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Sample records for alkylated dna bases

  1. DNA minor groove targeted alkylating agents based on bisbenzimidazole carriers: synthesis, cytotoxicity and sequence-specificity of DNA alkylation.

    PubMed

    Smaill, J B; Fan, J Y; Denny, W A

    1998-12-01

    A series of bisbenzimidazoles bearing a variety of alkylating agents [ortho- and meta-mustards, imidazolebis(hydroxymethyl), imidazolebis(methylcarbamate) and pyrrolebis(hydroxymethyl)], appended by a propyl linker chain, were prepared and investigated for sequence-specificity of DNA alkylation and their cytotoxicity. Previous work has shown that, for para-aniline mustards, a propyl linker is optimal for cytotoxicity. Alkaline cleavage assays using a variety of different labelled oligonucleotides showed that the preferred sequences for adenine alkylation were 5'-TTTANANAANN and 5'-ATTANANAANN (underlined bases show the drug alkylation sites), with AT-rich sequences required on both the 5' and 3' sides of the alkylated adenine. The different aniline mustards showed little variation in alkylation pattern and similar efficiencies of DNA cross-link formation despite the changes in orientation and positioning of the mustard, suggesting that the propyl linker has some flexibility. The imidazole- and pyrrolebis(hydroxymethyl) alkylators showed no DNA strand cleavage following base treatment, indicating that no guanine or adenine N3 or N7 adducts were formed. Using the PCR-based polymerase stop assay, these alkylators showed PCR blocks at 5'-C*G sites (the * nucleotide indicates the blocked site), particularly at 5'-TAC*GA 5'-AGC*GGA, and 5'-AGCC*GGT sequences, caused by guanine 2-NH2 lesions on the opposite strand. Only the (more reactive) imidazolebis(methylcarbamoyl) and pyrrolebis(hydroxymethyl) alkylators demonstrated interstrand cross-linking ability. All of the bifunctional mustards showed large (approximately 100-fold) increases in cytotoxicity over chlorambucil, with the corresponding monofunctional mustards being 20- to 60-fold less cytotoxic. These results suggest that in the mustards the propyl linker provides sufficient flexibility to achieve delivery of the alkylator to favoured (adenine N3) sites in the minor groove, regardless of its exact geometry with

  2. DNA-directed alkylating agents. 4. 4-anilinoquinoline-based minor groove directed aniline mustards.

    PubMed

    Gravatt, G L; Baguley, B C; Wilson, W R; Denny, W A

    1991-05-01

    A series of 4-anilinoquinoline-linked aniline mustards of widely varying mustard reactivity were prepared and evaluated for their antitumor activity. The compounds were designed as minor grove binding agents, where the aniline mustard ring is itself part of the DNA-binding ligand. While there was a general trend for cytotoxicity to correlate with mustard reactivity, this was much less pronounced than with untargeted mustards. The compounds were much more cytotoxic than the parent diols, and were also at least 10-fold more cytotoxic than the corresponding aniline mustards themselves. Comparative cell line studies suggested that the mechanism of cytotoxicity varied with mustard reactivity. The most reactive mustards cross-linked DNA, while cell killing by the less reactive compounds appeared to be by the formation of bulky monoadducts. The compounds were active but not particularly dose-potent against P388 leukemia in vivo. The modest potency may be related to their poor aqueous solubility, since the more soluble methyl quaternary salts were equally active at much lower doses.

  3. A new strategy for site-specific alkylation of DNA using oligonucleotides containing an abasic site and alkylating probes.

    PubMed

    Sato, Norihiro; Tsuji, Genichiro; Sasaki, Yoshihiro; Usami, Akira; Moki, Takuma; Onizuka, Kazumitsu; Yamada, Ken; Nagatsugi, Fumi

    2015-10-14

    Selective chemical reactions with DNA, such as its labelling, are very useful in many applications. In this paper, we discuss a new strategy for the selective alkylation of DNA using an oligonucleotide containing an abasic site and alkylating probes. We designed three probes consisting of 2-AVP as a reactive moiety and three kinds of binding moiety with high affinity to duplex DNA. Among these probes, Hoechst-AVP probe exhibited high selectivity and efficient reactivity to thymine bases at the site opposite an abasic site in DNA. Our method is potentially useful for inducing site-directed reactions aimed at inhibiting polymerase reactions.

  4. Structure-function relationships governing activity and stability of a DNA alkylation damage repair thermostable protein.

    PubMed

    Perugino, Giuseppe; Miggiano, Riccardo; Serpe, Mario; Vettone, Antonella; Valenti, Anna; Lahiri, Samarpita; Rossi, Franca; Rossi, Mosè; Rizzi, Menico; Ciaramella, Maria

    2015-10-15

    Alkylated DNA-protein alkyltransferases repair alkylated DNA bases, which are among the most common DNA lesions, and are evolutionary conserved, from prokaryotes to higher eukaryotes. The human ortholog, hAGT, is involved in resistance to alkylating chemotherapy drugs. We report here on the alkylated DNA-protein alkyltransferase, SsOGT, from an archaeal species living at high temperature, a condition that enhances the harmful effect of DNA alkylation. The exceptionally high stability of SsOGT gave us the unique opportunity to perform structural and biochemical analysis of a protein of this class in its post-reaction form. This analysis, along with those performed on SsOGT in its ligand-free and DNA-bound forms, provides insights in the structure-function relationships of the protein before, during and after DNA repair, suggesting a molecular basis for DNA recognition, catalytic activity and protein post-reaction fate, and giving hints on the mechanism of alkylation-induced inactivation of this class of proteins.

  5. Bifunctional rhodium intercalator conjugates as mismatch-directing DNA alkylating agents.

    PubMed

    Schatzschneider, Ulrich; Barton, Jacqueline K

    2004-07-21

    A conjugate of a DNA mismatch-specific rhodium intercalator, containing the bulky chrysenediimine ligand, and an aniline mustard has been prepared, and targeting of mismatches in DNA by this conjugate has been examined. The preferential alkylation of mismatched over fully matched DNA is found by a mobility shift assay at concentrations where untethered organic mustards show little reaction. The binding site of the Rh intercalator was determined by DNA photocleavage, and the position of covalent modification was established on the basis of the enhanced depurination associated with N-alkylation. The site-selective alkylation at mismatched DNA renders these conjugates useful tools for the covalent tagging of DNA base pair mismatches and new chemotherapeutic design.

  6. Alkylation Induced DNA Repair and Mutagenesis in Escherichia coli.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-11-23

    III (Gates and inn, 1977), Micrococcus luteus UV endo- nuclease (Grossman et al, 1978) and bacteriophage T UV endonuclease (Warner et al, 1980) have DNA...34, Garland Publishing, Inc. New York & London USA. Ather, A., Z. Ahmed and S. Riazxxddin, 1984. Adaptive response of Micrococcus luteus to alkylating...Laval, J., 3. Pierre and F. Laval. 1981. Release of 7-nmthylguanine residues frain alkylated ENA by extracts of Micrococcus luteus and Escherichia

  7. DNA-directed alkylating ligands as potential antitumor agents: sequence specificity of alkylation by intercalating aniline mustards.

    PubMed

    Prakash, A S; Denny, W A; Gourdie, T A; Valu, K K; Woodgate, P D; Wakelin, L P

    1990-10-23

    The sequence preferences for alkylation of a series of novel parasubstituted aniline mustards linked to the DNA-intercalating chromophore 9-aminoacridine by an alkyl chain of variable length were studied by using procedures analogous to Maxam-Gilbert reactions. The compounds alkylate DNA at both guanine and adenine sites. For mustards linked to the acridine by a short alkyl chain through a para O- or S-link group, 5'-GT sequences are the most preferred sites at which N7-guanine alkylation occurs. For analogues with longer chain lengths, the preference of 5'-GT sequences diminishes in favor of N7-adenine alkylation at the complementary 5'-AC sequence. Magnesium ions are shown to selectively inhibit alkylation at the N7 of adenine (in the major groove) by these compounds but not the alkylation at the N3 of adenine (in the minor groove) by the antitumor antibiotic CC-1065. Effects of chromophore variation were also studied by using aniline mustards linked to quinazoline and sterically hindered tert-butyl-9-aminoacridine chromophores. The results demonstrate that in this series of DNA-directed mustards the noncovalent interactions of the carrier chromophores with DNA significantly modify the sequence selectivity of alkylation by the mustard. Relationships between the DNA alkylation patterns of these compounds and their biological activities are discussed.

  8. Water extracts of tree Hypericum sps. protect DNA from oxidative and alkylating damage and enhance DNA repair in colon cells.

    PubMed

    Ramos, Alice A; Marques, Filipe; Fernandes-Ferreira, Manuel; Pereira-Wilson, Cristina

    2013-01-01

    Diet may induce colon carcinogenesis through oxidative or alkylating DNA damage. However, diet may also contain anticarcinogenic compounds that contribute to cancer prevention. DNA damage prevention and/or induction of repair are two important mechanisms involved in cancer chemoprevention by dietary compounds. Hypericum sps. are widely used in traditional medicine to prepare infusions due to their beneficial digestive and neurologic effects. In this study, we investigated the potential of water extracts from three Hypericum sps. and some of their main phenolic compounds to prevent and repair oxidative and alkylating DNA damage in colon cells. The results showed that water extracts of Hypericum perforatum, Hypericum androsaemum, Hypericum undulatum, quercetin and rutin have protective effect against oxidative DNA damage in HT29 cells. Protective effect was also observed against alkylating DNA damage induced by methyl-methanesulfonate, except for H. androsaemum. With regard to alkylating damage repair H. perforatum, H. androsaemum and chlorogenic acid increased repair of alkylating DNA damage by base excision repair pathway. No effect was observed on nucleotide excision repair pathway. Antigenotoxic effects of Hypericum sps. may contribute to colon cancer prevention and the high amount of phenolic compounds present in Hypericum sps. play an important role in DNA protective effects.

  9. Repair of Alkylation Damage in Eukaryotic Chromatin Depends on Searching Ability of Alkyladenine DNA Glycosylase.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yaru; O'Brien, Patrick J

    2015-11-20

    Human alkyladenine DNA glycosylase (AAG) initiates the base excision repair pathway by excising alkylated and deaminated purine lesions. In vitro biochemical experiments demonstrate that AAG uses facilitated diffusion to efficiently search DNA to find rare sites of damage and suggest that electrostatic interactions are critical to the searching process. However, it remains an open question whether DNA searching limits the rate of DNA repair in vivo. We constructed AAG mutants with altered searching ability and measured their ability to protect yeast from alkylation damage in order to address this question. Each of the conserved arginine and lysine residues that are near the DNA binding interface were mutated, and the functional impacts were evaluated using kinetic and thermodynamic analysis. These mutations do not perturb catalysis of N-glycosidic bond cleavage, but they decrease the ability to capture rare lesion sites. Nonspecific and specific DNA binding properties are closely correlated, suggesting that the electrostatic interactions observed in the specific recognition complex are similarly important for DNA searching complexes. The ability of the mutant proteins to complement repair-deficient yeast cells is positively correlated with the ability of the proteins to search DNA in vitro, suggesting that cellular resistance to DNA alkylation is governed by the ability to find and efficiently capture cytotoxic lesions. It appears that chromosomal access is not restricted and toxic sites of alkylation damage are readily accessible to a searching protein.

  10. Aag DNA glycosylase promotes alkylation-induced tissue damage mediated by Parp1.

    PubMed

    Calvo, Jennifer A; Moroski-Erkul, Catherine A; Lake, Annabelle; Eichinger, Lindsey W; Shah, Dharini; Jhun, Iny; Limsirichai, Prajit; Bronson, Roderick T; Christiani, David C; Meira, Lisiane B; Samson, Leona D

    2013-04-01

    Alkylating agents comprise a major class of front-line cancer chemotherapeutic compounds, and while these agents effectively kill tumor cells, they also damage healthy tissues. Although base excision repair (BER) is essential in repairing DNA alkylation damage, under certain conditions, initiation of BER can be detrimental. Here we illustrate that the alkyladenine DNA glycosylase (AAG) mediates alkylation-induced tissue damage and whole-animal lethality following exposure to alkylating agents. Aag-dependent tissue damage, as observed in cerebellar granule cells, splenocytes, thymocytes, bone marrow cells, pancreatic β-cells, and retinal photoreceptor cells, was detected in wild-type mice, exacerbated in Aag transgenic mice, and completely suppressed in Aag⁻/⁻ mice. Additional genetic experiments dissected the effects of modulating both BER and Parp1 on alkylation sensitivity in mice and determined that Aag acts upstream of Parp1 in alkylation-induced tissue damage; in fact, cytotoxicity in WT and Aag transgenic mice was abrogated in the absence of Parp1. These results provide in vivo evidence that Aag-initiated BER may play a critical role in determining the side-effects of alkylating agent chemotherapies and that Parp1 plays a crucial role in Aag-mediated tissue damage.

  11. Sequence-selective single-molecule alkylation with a pyrrole-imidazole polyamide visualized in a DNA nanoscaffold.

    PubMed

    Yoshidome, Tomofumi; Endo, Masayuki; Kashiwazaki, Gengo; Hidaka, Kumi; Bando, Toshikazu; Sugiyama, Hiroshi

    2012-03-14

    We demonstrate a novel strategy for visualizing sequence-selective alkylation of target double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) using a synthetic pyrrole-imidazole (PI) polyamide in a designed DNA origami scaffold. Doubly functionalized PI polyamide was designed by introduction of an alkylating agent 1-(chloromethyl)-5-hydroxy-1,2-dihydro-3H-benz[e]indole (seco-CBI) and biotin for sequence-selective alkylation at the target sequence and subsequent streptavidin labeling, respectively. Selective alkylation of the target site in the substrate DNA was observed by analysis using sequencing gel electrophoresis. For the single-molecule observation of the alkylation by functionalized PI polyamide using atomic force microscopy (AFM), the target position in the dsDNA (∼200 base pairs) was alkylated and then visualized by labeling with streptavidin. Newly designed DNA origami scaffold named "five-well DNA frame" carrying five different dsDNA sequences in its cavities was used for the detailed analysis of the sequence-selectivity and alkylation. The 64-mer dsDNAs were introduced to five individual wells, in which target sequence AGTXCCA/TGGYACT (XY = AT, TA, GC, CG) was employed as fully matched (X = G) and one-base mismatched (X = A, T, C) sequences. The fully matched sequence was alkylated with 88% selectivity over other mismatched sequences. In addition, the PI polyamide failed to attach to the target sequence lacking the alkylation site after washing and streptavidin treatment. Therefore, the PI polyamide discriminated the one mismatched nucleotide at the single-molecule level, and alkylation anchored the PI polyamide to the target dsDNA.

  12. Ada response - a strategy for repair of alkylated DNA in bacteria.

    PubMed

    Mielecki, Damian; Grzesiuk, Elżbieta

    2014-06-01

    Alkylating agents are widespread in the environment and also occur endogenously. They can be cytotoxic or mutagenic to the cells introducing alkylated bases to DNA or RNA. All organisms have evolved multiple DNA repair mechanisms to counteract the effects of DNA alkylation: the most cytotoxic lesion, N(3)-methyladenine (3meA), is excised by AlkA glycosylase initiating base excision repair (BER); toxic N(1)-methyladenine (1meA) and N(3)-methylcytosine (3meC), induced in DNA and RNA, are removed by AlkB dioxygenase; and mutagenic and cytotoxic O(6)-methylguanine (O(6) meG) is repaired by Ada methyltransferase. In Escherichia coli, Ada response involves the expression of four genes, ada, alkA, alkB, and aidB, encoding respective proteins Ada, AlkA, AlkB, and AidB. The Ada response is conserved among many bacterial species; however, it can be organized differently, with diverse substrate specificity of the particular proteins. Here, an overview of the organization of the Ada regulon and function of individual proteins is presented. We put special effort into the characterization of AlkB dioxygenases, their substrate specificity, and function in the repair of alkylation lesions in DNA/RNA.

  13. DNA alkylation lesions and their repair in human cells: modification of the comet assay with 3-methyladenine DNA glycosylase (AlkD).

    PubMed

    Hašplová, Katarína; Hudecová, Alexandra; Magdolénová, Zuzana; Bjøras, Magnar; Gálová, Eliška; Miadoková, Eva; Dušinská, Mária

    2012-01-05

    3-methyladenine DNA glycosylase (AlkD) belongs to a new family of DNA glycosylases; it initiates repair of cytotoxic and promutagenic alkylated bases (its main substrates being 3-methyladenine and 7-methylguanine). The modification of the comet assay (single cell gel electrophoresis) using AlkD enzyme thus allows assessment of specific DNA alkylation lesions. The resulting baseless sugars are alkali-labile, and under the conditions of the alkaline comet assay they appear as DNA strand breaks. The alkylating agent methyl methanesulfonate (MMS) was used to induce alkylation lesions and to optimize conditions for the modified comet assay method with AlkD on human lymphoblastoid (TK6) cells. We also studied cellular and in vitro DNA repair of alkylated bases in DNA in TK6 cells after treatment with MMS. Results from cellular repair indicate that 50% of DNA alkylation is repaired in the first 60 min. The in vitro repair assay shows that while AlkD recognises most alkylation lesions after 60 min, a cell extract from TK6 cells recognises most of the MMS-induced DNA adducts already in the first 15 min of incubation, with maximum detection of lesions after 60 min' incubation. Additionally, we tested the in vitro repair capacity of human lymphocyte extracts from 5 individuals and found them to be able to incise DNA alkylations in the same range as AlkD. The modification of the comet assay with AlkD can be useful for in vitro and in vivo genotoxicity studies to detect alkylation damage and repair and also for human biomonitoring and molecular epidemiology studies.

  14. Effect of pH on DNA alkylation by enzyme-activated mitomycin C and porfiromycin.

    PubMed

    Yu, F; Pan, S S

    1993-06-01

    DNA adduct formation by enzyme-activated antibiotics, mitomycin C (MMC) or porfiromycin (PFM), at pH 7.6 or pH 6.0 under anaerobic conditions was analyzed by a 32P-postlabeling method. Antibiotic activation by rat liver NADPH-cytochrome P-450 reductase (EC 1.6.2.4) and bovine milk xanthine oxidase (EC 1.2.3.2) produced similar results. Five 32P-labeled MMC adducts were separated by thin layer chromatography and high performance liquid chromatography from DNA alkylated at either pH. Four of the radioactive spots separated by thin layer chromatography were identified as two monofunctional monoadducts [1" alpha and 1" beta forms of N2-(2" beta,7"-diaminomitosen-1"-yl)-2'-deoxyguanylic acid], one bifunctional monoadduct [N2-(10"-decarbamoyl-2",7"-diaminomitosen-1" alpha-yl)-2'-deoxyguanylic acid], and one cross-linked adduct [N2-(2" beta,7"-diamino-10"-deoxyguanyl-N2-yl-mitosen- 1" alpha-yl)-2'-deoxyguanylic acid]. One minor radioactive spot was not identified. By comparing DNA alkylated at the two pH values, based on equal amounts of 32P radioactivity, similar amounts of cross-links were detected. However, the DNA showed different ratios of the alpha and beta isomers of the monofunctional monoadduct. Furthermore, the DNA alkylated at pH 6.0 showed more bifunctional monoadducts than did the DNA alkylated at pH 7.6. Analysis of alkylated DNA by enzyme-activated PFM showed a similar spectrum of DNA adduct formation. The effect of pH on the distribution of the five PFM-DNA adducts was similar to that observed for the five MMC-DNA adducts. The distribution of adducts in DNA alkylated at the same pH was similar irrespective of which enzyme activated MMC or PFM. The pH of the reaction during DNA and MMC interaction was the determining factor for the quantitative distribution of the adducts. This pH effect may be important for the cytotoxicity of MMC and PFM in tumor cells that have high levels of reductive enzymes with low optimal pH values.

  15. Transcriptional blockages in a cell-free system by sequence-selective DNA alkylating agents.

    PubMed

    Ferguson, L R; Liu, A P; Denny, W A; Cullinane, C; Talarico, T; Phillips, D R

    2000-04-14

    There is considerable interest in DNA sequence-selective DNA-binding drugs as potential inhibitors of gene expression. Five compounds with distinctly different base pair specificities were compared in their effects on the formation and elongation of the transcription complex from the lac UV5 promoter in a cell-free system. All were tested at drug levels which killed 90% of cells in a clonogenic survival assay. Cisplatin, a selective alkylator at purine residues, inhibited transcription, decreasing the full-length transcript, and causing blockage at a number of GG or AG sequences, making it probable that intrastrand crosslinks are the blocking lesions. A cyclopropylindoline known to be an A-specific alkylator also inhibited transcription, with blocks at adenines. The aniline mustard chlorambucil, that targets primarily G but also A sequences, was also effective in blocking the formation of full-length transcripts. It produced transcription blocks either at, or one base prior to, AA or GG sequences, suggesting that intrastrand crosslinks could again be involved. The non-alkylating DNA minor groove binder Hoechst 33342 (a bisbenzimidazole) blocked formation of the full-length transcript, but without creating specific blockage sites. A bisbenzimidazole-linked aniline mustard analogue was a more effective transcription inhibitor than either chlorambucil or Hoechst 33342, with different blockage sites occurring immediately as compared with 2 h after incubation. The blockages were either immediately prior to AA or GG residues, or four to five base pairs prior to such sites, a pattern not predicted from in vitro DNA-binding studies. Minor groove DNA-binding ligands are of particular interest as inhibitors of gene expression, since they have the potential ability to bind selectively to long sequences of DNA. The results suggest that the bisbenzimidazole-linked mustard does cause alkylation and transcription blockage at novel DNA sites. in addition to sites characteristic of

  16. Sequence selectivity of azinomycin B in DNA alkylation and cross-linking: a QM/MM study.

    PubMed

    Senthilnathan, Dhurairajan; Kalaiselvan, Anbarasan; Venuvanalingam, Ponnambalam

    2013-01-01

    Azinomycin B--a well-known antitumor drug--forms cross-links with DNA through alkylation of purine bases and blocks tumor cell growth. This reaction has been modeled using the ONIOM (B3LYP/6-31+g(d):UFF) method to understand the mechanism and sequence selectivity. ONIOM results have been checked for reliability by comparing them with full quantum mechanics calculations for selected paths. Calculations reveal that, among the purine bases, guanine is more reactive and is alkylated by aziridine ring through the C10 position, followed by alkylation of the epoxide ring through the C21 position of Azinomycin B. While the mono alkylation is controlled kinetically, bis-alkylation is controlled thermodynamically. Solvent effects were included using polarized-continuum-model calculations and no significant change from gas phase results was observed.

  17. Complementary addressed modification and cleavage of a single stranded DNA fragment with alkylating oligonucleotide derivatives.

    PubMed Central

    Vlassov, V V; Zarytova, V F; Kutiavin, I V; Mamaev, S V; Podyminogin, M A

    1986-01-01

    A single stranded DNA fragment was modified with alkylating derivatives of oligonucleotides complementary to a certain nucleotide sequences in the fragment. The derivatives carried aromatic 2-chloroethylamino groups at their 3'- or 5'-terminal nucleotide residues. Some of the derivatives carried both alkylating group and intercalating phenazine group which stabilized complementary complexes. It was found that these oligonucleotide derivatives modify the DNA fragment in a specific way near the target complementary nucleotide sequences, and the DNA fragment can be cleaved at the alkylated nucleotides positions. Alkylating derivatives carrying phenazine groups were found to be the most efficient in reaction with the DNA fragment. Images PMID:3714471

  18. Monitoring DNA hybridization on alkyl modified silicon surface through capacitance measurement.

    PubMed

    Wei, Fang; Sun, Bin; Guo, Yuan; Zhao, Xin Sheng

    2003-08-15

    Single strand oligodeoxynucleotide is attached to the alkyl modified silicon surface through a peptide bond. The oligodeoxynucleotide-modified silicon substrate is used as a working electrode in an electrochemical cell system. After the electrode is treated by a solution containing strands of complementary oligodeoxynucleotide the Mott-Schottky measurements exhibit obvious negative shift in the flat band potential of the electrode, while in a control experiment treated with a solution of non-complementary oligodeoxynucleotide such a shift does not occur. The DNA hybridization is also manifested in a real time capacitance measurement. A DNA sensor based on the capacitance measurement could be more convenient than that based on a fluorescence detection.

  19. Sequence-specific DNA alkylation by tandem Py-Im polyamide conjugates.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Rhys Dylan; Kawamoto, Yusuke; Hashiya, Kaori; Bando, Toshikazu; Sugiyama, Hiroshi

    2014-09-01

    Tandem N-methylpyrrole-N-methylimidazole (Py-Im) polyamides with good sequence-specific DNA-alkylating activities have been designed and synthesized. Three alkylating tandem Py-Im polyamides with different linkers, which each contained the same moiety for the recognition of a 10 bp DNA sequence, were evaluated for their reactivity and selectivity by DNA alkylation, using high-resolution denaturing gel electrophoresis. All three conjugates displayed high reactivities for the target sequence. In particular, polyamide 1, which contained a β-alanine linker, displayed the most-selective sequence-specific alkylation towards the target 10 bp DNA sequence. The tandem Py-Im polyamide conjugates displayed greater sequence-specific DNA alkylation than conventional hairpin Py-Im polyamide conjugates (4 and 5). For further research, the design of tandem Py-Im polyamide conjugates could play an important role in targeting specific gene sequences.

  20. Effect O6-guanine alkylation on DNA flexibility studied by comparative molecular dynamics simulations.

    PubMed

    Kara, Mahmut; Drsata, Tomas; Lankas, Filip; Zacharias, Martin

    2015-01-01

    Alkylation of guanine at the O6 atom is a highly mutagenic DNA lesion because it alters the coding specificity of the base causing G:C to A:T transversion mutations. Specific DNA repair enzymes, e.g. O(6)-alkylguanin-DNA-Transferases (AGT), recognize and repair such damage after looping out the damaged base to transfer it into the enzyme active site. The exact mechanism how the repair enzyme identifies a damaged site within a large surplus of undamaged DNA is not fully understood. The O(6)-alkylation of guanine may change the deformability of DNA which may facilitate the initial binding of a repair enzyme at the damaged site. In order to characterize the effect of O(6)-methyl-guanine (O(6)-MeG) containing base pairs on the DNA deformability extensive comparative molecular dynamics (MD) simulations on duplex DNA with central G:C, O(6)-MeG:C or O(6)-MeG:T base pairs were performed. The simulations indicate significant differences in the helical deformability due to the presence of O(6)-MeG compared to regular undamaged DNA. This includes enhanced base pair opening, shear and stagger motions and alterations in the backbone fine structure caused in part by transient rupture of the base pairing at the damaged site and transient insertion of water molecules. It is likely that the increased opening motions of O(6)-MeG:C or O(6)-MeG:T base pairs play a decisive role for the induced fit recognition or for the looping out of the damaged base by repair enzymes.

  1. Sequence-specific DNA alkylation targeting for Kras codon 13 mutation by pyrrole-imidazole polyamide seco-CBI conjugates.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Rhys Dylan; Asamitsu, Sefan; Takenaka, Tomohiro; Yamamoto, Makoto; Hashiya, Kaori; Kawamoto, Yusuke; Bando, Toshikazu; Nagase, Hiroki; Sugiyama, Hiroshi

    2014-01-27

    Hairpin N-methylpyrrole-N-methylimidazole polyamide seco-CBI conjugates 2-6 were designed for synthesis by Fmoc solid-phase synthesis, and their DNA-alkylating activities against the Kras codon 13 mutation were compared by high-resolution denaturing gel electrophoresis with 225 base pair (bp) DNA fragments. Conjugate 5 had high reactivity towards the Kras codon 13 mutation site, with alkylation occurring at the A of the sequence 5'-ACGTCACCA-3' (site 2), including minor 1 bp-mismatch alkylation against wild type 5'-ACGCCACCA-3' (site 3). Conjugate 6, which differs from conjugate 5 by exchanging one Py unit with a β unit, showed high selectivity but only weakly alkylated the A of 5'-ACGTCACCA-3' (site 2). The hairpin polyamide seco-CBI conjugate 5 thus alkylates according to Dervan's pairing rule with the pairing recognition which β/β pair targets T-A and A-T pairs. SPR and a computer-minimized model suggest that 5 binds to the target sequence with high affinity in a hairpin conformation, allowing for efficient DNA alkylation.

  2. DNA repair by MGMT, but not AAG, causes a threshold in alkylation-induced colorectal carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Fahrer, Jörg; Frisch, Janina; Nagel, Georg; Kraus, Alexander; Dörsam, Bastian; Thomas, Adam D; Reißig, Sonja; Waisman, Ari; Kaina, Bernd

    2015-10-01

    Epidemiological studies indicate that N-nitroso compounds (NOC) are causally linked to colorectal cancer (CRC). NOC induce DNA alkylations, including O (6)-methylguanine (O (6)-MeG) and N-methylated purines, which are repaired by O (6)-MeG-DNA methyltransferase (MGMT) and N-alkyladenine-DNA glycosylase (AAG)-initiated base excision repair, respectively. In view of recent evidence of nonlinear mutagenicity for NOC-like compounds, the question arises as to the existence of threshold doses in CRC formation. Here, we set out to determine the impact of DNA repair on the dose-response of alkylation-induced CRC. DNA repair proficient (WT) and deficient (Mgmt (-/-), Aag (-/-) and Mgmt (-/-)/Aag (-/-)) mice were treated with azoxymethane (AOM) and dextran sodium sulfate to trigger CRC. Tumors were quantified by non-invasive mini-endoscopy. A non-linear increase in CRC formation was observed in WT and Aag (-/-) mice. In contrast, a linear dose-dependent increase in tumor frequency was found in Mgmt (-/-) and Mgmt (-/-)/Aag (-/-) mice. The data were corroborated by hockey stick modeling, yielding similar carcinogenic thresholds for WT and Aag (-/-) and no threshold for MGMT lacking mice. O (6)-MeG levels and depletion of MGMT correlated well with the observed dose-response in CRC formation. AOM induced dose-dependently DNA double-strand breaks in colon crypts including Lgr5-positive colon stem cells, which coincided with ATR-Chk1-p53 signaling. Intriguingly, Mgmt (-/-) mice displayed significantly enhanced levels of γ-H2AX, suggesting the usefulness of γ-H2AX as an early genotoxicity marker in the colorectum. This study demonstrates for the first time a non-linear dose-response for alkylation-induced colorectal carcinogenesis and reveals DNA repair by MGMT, but not AAG, as a key node in determining a carcinogenic threshold.

  3. DNA stretching in the nucleosome facilitates alkylation by an intercalating antitumour agent

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Yuancai; Surana, Uttam; Davey, Curt A.

    2010-01-01

    DNA stretching in the nucleosome core can cause dramatic structural distortions, which may influence compaction and factor recognition in chromatin. We find that the base pair unstacking arising from stretching-induced extreme minor groove kinking near the nucleosome centre creates a hot spot for intercalation and alkylation by a novel anticancer compound. This may have far reaching implications for how chromatin structure can influence binding of intercalator species and indicates potential for the development of site selective DNA-binding agents that target unique conformational features of the nucleosome. PMID:20026584

  4. Differences in sequence selectivity of DNA alkylation by isomeric intercalating aniline mustards.

    PubMed

    Prakash, A S; Denny, W A; Wakelin, L P

    1990-01-01

    Two DNA-targeted mustard derivatives, N,N-bis(2-chloroethyl)-4-(5-[9-acridinylamino]-pentamido)aniline and 4-(9-[acridinylamino]butyl 4-(N,N-bis[2-chloroethyl]-aminobenzamide, which are isomeric compounds where the mustard is linked to the DNA-binding 9-aminoacridine moiety by either a -CONH- or a -NHCO- group, show significant differences in the sequence selectivity of their alkylation of DNA. The CONH isomer is a more efficient alxylating agent than the NHCO compound by an order of magnitude, consistent with the larger electron release of the CONH group to the aniline ring. However, the pattern of alkylation by the two compounds is also very different, with the CONH isomer preferring alkylation of guanines adjacent to 3'- or 5'-adenines and cytosines (for example those in sequences 5'-CGC, 5'-AGC, 5'-CGG and 5'-AGA) while the isomeric NHCO compound shows preference for guanines in runs of Gs. In addition, both isomers alkylate 3'-adenines in runs of adenines. Both compounds also show completely different patterns of alkylation to their untargeted mustard counterparts, since 4-MeCONH-aniline mustard alkylates all guanines and adenines in runs of adenines, while 4-Me2NCO-aniline mustard fails to alkylate DNA at all. These differences in alkylation patterns between the CONH- and its isomeric NHCO- compounds and their relationships between the alkylation patterns of the isomers and their biological activities are discussed.

  5. DNA Polymerases ImuC and DinB Are Involved in DNA Alkylation Damage Tolerance in Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Pseudomonas putida

    PubMed Central

    Jatsenko, Tatjana; Sidorenko, Julia; Saumaa, Signe; Kivisaar, Maia

    2017-01-01

    Translesion DNA synthesis (TLS), facilitated by low-fidelity polymerases, is an important DNA damage tolerance mechanism. Here, we investigated the role and biological function of TLS polymerase ImuC (former DnaE2), generally present in bacteria lacking DNA polymerase V, and TLS polymerase DinB in response to DNA alkylation damage in Pseudomonas aeruginosa and P. putida. We found that TLS DNA polymerases ImuC and DinB ensured a protective role against N- and O-methylation induced by N-methyl-N'-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine (MNNG) in both P. aeruginosa and P. putida. DinB also appeared to be important for the survival of P. aeruginosa and rapidly growing P. putida cells in the presence of methyl methanesulfonate (MMS). The role of ImuC in protection against MMS-induced damage was uncovered under DinB-deficient conditions. Apart from this, both ImuC and DinB were critical for the survival of bacteria with impaired base excision repair (BER) functions upon alkylation damage, lacking DNA glycosylases AlkA and/or Tag. Here, the increased sensitivity of imuCdinB double deficient strains in comparison to single mutants suggested that the specificity of alkylated DNA lesion bypass of DinB and ImuC might also be different. Moreover, our results demonstrated that mutagenesis induced by MMS in pseudomonads was largely ImuC-dependent. Unexpectedly, we discovered that the growth temperature of bacteria affected the efficiency of DinB and ImuC in ensuring cell survival upon alkylation damage. Taken together, the results of our study disclosed the involvement of ImuC in DNA alkylation damage tolerance, especially at low temperatures, and its possible contribution to the adaptation of pseudomonads upon DNA alkylation damage via increased mutagenesis. PMID:28118378

  6. A New Protein Architecture for Processing Alkylation Damaged DNA: The Crystal Structure of DNA Glycosylase AlkD

    SciTech Connect

    Rubinson, Emily H.; Metz, Audrey H.; O'Quin, Jami; Eichman, Brandt F.

    2008-12-15

    DNA glycosylases safeguard the genome by locating and excising chemically modified bases from DNA. AlkD is a recently discovered bacterial DNA glycosylase that removes positively charged methylpurines from DNA, and was predicted to adopt a protein fold distinct from from those of other DNA repair proteins. The crystal structure of Bacillus cereus AlkD presented here shows that the protein is composed exclusively of helical HEAT-like repeats, which form a solenoid perfectly shaped to accommodate a DNA duplex on the concave surface. Structural analysis of the variant HEAT repeats in AlkD provides a rationale for how this protein scaffolding motif has been modified to bind DNA. We report 7mG excision and DNA binding activities of AlkD mutants, along with a comparison of alkylpurine DNA glycosylase structures. Together, these data provide important insight into the requirements for alkylation repair within DNA and suggest that AlkD utilizes a novel strategy to manipulate DNA in its search for alkylpurine bases.

  7. S - and N-alkylating agents diminish the fluorescence of fluorescent dye-stained DNA.

    PubMed

    Giesche, Robert; John, Harald; Kehe, Kai; Schmidt, Annette; Popp, Tanja; Balzuweit, Frank; Thiermann, Horst; Gudermann, Thomas; Steinritz, Dirk

    2017-01-25

    Sulfur mustard (SM), a chemical warfare agent, causes DNA alkylation, which is believed to be the main cause of its toxicity. SM DNA adducts are commonly used to verify exposure to this vesicant. However, the required analytical state-of-the-art mass-spectrometry methods are complex, use delicate instruments, are not mobile, and require laboratory infrastructure that is most likely not available in conflict zones. Attempts have thus been made to develop rapid detection methods that can be used in the field. The analysis of SM DNA adducts (HETE-G) by immunodetection is a convenient and suitable method. For a diagnostic assessment, HETE-G levels must be determined in relation to the total DNA in the sample. Total DNA can be easily visualized by the use of fluorescent DNA dyes. This study examines whether SM and related compounds affect total DNA staining, an issue that has not been investigated before. After pure DNA was extracted from human keratinocytes (HaCaT cells), DNA was exposed to different S- and N-alkylating agents. Our experiments revealed a significant, dose-dependent decrease in the fluorescence signal of fluorescent dye-stained DNA after exposure to alkylating agents. After mass spectrometry and additional fluorescence measurements ruled out covalent modifications of ethidium bromide (EthBr) by SM, we assumed that DNA crosslinks caused DNA condensation and thereby impaired access of the fluorescent dyes to the DNA. DNA digestion by restriction enzymes restored fluorescence, a fact that strengthened our hypothesis. However, monofunctional agents, which are unable to crosslink DNA, also decreased the fluorescence signal. In subsequent experiments, we demonstrated that protons produced during DNA alkylation caused a pH decrease that was found responsible for the reduction in fluorescence. The use of an appropriate buffer system eliminated the adverse effect of alkylating agents on DNA staining with fluorescent dyes. An appropriate buffer system is thus

  8. A Review of the Role of the Sequence-Dependent Electrostatic Landscape in DNA Alkylation Patterns

    PubMed Central

    Gold, Barry; Marky, Luis M.; Stone, Michael P.; Williams, Loren D.

    2008-01-01

    Alkylating agents, including environmental and endogenous carcinogens, and DNA targeting antineoplastic agents, that adduct DNA via intermediates with significant cationic charge show a sequence selectively in their covalent bonding to nucleobases. The resulting patterns of alkylation eventually contribute to the agent-dependent distributions and types of mutations. The origin of the regioselective modification of DNA by electrophiles has been attributed to steric and/or electronic factors, but attempts to mechanistically model and predict alkylation patterns have had limited success. In this review, we present data consistent with the role of the intrinsic sequence-dependent electrostatic landscape (SDEL) in DNA that modulates the equilibrium binding of cations and the bonding of reactive charged alkylating agents to atoms that line the floor of the major groove of DNA. PMID:17112226

  9. The Interaction between Polynucleotide Kinase Phosphatase and the DNA Repair Protein XRCC1 Is Critical for Repair of DNA Alkylation Damage and Stable Association at DNA Damage Sites*

    PubMed Central

    Della-Maria, Julie; Hegde, Muralidhar L.; McNeill, Daniel R.; Matsumoto, Yoshihiro; Tsai, Miaw-Sheue; Ellenberger, Tom; Wilson, David M.; Mitra, Sankar; Tomkinson, Alan E.

    2012-01-01

    XRCC1 plays a key role in the repair of DNA base damage and single-strand breaks. Although it has no known enzymatic activity, XRCC1 interacts with multiple DNA repair proteins and is a subunit of distinct DNA repair protein complexes. Here we used the yeast two-hybrid genetic assay to identify mutant versions of XRCC1 that are selectively defective in interacting with a single protein partner. One XRCC1 mutant, A482T, that was defective in binding to polynucleotide kinase phosphatase (PNKP) not only retained the ability to interact with partner proteins that bind to different regions of XRCC1 but also with aprataxin and aprataxin-like factor whose binding sites overlap with that of PNKP. Disruption of the interaction between PNKP and XRCC1 did not impact their initial recruitment to localized DNA damage sites but dramatically reduced their retention there. Furthermore, the interaction between PNKP and the DNA ligase IIIα-XRCC1 complex significantly increased the efficiency of reconstituted repair reactions and was required for complementation of the DNA damage sensitivity to DNA alkylation agents of xrcc1 mutant cells. Together our results reveal novel roles for the interaction between PNKP and XRCC1 in the retention of XRCC1 at DNA damage sites and in DNA alkylation damage repair. PMID:22992732

  10. Structure and DNA binding of alkylation response protein AidB

    SciTech Connect

    Bowles, Timothy; Metz, Audrey H.; O'Quin, Jami; Wawrzak, Zdzislaw; Eichman, Brandt F.

    2009-01-12

    Exposure of Escherichia coli to alkylating agents activates expression of AidB in addition to DNA repair proteins Ada, AlkA, and AlkB. AidB was recently shown to possess a flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD) cofactor and to bind to dsDNA, implicating it as a flavin-dependent DNA repair enzyme. However, the molecular mechanism by which AidB acts to reduce the mutagenic effects of specific DNA alkylators is unknown. We present a 1.7-{angstrom} crystal structure of AidB, which bears superficial resemblance to the acyl-CoA dehydrogenase superfamily of flavoproteins. The structure reveals a unique quaternary organization and a distinctive FAD active site that provides a rationale for AidB's limited dehydrogenase activity. A highly electropositive C-terminal domain not present in structural homologs was identified by mutational analysis as the DNA binding site. Structural analysis of the DNA and FAD binding sites provides evidence against AidB-catalyzed DNA repair and supports a model in which AidB acts to prevent alkylation damage by protecting DNA and destroying alkylating agents that have yet to reach their DNA target.

  11. Induction of dnaN and dnaQ gene expression in Escherichia coli by alkylation damage to DNA.

    PubMed Central

    Quiñones, A; Kaasch, J; Kaasch, M; Messer, W

    1989-01-01

    The dnaN and dnaQ genes encode the beta-subunit and the epsilon-subunit of the DNA polymerase III holoenzyme. By transcriptional fusions to the galK gene, translational fusions to lacZ and comparative S1 mapping analysis, we investigated the in-vivo regulation of dnaN and dnaQ. We found that DNA damage caused by the alkylating agent methyl methanesulphonate (MMS) leads to a significant induction in dnaN and dnaQ gene expression suggesting a requirement of increased amounts of at least some DNA polymerase III holoenzyme subunits for recovery from DNA damage caused by MMS. These results are first evidences that subunits of the DNA polymerase III holoenzyme are DNA damage inducible. This MMS induction of dnaN and dnaQ gene expression is unrelated to the adaptive response. It was not observed in lexA and recA mutants which abolish the induction of the SOS response. Images PMID:2656258

  12. Induction of dnaN and dnaQ gene expression in Escherichia coli by alkylation damage to DNA.

    PubMed

    Quiñones, A; Kaasch, J; Kaasch, M; Messer, W

    1989-02-01

    The dnaN and dnaQ genes encode the beta-subunit and the epsilon-subunit of the DNA polymerase III holoenzyme. By transcriptional fusions to the galK gene, translational fusions to lacZ and comparative S1 mapping analysis, we investigated the in-vivo regulation of dnaN and dnaQ. We found that DNA damage caused by the alkylating agent methyl methanesulphonate (MMS) leads to a significant induction in dnaN and dnaQ gene expression suggesting a requirement of increased amounts of at least some DNA polymerase III holoenzyme subunits for recovery from DNA damage caused by MMS. These results are first evidences that subunits of the DNA polymerase III holoenzyme are DNA damage inducible. This MMS induction of dnaN and dnaQ gene expression is unrelated to the adaptive response. It was not observed in lexA and recA mutants which abolish the induction of the SOS response.

  13. Synthesis of a new conjugated polymer for DNA alkylation and gene regulation.

    PubMed

    Nie, Chenyao; Zhu, Chunlei; Feng, Liheng; Lv, Fengting; Liu, Libing; Wang, Shu

    2013-06-12

    A new polyfluorene derivative containing pendent alkylating chlorambucil (PFP-Cbl) was synthesized and characterized. Under direct incubation with DNA in vitro, PFP-Cbl could undergo an efficient DNA alkylating reaction and induce DNA cross-linking. In vitro transcription and translation experiment exhibited that the PFP-Cbl significantly down-regulated the gene expression of luciferase reporter plasmid. The down-regulation of gene expression was also verified through the transfection experiment of p-EGFP plasmid, which showed decreased green fluorescent protein (GFP) in cells. Meanwhile, the self-luminous property of PFP-Cbl could make it able to trace the internalized PFP-Cbl and plasmid complexes resulted from cross-linking in cells by fluorescent microscopy. Combining the features of alkylating function, multivalent binding sites, and fluorescent characteristics, PFP-Cbl provides a new insight in the area of gene regulation and extends the new applications of conjugated polymers (CPs).

  14. MODULATION BY IONIC STRENGTH AND SUPERHELICITY OF BENZO[a]PYRENE DIOL EPOXIDE INDUCED DNA ALKYLATION AND UNWINDING

    SciTech Connect

    Gamper, Howard B.; Straub, Kenneth; Calvin, Melvin; Bartholomew, James C.

    1980-01-01

    Superhelical and partially relaxed SV40 DNA were reacted in vitro with (+)7{beta}, 8{alpha}-dihydroxy-9{alpha},10{alpha}-epoxy-7,8,9,10-tetrahydrobenzo[a]pyrene (BaP diol epoxide). The modified DNA contained N{sup 2} guanine and N{sup 6} adeninte hydrocarbon adducts in the ratio 86:14. Superhelical SV40 DNA was approximately 6% more susceptible to modification than partially relaxed viral DNA. Counterions inhibited DNA alkylation by up to 90%, Mg{sup 2+} being 50-fold more effective than Na{sup +}. The sensitivity of covalent binding to helix stability is consistent with a reaction complex in which BaP diol epoxide is intercalated. The superhelical density of the modified DNA substrates was determined electrophoretically relative to partially relaxed standards and an unwinding angle for the hydrocarbon adducts was calculated. The angle was dependent upon the superhelicity of the DNA molecule and ranged from 330{sup o} to 30{sup o}. This data indicates that the modified base pairs are disrupted and, in the presence of torsional strain, act as centers for the further denaturation of up to 8 adjacent base pairs. In the absence of such strain the alkylation sites have an ordered structure with the attached hydrocarbon probably oriented in the minor or major groove of the helix.

  15. DNA Alkylating Therapy Induces Tumor Regression through an HMGB1-Mediated Activation of Innate Immunity

    PubMed Central

    Guerriero, Jennifer L.; Ditsworth, Dara; Catanzaro, Joseph M.; Sabino, Gregory; Furie, Martha B.; Kew, Richard R.; Crawford, Howard C.; Zong, Wei-Xing

    2011-01-01

    Dysregulation of apoptosis is associated with the development of human cancer and resistance to anticancer therapy. We have previously shown in tumor xenografts that DNA alkylating agents induce sporadic cell necrosis and regression of apoptosis-deficient tumors. Sporadic tumor cell necrosis is associated with extracellular release of cellular content such as the high mobility group box 1 (HMGB1) protein and subsequent recruitment of innate immune cells into the tumor tissue. It remained unclear whether HMGB1 and the activation of innate immunity played a role in tumor response to chemotherapy. In this study, we show that whereas DNA alkylating therapy leads to a complete tumor regression in an athymic mouse tumor xenograft model, it fails to do so in tumors deficient in HMGB1. The HMGB1-deficient tumors have an impaired ability to recruit innate immune cells including macrophages, neutrophils, and NK cells into the treated tumor tissue. Cytokine array analysis reveals that whereas DNA alkylating treatment leads to suppression of protumor cytokines such as IL-4, IL-10, and IL-13, loss of HMGB1 leads to elevated levels of these cytokines upon treatment. Suppression of innate immunity and HMGB1 using depleting Abs leads to a failure in tumor regression. Taken together, these results indicate that HMGB1 plays an essential role in activation of innate immunity and tumor clearance in response to DNA alkylating agents. PMID:21300822

  16. Nucleotide sequence of alkyl-dihydroxyacetonephosphate synthase cDNA from Dictyostelium discoideum.

    PubMed

    de Vet, E C; van den Bosch, H

    1998-11-27

    The nucleotide sequence is reported of alkyl-dihydroxyacetonephosphate synthase cDNA from the cellular slime mold Dictyostelium discoideum. The open reading frame encodes a protein of 611 amino acids which shows a 33% amino acid identity to the human enzyme. This D. discoideum homolog carries a variant of the peroxisomal targeting signal type 1 at its C-terminus (PKL). Expression of the cDNA in Escherichia coli yielded an enzymatically active protein.

  17. Photo-triggered fluorescent theranostic prodrugs as DNA alkylating agents for mechlorethamine release and spatiotemporal monitoring.

    PubMed

    Cao, Yanting; Pan, Rong; Xuan, Weimin; Wei, Yongyi; Liu, Kejian; Zhou, Jiahong; Wang, Wei

    2015-06-28

    We describe a new theranostic strategy for selective delivery and spatiotemporal monitoring of mechlorethamine, a DNA alkylating agent. A photo-responsive prodrug is designed and composed of a photolabile o-nitrophenylethyl group, a DNA alkylating mechlorethamine drug and a coumarin fluorophore. Masking of the "N" in mechlorethamine in a positively charged state in the prodrug renders it inactive, non-toxic, selective and non-fluorescent. Indeed, the stable prodrug shows negligible cytotoxicity towards normal cells with and without UV activation and is completely non-fluorescent. However, upon photo-irradiation, the active mechlorethamine is released and induces efficient DNA cross-links, accompanied by a strong fluorescence enhancement (152 fold). Furthermore, DNA cross-linking activity from the release can be transformed into anticancer activity observed in in vitro studies of tumor cells. Importantly, the drug release progress and the movement can be conveniently monitored by fluorescence spectroscopy. The mechanistic study proves that the DNA cross-linking activity is mainly due to the release of DNA alkylating mechlorethamine. Altogether, the studies show the power of the theranostic strategy for efficient therapy in cancer treatment.

  18. Chronic ethanol consumption inhibits repair of dimethylnitrosamine-induced DNA alkylation

    SciTech Connect

    Mufti, S.I.; Salvagnini, M.; Lieber, C.S.; Garro, A.J.

    1988-04-15

    Chronic ethanol consumption causes a DNA repair deficiency. This was demonstrated in Sprague-Dawley rats injected with /sup 14/C-labeled dimethylnitrosamine after being pair-fed isocaloric, ethanol, or carbohydrate control diets for 4 weeks. Hepatic DNA was isolated from rats killed at intervals over a 36 hour period after administration of the nitrosamine and concentrations of alkylated guanine derivatives were measured. While N7-methylguanine was lost at equivalent rates from the DNA of both diet groups, 06methylguanine, a promutagenic lesion, persisted at higher levels for longer periods of time in the DNA from the alcohol-fed animals.

  19. Specific Conformational Change in Giant DNA Caused by Anticancer Tetrazolato-Bridged Dinuclear Platinum(II) Complexes: Middle-Length Alkyl Substituents Exhibit Minimum Effect.

    PubMed

    Komeda, Seiji; Yoneyama, Hiroki; Uemura, Masako; Muramatsu, Akira; Okamoto, Naoto; Konishi, Hiroaki; Takahashi, Hiroyuki; Takagi, Akimitsu; Fukuda, Wakao; Imanaka, Tadayuki; Kanbe, Toshio; Harusawa, Shinya; Yoshikawa, Yuko; Yoshikawa, Kenichi

    2017-01-17

    Derivatives of the highly antitumor-active compound [{cis-Pt(NH3)2}2(μ-OH)(μ-tetrazolato-N2,N3)](2+) (5-H-Y), which is a tetrazolato-bridged dinuclear platinum(II) complex, were prepared by substituting a linear alkyl chain moiety at C5 of the tetrazolate ring. The general formula for the derivatives is [{cis-Pt(NH3)2}2(μ-OH)(μ-5-R-tetrazolato-N2,N3)](2+), where R is (CH2)nCH3 and n = 0 to 8 (complexes 1-9). The cytotoxicity of complexes 1-4 in NCI-H460 human non-small-cell lung cancer cells decreased with increasing alkyl chain length, and those of complexes 5-9 increased with increasing alkyl chain length. That is, the in vitro cytotoxicity of complexes 1-9 was found to have a U-shaped association with alkyl chain length. This U-shaped association is attributable to the degree of intracellular accumulation. Although circular dichroism spectroscopic measurement indicated that complexes 1-9 induced comparable conformational changes in the secondary structure of DNA, the tetrazolato-bridged complexes induced different degrees of DNA compaction as revealed by a single DNA measurement with fluorescence microsopy, which also had a U-shaped association with alkyl chain length that matched the association observed for cytotoxicity. Complexes 7-9, which had alkyl chains long enough to confer surfactant-like properties to the complex, induced DNA compaction 20 or 1000 times more efficiently than 5-H-Y or spermidine. A single DNA measurement with transmission electron microscopy revealed that complex 8 formed large spherical self-assembled structures that induced DNA compaction with extremely high efficiency. This result suggests that these structures may play a role in the DNA compaction that was induced by the complexes with the longer alkyl chains. The derivatization with a linear alkyl chain produced a series of complexes with unique cellular accumulation and DNA conformational change profiles and a potentially useful means of developing next-generation platinum-based

  20. Spectroscopic study on interaction between three cationic surfactants with different alkyl chain lengths and DNA.

    PubMed

    Guo, Lili; Zhang, Zhaohong; Qiao, Heng; Liu, Miao; Shen, Manli; Yuan, Tianxin; Chen, Jing; Dionysiou, Dionysios D

    2015-01-01

    In this study, the interaction between cationic surfactants with different alkyl chain lengths, such as hexyltrimethyl ammonium bromide (HTAB), dodecyltrimethyl ammonium bromide (DTAB) and cetyltrimethyl ammonium bromide (CTAB), and DNA was investigated by UV-vis spectroscopy, fluorescence spectroscopy and viscosity techniques. The results showed that these three cationic surfactants with different hydrocarbon chain lengths could all interact with DNA. Their binding modes were estimated and their interaction strength was compared. In addition, the effects of the surfactant, NaCl and phosphate ion concentrations on the interaction were reviewed. It is wished that this work would provide some valuable references to investigate the influence of cationic surfactants with different alkyl chain lengths on DNA.

  1. Alterations in repair of alkylating agent-induced DNA damage in polyamine-depleted human cells.

    PubMed

    Snyder, R D; Bhatt, S

    1993-08-16

    Treatment of HeLa cells with the polyamine biosynthesis inhibitors difluoromethylornithine (DFMO) and/or methylglyoxal bis(guanylhydrazone) (MGBG) results in marked depression in levels of the cellular polyamines putrescine, spermidine and spermine. Cells in this polyamine-depleted state exhibited increased sensitivity to monofunctional alkylating agents, manifested as decreased cloning ability and retardation of the DNA excision repair process. DFMO treatment did not alter the initial level of interaction of radiolabeled alkylating agent with cellular DNA, but combined treatment with DFMO and MGBG reduced covalent binding, probably through effects on cell cycling. Polyamine supplementation had no effects on initial yield of DNA single-strand breaks in drug-treated cells. The repair defect appeared similar to that observed previously in polyamine-depleted cells following X-irradiation and UV irradiation, namely retarded sealing of DNA strand breaks. It was not possible to reverse the effects of these inhibitors by short periods of polyamine loading, despite the fact that all three polyamines could be restored to near-normal levels. These findings provide the first demonstration of altered response of polyamine-depleted cells to monofunctional alkylating agents and contribute to our understanding of altered responses of polyamine-depleted cancer cells to a variety of DNA-reactive chemotherapeutic drugs.

  2. 40 CFR 721.10359 - Cardanol-based alkyl phosphate (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Cardanol-based alkyl phosphate... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10359 Cardanol-based alkyl phosphate (generic). (a) Chemical substance... cardanol-based alkyl phosphate (PMN P-09-613) is subject to reporting under this section for...

  3. 40 CFR 721.10359 - Cardanol-based alkyl phosphate (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Cardanol-based alkyl phosphate... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10359 Cardanol-based alkyl phosphate (generic). (a) Chemical substance... cardanol-based alkyl phosphate (PMN P-09-613) is subject to reporting under this section for...

  4. 40 CFR 721.10359 - Cardanol-based alkyl phosphate (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Cardanol-based alkyl phosphate... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10359 Cardanol-based alkyl phosphate (generic). (a) Chemical substance... cardanol-based alkyl phosphate (PMN P-09-613) is subject to reporting under this section for...

  5. Alkylation of nucleic acids by DNA-targeted 4-anilinoquinolinium aniline mustards: kinetic studies.

    PubMed

    O'Connor, C J; Denny, W A; Fan, J Y

    1991-01-01

    The rate of constant for hydrolysis of a series of 4-substituted aniline mustards Ar-X-pC6H4-N(CH2CH2Cl)2, where Ar is 4-anilinoquinolinium and X = O, CH2, CONH and CO, have been measured in water and 0.02 M imidazole buffer at 37 degrees C and in 50% aqueous acetone at 66 degrees C. The equilibrium binding constants of the compounds and their hydrolysis products to nucleic acids of differing base composition have been determined at varying ionic strengths, and the results are consistent with the compounds binding as expected in the DNA minor groove. The alkylating reactivity of the mustards towards these nucleic acids has been measured in water at 37 degrees C and in 0.01 M HEPES buffer over a range of temperatures from 25 degrees C to 60 degrees C. Evaluation of the thermodynamic parameters for these kinetic and equilibrium studies suggests that the interaction with nucleic acids is via an internal SN2 mechanism involving an aziridinium ion.

  6. Chiral Brønsted Base-Promoted Nitroalkane Alkylation: Enantioselective Synthesis of sec-Alkyl-3-Substituted Indoles

    PubMed Central

    Dobish, Mark C.; Johnston, Jeffrey N.

    2010-01-01

    A Brønsted base-catalyzed reaction of nitroalkanes with alkyl electrophiles provides indole heterocycles substituted at C3 bearing a sec-alkyl group with good enantioselectivity (up to 90% ee). Denitration by hydrogenolysis provides a product with equally high ee. An indolenine intermediate is implicated in the addition step, and surprisingly, water cosolvent was found to have a beneficial effect in this step, leading to a one-pot protocol for elimination/enantioselective addition using PBAM, a bis(amidine) chiral nonracemic base. PMID:21090654

  7. VP-16 and alkylating agents activate a common metabolic pathway for suppression of DNA replication

    SciTech Connect

    Das, S.K.; Berger, N.A.

    1986-05-01

    The cytotoxic effects of etoposide (VP-16) are mediated by topoisomerase II production of protein crosslinked DNA strand breaks. Previous studies have shown that alkylating agent induced DNA damage results in expansion of dTTP pools and reduction of dCTP pools and DNA replication. Studies were conducted with V79 cells to determine whether the metabolic consequences of VP-16 treatment were similar to those induced by alkylating agents. Treatment with 0.5..mu..M VP-16 prolonged the doubling time of V79 cells from 12 to 18 hrs and caused cell volume to increase from 1.1 to 1.6 x 10/sup -12/l. 2mM caffeine completely blocked the volume increase and substantially prevented the prolongation of doubling time. 5..mu..M VP-16 reduced the rate of (/sup 3/H)TdR incorporation by 70%, whereas in the presence of 2mM caffeine, VP-16 caused only a 10% decrease in the rate of (/sup 3/H)TdR incorporation. 4 hr treatment with 5.0..mu..M VP-16 increased dTTP levels from 65 +/- 10 pmol/10/sup 6/ cells to 80 +/- 13 pmol/10/sup 6/ cells and caused dCTP level to decline from 113 +/- 23 pmol/10/sup 6/ cells to 92 +/- 17 pmol/10/sup 6/ cells. These results indicate that the metabolic consequences of VP-16 treatment are similar to alkylating agent treatment and that an increase in dTTP pools with a subsequent effect on ribonucleotide reductase may be a final common pathway by which many cytotoxic agents suppress DNA synthesis.

  8. Oxidants and not alkylating agents induce rapid mtDNA loss and mitochondrial dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Furda, Amy M.; Marrangoni, Adele M.; Lokshin, Anna; Van Houten, Bennett

    2013-01-01

    Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) is essential for proper mitochondrial function and encodes 22 tRNAs, 2 rRNAs and 13 polypeptides that make up subunits of complex I, III, IV, in the electron transport chain and complex V, the ATP synthase. Although mitochondrial dysfunction has been implicated in processes such as premature aging, neurodegeneration, and cancer, it has not been shown whether persistent mtDNA damage causes a loss of oxidative phosphorylation. We addressed this question by treating mouse embryonic fibroblasts with either hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) or the alkylating agent methyl methanesulfonate (MMS) and measuring several endpoints, including mtDNA damage and repair rates using QPCR, levels of mitochondrial- and nuclear-encoded proteins using antibody analysis, and a pharmacologic profile of mitochondria using the Seahorse Extracellular Flux Analyzer. We show that a 60 min treatment with H2O2 causes persistent mtDNA lesions, mtDNA loss, decreased levels of a nuclear-encoded mitochondrial subunit, a loss of ATP-linked oxidative phosphorylation and a loss of total reserve capacity. Conversely, a 60 min treatment with 2 mM MMS causes persistent mtDNA lesions but no mtDNA loss, no decrease in levels of a nuclear-encoded mitochondrial subunit, and no mitochondrial dysfunction. These results suggest that persistent mtDNA damage is not sufficient to cause mitochondrial dysfunction. PMID:22766155

  9. DNA unwinding by ASCC3 helicase is coupled to ALKBH3-dependent DNA alkylation repair and cancer cell proliferation.

    PubMed

    Dango, Sebastian; Mosammaparast, Nima; Sowa, Mathew E; Xiong, Li-Jun; Wu, Feizhen; Park, Keyjung; Rubin, Mark; Gygi, Steve; Harper, J Wade; Shi, Yang

    2011-11-04

    Demethylation by the AlkB dioxygenases represents an important mechanism for repair of N-alkylated nucleotides. However, little is known about their functions in mammalian cells. We report the purification of the ALKBH3 complex and demonstrate its association with the activating signal cointegrator complex (ASCC). ALKBH3 is overexpressed in various cancers, and both ALKBH3 and ASCC are important for alkylation damage resistance in these tumor cell lines. ASCC3, the largest subunit of ASCC, encodes a 3'-5' DNA helicase, whose activity is crucial for the generation of single-stranded DNA upon which ALKBH3 preferentially functions for dealkylation. In cell lines that are dependent on ALKBH3 and ASCC3 for alkylation damage resistance, loss of ALKBH3 or ASCC3 leads to increased 3-methylcytosine and reduced cell proliferation, which correlates with pH2A.X and 53BP1 foci formation. Our data provide a molecular mechanism by which ALKBH3 collaborates with ASCC to maintain genomic integrity in a cell-type specific manner.

  10. On the role of DNA in DNA-based catalytic enantioselective conjugate addition reactions.

    PubMed

    Dijk, Ewold W; Boersma, Arnold J; Feringa, Ben L; Roelfes, Gerard

    2010-09-07

    A kinetic study of DNA-based catalytic enantioselective Friedel-Crafts alkylation and Michael addition reactions showed that DNA affects the rate of these reactions significantly. Whereas in the presence of DNA, a large acceleration was found for the Friedel-Crafts alkylation and a modest acceleration in the Michael addition of dimethyl malonate, a deceleration was observed when using nitromethane as nucleophile. Also, the enantioselectivities proved to be dependent on the DNA sequence. In comparison with the previously reported Diels-Alder reaction, the results presented here suggest that DNA plays a similar role in both cycloaddition and conjugate addition reactions.

  11. The ada operon of Mycobacterium tuberculosis encodes two DNA methyltransferases for inducible repair of DNA alkylation damage.

    PubMed

    Yang, Mingyi; Aamodt, Randi M; Dalhus, Bjørn; Balasingham, Seetha; Helle, Ina; Andersen, Pernille; Tønjum, Tone; Alseth, Ingrun; Rognes, Torbjørn; Bjørås, Magnar

    2011-06-10

    The ada operon of Mycobacterium tuberculosis, which encodes a composite protein of AdaA and AlkA and a separate AdaB/Ogt protein, was characterized. M. tuberculosis treated with N-methyl-N'-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine induced transcription of the adaA-alkA and adaB genes, suggesting that M. tuberculosis mount an inducible response to methylating agents. Survival assays of the methyltransferase defective Escherichia coli mutant KT233 (ada ogt), showed that expression of the adaB gene rescued the alkylation sensitivity. Further, adaB but not adaA-alkA complemented the hypermutator phenotype of KT233. Purified AdaA-AlkA and AdaB possessed methyltransferase activity. These data suggested that AdaB counteract the cytotoxic and mutagenic effect of O(6)-methylguanine, while AdaA-AlkA most likely transfers methyl groups from innocuous methylphosphotriesters. AdaA-AlkA did not possess alkylbase DNA glycosylase activity nor rescue the alkylation sensitivity of the E. coli mutant BK2118 (tag alkA). We propose that AdaA-AlkA is a positive regulator of the adaptive response in M. tuberculosis. It thus appears that the ada operon of M. tuberculosis suppresses the mutagenic effect of alkylation but not the cytotoxic effect of lesions such as 3-methylpurines. Collectively, these data indicate that M. tuberculosis hypermutator strains with defective adaptive response genes might sustain robustness to cytotoxic alkylation DNA damage and confer a selective advantage contributing to host adaptation.

  12. DNA-damaging disinfection byproducts: alkylation mechanism of mutagenic mucohalic acids.

    PubMed

    Gómez-Bombarelli, Rafael; González-Pérez, Marina; Arenas-Valgañón, Jorge; Céspedes-Camacho, Isaac Fabián; Calle, Emilio; Casado, Julio

    2011-10-15

    Hydroxyhalofuranones form a group of genotoxic disinfection byproduct (DBP) of increasing interest. Among them, mucohalic acids (3,4-dihalo-5-hydroxyfuran-2(5H)-one, MXA) are known mutagens that react with nucleotides, affording etheno, oxaloetheno, and halopropenal derivatives. Mucohalic acids have also found use in organic synthesis due to their high functionalization. In this work, the alkylation kinetics of mucochloric and mucobromic acids with model nucleophiles aniline and NBP has been studied experimentally. Also, the alkylation mechanism of nucleosides by MXA has been studied in silico. The results described allow us to reach the following conclusions: (i) based on the kinetic and computational evidence obtained, a reaction mechanism was proposed, in which MXA react directly with amino groups in nucleotides, preferentially attacking the exocyclic amino groups over the endocyclic aromatic nitrogen atoms; (ii) the suggested mechanism is in agreement with both the product distribution observed experimentally and the mutational pattern of MXA; (iii) the limiting step in the alkylation reaction is addition to the carbonyl group, subsequent steps occurring rapidly; and (iv) mucoxyhalic acids, the hydrolysis products of MXA, play no role in the alkylation reaction by MXA.

  13. Protein Recognition in Drug-Induced DNA Alkylation: When the Moonlight Protein GAPDH Meets S23906-1/DNA Minor Groove Adducts

    PubMed Central

    Savreux-Lenglet, Gaëlle; Depauw, Sabine; David-Cordonnier, Marie-Hélène

    2015-01-01

    DNA alkylating drugs have been used in clinics for more than seventy years. The diversity of their mechanism of action (major/minor groove; mono-/bis-alkylation; intra-/inter-strand crosslinks; DNA stabilization/destabilization, etc.) has undoubtedly major consequences on the cellular response to treatment. The aim of this review is to highlight the variety of established protein recognition of DNA adducts to then particularly focus on glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) function in DNA adduct interaction with illustration using original experiments performed with S23906-1/DNA adduct. The introduction of this review is a state of the art of protein/DNA adducts recognition, depending on the major or minor groove orientation of the DNA bonding as well as on the molecular consequences in terms of double-stranded DNA maintenance. It reviews the implication of proteins from both DNA repair, transcription, replication and chromatin maintenance in selective DNA adduct recognition. The main section of the manuscript is focusing on the implication of the moonlighting protein GAPDH in DNA adduct recognition with the model of the peculiar DNA minor groove alkylating and destabilizing drug S23906-1. The mechanism of action of S23906-1 alkylating drug and the large variety of GAPDH cellular functions are presented prior to focus on GAPDH direct binding to S23906-1 adducts. PMID:26556350

  14. Protein Recognition in Drug-Induced DNA Alkylation: When the Moonlight Protein GAPDH Meets S23906-1/DNA Minor Groove Adducts.

    PubMed

    Savreux-Lenglet, Gaëlle; Depauw, Sabine; David-Cordonnier, Marie-Hélène

    2015-11-05

    DNA alkylating drugs have been used in clinics for more than seventy years. The diversity of their mechanism of action (major/minor groove; mono-/bis-alkylation; intra-/inter-strand crosslinks; DNA stabilization/destabilization, etc.) has undoubtedly major consequences on the cellular response to treatment. The aim of this review is to highlight the variety of established protein recognition of DNA adducts to then particularly focus on glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) function in DNA adduct interaction with illustration using original experiments performed with S23906-1/DNA adduct. The introduction of this review is a state of the art of protein/DNA adducts recognition, depending on the major or minor groove orientation of the DNA bonding as well as on the molecular consequences in terms of double-stranded DNA maintenance. It reviews the implication of proteins from both DNA repair, transcription, replication and chromatin maintenance in selective DNA adduct recognition. The main section of the manuscript is focusing on the implication of the moonlighting protein GAPDH in DNA adduct recognition with the model of the peculiar DNA minor groove alkylating and destabilizing drug S23906-1. The mechanism of action of S23906-1 alkylating drug and the large variety of GAPDH cellular functions are presented prior to focus on GAPDH direct binding to S23906-1 adducts.

  15. DNA repair and replication fork helicases are differentially affected by alkyl phosphotriester lesion.

    PubMed

    Suhasini, Avvaru N; Sommers, Joshua A; Yu, Stephen; Wu, Yuliang; Xu, Ting; Kelman, Zvi; Kaplan, Daniel L; Brosh, Robert M

    2012-06-01

    DNA helicases are directly responsible for catalytically unwinding duplex DNA in an ATP-dependent and directionally specific manner and play essential roles in cellular nucleic acid metabolism. It has been conventionally thought that DNA helicases are inhibited by bulky covalent DNA adducts in a strand-specific manner. However, the effects of highly stable alkyl phosphotriester (PTE) lesions that are induced by chemical mutagens and refractory to DNA repair have not been previously studied for their effects on helicases. In this study, DNA repair and replication helicases were examined for unwinding a forked duplex DNA substrate harboring a single isopropyl PTE specifically positioned in the helicase-translocating or -nontranslocating strand within the double-stranded region. A comparison of SF2 helicases (RecQ, RECQ1, WRN, BLM, FANCJ, and ChlR1) with a SF1 DNA repair helicase (UvrD) and two replicative helicases (MCM and DnaB) demonstrates unique differences in the effect of the PTE on the DNA unwinding reactions catalyzed by these enzymes. All of the SF2 helicases tested were inhibited by the PTE lesion, whereas UvrD and the replication fork helicases were fully tolerant of the isopropyl backbone modification, irrespective of strand. Sequestration studies demonstrated that RECQ1 helicase was trapped by the PTE lesion only when it resided in the helicase-translocating strand. Our results are discussed in light of the current models for DNA unwinding by helicases that are likely to encounter sugar phosphate backbone damage during biological DNA transactions.

  16. Effect of ionic strength and cationic DNA affinity binders on the DNA sequence selective alkylation of guanine N7-positions by nitrogen mustards

    SciTech Connect

    Hartley, J.A.; Forrow, S.M.; Souhami, R.L. )

    1990-03-27

    Large variations in alkylation intensities exist among guanines in a DNA sequence following treatment with chemotherapeutic alkylating agents such as nitrogen mustards, and the substituent attached to the reactive group can impose a distinct sequence preference for reaction. In order to understand further the structural and electrostatic factors which determine the sequence selectivity of alkylation reactions, the effect of increase ionic strength, the intercalator ethidium bromide, AT-specific minor groove binders distamycin A and netropsin, and the polyamine spermine on guanine N7-alkylation by L-phenylalanine mustard (L-Pam), uracil mustard (UM), and quinacrine mustard (QM) was investigated with a modification of the guanine-specific chemical cleavage technique for DNA sequencing. The result differed with both the nitrogen mustard and the cationic agent used. The effect, which resulted in both enhancement and suppression of alkylation sites, was most striking in the case of netropsin and distamycin A, which differed from each other. DNA footprinting indicated that selective binding to AT sequences in the minor groove of DNA can have long-range effects on the alkylation pattern of DNA in the major groove.

  17. Differential alkylation-based redox proteomics--Lessons learnt.

    PubMed

    Wojdyla, Katarzyna; Rogowska-Wrzesinska, Adelina

    2015-12-01

    Cysteine is one of the most reactive amino acids. This is due to the electronegativity of sulphur atom in the side chain of thiolate group. It results in cysteine being present in several distinct redox forms inside the cell. Amongst these, reversible oxidations, S-nitrosylation and S-sulfenylation are crucial mediators of intracellular redox signalling, with known associations to health and disease. Study of their functionalities has intensified thanks to the development of various analytical strategies, with particular contribution from differential alkylation-based proteomics methods. Presented here is a critical evaluation of differential alkylation-based strategies for the analysis of S-nitrosylation and S-sulfenylation. The aim is to assess the current status and to provide insights for future directions in the dynamically evolving field of redox proteomics. To achieve that we collected 35 original research articles published since 2010 and analysed them considering the following parameters, (i) resolution of modification site, (ii) quantitative information, including correction of modification levels by protein abundance changes and determination of modification site occupancy, (iii) throughput, including the amount of starting material required for analysis. The results of this meta-analysis are the core of this review, complemented by issues related to biological models and sample preparation in redox proteomics, including conditions for free thiol blocking and labelling of target cysteine oxoforms.

  18. Synergistic cytotoxicity of the DNA alkylating agent busulfan, nucleoside analogs and SAHA in lymphoma cell lines

    PubMed Central

    Valdez, Benigno C.; Murray, David; Nieto, Yago; Li, Yang; Wang, Guiyun; Champlin, Richard E.; Andersson, Borje S.

    2013-01-01

    Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) is a promising treatment for lymphomas. Its success depends on effective pre-transplant conditioning regimens. We previously reported on the efficacy of DNA alkylating agent-nucleoside analog (NA) combinations for conditioning in AML. We hypothesized that a similar combinatory approach can be used for lymphomas. A combination of busulfan (Bu) with two NAs – clofarabine (Clo), fludarabine (Flu) or gemcitabine (Gem) – resulted in synergistic cytotoxicity in lymphoma cell lines. We demonstrated that the [2 NAs+Bu] combination activates a DNA damage response through the ATM-CHK2 and ATM-CHK1 pathways, leading to cell cycle checkpoint activation and apoptosis. Histone modifications and KAP1 phosphorylation are indicative of chromatin relaxation mediated by the nucleoside analogs which sequentially increase Bu alkylation. Addition of suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid (SAHA) enhanced chromatin relaxation through increased histone acetylation and further augmented the cytotoxicity of [2 NAs+Bu]. Our results provide a preclinical basis for a clinical trial on using [2 NAs+Bu±SAHA] combinations as conditioning therapy for chemotherapy-refractory lymphoma patients undergoing HSCT. PMID:22023523

  19. Synthesis and antiproliferative activity of some new DNA-targeted alkylating pyrroloquinolines.

    PubMed

    Ferlin, M G; Dalla Via, L; Gia, O M

    2004-02-15

    Two novel DNA-direct alkylating agents, consisting of aniline mustard linked to an angular 3H-pyrrolo[3,2-f]quinoline nucleus, were synthetized and assayed for their in vitro antiproliferative activity. Simple convergent synthesis, consisting of separate preparation of 9-chloro-3H-pyrrolo[3,2-f]quinoline and p-amino-aniline derivatives, and following their linkage by substitution reactions 8a, b and 10, yielded the corresponding diol derivatives 7b and 9. Biological properties were evaluated with respect to cell growth inhibition, ability to form cross-links with DNA, and capacity to give rise to a molecular complex with the macromolecule for 7b, 8b, 9 and 10.

  20. Expression of mammalian O6-alkylguanine-DNA alkyltransferase in a cell line sensitive to alkylating agents.

    PubMed

    Dolan, M E; Norbeck, L; Clyde, C; Hora, N K; Erickson, L C; Pegg, A E

    1989-09-01

    Chinese hamster ovary cells (CHO) were co-transfected with pSV2neo and sheared DNA from either a human cell line (HT29) expressing high levels of O6-alkylguanine-DNA alkyltransferase (AGT) or from a cell line (BE) deficient in this activity. Cells expressing the selectable marker were obtained by exposure to G418 and colonies resistant to alkylation damage isolated by growth in the presence of 1-(2-chloroethyl)-3-cyclohexyl-1-nitrosourea (CCNU). The number of colonies of cells expressing AGT activity arising after transfection with DNA from BE cells was similar to the number arising from cells exposed to HT29 DNA. Although the amount of AGT repair protein expressed in the transfectant colonies from this experiment was relatively low, these results indicate that repair of alkylation damage can be restored in AGT-deficient cells by transfection of human DNA from both repair-deficient and proficient cells. A separate transfection of CHOMG cells [a mutant of CHO cells resistant to the drug, methylglyoxal bis(guanylhydrazone) (MGBG)] with HT29 DNA and pSV2neo followed by selection of G418 and 1,3-bis-(2-chloroethyl)-1-nitrosourea (BCNU) resulted in three colonies with high AGT levels. These transfectants had different growth rates and expressed levels of the AGT protein between 230 and 300 fmol/mg protein. The transfectants were as resistant to the cytotoxic effects of BCNU, Clomesone, methylnitrosourea (MNU) and 1-methyl-3-nitro-1-nitrosoguanidine (MNNG) as HT29 cells which were much more resistant than the parental CHOMG cells. Pretreatment of transfectant cells with 0.4 mM O6-methylguanine for 24 h reduced AGT activity to 14% basal levels, which upon removal of the base increased to approximately 74% basal level within 8 h. The sensitivity to the cytotoxic effects of both the chloroethylating and methylating agents was enhanced by treatment with O6-methylguanine. In the same manner, the number of BCNU-induced DNA interstrand cross-links increased in transfectant

  1. DNA alkylation and tumor induction in regenerating rat liver after cell cycle-related continuous N-nitrosodimethylamine infusion

    SciTech Connect

    Rabes, H.M.; Kerler, R.; Wilhelm, R.

    1983-01-01

    Synchronized regenerating rat liver after partial hepatectomy was used to study cell cycle-related DNA base alkylation and liver carcinogenesis. A continuous iv infusion of (/sup 14/C)N-nitrosodimethylamine (DMN) at a dose of 0.5 mg/kg/hour was given to inbred male Wistar Af/Han rats over a period of 8 hours either during the G1 phase, hydroxyurea-synchronized DNA synthesis, or the G2+M-phase of regenerating liver or to untreated rats (G0-phase liver--carcinogen dose, 1.5 mg/kg/hour). Two hours after the end of the infusion, the amount of 7-methylguanine was highest in the G0-phase liver, with a decrease in the G1 phase, the S-phase, and the G2+M-phase. After continuous DMN exposure, the O6-methylguanine:7-methylguanine ratio was lower in the S-phase and G2+M-phase livers than in the G0-phase and G1-phase livers, indicating an increased O6-methylguanine repair during DNA synthesis and the G2+M-phase. Liver tumors in rats treated by continuous DMN infusion either during the G0 phase or the S-phase developed only after carcinogen exposure during DNA synthesis.

  2. Synthesis and evaluation of DNA-targeted spatially separated bis(aniline mustards) as potential alkylating agents with enhanced DNA cross-linking capability.

    PubMed

    Gourdie, T A; Prakash, A S; Wakelin, L P; Woodgate, P D; Denny, W A

    1991-01-01

    DNA-targeted separated bis-mustards were synthesized by attaching aniline mono-mustards at the 4- and 9-positions of the DNA-intercalating ligand 9-aminoacridine-4-carboxamide, with the intention of improving the low cross-link to monoadduct ratio found with most alkylating agents. The geometry of these compounds requires that, when the acridine binds to DNA by intercalation, one alkylating moiety is delivered to each DNA groove. Gel electrophoretic studies show that only one arm of these compounds (probably that attached to the 9-position) alkylates DNA, such alkylation occurring specifically in the major groove at the N7 of guanines. Cell-line studies confirm that the mode of cytotoxicity of these compounds (unlike that of untargeted aniline bis-mustards of comparable reactivity) is due to bulky DNA monoadduct formation. It is concluded that more information is required about the exact orientation of the initial monoadducts before ligands with specific DNA cross-linking ability can be designed.

  3. Oncometabolite D-2-Hydroxyglutarate Inhibits ALKBH DNA Repair Enzymes and Sensitizes IDH Mutant Cells to Alkylating Agents.

    PubMed

    Wang, Pu; Wu, Jing; Ma, Shenghong; Zhang, Lei; Yao, Jun; Hoadley, Katherine A; Wilkerson, Matthew D; Perou, Charles M; Guan, Kun-Liang; Ye, Dan; Xiong, Yue

    2015-12-22

    Chemotherapy of a combination of DNA alkylating agents, procarbazine and lomustine (CCNU), and a microtubule poison, vincristine, offers a significant benefit to a subset of glioma patients. The benefit of this regimen, known as PCV, was recently linked to IDH mutation that occurs frequently in glioma and produces D-2-hydroxyglutarate (D-2-HG), a competitive inhibitor of α-ketoglutarate (α-KG). We report here that D-2-HG inhibits the α-KG-dependent alkB homolog (ALKBH) DNA repair enzymes. Cells expressing mutant IDH display reduced repair kinetics, accumulate more DNA damages, and are sensitized to alkylating agents. The observed sensitization to alkylating agents requires the catalytic activity of mutant IDH to produce D-2-HG and can be reversed by the deletion of mutant IDH allele or overexpression of ALKBH2 or AKLBH3. Our results suggest that impairment of DNA repair may contribute to tumorigenesis driven by IDH mutations and that alkylating agents may merit exploration for treating IDH-mutated cancer patients.

  4. Indole and its alkyl-substituted derivatives protect erythrocyte and DNA against radical-induced oxidation.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Feng; Liu, Zai-Qun

    2009-01-01

    The antioxidant properties of 1,2,3,4-tetra-hydrocarbazole, 6-methoxy-1,2,3,4-tetrahydrocar-bazole (MTC), 2,3-dimethylindole, 5-methoxy-2,3-dimethylindole, and indole were investigated in the case of hemolysis of human erythrocytes and oxidative damage of DNA induced by 2,2'-azobis(2-amidinopropane hydrochloride) (AAPH), respectively. The aim of this work was to explore the influence of methoxy, methyl, and cyclohexyl substituents on the antioxidant activities of indole derivatives. These indole derivatives were able to protect erythrocytes and DNA in a concentration-dependent manner. The alkyl-substituted indole can protect erythrocytes and DNA against AAPH-induced oxidation. Especially, the structural features of cyclohexyl and methoxy substituents made MTC the best antioxidant among the indole derivatives used herein. Finally, the interaction between these indole derivatives and 2,2'-azinobis(3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulfonate) radical cation and 2,2'-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl, respectively, provided direct evidence for these indole derivatives to scavenge radicals and emphasized the importance of electron-donating groups for the free radical-scavenging activity of indole derivatives.

  5. A common element involved in transcriptional regulation of two DNA alkylation repair genes (MAG and MGT1) of Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, W; Singh, K K; Chen, B; Samson, L

    1993-01-01

    The Saccharomyces cerevisiae MAG gene encodes a 3-methyladenine DNA glycosylase that protects cells from killing by alkylating agents. MAG mRNA levels are induced not only by alkylating agents but also by DNA-damaging agents that do not produce alkylated DNA. We constructed a MAG-lacZ gene fusion to help identify the cis-acting promoter elements involved in regulating MAG expression. Deletion analysis defined the presence of one upstream activating sequence and one upstream repressing sequence (URS) and suggested the presence of a second URS. One of the MAG URS elements matches a decamer consensus sequence present in the promoters of 11 other S. cerevisiae DNA repair and metabolism genes, including the MGT1 gene, which encodes an O6-methylguanine DNA repair methyltransferase. Two proteins of 26 and 39 kDa bind specifically to the MAG and MGT1 URS elements. We suggest that the URS-binding proteins may play an important role in the coordinate regulation of these S. cerevisiae DNA repair genes. Images PMID:8246943

  6. Abnormal sensitivity of skin fibroblasts from familial polyposis patients to DNA alkylating agents

    SciTech Connect

    Barfknecht, T.R.; Little, J.B.

    1982-04-01

    Fibroblast cell strains derived from different patients all afflicted with genetic predisposing to the development of intestinal polyposis and cancer were tested for their sensitivity to the lethal effects of the DNA alkylating agents methylmethanesulfonate (MMS), ethyl methanesulfonate, N-methyl-N'-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine, and 4-nitroquinoline 1-oxide. The genetic syndromes studied were: (a) adenomatosis of the colon and rectum only, an autosomal dominant trait; (b) Turcot's syndrome, a rare autosomal recessive polyposis syndrome also characterized by central nervous system tumors; and (c) Gardner's syndrome, an autosomal dominant syndrome which, in addition to intestinal polyposis, is also clinically characterized by osteomas and soft tissue tumors. Fibroblasts from a patient with Turcot's syndrome were hypersensitive to MMS, having a D0 value of 0.24 mM (p less than 0.01) versus the normal average D0 of 0.36 mM and a D10 value of 0.95 mM (p less than 0.01) compared with the normal average value of 1.3 mM. Fibroblasts from the Gardner's syndrome proband were moderately sensitive to MMS, ethyl methanesulfonate, and N-methyl-N'-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine due to significant differences of D10 values of 0.60 mM (p less than 0.01), 15 mM (p less than 0.01), and 4.8 microM (p less than 0.025), respectively, versus the normal average values of 1.3 mM, 28 mM, and 9.4 microM. Fibroblasts from the clinically affected Gardner's syndrome daughter of the proband were significantly more sensitive to MMS treatment, D0 of 0.22 mM (p less than 0.01) versus the normal average D0 of 0.36 mM and a D10 of 0.97 mM (p less than 0.01) versus the normal average. This differential sensitivity to the several DNA alkylating agents suggests that different mechanisms of hypersensitivity to these chemicals may be associated with fibroblasts from the various forms of familial polyposis.

  7. Bifunctional alkylating agent-mediated MGMT-DNA cross-linking and its proteolytic cleavage in 16HBE cells.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Jin; Ye, Feng; Dan, Guorong; Zhao, Yuanpeng; Wang, Bin; Zhao, Jiqing; Sai, Yan; Zou, Zhongmin

    2016-08-15

    Nitrogen mustard (NM), a bifunctional alkylating agent (BAA), contains two alkyl arms and can act as a cross-linking bridge between DNA and protein to form a DNA-protein cross-link (DPC). O(6)-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase (MGMT), a DNA repair enzyme for alkyl adducts removal, is found to enhance cell sensitivity to BAAs and to promote damage, possibly due to its stable covalent cross-linking with DNA mediated by BAAs. To investigate MGMT-DNA cross-link (mDPC) formation and its possible dual roles in NM exposure, human bronchial epithelial cell line 16HBE was subjected to different concentrations of HN2, a kind of NM, and we found mDPC was induced by HN2 in a concentration-dependent manner, but the mRNA and total protein of MGMT were suppressed. As early as 1h after HN2 treatment, high mDPC was achieved and the level maintained for up to 24h. Quick total DPC (tDPC) and γ-H2AX accumulation were observed. To evaluate the effect of newly predicted protease DVC1 on DPC cleavage, we applied siRNA of MGMT and DVC1, MG132 (proteasome inhibitor), and NMS-873 (p97 inhibitor) and found that proteolysis plays a role. DVC1 was proven to be more important in the cleavage of mDPC than tDPC in a p97-dependent manner. HN2 exposure induced DVC1 upregulation, which was at least partially contributed to MGMT cleavage by proteolysis because HN2-induced mDPC level and DNA damage was closely related with DVC1 expression. Homologous recombination (HR) was also activated. Our findings demonstrated that MGMT might turn into a DNA damage promoter by forming DPC when exposed to HN2. Proteolysis, especially DVC1, plays a crucial role in mDPC repair.

  8. An Overview of Chemical Processes That Damage Cellular DNA: Spontaneous Hydrolysis, Alkylation, and Reactions with Radicals

    PubMed Central

    Gates, Kent S.

    2009-01-01

    The sequence of heterocyclic bases on the interior of the DNA double helix constitutes the genetic code that drives the operation of all living organisms. With this said, it is not surprising that chemical modification of cellular DNA can have profound biological consequences. Therefore, the organic chemistry of DNA damage is fundamentally important to diverse fields including medicinal chemistry, toxicology, and biotechnology. This review is designed to provide a brief overview of the common types of chemical reactions that lead to DNA damage under physiological conditions. PMID:19757819

  9. Characterization of reaction conditions providing rapid and specific cysteine alkylation for peptide-based mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Paulech, Jana; Solis, Nestor; Cordwell, Stuart J

    2013-01-01

    Alkylation converts Cys thiols to thioethers and prevents unwanted side reactions, thus facilitating mass spectrometric identification of Cys-containing peptides. Alkylation occurs preferentially at Cys due to its high nucleophilicity, however reactions at other such sites are possible. N-ethylmaleimide (NEM) shows rapid reaction kinetics with Cys and careful definition of reaction conditions results in little reactivity at other sites. Analysis of a protein standard alkylated under differing reaction conditions (pH, NEM concentrations and reaction times) was performed using liquid chromatography coupled to tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) and selected reaction monitoring (SRM) of NEM-modified and unmodified peptide pairs. Mis-alkylation sites at primary and secondary amines were identified and limited to one equivalent of NEM. No evidence for hydroxyl or thioether alkylation was observed. Improved specificity was achieved by restricting the pH below neutral, NEM concentration below 10mM and/or reaction time to below 5min. Maximal removal of Cys activity was observed in tissue homogenates at 40mM NEM within 1min, dependent upon efficient protein denaturation. SRM assays identified peptide-specific levels of mis-alkylation, indicating that NEM-modified to unmodified ratios did not exceed 10%, with the exception of Cys alkylation that proceeded to 100%, and some Lys residues that resulted in tryptic missed cleavages. High reactivity was observed for His residues considering their relatively low abundance. These data indicate that rapid and specific Cys alkylation is possible with NEM under relatively mild conditions, with more abrasive conditions leading to increased non-specific alkylation without appreciable benefit for MS-based proteomics.

  10. Caspase-9 is required for normal hematopoietic development and protection from alkylator-induced DNA damage in mice

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Elise Peterson; McLellan, Michael; Ding, Li; Fulton, Robert; Mardis, Elaine R.; Wilson, Richard K.; Miller, Christopher A.; Westervelt, Peter; DiPersio, John F.; Link, Daniel C.; Walter, Matthew J.; Ley, Timothy J.

    2014-01-01

    Apoptosis and the DNA damage responses have been implicated in hematopoietic development and differentiation, as well as in the pathogenesis of myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) and leukemia. However, the importance of late-stage mediators of apoptosis in hematopoiesis and leukemogenesis has not been elucidated. Here, we examine the role of caspase-9 (Casp9), the initiator caspase of the intrinsic apoptotic cascade, in murine fetal and adult hematopoiesis. Casp9 deficiency resulted in decreased erythroid and B-cell progenitor abundance and impaired function of hematopoietic stem cells after transplantation. Mouse bone marrow chimeras lacking Casp9 or its cofactor Apaf1 developed low white blood cell counts, decreased B-cell numbers, anemia, and reduced survival. Defects in apoptosis have also been previously implicated in susceptibility to therapy-related leukemia, a disease caused by exposure to DNA-damaging chemotherapy. We found that the burden of DNA damage was increased in Casp9-deficient cells after exposure to the alkylator, N-ethyl-nitrosourea (ENU). Furthermore, exome sequencing revealed that oligoclonal hematopoiesis emerged in Casp9-deficient bone marrow chimeras after alkylator exposure. Taken together, these findings suggest that defects in apoptosis could be a key step in the pathogenesis of alkylator-associated secondary malignancies. PMID:25349173

  11. Inhibition of KRAS codon 12 mutants using a novel DNA-alkylating pyrrole-imidazole polyamide conjugate.

    PubMed

    Hiraoka, Kiriko; Inoue, Takahiro; Taylor, Rhys Dylan; Watanabe, Takayoshi; Koshikawa, Nobuko; Yoda, Hiroyuki; Shinohara, Ken-ichi; Takatori, Atsushi; Sugimoto, Hirokazu; Maru, Yoshiaki; Denda, Tadamichi; Fujiwara, Kyoko; Balmain, Allan; Ozaki, Toshinori; Bando, Toshikazu; Sugiyama, Hiroshi; Nagase, Hiroki

    2015-04-27

    Despite extensive efforts to target mutated RAS proteins, anticancer agents capable of selectively killing tumour cells harbouring KRAS mutations have remained unavailable. Here we demonstrate the direct targeting of KRAS mutant DNA using a synthetic alkylating agent (pyrrole-imidazole polyamide indole-seco-CBI conjugate; KR12) that selectively recognizes oncogenic codon 12 KRAS mutations. KR12 alkylates adenine N3 at the target sequence, causing strand cleavage and growth suppression in human colon cancer cells with G12D or G12V mutations, thus inducing senescence and apoptosis. In xenograft models, KR12 infusions induce significant tumour growth suppression, with low host toxicity in KRAS-mutated but not wild-type tumours. This newly developed approach may be applicable to the targeting of other mutant driver oncogenes in human tumours.

  12. The transfection efficiency of calix[4]arene-based lipids: the role of the alkyl chain length.

    PubMed

    Mochizuki, Shinichi; Nishina, Koichi; Fujii, Shota; Sakurai, Kazuo

    2015-02-01

    The size, surface charge, and microstructure of lipoplexes comprising cationic lipids and nucleic acids are important factors for transfection efficiency. As these properties are largely determined by the cationic lipids used, a number of studies on the relationship between cationic lipids and the transfection efficiency have been reported. Among the many cationic lipids, lipids with multivalent cationic head groups are expected to be potent transfection reagents. Here, we prepared calix[4]arene-based lipids with different alkyl chain lengths from C3 to C15 and evaluated the relationship between the alkyl chain length and the transfection efficiency. C6 lipoplexes exhibited the highest transfection efficiency among all lipoplexes. The gene expression with C9 and C12 lipoplexes was slightly lower than that with C6 lipoplexes. C3 lipoplexes hardly induced gene expression, while C15 lipoplexes exhibited no complexation with plasmid DNA. Although all lipoplexes exhibited nearly identical characteristics, they exhibited different behaviours in terms of the interactions between the lipoplexes and anionic micelles comprising phosphatidylserine, a model of endosomal vehicle. After mixing with phosphatidylserine micelles, C6 lipoplexes released the bound plasmid DNA at pH 5 but not at pH 7, indicating that they can interact with the late endosomal membrane after being incorporated into cells. No plasmid DNA was released from C9 or C12 lipoplexes at either pH values. Thus, the alkyl chain length of cationic lipids is related to their interaction with the endosomal compartment and can provide a basis for the design of novel transfection reagents.

  13. Noncovalent DNA binding drives DNA alkylation by leinamycin: evidence that the Z,E-5-(thiazol-4-yl)-penta-2,4-dienone moiety of the natural product serves as an atypical DNA intercalator.

    PubMed

    Fekry, Mostafa I; Szekely, Jozsef; Dutta, Sanjay; Breydo, Leonid; Zang, Hong; Gates, Kent S

    2011-11-09

    Molecular recognition and chemical modification of DNA are important in medicinal chemistry, toxicology, and biotechnology. Historically, natural products have revealed many interesting and unexpected mechanisms for noncovalent DNA binding and covalent DNA modification. The studies reported here characterize the molecular mechanisms underlying the efficient alkylation of duplex DNA by the Streptomyces-derived natural product leinamycin. Previous studies suggested that alkylation of duplex DNA by activated leinamycin (2) is driven by noncovalent association of the natural product with the double helix. This is striking because leinamycin does not contain a classical noncovalent DNA-binding motif, such as an intercalating unit, a groove binder, or a polycation. The experiments described here provide evidence that leinamycin is an atypical DNA-intercalating agent. A competition binding assay involving daunomycin-mediated inhibition of DNA alkylation by leinamycin provided evidence that activated leinamycin binds to duplex DNA with an apparent binding constant of approximately 4.3 ± 0.4 × 10(3) M(-1). Activated leinamycin caused duplex unwinding and hydrodynamic changes in DNA-containing solutions that are indicative of DNA intercalation. Characterization of the reaction of activated leinamycin with palindromic duplexes containing 5'-CG and 5'-GC target sites, bulge-containing duplexes, and 5-methylcytosine-containing duplexes provided evidence regarding the orientation of leinamycin with respect to target guanine residues. The data allow construction of a model for the leinamycin-DNA complex suggesting how a modest DNA-binding constant combines with proper positioning of the natural product to drive efficient alkylation of guanine residues in the major groove of duplex DNA.

  14. Asymmetric synthesis of α-amino acids via homologation of Ni(II) complexes of glycine Schiff bases; Part 1: alkyl halide alkylations.

    PubMed

    Sorochinsky, Alexander E; Aceña, José Luis; Moriwaki, Hiroki; Sato, Tatsunori; Soloshonok, Vadim A

    2013-10-01

    Alkylations of chiral or achiral Ni(II) complexes of glycine Schiff bases constitute a landmark in the development of practical methodology for asymmetric synthesis of α-amino acids. Straightforward, easy preparation as well as high reactivity of these Ni(II) complexes render them ready available and inexpensive glycine equivalents for preparing a wide variety of α-amino acids, in particular on a relatively large scale. In the case of Ni(II) complexes containing benzylproline moiety as a chiral auxiliary, their alkylation proceeds with high thermodynamically controlled diastereoselectivity. Similar type of Ni(II) complexes derived from alanine can also be used for alkylation providing convenient access to quaternary, α,α-disubstituted α-amino acids. Achiral type of Ni(II) complexes can be prepared from picolinic acid or via recently developed modular approach using simple secondary or primary amines. These Ni(II) complexes can be easily mono/bis-alkylated under homogeneous or phase-transfer catalysis conditions. Origin of diastereo-/enantioselectivity in the alkylations reactions, aspects of practicality, generality and limitations of this methodology is critically discussed.

  15. A novel thermostable protein-tag: optimization of the Sulfolobus solfataricus DNA- alkyl-transferase by protein engineering.

    PubMed

    Vettone, Antonella; Serpe, Mario; Hidalgo, Aurelio; Berenguer, José; del Monaco, Giovanni; Valenti, Anna; Rossi, Mosé; Ciaramella, Maria; Perugino, Giuseppe

    2016-01-01

    In the last decade, a powerful biotechnological tool for the in vivo and in vitro specific labeling of proteins (SNAP-tag™ technology) was proposed as a valid alternative to classical protein-tags (green fluorescent proteins, GFPs). This was made possible by the discovery of the irreversible reaction of the human alkylguanine-DNA-alkyl-transferase (hAGT) in the presence of benzyl-guanine derivatives. However, the mild reaction conditions and the general instability of the mesophilic SNAP-tag™ make this new approach not fully applicable to (hyper-)thermophilic and, in general, extremophilic organisms. Here, we introduce an engineered variant of the thermostable alkylguanine-DNA-alkyl-transferase from the Archaea Sulfolobus solfataricus (SsOGT-H5), which displays a catalytic efficiency comparable to the SNAP-tag™ protein, but showing high intrinsic stability typical of proteins from this organism. The successful heterologous expression obtained in a thermophilic model organism makes SsOGT-H5 a valid candidate as protein-tag for organisms living in extreme environments.

  16. Targeting neddylation induces DNA damage and checkpoint activation and sensitizes chronic lymphocytic leukemia B cells to alkylating agents.

    PubMed

    Paiva, C; Godbersen, J C; Berger, A; Brown, J R; Danilov, A V

    2015-07-09

    Microenvironment-mediated upregulation of the B-cell receptor (BCR) and nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) signaling in CLL cells resident in the lymph node and bone marrow promotes apoptosis evasion and clonal expansion. We recently reported that MLN4924 (pevonedistat), an investigational agent that inhibits the NEDD8-activating enzyme (NAE), abrogates stromal-mediated NF-κB pathway activity and CLL cell survival. However, the NAE pathway also assists degradation of multiple other substrates. MLN4924 has been shown to induce DNA damage and cell cycle arrest, but the importance of this mechanism in primary neoplastic B cells has not been studied. Here we mimicked the lymph node microenvironment using CD40 ligand (CD40L)-expressing stroma and interleukin-21 (IL-21) to find that inducing proliferation of the primary CLL cells conferred enhanced sensitivity to NAE inhibition. Treatment of the CD40-stimulated CLL cells with MLN4924 resulted in deregulation of Cdt1, a DNA replication licensing factor, and cell cycle inhibitors p21 and p27. This led to DNA damage, checkpoint activation and G2 arrest. Alkylating agents bendamustine and chlorambucil enhanced MLN4924-mediated DNA damage and apoptosis. These events were more prominent in cells stimulated with IL-21 compared with CD40L alone, indicating that, following NAE inhibition, the culture conditions were able to direct CLL cell fate from an NF-κB inhibition to a Cdt1 induction program. Our data provide insight into the biological consequences of targeting NAE in CLL and serves as further rationale for studying the clinical activity of MLN4924 in CLL, particularly in combination with alkylating agents.

  17. Sequence-specific DNA alkylation and transcriptional inhibition by long-chain hairpin pyrrole-imidazole polyamide-chlorambucil conjugates targeting CAG/CTG trinucleotide repeats.

    PubMed

    Asamitsu, Sefan; Kawamoto, Yusuke; Hashiya, Fumitaka; Hashiya, Kaori; Yamamoto, Makoto; Kizaki, Seiichiro; Bando, Toshikazu; Sugiyama, Hiroshi

    2014-09-01

    Introducing novel building blocks to solid-phase peptide synthesis, we readily synthesized long-chain hairpin pyrrole-imidazole (PI) polyamide-chlorambucil conjugates 3 and 4 via the introduction of an amino group into a GABA (γ-turn) contained in 3, to target CAG/CTG repeat sequences, which are associated with various hereditary disorders. A high-resolution denaturing polyacrylamide sequencing gel revealed sequence-specific alkylation both strands at the N3 of adenines or guanines in CAG/CTG repeats by conjugates 3 and 4, with 11bp recognition. In vitro transcription assays using conjugate 4 revealed that specific alkylation inhibited the progression of RNA polymerase at the alkylating sites. Chiral substitution of the γ-turn with an amino group resulted in higher binding affinity observed in SPR assays. These assays suggest that conjugates 4 with 11bp recognition has the potential to cause specific DNA damage and transcriptional inhibition at the alkylating sites.

  18. DNA-directed alkylating agents. 6. Synthesis and antitumor activity of DNA minor groove-targeted aniline mustard analogues of pibenzimol (Hoechst 33258)

    PubMed

    Gravatt, G L; Baguley, B C; Wilson, W R; Denny, W A

    1994-12-09

    A series of nitrogen mustard analogues of the DNA minor groove binding fluorophore pibenzimol (Hoechst 33258) have been synthesized and evaluated for antitumor activity. Conventional construction of the bisbenzimidazole ring system from the piperazinyl terminus, via two consecutive Pinner-type reactions, gave low yields of products contaminated with the 2-methyl analogue which proved difficult to separate. An alternative synthesis was developed, involving construction of the bisbenzimidazole from the mustard terminus, via Cu(2+)-promoted oxidative coupling of the mustard aldehydes with 3,4-diaminobenzonitrile to form the monobenzimidazoles, followed by a Pinner-type reaction and condensation with 4-(1-methyl-4-piperazinyl)-o-phenylenediamine. This process gives higher yields and pure products. The mustard analogues showed high hypersensitivity factors (IC50AA8/IC50 UV4), typical of DNA alkylating agents. There was a large increase in cytotoxicity (85-fold) across the homologous series which cannot be explained entirely by changes in mustard reactivity and may be related to altering orientation of the mustard with respect to the DNA resulting in different patterns of alkylation. Pibenzimol itself (which has been evaluated clinically as an anticancer drug) was inactive against P388 in vivo using a single-dose protocol, but the short-chain mustard homologues were highly effective, eliciting a proportion of long-term survivors.

  19. Development of the adverse outcome pathway "alkylation of DNA in male premeiotic germ cells leading to heritable mutations" using the OECD's users' handbook supplement.

    PubMed

    Yauk, Carole L; Lambert, Iain B; Meek, M E Bette; Douglas, George R; Marchetti, Francesco

    2015-12-01

    The Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development's (OECD) Adverse Outcome Pathway (AOP) programme aims to develop a knowledgebase of all known pathways of toxicity that lead to adverse effects in humans and ecosystems. A Users' Handbook was recently released to provide supplementary guidance on AOP development. This article describes one AOP-alkylation of DNA in male premeiotic germ cells leading to heritable mutations. This outcome is an important regulatory endpoint. The AOP describes the biological plausibility and empirical evidence supporting that compounds capable of alkylating DNA cause germ cell mutations and subsequent mutations in the offspring of exposed males. Alkyl adducts are subject to DNA repair; however, at high doses the repair machinery becomes saturated. Lack of repair leads to replication of alkylated DNA and ensuing mutations in male premeiotic germ cells. Mutations that do not impair spermatogenesis persist and eventually are present in mature sperm. Thus, the mutations are transmitted to the offspring. Although there are some gaps in empirical support and evidence for essentiality of the key events for certain aspects of this AOP, the overall AOP is generally accepted as dogma and applies broadly to any species that produces sperm. The AOP was developed and used in an iterative process to test and refine the Users' Handbook, and is one of the first publicly available AOPs. It is our hope that this AOP will be leveraged to develop other AOPs in this field to advance method development, computational models to predict germ cell effects, and integrated testing strategies.

  20. Properties of Apolar Solutes in Alkyl Imidazolium-Based Ionic Liquids: The Importance of Local Interactions.

    PubMed

    Lesch, Volker; Heuer, Andreas; Holm, Christian; Smiatek, Jens

    2016-02-03

    The solvation and the dynamic properties of apolar model solutes in alkyl imidazolium-based ionic liquids (IL) are studied by using all-atom molecular dynamics simulations. In regards to specific IL effects, we focused on the often used 1-ethyl-3-methyl imidazolium cation in combination with the anions tetrafluoroborate, acetate, and bis(trifluoromethanesulfonyl)imide. Our findings reveal that the size of the anion crucially influences the accumulation behavior of the cations, which results in modified IL solvation properties. Deviations between the different alkyl imidazolium-based IL combinations can be also observed with regard to the results for the radial distribution functions, the number of surrounding molecules, and the molecular orientation. The analysis of the van Hove function further shows pronounced differences in the dynamic behavior of the solutes. The simulations verify that the solute mobilities are mainly influenced by the composition of the local solvent shell and the properties of the underlying Lennard-Jones interactions. Additional simulations with regard to modified short-range dispersion energies for alkyl imidazolium-based ILs validate our conclusions.

  1. DNA-directed alkylating agents. 1. Structure-activity relationships for acridine-linked aniline mustards: consequences of varying the reactivity of the mustard.

    PubMed

    Gourdie, T A; Valu, K K; Gravatt, G L; Boritzki, T J; Baguley, B C; Wakelin, L P; Wilson, W R; Woodgate, P D; Denny, W A

    1990-04-01

    A series of DNA-targeted aniline mustards have been prepared, and their chemical reactivity and in vitro and in vivo cytotoxicity have been evaluated and compared with that of the corresponding simple aniline mustards. The alkylating groups were anchored to the DNA-intercalating 9-aminoacridine chromophore by an alkyl chain of fixed length attached at the mustard 4-position through a link group X, while the corresponding simple mustards possessed an electronically identical small group at this position. The link group was varied to provide a series of compounds of similar geometry but widely differing mustard reactivity. Variation in biological activity should then largely be a consequence of this varying reactivity. Rates of mustard hydrolysis in the two series related only to the electronic properties of the link group, with attachment of the intercalating chromophore having no effect. The cytotoxicities of the simple mustards correlated well with group electronic properties (with a 200-300-fold range in IC50S). The corresponding DNA-targeted mustards were much more potent (up to 100-fold), but their IC50 values varied much less with linker group electronic properties. Most of the DNA-targeted mustards showed in vivo antitumor activity, being both more active and more dose-potent than either the corresponding untargeted mustards and chlorambucil. These results show that targeting alkylating agents to DNA by attachment to DNA-affinic units may be a useful strategy.

  2. The Shu complex promotes error-free tolerance of alkylation-induced base excision repair products

    PubMed Central

    Godin, Stephen K.; Zhang, Zhuying; Herken, Benjamin W.; Westmoreland, James W.; Lee, Alison G.; Mihalevic, Michael J.; Yu, Zhongxun; Sobol, Robert W.; Resnick, Michael A.; Bernstein, Kara A.

    2016-01-01

    Here, we investigate the role of the budding yeast Shu complex in promoting homologous recombination (HR) upon replication fork damage. We recently found that the Shu complex stimulates Rad51 filament formation during HR through its physical interactions with Rad55-Rad57. Unlike other HR factors, Shu complex mutants are primarily sensitive to replicative stress caused by MMS and not to more direct DNA breaks. Here, we uncover a novel role for the Shu complex in the repair of specific MMS-induced DNA lesions and elucidate the interplay between HR and translesion DNA synthesis. We find that the Shu complex promotes high-fidelity bypass of MMS-induced alkylation damage, such as N3-methyladenine, as well as bypassing the abasic sites generated after Mag1 removes N3-methyladenine lesions. Furthermore, we find that the Shu complex responds to ssDNA breaks generated in cells lacking the abasic site endonucleases. At each lesion, the Shu complex promotes Rad51-dependent HR as the primary repair/tolerance mechanism over error-prone translesion DNA polymerases. Together, our work demonstrates that the Shu complex's promotion of Rad51 pre-synaptic filaments is critical for high-fidelity bypass of multiple replication-blocking lesion. PMID:27298254

  3. DNA based molecular motors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michaelis, Jens; Muschielok, Adam; Andrecka, Joanna; Kügel, Wolfgang; Moffitt, Jeffrey R.

    2009-12-01

    Most of the essential cellular processes such as polymerisation reactions, gene expression and regulation are governed by mechanical processes. Controlled mechanical investigations of these processes are therefore required in order to take our understanding of molecular biology to the next level. Single-molecule manipulation and force spectroscopy have over the last 15 years been developed into extremely powerful techniques. Applying these techniques to the investigation of proteins and DNA molecules has led to a mechanistic understanding of protein function on the level of single molecules. As examples for DNA based molecular machines we will describe single-molecule experiments on RNA polymerases as well as on the packaging of DNA into a viral capsid-a process that is driven by one of the most powerful molecular motors.

  4. DNA-directed alkylating agents. 3. Structure-activity relationships for acridine-linked aniline mustards: consequences of varying the length of the linker chain.

    PubMed

    Valu, K K; Gourdie, T A; Boritzki, T J; Gravatt, G L; Baguley, B C; Wilson, W R; Wakelin, L P; Woodgate, P D; Denny, W A

    1990-11-01

    Four series of acridine-linked aniline mustards have been prepared and evaluated for in vitro cytotoxicity, in vivo antitumor activity, and DNA cross-linking ability. The anilines were attached to the DNA-intercalating acridine chromophores by link groups (-O-, -CH2-, -S-, and -SO2-) of widely varying electronic properties, providing four series of widely differing mustard reactivity where the alkyl chain linking the acridine and mustard moieties was varied from two to five carbons. Relationships were sought between chain length and biological properties. Within each series, increasing the chain length did not alter the reactivity of the alkylating moiety but did appear to position it differently on the DNA, since cross-linking ability (measured by agarose gel assay) altered with chain length, being maximal with the C4 analogue. The in vivo antitumor activities of the compounds depended to some extent on the reactivity of the mustard, with the least reactive SO2 compounds being inactive. However, DNA-targeting did appear to allow the use of less reactive mustards, since the S-linked acridine mustards showed significant activity whereas the parent S-mustard did not. Within each active series, the most active compound was the C4 homologue, suggesting some relationship between activity and extent of DNA alkylation.

  5. Multiple species of Bacillus subtilis DNA alkyltransferase involved in the adaptive response to simple alkylating agents

    SciTech Connect

    Morohoshi, F.; Munakata, N.

    1987-02-01

    Three molecular species of methyl-accepting proteins exist in Bacillus subtilis cells, which collect methyl groups from methylated DNA. A 20-kilodalton (kDa) protein was constitutively present in the cells of the ada/sup +/ (proficient in adaptive response) strain as well as in those of six ada (deficient in adaptive response) mutant strains and was assigned to the O/sup 6/-methylguanine:DNA methyltransferase. Another species of O/sup 6/-methylguanine:DNA methyltransferase, which had a molecular size of 22 kDa, emerged after adaptive treatment of the ada/sup +/ but not any of the ada mutant cells. A 27-kDa methyl-accepting protein, which preferred methylated poly(dT) to methylated calf thymus DNA as a substrate, was assigned to the methylphosphotriester:DNA methyltransferase. It was produced, after adaptive treatment, in the cells of ada/sup +/, ada-3, ada-4, and ada-6 strains but not in the cells of ada-1, ada-2, or ada-5 strains. These results support and extend the authors proposition that ada mutants can be classified into two groups; one (the ada-4 group) is defective only in the inducible synthesis of O/sup 6/-methylguanine:DNA methyltransferase (22-kDa protein), and the other (the ada-1 group) is deficient in the adaptive response in toto.

  6. Synthesis and characterization of an O(6)-2'-deoxyguanosine-alkyl-O(6)-2'-deoxyguanosine interstrand cross-link in a 5'-GNC motif and repair by human O(6)-alkylguanine-DNA alkyltransferase.

    PubMed

    McManus, Francis P; Fang, Qingming; Booth, Jason D M; Noronha, Anne M; Pegg, Anthony E; Wilds, Christopher J

    2010-10-07

    O(6)-2'-Deoxyguanosine-alkyl-O(6)-2'-deoxyguanosine interstrand DNA cross-links (ICLs) with a four and seven methylene linkage in a 5'-GNC- motif have been synthesized and their repair by human O6-alkylguanine-DNA alkyltransferase (hAGT) investigated. Duplexes containing 11 base-pairs with the ICLs in the center were assembled by automated DNA solid-phase synthesis using a cross-linked 2'-deoxyguanosine dimer phosphoramidite, prepared via a seven step synthesis which employed the Mitsunobu reaction to introduce the alkyl lesion at the O(6) atom of guanine. Introduction of the four and seven carbon ICLs resulted in no change in duplex stability based on UV thermal denaturation experiments compared to a non-cross-linked control. Circular dichroism spectra of these ICL duplexes exhibited features of a B-form duplex, similar to the control, suggesting that these lesions induce little overall change in structure. The efficiency of repair by hAGT was examined and it was shown that hAGT repairs both ICL containing duplexes, with the heptyl ICL repaired more efficiently relative to the butyl cross-link. These results were reproducible with various hAGT mutants including one that contains a novel V148L mutation. The ICL duplexes displayed similar binding affinities to a C145S hAGT mutant compared to the unmodified duplex with the seven carbon containing ICLs displaying slightly higher binding. Experiments with CHO cells to investigate the sensitivity of these cells to busulfan and hepsulfam demonstrate that hAGT reduces the cytotoxicity of hepsulfam suggesting that the O(6)-2'-deoxyguanosine-alkyl-O(6)-2'-deoxyguanosine interstrand DNA cross-link may account for at least part of the cytotoxicity of this agent.

  7. A Fundamental Relationship Between Hydrophobic Properties and Biological Activity for the Duocarmycin Class of DNA Alkylating Antitumor Drugs: Hydrophobic Binding-Driven-Bonding

    PubMed Central

    Wolfe, Amanda L.; Duncan, Katharine K.; Lajiness, James P.; Zhu, Kaicheng; Duerfeldt, Adam S.; Boger, Dale L.

    2013-01-01

    Two systematic series of increasingly hydrophilic derivatives of duocarmycin SA are described that feature the incorporation of ethylene glycol units (n = 1–5) into the methoxy substituents of the trimethoxyindole subunit. These derivatives exhibit progressively increasing water solubility, along with progressive decreases in cell growth inhibitory activity and DNA alkylation efficiency with the incremental ethylene glycol unit incorporations. A linear relationship between cLogP and –logIC50 for cell growth inhibition and –logAE (AE = cell free DNA alkylation efficiency) is observed where cLogP values span the productive range of 2.5–0.49 and –logIC50 values span the range of 11.2–6.4, representing IC50 values covering a 105 range (0.008 to 370 nM). The results quantify a fundamental role the compound hydrophobic character plays in the expression of the biological activity of members in this class, driving the intrinsically reversible DNA alkylation reaction, and define the stunning magnitude of its effect. PMID:23944748

  8. Host determinants of DNA alkylation and DNA repair activity in human colorectal tissue: O(6)-methylguanine levels are associated with GSTT1 genotype and O(6)-alkylguanine-DNA alkyltransferase activity with CYP2D6 genotype.

    PubMed

    Povey, A C; Hall, C N; Badawi, A F; Cooper, D P; Guppy, M J; Jackson, P E; O'Connor, P J; Margison, G P

    2001-08-22

    There is increasing evidence that alkylating agent exposure may increase large bowel cancer risk and factors which either alter such exposure or its effects may modify risk. Hence, in a cross-sectional study of 78 patients with colorectal disease, we have examined whether (i) metabolic genotypes (GSTT1, GSTM1, CYP2D6, CYP2E1) are associated with O(6)-methyldeoxyguanosine (O(6)-MedG) levels, O(6)-alkylguanine-DNA alkyltransferase (ATase) activity or K-ras mutations, and (ii) there was an association between ATase activity and O(6)-MedG levels. Patients with colon tumours and who were homozygous GSTT1(*)2 genotype carriers were more likely than patients who expressed GSTT1 to have their DNA alkylated (83 versus 32%, P=0.03) and to have higher O(6)-MedG levels (0.178+/-0.374 versus 0.016+/-0.023 micromol O(6)-MedG/mol dG, P=0.04) in normal, but not tumour, DNA. No such association was observed between the GSTT1 genotype and the frequency of DNA alkylation or O(6)-MedG levels in patients with benign colon disease or rectal tumours. Patients with colon tumours or benign colon disease who were CYP2D6-poor metabolisers had higher ATase activity in normal tissue than patients who were CYP2D6 extensive metabolisers or CYP2D6 heterozygotes. Patients with the CYP2E1 Dra cd genotype were less likely to have a K-ras mutation: of 55 patients with the wild-type CYP2E1 genotype (dd), 23 had K-ras mutations, whereas none of the 7 individuals with cd genotype had a K-ras mutation (P=0.04). No other associations were observed between GSTT1, GSTM1, CYP2D6 and CYP2E1 Pst genotypes and adduct levels, ATase activity or mutational status. O(6)-MedG levels were not associated with ATase activity in either normal or tumour tissue. However, in 15 patients for whom both normal and tumour DNA contained detectable O(6)-MedG levels, there was a strong positive association between the normal DNA/tumour DNA adduct ratio and the normal tissue/tumour tissue ATase ratio (r(2)=0.66, P=0.001). These

  9. Cinnamate-based DNA photolithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Lang; Romulus, Joy; Li, Minfeng; Sha, Ruojie; Royer, John; Wu, Kun-Ta; Xu, Qin; Seeman, Nadrian C.; Weck, Marcus; Chaikin, Paul

    2013-08-01

    As demonstrated by means of DNA nanoconstructs, as well as DNA functionalization of nanoparticles and micrometre-scale colloids, complex self-assembly processes require components to associate with particular partners in a programmable fashion. In many cases the reversibility of the interactions between complementary DNA sequences is an advantage. However, permanently bonding some or all of the complementary pairs may allow for flexibility in design and construction. Here, we show that the substitution of a cinnamate group for a pair of complementary bases provides an efficient, addressable, ultraviolet light-based method to bond complementary DNA covalently. To show the potential of this approach, we wrote micrometre-scale patterns on a surface using ultraviolet light and demonstrated the reversible attachment of conjugated DNA and DNA-coated colloids. Our strategy enables both functional DNA photolithography and multistep, specific binding in self-assembly processes.

  10. Induction of heat-labile sites in DNA of mammalian cells by the antitumor alkylating drug CC-1065

    SciTech Connect

    Zsido, T.J.; Woynarowski, J.M.; Baker, R.M.; Gawron, L.S.; Beerman, T.A. )

    1991-04-16

    CC-1065 is a very potent antitumor antibiotic capable of covalent and noncovalent binding to the minor groove of naked DNA. Upon thermal treatment, covalent adducts formed between CC-1065 and DNA generate strand break. The authors have shown that this molecular damage can be detected following CC-1065 treatment of mammalian whole cells. Using alkaline sucrose gradient analysis, They observe thermally induced breakage of ({sup 14}C)thymidine-prelabeled DNA from drug-treated African green monkey kidney BSC-1 cells. Very little damage to cellular DNA by CC-1065 can be detected without first heating the drug-treated samples. CC-1065 can also generate heat-labile sites within DNA during cell lysis and heating, subsequent to the exposure of cells to drug, suggesting that a pool of free and noncovalently bound drug is available for posttreatment adduct formation. This effect was controlled for by mixing ({sup 3}H)thymidine-labeled untreated cells with the ({sup 14}C)thymidine-labeled drug-treated samples. The lowest drug dose at which heat-labile sites were detected was 3 nM CC-1065 (3 single-stranded breaks/10{sup 6} base pairs). This concentration reduced survival of BSC-1 cells to 0.1% in cytotoxicity assays. The generation of CC-1065-induced lesions in cellular DNA is time dependent (the frequency of lesions caused by a 60 nM treatment reaching a plateau at 2 h) and is not readily reversible. The results of this study demonstrate that CC-1065 does generate heat-labile sites with the cellular DNA of intact cells and suggest that a mechanism of cytotoxic action of CC-1065 involves formation of covalent adducts to DNA.

  11. Synthesis and antifungal activity of natural product-based 6-alkyl-2 3 4 5-tetrahydropyridines

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Seven 6-alkyl-2,3,4,5-tetrahydropyridines (5a–5g) that mimic the natural products piperideines that were recently identified in the fire ant venom have been synthesized. Compounds 5c–5g with the C-6 alkyl chain lengths from C14 to C18 showed varying degrees of antifungal activities, with 5e (6-hexa...

  12. DNA-based soft phases.

    PubMed

    Bellini, Tommaso; Cerbino, Roberto; Zanchetta, Giuliano

    2012-01-01

    This chapter reviews the state-of-the-art in the study of molecular or colloidal systems whose mutual interactions are mediated by DNA molecules. In the last decade, the robust current knowledge of DNA interactions has enabled an impressive growth of self-assembled DNA-based structures that depend crucially on the properties of DNA-DNA interactions. In many cases, structures are built on design by exploiting the programmable selectivity of DNA interactions and the modularity of their strength. The study of DNA-based materials is definitely an emerging field in condensed matter physics, nanotechnology, and material science. This chapter will consider both systems that are entirely constructed by DNA and hybrid systems in which latex or metal colloidal particles are coated by DNA strands. We will confine our discussion to systems in which DNA-mediated interactions promote the formation of "phases," that is structures extending on length scales much larger than the building blocks. Their self-assembly typically involves a large number of interacting particles and often features hierarchical stages of structuring. Because of the possibility of fine-tuning the geometry and strength of the DNA-mediated interactions, these systems are characterized by a wide variety of patterns of self-assembly, ranging from amorphous, to liquid crystalline, to crystalline in one, two, or three dimensions.

  13. DNA binding, nucleotide flipping, and the helix-turn-helix motif in base repair by O6-alkylguanine-DNA alkyltransferase and its implications for cancer chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Tubbs, Julie L.; Pegg, Anthony E.; Tainer, John A.

    2007-01-01

    O6-alkylguanine-DNA alkyltransferase (AGT) is a crucial target both for the prevention of cancer and for chemotherapy, since it repairs mutagenic lesions in DNA, and it limits the effectiveness of alkylating chemotherapies. AGT catalyzes the unique, single-step, direct damage reversal repair of O6-alkylguanines by selectively transferring the O6-alkyl adduct to an internal cysteine residue. Recent crystal structures of human AGT alone and in complex with substrate DNA reveal a two-domain a/β fold and a bound zinc ion. AGT uses its helix-turn-helix motif to bind substrate DNA via the minor groove. The alkylated guanine is then flipped out from the base stack into the AGT active site for repair by covalent transfer of the alkyl adduct to Cys145. An asparagine hinge (Asn137) couples the helix-turn-helix DNA binding and active site motifs. An arginine finger (Arg128) stabilizes the extrahelical DNA conformation. With this newly improved structural understanding of AGT and its interactions with biologically relevant substrates, we can now begin to unravel the role it plays in preserving genetic integrity and discover how it promotes resistance to anticancer therapies. PMID:17485252

  14. DNA-based hybrid catalysis.

    PubMed

    Rioz-Martínez, Ana; Roelfes, Gerard

    2015-04-01

    In the past decade, DNA-based hybrid catalysis has merged as a promising novel approach to homogeneous (asymmetric) catalysis. A DNA hybrid catalysts comprises a transition metal complex that is covalently or supramolecularly bound to DNA. The chiral microenvironment and the second coordination sphere interactions provided by the DNA are key to achieve high enantioselectivities and, often, additional rate accelerations in catalysis. Nowadays, current efforts are focused on improved designs, understanding the origin of the enantioselectivity and DNA-induced rate accelerations, expanding the catalytic scope of the concept and further increasing the practicality of the method for applications in synthesis. Herein, the recent developments will be reviewed and the perspectives for the emerging field of DNA-based hybrid catalysis will be discussed.

  15. Enzymic aromatization of 6-alkyl-substituted androgens, potent competitive and mechanism-based inhibitors of aromatase.

    PubMed

    Numazawa, M; Yoshimura, A; Oshibe, M

    1998-01-01

    To gain insight into the relationships between the aromatase inhibitory activity of 6-alkyl-substituted androgens, potent competitive inhibitors, and their ability to serve as a substrate of aromatase, we studied the aromatization of a series of 6alpha- and 6beta-alkyl (methyl, ethyl, n-propyl, n-pentyl and n-heptyl)-substituted androst-4-ene-3,17-diones (ADs) and their androsta-1,4-diene-3,17-dione (ADD) derivatives with human placental aromatase, by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. Among the inhibitors examined, ADD and its 6alpha-alkyl derivatives with alkyl functions less than three carbons long, together with 6beta-methyl ADD, are suicide substrates of aromatase. All of the steroids, except for 6beta-n-pentyl ADD and its n-heptyl analogue as well as 6beta-n-heptyl AD, were found to be converted into the corresponding 6-alkyl oestrogens. The 6-methyl steroids were aromatized most efficiently in each series, and the aromatization rate essentially decreased in proportion to the length of the 6-alkyl chains in each series, where the 6alpha-alkyl androgens were more efficient substrates than the corresponding 6beta isomers. The Vmax of 6alpha-methyl ADD was approx. 2.5-fold that of the natural substrate AD and approx. 3-fold that of the parent ADD. On the basis of this, along with the facts that the rates of a mechanism-based inactivation of aromatase by ADD and its 6alpha-methyl derivative are similar, it is implied that alignment of 6alpha-methyl ADD in the active site could favour the pathway leading to oestrogen over the inactivation pathway, compared with that of ADD. The relative apparent Km values for the androgens obtained in this study are different from the relative Ki values obtained previously, indicating that there is a difference between the ability to serve as an inhibitor and the ability to serve as a substrate in the 6-alkyl androgen series.

  16. A chiroptical switch based on supramolecular chirality transfer through alkyl chain entanglement and dynamic covalent bonding.

    PubMed

    Lv, Kai; Qin, Long; Wang, Xiufeng; Zhang, Li; Liu, Minghua

    2013-12-14

    Chirality transfer is an interesting phenomenon in Nature, which represents an important step to understand the evolution of chiral bias and the amplification of the chirality. In this paper, we report the chirality transfer via the entanglement of the alkyl chains between chiral gelator molecules and achiral amphiphilic Schiff base. We have found that although an achiral Schiff base amphiphile could not form organogels in any kind of organic solvents, it formed co-organogels when mixed with a chiral gelator molecule. Interestingly, the chirality of the gelator molecules was transferred to the Schiff base chromophore in the mixed co-gels and there was a maximum mixing ratio for the chirality transfer. Furthermore, the supramolecular chirality was also produced based on a dynamic covalent chemistry of an imine formed by the reaction between an aldehyde and an amine. Such a covalent bond of imine was formed reversibly depending on the pH variation. When the covalent bond was formed the chirality transfer occurred, when it was destroyed, the transfer stopped. Thus, a supramolecular chiroptical switch is obtained based on supramolecular chirality transfer and dynamic covalent chemistry.

  17. DNA-directed aniline mustards based on 9-aminoacridine: interaction with DNA.

    PubMed

    O'Connor, C J; Denny, W A; Fan, J Y; Gamage, R S

    1992-11-30

    A series of 4-substituted aniline mustards ArNH(CH2)nOpC6H4N(CH2CH2Cl)2, where Ar is an acridine and n varies from 2 to 5, interact with DNA. Scatchard analysis shows the compounds bind tightly, with a binding site size similar to that of 9-aminoacridine. The rate of hydrolysis of the mustards, measured by HPLC, is essentially constant across the series. With increasing length of the polymethylene linker, non-covalent binding becomes less strong, but the rate of DNA alkylation increases. Viscometric helix extension measurements and electrophoretic analyses using closed circular supercoiled DNA show that all the compounds are DNA intercalating ligands. Despite these similarities, the compounds are known to have quite different patterns of DNA alkylation, switching from guanine to adenine alkylation as the chain length is extended.

  18. DNA modifications: Another stable base in DNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brazauskas, Pijus; Kriaucionis, Skirmantas

    2014-12-01

    Oxidation of 5-methylcytosine has been proposed to mediate active and passive DNA demethylation. Tracking the history of DNA modifications has now provided the first solid evidence that 5-hydroxymethylcytosine is a stable epigenetic modification.

  19. Alcohols as alkylating agents in heteroarene C–H functionalization

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Jian; MacMillan, David W. C.

    2015-01-01

    Redox processes and radical intermediates are found in many biochemical processes, including deoxyribonucleotide synthesis and oxidative DNA damage1. One of the core principles that underlies DNA biosynthesis is the radical-mediated elimnation of H2O to deoxygenate ribonucleotides, an example of ‘spin-center shift’ (SCS)2, during which an alcohol C–O bond is cleaved, resulting in a carbon-centered radical intermediate. While SCS is a well-understood biochemical process, it is underutilized by the synthetic organic chemistry community. We wondered whether it would be possible to take advantage of this naturally occurring process to accomplish mild, non-traditional alkylations using alcohols as radical precursors. Considering traditional radical-based alkylation methods require the use of stoichiometric oxidants, elevated temperatures, or peroxides3–7, the development of a mild protocol using simple and abundant alkylating agents would have significant utility in the synthesis of diversely functionalized pharmacophores. In this manuscript, we describe the successful execution of this idea via the development of a dual catalytic alkylation of heteroarenes using alcohols as mild alkylating reagents. This method represents the first broadly applicable use of unactivated alcohols as latent alkylating reagents, achieved via the successful merger of photoredox and hydrogen atom transfer (HAT) catalysis. The utility of this multi-catalytic protocol has been demonstrated through the late-stage functionalization of the medicinal agents, fasudil and milrinone. PMID:26308895

  20. Alcohols as alkylating agents in heteroarene C-H functionalization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Jian; MacMillan, David W. C.

    2015-09-01

    Redox processes and radical intermediates are found in many biochemical processes, including deoxyribonucleotide synthesis and oxidative DNA damage. One of the core principles underlying DNA biosynthesis is the radical-mediated elimination of H2O to deoxygenate ribonucleotides, an example of `spin-centre shift', during which an alcohol C-O bond is cleaved, resulting in a carbon-centred radical intermediate. Although spin-centre shift is a well-understood biochemical process, it is underused by the synthetic organic chemistry community. We wondered whether it would be possible to take advantage of this naturally occurring process to accomplish mild, non-traditional alkylation reactions using alcohols as radical precursors. Because conventional radical-based alkylation methods require the use of stoichiometric oxidants, increased temperatures or peroxides, a mild protocol using simple and abundant alkylating agents would have considerable use in the synthesis of diversely functionalized pharmacophores. Here we describe the development of a dual catalytic alkylation of heteroarenes, using alcohols as mild alkylating reagents. This method represents the first, to our knowledge, broadly applicable use of unactivated alcohols as latent alkylating reagents, achieved via the successful merger of photoredox and hydrogen atom transfer catalysis. The value of this multi-catalytic protocol has been demonstrated through the late-stage functionalization of the medicinal agents, fasudil and milrinone.

  1. Sensitization of melanoma cells to alkylating agent-induced DNA damage and cell death via orchestrating oxidative stress and IKKβ inhibition.

    PubMed

    Tse, Anfernee Kai-Wing; Chen, Ying-Jie; Fu, Xiu-Qiong; Su, Tao; Li, Ting; Guo, Hui; Zhu, Pei-Li; Kwan, Hiu-Yee; Cheng, Brian Chi-Yan; Cao, Hui-Hui; Lee, Sally Kin-Wah; Fong, Wang-Fun; Yu, Zhi-Ling

    2017-04-01

    Nitrosourea represents one of the most active classes of chemotherapeutic alkylating agents for metastatic melanoma. Treatment with nitrosoureas caused severe systemic side effects which hamper its clinical use. Here, we provide pharmacological evidence that reactive oxygen species (ROS) induction and IKKβ inhibition cooperatively enhance nitrosourea-induced cytotoxicity in melanoma cells. We identified SC-514 as a ROS-inducing IKKβ inhibitor which enhanced the function of nitrosoureas. Elevated ROS level results in increased DNA crosslink efficiency triggered by nitrosoureas and IKKβ inhibition enhances DNA damage signals and sensitizes nitrosourea-induced cell death. Using xenograft mouse model, we confirm that ROS-inducing IKKβ inhibitor cooperates with nitrosourea to reduce tumor size and malignancy in vivo. Taken together, our results illustrate a new direction in nitrosourea treatment, and reveal that the combination of ROS-inducing IKKβ inhibitors with nitrosoureas can be potentially exploited for melanoma therapy.

  2. 1-Alkyl-1H-imidazole-based dipolar organic compounds for dye-sensitized solar cells.

    PubMed

    Velusamy, Marappan; Hsu, Ying-Chan; Lin, Jiann T; Chang, Che-Wei; Hsu, Chao-Ping

    2010-01-04

    A series of donor-pi-acceptor-type organic dyes based on 1-alkyl-1H-imidazole spacers 1-5 have been developed and characterized. The two electron donors are at positions 4 and 5 of the imidazole, while the electron-accepting cyanoacrylic acid is incorporated at position 2 by a spacer-containing heteroaromatic rings, such as thiophene and thiazole. Detailed investigation on the relationship between the structure, spectral and electrochemical properties, and performance of DSSC is described here. Dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs) using dyes as the sensitizers exhibit good efficiencies, ranging from 3.06 to 6.35 %, which reached 42-87 % with respect to that of N719-based device (7.33 %) fabricated and measured under similar conditions. Time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT) calculations have been performed on the dyes, and the results show that both electron donors can contribute to electron injection upon photo-excitation, either directly or indirectly by internal conversion to the lowest excited state.

  3. Interplay between base excision repair activity and toxicity of 3-methyladenine DNA glycosylases in an E. coli complementation system.

    PubMed

    Troll, Christopher J; Adhikary, Suraj; Cueff, Marie; Mitra, Ileena; Eichman, Brandt F; Camps, Manel

    2014-01-01

    DNA glycosylases carry out the first step of base excision repair by removing damaged bases from DNA. The N3-methyladenine (3MeA) DNA glycosylases specialize in alkylation repair and are either constitutively expressed or induced by exposure to alkylating agents. To study the functional and evolutionary significance of constitutive versus inducible expression, we expressed two closely related yeast 3MeA DNA glycosylases - inducible Saccharomyces cerevisiae MAG and constitutive S. pombe Mag1 - in a glycosylase-deficient Escherichia coli strain. In both cases, constitutive expression conferred resistance to alkylating agent exposure. However, in the absence of exogenous alkylation, high levels of expression of both glycosylases were deleterious. We attribute this toxicity to excessive glycosylase activity, since suppressing spMag1 expression correlated with improved growth in liquid culture, and spMag1 mutants exhibiting decreased glycosylase activity showed improved growth and viability. Selection of a random spMag1 mutant library for increased survival in the presence of exogenous alkylation resulted in the selection of hypomorphic mutants, providing evidence for the presence of a genetic barrier to the evolution of enhanced glycosylase activity when constitutively expressed. We also show that low levels of 3MeA glycosylase expression improve fitness in our glycosylase-deficient host, implying that 3MeA glycosylase activity is likely necessary for repair of endogenous lesions. These findings suggest that 3MeA glycosylase activity is evolutionarily conserved for repair of endogenously produced alkyl lesions, and that inducible expression represents a common strategy to rectify deleterious effects of excessive 3MeA activity in the absence of exogenous alkylation challenge.

  4. Preparation and characterization of alkyl methacrylate-based monolithic columns for capillary gas chromatography applications.

    PubMed

    Yusuf, Kareem; Aqel, Ahmad; A L Othman, Zeid; Badjah-Hadj-Ahmed, Ahmed Yacine

    2013-08-02

    Gas chromatography (GC) is considered the least common application of both polymer and silica-based monolithic columns. This study describes the fabrication of alkyl methacrylate monolithic materials for use as stationary phases in capillary gas chromatography. Following the deactivation of the capillary surface with 3-(trimethoxysilyl)propyl methacrylate (TMSM), the monoliths were formed by the co-polymerization of either hexyl methacrylate (HMA) or lauryl methacrylate (LMA) with different percentage of ethylene glycol dimethacrylate (EDMA) in presence of an initiator (azobisisobutyronitrile, AIBN) and a mixture of porogens include 1-propanol, 1,4-butanediol and water. The monoliths were prepared in 500mm length capillaries possessing inner diameters of 250μm. The efficiencies of the monolithic columns for low molecular weight compounds significantly improved as the percentage of crosslinker was increased, because of the greater proportion of pores less than 50nm. The columns containing lower percentages of crosslinker were able to rapidly separate a series of 8 alkane members in 0.7min, but the separation was less efficient for the light alkanes. Columns prepared with the lauryl methacrylate monomer yielded a different morphology for the monolith-interconnected channels. The channels were more branched, which increased the separation time, and unlike the other columns, allowed for temperature programming.

  5. Imidiazolium based ionic liquids: effects of different anions and alkyl chains lengths on the barley seedlings.

    PubMed

    Cvjetko Bubalo, Marina; Hanousek, Karla; Radošević, Kristina; Gaurina Srček, Višnja; Jakovljević, Tamara; Radojčić Redovniković, Ivana

    2014-03-01

    We studied the effects of five imidiazolium based ionic liquids with different anions and length of alkyl chains linked to imidazolium ring on the early development of barley (Hordeum vulgare). The inhibitory effect depends on the ionic liquids concentration and chemical structure, whereby the most toxic one was [C10mim][Br], followed by [C7mim][Br], [C4mim][Br], [C4mim][CH3CO2] and [C4mim][BF4]. Both anion and cation structures affected the toxicity of ionic liquid indicating that selection of more biocompatible anions such as [CH3CO2] does not necessarily indicate lower toxicity. Alternation in the extent of oxidative stress and antioxidant enzymes activities were found in barley plants due to ionic liquid treatments. When seedlings were exposed to higher concentrations of ionic liquids, antioxidant system could not effectively remove reactive oxidative species, leading to lipid peroxidation and damage of the photosynthetic system. However, overall data indicated that the performance of barley seedling was improved when all measured enzymes involved in scavenging of reactive oxygen species (ROS) were increased with special emphasis on GPX activities. Since there are no studies about ionic liquid (IL) toxicity in plants, that simultaneously evaluates the antioxidative enzyme system in response to different ILs, this work is valuable for gaining knowledge about the protection mechanism of plants from oxidative stress caused by IL exposure.

  6. A role for Saccharomyces cerevisiae Tpa1 protein in direct alkylation repair.

    PubMed

    Shivange, Gururaj; Kodipelli, Naveena; Monisha, Mohan; Anindya, Roy

    2014-12-26

    Alkylating agents induce cytotoxic DNA base adducts. In this work, we provide evidence to suggest, for the first time, that Saccharomyces cerevisiae Tpa1 protein is involved in DNA alkylation repair. Little is known about Tpa1 as a repair protein beyond the initial observation from a high-throughput analysis indicating that deletion of TPA1 causes methyl methane sulfonate sensitivity in S. cerevisiae. Using purified Tpa1, we demonstrate that Tpa1 repairs both single- and double-stranded methylated DNA. Tpa1 is a member of the Fe(II) and 2-oxoglutarate-dependent dioxygenase family, and we show that mutation of the amino acid residues involved in cofactor binding abolishes the Tpa1 DNA repair activity. Deletion of TPA1 along with the base excision repair pathway DNA glycosylase MAG1 renders the tpa1Δmag1Δ double mutant highly susceptible to methylation-induced toxicity. We further demonstrate that the trans-lesion synthesis DNA polymerase Polζ (REV3) plays a key role in tolerating DNA methyl-base lesions and that tpa1Δmag1revΔ3 triple mutant is extremely susceptible to methylation-induced toxicity. Our results indicate a synergism between the base excision repair pathway and direct alkylation repair by Tpa1 in S. cerevisiae. We conclude that Tpa1 is a hitherto unidentified DNA repair protein in yeast and that it plays a crucial role in reverting alkylated DNA base lesions and cytotoxicity.

  7. Principles of DNA architectonics: design of DNA-based nanoobjects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vinogradova, O. A.; Pyshnyi, D. V.

    2012-02-01

    The methods of preparation of monomeric DNA blocks that serve as key building units for the construction of complex DNA objects are described. Examples are given of the formation of DNA blocks based on native and modified oligonucleotide components using hydrogen bonding and nucleic acid-specific types of bonding and also some affinity interactions with RNA, proteins, ligands. The static discrete and periodic two- and three-dimensional DNA objects reported to date are described systematically. Methods used to prove the structures of DNA objects and the prospects for practical application of nanostructures based on DNA and its analogues in biology, medicine and biophysics are considered. The bibliography includes 195 references.

  8. Mass Spectrometry-Based Quantitative Strategies for Assessing the Biological Consequences and Repair of DNA Adducts.

    PubMed

    You, Changjun; Wang, Yinsheng

    2016-02-16

    , where liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry is employed for the identification, and sometimes quantification, of the progeny products arising from the replication or transcription of lesion-bearing DNA substrates in vitro and in mammalian cells. We also highlight their applications to lesion bypass, mutagenesis, and repair studies of three representative types of DNA lesions, that is, the methylglyoxal-induced N(2)-CEdG, oxidatively induced 8,5'-cyclopurine-2'-deoxynucleosides, and regioisomeric alkylated thymidine lesions. Specially, we discuss the similar and distinct effects of the minor-groove DNA lesions including N(2)-CEdG and O(2)-alkylated thymidine lesions, as well as the major-groove O(4)-alkylated thymidine lesions on DNA replication and transcription machinery. For example, we found that the addition of an alkyl group to the O(4) position of thymine may facilitate its preferential pairing with guanine and thus induce exclusively the misincorporation of guanine nucleotide opposite the lesion, whereas alkylation of thymine at the O(2) position may render the nucleobase unfavorable in pairing with any of the canonical nucleobases and thus exhibit promiscuous miscoding properties during DNA replication and transcription. The MS-based strategies described herein should be generally applicable for quantitative measurement of the biological consequences and repair of other DNA lesions in vitro and in cells.

  9. Aggregation number-based degrees of counterion dissociation in sodium n-alkyl sulfate micelles.

    PubMed

    Lebedeva, Nataly V; Shahine, Antoine; Bales, Barney L

    2005-10-27

    Values of the degree of counterion dissociation, alpha, for sodium n-alkyl sulfate micelles, denoted by SN(c)S, where N(c) is the number of carbon atoms in the alkyl chain, are defined by asserting that the aggregation number, N, is dependent only on the concentration, C(aq), of counterions in the aqueous pseudophase. By using different combinations of surfactant and added salt concentrations to yield the same value of N, alpha can be determined, independent of the experimental method. Electron paramagnetic resonance measurements of the hyperfine spacings of two nitroxide spin probes, 16- and 5-doxylstearic acid methyl ester (16DSE and 5DSE, respectively), are employed to determine whether micelles from two samples have the same value of N to high precision. The EPR spectra are different for the two spin probes, but the values of alpha are the same, within experimental error, as they must be. In agreement with recent work on S12S and with prevailing thought in the literature, values of alpha are constant as a function of N. This implies that the value of alpha is constant whether the surfactant or added electrolyte concentrations are varied. Interestingly, alpha varies with chain length as follows: N(c) = 8, alpha = 0.42 +/- 0.03; N(c) = 9, alpha = 0.41 +/- 0.03; N(c) = 10, alpha = 0.35 +/- 0.02; N(c) = 11, alpha = 0.30 +/- 0.02 at 25 degrees C and N(c) = 13, alpha = 0.22 +/- 0.02; and N(c) = 14, alpha = 0.19 +/- 0.01 at 40 degrees C. A simple electrostatic theoretical description, based on the nonlinear Poisson-Boltzmann equation for the ion distribution around a charged sphere, was compared with the experimental results. The theory predicts values of alpha that are in reasonable agreement with experiment, nicely predicting the decrease of alpha as N(c) increases. However, the theory also predicts that, for a given value of N(c), alpha decreases as N increases. Moreover, this decrease is predicted to be different if N is increased by adding salt or by increasing

  10. Supramolecular soft and hard materials based on self-assembly algorithms of alkyl-conjugated fullerenes.

    PubMed

    Nakanishi, Takashi

    2010-05-28

    Dimensionally controlled and hierarchically assembled supramolecular architectures in nano/micro/bulk length scales are formed by self-organization of alkyl-conjugated fullerenes. The simple molecular design of covalently attaching hydrophobic long alkyl chains to fullerene (C(60)) is different from the conventional (hydrophobic-hydrophilic) amphiphilic molecular designs. The two different units of the alkyl-conjugated C(60) are incompatible but both are soluble in organic solvents. The van der Waals intermolecular forces among long hydrocarbon chains and the pi-pi interaction between C(60) moieties govern the self-organization of the alkyl-conjugated C(60) derivatives. A delicate balance between the pi-pi and van der Waals forces in the assemblies leads to a wide variety of supramolecular architectures and paves the way for developing supramolecular soft materials possessing various morphologies and functions. For instance, superhydrophobic films, electron-transporting thermotropic liquid crystals and room-temperature liquids have been demonstrated. Furthermore, the unique morphologies of the assemblies can be utilised as a template for the fabrication of nanostructured metallic surfaces in a highly reproducible and sustainable way. The resulting metallic surfaces can serve as excellent active substrates for surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) owing to their plasmon enhancing characteristics. The use of self-assembling supramolecular objects as a structural template to fabricate innovative well-defined metal nanomaterials links soft matter chemistry to hard matter sciences.

  11. DNA bending and a flip-out mechanism for base excision by the helix–hairpin–helix DNA glycosylase, Escherichia coli AlkA

    PubMed Central

    Hollis, Thomas; Ichikawa, Yoshitaka; Ellenberger, Tom

    2000-01-01

    The Escherichia coli AlkA protein is a base excision repair glycosylase that removes a variety of alkylated bases from DNA. The 2.5 Å crystal structure of AlkA complexed to DNA shows a large distortion in the bound DNA. The enzyme flips a 1–azaribose abasic nucleotide out of DNA and induces a 66° bend in the DNA with a marked widening of the minor groove. The position of the 1–azaribose in the enzyme active site suggests an SN1-type mechanism for the glycosylase reaction, in which the essential catalytic Asp238 provides direct assistance for base removal. Catalytic selectivity might result from the enhanced stacking of positively charged, alkylated bases against the aromatic side chain of Trp272 in conjunction with the relative ease of cleaving the weakened glycosylic bond of these modified nucleotides. The structure of the AlkA–DNA complex offers the first glimpse of a helix–hairpin–helix (HhH) glycosylase complexed to DNA. Modeling studies suggest that other HhH glycosylases can bind to DNA in a similar manner. PMID:10675345

  12. Repair of O6-G-alkyl-O6-G interstrand cross-links by human O6-alkylguanine-DNA alkyltransferase†

    PubMed Central

    Fang, Qingming; Noronha, Anne M.; Murphy, Sebastian P.; Wilds, Christopher J.; Tubbs, Julie L.; Tainer, John A.; Chowdhury, Goutam; Guengerich, F. Peter; Pegg, Anthony E.

    2008-01-01

    O6-Alkylguanine-DNA alkyltransferase (AGT) plays an important role protecting cells from alkylating agents. This reduces carcinogenesis and mutagenesis initiated by such agents but AGT also provides a major resistance mechanism to some chemotherapeutic drugs. In order to improve understanding of the AGT-mediated repair reaction and to increase understanding of the spectrum of repairable damage, we have studied the ability of AGT to repair interstrand cross-link DNA damage where the two DNA strands are joined via the guanine-O6 in each strand. An oligodeoxyribonucleotide containing a heptane cross-link was repaired with initial formation of an AGT-oligo complex and further reaction of a second AGT molecule yielding a hAGT dimer and free oligo. However, an oligodeoxyribonucleotide with a butane cross-link was a very poor substrate for AGT-mediated repair and only the first reaction to form an AGT-oligo complex could be detected. Models of the reaction of these substrates in the AGT active site show that the DNA duplex is forced apart locally to repair the first guanine. This reaction is greatly hindered with the butane cross-link, which is mostly buried in the active site pocket and limited in conformational flexibility. This limitation also prevents the adoption of a conformation for the second reaction to repair the AGT-oligo complex. These results are consistent with the postulated mechanism of AGT repair that involves DNA binding and flipping of the substrate nucleotide and indicate that hAGT can repair some types of interstrand cross-link damages. PMID:18803403

  13. Structure-based design, synthesis and biological testing of etoposide analog epipodophyllotoxin-N-mustard hybrid compounds designed to covalently bind to topoisomerase II and DNA

    PubMed Central

    Yadav, Arun A.; Wu, Xing; Patel, Daywin; Yalowich, Jack C.; Hasinoff, Brian B.

    2014-01-01

    Drugs that target DNA topoisomerase II isoforms and alkylate DNA represent two mechanistically distinct and clinically important classes of anticancer drugs. Guided by molecular modeling and docking a series of etoposide analog epipodophyllotoxin-N-mustard hybrid compounds were designed, synthesized and biologically characterized. These hybrids were designed to alkylate nucleophilic protein residues on topoisomerase II and thus produce inactive covalent adducts and to also alkylate DNA. The most potent hybrid had a mean GI50 in the NCI-60 cell screen 17-fold lower than etoposide. Using a variety of in vitro and cell-based assays all of the hybrids tested were shown to target topoisomerase II. A COMPARE analysis indicated that the hybrids had NCI 60-cell growth inhibition profiles matching both etoposide and the N-mustard compounds from which they were derived. These results supported the conclusion that the hybrids displayed characteristics that were consistent with having targeted both topoisomerase II and DNA. PMID:25282653

  14. Toward hypoxia-selective DNA-alkylating agents built by grafting nitrogen mustards onto the bioreductively activated, hypoxia-selective DNA-oxidizing agent 3-amino-1,2,4-benzotriazine 1,4-dioxide (tirapazamine).

    PubMed

    Johnson, Kevin M; Parsons, Zachary D; Barnes, Charles L; Gates, Kent S

    2014-08-15

    Tirapazamine (3-amino-1,2,4-benzotriazine 1,4-dioxide) is a heterocyclic di-N-oxide that undergoes enzymatic deoxygenation selectively in the oxygen-poor (hypoxic) cells found in solid tumors to generate a mono-N-oxide metabolite. This work explored the idea that the electronic changes resulting from the metabolic deoxygenation of tirapazamine analogues might be exploited to activate a DNA-alkylating species selectively in hypoxic tissue. Toward this end, tirapazamine analogues bearing nitrogen mustard units were prepared. In the case of the tirapazamine analogue 18a bearing a nitrogen mustard unit at the 6-position, it was found that removal of the 4-oxide from the parent di-N-oxide to generate the mono-N-oxide analogue 17a did indeed cause a substantial increase in reactivity of the mustard unit, as measured by hydrolysis rates and DNA-alkylation yields. Hammett sigma values were measured to quantitatively assess the magnitude of the electronic changes induced by metabolic deoxygenation of the 3-amino-1,2,4-benzotriazine 1,4-dioxide heterocycle. The results provide evidence that the 1,2,4-benzotiazine 1,4-dioxide unit can serve as an oxygen-sensing prodrug platform for the selective unmasking of bioactive agents in hypoxic cells.

  15. Biological evaluation of omega-(dialkylamino)alkyl derivatives of 6H-indolo[2,3-b]quinoline--novel cytotoxic DNA topoisomerase II inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Godlewska, Joanna; Luniewski, Wojciech; Zagrodzki, Bogdan; Kaczmarek, Lukasz; Bielawska-Pohl, Aleksandra; Dus, Danuta; Wietrzyk, Joanna; Opolski, Adam; Siwko, Magdalena; Jaromin, Anna; Jakubiak, Anna; Kozubek, Arkadiusz; Peczyñska-Czoch, Wanda

    2005-01-01

    A series of novel 6H-indolo[2,3-b]quinoline derivatives, substituted at C-2, C-9 or N-6 position with dialkyl(alkylamino)alkyl chains differing in the number of methylene groups, was prepared. These compounds were evaluated in vitro for their antimicrobial and cytotoxic activity against several cell lines of different origin and tested for their ability to influence the cell cycle and inhibit topoisomerase II activity. Liphophilic and calf thymus DNA-binding properties of these compounds were also investigated. All the compounds tested inhibited the growth of Gram-positive bacteria and fungi at MIC values ranging between 0.25 and 1 mM. They also showed cytotoxic activity against KB (human cervix carcinoma) cells (ID50 varied from 2.1 to 9.0 microM) and were able to overcome multidrug resistance in colorectal adenocarcinoma LoVo/DX, uterine sarcoma MES-SA/DX5 and promyelocytic leukemia HL-60/MX2 cells (the values of the resistance index RI fell between 0.54 and 2.4). The compounds induced G2M-phase cell cycle arrest in Jurkat T-cell leukemia cells, revealed DNA-binding properties and inhibited topoisomerase II activity.

  16. DNA Based Molecular Scale Nanofabrication

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-12-04

    water adsorption on DNA origami template and its impact on DNA-mediated chemical reactions. We also extended the concept of DNA-mediated reaction to...other nanoscale templates, (b) Studied the thermal and chemical stability of DNA origami template. The result shows that the DNA nanostructures can be...potentially used in very harsh chemical environments, (c) Studied the effect of DNA origami template on the growth of self-assembled monolayer (SAM

  17. Differential effects of luminol, nickel, and arsenite on the rejoining of ultraviolet light and alkylation-induced DNA breaks

    SciTech Connect

    Lee-Chen, S.F.; Yu, C.T.; Wu, D.R.

    1994-12-31

    When Chinese hamster ovary cells were treated with ultraviolet (UV) light or methyl methane-sulfonate (MMS), a large number of DNA strand breaks could be detected by alkaline elution. These strand breaks gradually disappeared if the treated cells were allowed to recover in a drug-free medium. The presence of nickel or arsenite during the recovery incubation retarded the disappearance of UV-induced strand breaks, whereas the disappearance of MMS-induced strand breaks was retarded by the presence of arsenite or of luminol, a new inhibit for poly(ADP-ribose) synthetase. Luminol, however, had no apparent effect on the repair of UV-induced DNA strand breaks, and nickel had no effect on the repair of MMS-induced DNA strand breaks. When UV- or MMS-treated cells were incubated in cytosine arabinofuranoside (AraC) plus hydroxyurea (HU), a large amount of low molecular weight DNA was detected by alkaline sucrose sedimentation. The molecular weight of these DNAs increased if the cells were further incubated in a drug-free medium. This rejoining of breaks in cells pretreated with UV plus AraC and HU was inhibited by nickel and by arsenite, but not by luminol. The rejoining of breaks in cells pretreated with MMS plus AraC and HU was inhibited by luminol and by arsenite, but not by nickel. These results suggest that different enzymes may be used in DNA resynthesis and/or ligation during the repairing of UV- and MMS-induced DNA strand breaks, and that nickel, luminol, and arsenite may have differential inhibitory effects on these enzymes. 29 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  18. A combined DNA-affinic molecule and N-mustard alkylating agent has an anti-cancer effect and induces autophagy in oral cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Lo, Wen-Liang; Chu, Pen-Yuan; Lee, Tsung-Heng; Su, Tsann-Long; Chien, Yueh; Chen, Yi-Wei; Huang, Pin-I; Tseng, Ling-Ming; Tu, Pang-Hsien; Kao, Shou-Yen; Lo, Jeng-Fan

    2012-01-01

    Although surgery or the combination of chemotherapy and radiation are reported to improve the quality of life and reduce symptoms in patients with oral cancer, the prognosis of oral cancer remains generally poor. DNA alkylating agents, such as N-mustard, play an important role in cancer drug development. BO-1051 is a new 9-anilinoacridine N-mustard-derivative anti-cancer drug that can effectively target a variety of cancer cell lines and inhibit tumorigenesis in vivo. However, the underlying mechanism of BO-1051-mediated tumor suppression remains undetermined. In the present study, BO-1051 suppressed cell viability with a low IC(50) in oral cancer cells, but not in normal gingival fibroblasts. Cell cycle analysis revealed that the tumor suppression by BO-1051 was accompanied by cell cycle arrest and downregulation of stemness genes. The enhanced conversion of LC3-I to LC3-II and the formation of acidic vesicular organelles indicated that BO-1501 induced autophagy. The expression of checkpoint kinases was upregulated as demonstrated with Western blot analysis, showing that BO-1051 could induce DNA damage and participate in DNA repair mechanisms. Furthermore, BO-1051 treatment alone exhibited a moderate tumor suppressive effect against xenograft tumor growth in immunocompromised mice. Importantly, the combination of BO-1051 and radiation led to a potent inhibition on xenograft tumorigenesis. Collectively, our findings demonstrated that BO-1051 exhibited a cytotoxic effect via cell cycle arrest and the induction of autophagy. Thus, the combination of BO-1051 and radiotherapy may be a feasible therapeutic strategy against oral cancer in the future.

  19. DNA-based watermarks using the DNA-Crypt algorithm

    PubMed Central

    Heider, Dominik; Barnekow, Angelika

    2007-01-01

    Background The aim of this paper is to demonstrate the application of watermarks based on DNA sequences to identify the unauthorized use of genetically modified organisms (GMOs) protected by patents. Predicted mutations in the genome can be corrected by the DNA-Crypt program leaving the encrypted information intact. Existing DNA cryptographic and steganographic algorithms use synthetic DNA sequences to store binary information however, although these sequences can be used for authentication, they may change the target DNA sequence when introduced into living organisms. Results The DNA-Crypt algorithm and image steganography are based on the same watermark-hiding principle, namely using the least significant base in case of DNA-Crypt and the least significant bit in case of the image steganography. It can be combined with binary encryption algorithms like AES, RSA or Blowfish. DNA-Crypt is able to correct mutations in the target DNA with several mutation correction codes such as the Hamming-code or the WDH-code. Mutations which can occur infrequently may destroy the encrypted information, however an integrated fuzzy controller decides on a set of heuristics based on three input dimensions, and recommends whether or not to use a correction code. These three input dimensions are the length of the sequence, the individual mutation rate and the stability over time, which is represented by the number of generations. In silico experiments using the Ypt7 in Saccharomyces cerevisiae shows that the DNA watermarks produced by DNA-Crypt do not alter the translation of mRNA into protein. Conclusion The program is able to store watermarks in living organisms and can maintain the original information by correcting mutations itself. Pairwise or multiple sequence alignments show that DNA-Crypt produces few mismatches between the sequences similar to all steganographic algorithms. PMID:17535434

  20. The use of an artificial nucleotide for polymerase-based recognition of carcinogenic O6-alkylguanine DNA adducts

    PubMed Central

    Wyss, Laura A.; Nilforoushan, Arman; Williams, David M.; Marx, Andreas; Sturla, Shana J.

    2016-01-01

    Enzymatic approaches for locating alkylation adducts at single-base resolution in DNA could enable new technologies for understanding carcinogenesis and supporting personalized chemotherapy. Artificial nucleotides that specifically pair with alkylated bases offer a possible strategy for recognition and amplification of adducted DNA, and adduct-templated incorporation of an artificial nucleotide has been demonstrated for a model DNA adduct O6-benzylguanine by a DNA polymerase. In this study, DNA adducts of biological relevance, O6-methylguanine (O6-MeG) and O6-carboxymethylguanine (O6-CMG), were characterized to be effective templates for the incorporation of benzimidazole-derived 2′-deoxynucleoside-5′-O-triphosphates (BenziTP and BIMTP) by an engineered KlenTaq DNA polymerase. The enzyme catalyzed specific incorporation of the artificial nucleotide Benzi opposite adducts, with up to 150-fold higher catalytic efficiency for O6-MeG over guanine in the template. Furthermore, addition of artificial nucleotide Benzi was required for full-length DNA synthesis during bypass of O6-CMG. Selective incorporation of the artificial nucleotide opposite an O6-alkylguanine DNA adduct was verified using a novel 2′,3′-dideoxy derivative of BenziTP. The strategy was used to recognize adducts in the presence of excess unmodified DNA. The specific processing of BenziTP opposite biologically relevant O6-alkylguanine adducts is characterized herein as a basis for potential future DNA adduct sequencing technologies. PMID:27378785

  1. DNA Microarray-Based Diagnostics.

    PubMed

    Marzancola, Mahsa Gharibi; Sedighi, Abootaleb; Li, Paul C H

    2016-01-01

    The DNA microarray technology is currently a useful biomedical tool which has been developed for a variety of diagnostic applications. However, the development pathway has not been smooth and the technology has faced some challenges. The reliability of the microarray data and also the clinical utility of the results in the early days were criticized. These criticisms added to the severe competition from other techniques, such as next-generation sequencing (NGS), impacting the growth of microarray-based tests in the molecular diagnostic market.Thanks to the advances in the underlying technologies as well as the tremendous effort offered by the research community and commercial vendors, these challenges have mostly been addressed. Nowadays, the microarray platform has achieved sufficient standardization and method validation as well as efficient probe printing, liquid handling and signal visualization. Integration of various steps of the microarray assay into a harmonized and miniaturized handheld lab-on-a-chip (LOC) device has been a goal for the microarray community. In this respect, notable progress has been achieved in coupling the DNA microarray with the liquid manipulation microsystem as well as the supporting subsystem that will generate the stand-alone LOC device.In this chapter, we discuss the major challenges that microarray technology has faced in its almost two decades of development and also describe the solutions to overcome the challenges. In addition, we review the advancements of the technology, especially the progress toward developing the LOC devices for DNA diagnostic applications.

  2. On-bead fluorescent DNA nanoprobes to analyze base excision repair activities.

    PubMed

    Gines, Guillaume; Saint-Pierre, Christine; Gasparutto, Didier

    2014-02-17

    DNA integrity is constantly threatened by endogenous and exogenous agents that can modify its physical and chemical structure. Changes in DNA sequence can cause mutations sparked by some genetic diseases or cancers. Organisms have developed efficient defense mechanisms able to specifically repair each kind of lesion (alkylation, oxidation, single or double strand break, mismatch, etc). Here we report the adjustment of an original assay to detect enzymes' activity of base excision repair (BER), that supports a set of lesions including abasic sites, alkylation, oxidation or deamination products of bases. The biosensor is characterized by a set of fluorescent hairpin-shaped nucleic acid probes supported on magnetic beads, each containing a selective lesion targeting a specific BER enzyme. We have studied the DNA glycosylase alkyl-adenine glycosylase (AAG) and the human AP-endonuclease (APE1) by incorporating within the DNA probe a hypoxanthine lesion or an abasic site analog (tetrahydrofuran), respectively. Enzymatic repair activity induces the formation of a nick in the damaged strand, leading to probe's break, that is detected in the supernatant by fluorescence. The functional assay allows the measurement of DNA repair activities from purified enzymes or in cell-free extracts in a fast, specific, quantitative and sensitive way, using only 1 pmol of probe for a test. We recorded a detection limit of 1 μg mL(-1) and 50 μg mL(-1) of HeLa nuclear extracts for APE1 and AAG enzymes, respectively. Finally, the on-bead assay should be useful to screen inhibitors of DNA repair activities.

  3. Synthesis and antibacterial activity of Schiff bases and amines derived from alkyl 2-(2-formyl-4-nitrophenoxy)alkanoates.

    PubMed

    Goszczyńska, Agata; Kwiecień, Halina; Fijałkowski, Karol

    A series of novel Schiff bases and secondary amines were obtained in good yields, as a result of the reductive amination of alkyl 2-(2-formyl-4-nitrophenoxy)alkanoates with both aniline and 4-methoxyaniline under established mild reaction conditions. Sodium triacetoxyborohydride as well as hydrogen in the presence of palladium on carbon were used as efficient reducing agents of the Schiff bases, in both direct and stepwise reductive amination processes. The Schiff bases, amines, and amine hydrochlorides were designed as potential antibacterial agents, and structure-activity relationship could be established following in vitro assays against Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria. The minimal inhibitory concentration and zone of inhibition were also determined. In these tests, some of Schiff bases and secondary amine hydrochlorides showed moderate-to-good activity against Gram-positive bacteria, including S. aureus, M. luteus, and S. mutans.

  4. Bimetallic oxidative addition involving radical intermediates in nickel-catalyzed alkyl-alkyl Kumada coupling reactions.

    PubMed

    Breitenfeld, Jan; Ruiz, Jesus; Wodrich, Matthew D; Hu, Xile

    2013-08-14

    Many nickel-based catalysts have been reported for cross-coupling reactions of nonactivated alkyl halides. The mechanistic understanding of these reactions is still primitive. Here we report a mechanistic study of alkyl-alkyl Kumada coupling catalyzed by a preformed nickel(II) pincer complex ([(N2N)Ni-Cl]). The coupling proceeds through a radical process, involving two nickel centers for the oxidative addition of alkyl halide. The catalysis is second-order in Grignard reagent, first-order in catalyst, and zero-order in alkyl halide. A transient species, [(N2N)Ni-alkyl(2)](alkyl(2)-MgCl), is identified as the key intermediate responsible for the activation of alkyl halide, the formation of which is the turnover-determining step of the catalysis.

  5. Engineering DNA-based functional materials.

    PubMed

    Roh, Young Hoon; Ruiz, Roanna C H; Peng, Songming; Lee, Jong Bum; Luo, Dan

    2011-12-01

    While DNA is a genetic material, it is also an inherently polymeric material made from repeating units called nucleotides. Although DNA's biological functions have been studied for decades, the polymeric features of DNA have not been extensively exploited until recently. In this tutorial review, we focus on two aspects of using DNA as a polymeric material: (1) the engineering methods, and (2) the potential real-world applications. More specifically, various strategies for constructing DNA-based building blocks and materials are introduced based on DNA topologies, which include linear, branched/dendritic, and networked. Different applications in nanotechnology, medicine, and biotechnology are further reviewed.

  6. Method for sequencing DNA base pairs

    DOEpatents

    Sessler, Andrew M.; Dawson, John

    1993-01-01

    The base pairs of a DNA structure are sequenced with the use of a scanning tunneling microscope (STM). The DNA structure is scanned by the STM probe tip, and, as it is being scanned, the DNA structure is separately subjected to a sequence of infrared radiation from four different sources, each source being selected to preferentially excite one of the four different bases in the DNA structure. Each particular base being scanned is subjected to such sequence of infrared radiation from the four different sources as that particular base is being scanned. The DNA structure as a whole is separately imaged for each subjection thereof to radiation from one only of each source.

  7. DNA base identification by electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Bell, David C; Thomas, W Kelley; Murtagh, Katelyn M; Dionne, Cheryl A; Graham, Adam C; Anderson, Jobriah E; Glover, William R

    2012-10-01

    Advances in DNA sequencing, based on fluorescent microscopy, have transformed many areas of biological research. However, only relatively short molecules can be sequenced by these technologies. Dramatic improvements in genomic research will require accurate sequencing of long (>10,000 base-pairs), intact DNA molecules. Our approach directly visualizes the sequence of DNA molecules using electron microscopy. This report represents the first identification of DNA base pairs within intact DNA molecules by electron microscopy. By enzymatically incorporating modified bases, which contain atoms of increased atomic number, direct visualization and identification of individually labeled bases within a synthetic 3,272 base-pair DNA molecule and a 7,249 base-pair viral genome have been accomplished. This proof of principle is made possible by the use of a dUTP nucleotide, substituted with a single mercury atom attached to the nitrogenous base. One of these contrast-enhanced, heavy-atom-labeled bases is paired with each adenosine base in the template molecule and then built into a double-stranded DNA molecule by a template-directed DNA polymerase enzyme. This modification is small enough to allow very long molecules with labels at each A-U position. Image contrast is further enhanced by using annular dark-field scanning transmission electron microscopy (ADF-STEM). Further refinements to identify additional base types and more precisely determine the location of identified bases would allow full sequencing of long, intact DNA molecules, significantly improving the pace of complex genomic discoveries.

  8. Nearest neighbor affects G:C to A:T transitions induced by alkylating agents

    SciTech Connect

    Glickman, B.W.; Horsfall, M.J.; Gordon, A.J.E.; Burns, P.A.

    1987-12-01

    The influence of local DNA sequence on the distribution of G:C to A:T transitions induced in the lacI gene of E. coli by a series of alkylating agents has been analyzed. In the case of nitrosoguanidine, two nitrosoureas and a nitrosamine, a strong preference for mutation at sites proceeded 5' by a purine base was noted. This preferences was observed with both methyl and ethyl donors where the predicted common ultimate alkylating species in the alkyl diazonium ion. In contrast, this preferences was not seen following treatment with ethylmethanesulfonate. The observed preference for 5'PuG-3' site over 5'-PyG-3' sites corresponds well with alterations observed in the Ha-ras oncogene recovered after treatment with NMU. This indicates that the mutations recovered in the oncogenes are likely the direct consequence of the alkylation treatment and that the local sequence effects seen in E. coli also appear to occur in mammalian cells.

  9. Light yield and n-γ pulse-shape discrimination of liquid scintillators based on linear alkyl benzene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kögler, T.; Beyer, R.; Birgersson, E.; Hannaske, R.; Junghans, A. R.; Massarczyk, R.; Matic, A.; Wagner, A.; Zuber, K.

    2013-02-01

    The relative light yields of NE-213 and linear alkyl benzene (LAB) based liquid scintillators from electrons were determined in the electron energy range 13-1600 keV using a combination of monoenergetic γ sources and a Compton spectrometer. The light yield was found to be proportional to energy for both types of scintillator and expected deviations below 100 keV were described successfully applying Birks’ law. A description of the Cherenkov light contribution to the total light yield was achieved for both detectors and is in agreement with the electromagnetic theory of fast particles in matter. Digital pulse-shape discrimination in a mixed n-γ field from a 252Cf source was investigated for LAB+PPO and LAB+PPO+bis-MSB and compared to NE-213. In combination with these two solutes, LAB shows poorer abilities to separate neutron-induced pulses from γ-induced ones.

  10. Metallic Nanostructures Based on DNA Nanoshapes

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Boxuan; Tapio, Kosti; Linko, Veikko; Kostiainen, Mauri A.; Toppari, Jari Jussi

    2016-01-01

    Metallic nanostructures have inspired extensive research over several decades, particularly within the field of nanoelectronics and increasingly in plasmonics. Due to the limitations of conventional lithography methods, the development of bottom-up fabricated metallic nanostructures has become more and more in demand. The remarkable development of DNA-based nanostructures has provided many successful methods and realizations for these needs, such as chemical DNA metallization via seeding or ionization, as well as DNA-guided lithography and casting of metallic nanoparticles by DNA molds. These methods offer high resolution, versatility and throughput and could enable the fabrication of arbitrarily-shaped structures with a 10-nm feature size, thus bringing novel applications into view. In this review, we cover the evolution of DNA-based metallic nanostructures, starting from the metallized double-stranded DNA for electronics and progress to sophisticated plasmonic structures based on DNA origami objects. PMID:28335274

  11. Synergistic effects of alkylated graphene oxide on the properties of polypropylene-based carbon nanocomposites.

    PubMed

    Yun, Young Soo; Pyo, Hye-Ri; Lee, Jae Yun; Chin, In-Joo; Jin, Hyoung-Joon

    2013-10-01

    Polypropylene (PP)/carbon black (CB)-alkylated graphene oxide (AGO) hybrid nanocomposites were prepared via solution process and the synergistic effects of AGO on the properties of the PP/CB nanocomposites were investigated. AGO at a content of only 0.2 wt% formed an overlapped network structure in the PP matrix and affected the electrical, thermal and mechanical properties of the PP/CB nanocomposites. Specifically, PP/CB (5 wt%)-AGO (0.2 wt%) nanocomposites exhibited an electrical percolation threshold at lower CB contents than the PP/CB nanocomposites did, and the sheet resistance was decreased to 2.3 x 10(7) omega/sq. The thermal degradation temperature and recrystallization temperature of the PP/CB (10 wt%) nanocomposites were increased by 11.3 and 1.6 degrees C, respectively, by the addition of 0.2 wt% AGO. In addition, the Young's modulus of the PP/CB (10 wt%) nanocomposite was increased from 438.1 to 540.1 MPa.

  12. Palladium-Catalyzed Arylation of Alkyl Sulfenate Anions.

    PubMed

    Jia, Tiezheng; Zhang, Mengnan; Jiang, Hui; Wang, Carol Y; Walsh, Patrick J

    2015-11-04

    A unique palladium-catalyzed arylation of alkyl sulfenate anions is introduced that affords aryl alkyl sulfoxides in high yields. Due to the base sensitivity of the starting sulfoxides, sulfenate anion intermediates, and alkyl aryl sulfoxide products, the use of a mild method to generate alkyl sulfenate anions was crucial to the success of this process. Thus, a fluoride triggered elimination strategy was employed with alkyl 2-(trimethylsilyl)ethyl sulfoxides to liberate the requisite alkyl sulfenate anion intermediates. In the presence of palladium catalysts with bulky monodentate phosphines (SPhos and Cy-CarPhos) and aryl bromides or chlorides, alkyl sulfenate anions were readily arylated. Moreover, the thermal fragmentation and the base promoted elimination of alkyl sulfoxides was overridden. The alkyl sulfenate anion arylation exhibited excellent chemoselectivity in the presence of functional groups, such as anilines and phenols, which are also known to undergo palladium catalyzed arylation reactions.

  13. Tunable and regenerative DNA zipper based spring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Landon, Preston; Mo, Alexander; Ramachandran, Srinivasan; Lal, Ratnesh

    2012-02-01

    We report a DNA zipper based actuator device termed `DNA- spring' with tunable and repeated cycles of extension and contraction ability. DNA zipper is a double-stranded DNA system engineered to open upon its specific interaction with appropriately designed single strand DNA (ssDNA), opening of the zipper is driven by binding energy differences between the DNA strands. The zipper system is incorporated with defined modifications to function like a spring, capable of delivering approximately 9 pN force over a distance of approximately 13 nm, producing approximately 116 kJ/mol of work. Time-lapse fluorescence and fluorescent DNA gel electrophoresis analysis is utilized to evaluate and confirm the spring action. A second zipper incorporated into the spring provides the ability to couple/decouple to an object/substrate. Such devices would have wide application, including for conditionally triggered molecular delivery systems and as actuators in nano-devices. zippers.

  14. Effect of bis(beta-chloroethyl)sulfide (BCES) on base mismatch repair of DNA in monkey kidney cells.

    PubMed

    Fan, L J; Bernstein, I A

    1991-11-01

    Sulfur mustard, bis(beta-chloroethyl)sulfide (BCES), a bifunctional alkylating agent, is a vesicant whose mode of action involves interference with the integrity of cellular DNA. Alkylation of DNA is responsible for some of the biological effects of BCES in tissue. Another possible mechanism by which BCES could exert its toxic effect is interference with high fidelity repair of damaged DNA. This study evaluated the possible effects of BCES on the repair of specific errors, i.e., mismatched bases, in the DNA. Heteroduplex (ht) DNA, formed between two temperature-sensitive mutants of SV40 virus, tsA239 and tsA255, each having a different point mutation in the gene for large T antigen, was used to study the effect of BCES on mismatched base repair in African green monkey kidney (AGMK) cells. AGMK cells were exposed to dilute solutions of BCES in methylene chloride (MC) prior to cationic lipofection with ht DNA. In order for the cells to produce wild type (wt) SV40 DNA at a nonpermissive temperature (41 degrees C), repair of at least one of the two mismatches in the DNA had to occur. It was observed that (a) as the concentration of BCES was increased, a proportionally longer delay in the appearance of wt DNA at 41 degrees C was observed in treated cells transfected with ht DNA as compared with cultures exposed to MC alone and then transfected with ht DNA, (b) there was no such effect in exposed AGMK cells transfected with wt DNA, (c) wt and ht DNA were transfected at similar rates in unexposed cells, and (d) BCES did not affect the rate of transfection of wt cells. These observations are consistent with the hypothesis that BCES affects mismatched base repair.

  15. Solubility of n-butane and 2-methylpropane (isobutane) in 1-alkyl-3-methylimidazolium-based ionic liquids with linear and branched alkyl side-chains.

    PubMed

    Pison, Laure; Shimizu, Karina; Tamas, George; Lopes, José Nuno Canongia; Quitevis, Edward L; Gomes, Margarida F Costa

    2015-11-11

    The solubility of n-butane and 2-methylpropane (isobutane) in three ionic liquids - 1-(2-methylpropyl)-3-methylimidazolium bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide [(2mC3)C1im][Ntf2], 1-(3-methylbutyl)-3-methylimidazolium bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide [(3mC4)C1im][Ntf2] and 1-methyl-3-pentylimidazolium bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide [C5C1im][Ntf2] - has been measured at atmospheric pressure from 303 to 343 K. Isobutane is less soluble than n-butane in all the ionic liquids. Henry's constant values range from 13.8 × 10(5) Pa for n-butane in [C5C1im][Ntf2] at 303 K to 64.5 × 10(5) Pa for isobutane in [(2mC3)C1im][Ntf2] at 343 K. The difference in solubility between the two gases can be explained by a more negative enthalpy of solvation for n-butane. A structural analysis of the pure solvents and of the solutions of the gases, probed by molecular dynamics simulations, could explain the differences found in the systems: (i) the nonpolar domains of the ionic liquids accommodate better the long and more flexible n-butane solute; (ii) the small differences in solubility of each gas in the ionic liquids with the same number of carbon atoms in the alkyl side-chains are explained by the absence of large structural differences in the pure solvents. In all cases, the structural analysis of the four ionic liquids confirms that the studied gases can act as probes of the molecular structure of the ionic liquids, the simulations being always compatible with the experimental solubility data.

  16. Reversible Data Hiding Based on DNA Computing

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Yingjie

    2017-01-01

    Biocomputing, especially DNA, computing has got great development. It is widely used in information security. In this paper, a novel algorithm of reversible data hiding based on DNA computing is proposed. Inspired by the algorithm of histogram modification, which is a classical algorithm for reversible data hiding, we combine it with DNA computing to realize this algorithm based on biological technology. Compared with previous results, our experimental results have significantly improved the ER (Embedding Rate). Furthermore, some PSNR (peak signal-to-noise ratios) of test images are also improved. Experimental results show that it is suitable for protecting the copyright of cover image in DNA-based information security. PMID:28280504

  17. Reversible Data Hiding Based on DNA Computing.

    PubMed

    Wang, Bin; Xie, Yingjie; Zhou, Shihua; Zhou, Changjun; Zheng, Xuedong

    2017-01-01

    Biocomputing, especially DNA, computing has got great development. It is widely used in information security. In this paper, a novel algorithm of reversible data hiding based on DNA computing is proposed. Inspired by the algorithm of histogram modification, which is a classical algorithm for reversible data hiding, we combine it with DNA computing to realize this algorithm based on biological technology. Compared with previous results, our experimental results have significantly improved the ER (Embedding Rate). Furthermore, some PSNR (peak signal-to-noise ratios) of test images are also improved. Experimental results show that it is suitable for protecting the copyright of cover image in DNA-based information security.

  18. Mild Catalytic methods for Alkyl-Alkyl Bond Formation

    SciTech Connect

    Vicic, David A

    2009-08-10

    Overview of Research Goals and Accomplishments for the Period 07/01/06 – 06/30/07: Our overall research goal is to transform the rapidly emerging synthetic chemistry involving alkyl-alkyl cross-couplings into more of a mechanism-based field so that that new, rationally-designed catalysts can be performed under energy efficient conditions. Our specific objectives for the previous year were 1) to obtain a proper electronic description of an active catalyst for alkyl-alkyl cross-coupling reactions and 2) to determine the effect of ligand structure on the rate, scope, selectivity, and functional group compatibility of C(sp3)-C(sp3) cross-coupling catalysis. We have completed both of these initial objectives and established a firm base for further studies. The specific significant achievements of the current grant period include: 1) we have performed magnetic and computational studies on (terpyridine)NiMe, an active catalyst for alkyl-alkyl cross couplings, and have discovered that the unpaired electron resides heavily on the terpyridine ligand and that the proper electronic description of this nickel complex is a Ni(II)-methyl cation bound to a reduced terpyridine ligand; 2) we have for the first time shown that alkyl halide reduction by terpyridyl nickel catalysts is substantially ligand based; 3) we have shown by isotopic labeling studies that the active catalyst (terpyridine)NiMe is not produced via a mechanism that involves the formation of methyl radicals when (TMEDA)NiMe2 is used as the catalyst precursor; 4) we have performed an extensive ligand survey for the alkyl-alkyl cross-coupling reactions and have found that electronic factors only moderately influence reactivity in the terpyridine-based catalysis and that the most dramatic effects arise from steric and solubility factors; 5) we have found that the use of bis(dialkylphosphino)methanes as ligands for nickel does not produce active catalysts for cross-coupling but rather leads to bridging hydride

  19. Kinetic studies of Escherichia coli AlkB using a new fluorescence-based assay for DNA demethylation.

    PubMed

    Roy, Todd W; Bhagwat, A S

    2007-01-01

    The Escherichia coli AlkB protein catalyzes the direct reversal of alkylation damage to DNA; primarily 1-methyladenine (1mA) and 3-methylcytosine (3mC) lesions created by endogenous or environmental alkylating agents. AlkB is a member of the non-heme iron (II) alpha-ketoglutarate-dependent dioxygenase superfamily, which removes the alkyl group through oxidation eliminating a methyl group as formaldehyde. We have developed a fluorescence-based assay for the dealkylation activity of this family of enzymes. It uses formaldehyde dehydrogenase to convert formaldehyde to formic acid and monitors the creation of an NADH analog using fluorescence. This assay is a great improvement over the existing assays for DNA demethylation in that it is continuous, rapid and does not require radioactively labeled material. It may also be used to study other demethylation reactions including demethylation of histones. We used it to determine the kinetic constants for AlkB and found them to be somewhat different than previously reported values. The results show that AlkB demethylates 1mA and 3mC with comparable efficiencies and has only a modest preference for a single-stranded DNA substrate over its double-stranded DNA counterpart.

  20. A Click Chemistry‐Based Proteomic Approach Reveals that 1,2,4‐Trioxolane and Artemisinin Antimalarials Share a Common Protein Alkylation Profile

    PubMed Central

    Ismail, Hanafy M.; Barton, Victoria E.; Panchana, Matthew; Charoensutthivarakul, Sitthivut; Biagini, Giancarlo A.; Ward, Stephen A.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract In spite of the recent increase in endoperoxide antimalarials under development, it remains unclear if all these chemotypes share a common mechanism of action. This is important since it will influence cross‐resistance risks between the different classes. Here we investigate this proposition using novel clickable 1,2,4‐trioxolane activity based protein‐profiling probes (ABPPs). ABPPs with potent antimalarial activity were able to alkylate protein target(s) within the asexual erythrocytic stage of Plasmodium falciparum (3D7). Importantly, comparison of the alkylation fingerprint with that generated from an artemisinin ABPP equivalent confirms a highly conserved alkylation profile, with both endoperoxide classes targeting proteins in the glycolytic, hemoglobin degradation, antioxidant defence, protein synthesis and protein stress pathways, essential biological processes for plasmodial survival. The alkylation signatures of the two chemotypes show significant overlap (ca. 90 %) both qualitatively and semi‐quantitatively, suggesting a common mechanism of action that raises concerns about potential cross‐resistance liabilities. PMID:27397940

  1. A Click Chemistry‐Based Proteomic Approach Reveals that 1,2,4‐Trioxolane and Artemisinin Antimalarials Share a Common Protein Alkylation Profile

    PubMed Central

    Ismail, Hanafy M.; Barton, Victoria E.; Panchana, Matthew; Charoensutthivarakul, Sitthivut; Biagini, Giancarlo A.; Ward, Stephen A.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract In spite of the recent increase in endoperoxide antimalarials under development, it remains unclear if all these chemotypes share a common mechanism of action. This is important since it will influence cross‐resistance risks between the different classes. Here we investigate this proposition using novel clickable 1,2,4‐trioxolane activity based protein‐profiling probes (ABPPs). ABPPs with potent antimalarial activity were able to alkylate protein target(s) within the asexual erythrocytic stage of Plasmodium falciparum (3D7). Importantly, comparison of the alkylation fingerprint with that generated from an artemisinin ABPP equivalent confirms a highly conserved alkylation profile, with both endoperoxide classes targeting proteins in the glycolytic, hemoglobin degradation, antioxidant defence, protein synthesis and protein stress pathways, essential biological processes for plasmodial survival. The alkylation signatures of the two chemotypes show significant overlap (ca. 90 %) both qualitatively and semi‐quantitatively, suggesting a common mechanism of action that raises concerns about potential cross‐resistance liabilities. PMID:27089538

  2. Method for sequencing DNA base pairs

    DOEpatents

    Sessler, A.M.; Dawson, J.

    1993-12-14

    The base pairs of a DNA structure are sequenced with the use of a scanning tunneling microscope (STM). The DNA structure is scanned by the STM probe tip, and, as it is being scanned, the DNA structure is separately subjected to a sequence of infrared radiation from four different sources, each source being selected to preferentially excite one of the four different bases in the DNA structure. Each particular base being scanned is subjected to such sequence of infrared radiation from the four different sources as that particular base is being scanned. The DNA structure as a whole is separately imaged for each subjection thereof to radiation from one only of each source. 6 figures.

  3. Effect of Out-of-Plane Alkyl Group's Position in Dye-Sensitized Solar Cell Efficiency: A Structure-Property Relationship Utilizing Indoline-Based Unsymmetrical Squaraine Dyes.

    PubMed

    Alagumalai, Ananthan; M K, Munavvar Fairoos; Vellimalai, Punitharasu; Sil, Manik Chandra; Nithyanandhan, Jayaraj

    2016-12-28

    Squaraine dyes are promising chromophores to harvest visible and near-infrared (NIR) photons. A series of indoline-based unsymmetrical squaraine (SQ) dyes that contain alkyl chains at sp(3) C- and N- atoms of indoline moieties with a carboxylic acid anchoring group were synthesized. The optical and electrochemical properties of the SQ dyes in solution were nearly identical as there was no change in the D-A-D SQ framework; however, remarkable changes with respect to the power conversion efficiencies (PCE) were observed depending upon the position of alkyl groups in the dye. Introduction of alkyl groups to the indoline unit that was away from anchoring unit were helped in more dye loading with controlled organization of dyes on surface, increased charge transfer resistance, long electron lifetime, and hence higher PCE than that of the corresponding isomer in which the alkyl groups funtionalized indoline unit contains the carboxylic acid anchoring group. Careful analysis of incident photon-to-current conversion efficiency (IPCE) profiles indicated the presence of aggregated structure on the TiO2 surface that contributes to the charge injection in the presence of a coadsorbent. A dye-sensitized solar cell (DSSC) device made out of SQ5 was achieved an efficiency of 9.0%, with an open-circuit potential (Voc) of 660 mV and short-circuit current density (Jsc) of 19.82 mA/cm(2), under simulated AM 1.5G illumination (100 mW/cm(2)). The IPCE profile of SQ5 shows an onset near to 750 nm with a good quantum efficiency (>80%) in the range of 550-700 nm, indicating the importance of self-organization of dyes on the TiO2 surface for an efficient charge injection. This present investigation revealed the importance of position of alkyl groups in the squaraine-based dyes for the better PCE.

  4. DNA Based Electrochromic and Photovoltaic Cells

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-01-01

    SUBJECT TERMS 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: 17. LIMITATION OF ABSTRACT 18. NUMBER OF PAGES 19a. NAME OF RESPONSIBLE PERSON a. REPORT...9550-09-1-0647 final 01-09-2009 ; 30-11-2011 DNA Based Electrochromic and Photovoltaic Cells FA 9550-09-1-0647 Pawlicka, Agnieszka, J. Instituto de...as well as DNA-CTMA and DNA-DODA were also obtained and characterized. High ionic conductivity results combined with transparency and adhesion to the

  5. Alternative DNA base pairing through metal coordination.

    PubMed

    Clever, Guido H; Shionoya, Mitsuhiko

    2012-01-01

    Base-pairing in the naturally occurring DNA and RNA oligonucleotide duplexes is based on π-stacking, hydrogen bonding, and shape complementarity between the nucleobases adenine, thymine, guanine, and cytosine as well as on the hydrophobic-hydrophilic balance in aqueous media. This complex system of multiple supramolecular interactions is the product of a long-term evolutionary process and thus highly optimized to serve its biological functions such as information storage and processing. After the successful implementation of automated DNA synthesis, chemists have begun to introduce artificial modifications inside the core of the DNA double helix in order to study various aspects of base pairing, generate new base pairs orthogonal to the natural ones, and equip the biopolymer with entirely new functions. The idea to replace the hydrogen bonding interactions with metal coordination between ligand-like nucleosides and suitable transition metal ions culminated in the development of a plethora of artificial base-pairing systems termed "metal base-pairs" which were shown to strongly enhance the DNA duplex stability. Furthermore, they show great potential for the use of DNA as a molecular wire in nanoscale electronic architectures. Although single electrons have proven to be transmitted by natural DNA over a distance of several base pairs, the high ohmic resistance of unmodified oligonucleotides was identified as a serious obstacle. By exchanging some or all of the Watson-Crick base pairs in DNA with metal complexes, this problem may be solved. In the future, these research efforts are supposed to lead to DNA-like materials with superior conductivity for nano-electronic applications. Other fields of potential application such as DNA-based supramolecular architecture and catalysis may be strongly influenced by these developments as well. This text is meant to illustrate the basic concepts of metal-base pairing and give an outline over recent developments in this field.

  6. DNA Polymerase ν Rapidly Bypasses O(6)-Methyl-dG but Not O(6)-[4-(3-Pyridyl)-4-oxobutyl-dG and O(2)-Alkyl-dTs.

    PubMed

    Gowda, A S Prakasha; Spratt, Thomas E

    2016-11-21

    4-(Methylnitrosamino)-1-(3-pyridyl)-1-butanone (NNK) is a potent tobacco carcinogen that forms mutagenic DNA adducts including O(6)-methyl-2'-deoxyguanosine (O(6)-Me-dG), O(6)-[4-(3-pyridyl)-4-oxobut-1-yl]-dG (O(6)-POB-dG), O(2)-methylthymidine (O(2)-Me-dT), and O(2)-POB-dT. We evaluated the ability of human DNA polymerase ν to bypass this damage to evaluate the structural constraints on substrates for pol ν and to evaluate if there is kinetic evidence suggesting the in vivo activity of pol ν on tobacco-induced DNA damage. Presteady-state kinetic analysis has indicated that O(6)-Me-dG is a good substrate for pol ν, while O(6)-POB-dG and the O(2)-alkyl-dT adducts are poor substrates for pol ν. The reactivity with O(6)-Me-dG is high with a preference for dCTP > dGTP > dATP > dTTP. The catalytic activity of pol ν toward O(6)-Me-dG is high and can potentially be involved in its bypass in vivo. In contrast, pol ν is unlikely to bypass O(6)-POB-dG or the O(2)-alkyl-dTs in vivo.

  7. QPSO-based adaptive DNA computing algorithm.

    PubMed

    Karakose, Mehmet; Cigdem, Ugur

    2013-01-01

    DNA (deoxyribonucleic acid) computing that is a new computation model based on DNA molecules for information storage has been increasingly used for optimization and data analysis in recent years. However, DNA computing algorithm has some limitations in terms of convergence speed, adaptability, and effectiveness. In this paper, a new approach for improvement of DNA computing is proposed. This new approach aims to perform DNA computing algorithm with adaptive parameters towards the desired goal using quantum-behaved particle swarm optimization (QPSO). Some contributions provided by the proposed QPSO based on adaptive DNA computing algorithm are as follows: (1) parameters of population size, crossover rate, maximum number of operations, enzyme and virus mutation rate, and fitness function of DNA computing algorithm are simultaneously tuned for adaptive process, (2) adaptive algorithm is performed using QPSO algorithm for goal-driven progress, faster operation, and flexibility in data, and (3) numerical realization of DNA computing algorithm with proposed approach is implemented in system identification. Two experiments with different systems were carried out to evaluate the performance of the proposed approach with comparative results. Experimental results obtained with Matlab and FPGA demonstrate ability to provide effective optimization, considerable convergence speed, and high accuracy according to DNA computing algorithm.

  8. Excised damaged base determines the turnover of human N-methylpurine-DNA glycosylase.

    PubMed

    Adhikari, Sanjay; Uren, Aykut; Roy, Rabindra

    2009-10-02

    N-Methylpurine-DNA glycosylase (MPG) initiates base excision repair in DNA by removing a wide variety of alkylated, deaminated, and lipid peroxidation-induced purine adducts. In this study, we tested the role of excised base on MPG enzymatic activity. After the reaction, MPG produced two products: free damaged base and AP-site containing DNA. Our results showed that MPG excises 1,N(6)-ethenoadenine (varepsilonA) from varepsilonA-containing oligonucleotide (varepsilonA-DNA) at a similar or slightly increased efficiency than it does hypoxanthine (Hx) from Hx-containing oligonucleotide (Hx-DNA) under similar conditions. Real-time binding experiments by surface plasmon resonance (SPR) spectroscopy suggested that both the substrate DNAs have a similar equilibrium binding constant (K(D)) towards MPG, but under single-turnover (STO) condition there is apparently no effect on catalytic chemistry; however, the turnover of the enzyme under multiple-turnover (MTO) condition is higher for varepsilonA-DNA than it is for Hx-DNA. Real-time binding experiments by SPR spectroscopy further showed that the dissociation of MPG from its product, AP-site containing DNA, is faster than the overall turnover of either Hx- or varepsilonA-DNA reaction. We thereby conclude that the excised base plays a critical role in product inhibition and, hence, is essential for MPG glycosylase activity. Thus, the results provide the first evidence that the excised base rather than AP-site could be rate-limiting for DNA-glycosylase reactions.

  9. Single-quantum-dot-based DNA nanosensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Chun-Yang; Yeh, Hsin-Chih; Kuroki, Marcos T.; Wang, Tza-Huei

    2005-11-01

    Rapid and highly sensitive detection of DNA is critical in diagnosing genetic diseases. Conventional approaches often rely on cumbersome, semi-quantitative amplification of target DNA to improve detection sensitivity. In addition, most DNA detection systems (microarrays, for example), regardless of their need for target amplification, require separation of unhybridized DNA strands from hybridized stands immobilized on a solid substrate, and are thereby complicated by solution-surface binding kinetics. Here, we report an ultrasensitive nanosensor based on fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) capable of detecting low concentrations of DNA in a separation-free format. This system uses quantum dots (QDs) linked to DNA probes to capture DNA targets. The target strand binds to a dye-labelled reporter strand thus forming a FRET donor-acceptor ensemble. The QD also functions as a concentrator that amplifies the target signal by confining several targets in a nanoscale domain. Unbound nanosensors produce near-zero background fluorescence, but on binding to even a small amount of target DNA (~50 copies or less) they generate a very distinct FRET signal. A nanosensor-based oligonucleotide ligation assay has been demonstrated to successfully detect a point mutation typical of some ovarian tumours in clinical samples.

  10. The thickening additives for mineral and synthetic oils based on the copolymers of alkyl acrylates or methacrylates and butyl vinyl ether

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geraskina, Evgeniya V.; Moikin, Alexey A.; Semenycheva, Ludmila L.

    2014-05-01

    A new method for synthesizing of the copolymers of acrylic and methacrylic acid esters with butyl vinyl ether in an excess of low-boiling monomer, which has proven effective for a number of alkyl methacrylates was proposed. Tests of thickening efficiency of the obtained copolymers were carried out. The resistance to mechanical degradation of the mineral, semi synthetic and synthetic base oils doped with the copolymers was evaluated.

  11. Enhancement of alkylation catalysts for improved supercritical fluid regeneration

    DOEpatents

    Ginosar, Daniel M.; Petkovic, Lucia

    2009-09-22

    A method of modifying an alkylation catalyst to reduce the formation of condensed hydrocarbon species thereon. The method comprises providing an alkylation catalyst comprising a plurality of active sites. The plurality of active sites on the alkylation catalyst may include a plurality of weakly acidic active sites, intermediate acidity active sites, and strongly acidic active sites. A base is adsorbed to a portion of the plurality of active sites, such as the strongly acidic active sites, selectively poisoning the strongly acidic active sites. A method of modifying the alkylation catalyst by providing an alkylation catalyst comprising a pore size distribution that sterically constrains formation of the condensed hydrocarbon species on the alkylation catalyst or by synthesizing the alkylation catalyst to comprise a decreased number of strongly acidic active sites is also disclosed, as is a method of improving a regeneration efficiency of the alkylation catalyst.

  12. Enhancement of alkylation catalysts for improved supercritical fluid regeneration

    DOEpatents

    Ginosar, Daniel M.; Petkovic, Lucia M.

    2010-12-28

    A method of modifying an alkylation catalyst to reduce the formation of condensed hydrocarbon species thereon. The method comprises providing an alkylation catalyst comprising a plurality of active sites. The plurality of active sites on the alkylation catalyst may include a plurality of weakly acidic active sites, intermediate acidity active sites, and strongly acidic active sites. A base is adsorbed to a portion of the plurality of active sites, such as the strongly acidic active sites, selectively poisoning the strongly acidic active sites. A method of modifying the alkylation catalyst by providing an alkylation catalyst comprising a pore size distribution that sterically constrains formation of the condensed hydrocarbon species on the alkylation catalyst or by synthesizing the alkylation catalyst to comprise a decreased number of strongly acidic active sites is also disclosed, as is a method of improving a regeneration efficiency of the alkylation catalyst.

  13. Effect of Different Alkyl Groups at the N-Position on the Luminescence of Carbazole-Based β-Diketonate Europium(III) Complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Pei; Wang, Huihui; Liu, Shenggui; Shi, Jianxin; Wang, Gang; Gong, Menglian

    2009-10-01

    A series of carbazole-based β-diketone derivatives and their europium(III) ternary complexes Eu(N-Cx)3phen were designed and synthesized, where N-Cx denotes carbazole-based β-diketonates with different alkyl substituents at N-position of the carbazole ring and phen is 1,10-phenethroline. Thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) shows that the decomposition temperature of the complexes is over 360 °C. UV-visible absorption spectroscopy, photoluminescence (PL), and the luminescence quantum yield of the Eu(III) complexes were measured and compared with each other, and the effect of different substituted-alkyls at N-position in the carbazole ring on the photoluminescence was discussed in details, indicating there exists a competition between the absorption capacity and the energy transfer efficiency for the complexes when the structure of the substituted-alkyls changes. The triplet state energy levels of the β-diketonate ligands in the complexes are higher than that of the lowest excited level of Eu3+ ion, 5D0, so the photoluminescence mechanism of the Eu(III) complexes was proposed as a ligand-sensitized luminescence process. Red LEDs were fabricated by precoating the complexes onto 395 nm emitting InGaN chips. All the results show that this series of Eu(III) complexes is a promising candidate as a red component in fabrication of NUV-based white LEDs.

  14. Effect of different alkyl groups at the N-position on the luminescence of carbazole-based beta-diketonate europium(III) complexes.

    PubMed

    He, Pei; Wang, Huihui; Liu, Shenggui; Shi, Jianxin; Wang, Gang; Gong, Menglian

    2009-11-19

    A series of carbazole-based beta-diketone derivatives and their europium(III) ternary complexes Eu(N-Cx)(3)phen were designed and synthesized, where N-Cx denotes carbazole-based beta-diketonates with different alkyl substituents at N-position of the carbazole ring and phen is 1,10-phenethroline. Thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) shows that the decomposition temperature of the complexes is over 360 degrees C. UV-visible absorption spectroscopy, photoluminescence (PL), and the luminescence quantum yield of the Eu(III) complexes were measured and compared with each other, and the effect of different substituted-alkyls at N-position in the carbazole ring on the photoluminescence was discussed in details, indicating there exists a competition between the absorption capacity and the energy transfer efficiency for the complexes when the structure of the substituted-alkyls changes. The triplet state energy levels of the beta-diketonate ligands in the complexes are higher than that of the lowest excited level of Eu(3+) ion, (5)D(0), so the photoluminescence mechanism of the Eu(III) complexes was proposed as a ligand-sensitized luminescence process. Red LEDs were fabricated by precoating the complexes onto 395 nm emitting InGaN chips. All the results show that this series of Eu(III) complexes is a promising candidate as a red component in fabrication of NUV-based white LEDs.

  15. Reactions of DNA bases with the anti-cancer nitrogen mustard mechlorethamine: A quantum chemical study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shukla, P. K.; Mishra, P. C.; Suhai, S.

    2007-12-01

    Reactions of the aziridinium ion of mechlorethamine (AZ+1) at the N7, N3 and O6 sites of guanine, N7, N3 and N1 sites of adenine, O2 and N3 sites of cytosine, and O2 and O4 sites of thymine were studied using density functional theory (B3LYP) and the MP2 method in gas phase and aqueous media. The calculations explain the mechanism of alkylation of the DNA bases and show that the reactions of the AZ+1 ion would be most likely to occur at the N7 site of guanine and the N3 site of adenine while it would be much less likely to occur at the carbonyl oxygen sites of the DNA bases.

  16. DNA-Based Enzyme Reactors and Systems

    PubMed Central

    Linko, Veikko; Nummelin, Sami; Aarnos, Laura; Tapio, Kosti; Toppari, J. Jussi; Kostiainen, Mauri A.

    2016-01-01

    During recent years, the possibility to create custom biocompatible nanoshapes using DNA as a building material has rapidly emerged. Further, these rationally designed DNA structures could be exploited in positioning pivotal molecules, such as enzymes, with nanometer-level precision. This feature could be used in the fabrication of artificial biochemical machinery that is able to mimic the complex reactions found in living cells. Currently, DNA-enzyme hybrids can be used to control (multi-enzyme) cascade reactions and to regulate the enzyme functions and the reaction pathways. Moreover, sophisticated DNA structures can be utilized in encapsulating active enzymes and delivering the molecular cargo into cells. In this review, we focus on the latest enzyme systems based on novel DNA nanostructures: enzyme reactors, regulatory devices and carriers that can find uses in various biotechnological and nanomedical applications. PMID:28335267

  17. Tribological Properties of a Pennzane(Registered Trademark)-Based Liquid Lubricant (Disubstituted Alkylated Cyclopentane) for Low Temperature Space Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Venier, Clifford; Casserly, Edward W.; Jones, William R., Jr.; Marchetti, Mario; Jansen, Mark J.; Predmore, Roamer E.

    2002-01-01

    The tribological properties of a disubstituted alkylated cyclopentane, Pennzane (registered) Synthesized Hydrocarbon Fluid X-1000, are presented. This compound is a lower molecular weight version of the commonly used multiply alkylated cyclopentane, Pennzane X-2000, currently used in many space mechanisms. New, lower temperature applications will require liquid lubricants with lower viscosities and pour points and acceptable vapor pressures. Properties reported include: friction and wear studies and lubricated lifetime in vacuum; additionally, typical physical properties (i.e., viscosity-temperature, pour point, flash and fire point, specific gravity, refractive index, thermal properties, volatility and vapor pressure) are reported.

  18. Alkylating potential of styrene oxide: reactions and factors involved in the alkylation process.

    PubMed

    González-Pérez, Marina; Gómez-Bombarelli, Rafael; Pérez-Prior, M Teresa; Arenas-Valgañón, Jorge; García-Santos, M Pilar; Calle, Emilio; Casado, Julio

    2014-10-20

    The chemical reactivity of styrene-7,8-oxide (SO), an alkylating agent with high affinity for the guanine–N7 position and a probable carcinogen for humans, with 4-(p-nitrobenzyl)pyridine (NBP), a trap for alkylating agents with nucleophilic characteristics similar to those of DNA bases, was investigated kinetically in water/dioxane media. UV–vis spectrophotometry and ultrafast liquid chromatography were used to monitor the reactions involved. It was found that in the alkylation process four reactions occur simultaneously: (a) the formation of a β-NBP–SO adduct through an SN2 mechanism; (b) the acid-catalyzed formation of the stable α-NBP–SO adduct through an SN2′ mechanism; (c) the base-catalyzed hydrolysis of the β-adduct, and (d) the acid-catalyzed hydrolysis of SO. At 37.5 °C and pH = 7.0 (in 7:3 water/dioxane medium), the values of the respective reaction rate constants were as follows: kalkβ = (2.1 ± 0.3) × 10–4 M–1 s–1, kalkα = (1.0 ± 0.1) × 10–4 M–1 s–1, khydAD = (3.06 ± 0.09) × 10–6 s–1, and khyd = (4.2 ± 0.9) × 10–6 s–1. These values show that, in order to determine the alkylating potential of SO, none of the four reactions involved can be neglected. Temperature and pH were found to exert a strong influence on the values of some parameters that may be useful to investigate possible chemicobiological correlations (e.g., in the pH 5.81–7.69 range, the fraction of total adducts formed increased from 24% to 90% of the initial SO, whereas the adduct lifetime of the unstable β-adduct, which gives an idea of the permanence of the adduct over time, decreased from 32358 to 13313 min). A consequence of these results is that the conclusions drawn in studies addressing alkylation reactions at temperatures and/or pH far from those of biological conditions should be considered with some reserve.

  19. Recombinant human O6-alkylguanine-DNA alkyltransferase (AGT), Cys145-alkylated AGT and Cys145 --> Met145 mutant AGT: comparison by isoelectric focusing, CD and time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy.

    PubMed Central

    Federwisch, M; Hassiepen, U; Bender, K; Dewor, M; Rajewsky, M F; Wollmer, A

    1997-01-01

    Isoelectric focusing, CD, steady-state and time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy were used to compare the native recombinant human DNA-repair protein O6-alkylguanine-DNA alkyltransferase (AGT) with AGT derivatives methylated or benzylated on Cys145 or modified by site-directed mutagenesis at the active centre (Met145 mutant). The AGT protein is approximately spherical with highly constrained Trp residues, but is not stabilized by disulphide bridges. In contrast with native AGT, alkylated AGT precipitated at 25 degrees C but remained monomeric at 4 degrees C. As revealed by isoelectric focusing, pI changed from 8.2 (AGT) to 8. 4 (Cys145-methylated AGT) and 8.6 (Cys145-benzylated AGT). The alpha-helical content of the Met145 mutant was decreased by approx. 5% and Trp residues were partially liberated. Although non-covalent binding of O6-benzylguanine did not alter the secondary structure of AGT, its alpha-helical content was increased by approx. 2% on methylation and by approx. 4% on benzylation, altogether indicating a small conformational change in AGT on undergoing alkylation. No signal sequences have been found in AGT that mark it for polyubiquitination. Therefore the signal for AGT degradation remains to be discovered. PMID:9164873

  20. An interplay of the base excision repair and mismatch repair pathways in active DNA demethylation

    PubMed Central

    Grin, Inga; Ishchenko, Alexander A.

    2016-01-01

    Active DNA demethylation (ADDM) in mammals occurs via hydroxylation of 5-methylcytosine (5mC) by TET and/or deamination by AID/APOBEC family enzymes. The resulting 5mC derivatives are removed through the base excision repair (BER) pathway. At present, it is unclear how the cell manages to eliminate closely spaced 5mC residues whilst avoiding generation of toxic BER intermediates and whether alternative DNA repair pathways participate in ADDM. It has been shown that non-canonical DNA mismatch repair (ncMMR) can remove both alkylated and oxidized nucleotides from DNA. Here, a phagemid DNA containing oxidative base lesions and methylated sites are used to examine the involvement of various DNA repair pathways in ADDM in murine and human cell-free extracts. We demonstrate that, in addition to short-patch BER, 5-hydroxymethyluracil and uracil mispaired with guanine can be processed by ncMMR and long-patch BER with concomitant removal of distant 5mC residues. Furthermore, the presence of multiple mispairs in the same MMR nick/mismatch recognition region together with BER-mediated nick formation promotes proficient ncMMR resulting in the reactivation of an epigenetically silenced reporter gene in murine cells. These findings suggest cooperation between BER and ncMMR in the removal of multiple mismatches that might occur in mammalian cells during ADDM. PMID:26843430

  1. The Escherichia coli AlkB protein protects human cells against alkylation-induced toxicity.

    PubMed Central

    Chen, B J; Carroll, P; Samson, L

    1994-01-01

    Escherichia coli can ameliorate the toxic effects of alkylating agents either by preventing DNA alkylation or by repairing DNA alkylation damage. The alkylation-sensitive phenotype of E. coli alkB mutants marks the alkB pathway as an extremely effective defense mechanism against the cytotoxic effects of the SN2, but not the SN1, alkylating agents. Although it is clear that AlkB helps cells to better handle alkylated DNA, no DNA alkylation repair function could be assigned to the purified AlkB protein, suggesting that AlkB either acts as part of a complex or acts to regulate the expression of other genes whose products are directly responsible for alkylation resistance. However, here we present evidence that the provision of alkylation resistance is an intrinsic function of the AlkB protein per se. We expressed the E. coli AlkB protein in two human cell lines and found that it confers the same characteristic alkylation-resistant phenotype in this foreign environment as it does in E. coli. AlkB expression rendered human cells extremely resistant to cell killing by the SN2 but not the SN1 alkylating agents but did not affect the ability of dimethyl sulfate (an SN2 agent) to alkylate the genome. We infer that SN2 agents produce a class of DNA damage that is not efficiently produced by SN1 agents and that AlkB somehow prevents this damage from killing the cell. Images PMID:7928996

  2. Initiation of the ATM-Chk2 DNA damage response through the base excision repair pathway.

    PubMed

    Chou, Wen-Cheng; Hu, Ling-Yueh; Hsiung, Chia-Ni; Shen, Chen-Yang

    2015-08-01

    The DNA damage response (DDR) is activated by various genotoxic stresses. Base lesions, which are structurally simple and predominantly fixed by base excision repair (BER), can trigger the ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM)-checkpoint kinase 2 (Chk2) pathway, a DDR component. How these lesions trigger DDR remains unclear. Here we show that, for alkylation damage, methylpurine-DNA glycosylase (MPG) and apurinic/apyrimidinic endonuclease 1, both of which function early in BER, are required for ATM-Chk2-dependent DDR. In addition, other DNA glycosylases, including uracil-DNA glycosylase and 8-oxoguanine glycosylase, which are involved in repairing deaminated bases and oxidative damage, also induced DDR. The early steps of BER therefore play a vital role in modulating the ATM-Chk2 DDR in response to base lesions, facilitating downstream BER processing for repair, in which the formation of a single-strand break was shown to play a critical role. Moreover, MPG knockdown rescued cell lethality, its overexpression led to cell death triggered by DNA damage and, more interestingly, higher MPG expression in breast and ovarian cancers corresponded with a greater probability of relapse-free survival after chemotherapy, underscoring the importance of glycosylase-dependent DDR. This study highlights the crosstalk between BER and DDR that contributes to maintaining genomic integrity and may have clinical applications in cancer therapy.

  3. Unzipping of DNA with correlated base sequence.

    PubMed

    Allahverdyan, A E; Gevorkian, Zh S; Hu, Chin-Kun; Wu, Ming-Chya

    2004-06-01

    We consider force-induced unzipping transition for a heterogeneous DNA model with a correlated base sequence. Both finite-range and long-range correlated situations are considered. It is shown that finite-range correlations increase stability of DNA with respect to the external unzipping force. Due to long-range correlations the number of unzipped base pairs displays two widely different scenarios depending on the details of the base sequence: either there is no unzipping phase transition at all, or the transition is realized via a sequence of jumps with magnitude comparable to the size of the system. Both scenarios are different from the behavior of the average number of unzipped base pairs (non-self-averaging). The results can be relevant for explaining the biological purpose of correlated structures in DNA.

  4. Power of surface-based DNA computation

    SciTech Connect

    Cai, Weiping; Condon, A.E.; Corn, R.M.

    1997-12-01

    A new model of DNA computation that is based on surface chemistry is studied. Such computations involve the manipulation of DNA strands that are immobilized on a surface, rather than in solution as in the work of Adleman. Surface-based chemistry has been a critical technology in many recent advances in biochemistry and offers several advantages over solution-based chemistry, including simplified handling of samples and elimination of loss of strands, which reduce error in the computation. The main contribution of this paper is in showing that in principle, surface-based DNA chemistry can efficiently support general circuit computation on many inputs in parallel. To do this, an abstract model of computation that allows parallel manipulation of binary inputs is described. It is then shown that this model can be implemented by encoding inputs as DNA strands and repeatedly modifying the strands in parallel on a surface, using the chemical processes of hybridization, exonuclease degradation, polymerase extension, and ligation. Thirdly, it is shown that the model supports efficient circuit simulation in the following sense: exactly those inputs that satisfy a circuit can be isolated and the number of parallel operations needed to do this is proportional to the size of the circuit. Finally, results are presented on the power of the model when another resource of DNA computation is limited, namely strand length. 12 refs.

  5. Multiphoton excitation of fluorescent DNA base analogs.

    PubMed

    Katilius, Evaldas; Woodbury, Neal W

    2006-01-01

    Multiphoton excitation was used to investigate properties of the fluorescent DNA base analogs, 2-aminopurine (2AP) and 6-methylisoxanthopterin (6MI). 2-aminopurine, a fluorescent analog of adenine, was excited by three-photon absorption. Fluorescence correlation measurements were attempted to evaluate the feasibility of using three-photon excitation of 2AP for DNA-protein interaction studies. However, high excitation power and long integration times needed to acquire high signal-to-noise fluorescence correlation curves render three-photon excitation FCS of 2AP not very useful for studying DNA base dynamics. The fluorescence properties of 6-methylisoxanthopterin, a guanine analog, were investigated using two-photon excitation. The two-photon absorption cross-section of 6MI was estimated to be about 2.5 x 10(-50) cm(4)s (2.5 GM units) at 700 nm. The two-photon excitation spectrum was measured in the spectral region from 700 to 780 nm; in this region the shape of the two-photon excitation spectrum is very similar to the shape of single-photon excitation spectrum in the near-UV spectral region. Two-photon excitation of 6MI is suitable for fluorescence correlation measurements. Such measurements can be used to study DNA base dynamics and DNA-protein interactions over a broad range of time scales.

  6. Alkylation of isobutane with light olefins: Yields of alkylates for different olefins

    SciTech Connect

    Albright, L.F.; Kranz, K.E.; Masters, K.R.

    1993-12-01

    For alkylation of isobutane with C{sub 3}-C{sub 5} olefins using sulfuric acid as the catalyst, the yields of alkylates with different olefins are compared as the operating conditions are changed. The results of recent pilot plant experiments with propylene, C{sub 4} olefins, and C{sub 5} olefins permit such comparisons. The yields expressed as weight of alkylate produced per 100 wt of olefin consumed varied from about 201:100 to 220:100. Weight ratios of the isobutane consumed per olefin consumed vary from about 101:100 to 120:100. differences of yield values are explained by the changes in the overall chemistry. The procedure employed to calculate yields with good accuracy is based on the analysis of the alkylate and the amount of conjunct polymers produced. Based on literature data, yields are also reported for alkylations using HF as the catalyst.

  7. Alkyladenine DNA glycosylase (AAG) localizes to mitochondria and interacts with mitochondrial single-stranded binding protein (mtSSB).

    PubMed

    van Loon, Barbara; Samson, Leona D

    2013-03-01

    Due to a harsh environment mitochondrial genomes accumulate high levels of DNA damage, in particular oxidation, hydrolytic deamination, and alkylation adducts. While repair of alkylated bases in nuclear DNA has been explored in detail, much less is known about the repair of DNA alkylation damage in mitochondria. Alkyladenine DNA glycosylase (AAG) recognizes and removes numerous alkylated bases, but to date AAG has only been detected in the nucleus, even though mammalian mitochondria are known to repair DNA lesions that are specific substrates of AAG. Here we use immunofluorescence to show that AAG localizes to mitochondria, and we find that native AAG is present in purified human mitochondrial extracts, as well as that exposure to alkylating agent promotes AAG accumulation in the mitochondria. We identify mitochondrial single-stranded binding protein (mtSSB) as a novel interacting partner of AAG; interaction between mtSSB and AAG is direct and increases upon methyl methanesulfonate (MMS) treatment. The consequence of this interaction is specific inhibition of AAG glycosylase activity in the context of a single-stranded DNA (ssDNA), but not a double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) substrate. By inhibiting AAG-initiated processing of damaged bases, mtSSB potentially prevents formation of DNA breaks in ssDNA, ensuring that base removal primarily occurs in dsDNA. In summary, our findings suggest the existence of AAG-initiated BER in mitochondria and further support a role for mtSSB in DNA repair.

  8. Random Coding Bounds for DNA Codes Based on Fibonacci Ensembles of DNA Sequences

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-07-01

    COVERED (From - To) 6 Jul 08 – 11 Jul 08 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE RANDOM CODING BOUNDS FOR DNA CODES BASED ON FIBONACCI ENSEMBLES OF DNA SEQUENCES ... sequences which are generalizations of the Fibonacci sequences . 15. SUBJECT TERMS DNA Codes, Fibonacci Ensembles, DNA Computing, Code Optimization 16...coding bound on the rate of DNA codes is proved. To obtain the bound, we use some ensembles of DNA sequences which are generalizations of the Fibonacci

  9. DNA-based control of protein activity

    PubMed Central

    Engelen, W.; Janssen, B. M. G.

    2016-01-01

    DNA has emerged as a highly versatile construction material for nanometer-sized structures and sophisticated molecular machines and circuits. The successful application of nucleic acid based systems greatly relies on their ability to autonomously sense and act on their environment. In this feature article, the development of DNA-based strategies to dynamically control protein activity via oligonucleotide triggers is discussed. Depending on the desired application, protein activity can be controlled by directly conjugating them to an oligonucleotide handle, or expressing them as a fusion protein with DNA binding motifs. To control proteins without modifying them chemically or genetically, multivalent ligands and aptamers that reversibly inhibit their function provide valuable tools to regulate proteins in a noncovalent manner. The goal of this feature article is to give an overview of strategies developed to control protein activity via oligonucleotide-based triggers, as well as hurdles yet to be taken to obtain fully autonomous systems that interrogate, process and act on their environments by means of DNA-based protein control. PMID:26812623

  10. PCR-based analysis of mitochondrial DNA copy number, mitochondrial DNA damage, and nuclear DNA damage

    PubMed Central

    Gonzalez-Hunt, Claudia P.; Rooney, John P.; Ryde, Ian T.; Anbalagan, Charumathi; Joglekar, Rashmi

    2016-01-01

    Because of the role DNA damage and depletion play in human disease, it is important to develop and improve tools to assess these endpoints. This unit describes PCR-based methods to measure nuclear and mitochondrial DNA damage and copy number. Long amplicon quantitative polymerase chain reaction (LA-QPCR) is used to detect DNA damage by measuring the number of polymerase-inhibiting lesions present based on the amount of PCR amplification; real-time PCR (RT-PCR) is used to calculate genome content. In this unit we provide step-by-step instructions to perform these assays in Homo sapiens, Mus musculus, Rattus norvegicus, Caenorhabditis elegans, Drosophila melanogaster, Danio rerio, Oryzias latipes, Fundulus grandis, and Fundulus heteroclitus, and discuss the advantages and disadvantages of these assays. PMID:26828332

  11. Biosensors based on DNA-Functionalized Graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vishnubhotla, Ramya; Ping, Jinglei; Vrudhula, Amey; Johnson, A. T. Charlie

    Since its discovery, graphene has been used for sensing applications due to its outstanding electrical properties and biocompatibility. Here, we demonstrate the capabilities of field effect transistors (FETs) based on CVD-grown graphene functionalized with commercially obtained DNA oligomers and aptamers for detection of various biomolecular targets (e.g., complementary DNA and small molecule drug targets). Graphene FETs were created with a scalable photolithography process that produces arrays consisting of 50-100 FETs with a layout suitable for multiplexed detection of four molecular targets. FETs were characterized via AFM to confirm the presence of the aptamer. From the measured electrical characteristics, it was determined that binding of molecular targets by the DNA chemical recognition element led to a reproducible, concentration-dependent shift in the Dirac voltage. This biosensor class is potentially suitable for applications in drug detection. This work is funded by NIH through the Center for AIDS Research at the University of Pennsylvania.

  12. DNA-Based Nanostructures: Changes of Mechanical Properties of DNA upon Ligand Binding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nechipurenko, Yury; Grokhovsky, Sergey; Gursky, Georgy; Nechipurenko, Dmitry; Polozov, Robert

    The formation of DNA-based nanostructures involves the binding of different kinds of ligands to DNA as well as the interaction of DNA molecules with each other. Complex formation between ligand and DNA can alter physicochemical properties of the DNA molecule. In the present work, the accessibility of DNA-ligand complexes to cleavage by DNase I are considered, and the exact algorithms for analysis of diagrams of DNase I footprinting for ligand-DNA complexes are obtained. Changes of mechanical properties of the DNA upon ligand binding are also demonstrated by the cleavage patterns generated upon ultrasound irradiation of cis-platin-DNA complexes. Propagation of the mechanical perturbations along DNA in the presence of bound ligands is considered in terms of a string model with a heterogeneity corresponding to the position of a bound ligand on DNA. This model can reproduce qualitatively the cleavage patterns obtained upon ultrasound irradiation of cis-platin-DNA complexes.

  13. Increased sensitivity of lymphocytes from patients with systemic autoimmune diseases to DNA alkylation by the methylating carcinogen N-methyl-N-nitrosourea.

    PubMed Central

    Lawley, P D; Topper, R; Denman, A M; Hylton, W; Hill, I D; Harris, G

    1988-01-01

    Lymphocytes from patients with various diseases associated with autoimmunity showed both impaired capacity to repair O6-methylguanine (a powerful, promutagenic, directly miscoding base lesion) and increased sensitivity to the cytocidal effects of cellular methylation by N-methyl-N-nitrosourea (MNU) compared with normal controls and patients with other disorders. Defective repair of O6-methylguanine was significantly associated with arthritis and myositis in the group with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), and increased sensitivity to the toxic action of MNU was associated with the presence of immune complexes and the administration of steroids to patients with Behçet's syndrome. The results indicate that lymphocytes from patients with the autoimmune diseases studied are more susceptible to DNA damage with possible relevance to aetiopathogenesis. PMID:3382263

  14. Communication: Electron ionization of DNA bases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahman, M. A.; Krishnakumar, E.

    2016-04-01

    No reliable experimental data exist for the partial and total electron ionization cross sections for DNA bases, which are very crucial for modeling radiation damage in genetic material of living cell. We have measured a complete set of absolute partial electron ionization cross sections up to 500 eV for DNA bases for the first time by using the relative flow technique. These partial cross sections are summed to obtain total ion cross sections for all the four bases and are compared with the existing theoretical calculations and the only set of measured absolute cross sections. Our measurements clearly resolve the existing discrepancy between the theoretical and experimental results, thereby providing for the first time reliable numbers for partial and total ion cross sections for these molecules. The results on fragmentation analysis of adenine supports the theory of its formation in space.

  15. The self-organization and functional activity of binary system based on erucyl amidopropyl betaine - alkylated polyethyleneimine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaynanova, Gulnara A.; Valiakhmetova, Alsu R.; Kuryashov, Dmitry A.; Kudryashova, Yuliana R.; Lukashenko, Svetlana S.; Syakaev, Victor V.; Latypov, Shamil K.; Bukharov, Sergey V.; Bashkirtseva, Natalia Yu.; Zakharova, Lucia Ya.

    2013-11-01

    The self-organization in individual and binary aqueous solutions of a zwitterionic surfactant erucyl amidopropyl betaine and alkylated polyethyleneimine is carried out with a wide range of physical and chemical methods, including tensiometry, conductometry, dynamic light scattering, pH-metry, spectrophotometry, and fluorescence spectroscopy. The data obtained strongly support the formation of nanosized aggregates in the systems and provide information on their structure and probable morphological transitions. High solubilization capacity and data on the contact angle showed a possibility of the application of these systems as nanocontainers or oil wetting agents in the oil recovery.

  16. DNA methylation profiling using bisulfite-based epityping of pooled genomic DNA.

    PubMed

    Docherty, Sophia J; Davis, Oliver S P; Haworth, Claire M A; Plomin, Robert; Mill, Jonathan

    2010-11-01

    DNA methylation plays a vital role in normal cellular function, with aberrant methylation signatures being implicated in a growing number of human pathologies and complex human traits. Methods based on the modification of genomic DNA with sodium bisulfite are considered the 'gold-standard' for DNA methylation profiling on genomic DNA; however they require large amounts of DNA and may be prohibitively expensive when used on the large sample sizes necessary to detect small effects. DNA pooling approaches are already widely used in large-scale studies of DNA sequence and gene expression. In this paper, we describe the application of this economical DNA pooling technique to the study of DNA methylation profiles. This method generates accurate quantitative assessments of group DNA methylation averages, reducing the time, cost and amount of DNA starting material required for large-scale epigenetic investigation of disease phenotypes.

  17. New Insight into the Formation Mechanism of Imidazolium-Based Ionic Liquids from N-Alkyl Imidazoles and Halogenated Hydrocarbons: A Polar Microenvironment Induced and Autopromoted Process.

    PubMed

    Mu, Xueli; Jiang, Nan; Liu, Chengbu; Zhang, Dongju

    2017-02-09

    To illustrate the formation mechanism of imidazolium-based ionic liquids (ILs) from N-alkyl imidazoles and halogenated hydrocarbons, density functional theory calculations have been carried out on a representative system, the reaction of N-methyl imidazole with chloroethane to form 1-ethyl-3-methyl imidazolium chloride ([Emim]Cl) IL. The reaction is shown to proceed via an SN2 transition state with a free energy barrier of 34.4 kcal/mol in the gas phase and 27.6 kcal/mol in toluene solvent. The reaction can be remarkably promoted by the presence of ionic products and water molecules. The calculated barriers in toluene are 22.0, 21.7, and 19.9 kcal/mol in the presence of 1-3 ionic pairs of [Emim]Cl and 23.5, 21.3, and 19.4 kcal/mol in the presence of 1-3 water molecules, respectively. These ionic pairs and water molecules do not participate directly in the reaction but provide a polar environment that favors stabilizing the transition state with large charge separation. Hence, we propose that the synthesis of imidazolium-based ILs from N-alkyl imidazoles and halogenated hydrocarbons is an autopromoted process and a polar microenvironment induced reaction, and the existence of water molecules (a highly polar solvent) in the reaction may be mainly responsible for the initiation of reaction.

  18. N-Alkylation by Hydrogen Autotransfer Reactions.

    PubMed

    Ma, Xiantao; Su, Chenliang; Xu, Qing

    2016-06-01

    Owing to the importance of amine/amide derivatives in all fields of chemistry, and also the green and environmentally benign features of using alcohols as alkylating reagents, the relatively high atom economic dehydrative N-alkylation reactions of amines/amides with alcohols through hydrogen autotransfer processes have received much attention and have developed rapidly in recent decades. Various efficient homogeneous and heterogeneous transition metal catalysts, nano materials, electrochemical methods, biomimetic methods, asymmetric N-alkylation reactions, aerobic oxidative methods, and even certain transition metal-free, catalyst-free, or autocatalyzed methods, have also been developed in recent years. With a brief introduction to the background and developments in this area of research, this chapter focuses mainly on recent progress and technical and conceptual advances contributing to the development of this research in the last decade. In addition to mainstream research on homogeneous and heterogeneous transition metal-catalyzed reactions, possible mechanistic routes for hydrogen transfer and alcohol activation, which are key processes in N-alkylation reactions but seldom discussed in the past, the recent reports on computational mechanistic studies of the N-alkylation reactions, and the newly emerged N-alkylation methods based on novel alcohol activation protocols such as air-promoted reactions and transition metal-free methods, are also reviewed in this chapter. Problems and bottlenecks that remained to be solved in the field, and promising new research that deserves greater future attention and effort, are also reviewed and discussed.

  19. DNA sequencing by synthesis based on elongation delay detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manturov, Alexey O.; Grigoryev, Anton V.

    2015-03-01

    The one of most important problem in modern genetics, biology and medicine is determination of the primary nucleotide sequence of the DNA of living organisms (DNA sequencing). This paper describes the label-free DNA sequencing approach, based on the observation of a discrete dynamics of DNA sequence elongation phase. The proposed DNA sequencing principle are studied by numerical simulation. The numerical model for proposed label-free DNA sequencing approach is based on a cellular automaton, which can simulate the elongation stage (growth of DNA strands) and dynamics of nucleotides incorporation to rising DNA strand. The estimates for number of copied DNA sequences for required probability of nucleotide incorporation event detection and correct DNA sequence determination was obtained. The proposed approach can be applied at all known DNA sequencing devices with "sequencing by synthesis" principle of operation.

  20. Both base excision repair and O6-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase protect against methylation-induced colon carcinogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Wirtz, Stefan; Nagel, Georg; Eshkind, Leonid; Neurath, Markus F.; Samson, Leona D.; Kaina, Bernd

    2010-01-01

    Methylating agents are widely distributed environmental carcinogens. Moreover, they are being used in cancer chemotherapy. The primary target of methylating agents is DNA, and therefore, DNA repair is the first-line barrier in defense against their toxic and carcinogenic effects. Methylating agents induce in the DNA O6-methylguanine (O6MeG) and methylations of the ring nitrogens of purines. The lesions are repaired by O6-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase (Mgmt) and by enzymes of the base excision repair (BER) pathway, respectively. Whereas O6MeG is well established as a pre-carcinogenic lesion, little is known about the carcinogenic potency of base N-alkylation products such as N3-methyladenine and N3-methylguanine. To determine their role in cancer formation and the role of BER in cancer protection, we checked the response of mice with a targeted gene disruption of Mgmt or N-alkylpurine-DNA glycosylase (Aag) or both Mgmt and Aag, to azoxymethane (AOM)-induced colon carcinogenesis, using non-invasive mini-colonoscopy. We demonstrate that both Mgmt- and Aag-null mice show a higher colon cancer frequency than the wild-type. With a single low dose of AOM (3 mg/kg) Aag-null mice showed an even stronger tumor response than Mgmt-null mice. The data provide evidence that both BER initiated by Aag and O6MeG reversal by Mgmt are required for protection against alkylation-induced colon carcinogenesis. Further, the data indicate that non-repaired N-methylpurines are not only pre-toxic but also pre-carcinogenic DNA lesions. PMID:20732909

  1. Synthesis Of Alkyl Hydroperoxides Via Alkylation Of gem-Dihydroperoxides

    PubMed Central

    Kyasa, ShivaKumar; Puffer, Benjamin W.

    2013-01-01

    Two-fold alkylation of 1,1-dihydroperoxides, followed by hydrolysis of the resulting bisperoxyacetals, provides a convenient method for synthesis of primary and secondary alkyl hydroperoxides. PMID:23469994

  2. Release of 3-methyladenine from linker and core DNA of chromatin by a purified DNA glycosylase

    SciTech Connect

    Heller, E.P.; Goldthwait, D.A.

    1983-12-01

    Oligonucleosomes were isolated from (/sub 14/C)thymidine-labeled HeLa cells by digestion of the nuclei with micrococcal nuclease and were then alkylated with (/sub 3/H)methylnitrosourea. Nucleosome core particles were also prepared by further digestion of the oligonucleosomes. The distribution of /sub 3/H-labeled methyl groups in the linker versus the core DNA was established by a determination of /sub 3/H:/sub 14/C ratios in oligonucleosome and core DNA. The ratios in the core DNA of 145 and 165 base pair DNA fragments were 5.2 and 5.4, respectively, while the ratio in the oligonucleosomal DNA was 8.2. Assuming an equal mixture (as determined) of 145 and 165 base pair fragments of DNA in the 185 base pair repeat, the relative concentration of /sub 3/H methyl groups in the linker versus the core DNA was 4.2. Thus, 45% of the /sub 3/H methyl groups were in the linker DNA, and 55% were in the core DNA. Some shielding of the DNA was evident during alkylation. The concentrations of alkyl groups on the linker and core DNA were 67 and 12% of that found on free DNA alkylated under comparable conditions. No evidence for preferential shielding of the major or minor groove was observed. The purified 3-methyladenine DNA glycosylase I of Escherichia coli released approximately 37% of the 3-methyladenine from the linker DNA and 13% from the core DNA. The limited enzymatic removal of 3-methyladenine in vitro compared to the efficient removal in vivo suggests that conformational changes of the oligonucleosome and core structure must occur for total repair.

  3. Bis(thienothiophenyl) diketopyrrolopyrrole-based conjugated polymers with various branched alkyl side chains and their applications in thin-film transistors and polymer solar cells.

    PubMed

    Shin, Jicheol; Park, Gi Eun; Lee, Dae Hee; Um, Hyun Ah; Lee, Tae Wan; Cho, Min Ju; Choi, Dong Hoon

    2015-02-11

    New thienothiophene-flanked diketopyrrolopyrrole and thiophene-containing π-extended conjugated polymers with various branched alkyl side-chains were successfully synthesized. 2-Octyldodecyl, 2-decyltetradecyl, 2-tetradecylhexadecyl, 2-hexadecyloctadecyl, and 2-octadecyldocosyl groups were selected as the side-chain moieties and were anchored to the N-positions of the thienothiophene-flanked diketopyrrolopyrrole unit. All five polymers were found to be soluble owing to the bulkiness of the side chains. The thin-film transistor based on the 2-tetradecylhexadecyl-substituted polymer showed the highest hole mobility of 1.92 cm2 V(-1) s(-1) due to it having the smallest π-π stacking distance between the polymer chains, which was determined by grazing incidence X-ray diffraction. Bulk heterojunction polymer solar cells incorporating [6,6]-phenyl-C71-butyric acid methyl ester as the n-type molecule and the additive 1,8-diiodooctane (1 vol %) were also constructed from the synthesized polymers without thermal annealing; the device containing the 2-octyldodecyl-substituted polymer exhibited the highest power conversion efficiency of 5.8%. Although all the polymers showed similar physical properties, their device performance was clearly influenced by the sizes of the branched alkyl side-chain groups.

  4. Influence of the organized structure of 1-alkyl-3-methylimidazolium-based ionic liquids on the rotational diffusion of an ionic solute.

    PubMed

    Gangamallaiah, V; Dutt, G B

    2013-08-29

    To understand the influence of organized structure of the ionic liquids on the rotational diffusion of a hydrogen bond donating ionic solute, reorientation times (τr) of rhodamine 110 (R110) have been measured in 1-alkyl-3-methylimidazolium ([Rmim+]) based ionic liquids with anions tetrafluoroborate ([BF4-]) and hexafluorophosphate ([PF6-]). The viscosity (η) was varied by changing the temperature (T) and also the alkyl chain length on the imidazolium cation (ethyl, butyl, hexyl, and octyl). It has been noticed that τr versus η/T plots contain two slopes corresponding to lower and higher values of η/T for ionic liquids with [BF4-] as well as [PF6-] anions. For lower values of η/T (<0.2 and <0.3 mPa s K(-1), respectively, for [Rmim+][BF4-] and [Rmim+][PF6-]), rotational diffusion of R110 follows Stokes-Einstein-Debye hydrodynamic theory with stick boundary condition due to specific interactions between the solute and the anions of the ionic liquids. In contrast, at higher η/T, the rotational diffusion of the solute is faster than the stick predictions and this trend could not be explained by the quasihydrodynamic theories of Gierer-Wirtz and Dote-Kivelson-Schwartz as well. Diminishing hydrogen bonding interactions between the solute and the anions, which transpire as a consequence of the organized structure of the ionic liquids, are responsible for the observed behavior.

  5. Excess Electron Localization in Solvated DNA Bases

    SciTech Connect

    Smyth, Maeve; Kohanoff, Jorge

    2011-06-10

    We present a first-principles molecular dynamics study of an excess electron in condensed phase models of solvated DNA bases. Calculations on increasingly large microsolvated clusters taken from liquid phase simulations show that adiabatic electron affinities increase systematically upon solvation, as for optimized gas-phase geometries. Dynamical simulations after vertical attachment indicate that the excess electron, which is initially found delocalized, localizes around the nucleobases within a 15 fs time scale. This transition requires small rearrangements in the geometry of the bases.

  6. Detection of DNA damage based on metal-mediated molecular beacon and DNA strands displacement reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiong, Yanxiang; Wei, Min; Wei, Wei; Yin, Lihong; Pu, Yuepu; Liu, Songqin

    2014-01-01

    DNA hairpin structure probes are usually designed by forming intra-molecular duplex based on Watson-Crick hydrogen bonds. In this paper, a molecular beacon based on silver ions-mediated cytosine-Ag+-cytosine base pairs was used to detect DNA. The inherent characteristic of the metal ligation facilitated the design of functional probe and the adjustment of its binding strength compared to traditional DNA hairpin structure probes, which make it be used to detect DNA in a simple, rapid and easy way with the help of DNA strands displacement reaction. The method was sensitive and also possesses the good specificity to differentiate the single base mismatched DNA from the complementary DNA. It was also successfully applied to study the damage effect of classic genotoxicity chemicals such as styrene oxide and sodium arsenite on DNA, which was significant in food science, environmental science and pharmaceutical science.

  7. A simple DNA-based translation system.

    PubMed

    Garibotti, Alejandra V; Liao, Shiping; Seeman, Nadrian C

    2007-02-01

    We have used DNA double crossover (DX) molecules to produce a translation system that generates unique molecular products. The particular species of DX molecule used contains an even number of half-turns between crossover points, so there is a continuous strand on both sides of the molecule. One of these strands acts as the input strand containing the message, and a second strand acts as the product of translation. The crossover strands carry the "code" that connects the two sides of the molecule. This system is more robust, more extendable, and simpler than previous DNA-based translation systems that have been reported. It is designed to be useful in a variety of applications that utilize the concept of translating from one code to another.

  8. Transfection of a human glioblastoma cell line with liver-type glutaminase (LGA) down-regulates the expression of DNA-repair gene MGMT and sensitizes the cells to alkylating agents.

    PubMed

    Szeliga, Monika; Zgrzywa, Agata; Obara-Michlewska, Marta; Albrecht, Jan

    2012-11-01

    O(6)-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase (MGMT) is a DNA-repair protein promoting resistance of tumor cells to alkylating chemotherapeutic agents. Glioma cells are particularly resistant to this class of drugs which include temozolomide (TMZ) and carmustine (BCNU). A previous study using the RNA microarray technique showed that decrease of MGMT mRNA stands out among the alterations in gene expression caused by the cell growth-depressing transfection of a T98G glioma cell line with liver-type glutaminase (LGA) [Szeliga et al. (2009) Glia, 57, 1014]. Here, we show that stably LGA-transfected cells (TLGA) exhibit decreased MGMT protein expression and activity as compared with non-transfected or mock transfected cells (controls). However, the decrease of expression occurs in the absence of changes in the methylation of the promoter region, indicating that LGA circumvents, by an as yet unknown route, the most common mechanism of MGMT silencing. TLGA turned out to be significantly more sensitive to treatment with 100-1000 μM of TMZ and BCNU in the acute cell growth inhibition assay (MTT). In the clonogenic survival assay, TLGA cells displayed increased sensitivity even to 10 μM TMZ and BCNU. Our results indicate that enrichment with LGA, in addition to inhibiting glioma growth, may facilitate chemotherapeutic intervention.

  9. Towards DNA-Based Programmable Matter

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-02-28

    that moves along a DNA track and mediates autonomous multistep organic synthesis in a single isothermal solution.35 McKee et al. recently used a DNA...functionalize a variety of mesoscale materials with DNA oligonucleotides. Finally, we demonstrated the ability of these DNA-linked surfaces to mediate ...these DNA-linked surfaces to mediate surface-surface interactions in a DNA sequence-specific manner. In a second line of research, we applied these

  10. Radiation-induced degradation of DNA bases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Douki, T.; Delatour, T.; Martini, R.; Cadet, J.

    1999-01-01

    Radio-induced degradation of DNA involves radical processes. A series of lesions among the major bases degradation products has been measured in isolated DNA exposed to gamma radiation in aerated aqueous solution. Degradation can be accounted for by the formation of hydroxyl radicals upon radiolysis of water (indirect effect). The four bases are degraded in high yield. Direct effect has been mimicked by photo-induced electron abstraction from the bases producing their radical cation. Quantification of the modified bases showed that guanine is the preferential target. This can be explained by its lower oxidation potential and charge transfer phenomena. La décomposition radio-induite de l'ADN fait intervenir des processus radicalaires. Une série de lésions choisies parmi les produits majeurs de dégradation des bases a été mesurée dans de l'ADN isolé exposé au rayonnement en solution aqueuse aérée. Les modifications sont alors dues aux radicaux hydroxyles produits par la radiolyse de l'eau (effet indirect) et les quatre bases sont efficacement dégradées. L'arrachement d'électrons aux bases par photosensibilisation pour produire leur radical cation, a été utilisé comme modèle de l'effet direct. La quantification des bases modifiées montre que la guanine est préférentiellement dégradée. Cette observation peut s'expliquer par le plus faible potentiel d'oxydation de cette base ainsi que par les phénomènes de transfert de charge vers les guanines.

  11. DNA biosensors based on self-assembled carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Wang, S G; Wang, Ruili; Sellin, P J; Zhang, Qing

    2004-12-24

    DNA biosensors based on self-assembled multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs) were described in this paper, in which the probe DNA oligonucleotides were immobilized by forming covalent amide bonds between carboxyl groups at the nanotubes and amino groups at the ends of the DNA oligonucleotides. Hybridization between the probe and target DNA oligonucleotides was confirmed by the changes in the voltammetric peak of the indicator of methylene blue. Our results demonstrate that the DNA biosensors based on self-assembled MWNTs had a higher hybridization efficiency compared to those based on random MWNTs. In addition, the developed DNA biosensors also had a high selectivity of hybridization detection.

  12. Envisioning the molecular choreography of DNA base excision repair.

    PubMed

    Parikh, S S; Mol, C D; Hosfield, D J; Tainer, J A

    1999-02-01

    Recent breakthroughs integrate individual DNA repair enzyme structures, biochemistry and biology to outline the structural cell biology of the DNA base excision repair pathways that are essential to genome integrity. Thus, we are starting to envision how the actions, movements, steps, partners and timing of DNA repair enzymes, which together define their molecular choreography, are elegantly controlled by both the nature of the DNA damage and the structural chemistry of the participating enzymes and the DNA double helix.

  13. DNA Base Excision Repair (BER) and Cancer Gene Therapy: Use of the Human N-mythlpurien DNA Glycosylase (MPG) to Sensitize Breast Cancer Cells to Low Dose Chemotherapy

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2003-06-01

    has found that the overexpression of this DNA repair protein is cytotoxic to tumor cells in response to the classic alkylating agent, methyl...SUBJECT TERMS 15. NUMBER OF PAGES DNA repair, methylpurine DNA glycosylase, breast cancer 5 16. PRICE CODE 17. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION 18 . SECURITY...NSN 7540-01-280-5500 Standard Form 298 (Rev. 2-89) Prescribed by ANSI Std. Z39- 18 298-102 BEST AVAILABLE COPY Table of Contents Cover

  14. Nucleophilic selectivity of alkylating agents and their hypermutability in Drosophila as predictors of carcinogenic potency in rodents.

    PubMed

    Vogel, E W; Barbin, A; Nivard, M J; Bartsch, H

    1990-12-01

    The nucleophilic selectivity (Swain-Scott s constant or initial 7-alkylguanine/O6-alkylguanine ratio in DNA) of 60 alkylating agents, mostly monofunctional or cross-linking was compared to their carcinogenic potency in rodents (median TD50 estimates) and to two genotoxicity indices in Drosophila: (i) hypermutability, measured by the increased frequency of induced sex-linked recessive lethal mutations (SLRL) in a strain defective in DNA excision repair (exr-), as compared to the wild-type (exr+); (ii) relative clastogenic efficiency, expressed by the ratio of chromosomal aberrations (ring-X loss) to SLRL determined in the exr+ strain. For a subset of direct-acting, monofunctional alkylating agents, nucleophilic selectivity and TD50 values or hypermutability indices were linearly correlated. In addition, the hypermutability indices in Drosophila by methylating or ethylating procarcinogens were similar to the corresponding values of their ultimate metabolites. In contrast, cross-linking agents, including antitumour drugs, did not show these positive correlations. The relative clastogenic efficiencies in Drosophila of 26 direct-acting, alkylating carcinogens increased with both their cross-linking activity and nucleophilic selectivity. By analyzing mutational spectra in Drosophila induced in the vermilion gene by four monofunctional alkylating agents with contrasting s values, critical DNA lesions, i.e. type of base pair substitution mutations, deletions, insertions, involved in genotoxicity were pinpointed. Thus, these multi-endpoint analyses should, as a new approach, assist in the quantitative risk evaluation of genotoxic agents.

  15. DNA nanostructure-based imaging probes and drug carriers.

    PubMed

    Zhan, Pengfei; Jiang, Qiao; Wang, Zhen-Gang; Li, Na; Yu, Haiyin; Ding, Baoquan

    2014-09-01

    Self-assembled DNA nanostructures are well-defined nanoscale shapes, with uniform sizes, precise spatial addressability, and excellent biocompatibility. With these features, DNA nanostructures show great potential for biomedical applications; various DNA-based biomedical imaging probes or payload delivery carriers have been developed. In this review, we summarize the recent developments of DNA-based nanostructures as tools for diagnosis and cancer therapy. The biological effects that are brought about by DNA nanostructures are highlighted by in vitro and in vivo imaging, antitumor drug delivery, and immunostimulatory therapy. The challenges and perspectives of DNA nanostructures in the field of nanomedicine are discussed.

  16. Re-examination of C1-C5 alkyl nitrates in Hong Kong using an observation-based model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lyu, X. P.; Ling, Z. H.; Guo, H.; Saunders, S. M.; Lam, S. H. M.; Wang, N.; Wang, Y.; Liu, M.; Wang, T.

    2015-11-01

    The photochemical formation of alkyl nitrates (RONO2) and their impact on ozone (O3) formation were investigated using a Photochemical Box Model incorporating the Master Chemical Mechanism (PBM-MCM). The model was constrained with field measurement data collected on selected O3 episode days at Tai O, a rural-coastal site in southwestern Hong Kong, from August 2001-December 2002. The in-situ observations showed that the sum of C1-C5 RONO2 varied from 30.7 ± 14.8 pptv in spring to 120.7 ± 10.4 pptv in autumn, of which 2-butyl nitrate dominated with the highest average concentration of 30.8 ± 2.6 pptv. Model simulations indicated that the pathway of CH3O reacting with NO2, proposed in our previous study, made minor contributions (11.3 ± 0.7%) to methyl nitrate formation. Indeed, 51.8 ± 3.1% and 36.5 ± 6.3% of the methyl nitrate was attributed to the reaction of CH3O2+NO and to oceanic emissions/biomass burning, respectively. For the C2-C5 alkyl nitrates, the contribution of photochemical formation increased with increasing carbon number, ranging from 64.4 ± 4.0% for ethyl nitrate (EtONO2) to 72.6 ± 4.2% for 2-pentyl nitrate (2-PenONO2), while the contribution of oceanic emissions/biomass burning decreased from 35.1 ± 6.5% for EtONO2 to 26.8 ± 6.8% for 2-PenONO2. Model simulations of photochemical O3 levels influenced by RONO2 chemistry showed that the formation of methyl-, ethyl-, i-propyl-, n-propyl-, 2-butyl-, 2-pentyl-, and 3-pentyl-nitrates led to O3 reduction of 0.05 ± 0.03, 0.05 ± 0.03, 0.06 ± 0.02, 0.02 ± 0.02, 0.18 ± 0.04, 0.09 ± 0.02 and 0.06 ± 0.02 ppbv, respectively, with an average reduction rate of 11.0 ± 3.2 ppbv O3 per 1 ppbv RONO2 formation. The C1-C5 RONO2 constituted 18.6 ± 1.9% of the entire RONO2, and had a nitrogen reserve of 4.1 ± 0.2%, implying their potential influence on O3 production in downwind areas.

  17. Oxidant and environmental toxicant-induced effects compromise DNA ligation during base excision DNA repair

    PubMed Central

    Çağlayan, Melike; Wilson, Samuel H.

    2015-01-01

    DNA lesions arise from many endogenous and environmental agents, and they promote deleterious events leading to genomic instability and cell death. Base excision repair (BER) is the main DNA repair pathway responsible for repairing single strand breaks, base lesions and abasic sites in mammalian cells. During BER, DNA substrates and repair intermediates are channeled from one step to the next in a sequential fashion so that release of toxic repair intermediates is minimized. This includes handoff of the product of gap-filling DNA synthesis to the DNA ligation step. The conformational differences in DNA polymerase β (pol β) associated with incorrect or oxidized nucleotide (8-oxodGMP) insertion could impact channeling of the repair intermediate to the final step of BER, i.e., DNA ligation by DNA ligase I or the DNA Ligase III/XRCC1 complex. Thus, modified DNA ligase substrates produced by faulty pol β gap-filling could impair coordination between pol β and DNA ligase. Ligation failure is associated with 5'-AMP addition to the repair intermediate and accumulation of strand breaks that could be more toxic than the initial DNA lesions. Here, we provide an overview of the consequences of ligation failure in the last step of BER. We also discuss DNA-end processing mechanisms that could play roles in reversal of impaired BER. PMID:26596511

  18. Oxidant and environmental toxicant-induced effects compromise DNA ligation during base excision DNA repair

    PubMed Central

    çağlayan, Melike; Wilson, Samuel H.

    2015-01-01

    DNA lesions arise from many endogenous and environmental agents, and they promote deleterious events leading to genomic instability and cell death. Base excision repair (BER) is the main DNA repair pathway responsible for repairing single strand breaks, base lesions and abasic sites in mammalian cells. During BER, DNA substrates and repair intermediates are channeled from one step to the next in a sequential fashion so that release of toxic repair intermediates is minimized. This includes handoff of the product of gap-filling DNA synthesis to the DNA ligation step. The conformational differences in DNA polymerase β (pol β) associated with incorrect or oxidized nucleotide (8-oxodGMP) insertion could impact channeling of the repair intermediate to the final step of BER, i.e., DNA ligation by DNA ligase I or the DNA Ligase III/XRCC1 complex. Thus, modified DNA ligase substrates produced by faulty pol β gap-filling could impair coordination between pol β and DNA ligase. Ligation failure is associated with 5′-AMP addition to the repair intermediate and accumulation of strand breaks that could be more toxic than the initial DNA lesions. Here, we provide an overview of the consequences of ligation failure in the last step of BER. We also discuss DNA-end processing mechanisms that could play roles in reversal of impaired BER. PMID:26466358

  19. Oxidant and environmental toxicant-induced effects compromise DNA ligation during base excision DNA repair.

    PubMed

    Çağlayan, Melike; Wilson, Samuel H

    2015-11-01

    DNA lesions arise from many endogenous and environmental agents, and such lesions can promote deleterious events leading to genomic instability and cell death. Base excision repair (BER) is the main DNA repair pathway responsible for repairing single strand breaks, base lesions and abasic sites in mammalian cells. During BER, DNA substrates and repair intermediates are channeled from one step to the next in a sequential fashion so that release of toxic repair intermediates is minimized. This includes handoff of the product of gap-filling DNA synthesis to the DNA ligation step. The conformational differences in DNA polymerase β (pol β) associated with incorrect or oxidized nucleotide (8-oxodGMP) insertion could impact channeling of the repair intermediate to the final step of BER, i.e., DNA ligation by DNA ligase I or the DNA Ligase III/XRCC1 complex. Thus, modified DNA ligase substrates produced by faulty pol β gap-filling could impair coordination between pol β and DNA ligase. Ligation failure is associated with 5'-AMP addition to the repair intermediate and accumulation of strand breaks that could be more toxic than the initial DNA lesions. Here, we provide an overview of the consequences of ligation failure in the last step of BER. We also discuss DNA-end processing mechanisms that could play roles in reversal of impaired BER.

  20. Alkyl Chain Length and Temperature Effects on Structural Properties of Pyrrolidinium-Based Ionic Liquids: A Combined Atomistic Simulation and Small-Angle X-ray Scattering Study

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Song; Bañuelos, José Leobardo; Guo, Jianchang; Anovitz, Lawrence; Rother, Gernot; Shaw, Robert W.; Hillesheim, Patrick C.; Dai, Sheng; Baker, Gary A.; Cummings, Peter T.

    2011-12-21

    Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of 1-alkyl-1-methylpyrrolidinium bis(trifluoromethanesulfonyl)imide ([CnMPy][Tf₂N], n = 3, 4, 6, 8, 10) were conducted using an all-atom model. Radial distribution functions (RDF) were computed and structure functions were generated to compare with new X-ray scattering experimental results, reported herein. The scattering peaks in the structure functions generally shift to lower Q values with increased temperature for all the liquids in this series. However, the first sharp diffraction peak (FSDP) in the longer alkyl chain liquids displays a marked shift to higher Q values with increasing temperature. Alkyl chain-dependent ordering of the polar groups and increased tail aggregation with increasing alkyl chain length were observed in the partial pair correlation functions and the structure functions. The reasons for the observed alkyl chain-dependent phenomena and temperature effects were explored.

  1. Alkyl Chain Length and Temperature Effects on Structural Properties of Pyrrolidinium-Based Ionic Liquids: A Combined Atomistic Simulation and Small-Angle X-ray Scattering Study.

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Song; Banuelos, Jose Leo; Guo, Jianchang; Anovitz, Lawrence {Larry} M; Rother, Gernot; Shaw, Robert W; Hillesheim, Patrick C; Dai, Sheng; Baker, Gary A; Cummings, Peter T

    2011-01-01

    Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of 1-alkyl-1-methylpyrrolidinium 12 bis(trifluoromethanesulfonyl)imide ([CnMPy][Tf2N], n = 3, 4, 6, 8, 10) were conducted 13 using an all-atom model. Radial distribution functions (RDF) were computed and structure 14 functions were generated to compare with new X-ray scattering experimental results, 15 reported herein. The scattering peaks in the structure functions generally shift to lower Q 16 values with increased temperature for all the liquids in this series. However, the first sharp 17 diffraction peak (FSDP) in the longer alkyl chain liquids displays a marked shift to higher Q 18 values with increasing temperature. Alkyl chain-dependent ordering of the polar groups and 19 increased tail aggregation with increasing alkyl chain length were observed in the partial pair 20 correlation functions and the structure functions. The reasons for the observed alkyl chain- 21 dependent phenomena and temperature effects were explored.

  2. Designing green plasticizers: influence of alkyl chain length on biodegradation and plasticization properties of succinate based plasticizers.

    PubMed

    Erythropel, Hanno C; Dodd, Patrick; Leask, Richard L; Maric, Milan; Cooper, David G

    2013-04-01

    Phthalate diesters such as di (2-ethylhexyl) phthalate (DEHP) are considered ubiquitous contaminants and are poorly biodegraded in the environment. Moreover, both the parent compound and stable metabolites such as mono (2-ethylhexyl) phthalate (MEHP) are linked to several negative impacts on the environment and human health. Earlier work established that saturated diester compounds, such as succinates, showed better biodegradation characteristics and comparable plasticizer properties compared to DEHP. In this work we examine the effect of alkyl chain length of succinate molecules on plasticizer and biodegradation properties. This included both the side chains (n-ethyl to n-octyl) as well as substituents on the middle part of the succinate molecule. We showed that the common soil bacterium Rhodococcus rhodocrous could rapidly break down all unsubstituted succinates, without the appearance of stable metabolites. Furthermore, the organisms used the plasticizer metabolites as carbon source. The introduction of a large cyclohexyl substituent on the succinate resulted in a poorer degradation rate. Glass Transition Temperature (Tg) measurements were performed to evaluate plasticizer properties and showed that longer side chains reduced the Tg more efficiently, while large cyclohexyl substituents on the succinate decreased this effect. However, all compounds performed better or equal to DEHP at reducing the Tg.

  3. Designing greener plasticizers: Effects of alkyl chain length and branching on the biodegradation of maleate based plasticizers.

    PubMed

    Erythropel, Hanno C; Brown, Tobin; Maric, Milan; Nicell, Jim A; Cooper, David G; Leask, Richard L

    2015-09-01

    The ubiquitous presence of the plasticizer di (2-ethylhexyl) phthalate (DEHP) in the environment is of concern due to negative biological effects associated with it and its metabolites. In particular, the metabolite mono (2-ethylhexyl) phthalate (MEHP) is a potential endocrine disruptor. Earlier work had identified the diester di (2-ethylhexyl) maleate (DEHM) as a potential greener candidate plasticizer to replace DEHP, yet its biodegradation rate was reported to be slow. In this study, we modified the side chains of maleate diesters to be linear (i.e., unbranched) alkyl chains that varied in length from ethyl to n-octyl. The plasticization efficiency of these compounds blended into PVC at 29 wt.% increased with the overall length of the molecule, but all compounds performed as well as or better than comparable samples with DEHP. Tests conducted with the equally long DEHM and dihexyl maleate (DHM) showed that branching has no effect on glass transition temperature (Tg) reduction efficiency. Biodegradation experiments with the common soil bacterium Rhodococcus rhodocrous in the presence of the plasticizer showed acceptable hydrolysis rates of maleates with unbranched side chains, while the branched DEHM showed almost no degradation. The addition of hexadecane as auxiliary carbon source improved hydrolysis rates. Temporary buildup of the respective monoester of the compounds were observed, but only in the case of the longest molecule, dioctyl maleate (DOM), did this buildup lead to growth inhibition of the bacteria. Maleates with linear side chains, if designed and tested properly, show promise as potential candidate plasticizers as replacements for DEHP.

  4. Poly(ethyleneoxide) functionalization through alkylation

    DOEpatents

    Sivanandan, Kulandaivelu; Eitouni, Hany Basam; Li, Yan; Pratt, Russell Clayton

    2015-04-21

    A new and efficient method of functionalizing high molecular weight polymers through alkylation using a metal amide base is described. This novel procedure can also be used to synthesize polymer-based macro-initiators containing radical initiating groups at the chain-ends for synthesis of block copolymers.

  5. FRET based characterization of DNA-based assemblies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buckhout-White, Susan; Gray, Rochester; Ancona, Mario; Goldman, Ellen R.; Medintz, Igor L.

    2014-05-01

    The "spectroscopic ruler" based on fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) is explored as a method for detailed structural characterization of DNA nanostructures in solution. The approach is most directly useful for assessing the positional relationships among chromophores organized by the DNA, but it can also be used to characterize the geometry and kinematics of the DNA scaffold itself. By accumulating data for the distances separating various donor-acceptor pairs, and correlating them with the expected distances, one can quantify the shape and deformability of the structure. A 8x16nm "mini-origami" rectangle is used as the model test structure and the dye-pairs are chosen to investigate anisotropy in the origami's mechanical properties. Not unexpectedly, our analysis finds a strong anisotropy in the stiffness, with the measured spacing across the origami weave deviating much more from expectation than the spacing aligned along the weave pattern.

  6. Direct, Regioselective N-Alkylation of 1,3-Azoles.

    PubMed

    Chen, Shuai; Graceffa, Russell F; Boezio, Alessandro A

    2016-01-04

    Regioselective N-alkylation of 1,3-azoles is a valuable transformation. Organomagnesium reagents were discovered to be competent bases to affect regioselective alkylation of various 1,3-azoles. Counterintuitively, substitution selectively occurred at the more sterically hindered nitrogen atom. Numerous examples are provided, on varying 1,3-azole scaffolds, with yields ranging from 25 to 95%.

  7. Hypoxia-activated prodrugs: substituent effects on the properties of nitro seco-1,2,9,9a-tetrahydrocyclopropa[c]benz[e]indol-4-one (nitroCBI) prodrugs of DNA minor groove alkylating agents.

    PubMed

    Tercel, Moana; Atwell, Graham J; Yang, Shangjin; Stevenson, Ralph J; Botting, K Jane; Boyd, Maruta; Smith, Eileen; Anderson, Robert F; Denny, William A; Wilson, William R; Pruijn, Frederik B

    2009-11-26

    Nitrochloromethylbenzindolines (nitroCBIs) are a new class of hypoxia-activated prodrugs for antitumor therapy. The recently reported prototypes undergo hypoxia-selective metabolism to form potent DNA minor groove alkylating agents and are selectively toxic to some but not all hypoxic tumor cell lines. Here we report a series of 31 analogues that bear an extra electron-withdrawing substituent that serves to raise the one-electron reduction potential of the nitroCBI. We identify a subset of compounds, those with a basic side chain and sulfonamide or carboxamide substituent, that have consistently high hypoxic selectivity. The best of these, with a 7-sulfonamide substituent, displays hypoxic cytotoxicity ratios of 275 and 330 in Skov3 and HT29 human tumor cell lines, respectively. This compound (28) is efficiently and selectively metabolized to the corresponding aminoCBI, is selectively cytotoxic under hypoxia in all 11 cell lines examined, and demonstrates activity against hypoxic tumor cells in a human tumor xenograft in vivo.

  8. Molecular biology basis for the response of poly(ADP-rib) polymerase and NAD metabolism to dna damage caused by mustard alkylating agents. Final report, 30 April 1990-30 July 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Smulson, M.E.

    1994-08-30

    During the course of this contract, we have performed a variety of experiments whose intent has been to provide a strategy to modulate the nuclear enzyme poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PADPRP) in cultured keratinocytes. During this study, human keratinocyte lines were stably transfected with the cDNA for human PADPRP in the antisense orientation under an inducible promoter. Induction of this antisense RNA by dexamethasone in cultured cells selectively lowered levels of PADPRP in RNA, protein, and enzyme activity. Induction of antisense RNA led to a reduction in the levels of PADPRP in individual cell nuclei, as well as the loss of the ability of cells to synthesize and modify proteins by poly(ADP-ribose) polymer in response to an alkylating agent. When keratinocyte clones containing the antisense construct or empty vector alone were grafted onto nude mice they formed histologically normal human skin. The PADPRP antisense construct was also inducible in vivo by the topical application of dexamethasone to the reconstituted epidermis. In addition, poly(ADP-ribose) polymer could be induced and detected in vivo following the topical application of a sulfur mustard to the grafted transfected skin layers. Accordingly, a model system has been developed in which the levels of PADPRP can be selectively manipulated in human keratinocytes in cell culture, and potentially in reconstituted epidermis as well.

  9. Effect of base sequence on the DNA cross-linking properties of pyrrolobenzodiazepine (PBD) dimers.

    PubMed

    Rahman, Khondaker M; James, Colin H; Thurston, David E

    2011-07-01

    Pyrrolo[2,1-c][1,4]benzodiazepine (PBD) dimers are synthetic sequence-selective DNA minor-groove cross-linking agents that possess two electrophilic imine moieties (or their equivalent) capable of forming covalent aminal linkages with guanine C2-NH(2) functionalities. The PBD dimer SJG-136, which has a C8-O-(CH(2))(3)-O-C8'' central linker joining the two PBD moieties, is currently undergoing phase II clinical trials and current research is focused on developing analogues of SJG-136 with different linker lengths and substitution patterns. Using a reversed-phase ion pair HPLC/MS method to evaluate interaction with oligonucleotides of varying length and sequence, we recently reported (JACS, 2009, 131, 13 756) that SJG-136 can form three different types of adducts: inter- and intrastrand cross-linked adducts, and mono-alkylated adducts. These studies have now been extended to include PBD dimers with a longer central linker (C8-O-(CH(2))(5)-O-C8'), demonstrating that the type and distribution of adducts appear to depend on (i) the length of the C8/C8'-linker connecting the two PBD units, (ii) the positioning of the two reactive guanine bases on the same or opposite strands, and (iii) their separation (i.e. the number of base pairs, usually ATs, between them). Based on these data, a set of rules are emerging that can be used to predict the DNA-interaction behaviour of a PBD dimer of particular C8-C8' linker length towards a given DNA sequence. These observations suggest that it may be possible to design PBD dimers to target specific DNA sequences.

  10. Noncanonical regulation of alkylation damage resistance by the OTUD4 deubiquitinase

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Yu; Majid, Mona C; Soll, Jennifer M; Brickner, Joshua R; Dango, Sebastian; Mosammaparast, Nima

    2015-01-01

    Repair of DNA alkylation damage is critical for genomic stability and involves multiple conserved enzymatic pathways. Alkylation damage resistance, which is critical in cancer chemotherapy, depends on the overexpression of alkylation repair proteins. However, the mechanisms responsible for this upregulation are unknown. Here, we show that an OTU domain deubiquitinase, OTUD4, is a positive regulator of ALKBH2 and ALKBH3, two DNA demethylases critical for alkylation repair. Remarkably, we find that OTUD4 catalytic activity is completely dispensable for this function. Rather, OTUD4 is a scaffold for USP7 and USP9X, two deubiquitinases that act directly on the AlkB proteins. Moreover, we show that loss of OTUD4, USP7, or USP9X in tumor cells makes them significantly more sensitive to alkylating agents. Taken together, this work reveals a novel, noncanonical mechanism by which an OTU family deubiquitinase regulates its substrates, and provides multiple new targets for alkylation chemotherapy sensitization of tumors. PMID:25944111

  11. Noncanonical regulation of alkylation damage resistance by the OTUD4 deubiquitinase.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yu; Majid, Mona C; Soll, Jennifer M; Brickner, Joshua R; Dango, Sebastian; Mosammaparast, Nima

    2015-06-12

    Repair of DNA alkylation damage is critical for genomic stability and involves multiple conserved enzymatic pathways. Alkylation damage resistance, which is critical in cancer chemotherapy, depends on the overexpression of alkylation repair proteins. However, the mechanisms responsible for this upregulation are unknown. Here, we show that an OTU domain deubiquitinase, OTUD4, is a positive regulator of ALKBH2 and ALKBH3, two DNA demethylases critical for alkylation repair. Remarkably, we find that OTUD4 catalytic activity is completely dispensable for this function. Rather, OTUD4 is a scaffold for USP7 and USP9X, two deubiquitinases that act directly on the AlkB proteins. Moreover, we show that loss of OTUD4, USP7, or USP9X in tumor cells makes them significantly more sensitive to alkylating agents. Taken together, this work reveals a novel, noncanonical mechanism by which an OTU family deubiquitinase regulates its substrates, and provides multiple new targets for alkylation chemotherapy sensitization of tumors.

  12. Optimization of the Alkyl Linker of TO Base Surrogate in Triplex-Forming PNA for Enhanced Binding to Double-Stranded RNA.

    PubMed

    Sato, Takaya; Sato, Yusuke; Nishizawa, Seiichi

    2017-03-23

    A series of triplex-forming peptide nucleic acid (TFP) probes carrying a thiazole orange (TO) base surrogate through an alkyl linker was synthesized, and the interactions between these so-called tFIT probes and purine-rich sequences within double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) were examined. We found that the TO base surrogate linker significantly affected both the binding affinity and the fluorescence response upon triplex formation with the target dsRNA. Among the probes examined, the TO base surrogate connected through the propyl linker in the tFIT probes increased the binding affinity by a factor of ten while maintaining its function as the fluorescent universal base. Isothermal titration calorimetry experiments revealed that the increased binding affinity resulted from the gain in the binding enthalpy, which could be explained by the enhanced π-stacking interaction between the TO base surrogate and the dsRNA part of the triplex. We expect that these results will provide a molecular basis for designing strong binding tFIT probes for fluorescence sensing of various kinds of purine-rich dsRNAs sequences including those carrying a pyrimidine-purine inversion. The obtained data also offers a new insight into further development of the universal bases incorporated in TFP.

  13. Alkyl imidazolium ionic liquid based sweeping-micellar electrokinetic chromatography for simultaneous determination of seven tea catechins in human plasma.

    PubMed

    El-Hady, Deia Abd; Albishri, Hassan M

    2014-10-15

    Determination of tea catechins in human plasma might provide a means of better evaluation of their benefits. The main difficulty in their analysis is the low catechins concentrations in plasma and their susceptible to oxidation during sample pretreatment. In the current work, a sweeping-micellar electrokinetic chromatography (sweeping-MEKC) by long alkyl chain ionic liquid was investigated for the simultaneous determination of seven principal naturally-occurring tea catechins in human plasma under acidic conditions after the intake of green tea beverage. The effects of type and concentration of three 1-tetradecyl-3-methylimidazolium ionic liquids, namely bromide, acetate and hydrogen sulfate salts were studied. The seven catechins were successfully separated within 5min by micellar running buffer of 5mmolL(-1) 1-tetradecyl-3-methylimidazolium bromide and 15mmolL(-1) phosphate buffer at pH 4.5 under optimal parameters of 50mbar injection for 150s, 10kV, 25°C and 200nm. To prevent the possibility of IL adsorption, an appropriate rinsing protocol was established. The method has analytical ranges from 0.5, 1, 0.5, 1, 2, 1 and 1 to 500ngmL(-1) for GC, C, EC, EGCG, GCG, ECG and EGC, respectively (r ranged from 0.995 to 0.999). The intraday precision and accuracy were 0.1-0.9% RSD (n=10) and 97-106% recovery, respectively. Limits of detections of analytes were ranged from 0.2 to 1.2ngmL(-1). The current sweeping-MEKC achieved sensitivity enhancement factor (SEF) up to 183-fold of analytes concentrations compared to other hitherto published CE reports that is suitable to find out the trace amounts of catechins in plasma.

  14. Analytical Devices Based on Direct Synthesis of DNA on Paper.

    PubMed

    Glavan, Ana C; Niu, Jia; Chen, Zhen; Güder, Firat; Cheng, Chao-Min; Liu, David; Whitesides, George M

    2016-01-05

    This paper addresses a growing need in clinical diagnostics for parallel, multiplex analysis of biomarkers from small biological samples. It describes a new procedure for assembling arrays of ssDNA and proteins on paper. This method starts with the synthesis of DNA oligonucleotides covalently linked to paper and proceeds to assemble microzones of DNA-conjugated paper into arrays capable of simultaneously capturing DNA, DNA-conjugated protein antigens, and DNA-conjugated antibodies. The synthesis of ssDNA oligonucleotides on paper is convenient and effective with 32% of the oligonucleotides cleaved and eluted from the paper substrate being full-length by HPLC for a 32-mer. These ssDNA arrays can be used to detect fluorophore-linked DNA oligonucleotides in solution, and as the basis for DNA-directed assembly of arrays of DNA-conjugated capture antibodies on paper, detect protein antigens by sandwich ELISAs. Paper-anchored ssDNA arrays with different sequences can be used to assemble paper-based devices capable of detecting DNA and antibodies in the same device and enable simple microfluidic paper-based devices.

  15. Molecular biological basis for the response of poly(ADP-rib) polymerase and NAD metabolism to DNA damage caused by mustard alkylating agents. Midterm report

    SciTech Connect

    Smulson, M.E.

    1996-07-01

    During the course of this contract, we have performed a variety of experiments to provide a strategy to modulate the nuclear enzyme poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP), in cultured keratinocytes. This enzyme modifies a variety of nuclear proteins utilizing NAD. DNA is required for the catalytic activity of the enzyme and the activity is dependent upon the presence of strand breaks in this DNA. It has been hypothesized that human skin exposed to mustards may develop blisters due to a generalized lowering of NAD in exposed skin cells. During the contract period, we have established a stably transfected human keratinocyte cell line which expresses antisense transcripts to PARP mRNA when these keratinocyte were grafted onto nude mice they formed histologically normal human skin. Accordingly, a model system has been developed in which the levels of PARP can be selectively manipulated in human keratinocytes in reconstituted epidermis as well. We also showed that PARP was proteolytically cleaved at the onset of spontaneous apoptosis following proteolytic conversion of CPP32b to its active form, termed `apopain`. Having characterized the events associated with apoptosis, we determined, during the last period, whether any or all of these features could be observed following exposure of keratinocytes to SM.

  16. A Novel DNA-Based Vaccine Methodology for Aids

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1998-11-01

    A., Beck, T.W., Grant, R.F., Bischofberger, N., Benveniste, R.E., Black, R. 1995. Prevention of SIV infection in macaques by (R)-9-(2...enhancement of CTL. Gene gun-based DNA immunization of rhesus macaques resulted in further refinement of DNA delivery parameters based on the degree of...responses by gene gun-based DNA immunization. In addition, we initiated 2 challenge studies in the SIV macaque model to test the role of CTL and mucosal

  17. In silico studies to explore the mutagenic ability of 5-halo/oxy/li-oxy-uracil bases with guanine of DNA base pairs.

    PubMed

    Jana, Kalyanashis; Ganguly, Bishwajit

    2014-10-16

    DNA nucleobases are reactive in nature and undergo modifications by deamination, oxidation, alkylation, or hydrolysis processes. Many such modified bases are susceptible to mutagenesis when formed in cellular DNA. The mutagenesis can occur by mispairing with DNA nucleobases by a DNA polymerase during replication. We have performed a study of mispairing of DNA bases with unnatural bases computationally. 5-Halo uracils have been studied as mispairs in mutagenesis; however, the reports on their different forms are scarce in the literature. The stability of mispairs with keto form, enol form, and ionized form of 5-halo-uracil has been computed with the M06-2X/6-31+G** level of theory. The enol form of 5-halo-uracil showed remarkable stability toward DNA mispair compared to the corresponding keto and ionized forms. (F)U-G mispair showed the highest stability in the series and (Halo)(U(enol/ionized)-G mispair interactions energies are more stable than the natural G-C basepair of DNA. To enhance the stability of DNA mispairs, we have introduced the hydroxyl group in the place of halogen atoms, which provides additional hydrogen-bonding interactions in the system while forming the 5-membered ring. The study has been further extended with lithiated 5-hydroxymethyl-uracil to stabilize the DNA mispair. (CH2OLi)U(ionized)-G mispair has shown the highest stability (ΔG = -32.4 kcal/mol) with multi O-Li interactions. AIM (atoms in molecules) and EDA (energy decomposition analysis) analysis has been performed to examine the nature of noncovalent interactions in such mispairs. EDA analysis has shown that electrostatic energy mainly contributes toward the interaction energy of mispairs. The higher stability achieved in these studied mispairs can play a pivotal role in the mutagenesis and can help to attain the mutation for many desired biological processes.

  18. DNA vs. mirror-image DNA: a universal approach to tune the absolute configuration in DNA-based asymmetric catalysis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jocelyn; Benedetti, Erica; Bethge, Lucas; Vonhoff, Stefan; Klussmann, Sven; Vasseur, Jean-Jacques; Cossy, Janine; Smietana, Michael; Arseniyadis, Stellios

    2013-10-25

    Mirror mirror on the wall: By taking advantage of the unique structural features of L-DNA, the first examples of left-helical enantioselective induction in the field of DNA-based asymmetric catalysis were realized. Most importantly, this approach is the only one that allows a reliable and predictable access to both enantiomers for any given reaction.

  19. Serine-based gemini surfactants with different spacer linkages: from self-assembly to DNA compaction.

    PubMed

    Silva, Sandra G; Oliveira, Isabel S; do Vale, M Luísa C; Marques, Eduardo F

    2014-12-14

    Cationic gemini surfactants have strong potential as compaction agents of nucleic acids for efficient non-viral gene delivery. In this work, we present the aggregation behavior of three novel cationic serine-based gemini surfactants as well as their ability to compact DNA per se and mixed with a helper lipid, 1,2-dioleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphoethanolamine (DOPE). All the surfactants have a 12-12-12 configuration, i.e. two main 12-carbon alkyl chains linked to the nitrogen atom of the amino acid residue and a 12 methylene spacer, but they differ in the nature of the spacer linkage: for (12Ser)2N12, an amine bond; for (12Ser)2CON12, an amide bond; and for (12Ser)2COO12, an ester bond. Interestingly, while the amine-based gemini aggregates into micelles, the amide and ester ones spontaneously form vesicles, which denotes a strong influence of the type of linkage on the surfactant packing parameter. The size, ζ-potential and stability of the vesicles have been characterized by light microscopy, cryogenic scanning electron microscopy (cryo-SEM) and dynamic light scattering (DLS). The interaction of the gemini aggregates with DNA at different charge ratios and in the absence and presence of DOPE has been studied by DLS, fluorescence spectroscopy and cryo-SEM. All the compounds are found to efficiently compact DNA (complexation > 90%), but relevant differences are obtained in terms of the size, ζ-potential and stability of the lipoplexes formed. Results are rationalized in terms of headgroup differences and the type of aggregates present prior to DNA condensation.

  20. Detecting Chemically Modified DNA Bases Using Surface Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Barhoumi, Aoune; Halas, Naomi J

    2011-12-15

    Post-translational modifications of DNA- changes in the chemical structure of individual bases that occur without changes in the DNA sequence- are known to alter gene expression. They are believed to result in frequently deleterious phenotypic changes, such as cancer. Methylation of adenine, methylation and hydroxymethylation of cytosine, and guanine oxidation are the primary DNA base modifications identified to date. Here we show it is possible to use surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) to detect these primary DNA base modifications. SERS detection of modified DNA bases is label-free and requires minimal additional sample preparation, reducing the possibility of additional chemical modifications induced prior to measurement. This approach shows the feasibility of DNA base modification assessment as a potentially routine analysis that may be further developed for clinical diagnostics.

  1. How to make DNA count: DNA-based diagnostic tools in veterinary parasitology.

    PubMed

    Hunt, P W; Lello, J

    2012-05-04

    Traditional methods for the diagnosis of parasitic helminth infections of livestock have a number of limitations, such as the inability to distinguish mixed-species infections, a heavy reliance on technical experience and also sub-sampling errors. Some of these limitations may be overcome through the development of rapid and accurate DNA-based tests. For example, DNA-based tests can specifically detect individual species in a mixed infection at either the larval or egg stages, in the absence of morphological differences among species. Even so, some diagnostic problems remain the same, irrespective of whether a DNA-based or traditional method is used. For example, sub-sampling errors from an aggregated distribution are likely to persist. It is proposed, however, that DNA-based diagnostic technologies offer an opportunity to expand diagnostic capabilities, and are discussed in the current review. The future introduction of DNA-based diagnostic technologies into routine diagnostic settings will also be discussed.

  2. Method of making alkyl esters

    DOEpatents

    Elliott, Brian

    2010-09-14

    Methods of making alkyl esters are described herein. The methods are capable of using raw, unprocessed, low-cost feedstocks and waste grease. Generally, the method involves converting a glyceride source to a fatty acid composition and esterifying the fatty acid composition to make alkyl esters. In an embodiment, a method of making alkyl esters comprises providing a glyceride source. The method further comprises converting the glyceride source to a fatty acid composition comprising free fatty acids and less than about 1% glyceride by mass. Moreover, the method comprises esterifying the fatty acid composition in the presence of a solid acid catalyst at a temperature ranging firm about 70.degree. C. to about 120.degree. C. to produce alkyl esters, such that at least 85% of the free fatty acids are converted to alkyl esters. The method also incorporates the use of packed bed reactors for glyceride conversion and/or fatty acid esterification to make alkyl esters.

  3. A novel bio-sensor based on DNA strand displacement.

    PubMed

    Shi, Xiaolong; Wang, Zhiyu; Deng, Chenyan; Song, Tao; Pan, Linqiang; Chen, Zhihua

    2014-01-01

    DNA strand displacement technology performs well in sensing and programming DNA segments. In this work, we construct DNA molecular systems based on DNA strand displacement performing computation of logic gates. Specifically, a class of so-called "DNA neurons" are achieved, in which a "smart" way inspired by biological neurons encoding information is developed to encode and deliver information using DNA molecules. The "DNA neuron" is bistable, that is, it can sense DNA molecules as input signals, and release "negative" or "positive" signals DNA molecules. We design intelligent DNA molecular systems that are constructed by cascading some particularly organized "DNA neurons", which could perform logic computation, including AND, OR, XOR logic gates, automatically. Both simulation results using visual DSD (DNA strand displacement) software and experimental results are obtained, which shows that the proposed systems can detect DNA signals with high sensitivity and accretion; moreover, the systems can process input signals automatically with complex nonlinear logic. The method proposed in this work may provide a new way to construct a sensitive molecular signal detection system with neurons spiking behavior in vitro, and can be used to develop intelligent molecular processing systems in vivo.

  4. Molecular characterization of an adaptive response to alkylating agents in the opportunistic pathogen Aspergillus fumigatus

    PubMed Central

    O’Hanlon, Karen A.; Margison, Geoffrey P.; Hatch, Amy; Fitzpatrick, David A.; Owens, Rebecca A.; Doyle, Sean; Jones, Gary W.

    2012-01-01

    An adaptive response to alkylating agents based upon the conformational change of a methylphosphotriester (MPT) DNA repair protein to a transcriptional activator has been demonstrated in a number of bacterial species, but this mechanism appears largely absent from eukaryotes. Here, we demonstrate that the human pathogen Aspergillus fumigatus elicits an adaptive response to sub-lethal doses of the mono-functional alkylating agent N-methyl-N′-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine (MNNG). We have identified genes that encode MPT and O6-alkylguanine DNA alkyltransferase (AGT) DNA repair proteins; deletions of either of these genes abolish the adaptive response and sensitize the organism to MNNG. In vitro DNA repair assays confirm the ability of MPT and AGT to repair methylphosphotriester and O6-methylguanine lesions respectively. In eukaryotes, the MPT protein is confined to a select group of fungal species, some of which are major mammalian and plant pathogens. The evolutionary origin of the adaptive response is bacterial and rooted within the Firmicutes phylum. Inter-kingdom horizontal gene transfer between Firmicutes and Ascomycete ancestors introduced the adaptive response into the Fungal kingdom. Our data constitute the first detailed characterization of the molecular mechanism of the adaptive response in a lower eukaryote and has applications for development of novel fungal therapeutics targeting this DNA repair system. PMID:22669901

  5. A Modified SDS-Based DNA Extraction Method for High Quality Environmental DNA from Seafloor Environments

    PubMed Central

    Natarajan, Vengadesh Perumal; Zhang, Xinxu; Morono, Yuki; Inagaki, Fumio; Wang, Fengping

    2016-01-01

    Recovering high quality genomic DNA from environmental samples is a crucial primary step to understand the genetic, metabolic, and evolutionary characteristics of microbial communities through molecular ecological approaches. However, it is often challenging because of the difficulty of effective cell lysis without fragmenting the genomic DNA. This work aims to improve the previous SDS-based DNA extraction methods for high-biomass seafloor samples, such as pelagic sediments and metal sulfide chimney, to obtain high quality and high molecular weight of the genomic DNA applicable for the subsequent molecular ecological analyses. In this regard, we standardized a modified SDS-based DNA extraction method (M-SDS), and its performance was then compared to those extracted by a recently developed hot-alkaline DNA extraction method (HA) and a commercial DNA extraction kit. Consequently, the M-SDS method resulted in higher DNA yield and cell lysis efficiency, lower DNA shearing, and higher diversity scores than other two methods, providing a comprehensive DNA assemblage of the microbial community on the seafloor depositional environment. PMID:27446026

  6. Investigation of a Sybr-Green-Based Method to Validate DNA Sequences for DNA Computing

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-05-01

    stranded DNA . We previously demonstrated that this technique can be exploited to distinguish between stably-hybridized Watson - Crick duplexes and...et al., 2004) we described the difference between the canonical Watson - Crick base pairs of DNA and the usually less stable mismatches that can also...computing, cross-hybridized duplexes represent errors. It is therefore crucial that DNA sequences be designed so that the formation of a Watson - Crick

  7. The synthesis and biological evaluation of new DNA-directed alkylating agents, phenyl N-mustard-4-anilinoquinoline conjugates containing a urea linker.

    PubMed

    Marvania, Bhavin; Kakadiya, Rajesh; Christian, Wilson; Chen, Tai-Lin; Wu, Ming-Hsi; Suman, Sharda; Tala, Kiran; Lee, Te-Chang; Shah, Anamik; Su, Tsann-Long

    2014-08-18

    We synthesized a series of phenyl N-mustard-4-anilinoquinoline conjugates to study their antitumorigenic effects. These agents were prepared by the condensation of 4-[N,N-bis(2-chloroethyl)amino]phenyl isocyanate with 6-amino-4-methylamino or 4-anilinoquinolines. The structure-activity relationship (SAR) studies revealed that the C2-methylquinoline derivatives (18a-o) were generally more cytotoxic than the C2-phenylquinoline conjugates (23a-d) in inhibiting the cell growth of various human tumor cell lines in vitro. However, the methylamino or aniline substituents at C4 of quinoline did not influence the cytotoxic effects. The title conjugates were capable of inducing DNA cross-linking and promoting cell-cycle arrest at the G2/M phase. This study demonstrates that phenyl N-mustard-4-anilinoquinoline conjugates are generally more potent than phenyl N-mustard-4-anilinoquinazoline conjugates against the cell growth of various tumor cell-lines.

  8. The histone deacetylase inhibitor SAHA sensitizes acute myeloid leukemia cells to a combination of nucleoside analogs and the DNA-alkylating agent busulfan.

    PubMed

    Song, Guiyun; Valdez, Benigno C; Li, Yang; Dominguez, Jose R; Corn, Paul; Champlin, Richard E; Andersson, Borje S

    2014-07-01

    Fludarabine (Flu), clofarabine (Clo) and busulfan (Bu) are used in allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplant (allo-HSCT). We reported that combining [Flu + Clo + Bu] had a synergistic cytotoxicity in AML cells. We hypothesized that combining [Flu + Clo + Bu] with the histone deacetylase inhibitor SAHA will further enhance cytotoxicity. We exposed the acute myeloid leukemia (AML) cell lines KBM3/Bu250(6) and OCI-AML3 to Flu, Clo, Bu and SAHA alone and in various combinations. [Flu + Clo + Bu + SAHA] resulted in synergistic cytotoxicity, which can be attributed to (1) activated DNA-damage response and cell cycle checkpoint activation through the ATM-CHK2-P53 (or P73) pathway or ATM-CHK2-cdc25-cdc2 pathway, (2) histone modifications and (3) activated apoptosis pathway. The [Flu + Clo + Bu + SAHA] combination causes mitochondrial outer membrane permeabilization, leakage of cytochrome c and Smac/Diablo into the cytosol with caspase activation, and release of apoptosis-inducing factor (AIF) into the nucleus resulting in nuclear fragmentation and cell death. These results provide a mechanistic basis for using SAHA in future clinical trials with double nucleoside analog-busulfan combinations in pretransplant conditioning therapy.

  9. 40 CFR 721.9595 - Alkyl benzene sulfonic acids and alkyl sulfates, amine salts (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Alkyl benzene sulfonic acids and alkyl... Significant New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.9595 Alkyl benzene sulfonic acids and alkyl...) The chemical substances identified generically as alkyl benzene sulfonic acids and alkyl...

  10. 40 CFR 721.9595 - Alkyl benzene sulfonic acids and alkyl sulfates, amine salts (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Alkyl benzene sulfonic acids and alkyl... Significant New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.9595 Alkyl benzene sulfonic acids and alkyl...) The chemical substances identified generically as alkyl benzene sulfonic acids and alkyl...

  11. 40 CFR 721.9595 - Alkyl benzene sulfonic acids and alkyl sulfates, amine salts (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Alkyl benzene sulfonic acids and alkyl... Significant New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.9595 Alkyl benzene sulfonic acids and alkyl...) The chemical substances identified generically as alkyl benzene sulfonic acids and alkyl...

  12. 40 CFR 721.9595 - Alkyl benzene sulfonic acids and alkyl sulfates, amine salts (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Alkyl benzene sulfonic acids and alkyl... Significant New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.9595 Alkyl benzene sulfonic acids and alkyl...) The chemical substances identified generically as alkyl benzene sulfonic acids and alkyl...

  13. 40 CFR 721.9595 - Alkyl benzene sulfonic acids and alkyl sulfates, amine salts (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Alkyl benzene sulfonic acids and alkyl... Significant New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.9595 Alkyl benzene sulfonic acids and alkyl...) The chemical substances identified generically as alkyl benzene sulfonic acids and alkyl...

  14. DNA base excision repair nanosystem engineering: model development.

    PubMed

    Sokhansanj, B A

    2005-01-01

    DNA base damage results from a combination of endogenous sources, (normal metabolism, increased metabolism due to obesity, stress from diseases such as arthritis and diabetes, and ischemia) and the environment (ingested toxins, ionizing radiation, etc.). If unrepaired DNA base damage can lead to diminished cell function, and potentially diseases and eventually mutations that lead to cancer. Sophisticated DNA repair mechanisms have evolved in all living cells to preserve the integrity of inherited genetic information and transcriptional control. Understanding a system like DNA repair is greatly enhanced by using engineering methods, in particular modeling interactions and using predictive simulation to analyze the impact of perturbations. We describe the use of such a "nanosystem engineering" approach to analyze the DNA base excision repair pathway in human cells, and use simulation to predict the impact of varying enzyme concentration on DNA repair capacity.

  15. An Evolution Based Biosensor Receptor DNA Sequence Generation Algorithm

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Eungyeong; Lee, Malrey; Gatton, Thomas M.; Lee, Jaewan; Zang, Yupeng

    2010-01-01

    A biosensor is composed of a bioreceptor, an associated recognition molecule, and a signal transducer that can selectively detect target substances for analysis. DNA based biosensors utilize receptor molecules that allow hybridization with the target analyte. However, most DNA biosensor research uses oligonucleotides as the target analytes and does not address the potential problems of real samples. The identification of recognition molecules suitable for real target analyte samples is an important step towards further development of DNA biosensors. This study examines the characteristics of DNA used as bioreceptors and proposes a hybrid evolution-based DNA sequence generating algorithm, based on DNA computing, to identify suitable DNA bioreceptor recognition molecules for stable hybridization with real target substances. The Traveling Salesman Problem (TSP) approach is applied in the proposed algorithm to evaluate the safety and fitness of the generated DNA sequences. This approach improves efficiency and stability for enhanced and variable-length DNA sequence generation and allows extension to generation of variable-length DNA sequences with diverse receptor recognition requirements. PMID:22315543

  16. Controlling charge current through a DNA based molecular transistor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Behnia, S.; Fathizadeh, S.; Ziaei, J.

    2017-01-01

    Molecular electronics is complementary to silicon-based electronics and may induce electronic functions which are difficult to obtain with conventional technology. We have considered a DNA based molecular transistor and study its transport properties. The appropriate DNA sequence as a central chain in molecular transistor and the functional interval for applied voltages is obtained. I-V characteristic diagram shows the rectifier behavior as well as the negative differential resistance phenomenon of DNA transistor. We have observed the nearly periodic behavior in the current flowing through DNA. It is reported that there is a critical gate voltage for each applied bias which above it, the electrical current is always positive.

  17. Method for rapid base sequencing in DNA and RNA

    DOEpatents

    Jett, J.H.; Keller, R.A.; Martin, J.C.; Moyzis, R.K.; Ratliff, R.L.; Shera, E.B.; Stewart, C.C.

    1987-10-07

    A method is provided for the rapid base sequencing of DNA or RNA fragments wherein a single fragment of DNA or RNA is provided with identifiable bases and suspended in a moving flow stream. An exonuclease sequentially cleaves individual bases from the end of the suspended fragment. The moving flow stream maintains the cleaved bases in an orderly train for subsequent detection and identification. In a particular embodiment, individual bases forming the DNA or RNA fragments are individually tagged with a characteristic fluorescent dye. The train of bases is then excited to fluorescence with an output spectrum characteristic of the individual bases. Accordingly, the base sequence of the original DNA or RNA fragment can be reconstructed. 2 figs.

  18. Method for rapid base sequencing in DNA and RNA

    DOEpatents

    Jett, J.H.; Keller, R.A.; Martin, J.C.; Moyzis, R.K.; Ratliff, R.L.; Shera, E.B.; Stewart, C.C.

    1990-10-09

    A method is provided for the rapid base sequencing of DNA or RNA fragments wherein a single fragment of DNA or RNA is provided with identifiable bases and suspended in a moving flow stream. An exonuclease sequentially cleaves individual bases from the end of the suspended fragment. The moving flow stream maintains the cleaved bases in an orderly train for subsequent detection and identification. In a particular embodiment, individual bases forming the DNA or RNA fragments are individually tagged with a characteristic fluorescent dye. The train of bases is then excited to fluorescence with an output spectrum characteristic of the individual bases. Accordingly, the base sequence of the original DNA or RNA fragment can be reconstructed. 2 figs.

  19. Method for rapid base sequencing in DNA and RNA

    DOEpatents

    Jett, James H.; Keller, Richard A.; Martin, John C.; Moyzis, Robert K.; Ratliff, Robert L.; Shera, E. Brooks; Stewart, Carleton C.

    1990-01-01

    A method is provided for the rapid base sequencing of DNA or RNA fragments wherein a single fragment of DNA or RNA is provided with identifiable bases and suspended in a moving flow stream. An exonuclease sequentially cleaves individual bases from the end of the suspended fragment. The moving flow stream maintains the cleaved bases in an orderly train for subsequent detection and identification. In a particular embodiment, individual bases forming the DNA or RNA fragments are individually tagged with a characteristic fluorescent dye. The train of bases is then excited to fluorescence with an output spectrum characteristic of the individual bases. Accordingly, the base sequence of the original DNA or RNA fragment can be reconstructed.

  20. Activation of cellular signaling by 8-oxoguanine DNA glycosylase-1-initiated DNA base excision repair.

    PubMed

    German, Peter; Szaniszlo, Peter; Hajas, Gyorgy; Radak, Zsolt; Bacsi, Attila; Hazra, Tapas K; Hegde, Muralidhar L; Ba, Xueqing; Boldogh, Istvan

    2013-10-01

    Accumulation of 8-oxo-7,8-dihydroguanine (8-oxoG) in the DNA results in genetic instability and mutagenesis, and is believed to contribute to carcinogenesis, aging processes and various aging-related diseases. 8-OxoG is removed from the DNA via DNA base excision repair (BER), initiated by 8-oxoguanine DNA glycosylase-1 (OGG1). Our recent studies have shown that OGG1 binds its repair product 8-oxoG base with high affinity at a site independent from its DNA lesion-recognizing catalytic site and the OGG1•8-oxoG complex physically interacts with canonical Ras family members. Furthermore, exogenously added 8-oxoG base enters the cells and activates Ras GTPases; however, a link has not yet been established between cell signaling and DNA BER, which is the endogenous source of the 8-oxoG base. In this study, we utilized KG-1 cells expressing a temperature-sensitive mutant OGG1, siRNA ablation of gene expression, and a variety of molecular biological assays to define a link between OGG1-BER and cellular signaling. The results show that due to activation of OGG1-BER, 8-oxoG base is released from the genome in sufficient quantities for activation of Ras GTPase and resulting in phosphorylation of the downstream Ras targets Raf1, MEK1,2 and ERK1,2. These results demonstrate a previously unrecognized mechanism for cellular responses to OGG1-initiated DNA BER.

  1. Polyimides with pendant alkyl groups

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jensen, B. J.; Young, P. R.

    1982-01-01

    The effect on selected polyimide properties when pendant alkyl groups were attached to the polymer backbone was investigated. A series of polymers were prepared using benzophenone tetracarboxylic acid dianhydride (BTDA) and seven different p-alkyl-m,p'-diaminobenzophenone monomers. The alkyl groups varied in length from C(1) (methyl) to C(9) (nonyl). The polyimide prepared from BTDA and m,p'-diaminobenzophenone was included as a control. All polymers were characterized by various chromatographic, spectroscopic, thermal, and mechanical techniques. Increasing the length of the pendant alkyl group resulted in a systematic decrease in glass transition temperature (Tg) for vacuum cured films. A 70 C decrease in Tg to 193 C was observed for the nonyl polymer compared to the Tg for the control. A corresponding systematic increase in Tg indicative of crosslinking, was observed for air cured films. Thermogravimetric analysis revealed a slight sacrifice in thermal stability with increasing alkyl length. No improvement in film toughness was observed.

  2. Antibody-controlled actuation of DNA-based molecular circuits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Engelen, Wouter; Meijer, Lenny H. H.; Somers, Bram; de Greef, Tom F. A.; Merkx, Maarten

    2017-02-01

    DNA-based molecular circuits allow autonomous signal processing, but their actuation has relied mostly on RNA/DNA-based inputs, limiting their application in synthetic biology, biomedicine and molecular diagnostics. Here we introduce a generic method to translate the presence of an antibody into a unique DNA strand, enabling the use of antibodies as specific inputs for DNA-based molecular computing. Our approach, antibody-templated strand exchange (ATSE), uses the characteristic bivalent architecture of antibodies to promote DNA-strand exchange reactions both thermodynamically and kinetically. Detailed characterization of the ATSE reaction allowed the establishment of a comprehensive model that describes the kinetics and thermodynamics of ATSE as a function of toehold length, antibody-epitope affinity and concentration. ATSE enables the introduction of complex signal processing in antibody-based diagnostics, as demonstrated here by constructing molecular circuits for multiplex antibody detection, integration of multiple antibody inputs using logic gates and actuation of enzymes and DNAzymes for signal amplification.

  3. Comparative study of the intermolecular dynamics of imidazolium-based ionic liquids with linear and branched alkyl chains: OHD-RIKES measurements.

    PubMed

    Xue, Lianjie; Bardak, Fehmi; Tamas, George; Quitevis, Edward L

    2017-02-08

    This article describes a comparative study of the low-frequency (0-450 cm(-1)) Kerr spectra of the branched 1-(iso-alkyl)-3-methylimidazolium bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)amide ([(N - 2)mCN-1C1im][NTf2] with N = 3-7) ionic liquids (ILs) and that of the linear 1-(n-alkyl)-3-methylimidazolium bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)amide ([CNC1im][NTf2] with N = 2-7) ILs. The spectra were obtained by use of femtosecond optical heterodyne-detected Raman-induced Kerr effect spectroscopy (OHD-RIKES). The intermolecular spectrum of a branched IL is similar to that of a linear IL that is of the same alkyl chain length rather than of the same number of carbon atoms in the alkyl chain. This similarity and the lack of a correlation of the first spectral moments and widths of the intermolecular spectra with chain length is mainly attributed to the increase in the dispersion contribution to the total molar cohesive energy being compensated by stretching of the ionic network due to the increasing size of the nonpolar domains, which is dependent only on the length of the alkyl chain.

  4. Forensic aspects of DNA-based human identity testing.

    PubMed

    Roper, Stephen M; Tatum, Owatha L

    2008-01-01

    The forensic applications of DNA-based human identity laboratory testing are often underappreciated. Molecular biology has seen an exponential improvement in the accuracy and statistical power provided by identity testing in the past decade. This technology, dependent upon an individual's unique DNA sequence, has cemented the use of DNA technology in the forensic laboratory. This paper will discuss the state of modern DNA-based identity testing, describe the technology used to perform this testing, and describe its use as it relates to forensic applications. We will also compare individual technologies, including polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and Southern Blotting, that are used to detect the molecular differences that make all individuals unique. An increasing reliance on DNA-based identity testing dictates that healthcare providers develop an understanding of the background, techniques, and guiding principles of this important forensic tool.

  5. qPCR-based mitochondrial DNA quantification: Influence of template DNA fragmentation on accuracy

    SciTech Connect

    Jackson, Christopher B.; Gallati, Sabina; Schaller, Andre

    2012-07-06

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Serial qPCR accurately determines fragmentation state of any given DNA sample. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Serial qPCR demonstrates different preservation of the nuclear and mitochondrial genome. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Serial qPCR provides a diagnostic tool to validate the integrity of bioptic material. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Serial qPCR excludes degradation-induced erroneous quantification. -- Abstract: Real-time PCR (qPCR) is the method of choice for quantification of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) by relative comparison of a nuclear to a mitochondrial locus. Quantitative abnormal mtDNA content is indicative of mitochondrial disorders and mostly confines in a tissue-specific manner. Thus handling of degradation-prone bioptic material is inevitable. We established a serial qPCR assay based on increasing amplicon size to measure degradation status of any DNA sample. Using this approach we can exclude erroneous mtDNA quantification due to degraded samples (e.g. long post-exicision time, autolytic processus, freeze-thaw cycles) and ensure abnormal DNA content measurements (e.g. depletion) in non-degraded patient material. By preparation of degraded DNA under controlled conditions using sonification and DNaseI digestion we show that erroneous quantification is due to the different preservation qualities of the nuclear and the mitochondrial genome. This disparate degradation of the two genomes results in over- or underestimation of mtDNA copy number in degraded samples. Moreover, as analysis of defined archival tissue would allow to precise the molecular pathomechanism of mitochondrial disorders presenting with abnormal mtDNA content, we compared fresh frozen (FF) with formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) skeletal muscle tissue of the same sample. By extrapolation of measured decay constants for nuclear DNA ({lambda}{sub nDNA}) and mtDNA ({lambda}{sub mtDNA}) we present an approach to possibly correct measurements in

  6. DNA tile based self-assembly: building complex nanoarchitectures.

    PubMed

    Lin, Chenxiang; Liu, Yan; Rinker, Sherri; Yan, Hao

    2006-08-11

    DNA tile based self-assembly provides an attractive route to create nanoarchitectures of programmable patterns. It also offers excellent scaffolds for directed self-assembly of nanometer-scale materials, ranging from nanoparticles to proteins, with potential applications in constructing nanoelectronic/nanophotonic devices and protein/ligand nanoarrays. This Review first summarizes the currently available DNA tile toolboxes and further emphasizes recent developments toward self-assembling DNA nanostructures with increasing complexity. Exciting progress using DNA tiles for directed self-assembly of other nanometer scale components is also discussed.

  7. DNA-based cryptographic methods for data hiding in DNA media.

    PubMed

    Marwan, Samiha; Shawish, Ahmed; Nagaty, Khaled

    2016-12-01

    Information security can be achieved using cryptography, steganography or a combination of them, where data is firstly encrypted using any of the available cryptography techniques and then hid into any hiding medium. Recently, the famous genomic DNA has been introduced as a hiding medium, known as DNA steganography, due to its notable ability to hide huge data sets with a high level of randomness and hence security. Despite the numerous cryptography techniques, to our knowledge only the vigenere cipher and the DNA-based playfair cipher have been combined with the DNA steganography, which keeps space for investigation of other techniques and coming up with new improvements. This paper presents a comprehensive analysis between the DNA-based playfair, vigenere, RSA and the AES ciphers, each combined with a DNA hiding technique. The conducted analysis reports the performance diversity of each combined technique in terms of security, speed, hiding capacity in addition to both key size and data size. Moreover, this paper proposes a modification of the current combined DNA-based playfair cipher technique, which makes it not only simple and fast but also provides a significantly higher hiding capacity and security. The conducted extensive experimental studies confirm such outstanding performance in comparison with all the discussed combined techniques.

  8. DNA-based computing of strategic assignment problems.

    PubMed

    Shu, Jian-Jun; Wang, Qi-Wen; Yong, Kian-Yan

    2011-05-06

    DNA-based computing is a novel technique to tackle computationally difficult problems, in which computing time grows exponentially corresponding to problematic size. A strategic assignment problem is a typical nondeterministic polynomial problem, which is often associated with strategy applications. In this Letter, a new approach dealing with strategic assignment problems is proposed based on manipulating DNA strands, which is believed to be better than the conventional silicon-based computing in solving the same problem.

  9. Therapeutic option of plasmid-DNA based gene transfer.

    PubMed

    Taniyama, Yoshiaki; Azuma, Junya; Kunugiza, Yasuo; Iekushi, Kazuma; Rakugi, Hiromi; Morishita, Ryuichi

    2012-01-01

    Gene therapy offers a novel approach for the prevention and treatment of a variety of diseases, but it is not yet a common method in clinical cases because of various problems. Viral vectors show high efficiency of gene transfer, but they have some problems with toxicity and immunity. On the other hand, plasmid deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA)-based gene transfer is very safe, but its efficiency is relatively low. Especially, plasmid DNA gene therapy is used for cardiovascular disease because plasmid DNA transfer is possible for cardiac or skeletal muscle. Clinical angiogenic gene therapy using plasmid DNA gene transfer has been attempted in patients with peripheral artery disease, but a phase III clinical trial did not show sufficient efficiency. In this situation, more efficient plasmid DNA gene transfer is needed all over the world. This review focuses on plasmid DNA gene transfer and its enhancement, including ultrasound with microbubbles, electroporation, hydrodynamic method, gene gun, jet injection, cationic lipids and cationic polymers.

  10. Unique magnetic signatures of mismatched base pairs in DNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Apalkov, Vadim; Berashevich, Julia; Chakraborty, Tapash

    2010-02-01

    Magnetic properties of DNA containing mispairs, such as different conformations of the GṡA mispair, or a GṡT mispair inserted into the DNA chain, have been theoretically investigated. The essential ingredients for these studies, the charge transfer integrals, were evaluated from the DNA sequences containing the mispair and optimized in the solvent. We find that the magnetic susceptibilities of the host DNA chain containing a large number of Watson-Crick base pairs are significantly altered in the presence of the mispairs, and the effects depend on the choice of mispairs. In particular, insertion of even a single GṡA mispair changes the nature of magnetization (sign of the susceptibility) of the host DNA. We propose that measurement of the magnetic properties of DNA might provide a direct route to detection and identification of those mispairs.

  11. Parp1 protects against Aag-dependent alkylation-induced nephrotoxicity in a sex-dependent manner

    PubMed Central

    Fake, Kimberly R.; Muthupalani, Sureshkumar; Corrigan, Joshua J.; Bronson, Roderick T.; Samson, Leona D.

    2016-01-01

    Nephrotoxicity is a common toxic side-effect of chemotherapeutic alkylating agents. Although the base excision repair (BER) pathway is essential in repairing DNA alkylation damage, under certain conditions the initiation of BER produces toxic repair intermediates that damage healthy tissues. We have shown that the alkyladenine DNA glycosylase, Aag (a.k.a. Mpg), an enzyme that initiates BER, mediates alkylation-induced whole-animal lethality and cytotoxicity in the pancreas, spleen, retina, and cerebellum, but not in the kidney. Cytotoxicity in both wild-type and Aag-transgenic mice (AagTg) was abrogated in the absence of Poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-1 (Parp1). Here we report that Parp1-deficient mice expressing increased Aag (AagTg/Parp1−/−) develop sex-dependent kidney failure upon exposure to the alkylating agent, methyl methanesulfonate (MMS), and suffer increased whole-animal lethality compared to AagTg and wild-type mice. Macroscopic, histological, electron microscopic and immunohistochemical analyses revealed morphological kidney damage including dilated tubules, proteinaceous casts, vacuolation, collapse of the glomerular tuft, and deterioration of podocyte structure. Moreover, mice exhibited clinical signs of kidney disease indicating functional damage, including elevated blood nitrogen urea and creatinine, hypoproteinemia and proteinuria. Pharmacological Parp inhibition in AagTg mice also resulted in sensitivity to MMS-induced nephrotoxicity. These findings provide in vivo evidence that Parp1 modulates Aag-dependent MMS-induced nephrotoxicity in a sex-dependent manner and highlight the critical roles that Aag-initiated BER and Parp1 may play in determining the side-effects of chemotherapeutic alkylating agents. PMID:27391435

  12. Osmium-Based Pyrimidine Contrast Tags for Enhanced Nanopore-Based DNA Base Discrimination.

    PubMed

    Henley, Robert Y; Vazquez-Pagan, Ana G; Johnson, Michael; Kanavarioti, Anastassia; Wanunu, Meni

    2015-01-01

    Nanopores are a promising platform in next generation DNA sequencing. In this platform, an individual DNA strand is threaded into nanopore using an electric field, and enzyme-based ratcheting is used to move the strand through the detector. During this process the residual ion current through the pore is measured, which exhibits unique levels for different base combinations inside the pore. While this approach has shown great promise, accuracy is not optimal because the four bases are chemically comparable to one another, leading to small differences in current obstruction. Nucleobase-specific chemical tagging can be a viable approach to enhancing the contrast between different bases in the sequence. Herein we show that covalent modification of one or both of the pyrimidine bases by an osmium bipyridine complex leads to measureable differences in the blockade amplitudes of DNA molecules. We qualitatively determine the degree of osmylation of a DNA strand by passing it through a solid-state nanopore, and are thus able to gauge T and C base content. In addition, we show that osmium bipyridine reacts with dsDNA, leading to substantially different current blockade levels than exhibited for bare dsDNA. This work serves as a proof of principle for nanopore sequencing and mapping via base-specific DNA osmylation.

  13. Novel binary deep eutectic electrolytes for rechargeable Li-ion batteries based on mixtures of alkyl sulfonamides and lithium perfluoroalkylsulfonimide salts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geiculescu, O. E.; DesMarteau, D. D.; Creager, S. E.; Haik, O.; Hirshberg, D.; Shilina, Y.; Zinigrad, E.; Levi, M. D.; Aurbach, D.; Halalay, I. C.

    2016-03-01

    Ionic liquids (IL's) were proposed for use in Li-ion batteries (LIBs), in order to mitigate some of the well-known drawbacks of LiPF6/mixed organic carbonates solutions. However, their large cations seriously decrease lithium transference numbers and block lithium insertion sites at electrode-electrolyte interfaces, leading to poor LIB rate performance. Deep eutectic electrolytes (DEEs) (which share some of the advantages of ILs but possess only one cation, Li+), were then proposed, in order to overcome the difficulties associated with ILs. We report herein on the preparation, thermal properties (melting, crystallization, and glass transition temperatures), transport properties (specific conductivity and viscosity) and thermal stability of binary DEEs based on mixtures of lithium bis(trifluoromethane)sulfonimide or lithium bis(fluoro)sulfonimide salts with an alkyl sulfonamide solvent. Promise for LIB applications is demonstrated by chronoamperometry on Al current collectors, and cycling behavior of negative and positive electrodes. Residual current densities of 12 and 45 nA cm-2 were observed at 5 V vs. Li/Li+ on aluminum, 1.5 and 16 nA cm-2 at 4.5 V vs. Li/Li+, respectively for LiFSI and LiTFSI based DEEs. Capacities of 220, 130, and 175 mAh· g-1 were observed at low (C/13 or C/10) rates, respectively for petroleum coke, LiMn1/3Ni1/3Co1/3O2 (a.k.a. NMC 111) and LiAl0.05Co0.15Ni0.8O2 (a.k.a. NCA).

  14. Nanostructured alkyl carboxylic acid-based restricted access solvents: Application to the combined microextraction and cleanup of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in mosses.

    PubMed

    Caballero-Casero, N; Çabuk, H; Martínez-Sagarra, G; Devesa, J A; Rubio, S

    2015-08-26

    Alkyl carboxylic acid-based nanostructured solvents, synthesized in mixtures of tetrahydrofuran (THF) and water through self-assembly and coacervation, were proved to behave as restricted access liquids. Both physical and chemical mechanisms were found responsible for exclusion of macromolecules such as proteins and polysaccharides. The potential of these solvents for extracting small molecules from complex solid samples, without interference from large biomolecules, was here evaluated. For this purpose, they were applied to the extraction of 14 priority polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) from mosses prior to their separation by liquid chromatography and fluorescence detection (LC-FLD). Sample treatment involved the vortex shaking of 200 mg of moss with 200 μL of decanoic acid-based solvent for 5 min, subsequent centrifugation for 8 min and analysis of the extract by LC-FLD using external calibration. Proteins precipitated during extraction because of both the decrease of the dielectric constant of the solution caused by THF and the formation of macromolecular complexes with decanoic acid. Polysaccharides were not solubilized in the aqueous cavities of the solvent because of their size exclusion. In-house method validation was performed according to the recommendations of the European Commission Decision 202/657/EC. Method detection and quantification limits for the different PAHs were in the ranges 0.04-0.24 and 0.14-0.80 μg kg(-1), respectively. The method was applied to the determination of different moss species collected in both polluted and unpolluted sites in the South of Spain. Recoveries were within the range 71-110%. The results obtained show that solvents with restricted access properties have the potential to expand the scope of application of restricted access materials to areas other than biological fluids because of their suitability to combine analyte isolation and sample cleanup of solid samples in a single step.

  15. Metal inhibition of human alkylpurine-DNA-N-glycosylase activityin base excision repair

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Ping; Guliaev, Anton B.; Hang, Bo

    2006-02-28

    Cadmium (Cd{sup 2+}), nickel (Ni{sup 2+}) and cobalt (Co{sup 2+}) are human and/or animal carcinogens. Zinc (Zn{sup 2+}) is not categorized as a carcinogen, and rather an essential element to humans. Metals were recently shown to inhibit DNA repair proteins that use metals for their function and/or structure. Here we report that the divalent ions Cd{sup 2+}, Ni{sup 2+}, and Zn{sup 2+} can inhibit the activity of a recombinant human N-methylpurine-DNA glycosylase (MPG) toward a deoxyoligonucleotide with ethenoadenine (var epsilonA). MPG removes a variety of toxic/mutagenic alkylated bases and does not require metal for its catalytic activity or structural integrity. At concentrations starting from 50 to 1000 {micro}M, both Cd{sup 2+} and Zn{sup 2+} showed metal-dependent inhibition of the MPG catalytic activity. Ni{sup 2+} also inhibited MPG, but to a lesser extent. Such an effect can be reversed with EDTA addition. In contrast, Co{sup 2+} and Mg{sup 2+} did not inhibit the MPG activity in the same dose range. Experiments using HeLa cell-free extracts demonstrated similar patterns of inactivation of the var epsilonA excision activity by the same metals. Binding of MPG to the substrate was not significantly affected by Cd{sup 2+}, Zn{sup 2+}, and Ni{sup 2+} at concentrations that show strong inhibition of the catalytic function, suggesting that the reduced catalytic activity is not due to altered MPG binding affinity to the substrate. Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations with Zn{sup 2+} showed that the MPG active site has a potential binding site for Zn{sup 2+}, formed by several catalytically important and conserved residues. Metal binding to such a site is expected to interfere with the catalytic mechanism of this protein. These data suggest that inhibition of MPG activity may contribute to metal genotoxicity and depressed repair of alkylation damage by metals in vivo.

  16. Integrating DNA-based data into bioassessments improves ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The integration of DNA-based identification methods into bioassessments could result in more accurate representations of species distributions and species-habitat relationships. DNA-based approaches may be particularly informative for tracking the distributions of rare and/or invasive species that can comprise a small proportion of samples or are difficult to identify morphologically. In 2012 and 2013, we used a combination of morphological and DNA-based methods (meta-barcoding) to identify fish eggs and larvae collected in the St. Louis River estuary area, Minnesota. We found a large proportion of cases where a lack of agreement occurred between species identified at a site using morphological versus DNA identification, prompting a discussion of how to best reconcile these differences. Choices made during sampling collection, DNA amplification/extraction, and bioinformatics processing influence the DNA-morphology match. The distribution of some species (including several invasives) and their relationships to habitat changed after DNA-data was incorporated. Results highlight how incorporating of DNA-data may get us closer to the “truth”, which has large ramifications in the search for rare species and when understanding the environmental drivers of species distributions is important for management. not applicable

  17. Immunogenicity of a DNA-launched replicon-based canine parvovirus DNA vaccine expressing VP2 antigen in dogs.

    PubMed

    Dahiya, Shyam S; Saini, Mohini; Kumar, Pankaj; Gupta, Praveen K

    2012-10-01

    A replicon-based DNA vaccine encoding VP2 gene of canine parvovirus (CPV) was developed by cloning CPV-VP2 gene into a replicon-based DNA vaccine vector (pAlpha). The characteristics of a replicon-based DNA vaccine like, self-amplification of transcripts and induction of apoptosis were analyzed in transfected mammalian cells. When the pAlpha-CPV-VP2 was injected intradermal as DNA-launched replicon-based DNA vaccine in dogs, it induced CPV-specific humoral and cell mediated immune responses. The virus neutralization antibody and lymphocyte proliferative responses were higher than conventional CPV DNA vaccine and commercial CPV vaccine. These results indicated that DNA-launched replicon-based CPV DNA vaccine was effective in inducing both CPV-specific humoral and cellular immune responses and can be considered as effective alternative to conventional CPV DNA vaccine and commercial CPV vaccine.

  18. Saccharomyces cerevisiae-based system for studying clustered DNA damages

    SciTech Connect

    Moscariello, M.M.; Sutherland, B.

    2010-08-01

    DNA-damaging agents can induce clustered lesions or multiply damaged sites (MDSs) on the same or opposing DNA strands. In the latter, attempts to repair MDS can generate closely opposed single-strand break intermediates that may convert non-lethal or mutagenic base damage into double-strand breaks (DSBs). We constructed a diploid S. cerevisiae yeast strain with a chromosomal context targeted by integrative DNA fragments carrying different damages to determine whether closely opposed base damages are converted to DSBs following the outcomes of the homologous recombination repair pathway. As a model of MDS, we studied clustered uracil DNA damages with a known location and a defined distance separating the lesions. The system we describe might well be extended to assessing the repair of MDSs with different compositions, and to most of the complex DNA lesions induced by physical and chemical agents.

  19. Stacking with the unnatural DNA base 6-ethynylpyridone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gibson, Douglas J.; van Mourik, Tanja

    2017-01-01

    It was previously reported that the incorporation of 6-ethynylpyridone (E) into a DNA duplex (replacing T in a T:A base pair) leads to DNA duplexes that are more stable than the T:A-containing duplexes. DFT calculations at the M06-2X/6-31+G(d) and BLYP-D3/6-31+G(d) levels on various base pairs, stacked bases and stacked base pairs in continuum solvation water suggest that the observed increased stability of E:A-containing duplexes is due to the combined effects of stronger base pairing and enhanced stacking of the E:A base pair.

  20. A liquid-crystal-based DNA biosensor for pathogen detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khan, Mashooq; Khan, Abdur Rahim; Shin, Jae-Ho; Park, Soo-Young

    2016-03-01

    A liquid-crystal (LC)-filled transmission electron microscopy (TEM) grid cell coated with the cationic surfactant dodecyltrimethylammonium bromide (DTAB), to which a single-stranded deoxyribonucleic acid probe (ssDNAprobe) was adsorbed at the LC/aqueous interface (TEMDTAB/DNA), was applied for the highly specific detection of target DNA molecules. The DTAB-coated E7 (used LC mixture) in the TEM grid (TEMDTAB) exhibited a homeotropic orientation, and changed to a planar orientation upon adsorption of the ssDNAprobe. The TEMDTAB/DNA was then exposed to complementary (target) ssDNA, which resulted in a planar-to-homeotropic configurational change of E7 that could be observed through a polarized optical microscope under crossed polarizers. The optimum adsorption density (2 μM) of ssDNAprobe enabled the detection of ≥0.05 nM complementary ssDNA. This TEMDTAB/DNA biosensor could differentiate complementary ssDNA from mismatched ssDNA as well as double-stranded DNA. It also successfully detected the genomic DNAs of the bacterium Erwinia carotovora and the fungi Rhazictonia solani. Owe to the high specificity, sensitivity, and label-free detection, this biosensor may broaden the applications of LC-based biosensors to pathogen detection.

  1. DNA-based self-assembly for functional nanomaterials.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhen-Gang; Ding, Baoquan

    2013-07-26

    The unprecedented development of DNA nanotechnology has caused DNA self-assembly to attract close attention in many disciplines. In this research news article, the employment of DNA self-assembly in the fields of materials science and nanotechnology is described. DNA self-assembly can be used to prepare bulk-scale hydrogels and 3D macroscopic crystals with nanoscale internal structures, to induce the crystallization of nanoparticles, to template the fabrication of organic conductive nanomaterials, and to act as drug delivery vehicles for therapeutic agents. The properties and functions are fully tunable because of the designability and specificity of DNA assembly. Moreover, because of the intrinsic dynamics, DNA self-assembly can act as a program switch and can efficiently control stimuli responsiveness. We highlight the power of DNA self-assembly in the preparation and function regulation of materials, aiming to motivate future multidisciplinary and interdisciplinary research. Finally, we describe some of the challenges currently faced by DNA assembly that may affect the functional evolution of such materials, and we provide our insights into the future directions of several DNA self-assembly-based nanomaterials.

  2. A liquid-crystal-based DNA biosensor for pathogen detection

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Mashooq; Khan, Abdur Rahim; Shin, Jae-Ho; Park, Soo-Young

    2016-01-01

    A liquid-crystal (LC)-filled transmission electron microscopy (TEM) grid cell coated with the cationic surfactant dodecyltrimethylammonium bromide (DTAB), to which a single-stranded deoxyribonucleic acid probe (ssDNAprobe) was adsorbed at the LC/aqueous interface (TEMDTAB/DNA), was applied for the highly specific detection of target DNA molecules. The DTAB-coated E7 (used LC mixture) in the TEM grid (TEMDTAB) exhibited a homeotropic orientation, and changed to a planar orientation upon adsorption of the ssDNAprobe. The TEMDTAB/DNA was then exposed to complementary (target) ssDNA, which resulted in a planar-to-homeotropic configurational change of E7 that could be observed through a polarized optical microscope under crossed polarizers. The optimum adsorption density (2 μM) of ssDNAprobe enabled the detection of ≥0.05 nM complementary ssDNA. This TEMDTAB/DNA biosensor could differentiate complementary ssDNA from mismatched ssDNA as well as double-stranded DNA. It also successfully detected the genomic DNAs of the bacterium Erwinia carotovora and the fungi Rhazictonia solani. Owe to the high specificity, sensitivity, and label-free detection, this biosensor may broaden the applications of LC-based biosensors to pathogen detection. PMID:26940532

  3. Multiple Base Substitution Corrections in DNA Sequence Evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kowalczuk, M.; Mackiewicz, P.; Szczepanik, D.; Nowicka, A.; Dudkiewicz, M.; Dudek, M. R.; Cebrat, S.

    We discuss the Jukes and Cantor's one-parameter model and Kimura's two-parameter model unability to describe evolution of asymmetric DNA molecules. The standard distance measure between two DNA sequences, which is the number of substitutions per site, should include the effect of multiple base substitutions separately for each type of the base. Otherwise, the respective tables of substitutions cannot reconstruct the asymmetric DNA molecule with respect to the composition. Basing on Kimura's neutral theory, we have derived a linear law for the correlation of the mean survival time of nucleotides under constant mutation pressure and their fraction in the genome. According to the law, the corrections to Kimura's theory have been discussed to describe evolution of genomes with asymmetric nucleotide composition. We consider the particular case of the strongly asymmetric Borrelia burgdorferi genome and we discuss in detail the corrections, which should be introduced into the distance measure between two DNA sequences to include multiple base substitutions.

  4. Operation of a DNA-Based Autocatalytic Network in Serum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graugnard, Elton; Cox, Amber; Lee, Jeunghoon; Jorcyk, Cheryl; Yurke, Bernard; Hughes, William L.

    The potential for inferring the presence of cancer by the detection of miRNA in human blood has motivated research into the design and operation of DNA-based chemical amplifiers that can operate in bodily fluids. As a first step toward this goal, we have tested the operation of a DNA-based autocatalytic network in human serum and mouse serum. With the addition of sodium dodecyl sulfate to prevent degradation by nuclease activity, the network was found to operate successfully with both DNA and RNA catalysts.

  5. DNA sequence analysis with droplet-based microfluidics

    PubMed Central

    Abate, Adam R.; Hung, Tony; Sperling, Ralph A.; Mary, Pascaline; Rotem, Assaf; Agresti, Jeremy J.; Weiner, Michael A.; Weitz, David A.

    2014-01-01

    Droplet-based microfluidic techniques can form and process micrometer scale droplets at thousands per second. Each droplet can house an individual biochemical reaction, allowing millions of reactions to be performed in minutes with small amounts of total reagent. This versatile approach has been used for engineering enzymes, quantifying concentrations of DNA in solution, and screening protein crystallization conditions. Here, we use it to read the sequences of DNA molecules with a FRET-based assay. Using probes of different sequences, we interrogate a target DNA molecule for polymorphisms. With a larger probe set, additional polymorphisms can be interrogated as well as targets of arbitrary sequence. PMID:24185402

  6. Femtosecond Raman-Induced Kerr Effect Study of Temperature-Dependent Intermolecular Dynamics in Imidazolium-Based Ionic Liquids: Effects of Anion Species and Cation Alkyl Groups.

    PubMed

    Kakinuma, Shohei; Ishida, Tateki; Shirota, Hideaki

    2017-01-12

    The temperature dependence of the intermolecular vibrational dynamics in imidazolium-based ionic liquids (ILs) with 10 different anions was studied by femtosecond Raman-induced Kerr effect spectroscopy. For all ILs investigated in this study, the intensity in the low-frequency region below 50 cm(-1) increases, and the spectral density in the high-frequency region above 80 cm(-1) decreases (and shows a redshift) with increasing temperature. The first phenomenon would be attributed to the activation of the translational vibrational motions, whereas the second one is ascribed to the slowing librational motion of the imidazolium ring with increasing temperature. Calculated spectra of the density of states for the intermolecular vibrations of 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium hexafluorophosphate, which is one of the experiment samples studied here, obtained by molecular dynamics simulation agreed well with the experimental results and confirmed the spectral assignments. When we compared the difference spectra between spectra measured at various temperatures and the spectrum measured at 293 K, a clear difference was found in the ∼50 cm(-1) region of the Kerr spectra of 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium thiocyanate and 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium dicyanamide from those of the other ILs. The difference might have originated from the librational motions of the corresponding anions. We also compared the temperature-dependent Kerr spectra of hexafluorophosphate salts of 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium, 1-hexyl-3-methylimidazolium, and 1-heptyl-3-methylimidazolium cations. These ILs showed a similar temperature dependence, which was not affected by the alkyl group length. The temperature-dependent viscosities and glass transition temperatures of the ILs were also estimated to determine their fragilities.

  7. Discovery of Benzothiazole Scaffold-Based DNA Gyrase B Inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Gjorgjieva, Marina; Tomašič, Tihomir; Barančokova, Michaela; Katsamakas, Sotirios; Ilaš, Janez; Tammela, Päivi; Peterlin Mašič, Lucija; Kikelj, Danijel

    2016-10-13

    Bacterial DNA gyrase and topoisomerase IV control the topological state of DNA during replication and are validated targets for antibacterial drug discovery. Starting from our recently reported 4,5,6,7-tetrahydrobenzo[1,2-d]thiazole-based DNA gyrase B inhibitors, we replaced their central core with benzothiazole-2,6-diamine scaffold and interchanged substituents in positions 2 and 6. This resulted in equipotent nanomolar inhibitors of DNA gyrase from Escherichia coli displaying improved inhibition of Staphylococcus aureus DNA gyrase and topoisomerase IV from both bacteria. Compound 27 was the most balanced inhibitor of DNA gyrase and topoisomerase IV from both E. coli and S. aureus. The crystal structure of the 2-((2-(4,5-dibromo-1H-pyrrole-2-carboxamido)benzothiazol-6-yl)amino)-2-oxoacetic acid (24) in complex with E. coli DNA gyrase B revealed the binding mode of the inhibitor in the ATP-binding pocket. Only some compounds possessed weak antibacterial activity against Gram-positive bacteria. These results provide a basis for structure-based optimization toward dual DNA gyrase and topoisomerase IV inhibitors with antibacterial activity.

  8. Artifacts associated with the measurement of oxidized DNA bases.

    PubMed Central

    Cadet, J; Douki, T; Ravanat, J L

    1997-01-01

    In this paper we review recent aspects of the measurement of oxidized DNA bases, currently a matter of debate. There has long been an interest in the determination of the level of oxidized bases in cellular DNA under both normal and oxidative stress conditions. In this respect, the situation is confusing because variations that may be as large as two orders of magnitude have been reported for the yield of the formation of 8-oxo-7,8-dihydroguanine (8-oxoGua) in similar DNA samples. However, recent findings clearly show that application of several assays like gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) and -32P--postlabeling may lead to a significant overestimation of the level of oxidized bases in cellular DNA. In particular, the silylation step, which is required to make the samples volatile for the GC-MS analysis, has been shown to induce oxidation of normal bases at the level of about one oxidized base per 10(4) normal bases. This has been found to be a general process that applies in particular to 8-oxoGua, 8-oxo-7, 8-dihydroadenine,5-hydroxycytosine, 5-(hydroxymethyl)uracil, and 5-formyluracil. Interestingly, prepurification of the oxidized bases from DNA hydrolysate prior to the derivatization reaction prevents artefactual oxidation. Under these conditions, the level of oxidized bases measured by GC-MS is similar to that obtained by HPLC associated with electrochemical detection (HPLC-EC). It should be added that the level of 8-oxo-7,8-dihydro-2;-deoxyguanosine in control cellular DNA has been found to be about fivefold lower than in earlier HPLC-EC measurements by using appropriate conditions of extraction and enzymatic digestion of DNA. Similar conclusions were reached by measuring formamidopyrimidine-DNA glycosylase sensitive sites as revealed by the single cell gel electrophoresis (comet) assay. Images Figure 1. PMID:9349826

  9. Artifacts associated with the measurement of oxidized DNA bases.

    PubMed

    Cadet, J; Douki, T; Ravanat, J L

    1997-10-01

    In this paper we review recent aspects of the measurement of oxidized DNA bases, currently a matter of debate. There has long been an interest in the determination of the level of oxidized bases in cellular DNA under both normal and oxidative stress conditions. In this respect, the situation is confusing because variations that may be as large as two orders of magnitude have been reported for the yield of the formation of 8-oxo-7,8-dihydroguanine (8-oxoGua) in similar DNA samples. However, recent findings clearly show that application of several assays like gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) and -32P--postlabeling may lead to a significant overestimation of the level of oxidized bases in cellular DNA. In particular, the silylation step, which is required to make the samples volatile for the GC-MS analysis, has been shown to induce oxidation of normal bases at the level of about one oxidized base per 10(4) normal bases. This has been found to be a general process that applies in particular to 8-oxoGua, 8-oxo-7, 8-dihydroadenine,5-hydroxycytosine, 5-(hydroxymethyl)uracil, and 5-formyluracil. Interestingly, prepurification of the oxidized bases from DNA hydrolysate prior to the derivatization reaction prevents artefactual oxidation. Under these conditions, the level of oxidized bases measured by GC-MS is similar to that obtained by HPLC associated with electrochemical detection (HPLC-EC). It should be added that the level of 8-oxo-7,8-dihydro-2;-deoxyguanosine in control cellular DNA has been found to be about fivefold lower than in earlier HPLC-EC measurements by using appropriate conditions of extraction and enzymatic digestion of DNA. Similar conclusions were reached by measuring formamidopyrimidine-DNA glycosylase sensitive sites as revealed by the single cell gel electrophoresis (comet) assay.

  10. Light yield and n-γ pulse-shape discrimination of liquid scintillators based on linear alkyl benzene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kögler, T.; Junghans, A. R.; Beyer, R.; Hannaske, R.; Massarczyk, R.; Schwengner, R.; Wagner, A.

    2012-03-01

    The relative light yields of NE-213 and LAB-based liquid scintillators to electrons were determined in the electron energy range 5-1600 keV using a combination of monoenergetic photon sources and a Compton spectrometer. The light yield was found to be proportional to energy for both types of scintillator and expected deviations below 100 keV were described successfully applying Birks' law. Digital pulse-shape discrimination in a mixed n-γ field of a 252Cf source was investigated for LAB+PPO and LAB+PPO+bis-MSB and compared to NE-213. In combination with these two solutes, LAB shows poorer abilities to separate neutron-induced pulses from photon-induced ones.

  11. DNA methyltransferase detection based on digestion triggering the combination of poly adenine DNA with gold nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Liu, Pei; Wang, Dandan; Zhou, Yunlei; Wang, Haiyan; Yin, Huanshun; Ai, Shiyun

    2016-06-15

    DNA methyltransferase (MTase) has received a large amount of attention due to its catalyzation of DNA methylation in both eukaryotes and prokaryotes, which has a close relationship to cancer and bacterial diseases. Herein, a novel electrochemical strategy based on Dpn I digestion triggering the combination of poly adenine (polyA) DNA with a gold nanoparticles functioned glassy carbon electrode (AuNPs/GCE), is developed for the simple and efficient detection of DNA MTase and inhibitor screening. Only one methylene blue (MB)-labeled DNA hairpin probe and two enzymes are involved in this designed method. In the presence of Dam MTase, the hairpin probe can be methylated and then cleaved by the restriction endonuclease. Thus, a MB-labeled polyA signal-stranded DNA product is introduced to the surface of AuNPs/GCE through the effect between polyA and AuNPs, resulting in an obvious electrochemical signal. On the contrary, in the absence of Dam MTase, the DNA probe cannot be cleaved and a relatively small electrochemical response can be observed. As a result, the as-proposed biosensor offered an efficient way for Dam MTase activity monitoring with a low detection of 0.27 U/mL, a wide linear range and good stability. Additionally, this assay holds great potential for further application in real biological matrices and inhibitors screening, which is expected to be useful in disease diagnosis and drug discovery.

  12. A CLIQUE algorithm using DNA computing techniques based on closed-circle DNA sequences.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hongyan; Liu, Xiyu

    2011-07-01

    DNA computing has been applied in broad fields such as graph theory, finite state problems, and combinatorial problem. DNA computing approaches are more suitable used to solve many combinatorial problems because of the vast parallelism and high-density storage. The CLIQUE algorithm is one of the gird-based clustering techniques for spatial data. It is the combinatorial problem of the density cells. Therefore we utilize DNA computing using the closed-circle DNA sequences to execute the CLIQUE algorithm for the two-dimensional data. In our study, the process of clustering becomes a parallel bio-chemical reaction and the DNA sequences representing the marked cells can be combined to form a closed-circle DNA sequences. This strategy is a new application of DNA computing. Although the strategy is only for the two-dimensional data, it provides a new idea to consider the grids to be vertexes in a graph and transform the search problem into a combinatorial problem.

  13. NMR analysis of base-pair opening kinetics in DNA.

    PubMed

    Szulik, Marta W; Voehler, Markus; Stone, Michael P

    2014-12-12

    Base pairing in nucleic acids plays a crucial role in their structure and function. Differences in the base-pair opening and closing kinetics of individual double-stranded DNA sequences or between chemically modified base pairs provide insight into the recognition of these base pairs by DNA processing enzymes. This unit describes how to quantify the kinetics for localized base pairs by observing changes in the imino proton signals by nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. The determination of all relevant parameters using state-of-the art techniques and NMR instrumentation, including cryoprobes, is discussed.

  14. Aniline mustard analogues of the DNA-intercalating agent amsacrine: DNA interaction and biological activity.

    PubMed

    Fan, J Y; Valu, K K; Woodgate, P D; Baguley, B C; Denny, W A

    1997-04-01

    Two series of analogues of the clinical antileukemic drug and DNA-intercalating ligand amsacrine have been prepared, containing aniline mustard sidechains of varying reactivity, linked either at the 4-position of the intercalating acridine chromophore (type A) or at the 1'-position of the 9-anilino group (type B). DNase I footprinting assays showed that compounds of type B had stronger reversible binding to DNA than did compounds of type A. Compounds of each type showed similar patterns of alkylation-induced cleavage of DNA, and alkylate at the N7 of guanines in runs of guanines (similar to the pattern for untargeted mustards) as well as some adenines. Both classes of compounds crosslinked DNA, although those bearing relatively inactive mustards did so only at high drug/base pair ratios. However, while the patterns of DNA alkylation were broadly similar, the compounds were considerably more cytotoxic than analogous untargeted mustards. Comparison of their cytotoxicities in wild-type and DNA repair-deficient lines indicated this toxicity was due to DNA crosslinks (except for the least reactive SO2-linked mustards). The 4-linked analogues showed slightly higher in vivo antileukemic activity than the corresponding 1'-linked analogues.

  15. Charge Transport across DNA-Based Three-Way Junctions.

    PubMed

    Young, Ryan M; Singh, Arunoday P N; Thazhathveetil, Arun K; Cho, Vincent Y; Zhang, Yuqi; Renaud, Nicolas; Grozema, Ferdinand C; Beratan, David N; Ratner, Mark A; Schatz, George C; Berlin, Yuri A; Lewis, Frederick D; Wasielewski, Michael R

    2015-04-22

    DNA-based molecular electronics will require charges to be transported from one site within a 2D or 3D architecture to another. While this has been shown previously in linear, π-stacked DNA sequences, the dynamics and efficiency of charge transport across DNA three-way junction (3WJ) have yet to be determined. Here, we present an investigation of hole transport and trapping across a DNA-based three-way junction systems by a combination of femtosecond transient absorption spectroscopy and molecular dynamics simulations. Hole transport across the junction is proposed to be gated by conformational fluctuations in the ground state which bring the transiently populated hole carrier nucleobases into better aligned geometries on the nanosecond time scale, thus modulating the π-π electronic coupling along the base pair sequence.

  16. Programmable molecular recognition based on the geometry of DNA nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woo, Sungwook; Rothemund, Paul W. K.

    2011-08-01

    From ligand-receptor binding to DNA hybridization, molecular recognition plays a central role in biology. Over the past several decades, chemists have successfully reproduced the exquisite specificity of biomolecular interactions. However, engineering multiple specific interactions in synthetic systems remains difficult. DNA retains its position as the best medium with which to create orthogonal, isoenergetic interactions, based on the complementarity of Watson-Crick binding. Here we show that DNA can be used to create diverse bonds using an entirely different principle: the geometric arrangement of blunt-end stacking interactions. We show that both binary codes and shape complementarity can serve as a basis for such stacking bonds, and explore their specificity, thermodynamics and binding rules. Orthogonal stacking bonds were used to connect five distinct DNA origami. This work, which demonstrates how a single attractive interaction can be developed to create diverse bonds, may guide strategies for molecular recognition in systems beyond DNA nanostructures.

  17. Stability and proton transfer in DNA base pairs of AMD473-DNA adduct

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarmah, Pubalee; Deka, Ramesh C.

    2011-05-01

    We investigate the energetics of four different adducts of cisplatin analogue cis-[PtCl 2(NH 3)(2-picoline)] (AMD473) with a duplex DNA using DFT/ONIOM methods to probe their stabilities. Further, we study the possibilities of proton transfer between DNA base pairs of the most stable drug-DNA adduct. The adduct b(2-picoline trans to 3'-G and 2-methyl group directs to the DNA major groove) is found to be the most stable configuration among all the possible adducts. From the proton transfer analysis we found that the single proton transfer between N1 position of guanine (G) and N3 position of cytosine (C) of each GC pair gives a structure energetically as stable as the original one.

  18. Cooperativity-based modeling of heterotypic DNA nanostructure assembly.

    PubMed

    Shapiro, Anastasia; Hozeh, Avital; Girshevitz, Olga; Abu-Horowitz, Almogit; Bachelet, Ido

    2015-07-27

    DNA origami is a robust method for the fabrication of nanoscale 2D and 3D objects with complex features and geometries. The process of DNA origami folding has been recently studied, however quantitative understanding of it is still elusive. Here, we describe a systematic quantification of the assembly process of DNA nanostructures, focusing on the heterotypic DNA junction-in which arms are unequal-as their basic building block. Using bulk fluorescence studies we tracked this process and identified multiple levels of cooperativity from the arms in a single junction to neighboring junctions in a large DNA origami object, demonstrating that cooperativity is a central underlying mechanism in the process of DNA nanostructure assembly. We show that the assembly of junctions in which the arms are consecutively ordered is more efficient than junctions with randomly-ordered components, with the latter showing assembly through several alternative trajectories as a potential mechanism explaining the lower efficiency. This highlights consecutiveness as a new design consideration that could be implemented in DNA nanotechnology CAD tools to produce more efficient and high-yield designs. Altogether, our experimental findings allowed us to devise a quantitative, cooperativity-based heuristic model for the assembly of DNA nanostructures, which is highly consistent with experimental observations.

  19. Cooperativity-based modeling of heterotypic DNA nanostructure assembly

    PubMed Central

    Shapiro, Anastasia; Hozeh, Avital; Girshevitz, Olga; Abu-Horowitz, Almogit; Bachelet, Ido

    2015-01-01

    DNA origami is a robust method for the fabrication of nanoscale 2D and 3D objects with complex features and geometries. The process of DNA origami folding has been recently studied, however quantitative understanding of it is still elusive. Here, we describe a systematic quantification of the assembly process of DNA nanostructures, focusing on the heterotypic DNA junction—in which arms are unequal—as their basic building block. Using bulk fluorescence studies we tracked this process and identified multiple levels of cooperativity from the arms in a single junction to neighboring junctions in a large DNA origami object, demonstrating that cooperativity is a central underlying mechanism in the process of DNA nanostructure assembly. We show that the assembly of junctions in which the arms are consecutively ordered is more efficient than junctions with randomly-ordered components, with the latter showing assembly through several alternative trajectories as a potential mechanism explaining the lower efficiency. This highlights consecutiveness as a new design consideration that could be implemented in DNA nanotechnology CAD tools to produce more efficient and high-yield designs. Altogether, our experimental findings allowed us to devise a quantitative, cooperativity-based heuristic model for the assembly of DNA nanostructures, which is highly consistent with experimental observations. PMID:26071955

  20. Anticancer activity of botanical alkyl hydroquinones attributed to topoisomerase II poisoning

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, C.-P.; Fang, W.-H.; Lin, L.-I.; Chiou, Robin Y.; Kan, L.-S.; Chi, N.-H.; Chen, Y.-R.; Lin, T.-Y.; Lin, S.-B.

    2008-03-15

    Cytotoxic alkyl hydroquinone compounds have been isolated from many plants. We previously isolated 3 structurally similar cytotoxic alkyl hydroquinone compounds from the sap of the lacquer tree Rhus succedanea L. belonging to the sumac family, which have a long history of medicinal use in Asia. Each has an unsaturated alkyl chain attached to the 2-position of a hydroquinone ring. One of these isolates, 10'(Z),13'(E),15'(E)-heptadecatrienylhydroquinone [HQ17(3)], being the most cytotoxic, was chosen for studying the anticancer mechanism of these compounds. We found that HQ17(3) was a topoisomerase (Topo) II poison. It irreversibly inhibited Topo II{alpha} activity through the accumulation of Topo II-DNA cleavable complexes. A cell-based assay showed that HQ17(3) inhibited the growth of leukemia HL-60 cells with an EC{sub 50} of 0.9 {mu}M, inhibited the topoisomerase-II-deficient cells HL-60/MX2 with an EC{sub 50} of 9.6 {mu}M, and exerted no effect on peripheral blood mononuclear cells at concentrations up to 50 {mu}M. These results suggest that Topo II is the cellular drug target. In HL-60 cells, HQ17(3) promptly inhibited DNA synthesis, induced chromosomal breakage, and led to cell death with an EC{sub 50} about one-tenth that of hydroquinone. Pretreatment of the cells with N-acetylcysteine could not attenuate the cytotoxicity and DNA damage induced by HQ17(3). However, N-acetylcysteine did significantly reduce the cytotoxicity of hydroquinone. In F344 rats, intraperitoneal injection of HQ17(3) for 28 days induced no clinical signs of toxicity. These results indicated that HQ17(3) is a potential anticancer agent, and its structural features could be a model for anticancer drug design.

  1. DNA Enzyme-Decorated DNA Nanoladders as Enhancer for Peptide Cleavage-Based Electrochemical Biosensor.

    PubMed

    Kou, Bei-Bei; Zhang, Li; Xie, Hua; Wang, Ding; Yuan, Ya-Li; Chai, Ya-Qin; Yuan, Ruo

    2016-09-07

    Herein, we developed a label-free electrochemical biosensor for sensitive detection of matrix metalloproteinase-7 (MMP-7) based on DNA enzyme-decorated DNA nanoladders as enhancer. A peptide and single-stranded DNA S1-modified platinum nanoparticles (P1-PtNPs-S1), which served as recognition nanoprobes, were first immobilized on electrode. When target MMP-7 specifically recognized and cleaved the peptide, the PtNPs-S1 bioconjugates were successfully released from electrode. The remaining S1 on electrode then hybridized with ssDNA1 (I1) and ssDNA2 (I2), which could synchronously trigger two hybridization chain reactions (HCRs), resulting in the in situ formation of DNA nanoladders. The desired DNA nanoladders not only were employed as ideal nanocarriers for enzyme loading, but also maintained its catalytic activity. With the help of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), manganese porphyrin (MnPP) with peroxidase-like activity accelerated the 4-chloro-1-naphthol (4-CN) oxidation with generation of insoluble precipitation on electrode, causing a very low differential pulse voltammetry (DPV) signal for quantitative determination of MMP-7. Under optimal conditions, the developed biosensor exhibited a wide linear ranging from 0.2 pg/mL to 20 ng/mL, and the detection limit was 0.05 pg/mL. This work successfully realized the combination of DNA signal amplification technique with artificial mimetic enzyme-catalyzed precipitation reaction in peptide cleavage-based protein detection, offering a promising avenue for the detection of other proteases.

  2. Responsive DNA-based hydrogels and their applications

    PubMed Central

    Xiong, Xiangling; Zhou, Cuisong; Wu, Cuichen; Zhu, Guizhi; Chen, Zhuo; Tan, Weihong

    2015-01-01

    The term hydrogel describes a type of soft and wet material formed by crosslinked hydrophilic polymers. The distinct feature of hydrogels is their ability to absorb a large amount of water and swell. The properties of a hydrogel are usually determined by the type of polymer and crosslinker, the degree of crosslinking, and the water content. However, a group of hydrogels, called “smart hydrogels”, changes properties in response to environmental changes or external stimuli. Recently, DNA or DNA-inspired responsive hydrogels have attracted considerable attention in construction of smart hydrogels because of the intrinsic advantages of DNA. As a biological polymer, DNA is hydrophilic, biocompatible, and highly programmable by Watson-Crick base pairing. DNA can form a hydrogel by itself under certain conditions, and it can also be incorporated into synthetic polymers to form DNA-hybrid hydrogels. Functional DNAs, such as aptamers and DNAzymes, provide additional molecular recognition capabilities and versatility. In this review, we discuss DNA-based hydrogels in terms of their stimulus response, as well as their applications. PMID:23857726

  3. DNA Fragments Assembly Based on Nicking Enzyme System

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Rui-Yan; Shi, Zhen-Yu; Guo, Ying-Ying; Chen, Jin-Chun; Chen, Guo-Qiang

    2013-01-01

    A couple of DNA ligation-independent cloning (LIC) methods have been reported to meet various requirements in metabolic engineering and synthetic biology. The principle of LIC is the assembly of multiple overlapping DNA fragments by single-stranded (ss) DNA overlaps annealing. Here we present a method to generate single-stranded DNA overlaps based on Nicking Endonucleases (NEases) for LIC, the method was termed NE-LIC. Factors related to cloning efficiency were optimized in this study. This NE-LIC allows generating 3′-end or 5′-end ss DNA overlaps of various lengths for fragments assembly. We demonstrated that the 10 bp/15 bp overlaps had the highest DNA fragments assembling efficiency, while 5 bp/10 bp overlaps showed the highest efficiency when T4 DNA ligase was added. Its advantage over Sequence and Ligation Independent Cloning (SLIC) and Uracil-Specific Excision Reagent (USER) was obvious. The mechanism can be applied to many other LIC strategies. Finally, the NEases based LIC (NE-LIC) was successfully applied to assemble a pathway of six gene fragments responsible for synthesizing microbial poly-3-hydroxybutyrate (PHB). PMID:23483947

  4. A Novel Image Encryption Algorithm Based on DNA Subsequence Operation

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Qiang; Xue, Xianglian; Wei, Xiaopeng

    2012-01-01

    We present a novel image encryption algorithm based on DNA subsequence operation. Different from the traditional DNA encryption methods, our algorithm does not use complex biological operation but just uses the idea of DNA subsequence operations (such as elongation operation, truncation operation, deletion operation, etc.) combining with the logistic chaotic map to scramble the location and the value of pixel points from the image. The experimental results and security analysis show that the proposed algorithm is easy to be implemented, can get good encryption effect, has a wide secret key's space, strong sensitivity to secret key, and has the abilities of resisting exhaustive attack and statistic attack. PMID:23093912

  5. An Optimal Seed Based Compression Algorithm for DNA Sequences

    PubMed Central

    Gopalakrishnan, Gopakumar; Karunakaran, Muralikrishnan

    2016-01-01

    This paper proposes a seed based lossless compression algorithm to compress a DNA sequence which uses a substitution method that is similar to the LempelZiv compression scheme. The proposed method exploits the repetition structures that are inherent in DNA sequences by creating an offline dictionary which contains all such repeats along with the details of mismatches. By ensuring that only promising mismatches are allowed, the method achieves a compression ratio that is at par or better than the existing lossless DNA sequence compression algorithms. PMID:27555868

  6. Age dependency of base modification in rabbit liver DNA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yamamoto, O.; Fuji, I.; Yoshida, T.; Cox, A. B.; Lett, J. T.

    1988-01-01

    Age-related modifications of DNA bases have been observed in the liver of the New Zealand white (NZW) rabbit (Oryctolagus cuniculus), a lagomorph with a median life span in captivity of 5-7 yr. The ages of the animals studied ranged from 6 wk to 9 yr. After the DNA had been extracted from the liver cell nuclei and hydrolyzed with acid, the bases were analyzed by column chromatography with Cellulofine gels (GC-15-m). Two peaks in the chromatogram, which eluted before the four DNA bases, contained modified bases. Those materials, which were obtained in relatively large amounts from old animals, were highly fluorescent, and were shown to be crosslinked base products by mass spectrometry. The yield of crosslinked products versus rabbit age (greater than 0.5 yr) can be fitted by an exponential function (correlation coefficient: 0.76 +/- 0.09).

  7. A Rewritable, Random-Access DNA-Based Storage System.

    PubMed

    Yazdi, S M Hossein Tabatabaei; Yuan, Yongbo; Ma, Jian; Zhao, Huimin; Milenkovic, Olgica

    2015-09-18

    We describe the first DNA-based storage architecture that enables random access to data blocks and rewriting of information stored at arbitrary locations within the blocks. The newly developed architecture overcomes drawbacks of existing read-only methods that require decoding the whole file in order to read one data fragment. Our system is based on new constrained coding techniques and accompanying DNA editing methods that ensure data reliability, specificity and sensitivity of access, and at the same time provide exceptionally high data storage capacity. As a proof of concept, we encoded parts of the Wikipedia pages of six universities in the USA, and selected and edited parts of the text written in DNA corresponding to three of these schools. The results suggest that DNA is a versatile media suitable for both ultrahigh density archival and rewritable storage applications.

  8. Molecular Dynamics Simulations of Perylenediimide DNA Base Surrogates.

    PubMed

    Markegard, Cade B; Mazaheripour, Amir; Jocson, Jonah-Micah; Burke, Anthony M; Dickson, Mary N; Gorodetsky, Alon A; Nguyen, Hung D

    2015-09-03

    Perylene-3,4,9,10-tetracarboxylic diimides (PTCDIs) are a well-known class of organic materials. Recently, these molecules have been incorporated within DNA as base surrogates, finding ready applications as probes of DNA structure and function. However, the assembly dynamics and kinetics of PTCDI DNA base surrogates have received little attention to date. Herein, we employ constant temperature molecular dynamics simulations to gain an improved understanding of the assembly of PTCDI dimers and trimers. We also use replica-exchange molecular dynamics simulations to elucidate the energetic landscape dictating the formation of stacked PTCDI structures. Our studies provide insight into the equilibrium configurations of multimeric PTCDIs and hold implications for the construction of DNA-inspired systems from perylene-derived organic semiconductor building blocks.

  9. Heterogeneous base distribution in mitochondrial DNA of Neurospora crassa.

    PubMed Central

    Terpstra, P; Holtrop, M; Kroon, A

    1977-01-01

    The mitochondrial DNA of Neurospora crassa has a heterogeneous intramolecular base distribution. A contiguous piece, representing at least 30% of the total genome, has a G+C content that is 6% lower than the overall G+C content of the DNA. The genes for both ribosomal RNAs are contained in the remaining, relatively G+C rich, part of the genome. PMID:141040

  10. DNA-directed aniline mustards with high selectivity for adenine or guanine bases: mutagenesis in a variety of Salmonella typhimurium strains differing in DNA-repair capability.

    PubMed

    Ferguson, L R; Denny, W A; Boritzki, T J

    1994-04-01

    Two closely-related aniline monomustards (1 and 2), linked to a DNA-targeting acridine chromophore by a linker chain of different length, show high selectivity for alkylation of polymer DNA. The shorter-chain derivative (2) alkylates mainly at guanine N7 sites, while the longer-chain analogue (1) reacts almost exclusively at adenine N1. The biological effects of these compounds have been studied in standard Ames Salmonella typhimurium strains in order to determine the mutagenic consequences of such well-defined DNA lesions, and the effect of DNA-repair systems on them. Both compounds caused detectable mutations in strains TA1537, TA98 or TA100 and some related strains. Mutation rates were greatly enhanced in strains carrying either a uvrB deletion or the plasmid pKM101. Frameshift mutagenesis by both compounds was completely eliminated by recA deletion, in both the presence or absence of the plasmid. The adenine-selective compound (1) appeared more sensitive to the DNA-repair defects than the guanine-selective derivative (2). Additionally, only the adenine-selective compound (1) caused statistically significant levels of detectable mutation in the repair-proficient strains TA102, TA4001 or TA4006. The bacterial mutagenesis evidence suggests that a bulky, major groove-residing adenine lesion may be more readily recognised by DNA-repair systems, and more likely to lead to a wider range of mutagenic events, than a similar guanine lesion.

  11. Sensitive determination of DNA based on the interaction between prulifloxacin-terbium(III) complex and DNA.

    PubMed

    Wu, Ting; Fang, Biyun; Chang, Lin; Liu, Min; Chen, Fang

    2013-01-01

    A simple spectrofluorimetric method is described for the determination of DNA, based on its enhancement of the fluorescence intensity of prulifloxacin (PUFX)-Tb(3+). The luminescence intensity of the PUFX-Tb(3+) complex increased up to 10-fold after adding DNA. The excitation and emission wavelengths were 345 and 545 nm, respectively. Under optimum conditions, variations in the fluorescence intensity showed a good linear relationship with the concentration of hsDNA in the range of 3.0 × 10(-9) to 1.0 × 10(-6) g/mL, with a correlation coefficient (R) of 0.997, and the detection limit was 2.1 × 10(-9) g/mL. The method was successfully applied to the determination of DNA in synthetic samples, and recoveries were in the range 97.3-102.0%. The mechanism of fluorescence enhancement of the PUFX-Tb(3+) complex by DNA is also discussed. The mechanism may involve formation of a ternary complex mainly by intercalation binding together with weak electrostatic interaction, which will increase the energy transition from ligand to Tb(3+), increasing the rigidity of the complex, and decreasing the radiationless energy loss through O-H vibration of the H2O molecule in the PUFX-Tb(3+) complex. Compared with the previous DNA probes, the proposed method is not only more robust and friendly to the environment, but also of relatively higher sensitivity.

  12. Development of DNA-based Identification methods to track the ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The ability to track the identity and abundance of larval fish, which are ubiquitous during spawning season, may lead to a greater understanding of fish species distributions in Great Lakes nearshore areas including early-detection of invasive fish species before they become established. However, larval fish are notoriously hard to identify using traditional morphological techniques. While DNA-based identification methods could increase the ability of aquatic resource managers to determine larval fish composition, use of these methods in aquatic surveys is still uncommon and presents many challenges. In response to this need, we have been working with the U. S. Fish and Wildlife Service to develop field and laboratory methods to facilitate the identification of larval fish using DNA-meta-barcoding. In 2012, we initiated a pilot-project to develop a workflow for conducting DNA-based identification, and compared the species composition at sites within the St. Louis River Estuary of Lake Superior using traditional identification versus DNA meta-barcoding. In 2013, we extended this research to conduct DNA-identification of fish larvae collected from multiple nearshore areas of the Great Lakes by the USFWS. The species composition of larval fish generally mirrored that of fish species known from the same areas, but was influenced by the timing and intensity of sampling. Results indicate that DNA-based identification needs only very low levels of biomass to detect pre

  13. Challenges and progress in making DNA-based AIS early ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The ability of DNA barcoding to find additional species in hard-to-sample locations or hard-to-identify samples is well established. Nevertheless, adoption of DNA barcoding into regular monitoring programs has been slow, in part due to issues of standardization and interpretation that need resolving. In this presentation, we describe our progress towards incorporating DNA-based identification into broad-spectrum aquatic invasive species early-detection monitoring in the Laurentian Great Lakes. Our work uses community biodiversity information as the basis for evaluating survey performance for various taxonomic groups. Issues we are tackling in bringing DNA-based data to bear on AIS monitoring design include: 1) Standardizing methodology and work flow from field collection and sample handling through bioinformatics post-processing; 2) Determining detection sensitivity and accounting for inter-species differences in DNA amplification and primer affinity; 3) Differentiating sequencing and barcoding errors from legitimate new finds when range and natural history information is limited; and 4) Accounting for the different nature of morphology- vs. DNA-based biodiversity information in subsequent analysis (e.g., via species accumulation curves, multi-metric indices). not applicable

  14. Measurement of oxidatively generated base damage in cellular DNA.

    PubMed

    Cadet, Jean; Douki, Thierry; Ravanat, Jean-Luc

    2011-06-03

    This survey focuses on the critical evaluation of the main methods that are currently available for monitoring single and complex oxidatively generated damage to cellular DNA. Among chromatographic methods, HPLC-ESI-MS/MS and to a lesser extent HPLC-ECD which is restricted to a few electroactive nucleobases and nucleosides are appropriate for measuring the formation of single and clustered DNA lesions. Such methods that require optimized protocols for DNA extraction and digestion are sensitive enough for measuring base lesions formed under conditions of severe oxidative stress including exposure to ionizing radiation, UVA light and high intensity UVC laser pulses. In contrast application of GC-MS and HPLC-MS methods that are subject to major drawbacks have been shown to lead to overestimated values of DNA damage. Enzymatic methods that are based on the use of DNA repair glycosylases in order to convert oxidized bases into strand breaks are suitable, even if they are far less specific than HPLC methods, to deal with low levels of single modifications. Several other methods including immunoassays and (32)P-postlabeling methods that are still used suffer from drawbacks and therefore are not recommended. Another difficult topic is the measurement of oxidatively generated clustered DNA lesions that is currently achieved using enzymatic approaches and that would necessitate further investigations.

  15. Computational investigation of CNT-based DNA polymerase nanocircuits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yan; Hodak, Miroslav; Lu, Wenchang; Bernholc, Jerry; Collins, Philip

    2015-03-01

    DNA polymerases are important enzymes that replicate DNA molecules with very low error rates - about one error in 105 bases. Recently, it was found that the replication process can be electrically monitored by attaching a Klenow fragment of polymerase I to the surface of a carbon nanotube and monitoring the current along the tube [1]. In this talk, we report results from computational studies on DNA polymerase nanocircuits. We have first performed classical molecular dynamics (MD) calculations to get snapshots of different enzymatic stages, particularly the open state (no DNA binding) and the closed state (DNA double helix binding). We then used density functional theory (DFT) and Keldysh non-equilibrium Green's function (NEGF) formalism to calculate transmission coefficients and currents for each enzymatic state. Our results show that the transmission spectrum and the currents change significantly when the enzyme moves from the open to the closed state. While the initial experiments did not show signal differences between dissimilar bases, the theoretical work in progress is investigating conditions where bases might have distinct signatures, which would allow for DNA sequencing.

  16. Two-base DNA hairpin-loop structures in vivo.

    PubMed Central

    Davison, A; Leach, D R

    1994-01-01

    In vitro studies have revealed that DNA hairpin-loops usually contain four unpaired bases. However, a small subset of sequences can form two-base loops. We have previously described an in vivo assay that is sensitive to tight loop formation and have set out to test whether DNA sequences known to form two-base loops in vitro also form tight loops in vivo. It is shown that the sequences 5'dCNNG and 5'dTNNA behave as predicted if they favour two-base loop formation in vivo, a result that is consistent with previously described in vitro studies. The ability of specific DNA sequences to form tight loops in vivo has implications for their potential to form transient structures involved in gene regulation, recombination and mutagenesis. PMID:7971265

  17. Delineation of G-Quadruplex Alkylation Sites Mediated by 3,6-Bis(1-methyl-4-vinylpyridinium iodide)carbazole-Aniline Mustard Conjugates.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chien-Han; Hu, Tsung-Hao; Huang, Tzu-Chiao; Chen, Ying-Lan; Chen, Yet-Ran; Cheng, Chien-Chung; Chen, Chao-Tsen

    2015-11-23

    A new G-quadruplex (G-4)-directing alkylating agent BMVC-C3M was designed and synthesized to integrate 3,6-bis(1-methyl-4-vinylpyridinium iodide)carbazole (BMVC) with aniline mustard. Various telomeric G-4 structures (hybrid-2 type and antiparallel) and an oncogene promoter, c-MYC (parallel), were constructed to react with BMVC-C3M, yielding 35 % alkylation yield toward G-4 DNA over other DNA categories (<6 %) and high specificity under competition conditions. Analysis of the intact alkylation adducts by electrospray ionization mass spectroscopy (ESI-MS) revealed the stepwise DNA alkylation mechanism of aniline mustard for the first time. Furthermore, the monoalkylation sites and intrastrand cross-linking sites were determined and found to be dependent on G-4 topology based on the results of footprinting analysis in combination with mass spectroscopic techniques and in silico modeling. The results indicated that BMVC-C3M preferentially alkylated at A15 (H26), G12 (H24), and G2 (c-MYC), respectively, as monoalkylated adducts and formed A15-C3M-A21 (H26), G12-C3M-G4 (H24), and G2-C3M-G4/G17 (c-MYC), respectively, as cross-linked dialkylated adducts. Collectively, the stability and site-selective cross-linking capacity of BMVC-C3M provides a credible tool for the structural and functional characterization of G-4 DNAs in biological systems.

  18. The acute toxic effects of imidazolium-based ionic liquids with different alkyl-chain lengths and anions on zebrafish (Danio rerio).

    PubMed

    Zhang, Cheng; Zhu, Lusheng; Wang, Jinhua; Wang, Jun; Zhou, Tongtong; Xu, Yaqi; Cheng, Chao

    2017-06-01

    With the increasing applications of ionic liquids (ILs), the toxicity of ILs has drawn increasing attention in recent years, especially the influences of different anions and alkyl-chain lengths on the acute toxicity to aquatic organisms. We performed a study on the acute toxicity of 1-alkyl-3-methylimidazolium nitrate ([Cnmim]NO3 (n=2, 4, 6, 8, 10, 12)), 1-hexyl-3-methylimidazolium ILs ([C6mim]R (R=Cl(-), Br(-), BF4(-), PF6(-))) to zebrafish (Danio rerio). We also evaluated the sensibility of the investigated animals and the stability of ILs in water via high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC, Agilent 1260, Agilent Technologies Inc., USA) to prove the reliability of the present study. The results illustrated that the test zebrafish (Danio rerio) were sensitive to the reference toxicant and that the investigated ILs in water were stable. The 50% lethal concentration (LC50) was used to represent the acute toxicity to zebrafish (Danio rerio). The present study showed that the highest toxic IL is [C12mim]NO3 and the lowest toxic IL is [C2mim]NO3 on Danio rerio. The LC50s for ILs with different anions had similar values. Accordingly, we believe that ILs with different alkyl-chain lengths cause greater effects than other anions on acute toxicity to aquatic organisms. Furthermore, the present study can also provide scientific methods for future studies to select and assess ILs.

  19. Regioselective 1-N-Alkylation and Rearrangement of Adenosine Derivatives.

    PubMed

    Oslovsky, Vladimir E; Drenichev, Mikhail S; Mikhailov, Sergey N

    2015-01-01

    Several methods for the preparation of some N(6)-substituted adenosines based on selective 1-N-alkylation with subsequent Dimroth rearrangement were developed. The proposed methods seem to be effective for the preparation of natural N(6)-isopentenyl- and N(6)-benzyladenosines, which are known to possess pronounced biological activities. Direct 1-N-alkylation of 2',3',5'-tri-O-acetyladenosine and 3',5'-di-O-acetyl-2'-deoxyadenosine with alkyl halides in N,N-dimethylformamide (DMF) in the presence of BaCO3 and KI gave 1-N-substituted derivatives with quantitative yields, whereas 1-N-alkylation of adenosine was accompanied by significant O-alkylation. Moreover, the reaction of trimethylsilyl derivatives of N(6)-acetyl-2',3',5'-tri-O-acetyladenosine and N(6)-acetyl-3',5'-di-O-acetyl-2'-deoxyadenosine with alkyl halides leads to the formation of the stable 1-N-substituted adenosines. Dimroth rearrangement of 1-N-substituted adenosines in aqueous ammonia yields pure N(6)-substituted adenosines.

  20. Gold Nanowire Based Electrical DNA Detection Using Rolling Circle Amplification

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    We present an electrical sensor that uses rolling circle amplification (RCA) of DNA to stretch across the gap between two electrodes, interact with metal nanoparticle seeds to generate an electrically conductive nanowire, and produce electrical signals upon detection of specific target DNA sequences. RCA is a highly specific molecular detection mechanism based on DNA probe circularization. With this technique, long single-stranded DNA with simple repetitive sequences are produced. Here we show that stretched RCA products can be metalized using silver or gold solutions to form metal wires. Upon metallization, the resistance drops from TΩ to kΩ for silver and to Ω for gold. Metallization is seeded by gold nanoparticles aligned along the single-stranded DNA product through hybridization of functionalized oligonucleotides. We show that combining RCA with electrical DNA detection produces results in readout with very high signal-to-noise ratio, an essential feature for sensitive and specific detection assays. Finally, we demonstrate detection of 10 ng of Escherichia coli genomic DNA using the sensor concept. PMID:24433087

  1. DNA nanotechnology based on i-motif structures.

    PubMed

    Dong, Yuanchen; Yang, Zhongqiang; Liu, Dongsheng

    2014-06-17

    CONSPECTUS: Most biological processes happen at the nanometer scale, and understanding the energy transformations and material transportation mechanisms within living organisms has proved challenging. To better understand the secrets of life, researchers have investigated artificial molecular motors and devices over the past decade because such systems can mimic certain biological processes. DNA nanotechnology based on i-motif structures is one system that has played an important role in these investigations. In this Account, we summarize recent advances in functional DNA nanotechnology based on i-motif structures. The i-motif is a DNA quadruplex that occurs as four stretches of cytosine repeat sequences form C·CH(+) base pairs, and their stabilization requires slightly acidic conditions. This unique property has produced the first DNA molecular motor driven by pH changes. The motor is reliable, and studies show that it is capable of millisecond running speeds, comparable to the speed of natural protein motors. With careful design, the output of these types of motors was combined to drive micrometer-sized cantilevers bend. Using established DNA nanostructure assembly and functionalization methods, researchers can easily integrate the motor within other DNA assembled structures and functional units, producing DNA molecular devices with new functions such as suprahydrophobic/suprahydrophilic smart surfaces that switch, intelligent nanopores triggered by pH changes, molecular logic gates, and DNA nanosprings. Recently, researchers have produced motors driven by light and electricity, which have allowed DNA motors to be integrated within silicon-based nanodevices. Moreover, some devices based on i-motif structures have proven useful for investigating processes within living cells. The pH-responsiveness of the i-motif structure also provides a way to control the stepwise assembly of DNA nanostructures. In addition, because of the stability of the i-motif, this

  2. Plasmid DNA-based gene transfer with ultrasound and microbubbles.

    PubMed

    Taniyama, Yoshiaki; Azuma, Junya; Rakugi, Hiromi; Morishita, Ryuichi

    2011-12-01

    Gene therapy offers a novel approach for the prevention and treatment of a variety of diseases, but it is not yet a common option in the real world because of various problems. Viral vectors show high efficiency of gene transfer, but they have some problems with toxicity and immunity. On the other hand, plasmid DNA-based gene transfer is very safe, but its efficiency is relatively low. Especially, plasmid DNA gene therapy is used for cardiovascular disease because plasmid DNA transfer is possible for cardiac or skeletal muscle. Clinical angiogenic gene therapy using plasmid DNA gene transfer has been attempted in patients with peripheral artery disease, but a Phase III clinical trial did not show sufficient efficiency. Recently, a Phase III clinical trial of hepatocyte growth factor gene therapy in peripheral artery disease (PAD) showed improvement of ischemic ulcers, but it could not salvage limbs from amputation. In addition, a Phase I/II clinical study of fibroblast growth factor gene therapy in PAD extended amputation-free survival, but it seemed to fail in Phase III. In this situation, we and others have developed plasmid DNA-based gene transfer using ultrasound with microbubbles to enhance its efficiency while maintaining safety. Ultrasound-mediated gene transfer has been reported to augment the gene transfer efficiency and select the target organ using cationic microbubble phospholipids which bind negatively charged DNA. Ultrasound with microbubblesis likely to create new therapeutic options inavariety of diseases.

  3. Monitoring DNA polymerase with nanotube-based nanocircuits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yan; Hodak, Miroslav; Lu, Wenchang; Bernholc, Jerry; Collins, Philip

    DNA polymerases play an important role in the process of life by accurately and efficiently replicating our genetic information. They use a single-stranded DNA as a template and incorporate nucleotides to create the full, double-stranded DNA. Recent experiments have successfully monitored this process by attaching a Klenow fragment of polymerase I to a carbon nanotube and measuring the current along the tube. Follow-up experiments have shown promise for distinguishing between DNA base pairs when nucleotide analogs are used, thus opening a new avenue for DNA sequencing. In this talk, we present results from computational studies on DNA polymerase I nanocircuits. The enzyme was first equilibrated in molecular dynamics and then density functional theory and Keldysh non-equilibrium Green's function methods were used to calculate the ballistic transmission coefficients and currents for different enzymatic states. Our results show significant change in current when the enzyme alternates between open (idle) and closed (synthesizing) states. We can also differentiate between some template bases when modified nucleotides and gate scanning are used.

  4. Base composition at mtDNA boundaries suggests a DNA triple helix model for human mitochondrial DNA large-scale rearrangements.

    PubMed

    Rocher, Christophe; Letellier, Thierry; Copeland, William C; Lestienne, Patrick

    2002-06-01

    Different mechanisms have been proposed to account for mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) instability based on the presence of short homologous sequences (direct repeats, DR) at the potential boundaries of mtDNA rearrangements. Among them, slippage-mispairing of the replication complex during the asymmetric replication cycle of the mammalian mitochondrial DNA has been proposed to account for the preferential localization of deletions. This mechanism involves a transfer of the replication complex from the first neo-synthesized heavy (H) strand of the DR1, to the DR2, thus bypassing the intervening sequence and producing a deleted molecule. Nevertheless, the nature of the bonds between the DNA strands remains unknown as the forward sequence of DR2, beyond the replication complex, stays double-stranded. Here, we have analyzed the base composition of the DR at the boundaries of mtDNA deletions and duplications and found a skewed pyrimidine content of about 75% in the light-strand DNA template. This suggests the possible building of a DNA triple helix between the G-rich neo-synthesized DR1 and the base-paired homologous G.C-rich DR2. In vitro experiments with the purified human DNA polymerase gamma subunits enabled us to show that the third DNA strand may be used as a primer for DNA replication, using a template with the direct repeat forming a hairpin, with which the primer could initiate DNA replication. These data suggest a novel molecular basis for mitochondrial DNA rearrangements through the distributive nature of the DNA polymerase gamma, at the level of the direct repeats. A general model accounting for large-scale mitochondrial DNA deletion and duplication is proposed. These experiments extend to a DNA polymerase from an eucaryote source the use of a DNA triple helix strand as a primer, like other DNA polymerases from phage and bacterial origins.

  5. Application of DNA-based methods in forensic entomology.

    PubMed

    Wells, Jeffrey D; Stevens, Jamie R

    2008-01-01

    A forensic entomological investigation can benefit from a variety of widely practiced molecular genotyping methods. The most commonly used is DNA-based specimen identification. Other applications include the identification of insect gut contents and the characterization of the population genetic structure of a forensically important insect species. The proper application of these procedures demands that the analyst be technically expert. However, one must also be aware of the extensive list of standards and expectations that many legal systems have developed for forensic DNA analysis. We summarize the DNA techniques that are currently used in, or have been proposed for, forensic entomology and review established genetic analyses from other scientific fields that address questions similar to those in forensic entomology. We describe how accepted standards for forensic DNA practice and method validation are likely to apply to insect evidence used in a death or other forensic entomological investigation.

  6. Magnetic Propulsion of Microswimmers with DNA-Based Flagellar Bundles.

    PubMed

    Maier, Alexander M; Weig, Cornelius; Oswald, Peter; Frey, Erwin; Fischer, Peer; Liedl, Tim

    2016-02-10

    We show that DNA-based self-assembly can serve as a general and flexible tool to construct artificial flagella of several micrometers in length and only tens of nanometers in diameter. By attaching the DNA flagella to biocompatible magnetic microparticles, we provide a proof of concept demonstration of hybrid structures that, when rotated in an external magnetic field, propel by means of a flagellar bundle, similar to self-propelling peritrichous bacteria. Our theoretical analysis predicts that flagellar bundles that possess a length-dependent bending stiffness should exhibit a superior swimming speed compared to swimmers with a single appendage. The DNA self-assembly method permits the realization of these improved flagellar bundles in good agreement with our quantitative model. DNA flagella with well-controlled shape could fundamentally increase the functionality of fully biocompatible nanorobots and extend the scope and complexity of active materials.

  7. Ultrasensitive electrochemical cocaine biosensor based on reversible DNA nanostructure.

    PubMed

    Sheng, Qinglin; Liu, Ruixiao; Zhang, Sai; Zheng, Jianbin

    2014-01-15

    We proposed an ultrasensitive electrochemical cocaine biosensor based on the three-dimensional (3D) DNA structure conversion of nanostructure from Triangular Pyramid Frustum (TPFDNA) to Equilateral Triangle (ETDNA). The presence of cocaine triggered the aptamer-composed DNA nanostructure change from "Close" to "Open", leading to obvious faradaic impedance changes. The unique properties with excellent stability and specific rigid structure of the 3D DNA nanostructure made the biosensing functions stable, sensitive, and regenerable. The Faradaic impedance responses were linearly related to cocaine concentration between 1.0 nM and 2.0 μM with a correlation coefficient of 0.993. The limit of detection was calculated to be 0.21 nM following IUPAC recommendations (3Sb/b). It is expected that the distinctive features of DNA nanostructure would make it potentially advantageous for a broad range of biosensing, bionanoelectronics, and therapeutic applications.

  8. Magnetic Propulsion of Microswimmers with DNA-Based Flagellar Bundles

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    We show that DNA-based self-assembly can serve as a general and flexible tool to construct artificial flagella of several micrometers in length and only tens of nanometers in diameter. By attaching the DNA flagella to biocompatible magnetic microparticles, we provide a proof of concept demonstration of hybrid structures that, when rotated in an external magnetic field, propel by means of a flagellar bundle, similar to self-propelling peritrichous bacteria. Our theoretical analysis predicts that flagellar bundles that possess a length-dependent bending stiffness should exhibit a superior swimming speed compared to swimmers with a single appendage. The DNA self-assembly method permits the realization of these improved flagellar bundles in good agreement with our quantitative model. DNA flagella with well-controlled shape could fundamentally increase the functionality of fully biocompatible nanorobots and extend the scope and complexity of active materials. PMID:26821214

  9. Antibody-controlled actuation of DNA-based molecular circuits

    PubMed Central

    Engelen, Wouter; Meijer, Lenny H. H.; Somers, Bram; de Greef, Tom F. A.; Merkx, Maarten

    2017-01-01

    DNA-based molecular circuits allow autonomous signal processing, but their actuation has relied mostly on RNA/DNA-based inputs, limiting their application in synthetic biology, biomedicine and molecular diagnostics. Here we introduce a generic method to translate the presence of an antibody into a unique DNA strand, enabling the use of antibodies as specific inputs for DNA-based molecular computing. Our approach, antibody-templated strand exchange (ATSE), uses the characteristic bivalent architecture of antibodies to promote DNA-strand exchange reactions both thermodynamically and kinetically. Detailed characterization of the ATSE reaction allowed the establishment of a comprehensive model that describes the kinetics and thermodynamics of ATSE as a function of toehold length, antibody–epitope affinity and concentration. ATSE enables the introduction of complex signal processing in antibody-based diagnostics, as demonstrated here by constructing molecular circuits for multiplex antibody detection, integration of multiple antibody inputs using logic gates and actuation of enzymes and DNAzymes for signal amplification. PMID:28211541

  10. Magnetophoretic-based microfluidic device for DNA Concentration.

    PubMed

    Shim, Sangjo; Shim, Jiwook; Taylor, William R; Kosari, Farhad; Vasmatzis, George; Ahlquist, David A; Bashir, Rashid

    2016-04-01

    Nucleic acids serve as biomarkers of disease and it is highly desirable to develop approaches to extract small number of such genomic extracts from human bodily fluids. Magnetic particles-based nucleic acid extraction is widely used for concentration of small amount of samples and is followed by DNA amplification in specific assays. However, approaches to integrate such magnetic particles based capture with micro and nanofluidic based assays are still lacking. In this report, we demonstrate a magnetophoretic-based approach for target-specific DNA extraction and concentration within a microfluidic device. This device features a large chamber for reducing flow velocity and an array of μ-magnets for enhancing magnetic flux density. With this strategy, the device is able to collect up to 95 % of the magnetic particles from the fluidic flow and to concentrate these magnetic particles in a collection region. Then an enzymatic reaction is used to detach the DNA from the magnetic particles within the microfluidic device, making the DNA available for subsequent analysis. Concentrations of over 1000-fold for 90 bp dsDNA molecules is demonstrated. This strategy can bridge the gap between detection of low concentration analytes from clinical samples and a range of micro and nanofluidic sensors and devices including nanopores, nano-cantilevers, and nanowires.

  11. Selection of DNA aptamers with two modified bases

    PubMed Central

    Gawande, Bharat N.; Rohloff, John C.; Carter, Jeffrey D.; von Carlowitz, Ira; Zhang, Chi; Schneider, Daniel J.; Janjic, Nebojsa

    2017-01-01

    The nucleobases comprising DNA and RNA aptamers provide considerably less chemical diversity than protein-based ligands, limiting their versatility. The introduction of novel functional groups at just one of the four bases in modified aptamers has recently led to dramatic improvement in the success rate of identifying nucleic acid ligands to protein targets. Here we explore the benefits of additional enhancement in physicochemical diversity by selecting modified DNA aptamers that contain amino-acid–like modifications on both pyrimidine bases. Using proprotein convertase subtilisin/kexin type 9 as a representative protein target, we identify specific pairwise combinations of modifications that result in higher affinity, metabolic stability, and inhibitory potency compared with aptamers with single modifications. Such doubly modified aptamers are also more likely to be encoded in shorter sequences and occupy nonoverlapping epitopes more frequently than aptamers with single modifications. These highly modified DNA aptamers have broad utility in research, diagnostic, and therapeutic applications. PMID:28265062

  12. Selection of DNA aptamers with two modified bases.

    PubMed

    Gawande, Bharat N; Rohloff, John C; Carter, Jeffrey D; von Carlowitz, Ira; Zhang, Chi; Schneider, Daniel J; Janjic, Nebojsa

    2017-03-14

    The nucleobases comprising DNA and RNA aptamers provide considerably less chemical diversity than protein-based ligands, limiting their versatility. The introduction of novel functional groups at just one of the four bases in modified aptamers has recently led to dramatic improvement in the success rate of identifying nucleic acid ligands to protein targets. Here we explore the benefits of additional enhancement in physicochemical diversity by selecting modified DNA aptamers that contain amino-acid-like modifications on both pyrimidine bases. Using proprotein convertase subtilisin/kexin type 9 as a representative protein target, we identify specific pairwise combinations of modifications that result in higher affinity, metabolic stability, and inhibitory potency compared with aptamers with single modifications. Such doubly modified aptamers are also more likely to be encoded in shorter sequences and occupy nonoverlapping epitopes more frequently than aptamers with single modifications. These highly modified DNA aptamers have broad utility in research, diagnostic, and therapeutic applications.

  13. Palladium-catalyzed Heck-type cross-couplings of unactivated alkyl iodides.

    PubMed

    McMahon, Caitlin M; Alexanian, Erik J

    2014-06-02

    A palladium-catalyzed, intermolecular Heck-type coupling of alkyl iodides and alkenes is described. This process is successful with a variety of primary and secondary unactivated alkyl iodides as reaction partners, including those with hydrogen atoms in the β position. The mild catalytic conditions enable intermolecular C-C bond formations with a diverse set of alkyl iodides and alkenes, including substrates containing base- or nucleophile-sensitive functionality.

  14. Boron-Catalyzed N-Alkylation of Amines using Carboxylic Acids.

    PubMed

    Fu, Ming-Chen; Shang, Rui; Cheng, Wan-Min; Fu, Yao

    2015-07-27

    A boron-based catalyst was found to catalyze the straightforward alkylation of amines with readily available carboxylic acids in the presence of silane as the reducing agent. Various types of primary and secondary amines can be smoothly alkylated with good selectivity and good functional-group compatibility. This metal-free amine alkylation was successfully applied to the synthesis of three commercial medicinal compounds, Butenafine, Cinacalcet. and Piribedil, in a one-pot manner without using any metal catalysts.

  15. Ab initio Study of Naptho-Homologated DNA Bases

    SciTech Connect

    Sumpter, Bobby G; Vazquez-Mayagoitia, Alvaro; Huertas, Oscar; Fuentes-Cabrera, Miguel A; Orozco, Modesto; Luque, Javier

    2008-01-01

    Naptho-homologated DNA bases have been recently used to build a new type of size expanded DNA known as yyDNA. We have used theoretical techniques to investigate the structure, tautomeric preferences, base-pairing ability, stacking interactions, and HOMO-LUMO gaps of the naptho-bases. The structure of these bases is found to be similar to that of the benzo-fused predecessors (y-bases) with respect to the planarity of the aromatic rings and amino groups. Tautomeric studies reveal that the canonical-like form of naptho-thymine (yyT) and naptho-adenine (yyA) are the most stable tautomers, leading to hydrogen-bonded dimers with the corresponding natural nucleobases that mimic the Watson-Crick pairing. However, the canonical-like species of naptho-guanine (yyG) and naptho-cytosine (yyC) are not the most stable tautomers, and the most favorable hydrogen-bonded dimers involve wobble-like pairings. The expanded size of the naphto-bases leads to stacking interactions notably larger than those found for the natural bases, and they should presumably play a dominant contribution in modulating the structure of yyDNA duplexes. Finally, the HOMO-LUMO gap of the naptho-bases is smaller than that of their benzo-base counterparts, indicating that size-expansion of DNA bases is an efficient way of reducing their HOMO-LUMO gap. These results are examined in light of the available experimental evidence reported for yyT and yyC.

  16. Electron and hole transfer from DNA base radicals to oxidized products of guanine in DNA.

    PubMed

    Cai, Zhongli; Sevilla, Michael D

    2003-03-01

    An investigation of electron and hole transfer to oxidized guanine bases in DNA is reported. Guanine in DNA was preferentially oxidized by Br(2)(*-) at 298 K to 8-oxo-7,8-dihydro-guanine (8-oxo-G) and higher oxidation products. HPLC-EC analysis of irradiated DNA shows that the formation of 8-oxo-G could not be increased above the ratio of one 8-oxo-G to 127 +/- 6 bp regardless of dose. 8-oxo-G can be produced only at low levels because it is further oxidized to other species. These oxidation products of guanine have been extensively investigated and identified by others. Our electron spin resonance studies suggest that at 77 K 8-oxo-G is a trap for radiation-produced holes, but certain further oxidation products of 8-oxo-G (G(ox)) are found to be efficient electron traps. Gamma irradiation of oxidized DNA samples in frozen (D(2)O) aqueous ices and glassy 7 M LiBr solutions resulted in radicals formed by electron attachment to the G(ox) sites that were monitored by electron spin resonance spectroscopy (ESR) at 77 K. These ESR spectra suggest that those oxidation products of 8-oxo-G containing alpha-diketo groups account for the electron traps (G(ox)) in oxidized DNA with oxaluric acid a likely major trap. Electron transfer from DNA anion radicals to G(ox) was followed by monitoring of their ESR signals with time at 77 K. Using typical values for the tunneling constant beta estimates of the relative amount of G(ox) to base pairs were obtained. Radicals formed by UV photolysis of oxidized DNA in 8 M NaClO(4) glassy aqueous solutions were also investigated. The 8-oxo-G cation accounts for less than 10% of all the radicals observed after either gamma irradiation of oxidized DNA in frozen (D(2)O) aqueous solution or UV photolysis of oxidized DNA in 8 M NaClO(4) glassy aqueous solutions. We estimate hole transfer distances of about 7 +/- 1 bp at 1 min from G(*+) to 8-oxo-G.

  17. An unprecedented nucleic acid capture mechanism for excision of DNA damage

    SciTech Connect

    Rubinson, Emily H.; Prakasha Gowda, A.S.; Spratt, Thomas E.; Gold, Barry; Eichmanbrand, Brandt F.

    2010-11-18

    DNA glycosylases that remove alkylated and deaminated purine nucleobases are essential DNA repair enzymes that protect the genome, and at the same time confound cancer alkylation therapy, by excising cytotoxic N3-methyladenine bases formed by DNA-targeting anticancer compounds. The basis for glycosylase specificity towards N3- and N7-alkylpurines is believed to result from intrinsic instability of the modified bases and not from direct enzyme functional group chemistry. Here we present crystal structures of the recently discovered Bacillus cereus AlkD glycosylase in complex with DNAs containing alkylated, mismatched and abasic nucleotides. Unlike other glycosylases, AlkD captures the extrahelical lesion in a solvent-exposed orientation, providing an illustration for how hydrolysis of N3- and N7-alkylated bases may be facilitated by increased lifetime out of the DNA helix. The structures and supporting biochemical analysis of base flipping and catalysis reveal how the HEAT repeats of AlkD distort the DNA backbone to detect non-Watson-Crick base pairs without duplex intercalation.

  18. Potential use of DNA barcoding for the identification of Salvia based on cpDNA and nrDNA sequences.

    PubMed

    Wang, Meng; Zhao, Hong-Xia; Wang, Long; Wang, Tao; Yang, Rui-Wu; Wang, Xiao-Li; Zhou, Yong-Hong; Ding, Chun-Bang; Zhang, Li

    2013-10-10

    An effective DNA marker for authenticating the genus Salvia was screened using seven DNA regions (rbcL, matK, trnL-F, and psbA-trnH from the chloroplast genome, and ITS, ITS1, and ITS2 from the nuclear genome) and three combinations (rbcL+matK, psbA-trnH+ITS1, and trnL-F+ITS1). The present study collected 232 sequences from 27 Salvia species through DNA sequencing and 77 sequences within the same taxa from the GenBank. The discriminatory capabilities of these regions were evaluated in terms of PCR amplification success, intraspecific and interspecific divergence, DNA barcoding gaps, and identification efficiency via a tree-based method. ITS1 was superior to the other marker for discriminating between species, with an accuracy of 81.48%. The three combinations did not increase species discrimination. Finally, we found that ITS1 is a powerful barcode for identifying Salvia species, especially Salvia miltiorrhiza.

  19. A MEMS-based miniature DNA analysis system

    SciTech Connect

    Northrup, M.A.; Gonzalez, C.; Hadley, D.

    1995-04-25

    We detail the design and development of a miniature thermal cycling instrument for performing the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) that uses microfabricated, silicon-based reaction chambers. The MEMS-based, battery-operated instrument shows significant improvements over commercial thermal cycling instrumentation. Several different biological systems have been amplified and verified with the miniature PCR instrument including the Human Immunodeficiency Virus; both cloned and genomic DNA templates of {beta} globin; and the genetic disease, Cystic Fibrosis from human DNA. The miniaturization of a PCR thermal cycler is the initial module of a fully-integrated portable, low-power, rapid, and highly efficient bioanalytical instrument.

  20. Electrochemical DNA Hybridization Sensors Based on Conducting Polymers

    PubMed Central

    Rahman, Md. Mahbubur; Li, Xiao-Bo; Lopa, Nasrin Siraj; Ahn, Sang Jung; Lee, Jae-Joon

    2015-01-01

    Conducting polymers (CPs) are a group of polymeric materials that have attracted considerable attention because of their unique electronic, chemical, and biochemical properties. This is reflected in their use in a wide range of potential applications, including light-emitting diodes, anti-static coating, electrochromic materials, solar cells, chemical sensors, biosensors, and drug-release systems. Electrochemical DNA sensors based on CPs can be used in numerous areas related to human health. This review summarizes the recent progress made in the development and use of CP-based electrochemical DNA hybridization sensors. We discuss the distinct properties of CPs with respect to their use in the immobilization of probe DNA on electrode surfaces, and we describe the immobilization techniques used for developing DNA hybridization sensors together with the various transduction methods employed. In the concluding part of this review, we present some of the challenges faced in the use of CP-based DNA hybridization sensors, as well as a future perspective. PMID:25664436

  1. Isolation and identification of products from alkylation of nucleic acids: ethyl- and isopropyl-purines.

    PubMed Central

    Lawley, P D; Orr, D J; Jarman, M

    1975-01-01

    Ethylation and isopropylation of guanine in alkaline solution, or of adenine in formic acid, by alkyl methanesulphonates gave the following products: 1-, N2-, 3-, O6-, 7- and 9-alkylguanines; 1-, 3-, 7- and 9-alkyladenines. The products were identified from their characteristic u.v-absorption spectra, by comparison with either known ethyladenines or with the corresponding known methyladenines, and were also characterized by mass spectrometry. Their chromatographic properties on paper, t.l.c. and various columns were determined. DNA was alkylated in neutral solution with 14C-labelled alkyl methanesulphonates and the ratios of the alkylpurines formed were obtained, and compared for alkylation by methyl, ethyl and isopropyl methanesulphonates and by N-methyl-N-nitrosourea. The extents of alkylation at O-6 of guanine relative to those at N-7 of guanine varied with the reactivity of the methylating agents according to the predictions of Swain & Scott (1953) relating nucleophilicity of the groups alkylated with the substrate constants of the alkylating agents. The relative extents of alkylation at N-3 of adenine did not follow this correlation. PMID:172066

  2. Low-risk gasoline alkylation process using a homogeneous liquid phase catalyst

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, S.R.; Nelson, L.G.

    1996-12-31

    Kerr-McGee`s interest in finding additional applications for its ROSES technology has led to a promising new alkylation process for the production of gasoline. The technology is timely due to its inherent environmental safety. The Homogeneous Alkylation Technology (HAT{trademark}) process uses a soluble alkylaluminum chloride-based catalyst at less than 1 percent of the acid concentrations used in conventional alkylation processes. The patented process greatly reduces the environmental risks associated with accidental acid releases from HF and sulfuric acid alkylation units. In addition, the process is projected to operate at lower cost than sulfuric acid alkylation and is a retrofit option for existing HF and sulfuric-acid alkylation units. Kerr-McGee has entered into a relationship with a major U.S. refiner to carry on the development of the HAT process. A gallon-per-day-scale pilot unit has been constructed for use in developing the process. 1 fig., 1 tab.

  3. Duplex-Selective Ruthenium-based DNA Intercalators

    PubMed Central

    Shade, Chad M.; Kennedy, Robert D.; Rouge, Jessica L.; Rosen, Mari S.; Wang, Mary X.; Seo, Soyoung E.; Clingerman, Daniel J.

    2016-01-01

    We report the design and synthesis of small molecules that exhibit enhanced luminescence in the presence of duplex rather than single-stranded DNA. The local environment presented by a well-known [Ru(dipyrido[2,3-a:3',2'-c]phenazine)L2]2+-based DNA intercalator was modified by functionalizing the bipyridine ligands with esters and carboxylic acids. By systematically varying the number and charge of the pendant groups, it was determined that decreasing the electrostatic interaction between the intercalator and the anionic DNA backbone reduced single-strand interactions and translated to better duplex specificity. In studying this class of complexes, a single RuII complex emerged that selectively luminesces in the presence of duplex DNA with little to no background from interacting with single stranded DNA. This complex shows promise as a new dye capable of selectively staining double versus single-stranded DNA in gel electrophoresis, which cannot be done with conventional SYBR dyes. PMID:26119581

  4. DNA-based species detection capabilities using laser transmission spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Mahon, A R; Barnes, M A; Li, F; Egan, S P; Tanner, C E; Ruggiero, S T; Feder, J L; Lodge, D M

    2013-01-06

    Early detection of invasive species is critical for effective biocontrol to mitigate potential ecological and economic damage. Laser transmission spectroscopy (LTS) is a powerful solution offering real-time, DNA-based species detection in the field. LTS can measure the size, shape and number of nanoparticles in a solution and was used here to detect size shifts resulting from hybridization of the polymerase chain reaction product to nanoparticles functionalized with species-specific oligonucleotide probes or with the species-specific oligonucleotide probes alone. We carried out a series of DNA detection experiments using the invasive freshwater quagga mussel (Dreissena bugensis) to evaluate the capability of the LTS platform for invasive species detection. Specifically, we tested LTS sensitivity to (i) DNA concentrations of a single target species, (ii) the presence of a target species within a mixed sample of other closely related species, (iii) species-specific functionalized nanoparticles versus species-specific oligonucleotide probes alone, and (iv) amplified DNA fragments versus unamplified genomic DNA. We demonstrate that LTS is a highly sensitive technique for rapid target species detection, with detection limits in the picomolar range, capable of successful identification in multispecies samples containing target and non-target species DNA. These results indicate that the LTS DNA detection platform will be useful for field application of target species. Additionally, we find that LTS detection is effective with species-specific oligonucleotide tags alone or when they are attached to polystyrene nanobeads and with both amplified and unamplified DNA, indicating that the technique may also have versatility for broader applications.

  5. Outlook for the U. S. alkylation industry

    SciTech Connect

    Felten, J.R.; Bradshaw, T.; McCarthy, K. )

    1994-01-01

    Alkylation has long been recognized in the refining industry as one of the best options to convert refinery olefins into valuable, clean, high octane blending components. In fact, refinery alkylation is a preferred source of blending stocks for reformulated gasoline. However, the hydrofluoric acid (HF) alkylation process and, to a lesser extent, the sulfuric acid (SA) process have come under increasing pressure in the US due to safety and environmental concerns. This paper examines the current outlook for the US alkylation industry including: key trends and driving forces in the industry, the impact of environmental issues on both HF and SA alkylation, US alkylation supply/demand forecast including the outlook for oxygenates, how US refines will respond to the increased demand and restricted supply for alkylates, and the outlook for new solid acid alkylation (SAC) technology.

  6. Total synthesis of alkyl citrate natural products.

    PubMed

    Rizzacasa, Mark A; Sturgess, Dayna

    2014-03-07

    This review highlights the synthesis of members of the alkyl citrate family of natural products. The focus is on the stereoselective construction of the alkyl citrate moiety common to these compounds.

  7. Activity of quinone alkylating agents in quinone-resistant cells.

    PubMed

    Begleiter, A; Leith, M K

    1990-05-15

    The role of the quinone group in the antitumor activity of quinone alkylating agents, such as mitomycin C and 2,5-diaziridinyl-3,5-bis(carboethoxyamino)-1,4-benzoquinone, is still uncertain. The quinone group may contribute to antitumor activity by inducing DNA strand breaks through the formation of free radicals and/or by influencing the alkylating activity of the quinone alkylators. The cytotoxic activity and DNA damage produced by the model quinone alkylating agents, benzoquinone mustard and benzoquinone dimustard, were compared in L5178Y murine lymphoblasts sensitive and resistant to the model quinone antitumor agent, hydrolyzed benzoquinone mustard. The resistant cell lines, L5178Y/HBM2 and L5178Y/HBM10, have increased concentrations of glutathione and elevated catalase, superoxide dismutase, glutathione S-transferase, and DT-diaphorase activity. L5178Y/HBM2 and L5178Y/HBM10 cells were 7.4- and 8.5-fold less sensitive to benzoquinone mustard and 1.7- and 4.3-fold less sensitive to benzoquinone dimustard, respectively, compared with sensitive cells, but showed no resistance to the non-quinone alkylating agent, aniline mustard. The formation of DNA double strand breaks by benzoquinone mustard was reduced by 2- and 8-fold in L5178Y/HBM2 and L5178Y/HBM10 cells, respectively, while double strand break formation by benzoquinone dimustard was reduced only in the L5178Y/HBM10 cells. The number of DNA-DNA cross-links produced by benzoquinone mustard was 3- and 6-fold lower, and the number produced by benzoquinone dimustard was 35% and 2-fold lower in L5178Y/HBM2 and L5178Y/HBM10 cells, respectively, compared with L5178Y parental cells. In contrast, cross-linking by aniline mustard was unchanged in sensitive and resistant cells. Dicoumarol, an inhibitor of DT-diaphorase, increased the cytotoxic activity of both benzoquinone mustard and benzoquinone dimustard in L5178Y/HBM10 cells. This study provides evidence that elevated DT-diaphorase activity in the resistant cells

  8. Flow cytometry-based DNA hybridization and polymorphism analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Cai, H.; Kommander, K.; White, P.S.; Nolan, J.P.

    1998-07-01

    Functional analysis of the humane genome, including the quantification of differential gene expression and the identification of polymorphic sites and disease genes, is an important element of the Human Genome Project. Current methods of analysis are mainly gel-based assays that are not well-suited to rapid genome-scale analyses. To analyze DNA sequence on a large scale, robust and high throughput assays are needed. The authors are developing a suite of microsphere-based approaches employing fluorescence detection to screen and analyze genomic sequence. The approaches include competitive DNA hybridization to measure DNA or RNA targets in unknown samples, and oligo ligation or extension assays to analyze single-nucleotide polymorphisms. Apart from the advances of sensitivity, simplicity, and low sample consumption, these flow cytometric approaches have the potential for high throughput multiplexed analysis using multicolored microspheres and automated sample handling.

  9. Flow-cytometry-based DNA hybidization and polymorphism analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Hong; Kommander, Kristina; White, P. S.; Nolan, John P.

    1998-05-01

    Functional analysis of the human genome, including the quantification of differential gene expression and the identification of polymorphic sites and disease genes, is an important element of the Human Genome Project. Current methods of analysis are mainly gel-based assays that are not well- suited to rapid genome-scale analyses. To analyze DNA sequence on a large scale, robust and high throughput assays are needed. We are developing a suite of microsphere-based approaches employing fluorescence detection to screen and analyze genomic sequence. Our approaches include competitive DNA hybridization to measure DNA or RNA targets in unknown samples, and oligo ligation or extension assays to analyze single-nucleotide polymorphisms. Apart from the advantages of sensitivity, simplicity, and low sample consumption, these flow cytometric approaches have the potential for high throughput multiplexed analysis using multicolored microspheres and automated sample handling.

  10. Molecular genotyping of Colletotrichum species based on arbitrarily primed PCR, A + T-Rich DNA, and nuclear DNA analyses

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Freeman, S.; Pham, M.; Rodriguez, R.J.

    1993-01-01

    Molecular genotyping of Colletotrichum species based on arbitrarily primed PCR, A + T-rich DNA, and nuclear DNA analyses. Experimental Mycology 17, 309-322. Isolates of Colletotrichum were grouped into 10 separate species based on arbitrarily primed PCR (ap-PCR), A + T-rich DNA (AT-DNA) and nuclear DNA banding patterns. In general, the grouping of Colletotrichum isolates by these molecular approaches corresponded to that done by classical taxonomic identification, however, some exceptions were observed. PCR amplification of genomic DNA using four different primers allowed for reliable differentiation between isolates of the 10 species. HaeIII digestion patterns of AT-DNA also distinguished between species of Colletotrichum by generating species-specific band patterns. In addition, hybridization of the repetitive DNA element (GcpR1) to genomic DNA identified a unique set of Pst 1-digested nuclear DNA fragments in each of the 10 species of Colletotrichum tested. Multiple isolates of C. acutatum, C. coccodes, C. fragariae, C. lindemuthianum, C. magna, C. orbiculare, C. graminicola from maize, and C. graminicola from sorghum showed 86-100% intraspecies similarity based on ap-PCR and AT-DNA analyses. Interspecies similarity determined by ap-PCR and AT-DNA analyses varied between 0 and 33%. Three distinct banding patterns were detected in isolates of C. gloeosporioides from strawberry. Similarly, three different banding patterns were observed among isolates of C. musae from diseased banana.

  11. DNA-based random number generation in security circuitry.

    PubMed

    Gearheart, Christy M; Arazi, Benjamin; Rouchka, Eric C

    2010-06-01

    DNA-based circuit design is an area of research in which traditional silicon-based technologies are replaced by naturally occurring phenomena taken from biochemistry and molecular biology. This research focuses on further developing DNA-based methodologies to mimic digital data manipulation. While exhibiting fundamental principles, this work was done in conjunction with the vision that DNA-based circuitry, when the technology matures, will form the basis for a tamper-proof security module, revolutionizing the meaning and concept of tamper-proofing and possibly preventing it altogether based on accurate scientific observations. A paramount part of such a solution would be self-generation of random numbers. A novel prototype schema employs solid phase synthesis of oligonucleotides for random construction of DNA sequences; temporary storage and retrieval is achieved through plasmid vectors. A discussion of how to evaluate sequence randomness is included, as well as how these techniques are applied to a simulation of the random number generation circuitry. Simulation results show generated sequences successfully pass three selected NIST random number generation tests specified for security applications.

  12. The photoinduced transformation of fluorescent DNA base analogue tC triggers DNA melting.

    PubMed

    Preus, Søren; Jønck, Søren; Pittelkow, Michael; Dierckx, Anke; Karpkird, Thitinun; Albinsson, Bo; Wilhelmsson, L Marcus

    2013-08-01

    While fluorescent analogues of the canonical nucleobases have proven to be highly valuable in a large number of applications, up until today, fluorescent DNA base analogues remain virtually inapplicable for single-molecule fluorescence experiments which require extremely bright and photostable dyes. Insight into the photodegradation processes of these fluorophores is thus a key step in the continuous development towards dyes with improved performances. Here, we show that the commercially available fluorescent nucleobase analogue tC under intense long-term illumination and in the presence of O2 is degraded to form a single photoreaction product which we suggest to be the sulfoxide form of tC. The photoproduct is characterized by a blue-shifted absorption and a less intense fluorescence compared to that of tC. Interestingly, when tC is positioned inside double-stranded DNA this photodriven conversion of tC to its photoproduct greatly reduces the duplex stability of the overall double helix in which the probe is positioned. Since tC can be excited selectively at 400 nm, well outside the absorption band of the natural DNA bases, this observation points towards the application of tC as a general light-triggered switch of DNA duplex stability.

  13. Quantum interference in DNA bases probed by graphene nanoribbons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeong, Heejeong; Seul Kim, Han; Lee, Sung-Hoon; Lee, Dongho; Hoon Kim, Yong; Huh, Nam

    2013-07-01

    Based on first-principles nonequilibrium Green's function calculations, we demonstrate quantum interference (QI) effects on the tunneling conductance of deoxyribonucleic acid bases placed between zigzag graphene nanoribbon electrodes. With the analogy of QI in hydrocarbon ring structures, we hypothesize that QI can be well preserved in the π-π coupling between the carbon-based electrode and a single DNA base. We demonstrate indications of QI, such as destructively interfered anti-resonance or Fano-resonance, that affect the variation of tunneling conductance depending on the orientation of a base. We find that guanine, with a 10-fold higher transverse conductance, can be singled out from the other bases.

  14. Chichibabin-type direct alkylation of pyridyl alcohols with alkyl lithium reagents.

    PubMed

    Jeffrey, Jenna L; Sarpong, Richmond

    2012-11-02

    Direct C(6) alkylation of pyridyl alcohols can be achieved following an initial deprotonation of the hydroxy group. This transformation, which is believed to occur by a Chichibabin-type alkylation, avoids lateral deprotonation prior to pyridine ring alkylation and gives increased regioselectivity for C(6) over C(4) alkylation.

  15. Refiners discuss HF alkylation process and issues

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-04-06

    Safety and oxygenate operations made HF alkylation a hot topic of discussion at the most recent National Petroleum Refiners Association annual question and answer session on refining and petrochemical technology. This paper provides answers to a variety of questions regarding the mechanical, process, and safety aspects of the HF alkylation process. Among the issues discussed were mitigation techniques, removal of oxygenates from alkylation unit feed, and amylene alkylation.

  16. Probe mapping to facilitate transposon-based DNA sequencing

    SciTech Connect

    Strausbaugh, L.D.; Bourke, M.T.; Sommer, M.T.; Coon, M.E.; Berg, C.M. )

    1990-08-01

    A promising strategy for DNA sequencing exploits transposons to provide mobile sites for the binding of sequencing primers. For such a strategy to be maximally efficient, the location and orientation of the transposon must be readily determined and the insertion sites should be randomly distributed. The authors demonstrate an efficient probe-based method for the localization and orientation of transposon-borne primer sites, which is adaptable to large-scale sequencing strategies. This approach requires no prior restriction enzyme mapping or knowledge of the cloned sequence and eliminates the inefficiency inherent in totally random sequencing methods. To test the efficiency of probe mapping, 49 insertions of the transposon {gamma}{delta} (Tn1000) in a cloned fragment of Drosophila melanogaster DNA were mapped and oriented. In addition, oligonucleotide primers specific for unique subterminal {gamma}{delta} segments were used to prime dideoxynucleotide double-stranded sequencing. These data provided an opportunity to rigorously examine {gamma}{delta} insertion sites. The insertions were quire randomly distributed, even though the target DNA fragment had both A+T-rich and G+C-rich regions; in G+C-rich DNA, the insertions were found in A+T-rich valleys. These data demonstrate that {gamma}{delta} is an excellent choice for supplying mobile primer binding sites to cloned DNA and that transposon-based probe mapping permits the sequences of large cloned segments to be determined without any subcloning.

  17. Chiral bidentate [N,S]-ferrocene ligands based on a thiazoline framework. Synthesis and use in palladium-catalyzed asymmetric allylic alkylation.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Rodríguez, E P; Hochberger-Roa, F; Corona-Sánchez, R; Barquera-Lozada, J E; Toscano, R A; Urrutigoïty, M; Gouygou, M; Ortega-Alfaro, M C; López-Cortés, J G

    2017-01-31

    An efficient method to obtain chiral 1,2-disubstituted ferrocenyl ligands has been developed. The introduction of planar chirality was accomplished by using 2-thiazoline as an ortho-directing lithiation group, and moreover, these kinds of ligands possess a central chirality from the amino alcohol used in their synthesis. The X-ray analysis and DFT calculations confirmed the diastereoselectivity of ortho-lithiation and the configuration of the planar chirality. The ability of these new bidentate [N,S]-ferrocene ligands to act in Pd-catalyzed asymmetric allylic alkylation has also been demonstrated and compared with their oxazoline counterparts.

  18. Method for rapid base sequencing in DNA and RNA with two base labeling

    DOEpatents

    Jett, J.H.; Keller, R.A.; Martin, J.C.; Posner, R.G.; Marrone, B.L.; Hammond, M.L.; Simpson, D.J.

    1995-04-11

    A method is described for rapid-base sequencing in DNA and RNA with two-base labeling and employing fluorescent detection of single molecules at two wavelengths. Bases modified to accept fluorescent labels are used to replicate a single DNA or RNA strand to be sequenced. The bases are then sequentially cleaved from the replicated strand, excited with a chosen spectrum of electromagnetic radiation, and the fluorescence from individual, tagged bases detected in the order of cleavage from the strand. 4 figures.

  19. Method for rapid base sequencing in DNA and RNA with two base labeling

    DOEpatents

    Jett, James H.; Keller, Richard A.; Martin, John C.; Posner, Richard G.; Marrone, Babetta L.; Hammond, Mark L.; Simpson, Daniel J.

    1995-01-01

    Method for rapid-base sequencing in DNA and RNA with two-base labeling and employing fluorescent detection of single molecules at two wavelengths. Bases modified to accept fluorescent labels are used to replicate a single DNA or RNA strand to be sequenced. The bases are then sequentially cleaved from the replicated strand, excited with a chosen spectrum of electromagnetic radiation, and the fluorescence from individual, tagged bases detected in the order of cleavage from the strand.

  20. DNA methylation detection based on difference of base content

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, Shinobu; Ohtsuka, Keiichi; Honda, Satoshi; Sato, Yusuke; Takenaka, Shigeori

    2016-04-01

    Methylation frequently occurs in cytosines of CpG sites to regulate gene expression. The identification of aberrant methylation of certain genes is important for cancer marker analysis. The aim of this study was to determine the methylation frequency in DNA samples of unknown length and/or concentration. Unmethylated cytosine is known to be converted to thymine following bisulfite treatment and subsequent PCR. For this reason, the AT content in DNA increases with an increasing number of methylation sites. In this study, the fluorescein-carrying bis-acridinyl peptide (FKA) molecule was used for the detection of methylation frequency. FKA contains fluorescein and two acridine moieties, which together allow for the determination of the AT content of double-stranded DNA fragments. Methylated and unmethylated human genomes were subjected to bisulfide treatment and subsequent PCR using primers specific for the CFTR, CDH4, DBC1, and NPY genes. The AT content in the resulting PCR products was estimated by FKA, and AT content estimations were found to be in good agreement with those determined by DNA sequencing. This newly developed method may be useful for determining methylation frequencies of many PCR products by measuring the fluorescence in samples excited at two different wavelengths.

  1. 40 CFR 721.9892 - Alkylated urea.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Alkylated urea. 721.9892 Section 721... Alkylated urea. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as an alkylated urea (PMN P-93-1649) is subject to reporting under...

  2. Indicator Based and Indicator - Free Electrochemical DNA Biosensors

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    of genomic material from infectious organisms. Methylene blue (MB) is an aromatic heterocycle that binds strongly to DNA via intercalation. MB...detection of disease- related point mutation in the guanine bases of the cyanobacteria . The resulting biosensors offer great promise for mismatch

  3. Nanopore-based fourth-generation DNA sequencing technology.

    PubMed

    Feng, Yanxiao; Zhang, Yuechuan; Ying, Cuifeng; Wang, Deqiang; Du, Chunlei

    2015-02-01

    Nanopore-based sequencers, as the fourth-generation DNA sequencing technology, have the potential to quickly and reliably sequence the entire human genome for less than $1000, and possibly for even less than $100. The single-molecule techniques used by this technology allow us to further study the interaction between DNA and protein, as well as between protein and protein. Nanopore analysis opens a new door to molecular biology investigation at the single-molecule scale. In this article, we have reviewed academic achievements in nanopore technology from the past as well as the latest advances, including both biological and solid-state nanopores, and discussed their recent and potential applications.

  4. Scalable, chromatography-free synthesis of alkyl-tethered pyrene-based materials. Application to first-generation "archipelago model" asphaltene compounds.

    PubMed

    Diner, Colin; Scott, David E; Tykwinski, Rik R; Gray, Murray R; Stryker, Jeffrey M

    2015-02-06

    In this paper, we report a highly efficient, scalable approach to the total synthesis of conformationally unrestricted, electronically isolated arrays of alkyl-tethered polycyclic aromatic chromophores. This new class of modular molecules consists of polycyclic aromatic "islands" comprising significant structural fragments present in unrefined heavy petroleum, tethered together by short saturated alkyl chains, as represented in the "archipelago model" of asphaltene structure. The most highly branched archipelago compounds reported here share an architecture with first-generation dendrimeric constructs, making the convergent, chromatography-free synthesis described herein particularly attractive for further extensions in scope and applications to materials chemistry. The syntheses are efficient, selective, and readily adaptable to a multigram scale, requiring only inexpensive, "earth-abundant" transition-metal catalysts for cross-coupling reactions and extraction and fractional crystallization for purification. This approach avoids typical limitations in cost, scale, and operational practicality. All of the archipelago compounds and synthetic intermediates have been fully characterized spectroscopically and analytically. The solid-state structure of one archipelago model compound has been determined by X-ray crystallography.

  5. DNA-Based Self-Assembly of Fluorescent Nanodiamonds.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Tao; Neumann, Andre; Lindlau, Jessica; Wu, Yuzhou; Pramanik, Goutam; Naydenov, Boris; Jelezko, Fedor; Schüder, Florian; Huber, Sebastian; Huber, Marinus; Stehr, Florian; Högele, Alexander; Weil, Tanja; Liedl, Tim

    2015-08-12

    As a step toward deterministic and scalable assembly of ordered spin arrays we here demonstrate a bottom-up approach to position fluorescent nanodiamonds (NDs) with nanometer precision on DNA origami structures. We have realized a reliable and broadly applicable surface modification strategy that results in DNA-functionalized and perfectly dispersed NDs that were then self-assembled in predefined geometries. With optical studies we show that the fluorescence properties of the nitrogen-vacancy color centers in NDs are preserved during surface modification and DNA assembly. As this method allows the nanoscale arrangement of fluorescent NDs together with other optically active components in complex geometries, applications based on self-assembled spin lattices or plasmon-enhanced spin sensors as well as improved fluorescent labeling for bioimaging could be envisioned.

  6. Base-sequence-dependent sliding of proteins on DNA.

    PubMed

    Barbi, M; Place, C; Popkov, V; Salerno, M

    2004-10-01

    The possibility that the sliding motion of proteins on DNA is influenced by the base sequence through a base pair reading interaction, is considered. Referring to the case of the T7 RNA-polymerase, we show that the protein should follow a noise-influenced sequence-dependent motion which deviate from the standard random walk usually assumed. The general validity and the implications of the results are discussed.

  7. Oligonucleotide-based systems: DNA, microRNAs, DNA/RNA aptamers

    PubMed Central

    Jolly, Pawan; Estrela, Pedro

    2016-01-01

    There are an increasing number of applications that have been developed for oligonucleotide-based biosensing systems in genetics and biomedicine. Oligonucleotide-based biosensors are those where the probe to capture the analyte is a strand of deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA), ribonucleic acid (RNA) or a synthetic analogue of naturally occurring nucleic acids. This review will shed light on various types of nucleic acids such as DNA and RNA (particularly microRNAs), their role and their application in biosensing. It will also cover DNA/RNA aptamers, which can be used as bioreceptors for a wide range of targets such as proteins, small molecules, bacteria and even cells. It will also highlight how the invention of synthetic oligonucleotides such as peptide nucleic acid (PNA) or locked nucleic acid (LNA) has pushed the limits of molecular biology and biosensor development to new perspectives. These technologies are very promising albeit still in need of development in order to bridge the gap between the laboratory-based status and the reality of biomedical applications. PMID:27365033

  8. Folding- and Dynamics-Based Electrochemical DNA Sensors.

    PubMed

    Lai, Rebecca Y

    2017-01-01

    A number of electrochemical DNA sensors based on the target-induced change in the conformation and/or flexibility of surface-bound oligonucleotides have been developed in recent years. These sensors, which are often termed E-DNA sensors, are comprised of an oligonucleotide probe modified with a redox label (e.g., methylene blue) at one terminus and attached to a gold electrode via a thiol-gold bond at the other. Binding of the target to the DNA probe changes its structure and dynamics, which, in turn, influences the efficiency of electron transfer to the interrogating electrode. Since electrochemically active contaminants are less common, these sensors are resistant to false-positive signals arising from the nonspecific adsorption of contaminants and perform well even when employed directly in serum, whole blood, and other realistically complex sample matrices. Moreover, because all of the sensor components are chemisorbed to the electrode, the E-DNA sensors are essentially label-free and readily reusable. To date, these sensors have achieved state-of-the-art sensitivity, while offering the unprecedented selectivity, reusability, and the operational convenience of direct electrochemical detection. This chapter reviews the recent advances in the development of both "signal-off" and "signal-on" E-DNA sensors. Critical aspects that dictate the stability and performance of these sensors are also addressed so as to provide a realistic overview of this oligonucleotide detection platform.

  9. A DNA-based assay for toxic chemicals in wastewater.

    PubMed

    Foreman, Amy L; Phillips, Leo; Kanellis, Vangelis G; Hammoudeh, Daoud; Naumann, Christoph; Wong, Henri; Chisari, Robert; Hibbert, D Brynn; Lee, Garry S H; Patra, Ronald; Julli, Moreno; Chapman, John; Cooke, A Roger; dos Remedios, Cristobal G

    2011-08-01

    Chemical toxicants, particularly metal ions, are a major contaminant in global waterways. Live-organism bioassays used to monitor chemical toxicants commonly involve measurements of activity or survival of a freshwater cladoceran (Ceriodaphnia dubia) or light emitted by the marine bacterium Vibrio fischeri, used in the commercial Microtox® bioassay. Here we describe a novel molecule-based assay system employing DNA as the chemical biosensor. Metals bind to DNA, causing structural changes that expel a bound (intercalated) fluorescent reporter dye. Analyses of test data using 48 wastewater samples potentially contaminated by metal ions show that the DNA-dye assay results correlate with those from C. dubia and Microtox bioassays. All three assays exhibit additive, antagonistic, and synergistic responses that cannot be predicted by knowing individual metal concentrations. Analyses of metals in these samples imply the presence of chemical toxicants other than metal ions. The DNA-dye assay is robust, has a 12-month shelf life, and is only slightly affected by sample pH in the range 4 to 9. The assay is completed in a matter of minutes, and its portability makes it well suited as a screening assay for use in the field. We conclude that the DNA-dye test is a surrogate bioassay suitable for screening chemical toxicity.

  10. Nanoparticle-Based Discrimination of Single-Nucleotide Polymorphism in Long DNA Sequences.

    PubMed

    Sanromán-Iglesias, María; Lawrie, Charles H; Liz-Marzán, Luis M; Grzelczak, Marek

    2017-03-01

    Circulating DNA (ctDNA) and specifically the detection cancer-associated mutations in liquid biopsies promises to revolutionize cancer detection. The main difficulty however is that the length of typical ctDNA fragments (∼150 bases) can form secondary structures potentially obscuring the mutated fragment from detection. We show that an assay based on gold nanoparticles (65 nm) stabilized with DNA (Au@DNA) can discriminate single nucleotide polymorphism in clinically relevant ssDNA sequences (70-140 bases). The preincubation step was crucial to this process, allowing sequential bridging of Au@DNA, so that single base mutation can be discriminated, down to 100 pM concentration.

  11. DNA sequence analysis using hierarchical ART-based classification networks

    SciTech Connect

    LeBlanc, C.; Hruska, S.I.; Katholi, C.R.; Unnasch, T.R.

    1994-12-31

    Adaptive resonance theory (ART) describes a class of artificial neural network architectures that act as classification tools which self-organize, work in real-time, and require no retraining to classify novel sequences. We have adapted ART networks to provide support to scientists attempting to categorize tandem repeat DNA fragments from Onchocerca volvulus. In this approach, sequences of DNA fragments are presented to multiple ART-based networks which are linked together into two (or more) tiers; the first provides coarse sequence classification while the sub- sequent tiers refine the classifications as needed. The overall rating of the resulting classification of fragments is measured using statistical techniques based on those introduced to validate results from traditional phylogenetic analysis. Tests of the Hierarchical ART-based Classification Network, or HABclass network, indicate its value as a fast, easy-to-use classification tool which adapts to new data without retraining on previously classified data.

  12. Recovery Based Nanowire Field-Effect Transistor Detection of Pathogenic Avian Influenza DNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Chih-Heng; Chu, Chia-Jung; Teng, Kang-Ning; Su, Yi-Jr; Chen, Chii-Dong; Tsai, Li-Chu; Yang, Yuh-Shyong

    2012-02-01

    Fast and accurate diagnosis is critical in infectious disease surveillance and management. We proposed a DNA recovery system that can easily be adapted to DNA chip or DNA biosensor for fast identification and confirmation of target DNA. This method was based on the re-hybridization of DNA target with a recovery DNA to free the DNA probe. Functionalized silicon nanowire field-effect transistor (SiNW FET) was demonstrated to monitor such specific DNA-DNA interaction using high pathogenic strain virus hemagglutinin 1 (H1) DNA of avian influenza (AI) as target. Specific electric changes were observed in real-time for AI virus DNA sensing and device recovery when nanowire surface of SiNW FET was modified with complementary captured DNA probe. The recovery based SiNW FET biosensor can be further developed for fast identification and further confirmation of a variety of influenza virus strains and other infectious diseases.

  13. Nanoinformatics and DNA-based computing: catalyzing nanomedicine.

    PubMed

    Maojo, Victor; Martin-Sanchez, Fernando; Kulikowski, Casimir; Rodriguez-Paton, Alfonso; Fritts, Martin

    2010-05-01

    Five decades of research and practical application of computers in biomedicine has given rise to the discipline of medical informatics, which has made many advances in genomic and translational medicine possible. Developments in nanotechnology are opening up the prospects for nanomedicine and regenerative medicine where informatics and DNA computing can become the catalysts enabling health care applications at sub-molecular or atomic scales. Although nanomedicine promises a new exciting frontier for clinical practice and biomedical research, issues involving cost-effectiveness studies, clinical trials and toxicity assays, drug delivery methods, and the implementation of new personalized therapies still remain challenging. Nanoinformatics can accelerate the introduction of nano-related research and applications into clinical practice, leading to an area that could be called "translational nanoinformatics." At the same time, DNA and RNA computing presents an entirely novel paradigm for computation. Nanoinformatics and DNA-based computing are together likely to completely change the way we model and process information in biomedicine and impact the emerging field of nanomedicine most strongly. In this article, we review work in nanoinformatics and DNA (and RNA)-based computing, including applications in nanopediatrics. We analyze their scientific foundations, current research and projects, envisioned applications and potential problems that might arise from them.

  14. Palladium-Catalyzed Heteroarylation and Concomitant ortho-Alkylation of Aryl Iodides.

    PubMed

    Lei, Chuanhu; Jin, Xiaojia; Zhou, Jianrong Steve

    2015-11-02

    Three-component couplings were achieved from common aryl halides, alkyl halides, and heteroarenes under palladium and norbornene co-catalysis. The reaction forges hindered aryl-heteroaryl bonds and introduces ortho-alkyl groups to aryl rings. Various heterocycles such as oxazoles, thiazoles and thiophenes underwent efficient coupling. The heteroarenes were deprotonated in situ by bases without the assistance of palladium catalysts.

  15. Multiplexed detection of pathogen DNA with DNA-based fluorescence nanobarcodes.

    PubMed

    Li, Yougen; Cu, Yen Thi Hong; Luo, Dan

    2005-07-01

    Rapid, multiplexed, sensitive and specific molecular detection is of great demand in gene profiling, drug screening, clinical diagnostics and environmental analysis. One of the major challenges in multiplexed analysis is to identify each specific reaction with a distinct label or 'code'. Two encoding strategies are currently used: positional encoding, in which every potential reaction is preassigned a particular position on a solid-phase support such as a DNA microarray, and reaction encoding, where every possible reaction is uniquely tagged with a code that is most often optical or particle based. The micrometer size, polydispersity, complex fabrication process and nonbiocompatibility of current codes limit their usability. Here we demonstrate the synthesis of dendrimer-like DNA-based, fluorescence-intensity-coded nanobarcodes, which contain a built-in code and a probe for molecular recognition. Their application to multiplexed detection of the DNA of several pathogens is first shown using fluorescence microscopy and dot blotting, and further demonstrated using flow cytometry that resulted in detection that was sensitive (attomole) and rapid.

  16. Oligonucleotide probes containing pyrimidine analogs reveal diminished hydrogen bonding capacity of the DNA adduct O⁶-methyl-G in DNA duplexes.

    PubMed

    Angelov, Todor; Dahlmann, Heidi A; Sturla, Shana J

    2013-10-15

    Oligonucleotide hybridization probes containing nucleoside analogs offer a potential strategy for binding specific DNA sequences that bear pro-mutagenic O(6)-G alkylation adducts. To optimize O(6)-Me-G-targeting probes, an understanding of how base pairs with O(6)-Me-G are stabilized is needed. In this study, we compared the ability of O(6)-Me-G and G to hydrogen bond with three pyrimidine-like nucleobases (Z, 4-thio-U, and 3-deaza-C) bearing varied hydrogen bond donor and acceptor groups. We found that duplexes containing the pyrimidine analog nucleoside:G pairs were more thermodynamically stable than those containing pyrimidine analog nucleoside:O(6)-alkyl-G pairs. Thus, hydrogen bonding alone was not sufficient to impart selectivity to probes that target O(6)-G alkylation adducts in DNA.

  17. Synthesis and biological studies of N-alkylated cyclic diamines.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Xiao-Qin; Liang, Feng; Yang, Li; Zhou, Xiang; Zheng, Cong-Yi; Cao, Xiao-Ping

    2007-01-01

    Several alkyl-substituted mesocyclic diamines were synthesized, and their interaction with DNA were studied by melting-temperature measurements and the ethidium bromide (EB)-fluorescence competitive method. The supercoiled DNA hydrolytic cleavage by 1,4-dioctyl-1,4-diazepan-6-ol (4) was supported by the evidence from free-radical quenching and T4-ligase ligation. Preliminary pharmacological tests showed that only 1,4-dioctyl-1,4-diazepan-6-ol (4) had antitumor activity against HeLa cell lines in vitro.

  18. A Proximity-Based Programmable DNA Nanoscale Assembly Line

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Hongzhou; Chao, Jie; Xiao, Shou-Jun; Seeman, Nadrian C.

    2010-01-01

    Our ability to synthesize nanometer-scale particles with desired shapes and compositions offers the exciting prospect of generating new functional materials and devices by combining the particles in a controlled fashion into larger structures. Self-assembly can achieve this task efficiently, but may be subject to thermodynamic and kinetic limitations: Reactants, intermediates and products may collide with each other throughout the assembly timecourse to produce non-target instead of target species. An alternative approach to nanoscale assembly uses information-containing molecules such as DNA1 to control interactions and thereby minimize unwanted crosstalk between different components. In principle, this method should allow the stepwise and programmed construction of target products by fastening individually selected nanoscale components – much as an automobile is built on an assembly line. Here, we demonstrate that a nanoscale assembly line can indeed be realized by the judicious combination of three known DNA-based modules: a DNA origami2 tile that provides a framework and track for the assembly process, cassettes containing three distinct two-state DNA machines that serve as programmable cargo-donating devices3,4 and are attached4,5 in series to the tile, and a DNA walker that can move on the track from device to device and collect cargo. As the walker traverses the pathway prescribed by the origami tile track, it encounters sequentially the three DNA devices that can be independently switched between an ‘ON’ state allowing its cargo to be transferred to the walker, and an ‘OFF’ state where no transfer occurs. We use three different types of gold nanoparticles as cargo and show that the experimental system does indeed allow the controlled fabrication of the eight different products that can be obtained with three two-state devices. PMID:20463734

  19. A proximity-based programmable DNA nanoscale assembly line.

    PubMed

    Gu, Hongzhou; Chao, Jie; Xiao, Shou-Jun; Seeman, Nadrian C

    2010-05-13

    Our ability to synthesize nanometre-scale chemical species, such as nanoparticles with desired shapes and compositions, offers the exciting prospect of generating new functional materials and devices by combining them in a controlled fashion into larger structures. Self-assembly can achieve this task efficiently, but may be subject to thermodynamic and kinetic limitations: reactants, intermediates and products may collide with each other throughout the assembly time course to produce non-target species instead of target species. An alternative approach to nanoscale assembly uses information-containing molecules such as DNA to control interactions and thereby minimize unwanted cross-talk between different components. In principle, this method should allow the stepwise and programmed construction of target products by linking individually selected nanoscale components-much as an automobile is built on an assembly line. Here we demonstrate that a nanoscale assembly line can be realized by the judicious combination of three known DNA-based modules: a DNA origami tile that provides a framework and track for the assembly process, cassettes containing three independently controlled two-state DNA machines that serve as programmable cargo-donating devices and are attached in series to the tile, and a DNA walker that can move on the track from device to device and collect cargo. As the walker traverses the pathway prescribed by the origami tile track, it sequentially encounters the three DNA devices, each of which can be independently switched between an 'ON' state, allowing its cargo to be transferred to the walker, and an 'OFF' state, in which no transfer occurs. We use three different types of gold nanoparticle species as cargo and show that the experimental system does indeed allow the controlled fabrication of the eight different products that can be obtained with three two-state devices.

  20. Hairpin DNA probe based surface plasmon resonance biosensor used for the activity assay of E. coli DNA ligase.

    PubMed

    Luan, Qingfen; Xue, Ying; Yao, Xin; Lu, Wu

    2010-02-01

    Using hairpin DNA probe self-structure change during DNA ligation process, a sensitive, label-free and simple method of E. coli DNA ligase assay via a home-built high-resolution surface plasmon resonance (SPR) instrument was developed. The DNA ligation process was monitored in real-time and the effects of single-base mutation on the DNA ligation process were investigated. Then an assay of E. coli DNA ligase was completed with a lower detection limit (0.6 nM), wider concentration range and better reproducibility. Moreover, the influence of Quinacrine on the activity of E. coli DNA ligase was also studied, which demonstrated that our method was useful for drug screening.

  1. The amplification effect of functionalized gold nanoparticles on the binding of anticancer drug dacarbazine to DNA and DNA bases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Qin; Wang, Xuemei; Fu, Degang

    2008-11-01

    The promising application of functionalized gold nanoparticles to amplify the performance of biosensors and relevant biomolecular recognition processes has been explored in this paper. Our observations illustrate the apparent enhancement effect of the gold nanoparticles on the electrochemical response of the anticancer drug dacarbazine (DTIC) binding to DNA and DNA bases, indicating that these functionalized gold nanoparticles could readily facilitate the specific interactions between DTIC and DNA/DNA bases. This raises the potential valuable applications of these biocompatible nanoparticles in the promising biosensors and biomedical engineering.

  2. Synthesis and highly potent hypolipidemic activity of alpha-asarone- and fibrate-based 2-acyl and 2-alkyl phenols as HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Mendieta, Aarón; Jiménez, Fabiola; Garduño-Siciliano, Leticia; Mojica-Villegas, Angélica; Rosales-Acosta, Blanca; Villa-Tanaca, Lourdes; Chamorro-Cevallos, Germán; Medina-Franco, José L; Meurice, Nathalie; Gutiérrez, Rsuini U; Montiel, Luisa E; Cruz, María Del Carmen; Tamariz, Joaquín

    2014-11-01

    In the search for new potential hypolipidemic agents, the present study focused on the synthesis of 2-acyl phenols (6a-c and 7a-c) and their saturated side-chain alkyl phenols (4a-c and 5a-c), and on the evaluation of their hypolipidemic activity using a murine Tyloxapol-induced hyperlipidemic protocol. The whole series of compounds 4-7 greatly and significantly reduced elevated serum levels of total cholesterol, LDL-cholesterol, and triglycerides, with series 6 and 7 showing the greatest potency ever found in our laboratory. At the minimum dose (25mg/kg/day), the latter compounds lowered cholesterol by 68-81%, LDL by 72-86%, and triglycerides by 59-80%. This represents a comparable performance than that shown by simvastatin. Experimental evidence and docking studies suggest that the activity of these derivatives is associated with the inhibition of HMG-CoA reductase.

  3. Inhibition of recombinase polymerase amplification by background DNA: a lateral flow-based method for enriching target DNA.

    PubMed

    Rohrman, Brittany; Richards-Kortum, Rebecca

    2015-02-03

    Recombinase polymerase amplification (RPA) may be used to detect a variety of pathogens, often after minimal sample preparation. However, previous work has shown that whole blood inhibits RPA. In this paper, we show that the concentrations of background DNA found in whole blood prevent the amplification of target DNA by RPA. First, using an HIV-1 RPA assay with known concentrations of nonspecific background DNA, we show that RPA tolerates more background DNA when higher HIV-1 target concentrations are present. Then, using three additional assays, we demonstrate that the maximum amount of background DNA that may be tolerated in RPA reactions depends on the DNA sequences used in the assay. We also show that changing the RPA reaction conditions, such as incubation time and primer concentration, has little effect on the ability of RPA to function when high concentrations of background DNA are present. Finally, we develop and characterize a lateral flow-based method for enriching the target DNA concentration relative to the background DNA concentration. This sample processing method enables RPA of 10(4) copies of HIV-1 DNA in a background of 0-14 μg of background DNA. Without lateral flow sample enrichment, the maximum amount of background DNA tolerated is 2 μg when 10(6) copies of HIV-1 DNA are present. This method requires no heating or other external equipment, may be integrated with upstream DNA extraction and purification processes, is compatible with the components of lysed blood, and has the potential to detect HIV-1 DNA in infant whole blood with high proviral loads.

  4. NHC-based tri-organyl Zn alkyl cations: synthesis, structure, isomerization for improved stability and use in CO2 functionalization.

    PubMed

    Dagorne, Samuel

    2017-02-21

    Tri-organyl and tri-coordinate N-heterocyclic carbene Zn-NHC alkyl cations (nNHC)2Zn-Me+ (nNHC = C2-bonded-IMes/-IDipp; 3+ and 4+) were first synthesized and structurally characterized via ionization of the corresponding neutral precursors (NHC)ZnMe2 with [Ph3C][B(C6F5)4] in the presence of 1 equiv. of free NHC. Cations 3+-5+ are the first Zn cations of the type Zn(C)(C')(C'')+ (C, C', C'' = σ-donor carbyl ligand). While cation (nIMes)2Zn-Me+ (3+) is stable, its sterically congested analogue (nIDipp)2Zn-Me+ (4+) readily undergoes a nNHC-to-aNHC isomerization in the presence of THF or IDipp to afford the more thermodynamically stable (aDipp)(nIDipp)Zn-Me+ (aIDipp = C5-bonded IDipp, 5+), reflecting the adaptable-to-sterics coordination chemistry of these cations for improved stability. Kinetic studies combined with DFT calculations agree with a nNHC-to-aNHC process proceeding through the initial deprotonation of 4+ (at a Zn-bonded C5-IDipp moiety) by IDipp. Unlike cations (nNHC)2Zn-Me+ 3+ and 4+, cation 5+ reacts with CO2 through insertion into the Zn-alkyl bond yielding the corresponding Zn(κ2-OAc)+ cation 6+. Both cations 5+ and 6+ were successfully used in CO2 hydrosilylation catalysis for silylformate formation.

  5. Electrophilic metal alkyl chemistry in new ligand environments

    SciTech Connect

    Jordan, Richard F.

    2002-09-11

    Cationic group 4 and actinide Cp{sub 2}MR{sup +} metallocenes, and isolobal neutral group 3 and lanthanide Cp{sub 2}MR analogs, are exceptionally reactive in insertion and {sigma}-bond metathesis processes, and have been exploited extensively in catalysis and synthesis, most notably single-site olefin polymerization. The objectives of recent work were to design new electrophilic metal alkyls based on non-Cp{sub 2}M structures, and to exploit these systems in fundamental and applied studies related to olefin polymerization and other catalytic reactions. Key results are reported in the following areas: discrete non-metallocene cationic group 4 alkyls, activation of non-metallocene compounds with methylalumoxane, and cationic aluminum alkyl compounds. Numerous structural formulas are included.

  6. Saturation anomalies of alkyl nitrates in the tropical Pacific Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dahl, Elizabeth E.; Yvon-Lewis, Shari A.; Saltzman, Eric S.

    2005-10-01

    This paper reports the first measurements of the saturation state of low molecular weight alkyl nitrates (methyl, ethyl, isopropyl, and n-propyl nitrate) in the tropical Pacific Ocean. These compounds were supersaturated with saturation anomalies as high as 2000%. Air/sea flux estimates based on these measurements suggest that surface ocean emissions are sufficient to account for observed levels of tropospheric alkyl nitrates in this region. Model calculations suggest that atmospheric loss rates are faster than can be explained by photolysis and reaction with OH alone. The implication is that removal via transport is important, and there must be a net export of alkyl nitrates from the tropics to other regions of the atmosphere.

  7. Hairpin DNA Switch for Ultrasensitive Spectrophotometric Detection of DNA Hybridization Based on Gold Nanoparticles and Enzyme Signal Amplification

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Youyu; Tang, Zhiwen; Wang, Jun; Wu, Hong; Maham, Aihui; Lin, Yuehe

    2010-08-01

    A novel DNA detection platform based on a hairpin-DNA switch, nanoparticles, and enzyme signal amplification for ultrasensitive detection of DNA hybridization has been developed in this work. In this DNA assay, a “stem-loop” DNA probe dually labeled with a thiol at its 5’ end and a biotin at its 3’ end, respectively, was used. This probe was immobilized on the gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) anchored by a protein, globulin, on a 96-well microplate. In the absence of target DNA, the immobilized probe with the stem-loop structure shields the biotin from being approached by a bulky horseradish peroxidase linked-avidin (avidin-HRP) conjugate due to the steric hindrance. However, in the presence of target DNA, the hybridization between the hairpin DNA probe and the target DNA causes significant conformational change of the probe, which forces biotin away from the surface of AuNPs. As a result, the biotin becomes accessible by the avidin-HRP, and the target hybridization event can be sensitively detected via the HRP catalyzed substrate 3, 3', 5, 5'-tetramethylbenzidine using spectrophometric method. Some experimental parameters governing the performance of the assay have been optimized. At optimal conditions, this DNA assay can detect DNA at the concentration of femtomolar level by means of a signal amplification strategy based on the combination of enzymes and nanoparticles. This approach also has shown excellent specificity to distinguish single-base mismatches of DNA targets because of the intrinsic high selectivity of the hairpin DNA probe.

  8. Methods of making alkyl esters

    DOEpatents

    Elliott, Brian

    2010-08-03

    A method comprising contacting an alcohol, a feed comprising one or more glycerides and equal to or greater than 2 wt % of one or more free fatty acids, and a solid acid catalyst, a nanostructured polymer catalyst, or a sulfated zirconia catalyst in one or more reactors, and recovering from the one or more reactors an effluent comprising equal to or greater than about 75 wt % alkyl ester and equal to or less than about 5 wt % glyceride.

  9. A dynamic bead-based microarray for parallel DNA detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sochol, R. D.; Casavant, B. P.; Dueck, M. E.; Lee, L. P.; Lin, L.

    2011-05-01

    A microfluidic system has been designed and constructed by means of micromachining processes to integrate both microfluidic mixing of mobile microbeads and hydrodynamic microbead arraying capabilities on a single chip to simultaneously detect multiple bio-molecules. The prototype system has four parallel reaction chambers, which include microchannels of 18 × 50 µm2 cross-sectional area and a microfluidic mixing section of 22 cm length. Parallel detection of multiple DNA oligonucleotide sequences was achieved via molecular beacon probes immobilized on polystyrene microbeads of 16 µm diameter. Experimental results show quantitative detection of three distinct DNA oligonucleotide sequences from the Hepatitis C viral (HCV) genome with single base-pair mismatch specificity. Our dynamic bead-based microarray offers an effective microfluidic platform to increase parallelization of reactions and improve microbead handling for various biological applications, including bio-molecule detection, medical diagnostics and drug screening.

  10. Nanoparticles based DNA conjugates for detection of pathogenic microorganisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jamdagni, Pragati; Khatri, Poonam; Rana, J. S.

    2016-01-01

    Infectious diseases have been on rise in the recent past. Early diagnosis plays a role as important as proper treatment and prophylaxis. The current practices of detection are time consuming which may result in unnecessary delays in treatment. Advances in nanodiagnostic approaches have been in focus lately. The rising interest and better understanding of nanoparticles have led to opening up of new frontiers in the concerned area. Optical properties of nanoparticles are being exploited to design detection systems that can provide fast, one-step and reliable results. Based on conserved DNA sequences unique to the target organism, the results offer accuracy comparable to conventional tests. Further, visual or spectrophotometric analysis omits the need of costly apparatus for result interpretation. The present review aims at putting together the information on nanoparticles based DNA conjugate systems for detection of pathogenic microorganisms.

  11. A history of the DNA repair and mutagenesis field: The discovery of base excision repair.

    PubMed

    Friedberg, Errol C

    2016-01-01

    This article reviews the early history of the discovery of an DNA repair pathway designated as base excision repair (BER), since in contrast to the enzyme-catalyzed removal of damaged bases from DNA as nucleotides [called nucleotide excision repair (NER)], BER involves the removal of damaged or inappropriate bases, such as the presence of uracil instead of thymine, from DNA as free bases.

  12. mTOR target NDRG1 confers MGMT-dependent resistance to alkylating chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Weiler, Markus; Blaes, Jonas; Pusch, Stefan; Sahm, Felix; Czabanka, Marcus; Luger, Sebastian; Bunse, Lukas; Solecki, Gergely; Eichwald, Viktoria; Jugold, Manfred; Hodecker, Sibylle; Osswald, Matthias; Meisner, Christoph; Hielscher, Thomas; Rübmann, Petra; Pfenning, Philipp-Niklas; Ronellenfitsch, Michael; Kempf, Tore; Schnölzer, Martina; Abdollahi, Amir; Lang, Florian; Bendszus, Martin; von Deimling, Andreas; Winkler, Frank; Weller, Michael; Vajkoczy, Peter; Platten, Michael; Wick, Wolfgang

    2014-01-07

    A hypoxic microenvironment induces resistance to alkylating agents by activating targets in the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) pathway. The molecular mechanisms involved in this mTOR-mediated hypoxia-induced chemoresistance, however, are unclear. Here we identify the mTOR target N-myc downstream regulated gene 1 (NDRG1) as a key determinant of resistance toward alkylating chemotherapy, driven by hypoxia but also by therapeutic measures such as irradiation, corticosteroids, and chronic exposure to alkylating agents via distinct molecular routes involving hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF)-1alpha, p53, and the mTOR complex 2 (mTORC2)/serum glucocorticoid-induced protein kinase 1 (SGK1) pathway. Resistance toward alkylating chemotherapy but not radiotherapy was dependent on NDRG1 expression and activity. In posttreatment tumor tissue of patients with malignant gliomas, NDRG1 was induced and predictive of poor response to alkylating chemotherapy. On a molecular level, NDRG1 bound and stabilized methyltransferases, chiefly O(6)-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase (MGMT), a key enzyme for resistance to alkylating agents in glioblastoma patients. In patients with glioblastoma, MGMT promoter methylation in tumor tissue was not more predictive for response to alkylating chemotherapy in patients who received concomitant corticosteroids.

  13. Base-Displaced Intercalated Structure of the N-(2'-Deoxyguanosin-8-yl)-3-aminobenzanthrone DNA Adduct.

    PubMed

    Politica, Dustin A; Malik, Chanchal K; Basu, Ashis K; Stone, Michael P

    2015-12-21

    3-Nitrobenzanthrone (3-NBA), an environmental mutagen found in diesel exhaust and a suspected carcinogen, undergoes metabolic reduction followed by reaction with DNA to form aminobenzanthrone (ABA) adducts, with the major alkylation product being N-(2'-deoxyguanosin-8-yl)-3-aminobenzanthrone (C8-dG-ABA). Site-specific synthesis of the C8-dG-ABA adduct in the oligodeoxynucleotide 5'-d(GTGCXTGTTTGT)-3':5'-d(ACAAACACGCAC)-3'; X = C8-dG-ABA adduct, including codons 272-275 of the p53 gene, has allowed for investigation into the structural and thermodynamic properties of this adduct. The conformation of the C8-dG-ABA adduct was determined using NMR spectroscopy and was refined using molecular dynamics (MD) calculations restrained by experimentally determined interproton distance restraints obtained from NOE experiments. The refined structure revealed that the C8-dG-ABA adduct formed a base-displaced intercalated conformation. The adducted guanine was shifted into the syn conformation about the glycosidic bond. The 5'- and 3'-neighboring base pairs remained intact. While this facilitated π-stacking interactions between the ABA moiety and neighboring bases, the thermal melting temperature (Tm) of the adduct-containing duplex showed a decrease of 11 °C as compared to the corresponding unmodified oligodeoxynucleotide duplex. Overall, in this sequence, the base-displaced intercalated conformation of the C8-dG-ABA lesion bears similarity to structures of other arylamine C8-dG adducts. However, in this sequence, the base-displaced intercalated conformation for the C8-dG-ABA adduct differs from the conformation of the N(2)-dG-ABA adduct reported by de los Santos and co-workers, in which it is oriented in the minor groove toward the 5' end of the duplex, with the modified guanine remaining in the anti conformation about the glyosidic torsion angle, and the complementary base remaining within the duplex. The results are discussed in relationship to differences between the C8-d

  14. PREPARATION OF ALKYL PYROPHOSPHATE EXTRACTANTS

    DOEpatents

    Levine, C.A.; Skiens, W.E.; Moore, G.R.

    1960-08-01

    A process for providing superior solvent extractants for metal recovery processes is given wherein the extractant comprises an alkyl pyrophosphoric acid ester dissolved in an organic solvent diluent. Finely divided solid P/sub 2/O/ sub 5/ is slurried in an organic solvent-diluent selected from organic solvents such as kerosene, benzene, chlorobenzene, toluene, etc. An alcohol selected from the higher alcohols having 4 to 17 carbon atoms. e.g.. hexanol-1. heptanol-3, octanol-1. 2.6-dimethyl-heptanol-4, and decanol-1, is rapidly added to the P/sub 2/O/sub 5/ slurry in the amount of about 2 moles of alcohol to 1 mole of P/sub 2/ O/sub 5/. The temperature is maintained below about 110 deg C during the course of the P/sub 2/O/sub 5/-alcohol reaction. An alkyl pyrophosphate extractant compound is formed as a consequence of the reaction process. The alkyl pyrophosphate solvent-diluent extractant phase is useful in solvent extraction metal recovery processes.

  15. How are base excision DNA repair pathways deployed in vivo?

    PubMed Central

    Thapar, Upasna; Demple, Bruce

    2017-01-01

    Since the discovery of the base excision repair (BER) system for DNA more than 40 years ago, new branches of the pathway have been revealed at the biochemical level by in vitro studies. Largely for technical reasons, however, the confirmation of these subpathways in vivo has been elusive. We review methods that have been used to explore BER in mammalian cells, indicate where there are important knowledge gaps to fill, and suggest a way to address them. PMID:28357058

  16. How are base excision DNA repair pathways deployed in vivo?

    PubMed

    Thapar, Upasna; Demple, Bruce

    2017-01-01

    Since the discovery of the base excision repair (BER) system for DNA more than 40 years ago, new branches of the pathway have been revealed at the biochemical level by in vitro studies. Largely for technical reasons, however, the confirmation of these subpathways in vivo has been elusive. We review methods that have been used to explore BER in mammalian cells, indicate where there are important knowledge gaps to fill, and suggest a way to address them.

  17. Bifacial Base-Pairing Behaviors of 5-Hydroxyuracil DNA Bases through Hydrogen Bonding and Metal Coordination.

    PubMed

    Takezawa, Yusuke; Nishiyama, Kotaro; Mashima, Tsukasa; Katahira, Masato; Shionoya, Mitsuhiko

    2015-10-12

    A novel bifacial ligand-bearing nucleobase, 5-hydroxyuracil (U(OH) ), which forms both a hydrogen-bonded base pair (U(OH) -A) and a metal-mediated base pair (U(OH) -M-U(OH) ) has been developed. The U(OH) -M-U(OH) base pairs were quantitatively formed in the presence of lanthanide ions such as Gd(III) when U(OH) -U(OH) pairs were consecutively incorporated into DNA duplexes. This result established metal-assisted duplex stabilization as well as DNA-templated assembly of lanthanide ions. Notably, a duplex possessing U(OH) -A base pairs was destabilized by addition of Gd(III) ions. This observation suggests that the hybridization behaviors of the U(OH) -containing DNA strands are altered by metal complexation. Thus, the U(OH) nucleobase with a bifacial base-pairing property holds great promise as a component for metal-responsive DNA materials.

  18. DNA-based identification of spices: DNA isolation, whole genome amplification, and polymerase chain reaction.

    PubMed

    Focke, Felix; Haase, Ilka; Fischer, Markus

    2011-01-26

    Usually spices are identified morphologically using simple methods like magnifying glasses or microscopic instruments. On the other hand, molecular biological methods like the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) enable an accurate and specific detection also in complex matrices. Generally, the origins of spices are plants with diverse genetic backgrounds and relationships. The processing methods used for the production of spices are complex and individual. Consequently, the development of a reliable DNA-based method for spice analysis is a challenging intention. However, once established, this method will be easily adapted to less difficult food matrices. In the current study, several alternative methods for the isolation of DNA from spices have been developed and evaluated in detail with regard to (i) its purity (photometric), (ii) yield (fluorimetric methods), and (iii) its amplifiability (PCR). Whole genome amplification methods were used to preamplify isolates to improve the ratio between amplifiable DNA and inhibiting substances. Specific primer sets were designed, and the PCR conditions were optimized to detect 18 spices selectively. Assays of self-made spice mixtures were performed to proof the applicability of the developed methods.

  19. Iron-Catalyzed Decarboxylative Alkyl Etherification of Vinylarenes with Aliphatic Acids as the Alkyl Source.

    PubMed

    Jian, Wujun; Ge, Liang; Jiao, Yihang; Qian, Bo; Bao, Hongli

    2017-03-20

    Because of the lack of effective alkylating reagents, alkyl etherification of olefins with general alkyl groups has not been previously reported. In this work, a variety of alkyl diacyl peroxides and peresters generated from aliphatic acids have been found to enable the first iron-catalyzed alkyl etherification of olefins with general alkyl groups. Primary, secondary and tertiary aliphatic acids are suitable for this reaction, delivering products with yields up to 97 %. Primary and secondary alcohols react well, affording products in up to 91 % yield.

  20. Arduino-based automation of a DNA extraction system.

    PubMed

    Kim, Kyung-Won; Lee, Mi-So; Ryu, Mun-Ho; Kim, Jong-Won

    2015-01-01

    There have been many studies to detect infectious diseases with the molecular genetic method. This study presents an automation process for a DNA extraction system based on microfluidics and magnetic bead, which is part of a portable molecular genetic test system. This DNA extraction system consists of a cartridge with chambers, syringes, four linear stepper actuators, and a rotary stepper actuator. The actuators provide a sequence of steps in the DNA extraction process, such as transporting, mixing, and washing for the gene specimen, magnetic bead, and reagent solutions. The proposed automation system consists of a PC-based host application and an Arduino-based controller. The host application compiles a G code sequence file and interfaces with the controller to execute the compiled sequence. The controller executes stepper motor axis motion, time delay, and input-output manipulation. It drives the stepper motor with an open library, which provides a smooth linear acceleration profile. The controller also provides a homing sequence to establish the motor's reference position, and hard limit checking to prevent any over-travelling. The proposed system was implemented and its functionality was investigated, especially regarding positioning accuracy and velocity profile.

  1. DNA sequence selective adenine alkylation, mechanism of adduct repair, and in vivo antitumor activity of the novel achiral seco-amino-cyclopropylbenz[e]indolone analogue of duocarmycin AS-I-145.

    PubMed

    Kiakos, Konstantinos; Sato, Atsushi; Asao, Tetsuji; McHugh, Peter J; Lee, Moses; Hartley, John A

    2007-10-01

    AS-I-145 is a novel achiral seco-amino-cyclopropylbenz[e]indolone (seco-amino-CBI) analogue of duocarmycin that has evolved from an alternative strategy of designing CC-1065/duocarmycin agents lacking the characteristic chiral center of the natural agents. The sequence specificity of this compound was assessed by a Taq polymerase stop assay, identifying the sites of covalent modification on plasmid DNA. The adenine-N3 adducts were confirmed at AT-rich sequences using a thermally induced strand cleavage assay. These studies reveal that this compound retains the inherent sequence selectivity of the related natural compounds. The AS-I-145 sensitivity of yeast mutants deficient in excision and post-replication repair (PRR) pathways was assessed. The sensitivity profile suggests that the sequence-specific adenine-N3 adducts are substrates for nucleotide excision repair (NER) but not base excision repair (BER). Single-strand ligation PCR was employed to follow the induction and repair of the lesions at nucleotide resolution in yeast cells. Sequence specificity was preserved in intact cells, and adduct elimination occurred in a transcription-coupled manner and was dependent on a functional NER pathway and Rad18. The involvement of NER as the predominant excision pathway was confirmed in mammalian DNA repair mutant cells. AS-I-145 showed good in vivo antitumor activity in the National Cancer Institute standard hollow fiber assay and was active against the human breast MDA-MD-435 xenograft when administered i.v. or p.o. Its novel structure and in vivo activity renders AS-I-145 a new paradigm in the design of novel achiral analogues of CC-1065 and the duocarmycins.

  2. DNA.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Felsenfeld, Gary

    1985-01-01

    Structural form, bonding scheme, and chromatin structure of and gene-modification experiments with deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) are described. Indicates that DNA's double helix is variable and also flexible as it interacts with regulatory and other molecules to transfer hereditary messages. (DH)

  3. Transition-Metal-Free Regioselective Alkylation of Pyridine N-Oxides Using 1,1-Diborylalkanes as Alkylating Reagents.

    PubMed

    Jo, Woohyun; Kim, Junghoon; Choi, Seoyoung; Cho, Seung Hwan

    2016-08-08

    Reported herein is an unprecedented base-promoted deborylative alkylation of pyridine N-oxides using 1,1-diborylalkanes as alkyl sources. The reaction proceeds efficiently for a wide range of pyridine N-oxides and 1,1-diborylalkanes with excellent regioselectivity. The utility of the developed method is demonstrated by the sequential C-H arylation and methylation of pyridine N-oxides. The reaction also can be applied for the direct introduction of a methyl group to 9-O-methylquinine N-oxide, thus it can serve as a powerful method for late-stage functionalization.

  4. O⁶-carboxymethylguanine in DNA forms a sequence context-dependent wobble base-pair structure with thymine.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Fang; Tsunoda, Masaru; Kikuchi, Yuji; Wilkinson, Oliver; Millington, Christopher L; Margison, Geoffrey P; Williams, David M; Takénaka, Akio

    2014-06-01

    N-Nitrosation of glycine and its derivatives generates potent alkylating agents that can lead to the formation of O(6)-carboxymethylguanine (O(6)-CMG) in DNA. O(6)-CMG has been identified in DNA derived from human colon tissue and its occurrence has been linked to diets high in red and processed meats, implying an association with the induction of colorectal cancer. By analogy to O(6)-methylguanine, O(6)-CMG is expected to be mutagenic, inducing G-to-A mutations that may be the molecular basis of increased cancer risk. Previously, the crystal structure of the DNA dodecamer d(CGCG[O(6)-CMG]ATTCGCG) has been reported, in which O(6)-CMG forms a Watson-Crick-type pair with thymine similar to the canonical A:T pair. In order to further investigate the versatility of O(6)-CMG in base-pair formation, the structure of the DNA dodecamer d(CGC[O(6)-CMG]AATTTGCG) containing O(6)-CMG at a different position has been determined by X-ray crystallography using four crystal forms obtained under conditions containing different solvent ions (Sr(2+), Ba(2+), Mg(2+), K(+) or Na(+)) with and without Hoechst 33258. The most striking finding is that the pairing modes of O(6)-CMG with T are quite different from those previously reported. In the present dodecamer, the T bases are displaced (wobbled) into the major groove to form a hydrogen bond between the thymine N(3) N-H and the carboxyl group of O(6)-CMG. In addition, a water molecule is bridged through two hydrogen bonds between the thymine O(2) atom and the 2-amino group of O(6)-CMG to stabilize the pairing. These interaction modes commonly occur in the four crystal forms, regardless of the differences in crystallization conditions. The previous and the present results show that O(6)-CMG can form a base pair with T in two alternative modes: the Watson-Crick type and a high-wobble type, the nature of which may depend on the DNA-sequence context.

  5. Measurement of oxidative DNA damage by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry: ethanethiol prevents artifactual generation of oxidized DNA bases.

    PubMed

    Jenner, A; England, T G; Aruoma, O I; Halliwell, B

    1998-04-15

    Analysis of oxidative damage to DNA bases by GC-MS enables identification of a range of base oxidation products, but requires a derivatization procedure. However, derivatization at high temperature in the presence of air can cause 'artifactual' oxidation of some undamaged bases, leading to an overestimation of their oxidation products, including 8-hydroxyguanine. Therefore derivatization conditions that could minimize this problem were investigated. Decreasing derivatization temperature to 23 degrees C lowered levels of 8-hydroxyguanine, 8-hydroxyadenine, 5-hydroxycytosine and 5-(hydroxymethyl)uracil measured by GC-MS in hydrolysed calf thymus DNA. Addition of the reducing agent ethanethiol (5%, v/v) to DNA samples during trimethylsilylation at 90 degrees C also decreased levels of these four oxidized DNA bases as well as 5-hydroxyuracil. Removal of guanine from hydrolysed DNA samples by treatment with guanase, prior to derivatization, resulted in 8-hydroxyguanine levels (54-59 pmol/mg of DNA) that were significantly lower than samples not pretreated with guanase, independent of the derivatization conditions used. Only hydrolysed DNA samples that were derivatized at 23 degrees C in the presence of ethanethiol produced 8-hydroxyguanine levels (56+/-8 pmol/mg of DNA) that were as low as those of guanase-pretreated samples. Levels of other oxidized bases were similar to samples derivatized at 23 degrees C without ethanethiol, except for 5-hydroxycytosine and 5-hydroxyuracil, which were further decreased by ethanethiol. Levels of 8-hydroxyguanine, 8-hydroxyadenine and 5-hydroxycytosine measured in hydrolysed calf thymus DNA by the improved procedures described here were comparable with those reported previously by HPLC with electrochemical detection and by GC-MS with prepurification to remove undamaged base. We conclude that artifactual oxidation of DNA bases during derivatization can be prevented by decreasing the temperature to 23 degrees C, removing air from the

  6. Anodized aluminum oxide-based capacitance sensors for the direct detection of DNA hybridization.

    PubMed

    Kang, Bongkeun; Yeo, Unjin; Yoo, Kyung-Hwa

    2010-03-15

    We fabricated a capacitance sensor based on an anodized aluminum oxide (AAO) nanoporous structure to detect DNA hybridization. We utilized Au film deposited on the surface of the AAO membrane and Au nanowires infiltrating the nanopores as the top and bottom electrodes, respectively. When completely complementary target DNA molecules were added to the sensor-immobilized DNA molecule probes, the capacitance was reduced; with a concentration of 1pM, the capacitance decreased by approximately 10%. We measured the capacitance change for different concentrations of the target DNA solution. A linear relationship was found between the capacitance change and DNA concentration on a semi-logarithmic scale. We also investigated the possibility of detecting DNA molecules with a single-base mismatch to the probe DNA molecule. In contrast to complementary target DNA molecules, the addition of one-base mismatch DNA molecules caused no significant change in capacitance, demonstrating that DNA hybridization was detected with single nucleotide polymorphism sensitivity.

  7. A Graphene-Based Biosensing Platform Based on Regulated Release of an Aptameric DNA Biosensor.

    PubMed

    Mao, Yu; Chen, Yongli; Li, Song; Lin, Shuo; Jiang, Yuyang

    2015-11-09

    A novel biosensing platform was developed by integrating an aptamer-based DNA biosensor with graphene oxide (GO) for rapid and facile detection of adenosine triphosphate (ATP, as a model target). The DNA biosensor, which is locked by GO, is designed to contain two sensing modules that include recognition site for ATP and self-replication track that yields the nicking domain for Nt.BbvCI. By taking advantage of the different binding affinity of single-stranded DNA, double-stranded DNA and aptamer-target complex toward GO, the DNA biosensor could be efficiently released from GO in the presence of target with the help of a complementary DNA strand (CPDNA) that partially hybridizes to the DNA biosensor. Then, the polymerization/nicking enzyme synergetic isothermal amplification could be triggered, leading to the synthesis of massive DNA amplicons, thus achieving an enhanced sensitivity with a wide linear dynamic response range of four orders of magnitude and good selectivity. This biosensing strategy expands the applications of GO-DNA nanobiointerfaces in biological sensing, showing great potential in fundamental research and biomedical diagnosis.

  8. Radioiodination of Aryl-Alkyl Cyclic Sulfates

    PubMed Central

    Mushti, Chandra; Papisov, Mikhail I.

    2015-01-01

    Among the currently available positron emitters suitable for Positron Emission Tomography (PET), 124I has the longest physical half-life (4.2 days). The long half-life and well-investigated behavior of iodine in vivo makes 124I very attractive for pharmacological studies. In this communication, we describe a simple yet effective method for the synthesis of novel 124I labeled compounds intended for PET imaging of arylsulfatase activity in vivo. Arylsulfatases have important biological functions, and genetic deficiencies of such functions require pharmacological replacement, the efficacy of which must be properly and non-invasively evaluated. These enzymes, even though their natural substrates are mostly of aliphatic nature, hydrolyze phenolic sulfates to phenol and sulfuric acid. The availability of [124I]iodinated substrates is expected to provide a PET-based method for measuring their activity in vivo. The currently available methods of synthesis of iodinated arylsulfates usually require either introducing of a protected sulfate ester early in the synthesis or introduction of sulfate group at the end of synthesis in a separate step. The described method gives the desired product in one step from an aryl-alkyl cyclic sulfate. When treated with iodide, the source cyclic sulfate opens with substitution of iodide at the alkyl center and gives the desired arylsulfate monoester. PMID:23135631

  9. The photodissociation dynamics of alkyl radicals

    SciTech Connect

    Giegerich, Jens; Fischer, Ingo

    2015-01-28

    The photodisscociation dynamics of the alkyl radicals i-propyl (CH(CH{sub 3}){sub 2}) and t-butyl (C(CH{sub 3}){sub 3}) are investigated by H-atom photofragment imaging. While i-propyl is excited at 250 nm, the photodynamics of t-butyl are explored over a large energy range using excitation wavelengths between 347 nm and 233 nm. The results are compared to those obtained previously for ethyl, CH{sub 3}CH{sub 2}, and to those reported for t-butyl using 248 nm excitation. The translational energy (E{sub T}) distribution of the H-atom photofragments is bimodal and appears rather similar for all three radicals. The low E{sub T} part of the distribution shows an isotropic photofragment angular distribution, while the high E{sub T} part is associated with a considerable anisotropy. Thus, for t-butyl, two H-atom loss channels of roughly equal importance have been identified in addition to the CH{sub 3}-loss channel reported previously. A mechanism for the photodissociation of alkyl radicals is suggested that is based on interactions between Rydberg- and valence states.

  10. Molecular switching behavior in isosteric DNA base pairs.

    PubMed

    Jissy, A K; Konar, Sukanya; Datta, Ayan

    2013-04-15

    The structures and proton-coupled behavior of adenine-thymine (A-T) and a modified base pair containing a thymine isostere, adenine-difluorotoluene (A-F), are studied in different solvents by dispersion-corrected density functional theory. The stability of the canonical Watson-Crick base pair and the mismatched pair in various solvents with low and high dielectric constants is analyzed. It is demonstrated that A-F base pairing is favored in solvents with low dielectric constant. The stabilization and conformational changes induced by protonation are also analyzed for the natural as well as the mismatched base pair. DNA sequences capable of changing their sequence conformation on protonation are used in the construction of pH-based molecular switches. An acidic medium has a profound influence in stabilizing the isostere base pair. Such a large gain in stability on protonation leads to an interesting pH-controlled molecular switch, which can be incorporated in a natural DNA tract.

  11. Magnetophoresis of flexible DNA-based dumbbell structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Babić, B.; Ghai, R.; Dimitrov, K.

    2008-02-01

    Controlled movement and manipulation of magnetic micro- and nanostructures using magnetic forces can give rise to important applications in biomedecine, diagnostics, and immunology. We report controlled magnetophoresis and stretching, in aqueous solution, of a DNA-based dumbbell structure containing magnetic and diamagnetic microspheres. The velocity and stretching of the dumbbell were experimentally measured and correlated with a theoretical model based on the forces acting on individual magnetic beads or the entire dumbbell structures. The results show that precise and predictable manipulation of dumbbell structures is achievable and can potentially be applied to immunomagnetic cell separators.

  12. Insight into the cooperative DNA binding of the O⁶-alkylguanine DNA alkyltransferase.

    PubMed

    Tessmer, Ingrid; Fried, Michael G

    2014-08-01

    The O(6)-alkylguanine DNA alkyltransferase (AGT) is a highly conserved protein responsible for direct repair of alkylated guanine and to a lesser degree thymine bases. While specific DNA lesion-bound complexes in crystal structures consist of monomeric AGT, several solution studies have suggested that cooperative DNA binding plays a role in the physiological activities of AGT. Cooperative AGT-DNA complexes have been described by theoretical models, which can be tested by atomic force microscopy (AFM). Direct access to structural features of AGT-DNA complexes at the single molecule level by AFM imaging revealed non-specifically bound, cooperative complexes with limited cluster length. Implications of cooperative binding in AGT-DNA interactions are discussed.

  13. Detection of DNA hybridization by field-effect DNA-based biosensors: mechanisms of signal generation and open questions.

    PubMed

    Cherstvy, A G

    2013-08-15

    We model theoretically the electrostatic effects taking place upon DNA hybridization in dense DNA arrays immobilized on a layer of Au nano-particles deposited on the surface of a field-effect-based DNA capacitive biosensor. We consider the influence of separation of a charged analyte from the sensor surface and the salinity of electrolyte solution, in the framework of both linear and nonlinear Poisson-Boltzmann theories. The latter predicts a substantially weaker sensor signals due to electrostatic saturation effects that is the main conclusion of this paper. We analyze how different physical parameters of dense DNA brushes affect the magnitude of hybridization signals. The list includes the fraction of DNA charge neutralization, the length and spatial conformations of adsorbed DNA molecules, as well as the discreteness of DNA charges. We also examine the effect of Donnan ionic equilibrium in DNA lattices on the sensor response. The validity of theoretical models is contrasted against recent experimental observations on detection of DNA hybridization via its intrinsic electric charge. The sensitivity of such biochemical sensing devices, their detection limit, and DNA hybridization efficiency are briefly discussed in the end.

  14. DNA-based influenza vaccines as immunoprophylactic agents toward universality.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Han; El Zowalaty, Mohamed E

    2016-01-01

    Influenza is an illness of global public health concern. Influenza viruses have been responsible for several pandemics affecting humans. Current influenza vaccines have proved satisfactory safety; however, they have limitations and do not provide protection against unexpected emerging influenza virus strains. Therefore, there is an urgent need for alternative approaches to conventional influenza vaccines. The development of universal influenza vaccines will help alleviate the severity of influenza pandemics. Influenza DNA vaccines have been the subject of many studies over the past decades due to their ability to induce broad-based protective immune responses in various animal models. The present review highlights the recent advances in influenza DNA vaccine research and its potential as an affordable universal influenza vaccine.

  15. The Web-Based DNA Vaccine Database DNAVaxDB and Its Usage for Rational DNA Vaccine Design.

    PubMed

    Racz, Rebecca; He, Yongqun

    2016-01-01

    A DNA vaccine is a vaccine that uses a mammalian expression vector to express one or more protein antigens and is administered in vivo to induce an adaptive immune response. Since the 1990s, a significant amount of research has been performed on DNA vaccines and the mechanisms behind them. To meet the needs of the DNA vaccine research community, we created DNAVaxDB ( http://www.violinet.org/dnavaxdb ), the first Web-based database and analysis resource of experimentally verified DNA vaccines. All the data in DNAVaxDB, which includes plasmids, antigens, vaccines, and sources, is manually curated and experimentally verified. This chapter goes over the detail of DNAVaxDB system and shows how the DNA vaccine database, combined with the Vaxign vaccine design tool, can be used for rational design of a DNA vaccine against a pathogen, such as Mycobacterium bovis.

  16. Complete sequence analysis of 18S rDNA based on genomic DNA extraction from individual Demodex mites (Acari: Demodicidae).

    PubMed

    Zhao, Ya-E; Xu, Ji-Ru; Hu, Li; Wu, Li-Ping; Wang, Zheng-Hang

    2012-05-01

    The study for the first time attempted to accomplish 18S ribosomal DNA (rDNA) complete sequence amplification and analysis for three Demodex species (Demodex folliculorum, Demodex brevis and Demodex canis) based on gDNA extraction from individual mites. The mites were treated by DNA Release Additive and Hot Start II DNA Polymerase so as to promote mite disruption and increase PCR specificity. Determination of D. folliculorum gDNA showed that the gDNA yield reached the highest at 1 mite, tending to descend with the increase of mite number. The individual mite gDNA was successfully used for 18S rDNA fragment (about 900 bp) amplification examination. The alignments of 18S rDNA complete sequences of individual mite samples and those of pooled mite samples ( ≥ 1000mites/sample) showed over 97% identities for each species, indicating that the gDNA extracted from a single individual mite was as satisfactory as that from pooled mites for PCR amplification. Further pairwise sequence analyses showed that average divergence, genetic distance, transition/transversion or phylogenetic tree could not effectively identify the three Demodex species, largely due to the differentiation in the D. canis isolates. It can be concluded that the individual Demodex mite gDNA can satisfy the molecular study of Demodex. 18S rDNA complete sequence is suitable for interfamily identification in Cheyletoidea, but whether it is suitable for intrafamily identification cannot be confirmed until the ascertainment of the types of Demodex mites parasitizing in dogs.

  17. Reactions of Tributylstannyl Anioniods with Alkyl Bromides.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-09-28

    g (12 mmol) of cesium tert-butoxide was added to the reaction vessel before the addition of n-butyllithium. Alkylation of Tributylstannyl Anionoids...Dry reaction vessels were purged with argon. The desired alkyl halide (1.0 mmol unless noted) and any desired additive were added to the reaction ...OFFICE OF NAVAL RESEARCH Contract N00014-79-C-0584 Task No. NR 053-714 TECHNICAL REPORT No. 2 Reactions of Tributylstannyl Anionoids with Alkyl

  18. Alkyl-π engineering in state control toward versatile optoelectronic soft materials

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Fengniu; Nakanishi, Takashi

    2015-01-01

    Organic π-conjugated molecules with extremely rich and tailorable electronic and optical properties are frequently utilized for the fabrication of optoelectronic devices. To achieve high solubility for facile solution processing and desirable softness for flexible device fabrication, the rigid π units were in most cases attached by alkyl chains through chemical modification. Considerable numbers of alkylated-π molecular systems with versatile applications have been reported. However, a profound understanding of the molecular state control through proper alkyl chain substitution is still highly demanded because effective applications of these molecules are closely related to their physical states. To explore the underlying rule, we review a large number of alkylated-π molecules with emphasis on the interplay of van der Waals interactions (vdW) of the alkyl chains and π–π interactions of the π moieties. Based on our comprehensive investigations of the two interactions’ impacts on the physical states of the molecules, a clear guidance for state control by alkyl-π engineering is proposed. Specifically, either with proper alkyl chain substitution or favorable additives, the vdW and π–π interactions can be adjusted, resulting in modulation of the physical states and optoelectronic properties of the molecules. We believe the strategy summarized here will significantly benefit the alkyl-π chemistry toward wide-spread applications in optoelectronic devices. PMID:27877748

  19. Electrochemical DNA biosensor based on avidin-biotin conjugation for influenza virus (type A) detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chung, Da-Jung; Kim, Ki-Chul; Choi, Seong-Ho

    2011-09-01

    An electrochemical DNA biosensor (E-DNA biosensor) was fabricated by avidin-biotin conjugation of a biotinylated probe DNA, 5'-biotin-ATG AGT CTT CTA ACC GAG GTC GAA-3', and an avidin-modified glassy carbon electrode (GCE) to detect the influenza virus (type A). An avidin-modified GCE was prepared by the reaction of avidin and a carboxylic acid-modified GCE, which was synthesized by the electrochemical reduction of 4-carboxyphenyl diazonium salt. The current value of the E-DNA biosensor was evaluated after hybridization of the probe DNA and target DNA using cyclic voltammetry (CV). The current value decreased after the hybridization of the probe DNA and target DNA. The DNA that was used follows: complementary target DNA, 5'-TTC GAC CTC GGT TAG AAG ACT CAT-3' and two-base mismatched DNA, 5'-TTC GAC AGC GGT TAT AAG ACT CAT-3'.

  20. The structural basis for recognition of base J containing DNA by a novel DNA binding domain in JBP1.

    PubMed

    Heidebrecht, Tatjana; Christodoulou, Evangelos; Chalmers, Michael J; Jan, Sabrina; Ter Riet, Bas; Grover, Rajesh K; Joosten, Robbie P; Littler, Dene; van Luenen, Henri; Griffin, Patrick R; Wentworth, Paul; Borst, Piet; Perrakis, Anastassis

    2011-07-01

    The J-binding protein 1 (JBP1) is essential for biosynthesis and maintenance of DNA base-J (β-d-glucosyl-hydroxymethyluracil). Base-J and JBP1 are confined to some pathogenic protozoa and are absent from higher eukaryotes, prokaryotes and viruses. We show that JBP1 recognizes J-containing DNA (J-DNA) through a 160-residue domain, DB-JBP1, with 10 000-fold preference over normal DNA. The crystal structure of DB-JBP1 revealed a helix-turn-helix variant fold, a 'helical bouquet' with a 'ribbon' helix encompassing the amino acids responsible for DNA binding. Mutation of a single residue (Asp525) in the ribbon helix abrogates specificity toward J-DNA. The same mutation renders JBP1 unable to rescue the targeted deletion of endogenous JBP1 genes in Leishmania and changes its distribution in the nucleus. Based on mutational analysis and hydrogen/deuterium-exchange mass-spectrometry data, a model of JBP1 bound to J-DNA was constructed and validated by small-angle X-ray scattering data. Our results open new possibilities for targeted prevention of J-DNA recognition as a therapeutic intervention for parasitic diseases.

  1. Physics of base-pairing dynamics in DNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manghi, Manoel; Destainville, Nicolas

    2016-05-01

    As a key molecule of life, Deoxyribo-Nucleic Acid (DNA) is the focus of numbers of investigations with the help of biological, chemical and physical techniques. From a physical point of view, both experimental and theoretical works have brought quantitative insights into DNA base-pairing dynamics that we review in this Report, putting emphasis on theoretical developments. We discuss the dynamics at the base-pair scale and its pivotal coupling with the polymer one, with a polymerization index running from a few nucleotides to tens of kilo-bases. This includes opening and closure of short hairpins and oligomers as well as zipping and unwinding of long macromolecules. We review how different physical mechanisms are either used by Nature or utilized in biotechnological processes to separate the two intertwined DNA strands, by insisting on quantitative results. They go from thermally-assisted denaturation bubble nucleation to force- or torque-driven mechanisms. We show that the helical character of the molecule, possibly supercoiled, can play a key role in many denaturation and renaturation processes. We categorize the mechanisms according to the relative timescales associated with base-pairing and chain orientational degrees of freedom such as bending and torsional elastic ones. In some specific situations, these chain orientational degrees of freedom can be integrated out, and the quasi-static approximation is valid. The complex dynamics then reduces to the diffusion in a low-dimensional free-energy landscape. In contrast, some important cases of experimental interest necessarily appeal to far-from-equilibrium statistical mechanics and hydrodynamics.

  2. A Single-Component Conductor Based on a Radical Gold Dithiolene Complex with Alkyl-Substituted Thiophene-2,3-dithiolate Ligand.

    PubMed

    Higashino, Toshiki; Jeannin, Olivier; Kawamoto, Tadashi; Lorcy, Dominique; Mori, Takehiko; Fourmigué, Marc

    2015-10-19

    Alkyl-substituted thiophene-2,3-dithiolate ligands are prepared through a Thio-Claisen rearrangement of 4,5-bis(propargylthio)-1,3-dithiole-2-thione derivatives. The two novel dithiolate ligands, namely, 4,5-dimethyl-thiophene-2,3-dithiolate (α-Me2tpdt) and 4-ethyl-5-methyl-thiophene-2,3-dithiolate (α-EtMetpdt), are engaged in anionic Au(III) square planar complexes formulated as [Au(α-Me2tpdt)2](-) and [Au(α-EtMetpdt)2](-), isolated as Ph4P(+) salts. Monoelectronic oxidation gives the neutral radical complexes [Au(α-Me2tpdt)2](•) and [Au(α-EtMetpdt)2](•). The latter crystallizes into uniform stacks with limited interstack interactions, giving rise to a calculated half-filled band structure. It exhibits a semiconducting behavior with room temperature conductivity of 3 × 10(-3) S cm(-1), indicating that this single-component conductor can be described as a Mott insulator. The different structures observed in [Au(α-EtMetpdt)2](•) and the known [Au(Et-thiazdt)2](•) complex (Et-thiazdt: N-ethyl-thiazoline-2-thione-4,5-dithiolate), despite their very similar shapes, are tentatively attributed to differences in the electronic structures of the ligand skeleton.

  3. 4-Alkyl-3,5-difluorophenyl-Substituted Benzodithiophene-Based Wide Band Gap Polymers for High-Efficiency Polymer Solar Cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Guangwu; Gong, Xue; Zhang, Jicheng; Liu, Yahui; Feng, Shiyu; Li, Cuihong; Bo, Zhishan

    2016-02-17

    Two novel polymers PTFBDT-BZS and PTFBDT-BZO with 4-alkyl-3,5-difluorophenyl substituted benzodithiophene as the donor unit, benzothiadiazole or benzooxadiazole as the acceptor unit, and thiophene as the spacer have been synthesized and used as donor materials for polymer solar cells (PSCs). These two polymers exhibited wide optical band gaps of about 1.8 eV. PSCs with the blend of PTFBDT-BZS:PC71BM (1:2, by weight) as the active layer fabricated without using any processing additive and any postannealing treatment showed power conversion efficiency (PCE) of 8.24% with an open circuit voltage (Voc) of 0.89 V, a short circuit current (Jsc) of 12.67 mA/cm(2), and a fill factor (FF) of 0.73 under AM 1.5G illumination, indicating that PTFBDT-BZS is a very promising donor polymer for PSCs. The blend of PTFBDT-BZO:PC71BM showed a lower PCE of 5.67% with a Voc of 0.96 V, a Jsc of 9.24 mA/cm(2), and an FF of 0.64. One reason for the lower PCE is probably due to that PTFBDT-BZO has a smaller LUMO offset with PC71BM, which cannot provide enough driving force for charge separation. And another reason is probably due to that PTFBDT-BZO has a lower hole mobility in comparison with PTFBDT-BZS.

  4. Homogeneous catalysis with methane. A strategy for the hydromethylation of olefins based on the nondegenerate exchange of alkyl groups and sigma-bond metathesis at scandium.

    PubMed

    Sadow, Aaron D; Tilley, T Don

    2003-07-02

    The scandium alkyl Cp*(2)ScCH(2)CMe(3) (2) was synthesized by the addition of a pentane solution of LiCH(2)CMe(3) to Cp*(2)ScCl at low temperature. Compound 2 reacts with the C-H bonds of hydrocarbons including methane, benzene, and cyclopropane to yield the corresponding hydrocarbyl complex and CMe(4). Kinetic studies revealed that the metalation of methane proceeds exclusively via a second-order pathway described by the rate law: rate = k[2][CH(4)] (k = 4.1(3) x 10(-4) M(-1)s(-1) at 26 degrees C). The primary inter- and intramolecular kinetic isotope effects (k(H)/k(D) = 10.2 (CH(4) vs CD(4)) and k(H)/k(D) = 5.2(1) (CH(2)D(2)), respectively) are consistent with a linear transfer of hydrogen from methane to the neopentyl ligand in the transition state. Activation parameters indicate that the transformation involves a highly ordered transition state (DeltaS++ = -36(1) eu) and a modest enthalpic barrier (DeltaH++ = 11.4(1) kcal/mol). High selectivity toward methane activation suggested the participation of this chemistry in a catalytic hydromethylation, which was observed in the slow, Cp*(2)ScMe-catalyzed addition of methane across the double bond of propene to form isobutane.

  5. 40 CFR 721.1875 - Boric acid, alkyl and substituted alkyl esters (generic name).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... alkyl esters (generic name). 721.1875 Section 721.1875 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... esters (generic name). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance boric acid, alkyl and substituted alkyl esters (PMN P-86-1252) is subject to...

  6. 40 CFR 721.1875 - Boric acid, alkyl and substituted alkyl esters (generic name).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... alkyl esters (generic name). 721.1875 Section 721.1875 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... esters (generic name). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance boric acid, alkyl and substituted alkyl esters (PMN P-86-1252) is subject to...

  7. 40 CFR 721.1875 - Boric acid, alkyl and substituted alkyl esters (generic name).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... alkyl esters (generic name). 721.1875 Section 721.1875 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... esters (generic name). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance boric acid, alkyl and substituted alkyl esters (PMN P-86-1252) is subject to...

  8. 40 CFR 721.1875 - Boric acid, alkyl and substituted alkyl esters (generic name).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... alkyl esters (generic name). 721.1875 Section 721.1875 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... esters (generic name). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance boric acid, alkyl and substituted alkyl esters (PMN P-86-1252) is subject to...

  9. 40 CFR 721.1875 - Boric acid, alkyl and substituted alkyl esters (generic name).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... alkyl esters (generic name). 721.1875 Section 721.1875 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... esters (generic name). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance boric acid, alkyl and substituted alkyl esters (PMN P-86-1252) is subject to...

  10. Electrochemical DNA biosensor based on the BDD nanograss array electrode

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The development of DNA biosensor has attracted considerable attention due to their potential applications, including gene analysis, clinical diagnostics, forensic study and more medical applications. Using electroactive daunomycin as an indicator, the hybridization detection was measured by differential pulse voltammetry in this study. Results Electrochemical DNA biosensor was developed based on the BDD film electrode (fBDD) and BDD nanograss array electrode (nBDD). In comparison with fBDD and AuNPs/CA/fBDD electrode, the lower semicircle diameter of electrochemical impedance spectroscopy obtained on nBDD and AuNPs/CA/nBDD electrode indicated that the presence of nanograss array improved the reactive site, reduced the interfacial resistance, and made the electron transfer easier. Using electroactive daunomycin as an indicator, the hybridization detection was measured by differential pulse voltammetry. Conclusions The experimental results demonstrated that the prepared AuNPs/CA/nBDD electrode was suitable for DNA hybridization with favorable performance of faster response, higher sensitivity, lower detection limit and satisfactory selectivity, reproducibility and stability. PMID:23575250

  11. Hydroxyl radical mediated DNA base modification by manmade mineral fibres.

    PubMed Central

    Leanderson, P; Söderkvist, P; Tagesson, C

    1989-01-01

    Manmade mineral fibres (MMMFs) were examined for their ability to hydroxylate 2-deoxyguanosine (dG) to 8-hydroxydeoxyguanosine (8-OH-dG), a reaction that is mediated by hydroxyl radicals. It appeared that (1) catalase and the hydroxyl radical scavengers, dimethylsulphoxide and sodium benzoate, inhibited the hydroxylation, whereas Fe2+ and H2O2 potentiated it; (2) pretreatment of MMMFs with the iron chelator, deferoxamine, or with extensive heat (200-400 degrees C), attenuated the hydroxylation; (3) the hydroxylation obtained by various MMMFs varied considerably; (4) there was no apparent correlation between the hydroxylation and the surface area of different MMMFs, although increasing the surface area of a fibre by crushing it increased its hydroxylating capacity; and (5) there was good correlation between the hydroxylation of dG residues in DNA and the hydroxylation of pure dG in solution for the 16 different MMMFs investigated. These findings indicate that MMMFs cause a hydroxyl radical mediated DNA base modification in vitro and that there is considerable variation in the reactivity of different fibre species. The DNA modifying ability seems to depend on physical or chemical characteristics, or both, of the fibre. PMID:2765416

  12. TOPOLOGIES OF COMPLEXES CONTAINING O6-ALKYLGUANINE-DNA ALKYLTRANSFERASE AND DNA

    PubMed Central

    Adams, Claire A.; Melikishvili, Manana; Rodgers, David W.; Rasimas, Joseph J.; Pegg, Anthony E.; Fried, Michael G.

    2009-01-01

    SUMMARY The mutagenic and cytotoxic effects of many alkylating agents are reduced by O6-alkylguanine-DNA alkyltransferase (AGT). In humans this protein protects the integrity of the genome, but also contributes to the resistance of tumors to DNA-alkylating chemotherapeutic agents. Here we describe and test models for cooperative multi-protein complexes of AGT with single-stranded and duplex DNAs that are based on in vitro binding data and the crystal structure of a 1:1 AGT-DNA complex. These models predict that cooperative assemblies contain a 3-start helical array of proteins with dominant protein-protein interactions between the amino-terminal face of protein n and the carboxy-terminal face of protein n + 3, and they predict that binding duplex DNA does not require large changes in B-form DNA geometry. Experimental tests using protein crosslinking analyzed by mass spectrometry, electrophoretic and analytical ultracentrifugation binding assays and topological analyses with closed circular DNA show that the properties of multiprotein AGT-DNA complexes are consistent with these predictions. PMID:19358853

  13. DNA base-pair flipping with fluorescent perylenediimide pincers.

    PubMed

    Zeidan, Tarek A; Hariharan, Mahesh; Siegmund, Karsten; Lewis, Frederick D

    2010-07-30

    The synthesis, structure, and electronic spectra of a series of DNA hairpins possessing two perylenediimide (PDI) base pair surrogates are reported. The PDI chromophores are located in opposite strands of the hairpin base pair domain opposite abasic sites and are either adjacent to each other or separated by a variable number of AT or GC base pairs. Molecular modeling of the conjugate having adjacent PDI chromophores shows that they adopt a slipped, pi-stacked geometry with an angle of 40 degrees between the PDI long axes. The electronic absorption, fluorescence, and circular dichroism of this conjugate are consistent with a stacked PDI structure. Conjugates having one or two GC base pairs between the PDI chromophores display spectra that are consistent with isolated PDIs. Conjugates having 1-4 AT base pairs have more complex spectra, suggestive of an equilibrium between base paired and flipped structures having stacked PDIs. Heating of the conjugates possessing isolated PDI chromophores results in base pair flipping. The free energy for PDI stacking is greater than that for a single AT base pair and comparable to that for a single GC base pair or two AT base pairs.

  14. A novel magneto-DNA duplex probe for bacterial DNA detection based on exonuclease III-aided cycling amplification.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Yan; Wan, Yi; Zhang, Dun; Qi, Peng

    2015-01-01

    A novel magneto-DNA duplex probe for bacterial DNA detection based on exonuclease III (Exo-III) aided cycling amplification has been developed. This magneto-DNA duplex probe contains a partly hybrid fluorophore-modified capture probe and a fluorophore-modified signal probe with magnetic microparticle as carrier. In the presence of a perfectly matched target bacterial DNA, blunt 3'-terminus of the capture probe is formed, activating the Exo-III aided cycling amplification. Thus, Exo-III catalyzes the stepwise removal of mononucleotides from this terminus, releasing both fluorophore-modified signal probe, fluorescent dyes of the capture probe and target DNA. The released target DNA then starts a new cycle, while released fluorescent fragments are recovered with magnetic separation for fluorescence signal collection. This system exhibited sensitive detection of bacterial DNA, with a detection limit of 14 pM because of the unique cleavage function of Exo-III, high fluorescence intensity, and separating function of magneto-DNA duplex probes. Besides this sensitivity, this strategy exhibited excellent selectivity with mismatched bacterial DNA targets and other bacterial species targets and good applicability in real seawater samples, hence, this strategy could be potentially used for qualitative and quantitative analysis of bacteria.

  15. A mitomycin-N6-deoxyadenosine adduct isolated from DNA.

    PubMed

    Palom, Y; Lipman, R; Musser, S M; Tomasz, M

    1998-03-01

    A minor N6-deoxyadenosine adduct of mitomycin C (MC) was isolated from synthetic oligonucleotides and calf thymus DNA, representing the first adduct of MC and a DNA base other than guanine. The structure of the adduct (8) was elucidated using submilligram quantities of total available material. UV difference spectroscopy, circular dichroism, and electrospray mass spectroscopy as well as chemical transformations were utilized in deriving the structure of 8. A series of synthetic oligonucleotides was designed to probe the specificities of the alkylation of adenine by MC. The nature and frequency of the oligonucleotide-MC adducts formed under conditions of reductive activation of MC were determined by their enzymatic digestion to the nucleoside level followed by quantitative analysis of the products by HPLC. The analyses indicated the following: (i) (A)n sequence is favored over (AT)n for adduct formation; (ii) the alkylation favors the duplex structure; (iii) at adenine sites only monofunctional alkylation occurs; (iv) the adenine-to-alkylation frequency in the model oligonucleotides was 0.3-0.6 relative to guanine alkylation at the 5'-ApG sequence but only 0.02-0.1 relative to guanine alkylation at 5'-CpG. The 5'-phosphodiester linkage of the MC-adenine adduct is resistant to snake venom diesterase. The overall ratio of adenine to guanine alkylation in calf thymus DNA was 0.03, indicating that 8 is a minor MC-DNA adduct relative to MC-DNA adducts at guanine residues in the present experimental residues in the present experimental system. However, the HPLC elution time of 8 coincides with that of a major, unknown MC adduct detected previously in mouse mammary tumor cells treated with radiolabeled MC [Bizanek, R., Chowdary, D., Arai, H., Kasai, M., Hughes, C. S., Sartorelli, A. C., Rockwell, S., and Tomasz, M. (1993) Cancer Res. 53, 5127-5134]. Thus, 8 may be identical or closely related to this major adduct formed in vivo. This possibility can now be tested by

  16. An unnatural base pair system for efficient PCR amplification and functionalization of DNA molecules

    PubMed Central

    Kimoto, Michiko; Kawai, Rie; Mitsui, Tsuneo; Yokoyama, Shigeyuki; Hirao, Ichiro

    2009-01-01

    Toward the expansion of the genetic alphabet, we present an unnatural base pair system for efficient PCR amplification, enabling the site-specific incorporation of extra functional components into DNA. This system can be applied to conventional PCR protocols employing DNA templates containing unnatural bases, natural and unnatural base triphosphates, and a 3′→5′ exonuclease-proficient DNA polymerase. For highly faithful and efficient PCR amplification involving the unnatural base pairing, we identified the natural-base sequences surrounding the unnatural bases in DNA templates by an in vitro selection technique, using a DNA library containing the unnatural base. The system facilitates the site-specific incorporation of a variety of modified unnatural bases, linked with functional groups of interest, into amplified DNA. DNA fragments (0.15 amol) containing the unnatural base pair can be amplified 107-fold by 30 cycles of PCR, with <1% total mutation rate of the unnatural base pair site. Using the system, we demonstrated efficient PCR amplification and functionalization of DNA fragments for the extremely sensitive detection of zeptomol-scale target DNA molecules from mixtures with excess amounts (pmol scale) of foreign DNA species. This unnatural base pair system will be applicable to a wide range of DNA/RNA-based technologies. PMID:19073696

  17. Humidity dependence of charge transport through DNA revealed by silicon-based nanotweezers manipulation.

    PubMed

    Yamahata, Christophe; Collard, Dominique; Takekawa, Tetsuya; Kumemura, Momoko; Hashiguchi, Gen; Fujita, Hiroyuki

    2008-01-01

    The study of the electrical properties of DNA has aroused increasing interest since the last decade. So far, controversial arguments have been put forward to explain the electrical charge transport through DNA. Our experiments on DNA bundles manipulated with silicon-based actuated tweezers demonstrate undoubtedly that humidity is the main factor affecting the electrical conduction in DNA. We explain the quasi-Ohmic behavior of DNA and the exponential dependence of its conductivity with relative humidity from the adsorption of water on the DNA backbone. We propose a quantitative model that is consistent with previous studies on DNA and other materials, like porous silicon, subjected to different humidity conditions.

  18. Detection of base-pair mismatches in DNA using graphene-based nanopore device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kundu, Sourav; Karmakar, S. N.

    2016-04-01

    We present a unique way to detect base-pair mismatches in DNA, leading to a different epigenetic disorder by the method of nanopore sequencing. Based on a tight-binding formulation of a graphene-based nanopore device, using the Green’s function approach we study the changes in the electronic transport properties of the device as we translocate a double-stranded DNA through the nanopore embedded in a zigzag graphene nanoribbon. In the present work we are not only successful in detecting the usual AT and GC pairs but also a set of possible mismatches in the complementary base pairing.

  19. Detection of base-pair mismatches in DNA using graphene-based nanopore device.

    PubMed

    Kundu, Sourav; Karmakar, S N

    2016-04-01

    We present a unique way to detect base-pair mismatches in DNA, leading to a different epigenetic disorder by the method of nanopore sequencing. Based on a tight-binding formulation of a graphene-based nanopore device, using the Green's function approach we study the changes in the electronic transport properties of the device as we translocate a double-stranded DNA through the nanopore embedded in a zigzag graphene nanoribbon. In the present work we are not only successful in detecting the usual AT and GC pairs but also a set of possible mismatches in the complementary base pairing.

  20. Anharmonic Vibrational Signatures of DNA Bases and Watson-Crick Base Pairs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Gui-xiu; Ma, Xiao-yan; Wang, Jian-ping

    2009-12-01

    Changes of molecular structure and associated charge distributions, and changes of anharmonic vibrational parameters from DNA base monomers to the Watson-Crick base pairs, have been investigated at the density functional theory level. Through examination of the NH2, N-H, and C = O stretching vibrational modes that are involved in the multiple H-bonds in the base pairs, sensitivity of their diagonal and off-diagonal anharmonicities, as well as anharmonic vibrational couplings, to the structure change are predicted. Our results reveal the intrinsic connection between the anharmonic vibrational potentials, H-bonding, and electrostatic interactions in DNA bases.

  1. Recognizing a Single Base in an Individual DNA Strand: A Step Toward Nanopore DNA Sequencing**

    PubMed Central

    Ashkenasy, N.; Sánchez-Quesada, J.; Ghadiri, M. R.; Bayley, H.

    2007-01-01

    Functional supramolecular chemistry at the single-molecule level. Single strands of DNA can be captured inside α-hemolysin transmembrane pore protein to form single-species α-HL·DNA pseudorotaxanes. This process can be used to identify a single adenine nucleotide at a specific location on a strand of DNA by the characteristic reductions in the α-HL ion conductance. This study suggests that α-HL-mediated single-molecule DNA sequencing might be fundamentally feasible. PMID:15666419

  2. Biomaterial-based Memory Device Development by Conducting Metallic DNA

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-05-28

    basis of the redshift of UV absorption spectra, we think that the incorporation of metal ions may result in a reduction of the original DNA band gap...memristor based on the changing of the boundary between the high-resistance and low-resistance layers of titanium dioxide TiO2 and TiO2 -x13. Their...electrode cell. These electrodes included a modified Au electrode (working electrode), a coiled platinum wire (counter electrode), and an Ag /AgCl

  3. Modeling the bandstructures of B-DNA base stacks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rengifo, E.; Murillo, G.; Arce, J. C.

    2013-05-01

    A pseudohelical approximation for the calculation of the bandstructures of DNA base homostacks in B conformation is introduced. It consists of choosing a unit cell of only two nucleobases with relative parallel displacement and twist that locally mimic the helical conformation. It is tested employing the extended Hückel method with a unique Wolfsberg-Helmholtz parameter. The resulting bandgaps and ionization potential trend agree well with the ones reported in the literature employing the full screw-axis symmetry and higher levels of theory. The electron and hole effective masses extracted from the bandstructures follow the same trends as the experimentally reported mobilities.

  4. Tetrahedron-structured DNA and functional oligonucleotide for construction of an electrochemical DNA-based biosensor.

    PubMed

    Bu, Nan-Nan; Tang, Chun-Xia; He, Xi-Wen; Yin, Xue-Bo

    2011-07-21

    Tetrahedron-structured DNA (ts-DNA) in combination with a functionalized oligonucleotide was used to develop a "turn-on" biosensor for Hg(2+) ions. The ts-DNA provided an improved sensitivity and was used to block the active sites.

  5. Base-by-Base Counting of Nucleotide Incorporations by DNA Polymerase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turvey, Mackenzie W.; Gul, O. Tolga; Pugliese, Kaitlin M.; Marushchak, Denys O.; Rajapakse, Arith J.; Weiss, Gregory A.; Collins, Phillip G.

    Previously, the catalytic cycle of DNA polymerase has been recorded by tethering single polymerase molecules to single-walled carbon nanotube field effect transistors (FETs). As the polymerase incorporates nucleotides into a single-stranded DNA template, it generates electrical signals in the SWCNT-FET. Here, we investigate the accuracy of this electronic method by using low concentrations (<10 nM) of DNA template, such that the signal consists of long, diffusion-limited pauses interrupted by template binding and a burst of nucleotide incorporation events. By counting the events generated by as few as 10 template molecules, template length has been correctly determined with <1 base pair resolution. Furthermore, differing template lengths can be identified and correctly enumerated in solutions containing mixtures of templates. Processivity of the Klenow Fragment of DNA polymerase currently limits read lengths to 50-100 base pairs, but the FET technique should work equally well with longer-processivity polymerases.

  6. Mechanical properties of base-modified DNA are not strictly determined by base stacking or electrostatic interactions.

    PubMed

    Peters, Justin P; Mogil, Lauren S; McCauley, Micah J; Williams, Mark C; Maher, L James

    2014-07-15

    This work probes the mystery of what balance of forces creates the extraordinary mechanical stiffness of DNA to bending and twisting. Here we explore the relationship between base stacking, functional group occupancy of the DNA minor and major grooves, and DNA mechanical properties. We study double-helical DNA molecules substituting either inosine for guanosine or 2,6-diaminopurine for adenine. These DNA variants, respectively, remove or add an amino group from the DNA minor groove, with corresponding changes in hydrogen-bonding and base stacking energy. Using the techniques of ligase-catalyzed cyclization kinetics, atomic force microscopy, and force spectroscopy with optical tweezers, we show that these DNA variants have bending persistence lengths within the range of values reported for sequence-dependent variation of the natural DNA bases. Comparison with seven additional DNA variants that modify the DNA major groove reveals that DNA bending stiffness is not correlated with base stacking energy or groove occupancy. Data from circular dichroism spectroscopy indicate that base analog substitution can alter DNA helical geometry, suggesting a complex relationship among base stacking, groove occupancy, helical structure, and DNA bend stiffness.

  7. Materials performance in HF-alkylation units

    SciTech Connect

    Forsen, O.; Aromaa, J.; Somervuori, M.; Tavi, M.

    1995-11-01

    Materials selection in HF-alkylation units is mostly based on long time experience. The most widely used material in the Station units is standard carbon steel, because it is capable to form a thick protective FeF{sub 2} layer in concentrated or anhydrous hydrofluoric acid. The corrosion resistance decreases, when the acid is dilute (less than 64% HF) or the temperature is above 160F (70 C). The composition and metallurgical state are also suspected to affect the corrosion resistance of carbon steel. The effect of composition appears more complicated than believed, especially the A-106 specification on the total amount of Cr+Ni+Cu+Mo+V < 1% should be studied more closely from the corrosion point of view. Laboratory tests showed that the uniform corrosion rate may be 100 times higher in galvanic contact of two dissimilar steels. The effect of galvanic contacts can neither be excluded in the process equipment corrosion cases.

  8. S-alkylation of soft scorpionates.

    PubMed

    Rajasekharan-Nair, Rajeev; Moore, Dean; Chalmers, Kirsten; Wallace, Dawn; Diamond, Louise M; Darby, Lisa; Armstrong, David R; Reglinski, John; Spicer, Mark D

    2013-02-11

    The alkylation reactions of soft scorpionates are reported. The hydrotris(S-alkyl-methimazolyl)borate dications (alkyl = methyl, allyl, benzyl), which were prepared by the reaction of Tm(Me) anion and primary alkyl halides, have been isolated and structurally characterised. The reaction is, however, not universally successful. DFT analysis of these alkylation reactions (C=S versus B-H alkylation) indicates that the observed outcome is driven by kinetic factors. Extending the study to incorporate alternative imine thiones (mercaptobenzothiazole, bz; thiazoline, tz) led to the structural characterisation of di[aquo-μ-aquohydrotris(mercaptobenzothiazolyl)boratosodium], which contains sodium atoms in the κ(3)-S,S,S coordination mode. Alkylation of Na[Tbz] and Na[tzTtz] leads to decomposition resulting in the formation of the simple S-alkylated heterocycles. The analysis of the species involved in these reactions shows an inherent weakness in the B-N bond in soft scorpionates, which has implications for their use in more advanced chemistry.

  9. Occupational asthma due to alkyl cyanoacrylate

    SciTech Connect

    Nakazawa, T. )

    1990-08-01

    A case of bronchial asthma induced by occupational exposure to alkyl cyanoacrylate, an adhesive, occurred in an assembly operation. Provocative exposure testing induced immediate and delayed asthmatic responses. Alkyl cyanoacrylate seemed to act as an allergen or as an irritant, resulting in the development of asthma.

  10. Intelligent DNA-based molecular diagnostics using linked genetic markers

    SciTech Connect

    Pathak, D.K.; Perlin, M.W.; Hoffman, E.P.

    1994-12-31

    This paper describes a knowledge-based system for molecular diagnostics, and its application to fully automated diagnosis of X-linked genetic disorders. Molecular diagnostic information is used in clinical practice for determining genetic risks, such as carrier determination and prenatal diagnosis. Initially, blood samples are obtained from related individuals, and PCR amplification is performed. Linkage-based molecular diagnosis then entails three data analysis steps. First, for every individual, the alleles (i.e., DNA composition) are determined at specified chromosomal locations. Second, the flow of genetic material among the individuals is established. Third, the probability that a given individual is either a carrier of the disease or affected by the disease is determined. The current practice is to perform each of these three steps manually, which is costly, time consuming, labor-intensive, and error-prone. As such, the knowledge-intensive data analysis and interpretation supersede the actual experimentation effort as the major bottleneck in molecular diagnostics. By examining the human problem solving for the task, we have designed and implemented a prototype knowledge-based system capable of fully automating linkage-based molecular diagnostics in X-linked genetic disorders, including Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy (DMD). Our system uses knowledge-based interpretation of gel electrophoresis images to determine individual DNA marker labels, a constraint satisfaction search for consistent genetic flow among individuals, and a blackboard-style problem solver for risk assessment. We describe the system`s successful diagnosis of DMD carrier and affected individuals from raw clinical data.

  11. Students' understanding of alkyl halide reactions in undergraduate organic chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cruz-Ramirez de Arellano, Daniel

    Organic chemistry is an essential subject for many undergraduate students completing degrees in science, engineering, and pre-professional programs. However, students often struggle with the concepts and skills required to successfully solve organic chemistry exercises. Since alkyl halides are traditionally the first functional group that is studied in undergraduate organic chemistry courses, establishing a robust understanding of the concepts and reactions related to them can be beneficial in assuring students' success in organic chemistry courses. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to elucidate and describe students' understanding of alkyl halide reactions in an undergraduate organic chemistry course. Participants were interviewed using a think-aloud protocol in which they were given a set of exercises dealing with reactions and mechanisms of alkyl halide molecules in order to shed light on the students' understanding of these reactions and elucidate any gaps in understanding and incorrect warrants that may be present. These interviews were transcribed and analyzed using qualitative inquiry approaches. In general, the findings from this study show that the students exhibited gaps in understanding and incorrect warrants dealing with: (1) classifying substances as bases and/or nucleophiles, (2) assessing the basic or nucleophilic strength of substances, (3) accurately describing the electron movement of the steps that take place during alkyl halide reaction mechanisms, and (4) assessing the viability of their proposed reactive intermediates and breakage of covalent bonds. In addition, implications for teaching and future research are proposed.

  12. Chiral Antioxidant-based Gold Nanoclusters Reprogram DNA Epigenetic Patterns

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Yue; Fu, Hualin; Zhang, Chunlei; Cheng, Shangli; Gao, Jie; Wang, Zhen; Jin, Weilin; Conde, João; Cui, Daxiang

    2016-01-01

    Epigenetic modifications sit ‘on top of’ the genome and influence DNA transcription, which can force a significant impact on cellular behavior and phenotype and, consequently human development and disease. Conventional methods for evaluating epigenetic modifications have inherent limitations and, hence, new methods based on nanoscale devices are needed. Here, we found that antioxidant (glutathione) chiral gold nanoclusters induce a decrease of 5-hydroxymethylcytosine (5hmC), which is an important epigenetic marker that associates with gene transcription regulation. This epigenetic change was triggered partially through ROS activation and oxidation generated by the treatment with glutathione chiral gold nanoclusters, which may inhibit the activity of TET proteins catalyzing the conversion of 5-methylcytosine (5mC) to 5hmC. In addition, these chiral gold nanoclusters can downregulate TET1 and TET2 mRNA expression. Alteration of TET-5hmC signaling will then affect several downstream targets and be involved in many aspects of cell behavior. We demonstrate for the first time that antioxidant-based chiral gold nanomaterials have a direct effect on epigenetic process of TET-5hmC pathways and reveal critical DNA demethylation patterns. PMID:27633378

  13. A hypermutation phenotype and somatic MSH6 mutations in recurrent human malignant gliomas after alkylator chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Hunter, Chris; Smith, Raffaella; Cahill, Daniel P; Stephens, Philip; Stevens, Claire; Teague, Jon; Greenman, Chris; Edkins, Sarah; Bignell, Graham; Davies, Helen; O'Meara, Sarah; Parker, Adrian; Avis, Tim; Barthorpe, Syd; Brackenbury, Lisa; Buck, Gemma; Butler, Adam; Clements, Jody; Cole, Jennifer; Dicks, Ed; Forbes, Simon; Gorton, Matthew; Gray, Kristian; Halliday, Kelly; Harrison, Rachel; Hills, Katy; Hinton, Jonathon; Jenkinson, Andy; Jones, David; Kosmidou, Vivienne; Laman, Ross; Lugg, Richard; Menzies, Andrew; Perry, Janet; Petty, Robert; Raine, Keiran; Richardson, David; Shepherd, Rebecca; Small, Alexandra; Solomon, Helen; Tofts, Calli; Varian, Jennifer; West, Sofie; Widaa, Sara; Yates, Andy; Easton, Douglas F; Riggins, Gregory; Roy, Jennifer E; Levine, Kymberly K; Mueller, Wolf; Batchelor, Tracy T; Louis, David N; Stratton, Michael R; Futreal, P Andrew; Wooster, Richard

    2006-04-15

    Malignant gliomas have a very poor prognosis. The current standard of care for these cancers consists of extended adjuvant treatment with the alkylating agent temozolomide after surgical resection and radiotherapy. Although a statistically significant increase in survival has been reported with this regimen, nearly all gliomas recur and become insensitive to further treatment with this class of agents. We sequenced 500 kb of genomic DNA corresponding to the kinase domains of 518 protein kinases in each of nine gliomas. Large numbers of somatic mutations were observed in two gliomas recurrent after alkylating agent treatment. The pattern of mutations in these cases showed strong similarity to that induced by alkylating agents in experimental systems. Further investigation revealed inactivating somatic mutations of the mismatch repair gene MSH6 in each case. We propose that inactivating somatic mutations of MSH6 confer resistance to alkylating agents in gliomas in vivo and concurrently unleash accelerated mutagenesis in resistant clones as a consequence of continued exposure to alkylating agents in the presence of defective mismatch repair. The evidence therefore suggests that when MSH6 is inactivated in gliomas, alkylating agents convert from induction of tumor cell death to promotion of neoplastic progression. These observations highlight the potential of large scale sequencing for revealing and elucidating mutagenic processes operative in individual human cancers.

  14. DNA microarray-based mutation discovery and genotyping.

    PubMed

    Gresham, David

    2011-01-01

    DNA microarrays provide an efficient means of identifying single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in DNA samples and characterizing their frequencies in individual and mixed samples. We have studied the parameters that determine the sensitivity of DNA probes to SNPs and found that the melting temperature (T (m)) of the probe is the primary determinant of probe sensitivity. An isothermal-melting temperature DNA microarray design, in which the T (m) of all probes is tightly distributed, can be implemented by varying the length of DNA probes within a single DNA microarray. I describe guidelines for designing isothermal-melting temperature DNA microarrays and protocols for labeling and hybridizing DNA samples to DNA microarrays for SNP discovery, genotyping, and quantitative determination of allele frequencies in mixed samples.

  15. Magnetic particle-based sandwich sensor with DNA-modified carbon nanotubes as recognition elements for detection of DNA hybridization.

    PubMed

    Hu, Po; Huang, Cheng Zhi; Li, Yuan Fang; Ling, Jian; Liu, Yu Ling; Fei, Liang Run; Xie, Jian Ping

    2008-03-01

    In this contribution, we design a visual sensor for DNA hybridization with DNA probe-modified magnetic particles (MPs) and multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs) without involving a visual recognition element such as fluorescent/chemiluminescent reagents. It was found that DNA probe-modified MWNTs, which could be dispersed in aqueous medium and have strong light scattering signals under the excitation of a light beam in the UV-vis region, could connect with DNA probe-modified MPs together in the presence of perfectly complementary target DNA and form a sandwich structure. In a magnetic field, the formed MP-MWNT species can easily be removed from the solution, resulting in a decrease of light scattering signals. Thus, a magnetic particle-based sandwich sensor could be developed to detect DNA hybridization by measuring the light scattering signals with DNA-modified MWNTs as recognition elements. Experiments showed that the DNA-modified MPs sensor could be reused at least 17 times and was stable for more than 6 months.

  16. Overexpression of DNA ligase III in mitochondria protects cells against oxidative stress and improves mitochondrial DNA base excision repair.

    PubMed

    Akbari, Mansour; Keijzers, Guido; Maynard, Scott; Scheibye-Knudsen, Morten; Desler, Claus; Hickson, Ian D; Bohr, Vilhelm A

    2014-04-01

    Base excision repair (BER) is the most prominent DNA repair pathway in human mitochondria. BER also results in a temporary generation of AP-sites, single-strand breaks and nucleotide gaps. Thus, incomplete BER can result in the generation of DNA repair intermediates that can disrupt mitochondrial DNA replication and transcription and generate mutations. We carried out BER analysis in highly purified mitochondrial extracts from human cell lines U2OS and HeLa, and mouse brain using a circular DNA substrate containing a lesion at a specific position. We found that DNA ligation is significantly slower than the preceding mitochondrial BER steps. Overexpression of DNA ligase III in mitochondria improved the rate of overall BER, increased cell survival after menadione induced oxidative stress and reduced autophagy following the inhibition of the mitochondrial electron transport chain complex I by rotenone. Our results suggest that the amount of DNA ligase III in mitochondria may be critical for cell survival following prolonged oxidative stress, and demonstrate a functional link between mitochondrial DNA damage and repair, cell survival upon oxidative stress, and removal of dysfunctional mitochondria by autophagy.

  17. DNA

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stent, Gunther S.

    1970-01-01

    This history for molecular genetics and its explanation of DNA begins with an analysis of the Golden Jubilee essay papers, 1955. The paper ends stating that the higher nervous system is the one major frontier of biological inquiry which still offers some romance of research. (Author/VW)

  18. Metal-mediated DNA base pairing: alternatives to hydrogen-bonded Watson-Crick base pairs.

    PubMed

    Takezawa, Yusuke; Shionoya, Mitsuhiko

    2012-12-18

    With its capacity to store and transfer the genetic information within a sequence of monomers, DNA forms its central role in chemical evolution through replication and amplification. This elegant behavior is largely based on highly specific molecular recognition between nucleobases through the specific hydrogen bonds in the Watson-Crick base pairing system. While the native base pairs have been amazingly sophisticated through the long history of evolution, synthetic chemists have devoted considerable efforts to create alternative base pairing systems in recent decades. Most of these new systems were designed based on the shape complementarity of the pairs or the rearrangement of hydrogen-bonding patterns. We wondered whether metal coordination could serve as an alternative driving force for DNA base pairing and why hydrogen bonding was selected on Earth in the course of molecular evolution. Therefore, we envisioned an alternative design strategy: we replaced hydrogen bonding with another important scheme in biological systems, metal-coordination bonding. In this Account, we provide an overview of the chemistry of metal-mediated base pairing including basic concepts, molecular design, characteristic structures and properties, and possible applications of DNA-based molecular systems. We describe several examples of artificial metal-mediated base pairs, such as Cu(2+)-mediated hydroxypyridone base pair, H-Cu(2+)-H (where H denotes a hydroxypyridone-bearing nucleoside), developed by us and other researchers. To design the metallo-base pairs we carefully chose appropriate combinations of ligand-bearing nucleosides and metal ions. As expected from their stronger bonding through metal coordination, DNA duplexes possessing metallo-base pairs exhibited higher thermal stability than natural hydrogen-bonded DNAs. Furthermore, we could also use metal-mediated base pairs to construct or induce other high-order structures. These features could lead to metal-responsive functional

  19. Covering Your Bases: Inheritance of DNA Methylation in Plant Genomes

    PubMed Central

    Schmitz, Robert J.

    2014-01-01

    Cytosine methylation is an important base modification that is inherited across mitotic and meiotic cell divisions in plant genomes. Heritable methylation variants can contribute to within-species phenotypic variation. Few methylation variants were known until recently, making it possible to begin to address major unanswered questions: the extent of natural methylation variation within plant genomes, its effects on phenotypic variation, its degree of dependence on genotype, and how it fits into an evolutionary context. Techniques like whole-genome bisulfite sequencing (WGBS) make it possible to determine cytosine methylation states at single-base resolution across entire genomes and populations. Application of this method to natural and novel experimental populations is revealing answers to these long-standing questions about the role of DNA methylation in plant genomes. PMID:24270503

  20. DNA based identification of medicinal materials in Chinese patent medicines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Rong; Dong, Juan; Cui, Xin; Wang, Wei; Yasmeen, Afshan; Deng, Yun; Zeng, Xiaomao; Tang, Zhuo

    2012-12-01

    Chinese patent medicines (CPM) are highly processed and easy to use Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM). The market for CPM in China alone is tens of billions US dollars annually and some of the CPM are also used as dietary supplements for health augmentation in the western countries. But concerns continue to be raised about the legality, safety and efficacy of many popular CPM. Here we report a pioneer work of applying molecular biotechnology to the identification of CPM, particularly well refined oral liquids and injections. What's more, this PCR based method can also be developed to an easy to use and cost-effective visual chip by taking advantage of G-quadruplex based Hybridization Chain Reaction. This study demonstrates that DNA identification of specific Medicinal materials is an efficient and cost-effective way to audit highly processed CPM and will assist in monitoring their quality and legality.

  1. Ultrafast dynamics in DNA base pairs following ultraviolet excitation.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orr-Ewing, Andrew

    2015-03-01

    Photo-protective mechanisms in DNA are essential to maintain the integrity of the genetic code by preventing damage from absorption of solar ultraviolet (UV) radiation. We have used time-resolved infra-red (TRIR) spectroscopy to observe the dynamics of Watson-Crick nucleobase pairs following absorption of femtosecond UV laser pulses. The base pairs are prepared as nucleosides in solution, and photo-induced dynamics are probed in the carbonyl and N-H bond stretching regions using broadband IR pulses with picosecond time resolution. Results will be presented for the guanine-cytosine (G-C) base pair, contrasting the rapid recovery of ground-state products (the photo-protection pathway) with formation of other photoproducts which might represent photo-damage mechanisms. This work is a collaboration with the group of Prof F. Temps (Christian-Albrechts-Universitat zu Kiel). This research is supported by ERC Advanced Grant 290966 CAPRI.

  2. DNA based identification of medicinal materials in Chinese patent medicines

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Rong; Dong, Juan; Cui, Xin; Wang, Wei; Yasmeen, Afshan; Deng, Yun; Zeng, Xiaomao; Tang, Zhuo

    2012-01-01

    Chinese patent medicines (CPM) are highly processed and easy to use Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM). The market for CPM in China alone is tens of billions US dollars annually and some of the CPM are also used as dietary supplements for health augmentation in the western countries. But concerns continue to be raised about the legality, safety and efficacy of many popular CPM. Here we report a pioneer work of applying molecular biotechnology to the identification of CPM, particularly well refined oral liquids and injections. What's more, this PCR based method can also be developed to an easy to use and cost-effective visual chip by taking advantage of G-quadruplex based Hybridization Chain Reaction. This study demonstrates that DNA identification of specific Medicinal materials is an efficient and cost-effective way to audit highly processed CPM and will assist in monitoring their quality and legality. PMID:23233877

  3. Poly(divinylbenzene-alkyl methacrylate) monolithic stationary phases in capillary electrochromatography.

    PubMed

    Huang, Hsi-Ya; Cheng, Yi-Jie; Liu, Wan-Ling; Hsu, Yi-Fen; Lee, Szetsen

    2010-09-10

    In this study, a series of poly(divinylbenzene-alkyl methacrylate) monolithic stationary phases, which were prepared by single step in situ polymerization of divinylbenzene and various alkyl methacrylates (butyl-, octyl-, or lauryl-methacrylate), were developed as separation columns of benzophenone compounds for capillary electrochromatography (CEC). In addition to the presence of plenty of benzene moieties, the stationary phases contained long and flexible alkyl groups on the surface. With an increase in the molecular length of alkyl methacrylate, the polymeric monolith, which had higher hydrophobicity, effectively reduced the peak tailing of benzophenones, but a weaker retention was observed. The unusual phenomenon was likely due to the pi-pi interaction between the aromatic compound and the polymeric material. The usage of longer alkyl methacrylate as reaction monomer limited the retention of aromatic compounds on the stationary phase surface, thus the pi-pi interaction between them was possibly reduced. Consequently, the retention time of aromatic compounds was markedly decreased with an increase in carbon length of alkyl methacrylate that was carried on the polymeric monolith. Compared to previous reports on polystyrene-based columns in which the peak-tailing problem was reduced by decreasing the benzene moieties on the stationary phase, this study demonstrated that the undesirable retention (peak-tailing) could also be improved by the inclusion of long alkyl methacrylate to the polystyrene-based columns.

  4. Assembly of a tile-based multilayered DNA nanostructure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Son, Junyoung; Lee, Junywe; Tandon, Anshula; Kim, Byeonghoon; Yoo, Sanghyun; Lee, Chang-Won; Park, Sung Ha

    2015-04-01

    The Watson-Crick complementarity of DNA is exploited to construct periodically patterned nanostructures, and we herein demonstrate tile-based three dimensional (3D) multilayered DNA nanostructures that incorporate two design strategies: vertical growth and horizontal layer stacking with substrate-assisted growth. To this end, we have designed a periodically holed double-double crossover (DDX) template that can be used to examine the growth of the multilayer structures in both the vertical and horizontal directions. For vertical growth, the traditional 2D double crossover (DX) DNA lattice is seeded and grown vertically from periodic holes in the DDX template. For horizontal stacking, the DDX layers are stacked by binding the connector tiles between each layer. Although both types of multilayers exhibited successful formation, the observations with an atomic force microscope indicated that the DDX layer growth achieved with the horizontal stacking approach could be considered to be slightly better relative to the vertical growth of the DX layers in terms of uniformity, layer size, and discreteness. In particular, the newly designed DDX template layer provided a parallel arrangement between each domain with substrate-assisted growth. This kind of layer arrangement suggests a possibility of using our design scheme in the construction of other periodic structures.The Watson-Crick complementarity of DNA is exploited to construct periodically patterned nanostructures, and we herein demonstrate tile-based three dimensional (3D) multilayered DNA nanostructures that incorporate two design strategies: vertical growth and horizontal layer stacking with substrate-assisted growth. To this end, we have designed a periodically holed double-double crossover (DDX) template that can be used to examine the growth of the multilayer structures in both the vertical and horizontal directions. For vertical growth, the traditional 2D double crossover (DX) DNA lattice is seeded and grown

  5. Toward DNA-based facial composites: preliminary results and validation.

    PubMed

    Claes, Peter; Hill, Harold; Shriver, Mark D

    2014-11-01

    The potential of constructing useful DNA-based facial composites is forensically of great interest. Given the significant identity information coded in the human face these predictions could help investigations out of an impasse. Although, there is substantial evidence that much of the total variation in facial features is genetically mediated, the discovery of which genes and gene variants underlie normal facial variation has been hampered primarily by the multipartite nature of facial variation. Traditionally, such physical complexity is simplified by simple scalar measurements defined a priori, such as nose or mouth width or alternatively using dimensionality reduction techniques such as principal component analysis where each principal coordinate is then treated as a scalar trait. However, as shown in previous and related work, a more impartial and systematic approach to modeling facial morphology is available and can facilitate both the gene discovery steps, as we recently showed, and DNA-based facial composite construction, as we show here. We first use genomic ancestry and sex to create a base-face, which is simply an average sex and ancestry matched face. Subsequently, the effects of 24 individual SNPs that have been shown to have significant effects on facial variation are overlaid on the base-face forming the predicted-face in a process akin to a photomontage or image blending. We next evaluate the accuracy of predicted faces using cross-validation. Physical accuracy of the facial predictions either locally in particular parts of the face or in terms of overall similarity is mainly determined by sex and genomic ancestry. The SNP-effects maintain the physical accuracy while significantly increasing the distinctiveness of the facial predictions, which would be expected to reduce false positives in perceptual identification tasks. To the best of our knowledge this is the first effort at generating facial composites from DNA and the results are preliminary

  6. Sequential addition of short DNA oligos in DNA-polymerase-based synthesis reactions

    DOEpatents

    Gardner, Shea N; Mariella, Jr., Raymond P; Christian, Allen T; Young, Jennifer A; Clague, David S

    2013-06-25

    A method of preselecting a multiplicity of DNA sequence segments that will comprise the DNA molecule of user-defined sequence, separating the DNA sequence segments temporally, and combining the multiplicity of DNA sequence segments with at least one polymerase enzyme wherein the multiplicity of DNA sequence segments join to produce the DNA molecule of user-defined sequence. Sequence segments may be of length n, where n is an odd integer. In one embodiment the length of desired hybridizing overlap is specified by the user and the sequences and the protocol for combining them are guided by computational (bioinformatics) predictions. In one embodiment sequence segments are combined from multiple reading frames to span the same region of a sequence, so that multiple desired hybridizations may occur with different overlap lengths.

  7. Alkylating agents and immunotoxins exert synergistic cytotoxic activity against ovarian cancer cells. Mechanism of action.

    PubMed Central

    Lidor, Y J; O'Briant, K C; Xu, F J; Hamilton, T C; Ozols, R F; Bast, R C

    1993-01-01

    Alkylating agents can be administered in high dosage to patients with ovarian cancer using autologous bone marrow support, but drug-resistant tumor cells can still persist. Immunotoxins provide reagents that might eliminate drug resistant cells. In the present study, concurrent treatment with alkylators and immunotoxins proved superior to treatment with each agent alone. Toxin immunoconjugates prepared from different monoclonal antibodies and recombinant ricin A chain (rRTA) inhibited clonogenic growth of ovarian cancer cell lines in limiting dilution assays. When alkylating agents and toxin conjugates were used in combination, the addition of the immunotoxins to cisplatin, or to cisplatin and thiotepa, produced synergistic cytotoxic activity against the OVCA 432 and OVCAR III cell lines. Studies performed to clarify the mechanism of action showed that cisplatin and thiotepa had no influence on internalization and binding of the 317G5-rRTA immunotoxin. Intracellular uptake of [195m]Pt-cisplatin was not affected by the immunoconjugate and thiotepa. The combination of the 317G5-rRTA and thiotepa, as well as 317G5-rRTA alone, increased [195m]Pt cisplatin-DNA adduct levels. The immunotoxin alone and in combination with the alkylators decreased intracellular glutathione levels and reduced glutathione-S-transferase activity. Repair of DNA damage induced by the combination of alkylators and 317G5-rRTA was significantly reduced when compared to repair after damage with alkylators alone. These findings suggest that immunotoxins affect levels and activity of enzymes required for the prevention and repair of alkylator damage. Images PMID:8227359

  8. DNA Source Selection for Downstream Applications Based on DNA Quality Indicators Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Lucena-Aguilar, Gema; Sánchez-López, Ana María; Barberán-Aceituno, Cristina; Carrillo-Ávila, José Antonio; López-Guerrero, José Antonio

    2016-01-01

    High-quality human DNA samples and associated information of individuals are necessary for biomedical research. Biobanks act as a support infrastructure for the scientific community by providing a large number of high-quality biological samples for specific downstream applications. For this purpose, biobank methods for sample preparation must ensure the usefulness and long-term functionality of the products obtained. Quality indicators are the tool to measure these parameters, the purity and integrity determination being those specifically used for DNA. This study analyzes the quality indicators in DNA samples derived from 118 frozen human tissues in optimal cutting temperature (OCT) reactive, 68 formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) tissues, 119 frozen blood samples, and 26 saliva samples. The results obtained for DNA quality are discussed in association with the usefulness for downstream applications and availability of the DNA source in the target study. In brief, if any material is valid, blood is the most approachable option of prospective collection of samples providing high-quality DNA. However, if diseased tissue is a requisite or samples are available, the recommended source of DNA would be frozen tissue. These conclusions will determine the best source of DNA, according to the planned downstream application. Furthermore our results support the conclusion that a complete procedure of DNA quantification and qualification is necessary to guarantee the appropriate management of the samples, avoiding low confidence results, high costs, and a waste of samples. PMID:27158753

  9. DNA Source Selection for Downstream Applications Based on DNA Quality Indicators Analysis.

    PubMed

    Lucena-Aguilar, Gema; Sánchez-López, Ana María; Barberán-Aceituno, Cristina; Carrillo-Ávila, José Antonio; López-Guerrero, José Antonio; Aguilar-Quesada, Rocío

    2016-08-01

    High-quality human DNA samples and associated information of individuals are necessary for biomedical research. Biobanks act as a support infrastructure for the scientific community by providing a large number of high-quality biological samples for specific downstream applications. For this purpose, biobank methods for sample preparation must ensure the usefulness and long-term functionality of the products obtained. Quality indicators are the tool to measure these parameters, the purity and integrity determination being those specifically used for DNA. This study analyzes the quality indicators in DNA samples derived from 118 frozen human tissues in optimal cutting temperature (OCT) reactive, 68 formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) tissues, 119 frozen blood samples, and 26 saliva samples. The results obtained for DNA quality are discussed in association with the usefulness for downstream applications and availability of the DNA source in the target study. In brief, if any material is valid, blood is the most approachable option of prospective collection of samples providing high-quality DNA. However, if diseased tissue is a requisite or samples are available, the recommended source of DNA would be frozen tissue. These conclusions will determine the best source of DNA, according to the planned downstream application. Furthermore our results support the conclusion that a complete procedure of DNA quantification and qualification is necessary to guarantee the appropriate management of the samples, avoiding low confidence results, high costs, and a waste of samples.

  10. Alkylation of organic aromatic compounds

    DOEpatents

    Smith, L.A. Jr.

    1989-07-18

    Aromatic compounds are alkylated in a catalytic distillation, wherein the catalyst structure also serves as a distillation component by contacting the aromatic compound with a C[sub 2] to C[sub 10] olefin in the catalyst bed under 0.25 to 50 atmospheres of pressure and at temperatures in the range of 80 C to 500 C, using as the catalyst a mole sieve characterized as acidic or an acidic cation exchange resin. For example, ethyl benzene is produced by feeding ethylene below the catalyst bed while benzene is conveniently added through the reflux in molar excess to that required to react with ethylene, thereby reacting substantially all of the ethylene and recovering benzene as the principal overhead and ethyl benzene in the bottoms. 1 fig.

  11. Alkylation of organic aromatic compounds

    DOEpatents

    Smith, Jr., Lawrence A.; Arganbright, Robert P.; Hearn, Dennis

    1994-01-01

    Aromatic compounds are alkylated in a catalytic distillation, wherein the catalyst structure also serves as a distillation component by contacting the aromatic compound with a C.sub.2 to C.sub.10 olefin in the catalyst bed under 0.25 to 50 atmospheres of pressure and at temperatures in the range of 80.degree. C. to 500.degree. C., using as the catalyst a mole sieve characterized as acidic or an acidic cation exchange resin. For example, ethyl benzene is produced by feeding ethylene below the catalyst bed while benzene is conveniently added through the reflux in molar excess to that required to react with ethylene, thereby reacting substantially all of the ethylene and recovering benzene as the principal overhead and ethyl benzene in the bottoms.

  12. Alkylation of organic aromatic compounds

    DOEpatents

    Smith, L.A. Jr.; Arganbright, R.P.; Hearn, D.

    1993-09-07

    Aromatic compounds are alkylated in a catalytic distillation, wherein the catalyst structure also serves as a distillation component by contacting the aromatic compound with a C[sub 2] to C[sub 10] olefin in the catalyst bed under 0.25 to 50 atmospheres of pressure and at temperatures in the range of 80 C to 500 C, using as the catalyst a molecular sieve characterized as acidic or an acidic cation exchange resin. For example, ethyl benzene is produced by feeding ethylene to about the mid point of the catalyst bed while benzene is conveniently added through the reflux in molar excess to that required to react with ethylene, thereby reacting substantially all of the ethylene and recovering benzene as the principal overhead and ethyl benzene in the bottoms. 1 figures.

  13. Alkylation of organic aromatic compounds

    DOEpatents

    Smith, L.A. Jr.; Arganbright, R.P.; Hearn, D.

    1993-01-05

    Aromatic compounds are alkylated in a combination reactor/distillation column comprising a vessel suitable for operating between 70 C and 500 C and from 0.5 to 20 atmospheres pressure; an inert distillation packing in the lower one-third of said vessel; solid acidic catalytic material such as zeolites or an acidic cation exchange resin supported in the middle one-third of said vessel; and inert distillation packing in the upper one-third of said vessel. A benzene inlet is located near the upper end of the vessel; an olefin inlet is juxtaposed with said solid acidic catalytic material; a bottoms outlet is positioned near the bottom of said vessel for removing said cumene and ethyl benzene; and an overhead outlet is placed at the top of said vessel for removing any unreacted benzene and olefin.

  14. Alkylation of organic aromatic compounds

    DOEpatents

    Smith, Jr., Lawrence A.

    1989-01-01

    Aromatic compounds are alkylated in a catalytic distillation, wherein the catalyst structure also serves as a distillation component by contacting the aromatic compound with a C.sub.2 to C.sub.10 olefin in the catalyst bed under 0.25 to 50 atmospheres of pressure and at temperatures in the range of 80.degree. C. to 500.degree. C., using as the catalyst a mole sieve characterized as acidic or an acidic cation exchange resin. For example, ethyl benzene is produced by feeding ethylene below the catalyst bed while benzene is conveniently added through the reflux in molar excess to that required to react with ethylene, thereby reacting substantially all of the ethylene and recovering benzene as the principal overhead and ethyl benzene in the bottoms.

  15. Alkylation of organic aromatic compounds

    DOEpatents

    Smith, Jr., Lawrence A.; Arganbright, Robert P.; Hearn, Dennis

    1993-01-01

    Aromatic compounds are alkylated in a catalytic distillation, wherein the catalyst structure also serves as a distillation component by contacting the aromatic compound with a C.sub.2 to C.sub.10 olefin in the catalyst bed under 0.25 to 50 atmospheres of pressure and at temperatures in the range of 80.degree. C. to 500.degree. C., using as the catalyst a mole sieve characterized as acidic or an acidic cation exchange resin. For example, ethyl benzene is produced by feeding ethylene to about the mid point of the catalyst bed while benzene is conveniently added through the reflux in molar excess to that required to react with ethylene, thereby reacting substantially all of the ethylene and recovering benzene as the principal overhead and ethyl benzene in the bottoms.

  16. Alkylation of organic aromatic compounds

    DOEpatents

    Smith, Jr., Lawrence A.; Arganbright, Robert P.; Hearn, Dennis

    1993-01-01

    Aromatic compounds are alkylated in a combination reactor/distillation column comprising a vessel suitable for operating between 70.degree. C. and 500.degree. C. and from 0.5 to 20 atmospheres pressure; an inert distillation packing in the lower one-third of said vessel; solid acidic catalytic material such as zeolites or an acidic cation exchange resin supported in the middle one-third of said vessel; and inert distillation packing in the upper one-third of said vessel. A benzene inlet is located near the upper end of the vessel; an olefin inlet is juxtaposed with said solid acidic catalytic material; a bottoms outlet is positioned near the bottom of said vessel for removing said cumene and ethyl benzene; and an overhead outlet is placed at the top of said vessel for removing any unreacted benzene and olefin.

  17. Alkylation of organic aromatic compounds

    DOEpatents

    Smith, L.A. Jr.; Arganbright, R.P.; Hearn, D.

    1994-06-14

    Aromatic compounds are alkylated in a catalytic distillation, wherein the catalyst structure also serves as a distillation component by contacting the aromatic compound with a C[sub 2] to C[sub 10] olefin in the catalyst bed under 0.25 to 50 atmospheres of pressure and at temperatures in the range of 80 C to 500 C, using as the catalyst a molecular sieve characterized as acidic or an acidic cation exchange resin. For example, ethyl benzene is produced by feeding ethylene below the catalyst bed while benzene is conveniently added through the reflux in molar excess to that required to react with ethylene, thereby reacting substantially all of the ethylene and recovering benzene as the principal overhead and ethyl benzene in the bottoms. 1 fig.

  18. From organic superconductors to DNA: Fragment orbital-based model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castet, Frédéric; Ducasse, Laurent; Fritsch, Alain

    A semi-empirical valence bond/Hartree-Fock (VB/HF) method is developed to calculate one- and two-electron interactions between molecular fragments in conducting supramolecular stacks. This fragment orbital-based formalism allows for consistent extraction of an effective Hamiltonian defined as a "frontier orbital" model. This Hamiltonian quantitatively describes transfer and electrostatic interactions between conducting electrons, while reducing the active space so dramatically that the electronic eigenstates of very large systems may be investigated. The capabilities of the VB/HF method are illustrated on two different supramolecular stacks involving a π-π interacting fragment. In the first part of this study, the framework of the VB/HF method is used to evaluate the relative magnitude of the electronic interactions between conduction electrons in organic conductors and superconductors derived from Bechgaard salts. In the second part of this study, the VB/HF formalism is extended to derive an effective model for conduction holes along doped DNA double strands. Transferable intra- and intersite parameters were first evaluated from VB/HF calculations carried out on nucleoside pairs. From this interaction databank, the effective Hamiltonian of any type of nucleoside sequence can be defined. The thermalized charge distribution for a single hole delocalized along a DNA sequence containing 240 Watson-Crick pairs is then calculated and compared with the experimental yields of damage revealed by photocleavage experiments.

  19. A fluorescence-based analysis of aristolochic acid-derived DNA adducts.

    PubMed

    Romanov, Victor; Sidorenko, Victoria; Rosenquist, Thomas A; Whyard, Terry; Grollman, Arthur P

    2012-08-01

    Aristolochic acids (AAs), major components of plant extracts from Aristolochia species, form (after metabolic activation) pro-mutagenic DNA adducts in renal tissue. The DNA adducts can be used as biomarkers for studies of AA toxicity. Identification of these adducts is a complicated and time-consuming procedure. We present here a fast, nonisotopic, fluorescence-based assay for the detection of AA-DNA adducts in multiple samples. This approach allows analysis of AA adducts in synthetic DNA with known nucleotide composition and analysis of DNA adducts formed from chemically diverse AAs in vitro. The method can be applied to compare AA-DNA adduct formation in cells and tissues.

  20. Roles of the amino group of purine bases in the thermodynamic stability of DNA base pairing.

    PubMed

    Nakano, Shu-ichi; Sugimoto, Naoki

    2014-08-05

    The energetic aspects of hydrogen-bonded base-pair interactions are important for the design of functional nucleotide analogs and for practical applications of oligonucleotides. The present study investigated the contribution of the 2-amino group of DNA purine bases to the thermodynamic stability of oligonucleotide duplexes under different salt and solvent conditions, using 2'-deoxyriboinosine (I) and 2'-deoxyribo-2,6-diaminopurine (D) as non-canonical nucleotides. The stability of DNA duplexes was changed by substitution of a single base pair in the following order: G • C > D • T ≈ I • C > A • T > G • T > I • T. The apparent stabilization energy due to the presence of the 2-amino group of G and D varied depending on the salt concentration, and decreased in the water-ethanol mixed solvent. The effects of salt concentration on the thermodynamics of DNA duplexes were found to be partially sequence-dependent, and the 2-amino group of the purine bases might have an influence on the binding of ions to DNA through the formation of a stable base-paired structure. Our results also showed that physiological salt conditions were energetically favorable for complementary base recognition, and conversely, low salt concentration media and ethanol-containing solvents were effective for low stringency oligonucleotide hybridization, in the context of conditions employed in this study.

  1. High Fidelity of Base Paring by 2-Selenothymidine in DNA

    SciTech Connect

    Hassan, A.; Sheng, J; Zhang, W; Huang, Z

    2010-01-01

    The base pairs are the contributors to the sequence-dependent recognition of nucleic acids, genetic information storage, and high fidelity of DNA polymerase replication. However, the wobble base pairing, where T pairs with G instead of A, reduces specific base-pairing recognition and compromises the high fidelity of the enzymatic polymerization. Via the selenium atomic probing at the 2-position of thymidine, we have investigated the wobble discrimination by manipulating the steric and electronic effects at the 2-exo position, providing a unique chemical strategy to enhance the base pair specificity. We report here the first synthesis of the novel 2-Se-thymidine ({sup Se}T) derivative, its phosphoramidite, and the Se-DNAs. Our biophysical and structural studies of the 2-Se-T DNAs reveal that the bulky 2-Se atom with a weak hydrogen-bonding ability can largely increase mismatch discriminations (including T/G wobble and T/C mismatched base pairs) while maintaining the {sup Se}T/A virtually identical to the native T/A base pair. The 2-Se atom bulkiness and the electronic effect are probably the main factors responsible for the discrimination against the formation of the wobble {sup Se}T/G base pair. Our investigations provide a potential novel tool to investigate the specific recognition of base pairs, which is the basis of high fidelity during replication, transcription, and translation. Furthermore, this Se-atom-specific substitution and probing are useful for X-ray crystal structure and function studies of nucleic acids.

  2. High fidelity of base pairing by 2-selenothymidine in DNA.

    PubMed

    Hassan, Abdalla E A; Sheng, Jia; Zhang, Wen; Huang, Zhen

    2010-02-24

    The base pairs are the contributors to the sequence-dependent recognition of nucleic acids, genetic information storage, and high fidelity of DNA polymerase replication. However, the wobble base pairing, where T pairs with G instead of A, reduces specific base-pairing recognition and compromises the high fidelity of the enzymatic polymerization. Via the selenium atomic probing at the 2-position of thymidine, we have investigated the wobble discrimination by manipulating the steric and electronic effects at the 2-exo position, providing a unique chemical strategy to enhance the base pair specificity. We report here the first synthesis of the novel 2-Se-thymidine ((Se)T) derivative, its phosphoramidite, and the Se-DNAs. Our biophysical and structural studies of the 2-Se-T DNAs reveal that the bulky 2-Se atom with a weak hydrogen-bonding ability can largely increase mismatch discriminations (including T/G wobble and T/C mismatched base pairs) while maintaining the (Se)T/A virtually identical to the native T/A base pair. The 2-Se atom bulkiness and the electronic effect are probably the main factors responsible for the discrimination against the formation of the wobble (Se)T/G base pair. Our investigations provide a potential novel tool to investigate the specific recognition of base pairs, which is the basis of high fidelity during replication, transcription, and translation. Furthermore, this Se-atom-specific substitution and probing are useful for X-ray crystal structure and function studies of nucleic acids.

  3. DNA as a Binary Code: How the Physical Structure of Nucleotide Bases Carries Information

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCallister, Gary

    2005-01-01

    The DNA triplet code also functions as a binary code. Because double-ring compounds cannot bind to double-ring compounds in the DNA code, the sequence of bases classified simply as purines or pyrimidines can encode for smaller groups of possible amino acids. This is an intuitive approach to teaching the DNA code. (Contains 6 figures.)

  4. A FLUORESCENCE BASED ASSAY FOR DNA DAMAGE INDUCED BY STYRENE OXIDE

    EPA Science Inventory

    A rapid and simple assay to detect DNA damage to calf thymus DNA caused by styrene oxide (SO) is reported. This assay is based on changes observed in the melting and annealing behavior of the damaged DNA. The melting annealing process was monitored using a fluorescence indicat...

  5. Conservation and divergence of DNA methylation in eukaryotes: new insights from single base-resolution DNA methylomes.

    PubMed

    Su, Zhixi; Han, Leng; Zhao, Zhongming

    2011-02-01

    DNA methylation is one of the most important heritable epigenetic modifications of the genome and is involved in the regulation of many cellular processes. Aberrant DNA methylation has been frequently reported to influence gene expression and subsequently cause various human diseases, including cancer. Recent rapid advances in next-generation sequencing technologies have enabled investigators to profile genome methylation patterns at single-base resolution. Remarkably, more than 20 eukaryotic methylomes have been generated thus far, with a majority published since November 2009. Analysis of this vast amount of data has dramatically enriched our knowledge of biological function, conservation and divergence of DNA methylation in eukaryotes. Even so, many specific functions of DNA methylation and their underlying regulatory systems still remain unknown to us. Here, we briefly introduce current approaches for DNA methylation profiling and then systematically review the features of whole genome DNA methylation patterns in eight animals, six plants and five fungi. Our systematic comparison provides new insights into the conservation and divergence of DNA methylation in eukaryotes and their regulation of gene expression. This work aims to summarize the current state of available methylome data and features informatively.

  6. Threading of Binuclear Ruthenium Complex Through DNA Bases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paramanathan, Thayaparan; Westerlund, Fredrik; McCauley, Micah; Lincoln, Per; Rouzina, Ioulia; Williams, Mark

    2009-03-01

    Due to steric constraints the dumb-bell shaped binuclear ruthenium complex can only intercalate DNA by threading, which requires local melting of the DNA to occur. By mechanically manipulating a single DNA molecule held with optical tweezers, we lower the barrier to threading compared to bulk experiments. Stretching single DNA molecules with different drug concentrations and holding a constant force allows the binding to reach equilibrium. We can obtain the equilibrium fractional ligand binding and length of DNA at saturation. Fitting these results yields quantitative measurements of the binding thermodynamics and kinetics. In addition, we obtain the minimum binding site size, which may be determined by either electrostatic repulsion or steric constraints.

  7. Catalysts of DNA Strand Cleavage at Apurinic/Apyrimidinic Sites

    PubMed Central

    Minko, Irina G.; Jacobs, Aaron C.; de Leon, Arnie R.; Gruppi, Francesca; Donley, Nathan; Harris, Thomas M.; Rizzo, Carmelo J.; McCullough, Amanda K.; Lloyd, R. Stephen

    2016-01-01

    Apurinic/apyrimidinic (AP) sites are constantly formed in cellular DNA due to instability of the glycosidic bond, particularly at purines and various oxidized, alkylated, or otherwise damaged nucleobases. AP sites are also generated by DNA glycosylases that initiate DNA base excision repair. These lesions represent a significant block to DNA replication and are extremely mutagenic. Some DNA glycosylases possess AP lyase activities that nick the DNA strand at the deoxyribose moiety via a β- or β,δ-elimination reaction. Various amines can incise AP sites via a similar mechanism, but this non-enzymatic cleavage typically requires high reagent concentrations. Herein, we describe a new class of small molecules that function at low micromolar concentrations as both β- and β,δ-elimination catalysts at AP sites. Structure-activity relationships have established several characteristics that appear to be necessary for the formation of an iminium ion intermediate that self-catalyzes the elimination at the deoxyribose ring. PMID:27363485

  8. Reference-based gene model prediction on DNA contigs

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Y.; Uberbacher, E.C.

    1997-01-01

    This paper presents an algorithm for constructing multiple gene models on a set of contigs of a large genomic clone. The algorithm first uses pattern recognition-based methods to locate exons or partial exons in each contig, and then applies protein homology or EST information from the databases, as reference models, to parse the predicted exons into gene models. In the phase of gene model construction, the algorithm uses a unified framework for genes ranging from situation with homologous proteins/ESTs to no homologous protein/EST in the database. By exploiting protein homology or EST information, the algorithm is able to (1) parse exons into multiple gene models over a set of DNA contigs (possibly unoriented and unordered); (2) remove falsely predicted exons; and (3) identify and locate exons missed by the initial exon prediction.

  9. Constructing DNA Barcode Sets based on Particle Swarm Optimization.

    PubMed

    Waang, Bin; Zheng, Xuedong; Zhou, Shihua; Zhou, Changjun; Wei, Xiaopeng; Zhang, Qiang; Wei, Ziqi

    2017-03-07

    Following the completion of the human genome project, a large amount of high-throughput bio-data was generated. To analyze these data, massively parallel sequencing, namely next-generation sequencing, was rapidly developed. DNA barcodes are used to identify the ownership between sequences and samples when they are attached at the beginning or end of sequencing reads. Constructing DNA barcode sets provides the candidate DNA barcodes for this application. To increase the accuracy of DNA barcode sets, a particle swarm optimization (PSO) algorithm has been modified and used to construct the DNA barcode sets in this paper. Compared with the extant results, some lower bounds of DNA barcode sets are improved. The results show that the proposed algorithm is effective in constructing DNA barcode sets.

  10. A sequence-dependent rigid-base model of DNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonzalez, O.; Petkevičiutė, D.; Maddocks, J. H.

    2013-02-01

    A novel hierarchy of coarse-grain, sequence-dependent, rigid-base models of B-form DNA in solution is introduced. The hierarchy depends on both the assumed range of energetic couplings, and the extent of sequence dependence of the model parameters. A significant feature of the models is that they exhibit the phenomenon of frustration: each base cannot simultaneously minimize the energy of all of its interactions. As a consequence, an arbitrary DNA oligomer has an intrinsic or pre-existing stress, with the level of this frustration dependent on the particular sequence of the oligomer. Attention is focussed on the particular model in the hierarchy that has nearest-neighbor interactions and dimer sequence dependence of the model parameters. For a Gaussian version of this model, a complete coarse-grain parameter set is estimated. The parameterized model allows, for an oligomer of arbitrary length and sequence, a simple and explicit construction of an approximation to the configuration-space equilibrium probability density function for the oligomer in solution. The training set leading to the coarse-grain parameter set is itself extracted from a recent and extensive database of a large number of independent, atomic-resolution molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of short DNA oligomers immersed in explicit solvent. The Kullback-Leibler divergence between probability density functions is used to make several quantitative assessments of our nearest-neighbor, dimer-dependent model, which is compared against others in the hierarchy to assess various assumptions pertaining both to the locality of the energetic couplings and to the level of sequence dependence of its parameters. It is also compared directly against all-atom MD simulation to assess its predictive capabilities. The results show that the nearest-neighbor, dimer-dependent model can successfully resolve sequence effects both within and between oligomers. For example, due to the presence of frustration, the model can

  11. DNA Microarray-Based PCR Ribotyping of Clostridium difficile

    PubMed Central

    Ehricht, Ralf; Slickers, Peter; Baier, Vico; Neubauer, Heinrich; Zimmermann, Stefan; Rabold, Denise; Lübke-Becker, Antina; Seyboldt, Christian

    2014-01-01

    This study presents a DNA microarray-based assay for fast and simple PCR ribotyping of Clostridium difficile strains. Hybridization probes were designed to query the modularly structured intergenic spacer region (ISR), which is also the template for conventional and PCR ribotyping with subsequent capillary gel electrophoresis (seq-PCR) ribotyping. The probes were derived from sequences available in GenBank as well as from theoretical ISR module combinations. A database of reference hybridization patterns was set up from a collection of 142 well-characterized C. difficile isolates representing 48 seq-PCR ribotypes. The reference hybridization patterns calculated by the arithmetic mean were compared using a similarity matrix analysis. The 48 investigated seq-PCR ribotypes revealed 27 array profiles that were clearly distinguishable. The most frequent human-pathogenic ribotypes 001, 014/020, 027, and 078/126 were discriminated by the microarray. C. difficile strains related to 078/126 (033, 045/FLI01, 078, 126, 126/FLI01, 413, 413/FLI01, 598, 620, 652, and 660) and 014/020 (014, 020, and 449) showed similar hybridization patterns, confirming their genetic relatedness, which was previously reported. A panel of 50 C. difficile field isolates was tested by seq-PCR ribotyping and the DNA microarray-based assay in parallel. Taking into account that the current version of the microarray does not discriminate some closely related seq-PCR ribotypes, all isolates were typed correctly. Moreover, seq-PCR ribotypes without reference profiles available in the database (ribotype 009 and 5 new types) were correctly recognized as new ribotypes, confirming the performance and expansion potential of the microarray. PMID:25411174

  12. DNA microarray-based PCR ribotyping of Clostridium difficile.

    PubMed

    Schneeberg, Alexander; Ehricht, Ralf; Slickers, Peter; Baier, Vico; Neubauer, Heinrich; Zimmermann, Stefan; Rabold, Denise; Lübke-Becker, Antina; Seyboldt, Christian

    2015-02-01

    This study presents a DNA microarray-based assay for fast and simple PCR ribotyping of Clostridium difficile strains. Hybridization probes were designed to query the modularly structured intergenic spacer region (ISR), which is also the template for conventional and PCR ribotyping with subsequent capillary gel electrophoresis (seq-PCR) ribotyping. The probes were derived from sequences available in GenBank as well as from theoretical ISR module combinations. A database of reference hybridization patterns was set up from a collection of 142 well-characterized C. difficile isolates representing 48 seq-PCR ribotypes. The reference hybridization patterns calculated by the arithmetic mean were compared using a similarity matrix analysis. The 48 investigated seq-PCR ribotypes revealed 27 array profiles that were clearly distinguishable. The most frequent human-pathogenic ribotypes 001, 014/020, 027, and 078/126 were discriminated by the microarray. C. difficile strains related to 078/126 (033, 045/FLI01, 078, 126, 126/FLI01, 413, 413/FLI01, 598, 620, 652, and 660) and 014/020 (014, 020, and 449) showed similar hybridization patterns, confirming their genetic relatedness, which was previously reported. A panel of 50 C. difficile field isolates was tested by seq-PCR ribotyping and the DNA microarray-based assay in parallel. Taking into account that the current version of the microarray does not discriminate some closely related seq-PCR ribotypes, all isolates were typed correctly. Moreover, seq-PCR ribotypes without reference profiles available in the database (ribotype 009 and 5 new types) were correctly recognized as new ribotypes, confirming the performance and expansion potential of the microarray.

  13. Aromatic nitrogen mustard-based prodrugs: activity, selectivity, and the mechanism of DNA cross-linking.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wenbing; Han, Yanyan; Peng, Xiaohua

    2014-06-10

    Three novel H2O2-activated aromatic nitrogen mustard prodrugs (6-8) are reported. These compounds contain a DNA alkylating agent connected to a H2O2-responsive trigger by different electron-withdrawing linkers so that they are inactive towards DNA but can be triggered by H2O2 to release active species. The activity and selectivity of these compounds towards DNA were investigated by measuring DNA interstrand cross-link (ICL) formation in the presence or absence of H2O2. An electron-withdrawing linker unit, such as a quaternary ammonia salt (6), a carboxyamide (7), and a carbonate group (8), is sufficient to deactivate the aromatic nitrogen mustard resulting in less than 1.5 % cross-linking formation. However, H2O2 can restore the activity of the effectors by converting a withdrawing group to a donating group, therefore increasing the cross-linking efficiency (>20 %). The stability and reaction sites of the ICL products were determined, which revealed that alkylation induced by 7 and 8 not only occurred at the purine sites but also at the pyrimidine site. For the first time, we isolated and characterized the monomer adducts formed between the canonical nucleosides and the aromatic nitrogen mustard (15) which supported that nitrogen mustards reacted with dG, dA, and dC. The activation mechanism was studied by NMR spectroscopic analysis. An in vitro cytotoxicity assay demonstrated that compound 7 with a carboxyamide linker dramatically inhibited the growth of various cancer cells with a GI50 of less than 1 μM, whereas compound 6 with a charged linker did not show any obvious toxicity in all cell lines tested. These data indicated that a neutral carboxyamide linker is preferable for developing nitrogen mustard prodrugs. Our results showed that 7 is a potent anticancer prodrug that can serve as a model compound for further development. We believe these novel aromatic nitrogen mustards will inspire further and effective applications.

  14. Novel signal amplification approach for HRP-based colorimetric genosensors using DNA binding protein tags.

    PubMed

    Aktas, Gülsen Betül; Skouridou, Vasso; Masip, Lluis

    2015-12-15

    The need for sensitive detection of DNA is growing as more specific DNA sequences are being correlated to gene markers for disease diagnosis, food safety and other security related applications. Detection in hybridization-based assays is usually achieved with target-specific ssDNA probes conjugated directly to enzyme labels like HRP that provide signal amplification or with nanoparticles functionalized with DNA and multiple HRP molecules. In order to overcome some of the drawbacks presented by these approaches, we developed a unique DNA sensing platform based on an HRP-DNA binding protein tag conjugate and a hybrid ssDNA-dsDNA detection probe. Specifically, in this work we describe the preparation and characterization of an HRP conjugate with scCro DNA binding protein tag and its application for the detection of a model ssDNA target sequence. By using the HRP-scCro conjugate together with a hybrid detection probe containing three scCro-specific dsDNA binding sites, we demonstrate an improvement by over 3-fold in both sensitivity and limit of detection of high-risk human papillomavirus (HPV16), compared to the standard ssDNA-HRP conjugate. These results show that the HRP-DNA binding protein tag conjugate can be used as an alternative and universal tool for signal enhancement in enzyme-linked assays suitable for integration in point-of-care systems.

  15. Potential for DNA-based identification of Great Lakes fauna: match and mismatch between taxa inventories and DNA barcode libraries.

    PubMed

    Trebitz, Anett S; Hoffman, Joel C; Grant, George W; Billehus, Tyler M; Pilgrim, Erik M

    2015-07-22

    DNA-based identification of mixed-organism samples offers the potential to greatly reduce the need for resource-intensive morphological identification, which would be of value both to bioassessment and non-native species monitoring. The ability to assign species identities to DNA sequences found depends on the availability of comprehensive DNA reference libraries. Here, we compile inventories for aquatic metazoans extant in or threatening to invade the Laurentian Great Lakes and examine the availability of reference mitochondrial COI DNA sequences (barcodes) in the Barcode of Life Data System for them. We found barcode libraries largely complete for extant and threatening-to-invade vertebrates (100% of reptile, 99% of fish, and 92% of amphibian species had barcodes). In contrast, barcode libraries remain poorly developed for precisely those organisms where morphological identification is most challenging; 46% of extant invertebrates lacked reference barcodes with rates especially high among rotifers, oligochaetes, and mites. Lack of species-level identification for many aquatic invertebrates also is a barrier to matching DNA sequences with physical specimens. Attaining the potential for DNA-based identification of mixed-organism samples covering the breadth of aquatic fauna requires a concerted effort to build supporting barcode libraries and voucher collections.

  16. Potential for DNA-based identification of Great Lakes fauna: match and mismatch between taxa inventories and DNA barcode libraries

    PubMed Central

    Trebitz, Anett S.; Hoffman, Joel C.; Grant, George W.; Billehus, Tyler M.; Pilgrim, Erik M.

    2015-01-01

    DNA-based identification of mixed-organism samples offers the potential to greatly reduce the need for resource-intensive morphological identification, which would be of value both to bioassessment and non-native species monitoring. The ability to assign species identities to DNA sequences found depends on the availability of comprehensive DNA reference libraries. Here, we compile inventories for aquatic metazoans extant in or threatening to invade the Laurentian Great Lakes and examine the availability of reference mitochondrial COI DNA sequences (barcodes) in the Barcode of Life Data System for them. We found barcode libraries largely complete for extant and threatening-to-invade vertebrates (100% of reptile, 99% of fish, and 92% of amphibian species had barcodes). In contrast, barcode libraries remain poorly developed for precisely those organisms where morphological identification is most challenging; 46% of extant invertebrates lacked reference barcodes with rates especially high among rotifers, oligochaetes, and mites. Lack of species-level identification for many aquatic invertebrates also is a barrier to matching DNA sequences with physical specimens. Attaining the potential for DNA-based identification of mixed-organism samples covering the breadth of aquatic fauna requires a concerted effort to build supporting barcode libraries and voucher collections. PMID:26199185

  17. Potential for DNA-based identification of Great Lakes fauna: match and mismatch between taxa inventories and DNA barcode libraries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trebitz, Anett S.; Hoffman, Joel C.; Grant, George W.; Billehus, Tyler M.; Pilgrim, Erik M.

    2015-07-01

    DNA-based identification of mixed-organism samples offers the potential to greatly reduce the need for resource-intensive morphological identification, which would be of value both to bioassessment and non-native species monitoring. The ability to assign species identities to DNA sequences found depends on the availability of comprehensive DNA reference libraries. Here, we compile inventories for aquatic metazoans extant in or threatening to invade the Laurentian Great Lakes and examine the availability of reference mitochondrial COI DNA sequences (barcodes) in the Barcode of Life Data System for them. We found barcode libraries largely complete for extant and threatening-to-invade vertebrates (100% of reptile, 99% of fish, and 92% of amphibian species had barcodes). In contrast, barcode libraries remain poorly developed for precisely those organisms where morphological identification is most challenging; 46% of extant invertebrates lacked reference barcodes with rates especially high among rotifers, oligochaetes, and mites. Lack of species-level identification for many aquatic invertebrates also is a barrier to matching DNA sequences with physical specimens. Attaining the potential for DNA-based identification of mixed-organism samples covering the breadth of aquatic fauna requires a concerted effort to build supporting barcode libraries and voucher collections.

  18. Radical gas-based DNA decontamination for ultra-sensitive molecular experiments.

    PubMed

    Morono, Yuki; Yamamoto, Katsuhiro; Inagaki, Fumio

    2012-01-01

    In this study, we tested a radical gas-based decontamination technique to prevent possible DNA contamination by the air and/or equipment used in molecular experiments. We prepared 10(4) molecules of model DNA contaminant and placed the dried DNA into test tubes, which were then exposed to radical gas. Quantitative PCR analysis showed that, even after a short exposure time of 30 minutes, 99.54% of the model DNA contaminant was effectively decomposed to undetectable levels. Our results demonstrate that the radical gas-based treatment is a useful method for eliminating potential DNA contaminant in ultra-sensitive molecular experiments.

  19. Bypass of a 5',8-cyclopurine-2'-deoxynucleoside by DNA polymerase β during DNA replication and base excision repair leads to nucleotide misinsertions and DNA strand breaks.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Zhongliang; Xu, Meng; Lai, Yanhao; Laverde, Eduardo E; Terzidis, Michael A; Masi, Annalisa; Chatgilialoglu, Chryssostomos; Liu, Yuan

    2015-09-01

    5',8-Cyclopurine-2'-deoxynucleosides including 5',8-cyclo-dA (cdA) and 5',8-cyclo-dG (cdG) are induced by hydroxyl radicals resulting from oxidative stress such as ionizing radiation. 5',8-cyclopurine-2'-deoxynucleoside lesions are repaired by nucleotide excision repair with low efficiency, thereby leading to their accumulation in the human genome and lesion bypass by DNA polymerases during DNA replication and base excision repair (BER). In this study, for the first time, we discovered that DNA polymerase β (pol β) efficiently bypassed a 5'R-cdA, but inefficiently bypassed a 5'S-cdA during DNA replication and BER. We found that cell extracts from pol β wild-type mouse embryonic fibroblasts exhibited significant DNA synthesis activity in bypassing a cdA lesion located in replication and BER intermediates. However, pol β knock-out cell extracts exhibited little DNA synthesis to bypass the lesion. This indicates that pol β plays an important role in bypassing a cdA lesion during DNA replication and BER. Furthermore, we demonstrated that pol β inserted both a correct and incorrect nucleotide to bypass a cdA at a low concentration. Nucleotide misinsertion was significantly stimulated by a high concentration of pol β, indicating a mutagenic effect induced by pol β lesion bypass synthesis of a 5',8-cyclopurine-2'-deoxynucleoside. Moreover, we found that bypass of a 5'S-cdA by pol β generated an intermediate that failed to be extended by pol β, resulting in accumulation of single-strand DNA breaks. Our study provides the first evidence that pol β plays an important role in bypassing a 5',8-cyclo-dA during DNA replication and repair, as well as new insight into mutagenic effects and genome instability resulting from pol β bypassing of a cdA lesion.

  20. Regioselectivity of Birch reductive alkylation of biaryls.

    PubMed

    Lebeuf, Raphaël; Robert, Frédéric; Landais, Yannick

    2005-10-13

    [reaction: see text] The regioselectivity of the Birch reductive alkylation of polysubstituted biaryls has been investigated. Results indicate that regioselectivity is affected by the electronic nature of substituents on both aromatic rings. The electron-rich 3,5-dimethoxyphenyl moiety is selectively reduced and then alkylated, while phenols and aniline are not dearomatized under these conditions. Biaryls possessing a phenol moiety are alkylated on the second ring, providing that the acidic proton has been removed prior to the Li/NH3 reduction.

  1. New insights into Hoogsteen base pairs in DNA duplexes from a structure-based survey

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Huiqing; Hintze, Bradley J.; Kimsey, Isaac J.; Sathyamoorthy, Bharathwaj; Yang, Shan; Richardson, Jane S.; Al-Hashimi, Hashim M.

    2015-01-01

    Hoogsteen (HG) base pairs (bps) provide an alternative pairing geometry to Watson–Crick (WC) bps and can play unique functional roles in duplex DNA. Here, we use structural features unique to HG bps (syn purine base, HG hydrogen bonds and constricted C1′–C1′ distance across the bp) to search for HG bps in X-ray structures of DNA duplexes in the Protein Data Bank. The survey identifies 106 A•T and 34 G•C HG bps in DNA duplexes, many of which are undocumented in the literature. It also uncovers HG-like bps with syn purines lacking HG hydrogen bonds or constricted C1′–C1′ distances that are analogous to conformations that have been proposed to populate the WC-to-HG transition pathway. The survey reveals HG preferences similar to those observed for transient HG bps in solution by nuclear magnetic resonance, including stronger preferences for A•T versus G•C bps, TA versus GG steps, and also suggests enrichment at terminal ends with a preference for 5′-purine. HG bps induce small local perturbations in neighboring bps and, surprisingly, a small but significant degree of DNA bending (∼14°) directed toward the major groove. The survey provides insights into the preferences and structural consequences of HG bps in duplex DNA. PMID:25813047

  2. Toward DNA-based Security Circuitry: First Step - Random Number Generation.

    PubMed

    Bogard, Christy M; Arazi, Benjamin; Rouchka, Eric C

    2008-08-10

    DNA-based circuit design is an area of research in which traditional silicon-based technologies are replaced by naturally occurring phenomena taken from biochemistry and molecular biology. Our team investigates the implications of DNA-based circuit design in serving security applications. As an initial step we develop a random number generation circuitry. A novel prototype schema employs solid-phase synthesis of oligonucleotides for random construction of DNA sequences. Temporary storage and retrieval is achieved through plasmid vectors.

  3. Sequential addition of short DNA oligos in DNA-polymerase-based synthesis reactions

    DOEpatents

    Gardner, Shea N [San Leandro, CA; Mariella, Jr., Raymond P.; Christian, Allen T [Tracy, CA; Young, Jennifer A [Berkeley, CA; Clague, David S [Livermore, CA

    2011-01-18

    A method of fabricating a DNA molecule of user-defined sequence. The method comprises the steps of preselecting a multiplicity of DNA sequence segments that will comprise the DNA molecule of user-defined sequence, separating the DNA sequence segments temporally, and combining the multiplicity of DNA sequence segments with at least one polymerase enzyme wherein the multiplicity of DNA sequence segments join to produce the DNA molecule of user-defined sequence. Sequence segments may be of length n, where n is an even or odd integer. In one embodiment the length of desired hybridizing overlap is specified by the user and the sequences and the protocol for combining them are guided by computational (bioinformatics) predictions. In one embodiment sequence segments are combined from multiple reading frames to span the same region of a sequence, so that multiple desired hybridizations may occur with different overlap lengths. In one embodiment starting sequence fragments are of different lengths, n, n+1, n+2, etc.

  4. Reductive alkylation and sequential reductive alkylation-click chemistry for on-solid-support modification of pyrrolidinyl peptide nucleic acid.

    PubMed

    Ditmangklo, Boonsong; Boonlua, Chalothorn; Suparpprom, Chaturong; Vilaivan, Tirayut

    2013-04-17

    A methodology for the site-specific attachment of fluorophores to the backbone of pyrrolidinyl peptide nucleic acids (PNAs) with an α/β-backbone derived from D-prolyl-(1S,2S)-2-aminocyclopentanecarboxylic acid (acpcPNA) has been developed. The strategy involves a postsynthetic reductive alkylation of the aldehyde-containing labels onto the acpcPNA that was previously modified with (3R,4S)-3-aminopyrrolidine-4-carboxylic acid on the solid support. The reductive alkylation reaction is remarkably efficient and compatible with a range of reactive functional groups including Fmoc-protected amino, azide, and alkynes. This allows further attachment of readily accessible carboxyl-, alkyne-, or azide-containing labels via amide bond formation or Cu-catalyzed azide-alkyne cycloaddition (CuAAC, also known as click chemistry). The label attached in this way does not negatively affect the affinity and specificity of the pairing of the acpcPNA to its DNA target. Applications of this methodology in creating self-reporting pyrene- and thiazole orange-labeled acpcPNA probes that can yield a change in fluorescence in response to the presence of the correct DNA target have also been explored. A strong fluorescence enhancement was observed with thiazole orange-labeled acpcPNA in the presence of DNA. The specificity could be further improved by enzymatic digestion with S1 nuclease, providing a 9- to 60-fold fluorescence enhancement with fully complementary DNA and a less than 3.5-fold enhancement with mismatched DNA targets.

  5. DNA Electrochemistry with Tethered Methylene Blue

    PubMed Central

    Pheeney, Catrina G.

    2012-01-01

    Methylene blue (MB′), covalently attached to DNA through a flexible C12 alkyl linker, provides a sensitive redox reporter in DNA electrochemistry measurements. Tethered, intercalated MB′ is reduced through DNA-mediated charge transport; the incorporation of a single base mismatch at position 3, 10, or 14 of a 17-mer causes an attenuation of the signal to 62 ± 3% of the well-matched DNA, irrespective of position in the duplex. The redox signal intensity for MB′–DNA is found to be least 3-fold larger than that of Nile blue (NB)–DNA, indicating that MB′ is even more strongly coupled to the π-stack. The signal attenuation due to an intervening mismatch does, however, depend on DNA film density and the backfilling agent used to passivate the surface. These results highlight two mechanisms for reduction of MB′ on the DNA-modified electrode: reduction mediated by the DNA base pair stack and direct surface reduction of MB′ at the electrode. These two mechanisms are distinguished by their rates of electron transfer that differ by 20-fold. The extent of direct reduction at the surface can be controlled by assembly and buffer conditions. PMID:22512327

  6. 21 CFR 176.120 - Alkyl ketene dimers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Alkyl ketene dimers. 176.120 Section 176.120 Food... Use Only as Components of Paper and Paperboard § 176.120 Alkyl ketene dimers. Alkyl ketene dimers may... section. (a) The alkyl ketene dimers are manufactured by the dehydrohalogenation of the acyl...

  7. 21 CFR 176.120 - Alkyl ketene dimers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Alkyl ketene dimers. 176.120 Section 176.120 Food... Use Only as Components of Paper and Paperboard § 176.120 Alkyl ketene dimers. Alkyl ketene dimers may... section. (a) The alkyl ketene dimers are manufactured by the dehydrohalogenation of the acyl...

  8. DNA excision repair at telomeres.

    PubMed

    Jia, Pingping; Her, Chengtao; Chai, Weihang

    2015-12-01

    DNA damage is caused by either endogenous cellular metabolic processes such as hydrolysis, oxidation, alkylation, and DNA base mismatches, or exogenous sources including ultraviolet (UV) light, ionizing radiation, and chemical agents. Damaged DNA that is not properly repaired can lead to genomic instability, driving tumorigenesis. To protect genomic stability, mammalian cells have evolved highly conserved DNA repair mechanisms to remove and repair DNA lesions. Telomeres are composed of long tandem TTAGGG repeats located at the ends of chromosomes. Maintenance of functional telomeres is critical for preventing genome instability. The telomeric sequence possesses unique features that predispose telomeres to a variety of DNA damage induced by environmental genotoxins. This review briefly describes the relevance of excision repair pathways in telomere maintenance, with the focus on base excision repair (BER), nucleotide excision repair (NER), and mismatch repair (MMR). By summarizing current knowledge on excision repair of telomere damage and outlining many unanswered questions, it is our hope to stimulate further interest in a better understanding of excision repair processes at telomeres and in how these processes contribute to telomere maintenance.

  9. Differential effect of three base modifications on DNA thermostability revealed by high resolution melting.

    PubMed

    López, Carlos M Rodríguez; Lloyd, Amanda J; Leonard, Kate; Wilkinson, Mike J

    2012-09-04

    High resolution melting (HRM) can detect and quantify the presence of 5-methylcytosine (5mC) in DNA samples, but the ability of HRM to diagnose other DNA modifications remains unexplored. The DNA bases N6-methyladenine and 5-hydroxymethylcytosine occur across almost all phyla. While their function remains controversial, their presence perturbs DNA structure. Such modifications could affect gene regulation, chromatin condensation and DNA packaging. Here, we reveal that DNA containing N6-methyladenine or 5-hydroxymethylcytosine exhibits reduced thermal stability compared to cytosine-methylated DNA. These thermostability changes are sufficiently divergent to allow detection and quantification by HRM analysis. Thus, we report that HRM distinguishes between sequence-identical DNA differing only in the modification type of one base. This approach is also able to distinguish between two DNA fragments carrying both N6-methyladenine and 5-methylcytosine but differing only in the distance separating the modified bases. This finding provides scope for the development of new methods to characterize DNA chemically and to allow for low cost screening of mutant populations of genes involved in base modification. More fundamentally, contrast between the thermostabilizing effects of 5mC on dsDNA compared with the destabilizing effects of N6-methyladenine (m6A) and 5-hydroxymethylcytosine (5hmC) raises the intriguing possibility of an antagonistic relationship between modification types with functional significance.

  10. Robust embryo identification using first polar body single nucleotide polymorphism microarray-based DNA fingerprinting.

    PubMed

    Treff, Nathan R; Su, Jing; Kasabwala, Natasha; Tao, Xin; Miller, Kathleen A; Scott, Richard T

    2010-05-01

    This study sought to validate a novel, minimally invasive system for embryo tracking by single nucleotide polymorphism microarray-based DNA fingerprinting of the first polar body. First polar body-based assignments of which embryos implanted and were delivered after multiple ET were 100% consistent with previously validated embryo DNA fingerprinting-based assignments.

  11. Ruthenium-catalyzed meta/ortho-selective C-H alkylation of azoarenes using alkyl bromides.

    PubMed

    Li, Gang; Ma, Xingxing; Jia, Chunqi; Han, Qingqing; Wang, Ya; Wang, Junjie; Yu, Liuyang; Yang, Suling

    2017-01-19

    meta/ortho-Selective CAr-H (di)alkylation reactions of azoarenes have been achieved via [Ru(p-cymene)Cl2]2 catalyzed ortho-metalation using various types of alkyl bromides. Particularly, dual meta-alkylation of azoarene and reduction offer an attractive strategy for the synthesis of meta-alkylanilines, which are difficult to access via traditional aniline functionalization methods.

  12. Guanine- 5-carboxylcytosine base pairs mimic mismatches during DNA replication.

    PubMed

    Shibutani, Toshihiro; Ito, Shinsuke; Toda, Mariko; Kanao, Rie; Collins, Leonard B; Shibata, Marika; Urabe, Miho; Koseki, Haruhiko; Masuda, Yuji; Swenberg, James A; Masutani, Chikahide; Hanaoka, Fumio; Iwai, Shigenori; Kuraoka, Isao

    2014-06-09

    The genetic information encoded in genomes must be faithfully replicated and transmitted to daughter cells. The recent discovery of consecutive DNA conversions by TET family proteins of 5-methylcytosine into 5-hydroxymethylcytosine, 5-formylcytosine, and 5-carboxylcytosine (5caC) suggests these modified cytosines act as DNA lesions, which could threaten genome integrity. Here, we have shown that although 5caC pairs with guanine during DNA replication in vitro, G·5caC pairs stimulated DNA polymerase exonuclease activity and were recognized by the mismatch repair (MMR) proteins. Knockdown of thymine DNA glycosylase increased 5caC in genome, affected cell proliferation via MMR, indicating MMR is a novel reader for 5caC. These results suggest the epigenetic modification products of 5caC behave as DNA lesions.

  13. Polymorphism of the DNA Base Excision Repair Genes in Keratoconus

    PubMed Central

    Wojcik, Katarzyna A.; Synowiec, Ewelina; Sobierajczyk, Katarzyna; Izdebska, Justyna; Blasiak, Janusz; Szaflik, Jerzy; Szaflik, Jacek P.

    2014-01-01

    Keratoconus (KC) is a degenerative corneal disorder for which the exact pathogenesis is not yet known. Oxidative stress is reported to be associated with this disease. The stress may damage corneal biomolecules, including DNA, and such damage is primarily removed by base excision repair (BER). Variation in genes encoding BER components may influence the effectiveness of corneal cells to cope with oxidative stress. In the present work we genotyped 5 polymorphisms of 4 BER genes in 284 patients and 353 controls. The A/A genotype of the c.–1370T>A polymorphism of the DNA polymerase γ (POLG) gene was associated with increased occurrence of KC, while the A/T genotype was associated with decreased occurrence of KC. The A/G genotype and the A allele of the c.1196A>G polymorphism of the X-ray repair cross-complementing group 1 (XRCC1) were associated with increased, and the G/G genotype and the G allele, with decreased KC occurrence. Also, the C/T and T as well as C/C genotypes and alleles of the c.580C>T polymorphism of the same gene displayed relationship with KC occurrence. Neither the g.46438521G>C polymorphism of the Nei endonuclease VIII-like 1 (NEIL1) nor the c.2285T>C polymorphism of the poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-1 (PARP-1) was associated with KC. In conclusion, the variability of the XRCC1 and POLG genes may play a role in KC pathogenesis and determine the risk of this disease. PMID:25356504

  14. A DNA machine-based fluorescence amplification strategy for sensitive detection of uracil-DNA glycosylase activity.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yushu; Wang, Lei; Zhu, Jing; Jiang, Wei

    2015-06-15

    Sensitive detection of uracil-DNA glycosylase (UDG) activity is critical for function study of UDG and clinical diagnosis. Here, we developed a novel fluorescent strategy for sensitive detection of UDG activity based on the signal amplification by a label-free and enzyme-free DNA machine. A double-strand DNA (dsDNA) probe P1-P2 with uracil bases and trigger sequence was designed for UDG recognition and signal transduction. Two hairpin probes H1 and H2 which were partially complementary were employed to construct the label-free and enzyme-free DNA machine. Under the action of UDG, uracil bases were removed from the P1-P2 dsDNA probe, and then a strand P2' with abasic sites was released. Subsequently, the liberated P2' activated the DNA machine and generated numerous H1-H2 complexes containing G-quadruplex (G4) structures in the end. Finally, the G4 structures could bind with N-methylmesoporphyrin IX (NMM) to form G4-NMM complexes with the enhanced fluorescence responses. This strategy could detect UDG activity as low as 0.00044 U/mL. In addition, the strategy was also applied for the analysis of UDG activity in HeLa cells lysate with low effect of cellular components. Moreover, this strategy was successfully applied for assaying the inhibition of UDG using uracil glycosylase inhibitor (UGI). This strategy provided a potential tool for sensitive quantification of UDG activity in UDG functional study and clinical diagnosis.

  15. A unified strategy for iron-catalyzed ortho-alkylation of carboxamides.

    PubMed

    Fruchey, Erin R; Monks, Brendan M; Cook, Silas P

    2014-09-24

    Using 8-aminoquinoline-based aryl carboxamides, the direct ortho-alkylation can be achieved in high yields in the presence of an iron source, 1,2-bis(diphenylphosphino)ethane (dppe) and phenylmagnesium bromide. The reactions proceed without overalkylation and provide high levels of regioselectivity. The benzylation reactions can be performed in air with reagent-grade THF, while the alkylation works well with unactivated secondary bromides and iodides in 2-methyltetrahydrofuran. Moreover, the reactions only require 5-10 min.

  16. A New Family of Ionic Liquids 1-amino-3-alkyl-1,2,3-Triazolium Nitrates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Drake, Greg; Kaplan, Greg; Hall, Leslie; Hawkins, Tommy; Larue, Joann

    2004-01-01

    A new class of ionic liquids based upon 1-amino-3-alkyl-1,2,3-triazolium nitrates (alkyl = methyl, ethyl, n-propyl, 2-propeny1, and n-butyl) have been synthesized and characterized by vibrational spectra, multinuclear NMR, elemental analysis, and DSC studies. A single crystal x-ray study was carried out for 1-amino-3-methyl-1,2,3-triazolium nitrate and the details will be presented.

  17. Effect of food processing on plant DNA degradation and PCR-based GMO analysis: a review.

    PubMed

    Gryson, Nicolas

    2010-03-01

    The applicability of a DNA-based method for GMO detection and quantification depends on the quality and quantity of the DNA. Important food-processing conditions, for example temperature and pH, may lead to degradation of the DNA, rendering PCR analysis impossible or GMO quantification unreliable. This review discusses the effect of several food processes on DNA degradation and subsequent GMO detection and quantification. The data show that, although many of these processes do indeed lead to the fragmentation of DNA, amplification of the DNA may still be possible. Length and composition of the amplicon may, however, affect the result, as also may the method of extraction used. Also, many techniques are used to describe the behaviour of DNA in food processing, which occasionally makes it difficult to compare research results. Further research should be aimed at defining ingredients in terms of their DNA quality and PCR amplification ability, and elaboration of matrix-specific certified reference materials.

  18. Adsorption and desorption of DNA tuned by hydroxyl groups in graphite oxides-based solid extraction material.

    PubMed

    Akceoglu, Garbis Atam; Li, Oi Lun; Saito, Nagahiro

    2015-12-01

    The extraction of DNA is the most crucial method used in molecular biology. Up to date silica matrices has been widely applied as solid support for selective DNA adsorption and extraction. However, since adsorption force of SiOH functional groups is much greater than that of desorption force, the DNA extraction efficiency of silica surfaces is limited. In order to increase the DNA extraction yield, a new surface with different functional groups which possess of greater desorption property is required. In this study, we proposed cellulose/graphite oxide (GO) composite as an alternative material for DNA adsorption and extraction. GO/Cellulose composite provides the major adsorption and desorption of DNA by COH, which belongs to alkyl or phenol type of OH functional group. Compared to SiOH, COH is less polarized and reactive, therefore the composite might provide a higher desorption of DNA during the elution process. The GO/cellulose composite were prepared in spherical structure by mixing urea, cellulose, NaOH, Graphite oxide and water. The concentration of GO within the composites were controlled to be 0-4.15 wt.%. The extraction yield of DNA increased with increasing weight percentage of GO. The highest yield was achieved at 4.15 wt.% GO, where the extraction efficiency was reported as 660.4 ng/μl when applying 2M GuHCl as the binding buffer. The absorbance ratios between 260 nm and 280 nm (A260/A280) of the DNA elution was demonstrated as 1.86, indicating the extracted DNA consisted of high purity. The results proved that GO/cellulose composite provides a simple method for selective DNA extraction with high extraction efficiency of pure DNA.

  19. DBD-Hunter: a knowledge-based method for the prediction of DNA-protein interactions.

    PubMed

    Gao, Mu; Skolnick, Jeffrey

    2008-07-01

    The structures of DNA-protein complexes have illuminated the diversity of DNA-protein binding mechanisms shown by different protein families. This lack of generality could pose a great challenge for predicting DNA-protein interactions. To address this issue, we have developed a knowledge-based method, DNA-binding Domain Hunter (DBD-Hunter), for identifying DNA-binding proteins and associated binding sites. The method combines structural comparison and the evaluation of a statistical potential, which we derive to describe interactions between DNA base pairs and protein residues. We demonstrate that DBD-Hunter is an accurate method for predicting DNA-binding function of proteins, and that DNA-binding protein residues can be reliably inferred from the corresponding templates if identified. In benchmark tests on approximately 4000 proteins, our method achieved an accuracy of 98% and a precision of 84%, which significantly outperforms three previous methods. We further validate the method on DNA-binding protein structures determined in DNA-free (apo) state. We show that the accuracy of our method is only slightly affected on apo-structures compared to the performance on holo-structures cocrystallized with DNA. Finally, we apply the method to approximately 1700 structural genomics targets and predict that 37 targets with previously unknown function are likely to be DNA-binding proteins. DBD-Hunter is freely available at http://cssb.biology.gatech.edu/skolnick/webservice/DBD-Hunter/.

  20. MG7 mimotope-based DNA vaccination for gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Dexin; Chen, Yu; Fan, Daiming

    2006-04-01

    Gastric cancer is still one of the leading causes of cancer-related death worldwide. Prevention and treatment of gastric cancer through vaccination has been difficult owing to lack of a specific target and poor immunity. A number of vaccination strategies have been used to augment immune responses against gastric cancer and some progress has been made. In a series of studies, the authors have focused on gastric cancer vaccination approaches based on MG7 mimotopes, which are mimicry epitopes selected from phage-displayed oligopeptide libraries with a gastric cancer cell-specific monoclonal antibody, MG7-Ab. Strategies employed in these studies include viral or plasmid vectors in combination with carrier sequence or unmethylated CpG with synthetic peptides in nanoemulsion. The results demonstrated that MG7 mimotopes could effectively and specifically induce both cellular and humoral immune reactions and in vivo antitumor responses. In particular, a four-MG7 mimotope DNA vaccine was found to elicit much stronger antitumor immune responses in mice compared with its single-mimotope counterpart. These encouraging findings might pave the way for the development of novel MG7 antigen-based vaccination approaches for human gastric cancer. The review also discusses other immune-enhancing vaccination strategies for gastric cancer.