from fish oil omega-3 fatty acids eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), called resolvins, protectins and maresins. Taken together, these mediators are also called specialized pro-resolution mediators (SPMs). As compared to the AA/EPA/DHA-derived compounds, research regarding mediators formed from the n-3 and n-6 docosapentaenoic acids (DPAn-3 and DPAn-6) is sparse. However, mono- di- and trihydroxy derivates of the DPAs have anti-inflammatory properties as well, even though mechanisms of their anti-inflammatory action have not been fully elucidated. This review aims to summarize current knowledge regarding the DPA-derived SPMs and their actions. PMID:26546723

  12. A PHYSIOLOGICALLY-BASED PHARMACOKINETIC MODEL FOR INTRAVENOUS AND INHALATION-ROUTE PHARMACOKINETICS OF BUTYL ACETATE AND METABOLITES N-BUTANOL AND N-BUTYRIC ACID

    EPA Science Inventory

    Risk assessment for n-butyl acetate and metabolites n-butanol and n-butyric acid (the butyl series) can be accomplished with limited toxicity data and pharmacokinetic data for each compound through application of the "family approach" (Barton et al., 2000). The necessary quantita...

  13. Ketoisocaproic acid, a metabolite of leucine, suppresses insulin-stimulated glucose transport in skeletal muscle cells in a BCAT2-dependent manner.

    PubMed

    Moghei, Mahshid; Tavajohi-Fini, Pegah; Beatty, Brendan; Adegoke, Olasunkanmi A J

    2016-09-01

    Although leucine has many positive effects on metabolism in multiple tissues, elevated levels of this amino acid and the other branched-chain amino acids (BCAAs) and their metabolites are implicated in obesity and insulin resistance. While some controversies exist about the direct effect of leucine on insulin action in skeletal muscle, little is known about the direct effect of BCAA metabolites. Here, we first showed that the inhibitory effect of leucine on insulin-stimulated glucose transport in L6 myotubes was dampened when other amino acids were present, due in part to a 140% stimulation of basal glucose transport (P < 0.05). Importantly, we also showed that α-ketoisocaproic acid (KIC), an obligatory metabolite of leucine, stimulated mTORC1 signaling but suppressed insulin-stimulated glucose transport (-34%, P < 0.05) in an mTORC1-dependent manner. The effect of KIC on insulin-stimulated glucose transport was abrogated in cells depleted of branched-chain aminotransferase 2 (BCAT2), the enzyme that catalyzes the reversible transamination of KIC to leucine. We conclude that although KIC can modulate muscle glucose metabolism, this effect is likely a result of its transamination back to leucine. Therefore, limiting the availability of leucine, rather than those of its metabolites, to skeletal muscle may be more critical in the management of insulin resistance and its sequelae. PMID:27488662

  14. Pseudotrienic acids A and B, two bioactive metabolites from Pseudomonas sp. MF381-IODS.

    PubMed

    Pohanka, Anton; Broberg, Anders; Johansson, Maria; Kenne, Lennart; Levenfors, Jolanta

    2005-09-01

    Bioassay-guided fractionation of the liquid culture broth of Pseudomonas sp. MF381-IODS yielded two new antimicrobial substances, identified as (2E,4E,6E)-9-[((2S,3R)-3-hydroxy-4-{[(3E,5E,7RS)-7-hydroxy-4-methylhexadeca-3,5-dienoyl]amino}-2-methylbutanoyl)amino]nona-2,4,6-trienoic acid and the tetradeca equivalent, named pseudotrienic acids A (1) and B (2), respectively. The compounds are prone to lactone formation, and their structures suggest them to be derived from ring opening of a macrolide. Pseudotrienic acids A and B inhibited growth of Staphylococcus aureus (MIC 70 microg/mL) and Pseudomonas syringae pv. syringae (MIC 70 microg/mL). Two known antimicrobial compounds, the polyketide 2,3-deepoxy-2,3-didehydrorhizoxin (3) and the tryptophan-derived pyrrolnitrin (4), were also identified.

  15. Inhibition of Na+-Taurocholate Co-transporting Polypeptide-mediated Bile Acid Transport by Cholestatic Sulfated Progesterone Metabolites*

    PubMed Central

    Abu-Hayyeh, Shadi; Martinez-Becerra, Pablo; Sheikh Abdul Kadir, Siti H.; Selden, Clare; Romero, Marta R.; Rees, Myrddin; Marschall, Hanns-Ulrich; Marin, Jose J. G.; Williamson, Catherine

    2010-01-01

    Sulfated progesterone metabolite (P4-S) levels are raised in normal pregnancy and elevated further in intrahepatic cholestasis of pregnancy (ICP), a bile acid-liver disorder of pregnancy. ICP can be complicated by preterm labor and intrauterine death. The impact of P4-S on bile acid uptake was studied using two experimental models of hepatic uptake of bile acids, namely cultured primary human hepatocytes (PHH) and Na+-taurocholate co-transporting polypeptide (NTCP)-expressing Xenopus laevis oocytes. Two P4-S compounds, allopregnanolone-sulfate (PM4-S) and epiallopregnanolone-sulfate (PM5-S), reduced [3H]taurocholate (TC) uptake in a dose-dependent manner in PHH, with both Na+-dependent and -independent bile acid uptake systems significantly inhibited. PM5-S-mediated inhibition of TC uptake could be reversed by increasing the TC concentration against a fixed PM5-S dose indicating competitive inhibition. Experiments using NTCP-expressing Xenopus oocytes confirmed that PM4-S/PM5-S are capable of competitively inhibiting NTCP-mediated uptake of [3H]TC. Total serum PM4-S + PM5-S levels were measured in non-pregnant and third trimester pregnant women using liquid chromatography-electrospray tandem mass spectrometry and were increased in pregnant women, at levels capable of inhibiting TC uptake. In conclusion, pregnancy levels of P4-S can inhibit Na+-dependent and -independent influx of taurocholate in PHH and cause competitive inhibition of NTCP-mediated uptake of taurocholate in Xenopus oocytes. PMID:20177056

  16. Melatonin in octopus (Octopus vulgaris): tissue distribution, daily changes and relation with serotonin and its acid metabolite.

    PubMed

    Muñoz, José L P; López Patiño, Marcos A; Hermosilla, Consuelo; Conde-Sieira, Marta; Soengas, José L; Rocha, Francisco; Míguez, Jesús M

    2011-08-01

    Information regarding melatonin production in molluscs is very limited. In this study the presence and daily fluctuations of melatonin levels were investigated in hemolymph, retina and nervous system-related structures in the cephalopod Octopus vulgaris. Adult animals were maintained in captivity under natural photoperiod and killed at different times in a regular daily cycle. Levels of melatonin, serotonin (5-HT) and its acid metabolite (5-hydroxyindole acetic acid, 5-HIAA) in the hemolymph, retina, optic lobe, and cerebral ganglion were assayed by HPLC. Melatonin content fluctuated rhythmically in the retina and hemolymph, peaking at night. In the retina, but not in the other neural tissues, the rhythm was opposite to that of 5-HT, which displayed basal levels at night. Also, 5-HIAA levels in the retina were higher during the night, supporting that rhythmic melatonin production could be linked to diurnal changes in 5-HT degradation. The high levels of melatonin found in the retina point to it as the major source of melatonin in octopus; in addition, a large variation of melatonin content was found in the optic lobe with maximal values at night. All these data suggest that melatonin might play a role in the transduction of the light-dark cycle information for adjustment of rhythmic physiological events in cephalopods.

  17. Development and validation of a simple determination of urine metabolites (oxalate, citrate, uric acid and creatinine) by capillary zone electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Muñoz, Jose A; López-Mesas, Montserrat; Valiente, Manuel

    2010-04-15

    Oxalate, citrate, uric acid and creatinine are important urine markers for the evaluation and treatment of urolithiasic patients. They have been traditionally analysed by enzymatic and chromatographic techniques which present practical drawbacks, mainly in the sample pre-treatment step. The purpose of this study was to evaluate those markers in urine samples, by an easy multi-analyte assay using capillary zone electrophoresis. The four urine metabolites were determined, at 25 degrees C, by using a 50 cm x 75 microm capillary in 50 mmol l(-1) phosphate buffer (pH 6.5), at constant voltage of -30 kV and UV detection at 195 nm (for oxalate and citrate) or 30 kV and 234 nm (for creatinine and uric acid). The sample pre-treatment was minimum, 5- and 20-fold dilution of the urine sample and acidification to pH 3-4. Validation parameters (linear range, sensitivity, accuracy, precision and detection limits) were statistically comparable to those obtained with the official methods normally used in the clinical practice. The effect of freezing as a conservation method of urine samples is also discussed in terms of recoveries of the analytes. The analytical method developed is highly useful as a diagnostic tool for detecting metabolic renal disorders due to its simplicity, time consuming, easy automation, cost efficiency and analytical effectiveness, accomplishing with the clinical requirements.

  18. Concentrations of the urinary pyrethroid metabolite 3-phenoxybenzoic acid in farm worker families in the MICASA study

    SciTech Connect

    Trunnelle, Kelly J.; Bennett, Deborah H.; Ahn, Ki Chang; Schenker, Marc B.; Tancredi, Daniel J.; Gee, Shirley J.; Stoecklin-Marois, Maria T.; Hammock, Bruce D.

    2014-05-01

    Indoor pesticide exposure is a growing concern, particularly from pyrethroids, a commonly used class of pesticides. Pyrethroid concentrations may be especially high in homes of immigrant farm worker families who often live in close proximity to agricultural fields, and are faced with poor housing conditions, causing higher pest infestation and more pesticide use. We investigate exposure of farm worker families to pyrethroids in a study of mothers and children living in Mendota, CA within the population-based Mexican Immigration to California: Agricultural Safety and Acculturation (MICASA) Study. We present pyrethroid exposure based on an ELISA analysis of urinary metabolite 3-phenoxybenzoic acid (3PBA) levels among 105 women and 103 children. The median urinary 3PBA levels (children=2.56 ug/g creatinine, mothers=1.46 ug/g creatinine) were higher than those reported in population based studies for the United States general population, but similar to or lower than studies with known high levels of pyrethroid exposure. A positive association was evident between poor housing conditions and the urinary metabolite levels, showing that poor housing conditions are a contributing factor to the higher levels of 3PBA seen in the urine of these farm worker families. Further research is warranted to fully investigate sources of exposure. - Highlights: • We investigate exposure of farm worker families to pyrethroids. • We present pyrethroid exposure based on an ELISA analysis of urinary 3PBA levels. • 3PBA levels were higher than those reported for the U.S. general population. • Poor housing conditions may be associated with pyrethroid exposure.

  19. Occurrence of urolithins, gut microbiota ellagic acid metabolites and proliferation markers expression response in the human prostate gland upon consumption of walnuts and pomegranate juice.

    PubMed

    González-Sarrías, Antonio; Giménez-Bastida, Juan A; García-Conesa, María T; Gómez-Sánchez, María B; García-Talavera, Noelia V; Gil-Izquierdo, Angel; Sánchez-Alvarez, Carmen; Fontana-Compiano, Luis O; Morga-Egea, Juan P; Pastor-Quirante, Francisco A; Martínez-Díaz, Francisco; Tomás-Barberán, Francisco A; Espín, Juan Carlos

    2010-03-01

    Epidemiology supports the important role of nutrition in prostate cancer (PCa) prevention. Pomegranate juice (PJ) exerts protective effects against PCa, mainly attributed to PJ ellagitannins (ETs). Our aim was to assess whether ETs or their metabolites ellagic acid and urolithins reach the human prostate upon consumption of ET-rich foods and to evaluate the effect on the expression of three proliferation biomarkers. Sixty-three patients with BPH or PCa were divided into controls and consumers of walnuts (35 g walnuts/day) or pomegranate (200 mL PJ/day) for 3 days before surgery. Independently of the ETs source, the main metabolite detected was urolithin A glucuronide, (3,8-dihydroxy-6H-dibenzo[b,d]pyran-6-one glucuronide) (up to 2 ng/g) together with the traces of urolithin B glucuronide, (3-hydroxy-6H-dibenzo[b,d]pyran-6-one glucuronide) and dimethyl ellagic acid. The small number of prostates containing metabolites was likely caused by clearance of the compounds during the fasting. This was corroborated in a parallel rat study and thus the presence of higher quantities of metabolites at earlier time points cannot be discarded. No apparent changes in the expression of CDKN1A, MKi-67 or c-Myc were found after consumption of the walnuts or PJ. Our results suggest that urolithin glucuronides and dimethyl ellagic acid may be the molecules responsible for the beneficial effects of PJ against PCa.

  20. Effect of Polyunsaturated Fatty Acids and Their Metabolites on Bleomycin-Induced Cytotoxic Action on Human Neuroblastoma Cells In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Polavarapu, Sailaja; Mani, Arul M.; Gundala, Naveen K. V.; Hari, Anasuya D.; Bathina, Siresha; Das, Undurti N.

    2014-01-01

    In the present study, we noted that bleomycin induced growth inhibitory action was augmented by all the polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) tested on human neuroblastoma IMR-32 (0.5×104 cells/100 µl of IMR) cells (EPA> DHA> ALA = GLA = AA> DGLA = LA: ∼60, 40, 30, 10–20% respectively) at the maximum doses used. Of all the prostaglandins (PGE1, PGE2, PGF2α, and PGI2) and leukotrienes (LTD4 and LTE4) tested; PGE1, PGE2 and LTD4 inhibited the growth of IMR-32 cells to a significant degree at the highest doses used. Lipoxin A4 (LXA4), 19,20-dihydroxydocosapentaenoate (19, 20 DiHDPA) and 10(S),17(S)-dihydroxy-4Z,7Z,11E,13Z,15E,19Z-docosahexaenoic acid (protectin: 10(S),17(S)DiHDoHE), metabolites of DHA, significantly inhibited the growth of IMR-32 cells. Pre-treatment with AA, GLA, DGLA and EPA and simultaneous treatment with all PUFAs used in the study augmented growth inhibitory action of bleomycin. Surprisingly, both indomethacin and nordihydroguaiaretic acid (NDGA) at 60 and 20 µg/ml respectively enhanced the growth of IMR-32 cells even in the presence of bleomycin. AA enhanced oxidant stress in IMR-32 cells as evidenced by an increase in lipid peroxides, superoxide dismutase levels and glutathione peroxidase activity. These results suggest that PUFAs suppress growth of human neuroblastoma cells, augment growth inhibitory action of bleomycin by enhancing formation of lipid peroxides and altering the status of anti-oxidants and, in all probability, increase the formation of lipoxins, resolvins and protectins from their respective precursors that possess growth inhibitory actions. PMID:25536345

  1. 5-Lipoxygenase metabolite 4-HDHA is a mediator of the antiangiogenic effect of ω-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids.

    PubMed

    Sapieha, Przemyslaw; Stahl, Andreas; Chen, Jing; Seaward, Molly R; Willett, Keirnan L; Krah, Nathan M; Dennison, Roberta J; Connor, Kip M; Aderman, Christopher M; Liclican, Elvira; Carughi, Arianna; Perelman, Dalia; Kanaoka, Yoshihide; Sangiovanni, John Paul; Gronert, Karsten; Smith, Lois E H

    2011-02-01

    Lipid signaling is dysregulated in many diseases with vascular pathology, including cancer, diabetic retinopathy, retinopathy of prematurity, and age-related macular degeneration. We have previously demonstrated that diets enriched in ω-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) effectively reduce pathological retinal neovascularization in a mouse model of oxygen-induced retinopathy, in part through metabolic products that suppress microglial-derived tumor necrosis factor-α. To better understand the protective effects of ω-3 PUFAs, we examined the relative importance of major lipid metabolic pathways and their products in contributing to this effect. ω-3 PUFA diets were fed to four lines of mice deficient in each key lipid-processing enzyme (cyclooxygenase 1 or 2, or lipoxygenase 5 or 12/15), retinopathy was induced by oxygen exposure; only loss of 5-lipoxygenase (5-LOX) abrogated the protection against retinopathy of dietary ω-3 PUFAs. This protective effect was due to 5-LOX oxidation of the ω-3 PUFA lipid docosahexaenoic acid to 4-hydroxy-docosahexaenoic acid (4-HDHA). 4-HDHA directly inhibited endothelial cell proliferation and sprouting angiogenesis via peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPARγ), independent of 4-HDHA's anti-inflammatory effects. Our study suggests that ω-3 PUFAs may be profitably used as an alternative or supplement to current anti-vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) treatment for proliferative retinopathy and points to the therapeutic potential of ω-3 PUFAs and metabolites in other diseases of vasoproliferation. It also suggests that cyclooxygenase inhibitors such as aspirin and ibuprofen (but not lipoxygenase inhibitors such as zileuton) might be used without losing the beneficial effect of dietary ω-3 PUFA. PMID:21307302

  2. DEVELOPMENT OF A PHYSIOLOGICALLY BASED PHARMACOKINETIC MODEL FOR ETHYLENE GLYCOL AND ITS MAJOR METABOLITE, GLYCOLIC ACID, IN RATS AND HUMANS

    SciTech Connect

    Corley, Rick A.; Bartels, M J.; Carney, E W.; Weitz, Karl K.; Soelberg, Jolen J.; Gies, Richard A.; Thrall, Karla D.

    2005-05-19

    An extensive database on the toxicity and modes of action of the major industrial chemical, ethylene glycol (EG), has been developed over the past several decades. These studies have consistently identified the kidney as a primary target organ, with rats being more sensitive than mice and males more sensitive than females following chronic exposure. Renal toxicity has been associated with the terminal metabolite, oxalic acid which can precipitate with calcium to form crystals. EG also induces developmental toxicity, although these effects appear to require high-doses or accelerated dose-rates, and have been reported only in rats and mice. The developmental toxicity of EG has been attributed to the intermediate metabolite, glycolic acid (GA). The developmental toxicity of EG has been the subject of extensive research and regulatory review in recent years. Therefore, a physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model was developed to integrate the extensive mode of action and pharmacokinetic data on EG and GA for use in developmental risk assessment. Metabolic rate constants and partition coefficients for EG and GA were estimated from in vitro studies. Other biochemical constants were optimized from appropriate in vivo pharmacokinetic studies. The resulting PBPK model includes inhalation, oral, dermal, intravenous and subcutaneous routes of administration. Metabolism of EG and GA were described in the liver with elimination via the kidneys. Several rat and human metabolism studies were used to validate the resulting PBPK model. Consistent with these studies, simulations indicated that the metabolism of EG to GA was essentially first-order (linear) up to 2500 mg/kg/day while the metabolism of GA saturated between bolus ethylene glycol doses of 200 and 1000 mg/kg/day. This saturation results in non-linear increases in blood GA concentrations, correlating with the developmental toxicity of EG. Pregnancy had no effect on maternal EG and GA kinetics over a broad dose

  3. Selective activation of the gamma-subspecies of protein kinase C from bovine cerebellum by arachidonic acid and its lipoxygenase metabolites.

    PubMed

    Shearman, M S; Naor, Z; Sekiguchi, K; Kishimoto, A; Nishizuka, Y

    1989-01-30

    The gamma-subspecies of protein kinase C (PKC) apparently is expressed only in central nervous tissues, and at a high level in the cerebellum and hippocampus. gamma-PKC from bovine cerebellum, but not the alpha- or beta I/beta II-subspecies, is activated by micromolar concentrations of arachidonic acid (AA), in the absence of both phospholipid and diacylglycerol. A significant component of this activation is also calcium independent. Other unsaturated fatty acids are much less active in this respect. Among the AA metabolites tested, lipoxin A (5(S),6(R),15(S)-11-cis-isomer) was a potent, selective activator of the gamma-subspecies, and also, to a lesser extent, 12(S)-hydroxy-5,8,10,14-eicosatetraenoic acid could support activation. These results raise the possibility that AA and some of its lipoxygenase metabolites may function as messenger molecules in neurones to activate the gamma-subspecies of PKC. PMID:2492951

  4. Development and Validation of an HPLC Method for Simultaneous Quantification of Clopidogrel Bisulfate, Its Carboxylic Acid Metabolite, and Atorvastatin in Human Plasma: Application to a Pharmacokinetic Study

    PubMed Central

    Croitoru, Octavian; Spiridon, Adela-Maria; Belu, Ionela; Turcu-Ştiolică, Adina; Neamţu, Johny

    2015-01-01

    A simple, sensitive, and specific reversed phase liquid chromatographic method was developed and validated for simultaneous quantification of clopidogrel, its carboxylic acid metabolite, and atorvastatin in human serum. Plasma samples were deproteinized with acetonitrile and ibuprofen was chosen as internal standard. Chromatographic separation was performed on an BDS Hypersil C18 column (250 × 4.6 mm; 5 μm) via gradient elution with mobile phase consisting of 10 mM phosphoric acid (sodium) buffer solution (pH = 2.6 adjusted with 85% orthophosphoric acid) : acetonitrile : methanol with flow rate of 1 mL·min−1. Detection was achieved with PDA detector at 220 nm. The method was validated in terms of linearity, sensitivity, precision, accuracy, limit of quantification, and stability tests. Calibration curves of the analytes were found to be linear in the range of 0.008–2 μg·mL−1 for clopidogrel, 0.01–4 μg·mL−1 for its carboxylic acid metabolite, and 0.005–2.5 μg·mL−1 for atorvastatin. The results of accuracy (as recovery) with ibuprofen as internal standard were in the range of 96–98% for clopidogrel, 94–98% for its carboxylic acid metabolite, and 90–99% for atorvastatin, respectively. PMID:26839733

  5. Development and Validation of an HPLC Method for Simultaneous Quantification of Clopidogrel Bisulfate, Its Carboxylic Acid Metabolite, and Atorvastatin in Human Plasma: Application to a Pharmacokinetic Study.

    PubMed

    Croitoru, Octavian; Spiridon, Adela-Maria; Belu, Ionela; Turcu-Ştiolică, Adina; Neamţu, Johny

    2015-01-01

    A simple, sensitive, and specific reversed phase liquid chromatographic method was developed and validated for simultaneous quantification of clopidogrel, its carboxylic acid metabolite, and atorvastatin in human serum. Plasma samples were deproteinized with acetonitrile and ibuprofen was chosen as internal standard. Chromatographic separation was performed on an BDS Hypersil C18 column (250 × 4.6 mm; 5 μm) via gradient elution with mobile phase consisting of 10 mM phosphoric acid (sodium) buffer solution (pH = 2.6 adjusted with 85% orthophosphoric acid) : acetonitrile : methanol with flow rate of 1 mL·min(-1). Detection was achieved with PDA detector at 220 nm. The method was validated in terms of linearity, sensitivity, precision, accuracy, limit of quantification, and stability tests. Calibration curves of the analytes were found to be linear in the range of 0.008-2 μg·mL(-1) for clopidogrel, 0.01-4 μg·mL(-1) for its carboxylic acid metabolite, and 0.005-2.5 μg·mL(-1) for atorvastatin. The results of accuracy (as recovery) with ibuprofen as internal standard were in the range of 96-98% for clopidogrel, 94-98% for its carboxylic acid metabolite, and 90-99% for atorvastatin, respectively. PMID:26839733

  6. Genes Specific for the Biosynthesis of Clavam Metabolites Antipodal to Clavulanic Acid Are Clustered with the Gene for Clavaminate Synthase 1 in Streptomyces clavuligerus

    PubMed Central

    Mosher, Roy H.; Paradkar, Ashish S.; Anders, Cecilia; Barton, Barry; Jensen, Susan E.

    1999-01-01

    Portions of the Streptomyces clavuligerus chromosome flanking cas1, which encodes the clavaminate synthase 1 isoenzyme (CAS1), have been cloned and sequenced. Mutants of S. clavuligerus disrupted in cvm1, the open reading frame located immediately upstream of cas1, were constructed by a gene replacement procedure. Similar techniques were used to generate S. clavuligerus mutants carrying a deletion that encompassed portions of the two open reading frames, cvm4 and cvm5, located directly downstream of cas1. Both classes of mutants still produced clavulanic acid and cephamycin C but lost the ability to synthesize the antipodal clavam metabolites clavam-2-carboxylate, 2-hydroxymethyl-clavam, and 2-alanylclavam. These results suggested that cas1 is clustered with genes essential and specific for clavam metabolite biosynthesis. When a cas1 mutant of S. clavuligerus was constructed by gene replacement, it produced lower levels of both clavulanic acid and most of the antipodal clavams except for 2-alanylclavam. However, a double mutant of S. clavuligerus disrupted in both cas1 and cas2 produced neither clavulanic acid nor any of the antipodal clavams, including 2-alanylclavam. This outcome was consistent with the contribution of both CAS1 and CAS2 to a common pool of clavaminic acid that is shunted toward clavulanic acid and clavam metabolite biosynthesis. PMID:10223939

  7. Metabolomics approach to assessing plasma 13- and 9-hydroxy-octadecadienoic acid and linoleic acid metabolite responses to 75-km cycling.

    PubMed

    Nieman, David C; Shanely, R Andrew; Luo, Beibei; Meaney, Mary Pat; Dew, Dustin A; Pappan, Kirk L

    2014-07-01

    Bioactive oxidized linoleic acid metabolites (OXLAMs) include 13- and 9-hydroxy-octadecadienoic acid (13-HODE + 9-HODE) and have been linked to oxidative stress, inflammation, and numerous pathological and physiological states. The purpose of this study was to measure changes in plasma 13-HODE + 9-HODE following a 75-km cycling bout and identify potential linkages to linoleate metabolism and established biomarkers of oxidative stress (F2-isoprostanes) and inflammation (cytokines) using a metabolomics approach. Trained male cyclists (N = 19, age 38.0 ± 1.6 yr, wattsmax 304 ± 10.5) engaged in a 75-km cycling time trial on their own bicycles using electromagnetically braked cycling ergometers (2.71 ± 0.07 h). Blood samples were collected preexercise, immediately post-, 1.5 h post-, and 21 h postexercise, and analyzed for plasma cytokines (IL-6, IL-8, IL-10, tumor necrosis factor-α, monocyte chemoattractant protein-1, granulocyte colony-stimulating factor), F2-isoprostanes, and shifts in metabolites using global metabolomics procedures with gas chromatography mass spectrometry (GC-MS) and liquid chromatography mass spectrometry (LC-MS). 13-HODE + 9-HODE increased 3.1-fold and 1.7-fold immediately post- and 1.5 h postexercise (both P < 0.001) and returned to preexercise levels by 21-h postexercise. Post-75-km cycling plasma levels of 13-HODE + 9-HODE were not significantly correlated with increases in plasma cytokines but were positively correlated with postexercise F2-isoprostanes (r = 0.75, P < 0.001), linoleate (r = 0.54, P = 0.016), arachidate (r = 0.77, P < 0.001), 12,13-dihydroxy-9Z-octadecenoate (12,13-DiHOME) (r = 0.60, P = 0.006), dihomo-linolenate (r = 0.57, P = 0.011), and adrenate (r = 0.56, P = 0.013). These findings indicate that prolonged and intensive exercise caused a transient, 3.1-fold increase in the stable linoleic acid oxidation product 13-HODE + 9-HODE and was related to increases in F2-isoprostanes, linoleate, and fatty acids in the linoleate

  8. Reactivity of partially reduced arylhydroxylamine and nitrosoarene metabolites of 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene (TNT) toward biomass and humic acids.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, Farrukh; Hughes, Joseph B

    2002-10-15

    Sequential anaerobic/aerobic treatment of 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene (TNT) generally results in the incorporation of residues into biomass and natural organic matter fractions of a system. To better understand the potential contribution of hydroxylamine and nitroso moieties in these reactions, studies were conducted using model systems taking advantage of the biocatalytic-activity of Clostridium acetobutylicum that does not produce aminated TNT derivatives. To evaluate binding to biomass only, systems containing cell-free extracts of C. acetobutylicum and molecular hydrogen as a reductant were employed. At the end of treatment, mass balance studies showed that 10% of the total 14C was associated with an insoluble protein-containing precipitate that could not be extracted with organic solvents. Model reactions were conducted between a mixture of 2,4-dihydroxylamino-6-nitrotoluene (DHA6NT) and 4-hydroxylamino-2,6-dinitrotoluene (4HADNT) and 1-thioglycerol to test the involvement of the nitroso-thiol reaction in binding to biomass. It was demonstrated that DHA6NT formed a new and relatively polar product with 1-thioglycerol only in the presence of oxygen. The oxygen requirement confirmed that the nitroso functionality was responsible for the binding reaction. The reactivity of arylhydroxylamino and nitrosoarene functionalities toward International Humic Substance Society (IHSS) peat humic acid was evaluated under anaerobic and aerobic conditions, respectively. 4HADNT showed no appreciable reactivity toward peat humic acid. Conversely, the nitrosoarene compound, nitrosobenzene, showed rapid reactivity with peat humic acid (50% removal in 48 h). When tested with two other humic acids (selected on the basis of their protein content), it became apparent that the proteinaceous fraction was responsible at least in part for the nitrosoarene's removal from solution. Furthermore, the pretreatment of the humic acids with a selective thiol derivatizing agent had a considerable effect

  9. Spiroscytalin, a new tetramic acid and other metabolites of mixed biogenesis from Scytalidium cuboideum.

    PubMed

    Sy-Cordero, Arlene A; Figueroa, Mario; Raja, Huzefa A; Meza Aviña, Maria Elena; Croatt, Mitchell P; Adcock, Audrey F; Kroll, David J; Wani, Mansukh C; Pearce, Cedric J; Oberlies, Nicholas H

    2015-11-25

    Spiroscytalin (1), a new tetramic acid that possesses an uncommon spiro-ring fusion between a polyketide-derived octalin ring system and a 2,4-pyrrolidinedione, along with two known compounds, leporin B (2) and purpactin A (3), were isolated from a solid phase culture of the fungus Scytalidium cuboideum (MSX 68345). The molecular connectivity of 1-3 was determined using NMR spectroscopy and mass spectrometry. The relative configurations of 1 and 2 were determined by NOESY experiments. The absolute configuration of 1 was determined by electronic circular dichroism (ECD) via a combination of experimental measurements and computational calculations. While leporin B was known, it displayed activities that had not been reported previously, including cytotoxicity against three human tumor cell lines and antibacterial activity against Candida albicans and Staphylococcus aureus.

  10. The highly abundant urinary metabolite urobilin interferes with the bicinchoninic acid assay.

    PubMed

    Sampson, D L; Chng, Y L; Upton, Z; Hurst, C P; Parker, A W; Parker, T J

    2013-11-01

    Estimation of total protein concentration is an essential step in any protein- or peptide-centric analysis pipeline. This study demonstrates that urobilin, a breakdown product of heme and a major constituent of urine, interferes considerably with the bicinchoninic acid (BCA) assay. This interference is probably due to the propensity of urobilin to reduce cupric ions (Cu(2+)) to cuprous ions (Cu(1+)), thus mimicking the reduction of copper by proteins, which the assay was designed to do. In addition, it is demonstrated that the Bradford assay is more resistant to the influence of urobilin and other small molecules. As such, urobilin has a strong confounding effect on the estimate of total protein concentrations obtained by BCA assay and thus this assay should not be used for urinary protein quantification. It is recommended that the Bradford assay be used instead.

  11. Dietary Gut Microbial Metabolites, Short-chain Fatty Acids, and Host Metabolic Regulation

    PubMed Central

    Kasubuchi, Mayu; Hasegawa, Sae; Hiramatsu, Takero; Ichimura, Atsuhiko; Kimura, Ikuo

    2015-01-01

    During feeding, the gut microbiota contributes to the host energy acquisition and metabolic regulation thereby influencing the development of metabolic disorders such as obesity and diabetes. Short-chain fatty acids (SCFAs) such as acetate, butyrate, and propionate, which are produced by gut microbial fermentation of dietary fiber, are recognized as essential host energy sources and act as signal transduction molecules via G-protein coupled receptors (FFAR2, FFAR3, OLFR78, GPR109A) and as epigenetic regulators of gene expression by the inhibition of histone deacetylase (HDAC). Recent evidence suggests that dietary fiber and the gut microbial-derived SCFAs exert multiple beneficial effects on the host energy metabolism not only by improving the intestinal environment, but also by directly affecting various host peripheral tissues. In this review, we summarize the roles of gut microbial SCFAs in the host energy regulation and present an overview of the current understanding of its physiological functions. PMID:25875123

  12. Protein binding of fentanyl and its metabolite nor-fentanyl in human plasma, albumin and α-1 acid glycoprotein.

    PubMed

    Bista, Sudeep Raj; Haywood, Alison; Hardy, Janet; Lobb, Michael; Tapuni, Angela; Norris, Ross

    2015-03-01

    1.Fentanyl is a highly lipophilic opioid commonly used to treat cancer pain. Plasma protein binding (PPB) of fentanyl in human plasma is reported as 80-85%, however it is unclear whether fentanyl binds primarily to albumin (ALB) or α-1 acid glycoprotein (AAG) and no studies have been conducted on the metabolite, nor-fentanyl. Fentanyl is also known to bind to plasticware and ultrafiltration (UF) devices which impacts adversely on binding experiments. 2.PPB of fentanyl and nor-fentanyl to ALB and AAG in isotonic phosphate buffer solution and seeded human plasma was quantified. PPB was also performed in plasma samples obtained from cancer patients receiving transdermal fentanyl. The adsorption of fentanyl and nor-fentanyl to UF devices and plasticware commonly used in PPB studies was also assessed. 3.Fentanyl was shown to bind primarily to ALB as opposed to AAG, with nor-fentanyl exhibiting negligible binding to plasma proteins. Total PPB of fentanyl was 86-89% in seeded human plasma. PPB in 56 cancer patient samples was 95.1 ± 3.52% for fentanyl and 32.4 ± 21.9% for nor-fentanyl. 4.UF was shown to be a reliable and convenient method for PPB studies, thereby removing the need for complex testing for adsorption of the drug to plasticware during UF.

  13. Melatonin promotes Bax sequestration to mitochondria reducing cell susceptibility to apoptosis via the lipoxygenase metabolite 5-hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid.

    PubMed

    Radogna, F; Albertini, M C; De Nicola, M; Diederich, M; Bejarano, I; Ghibelli, L

    2015-03-01

    Extra-neurological functions of melatonin include control of the immune system and modulation of apoptosis. We previously showed that melatonin inhibits the intrinsic apoptotic pathway in leukocytes via stimulation of high affinity MT1/MT2 receptors, thereby promoting re-localization of the anti-apoptotic Bcl-2 protein to mitochondria. Here we show that Bcl-2 sequesters pro-apoptotic Bax into mitochondria in an inactive form after melatonin treatment, thus reducing cell propensity to apoptosis. Bax translocation and the anti-apoptotic effect of melatonin are strictly dependent on the presence of Bcl-2, and on the 5-lipoxygenase (5-LOX) metabolite 5-hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid (5-HETE), which we have previously shown to be produced as a consequence of melatonin binding to its low affinity target calmodulin. Therefore, the anti-apoptotic effect of melatonin requires the simultaneous, independent interaction with high (MT1/MT2) and low (calmodulin) affinity targets, eliciting two independent signal transduction pathways converging into Bax sequestration and inactivation. MT1/MT2 vs. lipoxygenase pathways are activated by 10(-9) vs. 10(-5)M melatonin, respectively; the anti-apoptotic effect of melatonin is achieved at 10(-5)M, but drops to 10(-9)M upon addition of exogenous 5-HETE, revealing that lipoxygenase activation is the rate-limiting pathway. Therefore, in areas of inflammation with increased 5-HETE levels, physiological nanomolar concentrations of melatonin may suffice to maintain leukocyte viability.

  14. Microfluidic study of the chemotactic response of Escherichia coli to amino acids, signaling molecules and secondary metabolites.

    PubMed

    Nagy, Krisztina; Sipos, Orsolya; Valkai, Sándor; Gombai, Éva; Hodula, Orsolya; Kerényi, Ádám; Ormos, Pál; Galajda, Péter

    2015-07-01

    Quorum sensing and chemotaxis both affect bacterial behavior on the population level. Chemotaxis shapes the spatial distribution of cells, while quorum sensing realizes a cell-density dependent gene regulation. An interesting question is if these mechanisms interact on some level: Does quorum sensing, a density dependent process, affect cell density itself via chemotaxis? Since quorum sensing often spans across species, such a feedback mechanism may also exist between multiple species. We constructed a microfluidic platform to study these questions. A flow-free, stable linear chemical gradient is formed in our device within a few minutes that makes it suitable for sensitive testing of chemoeffectors: we showed that the amino acid lysine is a weak chemoattractant for Escherichia coli, while arginine is neutral. We studied the effect of quorum sensing signal molecules of Pseudomonas aeruginosa on E. coli chemotaxis. Our results show that N-(3-oxododecanoyl)-homoserine lactone (oxo-C12-HSL) and N-(butryl)-homoserine lactone (C4-HSL) are attractants. Furthermore, we tested the chemoeffector potential of pyocyanin and pyoverdine, secondary metabolites under a quorum sensing control. Pyocyanin is proved to be a weak attractant while pyoverdine are repellent. We demonstrated the usability of the device in co-culturing experiments, where we showed that various factors released by P. aeruginosa affect the dynamic spatial rearrangement of a neighboring E. coli population, while surface adhesion of the cells is also modulated. PMID:26339306

  15. Acidic metabolites. VI. 20 alpha-isosteroids as intermediates in 20 alpha-dihydrosteroid formation

    SciTech Connect

    Monder, C.; Bradlow, H.L.; Han, C.A.; Zumoff, B.

    1985-03-01

    We have previously shown that human subjects metabolize the 20 beta-epimer of isocortisol (11 beta, 17,20 beta-trihydroxy-3-oxo-pregn-4-en-21-al) to both 20 alpha- and 20 beta-hydroxy steroid end products. In this paper we describe the synthesis of tritium labeled 20 alpha-epimers of isocortisol and isoTHF (3 alpha, 11 beta, 17,20 alpha-tetrahydroxy-5 beta-pregnan-21-al) and their metabolic fate in humans. Both steroids yielded 20 alpha-hydroxy urinary neutral end-products (cortols and cortolones) and no 20 beta-hydroxy epimers. Regeneration of 17-ketols from aldols occurred to a small extent with isoTHF, but not with isocortisol. Isocortisol and isoTHF yielded less cortoic acids than did the corresponding ketols. The results provide further evidence that in man the stereochemistry at C-20 of the end-products of corticosteroid metabolism is determined by the configuration of the aldol at C-20 prior to subsequent metabolic events.

  16. High throughput volatile fatty acid skin metabolite profiling by thermal desorption secondary electrospray ionisation mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Martin, Helen J; Reynolds, James C; Riazanskaia, Svetlana; Thomas, C L Paul

    2014-09-01

    The non-invasive nature of volatile organic compound (VOC) sampling from skin makes this a priority in the development of new screening and diagnostic assays. Evaluation of recent literature highlights the tension between the analytical utility of ambient ionisation approaches for skin profiling and the practicality of undertaking larger campaigns (higher statistical power), or undertaking research in remote locations. This study describes how VOC may be sampled from skin and recovered from a polydimethylsilicone sampling coupon and analysed by thermal desorption (TD) interfaced to secondary electrospray ionisation (SESI) time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MS) for the high throughput screening of volatile fatty acids (VFAs) from human skin. Analysis times were reduced by 79% compared to gas chromatography-mass spectrometry methods (GC-MS) and limits of detection in the range 300 to 900 pg cm(-2) for VFA skin concentrations were obtained. Using body odour as a surrogate model for clinical testing 10 Filipino participants, 5 high and 5 low odour, were sampled in Manilla and the samples returned to the UK and screened by TD-SESI-MS and TD-GC-MS for malodour precursors with greater than >95% agreement between the two analytical techniques. Eight additional VFAs were also identified by both techniques with chains 4 to 15 carbons long being observed. TD-SESI-MS appears to have significant potential for the high throughput targeted screening of volatile biomarkers in human skin.

  17. Determination of selected synthetic cannabinoids and their metabolites by micellar electrokinetic chromatography--mass spectrometry employing perfluoroheptanoic acid-based micellar phase.

    PubMed

    Švidrnoch, Martin; Přibylka, Adam; Maier, Vítězslav

    2016-04-01

    Perfluoroheptanoic acid was employed as a volatile micellar phase in background electrolyte for micellar electrokinetic chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry separation and determination of 15 selected naphthoyl- and phenylacetylindole- synthetic cannabinoids and main metabolites derived from JWH-018, JWH-019, JWH-073, JWH-200 and JWH-250. The influence of concentration of perfluoroheptanoic acid in background electrolytes on the separation was studied as well as the influence of perfluoroheptanoic acid on mass spectrometry detection. The background electrolyte consisted of 75 mM perfluoroheptanoic acid, 150 mM ammonium hydroxide pH 9.2 with 10% (v/v) propane-2-ol allowed micellar electrokinetic chromatography separation together with mass spectrometry identification of the studied parent synthetic cannabinoids and their metabolites. The limits of detection of studied synthetic cannabinoids and metabolites were in the range from 0.9 ng/mL for JWH-073 to 3.0 ng/mL for JWH-200 employing liquid-liquid extraction. The developed method was applied on the separation and identification of studied analytes after liquid-liquid extraction of spiked urine and serum samples to demonstrate the potential of the method applicability for forensic and toxicological purposes.

  18. Two Sets of Paralogous Genes Encode the Enzymes Involved in the Early Stages of Clavulanic Acid and Clavam Metabolite Biosynthesis in Streptomyces clavuligerus

    PubMed Central

    Tahlan, Kapil; Park, Hyeon Ung; Wong, Annie; Beatty, Perrin H.; Jensen, Susan E.

    2004-01-01

    Recently, a second copy of a gene encoding proclavaminate amidinohydrolase (pah1), an enzyme involved in the early stages of clavulanic acid and clavam metabolite biosynthesis in Streptomyces clavuligerus, was identified and isolated. Using Southern analysis, we have now isolated second copies of the genes encoding the carboxyethylarginine synthase (ceaS) and β-lactam synthetase (bls) enzymes. These new paralogues are given the gene designations ceaS1 and bls1 and are located immediately upstream of pah1 on the chromosome. Furthermore, sequence analysis of the region downstream of pah1 revealed a second copy of a gene encoding ornithine acetyltransferase (oat1), thus indicating the presence of a cluster of paralogue genes. ceaS1, bls1, and oat1 display 73, 60, and 63% identities, respectively, at the nucleotide level to the original ceaS2, bls2, and oat2 genes from the clavulanic acid gene cluster. Single mutants defective in ceaS1, bls1, or oat1 were prepared and characterized and were found to be affected to variable degrees in their ability to produce clavulanic acid and clavam metabolites. Double mutants defective in both copies of the genes were also prepared and tested. The ceaS1/ceaS2 and the bls1/bls2 mutant strains were completely blocked in clavulanic acid and clavam metabolite biosynthesis. On the other hand, oat1/oat2 double mutants still produced some clavulanic acid and clavam metabolites. This may be attributed to the presence of the argJ gene in S. clavuligerus, which encodes yet another ornithine acetyltransferase enzyme that may be able to compensate for the lack of OAT1 and -2 in the double mutants. PMID:14982786

  19. Influence of maternal diet enrichment with conjugated linoleic acids on lipoxygenase metabolites of polyunsaturated fatty acids in serum of their offspring with 7,12-dimethylbenz[a]anthracene induced mammary tumors.

    PubMed

    Białek, Agnieszka; Jelińska, Małgorzata; Tokarz, Andrzej

    2015-01-01

    Conjugated linoleic acids (CLA), which are a group of naturally occurring in food isomers of linoleic acid, seem to be active in each step of cancer development. There are many possible mechanisms of this action, and interactions with polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) in lipoxygenase (LOX) and cyclooxygenase (COX) pathways are among the most likely ones. The aim of this study was to assess the influence of diet supplementation with CLA of pregnant and breastfeeding Sprague-Dawley female rats on selected polyunsaturated fatty acids and their LOX metabolites concentrations in serum of the progeny with chemically induced mammary tumors. We confirmed that higher supply of CLA in the diet of female rats corresponded with the lower susceptibility to chemically induced mammary tumors in their female offspring. It also influenced the polyunsaturated n-3 and n-6 fatty acid concentrations in serum, as well as the concentrations of their LOX metabolites. The significant negative correlation between the concentrations of two CLA isomers in serum and linoleic acid (p=0.0144, p=0.0098), eicosapentaenoic acid (p=0.0158, p=0.0124), and 5-HEPE (p=0.0014, p=0.01690) and between cis-9, trans-11 CLA and 15-HEPE was detected, whereas arachidonic acid concentration positively correlated with CLA concentration in serum (p=0.0150, p=0.0231). Our results indicate that CLA can compete with PUFA and influence serum concentration of PUFA and their LOX metabolites, which could partly explain the anticancerogenic action of CLA.

  20. JWH-018 ω-OH, a shared hydroxy metabolite of the two synthetic cannabinoids JWH-018 and AM-2201, undergoes oxidation by alcohol dehydrogenase and aldehyde dehydrogenase enzymes in vitro forming the carboxylic acid metabolite.

    PubMed

    Holm, Niels Bjerre; Noble, Carolina; Linnet, Kristian

    2016-09-30

    Synthetic cannabinoids are new psychoactive substances (NPS) acting as agonists at the cannabinoid receptors. The aminoalkylindole-type synthetic cannabinoid naphthalen-1-yl-(1-pentylindol-3-yl)methanone (JWH-018) was among the first to appear on the illicit drug market and its metabolism has been extensively investigated. The N-pentyl side chain is a major site of human cytochrome P450 (CYP)-mediated oxidative metabolism, and the ω-carboxylic acid metabolite appears to be a major in vivo human urinary metabolite. This metabolite is, however, not formed to any significant extent in human liver microsomal (HLM) incubations raising the possibility that the discrepancy is due to involvement of cytosolic enzymes. Here we demonstrate in incubations with human liver cytosol (HLC), that JWH-018 ω-OH, but not the JWH-018 parent compound, is a substrate for nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD(+))-dependent alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) and aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH) enzymes. The sole end-product identified in HLC was the JWH-018 ω-COOH metabolite, while trapping tests with methoxyamine proved the presence of the aldehyde intermediate. ADH/ALDH and UDP-glucuronosyl-transferases (UGT) enzymes may therefore both act on the JWH-018 ω-OH substrate. Finally, we note that for [1-(5-fluoropentyl)indol-3-yl]-naphthalen-1-yl-methanone (AM-2201), the ω-fluorinated analog of JWH-018, a high amount of JWH-018 ω-OH was formed in HLM incubated without NADPH, suggesting that the oxidative defluorination is efficiently catalyzed by non-CYP enzyme(s). The pathway presented here may therefore be especially important for N-(5-fluoropentyl) substituted synthetic cannabinoids, because the oxidative defluorination can occur even if the CYP-mediated metabolism preferentially takes place on other parts of the molecule than the N-alkyl side chain. Controlled clinical studies in humans are ultimately required to demonstrate the in vivo importance of the oxidation pathway presented here

  1. JWH-018 ω-OH, a shared hydroxy metabolite of the two synthetic cannabinoids JWH-018 and AM-2201, undergoes oxidation by alcohol dehydrogenase and aldehyde dehydrogenase enzymes in vitro forming the carboxylic acid metabolite.

    PubMed

    Holm, Niels Bjerre; Noble, Carolina; Linnet, Kristian

    2016-09-30

    Synthetic cannabinoids are new psychoactive substances (NPS) acting as agonists at the cannabinoid receptors. The aminoalkylindole-type synthetic cannabinoid naphthalen-1-yl-(1-pentylindol-3-yl)methanone (JWH-018) was among the first to appear on the illicit drug market and its metabolism has been extensively investigated. The N-pentyl side chain is a major site of human cytochrome P450 (CYP)-mediated oxidative metabolism, and the ω-carboxylic acid metabolite appears to be a major in vivo human urinary metabolite. This metabolite is, however, not formed to any significant extent in human liver microsomal (HLM) incubations raising the possibility that the discrepancy is due to involvement of cytosolic enzymes. Here we demonstrate in incubations with human liver cytosol (HLC), that JWH-018 ω-OH, but not the JWH-018 parent compound, is a substrate for nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD(+))-dependent alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) and aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH) enzymes. The sole end-product identified in HLC was the JWH-018 ω-COOH metabolite, while trapping tests with methoxyamine proved the presence of the aldehyde intermediate. ADH/ALDH and UDP-glucuronosyl-transferases (UGT) enzymes may therefore both act on the JWH-018 ω-OH substrate. Finally, we note that for [1-(5-fluoropentyl)indol-3-yl]-naphthalen-1-yl-methanone (AM-2201), the ω-fluorinated analog of JWH-018, a high amount of JWH-018 ω-OH was formed in HLM incubated without NADPH, suggesting that the oxidative defluorination is efficiently catalyzed by non-CYP enzyme(s). The pathway presented here may therefore be especially important for N-(5-fluoropentyl) substituted synthetic cannabinoids, because the oxidative defluorination can occur even if the CYP-mediated metabolism preferentially takes place on other parts of the molecule than the N-alkyl side chain. Controlled clinical studies in humans are ultimately required to demonstrate the in vivo importance of the oxidation pathway presented here.

  2. 10-oxo-12(Z)-octadecenoic acid, a linoleic acid metabolite produced by gut lactic acid bacteria, potently activates PPARγ and stimulates adipogenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Goto, Tsuyoshi; Kim, Young-Il; Furuzono, Tomoya; Takahashi, Nobuyuki; Yamakuni, Kanae; Yang, Ha-Eun; Li, Yongjia; Ohue, Ryuji; Nomura, Wataru; Sugawara, Tatsuya; Yu, Rina; Kitamura, Nahoko; and others

    2015-04-17

    Our previous study has shown that gut lactic acid bacteria generate various kinds of fatty acids from polyunsaturated fatty acids such as linoleic acid (LA). In this study, we investigated the effects of LA and LA-derived fatty acids on the activation of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs) which regulate whole-body energy metabolism. None of the fatty acids activated PPARδ, whereas almost all activated PPARα in luciferase assays. Two fatty acids potently activated PPARγ, a master regulator of adipocyte differentiation, with 10-oxo-12(Z)-octadecenoic acid (KetoA) having the most potency. In 3T3-L1 cells, KetoA induced adipocyte differentiation via the activation of PPARγ, and increased adiponectin production and insulin-stimulated glucose uptake. These findings suggest that fatty acids, including KetoA, generated in gut by lactic acid bacteria may be involved in the regulation of host energy metabolism. - Highlights: • Most LA-derived fatty acids from gut lactic acid bacteria potently activated PPARα. • Among tested fatty acids, KetoA and KetoC significantly activated PPARγ. • KetoA induced adipocyte differentiation via the activation of PPARγ. • KetoA enhanced adiponectin production and glucose uptake during adipogenesis.

  3. Analysis of cytochrome P450 metabolites of arachidonic acid by stable isotope probe labeling coupled with ultra high-performance liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Quan-Fei; Hao, Yan-Hong; Liu, Ming-Zhou; Yue, Jiang; Ni, Jian; Yuan, Bi-Feng; Feng, Yu-Qi

    2015-09-01

    Cytochrome P450 metabolites of arachidonic acid (AA) belong to eicosanoids and are potent lipid mediators of inflammation. It is well-known that eicosanoids play an important role in numerous pathophysiological processes. Therefore, quantitative analysis of cytochrome P450 metabolites of AA, including hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acids (HETEs), epoxyeicosatreinoic acids (EETs), and dihydroxyeicosatrienoic acids (DHETs) can provide crucial information to uncover underlying mechanisms of cytochrome P450 metabolites of AA related diseases. Herein, we developed a highly sensitive method to identify and quantify HETEs, EETs, and DHETs in lipid extracts of biological samples based on stable isotope probe labeling coupled with ultra high-performance liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry. To this end, a pair of stable isotope probes, 2-dimethylaminoethylamine (DMED) and d4-2-dimethylaminoethylamine (d4-DMED), were utilized to facilely label eicosanoids. The heavy labeled eicosanoid standards were prepared and used as internal standards for quantification to minimize the matrix and ion suppression effects in mass spectrometry analysis. In addition, the detection sensitivities of DMED labeled eicosanoids improved by 3-104 folds in standard solution and 5-138 folds in serum matrix compared with unlabeled analytes. Moreover, a good separation of eicosanoids isomers was achieved upon DMED labeling. The established method provided substantial sensitivity (limit of quantification at sub-picogram), high specificity, and broad linear dynamics range (3 orders of magnitude). We further quantified cytochrome P450 metabolites of AA in rat liver, heart, brain tissues and human serum using the developed method. The results showed that 19 eicosanoids could be distinctly detected and the contents of 11-, 15-, 16-, 20-HETE, 5,6-EET, and 14,15-EET in type 2 diabetes mellitus patients and 5-, 11-, 12-, 15-, 16-, 20-HETE, 8,9-EET, and 5,6-DHET in myeloid leukemia patients had significant changes

  4. Degradation of chloroacetanilide herbicides: The prevalence of sulfonic and oxanilic acid metabolites in Iowa groundwaters and surface waters

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kalkhoff, S.J.; Kolpin, D.W.; Thurman, E.M.; Ferrer, I.; Barcelo, D.

    1998-01-01

    Water samples were collected from 88 municipal wells throughout Iowa during the summer and were collected monthly at 12 stream sites in eastern Iowa from March to December 1996 to study the occurrence of the sulfonic and oxanilic metabolites of acetochlor, alachlor, and metolachlor. The sulfonic and oxanilic metabolites were present in almost 75% of the groundwater samples and were generally present from 3 to 45 times more frequently than their parent compounds. In groundwater, the median value of the summed concentrations of acetochlor, alachlor, and metolachlor was less than 0.05 μg/L, and the median value of the summed concentrations of the six metabolites was 1.2 μg/L. All surface water samples contained at least one detectable metabolite compound. Individual metabolites were detected from 2 to over 100 times more frequently than the parent compounds. In surface water, the median value of the summed concentrations of the three parent compounds was 0.13 μg/L, and the median value of the summed concentrations of the six metabolites was 6.4 μg/L. These data demonstrate the importance of analyzing both parent compounds and metabolites to more fully understand the environmental fate and transport of herbicides in the hydrologic system.

  5. Chemoprevention of esophageal cancer with black raspberries, their component anthocyanins, and a major anthocyanin metabolite, protocatechuic acid.

    PubMed

    Peiffer, Daniel S; Zimmerman, Noah P; Wang, Li-Shu; Ransom, Benjamin W S; Carmella, Steven G; Kuo, Chieh-Ti; Siddiqui, Jibran; Chen, Jo-Hsin; Oshima, Kiyoko; Huang, Yi-Wen; Hecht, Stephen S; Stoner, Gary D

    2014-06-01

    Diets containing either freeze-dried black raspberries (BRBs) or their polyphenolic anthocyanins (ACs) have been shown to inhibit the development of N-nitrosomethylbenzylamine (NMBA)-induced esophageal cancer in rats. The present study was conducted to determine whether PCA, a major microbial metabolite of black raspberry (BRB) ACs, also prevents NMBA-induced esophageal cancer in rats. F344 rats were injected with NMBA three times a week for 5 weeks and then fed control or experimental diets containing 6.1% BRBs, an anthocyanin (AC)-enriched fraction derived from BRBs, or protocatechuic acid (PCA). Animals were exsanguinated at weeks 15, 25, and 35 to quantify the development of preneoplastic lesions and tumors in the esophagus, and to relate this to the expression of inflammatory biomarkers. At weeks 15 and 25, all experimental diets were equally effective in reducing NMBA-induced esophageal tumorigenesis, as well as in reducing the expression of pentraxin-3 (PTX3), a cytokine produced by peripheral blood mononuclear cells in response to interleukin (IL)-1β and TNF-α. All experimental diets were also active at reducing tumorigenesis at week 35; however, the BRB diet was significantly more effective than the AC and PCA diets. Furthermore, all experimental diets inhibited inflammation in the esophagus via reducing biomarker (COX-2, iNOS, p-NF-κB, and sEH) and cytokine (PTX3) expression. Overall, our data suggest that BRBs, their component ACs, and PCA inhibit NMBA-induced esophageal tumorigenesis, at least in part, by their inhibitory effects on genes associated with inflammation.

  6. Effects of free ferulic acid on productive performance, blood metabolites, and carcass characteristics of feedlot finishing ewe lambs.

    PubMed

    Macías-Cruz, U; Perard, S; Vicente, R; Álvarez, F D; Torrentera-Olivera, N G; González-Ríos, H; Soto-Navarro, S A; Rojo, R; Meza-Herrera, C A; Avendaño-Reyes, L

    2014-12-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate effects of free ferulic acid (FA) supplementation on productive performance, some blood metabolite concentrations, and carcass characteristics of ewe lambs finished in a feedlot. Dorper×Pelibuey ewe lambs (n=20; BW=28.5±0.5 kg; age=5 mo) were individually housed in pens and assigned under a randomized complete block design to the following dietary treatments (n=10): daily feeding without (control) or with 300 mg of FA/animal. The feedlot feeding period lasted 34 d and then all ewe lambs were slaughtered. Free FA did not affect (P≥0.16) BW gain, ADG, DMI, and G:F during the first 17 d, but BW gain (P=0.10) and ADG (P=0.10) tended to decrease for FA from d 17 to 34 and from d 1 to 34 without affecting (P≥0.16) DMI and G:F in ewe lambs. Serum concentrations of glucose, cholesterol, triglyceride, total protein, and urea were not affected (P>0.05) by FA at d 1, 17, and 34 of the feeding period. Carcass characteristics were not affected (P>0.05) by FA. Stomach percentage tended (P=0.08) to decrease and leg yields increased (P=0.02) for FA. Other noncarcass components and wholesale cut yields were not affected (P>0.10) by FA. In conclusion, FA supplementation did not improve productive performance, metabolic status, and carcass characteristics of ewe lambs receiving a feedlot finishing diet.

  7. Detection Times of Carboxylic Acid Metabolites of the Synthetic Cannabinoids JWH-018 and JWH-073 in Human Urine.

    PubMed

    Hegstad, Solfrid; Westin, Andreas A; Spigset, Olav

    2015-05-01

    Over the past years, use of synthetic cannabinoids has become increasingly popular. To draw the right conclusions regarding new intake of these substances in situations of repeated urinary drug testing, knowledge of their elimination rate in urine is essential. We report data from consecutive urine specimens from five subjects after ingestion of synthetic cannabinoids. Urinary concentrations of the carboxylic acid metabolites JWH-018-COOH and JWH-073-COOH were measured by ultra-performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (UPLC-MS-MS) with a limit of quantification of 0.1 ng/mL. In these subjects, specimens remained positive over a period of 20-43 (mean 27) days for JWH-018-COOH and over a period of 11-25 (mean 19) days for JWH-073-COOH. Detection times were shorter for subjects that appeared to have ingested only one, or a few, doses prior to urine collection in the study. Creatinine-normalized concentrations (CN-concentrations) slowly declined throughout the follow-up period in all subjects, suggesting that no new intake had taken place during this period. Mean elimination half-lives in urine were 14.0 (range 4.4-23.8) days for CN-JWH-018-COOH and 9.3 (range 3.6-16.8) days for CN-JWH-073-COOH. These data show that urine specimens could be positive for JWH-018-COOH for more than 6 weeks and JWH-073-COOH for more than 3 weeks after ingestion. However, such long detection periods require a low limit of quantification.

  8. Enhanced metabolite generation

    DOEpatents

    Chidambaram, Devicharan

    2012-03-27

    The present invention relates to the enhanced production of metabolites by a process whereby a carbon source is oxidized with a fermentative microbe in a compartment having a portal. An electron acceptor is added to the compartment to assist the microbe in the removal of excess electrons. The electron acceptor accepts electrons from the microbe after oxidation of the carbon source. Other transfers of electrons can take place to enhance the production of the metabolite, such as acids, biofuels or brewed beverages.

  9. Linoleic acid and its metabolites, hydroperoxyoctadecadienoic acids, stimulate c-Fos, c-Jun, and c-Myc mRNA expression, mitogen-activated protein kinase activation, and growth in rat aortic smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed Central

    Rao, G N; Alexander, R W; Runge, M S

    1995-01-01

    Previous studies from other laboratories suggest that linoleic acid and its metabolites, hydroperoxyoctadecadienoic acids, play an important role in modulating the growth of some cells. A correlation has been demonstrated between hydroperoxyoctadecadienoic acids and conditions characterized by abnormal cell growth such as atherosclerosis and psoriasis. To determine if linoleic acid and its metabolites modulate cell growth in atherosclerosis, we measured DNA synthesis, protooncogene mRNA expression, and mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) activation in vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC). Linoleic acid induces DNA synthesis, c-fos, c-jun, and c-myc mRNA expression and MAPK activation in VSMC. Furthermore, nordihydroguaiaretic acid, a potent inhibitor of the lipoxygenase system, significantly reduced the growth-response effects of linoleic acid in VSMC, suggesting that conversion of linoleic acid to hydroperoxyoctadecadienoic acids (HPODEs) is required for these effects. HPODEs also caused significant induction of DNA synthesis, protooncogene mRNA expression, and MAPK activation in growth-arrested VSMC, suggesting that linoleic acid and its metabolic products, HPODEs, are potential mitogens in VSMC, and that conditions such as oxidative stress and lipid peroxidation which provoke the production of these substances may alter VSMC growth. Images PMID:7635978

  10. An Interspecies Signaling System Mediated by Fusaric Acid Has Parallel Effects on Antifungal Metabolite Production by Pseudomonas protegens Strain Pf-5 and Antibiosis of Fusarium spp.

    PubMed Central

    Quecine, Maria Carolina; Kidarsa, Teresa A.; Goebel, Neal C.; Shaffer, Brenda T.; Henkels, Marcella D.; Zabriskie, T. Mark

    2015-01-01

    Pseudomonas protegens strain Pf-5 is a rhizosphere bacterium that suppresses soilborne plant diseases and produces at least seven different secondary metabolites with antifungal properties. We derived mutants of Pf-5 with single and multiple mutations in biosynthesis genes for seven antifungal metabolites: 2,4-diacetylphoroglucinol (DAPG), pyrrolnitrin, pyoluteorin, hydrogen cyanide, rhizoxin, orfamide A, and toxoflavin. These mutants were tested for inhibition of the pathogens Fusarium verticillioides and Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. pisi. Rhizoxin, pyrrolnitrin, and DAPG were found to be primarily responsible for fungal antagonism by Pf-5. Previously, other workers showed that the mycotoxin fusaric acid, which is produced by many Fusarium species, including F. verticillioides, inhibited the production of DAPG by Pseudomonas spp. In this study, amendment of culture media with fusaric acid decreased DAPG production, increased pyoluteorin production, and had no consistent influence on pyrrolnitrin or orfamide A production by Pf-5. Fusaric acid also altered the transcription of biosynthetic genes, indicating that the mycotoxin influenced antibiotic production by Pf-5 at the transcriptional level. Addition of fusaric acid to the culture medium reduced antibiosis of F. verticillioides by Pf-5 and derivative strains that produce DAPG but had no effect on antibiosis by Pf-5 derivatives that suppressed F. verticillioides due to pyrrolnitrin or rhizoxin production. Our results demonstrated the importance of three compounds, rhizoxin, pyrrolnitrin, and DAPG, in suppression of Fusarium spp. by Pf-5 and confirmed that an interspecies signaling system mediated by fusaric acid had parallel effects on antifungal metabolite production and antibiosis by the bacterial biological control organism. PMID:26655755

  11. Supplementing Blends of Sugars, Amino Acids, and Secondary Metabolites to the Diet of Termites (Reticulitermes flavipes) Drive Distinct Gut Bacterial Communities.

    PubMed

    Huang, Xing-Feng; Chaparro, Jacqueline M; Reardon, Kenneth F; Judd, Timothy M; Vivanco, Jorge M

    2016-10-01

    Although it is well known that diet is one of the major modulators of the gut microbiome, how the major components of diet shape the gut microbial community is not well understood. Here, we developed a simple system that allows the investigation of the impact of given compounds as supplements of the diet on the termite gut microbiome. The 16S rRNA pyrosequencing analysis revealed that feeding termites different blends of sugars and amino acids did not majorly impact gut community composition; however, ingestion of blends of secondary metabolites caused shifts in gut bacterial community composition. The supplementation of sugars and amino acids reduced the richness significantly, and sugars alone increased the evenness of the gut bacterial community significantly. Secondary metabolites created the most dramatic effects on the microbial community, potentially overriding the effect of other types of compounds. Furthermore, some microbial groups were stimulated specifically by particular groups of compounds. For instance, termites fed with secondary metabolites contained more Firmicutes and Spirochaetes compared to the other treatments. In conclusion, our results suggest that the termite (Reticulitermes flavipes) can be used as a simple and effective system to test the effects of particular chemical compounds in modulating the gut microbiome. PMID:27338261

  12. Supplementing Blends of Sugars, Amino Acids, and Secondary Metabolites to the Diet of Termites (Reticulitermes flavipes) Drive Distinct Gut Bacterial Communities.

    PubMed

    Huang, Xing-Feng; Chaparro, Jacqueline M; Reardon, Kenneth F; Judd, Timothy M; Vivanco, Jorge M

    2016-10-01

    Although it is well known that diet is one of the major modulators of the gut microbiome, how the major components of diet shape the gut microbial community is not well understood. Here, we developed a simple system that allows the investigation of the impact of given compounds as supplements of the diet on the termite gut microbiome. The 16S rRNA pyrosequencing analysis revealed that feeding termites different blends of sugars and amino acids did not majorly impact gut community composition; however, ingestion of blends of secondary metabolites caused shifts in gut bacterial community composition. The supplementation of sugars and amino acids reduced the richness significantly, and sugars alone increased the evenness of the gut bacterial community significantly. Secondary metabolites created the most dramatic effects on the microbial community, potentially overriding the effect of other types of compounds. Furthermore, some microbial groups were stimulated specifically by particular groups of compounds. For instance, termites fed with secondary metabolites contained more Firmicutes and Spirochaetes compared to the other treatments. In conclusion, our results suggest that the termite (Reticulitermes flavipes) can be used as a simple and effective system to test the effects of particular chemical compounds in modulating the gut microbiome.

  13. [Investigations on the correlation between vinyl chloride (VCM)-uptake and excretion of its metabolites by 15 VCM-exposed workers. II. Measurements of the urinary excretion of the vcm-metabolite thiodiglycolic acid ].

    PubMed

    Heger, M; Müller, G; Norpoth, K

    1982-01-01

    Fifteen workers employed in a PVC producing plant were investigated concerning their individual vinyl chloride (VCM) exposure and the urinary excretion of the VCM metabolite thiodiglycolic acid (TdGA). The urine concentrations found were in the range 0.94-20.4 microgram/ml. These could be compared with exposure data calculated from VCM air analyses performed by personal air sampling and corrected with respect to the exposure times of the workers. The amounts of TdGA excreted within 24 h were correlated with the effective VCM body concentrations calculated from the exposure data as mean values for 12 h periods (Spearman coefficient P=alpha less than 0.005). This correlation resembles a function of the Michaelis-Menten type. It could be shown that during short exposure periods of less than 5 min, the metabolite formation in relation to the exposure data was lower than during longer periods of exposure although, as would be expected, there were some fluctuations of the exposure level. Therefore, the VCM body concentrations could not normally reach steady state values.

  14. Cyclodextrin-modified MEKC method for quantification of selected acidic metabolites of catecholamines in the presence of various biogenic amines. Application to diagnosis of neuroblastoma.

    PubMed

    Miękus, Natalia; Kowalski, Piotr; Olędzka, Ilona; Plenis, Alina; Bień, Ewa; Miękus, Aleksandra; Krawczyk, Małgorzata; Adamkiewicz-Drożyńska, Elżbieta; Bączek, Tomasz

    2015-10-15

    The main aim of the presented study was to develop a reliable and non-time-consuming method for the simultaneous separation of biogenic amines (BAs) like noradrenalin, adrenalin, dopamine and their main metabolites - homovanillic acid (HVA), vanillylmandelic acid (VMA), 3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetic acid (DOPAC) - in urine samples. To achieve this, the validated α-cyclodextrin (α-CD)-modified micellar electrokinetic chromatography method with DAD was proposed. The optimized separation parameters were as follows: background electrolyte was composed of 10mM sodium tetraborate decahydrate, 30mM SDS, 15% (v/v) methanol and 25mM α-CD, adjusted to pH 9.36 with 1N NaOH; uncoated fused silica capillary (75μm i.d.×60.2cm length); λ=200nm; injection time 5s, applied voltage 25kV; temperature 25 (±0.1)°C. Next, the developed MEKC method was practically applied to evaluate the levels of selected acidic metabolites of catecholamines like HVA, VMA and DOPAC in urine samples collected from patients diagnosed with neuroblastoma (NB), melanotic neuroectodermal tumor of infancy (MNTI). PMID:26402573

  15. Thermogenesis, blood metabolites and hormones, and growth of lambs born to ewes supplemented with algae-derived docosahexaenoic acid.

    PubMed

    Keithly, J I; Kott, R W; Berardinelli, J G; Moreaux, S; Hatfield, P G

    2011-12-01

    Neonatal lamb mortality is a major factor affecting profitability in the sheep industry, and lamb thermogenesis is a key element in neonatal lamb survival. Increased lamb vigor has been reported when ewes were supplemented during late gestation with algae-derived docosahexaenoic acid (DHA); however, the effects of DHA on lamb thermogenesis and immunocompetence have not been investigated. Eighty twin-bearing Targhee ewes (ages 2 to 5 yr; 68.5 ± 3 kg) were assigned randomly to 1 of 2 supplement treatments to determine the effects of feeding DHA to ewes during late gestation and early lactation on lamb thermogenesis, serum metabolites and hormones, and lamb growth. Supplement treatments were 12 g·ewe(-1)·d(-1) of algae-derived DHA (DHA Gold Advanced Bionutrition Corp., Columbia, MD; algae-derived DHA); and no algae-derived DHA (control). Supplements were individually fed daily during the last 30 d (±7 d) of gestation and pen fed (6 pens/treatment with 6 or 7 ewes/pen) during the first 38 d (±7 d) of lactation. One hour after lambing and before nursing, twin-born lambs were weighed, blood sampled via jugular puncture, and placed in a dry cold chamber for 30 min (0°C), and rectal temperatures were recorded every minute for 30 min. Lambs were removed from the cold chamber, blood sampled, warmed for 15 min, and returned to their dam. Ewes were blood sampled, and colostrum samples were collected 1 h postpartum. Ewe and lamb sera were assayed for glucose, NEFA, cortisol, and leptin. Lamb rectal temperature, glucose, NEFA, cortisol, leptin, and birth weights did not differ between treatments. The BW at 38 d was greater (P = 0.03) for lambs born to control ewes than for lambs born to algae-derived DHA-supplemented ewes; however, the colostrum of algae-derived DHA-supplemented ewes had a greater specific gravity (P = 0.05) than for control ewes. Overall, despite a potentially positive effect on ewe colostral IgG concentrations, supplementation of algae-derived DHA during

  16. Effects of Chromium Methionine Supplementation on Blood Metabolites and Fatty Acid Profile of Beef during Late Fattening Period in Holstein Steers

    PubMed Central

    Nejad, Jalil Ghassemi; Lee, Bae-Hun; Kim, Byong-Wan; Ohh, Sang-Jip; Sung, Kyung Il

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the effects of chromium methionine (Cr-Met) chelate supplementation on blood metabolites and fatty acid profile of beef from Holstein steers during late fattening period. Fifteen Holstein steers were allotted randomly into two groups including the control (non Cr-Met feeding, NCM, ave. body weight [BW] = 483±25.7 kg) and the treatment (Cr-Met feeding for 4 months, 4CM, ave. BW = 486±27.5 kg) group. The feeding amount of Cr-Met to animals was limited to 400 ppb/cow/d and was supplemented to total mixed ration. No difference in blood albumin, alkaline phosphatase, urea-nitrogen, calcium, creatine, glucose, total protein, triglyceride, and cholesterol were observed between the treatment groups (p>0.05). The level of high density lipoprotein was higher in the 4CM group than the NCM group, whereas low density lipoprotein was lower in the 4CM group (p<0.05). The fatty acid composition (caprate, laurate, myristate, pentadecanoate, palmitate, palmitoleate, margarate, cis-11 heptadodecanoate, stearate, oleate, trans-vaccenate, linoleate, cis-11 eicosenoate, docosa hexaenoic acid, and docosa pentaenoic acid) of the beef showed no difference between the two groups (p>0.05). The arachidonic acid level tended to be higher in the 4CM than the NCM group (p = 0.07). Cr-Met had no influence (p>0.05) on the ratio of saturated, unsaturated, unsaturated/saturated, monounsaturated/saturated and polyunsaturated/saturated fatty acids whereas the ratio of polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) in the 4CM group was comparatively higher than the NCM group (p<0.05). This study concluded that feeding Cr-Met supplementation in 400 ppb/d to Holstein steers for 4 months during late fattening period can improve some blood metabolites and beef quality by increasing PUFA and gamma-linoleate compositions of beef. PMID:26950869

  17. Cytochrome P450 2C8 ω3-Long-Chain Polyunsaturated Fatty Acid Metabolites Increase Mouse Retinal Pathologic Neovascularization—Brief Report

    PubMed Central

    Shao, Zhuo; Fu, Zhongjie; Stahl, Andreas; Joyal, Jean-Sébastien; Hatton, Colman; Juan, Aimee; Hurst, Christian; Evans, Lucy; Cui, Zhenghao; Pei, Dorothy; Gong, Yan; Xu, Dan; Tian, Katherine; Bogardus, Hannah; Edin, Matthew L.; Lih, Fred; Sapieha, Przemyslaw; Chen, Jing; Panigrahy, Dipak; Hellstrom, Ann; Zeldin, Darryl C.; Smith, Lois E.H.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Regulation of angiogenesis is critical for many diseases. Specifically, pathological retinal neovascularization, a major cause of blindness, is suppressed with dietary ω3-long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids (ω3LCPUFAs) through antiangiogenic metabolites of cyclooxygenase and lipoxygenase. Cytochrome P450 epoxygenases (CYP2C8) also metabolize LCPUFAs, producing bioactive epoxides, which are inactivated by soluble epoxide hydrolase (sEH) to transdihydrodiols. The effect of these enzymes and their metabolites on neovascularization is unknown. Approach and Results The mouse model of oxygen-induced retinopathy was used to investigate retinal neovascularization. We found that CYP2C (localized in wild-type monocytes/macrophages) is upregulated in oxygen-induced retinopathy, whereas sEH is suppressed, resulting in an increased retinal epoxide:diol ratio. With a ω3LCPUFA-enriched diet, retinal neovascularization increases in Tie2-driven human-CYP2C8–overexpressing mice (Tie2-CYP2C8-Tg), associated with increased plasma 19,20-epoxydocosapentaenoic acid and retinal epoxide:diol ratio. 19,20-Epoxydocosapentaenoic acids and the epoxide:diol ratio are decreased with overexpression of sEH (Tie2-sEH-Tg). Overexpression of CYP2C8 or sEH in mice does not change normal retinal vascular development compared with their wild-type littermate controls. The proangiogenic role in retina of CYP2C8 with both ω3LCPUFA and ω6LCPUFA and antiangiogenic role of sEH in ω3LCPUFA metabolism were corroborated in aortic ring assays. Conclusions Our results suggest that CYP2C ω3LCPUFA metabolites promote retinal pathological angiogenesis. CYP2C8 is part of a novel lipid metabolic pathway influencing retinal neovascularization. PMID:24458713

  18. Cyclohexane-1,2-dicarboxylic acid diisononyl ester and metabolite effects on rat epididymal stromal vascular fraction differentiation of adipose tissue

    SciTech Connect

    Campioli, Enrico; Duong, Tam B.; Deschamps, François; Papadopoulos, Vassilios

    2015-07-15

    Plastics are generally mixed with additives like plasticizers to enhance their flexibility, pliability, and elasticity proprieties. Plasticizers are easily released into the environment and are absorbed mainly through ingestion, dermal contact, and inhalation. One of the main classes of plasticizers, phthalates, has been associated with endocrine and reproductive diseases. In 2002, 1,2-cyclohexane dicarboxylic acid diisononyl ester (DINCH) was introduced in the market for use in plastic materials and articles intended to come into contact with food, and it received final approval from the European Food Safety Authority in 2006. At present, there is limited knowledge about the safety and potential metabolic and endocrine-disrupting properties of DINCH and its metabolites. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the biological effects of DINCH and its active metabolites, cyclohexane-1,2-dicarboxylic acid (CHDA) and cyclohexane-1,2-dicarboxylic acid mono isononyl ester (MINCH), on rat primary stromal vascular fraction (SVF) of adipose tissue. DINCH and its metabolite, CHDA, were not able to directly affect SVF differentiation. However, exposure of SVF to 50 μM and 100 μM concentrations of MINCH affected the expression of Cebpa and Fabp4, thus inducing SVF preadipocytes to accumulate lipids and fully differentiate into mature adipocytes. The effect of MINCH was blocked by the specific peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR)-α antagonist, GW6471. Taken together, these results suggest that MINCH is a potent PPAR-α agonist and a metabolic disruptor, capable of inducing SVF preadipocyte differentiation, that may interfere with the endocrine system in mammals. - Highlights: • DINCH and CHDA did not affect the adipogenesis of the SVF. • MINCH affected the adipogenesis of the SVF. • MINCH effect was blocked by the specific PPAR-α antagonist GW6471. • MINCH exerted a similar effect as MEHP on SVF adipogenesis. • DINCH/MINCH are potential metabolic

  19. Cyclohexane-1,2-dicarboxylic acid diisononyl ester and metabolite effects on rat epididymal stromal vascular fraction differentiation of adipose tissue.

    PubMed

    Campioli, Enrico; Duong, Tam B; Deschamps, François; Papadopoulos, Vassilios

    2015-07-01

    Plastics are generally mixed with additives like plasticizers to enhance their flexibility, pliability, and elasticity proprieties. Plasticizers are easily released into the environment and are absorbed mainly through ingestion, dermal contact, and inhalation. One of the main classes of plasticizers, phthalates, has been associated with endocrine and reproductive diseases. In 2002, 1,2-cyclohexane dicarboxylic acid diisononyl ester (DINCH) was introduced in the market for use in plastic materials and articles intended to come into contact with food, and it received final approval from the European Food Safety Authority in 2006. At present, there is limited knowledge about the safety and potential metabolic and endocrine-disrupting properties of DINCH and its metabolites. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the biological effects of DINCH and its active metabolites, cyclohexane-1,2-dicarboxylic acid (CHDA) and cyclohexane-1,2-dicarboxylic acid mono isononyl ester (MINCH), on rat primary stromal vascular fraction (SVF) of adipose tissue. DINCH and its metabolite, CHDA, were not able to directly affect SVF differentiation. However, exposure of SVF to 50 μM and 100 μM concentrations of MINCH affected the expression of Cebpa and Fabp4, thus inducing SVF preadipocytes to accumulate lipids and fully differentiate into mature adipocytes. The effect of MINCH was blocked by the specific peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR)-α antagonist, GW6471. Taken together, these results suggest that MINCH is a potent PPAR-α agonist and a metabolic disruptor, capable of inducing SVF preadipocyte differentiation, that may interfere with the endocrine system in mammals.

  20. In vivo relevant mixed urolithins and ellagic acid inhibit phenotypic and molecular colon cancer stem cell features: A new potentiality for ellagitannin metabolites against cancer.

    PubMed

    Núñez-Sánchez, María Ángeles; Karmokar, Ankur; González-Sarrías, Antonio; García-Villalba, Rocío; Tomás-Barberán, Francisco A; García-Conesa, María Teresa; Brown, Karen; Espín, Juan Carlos

    2016-06-01

    Colon cancer stem cells (CSCs) offer a novel paradigm for colorectal cancer (CRC) treatment and dietary polyphenols may contribute to battle these cells. Specifically, polyphenol-derived colon metabolites have the potential to interact with and affect colon CSCs. We herein report the effects against colon CSCs of two mixtures of ellagitannin (ET) metabolites, ellagic acid (EA) and the gut microbiota-derived urolithins (Uro) at concentrations detected in the human colon tissues following the intake of ET-containing products (pomegranate, walnuts). These mixtures reduce phenotypic and molecular features in two models of colon CSCs: Caco-2 cells and primary tumour cells from a patient with CRC. The mixture containing mostly Uro-A (85% Uro-A, 10% Uro-C, 5% EA) was most effective at inhibiting the number and size of colonospheres and aldehyde dehydrogenase activity (ALDH, a marker of chemoresistance) whereas the mixture containing less Uro-A but IsoUro-A and Uro-B (30% Uro-A, 50% IsoUro-A, 10% Uro-B, 5% Uro-C, 5% EA) had some effects on the number and size of colonospheres but not on ALDH. These data support a role for polyphenols metabolites in the control of colon cancer chemoresistance and relapse and encourage the research on the effects of polyphenols against CSCs.

  1. In vivo relevant mixed urolithins and ellagic acid inhibit phenotypic and molecular colon cancer stem cell features: A new potentiality for ellagitannin metabolites against cancer.

    PubMed

    Núñez-Sánchez, María Ángeles; Karmokar, Ankur; González-Sarrías, Antonio; García-Villalba, Rocío; Tomás-Barberán, Francisco A; García-Conesa, María Teresa; Brown, Karen; Espín, Juan Carlos

    2016-06-01

    Colon cancer stem cells (CSCs) offer a novel paradigm for colorectal cancer (CRC) treatment and dietary polyphenols may contribute to battle these cells. Specifically, polyphenol-derived colon metabolites have the potential to interact with and affect colon CSCs. We herein report the effects against colon CSCs of two mixtures of ellagitannin (ET) metabolites, ellagic acid (EA) and the gut microbiota-derived urolithins (Uro) at concentrations detected in the human colon tissues following the intake of ET-containing products (pomegranate, walnuts). These mixtures reduce phenotypic and molecular features in two models of colon CSCs: Caco-2 cells and primary tumour cells from a patient with CRC. The mixture containing mostly Uro-A (85% Uro-A, 10% Uro-C, 5% EA) was most effective at inhibiting the number and size of colonospheres and aldehyde dehydrogenase activity (ALDH, a marker of chemoresistance) whereas the mixture containing less Uro-A but IsoUro-A and Uro-B (30% Uro-A, 50% IsoUro-A, 10% Uro-B, 5% Uro-C, 5% EA) had some effects on the number and size of colonospheres but not on ALDH. These data support a role for polyphenols metabolites in the control of colon cancer chemoresistance and relapse and encourage the research on the effects of polyphenols against CSCs. PMID:26995228

  2. Development and validation of an HPLC-MS/MS method to quantify clopidogrel acyl glucuronide, clopidogrel acid metabolite, and clopidogrel in plasma samples avoiding analyte back-conversion.

    PubMed

    Silvestro, Luigi; Gheorghe, Mihaela; Iordachescu, Adriana; Ciuca, Valentin; Tudoroniu, Ariana; Rizea Savu, Simona; Tarcomnicu, Isabela

    2011-08-01

    A new sensitive and fast quantitative analytical method for the simultaneous determination of clopidogrel, its main metabolite clopidogrel carboxylic acid, and the newly described acyl glucuronide metabolite, in human plasma samples, is presented. The analytical procedures (plasma storage, handling, and extract storage in the autosampler) were optimized in order to avoid back-conversion; a known drawback in measurements of clopidogrel. Clopidogrel acyl glucuronide was confirmed as a major source of back-conversion to the parent drug in the presence of methanol, and thorough stability experiments were carried out to find the most appropriate conditions for an accurate analysis of clopidogrel and the two metabolites. The method was validated by assessing selectivity, sensitivity, linearity, accuracy, and precision for all three analytes, in accordance to Food and Drug Administration guidelines. Spiked quality controls in plasma as well as incurred samples were used to verify back-conversion in the selected conditions, with results meeting European Medicines Agency acceptance criteria (concentrations within 80-120% of the first reading). The method was then applied to a pharmacokinetic study, and for the first time, a pharmacokinetic curve of clopidogrel acyl glucuronide in human plasma is presented. The concentrations ranged up to 1,048.684 ng/mL, with a mean of 470.268 ng/mL, while clopidogrel had a mean C(max) of 1.348 ng/mL; these orders of magnitude show how much the back-conversion of this metabolite may influence clopidogrel quantification if it is not properly controlled.

  3. Arsenic Metabolites, Including N-Acetyl-4-hydroxy-m-arsanilic Acid, in Chicken Litter from a Roxarsone-Feeding Study Involving 1600 Chickens.

    PubMed

    Yang, Zonglin; Peng, Hanyong; Lu, Xiufen; Liu, Qingqing; Huang, Rongfu; Hu, Bin; Kachanoski, Gary; Zuidhof, Martin J; Le, X Chris

    2016-07-01

    The poultry industry has used organoarsenicals, such as 3-nitro-4-hydroxyphenylarsonic acid (Roxarsone, ROX), to prevent disease and to promote growth. Although previous studies have analyzed arsenic species in chicken litter after composting or after application to agricultural lands, it is not clear what arsenic species were excreted by chickens before biotransformation of arsenic species during composting. We describe here the identification and quantitation of arsenic species in chicken litter repeatedly collected on days 14, 24, 28, 30, and 35 of a Roxarsone-feeding study involving 1600 chickens of two strains. High performance liquid chromatography separation with simultaneous detection by both inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry and electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry provided complementary information necessary for the identification and quantitation of arsenic species. A new metabolite, N-acetyl-4-hydroxy-m-arsanilic acid (N-AHAA), was identified, and it accounted for 3-12% of total arsenic. Speciation analyses of litter samples collected from ROX-fed chickens on days 14, 24, 28, 30, and 35 showed the presence of N-AHAA, 3-amino-4-hydroxyphenylarsonic acid (3-AHPAA), inorganic arsenite (As(III)), arsenate (As(V)), monomethylarsonic acid (MMA(V)), dimethylarsinic acid (DMA(V)), and ROX. 3-AHPAA accounted for 3-19% of the total arsenic. Inorganic arsenicals (the sum of As(III) and As(V)) comprised 2-6% (mean 3.5%) of total arsenic. Our results on the detection of inorganic arsenicals, methylarsenicals, 3-AHPAA, and N-AHAA in the chicken litter support recent findings that ROX is actually metabolized by the chicken or its gut microbiome. The presence of the toxic metabolites in chicken litter is environmentally relevant as chicken litter is commonly used as fertilizer.

  4. A novel study of screening and confirmation of modafinil, adrafinil and their metabolite modafinilic acid under EI-GC-MS and ESI-LC-MS-MS ionization

    PubMed Central

    Dubey, S.; Ahi, S.; Reddy, I. M.; Kaur, T.; Beotra, A.; Jain, S.

    2009-01-01

    Objective: Adrafinil and modafinil have received wide publicity and have become controversial in the sporting world when several athletes were discovered allegedly using these drugs as doping agents. By acknowledging the facts, the World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA) banned these drugs in sports since 2004. The present study explores the possibility of differentiating adrafinil and modafinil and their major metabolites under electron impact ionization in gas chromatograph–mass spectrometer (GC-MSD) and electrospray ionization in liquid chromatograph–mass spectrometer (LC-MS/MS) by studying the fragmentation pattern of these drugs. Materials and Methods: Adrafinil, modafinil and their major metabolite, modafinilic acid were analyzed on EI-GC-MSD and ESI-LC-MS/MS using various individual parameters on both the instruments. The analytical technique and equipment used in the analysis were an Agilent 6890N GC with 5973 mass selective detector for the GC-MSD analysis and an Agilent 1100 HPLC with API-3200 Triple quadrupole mass spectrometer for the LC-MS/MS analysis. Validation of both methods was performed using six replicates at different concentrations. Result and Discussion: The results show that adrafinil, modafinil and their major metabolite modafinilic acid could be detected as a single artifact without differentiation under EI-GC-MSD analysis. However, all drugs could be detected and differentiated under ESI-LCMS/MS analysis without any artifaction. The GC-MSD analysis gives a single artifact for both the drugs without differentiation and thus can be used as a marker for screening purposes. Further, the Multiple Reaction Monitoring (MRM) method developed under LC-MS/MS is fit for the purpose for confirmation of suspicious samples in routine sports testing and in forensic and clinical analysis. PMID:20407560

  5. Separation and fragmentation study of isocoproporphyrin derivatives by UHPLC-ESI-exact mass MS/MS and identification of a new isocoproporphyrin sulfonic acid metabolite.

    PubMed

    Benton, Christopher M; Lim, Chang Kee; Moniz, Caje; Baxter, Sinéad L; Jones, Donald J L

    2014-01-01

    Isocoproporphyrin and its derivatives are commonly used as biomarkers of porphyria cutanea tarda, heavy metal toxicity and hexachlorobenzene (HCB) intoxication in humans and animals. However, most are isobaric with other porphyrins and reference materials are unavailable commercially. The structural characterisation of these porphyrins is important but very little data is available. We report here the separation and characterisation of isocoproporphyrin, deethylisocoproporphyrin, hydroxyisocoproporphyrin and ketoisocoproporphyrin, isolated in the faeces of rats fed with a diet containing HCB, by ultra high performance liquid chromatography-exact mass tandem mass spectrometry (UHPLC-MS/MS). Furthermore, we report the identification and characterisation of a previously unreported porphyrin metabolite, isocoproporphyrin sulfonic acid isolated in the rat faeces. The measured mass-to-charge ratio (m/z) of the precursor ion was m/z 735.2338, corresponding to a molecular formula of C36H39N4O11S with an error of 0.3 ppm from the calculated m/z 735.2336. The MS/MS data was consistent with an isocoproporphyrin sulfonic acid structure, derived from dehydroisocoproporphyrinogen by sulfonation of the vinyl group. The metabolite was present in a greater abundance than other isocoproporphyrin derivatives and may be a more useful biomarker for HCB intoxication.

  6. Metabolic engineering of Pseudomonas sp. strain VLB120 as platform biocatalyst for the production of isobutyric acid and other secondary metabolites

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Over the recent years the production of Ehrlich pathway derived chemicals was shown in a variety of hosts such as Escherichia coli, Corynebacterium glutamicum, and yeast. Exemplarily the production of isobutyric acid was demonstrated in Escherichia coli with remarkable titers and yields. However, these examples suffer from byproduct formation due to the fermentative growth mode of the respective organism. We aim at establishing a new aerobic, chassis for the synthesis of isobutyric acid and other interesting metabolites using Pseudomonas sp. strain VLB120, an obligate aerobe organism, as host strain. Results The overexpression of kivd, coding for a 2-ketoacid decarboxylase from Lactococcus lactis in Ps. sp. strain VLB120 enabled for the production of isobutyric acid and isobutanol via the valine synthesis route (Ehrlich pathway). This indicates the existence of chromosomally encoded alcohol and aldehyde dehydrogenases catalyzing the reduction and oxidation of isobutyraldehyde. In addition we showed that the strain possesses a complete pathway for isobutyric acid metabolization, channeling the compound via isobutyryl-CoA into valine degradation. Three key issues were addressed to allow and optimize isobutyric acid synthesis: i) minimizing isobutyric acid degradation by host intrinsic enzymes, ii) construction of suitable expression systems and iii) streamlining of central carbon metabolism finally leading to production of up to 26.8 ± 1.5 mM isobutyric acid with a carbon yield of 0.12 ± 0.01 g gglc-1. Conclusion The combination of an increased flux towards isobutyric acid using a tailor-made expression system and the prevention of precursor and product degradation allowed efficient production of isobutyric acid in Ps. sp. strain VLB120. This will be the basis for the development of a continuous reaction process for this bulk chemicals. PMID:24397404

  7. Metabolic characteristics of 13-cis-retinoic acid (isotretinoin) and anti-tumour activity of the 13-cis-retinoic acid metabolite 4-oxo-13-cis-retinoic acid in neuroblastoma

    PubMed Central

    Sonawane, Poonam; Cho, Hwang Eui; Tagde, Ashujit; Verlekar, Dattesh; Yu, Alice L; Reynolds, C Patrick; Kang, Min H

    2014-01-01

    Background and Purpose Isotretinoin (13-cis-retinoic acid; 13-cRA) is a differentiation inducer used to treat minimal residual disease after myeloablative therapy for high-risk neuroblastoma. However, more than 40% of children develop recurrent disease during or after 13-cRA treatment. The plasma concentrations of 13-cRA in earlier studies were considered subtherapeutic while 4-oxo-13-cis-RA (4-oxo-13-cRA), a metabolite of 13-cRA considered by some investigators as inactive, were greater than threefold higher than 13-cRA. We sought to define the metabolic pathways of 13-cRA and investigated the anti-tumour activity of its major metabolite, 4-oxo-13-cRA. Experimental Approach Effects of 13-cRA and 4-oxo-13-cRA on human neuroblastoma cell lines were assessed by DIMSCAN and flow cytometry for cell proliferation, MYCN down-regulation by reverse transcription PCR and immunoblotting, and neurite outgrowth by confocal microscopy. 13-cRA metabolism was determined using tandem MS in human liver microsomes and in patient samples. Key Results Six major metabolites of 13-cRA were identified in patient samples. Of these, 4-oxo-13-cRA was the most abundant, and 4-oxo-13-cRA glucuronide was also detected at a higher level in patients. CYP3A4 was shown to play a major role in catalysing 13-cRA to 4-oxo-13-cRA. In human neuroblastoma cell lines, 4-oxo-13-cRA and 13-cRA were equi-effective at inducing neurite outgrowth, inhibiting proliferation, decreasing MYCN mRNA and protein, and increasing the expression of retinoic acid receptor-β mRNA and protein levels. Conclusions and Implications We showed that 4-oxo-13-cRA is as active as 13-cRA against neuroblastoma cell lines. Plasma levels of both 13-cRA and 4-oxo-13-cRA should be evaluated in pharmacokinetic studies of isotretinoin in neuroblastoma. PMID:25039756

  8. QUANTITATION OF MERCAPTURIC ACID CONJUGATES OF 4-HYDROXY-2-NONENAL AND 4-OXO-2-NONENAL METABOLITES IN A SMOKING CESSATION STUDY

    PubMed Central

    Kuiper, Heather C.; Langsdorf, Brandi L.; Miranda, Cristobal L.; Joss, Jacqueline; Jubert, Carole; Mata, John E.; Stevens, Jan F.

    2009-01-01

    The breakdown of polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) under conditions of oxidative stress results in the formation of lipid peroxidation (LPO) products. These LPO products such as 4-hydroxy-2-nonenal (HNE) and 4-oxo-2-nonenal (ONE) can contribute to the development of cardiovascular and neurodegenerative diseases and cancer. Conjugation with glutathione, followed by further metabolism to mercapturic acid (MA) conjugates, can mitigate the effects of these LPO products in disease development by facilitating their excretion from the body. We have developed a quantitative method to simultaneously assess levels of 4-oxo-2-nonen-1-ol (ONO)-MA, HNE-MA, and 1,4-dihydroxy-2-nonene (DHN)-MA in human urine samples utilizing isotope-dilution mass spectrometry. We are also able to detect 4-hydroxy-2-nonenoic acid (HNA)-MA, 4-hydroxy-2-nonenoic acid lactone (HNAL)-MA, and 4-oxo-2-nonenoic acid (ONA)-MA with this method. The detection of ONO-MA and ONA-MA in humans is significant because it demonstrates that HNE/ONE branching occurs in the breakdown of PUFAs and suggests that ONO may contribute to the harmful effects currently associated with HNE. We were able to show significant decreases in HNE-MA, DHN-MA, and total LPO-MA in a group of seven smokers upon smoking cessation. These data demonstrate the value of HNE and ONE metabolites as in vivo markers of oxidative stress. PMID:19819328

  9. In vitro release of arachidonic acid metabolites, glutathione peroxidase, and oxygen-free radicals from platelets of asthmatic patients with and without aspirin intolerance.

    PubMed Central

    Plaza, V.; Prat, J.; Rosellò, J.; Ballester, E.; Ramis, I.; Mullol, J.; Gelpí, E.; Vives-Corrons, J. L.; Picado, C.

    1995-01-01

    BACKGROUND--An abnormal platelet release of oxygen-free radicals has been described in acetylsalicylic acid (aspirin)-induced asthma, a finding which might suggest the existence of an intrinsic, specific platelet abnormality of arachidonic acid metabolism in these patients. The objective of this study was to evaluate platelet arachidonic acid metabolism in asthmatic patients with or without intolerance to aspirin. METHODS--Thirty subjects distributed into three groups were studied: group 1, 10 healthy subjects; group 2, 10 asthmatic patients with aspirin tolerance; and group 3, 10 aspirin-intolerant asthmatics. Platelets were isolated from blood, preincubated with 3H-arachidonic acid for 30 minutes and then incubated for 10 minutes with platelet activating factor (PAF) and aspirin. Cyclo-oxygenase (thromboxane, PGE2, PGF2 alpha, and HHT) and lipoxygenase (12-HETE) arachidonic acid metabolites were measured by high pressure liquid chromatography. Release of oxygen free radicals after incubation with PAF and aspirin was measured by chemiluminescence. Platelet levels of glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px) were also measured using spectrophotometry. RESULTS--Platelets from aspirin-intolerant asthmatic patients produced higher quantities of arachidonic acid metabolites than the control group at baseline conditions. This increase was significant only for lipoxygenase products. No differences were found amongst the three groups in the response of arachidonic acid metabolism to PAF and aspirin. Incubation with aspirin but not with PAF caused an increase in oxygen-free radical production in aspirin-intolerant patients whereas in aspirin-tolerant patients PAF, rather than aspirin, was the more potent stimulus for oxygen-free radical production. No differences in GSH-Px levels were found amongst the three groups. CONCLUSIONS--These results suggest that the platelet lipoxygenase pathway is activated in aspirin-intolerant patients and that the production of oxygen-free radicals may

  10. Determination of acetylsalicylic acid and its major metabolite, salicylic acid, in human plasma using liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry: application to pharmacokinetic study of Astrix in Korean healthy volunteers.

    PubMed

    Bae, Soo Kyung; Seo, Kyung Ah; Jung, Eun Ji; Kim, Ho-Sook; Yeo, Chang-Woo; Shon, Ji-Hong; Park, Kyung-Mi; Liu, Kwang-Hyeon; Shin, Jae-Gook

    2008-06-01

    The first liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC/MS/MS) method for determination of acetylsalicylic acid (aspirin, ASA) and one of its major metabolites, salicylic acid (SA), in human plasma using simvastatin as an internal standard has been developed and validated. For ASA analysis, a plasma sample containing potassium fluoride was extracted using a mixture of ethyl acetate and diethyl ether in the presence of 0.5% formic acid. SA, a major metabolite of ASA, was extracted from plasma using protein precipitation with acetonitrile. The compounds were separated on a reversed-phase column with an isocratic mobile phase consisting of acetonitrile and water containing 0.1% formic acid (8:2, v/v). The ion transitions recorded in multiple reaction monitoring mode were m/z 179 --> 137, 137 --> 93 and 435 --> 319 for ASA, SA and IS, respectively. The coefficient of variation of the assay precision was less than 9.3%, and the accuracy exceeded 86.5%. The lower limits of quantification for ASA and SA were 5 and 50 ng/mL, respectively. The developed assay method was successfully applied for the evaluation of pharmacokinetics of ASA and SA after single oral administration of Astrix (entero-coated pellet, 100 mg of aspirin) to 10 Korean healthy male volunteers.

  11. Determination of acetylsalicylic acid and its major metabolite, salicylic acid, in human plasma using liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry: application to pharmacokinetic study of Astrix in Korean healthy volunteers.

    PubMed

    Bae, Soo Kyung; Seo, Kyung Ah; Jung, Eun Ji; Kim, Ho-Sook; Yeo, Chang-Woo; Shon, Ji-Hong; Park, Kyung-Mi; Liu, Kwang-Hyeon; Shin, Jae-Gook

    2008-06-01

    The first liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC/MS/MS) method for determination of acetylsalicylic acid (aspirin, ASA) and one of its major metabolites, salicylic acid (SA), in human plasma using simvastatin as an internal standard has been developed and validated. For ASA analysis, a plasma sample containing potassium fluoride was extracted using a mixture of ethyl acetate and diethyl ether in the presence of 0.5% formic acid. SA, a major metabolite of ASA, was extracted from plasma using protein precipitation with acetonitrile. The compounds were separated on a reversed-phase column with an isocratic mobile phase consisting of acetonitrile and water containing 0.1% formic acid (8:2, v/v). The ion transitions recorded in multiple reaction monitoring mode were m/z 179 --> 137, 137 --> 93 and 435 --> 319 for ASA, SA and IS, respectively. The coefficient of variation of the assay precision was less than 9.3%, and the accuracy exceeded 86.5%. The lower limits of quantification for ASA and SA were 5 and 50 ng/mL, respectively. The developed assay method was successfully applied for the evaluation of pharmacokinetics of ASA and SA after single oral administration of Astrix (entero-coated pellet, 100 mg of aspirin) to 10 Korean healthy male volunteers. PMID:18254152

  12. The gut microbiota ellagic acid-derived metabolite urolithin A and its sulfate conjugate are substrates for the drug efflux transporter breast cancer resistance protein (ABCG2/BCRP).

    PubMed

    González-Sarrías, Antonio; Miguel, Verónica; Merino, Gracia; Lucas, Ricardo; Morales, Juan C; Tomás-Barberán, Francisco; Alvarez, Ana I; Espín, Juan C

    2013-05-01

    The breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP/ABCG2) is a drug efflux transporter that can affect the pharmacological and toxicological properties of many molecules. Urolithins, metabolites produced by the gut microbiota from ellagic acid (EA) and ellagitannins, have been acknowledged with in vivo anti-inflammatory and cancer chemopreventive properties. This study evaluated whether urolithins (Uro-A, -B, -C, and -D) and their main phase II metabolites Uro-A sulfate, Uro-A glucuronide, and Uro-B glucuronide as well as their precursor EA were substrates for ABCG2/BCRP. Parental and Bcrp1-transduced MDCKII cells were used for active transport assays. Uro-A and, to a lesser extent, Uro-A sulfate showed a significant increase in apically directed translocation in Bcrp1-transduced cells. Bcrp1 did not show affinity for the rest of the tested compounds. Data were confirmed for murine, human, bovine, and ovine BCRP-transduced subclones as well as with the use of the selective BCRP inhibitor Ko143. The transport inhibition by Uro-A was analyzed by flow cytometry compared to Ko143 using the antineoplastic agent mitoxantrone as a model substrate. Results showed that Uro-A was able to inhibit mitoxantrone transport in a dose-dependent manner. This study reports for the first time that Uro-A and its sulfate conjugate are ABCG2/BCRP substrates. The results suggest that physiologically relevant concentrations of these gut microbiota-derived metabolites could modulate ABCG2/BCRP-mediated transport processes and mechanisms of cancer drug resistance. Further in vivo investigations are warranted.

  13. The gut microbiota ellagic acid-derived metabolite urolithin A and its sulfate conjugate are substrates for the drug efflux transporter breast cancer resistance protein (ABCG2/BCRP).

    PubMed

    González-Sarrías, Antonio; Miguel, Verónica; Merino, Gracia; Lucas, Ricardo; Morales, Juan C; Tomás-Barberán, Francisco; Alvarez, Ana I; Espín, Juan C

    2013-05-01

    The breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP/ABCG2) is a drug efflux transporter that can affect the pharmacological and toxicological properties of many molecules. Urolithins, metabolites produced by the gut microbiota from ellagic acid (EA) and ellagitannins, have been acknowledged with in vivo anti-inflammatory and cancer chemopreventive properties. This study evaluated whether urolithins (Uro-A, -B, -C, and -D) and their main phase II metabolites Uro-A sulfate, Uro-A glucuronide, and Uro-B glucuronide as well as their precursor EA were substrates for ABCG2/BCRP. Parental and Bcrp1-transduced MDCKII cells were used for active transport assays. Uro-A and, to a lesser extent, Uro-A sulfate showed a significant increase in apically directed translocation in Bcrp1-transduced cells. Bcrp1 did not show affinity for the rest of the tested compounds. Data were confirmed for murine, human, bovine, and ovine BCRP-transduced subclones as well as with the use of the selective BCRP inhibitor Ko143. The transport inhibition by Uro-A was analyzed by flow cytometry compared to Ko143 using the antineoplastic agent mitoxantrone as a model substrate. Results showed that Uro-A was able to inhibit mitoxantrone transport in a dose-dependent manner. This study reports for the first time that Uro-A and its sulfate conjugate are ABCG2/BCRP substrates. The results suggest that physiologically relevant concentrations of these gut microbiota-derived metabolites could modulate ABCG2/BCRP-mediated transport processes and mechanisms of cancer drug resistance. Further in vivo investigations are warranted. PMID:23586460

  14. In vitro antioxidant and antiproliferative effects of ellagic acid and its colonic metabolite, urolithins, on human bladder cancer T24 cells.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Zhenpeng; Zhou, Benhong; Jin, Long; Yu, Honglian; Liu, Lijuan; Liu, Youyi; Qin, Chengchen; Xie, Shuixiang; Zhu, Fan

    2013-09-01

    Urolithins were the metabolites of ellagic acid by intestinal flora in gastrointestinal tract. In previous research, it was found that urolithins could mainly inhibit prostate cancer and colon cancer cell growth. However, there is no report about bladder cancer therapy of urolithins. In this paper, three urolithin-type compounds (urolithin A, urolithin B, 8-OMe-urolithin A) and ellagic acid were evaluated for antiproliferative activity in vitro against human bladder cancer cell lines T24. The IC₅₀ values for T24 cell inhibition were 43.9, 35.2, 46.3 and 33.7 μM for urolithin A, urolithin B, 8-OMe-urolithin A and ellagic acid, respectively. After the administration of urolithins and ellagic acid, we found these compounds could increase mRNA and protein expression of Phospho-p38 MAPK, and decrease mRNA and protein expression of MEKK1 and Phospho-c-Jun in T24 cells. Caspase-3 was also activated and PPAR-γ protein expression increased in drug-induced apoptosis. And what's more, the antioxidant assay afforded by three urolithins and EA treatments were associated with decreases in the intracellular ROS and MDA levels, and increased SOD activity in H₂O₂-treated T24 cells. The results suggested that these compounds could inhibit cell proliferation by p38-MAPK and/or c-Jun medicated caspase-3 activation and reduce the oxidative stress status in bladder cancer.

  15. The enteric bacterial metabolite propionic acid alters brain and plasma phospholipid molecular species: further development of a rodent model of autism spectrum disorders

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Gastrointestinal symptoms and altered blood phospholipid profiles have been reported in patients with autism spectrum disorders (ASD). Most of the phospholipid analyses have been conducted on the fatty acid composition of isolated phospholipid classes following hydrolysis. A paucity of information exists on how the intact phospholipid molecular species are altered in ASD. We applied ESI/MS to determine how brain and blood intact phospholipid species were altered during the induction of ASD-like behaviors in rats following intraventricular infusions with the enteric bacterial metabolite propionic acid. Animals were infused daily for 8 days, locomotor activity assessed, and animals killed during the induced behaviors. Propionic acid infusions increased locomotor activity. Lipid analysis revealed treatment altered 21 brain and 30 blood phospholipid molecular species. Notable alterations were observed in the composition of brain SM, diacyl mono and polyunsaturated PC, PI, PS, PE, and plasmalogen PC and PE molecular species. These alterations suggest that the propionic acid rat model is a useful tool to study aberrations in lipid metabolism known to affect membrane fluidity, peroxisomal function, gap junction coupling capacity, signaling, and neuroinflammation, all of which may be associated with the pathogenesis of ASD. PMID:22747852

  16. Comparative Cytotoxicity and Sperm Motility Using a Computer-Aided Sperm Analysis System (CASA) for Isomers of Phthalic Acid, a Common Final Metabolite of Phthalates.

    PubMed

    Kwack, Seung Jun; Lee, Byung-Mu

    2015-01-01

    The general population is exposed to phthalates through consumer products, diet, and medical devices. Phthalic acid (PA) is a common final metabolite of phthalates, and its isomers include isophthalic acid (IPA), terephthalic acid (TPA), and phthalaldehyde (o-phthalic acid, OPA). The purpose of this study was to investigate whether PA and PA isomers exert reproductive toxicity, including altered sperm movement. In vitro cell viability assays were comparatively performed using Sertoli and liver cell lines. In animal experiments, PA or PA isomers (10, 100, or 1000 mg/kg) were administered orally to Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats, and semen samples were analyzed by computer-aided sperm analysis (CASA). PA treatment produced a significant effect on curvilinear velocity (VCL), straight-line velocity (VSL), mean velocity or average path velocity (VAP), amplitude of lateral head displacement (ALH), and frequency of head displacement or beat cross-frequency (BCF), whereas IPA, TPA, and OPA induced no marked effects. In vitro cell viability assays showed that mouse normal testis cells (TM4) and human testis cancer cells (NTERA 2 cl. D1) were more sensitive to PA and OPA than mouse liver normal cells (NCTC clone 1469) and human fetal liver cells (FL 62891). Our study suggests that PA and PA isomers specifically produced significant in vitro and in vivo reproductive toxicity, particularly sperm toxicity and testis cell cytotoxicity. Of the isomers examined, PA appeared to be the most toxic and may serve as a surrogate biomarker for reproductive toxicity following mixed exposure to phthalates.

  17. Impact of supplementation with amino acids or their metabolites on muscle wasting in patients with critical illness or other muscle wasting illness: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Wandrag, L; Brett, S J; Frost, G; Hickson, M

    2015-08-01

    Muscle wasting during critical illness impairs recovery. Dietary strategies to minimise wasting include nutritional supplements, particularly essential amino acids. We reviewed the evidence on enteral supplementation with amino acids or their metabolites in the critically ill and in muscle wasting illness with similarities to critical illness, aiming to assess whether this intervention could limit muscle wasting in vulnerable patient groups. Citation databases, including MEDLINE, Web of Knowledge, EMBASE, the meta-register of controlled trials and the Cochrane Collaboration library, were searched for articles from 1950 to 2013. Search terms included 'critical illness', 'muscle wasting', 'amino acid supplementation', 'chronic obstructive pulmonary disease', 'chronic heart failure', 'sarcopenia' and 'disuse atrophy'. Reviews, observational studies, sport nutrition, intravenous supplementation and studies in children were excluded. One hundred and eighty studies were assessed for eligibility and 158 were excluded. Twenty-two studies were graded according to standardised criteria using the GRADE methodology: four in critical care populations, and 18 from other clinically relevant areas. Methodologies, interventions and outcome measures used were highly heterogeneous and meta-analysis was not appropriate. Methodology and quality of studies were too varied to draw any firm conclusion. Dietary manipulation with leucine enriched essential amino acids (EAA), β-hydroxy-β-methylbutyrate and creatine warrant further investigation in critical care; EAA has demonstrated improvements in body composition and nutritional status in other groups with muscle wasting illness. High-quality research is required in critical care before treatment recommendations can be made. PMID:24807079

  18. Impact of supplementation with amino acids or their metabolites on muscle wasting in patients with critical illness or other muscle wasting illness: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Wandrag, L; Brett, S J; Frost, G; Hickson, M

    2015-08-01

    Muscle wasting during critical illness impairs recovery. Dietary strategies to minimise wasting include nutritional supplements, particularly essential amino acids. We reviewed the evidence on enteral supplementation with amino acids or their metabolites in the critically ill and in muscle wasting illness with similarities to critical illness, aiming to assess whether this intervention could limit muscle wasting in vulnerable patient groups. Citation databases, including MEDLINE, Web of Knowledge, EMBASE, the meta-register of controlled trials and the Cochrane Collaboration library, were searched for articles from 1950 to 2013. Search terms included 'critical illness', 'muscle wasting', 'amino acid supplementation', 'chronic obstructive pulmonary disease', 'chronic heart failure', 'sarcopenia' and 'disuse atrophy'. Reviews, observational studies, sport nutrition, intravenous supplementation and studies in children were excluded. One hundred and eighty studies were assessed for eligibility and 158 were excluded. Twenty-two studies were graded according to standardised criteria using the GRADE methodology: four in critical care populations, and 18 from other clinically relevant areas. Methodologies, interventions and outcome measures used were highly heterogeneous and meta-analysis was not appropriate. Methodology and quality of studies were too varied to draw any firm conclusion. Dietary manipulation with leucine enriched essential amino acids (EAA), β-hydroxy-β-methylbutyrate and creatine warrant further investigation in critical care; EAA has demonstrated improvements in body composition and nutritional status in other groups with muscle wasting illness. High-quality research is required in critical care before treatment recommendations can be made.

  19. Effect of Exposure to Atmospheric Ultrafine Particles on Production of Free Fatty Acids and Lipid Metabolites in the Mouse Small Intestine

    PubMed Central

    Li, Rongsong; Navab, Kaveh; Hough, Greg; Daher, Nancy; Zhang, Min; Mittelstein, David; Lee, Katherine; Pakbin, Payam; Saffari, Arian; Bhetraratana, May; Sulaiman, Dawoud; Beebe, Tyler; Wu, Lan; Jen, Nelson; Wine, Eytan; Tseng, Chi-Hong; Araujo, Jesus A.; Fogelman, Alan; Sioutas, Constantinos; Navab, Mohamed

    2014-01-01

    Background: Exposure to ambient ultrafine particulate matter (UFP) is a well-recognized risk factor for cardiovascular and respiratory diseases. However, little is known about the effects of air pollution on gastrointestinal disorders. Objective: We sought to assess whether exposure to ambient UFP (diameter < 180 nm) increased free fatty acids and lipid metabolites in the mouse small intestine. Methods: Ldlr-null mice were exposed to filtered air (FA) or UFP collected at an urban Los Angeles, California, site that was heavily affected by vehicular emissions; the exposure was carried out for 10 weeks in the presence or absence of D-4F, an apolipoprotein A-I mimetic peptide with antioxidant and anti-inflammation properties on a high-fat or normal chow diet. Results: Compared with FA, exposure to UFP significantly increased intestinal hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acids (HETEs), including 15-HETE, 12-HETE, 5-HETE, as well as hydroxyoctadecadienoic acids (HODEs), including 13-HODE and 9-HODE. Arachidonic acid (AA) and prostaglandin D2 (PGD2) as well as some of the lysophosphatidic acids (LPA) in the small intestine were also increased in response to UFP exposure. Administration of D-4F significantly reduced UFP-mediated increase in HETEs, HODEs, AA, PGD2, and LPA. Although exposure to UFP further led to shortened villus length accompanied by prominent macrophage and neutrophil infiltration into the intestinal villi, administration of D-4F mitigated macrophage infiltration. Conclusions: Exposure to UFP promotes lipid metabolism, villus shortening, and inflammatory responses in mouse small intestine, whereas administration of D-4F attenuated these effects. Our findings provide a basis to further assess the mechanisms underlying UFP-mediated lipid metabolism in the digestive system with clinical relevance to gut homeostasis and diseases. Citation: Li R, Navab K, Hough G, Daher N, Zhang M, Mittelstein D, Lee K, Pakbin P, Saffari A, Bhetraratana M, Sulaiman D, Beebe T, Wu L, Jen

  20. Jersey calf performance in response to high-protein, high-fat liquid feeds with varied fatty acid profiles: blood metabolites and liver gene expression.

    PubMed

    Swank, V A; Yoho, W S Bowen; O'Diam, K M; Eastridge, M L; Niehaus, A J; Daniels, K M

    2013-06-01

    Most available Jersey calf milk replacers (CMR) use edible lard as the primary fat source, which lacks medium-chain fatty acids (MCFA). However, Jersey cow milk consists of over 10% MCFA. The objective of this trial was to determine whether altering the fatty acid profile of CMR by increasing the amount of MCFA would alter liver lipid infiltration, liver gene expression, and blood metabolites when fed to Jersey calves. Fifty Jersey calves were fed 1 of 4 diets: pasteurized saleable whole milk (pSWM) from Jersey cows [27.9% crude protein (CP), 33.5% fat, dry matter (DM) basis]; CMR containing 100% of fat as edible lard (100:00; 29.3% CP, 29.1% fat, DM basis); CMR containing 20% of fat as coconut oil (CO; 80:20; 28.2% CP, 28.0% fat); or CMR containing 40% of fat as CO (60:40; 28.2% CP, 28.3% fat). Liquid diet DM intake averaged 0.523, 0.500, 0.498, and 0.512 kg/d for pSWM, 100:00, 80:20, and 60:40, respectively. Calves were fed their assigned liquid diet daily at 0600 and 1800 h from 2 d of age until 7 wk of age, and once daily until 8 wk of age. Calves were taken off trial at 9 wk of age. Calves had access to water and grain (23.8% CP, 2.71% fat, DM basis). Grain DM intake averaged 0.386, 0.439, 0.472, and 0.454 kg/d for pSWM, 100:00, 80:20, and 60:40, respectively. Liver biopsy cores were obtained from 15 calves at 42 d of age (pSWM, n=4; 100:00, n=4; 80:20, n=3; 60:40, n=4) and from 4 baseline calves <2d of age. Liver biopsy cores were used for histological appraisal of lipid infiltration and gene expression analyses of short-, medium-, and long- chain acyl-coenzyme A dehydrogenases, sterol regulatory element binding transcription factor 1, acetyl coenzyme A carboxylase, and fatty acid synthase. Lipid infiltration and expression of selected genes were not different among diets. After an overnight fast, weekly blood samples were taken immediately before feeding at 0600 h via jugular venipuncture in all calves. Serum and plasma obtained from blood samples were used

  1. Jersey calf performance in response to high-protein, high-fat liquid feeds with varied fatty acid profiles: blood metabolites and liver gene expression.

    PubMed

    Swank, V A; Yoho, W S Bowen; O'Diam, K M; Eastridge, M L; Niehaus, A J; Daniels, K M

    2013-06-01

    Most available Jersey calf milk replacers (CMR) use edible lard as the primary fat source, which lacks medium-chain fatty acids (MCFA). However, Jersey cow milk consists of over 10% MCFA. The objective of this trial was to determine whether altering the fatty acid profile of CMR by increasing the amount of MCFA would alter liver lipid infiltration, liver gene expression, and blood metabolites when fed to Jersey calves. Fifty Jersey calves were fed 1 of 4 diets: pasteurized saleable whole milk (pSWM) from Jersey cows [27.9% crude protein (CP), 33.5% fat, dry matter (DM) basis]; CMR containing 100% of fat as edible lard (100:00; 29.3% CP, 29.1% fat, DM basis); CMR containing 20% of fat as coconut oil (CO; 80:20; 28.2% CP, 28.0% fat); or CMR containing 40% of fat as CO (60:40; 28.2% CP, 28.3% fat). Liquid diet DM intake averaged 0.523, 0.500, 0.498, and 0.512 kg/d for pSWM, 100:00, 80:20, and 60:40, respectively. Calves were fed their assigned liquid diet daily at 0600 and 1800 h from 2 d of age until 7 wk of age, and once daily until 8 wk of age. Calves were taken off trial at 9 wk of age. Calves had access to water and grain (23.8% CP, 2.71% fat, DM basis). Grain DM intake averaged 0.386, 0.439, 0.472, and 0.454 kg/d for pSWM, 100:00, 80:20, and 60:40, respectively. Liver biopsy cores were obtained from 15 calves at 42 d of age (pSWM, n=4; 100:00, n=4; 80:20, n=3; 60:40, n=4) and from 4 baseline calves <2d of age. Liver biopsy cores were used for histological appraisal of lipid infiltration and gene expression analyses of short-, medium-, and long- chain acyl-coenzyme A dehydrogenases, sterol regulatory element binding transcription factor 1, acetyl coenzyme A carboxylase, and fatty acid synthase. Lipid infiltration and expression of selected genes were not different among diets. After an overnight fast, weekly blood samples were taken immediately before feeding at 0600 h via jugular venipuncture in all calves. Serum and plasma obtained from blood samples were used

  2. Pomegranate Juice Metabolites, Ellagic Acid and Urolithin A, Synergistically Inhibit Androgen-Independent Prostate Cancer Cell Growth via Distinct Effects on Cell Cycle Control and Apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Vicinanza, Roberto; Henning, Susanne M.; Heber, David

    2013-01-01

    Ellagitannins (ETs) from pomegranate juice (PJ) are bioactive polyphenols with chemopreventive potential against prostate cancer (PCa). ETs are not absorbed intact but are partially hydrolyzed in the gut to ellagic acid (EA). Colonic microflora can convert EA to urolithin A (UA), and EA and UA enter the circulation after PJ consumption. Here, we studied the effects of EA and UA on cell proliferation, cell cycle, and apoptosis in DU-145 and PC-3 androgen-independent PCa cells and whether combinations of EA and UA affected cell proliferation. EA demonstrated greater dose-dependent antiproliferative effects in both cell lines compared to UA. EA induced cell cycle arrest in S phase associated with decreased cyclin B1 and cyclin D1 levels. UA induced a G2/M arrest and increased cyclin B1 and cdc2 phosphorylation at tyrosine-15, suggesting inactivation of the cyclin B1/cdc2 kinase complex. EA induced apoptosis in both cell lines, while UA had a less pronounced proapoptotic effect only in DU-145. Cotreatment with low concentrations of EA and UA dramatically decreased cell proliferation, exhibiting synergism in PC-3 cells evaluated by isobolographic analysis and combination index. These data provide information on pomegranate metabolites for the prevention of PCa recurrence, supporting the role of gut flora-derived metabolites for cancer prevention. PMID:23710216

  3. Determination of alachlor and its sulfonic acid metabolite in water by solid-phase extraction and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Aga, D.S.; Thurman, E.M.; Pomes, M.L.

    1994-01-01

    Solid-phase extraction (SPE) and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) were combined for the trace analysis of the herbicide alachlor and its major soil metabolite, ethanesulfonic acid (ESA). The anti-alachlor antibody cross-reacted with ESA, which produced false-positive detections of alachlor in water samples by immunoassay screens. Alachlor and ESA were isolated from water by SPE on a C18 resin and eluted sequentially with ethyl acetate and methanol. Alachlor is soluble in ethyl acetate while the anionic ESA is not. Thus ESA remained adsorbed on the C18 resin and was eluted later with methanol. The combination of SPE with ELISA effectivety separated and quantified both alachlor and ESA using the same antibody for two ELISA methods. The general method may have applicability for the separation of other herbicides and their ionic metabolites. The SPE-ELISA method has a, detection limit of 0.01 ??g/L for alachlor and 0.05 ??g/L for ESA, with a precision of ?? 10%. Analyses of surface and ground water samples were confirmed by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry and high-performance liquid chromatography with photodiode-array detection. Results showed widespread occurrence of ESA in surface and ground water of the midwestern United States, with concentrations ranging from 10 ??g/L.

  4. Simultaneous determination of phenoxyethanol and its major metabolite, phenoxyacetic acid, in rat biological matrices by LC-MS/MS with polarity switching: Application to ADME studies.

    PubMed

    Kim, Tae Hwan; Kim, Min Gi; Kim, Min Gyu; Shin, Beom Soo; Kim, Kyu-Bong; Lee, Jong Bong; Paik, Soo Heui; Yoo, Sun Dong

    2015-11-01

    This study describes the development of a simple LC-ESI-MS/MS method with polarity switching for the simultaneous analysis of phenoxyethanol (PE) and its major metabolite, phenoxyacetic acid (PAA), in rat plasma, urine, and 7 different tissues. The assay was validated to demonstrate the linearity, precision, accuracy, LLOQ, recovery, and stability by using the matrix matched QC samples. The assay achieved the LLOQ of 10 and 20 ng/mL of PE and PAA, respectively, for plasma samples and the LLOQ of 20 and 50 ng/mL of PE and PAA, respectively, for urine and tissue samples. This method was successfully applied to the percutaneous absorption, distribution, metabolism, and excretion studies in rats. The absolute topical bioavailability of PE was 75.4% and 76.0% for emulsion and lotion, respectively. Conversion of PE to PAA was extensive, with the average AUCPAA-to-AUCPE ratio being 4.4 and 5.3 for emulsion and lotion, respectively. The steady-state tissue-to-plasma PE concentration ratio (Kp) was higher than unity for kidney, spleen, heart, brain, and testis and was lower (≤0.6) for lung and liver, while the metabolite Kp ratio was higher than unity for kidney, liver, lung, and testis and was lower (≤0.3) for other tissues. Findings of this study may be useful to evaluate the relationship between exposure and toxic potential of PE in risk assessment. PMID:26452788

  5. Simultaneous determination of phenoxyethanol and its major metabolite, phenoxyacetic acid, in rat biological matrices by LC-MS/MS with polarity switching: Application to ADME studies.

    PubMed

    Kim, Tae Hwan; Kim, Min Gi; Kim, Min Gyu; Shin, Beom Soo; Kim, Kyu-Bong; Lee, Jong Bong; Paik, Soo Heui; Yoo, Sun Dong

    2015-11-01

    This study describes the development of a simple LC-ESI-MS/MS method with polarity switching for the simultaneous analysis of phenoxyethanol (PE) and its major metabolite, phenoxyacetic acid (PAA), in rat plasma, urine, and 7 different tissues. The assay was validated to demonstrate the linearity, precision, accuracy, LLOQ, recovery, and stability by using the matrix matched QC samples. The assay achieved the LLOQ of 10 and 20 ng/mL of PE and PAA, respectively, for plasma samples and the LLOQ of 20 and 50 ng/mL of PE and PAA, respectively, for urine and tissue samples. This method was successfully applied to the percutaneous absorption, distribution, metabolism, and excretion studies in rats. The absolute topical bioavailability of PE was 75.4% and 76.0% for emulsion and lotion, respectively. Conversion of PE to PAA was extensive, with the average AUCPAA-to-AUCPE ratio being 4.4 and 5.3 for emulsion and lotion, respectively. The steady-state tissue-to-plasma PE concentration ratio (Kp) was higher than unity for kidney, spleen, heart, brain, and testis and was lower (≤0.6) for lung and liver, while the metabolite Kp ratio was higher than unity for kidney, liver, lung, and testis and was lower (≤0.3) for other tissues. Findings of this study may be useful to evaluate the relationship between exposure and toxic potential of PE in risk assessment.

  6. Secondary metabolites from Ganoderma.

    PubMed

    Baby, Sabulal; Johnson, Anil John; Govindan, Balaji

    2015-06-01

    Ganoderma is a genus of medicinal mushrooms. This review deals with secondary metabolites isolated from Ganoderma and their biological significance. Phytochemical studies over the last 40years led to the isolation of 431 secondary metabolites from various Ganoderma species. The major secondary compounds isolated are (a) C30 lanostanes (ganoderic acids), (b) C30 lanostanes (aldehydes, alcohols, esters, glycosides, lactones, ketones), (c) C27 lanostanes (lucidenic acids), (d) C27 lanostanes (alcohols, lactones, esters), (e) C24, C25 lanostanes (f) C30 pentacyclic triterpenes, (g) meroterpenoids, (h) farnesyl hydroquinones (meroterpenoids), (i) C15 sesquiterpenoids, (j) steroids, (k) alkaloids, (l) prenyl hydroquinone (m) benzofurans, (n) benzopyran-4-one derivatives and (o) benzenoid derivatives. Ganoderma lucidum is the species extensively studied for its secondary metabolites and biological activities. Ganoderma applanatum, Ganoderma colossum, Ganoderma sinense, Ganoderma cochlear, Ganoderma tsugae, Ganoderma amboinense, Ganoderma orbiforme, Ganoderma resinaceum, Ganoderma hainanense, Ganoderma concinna, Ganoderma pfeifferi, Ganoderma neo-japonicum, Ganoderma tropicum, Ganoderma australe, Ganoderma carnosum, Ganoderma fornicatum, Ganoderma lipsiense (synonym G. applanatum), Ganoderma mastoporum, Ganoderma theaecolum, Ganoderma boninense, Ganoderma capense and Ganoderma annulare are the other Ganoderma species subjected to phytochemical studies. Further phytochemical studies on Ganoderma could lead to the discovery of hitherto unknown biologically active secondary metabolites.

  7. Influence of tricarboxylic acid cycle intermediates and related metabolites on the biosynthesis of aflatoxin by resting cells of Aspergillus flavus.

    PubMed

    Shantha, T; Murthy, V S

    1981-11-01

    Resting cells of Aspergillus flavus synthesized aflatoxin from acetate as the sole carbon source after 36 h of incubation. Addition of pyruvate (5.5 mg/m) as cosubstrate to [1-14C]acetate and unlabeled acetate considerably reduced toxin production but increased the radioactivity on the tricarboxylic acid intermediates. This suggests that high tricarboxylic acid activity drastically affected toxin synthesis.

  8. Extension of a PBPK model for ethylene glycol and glycolic acid to include the competitive formation and clearance of metabolites associated with kidney toxicity in rats and humans

    SciTech Connect

    Corley, R.A.; Saghir, S.A.; Bartels, M.J.; Hansen, S.C.; Creim, J.; McMartin, K.E.; Snellings, W.M.

    2011-02-01

    A previously developed PBPK model for ethylene glycol and glycolic acid was extended to include glyoxylic acid, oxalic acid, and the precipitation of calcium oxalate that is associated with kidney toxicity in rats and humans. The development and evaluation of the PBPK model was based upon previously published pharmacokinetic studies coupled with measured blood and tissue partition coefficients and rates of in vitro metabolism of glyoxylic acid to oxalic acid, glycine and other metabolites using primary hepatocytes isolated from male Wistar rats and humans. Precipitation of oxalic acid with calcium in the kidneys was assumed to occur only at concentrations exceeding the thermodynamic solubility product for calcium oxalate. This solubility product can be affected by local concentrations of calcium and other ions that are expressed in the model using an ion activity product estimated from toxicity studies such that calcium oxalate precipitation would be minimal at dietary exposures below the NOAEL for kidney toxicity in the sensitive male Wistar rat. The resulting integrated PBPK predicts that bolus oral or dietary exposures to ethylene glycol would result in typically 1.4-1.6-fold higher peak oxalate levels and 1.6-2-fold higher AUC's for calcium oxalate in kidneys of humans as compared with comparably exposed male Wistar rats over a dose range of 1-1000 mg/kg. The converse (male Wistar rats predicted to have greater oxalate levels in the kidneys than humans) was found for inhalation exposures although no accumulation of calcium oxalate is predicted to occur until exposures are well in excess of the theoretical saturated vapor concentration of 200 mg/m{sup 3}. While the current model is capable of such cross-species, dose, and route-of-exposure comparisons, it also highlights several areas of potential research that will improve confidence in such predictions, especially at low doses relevant for most human exposures.

  9. Microbiological degradation of bile acids. Metabolites formed from 3-(3a alpha-hexahydro-7a beta-methyl-1,5-dioxoindan-4 alpha-yl) propionic acid by Streptomyces rubescens.

    PubMed Central

    Hashimoto, S; Hayakawa, S

    1977-01-01

    1. The metabolism of 3-(3a alpha-hexahydro-7a beta-methyl-1,5-dioxoindan-4 alpha-yl)propionic acid (III), which is a possible precursor of 2,3,4,6,6a beta, 7,8,9,9a alpha,9b beta-decahydro-6a beta-methyl-1H-cyclopenta[f]quinoline-3,7-dione (II) formed from cholic acid (I) by streptomyces rubescens, was investigated by using the same organism. 2. This organism effected amide bond formation, reduction of the carbonyl groups, trans alpha beta-desaturation and R-oriented beta-hydroxylation of the propionic acid side chain and skeleton cleavage, and the following metabolites were isolated as these forms or their derivatives: compound (II), 1,2,3,4 a beta,-5,6,6a beta,7,8,9a alpha,9b beta-dodecahydro-6a beta -methylcyclopental[f][1]benzopyran-3,7-dione (IVa), (1R)-1,2,3,4a beta,5,6,6a beta,7,8,9.9a alpha,9b beta-dodecahydro-1-hydroxy-6a beta-methylcyclopenta[f][1]benzopyran-3,7-dione (IVb), (E)-3-(3aalpha-hexahydro-5 alpha-hydroxy-7a beta-methyl-l-oxo-indan-4 alpha-yl)prop-2-enoic acid (V), (+)-(5R)-5-methyl-4-oxo-octane-1,8-dioic acid (VI), 3-(4-hydroxy-5-methyl-2-oxo-2H-pyran-6-yl)propionic acid (VII) and 3-(3a alpha-hexahydro-1 beta-hydroxy-7a beta-methyl-5-oxoindan-4 alpha-yl)propionic acid (VIII). The metabolites (IVb), (V), (VI) and (VII) were new compounds, and their structures were established by chemical synthesis. 3. The question of whether these metabolites are true degradative intermediates is discussed, and a degradative pathway of compound (III) to the possible precursor of compound (VII), 7-carboxy-4-methyl-3,5-dioxoheptanoyl-CoA (IX), is tentatively proposed. The further degradation of compound (IX) to small fragments is also considered. PMID:883963

  10. High throughput HPLC-ESI(-)-MS/MS methodology for mercapturic acid metabolites of 1,3-butadiene: Biomarkers of exposure and bioactivation.

    PubMed

    Kotapati, Srikanth; Esades, Amanda; Matter, Brock; Le, Chap; Tretyakova, Natalia

    2015-11-01

    1,3-Butadiene (BD) is an important industrial and environmental carcinogen present in cigarette smoke, automobile exhaust, and urban air. The major urinary metabolites of BD in humans are 2-(N-acetyl-L-cystein-S-yl)-1-hydroxybut-3-ene/1-(N-acetyl-L-cystein-S-yl)-2-hydroxybut-3-ene (MHBMA), 4-(N-acetyl-L-cystein-S-yl)-1,2-dihydroxybutane (DHBMA), and 4-(N-acetyl-L-cystein-S-yl)-1,2,3-trihydroxybutyl mercapturic acid (THBMA), which are formed from the electrophilic metabolites of BD, 3,4-epoxy-1-butene (EB), hydroxymethyl vinyl ketone (HMVK), and 3,4-epoxy-1,2-diol (EBD), respectively. In the present work, a sensitive high-throughput HPLC-ESI(-)-MS/MS method was developed for simultaneous quantification of MHBMA and DHBMA in small volumes of human urine (200 μl). The method employs a 96 well Oasis HLB SPE enrichment step, followed by isotope dilution HPLC-ESI(-)-MS/MS analysis on a triple quadrupole mass spectrometer. The validated method was used to quantify MHBMA and DHBMA in urine of workers from a BD monomer and styrene-butadiene rubber production facility (40 controls and 32 occupationally exposed to BD). Urinary THBMA concentrations were also determined in the same samples. The concentrations of all three BD-mercapturic acids and the metabolic ratio (MHBMA/(MHBMA+DHBMA+THBMA)) were significantly higher in the occupationally exposed group as compared to controls and correlated with BD exposure, with each other, and with BD-hemoglobin biomarkers. This improved high throughput methodology for MHBMA and DHBMA will be useful for future epidemiological studies in smokers and occupationally exposed workers.

  11. Activation of ATP-sensitive potassium channels in rat pancreatic beta-cells by linoleic acid through both intracellular metabolites and membrane receptor signalling pathway.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yu-Feng; Pei, Jianming; Chen, Chen

    2008-09-01

    ATP-sensitive potassium channels (K(ATP) channels) determine the excitability of pancreatic beta-cells and importantly regulate glucose-stimulated insulin secretion (GSIS). Long-chain free fatty acids (FFAs) decrease GSIS after long-term exposure to beta-cells, but the effects of exogenous FFAs on K(ATP) channels are not yet well clarified. In this study, the effects of linoleic acid (LA) on membrane potential (MP) and K(ATP) channels were observed in primary cultured rat pancreatic beta-cells. LA (20 microM) induced hyperpolarization of MP and opening of K(ATP) channels, which was totally reversed and inhibited by tolbutamide, a K(ATP) channel blocker. Inhibition of LA metabolism by acyl-CoA synthetase inhibitor, triacsin C (10 microM), partially inhibited LA-induced opening of K(ATP) channels by 64%. The non-FFA G protein-coupled receptor (GPR) 40 agonist, GW9508 (40 microM), induced an opening of K(ATP) channels, which was similar to that induced by LA under triacsin C treatment. Blockade of protein kinases A and C did not influence the opening of K(ATP) channels induced by LA and GW9508, indicating that these two protein kinase pathways are not involved in the action of LA on K(ATP) channels. The present study demonstrates that LA induces hyperpolarization of MP by activating K(ATP) channels via both intracellular metabolites and activation of GPR40. It indicates that not only intracellular metabolites of FFAs but also GPR40-mediated pathways take part in the inhibition of GSIS and beta-cell dysfunction induced by FFAs.

  12. Metabolomics uncovers dietary omega-3 fatty acid-derived metabolites implicated in anti-nociceptive responses after experimental spinal cord injury

    PubMed Central

    Figueroa, Johnny D.; Cordero, Kathia; Serrano-Illan, Miguel; Almeyda, Audra; Baldeosingh, Keisha; Almaguel, Frankis G.; De Leon, Marino

    2013-01-01

    Chronic neuropathic pain is a frequent comorbidity following spinal cord injury (SCI) and often fails to respond to conventional pain management strategies. Preventive administration of docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) or consumption of a diet rich in omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (O3PUFAs) confers potent prophylaxis against SCI and improves functional recovery. The present study examines whether this novel dietary strategy provides significant antinociceptive benefits in rats experiencing SCI-induced pain. Rats were fed control chow or chow enriched with O3PUFAs for 8 weeks before being subjected to sham or cord contusion surgeries, continuing the same diets after surgery for another 8 more weeks. The paw sensitivity to noxious heat was quantified for at least 8 weeks post-SCI using the Hargreaves test. We found that SCI rats consuming the preventive O3PUFA-enriched diet exhibited a significant reduction in thermal hyperalgesia compared to those consuming the normal diet. Functional neurometabolomic profiling revealed a distinctive deregulation in the metabolism of endocannabinoids (eCB) and related N-acyl ethanolamines (NAEs) at 8 weeks post-SCI. We found that O3PUFAs consumption led to a robust accumulation of novel NAE precursors, including the glycerophospho-containing docosahexaenoyl ethanolamine (DHEA), docosapentaenoyl ethanolamine (DPEA), and eicosapentaenoyl ethanolamine (EPEA). The tissue levels of these metabolites were significantly correlated with the antihyperalgesic phenotype. In addition, rats consuming the O3PUFA-rich diet showed reduced sprouting of nociceptive fibers containing CGRP and dorsal horn neuron p38 MAPK expression, well-established biomarkers of pain. The spinal cord levels of inositols were positively correlated with thermal hyperalgesia, supporting their role as biomarkers of chronic neuropathic pain. Notably, the O3PUFA-rich dietary intervention reduced the levels of these metabolites. Collectively, these results demonstrate the

  13. High throughput HPLC-ESI(-)-MS/MS methodology for mercapturic acid metabolites of 1,3-butadiene: Biomarkers of exposure and bioactivation.

    PubMed

    Kotapati, Srikanth; Esades, Amanda; Matter, Brock; Le, Chap; Tretyakova, Natalia

    2015-11-01

    1,3-Butadiene (BD) is an important industrial and environmental carcinogen present in cigarette smoke, automobile exhaust, and urban air. The major urinary metabolites of BD in humans are 2-(N-acetyl-L-cystein-S-yl)-1-hydroxybut-3-ene/1-(N-acetyl-L-cystein-S-yl)-2-hydroxybut-3-ene (MHBMA), 4-(N-acetyl-L-cystein-S-yl)-1,2-dihydroxybutane (DHBMA), and 4-(N-acetyl-L-cystein-S-yl)-1,2,3-trihydroxybutyl mercapturic acid (THBMA), which are formed from the electrophilic metabolites of BD, 3,4-epoxy-1-butene (EB), hydroxymethyl vinyl ketone (HMVK), and 3,4-epoxy-1,2-diol (EBD), respectively. In the present work, a sensitive high-throughput HPLC-ESI(-)-MS/MS method was developed for simultaneous quantification of MHBMA and DHBMA in small volumes of human urine (200 μl). The method employs a 96 well Oasis HLB SPE enrichment step, followed by isotope dilution HPLC-ESI(-)-MS/MS analysis on a triple quadrupole mass spectrometer. The validated method was used to quantify MHBMA and DHBMA in urine of workers from a BD monomer and styrene-butadiene rubber production facility (40 controls and 32 occupationally exposed to BD). Urinary THBMA concentrations were also determined in the same samples. The concentrations of all three BD-mercapturic acids and the metabolic ratio (MHBMA/(MHBMA+DHBMA+THBMA)) were significantly higher in the occupationally exposed group as compared to controls and correlated with BD exposure, with each other, and with BD-hemoglobin biomarkers. This improved high throughput methodology for MHBMA and DHBMA will be useful for future epidemiological studies in smokers and occupationally exposed workers. PMID:25727266

  14. Cellular responses induced in vitro by pestheic acid, a fungal metabolite, in a gastric adenocarcinoma cell line (PG100).

    PubMed

    Sousa, J M C; Matos, L A; Alcântara, D F A; Ribeiro, H F; Santos, L S; Oliveira, M N; Brito-Junior, L C; Khayat, A S; Guimarães, A C; Cunha, L A; Burbano, R R; Bahia, M O

    2013-01-01

    There is a constant search for new cancer treatments that are less aggressive and economically affordable. In this context, natural products extracted from plants, fungi, and microorganisms are of great interest. Pestheic acid, or dihidromaldoxin, is a chlorinated diphenylic ether extracted from the phytopathogenic fungus Pestalotiopsis guepinii (Amphisphaeriaceae). We assessed the cytotoxic, cytostatic, and genotoxic effects of pestheic acid in a gastric adenocarcinoma cell line (PG100). A decrease in clonogenic survival was observed. Pestheic acid also induced significant increases in both micronucleus and nucleoplasmic bridge frequency. However, we did not observe changes in cell cycle kinetics or apoptosis induction. Reactive oxygen species induced by diphenylic ethers may explain the genotoxicity and mutagenicity of pestheic acid. The absence of repair checkpoints that we observed is probably due to the fact that the PG100 cell line lacks the TP53 gene, which is common in gastric cancers. Even though pestheic acid has had a clear cytotoxic effect, the minimal inhibitory concentration was high, which shows that pestheic acid is not an active anticancer compound under these conditions. PMID:24114206

  15. In situ assay of fatty acid β-oxidation by metabolite profiling following permeabilization of cell membranes[S

    PubMed Central

    Ensenauer, Regina; Fingerhut, Ralph; Schriever, Sonja C.; Fink, Barbara; Becker, Marc; Sellerer, Nina C.; Pagel, Philipp; Kirschner, Andreas; Dame, Torsten; Olgemöller, Bernhard; Röschinger, Wulf; Roscher, Adelbert A.

    2012-01-01

    Quantitative analysis of mitochondrial FA β-oxidation (FAO) has drawn increasing interest for defining lipid-induced metabolic dysfunctions, such as in obesity-induced insulin resistance, and evaluating pharmacologic strategies to improve β-oxidation function. The aim was to develop a new assay to quantify β-oxidation function in intact mitochondria and with a low amount of cell material. Cell membranes of primary human fibroblasts were permeabilized with digitonin prior to a load with FFA substrate. Following 120 min of incubation, the various generated acylcarnitines were extracted from both cells and incubation medium by protein precipitation/desalting and subjected to solid-phase extraction. A panel of 30 acylcarnitines per well was quantified by MS/MS and normalized to citrate synthase activity to analyze mitochondrial metabolite flux. Pretreatment with bezafibrate and etomoxir revealed stimulating and inhibiting regulatory effects on β-oxidation function, respectively. In addition to the advantage of a much shorter assay time due to in situ permeabilization compared with whole-cell incubation systems, the method allows the detection of multiple acylcarnitines from an only limited amount of intact cells, particularly relevant to the use of primary cells. This novel approach facilitates highly sensitive, simple, and fast monitoring of pharmacological effects on FAO. PMID:22345709

  16. Anaplerotic Accumulation of Tricarboxylic Acid Cycle Intermediates as Well as Changes in Other Key Metabolites During Heterotopic Ossification

    PubMed Central

    Davis, Eleanor L.; Salisbury, Elizabeth A.; Olmsted‐Davis, Elizabeth

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Heterotopic ossification (HO) is the de novo formation of bone that occurs in soft tissue, through recruitment, expansion, and differentiation of multiple cells types including transient brown adipocytes, osteoblasts, chondrocytes, mast cells, and platelets to name a few. Much evidence is accumulating that suggests changes in metabolism may be required to accomplish this bone formation. Recent work using a mouse model of heterotopic bone formation reliant on delivery of adenovirus‐transduced cells expressing low levels of BMP2 showed the immediate expansion of a unique brown adipocyte‐like cell. These cells are undergoing robust uncoupled oxidative phosphorylation to a level such that oxygen in the microenvironment is dramatically lowered creating areas of hypoxia. It is unclear how these oxygen changes ultimately affect metabolism and bone formation. To identify the processes and changes occurring over the course of bone formation, HO was established in the mice, and tissues isolated at early and late times were subjected to a global metabolomic screen. Results show that there are significant changes in both glucose levels, as well as TCA cycle intermediates. Additionally, metabolites necessary for oxidation of stored lipids were also found to be significantly elevated. The complete results of this screen are presented here, and provide a unique picture of the metabolic changes occurring during heterotopic bone formation. J. Cell. Biochem. 117: 1044–1053, 2016. © 2015 The Authors. Journal of Cellular Biochemistry Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26627193

  17. Blood risk factor metabolites associated with heart disease and myocardial fatty acids in copper-deficient male and female rats

    SciTech Connect

    Fields, M.; Lewis, C.; Beal, T. ); Berlin, E.; Kliman, P.G.; Peters, R.C. )

    1989-07-01

    Intact and castrated males and intact and ovariectomized female rats were fed a copper-deficient diet in order to establish whether the protection provided in females against cardiovascular pathology and mortality is due to endogenous sex hormones, and different levels of blood lipids and/or myocardial fatty acids. Seventy-three male and female rats were assigned to a copper-deficient diet (0.6 {mu}g of copper/g diet) containing 62% fructose for 8 weeks. Twelve of the male rats underwent castration and 12 of the females were ovariectomized. All animals exhibited high levels of plasma cholesterol, triglycerides, and uric acid, which were neither affected by the sex of the rat nor by the surgical treatment. The composition of fatty acids of the myocardium was similar in males and females. Except for those animals that were sacrificed by us, all other male rats died of heart pathology. In contrast, none of the female rats exhibited heart pathology and none died of the deficiency. It is suggested that heart pathology and mortality in copper deficiency are sex related and not due to high levels of plasma cholesterol, triglycerides, and uric acid or to differences in myocardial fatty acid composition.

  18. Antibacterial activity of lichen secondary metabolite usnic acid is primarily caused by inhibition of RNA and DNA synthesis.

    PubMed

    Maciąg-Dorszyńska, Monika; Węgrzyn, Grzegorz; Guzow-Krzemińska, Beata

    2014-04-01

    Usnic acid, a compound produced by various lichen species, has been demonstrated previously to inhibit growth of different bacteria and fungi; however, mechanism of its antimicrobial activity remained unknown. In this report, we demonstrate that usnic acid causes rapid and strong inhibition of RNA and DNA synthesis in Gram-positive bacteria, represented by Bacillus subtilis and Staphylococcus aureus, while it does not inhibit production of macromolecules (DNA, RNA, and proteins) in Escherichia coli, which is resistant to even high doses of this compound. However, we also observed slight inhibition of RNA synthesis in a Gram-negative bacterium, Vibrio harveyi. Inhibition of protein synthesis in B. subtilis and S. aureus was delayed, which suggest indirect action (possibly through impairment of transcription) of usnic acid on translation. Interestingly, DNA synthesis was halted rapidly in B. subtilis and S. aureus, suggesting interference of usnic acid with elongation of DNA replication. We propose that inhibition of RNA synthesis may be a general mechanism of antibacterial action of usnic acid, with additional direct mechanisms, such as impairment of DNA replication in B. subtilis and S. aureus.

  19. Drought and air warming affect the species-specific levels of stress-related foliar metabolites of three oak species on acidic and calcareous soil.

    PubMed

    Hu, Bin; Simon, Judy; Rennenberg, Heinz

    2013-05-01

    adjustment developed better on calcareous compared with acidic soil; however, this effect was metabolite- as well as species-specific. PMID:23619385

  20. Drought and air warming affect the species-specific levels of stress-related foliar metabolites of three oak species on acidic and calcareous soil.

    PubMed

    Hu, Bin; Simon, Judy; Rennenberg, Heinz

    2013-05-01

    adjustment developed better on calcareous compared with acidic soil; however, this effect was metabolite- as well as species-specific.

  1. 15-Lipoxygenase metabolites of α-linolenic acid, [13-(S)-HPOTrE and 13-(S)-HOTrE], mediate anti-inflammatory effects by inactivating NLRP3 inflammasome

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Naresh; Gupta, Geetika; Anilkumar, Kotha; Fatima, Naireen; Karnati, Roy; Reddy, Gorla Venkateswara; Giri, Priyanka Voori; Reddanna, Pallu

    2016-01-01

    The ratio of ω-6 to ω-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) appears to be critical in the regulation of various pathophysiological processes and to maintain cellular homeostasis. While a high proportion of dietary intake of ω-6 PUFAs is associated with various inflammatory disorders, higher intake of ω-3 PUFAs is known to offer protection. It is now well established that beneficial effects of ω-3 PUFAs are mediated in part by their oxygenated metabolites mainly via the lipoxygenase (LOX) and cyclooxygenase (COX) pathways. However, the down-stream signaling pathways that are involved in these anti-inflammatory effects of ω-3 PUFAs have not been elucidated. The present study evaluates the effects of 15-LOX metabolites of α-linolenic acid (ALA, ω-3 PUFA) on lipopolysaccharide (LPS) induced inflammation in RAW 264.7 cells and peritoneal macrophages. Further, the effect of these metabolites on the survival of BALB/c mice in LPS mediated septic shock and also polymicrobial sepsis in Cecal Ligation and Puncture (CLP) mouse model was studied. These studies reveal the anti-inflammatory effects of 13-(S)-hydroperoxyoctadecatrienoic acid [13-(S)-HPOTrE] and 13-(S)-hydroxyoctadecatrienoic acid [13-(S)-HOTrE] by inactivating NLRP3 inflammasome complex through the PPAR-γ pathway. Additionally, both metabolites also deactivated autophagy and induced apoptosis. In mediating all these effects 13-(S)-HPOTrE was more potent than 13-(S)-HOTrE. PMID:27535180

  2. Beyond the classic eicosanoids: Peripherally-acting oxygenated metabolites of polyunsaturated fatty acids mediate pain associated with tissue injury and inflammation.

    PubMed

    Shapiro, Haim; Singer, Pierre; Ariel, Amiram

    2016-08-01

    Pain is a complex sensation that may be protective or cause undue suffering and loss of function, depending on the circumstances. Peripheral nociceptor neurons (PNs) innervate most tissues, and express ion channels, nocisensors, which depolarize the cell in response to intense stimuli and numerous substances. Inflamed tissues manifest inflammatory hyperalgesia in which the threshold for pain and the response to painful stimuli are decreased and increased, respectively. Constituents of the inflammatory milieu sensitize PNs, thereby contributing to hyperalgesia. Polyunsaturated fatty acids undergo enzymatic and free radical-mediated oxygenation into an array of bioactive metabolites, oxygenated polyunsaturated fatty acids (oxy-PUFAs), including the classic eicosanoids. Oxy-PUFA production is enhanced during inflammation. Pioneering studies by Vane and colleagues from the early 1970s first implicated classic eicosanoids in the pain associated with inflammation. Here, we review the production and action of oxy-PUFAs that are not classic eicosanoids, but nevertheless are produced in injured/ inflamed tissues and activate or sensitize PNs. In general, oxy-PUFAs that sensitize PNs may do so directly, by activation of nocisensors, ion channels or GPCRs expressed on the surface of PNs, or indirectly, by increasing the production of inflammatory mediators that activate or sensitize PNs. We focus on oxy-PUFAs that act directly on PNs. Specifically, we discuss the role of arachidonic acid-derived 12S-HpETE, HNE, ONE, PGA2, iso-PGA2 and 15d-PGJ2, 5,6-and 8,9-EET, PGE2-G and 8R,15S-diHETE, as well as the linoleic acid-derived 9-and 13-HODE in inducing acute nocifensive behavior and/or inflammatory hyperalgesia in rodents. The nocisensors TRPV1, TRPV4 and TRPA1, and putative Gαs-type GPCRs are the PN targets of these oxy-PUFAs. PMID:27067460

  3. Tissue Distribution and Urinary Excretion of Dimethylated Arsenic and Its Metabolites in Dimethylarsinic acid- or Arsenate-treated Rats - MCEARD

    EPA Science Inventory

    Adult female Fisher 344 rats received drinking water containing 0, 4, 40, 100, or 200 parts per million of dimethylarsinic acid or 100 parts per million of arsenate for 14 days. Urine was collected during the last 24 h of exposure. Tissues were then taken for analysis of dimethy...

  4. Plasma amino acid and metabolite signatures tracking diabetes progression in the UCD-T2DM rat model

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Elevations of plasma concentrations of branched-chain amino acids (BCAAs) are observed in human insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM); however, there has been some controversy with respect to the passive or causative nature of the BCAA phenotype. Using untargeted metabolomics, plasm...

  5. Scavenging of free-radical metabolites of aniline xenobiotics and drugs by amino acid derivatives: toxicological implications of radical-transfer reactions.

    PubMed

    Michail, Karim; Baghdasarian, Argishti; Narwaley, Malyaj; Aljuhani, Naif; Siraki, Arno G

    2013-12-16

    We investigated a novel scavenging mechanism of arylamine free radicals by poly- and monoaminocarboxylates. Free radicals of arylamine xenobiotics and drugs did not react with oxygen in peroxidase-catalyzed reactions; however, they showed marked oxygen uptake in the presence of an aminocarboxylate. These free-radical intermediates were identified using the spin trap 5,5-dimethyl-1-pyrroline-N-oxide (DMPO) and electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectrometry. Diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid (DTPA), a polyaminocarboxylate, caused a concentration-dependent attenuation of N-centered radicals produced by the peroxidative metabolism of arylamines with the subsequent formation of secondary aliphatic carbon-centered radicals stemming from the cosubstrate molecule. Analogously, N,N-dimethylglycine (DMG) and N-methyliminodiacetate (MIDA), but not iminodiacetic acid (IDA), demonstrated a similar scavenging effect of arylamine-derived free radicals in a horseradish peroxidase/H2O2 system. Using human promyelocytic leukemia (HL-60) cell lysate as a model of human neutrophils, DTPA, MIDA, and DMG readily reduced anilinium cation radicals derived from the arylamines and gave rise to the corresponding carbon radicals. The rate of peroxidase-triggered polymerization of aniline was studied as a measure of nitrogen-radical scavenging. Although, IDA had no effect on the rate of aniline polymerization, this was almost nullified in the presence of DTPA and MIDA at half of the molar concentration of the aniline substrate, whereas a 20 molar excess of DMPO caused only a partial inhibition. Furthermore, the yield of formaldehyde, a specific reaction endproduct of the oxidation of aminocarboxylates by aniline free-radical metabolites, was quantitatively determined. Azobenzene, a specific reaction product of peroxidase-catalyzed free-radical dimerization of aniline, was fully abrogated in the presence of DTPA, as confirmed by GC/MS. Under aerobic conditions, a radical-transfer reaction

  6. Altered secretion of selected arachidonic acid metabolites during subclinical endometritis relative to estrous cycle stage and grade of fibrosis in mares.

    PubMed

    Gajos, Katarzyna; Kozdrowski, Roland; Nowak, Marcin; Siemieniuch, Marta J

    2015-08-01

    Mares that fail to become pregnant after repeated breeding, without showing typical signs of clinical endometritis, should be suspected of subclinical endometritis (SE). Contact with infectious agents results in altered synthesis and secretion of inflammatory mediators, including cytokines and arachidonic acid metabolites, and disturbs endometrial functional balance. To address the hypothesis that SE affects the immune endocrine status of the equine endometrium, spontaneous secretion of prostaglandin E(2) (PGE(2)), prostaglandin F(2α) (PGF(2α)), 6-keto-PGF(1α )(a metabolite of prostacyclin I(2)), leukotriene B(4) (LTB(4)), and leukotriene C(4) (LTC(4)) was examined. In addition, secretion of these factors was examined relative to the grade of inflammation, fibrosis, and estrous cycle stage. Eighty-two warmblood mares, of known breeding history, were enrolled in this study. On the basis of histopathologic assessment, mares were classified as suffering from first-grade SE, second-grade SE, or being healthy. The grade of fibrosis and the infiltration of endometrial tissue with polymorphonuclear leukocytes were examined by routine hematoxylin-eosin staining. In mares suffering from SE, the secretion profiles of PGE(2), 6-keto-PGF(1α), LTB(4), and LTC(4) were changed compared to mares that did not suffer from endometritis. The secretion of PGE(2) and 6-keto-PGF1α was increased, whereas that of LTB(4) and LTC(4) was decreased. Secretion of 6-keto-PGF(1α) was increased in first- and second-grade SE (P < 0.01). The concentration of PGI(2) metabolite was increased only in inflamed endometrium, independently of the inflammation grade, but was not affected by fibrosis. Prostaglandin E(2) secretion was increased in second-grade SE (P < 0.05). The secretion of LTB(4) decreased in both first- and second-grade SE (P < 0.05), whereas secretion of LTC(4) was decreased only in second-grade SE (P < 0.05). Fibrosis did not change the secretion profile of PGE(2), PGF(2α), and 6

  7. Accurate quantification of the mercapturic acids of acrylonitrile and its genotoxic metabolite cyanoethylene-epoxide in human urine by isotope-dilution LC-ESI/MS/MS.

    PubMed

    Schettgen, T; Bertram, J; Kraus, T

    2012-08-30

    Acrylonitrile is a highly important industrial chemical with a high production volume worldwide, especially in the plastics industry. It is classified as a possible human carcinogen by the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC group 2B). During metabolism of acrylonitrile, the genotoxic metabolite cyanoethylene-epoxide is formed. The urinary mercapturic acids of acrylonitrile, namely N-acetyl-S-(2-cyanoethyl)-L-cysteine (CEMA) and cyanoethylene-epoxide, namely N-acetyl-S-(1-cyano-2-hydroxyethyl)-L-cysteine (CHEMA) are specific biomarkers for the determination of individual internal exposure to acrylonitrile and its highly reactive metabolite. We have developed and validated a sensitive method for the accurate determination of CEMA and CHEMA in human urine with a multidimensional LC/MS/MS-method using deuterium-labelled analogues for both analytes as internal standards. Analytes were stripped from urinary matrix by online extraction on a restricted access material, transferred to the analytical column and determined by tandem mass spectrometry. The limit of quantification (LOQ) for CEMA and CHEMA was 1 μg/L urine and allowed to quantify the background exposure of the (smoking) general population. Precision within and between series for CHEMA ranged from 2.6 to 8.0% at four concentrations ranging from 8.3 to 86 μg/L urine, mean accuracy was between 94 and 100%. For CEMA, precision within and between series ranged from 2.4 to 14.5% at four concentrations ranging from 15.1 to 196 μg/L urine, mean accuracy was between 91 and 104%. We applied the method to spot urine samples of 83 subjects of the general population with no known occupational exposure to acrylonitrile. Median levels (range) for CEMA and CHEMA in urine samples of non-smokers (n=47) were 1.9 μg/L (<1-16.4 μg/L) and<1 μg/L (<1-3 μg/L), while in urine samples of smokers (n=36), median levels were 184 μg/L (2-907 μg/L) and 29.3 μg/L (<1-147 μg/L), respectively. Smokers showed a

  8. Deoxycholic acid and selenium metabolite methylselenol exert common and distinct effects on cell cycle, apoptosis, and MAP kinase pathway in HCT116 human colon cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Huawei; Botnen, James H; Briske-Anderson, Mary

    2010-01-01

    The cell growth inhibition induced by bile acid deoxycholic acid (DCA) may cause compensatory hyperproliferation of colonic epithelial cells and consequently increase colon cancer risk. On the other hand, there is increasing evidence for the efficacy of certain forms of selenium (Se) as anticancer nutrients. Methylselenol has been hypothesized to be a critical Se metabolite for anticancer activity in vivo. In this study, we demonstrated that both DCA (75-300 micromol/l) and submicromolar methylselenol inhibited colon cancer cell proliferation by up to 64% and 63%, respectively. In addition, DCA and methylselenol each increased colon cancer cell apoptosis rate by up to twofold. Cell cycle analyses revealed that DCA induced an increase in only the G1 fraction with a concomitant drop in G2 and S-phase; in contrast, methylselenol led to an increase in the G1 and G2 fractions with a concomitant drop only in the S-phase. Although both DCA and methylselenol significantly promoted apoptosis and inhibited cell growth, examination of mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway activation showed that DCA, but not methylselenol, induced SAPK/JNK1/2, p38 MAPK, ERK1/2 activation. Thus, our data provide, for the first time, the molecular basis for opposite effects of methylselenol and DCA on colon tumorigenesis.

  9. NF-kappaB-dependent anti-inflammatory activity of urolithins, gut microbiota ellagic acid-derived metabolites, in human colonic fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    González-Sarrías, Antonio; Larrosa, Mar; Tomás-Barberán, Francisco Abraham; Dolara, Piero; Espín, Juan Carlos

    2010-08-01

    Previous studies have reported the anti-inflammatory properties of pomegranate extracts, suggesting that ellagitannins (ET) and ellagic acid (EA) are the main anti-inflammatory compounds. However, both ET and EA are metabolised in vivo by the gut microbiota to yield urolithins (Uro) which can be found in the gut and in systemic bloodstream. The present study was carried out to evaluate the individual effect of EA and their microbiota-derived metabolites Uro on colon fibroblasts upon IL-1beta treatment as an in vitro inflammation model. Uro-A and Uro-B (10 microm) inhibited PGE2 production (85 and 40 %, respectively) after IL-1beta stimulation, whereas EA did not show any effect. Uro-A, but not Uro-B, down-regulated cyclo-oxygenase-2 (COX-2) and microsomal PGE synthase-1 (mPGES-1) mRNA expression and protein levels. Both Uro inhibited NF-kappaB translocation to nucleus. Slight but significant effects were found in the activation of mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathways. Uro-A lowered c-Jun N-terminal kinase phosphorylation state, and both Uro inhibited p38 activation. No metabolites derived from Uro or EA were found in the cell media upon incubation of EA or Uro with the cells, and only traces of the compounds were found inside the cells. The present results suggest that Uro, mainly Uro-A, are the main compounds that are responsible for the pomegranate anti-inflammatory properties. The mechanism of action implicated seems to be via the inhibition of activation of NF-kappaB and MAPK, down-regulation of COX-2 and mPGES-1 expressions, and consequently,via the reduction of PGE2 production. Taking into account that Uro did not enter the cells, a competitive binding for IL-1beta membrane receptor cannot be discarded.

  10. CYP2J2 and its metabolites (epoxyeicosatrienoic acids) attenuate cardiac hypertrophy by activating AMPKα2 and enhancing nuclear translocation of Akt1.

    PubMed

    Wang, Bei; Zeng, Hesong; Wen, Zheng; Chen, Chen; Wang, Dao Wen

    2016-10-01

    Cytochrome P450 epoyxgenase 2J2 and epoxyeicosatrienoic acids (EETs) are known to protect against cardiac hypertrophy and heart failure, which involve the activation of 5'-AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) and Akt. Although the functional roles of AMPK and Akt are well established, the significance of cross talk between them in the development of cardiac hypertrophy and antihypertrophy of CYP2J2 and EETs remains unclear. We investigated whether CYP2J2 and its metabolites EETs protected against cardiac hypertrophy by activating AMPKα2 and Akt1. Moreover, we tested whether EETs enhanced cross talk between AMPKα2 and phosphorylated Akt1 (p-Akt1), and stimulated nuclear translocation of p-Akt1, to exert their antihypertrophic effects. AMPKα2(-/-) mice that overexpressed CYP2J2 in heart were treated with Ang II for 2 weeks. Interestingly, overexpression of CYP2J2 suppressed cardiac hypertrophy and increased levels of atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) in the heart tissue and plasma of wild-type mice but not AMPKα2(-/-) mice. The CYP2J2 metabolites, 11,12-EET, activated AMPKα2 to induce nuclear translocation of p-Akt1 selectively, which increased the production of ANP and therefore inhibited the development of cardiac hypertrophy. Furthermore, by co-immunoprecipitation analysis, we found that AMPKα2β2γ1 and p-Akt1 interact through the direct binding of the AMPKγ1 subunit to the Akt1 protein kinase domain. This interaction was enhanced by 11,12-EET. Our studies reveal a novel mechanism in which CYP2J2 and EETs enhanced Akt1 nuclear translocation through interaction with AMPKα2β2γ1 and protect against cardiac hypertrophy and suggest that overexpression of CYP2J2 might have clinical potential to suppress cardiac hypertrophy and heart failure.

  11. Enhancement of Anti-Inflammatory Activity of Aloe vera Adventitious Root Extracts through the Alteration of Primary and Secondary Metabolites via Salicylic Acid Elicitation

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Yun Sun; Ju, Hyun Kyoung; Kim, Yeon Jeong; Lim, Tae-Gyu; Uddin, Md Romij; Kim, Yeon Bok; Baek, Jin Hong; Kwon, Sung Won; Lee, Ki Won; Seo, Hak Soo; Park, Sang Un; Yang, Tae-Jin

    2013-01-01

    Aloe vera (Asphodeloideae) is a medicinal plant in which useful secondary metabolites are plentiful. Among the representative secondary metabolites of Aloe vera are the anthraquinones including aloe emodin and chrysophanol, which are tricyclic aromatic quinones synthesized via a plant-specific type III polyketide biosynthesis pathway. However, it is not yet clear which cellular responses can induce the pathway, leading to production of tricyclic aromatic quinones. In this study, we examined the effect of endogenous elicitors on the type III polyketide biosynthesis pathway and identified the metabolic changes induced in elicitor-treated Aloe vera adventitious roots. Salicylic acid, methyl jasmonate, and ethephon were used to treat Aloe vera adventitious roots cultured on MS liquid media with 0.3 mg/L IBA for 35 days. Aloe emodin and chrysophanol were remarkably increased by the SA treatment, more than 10–11 and 5–13 fold as compared with untreated control, respectively. Ultra-performance liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization mass spectrometry analysis identified a total of 37 SA-induced compounds, including aloe emodin and chrysophanol, and 3 of the compounds were tentatively identified as tricyclic aromatic quinones. Transcript accumulation analysis of polyketide synthase genes and gas chromatography mass spectrometry showed that these secondary metabolic changes resulted from increased expression of octaketide synthase genes and decreases in malonyl-CoA, which is the precursor for the tricyclic aromatic quinone biosynthesis pathway. In addition, anti-inflammatory activity was enhanced in extracts of SA-treated adventitious roots. Our results suggest that SA has an important role in activation of the plant specific-type III polyketide biosynthetic pathway, and therefore that the efficacy of Aloe vera as medicinal agent can be improved through SA treatment. PMID:24358188

  12. Abscisic acid induced changes in production of primary and secondary metabolites, photosynthetic capacity, antioxidant capability, antioxidant enzymes and lipoxygenase inhibitory activity of Orthosiphon stamineus Benth.

    PubMed

    Ibrahim, Mohd Hafiz; Jaafar, Hawa Z E

    2013-01-01

    An experiment was conducted to investigate and distinguish the relationships in the production of total phenolics, total flavonoids, soluble sugars, H2O2, O2-, phenylalanine ammonia lyase (PAL) activity, leaf gas exchange, antioxidant activity, antioxidant enzyme activity [ascorbate peroxidase (APX), catalase (CAT), superoxide dismutase (SOD) and Lipoxygenase inhibitory activity (LOX)] under four levels of foliar abscisic acid (ABA) application (0, 2, 4, 6 µM) for 15 weeks in Orthosiphon stamineus Benth. It was found that the production of plant secondary metabolites, soluble sugars, antioxidant activity, PAL activity and LOX inhibitory activity was influenced by foliar application of ABA. As the concentration of ABA was increased from 0 to 6 µM the production of total phenolics, flavonoids, sucrose, H2O2, O2-, PAL activity and LOX inhibitory activity was enhanced. It was also observed that the antioxidant capabilities (DPPH and ORAC) were increased. This was followed by increases in production of antioxidant enzymes APX, CAT and SOD. Under high application rates of ABA the net photosynthesis and stomatal conductance was found to be reduced. The production of primary and secondary metabolites displayed a significant positive relationship with H2O2 (total phenolics, r2 = 0.877; total flavonoids, r2 = 0.812; p ≤ 0.05) and O2- (total phenolics, r2 = 0.778; total flavonoids, r2 = 0.912; p ≤ 0.05). This indicated that increased oxidative stress at high application rates of ABA, improved the production of phytochemicals. PMID:23884129

  13. A comparative study on diurnal changes in metabolite levels in the leaves of three crassulacean acid metabolism (CAM) species, Ananas comosus, Kalanchoë daigremontiana and K. pinnata.

    PubMed

    Chen, Li-Song; Lin, Qin; Nose, Akihiro

    2002-02-01

    A comparative study on diurnal changes in metabolite levels associated with crassulacean acid metabolism (CAM) in the leaves of three CAM species, Ananas comosus (pineapple), a hexose-utilizing species, and Kalanchoë daigremontiana and K. pinnata, two starch-utilizing species, were made. All three CAM species showed a typical feature of CAM with nocturnal malate increase. In the two Kalanchoë species, isocitrate levels were higher than citrate levels; the reverse was the case in pineapple. In the two Kalanchoë species, a small nocturnal citrate increase was found and K. daigremontiana showed a small nocturnal isocitrate increase. Glucose 6-phosphate (G-6-P), fructose 6-phosphate (F-6-P) and glucose 1-phosphate (G-1-P) levels in the three CAM species rose rapidly during the first part of the dark period and decreased during the latter part of the dark period. The levels of the metabolites also decreased during the first 3 h of the light period, then, remained little changed through the rest of the light period. Absolute levels of G-6-P, F-6-P and G-1-P were higher in pineapple than in the two Kalanchoë species. Fructose 1,6-bisphosphate (F-1,6-P(2)) levels in the three CAM species increased during the dark period, then dramatically decreased during the first 3 h of the light period and remained unchanged through the rest of the light period. The extent of nocturnal F-1,6-P(2) increase was far greater in the two Kalanchoë species than in pineapple. Absolute levels of F-1,6-P(2) were higher in the two Kalanchoë species than in pineapple, especially during dark period. Diurnal changes in oxaloacetate (OAA), pyruvate (Pyr) and phosphoenolpyruvate (PEP) levels in the three CAM species were similar.

  14. Enhancement of anti-inflammatory activity of Aloe vera adventitious root extracts through the alteration of primary and secondary metabolites via salicylic acid elicitation.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yun Sun; Ju, Hyun Kyoung; Kim, Yeon Jeong; Lim, Tae-Gyu; Uddin, Md Romij; Kim, Yeon Bok; Baek, Jin Hong; Kwon, Sung Won; Lee, Ki Won; Seo, Hak Soo; Park, Sang Un; Yang, Tae-Jin

    2013-01-01

    Aloe vera (Asphodeloideae) is a medicinal plant in which useful secondary metabolites are plentiful. Among the representative secondary metabolites of Aloe vera are the anthraquinones including aloe emodin and chrysophanol, which are tricyclic aromatic quinones synthesized via a plant-specific type III polyketide biosynthesis pathway. However, it is not yet clear which cellular responses can induce the pathway, leading to production of tricyclic aromatic quinones. In this study, we examined the effect of endogenous elicitors on the type III polyketide biosynthesis pathway and identified the metabolic changes induced in elicitor-treated Aloe vera adventitious roots. Salicylic acid, methyl jasmonate, and ethephon were used to treat Aloe vera adventitious roots cultured on MS liquid media with 0.3 mg/L IBA for 35 days. Aloe emodin and chrysophanol were remarkably increased by the SA treatment, more than 10-11 and 5-13 fold as compared with untreated control, respectively. Ultra-performance liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization mass spectrometry analysis identified a total of 37 SA-induced compounds, including aloe emodin and chrysophanol, and 3 of the compounds were tentatively identified as tricyclic aromatic quinones. Transcript accumulation analysis of polyketide synthase genes and gas chromatography mass spectrometry showed that these secondary metabolic changes resulted from increased expression of octaketide synthase genes and decreases in malonyl-CoA, which is the precursor for the tricyclic aromatic quinone biosynthesis pathway. In addition, anti-inflammatory activity was enhanced in extracts of SA-treated adventitious roots. Our results suggest that SA has an important role in activation of the plant specific-type III polyketide biosynthetic pathway, and therefore that the efficacy of Aloe vera as medicinal agent can be improved through SA treatment.

  15. Hydroxylated jasmonates are commonly occurring metabolites of jasmonic acid and contribute to a partial switch-off in jasmonate signaling.

    PubMed

    Miersch, Otto; Neumerkel, Jana; Dippe, Martin; Stenzel, Irene; Wasternack, Claus

    2008-01-01

    In potato 12-hydroxyjasmonic acid (12-OH-JA) is a tuber-inducing compound. Here, it is demonstrated that 12-OH-JA, as well as its sulfated and glucosylated derivatives, are constituents of various organs of many plant species. All accumulate differentially and usually to much higher concentrations than jasmonic acid (JA). In wounded tomato leaves, 12-OH-JA and its sulfated, as well as glucosylated, derivative accumulate after JA, and their diminished accumulation in wounded leaves of the JA-deficient mutants spr2 and acx1 and also a JA-deficient 35S::AOCantisense line suggest their JA-dependent formation. To elucidate how signaling properties of JA/JAME (jasmonic acid methyl ester) are affected by hydroxylation and sulfation, germination and root growth were recorded in the presence of the different jasmonates, indicating that 12-OH-JA and 12-hydroxyjasmonic acid sulfate (12-HSO(4)-JA) were not bioactive. Expression analyses for 29 genes showed that expression of wound-inducible genes such as those coding for PROTEINASE INHIBITOR2, POLYPHENOL OXIDASE, THREONINE DEAMINASE or ARGINASE was induced by JAME and less induced or even down-regulated by 12-OH-JA and 12-HSO(4)-JA. Almost all genes coding for enzymes in JA biosynthesis were up-regulated by JAME but down-regulated by 12-OH-JA and 12-HSO(4)-JA. The data suggest that wound-induced metabolic conversion of JA/JAME into 12-OH-JA alters expression pattern of genes including a switch off in JA signaling for a subset of genes. PMID:17995915

  16. Direct chiral resolution of metalaxyl and metabolite metalaxyl acid in aged mobile phases: the role of trace water.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiaoxiang; Xia, Tingting; Chen, Jingwen; Huang, Liping; Cai, Xiyun

    2010-04-28

    The separation of chiral transformation products greatly complements the understanding of the stereochemistry of chiral pollutants. In this study, direct enantiomeric resolution of metalaxyl and its main degradation product metalaxyl acid, often co-occurring in the environment, was carried out in normal-phase high-performance liquid chromatography with a Chiralcel OJ-H column. (R)-Metalaxyl acid and (S)-metalaxyl, which were almost parallel bonding to the chiral stationary phase, tended to separate, started to overlap, coeluted, and separated again with subtle changes of the mobile phase consisting of n-hexane, 2-propanol, acetic acid, and trace water. Their competition above hampered an acceptable direct separation in fresh mobile phases. Aged mobile phases with a storage period of 3-5 days, however, significantly improved their separation, in which trace water from moisture air diffusion was found to play a major role. Trace water differentially affected peak width and retention times and then induced enhanced peak separation, confirmed by deliberate addition of water to fresh mobile phases. Furthermore, none of the studied factors, involving temperature, concomitant analytes, and trace water, could cause changes of the configuration of the chiral stationary phase. Simultaneous enantiomeric separation of both compounds was achieved in aged or fresh mobile phases with adventitious or added water and gave satisfactory peak separation, all with Rs values of more than 1.20 in environmental samples.

  17. Δ9-Tetrahydrocannabinolic acid synthase: The application of a plant secondary metabolite enzyme in biocatalytic chemical synthesis.

    PubMed

    Lange, Kerstin; Schmid, Andreas; Julsing, Mattijs K

    2016-09-10

    Δ(9)-Tetrahydrocannabinolic acid synthase (THCAS) from the secondary metabolism of Cannabis sativa L. catalyzes the oxidative formation of an intramolecular CC bond in cannabigerolic acid (CBGA) to synthesize Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinolic acid (THCA), which is the direct precursor of Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol (Δ(9)-THC). Aiming on a biotechnological production of cannabinoids, we investigated the potential of the heterologously produced plant oxidase in a cell-free system on preparative scale. THCAS was characterized in an aqueous/organic two-liquid phase setup in order to solubilize the hydrophobic substrate and to allow in situ product removal. Compared to the single phase aqueous setup the specific activity decreased by a factor of approximately 2 pointing to a substrate limitation of CBGA in the two-liquid phase system. However, the specific activity remained stable for at least 3h illustrating the benefit of the two-liquid phase setup. In a repeated-batch setup, THCAS showed only a minor loss of specific activity in the third batch pointing to a high intrinsic stability and high solvent tolerance of the enzyme. Maximal space-time-yields of 0.121gL(-1)h(-1) were reached proving the two-liquid phase concept suitable for biotechnological production of cannabinoids. PMID:27369551

  18. Effect of heat stress on the serum concentrations of free amino acids and some of their metabolites in growing pigs.

    PubMed

    Morales, A; Cota, S E M; Ibarra, N O; Arce, N; Htoo, J K; Cervantes, M

    2016-07-01

    Exposure to heat stress (HS) may affect the intestinal epithelia of pigs, resulting in impaired digestive and absorptive capacity. The serum concentration (SC) of free AA in pigs can be used as indicators of their availability. This study was conducted with 12 crossbred (Landrace × Hampshire × Duroc) pigs (29.0 ± 2.8 kg initial BW) distributed into 2 groups to analyze the SC of free AA and some AA metabolites in pigs exposed to HS conditions. The treatments were pigs housed under natural HS conditions in a room with no ambient temperature control (23.6 to 37.6°C, HS) and pigs housed at thermoneutral conditions (24 ± 2°C), feed restricted to a level similar to that of their HS counterparts. All pigs received a wheat-soybean meal diet. Blood samples were collected at both the absorptive (2.5 h after a meal) and postabsorptive (10.0 h after a meal) phase. At the absorptive phase, the SC of free Arg, Leu, Lys, Phe, Thr, and Trp were lower ( < 0.05) and the SC of His, Val, Ala, Pro, Ser, and Tyr tended to be lower ( < 0.10) in HS pigs. At the postabsorptive phase, the SC of free Arg, His, Met, Asn, Gln, and Tyr were higher ( < 0.05) but the SC of Ala was lower ( < 0.01) and the SC of Pro tended to be lower ( < 0.10) in HS pigs. The absorptive SC of carnosine, ornithine (Orn), and Tau were lower ( < 0.05) and of citrulline (Cit), cystathionine, and urea tended to be lower ( < 0.10) in HS pigs. The postabsorptive SC of 3-methyl-His, homo-Cys, OH-Lys, and OH-Pro increased ( = 0.05) and of Cit tended to increase ( = 0.10) but that of carnosine and sarcosine ( < 0.05) decreased in HS pigs. The results of this study show a marked and differential effect of HS on the SC of AA. These data indicate that HS negatively affects the digestive and absorptive capacity of pigs and that the metabolism of some AA is modified in pigs to counteract the negative effects of the HS. PMID:27482670

  19. Evaluation of the genotoxic potential of 3-monochloropropane-1,2-diol (3-MCPD) and its metabolites, glycidol and beta-chlorolactic acid, using the single cell gel/comet assay.

    PubMed

    El Ramy, R; Ould Elhkim, M; Lezmi, S; Poul, J M

    2007-01-01

    3-monochloropropane-1,2-diol (3-MCPD) is a member of a group of chemicals known as chloropropanols. It is found in many foods and food ingredients as a result of food processing. 3-MCPD is regarded as a rat carcinogen known to induce Leydig-cell and mammary gland tumours in males and kidney tumours in both genders. The aim of our study was to clarify the possible involvement of genotoxic mechanisms in 3-MCPD induced carcinogenicity at the target organ level. For that purpose, we evaluated DNA damages in selected target (kidneys and testes) and non-target (blood leukocytes, liver and bone marrow) male rat organs by the in vivo alkaline single cell gel electrophoresis (comet) assay, 3 and 24 h after 3-MCPD oral administration to Sprague-Dawley and Fisher 344 adult rats. 3-MCPD may be metabolised to a genotoxic intermediate, glycidol, whereas the predominant urinary metabolite in rats following 3-MCPD administration is beta-chlorolactic acid. Therefore, we also studied the DNA damaging effects of 3-MCPD and its metabolites, glycidol and beta-chlorolactic acid, in the in vitro comet assay on CHO cells. Our results show the absence of genotoxic potential of 3-MCPD in vivo in the target as well as in the non-target organs. Glycidol, the epoxide metabolite, induced DNA damages in CHO cells. beta-Chlorolactic acid, the main metabolite of 3-MCPD in rats, was shown to be devoid of DNA-damaging effects in vitro in mammalian cells.

  20. Effects of zilpaterol hydrochloride on growth performance, blood metabolites, and fatty acid profiles of plasma and adipose tissue in finishing steers.

    PubMed

    Van Bibber-Krueger, C L; Miller, K A; Parsons, G L; Thompson, L K; Drouillard, J S

    2015-05-01

    The effects of zilpaterol hydrochloride (ZH) on blood metabolites and fatty acid profiles of plasma and adipose tissue were evaluated in crossbred finishing steers (n = 18, BW 639 ± 12.69 kg) that were stratified by BW and randomly assigned, within strata (block), to receive 0 (control) or 8.33 mg/kg diet DM ZH. Cattle were fed once daily ad libitum in individual feeding pens (9 pens/treatment). Zilpaterol hydrochloride was fed for 23 d and withdrawn 3 d before harvest. Blood samples and measures of BW were taken on d 0, 7, 14, and 21. Concentrations of β-hydroxybutyrate (BHB), glucose, and lactate were determined from whole blood. Nonesterified fatty acids, urea nitrogen (PUN), glucose, lactate, and long-chain fatty acid (LCFA) concentrations were analyzed from plasma. Postharvest, adipose tissue samples (approximately 20 g) from subcutaneous fat covering the lumbar vertebrae were collected after 48 h of refrigeration and analyzed for LCFA profiles. Feeding ZH decreased DMI by 8% (P = 0.03) but did not affect BW gain or efficiency (P = 0.83 and P = 0.56, respectively). Addition of ZH resulted in greater HCW, dressing percentage, and LM area ( P = 0.02, P = 0.08, and P = 0.07, respectively) but did not influence other carcass traits (P > 0.10). A ZH × d interaction was observed for PUN and whole-blood glucose concentrations (P = 0.06), in which concentrations decreased in cattle receiving ZH. Nonesterified fatty acids, BHB, plasma glucose, whole-blood, and plasma lactate concentrations were unaffected by ZH (P > 0.10). Zilpaterol hydrochloride increased plasma concentrations of elaidic (P = 0.03), vaccenic (P = 0.006), and docosapentaenoic acids ( P= 0.08), but LCFA concentrations of adipose tissue were unaffected ( P> 0.10), suggesting no preferential oxidation of specific fatty acids. In conclusion, ZH supplementation decreased PUN concentration possibly due to decreased muscle catabolism, but components of blood related to lipid oxidation were unaffected

  1. Effects of zilpaterol hydrochloride on growth performance, blood metabolites, and fatty acid profiles of plasma and adipose tissue in finishing steers.

    PubMed

    Van Bibber-Krueger, C L; Miller, K A; Parsons, G L; Thompson, L K; Drouillard, J S

    2015-05-01

    The effects of zilpaterol hydrochloride (ZH) on blood metabolites and fatty acid profiles of plasma and adipose tissue were evaluated in crossbred finishing steers (n = 18, BW 639 ± 12.69 kg) that were stratified by BW and randomly assigned, within strata (block), to receive 0 (control) or 8.33 mg/kg diet DM ZH. Cattle were fed once daily ad libitum in individual feeding pens (9 pens/treatment). Zilpaterol hydrochloride was fed for 23 d and withdrawn 3 d before harvest. Blood samples and measures of BW were taken on d 0, 7, 14, and 21. Concentrations of β-hydroxybutyrate (BHB), glucose, and lactate were determined from whole blood. Nonesterified fatty acids, urea nitrogen (PUN), glucose, lactate, and long-chain fatty acid (LCFA) concentrations were analyzed from plasma. Postharvest, adipose tissue samples (approximately 20 g) from subcutaneous fat covering the lumbar vertebrae were collected after 48 h of refrigeration and analyzed for LCFA profiles. Feeding ZH decreased DMI by 8% (P = 0.03) but did not affect BW gain or efficiency (P = 0.83 and P = 0.56, respectively). Addition of ZH resulted in greater HCW, dressing percentage, and LM area ( P = 0.02, P = 0.08, and P = 0.07, respectively) but did not influence other carcass traits (P > 0.10). A ZH × d interaction was observed for PUN and whole-blood glucose concentrations (P = 0.06), in which concentrations decreased in cattle receiving ZH. Nonesterified fatty acids, BHB, plasma glucose, whole-blood, and plasma lactate concentrations were unaffected by ZH (P > 0.10). Zilpaterol hydrochloride increased plasma concentrations of elaidic (P = 0.03), vaccenic (P = 0.006), and docosapentaenoic acids ( P= 0.08), but LCFA concentrations of adipose tissue were unaffected ( P> 0.10), suggesting no preferential oxidation of specific fatty acids. In conclusion, ZH supplementation decreased PUN concentration possibly due to decreased muscle catabolism, but components of blood related to lipid oxidation were unaffected.

  2. Effect of inulin supplementation and dietary fat source on performance, blood serum metabolites, liver lipids, abdominal fat deposition, and tissue fatty acid composition in broiler chickens.

    PubMed

    Velasco, S; Ortiz, L T; Alzueta, C; Rebolé, A; Treviño, J; Rodríguez, M L

    2010-08-01

    A study was conducted to evaluate the effect of adding inulin to diets containing 2 different types of fat as energy sources on performance, blood serum metabolites, liver lipids, and fatty acids of abdominal adipose tissue and breast and thigh meat. A total of 240 one-day-old female broiler chicks were randomly allocated into 1 of 6 treatments with 8 replicates per treatment and 5 chicks per pen. The experiment consisted of a 3 x 2 factorial arrangement of treatments including 3 concentrations of inulin (0, 5, and 10 g/kg of diet) and 2 types of fat [palm oil (PO) and sunflower oil (SO)] at an inclusion rate of 90 g/kg of diet. The experimental period lasted from 1 to 34 d. Dietary fat type did not affect BW gain but impaired feed conversion (P < 0.001) in birds fed the PO diets compared with birds fed the SO diets. The diets containing PO increased abdominal fat deposition and serum lipid and glucose concentrations. Triacylglycerol contents in liver were higher in the birds fed PO diets. Dietary fat type also modified fatty acids of abdominal and i.m. fat, resulting in a higher concentration of C16:0 and C18:1n-9 and a lower concentration of C18:2n-6 in the birds fed PO diets. The addition of inulin to diets modified (P = 0.017) BW gain quadratically without affecting feed conversion. Dietary inulin decreased the total lipid concentration in liver (P = 0.003) and that of triacylglycerols and very low density lipoprotein cholesterol (up to 31%) in blood serum compared with the control groups. The polyunsaturated fatty acid:saturated fatty acid ratio increased in abdominal and i.m. fat when inulin was included in the SO-containing diets. The results from the current study suggest that the addition of inulin to broiler diets has a beneficial effect on blood serum lipids by decreasing triacylglyceride concentrations The results also support the use of inulin to increase the capacity of SO for enhancing polyunsaturated fatty acid:saturated fatty acid ratio of i.m. fat

  3. Beta-orcinol metabolites from the lichen Hypotrachyna revoluta.

    PubMed

    Papadopoulou, Panagiota; Tzakou, Olga; Vagias, Constantinos; Kefalas, Panagiotis; Roussis, Vassilios

    2007-01-01

    Four new beta-orcinol metabolites, hypotrachynic acid (1), deoxystictic acid (2), cryptostictinolide (3) and 8'-methylconstictic acid (4) along with the metabolites 8'-methylstictic acid (5), 8'-methylmenegazziaic acid (6), stictic acid (7), 8'-ethylstictic acid (8) and atranorin (9), that have been previously described, were isolated for the first time from the tissue extracts of the lichen Hypotrachyna revoluta (Flörke) Hale. The structures of the new metabolites were elucidated on the basis of extensive spectroscopic analyses. Radical scavenging activity (RSA) of the metabolites isolated in adequate amounts, was evaluated using luminol chemiluminescence and comparison with Trolox. PMID:17873835

  4. DGAEE, a newly synthesized derivative of glycyrrhetinic acid, potently attenuates mouse septic shock via its main metabolite DGA in an IL-10-dependent manner.

    PubMed

    Luo, Jinque; Liu, Mei; Wu, Xin; Dou, Yannong; Xia, Yufeng; Dai, Yue; Wei, Zhifeng

    2015-12-01

    Endotoxin can stimulate inflammatory cytokine release from monocytes/macrophages and result in septic shock. Glycyrrhetinic acid (GA), the main bioactive component of licorice, possesses substantial anti-inflammatory activity. Here, we explored effect of 11-deoxy-18α-glycyrrhetinic acid-30-ethyl ester (DGAEE), a newly synthesized derivative of GA, on septic shock. DGAEE and its main metabolite 11-deoxy-18α-glycyrrhetinic acid (DGA) significantly alleviated septic shock as evidenced by improvements of survival rates, lung histopathological changes and wet/dry ratio in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)/D-galactosamine-stimulated mice, and decreased blood pressure in LPS/D-galactosamine-stimulated rats. The two compounds decreased serum levels of NO, TNF-α, IL-6, IL-1β, and increased the level of IL-10 more potently in mice. In LPS-stimulated RAW 264.7 cells, DGA but not DGAEE showed marked regulation of NO, TNF-α, IL-6 and IL-10 levels, suggesting that DGAEE display anti-shock effect by DGA rather than itself. Moreover, the neutralizing antibody against IL-10 markedly prohibited the inhibitory effect of DGA on the production of cytokines from RAW 264.7 cells, and AS101 (an inhibitor of IL-10 biosynthesis) almost completely reversed the anti-shock effect of DGA in mice. In addition, DGA did not affect activation of NF-κB-p65 and p38 MAPK as well as IκBα degradation, but moderately reduced activation of ERK and JNK, and markedly increased phosphorylation of GSK3β in LPS-stimulated RAW 264.7 cells. LY294002 (an inhibitor of GSK3β phosphorylation) and LiCl (an inhibitor of GSK3β activity) diminished and potentiated increase of IL-10 levels by DGA, respectively. In conclusion, DGAEE alleviates septic shock through DGA in an IL-10-dependent manner, and the mechanism is related to inactivation of GSK3β. PMID:26456500

  5. Effects of chicory inulin on serum metabolites of uric acid, lipids, glucose, and abdominal fat deposition in quails induced by purine-rich diets.

    PubMed

    Lin, Zhijian; Zhang, Bing; Liu, Xiaoqing; Jin, Rui; Zhu, Wenjing

    2014-11-01

    Inulin, a group of dietary fibers, is reported to improve the metabolic disorders. In the present study, we investigated the effects of chicory inulin on serum metabolites of uric acid (UA), lipids, glucose, and abdominal fat deposition in quail model induced by a purine-rich diet. In this study, 60 male French quails were randomly allocated to five groups: CON (control group), MOD (model group), BEN (benzbromarone-treated group), CHI-H (high-dosage chicory inulin-treated group), and CHI-L (low-dosage chicory inulin-treated group). The serum UA level was significantly increased in the model group from days 7 to 28, as well as triglyceride (TG) and free fatty acid (FFA) increased later in the experimental period. The abdominal fat ratio was increased on day 28. Benzbromarone can decrease UA levels on days 14 and 28. The high and low dosage of chicory inulin also decreased serum UA levels on days 7, 14, and 28. The abdominal fat ratio, activity, and protein of acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACC) were decreased in chicory inulin-treated groups. The activities of xanthine oxidase (XOD) and fatty acid synthase (FAS) were increased in the model group and decreased in the benzbromarone and chicory inulin groups. This study evaluated a quail model of induced hyperuricemia with other metabolic disorders caused by a high-purine diet. The results indicated that a purine-rich diet might contribute to the development of hyperuricemia, hypertriglyceridemia, and abdominal obesity. Chicory inulin decreased serum UA, TG, and abdominal fat deposition in a quail model of hyperuricemia by altering the ACC protein expression and FAS and XOD activities.

  6. Glutaric acid and its metabolites cause apoptosis in immature oligodendrocytes: a novel mechanism of white matter degeneration in glutaryl-CoA dehydrogenase deficiency.

    PubMed

    Gerstner, Bettina; Gratopp, Alexander; Marcinkowski, Monika; Sifringer, Marco; Obladen, Michael; Bührer, Christoph

    2005-06-01

    Glutaryl-CoA dehydrogenase deficiency is an inherited metabolic disease characterized by elevated concentrations of glutaric acid (GA) and its metabolites glutaconic acid (GC) and 3-hydroxy-glutaric acid (3-OH-GA). Its hallmarks are striatal and cortical degeneration, which have been linked to excitotoxic neuronal cell death. However, magnetic resonance imaging studies have also revealed widespread white matter disease. Correspondingly, we decided to investigate the effects of GA, GC, and 3-OH-GA on the rat immature oligodendroglia cell line, OLN-93. For comparison, we also exposed the neuroblastoma line SH-SY5Y and the microglia line BV-2 to GA, GC, and 3-OH-GA. Cell viability was measured by metabolism of 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyl tetrazolium. Flow cytometry was used to assess apoptosis via annexin-V, anti-active caspase-3 antibody, and propidium iodide staining. GA, GC, and 3-OH-GA reduced OLN-93 oligodendroglia cell viability in a dose-dependent manner. Toxicity of GA, GC, and 3-OH-GA was abrogated by preincubation with the pan-caspase inhibitor z-VAD-fmk. Apoptosis but not necrosis was detected at various stages (early: annexin-V; effector: caspase-3) after 24-48 h of incubation with GA, GC, or 3-OH-GA in OLN-93 but not in neuroblastoma or microglia cells. OLN-93 lacked expression of N-methyl-d-aspartate receptors, making classical glutamatergic excitotoxicity an unlikely explanation for the selective toxicity of GA, GC, and 3-OH-GA for OLN-93 cells. GA, GC, and 3-OH-GA directly initiate the apoptotic cascade in oligodendroglia cells. This mechanism may contribute to the white matter damage observed in glutaryl-CoA dehydrogenase deficiency.

  7. Aspirin metabolites are GPR35 agonists.

    PubMed

    Deng, Huayun; Fang, Ye

    2012-07-01

    Aspirin is widely used as an anti-inflammatory, anti-platelet, anti-pyretic, and cancer-preventive agent; however, the molecular mode of action is unlikely due entirely to the inhibition of cyclooxygenases. Here, we report the agonist activity of several aspirin metabolites at GPR35, a poorly characterized orphan G protein-coupled receptor. 2,3,5-Trihydroxybenzoic acid, an aspirin catabolite, was found to be the most potent GPR35 agonist among aspirin metabolites. Salicyluric acid, the main metabolite of aspirin, was also active. These results suggest that the GPR35 agonist activity of certain aspirin metabolites may contribute to the clinical features of aspirin. PMID:22526472

  8. Monitoring of complex industrial bioprocesses for metabolite concentrations using modern spectroscopies and machine learning: application to gibberellic acid production.

    PubMed

    McGovern, Aoife C; Broadhurst, David; Taylor, Janet; Kaderbhai, Naheed; Winson, Michael K; Small, David A; Rowland, Jem J; Kell, Douglas B; Goodacre, Royston

    2002-06-01

    Two rapid vibrational spectroscopic approaches (diffuse reflectance-absorbance Fourier transform infrared [FT-IR] and dispersive Raman spectroscopy), and one mass spectrometric method based on in vacuo Curie-point pyrolysis (PyMS), were investigated in this study. A diverse range of unprocessed, industrial fed-batch fermentation broths containing the fungus Gibberella fujikuroi producing the natural product gibberellic acid, were analyzed directly without a priori chromatographic separation. Partial least squares regression (PLSR) and artificial neural networks (ANNs) were applied to all of the information-rich spectra obtained by each of the methods to obtain quantitative information on the gibberellic acid titer. These estimates were of good precision, and the typical root-mean-square error for predictions of concentrations in an independent test set was <10% over a very wide titer range from 0 to 4925 ppm. However, although PLSR and ANNs are very powerful techniques they are often described as "black box" methods because the information they use to construct the calibration model is largely inaccessible. Therefore, a variety of novel evolutionary computation-based methods, including genetic algorithms and genetic programming, were used to produce models that allowed the determination of those input variables that contributed most to the models formed, and to observe that these models were predominantly based on the concentration of gibberellic acid itself. This is the first time that these three modern analytical spectroscopies, in combination with advanced chemometric data analysis, have been compared for their ability to analyze a real commercial bioprocess. The results demonstrate unequivocally that all methods provide very rapid and accurate estimates of the progress of industrial fermentations, and indicate that, of the three methods studied, Raman spectroscopy is the ideal bioprocess monitoring method because it can be adapted for on-line analysis.

  9. Simultaneous determination of nicotinic acid and its four metabolites in rat plasma using high performance liquid chromatography with tandem mass spectrometric detection (LC/MS/MS).

    PubMed

    Szafarz, Malgorzata; Lomnicka, Magdalena; Sternak, Magdalena; Chlopicki, Stefan; Szymura-Oleksiak, Joanna

    2010-04-01

    A sensitive and specific liquid chromatography electrospray ionization-tandem mass spectrometry method for the simultaneous quantitation of nicotinic acid (NicA) and its metabolites nicotinamide (NA), 1-methylnicotinamide (MNA), 1-methyl-2-pyridone-5-carboxamide (M2PY) and 1-methyl-4-pyridone-5-carboxamide (M4PY) in rat plasma has been developed and validated. As an internal standard, 6-chloronicotinamide was used. The samples (100 microL) were subjected to deproteinization with acetonitrile (200 microL) and then, after centrifugation, 150 microL of the supernatant was transferred into conical vial and evaporated. Dry residue was reconstituted in 100 microL of the ACN/water (10:90, v/v) mixture. Chromatography was performed on a Waters Spherisorb 5 microm CNRP 4.6 x 150 mm analytical column with gradient elution using a mobile phase containing acetonitrile and water with 0.1% of formic acid. The full separation of all compounds was achieved within 15 min of analysis. Detection was performed by an Applied Biosystems MDS Sciex API 2000 triple quadrupole mass spectrometer set at unit resolution. The mass spectrometer was operated in the selected reactions monitoring mode (SRM), monitoring the transition of the protonated molecular ions m/z 153-110 for M2PY, 153-136 for M4PY, 124-80 for NicA, 123-80 for NA and 137-94 for MNA. The mass spectrometric conditions were optimized for each compound by continuously infusing the standard solution at the rate of 5 microL/min using a Harvard infusion pump. Electrospray ionization (ESI) was used for ion production. The instrument was coupled to an Agilent 1100 LC system. The precision and accuracy for both intra- and inter-day determination of all analytes ranged from 1.3% to 13.3% and from 94.43% to 110.88%. No significant matrix effect (ME) was observed. Stability of compounds was established in a battery of stability studies, i.e. bench-top, autosampler and long-term storage stability as well as freeze/thaw cycles. The method

  10. Volatile Metabolites

    PubMed Central

    Rowan, Daryl D.

    2011-01-01

    Volatile organic compounds (volatiles) comprise a chemically diverse class of low molecular weight organic compounds having an appreciable vapor pressure under ambient conditions. Volatiles produced by plants attract pollinators and seed dispersers, and provide defense against pests and pathogens. For insects, volatiles may act as pheromones directing social behavior or as cues for finding hosts or prey. For humans, volatiles are important as flavorants and as possible disease biomarkers. The marine environment is also a major source of halogenated and sulfur-containing volatiles which participate in the global cycling of these elements. While volatile analysis commonly measures a rather restricted set of analytes, the diverse and extreme physical properties of volatiles provide unique analytical challenges. Volatiles constitute only a small proportion of the total number of metabolites produced by living organisms, however, because of their roles as signaling molecules (semiochemicals) both within and between organisms, accurately measuring and determining the roles of these compounds is crucial to an integrated understanding of living systems. This review summarizes recent developments in volatile research from a metabolomics perspective with a focus on the role of recent technical innovation in developing new areas of volatile research and expanding the range of ecological interactions which may be mediated by volatile organic metabolites. PMID:24957243

  11. Effect of Alcohol Fermented Feed on Lactating Performance, Blood Metabolites, Milk Fatty Acid Profile and Cholesterol Content in Holstein Lactating Cows

    PubMed Central

    Li, X. Z.; Park, B. K.; Yan, C. G.; Choi, J. G.; Ahn, J. S.; Shin, J. S.

    2012-01-01

    A feeding experiment with 40 lactating Holstein cows and 4 dietary treatments was conducted to investigate supplementation with different levels of alcohol fermented feed to the TMR on lactating performance, blood metabolites, milk fatty acid profile and cholesterol concentration of blood and milk. Forty Holstein lactating cows (106±24 d post-partum; mean±SD) were distributed into four groups and randomly assigned to one of four treatments with each containing 10 cows per treatment. The treatment supplemented with TMR (DM basis) as the control (CON), and CON mixed with alcohol-fermented feeds (AFF) at a level of 5%, 10% and 15% of the TMR as T1, T2 and T3, respectively. Dry matter intake and milk yield were not affected by supplementation of AFF. An increased 4% FCM in the milk occurred in cows fed T3 diet compared with CON, while T1 and T2 diets decreased 4% FCM in a dose dependent manner. Supplementation of AFF increased the concentration of albumin, total protein (TP), ammonia, and high density lipoprotein-cholesterol in serum compared with CON. In contrast, supplementation with AFF clearly decreased concentration of blood urea nitrogen (BUN) and total cholesterol (TC) compare with CON. AFF supplementation increased the proportion of C18:1n9 and C18:2n6 compared to CON. A decrease in the concentration of saturated fatty acid (SFA) for T1, T2 and T3 resulted in an increased unsaturated fatty acid (USFA) to SFA ratio compared to CON. Concentration of cholesterol in milk fat was reduced in proportion to the supplemental level of AFF. Feeding a diet supplemented with a moderate level AFF to lactating cows could be a way to alter the feed efficiency and fatty acid profile of milk by increasing potentially human consumer healthy fatty acid without detrimental effects on feed intake and milk production. A substantially decreased cholesterol proportion in milk induced by supplementation AFF suggests that alcohol fermented feed may improve milk cholesterol levels

  12. [Search for nucleic acid influencing, as well as membrane active, potential cancerostatic fungal metabolites using microbiological and cytological screening methods].

    PubMed

    Dornberger, K; Gutsche, W; Horschak, R; Zureck, A

    1978-01-01

    A prescreening program including microbiological and cytological assays was employed in search of potential cancerostatic antibiotics in crude extracts of mushrooms. The microbiological tests based on agar diffusion techniques consist of prophage induction test and BIP-test. All active compounds selected by these microbiological models are potential inhibitors of nucleic acid metabolism. Cytological assays on leukemia L 1210 cells have been carried out by microscopic examination and by evaluation using an electronic particle counter. Activity was expressed as decrease of the number of single cells caused by agglutination or lysis of cells, changes in cell surface area, dye exclusion, and increase of cell volume. A wide variety of mushrooms was demonstrated to exhibit interesting activities in some of these screening systems. The influence of primary metabolic products of mushrooms on microbiological models was studied additionally. In vivo assays have not yet been accomplished.

  13. Studies on the metabolic clearance of ciclotropium to alpha-phenylciclopentylacetic acid using a new enantiospecific metabolite assay.

    PubMed

    Liebmann, B; Mayer, S; Mutschler, E; Spahn-Langguth, H

    1992-11-01

    Ester hydrolysis represents an important biotransformation pathway for various parasympatholytic agents. Cleavage of the ciclotropium ester bond results in the formation of alpha-phenylciclopentylacetic acid (PCA). The relevance of this metabolic route for ciclotropium bromide (HIT-PCE, CAS 85166-20-7) including its stereochemical aspects was studied in a preliminary pharmacokinetic study. An enantiospecific assay for biological material was developed that is based on chiral derivatization of PCA with N-ethyl-N'-(3-dimethylaminopropyl)carbodiimide (EDAC) and the primary amine S-FLOPA, a chiral coupling component for carboxylic acids derived from S-flunoxaprofen, followed by HPLC resolution. R-(--)-Ibuprofen was used as internal standard. From plasma or urine PCA can be extracted into n-hexane/ethanol (9:1) at pH 4 under addition of sodium chloride. Derivatization with EDAC/FLOPA was performed under addition of 1-hydroxybenzotriazole in anhydrous dichloromethane that contained trace amounts of pyridine (ambient temperature; 2 h reaction time). The chromatographic separation was performed on a silica gel stationary phase (Zorbax Sil) using n-hexane-chloroform-ethanol (100:10:1, by vol.) as mobile phase (flow rate, 2 ml/min; fluorescence-detection, 305/355 nm; elution order of the derivatives, (-) before (+)). Limit of quantification was 1.0 ng/ml for plasma and 10 ng/ml for urine. In the pharmacokinetic study in two healthy volunteers who received a single i.v. dose of 10 mg ciclotropium race-mate the PCA concentrations in plasma were below the detection limit, but approx. 1.5% of the administered dose were excreted into urine as the respective glucuronides.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  14. Dissimilar in vitro and in vivo effects of ellagic acid and its microbiota-derived metabolites, urolithins, on the cytochrome P450 1A1.

    PubMed

    González-Sarrías, Antonio; Azorín-Ortuño, María; Yáñez-Gascón, María-Josefa; Tomás-Barberán, Francisco A; García-Conesa, María-Teresa; Espín, Juan-Carlos

    2009-06-24

    This research shows that the dietary polyphenol ellagic acid (EA) and its colonic metabolites, urolithin-A (3,8-dihydroxy-6H-dibenzo[b,d]pyran-6-one, Uro-A) and urolithin-B (3-hydroxy-6H-dibenzo[b,d]pyran-6-one, Uro-B), modulate phase I and phase II detoxifying enzymes in colon cancer Caco-2 cells. EA and the urolithins, at micromolar concentrations achievable in the colon from the diet, induced the expression and activity of CYP1A1 and UGT1A10 and inhibited several sulfotransferases. As a result, the synthesis of glucuronides was favored over sulfated conjugates in the treated cells. In situ exposure to these compounds dissolved in buffer also led to the induction of CYP1A1 in the rat colon. However, in situ exposure to the compounds dissolved in oil or oral supplementation of the single compounds or pomegranate extract (PE) added to the feed failed to induce CYP1A1 in the colon mucosa. These results suggest that EA and urolithins may exert some blocking chemopreventive effects in the colon but that this effect is critically affected by interfering factors, such as the food matrix nature.

  15. Gene expression, cell cycle arrest and MAPK signalling regulation in Caco-2 cells exposed to ellagic acid and its metabolites, urolithins.

    PubMed

    González-Sarrías, Antonio; Espín, Juan-Carlos; Tomás-Barberán, Francisco A; García-Conesa, María-Teresa

    2009-06-01

    Novel gene expression profiles and cellular functions modulated in Caco-2 cells in response to the dietary polyphenol, ellagic acid (EA), and its colonic metabolites, urolithin-A (3,8-dihydroxy-6H-dibenzo[b,d] pyran-6-one) and urolithin-B (3-hydroxy-6H-dibenzo[b,d] pyran-6-one) have been identified. Exposure of cells to EA and urolithins arrested cell growth at the S- and G(2)/M-phases. Transcriptional profiling using microarray and functional analysis revealed changes in the expression levels of MAPK signalling genes such as, growth factor receptors (FGFR2, EGFR), oncogenes (K-Ras, c-Myc), and tumour suppressors (DUSP6, Fos) and of genes involved in cell cycle (CCNB1, CCNB1IP1). Results suggest that EA and urolithin-A and -B, at concentrations achievable in the lumen from the diet, might contribute to colon cancer prevention by modulating the expression of multiple genes in epithelial cells lining the colon. Some of these genes are involved in key cellular processes associated with cancer development and are currently being investigated as potential chemopreventive targets.

  16. In vitro antiproliferative and antioxidant effects of urolithin A, the colonic metabolite of ellagic acid, on hepatocellular carcinomas HepG2 cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yun; Qiu, Zhenpeng; Zhou, Benhong; Liu, Cong; Ruan, Jinlan; Yan, Qiujin; Liao, Jianming; Zhu, Fan

    2015-08-01

    The intestinal metabolites of ellagic acid (EA), urolithins are known to effectively inhibit cancer cell proliferation. This study investigates antiproliferative and antioxidant effects of urolithin A (UA) on cell survival of the HepG2 hepatic carcinomas cell line. The antiproliferative effects of UA (0-500 μM) on HepG2 cells were determined using a CCK assay following 12-36 h exposure. Effects on β-catenin and other factors of expression were assessed by using real-time PCR and Western blot. We found that UA showed potent antiproliferative activity on HepG2 cells. When cell death was induced by UA, it was found that the expression of β-catenin, c-Myc and Cyclin D1 were decreased and TCF/LEF transcriptional activation was notably down-regulated. UA also increased protein expression of p53, p38-MAPK and caspase-3, but suppressed expression of NF-κB p65 and other inflammatory mediators. Furthermore, the antioxidant assay afforded by UA and EA treatments was associated with decreases in intracellular ROS levels, and increases in intracellular SOD and GSH-Px activity. These results suggested that UA could inhibit cell proliferation and reduce oxidative stress status in liver cancer, thus acting as a viably effective constituent for HCC prevention and treatment.

  17. RNAi-based biosynthetic pathway screens to identify in vivo functions of non-nucleic acid-based metabolites such as lipids.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hongjie; Abraham, Nessy; Khan, Liakot A; Gobel, Verena

    2015-05-01

    The field of metabolomics continues to catalog new compounds, but their functional analysis remains technically challenging, and roles beyond metabolism are largely unknown. Unbiased genetic/RNAi screens are powerful tools to identify the in vivo functions of protein-encoding genes, but not of nonproteinaceous compounds such as lipids. They can, however, identify the biosynthetic enzymes of these compounds-findings that are usually dismissed, as these typically synthesize multiple products. Here, we provide a method using follow-on biosynthetic pathway screens to identify the endpoint biosynthetic enzyme and thus the compound through which they act. The approach is based on the principle that all subsequently identified downstream biosynthetic enzymes contribute to the synthesis of at least this one end product. We describe how to systematically target lipid biosynthetic pathways; optimize targeting conditions; take advantage of pathway branchpoints; and validate results by genetic assays and biochemical analyses. This approach extends the power of unbiased genetic/RNAi screens to identify in vivo functions of non-nucleic acid-based metabolites beyond their metabolic roles. It will typically require several months to identify a metabolic end product by biosynthetic pathway screens, but this time will vary widely depending, among other factors, on the end product's location in the pathway, which determines the number of screens required for its identification.

  18. LC-MS/MS for the simultaneous analysis of arachidonic acid and 32 related metabolites in human plasma: Basal plasma concentrations and aspirin-induced changes of eicosanoids.

    PubMed

    Shinde, Dhananjay D; Kim, Kwon-Bok; Oh, Kyung-Suk; Abdalla, Nagi; Liu, Kwang-Hyeon; Bae, Soo Kyung; Shon, Ji-Hong; Kim, Ho-Sook; Kim, Dong-Hyun; Shin, Jae Gook

    2012-12-12

    Eicosanoids play an important role in various biological responses and can be used as biomarkers for specific diseases. Therefore, we developed a highly selective, sensitive, and robust liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometric method to measure arachidonic acid and its 32 metabolites in human plasma. Sample preparation involved solid phase extraction, which efficiently removed sources of interference present in human plasma. Chromatographic separation was performed using a Luna C(8)-column with 0.5mM ammonium formate buffer and acetonitrile as the mobile phase under gradient conditions. Detection was performed using tandem mass spectrometry equipped with an electrospray ionization interface in negative ion mode. The matrix did not affect the reproducibility and reliability of the assay. All analytes showed good linearity over the investigated concentration range (r>0.997). The validated lower limit of quantitation for the analytes ranged from 10 to 400pg/mL. Intra- and inter-day precision (RDS%) over the concentration ranges for all eicosanoids were within 16.8%, and accuracy ranged between 88.1 and 108.2%. This assay was suitable for the determination of basal plasma levels of eicosanoids and the evaluation of effect of aspirin on eicosanoid plasma levels in healthy subjects. PMID:23217314

  19. Transient postnatal fluoxetine decreases brain concentrations of 20-HETE and 15-epi-LXA4, arachidonic acid metabolites in adult mice

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Zhi-Xin; Rapoport, Stanley I

    2015-01-01

    Background Transient postnatal exposure of rodents to the selective serotonin (5-HT) reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) fluoxetine alters behavior and brain 5-HT neurotransmission during adulthood, and also reduces brain arachidonic (ARA) metabolic consumption and protein level of the ARA metabolizing enzyme, cytochrome P4504A (CYP4A). Hypothesis Brain 20-hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid (20-HETE), converted by CYP4A from ARA, will be reduced in adult mice treated transiently and postnatally with fluoxetine. Methods Male mice pups were injected i.p. daily with fluoxetine (10 mg/kg) or saline during P4-P21. At P90 their brain was high-energy microwaved and analyzed for 20-HETE and six other ARA metabolites by enzyme immunoassay. Results Postnatal fluoxetine vs. saline significantly decreased brain concentrations of 20-HETE (−70.3%) and 15-epi-lipoxin A4 (−60%) in adult mice, but did not change other eicosanoid concentrations. Conclusions Transient postnatal administration of fluoxetine to mice results in reduced brain ARA metabolism involving CYP4A and 20-HETE formation during their adulthood. PMID:26234927

  20. Development of a physiologically-based pharmacokinetic model of 2-phenoxyethanol and its metabolite phenoxyacetic acid in rats and humans to address toxicokinetic uncertainty in risk assessment.

    PubMed

    Troutman, John A; Rick, David L; Stuard, Sharon B; Fisher, Jeffrey; Bartels, Michael J

    2015-11-01

    2-Phenoxyethanol (PhE) has been shown to induce hepatotoxicity, renal toxicity, and hemolysis at dosages ≥ 400 mg/kg/day in subchronic and chronic studies in multiple species. To reduce uncertainty associated with interspecies extrapolations and to evaluate the margin of exposure (MOE) for use of PhE in cosmetics and baby products, a physiologically-based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model of PhE and its metabolite 2-phenoxyacetic acid (PhAA) was developed. The PBPK model incorporated key kinetic processes describing the absorption, distribution, metabolism and excretion of PhE and PhAA following oral and dermal exposures. Simulations of repeat dose rat studies facilitated the selection of systemic AUC as the appropriate dose metric for evaluating internal exposures to PhE and PhAA in rats and humans. Use of the PBPK model resulted in refinement of the total default UF for extrapolation of the animal data to humans from 100 to 25. Based on very conservative assumptions for product composition and aggregate product use, model-predicted exposures to PhE and PhAA resulting from adult and infant exposures to cosmetic products are significantly below the internal dose of PhE observed at the NOAEL dose in rats. Calculated MOEs for all exposure scenarios were above the PBPK-refined UF of 25.

  1. 3,4-Dihydroxyphenylacetic acid, a microbiota-derived metabolite of quercetin, attenuates acetaminophen (APAP)-induced liver injury through activation of Nrf-2.

    PubMed

    Xue, Huiting; Xie, Wenyan; Jiang, Zhihui; Wang, Meng; Wang, Jian; Zhao, Hongqiong; Zhang, Xiaoying

    2016-10-01

    1. Acetaminophen (APAP) overdose leads to severe hepatotoxicity. 3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetic acid (DOPAC) is a scarcely studied microbiota-derived metabolite of quercetin. The aim of this study was to determine the protective effect of DOPAC against APAP-induced liver injury. 2. Mice were treated intragastrically with DOPAC (10, 20 or 50 mg/kg) for 3 days before APAP (300 mg/kg) injection. APAP alone caused increase in serum aminotransferase levels and changes in hepatic histopathology. APAP also promoted oxidative stress by increasing lipid peroxidation and decreasing anti-oxidant enzyme activities. These events led to hepatocellular necrosis and reduced liver function. DOPAC increased nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf-2) translocation to the nucleus and enhanced the expression of phase II enzymes and anti-oxidant enzymes, and thereby reduced APAP hepatotoxicity and enhanced anti-oxidant ability. 3. Our data provide evidence that DOPAC protected the liver against APAP-induced injury, which is involved in Nrf-2 activation, implying that DOPAC can be considered as a potential natural hepatoprotective agent.

  2. Detection and quantification of α-keto-δ-(N(G),N(G)-dimethylguanidino)valeric acid: a metabolite of asymmetric dimethylarginine.

    PubMed

    Martens-Lobenhoffer, Jens; Rodionov, Roman N; Drust, Andreas; Bode-Böger, Stefanie M

    2011-12-15

    Nitric oxide is an ubiquitary cell signaling substance. Its enzymatic production rate by nitric oxide synthase is regulated by the concentrations of the substrate L-arginine and the competitive inhibitor asymmetric dimethylarginine (ADMA). A newly recognized elimination pathway for ADMA is the transamination to α-keto-δ-(N(G),N(G)-dimethylguanidino)valeric acid (DMGV) by the enzyme alanine-glyoxylate aminotransferase 2 (AGXT2). This pathway has been proven to be relevant for nitric oxide regulation, but up to now no method exists for the determination of DMGV in biological fluids. We have developed a liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) method for the quantification of DMGV. D(6)-DMGV was used as internal standard. Samples were purified online by column switching, and separation was achieved on a porous graphitic carbon column. The calibration was linear over ranges of 10 to 200 nmol/L for plasma and 0.1 to 20 μmol/L for urine. The intra- and interday accuracies and precisions in plasma and urine were better than 10%. In plasma samples, DMGV was present in concentrations between 19.1 and 77.5 nmol/L. In urine samples, concentrations between 0.0114 and 1.03 μmol/mmol creatinine were found. This method can be used as a tool for the scientific investigation of the ADMA conversion to DMGV via the enzyme AGXT2.

  3. Allantoin, a stress-related purine metabolite, can activate jasmonate signaling in a MYC2-regulated and abscisic acid-dependent manner

    PubMed Central

    Takagi, Hiroshi; Ishiga, Yasuhiro; Watanabe, Shunsuke; Konishi, Tomokazu; Egusa, Mayumi; Akiyoshi, Nobuhiro; Matsuura, Takakazu; Mori, Izumi C.; Hirayama, Takashi; Kaminaka, Hironori; Shimada, Hiroshi; Sakamoto, Atsushi

    2016-01-01

    Allantoin is a metabolic intermediate of purine catabolism that often accumulates in stressed plants. Recently, we used Arabidopsis knockout mutants (aln) of ALLANTOINASE to show that this purine metabolite activates abscisic acid (ABA) production, thereby stimulating stress-related gene expression and enhancing seedling tolerance to abiotic stress. A detailed re-examination of the microarray data of an aln mutant (aln-1) confirmed the increased expression of ABA-related genes and also revealed altered expression of genes involved in jasmonic acid (JA) responses, probably under the control of MYC2, a master switch in the JA signaling pathway. Consistent with the transcriptome profiles, the aln-1 mutant displayed increased JA levels and enhanced responses to mechanical wounding and exogenous JA. Moreover, aln mutants demonstrated modestly increased susceptibility to Pseudomonas syringae and Pectobacterium carotovorum, probably reflecting the antagonistic action of MYC2 on the defense against these bacterial phytopathogens. Exogenously administered allantoin elicited the expression of JA-responsive genes, including MYC2, in wild-type plants, supporting the idea that allantoin might be responsible for the observed JA-related phenotypes of aln mutants. However, mutants deficient in bioactive JA (jar1-1), insensitive to JA (myc2-3), or deficient in ABA (aba2-1 and bglu18) suppressed the effect of exogenous allantoin. The suppression was further confirmed in aln-1 jar1-1 and aln-1 bglu18 double mutants. These results indicate that allantoin can activate the MYC2-regulated JA signaling pathway through ABA production. Overall, this study suggests a possible connection of purine catabolism with stress hormone homeostasis and signaling, and highlights the potential importance of allantoin in these interactions. PMID:26931169

  4. Effects of short-term oilseed supplementation on plasma fatty acid composition, progesterone and prostaglandin F metabolite in lactating beef cows.

    PubMed

    Scholljegerdes, E J; Lekatz, L A; Vonnahme, K A

    2014-05-01

    progesterone (P=0.18) or prostaglandin F metabolite (P=0.89). However, day after breeding had an effect on serum progesterone (P=0.01) with day 16 after timed AI being lower compared with other days. Feeding oilseeds during the time of estrous synchronization will not only increase the energy density of the diet but will provide key fatty acids around the time of maternal recognition of pregnancy.

  5. Affordable and rapid HPTLC method for the simultaneous analysis of artemisinin and its metabolite artemisinic acid in Artemisia annua L.

    PubMed

    Khan, Shazia; Ali, Athar; Ahmad, Shahzad; Abdin, Malik Zainul

    2015-10-01

    Artemisinin (AN) and artemisinic acid (AA), valuable phyto-pharmaceutical molecules, are well known anti-malarials, but their activities against diseases like cancer, schistosomiasis, HIV, hepatitis-B and leishmaniasis are also being reported. For the simultaneous estimation of AN and AA in the callus and leaf extracts of A. annua L. plants, we embarked upon a simple, rapid, selective, reliable and fairly economical high performance thin layer chromatography (HPTLC) method. Experimental conditions such as band size, chamber saturation time, migration of solvent front and slit width were critically studied and the optimum conditions were selected. The separations were achieved using toluene-ethyl acetate, 9:1 (v/v) as mobile phase on pre-coated silica gel plates, G 60F254 . Good resolution was achieved with Rf values of 0.35 ± 0.02 and 0.26 ± 0.02 at 536 nm for AN and 626 nm for AA, respectively, in absorption-reflectance mode. The method displayed a linear relationship with r(2) value 0.992 and 0.994 for AN and AA, respectively, in the concentration range of 300-1500 ng for AN and 200-1000 ng for AA. The method was validated for specificity by obtaining in-situ UV overlay spectra and sensitivity by estimating limit of detection (30 ng for AN and 15 ng for AA) and limit of quantitation (80 ng for AN and 45 ng for AA) values. The accuracy was checked by the recovery studies conducted at three different levels with the known concentrations and the average percentage recovery was 101.99% for AN and 103.84% for AA. The precision was analyzed by interday and intraday precision and was 1.09 and 1.00% RSD for AN and 1.22 and 6.05% RSD for AA. The analysis of statistical data substantiates that this HPTLC method can be used for the simultaneous estimation of AN and AA in biological samples. PMID:25829259

  6. Gas chromatography-electron capture detection determination of Dacthal and its di-acid metabolite in soil after ultrasound-assisted extraction and in situ focused microwave-assisted derivatization.

    PubMed

    Caballo-López, A; Luque de Castro, M D

    2006-09-01

    A quantitative method for the determination of Dacthal and its di-acid metabolite in soil has been developed by coupling ultrasound-assisted extraction and microwave-assisted derivatization of the analytes prior to gas chromatography-electron capture detection for individual separation and measurement. The main factors affecting both extraction efficiency and derivatization were optimized by experimental design methodology. The proposed approach allows extraction of these pollutants from spiked sediment and soil with efficiencies similar to those provided by the reference method but with a drastic reduction of both the extraction and derivatization times. The repeatability of the analyses, expressed as RSD, of Dacthal and its di-acid metabolite was 4.6% and 5.4%, respectively; meanwhile, the RSD for within-laboratory reproducibility was 8.7% and 9.2%, respectively.

  7. Identification of a Classical Mutant in the Industrial Host Aspergillus niger by Systems Genetics: LaeA Is Required for Citric Acid Production and Regulates the Formation of Some Secondary Metabolites

    PubMed Central

    Niu, Jing; Arentshorst, Mark; Nair, P. Deepa S.; Dai, Ziyu; Baker, Scott E.; Frisvad, Jens C.; Nielsen, Kristian F.; Punt, Peter J.; Ram, Arthur F.J.

    2015-01-01

    The asexual filamentous fungus Aspergillus niger is an important industrial cell factory for citric acid production. In this study, we genetically characterized a UV-generated A. niger mutant that was originally isolated as a nonacidifying mutant, which is a desirable trait for industrial enzyme production. Physiological analysis showed that this mutant did not secrete large amounts of citric acid and oxalic acid, thus explaining the nonacidifying phenotype. As traditional complementation approaches to characterize the mutant genotype were unsuccessful, we used bulk segregant analysis in combination with high-throughput genome sequencing to identify the mutation responsible for the nonacidifying phenotype. Since A. niger has no sexual cycle, parasexual genetics was used to generate haploid segregants derived from diploids by loss of whole chromosomes. We found that the nonacidifying phenotype was caused by a point mutation in the laeA gene. LaeA encodes a putative methyltransferase-domain protein, which we show here to be required for citric acid production in an A. niger lab strain (N402) and in other citric acid production strains. The unexpected link between LaeA and citric acid production could provide new insights into the transcriptional control mechanisms related to citric acid production in A. niger. Interestingly, the secondary metabolite profile of a ΔlaeA strain differed from the wild-type strain, showing both decreased and increased metabolite levels, indicating that LaeA is also involved in regulating the production of secondary metabolites. Finally, we show that our systems genetics approach is a powerful tool to identify trait mutations. PMID:26566947

  8. Identification of a Classical Mutant in the Industrial Host Aspergillus niger by Systems Genetics: LaeA Is Required for Citric Acid Production and Regulates the Formation of Some Secondary Metabolites.

    PubMed

    Niu, Jing; Arentshorst, Mark; Nair, P Deepa S; Dai, Ziyu; Baker, Scott E; Frisvad, Jens C; Nielsen, Kristian F; Punt, Peter J; Ram, Arthur F J

    2015-11-13

    The asexual filamentous fungus Aspergillus niger is an important industrial cell factory for citric acid production. In this study, we genetically characterized a UV-generated A. niger mutant that was originally isolated as a nonacidifying mutant, which is a desirable trait for industrial enzyme production. Physiological analysis showed that this mutant did not secrete large amounts of citric acid and oxalic acid, thus explaining the nonacidifying phenotype. As traditional complementation approaches to characterize the mutant genotype were unsuccessful, we used bulk segregant analysis in combination with high-throughput genome sequencing to identify the mutation responsible for the nonacidifying phenotype. Since A. niger has no sexual cycle, parasexual genetics was used to generate haploid segregants derived from diploids by loss of whole chromosomes. We found that the nonacidifying phenotype was caused by a point mutation in the laeA gene. LaeA encodes a putative methyltransferase-domain protein, which we show here to be required for citric acid production in an A. niger lab strain (N402) and in other citric acid production strains. The unexpected link between LaeA and citric acid production could provide new insights into the transcriptional control mechanisms related to citric acid production in A. niger. Interestingly, the secondary metabolite profile of a ΔlaeA strain differed from the wild-type strain, showing both decreased and increased metabolite levels, indicating that LaeA is also involved in regulating the production of secondary metabolites. Finally, we show that our systems genetics approach is a powerful tool to identify trait mutations.

  9. Identification of a classical mutant in the industrial host Aspergillus niger by systems genetics: LaeA is required for citric acid production and regulates the formation of some secondary metabolites

    DOE PAGES

    Niu, Jing; Arentshorst, Mark; Nair, P. Deepa S.; Dai, Ziyu; Baker, Scott E.; Frisvad, Jens C.; Nielsen, Kristian F.; Punt, Peter J.; Ram, Arthur F. J.

    2015-11-13

    The asexual filamentous fungus Aspergillus niger is an important industrial cell factory for citric acid production. In this study, we genetically characterized a UV-generated A. niger mutant that was originally isolated as a nonacidifying mutant, which is a desirable trait for industrial enzyme production. Physiological analysis showed that this mutant did not secrete large amounts of citric acid and oxalic acid, thus explaining the nonacidifying phenotype. As traditional complementation approaches to characterize the mutant genotype were unsuccessful, we used bulk segregant analysis in combination with high-throughput genome sequencing to identify the mutation responsible for the nonacidifying phenotype. Since A. nigermore » has no sexual cycle, parasexual genetics was used to generate haploid segregants derived from diploids by loss of whole chromosomes. We found that the nonacidifying phenotype was caused by a point mutation in the laeA gene. LaeA encodes a putative methyltransferase-domain protein, which we show here to be required for citric acid production in an A. niger lab strain (N402) and in other citric acid production strains. The unexpected link between LaeA and citric acid production could provide new insights into the transcriptional control mechanisms related to citric acid production in A. niger. Interestingly, the secondary metabolite profile of a ΔlaeA strain differed from the wild-type strain, showing both decreased and increased metabolite levels, indicating that LaeA is also involved in regulating the production of secondary metabolites. As a result, we show that our systems genetics approach is a powerful tool to identify trait mutations.« less

  10. Identification of a classical mutant in the industrial host Aspergillus niger by systems genetics: LaeA is required for citric acid production and regulates the formation of some secondary metabolites

    SciTech Connect

    Niu, Jing; Arentshorst, Mark; Nair, P. Deepa S.; Dai, Ziyu; Baker, Scott E.; Frisvad, Jens C.; Nielsen, Kristian F.; Punt, Peter J.; Ram, Arthur F. J.

    2015-11-13

    The asexual filamentous fungus Aspergillus niger is an important industrial cell factory for citric acid production. In this study, we genetically characterized a UV-generated A. niger mutant that was originally isolated as a nonacidifying mutant, which is a desirable trait for industrial enzyme production. Physiological analysis showed that this mutant did not secrete large amounts of citric acid and oxalic acid, thus explaining the nonacidifying phenotype. As traditional complementation approaches to characterize the mutant genotype were unsuccessful, we used bulk segregant analysis in combination with high-throughput genome sequencing to identify the mutation responsible for the nonacidifying phenotype. Since A. niger has no sexual cycle, parasexual genetics was used to generate haploid segregants derived from diploids by loss of whole chromosomes. We found that the nonacidifying phenotype was caused by a point mutation in the laeA gene. LaeA encodes a putative methyltransferase-domain protein, which we show here to be required for citric acid production in an A. niger lab strain (N402) and in other citric acid production strains. The unexpected link between LaeA and citric acid production could provide new insights into the transcriptional control mechanisms related to citric acid production in A. niger. Interestingly, the secondary metabolite profile of a ΔlaeA strain differed from the wild-type strain, showing both decreased and increased metabolite levels, indicating that LaeA is also involved in regulating the production of secondary metabolites. As a result, we show that our systems genetics approach is a powerful tool to identify trait mutations.

  11. 3,3',4,4',5-Pentachlorobiphenyl (PCB 126) Decreases Hepatic and Systemic Ratios of Epoxide to Diol Metabolites of Unsaturated Fatty Acids in Male Rats.

    PubMed

    Wu, Xianai; Yang, Jun; Morisseau, Christophe; Robertson, Larry W; Hammock, Bruce; Lehmler, Hans-Joachim

    2016-08-01

    Disruption of the homeostasis of oxygenated regulatory lipid mediators (oxylipins), potential markers of exposure to aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) agonists, such as 3,3',4,4',5-pentachlorobiphenyl (PCB 126), is associated with a range of diseases, including nonalcoholic fatty liver disease and nonalcoholic steatohepatitis. Here we test the hypothesis that PCB 126 exposure alters the levels of oxylipins in rats. Male Sprague-Dawley rats (5-weeks old) were treated over a 3-month period every 2 weeks with intraperitoneal injections of PCB 126 in corn oil (cumulative doses of 0, 19.8, 97.8, and 390 µg/kg b.w.; 6 injections total). PCB 126 treatment caused a reduction in growth rates at the highest dose investigated, a dose-dependent decrease in thymus weights, and a dose-dependent increase in liver weights. Liver PCB 126 levels increased in a dose-dependent manner, while levels in plasma were below or close to the detection limit. The ratios of several epoxides to diol metabolites formed via the cytochrome P450 (P450) monooxygenase/soluble epoxide hydrolase (sEH) pathway from polyunsaturated fatty acids displayed a dose-dependent decrease in the liver and plasma, whereas levels of oxylipins formed by other metabolic pathways were generally not altered by PCB 126 treatment. The effects of PCB 126 on epoxide-to-diol ratios were associated with an increased CYP1A activity in liver microsomes and an increased sEH activity in liver cytosol and peroxisomes. These results suggest that oxylipins are potential biomarkers of exposure to PCB 126 and that the P450/sEH pathway is a therapeutic target for PCB 126-mediated hepatotoxicity that warrants further attention. PMID:27208083

  12. Liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry method for the simultaneous analysis of multiple hallucinogens, chlorpheniramine, ketamine, ritalinic acid, and metabolites, in urine.

    PubMed

    del Mar Ramirez Fernandez, Maria; Laloup, Marleen; Wood, Michelle; De Boeck, Gert; Lopez-Rivadulla, Manuel; Wallemacq, Pierre; Samyn, Nele

    2007-10-01

    A validated method for the simultaneous analysis of multiple hallucinogens, chlorpheniramine, ketamine, ritalinic acid, and several metabolites is presented. The procedure comprises a sample clean-up step, using mixed-mode solid-phase extraction followed by liquid chromatography (LC)-tandem mass spectrometry analysis. Chromatographic separation was achieved using a Sunfire C(8) column eluted with a mixture of formate buffer, methanol, and acetonitrile. The applied LC gradient ensured the elution of all the drugs examined within 14 min and produced chromatographic peaks of acceptable symmetry. Selectivity of the method was achieved by a combination of retention time and two precursor-product ion transitions for the non-deuterated analogues. Validation of the method was performed using 500 microL of urine. The limits of quantification (LOQ) for LSD and 2-oxo-3-hydroxy-LSD were 0.05 and 1 ng/mL, respectively, and ranged, for the other hallucinogens, from 0.5 to 10 ng/mL. Linear and quadratic regression was observed from the LOQ of each compound to 12.5 ng/mL for LSD, 50 ng/mL for 2-oxo-3-hydroxy-LSD and 500 ng/mL for the others (r(2) > 0.99). Precision for the QC samples, spiked at a minimum of two concentrations, was calculated [%CV and %bias < 20% for most of the compounds, except for bufotenine and cathinone (%bias < 24%), and ibogaine (%bias < 30%)]. Extraction was found to be both reproducible and efficient with recoveries > 87% for all the analytes. Furthermore, the processed samples were demonstrated to be stable in the autosampler for at least 24 h. Finally, the validated method was applied to the determination of chlorpheniramine, ketamine, LSD, and psilocin in authentic urine samples.

  13. Diabetes Mellitus Reduces Activity of Human UDP-Glucuronosyltransferase 2B7 in Liver and Kidney Leading to Decreased Formation of Mycophenolic Acid Acyl-Glucuronide Metabolite

    PubMed Central

    Dostalek, Miroslav; Court, Michael H.; Hazarika, Suwagmani

    2011-01-01

    Mycophenolic acid (MPA) is an immunosuppressive agent commonly used after organ transplantation. Altered concentrations of MPA metabolites have been reported in diabetic kidney transplant recipients, although the reason for this difference is unknown. We aimed to compare MPA biotransformation and UDP-glucuronosyltransferase (UGT) expression and activity between liver (n = 16) and kidney (n = 8) from diabetic and nondiabetic donors. Glucuronidation of MPA, as well as the expression and probe substrate activity of UGTs primarily responsible for MPA phenol glucuronide (MPAG) formation (UGT1A1 and UGT1A9), and MPA acyl glucuronide (AcMPAG) formation (UGT2B7), was characterized. We have found that both diabetic and nondiabetic human liver microsomes and kidney microsomes formed MPAG with similar efficiency; however, AcMPAG formation was significantly lower in diabetic samples. This finding is supported by markedly lower glucuronidation of the UGT2B7 probe zidovudine, UGT2B7 protein, and UGT2B7 mRNA in diabetic tissues. UGT genetic polymorphism did not explain this difference because UGT2B7*2 or *1c genotype were not associated with altered microsomal UGT2B7 protein levels or AcMPAG formation. Furthermore, mRNA expression and probe activities for UGT1A1 or UGT1A9, both forming MPAG but not AcMPAG, were comparable between diabetic and nondiabetic tissues, suggesting the effect may be specific to UGT2B7-mediated AcMPAG formation. These findings suggest that diabetes mellitus is associated with significantly reduced UGT2B7 mRNA expression, protein level, and enzymatic activity of human liver and kidney, explaining in part the relatively low circulating concentrations of AcMPAG in diabetic patients. PMID:21123165

  14. The regulation of triglyceride synthesis and fatty acid synthesis in rat epididymal adipose tissue. Effects of insulin, adrenaline and some metabolites in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Saggerson, E. D.; Greenbaum, A. L.

    1970-01-01

    1. Adipose tissues from rats fed a balanced diet were incubated in the presence of glucose (20mm) with the following additions: insulin, anti-insulin serum, insulin+acetate, insulin+pyruvate, insulin+lactate, insulin+phenazine methosulphate, insulin+oleate+albumin, insulin+adrenaline+albumin, insulin+6-N-2′-O-dibutyryl 3′:5′-cyclic AMP+albumin. 2. Measurements were made of the whole tissue concentrations of adenine nucleotides, hexose phosphates, triose phosphates, glycerol 1-phosphate, 3 phosphoglycerate, 6-phosphogluconate, long-chain fatty acyl-CoA, acid-soluble CoA, citrate, isocitrate, malate and 2-oxoglutarate, and of the release into the incubation medium of lactate, pyruvate and glycerol after 1h of incubation. 3. Fluxes of [14C]glucose carbon through the major pathways of glucose metabolism were calculated from the yields of 14C in various products after 2h of incubation. Fluxes of [14C]acetate, [14C]pyruvate or [14C]lactate carbon in the presence of glucose were also determined. 4. Measurements were also made of the whole-tissue concentrations of metabolites in tissues taken directly from Nembutal-anaesthetized rats. 5. Whole tissue mass-action ratios for phosphofructokinase, phosphoglucose isomerase and the combined (aldolase×triose phosphate isomerase) reaction were similar in vivo and in vitro. The reactants of phosphofructokinase appeared to be far from mass-action equilibrium. In vitro, the reactants of hexokinase also appeared to be far from mass-action equilibrium. 6. Correlation of observed changes in glycolytic flux with changes in fructose 6-phosphate concentration suggested that phosphofructokinase may show regulatory behaviour. The enzyme appeared to be activated in the presence of oleate or adrenaline and to be inhibited in the presence of lactate or pyruvate. 7. Evidence is presented that the reactants of lactate dehydrogenase and glycerol 1-phosphate dehydrogenase may be near to mass-action equilibrium in the cytoplasm. 8. No

  15. Screening procedure for detection of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and their metabolites in urine as part of a systematic toxicological analysis procedure for acidic drugs and poisons by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry after extractive methylation.

    PubMed

    Maurer, H H; Tauvel, F X; Kraemer, T

    2001-01-01

    Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are widely used as analgesic and anti-rheumatic drugs, and they are often misused. A gas chromatographic-mass spectrometric (GC-MS) screening procedure was developed for their detection in urine as part of a systematic toxicological analysis procedure for acidic drugs and poisons after extractive methylation. The compounds were separated by capillary GC and identified by computerized MS in the full-scan mode. Using mass chromatography with the ions m/z 119, 135, 139, 152, 165, 229, 244, 266, 272, and 326, the possible presence of NSAIDs and their metabolites could be indicated. The identity of positive signals in such mass chromatograms was confirmed by comparison of the peaks underlying full mass spectra with the reference spectra recorded during this study. This method allowed the detection of therapeutic concentrations of acemetacin, acetaminophen (paracetamol), acetylsalicylic acid, diclofenac, diflunisal, etodolac, fenbufen, fenoprofen, flufenamic acid, flurbiprofen, ibuprofen, indometacin, kebuzone, ketoprofen, lonazolac, meclofenamic acid, mefenamic acid, mofebutazone, naproxen, niflumic acid, phenylbutazone, suxibuzone, tiaprofenic acid, tolfenamic acid, and tolmetin in urine samples. The overall recoveries of the different NSAIDs ranged between 50 and 80% with coefficients of variation of less than 15% (n = 5), and the limits of detection of the different NSAIDs were between 10 and 50 ng/mL (S/N = 3) in the full-scan mode. Extractive methylation has proved to be a versatile method for STA of various acidic drugs, poisons, and their metabolites in urine. It has also successfully been used for plasma analysis.

  16. All-trans retinoic acid enhances the transport of phase II metabolites of benzo[a]pyrene by inducing the Breast Cancer Resistance Protein expression in Caco-2 cells.

    PubMed

    Hessel, Stefanie; Lampen, Alfonso

    2010-08-16

    All-trans retinoic acid (atRA) is the most active metabolite of vitamin A. It is a ligand of retinoic acid receptors (RAR) as well as of retinoid X receptors (RXR) and effectively stimulates the RAR/RXR signalling pathway. In this study effects of atRA on the detoxification of the food contaminant benzo[a]pyrene (B[a]P) was elucidated by using the Caco-2 cell line as model system for the human small intestine. Caco-2 cells express a number of phase I and II xenobiotic-metabolising enzymes as well as several transport proteins of the ATP-binding cassette (ABC) superfamily. Pre-treatment of the cells with atRA resulted in enhanced apical excretion of B[a]P-3-sulfate, a phase II metabolite of B[a]P. Gene expression analysis revealed that the Breast Cancer Resistance Protein (BCRP), an ABC-transporter known to be involved in B[a]P-3-sulfate excretion, was strongly stimulated already at low concentrations of atRA. Furthermore co-incubation of the intestinal cell with RAR agonist and RXR agonist resulted in a strong additive induction of mRNA expression of BCRP. Thus, atRA was shown to induce BCRP gene expression probably via the RAR/RXR signalling pathway, resulting in effective removal of B[a]P metabolites from intestinal cells.

  17. Online restricted-access material combined with high-performance liquid chromatography and tandem mass spectrometry for the simultaneous determination of vanillin and its vanillic acid metabolite in human plasma.

    PubMed

    Li, De-Qiang; Zhang, Zhi-Qing; Yang, Xiu-Ling; Zhou, Chun-Hua; Qi, Jin-Long

    2016-09-01

    An automated online solid-phase extraction with restricted-access material combined with high-performance liquid chromatography and tandem mass spectrometry was developed and validated for the simultaneous quantification of vanillin and its vanillic acid metabolite in human plasma. After protein precipitation by methanol, which contained the internal standards, the supernatant of plasma samples was injected to the system, the endogenous large molecules were flushed out, and target analytes were trapped and enriched on the adsorbent, resulting in a minimization of sample complexity and ion suppression effects. Calibration curves were linear over the concentrations of 5-1000 ng/mL for vanillin and 10-5000 ng/mL for vanillic acid with a coefficient of determination >0.999 for the determined compounds. The lower limits of quantification of vanillin and vanillic acid were 5.0 and 10.0 ng/mL, respectively. The intra- and inter-run precisions expressed as the relative standard deviation were 2.6-8.6 and 3.2-10.2%, respectively, and the accuracies expressed as the relative error were in the range of -6.1 to 7.3%. Extraction recoveries of analytes were between 89.5 and 97.4%. There was no notable matrix effect for any analyte concentration. The developed method was proved to be sensitive, repeatable, and accurate for the quantification of vanillin and its vanillic acid metabolite in human plasma. PMID:27384745

  18. Online restricted-access material combined with high-performance liquid chromatography and tandem mass spectrometry for the simultaneous determination of vanillin and its vanillic acid metabolite in human plasma.

    PubMed

    Li, De-Qiang; Zhang, Zhi-Qing; Yang, Xiu-Ling; Zhou, Chun-Hua; Qi, Jin-Long

    2016-09-01

    An automated online solid-phase extraction with restricted-access material combined with high-performance liquid chromatography and tandem mass spectrometry was developed and validated for the simultaneous quantification of vanillin and its vanillic acid metabolite in human plasma. After protein precipitation by methanol, which contained the internal standards, the supernatant of plasma samples was injected to the system, the endogenous large molecules were flushed out, and target analytes were trapped and enriched on the adsorbent, resulting in a minimization of sample complexity and ion suppression effects. Calibration curves were linear over the concentrations of 5-1000 ng/mL for vanillin and 10-5000 ng/mL for vanillic acid with a coefficient of determination >0.999 for the determined compounds. The lower limits of quantification of vanillin and vanillic acid were 5.0 and 10.0 ng/mL, respectively. The intra- and inter-run precisions expressed as the relative standard deviation were 2.6-8.6 and 3.2-10.2%, respectively, and the accuracies expressed as the relative error were in the range of -6.1 to 7.3%. Extraction recoveries of analytes were between 89.5 and 97.4%. There was no notable matrix effect for any analyte concentration. The developed method was proved to be sensitive, repeatable, and accurate for the quantification of vanillin and its vanillic acid metabolite in human plasma.

  19. Eicosapentaenoic Acid Inhibits Oxidation of ApoB-containing Lipoprotein Particles of Different Size In Vitro When Administered Alone or in Combination With Atorvastatin Active Metabolite Compared With Other Triglyceride-lowering Agents.

    PubMed

    Mason, R Preston; Sherratt, Samuel C R; Jacob, Robert F

    2016-07-01

    Eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) is a triglyceride-lowering agent that reduces circulating levels of the apolipoprotein B (apoB)-containing lipoprotein particles small dense low-density lipoprotein (sdLDL), very-low-density lipoprotein (VLDL), and oxidized low-density lipoprotein (LDL). These benefits may result from the direct antioxidant effects of EPA. To investigate this potential mechanism, these particles were isolated from human plasma, preincubated with EPA in the absence or presence of atorvastatin (active) metabolite, and subjected to copper-initiated oxidation. Lipid oxidation was measured as a function of thiobarbituric acid reactive substances formation. EPA inhibited sdLDL (IC50 ∼2.0 μM) and LDL oxidation (IC50 ∼2.5 μM) in a dose-dependent manner. Greater antioxidant potency was observed for EPA in VLDL. EPA inhibition was enhanced when combined with atorvastatin metabolite at low equimolar concentrations. Other triglyceride-lowering agents (fenofibrate, niacin, and gemfibrozil) and vitamin E did not significantly affect sdLDL, LDL, or VLDL oxidation compared with vehicle-treated controls. Docosahexaenoic acid was also found to inhibit oxidation in these particles but over a shorter time period than EPA. These data support recent clinical findings and suggest that EPA has direct antioxidant benefits in various apoB-containing subfractions that are more pronounced than those of other triglyceride-lowering agents and docosahexaenoic acid. PMID:26945158

  20. Essential fatty acids and their metabolites could function as endogenous HMG-CoA reductase and ACE enzyme inhibitors, anti-arrhythmic, anti-hypertensive, anti-atherosclerotic, anti-inflammatory, cytoprotective, and cardioprotective molecules.

    PubMed

    Das, Undurti N

    2008-01-01

    Lowering plasma low density lipoprotein-cholesterol (LDL-C), blood pressure, homocysteine, and preventing platelet aggregation using a combination of a statin, three blood pressure lowering drugs such as a thiazide, a beta blocker, and an angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitor each at half standard dose; folic acid; and aspirin-called as polypill- was estimated to reduce cardiovascular events by approximately 80%. Essential fatty acids (EFAs) and their long-chain metabolites: gamma-linolenic acid (GLA), dihomo-GLA (DGLA), arachidonic acid, eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA), and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) and other products such as prostaglandins E1 (PGE1), prostacyclin (PGI2), PGI3, lipoxins (LXs), resolvins, protectins including neuroprotectin D1 (NPD1) prevent platelet aggregation, lower blood pressure, have anti-arrhythmic action, reduce LDL-C, ameliorate the adverse actions of homocysteine, show anti-inflammatory actions, activate telomerase, and have cytoprotective properties. Thus, EFAs and their metabolites show all the classic actions expected of the "polypill". Unlike the proposed "polypill", EFAs are endogenous molecules present in almost all tissues, have no significant or few side effects, can be taken orally for long periods of time even by pregnant women, lactating mothers, and infants, children, and adults; and have been known to reduce the incidence cardiovascular diseases including stroke. In addition, various EFAs and their long-chain metabolites not only enhance nitric oxide generation but also react with nitric oxide to yield their respective nitroalkene derivatives that produce vascular relaxation, inhibit neutrophil degranulation and superoxide formation, inhibit platelet activation, and possess PPAR-gamma ligand activity and release NO, thus prevent platelet aggregation, thrombus formation, atherosclerosis, and cardiovascular diseases. Based on these evidences, I propose that a rational combination of omega-3 and omega-6 fatty acids and the

  1. Effects of pistachio by-products on digestibility, milk production, milk fatty acid profile and blood metabolites in Saanen dairy goats.

    PubMed

    Sedighi-Vesagh, R; Naserian, A A; Ghaffari, M H; Petit, H V

    2015-08-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the effects of pistachio by-products (PBP) on nutrient digestibility, blood metabolites and milk fatty acid (FA) profile in Saanen dairy goats. Nine multiparous lactating Saanen goats (on day 90 post-partum, 45 ± 2/kg BW) were randomly assigned to a 3 × 3 Latin square design with three treatment diets: 1) control diet (alfalfa hay based), 2) 32% PBP and 3) 32% PBP + polyethylene glycol (PEG-4000; 1 g/kg dry matter). Each period lasted 21 days, including 14 day for treatment adaptation and 7 day for data collection. Pistachio by-products significantly decreased (p < 0.01) crude protein (CP) digestibility compared with the control diet (64.4% vs. 58.7%), but PEG addition did not differ for CP digestibility of goats fed 32% PBP + PEG and those fed the two other diets. The digestibility of NDF tended (p = 0.06) to decrease for goats fed PBP compared with those fed the control diet. Yields of milk and 4% fat-corrected milk were not affected by dietary treatments. Compared with the control diet, PBP supplementation appreciably changed the proportions of almost all the milk FA measured; the main effects were decreases (p < 0.01) in FA from 8:0 to 16:0 and increases (p < 0.01) proportions of cis-9, trans-11 18:2 and trans-11 18:1, monounsaturated FA, polyunsaturated FA and long-chain FA. The saturated FA, short-chain FA and medium-chain FA proportions were lower (p < 0.01) in goats fed the two PBP supplemented diet than in those fed the control diet and PEG addition led to intermediate proportions of saturated FA, unsaturated and monounsaturated FA. Inclusion of PBP in the diet decreased (p < 0.01) plasma concentrations of glucose and urea nitrogen compared with the control diet. It was concluded that PBP can be used as forage in the diet of dairy goats without interfering with milk yield. Inclusion of 32% PBP in the diet of dairy goats had beneficial effects on milk FA profile but PEG addition to PBP

  2. Liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry evaluation of the pharmacokinetics of a diacid metabolite of norcantharidin loaded in folic acid-targeted liposomes in mice.

    PubMed

    Liu, Min-Chen; Ma, Xiao-Qiong; Xu, Yong; Peng, Li-Hua; Han, Min; Gao, Jian-Qing

    2016-02-01

    A previous study has reported diacid metabolite (DM) as the stable form of norcantharidin (NCTD), which is almost 100% metabolized to DM-NCTD. However, the unreliable pharmacokinetic characteristics of DM-NCTD could result in low bioavailability, hindering the clinical use of DM-NCTD in the treatment of diseases. A liposomal drug delivery system could overcome the shortcomings of DM-NCTD by improving the relative bioavailability (Fr), reducing drug toxicity, and increasing the therapeutic efficacy. However, there are no data concerning the pharmacokinetics of a DM-NCTD-loaded liposomal drug delivery system in animals, which is required for assessing its safety profile. Therefore, a rapid and sensitive liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) method was developed and validated for the determination of DM-NCTD in mouse plasma. Standard curves were linear (r=0.9966) over the range 10.0-1.00×10(4)ng/ml in mouse plasma with a lower limit of quantification (LLOQ) of 10ng/ml. This study successfully investigated the pharmacokinetics of DM-NCTD and DM-NCTD encapsulated in polyethylene glycol (PEG)-Liposomes (DM-NCTD/PEG-Liposome) or folic acid (FA)-PEG-Liposomes (DM-NCTD/FA-PEG-Liposome) in Kunming mice after a single intravenous dose of 2mg/kg. The plasma profile data of the three groups adhered to a two-compartment model. Compared with the DM-NCTD group, the Liposome groups had longer circulation times following intravenous administration in mice, and the Fr of DM-NCTD increased significantly (P<0.05). Furthermore, the area under the concentration-time curve (AUC) declined with an increase in the volume of distribution (Vd) from the PEG-Liposome to the FA-PEG-Liposome groups, which indicates a more efficient removal of the drug from the plasma of the FA-PEG-Liposome group. This result suggests a possible increased risk of DM-NCTD intoxication in normal tissues with FA-PEG-Liposomes. Based on this study, further investigation of the biodistribution of DM

  3. Early modulation of the transcription factor Nrf2 in rodent striatal slices by quinolinic acid, a toxic metabolite of the kynurenine pathway.

    PubMed

    Colín-González, A L; Luna-López, A; Königsberg, M; Ali, S F; Pedraza-Chaverrí, J; Santamaría, A

    2014-02-28

    Nuclear factor (erythroid-derived 2)-like 2 (Nrf2) is a transcription factor involved in the orchestration of antioxidant responses. Although its pharmacological activation has been largely hypothesized as a promising tool to ameliorate the progression of neurodegenerative events, the actual knowledge about its modulation in neurotoxic paradigms remains scarce. In this study, we investigated the early profile of Nrf2 modulation in striatal slices of rodents incubated in the presence of the toxic kynurenine pathway metabolite, quinolinic acid (QUIN). Tissue slices from rats and mice were obtained and used throughout the experiments in order to compare inter-species responses. Nuclear Nrf2 protein levels and oxidative damage to lipids were compared. Time- and concentration-response curves of all markers were explored. Nrf2 nuclear activation was corroborated through phase 2 antioxidant protein expression. The effects of QUIN on Nrf2 modulation and oxidative stress were also compared between slices of wild-type (Nrf2(+/+)) and Nrf2 knock-out (Nrf2(-/-)) mice. The possible involvement of the N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor (NMDAr) in the Nrf2 modulation and lipid peroxidation was further explored in mice striatal slices. In rat striatal slices, QUIN stimulated the Nrf2 nuclear translocation. This effect was accompanied by augmented lipid peroxidation. In the mouse striatum, QUIN per se exerted an induction of Nrf2 factor only at 1h of incubation, and a concentration-response effect on lipid peroxidation after 3h of incubation. QUIN stimulated the striatal content of phase 2 enzymes. Nrf2(-/-) mice were slightly more responsive than Nrf2(+/+) mice to the QUIN-induced oxidative damage, and completely unresponsive to the NMDAr antagonist MK-801 when tested against QUIN. Findings of this study indicate that: (1) Nrf2 is modulated in rodent striatal tissue in response to QUIN; (2) Nrf2(-/-) striatal tissue was moderately more vulnerable to oxidative damage than the Wt

  4. Comprehensive profiling of mercapturic acid metabolites from dietary acrylamide as short-term exposure biomarkers for evaluation of toxicokinetics in rats and daily internal exposure in humans using isotope dilution ultra-high performance liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yu; Wang, Qiao; Cheng, Jun; Zhang, Jingshun; Xu, Jiaojiao; Ren, Yiping

    2015-09-24

    Mercapturic acid metabolites from dietary acrylamide are important short-term exposure biomarkers for evaluating the in vivo toxicity of acrylamide. Most of studies have focused on the measurement of two metabolites, N-acetyl-S-(2-carbamoylethyl)-L-cysteine (AAMA) and N-acetyl-S-(2-carbamoyl-2-hydroxyethyl)-L-cysteine (GAMA). Thus, the comprehensive profile of acrylamide urinary metabolites cannot be fully understood. We developed an isotope dilution ultra-high performance liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (UHPLC-MS/MS) method for the simultaneous determination of all four mercapturic acid adducts of acrylamide and its primary metabolite glycidamide under the electroscopy ionization negative (ESI-) mode in the present study. The limit of detection (LOD) and limit of quantification (LOQ) of the analytes ranged 0.1-0.3 ng/mL and 0.4-1.0 ng/mL, respectively. The recovery rates with low, intermediate and high spiking levels were calculated as 95.5%-105.4%, 98.2%-114.0% and 92.2%-108.9%, respectively. Acceptable within-laboratory reproducibility (RSD<7.0%) substantially supported the use of current method for robust analysis. Rapid pretreatment procedures and short run time (8 min per sample) ensured good efficiency of metabolism profiling, indicating a wide application for investigating short-term internal exposure of dietary acrylamide. Our proposed UHPLC-MS/MS method was successfully applied to the toxicokinetic study of acrylamide in rats. Meanwhile, results of human urine analysis indicated that the levels of N-acetyl-S-(2-carbamoylethyl)-L-cysteine-sulfoxide (AAMA-sul), which did not appear in the mercapturic acid metabolites in rodents, were more than the sum of GAMA and N-acetyl-S-(1-carbamoyl-2-hydroxyethyl)-L-cysteine (iso-GAMA). Thus, AAMA-sul may alternatively become a specific biomarker for investigating the acrylamide exposure in humans. Current proposed method provides a substantial methodology support for comprehensive profiling of

  5. Second-order multivariate models for the processing of standard-addition synchronous fluorescence-pH data. Application to the analysis of salicylic acid and its major metabolite in human urine.

    PubMed

    Pagani, Ariana P; Ibañez, Gabriela A

    2014-05-01

    In the present work, we describe the determination of salicylic acid and its major metabolite, salicyluric acid, in spiked human urine samples, using synchronous fluorescence spectra measured in a flow-injection system with a double pH gradient. Because the fluorescent urine background constitutes a potentially interfering signal, it becomes necessary to achieve the second-order advantage. Moreover, due to significant changes in the signal of the analytes in the presence of the urine matrix, mainly for salicyluric acid, standard addition was required in order to obtain appropriate quantifications. Several second-order multivariate calibration models were evaluated for this purpose: PARAFAC and MCR-ALS in two different modes, and PLS/RBL.

  6. Apo-10'-lycopenoic acid, an enzymatic metabolite of lycopene, induces Nrf2-mediated expression of phase II detoxifying/antioxidant enzymes in human bronchial epithelial cells

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The chemopreventive effects of lycopene against certain types of cancers have been proposed to be mediated by its oxidative products/metabolites. Lycopene can be cleaved by carotene 9',10'-oxygenase at its 9',10' double bond to form apo-10'-lycopenoids, including apo-10'-lycopenal, -lycopenol and -...

  7. Apo-10'-lycopenoic acid, a lycopene 1 metabolite, increases sirtuin 1 mRNA and protein levels and decreases hepatic fat accumulation in ob/ob mice

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Lycopene has been shown to be beneficial in protecting against high-fat diet-induced fatty liver. The recent demonstration that lycopene can be converted by carotene 99,10’-oxygenase into a biologically active metabolite, ALA, led us to propose that the function of lycopene can be mediated by ALA. I...

  8. An inter-species signaling system mediated by fusaric acid has parallel effects on antifungal metabolite production by Pseudomonas protegens Pf-5 and antibiosis of Fusarium spp.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Pseudomonas protegens strain Pf-5 is a rhizosphere bacterium that acts as a biocontrol agent of soilborne plant diseases, and produces at least seven different secondary metabolites with antifungal properties. We derived site-directed mutants of Pf-5 with single and multiple mutations in the biosynt...

  9. Rapid and sensitive detection of fipronil and its metabolites in edible oils by solid-phase extraction based on humic acid bonded silica combined with gas chromatography with electron capture detection.

    PubMed

    Peng, Xi-Tian; Li, Yu-Nan; Xia, Hong; Peng, Li-Jun; Feng, Yu-Qi

    2016-06-01

    Solid-phase extraction based on humic acid bonded silica followed by gas chromatography with electron capture detection was developed to determine fipronil and its metabolites in edible oil. To achieve the best extraction performance, we systematically investigated a series of solid-phase extraction parameters. Under the optimized conditions, the method was validated according to linearity, recovery, and precision. Good linearities were obtained with R(2) more than 0.9996 for all analytes. The limits of detection were between 0.3 and 0.5 ng/g, and the recoveries ranged from 83.1 to 104.0% at three spiked concentrations with intra- and interday relative standard deviation values less than 8.7%. Finally, the proposed method was applied to determine fipronil and its metabolites in 11 edible oil samples taken from Wuhan markets. Fipronil was detectable in four samples with concentrations ranging from 3.0 to 5.2 ng/g. In China, the maximum residue limits of fipronil in some vegetables and maize are 20 and 100 ng/g (GB/T 2763-2014), respectively. The residues of fipronil and its metabolites in commercial edible oils might exhibit some potential threat to human health as a result of high consumption of edible oil as part of daily intake. PMID:27280701

  10. The significance of lichens and their metabolites.

    PubMed

    Huneck, S

    1999-12-01

    Lichens, symbiontic organisms of fungi and algae, synthesize numerous metabolites, the "lichen substances," which comprise aliphatic, cycloaliphatic, aromatic, and terpenic compounds. Lichens and their metabolites have a manifold biological activity: antiviral, antibiotic, antitumor, allergenic, plant growth inhibitory, antiherbivore, and enzyme inhibitory. Usnic acid, a very active lichen substance is used in pharmaceutical preparations. Large amounts of Pseudevernia furfuracea and Evernia prunastri are processed in the perfume industry, and some lichens are sensitive reagents for the evaluation of air pollution.

  11. The Significance of Lichens and Their Metabolites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huneck, S.

    Lichens, symbiontic organisms of fungi and algae, synthesize numerous metabolites, the "lichen substances," which comprise aliphatic, cycloaliphatic, aromatic, and terpenic compounds. Lichens and their metabolites have a manifold biological activity: antiviral, antibiotic, antitumor, allergenic, plant growth inhibitory, antiherbivore, and enzyme inhibitory. Usnic acid, a very active lichen substance is used in pharmaceutical preparations. Large amounts of Pseudevernia furfuracea and Evernia prunastri are processed in the perfume industry, and some lichens are sensitive reagents for the evaluation of air pollution.

  12. Quantification of Secondary Metabolites.

    PubMed

    2016-01-01

    Plants are a rich source of secondary metabolites that have medicinal and aromatic properties. Secondary metabolites such as alkaloids, iridoids and phenolics generally produced by plants for their defence mechanisms have been implicated in the therapeutic properties of most medicinal plants. Hence, quantification of these metabolites will aid to discover new and effective drugs from plant sources and also to scientifically validate the existing traditional practices. Quantification of large group of phytochemicals such as phenolics and flavonoids is quantified in this context.

  13. A LC-ESI-MS method for the simultaneous determination of madecassoside and its metabolite madecassic acid in rat plasma: comparison pharmacokinetics in normal and collagen-induced arthritic rats.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ting; Leng, Dan-Dan; Gao, Fei-Fei; Jiang, Chun-Jie; Xia, Yu-Feng; Dai, Yue

    2014-12-01

    To develop a simple and highly sensitive high performance liquid chromatography with electrospray ionization mass spectrometric (LC-ESI-MS) method for the simultaneous determination of madecassoside and its major metabolite madecassic acid in rat plasma, and compare the pharmacokinetics of the two compounds in normal and collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) rats. Glycyrrhetinic acid was used as the internal standard (IS). Chromatographic separation was accomplished on an Inertsil ODS-3 column, using a gradient elution with the mobile phase composed of acetonitrile and water acidified with 0.1% (V/V) formic acid. Detection was achieved by ESI-MS under the negative selected ion monitoring (SIM) mode. In normal and CIA rats, madecassoside (30 mg·kg(-1)) was orally administered for 21 consecutive days from the day of arthritis onset. For madecassoside, the linear range was 10-1 000 ng·mL(-1) with the square regression coefficient (r) of 0.998 9, while for madecassic acid, the linear range was 10-500 ng·mL(-1) with the square regression coefficient (r) of 0.996 1. The lower limit of quantification was 10 ng·mL(-1) for both analytes. The intra- and inter-day precision ranged from 1.78% to 13.42% for madecassoside and 2.30% to 14.90% for madecassic acid, and the accuracy was between -0.95% and 6.30% for madecassoside and between -1.48% and 5.34% for madecassic acid. The average recoveries of madecassoside, madecassic acid and IS from spiked plasma samples were > 81%. The developed method was successfully applied to the pharmacokinetic study of madecassoside and madecassic acid in rats after an oral administration of madecassoside. During initial 7 days of dosing, the cmax and AUC of madecassoside were greatly decreased and Vd/F was markedly increased in CIA rats, and no significant difference was observed on the first day of dosing. In contrast, the T1/2, cmax and AUC of madecassic acid were significantly increased, and Ke of madecassic acid was greatly decreased in CIA

  14. Validation of UHPLC-MS/MS methods for the determination of kaempferol and its metabolite 4-hydroxyphenyl acetic acid, and application to in vitro blood-brain barrier and intestinal drug permeability studies.

    PubMed

    Moradi-Afrapoli, Fahimeh; Oufir, Mouhssin; Walter, Fruzsina R; Deli, Maria A; Smiesko, Martin; Zabela, Volha; Butterweck, Veronika; Hamburger, Matthias

    2016-09-01

    Sedative and anxiolytic-like properties of flavonoids such as kaempferol and quercetin, and of some of their intestinal metabolites, have been demonstrated in pharmacological studies. However, routes of administration were shown to be critical for observing in vivo activity. Therefore, the ability to cross intestinal and blood-brain barriers was assessed in cell-based models for kaempferol (KMF), and for the major intestinal metabolite of KMF, 4-hydroxyphenylacetic acid (4-HPAA). Intestinal transport studies were performed with Caco-2 cells, and blood-brain barrier transport studies with an immortalized monoculture human model and a primary triple-co-culture rat model. UHPLC-MS/MS methods for KMF and 4-HPAA in Ringer-HEPES buffer and in Hank's balanced salt solution were validated according to industry guidelines. For all methods, calibration curves were fitted by least-squares quadratic regression with 1/X(2) as weighing factor, and mean coefficients of determination (R(2)) were >0.99. Data obtained with all barrier models showed high intestinal and blood-brain barrier permeation of KMF, and no permeability of 4-HPAA, when compared to barrier integrity markers.

  15. Validation of UHPLC-MS/MS methods for the determination of kaempferol and its metabolite 4-hydroxyphenyl acetic acid, and application to in vitro blood-brain barrier and intestinal drug permeability studies.

    PubMed

    Moradi-Afrapoli, Fahimeh; Oufir, Mouhssin; Walter, Fruzsina R; Deli, Maria A; Smiesko, Martin; Zabela, Volha; Butterweck, Veronika; Hamburger, Matthias

    2016-09-01

    Sedative and anxiolytic-like properties of flavonoids such as kaempferol and quercetin, and of some of their intestinal metabolites, have been demonstrated in pharmacological studies. However, routes of administration were shown to be critical for observing in vivo activity. Therefore, the ability to cross intestinal and blood-brain barriers was assessed in cell-based models for kaempferol (KMF), and for the major intestinal metabolite of KMF, 4-hydroxyphenylacetic acid (4-HPAA). Intestinal transport studies were performed with Caco-2 cells, and blood-brain barrier transport studies with an immortalized monoculture human model and a primary triple-co-culture rat model. UHPLC-MS/MS methods for KMF and 4-HPAA in Ringer-HEPES buffer and in Hank's balanced salt solution were validated according to industry guidelines. For all methods, calibration curves were fitted by least-squares quadratic regression with 1/X(2) as weighing factor, and mean coefficients of determination (R(2)) were >0.99. Data obtained with all barrier models showed high intestinal and blood-brain barrier permeation of KMF, and no permeability of 4-HPAA, when compared to barrier integrity markers. PMID:27281582

  16. Synthesis Of Labeled Metabolites

    DOEpatents

    Martinez, Rodolfo A.; Silks, III, Louis A.; Unkefer, Clifford J.; Atcher, Robert

    2004-03-23

    The present invention is directed to labeled compounds, for example, isotopically enriched mustard gas metabolites including: [1,1',2,2'-.sup.13 C.sub.4 ]ethane, 1,1'-sulfonylbis[2-(methylthio); [1,1',2,2'-.sup.13 C.sub.4 ]ethane, 1-[[2-(methylsulfinyl)ethyl]sulfonyl]-2-(methylthio); [1,1',2,2'-.sup.13 C.sub.4 ]ethane, 1,1'-sulfonylbis[2-(methylsulfinyl)]; and, 2,2'-sulfinylbis([1,2-.sup.13 C.sub.2 ]ethanol of the general formula ##STR1## where Q.sup.1 is selected from the group consisting of sulfide (--S--), sulfone (--S(O)--), sulfoxide (--S(O.sub.2)--) and oxide (--O--), at least one C* is .sup.13 C, X is selected from the group consisting of hydrogen and deuterium, and Z is selected from the group consisting of hydroxide (--OH), and --Q.sup.2 --R where Q.sup.2 is selected from the group consisting of sulfide (--S--), sulfone(--S(O)--), sulfoxide (--S(O.sub.2)--) and oxide (--O--), and R is selected from the group consisting of hydrogen, a C.sub.1 to C.sub.4 lower alkyl, and amino acid moieties, with the proviso that when Z is a hydroxide and Q.sup.1 is a sulfide, then at least one X is deuterium.

  17. New synthesis and characterization of (+)-lysergic acid diethylamide (LSD) derivatives and the development of a microparticle-based immunoassay for the detection of LSD and its metabolites.

    PubMed

    Li, Z; Goc-Szkutnicka, K; McNally, A J; Pilcher, I; Polakowski, S; Vitone, S; Wu, R S; Salamone, S J

    1997-01-01

    In this paper are reported the synthesis and characterization of three LSD derivatives. On the basis of several analytical characterization studies, the most stable derivative has been selected and a procedure to covalently link the derivative to polystyrene microparticles through a carrier protein has been developed. In addition, two new LSD immunogens have been synthesized and characterized, and from these immunogens antibodies that recognize not only LSD but also several major LSD metabolites have been generated. Using the selected derivative and antibody, a homogeneous microparticle-based immunoassay has been developed for the detection of LSD in human urine with the required sensitivity and specificity for an effective screening assay. The performance of this LSD OnLine assay has been evaluated using the criteria of precision, cross-reactivity, correlation to the Abuscreen LSD RIA and GC/MS/MS, assay specificity, and limit of detection.

  18. Familial resemblance for serum metabolite concentrations.

    PubMed

    Draisma, Harmen H M; Beekman, Marian; Pool, René; van Ommen, Gert-Jan B; Adamski, Jerzy; Prehn, Cornelia; Vaarhorst, Anika A M; de Craen, Anton J M; Willemsen, Gonneke; Slagboom, P Eline; Boomsma, Dorret I

    2013-10-01

    Metabolomics is the comprehensive study of metabolites, which are the substrates, intermediate, and end products of cellular metabolism. The heritability of the concentrations of circulating metabolites bears relevance for evaluating their suitability as biomarkers for disease. We report aspects of familial resemblance for the concentrations in human serum of more than 100 metabolites, measured using a targeted metabolomics platform. Age- and sex-corrected monozygotic twin correlations, midparent-offspring regression coefficients, and spouse correlations in subjects from two independent cohorts (Netherlands Twin Register and Leiden Longevity Study) were estimated for each metabolite. In the Netherlands Twin Register subjects, who were largely fasting, we found significant monozygotic twin correlations for 121 out of 123 metabolites. Heritability was confirmed by midparent-offspring regression. For most detected metabolites, the correlations between spouses were considerably lower than those between twins, indicating a contribution of genetic effects to familial resemblance. Remarkably high heritability was observed for free carnitine (monozygotic twin correlation 0.66), for the amino acids serine (monozygotic twin correlation 0.77) and threonine (monozygotic twin correlation 0.64), and for phosphatidylcholine acyl-alkyl C40:3 (monozygotic twin correlation 0.77). For octenoylcarnitine, a consistent point estimate of approximately 0.50 was found for the spouse correlations in the two cohorts as well as for the monozygotic twin correlation, suggesting that familiality for this metabolite is explained by shared environment. We conclude that for the majority of metabolites targeted by the used metabolomics platform, the familial resemblance of serum concentrations is largely genetic. Our results contribute to the knowledge of the heritability of fasting serum metabolite concentrations, which is relevant for biomarker research. PMID:23985338

  19. Simultaneous determination of niacin and its metabolites--nicotinamide, nicotinuric acid and N-methyl-2-pyridone-5-carboxamide--in human plasma by LC-MS/MS and its application to a human pharmacokinetic study.

    PubMed

    Inamadugu, Jaswanth Kumar; Damaramadugu, Rajasekhar; Mullangi, Ramesh; Ponneri, Venkateswarlu

    2010-10-01

    An LC-MS/MS method for the simultaneous quantitation of niacin (NA) and its metabolites, i.e. nicotinamide (NAM), nicotinuric acid (NUA) and N-methyl-2-pyridone-5-carboxamide (2-Pyr), in human plasma (1 mL) was developed and validated using nevirapine as an internal standard (IS). Extraction of the NA and its metabolites along with the IS from human plasma was accomplished using a simple liquid-liquid extraction. The chromatographic separation of NA, NAM, NUA, 2-Pyr and IS was achieved on a Hypersil-BDS column (150 x 4.6 mm, 5 microm) column using a mobile phase consisting of 0.1% formic acid : acetonitrile (20:80 v/v) at a flow rate of 1 mL/min. The total run time of analysis was 2 min and elution of NA, NAM, NUA, 2-Pyr and IS occurred at 1.37, 1.46, 1.40, 1.06 and 1.27 min, respectively. A detailed validation of the method was performed as per the FDA guidelines and the standard curves were found to be linear in the range of 100-20000 ng/mL for NA; 10-1600 ng/mL for NUA and NAM and 50-5000 ng/mL for 2-Pyr with mean correlation coefficient of ≥ 0.99 for each analyte. The method was sensitive, specific, precise, accurate and suitable for bioequivalence and pharmacokinetic studies. The developed assay method was successfully applied to a pharmacokinetic study in humans.

  20. Tear metabolite changes in keratoconus

    PubMed Central

    Karamichos, D; Zieske, JD; Sejersen, H; Sarker-Nag, A; Asara, John M; Hjortdal, J

    2015-01-01

    While efforts have been made over the years, the exact cause of keratoconus (KC) remains unknown. The aim of this study was to identify alterations in endogenous metabolites in the tears of KC patients compared with age-matched healthy subjects. Three groups were tested: 1) Age-matched controls with no eye disease (N=15), 2) KC – patients wearing Rigid Gas permeable lenses (N=16), and 3) KC – No Correction (N=14). All samples were processed for metabolomics analysis using LC-MS/MS. We identified a total of 296 different metabolites of which >40 were significantly regulated between groups. Glycolysis and gluconeogenesis had significant changes, such as 3-phosphoglycerate and 1,3 diphopshateglycerate. As a result the citric acid cycle (TCA) was also affected with notable changes in Isocitrate, aconitate, malate, and acetylphosphate, up regulated in Group 2 and/or 3. Urea cycle was also affected, especially in Group 3 where ornithine and aspartate were up-regulated by at least 3 fold. The oxidation state was also severely affected. Groups 2 and 3 were under severe oxidative stress causing multiple metabolites to be regulated when compared to Group 1. Group 2 and 3, both showed significant down regulation in GSH-to-GSSG ratio when compared to Group 1. Another indicator of oxidative stress, the ratio of lactate – pyruvate was also affected with Groups 2 and 3 showing at least a 2-fold up regulation. Overall, our data indicate that levels of metabolites related to urea cycle, TCA cycle and oxidative stress are highly altered in KC patients. PMID:25579606

  1. Simvastatin (SV) metabolites in mouse tissues

    SciTech Connect

    Duncan, C.A.; Vickers, S. )

    1990-02-26

    SV, a semisynthetic analog of lovastatin, is hydrolyzed in vivo to its hydroxy acid (SVA), a potent inhibitor of HMG CoA reductase (HR). Thus SV lowers plasma cholesterol. SV is a substrate for mixed function oxidases whereas SVA undergoes lactonization and {beta}-oxidation. Male CD-1 mice were dosed orally with a combination of ({sup 14}C)SV and ({sup 3}H)SVA at 25 mg/kg of each, bled and killed at 0.5, 2 and 4 hours. Labeled SV, SVA, 6{prime}exomethylene SV (I), 6{prime}CH{sub 2}OH-SV (II), 6{prime}COOH-SV (III) and a {beta}-oxidized metabolite (IV) were assayed in liver, bile, kidneys, testes and plasma by RIDA. Levels of potential and active HR inhibitors in liver were 10 to 40 fold higher than in other tissues. II and III, in which the configuration at 6{prime} is inverted, may be 2 metabolites of I. Metabolites I-III are inhibitors of HR in their hydroxy acid forms. Qualitatively ({sup 14}C)SV and ({sup 3}H)SVA were metabolized similarly (consistent with their proposed interconversion). However {sup 3}H-SVA, I-III (including hydroxy acid forms) achieved higher concentrations than corresponding {sup 14}C compounds (except in gall bladder bile). Major radioactive metabolites in liver were II-IV (including hydroxy acid forms). These metabolites have also been reported in rat tissues. In bile a large fraction of either label was unidentified polar metabolites. The presence of IV indicated that mice (like rats) are not good models for SV metabolism in man.

  2. Synthesis of an Albendazole Metabolite: Characterization and HPLC Determination

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mahler, Graciela; Davyt, Danilo; Gordon, Sandra; Incerti, Marcelo; Nunez, Ivana; Pezaroglo, Horacio; Scarone, Laura; Serra, Gloria; Silvera, Mauricio; Manta, Eduardo

    2008-01-01

    In this laboratory activity, students are introduced to the synthesis of an albendazole metabolite obtained by a sulfide oxidation reaction. Albendazole as well as its metabolite, albendazole sulfoxide, are used as anthelmintic drugs. The oxidation reagent is H[subscript 2]O[subscript 2] in acetic acid. The reaction is environmental friendly,…

  3. Quantification of Secondary Metabolites.

    PubMed

    2016-01-01

    Plants are a rich source of secondary metabolites that have medicinal and aromatic properties. Secondary metabolites such as alkaloids, iridoids and phenolics generally produced by plants for their defence mechanisms have been implicated in the therapeutic properties of most medicinal plants. Hence, quantification of these metabolites will aid to discover new and effective drugs from plant sources and also to scientifically validate the existing traditional practices. Quantification of large group of phytochemicals such as phenolics and flavonoids is quantified in this context. PMID:26939265

  4. Attenuation of Thrombosis by Crude Rice (Oryza sativa) Bran Policosanol Extract: Ex Vivo Platelet Aggregation and Serum Levels of Arachidonic Acid Metabolites

    PubMed Central

    Ismail, Maznah; Tohit, Eusni Rahayu Mohd; Abdullah, Rasedee; Zhang, Yi-Da

    2016-01-01

    Background. Vascular occlusion or thrombosis was often attributed to uncontrolled platelet activation. Influence of sugarcane policosanol extract on platelet was reported but little was known of rice bran policosanol, particularly its mechanisms of actions on platelet activities. Objective. Antiplatelet mechanisms of rice bran policosanol extract (RBE) were studied using hyperlipidemic Sprague Dawley rats. Ex vivo platelet aggregation, platelet count (PC), bleeding time (BT), and coagulation time were assayed. Serum eicosanoids and other aggregation-related metabolites levels were quantified. Design. Rats were divided into 6 groups for comparisons (vehicle control Tween 20/H2O, high dose policosanol 500 mg/kg, middle dose policosanol 250 mg/kg, low dose policosanol 100 mg/kg, and positive control aspirin 30 mg/kg). Results. Low dose 100 mg/kg of RBE inhibited aggregation by 42.32 ± 4.31% and this was comparable with the effect of 30 mg/kg aspirin, 43.91 ± 5.27%. Results showed that there were no significant differences in PC, BT, and coagulation time among various groups after RBE treatment. Serum thromboxane A2 was attenuated while prostacyclin level increased upon RBE treatment. Conclusions. RBE reduced ex vivo ADP-induced platelet aggregation without giving adverse effects. No changes in full blood count suggested that rice bran policosanol did not disturb biological blood cell production and destruction yet it reduced aggregation through different mechanisms. PMID:27800004

  5. Aspirin-triggered metabolites of EFAs.

    PubMed

    Makriyannis, Alexandros; Nikas, Spyros P

    2011-10-28

    Aspirin triggers the biosynthesis of oxygenated metabolites from arachidonic, eicosapentaenoic, and docosahexaenoic (DHA) acids. In a preceding issue, Serhan et al. (2011) describe a novel aspirin-triggered DHA pathway for the biosynthesis of a potent anti-inflammatory and proresolving molecule. PMID:22035788

  6. Lycopene metabolite, apo-10'-lycopenoic acid, inhibits diethylnitrosamine-initiated, high fat diet-promoted hepatic inflammation and tumorigenesis in mice

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Obesity is associated with increased risk in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) development and mortality. An important disease control strategy is the prevention of obesity-related hepatic inflammation and tumorigenesis by dietary means. Here, we report that apo-10'-lycopenoic acid (APO10LA), a cleavag...

  7. The possible involvement of D-amino acids or their metabolites in Arabidopsis cysteine proteinase/cystatin N-dependent proteolytic pathway.

    PubMed

    Gholizadeh, A

    2015-01-01

    Cysteine proteinases and their inhibitors 'cystatins' play essential roles in plant growth and development. They are involved in various signaling pathways and in the response to wide ranges of biotic and abiotic environmental stresses. To investigate their possible influence from D-amino acids or their metabolism in vivo, Arabidopsis seedlings were allowed to grow under four physicochemically different D-amino acids including D-aspartate, D-serine, D-alanine and D-phenylalanine containing media. The reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (R T-PCR) analysis of cysteine proteinase and cystatin gene expressions showed that the addition of D-amino acid to the plant growth media considerably induce the expression of proteinase transcript while decrease the expression level of inhibitor gene in the leaf and root tissues of the test plant in overall. Based on the obtained results the potential impact of D-amino acids or their metabolism on the activity of cysteine proteinase/cystatin-dependent proteolytic apparatus as well as their possible cooperation were predicted and discussed in the plant system.

  8. Effects Of Haloacetic Acids and their major metabolites in a Mouse Embryonic Stem Cell Adherent Cell Differentiation and Cytotoxicity (ACDC) Assay

    EPA Science Inventory

    The haloacetic acids (HAAs) are a class of chemicals produced by disinfection of drinking water. Many of the HAAs are developmental toxicants when administered to rodents producing a variety of developmental effects. We have previously shown that the HAAs can produce direct effec...

  9. Influence of dietary fat on metabolism of (14-/sup 14/C)erucic acid in the perfused rat liver. Distribution of metabolites in lipid classes

    SciTech Connect

    Holmer, G.; Ronneberg, R.

    1986-06-01

    Two groups of rats were fed diets containing 20% by weight of either partially hydrogenated marine oil supplemented with sunflower seed oil (PHMO) or palm oil (PO) for 8 wk. Using a liver perfusion system, the effect of dietary long chain monoenoic fatty acids on the uptake and metabolism of (14-/sup 14/C)erucic acid was studied. The perfusion times were 15 and 60 min, respectively. The two groups showed equal ability for erucic acid uptake in the liver but differed in the channeling of the fatty acids into various metabolic pathways. A higher metabolic turnover of 22:1 in the PHMO livers relative to the PO livers was demonstrated by an increased recovery of total (/sup 14/C)labeling in the triglyceride (TG) and phospholipid (PL) fractions, already evident after 15 min of perfusion. The chain-shortening capacity was highest in the PHMO group, reflected by a higher (/sup 14/C)18:1 incorporation in both TG and PL, and increasing from 15 to 60 min of perfusion. The amount of (/sup 14/C)18:1 found in PL and TG after 60 min of perfusion of livers from rats fed PO corresponded to that shown for the PHMO group after 15 min. The PL demonstrated a discrimination against 22:1 compared to TG, and, when available, 18:1 was highly preferred for PL-synthesis. The total fatty acid distribution in the TG, as determined by gas liquid chromatography (GLC), reflected the composition of the dietary fats. In the total liver PL, 22:1 and 20:1 were present in negligible amounts, although the PHMO diet contained 12-13% of both 22:1 and 20:1. In the free fatty acid fraction (FFA), the major part of the radioactivity (approximately 80%) was (14-/sup 14/C)erucic acid, and only small amounts of (/sup 14/C)18:1 (less than 2%) were present, even after 60 min of perfusion. The shortened-chain 18:1 was readily removed from the FFA pool and preferentially used for lipid esterification.

  10. Antimycobacterial activity of lichen metabolites in vitro.

    PubMed

    Ingólfsdóttir, K; Chung, G A; Skúlason, V G; Gissurarson, S R; Vilhelmsdóttir, M

    1998-04-01

    Several compounds, whose structures represent the most common chemical classes of lichen metabolites, were screened for in vitro activity against Mycobacterium aurum, a non-pathogenic organism with a similar sensitivity profile to M. tuberculosis. Of the compounds tested, usnic acid from Cladonia arbuscula exhibited the highest activity with an MIC value of 32 microg/ml. Atranorin and lobaric acid, both isolated from Stereocaulon alpinum, salazinic acid from Parmelia saxatilis and protolichesterinic acid from Cetraria islandica all showed MIC values >/=125 microg/ml. PMID:9795033

  11. Simultaneous Qualitative Assessment and Quantitative Analysis of Metabolites (Phenolics, Nucleosides and Amino Acids) from the Roots of Fresh Gastrodia elata Using UPLC-ESI-Triple Quadrupole Ion MS and ESI- Linear Ion Trap High-Resolution MS

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Sha; Liu, Jun Qiu; Xiao, Hui; Zhang, Jun; Liu, An

    2016-01-01

    A sensitive, effective and optimized method, based on ultra performance liquid chromatography (UPLC) coupled with ESI-triple quadrupole ion MS and ESI-linear ion trap high-resolution MS, has been developed for the simultaneous quantitative and qualitative determination of phenolics, nucleosides and amino acids in the roots of fresh Gastrodia elata. Optimization of the analytical method provided higher separation efficiency and better peak resolution for the targeted compounds. The simultaneous separation protocols were also optimized by routinely using accurate mass measurements, within 5 ppm error, for each molecular ion and the subsequent fragment ions. In total, 31 compounds, including 23 phenolics, two nucleosides, four amino acids, one gastrodin and one other compound were identified or tentatively characterized. Mono-substituted parishin glucoside (9), methoxy mono-substituted parishin (13), methyl parishin (26), p-hydroxybenzyl di-substituted parishin (29), and p-hydroxybenzyl parishin (31) were tentatively identified as new compounds. Principal metabolite content analysis and the composition of eight representative G. elata cultivars of various species indicated that geographic insulation was the main contributor to clustering. PMID:26954012

  12. Simultaneous Qualitative Assessment and Quantitative Analysis of Metabolites (Phenolics, Nucleosides and Amino Acids) from the Roots of Fresh Gastrodia elata Using UPLC-ESI-Triple Quadrupole Ion MS and ESI- Linear Ion Trap High-Resolution MS.

    PubMed

    Chen, Sha; Liu, Jun Qiu; Xiao, Hui; Zhang, Jun; Liu, An

    2016-01-01

    A sensitive, effective and optimized method, based on ultra performance liquid chromatography (UPLC) coupled with ESI-triple quadrupole ion MS and ESI-linear ion trap high-resolution MS, has been developed for the simultaneous quantitative and qualitative determination of phenolics, nucleosides and amino acids in the roots of fresh Gastrodia elata. Optimization of the analytical method provided higher separation efficiency and better peak resolution for the targeted compounds. The simultaneous separation protocols were also optimized by routinely using accurate mass measurements, within 5 ppm error, for each molecular ion and the subsequent fragment ions. In total, 31 compounds, including 23 phenolics, two nucleosides, four amino acids, one gastrodin and one other compound were identified or tentatively characterized. Mono-substituted parishin glucoside (9), methoxy mono-substituted parishin (13), methyl parishin (26), p-hydroxybenzyl di-substituted parishin (29), and p-hydroxybenzyl parishin (31) were tentatively identified as new compounds. Principal metabolite content analysis and the composition of eight representative G. elata cultivars of various species indicated that geographic insulation was the main contributor to clustering.

  13. Synthesis of no carrier added F-18 16-fluorohexadecanoic acid (FHDA) and investigation of its labeled metabolites and its kinetics in the heart

    SciTech Connect

    DeGrado, T.R.; Bernstein, D.R.; Gatley, S.J.; Ng, C.K.; Holden, J.E.

    1984-01-01

    No carrier added FHDA was prepared via saponification of the product of silver oxide assisted reaction of near-anhydrous tetraethylammonium fluoride with methyl 16-iodohexadecanoate. The labeled fatty acid was injected into isolated perfused rat hearts. Coronary perfusate was collected for 4-9 minutes, when hearts were chilled and homogenized. F-18 in perfusate was analysed by HPLC (NH column; 50mM amm. acetate in 50% acetonitrile). Material with the same retention time as F-18 fluoroacetate (prepared by F-for-I exchange with ethyl iodoacetate) was found. Some F-18 stuck permanently to the column and was assigned as fluoride since the same fraction of label in perfusate was retained on alumina columns eluted with water. Anion exchange HPLC (SAX column; 20mM pot. phosphate, pH 7) of homogenates gave peaks corresponding to fluoroacetate plus fluoride and minor peaks which could be fluoroacetylCoA and fluorocitrate. The authors interpret their data as follows. Beta-oxidation of FHDA results in fluoroacetylCoA which either undergoes ''lethal synthesis'' to fluorocitrate or is hydrolysed to fluoroacetate which diffuses out of the heart. The source of the fluoride is not yet clear, but could complicate interpretation of FHDA kinetics measured in vivo with positron tomography. Clearance of label from FHDA in isolated perfused hearts was faster than for labeled 16-iodohexadecanoic acid, indicating that the F-18 tracer may be a more sensitive probe of myocardial fatty acid metabolism.

  14. Improved amino acid, bioenergetic metabolite and neurotransmitter profiles following human amnion epithelial cell transplant in intermediate maple syrup urine disease mice.

    PubMed

    Skvorak, Kristen J; Dorko, Kenneth; Marongiu, Fabio; Tahan, Veysel; Hansel, Marc C; Gramignoli, Roberto; Arning, Erland; Bottiglieri, Teodoro; Gibson, K Michael; Strom, Stephen C

    2013-06-01

    Orthotopic liver transplant (OLT) significantly improves patient outcomes in maple syrup urine disease (MSUD; OMIM: 248600), yet organ shortages point to the need for alternative therapies. Hepatocyte transplantation has shown both clinical and preclinical efficacy as an intervention for metabolic liver diseases, yet the availability of suitable livers for hepatocyte isolation is also limited. Conversely, human amnion epithelial cells (hAEC) may have utility as a hepatocyte substitute, and they share many of the characteristics of pluripotent embryonic stem cells while lacking their safety and ethical concerns. We reported that like hepatocytes, transplantation of hAEC significantly improved survival and lifespan, normalized body weight, and significantly improved branched-chain amino acid (BCAA) levels in sera and brain in a transgenic murine model of intermediate maple syrup urine disease (imsud). In the current report, we detail the neural and peripheral metabolic improvements associated with hAEC transplant in imsud mice, including amino acids associated with bioenergetics, the urea cycle, as well as the neurotransmitter systems for serotonin, dopamine, and gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA). This stem cell therapy results in significant global correction of the metabolic profile that characterizes the disease, both in the periphery and the central nervous system, the target organ for toxicity in iMSUD. The significant correction of the disease phenotype, coupled with the theoretical benefits of hAEC, particularly their lack of immunogenicity and tumorigenicity, suggests that human amnion epithelial cells deserve serious consideration for clinical application to treat metabolic liver diseases.

  15. Effect of dietary sugar concentration and sunflower seed supplementation on lactation performance, ruminal fermentation, milk fatty acid profile, and blood metabolites of dairy cows.

    PubMed

    Razzaghi, A; Valizadeh, R; Naserian, A A; Mesgaran, M Danesh; Carpenter, A J; Ghaffari, M H

    2016-05-01

    Previous research has shown that both sunflower seed (SF) and sucrose (SC) supplementation can result in variation in milk fat concentration and composition, possibly due to altered fermentation patterns and biohydrogenation of fatty acids in the rumen. The objective of this study was to determine the effects of different sugar concentrations with or without SF supplementation on lactation performance, ruminal fermentation, and milk fatty acid profile in lactating dairy cows. Eight multiparous Holstein dairy cows (body weight=620±15kg, 60±10 d in milk, mean ± standard deviation) were randomly assigned to treatments in a replicated 4×4 Latin square design with a 2×2 factorial arrangement of treatments. Each 21-d period consisted of a 14-d diet adaptation period and 7-d collection period. Dairy cows were fed 1 of the following 4 diets: (1) no additional SC without SF supplementation (NSC-SF), (2) no additional SC with SF supplementation (NSC+SF), (3) SC without SF supplementation (SC-SF), and (4) SC with SF supplementation (SC+SF). The diets contained the same amount of forages (corn silage and alfalfa hay). Four isonitrogenous and isoenergetic diets were formulated by replacing corn grain with SC and SF and balanced using change in proportions of canola meal and sugar beet pulp. No interaction was detected between SC and SF supplementation with respect to dry matter intake, milk yield, and composition. A tendency was found for an interaction between inclusion of SC and SF on energy-corrected milk with the highest amount in the SC-SF diet. Ruminal pH and the molar proportion of acetate were affected by SC inclusion, with an increase related to the SC-SF diet. Diets containing SF decreased the concentrations of short-chain fatty acids (4:0 to 10:0) and medium-chain fatty acids (12:0 to 16:0) in milk fat. The addition of SC tended to decrease the concentration of total trans-18:1. These data provide evidence that exchanging SC for corn at 4% of dietary dry matter

  16. Effect of dietary sugar concentration and sunflower seed supplementation on lactation performance, ruminal fermentation, milk fatty acid profile, and blood metabolites of dairy cows.

    PubMed

    Razzaghi, A; Valizadeh, R; Naserian, A A; Mesgaran, M Danesh; Carpenter, A J; Ghaffari, M H

    2016-05-01

    Previous research has shown that both sunflower seed (SF) and sucrose (SC) supplementation can result in variation in milk fat concentration and composition, possibly due to altered fermentation patterns and biohydrogenation of fatty acids in the rumen. The objective of this study was to determine the effects of different sugar concentrations with or without SF supplementation on lactation performance, ruminal fermentation, and milk fatty acid profile in lactating dairy cows. Eight multiparous Holstein dairy cows (body weight=620±15kg, 60±10 d in milk, mean ± standard deviation) were randomly assigned to treatments in a replicated 4×4 Latin square design with a 2×2 factorial arrangement of treatments. Each 21-d period consisted of a 14-d diet adaptation period and 7-d collection period. Dairy cows were fed 1 of the following 4 diets: (1) no additional SC without SF supplementation (NSC-SF), (2) no additional SC with SF supplementation (NSC+SF), (3) SC without SF supplementation (SC-SF), and (4) SC with SF supplementation (SC+SF). The diets contained the same amount of forages (corn silage and alfalfa hay). Four isonitrogenous and isoenergetic diets were formulated by replacing corn grain with SC and SF and balanced using change in proportions of canola meal and sugar beet pulp. No interaction was detected between SC and SF supplementation with respect to dry matter intake, milk yield, and composition. A tendency was found for an interaction between inclusion of SC and SF on energy-corrected milk with the highest amount in the SC-SF diet. Ruminal pH and the molar proportion of acetate were affected by SC inclusion, with an increase related to the SC-SF diet. Diets containing SF decreased the concentrations of short-chain fatty acids (4:0 to 10:0) and medium-chain fatty acids (12:0 to 16:0) in milk fat. The addition of SC tended to decrease the concentration of total trans-18:1. These data provide evidence that exchanging SC for corn at 4% of dietary dry matter

  17. Reduced folate and serum vitamin metabolites in patients with rectal carcinoma: an open-label feasibility study of pemetrexed with folic acid and vitamin B12 supplementation.

    PubMed

    Stoffregen, Clemens C; Odin, Elisabeth A; Carlsson, Göran U; Kurlberg, Göran K; Björkqvist, Hillevi G; Tångefjord, Maria T; Gustavsson, Bengt G

    2016-06-01

    The objectives of this single-center, open-label, phase II study were to evaluate (a) the feasibility and safety of neoadjuvant administration of pemetrexed with oral folic acid and vitamin B12 (FA/B12) in newly diagnosed patients with resectable rectal cancer and (b) intracellular and systemic vitamin metabolism. Patients were treated with three cycles of pemetrexed (500 mg/m, every 3 weeks) and FA/B12 before surgery. The reduced folates tetrahydrofolate, 5-methyltetrahydrofolate, and 5,10-methylenetetrahydrofolate were evaluated from biopsies in tumor tissue and in adjacent mucosa. Serum levels of homocysteine, cystathionine, and methylmalonic acid were also measured. All 37 patients received three cycles of pemetrexed; 89.2% completed their planned dosage within a 9-week feasibility time frame. Neither dose reductions nor study drug-related serious adverse events were reported. Reduced folate levels were significantly higher in tumor tissue compared with adjacent mucosa at baseline. After FA/B12 administration, tissue levels of reduced folates increased significantly and remained high during treatment in both tumor and mucosa until surgery. Serum levels of cystathionine increased significantly compared with baseline after FA/B12 administration, but then decreased, fluctuating cyclically during pemetrexed therapy. Homocysteine and methylmalonic acid levels decreased significantly after FA/B12 administration, and remained below baseline levels during the study. These results indicate that administration of three neoadjuvant cycles of single-agent pemetrexed, every 3 weeks, with FA/B12 in patients with resectable rectal cancer is feasible and tolerable. Tissue and serum vitamin metabolism results demonstrate the influence of pemetrexed and FA/B12 on vitamin metabolism and warrant further study. PMID:26825869

  18. Reduced folate and serum vitamin metabolites in patients with rectal carcinoma: an open-label feasibility study of pemetrexed with folic acid and vitamin B12 supplementation.

    PubMed

    Stoffregen, Clemens C; Odin, Elisabeth A; Carlsson, Göran U; Kurlberg, Göran K; Björkqvist, Hillevi G; Tångefjord, Maria T; Gustavsson, Bengt G

    2016-06-01

    The objectives of this single-center, open-label, phase II study were to evaluate (a) the feasibility and safety of neoadjuvant administration of pemetrexed with oral folic acid and vitamin B12 (FA/B12) in newly diagnosed patients with resectable rectal cancer and (b) intracellular and systemic vitamin metabolism. Patients were treated with three cycles of pemetrexed (500 mg/m, every 3 weeks) and FA/B12 before surgery. The reduced folates tetrahydrofolate, 5-methyltetrahydrofolate, and 5,10-methylenetetrahydrofolate were evaluated from biopsies in tumor tissue and in adjacent mucosa. Serum levels of homocysteine, cystathionine, and methylmalonic acid were also measured. All 37 patients received three cycles of pemetrexed; 89.2% completed their planned dosage within a 9-week feasibility time frame. Neither dose reductions nor study drug-related serious adverse events were reported. Reduced folate levels were significantly higher in tumor tissue compared with adjacent mucosa at baseline. After FA/B12 administration, tissue levels of reduced folates increased significantly and remained high during treatment in both tumor and mucosa until surgery. Serum levels of cystathionine increased significantly compared with baseline after FA/B12 administration, but then decreased, fluctuating cyclically during pemetrexed therapy. Homocysteine and methylmalonic acid levels decreased significantly after FA/B12 administration, and remained below baseline levels during the study. These results indicate that administration of three neoadjuvant cycles of single-agent pemetrexed, every 3 weeks, with FA/B12 in patients with resectable rectal cancer is feasible and tolerable. Tissue and serum vitamin metabolism results demonstrate the influence of pemetrexed and FA/B12 on vitamin metabolism and warrant further study.

  19. Probing the active site of MIO-dependent 2,3-aminomutases, key catalysts in the biosynthesis of beta-amino acids incorporated in secondary metabolites

    PubMed Central

    Bruner, Steven D.; Cooke, Heather

    2012-01-01

    The tyrosine aminomutase SgTAM produces (S)-β-tyrosine from l-tyrosine in the biosynthesis of the enediyne antitumor antibiotic C-1027. This conversion is promoted by the methylideneimidazole-5-one (MIO) prosthetic group. MIO was first identified in the homologous family of ammonia lyases, which deaminate aromatic amino acids to form α,β-unsaturated carboxylates. Studies of substrate specificity have been described for lyases but there have been no reports in altering the substrate specificity of aminomutases. Furthermore, it remains unclear as to what structural properties are responsible for catalyzing the presumed readdition of the amino group into the α,β-unsaturated intermediates to form β-amino acids. Attempts to elucidate specificity and mechanistic determinants of SgTAM have also proved to be difficult as it is recalcitrant to perturbations to the active site via mutagenesis. An X-ray co-crystal structure of the SgTAM mutant of the catalytic base with l-tyrosine verified important substrate binding residues as well as the enzymatic base. Further mutagenesis revealed that removal of these crucial interactions renders the enzyme inactive. Proposed structural determinants for mutase activity probed via mutagenesis, time-point assays and X-ray crystallography revealed a complicated role for these residues in maintaining key quaternary structure properties that aid in catalysis. PMID:20577998

  20. Probing the Active Site of MIO-dependent Aminomutases, Key Catalysts in the Biosynthesis of amino Acids Incorporated in Secondary Metabolites

    SciTech Connect

    Cooke, H.; Bruner, S

    2010-01-01

    The tyrosine aminomutase SgTAM produces (S)-{beta}-tyrosine from L-tyrosine in the biosynthesis of the enediyne antitumor antibiotic C-1027. This conversion is promoted by the methylideneimidazole-5-one (MIO) prosthetic group. MIO was first identified in the homologous family of ammonia lyases, which deaminate aromatic amino acids to form {alpha},{beta}-unsaturated carboxylates. Studies of substrate specificity have been described for lyases but there have been limited reports in altering the substrate specificity of aminomutases. Furthermore, it remains unclear as to what structural properties are responsible for catalyzing the presumed readdition of the amino group into the {alpha},{beta}-unsaturated intermediates to form {beta}-amino acids. Attempts to elucidate specificity and mechanistic determinants of SgTAM have also proved to be difficult as it is recalcitrant to perturbations to the active site via mutagenesis. An X-ray cocrystal structure of the SgTAM mutant of the catalytic base with L-tyrosine verified important substrate binding residues as well as the enzymatic base. Further mutagenesis revealed that removal of these crucial interactions renders the enzyme inactive. Proposed structural determinants for mutase activity probed via mutagenesis, time-point assays and X-ray crystallography revealed a complicated role for these residues in maintaining key quaternary structure properties that aid in catalysis.

  1. Experimental colitis in mice is attenuated by changes in the levels of endocannabinoid metabolites induced by selective inhibition of fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH)

    PubMed Central

    Sałaga, M; Mokrowiecka, A; Zakrzewski, P K; Cygankiewicz, A; Leishman, E; Sobczak, M; Zatorski, H; Małecka-Panas, E; Kordek, R; Storr, M; Krajewska, W M; Bradshaw, H B; Fichna, J

    2014-01-01

    Background and aims Pharmacological treatment and/or maintenance of remission in inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD) is currently one of the biggest challenge in the field of gastroenterology. Available therapies are mostly limited to overcoming the symptoms, but not the cause of the disease. Recently, the endocannabinoid system has been proposed as a novel target in the treatment of IBD. Here we aimed to assess the anti-inflammatory action of the novel fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH) inhibitor PF-3845 and its effect on the endocannabinoid and related lipid metabolism during the course of experimental colitis. Methods We used two models of experimental colitis in mice (TNBS- and DSS-induced) and additionally, we employed LC/MS/MS spectrometry to determine the changes in biolipid levels in the mouse colon during inflammation. Results We showed that the FAAH inhibitor PF-3845 reduced experimental TNBS-induced colitis in mice and its anti-inflammatory action is associated with altering the levels of selected biolipids (arachidonic and oleic acid derivatives, prostaglandins and biolipids containing glycine in the mouse colon). Conclusions We show that FAAH is a promising pharmacological target and the FAAH-dependent biolipids play a major role in colitis. Our results highlight and promote therapeutic strategy based on targeting FAAH-dependent metabolic pathways in order to alleviate intestinal inflammation. PMID:24530133

  2. INTRACELLULAR ANTIOXIDANT ACTIVITY OF A STREPTOMYCES SP. 8812 SECONDARY METABOLITE, 6,7-DIHYDROXY-3,4-DIHYDROISOQINO- LINE-3-CARBOXYLIC ACID, AND ITS SYNTHETIC DERIVATIVES.

    PubMed

    Guśpiel, Adam; Ziemska, Joanna; Cześcik, Agnieszka; Kawecki, Robert; Solecka, Jolanta

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the antioxidant properties of 6,7-dihydroxy-3,4-dihydroiso- quinoline-3-carboxylic acid (1) and its derivatives in living cells against reactive forms of oxygen and nitrogen, i.e., hydrogen peroxide and nitric oxide. Four of tested compounds scavenged the reactive form of nitrogen more efficiently or similarly to Trolox (EC50 = 55.80 µM). Two compounds exhibited antioxidant activity against reactive oxygen species better than Trolox (EC50 = 51.88 µM). The most active derivative of 1 was the compound containing an iodine atom at position 8 (6,7-dihydroxy-8-iodo-3,4-dihydroisoquinoline-3-carboxylic acid). Our studies showed that some of the derivatives had the ability to cross the cell membrane and scavenge free radicals inside living cells. Thus, they are able to protect DNA and other cellular structures from the dam- aging effects of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species. In addition, some molecular descriptors of the tested compounds were determined with the use of ICM Pro (Molsoft L.L.C.). PMID:27476282

  3. Human nails metabolite analysis: A rapid and simple method for quantification of uric acid in human fingernail by high-performance liquid chromatography with UV-detection.

    PubMed

    Li, Xi-Ling; Li, Gao; Jiang, Ying-Zi; Kang, Dongzhou; Jin, Cheng Hua; Shi, Qing; Jin, Toufeng; Inoue, Koichi; Todoroki, Kenichiro; Toyo'oka, Toshimasa; Min, Jun Zhe

    2015-10-01

    A rapid and simple analytical method for the quantification of uric acid (UA) in human fingernails by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) with ultraviolet (UV) detection is described. UA was extracted from human fingernail samples at 90°C for 20min, then separated on an Inertsil ODS-2 column (250×4.6mm I.D., 5.0μm, GL Sciences) by isocratic elution using methanol: 74mM phosphate buffer (pH 2.2) 2:98 (v/v). An UV detector was used to monitor at 284nm. The results indicated that under optimized measurement conditions results were achieved within 8.0min, and a good linearity was achieved from the calibration curves (r(2)>0.9999) in the range of 1.0-10000ng; the limit of detection (S/N=3) was 2.0pg, the inter-day and intra-day assay precisions were all less than 0.46% and the mean recoveries (%) of the uric acid spiked in the human fingernail were 101.95%. The amounts of UA in the fingernails of healthy volunteers were determined.

  4. TNT metabolites in animal tissues

    SciTech Connect

    Shugart, L.R.; Griest, W.H.; Tan, E.; Guzman, C.; Caton, J.E.; Ho, C.-H.; Tomkins, B.A.

    1991-06-01

    Analyses for TNT and nine potential metabolites (TNT-related compounds) were made in deer, rabbit, and quail tissues (muscle and liver) taken from the Alabama Army Ammunition Plant (AAAP), Childersburg, Alabama. The listed TNT-related compounds are 2,4,6- trinitrotoluene (parent compound); 2,4-diamino-6-nitrotoluene; 2,6-diamino-4-nitrotoluene; 2-amino-4,6-dinitrotoluene; 4-amino-2,6- dinitrotoluene; 2,4,6-trinitrobenzyl alcohol; 2,4,6-trinitrobenzoic acid; 1,3,5-trinitrobenzene; 4-hydroxylamino-2,6-dinitrotoluene; and 2,6,2',6'-tetranitro-4,4'-azoxytoluene. The procedure for extraction of these compounds from animal tissue required homogenization in acetonitrile, and subsequent partitioning into chloroform. Quantitative determination of extracted compounds was obtained by chromatographic separation on a mixed-mode HPLC column in which the phase bonded to the silica surface contained both a C18 (reversed-phase function) and a secondary amine (anion exchange function) incorporated into a single ligand. A ternary mobile phase gradient containing pH 5.1 phosphate buffer, methanol, and acetonitrile was used in separation. An experimental verification of the metabolism of TNT and the detection (or absence) of the selected metabolites was performed in mice subacutely dosed with 100 milligrams per kilogram of ({sup 14}C)-TNT. These studies show that the TNT-related compounds of concern do accumulate in muscle and liver tissue of the mouse under the experimental conditions imposed, but at concentrations below the 1.2 ppM level. However, products other than TNT and free metabolites may be accumulating since some ({sup 14}C) was found to be nonextractable. 13 refs., 5 figs., 6 tabs.

  5. Mexiletine metabolites: a review.

    PubMed

    Catalano, Alessia; Carocci, Alessia; Sinicropi, Maria Stefania

    2015-01-01

    Mexiletine belongs to class IB antiarrhythmic drugs and it is still considered a drug of choice for treating myotonias. However some patients do not respond to mexiletine or have significant side effects limiting its use; thus, alternatives to this drug should be envisaged. Mexiletine is extensive metabolized in humans via phase I and phase II reactions. Only a small fraction (about 10%) of the dose of mexiletine administered is recovered without modifications in urine. Although in the past decades Mex metabolites were reported to be devoid of biological activity, recent studies seem to deny this assertion. Actually, several hydroxylated metabolites showed pharmacological activity similar to that of Mex, thus contributing to its clinical profile. Purpose of this review is to summarize all the studies proposed till now about mexiletine metabolites, regarding structureactivity relationship studies as well as synthetic strategies. Biological and analytical studies will be also reported. PMID:25723511

  6. Secondary metabolites in fungus-plant interactions

    PubMed Central

    Pusztahelyi, Tünde; Holb, Imre J.; Pócsi, István

    2015-01-01

    Fungi and plants are rich sources of thousands of secondary metabolites. The genetically coded possibilities for secondary metabolite production, the stimuli of the production, and the special phytotoxins basically determine the microscopic fungi-host plant interactions and the pathogenic lifestyle of fungi. The review introduces plant secondary metabolites usually with antifungal effect as well as the importance of signaling molecules in induced systemic resistance and systemic acquired resistance processes. The review also concerns the mimicking of plant effector molecules like auxins, gibberellins and abscisic acid by fungal secondary metabolites that modulate plant growth or even can subvert the plant defense responses such as programmed cell death to gain nutrients for fungal growth and colonization. It also looks through the special secondary metabolite production and host selective toxins of some significant fungal pathogens and the plant response in form of phytoalexin production. New results coming from genome and transcriptional analyses in context of selected fungal pathogens and their hosts are also discussed. PMID:26300892

  7. Enteric Bacterial Metabolites Propionic and Butyric Acid Modulate Gene Expression, Including CREB-Dependent Catecholaminergic Neurotransmission, in PC12 Cells - Possible Relevance to Autism Spectrum Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Nankova, Bistra B.; Agarwal, Raj; MacFabe, Derrick F.; La Gamma, Edmund F.

    2014-01-01

    Alterations in gut microbiome composition have an emerging role in health and disease including brain function and behavior. Short chain fatty acids (SCFA) like propionic (PPA), and butyric acid (BA), which are present in diet and are fermentation products of many gastrointestinal bacteria, are showing increasing importance in host health, but also may be environmental contributors in neurodevelopmental disorders including autism spectrum disorders (ASD). Further to this we have shown SCFA administration to rodents over a variety of routes (intracerebroventricular, subcutaneous, intraperitoneal) or developmental time periods can elicit behavioral, electrophysiological, neuropathological and biochemical effects consistent with findings in ASD patients. SCFA are capable of altering host gene expression, partly due to their histone deacetylase inhibitor activity. We have previously shown BA can regulate tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) mRNA levels in a PC12 cell model. Since monoamine concentration is known to be elevated in the brain and blood of ASD patients and in many ASD animal models, we hypothesized that SCFA may directly influence brain monoaminergic pathways. When PC12 cells were transiently transfected with plasmids having a luciferase reporter gene under the control of the TH promoter, PPA was found to induce reporter gene activity over a wide concentration range. CREB transcription factor(s) was necessary for the transcriptional activation of TH gene by PPA. At lower concentrations PPA also caused accumulation of TH mRNA and protein, indicative of increased cell capacity to produce catecholamines. PPA and BA induced broad alterations in gene expression including neurotransmitter systems, neuronal cell adhesion molecules, inflammation, oxidative stress, lipid metabolism and mitochondrial function, all of which have been implicated in ASD. In conclusion, our data are consistent with a molecular mechanism through which gut related environmental signals such as

  8. Multiway partial least-squares coupled to residual trilinearization: a genuine multidimensional tool for the study of third-order data. Simultaneous analysis of procaine and its metabolite p-aminobenzoic acid in equine serum.

    PubMed

    Damiani, Patricia C; Durán-Merás, Isabel; García-Reiriz, Alejandro; Jiménez-Girón, Ana; de la Peña, Arsenio Muñoz; Olivieri, Alejandro C

    2007-09-15

    A new third-order multivariate calibration approach, based on the combination of multiway-partial least-squares with a separate procedure called residual trilinearization (N-PLS/RTL), is presented and applied to multicomponent analysis using third-order data. The proposed chemometric algorithm is able to predict analyte concentrations in the presence of unexpected sample components, which require strict adherence to the second-order advantage. Results for the determination of procaine and its metabolite p-aminobenzoic acid in equine serum are discussed, based on kinetic fluorescence excitation-emission four-way measurements and application of the newly developed multiway methodology. Since the analytes are also the reagent and product of the hydrolysis reaction followed by fast-scanning fluorescence spectroscopy, the classical approach based on parallel factor analysis is challenged by strong linear dependencies and multilinearity losses. In comparison, N-PLS/RTL appears an appealing genuine multiway alternative that avoids the latter complications, yielding analytical results that are statistically comparable to those rendered by related unfolded algorithms, which are also able to process four-way data. Prediction was made on validation samples with a qualitative composition similar to the calibration set and also on test samples containing unexpected equine serum components.

  9. Mineralization of the Common Groundwater Pollutant 2,6-Dichlorobenzamide (BAM) and its Metabolite 2,6-Dichlorobenzoic Acid (2,6-DCBA) in Sand Filter Units of Drinking Water Treatment Plants.

    PubMed

    Vandermaesen, Johanna; Horemans, Benjamin; Degryse, Julie; Boonen, Jos; Walravens, Eddy; Springael, Dirk

    2016-09-20

    The intrinsic capacity to mineralize the groundwater pollutant 2,6-dichlorobenzamide (BAM) and its metabolite 2,6-dichlorobenzoic acid (2,6-DCBA) was evaluated in samples from sand filters (SFs) of drinking water treatment plants (DWTPs). Whereas BAM mineralization occurred rarely and only in SFs exposed to BAM, 2,6-DCBA mineralization was common in SFs, including those treating uncontaminated water. Nevertheless, SFs treating BAM contaminated water showed the highest 2,6-DCBA mineralization rates. For comparison, 2,6-DCBA and BAM mineralization were determined in various topsoil samples. As in SF samples, BAM mineralization was rare, whereas 2,6-DCBA mineralization capacity appeared widespread, with high mineralization rates found especially in forest soils. Multivariate analysis showed that in both SF and soil samples, high 2,6-DCBA mineralization correlated with high organic carbon content. Adding a 2,6-DCBA degradation deficient mutant of the BAM mineralizing Aminobacter sp. MSH1 confirmed that 2,6-DCBA produced from BAM is rapidly mineralized by the endogenous microbial community in SFs showing intrinsic 2,6-DCBA mineralization. This study demonstrates that (i) 2,6-DCBA mineralization is widely established in SFs of DWTPs, allowing the mineralization of 2,6-DCBA produced during BAM degradation and (ii) the first metabolic step in BAM mineralization is rare in microbial communities, rather than its further degradation beyond 2,6-DCBA. PMID:27533590

  10. Effect of L- or DL-methionine Supplementation on Nitrogen Retention, Serum Amino Acid Concentrations and Blood Metabolites Profile in Starter Pigs

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Q. Y.; Zeng, Z. K.; Zhang, Y. X.; Long, S. F.; Piao, X. S.

    2016-01-01

    The objective of the current study was to evaluate the effect of supplementation of either L-methionine (L-Met) or DL-methionine (DL-Met) to diets of starter pigs on nitrogen (N) balance, metabolism, and serum amino acid profile. Eighteen crossbred (Duroc×Landrace×Yorkshire) barrows weighing 15.45±0.88 kg were randomly allotted to 1 of 3 diets with 6 pigs per treatment. The diets included a basal diet (Met-deficient diet) containing 0.24% standardized ileal digestibility Met with all other essential nutrients meeting the pig’s requirements. The other two diets were produced by supplementing the basal diet with 0.12% DL-Met or L-Met. The experiment lasted for 18 days, consisting of a 13-day adaptation period to the diets followed by a 5-day experimental period. Pigs were fed ad libitum and free access to water throughout the experiment. Results showed that the supplementation of either L-Met or DL-Met improved N retention, and serum methionine concentration, and decreased N excretion compared with basal diet (p<0.01). The N retention of pigs fed diets supplemented with the same inclusion levels of DL-Met or L-Met were not different (p>0.05). In conclusion, on equimolar basis DL-Met and L-Met are equally bioavailable as Met sources for starter pigs. PMID:26954214

  11. Gene expression and metabolite profiling of developing highbush blueberry fruit indicates transcriptional regulation of flavonoid metabolism and activation of abscisic acid metabolism.

    PubMed

    Zifkin, Michael; Jin, Alena; Ozga, Jocelyn A; Zaharia, L Irina; Schernthaner, Johann P; Gesell, Andreas; Abrams, Suzanne R; Kennedy, James A; Constabel, C Peter

    2012-01-01

    Highbush blueberry (Vaccinium corymbosum) fruits contain substantial quantities of flavonoids, which are implicated in a wide range of health benefits. Although the flavonoid constituents of ripe blueberries are known, the molecular genetics underlying their biosynthesis, localization, and changes that occur during development have not been investigated. Two expressed sequence tag libraries from ripening blueberry fruit were constructed as a resource for gene identification and quantitative real-time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction primer design. Gene expression profiling by quantitative real-time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction showed that flavonoid biosynthetic transcript abundance followed a tightly regulated biphasic pattern, and transcript profiles were consistent with the abundance of the three major classes of flavonoids. Proanthocyanidins (PAs) and corresponding biosynthetic transcripts encoding anthocyanidin reductase and leucoanthocyanidin reductase were most concentrated in young fruit and localized predominantly to the inner fruit tissue containing the seeds and placentae. Mean PA polymer length was seven to 8.5 subunits, linked predominantly via B-type linkages, and was relatively constant throughout development. Flavonol accumulation and localization patterns were similar to those of the PAs, and the B-ring hydroxylation pattern of both was correlated with flavonoid-3'-hydroxylase transcript abundance. By contrast, anthocyanins accumulated late in maturation, which coincided with a peak in flavonoid-3-O-glycosyltransferase and flavonoid-3'5'-hydroxylase transcripts. Transcripts of VcMYBPA1, which likely encodes an R2R3-MYB transcriptional regulator of PA synthesis, were prominent in both phases of development. Furthermore, the initiation of ripening was accompanied by a substantial rise in abscisic acid, a growth regulator that may be an important component of the ripening process and contribute to the regulation of

  12. 3-iodothyroacetic acid, a metabolite of thyroid hormone, induces itch and reduces threshold to noxious and to painful heat stimuli in mice

    PubMed Central

    Laurino, Annunziatina; De Siena, Gaetano; Resta, Francesco; Masi, Alessio; Musilli, Claudia; Zucchi, Riccardo; Raimondi, Laura

    2015-01-01

    Background and purpose Itch is associated with increased sensitization to nociceptive stimuli. We investigated whether 3-iodothyroacetic acid (TA1), by releasing histamine, induces itch and increases sensitization to noxious and painful heat stimuli. Experimental Approach Itch was evaluated after s.c. administration of TA1 (0.4, 1.32 and 4 μg·kg−1). Mice threshold to noxious (NHT) and to painful heat stimuli were evaluated by the increasing-temperature hot plate (from 45.5 to 49.5°C) or by the hot plate (51.5°C) test, respectively, 15 min after i.p. injection of TA1 (0.4, 1.32 and 4 μg·kg−1). Itch, NHT and pain threshold evaluation were repeated in mice pretreated with pyrilamine. Itch and NHT were also measured in HDC+/+ and HDC−/− following injection of saline or TA1 (1.32, 4 and 11 μg·kg−1; s.c. and i.p.). pERK1/2 levels were determined by Western blot in dorsal root ganglia (DRG) isolated from CD1 mice 15 min after they received (i.p.): saline, saline and noxious heat stimulus (46.5°C), TA1 (0.1, 0.4, 1.32, 4 μg·kg−1) or TA1 1.32 μg·kg−1 and noxious heat stimulus. Key Results TA1 0.4 and 1.32 μg·kg−1 induced itch and reduced NHT; pyrilamine pretreatment prevented both of these effects. TA1 4 μg·kg−1 (i.p.) reduced pain threshold without inducing itch or modifying NHT. In HDC−/− mice, TA1 failed to induce itch and to reduce NHT. In DRG, pERK1/2 levels were significantly increased by noxious heat stimuli and by TA1 0.1, 0.4 and 1.32 μg·kg−1; i.p. Conclusions and Implications Increased TA1 levels induce itch and an enhanced sensitivity to noxious heat stimuli suggesting that TA1 might represent a potential cause of itch in thyroid diseases. PMID:25439265

  13. Larvicidal activity of some secondary lichen metabolites against the mosquito Culiseta longiareolata Macquart (Diptera: Culicidae).

    PubMed

    Cetin, H; Tufan-Cetin, O; Turk, A O; Tay, T; Candan, M; Yanikoglu, A; Sumbul, H

    2012-01-01

    The larvicidal activity of some lichen metabolites, (+)-usnic acid, atranorin, 3-hydroxyphysodic acid and gyrophoric acid, against the second and third instar larvae of the mosquito Culiseta longiareolata were studied. All metabolites caused high larvicidal activities. When metabolites were compared on the basis of their LC(50) values, the order of increasing toxicity was as follows: gyrophoric acid (0.41 ppm) > (+)-usnic acid (0.48 ppm) > atranorin (0.52 ppm) > 3-hydroxyphysodic acid (0.97 ppm). However, when LC(90) values were compared, the order of toxicity was (+)-usnic acid (1.54 ppm) > gyrophoric acid (1.93 ppm) > 3-hydroxyphysodic acid (4.33 ppm) > atranorin (5.63 ppm). In conclusion, our results found that lichen secondary metabolites may have a promising role as potential larvicides.

  14. Larvicidal activity of some secondary lichen metabolites against the mosquito Culiseta longiareolata Macquart (Diptera: Culicidae).

    PubMed

    Cetin, H; Tufan-Cetin, O; Turk, A O; Tay, T; Candan, M; Yanikoglu, A; Sumbul, H

    2012-01-01

    The larvicidal activity of some lichen metabolites, (+)-usnic acid, atranorin, 3-hydroxyphysodic acid and gyrophoric acid, against the second and third instar larvae of the mosquito Culiseta longiareolata were studied. All metabolites caused high larvicidal activities. When metabolites were compared on the basis of their LC(50) values, the order of increasing toxicity was as follows: gyrophoric acid (0.41 ppm) > (+)-usnic acid (0.48 ppm) > atranorin (0.52 ppm) > 3-hydroxyphysodic acid (0.97 ppm). However, when LC(90) values were compared, the order of toxicity was (+)-usnic acid (1.54 ppm) > gyrophoric acid (1.93 ppm) > 3-hydroxyphysodic acid (4.33 ppm) > atranorin (5.63 ppm). In conclusion, our results found that lichen secondary metabolites may have a promising role as potential larvicides. PMID:21452097

  15. Cytotoxic Cytochalasins and Other Metabolites from Xylariaceae sp. FL0390, a Fungal Endophyte of Spanish Moss.

    PubMed

    Xu, Ya-Ming; Bashyal, Bharat P; Liu, Mangping X; Espinosa-Artiles, Patricia; U'Ren, Jana M; Arnold, A Elizabeth; Gunatilaka, A A Leslie

    2015-10-01

    Two new metabolites, 6-oxo-12-norcytochalasin D (1) and 4,5-di-isobutyl-2(1H)-pyrimidinone (2), together with seven known metabolites, cytochalasins D (3), Q (4), and N (5), 12-hydroxyzygosporin G (6), heptelidic acid chlorohydrin (7), (+)-heptelidic acid (8), and trichoderonic acid A (9), were isolated from Xylariaceae sp. FL0390, a fungal endophyte inhabiting Spanish moss, Tillandsia usneoides. Metabolite 1 is the first example of a 12-norcytochalasin. All metabolites, except 2 and 9, showed cytotoxic activity in a panel of five human tumor cell lines with IC50S of 0.2-5.0 μM. PMID:26669096

  16. Effect of extruded linseeds alone or in combination with fish oil on intake, milk production, plasma metabolite concentrations and milk fatty acid composition in lactating goats.

    PubMed

    Bernard, L; Leroux, C; Rouel, J; Delavaud, C; Shingfield, K J; Chilliard, Y

    2015-05-01

    Based on the potential benefits for long-term human health, there is interest in developing sustainable nutritional strategies for lowering medium-chain saturated fatty acids (FA) and increasing specific unsaturated FA in ruminant milk. Dietary supplements of extruded linseeds (EL), fish oil (FO) or a mixture of EL and FO increase cis-9,trans-11 CLA and long-chain n-3 polyunsaturated FA in bovine milk. Supplements of FO cause milk fat depression in lactating cows, but information for dairy goats is limited. A total of 14 Alpine goats were used in a replicated 3×3 Latin square with 28-days experimental periods to examine the effects of EL alone or in combination with FO on animal performance, milk fat synthesis and milk FA composition. Treatments comprised diets based on natural grassland hay supplemented with no additional oil (control), 530 of EL or 340 g/day of EL and 39 g/day of FO (ELFO). Compared with the control, ELFO tended (P=0.08) to lower milk fat yield, whereas EL increased (P<0.01) milk fat content and yield (15% and 10%, respectively). Relative to EL, ELFO decreased (P<0.01) milk fat content and yield (19% and 17%, respectively). Relative to the control and ELFO, EL decreased (P<0.05) milk 10:0 to 16:0 and odd- and branched-chain FA content and increased 18:0, cis-18:1, trans-13 18:1 (and their corresponding ∆-9 (desaturase products), trans-12,cis-14 CLA, cis-13,trans-15 CLA, cis-12,trans-14 CLA and trans-11,cis-13 CLA and 18:3n-3 concentrations. ELFO was more effective for enriching (P<0.05) milk cis-9, trans-11 CLA and trans-11 18:1 concentrations (up to 5.4- and 7.1-fold compared with the control) than EL (up to 1.7- and 2.5-fold increases). Furthermore, ELFO resulted in a substantial increase in milk trans-10 18:1 concentration (5.4% total FA), with considerable variation between individual animals. Relative to the control and EL, milk fat responses to ELFO were characterized by increases (P<0.05) in milk trans-16:1 (Δ9 to 11), trans-18:1 (Δ6

  17. Effect of extruded linseeds alone or in combination with fish oil on intake, milk production, plasma metabolite concentrations and milk fatty acid composition in lactating goats.

    PubMed

    Bernard, L; Leroux, C; Rouel, J; Delavaud, C; Shingfield, K J; Chilliard, Y

    2015-05-01

    Based on the potential benefits for long-term human health, there is interest in developing sustainable nutritional strategies for lowering medium-chain saturated fatty acids (FA) and increasing specific unsaturated FA in ruminant milk. Dietary supplements of extruded linseeds (EL), fish oil (FO) or a mixture of EL and FO increase cis-9,trans-11 CLA and long-chain n-3 polyunsaturated FA in bovine milk. Supplements of FO cause milk fat depression in lactating cows, but information for dairy goats is limited. A total of 14 Alpine goats were used in a replicated 3×3 Latin square with 28-days experimental periods to examine the effects of EL alone or in combination with FO on animal performance, milk fat synthesis and milk FA composition. Treatments comprised diets based on natural grassland hay supplemented with no additional oil (control), 530 of EL or 340 g/day of EL and 39 g/day of FO (ELFO). Compared with the control, ELFO tended (P=0.08) to lower milk fat yield, whereas EL increased (P<0.01) milk fat content and yield (15% and 10%, respectively). Relative to EL, ELFO decreased (P<0.01) milk fat content and yield (19% and 17%, respectively). Relative to the control and ELFO, EL decreased (P<0.05) milk 10:0 to 16:0 and odd- and branched-chain FA content and increased 18:0, cis-18:1, trans-13 18:1 (and their corresponding ∆-9 (desaturase products), trans-12,cis-14 CLA, cis-13,trans-15 CLA, cis-12,trans-14 CLA and trans-11,cis-13 CLA and 18:3n-3 concentrations. ELFO was more effective for enriching (P<0.05) milk cis-9, trans-11 CLA and trans-11 18:1 concentrations (up to 5.4- and 7.1-fold compared with the control) than EL (up to 1.7- and 2.5-fold increases). Furthermore, ELFO resulted in a substantial increase in milk trans-10 18:1 concentration (5.4% total FA), with considerable variation between individual animals. Relative to the control and EL, milk fat responses to ELFO were characterized by increases (P<0.05) in milk trans-16:1 (Δ9 to 11), trans-18:1 (Δ6

  18. Microalgal metabolites: a new perspective.

    PubMed

    Shimizu, Y

    1996-01-01

    Occurrence of secondary metabolites in microalgae (protoctista) is discussed with respect to the phylogenic or taxonomic relationships of organisms. Biosynthetic mechanisms of certain metabolites such as paralytic shellfish poisoning toxins and polyether toxins are also discussed, and genetic aspects of the secondary metabolite production as well.

  19. Microalgal metabolites: a new perspective.

    PubMed

    Shimizu, Y

    1996-01-01

    Occurrence of secondary metabolites in microalgae (protoctista) is discussed with respect to the phylogenic or taxonomic relationships of organisms. Biosynthetic mechanisms of certain metabolites such as paralytic shellfish poisoning toxins and polyether toxins are also discussed, and genetic aspects of the secondary metabolite production as well. PMID:8905087

  20. Three new metabolites from Botrytis cinerea.

    PubMed

    Wang, Tian-Shan; Zhou, Jin-Yan; Tan, Hong

    2008-01-01

    Three new metabolites, gamma-abscisolactone (1), botrytisic acids A (3) and B (4) were isolated from the fermentation broth of Botrytis cinerea TB-3-H8. Their structures were elucidated on the basis of MS, IR, UV, and NMR spectroscopic data. Compound 2 was isolated from natural resource for the first time. The structure of 1 was further confirmed by single-crystal X-ray diffraction (CCDC-265897).

  1. Three new metabolites from Botrytis cinerea.

    PubMed

    Wang, Tian-Shan; Zhou, Jin-Yan; Tan, Hong

    2008-01-01

    Three new metabolites, gamma-abscisolactone (1), botrytisic acids A (3) and B (4) were isolated from the fermentation broth of Botrytis cinerea TB-3-H8. Their structures were elucidated on the basis of MS, IR, UV, and NMR spectroscopic data. Compound 2 was isolated from natural resource for the first time. The structure of 1 was further confirmed by single-crystal X-ray diffraction (CCDC-265897). PMID:19003608

  2. Metabolite Damage and Metabolite Damage Control in Plants.

    PubMed

    Hanson, Andrew D; Henry, Christopher S; Fiehn, Oliver; de Crécy-Lagard, Valérie

    2016-04-29

    It is increasingly clear that (a) many metabolites undergo spontaneous or enzyme-catalyzed side reactions in vivo, (b) the damaged metabolites formed by these reactions can be harmful, and (c) organisms have biochemical systems that limit the buildup of damaged metabolites. These damage-control systems either return a damaged molecule to its pristine state (metabolite repair) or convert harmful molecules to harmless ones (damage preemption). Because all organisms share a core set of metabolites that suffer the same chemical and enzymatic damage reactions, certain damage-control systems are widely conserved across the kingdoms of life. Relatively few damage reactions and damage-control systems are well known. Uncovering new damage reactions and identifying the corresponding damaged metabolites, damage-control genes, and enzymes demands a coordinated mix of chemistry, metabolomics, cheminformatics, biochemistry, and comparative genomics. This review illustrates the above points using examples from plants, which are at least as prone to metabolite damage as other organisms. PMID:26667673

  3. Pyrazinone protease inhibitor metabolites from Photorhabdus luminescens.

    PubMed

    Park, Hyun Bong; Crawford, Jason M

    2016-08-01

    Photorhabdus luminescens is a bioluminescent entomopathogenic bacterium that undergoes phenotypic variation and lives in mutualistic association with nematodes of the family Heterorhabditidae. The pair infects and kills insects, and during their coordinated lifecycle, the bacteria produce an assortment of specialized metabolites to regulate its mutualistic and pathogenic roles. As part of our search for new specialized metabolites from the Photorhabdus genus, we examined organic extracts from P. luminescens grown in an amino-acid-rich medium based on the free amino-acid levels found in the circulatory fluid of its common insect prey, the Galleria mellonella larva. Reversed-phase HPLC/UV/MS-guided fractionation of the culture extracts led to the identification of two new pyrazinone metabolites, lumizinones A (1) and B (2), together with two N-acetyl dipeptides (3 and 4). The lumizinones were produced only in the phenotypic variant associated with nematode development and insect pathogenesis. Their chemical structures were elucidated by analysis of 1D and 2D NMR and high-resolution ESI-QTOF-MS spectral data. The absolute configurations of the amino acids in 3 and 4 were determined by Marfey's analysis. Compounds 1-4 were evaluated for their calpain protease inhibitory activity, and lumizinone A (1) showed inhibition with an IC50 (half-maximal inhibitory concentration) value of 3.9 μm. PMID:27353165

  4. Increased plasma serotonin metabolite 5-hydroxyindole acetic acid concentrations are associated with impaired systolic and late diastolic forward flows during cardiac cycle and elevated resistive index at popliteal artery and renal insufficiency in type 2 diabetic patients with microalbuminuria.

    PubMed

    Saito, Jun; Suzuki, Eiji; Tajima, Yoshitaka; Takami, Kazuhisa; Horikawa, Yukio; Takeda, Jun

    2016-01-01

    Although lower extremity arterial disease is frequently accompanied by diabetes mellitus, the association of circulating biomarkers with flow components during the cardiac cycle in lower-leg arteries has yet to be fully elucidated. We enrolled 165 type 2 diabetic patients with normal ankle-brachial index (ABI 1.0-1.4), comprising 106 normoalbuminuric and 59 microalbuminuric patients, and 40 age-matched nondiabetic subjects consecutively admitted to our hospital. Serum high sensitivity C-reactive protein (hsCRP) level and plasma von Willebrand factor ristocetin cofactor activity (VWF) and vasoconstrictor serotonin metabolite 5-hydroxyindole acetic acid (5-HIAA) concentrations were measured. An automatic device was used to measure ABI and brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity (baPWV). Flow components during the cardiac cycle, total flow volume, and resistive index at popliteal artery were evaluated using gated magnetic resonance imaging. Although estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR), early diastolic flow reversal, heart rate, and ABI were similar between the groups, diabetic patients had higher log hsCRP (p<0.001), VWF (p<0.001), 5-HIAA (p=0.002), resistive index (p<0.001) and baPWV (p<0.001) and lower systolic (p=0.026) and late diastolic (p<0.001) forward flows and total flow volume (p<0.001) than nondiabetic subjects. Multivariate analyses demonstrated that 5-HIAA in microalbuminuric patients showed higher associations with systolic and late diastolic forward flows during the cardiac cycle, total flow volume and resistive index at popliteal artery, and eGFR compared to normoalbuminuric patients. In microalbuminuric patients, 5-HIAA was a significant independent determinant among these factors. Thus, increased plasma 5-HIAA levels are involved in the pathogenesis of impaired blood flow in lower extremities and renal insufficiency in diabetic patients with microalbuminuria.

  5. Locomotor response to L-DOPA in reserpine-treated rats following central inhibition of aromatic L-amino acid decarboxylase: further evidence for non-dopaminergic actions of L-DOPA and its metabolites.

    PubMed

    Alachkar, Amal; Brotchie, Jonathan M; Jones, Owen T

    2010-09-01

    L-DOPA is the most widely used treatment for Parkinson's disease. The anti-parkinsonian and pro-dyskinetic actions of L-DOPA are widely attributed to its conversion, by the enzyme aromatic L-amino acid decarboxylase (AADC), to dopamine. We investigated the hypothesis that exogenous L-DOPA can induce behavioural effects without being converted to dopamine in the reserpine-treated rat-model of Parkinson's disease. A parkinsonian state was induced with reserpine (3 mg/kg s.c.). Eighteen hours later, the rats were administered L-DOPA plus the peripherally acting AADC inhibitor benserazide (25 mg/kg), with or without the centrally acting AADC inhibitor NSD1015 (100 mg/kg). L-DOPA/benserazide alone reversed reserpine-induced akinesia (4158+/-1125 activity counts/6 h, cf vehicle 1327+/-227). Addition of NSD1015 elicited hyperactive behaviour that was approximately 7-fold higher than L-DOPA/benserazide (35755+/-5226, P<0.001). The hyperactivity induced by L-DOPA and NSD1015 was reduced by the alpha(2C) antagonist rauwolscine (1 mg/kg) and the 5-HT(2C) agonist MK212 (5 mg/kg), but not by the D2 dopamine receptor antagonist remoxipride (3 mg/kg) or the D1 dopamine receptor antagonist SCH23390 (1 mg/kg). These data suggest that L-DOPA, or metabolites produced via routes not involving AADC, might be responsible for the generation of at least some L-DOPA actions in reserpine-treated rats. PMID:20542064

  6. Simultaneous quantification of fosinopril and its active metabolite fosinoprilat in rat plasma by UFLC-MS/MS: Application of formic acid in the stabilization of an ester-containing drug.

    PubMed

    Xue, Kewen; Li, Gao; Sun, Xiao; Hu, Yang; Hu, Lei; Huang, Jiangeng; Si, Luqin

    2015-05-15

    Fosinopril is an angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor containing a phosphate ester group which undergoes esterase hydrolysis to its active metabolite, fosinoprilat. EDTA was utilized as an anticoagulant to inhibit the hydrolysis of fosinopril in whole blood during blood collection and processing. To prevent the ex vivo conversion to fosinoprilat, formic acid was added to rat plasma to effectively stabilize fosinopril. A sensitive, rapid and robust ultra-fast liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (UFLC-MS/MS) method was developed and validated for simultaneous determination of fosinopril and fosinoprilat in rat plasma. Protein precipitation was employed for plasma sample clean-up. Chromatographic separation was achieved on a Welch Ultimate XB-C18 column using gradient elution with a total run time of 5min. Analytes and their stable isotope labeled internal standards were detected by positive ion electrospray tandem mass spectrometric assay. The assay involves quantitation of both analytes in small-volume (50μL) plasma, with the lower limit of quantification of 0.1 and 1ng/mL for fosinopril and fosinoprilat, respectively. The method was fully validated in linear calibration ranges of 0.1-150ng/mL for fosinopril and 1-1500ng/mL for fosinoprilat with acceptable accuracy and precision. Assay recoveries were high (>95% for fosinopril and >91% for fosinoprilat) and matrix effect was negligible. Both analytes were found to be stable in stabilized rat plasma for 6h at room temperature, 30 days at -80°C, and following three freeze-thaw cycles and were also stable in processed samples for 36h at 4°C. The validated method was successfully applied to sample analyses for pharmacokinetic study of fosinopril and can be extended to the measurement of fosinopril in other biological samples. PMID:25875586

  7. Direct determination of glyphosate and its major metabolite, aminomethylphosphonic acid, in fruits and vegetables by mixed-mode hydrophilic interaction/weak anion-exchange liquid chromatography coupled with electrospray tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ming-Xue; Cao, Zhao-Yun; Jiang, Yan; Zhu, Zhi-Wei

    2013-01-11

    A novel method was developed for the direct, sensitive, and rapid determination of glyphosate and its major metabolite, aminomethylphosphonic acid (AMPA), in fruit and vegetable samples by mixed-mode hydrophilic interaction/weak anion-exchange liquid chromatography (HILIC/WAX) coupled with electrospray tandem mass spectrometry (ESI-MS/MS). Homogenized samples were extracted with water, without derivatization or further clean-up, and the extracts were injected directly onto the Asahipak NH2P-50 4E column (250 mm × 4.6 mm i.d., 5 μm). The best results were obtained when the column was operated under mixed-mode HILIC/WAX elution conditions. An initial 10-min washing step with acetonitrile/water (10:90, v/v) in HILIC mode was used to remove potentially interfering compounds, and then the analytes were eluted in WAX mode with acetonitrile and water containing 0.1 molL(-1) ammonium hydroxide under gradient elution for the ESI analysis in negative ion mode. Limits of quantification of glyphosate and AMPA were 5 μgkg(-1) and 50 μgkg(-1), respectively, with limits of detection as low as 1.2 μgkg(-1) for glyphosate and 15 μgkg(-1) for AMPA. The linearity was satisfactory, with correlation coefficients (r)>0.9966. Recovery studies were carried out on spiked matrices (6 vegetables, 3 fruits) with glyphosate at four concentrations and AMPA at three concentrations. The mean recoveries for glyphosate and AMPA were 75.3-110% and 76.1-110%, respectively, with relative standard deviations in the range of 1.1-13.8%. The intra-day precision (n=7) for glyphosate and AMPA in vegetable and fruit samples spiked at an intermediate level between 5.9% and 7.5%, and the inter-day precision over 11 days (n=11) was between 7.0% and 13%.

  8. Mutagenicity of dimethylated metabolites of inorganic arsenics.

    PubMed

    Yamanaka, K; Ohba, H; Hasegawa, A; Sawamura, R; Okada, S

    1989-10-01

    The genotoxic effects of dimethylarsinic acid (DMAA), one of the main metabolites of inorganic arsenics in mammals, and its further metabolites were investigated using Escherichia coli B tester strains. When H/r30R (wild-type; Exc+Rec+) and Hs30R (uvrA-; Exc-Rec+) cells were incubated with DMAA for 3 h in liquid NB medium, many more revertants appeared in sealed tubes than in the control, but this was not the case in unsealed tubes, suggesting that volatile metabolites of DMAA caused the mutagenesis. By gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS), dimethylarsine and trimethylarsine, known to be volatile metabolites in microorganisms, were detected in the gas phase of DMAA-added tester strain cell suspensions in sealed tubes. Among these arsines, dimethylarsine was mutagenic in WP2 (wild-type; Exc+Rec+) and WP2uvrA (uvrA-; Exc-Rec+), while trimethylarsine was not. The mutagenesis induced by dimethylarsine required oxygen gas in the assay system; the number of revertants markedly increased in an oxygen-replaced system and diminished in a nitrogen-replaced one. These results suggest that the reaction product(s) between dimethylarsine and molecular oxygen is responsible for the mutagenesis. The significance of this mutagenesis in the genetoxic action of inorganic arsenics is discussed.

  9. Growth promoting effects of some lichen metabolites on probiotic bacteria.

    PubMed

    Gaikwad, Subhash; Verma, Neeraj; Sharma, B O; Behera, B C

    2014-10-01

    In the present study, the extract of four natural lichen species Canoparmelia eruptens, Everniastrum cirrhatum, Parmotrema austrosinense and Rimelia cetrata were studied for the source of natural antioxidant and their purified secondary metabolites were evaluated for growth promoting effects on probiotic bacteria Lactobacillus casei. The methanolic fraction of lichen species showed moderate to high antioxidant activity in the order P. austrosinense > E. cirrhatum > C. eruptens > R. cetrata. The lichen metabolites showed antioxidant activity with an IC50 values (μg/ml); lecanoric acid 79-95, salazinic 88-108, atranorin 100-116 and consalazinic acid 119-125. As far as the growth promoting effects of lichen metabolites on L. casei is concerned, lecanoric acid at 100 μg/ml conc. showed high growth stimulating activity in terms of increased dry matter of biomass (56.08 mg) of L. casei. Other lichen metabolites; salazinic acid, atranorin and consalazinic acid produced relatively less dry biomass 43.98 mg, 41.1 mg, 40.68 mg, respectively. However, standard antioxidants butylated hydroxyanisole (BHA), butylated hydroxytoluene (BHT) and Trolox after 36 h produced 39.04-47.81 mg dry biomass. At lower pH the growth promoting activity of lichen metabolites was found stable. PMID:25328204

  10. Modulation of antimicrobial metabolites production by the fungus Aspergillus parasiticus

    PubMed Central

    Bracarense, Adriana A.P.; Takahashi, Jacqueline A.

    2014-01-01

    Biosynthesis of active secondary metabolites by fungi occurs as a specific response to the different growing environments. Changes in this environment alter the chemical and biological profiles leading to metabolites diversification and consequently to novel pharmacological applications. In this work, it was studied the influence of three parameters (fermentation length, medium composition and aeration) in the biosyntheses of antimicrobial metabolites by the fungus Aspergillus parasiticus in 10 distinct fermentation periods. Metabolism modulation in two culturing media, CYA and YES was evaluated by a 22 full factorial planning (ANOVA) and on a 23 factorial planning, role of aeration, medium composition and carbohydrate concentration were also evaluated. In overall, 120 different extracts were prepared, their HPLC profiles were obtained and the antimicrobial activity against A. flavus, C. albicans, E. coli and S. aureus of all extracts was evaluated by microdilution bioassay. Yield of kojic acid, a fine chemical produced by the fungus A. parasiticus was determined in all extracts. Statistical analyses pointed thirteen conditions able to modulate the production of bioactive metabolites by A. parasiticus. Effect of carbon source in metabolites diversification was significant as shown by the changes in the HPLC profiles of the extracts. Most of the extracts presented inhibition rates higher than that of kojic acid as for the extract obtained after 6 days of fermentation in YES medium under stirring. Kojic acid was not the only metabolite responsible for the activity since some highly active extracts showed to possess low amounts of this compound, as determined by HPLC. PMID:24948950

  11. Intracellular Metabolite Pool Changes in Response to Nutrient Depletion Induced Metabolic Switching in Streptomyces coelicolor.

    PubMed

    Wentzel, Alexander; Sletta, Havard; Ellingsen, Trond E; Bruheim, Per

    2012-02-17

    A metabolite profiling study of the antibiotic producing bacterium Streptomyces coelicolor A3(2) has been performed. The aim of this study was to monitor intracellular metabolite pool changes occurring as strains of S. coelicolor react to nutrient depletion with metabolic re-modeling, so-called metabolic switching, and transition from growth to secondary metabolite production phase. Two different culture media were applied, providing depletion of the key nutrients phosphate and L-glutamate, respectively, as the triggers for metabolic switching. Targeted GC-MS and LC-MS methods were employed to quantify important primary metabolite groups like amino acids, organic acids, sugar phosphates and other phosphorylated metabolites, and nucleotides in time-course samples withdrawn from fully-controlled batch fermentations. A general decline, starting already in the early growth phase, was observed for nucleotide pools and phosphorylated metabolite pools for both the phosphate and glutamate limited cultures. The change in amino acid and organic acid pools were more scattered, especially in the phosphate limited situation while a general decrease in amino acid and non-amino organic acid pools was observed in the L-glutamate limited situation. A phoP deletion mutant showed basically the same metabolite pool changes as the wild-type strain M145 when cultivated on phosphate limited medium. This implies that the inactivation of the phoP gene has only little effect on the detected metabolite levels in the cell. The energy charge was found to be relatively constant during growth, transition and secondary metabolite production phase. The results of this study and the employed targeted metabolite profiling methodology are directly relevant for the evaluation of precursor metabolite and energy supply for both natural and heterologous production of secondary metabolites in S. coelicolor.

  12. Intracellular Metabolite Pool Changes in Response to Nutrient Depletion Induced Metabolic Switching in Streptomyces coelicolor

    PubMed Central

    Wentzel, Alexander; Sletta, Havard; Consortium, Stream; Ellingsen, Trond E.; Bruheim, Per

    2012-01-01

    A metabolite profiling study of the antibiotic producing bacterium Streptomyces coelicolor A3(2) has been performed. The aim of this study was to monitor intracellular metabolite pool changes occurring as strains of S. coelicolor react to nutrient depletion with metabolic re-modeling, so-called metabolic switching, and transition from growth to secondary metabolite production phase. Two different culture media were applied, providing depletion of the key nutrients phosphate and L-glutamate, respectively, as the triggers for metabolic switching. Targeted GC-MS and LC-MS methods were employed to quantify important primary metabolite groups like amino acids, organic acids, sugar phosphates and other phosphorylated metabolites, and nucleotides in time-course samples withdrawn from fully-controlled batch fermentations. A general decline, starting already in the early growth phase, was observed for nucleotide pools and phosphorylated metabolite pools for both the phosphate and glutamate limited cultures. The change in amino acid and organic acid pools were more scattered, especially in the phosphate limited situation while a general decrease in amino acid and non-amino organic acid pools was observed in the L-glutamate limited situation. A phoP deletion mutant showed basically the same metabolite pool changes as the wild-type strain M145 when cultivated on phosphate limited medium. This implies that the inactivation of the phoP gene has only little effect on the detected metabolite levels in the cell. The energy charge was found to be relatively constant during growth, transition and secondary metabolite production phase. The results of this study and the employed targeted metabolite profiling methodology are directly relevant for the evaluation of precursor metabolite and energy supply for both natural and heterologous production of secondary metabolites in S. coelicolor. PMID:24957373

  13. Cerebral metabolic and circulatory effects of 1,1,1-trichloroethane, a neurotoxic industrial solvent. 2. Tissue concentrations of labile phosphates, glycolytic metabolites, citric acid cycle intermediates, amino acids, and cyclic nucleotides.

    PubMed

    Folbergrová, J; Hougaard, K; Westerberg, E; Siesjö, B K

    1984-01-01

    In order to obtain information on the mechanisms of neurotoxicity of 1,1,1-trichloroethane, rats maintained artificially ventilated on N2O:O2 (70:30) were exposed to a concentration of 1,1,1-trichloroethane of 8000 ppm, 43.7 mg L-1, that induces moderate ataxia in awake, spontaneously breathing animals. After 5 and 60 min of exposure, as well as after a 60-min recovery period following 60 min of exposure, the brain was frozen in situ and cortical tissue was assayed for phosphocreatine (PCr), + ATP, ADP, AMP, glycogen, glucose, pyruvate, lactate, citric acid cycle intermediates, associated amino acids, and cyclic nucleotides; in addition, purine nucleotides, nucleosides, and bases were assayed by HPLC techniques. Exposure of animals to 1,1,1-trichloroethane failed to alter blood glucose, lactate, and pyruvate concentrations. However, the solvent induced highly significant increases in tissue lactate and pyruvate concentrations that were also reflected in cisternal CSF. Associated with these changes were increases in all citric acid cycle intermediates except succinate, an increase in alanine concentration, and a rise in the glutamate/aspartate ratio. After 5 min, a small decrease in glycogen concentration also occurred. All these changes were reversed when the exposure was terminated. No changes were observed in tissue concentrations of purine nucleotides, nucleosides, and bases except for a small reduction of ATP concentration after 60 min of exposure, still noticeable after 60 min of recovery. Apart from a small reduction in cAMP concentration after 5 min of exposure, cyclic nucleotide concentrations did not change.

  14. Reevaluating the hype: four bacterial metabolites under scrutiny

    PubMed Central

    Mayerhofer, R.; Holzer, P.

    2015-01-01

    With microbiome research being a fiercely contested playground in science, new data are being published at tremendous pace. The review at hand serves to critically revise four microbial metabolites widely applied in research: butyric acid, flagellin, lipoteichoic acid, and propionic acid. All four metabolites are physiologically present in healthy humans. Nevertheless, all four are likewise involved in pathologies ranging from cancer to mental retardation. Their inflammatory potential is equally friend and foe. The authors systematically analyze positive and negative attributes of the aforementioned substances, indicating chances and dangers with the use of pre- and probiotic therapeutics. Furthermore, the widespread actions of microbial metabolites on distinct organs and diseases are reconciled. Moreover, the review serves as critical discourse on scientific methods commonly employed in microbiome research and comparability as well as reproducibility issues arising thereof. PMID:25883790

  15. Exploring antagonistic metabolites of established biocontrol agent of marine origin.

    PubMed

    Rane, Makarand Ramesh; Sarode, Prashant Diwakar; Chaudhari, Bhushan Liladhar; Chincholkar, Sudhir Bhaskarrao

    2008-12-01

    Biocontrol ability of Pseudomonas aeruginosa ID 4365, a biocontrol agent of groundnut phytopathogens from marine origin, was previously attributed to the production of pyoverdin type of siderophores. However, pyoverdin-rich supernatants of this organism showed better antifungal activity compared to equivalent amount of purified pyoverdin indicating presence of undetected metabolite(s) in pyoverdin rich supernatants. On the basis of observation that antagonistic activity was iron-dependent and iron-independent, an attempt was made to detect the presence of additional metabolites. In addition to pyoverdin, strain produced additional siderophores, viz. pyochelin and salicylic acid. Two broad spectrum antifungal compounds, viz. pyocyanin and phenazine-1-carboxylic acid, were detected, characterized, and activity against phytopathogens was demonstrated. Iron- and phosphate-dependent co-production of siderophores and phenazines was confirmed. Strain showed additional features like production of hydrogen cyanide, indol-3-acetic acid, and phosphate solubilization. PMID:18626581

  16. Systematic Identification of Protein-Metabolite Interactions in Complex Metabolite Mixtures by Ligand-Detected Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Nikolaev, Yaroslav V; Kochanowski, Karl; Link, Hannes; Sauer, Uwe; Allain, Frederic H-T

    2016-05-10

    Protein-metabolite interactions play a vital role in the regulation of numerous cellular processes. Consequently, identifying such interactions is a key prerequisite for understanding cellular regulation. However, the noncovalent nature of the binding between proteins and metabolites has so far hampered the development of methods for systematically mapping protein-metabolite interactions. The few available, largely mass spectrometry-based, approaches are restricted to specific metabolite classes, such as lipids. In this study, we address this issue and show the potential of ligand-detected nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy, which is routinely used in drug development, to systematically identify protein-metabolite interactions. As a proof of concept, we selected four well-characterized bacterial and mammalian proteins (AroG, Eno, PfkA, and bovine serum albumin) and identified metabolite binders in complex mixes of up to 33 metabolites. Ligand-detected NMR captured all of the reported protein-metabolite interactions, spanning a full range of physiologically relevant Kd values (low micromolar to low millimolar). We also detected a number of novel interactions, such as promiscuous binding of the negatively charged metabolites citrate, AMP, and ATP, as well as binding of aromatic amino acids to AroG protein. Using in vitro enzyme activity assays, we assessed the functional relevance of these novel interactions in the case of AroG and show that l-tryptophan, l-tyrosine, and l-histidine act as novel inhibitors of AroG activity. Thus, we conclude that ligand-detected NMR is suitable for the systematic identification of functionally relevant protein-metabolite interactions.

  17. Multiple tyrosine metabolites are GPR35 agonists

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Huayun; Hu, Haibei; Fang, Ye

    2012-01-01

    Both kynurenic acid and 2-acyl lysophosphatidic acid have been postulated to be the endogenous agonists of GPR35. However, controversy remains whether alternative endogenous agonists exist. The molecular targets accounted for many nongenomic actions of thyroid hormones are mostly unknown. Here we report the agonist activity of multiple tyrosine metabolites at the GPR35. Tyrosine metabolism intermediates that contain carboxylic acid and/or catechol functional groups were first selected. Whole cell dynamic mass redistribution (DMR) assays enabled by label-free optical biosensor were then used to characterize their agonist activity in native HT-29. Molecular assays including β-arrestin translocation, ERK phosphorylation and receptor internalization confirmed that GPR35 functions as a receptor for 5,6-dihydroxyindole-2-carboxylic acid, 3,3′,5′-triiodothyronine, 3,3′,5-triiodothyronine, gentisate, rosmarinate, and 3-nitrotyrosine. These results suggest that multiple tyrosine metabolites are alternative endogenous ligands of GPR35, and GPR35 may represent a druggable target for treating certain diseases associated with abnormality of tyrosine metabolism. PMID:22523636

  18. In vitro cytotoxicity of BTEX metabolites in HeLa cells.

    PubMed

    Shen, Y

    1998-04-01

    Fuel leakage from underground storage tanks is a major source of groundwater contamination. Although the toxicity of regulated compounds such as benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, and xylene (BTEX) are well recognized, the cytotoxicity of their metabolites has not been studied extensively. In this study, Hela cells, propagated at 37 degrees C in an atmosphere of 5% CO2-95% air, served as a target for evaluation of cytotoxicity of BTEX metabolites 3-methylcatechol, 4-methylcatechol, 4-hydroxybenzoic acid, and 4-hydroxy-3-methoxybenzoic acid. The cells were exposed to different concentrations of the metabolites, which subsequently showed inhibition of cell growth and produced dose-related decreases in cell viability and cell protein content. The BTEX metabolites affected the levels of the polyamines spermidine, spermine, and putrescine, which are known to be important in cell proliferation. The cytotoxic effects for these BTEX metabolites to Hela cells were 3-methylcatechol > 4-methylcatechol > 4-hydroxy-3-methoxybenzoic acid > 4-hydroxybenzoic acid.

  19. Metabolic regulation and overproduction of primary metabolites

    PubMed Central

    Sanchez, Sergio; Demain, Arnold L.

    2008-01-01

    Summary Overproduction of microbial metabolites is related to developmental phases of microorganisms. Inducers, effectors, inhibitors and various signal molecules play a role in different types of overproduction. Biosynthesis of enzymes catalysing metabolic reactions in microbial cells is controlled by well‐known positive and negative mechanisms, e.g. induction, nutritional regulation (carbon or nitrogen source regulation), feedback regulation, etc. The microbial production of primary metabolites contributes significantly to the quality of life. Fermentative production of these compounds is still an important goal of modern biotechnology. Through fermentation, microorganisms growing on inexpensive carbon and nitrogen sources produce valuable products such as amino acids, nucleotides, organic acids and vitamins which can be added to food to enhance its flavour, or increase its nutritive values. The contribution of microorganisms goes well beyond the food and health industries with the renewed interest in solvent fermentations. Microorganisms have the potential to provide many petroleum‐derived products as well as the ethanol necessary for liquid fuel. Additional applications of primary metabolites lie in their impact as precursors of many pharmaceutical compounds. The roles of primary metabolites and the microbes which produce them will certainly increase in importance as time goes on. In the early years of fermentation processes, development of producing strains initially depended on classical strain breeding involving repeated random mutations, each followed by screening or selection. More recently, methods of molecular genetics have been used for the overproduction of primary metabolic products. The development of modern tools of molecular biology enabled more rational approaches for strain improvement. Techniques of transcriptome, proteome and metabolome analysis, as well as metabolic flux analysis. have recently been introduced in order to identify new and

  20. The metabolite profiling of coastal coccolithophorid species Pleurochrysis carterae (Haptophyta)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Chengxu; Luo, Jie; Ye, Yangfang; Yan, Xiaojun; Liu, Baoning; Wen, Xin

    2016-07-01

    Pleurochrysis carterae is a calcified coccolithophorid species that usually blooms in the coastal area and causes aquaculture losses. The cellular calcification, blooming and many other critical species specific eco-physiological processes are closely related to various metabolic pathways. The purpose of this study is to apply the unbiased and non-destructive method of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) to detect the unknown holistic metabolite of P. carterae. The results show that NMR spectroscopic method is practical in the analysis of metabolites of phytoplankton. The metabolome of P. carterae was dominated by 26 metabolites involved in a number of different primary and secondary metabolic pathways. Organic acids and their derivatives, amino acids, sugars, nucleic aides were mainly detected. The abundant metabolites are that closely related to the process of cellular osmotic adjustment, which possibly reflect the active ability of P. carterae to adapt to the versatile coastal niche. DMSP (dimethylsulphoniopropionate) was the most dominant metabolite in P. carterae, up to 2.065±0.278 mg/g lyophilized cells, followed by glutamate and lactose, the contents were 0.349±0.035 and 0.301±0.073 mg/g lyophilized cells respectively. Other metabolites that had the content ranged between 0.1-0.2 mg/g lyophilized cells were alanine, isethionate and arabinose. Amino acid (valine, phenylalanine, isoleucine, tyrosine), organic acid salts (lactate, succinate), scyllitol and uracil had content ranged from 0.01 to below 0.1 mg/g lyophilized cells. Trigonelline, fumarate and formate were detected in very low content (only thousandths of 1 mg per gram of lyophilized cells or below). Our results of the holistic metabolites of P. carterae are the basic references for the further studies when multiple problems will be addressed to this notorious blooming calcifying species.

  1. Secondary Metabolites from Higher Fungi: Discovery, Bioactivity, and Bioproduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhong, Jian-Jiang; Xiao, Jian-Hui

    Medicinal higher fungi such as Cordyceps sinensis and Ganoderma lucidum have been used as an alternative medicine remedy to promote health and longevity for people in China and other regions of the world since ancient times. Nowadays there is an increasing public interest in the secondary metabolites of those higher fungi for discovering new drugs or lead compounds. Current research in drug discovery from medicinal higher fungi involves a multifaceted approach combining mycological, biochemical, pharmacological, metabolic, biosynthetic and molecular techniques. In recent years, many new secondary metabolites from higher fungi have been isolated and are more likely to provide lead compounds for new drug discovery, which may include chemopreventive agents possessing the bioactivity of immunomodulatory, anticancer, etc. However, numerous challenges of secondary metabolites from higher fungi are encountered including bioseparation, identification, biosynthetic metabolism, and screening model issues, etc. Commercial production of secondary metabolites from medicinal mushrooms is still limited mainly due to less information about secondary metabolism and its regulation. Strategies for enhancing secondary metabolite production by medicinal mushroom fermentation include two-stage cultivation combining liquid fermentation and static culture, two-stage dissolved oxygen control, etc. Purification of bioactive secondary metabolites, such as ganoderic acids from G. lucidum, is also very important to pharmacological study and future pharmaceutical application. This review outlines typical examples of the discovery, bioactivity, and bioproduction of secondary metabolites of higher fungi origin.

  2. Derivation of a human equivalent concentration for n-butanol using a physiologically based pharmacokinetic model for n-butyl acetate and metabolites n-butanol and n-butyric acid

    SciTech Connect

    Teeguarden, Justin G.; Deisinger, P. J.; Poet, Torka S.; English, J C.; Faber, W D.; Barton, H. A.; Corley, Rick A.; Clewell, III, H. J.

    2005-05-01

    The metabolic series (family) approach for risk assessment uses a dosimetry-based analysis to develop toxicity information for a group of metabolically linked compounds using pharmacokinetic (PK) data for each compound and toxicity data for the parent compound. An initial physiologically-based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model was developed to support the implementation of the metabolic series approach for n-butyl acetate and its subsequent metabolites, n-butanol, and n-butyric acid (the butyl series) (Barton et al. 2000). In conjunction with pilot pharmacokinetic studies, the model was used to design the definitive intravenous (i.v.) PK studies. Rats were implanted with dual indwelling cannulae and administered test compounds by i.v. bolus dose, i.v. infusion, or by inhalation in a recirculating closed chamber. Hepatic, vascular and extravascular metabolic constants for metabolism were estimated by fitting the model to the blood time course data from these experiments. The respiratory bioavailability of n-butyl acetate and n-butanol was estimated from closed chamber inhalation studies and measured ventilation rates. The resulting butyl series PBPK model successfully reproduces the blood time course of these compounds following i.v. administration, and inhalation exposure to n-butyl acetate and n-butanol. A fully scaled human version of the model successfully reproduces arterial blood n-butanol kinetics following inhalation exposure to n-butanol. These validated i.v (rat) and inhalation route models (rat, butyl acetate, n-butanol; human, butanol only) can be used to support species and dose-route extrapolations required for risk assessment of butyl series family of compounds. Further, this work demonstrates the usefulness of i.v. kinetic data for parameterization of systemic metabolism and the value of collaboration between experimentalists and kineticists in the development of PBPK models. The product of this effort, validated rat and human PBPK models for the butyl

  3. Duration of time that beef cattle are fed a high-grain diet affects the recovery from a bout of ruminal acidosis: short-chain fatty acid and lactate absorption, saliva production, and blood metabolites.

    PubMed

    Schwaiger, T; Beauchemin, K A; Penner, G B

    2013-12-01

    This study was conducted to determine if the duration of time that beef cattle are fed a high-grain diet affects short-chain fatty acid (SCFA) absorption, saliva production, and blood metabolites before, during, and following an induced bout of ruminal acidosis. Sixteen Angus heifers were assigned to 1 of 4 blocks and within block to 1 of 2 treatments designated as long adapted (LA) or short adapted (SA). Long adapted and SA heifers were fed a backgrounding diet [forage:concentrate (F:C) = 60:40] for 33 and 7 d, respectively, and then transitioned over 20 d to a high-grain diet (F:C = 9:91) with the timing of dietary transition staggered such that the LA and SA heifers were fed the high-grain diet for 34 and 8 d, respectively, before inducing ruminal acidosis. Ruminal acidosis was induced by restricting feed to 50% of DMI:BW for 24 h followed by an intraruminal infusion of ground barley at 10% DMI:BW. Heifers were then given their regular diet allocation 1 h after the intraruminal infusion. Data were collected during an 8 d baseline period (BASE), on the day of the acidosis challenge (CHAL), and during 2 consecutive 8 d recovery periods (REC1 and REC2). When pooled across periods, the fractional rates of propionate (42 vs. 34%/h; P = 0.045) and butyrate (45 vs. 36%/h; P = 0.019) absorption, measured using the isolated and washed reticulorumen technique, were greater for LA than SA heifers. Moreover, overall, LA heifers tended to have greater absolute rates of butyrate absorption (94 vs. 79 mmol/h; P = 0.087) and fractional rates of total SCFA absorption (37 vs. 32%/h; P = 0.100). Treatment × period interactions for lactate absorption (P = 0.024) and serum D-lactate concentration (P = 0.003) were detected with LA heifers having greater D-lactate concentrations during CHAL and greater fractional rates of lactate absorption during REC1 than SA. The absolute and fractional absorption of acetate, propionate, and butyrate increased between REC1 and REC2, with

  4. Fermented functional foods based on probiotics and their biogenic metabolites.

    PubMed

    Stanton, Catherine; Ross, R Paul; Fitzgerald, Gerald F; Van Sinderen, Douwe

    2005-04-01

    The claimed health benefits of fermented functional foods are expressed either directly through the interaction of ingested live microorganisms, bacteria or yeast with the host (probiotic effect) or indirectly as a result of ingestion of microbial metabolites produced during the fermentation process (biogenic effect). Although still far from fully understood, several probiotic mechanisms of action have been proposed, including competitive exclusion, competition for nutrients and/or stimulation of an immune response. The biogenic properties of fermented functional foods result from the microbial production of bioactive metabolites such as certain vitamins, bioactive peptides, organic acids or fatty acids during fermentation.

  5. Lichen secondary metabolites as DNA-interacting agents.

    PubMed

    Plsíkova, J; Stepankova, J; Kasparkova, J; Brabec, V; Backor, M; Kozurkova, M

    2014-03-01

    A series of lichen secondary metabolites (parietin, atranorin, usnic and gyrophoric acid) and their interactions with calf thymus DNA were investigated using molecular biophysics and biochemical methods. The binding constants K were estimated to range from 4.3×10(5) to 2.4×10(7)M(-1) and the percentage of hypochromism was found to be 16-34% (from spectral titration). The results of spectral measurement indicate that the compounds act as effective DNA-interacting agents. Electrophoretic separation studies prove that from all the metabolites tested in this study, only gyrophoric acid exhibited an inhibitory effect on Topo I (25μM).

  6. Lichen secondary metabolites as DNA-interacting agents.

    PubMed

    Plsíkova, J; Stepankova, J; Kasparkova, J; Brabec, V; Backor, M; Kozurkova, M

    2014-03-01

    A series of lichen secondary metabolites (parietin, atranorin, usnic and gyrophoric acid) and their interactions with calf thymus DNA were investigated using molecular biophysics and biochemical methods. The binding constants K were estimated to range from 4.3×10(5) to 2.4×10(7)M(-1) and the percentage of hypochromism was found to be 16-34% (from spectral titration). The results of spectral measurement indicate that the compounds act as effective DNA-interacting agents. Electrophoretic separation studies prove that from all the metabolites tested in this study, only gyrophoric acid exhibited an inhibitory effect on Topo I (25μM). PMID:24269500

  7. Phoma Saccardo: distribution, secondary metabolite production and biotechnological applications.

    PubMed

    Rai, Mahendra; Deshmukh, Prajakta; Gade, Aniket; Ingle, Avinash; Kövics, György J; Irinyi, László

    2009-01-01

    Phoma Sacc. is an ubiquitous fungus, which has been reported from plants, soil, human beings, animals, and air. Some species of Phoma like P. sorghina, P. herbarum, P. exigua var. exigua, P. macrostoma, P. glomerata, Phoma macdonaldii, Phoma tracheiphila, Phoma proboscis, P. multirostrata, and Phoma foveata secrete phytotoxin and anthraquinone pigments as secondary metabolites, which have great potential for the biological control of weeds, and can be exploited for the production of mycopesticides, agrophytochemicals, and dyes. Some other species produce pharmaceutically active metabolites, viz., Sirodesmins, Phomenoic acid, Phomenolactone, Phomadecalins, Phomactin A, Phomasetin, Squalestatin-1 (S1), and Squalestatin-2 (S2). The secondary metabolites secreted by some species of Phoma are antitumor, antimicrobial, and anti-HIV. Equisetin and Phomasetin obtained from species of Phoma are useful against AIDS. The main goal of the present review is to discuss secondary metabolite production by species of Phoma and their utilization as antibiotics and as biocontrol agents. PMID:19624254

  8. Exposure to benzene metabolites causes oxidative damage in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Raj, Abhishek; Nachiappan, Vasanthi

    2016-06-01

    Hydroquinone (HQ) and benzoquinone (BQ) are known benzene metabolites that form reactive intermediates such as reactive oxygen species (ROS). This study attempts to understand the effect of benzene metabolites (HQ and BQ) on the antioxidant status, cell morphology, ROS levels and lipid alterations in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. There was a reduction in the growth pattern of wild-type cells exposed to HQ/BQ. Exposure of yeast cells to benzene metabolites increased the activity of the anti-oxidant enzymes catalase, superoxide dismutase and glutathione peroxidase but lead to a decrease in ascorbic acid and reduced glutathione. Increased triglyceride level and decreased phospholipid levels were observed with exposure to HQ and BQ. These results suggest that the enzymatic antioxidants were increased and are involved in the protection against macromolecular damage during oxidative stress; presumptively, these enzymes are essential for scavenging the pro-oxidant effects of benzene metabolites. PMID:27016252

  9. Spatio-temporal distribution and natural variation of metabolites in citrus fruits.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shouchuang; Tu, Hong; Wan, Jian; Chen, Wei; Liu, Xianqing; Luo, Jie; Xu, Juan; Zhang, Hongyan

    2016-05-15

    To study the natural variation and spatio-temporal accumulation of citrus metabolites, liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS) based metabolome analysis was performed on four fruit tissues (flavedo, albedo, segment membrane and juice sacs) and different Citrus species (lemon, pummelo and grapefruit, sweet orange and mandarin). Using a non-targeted metabolomics approach, more than 2000 metabolite signals were detected, from which more than 54 metabolites, including amino acids, flavonoids and limonoids, were identified/annotated. Differential accumulation patterns of both primary metabolites and secondary metabolites in various tissues and species were revealed by our study. Further investigation indicated that flavedo accumulates more flavonoids while juice sacs contain more amino acids. Besides this, cluster analysis based on the levels of metabolites detected in 47 individual Citrus accessions clearly grouped them into four distinct clusters: pummelos and grapefruits, lemons, sweet oranges and mandarins, while the cluster of pummelos and grapefruits lay distinctly apart from the other three species.

  10. Severe drought stress is affecting selected primary metabolites, polyphenols, and volatile metabolites in grapevine leaves (Vitis vinifera cv. Pinot noir).

    PubMed

    Griesser, Michaela; Weingart, Georg; Schoedl-Hummel, Katharina; Neumann, Nora; Becker, Manuel; Varmuza, Kurt; Liebner, Falk; Schuhmacher, Rainer; Forneck, Astrid

    2015-03-01

    Extreme weather conditions with prolonged dry periods and high temperatures as well as heavy rain events can severely influence grapevine physiology and grape quality. The present study evaluates the effects of severe drought stress on selected primary metabolites, polyphenols and volatile metabolites in grapevine leaves. Among the 11 primary metabolites, 13 polyphenols and 95 volatiles which were analyzed, a significant discrimination between control and stressed plants of 7 primary metabolites, 11 polyphenols and 46 volatile metabolites was observed. As single parameters are usually not specific enough for the discrimination of control and stressed plants, an unsupervised (PCA) and a supervised (PLS-DA) multivariate approach were applied to combine results from different metabolic groups. In a first step a selection of five metabolites, namely citric acid, glyceric acid, ribose, phenylacetaldehyde and 2-methylbutanal were used to establish a calibration model using PLS regression to predict the leaf water potential. The model was strong enough to assign a high number of plants correctly with a correlation of 0.83. The PLS-DA provides an interesting approach to combine data sets and to provide tools for the specific evaluation of physiological plant stresses.

  11. Severe drought stress is affecting selected primary metabolites, polyphenols, and volatile metabolites in grapevine leaves (Vitis vinifera cv. Pinot noir).

    PubMed

    Griesser, Michaela; Weingart, Georg; Schoedl-Hummel, Katharina; Neumann, Nora; Becker, Manuel; Varmuza, Kurt; Liebner, Falk; Schuhmacher, Rainer; Forneck, Astrid

    2015-03-01

    Extreme weather conditions with prolonged dry periods and high temperatures as well as heavy rain events can severely influence grapevine physiology and grape quality. The present study evaluates the effects of severe drought stress on selected primary metabolites, polyphenols and volatile metabolites in grapevine leaves. Among the 11 primary metabolites, 13 polyphenols and 95 volatiles which were analyzed, a significant discrimination between control and stressed plants of 7 primary metabolites, 11 polyphenols and 46 volatile metabolites was observed. As single parameters are usually not specific enough for the discrimination of control and stressed plants, an unsupervised (PCA) and a supervised (PLS-DA) multivariate approach were applied to combine results from different metabolic groups. In a first step a selection of five metabolites, namely citric acid, glyceric acid, ribose, phenylacetaldehyde and 2-methylbutanal were used to establish a calibration model using PLS regression to predict the leaf water potential. The model was strong enough to assign a high number of plants correctly with a correlation of 0.83. The PLS-DA provides an interesting approach to combine data sets and to provide tools for the specific evaluation of physiological plant stresses. PMID:25602440

  12. Identification of Microbial Metabolites Elevating Vitamin Contents in Barley Seeds.

    PubMed

    Yousaf, Anam; Qadir, Abdul; Anjum, Tehmina; Ahmad, Aqeel

    2015-08-19

    The current investigation analyzes metabolites of Acetobacter aceti to explore chemical compounds responsible for the induction of vitamins in barley seeds. A bioactivity guided assay of bacterial extracts and chromatographic analyses of barley produce revealed 13 chemical compounds, which were subjected to principal component analysis (PCA). PCA determined four chemical compounds (i.e., quinolinic acid, pyridoxic acid, p-aminobenzoate, and α-oxobutanoic acid) highly associated with increased quantities of vitamins. Further experimentations confirmed that quinolinic acid and p-aminobenzoate were the most efficient vitamin inducers. The results indicated chloroform/ethanol (4:1) as the best solvent system for the extraction of active compounds from crude metabolites of A. aceti. Significant quantities of mevalonic acid were detected in the extracted fraction, indicating the possible induction of the isoprenoid pathway. Altogether, the current investigation broadens the frontiers in plant-microbe interaction.

  13. Endogenous cross-talk of fungal metabolites

    PubMed Central

    Sheridan, Kevin J.; Dolan, Stephen K.; Doyle, Sean

    2015-01-01

    Non-ribosomal peptide (NRP) synthesis in fungi requires a ready supply of proteogenic and non-proteogenic amino acids which are subsequently incorporated into the nascent NRP via a thiotemplate mechanism catalyzed by NRP synthetases. Substrate amino acids can be modified prior to or during incorporation into the NRP, or following incorporation into an early stage amino acid-containing biosynthetic intermediate. These post-incorporation modifications involve a range of additional enzymatic activities including but not exclusively, monooxygenases, methyltransferases, epimerases, oxidoreductases, and glutathione S-transferases which are essential to effect biosynthesis of the final NRP. Likewise, polyketide biosynthesis is directly by polyketide synthase megaenzymes and cluster-encoded ancillary decorating enzymes. Additionally, a suite of additional primary metabolites, for example: coenzyme A (CoA), acetyl CoA, S-adenosylmethionine, glutathione (GSH), NADPH, malonyl CoA, and molecular oxygen, amongst others are required for NRP and polyketide synthesis (PKS). Clearly these processes must involve exquisite orchestration to facilitate the simultaneous biosynthesis of different types of NRPs, polyketides, and related metabolites requiring identical or similar biosynthetic precursors or co-factors. Moreover, the near identical structures of many natural products within a given family (e.g., ergot alkaloids), along with localization to similar regions within fungi (e.g., conidia) suggests that cross-talk may exist, in terms of biosynthesis and functionality. Finally, we speculate if certain biosynthetic steps involved in NRP and PKS play a role in cellular protection or environmental adaptation, and wonder if these enzymatic reactions are of equivalent importance to the actual biosynthesis of the final metabolite. PMID:25601857

  14. [Study on secondary metabolites of endophytic fungi Penicillium dangeardii].

    PubMed

    Lv, Hai-ning; Ding, Guang-zhi; Liu, Yun-bao; Qu, Jing

    2015-05-01

    Endophytic fungi Penicillium dangeardii, isolated from Lysidice rhodostegia Hance root, was fermented and the secondary metabolites were studied. By means of Sephadex LH-20 column chromatography, ODS column chromatography and PHPLC over the fermented culture, 5 compounds were isolated. By using ESI-MS and NMR, the structures of the compounds were determined as N-[9-(β- D-ribofuranosyl)-9H-purin-6-yl]-L-aspartic acid (1), 3-caffeoylquinic acid (2), 4-caffeoylquinic acid (3), and 5-caffeoylquinic acid (4), 3-hydroxy-benzoic acid-4-O-β-D-glucopyranoside (5).

  15. Polar metabolites of polycyclic aromatic compounds from fungi are potential soil and groundwater contaminants.

    PubMed

    Boll, Esther S; Johnsen, Anders R; Christensen, Jan H

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated the sorption to soil of water-soluble metabolites from polycyclic aromatic compounds (PACs). The soil fungus Cunninghamella elegans was used to produce PAC metabolites from two un-substituted PACs (phenanthrene, pyrene), three alkyl-substituted PACs (2-methylnaphthalene, 1-methylphenanthrene, 1-methylpyrene), and one sulfur-containing heterocyclic PAC (dibenzothiophene). Fifty-eight metabolites were tentatively identified; metabolites from the un-substituted PACs were hydroxylated and sulfate conjugated, whereas metabolites from alkyl-substituted PACs were sulfate conjugated and either hydroxylated or oxidized to carboxylic acids at the methyl group. The metabolism of the sulfur-containing heterocyclic PAC resulted in sulfate conjugates. The sorption of the PAC metabolites to three soils was determined using a batch equilibrium method, and partition coefficients (Kd's) were calculated for fourteen representative metabolites. Sulfate conjugated metabolites displayed Kd's below 70 whereas the metabolites with both a sulfate and a carboxylic acid group had Kd's below 2.8. The low Kd's of water-soluble PAC metabolites indicate high mobility in soil and a potential for leaching to surface- and groundwaters.

  16. Metabolic Profiling and Antioxidant Assay of Metabolites from Three Radish Cultivars (Raphanus sativus).

    PubMed

    Park, Chang Ha; Baskar, Thanislas Bastin; Park, Soo-Yun; Kim, Sun-Ju; Valan Arasu, Mariadhas; Al-Dhabi, Naif Abdullah; Kim, Jae Kwang; Park, Sang Un

    2016-01-28

    A total of 13 anthocyanins and 33 metabolites; including organic acids, phenolic acids, amino acids, organic compounds, sugar acids, sugar alcohols, and sugars, were profiled in three radish cultivars by using high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) and gas chromatography time-of-flight mass spectrometry (GC-TOFMS)-based metabolite profiling. Total phenolics and flavonoids and their in vitro antioxidant activities were assessed. Pelargonidins were found to be the major anthocyanin in the cultivars studied. The cultivar Man Tang Hong showed the highest level of anthocyanins (1.89 ± 0.07 mg/g), phenolics (0.0664 ± 0.0033 mg/g) and flavonoids (0.0096 ± 0.0004 mg/g). Here; the variation of secondary metabolites in the radishes is described, as well as their association with primary metabolites. The low-molecular-weight hydrophilic metabolite profiles were subjected to principal component analysis (PCA), hierarchical clustering analysis (HCA), Pearson's correlation analysis. PCA fully distinguished the three radish cultivars tested. The polar metabolites were strongly correlated between metabolites that participate in the TCA cycle. The chemometrics results revealed that TCA cycle intermediates and free phenolic acids as well as anthocyanins were higher in the cultivar Man Tang Hong than in the others. Furthermore; superoxide radical scavenging activities and 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) radical scavenging were investigated to elucidate the antioxidant activity of secondary metabolites in the cultivars. Man Tang Hong showed the highest superoxide radical scavenging activity (68.87%) at 1000 μg/mL, and DPPH activity (20.78%), followed by Seo Ho and then Hong Feng No. 1. The results demonstrate that GC-TOFMS-based metabolite profiling, integrated with chemometrics, is an applicable method for distinguishing phenotypic variation and determining biochemical reactions connecting primary and secondary metabolism. Therefore; this study might provide

  17. Analysis of selected herbicide metabolites in surface and ground water of the United States

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Scribner, E.A.; Thurman, E.M.; Zimmerman, L.R.

    2000-01-01

    One of the primary goals of the US Geological Survey (USGS) Laboratory in Lawrence, Kansas, is to develop analytical methods for the analysis of herbicide metabolites in surface and ground water that are vital to the study of herbicide fate and degradation pathways in the environment. Methods to measure metabolite concentrations from three major classes of herbicides - triazine, chloroacetanilide and phenyl-urea - have been developed. Methods for triazine metabolite detection cover nine compounds: six compounds are detected by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry; one is detected by high-performance liquid chromatography with diode-array detection; and eight are detected by liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry. Two metabolites of the chloroacetanilide herbicides - ethane sulfonic acid and oxanilic acid - are detected by high-performance liquid chromatography with diode-array detection and liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry. Alachlor ethane sulfonic acid also has been detected by solid-phase extraction and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Six phenylurea metabolites are all detected by liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry; four of the six metabolites also are detected by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry. Additionally, surveys of herbicides and their metabolites in surface water, ground water, lakes, reservoirs, and rainfall have been conducted through the USGS laboratory in Lawrence. These surveys have been useful in determining herbicide and metabolite occurrence and temporal distribution and have shown that metabolites may be useful in evaluation of non-point-source contamination. Copyright (C) 2000 Elsevier Science B.V.

  18. The effects of GA and ABA treatments on metabolite profile of germinating barley.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yuqing; Cai, Shengguan; Ye, Lingzhen; Hu, Hongliang; Li, Chengdao; Zhang, Guoping

    2016-02-01

    Sugar degradation during grain germination is important for malt quality. In malting industry, gibberellin (GA) is frequently used for improvement of malting quality. In this study, the changes of metabolite profiles and starch-degrading enzymes during grain germination, and as affected by GA and abscisic acid (ABA) were investigated using two wild barley accessions XZ72 and XZ95. Totally fifty-two metabolites with known structures were detected and the change of metabolite during germination was time- and genotype dependent. Sugars and amino acids were the most dramatically changed compounds. Addition of GA enhanced the activities of starch-degrading enzymes, and increased most metabolites, especially sugars and amino acids, whereas ABA had the opposite effect. The effect varied with the barley accessions. The current study is the first attempt in investigating the effect of hormones on metabolite profiles in germinating barley grain, being helpful for identifying the factors affecting barley germination or malt quality. PMID:26304431

  19. Rethinking cycad metabolite research.

    PubMed

    Snyder, Laura R; Marler, Thomas E

    2011-01-01

    Cycads are among the most ancient of extant Spermatophytes, and are known for their numerous pharmacologically active compounds. One compound in particular, β-methylamino-L-alanine (BMAA), has been implicated as the cause of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis/Parkinson dementia complex (ALS/PDC) on Guam. Previous studies allege that BMAA is produced exclusively by cyanobacteria, and is transferred to cycads through the symbiotic relationship between these cyanobacteria and the roots of cycads. We recently published data showing that Cycas micronesica seedlings grown without endophytic cyanobacteria do in fact increase in BMAA, invalidating the foundation of the BMAA hypothesis. We use this example to suggest that the frenzy centered on BMAA and other single putative toxins has hindered progress. The long list of cycad-specific compounds may have important roles in signaling or communication, but these possibilities have been neglected during decades of attempts to force single metabolites into a supposed anti-herbivory function. We propose that an unbiased, comprehensive approach may be a more appropriate means of proceeding with cycad biochemistry research. PMID:21509189

  20. Rethinking cycad metabolite research.

    PubMed

    Snyder, Laura R; Marler, Thomas E

    2011-01-01

    Cycads are among the most ancient of extant Spermatophytes, and are known for their numerous pharmacologically active compounds. One compound in particular, β-methylamino-L-alanine (BMAA), has been implicated as the cause of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis/Parkinson dementia complex (ALS/PDC) on Guam. Previous studies allege that BMAA is produced exclusively by cyanobacteria, and is transferred to cycads through the symbiotic relationship between these cyanobacteria and the roots of cycads. We recently published data showing that Cycas micronesica seedlings grown without endophytic cyanobacteria do in fact increase in BMAA, invalidating the foundation of the BMAA hypothesis. We use this example to suggest that the frenzy centered on BMAA and other single putative toxins has hindered progress. The long list of cycad-specific compounds may have important roles in signaling or communication, but these possibilities have been neglected during decades of attempts to force single metabolites into a supposed anti-herbivory function. We propose that an unbiased, comprehensive approach may be a more appropriate means of proceeding with cycad biochemistry research.

  1. Childhood Psychosis and Monoamine Metabolites in Spinal Fluid.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gillberg, Christopher; And Others

    1983-01-01

    Analysis of cerebrospinal fluid of 22 psychotic children, 22 normal controls, and Ss with mental retardation, progressive encephalopathy, or meningitis revealed that psychotic Ss had raised levels of homovanillic acid. Thirteen Ss diagnosed as autistic showed isolated inrease of this metabolite. Increased concentration of mongamines was not…

  2. Blood metabolites during basketball competitions.

    PubMed

    Ben Abdelkrim, Nidhal; Castagna, Carlo; El Fazaa, Saloua; Tabka, Zouhaier; El Ati, Jalila

    2009-05-01

    This study examined basketball game blood hormonal and metabolite responses in 38 (8 guards, 18 forwards, and 12 centers) male national elite-junior players (age, 18.2 +/- 0.5 years; height, 1.89 +/- 0.1 m; body mass, 80.3 +/- 6.7 kg; body fat, 8.2 +/- 5.6%; maximum oxygen uptake Vo2max], 52.8 +/- 2.4 mlxkgxmin). At the moment of the investigation, players had 8 +/- 1.6 years of competitive experience. Blood samples were collected at the beginning, at halftime, and at fulltime of 6 junior competitive games (Tunisian under 19 basketball championship). Game intensity was assessed monitoring heart rates (HR). During the game, players attained 93 +/- 2% of maximal HR. Triglycerides (TG) and free fatty acids (FFA) concentrations significantly increased during the game, most markedly so in the second half. Postgame TG and FFA concentrations were significantly (p < 0.05 and p < 0.001, respectively) lower for guards (1.48 +/- 0.22 and 0.88 +/- 0.14 mmolxL, respectively) than for centers (1.88 +/- 0.30 and 1.08 +/- 0.09 mmolxL, respectively). Plasma glucose significantly increased at halftime (from 4.05 +/- 1.27 to 5.98 +/- 0.88 mmolxL; p < 0.001) but decreased in the second half. Serum insulin (INS) progressively decreased for all players during the game, whereas serum cortisol increased at the end of the first half (from 333 +/- 129 to 487 +/- 209 nmolxL; p < 0.001) to remain increased throughout the second half.Basketball game demands seem to induce significant metabolic-hormonal changes on players. Higher values of HR and glycemia were observed in the first half, but a more important increase of lipolytic variables was recorded in the second half. Changes in metabolic markers are role-dependent.

  3. Concurrent quantification of tryptophan and its major metabolites.

    PubMed

    Lesniak, Wojciech G; Jyoti, Amar; Mishra, Manoj K; Louissaint, Nicolette; Romero, Roberto; Chugani, Diane C; Kannan, Sujatha; Kannan, Rangaramanujam M

    2013-12-15

    An imbalance in tryptophan (TRP) metabolites is associated with several neurological and inflammatory disorders. Therefore, analytical methods allowing for simultaneous quantification of TRP and its major metabolites would be highly desirable, and may be valuable as potential biomarkers. We have developed a HPLC method for concurrent quantitative determination of tryptophan, serotonin, 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid, kynurenine, and kynurenic acid in tissue and fluids. The method utilizes the intrinsic spectroscopic properties of TRP and its metabolites that enable UV absorbance and fluorescence detection by HPLC, without additional labeling. The origin of the peaks related to analytes of interest was confirmed by UV-Vis spectral patterns using a PDA detector and mass spectrometry. The developed methods were validated in rabbit fetal brain and amniotic fluid at gestational day 29. Results are in excellent agreement with those reported in the literature for the same regions. This method allows for rapid quantification of tryptophan and four of its major metabolites concurrently. A change in the relative ratios of these metabolites can provide important insights in predicting the presence and progression of neuroinflammation in disorders such as cerebral palsy, autism, multiple sclerosis, Alzheimer disease, and schizophrenia. PMID:24036037

  4. A correlation between antioxidant activity and metabolite release during the blanching of Chrysanthemum coronarium L.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jiyoung; Choi, Jung Nam; Ku, Kang Mo; Kang, Daejung; Kim, Jong Sang; Park, Jung Han Yoon; Lee, Choong Hwan

    2011-01-01

    Liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (LCMS/MS)-based metabolite profiling was applied to elucidate the correlation between metabolite release and antioxidant activity during water blanching of Chrysanthemum coronarium L. (CC). Some major metabolites showing differences between fresh CC and blanched CC (BCC) were selected by principal component analysis (PCA) and partial least-square discriminate analysis (PLS-DA) loading plots, and were identified as dicaffeoylquinic acid (DCQA), succinoyl-DCQA, and acetylmycosinol. By PLS regression analysis of the correlation between antioxidant components and effects, candidate antioxidative metabolites were predicted due to strong positive correlations with DCQA and succinoyl-DCQA, and by a relatively weak positive correlation with acetylmycosinol.

  5. Nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy is highly sensitive for lipid-soluble metabolites.

    PubMed

    Dai, Haiyang; Hong, Bikai; Xu, Zhifeng; Ma, Lian; Chen, Yaowen; Xiao, Yeyu; Wu, Renhua

    2013-08-01

    Although the water-soluble metabolite profile of human mesenchymal stem cells is known, the lipid profile still needs further investigation. In this study, methanol-chloroform was used to extract pid-soluble metabolites and perchloric acid was used to extract water-soluble metabolites. Furthermore, a dual phase extraction method using methanol-chloroform and water was used to obtain both water and lipid fractions simultaneously. All metabolite extractions were analyzed on a 9.4T high-resolution nuclear magnetic resonance spectrometer. Metabolite resonance peaks were assigned in the acquired spectra according to the chemical shift, and the extraction efficiency of ferent methods was compared. Results showed that in the spectra of water-soluble extracts, major metabolites comprised low molecular weight metabolites, including lactate, acetic acid, fatty acids, threonine, glutamic acid, creatine, choline and its derivatives, while in the spectra of lipid-soluble extracts, most metabolites were assigned to fatty acids. Among the different extraction procedures, perchloric acid was more efficient in extracting water-soluble metabolites and methanol-chloroform was efficient in extracting organic components compared with the dual phase extraction method. Nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy showed that as low as 0.7 mg organic yield was enough to obtain clear resonance peaks, while about 6.0 mg water-soluble yield was needed to obtain relatively favorable spectral lines. These results show that the efficiency of extracting water and lipid fractions is higher using perchloric acid and methanol-chloroform compared with dual phase extraction and that nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy is highly sensitive for analyzing lipid-soluble extracts.

  6. Metabolite Profile Changes in Xylem Sap and Leaf Extracts of Strategy I Plants in Response to Iron Deficiency and Resupply

    PubMed Central

    Rellán-Álvarez, Rubén; El-Jendoubi, Hamdi; Wohlgemuth, Gert; Abadía, Anunciación; Fiehn, Oliver; Abadía, Javier; Álvarez-Fernández, Ana

    2011-01-01

    The metabolite profile changes induced by Fe deficiency in leaves and xylem sap of several Strategy I plant species have been characterized. We have confirmed that Fe deficiency causes consistent changes both in the xylem sap and leaf metabolite profiles. The main changes in the xylem sap metabolite profile in response to Fe deficiency include consistent decreases in amino acids, N-related metabolites and carbohydrates, and increases in TCA cycle metabolites. In tomato, Fe resupply causes a transitory flush of xylem sap carboxylates, but within 1 day the metabolite profile of the xylem sap from Fe-deficient plants becomes similar to that of Fe-sufficient controls. The main changes in the metabolite profile of leaf extracts in response to Fe deficiency include consistent increases in amino acids and N-related metabolites, carbohydrates and TCA cycle metabolites. In leaves, selected pairs of amino acids and TCA cycle metabolites show high correlations, with the sign depending of the Fe status. These data suggest that in low photosynthesis, C-starved Fe-deficient plants anaplerotic reactions involving amino acids can be crucial for short-term survival. PMID:22645546

  7. Urinary Metabolite Markers of Precocious Puberty*

    PubMed Central

    Qi, Ying; Li, Pin; Zhang, Yongyu; Cui, Lulu; Guo, Zi; Xie, Guoxiang; Su, Mingming; Li, Xin; Zheng, Xiaojiao; Qiu, Yunping; Liu, Yumin; Zhao, Aihua; Jia, Weiping; Jia, Wei

    2012-01-01

    The incidence of precocious puberty (PP, the appearance of signs of pubertal development at an abnormally early age), is rapidly rising, concurrent with changes of diet, lifestyles, and social environment. The current diagnostic methods are based on a hormone (gonadotropin-releasing hormone) stimulation test, which is costly, time-consuming, and uncomfortable for patients. The lack of molecular biomarkers to support simple laboratory tests, such as a blood or urine test, has been a long standing bottleneck in the clinical diagnosis and evaluation of PP. Here we report a metabolomic study using an ultra performance liquid chromatography-quadrupole time of flight mass spectrometry and gas chromatography-time of flight mass spectrometry. Urine metabolites from 163 individuals were profiled, and the metabolic alterations were analyzed after treatment of central precocious puberty (CPP) with triptorelin depot. A panel of biomarkers selected from >70 differentially expressed urinary metabolites by receiver operating characteristic and logistic regression analysis provided excellent predictive power with high sensitivity and specificity for PP. The altered metabolic profile of the PP patients was characterized by three major perturbed metabolic pathways: catecholamine, serotonin metabolism, and tricarboxylic acid cycle, presumably resulting from activation of the sympathetic nervous system and the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis. Treatment with triptorelin depot was able to normalize these three altered pathways. Additionally, significant changes in the urine levels of 4-hydroxyphenylacetic acid, 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid, indoleacetic acid, 5-hydroxytryptophan, and 5-hydroxykynurenamine in the CPP group suggest that the development of CPP condition may involve an alteration in symbiotic gut microbial composition. PMID:22027199

  8. Urinary metabolite markers of precocious puberty.

    PubMed

    Qi, Ying; Li, Pin; Zhang, Yongyu; Cui, Lulu; Guo, Zi; Xie, Guoxiang; Su, Mingming; Li, Xin; Zheng, Xiaojiao; Qiu, Yunping; Liu, Yumin; Zhao, Aihua; Jia, Weiping; Jia, Wei

    2012-01-01

    The incidence of precocious puberty (PP, the appearance of signs of pubertal development at an abnormally early age), is rapidly rising, concurrent with changes of diet, lifestyles, and social environment. The current diagnostic methods are based on a hormone (gonadotropin-releasing hormone) stimulation test, which is costly, time-consuming, and uncomfortable for patients. The lack of molecular biomarkers to support simple laboratory tests, such as a blood or urine test, has been a long standing bottleneck in the clinical diagnosis and evaluation of PP. Here we report a metabolomic study using an ultra performance liquid chromatography-quadrupole time of flight mass spectrometry and gas chromatography-time of flight mass spectrometry. Urine metabolites from 163 individuals were profiled, and the metabolic alterations were analyzed after treatment of central precocious puberty (CPP) with triptorelin depot. A panel of biomarkers selected from >70 differentially expressed urinary metabolites by receiver operating characteristic and logistic regression analysis provided excellent predictive power with high sensitivity and specificity for PP. The altered metabolic profile of the PP patients was characterized by three major perturbed metabolic pathways: catecholamine, serotonin metabolism, and tricarboxylic acid cycle, presumably resulting from activation of the sympathetic nervous system and the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis. Treatment with triptorelin depot was able to normalize these three altered pathways. Additionally, significant changes in the urine levels of 4-hydroxyphenylacetic acid, 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid, indoleacetic acid, 5-hydroxytryptophan, and 5-hydroxykynurenamine in the CPP group suggest that the development of CPP condition may involve an alteration in symbiotic gut microbial composition.

  9. Tentative identification of new metabolites of epimedin C by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Liu, Minyan; Zhao, Shaohua; Wang, Zongquan; Wang, Hongtao; Shi, Xiaowei; Lü, Ziming; Xu, Honghui; Wang, Hairong; Du, Yingfeng; Zhang, Lantong

    2011-11-01

    Epimedin C is one of the major bioactive constituents of Herba Epimedii. The aim of this study is to characterize and elucidate the structure of metabolites in the rat after administration of epimedin C. Metabolite identification was performed using a predictive multiple reaction monitoring-information dependent acquisition-enhanced product ion (pMRM-IDA-EPI) scan in positive ion mode on a hybrid triple quadrupole-linear ion trap mass spectrometer. A total of 18 metabolites were characterized by the changes in their protonated molecular masses, their MS/MS spectrum and their retention times compared with those of the parent drug. The results reveal possible metabolite profiles of epimedin C in rats; the metabolic pathways including hydrolysis, hydroxylation, dehydrogenation, demethylation and conjugation with glucuronic acid and different sugars were observed. This study provides a practical approach for rapidly identifying complicated metabolites, a methodology that could be widely applied for the structural characterization of metabolites of other compounds. PMID:22012680

  10. Seed coat color and seed weight contribute differential responses of targeted metabolites in soybean seeds.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jinwook; Hwang, Young-Sun; Kim, Sun Tae; Yoon, Won-Byong; Han, Won Young; Kang, In-Kyu; Choung, Myoung-Gun

    2017-01-01

    The distribution and variation of targeted metabolites in soybean seeds are affected by genetic and environmental factors. In this study, we used 192 soybean germplasm accessions collected from two provinces of Korea to elucidate the effects of seed coat color and seeds dry weight on the metabolic variation and responses of targeted metabolites. The effects of seed coat color and seeds dry weight were present in sucrose, total oligosaccharides, total carbohydrates and all measured fatty acids. The targeted metabolites were clustered within three groups. These metabolites were not only differently related to seeds dry weight, but also responded differentially to seed coat color. The inter-relationship between the targeted metabolites was highly present in the result of correlation analysis. Overall, results revealed that the targeted metabolites were diverged in relation to seed coat color and seeds dry weight within locally collected soybean seed germplasm accessions. PMID:27507473

  11. Intestinal Microbial Metabolites Are Linked to Severity of Myocardial Infarction in Rats.

    PubMed

    Lam, Vy; Su, Jidong; Hsu, Anna; Gross, Garrett J; Salzman, Nita H; Baker, John E

    2016-01-01

    Intestinal microbiota determine severity of myocardial infarction in rats. We determined whether low molecular weight metabolites derived from intestinal microbiota and transported to the systemic circulation are linked to severity of myocardial infarction. Plasma from rats treated for seven days with the non-absorbed antibiotic vancomycin or a mixture of streptomycin, neomycin, polymyxin B and bacitracin was analyzed using mass spectrometry-based metabolite profiling platforms. Antibiotic-induced changes in the abundance of individual groups of intestinal microbiota dramatically altered the host's metabolism. Hierarchical clustering of dissimilarities separated the levels of 284 identified metabolites from treated vs. untreated rats; 193 were altered by the antibiotic treatments with a tendency towards decreased metabolite levels. Catabolism of the aromatic amino acids phenylalanine, tryptophan and tyrosine was the most affected pathway comprising 33 affected metabolites. Both antibiotic treatments decreased the severity of an induced myocardial infarction in vivo by 27% and 29%, respectively. We then determined whether microbial metabolites of the amino acids phenylalanine, tryptophan and tyrosine were linked to decreased severity of myocardial infarction. Vancomycin-treated rats were administered amino acid metabolites prior to ischemia/reperfusion studies. Oral or intravenous pretreatment of rats with these amino acid metabolites abolished the decrease in infarct size conferred by vancomycin. Inhibition of JAK-2 (AG-490, 10 μM), Src kinase (PP1, 20 μM), Akt/PI3 kinase (Wortmannin, 100 nM), p44/42 MAPK (PD98059, 10 μM), p38 MAPK (SB203580, 10 μM), or KATP channels (glibenclamide, 3 μM) abolished cardioprotection by vancomycin, indicating microbial metabolites are interacting with cell surface receptors to transduce their signals through Src kinase, cell survival pathways and KATP channels. These inhibitors have no effect on myocardial infarct size in

  12. Identification of novel metoclopramide metabolites in humans: in vitro and in vivo studies.

    PubMed

    Argikar, Upendra A; Gomez, Javier; Ung, Din; Parkman, Henry P; Nagar, Swati

    2010-08-01

    Metoclopramide (MCP) is frequently used to treat gastroparesis. Previous studies have documented MCP metabolism, but systematic structural identification of metabolites has not been performed. The aim of this study was to better understand MCP metabolism in humans. For examination of in vivo metabolism, a single oral 20-mg MCP dose was administered to eight healthy male volunteers, followed by complete urine collection over 24 h. In vitro incubations were performed in human liver microsomes (HLM) to characterize metabolism via cytochromes P450 and UDP-glucuronosyltransferases and in human liver cytosol for metabolism via sulfotransferases. Urine and subcellular incubations were analyzed for MCP metabolites on a mass spectrometer with accurate mass measurement capability. Five MCP metabolites were detected in vivo, and five additional metabolites were detected in vitro. The five metabolites of MCP identified both in vitro and in vivo were an N-O-glucuronide (M1), an N-sulfate (M2), a des-ethyl metabolite (M3), a hydroxylated metabolite (M4), and an oxidative deaminated metabolite (M5). To our knowledge, metabolites M1 and M4 have not been reported previously. M2 urinary levels varied 22-fold and M3 levels varied 16-fold among eight subjects. In vitro studies in HLM revealed the following additional metabolites: two ether glucuronides (M6 and M8), possibly on the phenyl ring after oxidation, an N-glucuronide (M7), a carbamic acid (M9), and a nitro metabolite (M10). Metabolites M6 to M10 have not been reported previously. In conclusion, this study describes the identification of MCP metabolites in vivo and in vitro in humans. PMID:20423954

  13. Determination of Tyrosine and Tryptophan Metabolites in Body Ruids Using Electrochemical Detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, Gregory C.; Koch, David D.; Kissinger, Peter T.; Bruntlett, Craig S.; Shoup, Ronald E.

    The amino acids tyrosine and tryptophan are precursors for a number of important physiological compounds. The catecholamines, which are metabolites of tyrosine, serve as neurotransmitters in the central and peripheral nervous systems. Serotonin, a major metabolite of tryptophan, is a potent neurotransmitter and vasoconstrictor. Without doubt, these compounds have been some of the most intensely studied molecules in the last twenty years. One of the benefits that often accrues from basic biochemical research is clinical data of diagnostic and prognostic significance. In this case, however, the results have been disappointing. In only a few instances has the measurement of metabolites of these two amino acids been shown to have real clinical significance.

  14. Classification of terverticillate penicillia based on profiles of mycotoxins and other secondary metabolites.

    PubMed Central

    Frisvad, J C; Filtenborg, O

    1983-01-01

    Strains of available terverticillate penicillium species and varieties were analyzed for profiles of known mycotoxins and other secondary metabolites produced on Czapek yeast autolysate agar (intracellular metabolites) and yeast extract-sucrose agar (extracellular metabolites) by using simple thin-layer chromatography screening techniques. These strains (2,473 in all) could be classified into 29 groups based on profiles of secondary metabolites. Most of these profiles of secondary metabolites were distinct, containing several biosynthetically different mycotoxins and unknown metabolites characterized by distinct colors and retardation factors on thin-layer chromatography plates. Some species (P. italicum and P. atramentosum) only produced one or two metabolites by the simple screening methods. The 29 groups based on profiles of secondary metabolites were known species or subgroups thereof. These species and subgroups were independently identifiable by using morphological and physiological criteria. The species accepted, the number of isolates in each species investigated, and the mycotoxins they produced were: P. atramentosum, 4; P. aurantiogriseum, 510 (group I: penicillic acid and S-toxin and group II: penicillic acid, penitrem A [low frequency], terrestric acid [low frequency], viomellein, and xanthomegnin); P. brevicompactum, 81 (brevianamid A and mycophenolic acid); P. camembertii group I, 38, and group II, 114 (cyclopiazonic acid); P. chrysogenum, 87 (penicillin, roquefortine C, and PR-toxin); P. claviforme, 4 (patulin and roquefortine C); P. clavigerum, 4 (penitrem A); P. concentricum group I, 10 (griseofulvin and roquefortine C), and group II, 3 (patulin and roquefortine C); P. crustosum, 123 (penitrem A, roquefortine C, and terrestric acid); P. echinulatum, 13; P. expansum, 91 (citrinin, patulin, and roquefortine C); P. granulatum, 6 (patulin, penitrem A, and roquefortine C [traces]); P. griseofulvum, 21 (cyclopiazonic acid, griseofulvin, patulin, and

  15. Metabolite changes in nine different soybean cultivars grown under field and greenhouse conditions

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Differences in the primary (amino acids, organic acids, and sugars) and secondary (isoflavones, fatty acid methyl esters) metabolites of nine soybean varieties grown in the field and in greenhouses were investigated by chemometric tools to identify the metabolic patterns associated with the growing ...

  16. [Occurrence of indole alkaloids among secondary metabolites of soil Aspergillus].

    PubMed

    Vinokurova, N G; Khmel'nitskaia, I I; Baskunov, B P; Arinbasarov, M U

    2003-01-01

    The occurrence of indole alkaloids among secondary fungal metabolites was studied in species of the genus Aspergillus, isolated from soils that were sampled in various regions of Russia (a total of 102 isolates of the species A. niger, A. phoenicis, A. fumigatus, A. flavus, A. versicolor, A. ustus, A. clavatus, and A. ochraceus). Clavine alkaloids were represented by fumigaclavine, which was formed by A. fumigatus. alpha-Cyclopiazonic acid was formed by isolates of A. fumigatus, A. flavus, A. versicolor, A. phoenicis, and A. clavatus. The occurrence of indole-containing diketopiperazine alkaloids was documented for isolates of A. flavus, A. fumigatus, A. clavatus, and A. ochraceus. No indole-containing metabolites were found among the metabolites of A. ustus or A. niger. PMID:12722658

  17. Pregnane X receptor prevents hepatorenal toxicity from cholesterol metabolites

    PubMed Central

    Sonoda, Junichiro; Chong, Ling Wa; Downes, Michael; Barish, Grant D.; Coulter, Sally; Liddle, Christopher; Lee, Chih-Hao; Evans, Ronald M.

    2005-01-01

    Efficient detoxification and clearance of cholesterol metabolites such as oxysterols, bile alcohols, and bile acids are critical for survival because they can promote liver and cardiovascular disease. We report here that loss of the nuclear xenobiotic receptor PXR (pregnane X receptor), a regulator of enterohepatic drug metabolism and clearance, results in an unexpected acute lethality associated with signs of severe hepatorenal failure when mice are fed with a diet that elicits accumulation of cholesterol and its metabolites. Induction of a distinct drug clearance program by a high-affinity ligand for the related nuclear receptor, the constitutive androstane receptor, does not overcome the lethality, indicating the unique requirement of PXR for detoxification. We propose that the PXR signaling pathway protects the body from toxic dietary cholesterol metabolites, and, by extension, PXR ligands may ameliorate human diseases such as cholestatic liver diseases and the associating acute renal failure. PMID:15671183

  18. Modulation of the cellular content of metabolites in adipocytes by insulin.

    PubMed

    Qiao, Yuhang; Tomonaga, Shozo; Matsui, Tohru; Funaba, Masayuki

    2016-03-15

    Although the insulin-mediated cell signaling pathway has been extensively examined, changes in the cellular content of metabolites currently remain unclear. We herein examined metabolite contents in 3T3-L1 adipocytes treated with insulin using a metabolomic analysis. Fifty-four compounds were detected, and the contents of metabolites from the citric acid cycle increased in response to the insulin treatment for 4 h, which was sensitive to U0126 and LY294002, inhibitors for mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase-1 and phosphoinositide 3-kinase, respectively. The cellular contents of fumaric acid and malic acid were increased more by insulin than those of citric acid and succinic acid. Time-course changes in metabolites from the citric acid cycle exhibited oscillations with a 2-h cycle. A metabolic pathway analysis also indicated that insulin affected the metabolism of alanine, aspartate and glutamate, as well as that of arginine and proline. The contents of free amino acids were slightly decreased by the insulin treatment, while the co-treatment with U0126 and LY294002 abrogated these insulin-mediated decreases. The present study revealed the unexpected accumulation of citric acid cycle metabolites in adipocytes by insulin. Our results indicate the usefulness of metabolomic analyses for obtaining a more comprehensive understanding of the regulation of metabolic pathways in cell-culture systems.

  19. Modulation of the cellular content of metabolites in adipocytes by insulin.

    PubMed

    Qiao, Yuhang; Tomonaga, Shozo; Matsui, Tohru; Funaba, Masayuki

    2016-03-15

    Although the insulin-mediated cell signaling pathway has been extensively examined, changes in the cellular content of metabolites currently remain unclear. We herein examined metabolite contents in 3T3-L1 adipocytes treated with insulin using a metabolomic analysis. Fifty-four compounds were detected, and the contents of metabolites from the citric acid cycle increased in response to the insulin treatment for 4 h, which was sensitive to U0126 and LY294002, inhibitors for mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase-1 and phosphoinositide 3-kinase, respectively. The cellular contents of fumaric acid and malic acid were increased more by insulin than those of citric acid and succinic acid. Time-course changes in metabolites from the citric acid cycle exhibited oscillations with a 2-h cycle. A metabolic pathway analysis also indicated that insulin affected the metabolism of alanine, aspartate and glutamate, as well as that of arginine and proline. The contents of free amino acids were slightly decreased by the insulin treatment, while the co-treatment with U0126 and LY294002 abrogated these insulin-mediated decreases. The present study revealed the unexpected accumulation of citric acid cycle metabolites in adipocytes by insulin. Our results indicate the usefulness of metabolomic analyses for obtaining a more comprehensive understanding of the regulation of metabolic pathways in cell-culture systems. PMID:26811873

  20. Toxicological significance of dihydrodiol metabolites

    SciTech Connect

    Hsia, M.T.

    1982-01-01

    Dihydrodiols are often found as the major organic-extractable metabolites of various olefinic or aromatic xenobiotics in many biological samples. Studies on the chemistry of dihydrodiol metabolites have provided insight into the pharmacokinetic behavior and the mode of action of the parent compound. The toxicology of dihydrodiol is more complex than what can be deduced solely on the basis of diminished bioavailability of the epoxide precursor, and the increased hydrophilicity associated with the dihydrodiol moiety. Dihydrodiols can be intrinsically toxic and may even represent metabolically activated species. Some of the dihydrodiol metabolites may still retain sufficient lipophilic character to serve again as substrates for microsomal oxygenases. Because of the tremendous chemical and biological diversity that existed among the various dihydrodiols, more mechanistic studies are needed to examine the toxicological properties of these compounds. It may be premature to conclude dihydrodiol formation as purely a detoxification route for xenobioties.

  1. In Vitro Metabolites of Di-2-ethylhexyl Adipate (DEHA) as Biomarkers of Exposure in Human Biomonitoring Applications

    PubMed Central

    Silva, Manori J.; Samandar, Ella; Ye, Xiaoyun; Calafat, Antonia M.

    2015-01-01

    Di-2-ethylhexyl adipate (DEHA) is a common plasticizer used in food packaging. At high doses, DEHA can cause adverse health effects in rats. Although the potential for human exposure to DEHA is high, no DEHA specific biomarkers are identified for human biomonitoring. Using human liver microsomes, we investigated the in vitro phase I metabolism of DEHA and its hydrolytic metabolite mono-2-ethylhexyl adipate (MEHA) and, for comparison purposes, of the analogous di-2-ethylhexyl phthalate (DEHP) and its hydrolytic metabolite mono-2-ethylhexyl phthalate. We unequivocally identified MEHA, a DEHA specific biomarker, and adipic acid, a nonspecific biomarker, using authentic standards. On the basis of their mass spectrometric fragmentation patterns, we tentatively identified two other DEHA specific metabolites: mono-2-ethylhydroxyhexyl adipate (MEHHA) and mono-2-ethyloxohexyl adipate (MEOHA), analogous to the oxidative metabolites of DEHP. Interestingly, although adipic acid was the major in vitro metabolite of DEHA, the analogous phthalic acid was not the major in vitro metabolite of DEHP. Our preliminary data for 144 adults with no known exposure to DEHA suggests that adipic acid is also the main in vivo urinary metabolite, while MEHA, MEHHA, and MEOHA are only minor metabolites. Therefore, the use of these specific metabolites for assessing the exposure of DEHA may be limited to highly exposed populations. PMID:24016063

  2. Toxicity of fluoranthene and its biodegradation metabolites to aquatic organisms.

    PubMed

    Sepic, Ester; Bricelj, Mihael; Leskovsek, Hermina

    2003-08-01

    The toxicity of nine stable products of the biodegradation of fluoranthene with the pure bacterial strain Pasteurella sp. IFA was studied. For their quantification, an improved analytical procedure with two-step liquid-liquid extraction, derivatisation and gas chromatographic-mass spectrometric detection was used. Growth inhibition and immobility tests for fluoranthene and its metabolites were carried out using algae (Scenedesmus subspicatus), bacteria (Pseudomonas putida) and crustaceans (Daphnia magna and Thamnocephalus platyurus). Tests using the alga S. subspicatus revealed that with the exception of 9-hydroxyfluorene, which was only four times less toxic than fluoranthene, all the other metabolites were 37 to approximately 3000 times less toxic than the parent material. P. putida cells were resistant to fluoranthene and its primary metabolites, but were inhibited by low molecular weight intermediates, especially benzoic acid. Fluoranthene was not toxic to T. Platyurus, but was toxic to D. magna. Its primary metabolites (including 9-fluorenone and 9-hydroxyfluorene) were toxic to D. magna, and a low molecular weight metabolite (2-carboxybenzaldehyde) was highly toxic to T. platyurus. PMID:12820993

  3. Determination of XLR-11 and its metabolites in hair by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Park, Meejung; Yeon, Seonghoon; Lee, Jaesin; In, Sangwhan

    2015-10-10

    Analysis of drugs in hair is often used as a routine method to obtain detailed information about drug ingestion. However, few studies have been conducted on disposition of synthetic cannabinoids including cyclopropylindoles (UR-144 and XLR-11) and their metabolites in hair. XLR-11 has been widely abused in South Korea recently. Identification of metabolites in hair can be an important proof of synthetic cannabinoids use because it can exclude the possibility of passive smoke exposure. In this study, we described a quantitative analytical method of XLR-11 and its metabolites (UR-144, UR-144 N-5-hydroxypentyl metabolite, UR-144 N-4-hydroxypentyl metabolite, UR-144 N-pentanoic acid metabolite and XLR-11 N-4-hydroxypentyl metabolite) in hair by liquid chromatography with ESI-MS/MS. The target analytes were extracted with methanol from washed and cut hair samples and the extracts were evaporated, filtered and analyzed by LC-MS/MS with electrospray ion source in positive-ionization mode. JWH-018-d9 and JWH-018 N-5-hydroxypentyl metabolite-d5 were used as internal standards. Chromatographic separation was completed within 15 min. No interferences were detected in 10 blank hair samples. In intra- and inter-assay precision and accuracy study, CV (%) and bias (%) were below 12. The limit of detection (LOD) was 0.1∼2 pg/mg and the limit of quantification (LOQ) was 0.2-2 pg/mg, respectively. The validation results proved that the method was selective, accurate and precise with acceptable linearity within calibration range. No significant variation was observed by different sources of matrices. This method was applied to hair samples from 14 individual suspects of XLR-11 use. In this result, XLR-11, UR-144, UR-144 N-5-hydroxypentyl metabolite and UR-144 N-pentanoic acid metabolite, XLR-11 N-4-hydroxypentyl metabolite were detected. The concentration of XLR-11 as a parent drug was much higher than other metabolites. UR-144 N-5-hydroxy metabolite and UR-144 N-pentanoic acid

  4. Metabolite production by different Ulocladium species.

    PubMed

    Andersen, Birgitte; Hollensted, Morten

    2008-08-15

    Ulocladium, which is phylogenetically related to Alternaria, contains species that are food spoilers and plant pathogens, but also species that have potential as enzyme producers and bio-control agents. Ulocladium spp. are often found on dead vegetation, in soil, air and dust, but also on food and feedstuffs and on water-damaged building materials. The aim was to study the morphological and chemical diversity within the genus Ulocladium. Cultures of 52 Ulocladium strains were identified morphologically, and then extracted and analyzed using automated Chemical Image Analysis. Production of individual metabolites was correlated to species identity and source of isolation (substratum). Chemical analyses corroborated the morphological identifications and showed the existence of several species species-specific metabolites, of which most were known compounds. The production of curvularins was specific to Ulocladium atrum, while most species produced infectopyrones and derivatives of altertoxin I. None of the 52 Ulocladium strains produced alternariols, tenuazonic acid, altersolanols or macrosporin, which are common in species of Alternaria.

  5. The quantitation of 2-oxo-3-hydroxy lysergic acid diethylamide (O-H-LSD) in human urine specimens, a metabolite of LSD: comparative analysis using liquid chromatography-selected ion monitoring mass spectrometry and liquid chromatography-ion trap mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Poch, G K; Klette, K L; Anderson, C

    2000-04-01

    This paper compares the potential forensic application of two sensitive and rapid procedures (liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry and liquid chromatography-ion trap mass spectrometry) for the detection and quantitation of 2-oxo-3-hydroxy lysergic acid diethylamide (O-H-LSD) a major LSD metabolite. O-H-LSD calibration curves for both procedures were linear over the concentration range 0-8,000 pg/mL with correlation coefficients (r2) greater than 0.99. The observed limit of detection (LOD) and limit of quantitation (LOQ) for O-H-LSD in both procedures was 400 pg/mL. Sixty-eight human urine specimens that had previously been found to contain LSD by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry were reanalyzed by both procedures for LSD and O-H-LSD. These specimens contained a mean concentration of O-H-LSD approximately 16 times higher than the LSD concentration. Because both LC methods produce similar results, either procedure can be readily adapted to O-H-LSD analysis for use in high-volume drug-testing laboratories. In addition, the possibility of significantly increasing the LSD detection time window by targeting this major LSD metabolite for analysis may influence other drug-free workplace programs to test for LSD.

  6. A novel fungal metabolite with beneficial properties for agricultural applications.

    PubMed

    Vinale, Francesco; Manganiello, Gelsomina; Nigro, Marco; Mazzei, Pierluigi; Piccolo, Alessandro; Pascale, Alberto; Ruocco, Michelina; Marra, Roberta; Lombardi, Nadia; Lanzuise, Stefania; Varlese, Rosaria; Cavallo, Pierpaolo; Lorito, Matteo; Woo, Sheridan L

    2014-07-08

    Trichoderma are ubiquitous soil fungi that include species widely used as biocontrol agents in agriculture. Many isolates are known to secrete several secondary metabolites with different biological activities towards plants and other microbes. Harzianic acid (HA) is a T. harzianum metabolite able to promote plant growth and strongly bind iron. In this work, we isolated from the culture filtrate of a T. harzianum strain a new metabolite, named isoharzianic acid (iso-HA), a stereoisomer of HA. The structure and absolute configuration of this compound has been determined by spectroscopic methods, including UV-Vis, MS, 1D and 2D NMR analyses. In vitro applications of iso-HA inhibited the mycelium radial growth of Sclerotinia sclerotiorum and Rhizoctonia solani. Moreover, iso HA improved the germination of tomato seeds and induced disease resistance. HPLC-DAD experiments showed that the production of HA and iso HA was affected by the presence of plant tissue in the liquid medium. In particular, tomato tissue elicited the production of HA but negatively modulated the biosynthesis of its analogue iso-HA, suggesting that different forms of the same Trichoderma secondary metabolite have specific roles in the molecular mechanism regulating the Trichoderma plant interaction.

  7. Reactive Arrays of Colorimetric Sensors for Metabolite and Steroid Identification.

    PubMed

    Batres, Gary; Jones, Talia; Johnke, Hannah; Wilson, Mark; Holmes, Andrea E; Sikich, Sharmin

    2014-12-31

    The work described herein examines a rapid mix-and-measure method called DETECHIP suitable for screening of steroids and metabolites. The addition of steroids and metabolites to reactive arrays of colorimetric sensors generated characteristic color "fingerprints" that were used to identify the analyte. A color analysis tool was used to identify the analyte pool that now includes biologically relevant analytes. The mix-and-measure arrays allowed the detection of disease metabolites, orotic acid and argininosuccinic acid; and the steroids androsterone, 1,4-androstadiene, testosterone, stanozolol, and estrone. The steroid 1,4-androstadiene was also detected by this method while dissolved in synthetic urine. Some of the steroids, such as androstadiene, stanozolol, and androsterone were co-dissolved with (2-hydroxypropyl)-β-cyclodextrin in order to increase solubility in aqueous buffered solutions. The colorimetric arrays do not intend to eliminate ELISA or mass spectroscopy based screening, but to possibly provide an alternative analytical detection method for steroids and metabolites. PMID:25019034

  8. Pentylindole/Pentylindazole Synthetic Cannabinoids and Their 5-Fluoro Analogs Produce Different Primary Metabolites: Metabolite Profiling for AB-PINACA and 5F-AB-PINACA.

    PubMed

    Wohlfarth, Ariane; Castaneto, Marisol S; Zhu, Mingshe; Pang, Shaokun; Scheidweiler, Karl B; Kronstrand, Robert; Huestis, Marilyn A

    2015-05-01

    Whereas non-fluoropentylindole/indazole synthetic cannabinoids appear to be metabolized preferably at the pentyl chain though without clear preference for one specific position, their 5-fluoro analogs' major metabolites usually are 5-hydroxypentyl and pentanoic acid metabolites. We determined metabolic stability and metabolites of N-(1-amino-3-methyl-1-oxobutan-2-yl)-1-pentyl-1H-indazole-3-carboxamide (AB-PINACA) and 5-fluoro-AB-PINACA (5F-AB-PINACA), two new synthetic cannabinoids, and investigated if results were similar. In silico prediction was performed with MetaSite (Molecular Discovery). For metabolic stability, 1 μmol/L of each compound was incubated with human liver microsomes for up to 1 h, and for metabolite profiling, 10 μmol/L was incubated with pooled human hepatocytes for up to 3 h. Also, authentic urine specimens from AB-PINACA cases were hydrolyzed and extracted. All samples were analyzed by liquid chromatography high-resolution mass spectrometry on a TripleTOF 5600+ (AB SCIEX) with gradient elution (0.1% formic acid in water and acetonitrile). High-resolution full-scan mass spectrometry (MS) and information-dependent acquisition MS/MS data were analyzed with MetabolitePilot (AB SCIEX) using different data processing algorithms. Both drugs had intermediate clearance. We identified 23 AB-PINACA metabolites, generated by carboxamide hydrolysis, hydroxylation, ketone formation, carboxylation, epoxide formation with subsequent hydrolysis, or reaction combinations. We identified 18 5F-AB-PINACA metabolites, generated by the same biotransformations and oxidative defluorination producing 5-hydroxypentyl and pentanoic acid metabolites shared with AB-PINACA. Authentic urine specimens documented presence of these metabolites. AB-PINACA and 5F-AB-PINACA produced suggested metabolite patterns. AB-PINACA was predominantly hydrolyzed to AB-PINACA carboxylic acid, carbonyl-AB-PINACA, and hydroxypentyl AB-PINACA, likely in 4-position. The most intense 5F

  9. Metabolite profiling of sucrose effect on the metabolism of Melissa officinalis by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sooah; Shin, Min Hye; Hossain, Md Aktar; Yun, Eun Ju; Lee, Hojoung; Kim, Kyoung Heon

    2011-04-01

    The effect of sugar on plant metabolism, which is known to be similar to hormone-like signaling, was metabolomically studied using Melissa officinalis (lemon balm). The metabolite profiles of M. officinalis treated with sucrose were analyzed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) and principal component analysis (PCA). A total of 64 metabolites from various chemical classes including alcohols, amines, amino acids, fatty acids, inorganic acids, organic acids, phosphates, and sugars were identified by GC-MS. Three groups treated with different sucrose concentrations were clearly separated by PCA of their metabolite profiles, indicating changes in the levels of many metabolites depending on the sucrose concentration. Metabolite profiling revealed that treatment with a higher sucrose level caused an increase in the levels of metabolites such as sugars, sugar alcohols, and sugar phosphates, which are related to the glycolytic pathway of M. officinalis. Furthermore, proline and succinic acid, which are associated with the proline-linked pentose phosphate pathway, the shikimic acid pathway, and the biosynthesis of phenylpropanoids, also increased with increasing sucrose concentration. Therefore, these metabolic changes induced by sucrose ultimately led to the increased production of flavonoids such as caffeic acid via the biosynthetic pathway of phenylpropanoids. This study demonstrated that the abundance changes in some primary and secondary metabolites were somewhat interlocked with each other in response to sucrose. PMID:21301821

  10. Metabolite profiling of sucrose effect on the metabolism of Melissa officinalis by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sooah; Shin, Min Hye; Hossain, Md Aktar; Yun, Eun Ju; Lee, Hojoung; Kim, Kyoung Heon

    2011-04-01

    The effect of sugar on plant metabolism, which is known to be similar to hormone-like signaling, was metabolomically studied using Melissa officinalis (lemon balm). The metabolite profiles of M. officinalis treated with sucrose were analyzed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) and principal component analysis (PCA). A total of 64 metabolites from various chemical classes including alcohols, amines, amino acids, fatty acids, inorganic acids, organic acids, phosphates, and sugars were identified by GC-MS. Three groups treated with different sucrose concentrations were clearly separated by PCA of their metabolite profiles, indicating changes in the levels of many metabolites depending on the sucrose concentration. Metabolite profiling revealed that treatment with a higher sucrose level caused an increase in the levels of metabolites such as sugars, sugar alcohols, and sugar phosphates, which are related to the glycolytic pathway of M. officinalis. Furthermore, proline and succinic acid, which are associated with the proline-linked pentose phosphate pathway, the shikimic acid pathway, and the biosynthesis of phenylpropanoids, also increased with increasing sucrose concentration. Therefore, these metabolic changes induced by sucrose ultimately led to the increased production of flavonoids such as caffeic acid via the biosynthetic pathway of phenylpropanoids. This study demonstrated that the abundance changes in some primary and secondary metabolites were somewhat interlocked with each other in response to sucrose.

  11. Lipid Metabolites from the Mushroom Meripilus giganteus.

    PubMed

    Catenia, Francesca; Altieri, Tiziano; Zacchigna, Marina; Procida, Giuseppe; Zilic, Jelena; Zigon, Dusan; Cichelli, Angelo

    2015-11-01

    The phytochemical investigation of the methanolic extract of the white rot fungus Meripilus giganteus resulted in the isolation and identification of complex mixtures of free fatty acids (1), monoacylglycerols (2), cerebrosides (3), ergosterol (4) and ergosterol peroxide (5). The structures of the isolated lipid metabolites (1-5) were determined by chemical and spectroscopic methods. The antioxidant activity of the whole MeOH extract of the fungus was evaluated through in vitro model systems, such as 2,2-diphenyl-l-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) and superoxide anion. In all two systems, the results indicated that the extract of the fungus showed the same free-radical-scavenging activity with SC50 data of 47.70 µg/mL, compared with the positive control quercetin (DPPH assay). None of the isolated compounds (1-5) showed a significant activity. Compounds 2-4 were isolated from Meripilus giganteus for the first time.

  12. Automated analysis of oxidative metabolites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Furner, R. L. (Inventor)

    1974-01-01

    An automated system for the study of drug metabolism is described. The system monitors the oxidative metabolites of aromatic amines and of compounds which produce formaldehyde on oxidative dealkylation. It includes color developing compositions suitable for detecting hyroxylated aromatic amines and formaldehyde.

  13. Primary expectations of secondary metabolites

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Plant secondary metabolites (e.g., phenolics) are important for human health, in addition to the organoleptic properties they impart to fresh and processed foods. Consumer expectations such as appearance, taste, or texture influence their purchasing decisions. Thorough identification of phenolic com...

  14. Metabolite diversity in the plant pathogen Alternaria brassicicola: factors affecting production of brassicicolin A, depudecin, phomapyrone A and other metabolites.

    PubMed

    Pedras, M Soledade C; Park, Myung Ryeol

    2015-01-01

    A systematic investigation of the metabolites of Alternaria brassicicola produced under various culture conditions is reported. The phytotoxin brassicicolin A is produced in significantly larger amounts in potato dextrose broth than in minimal medium cultures. In general an increase in the incubation temperature of cultures 23-30 C increases the production of brassicicolin A but decreases depudecin production. Reducing or eliminating nitrate from culture media or adding ammonium chloride increases the production of brassicicolin A at 30 C, depudecin at 23 C and α-acetylorcinol at either temperature, suggesting that nitrogen represses their biosynthesis. Siderophores are detected in cultures of A. brassicicola containing low and high ferric ion concentrations. The metabolites α-acetylorcinol and tyrosol are isolated for the first time from cultures of A. brassicicola, and α-acetylorcinol is synthesized in four steps and 36% overall yield. Only brassicicolin A and no other isolated metabolites, including depudecin and phomapyrone A, display phytotoxicity on leaves of Brassica species (up to 5.0 mM). Epigenetic modifiers, 5-azacitidin (5-AZA), suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid (SAHA) and suberoyl bis-hydroxamic acid (SBHA) do not affect the metabolite profiles of liquid cultures of this fungal pathogen.

  15. The impact of zinc sulfate addition on the dynamic metabolic profiling of Saccharomyces cerevisiae subjected to long term acetic acid stress treatment and identification of key metabolites involved in the antioxidant effect of zinc.

    PubMed

    Wan, Chun; Zhang, Mingming; Fang, Qing; Xiong, Liang; Zhao, Xinqing; Hasunuma, Tomohisa; Bai, Fengwu; Kondo, Akihiko

    2015-02-01

    The mechanisms of how zinc protects the cells against acetic acid toxicity and acts as an antioxidant are still not clear. Here we present results of the metabolic profiling of the eukaryotic model yeast species Saccharomyces cerevisiae subjected to long term high concentration acetic acid stress treatment in the presence and absence of zinc supplementation. Zinc addition decreased the release of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in the presence of chronic acetic acid stress. The dynamic changes in the accumulation of intermediates in central carbon metabolism were observed, and higher contents of intracellular alanine, valine and serine were observed by zinc supplementation. The most significant change was observed in alanine content, which is 3.51-fold of that of the control culture in cells in the stationary phase. Subsequently, it was found that 0.5 g L(-1) alanine addition resulted in faster glucose consumption in the presence of 5 g L(-1) acetic acid, and apparently decreased ROS accumulation in zinc-supplemented cells. This indicates that alanine exerted its antioxidant effect at least partially through the detoxification of acetic acid. In addition, intracellular glutathione (GSH) accumulation was enhanced by zinc addition, which is related to the protection of yeast cells from the oxidative injury caused by acetic acid. Our studies revealed for the first time that zinc modulates cellular amino acid metabolism and redox balance, especially biosynthesis of alanine and glutathione to exert its antioxidant effect.

  16. Dietary supplementation with ethyl ester concentrates of fish oil (n-3) and borage oil (n-6) polyunsaturated fatty acids induces epidermal generation of local putative anti-inflammatory metabolites.

    PubMed

    Miller, C C; Tang, W; Ziboh, V A; Fletcher, M P

    1991-01-01

    Clinical reports have attributed the amelioration of chronic inflammatory skin disorders to the presence of certain polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) in dietary oils. To test the hypothesis of a local modulatory effect of these PUFA in the epidermis, the basal diet of normal guinea pigs was supplemented with ethyl esters of either fish oil [rich in eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA)] or borage oil [rich in gamma-linolenic acid (GLA)]. Our data demonstrated that dietary oils influence the distribution of PUFA in epidermal phospholipids and the epidermal levels of PUFA-derived hydroxy fatty acids. Specifically, animals supplemented with ethyl esters of fish oil markedly incorporated EPA and DHA into epidermal phospholipids, which paralleled the epidermal accumulation of 15-hydroxyeicosapentaenoic acid (15-HEPE) and 17-hydroxydocosahexaenoic acid (17-HDoHE). Similarly, animals supplemented with esters of borage oil preferentially incorporated dihomogammalinolenic acid (DGLA), the epidermal elongase product of GLA, into the epidermal phospholipids, which also was accompanied by epidermal accumulation of 15-hydroxyeicosatrienoic acid (15-HETrE). By factoring the epidermal levels of the 15-lipoxygenase products and their relative inhibitory potencies, we evolved a measure of the overall potential of dietary oils to exert local anti-inflammatory effect. For example, the leukotriene inhibition potentials (LIP) of both fish oil and borage oil were greatly enhanced when compared to controls. Thus, the altered profiles of epidermal 15-lipoxygenase products generated from particular dietary oils may be responsible, at least in part, for reported ameliorative effects of oils on chronic inflammatory skin disorders.

  17. Understanding Boswellia papyrifera tree secondary metabolites through bark spectral analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Girma, Atkilt; Skidmore, Andrew K.; de Bie, C. A. J. M.; Bongers, Frans

    2015-07-01

    Decision makers are concerned whether to tap or rest Boswellia Papyrifera trees. Tapping for the production of frankincense is known to deplete carbon reserves from the tree leading to production of less viable seeds, tree carbon starvation and ultimately tree mortality. Decision makers use traditional experience without considering the amount of metabolites stored or depleted from the stem-bark of the tree. This research was designed to come up with a non-destructive B. papyrifera tree metabolite estimation technique relevant for management using spectroscopy. The concentration of biochemicals (metabolites) found in the tree bark was estimated through spectral analysis. Initially, a random sample of 33 trees was selected, the spectra of bark measured with an Analytical Spectral Device (ASD) spectrometer. Bark samples were air dried and ground. Then, 10 g of sample was soaked in Petroleum ether to extract crude metabolites. Further chemical analysis was conducted to quantify and isolate pure metabolite compounds such as incensole acetate and boswellic acid. The crude metabolites, which relate to frankincense produce, were compared to plant properties (such as diameter and crown area) and reflectance spectra of the bark. Moreover, the extract was compared to the ASD spectra using partial least square regression technique (PLSR) and continuum removed spectral analysis. The continuum removed spectral analysis were performed, on two wavelength regions (1275-1663 and 1836-2217) identified through PLSR, using absorption features such as band depth, area, position, asymmetry and the width to characterize and find relationship with the bark extracts. The results show that tree properties such as diameter at breast height (DBH) and the crown area of untapped and healthy trees were strongly correlated to the amount of stored crude metabolites. In addition, the PLSR technique applied to the first derivative transformation of the reflectance spectrum was found to estimate the

  18. Identification of Epoxide-Derived Metabolite(s) of Benzbromarone.

    PubMed

    Wang, Kai; Wang, Hui; Peng, Ying; Zheng, Jiang

    2016-04-01

    Benzbromarone (BBR) is a benzofuran derivative that has been quite useful for the treatment of gout; however, it was withdrawn from European markets in 2003 because of reported serious incidents of drug-induced liver injury. BBR-induced hepatotoxicity has been suggested to be associated with the formation of a quinone intermediate. The present study reported epoxide-derived intermediate(s) of BBR. An N-acetylcysteine (NAC) conjugate derived from epoxide metabolite(s) was detected in both microsomal incubations of BBR and urine samples of mice treated with BBR. The NAC conjugate was identified as 6-NAC BBR. Ketoconazole suppressed the bioactivation of BBR to the epoxide intermediate(s), and the CYP3A subfamily was the primary enzyme responsible for the formation of the epoxide(s). The present study provided new information on metabolic activation of BBR. PMID:26792818

  19. Metabolite analysis of Mycobacterium species under aerobic and hypoxic conditions reveals common metabolic traits.

    PubMed

    Drapal, Margit; Wheeler, Paul R; Fraser, Paul D

    2016-08-01

    A metabolite profiling approach has been implemented to elucidate metabolic adaptation at set culture conditions in five Mycobacterium species (two fast- and three slow-growing) with the potential to act as model organisms for Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb). Analysis has been performed over designated growth phases and under representative environments (nutrient and oxygen depletion) experienced by Mtb during infection. The procedure was useful in determining a range of metabolites (60-120 compounds) covering nucleotides, amino acids, organic acids, saccharides, fatty acids, glycerols, -esters, -phosphates and isoprenoids. Among these classes of compounds, key biomarker metabolites, which can act as indicators of pathway/process activity, were identified. In numerous cases, common metabolite traits were observed for all five species across the experimental conditions (e.g. uracil indicating DNA repair). Amino acid content, especially glutamic acid, highlighted the different properties between the fast- and slow-growing mycobacteria studied (e.g. nitrogen assimilation). The greatest similarities in metabolite composition between fast- and slow-growing mycobacteria were apparent under hypoxic conditions. A comparison to previously reported transcriptomic data revealed a strong correlation between changes in transcription and metabolite content. Collectively, these data validate the changes in the transcription at the metabolite level, suggesting transcription exists as one of the predominant modes of cellular regulation in Mycobacterium. Sectors with restricted correlation between metabolites and transcription (e.g. hypoxic cultivation) warrant further study to elucidate and exploit post-transcriptional modes of regulation. The strong correlation between the laboratory conditions used and data derived from in vivo conditions, indicate that the approach applied is a valuable addition to our understanding of cell regulation in these Mycobacterium species.

  20. Pesticide Urinary Metabolite Levels of Children in Eastern North Carolina Farmworker Households

    PubMed Central

    Arcury, Thomas A.; Grzywacz, Joseph G.; Barr, Dana B.; Tapia, Janeth; Chen, Haiying; Quandt, Sara A.

    2007-01-01

    Background In this investigation we documented the pesticide urinary metabolite levels of farmworker children in North Carolina, determined the number of different metabolites detected for each child, and delineated risk factors associated with the number of metabolites. Methods Urine samples were collected from 60 Latino farmworker children 1–6 years of age (34 female, 26 male). Interviews were completed by their mothers in Spanish. We analyzed urine samples for 14 pesticide metabolites, including the organophosphate pesticides chlorpyrifos, coumaphos, diazinon, isazaphos, malathion, pirimiphos, and parathion and its methyl counterpart; a common metabolite of at least 18 pyrethroid insecticides; the repellent DEET; and the herbicides 2,4,5-trichlorphenoxyacetic acid, 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid, acetochlor, atrazine, and metolachlor. Predictors included measures of paraoccupational, residential, and environmental exposure, child characteristics, and mother characteristics. Results Thirteen metabolites were present in the urine samples. Organophosphate pesticide metabolites were detected in a substantial proportion of children, particularly metabolites of parathion/methyl parathion (90.0%; geometric mean 1.00 μg/L), chlorpyrifos/chlorpyrifos methyl (83.3%; geometric mean 1.92 μg/L), and diazinon (55.0%; geometric mean 10.56 μg/L). The number of metabolites detected ranged from 0 to 7, with a mode of 4 detected (28.3%). Boys, children living in rented housing, and children with mothers working part-time had more metabolites detected. Conclusions Children in farmworker homes experience multiple sources of pesticide exposure. Pesticides may remain in their environments for long periods. Environmental and occupational health changes are needed to address these exposures. Research is needed with more precise measures of exposure and on the health effects of concurrent exposure to multiple pesticides. PMID:17687456

  1. AN IMPROVED HPLC-MS/MS METHOD FOR DETERMINATION OF ISOXAFLUTOLE (BALANCE) AND ITS METABOLITES IN SOILS AND FORAGE PLANTS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    An analytical method using turbo-spray and heat-nebulizer high-performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (HPLC-MS/MS) was developed for the analysis of isoxaflutole (IXF) and its two metabolites, diketonitrile (DKN) and the benzoic acid metabolite (BA), at sub 'g/kg levels in soil a...

  2. The Metabolite Transporters of the Plastid Envelope: An Update

    PubMed Central

    Facchinelli, Fabio; Weber, Andreas P. M.

    2011-01-01

    The engulfment of a photoautotrophic cyanobacterium by a primitive mitochondria-bearing eukaryote traces back to more than 1.2 billion years ago. This single endosymbiotic event not only provided the early petroalgae with the metabolic capacity to perform oxygenic photosynthesis, but also introduced a plethora of other metabolic routes ranging from fatty acids and amino acids biosynthesis, nitrogen and sulfur assimilation to secondary compounds synthesis. This implicated the integration and coordination of the newly acquired metabolic entity with the host metabolism. The interface between the host cytosol and the plastidic stroma became of crucial importance in sorting precursors and products between the plastid and other cellular compartments. The plastid envelope membranes fulfill different tasks: they perform important metabolic functions, as they are involved in the synthesis of carotenoids, chlorophylls, and galactolipids. In addition, since most genes of cyanobacterial origin have been transferred to the nucleus, plastidial proteins encoded by nuclear genes are post-translationally transported across the envelopes through the TIC–TOC import machinery. Most importantly, chloroplasts supply the photoautotrophic cell with photosynthates in form of reduced carbon. The innermost bilayer of the plastidic envelope represents the permeability barrier for the metabolites involved in the carbon cycle and is literally stuffed with transporter proteins facilitating their transfer. The intracellular metabolite transporters consist of polytopic proteins containing membrane spans usually in the number of four or more α-helices. Phylogenetic analyses revealed that connecting the plastid with the host metabolism was mainly a process driven by the host cell. In Arabidopsis, 58% of the metabolite transporters are of host origin, whereas only 12% are attributable to the cyanobacterial endosymbiont. This review focuses on the metabolite transporters of the inner envelope

  3. Cerebrospinal Fluid Levels of Monoamine Metabolites in the Epileptic Baboon

    PubMed Central

    Szabó, C. Ákos; Patel, Mayuri; Uteshev, Victor V.

    2016-01-01

    The baboon represents a natural model for genetic generalized epilepsy and sudden unexpected death in epilepsy (SUDEP). In this retrospective study, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) monoamine metabolites and scalp electroencephalography (EEG) were evaluated in 263 baboons of a pedigreed colony. CSF monoamine abnormalities have been linked to reduced seizure thresholds, behavioral abnormalities and SUDEP in various animal models of epilepsy. The levels of 3-hydroxy-4-methoxyphenylglycol, 5-hydroxyindolacetic acid and homovanillic acid in CSF samples drawn from the cisterna magna were analyzed using high-performance liquid chromatography. These levels were compared between baboons with seizures (SZ), craniofacial trauma (CFT) and asymptomatic, control (CTL) baboons, between baboons with abnormal and normal EEG studies. We hypothesized that the CSF levels of major monoaminergic metabolites (i.e., dopamine, serotonin and norepinephrine) associate with the baboons’ electroclinical status and thus can be used as clinical biomarkers applicable to seizures/epilepsy. However, despite apparent differences in metabolite levels between the groups, usually lower in SZ and CFT baboons and in baboons with abnormal EEG studies, we did not find any statistically significant differences using a logistic regression analysis. Significant correlations between the metabolite levels, especially between 5-HIAA and HVA, were preserved in all electroclinical groups. While we were not able to demonstrate significant differences in monoamine metabolites in relation to seizures or EEG markers of epilepsy, we cannot exclude the monoaminergic system as a potential source of pathogenesis in epilepsy and SUDEP. A prospective study evaluating serial CSF monoamine levels in baboons with recently witnessed seizures, and evaluation of abnormal expression and function of monoaminergic receptors and transporters within epilepsy-related brain regions, may impact the electroclinical status. PMID:26924854

  4. Circadian variations in the liver metabolites of medaka (Oryzias latipes)

    PubMed Central

    Fujisawa, Koichi; Takami, Taro; Kimoto, Yoshitaka; Matsumoto, Toshihiko; Yamamoto, Naoki; Terai, Shuji; Sakaida, Isao

    2016-01-01

    Circadian rhythms are biological rhythms with a period of around 24 hours. In this study, we compared the metabolome of the liver of medaka during the day and night. To comprehensively analyze the circadian variations in the levels of metabolites in the liver, livers were isolated from Zeitgeber time (ZT)4 and ZT16, and the variations in metabolite levels were evaluated. Inosinemonophosphate (IMP) and uridinemonophosphate (UMP) were found to be increased at night, indicating that nucleotide synthesis is most active during the night. Furthermore, the levels of metabolites of the tricarboxylic acid cycle were also reduced at night. In addition, the levels of many amino acids were reduced during the night, suggesting that the amino acids had been degraded. Moreover, the citrulline/ornithine ratio, which is related to arginine consumption, was lower during the day than at night. This pattern suggests that the urea cycle is activated during the day, whereas large amounts of nitric oxide and citrulline may be produced from arginine via nitric oxide synthase during the night. The results of this metabolomic analysis may be useful in future fundamental research to provide insight into chronobiology as well as applied research on drug evaluations using medaka as a model species. PMID:26862003

  5. Profiling of metabolites in oil palm mesocarp at different stages of oil biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Neoh, Bee Keat; Teh, Huey Fang; Ng, Theresa Lee Mei; Tiong, Soon Huat; Thang, Yin Mee; Ersad, Mohd Amiron; Mohamed, Mohaimi; Chew, Fook Tim; Kulaveerasingam, Harikrishna; Appleton, David R

    2013-02-27

    Oil palm is one of the most productive oil producing crops and can store up to 90% oil in its fruit mesocarp. However, the biosynthetic regulation and drivers of palm mesocarp development are still not well understood. Multiplatform metabolomics technology was used to profile palm metabolites during six critical stages of fruit development in order to better understand lipid biosynthesis. Significantly higher amino acid levels were observed in palm mesocarp preceding lipid biosynthesis. Nucleosides were found to be in high concentration during lipid biosynthesis, whereas levels of metabolites involved in the tricarboxylic acid cycle were more concentrated during early fruit development. Apart from insights into the regulation of metabolites during fruit development in oil palm, these results provide potentially useful metabolite yield markers and genes of interest for use in breeding programs. PMID:23384169

  6. Two metabolites from Aspergillus flavipes.

    PubMed

    Clark, A M; Hufford, C D; Robertson, L W

    1977-01-01

    Two novel fungal metabolites, N-benzoyl-L-phenylalaninol (1a) and asperphenamate (2) were isolated from the culture filtrate and mycelium of Aspergillus flavipes ATCC 11013. N-benzoyl-L-phenylalaninol was identified by direct comparison with an authentic sample. The structure of asperphenamate is proposed as (S)-N-benzoyl-phenylalanine-(S)-2-benzamido-3-phenyl propyl ester, based on chemical and spectroscopic evidence. PMID:875642

  7. Correlation between species-specific metabolite profiles and bioactivities of blueberries (Vaccinium spp.).

    PubMed

    Lee, Sarah; Jung, Eun Sung; Do, Seon-Gil; Jung, Ga-Young; Song, Gwanpil; Song, Jung-Min; Lee, Choong Hwan

    2014-03-01

    Metabolite profiling of three blueberry species (Vaccinium bracteatum Thunb., V. oldhamii Miquel., and V. corymbosum L.) was performed using gas chromatography-time-of-flight-mass spectrometry (GC-TOF-MS) and ultraperformance liquid chromatography-quadrupole-time-of-flight-mass spectrometry (UPLC-Q-TOF-MS) combined multivariate analysis. Partial least-squares discriminant analysis clearly showed metabolic differences among species. GC-TOF-MS analysis revealed significant differences in amino acids, organic acids, fatty acids, sugars, and phenolic acids among the three blueberry species. UPLC-Q-TOF-MS analysis indicated that anthocyanins were the major metabolites distinguishing V. bracteatum from V. oldhamii. The contents of anthocyanins such as glycosides of cyanidin were high in V. bracteatum, while glycosides of delphinidin, petunidin, and malvidin were high in V. oldhamii. Antioxidant activities assessed using ABTS and DPPH assays showed the greatest activity in V. oldhamii and revealed the highest correlation with total phenolic, total flavonoid, and total anthocyanin contents and their metabolites.

  8. Differential metabolite profiles during fruit development in high-yielding oil palm mesocarp.

    PubMed

    Teh, Huey Fang; Neoh, Bee Keat; Hong, May Ping Li; Low, Jaime Yoke Sum; Ng, Theresa Lee Mei; Ithnin, Nalisha; Thang, Yin Mee; Mohamed, Mohaimi; Chew, Fook Tim; Yusof, Hirzun Mohd; Kulaveerasingam, Harikrishna; Appleton, David R

    2013-01-01

    To better understand lipid biosynthesis in oil palm mesocarp, in particular the differences in gene regulation leading to and including de novo fatty acid biosynthesis, a multi-platform metabolomics technology was used to profile mesocarp metabolites during six critical stages of fruit development in comparatively high- and low-yielding oil palm populations. Significantly higher amino acid levels preceding lipid biosynthesis and nucleosides during lipid biosynthesis were observed in a higher yielding commercial palm population. Levels of metabolites involved in glycolysis revealed interesting divergence of flux towards glycerol-3-phosphate, while carbon utilization differences in the TCA cycle were proven by an increase in malic acid/citric acid ratio. Apart from insights into the regulation of enhanced lipid production in oil palm, these results provide potentially useful metabolite yield markers and genes of interest for use in breeding programmes. PMID:23593468

  9. Quantification of Water-Soluble Metabolites in Medicinal Mushrooms Using Proton NMR Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Lo, Yu-Chang; Chien, Shih-Chang; Mishchuk, Darya O; Slupsky, Carolyn M; Mau, Jeng-Leun

    2016-01-01

    The water-soluble metabolites in 5 mushrooms were identified and quantified using proton nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy and software for targeted metabolite detection and quantification. In total, 35 compounds were found in Agaricus brasiliensis, 25 in Taiwanofungus camphoratus, 23 in Ganoderma lucidum (Taiwan) and Lentinus edodes, and 16 in G. lucidum (China). Total amounts of all identified metabolites in A. brasiliensis, T. camphoratus, G. lucidum, G. lucidum (China), and L. edodes were 149,950.51, 12,834.18, 9,549.09, 2,788.41, and 111,726.51 mg/kg dry weight, respectively. These metabolites were categorized into 4 groups: free amino acids and derivatives, carbohydrates, carboxylic acids, and nucleosides. Carbohydrates were the most abundant metabolites among all 4 groups, with mannitol having the highest concentration among all analyzed metabolites (848-94,104 mg/kg dry weight). Principal components analysis (PCA) showed obvious distinction among the metabolites of the 5 different kinds of mushrooms analyzed in this study. Thus PCA could provide an optional analytical way of identifying and recognizing the compositions of flavor products. Furthermore, the results of this study demonstrate that NMRbased metabolomics is a powerful tool for differentiating between various medicinal mushrooms. PMID:27649603

  10. Bioactive metabolites from Spilanthes acmella Murr.

    PubMed

    Prachayasittikul, Supaluk; Suphapong, Saowapa; Worachartcheewan, Apilak; Lawung, Ratana; Ruchirawat, Somsak; Prachayasittikul, Virapong

    2009-01-01

    Spilanthes acmella Murr. (Compositae) has been used as a traditional medicine for toothache, rheumatism and fever. Its extracts had been shown to exhibit vasorelaxant and antioxidant activities. Herein, its antimicrobial, antioxidant and cytotoxic activities were evaluated. Agar dilution method assays against 27 strains of microorganisms were performed. Results showed that fractions from the chloroform and methanol extracts inhibited the growth of many tested organisms, e.g. Corynebacterium diphtheriae NCTC 10356 with minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) of 64-256 mg/mL and Bacillus subtilis ATCC 6633 with MIC of 128-256 mg/mL. The tested fractions all exhibited antioxidant properties in both DPPH and SOD assays. Potent radical scavenging activity was observed in the DPPH assay. No cytotoxic effects of the extracts against KB and HuCCA-1 cell lines were evident. Bioassay-guided isolation resulted in a diverse group of bioactive compounds such as phenolics [vanillic acid (2), trans-ferulic acid (5) and trans-isoferulic acid (6)], coumarin (scopoletin, 4) and triterpenoids like 3-acetylaleuritolic acid (1), b-sitostenone (3), stigmasterol and stigmasteryl-3-O-b-D-glucopyranosides, in addition to a mixture of stigmasteryl-and b-sitosteryl-3-O-b-D-glucopyranosides. The compounds 1-6 represent bioactive metabolites of S. acmella Murr. that were never previously reported. Our findings demonstrate for the first time the potential benefits of this medicinal plant as a rich source of high therapeutic value compounds for medicines, cosmetics, supplements and as a health food. PMID:19255544

  11. Metabolism of Chuanxiong Rhizoma decoction: Identification of the metabolites in WZS-miniature pig urine.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lei; Yang, Dong-Hui; Zhao, Xin; Xu, Feng; Liang, Jing; Zhou, Qi-Le; Yang, Xiao-Yan; Yang, Xiu-Wei

    2015-09-01

    Chuanxiong Rhizoma (CR), a well-known traditional Chinese medicine originated from the rhizome of Ligusticum chuanxiong Hort., was effective for treating various vascular diseases. To identify the metabolites of CR in vivo, the drug-containing urine samples of WZS-miniature pigs after orally administrated CR decoction were collected, after sequential column chromatography 17 metabolites (M1-M17) were isolated from the methanol extract of the urine samples. Their structures, including nine phthalides (M1-M9) and eight phenolic acids (M10-M17), were identified by spectroscopic means. Among them, 8 were new ones (M1-M6, M11-M12). On the basis of the structures of identified metabolites, seven original constituents, including 2 phthalides (senkyunolideI/H) and 5 phenolic acids (ferulic acid, isoferulic acid, caffeic acid, 3-hydroxycinnamoyl acid and 4-hydroxybenzonic acid) were deduced to be the major absorbed original constituents of CR in vivo. This is the first study on the metabolites of CR decoction in non-rodent animal (WZS-miniature pig), the results will give an insight into the metabolism profiles of phthalides and phenolic acids in CR decoction in vivo. PMID:26162556

  12. RELTIVE POTENCIES OF SELECTED DIHALOACETATES AND THEIR MAJOR METABOLITES IN RODENT WHOLE EMBRYO CULTURE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Relative potencies of selected dihaloacetic acids and their major metabolites in rodent whole embryo culture.

    S. Hunter, M. Blanton, E. Rogers
    RTD, NHEERL, ORD, US EPA, RTP, NC, 27711

    Haloacetic acids (HAA) are produced by disinfection and present in tap water. S...

  13. Marine-Derived Metabolites of S-Adenosylmethionine as Templates for New Anti-Infectives

    PubMed Central

    Sufrin, Janice R.; Finckbeiner, Steven; Oliver, Colin M.

    2009-01-01

    S-Adenosylmethionine (AdoMet) is a key biochemical co-factor whose proximate metabolites include methylated macromolecules (e.g., nucleic acids, proteins, phospholipids), methylated small molecules (e.g., sterols, biogenic amines), polyamines (e.g., spermidine, spermine), ethylene, and N-acyl-homoserine lactones. Marine organisms produce numerous AdoMet metabolites whose novel structures can be regarded as lead compounds for anti-infective drug design. PMID:19841722

  14. Rapid analysis of fungal cultures and dried figs for secondary metabolites by LC/TOF-MS.

    PubMed

    Senyuva, Hamide Z; Gilbert, John; Oztürkoğlu, Sebnem

    2008-06-01

    A liquid chromatography-time-of-flight mass spectrometry (LC/TOF-MS) method has been developed for profiling fungal metabolites. The performance of the procedure in terms of mass accuracy, selectivity (specificity) and repeatability was established by spiking aflatoxins, ochratoxins, trichothecenes and other metabolites into blank growth media. After extracting, and carrying out LC/TOF-MS analysis, the standards were correctly identified by searching a specially constructed database of 465 secondary metabolites. To demonstrate the viability of this approach 11 toxigenic and four non-toxigenic fungi from reference collections were grown on various media, for 7-14 days. The method was also applied to two toxigenic fungi, A. flavus (200-138) and A. parasiticus (2999-465) grown on gamma radiation sterilised dried figs, for 7-14 days. The fungal hyphae plus a portion of growth media or portions of dried figs were solvent extracted and analysed by LC/TOF-MS using a rapid resolution microbore LC column. Data processing based on cluster analysis, showed that electrospray ionization (ESI)-TOF-MS could be used to unequivocally identify metabolites in crude extracts. Using the elemental metabolite database, it was demonstrated that from culture collection isolates, anticipated metabolites. The speed and simplicity of the method has meant that levels of these metabolites could be monitored daily in sterilised figs. Over a 14-day period, levels of aflatoxins and kojic acid maximised at 5-6 days, whilst levels of 5-methoxysterigmatocystin remained relatively constant. In addition to the known metabolites expected to be produced by these fungi, roquefortine A, fumagillin, fumigaclavine B, malformins (peptides), aspergillic acid, nigragillin, terrein, terrestric acid and penicillic acid were also identified. PMID:18486645

  15. Association between Metabolite Profiles, Metabolic Syndrome and Obesity Status.

    PubMed

    Allam-Ndoul, Bénédicte; Guénard, Frédéric; Garneau, Véronique; Cormier, Hubert; Barbier, Olivier; Pérusse, Louis; Vohl, Marie-Claude

    2016-01-01

    Underlying mechanisms associated with the development of abnormal metabolic phenotypes among obese individuals are not yet clear. Our aim is to investigate differences in plasma metabolomics profiles between normal weight (NW) and overweight/obese (Ov/Ob) individuals, with or without metabolic syndrome (MetS). Mass spectrometry-based metabolite profiling was used to compare metabolite levels between each group. Three main principal components factors explaining a maximum of variance were retained. Factor 1's (long chain glycerophospholipids) metabolite profile score was higher among Ov/Ob with MetS than among Ov/Ob and NW participants without MetS. This factor was positively correlated to plasma total cholesterol (total-C) and triglyceride levels in the three groups, to high density lipoprotein -cholesterol (HDL-C) among participants without MetS. Factor 2 (amino acids and short to long chain acylcarnitine) was positively correlated to HDL-C and negatively correlated with insulin levels among NW participants. Factor 3's (medium chain acylcarnitines) metabolite profile scores were higher among NW participants than among Ov/Ob with or without MetS. Factor 3 was negatively associated with glucose levels among the Ov/Ob with MetS. Factor 1 seems to be associated with a deteriorated metabolic profile that corresponds to obesity, whereas Factors 2 and 3 seem to be rather associated with a healthy metabolic profile. PMID:27240400

  16. Association between Metabolite Profiles, Metabolic Syndrome and Obesity Status.

    PubMed

    Allam-Ndoul, Bénédicte; Guénard, Frédéric; Garneau, Véronique; Cormier, Hubert; Barbier, Olivier; Pérusse, Louis; Vohl, Marie-Claude

    2016-01-01

    Underlying mechanisms associated with the development of abnormal metabolic phenotypes among obese individuals are not yet clear. Our aim is to investigate differences in plasma metabolomics profiles between normal weight (NW) and overweight/obese (Ov/Ob) individuals, with or without metabolic syndrome (MetS). Mass spectrometry-based metabolite profiling was used to compare metabolite levels between each group. Three main principal components factors explaining a maximum of variance were retained. Factor 1's (long chain glycerophospholipids) metabolite profile score was higher among Ov/Ob with MetS than among Ov/Ob and NW participants without MetS. This factor was positively correlated to plasma total cholesterol (total-C) and triglyceride levels in the three groups, to high density lipoprotein -cholesterol (HDL-C) among participants without MetS. Factor 2 (amino acids and short to long chain acylcarnitine) was positively correlated to HDL-C and negatively correlated with insulin levels among NW participants. Factor 3's (medium chain acylcarnitines) metabolite profile scores were higher among NW participants than among Ov/Ob with or without MetS. Factor 3 was negatively associated with glucose levels among the Ov/Ob with MetS. Factor 1 seems to be associated with a deteriorated metabolic profile that corresponds to obesity, whereas Factors 2 and 3 seem to be rather associated with a healthy metabolic profile.

  17. Metabolites identification of bioactive licorice compounds in rats.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qi; Qian, Yi; Wang, Qing; Yang, Yan-Fang; Ji, Shuai; Song, Wei; Qiao, Xue; Guo, De-An; Liang, Hong; Ye, Min

    2015-11-10

    Licorice (Glycyrrhiza uralensis Fisch.) is one of the most popular herbal medicines worldwide. This study aims to identify the metabolites of seven representative bioactive licorice compounds in rats. These compounds include 22β-acetoxyl glycyrrhizin (1), licoflavonol (2), licoricidin (3), licoisoflavanone (4), isoglycycoumarin (5), semilicoisoflavone B (6), and 3-methoxy-9-hydroxy-pterocarpan (7). After oral administration of 250mg/kg of 1 or 40mg/kg of 2-7 to rats, a total of 16, 43 and 31 metabolites were detected in the plasma, urine and fecal samples, respectively. The metabolites were characterized by HPLC/DAD/ESI-MS(n) and LC/IT-TOF-MS analyses. Particularly, two metabolites of 1 were unambiguously identified by comparing with reference standards, and 22β-acetoxyl glycyrrhizin-6″-methyl ester (1-M2) is a new compound. Compound 1 could be readily hydrolyzed to eliminate the glucuronic acid residue. The phenolic compounds (4-7) mainly undertook phase II metabolism (glucuronidation or sulfation). Most phenolic compounds with an isoprenyl group