Science.gov

Sample records for alkylating agent chemotherapy

  1. Chemotherapy-induced pulmonary hypertension: role of alkylating agents.

    PubMed

    Ranchoux, Benoît; Günther, Sven; Quarck, Rozenn; Chaumais, Marie-Camille; Dorfmüller, Peter; Antigny, Fabrice; Dumas, Sébastien J; Raymond, Nicolas; Lau, Edmund; Savale, Laurent; Jaïs, Xavier; Sitbon, Olivier; Simonneau, Gérald; Stenmark, Kurt; Cohen-Kaminsky, Sylvia; Humbert, Marc; Montani, David; Perros, Frédéric

    2015-02-01

    Pulmonary veno-occlusive disease (PVOD) is an uncommon form of pulmonary hypertension (PH) characterized by progressive obstruction of small pulmonary veins and a dismal prognosis. Limited case series have reported a possible association between different chemotherapeutic agents and PVOD. We evaluated the relationship between chemotherapeutic agents and PVOD. Cases of chemotherapy-induced PVOD from the French PH network and literature were reviewed. Consequences of chemotherapy exposure on the pulmonary vasculature and hemodynamics were investigated in three different animal models (mouse, rat, and rabbit). Thirty-seven cases of chemotherapy-associated PVOD were identified in the French PH network and systematic literature analysis. Exposure to alkylating agents was observed in 83.8% of cases, mostly represented by cyclophosphamide (43.2%). In three different animal models, cyclophosphamide was able to induce PH on the basis of hemodynamic, morphological, and biological parameters. In these models, histopathological assessment confirmed significant pulmonary venous involvement highly suggestive of PVOD. Together, clinical data and animal models demonstrated a plausible cause-effect relationship between alkylating agents and PVOD. Clinicians should be aware of this uncommon, but severe, pulmonary vascular complication of alkylating agents. PMID:25497573

  2. mTOR target NDRG1 confers MGMT-dependent resistance to alkylating chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Weiler, Markus; Blaes, Jonas; Pusch, Stefan; Sahm, Felix; Czabanka, Marcus; Luger, Sebastian; Bunse, Lukas; Solecki, Gergely; Eichwald, Viktoria; Jugold, Manfred; Hodecker, Sibylle; Osswald, Matthias; Meisner, Christoph; Hielscher, Thomas; Rübmann, Petra; Pfenning, Philipp-Niklas; Ronellenfitsch, Michael; Kempf, Tore; Schnölzer, Martina; Abdollahi, Amir; Lang, Florian; Bendszus, Martin; von Deimling, Andreas; Winkler, Frank; Weller, Michael; Vajkoczy, Peter; Platten, Michael; Wick, Wolfgang

    2014-01-01

    A hypoxic microenvironment induces resistance to alkylating agents by activating targets in the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) pathway. The molecular mechanisms involved in this mTOR-mediated hypoxia-induced chemoresistance, however, are unclear. Here we identify the mTOR target N-myc downstream regulated gene 1 (NDRG1) as a key determinant of resistance toward alkylating chemotherapy, driven by hypoxia but also by therapeutic measures such as irradiation, corticosteroids, and chronic exposure to alkylating agents via distinct molecular routes involving hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF)-1alpha, p53, and the mTOR complex 2 (mTORC2)/serum glucocorticoid-induced protein kinase 1 (SGK1) pathway. Resistance toward alkylating chemotherapy but not radiotherapy was dependent on NDRG1 expression and activity. In posttreatment tumor tissue of patients with malignant gliomas, NDRG1 was induced and predictive of poor response to alkylating chemotherapy. On a molecular level, NDRG1 bound and stabilized methyltransferases, chiefly O6-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase (MGMT), a key enzyme for resistance to alkylating agents in glioblastoma patients. In patients with glioblastoma, MGMT promoter methylation in tumor tissue was not more predictive for response to alkylating chemotherapy in patients who received concomitant corticosteroids. PMID:24367102

  3. Stabilized dialkyl aluminum complexes as alkylating agents

    SciTech Connect

    Blum, J.; Baidossi, W.; Rosenfeld, A.

    1995-12-31

    Although trialkylaluminum derivatives are widely used as Ziegler-Natta polymerization co-catalysts, their application as routine alkylating agents is limited owing to their pyrophoric nature. The authors have now found that substitution of one of the alkyl moieties by a chelating group reduces the sensitivity of the organoaluminum compounds to air, and enables one to utilize them under normal laboratory conditions.

  4. MGMT Promoter Methylation Correlates with an Overall Survival Benefit in Chinese High-Grade Glioblastoma Patients Treated with Radiotherapy and Alkylating Agent-Based Chemotherapy: A Single-Institution Study

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Dong; Liu, Tao; Lin, Qingfen; Lu, Xiangdong; Wang, Qiong; Lin, Feng; Mao, Weidong

    2014-01-01

    Promoter methylation of the O6-methylguanine-DNA-methyltransferase (MGMT) gene has been considered a prognostic marker and has become more important in the treatment of glioblastoma. However, reports on the correlation between MGMT and clinical outcomes in Chinese glioblastoma patients are very scarce. In this study, quantitative methylation data were obtained by the pyrosequencing of tumor tissues from 128 GBM patients. The median overall survival (OS) was 13.1 months, with a 1-year survival of 45.3%. The pyrosequencing data were reproducible based on archived samples yielding data for all glioblastomas. MGMT promoter methylation was detected in 75/128 cases (58.6%), whereas 53/128 (41.4%) cases were unmethylated. Further survival analysis also revealed that methylation was an independent prognostic factor associated with prolonged OS but not with progression-free survival (PFS) (p = 0.029 and p = 0.112, respectively); the hazard radios were 0.63 (95% CI: 0.42–0.96) and 0.72 (95% CI: 0.48–1.09), respectively. These data indicated that MGMT methylation has prognostic significance in patients with newly diagnosed high-grade glioblastoma undergoing alkylating agent-based chemotherapy after surgical resection. PMID:25211033

  5. Chemotherapy and Dietary Phytochemical Agents

    PubMed Central

    Sak, Katrin

    2012-01-01

    Chemotherapy has been used for cancer treatment already for almost 70 years by targeting the proliferation potential and metastasising ability of tumour cells. Despite the progress made in the development of potent chemotherapy drugs, their toxicity to normal tissues and adverse side effects in multiple organ systems as well as drug resistance have remained the major obstacles for the successful clinical use. Cytotoxic agents decrease considerably the quality of life of cancer patients manifesting as acute complaints and impacting the life of survivors also for years after the treatment. Toxicity often limits the usefulness of anticancer agents being also the reason why many patients discontinue the treatment. The nutritional approach may be the means of helping to raise cancer therapy to a new level of success as supplementing or supporting the body with natural phytochemicals cannot only reduce adverse side effects but improve also the effectiveness of chemotherapeutics. Various plant-derived compounds improve the efficiency of cytotoxic agents, decrease their resistance, lower and alleviate toxic side effects, reduce the risk of tumour lysis syndrome, and detoxify the body of chemotherapeutics. The personalised approach using various phytochemicals provides thus a new dimension to the standard cancer therapy for improving its outcome in a complex and complementary way. PMID:23320169

  6. Clinical applications of quinone-containing alkylating agents.

    PubMed

    Begleiter, A

    2000-11-01

    Quinone-containing alkylating agents are a class of chemical agents that have received considerable interest as anticancer drugs. These agents contain a quinone moiety that can be reduced and an alkylating group that can form covalent bonds with a variety of cellular components. The oxidation state of the quinone element can modulate the activity of the alkylating element, and reduction of the quinone is required for activation of the alkylating activity of many of these agents. The quinone element may also contribute to the cytotoxic activity of quinone-containing alkylating agents through the formation of reactive oxygen species during redox cycling. The natural product, mitomycin C, has been the most widely used quinone-containing alkylating agent in the clinic, but other quinone-containing alkylating agents like porfiromycin, diaziquone, carbazilquinone, triaziquone and EO9 have also been used in the clinic for the treatment of cancer. In addition, many other quinone-containing alkylating agents have been tested in preclinical studies and the development of new agents is being actively pursued. This chapter describes the current and past clinical uses of these agents in the treatment of cancer and discusses new agents that are currently in clinical trials. PMID:11056078

  7. Detection of Alkylating Agents using Electrical and Mechanical Means

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerchikov, Yulia; Borzin, Elena; Gannot, Yair; Shemesh, Ariel; Meltzman, Shai; Hertzog-Ronen, Carmit; Tal, Shay; Stolyarova, Sara; Nemirovsky, Yael; Tessler, Nir; Eichen, Yoav

    2011-08-01

    Alkylating agents are reactive molecules having at least one polar bond between a carbon atom and a good leaving group. These often simple molecules are frequently used in organic synthesis, as sterilizing agents in agriculture and even as anticancer agents in medicine. Unfortunately, for over a century, some of the highly reactive alkylating agents are also being used as blister chemical warfare agents. Being relatively simple to make, the risk is that these will be applied by terrorists as poor people warfare agents. The detection and identification of such alkylating agents is not a simple task because of their high reactivity and simple structure of the reactive site. Here we report on new approaches to the detection and identification of such alkylating agents using electrical (organic field effect transistors) and mechanical (microcantilevers) means.

  8. Alcohols as alkylating agents in heteroarene C–H functionalization

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Jian; MacMillan, David W. C.

    2015-01-01

    Redox processes and radical intermediates are found in many biochemical processes, including deoxyribonucleotide synthesis and oxidative DNA damage1. One of the core principles that underlies DNA biosynthesis is the radical-mediated elimnation of H2O to deoxygenate ribonucleotides, an example of ‘spin-center shift’ (SCS)2, during which an alcohol C–O bond is cleaved, resulting in a carbon-centered radical intermediate. While SCS is a well-understood biochemical process, it is underutilized by the synthetic organic chemistry community. We wondered whether it would be possible to take advantage of this naturally occurring process to accomplish mild, non-traditional alkylations using alcohols as radical precursors. Considering traditional radical-based alkylation methods require the use of stoichiometric oxidants, elevated temperatures, or peroxides3–7, the development of a mild protocol using simple and abundant alkylating agents would have significant utility in the synthesis of diversely functionalized pharmacophores. In this manuscript, we describe the successful execution of this idea via the development of a dual catalytic alkylation of heteroarenes using alcohols as mild alkylating reagents. This method represents the first broadly applicable use of unactivated alcohols as latent alkylating reagents, achieved via the successful merger of photoredox and hydrogen atom transfer (HAT) catalysis. The utility of this multi-catalytic protocol has been demonstrated through the late-stage functionalization of the medicinal agents, fasudil and milrinone. PMID:26308895

  9. Alcohols as alkylating agents in heteroarene C-H functionalization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Jian; MacMillan, David W. C.

    2015-09-01

    Redox processes and radical intermediates are found in many biochemical processes, including deoxyribonucleotide synthesis and oxidative DNA damage. One of the core principles underlying DNA biosynthesis is the radical-mediated elimination of H2O to deoxygenate ribonucleotides, an example of `spin-centre shift', during which an alcohol C-O bond is cleaved, resulting in a carbon-centred radical intermediate. Although spin-centre shift is a well-understood biochemical process, it is underused by the synthetic organic chemistry community. We wondered whether it would be possible to take advantage of this naturally occurring process to accomplish mild, non-traditional alkylation reactions using alcohols as radical precursors. Because conventional radical-based alkylation methods require the use of stoichiometric oxidants, increased temperatures or peroxides, a mild protocol using simple and abundant alkylating agents would have considerable use in the synthesis of diversely functionalized pharmacophores. Here we describe the development of a dual catalytic alkylation of heteroarenes, using alcohols as mild alkylating reagents. This method represents the first, to our knowledge, broadly applicable use of unactivated alcohols as latent alkylating reagents, achieved via the successful merger of photoredox and hydrogen atom transfer catalysis. The value of this multi-catalytic protocol has been demonstrated through the late-stage functionalization of the medicinal agents, fasudil and milrinone.

  10. Alcohols as alkylating agents in heteroarene C-H functionalization.

    PubMed

    Jin, Jian; MacMillan, David W C

    2015-09-01

    Redox processes and radical intermediates are found in many biochemical processes, including deoxyribonucleotide synthesis and oxidative DNA damage. One of the core principles underlying DNA biosynthesis is the radical-mediated elimination of H2O to deoxygenate ribonucleotides, an example of 'spin-centre shift', during which an alcohol C-O bond is cleaved, resulting in a carbon-centred radical intermediate. Although spin-centre shift is a well-understood biochemical process, it is underused by the synthetic organic chemistry community. We wondered whether it would be possible to take advantage of this naturally occurring process to accomplish mild, non-traditional alkylation reactions using alcohols as radical precursors. Because conventional radical-based alkylation methods require the use of stoichiometric oxidants, increased temperatures or peroxides, a mild protocol using simple and abundant alkylating agents would have considerable use in the synthesis of diversely functionalized pharmacophores. Here we describe the development of a dual catalytic alkylation of heteroarenes, using alcohols as mild alkylating reagents. This method represents the first, to our knowledge, broadly applicable use of unactivated alcohols as latent alkylating reagents, achieved via the successful merger of photoredox and hydrogen atom transfer catalysis. The value of this multi-catalytic protocol has been demonstrated through the late-stage functionalization of the medicinal agents, fasudil and milrinone. PMID:26308895

  11. The effect of alkylating agents on model supported metal clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Erdem-Senatalar, A.; Blackmond, D.G.; Wender, I. . Dept. of Chemical and Petroleum Engineering); Oukaci, R. )

    1988-01-01

    Interactions between model supported metal clusters and alkylating agents were studied in an effort to understand a novel chemical trapping technique developed for identifying species adsorbed on catalyst surfaces. It was found that these interactions are more complex than had previously been suggested. Studies were completed using deuterium-labeled dimethyl sulfate (DMS), (CH{sub 3}){sub 2}SO{sub 4}, as a trapping agent to interact with the supported metal cluster ethylidyne tricobalt enneacarbonyl. Results showed that oxygenated products formed during the trapping reaction contained {minus}OCD{sub 3} groups from the DMS, indicating that the interaction was not a simple alkylation. 18 refs., 1 fig., 3 tabs.

  12. Synthesis and Performance of a Biomimetic Indicator for Alkylating Agents.

    PubMed

    Provencher, Philip A; Love, Jennifer A

    2015-10-01

    4-(4-Nitrobenzyl)pyridine (NBP) is a colorimetric indicator compound for many types of carcinogenic alkylating agents. Because of the similar reactivity of NBP and guanine in DNA, NBP serves as a DNA model. NBP assays are used in the toxicological screening of pharmaceutical compounds, detection of chemical warfare agents, environmental hygiene technology, preliminary toxicology tests, mutagenicity of medicinal compounds, and other chemical analyses. Nevertheless, the use of NBP as a DNA model suffers from the compound's low water solubility, its lack of reactive oxygen sites, and dissimilar steric encumbrance compared to DNA. We report herein the design and synthesis of NBP derivatives that address some of these issues. These derivatives have been tested in solution and found to be superior in the colorimetric assay of the alkylating anticancer drug cyclophosphamide. The derivatives have also been integrated into a polymeric silica material which changes color upon the exposure to dangerous alkylating agents, such as iodomethane vapor, without the need for an exogenous base. This material modernizes the NBP assay from a time-consuming laboratory analysis to a real-time solid state sensor, which requires neither solvent nor additional reagents and can detect both gas- and solution-phase alkylating agents. PMID:26393809

  13. Structure-activity studies on organoselenium alkylating agents.

    PubMed

    Kang, S I; Spears, C P

    1990-01-01

    A variety of organoselenium alkylating agents were synthesized, using 2-hydroxyethyl and 3-hydroxypropyl selenocyanate intermediates, and studied to determine their chemical reactivities with 4-(4-nitrobenzyl)pyridine (NBP) and cytotoxicities against CCRF-CEM, L1210/0, and L1210/L-PAM cells. The comparison between the 2-chloroethyl sulfides and selenides 1-4 revealed the markedly enhanced nucleophilicity of selenium (Se) over sulfur (S) by two or more orders of magnitude. This finding indicates that a major consideration in the design of antitumor alkylating organoselenides is the reactivity of selenium. A Taft plot of the experimental first-order rate constant, knbp, and sigma* in a series of 2-chloroethylseleno compounds gave a slope of -1.73 (rho*), with the exception of 2-chloroethyl 2-nitrophenyl selenide (10). The anomalous behavior of 10 is explained in terms of the ortho-nitro stabilization effect directly interacting with the selenium atom of ethyleneselenonium ion to form a 5-membered cyclic intermediate. In the same series, a 5000-fold difference in alkylating reactivity offered only a sixfold variation in cytotoxicity against CCRF-CEM cells. Increasing the alkylating chain length from ethlene to propylene units markedly reduced alkylating reactivities. In the CH3Se(CH2)n Cl series, 16 (n = 3) was 1.5 X 10(5) times slower than 2 (n = 2) in NBP alkylation, revealing that 3-chloro-n-propyl selenides are not chemically reactive enough to be biological alkylating agents despite the presence of the highly nucleophilic selenium atom. Replacement of chloride with mesylate in 3-substituted propyl selenides, such as 17 and 20, restored desirable reactivities and cytotoxicities. PMID:2313578

  14. Leukemia after therapy with alkylating agents for childhood cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Tucker, M.A.; Meadows, A.T.; Boice, J.D. Jr.; Stovall, M.; Oberlin, O.; Stone, B.J.; Birch, J.; Voute, P.A.; Hoover, R.N.; Fraumeni, J.F. Jr.

    1987-03-01

    The risk of leukemia was evaluated in 9,170 2-or-more-year survivors of childhood cancer in the 13 institutions of the Late Effects Study Group. Secondary leukemia occurred in 22 nonreferred individuals compared to 1.52 expected, based on general population rates (relative risk (RR) = 14; 95% confidence interval (CI), 9-22). The influence of therapy for the first cancer on subsequent leukemia risk was determined by a case-control study conducted on 25 cases and 90 matched controls. Treatment with alkylating agents was associated with a significantly elevated risk of leukemia (RR = 4.8; 95% CI, 1.2-18.9). A strong dose-response relationship was also observed between leukemia risk and total dose of alkylating agents, estimated by an alkylator score. The RR of leukemia reached 23 in the highest dose category. Radiation therapy, however, did not increase risk. Although doxorubicin was also identified as a possible risk factor, the excess risk of leukemia following treatment for childhood cancer appears almost entirely due to alkylating agents.

  15. Chemotherapy Agents: A Primer for the Interventional Radiologist

    PubMed Central

    Mihlon, Frank; Ray, Charles E.; Messersmith, Wells

    2010-01-01

    In this article, the authors review the basic principles of cancer chemotherapy and provide an overview of each of the general classes of chemotherapeutic agents with a target audience of interventional radiologists in mind. Special attention is paid to agents used in regional chemotherapy as well as agents commonly included in systemic chemotherapeutic regimens for patients who also require regional chemotherapy. PMID:22550380

  16. [Clinical pharmacology of anticancer agents. (Part 1) Introduction, alkylating agents and platinum compounds].

    PubMed

    Fujita, H

    1991-11-01

    Pharmacokinetic concepts as to absorption, distribution, metabolism and excretion of anticancer agents, and how drugs reach to the site of action were reviewed. Then, roles of the liver and kidney to the excretion and metabolism, intracellular pharmacokinetics, and relationships between drug response and cell proliferation kinetics or cell cycle phase were explained. Drug development, mode of action and pharmacokinetics of alkylating agents and platinum compounds were reviewed. This includes: alkylating agents: nitrogen mustard, phenylalanine mustard, estracyte, cyclophosphamide, carboquone, busulfan, nitrosourea, etc., and platinum compounds: cisplatin, carboplatin, 254-S, DWA-2114 R, NK-121. PMID:1952967

  17. Decreased stability of DNA in cells treated with alkylating agents

    SciTech Connect

    Frankfurt, O.S. )

    1990-12-01

    A modified highly sensitive procedure for the evaluation of DNA damage in individual cells treated with alkylating agents is reported. The new methodology is based on the amplification of single-strandedness in alkylated DNA by heating in the presence of Mg{sup 2+}. Human ovarian carcinoma cells A2780 were treated with nitrogen mustard (HN2), fixed in methanol, and stained with monoclonal antibody (MOAB) F7-26 generated against HN2-treated DNA. Binding of MOAB was measured by flow cytometry with indirect immunofluorescence. Intensive binding of MOAB to control and drug-treated cells was observed after heating in Tris buffer supplemented with MgCl{sub 2}. Thus, the presence of phosphates and MgCl{sub 2} during heating was necessary for the detection of HN2-induced changes in DNA stability. Fluorescence of HN2-treated cells decreased to background levels after treatment with single-strand-specific S{sub 1} nuclease. MOAB F7-26 interacted with single-stranded regions in DNA and did not bind to dsDNA or other cellular antigens. It is suggested that alkylation of guanines decreased the stability of the DNA molecule and increased the access of MOAB F7-26 to deoxycytidines on the opposite DNA strand.

  18. Oncometabolite D-2-Hydroxyglutarate Inhibits ALKBH DNA Repair Enzymes and Sensitizes IDH Mutant Cells to Alkylating Agents.

    PubMed

    Wang, Pu; Wu, Jing; Ma, Shenghong; Zhang, Lei; Yao, Jun; Hoadley, Katherine A; Wilkerson, Matthew D; Perou, Charles M; Guan, Kun-Liang; Ye, Dan; Xiong, Yue

    2015-12-22

    Chemotherapy of a combination of DNA alkylating agents, procarbazine and lomustine (CCNU), and a microtubule poison, vincristine, offers a significant benefit to a subset of glioma patients. The benefit of this regimen, known as PCV, was recently linked to IDH mutation that occurs frequently in glioma and produces D-2-hydroxyglutarate (D-2-HG), a competitive inhibitor of α-ketoglutarate (α-KG). We report here that D-2-HG inhibits the α-KG-dependent alkB homolog (ALKBH) DNA repair enzymes. Cells expressing mutant IDH display reduced repair kinetics, accumulate more DNA damages, and are sensitized to alkylating agents. The observed sensitization to alkylating agents requires the catalytic activity of mutant IDH to produce D-2-HG and can be reversed by the deletion of mutant IDH allele or overexpression of ALKBH2 or AKLBH3. Our results suggest that impairment of DNA repair may contribute to tumorigenesis driven by IDH mutations and that alkylating agents may merit exploration for treating IDH-mutated cancer patients. PMID:26686626

  19. Escherichia coli gene that controls sensitivity to alkylating agents.

    PubMed Central

    Yamamoto, Y; Katsuki, M; Sekiguchi, M; Otsuji, N

    1978-01-01

    A new type of Escherichia coli mutant which shows increased sensitivity to methyl methane sulfonate but not to UV light or to gamma rays was isolated after mutagenesis with N-methyl-N'-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine. The mutant is unable to reactivate phage lambdavir or double-stranded phiX174 DNA (replicative form) that had been treated with methyl methane sulfonate. The mutant is sensitive to other alkylating agents, such as ethyl methane sulfonate, mitomycin C, and N-methyl-N'-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine, as well. It grows normally and exhibits almost normal recombination proficiency. The mutant possesses normal levels of DNA polymerase I, exonuclease I, exonuclease V, endonuclease specific for methyl methane sulfonate-treated DNA, and 3-methyladenine-DNA glycosidase activities. The genetic locus responsible has been named alk and is located near his on the chromosome. PMID:353028

  20. The Alkylating-HDAC Inhibition Fusion Principle: Taking Chemotherapy to the Next Level with the First in Class Molecule EDO-S101.

    PubMed

    Mehrling, Thomas; Chen, Yi

    2016-01-01

    Chemotherapy may still be an essential component to treat cancer in combination with new targeted therapies. But chemotherapy needs to get smarter in order to make those combination regimens more effective and also more tolerable, particularly for an aging population. We describe the first time the synthesis and pharmacological testing of a fusion molecule comprising of the alkylator bendamustine and the HDAC-inhibitor vorinostat. The drug was designed to allow for the exploitation of both mechanisms of action simultaneously with the goal to provide a molecule with superior efficacy over the single agents. The pharmacological testing confirms the full functional capacity of both moieties and encouraging pharmacological data raises the hope that the drug may turn out to be a great addition to the armentarium of anticancer agents. PMID:25980817

  1. Chemotherapy and targeted agents for thymic malignancies.

    PubMed

    Girard, Nicolas

    2012-05-01

    Thymic malignancies are rare epithelial tumors that may be aggressive and difficult to treat. Thymomas are usually localized to the anterior mediastinum and are frequently eligible for upfront surgical resection. However, nearly 30% of patients present with locally advanced tumors at time of diagnosis, and chemotherapy is then used to reduce the tumor burden, possibly allowing subsequent surgery and/or radiotherapy. Metastatic and recurrent thymic malignancies may similarly be treated with chemotherapy. More recently, the molecular characterization of thymoma and thymic carcinoma led to the identification of potentially druggable targets, laying the foundations to implement personalized medicine for patients. PMID:22594902

  2. Triple Negative Breast Cancer: Role of Specific Chemotherapy Agents

    PubMed Central

    Isakoff, Steven J.

    2010-01-01

    Cytotoxic chemotherapy remains the mainstay of treatment for triple negative breast cancer (TNBC) despite the promise of new targeted and biologic agents. Many studies have shown significant benefit of chemotherapy in the neoadjuvant, adjuvant and metastatic treatment of TNBC. Neoadjuvant chemotherapy studies have consistently reported higher response rates in TNBC than non-TNBC, and pathologic complete response has been shown to predict improved long term outcomes for TNBC. Although the specific adjuvant regimens that may be most effective for TNBC are still being determined, third generation chemotherapy regimens utilizing dose dense or metronomic polychemotherapy are among the most effective tools presently available. The role of specific chemotherapy agents in the treatment of TNBC remains incompletely defined and warrants careful review to ensure the most effective therapy is delivered while minimizing unnecessary toxicity. Platinum agents have seen renewed interest in TNBC based on a growing body of preclinical and clinical data suggesting encouraging activity. Taxanes and anthracyclines are active in TNBC and remain important agents, but have not shown specific benefit over non-TNBC. Capecitabine has limited reported data in TNBC, but some reports suggest differential activity in TNBC compared to hormone receptor positive breast cancer. TNBC is itself a heterogeneous group in which subgroups such as BRCA1 mutation carriers may have particular sensitivity to platinum agents and relatively less sensitivity to taxanes. Therefore, the identification of additional molecular biomarkers to predict response to specific chemotherapy is required to further improve treatment strategies with the current menu of chemotherapy options and future combinations with targeted therapies. PMID:20164691

  3. Alkyl phospholipid antihypertensive agents in method of lowering blood pressure

    DOEpatents

    Snyder, Fred L.; Blank, Merle L.; Muirhead, Ernest E.; Leach, deceased, Byron E.; Byers, Lawrence W.

    1988-01-01

    The composition of this invention is 1-O-alkyl-2-acetoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine, having the ionic structural formula; ##STR1## wherein R is saturated alkyl having 9-21 carbon atoms, or salts or hydrates of the composition. Preferably R has 13-19 carbon atoms and most preferably R has 15 carbon atoms. The composition of this invention is useful for reducing hypertension in warm-blooded animals, including humans, when administered either orally or by injection or innoculation, e.g., intravenous injection. The composition can be prepared from naturally occurring lipids or synthetically from commercially available material.

  4. Suppression of alkylating agent induced cell transformation and gastric ulceration by low-dose alkylating agent pretreatment

    SciTech Connect

    Onodera, Akira; Kawai, Yuichi; Kashimura, Asako; Ogita, Fumiya; Tsutsumi, Yasuo; Itoh, Norio

    2013-06-14

    Highlights: •Low-dose MNNG pretreatment suppresses high-dose MNNG induced in vitro transformation. •Gastric ulcers induced by high-dose MNNG decreased after low-dose MNNG pretreatment. •Efficacy of low-dose MNNG related to resistance of mutation and oxidative stress. -- Abstract: Exposure to mild stress by chemicals and radiation causes DNA damage and leads to acquired stress resistance. Although the linear no-threshold (LNT) model of safety assessment assumes risk from any dose, evidence from radiological research demonstrates a conflicting hormetic phenomenon known as the hormesis effect. However, the mechanisms underlying radiation hormesis have not yet been clarified, and little is known about the effects of low doses of chemical carcinogens. We analyzed the efficacy of pretreatment with low doses of the alkylating agent N-methyl-N′-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine (MNNG) on the subsequent induction of cell transformation and gastric ulceration by high-dose MNNG. We used an in vitro Balb/3T3 A31-1-1 cell transformation test and monitored the formation of gastric ulcers in 5-week-old male ICR mice that were administered MNNG in drinking water. The treatment concentrations of MNNG were determined by the cell survival rate and past reports. For low-dose in vitro and in vivo experiments, MNNG was used at 0.028 μM, and 2.8 μg/mL, respectively. The frequency of cell transformation induced by 10 μm MNNG was decreased by low-dose MNNG pretreatment to levels similar to that of spontaneous transformation. In addition, reactive oxygen species (ROS) and mutation frequencies induced by 10 μm MNNG were decreased by low-dose MNNG pretreatment. Importantly, low-dose MNNG pretreatment had no effect on cell proliferation. In vivo studies showed that the number of gastric ulcers induced by 1 mg/mL MNNG decreased after low-dose MNNG pretreatment. These data indicate that low-dose pretreatment with carcinogens may play a beneficial role in the prevention of chemical toxicity

  5. ATM regulates 3-Methylpurine-DNA glycosylase and promotes therapeutic resistance to alkylating agents

    PubMed Central

    Agnihotri, Sameer; Burrell, Kelly; Buczkowicz, Pawel; Remke, Marc; Golbourn, Brian; Chornenkyy, Yevgen; Gajadhar, Aaron; Fernandez, Nestor A.; Clarke, Ian D.; Barszczyk, Mark S.; Pajovic, Sanja; Ternamian, Christian; Head, Renee; Sabha, Nesrin; Sobol, Robert W.; Taylor, Michael D; Rutka, James T.; Jones, Chris; Dirks, Peter B.; Zadeh, Gelareh; Hawkins, Cynthia

    2014-01-01

    Alkylating agents are a frontline therapy for the treatment of several aggressive cancers including pediatric glioblastoma, a lethal tumor in children. Unfortunately, many tumors are resistant to this therapy. We sought to identify ways of sensitizing tumor cells to alkylating agents while leaving normal cells unharmed; increasing therapeutic response while minimizing toxicity. Using a siRNA screen targeting over 240 DNA damage response genes, we identified novel sensitizers to alkylating agents. In particular the base excision repair (BER) pathway, including 3-methylpurine-DNA glycosylase (MPG), as well as ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM) were identified in our screen. Interestingly, we identified MPG as a direct novel substrate of ATM. ATM-mediated phosphorylation of MPG was required for enhanced MPG function. Importantly, combined inhibition or loss of MPG and ATM resulted in increased alkylating agent-induced cytotoxicity in vitro and prolonged survival in vivo. The discovery of the ATM-MPG axis will lead to improved treatment of alkylating agent-resistant tumors. PMID:25100205

  6. Principles and major agents in clinical oncology chemotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Weller, R.E.

    1991-10-01

    This paper provides a brief classification of drugs available for veterinary chemotherapy, as well as justifications for their use. Some common neoplasia and the drugs of choice for their treatment are described. A listing by class of systemic chemotherapeutic agents, their mode of action, tumors responsive to the drugs, precautions and common adverse effects and mode of administration is provided. 2 tabs. (MHB)

  7. Mutagenesis by Cytostatic Alkylating Agents in Yeast Strains of Differing Repair Capacities

    PubMed Central

    Ruhland, Axel; Brendel, Martin

    1979-01-01

    Reversion of two nuclear ochre nonsense alleles and cell inactivation induced by mono-, bi-, and tri-functional alkylating agents and by UV has been investigated in stationary-phase haploid cells of yeast strains with differing capacities for DNA repair. The ability to survive alkylation damage is correlated with UV repair capacity, a UV-resistant and UV-mutable strain (RAD REV) being least and a UV-sensitive and UV-nonmutable strain (rad1 rev3) most sensitive. Mutagenicity of alkylating agents is highest in the former and is abolished in the latter strain. Deficiency in excision repair (rad1 rad2) or in the RAD18 function does not lead to enhanced mutability. Mutagenesis by the various agents is characterized by a common pattern of induction of locus-specific revertants and suppressor mutants. Induction kinetics are mostly linear, but UV-induced reversion in the RAD REV strain follows higher-than-linear (probably "quadratic") kinetics. The alkylating agent cyclophosphamide, usually considered inactive without metabolic conversion, reduces colony-forming ability and induces revertants in a manner similar but not identical to the other chemicals tested. These findings are taken to support the concept of mutagenesis by misrepair after alkylation, which albeit sharing common features with the mechanism of UV-induced reversion, can be distinguished therefrom. PMID:387518

  8. Immunological Effects of Conventional Chemotherapy and Targeted Anticancer Agents.

    PubMed

    Galluzzi, Lorenzo; Buqué, Aitziber; Kepp, Oliver; Zitvogel, Laurence; Kroemer, Guido

    2015-12-14

    The tremendous clinical success of checkpoint blockers illustrates the potential of reestablishing latent immunosurveillance for cancer therapy. Although largely neglected in the clinical practice, accumulating evidence indicates that the efficacy of conventional and targeted anticancer agents does not only involve direct cytostatic/cytotoxic effects, but also relies on the (re)activation of tumor-targeting immune responses. Chemotherapy can promote such responses by increasing the immunogenicity of malignant cells, or by inhibiting immunosuppressive circuitries that are established by developing neoplasms. These immunological "side" effects of chemotherapy are desirable, and their in-depth comprehension will facilitate the design of novel combinatorial regimens with improved clinical efficacy. PMID:26678337

  9. Synthesis and Characterization of DNA Minor Groove Binding Alkylating Agents

    PubMed Central

    Iyer, Prema; Srinivasan, Ajay; Singh, Sreelekha K.; Mascara, Gerard P.; Zayitova, Sevara; Sidone, Brian; Fouquerel, Elise; Svilar, David; Sobol, Robert W.; Bobola, Michael S.; Silber, John R.; Gold, Barry

    2012-01-01

    Derivatives of methyl 3-(1-methyl-5-(1-methyl-5-(propylcarbamoyl)-1H-pyrrol-3-ylcarbamoyl)-1H-pyrrol-3-ylamino)-3-oxopropane-1-sulfonate (1), a peptide-based DNA minor groove binding methylating agent, were synthesized and characterized. In all cases the N-terminus was appended with a O-methyl sulfonate ester while the C-terminus group was varied with non-polar and polar sidechains. In addition, the number of pyrrole rings was varied from 2 (dipeptide) to 3 (tripeptide). The ability of the different analogues to efficiently generate N3-methyladenine was demonstrated as was their selectivity for minor groove (N3-methyladenine) vs. major groove (N7-methylguanine) methylation. Induced circular dichroism studies were used to measure the DNA equilibrium binding properties of the stable sulfone analogues; the tripeptide binds with affinity that is > 10-fold higher than the dipeptide. The toxicities of the compounds were evaluated in alkA/tag glycosylase mutant E. coli and in human WT glioma cells and in cells over-expressing and under-expressing N-methylpurine-DNA glycosylase, which excises N3-methyladenine from DNA. The results show that equilibrium binding correlates with the levels of N3-methyladenine produced and cellular toxicity. The toxicity of 1 was inversely related to expression of MPG in both the bacterial and mammalian cell lines. The enhanced toxicity parallels the reduced activation of PARP and diminished rate of formation of aldehyde reactive sites observed in the MPG knockdown cells. It is proposed that unrepaired N3-methyladenine is toxic due to its ability to directly block DNA polymerization. PMID:23234400

  10. Synthesis and characterization of DNA minor groove binding alkylating agents.

    PubMed

    Iyer, Prema; Srinivasan, Ajay; Singh, Sreelekha K; Mascara, Gerard P; Zayitova, Sevara; Sidone, Brian; Fouquerel, Elise; Svilar, David; Sobol, Robert W; Bobola, Michael S; Silber, John R; Gold, Barry

    2013-01-18

    Derivatives of methyl 3-(1-methyl-5-(1-methyl-5-(propylcarbamoyl)-1H-pyrrol-3-ylcarbamoyl)-1H-pyrrol-3-ylamino)-3-oxopropane-1-sulfonate (1), a peptide-based DNA minor groove binding methylating agent, were synthesized and characterized. In all cases, the N-terminus was appended with an O-methyl sulfonate ester, while the C-terminus group was varied with nonpolar and polar side chains. In addition, the number of pyrrole rings was varied from 2 (dipeptide) to 3 (tripeptide). The ability of the different analogues to efficiently generate N3-methyladenine was demonstrated as was their selectivity for minor groove (N3-methyladenine) versus major groove (N7-methylguanine) methylation. Induced circular dichroism studies were used to measure the DNA equilibrium binding properties of the stable sulfone analogues; the tripeptide binds with affinity that is >10-fold higher than that of the dipeptide. The toxicities of the compounds were evaluated in alkA/tag glycosylase mutant E. coli and in human WT glioma cells and in cells overexpressing and under-expressing N-methylpurine-DNA glycosylase, which excises N3-methyladenine from DNA. The results show that equilibrium binding correlates with the levels of N3-methyladenine produced and cellular toxicity. The toxicity of 1 was inversely related to the expression of MPG in both the bacterial and mammalian cell lines. The enhanced toxicity parallels the reduced activation of PARP and the diminished rate of formation of aldehyde reactive sites observed in the MPG knockdown cells. It is proposed that unrepaired N3-methyladenine is toxic due to its ability to directly block DNA polymerization. PMID:23234400

  11. Nearest neighbor affects G:C to A:T transitions induced by alkylating agents.

    PubMed Central

    Glickman, B W; Horsfall, M J; Gordon, A J; Burns, P A

    1987-01-01

    The influence of local DNA sequence on the distribution of G:C to A:T transitions induced in the lacI gene of E. coli by a series of alkylating agents has been analyzed. In the case of nitrosoguanidine, two nitrosoureas and a nitrosamine, a strong preference for mutation at sites proceeded 5' by a purine base was noted. This preference was observed with both methyl and ethyl donors where the predicted common ultimate alkylating species is the alkyl diazonium ion. In contrast, this preference was not seen following treatment with ethylmethanesulfonate. The observed preference for 5'PuG-3' site over 5'-PyG-3' sites corresponds well with alterations observed in the Ha-ras oncogene recovered after treatment with NMU. This indicates that the mutations recovered in the oncogenes are likely the direct consequence of the alkylation treatment and that the local sequence effects seen in E. coli also appear to occur in mammalian cells. PMID:3329097

  12. Cytotoxicity of alkylating agents towards sensitive and resistant strains of Escherichia coli in relation to extent and mode of alkylation of cellular macromolecules and repair of alkylation lesions in deoxyribonucleic acids

    PubMed Central

    Lawley, P. D.; Brookes, P.

    1968-01-01

    1. A quantitative study was made of the relationship between survival of colony-forming ability in Escherichia coli strains B/r and Bs–1 and the extents of alkylation of cellular DNA, RNA and protein after treatment with mono- or di-functional sulphur mustards, methyl methanesulphonate or iodoacetamide. 2. The mustards and methyl methanesulphonate react with nucleic acids in the cells, in the same way as found previously from chemical studies in vitro, and with proteins. Iodoacetamide reacts only with protein, principally with the thiol groups of cysteine residues. 3. The extents of alkylation of cellular constituents required to prevent cell division vary widely according to the strain of bacteria and the nature of the alkylating agent. 4. The extents of alkylation of the sensitive and resistant strains at a given dose of alkylating agent do not differ significantly. 5. Removal of alkyl groups from DNA of cells of the resistant strains B/r and 15T− after alkylation with difunctional sulphur mustard was demonstrated; the product di(guanin-7-ylethyl) sulphide, characteristic of di- as opposed to mono-functional alkylation, was selectively removed; the time-scale of this effect suggests an enzymic rather than a chemical mechanism. 6. The sensitive strain Bs–1 removed alkyl groups from DNA in this way only at very low extents of alkylation. When sensitized to mustard action by treatment with iodoacetamide, acriflavine or caffeine, the extent of alkylation of cellular DNA corresponding to a mean lethal dose was decreased to approximately 3 molecules of di(guanin-7-ylethyl) sulphide in the genome of this strain. 7. Relatively large numbers of monofunctional alkylations per genome can be withstood by this sensitive strain. Iodoacetamide had the weakest cytotoxic action of the agents investigated; methyl methanesulphonate was significantly weaker in effect than the monofunctional sulphur mustard, which was in turn weaker than the difunctional sulphur mustard. 8

  13. Sites of Alkylation of Human Keap1 by Natural Chemoprevention Agents

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Yan; Eggler, Aimee L.; Liu, Dongting; Liu, Guowen; Mesecar, Andrew D.; van Breemen, Richard B.

    2007-01-01

    Under basal conditions, the interaction of the cytosolic protein Keap1 with the transcription factor Nrf2 results in a low level of expression of cytoprotective genes whose promoter region contains the antioxidant response element (ARE). Alkylation of one or more of the 27 cysteine sulfhydryl groups of human Keap1 is proposed to lead to Nrf2 nuclear accumulation, to upregulation of cytoprotective gene expression via the ARE, and to prevention of degenerative diseases, such as cancer. Therefore, identification of the most reactive of these cysteine residues towards specific electrophiles should help clarify this mechanism of cancer prevention, also known as chemoprevention. To address this issue, preliminary analyses of tryptic digests of Keap1 alkylated by the model electrophile 1-biotinamido-4-(4′-[maleimidoethyl-cyclohexane]-carboxamido) butane were carried out using LC-MS/MS with a cylindrical ion trap mass spectrometer and also using LC-MS/MS with a hybrid linear ion trap FT ICR mass spectrometer. Since the FT ICR instrument provided more complete peptide sequencing coverage and enabled the identification of more alkylated cysteine residues, only this instrument was used in subsequent studies of Keap1 alkylation by three electrophilic natural products that can up-regulate the ARE, xanthohumol, isoliquiritigenin and 10-shogaol. Among the various cysteine residues of Keap1, C151 was most reactive towards these three electrophiles. These in vitro results agree with evidence from in vivo experiments, and indicate that C151 is the most important site of alkylation on Keap1 by chemoprevention agents that function by activating the ARE through Nrf2. PMID:17980616

  14. Covalent binding to glutathione of the DNA-alkylating antitumor agent, S23906-1.

    PubMed

    David-Cordonnier, Marie-Hélène; Laine, William; Joubert, Alexandra; Tardy, Christelle; Goossens, Jean-François; Kouach, Mostafa; Briand, Gilbert; Thi Mai, Huong Doan; Michel, Sylvie; Tillequin, Francois; Koch, Michel; Leonce, Stéphane; Pierre, Alain; Bailly, Christian

    2003-07-01

    The benzoacronycine derivative, S23906-1, was characterized recently as a novel potent antitumor agent through alkylation of the N2 position of guanines in DNA. We show here that its reactivity towards DNA can be modulated by glutathione (GSH). The formation of covalent adducts between GSH and S23906-1 was evidenced by EI-MS, and the use of different GSH derivatives, amino acids and dipeptides revealed that the cysteine thiol group is absolutely required for complex formation because glutathione disulfide (GSSG) and other S-blocked derivatives failed to react covalently with S23906-1. Gel shift assays and fluorescence measurements indicated that the binding of S23906-1 to DNA and to GSH are mutually exclusive. Binding of S23906-1 to an excess of GSH prevents DNA alkylation. Additional EI-MS measurements performed with the mixed diester, S28053-1, showed that the acetate leaving group at the C1 position is the main reactive site in the drug: a reaction scheme common to GSH and guanines is presented. At the cellular level, the presence of GSH slightly reduces the cytotoxic potential of S23906-1 towards KB-3-1 epidermoid carcinoma cells. The GSH-induced threefold reduction of the cytotoxicity of S23906-1 is attributed to the reduced formation of lethal drug-DNA covalent complexes in cells. Treatment of the cells with buthionine sulfoximine, an inhibitor of GSH biosynthesis, facilitates the formation of drug-DNA adducts and promotes the cytotoxic activity. This study identifies GSH as a reactant for the antitumor drug, S23906-1, and illustrates a pathway by which GSH may modulate the cellular sensitivity to this DNA alkylating agent. The results presented here, using GSH as a biological nucleophile, fully support our initial hypothesis that DNA alkylation is the major mechanism of action of the promising anticancer drug S23906-1. PMID:12823555

  15. VP-16 and alkylating agents activate a common metabolic pathway for suppression of DNA replication

    SciTech Connect

    Das, S.K.; Berger, N.A.

    1986-05-01

    The cytotoxic effects of etoposide (VP-16) are mediated by topoisomerase II production of protein crosslinked DNA strand breaks. Previous studies have shown that alkylating agent induced DNA damage results in expansion of dTTP pools and reduction of dCTP pools and DNA replication. Studies were conducted with V79 cells to determine whether the metabolic consequences of VP-16 treatment were similar to those induced by alkylating agents. Treatment with 0.5..mu..M VP-16 prolonged the doubling time of V79 cells from 12 to 18 hrs and caused cell volume to increase from 1.1 to 1.6 x 10/sup -12/l. 2mM caffeine completely blocked the volume increase and substantially prevented the prolongation of doubling time. 5..mu..M VP-16 reduced the rate of (/sup 3/H)TdR incorporation by 70%, whereas in the presence of 2mM caffeine, VP-16 caused only a 10% decrease in the rate of (/sup 3/H)TdR incorporation. 4 hr treatment with 5.0..mu..M VP-16 increased dTTP levels from 65 +/- 10 pmol/10/sup 6/ cells to 80 +/- 13 pmol/10/sup 6/ cells and caused dCTP level to decline from 113 +/- 23 pmol/10/sup 6/ cells to 92 +/- 17 pmol/10/sup 6/ cells. These results indicate that the metabolic consequences of VP-16 treatment are similar to alkylating agent treatment and that an increase in dTTP pools with a subsequent effect on ribonucleotide reductase may be a final common pathway by which many cytotoxic agents suppress DNA synthesis.

  16. Activation of the chemosensing transient receptor potential channel A1 (TRPA1) by alkylating agents.

    PubMed

    Stenger, Bernhard; Zehfuss, Franziska; Mückter, Harald; Schmidt, Annette; Balszuweit, Frank; Schäfer, Eva; Büch, Thomas; Gudermann, Thomas; Thiermann, Horst; Steinritz, Dirk

    2015-09-01

    The transient receptor potential ankyrin 1 (TRPA1) cation channel is expressed in different tissues including skin, lung and neuronal tissue. Recent reports identified TRPA1 as a sensor for noxious substances, implicating a functional role in the molecular toxicology. TRPA1 is activated by various potentially harmful electrophilic substances. The chemical warfare agent sulfur mustard (SM) is a highly reactive alkylating agent that binds to numerous biological targets. Although SM is known for almost 200 years, detailed knowledge about the pathophysiology resulting from exposure is lacking. A specific therapy is not available. In this study, we investigated whether the alkylating agent 2-chloroethyl-ethylsulfide (CEES, a model substance for SM-promoted effects) and SM are able to activate TRPA1 channels. CEES induced a marked increase in the intracellular calcium concentration ([Ca(2+)]i) in TRPA1-expressing but not in TRPA1-negative cells. The TRP-channel blocker AP18 diminished the CEES-induced calcium influx. HEK293 cells permanently expressing TRPA1 were more sensitive toward cytotoxic effects of CEES compared with wild-type cells. At low CEES concentrations, CEES-induced cytotoxicity was prevented by AP18. Proof-of-concept experiments using SM resulted in a pronounced increase in [Ca(2+)]i in HEK293-A1-E cells. Human A549 lung epithelial cells, which express TRPA1 endogenously, reacted with a transient calcium influx in response to CEES exposure. The CEES-dependent calcium response was diminished by AP18. In summary, our results demonstrate that alkylating agents are able to activate TRPA1. Inhibition of TRPA1 counteracted cellular toxicity and could thus represent a feasible approach to mitigate SM-induced cell damage. PMID:25395009

  17. O6-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase activity is associated with response to alkylating agent therapy and with MGMT promoter methylation in glioblastoma and anaplastic glioma

    PubMed Central

    Bobola, Michael S.; Alnoor, Mohammad; Chen, John Y.-S.; Kolstoe, Douglas D.; Silbergeld, Daniel L.; Rostomily, Robert C.; Blank, A.; Chamberlain, Marc C.; Silber, John R.

    2014-01-01

    Background CpG methylation in the O6-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase (MGMT) promoter is associated with better outcome following alkylating agent chemotherapy in glioblastoma (GBM) and anaplastic glioma (AG). To what extent improved response reflects low or absent MGMT activity in glioma tissue has not been unequivocally assessed. This information is central to developing anti-resistance therapies. Methods We examined the relationship of MGMT activity in 91 GBMs and 84 AGs with progression-free survival (PFS) following alkylator therapy and with promoter methylation status determined by methylation-specific PCR (MSP). Results Cox regression analysis revealed that GBMs with high activity had a significantly greater risk for progression in dichotomous (P ≤ 0.001) and continuous (P ≤ 0.003) models, an association observed for different alkylator regimens, including concurrent chemo-radiation with temozolomide. Analysis of MGMT promoter methylation status in 47 of the GBMs revealed that methylated tumors had significantly lower activity (P ≤ 0.005) and longer PFS (P ≤ 0.036) compared to unmethylated tumors, despite overlapping activities. PFS was also significantly greater in methylated vs. unmethylated GBMs with comparable activity (P ≤ 0.005), and among unmethylated tumors with less than median activity (P ≤ 0.026), suggesting that mechanisms in addition to MGMT promote alkylator resistance. Similar associations of MGMT activity with PFS and promoter methylation status were observed for AGs. Conclusions Our results provide strong support for the hypotheses that MGMT activity promotes alkylator resistance and reflects promoter methylation status in malignant gliomas. General significance MGMT activity is an attractive target for anti-resistance therapy regardless of methylation status. PMID:25558448

  18. Proteomic analysis of mismatch repair-mediated alkylating agent-induced DNA damage response

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Mediating DNA damage-induced apoptosis is an important genome-maintenance function of the mismatch repair (MMR) system. Defects in MMR not only cause carcinogenesis, but also render cancer cells highly resistant to chemotherapeutics, including alkylating agents. To understand the mechanisms of MMR-mediated apoptosis and MMR-deficiency-caused drug resistance, we analyze a model alkylating agent (N-methyl-N’-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine, MNNG)-induced changes in protein phosphorylation and abundance in two cell lines, the MMR-proficient TK6 and its derivative MMR-deficient MT1. Results Under an experimental condition that MNNG-induced apoptosis was only observed in MutSα-proficient (TK6), but not in MutSα-deficient (MT1) cells, quantitative analysis of the proteomic data revealed differential expression and phosphorylation of numerous individual proteins and clusters of protein kinase substrates, as well differential activation of response pathways/networks in MNNG-treated TK6 and MT1 cells. Many alterations in TK6 cells are in favor of turning on the apoptotic machinery, while many of those in MT1 cells are to promote cell proliferation and anti-apoptosis. Conclusions Our work provides novel molecular insights into the mechanism of MMR-mediated DNA damage-induced apoptosis. PMID:24330662

  19. Molecular characterization of an adaptive response to alkylating agents in the opportunistic pathogen Aspergillus fumigatus

    PubMed Central

    O’Hanlon, Karen A.; Margison, Geoffrey P.; Hatch, Amy; Fitzpatrick, David A.; Owens, Rebecca A.; Doyle, Sean; Jones, Gary W.

    2012-01-01

    An adaptive response to alkylating agents based upon the conformational change of a methylphosphotriester (MPT) DNA repair protein to a transcriptional activator has been demonstrated in a number of bacterial species, but this mechanism appears largely absent from eukaryotes. Here, we demonstrate that the human pathogen Aspergillus fumigatus elicits an adaptive response to sub-lethal doses of the mono-functional alkylating agent N-methyl-N′-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine (MNNG). We have identified genes that encode MPT and O6-alkylguanine DNA alkyltransferase (AGT) DNA repair proteins; deletions of either of these genes abolish the adaptive response and sensitize the organism to MNNG. In vitro DNA repair assays confirm the ability of MPT and AGT to repair methylphosphotriester and O6-methylguanine lesions respectively. In eukaryotes, the MPT protein is confined to a select group of fungal species, some of which are major mammalian and plant pathogens. The evolutionary origin of the adaptive response is bacterial and rooted within the Firmicutes phylum. Inter-kingdom horizontal gene transfer between Firmicutes and Ascomycete ancestors introduced the adaptive response into the Fungal kingdom. Our data constitute the first detailed characterization of the molecular mechanism of the adaptive response in a lower eukaryote and has applications for development of novel fungal therapeutics targeting this DNA repair system. PMID:22669901

  20. Chemotherapy

    MedlinePlus

    ... saved articles window. My Saved Articles » My ACS » Chemotherapy Chemotherapy (chemo) usually refers to the use of ... better sense of control over your cancer treatment. Chemotherapy Basics How Is Chemotherapy Used to Treat Cancer? ...

  1. Alkylating agent melphalan augments the efficacy of adoptive immunotherapy using tumor-specific CD4+ T cells

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Xiaoyun; Ding, Zhi-Chun; Cao, Yang; Liu, Chufeng; Habtetsion, Tsadik; Yu, Miao; Lemos, Henrique; Salman, Huda; Xu, Hongyan; Mellor, Andrew L.; Zhou, Gang

    2014-01-01

    In recent years the immune-potentiating effects of some widely used chemotherapeutic agents have been increasingly appreciated. This provides a rationale for combining conventional chemotherapy with immunotherapy strategies to achieve durable therapeutic benefits. Previous studies have implicated the immunomodulatory effects of melphalan, an alkylating agent commonly used to treat multiple myeloma, but the underlying mechanisms remain obscure. In the current study, we investigated the impact of melphalan on endogenous immune cells as well as adoptively transferred tumor-specific CD4+ T cells in tumor-bearing mice. We showed that melphalan treatment resulted in a rapid burst of inflammatory cytokines and chemokines during the cellular recovery phase after melphalan-induced myelo-leukodepletion. After melphalan treatment, tumor cells exhibited characteristics of immunogenic cell death, including membrane translocation of the endoplasmic reticulum resident calreticulin (CRT), and extracellular release of high-mobility group box 1 (HMGB1). In addition, there was enhanced tumor antigen uptake by dendritic cells in the tumor-draining lymph node. Consistent with these immunomodulatory effects, melphalan treatment of tumor-bearing mice led to the activation of the endogenous CD8+ T cells, and more importantly, effectively drove the clonal expansion and effector differentiation of adoptively transferred tumor-specific CD4+ T cells. Notably, the combination of melphalan and CD4+ T-cell adoptive cell therapy (ACT) was more efficacious than either treatment alone in prolonging the survival of mice with advanced B-cell lymphomas or colorectal tumors. These findings provide mechanistic insights into melphalan’s immunostimulatory effects, and demonstrate the therapeutic potential of combining melphalan with adoptive cell therapy utilizing antitumor CD4+ T cells. PMID:25560408

  2. 2-Sulfonylpyrimidines: Mild alkylating agents with anticancer activity toward p53-compromised cells.

    PubMed

    Bauer, Matthias R; Joerger, Andreas C; Fersht, Alan R

    2016-09-01

    The tumor suppressor p53 has the most frequently mutated gene in human cancers. Many of p53's oncogenic mutants are just destabilized and rapidly aggregate, and are targets for stabilization by drugs. We found certain 2-sulfonylpyrimidines, including one named PK11007, to be mild thiol alkylators with anticancer activity in several cell lines, especially those with mutationally compromised p53. PK11007 acted by two routes: p53 dependent and p53 independent. PK11007 stabilized p53 in vitro via selective alkylation of two surface-exposed cysteines without compromising its DNA binding activity. Unstable p53 was reactivated by PK11007 in some cancer cell lines, leading to up-regulation of p53 target genes such as p21 and PUMA. More generally, there was cell death that was independent of p53 but dependent on glutathione depletion and associated with highly elevated levels of reactive oxygen species and induction of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress, as also found for the anticancer agent PRIMA-1(MET)(APR-246). PK11007 may be a lead for anticancer drugs that target cells with nonfunctional p53 or impaired reactive oxygen species (ROS) detoxification in a wide variety of mutant p53 cells. PMID:27551077

  3. Cumulative alkylating agent exposure and semen parameters in adult survivors of childhood cancer: a report from the St Jude Lifetime Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Green, Daniel M; Liu, Wei; Kutteh, William H; Ke, Raymond W; Shelton, Kyla C; Sklar, Charles A; Chemaitilly, Wassim; Pui, Ching-Hon; Klosky, James L; Spunt, Sheri L; Metzger, Monika L; Srivastava, DeoKumar; Ness, Kirsten K; Robison, Leslie L; Hudson, Melissa M

    2014-01-01

    Summary Background Few data define the dose-specific relation between alkylating agent exposure and semen variables in adult survivors of childhood cancer. We undertook this study to test the hypothesis that increased exposure to alkylating agents would be associated with decreased sperm concentration in a cohort of adult male survivors of childhood cancer who were not exposed to radiation therapy for their childhood cancer. Methods We did semen analysis on 214 adult male survivors of childhood cancer (median age 7·7 years [range 0·01–20·3] at diagnosis, 29·0 years [18·4–56·1] at assessment, and a median of 21·0 years [10·5–41·6] since diagnosis) who had received alkylating agent chemotherapy but no radiation therapy. Alkylating agent exposure was estimated using the cyclophosphamide equivalent dose (CED). Odds ratios (ORs) and 95% CIs for oligospermia (sperm concentration >0 and <15 million per mL) and azoospermia were calculated with logistic regression modelling. Findings Azoospermia was noted in 53 (25%) of 214 participants, oligospermia in 59 (28%), and normospermia (sperm concentration ≥15 million per mL) in 102 (48%) participants. 31 (89%) of 35 participants who received CED less than 4000 mg/m2 were normospermic. CED was negatively correlated with sperm concentration (correlation coefficient=–0·37, p<0·0001). Mean CED was 10 830 mg/m2 (SD 7274) in patients with azoospermia, 8480 mg/m2 (4264) in patients with oligospermia, and 6626 mg/m2 (3576) in patients with normospermia. In multivariable analysis, CED was significantly associated with an increased risk per 1000 mg/m2 CED for azoospermia (OR 1·22, 95% CI 1·11–1·34), and for oligospermia (1·14, 1·04–1·25), but age at diagnosis and age at assessment were not. Interpretation Impaired spermatogenesis was unlikely when the CED was less than 4000 mg/m2. Although sperm concentration decreases with increasing CED, there was substantial overlap of CED associated with normospermia

  4. A comparison of the antifertility effects of alkylating agents and vinca alkaloids in male rats.

    PubMed Central

    Cooke, R A; Nikles, A; Roeser, H P

    1978-01-01

    1 The anti-fertility effects of cyclophosphamide, nitrogen mustard, vincristine and vinblastine were studied and compared in male rats. 2 The effects of the drugs on body weight and haematological values were used to monitor the pharmacological actions of the drugs. 3 All four drugs impaired fertility, the severity of the impairment depending on dose and duration of treatment. 4 Testicular size and histological appearances remained mostly normal, even in infertile animals, but seminiferous tubules were fewer in number and maturation arrest at the spermatid level was evident in some sections. 5 Recovery of drug-induced infertility occurred in 64% of treated animals, 9 to 40 weeks after cessation of treatment. 6 Morbidity and mortality were much higher with alkylating agents than with vinca alkaloids for approximately similar degrees of impairment in fertility. PMID:687878

  5. Effect of the antitumoral alkylating agent 3-bromopyruvate on mitochondrial respiration: role of mitochondrially bound hexokinase.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues-Ferreira, Clara; da Silva, Ana Paula Pereira; Galina, Antonio

    2012-02-01

    The alkylating agent 3-Bromopyruvate (3-BrPA) has been used as an anti-tumoral drug due to its anti-proliferative property in hepatomas cells. This propriety is believed to disturb glycolysis and respiration, which leads to a decreased rate of ATP synthesis. In this study, we evaluated the effects of the alkylating agent 3-BrPA on the respiratory states and the metabolic steps of the mitochondria of mice liver, brain and in human hepatocarcinoma cell line HepG2. The mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨ(m)), O(2) consumption and dehydrogenase activities were rapidly dissipated/or inhibited by 3-BrPA in respiration medium containing ADP and succinate as respiratory substrate. 3-BrPA inhibition was reverted by reduced glutathione (GSH). Respiration induced by yeast soluble hexokinase (HK) was rapidly inhibited by 3-BrPA. Similar results were observed using mice brain mitochondria that present HK naturally bound to the outer mitochondrial membrane. When the adenine nucleotide transporter (ANT) was blocked by the carboxyatractiloside, the 3-BrPA effect was significantly delayed. In permeabilized human hepatoma HepG2 cells that present HK type II bound to mitochondria (mt-HK II), the inhibiting effect occurred faster when the endogenous HK activity was activated by 2-deoxyglucose (2-DOG). Inhibition of mt-HK II by glucose-6-phosphate retards the mitochondria to react with 3-BrPA. The HK activities recovered in HepG2 cells treated or not with 3-BrPA were practically the same. These results suggest that mitochondrially bound HK supporting the ADP/ATP exchange activity levels facilitates the 3-BrPA inhibition reaction in tumors mitochondria by a proton motive force-dependent dynamic equilibrium between sensitive and less sensitive SDH in the electron transport system. PMID:22322891

  6. Epipodophyllotoxins, alkylating agents, and radiation and risk of secondary leukaemia after childhood cancer.

    PubMed Central

    Hawkins, M. M.; Wilson, L. M.; Stovall, M. A.; Marsden, H. B.; Potok, M. H.; Kingston, J. E.; Chessells, J. M.

    1992-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--To investigate the incidence and aetiology of secondary leukaemia after childhood cancer in Britain. DESIGN--Cohort study and a case-control study. SETTING--Britain and population based National Register of Childhood Tumours. SUBJECTS--Cohort of 16,422 one year survivors of childhood cancer diagnosed in Britain between 1962 and 1983, among whom 22 secondary leukaemias were observed. A case-control study of 26 secondary leukaemias observed among survivors of childhood cancer diagnosed in Britain between 1940 and 1983; 96 controls were selected matched for sex, type of first cancer, age at first cancer, and interval to diagnosis of secondary leukaemia. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES--Dose of radiation averaged over patients' active bone marrow and total accumulated dose of epipodophyllotoxins, alkylating agents, vinca alkaloids, antimetabolites, and antibiotics (mg/m2) given for the original cancer. RESULTS--Cumulative risk of secondary leukaemia within the cohort did not exceed 0.5% over the initial five years beyond one year survival, except that after non-Hodgkin's lymphomas 1.4% of patients developed secondary leukaemia. Corresponding figure for patients treated for non-Hodgkin's lymphomas in the early 1980s was 4%. The relative risk of secondary leukaemia increased significantly with exposure to epipodophyllotoxins and dose of radiation averaged over patients' active bone marrow. Ten patients developed leukaemia after having an epipodophyllotoxin-teniposide in nine cases, etoposide in one. Chromosomal translocations involving 11q23 were observed relating to two secondary leukaemias from a total of six for which there were successful cytogenetic studies after administration of an epipodophyllotoxin. CONCLUSIONS--Epipodophyllotoxins acting alone or together with alkylating agents or radiation seem to be involved in secondary leukaemia after childhood cancer. PMID:1581717

  7. Kinetics of micronucleus induction and cytotoxicity caused by distinct antineoplastics and alkylating agents in vivo.

    PubMed

    Morales-Ramírez, Pedro; Vallarino-Kelly, Teresita; Cruz-Vallejo, Virginia

    2014-01-30

    This mini-review aims to compare the differences in the kinetics of the induction of micronucleated polychromatic erythrocytes (MN-PCE) and cytotoxicity by distinct antineoplastic and genotoxic agents in murine peripheral blood in vivo and to correlate these kinetics with the underlying processes. Comparisons were carried out using our previously obtained data with nominal doses causing similar levels of cytotoxicity, as measured in terms reduction of PCE. The aneuploidogens caused the most rapid induction of MN-PCEs and had the highest rates of cytotoxicity and genotoxicity. The promutagens cyclophosphamide and dimethylnitrosamine showed the most delayed responses and had the lowest genotoxic and cytotoxic efficiencies. DNA crosslinking agents had a similar delay of 4-5 h, greater than those of aneuploidogens, but differed in their cytotoxic and genotoxic efficiencies. Methylnitrosourea and 5-aza-cytidine caused greater delays than crosslinking agents. These delays can be due to the methylnitrosourea-mediated induction of formation of mono alkyl adducts which are interpreted as mismatches during DNA duplication, whereas 5-aza-cytidine requires incorporation into the DNA to induce breakage. This review allows us to conclude that the requirement for metabolic activation and the mechanisms of DNA breakage and of micronucleus induction are the main factors that affect the time of maximal MN-PCE induction. PMID:24269717

  8. A Phase I Study of DMS612, a Novel Bi-functional Alkylating Agent

    PubMed Central

    Appleman, Leonard J.; Balasubramaniam, Sanjeeve; Parise, Robert A; Bryla, Christine; Redon, Christophe E.; Nakamura, Asako J.; Bonner, William M.; Wright, John J; Piekarz, Richard; Kohler, David R; Jiang, Yixing; Belani, Chandra P.; Eiseman, Julie; Chu, Edward; Beumer, Jan H.; Bates, Susan E.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose DMS612 is a dimethane sulfonate analog with bifunctional alkylating activity and preferential cytotoxicity to human renal cell carcinoma (RCC) in the NCI-60 cell panel. This first-in-human phase I study aimed to determine dose-limiting toxicity (DLT), maximum tolerated dose (MTD), pharmacokinetics (PK), and pharmacodynamics (PD) of DMS612 administered by 10-min intravenous infusion on days 1, 8, and 15 of an every 28-day schedule. Experimental Design Patients with advanced solid malignancies were eligible. Enrollment followed a 3+3 design. Pharmacokinetics of DMS612 and metabolites were assessed by mass spectroscopy and pharmacodynamics by γ-H2AX immunofluorescence. Results A total of 31 patients with colorectal (11), RCC (4), cervical (2), and urothelial (1) cancers were enrolled. Six dose levels were studied, from 1.5 mg/m2 to 12 mg/m2. DLTs of grade 4 neutropenia and prolonged grade 3 thrombocytopenia were observed at 12 mg/m2. The MTD was determined to be 9 mg/m2 with a single DLT of grade 4 thrombocytopenia in 1 of 12 patients. Two patients had a confirmed partial response at the 9 mg/m2 dose level, in renal (1) and cervical (1) cancer. DMS612 was rapidly converted into active metabolites. γ-H2AX immunofluorescence revealed dose-dependent DNA damage in both peripheral blood lymphocytes and scalp hairs. Conclusions The MTD of DMS12 on days 1, 8, and 15 every 28 days was 9 mg/m2. DMS612 appears to be an alkylating agent with unique tissue specificities. Dose-dependent pharmacodynamic signals and 2 partial responses at the MTD support further evaluation of DMS612 in phase II trials. PMID:25467180

  9. Lung cancer chemotherapy agents increase procoagulant activity via protein disulfide isomerase-dependent tissue factor decryption.

    PubMed

    Lysov, Zakhar; Swystun, Laura L; Kuruvilla, Sara; Arnold, Andrew; Liaw, Patricia C

    2015-01-01

    Lung cancer patients undergoing chemotherapy have an elevated risk for thrombosis. However, the mechanisms by which chemotherapy agents increase the risk for thrombosis remains unclear. The aim of this study was to determine the mechanism(s) by which lung cancer chemotherapy agents cisplatin, carboplatin, gemcitabine, and paclitaxel elicit increased tissue factor activity on endothelial cells, A549 cells, and monocytes. Tissue factor activity, tissue factor antigen, and phosphatidylserine exposure were measured on chemotherapy-treated human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC), A549 cells, and monocytes. Cell surface protein disulfide isomerase (PDI) and cell surface free thiol levels were measured on HUVEC and A549 non-small cell lung carcinoma cells. Treatment of HUVECs, A549 cells, and monocytes with lung cancer chemotherapy significantly increased cell surface tissue factor activity. However, elevated tissue factor antigen levels were observed only on cisplatin-treated and gemcitabine-treated monocytes. Cell surface levels of phosphatidylserine were increased on HUVEC and monocytes treated with cisplatin/gemcitabine combination therapy. Chemotherapy also resulted in increased cell surface levels of PDI and reduced cell surface free thiol levels. Glutathione treatment and PDI inhibition, but not phosphatidylserine inhibition, attenuated tissue factor activity. Furthermore, increased tissue factor activity was reversed by reducing cysteines with dithiothreitol. These studies are the first to demonstrate that lung cancer chemotherapy agents increase procoagulant activity on endothelial cells and A549 cells by tissue factor decryption through a disulfide bond formation in a PDI-dependent mechanism. PMID:24911456

  10. Re-Directing an Alkylating Agent to Mitochondria Alters Drug Target and Cell Death Mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Wisnovsky, Simon P.; Pereira, Mark P.; Wang, Xiaoming; Hurren, Rose; Parfitt, Jeremy; Larsen, Lesley; Smith, Robin A. J.; Murphy, Michael P.; Schimmer, Aaron D.; Kelley, Shana O.

    2013-01-01

    We have successfully delivered a reactive alkylating agent, chlorambucil (Cbl), to the mitochondria of mammalian cells. Here, we characterize the mechanism of cell death for mitochondria-targeted chlorambucil (mt-Cbl) in vitro and assess its efficacy in a xenograft mouse model of leukemia. Using a ρ° cell model, we show that mt-Cbl toxicity is not dependent on mitochondrial DNA damage. We also illustrate that re-targeting Cbl to mitochondria results in a shift in the cell death mechanism from apoptosis to necrosis, and that this behavior is a general feature of mitochondria-targeted Cbl. Despite the change in cell death mechanisms, we show that mt-Cbl is still effective in vivo and has an improved pharmacokinetic profile compared to the parent drug. These findings illustrate that mitochondrial rerouting changes the site of action of Cbl and also alters the cell death mechanism drastically without compromising in vivo efficacy. Thus, mitochondrial delivery allows the exploitation of Cbl as a promiscuous mitochondrial protein inhibitor with promising therapeutic potential. PMID:23585833

  11. Influence of Mikania laevigata Extract over the Genotoxicity Induced by Alkylating Agents

    PubMed Central

    Nicolau, Vanessa; de Aguiar Amaral, Patrícia; de Andrade, Vanessa Moraes

    2013-01-01

    Medicinal plants are still widely used worldwide; yet for some species, little or no information is available concerning their biological activity, specially their genotoxic and antimutagenic potential. Mikania laevigata (Asteraceae) is a native plant from South America, and its extracts are largely used to treat respiratory complaints. The aim of the present work was then to evaluate, in vivo, the potential biological activity of M. laevigata on the genotoxicity induced by methyl methanesulfonate (MMS) and cyclophosphamide (CP), using the comet assay. Male CF1 mice were divided into groups of 5-6 animals, received by gavage 0.1 mL/10 g body wt of water, Mikania laevigata extract (MLE), MMS, and CP. Results showed that treatment with 200 mg/kg of the MLE previously to MMS and CP administration, respectively, reduced the damage index (DI) in 52% and 60%, when compared to DI at 24 h. Pretreatment also reduced the damage frequency (DF) in 56% (MMS) and 58% (CP), compared to DF at 24 h. MLE administration has been shown to protect mouse DNA from damage induced by alkylating agents; this corroborates to the biological activities of M. laevigata and points towards the need of plant compounds isolation to proceed with further studies. PMID:23724299

  12. Chemotherapeutic attack of hypoxic tumor cells by the bioreductive alkylating agent mitomycin C.

    PubMed

    Keyes, S R; Heimbrook, D C; Fracasso, P M; Rockwell, S; Sligar, S G; Sartorelli, A C

    1985-01-01

    Since the cure of solid tumors is limited by the presence of cells with low oxygen contents, we have approached the development of treatment regimens and of new drugs for these tumors by investigating agents which are preferentially bioactivated under hypoxia. Major emphasis has been directed at studying the mode of action of the mitomycin antibiotics, as bioreductive alkylating agents. Using primarily the EMT6 mouse mammary carcinoma as a solid tumor model, we have found that mitomycin C and porfiromycin are preferentially toxic to cells with low oxygen contents. The mitomycin analog BMY-25282 is more toxic to hypoxic cells than are mitomycin C and porfiromycin; however, unlike these antibiotics, BMY-25282 is preferentially toxic to well-oxygenated cells. With these three mitomycins, we have observed a correlation between cytotoxicity to hypoxic cells, the rate of generation of reactive products, and the redox potentials of the drugs. Investigations of the enzymes in EMT6 cells that could possibly activate mitomycin C have revealed that cytochrome P-450 and xanthine oxidase are not present in measurable quantities and therefore are not responsible for activation of mitomycin C. Activities representative of NADPH-cytochrome c reductase and DT-diaphorase are present in these neoplastic cells. Comparison of these enzymatic activities in EMT6, CHO, and V79 cells with the rate of generation of reactive products under hypoxia shows a direct correlation between these two parameters, but there is no quantitative correlation between these two parameters and the amount of cytotoxicity. Use of purified NADPH-cytochrome c reductase and inhibitors of this enzyme demonstrated that NADPH-cytochrome c reductase can activate mitomycin C, but that it is probably not the only enzyme participating in this bioactivation in EMT6 cells. The DT-diaphorase inhibitor dicoumarol was employed to show that this enzyme is not involved in the activation of mitomycin C to a cytotoxic agent

  13. Cyclooxygenase inhibitors - invitro and invivo effects on antitumor alkylating-agents in the emt-6 murine mammary-carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Teicher, B; Holden, S; Ara, G; Liu, J; Robinson, M; Flodgren, P; Dupuis, N; Northey, D

    1993-02-01

    The nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs that inhibit cyclooxygenase block the formation of prostanoids in vivo. These agents may be useful as modulators of cytotoxic anticancer therapies. EMT-6 mouse mammary carcinoma cells growing in culture were exposed for 1 h or 24 h to eleven different nonsteroidal antiinflammatory agents or acetaminophen. None of these drugs was very cytotoxic. A concentration of 50muM of the nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs or acetaminophen was chosen for modulator combination studies with the antitumor alkylating agents CDDP, L-PAM, BCNU and 4-HC in cell culture. Several of the modulators protected the EMT-6 cells from the cytotoxicity of the antitumor alkylating agents; however, diflunisal, sulindac, indomethacin, acetaminophen and in some cases ibuprofen and tolmetin were positive modulators of the antitumor alkylating agents under the cell culture conditions tested. EMT-6 tumor cell survival studies and bone marrow CFU-GM survival studies were carried out with seven of the modulators and various doses of cyclophosphamide. Tolmetin, ibuprofen, sulindac, piroxicam and diflunisal in combination with cyclophosphamide produced increased tumor cell killing compared with cyclophosphamide alone without marked changes in toxicity to the bone marrow derived CFU-GM. In EMT-6 tumor growth delay experiments, none of the six modulators tested affected the growth of the tumors; however, tolmetin, ibuprofen, diflunisal and sulindac increased the tumor growth delay obtained with standard dose-schedules of cyclophosphamide or CDDP. When minocycline, a collagenase inhibitor, was added to treatment regimens including diflunisal or sulindac and either cyclophosphamide, CDDP or L-PAM further increases in tumor growth delay were obtained especially when L-PAM was the cytotoxic therapeutic agent. The number of lung metastases and the percentage lung metastases with diameters >3 mm were reduced by treatment with the modulator combinations alone and further

  14. A novel alkylating agent Melflufen induces irreversible DNA damage and cytotoxicity in multiple myeloma cells.

    PubMed

    Ray, Arghya; Ravillah, Durgadevi; Das, Deepika S; Song, Yan; Nordström, Eva; Gullbo, Joachim; Richardson, Paul G; Chauhan, Dharminder; Anderson, Kenneth C

    2016-08-01

    Our prior study utilized both in vitro and in vivo multiple myeloma (MM) xenograft models to show that a novel alkylator melphalan-flufenamide (Melflufen) is a more potent anti-MM agent than melphalan and overcomes conventional drug resistance. Here we examined whether this potent anti-MM activity of melflufen versus melphalan is due to their differential effect on DNA damage and repair signalling pathways via γ-H2AX/ATR/CHK1/Ku80. Melflufen-induced apoptosis was associated with dose- and time-dependent rapid phosphorylation of γ-H2AX. Melflufen induces γ-H2AX, ATR, and CHK1 as early as after 2 h exposure in both melphalan-sensitive and -resistant cells. However, melphalan induces γ-H2AX in melphalan-sensitive cells at 6 h and 24 h; no γ-H2AX induction was observed in melphalan-resistant cells even after 24 h exposure. Similar kinetics was observed for ATR and CHK1 in meflufen- versus melphalan-treated cells. DNA repair is linked to melphalan-resistance; and importantly, we found that melphalan, but not melflufen, upregulates Ku80 that repairs DNA double-strand breaks. Washout experiments showed that a brief (2 h) exposure of MM cells to melflufen is sufficient to initiate an irreversible DNA damage and cytotoxicity. Our data therefore suggest that melflufen triggers a rapid, robust, and an irreversible DNA damage which may account for its ability to overcome melphalan-resistance in MM cells. PMID:27098276

  15. Evidence for abasic site sugar phosphate-mediated cytotoxicity in alkylating agent treated Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Heacock, Michelle; Poltoratsky, Vladimir; Prasad, Rajendra; Wilson, Samuel H

    2012-01-01

    To better understand alkylating agent-induced cytotoxicity and the base lesion DNA repair process in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, we replaced the RAD27(FEN1) open reading frame (ORF) with the ORF of the bifunctional human repair enzyme DNA polymerase (Pol) β. The aim was to probe the effect of removal of the incised abasic site 5'-sugar phosphate group (i.e., 5'-deoxyribose phosphate or 5'-dRP) in protection against methyl methanesulfonate (MMS)-induced cytotoxicity. In S. cerevisiae, Rad27(Fen1) was suggested to protect against MMS-induced cytotoxicity by excising multinucleotide flaps generated during repair. However, we proposed that the repair intermediate with a blocked 5'-end, i.e., 5'-dRP group, is the actual cytotoxic lesion. In providing a 5'-dRP group removal function mediated by dRP lyase activity of Pol β, the effects of the 5'-dRP group were separated from those of the multinucleotide flap itself. Human Pol β was expressed in S. cerevisiae, and this partially rescued the MMS hypersensitivity observed with rad27(fen1)-null cells. To explore this rescue effect, altered forms of Pol β with site-directed eliminations of either the 5'-dRP lyase or polymerase activity were expressed in rad27(fen1)-null cells. The 5'-dRP lyase, but not the polymerase activity, conferred the resistance to MMS. These results suggest that after MMS exposure, the 5'-dRP group in the repair intermediate is cytotoxic and that Rad27(Fen1) protection against MMS in wild-type cells is due to elimination of the 5'-dRP group. PMID:23144716

  16. Immunosuppression associated with novel chemotherapy agents and monoclonal antibodies.

    PubMed

    Morrison, Vicki A

    2014-11-15

    The introduction of novel agents to the therapeutic armamentarium for oncologic, rheumatologic, and neurologic disorders has resulted in major clinical advances. These agents impact immune function, resulting in a discrete spectrum of infectious complications. Purine analogues and alemtuzumab alter cell-mediated immunity, resulting in opportunistic viral/fungal infections. Herpes zoster incidence increases with bortezomib. Hepatitis B reactivation may occur with rituximab. Cases of progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy have occurred following monoclonal antibody therapy. Tumor necrosis factor-α inhibitor therapy is complicated by tuberculosis reactivation and fungal infections. We summarize the impact of these therapies on pathogenesis and spectrum of infection complicating their usage. PMID:25352632

  17. Noncanonical regulation of alkylation damage resistance by the OTUD4 deubiquitinase

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Yu; Majid, Mona C; Soll, Jennifer M; Brickner, Joshua R; Dango, Sebastian; Mosammaparast, Nima

    2015-01-01

    Repair of DNA alkylation damage is critical for genomic stability and involves multiple conserved enzymatic pathways. Alkylation damage resistance, which is critical in cancer chemotherapy, depends on the overexpression of alkylation repair proteins. However, the mechanisms responsible for this upregulation are unknown. Here, we show that an OTU domain deubiquitinase, OTUD4, is a positive regulator of ALKBH2 and ALKBH3, two DNA demethylases critical for alkylation repair. Remarkably, we find that OTUD4 catalytic activity is completely dispensable for this function. Rather, OTUD4 is a scaffold for USP7 and USP9X, two deubiquitinases that act directly on the AlkB proteins. Moreover, we show that loss of OTUD4, USP7, or USP9X in tumor cells makes them significantly more sensitive to alkylating agents. Taken together, this work reveals a novel, noncanonical mechanism by which an OTU family deubiquitinase regulates its substrates, and provides multiple new targets for alkylation chemotherapy sensitization of tumors. PMID:25944111

  18. Contributions of DNA repair and damage response pathways to the non-linear genotoxic responses of alkylating agents.

    PubMed

    Klapacz, Joanna; Pottenger, Lynn H; Engelward, Bevin P; Heinen, Christopher D; Johnson, George E; Clewell, Rebecca A; Carmichael, Paul L; Adeleye, Yeyejide; Andersen, Melvin E

    2016-01-01

    From a risk assessment perspective, DNA-reactive agents are conventionally assumed to have genotoxic risks at all exposure levels, thus applying a linear extrapolation for low-dose responses. New approaches discussed here, including more diverse and sensitive methods for assessing DNA damage and DNA repair, strongly support the existence of measurable regions where genotoxic responses with increasing doses are insignificant relative to control. Model monofunctional alkylating agents have in vitro and in vivo datasets amenable to determination of points of departure (PoDs) for genotoxic effects. A session at the 2013 Society of Toxicology meeting provided an opportunity to survey the progress in understanding the biological basis of empirically-observed PoDs for DNA alkylating agents. Together with the literature published since, this review discusses cellular pathways activated by endogenous and exogenous alkylation DNA damage. Cells have evolved conserved processes that monitor and counteract a spontaneous steady-state level of DNA damage. The ubiquitous network of DNA repair pathways serves as the first line of defense for clearing of the DNA damage and preventing mutation. Other biological pathways discussed here that are activated by genotoxic stress include post-translational activation of cell cycle networks and transcriptional networks for apoptosis/cell death. The interactions of various DNA repair and DNA damage response pathways provide biological bases for the observed PoD behaviors seen with genotoxic compounds. Thus, after formation of DNA adducts, the activation of cellular pathways can lead to the avoidance of a mutagenic outcome. The understanding of the cellular mechanisms acting within the low-dose region will serve to better characterize risks from exposures to DNA-reactive agents at environmentally-relevant concentrations. PMID:27036068

  19. 5-(1-Substituted) alkyl pyrimidine nucleosides as antiviral (herpes) agents.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Rakesh

    2004-10-01

    -substituent of pyrimidine nucleosides have been well established for anti-herpes activity. However, there is little qualitative or mechanistic knowledge of the derivatives with substitution at the C-1 carbon of the 5-substituent of pyrimidine nucleosides. During the last few years of our research, we have investigated a variety of C-1 functionalized substituents at the 5-position of the pyrimidine nucleosides to determine their usefulness as antiviral (herpes) agents. In the 5-(1-substituted) group of pyrimidine nucleosides, we demonstrated that novel substituents present at the C-1 carbon of the 5-side chain of the pyrimidine nucleosides are important determinants of potent and broad spectrum antiviral (herpes) activity including EBV and HCMV. In this article the work on design, synthesis and structure activity relationships of several 5-[(1-substituted) alkyl (or vinyl)] pyrimidine nucleoside derivatives as potential inhibitors of herpes viruses is reviewed. PMID:15544474

  20. Quantum molecular modeling of the interaction between guanine and alkylating agents--1--sulfur mustard.

    PubMed

    Broch, H; Hamza, A; Vasilescu, D

    1996-06-01

    Interaction between Guanine and the episulfonium form of Sulfur mustard (HD) was studied using the ab initio LCAO-MO method at the HF/6-31G level. The alkylation mechanism on guanine-N7 was analyzed by using a supermolecular modeling. Our stereostructural results associated with the molecular electrostatic potentials and HOMO-LUMO properties, show that in vacuum the alkylation of the N7 of guanine by HD in the aggressive episulfonium form is a direct process without transition state and of which the pathway is determined. PMID:8832373

  1. The Cyclophosphamide Equivalent Dose as an Approach for Quantifying Alkylating Agent Exposure. A Report from the Childhood Cancer Survivor Study

    PubMed Central

    Green, Daniel M.; Nolan, Vikki G.; Goodman, Pamela J.; Whitton, John A.; Srivastava, DeoKumar; Leisenring, Wendy M.; Neglia, Joseph P.; Sklar, Charles A.; Kaste, Sue C.; Hudson, Melissa M.; Diller, Lisa R.; Stovall, Marilyn; Donaldson, Sarah S.; Robison, Leslie L.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND Estimation of the risk of adverse long-term outcomes such as second malignant neoplasms and infertility often requires reproducible quantification of exposures. The method for quantification should be easily utilized and valid across different study populations. The widely used Alkylating Agent Dose (AAD) score is derived from the drug dose distribution of the study population and thus cannot be used for comparisons across populations as each will have a unique distribution of drug doses. METHODS We compared the performance of the Cyclophosphamide Equivalent Dose (CED), a unit for quantifying alkylating agent exposure independent of study population, to the AAD. Comparisons included associations from three Childhood Cancer Survivor Study (CCSS)outcome analyses, receiver operator characteristic (ROC) curves and goodness of fit based on the Akaike’s Information Criterion (AIC). RESULTS The CED and AAD performed essentially identically in analyses of risk for pregnancy among the partners of male CCSS participants, risk for adverse dental outcomes among all CCSS participants and risk for premature menopause among female CCSS participants, based on similar associations, lack of statistically significant differences between the areas under the ROC curves and similar model fit values for the AIC between models including the two measures of exposure. CONCLUSION The CED is easily calculated, facilitating its use for patient counseling. It is independent of the drug dose distribution of a particular patient population, a characteristic that will allow direct comparisons of outcomes among epidemiological cohorts. We recommend the use of the CED in future research assessing cumulative alkylating agent exposure. PMID:23940101

  2. Neutron capture therapy: a comparison between dose enhancement of various agents, nanoparticles and chemotherapy drugs.

    PubMed

    Khosroabadi, Mohsen; Ghorbani, Mahdi; Rahmani, Faezeh; Knaup, Courtney

    2014-09-01

    The aim of this study is to compare dose enhancement of various agents, nanoparticles and chemotherapy drugs for neutron capture therapy. A (252)Cf source was simulated to obtain its dosimetric parameters, including air kerma strength, dose rate constant, radial dose function and total dose rates. These results were compared with previously published data. Using (252)Cf as a neutron source, the in-tumour dose enhancements in the presence of atomic (10)B, (157)Gd and (33)S agents; (10)B, (157)Gd, (33)S nanoparticles; and Bortezomib and Amifostine chemotherapy drugs were calculated and compared in neutron capture therapy. Monte Carlo code MCNPX was used for simulation of the (252)Cf source, a soft tissue phantom, and a tumour containing each capture agent. Dose enhancement for 100, 200 and 500 ppm of the mentioned media was calculated. Calculated dosimetric parameters of the (252)Cf source were in agreement with previously published values. In comparison to other agents, maximum dose enhancement factor was obtained for 500 ppm of atomic (10)B agent and (10)B nanoparticles, equal to 1.06 and 1.08, respectively. Additionally, Bortezomib showed a considerable dose enhancement level. From a dose enhancement point of view, media containing (10)B are the best agents in neutron capture therapy. Bortezomib is a chemotherapy drug containing boron and can be proposed as an agent in boron neutron capture therapy. However, it should be noted that other physical, chemical and medical criteria should be considered in comparing the mentioned agents before their clinical use in neutron capture therapy. PMID:24961208

  3. Introduction of Peripheral Carboxylates to Decrease the Charge on Tm(3+) DOTAM-Alkyl Complexes: Implications for Detection Sensitivity and in Vivo Toxicity of PARACEST MRI Contrast Agents.

    PubMed

    Suchý, Mojmír; Milne, Mark; Elmehriki, Adam A H; McVicar, Nevin; Li, Alex X; Bartha, Robert; Hudson, Robert H E

    2015-08-27

    A series of structurally modified Tm(3+) DOTAM-alkyl complexes as potential PARACEST MRI contrast agents has been synthesized with the aim to decrease the overall positive charge associated with these molecules and increase their biocompatibility. Two types of structural modification have been performed, an introduction of terminal carboxylate arms to the alkyl side chains and a conjugation of one of the alkyl side chains with aspartic acid. Detailed evaluation of the magnetic resonance imaging chemical exchange contrast associated with the structurally modified contrast agents has been performed. In contrast to the acutely toxic Tm(3+) DOTAM-alkyl complexes, the structurally modified compounds were found to be tolerated well during in vivo MRI studies in mice; however, only the aspartic acid modified chelates produced an amide proton-based PARACEST signal. PMID:26214576

  4. 3-methyladenine-DNA-glycosylase and O6-alkyl guanine-DNA-alkyltransferase activities and sensitivity to alkylating agents in human cancer cell lines.

    PubMed Central

    Damia, G.; Imperatori, L.; Citti, L.; Mariani, L.; D'Incalci, M.

    1996-01-01

    The activities and the expression of 3-methyladenine glycosylase (3-meAde gly) and O6-alkylguanine-DNA-alkyltransferase (O6 ATase) were investigated in ten human cancer cell lines. Both 3-meAde gly and O6 ATase activities were variable among different cell lines. mRNA levels of the O6 ATase gene, appeared to be related to the content of O6 ATase in different cell lines, whereas no apparent correlation was found between mRNA of 3-meAde gly and the enzyme activity. No correlation was found between the activity of the two enzymes and the sensitivity to alkylating agents of different structures such as CC-1065, tallimustine, dimethylsulphate (DMSO), N-methyl-N'-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine (MNNG), cis-diamminedichloroplatinum (cDDP) and melphalan (L-PAM). The most striking finding of this study is that a correlation exists between the activity of O6 ATase and 3-meAde gly in the various cell lines investigated (P<0.01), suggesting a common mechanism of regulation of two DNA repair enzymes. Images Figure 2 PMID:8611396

  5. Stability of solutions of antineoplastic agents during preparation and storage for in vitro assays. General considerations, the nitrosoureas and alkylating agents.

    PubMed

    Bosanquet, A G

    1985-01-01

    In vitro drug sensitivity of tumour biopsies is currently being determined using a variety of methods. For these chemosensitivity assays many drugs are required at short notice, and this in turn means that the drugs must generally be stored in solution. There are, however, a number of potential problems associated with dissolving and storing drugs for in vitro use, which include (a) drug adsorption; (b) effects of freezing; (c) drug stability under the normal conditions of dilution and setting up of an in vitro assay; and (d) insolubility of drugs in normal saline (NS) or phosphate-buffered saline (PBS). These problems are considered in general, and some recommendations for use of solutions of drugs in in vitro assays are suggested. The nitrosoureas and alkylating agents are also investigated in greater detail in this respect. The nitrosoureas are found to be very labile in PBS at pH 7, with 5% degradation (t0.95) occurring in 10-50 min at room temperature. These values are increased about 10-fold on refrigeration and about 5- to 10-fold on reduction of the pH of the medium to pH 4-5. At pH 7 and room temperature, t0.95 is observed in under 1 h with the alkylating agents nitrogen mustard, chlorambucil, melphalan, 2,5-diaziridinyl-3,6-bis(2-hydroxyethylamino)-1,4-benzoquinone (BZQ), dibromodulcitol, dibromomannitol, treosulphan, and procarbazine. Of the other alkylating agents, 4-hydroperoxycylophosphamide (sometimes used in vitro in place of cyclophosphamide), busulphan, dianhydrogalactitol, aziridinylbenzoquinone (AZQ), and dacarbazine have a t0.95 of between 2 and 24 h, while ifosfamide and pentamethylmelamine are both stable in aqueous solution for greater than 7 days. About half the drugs studied in detail have been stored frozen in solution for in vitro use, although very little is known about their stability under these conditions. PMID:3882257

  6. Influence of promoter/enhancer region haplotypes on MGMT transcriptional regulation: a potential biomarker for human sensitivity to alkylating agents

    PubMed Central

    Abdel-Rahman, Sherif Z.

    2014-01-01

    The O 6-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase gene (MGMT) encodes the direct reversal DNA repair protein that removes alkyl adducts from the O 6 position of guanine. Several single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) exist in the MGMT promoter/enhancer (P/E) region. However, the haplotype structure encompassing these SNPs and their functional/biological significance are currently unknown. We hypothesized that MGMT P/E haplotypes, rather than individual SNPs, alter MGMT transcription and can thus alter human sensitivity to alkylating agents. To identify the haplotype structure encompassing the MGMT P/E region SNPs, we sequenced 104 DNA samples from healthy individuals and inferred the haplotypes using the data generated. We identified eight SNPs in this region, namely T7C (rs180989103), T135G (rs1711646), G290A (rs61859810), C485A (rs1625649), C575A (rs113813075), G666A (rs34180180), C777A (rs34138162) and C1099T (rs16906252). Phylogenetics and Sequence Evolution analysis predicted 21 potential haplotypes that encompass these SNPs ranging in frequencies from 0.000048 to 0.39. Of these, 10 were identified in our study population as 20 paired haplotype combinations. To determine the functional significance of these haplotypes, luciferase reporter constructs representing these haplotypes were transfected into glioblastoma cells and their effect on MGMT promoter activity was determined. Compared with the most common (reference) haplotype 1, seven haplotypes significantly upregulated MGMT promoter activity (18–119% increase; P < 0.05), six significantly downregulated MGMT promoter activity (29–97% decrease; P < 0.05) and one haplotype had no effect. Mechanistic studies conducted support the conclusion that MGMT P/E haplotypes, rather than individual SNPs, differentially regulate MGMT transcription and could thus play a significant role in human sensitivity to environmental and therapeutic alkylating agents. PMID:24163400

  7. The influence of oxazaphosphorines alkylating agents on autonomic nervous system activity in rat experimental cystitis model.

    PubMed

    Dobrek, Łukasz; Baranowska, Agnieszka; Thor, Piotr J

    2013-01-01

    The oxazaphosphorines alkylating agents (cyclophosphamide; CP and ifosfamide; IF) are often used in common clinical practice. However, treatment with CP/IF is burdened with the risk of many adverse drug reactions, especially including hemorrhagic cystitis (HC) that is associated with bladder overactivity symptoms (OAB). The HC pathophysiology is still not fully displayed; it seems that autonomic nervous system (ANS) functional abnormalities play important role in this disturbance. The aim of our study was to reveal the potential ANS differences in rat experimental HC model, evoked by CP and IF by an indirect ANS assessment--heart rate variability (HRV) study. We carried out our experimental research in three essential groups: control group (group 1), cyclophosphamide-induced HC (CP-HC; group 2) one and ifosfamide-induced HC (IF-HC; group 3) one. CP was i.p. administrated four times in dose of 75 mg/kg body weight while IF-treated rats received i.p. five drug doses; 50 mg/kg body weight. Control rats were administrated i.p. vehicle in appropriate volumes as CP/IF treated animals. HRV studies were performed the next day after the last oxazaphosphorines dose. Standard time- and spectral (frequency) domain parameters were estimated. We confirmed the HC development after both CP/IF in macroscopic assessment and bladder wet weight measurement; however, it was more aggravated in CP-HC group. Moreover, we demonstrated HRV disturbances, suggesting ANS impairment after both studied oxazaphosphorines, however, consistent with the findings mentioned above, the autonomic dysfunction was more emphasized after CP. CP treatment was also associated with changes of non-normalized HRV spectral components percentage distribution--a marked very low frequency--VLF [%] increase together with low frequency--LF [%] and high frequency--HF [%] decrease were observed. Taking into consideration the next findings, demonstrating the lack of both normalized power spectral components (nLF and n

  8. Influence of anoxia and respiratory deficiency on the genotoxicity of some direct-acting alkylating agents in yeast.

    PubMed

    Deorukhakar, V V; Murthy, M S

    1991-01-01

    We have studied the influence of anoxia and respiratory deficiency (RD) in yeast on the cytotoxic and recombinogenic effects of 5 direct-acting alkylating agents, namely N-methyl-N'-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine (MNNG), methylnitrosourea (MNU), ethylnitrosourea (ENU), methyl methanesulphonate (MMS) and ethyl methanesulphonate (EMS). We found that the effects of both conditions parallel each other for MMS, MNNG, MNU and ENU. Both anoxia and RD did not modify the effects of MMS to any significant extent. On the other hand, anoxic and respiratory-deficient cells were found to be more resistant than euoxic and respiratory-proficient cells respectively for MNNG, MNU and ENU. In the case of EMS, which is similar to MMS in its chemical reaction with DNA, the respiratory-deficient cells were found to be more sensitive than the respiratory-proficient ones. These studies indicate that the response of anoxic and respiratory-deficient cells cannot be predicted solely on the basis of the chemical reactivity pattern of the alkylating agents. The physiological state which exists under these conditions may exert considerable influence on the cellular response. PMID:1846028

  9. Bifunctional alkylating agent-mediated MGMT-DNA cross-linking and its proteolytic cleavage in 16HBE cells.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Jin; Ye, Feng; Dan, Guorong; Zhao, Yuanpeng; Wang, Bin; Zhao, Jiqing; Sai, Yan; Zou, Zhongmin

    2016-08-15

    Nitrogen mustard (NM), a bifunctional alkylating agent (BAA), contains two alkyl arms and can act as a cross-linking bridge between DNA and protein to form a DNA-protein cross-link (DPC). O(6)-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase (MGMT), a DNA repair enzyme for alkyl adducts removal, is found to enhance cell sensitivity to BAAs and to promote damage, possibly due to its stable covalent cross-linking with DNA mediated by BAAs. To investigate MGMT-DNA cross-link (mDPC) formation and its possible dual roles in NM exposure, human bronchial epithelial cell line 16HBE was subjected to different concentrations of HN2, a kind of NM, and we found mDPC was induced by HN2 in a concentration-dependent manner, but the mRNA and total protein of MGMT were suppressed. As early as 1h after HN2 treatment, high mDPC was achieved and the level maintained for up to 24h. Quick total DPC (tDPC) and γ-H2AX accumulation were observed. To evaluate the effect of newly predicted protease DVC1 on DPC cleavage, we applied siRNA of MGMT and DVC1, MG132 (proteasome inhibitor), and NMS-873 (p97 inhibitor) and found that proteolysis plays a role. DVC1 was proven to be more important in the cleavage of mDPC than tDPC in a p97-dependent manner. HN2 exposure induced DVC1 upregulation, which was at least partially contributed to MGMT cleavage by proteolysis because HN2-induced mDPC level and DNA damage was closely related with DVC1 expression. Homologous recombination (HR) was also activated. Our findings demonstrated that MGMT might turn into a DNA damage promoter by forming DPC when exposed to HN2. Proteolysis, especially DVC1, plays a crucial role in mDPC repair. PMID:27342729

  10. MLN2238, a proteasome inhibitor, induces caspase-dependent cell death, cell cycle arrest, and potentiates the cytotoxic activity of chemotherapy agents in rituximab-chemotherapy-sensitive or rituximab-chemotherapy-resistant B-cell lymphoma preclinical models.

    PubMed

    Gu, Juan J; Hernandez-Ilizaliturri, Francisco J; Mavis, Cory; Czuczman, Natalie M; Deeb, George; Gibbs, John; Skitzki, Joseph J; Patil, Ritesh; Czuczman, Myron S

    2013-11-01

    To further develop therapeutic strategies targeting the proteasome system, we studied the antitumor activity and mechanisms of action of MLN2238, a reversible proteasome inhibitor, in preclinical lymphoma models. Experiments were conducted in rituximab-chemotherapy-sensitive cell lines, rituximab-chemotherapy-resistant cell lines (RRCL), and primary B-cell lymphoma cells. Cells were exposed to MLN2238 or caspase-dependent inhibitors, and differences in cell viability, alterations in apoptotic protein levels, effects on cell cycle, and the possibility of synergy when combined with chemotherapeutic agents were evaluated. MLN2238 showed more potent dose-dependent and time-dependent cytotoxicity and inhibition of cell proliferation in lymphoma cells than bortezomib. Our data suggest that MLN2238 can induce caspase-independent cell death in RRCL. MLN2238 (and to a much lesser degree bortezomib) reduced RRCL S phase and induced cell cycle arrest in the G2/M phase. Exposure of rituximab-chemotherapy-sensitive cell lines and RRCL to MLN2238 potentiated the cytotoxic effects of gemcitabine, doxorubicin, and paclitaxel and overcame resistance to chemotherapy in RRCL. MLN2238 is a potent proteasome inhibitor active in rituximab-chemotherapy-sensitive and rituximab-chemotherapy-resistant cell models and potentiates the antitumor activity of chemotherapy agents and has the potential of becoming an effective therapeutic agent in the treatment of therapy-resistant B-cell lymphoma. PMID:23995855

  11. Alkylating agent methyl methanesulfonate (MMS) induces a wave of global protein hyperacetylation: Implications in cancer cell death

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Min-Young; Kim, Myoung-Ae; Kim, Hyun-Ju; Bae, Yoe-Sik; Park, Joo-In; Kwak, Jong-Young; Chung, Jay H.; Yun, Jeanho . E-mail: yunj@dau.ac.kr

    2007-08-24

    Protein acetylation modification has been implicated in many cellular processes but the direct evidence for the involvement of protein acetylation in signal transduction is very limited. In the present study, we found that an alkylating agent methyl methanesulfonate (MMS) induces a robust and reversible hyperacetylation of both cytoplasmic and nuclear proteins during the early phase of the cellular response to MMS. Notably, the acetylation level upon MMS treatment was strongly correlated with the susceptibility of cancer cells, and the enhancement of MMS-induced acetylation by histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitors was shown to increase the cellular susceptibility. These results suggest protein acetylation is important for the cell death signal transduction pathway and indicate that the use of HDAC inhibitors for the treatment of cancer is relevant.

  12. Novel Drug Therapies for Fertility Preservation in Men Undergoing Chemotherapy: Clinical Relevance of Protector Agents.

    PubMed

    Rabaça, A; Sousa, M; Alves, M G; Oliveira, P F; Sá, R

    2015-01-01

    Cancer has been affecting a growing number of children, adolescents and adult males in reproductive age. Male reproductive potential is adversely affected by chemotherapeutic drugs and patients are at risk for prolonged infertility. Fertility recovery is related to the chemotherapeutic agent and dosage used, being thus difficult to predict. As a result, there is a strong need to identify a natural or synthetic compound that is able to preserve male fertility without interfering with the efficacy of the chemotherapeutic regimen. New procedures, as well as several drugs, are being investigated to assess their efficiency in protecting male reproductive functions from the chemotherapy side-effects. This review provides an overview of the wide range of chemotherapeutic drugs regularly used in cancer treatment and their detrimental effects on male fertility. In addition, it also assesses the existing protector agents for male fertility and their usefulness in preserving and protecting male reproductive functions exposed to chemotherapeutics. Several protector agents for male fertility are being studied, and results are promising. Nonetheless, further research must be implemented to identify a supplemental therapy that addresses the multiple side effects of chemotherapy on male reproductive function. Until such therapy is discovered, it is fundamental that all fertility preservation options are discussed with patients, before treatment is initiated, to assure parenthood. PMID:26295467

  13. Alkyl and aryl sulfonyl p-pyridine ethanone oximes are efficient DNA photo-cleavage agents.

    PubMed

    Andreou, Nicolaos-Panagiotis; Dafnopoulos, Konstantinos; Tortopidis, Christos; Koumbis, Alexandros E; Koffa, Maria; Psomas, George; Fylaktakidou, Konstantina C

    2016-05-01

    Sulfonyloxyl radicals, readily generated upon UV irradiation of p-pyridine sulfonyl ethanone oxime derivatives, effectively cleave DNA, in a pH independent manner, and under either aerobic or anaerobic conditions. p-Pyridine sulfonyl ethanone oxime derivatives were synthesized from the reaction of p-pyridine ethanone oxime with the corresponding sulfonyl chlorides in good to excellent yields. All compounds, at a concentration of 100μM, were irradiated at 312nm for 15min, after incubation with supercoiled circular pBluescript KS II DNA and resulted in extended single- and double- strand cleavages. The cleavage ability was found to be concentration dependent, with some derivatives exhibiting activity even at nanomolar levels. Besides that, p-pyridine sulfonyl ethanone oxime derivatives showed good affinity to DNA, as it was observed with UV interaction and viscosity experiments with CT DNA and competitive studies with ethidium bromide. The compounds interact to CT DNA probably by non-classical intercalation (i.e. groove-binding) and at a second step they may intercalate within the DNA base pairs. The fluorescence emission spectra of pre-treated EB-DNA exhibited a significant or moderate quenching. Comparing with the known aryl carbonyloxyl radicals the sulfonyloxyl ones are more powerful, with both aryl and alkyl sulfonyl substituted derivatives to exhibit DNA photo-cleaving ability, in significantly lower concentrations. These properties may serve in the discovery of new leads for "on demand" biotechnological and medical applications. PMID:26945644

  14. DNA-damaging agents in cancer chemotherapy: serendipity and chemical biology.

    PubMed

    Cheung-Ong, Kahlin; Giaever, Guri; Nislow, Corey

    2013-05-23

    DNA-damaging agents have a long history of use in cancer chemotherapy. The full extent of their cellular mechanisms, which is essential to balance efficacy and toxicity, is often unclear. In addition, the use of many anticancer drugs is limited by dose-limiting toxicities as well as the development of drug resistance. Novel anticancer compounds are continually being developed in the hopes of addressing these limitations; however, it is essential to be able to evaluate these compounds for their mechanisms of action. This review covers the current DNA-damaging agents used in the clinic, discusses their limitations, and describes the use of chemical genomics to uncover new information about the DNA damage response network and to evaluate novel DNA-damaging compounds. PMID:23706631

  15. Effects of chemotherapy agents on Sphingosine-1-Phosphate receptors expression in MCF-7 mammary cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Ghosal, P; Sukocheva, O A; Wang, T; Mayne, G C; Watson, D I; Hussey, D J

    2016-07-01

    Sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) is a potent bioactive sphingolipid involved in the regulation of cell proliferation and cancer progression. Increased expression of S1P receptors has been detected in advanced breast tumours with poor prognosis suggesting that S1P receptors might control tumour response to chemotherapy. However, it remains unclear how the levels of S1P receptor expression are influenced by chemotherapy agents. Western immunoblotting, PCR analysis and fluorescent microscopy techniques were used in this study to analyze expression patterns of S1P receptors 2 and 3 (S1P2/S1P3) in MCF-7 breast adenocarcinoma cells treated by Tamoxifen (TAM) and/or Medroxyprogesterone acetate (MPA). We found that TAM/MPA induce downregulation of S1P3 receptors, but stimulate expression of S1P2. According to cell viability and caspase activity analyses, as expected, TAM activated apoptosis. We also detected TAM/MPA-induced autophagy marked by formation of macroautophagosomes and increased level of Beclin 1. Combined application of TAM and MPA resulted in synergistic apoptosis- and autophagy-stimulating effects. Assessed by fluorescent microscopy with autophagosome marker LAMP-2, changes in S1P receptor expression coincided with activation of autophagy, suggestively, directing breast cancer cells towards death. Further studies are warranted to explore the utility of manipulation of S1P2 and S1P3 receptor expression as a novel treatment approach. PMID:27261597

  16. [Clinical availability of the herbal medicine, SYOUSAIKOTOU, as a gargling agent for prevention and treatment of chemotherapy-induced stomatitis].

    PubMed

    Matsuoka, Hitoshi; Mizushima, Yuki; Kawano, Masako; Tachibana, Naoko; Sawada, Yoshiko; Kato, Sachiko; Nagakura, Hiromi; Tanaka, Miyuki; Suzuki, Keiko; Tadanobu, Kuribayashi

    2004-11-01

    The stomatitis accompanying chemotherapy reduces a patient's QOL. Many reports have suggested that some kinds of gargling agents for oral mucositis shorten the duration and severity of symptoms. This study tested the prevention and efficacy against stomatitis of a herbal medicine (Syousaikotou) as a gargling agent for patients receiving chemotherapy. Compared to gargling with providone-iodine and amphotericin B, the Syousaikotou gargle showed a significantly decreased incidence of stomatitis, and a painkilling effect. Stomatitis occurred in about 17.4% among 23 chemotherapy cycles with the Syousaikotou gargle, against about 40.8% among 71 chemotherapy cycles without the Syousaikotou gargle. Among the patients suffering stomatitis pain after 22 chemotherapy cycles, the painkilling effect was seen to be 76.2%, and continues for about 2 hours. Critical side effects were not seen, but in 4 cases there were complaints about foul smells, such as oil and grass smells. Syousaikotou gargle was considered to be one of the useful methods against the stomatitis prevention and sharp pain mitigation from the chemotherapy. PMID:15570931

  17. Preferential kill of hypoxic EMT6 mammary tumor cells by the bioreductive alkylating agent porfiromycin.

    PubMed

    Sartorelli, A C; Belcourt, M F; Hodnick, W F; Keyes, S R; Pritsos, C A; Rockwell, S

    1995-01-01

    Hypoxic cells in solid tumors represent a therapeutically resistant population that limits the curability of many solid tumors by irradiation and by most chemotherapeutic agents. The oxygen deficit, however, creates an environment conducive to reductive processes; this results in a major exploitable difference between normal and neoplastic tissues. The mitomycin antibiotics can be reductively activated by a number of oxidoreductases, in a process required for the production of their therapeutic effects. Preferential activation of these drugs under hypoxia and greater toxicity to oxygen-deficient cells than to their oxygenated counterparts are obtained in most instances. The demonstration that mitomycin C and porfiromycin, used to kill the hypoxic fraction, in combination with irradiation, to eradicate the oxygenated portion of the tumor, produced enhanced cytodestructive effects on solid tumors in animals has led to the clinical evaluation of the mitomycins in combination with radiation therapy in patients with head and neck cancer. The findings from these clinical trials have demonstrated the value of directing a concerted therapeutic attack on the hypoxic fraction of solid tumors as an approach toward enhancing the curability of localized neoplasms by irradiation. PMID:7572339

  18. Relationship of gonadal activity and chemotherapy-induced gonadal damage

    SciTech Connect

    Rivkees, S.A.; Crawford, J.D.

    1988-04-08

    The authors tested the hypothesis that chemotherapy-induced gonadal damage is proportional to the degree of gonadal activity during treatment. Thirty studies that evaluated gonadal function after cyclophosphamide therapy for renal disease or combination chemotherapy for Hodgkin's disease or acute lymphocytic leukemia provided data for analysis. Data were stratified according to sex, illness, chemotherapeutic regimen and dose, and pubertal stage at the time of treatment. Chemotherapy-induced damage was more likely to occur in patients who were treated when sexually mature compared with those who were treated when prepubertal. Males were significantly more frequently affected than females when treated for renal disease of Hodgkin's disease. Chemotherapy-induced damage was also more likely to occur when patients were treated with large doses of alkylating agents. These data suggest that chemotherapy-induced damage is proportional to gonadal activity. Further efforts are needed to test whether induced gonadal quiescence during chemotherapy will reduce the strikingly high incidence of gonadal failure following chemotherapy.

  19. Chemotherapy and fertility.

    PubMed

    Blumenfeld, Zeev

    2012-06-01

    The overall increase in cancer prevalence and the significant increase in long-term survival have generated worldwide interest in preserving fertility in young women exposed to gonadotoxic chemo- and radiotherapy. Infertility represents one of the main long-term consequences of combination chemotherapy given for lymphoma, leukaemia and other malignancies in young women. The gonadotoxic effect of various chemotherapeutic agents is diverse, may involve a variety of pathophysiologic mechanisms, and is not unequivocally understood. Proliferating cells, such as in tissues with high turnover (i.e. bone marrow, gastrointestinal tract and growing ovarian follicles) are more vulnerable to the toxic effect of alkylating agents. These agents may also be cytotoxic to cells at rest, as they are not cell-cycle specific. Alkylating agents, the most gonadotoxic chemotherapeutic medications, cause dose-dependent, direct destruction of oocytes and follicular depletion, and may bring about cortical fibrosis and ovarian blood-vessel damage. The reported rate of premature ovarian failure after various diseases and chemotherapeutic protocols differ enormously, and depend mainly on the chemotherapeutic protocol used and age range of the woman. Several options have been proposed for preserving female fertility, despite gonadotoxic chemotherapy: ovarian transposition, cryopreservation of embryos, unfertilised metaphase-II oocytes and ovarian tissue, and administration of gonadotropin-releasing hormone agonistic analogs in an attempt to decrease the gonadotoxic effects of chemotherapy by simulating a prepubertal hormonal milieu. None of these methods is ideal and none guarantees future fertility in all survivors; therefore, a combination of methods is recommended for maximising women's chances of future fertility. PMID:22281514

  20. In vitro and In vivo Antitumor Activity of a Novel Alkylating Agent Melphalan-flufenamide Against Multiple Myeloma Cells

    PubMed Central

    Chauhan, Dharminder; Ray, Arghya; Viktorsson, Kristina; Spira, Jack; Paba-Prada, Claudia; Munshi, Nikhil; Richardson, Paul; Lewensohn, Rolf; Anderson, Kenneth C.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose The alkylating agent melphalan prolongs survival in multiple myeloma (MM) patients; however, it is associated with toxicities and development of drug-resistance. Here, we evaluated the efficacy of melphalan-flufenamide (Mel-flufen), a novel dipeptide prodrug of melphalan in MM. Experimental Design MM cell lines, primary patient cells, and the human MM xenograft animal model were utilized to study the antitumor activity of mel-flufen. Results Low doses of mel-flufen triggers a more rapid and higher intracellular concentrations of melphalan in MM cells than is achievable by free melphalan. Cytotoxicity analysis showed significantly lower IC50 of mel-flufen than melphalan in MM cells. Importantly, mel-flufen induces apoptosis even in melphalan-, and bortezomib-resistant MM cells. Mechanistic studies show that siRNA knockdown of aminopeptidase N, a key enzyme mediating intracellular conversion of mel-flufen to melphalan, attenuates anti-MM activity of mel-flufen. Furthermore, mel-flufen-induced apoptosis was associated with: 1) activation of caspases and PARP cleavage; 2) ROS generation; 3) mitochondrial dysfunction and release of cytochrome-c; and 4) induction of DNA damage. Moreover, mel-flufen inhibits MM cell migration and tumor-associated angiogenesis. Human MM xenograft studies showed a more potent inhibition of tumor growth in mice treated with mel-flufen than mice receiving equimolar doses of melphalan. Finally, combining mel-flufen with lenalidomide, bortezomib, or dexamethasone triggers synergistic anti-MM activity. Conclusion Our preclinical study supports clinical evaluation of mel-flufen to enhance therapeutic potential of melphalan, overcome drug-resistance, and improve MM patient outcome. PMID:23584492

  1. Clinically relevant doses of chemotherapy agents reversibly block formation of glioblastoma neurospheres

    PubMed Central

    Mihaliak, Alicia M.; Gilbert, Candace A.; Li, Li; Daou, Marie-Claire; Moser, Richard P.; Reeves, Andrew; Cochran, Brent H.; Ross, Alonzo H.

    2010-01-01

    Glioblastoma patients have a poor prognosis, even after surgery, radiotherapy, and chemotherapy with temozolomide or 1,3-bis(2-chloroethy)-1-nitrosourea. We developed an in vitro recovery model using neurosphere cultures to analyze the efficacy of chemotherapy treatments, and tested whether glioblastoma neurosphere initiating cells are resistant. Concentrations of chemotherapy drugs that inhibit neurosphere formation are similar to clinically relevant doses. Some lines underwent a transient cell cycle arrest and a robust recovery of neurosphere formation. These results indicate that glioblastoma neurospheres can regrow after treatment with chemotherapy drugs. This neurosphere recovery assay will facilitate studies of chemo-resistant subpopulations and methods to enhance glioblastoma therapy. PMID:20435409

  2. Alterations in Bacillus subtilis transforming DNA induced by beta-propiolactone and 1,3-propane sultone, two mutagenic and carcinogenic alkylating agents.

    PubMed Central

    Kubinski, Z O; Kubinski, H

    1978-01-01

    than did some of the apparently smaller molecules which sedimented more slowly through the gradient. An increase in cotransformation of distant markers was evident in DNA molecules after a short exposure to an alkylating agent, but cotransformation of such markers was absent in DNA treated for longer periods. The observed changes in the transforming and cotransforming activities of the alkylated DNA can be explained by what is known about the physicochemistry of such DNA and in particular about the propensity of the alkylated and broken molecules to form complexes with themselves and with other macromolecules. PMID:102637

  3. Reactions of 4-nitro-1,2,3-triazole with alkylating agents and compounds with activated multiple bonds

    SciTech Connect

    Vereshchagin, L.I.; Kuznetsova, N.I.; Kirillova, L.P.; Shcherbakov, V.V.; Sukhanov, G.T.; Gareev, G.A.

    1987-01-01

    When 4-nitro-1,2,3-triazole is alkylated, a mixture of N1- and N2-isomers is formed, with the latter usually predominating. The same behavior is also observed in addition reactions of 4-nitrotriazole to activated multiple bonds.

  4. Monascus Pigment Rubropunctatin: A Potential Dual Agent for Cancer Chemotherapy and Phototherapy.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Yunquan; Zhang, Yun; Chen, Deshan; Chen, Haijun; Lin, Ling; Zheng, Chengzhuo; Guo, Yanghao

    2016-03-30

    The Monascus pigment, rubropunctatin, was extracted and purified from red mold rice (RMR), and its cytotoxic activities against human cervical carcinoma HeLa cells were studied under the conditions with or without light irradiation. The IC50 value of rubropunctatin against HeLa cells in the dark was 93.71 ± 1.96 μM (24 h), while the cytotoxic activity was enhanced more than 3 times (IC50 = 24.02 ± 2.17 μM) under light irradiation (halogen lamp, 500 W; wavelength, 597-622 nm; and fluence rate, 15 mW cm(-2), for 30 min). However, the IC50 value of rubropunctatin against the immortalized human cervical epithelial H8 cells was more than 300 μM, even under light irradiation, indicating that rubropunctatin has a favorable selectivity index (SI). Treatment of HeLa cells with rubropunctatin in the dark or under light irradiation resulted in a dose-dependent apoptosis, as validated by the increase in the percentage of cells in the sub-G1 phase and phosphatidylserine externalization, and the inductive effect on HeLa cell apoptosis was boosted by the light irradiation. In addition, treatment with rubropunctatin alone or under light irradiation was found to induce apoptosis in HeLa cells via the mitochondrial pathway, including loss of mitochondrial membrane potential, activation of caspase-3, caspase-8, and caspase-9, and increase of the level of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS). It was suggested that rubropunctatin could be a promising natural dual anticancer agent for photodynamic therapy and chemotherapy. PMID:26953890

  5. Anticancer chemotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Weller, R.E.

    1991-10-01

    This document examines chemotherapeutic agents for use in veterinary oncology. It lists some of the most common categories of chemotherapeutic drugs, such as alkylating agents and corticosteroids. For each category, the paper lists some example drugs, gives their mode of action, tumors usually susceptible to the drug, and common side effects. A brief discussion of mechanisms of drug resistance is also provided. (MHB)

  6. Chemotherapy Agents Alter Plasma Lipids in Breast Cancer Patients and Show Differential Effects on Lipid Metabolism Genes in Liver Cells.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Monika; Tuaine, Jo; McLaren, Blair; Waters, Debra L; Black, Katherine; Jones, Lynnette M; McCormick, Sally P A

    2016-01-01

    Cardiovascular complications have emerged as a major concern for cancer patients. Many chemotherapy agents are cardiotoxic and some appear to also alter lipid profiles, although the mechanism for this is unknown. We studied plasma lipid levels in 12 breast cancer patients throughout their chemotherapy. Patients received either four cycles of doxorubicin and cyclophosphamide followed by weekly paclitaxel or three cycles of epirubicin, cyclophosphamide and 5'-fluorouracil followed by three cycles of docetaxel. Patients demonstrated a significant reduction (0.32 mmol/L) in high density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) and apolipoprotein A1 (apoA1) levels (0.18 g/L) and an elevation in apolipoprotein B (apoB) levels (0.15 g/L) after treatment. Investigation of the individual chemotherapy agents for their effect on genes involved in lipoprotein metabolism in liver cells showed that doxorubicin decreased ATP binding cassette transporter A1 (ABCA1) via a downregulation of the peroxisomal proliferator activated receptor γ (PPARγ) and liver X receptor α (LXRα) transcription factors. In contrast, ABCA1 levels were not affected by cyclophosphamide or paclitaxel. Likewise, apoA1 levels were reduced by doxorubicin and remained unaffected by cyclophosphamide and paclitaxel. Doxorubicin and paclitaxel both increased apoB protein levels and paclitaxel also decreased low density lipoprotein receptor (LDLR) protein levels. These findings correlate with the observed reduction in HDL-C and apoA1 and increase in apoB levels seen in these patients. The unfavourable lipid profiles produced by some chemotherapy agents may be detrimental in the longer term to cancer patients, especially those already at risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD). This knowledge may be useful in tailoring effective follow-up care plans for cancer survivors. PMID:26807857

  7. Chemotherapy Agents Alter Plasma Lipids in Breast Cancer Patients and Show Differential Effects on Lipid Metabolism Genes in Liver Cells

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Monika; Tuaine, Jo; McLaren, Blair; Waters, Debra L.; Black, Katherine

    2016-01-01

    Cardiovascular complications have emerged as a major concern for cancer patients. Many chemotherapy agents are cardiotoxic and some appear to also alter lipid profiles, although the mechanism for this is unknown. We studied plasma lipid levels in 12 breast cancer patients throughout their chemotherapy. Patients received either four cycles of doxorubicin and cyclophosphamide followed by weekly paclitaxel or three cycles of epirubicin, cyclophosphamide and 5’-fluorouracil followed by three cycles of docetaxel. Patients demonstrated a significant reduction (0.32 mmol/L) in high density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) and apolipoprotein A1 (apoA1) levels (0.18 g/L) and an elevation in apolipoprotein B (apoB) levels (0.15 g/L) after treatment. Investigation of the individual chemotherapy agents for their effect on genes involved in lipoprotein metabolism in liver cells showed that doxorubicin decreased ATP binding cassette transporter A1 (ABCA1) via a downregulation of the peroxisomal proliferator activated receptor γ (PPARγ) and liver X receptor α (LXRα) transcription factors. In contrast, ABCA1 levels were not affected by cyclophosphamide or paclitaxel. Likewise, apoA1 levels were reduced by doxorubicin and remained unaffected by cyclophosphamide and paclitaxel. Doxorubicin and paclitaxel both increased apoB protein levels and paclitaxel also decreased low density lipoprotein receptor (LDLR) protein levels. These findings correlate with the observed reduction in HDL-C and apoA1 and increase in apoB levels seen in these patients. The unfavourable lipid profiles produced by some chemotherapy agents may be detrimental in the longer term to cancer patients, especially those already at risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD). This knowledge may be useful in tailoring effective follow-up care plans for cancer survivors. PMID:26807857

  8. A pilot study of an automated voice response system and nursing intervention to monitor adherence to oral chemotherapy agents.

    PubMed

    Decker, Veronica; Spoelstra, Sandra; Miezo, Emily; Bremer, Renee; You, Mei; Given, Charles; Given, Barbara

    2009-01-01

    This study was designed to develop and test a system to monitor adherence with nonhormonal oral chemotherapeutic agents using an automated voice response (AVR) system plus nursing intervention. Participants were patients diagnosed with solid tumor cancers, primarily breast, colon, and lung cancers, who received the Symptom Management Toolkit and participated in an interview for symptom severity, satisfaction, and beliefs about oral agents. Patients received weekly AVR calls, which assessed adherence to oral agents and severity of 15 symptoms. Patients who reported adherence of below 100% of the prescribed oral agents or symptoms of 4 or greater (0-10 scale) for 3 consecutive weeks were called by a nurse for assistance with symptom management and adherence to oral chemotherapy medications. After the 8 weekly AVR calls, patients participated in a follow-up interview and medical record review. Participants were 30 oncology patients who were ambulatory and treated at 2 cancer centers in Midwest United States. The results indicate 23.3% nonadherence rate to oral chemotherapy medications due to symptoms and forgetting to take the medication. An association between symptom management and adherence was found. Symptom severity and beliefs about medications were not significantly different between adherent and nonadherent patients. This pilot study demonstrated the ability to accrue patients for a longitudinal trial and informed intervention design while providing guidance for future interventions and research studies. PMID:19816160

  9. Genomic Phenotyping by Barcode Sequencing Broadly Distinguishes between Alkylating Agents, Oxidizing Agents, and Non-Genotoxic Agents, and Reveals a Role for Aromatic Amino Acids in Cellular Recovery after Quinone Exposure

    PubMed Central

    Svensson, J. Peter; Quirós Pesudo, Laia; McRee, Siobhan K.; Adeleye, Yeyejide; Carmichael, Paul; Samson, Leona D.

    2013-01-01

    Toxicity screening of compounds provides a means to identify compounds harmful for human health and the environment. Here, we further develop the technique of genomic phenotyping to improve throughput while maintaining specificity. We exposed cells to eight different compounds that rely on different modes of action: four genotoxic alkylating (methyl methanesulfonate (MMS), N-Methyl-N-nitrosourea (MNU), N,N′-bis(2-chloroethyl)-N-nitroso-urea (BCNU), N-ethylnitrosourea (ENU)), two oxidizing (2-methylnaphthalene-1,4-dione (menadione, MEN), benzene-1,4-diol (hydroquinone, HYQ)), and two non-genotoxic (methyl carbamate (MC) and dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO)) compounds. A library of S. cerevisiae 4,852 deletion strains, each identifiable by a unique genetic ‘barcode’, were grown in competition; at different time points the ratio between the strains was assessed by quantitative high throughput ‘barcode’ sequencing. The method was validated by comparison to previous genomic phenotyping studies and 90% of the strains identified as MMS-sensitive here were also identified as MMS-sensitive in a much lower throughput solid agar screen. The data provide profiles of proteins and pathways needed for recovery after both genotoxic and non-genotoxic compounds. In addition, a novel role for aromatic amino acids in the recovery after treatment with oxidizing agents was suggested. The role of aromatic acids was further validated; the quinone subgroup of oxidizing agents were extremely toxic in cells where tryptophan biosynthesis was compromised. PMID:24040048

  10. Alkylating potential of oxetanes.

    PubMed

    Gómez-Bombarelli, Rafael; Palma, Bernardo Brito; Martins, Célia; Kranendonk, Michel; Rodrigues, Antonio S; Calle, Emilio; Rueff, José; Casado, Julio

    2010-07-19

    Small, highly strained heterocycles are archetypical alkylating agents (oxiranes, beta-lactones, aziridinium, and thiirinium ions). Oxetanes, which are tetragonal ethers, are higher homologues of oxiranes and reduced counterparts of beta-lactones, and would therefore be expected to be active alkylating agents. Oxetanes are widely used in the manufacture of polymers, especially in organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs), and are present, as a substructure, in compounds such as the widely used antimitotic taxol. Whereas the results of animal tests suggest that trimethylene oxide (TMO), the parent compound, and beta,beta-dimethyloxetane (DMOX) are active carcinogens at the site of injection, no studies have explored the alkylating ability and genotoxicity of oxetanes. This work addresses the issue using a mixed methodology: a kinetic study of the alkylation reaction of 4-(p-nitrobenzyl)pyridine (NBP), a trap for alkylating agents with nucleophilicity similar to that of DNA bases, by three oxetanes (TMO, DMOX, and methyloxetanemethanol), and a mutagenicity, genotoxicity, and cell viability study (Salmonella microsome test, BTC E. coli test, alkaline comet assay, and MTT assay). The results suggest either that oxetanes lack genotoxic capacity or that their mode of action is very different from that of epoxides and beta-lactones. PMID:20550097

  11. Magnetic nanoparticle-based therapeutic agents for thermo-chemotherapy treatment of cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hervault, Aziliz; Thanh, Nguyêl; N. Thé, Kim

    2014-09-01

    Magnetic nanoparticles have been widely investigated for their great potential as mediators of heat for localised hyperthermia therapy. Nanocarriers have also attracted increasing attention due to the possibility of delivering drugs at specific locations, therefore limiting systematic effects. The enhancement of the anti-cancer effect of chemotherapy with application of concurrent hyperthermia was noticed more than thirty years ago. However, combining magnetic nanoparticles with molecules of drugs in the same nanoformulation has only recently emerged as a promising tool for the application of hyperthermia with combined chemotherapy in the treatment of cancer. The main feature of this review is to present the recent advances in the development of multifunctional therapeutic nanosystems incorporating both magnetic nanoparticles and drugs, and their superior efficacy in treating cancer compared to either hyperthermia or chemotherapy as standalone therapies. The principle of magnetic fluid hyperthermia is also presented.

  12. Rapid chemotherapy-induced acute endothelial progenitor cell mobilization: implications for antiangiogenic drugs as chemosensitizing agents

    PubMed Central

    Shaked, Yuval; Henke, Erik; Roodhart, Jeanine; Mancuso, Patrizia; Langenberg, Marlies; Colleoni, Marco; Daenen, Laura G.; Man, Shan; Xu, Ping; Emmenegger, Urban; Tang, Terence; Zhu, Zhenping; Witte, Larry; Strieter, Robert M.; Bertolini, Francesco; Voest, Emile; Benezra, Robert; Kerbel, Robert S.

    2008-01-01

    SUMMARY Several hypotheses have been proposed to explain how antiangiogenic drugs enhance the treatment efficacy of cytotoxic chemotherapy including impairing the ability of chemotherapy-responsive tumors to regrow after therapy. With respect to the latter, we show that certain chemotherapy drugs, e.g. paclitaxel, can rapidly induce pro-angiogenic bone marrow derived circulating endothelial cell (CEP) mobilization, and subsequent tumor homing, whereas others, e.g. gemcitabine, did not. Acute CEP mobilization was mediated, at least in part, by systemic induction of SDF-1α and could be prevented by various procedures such as treatment with anti-VEGFR2 blocking antibodies or by paclitaxel treatment in CEP-deficient Id-mutant mice, both of which resulted in enhanced anti-tumor effects mediated by paclitaxel, but not gemcitabine. PMID:18772115

  13. Modification of chemotherapy by nitroimidazoles

    SciTech Connect

    Siemann, D.W.

    1984-09-01

    The potentiation of chemotherapeutic agents by radiation sensitizers has been extensively studied for several years. There is little doubt that the effectiveness of certain anti-cancer drugs, primarily alkylating agents, can readily be enhanced both in vitro and in vivo through the addition of a sensitizer. While enhanced effects have been observed in certain critical normal tissues, in general most animal model studies have demonstrated a therapeutic gain at large sensitizer doses. This approach to combination therapies therefore appears promising. Yet many questions concerning the interaction between chemotherapeutic agents and radiosensitizers, particularly in the aspects of modification of chemotherapy by nitroimidazoles are reviewed and discussed. These address the importance in chemopotentiation of (i) hypoxia, (ii) alterations in DNA damage and/or repair, (iii) depletion of intracellular sulfhydryls and (iv) modification of drug pharmacokinetics.

  14. Alternative agents versus prophylactic platelet transfusion for preventing bleeding in patients with haematological disorders after chemotherapy or stem cell transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Estcourt, Lise J; Gregg, Richard; Stanworth, Simon; Doree, Carolyn; Trivella, Marialena; Murphy, Michael F; Tinmouth, Alan

    2014-01-01

    This is the protocol for a review and there is no abstract. The objectives are as follows: To determine whether alternative agents (e.g. artificial platelet substitutes, platelet-poor plasma, fibrinogen, rFVIIa, thrombopoietin mimetics) are as effective and safe as the use of platelet transfusions for the prevention of bleeding (prophylactic platelet transfusion) in patients with haematological disorders who are undergoing myelosuppressive chemotherapy or stem cell transplantation. Antifibrinolytics (lysine analogues) will not be included in this review because they have been the focus of another Cochrane review (Wardrop 2013). PMID:25722650

  15. Quantitative comparison of carcinogenicity, mutagenicity and electrophilicity of 10 direct-acting alkylating agents and of the initial O6:7-alkylguanine ratio in DNA with carcinogenic potency in rodents.

    PubMed

    Bartsch, H; Terracini, B; Malaveille, C; Tomatis, L; Wahrendorf, J; Brun, G; Dodet, B

    1983-08-01

    The quantitative relationship between carcinogenicity in rodents and mutagenicity in Salmonella typhimurium was examined, by using 10 monofunctional alkylating agents, including N-nitrosamides, alkyl methanesulfonates, epoxides, beta-propiolactone and 1,3-propane sultone. The compounds were assayed for mutagenicity in two S. typhimurium strains (TA1535 and TA100) and in plate and liquid assays. The mutagenic activity of the agents was compared with their alkylating activity towards 4-(4'-nitrobenzyl)pyridine and with their half-lives (solvolysis constants) in an aqueous medium. No correlations between these variables were found, nor was mutagenic activity correlated with estimates of carcinogenicity in rodents. There was a positive relationship between carcinogenicity and the initial ratios of 7-:O6-alkylguanine formed or expected after their reaction with double-stranded DNA in vitro. The results suggest that alkylation of guanine at position O6 (or at other O atoms of DNA bases) may be a critical DNA-base modification that determines the overall carcinogenicity of these alkylating agents in rodents. PMID:6348521

  16. Aryl-Alkyl-Lysines: Agents That Kill Planktonic Cells, Persister Cells, Biofilms of MRSA and Protect Mice from Skin-Infection

    PubMed Central

    Ghosh, Chandradhish; Manjunath, Goutham B.; Konai, Mohini M.; Uppu, Divakara S. S. M.; Hoque, Jiaul; Paramanandham, Krishnamoorthy; Shome, Bibek R.; Haldar, Jayanta

    2015-01-01

    Development of synthetic strategies to combat Staphylococcal infections, especially those caused by methicillin resistant Staphyloccus aureus (MRSA), needs immediate attention. In this manuscript we report the ability of aryl-alkyl-lysines, simple membrane active small molecules, to treat infections caused by planktonic cells, persister cells and biofilms of MRSA. A representative compound, NCK-10, did not induce development of resistance in planktonic cells in multiple passages and retained activity in varying environments of pH and salinity. At low concentrations the compound was able to depolarize and permeabilize the membranes of S. aureus persister cells rapidly. Treatment with the compound not only eradicated pre-formed MRSA biofilms, but also brought down viable counts in bacterial biofilms. In a murine model of MRSA skin infection, the compound was more effective than fusidic acid in bringing down the bacterial burden. Overall, this class of molecules bears potential as antibacterial agents against skin-infections. PMID:26669634

  17. In vitro study of cytotoxicity by U. V. radiation and differential sensitivity in combination with alkylating agents on established cell systems

    SciTech Connect

    Ramudu, K. )

    1991-01-01

    The effect of U.V. radiation or alkylating agents, such as actinomycin-D, cycloheximide and mitomycin-C (MMC), was studied on CHO, BHK and HeLa cells. U.V. radiation caused DNA ssb and dsb and were prevented by cycloheximide and actinomycin-D. MMC is known to be cytotoxic in CHO/BHK cells by forming free radical generation. MMC in combination with U.V. radiation enhanced DNA ssb dsb in these cell types. However, HeLa cells were insensitive to U.V. radiation. This insensitivity to U.V. radiation could be ascribed to the presence of glutathione transferase which is absent in CHO/BHK cell line.

  18. Oral single-agent chemotherapy in older patients with solid tumours: A position paper from the International Society of Geriatric Oncology (SIOG).

    PubMed

    Biganzoli, L; Lichtman, S; Michel, J-P; Papamichael, D; Quoix, E; Walko, C; Aapro, M

    2015-11-01

    Compared with intravenous (i.v.) chemotherapy, oral administration is convenient, requires fewer healthcare resources, is generally preferred by patients, and may be appropriate in older people with breast, colorectal and lung cancers. The effects of organ dysfunction on drug metabolism and drug interactions in patients with multiple comorbidities must be considered but are not specific to oral chemotherapy. Single-agent oral chemotherapy with capecitabine or vinorelbine is active in older patients with advanced or metastatic breast cancer. Choice of treatment is based mainly on different safety profiles. In the adjuvant treatment of colorectal cancer (CRC), single-agent oral capecitabine is an effective alternative to i.v. fluorouracil (5-FU) regimens. In metastatic CRC, oral, single-agent capecitabine has recently shown encouraging median overall survival in combination with bevacizumab. In non-small cell lung cancer, fit older patients, like their younger counterparts, benefit from platinum-based doublets, with carboplatin preferred to cisplatin. Single agent vinorelbine is an option for those less suited to combination chemotherapy, and oral may be an alternative to i.v. administration. For elderly cancer patients in general, metronomic chemotherapy combines good tolerability with acceptable activity. PMID:26340809

  19. Antiangiogenic agents, chemotherapy, and the treatment of metastatic transitional cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Vogelzang, Nicholas J

    2013-02-20

    A 69-year-old man with a 100 pack-year history of smoking developed gross hematuria. His medical history included hypertension, a silent myocardial infarction, and a cerebrovascular accident complicated by seizures. Cystoscopy and biopsy showed a 4-cm mass at the right ureteral orifice positive for a high-grade papillary transitional cell carcinoma (TCC) with muscularis propria invasion (Fig 1). The computed tomography (CT)/positron emission tomography (PET) scan of the chest, abdomen, and pelvis showed hydronephrosis and hydroureter with marked cortical thinning and multiple bilateral PET-avid pulmonary nodules, with the largest in the left upper lung measuring 3.0 × 2.5 cm (Figs 2A, 3A), biopsy of which showed invasive high-grade urothelial carcinoma. The patient consented to join a clinical trial for metastatic TCC (USON [US Oncology Network study] 06040) involving treatment with gemcitabine, cisplatin, and sunitinib (GCS) 37.5 mg per day. Four days later, he experienced a 10-day hospitalization for acute pancreatitis and neutropenia. Sunitinib was discontinued, and he completed four additional cycles of GC. CT/PET showed that the right ureteral mass and all lung nodules had regressed or disappeared (Figs 2B, 3B). The largest remaining lung nodule at 1.4 cm showed no metabolic activity. He underwent a radical cystoprostatectomy and right nephroureterectomy, disclosing residual high-grade urothelial carcinoma infiltrating the full thickness of the ureteral wall. There was carcinoma in situ of the bladder, and 42 nodes were negative for cancer. The surgery was followed by a small, uncomplicated myocardial infarction. A scheduled left thoracotomy to remove the remaining nodule was cancelled. No additional chemotherapy was administered, and the patient remains free of recurrence 2 years from initiation of chemotherapy. The 1.4-cm nodule has calcified and remains stable and metabolically inactive. He has no sequelae of chemotherapy or surgery, with a creatinine

  20. Spiro-fused carbohydrate oxazoline ligands: Synthesis and application as enantio-discrimination agents in asymmetric allylic alkylation.

    PubMed

    Kraft, Jochen; Golkowski, Martin; Ziegler, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    In the present work, we describe a convenient synthesis of spiro-fused D-fructo- and D-psico-configurated oxazoline ligands and their application in asymmetric catalysis. The ligands were synthesized from readily available 3,4,5-tri-O-benzyl-1,2-O-isopropylidene-β-D-fructopyranose and 3,4,5-tri-O-benzyl-1,2-O-isopropylidene-β-D-psicopyranose, respectively. The latter compounds were partially deprotected under acidic conditions followed by condensation with thiocyanic acid to give an anomeric mixture of the corresponding 1,3-oxazolidine-2-thiones. The anomeric 1,3-oxazolidine-2-thiones were separated after successive benzylation, fully characterized and subjected to palladium catalyzed Suzuki-Miyaura coupling with 2-pyridineboronic acid N-phenyldiethanolamine ester to give the corresponding 2-pyridyl spiro-oxazoline (PyOx) ligands. The spiro-oxazoline ligands showed high asymmetric induction (up to 93% ee) when applied as chiral ligands in palladium-catalyzed allylic alkylation of 1,3-diphenylallyl acetate with dimethyl malonate. The D-fructo-PyOx ligand provided mainly the (R)-enantiomer while the D-psico-configurated ligand gave the (S)-enantiomer with a lower enantiomeric excess. PMID:26877819

  1. Spiro-fused carbohydrate oxazoline ligands: Synthesis and application as enantio-discrimination agents in asymmetric allylic alkylation

    PubMed Central

    Kraft, Jochen; Golkowski, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Summary In the present work, we describe a convenient synthesis of spiro-fused D-fructo- and D-psico-configurated oxazoline ligands and their application in asymmetric catalysis. The ligands were synthesized from readily available 3,4,5-tri-O-benzyl-1,2-O-isopropylidene-β-D-fructopyranose and 3,4,5-tri-O-benzyl-1,2-O-isopropylidene-β-D-psicopyranose, respectively. The latter compounds were partially deprotected under acidic conditions followed by condensation with thiocyanic acid to give an anomeric mixture of the corresponding 1,3-oxazolidine-2-thiones. The anomeric 1,3-oxazolidine-2-thiones were separated after successive benzylation, fully characterized and subjected to palladium catalyzed Suzuki–Miyaura coupling with 2-pyridineboronic acid N-phenyldiethanolamine ester to give the corresponding 2-pyridyl spiro-oxazoline (PyOx) ligands. The spiro-oxazoline ligands showed high asymmetric induction (up to 93% ee) when applied as chiral ligands in palladium-catalyzed allylic alkylation of 1,3-diphenylallyl acetate with dimethyl malonate. The D-fructo-PyOx ligand provided mainly the (R)-enantiomer while the D-psico-configurated ligand gave the (S)-enantiomer with a lower enantiomeric excess. PMID:26877819

  2. Outcomes of children with central nervous system germinoma treated with multi-agent chemotherapy followed by reduced radiation.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Sylvia; Kilday, John-Paul; Laperriere, Normand; Janzen, Laura; Drake, James; Bouffet, Eric; Bartels, Ute

    2016-03-01

    CNS germinomas have an excellent prognosis with radiation therapy alone. However, in children, volume and dose of CNS radiation are associated with neurocognitive and neuroendocrine sequelae. Our objective was to determine long-term outcomes of our cohort who received chemotherapy and reduced radiation. This retrospective cohort study analyzed treatment and outcome of intracranial germinoma patients consecutively treated at Sick Kids, Toronto, Canada, from January 2000 to December 2013. 24 children (13 male, 11 female; median age 13.36 years) were identified. Median follow up was 61 months (range 1-144 months). Tumor location was suprasellar (n = 9), bifocal (8), pineal (6), and basal ganglia (1). Three children showed dissemination on imaging. 2/24 had only elevated serum human chorionic gonadotropin, 3/24 only elevated lumbar cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) hCG, and 2/24 had both elevated serum and lumbar CSF hCG. 23/24 children completed treatment and received multi-agent chemotherapy followed by either ventricular radiation (2340-2400 cGy) (n = 9), ventricular radiation + boost (1600 cGy) (n = 8), whole brain (2340 cGy) (n = 3), focal (4000 cGy) (n = 2) or craniospinal radiation (2340 cGy) (n = 1). Five-year progression free and overall survival was 96 and 100 % respectively. 8/24 patients with ventricular radiation ± boost (2340/4000 cGy) displayed stable full scale intelligence quotient over a mean interval of 3 years following radiation, but showed declined processing speed. In this limited experience, excellent 5-year overall survival rates were achieved with chemotherapy followed by reduced whole ventricular radiation even if ventricular radiation was delivered without boost. PMID:26744133

  3. Hot foam for weed control-Do alkyl polyglucoside surfactants used as foaming agents affect the mobility of organic contaminants in soil?

    PubMed

    Cederlund, H; Börjesson, E

    2016-08-15

    Use of alkyl polyglucosides (APGs) as a foaming agent during hot water weed control may influence the environmental fate of organic contaminants in soil. We studied the effects of the APG-based foaming agent NCC Spuma (C8-C10) on leaching of diuron, glyphosate, and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in sand columns. We also examined how APG concentration affected the apparent water solubility and adsorption of the herbicides and of the PAHs acenaphthene, acenaphthylene and fluorene. Application of APGs at the recommended concentration of 0.3% did not significantly affect leaching of any of the compounds studied. However, at a concentration of 1.5%, leaching of both diuron and glyphosate was significantly increased. The increased leaching corresponded to an increase in apparent water solubility of diuron and a decrease in glyphosate adsorption to the sand. However, APG addition did not significantly affect the mobility of PAHs even though their apparent water solubility was increased. These results suggest that application of APG-based foam during hot water weed control does not significantly affect the mobility of organic contaminants in soil if used according to recommendations. Moreover, they suggest that APGs could be useful for soil bioremediation purposes if higher concentrations are used. PMID:27149400

  4. High affinity and covalent-binding microtubule stabilizing agents show activity in chemotherapy-resistant acute myeloid leukemia cells

    PubMed Central

    Pera, Benet; Calvo-Vidal, M. Nieves; Ambati, Srikanth; Jordi, Michel; Kahn, Alissa; Díaz, J. Fernando; Fang, Weishuo; Altmann, Karl-Heinz; Cerchietti, Leandro; Moore, Malcolm A.S.

    2016-01-01

    Treatment failure in acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is frequently due to the persistence of a cell population resistant to chemotherapy through different mechanisms, in which drug efflux via ATP-binding cassette (ABC) proteins, specifically P-glycoprotein, is one of the most recognized. However, disappointing results from clinical trials employing inhibitors for these transporters have demonstrated the need to adopt different strategies. We hypothesized that microtubule targeting compounds presenting high affinity or covalent binding could overcome the effect of ABC transporters. We therefore evaluated the activity of the high-affinity paclitaxel analog CTX-40 as well as the covalent binder zampanolide (ZMP) in AML cells. Both molecules were active in chemosensitive as well as in chemoresistant cell lines overexpressing P-glycoprotein. Moreover, ZMP or CTX-40 in combination with daunorubicin showed synergistic killing without increased in vitro hematopoietic toxicity. In a primary AML sample, we further demonstrated that ZMP and CTX-40 are active in progenitor and differentiated leukemia cell populations. In sum, our data indicate that high affinity and covalent-binding anti-microtubule agents are active in AML cells otherwise chemotherapy resistant. PMID:26277539

  5. The hypomethylating agent decitabine prior to chemotherapy improves the therapy efficacy in refractory/relapsed acute myeloid leukemia patients

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Xuejie; Wang, Zhixiang; Ding, Bingjie; Yin, Changxin; Zhong, Qingxiu; Carter, Bing Z.; Yu, Guopan; Jiang, Ling; Ye, Jieyu; Dai, Min; Zhang, Yu; Liang, Shuang; Zhao, Qingxia; Liu, Qifa; Meng, Fanyi

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we investigated the effect of pre-treatment with demethylating agent decitabine on susceptibility to chemotherapeutic drugs in HL60/ADR, Kasumi-1 and primary AML cells. Cytotoxic effect was increased by decitabine through activation of p53 and inhibition of c-Myc, Survivin and Bcl-2. We demonstrated in clinic that combination of decitabine and HAA consisting of harringtonine, aclarubicin and cytarabine was effective and safe to treat patients with refractory, relapsed or high-risk AML. Decitabine prior to HAA regimen improved the first induction complete response rate, and significantly prolonged overall survival and disease-free survival in these patients compared with HAA alone. These findings support clinic protocols based on decitabine prior to chemotherapy to overcome resistance and improve therapeutic efficacy in AML patients. PMID:26384351

  6. Toward Hypoxia-Selective DNA-Alkylating Agents Built by Grafting Nitrogen Mustards onto the Bioreductively Activated, Hypoxia-Selective DNA-Oxidizing Agent 3-Amino-1,2,4-benzotriazine 1,4-Dioxide (Tirapazamine)

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Tirapazamine (3-amino-1,2,4-benzotriazine 1,4-dioxide) is a heterocyclic di-N-oxide that undergoes enzymatic deoxygenation selectively in the oxygen-poor (hypoxic) cells found in solid tumors to generate a mono-N-oxide metabolite. This work explored the idea that the electronic changes resulting from the metabolic deoxygenation of tirapazamine analogues might be exploited to activate a DNA-alkylating species selectively in hypoxic tissue. Toward this end, tirapazamine analogues bearing nitrogen mustard units were prepared. In the case of the tirapazamine analogue 18a bearing a nitrogen mustard unit at the 6-position, it was found that removal of the 4-oxide from the parent di-N-oxide to generate the mono-N-oxide analogue 17a did indeed cause a substantial increase in reactivity of the mustard unit, as measured by hydrolysis rates and DNA-alkylation yields. Hammett sigma values were measured to quantitatively assess the magnitude of the electronic changes induced by metabolic deoxygenation of the 3-amino-1,2,4-benzotriazine 1,4-dioxide heterocycle. The results provide evidence that the 1,2,4-benzotiazine 1,4-dioxide unit can serve as an oxygen-sensing prodrug platform for the selective unmasking of bioactive agents in hypoxic cells. PMID:25029663

  7. Anticancer chemotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Weller, R.E.

    1988-10-01

    Despite troubled beginnings, anticancer chemotherapy has made significant contribution to the control of cancer in man, particularly within the last two decades. Early conceptual observations awakened the scientific community to the potentials of cancer chemotherapy. There are now more than 50 agents that are active in causing regression of clinical cancer. Chemotherapy's major conceptual contributions are two-fold. First, there is now proof that patients with overt metastatic disease can be cured, and second, to provide a strategy for control of occult metastases. In man, chemotherapy has resulted in normal life expectancy for some patients who have several types of metastatic cancers, including choriocarcinoma, Burkitt's lymphomas, Wilm's tumor, acute lymphocytic leukemia, Hodgkins disease, diffuse histiocytic lymphoma and others. Anticancer chemotherapy in Veterinary medicine has evolved from the use of single agents, which produce only limited remissions, to the concept of combination chemotherapy. Three basic principles underline the design of combination chemotherapy protocols; the fraction of tumor cell killed by one drug is independent of the fraction killed by another drug; drugs with different mechanisms of action should be chosen so that the antitumor effects will be additive; and since different classes of drugs have different toxicities the toxic effects will not be additive.

  8. Gadolinium(III) Complexes with N-Alkyl-N-methylglucamine Surfactants Incorporated into Liposomes as Potential MRI Contrast Agents

    PubMed Central

    Silva, Simone Rodrigues; Duarte, Érica Correia; Ramos, Guilherme Santos; Kock, Flávio Vinícius Crizóstomo; Andrade, Fabiana Diuk; Frézard, Frédéric; Colnago, Luiz Alberto; Demicheli, Cynthia

    2015-01-01

    Complexes of gadolinium(III) with N-octanoyl-N-methylglucamine (L8) and N-decanoyl-N-methylglucamine (L10) with 1 : 2 stoichiometry were synthesized and characterized by elemental analysis, electrospray ionization-tandem mass spectrometry (ESI-MS), infrared (IR) spectroscopy, and molar conductivity measurements. The transverse (r2) and longitudinal (r1) relaxivity protons were measured at 20 MHz and compared with those of the commercial contrasts. These complexes were incorporated in liposomes, resulting in the increase of the vesicle zeta potential. Both the free and liposome-incorporated gadolinium complexes showed high relaxation effectiveness, compared to commercial contrast agent gadopentetate dimeglumine (Magnevist). The high relaxivity of these complexes was attributed to the molecular rotation that occurs more slowly, because of the elevated molecular weight and incorporation in liposomes. The results establish that these paramagnetic complexes are highly potent contrast agents, making them excellent candidates for various applications in molecular MR imaging. PMID:26347596

  9. Pathophysiology of cardiotoxicity induced by nonanthracycline chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Madeddu, Clelia; Deidda, Martino; Piras, Alessandra; Cadeddu, Christian; Demurtas, Laura; Puzzoni, Marco; Piscopo, Giovanna; Scartozzi, Mario; Mercuro, Giuseppe

    2016-05-01

    The risk and mechanism of chemotherapy-induced cardiotoxicity (CTX) vary depending on the type and intensity of the anticancer regimen. Myriad chemotherapeutic drugs produce adverse cardiovascular effects such as arterial hypertension, heart failure, and thromboembolic events. Among the numerous classes of these drugs, anthracyclines have been studied most extensively because of their overt cardiovascular effects and the high associated incidence of heart failure. However, CTX might also be caused by other types of chemotherapeutic agents, including alkylating agents (cyclophosphamide, ifosfamide), platinum agents, antimetabolites (5-fluorouracil, capecitabine), antibiotics (mitoxantrone, mitomycin, bleomycin), and antimicrotubule agents (taxanes). Here, we review the incidence, clinical impact, and potential mechanisms of CTX associated with nonanthracycline chemotherapy used for cancer patients. The published data support a marked increase in CTX risk, particularly with certain drugs such as 5-fluorouracil and cisplatin. Each anticancer regimen is associated with distinct modes of heart damage, both symptomatic and asymptomatic. However, the underlying mechanisms of CTX have been established only in a few cases, and only few nonanthracycline chemotherapeutics (mitoxantrone, mitomycin, ifosfamide) act through a recognizable mechanism and show a predictable dose dependence. Lastly, nonanthracycline chemotherapy can induce both chronic lesions, such as systolic dysfunction, and acute lesions, such as the ischemia that occurs within hours or days after treatment. An increased understanding of the incidence, mechanisms, and potential therapeutic targets of CTX induced by various nonanthracycline chemotherapeutic agents is clearly required. PMID:27183520

  10. Porfiromycin as a bioreductive alkylating agent with selective toxicity to hypoxic EMT6 tumor cells in vivo and in vitro.

    PubMed

    Keyes, S R; Rockwell, S; Sartorelli, A C

    1985-08-01

    Hypoxic cells may limit the curability of solid tumors by conventional chemotherapeutic agents and radiotherapy. Agents which are preferentially toxic to cells with low oxygen contents could therefore be useful as adjuncts to the regimens now used to treat these cancers. To date, the best agent of this type that we have tested is porfiromycin. Porfiromycin is similar to mitomycin C in its toxicity to hypoxic EMT6 cells in vitro but has much less toxicity than mitomycin C to well-oxygenated EMT6 cells. EMT6 cell sonicates reduce mitomycin C and porfiromycin to reactive electrophiles at similar rates under hypoxic conditions, a finding that correlates with cytotoxicity, whereas the rate of production of reactive species from both drugs is very slow under aerobic conditions. We also show that porfiromycin is capable of killing hypoxic radiation-resistant cells in solid EMT6 tumors. Appropriate regimens combining porfiromycin (which preferentially kills hypoxic cells) and radiation (which preferentially kills aerated cells) may therefore be especially efficacious for the treatment of solid tumors. PMID:3926306

  11. The role of chemotherapy in managing chronic lymphocytic leukemia: optimizing combinations with targeted therapy.

    PubMed

    Nastoupil, Loretta J; Sinha, Rajni; Flowers, Christopher R

    2013-09-01

    For many years, alkylating agents were the standard treatment for chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL). The advent of purine analogs improved response rates, but not overall survival, and although the monoclonal antibody rituximab is generally active against B-cell malignancies, it has demonstrated limited benefits as monotherapy for the treatment of CLL. However, specific combinations of chemotherapy, antibodies and targeted therapies have demonstrated additive or synergistic activity in CLL cells and deliver substantial clinical benefits. A greater understanding of the actions of chemotherapies and targeted agents on cellular pathways will advance the development of rationally designed combinations corresponding to individual patients' disease profiles. PMID:23919536

  12. Effective multi-agent chemotherapy for advanced abdominal lymphoma and FAB L3 leukemia of childhood.

    PubMed

    Toogood, I R; Tiedemann, K; Stevens, M; Smith, P J

    1993-01-01

    Between June 1981 and May 1988, 51 children with diffuse undifferentiated, advanced (Murphy Stage III and IV) intra-abdominal non-Hodgkin's lymphoma were treated on an intensive multi-drug chemotherapy protocol without irradiation to the primary tumour. Therapy was completed for Stage III disease at one year, but Stage IV patients continued with a further year of therapy until January 1986, when it was reduced to one year. Central nervous system (CNS) prophylaxis consisted of eight doses of intrathecal MTX for all children, and 24 Gy cranial irradiation for Stage IV patients only. There were 42 patients with Stage III disease (III A n = 29 and III B n = 13) and nine patients with Stage IV disease, of whom eight had extensive bone marrow and extramedullary disease (FAB L3 ALL). No patient had CNS disease at presentation. Forty-eight of 51 children (94%) achieved a complete remission. Two children died during remission induction therapy and eleven children relapsed, mostly within eight months of diagnosis. All patients have completed therapy. Failure free survival is 76% for Stage III and 67% for Stage IV patients, with a median followup of 90 and 64 months, respectively. Subdividing Stage III patients into Stage III A and III B did not show significantly different survival (P = 0.9), but the number of patients in Stage III B is small. These results compare favourably with the most effective published protocols, and toxicity has been manageable. PMID:8433675

  13. Design, synthesis and pharmacological evaluation of N-[4-(4-(alkyl/aryl/heteroaryl)-piperazin-1-yl)-phenyl]-carbamic acid ethyl ester derivatives as novel anticonvulsant agents.

    PubMed

    Kumari, Shikha; Mishra, Chandra Bhushan; Tiwari, Manisha

    2015-03-01

    A series of alkyl/aryl/heteroaryl piperazine derivatives (37-54) were designed and synthesized as potential anticonvulsant agents. The target compounds are endowed with satisfactory physicochemical as well as pharmacokinetic properties. The synthesized compounds were screened for their in vivo anticonvulsant activity in maximal electroshock (MES) and subcutaneous pentylenetetrazole (sc-PTZ) seizure tests. Further, neurotoxicity evaluation was carried out using rotarod method. Structure activity relationship studies showed that compounds possessing aromatic group at the piperazine ring displayed potent anticonvulsant activity. Majority of the compounds showed anti-MES activity whereas compounds 39, 41, 42, 43, 44, 50, 52, and 53 exhibited anticonvulsant activity in both seizure tests. All the compounds except 42, 46, 47, and 50 did not show neurotoxicity. The most active derivative, 45 demonstrated potent anticonvulsant activity in MES test at the dose of 30mg/kg (0.5h) and 100mg/kg (4h) and also delivered excellent protection in sc-PTZ test (100mg/kg) at both time intervals. Therefore, compound 45 was further assessed in PTZ-kindling model of epilepsy which is widely used model for studying epileptogenesis. This compound was effective in delaying onset of PTZ-evoked seizures at the dose of 5mg/kg in kindled animals and significantly reduced oxidative stress better than standard drug phenobarbital (PB). In result, compound 45 emerged as a most potent and safer anticonvulsant lead molecule. PMID:25619635

  14. Evaluation of progression-free survival as a surrogate endpoint for survival in chemotherapy and targeted agent metastatic colorectal cancer trials.

    PubMed

    Sidhu, Roger; Rong, Alan; Dahlberg, Steve

    2013-03-01

    Pooled analyses of chemotherapy trials in metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC) have suggested that progression-free survival (PFS) is a surrogate endpoint for overall survival (OS). However, this has not been evaluated under current standard-of-care regimens of chemotherapy in combination with targeted therapies. We conducted an analysis of published mCRC trials of chemotherapy and targeted therapies from 2000 to evaluate the surrogacy of PFS and response rate (RR) for OS. Study-level data was pooled from 24 randomized mCRC trials that evaluated fluoropyrimidine-based regimens and included trials conducted with targeted agents (panitumumab, cetuximab, bevacizumab, and aflibercept). A total of 69 treatment arms with a sample size of 20,438 patients was included. Linear regression analysis was carried out to estimate the correlation of PFS and RR with OS. The correlation coefficient between PFS HRs and OS HRs was 0.86 for all trials, 0.89 for 12 phase III trials of targeted agents in combination with chemotherapy, 0.95 for 8 first-line phase III trials of targeted agents, and 0.83 for 9 trials of anti-EGFR-targeted agents. In all cases, correlation coefficients between RR and OS HRs were lower than those between PFS HRs and OS HRs (range, 0.42-0.81). In this study-level analysis of randomized mCRC trials of chemotherapy and targeted agents, improvements in PFS are strongly correlated with improvements in OS. This suggests that PFS remains a valid surrogate endpoint for OS with current treatment regimens in the mCRC setting. PMID:23303214

  15. Somatic reversion of some copia-like induced mutations, at the white locus of Drosophila melanogaster, after treatment with alkylating agents.

    PubMed

    Soriano, S; Creus, A; Marcos, R; Xamena, N

    1995-01-01

    It has been suggested that transposable elements can be associated with different types of genotoxic effects. For this reason it seems appropriate to outline suitable systems to detect changes in the phenotypic expression of the loci containing transposable elements, as well as those agents that induce such changes. The sex-linked white locus offers a suitable experimental system for studying such events because most of the spontaneous mutations at the white locus are the result of insertions of repeated mobile sequences, and it is easy to follow mutational changes of the locus due to the possibility of detecting even slight changes in eye color. Here we report the results obtained in different strains of Drosophila melanogaster with copia-like induced mutations at the white locus, after treatment with three alkylating agents: ethyl methanesulfonate (EMS), methyl methanesulfonate (MMS), and N-nitroso-N-ethylurea (ENU). The three insertional white mutants used in this work were wa4, wbf, and wsp55, with the wa2 mutation used as control because its mutant phenotype is the result of a point mutation instead of the insertion of a DNA fragment. Our data constitute evidence that EMS, MMS, and ENU induce a clear increase in the frequencies of somatic-revertant sectors in the three strains carrying a white allele with an inserted copia-like element. For the wa2 strain, whose mutant phenotype is the result of a point mutation, only ENU at the highest concentration tested is able to induce a significant increase in the somatic reversion frequency. In addition, our results indicate that the use of D. melanogaster strains with transposable elements in the white locus is suitable for detecting genotoxic damage induced by chemicals. PMID:7698106

  16. Dose-Response for Multiple Biomarkers of Exposure and Genotoxic Effect Following Repeated Treatment of Rats with the Alkylating Agents, MMS and MNU.

    PubMed

    Ji, Zhiying; LeBaron, Matthew J; Schisler, Melissa R; Zhang, Fagen; Bartels, Michael J; Gollapudi, B Bhaskar; Pottenger, Lynn H

    2016-05-01

    The nature of the dose-response relationship for various in vivo endpoints of exposure and effect were investigated using the alkylating agents, methyl methanesulfonate (MMS) and methylnitrosourea (MNU). Six male F344 rats/group were dosed orally with 0, 0.5, 1, 5, 25 or 50mg/kg bw/day (mkd) of MMS, or 0, 0.01, 0.1, 1, 5, 10, 25 or 50 mkd of MNU, for 4 consecutive days and sacrificed 24h after the last dose. The dose-responses for multiple biomarkers of exposure and genotoxic effect were investigated. In MMS-treated rats, the hemoglobin adduct level, a systemic exposure biomarker, increased linearly with dose (r (2) = 0.9990, P < 0.05), indicating the systemic availability of MMS; however, the N7MeG DNA adduct, a target exposure biomarker, exhibited a non-linear dose-response in blood and liver tissues. Blood reticulocyte micronuclei (MN), a genotoxic effect biomarker, exhibited a clear no-observed-genotoxic-effect-level (NOGEL) of 5 mkd as a point of departure (PoD) for MMS. Two separate dose-response models, the Lutz and Lutz model and the stepwise approach using PROC REG both supported a bilinear/threshold dose-response for MN induction. Liver gene expression, a mechanistic endpoint, also exhibited a bilinear dose-response. Similarly, in MNU-treated rats, hepatic DNA adducts, gene expression changes and MN all exhibited clear PoDs, with a NOGEL of 1 mkd for MN induction, although dose-response modeling of the MNU-induced MN data showed a better statistical fit for a linear dose-response. In summary, these results provide in vivo data that support the existence of clear non-linear dose-responses for a number of biologically significant events along the pathway for genotoxicity induced by DNA-reactive agents. PMID:26040483

  17. Efficacy of platinum chemotherapy agents in the adjuvant setting for adenosquamous carcinoma of the pancreas

    PubMed Central

    Wild, Aaron T.; Dholakia, Avani S.; Fan, Katherine Y.; Kumar, Rachit; Moningi, Shalini; Rosati, Lauren M.; Laheru, Daniel A.; Zheng, Lei; De Jesus-Acosta, Ana; Ellsworth, Susannah G.; Hacker-Prietz, Amy; Voong, Khinh R.; Tran, Phuoc T.; Hruban, Ralph H.; Pawlik, Timothy M.; Wolfgang, Christopher L.

    2015-01-01

    Background Pancreatic adenosquamous carcinoma (PASC) accounts for only 1-4% of all exocrine pancreatic cancers and carries a particularly poor prognosis. This retrospective study was performed to determine whether inclusion of a platinum agent as part of adjuvant therapy is associated with improved survival in patients with resected PASC. Methods Records of all patients who underwent pancreatic resection at Johns Hopkins Hospital from 1986 to 2012 were reviewed to identify those with PASC. Multivariable Cox proportional hazards modeling was used to assess for significant associations between patient characteristics and survival. Results In total, 62 patients (1.1%) with resected PASC were identified among 5,627 cases. Median age was 68 [interquartile range (IQR), 57-77] and 44% were female. Multivariate analysis revealed that, among all patients (n=62), the following factors were independently predictive of poor survival: lack of adjuvant therapy [hazard ratio (HR) =3.6; 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.8-7.0; P<0.001], margin-positive resection (HR =3.5; 95% CI, 1.8-6.8; P<0.001), lymph node involvement (HR =3.5; 95% CI, 1.5-8.2; P=0.004), and age (HR =1.0; 95% CI, 1.0-1.1; P=0.035). There were no significant differences between patients who did and did not receive adjuvant therapy following resection (all P>0.05). A second multivariable model included only those patients who received adjuvant therapy (n=39). Lack of inclusion of a platinum agent in the adjuvant regimen (HR =2.4; 95% CI, 1.0-5.8; P=0.040) and larger tumor diameter (HR =1.3; 95% CI, 1.0-1.6; P=0.047) were independent predictors of inferior survival. Conclusions Addition of a platinum agent to adjuvant regimens for resected PASC may improve survival among these high-risk patients, though collaborative prospective investigation is needed. PMID:25830031

  18. Tunable release of chemotherapeutic and vascular disrupting agents from injectable fiber fragments potentiates combination chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Luo, Xiaoming; Xu, Guisen; Wei, Jiaojun; Chen, Maohua; Zhang, Hong; Li, Xiaohong

    2016-06-15

    Cancer progression and metastasis relies much on vasculature networks in tumor microenvironment, and the combination treatment with chemotherapeutic drugs and vascular disrupting agents represents apparent clinical benefits. In the current study, fiber fragments with loadings of hydroxycamptothecin (HCPT) or combretastatin A-4 (CA4) were proposed for tumor inhibition and blood vessel disruption after local administration in tumors. To address challenges in balancing the disruption of tumor vessels and intratumoral uptake of chemotherapeutic agents, this study is focus on release tuning of HCPT and CA4 from the fiber fragment mixtures. Hydroxypropyl-β-cyclodextrin (HPCD) was blended at ratios from 0 to 10% into CA4-loaded fiber fragments (Fc) to modulate CA4 release durations from 0.5 to 24days, and HCPT-loaded fiber fragments (Fh) indicated a sustained release for over 35days. In vitro cytotoxicity tests indicated a sequential inhibition on the endothelial and tumor cell growth, and the growth inhibition of tumor cells was more significant after treatment with mixtures of Fh and Fc containing 2% HPCD (Fc2) than that of other mixtures. In an orthotopic breast tumor model, compared with those of free CA4, or Fc with a fast or slow release of CA4, Fh/Fc mixtures with CA4 release durations from 2 to 12days indicated a lower tumor growth rate, a prolonged animal survival, a lower vessel density in tumors, and a less significant tumor metastasis. In addition, the tumor cell proliferation rate, hypoxia-inducible factor-1α expression within tumors, and the number of surface metastatic nodules in lungs were significantly lower after treatment with Fh/Fc2 mixtures with a CA4 release duration of 5days than those of other mixtures. It demonstrates the advantages of fiber fragment mixtures in independently modulating the release of multiple drugs and the essential role of release tuning of chemotherapeutic drugs and vascular disrupting agents in improving the therapeutic

  19. Modification of the metabolism and cytotoxicity of bioreductive alkylating agents by dicoumarol in aerobic and hypoxic murine tumor cells.

    PubMed

    Keyes, S R; Rockwell, S; Sartorelli, A C

    1989-06-15

    We have demonstrated previously that dicoumarol (DIC) increased the generation of reactive metabolites from mitomycin C (MC) in EMT6 cells under hypoxic conditions in vitro. This increased reaction rate was associated with an increased toxicity of MC to hypoxic EMT6 cells. In contrast, aerobic cells treated with DIC in vitro were protected from MC toxicity. We now demonstrate that DIC sensitizes EMT6 cells to two MC analogues, porfiromycin (POR) and the 7-N-dimethylaminomethylene analogue of mitomycin C (BMY-25282), in hypoxia and protects cells from these agents in air, despite the fact that POR is preferentially toxic to hypoxic cells and BMY-25282 is preferentially toxic to aerobic cells. In contrast, DIC increases menadione cytotoxicity in both air and hypoxia and has no effect on the cytotoxicity of Adriamycin. We have also shown previously that the preferential toxicity of POR to hypoxic cells is associated with an increased rate of drug uptake. In the present study, DIC had no measurable effect on the uptake of [3H]POR but increased the extent of efflux of this agent. MC-induced DNA cross-links, which have been proposed as the lesions responsible for the lethality of MC, are decreased by DIC in air and increased by DIC in hypoxia, in concert with the observed modifications of MC cytotoxicity by DIC. However, in aerobic cells treated with DIC and MC, the decrease in DNA interstrand cross-links is not directly associated with a decrease in cytotoxicity. L1210 cells, which have no measurable quinone reductase activity, demonstrate increased toxicity when treated with DIC and MC in hypoxia, as observed with EMT6 cells. Unlike EMT6 cells, however, L1210 cells are not protected by DIC from MC toxicity in air. Taken together, these findings suggest that DIC is altering the intracellular metabolism of MC and that quinone reductase or another, unidentified, enzyme sensitive to DIC may be involved in activating MC to a toxic product in aerobic EMT6 cells. PMID:2470504

  20. Antiviral Chemistry & Chemotherapy's current antiviral agents FactFile 2008 (2nd edition): RNA viruses.

    PubMed

    De Clercq, Erik; Field, Hugh J

    2008-01-01

    Among the RNA viruses, other than the retroviruses (that is, HIV), which are dealt with separately in the current FactFile, the most important targets for the development of antiviral agents at the moment are the orthomyxoviruses (that is, influenza), the hepaciviruses (that is, hepatitis C virus [HCV]) and, to a lesser extent, the picornaviruses. Although the uncoating inhibitors amantadine and rimantadine were the first known inhibitors of influenza A, the neuraminidase inhibitors oseltamivir, zanamivir and peramivir have now become the prime antiviral drugs for the treatment of influenza A and B virus infections. For HCV infections, standard treatment consists of the combination of pegylated interferon-alpha with ribavirin, but several other antivirals targeted at specific viral functions such as the HCV protease and/ or polymerase may be expected to soon take an important share of this important market. Still untapped is the potential of a variety of uncoating inhibitors, as well as protease and/or polymerase inhibitors against the wide spectrum of picornaviruses. While ribavirin has been available for 35 years as a broad-spectrum anti-RNA virus agent, relatively new and unexplored is favipiravir (T-705) accredited with activity against influenza as well as flaviviruses, bunyaviruses and arenaviruses. PMID:18727441

  1. Effect of Previous Chemotherapy on the Quality of Cryopreserved Human Ovarian Tissue In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Asadi Azarbaijani, Babak; Sheikhi, Mona; Oskam, Irma C.; Nurmio, Mirja; Laine, Tiina; Tinkanen, Helena; Mäkinen, Sirpa; Tanbo, Tom G.; Hovatta, Outi; Jahnukainen, Kirsi

    2015-01-01

    Background Cryopreservation of ovarian tissue has been widely accepted as an option for fertility preservation among cancer patients. Some patients are exposed to chemotherapy prior to ovarian tissue cryopreservation. Consequently, assessment of the developmental capacity of human ovarian tissue after chemotherapy is of primary importance. Materials In order to study the impact of previous chemotherapy on in vitro development and viability of ovarian follicles, quality control samples from 34 female cancer patients at median age of 15 years (range 1‒35), cryopreserved for fertility preservation before (n = 14) or after (n = 20) initiation of chemotherapy, were thawed and cultured for 7 days. The morphology and developmental stages of ovarian follicles were studied by light microscopy before and after culture. Possible associations between follicular densities, age and exposure to alkylating agents, expressed as cyclophosphamide equivalent dose (CED) were tested. Results Exposure to chemotherapy significantly impaired the survival and development of ovarian follicles in culture. After seven days, significantly higher densities of intermediary, primary and secondary follicles and lower densities of atretic follicles was detected in the samples collected before chemotherapy. Increasing dose of alkylating agents was identified by multivariate linear regression analysis as an independent predictor of a higher density of atretic follicles, whereas increasing age of the patient predicted a better outcome with less follicle atresia and a higher density of maturing follicles. Conclusion This study provides quantitative in vitro evidence of the impact of chemotherapy on developmental capacity of cryopreserved human ovarian tissue. The results indicate that fertility preservation should be carried out, if possible, before initiation of alkylating agents in order to guarantee better in vitro survival of ovarian follicles. In addition, ovarian samples from younger girls show

  2. Motor fuel alkylation process utilizing low acid

    SciTech Connect

    Kocal, J.A.; Imai, T.

    1987-01-06

    A process is described for the alkylation of an isoparaffin with an olefin acting agent comprising contacting the isoparaffin with the olefin acting agent at alkylation conditions in the presence of a catalyst. The catalyst consists essentially of an anhydrous, nonalcoholic mixture of from about 5 to 15 wt. % methyl tert-butyl ether and from 85 to 95 wt. % hydrofluoric acid. The volumetric ratio of hydrofluoric acid to isoparaffin and olefin acting agent is less than 0.75.

  3. Bioreductive alkylating agent porfiromycin in combination with radiation therapy for the management of squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck.

    PubMed

    Haffty, B G; Son, Y H; Wilson, L D; Papac, R; Fischer, D; Rockwell, S; Sartorelli, A C; Ross, D; Sasaki, C T; Fischer, J J

    1997-01-01

    statistically significant differences between the two arms with respect to white blood cell count (WBC), platelet, or hemoglobin nadirs. Acute nonhematological toxicities including mucositis, epidermitis, odynophagia, and nausea have also been comparable. Two patients in this current randomized trial died during treatment, apparently of nondrug-related causes. We conclude that the bioreductive alkylating agent porfiromycin has demonstrated an acceptable toxicity profile to date. Final analysis of the phase I trial, which revealed a 5-year no evidence of disease survival rate of 32% in patients with locally advanced disease and a low probability of cure, appears encouraging. We anticipate completion of the current ongoing trial comparing mitomycin C to porfiromycin in the next 2 years. Further investigations, including large-scale multiinstitutional trials employing bioreductive alkylating agents or other hypoxic cell cytotoxins as adjuncts to RT, are warranted. PMID:9372546

  4. Enhancement of radiosensitivity in human glioblastoma cells by the DNA N-mustard alkylating agent BO-1051 through augmented and sustained DNA damage response

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background 1-{4-[Bis(2-chloroethyl)amino]phenyl}-3-[2-methyl-5-(4-methylacridin-9-ylamino)phenyl]urea (BO-1051) is an N-mustard DNA alkylating agent reported to exhibit antitumor activity. Here we further investigate the effects of this compound on radiation responses of human gliomas, which are notorious for the high resistance to radiotherapy. Methods The clonogenic assay was used to determine the IC50 and radiosensitivity of human glioma cell lines (U87MG, U251MG and GBM-3) following BO-1051. DNA histogram and propidium iodide-Annexin V staining were used to determine the cell cycle distribution and the apoptosis, respectively. DNA damage and repair state were determined by γ-H2AX foci, and mitotic catastrophe was measure using nuclear fragmentation. Xenograft tumors were measured with a caliper, and the survival rate was determined using Kaplan-Meier method. Results BO-1051 inhibited growth of human gliomas in a dose- and time-dependent manner. Using the dosage at IC50, BO-1051 significantly enhanced radiosensitivity to different extents [The sensitizer enhancement ratio was between 1.24 and 1.50 at 10% of survival fraction]. The radiosensitive G2/M population was raised by BO-1051, whereas apoptosis and mitotic catastrophe were not affected. γ-H2AX foci was greatly increased and sustained by combined BO-1051 and γ-rays, suggested that DNA damage or repair capacity was impaired during treatment. In vivo studies further demonstrated that BO-1051 enhanced the radiotherapeutic effects on GBM-3-beared xenograft tumors, by which the sensitizer enhancement ratio was 1.97. The survival rate of treated mice was also increased accordingly. Conclusions These results indicate that BO-1051 can effectively enhance glioma cell radiosensitivity in vitro and in vivo. It suggests that BO-1051 is a potent radiosensitizer for treating human glioma cells. PMID:21244709

  5. Predictive value of BRCA1 expression on the efficacy of chemotherapy based on anti-microtubule agents: a pooled analysis across different malignancies and agents

    PubMed Central

    He, Qihua; Zhang, Mingzhe; Zhang, Jianrong; Zhong, Shengyi; Liu, Yang; Shen, Jianfei; He, Jiaxi; Jiang, Long; Yang, Chenglin; Zeng, Yuan; Guo, Minzhang; Chen, Xuewei

    2016-01-01

    Background Breast cancer susceptibility gene 1 (BRCA1) expression has been suggested as a predictor in anti-neoplastic treatment with anti-microtubule agents. However, the existing evidence is conflicting. Consulting the literature, we sought to examine the true impact of BRCA1 expression on the efficacy of anti-microtubule agents. Methods Medline by PubMed and Embase databases were searched for eligible studies. The primary endpoints were objective response rate (ORR) and progression free survival (PFS). Additional subgroup analyses stratified for detection methods, regimen, and patient origin were also performed. Results A total of 13 relevant studies involving a total of 1,490 cases were enrolled. Involved agents included paclitaxel, docetaxel and vinorelbine; Malignancies included non-small cell lung cancer, gastric cancer, esophageal carcinoma, ovarian carcinoma, malignant pleural mesothelioma, breast cancer, and small cell lung cancer. Through meta-analyses, we observed a potentially greater ORR in the population with high BRCA1 expression vs. low BRCA1 expression (OR 1.63, 95% CI: 0.92 to 2.88, P=0.09) but the heterogeneity is severe (P=0.01; I2=61%). Similar results were observed in PFS (high vs. low expression, HR 0.93, 95% CI: 0.75 to 1.15, P=0.49; heterogeneity, P<0.01, I2=75%). After stratification by testing methods, a significantly higher ORR in the population with high BRCA1 expression was shown in the subgroup using mRNA as a quantitative method (OR 2.90, 95% CI: 1.92 to 4.39, P<0.01; I2=0) whereas the difference in the subgroup using immunohistochemistry (IHC) was not significant (OR 0.60, 95% CI: 0.33 to 1.10, P=0.10; I2=0). Stratification by regimen (platinum-based vs. non platinum-based) and patient origin (Asian vs. Caucasian) did not reduce the heterogeneity. Conclusions Although the predictive value of BRCA1 expression on the anti-microtubule chemotherapy remained uncertain based on overall results, our exploratory analyses suggested that

  6. SMAC mimetic (JP1201) sensitizes non-small cell lung cancers to multiple chemotherapy agents in an IAP dependent but TNFα independent manner

    PubMed Central

    Greer, Rachel M.; Peyton, Michael; Larsen, Jill E.; Girard, Luc; Xie, Yang; Gazdar, Adi; Harran, Patrick; Wang, Lai; Brekken, Rolf A.; Wang, Xiaodong; Minna, John D.

    2012-01-01

    Inhibitors of apoptosis proteins (IAPs) are key regulators of apoptosis and are inhibited by the second mitocondrial activator of caspases (SMAC). Previously, a small subset of TNFα-expressing non-small cell lung cancers (NSCLCs) was found to be sensitive to SMAC mimetics alone. In this study we determined if a SMAC mimetic (JP1201) could sensitize non-responsive NSCLC cell lines to standard chemotherapy. We found that JP1201 sensitized NSCLCs to doxorubicin, erlotinib, gemcitabine, paclitaxel, vinorelbine, and the combination of carboplatin with paclitaxel in a synergistic manner at clinically achievable drug concentrations. Sensitization did not occur with platinum alone. Furthermore, sensitization was specific for tumor compared to normal lung epithelial cells, increased in NSCLCs harvested after chemotherapy treatment, and did not induce TNFα secretion. Sensitization also was enhanced in vivo with increased tumor inhibition and increased survival of mice carrying xenografts. These effects were accompanied by caspase 3, 4, and 9 activation, indicating that both mitochondrial and ER stress-induced apoptotic pathways are activated by the combination of vinorelbine and JP1201. Chemotherapies that induce cell death through the mitochondrial pathway required only inhibition of XIAP for sensitization, while chemotherapies that induce cell death through multiple apoptotic pathways required inhibition of cIAP1, cIAP2, and XIAP. Therefore, the data suggest that IAP-targeted therapy using a SMAC mimetic provides a new therapeutic strategy for synergistic sensitization of NSCLCs to standard chemotherapy agents, which appears to occur independently of TNFα secretion. PMID:22049529

  7. Chemotherapy versus Hypomethylating Agents for the Treatment of Relapsed Acute Myeloid Leukemia and Myelodysplastic Syndrome after Allogeneic Stem Cell Transplant.

    PubMed

    Motabi, Ibraheem H; Ghobadi, Armin; Liu, Jingxia; Schroeder, Mark; Abboud, Camille N; Cashen, Amanda F; Stockler-Goldstein, Keith E; Uy, Geoffrey L; Vij, Ravi; Westervelt, Peter; DiPersio, John F

    2016-07-01

    Allogeneic stem cell transplantation (allo-SCT) is a potentially curative treatment for high-risk acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS). For patients with relapsed disease after transplantation, intensive chemotherapy followed by donor lymphocyte infusion (DLI) or a second allo-SCT may result in a durable response in some patients. High-intensity chemotherapy and less aggressive therapy with hypomethylating agents (HAs) with and without DLI are often used for relapse after allo-SCT. Here we compared the treatment outcomes of intensive chemotherapy with that of HAs in relapsed AML and MDS after allo-SCT. Patients who had received a second SCT within 90 days of the relapse date were excluded. The primary endpoints were overall response rate (ORR) and overall survival (OS). Secondary endpoints were complete remission (CR) rate and progression-free survival (PFS). One hundred patients were included: 73 patients received chemotherapy and 27 patients received an HA. Fifty-six percent of patients in the chemotherapy group and 33% of patients in the HA group received at least 1 DLI after treatment. Treatment with chemotherapy resulted in a higher ORR (51% versus 19%, P = .004) and a higher CR rate (40% versus 7%, P = .002). The median OS (6 versus 3.9 months, P = .01) and PFS (4.9 versus 3.8 months, P = .02) were longer in the chemotherapy group. Similar benefit of chemotherapy over HAs was maintained in all treatment outcomes after controlling for the use of DLI. The use of chemotherapy followed by DLI offered the greatest benefit (ORR, 68%; CR, 59%, 1-year OS, 44%; and median OS, 9.8 months). In conclusion, in our hands, with limited numbers, the use of more conventional salvage chemotherapy, with DLI when possible, for the treatment of relapsed AML and MDS after allo-SCT is associated with better outcomes than nonchemotherapy (HA) options. PMID:27026249

  8. Vascular Complications of Cancer Chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Cameron, Alan C; Touyz, Rhian M; Lang, Ninian N

    2016-07-01

    Development of new anticancer drugs has resulted in improved mortality rates and 5-year survival rates in patients with cancer. However, many of the modern chemotherapies are associated with cardiovascular toxicities that increase cardiovascular risk in cancer patients, including hypertension, thrombosis, heart failure, cardiomyopathy, and arrhythmias. These limitations restrict treatment options and might negatively affect the management of cancer. The cardiotoxic effects of older chemotherapeutic drugs such as alkylating agents, antimetabolites, and anticancer antibiotics have been known for a while. The newer agents, such as the antiangiogenic drugs that inhibit vascular endothelial growth factor signalling are also associated with cardiovascular pathology, especially hypertension, thromboembolism, myocardial infarction, and proteinuria. Exact mechanisms by which vascular endothelial growth factor inhibitors cause these complications are unclear but impaired endothelial function, vascular and renal damage, oxidative stress, and thrombosis might be important. With increasing use of modern chemotherapies and prolonged survival of cancer patients, the incidence of cardiovascular disease in this patient population will continue to increase. Accordingly, careful assessment and management of cardiovascular risk factors in cancer patients by oncologists and cardiologists working together is essential for optimal care so that prolonged cancer survival is not at the expense of increased cardiovascular events. PMID:26968393

  9. [Analysis of the risk factors for severe neutropenia in advanced non-small cell lung cancer after the first course of chemotherapy with third-generation agents].

    PubMed

    Shibuya, Midori; Kogo, Mari; Kurihara, Tatsuya; Shikama, Yusuke; Nakajima, Hiroaki; Yoneyama, Keiichiro; Kiuchi, Yuji

    2013-01-01

      We retrospectively evaluated clinical data before therapy to determine the risk factors for severe neutropenia in advanced non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients treated with third-generation agents. We analyzed 100 patients who received such agents (paclitaxel, docetaxel, gemcitabine, irinotecan, or vinorelbine) for advanced NSCLC. The endpoint of the survey was the occurrence of severe neutropenia (grade 4). Risk factors significantly related to severe neutropenia were identified using logistic regression analysis. Of the 100 patients studied, the median age was 62.0 (32-81 years), and 77 (77.0%) were male. CEA 6.6 (0-2220) ng/dL and cytokeratin 19 fragment 21-1 (CYFRA) 4.8 (0.2-173.8) ng/dL before chemotherapy were higher than normal range. Severe neutropenia occurred in 36.0%, the incidence being highest in the first cycle (61.1%). In the univariate analysis, variables associated with severe neutropenia were sex, chest pain, absolute neutrophil count (ANC), Cr, CRP, and CYFRA. In the multivariate analysis, low CYFRA level was identified as a significant risk factor that contributed independently to chemotherapy-induced severe neutropenia (p<0.05). Our analysis suggests that low CYFRA level is the most important risk factor for severe neutropenia in advanced NSCLC patients after the first course of chemotherapy with third-generation agents. PMID:23728094

  10. Core-shell nanoparticles based on pullulan and poly(β-amino) ester for hepatoma-targeted codelivery of gene and chemotherapy agent.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yuanyuan; Wang, Yan; Zhang, Cong; Zhou, Ping; Liu, Yang; An, Tong; Sun, Duxin; Zhang, Ning; Wang, Yinsong

    2014-01-01

    This study designs a novel nanoparticle system with core-shell structure based on pullulan and poly(β-amino) ester (PBAE) for the hepatoma-targeted codelivery of gene and chemotherapy agent. Plasmid DNA expressing green fluorescent protein (pEGFP), as a model gene, was fully condensed with cationic PBAE to form the inner core of PBAE/pEGFP polycomplex. Methotrexate (MTX), as a model chemotherapy agent, was conjugated to pullulan by ester bond to synthesize polymeric prodrug of MTX-PL. MTX-PL was then adsorbed on the surface of PBAE/pEGFP polycomplex to form MTX-PL/PBAE/pEGFP nanoparticles with a classic core-shell structure. MTX-PL was also used as a hepatoma targeting moiety, because of its specific binding affinity for asialoglycoprotein receptor (ASGPR) overexpressed by human hepatoma HepG2 cells. MTX-PL/PBAE/pEGFP nanoparticles realized the efficient transfection of pEGFP in HepG2 cells and exhibited significant inhibitory effect on the cell proliferation. In HepG2 tumor-bearing nude mice, MTX-PL/PBAE/pEGFP nanoparticles were mainly distributed in the tumor after 24 h postintravenous injection. Altogether, this novel codelivery system with a strong hepatoma-targeting property achieved simultaneous delivery of gene and chemotherapy agent into tumor at both cellular and animal levels. PMID:25289563

  11. Antiangiogenic agents significantly improve survival in tumor-bearing mice by increasing tolerance to chemotherapy-induced toxicity

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Danfang; Hedlund, Eva-Maria E.; Lim, Sharon; Chen, Fang; Zhang, Yin; Sun, Baocun; Cao, Yihai

    2011-01-01

    Chemotherapy-induced broad toxicities are the leading cause of the drug-induced mortality in cancer patients. Antiangiogenic drugs (ADs) in combination with chemotherapy are widely used as front-line therapy for the treatment of various human cancers. However, the beneficial mechanisms underlying combination therapy are poorly understood. Here we show that, in several murine tumor models, administration of sunitinib markedly reduced chemotherapy-induced bone marrow toxicity. Intriguingly, in a sequential treatment regimen, delivery of ADs followed by chemotherapy demonstrated superior survival benefits compared with simultaneous administration of two drugs. In murine tumor models, we show that VEGF increased chemotoxicity by synergistically suppressing bone marrow hematopoiesis with cytostatic drugs. These findings shed light on molecular mechanisms by which ADs in combination with chemotherapy produce survival benefits in cancer patients and provide conceptual information guiding future designs of clinical trials, current practice, and optimization of ADs for the treatment of cancer. PMID:21367692

  12. Anti-Tumor Effect of a Novel Soluble Recombinant Human Endostatin: Administered as a Single Agent or in Combination with Chemotherapy Agents in Mouse Tumor Models

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Wenhong; Dai, Wei; Jiang, Yongping

    2014-01-01

    Background Angiogenesis has become an attractive target in cancer treatment. Endostatin is one of the potent anti-angiogenesis agents. Its recombinant form expressed in the yeast system is currently under clinical trials. Endostatin suppresses tumor formation through the inhibition of blood vessel growth. It is anticipated that combined therapy using endostatin and cytotoxic compounds may exert an additive effect. In the present study, we expressed and purified recombinant human endostatin (rhEndostatin) that contained 3 additional amino acid residues (arginine, glycine, and serine) at the amino-terminus and 6 histidine residues in its carboxyl terminus. The recombinant protein was expressed in E. Coli and refolded into a soluble form in a large scale purification process. The protein exhibited a potent anti-tumor activity in bioassays. Furthermore, rhEndostatin showed an additive effect with chemotherapy agents including cyclophosphamide (CTX) and cisplatin (DDP). Methods rhEndostatin cDNA was cloned into PQE vector and expressed in E. Coli. The protein was refolded through dialysis with an optimized protocol. To establish tumor models, nude mice were subcutaneously injected with human cancer cells (lung carcinoma A549, hepatocellular carcinoma QGY-7703, or breast cancer Bcap37). rhEndostatin and/or DDP was administered peritumorally to evaluate the rate of growth inhibition of A549 tumors. For the tumor metastasis model, mice were injected intravenously with mouse melanoma B16 cells. One day after tumor cell injection, a single dose of rhEndostatin, or in combination with CTX, was administered intravenously or at a site close to the tumor. Results rhEndostatin reduced the growth of A549, QGY-7703, and Bcap37 xenograft tumors in a dose dependent manner. When it was administered peritumorally, rhEndostatin exhibited a more potent inhibitory activity. Furthermore, rhEndostatin displayed an additive effect with CTX or DDP on the inhibition of metastasis of B16 tumors

  13. Induction of resistance to alkylating agents in E. coli: the ada+ gene product serves both as a regulatory protein and as an enzyme for repair of mutagenic damage.

    PubMed Central

    Teo, I; Sedgwick, B; Demple, B; Li, B; Lindahl, T

    1984-01-01

    The expression of several inducible enzymes for repair of alkylated DNA in Escherichia coli is controlled by the ada+ gene. This regulatory gene has been cloned into a multicopy plasmid and shown to code for a 37-kd protein. Antibodies raised against homogeneous O6-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase (the main repair activity for mutagenic damage in alkylated DNA) were found to cross-react with this 37-kd protein. Cell extracts from several independently derived ada mutants contain variable amounts of an altered 37-kd protein after an inducing alkylation treatment. In addition, an 18-kd protein identical with the previously isolated O6-methyl-guanine-DNA methyltransferase has been identified as a product of the ada+ gene. The smaller polypeptide is derived from the 37-kd protein by proteolytic processing. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 2. Fig. 4. Fig. 5. Fig. 6. Fig. 7. Fig. 8. PMID:6092060

  14. Therapy related myelodysplasia/myeloproliferative neoplasia-unclassified with acute leukemic transformation following Paclitaxel and Carboplatin based chemotherapy in an ovarian cancer patient.

    PubMed

    Vanajakshi, S; Prasad, S V S S; Amina, S S; Kavitha, E; Iravathy Goud, K; Kshitija, K

    2014-09-01

    Alkylating agents used in chemotherapy are mutagenic and have strong leukemogenic potential. The most serious long term complication of chemotherapy is the development of secondary disease, particularly hematological malignancy; they have rarely been reported in the context of ovarian cancer treatment. We describe quite a rare occurrence of a myelodyplastic/myeloproliferative neoplasm, unclassified (MDS/MPN-U) with acute leukemic transformation and multiple cytogenetic abnormalities not usually found together as JAK2 V617F mutation, 5q- and 7q-deletion, after exposure to paclitaxel and carboplatin based chemotherapy in a patient treated for ovarian cancer. We should be aware of such complication whose prognosis is really poor. PMID:25332593

  15. [Standards and new developments in the chemotherapy of glioblastomas].

    PubMed

    Weller, M

    2005-10-01

    For 25 years involved-field radiotherapy has remained the mainstay of postoperative treatment for glioblastoma. In contrast, the role of adjuvant chemotherapy in addition to radiotherapy has remained controversial. A recent randomized multinational phase III trial (EORTC 26 981/22 981/NCIC CE.3) assessing concomitant and adjuvant chemotherapy with the alkylating agent, temozolomide, in addition to radiotherapy in newly diagnosed glioblastoma defines an increase in median survival from 12.1 months with radiotherapy alone to 14.6 months with radiochemotherapy and an increase in the 2-year survival rate from 10 to 26 %. Subgroup analysis revealed that the gain in survival in the experimental arm was largely achieved in patients with glioblastomas which exhibited a methylation of the promoter region of the O (6)-methylguanine DNA methyltransferase (MGMT) gene and thus did not express MGMT. MGMT is a DNA repair enzyme which repairs DNA lesions induced by chemotherapy with alkylating agents. The cellular MGMT stores are consumed during DNA repair, suggesting that temozolomide itself may deplete MGMT and thus overcome its own most important pathway of resistance. EORTC 26 981/22 981/NCIC CE.3 thus defines a milestone in the treatment of glioblastoma and will provide a platform for further efforts at improving the outcome for patients suffering from this still invariably fatal neoplasm. PMID:16208603

  16. In Vitro and In Vivo Studies of Non-Platinum-Based Halogenated Compounds as Potent Antitumor Agents for Natural Targeted Chemotherapy of Cancers

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Qing-Bin; Zhang, Qin-Rong; Ou, Ning; Wang, Chun-Rong; Warrington, Jenny

    2015-01-01

    Based on a molecular-mechanism-based anticancer drug discovery program enabled by an innovative femtomedicine approach, we have found a previously unknown class of non-platinum-based halogenated molecules (called FMD compounds) as potent antitumor agents for effective treatment of cancers. Here, we present in vitro and in vivo studies of the compounds for targeted chemotherapy of cervical, breast, ovarian, and lung cancers. Our results show that these FMD agents led to DNA damage, cell cycle arrest in the S phase, and apoptosis in cancer cells. We also observed that such a FMD compound caused an increase of reduced glutathione (GSH, an endogenous antioxidant) levels in human normal cells, while it largely depleted GSH in cancer cells. We correspondingly found that these FMD agents exhibited no or little toxicity toward normal cells/tissues, while causing significant cytotoxicity against cancer cells, as well as suppression and delay in tumor growth in mouse xenograft models of cervical, ovarian, breast and lung cancers. These compounds are therefore a previously undiscovered class of potent antitumor agents that can be translated into clinical trials for natural targeted chemotherapy of multiple cancers. PMID:26351651

  17. Testing chemotherapeutic agents in the feather follicle identifies a selective blockade of cell proliferation and a key role for sonic hedgehog signaling in chemotherapy-induced tissue damage.

    PubMed

    Xie, Guojiang; Wang, Hangwei; Yan, Zhipeng; Cai, Linyan; Zhou, Guixuan; He, Wanzhong; Paus, Ralf; Yue, Zhicao

    2015-03-01

    Chemotherapeutic agents induce complex tissue responses in vivo and damage normal organ functions. Here we use the feather follicle to investigate details of this damage response. We show that cyclophosphamide treatment, which causes chemotherapy-induced alopecia in mice and man, induces distinct defects in feather formation: feather branching is transiently and reversibly disrupted, thus leaving a morphological record of the impact of chemotherapeutic agents, whereas the rachis (feather axis) remains unperturbed. Similar defects are observed in feathers treated with 5-fluorouracil or taxol but not with doxorubicin or arabinofuranosyl cytidine (Ara-C). Selective blockade of cell proliferation was seen in the feather branching area, along with a downregulation of sonic hedgehog (Shh) transcription, but not in the equally proliferative rachis. Local delivery of the Shh inhibitor, cyclopamine, or Shh silencing both recapitulated this effect. In mouse hair follicles, those chemotherapeutic agents that disrupted feather formation also downregulated Shh gene expression and induced hair loss, whereas doxorubicin or Ara-C did not. Our results reveal a mechanism through which chemotherapeutic agents damage rapidly proliferating epithelial tissue, namely via the cell population-specific, Shh-dependent inhibition of proliferation. This mechanism may be targeted by future strategies to manage chemotherapy-induced tissue damage. PMID:25233072

  18. The level of intracellular glutathione is a key regulator for the induction of stress-activated signal transduction pathways including Jun N-terminal protein kinases and p38 kinase by alkylating agents.

    PubMed Central

    Wilhelm, D; Bender, K; Knebel, A; Angel, P

    1997-01-01

    Monofunctional alkylating agents like methyl methanesulfonate (MMS) and N-methyl-N'-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine (MNNG) are potent inducers of cellular stress leading to chromosomal aberrations, point mutations, and cell killing. We show that these agents induce a specific cellular stress response program which includes the activation of Jun N-terminal kinases/stress-activated protein kinases (JNK/SAPKs), p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase, and the upstream kinase SEK1/MKK4 and which depends on the reaction mechanism of the alkylating agent in question. Similar to another inducer of cellular stress, UV irradiation, damage of nuclear DNA by alkylation is not involved in the MMS-induced response. However, in contrast to UV and other inducers of the JNK/SAPKs and p38 pathways, activation of growth factor and G-protein-coupled receptors does not play a role in the MMS response. We identified the intracellular glutathione (GSH) level as critical for JNK/SAPK activation by MMS: enhancing the GSH level by pretreatment of the cells with GSH or N-acetylcysteine inhibits, whereas depletion of the cellular GSH pool causes hyperinduction of JNK/SAPK activity by MMS. In light of the JNK/SAPK-dependent induction of c-jun and c-fos transcription, and the Jun/Fos-induced transcription of xenobiotic-metabolizing enzymes, these data provide a potential critical role of JNK/SAPK and p38 in the induction of a cellular defense program against cytotoxic xenobiotics such as MMS. PMID:9234735

  19. Efficacy of Addition of Antiangiogenic Agents to Taxanes-Containing Chemotherapy in Advanced Nonsmall-Cell Lung Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Sheng, Jin; Yang, Yun-Peng; Yang, Bi-Jun; Zhao, Yuan-Yuan; Ma, Yu-Xiang; Hong, Shao-Dong; Zhang, Ya-Xiong; Zhao, Hong-Yun; Huang, Yan; Zhang, Li

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Preclinical researches indicated a potential synergistic effect of taxanes-containing chemotherapy (TCC) and antiangiogenic agents (AAs) on the treatment of advanced nonsmall-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). The advantage of adding AA to TCC in the real world remains confusing. We summarized the current evidences from relevant phase II/III randomized controlled trials (RCTs) by performing this meta-analyses. Electronic databases were searched for eligible literatures. The primary endpoint was overall survival (OS). Pooled hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for outcomes were calculated using RevMan 5.2. A total of 14 phase II/III RCTs involving 9703 participants were included. Compared to standard TCC, the addition of AA was associated with the significant better OS (HR 0.92, 95% CI 0.87–0.97, P = 0.002), prolonged progression-free survival (HR 0.79, 95% CI 0.71–0.87, P < 0.00001), superior response rate (risk ratio [RR] 1.69, 95% CI 1.47–1.95, P < 0.0001), and disease control rate (RR 1.19, 95% CI 1.08–1.32, P < 0.00001). Subgroup analyses indicated that patient treated with monoclonal antibodies (HR 0.89, 95% CI 0.82–0.96, P = 0.02) as well as application in second-line (HR 0.91, 95% CI 0.85–0.96, P = 0.02) acquired significant OS improvement. Other clinical factors directing significant OS improvement by the combination strategy included nonsquamous cancer (P = 0.002), nonsmokers (P = 0.0005), and female (P = 0.02). Toxicities were greater but generally mild or moderate in the combination group, and were mostly manageable. In summary, the addition of AAs to TCC could improve prognosis of advanced NSCLC. Furthermore, proper selection of patient population and AAs is crucial for clinical trials design and clinical practice in the future. PMID:26252298

  20. Nanostructured self-assembly materials from neat and aqueous solutions of C18 lipid pro-drug analogues of Capecitabine—a chemotherapy agent. Focus on nanoparticulate cubosomes™ of the oleyl analogue

    SciTech Connect

    Gong, Xiaojuan; Moghaddam, Minoo J.; Sagnella, Sharon M.; Conn, Charlotte E.; Mulet, Xavier; Danon, Stephen J.; Waddington, Lynne J.; Drummond, Calum J.

    2014-09-24

    A series of prodrug analogues based on the established chemotherapy agent, 5-fluorouracil, have been prepared and characterized. C18 alkyl and alkenyl chains with increasing degree of unsaturation were attached to the N4 position of the 5-fluorocytosine (5-FC) base via a carbamate bond. Physicochemical characterization of the prodrug analogues was carried out using a combination of differential scanning calorimetry, cross-polarized optical microscopy, X-ray diffraction and small-angle X-ray scattering. The presence of a monounsaturated oleyl chain was found to promote lyotropic liquid crystalline phase formation in excess water with a fluid lamellar phase observed at room temperature and one or more bicontinuous cubic phases at 37 °C. The bulk phase was successfully dispersed into liposomes or cubosomes at room and physiological temperature respectively. In vitro toxicity of the nanoparticulate 5-FCOle dispersions was evaluated against several normal and cancer cell types over a 48 h period and exhibited an IC50 of -100 μM against all cell types. The in vivo efficacy of 5-FCOle cubosomes was assessed against the highly aggressive mouse 4T1 breast cancer model and compared to Capecitabine (a water-soluble commercially available 5-FU prodrug) delivered at the same dosages. After 21 days of treatment, the 0.5 mmol 5-FCOle treatment group exhibited a significantly smaller average tumour volume than all other treatment groups including Capecitabine at similar dosage. These results exemplify the potential of self-assembled amphiphile prodrugs for delivery of bioactives in vivo.

  1. Gonadal damage from chemotherapy and radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Howell, S; Shalet, S

    1998-12-01

    Treatment with cytotoxic chemotherapy and radiotherapy is associated with significant gonadal damage in men and women. Alkylating agents such as cyclophosphamide and procarbazine are the most common agents implicated. The vast majority of men receiving procarbazine-containing regimens for the treatment of lymphomas become permanently infertile. Cisplatin-based chemotherapy for testicular cancer results in temporary azoospermia in most men, with a recovery of spermatogenesis in about 50% after 2 years and in 80% after 5 years. There is also evidence of Leydig cell impairment in a proportion of these men, although the clinical significance of this is not clear. The germinal epithelium is very sensitive to radiation-induced damage, with changes to spermatogonia occurring following as little as 0.1 Gy and permanent infertility after fractionated doses of 2 Gy and above. Cytotoxic-induced premature ovarian failure is age- and drug-dependent and ensues in approximately half of women treated with procarbazine-containing chemotherapy for lymphomas. High-dose chemotherapy, total body irradiation, and irradiation at an ovarian dose above 6 Gy usually result in permanent ovarian failure. The course of ovarian function after chemotherapy is variable, and late recovery occurs in some patients. Several methods of preserving gonadal function during potentially sterilizing treatment have been considered. Currently, sperm banking remains the only proven method in men, although hormonal manipulation to enhance the recovery of spermatogenesis and cryopreservation of testicular germ cells are possibilities for the future. Transposition of the ovaries to allow better shielding during radiotherapy is of use in some women, and the prospect of cryopreservation and reimplantation of ovarian tissue is promising. PMID:9922915

  2. Alkylating reactivity and herbicidal activity of chloroacetamides.

    PubMed

    Jablonkai, Istvan

    2003-04-01

    The relationship between S- and N-alkylating reactivity and herbicidal activity within a series of chloroacetamides, including several commercial herbicides and newly synthesised analogues was studied. The S-alkylating reactivity of selected chloroacetamides, as well as those of atrazine and chlorfenprop-methyl, was determined by in vitro GSH conjugation at a ratio of GSH to alkylating agent of 25:1. A spectrophotometric reaction using 4-(4-nitrobenzyl)pyridine was used to characterise the N-alkylating reactivity of the chemicals. Our results indicate that a reduced level of N-alkylating reactivity correlates with an improved herbicidal efficacy at a practical rate. However, the phytoxicity of the molecules is not simply dependent on chemical reactivities, but strictly related to the molecular structure, indicating that lipophilicity, uptake, mobility and induction of detoxifying enzymes may also be decisive factors in the mode of action. PMID:12701706

  3. Catalytic alkylation apparatus

    SciTech Connect

    Hann, P.D.; VanPool, J.

    1989-09-05

    This patent describes an apparatus. It comprises alkylation reactor means for producing alkylate product; acid catalyst settler means having an upper portion, an intermediate portion and a lower portion; means for withdrawing alkylate product from the alkylation reactor means and for providing alkylate product from the alkylation reactor means to a point of introduction in the intermediate portion of the acid catalyst settler means; and means for establishing a temperature gradient in the upper the gas lines to the detector so that a flow rate of a sample gas passing through the detector is constant.

  4. Pretreatment drugs against organophosphorus agents based on azabicyclic n-alkyl oximino o-carbamates. Annual report, 24 September 1991-23 September 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Moriarty, R.M.

    1992-11-11

    During the past year, 27 compounds of azabicyclic and carbocyclic oximino carbamate structural types have been prepared and submitted for biological testing as pretreatment agents against organophosphorus nerve agent poisoning. Biological data has been tabulated and has shown that the carbocyclic norbornanone derived oximino carbamates offer potential as pretreatment agents.

  5. Chemotherapy in Prostate Cancer.

    PubMed

    Hurwitz, Michael

    2015-10-01

    For approximately a decade, chemotherapy has been shown to prolong life in patients with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC). Since that time, however, only two agents have proven to prolong life (docetaxel and cabazitaxel). However, in the last year, the addition of chemotherapy to primary hormonal therapy became a standard of care for high-volume castration-sensitive metastatic disease. Here I will review current prostate cancer chemotherapies, mechanisms of resistance to those therapies, and ongoing clinical studies of chemotherapy combinations and novel chemotherapeutics. PMID:26216506

  6. When alcohol is the answer: Trapping, identifying and quantifying simple alkylating species in aqueous environments.

    PubMed

    Penketh, Philip G; Shyam, Krishnamurthy; Baumann, Raymond P; Zhu, Rui; Ishiguro, Kimiko; Sartorelli, Alan C; Ratner, Elena S

    2016-09-01

    Alkylating agents are a significant class of environmental carcinogens as well as commonly used anticancer therapeutics. Traditional alkylating activity assays have utilized the colorimetric reagent 4-(4-nitrobenzyl)pyridine (4NBP). However, 4NBP based assays have a relatively low sensitivity towards harder, more oxophilic alkylating species and are not well suited for the identification of the trapped alkyl moiety due to adduct instability. Herein we describe a method using water as the trapping agent which permits the trapping of simple alkylating electrophiles with a comparatively wide range of softness/hardness and permits the identification of donated simple alkyl moieties. PMID:27188264

  7. Hyperthermic Intraperitoneal Chemotherapy (HIPEC) Methodology, Drugs and Bidirectional Chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Valle, S J; Alzahrani, N A; Liauw, W; Sugarbaker, P H; Bhatt, A; Morris, D L

    2016-06-01

    Cytoreductive surgery (CRS) and hyperthermic intraperitoneal chemotherapy (HIPEC) combined have been recognized as standard of care for treatment of a subset of patients with peritoneal carcinomatosis (PC). The aim of CRS is to eliminate all macroscopic disease through a series of visceral resections followed by targeting any residual microscopic disease with intraperitoneal chemotherapy, exposing the peritoneal surfaces to a high concentration of chemotherapy with a lower systemic toxicity. Different regimes of intraperitoneal chemotherapy include HIPEC, early postoperative intraperitoneal chemotherapy (EPIC) and bidirectional chemotherapy. The efficacy and modality of treatment with intraperitoneal chemotherapy is dependent on multiple factors including the chosen cytotoxic agent and its pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics. There is no standardized methodology for intraperitoneal chemotherapy administration. This review will discuss the pharmacological principles of the various intraperitoneal chemotherapy techniques. PMID:27065705

  8. First clinical experience with the magnetic resonance imaging contrast agent and superoxide dismutase mimetic mangafodipir as an adjunct in cancer chemotherapy-a translational study.

    PubMed

    Karlsson, Jan Olof G; Adolfsson, Karin; Thelin, Bo; Jynge, Per; Andersson, Rolf Gg; Falkmer, Ursula G

    2012-02-01

    Preclinical research suggests that the clinically approved magnetic resonance imaging contrast agent mangafodipir may protect against adverse events (AEs) caused by chemotherapy, without interfering negatively with the anticancer efficacy. The present translational study tested if pretreatment with mangafodipir lowers AEs during curative (adjuvant) FOLFOX6 chemotherapy in stage III colon cancer (Dukes' C). The study was originally scheduled to include 20 patients, but because of the unforeseen withdrawal of mangafodipir from the market, the study had to be closed after 14 patients had been included. The withdrawal of mangafodipir was purely based on commercial considerations from the producer and not on any safety concerns. The patients were treated throughout the first 3 of 12 scheduled cycles. Patients were randomized to a 5-minute infusion of either mangafodipir or placebo (7 in each group). AEs were evaluated according to the National Cancer Institute's (NCI) Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events and the Sanofi-NCI criteria. The primary end points were neutropenia and neurosensory toxicity. There were four AEs of grade 3 (severe) and one AE of grade 4 (life threatening) in four patients in the placebo group, whereas there were none in the mangafodipir group (P < .05). Of the grade 3 and 4 events, two were neutropenia and one was neurosensory toxicity. Furthermore, white blood cell count was statistically, significantly higher in the mangafodipir group than in the placebo group (P < .01) after treatment with FOLFOX. This small feasibility study seems to confirm what has been demonstrated preclinically, namely, that pretreatment with mangafodipir lowers AEs during adjuvant 5-fluorouracil plus oxaliplatin-based chemotherapy in colon cancer patients. PMID:22348174

  9. Pretreatment drugs against organophosphorus agents based on azabicyclic n-alkyl oximino o-carbamates. Annual report, 24 September 1990-23 September 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Moriarty, R.M.

    1991-11-12

    During the past year, a number of purely carbocyclic norbonanone derived oximino carbamates and their methiodide salts have been synthesized and submitted for biological evaluation as pretreatment agents against organophosphorus agents. Additionally, a synthetic route has been devised and employed for the preparation of 2-tropinone, a key precursor for the synthesis of structurally important oximino carbamate derivatives.

  10. The Efficacy of Combining Antiangiogenic Agents with Chemotherapy for Patients with Advanced Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Who Failed First-Line Chemotherapy: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Bijun; Zhang, Yaxiong; Kang, Shiyang; Zhou, Ting; Hong, Shaodong; Qin, Tao; Hu, Zhihuang; Fang, Wenfeng; Huang, Yan; Zhang, Li

    2015-01-01

    Background The clinical outcomes of patients with NSCLC who progressed after first-line treatments remain poor. The purpose of this study was to assess the advantage of antiangiogenic therapy plus standard treatment versus standard treatment alone for this population of patients. Methods We conducted a rigorous search using electronic databases for eligible studies reporting antiangiogenic therapy combined with standard second-line chemotherapy versus standard second-line treatment for patient who progressed after front-line treatment. Pooled risk ratio and 95% confidence intervals were calculated using proper statistical method. Predefined subgroup analyses were conducted to identify the potential proper patients. Results Thirteen phase II/III RCTs which involved a total of 8358 participants were included. Overall, there was significant improvement in OS (HR 0.94, 95%CI: 0.89-0.99, p=0.03), PFS (HR 0.80, 95%CI: 0.76-0.84, p<0.00001), ORR (RR 1.75, 95%CI: 1.55-1.98, p<0.00001) and DCR (RR 1.23, 95%CI: 1.18-1.28, p<0.00001) in the group with antiangiogenic therapy plus standard treatment versus the group with standard treatment alone. Subgroup analysis showed that OS benefit was presented only in patients treated with docetaxel plus antiangiogenic agents (HR 0.92, 95%CI: 0.86-0.99, p=0.02) and patients with non-squamous NSCLC (HR for OS 0.92, 95%CI: 0.86-0.99, p=0.02). Conclusions This study revealed that the addition of antiangiogenic agents to the standard treatments could provide clinical benefit to NSCLC patients who failed their first-line therapy. Furthermore, proper selection of the combined standard cytotoxic agent, as well as the patient population by tumor histology, is warranted for future studies and clinical application of antiangiogenic therapy. PMID:26034985

  11. Combined Gene Expression and RNAi Screening to Identify Alkylation Damage Survival Pathways from Fly to Human

    PubMed Central

    Zanotto-Filho, Alfeu; Dashnamoorthy, Ravi; Loranc, Eva; de Souza, Luis H. T.; Moreira, José C. F.; Suresh, Uthra; Chen, Yidong

    2016-01-01

    Alkylating agents are a key component of cancer chemotherapy. Several cellular mechanisms are known to be important for its survival, particularly DNA repair and xenobiotic detoxification, yet genomic screens indicate that additional cellular components may be involved. Elucidating these components has value in either identifying key processes that can be modulated to improve chemotherapeutic efficacy or may be altered in some cancers to confer chemoresistance. We therefore set out to reevaluate our prior Drosophila RNAi screening data by comparison to gene expression arrays in order to determine if we could identify any novel processes in alkylation damage survival. We noted a consistent conservation of alkylation survival pathways across platforms and species when the analysis was conducted on a pathway/process level rather than at an individual gene level. Better results were obtained when combining gene lists from two datasets (RNAi screen plus microarray) prior to analysis. In addition to previously identified DNA damage responses (p53 signaling and Nucleotide Excision Repair), DNA-mRNA-protein metabolism (transcription/translation) and proteasome machinery, we also noted a highly conserved cross-species requirement for NRF2, glutathione (GSH)-mediated drug detoxification and Endoplasmic Reticulum stress (ER stress)/Unfolded Protein Responses (UPR) in cells exposed to alkylation. The requirement for GSH, NRF2 and UPR in alkylation survival was validated by metabolomics, protein studies and functional cell assays. From this we conclude that RNAi/gene expression fusion is a valid strategy to rapidly identify key processes that may be extendable to other contexts beyond damage survival. PMID:27100653

  12. Chemotherapy-induced endometrial pathology: mimicry of malignancy and viral endometritis

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Eun Kyung; Yoon, Gun; Kim, Hyun-Soo

    2016-01-01

    Chemotherapy is a common type of preoperative neoadjuvant treatment and postoperative adjuvant or palliative therapy for many different types of malignancies. Certain chemotherapeutic agents can induce bizarre epithelial atypia that mimics malignancy. Unfamiliarity with these changes could potentially cause confusion with a neoplastic or infectious process. The endometrium is one of the few sites where chemotherapy-induced epithelial atypia has not been appreciated. We identified four patients with marked cytologic atypia of the endometrial glandular epithelium from the surgical pathology files of Severance Hospital. The histopathologic features, immunostaining results and medical records of these patients were reviewed. All patients underwent hysteroscopic examination with endometrial curettage for investigation of vaginal bleeding. They had previously undergone chemotherapy for uterine cervical cancer (n=1), rectal cancer (n=2) and myelodysplastic syndrome (n=1). The chemotherapy regimens included alkylating agents (busulfan, cyclophosphamide, ifosfamide, cisplatin, and oxaliplatin), pyrimidine antagonists (capecitabine, decitabine, and 5-fluorouracil), taxanes (paclitaxel), and topoisomerase inhibitors (irinotecan and etoposide). On histopathological examination, the atypical epithelial changes included marked nuclear enlargement and pleomorphism, a degenerative-looking chromatin pattern, abundant microvacuolated cytoplasm, and preservation of the nuclear/cytoplasmic ratio. This study demonstrates that certain chemotherapeutic agents may cause bizarre, reactive atypia of the endometrial glandular epithelium. These changes should not be interpreted as neoplastic or infectious in nature. An awareness of prior exposure to cytotoxic agents and a familiarity with the nature and distribution of these bizarre alterations is essential to avoid misinterpretation of the morphologic features and prevent unnecessary treatment. PMID:27347355

  13. Chemotherapy-induced endometrial pathology: mimicry of malignancy and viral endometritis.

    PubMed

    Kim, Eun Kyung; Yoon, Gun; Kim, Hyun-Soo

    2016-01-01

    Chemotherapy is a common type of preoperative neoadjuvant treatment and postoperative adjuvant or palliative therapy for many different types of malignancies. Certain chemotherapeutic agents can induce bizarre epithelial atypia that mimics malignancy. Unfamiliarity with these changes could potentially cause confusion with a neoplastic or infectious process. The endometrium is one of the few sites where chemotherapy-induced epithelial atypia has not been appreciated. We identified four patients with marked cytologic atypia of the endometrial glandular epithelium from the surgical pathology files of Severance Hospital. The histopathologic features, immunostaining results and medical records of these patients were reviewed. All patients underwent hysteroscopic examination with endometrial curettage for investigation of vaginal bleeding. They had previously undergone chemotherapy for uterine cervical cancer (n=1), rectal cancer (n=2) and myelodysplastic syndrome (n=1). The chemotherapy regimens included alkylating agents (busulfan, cyclophosphamide, ifosfamide, cisplatin, and oxaliplatin), pyrimidine antagonists (capecitabine, decitabine, and 5-fluorouracil), taxanes (paclitaxel), and topoisomerase inhibitors (irinotecan and etoposide). On histopathological examination, the atypical epithelial changes included marked nuclear enlargement and pleomorphism, a degenerative-looking chromatin pattern, abundant microvacuolated cytoplasm, and preservation of the nuclear/cytoplasmic ratio. This study demonstrates that certain chemotherapeutic agents may cause bizarre, reactive atypia of the endometrial glandular epithelium. These changes should not be interpreted as neoplastic or infectious in nature. An awareness of prior exposure to cytotoxic agents and a familiarity with the nature and distribution of these bizarre alterations is essential to avoid misinterpretation of the morphologic features and prevent unnecessary treatment. PMID:27347355

  14. Signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) inhibitor, S3I-201, acts as a potent and non-selective alkylating agent

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Declan; Resetca, Diana; Wilson, Derek J.; Gunning, Patrick T.

    2016-01-01

    The Signal Transducer and Activator of Transcription 3 (STAT3) oncogene is a master regulator of many human cancers, and a well-recognized target for therapeutic intervention. A well known STAT3 inhibitor, S3I-201 (NSC 74859), is hypothesized to block STAT3 function in cancer cells by binding the STAT3 SH2 domain and disrupt STAT3 protein complexation events. In this study, liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry analysis revealed that STAT3, in the presence of S3I-201, showed a minimum of five specific sites of modification, cysteine's 108, 259, 367, 542, and 687. Moreover, a prepared fluorescently labeled chemical probe of S3I-201 (DB-6-055) revealed that S3I-201 non-specifically and globally alkylated intracellular proteins at concentrations consistent with S3I-201's reported IC50. These data are consistent with the hypothesis that S3I-201 is a sub-optimal probe for interrogating STAT3-related cell biology. PMID:26942696

  15. Labelling of living mammalian spermatozoa with the fluorescent thiol alkylating agent, monobromobimane (MB): immobilization upon exposure to ultraviolet light and analysis of acrosomal status

    SciTech Connect

    Cummins, J.M.; Fleming, A.D.; Crozet, N.; Kuehl, T.J.; Kosower, N.S.; Yanagimachi, R.

    1986-03-01

    Living spermatozoa of seven mammalian species were treated with the thiol-alkylating fluorescent labelling compound, monobromobimane (MBBR). MB-labelling alone had no effect on sperm motility, nor on the time course or ability of golden hamster spermatozoa to undergo the acrosome reaction when capacitated in vitro. Exposure of MB-labelled spermatozoa to ultraviolet (UV) light and excitation of the MB fluorochrome resulted in virtually immediate immobilization of the spermatozoa without affecting acrosomal status. UV exposure of unlabelled spermatozoa for up to 30 sec had no effect upon motility. Immobilization of MB-labelled spermatozoa depended on the midpiece being irradiated, as irradiation of the head alone, or of the more distal parts of the principal piece, had little or no effect upon motility. Labelling with MB followed by immobilization of individually selected spermatozoa was most useful for detailing the course and site of occurrence of the acrosome reaction during penetration of the cumulus oophorus by golden hamster spermatozoa in vitro. In these often hyperactivated spermatozoa, precise determination of the acrosomal status could not often otherwise be made due to the difficulty in visualizing the acrosomal region of a vigorously thrashing, hyperactivated spermatozoon. This technique should prove valuable in a variety of studies on sperm motility, capacitation and fertilization, and could also be extended to other cell systems.

  16. Design and synthesis of some new 1-phenyl-3/4-[4-(aryl/heteroaryl/alkyl-piperazine1-yl)-phenyl-ureas as potent anticonvulsant and antidepressant agents.

    PubMed

    Mishra, Chandra Bhushan; Kumari, Shikha; Tiwari, Manisha

    2016-05-01

    A series of 1-phenyl-3/4-[4-(aryl/heteroaryl/alkyl-piperazine1-yl)-phenyl-urea derivatives (29-42) were designed, synthesized and evaluated for their anticonvulsant activity by using maximal electroshock (MES), subcutaneous pentylenetetrazole (scPTZ) seizure tests. The acute neurotoxicity was checked by rotarod assay. Most of the test compounds were found effective in both seizure tests. Compound 30 (1-{4-[4-(4-chloro-phenyl)-piperazin-1-yl]-phenyl}-3-phenyl-urea) exhibited marked anticonvulsant activity in MES as well as scPTZ tests. The phase II anticonvulsant quantification study of compound 30 indicates the ED50 value of 28.5 mg/kg against MES induced seizures. In addition, this compound also showed considerable protection against pilocarpine induced status epilepticus in rats. Seizures induced by 3-mercaptopropionic acid model and thiosemicarbazide were significantly attenuated by compound 30, which suggested its broad spectrum of anticonvulsant activity. Interestingly, compound 30 displayed better antidepressant activity than standard drug fluoxetine. Moreover, compound 30 appeared as a non-toxic chemical entity in sub-acute toxicity studies. PMID:26891908

  17. The hypoxia-mimetic agent CoCl2 induces chemotherapy resistance in LOVO colorectal cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Yang, Guanglei; Xu, Shuqing; Peng, Lintao; Li, Hui; Zhao, Yan; Hu, Yanfang

    2016-03-01

    Hypoxia, which is an important factor that mediates tumor progression and poor treatment response, is particularly associated with tumor chemoresistance. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying hypoxia-induced colorectal cancer chemoresistance remain unclear. The present study aimed to explore the mechanism underlying hypoxia‑induced chemotherapy resistance in LOVO colorectal cancer cells. LOVO cells were cultured in a hypoxic environment simulated by cobalt chloride (CoCl2), which is a chemical inducer of hypoxia‑inducible factor‑1α (HIF‑1α). HIF‑1α is a transcription factor that has an important role in tumor cell adaptation to hypoxia, and controls the expression of several genes. Various CoCl2 concentrations are often used to simulate degrees of hypoxia. In the present study, following treatment with CoCl2, an MTT assay was conducted to determine the growth and drug sensitivity of LOVO cells. Reverse transcription‑polymerase chain reaction and western blotting were used to detect the mRNA and protein expression levels of HIF‑1α and factors associated with chemotherapy resistance, including multidrug resistance protein (MRP) and multidrug resistant 1 (MDR1), which encodes the major transmembrane efflux transporter P‑glycoprotein (P‑gp). In addition, the expression levels of apoptosis‑related proteins, including B‑cell lymphoma 2 (Bcl‑2), Bcl‑2‑associated X protein (Bax) and Bcl‑2‑associated agonist of cell death (Bad) were detected by western blotting. Flow cytometry (FCM) was used to visually observe Adriamycin (ADR) accumulation and retention, thus analyzing intracellular drug transportation in cells under hypoxic and normoxic conditions. CoCl2‑simulated hypoxia was able to inhibit tumor cell proliferation, and upregulate the expression levels of HIF‑1α, MDR1/P‑gp and MRP. In addition, proapoptotic members of the Bcl‑2 protein family, Bax and Bad, were downregulated. The anti‑apoptotic member Bcl‑2

  18. The hypoxia-mimetic agent CoCl2 induces chemotherapy resistance in LOVO colorectal cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    YANG, GUANGLEI; XU, SHUQING; PENG, LINTAO; LI, HUI; ZHAO, YAN; HU, YANFANG

    2016-01-01

    Hypoxia, which is an important factor that mediates tumor progression and poor treatment response, is particularly associated with tumor chemoresistance. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying hypoxia-induced colorectal cancer chemoresistance remain unclear. The present study aimed to explore the mechanism underlying hypoxia-induced chemotherapy resistance in LOVO colorectal cancer cells. LOVO cells were cultured in a hypoxic environment simulated by cobalt chloride (CoCl2), which is a chemical inducer of hypoxia-inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α). HIF-1α is a transcription factor that has an important role in tumor cell adaptation to hypoxia, and controls the expression of several genes. Various CoCl2 concentrations are often used to simulate degrees of hypoxia. In the present study, following treatment with CoCl2, an MTT assay was conducted to determine the growth and drug sensitivity of LOVO cells. Reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction and western blotting were used to detect the mRNA and protein expression levels of HIF-1α and factors associated with chemotherapy resistance, including multidrug resistance protein (MRP) and multidrug resistant 1 (MDR1), which encodes the major transmembrane efflux transporter P-glycoprotein (P-gp). In addition, the expression levels of apoptosis-related proteins, including B-cell lymphoma 2 (Bcl-2), Bcl-2-associated X protein (Bax) and Bcl-2-associated agonist of cell death (Bad) were detected by western blotting. Flow cytometry (FCM) was used to visually observe Adriamycin (ADR) accumulation and retention, thus analyzing intracellular drug transportation in cells under hypoxic and normoxic conditions. CoCl2-simulated hypoxia was able to inhibit tumor cell proliferation, and upregulate the expression levels of HIF-1α, MDR1/P-gp and MRP. In addition, proapoptotic members of the Bcl-2 protein family, Bax and Bad, were downregulated. The anti-apoptotic member Bcl-2 exhibited no significant change in expression

  19. 1-vinyl-4-alkyl-1,2,4-triazolium salts

    SciTech Connect

    Ermakova, T.G.; Chipanina, N.N.; Gritza, A.I.; Kuznetsova, N.P.; Lopyrev, V.A.; Tatarova, L.A.

    1985-04-01

    Quaternary salts based on 1-vinyl-1,2,4-triazole have been synthesized. Alkyl iodides and bromides and dimethyl sulfate served as the quaternizing agent. Polymeric quaternary salts of 1-vinyl-1,2,4-triazole have been obtained by alkylation of its polymer.

  20. Biotin-Containing Reduced Graphene Oxide-Based Nanosystem as a Multieffect Anticancer Agent: Combining Hyperthermia with Targeted Chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Mauro, Nicolò; Scialabba, Cinzia; Cavallaro, Gennara; Licciardi, Mariano; Giammona, Gaetano

    2015-09-14

    Among the relevant properties of graphene derivatives, their ability of acting as an energy-converting device so as to produce heat (i.e., thermoablation and hyperthermia) was more recently taken into account for the treatment of solid tumors. In this pioneering study, for the first time, the in vitro RGO-induced hyperthermia was assessed and combined with the stimuli-sensitive anticancer effect of a biotinylated inulin-doxorubicin conjugate (CJ-PEGBT), hence, getting to a nanosystem endowed with synergic anticancer effects and high specificity. CJ-PEGBT was synthesized by linking pentynoic acid and citraconic acid to inulin. The citraconylamide pendants, used as pH reversible spacer, were exploited to further conjugate doxorubicin, whereas the alkyne moiety was orthogonally functionalized with an azido PEG-biotin derivative by copper(II) catalyzed 1,3-dipolar cycloaddition. DSC measures, AFM, and UV spectrophotometry were employed to systematically investigate adsorption of CJ-PEGBT onto RGO and its physicochemical stability in aqueous media, demonstrating that a stable π-staked nanosystem can be obtained. In vitro tests using cancer breast cells (MCF-7) showed the ability of the RGO/CJ-PEGBT of efficiently killing cancer cells both via a selective laser beam thermoablation and hyperthermia-triggered chemotherapy. If compared with the nonbiotinylated nanosystem, including virgin RGO and the free conjugate, RGO/CJ-PEGBT is endowed with a smart combination of properties which warrant potential as an anticancer nanomedicine. PMID:26204419

  1. Effectiveness of chemotherapy in rhabdomyosarcoma: example of orbital primary.

    PubMed

    Orbach, Daniel; Brisse, Hervé; Helfre, Sylvie; Freneaux, Paul; Husseini, Khaled; Aerts, Isabelle; Desjardins, Laurence; Fattet, Sarah

    2003-12-01

    The survival of patients with rhabdomyosarcoma has been progressively improved with successive protocols due to the development of multidisciplinary management and the data accumulated by international groups. Orbital rhabdomyosarcoma represents 10% of all cases and affects young children (median age: 6.8 years). It is a chemosensitive and radiosensitive tumour. Chemotherapy is designed to decrease the indications for local therapy (mainly radiotherapy) responsible for a high rate of sequelae (cosmetic, functional or secondary cancer). According to the International Society of Paediatric Oncology guidelines, local therapy is not indicated as first-line treatment in case of complete remission after chemotherapy. The 10-year survival of children with non-parameningeal orbital rhabdomyosarcoma is currently 87% and identical survivals are reported by the various collaborative groups despite the use of different treatments. Despite clinical trials demonstrating the efficacy of many types of chemotherapy (cisplatin, etoposide, doxorubicin, dacarbazine), the value of adding these drugs to combination chemotherapy comprising of an alkylating agent (cyclophosphamide or ifosfamide), vincristine and dactinomycin has not been formally demonstrated in terms of survival benefit for children with rhabdomyosarcoma. The authors review these various results and compare the current guidelines for the management of orbital rhabdomyosarcoma recommended by North American and European groups. PMID:14640915

  2. Innovative Treatments for Cancer:. The Impact of Delivering siRNAs, Chemotherapies, and Preventative Agents Using Nanoformulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hook, Sara S.; Farrell, Dorothy; Hinkal, George W.; Ptak, Krzystzof; Grodzinski, Piotr; Panaro, Nicholas J.

    2013-09-01

    A multi-disciplinary approach to research epitomized by the emerging field of cancer nanotechnology can catalyze scientific developments and enable clinical translation beyond what we currently utilize. Engineers, chemists, and physical scientists are teaming up with cancer biologists and clinical oncologists to attack the vast array of cancer malignancies using materials at the nanoscale. We discuss how nanoformulations are enabling the targeted, efficient, delivery of not only genetic therapies such silencing RNAs, but also conventional cytotoxic agents and small molecules which results in decreased systemic toxicity and improved therapeutic index. As preventative approaches, there are various imaging agents and devices are being developed for screening purposes as well as new formulations of sunscreens, neutraceuticals, and cancer vaccines. The goal then of incorporating nanotechnology into clinical applications is to achieve new and more effective ways of diagnosing, treating, and preventing cancer to ultimately change the lives of patients worldwide.

  3. Chemotherapy, targeted agents, antiemetics and growth-factors in human milk: how should we counsel cancer patients about breastfeeding?

    PubMed

    Pistilli, Barbara; Bellettini, Giulia; Giovannetti, Elisa; Codacci-Pisanelli, Giovanni; Azim, Hatem A; Benedetti, Giovanni; Sarno, Maria Anna; Peccatori, Fedro A

    2013-05-01

    An increasing number of women are diagnosed with cancer during pregnancy and lactation. Women are usually advised to interrupt breastfeeding during systemic anticancer treatment for fear of serious adverse effects to the nursed infant. However, the issue is poorly addressed in the literature and very few studies have evaluated the safety of breastfeeding during or after cytotoxic drugs or target agents administration. In this review we will analyze the available evidence that addresses the issue of anticancer drugs, targeted agents, antiemetics and growth-factors excretion in human milk. This could serve as a unique resource that may aid physicians in the management of breastfeeding cancer patients interested in maintaining lactation during treatment. PMID:23199900

  4. Chemotherapy-Related Neurotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Taillibert, Sophie; Le Rhun, Emilie; Chamberlain, Marc C

    2016-09-01

    Chemotherapy may have detrimental effects on either the central or peripheral nervous system. Central nervous system neurotoxicity resulting from chemotherapy manifests as a wide range of clinical syndromes including acute, subacute, and chronic encephalopathies, posterior reversible encephalopathy, acute cerebellar dysfunction, chronic cognitive impairment, myelopathy, meningitis, and neurovascular syndromes. These clinical entities vary by causative agent, degree of severity, evolution, and timing of occurrence. In the peripheral nervous system, chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy (CIPN) and myopathy are the two main complications of chemotherapy. CIPN is the most common complication, and the majority manifest as a dose-dependent length-dependent sensory axonopathy. In severe cases of CIPN, the dose of chemotherapy is reduced, the administration delayed, or the treatment discontinued. Few treatments are available for CIPN and based on meta-analysis, duloxetine is the preferred symptomatic treatment. Myopathy due to corticosteroid use is the most frequent cause of muscle disorders in patients with cancer. PMID:27443648

  5. Immunochemical analysis of poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation in HaCaT keratinocytes induced by the mono-alkylating agent 2-chloroethyl ethyl sulfide (CEES): Impact of experimental conditions.

    PubMed

    Debiak, Malgorzata; Lex, Kirsten; Ponath, Viviane; Burckhardt-Boer, Waltraud; Thiermann, Horst; Steinritz, Dirk; Schmidt, Annette; Mangerich, Aswin; Bürkle, Alexander

    2016-02-26

    Sulfur mustard (SM) is a bifunctional alkylating agent with a long history of use as a chemical weapon. Although its last military use is dated for the eighties of the last century, a potential use in terroristic attacks against civilians remains a significant threat. Thus, improving medical therapy of mustard exposed individuals is still of particular interest. PARP inhibitors were recently brought into the focus as a potential countermeasure for mustard-induced pathologies, supported by the availability of efficient compounds successfully tested in cancer therapy. PARP activation after SM treatment was reported in several cell types and tissues under various conditions; however, a detailed characterization of this phenomenon is still missing. This study provides the basis for such studies by developing and optimizing experimental conditions to investigate poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation (PARylation) in HaCaT keratinocytes upon treatment with the monofunctional alkylating agent 2-chloroethyl ethyl sulfide ("half mustard", CEES). By using an immunofluorescence-based approach, we show that optimization of experimental conditions with regards to the type of solvent, dilution factors and treatment procedure is essential to obtain a homogenous PAR staining in HaCaT cell cultures. Furthermore, we demonstrate that different CEES treatment protocols significantly influence the cytotoxicity profiles of treated cells. Using an optimized treatment protocol, our data reveals that CEES induces a dose- and time-dependent dynamic PARylation response in HaCaT cells that could be completely blocked by treating cells with the clinically relevant pharmacological PARP inhibitor ABT888 (also known as veliparib). Finally, siRNA experiments show that CEES-induced PAR formation is predominantly due to the activation of PARP1. In conclusion, this study provides a detailed analysis of the CEES-induced PARylation response in HaCaT keratinocytes, which forms an experimental basis to study the

  6. The past, present, and future of cytotoxic chemotherapy and pathway-directed targeted agents for soft tissue sarcoma.

    PubMed

    Ryan, Christopher W; Desai, Jayesh

    2013-01-01

    The individual rarity of the many subtypes of soft tissue sarcomas has historically mandated an empiric approach to systemic therapy. Doxorubicin, first reported to have activity in sarcomas 40 years ago, remains the generalizable first-line treatment of choice for many subtypes, with no other drug or combination having shown an overall-survival advantage. Other cytotoxic agents, such as paclitaxel for angiosarcoma or gemcitabine with docetaxel for leiomyosarcoma, are commonly used for certain histologic subtypes based on relatively small studies. Trabectedin, particularly active against leiomyosarcoma and myxoid liposarcoma, is approved in many countries worldwide but not yet in the United States or Australia. Newer cytotoxic agents, including ifosfamide derivatives, are in current phase III testing. Although advances is systemic therapy of soft-tissue sarcomas have been hampered by their biologic heterogeneity, this diversity also serves as fertile ground for discovery and validation of targetable molecular drivers. The most notable success in this regard has been the development of small molecule therapies for gastrointestinal stromal tumors. Other targets of recent interest include mouse double minute 2 homolog (MDM2) in dedifferentiated liposarcoma and anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) in inflammatory myofibroblastic tumor. Molecular therapies that have shown activity in diverse sarcoma populations include mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) inhibitors and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF-R) inhibitors. Among the latter, pazopanib demonstrated a progression-free survival over placebo in prior-treated patients with advanced sarcoma, and is now approved for use in the sarcomas in many countries. Efforts to understand the key molecular aberrations in any particular tumor continue towards a goal of individualized sarcoma therapy. PMID:23714556

  7. Comparison of the Lonidamine Potentiated Effect of Nitrogen Mustard Alkylating Agents on the Systemic Treatment of DB-1 Human Melanoma Xenografts in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Nath, Kavindra; Nelson, David S.; Putt, Mary E.; Leeper, Dennis B.; Garman, Bradley; Nathanson, Katherine L.; Glickson, Jerry D.

    2016-01-01

    Previous NMR studies demonstrated that lonidamine (LND) selectively diminishes the intracellular pH (pHi) of DB-1 melanoma and mouse xenografts of a variety of other prevalent human cancers while decreasing their bioenergetic status (tumor βNTP/Pi ratio) and enhancing the activities of melphalan and doxorubicin in these cancer models. Since melphalan and doxorubicin are highly toxic agents, we have examined three other nitrogen (N)-mustards, chlorambucil, cyclophosphamide and bendamustine, to determine if they exhibit similar potentiation by LND. As single agents LND, melphalan and these N-mustards exhibited the following activities in DB-1 melanoma xenografts; LND: 100% tumor surviving fraction (SF); chlorambucil: 100% SF; cyclophosphamide: 100% SF; bendamustine: 79% SF; melphalan: 41% SF. When combined with LND administered 40 min prior to administration of the N-mustard (to maximize intracellular acidification) the following responses were obtained; chlorambucil: 62% SF; cyclophosphamide: 42% SF; bendamustine: 36% SF; melphalan: 10% SF. The effect of LND on the activities of these N-mustards is generally attributed to acid stabilization of the aziridinium active intermediate, acid inhibition of glutathione-S-transferase, which acts as a scavenger of aziridinium, and acid inhibition of DNA repair by O6-alkyltransferase. Depletion of ATP by LND may also decrease multidrug resistance and increase tumor response. At similar maximum tolerated doses, our data indicate that melphalan is the most effective N-mustard in combination with LND when treating DB-1 melanoma in mice, but the choice of N-mustard for coadministration with LND will also depend on the relative toxicities of these agents, and remains to be determined. PMID:27285585

  8. A sensitive gas chromatographic-tandem mass spectrometric method for detection of alkylating agents in water: application to acrylamide in drinking water, coffee and snuff.

    PubMed

    Pérez, Hermes Licea; Osterman-Golkar, Siv

    2003-08-01

    A sensitive analytical method for the analysis of acrylamide and other electrophilic agents in water has been developed. The amino acid L-valine served as a nucleophilic trapping agent. The method was applied to the analysis of acrylamide in 0.2-1 mL samples of drinking water or Millipore-filtered water, brewed coffee, or water extracts of snuff. The reaction product, N-(2-carbamoylethyl)valine, was incubated with pentafluorophenyl isothiocyanate to give a pentafluorophenylthiohydantoin (PFPTH) derivative. This derivative was extracted with diethyl ether, separated from excess reagent and impurities by a simple extraction procedure, and analyzed by gas chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. (2H3)Acrylamide, added before the reaction with L-valine, was used as internal standard. Acrylamide and the related compound, N-methylolacrylamide, gave the same PFPTH derivative. The concentrations of acrylamides were < or = 0.4 nmol L(-1) (< or = 0.03 microg acrylamide L(-1)) in water, 200 to 350 nmol L(-1) in brewed coffee, and 10 to 34 nmol g(-1) snuff in portion bags, respectively. The precision (the coefficient of variation was 5%) and accuracy of the method were good. The detection limit was considerably lower than that of previously published methods for the analysis of acrylamide. PMID:12964603

  9. Molecular biology basis for the response of poly(ADP-rib) polymerase and NAD metabolism to dna damage caused by mustard alkylating agents. Final report, 30 April 1990-30 July 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Smulson, M.E.

    1994-08-30

    During the course of this contract, we have performed a variety of experiments whose intent has been to provide a strategy to modulate the nuclear enzyme poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PADPRP) in cultured keratinocytes. During this study, human keratinocyte lines were stably transfected with the cDNA for human PADPRP in the antisense orientation under an inducible promoter. Induction of this antisense RNA by dexamethasone in cultured cells selectively lowered levels of PADPRP in RNA, protein, and enzyme activity. Induction of antisense RNA led to a reduction in the levels of PADPRP in individual cell nuclei, as well as the loss of the ability of cells to synthesize and modify proteins by poly(ADP-ribose) polymer in response to an alkylating agent. When keratinocyte clones containing the antisense construct or empty vector alone were grafted onto nude mice they formed histologically normal human skin. The PADPRP antisense construct was also inducible in vivo by the topical application of dexamethasone to the reconstituted epidermis. In addition, poly(ADP-ribose) polymer could be induced and detected in vivo following the topical application of a sulfur mustard to the grafted transfected skin layers. Accordingly, a model system has been developed in which the levels of PADPRP can be selectively manipulated in human keratinocytes in cell culture, and potentially in reconstituted epidermis as well.

  10. An AS1411 aptamer-conjugated liposomal system containing a bubble-generating agent for tumor-specific chemotherapy that overcomes multidrug resistance.

    PubMed

    Liao, Zi-Xian; Chuang, Er-Yuan; Lin, Chia-Chen; Ho, Yi-Cheng; Lin, Kun-Ju; Cheng, Po-Yuan; Chen, Ko-Jie; Wei, Hao-Ji; Sung, Hsing-Wen

    2015-06-28

    Recent research in chemotherapy has prioritized overcoming the multidrug resistance (MDR) of cancer cells. In this work, liposomes that contain doxorubicin (DOX) and ammonium bicarbonate (ABC, a bubble-generating agent) are prepared and functionalized with an antinucleolin aptamer (AS1411 liposomes) to target DOX-resistant breast cancer cells (MCF-7/ADR), which overexpress nucleolin receptors. Free DOX and liposomes without functionalization with AS1411 (plain liposomes) were used as controls. The results of molecular dynamic simulations suggest that AS1411 functionalization may promote the affinity and specific binding of liposomes to the nucleolin receptors, enhancing their subsequent uptake by tumor cells, whereas plain liposomes enter cells with difficulty. Upon mild heating, the decomposition of ABC that is encapsulated in the liposomes enables the immediate activation of generation of CO2 bubbles, creating permeable defects in their lipid bilayers, and ultimately facilitating the swift intracellular release of DOX. In vivo studies in nude mice that bear tumors demonstrate that the active targeting of AS1411 liposomes can substantially increase the accumulation of DOX in the tumor tissues relative to free DOX or passively targeted plain liposomes, inhibiting tumor growth and reducing systemic side effects, including cardiotoxicity. The above findings indicate that liposomes that are functionalized with AS1411 represent an attractive therapeutic alternative for overcoming the MDR effect, and support a potentially effective strategy for cancer therapy. PMID:25637705

  11. FePt nanoparticles as a potential X-ray activated chemotherapy agent for HeLa cells

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Yanhong; Tang, Yunlan; Bao, Zhirong; Wang, Hui; Ren, Feng; Guo, Mingxiong; Quan, Hong; Jiang, Changzhong

    2015-01-01

    Nanomaterials have an advantage in “personalized” therapy, which is the ultimate goal of tumor treatment. In order to investigate the potential ability of FePt nanoparticles (NPs) in the diagnosis and chemoradiotherapy treatment of malignant tumors, superparamagnetic, monodispersed FePt (~3 nm) alloy NPs were synthesized, using cysteamine as a capping agent. The NPs were characterized by means of X-ray diffraction; transmission electron microscopy, Physical Property Measurement System, and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. The cytotoxicity of FePt NPs on Vero cells was assessed using an MTT assay, and tumor cell proliferation inhibited by individual FePt NPs and FePt NPs combined with X-ray beams were also collected using MTT assays; HeLa human cancer cell lines were used as in vitro models. Further confirmation of the combined effect of FePt NPs and X-rays was verified using HeLa cells, after which, the cellular uptake of FePt NPs was captured by transmission electron microscopy. The results indicated that the growth of HeLa cells was significantly inhibited by FePt NPs in a concentration-dependent manner, and the growth was significantly more inhibited by FePt NPs combined with a series of X-ray beam doses; the individual NPs did not display any remarkable cytotoxicity on Vero cells at a concentration <250 μg/mL. Meanwhile, the FePt NPs showed negative/positive contrast enhancement for MRI/CT molecule imaging at the end of the study. Therefore, the combined results implied that FePt NPs might potentially serve as a promising nanoprobe for the integration of tumor diagnosis and chemoradiotherapy. PMID:26604740

  12. FePt nanoparticles as a potential X-ray activated chemotherapy agent for HeLa cells.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Yanhong; Tang, Yunlan; Bao, Zhirong; Wang, Hui; Ren, Feng; Guo, Mingxiong; Quan, Hong; Jiang, Changzhong

    2015-01-01

    Nanomaterials have an advantage in "personalized" therapy, which is the ultimate goal of tumor treatment. In order to investigate the potential ability of FePt nanoparticles (NPs) in the diagnosis and chemoradiotherapy treatment of malignant tumors, superparamagnetic, monodispersed FePt (~3 nm) alloy NPs were synthesized, using cysteamine as a capping agent. The NPs were characterized by means of X-ray diffraction; transmission electron microscopy, Physical Property Measurement System, and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. The cytotoxicity of FePt NPs on Vero cells was assessed using an MTT assay, and tumor cell proliferation inhibited by individual FePt NPs and FePt NPs combined with X-ray beams were also collected using MTT assays; HeLa human cancer cell lines were used as in vitro models. Further confirmation of the combined effect of FePt NPs and X-rays was verified using HeLa cells, after which, the cellular uptake of FePt NPs was captured by transmission electron microscopy. The results indicated that the growth of HeLa cells was significantly inhibited by FePt NPs in a concentration-dependent manner, and the growth was significantly more inhibited by FePt NPs combined with a series of X-ray beam doses; the individual NPs did not display any remarkable cytotoxicity on Vero cells at a concentration <250 μg/mL. Meanwhile, the FePt NPs showed negative/positive contrast enhancement for MRI/CT molecule imaging at the end of the study. Therefore, the combined results implied that FePt NPs might potentially serve as a promising nanoprobe for the integration of tumor diagnosis and chemoradiotherapy. PMID:26604740

  13. Cancer Chemotherapy

    MedlinePlus

    ... controlled way. Cancer cells keep growing without control. Chemotherapy is drug therapy for cancer. It works by killing the cancer ... It depends on the type and amount of chemotherapy you get and how your body reacts. Some ...

  14. Cancer Chemotherapy

    MedlinePlus

    ... cells grow and die in a controlled way. Cancer cells keep forming without control. Chemotherapy is drug ... Your course of therapy will depend on the cancer type, the chemotherapy drugs used, the treatment goal ...

  15. Method for reactivating solid catalysts used in alkylation reactions

    DOEpatents

    Ginosar, Daniel M.; Thompson, David N.; Coates, Kyle; Zalewski, David J.; Fox, Robert V.

    2003-06-17

    A method for reactivating a solid alkylation catalyst is provided which can be performed within a reactor that contains the alkylation catalyst or outside the reactor. Effective catalyst reactivation is achieved whether the catalyst is completely deactivated or partially deactivated. A fluid reactivating agent is employed to dissolve catalyst fouling agents and also to react with such agents and carry away the reaction products. The deactivated catalyst is contacted with the fluid reactivating agent under pressure and temperature conditions such that the fluid reactivating agent is dense enough to effectively dissolve the fouling agents and any reaction products of the fouling agents and the reactivating agent. Useful pressures and temperatures for reactivation include near-critical, critical, and supercritical pressures and temperatures for the reactivating agent. The fluid reactivating agent can include, for example, a branched paraffin containing at least one tertiary carbon atom, or a compound that can be isomerized to a molecule containing at least one tertiary carbon atom.

  16. Continuous exposure of pancreatic cancer cells to dietary bioactive agents does not induce drug resistance unlike chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Fan, P; Zhang, Y; Liu, L; Zhao, Z; Yin, Y; Xiao, X; Bauer, N; Gladkich, J; Mattern, J; Gao, C; Schemmer, P; Gross, W; Herr, I

    2016-01-01

    The repeated treatment of cancer cells with chemo- or radiotherapy induces therapy resistance, but it was previously unknown whether the same effect occurs upon continuous exposure of cancer cells to diet-derived chemopreventive agents. We elucidated this interesting question in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma, which is a highly aggressive cancer entity with a marked resistance toward gemcitabine and other cytotoxic drugs. The isothiocyanate sulforaphane, present in cruciferous vegetables, and the polyphenol quercetin, present in many fruits and vegetables induced apoptosis and reduced viability in gemcitabine-sensitive BxPC-3 cells but not in non-malignant ductal pancreas cells and mesenchymal stromal cells. In turn, BxPC-3 cells were treated with increasing concentrations of gemcitabine, sulforaphane or quercetin for more than 1 year and the surviving subclones Bx-GEM, Bx-SF and Bx-Q were selected, respectively. While Bx-GEM cells acquired a total resistance, Bx-SF or Bx-Q cells largely kept their sensitivity as proved by MTT assay, annexin staining and FACS analysis. The evaluation of the self-renewal-, differentiation- and migration-potential by colony formation, differentiation or migration assays demonstrated that cancer stem cell features were enriched in gemcitabine-resistant cells, but decreased in sulforaphane- and quercetin-long time-treated cells. These results were confirmed by orthotopic xenotransplantation of cancer cells to the mouse pancreas, where Bx-GEM formed large, Bx-Q small and Bx-SF cells almost undetectable tumors. An mRNA expression profiling array and subsequent gene set enrichment analysis and qRT-PCR confirmed that tumor progression markers were enriched in Bx-GEM, but reduced in Bx-SF and Bx-Q cells. This study demonstrates that the continuous exposure of pancreatic cancer cells to sulforaphane or quercetin does not induce resistance in surviving cells but reduces tumorigenicity by inhibition of tumor progression markers. These

  17. The synthesis and biological evaluation of new DNA-directed alkylating agents, phenyl N-mustard-4-anilinoquinoline conjugates containing a urea linker.

    PubMed

    Marvania, Bhavin; Kakadiya, Rajesh; Christian, Wilson; Chen, Tai-Lin; Wu, Ming-Hsi; Suman, Sharda; Tala, Kiran; Lee, Te-Chang; Shah, Anamik; Su, Tsann-Long

    2014-08-18

    We synthesized a series of phenyl N-mustard-4-anilinoquinoline conjugates to study their antitumorigenic effects. These agents were prepared by the condensation of 4-[N,N-bis(2-chloroethyl)amino]phenyl isocyanate with 6-amino-4-methylamino or 4-anilinoquinolines. The structure-activity relationship (SAR) studies revealed that the C2-methylquinoline derivatives (18a-o) were generally more cytotoxic than the C2-phenylquinoline conjugates (23a-d) in inhibiting the cell growth of various human tumor cell lines in vitro. However, the methylamino or aniline substituents at C4 of quinoline did not influence the cytotoxic effects. The title conjugates were capable of inducing DNA cross-linking and promoting cell-cycle arrest at the G2/M phase. This study demonstrates that phenyl N-mustard-4-anilinoquinoline conjugates are generally more potent than phenyl N-mustard-4-anilinoquinazoline conjugates against the cell growth of various tumor cell-lines. PMID:25014640

  18. Low density lipoprotein for delivery of a water-insoluble alkylating agent to malignant cells. In vitro and in vivo studies of a drug-lipoprotein complex.

    PubMed Central

    Vitols, S.; Söderberg-Reid, K.; Masquelier, M.; Sjöström, B.; Peterson, C.

    1990-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that human leukaemic cells and certain tumour tissues have a higher receptor-mediated uptake of low density lipoprotein (LDL) than the corresponding normal cells or tissues. LDL has therefore been proposed as a carrier for anti-cancer agents. In the current study, a water-insoluble mitoclomine derivative (WB 4291) was incorporated into LDL. The WB 4291-LDL complex contained about 1,500 drug molecules per LDL particle and showed receptor-mediated toxicity in vitro as judged from the difference in growth inhibitory effect on normal and mutant (LDL-receptor-negative) cultured Chinese hamster ovary cells. However, cellular drug uptake did not exclusively occur by the receptor pathway since mutant cells were also affected to some extent. The LDL part of the complex had the same plasma clearance and organ distribution as native LDL after i.v. injection in mice and rabbits. Therapeutic effects were observed when Balb-C mice with experimental leukaemia were treated with the complex. After i.p. administration to mice with i.p. leukaemia median survival time was prolonged 2.5-fold and 40% became long time survivors. The effect was weaker (42% increase in life span) after i.v. injections of the complex to mice with i.v. leukaemia. Images Figure 3 PMID:2245164

  19. Synthesis and preclinical evaluation of a new C-6 alkylated pyrimidine derivative as a PET imaging agent for HSV1-tk gene expression

    PubMed Central

    Müller, Ursina; Ross, Tobias L; Ranadheera, Charlene; Slavik, Roger; Müller, Adrienne; Born, Mariana; Trauffer, Evelyn; Sephton, Selena Milicevic; Scapozza, Leonardo; Krämer, Stefanie D; Ametamey, Simon M

    2013-01-01

    [18F]FHOMP (6-((1-[18F]-fluoro-3-hydroxypropan-2-yloxy)methyl)-5-methylpyrimidine-2,4(1H,3H)-dione), a C-6 substituted pyrimidine derivative, has been synthesized and evaluated as a potential PET agent for imaging herpes simplex virus type 1 thymidine kinase (HSV1-tk) gene expression. [18F]FHOMP was prepared by the reaction of the tosylated precursor with tetrabutylammonium [18F]-fluoride followed by acidic cleavage of the protecting groups. In vitro cell accumulation of [18F]FHOMP and [18F]FHBG (reference) was studied with HSV1-tk transfected HEK293 (HEK293TK+) cells. Small animal PET and biodistribution studies were performed with HEK293TK+ xenograft-bearing nude mice. The role of equilibrative nucleoside transporter 1 (ENT1) in the transport and uptake of [18F] FHOMP was also examined in nude mice after treatment with ENT1 inhibitor nitrobenzylmercaptopurine ribonucleoside phosphate (NBMPR-P). [18F]FHOMP was obtained in a radiochemical yield of ~25% (decay corrected) and the radiochemical purity was greater than 95%. The uptake of [18F]FHOMP in HSV1-TK containing HEK293TK+ cells was 52 times (at 30 min) and 244 times (at 180 min) higher than in control HEK293 cells. The uptake ratios between HEK293TK+ and HEK293 control cells for [18F]FHBG were significantly lower i.e. 5 (at 30 min) and 81 (240 min). In vivo, [18F]FHOMP accumulated to a similar extend in HEK293TK+ xenografts as [18F]FHBG but with a higher general background. Blocking of ENT1 reduced [18F]FHOMP uptake into brain from a standardized uptake value (SUV) of 0.10±0.01 to 0.06±0.02, but did not reduce the general background signal in PET. Although [18F]FHOMP does not outperform [18F]FHBG in its in vivo performance, this novel C-6 pyrimidine derivative may be a useful probe for monitoring HSV1-tk gene expression in vivo. PMID:23342302

  20. Neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NCT) plus targeted agents versus NCT alone in colorectal liver metastases patients: A systematic review and meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Chun-Hui; Huang, Shu-Xin; Qi, Jia; Zhu, Hui-Juan; Huang, Zong-Hai; Yu, Jin-Long

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To assess the efficacy of neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NCT) plus targeted agents versus NCT alone for the treatment of colorectal liver metastases (CRLM) patients. Methods Trials published between 1994 and 2015 were identified by an electronic search of public databases (MEDLINE, EMBASE, Cochrane library). All clinical studies were independently identified by two authors for inclusion. Demographic data, treatment regimens, objective response rate (ORR), hepatic resection and R0 hepatic resection rate were extracted and analyzed using Comprehensive MetaAnalysis software (Version 2.0). Results A total of 40 cohorts with 2099 CRLM patients were included: 962 patients were treated with NCT alone, 602 with NCT plus anti-epidermal growth-factor receptor (EGFR)-monoclonal antibodies (MoAbs) and 535 with NCT plus bevacizumab. Pooled ORR was significantly higher for NCT plus bevacizumab or anti-EGFR-MoAbs than NCT alone [relative risk (RR) 1.53, 95% CI 1.30–1.80; p < 0.001; RR 1.53, 95% CI: 1.27–1.83, p < 0.001; respectively]. NCT plus bevacizumab significantly improved R0 hepatic resection rate (RR 1.61, 95% CI: 1.27–2.04, p < 0.001), but not for overall hepatic resection rate (RR 1.26, 95% CI: 0.81–1.94, p = 0.30). While hepatic resection and R0 hepatic resection rate was comparable between NCT plus anti-EGFR-MoAbs and NCT alone (p = 0.42 and p = 0.37, respectively). Conclusions In comparison with NCT alone, NCT plus bevacizumab significantly improve ORR and R0 hepatic resection rate but not for hepatic resection rate. Our findings support the need to compare NCT plus bevacizumab with NCT alone in the neoadjuvant setting in large prospective trials due to its higher hepatic resection rate and R0 hepatic resection rate in CRLM patients. PMID:26515604

  1. Sex-specific effects of cytotoxic chemotherapy agents cyclophosphamide and mitomycin C on gene expression, oxidative DNA damage, and epigenetic alterations in the prefrontal cortex and hippocampus - an aging connection.

    PubMed

    Kovalchuk, Anna; Rodriguez-Juarez, Rocio; Ilnytskyy, Yaroslav; Byeon, Boseon; Shpyleva, Svitlana; Melnyk, Stepan; Pogribny, Igor; Kolb, Bryan; Kovalchuk, Olga

    2016-04-01

    Recent research shows that chemotherapy agents can be more toxic to healthy brain cells than to the target cancer cells. They cause a range of side effects, including memory loss and cognitive dysfunction that can persist long after the completion of treatment. This condition is known as chemo brain. The molecular and cellular mechanisms of chemo brain remain obscure. Here, we analyzed the effects of two cytotoxic chemotherapy drugs-cyclophosphamide (CPP) and mitomycin C (MMC) - on transcriptomic and epigenetic changes in the murine prefrontal cortex (PFC) and hippocampal regions. We for the first time showed that CPP and MMC treatments led to profound sex- and brain region-specific alterations in gene expression profiles. Gene expression changes were most prominent in the PFC tissues of female mice 3 weeks after MMC treatment, and the gene expression response was much greater for MCC than CPP exposure. MMC exposure resulted in oxidative DNA damage, evidenced by accumulation of 8-oxo-2'-deoxyguanosine (8-oxodG) and a decrease in the level of 8-oxodG repair protein OGG1 in the PFC of female animals 3 weeks after treatment. MMC treatment decreased global DNA methylation and increased DNA hydroxymethylation in the PFC tissues of female mice. The majority of the changes induced by chemotherapy in the PFC tissues of female mice resembled those that occur during the brain's aging processes. Therefore, our study suggests a link between chemotherapy-induced chemo brain and brain aging, and provides an important roadmap for future analysis. PMID:27032448

  2. ALKYL PYROPHOSPHATE METAL SOLVENT EXTRACTANTS AND PROCESS

    DOEpatents

    Long, R.L.

    1958-09-30

    A process is presented for the recovery of uranium from aqueous mineral acidic solutions by solvent extraction. The extractant is a synmmetrical dialkyl pyrophosphate in which the alkyl substituents have a chain length of from 4 to 17 carbon atoms. Mentioned as a preferred extractant is dioctyl pyrophosphate. The uranium is precipitated irom the organic extractant phase with an agent such as HF, fluoride salts. alcohol, or ammonia.

  3. Chemotherapy and Your Mouth

    MedlinePlus

    ... Health > Chemotherapy and Your Mouth Chemotherapy and Your Mouth Main Content Are You Being Treated With Chemotherapy ... Back to Top How Does Chemotherapy Affect the Mouth? Chemotherapy is the use of drugs to treat ...

  4. Safety Assessment of Alkyl PEG/PPG Ethers as Used in Cosmetics.

    PubMed

    Fiume, Monice M; Heldreth, Bart; Bergfeld, Wilma F; Belsito, Donald V; Hill, Ronald A; Klaassen, Curtis D; Liebler, Daniel C; Marks, James G; Shank, Ronald C; Slaga, Thomas J; Snyder, Paul W; Andersen, F Alan

    2016-07-01

    The Cosmetic Ingredient Review (CIR) Expert Panel assessed the safety of 131 alkyl polyethylene glycol (PEG)/polypropylene glycol ethers as used in cosmetics, concluding that these ingredients are safe in the present practices of use and concentration described in this safety assessment when formulated to be nonirritating. Most of the alkyl PEG/PPG ethers included in this review are reported to function in cosmetics as surfactants, skin-conditioning agents, and/or emulsifying agents. The alkyl PEG/PPG ethers share very similar physiochemical properties as the alkyl PEG ethers, which were reviewed previously by the CIR Expert Panel and found safe when formulated to be nonirritating. The alkyl PEG ethers differ by the inclusion of PPG repeat units, which are used to fine-tune the surfactant properties of this group. The Panel relied heavily on data on analogous ingredients, extracted from the alkyl PEG ethers and PPG reports, when making its determination of safety. PMID:27383199

  5. Boron-Catalyzed N-Alkylation of Amines using Carboxylic Acids.

    PubMed

    Fu, Ming-Chen; Shang, Rui; Cheng, Wan-Min; Fu, Yao

    2015-07-27

    A boron-based catalyst was found to catalyze the straightforward alkylation of amines with readily available carboxylic acids in the presence of silane as the reducing agent. Various types of primary and secondary amines can be smoothly alkylated with good selectivity and good functional-group compatibility. This metal-free amine alkylation was successfully applied to the synthesis of three commercial medicinal compounds, Butenafine, Cinacalcet. and Piribedil, in a one-pot manner without using any metal catalysts. PMID:26150397

  6. In vivo kinetics of micronuclei induction by bifunctional alkylating antineoplastics.

    PubMed

    Morales-Ramírez, Pedro; Vallarino-Kelly, Teresita; Cruz-Vallejo, Virginia L; López-Iturbe, Rosario; Alvaro-Delgadillo, Horacio

    2004-05-01

    The aim of the present study was to determine in vivo the kinetics of micronucleated polychromatic erythrocyte (MN-PCE) induction in mice, as an approach for studying the mechanism of micronuclei induction by mitomycin C, cis-diamine dichloroplatinum, busulfan and bis-chloroethylnitrosourea, bifuctional alkylating antineoplastic agents having different patterns of crosslink induction. The kinetics of MN-PCE induction was established by scoring the frequency of MN-PCE in 2000 PCE in peripheral blood, for periods of 8 or 10 h after acute treatment and up to 80 h, with different doses of the agent. The kinetics of MN-PCE induction and particularly the times of maximal induction by different bifunctional alkylating agents were compared with the kinetics previously obtained for ethylnitrosourea, methylnitrosourea and 6-mercaptopurine, agents that cause MN-PCE mainly in the first, second and third divisions after exposure, respectively. The results obtained in the present study allow us to conclude that: (i) bifunctional alkylating agents have very different efficiencies of genotoxic and cytotoxic action; (ii) all assayed bifunctional alkylating agents induced micronuclei during the first cell division, owing to the mistaken repair of primary lesions, e.g. excision; (iii) busulfan and bis-chloroethylnitrosourea showed an additional late mechanism of micronuclei induction, which is expressed at the third division and seems to be related to the mismatch repair process. PMID:15123786

  7. Radical-based alkylation of guanine derivatives in aqueous medium.

    PubMed

    Chatgilialoglu, Chryssostomos; Caminal, Clara; Mulazzani, Quinto G

    2011-05-01

    The radical-based alkylation of 8-bromoguanosine (1a) and 8-bromo-2'-deoxyguanosine (1b) at the C8 position has been investigated in aqueous solutions. Alkyl radicals were generated by scavenging of the primary species of γ-radiolysis by the alcohol substrate. These reactions result in the efficient formation of intermolecular C-C bonds in aqueous media, by using the reactivity of α-hydroxyalkyl radicals derived from alcohols with 1a and 1b. A mechanism for the formation of C8 guanine alkylated adducts has been proposed, based on the quantification of radiation chemical yields for the disappearance of starting material and the formation of all products. Two α-hydroxyalkyl radicals are needed to form an alkylated guanine, the first one adding to C8 followed by ejection of Br(-) with formation of guanyl adduct and the second one acting as reducing agent of the guanyl adduct. PMID:21431230

  8. Sex-specific effects of cytotoxic chemotherapy agents cyclophospha-mide and mitomycin C on gene expression, oxidative DNA damage, and epigenetic alterations in the prefrontal cortex and hippocampus – an aging connection

    PubMed Central

    Kovalchuk, Anna; Rodriguez-Juarez, Rocio; Ilnytskyy, Yaroslav; Byeon, Boseon; Shpyleva, Svitlana; Melnyk, Stepan; Pogribny, Igor; Kolb, Bryan; Kovalchuk, Olga

    2016-01-01

    Recent research shows that chemotherapy agents can be more toxic to healthy brain cells than to the target cancer cells. They cause a range of side effects, including memory loss and cognitive dysfunction that can persist long after the completion of treatment. This condition is known as chemo brain. The molecular and cellular mechanisms of chemo brain remain obscure. Here, we analyzed the effects of two cytotoxic chemotherapy drugs—cyclophosphamide (CPP) and mitomycin C (MMC) - on transcriptomic and epigenetic changes in the murine prefrontal cortex (PFC) and hippocampal regions. We for the first time showed that CPP and MMC treatments led to profound sex- and brain region-specific alterations in gene expression profiles. Gene expression changes were most prominent in the PFC tissues of female mice 3 weeks after MMC treatment, and the gene expression response was much greater for MCC than CPP exposure. MMC exposure resulted in oxidative DNA damage, evidenced by accumulation of 8-oxo-2′-deoxyguanosine (8-oxodG) and a decrease in the level of 8-oxodG repair protein OGG1 in the PFC of female animals 3 weeks after treatment. MMC treatment decreased global DNA methylation and increased DNA hydroxymethylation in the PFC tissues of female mice. The majority of the changes induced by chemotherapy in the PFC tissues of female mice resembled those that occur during the brain's aging processes. Therefore, our study suggests a link between chemotherapy-induced chemo brain and brain aging, and provides an important roadmap for future analysis. PMID:27032448

  9. Method of making alkyl esters

    DOEpatents

    Elliott, Brian

    2010-09-14

    Methods of making alkyl esters are described herein. The methods are capable of using raw, unprocessed, low-cost feedstocks and waste grease. Generally, the method involves converting a glyceride source to a fatty acid composition and esterifying the fatty acid composition to make alkyl esters. In an embodiment, a method of making alkyl esters comprises providing a glyceride source. The method further comprises converting the glyceride source to a fatty acid composition comprising free fatty acids and less than about 1% glyceride by mass. Moreover, the method comprises esterifying the fatty acid composition in the presence of a solid acid catalyst at a temperature ranging firm about 70.degree. C. to about 120.degree. C. to produce alkyl esters, such that at least 85% of the free fatty acids are converted to alkyl esters. The method also incorporates the use of packed bed reactors for glyceride conversion and/or fatty acid esterification to make alkyl esters.

  10. N-O Chemistry for Antibiotics: Discovery of N-Alkyl-N-(pyridin-2-yl)hydroxylamine Scaffolds as Selective Antibacterial Agents Using Nitroso Diels-Alder and Ene Chemistry

    PubMed Central

    Wencewicz, Timothy A.; Yang, Baiyuan; Rudloff, James R.; Oliver, Allen G.; Miller, Marvin J.

    2011-01-01

    The discovery, syntheses, and structure-activity relationships (SAR) of a new family of heterocyclic antibacterial compounds based on N-alkyl-N-(pyridin-2-yl)hydroxylamine scaffolds are described. A structurally diverse library of ~100 heterocyclic molecules generated from Lewis acid-mediated nucleophilic ring opening reactions with nitroso Diels-Alder cycloadducts and nitroso ene reactions with substituted alkenes was evaluated in whole cell antibacterial assays. Compounds containing the N-alkyl-N-(pyridin-2-yl)hydroxylamine structure demonstrated selective and potent antibacterial activity against the Gram-positive bacterium Micrococcus luteus ATCC 10240 (MIC90 = 2.0 μM or 0.41 μg/mL) and moderate activity against other Gram-positive strains including antibiotic resistant strains of Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and Enterococcus faecalis (VRE). A new synthetic route to the active core was developed using palladium-catalyzed Buchwald-Hartwig amination reactions of N-alkyl-O-(4-methoxybenzyl)hydroxylamines with 2-halo-pyridines that facilitated SAR studies and revealed the simplest active structural fragment. This work shows the value of using a combination of diversity-oriented synthesis (DOS) and parallel synthesis for identifying new antibacterial scaffolds. PMID:21859126

  11. 40 CFR 721.9595 - Alkyl benzene sulfonic acids and alkyl sulfates, amine salts (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Alkyl benzene sulfonic acids and alkyl... Significant New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.9595 Alkyl benzene sulfonic acids and alkyl...) The chemical substances identified generically as alkyl benzene sulfonic acids and alkyl...

  12. 40 CFR 721.9595 - Alkyl benzene sulfonic acids and alkyl sulfates, amine salts (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Alkyl benzene sulfonic acids and alkyl... Significant New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.9595 Alkyl benzene sulfonic acids and alkyl...) The chemical substances identified generically as alkyl benzene sulfonic acids and alkyl...

  13. 40 CFR 721.9595 - Alkyl benzene sulfonic acids and alkyl sulfates, amine salts (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Alkyl benzene sulfonic acids and alkyl... Significant New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.9595 Alkyl benzene sulfonic acids and alkyl...) The chemical substances identified generically as alkyl benzene sulfonic acids and alkyl...

  14. 40 CFR 721.9595 - Alkyl benzene sulfonic acids and alkyl sulfates, amine salts (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Alkyl benzene sulfonic acids and alkyl... Significant New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.9595 Alkyl benzene sulfonic acids and alkyl...) The chemical substances identified generically as alkyl benzene sulfonic acids and alkyl...

  15. 40 CFR 721.9595 - Alkyl benzene sulfonic acids and alkyl sulfates, amine salts (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Alkyl benzene sulfonic acids and alkyl... Significant New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.9595 Alkyl benzene sulfonic acids and alkyl...) The chemical substances identified generically as alkyl benzene sulfonic acids and alkyl...

  16. Understanding Chemotherapy

    MedlinePlus

    ... you may get chemotherapy before a peripheral blood stem cell transplant. Fill this section in with your doctor or nurse. I am getting chemo ... can be given in these forms: An IV (intravenously) A shot (injection) into a muscle or other part of your body A pill ...

  17. Polyimides with pendant alkyl groups

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jensen, B. J.; Young, P. R.

    1982-01-01

    The effect on selected polyimide properties when pendant alkyl groups were attached to the polymer backbone was investigated. A series of polymers were prepared using benzophenone tetracarboxylic acid dianhydride (BTDA) and seven different p-alkyl-m,p'-diaminobenzophenone monomers. The alkyl groups varied in length from C(1) (methyl) to C(9) (nonyl). The polyimide prepared from BTDA and m,p'-diaminobenzophenone was included as a control. All polymers were characterized by various chromatographic, spectroscopic, thermal, and mechanical techniques. Increasing the length of the pendant alkyl group resulted in a systematic decrease in glass transition temperature (Tg) for vacuum cured films. A 70 C decrease in Tg to 193 C was observed for the nonyl polymer compared to the Tg for the control. A corresponding systematic increase in Tg indicative of crosslinking, was observed for air cured films. Thermogravimetric analysis revealed a slight sacrifice in thermal stability with increasing alkyl length. No improvement in film toughness was observed.

  18. Effects of radiation therapy and chemotherapy on testicular function

    SciTech Connect

    Kinsella, T.J. )

    1989-01-01

    Chemotherapy and radiation therapy are commonly used alone or in combination in the curative management of many malignancies in adolescent and adult males. Over the last 15-20 years, the striking success in the treatment of some common cancers in reproductive males has led to increasing concern for damage to normal tissues, such as the testes, resulting from curative cancer treatment. Indeed, a major future goal for cancer treatment will be to improve on the complication-free cure rate. Inherent in achieving this goal is to understand the pathophysiology and clinical expression of testicular injury. Both chemotherapy and radiation therapy result in germ cell depletion with the development of oligo- to azoospermia and testicular atrophy. The type of drug (particularly the alkylating agents), duration of treatment, intensity of treatment, and drug combination are major variables in determining the extent and duration of testicular injury. Testicular injury with chemotherapy also appears to vary with the age of the patient at the time of treatment. Newer drug combinations are now being used which appear to have curative potential in tumors such as Hodgkin's disease and germ cell testicular cancer with less potential for testicular injury. The most accurate and complete information on radiation injury to the testes is derived from two studies of normal volunteers who received graded single doses directly to the testes. A clear dose-response relationship of clinical and histological testicular damage was found with gradual recovery occurring following doses of up to 600 cGy. While these two studies provide an important clinical data base, radiation therapy used in treating cancers involves multiple daily treatments, usually 25-35 delivered over several weeks. Additionally, direct testicular irradiation is seldom used clinically. 37 references.

  19. A Review of the Role of the Sequence-Dependent Electrostatic Landscape in DNA Alkylation Patterns

    PubMed Central

    Gold, Barry; Marky, Luis M.; Stone, Michael P.; Williams, Loren D.

    2008-01-01

    Alkylating agents, including environmental and endogenous carcinogens, and DNA targeting antineoplastic agents, that adduct DNA via intermediates with significant cationic charge show a sequence selectively in their covalent bonding to nucleobases. The resulting patterns of alkylation eventually contribute to the agent-dependent distributions and types of mutations. The origin of the regioselective modification of DNA by electrophiles has been attributed to steric and/or electronic factors, but attempts to mechanistically model and predict alkylation patterns have had limited success. In this review, we present data consistent with the role of the intrinsic sequence-dependent electrostatic landscape (SDEL) in DNA that modulates the equilibrium binding of cations and the bonding of reactive charged alkylating agents to atoms that line the floor of the major groove of DNA. PMID:17112226

  20. C-Alkylation of Ketones and Related Compounds by Alcohols: Transition-Metal-Catalyzed Dehydrogenation.

    PubMed

    Huang, Fei; Liu, Zhuqing; Yu, Zhengkun

    2016-01-18

    Transition-metal-catalyzed C-alkylation of ketones and secondary alcohols, with alcohols, avoids use of organometallic or environmentally unfriendly alkylating agents by means of borrowing hydrogen (BH) or hydrogen autotransfer (HA) activation of the alcohol substrates. Water is formed as the only by-product, thus making the BH process atom-economical and environmentally benign. Diverse homogeneous and heterogeneous transition-metal catalysts, ketones, and alcohols can be used for this transformation, thus rendering the BH process promising for replacing those procedures that use traditional alkylating agents. This Minireview summarizes the advances during the last five years in transition-metal-catalyzed BH α-alkylation of ketones, and β-alkylation of secondary alcohols with alcohols. A discussion on the application of the BH strategy for C-C bond formation is included. PMID:26639633

  1. Brief chemotherapy (Stanford V) and adjuvant radiotherapy for bulky or advanced Hodgkin's disease: an update.

    PubMed

    Horning, S J; Rosenberg, S A; Hoppe, R T

    1996-01-01

    From May 1989 to August 1995, 94 previously untreated patients with Hodgkin's disease stage II with bulky mediastinal involvement (n = 28) or stage III or IV (n = 66) received an abbreviated chemotherapy regimen, Stanford V, +/-radiotherapy (RT). Chemotherapy was given weekly for 12 weeks followed by consolidative RT to sites of initial bulky disease. With a median follow-up of 3 years, the actuarial 6-year survival is 93% and the freedom from progression is 89%. There have been no relapses or deaths among the 28 patients with stage II bulky mediastinal disease. Eight relapses and three deaths have occurred in the group of 66 patients with stage III-IV disease. The abbreviated chemotherapy regimen, Stanford V, in combination with RT is well tolerated and highly effective therapy for bulky, limited stage and advanced stage HD. Lower cumulative exposure to alkylating agents, doxorubicin, bleomycin and limited use of radiation is expected to improved the prospects for fertility and decrease the risks for second neoplasms and late cardiopulmonary toxicity. PMID:8836420

  2. ESCHERICHIA COLI Gene Induction by Alkylation Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Volkert, Michael R.; Nguyen, Dinh C.; Beard, K. Christopher

    1986-01-01

    Searches for alkylation-inducible (aid) genes of Escherichia coli have been conducted by screening random fusions of the Mu-dl(ApR lac) phage for fusions showing increased β-galactosidase activity after treatment with methylating agents, but not after treatments with UV-irradiation. In this report we describe gene fusions that are specifically induced by alkylation treatments. Nine new mutants are described, and their properties are compared with the five mutants described previously. The total of 14 fusion mutants map at five distinct genetic loci. They can be further subdivided on the basis of their induction by methyl methanesulfonate (MMS) and N-methyl-N'-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine (MNNG). alkA, aidB and aidD are induced by both agents and appear to be regulated by ada. Neither aidC nor aidI is regulated by ada. Moreover, since aidC is induced only by MNNG and aidI is induced only by MMS, these two genes are likely to be individually regulated. Thus, there appear to be at least three different regulatory mechanisms controlling aid genes. PMID:3080354

  3. Effects of changes in intracellular iron pool on AlkB-dependent and AlkB-independent mechanisms protecting E.coli cells against mutagenic action of alkylating agent.

    PubMed

    Sikora, Anna; Maciejewska, Agnieszka M; Poznański, Jarosław; Pilżys, Tomasz; Marcinkowski, Michał; Dylewska, Małgorzata; Piwowarski, Jan; Jakubczak, Wioletta; Pawlak, Katarzyna; Grzesiuk, Elżbieta

    2015-08-01

    An Escherichia coli hemH mutant accumulates protoporphyrin IX, causing photosensitivity of cells to visible light. Here, we have shown that intracellular free iron in hemH mutants is double that observed in hemH(+) strain. The aim of this study was to recognize the influence of this increased free iron concentration on AlkB-directed repair of alkylated DNA by analyzing survival and argE3 → Arg(+) reversion induction after λ>320 nm light irradiation and MMS-treatment in E. coli AB1157 hemH and alkB mutants. E.coli AlkB dioxygenase constitutes a direct single-protein repair system using non-hem Fe(II) and cofactors 2-oxoglutarate (2OG) and oxygen (O2) to initiate oxidative dealkylation of DNA/RNA bases. We have established that the frequency of MMS-induced Arg(+) revertants in AB1157 alkB(+)hemH(-)/pMW1 strain was 40 and 26% reduced comparing to the alkB(+)hemH(-) and alkB(+)hemH(+)/pMW1, respectively. It is noteworthy that the effect was observed only when bacteria were irradiated with λ>320 nm light prior MMS-treatment. This finding indicates efficient repair of alkylated DNA in photosensibilized cells in the presence of higher free iron pool and AlkB concentrations. Interestingly, a 31% decrease in the level of Arg(+) reversion was observed in irradiated and MMS-treated hemH(-)alkB(-) cells comparing to the hemH(+)alkB(-) strain. Also, the level of Arg(+) revertants in the irradiated and MMS treated hemH(-) alkB(-) mutant was significantly lower (by 34%) in comparison to the same strain but MMS-treated only. These indicate AlkB-independent repair involving Fe ions and reactive oxygen species. According to our hypothesis it may be caused by non-enzymatic dealkylation of alkylated dNTPs in E. coli cells. In in vitro studies, the absence of AlkB protein in the presence of iron ions allowed etheno(ϵ) dATP and ϵdCTP to spontaneously convert to dAMP and dCMP, respectively. Thus, hemH(-) intra-cellular conditions may favor Fe-dependent dealkylation of modified d

  4. 40 CFR 721.1875 - Boric acid, alkyl and substituted alkyl esters (generic name).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Boric acid, alkyl and substituted... Significant New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.1875 Boric acid, alkyl and substituted alkyl... chemical substance boric acid, alkyl and substituted alkyl esters (PMN P-86-1252) is subject to...

  5. 40 CFR 721.1875 - Boric acid, alkyl and substituted alkyl esters (generic name).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Boric acid, alkyl and substituted... Significant New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.1875 Boric acid, alkyl and substituted alkyl... chemical substance boric acid, alkyl and substituted alkyl esters (PMN P-86-1252) is subject to...

  6. 40 CFR 721.1875 - Boric acid, alkyl and substituted alkyl esters (generic name).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Boric acid, alkyl and substituted... Significant New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.1875 Boric acid, alkyl and substituted alkyl... chemical substance boric acid, alkyl and substituted alkyl esters (PMN P-86-1252) is subject to...

  7. 40 CFR 721.1875 - Boric acid, alkyl and substituted alkyl esters (generic name).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Boric acid, alkyl and substituted... Significant New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.1875 Boric acid, alkyl and substituted alkyl... chemical substance boric acid, alkyl and substituted alkyl esters (PMN P-86-1252) is subject to...

  8. 40 CFR 721.1875 - Boric acid, alkyl and substituted alkyl esters (generic name).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Boric acid, alkyl and substituted... Significant New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.1875 Boric acid, alkyl and substituted alkyl... chemical substance boric acid, alkyl and substituted alkyl esters (PMN P-86-1252) is subject to...

  9. Prevention of chemotherapy-induced ovarian damage.

    PubMed

    Roness, Hadassa; Kashi, Oren; Meirow, Dror

    2016-01-01

    Recent advances in our understanding of the mechanisms underlying the impact of cytotoxic drugs on the ovary have opened up new directions for the protection of the ovary from chemotherapy-induced damage. These advances have spurred the investigation of pharmacological agents to prevent ovarian damage at the time of treatment. Prevention of ovarian damage and follicle loss would provide significant advantages over existing fertility preservation techniques. This manuscript reviews new methods for the prevention of chemotherapy-induced ovarian damage, including agents that act on the PI3K/PTEN/Akt follicle activation pathway, apoptotic pathways, the vascular system, and other potential methods of reducing chemotherapy-induced ovotoxicity. PMID:26677788

  10. Oral Health Status of Chinese Paediatric and Adolescent Oncology Patients with Chemotherapy in Hong Kong: a Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Kung, A.Y.H; Zhang, S; Zheng, L.W; Wong, G.H.M; Chu, C.H

    2015-01-01

    Aim: To study the oral health status of Chinese children and adolescents undergoing chemotherapy in Hong Kong. Method: All Chinese children and adolescent oncology patients aged 18 or below attending the Children's Centre for Cancer and Blood Disease at a hospital for chemotherapy were invited and parental consent was sought before they were accepted into the study. The study comprised of 1) a parental questionnaire, 2) the collection of medical history and 3) a clinical examination for tooth decay (caries) and mucosal status. Results: A total of 69 patients were invited, and they all participated in this study. Their mean age was 9.2±5.0 and 44 (64%) were males. Twenty-six patients (38%) had no caries experience (DMFT and/or dmft = 0). Higher caries experience was detected in participants that were not born in Hong Kong, had completed active chemotherapy, participated in school dental care service and whose parents had low educational levels. There were 41 patients with active chemotherapy, 24 of whom were diagnosed with acute leukaemia, 5 with haematological malignancies other than leukaemia and 11 with solid tumours. Antimetabolites, cytotoxic antibiotics, alkylating agents and plant alkaloids were administered in 49%, 32%, 24% and 22% of them, respectively. Twenty-six (63%) patients showed no mucosal complications. The most common oral complication was oral mucositis (24%) followed by petechiae (10%). Conclusion: About two-thirds of paediatric and adolescent cancer patients had caries experience, which was more common among those who had completed chemotherapy. Oral mucositis followed by petechiae were the two most common complications of receiving chemotherapy. PMID:25674168

  11. Alkylation and acylation of cyclotriphosphazenes.

    PubMed

    Benson, Mark A; Zacchini, Stefano; Boomishankar, Ramamoorthy; Chan, Yuri; Steiner, Alexander

    2007-08-20

    Phosphazenes (RNH)6P3N3 (R = n-propyl, isobutyl, isopropyl, cyclohexyl, tert-butyl, benzyl) are readily alkylated at ring N sites by alkyl halides forming N-alkyl phosphazenium cations. Alkylation of two ring N sites occurred after prolonged heating in the presence of methyl iodide or immediately at room temperature with methyl triflate yielding N,N'-dimethyl phosphazenium dications. Geminal dichloro derivatives Cl2(RNH)4P3N3 are methylated by methyl iodide at the ring N site adjacent to both P centers carrying four RNH groups. X-ray crystal structures showed that the alkylation of ring N sites leads to substantial elongation of the associated P-N bonds. Both N-alkyl and N,N'-dialkyl phosphazenium salts form complex supramolecular networks in the solid state via NH...X interactions. Systems carrying less-bulky RNH groups show additional NH...N bonds between N-alkyl phosphazenium ions. N-Alkyl phosphazenium halides form complexes with silver ions upon treatment with silver nitrate. Depending on the steric demand of RNH substituents, either one or both of the vacant ring N sites engage in coordination to silver ions. Treatment of (RNH)6P3N3 (R = isopropyl) with acetyl chloride and benzoyl chloride, respectively, yielded N-acyl phosphazenium ions. X-ray crystal structures revealed that elongation of P-N bonds adjacent to the acylated ring N site is more pronounced than it is in the case of N-alkylated species. Salts containing N-alkyl phosphazenium ions are stable toward water and other mild nucleophiles, while N,N'-dialkyl and N-acyl phosphazenium salts are readily hydrolyzed. The reaction of (RNH)6P3N3 with bromoacetic acid led to N-alkylation at one ring N site in addition to formation of an amide via condensation of an adjacent RNH substituent with the carboxylic acid group. The resulting bromide salt contains mono cations of composition (RNH)5P3N3CH2CONR in which a CH2-C(O) unit is embedded between a ring N and an exocyclic N site of the phosphazene. PMID

  12. Safety Assessment of Alkyl PEG Sulfosuccinates as Used in Cosmetics.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Wilbur; Heldreth, Bart; Bergfeld, Wilma F; Belsito, Donald V; Hill, Ronald A; Klaassen, Curtis D; Liebler, Daniel C; Marks, James G; Shank, Ronald C; Slaga, Thomas J; Snyder, Paul W; Andersen, F Alan

    2015-09-01

    The Cosmetic Ingredient Review (CIR) Expert Panel (Panel) reviewed the safety of alkyl polyethylene glycol (PEG) sulfosuccinates, which function in cosmetics mostly as surfactants/cleansing agents. Although these ingredients may cause ocular and skin irritation, dermal penetration is unlikely because of the substantial polarity and molecular size of these ingredients. The Panel considered the negative oral carcinogenicity and reproductive and developmental toxicity data on chemically related laureths (PEG lauryl ethers) and negative repeated dose toxicity and skin sensitization data on disodium laureth sulfosuccinate supported the safety of these alkyl PEG sulfosuccinates in cosmetic products, but. The CIR Expert Panel concluded that the alkyl PEG sulfosuccinates are safe in the present practices of use and concentration when formulated to be nonirritating. PMID:26362121

  13. Safety Assessment of Alkyl Ethylhexanoates as Used in Cosmetics.

    PubMed

    Fiume, Monice; Heldreth, Bart; Bergfeld, Wilma F; Belsito, Donald V; Hill, Ronald A; Klaassen, Curtis D; Liebler, Daniel C; Marks, James G; Shank, Ronald C; Slaga, Thomas J; Snyder, Paul W; Andersen, F Alan

    2015-01-01

    The Cosmetic Ingredient Review (CIR) Expert Panel (Panel) assessed the safety of 16 alkyl ethylhexanoates for use in cosmetics, concluding that these ingredients are safe in cosmetic formulations in the present practices of use and concentrations when formulated to be nonirritating. The alkyl ethylhexanoates primarily function as skin-conditioning agents in cosmetics. The highest concentration of use reported for any of the alkyl ethylhexanoates is 77.3% cetyl ethylhexanoate in rinse-off formulations used near the eye, and the highest leave-on use reported is 52% cetyl ethylhexanoate in lipstick formulations. The Panel reviewed available animal and clinical data related to these ingredients, and the similarities in structure, properties, functions, and uses of ingredients from previous CIR assessments on constituent alcohols that allowed for extrapolation of the available toxicological data to assess the safety of the entire group. PMID:26684798

  14. Extended Survival after Complete Pathological Response in Metastatic Pancreatic Ductal Adenocarcinoma Following Induction Chemotherapy, Chemoradiotherapy, and a Novel Immunotherapy Agent, IMM-101.

    PubMed

    Costa Neves, Mafalda; Giakoustidis, Alex; Stamp, Gordon; Gaya, Andy; Mudan, Satvinder

    2015-01-01

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) has an extremely poor prognosis. Median survival for metastatic patients is six to nine months and survivors beyond one year are exceptional. Pancreatic cancer is resistant to conventional chemotherapy and is often diagnosed at advanced stages. However, immunotherapy is a rapidly advancing new treatment modality, which shows promise in many solid tumor types.​ We present a patient with metastatic pancreatic cancer who underwent a synchronous resection of the primary tumour (pancreatoduodenectomy) and metastatic site (left hepatectomy) after multimodality neoadjuvant treatment with gemcitabine, nab-paclitaxel, and immunotherapy backbone with IMM-101 (an intradermally applied immunomodulator), as well as consolidation chemoradiation. Pathology of the specimens showed a complete response in both sites of the disease. The patient remains alive four years from the initial diagnosis and continues on maintenance immunotherapy. This exceptional response to initial chemo-immunotherapy was followed by a novel and off-protocol approach of low-dose capecitabine and IMM-101 as a maintenance strategy. The survival benefit and sustained performance status could set this as a new paradigm for the treatment of oligometastatic pancreatic cancer following response to systemic therapy and immunotherapy.​. PMID:26870619

  15. Single Agents with Designed Combination Chemotherapy Potential: Synthesis and Evaluation of Substituted Pyrimido[4,5-b]indoles as Receptor Tyrosine Kinase and Thymidylate Synthase Inhibitors and as Antitumor Agents

    PubMed Central

    Gangjee, Aleem; Zaware, Nilesh; Raghavan, Sudhir; Ihnat, Michael; Shenoy, Satyendra; Kisliuk, Roy L.

    2010-01-01

    Combinations of antiangiogenic agents (AAs) with cytotoxic agents have shown significant promise and several such clinical trials are currently underway. We have designed, synthesized and evaluated two compounds that each inhibit vascular endothelial growth factor receptor-2 (VEGFR-2) and platelet derived growth factor receptor-beta (PDGFR-β) for antiangiogenic effects and also inhibit human thymidylate synthase (hTS) for cytotoxic effects in single agents. The synthesis of these compounds involved the nucleophilic displacement of the common intermediate 5-chloro-9H-pyrimido[4,5-b]indole-2,4-diamine with appropriate benzenethiols. The inhibitory potency of both these single agents against VEGFR-2, PDGFR-β and hTS is better than or close to standards. In a COLO-205 xenograft mouse model one of the analogs significantly decreased tumor growth (TGI = 76% at 35 mg/kg), liver metastases and tumor blood vessels compared to a standard drug and to control and thus demonstrated potent tumor growth inhibition, inhibition of metastasis and antiangiogenic effects in vivo. These compounds afford combination chemotherapeutic potential in single agents. PMID:20092323

  16. Mild Catalytic methods for Alkyl-Alkyl Bond Formation

    SciTech Connect

    Vicic, David A

    2009-08-10

    Overview of Research Goals and Accomplishments for the Period 07/01/06 – 06/30/07: Our overall research goal is to transform the rapidly emerging synthetic chemistry involving alkyl-alkyl cross-couplings into more of a mechanism-based field so that that new, rationally-designed catalysts can be performed under energy efficient conditions. Our specific objectives for the previous year were 1) to obtain a proper electronic description of an active catalyst for alkyl-alkyl cross-coupling reactions and 2) to determine the effect of ligand structure on the rate, scope, selectivity, and functional group compatibility of C(sp3)-C(sp3) cross-coupling catalysis. We have completed both of these initial objectives and established a firm base for further studies. The specific significant achievements of the current grant period include: 1) we have performed magnetic and computational studies on (terpyridine)NiMe, an active catalyst for alkyl-alkyl cross couplings, and have discovered that the unpaired electron resides heavily on the terpyridine ligand and that the proper electronic description of this nickel complex is a Ni(II)-methyl cation bound to a reduced terpyridine ligand; 2) we have for the first time shown that alkyl halide reduction by terpyridyl nickel catalysts is substantially ligand based; 3) we have shown by isotopic labeling studies that the active catalyst (terpyridine)NiMe is not produced via a mechanism that involves the formation of methyl radicals when (TMEDA)NiMe2 is used as the catalyst precursor; 4) we have performed an extensive ligand survey for the alkyl-alkyl cross-coupling reactions and have found that electronic factors only moderately influence reactivity in the terpyridine-based catalysis and that the most dramatic effects arise from steric and solubility factors; 5) we have found that the use of bis(dialkylphosphino)methanes as ligands for nickel does not produce active catalysts for cross-coupling but rather leads to bridging hydride

  17. Regorafenib as a potential adjuvant chemotherapy agent in disseminated small colon cancer: Drug selection outcome of a novel screening system using nanoimprinting 3-dimensional culture with HCT116-RFP cells.

    PubMed

    Yoshii, Yukie; Furukawa, Takako; Aoyama, Hironori; Adachi, Naoya; Zhang, Ming-Rong; Wakizaka, Hidekatsu; Fujibayashi, Yasuhisa; Saga, Tsuneo

    2016-04-01

    Colon cancer is one of the leading causes of cancer death worldwide. Adjuvant chemotherapy following primary surgical treatment is suggested to be beneficial in eradicating invisible disseminated small tumors in colon cancer; however, an effective drug remains to be developed. Recently, we reported a novel drug screening system using a nanoimprinting 3-dimensional (3D) culture that creates multicellular spheroids, which simulate in vivo conditions and, thereby, predict effective drugs in vivo. This study aimed to perform drug selection using our recently developed 3D culture system in a human colon cancer HCT116 cell line stably expressing red fluorescent protein (HCT116-RFP), to determine the most effective agent in a selection of clinically used antitumor agents for colon cancer. In addition, we confirmed the efficacy of the selected drug regorafenib, in vivo using a mouse model of disseminated small tumors. HCT116-RFP cells were cultured using a nanoimprinting 3D culture and in vitro drug selection was performed with 8 clinically used drugs [bevacizumab, capecitabine, cetuximab, 5-fluorouracil (5-FU), irinotecan, oxaliplatin, panitumumab and regorafenib]. An in vivo study was performed in mice bearing HCT116-RFP intraperitoneally disseminated small tumors using 3'-[18F]-fluoro-3'-deoxythymidine-positron emission tomography and fluorescence microscopy imaging to evaluate the therapeutic effects. Regorafenib was determined to be the most effective drug in the 3D culture, and significantly inhibited tumor growth in vivo, compared to the untreated control and 5-FU-treated group. The drug 5-FU is commonly used in colon cancer treatment and was used as a reference. Our results demonstrate that regorafenib is a potentially efficacious adjuvant chemotherapeutic agent for the treatment of disseminated small colon cancer and, therefore, warrants further preclinical and clinical studies. PMID:26820693

  18. Lessons from the past: Long-term safety and survival outcomes of a prematurely terminated randomized controlled trial on prophylactic vs. hemoglobin-based administration of erythropoiesis-stimulating agents in patients with chemotherapy-induced anemia

    PubMed Central

    MOUNTZIOS, GIANNIS; ARAVANTINOS, GERASIMOS; ALEXOPOULOU, ZOI; TIMOTHEADOU, ELENI; MATSIAKOU, FOTINI; CHRISTODOULOU, CHRISTOS; LASCHOS, KONSTANTINOS; GALANI, ELENI; KOUTRAS, ANGELOS; BAFALOUKOS, DIMITRIOS; LINARDOU, HELENA; PECTASIDES, DIMITRIOS; VARTHALITIS, IOANNIS; PAPAKOSTAS, PAVLOS; KALOFONOS, HARALAMBOS P.; FOUNTZILAS, GEORGE

    2016-01-01

    Prophylactic erythropoiesis-stimulating agent (ESA) administration for chemotherapy-induced anemia (CIA) is not supported by current guidelines. Long-term follow-up of patients WHO had been treated with ESA for CIA in the past may provide useful information. In 2002, we undertook a prospective, randomized phase III trial of prophylactic vs. hemoglobin (Hb)-based (threshold: 11 mg/dl) ESA administration in patients with solid tumors and CIA. ESA administration FOR CIA was permanently suspended in 2007 in view of published data at that time, while patient surveillance continued. Among 630 evaluable patients, 38.6% were male, 50.9% had advanced cancer at diagnosis, 40.6% had Hb levels <12 mg/dl at baseline and 47.9% received ESA prophylactically (1:1 randomization). The major tumor types included colorectal (36.0%), breast (20.6%), non-prostate genitourinary (11.0%) and lung CANCER (8.4%). After a median follow-up of 85.4 months, 358 patients had relapsed and 380 had succumbed to the disease. Patients in the prophylactic ESA group (GROUP A; experimental arm), as compared with those in the Hb-based group (GROUP B; iron supplementation alone), exhibited A significantly more prominent increase in median Hb levels, particularly in the subset of patients with non-metastatic disease (two-sided P<0.01) among patients receiving chemotherapy for advanced cancer, those who received ESAs prophylactically exhibited a lower incidence of CIA (all grades: P=0.014, grades 3–4: P=0.034) and fatigue (all grades: P<0.001, grades 3–4: P=0.055), but a higher rate of a composite outcome encompassing all thrombosis-related events (all grades: P=0.043, grades 3–4: P=0.099). These differences were less prominent in the group of patients who received adjuvant treatment. There were no significant differences in overall mortality and relapse/progression rates between the two groups. therefore, prophylactic, compared with Hb-based, administration of ESAs for CIA in patients with solid

  19. Chemotherapy for Thyroid Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... cancer Next Topic Targeted therapy for thyroid cancer Chemotherapy for thyroid cancer Chemotherapy (chemo) uses anti-cancer drugs that are injected ... vein or muscle, or are taken by mouth. Chemotherapy is systemic therapy, which means that the drug ...

  20. Types of chemotherapy

    MedlinePlus

    Chemotherapy is the use of medicine to treat cancer. Chemotherapy kills cancer cells. It may be used to ... people are treated with a single type of chemotherapy. But often, people get more than one type ...

  1. Activation of the Nrf2/ARE pathway via S-alkylation of cysteine 151 in the chemopreventive agent-sensor Keap1 protein by falcarindiol, a conjugated diacetylene compound

    SciTech Connect

    Ohnuma, Tomokazu; Nakayama, Shinji; Anan, Eisaburo; Nishiyama, Takahito; Ogura, Kenichiro; Hiratsuka, Akira

    2010-04-01

    Under basal conditions, the interaction of the cytosolic protein Kelch-like ECH-associated protein 1 (Keap1) with the transcription factor nuclear factor-E2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) results in a low level of expression of cytoprotective genes whose promoter region contains the antioxidant response element (ARE). In response to oxidants and electrophiles, Nrf2 is stabilized and accumulates in the nucleus. The mechanism for this effect has been proposed to involve thiol-dependent modulation of Keap1, leading to loss of its ability to negatively regulate Nrf2. We previously reported that falcarindiol (heptadeca-1,9(Z)-diene-4,6-diyne-3,8-diol), which occurs in Apiaceae and the closely related Araliaceae plants, causes nuclear accumulation of Nrf2 and induces ARE-regulated enzymes. Here, we report the mechanism of Nrf2 induction by falcarindiol. NMR analysis revealed that the conjugated diacetylene carbons of falcarindiol acted as electrophilic moieties to form adducts with a cysteine (Cys) thiol. In addition, using matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry and circular dichroism spectroscopy, it was demonstrated that falcarindiol alkylated Cys residues in Keap1 and altered the Keap1 secondary structure. Transfection studies using the purified Keap1 protein, a luciferase reporter construct, and an Nrf2-expressing plasmid indicated that the intact Keap1 protein suppressed Nrf2-mediated ARE-luciferase activity. On the other hand, the falcarindiol-alkylated Keap1 protein did not suppress such activity. Treatment of HEK293 cells overexpressing Keap1 with falcarindiol generated a high molecular weight (HMW) form of Keap1. Furthermore, the Cys151 residue in Keap1 was found to be uniquely required for not only the formation of HMW Keap1 but also an increase in ARE-luciferase activity by falcarindiol. Our results demonstrate that falcarindiol having conjugated diacetylene carbons covalently modifies the Cys151 residue in Keap1 and that the

  2. Manganese-Mediated C-H Alkylation of Unbiased Arenes Using Alkylboronic Acids.

    PubMed

    Castro, Susana; Fernández, Juan J; Fañanás, Francisco J; Vicente, Rubén; Rodríguez, Félix

    2016-06-27

    The alkylation of arenes is an essential synthetic step of interest not only from the academic point of view but also in the bulk chemical industry. Despite its limitations, the Friedel-Crafts reaction is still the method of choice for most of the arene alkylation processes. Thus, the development of new strategies to synthesize alkyl arenes is a highly desirable goal, and herein, we present an alternative method to those conventional reactions. Particularly, a simple protocol for the direct C-H alkylation of unbiased arenes with alkylboronic acids in the presence of Mn(OAc)3 ⋅2H2 O is reported. Primary or secondary unactivated alkylboronic acids served as alkylating agents for the direct functionalization of representative polyaromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) or benzene. The results are consistent with a free-radical mechanism. PMID:27124250

  3. Alkylation of toluene with ethanol

    SciTech Connect

    Walendziewski, J.; Trawczynski, J.

    1996-10-01

    A series of Y and ZSM-5 zeolite based catalysts was prepared. Zeolites were cation exchanged and formed with 50% of aluminum hydroxide as a binder, and the obtained catalysts were finally thermally treated. Activity tests in alkylation of toluene with ethanol were carried out in the temperature range of 325--400 C, in nitrogen or hydrogen stream, and a pressure up to 3 MPa. The feed consisted of toluene and ethanol mixed in a mole ratio 1/1 or 2/1. The obtained results showed that among the studied catalysts the highest activity in the alkylation reaction was attained by ZSM-5 zeolite based catalyst with a moderate acidity and medium silica to alumina ratio, i.e., {approximately}50. Activity and selectivity of the most active catalyst as well as conversion of the feed components were similar to those reported in other papers. The content of p-ethyltoluene in alkylation products attained ca. 60%.

  4. A biological source of oceanic alkyl nitrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dahl, E. E.; Lewis, C. B.; Velasco, F. L.; Escobar, C.; Kellogg, D.; Velcamp, M.

    2013-12-01

    Alkyl nitrates are an important component of reactive nitrogen in the troposphere. The oceans are a source of alkyl nitrates to the atmosphere, however the source of alkyl nitrates in the oceans is unknown. It has been demonstrated that the reaction of alkyl peroxy radicals (ROO) with nitric oxide (NO) produces alkyl nitrates in the aqueous phase. We hypothesize that alkyl nitrates may be formed by organisms through the same reaction and therefore biological production could be a source of alkyl nitrates to the troposphere. This work focuses on the production of alkyl nitrates by the diatoms Chaetoceros muelleri and Thalassiosira weisfloggi. Using chemostats, we measure alkyl nitrates formed under nitrate limited conditions. We also use triggers and inhibitors of nitric oxide formation to determine if alkyl nitrate formation is affected by changes in NO production. To date, the rates of production of alkyl nitrates in our cultures, lead us to estimate a production rate on the order of femtomolar/day for C1-C3 alkyl nitrates by diatom species in the equatorial Pacific Ocean. This suggests that diatoms may contribute to the overall ocean source of alkyl nitrates; however, it is possible that other types of phytoplankton, such as cyanobacteria, that are more abundant in the open ocean, may contribute to a greater extent.

  5. Lamellar crystalline self-assembly behaviour and solid lipid nanoparticles of a palmityl prodrug analogue of Capecitabine—A chemotherapy agent

    SciTech Connect

    Gong, Xiaojuan; Moghaddam, Minoo J.; Sagnella, Sharon M.; Conn, Charlotte E.; Danon, Stephen J.; Waddington, Lynne J.; Drummond, Calum J.

    2014-09-24

    An amphiphile prodrug, 5'-deoxy-5-fluoro-N4-(palmityloxycarbonyl) cytidine or 5'-deoxy-5-fluoro-N4-(hexadecanaloxycarbonyl) cytidine (5-FCPal), consisting of the same head group as the commercially available chemotherapeutic agent Capecitabine, linked to a palmityl hydrocarbon chain via a carbamate bond is reported. Thermal analysis of this prodrug indicates that it melts at ~115 °C followed quickly by degradation beginning at ~120 °C. The neat solid 5-FCPal amphiphile acquires a lamellar crystalline arrangement with a d-spacing of 28.6 ± 0.3 Å, indicating interdigitation of the hydrocarbon chains. Under aqueous conditions, solid 5-FCPal is non-swelling and no lyotropic liquid crystalline phase formation is observed. In order to assess the in vitro toxicity and in vivo efficacy in colloidal form, solid lipid nanoparticles (SLNs) with an average size of ~700 nm were produced via high pressure homogenization. The in vitro toxicity of the 5-FCPal SLNs against several different cancer and normal cell types was assessed over a 48 h period, and IC50 values were comparable to those observed for Capecitabine. The in vivo efficacy of the 5-FCPal SLNs was then assessed against the highly aggressive mouse 4T1 breast cancer model. To do so, the prodrug SLNs were administered orally at 3 different dosages (0.1, 0.25, 0.5 mmol/mouse/day) and compared to Capecitabine delivered at the same dosages. After 21 days of receiving the treatments, the 0.5 mmol dose of 5-FCPal exhibited the smallest average tumour volume. Since 5-FCPal is activated in a similar manner to Capecitabine via a 3 step enzymatic pathway with the final step occurring preferentially at the tumour site, formulation of the prodrug into SLNs combines the advantage of selective, localized activation with the sustained release properties of nanostructured amphiphile self-assembly and multiple payload materials thereby potentially creating a more effective anticancer agent.

  6. Myeloid neoplasms after chemotherapy and PRRT: myth and reality.

    PubMed

    Bodei, Lisa; Modlin, Irvin M; Luster, Markus; Forrer, Flavio; Cremonesi, Marta; Hicks, Rodney J; Ezziddin, Samer; Kidd, Mark; Chiti, Arturo

    2016-08-01

    Peptide receptor radionuclide therapy (PRRT) with (90)Y-octreotide or (177)Lu-octreotate is an effective treatment for inoperable or metastatic neuroendocrine tumors (NETs), particularly well-differentiated gastroenteropancreatic or bronchopulmonary NETs. PRRT is generally extremely well tolerated, with modest toxicity to target organs, kidney and bone marrow. Nevertheless, a priori concerns regarding long-term effects lead clinicians such as Brieau and coworkers, in this ERC issue, to ascribe to the combination of alkylating agents and PRRT the apparently high occurrence (n=4) of myeloproliferative events (therapy-related myeloid neoplasms (t-MNs)) in a small cohort of 20 progressive, advanced digestive NETs treated with PRRT after chemotherapy. Anecdotal reports of myelotoxic events should be placed in the correct perspective of larger series, where the reported incidence of these events is ~2%, with the aim of promoting a balanced awareness of the issue and unbiased and reasonable overall conclusions. For a comprehensive definition of the issue, we provide an evaluation of the occurrence of t-MN in patients treated with various myelotoxic treatments. PMID:27353035

  7. Pd and Mo Catalyzed Asymmetric Allylic Alkylation

    PubMed Central

    Trost, Barry M.

    2012-01-01

    The ability to control the alkylation of organic substrates becomes ever more powerful by using metal catalysts. Among the major benefits of metal catalysis is the possibility to perform such processes asymmetrically using only catalytic amounts of the chiral inducing agent which is a ligand to the metal of the catalyst. A unique aspect of asymmetric metal catalyzed processes is the fact that many mechanisms exist for stereoinduction. Furthermore, using the same catalyst system, many types of bonds including but not limited to C-C, C-N, C-O, C-S, C-P, and C-H can be formed asymmetrically. An overview of this process using palladium and molybdenum based metals being developed in my laboratories and how they influence strategy in synthesizing bioactive molecular targets is presented. PMID:22736934

  8. Phosphine-alkene ligand-mediated alkyl-alkyl and alkyl-halide elimination processes from palladium(II).

    PubMed

    Tuxworth, Luke; Baiget, Lise; Phanopoulos, Andreas; Metters, Owen J; Batsanov, Andrei S; Fox, Mark A; Howard, Judith A K; Dyer, Philip W

    2012-10-28

    N-Diphenylphosphino-7-aza-benzobicyclo[2.2.1]hept-2-ene (2) behaves as a chelating phosphine-alkene ligand for Pd(0) and Pd(II), promoting direct alkyl-alkyl and indirect alkyl-halide reductive elimination reactions due to the stabilisation of the resulting bis(phosphine-alkene)Pd(0) complex. PMID:22986447

  9. New potential of the reductive alkylation of amines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gusak, K. N.; Ignatovich, Zh V.; Koroleva, E. V.

    2015-03-01

    Available data on the reductive alkylation of amines with carbonyl compounds — a key method for the preparation of secondary and tertiary amines — are described systematically. The review provides information on the relevant reducing agents and catalysts and on the use of chiral catalysts in stereo- and enantiocontrolled reactions of amine synthesis. The effect of the reactant and catalyst structures on the reaction rates and chemo- and stereo(enantio)selectivity is considered. The bibliography includes 156 references.

  10. Improving Systemic Chemotherapy for Bladder Cancer.

    PubMed

    Rose, Tracy L; Milowsky, Matthew I

    2016-05-01

    Systemic chemotherapy is integral to the management of muscle-invasive and metastatic bladder cancer (BCa). Neoadjuvant chemotherapy has been increasingly utilized for muscle-invasive BCa over the past several years, and several options for cisplatin-based regimens have emerged. Adjuvant chemotherapy may be considered for select patients who did not receive neoadjuvant therapy. Systemic chemotherapy added to radiotherapy is a critical component of a bladder-preserving approach and superior to radiotherapy alone. Cisplatin-based chemotherapy has been the mainstay for metastatic BCa for more than three decades. Novel targeted agents are in development fueled by the recent molecular characterization of BCa. Recent trials of immunotherapy have demonstrated the possibility of a less toxic and potentially more effective treatment for metastatic disease. It is an extremely exciting time for BCa research, and much needed improvements in systemic treatment are most certainly on the horizon. PMID:26984414

  11. Dichloroacetate should be considered with platinum-based chemotherapy in hypoxic tumors rather than as a single agent in advanced non-small cell lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Garon, Edward B.; Christofk, Heather R.; Hosmer, Wylie; Britten, Carolyn D; Bahng, Agnes; Crabtree, Matthew J; Hong, Candice Sun; Kamranpour, Naeimeh; Pitts, Sharon; Kabbinavar, Fairooz; Patel, Cecil; von Euw, Erika; Black, Alexander; Michelakis, Evangelos D.; Dubinett, Steven M.; Slamon, Dennis J.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Dichloroacetate (DCA) is a highly bioavailable small molecule that inhibits pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase, promoting glucose oxidation and reversing the glycolytic phenotype in preclinical cancer studies. We designed this open label phase II trial to determine the response rate, safety, and tolerability of oral DCA in patients with metastatic breast cancer and advanced stage NSCLC. Materials and Methods This trial was conducted with DCA 6.25 mg/kg orally twice daily in previously treated stage IIIB/IV non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) or stage IV breast cancer. Growth inhibition by DCA was also evaluated in a panel of 54 NSCLC cell lines with and without cytotoxic chemotherapeutics (cisplatin and docetaxel) in normoxic and hypoxic conditions. Results and Conclusions Under normoxic conditions in vitro, single agent IC50 was > 2 mM for all evaluated cell lines. Synergy with cisplatin was seen in some cell lines under hypoxic conditions. In the clinical trial, after seven patients were enrolled, the study was closed based on safety concerns. The only breast cancer patient had stable disease after 8 weeks, quickly followed by progression in the brain. Two patients withdrew consent within a week of enrollment. Two patients had disease progression prior to the first scheduled scans. Within one week of initiating DCA, one patient died suddenly of unknown cause, and one experienced a fatal pulmonary embolism. We conclude that patients with previously treated advanced NSCLC did not benefit from oral DCA. In the absence of a larger controlled trial, firm conclusions regarding the association between these adverse events and DCA are unclear. Further development of DCA should be in patients with longer life expectancy, in whom sustained therapeutic levels can be achieved, and potentially in combination with cisplatin. PMID:24442098

  12. Efficacy of Combination Chemotherapy Using a Novel Oral Chemotherapeutic Agent, TAS-102, with Oxaliplatin on Human Colorectal and Gastric Cancer Xenografts.

    PubMed

    Nukatsuka, Mamoru; Nakagawa, Fumio; Takechi, Teiji

    2015-09-01

    TAS-102 is a novel oral nucleoside antitumor agent consisting of trifluridine (FTD) and the thymidine phosphorylase inhibitor tipiracil hydrochloride (at a molar ratio of 1:0.5) that was approved in Japan in 2014 for the treatment of unresectable advanced or recurrent colorectal cancer. In the present study, the enhancement of therapeutic efficacy using a combination of TAS-102 and oxaliplatin was evaluated in a xenograft-bearing nude mouse model of colorectal and gastric cancer. TAS-102 was orally administered twice-a-day from day 1 to 14, and oxaliplatin was administered intravenously on days 1 and 8. The in vivo growth-inhibitory activity was evaluated based on the tumor volume and the growth-delay period, was estimated based on the period required to reach a tumor volume five-times greater than the initial volume (RTV5). The tumor growth-inhibitory activity and RTV5 in mice administered TAS-102 with oxaliplatin were significantly superior to those associated with either monotherapy in mice with colorectal (HCT 116, SW-48; p<0.001) and gastric cancer (SC-2, MKN74; p<0.001). MKN74/5FU, a 5-fluorouracil-resistant MKN74 sub-line, was sensitive to both FTD and oxaliplatin in vitro. In vivo, TAS-102 alone was effective in MKN74/5FU, and its anti-tumor activity was significantly enhanced in combination with oxaliplatin (p<0.001). No significant decrease in body weight or toxicity was observed compared to either monotherapy. The present pre-clinical findings indicate that combination of TAS-102 and oxaliplatin is a promising treatment option for colorectal or gastric cancer, and can be utilized in both chemo-naïve tumors and recurrent tumors after 5-fluorouracil treatment. PMID:26254349

  13. Structure-function relationships governing activity and stability of a DNA alkylation damage repair thermostable protein.

    PubMed

    Perugino, Giuseppe; Miggiano, Riccardo; Serpe, Mario; Vettone, Antonella; Valenti, Anna; Lahiri, Samarpita; Rossi, Franca; Rossi, Mosè; Rizzi, Menico; Ciaramella, Maria

    2015-10-15

    Alkylated DNA-protein alkyltransferases repair alkylated DNA bases, which are among the most common DNA lesions, and are evolutionary conserved, from prokaryotes to higher eukaryotes. The human ortholog, hAGT, is involved in resistance to alkylating chemotherapy drugs. We report here on the alkylated DNA-protein alkyltransferase, SsOGT, from an archaeal species living at high temperature, a condition that enhances the harmful effect of DNA alkylation. The exceptionally high stability of SsOGT gave us the unique opportunity to perform structural and biochemical analysis of a protein of this class in its post-reaction form. This analysis, along with those performed on SsOGT in its ligand-free and DNA-bound forms, provides insights in the structure-function relationships of the protein before, during and after DNA repair, suggesting a molecular basis for DNA recognition, catalytic activity and protein post-reaction fate, and giving hints on the mechanism of alkylation-induced inactivation of this class of proteins. PMID:26227971

  14. Structure-function relationships governing activity and stability of a DNA alkylation damage repair thermostable protein

    PubMed Central

    Perugino, Giuseppe; Miggiano, Riccardo; Serpe, Mario; Vettone, Antonella; Valenti, Anna; Lahiri, Samarpita; Rossi, Franca; Rossi, Mosè; Rizzi, Menico; Ciaramella, Maria

    2015-01-01

    Alkylated DNA-protein alkyltransferases repair alkylated DNA bases, which are among the most common DNA lesions, and are evolutionary conserved, from prokaryotes to higher eukaryotes. The human ortholog, hAGT, is involved in resistance to alkylating chemotherapy drugs. We report here on the alkylated DNA-protein alkyltransferase, SsOGT, from an archaeal species living at high temperature, a condition that enhances the harmful effect of DNA alkylation. The exceptionally high stability of SsOGT gave us the unique opportunity to perform structural and biochemical analysis of a protein of this class in its post-reaction form. This analysis, along with those performed on SsOGT in its ligand-free and DNA-bound forms, provides insights in the structure-function relationships of the protein before, during and after DNA repair, suggesting a molecular basis for DNA recognition, catalytic activity and protein post-reaction fate, and giving hints on the mechanism of alkylation-induced inactivation of this class of proteins. PMID:26227971

  15. [Prostate cancer and chemotherapy].

    PubMed

    Gravis, Gwenaelle; Salem, Naji; Bladou, Franck; Viens, Patrice

    2007-07-01

    Androgen deprivation in patients with metastatic prostate cancer produces palliation of symptoms, PSA decrease and tumoral regression in most patients. After a brief period of disease regression lasting 18 to 24 months nearly all pts will progress to androgen independence disease (HRPC) with progressive clinical deterioration and ultimately death. Chemotherapy with mitoxantrone has been shown to palliate symptoms but did not extend survival. Two large randomized trials showed a survival benefit for pts with HRPC treated with docetaxel with a reduction risk of death by 21-24%, and significant improvement in palliation of symptoms and quality of life. New agents targeting angiogenesis, apoptosis, signal transduction pathway, used alone or in combination with docetaxel currently are under trial in an attempt to provide much needed improvements in outcome. Questions remains in suspend when and who need to be treated, earlier, in high risk as in adjuvant setting? Current data have demonstrated that neoadjuvant or adjuvant chemotherapy is relatively safe and feasible. Further investigation through prospective randomize trials is critical to define the precise role of this modality in high risk populations. PMID:17845990

  16. 40 CFR 721.9892 - Alkylated urea.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Alkylated urea. 721.9892 Section 721... Alkylated urea. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as an alkylated urea (PMN P-93-1649) is subject to reporting under...

  17. 40 CFR 721.9892 - Alkylated urea.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Alkylated urea. 721.9892 Section 721... Alkylated urea. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as an alkylated urea (PMN P-93-1649) is subject to reporting under...

  18. 40 CFR 721.9892 - Alkylated urea.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Alkylated urea. 721.9892 Section 721... Alkylated urea. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as an alkylated urea (PMN P-93-1649) is subject to reporting under...

  19. 40 CFR 721.9892 - Alkylated urea.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Alkylated urea. 721.9892 Section 721... Alkylated urea. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as an alkylated urea (PMN P-93-1649) is subject to reporting under...

  20. 40 CFR 721.9892 - Alkylated urea.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Alkylated urea. 721.9892 Section 721... Alkylated urea. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as an alkylated urea (PMN P-93-1649) is subject to reporting under...

  1. Hydrogen Peroxide Inducible DNA Cross-Linking Agents: Targeted Anticancer Prodrugs

    PubMed Central

    Kuang, Yunyan; Balakrishnan, Kumudha; Gandhi, Varsha; Peng, Xiaohua

    2011-01-01

    The major concern for anticancer chemotherapeutic agents is the host toxicity. The development of anti-cancer prodrugs targeting the unique biochemical alterations in cancer cells is an attractive approach to achieve therapeutic activity and selectivity. We designed and synthesized a new type of nitrogen mustard prodrug that can be activated by high level of reactive oxygen species (ROS) found in cancer cells to release the active chemotherapy agent. The activation mechanism was determined by NMR analysis. The activity and selectivity of these prodrugs towards ROS was determined by measuring DNA interstrand crosslinks and/or DNA alkylations. These compounds showed 60–90% inhibition toward various cancer cells, while normal lymphocytes were not affected. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first example of H2O2-activated anticancer prodrugs. PMID:22035519

  2. Oil compositions containing alkyl amine or alkyl mercaptan derivatives of copolymers of an alpha olefin or an alkyl vinyl ether

    SciTech Connect

    Le, H.T.

    1990-02-13

    This patent describes an oil composition. It comprises a major amount of an oil selected from a crude oil or fuel oil and a minor amount of an alkyl amine or alkyl mercaptan derivative of an alpha olefin or alkyl vinyl ether and an unsaturated alpha, beta-dicarboxylic compound copolymer having pour point depressant ;properties. The copolymer comprising the reaction product of an alpha olefin having from about 2 to about 30 carbon atoms or mixtures of alpha olefins having from about 2 to about 30 carbon atoms or an alkyl vinyl ether or mixture of alkyl vinyl ethers.

  3. Hyperthermic intraperitoneal chemotherapy: Rationale and technique

    PubMed Central

    González-Moreno, Santiago; González-Bayón, Luis A; Ortega-Pérez, Gloria

    2010-01-01

    The combination of complete cytoreductive surgery and perioperative intraperitoneal chemotherapy provides the only chance for long-term survival for selected patients diagnosed with a variety of peritoneal neoplasms, either primary or secondary to digestive or gynecologic malignancy. Hyperthermic intraperitoneal chemotherapy (HIPEC) delivered in the operating room once the cytoreductive surgical procedure is finalized, constitutes the most common form of administration of perioperative intraperitoneal chemotherapy. This may be complemented in some instances with early postoperative intraperitoneal chemotherapy (EPIC). HIPEC combines the pharmacokinetic advantage inherent to the intracavitary delivery of certain cytotoxic drugs, which results in regional dose intensification, with the direct cytotoxic effect of hyperthermia. Hyperthermia exhibits a selective cell-killing effect in malignant cells by itself, potentiates the cytotoxic effect of certain chemotherapy agents and enhances the tissue penetration of the administered drug. The chemotherapeutic agents employed in HIPEC need to have a cell cycle nonspecific mechanism of action and should ideally show a heat-synergistic cytotoxic effect. Delivery of HIPEC requires an apparatus that heats and circulates the chemotherapeutic solution so that a stable temperature is maintained in the peritoneal cavity during the procedure. An open abdomen (Coliseum) or closed abdomen technique may be used, with no significant differences in efficacy proven to date. Specific technical training and a solid knowledge of regional chemotherapy management are required. Concerns about safety of the procedure for operating room personnel are expected but are manageable if universal precautions and standard chemotherapy handling procedures are used. Different HIPEC drug regimens and dosages are currently in use. A tendency for concurrent intravenous chemotherapy administration (bidirectional chemotherapy, so-called “HIPEC plus”) has

  4. Management of Chemotherapy Induced Nausea and Vomiting in Patients on Multiday Cisplatin Based Combination Chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Ranganath, Praveen; Einhorn, Lawrence; Albany, Costantine

    2015-01-01

    Introduction of cisplatin based chemotherapy has revolutionized the treatment of germ cell tumors. A common side effect of multiday cisplatin chemotherapy is severe nausea and vomiting. Considerable progress has been made in the control of these side effects since the introduction of cisplatin based chemotherapy in the 1970s. Germ cell tumor which is a model for a curable neoplasm has also turned into an excellent testing ground to develop effective strategies to prevent chemotherapy induced nausea and vomiting (CINV) in multiday cisplatin based regimens. The use of combination of a 5-hydroxytryptamine (HT)3 receptor antagonist, a neurokinin-1 (NK1) antagonist, and dexamethasone has greatly improved our ability to prevent and control acute and delayed CINV. Mechanism and pattern of CINV with multiday chemotherapy may differ from those in single day chemotherapy and therefore efficacy of antiemetic drugs as observed in single day chemotherapy may not be applicable. There are only few randomized clinical trials with special emphasis on multiday chemotherapy. Further studies are essential to determine the efficacy, optimal dose, and duration of the newer agents and combinations in multiday cisplatin based chemotherapy. PMID:26425563

  5. Methods of making alkyl esters

    DOEpatents

    Elliott, Brian

    2010-08-03

    A method comprising contacting an alcohol, a feed comprising one or more glycerides and equal to or greater than 2 wt % of one or more free fatty acids, and a solid acid catalyst, a nanostructured polymer catalyst, or a sulfated zirconia catalyst in one or more reactors, and recovering from the one or more reactors an effluent comprising equal to or greater than about 75 wt % alkyl ester and equal to or less than about 5 wt % glyceride.

  6. Escalating costs for cancer chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Nyman, J V; Dorr, R T; Hall, G R

    1981-08-01

    The annual costs of chemotherapeutic agents from 1975 to 1980 were determined, and the impact on a hospital's budget of new chemotherapeutic agents marketed during this period was evaluated. Pharmacy purchasing records for the antineoplastics were reviewed retrospectively to determine fiscal year (FY) costs. Statistics from the Consumer Price Index report and hospital patient load were used to project an adjusted annual cost for cancer chemotherapy. The annual expenditures for seven agents marketed in the past five years were expressed as a percentage of the pharmacy's budget. In addition, the oncology clinic records for the past four years were reviewed to assess trends in the number of visits and quantity of drugs prescribed. Analysis indicated that the costs of antineoplastic drugs have risen from $10,156 for FY 1973-1974 to $296,914 for FY 1979-1980. Antineoplastic drug costs have risen from 5.74 to 16.74% of the total drug budget during the same period. Only a portion of the increase in costs could be attributed to increased patient load and inflation. The percentage of patients receiving chemotherapy has reached a plateau, and the quantity of agents being prescribed was not found to be increasing. It was concluded that the rise in cost tends to follow the recent commercial availability of several new antineoplastics, especially doxorubicin. Cancer drug costs will continue to represent a large portion of the total hospital budget in the future and budgets must be planned accordingly. PMID:7270558

  7. PREPARATION OF ALKYL PYROPHOSPHATE EXTRACTANTS

    DOEpatents

    Levine, C.A.; Skiens, W.E.; Moore, G.R.

    1960-08-01

    A process for providing superior solvent extractants for metal recovery processes is given wherein the extractant comprises an alkyl pyrophosphoric acid ester dissolved in an organic solvent diluent. Finely divided solid P/sub 2/O/ sub 5/ is slurried in an organic solvent-diluent selected from organic solvents such as kerosene, benzene, chlorobenzene, toluene, etc. An alcohol selected from the higher alcohols having 4 to 17 carbon atoms. e.g.. hexanol-1. heptanol-3, octanol-1. 2.6-dimethyl-heptanol-4, and decanol-1, is rapidly added to the P/sub 2/O/sub 5/ slurry in the amount of about 2 moles of alcohol to 1 mole of P/sub 2/ O/sub 5/. The temperature is maintained below about 110 deg C during the course of the P/sub 2/O/sub 5/-alcohol reaction. An alkyl pyrophosphate extractant compound is formed as a consequence of the reaction process. The alkyl pyrophosphate solvent-diluent extractant phase is useful in solvent extraction metal recovery processes.

  8. Safety Assessment of Alkyl Esters as Used in Cosmetics.

    PubMed

    Fiume, Monice M; Heldreth, Bart A; Bergfeld, Wilma F; Belsito, Donald V; Hill, Ronald A; Klaassen, Curtis D; Liebler, Daniel C; Marks, James G; Shank, Ronald C; Slaga, Thomas J; Snyder, Paul W; Andersen, F Alan

    2015-09-01

    The Cosmetic Ingredient Review Expert Panel (Panel) assessed the safety of 237 alkyl esters for use in cosmetics. The alkyl esters included in this assessment have a variety of reported functions in cosmetics, with skin-conditioning agent being the most common function. The Panel reviewed available animal and clinical data in making its determination of safety on these ingredients, and where there were data gaps, similarity in structure, properties, functions, and uses of these ingredients allowed for extrapolation of the available toxicological data to assess the safety of the entire group. The Panel concluded that these ingredients are safe in cosmetic formulations in the present practices of use and concentration when formulated to be nonirritating. PMID:26362120

  9. O6-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase as a prognostic and predictive marker for basal-like breast cancer treated with cyclophosphamide-based chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    ISONO, SAYURI; FUJISHIMA, MAKOTO; AZUMI, TATSUYA; HASHIMOTO, YUKIHIKO; KOMOIKE, YOSHIFUMI; YUKAWA, MASAO; WATATANI, MASAHIRO

    2014-01-01

    The O6-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase (MGMT) protein protects cells from alkylating agents by removing alkyl groups from the O6-position of guanine. However, its effect on DNA damage induced by cyclophosphamide (CPM) is unclear. The present study investigated whether MGMT expression was correlated with prognosis in patients with breast cancer that was managed according to a common therapeutic protocol or treated with CPM-based chemotherapy. The intrinsic subtypes and MGMT protein expression levels were assessed in 635 consecutive patients with breast cancer using immunohistochemistry. In total, 425 (67%) luminal A, 95 (15%) luminal B, 47 (7%) human epidermal growth factor receptor-2+/estrogen receptor− (HER2+/ER−) and 48 (8%) basal-like subtypes were identified. Of these, MGMT positivity was identified in 398 (63%) of 635 breast cancers; 68% of luminal A, 67% of luminal B, 30% of HER2+/ER− and 46% of basal-like subtypes were positive. The overall survival (OS) and disease-free survival (DFS) rates did not significantly differ according to the MGMT status among patients with luminal A, luminal B or HER2+/ER− subtypes, and patients with MGMT-negative basal-like cancers tended to have a longer DFS, but not a significantly longer OS time. CPM-containing chemotherapy was administered to 26%, 40%, 47% and 31% of patients with luminal A, luminal B, HER2+/ER− and basal-like tumors, respectively. Although the MGMT status and clinical outcomes of patients with the luminal A, luminal B or HER2+/ER− subtypes treated with CPM were not significantly correlated, the patients with MGMT-negative basal-like tumors who received CPM exhibited significantly improved DFS and OS compared with the CPM-treated patients with MGMT-positive tumors. MGMT may be a useful prognostic and predictive marker for CPM-containing chemotherapy in basal-like breast cancer. PMID:24932232

  10. Combining Chemotherapy with Bevacizumab Improves Outcomes for Ovarian Cancer Patients

    Cancer.gov

    Results from two phase III randomized clinical trials suggest that, at least for some patients with ovarian cancer, adding the antiangiogenesis agent bevacizumab to chemotherapy increases the time to disease progression and may improve survival.

  11. Prognostic relevance of the mitotic count and the amount of viable tumour after neoadjuvant chemotherapy for primary, localised, high-grade soft tissue sarcoma

    PubMed Central

    Andreou, D; Werner, M; Pink, D; Traub, F; Schuler, M; Gosheger, G; Jobke, B; Reichardt, P; Tunn, P U

    2015-01-01

    Background: We sought to examine whether mitotic count (MC) and the amount of viable tumour (VT) following neoadjuvant systemic chemotherapy (SC) for primary, localised, high-grade soft tissue sarcoma (STS) correlate with prognosis. Methods: Retrospective analysis of 57 patients who underwent SC involving a combination of an anthracycline and an alkylating agent, followed by surgical resection between 2001 and 2011. Results: The amount of VT after chemotherapy was significantly associated with disease-specific survival (DSS) and event-free survival (EFS). Patients with <10% VT had a DSS of 94% at 5 years, compared with 61% for patients with ⩾10% VT (P=0.033); EFS was 75%, compared with 48% (P=0.030). Patients with an MC of ⩾20/10 high power fields (HPF) after chemotherapy had a significantly lower DSS (33% vs 84% at 5 years, P<0.001) and EFS (40% vs 63% at 5 years, P=0.019) than patients with an MC of <20/10 HPF. Conclusions: The MC and the amount of VT after neoadjuvant therapy for primary, localised, high-grade STS appear to correlate with prognosis. If these results are validated prospectively, then they could provide a rational for the design of neoadjuvant treatment modification/escalation studies, analogue to the EURAMOS-1 trial for bone sarcomas. PMID:25535732

  12. Chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Fehrenbacher, Jill C

    2015-01-01

    Chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy (CIPN) is common in patients receiving anticancer treatment and can affect survivability and long-term quality of life of the patient following treatment. The symptoms of CIPN primarily include abnormal sensory discrimination of touch, vibration, thermal information, and pain. There is currently a paucity of pharmacological agents to prevent or treat CIPN. The lack of efficacious therapeutics is due, at least in part, to an incomplete understanding of the mechanisms by which chemotherapies alter the sensitivity of sensory neurons. Although the clinical presentation of CIPN can be similar with the various classes of chemotherapeutic agents, there are subtle differences, suggesting that each class of drugs might induce neuropathy via different mechanisms. Multiple mechanisms have been proposed to underlie the development and maintenance of neuropathy; however, most pharmacological agents generated from preclinical experiments have failed to alleviate the symptoms of CIPN in the clinic. Further research is necessary to identify the specific mechanisms by which each class of chemotherapeutics induces neuropathy. PMID:25744683

  13. Pharmacogenetics of alkylator-associated acute myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Knoche, Eric; McLeod, Howard L; Graubert, Timothy A

    2006-07-01

    Therapy-related acute myeloid leukemia (t-AML) is a lethal late complication of alkylator chemotherapy. The genetic basis of susceptibility to t-AML is poorly understood. Both t-AML and de novo AML are complex genetic diseases, requiring cooperating mutations in interacting pathways for disease initiation and progression. Germline variants of these 'leukemia pathway' genes may cooperate with somatic mutations to induce both de novo and therapy-related AML. Several cancer susceptibility syndromes have been identified that cause an inherited predisposition to de novo and t-AML. The genes responsible for these syndromes are also somatically mutated in sporadic AML. We reason that germline polymorphism in any gene somatically mutated in AML could contribute to t-AML risk in the general population. Identification of these susceptibility alleles should help clinicians develop tailored therapies that reduce the relative risk of t-AML. PMID:16886897

  14. N-methylpurine DNA glycosylase overexpression increases alkylation sensitivity by rapidly removing non-toxic 7-methylguanine adducts

    PubMed Central

    Rinne, M. L.; He, Y.; Pachkowski, B. F.; Nakamura, J.; Kelley, M. R.

    2005-01-01

    Previous studies indicate that overexpression of N-methylpurine DNA glycosylase (MPG) dramatically sensitizes cells to alkylating agent-induced cytotoxicity. We recently demonstrated that this sensitivity is preceded by an increased production of AP sites and strand breaks, confirming that overexpression of MPG disrupts normal base excision repair and causes cell death through overproduction of toxic repair intermediates. Here we establish through site-directed mutagenesis that MPG-induced sensitivity to alkylation is dependent on enzyme glycosylase activity. However, in contrast to the sensitivity seen to heterogeneous alkylating agents, MPG overexpression generates no cellular sensitivity to MeOSO2(CH2)2-lexitropsin, an alkylator which exclusively induces 3-meA lesions. Indeed, MPG overexpression has been shown to increase the toxicity of alkylating agents that produce 7-meG adducts, and here we demonstrate that MPG-overexpressing cells have dramatically increased removal of 7-meG from their DNA. These data suggest that the mechanism of MPG-induced cytotoxicity involves the conversion of non-toxic 7-meG lesions into highly toxic repair intermediates. This study establishes a mechanism by which a benign DNA modification can be made toxic through the overexpression of an otherwise well-tolerated gene product, and the application of this principle could lead to improved chemotherapeutic strategies that reduce the peripheral toxicity of alkylating agents. PMID:15905475

  15. 40 CFR 721.8673 - [(Disubstituted phenyl)]azo dihydro hydroxy alkyl oxo alkyl-substituted-pyridines (generic name).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false azo dihydro hydroxy alkyl oxo alkyl... Significant New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.8673 azo dihydro hydroxy alkyl oxo alkyl...) The chemical substances identified generically as azo dihydro hydroxy alkyl oxo...

  16. 40 CFR 721.8673 - [(Disubstituted phenyl)]azo dihydro hydroxy alkyl oxo alkyl-substituted-pyridines (generic name).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false azo dihydro hydroxy alkyl oxo alkyl... Significant New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.8673 azo dihydro hydroxy alkyl oxo alkyl...) The chemical substances identified generically as azo dihydro hydroxy alkyl oxo...

  17. 40 CFR 721.8673 - [(Disubstituted phenyl)]azo dihydro hydroxy alkyl oxo alkyl-substituted-pyridines (generic name).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false azo dihydro hydroxy alkyl oxo alkyl... Significant New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.8673 azo dihydro hydroxy alkyl oxo alkyl...) The chemical substances identified generically as azo dihydro hydroxy alkyl oxo...

  18. Occupational asthma due to alkyl cyanoacrylate

    SciTech Connect

    Nakazawa, T. )

    1990-08-01

    A case of bronchial asthma induced by occupational exposure to alkyl cyanoacrylate, an adhesive, occurred in an assembly operation. Provocative exposure testing induced immediate and delayed asthmatic responses. Alkyl cyanoacrylate seemed to act as an allergen or as an irritant, resulting in the development of asthma.

  19. MITOMYCIN C: CHEMICAL AND BIOLOGICAL STUDIES ON ALKYLATION.

    PubMed

    SCHWARTZ, H S; SODERGREN, J E; PHILIPS, F S

    1963-11-29

    The presence of an aziridine ring in mitomycin C suggests that the mechanism of action of the antibiotic is like that of the antitumor alkylating agents. However the compound is unexpectedly stable during aerobic incubation with rat liver homogenates although rapidly metabolized anaerobically. Mitomycin is not reactive with gamma-(4-nitrobenzyl) pyridine and reacts only slowly at acid p(H) with thiosulfate. It is proposed that mitomycin is activated in vivo, possibly by a reduction which "unmasks" the potential activity of the fused aziridine ring. PMID:14069241

  20. Synthesis and cytotoxic activity of some derivatives of alkyl piperidine.

    PubMed

    Jahan, Sarwat; Akhtar, Shamim; Saify, Zafar Saied; Mushtaq, Nousheen; Sial, Ali Akbar; Kamil, Arfa; Arif, Muhammed

    2013-05-01

    Synthesis of novel phenacyl derivatives of alkyl piperidine as cytotoxic agents via simple and single step reaction procedure is going to be reported here. Twelve new compounds were successfully synthesized in moderate yield and in solid form. Their synthesis was confirmed by TLC, melting point, CHN analysis and through different spectral studies such as UV, IR, Mass and proton NMR. The advantages of this synthetic route are simple operation, mild reaction conditions and good yields. These newly synthesized derivatives were extensively explored for their cytotoxicity by brine shrimp lethality assay. PMID:23625425

  1. Reactions in water: alkyl nitrile coupling reactions using Fenton's reagent.

    PubMed

    Keller, Christopher L; Dalessandro, James D; Hotz, Richard P; Pinhas, Allan R

    2008-05-01

    The coupling reaction of water-soluble alkyl nitriles using Fenton's reagent (Fe(II) and H2O2) is described. The best metal for the reaction is iron(II), and the greatest yields are obtained when the concentration of the metal is kept low. Hydrogen-atom abstraction is selective, preferentially producing the radical alpha to the nitrile. In order to increase the production of dinitrile, in situ reduction of iron(III) to iron(II), using a variety of reducing agents, was investigated. PMID:18363368

  2. The multidrug-resistance transporter Abcc3 protects NK cells from chemotherapy in a murine model of malignant glioma

    PubMed Central

    Pessina, Sara; Cantini, Gabriele; Kapetis, Dimos; Cazzato, Emanuela; Di Ianni, Natalia; Finocchiaro, Gaetano; Pellegatta, Serena

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Abcc3, a member of the ATP-binding cassette transporter superfamily, plays a role in multidrug resistance. Here, we found that Abcc3 is highly expressed in blood-derived NK cells but not in CD8+ T cells. In GL261 glioma-bearing mice treated with the alkylating agent temozolomide (TMZ) for 5 d, an early increased frequency of NK cells was observed. We also found that Abcc3 is strongly upregulated and functionally active in NK cells from mice treated with TMZ compared to controls. We demonstrate that Abcc3 is critical for NK cell survival during TMZ administration; more importantly, Akt, involved in lymphocyte survival, is phosphorylated only in NK cells expressing Abcc3. The resistance of NK cells to chemotherapy was accompanied by increased migration and homing in the brain at early time points. Cytotoxicity, evaluated by IFNγ production and specific lytic activity against GL261 cells, increased peripherally in the later phases, after conclusion of TMZ treatment. Intra-tumor increase of the NK effector subset as well as in IFNγ, granzymes and perforin-1 expression, were found early and persisted over time, correlating with a profound modulation on glioma microenvironment induced by TMZ. Our findings reveal an important involvement of Abcc3 in NK cell resistance to chemotherapy and have important clinical implications for patients treated with chemo-immunotherapy. PMID:27467914

  3. Distribution coefficients of purine alkaloids in water-ammonium sulfate-alkyl acetate-dialkyl phthalate systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korenman, Ya. I.; Krivosheeva, O. A.; Mokshina, N. Ya.

    2012-12-01

    The distribution of purine alkaloids (caffeine, theobromine, theophylline) was studied in the systems: alkyl acetates-dialkyl phtalate-salting-out agent (ammonium sulfate). The quantitative characteristics of the extraction-distribution coefficients ( D) and the degree of extraction ( R, %) are calculated. The relationships between the distribution coefficients of alkaloids and the length of the hydrocarbon radical in the molecule of alkyl acetate (dialkyl phtalate) are determined. The possibility of predicting the distribution coefficients is demonstrated.

  4. C-Alkylation by Hydrogen Autotransfer Reactions.

    PubMed

    Obora, Yasushi

    2016-04-01

    The development of practical, efficient, and atom-economical methods for the formation of carbon-carbon bonds remains a topic of considerable interest in current synthetic organic chemistry. In this review, we have summarized selected topics from the recent literature with particular emphasis on C-alkylation processes involving hydrogen transfer using alcohols as alkylation reagents. This review includes selected highlights concerning recent progress towards the modification of catalytic systems for the α-alkylation of ketones, nitriles, and esters. Furthermore, we have devoted a significant portion of this review to the methylation of ketones, alcohols, and indoles using methanol. Lastly, we have also documented recent advances in β-alkylation methods involving the dimerization of alcohols (Guerbet reaction), as well as new developments in C-alkylation methods based on sp (3) C-H activation. PMID:27573136

  5. Theory Of Alkyl Terminated Silicon Quantum Dots

    SciTech Connect

    Reboredo, F; Galli, G

    2004-08-19

    We have carried out a series of ab-initio calculations to investigate changes in the optical properties of Si quantum dots as a function of surface passivation. In particular, we have compared hydrogen passivated dots with those having alkyl groups at the surface. We find that, while on clusters with reconstructed surfaces a complete alkyl passivation is possible, steric repulsion prevents full passivation of Si dots with unreconstructed surfaces. In addition, our calculations show that steric repulsion may have a dominant effect in determining the surface structure, and eventually the stability of alkyl passivated clusters, with results dependent on the length of the carbon chain. Alkyl passivation weakly affects optical gaps of silicon quantum dots, while it substantially decreases ionization potentials and electron affinities and affect their excited state properties. On the basis of our results we propose that alkyl terminated quantum dots may be size selected taking advantage of the change in ionization potential as a function of the cluster size.

  6. Adsorption of alkyl-dimethyl-benzyl-ammonium chloride on differently pretreated nonwoven cotton substrate

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The adsorption of alkyl-dimethyl-benzyl-ammonium chloride (ADBAC), a cationic surfactant commonly employed as an antimicrobial agent, on greige, alkaline scoured, and bleached nonwoven cotton fabrics was investigated at varying surfactant concentrations and liquor ratios using UV-vis absorption spec...

  7. Management of hepatitis B reactivation in patients receiving cancer chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Yi-Wen

    2012-01-01

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) reactivation is well documented in previously resolved or inactive HBV carriers who receive cancer chemotherapy. The consequences of HBV reactivation range from self-limited conditions to fulminant hepatic failure and death. HBV reactivation also leads to premature termination of chemotherapy or delay in treatment schedules. This review summarizes current knowledge of management of HBV reactivation in patients receiving cancer chemotherapy. HBV surface antigen (HBsAg) testing should be performed in patients who require cancer chemotherapy. Four meta-analyses support lamivudine prophylaxis for HBV reactivation during chemotherapy in HBsAg-positive patients. Randomized controlled trials to compare different HBV antiviral agents are needed to define optimal regimens for the prevention and treatment of HBV reactivation in patients receiving cancer chemotherapy. PMID:22973419

  8. Inhaled chemotherapy in lung cancer: future concept of nanomedicine

    PubMed Central

    Zarogoulidis, Paul; Chatzaki, Ekaterini; Porpodis, Konstantinos; Domvri, Kalliopi; Hohenforst-Schmidt, Wolfgang; Goldberg, Eugene P; Karamanos, Nikos; Zarogoulidis, Konstantinos

    2012-01-01

    Regional chemotherapy was first used for lung cancer 30 years ago. Since then, new methods of drug delivery and pharmaceuticals have been investigated in vitro, and in animals and humans. An extensive review of drug delivery systems, pharmaceuticals, patient monitoring, methods of enhancing inhaled drug deposition, safety and efficacy, and also additional applications of inhaled chemotherapy and its advantages and disadvantages are presented. Regional chemotherapy to the lung parenchyma for lung cancer is feasible and efficient. Safety depends on the chemotherapy agent delivered to the lungs and is dose-dependent and time-dependent. Further evaluation is needed to provide data regarding early lung cancer stages, and whether regional chemotherapy can be used as neoadjuvant or adjuvant treatment. Finally, inhaled chemotherapy could one day be administered at home with fewer systemic adverse effects. PMID:22619512

  9. Chemotherapy for Stage II Colon Cancer.

    PubMed

    Varghese, Anna

    2015-12-01

    The adjuvant treatment of patients with stage II colon cancer is an area of controversy in medical oncology. Adjuvant chemotherapy aims to eradicate micrometastatic disease present at the time of surgery, preventing the development of distant metastatic disease and thereby curing those patients of their cancer. National and international guidelines for the adjuvant treatment of stage II colon cancer recommend a range of treatment options from observation to chemotherapy with single-agent or combination regimens, depending on the presence or absence of high-risk features (poorly differentiated histology, presence of lymphovascular invasion, presence of perineural invasion, report of < 12 lymph nodes, bowel obstruction, localized perforation, or positive margins). In the one prospective study designed to address the role of adjuvant chemotherapy in stage II colon cancer, a small but statistically significant benefit in overall survival was seen for those patients who received adjuvant chemotherapy; however, multiple meta-analyses and retrospective subgroup analyses have called these findings into question. Though there may be a role for adjuvant chemotherapy in the treatment of patients with stage II colon cancer, its incremental benefit is small, at best, and comes with the risks of real and rarely fatal complications of chemotherapy. PMID:26648796

  10. Cancer cell adaptation to chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Di Nicolantonio, Federica; Mercer, Stuart J; Knight, Louise A; Gabriel, Francis G; Whitehouse, Pauline A; Sharma, Sanjay; Fernando, Augusta; Glaysher, Sharon; Di Palma, Silvana; Johnson, Penny; Somers, Shaw S; Toh, Simon; Higgins, Bernie; Lamont, Alan; Gulliford, Tim; Hurren, Jeremy; Yiangou, Constantinos; Cree, Ian A

    2005-01-01

    Background Tumor resistance to chemotherapy may be present at the beginning of treatment, develop during treatment, or become apparent on re-treatment of the patient. The mechanisms involved are usually inferred from experiments with cell lines, as studies in tumor-derived cells are difficult. Studies of human tumors show that cells adapt to chemotherapy, but it has been largely assumed that clonal selection leads to the resistance of recurrent tumors. Methods Cells derived from 47 tumors of breast, ovarian, esophageal, and colorectal origin and 16 paired esophageal biopsies were exposed to anticancer agents (cisplatin; 5-fluorouracil; epirubicin; doxorubicin; paclitaxel; irinotecan and topotecan) in short-term cell culture (6 days). Real-time quantitative PCR was used to measure up- or down-regulation of 16 different resistance/target genes, and when tissue was available, immunohistochemistry was used to assess the protein levels. Results In 8/16 paired esophageal biopsies, there was an increase in the expression of multi-drug resistance gene 1 (MDR1) following epirubicin + cisplatin + 5-fluorouracil (ECF) chemotherapy and this was accompanied by increased expression of the MDR-1 encoded protein, P-gp. Following exposure to doxorubicin in vitro, 13/14 breast carcinomas and 9/12 ovarian carcinomas showed >2-fold down-regulation of topoisomerase IIα (TOPOIIα). Exposure to topotecan in vitro, resulted in >4-fold down-regulation of TOPOIIα in 6/7 colorectal tumors and 8/10 ovarian tumors. Conclusion This study suggests that up-regulation of resistance genes or down-regulation in target genes may occur rapidly in human solid tumors, within days of the start of treatment, and that similar changes are present in pre- and post-chemotherapy biopsy material. The molecular processes used by each tumor appear to be linked to the drug used, but there is also heterogeneity between individual tumors, even those with the same histological type, in the pattern and magnitude of

  11. Influence of WR 2721 on the efficacy of radiotherapy and chemotherapy of murine tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Clement, J.J.; Johnson, R.K.

    1982-03-01

    The effect of WR2721 on the response of tumors to radiation, antineoplastic alkylating drugs, and DNA binding agents was evaluated and compared to the degree of normal tissue protection provided by WR 2721 against these agents. WR 2721 administered to mice bearing P388 leukemia or Lewis lung carcinoma was found to reduce the radiosensitivity of the leukemia and lung tumor by dose modifying factors of 1.4 and 1.3, respectively. WR 2721 protected bone marow, intestine, and skin from radiation by factors of 1.9. 1.4 and 1.8. WR 2721 protected mice from the lethality of cyclophosphamide by a factor of only 1.2 whereas protection from melphalan toxicity was more dramatic with a dose modifying factor of 1.6. In chemotherapy studies of established M5076 ovarian tumor, the combination of WR 2721 plus cyclophosphamide was equivalent in activity to cyclophosphamide alone. WR 2721 did not modify the antitumor activity of melphalan in early Lewis lung carcinoma did not decrease the antileukemic effects of this agent by a factor of 2.6 indicating tumor protection greater than host protection in the leukemia. The antitumor activity of the DNA binding agents etoposide (VP16-213) and mitoxantrone against systemic P388 leukemia was not diminished by WR 2721, while a substantial increase in host toxicity was noted for the combinations. The protective effects of WR 2721 against radiation and drug damage were, therefore, not entirely selective for normal tissues. In some cases the degree of tumor protection can be similar to, or greater than, normal tissue protection.

  12. Chemotherapy for lung cancers: here to stay.

    PubMed

    Kris, Mark G; Hellmann, Matthew D; Chaft, Jamie E

    2014-01-01

    Four decades of clinical research document the effectiveness of chemotherapy in patients with lung cancers. Chemotherapeutic agents can improve lung cancer symptoms, lengthen life in most patients with lung cancers, and enhance curability in individuals with locoregional disease when combined with surgery or irradiation. Chemotherapy's effectiveness is enhanced in patients with EGFR-mutant and ALK-positive lung cancers and can "rescue" individuals whose oncogene-driven cancers have become resistant to targeted agents. As immunotherapies become part of the therapeutic armamentarium for lung cancers, chemotherapeutic drugs have the potential to modulate the immune system to enhance the effectiveness of immune check point inhibitors. Even in this era of personalized medicine and targeted therapies, chemotherapeutic agents remain essential components in cancer care. PMID:24857127

  13. Mechanisms of chemotherapy-induced behavioral toxicities

    PubMed Central

    Vichaya, Elisabeth G.; Chiu, Gabriel S.; Krukowski, Karen; Lacourt, Tamara E.; Kavelaars, Annemieke; Dantzer, Robert; Heijnen, Cobi J.; Walker, Adam K.

    2015-01-01

    While chemotherapeutic agents have yielded relative success in the treatment of cancer, patients are often plagued with unwanted and even debilitating side-effects from the treatment which can lead to dose reduction or even cessation of treatment. Common side effects (symptoms) of chemotherapy include (i) cognitive deficiencies such as problems with attention, memory and executive functioning; (ii) fatigue and motivational deficit; and (iii) neuropathy. These symptoms often develop during treatment but can remain even after cessation of chemotherapy, severely impacting long-term quality of life. Little is known about the underlying mechanisms responsible for the development of these behavioral toxicities, however, neuroinflammation is widely considered to be one of the major mechanisms responsible for chemotherapy-induced symptoms. Here, we critically assess what is known in regards to the role of neuroinflammation in chemotherapy-induced symptoms. We also argue that, based on the available evidence, neuroinflammation is unlikely the only mechanism involved in the pathogenesis of chemotherapy-induced behavioral toxicities. We evaluate two other putative candidate mechanisms. To this end we discuss the mediating role of damage-associated molecular patterns (DAMPs) activated in response to chemotherapy-induced cellular damage. We also review the literature with respect to possible alternative mechanisms such as a chemotherapy-induced change in the bioenergetic status of the tissue involving changes in mitochondrial function in relation to chemotherapy-induced behavioral toxicities. Understanding the mechanisms that underlie the emergence of fatigue, neuropathy, and cognitive difficulties is vital to better treatment and long-term survival of cancer patients. PMID:25954147

  14. Alkylation of organic aromatic compounds

    DOEpatents

    Smith, L.A. Jr.; Arganbright, R.P.; Hearn, D.

    1993-01-05

    Aromatic compounds are alkylated in a combination reactor/distillation column comprising a vessel suitable for operating between 70 C and 500 C and from 0.5 to 20 atmospheres pressure; an inert distillation packing in the lower one-third of said vessel; solid acidic catalytic material such as zeolites or an acidic cation exchange resin supported in the middle one-third of said vessel; and inert distillation packing in the upper one-third of said vessel. A benzene inlet is located near the upper end of the vessel; an olefin inlet is juxtaposed with said solid acidic catalytic material; a bottoms outlet is positioned near the bottom of said vessel for removing said cumene and ethyl benzene; and an overhead outlet is placed at the top of said vessel for removing any unreacted benzene and olefin.

  15. Alkylation of organic aromatic compounds

    DOEpatents

    Smith, L.A. Jr.; Arganbright, R.P.; Hearn, D.

    1993-09-07

    Aromatic compounds are alkylated in a catalytic distillation, wherein the catalyst structure also serves as a distillation component by contacting the aromatic compound with a C[sub 2] to C[sub 10] olefin in the catalyst bed under 0.25 to 50 atmospheres of pressure and at temperatures in the range of 80 C to 500 C, using as the catalyst a molecular sieve characterized as acidic or an acidic cation exchange resin. For example, ethyl benzene is produced by feeding ethylene to about the mid point of the catalyst bed while benzene is conveniently added through the reflux in molar excess to that required to react with ethylene, thereby reacting substantially all of the ethylene and recovering benzene as the principal overhead and ethyl benzene in the bottoms. 1 figures.

  16. Alkylation of organic aromatic compounds

    DOEpatents

    Smith, Jr., Lawrence A.; Arganbright, Robert P.; Hearn, Dennis

    1994-01-01

    Aromatic compounds are alkylated in a catalytic distillation, wherein the catalyst structure also serves as a distillation component by contacting the aromatic compound with a C.sub.2 to C.sub.10 olefin in the catalyst bed under 0.25 to 50 atmospheres of pressure and at temperatures in the range of 80.degree. C. to 500.degree. C., using as the catalyst a mole sieve characterized as acidic or an acidic cation exchange resin. For example, ethyl benzene is produced by feeding ethylene below the catalyst bed while benzene is conveniently added through the reflux in molar excess to that required to react with ethylene, thereby reacting substantially all of the ethylene and recovering benzene as the principal overhead and ethyl benzene in the bottoms.

  17. Alkylation of organic aromatic compounds

    DOEpatents

    Smith, L.A. Jr.; Arganbright, R.P.; Hearn, D.

    1994-06-14

    Aromatic compounds are alkylated in a catalytic distillation, wherein the catalyst structure also serves as a distillation component by contacting the aromatic compound with a C[sub 2] to C[sub 10] olefin in the catalyst bed under 0.25 to 50 atmospheres of pressure and at temperatures in the range of 80 C to 500 C, using as the catalyst a molecular sieve characterized as acidic or an acidic cation exchange resin. For example, ethyl benzene is produced by feeding ethylene below the catalyst bed while benzene is conveniently added through the reflux in molar excess to that required to react with ethylene, thereby reacting substantially all of the ethylene and recovering benzene as the principal overhead and ethyl benzene in the bottoms. 1 fig.

  18. Alkylation of organic aromatic compounds

    DOEpatents

    Smith, Jr., Lawrence A.

    1989-01-01

    Aromatic compounds are alkylated in a catalytic distillation, wherein the catalyst structure also serves as a distillation component by contacting the aromatic compound with a C.sub.2 to C.sub.10 olefin in the catalyst bed under 0.25 to 50 atmospheres of pressure and at temperatures in the range of 80.degree. C. to 500.degree. C., using as the catalyst a mole sieve characterized as acidic or an acidic cation exchange resin. For example, ethyl benzene is produced by feeding ethylene below the catalyst bed while benzene is conveniently added through the reflux in molar excess to that required to react with ethylene, thereby reacting substantially all of the ethylene and recovering benzene as the principal overhead and ethyl benzene in the bottoms.

  19. Alkylation of organic aromatic compounds

    DOEpatents

    Smith, Jr., Lawrence A.; Arganbright, Robert P.; Hearn, Dennis

    1993-01-01

    Aromatic compounds are alkylated in a combination reactor/distillation column comprising a vessel suitable for operating between 70.degree. C. and 500.degree. C. and from 0.5 to 20 atmospheres pressure; an inert distillation packing in the lower one-third of said vessel; solid acidic catalytic material such as zeolites or an acidic cation exchange resin supported in the middle one-third of said vessel; and inert distillation packing in the upper one-third of said vessel. A benzene inlet is located near the upper end of the vessel; an olefin inlet is juxtaposed with said solid acidic catalytic material; a bottoms outlet is positioned near the bottom of said vessel for removing said cumene and ethyl benzene; and an overhead outlet is placed at the top of said vessel for removing any unreacted benzene and olefin.

  20. Alkylation of organic aromatic compounds

    DOEpatents

    Smith, Jr., Lawrence A.; Arganbright, Robert P.; Hearn, Dennis

    1993-01-01

    Aromatic compounds are alkylated in a catalytic distillation, wherein the catalyst structure also serves as a distillation component by contacting the aromatic compound with a C.sub.2 to C.sub.10 olefin in the catalyst bed under 0.25 to 50 atmospheres of pressure and at temperatures in the range of 80.degree. C. to 500.degree. C., using as the catalyst a mole sieve characterized as acidic or an acidic cation exchange resin. For example, ethyl benzene is produced by feeding ethylene to about the mid point of the catalyst bed while benzene is conveniently added through the reflux in molar excess to that required to react with ethylene, thereby reacting substantially all of the ethylene and recovering benzene as the principal overhead and ethyl benzene in the bottoms.

  1. Alkylation of organic aromatic compounds

    DOEpatents

    Smith, L.A. Jr.

    1989-07-18

    Aromatic compounds are alkylated in a catalytic distillation, wherein the catalyst structure also serves as a distillation component by contacting the aromatic compound with a C[sub 2] to C[sub 10] olefin in the catalyst bed under 0.25 to 50 atmospheres of pressure and at temperatures in the range of 80 C to 500 C, using as the catalyst a mole sieve characterized as acidic or an acidic cation exchange resin. For example, ethyl benzene is produced by feeding ethylene below the catalyst bed while benzene is conveniently added through the reflux in molar excess to that required to react with ethylene, thereby reacting substantially all of the ethylene and recovering benzene as the principal overhead and ethyl benzene in the bottoms. 1 fig.

  2. Optimizing initial chemotherapy for metastatic pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Mantripragada, Kalyan C; Safran, Howard

    2016-05-01

    The two combination chemotherapy regimens FOLFIRINOX and gemcitabine plus nab-paclitaxel represent major breakthroughs in the management of metastatic pancreatic cancer. Both regimens showed unprecedented survival advantage in the setting of front-line therapy. However, their application for treatment of patients in the community is challenging because of significant toxicities, thus limiting potential benefits to a narrow population of patients. Modifications to the dose intensity or schedule of those regimens improve their tolerability, while likely retaining survival advantage over single-agent chemotherapy. Newer strategies to optimize these two active regimens in advanced pancreatic cancer are being explored that can help personalize treatment to individual patients. PMID:26939741

  3. Sequence-selective single-molecule alkylation with a pyrrole-imidazole polyamide visualized in a DNA nanoscaffold.

    PubMed

    Yoshidome, Tomofumi; Endo, Masayuki; Kashiwazaki, Gengo; Hidaka, Kumi; Bando, Toshikazu; Sugiyama, Hiroshi

    2012-03-14

    We demonstrate a novel strategy for visualizing sequence-selective alkylation of target double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) using a synthetic pyrrole-imidazole (PI) polyamide in a designed DNA origami scaffold. Doubly functionalized PI polyamide was designed by introduction of an alkylating agent 1-(chloromethyl)-5-hydroxy-1,2-dihydro-3H-benz[e]indole (seco-CBI) and biotin for sequence-selective alkylation at the target sequence and subsequent streptavidin labeling, respectively. Selective alkylation of the target site in the substrate DNA was observed by analysis using sequencing gel electrophoresis. For the single-molecule observation of the alkylation by functionalized PI polyamide using atomic force microscopy (AFM), the target position in the dsDNA (∼200 base pairs) was alkylated and then visualized by labeling with streptavidin. Newly designed DNA origami scaffold named "five-well DNA frame" carrying five different dsDNA sequences in its cavities was used for the detailed analysis of the sequence-selectivity and alkylation. The 64-mer dsDNAs were introduced to five individual wells, in which target sequence AGTXCCA/TGGYACT (XY = AT, TA, GC, CG) was employed as fully matched (X = G) and one-base mismatched (X = A, T, C) sequences. The fully matched sequence was alkylated with 88% selectivity over other mismatched sequences. In addition, the PI polyamide failed to attach to the target sequence lacking the alkylation site after washing and streptavidin treatment. Therefore, the PI polyamide discriminated the one mismatched nucleotide at the single-molecule level, and alkylation anchored the PI polyamide to the target dsDNA. PMID:22320236

  4. Disulfiram is a direct and potent inhibitor of human O6-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase (MGMT) in brain tumor cells and mouse brain and markedly increases the alkylating DNA damage

    PubMed Central

    Srivenugopal, Kalkunte S.

    2014-01-01

    The alcohol aversion drug disulfiram (DSF) reacts and conjugates with the protein-bound nucleophilic cysteines and is known to elicit anticancer effects alone or improve the efficacy of many cancer drugs. We investigated the effects of DSF on human O6-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase (MGMT), a DNA repair protein and chemotherapy target that removes the mutagenic O6-akyl groups from guanines, and thus confers resistance to alkylating agents in brain tumors. We used DSF, copper-chelated DSF or CuCl2–DSF combination and found that all treatments inhibited the MGMT activity in two brain tumor cell lines in a rapid and dose-dependent manner. The drug treatments resulted in the loss of MGMT protein from tumor cells through the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway. Evidence showed that Cys145, a reactive cysteine, critical for DNA repair was the sole site of DSF modification in the MGMT protein. DSF was a weaker inhibitor of MGMT, compared with the established O6-benzylguanine; nevertheless, the 24–36h suppression of MGMT activity in cell cultures vastly increased the alkylation-induced DNA interstrand cross-linking, G2/M cell cycle blockade, cytotoxicity and the levels of apoptotic markers. Normal mice treated with DSF showed significantly attenuated levels of MGMT activity and protein in the liver and brain tissues. In nude mice bearing T98 glioblastoma xenografts, there was a preferential inhibition of tumor MGMT. Our studies demonstrate a strong and direct inhibition of MGMT by DSF and support the repurposing of this brain penetrating drug for glioma therapy. The findings also imply an increased risk for alkylation damage in alcoholic patients taking DSF. PMID:24193513

  5. Process for recovering uranium using an alkyl pyrophosphoric acid and alkaline stripping solution

    SciTech Connect

    Worthington, R.E.; Magdics, A.

    1987-03-24

    A process is described for stripping uranium for a pregnant organic extractant comprising an alkyl pyrophosphoric acid dissolved in a substantially water-immiscible organic diluent. The organic extractant contains tetravalent uranium and an alcohol or phenol modifier in a quantity sufficient to retain substantially all the unhydrolyzed alkyl pyrophosphoric acid in solution in the diluent during stripping. The process comprises adding an oxidizing agent to the organic extractant and thereby oxidizing the tetravalent uranium to the +6 state in the organic extractant, and contacting the organic extractant containing the uranium in the +6 state with a stripping solution comprising an aqueous solution of an alkali metal or ammonium carbonate or hydroxide thereby stripping uranium from the organic extractant into the stripping solution. The resulting barren organic extractant containing substantially all of the unhydrolyzed alkyl pyrophosphoric acid dissolved in the diluent is separated from the stripping solution containing the stripped uranium, the barren extractant being suitable for recycle.

  6. Process for recovering uranium using an alkyl pyrophosphoric acid and alkaline stripping solution

    SciTech Connect

    Worthington, R.E.; Magdics, A.

    1987-03-24

    A process is described for stripping uranium from a pregnant organic extractant comprising an alkyl pyrophosphoric acid dissolved in a substantially water-immiscible organic diluent. The organic extractant contains tetravalent uranium and an alcohol or phenol modifier in a quantity sufficient to retain substantially all the unhydrolyzed alkyl pyrophosphoric acid in solution in the diluent during stripping. The process comprises adding an oxidizing agent to the organic extractant to and thereby oxidizing the tetravalent uranium to the +6 state in the organic extractant, and contacting the organic extractant containing the uranium in the +6 state with a stripping solution comprising an aqueous solution of an alkali metal or ammonium carbonate, nonsaturated in uranium. The uranium is stripped from, the organic extractant into the stripping solution, and the resulting barren organic extractant containing substantially all of the unhydrolyzed alkyl pyrophosphoric acid dissolved in the diluent is separated from the stripping solution containing the stripped uranium, the barren extractant being suitable for recycle.

  7. Inflammatory breast cancer: results of antracycline-based neoadjuvant chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Ozmen, Vahit; Cabioglu, Neslihan; Igci, Abdullah; Dagoglu, Temel; Aydiner, Adnan; Kecer, Mustafa; Bozfakioglu, Yavuz; Dinçer, Maktav; Bilir, Ayhan; Topuz, Erkan

    2003-01-01

    Twenty-three patients with inflammatory breast cancer treated with a combined modality approach including anthracycline-based induction chemotherapy-surgery-chemotherapy-radiotherapy were reviewed. Twelve patients (52.2%) received FAC (5-fluorouracil, adriamycin, cyclophosphamide) and 11 patients (47.8%) were treated with FEC (5-fluorouracil, epirubicin, cyclophosphamide) induction chemotherapy for three cycles every 3 weeks. Surgery was followed by the initial chemotherapy or second-line chemotherapy for an additional six cycles to complete nine cycles and radiotherapy, respectively. The median overall survival (OS) time was 27 months and the median disease-free survival (DFS) was 13 months. Furthermore, patients treated with FAC induction chemotherapy have been found to have longer median OS and DFS periods compared to patients with FEC induction chemotherapy in both univariate and multivariate analysis. In conclusion, the superiority of doxorubicin-containing chemotherapy over epirubicin-containing chemotherapy should be established in larger randomized studies and more effective chemotherapeutic agents such as taxans are required for better survival rates in inflammatory breast cancer patients. PMID:12603379

  8. Thermally induced alkylation of diamond.

    PubMed

    Hoeb, Marco; Auernhammer, Marianne; Schoell, Sebastian J; Brandt, Martin S; Garrido, Jose A; Stutzmann, Martin; Sharp, Ian D

    2010-12-21

    We present an approach for the thermally activated formation of alkene-derived self-assembled monolayers on oxygen-terminated single and polycrystalline diamond surfaces. Chemical modification of the oxygen and hydrogen plasma-treated samples was achieved by heating in 1-octadecene. The resulting layers were characterized using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, thermal desorption spectroscopy, atomic force microscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, and water contact angle measurements. This investigation reveals that alkenes selectively attach to the oxygen-terminated sites via covalent C-O-C bonds. The hydrophilic oxygen-terminated diamond is rendered strongly hydrophobic following this reaction. The nature of the process limits the organic layer growth to a single monolayer, and FTIR measurements reveal that such monolayers are dense and well ordered. In contrast, hydrogen-terminated diamond sites remain unaffected by this process. This method is thus complementary to the UV-initiated reaction of alkenes with diamond, which exhibits the opposite reactivity contrast. Thermal alkylation increases the range of available diamond functionalization strategies and provides a means of straightforwardly forming single organic layers in order to engineer the surface properties of diamond. PMID:21090790

  9. Chemotherapy in Elderly Patients with Gastric Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hyeong Su; Kim, Jung Han; Kim, Ji Won; Kim, Byung Chun

    2016-01-01

    Gastric cancer (GC) is one of the most frequent malignant diseases in the elderly. Systemic chemotherapy showed an improvement of quality of life and survival benefit compared to supportive care alone in patients with advanced GC. Because comorbidities or age-related changes in pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics may lead to higher toxicity, however, many oncologists hesitate to recommend elderly patients to receive chemotherapy. Available data suggest that elderly patients with GC are able to tolerate and benefit from systemic chemotherapy to the same extent as younger patients. The age alone should not be the only criteria to preclude effective chemotherapy. However, proper patient selection is extremely important to deliver effective treatment safely. A comprehensive geriatric assessment (CGA) is a useful method to assess life expectancy and risk of morbidity in older patients and to guide providing optimal treatment. Treatment should be personalized based on the nature of the disease, the life expectancy, the risk of complication, and the patient's preference. Combination chemotherapy can be considered for older patients with metastatic GC who are classified as non-frail patients by CGA. For frail or vulnerable patients, however, monotherapy or only symptomatic treatment may be desirable. Targeted agents seem to be promising treatment options for elderly patients with GC considering their better efficacy and less toxicity. PMID:26722364

  10. N-Alkylation by Hydrogen Autotransfer Reactions.

    PubMed

    Ma, Xiantao; Su, Chenliang; Xu, Qing

    2016-06-01

    Owing to the importance of amine/amide derivatives in all fields of chemistry, and also the green and environmentally benign features of using alcohols as alkylating reagents, the relatively high atom economic dehydrative N-alkylation reactions of amines/amides with alcohols through hydrogen autotransfer processes have received much attention and have developed rapidly in recent decades. Various efficient homogeneous and heterogeneous transition metal catalysts, nano materials, electrochemical methods, biomimetic methods, asymmetric N-alkylation reactions, aerobic oxidative methods, and even certain transition metal-free, catalyst-free, or autocatalyzed methods, have also been developed in recent years. With a brief introduction to the background and developments in this area of research, this chapter focuses mainly on recent progress and technical and conceptual advances contributing to the development of this research in the last decade. In addition to mainstream research on homogeneous and heterogeneous transition metal-catalyzed reactions, possible mechanistic routes for hydrogen transfer and alcohol activation, which are key processes in N-alkylation reactions but seldom discussed in the past, the recent reports on computational mechanistic studies of the N-alkylation reactions, and the newly emerged N-alkylation methods based on novel alcohol activation protocols such as air-promoted reactions and transition metal-free methods, are also reviewed in this chapter. Problems and bottlenecks that remained to be solved in the field, and promising new research that deserves greater future attention and effort, are also reviewed and discussed. PMID:27573267

  11. Formulation and stability of busulfan for intravenous administration in high-dose chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Bhagwatwar, H P; Phadungpojna, S; Chow, D S; Andersson, B S

    1996-01-01

    The bifunctional alkylating agent busulfan (Bu) was solubilized in a cosolvent mixture of anhydrous dimethylacetamide (DMA), polyethylene glycol 400 (PEG400), and water at a ratio of 1:2:2 (v/v/v), to achieve a Bu concentration of 3 mg/ml, a preparation that would be suitable for parenteral administration in high-dose chemotherapy preceding bone marrow transplantation. The complete formulation was stable for more than 54 h at room temperature (RT, 22 degrees C). An accelerated stability study of Bu in anhydrous DMA or DMA/PEG400 (1:2) as stock solutions indicated shelf-lives of 191 and 180 days respectively, at RT, and 8.2 and 7.5 years, respectively, at 4 degrees C. Although the complete formulation with Bu was very hypertonic, hemolysis studies indicated that the formulation would be safe for intravenous (i.v.) administration, since it would be rapidly diluted to harmless tonicity levels in the blood. Cytotoxicity studies of the complete formulation in vitro proved that Bu retained its activity when dissolved in the complete vehicle. A preliminary pharmacokinetic study in a rodent model after the i.v. administration of Bu at a dose of 1 mg/kg body weight yielded high plasma concentrations of Bu for at least 5 h after injection. PMID:8599861

  12. Effect of alkyl glycerophosphate on the activation of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma and glucose uptake in C2C12 cells

    SciTech Connect

    Tsukahara, Tamotsu; Haniu, Hisao; Matsuda, Yoshikazu

    2013-04-12

    Highlights: •Alkyl-LPA specifically interacts with PPARγ. •Alkyl-LPA treatments induces lipid accumulation in C2C12 cells. •Alkyl-LPA enhanced glucose uptake in C2C12 cells. •Alkyl-LPA-treated C2C12 cells express increased amounts of GLUT4 mRNA. •Alkyl-LPA is a novel therapeutic agent that can be used for the treatment of obesity and diabetes. -- Abstract: Studies on the effects of lipids on skeletal muscle cells rarely examine the effects of lysophospholipids. Through our recent studies, we identified select forms of phospholipids, such as alkyl-LPA, as ligands for the intracellular receptor peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARγ). PPARγ is a nuclear hormone receptor implicated in many human diseases, including diabetes and obesity. We previously showed that alkyl-LPA is a specific agonist of PPARγ. However, the mechanism by which the alkyl-LPA–PPARγ axis affects skeletal muscle cells is poorly defined. Our objective in the present study was to determine whether alkyl-LPA and PPARγ activation promotes glucose uptake in skeletal muscle cells. Our findings indicate that PPARγ1 mRNA is more abundant than PPARγ2 mRNA in C2C12 cells. We showed that alkyl-LPA (3 μM) significantly activated PPARγ and increased intracellular glucose levels in skeletal muscle cells. We also showed that incubation of C2C12 cells with alkyl-LPA led to lipid accumulation in the cells. These findings suggest that alkyl-LPA activates PPARγ and stimulates glucose uptake in the absence of insulin in C2C12 cells. This may contribute to the plasma glucose-lowering effect in the treatment of insulin resistance.

  13. Chemotherapy-induced polyneuropathy. Part I. Pathophysiology

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy (CIPN) is a toxic neuropathy, a syndrome consisting of highly distressing symptoms of various degrees of severity. It includes numbness of distal extremities, long-term touch, heat, and cold dysaesthesia and, in more severe cases, motor impairment affecting daily functioning. Each form of the syndrome may be accompanied by symptoms of neuropathic stinging, burning, and tingling pain. In the case of most chemotherapeutic agents, the incidence and severity of CIPN are dependent on the cumulative dose of the drug. The syndrome described is caused by damage to the axons and/or cells of the peripheral nervous system. Chemotherapeutic agents have distinct mechanisms of action in both neoplastic tissue and the peripheral nervous system; therefore, CIPN should not be regarded as a homogeneous disease entity. The present article is an attempt to systematize the knowledge about the toxic effects of chemotherapy on the peripheral nervous system. PMID:23788859

  14. Chemotherapy in metastatic retinoblastoma.

    PubMed

    Kingston, J E; Hungerford, J L; Plowman, P N

    1987-03-01

    Eleven children with metastatic retinoblastoma diagnosed during the period 1970-1984 were treated with chemotherapy. Short-term complete responses were observed in three children treated with a four-drug combination which included cisplatinum, and in one child treated with vincristine and cyclophosphamide. The median duration of survival of the 11 children receiving chemotherapy was nine months, whilst the median survival of 13 children with metastatic retinoblastoma who were not given chemotherapy was only 2.3 months (p = 0.06). This suggests that retinoblastoma is a chemosensitive tumour and therefore adjuvant chemotherapy may have a role in children with retinoblastoma who at diagnosis are thought to be at high risk of developing metastatic disease. PMID:3587892

  15. Chemotherapy (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... sample before beginning chemotherapy to evaluate kidney function. Giving your child plenty of fluids to drink will ... eating, after using the bathroom, and after touching animals. They shouldn't share cups or utensils with ...

  16. Case report: retinitis pigmentosa following cytotoxic chemotherapy in Usher's syndrome.

    PubMed

    Blanchet, P; Wellemeyer, M L; Burton, G V

    1992-05-01

    Ocular toxicity is an uncommon complication of cytotoxic chemotherapy. Retinitis pigmentosa complicating cancer chemotherapy has not been reported. A patient with probable Usher's syndrome (congenital sensorineural deafness) had apparent acceleration of retinitis pigmentosa with blindness following cytotoxic chemotherapy for non-Hodgkin's lymphoma. Retinitis pigmentosa, a feature of Usher's syndrome, usually develops as a slowly progressive process. The rapid acceleration of retinopathy following tumor therapy suggests a possible relationship to the cytotoxic chemotherapy. Lymphocytes and fibroblasts from patients with Usher's syndrome are hypersensitive to the x-ray type of DNA-damaging agents. The DNA-damaging effects of chemotherapy may have accelerated the progression of retinitis pigmentosa in this patient. PMID:1580321

  17. Update in Cancer Chemotherapy: Gastrointestinal Cancer—Colorectal Cancer, Part 2

    PubMed Central

    Wright, Jane C.

    1986-01-01

    An update of the state of the art of cancer chemotherapeutic treatment of gastrointestinal tract cancer is described in a multi-part series. Part 1 surveyed colorectal cancer and the use of single-agent chemotherapy in the April issue of the Journal. Part 2 of colorectal cancer will describe combination chemotherapy, preoperative and postoperative radiation, and combinations of chemotherapy and radiation, and adjuvant chemotherapy. In advanced gastrointestinal tract cancer, chemotherapy is only of palliative value with response rates generally under 50 percent and survival rates of several months to one year or more. Combination chemotherapy often produces higher response rates, yet there is no acceptable evidence that survival is improved. While some adjuvant chemotherapy trials suggest improvement, major survival gains remain to be demonstrated. Uncertainty as to the role of chemotherapy in the treatment of gastrointestinal cancers may be due to lack of data. PMID:3519988

  18. Alkyl rearrangement processes in organozirconium complexes. Observation of internal alkyl complexes during hydrozirconation

    SciTech Connect

    Chirik, P.J.; Day, M.W.; Labinger, J.A.; Bercaw, J.E.

    1999-11-10

    Isotopically labeled alkyl zirconocene complexes of the form (CpR{sub n}){sub 2}Zr(CH{sub 2}CDR{sub 2}{prime})(X) (CpR{sub n} = alkyl-substituted cyclopentadienyl; R{prime} = H, alkyl group; X = H, D, Me) undergo isomerization of the alkyl ligand as well as exchange with free olefin in solution under ambient conditions. Increasing the substitution on the Cp ring results in slower isomerization reactions, but these steric effects are small. In contrast, changing X has a very large effect on the rate of isomerization. Pure {sigma}-bonding ligands such as methyl and hydride promote rapid isomerization, whereas {pi}-donor ligands inhibit {beta}-H elimination and hence alkyl isomerization. For ({eta}{sup 5}-C{sub 5}H{sub 5}){sub 2}Zr(R)(Cl), internal alkyl complexes have been observed for the first time. The rate of isomerization depends on the length of the alkyl group: longer alkyl chains (heptyl, hexyl) isomerize faster than shorter chains (butyl). The transient intermediate species have been identified by a combination of isotopic labeling and {sup 1}H, {sup 2}H, and {sup 13}C NMR experiments. The solid-state structure of the zirconocene cyclopentyl chloride complex, Cp{sub 2}Zr(cyclo-C{sub 5}H{sub 9})(Cl), has been determined by X-ray diffraction.

  19. Blend of alkyl phenol ethoxylates and alkyl phenol glycoxylates and their use as surfactants

    SciTech Connect

    Grolitzer, M. A.

    1985-11-12

    Nonionic surfactant compositions useful in forming stable emulsions with oil in saline solutions comprising a blend of: at least one alkyl phenol ethoxylate and at least one alkyl phenol glycoxylate. These surfactant compositions may be employed in enhanced oil recovery processes and other applications where good emulsification and high salinity tolerances are required such as textiles, leather, dairy, concrete grinding aids and drilling muds.

  20. Improved survival rate in children with stage III and IV B cell non-Hodgkin's lymphoma and leukemia using multi-agent chemotherapy: results of a study of 114 children from the French Pediatric Oncology Society.

    PubMed

    Patte, C; Philip, T; Rodary, C; Bernard, A; Zucker, J M; Bernard, J L; Robert, A; Rialland, X; Benz-Lemoine, E; Demeocq, F

    1986-08-01

    Children with B cell non-Hodgkin's lymphoma who have not relapsed 1 year after diagnosis and treatment are generally cured. We report here the results of treatment in 114 children who all had a minimum follow-up of 20 months. The protocol LMB 0281 from the French Pediatric Oncology Society was used. This nine-drug intensive-pulsed chemotherapy was based on high-dose cyclophosphamide, high-dose methotrexate (HD MTX), and cytosine arabinoside (ara-C) in continuous infusion. CNS prophylaxis was with chemotherapy only. No local irradiation was performed. No debulking surgery was recommended. There were 72 patients with stage III lymphoma and 42 patients with stage IV lymphoma or B cell acute lymphocytic leukemia (B-ALL). Among those 42 patients, seven had CNS involvement alone, 21 had bone marrow alone, and 14 had both; 26 had greater than 25% blast cells in bone marrow, 14 of whom had blast cells in blood. The primary site of involvement was the abdomen in 90 patients, the Waldeyer Ring in nine, and various sites in eight; seven patients presented without tumor. Seventy-seven patients are alive with a median follow-up of 2 years and 8 months. Seven patients died due to initial treatment failure, 11 died from toxicity, and 19 died after relapse. Among the 93 patients without initial CNS involvement, only one isolated relapse in CNS occurred. Survival and disease-free survival rates reached 67% and 64%, respectively, for all patients, 75% and 73% for stage III patients and 54% and 48% for stage IV and B-ALL patients. Bone marrow involvement was not an adverse prognostic factor. Contrary initial CNS involvement indicated a bad prognosis with a disease-free survival rate of 19% compared with 76% without CNS disease. This study showed that CNS prophylaxis and local control of the primary tumor can be achieved by intensive chemotherapy alone, without radiotherapy or debulking surgery. PMID:3525767

  1. Alkylation of isobutane with light olefins: Yields of alkylates for different olefins

    SciTech Connect

    Albright, L.F.; Kranz, K.E.; Masters, K.R.

    1993-12-01

    For alkylation of isobutane with C{sub 3}-C{sub 5} olefins using sulfuric acid as the catalyst, the yields of alkylates with different olefins are compared as the operating conditions are changed. The results of recent pilot plant experiments with propylene, C{sub 4} olefins, and C{sub 5} olefins permit such comparisons. The yields expressed as weight of alkylate produced per 100 wt of olefin consumed varied from about 201:100 to 220:100. Weight ratios of the isobutane consumed per olefin consumed vary from about 101:100 to 120:100. differences of yield values are explained by the changes in the overall chemistry. The procedure employed to calculate yields with good accuracy is based on the analysis of the alkylate and the amount of conjunct polymers produced. Based on literature data, yields are also reported for alkylations using HF as the catalyst.

  2. Structure and DNA binding of alkylation response protein AidB

    SciTech Connect

    Bowles, Timothy; Metz, Audrey H.; O'Quin, Jami; Wawrzak, Zdzislaw; Eichman, Brandt F.

    2009-01-12

    Exposure of Escherichia coli to alkylating agents activates expression of AidB in addition to DNA repair proteins Ada, AlkA, and AlkB. AidB was recently shown to possess a flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD) cofactor and to bind to dsDNA, implicating it as a flavin-dependent DNA repair enzyme. However, the molecular mechanism by which AidB acts to reduce the mutagenic effects of specific DNA alkylators is unknown. We present a 1.7-{angstrom} crystal structure of AidB, which bears superficial resemblance to the acyl-CoA dehydrogenase superfamily of flavoproteins. The structure reveals a unique quaternary organization and a distinctive FAD active site that provides a rationale for AidB's limited dehydrogenase activity. A highly electropositive C-terminal domain not present in structural homologs was identified by mutational analysis as the DNA binding site. Structural analysis of the DNA and FAD binding sites provides evidence against AidB-catalyzed DNA repair and supports a model in which AidB acts to prevent alkylation damage by protecting DNA and destroying alkylating agents that have yet to reach their DNA target.

  3. Tandem high-dose chemotherapy strategy as first-line treatment of primary disseminated multifocal Ewing sarcomas in children, adolescents and young adults.

    PubMed

    Loschi, S; Dufour, C; Oberlin, O; Goma, G; Valteau-Couanet, D; Gaspar, N

    2015-08-01

    The prognosis of primary disseminated multifocal metastatic Ewing's sarcoma (PDMES) is poor even if a slight improvement has been achieved with high-dose alkylating agent-containing chemotherapy. To enhance treatment efficacy, we assessed the feasibility, safety and efficacy of a tandem high-dose chemotherapy (HDC) regimen. In a single institution, patients with PDMES received six courses of vincristine/ifosfamide/doxorubicin/etoposide induction therapy, followed by high-dose thiotepa, and then melphalan-busulfan, 8 weeks apart. Surgical resection of primary tumour was carried out between the two HDC regimens and 70 days after the last HDC regimen for post-operative radiotherapy or irradiation alone. From October 2002 to 2009, 13 of the 18 consecutive patients with PDMES (72%) received the full treatment programme. The other five patients experienced early progression and died. Among the 13 patients, 11 relapsed after the end of the treatment programme within 6 months (2.2-11.9) from end of therapy. Only two patients are still alive in first complete remission after 9 years. The 3-year event-free survival (EFS) and overall survival (OS) rates were 11 and 22%, respectively. The median EFS and OS duration from the diagnosis were 13.4 and 17.3 months, respectively. Neither major complications nor treatment-related death occurred. The tandem-HDC regimen was feasible, with expected side effects, but it did not improve the outcome of patients with PDMES. PMID:26030048

  4. Molecular mechanisms of alkylation sensitivity in Indian muntjac cell lines.

    PubMed

    Musk, S R; Hatton, D H; Bouffler, S D; Margison, G P; Johnson, R T

    1989-07-01

    The responses of two Indian muntjac cell lines to two monofunctional alkylating agents were investigated. An SV40-transformed line (SVM) had an increased sensitivity to cell killing when compared to the other, euploid line (DM) after exposure both to methyl nitrosourea (MNU) and to dimethylsulphate (DMS) and also exhibited higher frequencies of sister chromatid exchanges (SCEs) following alkylation. The hypersensitivity of SVM to DMS correlates with the defective repair of single-strand breaks that results in the generation of long-lived breaks in the DNA following exposure, leading eventually to the formation of chromosome aberrations. In contrast no difference is seen in the formation of long-lived breaks in the DNA of SVM and DM after treatment with biologically relevant doses of MNU; in this case hypersensitivity may be due to the loss of O6-alkylguanine-DNA-alkyltransferase activity. The conclusion that the hypersensitivites of SVM to MNU and to DMS have different molecular bases is supported by transfection of SVM with plasmids containing the protein coding region of the Escherichia coli ada+ gene; subsequent expression within the cell corrects its hypersensitivity to the cytotoxic and SCE-inducing effects of MNU but has very little influence upon the lethality, SCE induction or the repair of long-lived DNA strand breaks after exposure to DMS. PMID:2544312

  5. Antibacterial Activity of Alkyl Gallates against Xanthomonas citri subsp. citri

    PubMed Central

    Silva, I. C.; Regasini, L. O.; Petrônio, M. S.; Silva, D. H. S.; Bolzani, V. S.; Belasque, J.; Sacramento, L. V. S.

    2013-01-01

    The plant-pathogenic bacterium Xanthomonas citri subsp. citri is the causal agent of Asiatic citrus canker, a serious disease that affects all the cultivars of citrus in subtropical citrus-producing areas worldwide. There is no curative treatment for citrus canker; thus, the eradication of infected plants constitutes the only effective control of the spread of X. citri subsp. citri. Since the eradication program in the state of São Paulo, Brazil, is under threat, there is a clear risk of X. citri subsp. citri becoming endemic in the main orange-producing area in the world. Here we evaluated the potential use of alkyl gallates to prevent X. citri subsp. citri growth. These esters displayed a potent anti-X. citri subsp. citri activity similar to that of kanamycin (positive control), as evaluated by the resazurin microtiter assay (REMA). The treatment of X. citri subsp. citri cells with these compounds induced altered cell morphology, and investigations of the possible intracellular targets using X. citri subsp. citri strains labeled for the septum and centromere pointed to a common target involved in chromosome segregation and cell division. Finally, the artificial inoculation of citrus with X. citri subsp. citri cells pretreated with alkyl gallates showed that the bacterium loses the ability to colonize its host, which indicates the potential of these esters to protect citrus plants against X. citri subsp. citri infection. PMID:23104804

  6. WE-D-BRE-04: Modeling Optimal Concurrent Chemotherapy Schedules

    SciTech Connect

    Jeong, J; Deasy, J O

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: Concurrent chemo-radiation therapy (CCRT) has become a more common cancer treatment option with a better tumor control rate for several tumor sites, including head and neck and lung cancer. In this work, possible optimal chemotherapy schedules were investigated by implementing chemotherapy cell-kill into a tumor response model of RT. Methods: The chemotherapy effect has been added into a published model (Jeong et al., PMB (2013) 58:4897), in which the tumor response to RT can be simulated with the effects of hypoxia and proliferation. Based on the two-compartment pharmacokinetic model, the temporal concentration of chemotherapy agent was estimated. Log cell-kill was assumed and the cell-kill constant was estimated from the observed increase in local control due to concurrent chemotherapy. For a simplified two cycle CCRT regime, several different starting times and intervals were simulated with conventional RT regime (2Gy/fx, 5fx/wk). The effectiveness of CCRT was evaluated in terms of reduction in radiation dose required for 50% of control to find the optimal chemotherapy schedule. Results: Assuming the typical slope of dose response curve (γ50=2), the observed 10% increase in local control rate was evaluated to be equivalent to an extra RT dose of about 4 Gy, from which the cell-kill rate of chemotherapy was derived to be about 0.35. Best response was obtained when chemotherapy was started at about 3 weeks after RT began. As the interval between two cycles decreases, the efficacy of chemotherapy increases with broader range of optimal starting times. Conclusion: The effect of chemotherapy has been implemented into the resource-conservation tumor response model to investigate CCRT. The results suggest that the concurrent chemotherapy might be more effective when delayed for about 3 weeks, due to lower tumor burden and a larger fraction of proliferating cells after reoxygenation.

  7. Alkyl phosphonic acids and sulfonic acids in the Murchison meteorite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cooper, George W.; Onwo, Wilfred M.; Cronin, John R.

    1992-01-01

    Homologous series of alkyl phosphonic acids and alkyl sulfonic acids, along with inorganic orthophosphate and sulfate, are identified in water extracts of the Murchison meteorite after conversion to their t-butyl dimethylsilyl derivatives. The methyl, ethyl, propyl, and butyl compounds are observed in both series. Five of the eight possible alkyl phosphonic acids and seven of the eight possible alkyl sulfonic acids through C4 are identified. Abundances decrease with increasing carbon number as observed of other homologous series indigenous to Murchison. Concentrations range downward from approximately 380 nmol/gram in the alkyl sulfonic acid series, and from 9 nmol/gram in the alkyl phosphonic acid series.

  8. Oculomotor Deficits after Chemotherapy in Childhood.

    PubMed

    Einarsson, Einar-Jón; Patel, Mitesh; Petersen, Hannes; Wiebe, Thomas; Magnusson, Måns; Moëll, Christian; Fransson, Per-Anders

    2016-01-01

    Advances in the diagnosis and treatment of pediatric malignancies have substantially increased the number of childhood cancer survivors. However, reports suggest that some of the chemotherapy agents used for treatment can cross the blood brain barrier which may lead to a host of neurological symptoms including oculomotor dysfunction. Whether chemotherapy at young age causes oculomotor dysfunction later in life is unknown. Oculomotor performance was assessed with traditional and novel methods in 23 adults (mean age 25.3 years, treatment age 10.2 years) treated with chemotherapy for a solid malignant tumor not affecting the central nervous system. Their results were compared to those from 25 healthy, age-matched controls (mean age 25.1 years). Correlation analysis was performed between the subjective symptoms reported by the chemotherapy treated subjects (CTS) and oculomotor performance. In CTS, the temporal control of the smooth pursuit velocity (velocity accuracy) was markedly poorer (p<0.001) and the saccades had disproportionally shorter amplitude than normal for the associated saccade peak velocity (main sequence) (p = 0.004), whereas smooth pursuit and saccade onset times were shorter (p = 0.004) in CTS compared with controls. The CTS treated before 12 years of age manifested more severe oculomotor deficits. CTS frequently reported subjective symptoms of visual disturbances (70%), unsteadiness, light-headedness and that things around them were spinning or moving (87%). Several subjective symptoms were significantly related to deficits in oculomotor performance. To conclude, chemotherapy in childhood or adolescence can result in severe oculomotor dysfunctions in adulthood. The revealed oculomotor dysfunctions were significantly related to the subjects' self-perception of visual disturbances, dizziness, light-headedness and sensing unsteadiness. Assessments of oculomotor function may, thus, offer an objective method to track and rate the level of neurological

  9. Oculomotor Deficits after Chemotherapy in Childhood

    PubMed Central

    Einarsson, Einar-Jón; Patel, Mitesh; Petersen, Hannes; Wiebe, Thomas; Magnusson, Måns; Moëll, Christian; Fransson, Per-Anders

    2016-01-01

    Advances in the diagnosis and treatment of pediatric malignancies have substantially increased the number of childhood cancer survivors. However, reports suggest that some of the chemotherapy agents used for treatment can cross the blood brain barrier which may lead to a host of neurological symptoms including oculomotor dysfunction. Whether chemotherapy at young age causes oculomotor dysfunction later in life is unknown. Oculomotor performance was assessed with traditional and novel methods in 23 adults (mean age 25.3 years, treatment age 10.2 years) treated with chemotherapy for a solid malignant tumor not affecting the central nervous system. Their results were compared to those from 25 healthy, age-matched controls (mean age 25.1 years). Correlation analysis was performed between the subjective symptoms reported by the chemotherapy treated subjects (CTS) and oculomotor performance. In CTS, the temporal control of the smooth pursuit velocity (velocity accuracy) was markedly poorer (p<0.001) and the saccades had disproportionally shorter amplitude than normal for the associated saccade peak velocity (main sequence) (p = 0.004), whereas smooth pursuit and saccade onset times were shorter (p = 0.004) in CTS compared with controls. The CTS treated before 12 years of age manifested more severe oculomotor deficits. CTS frequently reported subjective symptoms of visual disturbances (70%), unsteadiness, light-headedness and that things around them were spinning or moving (87%). Several subjective symptoms were significantly related to deficits in oculomotor performance. To conclude, chemotherapy in childhood or adolescence can result in severe oculomotor dysfunctions in adulthood. The revealed oculomotor dysfunctions were significantly related to the subjects’ self-perception of visual disturbances, dizziness, light-headedness and sensing unsteadiness. Assessments of oculomotor function may, thus, offer an objective method to track and rate the level of neurological

  10. Antiparasitic agents.

    PubMed

    Rosenblatt, J E

    1999-11-01

    Several important developments have occurred in recent years in the chemotherapy for and prophylaxis of parasitic infections. Although mefloquine is clearly the most effective agent for prevention of chloroquine-resistant falciparum malaria, its use has been compromised by side effects, both real and imagined. Well-designed studies have shown that side effects occur no more frequently with low-dose mefloquine than with chloroquine. Use of mefloquine in pregnant women has not been associated with birth defects, but the incidence of stillbirths may be increased. Malarone is a new agent that combines atovaquone and proguanil, and it may be as effective as mefloquine; however, it is not yet available in the United States. Several newer agents have appeared in response to the development of multidrug resistant Plasmodium falciparum, especially in Southeast Asia. Halofantrine is available for the treatment of mild to moderate malaria due to P. falciparum and for P. vivax infections. Because of severe toxic effects, use of halofantrine should be restricted to only those unusual and rare situations in which other agents cannot be used. Artemisinin (an extract of the Chinese herbal remedy qinghaosu) and two derivatives, artesunate and artemether, are active against multidrug resistant P. falciparum and are widely used in Asia in oral, parenteral, and rectal forms. The antibacterial azithromycin in combination with atovaquone or quinine has now been reported to treat babesiosis effectively in experimental animals and in a few patients. Azithromycin in combination with paromomycin has also shown promise in the treatment of cryptosporidiosis (and toxoplasmosis when combined with pyrimethamine) in patients with the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS). Albendazole is currently the only systemic agent available for treatment of microsporidiosis, an infection primarily of patients with AIDS. In addition, albendazole and ivermectin have emerged as effective broad

  11. Experimental studies of combination of PDT and tumor chemotherapy or 60Co irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Didziapetriene, Janina; Prasmickiene, Grazina; Sukeliene, Dalija; Rotomskis, Ricardas; Streckyte, Giedre; Atkocius, Vydmantas; Staciokiene, Laima; Smilgevicius, Valerijus

    1995-01-01

    We present experimental results obtained by combining photodynamic therapy (PDT) with tumor chemotherapy or radiotherapy. Dimethoxyhematoporphyrin (DMHp) and photosan (PS) were used as photosensitizers, pharanoxi and vincristine as antitumor drugs. The therapeutic effect of the combination of PDT and antitumor drugs (pharanoxi, vincristine) slightly increases as compared to the treatment of PDT or antitumor drug alone. The additive therapeutic effect is achieved under the combination of PDT and 60Co irradiation. It seems that the sensitizers DMHp and PS regulate lipid peroxidation in blood serum of experimental animals, which becomes more active under the influence of alkylating antitumor drugs. Therefore, they could protect an organism from negative influence of tumor chemotherapy.

  12. Synthesis of Norbornane Bisether Antibiotics via Silver-mediated Alkylation

    PubMed Central

    Hickey, Shane M.; Ashton, Trent D.; White, Jonathan M.; Li, Jian; Nation, Roger L.; Yu, Heidi Y.; Elliott, Alysha G.; Butler, Mark S.; Huang, Johnny X.; Cooper, Matthew A.

    2015-01-01

    A small series of norbornane bisether diguanidines have been synthesized and evaluated as antibacterial agents. The key transformation—bisalkylation of norbornane diol 6—was not successful using Williamson methodology but has been accomplished using Ag2O mediated alkylation. Further functionalization to incorporate two guanidinium groups gave rise to a series of structurally rigid cationic amphiphiles; several of which (16d, 16g and 16h) exhibited antibiotic activity. For example, compound 16d was active against a broad range of bacteria including Pseudomonas aeruginosa (MIC = 8 µg/mL), Escherichia coli (MIC = 8 µg/mL) and methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MIC = 8 µg/mL). PMID:26251697

  13. Palladium-Catalyzed, Ring-Forming Aromatic C–H Alkylations with Unactivated Alkyl Halides

    PubMed Central

    Venning, Alexander R. O.; Bohan, Patrick T.; Alexanian, Erik J.

    2015-01-01

    A catalytic C–H alkylation using unactivated alkyl halides and a variety of arenes and heteroarenes is described. This ring-forming process is successful with a variety of unactivated primary and secondary alkyl halides, including those with β-hydrogens. In contrast to standard polar or radical cyclizations of aromatic systems, electronic activation of the substrate is not required. The mild, catalytic reaction conditions are highly functional group tolerant and facilitate access to a diverse range of synthetically and medicinally important carbocyclic and heterocyclic systems. PMID:25746442

  14. New therapies for antiemetic prophylaxis for chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Davis, Mellar P

    2016-01-01

    A number of new advances have occurred over the past 2 years in the management of chemotherapy-related nausea and vomiting (CINV). A new neurokinin-1 receptor antagonist (NK1RA), netupitant, has been combined with palonosetron in a single oral tablet for treating the effects of moderately emetogenic chemotherapy (MEC) and highly emetogenic chemotherapy (HEC). Rolapitant, another NK1RA, unlike aprepitant, has a long half-life and does not block CYP-3A4 and therefore has fewer drug interactions. Olanzapine reduces nausea more effectively than aprepitant in patients who are receiving HEC and is a better rescue antiemetic than is metoclopramide. Ginger lacks efficacy as an antiemetic agent for CINV. Although there was some evidence in a pilot study of gabapentin as an antiemetic, it was no better in reducing CINV than was placebo. Compliance to guidelines in multiple settings ranges from 50%-60% but is improved by computerized order entry of antiemetics and recommendations displayed with chemotherapy. PMID:26870838

  15. Enhancement of alkylation catalysts for improved supercritical fluid regeneration

    DOEpatents

    Ginosar, Daniel M.; Petkovic, Lucia

    2009-09-22

    A method of modifying an alkylation catalyst to reduce the formation of condensed hydrocarbon species thereon. The method comprises providing an alkylation catalyst comprising a plurality of active sites. The plurality of active sites on the alkylation catalyst may include a plurality of weakly acidic active sites, intermediate acidity active sites, and strongly acidic active sites. A base is adsorbed to a portion of the plurality of active sites, such as the strongly acidic active sites, selectively poisoning the strongly acidic active sites. A method of modifying the alkylation catalyst by providing an alkylation catalyst comprising a pore size distribution that sterically constrains formation of the condensed hydrocarbon species on the alkylation catalyst or by synthesizing the alkylation catalyst to comprise a decreased number of strongly acidic active sites is also disclosed, as is a method of improving a regeneration efficiency of the alkylation catalyst.

  16. Enhancement of alkylation catalysts for improved supercritical fluid regeneration

    DOEpatents

    Ginosar, Daniel M.; Petkovic, Lucia M.

    2010-12-28

    A method of modifying an alkylation catalyst to reduce the formation of condensed hydrocarbon species thereon. The method comprises providing an alkylation catalyst comprising a plurality of active sites. The plurality of active sites on the alkylation catalyst may include a plurality of weakly acidic active sites, intermediate acidity active sites, and strongly acidic active sites. A base is adsorbed to a portion of the plurality of active sites, such as the strongly acidic active sites, selectively poisoning the strongly acidic active sites. A method of modifying the alkylation catalyst by providing an alkylation catalyst comprising a pore size distribution that sterically constrains formation of the condensed hydrocarbon species on the alkylation catalyst or by synthesizing the alkylation catalyst to comprise a decreased number of strongly acidic active sites is also disclosed, as is a method of improving a regeneration efficiency of the alkylation catalyst.

  17. Cytoreductive surgery plus chemotherapy versus chemotherapy alone for recurrent epithelial ovarian cancer

    PubMed Central

    Galaal, Khadra; Naik, Raj; Bristow, Robert E; Patel, Amit; Bryant, Andrew; Dickinson, Heather O

    2014-01-01

    Background Most women with advanced epithelial ovarian cancer will ultimately develop recurrent disease after completion of initial treatment with primary surgery and adjuvant chemotherapy. Secondary cytoreductive surgery may have survival benefits in selected patients. However, a number of chemotherapeutic agents are active in recurrent ovarian cancer and the standard treatment of patients with recurrent ovarian cancer remains poorly defined. Objectives To evaluate the effectiveness and safety of secondary surgical cytoreduction and chemotherapy compared to chemotherapy alone for women with recurrent epithelial ovarian cancer. Search methods We searched the Cochrane Gynaecological Cancer Group Trials Register, The Cochrane Register of Controlled Trials, (CENTRAL) Issue 1 2009, MEDLINE and EMBASE up to February 2009. We also searched registers of clinical trials, abstracts of scientific meetings, reference lists of review articles and contacted experts in the field. Selection criteria We searched for RCTs, quasi-randomised trials and non-randomised studies that compared secondary cytoreductive surgery and chemotherapy to chemotherapy alone in women with recurrent epithelial ovarian cancer. Data collection and analysis Three reviewers independently assessed whether potentially relevant studies met the inclusion criteria. No trials were found and therefore no data were analysed. Main results The search strategy identified 1431 unique references of which all were excluded on the basis of title and abstract. Authors’ conclusions We found no evidence from RCTs to inform decisions about secondary surgical cytoreduction and chemotherapy compared to chemotherapy alone for women with recurrent epithelial ovarian cancer. Ideally, a large randomised controlled trial or, at the very least, well designed non-randomised studies that use multivariate analysis to adjust for baseline imbalances are needed to compare these treatment modalities. The results of the ongoing RCT AGO

  18. Chemotherapy for malignant brain tumors of childhood

    PubMed Central

    Gottardo, Nicholas G.; Gajjar, Amar

    2009-01-01

    During the past 3 decades, chemotherapeutic agents have been extensively evaluated for the treatment of pediatric brain tumors in a myriad of schedules, doses, and combinations. Remarkable advances in outcome have been achieved for certain groups of children, notably those with medulloblastoma, and chemotherapy has played a key role. However, improvements in survival are obtained at a high cost to quality of life. In addition, the success achieved for medulloblastoma is offset by a lack of progress for high-grade glioma. Despite decades of intensive investigation, no single chemotherapeutic regimen stands out as particularly beneficial for children with high-grade glioma, with the vast majority of these patients succumbing to their disease. A plateau in efficacy has been reached. Further treatment intensification using conventional nonspecific chemotherapy is more likely to result in additional toxicity without major advances in survival. Genomewide analysis using microarray technology has contributed significantly to our understanding of tumor biology. This knowledge has shifted the focus onto novel agents that target molecular changes crucial for tumor proliferation or survival. These selective agents are likely to be less toxic to normal cells and it is anticipated they will be more effective than the nonspecific chemotherapeutic agents currently used. PMID:18952581

  19. Role of alkyl alcohol on viscosity of silica-based chemical gels for decontamination of highly radioactive nuclear facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, B. S.; Yoon, S. B.; Jung, C. H.; Lee, K. W.; Moon, J. K.

    2012-07-01

    Silica-based chemical gel for the decontamination of nuclear facilities was prepared by using fumed silica as a viscosifier, a 0.5 M Ce (IV) solution dissolved in concentrated nitric acid as a chemical decontamination agent, and tripropylene glycol butyl ether (TPGBE) as a co-viscosifier. A new effective strategy for the preparation of the chemical gel was investigated by introducing the alkyl alcohols as organic solvents to effectively dissolve the co-viscosifier. The mixture solution of the co-viscosifier and alkyl alcohols was more effective in the control of viscosity than that of the co-viscosifier only in gel. Here, the alkyl alcohols played a key role as an effective dissolution solvent for the co-viscosifier in the preparation of the chemical gel, resulting in a reducing of the amount of the co-viscosifier and gel time compared with that of the chemical gel prepared without the alkyl alcohols. It was considered that the alkyl alcohols contributed to the effective dissolution of the co-viscosifier as well as the homogeneous mixing in the formation of the gel, while the co-viscosifier in an aqueous media of the chemical decontamination agent solution showed a lower solubility. The decontamination efficiency of the chemical gels prepared in this work using a multi-channel analyzer (MCA) showed a high decontamination efficiency of over ca. 94% and ca. 92% for Co-60 and Cs-137 contaminated on surface of the stainless steel 304, respectively. (authors)

  20. Managing Chemotherapy Side Effects: Infection

    MedlinePlus

    ... ational C ancer I nstitute Managing Chemotherapy Side Effects Infection “I am extra careful to stay away ... doctor or nurse right away. Managing Chemotherapy Side Effects: Infection Take these steps to lower your chances ...

  1. Managing Chemotherapy Side Effects: Diarrhea

    MedlinePlus

    ... ational C ancer I nstitute Managing Chemotherapy Side Effects U.S. DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES National ... before taking medicine for diarrhea. Managing Chemotherapy Side Effects: Diarrhea These foods and drinks may help if ...

  2. Capecitabine Induced Multifocal Leukoencephalopathy: Do We Have Always to Switch off the Chemotherapy?

    PubMed

    Bougea, Anastasia; Voskou, Panagiota; Kilidireas, Constantinos; Andreadou, Elisabeth

    2016-01-01

    Capecitabine is a well tolerated and safe 5-fluorouracil agent for adjuvant, neoadjuvant chemotherapy or metastatic cases. Neurological side effects require discontinuation of chemotherapy. We report this unique case of a 50-year-old female, who presented an isolated episode of dysarthria and ataxia under bevacizumab, capecitabine, and oxaliplatin treatment due to reversible multifocal leukoencephalopathy that did not recur after readministration of chemotherapy. PMID:26966603

  3. Treatment-induced cell cycle kinetics dictate tumor response to chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Hallett, Robin M.; Huang, Cheng; Motazedian, Ali; Auf der Mauer, Stefanie; Pond, Gregory R.; Hassell, John A.; Nordon, Robert E.; Draper, Jonathan S.

    2015-01-01

    Chemotherapy fails to provide durable cure for the majority of cancer patients. To identify mechanisms associated with chemotherapy resistance, we identified genes differentially expressed before and after chemotherapeutic treatment of breast cancer patients. Treatment response resulted in either increased or decreased cell cycle gene expression. Tumors in which cell cycle gene expression was increased by chemotherapy were likely to be chemotherapy sensitive, whereas tumors in which cell cycle gene transcripts were decreased by chemotherapy were resistant to these agents. A gene expression signature that predicted these changes proved to be a robust and novel index that predicted the response of patients with breast, ovarian, and colon tumors to chemotherapy. Investigations in tumor cell lines supported these findings, and linked treatment induced cell cycle changes with p53 signaling and G1/G0 arrest. Hence, chemotherapy resistance, which can be predicted based on dynamics in cell cycle gene expression, is associated with TP53 integrity. PMID:25749523

  4. 40 CFR 721.2420 - Alkoxylated dialkyldiethylenetriamine, alkyl sulfate salt.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ..., alkyl sulfate salt. 721.2420 Section 721.2420 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.2420 Alkoxylated dialkyldiethylenetriamine, alkyl sulfate salt. (a... generically as an alkoxylated dialkyldiethylenetriamine, alkyl sulfate salt (PMN P-91-288) is subject...

  5. 40 CFR 721.2420 - Alkoxylated dialkyldiethylenetriamine, alkyl sulfate salt.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ..., alkyl sulfate salt. 721.2420 Section 721.2420 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.2420 Alkoxylated dialkyldiethylenetriamine, alkyl sulfate salt. (a... generically as an alkoxylated dialkyldiethylenetriamine, alkyl sulfate salt (PMN P-91-288) is subject...

  6. 40 CFR 721.575 - Substituted alkyl halide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Substituted alkyl halide. 721.575... Substances § 721.575 Substituted alkyl halide. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as substituted alkyl halide (PMN P-83-1222)...

  7. 40 CFR 721.1878 - Alkali metal alkyl borohydride (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Alkali metal alkyl borohydride... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.1878 Alkali metal alkyl borohydride (generic). (a) Chemical substance... alkali metal alkyl borohydride (PMN P-00-1089) is subject to reporting under this section for...

  8. 40 CFR 721.1878 - Alkali metal alkyl borohydride (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Alkali metal alkyl borohydride... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.1878 Alkali metal alkyl borohydride (generic). (a) Chemical substance... alkali metal alkyl borohydride (PMN P-00-1089) is subject to reporting under this section for...

  9. 40 CFR 721.1878 - Alkali metal alkyl borohydride (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Alkali metal alkyl borohydride... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.1878 Alkali metal alkyl borohydride (generic). (a) Chemical substance... alkali metal alkyl borohydride (PMN P-00-1089) is subject to reporting under this section for...

  10. 40 CFR 721.1878 - Alkali metal alkyl borohydride (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Alkali metal alkyl borohydride... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.1878 Alkali metal alkyl borohydride (generic). (a) Chemical substance... alkali metal alkyl borohydride (PMN P-00-1089) is subject to reporting under this section for...

  11. 40 CFR 721.555 - Alkyl amino nitriles (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Substances § 721.555 Alkyl amino nitriles (generic). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substances identified generically as alkyl amino nitriles (PMNs P-96... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Alkyl amino nitriles (generic)....

  12. 40 CFR 721.3485 - Hydrofluorocarbon alkyl ether.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Hydrofluorocarbon alkyl ether. 721... Substances § 721.3485 Hydrofluorocarbon alkyl ether. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as a hydrofluorocarbon alkyl...

  13. 40 CFR 721.3485 - Hydrofluorocarbon alkyl ether.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Hydrofluorocarbon alkyl ether. 721... Substances § 721.3485 Hydrofluorocarbon alkyl ether. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as a hydrofluorocarbon alkyl...

  14. 40 CFR 721.10053 - Alkyl silane methacrylate (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Alkyl silane methacrylate (generic... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10053 Alkyl silane methacrylate (generic). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as alkyl...

  15. 40 CFR 721.10053 - Alkyl silane methacrylate (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Alkyl silane methacrylate (generic... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10053 Alkyl silane methacrylate (generic). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as alkyl...

  16. 40 CFR 721.10053 - Alkyl silane methacrylate (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Alkyl silane methacrylate (generic... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10053 Alkyl silane methacrylate (generic). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as alkyl...

  17. 40 CFR 721.10053 - Alkyl silane methacrylate (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Alkyl silane methacrylate (generic... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10053 Alkyl silane methacrylate (generic). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as alkyl...

  18. 40 CFR 721.10053 - Alkyl silane methacrylate (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Alkyl silane methacrylate (generic... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10053 Alkyl silane methacrylate (generic). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as alkyl...

  19. 40 CFR 721.555 - Alkyl amino nitriles (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Substances § 721.555 Alkyl amino nitriles (generic). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substances identified generically as alkyl amino nitriles (PMNs P-96... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Alkyl amino nitriles (generic)....

  20. IONIC LIQUID-CATALYZED ALKYLATION OF ISOBUTANE WITH 2-BUTENE

    EPA Science Inventory

    A detailed study of the alkylation of isobutane with 2-butene in ionic liquid media has been conducted using 1-alkyl-3-methylimidazolium halides?aluminum chloride encompassing various alkyl groups (butyl-, hexyl-, and octyl-) and halides (Cl, Br, and I) on its cations and anions,...

  1. 40 CFR 721.1852 - Di-alkyl borane (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Di-alkyl borane (generic). 721.1852... Substances § 721.1852 Di-alkyl borane (generic). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as di-alkyl borane (PMN P-00-1087) is...

  2. 40 CFR 721.10087 - Substituted alkyl phosphine oxide (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Substituted alkyl phosphine oxide... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10087 Substituted alkyl phosphine oxide (generic). (a) Chemical... as substituted alkyl phosphine oxide (PMN P-06-332) is subject to reporting under this section...

  3. 40 CFR 721.10087 - Substituted alkyl phosphine oxide (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Substituted alkyl phosphine oxide... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10087 Substituted alkyl phosphine oxide (generic). (a) Chemical... as substituted alkyl phosphine oxide (PMN P-06-332) is subject to reporting under this section...

  4. 40 CFR 721.9720 - Disubstituted alkyl triazines (generic name).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Disubstituted alkyl triazines (generic... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.9720 Disubstituted alkyl triazines (generic name). (a) Chemical... as disubstituted alkyl triazines (PMNs P-85-932 and P-85-933) are subject to reporting under...

  5. 40 CFR 721.10506 - Alkylated phenols (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Alkylated phenols (generic). 721.10506... Substances § 721.10506 Alkylated phenols (generic). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substances identified generically as alkylated phenols (PMNs...

  6. 40 CFR 721.5769 - Mixture of nitrated alkylated phenols.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Mixture of nitrated alkylated phenols... Substances § 721.5769 Mixture of nitrated alkylated phenols. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified as a mixture of nitrated alkylated...

  7. 40 CFR 721.5769 - Mixture of nitrated alkylated phenols.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Mixture of nitrated alkylated phenols... Substances § 721.5769 Mixture of nitrated alkylated phenols. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified as a mixture of nitrated alkylated...

  8. 40 CFR 721.5769 - Mixture of nitrated alkylated phenols.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Mixture of nitrated alkylated phenols... Substances § 721.5769 Mixture of nitrated alkylated phenols. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified as a mixture of nitrated alkylated...

  9. 40 CFR 721.5769 - Mixture of nitrated alkylated phenols.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Mixture of nitrated alkylated phenols... Substances § 721.5769 Mixture of nitrated alkylated phenols. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified as a mixture of nitrated alkylated...

  10. 40 CFR 721.5769 - Mixture of nitrated alkylated phenols.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Mixture of nitrated alkylated phenols... Substances § 721.5769 Mixture of nitrated alkylated phenols. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified as a mixture of nitrated alkylated...

  11. 40 CFR 721.10506 - Alkylated phenols (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Alkylated phenols (generic). 721.10506... Substances § 721.10506 Alkylated phenols (generic). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substances identified generically as alkylated phenols (PMNs...

  12. 40 CFR 721.2410 - Alkoxylated alkyldiethylenetriamine, alkyl sulfate salts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ..., alkyl sulfate salts. 721.2410 Section 721.2410 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.2410 Alkoxylated alkyldiethylenetriamine, alkyl sulfate salts. (a... generically as alkoxylated dialkyldiethylenetriamine, alkyl sulfate salts (PMN P-94-325, 326, and 327)...

  13. 40 CFR 721.2420 - Alkoxylated dialkyldiethylenetriamine, alkyl sulfate salt.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ..., alkyl sulfate salt. 721.2420 Section 721.2420 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.2420 Alkoxylated dialkyldiethylenetriamine, alkyl sulfate salt. (a... generically as an alkoxylated dialkyldiethylenetriamine, alkyl sulfate salt (PMN P-91-288) is subject...

  14. 40 CFR 721.2410 - Alkoxylated alkyldiethylenetriamine, alkyl sulfate salts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ..., alkyl sulfate salts. 721.2410 Section 721.2410 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.2410 Alkoxylated alkyldiethylenetriamine, alkyl sulfate salts. (a... generically as alkoxylated dialkyldiethylenetriamine, alkyl sulfate salts (PMN P-94-325, 326, and 327)...

  15. 40 CFR 721.2410 - Alkoxylated alkyldiethylenetriamine, alkyl sulfate salts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ..., alkyl sulfate salts. 721.2410 Section 721.2410 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.2410 Alkoxylated alkyldiethylenetriamine, alkyl sulfate salts. (a... generically as alkoxylated dialkyldiethylenetriamine, alkyl sulfate salts (PMN P-94-325, 326, and 327)...

  16. 40 CFR 721.2410 - Alkoxylated alkyldiethylenetriamine, alkyl sulfate salts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ..., alkyl sulfate salts. 721.2410 Section 721.2410 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.2410 Alkoxylated alkyldiethylenetriamine, alkyl sulfate salts. (a... generically as alkoxylated dialkyldiethylenetriamine, alkyl sulfate salts (PMN P-94-325, 326, and 327)...

  17. 40 CFR 721.2410 - Alkoxylated alkyldiethylenetriamine, alkyl sulfate salts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ..., alkyl sulfate salts. 721.2410 Section 721.2410 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.2410 Alkoxylated alkyldiethylenetriamine, alkyl sulfate salts. (a... generically as alkoxylated dialkyldiethylenetriamine, alkyl sulfate salts (PMN P-94-325, 326, and 327)...

  18. 40 CFR 721.2420 - Alkoxylated dialkyldiethylenetriamine, alkyl sulfate salt.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ..., alkyl sulfate salt. 721.2420 Section 721.2420 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.2420 Alkoxylated dialkyldiethylenetriamine, alkyl sulfate salt. (a... generically as an alkoxylated dialkyldiethylenetriamine, alkyl sulfate salt (PMN P-91-288) is subject...

  19. 40 CFR 721.2420 - Alkoxylated dialkyldiethylenetriamine, alkyl sulfate salt.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ..., alkyl sulfate salt. 721.2420 Section 721.2420 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.2420 Alkoxylated dialkyldiethylenetriamine, alkyl sulfate salt. (a... generically as an alkoxylated dialkyldiethylenetriamine, alkyl sulfate salt (PMN P-91-288) is subject...

  20. 40 CFR 721.2825 - Alkyl ester (generic name).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Alkyl ester (generic name). 721.2825... Substances § 721.2825 Alkyl ester (generic name). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance alkyl ester (PMN P-84-968) is subject to reporting under this...

  1. 40 CFR 721.2825 - Alkyl ester (generic name).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Alkyl ester (generic name). 721.2825... Substances § 721.2825 Alkyl ester (generic name). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance alkyl ester (PMN P-84-968) is subject to reporting under this...

  2. 40 CFR 721.4136 - Alkyl heteropolycyclic-aniline (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Alkyl heteropolycyclic-aniline... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.4136 Alkyl heteropolycyclic-aniline (generic). (a) Chemical substance... alkyl heteropolycyclic-aniline (PMN P-00-0067) is subject to reporting under this section for...

  3. 40 CFR 721.4136 - Alkyl heteropolycyclic-aniline (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Alkyl heteropolycyclic-aniline... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.4136 Alkyl heteropolycyclic-aniline (generic). (a) Chemical substance... alkyl heteropolycyclic-aniline (PMN P-00-0067) is subject to reporting under this section for...

  4. 40 CFR 721.4136 - Alkyl heteropolycyclic-aniline (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Alkyl heteropolycyclic-aniline... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.4136 Alkyl heteropolycyclic-aniline (generic). (a) Chemical substance... alkyl heteropolycyclic-aniline (PMN P-00-0067) is subject to reporting under this section for...

  5. 40 CFR 721.4136 - Alkyl heteropolycyclic-aniline (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Alkyl heteropolycyclic-aniline... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.4136 Alkyl heteropolycyclic-aniline (generic). (a) Chemical substance... alkyl heteropolycyclic-aniline (PMN P-00-0067) is subject to reporting under this section for...

  6. 40 CFR 721.4136 - Alkyl heteropolycyclic-aniline (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Alkyl heteropolycyclic-aniline... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.4136 Alkyl heteropolycyclic-aniline (generic). (a) Chemical substance... alkyl heteropolycyclic-aniline (PMN P-00-0067) is subject to reporting under this section for...

  7. Synthesis and characterization of chitosan alkyl urea.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jing; Jiang, Ji-Zhou; Chen, Wei; Bai, Zheng-Wu

    2016-07-10

    Chitosan is a versatile material employed for various purposes in many fields including the development of chiral stationary phases for enantioseparation. Chitosan alkyl urea is a kind of intermediate used to prepare enantioseparation materials. In order to synthesize the intermediates, in the present work, a new way to prepare chitosan alkyl urea has been established: chitosan was first reacted with methyl chloroformate yielding N-methoxyformylated chitosan, which was then converted to chitosan alkyl urea through amine-ester exchange reaction. With a large excess of methyl chloroformate and primary amine of low stereohindrance, the amino group in chitosan could be almost completely converted to ureido group. The as-prepared chitosan alkyl urea derivatives were characterized by IR, (1)H NMR, (13)C NMR,(1)H-(1)H COSY and (1)H-(13)C HSQC NMR spectra. The chemical shifts of hydrogen and carbon atoms of glucose unit were assigned. It was found that the degree of substitution was obviously lower if cyclopropyl amine, aniline, tert-butyl amine and diethyl amine were used as reactants for the amine-ester exchange reaction. The reason was explained with the aid of theoretical calculations. PMID:27106154

  8. Poly(ethyleneoxide) functionalization through alkylation

    SciTech Connect

    Sivanandan, Kulandaivelu; Eitouni, Hany Basam; Li, Yan; Pratt, Russell Clayton

    2015-04-21

    A new and efficient method of functionalizing high molecular weight polymers through alkylation using a metal amide base is described. This novel procedure can also be used to synthesize polymer-based macro-initiators containing radical initiating groups at the chain-ends for synthesis of block copolymers.

  9. Polygas spells relief from alkylation ills

    SciTech Connect

    Weismantel, G.E.

    1980-06-16

    Tight supplies and soaring prices of isobutane (for olefin alkylation), are causing renewed interest in the olefin ''polymerization'' (i.e., dimerization), route to high-octane gasoline-blending components. Modern polymerization processes, intended to supplement rather than replace alkylation offer considerable energy and capital savings, compared with alkylation-only schemes. In addition to the Institut Francais du Petrole's Dimersol ''polymerization'' tecnique which is already being used or will be used by 1981 in at least five U.S. refineries, with six more units in the planning stage, a low-cost process to ''polymerize'' excess refinery olefins, developed by International Energy Consultants Inc., is nearing commercialization. A third route to process C/sub 3//C/sub 4/ refinery streams with high conversion rates has been proposed by UOP Inc. The low motor octane number (MON) of the product gasoline (approx. 13 numbers lower than a typical alkylate), was recently confirmed in Total Petroleum Inc.'s studies, but Good Hope Refineries Inc. plans to increase its polymer gasoline MON by adding methyl tert.-butyl ether.

  10. Separate olefin processing in sulfuric acid alkylation

    SciTech Connect

    Imhoff, S.A.; Graves, D.C.

    1995-09-01

    This paper will discuss the effects of alkylating propylene, butylenes and amylenes together and suggest alternative processing schemes which will minimize the negative synergies, improve octane and/or minimize acid consumption. The first option will show the impact of segregating the propylene and amylenes. In the second option, the benefit of alkylating the individual olefins at their optimal acid strengths will be presented. Additionally, each olefin`s optimal reaction conditions will be examined. Unfortunately, many refiners may not have the existing flexibility to take advantage of separate olefin processing. First, the majority of the propylene, butylenes and amylenes must be separate upon entry to the alkylation unit. If the olefins cannot be segregated upstream, separate olefin processing will not be as beneficial. If this is the case, then the benefits of separate olefin processing will have to be weighed versus the capital and energy costs required to separate them. In addition, small units may not have sufficient numbers of Contactors and settlers to achieve adequate segregation. Later in this paper, the modifications required in the alkylation unit for separate olefin processing will be discussed.

  11. Cutaneous manifestations of nontargeted and targeted chemotherapies.

    PubMed

    Shi, Veronica J; Levy, Lauren L; Choi, Jennifer N

    2016-06-01

    Care of the oncologic patient requires an integral understanding of the adverse reactions of chemotherapy. With the advent of targeted agents and immunomodulating therapies, reactions to these newer treatments are of clinical interest. Cutaneous side effects of chemotherapeutic agents, including toxic erythema and mucositis, are common and may require cessation of treatment if associated with discomfort, superinfection, or negative impact on quality of life. This article reviews the cutaneous adverse reactions and treatment options of both conventional cytotoxic chemotherapeutic agents and newer targeted, multikinase inhibitors and immunomodulating therapies. An understanding of possible cutaneous reactions by all providers involved in the care of the oncologic patient is critical for prompt recognition, allowing for appropriate treatment and referral to dermatologists when necessary. PMID:27178698

  12. Chemotherapy of prostate cancer: present and future.

    PubMed

    Trump, Donald; Lau, Yiu-Keung

    2003-06-01

    The role of chemotherapy in prostate cancer continues to evolve. In men with symptomatic androgen-independent prostate cancer, significant reduction in pain and analgesic requirements are achievable with mitoxantrone and glucocorticoid combinations compared with glucocorticoids alone. However, survival rates are not improved. Taxane-based combinations with estramustine phosphate or other new agents show promise. Prostate-specific antigen response rates with these combinations appear to be 1.5 to 2 times more frequent than with mitoxantrone-based combinations. Randomized trials of taxane versus mitoxantrone-based therapies are underway. New agents and applications of current agents in adjuvant settings should be explored if survival in men with prostate cancer is to be improved. PMID:12756087

  13. Masked N-Heterocyclic Carbene-Catalyzed Alkylation of Phenols with Organic Carbonates.

    PubMed

    Lui, Matthew Y; Yuen, Alexander K L; Masters, Anthony F; Maschmeyer, Thomas

    2016-09-01

    An easily prepared masked N-heterocyclic carbene, 1,3-dimethylimidazolium-2-carboxylate (DMI-CO2 ), was investigated as a "green" and inexpensive organocatalyst for the alkylation of phenols. The process made use of various low-toxicity and renewable alkylating agents, such as dimethyl- and diethyl carbonate, in a focused microwave reactor. DMI-CO2 was found to be a very active catalyst and excellent yields of a range of aryl alkyl ethers were obtained under relatively benign conditions. The observed difference in the conversion behavior of phenol methylation, in the presence of either the carbene or 1,8-diazabicycloundec-7-ene (DBU) catalyst, was rationalized on the basis of mechanistic investigations. The primary mode of action for the N-heterocyclic carbene is nucleophilic catalysis. Activation of the dialkyl carbonate electrophile results in concomitant evolution of an organo-soluble alkoxide, which deprotonates the phenolic starting material. In contrast, DBU is initially protonated by the phenol and thus consumed. Subsequent regeneration and participation in nucleophilic catalysis only becomes significant after some phenolate alkylation occurs. PMID:27528488

  14. A role for Saccharomyces cerevisiae Tpa1 protein in direct alkylation repair.

    PubMed

    Shivange, Gururaj; Kodipelli, Naveena; Monisha, Mohan; Anindya, Roy

    2014-12-26

    Alkylating agents induce cytotoxic DNA base adducts. In this work, we provide evidence to suggest, for the first time, that Saccharomyces cerevisiae Tpa1 protein is involved in DNA alkylation repair. Little is known about Tpa1 as a repair protein beyond the initial observation from a high-throughput analysis indicating that deletion of TPA1 causes methyl methane sulfonate sensitivity in S. cerevisiae. Using purified Tpa1, we demonstrate that Tpa1 repairs both single- and double-stranded methylated DNA. Tpa1 is a member of the Fe(II) and 2-oxoglutarate-dependent dioxygenase family, and we show that mutation of the amino acid residues involved in cofactor binding abolishes the Tpa1 DNA repair activity. Deletion of TPA1 along with the base excision repair pathway DNA glycosylase MAG1 renders the tpa1Δmag1Δ double mutant highly susceptible to methylation-induced toxicity. We further demonstrate that the trans-lesion synthesis DNA polymerase Polζ (REV3) plays a key role in tolerating DNA methyl-base lesions and that tpa1Δmag1revΔ3 triple mutant is extremely susceptible to methylation-induced toxicity. Our results indicate a synergism between the base excision repair pathway and direct alkylation repair by Tpa1 in S. cerevisiae. We conclude that Tpa1 is a hitherto unidentified DNA repair protein in yeast and that it plays a crucial role in reverting alkylated DNA base lesions and cytotoxicity. PMID:25381260

  15. A Role for Saccharomyces cerevisiae Tpa1 Protein in Direct Alkylation Repair*

    PubMed Central

    Shivange, Gururaj; Kodipelli, Naveena; Monisha, Mohan; Anindya, Roy

    2014-01-01

    Alkylating agents induce cytotoxic DNA base adducts. In this work, we provide evidence to suggest, for the first time, that Saccharomyces cerevisiae Tpa1 protein is involved in DNA alkylation repair. Little is known about Tpa1 as a repair protein beyond the initial observation from a high-throughput analysis indicating that deletion of TPA1 causes methyl methane sulfonate sensitivity in S. cerevisiae. Using purified Tpa1, we demonstrate that Tpa1 repairs both single- and double-stranded methylated DNA. Tpa1 is a member of the Fe(II) and 2-oxoglutarate-dependent dioxygenase family, and we show that mutation of the amino acid residues involved in cofactor binding abolishes the Tpa1 DNA repair activity. Deletion of TPA1 along with the base excision repair pathway DNA glycosylase MAG1 renders the tpa1Δmag1Δ double mutant highly susceptible to methylation-induced toxicity. We further demonstrate that the trans-lesion synthesis DNA polymerase Polζ (REV3) plays a key role in tolerating DNA methyl-base lesions and that tpa1Δmag1revΔ3 triple mutant is extremely susceptible to methylation-induced toxicity. Our results indicate a synergism between the base excision repair pathway and direct alkylation repair by Tpa1 in S. cerevisiae. We conclude that Tpa1 is a hitherto unidentified DNA repair protein in yeast and that it plays a crucial role in reverting alkylated DNA base lesions and cytotoxicity. PMID:25381260

  16. Recent advances in the pharmacogenetics of cancer chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Watters, James W; McLeod, Howard L

    2002-12-01

    Patient response to chemotherapy varies widely between individuals. Pharmacogenetics is the study of inherited DNA polymorphisms that influence drug disposition and effects, the goal of which is the individualization of drug treatment. As unpredictable efficacy and high levels of systemic toxicity are common in cancer chemotherapy, pharmacogenetics is particularly appealing for oncology. Recent studies have shown that polymorphisms in genes involved in drug metabolism, nucleotide synthesis and DNA repair contribute to inter-patient variability in the efficacy and toxicity of many chemotherapy agents. This review will discuss recent developments in the most clinically relevant examples of cancer pharmacogenetics, and how genetic differences among individuals are shaping the future of cancer chemotherapy. PMID:12596358

  17. Persistent Mobility Disability After Neurotoxic Chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Fitzgerald, G. Kelley; Studenski, Stephanie A.

    2010-01-01

    Background and Purpose The impact of cancer and its treatments on balance and functional mobility in older adults remains unknown but is increasingly important, given the evolution of cancer treatments. Subacute and more persistent side effects such as chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy are on the rise, and the effects on mobility and balance, as well as the prognosis for resolution of any functional deficits, must be established before interventions can be trialed. The purpose of this case report is to describe the severity and long-term persistence of mobility decline in an older adult who received neurotoxic chemotherapy. To our knowledge, this is the first case report to describe an older adult with chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy using results of standardized balance and mobility tests and to focus on prognosis by repeating these measures more than 2 years after chemotherapy. Case Description An 81-year-old woman received a neurotoxic agent (paclitaxel) after curative mastectomy for breast cancer. Baseline testing prior to taxane therapy revealed a socially active woman with no reported functional deficits or neuropathic symptoms, 1.2-m/s gait speed, and performance at the ceiling on balance and gait portions of a standardized mobility measure. Outcomes After 3 cycles, paclitaxel therapy was stopped by the oncologist because of neurotoxicity. Declines as large as 50% were seen in performance-based measures at 12 weeks and persisted at 2.5 years, and the patient reported recurrent falls, cane use, and mobility-related disability. Discussion This case highlights the extent to which function can decline in an older individual receiving neurotoxic chemotherapy, the potential for these deficits to persist years after treatment is stopped, and the need for physical therapy intervention and further research in this population. PMID:20813818

  18. Dichloromethyl alkyl ethers and sulfides in the Reformatskii reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Lapkin, I.I.; Fotin, V.V.

    1986-09-10

    A study was carried out on the reaction of dichloromethyl alkyl ethers and sulfides with ..cap alpha..-brominated esters in the presence of zinc resulting in the formation of either ..cap alpha..-alkyl-..beta..-alkoxyacrylates (or ..cap alpha..-alkyl-..beta..-alkylthioacrylates) or ..cap alpha..,..cap alpha..,..cap alpha..',..cap alpha..'-tetramethyl-..beta..-alkoxyglutaric acid (or ..cap alpha..,..cap alpha..,..cap alpha..',..cap alpha..'-tetramethyl-..beta..-alkylthioglutaric acid) depending on the structure of the starting bromoester. PMR and IR spectroscopy indicates the geometry of the ..cap alpha..-alkyl-..beta..-alkoxyacrylates and ..cap alpha..-alkyl-..beta..-alkylthioacrylates.

  19. Ultra-bright alkylated graphene quantum dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Lan; Tang, Xing-Yan; Zhong, Yun-Xin; Liu, Yue-Wen; Song, Xue-Huan; Deng, Shun-Liu; Xie, Su-Yuan; Yan, Jia-Wei; Zheng, Lan-Sun

    2014-10-01

    Highly efficient and stable photoluminescence (PL) are urgently desired for graphene quantum dots (GQDs) to facilitate their prospective applications as optical materials. Here, we report the facile and straightforward synthesis of alkylated graphene quantum dots (AGQDs) via the solvothermal reaction of propagatively alkylated graphene sheets (PAGenes). In contrast to most GQDs reported so far, the synthesized AGQDs process pH-independent and ultra-bright PL with a relative quantum yield of up to 65%. Structural and chemical composition characterization demonstrated that the synthesized AGQDs are nearly oxygen-defect-free with alkyl groups decorated on edges and basal plane, which may contribute to their greatly improved pH tolerance and high quantum efficiency. The photocatalytic performance of AGQDs-P25 nanocomposites was evaluated by the degradation of Rhodamine B under visible light. The photocatalytic rate is ca. 5.9 times higher than that of pure P25, indicating that AGQDs could harness the visible spectrum of sunlight for energy conversion or environmental therapy.Highly efficient and stable photoluminescence (PL) are urgently desired for graphene quantum dots (GQDs) to facilitate their prospective applications as optical materials. Here, we report the facile and straightforward synthesis of alkylated graphene quantum dots (AGQDs) via the solvothermal reaction of propagatively alkylated graphene sheets (PAGenes). In contrast to most GQDs reported so far, the synthesized AGQDs process pH-independent and ultra-bright PL with a relative quantum yield of up to 65%. Structural and chemical composition characterization demonstrated that the synthesized AGQDs are nearly oxygen-defect-free with alkyl groups decorated on edges and basal plane, which may contribute to their greatly improved pH tolerance and high quantum efficiency. The photocatalytic performance of AGQDs-P25 nanocomposites was evaluated by the degradation of Rhodamine B under visible light. The

  20. A multicenter, randomized trial of flat dosing versus intrapatient dose escalation of single-agent carboplatin as first-line chemotherapy for advanced ovarian cancer: an SGCTG (SCOTROC 4) and ANZGOG study on behalf of GCIG

    PubMed Central

    Banerjee, S.; Rustin, G.; Paul, J.; Williams, C.; Pledge, S.; Gabra, H.; Skailes, G.; Lamont, A.; Hindley, A.; Goss, G.; Gilby, E.; Hogg, M.; Harper, P.; Kipps, E.; Lewsley, L-A; Hall, M.; Vasey, P.; Kaye, S. B.

    2015-01-01

    Background The aim of the study is to demonstrate that intrapatient dose escalation of carboplatin would improve the outcome in ovarian cancer compared with flat dosing. Patients and methods Patients with untreated stage IC-IV ovarian cancer received six cycles of carboplatin area under the curve 6 (AUC 6) 3 weekly either with no dose modification except for toxicity (Arm A) or with dose escalations in cycles 2–6 based on nadir neutrophil and platelet counts (Arm B). The primary end-point was progression-free survival (PFS). Results Nine hundred and sixty-four patients were recruited from 71 centers. Dose escalation was achieved in 77% of patients who had ≥1 cycle. The median AUCs (cycle 2–6) received were 6.0 (Arm A) and 7.2 (Arm B) (P < 0.001). Grade 3/4 non-hematological toxicity was higher in Arm B (31% versus 22% P = 0.001). The median PFS was 12.1 months in Arm A and B [hazard ratio (HR) 0.99; 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.85–1.15; P = 0.93]. The median overall survival (OS) was 34.1 and 30.7 months in Arms A and B, respectively (HR 0.98; 95% CI 0.81–1.18, P = 0.82). In multivariate analysis, baseline neutrophil (P < 0.001), baseline platelet counts (P < 0.001) and the difference between white blood cell (WBC) and neutrophil count (P = 0.009) had a significant adverse prognostic value. Conclusions Intrapatient dose escalation of carboplatin based on nadir blood counts is feasible and safe. However, it provided no improvement in PFS or OS compared with flat dosing. Baseline neutrophils over-ride nadir counts in prognostic significance. These data may have wider implications particularly in respect of the management of chemotherapy-induced neutropenia. PMID:23041585

  1. Comparison of Intensive Chemotherapy and Hypomethylating Agents before Allogeneic Stem Cell Transplantation for Advanced Myelodysplastic Syndromes: A Study of the Myelodysplastic Syndrome Subcommittee of the Chronic Malignancies Working Party of the European Society for Blood and Marrow Transplant Research.

    PubMed

    Potter, Victoria T; Iacobelli, Simona; van Biezen, Anja; Maertens, Johann; Bourhis, Jean-Henri; Passweg, Jakob R; Yakhoub-Agha, Ibrahim; Tabrizi, Reza; Bay, Jacques-Olivier; Chevallier, Patrice; Chalandon, Yves; Huynh, Anne; Cahn, Jean Yves; Ljungman, Per; Craddock, Charles; Lenhoff, Stig; Russell, N H; Fegueux, Nathalie; Socié, Gerard; Benedetto, Bruno; Meijer, Ellen; Mufti, G J; de Witte, Theo; Robin, Marie; Kröger, Nicolaus

    2016-09-01

    The European Society for Blood and Marrow Transplant Research data set was used to retrospectively analyze the outcomes of hypomethylating therapy (HMA) compared with those of conventional chemotherapy (CC) before hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) in 209 patients with advanced myelodysplastic syndromes. Median follow-up was 22.1 months and the median age of the group was 57.6 years with 37% of the population older than > 60 years. The majority of patients (59%) received reduced-intensity conditioning and 34% and 27% had intermediate-2 and high international prognostic scoring system (IPSS) scores. At time of HSCT, 32% of patients did not achieve complete remission (CR) and 13% had primary refractory disease. On univariate analysis, outcomes at 3 years were not significantly different between HMA and CC for overall survival (OS), relapse-free survival (RFS), cumulative incidence of relapse (CIR), and nonrelapse mortality (NRM): OS (42% versus 35%), RFS (29% versus 31%), CIR (45% versus 40%), and NRM (26% versus 28%). Comparing characteristics of the groups, there were more patients < 55 years old, more patients in CR (68% versus 32%), and fewer patients with primary refractory disease in the CC group than in the HMA group (10% versus 19%, P < .001). Patients with primary refractory disease had worse outcomes than those in CR with regard to OS (hazard ratio [HR], 2.42; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.41 to 4.13; P = .001), RFS (HR, 2.27; 95% CI, 1.37 to 3.76; P = .001), and NRM (HR, 2.49; 95% CI, 1.18 to 5.26; P = .016). In addition, an adverse effect of IPSS-R cytogenetic risk group was evident for RFS. In summary, outcomes after HSCT are similar for patients receiving HMA compared with those receiving CC, despite the higher proportion of patients with primary refractory disease in the HMA group. PMID:27264633

  2. Chemotherapy and molecular targeting therapy for recurrent cervical cancer.

    PubMed

    Tsuda, Naotake; Watari, Hidemichi; Ushijima, Kimio

    2016-04-01

    For patients with primary stage ⅣB, persistent, or recurrent cervical cancer, chemotherapy remains the standard treatment, although it is neither curative nor associated with long-term disease control. In this review, we summarized the history of treatment of recurrent cervical cancer, and the current recommendation for chemotherapy and molecular targeted therapy. Eligible articles were identified by a search of the MEDLINE bibliographical database for the period up to November 30, 2014. The search strategy included the following any or all of the keywords: "uterine cervical cancer", "chemotherapy", and "targeted therapies". Since cisplatin every 21 days was considered as the historical standard treatment for recurrent cervical cancer, subsequent trials have evaluated and demonstrated activity for other agents including paclitaxel, gemcitabine, topotecan and vinorelbine among others. Accordingly, promising agents were incorporated into phase Ⅲ trials. To examine the best agent to combine with cisplatin, several landmark phase Ⅲ clinical trials were conducted by Gynecologic Oncology Group (GOG) and Japan Clinical Oncology Group (JCOG). Through, GOG204 and JCOG0505, paclitaxel/cisplatin (TP) and paclitaxel/carboplatin (TC) are now considered to be the recommended therapies for recurrent cervical cancer patients. However, the prognosis of patients who are already resistant to chemotherapy, are very poor. Therefore new therapeutic strategies are urgently required. Molecular targeted therapy will be the most hopeful candidate of these strategies. From the results of GOG240, bevacizumab combined with TP reached its primary endpoint of improving overall survival (OS). Although, the prognosis for recurrent cervical cancer patients is still poor, the results of GOG240 shed light on the usefulness of molecular target agents to chemotherapy in cancer patients. Recurrent cervical cancer is generally considered incurable and current chemotherapy regiments offer only

  3. PROCESS FOR PRODUCING ALKYL ORTHOPHOSPHORIC ACID EXTRACTANTS

    DOEpatents

    Grinstead, R.R.

    1962-01-23

    A process is given for producing superior alkyl orthophosphoric acid extractants for use in solvent extraction methods to recover and purify various metals such as uranium and vanadium. The process comprises slurrying P/sub 2/O/ sub 5/ in a solvent diluent such as kerosene, benzene, isopropyl ether, and the like. An alipbatic alcohol having from nine to seventeen carbon atoms, and w- hcrein ihc OH group is situated inward of the terminal carbon atoms, is added to the slurry while the reaction temperature is mainiained below 60 deg C. The alcohol is added in the mole ratio of about 2 to l, alcohol to P/sub 2/O/sub 5/. A pyrophosphate reaotion product is formed in the slurry-alcohol mixture. Subsequently, the pyrophosphate reaction product is hydrolyzed with dilute mineral acid to produce the desired alkyl orthophosphoric aeid extractant. The extraetant may then be separated and utilized in metal-recovery, solvent- extraction processes. (AEC)

  4. Synthesis, characterization and chemoprotective activity of polyoxovanadates against DNA alkylation.

    PubMed

    Nunes, Giovana G; Bonatto, Ana C; de Albuquerque, Carla G; Barison, Andersson; Ribeiro, Ronny R; Back, Davi F; Andrade, André Vitor C; de Sá, Eduardo L; Pedrosa, Fábio de O; Soares, Jaísa F; de Souza, Emanuel M

    2012-03-01

    The alkylation of pUC19 plasmid DNA has been employed as a model reaction for the first studies on chemoprotective action by a mixed-valence (+IV/+V) polyoxovanadate. A new, non-hydrothermal route for the high yield preparation of the test compound is described. The deep green, microcrystalline solid A was isolated after a three-day reaction in water at 80°C and 1 atm, while the reaction at 100°C gave green crystals of B. Both solids were structurally characterized by X-ray diffractometry and FTIR, EPR, NMR and Raman spectroscopies. Product A was identified as (NH(4))(2)V(3)O(8), while B corresponds to the spherical polyoxoanion [V(15)O(36)(Cl)](6-), isolated as the NMe(4)(+) salt. The lack of solubility of A in water and buffers prevented its use in DNA interaction studies, which were then carried out with B. Complex B was also tested for its ability to react with DNA alkylating agents by incubation with diethylsulphate (DES) and dimethylsulphate (DMS) in both the absence and presence of pUC19. For DMS, the best results were obtained with 10 mM of B (48% protection); with DES, this percentage increased to 70%. The direct reaction of B with increasing amounts of DMS in both buffered (PIPES 50 mM) and non-buffered aqueous solutions revealed the sequential formation of several vanadium(IV), vanadium(V) and mixed-valence aggregates of different nuclearities, whose relevance to the DNA-protecting activity is discussed. PMID:22265837

  5. In pursuit of homoleptic actinide alkyl complexes.

    PubMed

    Seaman, Lani A; Walensky, Justin R; Wu, Guang; Hayton, Trevor W

    2013-04-01

    This Forum Article describes the pursuit of isolable homoleptic actinide alkyl complexes, starting with the pioneering work of Gilman during the Manhattan project. The initial reports in this area suggested that homoleptic uranium alkyls were too unstable to be isolated, but Wilkinson demonstrated that tractable uranium alkyls could be generated by purposeful "ate" complex formation, which serves to saturate the uranium coordination sphere and provide the complexes with greater kinetic stability. More recently, we reported the solid-state molecular structures of several homoleptic uranium alkyl complexes, including [Li(THF)4][U(CH2(t)Bu)5], [Li(TMEDA)]2[UMe6], [K(THF)]3[K(THF)2][U(CH2Ph)6]2, and [Li(THF)4][U(CH2SiMe3)6], by employing Wilkinson's strategy. Herein, we describe our attempts to extend this chemistry to thorium. The treatment of ThCl4(DME)2 with 5 equiv of LiCH2(t)Bu or LiCH2SiMe3 at -25 °C in THF affords [Th(CH2(t)Bu)5] (1) and [Li(DME)2][Th(CH2SiMe3)5 (2), respectively, in moderate yields. Similarly, the treatment of ThCl4(DME)2 with 6 equiv of K(CH2Ph) produces [K(THF)]2[Th(CH2Ph)6] (3), in good yield. Complexes 1-3 have been fully characterized, while the structures of 1 and 3 were confirmed by X-ray crystallography. Additionally, the electronic properties of 1 and 3 were explored by density functional theory. PMID:22716022

  6. Pregabalin in Chemotherapy Induced Neuropathic Pain

    PubMed Central

    Atreya, Shrikant

    2016-01-01

    Chemotherapeutic agents belonging to vinca alkaloids, taxanes, and antitubulins produce peripheral neuropathy for which there is no validated treatment. Pregabalin, a gamma-aminobutyric acid analog, is known to inhibit theα2δ subunit of the voltage-gated calcium channel. Earlier studies and case reports have shown pregabalin to be effective in treating neuropathic pain. We present a case series of patients with chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy who were successfully treated with pregabalin with reduction in the hyperalgesia, allodynia, and improvement in the quality of life. PMID:26962289

  7. Pregabalin in Chemotherapy Induced Neuropathic Pain.

    PubMed

    Atreya, Shrikant

    2016-01-01

    Chemotherapeutic agents belonging to vinca alkaloids, taxanes, and antitubulins produce peripheral neuropathy for which there is no validated treatment. Pregabalin, a gamma-aminobutyric acid analog, is known to inhibit theα2δ subunit of the voltage-gated calcium channel. Earlier studies and case reports have shown pregabalin to be effective in treating neuropathic pain. We present a case series of patients with chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy who were successfully treated with pregabalin with reduction in the hyperalgesia, allodynia, and improvement in the quality of life. PMID:26962289

  8. 1,2-bis(arylsulfonyl)hydrazines. 2. The influence of arylsulfonyl and aralkylsulfonyl substituents on antitumor and alkylating activity.

    PubMed

    Shyam, K; Furubayashi, R; Hrubiec, R T; Cosby, L A; Sartorelli, A C

    1986-07-01

    Several 1,2-bis(arylsulfonyl)-1-methylhydrazines were synthesized and evaluated for antineoplastic activity against the L1210 leukemia. The most active compound to emerge from this study, 2-[(4-chlorophenyl)sulfonyl]-1-methyl-1-(4-tolylsulfonyl)hydrazine , increased the survival time of tumor-bearing mice by 88%. The alkylating activity of the synthesized analogues and several compounds reported earlier was determined by measuring the absorbance at 540 nm of the alkylated product of 4-(4-nitrobenzyl)pyridine. The results obtained support the concept that the ability to alkylate is a necessary but not a sufficient condition for the expression of antitumor activity by agents of this class. PMID:3806585

  9. Ultra-bright alkylated graphene quantum dots.

    PubMed

    Feng, Lan; Tang, Xing-Yan; Zhong, Yun-Xin; Liu, Yue-Wen; Song, Xue-Huan; Deng, Shun-Liu; Xie, Su-Yuan; Yan, Jia-Wei; Zheng, Lan-Sun

    2014-11-01

    Highly efficient and stable photoluminescence (PL) are urgently desired for graphene quantum dots (GQDs) to facilitate their prospective applications as optical materials. Here, we report the facile and straightforward synthesis of alkylated graphene quantum dots (AGQDs) via the solvothermal reaction of propagatively alkylated graphene sheets (PAGenes). In contrast to most GQDs reported so far, the synthesized AGQDs process pH-independent and ultra-bright PL with a relative quantum yield of up to 65%. Structural and chemical composition characterization demonstrated that the synthesized AGQDs are nearly oxygen-defect-free with alkyl groups decorated on edges and basal plane, which may contribute to their greatly improved pH tolerance and high quantum efficiency. The photocatalytic performance of AGQDs-P25 nanocomposites was evaluated by the degradation of Rhodamine B under visible light. The photocatalytic rate is ca. 5.9 times higher than that of pure P25, indicating that AGQDs could harness the visible spectrum of sunlight for energy conversion or environmental therapy. PMID:25192187

  10. Hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry methylphosponic and alkyl methylphosphonic acids determination in environmental samples after pre-column derivatization with p-bromophenacyl bromide.

    PubMed

    Baygildiev, T M; Rodin, I A; Stavrianidi, A N; Braun, A V; Lebedev, A T; Rybalchenko, I V; Shpigun, O A

    2016-04-15

    Once exposed to the environment organophosphate nerve agents readily degrade by rapid hydrolysis to the corresponding alkyl methylphosphonic acids which do not exist in nature. These alkyl methylphosphonic acids are finally slowly hydrolyzed to methylphosphonic acid. Methylphosphonic acid is the most stable hydrolysis product of organophosphate nerve agents, persisting in environment for a long time. A highly sensitive method of methylphosphonic acid and alkyl methylphosphonic acids detection in dust and ground mixed samples has been developed and validated. The fact that alkyl methylphosphonic acids unlike methylphosphonic acid did not react with p-bromophenacyl bromide under chosen conditions was discovered. This allowed simultaneous chromatographic separation and mass spectrometric detection of derivatized methylphosphonic acid and underivatized alkyl methylphosphonic acids using HILIC-MS/MS method. Very simple sample pretreatment with high recoveries for each analyte was developed. Methylphosphonic acid pre-column derivate and alkyl methylphosphonic acids were detected using tandem mass spectrometry with electrospray ionization after hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography separation. The developed approach allows achieving ultra-low detection limits: 200 pg mL(-1) for methylphosphonic acid, 70 pg mL(-1) for ethyl methylphosphonic acid, 8 pg mL(-1) for i-propyl methylphosphonic acid, 8 pg mL(-1) for i-butyl methylphosphonic acid, 5 pg mL(-1) for pinacolyl methylphosphonic acid in the extracts of dust and ground mixed samples. This approach was successfully applied to the dust and ground mixed samples from decommissioned plant for the production of chemical weapons. PMID:26965649

  11. Recent advances in antifungal chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Petrikkos, George; Skiada, Anna

    2007-08-01

    For over 50 years, amphotericin B deoxycholate (AmBD) has been the 'gold standard' in antifungal chemotherapy, despite its frequent toxicities. However, improved treatment options for invasive fungal infections (IFIs) have been developed during the last 15 years. Newer antifungal agents, including less toxic lipid preparations of AmBD, triazoles and the echinocandins, have been added to our armamentarium against IFIs. Some of these newer drugs can now replace AmBD as primary therapy (e.g. caspofungin for candidiasis, voriconazole for aspergillosis), whilst others offer new therapeutic options for difficult-to-treat IFIs (e.g. posaconazole for zygomycosis, fusariosis and chromoblastomycosis). It is interesting that extended use of newer antifungals such as fluconazole, despite decreasing the mortality attributed to candidiasis, resulted in selection of species resistant to several antifungals (Candida krusei, Candida glabrata); whilst several publications suggest that prolonged use of voriconazole may expose severely immunocompromised patients to the risk of zygomycosis (breakthrough). On the other hand, the differences in the mode of action of newer antifungals such as echinocandins raise the question whether combination antifungal therapy is more effective than monotherapy. Finally, the availability of an oral formulation with excellent biosafety of several newer antifungals (e.g. posaconazole) makes them candidates for prophylactic or prolonged maintenance therapy. PMID:17524625

  12. Beneficiation of coal and metallic and non-metallic ores by froth flotation process using polyhydroxy alkyl xanthate depressants

    SciTech Connect

    Petrovich, V.

    1980-07-08

    In the concentration of metallic and non-metallic minerals by froth flotation with a high content of pyrite and the like iron sulfides, which includes the subjecting of such ores when finely ground and sized to substantially liberate particles of pyrite, to froth flotation process in the presence of any suitabl E and adeuqate collector and frother for desired metallic and non-metallic mineral for the recovery of the same, and in the presence of a polyhydroxy alkyl xanthate wetting and depressing agent for pyrite, the step of adding to a pulp of mineral slurry an amount of the order of 0.01 to 0.10 kg per metric ton of a non-collecting polyhydroxy alkyl xanthate, of which hydroxyl groups of said polyhydroxy alkyl xanthates contain from 3 to 4, and having the following general formula: HOCH/sub 2/(CHOH)mcH(CHO)OCSSK wherein M is an integer from 2 to 3; said polyhydroxy alkyl xanthates, react with pyrite and said iron sulfides of the pulp of mineral slurry to yield a water soluble or insoluble hydrophilic coating depressing the pyrite and said iron sulfides, said polyhydroxy alkyl xanthates being selected from the group consisting of potassium pentose, and potassium hexose xanthates, such as potassium arabinose xanthate, potassium xylose xanthate, potassium glucose xanthate, potassium fructose xanthate.

  13. Selection of chemotherapy for non-small cell lung cancer is facilitated by new therapeutic strategies

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zhehai

    2014-01-01

    Nowadays, advanced non-small cell lung cancer is still an incurable disease. Recent researches have led to considerable progress in the treatment of non-small cell lung cancer. This article reviews the main studies on chemotherapy on non-small cell lung cancer and discusses the new therapeutic strategies available to date. Stable disease (SD) is necessary in chemotherapy for tumor. The proportion of population with responders or SD basically maintained similar regardless of regimens. The overall survival after chemotherapy for patients with SD was lower than patients with responders, and higher than patients with progressive disease. Greater benefits could be achieved in patients with effective induction chemotherapy using chemotherapeutic agents for maintenance therapy, whereas the benefits were relatively small for patients with SD. It has been found that epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) mutation status had certain correlation with the efficacy of chemotherapy. First-line chemotherapy has shown advantages in effective rate and progression free survival on EGFR mutant. EGFR mutation produced significant effects on the efficacy of postoperative adjuvant chemotherapy. Patients with EGFR mutation had a higher effective rate than wild-type EGFR patients, and patients with responders had a greater benefit in progression free survival from maintenance therapy. However, it is still necessary to carry out more careful and deeper studies and analyses on traditional cytotoxic chemotherapy, to further optimize cytotoxic chemotherapy and to use molecular targeted agents with different mechanisms. PMID:25550891

  14. Clofarabine-based combination chemotherapy for relapse and refractory childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Arakawa, Yuki; Koh, Katsuyoshi; Aoki, Takahiro; Kubota, Yasuo; Oyama, Ryo; Mori, Makiko; Hayashi, Mayumi; Hanada, Ryoji

    2014-11-01

    Clofarabine, one of the key treatment agents for refractory and relapsed acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL), achieves a remission rate of approximately 30% with single-agent clofarabine induction chemotherapy. However, a remission rate of approximately 50% was reported with a combination chemotherapy regimen consisting of clofarabine, etoposide, and cyclophosphamide. We treated two cases with refractory and relapsed ALL with combination chemotherapy including clofarabine; one was an induction failure but the other achieved remission. Both cases developed an infectious complication (NCI-CTCAE grade 3) and body pain with infusion. Prophylactic antibiotic and opioid infusions facilitated avoiding septic shock and pain. Further investigation of such cases is required. PMID:25501414

  15. Hypersensitivity to antineoplastic agents.

    PubMed

    Castells, M C

    2008-01-01

    The need to offer first line therapy for primary and recurrent cancers has spurred the clinical development of rapid desensitizations for chemotherapy and monoclonal antibodies. Rapid desensitizations allow patients to be treated with medications to which they have presented with hypersensitivity reactions (HSRs), including anaphylaxis. Rapid desensitization achieves temporary tolerization to full therapeutic doses by slow administration of incremental doses of the drug inducing the HSR. Protocols are available for most chemotherapy agents, including taxanes, platins, doxorubicin, monoclonal antibodies, and others. Candidate patients include those who present with type I HSRs, mast cell/IgE dependent, including anaphylaxis, and non-IgE mediated HSRs, during the chemotherapy infusion or shortly after. Idiosyncratic reactions, erythema multiforme, Stevens-Johnson syndrome and toxic epidermal necrolysis are not amenable to rapid desensitization. The recommendation for rapid desensitization can only be made by allergy and immunology specialists and can only be performed in settings with one-to-one nurse-patient care and where resuscitation personnel and resources are readily available. Repeated desensitizations can be safely performed in outpatient settings with similar conditions, which allow cancer patients to remain in clinical studies. We have generated a universal 12-step protocol that was applied to 413 cases of intravenous and intraperitoneal rapid desensitizations using taxanes, platins, liposomal doxorubicin, doxorubicin, rituximab, and other chemotherapy drugs. Under this protocol all patients were able to complete their target dose, and 94% of the patients had limited or no reactions. No deaths or codes were reported, indicating that the procedure was safe and effective in delivering first line chemotherapy drugs. PMID:18991707

  16. Salvage chemotherapy with amrubicin and platinum for relapsed thymic carcinoma: experience in six cases.

    PubMed

    Koizumi, Tomonobu; Agatsuma, Toshihiko; Ichiyama, Takashi; Yokoyama, Toshiki; Ushiki, Atsuhito; Komatsu, Yoshimichi; Tanabe, Tsuyoshi; Kobayashi, Takashi; Yoshikawa, Sumiko; Yasuo, Masanori; Yamamoto, Hiroshi; Kubo, Keishi; Hachiya, Tsutomu

    2010-06-01

    It has been reported that cisplatin-based chemotherapy shows beneficial effects in certain patients with advanced thymic carcinoma. However, the usefulness of salvage therapy has not been reported. We focused on a new anthracycline agent, amrubicin, combined with platinum compounds as salvage chemotherapy in patients with thymic carcinoma. Six cases of unresectable and locally advanced thymic carcinoma relapsed from prior cisplatin-containing chemotherapy were treated with amrubicin (30-40 mg/m(2) day 1-3) plus platinum compounds (cisplatin 60 mg/m(2) day 1 or nedaplatin 70 mg/m(2) day 1) chemotherapy as salvage chemotherapy. Two patients showed a partial response. However, Grade 3/4 neutropenia and thrombocytopenia occurred in all and two of the patients, respectively. We conclude that thymic carcinoma is sensitive to platinum-based chemotherapy and that amrubicin appears to have significant activity against thymic carcinoma. The major toxicity is hematological toxicities. PMID:19415537

  17. Chemotherapy for gliomas in mainland China: An overview

    PubMed Central

    SAI, KE; YANG, QUN-YING; SHEN, DONG; CHEN, ZHONG-PING

    2013-01-01

    Chemotherapy is currently the standard treatment modality for malignant gliomas. Many patients with gliomas are treated in mainland China every year. The history and development of chemotherapy for glioma, however, are not well documented. In this study, an extensive literature search of Pubmed and major Chinese electronic databases was performed to identify clinical studies. A total of 210 publications were identified, with a total of 10,105 patients. Among these studies, 76.2% were retrospective and 23.8% were prospective. Chemotherapy was found to have been administered by the Department of Neurosurgery in 143 studies (68.1%). Oral or intravenous administration was found in 55.7% of studies, followed by intra-arterial (26.7%) and interstitial (15.7%) chemotherapy. Nitrosoureas were the most frequently used chemotherapeutic agents, as found in 133 studies (63.3%). Since 2003, 56 studies on temozolomide (TMZ) have been published. Studies on chemotherapy for gliomas began in the 1970s in mainland China but well-designed randomized controlled trials (RCTs) are rare. Much effort and collaboration should be made to carry out high-quality multicenter RCTs on chemotherapy for gliomas. PMID:23761809

  18. Effects of chemotherapy during pregnancy on the placenta.

    PubMed

    Abellar, Rosanna G; Pepperell, John R; Greco, David; Gundogan, Fusun; Kostadinov, Stefan; Schwartz, Joanna; Tantravahi, Umadevi; De Paepe, Monique E

    2009-01-01

    Whereas the effects of chemotherapy during pregnancy for mother and fetus are well described, its effects on the placenta remain largely undetermined. We performed a retrospective clinicopathologic analysis of the placenta following chemotherapy. Charts were reviewed for type of malignancy, type and timing of chemotherapy, and fetal and pregnancy outcome. Placentas were studied by standard pathologic analysis as well as computer-assisted morphometry and fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) analysis. Patients (n = 13) underwent chemotherapy during pregnancy for carcinoma of breast (3), ovary (2), cervix (2), salivary gland (1), lymphoma/leukemia (4), or rhabdomyosarcoma (1). Eleven patients were treated with DNA-active cytotoxic agents during the 2nd and/or 3rd trimesters; their placentas showed nonspecific findings, including villous hypermaturity, distal villous hypoplasia, villous edema, and excessive extravillous trophoblast, and 4/11 (36%) were small-for-age. In one case (rhabdomyosarcoma), the mother was exposed to cytotoxic agents throughout the entire pregnancy. In this case, associated with severe congenital anomalies, the placenta showed striking nuclear pleomorphism of the extravillous trophoblast of the chorion laeve, associated with FISH-demonstrated hyperpolyploidy. One patient was treated with the targeted tyrosine kinase inhibitor, imatinib, in 2 consecutive pregnancies; these placentas showed no specific anomalies. Our findings suggest that chemotherapy during the 1st trimester induces excessive polyploidization of the chorion laeve trophoblast, likely representing an adaptive response to intraamniotic toxins. Second and 3rd trimester exposure to cytotoxic agents may predispose to placental underdevelopment. However, without appropriate controls (untreated patients with equivalent malignancies), the specific effects of chemotherapy in this group are difficult to assess. PMID:18462010

  19. Chemotherapy principles of managing stage IV breast cancer in the United States.

    PubMed

    Hernandez-Aya, Leonel F; Ma, Cynthia X

    2016-06-01

    The therapeutic landscape for metastatic breast cancer (MBC) has expanded greatly over the last three decades with an increasing availability of targeted therapies for specific breast cancer subtypes. However, cytotoxic chemotherapy remains an essential component for the management of endocrine refractory or triple negative MBC. Multiple chemotherapy agents have demonstrated activity in MBC as single agents and in combination. While taxanes are frequently recommended as the initial treatment of metastatic disease, capecitabine is a convenient oral therapy with well received toxicity profile. Eribulin is the only agent that demonstrated overall survival (OS) benefit in a phase III clinical trial when compared to treatment of physician choice in heavily pre-treated patients. Ixabepilone, gemcitabine, vinorelbine and platinum agents have demonstrated activity and, therefore, constitute additional therapeutic options. In this review, we will discuss the data supporting the use of different cytotoxic agents and the general principles in guiding the use of chemotherapy. PMID:27164855

  20. Lithium perchlorate-nitromethane-promoted alkylation of anilines with arylmethanols.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Jun; Mao, Hai-Feng; Wang, Lu; Zou, Jian-Ping; Zhang, Wei

    2011-11-01

    A new application of lithium perchlorate-nitromethane (LPNM) for the formation of aromatic C-N and C-C bonds is introduced. LPNM-promoted reactions of anilines with diarylmethanols selectively generate N-alkylated anilines or mono and double Friedel-Crafts alkylation products under different conditions by changing the reaction time, reaction temperature, and the ratio of the reactants. This method does not require the use of transition metal catalysts to prepare alkylated aniline derivatives. PMID:21547437

  1. Chemotherapy for patients with advanced lung cancer receiving long-term oxygen therapy

    PubMed Central

    Suzuki, Hidekazu; Shiroyama, Takayuki; Tamiya, Motohiro; Okamoto, Norio; Tanaka, Ayako; Morishita, Naoko; Nishida, Takuji; Nishihara, Takashi; Hirashima, Tomonori

    2016-01-01

    Background Long-term oxygen therapy (LTOT) is sometimes prescribed for patients with advanced lung cancer who are potential candidates for chemotherapy. The aim of this study was to assess the usefulness of chemotherapy for patients with this disease who require LTOT. Methods The medical records of 40 patients with advanced lung cancer who received LTOT while undergoing systemic chemotherapy at our institution between January 2009 and December 2014 were retrospectively reviewed. Chemotherapy consisted of cytotoxic or molecular-targeted agents. Results Twenty-four patients had adenocarcinoma, 6 had squamous cell carcinoma, and 10 had small cell lung cancer (SCLC). The median survival time from the date of the first chemotherapy cycle performed in conjunction with LTOT was 194 days. In a multivariate analysis, the only factor significantly associated with better prognosis was the line (first or second) of the first chemotherapy with LTOT (hazard ratio =0.42; 95% confidence interval, 0.18 to 0.94). Among the 40 patients, 10 (25%) received chemotherapy during the last 30 days of their lives, 2 of whom died of chemotherapy-related adverse events. Conclusions Chemotherapy for patients with advanced lung cancer who receive LTOT may be acceptable if it is the first- or second-line treatment. However, we should be mindful of the potential overuse of chemotherapy and its negative impact on quality of life. PMID:26904219

  2. [Chemotherapy and the heart].

    PubMed

    Plana, Juan C

    2011-05-01

    The improvements in cancer detection and therapy have created a new cohort of patients who will experience sufficient survival to develop the cardiac complications of the cancer therapy. Three-dimensional echocardiography has been validated as the ultrasound modality with the best accuracy for the calculation of ejection fraction when compared to magnetic resonance imaging, the current gold standard, making it the tool of choice, when available, for the initial evaluation and follow up of the patient receiving chemotherapy. If three-dimensional echocardiography is not available, or if the quality of the images is inadequate, the use of ultrasound contrast can be useful for the definition of the endocardial border and identification of the true apex of the heart, enhancing the ability of the interpreter to accurately calculate volumes and ejection fraction. Two-dimensional strain appears promising as a tool to identify abnormalities in myocardial mechanics very early on during cardiotoxicity, allowing the prediction of later overt systolic dysfunction. This parameter may be useful in the detection of chemotherapy treated patients who could benefit from alternate therapies, thereby decreasing the incidence of cardiotoxicity and its associated morbidity and mortality. PMID:21492985

  3. Preventing medication errors in cancer chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Cohen, M R; Anderson, R W; Attilio, R M; Green, L; Muller, R J; Pruemer, J M

    1996-04-01

    Recommendations for preventing medication errors in cancer chemotherapy are made. Before a health care provider is granted privileges to prescribe, dispense, or administer antineoplastic agents, he or she should undergo a tailored educational program and possibly testing or certification. Appropriate reference materials should be developed. Each institution should develop a dose-verification process with as many independent checks as possible. A detailed checklist covering prescribing, transcribing, dispensing, and administration should be used. Oral orders are not acceptable. All doses should be calculated independently by the physician, the pharmacist, and the nurse. Dosage limits should be established and a review process set up for doses that exceed the limits. These limits should be entered into pharmacy computer systems, listed on preprinted order forms, stated on the product packaging, placed in strategic locations in the institution, and communicated to employees. The prescribing vocabulary must be standardized. Acronyms, abbreviations, and brand names must be avoided and steps taken to avoid other sources of confusion in the written orders, such as trailing zeros. Preprinted antineoplastic drug order forms containing checklists can help avoid errors. Manufacturers should be encouraged to avoid or eliminate ambiguities in drug names and dosing information. Patients must be educated about all aspects of their cancer chemotherapy, as patients represent a last line of defense against errors. An interdisciplinary team at each practice site should review every medication error reported. Pharmacists should be involved at all sites where antineoplastic agents are dispensed. Although it may not be possible to eliminate all medication errors in cancer chemotherapy, the risk can be minimized through specific steps. Because of their training and experience, pharmacists should take the lead in this effort. PMID:8697025

  4. Chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy: an update on the current understanding

    PubMed Central

    Addington, James; Freimer, Miriam

    2016-01-01

    Chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy is a common side effect of selected chemotherapeutic agents. Previous work has suggested that patients often under report the symptoms of chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy and physicians fail to recognize the presence of such symptoms in a timely fashion. The precise pathophysiology that underlies chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy, in both the acute and the chronic phase, remains complex and appears to be medication specific. Recent work has begun to demonstrate and further clarify potential pathophysiological processes that predispose and, ultimately, lead to the development of chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy. There is increasing evidence that the pathway to neuropathy varies with each agent. With a clearer understanding of how these agents affect the peripheral nervous system, more targeted treatments can be developed in order to optimize treatment and prevent long-term side effects. PMID:27408692

  5. Cytotoxic chemotherapy in the contemporary management of metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC).

    PubMed

    Sonpavde, Guru; Wang, Christopher G; Galsky, Matthew D; Oh, William K; Armstrong, Andrew J

    2015-07-01

    For several years, docetaxel was the only treatment shown to improve survival of patients with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC). There are now several novel agents available, although chemotherapy with docetaxel and cabazitaxel continues to play an important role. However, the increasing number of available agents will inevitably affect the timing of chemotherapy and therefore it may be important to offer this approach before declining performance status renders patients ineligible for chemotherapy. Patient selection is also important to optimise treatment benefit. The role of predictive biomarkers has assumed greater importance due to the development of multiple agents and resistance to available agents. In addition, the optimal sequence of treatments remains undefined and requires further study in order to maximize long-term outcomes. We provide an overview of the clinical data supporting the role of chemotherapy in the treatment of mCRPC and the emerging role in metastatic castration-sensitive prostate cancer. We review the key issues in the management of patients including selection of patients for chemotherapy, when to start chemotherapy, and how best to sequence treatments to maximise outcomes. In addition, we briefly summarise the promising new chemotherapeutic agents in development in the context of emerging therapies. PMID:25046451

  6. Novel agents for advanced pancreatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    Akinleye, Akintunde; Iragavarapu, Chaitanya; Furqan, Muhammad; Cang, Shundong; Liu, Delong

    2015-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is relatively insensitive to conventional chemotherapy. Therefore, novel agents targeting dysregulated pathways (MAPK/ERK, EGFR, TGF-β, HEDGEHOG, NOTCH, IGF, PARP, PI3K/AKT, RAS, and Src) are being explored in clinical trials as monotherapy or in combination with cytotoxic chemotherapy. This review summarizes the most recent advances with the targeted therapies in the treatment of patients with advanced pancreatic cancer. PMID:26369833

  7. Determining cysteine oxidation status using differential alkylation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schilling, Birgit; Yoo, Chris B.; Collins, Christopher J.; Gibson, Bradford W.

    2004-08-01

    Oxidative damage to proteins plays a major role in aging and in the pathology of many degenerative diseases. Under conditions of oxidative stress, reactive oxygen and nitrogen species can modify key redox sensitive amino acid side chains leading to altered biological activities or structures of the targeted proteins. This in turn can affect signaling or regulatory control pathways as well as protein turnover and degradation efficiency in the proteasome. Cysteine residues are particularly susceptible to oxidation, primarily through reversible modifications (e.g., thiolation and nitrosylation), although irreversible oxidation can lead to products that cannot be repaired in vivo such as sulfonic acid. This report describes a strategy to determine the overall level of reversible cysteine oxidation using a stable isotope differential alkylation approach in combination with mass spectrometric analysis. This method employs 13C-labeled alkylating reagents, such as N-ethyl-[1,4-13C2]-maleimide, bromo-[1,2-13C2]-acetic acid and their non-labeled counterparts to quantitatively assess the level of cysteine oxidation at specific sites in oxidized proteins. The differential alkylation protocol was evaluated using standard peptides and proteins, and then applied to monitor and determine the level of oxidative damage induced by diamide, a mild oxidant. The formation and mass spectrometric analysis of irreversible cysteine acid modification will also be discussed as several such modifications have been identified in subunits of the mitochondrial electron transport chain complexes. This strategy will hopefully contribute to our understanding of the role that cysteine oxidation plays in such chronic diseases such as Parkinson's disease, where studies in animal and cell models have shown oxidative damage to mitochondrial Complex I to be a specific and early target.

  8. Chemotherapy and molecular targeting therapy for recurrent cervical cancer

    PubMed Central

    Tsuda, Naotake; Watari, Hidemichi; Ushijima, Kimio

    2016-01-01

    For patients with primary stage ⅣB, persistent, or recurrent cervical cancer, chemotherapy remains the standard treatment, although it is neither curative nor associated with long-term disease control. In this review, we summarized the history of treatment of recurrent cervical cancer, and the current recommendation for chemotherapy and molecular targeted therapy. Eligible articles were identified by a search of the MEDLINE bibliographical database for the period up to November 30, 2014. The search strategy included the following any or all of the keywords: “uterine cervical cancer”, “chemotherapy”, and “targeted therapies”. Since cisplatin every 21 days was considered as the historical standard treatment for recurrent cervical cancer, subsequent trials have evaluated and demonstrated activity for other agents including paclitaxel, gemcitabine, topotecan and vinorelbine among others. Accordingly, promising agents were incorporated into phase Ⅲ trials. To examine the best agent to combine with cisplatin, several landmark phase Ⅲ clinical trials were conducted by Gynecologic Oncology Group (GOG) and Japan Clinical Oncology Group (JCOG). Through, GOG204 and JCOG0505, paclitaxel/cisplatin (TP) and paclitaxel/carboplatin (TC) are now considered to be the recommended therapies for recurrent cervical cancer patients. However, the prognosis of patients who are already resistant to chemotherapy, are very poor. Therefore new therapeutic strategies are urgently required. Molecular targeted therapy will be the most hopeful candidate of these strategies. From the results of GOG240, bevacizumab combined with TP reached its primary endpoint of improving overall survival (OS). Although, the prognosis for recurrent cervical cancer patients is still poor, the results of GOG240 shed light on the usefulness of molecular target agents to chemotherapy in cancer patients. Recurrent cervical cancer is generally considered incurable and current chemotherapy regiments

  9. Alkyl Chlorides as Hydrogen Bond Acceptors

    SciTech Connect

    Nadas, Janos I; Vukovic, Sinisa; Hay, Benjamin

    2012-01-01

    To gain an understanding of the role of an alkyl chloride as a hydrogen bond acceptor, geometries and interaction energies were calculated at the MP2/aug-cc-pVDZ level of theory for complexes between ethyl chloride and representative hydrogen donor groups. The results establish that these donors, which include hydrogen cyanide, methanol, nitrobenzene, pyrrole, acetamide, and N-methylurea, form X-H {hor_ellipsis} Cl hydrogen bonds (X = C, N, O) of weak to moderate strength, with {Delta}E values ranging from -2.8 to -5.3 kcal/mol.

  10. Artemisinin and the antimalarial endoperoxides: from herbal remedy to targeted chemotherapy.

    PubMed Central

    Meshnick, S R; Taylor, T E; Kamchonwongpaisan, S

    1996-01-01

    Artemisinin and its derivatives are endoperoxide-containing compounds which represent a promising new class of antimalarial drugs. In the presence of intraparasitic iron, these drugs are converted into free radicals and other electrophilic intermediates which then alkylate specific malaria target proteins. Combinations of available derivatives and other antimalarial agents show promise both as first-line agents and in the treatment of severe disease. PMID:8801435

  11. Chemotherapy targeting cancer stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Haiguang; Lv, Lin; Yang, Kai

    2015-01-01

    Conventional chemotherapy is the main treatment for cancer and benefits patients in the form of decreased relapse and metastasis and longer overall survival. However, as the target therapy drugs and delivery systems are not wholly precise, it also results in quite a few side effects, and is less efficient in many cancers due to the spared cancer stem cells, which are considered the reason for chemotherapy resistance, relapse, and metastasis. Conventional chemotherapy limitations and the cancer stem cell hypothesis inspired our search for a novel chemotherapy targeting cancer stem cells. In this review, we summarize cancer stem cell enrichment methods, the search for new efficient drugs, and the delivery of drugs targeting cancer stem cells. We also discuss cancer stem cell hierarchy complexity and the corresponding combination therapy for both cancer stem and non-stem cells. Learning from cancer stem cells may reveal novel strategies for chemotherapy in the future. PMID:26045975

  12. Drilling fluid containing a copolymer filtration control agent

    SciTech Connect

    Enright, D.P.; Lucas, J.M.; Perricone, A.C.

    1981-10-06

    The invention relates to an aqueous drilling fluid composition, a filtration control agent for utilization in said aqueous drilling fluid, and a method of forming a filter cake on the wall of a well for the reduction of filtrate from said drilling fluid, by utilization of a copolymer of: (1) a (Meth) acrylamido alkyl sulfonic acid or alkali metal salt thereof; and (2) a (Meth) acrylamide or n-alkyl (Meth) acrylamide. The copolymer may be cross-linked with a quaternary ammonium salt cross-linking agent.

  13. 40 CFR 721.10218 - 2-Propenoic acid, 2-mehtyl-, C12-15-branched and linear alkyl esters, telomers with alkyl 2...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...-branched and linear alkyl esters, telomers with alkyl 2- thio]-2-alkanoate, aminoalkyl methacrylate and alkyl methacrylate, tert-Bu 2-ethylhexanoperoxoate-initiated (generic). 721.10218 Section 721.10218...-alkanoate, aminoalkyl methacrylate and alkyl methacrylate, tert-Bu 2-ethylhexanoperoxoate-initiated...

  14. 40 CFR 721.10218 - 2-Propenoic acid, 2-mehtyl-, C12-15-branched and linear alkyl esters, telomers with alkyl 2...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...-branched and linear alkyl esters, telomers with alkyl 2- thio]-2-alkanoate, aminoalkyl methacrylate and alkyl methacrylate, tert-Bu 2-ethylhexanoperoxoate-initiated (generic). 721.10218 Section 721.10218...-alkanoate, aminoalkyl methacrylate and alkyl methacrylate, tert-Bu 2-ethylhexanoperoxoate-initiated...

  15. 40 CFR 721.10218 - 2-Propenoic acid, 2-mehtyl-, C12-15-branched and linear alkyl esters, telomers with alkyl 2...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...-branched and linear alkyl esters, telomers with alkyl 2- thio]-2-alkanoate, aminoalkyl methacrylate and alkyl methacrylate, tert-Bu 2-ethylhexanoperoxoate-initiated (generic). 721.10218 Section 721.10218...-alkanoate, aminoalkyl methacrylate and alkyl methacrylate, tert-Bu 2-ethylhexanoperoxoate-initiated...

  16. 40 CFR 721.10218 - 2-Propenoic acid, 2-mehtyl-, C12-15-branched and linear alkyl esters, telomers with alkyl 2...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...-branched and linear alkyl esters, telomers with alkyl 2- thio]-2-alkanoate, aminoalkyl methacrylate and alkyl methacrylate, tert-Bu 2-ethylhexanoperoxoate-initiated (generic). 721.10218 Section 721.10218...-alkanoate, aminoalkyl methacrylate and alkyl methacrylate, tert-Bu 2-ethylhexanoperoxoate-initiated...

  17. Pioneers in Antimicrobial Chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Neha; Rodrigues, Camilla; Soman, Rajeev

    2015-09-01

    "If we are not careful, we soon will be in the post-antibiotic era, and for some patients and some microbes we are already there"- Tom Friedan Antibiotics revolutionized medicine in the 20th century. The era of antibacterial chemotherapy began in 1907 with the discovery of arsphenamine, first synthesized by Alferd Bertheim and Paul Ehrlich in 1907, used to treat syphilis. The first systemically active antibiotic, Prontosil was discovered in 1933 by Gerhard Domagk, for which he was awarded the 1939 Nobel Prize. Fleming's accidental discovery and isolation of penicillin in September 1928 marked the start of modern antibiotics. It was a discovery that changed the course of history and saved millions of lives. PMID:27608881

  18. The photodissociation dynamics of alkyl radicals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giegerich, Jens; Fischer, Ingo

    2015-01-01

    The photodisscociation dynamics of the alkyl radicals i-propyl (CH(CH3)2) and t-butyl (C(CH3)3) are investigated by H-atom photofragment imaging. While i-propyl is excited at 250 nm, the photodynamics of t-butyl are explored over a large energy range using excitation wavelengths between 347 nm and 233 nm. The results are compared to those obtained previously for ethyl, CH3CH2, and to those reported for t-butyl using 248 nm excitation. The translational energy (ET) distribution of the H-atom photofragments is bimodal and appears rather similar for all three radicals. The low ET part of the distribution shows an isotropic photofragment angular distribution, while the high ET part is associated with a considerable anisotropy. Thus, for t-butyl, two H-atom loss channels of roughly equal importance have been identified in addition to the CH3-loss channel reported previously. A mechanism for the photodissociation of alkyl radicals is suggested that is based on interactions between Rydberg- and valence states.

  19. The photodissociation dynamics of alkyl radicals

    SciTech Connect

    Giegerich, Jens; Fischer, Ingo

    2015-01-28

    The photodisscociation dynamics of the alkyl radicals i-propyl (CH(CH{sub 3}){sub 2}) and t-butyl (C(CH{sub 3}){sub 3}) are investigated by H-atom photofragment imaging. While i-propyl is excited at 250 nm, the photodynamics of t-butyl are explored over a large energy range using excitation wavelengths between 347 nm and 233 nm. The results are compared to those obtained previously for ethyl, CH{sub 3}CH{sub 2}, and to those reported for t-butyl using 248 nm excitation. The translational energy (E{sub T}) distribution of the H-atom photofragments is bimodal and appears rather similar for all three radicals. The low E{sub T} part of the distribution shows an isotropic photofragment angular distribution, while the high E{sub T} part is associated with a considerable anisotropy. Thus, for t-butyl, two H-atom loss channels of roughly equal importance have been identified in addition to the CH{sub 3}-loss channel reported previously. A mechanism for the photodissociation of alkyl radicals is suggested that is based on interactions between Rydberg- and valence states.

  20. 40 CFR 721.10038 - Trimellitic anhydride, polymer with substituted glycol, alkyl phenols and ethoxylated nonylphenol...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... substituted glycol, alkyl phenols and ethoxylated nonylphenol (generic). 721.10038 Section 721.10038... Trimellitic anhydride, polymer with substituted glycol, alkyl phenols and ethoxylated nonylphenol (generic... identified generically as trimellitic anhydride, polymer with substituted glycol, alkyl phenols...

  1. 40 CFR 721.10038 - Trimellitic anhydride, polymer with substituted glycol, alkyl phenols and ethoxylated nonylphenol...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... substituted glycol, alkyl phenols and ethoxylated nonylphenol (generic). 721.10038 Section 721.10038... Trimellitic anhydride, polymer with substituted glycol, alkyl phenols and ethoxylated nonylphenol (generic... identified generically as trimellitic anhydride, polymer with substituted glycol, alkyl phenols...

  2. 40 CFR 721.10038 - Trimellitic anhydride, polymer with substituted glycol, alkyl phenols and ethoxylated nonylphenol...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... substituted glycol, alkyl phenols and ethoxylated nonylphenol (generic). 721.10038 Section 721.10038... Trimellitic anhydride, polymer with substituted glycol, alkyl phenols and ethoxylated nonylphenol (generic... identified generically as trimellitic anhydride, polymer with substituted glycol, alkyl phenols...

  3. Understanding Resistance to Combination Chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Pritchard, Justin R.; Lauffenburger, Douglas A.; Hemann, Michael T.

    2014-01-01

    Summary The current clinical application of combination chemotherapy is guided by a historically successful set of practices that were developed by basic and clinical researchers 50-60 years ago. Thus, in order to understand how emerging approaches to drug development might aid the creation of new therapeutic combinations, it is critical to understand the defining principles underlying classic combination therapy and the original experimental rationales behind them. One such principle is that the use of combination therapies with independent mechanisms of action can minimize the evolution of drug resistance. Another is that in order to kill sufficient cancer cells to cure a patient, multiple drugs must be delivered at their maximum tolerated dose – a condition that allows for enhanced cancer cell killing with manageable toxicity. In light of these models, we aim to explore recent genomic evidence underlying the mechanisms of resistance to the combination regimens constructed on these principles. Interestingly, we find that emerging genomic evidence contradicts some of the rationales of early practitioners in developing commonly used drug regimens. However, we also find that the addition of recent targeted therapies has yet to change the current principles underlying the construction of anti-cancer combinatorial regimens, nor have they made substantial inroads into the treatment of most cancers. We suggest that emerging systems/network biology approaches have an immense opportunity to impact the rational development of successful drug regimens. Specifically, by examining drug combinations in multivariate ways, next generation combination therapies can be constructed with a clear understanding of how mechanisms of resistance to multi-drug regimens differ from single agent resistance. PMID:23164555

  4. Design and in vitro activities of N-alkyl-N-[(8-R-2,2-dimethyl-2H-chromen-6-yl)methyl]heteroarylsulfonamides, novel small molecule Hypoxia Inducible Factor-1 (HIF-1) pathway inhibitors and anti-cancer agents

    PubMed Central

    Mun, Jiyoung; Jabbar, Adnan Abdul; Devi, Narra Sarojini; Yin, Shaoman; Wang, Yingzhe; Tan, Chalet; Culver, Deborah; Snyder, James P.; Van Meir, Erwin G.; Goodman, Mark M.

    2013-01-01

    The Hypoxia Inducible Factor (HIF) pathway is an attractive target for cancer as it controls tumor adaptation to growth under hypoxia and mediates chemo- and radiation resistance. We previously discovered 3,4-dimethoxy-N-[(2,2-dimethyl-2H-chromen-6-yl)methyl]-N-phenylbenzenesulfonamide, as a novel small molecule HIF-1 pathway inhibitor in a high-throughput cell-based assay, but its in vivo delivery is hampered by poor aqueous solubility (0.009 μM in water; logP7.4: 3.7). Here we describe the synthesis of twelve N-alkyl-N-[(8-R-2,2-dimethyl-2H-chromen-6-yl)methyl]heteroarylsulfonamides, which were designed to possess optimal lipophilicities and aqueous solubilities by in silico calculations. Experimental logP7.4 values of 8 of the 12 new analogs ranged from 1.2 ∼ 3.1. Aqueous solubilities of 3 analogs were measured, among which the most soluble N-[(8-methoxy-2,2-dimethyl-2H-chromen-6-yl)methyl]-N-(propan-2-yl)pyridine-2-sulfonamide had an aqueous solubility of 80 μM, e.g. a solubility improvement of ∼9,000-fold. The pharmacological optimization had minimal impact on drug efficacy as the compounds retained IC50 values at or below 5 μM in our HIF-dependent reporter assay. PMID:22746274

  5. 5-Alkyl-6-benzyl-2-(2-oxo-2-phenylethylsulfanyl)pyrimidin-4(3H)-ones, a series of anti-HIV-1 agents of the dihydro-alkoxy-benzyl-oxopyrimidine family with peculiar structure-activity relationship profile.

    PubMed

    Nawrozkij, Maxim B; Rotili, Dante; Tarantino, Domenico; Botta, Giorgia; Eremiychuk, Alexandre S; Musmuca, Ira; Ragno, Rino; Samuele, Alberta; Zanoli, Samantha; Armand-Ugón, Mercedes; Clotet-Codina, Imma; Novakov, Ivan A; Orlinson, Boris S; Maga, Giovanni; Esté, José A; Artico, Marino; Mai, Antonello

    2008-08-14

    A series of dihydro-alkylthio-benzyl-oxopyrimidines (S-DABOs) bearing a 2-aryl-2-oxoethylsulfanyl chain at pyrimidine C2, an alkyl group at C5, and a 2,6-dichloro-, 2-chloro-6-fluoro-, and 2,6-difluoro-benzyl substitution at C6 (oxophenethyl- S-DABOs, 6-8) is here described. The new compounds showed low micromolar to low nanomolar (in one case subnanomolar) inhibitory activity against wt HIV-1. Against clinically relevant HIV-1 mutants (K103N, Y181C, and Y188L) as well as in enzyme (wt and K103N, Y181I, and L100I mutated RTs) assays, compounds carrying an ethyl/ iso-propyl group at C5 and a 2,6-dichloro-/2-chloro-6-fluoro-benzyl moiety at C6 were the most potent derivatives, also characterized by low fold resistance ratio. Interestingly, the structure-activity relationship (SAR) data drawn from this DABO series are more related to HEPT than to DABO derivatives. These findings were at least in part rationalized by the description of a fair superimposition between the 6-8 and TNK-651 (a HEPT analogue) binding modes in both WT and Y181C RTs. PMID:18630898

  6. Agent Orange

    MedlinePlus

    ... Index Agent Orange Agent Orange Home Facts about Herbicides Veterans' Diseases Birth Defects Benefits Exposure Locations Provider ... millions of gallons of Agent Orange and other herbicides on trees and vegetation during the Vietnam War. ...

  7. Fragmentation of Electrospray-Produced Deprotonated Ions of Oligodeoxyribonucleotides Containing an Alkylated or Oxidized Thymidine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Pengcheng; Williams, Renee T.; Guerrero, Candace R.; Ji, Debin; Wang, Yinsheng

    2014-07-01

    Alkylation and oxidation constitute major routes of DNA damage induced by endogenous and exogenous genotoxic agents. Understanding the biological consequences of DNA lesions often necessitates the availability of oligodeoxyribonucleotide (ODN) substrates harboring these lesions, and sensitive and robust methods for validating the identities of these ODNs. Tandem mass spectrometry is well suited for meeting these latter analytical needs. In the present study, we evaluated how the incorporation of an ethyl group to different positions (i.e., O 2, N3, and O 4) of thymine and the oxidation of its 5-methyl carbon impact collisionally activated dissociation (CAD) pathways of electrospray-produced deprotonated ions of ODNs harboring these thymine modifications. Unlike an unmodified thymine, which often manifests poor cleavage of the C3'-O3' bond, the incorporation of an alkyl group to the O 2 position and, to a much lesser extent, the O 4 position, but not the N3 position of thymine, led to facile cleavage of the C3'-O3' bond on the 3' side of the modified thymine. Similar efficient chain cleavage was observed when thymine was oxidized to 5-formyluracil or 5-carboxyluracil, but not 5-hydroxymethyluracil. Additionally, with the support of computational modeling, we revealed that proton affinity and acidity of the modified nucleobases govern the fragmentation of ODNs containing the alkylated and oxidized thymidine derivatives, respectively. These results provided important insights into the effects of thymine modifications on ODN fragmentation.

  8. Structure-Function Relationship of Substituted Bromomethylcoumarins in Nucleoside Specificity of RNA Alkylation

    PubMed Central

    Kellner, Stefanie; Kollar, Laura Bettina; Ochel, Antonia; Ghate, Manjunath; Helm, Mark

    2013-01-01

    Selective alkylation of RNA nucleotides is an important field of RNA biochemistry, e.g. in applications of fluorescent labeling or in structural probing experiments, yet detailed structure-function studies of labeling agents are rare. Here, bromomethylcoumarins as reactive compounds for fluorescent labeling of RNA are developed as an attractive scaffold on which electronic properties can be modulated by varying the substituents. Six different 4-bromomethyl-coumarins of various substitution patterns were tested for nucleotide specificity of RNA alkylation using tRNA from Escherichia coli as substrate. Using semi-quantitative LC-MS/MS analysis, reactions at mildly acidic and slightly alkaline pH were compared. For all tested compounds, coumarin conjugates with 4-thiouridine, pseudouridine, guanosine, and uridine were identified, with the latter largely dominating. This data set shows that selectivity of ribonucleotide alkylation depends on the substitution pattern of the reactive dye, and even more strongly on the modulation of the reaction conditions. The latter should be therefore carefully optimized when striving to achieve selectivity. Interestingly, the highest selectivity for labeling of a modified nucleoside, namely of 4-thiouridine, was achieved with a compound whose selectivity was somewhat less dependent on reaction conditions than the other compounds. In summary, bromomethylcoumarin derivatives are a highly interesting class of compounds, since their selectivity for 4-thiouridine can be efficiently tuned by variation of substitution pattern and reaction conditions. PMID:23844135

  9. Alkyl hydroperoxide reductase: a candidate Helicobacter pylori vaccine.

    PubMed

    O'Riordan, Avril A; Morales, Veronica Athie; Mulligan, Linda; Faheem, Nazia; Windle, Henry J; Kelleher, Dermot P

    2012-06-01

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) is the most important etiological agent of chronic active gastritis, peptic ulcer disease and gastric cancer. The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of alkyl hydroperoxide reductase (AhpC) and mannosylated AhpC (mAhpC) as candidate vaccines in the C57BL/6J mouse model of H. pylori infection. Recombinant AhpC was cloned, over-expressed and purified in an unmodified form and was also engineered to incorporate N and C-terminal mannose residues when expressed in the yeast Pichia pastoris. Mice were immunized systemically and mucosally with AhpC and systemically with mAhpC prior to challenge with H. pylori. Serum IgG responses to AhpC were determined and quantitative culture was used to determine the efficacy of vaccination strategies. Systemic prophylactic immunization with AhpC/alum and mAhpC/alum conferred protection against infection in 55% and 77.3% of mice, respectively. Mucosal immunization with AhpC/cholera toxin did not protect against infection and elicited low levels of serum IgG in comparison with systemic immunization. These data support the use of AhpC as a potential vaccine candidate against H. pylori infection. PMID:22512976

  10. 40 CFR 721.10073 - Modified alkyl acrylamide (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Modified alkyl acrylamide (generic... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10073 Modified alkyl acrylamide (generic). (a) Chemical substance and... acrylamide (PMN P-05-536) is subject to reporting under this section for the significant new uses...

  11. 40 CFR 721.840 - Alkyl substituted diaromatic hydrocarbons.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... hydrocarbons. 721.840 Section 721.840 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.840 Alkyl substituted diaromatic hydrocarbons. (a) Chemical substance... alkyl substituted di-aro-matic hydrocarbons (PMN P-91-710) is subject to reporting under this...

  12. 40 CFR 721.840 - Alkyl substituted diaromatic hydrocarbons.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... hydrocarbons. 721.840 Section 721.840 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.840 Alkyl substituted diaromatic hydrocarbons. (a) Chemical substance... alkyl substituted di-aro-matic hydrocarbons (PMN P-91-710) is subject to reporting under this...

  13. 40 CFR 721.840 - Alkyl substituted diaromatic hydrocarbons.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... hydrocarbons. 721.840 Section 721.840 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.840 Alkyl substituted diaromatic hydrocarbons. (a) Chemical substance... alkyl substituted di-aro-matic hydrocarbons (PMN P-91-710) is subject to reporting under this...

  14. 40 CFR 721.840 - Alkyl substituted diaromatic hydrocarbons.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... hydrocarbons. 721.840 Section 721.840 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.840 Alkyl substituted diaromatic hydrocarbons. (a) Chemical substance... alkyl substituted di-aro-matic hydrocarbons (PMN P-91-710) is subject to reporting under this...

  15. 40 CFR 721.840 - Alkyl substituted diaromatic hydrocarbons.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... hydrocarbons. 721.840 Section 721.840 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.840 Alkyl substituted diaromatic hydrocarbons. (a) Chemical substance... alkyl substituted di-aro-matic hydrocarbons (PMN P-91-710) is subject to reporting under this...

  16. 40 CFR 721.9515 - Aminofunctional alkoxy alkyl siloxane.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Aminofunctional alkoxy alkyl siloxane... Substances § 721.9515 Aminofunctional alkoxy alkyl siloxane. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses... siloxane (PMN P-96-346) is subject to reporting under this section for the significant new uses...

  17. 40 CFR 721.9515 - Aminofunctional alkoxy alkyl siloxane.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Aminofunctional alkoxy alkyl siloxane... Substances § 721.9515 Aminofunctional alkoxy alkyl siloxane. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses... siloxane (PMN P-96-346) is subject to reporting under this section for the significant new uses...

  18. 40 CFR 721.9515 - Aminofunctional alkoxy alkyl siloxane.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Aminofunctional alkoxy alkyl siloxane... Substances § 721.9515 Aminofunctional alkoxy alkyl siloxane. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses... siloxane (PMN P-96-346) is subject to reporting under this section for the significant new uses...

  19. 40 CFR 721.9515 - Aminofunctional alkoxy alkyl siloxane.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Aminofunctional alkoxy alkyl siloxane... Substances § 721.9515 Aminofunctional alkoxy alkyl siloxane. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses... siloxane (PMN P-96-346) is subject to reporting under this section for the significant new uses...

  20. 40 CFR 721.9515 - Aminofunctional alkoxy alkyl siloxane.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Aminofunctional alkoxy alkyl siloxane... Substances § 721.9515 Aminofunctional alkoxy alkyl siloxane. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses... siloxane (PMN P-96-346) is subject to reporting under this section for the significant new uses...

  1. 40 CFR 721.655 - Ethoxylated alkyl quaternary ammonium compound.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... compound. 721.655 Section 721.655 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.655 Ethoxylated alkyl quaternary ammonium compound. (a) Chemical... as an ethoxylated alkyl quaternary ammonium compound (PMN P-96-573) is subject to reporting...

  2. 40 CFR 721.655 - Ethoxylated alkyl quaternary ammonium compound.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... compound. 721.655 Section 721.655 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.655 Ethoxylated alkyl quaternary ammonium compound. (a) Chemical... as an ethoxylated alkyl quaternary ammonium compound (PMN P-96-573) is subject to reporting...

  3. 40 CFR 721.655 - Ethoxylated alkyl quaternary ammonium compound.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... compound. 721.655 Section 721.655 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.655 Ethoxylated alkyl quaternary ammonium compound. (a) Chemical... as an ethoxylated alkyl quaternary ammonium compound (PMN P-96-573) is subject to reporting...

  4. 40 CFR 721.655 - Ethoxylated alkyl quaternary ammonium compound.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... compound. 721.655 Section 721.655 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.655 Ethoxylated alkyl quaternary ammonium compound. (a) Chemical... as an ethoxylated alkyl quaternary ammonium compound (PMN P-96-573) is subject to reporting...

  5. 40 CFR 721.655 - Ethoxylated alkyl quaternary ammonium compound.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... compound. 721.655 Section 721.655 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.655 Ethoxylated alkyl quaternary ammonium compound. (a) Chemical... as an ethoxylated alkyl quaternary ammonium compound (PMN P-96-573) is subject to reporting...

  6. Alkylation of refinery C5 streams to lower gasoline volatility

    SciTech Connect

    Cronkright, W.A.; Ditz, J.M.; Newsome, D.S. ); Lerner, H. ); Schorfheide, J.J. ); Libbers, D.D. )

    1994-01-01

    A pilot plant program was carried out to provide precise information about the sulfuric acid alkylation of refinery C5 streams under conditions found in commercial operation of the Exxon stirred, autorefrigerated alkylation process. The study used isobutane to alkylate the full range of pentenes in a C5 cut from an FCC unit as well as the linear olefin concentrate in the raffinate that would be obtained after processing this cut in a TAME unit. A few experiments were conducted with a mixture of C5 olefins matching the composition of the refinery feed in order to highlight the effect of impurities. The results showed that hydrocarbon impurities are a principal factor causing the high acid consumption values reported for pentene alkylation. The results also demonstrated that operating variables that affect acid consumption and alkylate quality in butene alkylation produce directionally similar effects in pentene alkylation, but of different magnitude. It is concluded that sulfur acid alkylation of pentenes produces an excellent isoparaffinic blending stock for the gasoline pool while eliminating volatile olefins and reducing gasoline RVP. Combined with the TAME process, a scheme for adding oxygen and achieving maximum RVP reduction at the same time is realized.

  7. Degradable Polymer Composites Fabricated from Starch and Alkyl Cyanoacrylate Monomer

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Degradable polymer composites are fabricated from alkyl cyanoacrylate monomer and starch without special equipment. Alkyl cyanoacrylate, which is a major component of “super glue”, is a monomer that polymerizes at room temperature in the presence of initiators. During the fabrication of polymer com...

  8. 40 CFR 721.8700 - Halogenated alkyl pyridine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Halogenated alkyl pyridine. 721.8700 Section 721.8700 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) TOXIC SUBSTANCES CONTROL ACT SIGNIFICANT NEW USES OF CHEMICAL SUBSTANCES Significant New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.8700 Halogenated alkyl...

  9. 40 CFR 721.2825 - Alkyl ester (generic name).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Alkyl ester (generic name). 721.2825 Section 721.2825 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) TOXIC SUBSTANCES... Substances § 721.2825 Alkyl ester (generic name). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject...

  10. 40 CFR 721.2825 - Alkyl ester (generic name).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Alkyl ester (generic name). 721.2825 Section 721.2825 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) TOXIC SUBSTANCES... Substances § 721.2825 Alkyl ester (generic name). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject...

  11. 40 CFR 721.2560 - Alkylated diphenyl oxide (generic name).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Alkylated diphenyl oxide (generic name). 721.2560 Section 721.2560 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) TOXIC... Substances § 721.2560 Alkylated diphenyl oxide (generic name). (a) Chemical substance and significant...

  12. 40 CFR 721.9720 - Disubstituted alkyl triazines (generic name).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Disubstituted alkyl triazines (generic name). 721.9720 Section 721.9720 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.9720 Disubstituted alkyl triazines (generic name). (a)...

  13. 40 CFR 721.2560 - Alkylated diphenyl oxide (generic name).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Alkylated diphenyl oxide (generic name). 721.2560 Section 721.2560 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) TOXIC... Substances § 721.2560 Alkylated diphenyl oxide (generic name). (a) Chemical substance and significant...

  14. 40 CFR 721.2825 - Alkyl ester (generic name).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Alkyl ester (generic name). 721.2825 Section 721.2825 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) TOXIC SUBSTANCES... Substances § 721.2825 Alkyl ester (generic name). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject...

  15. 21 CFR 176.120 - Alkyl ketene dimers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Alkyl ketene dimers. 176.120 Section 176.120 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) INDIRECT FOOD ADDITIVES: PAPER AND PAPERBOARD COMPONENTS Substances for Use Only as Components of Paper and Paperboard § 176.120 Alkyl ketene dimers....

  16. 40 CFR 721.1878 - Alkali metal alkyl borohydride (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...) TOXIC SUBSTANCES CONTROL ACT SIGNIFICANT NEW USES OF CHEMICAL SUBSTANCES Significant New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.1878 Alkali metal alkyl borohydride (generic). (a) Chemical substance... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Alkali metal alkyl...

  17. 40 CFR 721.1852 - Di-alkyl borane (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Di-alkyl borane (generic). 721.1852 Section 721.1852 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) TOXIC SUBSTANCES CONTROL ACT SIGNIFICANT NEW USES OF CHEMICAL SUBSTANCES Significant New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.1852 Di-alkyl borane...

  18. 40 CFR 721.2155 - Alkoxyamino-alkyl-coumarin (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Alkoxyamino-alkyl-coumarin (generic... Substances § 721.2155 Alkoxyamino-alkyl-coumarin (generic). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as...

  19. 40 CFR 721.2155 - Alkoxyamino-alkyl-coumarin (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Alkoxyamino-alkyl-coumarin (generic... Substances § 721.2155 Alkoxyamino-alkyl-coumarin (generic). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as...

  20. 21 CFR 176.120 - Alkyl ketene dimers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... HUMAN CONSUMPTION (CONTINUED) INDIRECT FOOD ADDITIVES: PAPER AND PAPERBOARD COMPONENTS Substances for Use Only as Components of Paper and Paperboard § 176.120 Alkyl ketene dimers. Alkyl ketene dimers may be safely used as a component of articles intended for use in producing, manufacturing,...

  1. 21 CFR 176.120 - Alkyl ketene dimers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... HUMAN CONSUMPTION (CONTINUED) INDIRECT FOOD ADDITIVES: PAPER AND PAPERBOARD COMPONENTS Substances for Use Only as Components of Paper and Paperboard § 176.120 Alkyl ketene dimers. Alkyl ketene dimers may be safely used as a component of articles intended for use in producing, manufacturing,...

  2. 40 CFR 721.6070 - Alkyl phosphonate ammonium salts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Alkyl phosphonate ammonium salts. 721... Substances § 721.6070 Alkyl phosphonate ammonium salts. (a) Chemical substances and significant new uses... salts (PMNs P-93-725 and P-93-726) are subject to reporting under this section for the significant...

  3. 40 CFR 721.10430 - Tetra alkyl ammonium salt (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Tetra alkyl ammonium salt (generic... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10430 Tetra alkyl ammonium salt (generic). (a) Chemical substance and... ammonium salt (PMN P-97-823) is subject to reporting under this section for the significant new...

  4. 40 CFR 721.6070 - Alkyl phosphonate ammonium salts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Alkyl phosphonate ammonium salts. 721... Substances § 721.6070 Alkyl phosphonate ammonium salts. (a) Chemical substances and significant new uses... salts (PMNs P-93-725 and P-93-726) are subject to reporting under this section for the significant...

  5. 40 CFR 721.6070 - Alkyl phosphonate ammonium salts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Alkyl phosphonate ammonium salts. 721... Substances § 721.6070 Alkyl phosphonate ammonium salts. (a) Chemical substances and significant new uses... salts (PMNs P-93-725 and P-93-726) are subject to reporting under this section for the significant...

  6. 40 CFR 721.10430 - Tetra alkyl ammonium salt (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Tetra alkyl ammonium salt (generic... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10430 Tetra alkyl ammonium salt (generic). (a) Chemical substance and... ammonium salt (PMN P-97-823) is subject to reporting under this section for the significant new...

  7. 40 CFR 721.6070 - Alkyl phosphonate ammonium salts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Alkyl phosphonate ammonium salts. 721... Substances § 721.6070 Alkyl phosphonate ammonium salts. (a) Chemical substances and significant new uses... salts (PMNs P-93-725 and P-93-726) are subject to reporting under this section for the significant...

  8. 40 CFR 721.6070 - Alkyl phosphonate ammonium salts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Alkyl phosphonate ammonium salts. 721... Substances § 721.6070 Alkyl phosphonate ammonium salts. (a) Chemical substances and significant new uses... salts (PMNs P-93-725 and P-93-726) are subject to reporting under this section for the significant...

  9. Microwave-assisted synthesis of alkyl cellulose in aqueous medium

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Alkyl celluloses are commercial products that are made typically in an alcohol medium over the course of several hours. In this work an alternative, simplified synthesis of alkyl cellulose is reported, using microwave irradiation and aqueous alkaline medium. No alcohol is needed during the reaction....

  10. 40 CFR 721.10317 - Alkyl phosphate derivative (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Alkyl phosphate derivative (generic... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10317 Alkyl phosphate derivative (generic). (a) Chemical substance and... phosphate derivative (PMN P-02-1040) is subject to reporting under this section for the significant new...

  11. 40 CFR 721.10317 - Alkyl phosphate derivative (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Alkyl phosphate derivative (generic... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10317 Alkyl phosphate derivative (generic). (a) Chemical substance and... phosphate derivative (PMN P-02-1040) is subject to reporting under this section for the significant new...

  12. 40 CFR 721.10317 - Alkyl phosphate derivative (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Alkyl phosphate derivative (generic... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10317 Alkyl phosphate derivative (generic). (a) Chemical substance and... phosphate derivative (PMN P-02-1040) is subject to reporting under this section for the significant new...

  13. Caspase-9 is required for normal hematopoietic development and protection from alkylator-induced DNA damage in mice

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Elise Peterson; McLellan, Michael; Ding, Li; Fulton, Robert; Mardis, Elaine R.; Wilson, Richard K.; Miller, Christopher A.; Westervelt, Peter; DiPersio, John F.; Link, Daniel C.; Walter, Matthew J.; Ley, Timothy J.

    2014-01-01

    Apoptosis and the DNA damage responses have been implicated in hematopoietic development and differentiation, as well as in the pathogenesis of myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) and leukemia. However, the importance of late-stage mediators of apoptosis in hematopoiesis and leukemogenesis has not been elucidated. Here, we examine the role of caspase-9 (Casp9), the initiator caspase of the intrinsic apoptotic cascade, in murine fetal and adult hematopoiesis. Casp9 deficiency resulted in decreased erythroid and B-cell progenitor abundance and impaired function of hematopoietic stem cells after transplantation. Mouse bone marrow chimeras lacking Casp9 or its cofactor Apaf1 developed low white blood cell counts, decreased B-cell numbers, anemia, and reduced survival. Defects in apoptosis have also been previously implicated in susceptibility to therapy-related leukemia, a disease caused by exposure to DNA-damaging chemotherapy. We found that the burden of DNA damage was increased in Casp9-deficient cells after exposure to the alkylator, N-ethyl-nitrosourea (ENU). Furthermore, exome sequencing revealed that oligoclonal hematopoiesis emerged in Casp9-deficient bone marrow chimeras after alkylator exposure. Taken together, these findings suggest that defects in apoptosis could be a key step in the pathogenesis of alkylator-associated secondary malignancies. PMID:25349173

  14. Ni-Catalyzed C-C Couplings Using Alkyl Electrophiles.

    PubMed

    Iwasaki, Takanori; Kambe, Nobuaki

    2016-10-01

    Much effort has been devoted to developing new methods using Ni catalysts for the cross-coupling reaction of alkyl electrophiles with organometallic reagents, and significant achievements in this area have emerged during the past two decades. Nickel catalysts have enabled the coupling reaction of not only primary alkyl electrophiles, but also sterically hindered secondary and tertiary alkyl electrophiles possessing β-hydrogens with various organometallic reagents to construct carbon skeletons. In addition, Ni catalysts opened a new era of asymmetric cross-coupling reaction using alkyl halides. Recent progress in nickel-catalyzed cross-coupling reaction of alkyl electrophiles with sp(3)-, sp(2)-, and sp-hybridized organometallic reagents including asymmetric variants as well as mechanistic insights of nickel catalysis are reviewed in this chapter. PMID:27580894

  15. Abuse potential and dopaminergic effect of alkyl nitrites.

    PubMed

    Jeon, Seo Young; Kim, Yun Ji; Kim, Young-Hoon; Shin, Jisoon; Yun, Jaesuk; Han, Kyoungmoon; Park, Hye-Kyung; Kim, Hyung Soo; Cha, Hye Jin

    2016-08-26

    The abuse of alkyl nitrites is common among adolescents and young adults worldwide. However, the information regarding the effects of alkyl nitrites on the central nervous system and the associated psychological abuse potential is scarce. The abuse potential of 3 representative alkyl nitrites - isobutyl nitrite, isoamyl nitrite, and butyl nitrite - was evaluated in mice using conditioned place preference tests with an unbiased method. The dopamine levels released by synaptosomes extracted from the striatal region were measured using high performance liquid chromatography. Mice treated with the test substances (50mg/kg, i.p.) exhibited a significantly increased drug-paired place preference. Moreover, greater levels of dopamine were released by striatal region synaptosomes in response to isobutyl nitrite treatment in mice. Thus, our findings suggest that alkyl nitrites could lead to psychological dependence and dopaminergic effects. Furthermore, these results provide scientific evidence to support the regulation of alkyl nitrites as psychoactive substances in the future. PMID:27369324

  16. Polyimide characterization studies - Effect of pendant alkyl groups

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jensen, B. J.; Young, P. R.

    1984-01-01

    The effect on selected polyimide properties when pendant alkyl groups were attached to the polymer backbone was investigated. A series of polymers were prepared using benzophenone tetracarboxylic acid dianhydride (BTDA) and seven different p-alkyl-m,p'-diaminobenzophenone monomers. The alkyl groups varied in length from C(1) (methyl) to C(9) (nonyl). The polyimide prepared from BTDA and m,p'-diaminobenzophenone was included as a control. All polymers were characterized by various chromatographic, spectroscopic, thermal, and mechanical techniques. Increasing the length of the pendant alkyl group resulted in a systematic decrease in glass transition temperature (Tg) for vacuum cured films. A 70 C decrease in Tg to 193 C was observed for the nonyl polymer compared to the Tg for the control. A corresponding systematic increase in Tg indicative of crosslinking, was observed for air cured films. Thermogravimetric analysis revealed a slight sacrifice in thermal stability with increasing alkyl length. No improvement in film toughness was observed.

  17. Genomic patterns resembling BRCA1- and BRCA2-mutated breast cancers predict benefit of intensified carboplatin-based chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Introduction BRCA-mutated breast cancer cells lack the DNA-repair mechanism homologous recombination that is required for error-free DNA double-strand break (DSB) repair. Homologous recombination deficiency (HRD) may cause hypersensitivity to DNA DSB-inducing agents, such as bifunctional alkylating agents and platinum salts. HRD can be caused by BRCA mutations, and by other mechanisms. To identify HRD, studies have focused on triple-negative (TN) breast cancers as these resemble BRCA1-mutated breast cancer closely and might also share this hypersensitivity. However, ways to identify HRD in non-BRCA-mutated, estrogen receptor (ER)-positive breast cancers have remained elusive. The current study provides evidence that genomic patterns resembling BRCA1- or BRCA2-mutated breast cancers can identify breast cancer patients with TN as well as ER-positive, HER2-negative tumors that are sensitive to intensified, DSB-inducing chemotherapy. Methods Array comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH) was used to classify breast cancers. Patients with tumors with similar aCGH patterns as BRCA1- and/or BRCA2-mutated breast cancers were defined as having a BRCA-likeCGH status, others as non-BCRA-likeCGH. Stage-III patients (n = 249) had participated in a randomized controlled trial of adjuvant high-dose (HD) cyclophosphamide-thiotepa-carboplatin (CTC) versus 5-fluorouracil-epirubicin-cyclophosphamide (FE90C) chemotherapy. Results Among patients with BRCA-likeCGH tumors (81/249, 32%), a significant benefit of HD-CTC compared to FE90C was observed regarding overall survival (adjusted hazard ratio 0.19, 95% CI: 0.08 to 0.48) that was not seen for patients with non-BRCA-likeCGH tumors (adjusted hazard ratio 0.90, 95% CI: 0.53 to 1.54) (P = 0.004). Half of all BRCA-likeCGH tumors were ER-positive. Conclusions Distinct aCGH patterns differentiated between HER2-negative patients with a markedly improved outcome after adjuvant treatment with an intensified DNA-DSB-inducing regimen

  18. Effect of polyester blends in hydroentangled raw and bleached cotton nonwoven fabrics on the adsorption of alkyl-dimethyl-benzyl-ammonium chloride

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The adsorption kinetics and isotherms of alkyl-dimethyl-benzyl-ammonium chloride (ADBAC), a cationic surfactant commonly employed as an antimicrobial agent, on hydroentangled nonwoven fabrics (applicable for wipes) including raw cotton, bleached cotton, and their blends with polyester (PES) were stu...

  19. Repair-deficient 3-methyladenine DNA glycosylase homozygous mutant mouse cells have increased sensitivity to alkylation-induced chromosome damage and cell killing.

    PubMed Central

    Engelward, B P; Dreslin, A; Christensen, J; Huszar, D; Kurahara, C; Samson, L

    1996-01-01

    In Escherichia coli, the repair of 3-methyladenine (3MeA) DNA lesions prevents alkylation-induced cell death because unrepaired 3MeA blocks DNA replication. Whether this lesion is cytotoxic to mammalian cells has been difficult to establish in the absence of 3MeA repair-deficient cell lines. We previously isolated and characterized a mouse 3MeA DNA glycosylase cDNA (Aag) that provides resistance to killing by alkylating agents in E. coli. To determine the in vivo role of Aag, we cloned a large fragment of the Aag gene and used it to create Aag-deficient mouse cells by targeted homologous recombination. Aag null cells have no detectable Aag transcripts or 3MeA DNA glycosylase activity. The loss of Aag renders cells significantly more sensitive to methyl methanesulfonate-induced chromosome damage, and to cell killing induced by two methylating agents, one of which produces almost exclusively 3MeAs. Aag null embryonic stem cells become sensitive to two cancer chemotherapeutic alkylating agents, namely 1,3-bis(2-chloroethyl)-1-nitrosourea and mitomycin C, indicating that Aag status is an important determinant of cellular resistance to these agents. We conclude that this mammalian 3MeA DNA glycosylase plays a pivotal role in preventing alkylation-induced chromosome damage and cytotoxicity. Images PMID:8631315

  20. Effect of varying nonwoven cotton substrate and the properties of the surfactant solution upon the adsorption of aqueous solutions of alkyl-dimethyl-benzyl-ammonium chloride

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The adsorption of alkyl-dimethyl-benzyl-ammonium chloride (ADBAC), a cationic surfactant commonly employed as an antimicrobial agent, on greige, alkaline scoured, and bleached nonwoven cotton fabrics was investigated at varying surfactant concentrations using UV/vis spectroscopy. Results show greige...

  1. Effect of varying nonwoven cotton substrate and the properties of the surfactant solution upon the adsorption of aqueous solutions of alkyl-dimethyl-benzyl-ammonium chloride

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The adsorption of alkyl-dimethyl-benzyl-ammonium chloride (ADBAC), a cationic surfactant commonly employed as an antimicrobial agent, on greige, alkaline scoured, and bleached nonwoven cotton fabrics was investigated at varying surfactant concentrations and liquor ratios using UV-vis absorption spec...

  2. Pathobiology of cancer chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy (CIPN)

    PubMed Central

    Han, Yaqin; Smith, Maree T.

    2013-01-01

    Chemotherapy induced peripheral neuropathy (CIPN) is a type of neuropathic pain that is a major dose-limiting side-effect of potentially curative cancer chemotherapy treatment regimens that develops in a “stocking and glove” distribution. When pain is severe, a change to less effective chemotherapy agents may be required, or patients may choose to discontinue treatment. Medications used to alleviate CIPN often lack efficacy and/or have unacceptable side-effects. Hence the unmet medical need for novel analgesics for relief of this painful condition has driven establishment of rodent models of CIPN. New insights on the pathobiology of CIPN gained using these models are discussed in this review. These include mitochondrial dysfunction and oxidative stress that are implicated as key mechanisms in the development of CIPN. Associated structural changes in peripheral nerves include neuronopathy, axonopathy and/or myelinopathy, especially intra-epidermal nerve fiber (IENF) degeneration. In patients with CIPN, loss of heat sensitivity is a hallmark symptom due to preferential damage to myelinated primary afferent sensory nerve fibers in the presence or absence of demyelination. The pathobiology of CIPN is complex as cancer chemotherapy treatment regimens frequently involve drug combinations. Adding to this complexity, there are also subtle differences in the pathobiological consequences of commonly used cancer chemotherapy drugs, viz platinum compounds, taxanes, vincristine, bortezomib, thalidomide and ixabepilone, on peripheral nerves. PMID:24385965

  3. Glutamine: A novel approach to chemotherapy-induced toxicity

    PubMed Central

    Gaurav, Kumar; Goel, R. K.; Shukla, Mridula; Pandey, Manoj

    2012-01-01

    Treatment of cancer is associated with short- and long-term side-effects. Cancer produces a state of glutamine deficiency, which is further aggravated by toxic effects of chemotherapeutic agents leading to increased tolerance of tumor to chemotherapy as well as reduced tolerance of normal tissues to the side-effects of chemotherapy. This article reviews the possible role of glutamine supplementation in reducing the serious adverse events in patients treated with anticancer drugs. The literature related to the possible role of glutamine in humans with cancer and the supportive evidence from animal studies was reviewed. Searches were made and the literature was retrieved using PUBMED, MEDLINE, COCHRANE LIBRARY, CENAHL and EMBASE, with a greater emphasis on the recent advances and clinical trials. Glutamine supplementation was found to protect against radiation-induced mucositis, anthracycline-induced cardiotoxicity and paclitaxel-related myalgias/arthralgias. Glutamine may prevent neurotoxicity of paclitaxel, cisplatin, oxaplatin bortezomib and lenolidamide, and is beneficial in the reduction of the dose-limiting gastrointestinal toxic effects of irinotecan and 5-FU-induced mucositis and stomatitis. Dietary glutamine reduces the severity of the immunosuppressive effect induced by methotrexate and improves the immune status of rats recovering from chemotherapy. In patients with acute myeloid leukemia requiring parenteral nutrition, glycyl-glutamine supplementation could hasten neutrophil recovery after intensive myelosuppressive chemotherapy. Current data supports the usefulness of glutamine supplementation in reducing complications of chemotherapy; however, paucity of clinical trials weakens the clear interpretation of these findings. PMID:22754203

  4. An efficient copper-catalyzed cross-coupling reaction of alkyl-triflates with alkyl-Grignard reagents

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A highly efficient method for the formation of C-C covalent bonds by cross-coupling reaction between alkyl-triflates and alkyl-Grignard reagents catalyzed by copper catalyst, Li2CuCl4, is described. The reaction works with most primary triflates in diethyl ether at low temperature within 0.5-3 h an...

  5. Tandem high-dose chemotherapy with thiotepa and busulfan-melphalan and autologous stem cell transplantation in very high-risk neuroblastoma patients.

    PubMed

    Pasqualini, C; Dufour, C; Goma, G; Raquin, M-A; Lapierre, V; Valteau-Couanet, D

    2016-02-01

    High-risk neuroblastoma is characterised by poor long-term survival, especially for very high-risk (VHR) patients (poor response of metastases after induction therapy). We report the results of an intensified high-dose chemotherapy (HDC) strategy to improve the prognosis of VHR patients. This strategy was based on tandem HDC with thiotepa and busulfan-melphalan (Bu-Mel) followed by autologous stem cell transplantation (ASCT). All data were prospectively recorded in the Gustave Roussy Paediatric ASCT database. From April 2004 to August 2011, 26 patients were eligible for tandem HDC. The median age at diagnosis was 4.4 years (1-15.9). All patients had metastatic disease. MYCN was amplified in 5/26 tumours. Despite the cumulative toxicity of alkylating agents, the toxicity of the intensified HDC strategy was manageable. Thiotepa-related toxicity was mainly digestive, whereas sinusoidal obstruction syndrome was the main toxicity observed after Bu-Mel. The 3-year event-free survival of this cohort was 37.3% (21.3-56.7). This strategy will be compared with combined (131)I-mIBG/Bu-Mel in the upcoming SIOPEN VHR Neuroblastoma Protocol. PMID:26524264

  6. Metabolic and mutagenicity studies on DDT and 15 derivatives. Detection of 1,1-bis(p-chlorophenyl)-2,2-dichloroethane and 1,1-bis(p-chlorophenyl)-2,2,2-trichloroethyl acetate (kelthane acetate) as mutagens in Salmonella typhimurium and of 1,1-bis(p-chlorophenyl) ethylene oxide, a likely metabolite, as an alkylating agent.

    PubMed

    Planche, G; Croisy, A; Malaveille, C; Tomatis, L; Bartsch, H

    1979-05-01

    Using a novel in vitro technique, whereby microsomal enzymes were embedded in an agar layer to prolong their viability, 1,1-bis(p-chlorophenyl) ethylene(DDNU), a mammalian metabolite of 1,1-bis(p-chlorophenyl)-2,2,2-trichloroethane (DDT), was converted by microsomal mono-oxygenases of mouse liver into 1,1-bis(p-chlorophenyl)-1,2-ethanediol (DDNU-diol). The putative epoxide intermediate, 1,1-bis(p-chlorophenyl)ethylene oxide (DDNU-oxide), a new compound, was synthesized; it showed weak alkylating activity with 4-(4-nitrobenzyl)pyridine but was not mutagenic in Salmonella typhimurium strains TA100 and TA98. DDT and 13 of its metabolites or putative synthetic derivatives, including 1,1-bis(p-chlorophenyl)-2,2-dichloroethylene (DDE), 1 1,1-bis(p-chlorophenyl)-2-chloroethylene (DDMU), 1,1-bis(p-chlorophenyl)-2-chloroethane (DDMS)-DDNU, 2,2-bis(p-chlorophenyl)ethanol (DDOH), bis(p-chlorophenyl)acetic acid (DDA) and 1,1-bis(p-chlorophenyl)-2,2,2-trichloroethanol (Kethane), caused no mutagenic effects in S. typhimurium strains TA100 or TA98, either in the presence or absence of a mouse-liver microsomal fraction. 1,1-Bis(p-chlorophenyl)-2,2,2-trichloroethyl acetate (Kelthane acetate) was a direct-acting mutagen in strain TA100, whereas 1,1-bis(p-chlorophenyl)-2,2-dichloroethane (DDD) was mutagenic in TA98, only in the presence of a mouse-liver microsomal system. The results are discussed in relation to possible pathways whereby DDT is activated to mutagenic and/or carcinogenic metabolites. PMID:380827

  7. Chemotherapy for Soft Tissue Sarcomas

    MedlinePlus

    ... drugs may be used as well, including cisplatin, dacarbazine (DTIC), docetaxel (Taxotere ® ), gemcitabine (Gemzar ® ), methotrexate, oxaliplatin, paclitaxel (Taxol ® ), ... such as: MAID (mesna, Adriamycin [doxorubicin], ifosfamide, and dacarbazine). Chemotherapy drugs kill cancer cells but also damage ...

  8. [Chemotherapy for CRPC].

    PubMed

    Ozono, Seiichiro; Furuse, Hiroshi

    2014-12-01

    Cabazitaxel, new chemotherapeutic agent for castration resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) treated after docetaxel, was developed. In addition, new hormonal drugs for CRPC, such as enzalutamide and abiraterone were also approved in Japan recently. Treatment strategy for CRPC using these drugs is still controversial, therefore we need much more clinical data of Japanese patients with CRPC. Management of this severe condition and future of prostate cancer were discussed. PMID:25518353

  9. The evolving role of cytotoxic chemotherapy in the management of patients with metastatic prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Diamond, Elan; Garcias, María del Carmen; Karir, Beerinder; Tagawa, Scott T

    2015-02-01

    Prostate cancer (PC) is the most common cancer in men in the United States. Although outcomes are excellent for early-stage disease, survival for men with metastatic PC is limited. While older studies did not supported the use of chemotherapy in PC, the efficacy of taxane chemotherapy plus prednisone is now well established in men with metastatic castration resistant PC (CRPC). The results of CHAARTED trial have further expanded the use of chemotherapy to patients with metastatic hormone-sensitive disease. The clinical efficacy of taxanes over other chemotherapeutics may be a result of its ability to inhibit microtubule-dependent trafficking of proteins such as the androgen-receptor (AR). Ongoing research uses chemotherapy earlier in the disease course as well as explores the utility of combining cytotoxic chemotherapy with biologic agents. PMID:25762124

  10. Modeling Chemotherapy-Induced Hair Loss: From Experimental Propositions toward Clinical Reality.

    PubMed

    Botchkarev, Vladimir A; Sharov, Andrey A

    2016-03-01

    Chemotherapy-induced hair loss is one of the most devastating side effects of cancer treatment. To study the effects of chemotherapeutic agents on the hair follicle, a number of experimental models have been proposed. Yoon et al. report that transplantation of human scalp hair follicles onto chemotherapy-treated immunodeficient mice serves as an excellent in vivo model for chemotherapy-induced hair loss. Yoon et al. demonstrate that (i) the response of human hair follicles grafted onto immunodeficient mice to cyclophosphamide resembles the key features of the chemotherapy-induced hair loss seen in patients with cancer and (ii) this human in vivo model for chemotherapy-induced hair loss is closer to clinical reality than to any earlier models. Undoubtedly, this model will serve as a valuable tool for analyses of the mechanisms that underlie this devastating side effect of anti-cancer therapy. PMID:26902124

  11. [PIPAC--Pressurized intraperitoneal aerosol chemotherapy. A novel treatment for peritoneal carcinomatosis].

    PubMed

    Hübner, Martin; Teixeira, Hugo; Boussaha, Tarek; Cachemaille, Matthieu; Lehmann, Kuno; Demartines, Nicolas

    2015-06-17

    Peritoneal carcinomatosis remains a diagnostic challenge with sparse treatment options. The effect of systemic chemotherapy remains limited inside the peritoneum due to low penetration and a relative resistance of peritoneal nodules. Heated IntraPeritoneal Chemotherapy (HIPEC) improves survival in selected patients but entails a high incidence of complications. Pressurized IntraPeritoneal Aerosol Chemotherapy (PIPAC) allows to disperse the active agents inside the peritoneal cavity by laparoscopy. Distribution and tissue penetration of chemotherapy by PIPAC are superior to HIPEC and systemic chemotherapy despite of lower doses. Systemic side effects are uncommon and surgical trauma is limited. Histological and clinical response rates in platinum-resistant patients approach 70% and survival data appear to be favorable compared with standard therapy. PMID:26255492

  12. Non-platinum-based chemotherapy for treatment of advanced gastric cancer: 5-fluorouracil, taxanes, and irinotecan.

    PubMed

    Kang, Byung Woog; Kim, Jong Gwang; Kwon, Oh-Kyoung; Chung, Ho Young; Yu, Wansik

    2014-05-14

    Despite numerous advances in treatment options, advanced gastric cancer (AGC) remains a major public health issue and the leading cause of cancer-related deaths. Cisplatin is one of the most effective broad-spectrum anticancer drugs for AGC and a doublet combination regimen of either cisplatin-based or 5-fluorouracil (5FU)-based chemotherapy is generally used for treatment of patients with AGC. However, there is still no consensus on the best regimen for treating AGC. Recently, various new chemotherapeutic agents, including oral 5FU, taxanes, and irinotecan, have been identified as improving the outcomes for AGC when used as a single agent or in combination with non-platinum chemotherapy. Nonetheless, it is still unclear whether non-platinum-based chemotherapy is a viable treatment option for patients with AGC. Accordingly, this review focuses on the efficacy and tolerability of non-platinum-based chemotherapy for patients with AGC. PMID:24833869

  13. Non-platinum-based chemotherapy for treatment of advanced gastric cancer: 5-fluorouracil, taxanes, and irinotecan

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Byung Woog; Kim, Jong Gwang; Kwon, Oh-Kyoung; Chung, Ho Young; Yu, Wansik

    2014-01-01

    Despite numerous advances in treatment options, advanced gastric cancer (AGC) remains a major public health issue and the leading cause of cancer-related deaths. Cisplatin is one of the most effective broad-spectrum anticancer drugs for AGC and a doublet combination regimen of either cisplatin-based or 5-fluorouracil (5FU)-based chemotherapy is generally used for treatment of patients with AGC. However, there is still no consensus on the best regimen for treating AGC. Recently, various new chemotherapeutic agents, including oral 5FU, taxanes, and irinotecan, have been identified as improving the outcomes for AGC when used as a single agent or in combination with non-platinum chemotherapy. Nonetheless, it is still unclear whether non-platinum-based chemotherapy is a viable treatment option for patients with AGC. Accordingly, this review focuses on the efficacy and tolerability of non-platinum-based chemotherapy for patients with AGC. PMID:24833869

  14. A Case of Neurotoxicity Following 5-Fluorouracil-based Chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Ki, Seung Seog; Jeong, Jin Mo; Kim, Seong Ho; Jeong, Sook Hyang; Lee, Jin Hyuk; Han, Chul Ju; Kim, You Cheol; Lee, Jhin Oh; Hong, Young Joon

    2002-01-01

    5-Fluorouracil (5-FU) is a commonly used chemotherapeutic agent. However, its neurotoxicity is rare and not well recognized. We report a case of 5-FU neurotoxicity with organic brain syndrome and progression to multifocal leukoencephalopathy in a 44-year-old male patient having malignant gastrointestinal stromal tumor. 5-FU-induced neurotoxicity should, therefore, be considered as an important differential diagnosis in cancer patients with neurological abnormality and history of chemotherapy. PMID:12014219

  15. Systemic Chemotherapy in Advanced Pancreatic Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hee Seung; Park, Seung Woo

    2016-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer remains one of the most lethal cancers. These patients often have multiple symptoms, and integrated supportive care is critical in helping them remain well for as long as possible. Fluorouracil-based chemotherapy is known to improve overall survival (OS) by approximately 3 months, compared to the best supportive care alone. A 1997 study comparing gemcitabine and fluorouracil treatment of advanced pancreatic cancer patients showed an improvement in OS of 1 month in patients receiving gemcitabine. Over the next 10 years, multiple randomized studies compared single-agent gemcitabine with combination chemotherapy and showed no effective survival improvement. However, the addition of erlotinib, an epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) inhibitor, was associated with a significant improvement in OS of approximately 2 weeks. However, adoption of this regimen has not been widespread because of its limited effect and added toxicity. Two clinical trials have recently prolonged OS in advanced pancreatic cancer patients by almost 1 year. The first compared FOLFIRINOX with gemcitabine alone, and was associated with a significant improvement in median survival. The second compared gemcitabine and nab-paclitaxel with gemcitabine alone, and was associated with improvements in OS. At present, these regimens are considered standard treatment for patients with good performance statuses. PMID:27114434

  16. Chemical kinetics of cetane number improving agents

    SciTech Connect

    Hashimoto, K.; Akutsu, Y.; Arai, M.; Tamura, M.

    1996-12-31

    The increasing demand for diesel fuels has resulted in the use of greater percentage of cracked distillates having poor ignition properties. The ignition properties of diesel fuels can be rated in terms of their cetane number and diesel fuels having low cetane number may have poor ignition properties such as diesel knock, difficulties to start engines in the cold weather and so on. Such diesel fuels need cetane number improving agents. In the 1940s and 1950s alkyl nitrates, alkyl nitrites and organic peroxides were found to be effective cetane number improving additives. Our recent study suggests that free radicals produced from thermal decomposition just before ignition should have an important role to improve their ignition properties. However no studies on the reaction mechanism for improving effect of these additives have been attempted because of complex nature of spontaneous ignition reaction of hydrocarbons. In order to clarify the reaction mechanism for improving effects of cetane number improving agents. We here have attempted to simulate the spontaneous ignition of n-butane as a model compound in the presence of alkyl nitrites as cetane number improving agents.

  17. [The chemotherapy of patients with prostatic tuberculosis].

    PubMed

    Kamyshan, I S; Biazrov, S T; Pogrebinskiĭ, V I

    1991-01-01

    The authors examined the efficacy of various chemotherapeutic regimes in the management of patients with tuberculosis of the prostate. The data of bacteriostatic secretion activity of the prostate showed that the most effective regimes were as follows: 1) isoniazid and ethambutol followed by galvanization of the prostatic region, then rifampicin suppository containing dimexid; 2) isoniazid and rifampicin suppository containing dimexid; oral ethambutol. Proper curative measures depending on the clinicomorphological types of the tuberculous prostate and their duration are also given. Using the proposed regimes in 68 patients provided 80.7-96.6% positive responses. The authors advise to carry out seasonal courses of chemotherapy using mainly the method of rectal administration of anti-tuberculous agents, dimexid and tissue electrophoresis. PMID:1871918

  18. Chemotherapy-induced oral mucositis. Prevention and management.

    PubMed

    Knox, J J; Puodziunas, A L; Feld, R

    2000-10-01

    Oral mucositis is a frequent and potentially severe complication of chemotherapy which has a considerable impact on patient quality of life. While the management of other chemotherapy-related toxicities has improved, the incidence of mucositis is increasing. A critical review of the literature published between 1985 and 1999 reveals very few strategies or agents with proven efficacy, leaving few recommendations for the standard care in the prevention and treatment of mucositis at this time. Recommendations that can be made include: reducing patient risk factors, implementing proven preventative interventions such as utilising oral ice chips with fluorouracil chemotherapy, and optimising supportive care practices individualised to the patients' needs and symptoms. Progress in understanding the pathophysiology of mucositis at the molecular level has led to the evaluation of a number of new investigational agents, specifically those directed to the epithelial mucosa, such as mitogens and epithelial growth factors. These appear to be very promising in preclinical studies. Randomised clinical trials with these agents may finally demonstrate an impact on the clinical practice of mucositis management in the coming years. PMID:11087004

  19. U. S. refiners must increase alkylation capacity to meet demand

    SciTech Connect

    Rhodes, A.

    1994-08-22

    Alkylation is one of the most important refinery processes for producing conventional gasoline. And alkylate will continue to be a preferred blending stock in the reformulated-gasoline era. US alkylation units are operating at more than 90% of capacity, and additional capacity will be required to meet projected demand in 1998 and beyond. This capacity will come primarily through debottlenecking existing units, but new capacity will be required in the U.S., particularly after the year 2000. This paper briefly discusses industry trends, supply and demand, and solid acid catalyst technology.

  20. MUTAGENIC AGENTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    A description of some chemicals that are used in chemotherapy and pyschotherapy is presented in relation to their mutagenic activity. A comparison of the mutagenic activity of these pharmaceutical compounds together with some industrial chemicals is also made to understand their ...