Science.gov

Sample records for alkylene group forming

  1. Poly(phenylene alkylene)-based lonomers

    DOEpatents

    Hibbs, Michael R.

    2017-01-03

    A composition and method of forming a composition including a compound including a poly(phenylene) backbone represented by the following formula: ##STR00001## wherein each of R.sub.1, R.sub.2 and R.sub.3 may be the same or different and is H or an unsubstituted or inertly-substituted aromatic moiety; wherein Ar.sub.1 is an unsubstituted or inertly-substituted aromatic moiety; wherein R.sub.4 is an alkylene, perfluoroalkyl, polyethylene glycol, or polypropylene glycol moiety; wherein each of R.sub.6, R.sub.7, R.sub.8, R.sub.9, R.sub.10 and R.sub.11 is H or a monovalent hydrocarbon group including two to 18 carbon atoms, with the proviso that each R.sub.6, R.sub.7, R.sub.8, R.sub.9, R.sub.10 and R.sub.11 cannot be H; and wherein each of Y.sub.6, Y.sub.7, Y.sub.8, Y.sub.9, Y.sub.10 and Y.sub.11 may be the same or different and is H or a functional group are disclosed. The composition can be used as anion-exchange membranes and as an electrode binder material in anion exchange membrane fuel cells.

  2. 46 CFR 153.1010 - Alkylene oxides.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... BULK LIQUID, LIQUEFIED GAS, OR COMPRESSED GAS HAZARDOUS MATERIALS Operations Special Cargo Procedures...'s flag administration. (2) Purge the containment system until the oxygen content of the cargo tank... that: (1) No alkylene oxide vapor or liquid is released to the atmosphere during cargo transfer; (2)...

  3. 46 CFR 153.1010 - Alkylene oxides.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... BULK LIQUID, LIQUEFIED GAS, OR COMPRESSED GAS HAZARDOUS MATERIALS Operations Special Cargo Procedures...'s flag administration. (2) Purge the containment system until the oxygen content of the cargo tank... that: (1) No alkylene oxide vapor or liquid is released to the atmosphere during cargo transfer; (2)...

  4. 46 CFR 153.1010 - Alkylene oxides.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... BULK LIQUID, LIQUEFIED GAS, OR COMPRESSED GAS HAZARDOUS MATERIALS Operations Special Cargo Procedures...'s flag administration. (2) Purge the containment system until the oxygen content of the cargo tank... that: (1) No alkylene oxide vapor or liquid is released to the atmosphere during cargo transfer; (2)...

  5. Alkylene-bridged polygerm- and polygermsilsesqui-oxanes: New hybrid organic-inorganic materials

    SciTech Connect

    Jamison, G.M.; Loy, D.A.; Zender, G.; Shea, K.J.

    1993-12-31

    Alkylene-bridge polygerm- and polygermsilsequioxanes have been formed by hydrolysis-condensation of their corresponding (EtO){sub 3}M(CH{sub 2}){sub n}Ge(OEt){sub 3} monomers under HCl- and NEt{sub 3}-catalyzed conditions in ethanol. Solid state {sup 13}C and {sup 29}Si NMR indicate the retention of the alkylene bridging moiety during polymerization. The resulting aerogels are mesoporous materials with high surface areas. Incorporation of the short ethylene bridging unit results in higher surface areas than when heylene bridges are present. The porous nature of hexylene-bridged hybrid network [Si(CH{sub 2}){sub 6}GeO{sub 3}]{sub n} appears insensitive to the acidic or basic nature of the catalyst employed in it formation, in contrast to its polysilsesquioxane counterpart. Work is underway to determine the origin of porosity in these materials, and to characterize xerogel materials generated from these monomers.

  6. 40 CFR 721.2920 - tert-Amyl peroxy alkylene ester (generic name).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false tert-Amyl peroxy alkylene ester... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.2920 tert-Amyl peroxy alkylene ester (generic name). (a) Chemical... alkylene ester (PMN P-85-1180) is subject to reporting under this section for the significant new...

  7. 40 CFR 721.2920 - tert-Amyl peroxy alkylene ester (generic name).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false tert-Amyl peroxy alkylene ester... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.2920 tert-Amyl peroxy alkylene ester (generic name). (a) Chemical... alkylene ester (PMN P-85-1180) is subject to reporting under this section for the significant new...

  8. 40 CFR 721.2920 - tert-Amyl peroxy alkylene ester (generic name).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false tert-Amyl peroxy alkylene ester... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.2920 tert-Amyl peroxy alkylene ester (generic name). (a) Chemical... alkylene ester (PMN P-85-1180) is subject to reporting under this section for the significant new...

  9. 40 CFR 721.2920 - tert-Amyl peroxy alkylene ester (generic name).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false tert-Amyl peroxy alkylene ester... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.2920 tert-Amyl peroxy alkylene ester (generic name). (a) Chemical... alkylene ester (PMN P-85-1180) is subject to reporting under this section for the significant new...

  10. 40 CFR 721.2920 - tert-Amyl peroxy alkylene ester (generic name).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false tert-Amyl peroxy alkylene ester... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.2920 tert-Amyl peroxy alkylene ester (generic name). (a) Chemical... alkylene ester (PMN P-85-1180) is subject to reporting under this section for the significant new...

  11. 40 CFR 721.2582 - Reaction product of alkylene diamine, MDl, substituted carbomonocyclic amine and alkylamine...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Reaction product of alkylene diamine... Reaction product of alkylene diamine, MDl, substituted carbomonocyclic amine and alkylamine (generic). (a... generically as reaction product of alkylene diamine, MDl, substituted carbomonocyclic amine and...

  12. 40 CFR 721.2582 - Reaction product of alkylene diamine, MDl, substituted carbomonocyclic amine and alkylamine...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Reaction product of alkylene diamine... Reaction product of alkylene diamine, MDl, substituted carbomonocyclic amine and alkylamine (generic). (a... generically as reaction product of alkylene diamine, MDl, substituted carbomonocyclic amine and...

  13. 40 CFR 721.2582 - Reaction product of alkylene diamine, MDl, substituted carbomonocyclic amine and alkylamine...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Reaction product of alkylene diamine... Reaction product of alkylene diamine, MDl, substituted carbomonocyclic amine and alkylamine (generic). (a... generically as reaction product of alkylene diamine, MDl, substituted carbomonocyclic amine and...

  14. 40 CFR 721.2582 - Reaction product of alkylene diamine, MDl, substituted carbomonocyclic amine and alkylamine...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Reaction product of alkylene diamine... Reaction product of alkylene diamine, MDl, substituted carbomonocyclic amine and alkylamine (generic). (a... generically as reaction product of alkylene diamine, MDl, substituted carbomonocyclic amine and...

  15. 40 CFR 721.2582 - Reaction product of alkylene diamine, MDl, substituted carbomonocyclic amine and alkylamine...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Reaction product of alkylene diamine... Reaction product of alkylene diamine, MDl, substituted carbomonocyclic amine and alkylamine (generic). (a... generically as reaction product of alkylene diamine, MDl, substituted carbomonocyclic amine and...

  16. Poly(alkylene phosphates): from synthetic models of biomacromolecules and biomembranes toward polymer-inorganic hybrids (mimicking biomineralization).

    PubMed

    Penczek, Stanislaw; Pretula, Julia; Kaluzynski, Krzysztof

    2005-01-01

    Syntheses of poly(alkylene phosphates), with repeating units having two or three methylene groups and phosphoryl groups and mimicking backbones of biomacromolecules, are reviewed. Two major methods elaborated in this laboratory, namely, ring-opening polymerization and transesterification, are described. The resulting polymers were used as carriers of cations (Ca2+ and Mg2+) in membrane processes and in controlling the crystallization of CaCO3, in a process related to biomineralization.

  17. New Applications of Ring-Opening Metathesis Polymerization for Grafting Alkylene Oxide-Based Copolymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spurcaciu, Bogdan; Buzdugan, Emil; Nicolae, Cristian; Ghioca, Paul; Iancu, Lorena; Dragutan, Valerian; Dragutan, Ileana

    This research tackles the challenges of innovative modification of poly(allyl alkylene oxides) by ROMP to produce new materials. Firstly, binary and ternary copolymers, poly(epichlorohydrin-allyl glycidyl ether) (ECH-AGE) and poly (epichlorohydrin-propylene oxide-allyl glycidyl ether) (ECH-PO-AGE), have been prepared using as initiator a catalytic system consisting of an alkyl aluminium, controlled amounts of water and different compounds (ethers, diols, phosphines, salicylic acid derivatives, organozincs) acting as cocatalysts. Among catalysts explored in these copolymerizations most productive showed to be the systems triisobutylaluminium (TIBA), water and Zn(DIPS)2 or Zn(acac)2. Copolymers which have become thus available were subsequently grafted onto the pendent allylic groups by ROMP with cycloolefins (cyclooctene, norbornene, cyclododecene) involving ruthenium based catalysts.

  18. Ostene, a New Alkylene Oxide Copolymer Bone Hemostatic Material, Does Not Inhibit Bone Healing

    PubMed Central

    Magyar, Clara E.; Aghaloo, Tara L.; Atti, Elisa; Tetradis, Sotirios

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE In this study, we investigate the effects of a soft bone hemostatic wax comprised of water-soluble alkylene oxide copolymers (Ostene; Ceremed, Inc., Los Angeles, CA) on bone healing in a rat calvaria defect model. We compared the effects with a control (no hemostatic agent) and bone wax, an insoluble and nonresorbable material commonly used for bone hemostasis. METHODS Two bilateral 3-mm circular noncritical-sized defects were made in the calvariae of 30 rats. Alkylene oxide copolymer or bone wax was applied or no hemostatic material was used (control). After 3, 6, and 12 weeks, rats were sacrificed and the calvariae excised. Bone healing, expressed as fractional bone volume (± standard error of the mean), was measured by microcomputed tomography. RESULTS Immediate hemostasis was achieved equally with bone wax and alkylene oxide copolymer. Bone wax-filled defects remained unchanged at all time points with negligible healing observed. At 3 weeks, no evidence of alkylene oxide copolymer was observed at the application site, with fractional bone volume significantly greater than bone wax-treated defects (0.20 ± 0.03 versus 0.02 ± 0.01; P = 0.0003). At 6 and 12-weeks, alkylene oxide copolymer-treated defects continued to show significantly greater healing versus bone wax (0.18 ± 0.04 versus 0.05 ± 0.01 and 0.31 ± 0.04 versus 0.06 ± 0.02, respectively). At all time points, alkylene oxide copolymer-treated and control defects showed good healing with no significant difference. CONCLUSION Alkylene oxide copolymer is an effective hemostatic agent that does not inhibit osteogenesis or bone healing. PMID:18981846

  19. The tissue response to an alkylene bis(dilactoyl)-methacrylate bone adhesive.

    PubMed

    Heiss, Christian; Hahn, Niels; Wenisch, Sabine; Alt, Volker; Pokinskyj, Peter; Horas, Uwe; Kilian, Olaf; Schnettler, Reinhard

    2005-04-01

    Gluing is an attractive technique to fix small bone fragments. However, to date no bone adhesive could be established successfully for all day clinical use. The purpose of this experimental study was to investigate the biocompatibility of a new bone glue based on alkylene bis(dilactoyl)-methacrylate in 36 rabbits. Monocondylar osteotomy of the distal femur was performed and bone glue was applied into the osteotomy gap in 24 rabbits. The remaining 12 animals served as controls. In all rabbits the osteotomy was subsequently stabilized by K-wire osteosynthesis. Six animals of the glue group and 3 controls were euthanized after 7, 21, 42, and 84 days, respectively. Fracture healing and degradation pattern of the glue was studied using histological, histomorphometrical, scanning electron microscopical, and radiological methods. Good resorption of the glue by mononuclear and multinucleated giant cells without prolonged inflammatory processes was observed in the glue group. Histomorphometrical analysis did not reveal any significant differences in fracture healing between the glue and control group at any time. Complete remodelling of the former osteotomy gap was found in all rabbits after 84 days. This bioresorbable bone adhesive exhibited good biocompatibility and its degradation did not interfere with physiological fracture healing.

  20. 46 CFR 153.1011 - Changing containment systems and hoses to and from alkylene oxide service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... reactive with alkylene oxides: (1) Non-oxidizing mineral acids (e.g. hydrochloric, phosphoric); (2) Sulfuric acid; (3) Nitric acid; (4) Organic acids (e.g. acetic, formic); (5) Halogenated organic acids (e.g. chloroacetic); (6) Sulfonic acids (e.g. alkyl benzene sulfonic); (7) Caustic alkalies (e.g. caustic...

  1. 46 CFR 153.1011 - Changing containment systems and hoses to and from alkylene oxide service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... reactive with alkylene oxides: (1) Non-oxidizing mineral acids (e.g. hydrochloric, phosphoric); (2) Sulfuric acid; (3) Nitric acid; (4) Organic acids (e.g. acetic, formic); (5) Halogenated organic acids (e.g. chloroacetic); (6) Sulfonic acids (e.g. alkyl benzene sulfonic); (7) Caustic alkalies (e.g. caustic...

  2. 46 CFR 153.1011 - Changing containment systems and hoses to and from alkylene oxide service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... reactive with alkylene oxides: (1) Non-oxidizing mineral acids (e.g. hydrochloric, phosphoric); (2) Sulfuric acid; (3) Nitric acid; (4) Organic acids (e.g. acetic, formic); (5) Halogenated organic acids (e.g. chloroacetic); (6) Sulfonic acids (e.g. alkyl benzene sulfonic); (7) Caustic alkalies (e.g. caustic...

  3. 46 CFR 153.1011 - Changing containment systems and hoses to and from alkylene oxide service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... reactive with alkylene oxides: (1) Non-oxidizing mineral acids (e.g. hydrochloric, phosphoric); (2) Sulfuric acid; (3) Nitric acid; (4) Organic acids (e.g. acetic, formic); (5) Halogenated organic acids (e.g. chloroacetic); (6) Sulfonic acids (e.g. alkyl benzene sulfonic); (7) Caustic alkalies (e.g. caustic...

  4. 46 CFR 153.1011 - Changing containment systems and hoses to and from alkylene oxide service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... reactive with alkylene oxides: (1) Non-oxidizing mineral acids (e.g. hydrochloric, phosphoric); (2) Sulfuric acid; (3) Nitric acid; (4) Organic acids (e.g. acetic, formic); (5) Halogenated organic acids (e.g. chloroacetic); (6) Sulfonic acids (e.g. alkyl benzene sulfonic); (7) Caustic alkalies (e.g. caustic...

  5. Waste forms, packages, and seals working group summary

    SciTech Connect

    Sridhar, N.; McNeil, M.B.

    1995-09-01

    This article is a summary of the proceedings of a group discussion which took place at the Workshop on the Role of Natural Analogs in Geologic Disposal of High-Level Nuclear Waste in San Antonio, Texas on July 22-25, 1991. The working group concentrated on the subject of radioactive waste forms and packaging. Also included is a description of the use of natural analogs in waste packaging, container materials and waste forms.

  6. Reliability and Validity of the Group Member Rating Form.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chalupa, Marilyn R.; Chen, Catherine S.; Sormunen-Jones, Carolee

    2000-01-01

    Business communication students (n=92) used a new instrument to rate their performance and that of other group members. Factor analyses and Cronbach's alpha confirmed the reliability and validity of the Group Member Rating Form as a self-evaluation instrument. (SK)

  7. Market power and contract form: evidence from physician group practices.

    PubMed

    Town, Robert; Feldman, Roger; Kralewski, John

    2011-06-01

    We examine how the market power of physician groups affects the form of their contracts with health insurers. We develop a simple model of physician contracting based on 'behavioral economics' and test it with data from two sources: a survey of physician group practices in Minnesota; and the physician component of the Community Tracking Survey. In both data sets we find that increases in groups' market power are associated with proportionately more fee-for-service revenue and less revenue from capitation.

  8. Forming a Turbomachinery Seals Working Group - An Overview and Discussion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Proctor, Margaret P.

    2007-01-01

    A proposal to form a Turbomachinery Seals Working Group is discussed. Survey responses regarding the purpose, membership, and meeting frequency are presented as well as the areas of expertise and experience of the respondents. The types of seals used, designed, or sold, current work, and technical challenges of turbomachinery seals, their materials, analysis, geometry, manufacturing, maintenance, testing, and incorporation into engine systems are also presented.

  9. Duality groups, automorphic forms, and higher derivative corrections

    SciTech Connect

    Lambert, Neil; West, Peter

    2007-03-15

    We study the higher derivative corrections that occur in type II superstring theories in ten dimensions or less. Assuming invariance under a discrete duality group G(Z) we show that the generic functions of the scalar fields that occur can be identified with automorphic forms. We then give a systematic method to construct automorphic forms from a given group G(Z) together with a chosen subgroup H and a linear representation of G(Z). This construction is based on the theory of nonlinear realizations and we find that the automorphic forms contain the weights of G. We also carry out the dimensional reduction of the generic higher derivative corrections of the IIB theory to three dimensions and find that the weights of E{sub 8} occur generalizing previous results of the authors on M theory. Since the automorphic forms of this theory contain the weights of E{sub 8} we can interpret the occurrence of weights in the dimensional reduction as evidence for an underlying U-duality symmetry.

  10. Methods for forming group III-arsenide-nitride semiconductor materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Major, Jo S. (Inventor); Welch, David F. (Inventor); Scifres, Donald R. (Inventor)

    2002-01-01

    Methods are disclosed for forming Group III-arsenide-nitride semiconductor materials. Group III elements are combined with group V elements, including at least nitrogen and arsenic, in concentrations chosen to lattice match commercially available crystalline substrates. Epitaxial growth of these III-V crystals results in direct bandgap materials, which can be used in applications such as light emitting diodes and lasers. Varying the concentrations of the elements in the III-V crystals varies the bandgaps, such that materials emitting light spanning the visible spectra, as well as mid-IR and near-UV emitters, can be created. Conversely, such material can be used to create devices that acquire light and convert the light to electricity, for applications such as full color photodetectors and solar energy collectors. The growth of the III-V crystals can be accomplished by growing thin layers of elements or compounds in sequences that result in the overall lattice match and bandgap desired.

  11. Process for forming shaped group II-VI semiconductor nanocrystals, and product formed using process

    DOEpatents

    Alivisatos, A. Paul; Peng, Xiaogang; Manna, Liberato

    2001-01-01

    A process for the formation of shaped Group II-VI semiconductor nanocrystals comprises contacting the semiconductor nanocrystal precursors with a liquid media comprising a binary mixture of phosphorus-containing organic surfactants capable of promoting the growth of either spherical semiconductor nanocrystals or rod-like semiconductor nanocrystals, whereby the shape of the semiconductor nanocrystals formed in said binary mixture of surfactants is controlled by adjusting the ratio of the surfactants in the binary mixture.

  12. Process for forming shaped group III-V semiconductor nanocrystals, and product formed using process

    DOEpatents

    Alivisatos, A. Paul; Peng, Xiaogang; Manna, Liberato

    2001-01-01

    A process for the formation of shaped Group III-V semiconductor nanocrystals comprises contacting the semiconductor nanocrystal precursors with a liquid media comprising a binary mixture of phosphorus-containing organic surfactants capable of promoting the growth of either spherical semiconductor nanocrystals or rod-like semiconductor nanocrystals, whereby the shape of the semiconductor nanocrystals formed in said binary mixture of surfactants is controlled by adjusting the ratio of the surfactants in the binary mixture.

  13. Branched Rod-Coil Polyimide-Poly(Alkylene Oxide) Copolymers and Electrolyte Compositions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meador, Maryann B. (Inventor); Tigelaar, Dean M. (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    Crosslinked polyimide-poly(alkylene oxide) copolymers capable of holding large volumes of liquid while maintaining good dimensional stability. Copolymers are derived at ambient temperatures from amine endcapped amic-acid oligomers subsequently imidized in solution at increased temperatures, followed by reaction with trifunctional compounds in the presence of various additives. Films of these copolymers hold over four times their weight at room temperature of liquids such as ionic liquids (RTIL) and/or carbonate solvents. These rod-coil polyimide copolymers are used to prepare polymeric electrolytes by adding to the copolymers various amounts of compounds such as ionic liquids (RTIL), lithium trifluoromethane-sulfonimide (LiTFSi) or other lithium salts, and alumina.

  14. Flexible Polyimide Aerogel Cross-linked by Poly(maleic Anhydride-alt-alkylene)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guo, Haiquan; Meador, Mary Ann B.; Wilkewitz, Brittany Marie

    2014-01-01

    Aerogels are potential materials for aerospace applications due to their lower thermal conductivity, lighter weight, and low dielectric constant. However, silica aerogels are restricted due to their inherent fragility, hygroscopic nature, and poor mechanical properties, especially in extreme aerospace environments. In order to fit the needs of aerospace applications, developing new thermal insulation materials that are flexible, and moisture resistant is needed. To this end, we fabricated a series of polyimide aerogels crosslinked with different poly(maleic anhydride-alt-alkylene)s as seen in Scheme 1. The polyimide oligomers were made with 3,3,4,4-biphenyltetracarboxylic dianhydride (BPDA), and different diamines or diamine combinations. The resulting aerogels have low density (0.06 gcm3 to 0.16 gcm3) and high surface area (240-440 m2g). The effect of the different backbone structures on density, shrinkage, porosity, surface area, mechanical properties, moisture resistance and thermal properties will be discussed. These novel polyalkylene-imide aerogels may be potential candidates for applications such as space suit insulation for planetary surface missions, insulation for inflatable structures for habitats, inflatable aerodynamic decelerators for entry, descent and landing (EDL) operations, and cryotank insulation for advance space propulsion systems. Scheme 1. Network of polyimide aerogels crosslinked with deifferent poly(maleic anhydride).

  15. Polymerization of Ethylene Oxide, Propylene Oxide, and Other Alkylene Oxides: Synthesis, Novel Polymer Architectures, and Bioconjugation.

    PubMed

    Herzberger, Jana; Niederer, Kerstin; Pohlit, Hannah; Seiwert, Jan; Worm, Matthias; Wurm, Frederik R; Frey, Holger

    2016-02-24

    The review summarizes current trends and developments in the polymerization of alkylene oxides in the last two decades since 1995, with a particular focus on the most important epoxide monomers ethylene oxide (EO), propylene oxide (PO), and butylene oxide (BO). Classical synthetic pathways, i.e., anionic polymerization, coordination polymerization, and cationic polymerization of epoxides (oxiranes), are briefly reviewed. The main focus of the review lies on more recent and in some cases metal-free methods for epoxide polymerization, i.e., the activated monomer strategy, the use of organocatalysts, such as N-heterocyclic carbenes (NHCs) and N-heterocyclic olefins (NHOs) as well as phosphazene bases. In addition, the commercially relevant double-metal cyanide (DMC) catalyst systems are discussed. Besides the synthetic progress, new types of multifunctional linear PEG (mf-PEG) and PPO structures accessible by copolymerization of EO or PO with functional epoxide comonomers are presented as well as complex branched, hyperbranched, and dendrimer like polyethers. Amphiphilic block copolymers based on PEO and PPO (Poloxamers and Pluronics) and advances in the area of PEGylation as the most important bioconjugation strategy are also summarized. With the ever growing toolbox for epoxide polymerization, a "polyether universe" may be envisaged that in its structural diversity parallels the immense variety of structural options available for polymers based on vinyl monomers with a purely carbon-based backbone.

  16. Nanoparticles Formed from Bacterial Oxyanion Reduction of Toxic Group 15 and Group 16 Metalloids

    SciTech Connect

    Pearce, Carolyn I.; Baesman, Shaun M.; Switzer Blum, Jodi; Fellowes, Jonathan W.; Oremland, Ronald S.

    2012-03-01

    Environmental Significance of Group 15 and 16 Toxic Metalloids Selenium, tellurium, and arsenic are present naturally in aquatic and terrestrial environments and share many similar biogeochemical characteristics. These elements are released into the environment through the weathering and decomposition of minerals contained within a variety of lithologies, with slow release rates resulting in low environmental concentrations. Selenium, tellurium, and arsenic occur in several oxidation states as oxyanions (e.g., selenate [SeO4 2], selenite [SeO3 2], tellurate [TeO4 2], tellurite [TeO3 2], arsenate [HAsO4 2], and arsenite [HAsO3 2]) in their native elemental states [e.g., Se(0), Te(0)] or in their most reduced states as selenide (-II) and telluride (-II) or arsenide/arsines (-III). These elements can be methylated through microbial activity to form compounds such as dimethylselenide (Ehrlich, 2002; Masscheleyn, et al., 1990), dimethyltelluride (Basnayake, et al., 2001; Fleming and Alexander, 1972), and methylarsonous acid (Dopp, et al., 2004) as well as a variety of toxic methylated arsine gases (Yuan, et al., 2008). These elements are also found as analogues of sulfurous proteins such as selenocysteine and selenomethionine (Bock, et al., 1991; Jones, et al., 1979; Stolz, et al., 2006; Zannoni, et al., 2008), tellurocysteine, telluromethionine (Zannoni, et al., 2008), and the arsenic-containing amino acid, arsenomethionine (Dembitsky and Levitsky, 2004).

  17. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Star-forming compact groups (Hernandez-Fernandez+, 2015)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hernandez-Fernandez, J. D.; Mendes de Oliveira, C.

    2016-03-01

    This article provides a local sample (z<~0.15) of compact groups of star-forming galaxies. In this type of groups, galaxies strongly interact among themselves and with the rest of the group components (ICM, dark matter halo). This induces morphological changes and star formation events which are currently taking place. The peculiar evolutionary stage of these groups provides a wealth of galaxy observables that may clarify the theoretical framework about galaxy evolution in groups. We have performed an all-sky search for compact groups of star-forming galaxies in the GALEX UV catalogues. (3 data files).

  18. Form gene clustering method about pan-ethnic-group products based on emotional semantic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Dengkai; Ding, Jingjing; Gao, Minzhuo; Ma, Danping; Liu, Donghui

    2016-09-01

    The use of pan-ethnic-group products form knowledge primarily depends on a designer's subjective experience without user participation. The majority of studies primarily focus on the detection of the perceptual demands of consumers from the target product category. A pan-ethnic-group products form gene clustering method based on emotional semantic is constructed. Consumers' perceptual images of the pan-ethnic-group products are obtained by means of product form gene extraction and coding and computer aided product form clustering technology. A case of form gene clustering about the typical pan-ethnic-group products is investigated which indicates that the method is feasible. This paper opens up a new direction for the future development of product form design which improves the agility of product design process in the era of Industry 4.0.

  19. Exploring Group Forming Strategies by Examining Participation Behaviours during Whole Class Discussions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jahng, Namsook; Bullen, Mark

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore group forming strategies by examining participation behaviours during whole class discussions associated with active participation in a following small group activity. Written communication data, posted in class discussion forums (843 messages/70,432 words) and small group forums (732 messages/59,394…

  20. Trapping Open and Closed Forms of FitE-A Group III Periplasmic Binding Protein

    SciTech Connect

    Shi, R.; Proteau, A; Wagner, J; Cui, Q; Purisima, E; Matte, A; Cygler, M

    2009-01-01

    Periplasmic binding proteins (PBPs) are essential components of bacterial transport systems, necessary for bacterial growth and survival. The two-domain structures of PBPs are topologically classified into three groups based on the number of crossovers or hinges between the globular domains: group I PBPs have three connections, group II have two, and group III have only one. Although a large number of structures for group I or II PBPs are known, fewer group III PBPs have been structurally characterized. Group I and II PBPs exhibit significant domain motions during transition from the unbound to ligand-bound form, however, no large conformational changes have been observed to date in group III PBPs. We have solved the crystal structure of a periplasmic binding protein FitE, part of an iron transport system, fit, recently identified in a clinical E. coli isolate. The structure, determined at 1.8 {angstrom} resolution, shows that FitE is a group III PBP containing a single {alpha}-helix bridging the two domains. Among the individual FitE molecules present in two crystal forms we observed three different conformations (open, closed, intermediate). Our crystallographic and molecular dynamics results strongly support the notion that group III PBPs also adopt the same Venus flytrap mechanism as do groups I and II PBPs. Unlike other group III PBPs, FitE forms dimers both in solution and in the crystals. The putative siderophore binding pocket is lined with arginine residues, suggesting an anionic nature of the iron-containing siderophore.

  1. Methyl group dynamics in paracetamol and acetanilide: probing the static properties of intermolecular hydrogen bonds formed by peptide groups

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, M. R.; Prager, M.; Grimm, H.; Neumann, M. A.; Kearley, G. J.; Wilson, C. C.

    1999-06-01

    Measurements of tunnelling and librational excitations for the methyl group in paracetamol and tunnelling excitations for the methyl group in acetanilide are reported. In both cases, results are compared with molecular mechanics calculations, based on the measured low temperature crystal structures, which follow an established recipe. Agreement between calculated and measured methyl group observables is not as good as expected and this is attributed to the presence of comprehensive hydrogen bond networks formed by the peptide groups. Good agreement is obtained with a periodic quantum chemistry calculation which uses density functional methods, these calculations confirming the validity of the one-dimensional rotational model used and the crystal structures. A correction to the Coulomb contribution to the rotational potential in the established recipe using semi-emipircal quantum chemistry methods, which accommodates the modified charge distribution due to the hydrogen bonds, is investigated.

  2. Attention to Form in Collaborative Writing Tasks: Comparing Pair and Small Group Interaction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dobao, Ana Fernández

    2014-01-01

    This study examines the opportunities that a collaborative writing task completed in pairs and in small groups offers for attention to form. Previous research suggests that collaborative writing activities encourage learners to focus their attention on language and to collaborate in the resolution of their language-related problems in ways that…

  3. Content Analysis of a Facebook Group as a Form of Mentoring for EFL Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cinkara, Emrah; Arslan, Fadime Yalçin

    2017-01-01

    Mentoring, a main constituent of teacher education, has taken new shape in recent years, with educators incorporating technology and social media into their practices. This study investigated the use of a Facebook group as a form of informal mentoring among teachers with reference to qualitative and quantitative data collected from the entries,…

  4. Role of Peers in Student Academic Achievement in Exogenously Formed University Groups

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Androushchak, Gregory; Poldin, Oleg; Yudkevich, Maria

    2013-01-01

    We estimate the influence of classmates' ability characteristics on student achievement in exogenously formed university student groups. The study uses administrative data on undergraduate students at a large selective university in Russia. The presence of high-ability classmates has a significant positive effect on individual grades in key…

  5. Effects of Grouping Forms, Student Gender and Ability Level on the Pleasure Experienced in Physical Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lentillon-Kaestner, Vanessa; Patelli, Gianpaolo

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to estimate the main and interaction effects of grouping forms, student gender and ability level on the pleasure experienced in physical education (PE). The participants included 178 secondary school students (M = 13.17, SD = 0.81), with 72 students enrolled in a basketball unit and 106 students enrolled in an…

  6. Transparent and Dense Ladder-Like Alkylene-Bridged Polymethylsiloxane Coating with Enhanced Water Vapor Barrier Property.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ce; Zhang, Cong; Cui, Xinmin; Sun, Jinghua; Ding, Ruimin; Zhang, Qinghua; Xu, Yao

    2015-10-14

    Organic-inorganic hybrid composites have been well-studied as water vapor barrier materials for their long diffusion length of water vapor in coatings which can be realized by improving the aspect ratio of inorganic components and regularity of nanostructure in coatings. In this paper, dense organic-inorganic hybrid coating based on ladder-like alkylene-bridged polymethylsiloxane (ABPMS) was successfully fabricated through the hydrosilylation reaction between polymethylhydrosiloxane and diene (1,5-hexadiene or 1,7-octadiene) in toluene under Pt/C catalysis. Its ladder-like structure was verified by 29Si magic angle spinning (MAS) NMR, 13C MAS NMR, and in-plane and out-of-plane glance-incident X-ray diffraction (GIXRD) techniques. Its corresponding coating showed excellent water vapor barrier ability for a typical water-soluble crystal, potassium dihydrogen phosphate (KDP). When treated in 50% relative humidity (RH) condition at 25 °C for 8 months, the ABPMS coating with 100 nm thickness displayed a very low transmittance loss of 1.6% compared with the high transmittance loss of 10% for uncoated KDP. Moreover, the ABPMS coating showed good ultraviolet radiation resistance, thermal stability, low mechanical property, and excellent compatibility with hydrophobic antireflective (AR) coatings.

  7. To Propose an Algorithm for Team Forming: Simulated Annealing K Team-Forming Algorithm for Heterogeneous Grouping.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zhi-Feng Liu, Eric

    2005-01-01

    In recent studies, some researchers were eager for the answer of how to group a perfectly dream team. There are various grouping methods, e.g. random assignment, homogeneous grouping with personality or achievement and heterogeneous grouping with personality or achievement, were proposed. Some instructors could put some students in a team better…

  8. Sympatric Woodland Myotis Bats Form Tight-Knit Social Groups with Exclusive Roost Home Ranges

    PubMed Central

    August, Tom A.; Nunn, Miles A.; Fensome, Amy G.; Linton, Danielle M.; Mathews, Fiona

    2014-01-01

    Background The structuring of wild animal populations can influence population dynamics, disease spread, and information transfer. Social network analysis potentially offers insights into these processes but is rarely, if ever, used to investigate more than one species in a community. We therefore compared the social, temporal and spatial networks of sympatric Myotis bats (M. nattereri (Natterer's bats) and M. daubentonii (Daubenton's bats)), and asked: (1) are there long-lasting social associations within species? (2) do the ranges occupied by roosting social groups overlap within or between species? (3) are M. daubentonii bachelor colonies excluded from roosting in areas used by maternity groups? Results Using data on 490 ringed M. nattereri and 978 M. daubentonii from 379 colonies, we found that both species formed stable social groups encompassing multiple colonies. M. nattereri formed 11 mixed-sex social groups with few (4.3%) inter-group associations. Approximately half of all M. nattereri were associated with the same individuals when recaptured, with many associations being long-term (>100 days). In contrast, M. daubentonii were sexually segregated; only a quarter of pairs were associated at recapture after a few days, and inter-sex associations were not long-lasting. Social groups of M. nattereri and female M. daubentonii had small roost home ranges (mean 0.2 km2 in each case). Intra-specific overlap was low, but inter-specific overlap was high, suggesting territoriality within but not between species. M. daubentonii bachelor colonies did not appear to be excluded from roosting areas used by females. Conclusions Our data suggest marked species- and sex-specific patterns of disease and information transmission are likely between bats of the same genus despite sharing a common habitat. The clear partitioning of the woodland amongst social groups, and their apparent reliance on small patches of habitat for roosting, means that localised woodland management

  9. Multiple forms of contour grouping deficits in schizophrenia: what is the role of spatial frequency?

    PubMed

    Keane, Brian P; Erlikhman, Gennady; Kastner, Sabine; Paterno, Danielle; Silverstein, Steven M

    2014-12-01

    Schizophrenia patients poorly perceive Kanizsa figures and integrate co-aligned contour elements (Gabors). They also poorly process low spatial frequencies (SFs), which presumably reflects dysfunction along the dorsal pathway. Can contour grouping deficits be explained in terms of the spatial frequency content of the display elements? To address the question, we tested patients and matched controls on three contour grouping paradigms in which the SF composition was modulated. In the Kanizsa task, subjects discriminated quartets of sectored circles ("pac-men") that either formed or did not form Kanizsa shapes (illusory and fragmented conditions, respectively). In contour integration, subjects identified the screen quadrant thought to contain a closed chain of co-circular Gabors. In collinear facilitation, subjects attempted to detect a central low-contrast element flanked by collinear or orthogonal high-contrast elements, and facilitation corresponded to the amount by which collinear flankers reduced contrast thresholds. We varied SF by modifying the element features in the Kanizsa task and by scaling the entire stimulus display in the remaining tasks (SFs ranging from 4 to 12 cycles/deg). Irrespective of SF, patients were worse at discriminating illusory, but not fragmented shapes. Contrary to our hypothesis, collinear facilitation and contour integration were abnormal in the clinical group only for the higher SF (>=10 c/deg). Grouping performance correlated with clinical variables, such as conceptual disorganization, general symptoms, and levels of functioning. In schizophrenia, three forms of contour grouping impairments prominently arise and cannot be attributed to poor low SF processing. Neurobiological and clinical implications are discussed.

  10. Dimorphic forms of 3,6-dinitrodurene in a single space group.

    PubMed

    Galicia Aguilar, José Alberto; Bernès, Sylvain

    2009-04-01

    3,6-Dinitrodurene (1,2,4,5-tetramethyl-3,6-dinitrobenzene), C(10)H(12)N(2)O(4), has been crystallized in two polymorphic forms which may be distinguished by their colours in the solid state. Polymorph I gives clear colourless prismatic crystals, while polymorph II crystallizes in the dark and under an inert atmosphere as irregular purple blocks. Both forms belong to the space group C2/c, with both asymmetric units containing two half-molecules. One molecule is located on an inversion centre and the other lies on a twofold axis. The polymorphism arises from different orientations of the twofold axis: in form I, this axis passes through the mid-points of two C-C bonds of the benzene ring and, as a consequence, all atoms in the asymmetric unit are in general positions. In form II, the N atoms of the nitro groups and the C(ipso) atoms are located on the binary axis. Comparing phases I and II, slightly different conformations are observed for the nitro substituents, while the stacking structures are very similar.

  11. Methods for forming group III-V arsenide-nitride semiconductor materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Major, Jo S. (Inventor); Welch, David F. (Inventor); Scifres, Donald R. (Inventor)

    2000-01-01

    Methods are disclosed for forming Group III--arsenide-nitride semiconductor materials. Group III elements are combined with group V elements, including at least nitrogen and arsenic, in concentrations chosen to lattice match commercially available crystalline substrates. Epitaxial growth of these III-V crystals results in direct bandgap materials, which can be used in applications such as light emitting diodes and lasers. Varying the concentrations of the elements in the III-V crystals varies the bandgaps, such that materials emitting light spanning the visible spectra, as well as mid-IR and near-UV emitters, can be created. Conversely, such material can be used to create devices that acquire light and convert the light to electricity, for applications such as full color photodetectors and solar energy collectors. The growth of the III-V crystals can be accomplished by growing thin layers of elements or compounds in sequences that result in the overall lattice match and bandgap desired.

  12. Ease of opening of blistered solid dosage forms in a senior citizens target group.

    PubMed

    Braun-Münker, Myriam; Ecker, Felix

    2016-10-30

    Blisters differing in design and handling are established as packaging material for solid dosage forms. The ease of opening of blisters influences application and patient's compliance. In this study the influence of visibility and movability of solid dosage forms in blister packaging on both, easy opening and patient's satisfaction, were investigated by target group testing according to ONR CEN/TS 15945. For each testing 20 participants in the age of 65-80 years were recruited randomly. They opened the blisters on realistic terms without any auxiliary devices. Video documentation of the hands' movements was recorded to analyze the opening procedure. To show the influence of visibility of the dosage form in the blister, capsules size 1 were packed in transparent and opaque blisters. A moderate influence of the visibility on both, the ease of opening and patient satisfaction, was observed. A second study dealt with the movability of solid dosage forms in blisters. Therefore, three different sizes of tablets with similar shapes were packed in identical cavities. Limited movability was found as major criterion on effectiveness and effectivity of opening as well as on satisfaction with the opening procedure.

  13. Norms of German adolescents for the Harvard Group Scale of Hypnotic Susceptibility, Form A.

    PubMed

    Peter, Burkhard; Geiger, Emilia; Prade, Tanja; Vogel, Sarah; Piesbergen, Christoph

    2015-01-01

    The Harvard Group Scale of Hypnotic Susceptibility, Form A (HGSHS:A) has not been explicitly tested on an adolescent population. In this study, the German version of the HGSHS:A was administered to 99 German adolescents aged 15 to 19. In contrast to other studies, the gender distribution was relatively balanced: 57% female and 43% male. Results were comparable to 14 earlier studies with regard to distribution, mean, and standard deviation. Some peculiarities in contrast to the 14 previous studies are pointed out. It is concluded that the HGSHS:A can be used as a valid and reliable instrument to measure hypnotic suggestibility in adolescent samples.

  14. French Norms for the Harvard Group Scale of Hypnotic Susceptibility, Form A.

    PubMed

    Anlló, Hernán; Becchio, Jean; Sackur, Jérôme

    2017-01-01

    The authors present French norms for the Harvard Group Scale of Hypnotic Susceptibility, Form A (HGSHS:A). They administered an adapted translation of Shor and Orne's original text (1962) to a group of 126 paid volunteers. Participants also rated their own responses following our translation of Kihlstrom's Scale of Involuntariness (2006). Item pass rates, score distributions, and reliability were calculated and compared with several other reference samples. Analyses show that the present French norms are congruous with the reference samples. Interestingly, the passing rate for some items drops significantly if "entirely voluntary" responses (as identified by Kihlstrom's scale) are scored as "fail." Copies of the translated scales and response booklet are available online.

  15. Hungarian norms for the Harvard Group Scale of Hypnotic Susceptibility, Form A.

    PubMed

    Költő, András; Gősi-Greguss, Anna C; Varga, Katalin; Bányai, Éva I

    2015-01-01

    Hungarian norms for the Harvard Group Scale of Hypnotic Susceptibility, Form A (HGSHS:A) are presented. The Hungarian translation of the HGSHS:A was administered under standard conditions to 434 participants (190 males, 244 females) of several professions. In addition to the traditional self-scoring, hypnotic behavior was also recorded by trained observers. Female participants proved to be more hypnotizable than males and so were psychology students and professionals as compared to nonpsychologists. Hypnotizability varied across different group sizes. The normative data-including means, standard deviations, and indicators of reliability-are comparable with previously published results. The authors conclude that measuring observer-scores increases the ecological validity of the scale. The Hungarian version of the HGSHS:A seems to be a reliable and valid measure of hypnotizability.

  16. Development of form similarity as a Gestalt grouping principle in infancy.

    PubMed

    Quinn, Paul C; Bhatt, Ramesh S; Brush, Diana; Grimes, Autumn; Sharpnack, Heather

    2002-07-01

    Given evidence demonstrating that infants 3 months of age and younger can utilize the Gestalt principle of lightness similarity to group visually presented elements into organized percepts, four experiments using the familiarization/novelty-preference procedure were conducted to determine whether infants can also organize visual pattern information in accord with the Gestalt principle of form similarity. In Experiments 1 and 2, 6- to 7-month-olds, but not 3- to 4-month-olds, presented with generalization and discrimination tasks involving arrays of X and O elements responded as if they organized the elements into columns or rows based on form similarity. Experiments 3 and 4 demonstrated that the failure of the young infants to use form similarity was not due to insufficient processing time or the inability to discriminate between the individual X and O elements. The results suggest that different Gestalt principles may become functional over different time courses of development, and that not all principles are automatically deployed in the manner originally proposed by Gestalt theorists.

  17. Energetics, molecular electronic structure, and spectroscopy of forming Group IIA dihalide complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Devore, T. C.; Gole, J. L.

    1999-02-01

    Multiple-collision relaxed (helium) chemiluminescence and laser-induced fluorescent spectroscopy have been used to demonstrate the highly efficient collisional stabilization of electronically excited Group IIA dihalide collision complexes formed in M (Ca,Sr)+X 2 (XY) (Cl 2, Br 2, ICl, IBr, I 2) reactive encounters. The first discrete emission spectra for the CaCl 2, CaBr 2, SrCl 2, SrBr 2, and SrICl dihalides are observed and evaluated; however, the low-pressure `continuous' chemiluminescent emission observed for forming barium dihalide (BaX 2) complexes is quenched under these experimental conditions. The reactions of the Group IIA metals with molecular fluorine do not readily produce the corresponding dihalide. While the lowest-lying observed dihalide visible transition is, as predicted, found to result in an extended progression in a dihalide complex bending mode (SrCl 2), the observed progression suggests the presence of a residual halogen (Cl-Cl) bond. Two higher-lying transitions are dominated by a vibrational mode structure corresponding to progressions in the symmetric stretching mode or, for nominally forbidden electronic transitions, odd quanta of the asymmetric stretching mode. Some evidence for sequence structure associated with the dihalide bending mode is also obtained. These observations are consistent with complex formation as it is coupled with a modified valence electron structure (correlation diagram) associated with the highly ionic nature of the dihalides. The bonding in the Group IIA dihalides (and their complexes), whose atomization energies are more than twice the metal monohalide bond energy, strongly influences the evaluation of energetics and the determination of monohalide bond energies from chemiluminescent processes. Discrepancies between those bond strengths determined by mass spectrometry and chemiluminescence are discussed with a focus on energy partitioning in dihalide complex formation and its influence on chemical vapor

  18. The Weyl group and asymptotics: All supergravity billiards have a closed form general integral

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fré, Pietro; Sorin, Alexander S.

    2009-07-01

    In this paper we show that all supergravity billiards corresponding to σ-models on any U/H non-compact-symmetric space and obtained by compactifying supergravity to D=3 admit a closed form general integral depending analytically on a complete set of integration constants. The key point in establishing the integration algorithm is provided by an upper triangular embedding of the solvable Lie algebra associated with U/H into sl(N,R) which is guaranteed to exist for all non-compact symmetric spaces and also for homogeneous special geometries non-corresponding to symmetric spaces. In this context we establish a remarkable relation between the end-points of the time-flow and the properties of the Weyl group. The asymptotic states of the developing Universe are in one-to-one correspondence with the elements of the Weyl group which is a property of the Tits-Satake universality classes and not of their single representatives. Furthermore the Weyl group admits a natural ordering in terms of ℓ, the number of reflections with respect to the simple roots. The direction of time flows is always from the minimal accessible value of ℓ to the maximum one or vice versa.

  19. Chromatin fibers are formed by heterogeneous groups of nucleosomes in vivo.

    PubMed

    Ricci, Maria Aurelia; Manzo, Carlo; García-Parajo, María Filomena; Lakadamyali, Melike; Cosma, Maria Pia

    2015-03-12

    Nucleosomes help structure chromosomes by compacting DNA into fibers. To gain insight into how nucleosomes are arranged in vivo, we combined quantitative super-resolution nanoscopy with computer simulations to visualize and count nucleosomes along the chromatin fiber in single nuclei. Nucleosomes assembled in heterogeneous groups of varying sizes, here termed "clutches," and these were interspersed with nucleosome-depleted regions. The median number of nucleosomes inside clutches and their compaction defined as nucleosome density were cell-type-specific. Ground-state pluripotent stem cells had, on average, less dense clutches containing fewer nucleosomes and clutch size strongly correlated with the pluripotency potential of induced pluripotent stem cells. RNA polymerase II preferentially associated with the smallest clutches while linker histone H1 and heterochromatin were enriched in the largest ones. Our results reveal how the chromatin fiber is formed at nanoscale level and link chromatin fiber architecture to stem cell state.

  20. Romanian norms for the Harvard Group Scale of Hypnotic Susceptibility, Form A.

    PubMed

    David, Daniel; Montgomery, Guy; Holdevici, Irina

    2003-01-01

    A Romanian-language version of the Harvard Group Scale of Hypnotic Susceptibility, Form A (HGSHS:A) was administered to 340 subjects (218 females and 122 males) recruited from 1998 to 1999 in Romania. Data were collected from three samples of participants to provide greater heterogeneity within the sample. The results from the Romanian version of the HGSHS:A were compared to those from Australian, Canadian, Danish, Finnish, German, Italian, Spanish, and original U.S. samples. The Romanian normative data are consistent with earlier normative studies in score distribution, item difficulty levels, and reliability. The mean score of the Romanian sample did not differ from those in the German and Italian samples but did significantly differ from the remaining samples. The total score reliability (.71) and item reliability of the Romanian sample was also comparable with published reference samples. No differences between women and men were found.

  1. Social Exclusion Based on Group Membership is a Form of Prejudice.

    PubMed

    Cooley, Shelby; Elenbaas, Laura; Killen, Melanie

    2016-01-01

    Children around the world are affected by bias, prejudice, and discrimination. In this chapter, we argue that intergroup social exclusion-exclusion of peers on the basis of group membership-is a form of prejudice. As such, research efforts should be directed at uncovering the negative intergroup attitudes that sustain these behaviors, and encouraging the development of children's capacity to resist biases in favor of inclusion and just treatment of others. In order to interpret what is known about intergroup social exclusion in childhood, as well as identify compelling issues for current investigation, we introduce our integrative social reasoning developmental model, which emphasizes how children weigh moral and social concerns in everyday peer contexts. This chapter emphasizes three areas of research that have contributed to understanding social inclusion and exclusion decisions in childhood which include the roles of: (1) intergroup contact and friendship, (2) peer group norms, and (3) messages from parents and teachers. While providing a background on the state of research to date, this chapter also pinpoints recent work, shedding new light on the complex interplay of moral reasoning and intergroup attitudes in children's inclusion and exclusion decisions.

  2. OTSEGO COUNTY EXPERIMENTAL PROGRAM FOR TESTING METHODS OF FORMING FARM MANAGEMENT STUDY GROUPS, A PROGRESS REPORT. EXTENSION STUDY, NUMBER 8.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    LONGEST, JAMES W.; GENGENBACK, WILLIAM H.

    THE MOST FREQUENT METHOD OF GROUP FORMATION FOR INTENSIVE FARM MANAGEMENT PROGRAMS IN NEW YORK STATE HAS BEEN TO COMBINE ALL INTERESTED FARMERS IN LARGE GROUPS AT THE COUNTY EXTENSION HEADQUARTERS. THIS EXPERIMENT WAS SET UP TO STUDY THE EFFECTIVENESS OF TWO METHODS OF FORMING SMALL GROUPS--BY SOCIOMETRIC CHOICE OR SIMILAR CHARACTERISTICS. ALL…

  3. Trace element seasonality in marine macroalgae of different functional-form groups.

    PubMed

    Malea, Paraskevi; Chatziapostolou, Anastasia; Kevrekidis, Theodoros

    2015-02-01

    Novel information on the seasonality of element accumulation in seaweeds is provided. Seasonal patterns of As, Ba, Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Mn, Mo, Ni, Pb, Se, Sr, U, V and Zn concentrations in macroalgae belonging to different functional-form groups (Ulva intestinalis, Ulva rigida, Codium fragile, Gracilaria gracilis) from the Thessaloniki Gulf, Aegean Sea were determined and compared. Uni- and multivariate data analyses were applied. Element concentrations generally decreased during spring and/or summer, probably due to the growth effect, but a reverse trend, particularly in Ulva species, was also observed. Most elements (Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Mo, Ni, Pb, Sr) in Ulva species displayed a comparatively low monthly variability, indicating that the extent of seasonal variation is closely related to thallus morphology and growth strategy. In particular, these data suggest that Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Mo, Ni, Pb and Sr contents in fast-growing, sheet-like macroalgae are less influenced by the season, compared to their contents in coarsely-branched and thick-leathery macroalgae; therefore, sheet-like macroalgae may be more appropriate to be used in biomonitoring of coastal waters. The data presented could be utilized in the development of biomonitoring programmes for the protection of coastal environments.

  4. Heterogeneity of high-mobility-group protein 2. Enrichment of a rapidly migrating form in testis.

    PubMed Central

    Bucci, L R; Brock, W A; Meistrich, M L

    1985-01-01

    A determination of the absolute amounts of high-mobility-group proteins 1 and 2 (HMG1 and HMG2) in rat tissues demonstrated that amounts of HMG2 were low in non-proliferating tissues, somewhat higher in proliferating and lymphoid tissues, but were extremely elevated in the testis. This increase was due to a germ-cell-specific form of HMG2 with increased mobility relative to somatic HMG2 on acid/urea/polyacrylamide-gel electrophoresis. To determine if the findings in the rat were a general feature of spermatogenesis, testis (germinal), spleen (lymphoid), and liver (non-proliferating) tissues from various vertebrate species were examined for their relative amounts of HMG1 and HMG2, and for HMG2 heterogeneity. Bull, chimpanzee, cynomologus monkey, dog, gopher, guinea pig, hamster, mouse, opossum, rabbit, rat, rhesus monkey, squirrel and toad (Xenopus) tissues were analysed. Nearly all species showed relatively high contents of HMG2 in testis tissue, whereas HMG1 contents were similar in all species and tissues. Ten of thirteen species showed a rapidly migrating HMG2 subtype in testis tissue, separable by acid/urea/polyacrylamide-gel electrophoresis. Xenopus, which lacks HMG2 in somatic tissues, showed an HMG2-like protein in testis tissue. Although the rapidly migrating HMG2 subtype in species other than rat was not testis-specific, it was always enriched in the testis. This study indicates that increased amounts of HMG2 and the enrichment of a rapidly migrating HMG2 subtype are general features of spermatogenic cells. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 2. Fig. 3. PMID:4038257

  5. 46 CFR Appendix D to Subpart C of... - Ocean Transportation Intermediary (OTI) Group Bond Form [FMC-69

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 9 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Ocean Transportation Intermediary (OTI) Group Bond Form... OCEAN SHIPPING IN FOREIGN COMMERCE LICENSING, FINANCIAL RESPONSIBILITY REQUIREMENTS, AND GENERAL DUTIES FOR OCEAN TRANSPORTATION INTERMEDIARIES Financial Responsibility Requirements; Claims Against...

  6. 46 CFR Appendix D to Subpart C of... - Ocean Transportation Intermediary (OTI) Group Bond Form [FMC-69

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 9 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Ocean Transportation Intermediary (OTI) Group Bond Form... OCEAN SHIPPING IN FOREIGN COMMERCE LICENSING, FINANCIAL RESPONSIBILITY REQUIREMENTS, AND GENERAL DUTIES FOR OCEAN TRANSPORTATION INTERMEDIARIES Financial Responsibility Requirements; Claims Against...

  7. 46 CFR Appendix D to Subpart C of... - Ocean Transportation Intermediary (OTI) Group Bond Form [FMC-69

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 9 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Ocean Transportation Intermediary (OTI) Group Bond Form... OCEAN SHIPPING IN FOREIGN COMMERCE LICENSING, FINANCIAL RESPONSIBILITY REQUIREMENTS, AND GENERAL DUTIES FOR OCEAN TRANSPORTATION INTERMEDIARIES Financial Responsibility Requirements; Claims Against...

  8. 46 CFR Appendix D to Subpart C of... - Ocean Transportation Intermediary (OTI) Group Bond Form [FMC-69

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 9 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Ocean Transportation Intermediary (OTI) Group Bond Form... OCEAN SHIPPING IN FOREIGN COMMERCE LICENSING, FINANCIAL RESPONSIBILITY REQUIREMENTS, AND GENERAL DUTIES FOR OCEAN TRANSPORTATION INTERMEDIARIES Financial Responsibility Requirements; Claims Against...

  9. 46 CFR Appendix D to Subpart C of... - Ocean Transportation Intermediary (OTI) Group Bond Form [FMC-69

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 9 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Ocean Transportation Intermediary (OTI) Group Bond Form... OCEAN SHIPPING IN FOREIGN COMMERCE LICENSING, FINANCIAL RESPONSIBILITY REQUIREMENTS, AND GENERAL DUTIES FOR OCEAN TRANSPORTATION INTERMEDIARIES Financial Responsibility Requirements; Claims Against...

  10. Post-UV colony-forming ability of normal fibroblast strains and of the xeroderma pigmentosum group G strain

    SciTech Connect

    Barrett, S.F.; Tarone, R.E.; Moshell, A.N.; Ganges, M.B.; Robbins, J.H.

    1981-01-01

    In xeroderma pigmentosum, an inherited disorder of defective DNA repair, post-uv colony-forming ability of fibroblasts from patients in complementation groups A through F correlates with the patients' neurological status. The first xeroderma pigmentosum patient assigned to the recently discovered group G had the neurological abnormalities of XP. Researchers have determined the post-uv colony-forming ability of cultured fibroblasts from this patient and from 5 more control donors. Log-phase fibroblasts were irradiated with 254 nm uv light from a germicidal lamp, trypsinized, and replated at known densities. After 2 to 4 weeks' incubation the cells were fixed, stained and scored for colony formation. The strains' post-uv colony-forming ability curves were obtained by plotting the log of the percent remaining post-uv colony-forming ability as a function of the uv dose. The post-uv colony-forming ability of 2 of the 5 new normal strains was in the previously defined control donor zone, but that of the other 3 extended down to the level of the most resistant xeroderma pigmentosum strain. The post-uv colony-forming ability curve of the group G fibroblasts was not significantly different from the curves of the group D fibroblast strains from patients with clinical histories similar to that of the group G patient.

  11. OAST Space Theme Workshop. Volume 3: Working Group Summary. 5: Propulsion (P-1). A. Summary Statement. B. Technology Needs (Form 1). C. Priority Assessments (Form 2)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    All themes require some form of advanced propulsion capabilities to achieve their stated objectives. Requirements cover a broad spectrum ranging from a new generation of heavy lift launch vehicles to low thrust, long lift system for on-orbit operations. The commonality extant between propulsive technologies was established and group technologies were grouped into vehicle classes by functional capability. The five classes of launch vehicles identified by the space transportation theme were augmented with a sixth class, encompassing planetary and on-orbit operations. Propulsion technologies in each class were then ranked, and assigned priority numbers. Prioritized technologies were matched to theme requirements.

  12. Emergence of interest groups on hazardous waste siting: how do they form and survive

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, R.G.; Payne, B.A.

    1985-10-30

    This paper discusses the two components of the facilitative setting that are important for group formation. The first component, the ideological component, provides the basic ideas that are adopted by the emerging group. The ideological setting for group formation is produced by such things as antinuclear news coverage and concentration of news stories on hazardous waste problems, on ideas concerning the credibility of the federal government, and on the pervasivensee of ideas about general environmental problems. The organizational component of the facilitative setting provides such things as leadership ability, flexible time, resources, and experience. These are important for providing people, organization, and money to achieve group goals. By and large, the conditions conducive to group formation, growth, and survival are outside the control of decision-makers. Agencies and project sponsors are currently caught in a paradox. Actively involving the public in the decision-making process tends to contribute to the growth and survival of various interest groups. Not involving the public means damage to credibility and conflict with values concerning participatory democracy. Resolution in this area can only be achieved when a comprehensive, coordinated national approach to hazardous waste management emerges. 26 refs.

  13. Measurement Invariance of the Gifted Rating Scales--School Form across Five Cultural Groups

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Li, Huijun; Lee, Donghyuck; Pfeiffer, Steven I.; Kamata, Akihito; Kumtepe, Alper T.; Rosado, Javier

    2009-01-01

    This study examined measurement invariance of the Gifted Rating Scales--School Form (GRS-S) across the United States, Puerto Rico, China, South Korea, and Turkey, using multigroup confirmatory factor analysis. A total of 1,817 students were rated by 287 teachers using either translated versions of GRS-S or the original English GRS-S. Results…

  14. Forming a support group for people affected by inflammatory bowel disease

    PubMed Central

    Swarup, Nidhi; Nayak, Saumya; Lee, Jessie; Pai Raikar, Srinivas; Hou, David; Sockalingam, Senthil; Lee, Ken J

    2017-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) – primarily Crohn’s disease and ulcerative colitis – is a debilitating lifelong condition with significant health and economic costs. From diagnosis to management, IBD can cause huge psychosocial concerns to patients and their caregivers. This study reports an experience of a Crohn’s patient, leading to the formation of the first IBD patient support group in Singapore and how this group has evolved in the last 4 years in supporting other IBD patients. IBD patient advocacy and/or support groups facilitate open conversations on patients’ fears, concerns, preferences and needs, and may potentially improve disease knowledge and quality of life for individuals with the condition or their families. PMID:28255233

  15. Closed-form irreducible differential formulations of the Wilson renormalization group

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vvedensky, D. D.; Chang, T. S.; Nicoll, J. F.

    1983-06-01

    We present a detailed derivation of the one-particle-irreducible (1PI) differential renormalization-group generators originally developed by Nicoll and Chang and by Chang, Nicoll, and Young. We illustrate the machinery of the irreducible formulation by calculating to order ɛ2 the characteristic time exponent z for the time-dependent Ginsburg-Landau model in the cases of conserved and nonconserved order parameter. We then calculate both z and η to order ɛ2 by applying to the 1PI generator an extension of the operator expansion technique developed by Wegner for the Wilson smooth-cutoff renormalization-group generator.

  16. Learning Patterns as Criterion for Forming Work Groups in 3D Simulation Learning Environments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maria Cela-Ranilla, Jose; Molías, Luis Marqués; Cervera, Mercè Gisbert

    2016-01-01

    This study analyzes the relationship between the use of learning patterns as a grouping criterion to develop learning activities in the 3D simulation environment at University. Participants included 72 Spanish students from the Education and Marketing disciplines. Descriptive statistics and non-parametric tests were conducted. The process was…

  17. Evaluation of final waste forms and recommendations for baseline alternatives to group and glass

    SciTech Connect

    Bleier, A.

    1997-09-01

    An assessment of final waste forms was made as part of the Federal Facilities Compliance Agreement/Development, Demonstration, Testing, and Evaluation (FFCA/DDT&E) Program because supplemental waste-form technologies are needed for the hazardous, radioactive, and mixed wastes of concern to the Department of Energy and the problematic wastes on the Oak Ridge Reservation. The principal objective was to identify a primary waste-form candidate as an alternative to grout (cement) and glass. The effort principally comprised a literature search, the goal of which was to establish a knowledge base regarding four areas: (1) the waste-form technologies based on grout and glass, (2) candidate alternatives, (3) the wastes that need to be immobilized, and (4) the technical and regulatory constraints on the waste-from technologies. This report serves, in part, to meet this goal. Six families of materials emerged as relevant; inorganic, organic, vitrified, devitrified, ceramic, and metallic matrices. Multiple members of each family were assessed, emphasizing the materials-oriented factors and accounting for the fact that the two most prevalent types of wastes for the FFCA/DDT&E Program are aqueous liquids and inorganic sludges and solids. Presently, no individual matrix is sufficiently developed to permit its immediate implementation as a baseline alternative. Three thermoplastic materials, sulfur-polymer cement (inorganic), bitumen (organic), and polyethylene (organic), are the most technologically developed candidates. Each warrants further study, emphasizing the engineering and economic factors, but each also has limitations that regulate it to a status of short-term alternative. The crystallinity and flexible processing of sulfur provide sulfur-polymer cement with the highest potential for short-term success via encapsulation. Long-term immobilization demands chemical stabilization, which the thermoplastic matrices do not offer. Among the properties of the remaining

  18. Forming a new clinical team for frail older people: can a group development model help?

    PubMed

    Anderson, Elizabeth Susan; Pollard, Lorraine; Conroy, Simon; Clague-Baker, Nicola

    2014-03-01

    Integrated services which utilise the expertise of team members along care pathways are evolving. Changes in service structure and subsequent team working arrangements can be a challenge for practitioners expected to redefine how they work with one another. These services are particularly important for the care of frail older people. This exploratory study of one newly forming team presents the views of staff involved in establishing an interprofessional healthcare advisory team for older people within an acute hospital admissions unit. Staff experiences of forming a new service are aligned to a model of team development. The findings are presented as themes relating to the stages of team development and identify the challenges of setting up an integrated service alongside existing services. In particular, team process issues relating to the clarity of goals, role clarification, leadership, team culture and identity. Managers must allow time to ensure new services evolve before setting up evaluation studies for efficiency and effectiveness which might prove against the potential for interprofessional teamworking.

  19. ssRNA viruses from biotrophic Oomycetes form a new phylogenetic group between Nodaviridae and Tombusviridae.

    PubMed

    Grasse, Wolfgang; Spring, Otmar

    2017-02-02

    Plasmopara halstedii virus (PhV) is one of the few characterized oomycete viruses. Although it is fully sequenced and well-studied in its genetic diversity, the exact classification and phylogenetic relationships of PhV remain uncertain. The only known virus with characteristics similar to PhV is the Sclerophthora macrospora Virus A (SmV-A). Both viruses infect obligate biotrophic oomycetes. While RNA-dependent RNA polymerases (RdRp) of oomycetes viruses have high similarity to the corresponding enzymes from viruses classified in the family Nodaviridae, the coat proteins (CP) seem to be completely different from those of other viruses of this family. In contrast, the coat proteins of PhV and SmV-A have high similarity to viruses classified in the Tombusviridae, Circoviridae and a new group of hybrid DNA-RNA viruses (so-called chimeric viruses or cruciviruses). Because phylogenetic analyses based on the sequences of either RdRp or CP result in different affinities, an alternative, genome-based approach combining the sequences of both proteins was used. This analysis placed the two oomycete viruses together with Tombunodavirus UC1 in a new, independent group between families Nodaviridae and Tombusviridae.

  20. Hidden Genetic Diversity in an Asexually Reproducing Lichen Forming Fungal Group.

    PubMed

    Del-Prado, Ruth; Divakar, Pradeep Kumar; Lumbsch, H Thorsten; Crespo, Ana M

    2016-01-01

    Asexual species with vegetative propagation of both symbiont partners (soredia) in lichens may harbor lower species diversity because they may indeed represent evolutionary dead ends or clones. In this study we aim to critically examine species boundaries in the sorediate lichen forming fungi Parmotrema reticulatum-Parmotrema pseudoreticulatum complex applying coalescent-based approaches and other recently developed DNA-based methods. To this end, we gathered 180 samples from Africa, Asia, Australasia, Europe, North and South America and generated sequences of internal transcribed spacer of nuclear ribosomal DNA (ITS) and DNA replication licensing factor MCM7 (MCM7). The dataset was analysed using different approaches such as traditional phylogeny-maximum likelihood and Bayesian-genetic distances, automatic barcode gap discovery and coalescent-based methods-PTP, GMYC, spedeSTEM and *Beast-in order to test congruence among results. Additionally, the divergence times were also estimated to elucidate diversification events. Delimitations inferred from the different analyses are comparable with only minor differences, and following a conservative approach we propose that the sampled specimens of the P. reticulatum-P. pseudoreticulatum complex belong to at least eight distinct species-level lineages. Seven are currently classified under P. reticulatum and one as P. pseudoreticulatum. In this work we discuss one of only few examples of cryptic species that have so far been found in sorediate reproducing lichen forming fungi. Additionally our estimates suggest a recent origin of the species complex-during the Miocene. Consequently, the wide distribution of several of the cryptic species has to be explained by intercontinental long-distance dispersal events.

  1. Hidden Genetic Diversity in an Asexually Reproducing Lichen Forming Fungal Group

    PubMed Central

    Del-Prado, Ruth; Divakar, Pradeep Kumar; Lumbsch, H. Thorsten; Crespo, Ana M.

    2016-01-01

    Asexual species with vegetative propagation of both symbiont partners (soredia) in lichens may harbor lower species diversity because they may indeed represent evolutionary dead ends or clones. In this study we aim to critically examine species boundaries in the sorediate lichen forming fungi Parmotrema reticulatum–Parmotrema pseudoreticulatum complex applying coalescent-based approaches and other recently developed DNA-based methods. To this end, we gathered 180 samples from Africa, Asia, Australasia, Europe, North and South America and generated sequences of internal transcribed spacer of nuclear ribosomal DNA (ITS) and DNA replication licensing factor MCM7 (MCM7). The dataset was analysed using different approaches such as traditional phylogeny–maximum likelihood and Bayesian–genetic distances, automatic barcode gap discovery and coalescent-based methods–PTP, GMYC, spedeSTEM and *Beast–in order to test congruence among results. Additionally, the divergence times were also estimated to elucidate diversification events. Delimitations inferred from the different analyses are comparable with only minor differences, and following a conservative approach we propose that the sampled specimens of the P. reticulatum–P. pseudoreticulatum complex belong to at least eight distinct species-level lineages. Seven are currently classified under P. reticulatum and one as P. pseudoreticulatum. In this work we discuss one of only few examples of cryptic species that have so far been found in sorediate reproducing lichen forming fungi. Additionally our estimates suggest a recent origin of the species complex–during the Miocene. Consequently, the wide distribution of several of the cryptic species has to be explained by intercontinental long-distance dispersal events. PMID:27513649

  2. Cationized bovine serum albumin with pendant RGD groups forms efficient biocoatings for cell adhesion.

    PubMed

    Ng, Jeck Fei; Weil, Tanja; Jaenicke, Stephan

    2011-11-01

    Cationized bovine serum albumin (cBSA-147) has been modified by attaching the cyclic pentapeptide cRGDfK to its surface through linkers of different length. Coatings of these bioconjugates on glass surfaces were studied for their ability to stimulate cell adhesion. These chemically modified albumins combine a high number of positive charges which facilitate the initial cell adhesion to the surface with multiple Arg-Gly-Asp groups which enable focal adhesion of fibroblast cells by specific interactions with cell-surface receptors. The biocoatings are easily prepared within a few minutes by simple incubation from a dilute solution of the modified albumin. This constitutes a convenient approach for preparing surfaces for cell adhesion. Excellent focal adhesion of NIH 3T3 fibroblast cells on the biocoatings was observed. About 75% of the seeded cells attached to the cRGDfK-cBSA-147 coated surfaces, and 97% of them underwent focal adhesion. Adhering cells were able to grow and proliferate on the coated surfaces, confirming the outstanding biocompatibility of these biocoatings.

  3. Function Over Form: Modeling Groups of Inherited Neurological Conditions in Zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Kozol, Robert A.; Abrams, Alexander J.; James, David M.; Buglo, Elena; Yan, Qing; Dallman, Julia E.

    2016-01-01

    Zebrafish are a unique cell to behavior model for studying the basic biology of human inherited neurological conditions. Conserved vertebrate genetics and optical transparency provide in vivo access to the developing nervous system as well as high-throughput approaches for drug screens. Here we review zebrafish modeling for two broad groups of inherited conditions that each share genetic and molecular pathways and overlap phenotypically: neurodevelopmental disorders such as Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD), Intellectual Disability (ID) and Schizophrenia (SCZ), and neurodegenerative diseases, such as Cerebellar Ataxia (CATX), Hereditary Spastic Paraplegia (HSP) and Charcot-Marie Tooth Disease (CMT). We also conduct a small meta-analysis of zebrafish orthologs of high confidence neurodevelopmental disorder and neurodegenerative disease genes by looking at duplication rates and relative protein sizes. In the past zebrafish genetic models of these neurodevelopmental disorders and neurodegenerative diseases have provided insight into cellular, circuit and behavioral level mechanisms contributing to these conditions. Moving forward, advances in genetic manipulation, live imaging of neuronal activity and automated high-throughput molecular screening promise to help delineate the mechanistic relationships between different types of neurological conditions and accelerate discovery of therapeutic strategies. PMID:27458342

  4. Function Over Form: Modeling Groups of Inherited Neurological Conditions in Zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Kozol, Robert A; Abrams, Alexander J; James, David M; Buglo, Elena; Yan, Qing; Dallman, Julia E

    2016-01-01

    Zebrafish are a unique cell to behavior model for studying the basic biology of human inherited neurological conditions. Conserved vertebrate genetics and optical transparency provide in vivo access to the developing nervous system as well as high-throughput approaches for drug screens. Here we review zebrafish modeling for two broad groups of inherited conditions that each share genetic and molecular pathways and overlap phenotypically: neurodevelopmental disorders such as Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD), Intellectual Disability (ID) and Schizophrenia (SCZ), and neurodegenerative diseases, such as Cerebellar Ataxia (CATX), Hereditary Spastic Paraplegia (HSP) and Charcot-Marie Tooth Disease (CMT). We also conduct a small meta-analysis of zebrafish orthologs of high confidence neurodevelopmental disorder and neurodegenerative disease genes by looking at duplication rates and relative protein sizes. In the past zebrafish genetic models of these neurodevelopmental disorders and neurodegenerative diseases have provided insight into cellular, circuit and behavioral level mechanisms contributing to these conditions. Moving forward, advances in genetic manipulation, live imaging of neuronal activity and automated high-throughput molecular screening promise to help delineate the mechanistic relationships between different types of neurological conditions and accelerate discovery of therapeutic strategies.

  5. Inactivation of the pore-forming toxin Sticholysin I by peroxynitrite: protection by cys groups incorporated in the toxin.

    PubMed

    León, L; Lissi, E A; Celedón, G; Gonzalez, G; Pazos, F; Alvarez, C; Lanio, M E

    2014-10-01

    Sea anemones synthesize a variety of toxic peptides and proteins of biological interest. The Caribbean Sea anemone Stichodactyla helianthus, produces two pore-forming toxins, Sticholysin I (St I) and Stichloysin II (St II), with the ability to form oligomeric pores in cell and lipid bilayers characteristically lacking cysteine in their amino acid sequences. Recently, two mutants of a recombinant variant of Sticholysin I (rSt I) have been obtained with a Cys residue in functionally relevant regions for the pore-forming activity of the toxin: r St I F15C (in the amino terminal sequence) and r St I R52C (in the binding site). Aiming at characterizing the effects of oxidants in toxins devoid (r St I) or containing -SH moieties (r St I F15C and r St I R52C), we measured their hemolytic activity and pore forming capacity prior and after their incubation with peroxynitrite (ONOO(-)). At low ONOO(-)/Toxin ratios, nearly 0.8 Trp groups are modified by each added peroxynitrite molecule, and the toxin activity is reduced in ca. 20 %. On the other hand, in -SH bearing mutants only 0.5 Trp groups are modified by each peroxynitrite molecule and the toxin activity is only reduced in 10 %. The results indicated that Cys is the initial target of the oxidative damage and that Trp residues in Cys-containing toxins were less damaged than those in r St I. This relative protection of Trp groups correlates with a smaller loss of hemolytic activity and permeabilization ability in liposomes and emphasizes the relevance of Trp groups in the pore forming capacity of the toxins.

  6. Drosophila BTB/POZ domains of "ttk group" can form multimers and selectively interact with each other.

    PubMed

    Bonchuk, Artem; Denisov, Stepan; Georgiev, Pavel; Maksimenko, Oksana

    2011-09-23

    The BTB (bric-a-brac, tramtrack and broad complex)/POZ (poxvirus and zinc finger) domain is a conserved protein-protein interaction motif contained in a variety of transcription factors involved in development, chromatin remodeling, insulator activity, and carcinogenesis. All well-studied mammalian BTB domains form obligate homodimers and, rarely, tetramers. Only the BTB domain of the Drosophila GAGA factor (GAF) has been shown to exist as higher-order multimers. The BTB domain of GAF belongs to the "ttk group" that contains several highly conserved sequences not found in other BTB domains. Here, we have shown by size-exclusion chromatography, chemical cross-linking, and nondenaturing PAGE that four additional BTB domains of the ttk group-Batman, Mod(mdg4), Pipsqueak, and Tramtrack-can form multimers, like GAF. Interestingly, the BTB domains of GAF and Batman have formed a wide range of complexes and interacted in the yeast two-hybrid assay with other BTB domains tested. In contrast, the BTB domains of Mod(mdg4), Pipsqueak, and Tramtrack have formed stable high-order multimer complexes and failed to interact with each other. The BTB domain of Drosophila CP190 protein does not belong to the ttk group. This BTB domain has formed stable dimers and has not interacted with domains of the ttk group. Previously, it was suggested that GAF oligomerization into higher-order complexes facilitates long-range activation by providing a protein bridge between an enhancer and a promoter. Unexpectedly, experiments in the Drosophila model system have not supported the role of GAF in organization of long-distance interaction between the yeast GAL4 activator and the white promoter.

  7. Blocking actions of alkylene-tethered bis-neonicotinoids on nicotinic acetylcholine receptors expressed by terminal abdominal ganglion neurons of Periplaneta americana.

    PubMed

    Ihara, Makoto; Hirata, Koichi; Ishida, Chiharu; Kagabu, Shinzo; Matsuda, Kazuhiko

    2007-10-02

    Neonicotinoid insecticides target nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs), which, in both vertebrates and invertebrates, mediate fast-acting synaptic neurotransmission in the nervous system. Recently, Kagabu et al. synthesized bis-neonicotinoids. The neural activities of bis-neonicotinoids have been evaluated on the central nerve cord of American cockroaches. However, the action of bis-neonicotinoids on nAChRs expressed by dissociated insect neurons has not yet been studied. Thus, the actions of several alkylene-tethered bis-neonicotinoids on the terminal abdominal ganglion neurons of the American cockroach, Periplaneta americana, were investigated using whole-cell patch-clamp electrophysiology. All of the ligands tested did not induce membrane currents, but reduced the responses to ACh when bath applied prior to co-application with ACh. Of the compounds tested, HK-13, which possesses two imidacloprid units linked with a hexamethylene bridge, had the highest antagonist potency. The antagonist action was reduced, not only by elongating, but also by shortening the linker.

  8. 26 CFR 1.6052-1 - Information returns regarding payment of wages in the form of group-term life insurance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... in the form of group-term life insurance. 1.6052-1 Section 1.6052-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE... § 1.6052-1 Information returns regarding payment of wages in the form of group-term life insurance. (a... employees remuneration for services in the form of group-term life insurance on the life of such...

  9. 26 CFR 1.6052-1 - Information returns regarding payment of wages in the form of group-term life insurance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... in the form of group-term life insurance. 1.6052-1 Section 1.6052-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE...) Information Returns § 1.6052-1 Information returns regarding payment of wages in the form of group-term life... provides any one of his employees remuneration for services in the form of group-term life insurance on...

  10. 26 CFR 1.6052-1 - Information returns regarding payment of wages in the form of group-term life insurance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... in the form of group-term life insurance. 1.6052-1 Section 1.6052-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE...) Information Returns § 1.6052-1 Information returns regarding payment of wages in the form of group-term life... provides any one of his employees remuneration for services in the form of group-term life insurance on...

  11. Large birefringence and polarization holographic gratings formed in photocross-linkable polymer liquid crystals comprising bistolane mesogenic side groups

    SciTech Connect

    Emoto, Akira; Matsumoto, Taro; Shioda, Tatsutoshi; Ono, Hiroshi; Yamashita, Ayumi; Kawatsuki, Nobuhiro

    2009-10-01

    Polarization gratings with large birefringence are formed in photoreactive polymer liquid crystals with bistolane moiety and terminal cinnamic acid moiety by the use of polarized ultraviolet interference light and subsequent annealing. The polarized ultraviolet light causes the axis-selective photoreaction between the cinnamic acid groups and subsequent annealing induce the reorientation of peripheral molecules without cross-linking along the cross-linked groups. Long bistolane mesogenic moiety exhibits large birefringence in comparison with a biphenyl mesogenic moiety, the value of the induced birefringence in the bistolane mesogenic liquid crystalline (LC) polymer is strongly dependent on both the grating constant and the wavelength of the reconstruction light.

  12. Social compatibility in a newly formed all-male group of white crowned mangabeys (Cercocebus atys lunulatus).

    PubMed

    Fàbregas, María; Guillén-Salazar, Federico

    2007-01-01

    Surplus males in primate captive populations are a common problem for zoos. Some captive breeding programs promote all-male groups as an adequate option to house surplus males, but there have been few attempts to assess the feasibility of this management technique across primate species. The present study provides preliminary data regarding social compatibility within a newly formed all-male group of four white crowned mangabeys (Cercocebus atys lunulatus). The study was conducted at the Valencia Zoo (Spain), where data on social behavior were collected over 6 months using continuous focal animal sampling for a total of 87 hr of observation. Results show that low intensity aggressive behaviors (facial threats) were expressed at high rates, whereas physical aggression (fights) rarely occurred. Aggression was more frequent among individuals belonging to the same age-gender class. Regarding affiliative behaviors, every individual actively sought proximity to all other group members through positive approaches, and although not all males carried out social grooming, every male was groomed by at least one group member. Our results suggest that the group was compatible socially because social relationships among the individuals were not neutral, and physical aggression occurred at low rates. The present study provides preliminary data supporting the feasibility of all-male groups as a management option for surplus males in captive populations of white crowned mangabeys. Nevertheless, further studies are needed to be able to generalize both within and across species. Zoo Biol 0:1-7, 2007. (c) 2006 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  13. 26 CFR 1.6052-2 - Statements to be furnished employees with respect to wages paid in the form of group-term life...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... respect to wages paid in the form of group-term life insurance. 1.6052-2 Section 1.6052-2 Internal Revenue... the form of group-term life insurance. (a) Requirement. Every employer filing a return under section 6052(a) and § 1.6052-1 with respect to group-term life insurance on the life of an employee...

  14. 26 CFR 1.6052-2 - Statements to be furnished employees with respect to wages paid in the form of group-term life...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... respect to wages paid in the form of group-term life insurance. 1.6052-2 Section 1.6052-2 Internal Revenue... the form of group-term life insurance. (a) Requirement. Every employer filing a return under section 6052(a) and § 1.6052-1 with respect to group-term life insurance on the life of an employee...

  15. Temporal characteristics of polarization holographic gratings formed in a photosensitive polymeric film containing N-benzylideneaniline derivative side groups

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sasaki, Tomoyuki; Shoho, Takashi; Noda, Kohei; Kawatsuki, Nobuhiro; Ono, Hiroshi

    2014-04-01

    A polarization holographic grating was recorded in a transparent thin film formed from polymethacrylate with N-benzylideneaniline (NBA) derivative side groups. We measured the real time diffraction properties. The data were analyzed based on a theoretical model that accounted for the distribution of optical anisotropy caused by molecular reorientation as well as for surface relief (SR) deformation caused by molecular motion. Optical anisotropy rapidly increased and then slowly decreased, with increasing recording time. This phenomenon was described based on photoisomerization and photocleavage reactions of the NBA side groups. SR deformation was also induced in the film by polarization holographic recording, without any subsequent processes. The photoinduced optical anisotropy and SR deformation were retained after the recording was turned off.

  16. Carbide-forming groups IVB-VIB metals: a new territory in the periodic table for CVD growth of graphene.

    PubMed

    Zou, Zhiyu; Fu, Lei; Song, Xiuju; Zhang, Yanfeng; Liu, Zhongfan

    2014-07-09

    Early transition metals, especially groups IVB-VIB metals, can form stable carbides, which are known to exhibit excellent "noble-metal-like" catalytic activities. We demonstrate herein the applications of groups IVB-VIB metals in graphene growth using atmospheric pressure chemical vapor deposition technique. Similar to the extensively studied Cu, Ni, and noble metals, these transition-metal foils facilitate the catalytic growth of single- to few-layer graphene. The most attractive advantage over the existing catalysts is their perfect control of layer thickness and uniformity with highly flexible experimental conditions by in situ converting the dissolved carbons into stable carbides to fully suppress the upward segregation/precipitation effect. The growth performance of graphene on these transition metals can be well explained by the periodic physicochemical properties of elements. Our work has disclosed a new territory of catalysts in the periodic table for graphene growth and is expected to trigger more interest in graphene research.

  17. Temporal characteristics of polarization holographic gratings formed in a photosensitive polymeric film containing N-benzylideneaniline derivative side groups

    SciTech Connect

    Sasaki, Tomoyuki Shoho, Takashi; Noda, Kohei; Ono, Hiroshi; Kawatsuki, Nobuhiro

    2014-04-21

    A polarization holographic grating was recorded in a transparent thin film formed from polymethacrylate with N-benzylideneaniline (NBA) derivative side groups. We measured the real time diffraction properties. The data were analyzed based on a theoretical model that accounted for the distribution of optical anisotropy caused by molecular reorientation as well as for surface relief (SR) deformation caused by molecular motion. Optical anisotropy rapidly increased and then slowly decreased, with increasing recording time. This phenomenon was described based on photoisomerization and photocleavage reactions of the NBA side groups. SR deformation was also induced in the film by polarization holographic recording, without any subsequent processes. The photoinduced optical anisotropy and SR deformation were retained after the recording was turned off.

  18. Individuals with eating disorders and the use of online support groups as a form of social support.

    PubMed

    McCormack, Abby

    2010-01-01

    The increase in Internet use in recent years has fostered the development of online support groups to help individuals cope with a number of conditions. Individuals with eating disorders may particularly benefit from such groups as they provide a means of sharing experiences, knowledge, and support with like-minded individuals without the anxiety and worry of others negatively evaluating their appearance. The aim of this study was to examine the nature and types of social support that took place on an anorexia discussion forum. The deductive thematic analysis of 325 messages indicates that the primary function of the group was the communication of encouragement and esteem and information support notably in terms of diagnosis, treatment, and interaction with healthcare specialists. Considering the high rate of relapse among individuals with eating disorders, it is imperative that some form of support is available when they leave treatment centers. Regulated computer-mediated support groups provide a low-cost, easily accessible self-help service to individuals with eating disorders.

  19. Crystal Structures of Group B Streptococcus Glyceraldehyde-3-Phosphate Dehydrogenase: Apo-Form, Binary and Ternary Complexes

    PubMed Central

    Schormann, Norbert; Ayres, Chapelle A.; Fry, Alexandra; Green, Todd J.; Banerjee, Surajit; Ulett, Glen C.

    2016-01-01

    Glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase or GAPDH is an evolutionarily conserved glycolytic enzyme. It catalyzes the two step oxidative phosphorylation of D-glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate into 1,3-bisphosphoglycerate using inorganic phosphate and NAD+ as cofactor. GAPDH of Group B Streptococcus is a major virulence factor and a potential vaccine candidate. Moreover, since GAPDH activity is essential for bacterial growth it may serve as a possible drug target. Crystal structures of Group B Streptococcus GAPDH in the apo-form, two different binary complexes and the ternary complex are described here. The two binary complexes contained NAD+ bound to 2 (mixed-holo) or 4 (holo) subunits of the tetrameric protein. The structure of the mixed-holo complex reveals the effects of NAD+ binding on the conformation of the protein. In the ternary complex, the phosphate group of the substrate was bound to the new Pi site in all four subunits. Comparison with the structure of human GAPDH showed several differences near the adenosyl binding pocket in Group B Streptococcus GAPDH. The structures also reveal at least three surface-exposed areas that differ in amino acid sequence compared to the corresponding areas of human GAPDH. PMID:27875551

  20. Crystal Structures of Group B Streptococcus Glyceraldehyde-3-Phosphate Dehydrogenase: Apo-Form, Binary and Ternary Complexes.

    PubMed

    Schormann, Norbert; Ayres, Chapelle A; Fry, Alexandra; Green, Todd J; Banerjee, Surajit; Ulett, Glen C; Chattopadhyay, Debasish

    2016-01-01

    Glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase or GAPDH is an evolutionarily conserved glycolytic enzyme. It catalyzes the two step oxidative phosphorylation of D-glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate into 1,3-bisphosphoglycerate using inorganic phosphate and NAD+ as cofactor. GAPDH of Group B Streptococcus is a major virulence factor and a potential vaccine candidate. Moreover, since GAPDH activity is essential for bacterial growth it may serve as a possible drug target. Crystal structures of Group B Streptococcus GAPDH in the apo-form, two different binary complexes and the ternary complex are described here. The two binary complexes contained NAD+ bound to 2 (mixed-holo) or 4 (holo) subunits of the tetrameric protein. The structure of the mixed-holo complex reveals the effects of NAD+ binding on the conformation of the protein. In the ternary complex, the phosphate group of the substrate was bound to the new Pi site in all four subunits. Comparison with the structure of human GAPDH showed several differences near the adenosyl binding pocket in Group B Streptococcus GAPDH. The structures also reveal at least three surface-exposed areas that differ in amino acid sequence compared to the corresponding areas of human GAPDH.

  1. Structural characterization of the isoenzymatic forms of human myeloperoxidase: evaluation of the iron-containing prosthetic group.

    PubMed

    Wright, J; Bastian, N; Davis, T A; Zuo, C; Yoshimoto, S; Orme-Johnson, W H; Tauber, A I

    1990-01-01

    Myeloperoxidase (MPO) from human neutrophils has been purified and found to exist in three isoenzymatic forms, resolved by ion exchange chromatography. In addition to differences in subunit size and cellular compartmentalization of the isoenzymes, differences have been reported in their activity and susceptibility to inhibition. The structural basis of these isoenzymes is unclear; we attempted to further define their functional characteristics and structural identity. First, we measured respective enzymatic activity using a panel of substrates; MPO I was found to have lower activity with some substrates (pyrogallol, guaiacol, potassium iodide [KI]), but similar activity to the other isoenzymes with 4-aminoantipyrine. These studies confirm that MPO I is enzymatically distinct from MPO II and MPO III. Next, we examined the structural basis of these differences by evaluating the iron-containing prosthetic group in each form using electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) and determination of the pyridine hemochrome. No significant difference between the isoenzymes was noted in these parameters, suggesting that the prosthetic group is the same in each protein. The cause for any difference in enzymatic activity must lie then in variations extrinsic to the heme, and based on previous studies of the gene and protein analysis, the posttranslational modification of MPO must account for these isoenzymatic species.

  2. Child maltreatment in Taiwan for 2004-2013: A shift in age group and forms of maltreatment.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chih-Tsai; Yang, Nan-Ping; Chou, Pesus

    2016-02-01

    Cases of child maltreatment are being increasingly reported in Taiwan. However, the trend or changes of child maltreatment in Taiwan are fragmentary and lack empirical evidence. This study analyzed the epidemiological characteristics of substantiated child maltreatment cases from the previous decade, using mortality as an indicator to investigate the care of children who experienced substantiated maltreatment in the past to determine any new developments. Data for analysis and estimates were retrieved from the Department of Statistics in the Ministry of the Interior from 2004 to 2013. Trend analyses were conducted using the Joinpoint Regression Program. The child maltreatment rate in Taiwan was found to have nearly tripled from 2004 to 2013. A greater increase in the maltreatment of girls than boys and the maltreatment of aboriginal children than non-aboriginal children was noted from 2004 to 2013. When stratified by age group, the increase in maltreatment was most pronounced in children aged 12-17 years, and girls aged 12-17 years experienced the greatest increase in maltreatment. In terms of the proportional changes of different maltreatment forms among substantiated child maltreatment cases, child neglect was decreasing. The increase in sexual abuse was higher than for any other form of maltreatment and surpassed neglect by the end of 2013. Furthermore, the mortality rate of children with substantiated maltreatment record is increasing in Taiwan, whereas the mortality rate among children without any substantiated maltreatment record is decreasing. The results of this study highlight the need for policy reform in Taiwan regarding child maltreatment.

  3. [Factors forming opnion on marijuana legalization in Poland among group of students from medical and technical college faculty].

    PubMed

    Suwała, Małgorzata; Gerstenkorn, Andrzej; Szewczyk, Anna

    2015-01-01

    Marijuana is the most popular illegal drug in the world. In 2010 17.6% of polish adult population (age 15-64) and 37.3% of youth (age 17-18) declared use of marijuana at least once in their lifetime. Recent years in Poland brought back public discussion regarding decriminalization and legalization of marijuana. The main goal of the study was to reveal the opinion about legalization of marijuana in Poland among students of medical and technical faculty in correlation with chosen socio-demographic factors, college major, attitude to tobacco smoking, use of drugs and religious practice. Study included 230 students (110 from Medical University of Lodz and 120 from Technical University of Lodz). Women consisted on 56.1% of surveyed and men on 43.9%. Study used audit survey as a research method. Results. 40.4% of students considered marijuana as "soft" drug and in majority (65.7%) are convinced that it is not addictive. The main part of studied group (83%) claimed that marijuana is easily accessible in Poland. The majority of the group (38.75%) was against marijuana legalization, a little bit less (35.2%) approved its legalization in Poland and 26.1% had no opinion. Type of college faculty had not been detected as a factor influencing support for legalization. Important factors influencing positive opinion on legalization was: living in the city, tobacco smoking, socializing with legalization supporters, lack of regular religious practice, drug use. CONCLUSION. Young people's diversified opinion regarding legalization of marijuana in Poland should encourage further discussion. Educational and preventive activities within different social groups are necessary to form a conscious opinion on legalization of marijuana in Poland based on the knowledge of actual scientific facts.

  4. Complete group classification of systems of two nonlinear second-Order ordinary differential equations of the form y‧‧ = F(y)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oguis, G. F.; Moyo, S.; Meleshko, S. V.

    2017-03-01

    Extensive work has been done on the group classification of systems of equations in the literature. This paper identifies the gap in the literature which concerns the group classification of systems of two nonlinear second-order ordinary differential equations. We provide a complete group classification of systems of two ordinary differential equations of the form, y‧‧ = F(y) , which occur in many physical applications using two approaches which form the essence of this paper.

  5. 26 CFR 1.6052-2 - Statements to be furnished employees with respect to wages paid in the form of group-term life...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... respect to wages paid in the form of group-term life insurance. 1.6052-2 Section 1.6052-2 Internal Revenue... group-term life insurance. (a) Requirement. Every employer filing a return under section 6052(a) and § 1.6052-1 with respect to group-term life insurance on the life of an employee shall furnish to...

  6. On the Choice Address Forms: Intimate Address Forms as In-Group Identity Markers of Black South Africans in "Invictus" Movie

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Prihantoro

    2012-01-01

    "Invictus" is a movie which is adapted from a true story of how the South African President, Nelson Mandela, tried to unite South Africa by supporting the national rugby team, Springbok, which used to be the symbol of Apartheid. His relation with other characters in this movie is reflected from the address forms and the choice is…

  7. Interspersed DNA repeats bcr1-bcr18 of Bacillus cereus group bacteria form three distinct groups with different evolutionary and functional patterns.

    PubMed

    Kristoffersen, Simen M; Tourasse, Nicolas J; Kolstø, Anne-Brit; Økstad, Ole Andreas

    2011-02-01

    Many short (<400 bp) interspersed sequence repeats exist in bacteria, yet little is known about their origins, mode of generation, or possible function. Here, we present a comprehensive analysis of 18 different previously identified repeated DNA elements, bcr1-bcr18 (Økstad OA, Hegna I, Lindback T, Rishovd AL, Kolstø AB. 1999. Genome organization is not conserved between Bacillus cereus and Bacillus subtilis. Microbiology. 145:621-631.; Tourasse NJ, Helgason E, Økstad OA, Hegna IK, Kolstø AB. 2006. The Bacillus cereus group: novel aspects of population structure and genome dynamics. J Appl Microbiol. 101:579-593.), in 36 sequenced genomes from the Bacillus cereus group of bacteria. This group consists of genetically closely related species with variable pathogenic specificity toward different hosts and includes among others B. anthracis, B. cereus, and B. thuringiensis. The B. cereus group repeat elements could be classified into three categories with different properties: Group A elements (bcr1-bcr3) exhibited highly variable copy numbers ranging from 4 to 116 copies per strain, showed a nonconserved chromosomal distribution pattern between strains, and displayed several features characteristic of mobile elements. Group B repeats (bcr4-bcr6) were present in 0-10 copies per strain and were associated with strain-specific genes and disruptions of genome synteny, implying a possible contribution to genome rearrangements and/or horizontal gene transfer events. bcr5, in particular, was associated with large gene clusters showing resemblance to integrons. In agreement with their potentially mobile nature or involvement in horizontal transfers, the sequences of the repeats from Groups A and B (bcr1-bcr6) followed a phylogeny different from that of the host strains. Conversely, repeats from Group C (bcr7-bcr18) had a conserved chromosomal location and orthologous gene neighbors in the investigated B. cereus group genomes, and their phylogeny matched that of the host

  8. [Toward exploration of morphological disparity of measurable traits of mammalian skull. 1. Interrelation between different forms of group variation].

    PubMed

    Pavlinov, I Ia; Nanova, O G; Spasskaia, N N

    2008-01-01

    Interrelations between some forms of group variation (FGVs) (age, sex, geographic, inter-species, differences among breeds) of 12 to 15 measurable skull traits are studied in 6 mammal species (pine marten, polar fox, Przewalskii horse, and 3 jird species) by means of dispersion analysis (model III, MANOVA). The above FGVs are considered as factors in the MANOVA, and skull traits are considered as dependent variables. To obtaine commeasurables estimates for the FGVs, each of them is assessed numerically as a portion of its dispersion in the entire morphological disparity defined for each character (or a set of characters) by MANOVA. The data obtained indicate a wide diversity of interrelations between FGVs. It is shown that statistical analysis of significance of joint effects of FGVs does not substitute the analysis of numerical interrelations of their dispersion portions. It is concluded that it is unproductive to study such interrelations as simple "statistical regularities" like the Kluge-Kerfoot phenomenon, so the character sets are not to be considered as statistical ensembles. A kind of content-wise null-model for FGVs of measurable traits is formulated according to which there is a "background" age variation while other FGVs are its derivatives. Respectively, other factors structuring the morphological disparity under investigation being absent, a positive correlation between FGVs is to be anticipated (strong succession). With the significant deviations of the postulated correlation being observed, other factors regulating respective FGVs that cannot be reduced to the age variation are to be supposed (weak succession). Possible interpretations of interrelations between age variation and some other FGVs in carnivores are considered. Craniological variation in the Przewalskii horse is just slightly effected by maintenance conditions under its domestication, a significant influence of other factors is to be supposed. Negative correlation between geographic and

  9. 40 CFR 35.4115 - After the public notice that EPA has received an LOI, how much time does my group have to form a...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... ASSISTANCE STATE AND LOCAL ASSISTANCE Grants for Technical Assistance How to Apply for A Tag § 35.4115 After... local newspaper) to submit documentation that you have formed a coalition with the first group and...

  10. Group contribution methodology based on the statistical associating fluid theory for heteronuclear molecules formed from Mie segments.

    PubMed

    Papaioannou, Vasileios; Lafitte, Thomas; Avendaño, Carlos; Adjiman, Claire S; Jackson, George; Müller, Erich A; Galindo, Amparo

    2014-02-07

    A generalization of the recent version of the statistical associating fluid theory for variable range Mie potentials [Lafitte et al., J. Chem. Phys. 139, 154504 (2013)] is formulated within the framework of a group contribution approach (SAFT-γ Mie). Molecules are represented as comprising distinct functional (chemical) groups based on a fused heteronuclear molecular model, where the interactions between segments are described with the Mie (generalized Lennard-Jonesium) potential of variable attractive and repulsive range. A key feature of the new theory is the accurate description of the monomeric group-group interactions by application of a high-temperature perturbation expansion up to third order. The capabilities of the SAFT-γ Mie approach are exemplified by studying the thermodynamic properties of two chemical families, the n-alkanes and the n-alkyl esters, by developing parameters for the methyl, methylene, and carboxylate functional groups (CH3, CH2, and COO). The approach is shown to describe accurately the fluid-phase behavior of the compounds considered with absolute average deviations of 1.20% and 0.42% for the vapor pressure and saturated liquid density, respectively, which represents a clear improvement over other existing SAFT-based group contribution approaches. The use of Mie potentials to describe the group-group interaction is shown to allow accurate simultaneous descriptions of the fluid-phase behavior and second-order thermodynamic derivative properties of the pure fluids based on a single set of group parameters. Furthermore, the application of the perturbation expansion to third order for the description of the reference monomeric fluid improves the predictions of the theory for the fluid-phase behavior of pure components in the near-critical region. The predictive capabilities of the approach stem from its formulation within a group-contribution formalism: predictions of the fluid-phase behavior and thermodynamic derivative properties of

  11. Control Strivings in Attaining Peer-Group Membership and Forming Romantic Relationships among Adolescents with and without Visual Impairment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pfeiffer, Jens P.; Pinquart, Martin

    2011-01-01

    This study compared control striving with regard to two developmental goals in adolescents with visual impairment and sighted peers. A matched-pair design was used with 158 adolescents with visual impairment and 158 sighted peers by using age, gender, habitation (living with ones' parents vs. other forms of living), and socioeconomic status as…

  12. A Validation Study of the Dutch Childhood Trauma Questionnaire-Short Form: Factor Structure, Reliability, and Known-Groups Validity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thombs, Brett D.; Bernstein, David P.; Lobbestael, Jill; Arntz, Arnoud

    2009-01-01

    Objective: The 28-item Childhood Trauma Questionnaire-Short Form (CTQ-SF) has been translated into at least 10 different languages. The validity of translated versions of the CTQ-SF, however, has generally not been examined. The objective of this study was to investigate the factor structure, internal consistency reliability, and known-groups…

  13. Process for depositing thin film layers onto surfaces modified with organic functional groups and products formed thereby

    DOEpatents

    Tarasevich, B.J.; Rieke, P.C.

    1998-06-02

    A method is provided for producing a thin film product, comprising a first step in which an underlying substrate of a first material is provided. The underlying substrate includes a plurality of unmodified sites. The underlying substrate is then chemically modified wherein a plurality of organic functional groups are attached to a plurality of the unmodified sites. The arrangement and type of the functional group used can be selected for the purpose of controlling particular properties of the second material deposited. A thin film layer of at least one second material is then deposited onto the chemically modified underlying substrate. This can be accomplished by connecting the thin film to the underlying substrate by binding the thin film to the functional groups. 5 figs.

  14. Process for depositing thin film layers onto surfaces modified with organic functional groups and products formed thereby

    DOEpatents

    Tarasevich, Barbara J.; Rieke, Peter C.

    1998-01-01

    A method is provided for producing a thin film product, comprising a first step in which an underlying substrate of a first material is provided. The underlying substrate includes a plurality of unmodified sites. The underlying substrate is then chemically modified wherein a plurality of organic functional groups are attached to a plurality of the unmodified sites. The arrangement and type of the functional group used can be selected for the purpose of controlling particular properties of the second material deposited. A thin film layer of at least one second material is then deposited onto the chemically modified underlying substrate. This can be accomplished by connecting the thin film to the underlying substrate by binding the thin film to the functional groups.

  15. Tl(+) showed negligible interaction with inner membrane sulfhydryl groups of rat liver mitochondria, but formed complexes with matrix proteins.

    PubMed

    Korotkov, Sergey M; Brailovskaya, Irina V; Kormilitsyn, Boris N; Furaev, Viktor V

    2014-04-01

    The effects of Tl(+) on protein sulfhydryl (SH) groups, swelling, and respiration of rat liver mitochondria (RLM) were studied in a medium containing TlNO3 and sucrose, or TlNO3 and KNO3 as well as glutamate plus malate, or succinate plus rotenone. Detected with Ellman's reagent, an increase in the content of the SH groups was found in the inner membrane fraction, and a simultaneous decline was found in the content of the matrix-soluble fraction for RLM, incubated and frozen in 25-75 mM TlNO3 . This increase was greater in the medium containing KNO3 regardless of the presence of Ca(2+) . It was eliminated completely for RLM injected in the medium containing TlNO3 and then washed and frozen in the medium containing KNO3 . Calcium-loaded RLM showed increased swelling and decreased respiration. These results suggest that a ligand interaction of Tl(+) with protein SH groups, regardless of the presence of calcium, may underlie the mechanism of thallium toxicity.

  16. Utility of the MMPI-2-RF (Restructured Form) Validity Scales in Detecting Malingering in a Criminal Forensic Setting: A Known-Groups Design

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sellbom, Martin; Toomey, Joseph A.; Wygant, Dustin B.; Kucharski, L. Thomas; Duncan, Scott

    2010-01-01

    The current study examined the utility of the recently released Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory-2 Restructured Form (MMPI-2-RF; Ben-Porath & Tellegen, 2008) validity scales to detect feigned psychopathology in a criminal forensic setting. We used a known-groups design with the Structured Interview of Reported Symptoms (SIRS;…

  17. The Sound and the Sense: Exploring the Collaborative Construction of Free-Form Poetry in the Six-Year-Old Group

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pramling, Niklas

    2010-01-01

    An exploratory study into the collaborative activity of creating a poem in early years education is reported. A group of 6-year-old children and their teacher making free-form poetry are followed for three consecutive lessons. The analytical interest is wide in scope, from looking at the process in terms of the verbal actions of the children and…

  18. Activating the branch-forming splicing pathway by reengineering the ribozyme component of a natural group II intron

    PubMed Central

    Monachello, Dario; Michel, François; Costa, Maria

    2016-01-01

    When assayed in vitro, group IIC self-splicing introns, which target bacterial Rho-independent transcription terminators, generally fail to yield branched products during splicing despite their possessing a seemingly normal branchpoint. Starting with intron O.i.I1 from Oceanobacillus iheyensis, whose crystallographically determined structure lacks branchpoint-containing domain VI, we attempted to determine what makes this intron unfit for in vitro branch formation. A major factor was found to be the length of the helix at the base of domain VI: 4 base pairs (bp) are required for efficient branching, even though a majority of group IIC introns have a 3-bp helix. Equally important for lariat formation is the removal of interactions between ribozyme domains II and VI, which are specific to the second step of splicing. Conversely, mismatching of domain VI and its proposed first-step receptor in subdomain IC1 was found to be detrimental; these data suggest that the intron-encoded protein may promote branch formation partly by modulating the equilibrium between conformations specific to the first and second steps of splicing. As a practical application, we show that by making just two changes to the O.i.I1 ribozyme, it is possible to generate sufficient amounts of lariat intron for the latter to be purified and used in kinetic assays in which folding and reaction are uncoupled. PMID:26769855

  19. [Rapid release fentanyl administration forms. Comments of the Working Group on Tumor Pain of the German Pain Society].

    PubMed

    Wirz, S; Wiese, C H R; Zimmermann, M; Junker, U; Heuser-Grannemann, E; Schenk, M

    2013-02-01

    The spectrum of indications for rapid release fentanyl preparations is controversial. For this reason the Working Group on Tumor Pain will formulate comments on how to deal with these substances. Breakthrough pain should receive individualized therapy; therefore, the use of opioids of various galenic formulations seems to be advisable. New rapid release fentanyl preparations are suitable for alleviating spontaneous breakthrough pain in tumor patients due to a rapid but short-acting effect. However, a prior optimization of the analgesic basis medication is absolutely necessary. Uncontrolled prescription for non-cancer pain must be criticized due to the problem of addiction. The medical profession should be informed about the benefits of rapid release fentanyl preparations but must also be made aware of the risk of a rapid development of addiction and tolerance. A self-commitment of the pharmaceutical industry to waive advertising for the dangerous off-label use would be desirable. In the opinion of the Working Group on Tumor Pain the use of fentanyl should be openly discussed and further scientific investigations are imperative with the aim of formulating clear recommendations.

  20. Group 1 metabotropic glutamate receptors 1 and 5 form a protein complex in mouse hippocampus and cortex

    PubMed Central

    Pandya, Nikhil J.; Klaassen, Remco V.; van der Schors, Roel C.; Slotman, Johan A.; Houtsmuller, Adriaan; Smit, August B.

    2016-01-01

    The group 1 metabotropic glutamate receptors 1 and 5 (mGluR1/5) have been implicated in mechanisms of synaptic plasticity and may serve as potential therapeutic targets in autism spectrum disorders. The interactome of group 1 mGluRs has remained largely unresolved. Using a knockout‐controlled interaction proteomics strategy we examined the mGluR5 protein complex in two brain regions, hippocampus and cortex, and identified mGluR1 as its major interactor in addition to the well described Homer proteins. We confirmed the presence of mGluR1/5 complex by (i) reverse immunoprecipitation using an mGluR1 antibody to pulldown mGluR5 from hippocampal tissue, (ii) coexpression in HEK293 cells followed by coimmunoprecipitation to reveal the direct interaction of mGluR1 and 5, and (iii) superresolution microscopy imaging of hippocampal primary neurons to show colocalization of the mGluR1/5 in the synapse. PMID:27392515

  1. Activating the branch-forming splicing pathway by reengineering the ribozyme component of a natural group II intron.

    PubMed

    Monachello, Dario; Michel, François; Costa, Maria

    2016-03-01

    When assayed in vitro, group IIC self-splicing introns, which target bacterial Rho-independent transcription terminators, generally fail to yield branched products during splicing despite their possessing a seemingly normal branchpoint. Starting with intron O.i.I1 from Oceanobacillus iheyensis, whose crystallographically determined structure lacks branchpoint-containing domain VI, we attempted to determine what makes this intron unfit for in vitro branch formation. A major factor was found to be the length of the helix at the base of domain VI: 4 base pairs (bp) are required for efficient branching, even though a majority of group IIC introns have a 3-bp helix. Equally important for lariat formation is the removal of interactions between ribozyme domains II and VI, which are specific to the second step of splicing. Conversely, mismatching of domain VI and its proposed first-step receptor in subdomain IC1 was found to be detrimental; these data suggest that the intron-encoded protein may promote branch formation partly by modulating the equilibrium between conformations specific to the first and second steps of splicing. As a practical application, we show that by making just two changes to the O.i.I1 ribozyme, it is possible to generate sufficient amounts of lariat intron for the latter to be purified and used in kinetic assays in which folding and reaction are uncoupled.

  2. The IAB Iron-Meteorite Complex: A Group, Five Subgroups, Numerous Grouplets, Closely Related, Mainly Formed by Crystal Segregation in Rapidly Cooling Melts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wasson, J. T.; Kallemeyn, G. W.

    2002-01-01

    We present new data or iron meteorites that are members of group IAB or are closely related to this large group, and we have also reevaluated some of our earlier data for these irons. In the past it was not possible to distinguish IAB and IIICD irons on the basis of their positions on element-Ni diagrams. We now find that plotting, the new and revised data yields six sets of compact fields on element-Au diagrams, each set corresponding to a compositional group. The largest set includes the majority (approximately equal to 70) of irons previously designated IA: We christened this set the IAB main group. The remaining five sets we designate subgroups within the IAB complex. Three of these subgroups have Au contents similar to the main group, and form parallel trends in most element-Ni diagrams. The groups originally designated IIIC and IIID are two of these subgroups: they are now well resolved from each other and from the main group. The other low-Au subgroup has Ni contents just above the main group. Two other IAB subgroups have appreciably higher Au contents than the main group and show weaker compositional links to it. We have named these five subgroups on the basis of their Au and Ni contents. The three subgroups having Au contents similar to the main group are the low-Au (L) subgroups the two others the high-Au (H) subgroups. The Ni contents are designated high (H), medium (M), or low (L). Thus the old group IIID is now the sLH subgroup. the old group IIIC is the sLM subgroup. In addition, eight irons assigned to two grouplets plot between sLL and sLM on most element-Au diagrams. A large number (27) of related irons plot outside these compact fields but nonetheless appear to be sufficiently related to also be included in the IAB complex.

  3. CD4+ group 1 innate lymphoid cells form a functionally distinct ILC subset that is increased in systemic sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Whalen, Elizabeth; Molitor, Jerry A.; Bluestone, Jeffrey A.; Buckner, Jane H.; Ziegler, Steven F.

    2016-01-01

    Innate lymphoid cells (ILC) are a heterogeneous group of cellular subsets that produce large amounts of T cell-associated cytokines in response to innate stimulation in the absence of antigen. In this study, we define distinct patterns of surface marker and cytokine expression among the ILC subsets that may further delineate their migration and function. Most notably, we found that the subset previously defined as ILC1 contains CD4+ CD8−, CD4− CD8+ and CD4− CD8− populations. Although all ILC1 subsets shared characteristics with Th1 cells, CD4+ ILC1 also demonstrated significant phenotypic and functional heterogeneity. We also show that the frequencies of CD4+ ILC1 and NKp44+ ILC3, but not CD4− ILC1 or ILC2, are increased in the peripheral blood of individuals with systemic sclerosis (SSc), a disease characterized by fibrotic and vascular pathology as well as immune dysregulation. Furthermore, we demonstrate that CD4+ and CD4− ILC1 are functionally divergent based on their IL-6Rα expression, and that the frequency of IL-6Rα expression on ILC is altered in SSc. The distinct phenotypic and functional features of CD4+ and CD4− ILC1 suggest that they may have differing roles in the pathogenesis of immune-mediated diseases such as systemic sclerosis. PMID:26826243

  4. DNA polymerase gene sequences indicate western and forest tent caterpillar viruses form a new taxonomic group within baculoviruses.

    PubMed

    Nielsen, Cydney B; Cooper, Dawn; Short, Steven M; Myers, Judith H; Suttle, Curtis A

    2002-11-01

    Baculoviruses infect larval lepidopterans, and thus have potential value as microbial controls of agricultural and forest pests. Understanding their genetic relatedness and host specificity is relevant to the risk assessment of viral insecticides if non-target impacts are to be avoided. DNA polymerase gene sequences have been demonstrated to be useful for inferring genetic relatedness among dsDNA viruses. We have adopted this approach to examine the relatedness among natural isolates of two uncharacterized caterpillar-infecting baculoviruses, Malacosoma californicum pluviale nucleopolyhedrovirus (McplMNPV) and Malacosoma disstria nucleopolyhedrovirus (MadiMNPV), which infect two closely related host species with little to no cross-infectivity. We designed two degenerate primers (BVP1 and BVP2) based on protein motifs conserved among baculoviruses. McplMNPV and MadiMNPV viral DNA was obtained from naturally infected caterpillars collected from geographically distinct sites in the Southern Gulf Islands and Prince George regions of British Columbia, Canada. Sequencing of 0.9 kb PCR amplicons from six McplMNPV and six MadiMNPV isolates obtained from a total of eight sites, revealed very low nucleotide variation among McplMNPV isolates (99.2-100% nucleotide identity) and among MadiMNPV isolates (98.9-100% nucleotide identity). Greater nucleotide variation was observed between viral isolates from the two different caterpillar species (only 84.7-86.1% nucleotide identity). Both maximum parsimony and maximum likelihood phylogenetic analyses support placement of McplMNPV and MadiMNPV in a clade that is distinct from other groups of baculoviruses.

  5. Chain structures of surface hydroxyl groups formed via line oxygen vacancies on TiO2(110) surfaces studied using noncontact atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Namai, Yoshimichi; Matsuoka, Osamu

    2005-12-22

    Structures of surface hydroxyl groups arranged on a reduced TiO2(110) surface that had line oxygen vacancies were studied using noncontact atomic force microscopy (NC-AFM). NC-AFM results revealed that by increasing the density of oxygen vacancies on the TiO2(110) surface, line oxygen vacancies were formed by removal of oxygen atoms in a bridge oxygen row on the TiO2(110) surface. After the TiO2(110) surface with the line oxygen vacancies was exposed to water, the surface showed hydroxyl chain structures that were composed of hydroxyl groups linearly arranged in a form of two rows on the line oxygen vacancies and on a neighboring bridge oxygen row. In-situ NC-AFM measurements of these surfaces exposed to water at room temperature revealed that hydroxyl chain structures were formed at the line oxygen vacancy. Annealing above 500 K was sufficient to remove the hydroxyl chain structures on the TiO2(110) surface and allowed line oxygen vacancies to reappear on the surface. The line oxygen vacancies are active sites for water dissociation. In conclusion, the formation of the hydroxyl chain structure suggests that the surface hydroxyl groups on a TiO2(110) surface can be controlled by preparing oxygen vacancy structures on the surface.

  6. A group 6 late embryogenesis abundant protein from common bean is a disordered protein with extended helical structure and oligomer-forming properties.

    PubMed

    Rivera-Najera, Lucero Y; Saab-Rincón, Gloria; Battaglia, Marina; Amero, Carlos; Pulido, Nancy O; García-Hernández, Enrique; Solórzano, Rosa M; Reyes, José L; Covarrubias, Alejandra A

    2014-11-14

    Late embryogenesis-abundant proteins accumulate to high levels in dry seeds. Some of them also accumulate in response to water deficit in vegetative tissues, which leads to a remarkable association between their presence and low water availability conditions. A major sub-group of these proteins, also known as typical LEA proteins, shows high hydrophilicity and a high percentage of glycine and other small amino acid residues, distinctive physicochemical properties that predict a high content of structural disorder. Although all typical LEA proteins share these characteristics, seven groups can be distinguished by sequence similarity, indicating structural and functional diversity among them. Some of these groups have been extensively studied; however, others require a more detailed analysis to advance in their functional understanding. In this work, we report the structural characterization of a group 6 LEA protein from a common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) (PvLEA6) by circular dichroism and nuclear magnetic resonance showing that it is a disordered protein in aqueous solution. Using the same techniques, we show that despite its unstructured nature, the addition of trifluoroethanol exhibited an intrinsic potential in this protein to gain helicity. This property was also promoted by high osmotic potentials or molecular crowding. Furthermore, we demonstrate that PvLEA6 protein is able to form soluble homo-oligomeric complexes that also show high levels of structural disorder. The association between PvLEA6 monomers to form dimers was shown to occur in plant cells by bimolecular fluorescence complementation, pointing to the in vivo functional relevance of this association.

  7. A Group 6 Late Embryogenesis Abundant Protein from Common Bean Is a Disordered Protein with Extended Helical Structure and Oligomer-forming Properties*

    PubMed Central

    Rivera-Najera, Lucero Y.; Saab-Rincón, Gloria; Battaglia, Marina; Amero, Carlos; Pulido, Nancy O.; García-Hernández, Enrique; Solórzano, Rosa M.; Reyes, José L.; Covarrubias, Alejandra A.

    2014-01-01

    Late embryogenesis-abundant proteins accumulate to high levels in dry seeds. Some of them also accumulate in response to water deficit in vegetative tissues, which leads to a remarkable association between their presence and low water availability conditions. A major sub-group of these proteins, also known as typical LEA proteins, shows high hydrophilicity and a high percentage of glycine and other small amino acid residues, distinctive physicochemical properties that predict a high content of structural disorder. Although all typical LEA proteins share these characteristics, seven groups can be distinguished by sequence similarity, indicating structural and functional diversity among them. Some of these groups have been extensively studied; however, others require a more detailed analysis to advance in their functional understanding. In this work, we report the structural characterization of a group 6 LEA protein from a common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) (PvLEA6) by circular dichroism and nuclear magnetic resonance showing that it is a disordered protein in aqueous solution. Using the same techniques, we show that despite its unstructured nature, the addition of trifluoroethanol exhibited an intrinsic potential in this protein to gain helicity. This property was also promoted by high osmotic potentials or molecular crowding. Furthermore, we demonstrate that PvLEA6 protein is able to form soluble homo-oligomeric complexes that also show high levels of structural disorder. The association between PvLEA6 monomers to form dimers was shown to occur in plant cells by bimolecular fluorescence complementation, pointing to the in vivo functional relevance of this association. PMID:25271167

  8. First-principles investigation on the electronic efficiency and binding energy of the contacts formed by graphene and poly-aromatic hydrocarbon anchoring groups

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Yang; Tu, Xingchen; Wang, Hao; Hou, Shimin; Sanvito, Stefano

    2015-04-28

    The electronic efficiency and binding energy of contacts formed between graphene electrodes and poly-aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) anchoring groups have been investigated by the non-equilibrium Green’s function formalism combined with density functional theory. Our calculations show that PAH molecules always bind in the interior and at the edge of graphene in the AB stacking manner, and that the binding energy increases following the increase of the number of carbon and hydrogen atoms constituting the PAH molecule. When we move to analyzing the electronic transport properties of molecular junctions with a six-carbon alkyne chain as the central molecule, the electronic efficiency of the graphene-PAH contacts is found to depend on the energy gap between the highest occupied molecular orbital (HOMO) and the lowest unoccupied molecular orbital (LUMO) of the corresponding PAH anchoring group, rather than its size. To be specific, the smaller is the HOMO-LUMO gap of the PAH anchoring group, the higher is the electronic efficiency of the graphene-PAH contact. Although the HOMO-LUMO gap of a PAH molecule depends on its specific configuration, PAH molecules with similar atomic structures show a decreasing trend for their HOMO-LUMO gap as the number of fused benzene rings increases. Therefore, graphene-conjugated molecule-graphene junctions with high-binding and high-conducting graphene-PAH contacts can be realized by choosing appropriate PAH anchor groups with a large area and a small HOMO-LUMO gap.

  9. A theory of moving form perception: Synergy between masking, perceptual grouping, and motion computation in retinotopic and non-retinotopic representations

    PubMed Central

    Öğmen, Haluk

    2008-01-01

    Because object and self-motion are ubiquitous in natural viewing conditions, understanding how the human visual system achieves a relatively clear perception for moving objects is a fundamental problem in visual perception. Several studies have shown that the visible persistence of a briefly presented stationary stimulus is approximately 120 ms under normal viewing conditions. Based on this duration of visible persistence, we would expect moving objects to appear highly blurred. However, in human vision, objects in motion typically appear relatively sharp and clear. We suggest that clarity of form in dynamic viewing is achieved by a synergy between masking, perceptual grouping, and motion computation across retinotopic and non-retinotopic representations. We also argue that dissociations observed in masking are essential to create and maintain this synergy. PMID:20517499

  10. Residues of the human nuclear vitamin D receptor that form hydrogen bonding interactions with the three hydroxyl groups of 1alpha,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3.

    PubMed

    Reddy, Madhuri D; Stoynova, Ludmilla; Acevedo, Alejandra; Collins, Elaine D

    2007-03-01

    Most of the biological effects of 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D(3) (hormone D) are mediated through the nuclear vitamin D receptor (VDR). Hormone binding induces conformational changes in VDR that enable the receptor to activate gene transcription. It is known that residues S237 and R274 form hydrogen bonds with the 1-hydroxyl group of hormone D, while residues Y143 and S278, and residues H305 and H397 form hydrogen bonds with the 3-hydroxyl and the 25-hydroxyl groups of the hormone. A series of VDR mutations were constructed (S237A, R274A, R274Q, Y143F, Y143A, S278A, H305A, and H397F; double mutants: S237A/R274A, Y143F/S278A, Y143A/S278A, and H305A/H397F). The relative binding affinities of the wild-type and variant VDRs were assessed. All of the mutants except H397F resulted in lower binding affinity compared to wild-type VDR. Binding to hormone was barely detectable in Y143F, H305A, and H305A/H397F mutants, and undetectable in mutants R274A, R274Q, Y143A, S237A/R274A, and Y143A/S278A, indicating the importance of these residues. Ability to activate gene transcription was also assessed. All of the VDR mutants, except the single mutant S278A, required higher doses of hormone D for half-maximal response. Defining the role of hormone D-VDR binding will lead to a better understanding of the vitamin D signal transduction pathway.

  11. Preparation of a technology development roadmap for the Accelerator Transmutation of Waste (ATW) System : report of the ATW separations technologies and waste forms technical working group.

    SciTech Connect

    Collins, E.; Duguid, J.; Henry, R.; Karell, E.; Laidler, J.; McDeavitt, S.; Thompson, M.; Toth, M.; Williamson, M.; Willit, J.

    1999-08-12

    In response to a Congressional mandate to prepare a roadmap for the development of Accelerator Transmutation of Waste (ATW) technology, a Technical Working Group comprised of members from various DOE laboratories was convened in March 1999 for the purpose of preparing that part of the technology development roadmap dealing with the separation of certain radionuclides for transmutation and the disposal of residual radioactive wastes from these partitioning operations. The Technical Working Group for ATW Separations Technologies and Waste Forms completed its work in June 1999, having carefully considered the technology options available. A baseline process flowsheet and backup process were identified for initial emphasis in a future research, development and demonstration program. The baseline process combines aqueous and pyrochemical processes to permit the efficient separation of the uranium, technetium, iodine and transuranic elements from the light water reactor (LWR) fuel in the head-end step. The backup process is an all- pyrochemical system. In conjunction with the aqueous process, the baseline flowsheet includes a pyrochemical process to prepare the transuranic material for fabrication of the ATW fuel assemblies. For the internal ATW fuel cycle the baseline process specifies another pyrochemical process to extract the transuranic elements, Tc and 1 from the ATW fuel. Fission products not separated for transmutation and trace amounts of actinide elements would be directed to two high-level waste forms, one a zirconium-based alloy and the other a glass/sodalite composite. Baseline cost and schedule estimates are provided for a RD&D program that would provide a full-scale demonstration of the complete separations and waste production flowsheet within 20 years.

  12. A Hubble Space Telescope Treasury Study of Star-forming Regions in the Local Group. II. Young Stellar Populations in M31

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bianchi, Luciana; Efremova, Boryana; Hodge, Paul; Kang, Yongbeom

    2012-11-01

    We studied the young stellar populations of 22 star-forming regions in the Andromeda galaxy (M31), with Hubble Space Telescope (HST) multi-band imaging from far-UV to I. The regions were selected from Galaxy Evolution Explorer (GALEX) wide-field far-UV imaging; they sample different environments and galactocentric distances from 6 to 22 kpc. They were imaged with 30 HST fields (360 distinct images, in six bandpasses), with a pixel scale of 0.38 pc projected on the sky, at the distance of M31. This study is part of HST treasury survey program HST-GO-11079, which includes star-forming regions in eight Local Group galaxies. We provide a merged catalog of six-band stellar photometry in the 30 M31 fields, containing 118,036 sources brighter than V and B ~ 23 mag. Each HST field covers about 0.3 kpc2 in M31, and contains up to ~7000 stars, of which the number varies by a factor of >7 among the target regions; a large fraction of the sample are hot massive stars, due to our choice of filters and exposures. We derived stellar physical parameters and interstellar extinction for individual sources by spectral energy distribution analysis with model-atmosphere colors, and used the results to infer ages, massive stars content, and extinction of the star-forming regions. Reddening is up to E(B - V) <~ 0.6 mag in some OB associations, and lowest in the outermost regions (average of lsim0.12 mag in OB184 at 21.9 kpc). We examined the spatial distribution (clustering) of the hot massive stars, and defined OB associations on various spatial scales from compact to wider, more spread out ones. A hierarchical structuring is observed, with small compact groups arranged within large complexes. Their areas vary from less than 10 to 105 pc2, and masses are up to ≈105 M ⊙, in the scales sampled by our analysis. Their cumulative mass distribution follows a power law, at least in part of the sampled regime. Hot-star counts in the young regions compare very well with integrated

  13. Identification of dusty massive stars in star-forming dwarf irregular galaxies in the Local Group with mid-IR photometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Britavskiy, N. E.; Bonanos, A. Z.; Mehner, A.; Boyer, M. L.; McQuinn, K. B. W.

    2015-12-01

    Context. Increasing the statistics of spectroscopically confirmed evolved massive stars in the Local Group enables the investigation of the mass loss phenomena that occur in these stars in the late stages of their evolution. Aims: We aim to complete the census of luminous mid-IR sources in star-forming dwarf irregular (dIrr) galaxies of the Local Group. To achieve this we employed mid-IR photometric selection criteria to identify evolved massive stars, such as red supergiants (RSGs) and luminous blue variables (LBVs), by using the fact that these types of stars have infrared excess due to dust. Methods: The method is based on 3.6 μm and 4.5 μm photometry from archival Spitzer Space Telescope images of nearby galaxies. We applied our criteria to four dIrr galaxies: Pegasus, Phoenix, Sextans A, and WLM, selecting 79 point sources that we observed with the VLT/FORS2 spectrograph in multi-object spectroscopy mode. Results: We identified 13 RSGs, of which 6 are new discoveries, as well as two new emission line stars, and one candidate yellow supergiant. Among the other observed objects we identified carbon stars, foreground giants, and background objects, such as a quasar and an early-type galaxy that contaminate our survey. We use the results of our spectroscopic survey to revise the mid-IR and optical selection criteria for identifying RSGs from photometric measurements. The optical selection criteria are more efficient in separating extragalactic RSGs from foreground giants than mid-IR selection criteria, but the mid-IR selection criteria are useful for identifying dusty stars in the Local Group. This work serves as a basis for further investigation of the newly discovered dusty massive stars and their host galaxies. Based on observations made with ESO Telescopes at the La Silla Paranal Observatory under programme IDs 090.D-0009 and 091.D-0010.Appendix A is available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  14. High Degree of HIV-1 Group M (HIV-1M) Genetic Diversity within Circulating Recombinant Forms: Insight into the Early Events of HIV-1M Evolution.

    PubMed

    Tongo, Marcel; Dorfman, Jeffrey R; Martin, Darren P

    2015-12-09

    The existence of various highly divergent HIV-1 lineages and of recombination-derived sequence tracts of indeterminate origin within established circulating recombinant forms (CRFs) strongly suggests that HIV-1 group M (HIV-1M) diversity is not fully represented under the current classification system. Here we used a fully exploratory screen for recombination on a set of 480 near-full-length genomes representing the full known diversity of HIV-1M. We decomposed recombinant sequences into their constituent parts and then used maximum-likelihood phylogenetic analyses of this mostly recombination-free data set to identify rare divergent sequence lineages that fall outside the major named HIV-1M taxonomic groupings. We found that many of the sequence fragments occurring within CRFs (including CRF04_cpx, CRF06_cpx, CRF11_cpx, CRF18_cpx, CRF25_cpx, CRF27_cpx, and CRF49_cpx) are in fact likely derived from divergent unclassified parental lineages that may predate the current subtypes, even though they are presently identified as derived from currently defined HIV-1M subtypes. Our evidence suggests that some of these CRFs are descended predominantly from what were or are major previously unidentified HIV-1M lineages that were likely epidemiologically relevant during the early stages of the HIV-1M epidemic. The restriction of these divergent lineages to the Congo basin suggests that they were less infectious and/or simply not present at the time and place of the initial migratory wave that triggered the global epidemic.IMPORTANCE HIV-1 group M (HIV-1M) likely spread to the rest of the world from the Congo basin in the mid-1900s (N. R. Faria et al., Science 346:56-61, 2014, http://dx.doi.org/10.1126/science.1256739) and is today the principal cause of the AIDS pandemic. Here, we show that large sequence fragments from several HIV-1M circulating recombinant forms (CRFs) are derived from divergent parental lineages that cannot reasonably be classified within the nine

  15. High Degree of HIV-1 Group M (HIV-1M) Genetic Diversity within Circulating Recombinant Forms: Insight into the Early Events of HIV-1M Evolution

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT The existence of various highly divergent HIV-1 lineages and of recombination-derived sequence tracts of indeterminate origin within established circulating recombinant forms (CRFs) strongly suggests that HIV-1 group M (HIV-1M) diversity is not fully represented under the current classification system. Here we used a fully exploratory screen for recombination on a set of 480 near-full-length genomes representing the full known diversity of HIV-1M. We decomposed recombinant sequences into their constituent parts and then used maximum-likelihood phylogenetic analyses of this mostly recombination-free data set to identify rare divergent sequence lineages that fall outside the major named HIV-1M taxonomic groupings. We found that many of the sequence fragments occurring within CRFs (including CRF04_cpx, CRF06_cpx, CRF11_cpx, CRF18_cpx, CRF25_cpx, CRF27_cpx, and CRF49_cpx) are in fact likely derived from divergent unclassified parental lineages that may predate the current subtypes, even though they are presently identified as derived from currently defined HIV-1M subtypes. Our evidence suggests that some of these CRFs are descended predominantly from what were or are major previously unidentified HIV-1M lineages that were likely epidemiologically relevant during the early stages of the HIV-1M epidemic. The restriction of these divergent lineages to the Congo basin suggests that they were less infectious and/or simply not present at the time and place of the initial migratory wave that triggered the global epidemic. IMPORTANCE HIV-1 group M (HIV-1M) likely spread to the rest of the world from the Congo basin in the mid-1900s (N. R. Faria et al., Science 346:56–61, 2014, http://dx.doi.org/10.1126/science.1256739) and is today the principal cause of the AIDS pandemic. Here, we show that large sequence fragments from several HIV-1M circulating recombinant forms (CRFs) are derived from divergent parental lineages that cannot reasonably be classified within the

  16. A Treasury Study of Star-forming Regions in the Local Group. I. HST Photometry of Young Populations in Six Dwarf Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bianchi, Luciana; Efremova, Boryana; Hodge, Paul; Massey, Philip; Olsen, K. A. G.

    2012-03-01

    We present a comprehensive study of young stellar populations in six dwarf galaxies in or near the Local Group: Phoenix, Pegasus, Sextans A, Sextans B, WLM, and NGC 6822. Their star-forming regions, selected from GALEX wide-field far-UV imaging, were imaged (at sub-pc resolution) with the WFPC2 camera on board the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) in six bandpasses from far-UV to I to detect and characterize their hot massive star content. This study is part of HST treasury survey program HST-GO-11079; the general data characteristics and reduction procedures are detailed in this paper and results are presented for the first six galaxies. From a total of 180 HST images, we provide catalogs of the multi-band stellar photometry and derive the physical parameters of massive stars by analyzing it with model-atmosphere colors. We use the results to infer ages, number of massive stars, extinction, and spatial characteristics of the young stellar populations. The hot massive star content varies largely across our galaxy sample, from an inconspicuous presence in Phoenix and Pegasus to the highest relative abundance of young massive stars in Sextans A and WLM. Albeit to a largely varying extent, most galaxies show a very young population (a few Myrs, except for Phoenix), and older ones (a few 107 years in Sextans A, Sextans B, NGC 6822, and WLM, ~108yr in Phoenix and Pegasus), suggesting discrete bursts of recent star formation in the mapped regions. The hot massive star content (indicative of the young populations) broadly correlates with the total galaxy stellar mass represented by the integrated optical magnitude, although it varies by a factor of ~3 between Sextans A, WLM, and Sextans B, which have similar MV . Extinction properties are also derived.

  17. A TREASURY STUDY OF STAR-FORMING REGIONS IN THE LOCAL GROUP. I. HST PHOTOMETRY OF YOUNG POPULATIONS IN SIX DWARF GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Bianchi, Luciana; Efremova, Boryana; Hodge, Paul; Massey, Philip; Olsen, K. A. G.

    2012-03-15

    We present a comprehensive study of young stellar populations in six dwarf galaxies in or near the Local Group: Phoenix, Pegasus, Sextans A, Sextans B, WLM, and NGC 6822. Their star-forming regions, selected from GALEX wide-field far-UV imaging, were imaged (at sub-pc resolution) with the WFPC2 camera on board the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) in six bandpasses from far-UV to I to detect and characterize their hot massive star content. This study is part of HST treasury survey program HST-GO-11079; the general data characteristics and reduction procedures are detailed in this paper and results are presented for the first six galaxies. From a total of 180 HST images, we provide catalogs of the multi-band stellar photometry and derive the physical parameters of massive stars by analyzing it with model-atmosphere colors. We use the results to infer ages, number of massive stars, extinction, and spatial characteristics of the young stellar populations. The hot massive star content varies largely across our galaxy sample, from an inconspicuous presence in Phoenix and Pegasus to the highest relative abundance of young massive stars in Sextans A and WLM. Albeit to a largely varying extent, most galaxies show a very young population (a few Myrs, except for Phoenix), and older ones (a few 10{sup 7} years in Sextans A, Sextans B, NGC 6822, and WLM, {approx}10{sup 8}yr in Phoenix and Pegasus), suggesting discrete bursts of recent star formation in the mapped regions. The hot massive star content (indicative of the young populations) broadly correlates with the total galaxy stellar mass represented by the integrated optical magnitude, although it varies by a factor of {approx}3 between Sextans A, WLM, and Sextans B, which have similar M{sub V}. Extinction properties are also derived.

  18. Spent Fuel Working Group report on inventory and storage of the Department`s spent nuclear fuel and other reactor irradiated nuclear materials and their environmental, safety and health vulnerabilities. Volume 2, Working Group Assessment Team reports; Vulnerability development forms; Working group documents

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-11-01

    The Secretary of Energy`s memorandum of August 19, 1993, established an initiative for a Department-wide assessment of the vulnerabilities of stored spent nuclear fuel and other reactor irradiated nuclear materials. A Project Plan to accomplish this study was issued on September 20, 1993 by US Department of Energy, Office of Environment, Health and Safety (EH) which established responsibilities for personnel essential to the study. The DOE Spent Fuel Working Group, which was formed for this purpose and produced the Project Plan, will manage the assessment and produce a report for the Secretary by November 20, 1993. This report was prepared by the Working Group Assessment Team assigned to the Hanford Site facilities. Results contained in this report will be reviewed, along with similar reports from all other selected DOE storage sites, by a working group review panel which will assemble the final summary report to the Secretary on spent nuclear fuel storage inventory and vulnerability.

  19. The Cost-Effectiveness of Two Forms of Case Management Compared to a Control Group for Persons with Dementia and Their Informal Caregivers from a Societal Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Eekhout, Iris; Joling, Karlijn J.; van Mierlo, Lisa D.; Meiland, Franka J. M.; van Hout, Hein P. J.; de Rooij, Sophia E.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives The objective of this article was to compare the costs and cost-effectiveness of the two most prominent types of case management in the Netherlands (intensive case management and linkage models) against no access to case management (control group) for people with already diagnosed dementia and their informal caregivers. Methods The economic evaluation was conducted from a societal perspective embedded within a two year prospective, observational, controlled, cohort study with 521 informal caregivers and community-dwelling persons with dementia. Case management provided within one care organization (intensive case management model, ICMM), case management where care was provided by different care organizations within one region (Linkage model, LM), and a group with no access to case management (control) were compared. The economic evaluation related incremental costs to incremental effects regarding neuropsychiatric symptoms (NPI), psychological health of the informal caregiver (GHQ-12), and quality adjusted life years (QALY) of the person with dementia and informal caregiver. Results Inverse-propensity-score-weighted models showed no significant differences in clinical or total cost outcomes between the three groups. Informal care costs were significantly lower in the ICMM group compared to both other groups. Day center costs were significantly lower in the ICMM group compared to the control group. For all outcomes, the probability that the ICMM was cost-effective in comparison with LM and the control group was larger than 0.97 at a threshold ratio of 0 €/incremental unit of effect. Conclusion This study provides preliminary evidence that the ICMM is cost-effective compared to the control group and the LM. However, the findings should be interpreted with caution since this study was not a randomized controlled trial. PMID:27655234

  20. A chiral 2,6-bis(oxazolinyl)pyridine ligand with amide groups to form isomorphous complexes through all the lanthanoid series.

    PubMed

    Matsumoto, Kenji; Suzuki, Keita; Tsukuda, Toshiaki; Tsubomura, Taro

    2010-06-07

    We newly synthesized the chiral pybox ligand, 2,6-bis[(4S)-tert-butylcarbamoyl-2-oxazolin-2-yl]pyridine, whose lanthanoid(III) complexes have formed isomorphous crystals through all the lanthanoid series. The luminescence properties of the Eu(III) complex have been investigated.

  1. Infant hybrids in a newly formed mixed-species group of howler monkeys (Alouatta guariba clamitans and Alouatta caraya) in northeastern Argentina.

    PubMed

    Agostini, Ilaria; Holzmann, Ingrid; Di Bitetti, Mario S

    2008-10-01

    Natural hybridisation between species has been reported in several primate taxa. In the Neotropics, there is increasing evidence of this phenomenon in howler monkeys (genus Alouatta) in contact zones between species. We describe the first known case of formation of a mixed-species group, and two cases of putative infant hybrids between the brown howler (Alouatta guariba clamitans) and the black howler (A. caraya) in Misiones, Argentina. For 2 years, we followed a group consisting of one adult male and two adult female brown howlers and one adult female black howler. The adult female black howler was observed to copulate twice with brown howler males, and never with black howler males. In December 2006, this female was carrying an infant with a hybrid morphotype. This infant died at approximately 1.5 months of age. In November 2007, the same female had another putative hybrid newborn. This infant male died together with all members of his group during a yellow fever outbreak in early 2008. The lower frequency of mixed-species groups and hybrids at our site compared with other contact zones reported in the literature, suggests that the incidence of natural hybridisation between howler species differs depending on local factors such as population demography and landscape fragmentation.

  2. Weak hydrogen bonds formed by thiol groups in N-acetyl-(L)-cysteine and their response to the crystal structure distortion on increasing pressure.

    PubMed

    Minkov, Vasily S; Boldyreva, Elena V

    2013-11-21

    The effect of hydrostatic pressure on single crystals of N-acetyl-l-cysteine was followed at multiple pressure points from 10(-4) to 6.2 GPa with a pressure step of 0.2-0.3 GPa by Raman spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction. Since in the crystals of N-acetyl-l-cysteine the thiol group is involved in intermolecular hydrogen bonds not as a donor only (bonds S-H···O) but also as an acceptor (bonds N-H···S), increasing the pressure does not result in phase transitions. This makes a contrast with the polymorphs of l- and dl-cysteine, in which multiple phase transitions are observed already at relatively low hydrostatic pressures and are related to the changes in the conformation of the thiol side chains only weakly bound to the neighboring molecules in the structure and thus easily switching over the weak S-H···O and S-H···S hydrogen bonds. No phase transitions occur in N-acetyl-l-cysteine with increasing pressure, and changes in cell parameters and volume vs pressure do not reveal any peculiar features. Nevertheless, a more detailed analysis of the changes in intermolecular distances, in particular, of the geometric parameters of the hydrogen bonds based on X-ray single crystal diffraction analysis, complemented by an equally detailed study of the positions of all the significant bands in Raman spectra, allowed us to study the fine details of subtle changes in the hydrogen bond network. Thus, as pressure increases, a continuous shift of the hydrogen atom of the thiol group from one acceptor (a carboxyl group) to another acceptor (a carbonyl group) is observed. Precise single-crystal X-ray diffraction and polarized Raman spectroscopy structural data reveal the formation of a bifurcated S-H···O hydrogen bond with increasing pressure starting with ∼1.5 GPa. The analysis of the vibrational bands in Raman spectra has shown that different donor and acceptor groups start "feeling" the formation of the bifurcated S-H···O hydrogen bond in different pressure

  3. Bacillus amyloliquefaciens, Bacillus velezensis, and Bacillus siamensis Form an “Operational Group B. amyloliquefaciens” within the B. subtilis Species Complex

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Ben; Blom, Jochen; Klenk, Hans-Peter; Borriss, Rainer

    2017-01-01

    The plant growth promoting model bacterium FZB42T was proposed as the type strain of Bacillus amyloliquefaciens subsp. plantarum (Borriss et al., 2011), but has been recently recognized as being synonymous to Bacillus velezensis due to phylogenomic analysis (Dunlap C. et al., 2016). However, until now, majority of publications consider plant-associated close relatives of FZB42 still as “B. amyloliquefaciens.” Here, we reinvestigated the taxonomic status of FZB42 and related strains in its context to the free-living soil bacterium DSM7T, the type strain of B. amyloliquefaciens. We identified 66 bacterial genomes from the NCBI data bank with high similarity to DSM7T. Dendrograms based on complete rpoB nucleotide sequences and on core genome sequences, respectively, clustered into a clade consisting of three tightly linked branches: (1) B. amyloliquefaciens, (2) Bacillus siamensis, and (3) a conspecific group containing the type strains of B. velezensis, Bacillus methylotrophicus, and B. amyloliquefaciens subsp. plantarum. The three monophyletic clades shared a common mutation rate of 0.01 substitutions per nucleotide position, but were distantly related to Bacillus subtilis (0.1 substitutions per nucleotide position). The tight relatedness of the three clusters was corroborated by TETRA, dDDH, ANI, and AAI analysis of the core genomes, but dDDH and ANI values were found slightly below species level thresholds when B. amyloliquefaciens DSM7T genome sequence was used as query sequence. Due to these results, we propose that the B. amyloliquefaciens clade should be considered as a taxonomic unit above of species level, designated here as “operational group B. amyloliquefaciens” consisting of the soil borne B. amyloliquefaciens, and plant associated B. siamensis and B. velezensis, whose members are closely related and allow identifying changes on the genomic level due to developing the plant-associated life-style. PMID:28163698

  4. Palladium catalysts supported on mesoporous molecular sieves bearing nitrogen donor groups: preparation and use in Heck and Suzuki C-C bond-forming reactions.

    PubMed

    Demel, Jan; Lamac, Martin; Cejka, Jirí; Stepnicka, Petr

    2009-01-01

    A series of supported catalysts is prepared by treatment of SBA-15-type mesoporous molecular sieve bearing [triple chemical bond]SiCH(2)CH(2)CH(2)NHCH(2)CH(2)NEt(2) groups with palladium(II) acetate. These catalysts are studied in Suzuki biaryl couplings and in Heck reactions to establish the influence of metal loading and innocent surface modifications (trimethylsilylation). The Suzuki reaction proceeded efficiently with model and practically relevant substrates; the catalyst performance increasing with an increasing degree of metalation (decreasing N/Pd ratio). Catalyst poisoning tests revealed that the reaction takes place in the liquid phase with the catalyst serving as a reservoir of active metal species and also as a stabilizing support once the reaction is performed. In the Heck reactions, on the other hand, the catalyst performance strongly changed with the reaction temperature and with the N/Pd ratio. The material with the lowest metal loading (0.01 mmol palladium per gram of material, N/Pd ratio ca. 100:1) proved particularly attractive in the Heck coupling, being highly active at elevated temperatures, recyclable, and capable of acting as a bifunctional catalyst (i.e., functioning without any external base.

  5. A hydro/organo/hybrid gelator: a peptide lipid with turning aspartame head groups.

    PubMed

    Mukai, Masaru; Minamikawa, Hiroyuki; Aoyagi, Masaru; Asakawa, Masumi; Shimizu, Toshimi; Kogiso, Masaki

    2013-04-01

    This work presents a novel bola-type peptide lipid which can gelate water, organic solvents, and water/organic-solvent mixtures. In its molecular structure, an amphiphilic dipeptide aspartame (L-α-aspartyl-L-phenylalanine methyl ester) is connected at both ends of an alkylene linker. The different morphologies in the hydrogel (helical nanotapes) and the organogel (tape-like nanostructures) were visualized by energy-filtering transmission electron microscopy (EF-TEM) and energy-filtering scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM), and the molecular arrangement was examined using X-ray diffraction (XRD), infrared (IR) spectroscopy, and circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopy. Possessing a hydrophilic aspartic acid group and a (relatively) hydrophobic phenylalanine methyl ester group, the dipeptide head group can turn about in response to solvent polarity. As a consequence, the solvent condition changed the molecular packing of the gelator and affected the overall supramolecular structure of the gel. It is noted that the peptide lipid gelated mixed solvents of water and organic solvents such as dichloromethane, liquid-paraffin, olive-oil, silicone-oils, and so on. The present hybrid gel can simultaneously hold hydrophilic and hydrophobic functional materials.

  6. Orientation Preferences of Backbone Secondary Amide Functional Groups in Peptide Nucleic Acid Complexes: Quantum Chemical Calculations Reveal an Intrinsic Preference of Cationic D-Amino Acid-Based Chiral PNA Analogues for the P-form

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, Jeremy C; Topham, Christopher

    2007-01-01

    Geometric descriptions of nonideal interresidue hydrogen bonding and backbone-base water bridging in the minor groove are established in terms of polyamide backbone carbonyl group orientation from analyses of residue junction conformers in experimentally determined peptide nucleic acid (PNA) complexes. Two types of interresidue hydrogen bonding are identified in PNA conformers in heteroduplexes with nucleic acids that adopt A-like base pair stacking. Quantum chemical calculations on the binding of a water molecule to an O2 base atom in glycine-based PNA thymine dimers indicate that junctions modeled with P-form backbone conformations are lower in energy than a dimer comprising the predominant conformation observed in A-like helices. It is further shown in model systems that PNA analogs based on D-lysine are better able to preorganize in a conformation exclusive to P-form helices than is glycine-based PNA. An intrinsic preference for this conformation is also exhibited by positively charged chiral PNA dimers carrying 3-amino-D-alanine or 4-aza-D-leucine residue units that provide for additional rigidity by side-chain hydrogen bonding to the backbone carbonyl oxygen. Structural modifications stabilizing P-form helices may obviate the need for large heterocycles to target DNA pyrimidine bases via PNADNA-PNA triplex formation. Quantum chemical modeling methods are used to propose candidate PNA Hoogsteen strand designs.

  7. Permission Forms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zirkel, Perry A.

    2005-01-01

    The prevailing practice in public schools is to routinely require permission or release forms for field trips and other activities that pose potential for liability. The legal status of such forms varies, but they are generally considered to be neither rock-solid protection nor legally valueless in terms of immunity. The following case and the…

  8. A high-risk group of pregnant women with elevated levels of conflict-related trauma, intimate partner violence, symptoms of depression and other forms of mental distress in post-conflict Timor-Leste

    PubMed Central

    Rees, S J; Tol, W; Mohammad, M; Tay, A K; Tam, N; dos Reis, N; da Costa, E; Soares, C; Silove, D M

    2016-01-01

    Women in post-conflict, low-income, post-conflict (LI-PC) countries are at risk of exposure to the traumatic events (TEs) of war and intimate partner violence (IPV), forms of stress that are known to lead to depression and other adverse mental health outcomes. We aimed to assess an index of exposure to these two forms of trauma to identify pregnant women attending antenatal clinics in conflict-affected Timor-Leste at high risk of depression and other forms of stress. A large, cross-sectional study of women in the second trimester of pregnancy was conducted in the four main government antenatal clinics in Dili district of Timor-Leste, between May 2014, and January 2015. The sample consisted of 1672 consecutive women, 3 to 6 months pregnant, with a response rate of 96%. We applied the Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale, the Kessler-10 psychological distress scale and the Harvard Trauma Questionnaire. IPV was assessed by the World Health Organisation measure. Composite categories of conflict-related TEs and severity of IPV showed a dose–response relationship with depressive symptoms: for exposure to four or more conflict-related TEs and severe psychological IPV, the adjusted odds ratio (AOR) was 3.95 (95% confidence interval (CI) 2.10–7.40); for four or more TEs and physical abuse, AOR 8.16 (95% CI 3.53–18.85); and for four or more TEs and severe psychological and physical abuse, AOR 9.78 (95% CI 5.31–18.02). For any mental distress, the AOR for four or more TEs and severe psychological abuse was 3.60 (95% CI 2.08–6.23); for four or more TEs and physical abuse 7.03 (95% CI 3.23–15.29); and for four or more TEs and severe psychological and physical abuse the AOR was 10.45 (95% CI 6.06–18.01). Of 184 women (11% of the sample) who reported ⩾4 TEs and either physical abuse alone or in combination with severe psychological abuse, 78 (42%) reached threshold for depressive symptoms and 93 (51%) for any mental distress, a 10-fold increase in depressive and

  9. [Recommendations for prevention of community-acquired pneumonia with bacteremia as the leading form of invasive pneumococcal infections in the population of people over 50 years of age and risk groups above 19 years of age].

    PubMed

    Albrecht, Piotr; Antczak, Adam; Hryniewicz, Waleria; Skoczyńska, Anna; Radzikowski, Andrzej; Kedziora-Kornatowska, Kornelia; Bernatowska, Ewa; Stompór, Tomasz; Grodzicki, Tomasz; Gyrczuk, Ewa; Imiela, Jacek; Jedrzejczak, Wiesław; Windak, Adam

    2014-02-01

    Invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD) is a main cause of mortality associated with pneumococcal infections. Although, IPD is regarding mainly small children and persons in the age > 65 years, the investigations showed that because of IPD exactly sick persons are burdened with the greatest mortality in the older age, rather than of children. The most frequent form of IPD is community acquired pneumonia (CAP) with the bacteremia. The presence of even a single additional risk factor is increasing the probability of the unfavorable descent of pneumococcal infection. The risk factors for IPD and/or pneumonia with bacteremia apart from the age are among others asthma (> 2 x), chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), sarcoidosis (4 x), idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (5 x), bronchiectases (2 x), allergic alveolitis (1.9 x) and pneumoconiosis (2 x), type 1 diabetes (4.4 x), type 2 diabetes (1.2 x), autoimmune diseases (e.g. rheumatoid arthritis (4.2 to 14.9 x), kidney failure with the necessity to dialysis (12 x), immunosuppression, cardiovascular disease, alcoholism and cancers. Examinations show that the best method of IPD and CAP preventing are pneumococcal vaccinations. On the market for ages 23-valent polysaccharide vaccine (PPV23) is available covering close the 90% of IPD triggering stereotypes. Her role in preventing CAP is uncertain and the immunological answer after vaccination at older persons and after revaccination is weak. Widely discussed disadvantageous effects of growing old of the immunological system show on the benefit from applying the immunization inducing the immunological memory, i.e. of conjugated vaccines which are activating the T-dependent reply and are ensuring the readiness for the effective secondary response. Examinations so far conducted with conjugated 7-valent and 13-valent (PCV13) vaccines at persons in the age > 50 years are confirming these expectations. Also sick persons can take benefits from PCV13 applying back from so-called IPD

  10. Group evaporation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shen, Hayley H.

    1991-01-01

    Liquid fuel combustion process is greatly affected by the rate of droplet evaporation. The heat and mass exchanges between gas and liquid couple the dynamics of both phases in all aspects: mass, momentum, and energy. Correct prediction of the evaporation rate is therefore a key issue in engineering design of liquid combustion devices. Current analytical tools for characterizing the behavior of these devices are based on results from a single isolated droplet. Numerous experimental studies have challenged the applicability of these results in a dense spray. To account for the droplets' interaction in a dense spray, a number of theories have been developed in the past decade. Herein, two tasks are examined. One was to study how to implement the existing theoretical results, and the other was to explore the possibility of experimental verifications. The current theoretical results of group evaporation are given for a monodispersed cluster subject to adiabatic conditions. The time evolution of the fluid mechanic and thermodynamic behavior in this cluster is derived. The results given are not in the form of a subscale model for CFD codes.

  11. Deciphering the Positional Influence of the Hydroxyl Group in the Cinnamoyl Part of 3-Hydroxy Flavonoids for Structural Modification and Their Interaction with the Protonated and B Form of Calf Thymus DNA Using Spectroscopic and Molecular Modeling Studies.

    PubMed

    Pradhan, Ankur Bikash; Haque, Lucy; Bhuiya, Sutanwi; Ganguly, Aniruddha; Das, Suman

    2015-06-11

    Studies on the interaction of naturally occurring flavonoids with different polymorphic forms of nucleic acid are helpful for understanding the molecular aspects of binding mode and providing direction for the use and design of new efficient therapeutic agents. However, much less information is available on the interactions of these compounds with different polymorphic forms of DNA at the molecular level. In this report we investigated the interaction of two widely abundant dietary flavonoids quercetin (Q) and morin (M) with calf thymus (CT) DNA. Spectrophotometric, spectropolarimetric, viscosity measurement, and molecular docking simulation methods are used as tools to delineate the binding mode and probable location of the flavonoids and their effects on the stability and conformation of DNA. It is observed that in the presence of the protonated form of DNA the dual fluorescence of Q and M resulting from the excited-state intramolecular proton transfer (ESIPT) is modified significantly. Structural analysis showed Q and M binds weakly to the B form (groove binding) compared to the protonated form of CT DNA (electrostatic interaction). In both cases, Q binds strongly to both forms of DNA compared to M.

  12. Group X

    SciTech Connect

    Fields, Susannah

    2007-08-16

    This project is currently under contract for research through the Department of Homeland Security until 2011. The group I was responsible for studying has to remain confidential so as not to affect the current project. All dates, reference links and authors, and other distinguishing characteristics of the original group have been removed from this report. All references to the name of this group or the individual splinter groups has been changed to 'Group X'. I have been collecting texts from a variety of sources intended for the use of recruiting and radicalizing members for Group X splinter groups for the purpose of researching the motivation and intent of leaders of those groups and their influence over the likelihood of group radicalization. This work included visiting many Group X websites to find information on splinter group leaders and finding their statements to new and old members. This proved difficult because the splinter groups of Group X are united in beliefs, but differ in public opinion. They are eager to tear each other down, prove their superiority, and yet remain anonymous. After a few weeks of intense searching, a list of eight recruiting texts and eight radicalizing texts from a variety of Group X leaders were compiled.

  13. Group Processes in Experiential Training Groups in Botswana

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nitza, Amy

    2011-01-01

    While group counseling has the potential to be an effective form of intervention in sub-Saharan Africa, research on group processes that would help guide group interventions in the region is scarce. This study investigated therapeutic factors and group climate in experiential training groups in Botswana. The Critical Incident Questionnaire (CIQ;…

  14. Group Flow and Group Genius

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sawyer, Keith

    2015-01-01

    Keith Sawyer views the spontaneous collaboration of group creativity and improvisation actions as "group flow," which organizations can use to function at optimum levels. Sawyer establishes ideal conditions for group flow: group goals, close listening, complete concentration, being in control, blending egos, equal participation, knowing…

  15. Isopermutation group

    SciTech Connect

    Muktibodh, A. S.

    2015-03-10

    The concept of ‘Isotopy’ as formulated by Ruggero Maria Santilli [1, 2, 3] plays a vital role in the development of Iso mathematics. Santilli defined iso-fields of characteristic zero. In this paper we extend this definition to define Iso-Galois fields [4] which are essentially of non-zero characteristic. Isotopically isomorphic realizations of a group define isopermutation group which gives a clear cut distinction between automorphic groups and isotopic groups.

  16. Home Groups.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stahler, Theresa M.

    All students enrolled in the entry level foundations course in the College of Education of Kutztown University (Pennsylvania) participate in home groups, a cooperative learning strategy. Each student is assigned to a five- or six-person home group on the first day of class. Although group placements are made on the basis of class lists, every…

  17. Grouping for Inequity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Macqueen, Suzanne Elizabeth

    2013-01-01

    The inequity of streaming as a method of organising classes was established by research conducted in the 1960s and 1970s. While the practice produces small advantages for limited groups of students, it hinders the academic and social advancement of the majority. Although streaming has declined, new forms of achievement grouping have emerged, with…

  18. Electromagnetic nucleon form factors

    SciTech Connect

    Bender, A.; Roberts, C.D.; Frank, M.R.

    1995-08-01

    The Dyson-Schwinger equation framework is employed to obtain expressions for the electromagnetic nucleon form factor. In generalized impulse approximation the form factor depends on the dressed quark propagator, the dressed quark-photon vertex, which is crucial to ensuring current conservation, and the nucleon Faddeev amplitude. The approach manifestly incorporates the large space-like-q{sup 2} renormalization group properties of QCD and allows a realistic extrapolation to small space-like-q{sup 2}. This extrapolation allows one to relate experimental data to the form of the quark-quark interaction at small space-like-q{sup 2}, which is presently unknown. The approach provides a means of unifying, within a single framework, the treatment of the perturbative and nonperturbative regimes of QCD. The wealth of experimental nucleon form factor data, over a large range of q{sup 2}, ensures that this application will provide an excellent environment to test, improve and extend our approach.

  19. Galaxy groups

    SciTech Connect

    Brent Tully, R.

    2015-02-01

    Galaxy groups can be characterized by the radius of decoupling from cosmic expansion, the radius of the caustic of second turnaround, and the velocity dispersion of galaxies within this latter radius. These parameters can be a challenge to measure, especially for small groups with few members. In this study, results are gathered pertaining to particularly well-studied groups over four decades in group mass. Scaling relations anticipated from theory are demonstrated and coefficients of the relationships are specified. There is an update of the relationship between light and mass for groups, confirming that groups with mass of a few times 10{sup 12}M{sub ⊙} are the most lit up while groups with more and less mass are darker. It is demonstrated that there is an interesting one-to-one correlation between the number of dwarf satellites in a group and the group mass. There is the suggestion that small variations in the slope of the luminosity function in groups are caused by the degree of depletion of intermediate luminosity systems rather than variations in the number per unit mass of dwarfs. Finally, returning to the characteristic radii of groups, the ratio of first to second turnaround depends on the dark matter and dark energy content of the universe and a crude estimate can be made from the current observations of Ω{sub matter}∼0.15 in a flat topology, with a 68% probability of being less than 0.44.

  20. GROUP INEQUALITY

    PubMed Central

    Bowles, Samuel; Loury, Glenn C.; Sethi, Rajiv

    2014-01-01

    We explore the combined effect of segregation in social networks, peer effects, and the relative size of a historically disadvantaged group on the incentives to invest in market-rewarded skills and the dynamics of inequality between social groups. We identify conditions under which group inequality will persist in the absence of differences in ability, credit constraints, or labor market discrimination. Under these conditions, group inequality may be amplified even if initial group differences are negligible. Increases in social integration may destabilize an unequal state and make group equality possible, but the distributional and human capital effects of this depend on the demographic composition of the population. When the size of the initially disadvantaged group is sufficiently small, integration can lower the long-run costs of human capital investment in both groups and result in an increase the aggregate skill share. In contrast, when the initially disadvantaged group is large, integration can induce a fall in the aggregate skill share as the costs of human capital investment rise in both groups. We consider applications to concrete cases and policy implications. PMID:25554727

  1. Whitehead Groups of Spinor Groups

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monastyrnyĭ, A. P.; Yanchevskiĭ, V. I.

    1991-02-01

    The Whitehead groups of spinor groups are studied. The known Kneser-Tits conjecture for spinor groups is reduced to a spinor analogue of the Tannaka-Artin problem, namely, to the question of whether the group K1Spin(D), where D is a division ring of exponent 2 , is trivial. A counterexample to the Kneser-Tits problem is constructed in the class of spinor groups. The group K1Spin(D) is computed. The stability of the Whitehead groups of spinor groups under purely transcendental extensions of the ground field is established. The R-equivalence on the k-points of spinor groups and the weak approximation problem are considered. The study of spinor group completes the study of the Whitehead groups of algebraic groups of classical type, that was started in studying reduced K-theory (V.P. Platonov) and was continued for reduced unitary K-theory (V.I. Yanchevskiĭ) and Hermitian K-theory (Platonov and Yanchevskiĭ). Bibliography: 50 titles.

  2. Perceiving persons and groups.

    PubMed

    Hamilton, D L; Sherman, S J

    1996-04-01

    This article analyzes the similarities and differences in forming impressions of individuals and in developing conceptions of groups. In both cases, the perceiver develops a mental conception of the target (individual or group) on the basis of available information and uses that information to make judgments about that person or group. However, a review of existing evidence reveals differences in the outcomes of impressions formed of individual and group targets, even when those impressions are based on the very same behavioral information. A model is proposed to account for these differences. The model emphasizes the role of differing expectancies of unity and coherence in individual and group targets, which in turn engage different mechanisms for processing information and making judgments. Implications of the model are discussed.

  3. 40 CFR 721.4000 - Polyoxy alkylene glycol amine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... paragraph (a)(2) of this section. (2) The significant new uses are: (i) Release to water. Requirements as specified at § 721.90 (a)(1), (b)(1), and (c)(1). (ii) (b) Specific requirements. The provisions of subpart... requirements. Recordkeeping requirements as specified at § 721.125 (a), (b), (c), and (k) are applicable...

  4. Poly(alkylene oxide) Copolymers for Nucleic Acid Delivery

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-07-17

    biofilm infection treatments, pain control and cancer chemotherapy. Charles M. Roth is an Associate Professor in the Department of Chemical and...technology and engineering approaches to cancer . REFERENCES 1. Aigner A. Nonviral in vivo delivery of therapeutic small interfering RNAs. Curr Opin Mol Ther

  5. 46 CFR 153.530 - Special requirements for alkylene oxides.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... CARGOES SHIPS CARRYING BULK LIQUID, LIQUEFIED GAS, OR COMPRESSED GAS HAZARDOUS MATERIALS Design and... this section must have continuous monitoring of oxygen concentration or have an arrangement to enable sampling with a portable oxygen analyzer. (i) Valve disks or disk faces, seats, and other wearing...

  6. 46 CFR 151.50-10 - Alkylene oxides.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... valves, gauges, thermometers, or any similar devices. Gaskets shall be constructed of spirally wound... minimum. Threaded joints in the cargo liquid and vapor lines are prohibited. (f) The thermometer...

  7. 46 CFR 151.50-10 - Alkylene oxides.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... valves, gauges, thermometers, or any similar devices. Gaskets shall be constructed of spirally wound... minimum. Threaded joints in the cargo liquid and vapor lines are prohibited. (f) The thermometer...

  8. 46 CFR 151.50-10 - Alkylene oxides.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... valves, gauges, thermometers, or any similar devices. Gaskets shall be constructed of spirally wound... minimum. Threaded joints in the cargo liquid and vapor lines are prohibited. (f) The thermometer...

  9. 46 CFR 153.530 - Special requirements for alkylene oxides.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...) and (c) of this section, a cargo containment system must be made of: (1) Stainless steel other than... be composites of spirally wound stainless steel and Teflon or similar flourinated polymer. (c) The... parts must be made of stainless steel containing no less than 11 percent chromium. (j) The...

  10. 46 CFR 153.530 - Special requirements for alkylene oxides.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ...) and (c) of this section, a cargo containment system must be made of: (1) Stainless steel other than... be composites of spirally wound stainless steel and Teflon or similar flourinated polymer. (c) The... parts must be made of stainless steel containing no less than 11 percent chromium. (j) The...

  11. 46 CFR 151.50-10 - Alkylene oxides.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... pressure for which the cargo tank is designed, or the shutoff head of the cargo pump, whichever is greater... pit if one is provided. (i) Venting. (1) The discharge fittings from each safety relief or pressure... safety or pressure vacuum relief valve as a result of a fire or other casualty. In addition,...

  12. 46 CFR 151.50-10 - Alkylene oxides.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... pressure for which the cargo tank is designed, or the shutoff head of the cargo pump, whichever is greater... pit if one is provided. (i) Venting. (1) The discharge fittings from each safety relief or pressure... safety or pressure vacuum relief valve as a result of a fire or other casualty. In addition,...

  13. Group Psychotherapy in Italy.

    PubMed

    Giannone, Francesca; Giordano, Cecilia; Di Blasi, Maria

    2015-10-01

    This article describes the history and the prevailing orientations of group psychotherapy in Italy (psychoanalytically oriented, psychodrama, CBT groups) and particularly group analysis. Provided free of charge by the Italian health system, group psychotherapy is growing, but its expansion is patchy. The main pathways of Italian training in the different group psychotherapy orientations are also presented. Clinical-theoretical elaboration on self development, psychopathology related to group experiences, and the methodological attention paid to objectives and methods in different clinical groups are issues related to group therapy in Italy. Difficulties in the relationship between research and clinical practice are discussed, as well as the empirical research network that tries to bridge the gap between research and clinical work in group psychotherapy. The economic crisis in Italy has led to massive cuts in health care and to an increasing demand for some forms of psychological treatment. For these reasons, and because of its positive cost-benefit ratio, group psychotherapy is now considered an important tool in the national health care system to expand the clinical response to different forms of psychological distress.

  14. Group Theatre.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clark, Brian

    The group interpretation approach to theatre production is defined as a method that will lead to production of plays that will appeal to "all the layers of the conscious and unconscious mind." In practice, it means that the group will develop and use resources of the theatre that orthodox companies too often ignore. The first two chapters of this…

  15. The evolution of HIV-1 group M genetic variability in Southern Cameroon is characterized by several emerging recombinant forms of CRF02_AG and viruses with drug resistance mutations.

    PubMed

    Agyingi, Lucy; Mayr, Luzia M; Kinge, Thompson; Orock, George Enow; Ngai, Johnson; Asaah, Bladine; Mpoame, Mbida; Hewlett, Indira; Nyambi, Phillipe

    2014-03-01

    The HIV epidemic in Cameroon is marked by a broad genetic diversity dominated by circulating recombinant forms (CRFs). Studies performed more than a decade ago in urban settings of Southern Cameroon revealed a dominance of the CRF02_AG and clade A variants in >90% of the infected subjects; however, little is known about the evolving viral variants circulating in this region. To document circulating HIV viral diversity, four regions of the viral genome (gag, PR, reverse transcriptase, env) in 116 HIV-1 positive individuals in Limbe, Southern Cameroon, were PCR-amplified. Sequences obtained at the RT and protease regions were analyzed for mutations that conferred drug resistance using the Stanford Drug Resistance Database. The present study reveals a broad genetic diversity characterized by several unique recombinant forms (URF) accounting for 36% of infections, 48.6% of patients infected with CRF02_AG, and the emergence of CRF22_01A1 in 7.2% of patients. Three out of 15 (20%) treated patients and 13 out of 93 (13.9%) drug naïve patients harbor drug resistance mutations to RT inhibitors, while 3.2% of drug naïve patients harbor drug resistance mutations associated with protease inhibitors. The high proportion (13.9%) of drug resistance mutations among the drug naïve patients reveals the ongoing transmission of these viruses in this region of Cameroon and highlights the need for drug resistance testing before starting treatment for patients infected with HIV-1.

  16. Molecular cloning, sequence, and expression of a human GDP-L-fucose:. beta. -D-galactoside 2-. alpha. -L-fucosyltransferase cDNA that can form the H blood group antigen

    SciTech Connect

    Larsen, R.D.; Ernst, L.K.; Nair, R.P.; Lowe, J.B. )

    1990-09-01

    The authors have previously used a gene-transfer scheme to isolate a human genomic DNA fragment that determines expression of a GDP-L-fucose:{beta}D-galactoside 2-{alpha}-L-fucosyltransferase. Although this fragment determined expression of an {alpha}(1,2)FT whose kinetic properties mirror those of the human H blood group {alpha}(1,2)FT, their precise nature remained undefined. They describe here the molecular cloning, sequence, and expression of a human of cDNA corresponding to these human genomic sequences. When expressed in COS-1 cells, the cDNA directs expression of cell surface H structures and a cognate {alpha}(1,2)FT activity with properties analogous to the human H blood group {alpha}(1,2)FT. The cDNA sequence predicts a 365-amino acid polypeptide characteristic of a type II transmembrane glycoprotein with a domain structure analogous to that of other glycosyltransferases but without significant primary sequence similarity to these or other known proteins. To directly demonstrate that the cDNA encodes an {alpha}(1,2)FT, the COOH-terminal domain predicted to be Golgi-resident was expressed in COS-1 cells as a catalytically active, secreted, and soluble protein A fusion peptide. Southern blot analysis showed that this cDNA identified DNA sequences syntenic to the human H locus on chromosome 19. These results strongly suggest that this cloned {alpha}(1,2)FT cDNA represents the product of the human H blood group locus.

  17. Alkali metal and rare earth element evolution of rock-forming minerals from the Gatumba area pegmatites (Rwanda): Quantitative assessment of crystal-melt fractionation in the regional zonation of pegmatite groups

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hulsbosch, Niels; Hertogen, Jan; Dewaele, Stijn; André, Luc; Muchez, Philippe

    2014-05-01

    This study presents a general model for the evaluation of Rayleigh fractional crystallisation as the principal differentiation mechanism in the formation of regionally zoned common and rare-element pegmatites. The magmatic evolution of these systems from a granitic source is reconstructed by means of alkali element and rare earth element (REE) analyses of rock-forming minerals (feldspars, micas and tourmaline), which represent a whole sequence of regional pegmatite zonation. The Gatumba pegmatite field (Rwanda, Central Africa) is chosen as case study area because of its well-developed regional zonation sequence. The pegmatites are spatially and temporally related to peraluminous G4-granites (986 ± 10 Ma). The regional zonation is developed around a G4-granite and the proximal pegmatites grade outwardly into biotite, two-mica and muscovite pegmatites. Rare-element (Nb-Ta-Sn) pegmatites occur most distal from the granite.

  18. A novel layer formed by paradodecatungstate clusters and {Cu(en) 2} 2+ bridging groups: Synthesis and characterization of [{Cu(en) 2} 4(H 4W 12O 42)]·9H 2O

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Li-Wen; Lin, Bi-Zhou; Liu, Xue-Zhong; Huang, Xiu-Feng; Feng, Yun-Long

    2008-03-01

    A novel two-dimensional solid, [{Cu(en) 2} 4(H 4W 12O 42)]·9H 2O (en = ethylenediamine), has been prepared under mild hydrothermal conditions. Single crystal X-ray diffraction revealed that each paradodecatungstate [H 4W 12O 42] 8- cluster in the title compound is connected with its four adjacent clusters through eight {Cu(en) 2} 2+ bridging groups into a two-dimensional layered structure. Its cyclic voltammetric behavior in aqueous electrolyte demonstrated that its modified carbon paste electrode has a good stability. A probe reaction indicated that the catalytic activity of paradodecatungstates in epoxidation of maleic anhydride has been enhanced by assembling paradodecatungstate clusters into extended structures.

  19. Group Grammar

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adams, Karen

    2015-01-01

    In this article Karen Adams demonstrates how to incorporate group grammar techniques into a classroom activity. In the activity, students practice using the target grammar to do something they naturally enjoy: learning about each other.

  20. Heterotic supergravity with internal almost-Kähler spaces; instantons for SO(32), or E 8 × E 8, gauge groups; and deformed black holes with soliton, quasiperiodic and/or pattern-forming structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bubuianu, Laurenţiu; Irwin, Klee; Vacaru, Sergiu I.

    2017-04-01

    Heterotic supergravity with (1  +  3)-dimensional domain wall configurations and (warped) internal, six dimensional, almost-Kähler manifolds {{}6}\\text{X} are studied. Considering ten dimensional spacetimes with nonholonomic distributions and conventional double fibrations, 2  +  2  +  ...  =  2  +  2  +  3  +  3, and associated SU(3) structures on internal space, we generalize for real, internal, almost symplectic gravitational structures the constructions with gravitational and gauge instantons of tanh-kink type [1, 2]. They include the first {α\\prime} corrections to the heterotic supergravity action, parameterized in a form to imply nonholonomic deformations of the Yang–Mills sector and corresponding Bianchi identities. We show how it is possible to construct a variety of solutions depending on the type of nonholonomic distributions and deformations of ‘prime’ instanton configurations characterized by two real supercharges. This corresponds to N=1/2 supersymmetric, nonholonomic manifolds from the four dimensional point of view. Our method provides a unified description of embedding nonholonomically deformed tanh-kink-type instantons into half-BPS solutions of heterotic supergravity. This allows us to elaborate new geometric methods of constructing exact solutions of motion equations, with first order {α\\prime} corrections to the heterotic supergravity. Such a formalism is applied for general and/or warped almost-Kähler configurations, which allows us to generate nontrivial (1  +  3)-d domain walls and black hole deformations determined by quasiperiodic internal space structures. This formalism is utilized in our associated publication [3] in order to construct and study generic off-diagonal nonholonomic deformations of the Kerr metric, encoding contributions from heterotic supergravity.

  1. Densified waste form and method for forming

    DOEpatents

    Garino, Terry J.; Nenoff, Tina M.; Sava Gallis, Dorina Florentina

    2016-05-17

    Materials and methods of making densified waste forms for temperature sensitive waste material, such as nuclear waste, formed with low temperature processing using metallic powder that forms the matrix that encapsulates the temperature sensitive waste material. The densified waste form includes a temperature sensitive waste material in a physically densified matrix, the matrix is a compacted metallic powder. The method for forming the densified waste form includes mixing a metallic powder and a temperature sensitive waste material to form a waste form precursor. The waste form precursor is compacted with sufficient pressure to densify the waste precursor and encapsulate the temperature sensitive waste material in a physically densified matrix.

  2. Densified waste form and method for forming

    SciTech Connect

    Garino, Terry J.; Nenoff, Tina M.; Sava Gallis, Dorina Florentina

    2015-08-25

    Materials and methods of making densified waste forms for temperature sensitive waste material, such as nuclear waste, formed with low temperature processing using metallic powder that forms the matrix that encapsulates the temperature sensitive waste material. The densified waste form includes a temperature sensitive waste material in a physically densified matrix, the matrix is a compacted metallic powder. The method for forming the densified waste form includes mixing a metallic powder and a temperature sensitive waste material to form a waste form precursor. The waste form precursor is compacted with sufficient pressure to densify the waste precursor and encapsulate the temperature sensitive waste material in a physically densified matrix.

  3. The thermodynamic contribution of the 5-methyl group of thymine in the two- and three-stranded complexes formed by poly(dU) and poly(dT) with poly(dA).

    PubMed

    Ross, Philip D; Howard, Frank B

    2003-02-01

    To assess the thermodynamic contribution of the 5-methyl group of thymine, we have studied the two-stranded helical complexes poly(dA).poly(dU) and poly(dA).poly(dT) and the three-stranded complexes--poly(dA).2poly(dU), poly(dA).poly(dT).poly(dU) and poly(dA).2poly(dT)--by differential scanning calorimetry, and uv optical melting experiments. The thermodynamic quantities associated with the 3 --> 2, 2 --> 1, and 3 --> 1 melting transitions are found to vary with salt concentration and temperature in a more complex manner than commonly believed. The transition temperatures, T(m), are generally not linear in the logarithm of concentration or activity of NaCl. The change in enthalpy and in entropy upon melting varies with salt concentration and temperature, and a change in heat capacity accompanies each transition. The poly(dA).2poly(dU) triple helix is markedly different from poly(dA).2poly(dT) in both its CD spectrum and thermodynamic behavior, while the poly(dA).poly(dT).poly(dU) triple helix resembles poly(dA).2poly(dT) in these properties. In comparing poly(dA).2poly(dT) with either the poly(dA).poly(dT).poly(dU) or the poly(dA).2poly(dU) triplexes, the substitution of thymine for uracil in the third strand results in an enhancement of stability against the 3 --> 2 dissociation of deltadeltaG degrees = -135 +/- 85 cal (mol A)(-1) at 37 degrees C. This represents a doubling of the absolute stability toward dissociation compared to the triplexes with poly(dU) as the third strand. The poly (dA).poly (dT) duplex is more stable than poly(dA).poly(dU) by deltadeltaG degrees = -350 +/- 60 cal (mol base pair)(-1) at 37 degrees C. Poly(dA).poly(dT) has 50% greater stability than poly(dA).poly(dU) as a result of the dT for dU substitution in the duplex.

  4. Group Learning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Black, Susan

    1992-01-01

    Research suggests that cooperative learning works best when students are first taught group-processing skills, such as leadership, decision making, communication, trust building, and conflict management. Inadequate teacher training and boring assignments can torpedo cooperative learning efforts. Administrators should reassure teachers with…

  5. Kinesics, Communication and Group Interaction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Connor, J. Regis

    This paper reports on the effects of four forms of kinesic communication and three forms of verbal communication on leadership perception in a small group setting. Forty-eight college age discussants were observed in groups of four during twelve 30-minute sessions. Permitted only visual input, eleven previously trained observers recorded four…

  6. An Intergenerational Women's Group.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fogler, Janet

    1989-01-01

    Discusses the Intergenerational Women's Group, formed to provide social support and an interchange of ideas between women of different generations. Provides a model for such a program that may be offered in geriatric medical clinics. Discusses the impact of intergenerational support for both the old and the young. (Author/BHK)

  7. Analytic pion form factor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lomon, Earle L.; Pacetti, Simone

    2016-09-01

    The pion electromagnetic form factor and two-pion production in electron-positron collisions are simultaneously fitted by a vector dominance model evolving to perturbative QCD at large momentum transfer. This model was previously successful in simultaneously fitting the nucleon electromagnetic form factors (spacelike region) and the electromagnetic production of nucleon-antinucleon pairs (timelike region). For this pion case dispersion relations are used to produce the analytic connection of the spacelike and timelike regions. The fit to all the data is good, especially for the newer sets of timelike data. The description of high-q2 data, in the timelike region, requires one more meson with ρ quantum numbers than listed in the 2014 Particle Data Group review.

  8. Local Group

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mateo, M.; Murdin, P.

    2000-11-01

    Not long after EDWIN HUBBLE established that galaxies are `island universes' similar to our home galaxy, the MILKY WAY, he realized that a few of these external galaxies are considerably closer to us than any others. In 1936 he first coined the term `Local Group' in his famous book The Realm of the Nebulae to identify our nearest galactic neighbors. More than 60 yr later, the galaxies of the Loca...

  9. Underrepresented groups

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peters, David A.

    1990-01-01

    The problem with the shortage of under represented groups in science and engineering is absolutely crucial, especially considering that U.S. will experience a shortage of 560,000 science and engineering personnel by the year 2010. Most studies by the National Science Foundation also concluded that projected shortages cannot be alleviated without significant increases in the involvement of Blacks, Hispanics, Native Americans, handicapped persons, and women.

  10. Group Composition and Group Therapy for Complicated Grief

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Piper, William E.; Ogrodniczuk, John S.; Joyce, Anthony S.; Weideman, Rene; Rosie, John S.

    2007-01-01

    This prospective study investigated the impact of group composition on the outcome of 2 forms of time-limited, short-term group therapy (interpretive, supportive) with 110 outpatients from 18 therapy groups, who presented with complicated grief. The composition variable was based on the patient's level of quality of object relations. The higher…

  11. Group Connections: Whole Group Teaching.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Griffiths, Dorothy

    2002-01-01

    A learner-centered approach to adult group instruction involved learners in investigating 20th-century events. The approach allowed learners to concentrate on different activities according to their abilities and gave them opportunities to develop basic skills and practice teamwork. (SK)

  12. Forming a Turbomachinery Seals Working Group: An Overview and Discussion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Proctor, Margaret P.

    2007-01-01

    Purose: Identify technical challenges to improving turbomachinery seal leakage and wear performance, reliability and cost effectiveness. Develop a coordinated effort to resolve foundational issues for turbomachinery seal technologies. Identify and foster opportunities for collaboration. Advocate for funding.

  13. Cardiovascular group

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blomqvist, Gunnar

    1989-01-01

    As a starting point, the group defined a primary goal of maintaining in flight a level of systemic oxygen transport capacity comparable to each individual's preflight upright baseline. The goal of maintaining capacity at preflight levels would seem to be a reasonable objective for several different reasons, including the maintenance of good health in general and the preservation of sufficient cardiovascular reserve capacity to meet operational demands. It is also important not to introduce confounding variables in whatever other physiological studies are being performed. A change in the level of fitness is likely to be a significant confounding variable in the study of many organ systems. The principal component of the in-flight cardiovascular exercise program should be large-muscle activity such as treadmill exercise. It is desirable that at least one session per week be monitored to assure maintenance of proper functional levels and to provide guidance for any adjustments of the exercise prescription. Appropriate measurements include evaluation of the heart-rate/workload or the heart-rate/oxygen-uptake relationship. Respiratory gas analysis is helpful by providing better opportunities to document relative workload levels from analysis of the interrelationships among VO2, VCO2, and ventilation. The committee felt that there is no clear evidence that any particular in-flight exercise regimen is protective against orthostatic hypotension during the early readaptation phase. Some group members suggested that maintenance of the lower body muscle mass and muscle tone may be helpful. There is also evidence that late in-flight interventions to reexpand blood volume to preflight levels are helpful in preventing or minimizing postflight orthostatic hypotension.

  14. Synchronous computer mediated group discussion.

    PubMed

    Gallagher, Peter

    2005-01-01

    Over the past 20 years, focus groups have become increasingly popular with nursing researchers as a data collection method, as has the use of computer-based technologies to support all forms of nursing research. This article describes the conduct of a series of focus groups in which the participants were in the same room as part of a "real-time" discussion during which they also used personal computers as an interface between each other and the moderator. Synchronous Computer Mediated Group Discussion differed from other forms of focus group discussion in that participants used personal computers rather than verbal expressions to respond to specific questions, engage in communication with other participants, and to record their thoughts. This form of focus group maintained many of the features of spoken exchanges, a cornerstone of the focus group, while capturing the advantages of online discussion.

  15. Careers (A Course of Study). Unit V: Forms, Forms, Forms.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Turley, Kay

    Designed to enable special needs students to understand and complete various job-related forms, this set of activities devoted to forms encountered before and after one obtains a job is the fifth in a nine-unit secondary level careers course intended to provide handicapped students with the knowledge and tools necessary to succeed in the world of…

  16. Management Agenda Task Group

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-02-01

    Report FY04-4 • Recommendations related to business management priorities for the Secretary of Defense February...Business Board (DBB) formed this Task Group to assess and make recommendations to the Department of Defense on management priorities for the next four...This list should be drawn from the four primary areas of DBB focus over the past three years: human resources, financial management, acquisition

  17. MOVES Model Review Work Group

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The FACA MOVES Review Work Group was formed under the Mobile Sources Technical Review Subcommittee (MSTRS), and is charged to provide input to EPA via the MSTRS and the Clean Air Act Advisory Committee on specific issues regarding MOVES development.

  18. Supergravity actions with integral forms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castellani, L.; Catenacci, R.; Grassi, P. A.

    2014-12-01

    Integral forms provide a natural and powerful tool for the construction of supergravity actions. They are generalizations of usual differential forms and are needed for a consistent theory of integration on supermanifolds. The group geometrical approach to supergravity and its variational principle are reformulated and clarified in this language. Central in our analysis is the Poincaré dual of a bosonic manifold embedded into a supermanifold. Finally, using integral forms we provide a proof of Gates' so-called "Ectoplasmic Integration Theorem", relating superfield actions to component actions.

  19. Nucleon form factors '99

    SciTech Connect

    Kees de Jager; B. Pire

    1999-06-01

    The authors review recent progress in the experimental knowledge of and theoretical speculations about nucleon form factors, with special emphasis on the large Q{sup 2} region. There is now a long history of continuous progress in the understanding of electromagnetic form factors at large momentum transfer. After the pioneering works leading to the celebrated quark counting rules, the understanding of hard scattering exclusive processes has been solidly founded. A perturbative QCD subprocess is factorized from a wave function-like distribution amplitude {var_phi}(x{sub i},Q{sup 2}) (x{sub i} being the light cone fractions of momentum carried by valence quarks), the Q{sup 2} dependence of which is analyzed in the renormalization group approach. Although an asymptotic expression emerges from this analysis for the x dependence of the distribution, it was quickly understood that the evolution to the asymptotic Q{sub 2} is very slow and that indeed some non perturbative input is required to get reliable estimates of this distribution amplitude at measurable Q{sup 2}.

  20. Elevated temperature envelope forming

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burg, Bruce M. (Inventor); Gane, David H. (Inventor); Starowski, Robert M. (Inventor)

    1992-01-01

    Elevated temperature envelope forming includes enclosing a part blank and form tool within an envelope sealed against the atmosphere, heat treating the combination while forming pressure holds the envelope and part against the form tool, and allowing part cool down to occur in an inert atmosphere with forming pressure removed. The forming pressure is provided by evacuating the envelope and may be aided by differential force applied between the envelope and the form tool.

  1. Strategic Groups: One Perspective on Integrating Strategic and Group Therapies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leahey, Maureen; Wallace, Evie

    1988-01-01

    Describes a short-term, strategic, solution-focused self-esteem group in an outpatient mental health setting. Discusses constructs that form foundations of both strategic and group therapies. Training, supervision, and outcome issues arising from integrating the two therapies are addressed. (Author/NB)

  2. Group Capability Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Olejarski, Michael; Appleton, Amy; Deltorchio, Stephen

    2009-01-01

    The Group Capability Model (GCM) is a software tool that allows an organization, from first line management to senior executive, to monitor and track the health (capability) of various groups in performing their contractual obligations. GCM calculates a Group Capability Index (GCI) by comparing actual head counts, certifications, and/or skills within a group. The model can also be used to simulate the effects of employee usage, training, and attrition on the GCI. A universal tool and common method was required due to the high risk of losing skills necessary to complete the Space Shuttle Program and meet the needs of the Constellation Program. During this transition from one space vehicle to another, the uncertainty among the critical skilled workforce is high and attrition has the potential to be unmanageable. GCM allows managers to establish requirements for their group in the form of head counts, certification requirements, or skills requirements. GCM then calculates a Group Capability Index (GCI), where a score of 1 indicates that the group is at the appropriate level; anything less than 1 indicates a potential for improvement. This shows the health of a group, both currently and over time. GCM accepts as input head count, certification needs, critical needs, competency needs, and competency critical needs. In addition, team members are categorized by years of experience, percentage of contribution, ex-members and their skills, availability, function, and in-work requirements. Outputs are several reports, including actual vs. required head count, actual vs. required certificates, CGI change over time (by month), and more. The program stores historical data for summary and historical reporting, which is done via an Excel spreadsheet that is color-coded to show health statistics at a glance. GCM has provided the Shuttle Ground Processing team with a quantifiable, repeatable approach to assessing and managing the skills in their organization. They now have a common

  3. Group Development: Extending Tuckman's Theory.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maples, Mary F.

    1988-01-01

    Presents a framework for extending the Tuckman model of developmental sequence in small groups. Considers Tuckman's stages of forming, storming, norming, performing, and adjourning lacking in descriptive depth and clear definition. Gathered and organized group dynamics graduate students' assessments of characteristics of stages over five-year…

  4. Innovative uses of psychodynamic group psychotherapy.

    PubMed

    Buchele, B J

    1994-01-01

    Psychodynamic group psychotherapy is gaining renewed attention as an effective form of treatment, due in part to increasing economic constraints that make other forms of treatment less accessible. The author highlights some innovative applications of both extended and time-limited groups. She also describes specific issues that can be addressed effectively in homogeneous time-limited group therapy.

  5. Form 5-Mining venture agreement model form

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1984-01-01

    This text acts as a reference of the basic terms and conditions for a negotiated mining venture agreement. Alternative clauses and provisions, along with extensive commentary, are supplied. The model form contains many articles which define and detail the process.

  6. Bacteria form tellurium nanocrystals

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Oremland, R.S.

    2007-01-01

    A team of researchers have found two bacterial species that produce tellurium oxyanions as respiratory electron acceptors for growth, leaving elemental tellurium in the form of nanoparticles. The crystals from the two organisms exhibit distinctively different structures. Bacillus selenitireducens initially forms nanorods that cluster together to form rosettes. Sulfurospirillum barnesii forms irregularly-shaped nanospheres that coalesce into larger composite aggregates.

  7. Handbook of Poetic Forms.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Padgett, Ron, Ed.

    Intended for secondary teachers and student writers but useful for anyone interested in poetic forms, this book defines 74 basic poetic forms, summarizes their histories, quotes examples from noted poets, and offers professional tricks of the trade on how to use each form. The book covers the following poetic forms: abstract poem, acrostic,…

  8. Internet Cancer Support Groups

    PubMed Central

    Chee, Wonshik; Tsai, Hsiu-Min; Lin, Li-Chen; Cheng, Ching-Yu

    2006-01-01

    Internet Cancer Support Groups (ICSGs) are an emerging form of support group on Internet specifically for cancer patients. Previous studies have indicated the effectiveness of ICSGs as a research setting or a data-collection method. Yet recent studies have also indicated that ICSGs tend to serve highly educated, high-income White males who tend to be at an early stage of cancer. In this article, a total of 317 general ICSGs and 229 ethnic-specific ICSGs searched through Google.com, Yahoo.com, http://Msn.com, AOL.com, and ACOR.org are analyzed from a feminist perspective. The written records of group discussions and written memos by the research staff members were also analyzed using content analysis. The idea categories that emerged about these groups include (a) authenticity issues; (b) ethnicity and gender issues; (c) intersubjectivity issues; and (d) potential ethical issues. The findings suggest that (a) researchers adopt multiple recruitment strategies through various Internet sites and/or real settings; (b) researchers raise their own awareness of the potential influences of the health-related resources provided by ICSGs and regularly update their knowledge related to the federal and state standards and/or policies related to ICSGs; and (c) researchers consider adopting a quota-sampling method. PMID:15681976

  9. Associative grouping: perceptual grouping of shapes by association.

    PubMed

    Vickery, Timothy J; Jiang, Yuhong V

    2009-05-01

    Perceptual grouping is usually defined by principles that associate distinct elements by virtue of image properties, such as proximity, similarity, and occurrence within common regions. What role does learning play in forming a perceptual group? This study provides evidence that learning of shape associations leads to perceptual grouping. Subjects were repeatedly exposed to pairs of unique shapes that co-occurred within a common region. The common region cue was later removed in displays composed of these shapes, and the subjects searched the display for two adjacent shapes of the same color. The subjects were faster at locating the color repetition when the adjacent shapes with the same color came from the same trained groups than when they were composed of two shapes from different trained groups. The effects were perceptual in nature: Learned pairings produced spatial distortions similar to those observed for groups defined by perceptual similarity. A residual grouping effect was observed even when the shapes in the trained group switched their relative positions but was eliminated when each shape was inverted. These results indicate that statistical co-occurrence with explicit grouping cues may form an important component of perceptual organization, determining perceived scene structure solely on the basis of past experience.

  10. Adverse Outcomes in Group Psychotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Roback, Howard B.

    2000-01-01

    Group forms of therapy have been growing at a rapid rate, in part because of their documented effectiveness and economic considerations such as managed care. It is therefore becoming increasingly important to assess the psychological risks of these interventions. The author provides an overview of the published literature and conference presentations on negative effects in adult outpatient groups. Although much of the literature on adverse outcomes in group therapy focuses on single risk factors (e.g., negative leader, group process, or patient characteristics), the author argues that an interactional model should be encouraged. Means of reducing casualties are also discussed, as well as methodological issues and research directions. PMID:10896735

  11. Using Consensus Groups in Online Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Regina O.; Dirkx, John M.

    2007-01-01

    This chapter describes online consensus group work, a form of collaborative learning. It discusses collaborative learning, small group work, and consensus learning, with recommendations for their use in online contexts.

  12. RY 2004 Reporting Forms

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The TRI reporting forms on this page are for reference only. Do not submit these forms to EPA. All facilities are required to submit their TRI data electronically using the TRI-MEweb application, per the TRI Electronic Reporting Rule.

  13. RY 2009 Reporting Forms

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The TRI reporting forms on this page are for reference only. Do not submit these forms to EPA. All facilities are required to submit their TRI data electronically using the TRI-MEweb application, per the TRI Electronic Reporting Rule.

  14. RY 2003 Reporting Forms

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The TRI reporting forms on this page are for reference only. Do not submit these forms to EPA. All facilities are required to submit their TRI data electronically using the TRI-MEweb application, per the TRI Electronic Reporting Rule.

  15. Forms of Arthritis

    MedlinePlus

    ... stiffness, inflammation, swelling and, sometimes, destruction of joints. Gout — a form of arthritis that occurs when uric ... the joints. Some 2.1 million Americans have gout. Lupus — a form of arthritis, like rheumatoid arthritis, ...

  16. Group typicality, group loyalty and cognitive development.

    PubMed

    Patterson, Meagan M

    2014-09-01

    Over the course of childhood, children's thinking about social groups changes in a variety of ways. Developmental Subjective Group Dynamics (DSGD) theory emphasizes children's understanding of the importance of conforming to group norms. Abrams et al.'s study, which uses DSGD theory as a framework, demonstrates the social cognitive skills underlying young elementary school children's thinking about group norms. Future research on children's thinking about groups and group norms should explore additional elements of this topic, including aspects of typicality beyond loyalty.

  17. Method for forming ammonia

    DOEpatents

    Kong, Peter C.; Pink, Robert J.; Zuck, Larry D.

    2008-08-19

    A method for forming ammonia is disclosed and which includes the steps of forming a plasma; providing a source of metal particles, and supplying the metal particles to the plasma to form metal nitride particles; and providing a substance, and reacting the metal nitride particles with the substance to produce ammonia, and an oxide byproduct.

  18. Forms in Space.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moore, Paula

    1998-01-01

    Uses the work of M. C. Escher to instruct upper elementary students in the transformation of flat shape into three-dimensional form. Outlines the lesson as a series of sections: (1) reviewing form drawing; (2) creating three-dimensional effects; (3) imagining the forms in an inhabited world; and (4) using color and shading. (DSK)

  19. The evolution of groups and clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gottlöber, S.; Klypin, A.; Kravtsov, A. V.; Turchaninov, V.

    Using high resolution N -body simulations we study the formation and evolution of clusters and groups in a &Lambda CDM cosmological model. Groups of galaxies already form before z = 4. Merging of groups and accretion leads to cluster formation at z <&sim2. Some of the groups merge into large isolated halos.

  20. The canonical forms of a lattice rule

    SciTech Connect

    Lyness, J.N.

    1992-12-31

    Much of the elementary theory of lattice rules may, be presented as an elegant application of classical results. These include Kronecker group representation theorem and the Hermite and Smith normal forms of integer matrices. The theory of the canonical form is a case in point. In this paper, some of this theory is treated in a constructive rather than abstract manner. A step-by-step approach that parallels the group theory is described, leading to an algorithm to obtain a canonical form of a rule of prime power order. The number of possible distinct canonical forms is derived, and this is used to determine the number of integration lattices having specified invariants.

  1. The canonical forms of a lattice rule

    SciTech Connect

    Lyness, J.N.

    1992-01-01

    Much of the elementary theory of lattice rules may, be presented as an elegant application of classical results. These include Kronecker group representation theorem and the Hermite and Smith normal forms of integer matrices. The theory of the canonical form is a case in point. In this paper, some of this theory is treated in a constructive rather than abstract manner. A step-by-step approach that parallels the group theory is described, leading to an algorithm to obtain a canonical form of a rule of prime power order. The number of possible distinct canonical forms is derived, and this is used to determine the number of integration lattices having specified invariants.

  2. Two forms of reactive arthritis?

    PubMed Central

    Toivanen, P.; Toivanen, A.

    1999-01-01

    Inflammatory arthritides developing after a distant infection have so far been called reactive or postinfectious, quite often depending on the microbial trigger and/or HLA-B27 status of the patient. For clarity, it is proposed that they all should be called reactive arthritis, which, according to the trigger, occurs as an HLA-B27 associated or non-associated form. In addition to the causative agents and HLA-B27, these two categories are also distinguished by other characteristics. Most important, HLA-B27 associated arthritis may occur identical to the Reiter's syndrome with accompanying uretheritis and/or conjunctivitis, whereas in the B27 non-associated form this has not been clearly described. Likewise, only the B27 associated form belongs to the group of spondyloarthropathies.

 PMID:10577958

  3. Methods of forming steel

    DOEpatents

    Branagan, Daniel J.; Burch, Joseph V.

    2001-01-01

    In one aspect, the invention encompasses a method of forming a steel. A metallic glass is formed and at least a portion of the glass is converted to a crystalline steel material having a nanocrystalline scale grain size. In another aspect, the invention encompasses another method of forming a steel. A molten alloy is formed and cooled the alloy at a rate which forms a metallic glass. The metallic glass is devitrified to convert the glass to a crystalline steel material having a nanocrystalline scale grain size. In yet another aspect, the invention encompasses another method of forming a steel. A first metallic glass steel substrate is provided, and a molten alloy is formed over the first metallic glass steel substrate to heat and devitrify at least some of the underlying metallic glass of the substrate.

  4. Group Cohesion in Experiential Growth Groups

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Steen, Sam; Vasserman-Stokes, Elaina; Vannatta, Rachel

    2014-01-01

    This article explores the effect of web-based journaling on changes in group cohesion within experiential growth groups. Master's students were divided into 2 groups. Both used a web-based platform to journal after each session; however, only 1 of the groups was able to read each other's journals. Quantitative data collected before and…

  5. Hydrophobic ionic liquids

    SciTech Connect

    Koch, V.R.; Nanjundiah, C.; Carlin, R.T.

    1998-10-27

    Ionic liquids having improved properties for application in non-aqueous batteries, electrochemical capacitors, electroplating, catalysis and chemical separations are disclosed. Exemplary compounds have one of the following formulas shown in a diagram wherein R{sub 1}, R{sub 2}, R{sub 3}, R{sub 4}, R{sub 5}, and R{sub 6} are either H; F; separate alkyl groups of from 1 to 4 carbon atoms, respectively, or joined together to constitute a unitary alkylene radical of from 2 to 4 carbon atoms forming a ring structure converging on N; or separate phenyl groups; and wherein the alkyl groups, alkylene radicals or phenyl groups may be substituted with electron withdrawing groups, preferably F-, Cl-, CF{sub 3}-, SF{sub 5}-, CF{sub 3}S-, (CF{sub 3}){sub 2}CHS- or (CF{sub 3}){sub 3}CS-; and X{sup {minus}} is a non-Lewis acid-containing polyatomic anion having a van der Waals volume exceeding 100 {angstrom}{sup 3}. 4 figs.

  6. Hydrophobic ionic liquids

    DOEpatents

    Koch, Victor R.; Nanjundiah, Chenniah; Carlin, Richard T.

    1998-01-01

    Ionic liquids having improved properties for application in non-aqueous batteries, electrochemical capacitors, electroplating, catalysis and chemical separations are disclosed. Exemplary compounds have one of the following formulas: ##STR1## wherein R.sub.1, R.sub.2, R.sub.3, R.sub.4, R.sub.5, and R.sub.6 are either H; F; separate alkyl groups of from 1 to 4 carbon atoms, respectively, or joined together to constitute a unitary alkylene radical of from 2 to 4 carbon atoms forming a ring structure converging on N; or separate phenyl groups; and wherein the alkyl groups, alkylene radicals or phenyl groups may be substituted with electron withdrawing groups, preferably F--, Cl--, CF.sub.3 --, SF.sub.5 --, CF.sub.3 S--, (CF.sub.3).sub.2 CHS-- or (CF.sub.3).sub.3 CS--; and X.sup.- is a non-Lewis acid-containing polyatomic anion having a van der Waals volume exceeding 100 .ANG..sup.3.

  7. Computer Programming and Group Theory

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-05-01

    the following: SO is the null subgroup S1 = ( eO el e2 ) The above was a very quick walk -through of the group generation options of the system. We will...depth-of-canonical form) first element - canionical form~m] En]; hold =n; ++n; while(canionicatlform(m][n] I 1 \\0’) if(first-element > canonical...canonicalform - 0) m z 0; first element = canonical forin~m] En]; hold = m; ++m; while(m :depth of canionical form) if(first-element < canonical-formlm

  8. Group theories: relevance to group safety studies.

    PubMed

    Benevento, A L

    1998-01-01

    Promoting safety in the workplace has been attempted in a variety of ways. Increasingly, industries are using groups such as safety teams and quality circles to promote worker safety. Group influences on individual behavior and attitudes have long been studied in the social psychology literature, but the theories have not been commonly found outside the psychology arena. This paper describes the group theories of group polarization, risky shift, social loafing, groupthink and team think and attempts to apply these theories to existing studies that examine work group influences on safety. Interesting parallels were found but only one study examined group influences as their primary focus of research. Since groups are increasingly used for safety promotion, future research on safety that studies group influences with respect to current group theories is recommended.

  9. Crystal forms of naproxen.

    PubMed

    Song, Jung-Soon; Sohn, Young-Taek

    2011-01-01

    The objective of this work was to investigate the existence of polymorphs and pseudopolymorphs of naproxen and the transformation of crystal forms. Four crystal forms of naproxen have been isolated by recrystallization and characterized by differential scanning calorimetry, powder X-ray diffractometry and thermogravimetric analysis. The differential scanning calorimetry and powder X-ray diffractometry patterns of the four crystal forms were different respectively. In the dissolution studies in pH 6.8 ± 0.05 buffer equilibrated at 37 ± 0.5°C, the solubility of four crystal forms was similar (within the error range). After storage of 1 month at 0% RH (silica gel, 20°C), 52% RH (saturated solution of Na(2)Cr(2)O(7.2)H(2)O/20°C) and 95% RH (saturated solution of Na(2)HPO(4)/20°C), Form 2 and Form 4 were transformed to Form 1, but Form 3 and Form 1 were not transformed and they were shown to have a good physical stability at room temperature for 1 month.

  10. Pseudo-Equivalent Groups and Linking

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haberman, Shelby J.

    2015-01-01

    Adjustment by minimum discriminant information provides an approach to linking test forms in the case of a nonequivalent groups design with no satisfactory common items. This approach employs background information on individual examinees in each administration so that weighted samples of examinees form pseudo-equivalent groups in the sense that…

  11. Constructing Group Learning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heimlich, Joe E.

    1996-01-01

    Presents guidelines for constructing group learning activities, describes group learning methods (discussion, gaming, role play, simulation, projects), and provides tips for facilitating group activities. (SK)

  12. 12 CFR Appendix A to Part 716 - Model Privacy Form

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... institution, including a group of financial institutions that use a common privacy notice, to meet the content... model form is a standardized form, including page layout, content, format, style, pagination, and... form, as appropriate. 2. The Contents of the Model Privacy Form The model form consists of two...

  13. 12 CFR Appendix A to Part 573 - Model Privacy Form

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... institution, including a group of financial institutions that use a common privacy notice, to meet the content... model form is a standardized form, including page layout, content, format, style, pagination, and... form, as appropriate. 2. The Contents of the Model Privacy Form The model form consists of two...

  14. Emergent Power Hierarchies and Group Performance.

    PubMed

    Frauendorfer, Denise; Schmid Mast, Marianne; Sanchez-Cortes, Dairazalia; Gatica-Perez, Daniel

    2015-10-01

    In newly formed groups, informal hierarchies emerge automatically and readily. In this study, we argue that emergent group hierarchies enhance group performance (Hypothesis 1) and we assume that the more the power hierarchy within a group corresponds to the task-competence differences of the individual group members, the better the group performs (Hypothesis 2). Twelve three-person groups and 28 four-person groups were investigated while solving the Winter Survival Task. Results show that emerging power hierarchies positively impact group performance but the alignment between task-competence and power hierarchy did not affect group performance. Thus, emergent power hierarchies are beneficial for group performance and although they were on average created around individual group members' competence, this correspondence was not a prerequisite for better group performance.

  15. 32 CFR 881.9 - Form prescribed.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 6 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Form prescribed. 881.9 Section 881.9 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE AIR FORCE MILITARY PERSONNEL DETERMINATION OF ACTIVE MILITARY SERVICE AND DISCHARGE FOR CIVILIAN OR CONTRACTUAL GROUPS § 881.9 Form prescribed....

  16. Method of forming nanodielectrics

    DOEpatents

    Tuncer, Enis [Knoxville, TN; Polyzos, Georgios [Oak Ridge, TN

    2014-01-07

    A method of making a nanoparticle filled dielectric material. The method includes mixing nanoparticle precursors with a polymer material and reacting the nanoparticle mixed with the polymer material to form nanoparticles dispersed within the polymer material to form a dielectric composite.

  17. The "Energy" of Form.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blankenship, Jane; Sweeney, Barbara

    1980-01-01

    Examines three types of "energy" of form as form relates to content: "dynamos," potential energy; "energeia," that energy which sustains movement toward an end; and "ergon," that energy which is associated with perfected habit. Uses some examples from contemporary political rhetoric to illustrate this analysis. (JMF)

  18. Using Telestrations™ to Illustrate Small Group Communication Principles

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fedesco, Heather Noel

    2014-01-01

    This single class activity described here: (1) illustrates the importance of interdependence in groups; (2) can be used to measure group productivity and performance; (3) can encourage groups to engage in group learning; and (4) can facilitate group cohesion for newly formed groups. Students will be working in groups for the majority of their…

  19. Method for forming materials

    DOEpatents

    Tolle, Charles R.; Clark, Denis E.; Smartt, Herschel B.; Miller, Karen S.

    2009-10-06

    A material-forming tool and a method for forming a material are described including a shank portion; a shoulder portion that releasably engages the shank portion; a pin that releasably engages the shoulder portion, wherein the pin defines a passageway; and a source of a material coupled in material flowing relation relative to the pin and wherein the material-forming tool is utilized in methodology that includes providing a first material; providing a second material, and placing the second material into contact with the first material; and locally plastically deforming the first material with the material-forming tool so as mix the first material and second material together to form a resulting material having characteristics different from the respective first and second materials.

  20. Group Dynamic Processes in Email Groups

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alpay, Esat

    2005-01-01

    Discussion is given on the relevance of group dynamic processes in promoting decision-making in email discussion groups. General theories on social facilitation and social loafing are considered in the context of email groups, as well as the applicability of psychodynamic and interaction-based models. It is argued that such theories may indeed…

  1. Spin forming development

    SciTech Connect

    Gates, W.G.

    1982-05-01

    Bendix product applications require the capability of fabricating heavy gage, high strength materials. Five commercial sources have been identified that have the capability of spin forming metal thicknesses greater than 9.5 mm and four equiment manufacturers produce machines with this capability. Twelve assemblies selected as candidates for spin forming applications require spin forming of titanium, 250 maraging steel, 17-4 pH stainless steel, Nitronic 40 steel, 304 L stainless steel, and 6061 aluminum. Twelve parts have been cold spin formed from a 250 maraging steel 8.1 mm wall thickness machine preform, and six have been hot spin formed directly from 31.8-mm-thick flat plate. Thirty-three Ti-6Al-4V titanium alloy parts and 26 17-4 pH stainless steel parts have been hot spin formed directly from 31.8-mm-thick plate. Hot spin forming directly from plate has demonstrated the feasibility and favorable economics of this fabrication technique for Bendix applications.

  2. Advanced Electrochemical Waste Forms

    SciTech Connect

    Riley, Brian J.; Crum, Jarrod V.; McCloy, John S.; Matyas, Josef

    2011-12-01

    This is a brief description of PNNL's efforts in FY2011 towards developing advanced electrochemical waste forms. This is a short section that will become part of a larger document being put together by INL.

  3. Handprinted Forms and Characters

    National Institute of Standards and Technology Data Gateway

    NIST Handprinted Forms and Characters (PC database for purchase)   NIST Special Database 19 contains NIST's entire corpus of training materials for handprinted document and character recognition. It supersedes NIST Special Databases 3 and 7.

  4. Image forming apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Satoh, Hisao; Haneda, Satoshi; Ikeda, Tadayoshi; Morita, Shizuo; Fukuchi, Masakazu

    1996-01-01

    In an image forming apparatus having a detachable process cartridge in which an image carrier on which an electrostatic latent image is formed, and a developing unit which develops the electrostatic latent image so that a toner image can be formed, both integrally formed into one unit. There is provided a developer container including a discharge section which can be inserted into a supply opening of the developing unit, and a container in which a predetermined amount of developer is contained, wherein the developer container is provided to the toner supply opening of the developing unit and the developer is supplied into the developing unit housing when a toner stirring screw of the developing unit is rotated.

  5. Alumina forming iron base superalloy

    DOEpatents

    Yamamoto, Yukinori; Muralidharan, Govindarajan; Brady, Michael P.

    2014-08-26

    An austenitic stainless steel alloy, consists essentially of, in weight percent 2.5 to 4 Al; 25 to 35 Ni; 12 to 19 Cr; at least 1, up to 4 total of at least one element selected from the group consisting of Nb and Ta; 0.5 to 3 Ti; less than 0.5 V; 0.1 to 1 of at least on element selected from the group consisting of Zr and Hf; 0.03 to 0.2 C; 0.005 to 0.1 B; and base Fe. The weight percent Fe is greater than the weight percent Ni. The alloy forms an external continuous scale including alumina, and contains coherent precipitates of .gamma.'-Ni.sub.3Al, and a stable essentially single phase FCC austenitic matrix microstructure. The austenitic matrix is essentially delta-ferrite-free and essentially BCC-phase-free.

  6. Seven Keys for Small Group Success

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Armstrong, Joseph L.

    2004-01-01

    One of the most commonly used instructional methods in adult education is the small group. Small group learning is a staple of the adult education enterprise. Small groups are used in higher education, adult literacy and basic education, and many forms of training (Taylor, Marienau, & Fiddler, 2000). Some write solely about it (Brookfield…

  7. Group Work and Multicultural Management Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kelly, Phil

    2009-01-01

    Globalization changes the composition of the adult classroom, increasing diversity and bringing new associated teaching and learning problems; problems with group work. Educators may have goals to teach transferable multicultural group working skills yet learners find such work more challenging, showing a propensity to form groups containing…

  8. Forming techniques and procedures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ronde-Oustau, F.

    1980-09-01

    Several forming techniques are discussed including: (1) cooling stamping and swaging tools by the "Caloduc' methods; (2) non-burr stamping (stamping in a closed die); (3) continuous casting; (4) orbital forging; and (5) plastic deformation and spheroidal graphite iron. In addition, the subject of superplasticity is discussed in some detail, and brief consideration is given to precision forging, forging die castings, sintered forging, squeeze casting, ausforming, magnetoforming, and ultrasonic forming.

  9. Shell forming system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kendall, Jr., James M. (Inventor); Wang, Taylor G. (Inventor); Elleman, Daniel D. (Inventor)

    1990-01-01

    Hollow shells of high uniformity are formed by emitting liquid through an outer nozzle and gas through an inner nozzle, to form a hollow extrusion, by flowing the gas at a velocity between about 1.3 and 10 times the liquid velocity. The natural breakup rate of the extrusion can be increased to decrease shell size by applying periodic perturbations to one of the materials prior to exiting the nozzles, to a nozzle, or to the extrusion.

  10. Unitary Representations of Gauge Groups

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huerfano, Ruth Stella

    I generalize to the case of gauge groups over non-trivial principal bundles representations that I. M. Gelfand, M. I. Graev and A. M. Versik constructed for current groups. The gauge group of the principal G-bundle P over M, (G a Lie group with an euclidean structure, M a compact, connected and oriented manifold), as the smooth sections of the associated group bundle is presented and studied in chapter I. Chapter II describes the symmetric algebra associated to a Hilbert space, its Hilbert structure, a convenient exponential and a total set that later play a key role in the construction of the representation. Chapter III is concerned with the calculus needed to make the space of Lie algebra valued 1-forms a Gaussian L^2-space. This is accomplished by studying general projective systems of finitely measurable spaces and the corresponding systems of sigma -additive measures, all of these leading to the description of a promeasure, a concept modeled after Bourbaki and classical measure theory. In the case of a locally convex vector space E, the corresponding Fourier transform, family of characters and the existence of a promeasure for every quadratic form on E^' are established, so the Gaussian L^2-space associated to a real Hilbert space is constructed. Chapter III finishes by exhibiting the explicit Hilbert space isomorphism between the Gaussian L ^2-space associated to a real Hilbert space and the complexification of its symmetric algebra. In chapter IV taking as a Hilbert space H the L^2-space of the Lie algebra valued 1-forms on P, the gauge group acts on the motion group of H defining in an straight forward fashion the representation desired.

  11. Organization of an undergraduate research group

    SciTech Connect

    Hill, J.; Noteboom, E.

    1995-04-01

    Traditionally, research groups consist of senior physicists, staff members, and graduate students. The physics department at Creighton University has formed a Relativistic Heavy Ion physics research group consisting primarily of undergraduate students. Although senior staff and graduate students are actively involved, undergraduate research and the education of undergraduates is the focus of the group. The presentation, given by two undergraduate members of the group, will outline progress made in the group`s organization, discuss the benefits to the undergraduate group members, and speak to the balance which must be struck between education concerns and research goals.

  12. Forming a Cyber Coalition

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-04-06

    update and harmonize their criminal laws against hacking, infringements on copyrights, computer facilitated fraud, child pornography , and other illicit...unlawful use of force or violence , committed by a group(s) of two or more individuals, against persons or property, to intimidate or coerce a...The unlawful use of, or threatened use, of force or violence against individuals or property, to coerce and intimidate governments or societies, often

  13. Can Groups Learn?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cohen, Elizabeth G.; Lotan, Rachel A.; Abram, Percy L.; Scarloss, Beth A.; Schultz, Susan E.

    2002-01-01

    Evaluated the work of sixth grade students' creative problem-solving groups, proposing that providing students with specific guidelines about what makes an exemplary group product would improve the character of the discussion and quality of the group product. Student groups did learn as a result of their discussions and creation of group products.…

  14. Small Groups in Action

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Suessmuth, Patrick

    1974-01-01

    Small groups can sometimes be difficult to set up and work with properly. A number of tips for small group instruction are divided into seven areas: (1) presenting tasks; (2) group seating; (3) task time; (4) answering questions; (5) teacher's role in observing groups; (6) group noise level patterns; and (7) serial take-ups. (BP)

  15. Group Work: How to Use Groups Effectively

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burke, Alison

    2011-01-01

    Many students cringe and groan when told that they will need to work in a group. However, group work has been found to be good for students and good for teachers. Employers want college graduates to have developed teamwork skills. Additionally, students who participate in collaborative learning get better grades, are more satisfied with their…

  16. Group Time: Building Language at Group Time

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Church, Ellen Booth

    2004-01-01

    This article features energizing and surprising activities for children at group time. In the drawing activity, children are asked to give instructions on how to draw a picture using vocabulary and descriptive language. In the mailbox activity, children will be surprised to discover that they have mail at group time. Mailboxes can be used for…

  17. UltraForm finishing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fess, E.; Schoen, J.; Bechtold, M.; Mohring, D.

    2005-05-01

    A new compliant sub-aperture optical finishing technique is being investigated for the removal of mid-spatial frequency artifacts and smoothing of hard polycrystalline infrared ceramics for aspheric applications and conformal shaped optics. The UltraForm concept was developed by OptiPro Systems, Ontario, NY, and is a joint process development effort with the Center for Optics manufacturing (COM). The UltraForm tool is a pressurized, elastomeric bladder in the shape of a toroid. Finishing pads are attached to the periphery, allowing the use of a wide variety of pad materials and abrasive selections. Experimentation has been conducted using both slurry mixes and fixed abrasive pads. The toroidal tool is rotated while the compliant tool is compressed into contact with the surface. Currently this process has specific interest for the finishing of conformal ALON Domes. Also to be discussed will be new versions of the UltraForm Tools which are currently be developed and tested.

  18. Microbicide dosage forms.

    PubMed

    Rohan, L C; Devlin, B; Yang, H

    2014-01-01

    Microbicides are topically applied, user controlled dosage forms that are being developed to prevent the transmission of HIV during coitus. Early candidates focused on coitally dependent dosage forms such as gels and creams. More recent development has focused on broadening the coitally dependent options through the introduction of films and fast dissolving tablets. Additionally, it has become important to have longer acting products to minimize the burden of user compliance and thus vaginal rings have been developed providing sustained delivery of antiretroviral drugs. This chapter discusses the history of microbicides along with a detailed description of coitally dependent products, gels, films, tablets diaphragms, as well as coitally independent dosage forms such as vaginal rings and the introduction of a new technology, electrospun fibers.

  19. Physical forms of MIPs.

    PubMed

    Biffis, Andrea; Dvorakova, Gita; Falcimaigne-Cordin, Aude

    2012-01-01

    The current state of the art in the development of methodologies for the preparation of MIPs in predetermined physical forms is critically reviewed, with particular attention being paid to the forms most widely employed in practical applications, such as spherical beads in the micro- to nanometer range, microgels, monoliths, membranes. Although applications of the various MIP physical forms are mentioned, the focus of the paper is mainly on the description of the various preparative methods. The aim is to provide the reader with an overview of the latest achievements in the field, as well as with a mean for critically evaluating the various proposed methodologies towards an envisaged application. The review covers the literature up to early 2010, with special emphasis on the developments of the last 10 years.

  20. Hydrogen forming reaction process

    SciTech Connect

    Marianowski, L.G.; Fleming, D.K.

    1989-03-07

    A hydrogen forming process is described, comprising: conducting in a hydrogen production zone a chemical reaction forming mixed gases comprising molecular hydrogen; contacting one side of a hydrogen ion porous and molecular gas nonporous metallic foil with the mixed gases in the hydrogen production zone; dissociating the molecular hydrogen to ionic hydrogen on the one side of the metallic foil; passing the ionic hydrogen through the metallic foil to its other side; and withdrawing hydrogen from the other side of the metallic foil, thereby removing hydrogen from the hydrogen production zone.

  1. Emotions: form follows function.

    PubMed

    Farb, Norman A S; Chapman, Hanah A; Anderson, Adam K

    2013-06-01

    Emotion research has been divided by debate as to whether emotions are universal in form or cognitively constructed. We review an emerging approach that focuses on function rather than form. Functional affective science suggests that the particular origin of an emotion is relatively unimportant; instead, emotions can be understood in terms of a rapidly deployed set of mechanisms that structure perception, cognition and behavior to facilitate goal fulfillment. Evidence from this approach suggests at least three major functions of emotion: sensory gating, embodying affect, and integrating knowledge toward goal resolution. These functions appear to be universal and automatically activated, yet also moderated by conscious representation and regulatory efforts.

  2. Group B Strep Infection

    MedlinePlus

    ... Questions OverviewWhat is group B strep?Group B streptococcus, or group B strep for short, is a ... can develop an infection of the lungs (called pneumonia), bloodstream (called sepsis), or the fluid around the ...

  3. Fostering group identification and creativity in diverse groups: the role of individuation and self-verification.

    PubMed

    Swann, William B; Kwan, Virginia S Y; Polzer, Jeffrey T; Milton, Laurie P

    2003-11-01

    A longitudinal study examined the interplay of identity negotiation processes and diversity in small groups of master's of business administration (MBA) students. When perceivers formed relatively positive impressions of other group members, higher diversity predicted more individuation of targets. When perceivers formed relatively neutral impressions of other group members, however, higher diversity predicted less individuation of targets. Individuation at the outset of the semester predicted self-verification effects several weeks later, and self-verification, in turn, predicted group identification and creative task performance. The authors conclude that contrary to self-categorization theory, fostering individuation and self-verification in diverse groups may maximize group identification and productivity.

  4. ILDG Middleware Working Group Status Report

    SciTech Connect

    B. Joo; W. Watson

    2004-09-01

    We report on the status of the ILDG Middleware Working Group. The Middleware Working Group was formed with the aim of designing standard middleware to allow the interoperation of the data grids of ILDG member collaborations. Details of the working group are given. In this contribution we outline the role of middleware in the ILDG, present our proposed middleware architecture and discuss our current status and future work within the working group.

  5. Sixth Form Examining Methods.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schools Council, London (England).

    The methods of examining in the sixth form of secondary education in England and Wales is the basis for discussion by subject committees of the Schools Council. Special reference is made to internal examinations, oral assessments, teacher's assessments, the relaxing of the time limits for examination, and the use of aids during examinations. The…

  6. Many Forms of Culture

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cohen, Adam B.

    2009-01-01

    Psychologists interested in culture have focused primarily on East-West differences in individualism-collectivism, or independent-interdependent self-construal. As important as this dimension is, there are many other forms of culture with many dimensions of cultural variability. Selecting from among the many understudied cultures in psychology,…

  7. Geodiversity and land form

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gray, Murray

    2014-05-01

    The Earth's surface has a dynamic and topographically varied natural landscape. In some cases the resulting landforms are given generic names reflecting their form and/or origin, (e.g. sand dunes, eskers, ox-bow lakes) but in many cases the land surface has a more amorphous form and is less easily categorized other than at a landscape scale (e.g. dissected plateau, Chalk downland). Across much of Europe, while the natural vegetation has been removed or radically modified, the natural land form/topography remains in tact. In this context and in terms of geoconservation we ought to be: • allowing the dynamic natural processes that create, carve and modify landscapes to continue to operate; and • retaining natural topographic character and geomorphological authenticity in the face of human actions seeking to remodel the land surface. In this presentation examples of this approach to geoconservation of land form will be given from the UK and other parts of the world. This will include examples of both appropriate and inappropriate topographic modifications.

  8. Literature: Internal Forms.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Regional Curriculum Project, Atlanta, GA.

    This curriculum guide in literature, developed as part of a total English curriculum for pre-kindergarten through grade 10, suggests that students can best understand literature by recognizing its internal forms (i.e., characteristics that recur in settings, characters, and narrative patterns). Materials cover (1) an overview for teachers on the…

  9. Bristol Stool Form Scale

    MedlinePlus

    ... Stool Form Scale Type Description Type 1 Separate hard lumps, like nuts Image Type 2 Sausage-shaped but lumpy Type 3 Like a sausage or snake but with cracks on its surface Type 4 Like a sausage or snake, smooth and soft ...

  10. Forms of Soft Sculpture

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tucker, Dorothy

    1978-01-01

    For the past several years, students at Madison Senior High School in San Diego have responded to the tactile texture and draping quality of soft materials. They experimented enthusiastically with three-dimensional forms made out of foam rubber. Here is the result of their efforts and experimentation. (Author/RK)

  11. Apparatus for forming targets

    DOEpatents

    Woerner, Robert L.

    1980-01-01

    Apparatus and method for cryoinduced uniform deposition of cryogenic materials, such as deuterium-tritium (DT) mixtures, on the inner surface of hollow spherical members, such as inertially imploded targets. By vaporizing and quickly refreezing cryogenic materials contained within a hollow spherical member, a uniform layer of the materials is formed on the inner surface of the spherical member. Heating of the cryogenic material, located within a non-isothermal compact freezing cell, is accomplished by an electrical heat pulse, whereafter the material is quickly frozen forming a uniform layer on the inner surface of the spherical member. The method is not restricted to producing a frozen layer on only the inner surface of the innermost hollow member, but where multiple concentric hollow spheres are involved, such as in multiple shell targets for lasers, electron beams, etc., layers of cryogenic material may also be formed on the inner surface of intermediate or outer spherical members, thus providing the capability of forming targets having multiple concentric layers or shells of frozen DT.

  12. Method for forming targets

    DOEpatents

    Woerner, Robert L.

    1979-01-01

    Method for cryoinduced uniform deposition of cryogenic materials, such as deuterium-tritium (DT) mixtures, on the inner surface of hollow spherical members, such as inertially imploded targets. By vaporizing and quickly refreezing cryogenic materials contained within a hollow spherical member, a uniform layer of the materials is formed on the inner surface of the spherical member. Heating of the cryogenic material, located within a non-isothermal compact freezing cell, is accomplished by an electrical heat pulse, whereafter the material is quickly frozen forming a uniform layer on the inner surface of the spherical member. The method is not restricted to producing a frozen layer on only the inner surface of the innermost hollow member, but where multiple concentric hollow spheres are involved, such as in multiple shell targets for lasers, electron beams, etc., layers of cryogenic material may also be formed on the inner surface of intermediate or outer spherical members, thus providing the capability of forming targets having multiple concentric layers or shells of frozen DT.

  13. High energy forming facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ciurlionis, B.

    1967-01-01

    Watertight, high-explosive forming facility, 25 feet in diameter and 15 feet deep, withstands repeated explosions of 10 pounds of TNT equivalent. The shell is fabricated of high strength steel and allows various structural elements to deform or move elastically and independently while retaining structural integrity.

  14. Nucleon electromagnetic form factors

    SciTech Connect

    Kees de Jager

    2000-01-01

    A review of data on the nucleon electromagnetic form factors in the space-like region is presented. Recent results from experiments using polarized beams and polarized targets or nucleon recoil polarimeters have yielded a significant improvement on the precision of the data obtained with the traditional Rosenbluth separation. Future plans for extended measurements are outlined.

  15. Nucleon Magnetic Form Factors

    SciTech Connect

    Kees de Jager

    2001-12-01

    A review of data on the nucleon electromagnetic form factors in the space-like region is presented. Recent results from experiments using polarized beams and polarized targets or nucleon recoil polarimeters have yielded a significant improvement on the precision of the data obtained with the traditional Rosenbluth separation. Future plans for extended measurements are outlined.

  16. Nucleon Form Factors

    SciTech Connect

    Kees de Jager

    2002-10-01

    A review of data on the nucleon electro-weak form factors in the space-like region is presented. Recent results from experiments using polarized beams and either polarized targets or nucleon recoil polarimeters have yielded a significant improvement on the precision of the electromagnetic data obtained with the traditional Rosenbluth separation. An outlook is presented of planned experiments.

  17. Formed photovoltaic module busbars

    DOEpatents

    Rose, Douglas; Daroczi, Shan; Phu, Thomas

    2015-11-10

    A cell connection piece for a photovoltaic module is disclosed herein. The cell connection piece includes an interconnect bus, a plurality of bus tabs unitarily formed with the interconnect bus, and a terminal bus coupled with the interconnect bus. The plurality of bus tabs extend from the interconnect bus. The terminal bus includes a non-linear portion.

  18. Cluster functional renormalization group

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reuther, Johannes; Thomale, Ronny

    2014-01-01

    Functional renormalization group (FRG) has become a diverse and powerful tool to derive effective low-energy scattering vertices of interacting many-body systems. Starting from a free expansion point of the action, the flow of the RG parameter Λ allows us to trace the evolution of the effective one- and two-particle vertices towards low energies by taking into account the vertex corrections between all parquet channels in an unbiased fashion. In this work, we generalize the expansion point at which the diagrammatic resummation procedure is initiated from a free UV limit to a cluster product state. We formulate a cluster FRG scheme where the noninteracting building blocks (i.e., decoupled spin clusters) are treated exactly, and the intercluster couplings are addressed via RG. As a benchmark study, we apply our cluster FRG scheme to the spin-1/2 bilayer Heisenberg model (BHM) on a square lattice where the neighboring sites in the two layers form the individual two-site clusters. Comparing with existing numerical evidence for the BHM, we obtain reasonable findings for the spin susceptibility, the spin-triplet excitation energy, and quasiparticle weight even in coupling regimes close to antiferromagnetic order. The concept of cluster FRG promises applications to a large class of interacting electron systems.

  19. 12 CFR Appendix A to Part 40 - Model Privacy Form

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... institution, including a group of financial institutions that use a common privacy notice, to meet the content... form is a standardized form, including page layout, content, format, style, pagination, and shading... appropriate. 2. The Contents of the Model Privacy Form The model form consists of two pages, which may...

  20. Cooperation during cultural group formation promotes trust towards members of out-groups

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Xiaofei Sophia; Houser, Daniel

    2013-01-01

    People often cooperate with members of their own group, and discriminate against members of other groups. Previous research establishes that cultural groups can form endogenously, and that these groups demonstrate in-group favouritism. Given the presence of cultural groups, the previous literature argues that cultural evolution selects for groups that exhibit parochial altruism. The source of initial variation in these traits, however, remains uninformed. We show here that a group's economic production environment may substantially influence parochial tendencies, with groups formed around more cooperative production (CP) displaying less parochialism than groups formed around more independent production (IP) processes. Participants randomized into CP and IP production tasks formed cultural groups, and subsequently played hidden-action trust games with in-group and out-group trustees. We found CP to be associated with significantly greater sharing and exchanging behaviours than IP. In trust games, significant parochial altruism (in-group favouritism combined with out-group discrimination) was displayed by members of IP groups. By contrast, members of CP groups did not engage in either in-group favouritism or out-group discrimination. Further, we found the absence of out-group discrimination in CP to persist even following ‘betrayal’. Finally, belief data suggest that members of CP are not more intrinsically generous than IP members, but rather more likely to believe that out-group trustees will positively reciprocate. Our results have important implications for anyone interested in building cooperative teams, and shed new light on connections between culture and cooperation. PMID:23658200

  1. Pride, Shame, and Group Identification

    PubMed Central

    Salice, Alessandro; Montes Sánchez, Alba

    2016-01-01

    Self-conscious emotions such as shame and pride are emotions that typically focus on the self of the person who feels them. In other words, the intentional object of these emotions is assumed to be the subject that experiences them. Many reasons speak in its favor and yet this account seems to leave a question open: how to cash out those cases in which one genuinely feels ashamed or proud of what someone else does? This paper contends that such cases do not necessarily challenge the idea that shame and pride are about the emoting subject. Rather, we claim that some of the most paradigmatic scenarios of shame and pride induced by others can be accommodated by taking seriously the consideration that, in such cases, the subject “group-identifies” with the other. This is the idea that, in feeling these forms of shame or pride, the subject is conceiving of herself as a member of the same group as the subject acting shamefully or in an admirable way. In other words, these peculiar emotive responses are elicited in the subject insofar as, and to the extent that, she is (or sees herself as being) a member of a group – the group to which those who act shamefully or admirably also belong. By looking into the way in which the notion of group identification can allow for an account of hetero-induced shame and pride, this paper attempts to achieve a sort of mutual enlightenment that brings to light not only an important and generally neglected form of self-conscious emotions, but also relevant features of group identification. In particular, it generates evidence for the idea that group identification is a psychological process that the subject does not have to carry out intentionally in the sense that it is not necessarily triggered by the subject’s conative states like desires or intentions. PMID:27199797

  2. The Group Experience

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wadsworth, John

    2008-01-01

    Knowledge of group dynamics and leadership activities is a component of the CORE Standards for the Master's degree curriculum in Rehabilitation Counseling. A group experience is often included as a learning activity in rehabilitation counselor education curricula as an instructional method of imparting knowledge of group dynamics. Group experience…

  3. Waste-form development

    SciTech Connect

    Neilson, R.M. Jr.; Colombo, P.

    1982-01-01

    Contemporary solidification agents are being investigated relative to their applications to major fuel cycle and non-fuel cycle low-level waste (LLW) streams. Work is being conducted to determine the range of conditions under which these solidification agents can be applied to specific LLW streams. These studies are directed primarily towards defining operating parameters for both improved solidification of problem wastes and solidification of new LLW streams generated from advanced volume reduction technologies. Work is being conducted to measure relevant waste form properties. These data will be compiled and evaluated to demonstrate compliance with waste form performance and shallow land burial acceptance criteria and transportation requirements (both as they exist and as they are modified with time).

  4. Formed HIP Can Processing

    SciTech Connect

    Clarke, Kester Diederik

    2015-07-27

    The intent of this report is to document a procedure used at LANL for HIP bonding aluminum cladding to U-10Mo fuel foils using a formed HIP can for the Domestic Reactor Conversion program in the NNSA Office of Material, Management and Minimization, and provide some details that may not have been published elsewhere. The HIP process is based on the procedures that have been used to develop the formed HIP can process, including the baseline process developed at Idaho National Laboratory (INL). The HIP bonding cladding process development is summarized in the listed references. Further iterations with Babcock & Wilcox (B&W) to refine the process to meet production and facility requirements is expected.

  5. How Stars Form

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKee, Christopher F.

    2017-01-01

    Stars are the atoms of the universe. The process by which stars form is at the nexus of astrophysics since they are believed to be responsible for the re-ionization of the universe, they created the heavy elements, they play a central role in the formation and evolution of galaxies, and their formation naturally leads to the formation of planets. Whereas early work on star formation was based on the assumption that it is a quiescent process, it is now believed that turbulence plays a dominant role. In this overview, I shall discuss the evolution of our understanding of how stars form and current ideas about the stellar initial mass function and the rate of star formation.

  6. Tube-Forming Assays.

    PubMed

    Brown, Ryan M; Meah, Christopher J; Heath, Victoria L; Styles, Iain B; Bicknell, Roy

    2016-01-01

    Angiogenesis involves the generation of new blood vessels from the existing vasculature and is dependent on many growth factors and signaling events. In vivo angiogenesis is dynamic and complex, meaning assays are commonly utilized to explore specific targets for research into this area. Tube-forming assays offer an excellent overview of the molecular processes in angiogenesis. The Matrigel tube forming assay is a simple-to-implement but powerful tool for identifying biomolecules involved in angiogenesis. A detailed experimental protocol on the implementation of the assay is described in conjunction with an in-depth review of methods that can be applied to the analysis of the tube formation. In addition, an ImageJ plug-in is presented which allows automatic quantification of tube images reducing analysis times while removing user bias and subjectivity.

  7. Evoked Cultural Forms

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-12-01

    individual (1) pathological behaviors (such as those exhibited by Obsessive Compulsive Disorder (OCD) patients) and (2) non-pathological precautionary...McClelland, J., et al. (2001). Compulsive Checking Behavior of Quinpirole-Sensitized Rats as an Animal Model of Obsessive - Compulsive Disorder (OCD...Form and Control. BMC Neuroscience, 2(1), 4. Szechtman, H., & Woody, E. (2004). Obsessive - Compulsive disorder as a disturbance of security Motivation

  8. GlassForm

    SciTech Connect

    2011-09-16

    GlassForm is a software tool for generating preliminary waste glass formulas for a given waste stream. The software is useful because it reduces the number of verification melts required to develop a suitable additive composition. The software includes property models that calculate glass properties of interest from the chemical composition of the waste glass. The software includes property models for glass viscosity, electrical conductivity, glass transition temperature, and leach resistance as measured by the 7-day product consistency test (PCT).

  9. Atomization methods for forming magnet powders

    SciTech Connect

    Sellers, C.H.; Branagan, D.J.; Hyde, T.A.

    2000-02-08

    The invention encompasses methods of utilizing atomization, methods for forming magnet powders, methods for forming magnets, and methods for forming bonded magnets. The invention further encompasses methods for simulating atomization conditions. In one aspect, the invention includes an atomization method for forming a magnet powder comprising: (a) forming a melt comprising R{sub 2.1}Q{sub 13.9}B{sub 1}, Z and X, wherein R is a rare earth element; X is an element selected from the group consisting of carbon, nitrogen, oxygen and mixtures thereof; Q is an element selected from the group consisting of Fe, Co and mixtures thereof; and Z is an element selected from the group consisting of Ti, Zr, Hf and mixtures thereof; (b) atomizing the melt to form generally spherical alloy powder granules having an internal structure comprising at least one of a substantially amorphous phase or a substantially nanocrystalline phase; and (c) heat treating the alloy powder to increase an energy product of the alloy powder; after the heat treatment, the alloy powder comprising an energy product of at least 10 MGOe. In another aspect, the invention includes a magnet comprising R, Q, B, Z and X, wherein R is a rare earth element; X is an element selected from the group consisting of carbon, nitrogen, oxygen and mixtures thereof; Q is an element selected from the group consisting of Fe, Co and mixtures thereof; and Z is an element selected from the group consisting of Ti, Zr, Hf and mixtures thereof; the magnet comprising an internal structure comprising R{sub 2.1}Q{sub 13.9}B{sub 1}.

  10. Atomization methods for forming magnet powders

    DOEpatents

    Sellers, Charles H.; Branagan, Daniel J.; Hyde, Timothy A.

    2000-01-01

    The invention encompasses methods of utilizing atomization, methods for forming magnet powders, methods for forming magnets, and methods for forming bonded magnets. The invention further encompasses methods for simulating atomization conditions. In one aspect, the invention includes an atomization method for forming a magnet powder comprising: a) forming a melt comprising R.sub.2.1 Q.sub.13.9 B.sub.1, Z and X, wherein R is a rare earth element; X is an element selected from the group consisting of carbon, nitrogen, oxygen and mixtures thereof; Q is an element selected from the group consisting of Fe, Co and mixtures thereof; and Z is an element selected from the group consisting of Ti, Zr, Hf and mixtures thereof; b) atomizing the melt to form generally spherical alloy powder granules having an internal structure comprising at least one of a substantially amorphous phase or a substantially nanocrystalline phase; and c) heat treating the alloy powder to increase an energy product of the alloy powder; after the heat treatment, the alloy powder comprising an energy product of at least 10 MGOe. In another aspect, the invention includes a magnet comprising R, Q, B, Z and X, wherein R is a rare earth element; X is an element selected from the group consisting of carbon, nitrogen, oxygen and mixtures thereof; Q is an element selected from the group consisting of Fe, Co and mixtures thereof; and Z is an element selected from the group consisting of Ti, Zr, Hf and mixtures thereof; the magnet comprising an internal structure comprising R.sub.2.1 Q.sub.13.9 B.sub.1.

  11. Nucleon Electromagnetic Form Factors

    SciTech Connect

    Kees de Jager

    2004-08-01

    Although nucleons account for nearly all the visible mass in the universe, they have a complicated structure that is still incompletely understood. The first indication that nucleons have an internal structure, was the measurement of the proton magnetic moment by Frisch and Stern (1933) which revealed a large deviation from the value expected for a point-like Dirac particle. The investigation of the spatial structure of the nucleon, resulting in the first quantitative measurement of the proton charge radius, was initiated by the HEPL (Stanford) experiments in the 1950s, for which Hofstadter was awarded the 1961 Nobel prize. The first indication of a non-zero neutron charge distribution was obtained by scattering thermal neutrons off atomic electrons. The recent revival of its experimental study through the operational implementation of novel instrumentation has instigated a strong theoretical interest. Nucleon electro-magnetic form factors (EMFFs) are optimally studied through the exchange of a virtual photon, in elastic electron-nucleon scattering. The momentum transferred to the nucleon by the virtual photon can be selected to probe different scales of the nucleon, from integral properties such as the charge radius to scaling properties of its internal constituents. Polarization instrumentation, polarized beams and targets, and the measurement of the polarization of the recoiling nucleon have been essential in the accurate separation of the charge and magnetic form factors and in studies of the elusive neutron charge form factor.

  12. Between-group competition elicits within-group cooperation in children

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Majolo, Bonaventura; Maréchal, Laëtitia

    2017-02-01

    Aggressive interactions between groups are frequent in human societies and can bear significant fitness costs and benefits (e.g. death or access to resources). During between-group competitive interactions, more cohesive groups (i.e. groups formed by individuals who cooperate in group defence) should out-perform less cohesive groups, other factors being equal (e.g. group size). The cost/benefit of between-group competition are thought to have driven correlated evolution of traits that favour between-group aggression and within-group cooperation (e.g. parochial altruism). Our aim was to analyse whether the proximate relationship between between-group competition and within-group cooperation is found in 3–10 years old children and the developmental trajectory of such a relationship. We used a large cohort of children (n = 120) and tested whether simulated between-group competition increased within-group cooperation (i.e. how much of a resource children were giving to their group companions) in two experiments. We found greater within-group cooperation when groups of four children were competing with other groups then in the control condition (no between-group competition). Within-group cooperation increased with age. Our study suggests that parochial altruism and in-group/out-group biases emerge early during the course of human development.

  13. Between-group competition elicits within-group cooperation in children.

    PubMed

    Majolo, Bonaventura; Maréchal, Laëtitia

    2017-02-24

    Aggressive interactions between groups are frequent in human societies and can bear significant fitness costs and benefits (e.g. death or access to resources). During between-group competitive interactions, more cohesive groups (i.e. groups formed by individuals who cooperate in group defence) should out-perform less cohesive groups, other factors being equal (e.g. group size). The cost/benefit of between-group competition are thought to have driven correlated evolution of traits that favour between-group aggression and within-group cooperation (e.g. parochial altruism). Our aim was to analyse whether the proximate relationship between between-group competition and within-group cooperation is found in 3-10 years old children and the developmental trajectory of such a relationship. We used a large cohort of children (n = 120) and tested whether simulated between-group competition increased within-group cooperation (i.e. how much of a resource children were giving to their group companions) in two experiments. We found greater within-group cooperation when groups of four children were competing with other groups then in the control condition (no between-group competition). Within-group cooperation increased with age. Our study suggests that parochial altruism and in-group/out-group biases emerge early during the course of human development.

  14. Between-group competition elicits within-group cooperation in children

    PubMed Central

    Majolo, Bonaventura; Maréchal, Laëtitia

    2017-01-01

    Aggressive interactions between groups are frequent in human societies and can bear significant fitness costs and benefits (e.g. death or access to resources). During between-group competitive interactions, more cohesive groups (i.e. groups formed by individuals who cooperate in group defence) should out-perform less cohesive groups, other factors being equal (e.g. group size). The cost/benefit of between-group competition are thought to have driven correlated evolution of traits that favour between-group aggression and within-group cooperation (e.g. parochial altruism). Our aim was to analyse whether the proximate relationship between between-group competition and within-group cooperation is found in 3–10 years old children and the developmental trajectory of such a relationship. We used a large cohort of children (n = 120) and tested whether simulated between-group competition increased within-group cooperation (i.e. how much of a resource children were giving to their group companions) in two experiments. We found greater within-group cooperation when groups of four children were competing with other groups then in the control condition (no between-group competition). Within-group cooperation increased with age. Our study suggests that parochial altruism and in-group/out-group biases emerge early during the course of human development. PMID:28233820

  15. Electromagnetic pion form factor

    SciTech Connect

    Roberts, C.D.

    1995-08-01

    A phenomenological Dyson-Schwinger/Bethe-Salpeter equation approach to QCD, formalized in terms of a QCD-based model field theory, the Global Color-symmetry Model (GCM), was used to calculate the generalized impulse approximation contribution to the electromagnetic pion form factor at space-like q{sup 2} on the domain [0,10] GeV{sup 2}. In effective field theories this form factor is sometimes understood as simply being due to Vector Meson Dominance (VMD) but this does not allow for a simple connection with QCD where the VMD contribution is of higher order than that of the quark core. In the GCM the pion is treated as a composite bound state of a confined quark and antiquark interacting via the exchange of colored vector-bosons. A direct study of the quark core contribution is made, using a quark propagator that manifests the large space-like-q{sup 2} properties of QCD, parameterizes the infrared behavior and incorporates confinement. It is shown that the few parameters which characterize the infrared form of the quark propagator may be chosen so as to yield excellent agreement with the available data. In doing this one directly relates experimental observables to properties of QCD at small space-like-q{sup 2}. The incorporation of confinement eliminates endpoint and pinch singularities in the calculation of F{sub {pi}}(q{sup 2}). With asymptotic freedom manifest in the dressed quark propagator the calculation yields q{sup 4}F{sub {pi}}(q{sup 2}) = constant, up to [q{sup 2}]- corrections, for space-like-q{sup 2} {approx_gt} 35 GeV{sup 2}, which indicates that soft, nonperturbative contributions dominate the form factor at presently accessible q{sup 2}. This means that the often-used factorization Ansatz fails in this exclusive process. A paper describing this work was submitted for publication. In addition, these results formed the basis for an invited presentation at a workshop on chiral dynamics and will be published in the proceedings.

  16. Group Psychotherapy in Iceland.

    PubMed

    Ívarsson, Ómar

    2015-10-01

    In this overview of group psychotherapy in Iceland, an attempt will be made to describe how it is practiced today, give some glimpses into its earlier history, and clarify seven issues: (1) the standing of group psychotherapy in Iceland, its previous history, and the theoretical orientation of dynamic group therapy in the country; (2) the role of group therapy in the health care system; (3) how training in group therapy is organized; (4) the relationship between group psychotherapy research and clinical practice; (5) which issues/processes can be identified as unique to therapy groups in Iceland; and (6) how important are group-related issues within the social background of the country; and (7) what group work holds for the future.

  17. Miscellaneous Waste-Form FEPs

    SciTech Connect

    A. Schenker

    2000-12-08

    The US DOE must provide a reasonable assurance that the performance objectives for the Yucca Mountain Project (YMP) potential radioactive-waste repository can be achieved for a 10,000-year post-closure period. The guidance that mandates this direction is under the provisions of 10 CFR Part 63 and the US Department of Energy's ''Revised Interim Guidance Pending Issuance of New US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) Regulations (Revision 01, July 22, 1999), for Yucca Mountain, Nevada'' (Dyer 1999 and herein referred to as DOE's Interim Guidance). This assurance must be demonstrated in the form of a performance assessment that: (1) identifies the features, events, and processes (FEPs) that might affect the performance of the potential geologic repository; (2) examines the effects of such FEPs on the performance of the potential geologic repository; (3) estimates the expected annual dose to a specified receptor group; and (4) provides the technical basis for inclusion or exclusion of specific FEPs.

  18. Forms and functions of human SDR enzymes.

    PubMed

    Oppermann, U C; Filling, C; Jörnvall, H

    2001-01-30

    Short-chain dehydrogenases/reductases (SDR) are defined by distinct, common sequence motifs but constitute a functionally heterogenous superfamily of enzymes. At present, well over 1600 members from all forms of life are annotated in databases. Using the defined sequence motifs as queries, 37 distinct human members of the SDR family can be retrieved. The functional assignments of these forms fall minimally into three main groups, enzymes involved in intermediary metabolism, enzymes participating in lipid hormone and mediator metabolism, and open reading frames (ORFs) of yet undeciphered function. This overview, prepared just before completion of the human genome project, gives the different human SDR forms and relates them to human diseases.

  19. What Makes a "Good Group"? Exploring the Characteristics and Performance of Undergraduate Student Groups

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Channon, S. B.; Davis, R. C.; Goode, N. T.; May, S. A.

    2017-01-01

    Group work forms the foundation for much of student learning within higher education, and has many educational, social and professional benefits. This study aimed to explore the determinants of success or failure for undergraduate student teams and to define a "good group" through considering three aspects of group success: the task, the…

  20. Using Student Skill Self-Assessments To Get Balanced Groups for Group Projects.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blowers, Paul

    2003-01-01

    Discusses common methods of forming student groups for group work, suggesting that many are ineffective, then describes a student self-assessment method used to group students according to their skills. Asserts that the method, used for 2 years in both sophomore- and senior-level courses, has been proven to prevent intragroup skill imbalances. (EV)

  1. The GROOP Effect: Groups Mimic Group Actions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tsai, Jessica Chia-Chin; Sebanz, Natalie; Knoblich, Gunther

    2011-01-01

    Research on perception-action links has focused on an interpersonal level, demonstrating effects of observing individual actions on performance. The present study investigated perception-action matching at an inter-group level. Pairs of participants responded to hand movements that were performed by two individuals who used one hand each or they…

  2. Bipolar pulse forming line

    DOEpatents

    Rhodes, Mark A.

    2008-10-21

    A bipolar pulse forming transmission line module for linear induction accelerators having first, second, third, fourth, and fifth planar conductors which form an interleaved stack with dielectric layers between the conductors. Each conductor has a first end, and a second end adjacent an acceleration axis. The first and second planar conductors are connected to each other at the second ends, the fourth and fifth planar conductors are connected to each other at the second ends, and the first and fifth planar conductors are connected to each other at the first ends via a shorting plate adjacent the first ends. The third planar conductor is electrically connectable to a high voltage source, and an internal switch functions to short a high voltage from the first end of the third planar conductor to the first end of the fourth planar conductor to produce a bipolar pulse at the acceleration axis with a zero net time integral. Improved access to the switch is enabled by an aperture through the shorting plate and the proximity of the aperture to the switch.

  3. Working with Groups.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morris, Joan, Ed.

    1984-01-01

    Describes nine Canadian programs for counseling groups of students. Topics include introducing computer-assisted guidance, future challenges for counselors, sociometry, sexuality, parent counseling, reluctant students, shyness, peer groups, education for living, and guidance advisory committees. (JAC)

  4. What Makes Groups Tick.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allcorn, Seth

    1985-01-01

    By reviewing this analysis of the behavior of both groups and individuals in groups, human resources managers can learn to tell whether committees, task forces, and departments may be encouraging or inhibiting the work they set out to do. (Author)

  5. Group B streptococcus - pregnancy

    MedlinePlus

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000511.htm Group B streptococcus - pregnancy To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Group B streptococcus (GBS) is a type of bacteria that some ...

  6. The group selection controversy.

    PubMed

    Leigh, E G

    2010-01-01

    Many thought Darwinian natural selection could not explain altruism. This error led Wynne-Edwards to explain sustainable exploitation in animals by selection against overexploiting groups. Williams riposted that selection among groups rarely overrides within-group selection. Hamilton showed that altruism can evolve through kin selection. How strongly does group selection influence evolution? Following Price, Hamilton showed how levels of selection interact: group selection prevails if Hamilton's rule applies. Several showed that group selection drove some major evolutionary transitions. Following Hamilton's lead, Queller extended Hamilton's rule, replacing genealogical relatedness by the regression on an actor's genotypic altruism of interacting neighbours' phenotypic altruism. Price's theorem shows the generality of Hamilton's rule. All instances of group selection can be viewed as increasing inclusive fitness of autosomal genomes. Nonetheless, to grasp fully how cooperation and altruism evolve, most biologists need more concrete concepts like kin selection, group selection and selection among individuals for their common good.

  7. Gestalt Interactional Groups

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harman, Robert L.; Franklin, Richard W.

    1975-01-01

    Gestalt therapy in groups is not limited to individual work in the presence of an audience. Describes several ways to involve gestalt groups interactionally. Interactions described focus on learning by doing and discovering, and are noninterpretive. (Author/EJT)

  8. Practice and Group Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hager, Paul

    2014-01-01

    Although learning has always been a central topic for philosophy of education, little attention has been paid to the notion of group learning. This article outlines and discusses some plausible examples of group learning. Drawing on these examples, various principles and issues that surround the notion of group learning are identified and…

  9. Customizing Group Therapy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chambliss, Catherine; Oxman, Elaine

    The group therapy context provides unparalleled opportunities for cost effective learning. However, within group meetings, therapists must strive to tailor psychological services to address the particular needs of individual patients. Creative means of customizing patients experiences within group are needed in order to address consumer needs…

  10. Internet Discussion Groups.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bull, Glen; Bull, Gina; Sigmon, Tim

    1997-01-01

    Discusses newsgroups, listservs, and Web-based discussion groups. Highlights include major categories of international USENET discussion groups; newsgroups versus mailing lists; newsreaders; news servers; newsgroup subscriptions; newsgroups versus Web discussion groups; linking newsgroups, mailing lists, and the Web; and setting up a news host. A…

  11. Parent Group Spotlight

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parenting for High Potential, 2014

    2014-01-01

    This issue's "Parent Group Spotlight" features Deborah Simon, president of West Sound Gifted, Talented & Twice-Exceptional (WSGT2e), who started a parent group in Washington in 2013. In just one year, this small, but mighty group has held community forums, attended school board meetings, and helped influence local gifted programming.…

  12. Infant Group Care Risks.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kendall, Earline D.

    Children under 3 years of age who are in group care face special health risks. The U.S. Centers for Disease Control indicate the existence of a causal relationship between infant group day care and certain diseases that are spread through contact at day care centers. Children in group care who are still in diapers are especially vulnerable to…

  13. Integrated Play Groups

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Glovak, Sandra

    2007-01-01

    As an occupational therapist running social play groups with sensory integration for children on the autism spectrum, the author frequently doubted the wisdom of combining several children on the spectrum into a group. In fact, as the owner of a clinic she said, "No more!" The groups seemed like a waste of parents' time and money, and she refused…

  14. Leading Deep Conversations in Collaborative Inquiry Groups

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nelson, Tamara Holmlund; Deuel, Angie; Slavit, David; Kennedy, Anne

    2010-01-01

    Collaborative inquiry groups, such as professional learning communities and lesson study groups, are proliferating in schools across the United States. In whatever form, the potential for impacting student learning through this collaborative work is expanded or limited by the nature of teachers' conversations. Polite, congenial conversations…

  15. Stages of Small-Group Development Revisited

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tuckman, Bruce W.; Jensen, Mary Ann C.

    1977-01-01

    This review examines published research on small-group development done in the last ten years that would constitute an empirical test of Tuckman's hypothesis that groups go through the stages of "forming,""storming,""norming," and "performing." A fifth stage, "adjourning," was added to the…

  16. System and method for secure group transactions

    DOEpatents

    Goldsmith, Steven Y.

    2006-04-25

    A method and a secure system, processing on one or more computers, provides a way to control a group transaction. The invention uses group consensus access control and multiple distributed secure agents in a network environment. Each secure agent can organize with the other secure agents to form a secure distributed agent collective.

  17. Effect of a Collective Project on Group Cohesion.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shipley, Robert H.

    Immediately before their second group therapy session, 10 newly formed inpatient therapy groups were randomly assigned to complete either collective or individual art projects. The members of a group in the collective-project condition completed a single art project as a group. Each member of a group assigned to the individual project condition…

  18. Gunn and Heid: Teaching Small Group Development with Reality TV

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kopaczewski, Shana

    2017-01-01

    Courses: Small group communication or any courses with units on group/team work. Objective: In this single-class activity, students will use reality TV to identify Tuckman's five phases of group development: forming, storming, norming, performing, and adjourning. Students analyze how phases of group development manifest through group interaction…

  19. A European Humus Forms Reference Base

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zanella, A.; Englisch, M.; Ponge, J.-F.; Jabiol, B.; Sartori, G.; Gardi, C.

    2012-04-01

    From 2003 on, a panel of experts in humus and humus dynamics (Humus group) has been working about a standardisation and improvement of existing national humus classifications. Some important goals have been reached, in order to share data and experiences: a) definition of specific terms; b) description of 15 types of diagnostic horizons; c) of 10 basic humus forms references; d) subdivision of each main reference in 2-4 sub-unities; e) elaboration of a general European Humus Form Reference Base (http://hal-agroparistech.archives-ouvertes.fr/docs/00/56/17/95/PDF/Humus_Forms_ERB_31_01_2011.pdf); f) publication of the scientific significance of this base of classification as an article [A European morpho-functional classification of humus forms. Geoderma, 164 (3-4), 138-145]. The classification will be updated every 2 years and presently the Humus group is assessing biological (general: soil, vegetation, biome; specific: fungi, bacteria, pedofauna), physical (air temperature, rainfall) and chemical (pH, mineral elements, organic matter, quality and quantity of humic components…) factors which characterize basic humus forms and their varieties. The content of the new version of the classification is planned to be more "practical", like an ecological manual which lists associated humus forms and environmental data in the aim to contribute to a more precise environmental diagnosis of every analysed terrestrial and semiterrestrial European ecosystem. The Humus group is also involved in an endeavour to include humus forms in the World Reference Base for Soils (WRB-FAO) according to nomenclatural principles erected for soil profiles. Thirty basic references have been defined, complemented by a set of qualifiers (prefixes and suffixes), allowing to classify European humus forms and probably a large majority of humus forms known worldwide. The principles of the classification, the diagnostic horizons and humus forms main references are presented at the General Assembly of

  20. Joking Culture: The Role of Repeated Humorous Interactions on Group Processes during Challenge Course Experiences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rothwell, Erin; Siharath, Kassidy; Bell, Steven; Nguyen, Kim; Baker, Carla

    2011-01-01

    When groups form, they develop their own culture from the shared meaning created from their interactions. Humor is part of every social group, and when repeatedly referenced, it forms a joking culture. The joking culture of small groups influences group processes by smoothing group interaction, forming a collective identity, separating the group…

  1. Pion form factor

    SciTech Connect

    Ryong Ji, C.; Pang, A.; Szczepaniak, A.

    1994-04-01

    It is pointed out that the correct criterion to define the legal PQCD contribution to the exclusive processes in the lightcone perturbative expansion should be based on the large off-shellness of the lightcone energy in the intermediate states. In the lightcone perturbative QCD calculation of the pion form factor, the authors find that the legal PQCD contribution defined by the lightcone energy cut saturates in the smaller Q{sup 2} region compared to that defined by the gluon four-momentum square cut. This is due to the contribution by the highly off-energy-shell gluons in the end point regions of the phase space, indicating that the gluon four-momentum-square cut may have cut too much to define the legal PQCD.

  2. Nucleon Electromagnetic Form Factors

    SciTech Connect

    Marc Vanderhaeghen; Charles Perdrisat; Vina Punjabi

    2007-10-01

    There has been much activity in the measurement of the elastic electromagnetic proton and neutron form factors in the last decade, and the quality of the data has greatly improved by performing double polarization experiments, in comparison with previous unpolarized data. Here we review the experimental data base in view of the new results for the proton, and neutron, obtained at JLab, MAMI, and MIT-Bates. The rapid evolution of phenomenological models triggered by these high-precision experiments will be discussed, including the recent progress in the determination of the valence quark generalized parton distributions of the nucleon, as well as the steady rate of improvements made in the lattice QCD calculations.

  3. Shell forming apparatus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Taylor G. (Inventor); Granett, Dan (Inventor); Akutagawa, Wesley M. (Inventor)

    1987-01-01

    A nozzle assembly is described for use in a system that forms small gas-filled shells, which avoids the need for holding a miniature inner nozzle precisely concentric with a miniature outer nozzle. The outer nozzle has a diameter which is less than about 0.7 millimeter, which results in fluid passing through the nozzle having a progressively greater velocity at locations progressively further from the walls of the outer nozzle across most of the nozzle. This highly variable velocity profile automatically forces gas to the center of the outer nozzle. The end of the inner nozzle, which emits gas, is spaced upstream from the tip of the outer nozzle, to provide a distance along which to center the gas. This self-centering characteristic permits the inner nozzle to be positioned so its axis is not concentric with the axis of the outer nozzle.

  4. Shell forming system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kendall, Jr., James M. (Inventor); Wang, Taylor G. (Inventor); Elleman, Daniel D. (Inventor)

    1987-01-01

    An apparatus is provided for forming gas-filled spheres of metal, glass or other material, which produces spheres (12) of uniform size and wall thickness in a relatively simple system. The system includes concentric nozzles, including an inner nozzle (18) through which gas flows and and an outer nozzle (20), which jointly define an annular passageway (50) through which a liquid flows. The flow rates are adjusted so that the gas flows at greater velocity than does the liquid, out of their respective nozzles, e.g. three times as great, in order to produce an extrusion (30) which undergoes axisymmetric oscillations resulting in the pinch off into hollow spheres with very uniform spacing. The system is useful not only where gas-filled spheres are required, but also is useful to accurately control the dispensing of solid, liquid, or gaseous materials.

  5. 78 FR 58605 - Proposed Collection; Comment Request for Form 8453-EMP, Form 8453-F, Form 8453-FE, Form 8879-F...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-24

    ... Internal Revenue Service Proposed Collection; Comment Request for Form 8453-EMP, Form 8453-F, Form 8453-FE, Form 8879-F, and 8879-EMP. AGENCY: Internal Revenue Service (IRS), Treasury. ACTION: Notice and request... comments concerning Form 8453-F, U.S. Estate of Trust Income Tax Declaration and Signature for...

  6. Spin line groups.

    PubMed

    Lazić, Nataša; Milivojević, Marko; Damnjanović, Milan

    2013-11-01

    Spin line groups describe the symmetries of spin arrangements in quasi-one-dimensional systems. These groups are derived for the first family of line groups. Among them, magnetic groups are singled out as a special case. Spin arrangements generated by the derived groups are first discussed for single-orbit systems and then the conclusions are extended to multi-orbit cases. The results are illustrated by the examples of a CuO2 zigzag chain, a (13)C nanotube and the hexaferrite Ba2Mg2Fe12O22. Applications to neutron diffraction and classical ground-state determination are indicated.

  7. Grouped exposed metal heaters

    SciTech Connect

    Vinegar, Harold J.; Coit, William George; Griffin, Peter Terry; Hamilton, Paul Taylor; Hsu, Chia-Fu; Mason, Stanley Leroy; Samuel, Allan James; Watkins, Ronnie Wade

    2010-11-09

    A system for treating a hydrocarbon containing formation is described. The system includes two or more groups of elongated heaters. The group includes two or more heaters placed in two or more openings in the formation. The heaters in the group are electrically coupled below the surface of the formation. The openings include at least partially uncased wellbores in a hydrocarbon layer of the formation. The groups are electrically configured such that current flow through the formation between at least two groups is inhibited. The heaters are configured to provide heat to the formation.

  8. Grouped exposed metal heaters

    DOEpatents

    Vinegar, Harold J [Bellaire, TX; Coit, William George [Bellaire, TX; Griffin, Peter Terry [Brixham, GB; Hamilton, Paul Taylor [Houston, TX; Hsu, Chia-Fu [Granada Hills, CA; Mason, Stanley Leroy [Allen, TX; Samuel, Allan James [Kular Lumpar, ML; Watkins, Ronnie Wade [Cypress, TX

    2012-07-31

    A system for treating a hydrocarbon containing formation is described. The system includes two or more groups of elongated heaters. The group includes two or more heaters placed in two or more openings in the formation. The heaters in the group are electrically coupled below the surface of the formation. The openings include at least partially uncased wellbores in a hydrocarbon layer of the formation. The groups are electrically configured such that current flow through the formation between at least two groups is inhibited. The heaters are configured to provide heat to the formation.

  9. Forming Spirals From Shadows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2016-07-01

    What causes the large-scale spiral structures found in some protoplanetary disks? Most models assume theyre created by newly-forming planets, but a new study suggests that planets might have nothing to do with it.Perturbations from Planets?In some transition disks protoplanetary disks with gaps in their inner regions weve directly imaged large-scale spiral arms. Many theories currently attribute the formation of these structures to young planets: either the direct perturbations of a planet embedded in the disk cause the spirals, or theyre indirectly caused by the orbit of a planetary body outside of the arms.Another example of spiral arms detected in a protoplanetary disk, MWC 758. [NASA/ESA/ESO/M. Benisty et al.]But what if you could get spirals without any planets? A team of scientists led by Matas Montesinos (University of Chile) have recently published a study in which they examine what happens to a shadowed protoplanetary disk.Casting Shadows with WarpsIn the teams setup, they envision a protoplanetary disk that is warped: the inner region is slightly tilted relative to the outer region. As the central star casts light out over its protoplanetary disk, this disk warping would cause some regions of the disk to be shaded in a way that isnt axially symmetric with potentially interesting implications.Montesinos and collaborators ran 2D hydrodynamics simulations to determine what happens to the motion of particles within the disk when they pass in and out of the shadowed regions. Since the shadowed regions are significantly colder than the illuminated disk, the pressure in these regions is much lower. Particles are therefore accelerated and decelerated as they pass through these regions, and the lack of axial symmetry causes spiral density waves to form in the disk as a result.Initial profile for the stellar heating rate per unit area for one of the authors simulations. The regions shadowed as a result of the disk warp subtend 0.5 radians each (shown on the left

  10. Perfluoroalkyl polytriazines containing pendent iododifluoromethyl groups

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosser, R. W.; Psarras, T. (Inventor)

    1980-01-01

    New perfluoroalkyl polytriazines containing pendent iododifluoromethyl groups are prepared by the reaction of perfluoroalkyl dinitriles with ammonia to form poly(imidoylamidines), followed by the cyclization of the imidoylamidine groups with, e.g., various mixtures of a perfluoroacyl fluoride with an omega iodoperfluoroacyl fluoride. The polytriazines obtained can be cured by heat which causes crosslinking at the iododifluoromethyl groups by elimination of iodine and formation of carbon-to-carbon bonds.

  11. A Fossil Group in Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, Eric D.; Rappaport, Saul A.; McDonald, Michael; Bautz, Mark W.; Grant, Catherine E.; Veilleux, Sylvain

    2016-04-01

    In the current picture of hierarchical structure formation, galaxy groups play a vital role as the seeds from which large assemblies of matter form. Compact groups are also important environments in which to watch the fueling of star formation and AGN activity, as the conditions are ideal for galaxy-galaxy interactions. We have identified a galaxy system that may represent an intermediate or transition stage in group evolution. Shakhbazyan 1 (or SHK 1) is a remarkably compact collection of about ten massive, red-sequence galaxies within a region 100 kpc across. Several of these galaxies show signs of AGN activity, and new, deep optical observations with the Discovery Channel Telescope reveal an extended stellar envelope surrounding the galaxies. This envelope is much more extended than what would be expected from a superposition of normal galaxy envelopes, and it indicates a large amount of intra-group starlight, evidence that the galaxies in SHK 1 are dynamically interacting.We here present new Chandra spectral imaging observations of this unusual system that confirm the presence of an X-ray-emitting diffuse intra-group medium (IGM), with a temperature of 1.5 keV and X-ray luminosity of 1043 erg/s. Assuming hydrostatic equilibrium, the system is about 1/3 as massive as expected from the optical richness. In addition, three of the ten central galaxies exhibit signatures of X-ray AGN. The under-luminous IGM, high density of bright galaxies, and evidence for galaxy-galaxy interaction indicate that this system may be in a transition stage of galaxy merging, similar to that expected in the formation of a fossil group. Alternatively, SHK 1 may consist of multiple poor groups in the final stages of merging along our line of sight. We explore these scenarios and outline paths of future study for this enigmatic system.

  12. 75 FR 38183 - Proposed Collection; Comment Request for Form 8916

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-01

    ... Schedule M-3 Taxable Income with Tax Return Taxable Income for Mixed Groups. DATES: Written comments should... Income with Tax Return Taxable Income for Mixed Groups. OMB Number: 1545-2062. Form Number: Form 8916... information collections, as required by the Paperwork Reduction Act of 1995, Public Law 104-13 (44 U.S.C....

  13. Conjugate and method for forming aminomethyl phosphorus conjugates

    DOEpatents

    Katti, Kattesh V.; Berning, Douglas E.; Volkert, Wynn A.; Ketring, Alan R.; Churchill, Robert

    1999-01-01

    A method of forming phosphine-amine conjugates includes reacting a hydroxymethyl phosphine group of an amine-free first molecule with at least one free amine group of a second molecule to covalently bond the first molecule with the second molecule through an aminomethyl phosphorus linkage and the conjugates formed thereby.

  14. Conjugate and method for forming aminomethyl phosphorus conjugates

    SciTech Connect

    Katti, K.V.; Berning, D.E.; Volkert, W.A.; Ketring, A.R.; Churchill, R.

    1999-09-07

    A method of forming phosphine-amine conjugates includes reacting a hydroxymethyl phosphine group of an amine-free first molecule with at least one free amine group of a second molecule to covalently bond the first molecule with the second molecule through an aminomethyl phosphorus linkage and the conjugates formed thereby.

  15. Safeguards and retrievability from waste forms

    SciTech Connect

    Danker, W.

    1996-05-01

    This report describes issues discussed at a session from the PLutonium Stabilization and Immobilization Workshop related to safeguards and retrievability from waste forms. Throughout the discussion, the group probed the goals of disposition efforts, particularly an understanding of the {open_quotes}spent fuel standard{close_quotes}, since the disposition material form derives from these goals. The group felt strongly that not only the disposition goals but safeguards to meet these goals could affect the material form. Accordingly, the Department was encouraged to explore and apply safeguards as early in the implementation process as possible. It was emphasized that this was particularly true for any planned use of existing facilities. It is much easier to build safeguards approaches into the development of new facilities, than to backfit existing facilities. Accordingly, special safeguards challenges are likely to be encountered, given the cost and schedule advantages offered by use of existing facilities.

  16. Moon (Form-Origin)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsiapas, Elias

    2016-04-01

    When the Earth was formed, it was in a state of burning heat. As time went by, temperature on the planet's surface was falling due to radiation and heat transfer, and various components (crusts) began taking solid form at the Earth's poles. The formation of crusts took place at the Earth's poles, because the stirring of burning and fluid masses on the surface of the Earth was significantly slighter there than it was on the equator. Due to centrifugal force and Coriolis Effect, these solid masses headed towards the equator; those originating from the North Pole followed a south-western course, while those originating from the South Pole followed a north-western course and there they rotated from west to east at a lower speed than the underlying burning and liquid earth, because of their lower initial linear velocity, their solid state and inertia. Because inertia is proportional to mass, the initially larger solid body swept all new solid ones, incorporating them to its western side. The density of the new solid masses was higher, because the components on the surface would freeze and solidify first, before the underlying thicker components. As a result, the western side of the initial islet of solid rocks submerged, while the east side elevated. . As a result of the above, this initial islet began to spin in reverse, and after taking on the shape of a sphere, it formed the "heart" of the Moon. The Moon-sphere, rolling on the equator, would sink the solid rocks that continued to descend from the Earth's poles. The sinking rocks partially melted because of higher temperatures in the greater depths that the Moon descended to, while part of the rocks' mass bonded with the Moon and also served as a heat-insulating material, preventing the descended side of the sphere from melting. Combined with the Earth's liquid mass that covered its emerging eastern surface, new sphere-shaped shells were created, with increased density and very powerful structural cohesion. During the

  17. Moon (Form-Origin)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsiapas, Elias

    2014-05-01

    When the Earth was formed, it was in a state of burning heat. As time went by, temperature on the planet's surface was falling due to radiation and heat transfer, and various components (crusts) began taking solid form at the Earth's poles. The formation of crusts took place at the Earth's poles, because the stirring of burning and fluid masses on the surface of the Earth was significantly slighter there than it was on the equator. Due to centrifugal force and Coriolis Effect, these solid masses headed towards the equator; those originating from the North Pole followed a south-western course, while those originating from the South Pole followed a north-western course and there they rotated from west to east at a lower speed than the underlying burning and liquid earth, because of their lower initial linear velocity, their solid state and inertia. Because inertia is proportional to mass, the initially larger solid body swept all new solid ones, incorporating them to its western side. The density of the new solid masses was higher, because the components on the surface would freeze and solidify first, before the underlying thicker components. As a result, the western side of the initial islet of solid rocks submerged, while the east side elevated. . As a result of the above, this initial islet began to spin in reverse, and after taking on the shape of a sphere, it formed the "heart" of the Moon. The Moon-sphere, rolling on the equator, would sink the solid rocks that continued to descend from the Earth's poles. The sinking rocks partially melted because of higher temperatures in the greater depths that the Moon descended to, while part of the rocks' mass bonded with the Moon and also served as a heat-insulating material, preventing the descended side of the sphere from melting. Combined with the Earth's liquid mass that covered its emerging eastern surface, new sphere-shaped shells were created, with increased density and very powerful structural cohesion. During the

  18. Moon (Form-Origin)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsiapas, Elias

    2015-04-01

    When the Earth was formed, it was in a state of burning heat. As time went by, temperature on the planet's surface was falling due to radiation and heat transfer, and various components (crusts) began taking solid form at the Earth's poles. The formation of crusts took place at the Earth's poles, because the stirring of burning and fluid masses on the surface of the Earth was significantly slighter there than it was on the equator. Due to centrifugal force and Coriolis Effect, these solid masses headed towards the equator; those originating from the North Pole followed a south-western course, while those originating from the South Pole followed a north-western course and there they rotated from west to east at a lower speed than the underlying burning and liquid earth, because of their lower initial linear velocity, their solid state and inertia. Because inertia is proportional to mass, the initially larger solid body swept all new solid ones, incorporating them to its western side. The density of the new solid masses was higher, because the components on the surface would freeze and solidify first, before the underlying thicker components. As a result, the western side of the initial islet of solid rocks submerged, while the east side elevated. . As a result of the above, this initial islet began to spin in reverse, and after taking on the shape of a sphere, it formed the "heart" of the Moon. The Moon-sphere, rolling on the equator, would sink the solid rocks that continued to descend from the Earth's poles. The sinking rocks partially melted because of higher temperatures in the greater depths that the Moon descended to, while part of the rocks' mass bonded with the Moon and also served as a heat-insulating material, preventing the descended side of the sphere from melting. Combined with the Earth's liquid mass that covered its emerging eastern surface, new sphere-shaped shells were created, with increased density and very powerful structural cohesion. During the

  19. Moon (Form-Origin)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsiapas, Elias

    2013-04-01

    When the Earth was formed, it was in a state of burning heat. As time went by, temperature on the planet's surface was falling due to radiation and heat transfer, and various components (crusts) began taking solid form at the Earth's poles. The formation of crusts took place at the Earth's poles, because the stirring of burning and fluid masses on the surface of the Earth was significantly slighter there than it was on the equator. Due to centrifugal force and Coriolis Effect, these solid masses headed towards the equator; those originating from the North Pole followed a south-western course, while those originating from the South Pole followed a north-western course and there they rotated from west to east at a lower speed than the underlying burning and liquid earth, because of their lower initial linear velocity, their solid state and inertia. Because inertia is proportional to mass, the initially larger solid body swept all new solid ones, incorporating them to its western side. The density of the new solid masses was higher, because the components on the surface would freeze and solidify first, before the underlying thicker components. As a result, the western side of the initial islet of solid rocks submerged, while the east side elevated. As a result of the above, this initial islet began to spin in reverse, and after taking on the shape of a sphere, it formed the "heart" of the Moon. The Moon-sphere, rolling on the equator, would sink the solid rocks that continued to descend from the Earth's poles. The sinking rocks partially melted because of higher temperatures in the greater depths that the Moon descended to, while part of the rocks' mass bonded with the Moon and also served as a heat-insulating material, preventing the descended side of the sphere from melting. Combined with the Earth's liquid mass that covered its emerging eastern surface, new sphere-shaped shells were created, with increased density and very powerful structural cohesion. During the

  20. Methods of forming single source precursors, methods of forming polymeric single source precursors, and single source precursors formed by such methods

    DOEpatents

    Fox, Robert V.; Rodriguez, Rene G.; Pak, Joshua J.; Sun, Chivin; Margulieux, Kelsey R.; Holland, Andrew W.

    2014-09-09

    Methods of forming single source precursors (SSPs) include forming intermediate products having the empirical formula 1/2{L.sub.2N(.mu.-X).sub.2M'X.sub.2}.sub.2, and reacting MER with the intermediate products to form SSPs of the formula L.sub.2N(.mu.-ER).sub.2M'(ER).sub.2, wherein L is a Lewis base, M is a Group IA atom, N is a Group IB atom, M' is a Group IIIB atom, each E is a Group VIB atom, each X is a Group VIIA atom or a nitrate group, and each R group is an alkyl, aryl, vinyl, (per)fluoro alkyl, (per)fluoro aryl, silane, or carbamato group. Methods of forming polymeric or copolymeric SSPs include reacting at least one of HE.sup.1R.sup.1E.sup.1H and MER with one or more substances having the empirical formula L.sub.2N(.mu.-ER).sub.2M'(ER).sub.2 or L.sub.2N(.mu.-X).sub.2M'(X).sub.2 to form a polymeric or copolymeric SSP. New SSPs and intermediate products are formed by such methods.

  1. Methods of forming single source precursors, methods of forming polymeric single source precursors, and single source precursors and intermediate products formed by such methods

    DOEpatents

    Fox, Robert V.; Rodriguez, Rene G.; Pak, Joshua J.; Sun, Chivin; Margulieux, Kelsey R.; Holland, Andrew W.

    2012-12-04

    Methods of forming single source precursors (SSPs) include forming intermediate products having the empirical formula 1/2{L.sub.2N(.mu.-X).sub.2M'X.sub.2}.sub.2, and reacting MER with the intermediate products to form SSPs of the formula L.sub.2N(.mu.-ER).sub.2M'(ER).sub.2, wherein L is a Lewis base, M is a Group IA atom, N is a Group IB atom, M' is a Group IIIB atom, each E is a Group VIB atom, each X is a Group VIIA atom or a nitrate group, and each R group is an alkyl, aryl, vinyl, (per)fluoro alkyl, (per)fluoro aryl, silane, or carbamato group. Methods of forming polymeric or copolymeric SSPs include reacting at least one of HE.sup.1R.sup.1E.sup.1H and MER with one or more substances having the empirical formula L.sub.2N(.mu.-ER).sub.2M'(ER).sub.2 or L.sub.2N(.mu.-X).sub.2M'(X).sub.2 to form a polymeric or copolymeric SSP. New SSPs and intermediate products are formed by such methods.

  2. Methods of forming single source precursors, methods of forming polymeric single source precursors, and single source precursors formed by such methods

    DOEpatents

    Fox, Robert V.; Rodriguez, Rene G.; Pak, Joshua J.; Sun, Chivin; Margulieux, Kelsey R.; Holland, Andrew W.

    2016-04-19

    Methods of forming single source precursors (SSPs) include forming intermediate products having the empirical formula 1/2{L.sub.2N(.mu.-X).sub.2M'X.sub.2}.sub.2, and reacting MER with the intermediate products to form SSPs of the formula L.sub.2N(.mu.-ER).sub.2M'(ER).sub.2, wherein L is a Lewis base, M is a Group IA atom, N is a Group IB atom, M' is a Group IIIB atom, each E is a Group VIB atom, each X is a Group VIIA atom or a nitrate group, and each R group is an alkyl, aryl, vinyl, (per)fluoro alkyl, (per)fluoro aryl, silane, or carbamato group. Methods of forming polymeric or copolymeric SSPs include reacting at least one of HE.sup.1R.sup.1E.sup.1H and MER with one or more substances having the empirical formula L.sub.2N(.mu.-ER).sub.2M'(ER).sub.2 or L.sub.2N(.mu.-X).sub.2M'(X).sub.2 to form a polymeric or copolymeric SSP. New SSPs and intermediate products are formed by such methods.

  3. Gas Giants Form Quickly

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    This is an artist's concept of a hypothetical 10-million-year-old star system. The bright blur at the center is a star much like our sun. The other orb in the image is a gas-giant planet like Jupiter. Wisps of white throughout the image represent traces of gas.

    Astronomers using NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope have found evidence showing that gas-giant planets either form within the first 10 million years of a sun-like star's life, or not at all. The lifespan for sun-like stars is about 10 billion years.

    The scientists came to this conclusion after searching for traces of gas around 15 different sun-like stars, most with ages ranging from 3 million to 30 million years. With the help of Spitzer's Infrared Spectrometer instrument, they were able to search for relatively warm gas in the inner regions of these star systems, an area comparable to the zone between Earth and Jupiter in our own solar system. They also used ground-based radio telescopes to search for cooler gas in the outer regions of these systems, an area comparable to the zone around Saturn and beyond.

  4. What's your group worth?

    PubMed

    Greenberg, M R

    1986-01-01

    With the advent of acquisitions and mergers of healthcare organizations, it has become necessary for medical group practices to know what they are worth. The traditional balance sheet valuation ignores what is perhaps the most important consideration of all: a group's earning potential. Discussed in this article are the many facets of the complex valuation process, including both tangible and intangible assets, and the author provides a method for adequately determining a range of values for a medical group.

  5. E-Group Arrangements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aylesworth, Grant R.

    Group E at Uaxactún has long been considered an ancient Maya observatory in which an observer could see the sun rise along architectural alignments at the solstices and equinoxes. E-Groups named for the architectural complex list identified in Group E at Uaxactún, typically consist of a large radial pyramid on their west side and three temples on a raised platform on their east side.

  6. Immersive group-to-group telepresence.

    PubMed

    Beck, Stephan; Kunert, André; Kulik, Alexander; Froehlich, Bernd

    2013-04-01

    We present a novel immersive telepresence system that allows distributed groups of users to meet in a shared virtual 3D world. Our approach is based on two coupled projection-based multi-user setups, each providing multiple users with perspectively correct stereoscopic images. At each site the users and their local interaction space are continuously captured using a cluster of registered depth and color cameras. The captured 3D information is transferred to the respective other location, where the remote participants are virtually reconstructed. We explore the use of these virtual user representations in various interaction scenarios in which local and remote users are face-to-face, side-by-side or decoupled. Initial experiments with distributed user groups indicate the mutual understanding of pointing and tracing gestures independent of whether they were performed by local or remote participants. Our users were excited about the new possibilities of jointly exploring a virtual city, where they relied on a world-in-miniature metaphor for mutual awareness of their respective locations.

  7. Renormalization group in internal space

    SciTech Connect

    Polonyi, J.; Sailer, K.

    2005-01-15

    Renormalization group in the internal space consists of the gradual change of the coupling constants. Functional evolution equations corresponding to the change of the mass or the coupling constant are presented in the framework of a scalar model. The evolution in the mass which yields the functional generalization of the Callan-Symanzik equation for the one-particle irreducible effective action is given in its renormalized, cutoff-independent form. The evolution of the coupling constant generates an evolution equation for the two-particle irreducible effective action.

  8. Group Sparse Additive Models

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Junming; Chen, Xi; Xing, Eric P.

    2016-01-01

    We consider the problem of sparse variable selection in nonparametric additive models, with the prior knowledge of the structure among the covariates to encourage those variables within a group to be selected jointly. Previous works either study the group sparsity in the parametric setting (e.g., group lasso), or address the problem in the nonparametric setting without exploiting the structural information (e.g., sparse additive models). In this paper, we present a new method, called group sparse additive models (GroupSpAM), which can handle group sparsity in additive models. We generalize the ℓ1/ℓ2 norm to Hilbert spaces as the sparsity-inducing penalty in GroupSpAM. Moreover, we derive a novel thresholding condition for identifying the functional sparsity at the group level, and propose an efficient block coordinate descent algorithm for constructing the estimate. We demonstrate by simulation that GroupSpAM substantially outperforms the competing methods in terms of support recovery and prediction accuracy in additive models, and also conduct a comparative experiment on a real breast cancer dataset.

  9. EXPERIMENTS IN GROUP PREDICTION,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    GROUP DYNAMICS, *ATTITUDES(PSYCHOLOGY)), (*PREDICTIONS, ACCURACY), PROBLEM SOLVING, DECISION MAKING, CONFORMITY , QUESTIONNAIRES, EXPERIMENTAL DESIGN, SOCIAL PSYCHOLOGY, FEEDBACK, RELIABILITY, STATISTICAL ANALYSIS

  10. Waste form product characteristics

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, L.L.; Shikashio, R.

    1995-01-01

    The Department of Energy has operated nuclear facilities at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) to support national interests for several decades. Since 1953, it has supported the development of technologies for the storage and reprocessing of spent nuclear fuels (SNF) and the resultant wastes. However, the 1992 decision to discontinue reprocessing of SNF has left nearly 768 MT of SNF in storage at the INEL with unspecified plans for future dispositioning. Past reprocessing of these fuels for uranium and other resource recovery has resulted in the production of 3800 M{sup 3} calcine and a total inventory of 7600 M{sup 3} of radioactive liquids (1900 M{sup 3} destined for immediate calcination and the remaining sodium-bearing waste requiring further treatment before calcination). These issues, along with increased environmental compliance within DOE and its contractors, mandate operation of current and future facilities in an environmentally responsible manner. This will require satisfactory resolution of spent fuel and waste disposal issues resulting from the past activities. A national policy which identifies requirements for the disposal of SNF and high level wastes (HLW) has been established by the Nuclear Waste Policy Act (NWPA) Sec.8,(b) para(3)) [1982]. The materials have to be conditioned or treated, then packaged for disposal while meeting US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) regulations. The spent fuel and HLW located at the INEL will have to be put into a form and package that meets these regulatory criteria. The emphasis of Idaho Chemical Processing Plant (ICPP) future operations has shifted toward investigating, testing, and selecting technologies to prepare current and future spent fuels and waste for final disposal. This preparation for disposal may include mechanical, physical and/or chemical processes, and may differ for each of the various fuels and wastes.

  11. Bismaleimide compounds

    DOEpatents

    Adams, Johnnie E.; Jamieson, Donald R.

    1986-01-14

    Bismaleimides of the formula ##STR1## wherein R.sub.1 and R.sub.2 each independently is H, C.sub.1-4 -alkyl, C.sub.1-4 -alkoxy, C1 or Br, or R.sub.1 and R.sub.2 together form a fused 6-membered hydrocarbon aromatic ring, with the proviso that R.sub.1 and R.sub.2 are not t-butyl or t-butoxy; X is O, S or Se; n is 1-3; and the alkylene bridging group, optionally, is substituted by 1-3 methyl groups or by fluorine, form polybismaleimide resins which have valuable physical properties. Uniquely, these compounds permit extended cure times, i.e., they remain fluid for a time sufficient to permit the formation of a homogeneous melt prior to curing.

  12. Bismaleimide compounds

    DOEpatents

    Adams, J.E.; Jamieson, D.R.

    1986-01-14

    Bismaleimides of the formula shown in the diagram wherein R[sub 1] and R[sub 2] each independently is H, C[sub 1-4]-alkyl, C[sub 1-4]-alkoxy, Cl or Br, or R[sub 1] and R[sub 2] together form a fused 6-membered hydrocarbon aromatic ring, with the proviso that R[sub 1] and R[sub 2] are not t-butyl or t-butoxy; X is O, S or Se; n is 1--3; and the alkylene bridging group, optionally, is substituted by 1--3 methyl groups or by fluorine, form polybismaleimide resins which have valuable physical properties. Uniquely, these compounds permit extended cure times, i.e., they remain fluid for a time sufficient to permit the formation of a homogeneous melt prior to curing.

  13. Science Grade 7, Long Form.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    New York City Board of Education, Brooklyn, NY. Bureau of Curriculum Development.

    The Grade 7 Science course of study was prepared in two parallel forms. A short form designed for students who had achieved a high measure of success in previous science courses; the long form for those who have not been able to maintain the pace. Both forms contain similar content. The Grade 7 guide is the first in a three-year sequence for…

  14. Democratic Group Work

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Laursen, Erik K.; Tate, Thomas F.

    2012-01-01

    For a century, democratic values have called for abandoning coercive approaches and teaching children and youth to be responsible citizens. The authors explore strategies for creating respectful environments and positive group cultures with challenging youth. They offer suggestions to adult group facilitators to support youth in developing…

  15. User Working Group Members

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2014-04-29

    User Working Group Members   Mail for the entire group may be directed to:  larc-asdc-uwg@lists.nasa.gov   Member Status Affiliation E-mail Contact Bob Holz (Co-Chair in 2010) Co-Chair University of ...

  16. Beam dynamics group summary

    SciTech Connect

    Peggs, S.

    1994-12-31

    This paper summarizes the activities of the beam dynamics working group of the LHC Collective Effects Workshop that was held in Montreux in 1994. It reviews the presentations that were made to the group, the discussions that ensued, and the consensuses that evolved.

  17. Group Work. Research Brief

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walker, Karen

    2010-01-01

    According to Johnson and Johnson, group work helps increase student retention and satisfaction, develops strong oral communication and social skills, as well as higher self-esteem (University of Minnesota, n.d.). Group work, when planned and implemented deliberately and thoughtfully helps students develop cognitive and leadership skills as well as…

  18. Fairness and Ability Grouping.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Strike, Kenneth A.

    1983-01-01

    A recent controversy regarding ability grouping is that it is often perceived as a means whereby racial or class bias can be subtly transformed into mechanisms of discrimination which exhibit the appearance of fairness and objectivity. This article addresses the question of fairness in ability grouping. (CJB)

  19. Topologies on Abelian Groups

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zelenyuk, E. G.; Protasov, I. V.

    1991-04-01

    A filter phi on an abelian group G is called a T-filter if there exists a Hausdorff group topology under which phi converges to zero. G{phi} will denote the group G with the largest topology among those making phi converge to zero. This method of defining a group topology is completely equivalent to the definition of an abstract group by defining relations. We shall obtain characterizations of T-filters and of T-sequences; among these, we shall pay particular attention to T-sequences on the integers. The method of T-sequences will be used to construct a series of counterexamples for several open problems in topological algebra. For instance there exists, on every infinite abelian group, a topology distinguishing between sequentiality and the Fréchet-Urysohn property (this solves a problem posed by V.I. Malykhin) we also find a topology on the group of integers admitting no nontrivial continuous character, thus solving a problem of Nienhuys. We show also that on every infinite abelian group there exists a free ultrafilter which is not a T-ultrafilter.

  20. Physically detached 'compact groups'

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hernquist, Lars; Katz, Neal; Weinberg, David H.

    1995-01-01

    A small fraction of galaxies appear to reside in dense compact groups, whose inferred crossing times are much shorter than a Hubble time. These short crossing times have led to considerable disagreement among researchers attempting to deduce the dynamical state of these systems. In this paper, we suggest that many of the observed groups are not physically bound but are chance projections of galaxies well separated along the line of sight. Unlike earlier similar proposals, ours does not require that the galaxies in the compact group be members of a more diffuse, but physically bound entity. The probability of physically separated galaxies projecting into an apparent compact group is nonnegligible if most galaxies are distributed in thin filaments. We illustrate this general point with a specific example: a simulation of a cold dark matter universe, in which hydrodynamic effects are included to identify galaxies. The simulated galaxy distribution is filamentary and end-on views of these filaments produce apparent galaxy associations that have sizes and velocity dispersions similar to those of observed compact groups. The frequency of such projections is sufficient, in principle, to explain the observed space density of groups in the Hickson catalog. We discuss the implications of our proposal for the formation and evolution of groups and elliptical galaxies. The proposal can be tested by using redshift-independent distance estimators to measure the line-of-sight spatial extent of nearby compact groups.

  1. 10. VIEW SHOWING THE ARCH FORMS. THE INTRADOS FORM IS ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    10. VIEW SHOWING THE ARCH FORMS. THE INTRADOS FORM IS COMMONLY LIFTED 3 TO 4 DAYS AFTER POURING. REINFORCING STEEL IS THEN PLACED AND THE EXTRADOS FORM RAISED TO POSITION. THE OPERATING OF MOVING FORMS, PLACING STEEL AND CONCRETE FOR EACH ARCH LIFT REQUIRES, ON AVERAGE, EIGHT DAYS. NOTE THE TWO LINES OF WATER PIPE ON THE EXTRADOS FORM. THESE PIPES ARE FILLED WITH SPRAY NOZZLES WHICH ARE IN PRACTICALLY CONTINUOUS OPERATION EXCEPT WHEN WORK IS BEING DONE ON THE FORMS. August 9, 1938 - Bartlett Dam, Verde River, Phoenix, Maricopa County, AZ

  2. Filtrating forms of soil bacteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van'kova, A. A.; Ivanov, P. I.; Emtsev, V. T.

    2013-03-01

    Filtrating (ultramicroscopic) forms (FF) of bacteria were studied in a soddy-podzolic soil and the root zone of alfalfa plants as part of populations of the most widespread physiological groups of soil bacteria. FF were obtained by filtering soil solutions through membrane filters with a pore diameter of 0.22 μm. It was established that the greater part of the bacteria in the soil and in the root zone of the plants has an ultramicroscopic size: the average diameter of the cells is 0.3 μm, and their length is 0.6 μm, which is significantly less than the cell size of banal bacteria. The number of FF varies within a wide range depending on the physicochemical conditions of the habitat. The FF number's dynamics in the soil is of a seasonal nature; i.e., the number of bacteria found increases in the summer and fall and decreases in the winter-spring period. In the rhizosphere of the alfalfa, over the vegetation period, the number of FF and their fraction in the total mass of the bacteria increase. A reverse tendency is observed in the rhizoplane. The morphological particularities (identified by an electron microscopy) and the nature of the FF indicate their physiological activity.

  3. Cosmic Dawn Science Interest Group

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lazio, T. Joseph W.; Cosmic Origins Program Analysis Group

    2016-01-01

    Cosmic Dawn was identified as one of the three science objectives for this decade in the _New Worlds, New Horizons_ Decadal report, and it will likely continue to be a research focus well into the next decade. Cosmic Dawn refers to the interval during which the Universe transitioned from a nearly completely neutral state back to a nearly fully ionized state and includes the time during which the first stars formed and the first galaxies assembled.The Cosmic Dawn Science Interest Group (SIG) was formed recently under the auspices of the Cosmic Origins Program Analysis Group (COPAG). The Cosmic Dawn SIG focusses on the science cases, observations, and technology development needed to address the "great mystery" of Cosmic Origins. The reach of this SIG is broad, involving the nature of the first stars and the detectability of gamma-ray bursts at high redshifts, the extent to which the first galaxies and first supermassive black holes grew together, and the technology required to pursue these questions.For further information, consult the Cosmic Dawn SIG Web site http://cd-sig.jpl.nasa.gov/ and join the mailing list (by contacting the author).Part of this research was carried out at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, under a contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.

  4. Mineralogy of Meteorite Groups

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rubin, Alan E.

    1997-01-01

    phases were formed by shock metamorphism. Martensite (a2-fe,Ni) has a distorted body-centered-cubic structure and formed by a shear transformation from taenite during shock reheating and rapid cooling. The C polymorphs diamond, lonsdaleite and chaoite formed by shock from graphite. Suessite formed in the North Haig ureilite by reduction of Fe and Si (possibly from olivine) via reaction with carbonaceous matrix material. Ringwoodite, the spinel form of (Mg,Fe)2Si04, and majorite, a polymorph of (Mg,Fe)Si03 with the garnet structure, formed inside shock veins in highly shocked ordinary chondrites. Secondary minerals in meteorite finds that formed during terrestrial weathering include oxides and hy-. droxides formed directly from metallic Fe-Ni by oxidation, phosphates formed by the alteration of schreibersite, and sulfates formed by alteration of troilite.

  5. Groups and Violence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhavnani, Ravi; Miodownik, Dan; Riolo, Rick

    Violence can take place along a multitude of cleavages, e.g., (1) between political groups like the Kach Movement, pitting West Bank settlers against Israeli governments supporting the land-for-peace agenda; (2) between religious groups, such as Christians and Muslims in the Nigerian cities of Jos and Kaduna; (3) along class lines, as in India between Dalits and members of the Brahminical upper castes, upwardly mobile intermediate castes, and even other backward castes such as the Thevars; and (4) between ethnic groups such as the Hutu and Tutsi, both within and across state boundaries in Rwanda and neighboring Burundi.

  6. Group key management

    SciTech Connect

    Dunigan, T.; Cao, C.

    1997-08-01

    This report describes an architecture and implementation for doing group key management over a data communications network. The architecture describes a protocol for establishing a shared encryption key among an authenticated and authorized collection of network entities. Group access requires one or more authorization certificates. The implementation includes a simple public key and certificate infrastructure. Multicast is used for some of the key management messages. An application programming interface multiplexes key management and user application messages. An implementation using the new IP security protocols is postulated. The architecture is compared with other group key management proposals, and the performance and the limitations of the implementation are described.

  7. Conformal Carroll groups

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duval, C.; Gibbons, G. W.; Horvathy, P. A.

    2014-08-01

    Conformal extensions of Lévy-Leblond's Carroll group, based on geometric properties analogous to those of Newton-Cartan space-time are proposed. The extensions are labeled by an integer k. This framework includes and extends our recent study of the Bondi-Metzner-Sachs (BMS) and Newman-Unti (NU) groups. The relation to conformal Galilei groups is clarified. Conformal Carroll symmetry is illustrated by ‘Carrollian photons’. Motion both in the Newton-Cartan and Carroll spaces may be related to that of strings in the Bargmann space.

  8. Cyclic soft groups and their applications on groups.

    PubMed

    Aktaş, Hacı; Özlü, Serif

    2014-01-01

    In crisp environment the notions of order of group and cyclic group are well known due to many applications. In this paper, we introduce order of the soft groups, power of the soft sets, power of the soft groups, and cyclic soft group on a group. We also investigate the relationship between cyclic soft groups and classical groups.

  9. Quantum groups: Geometry and applications

    SciTech Connect

    Chu, Chong -Sun

    1996-05-13

    The main theme of this thesis is a study of the geometry of quantum groups and quantum spaces, with the hope that they will be useful for the construction of quantum field theory with quantum group symmetry. The main tool used is the Faddeev-Reshetikhin-Takhtajan description of quantum groups. A few content-rich examples of quantum complex spaces with quantum group symmetry are treated in details. In chapter 1, the author reviews some of the basic concepts and notions for Hopf algebras and other background materials. In chapter 2, he studies the vector fields of quantum groups. A compact realization of these vector fields as pseudodifferential operators acting on the linear quantum spaces is given. In chapter 3, he describes the quantum sphere as a complex quantum manifold by means of a quantum stereographic projection. A covariant calculus is introduced. An interesting property of this calculus is the existence of a one-form realization of the exterior differential operator. The concept of a braided comodule is introduced and a braided algebra of quantum spheres is constructed. In chapter 4, the author considers the more general higher dimensional quantum complex projective spaces and the quantum Grassman manifolds. Differential calculus, integration and braiding can be introduced as in the one dimensional case. Finally, in chapter 5, he studies the framework of quantum principal bundle and construct the q-deformed Dirac monopole as a quantum principal bundle with a quantum sphere as the base and a U(1) with non-commutative calculus as the fiber. The first Chern class can be introduced and integrated to give the monopole charge.

  10. Molten-Salt-Based Growth of Group III Nitrides

    DOEpatents

    Waldrip, Karen E.; Tsao, Jeffrey Y.; Kerley, Thomas M.

    2008-10-14

    A method for growing Group III nitride materials using a molten halide salt as a solvent to solubilize the Group-III ions and nitride ions that react to form the Group III nitride material. The concentration of at least one of the nitride ion or Group III cation is determined by electrochemical generation of the ions.

  11. Women Together Again: A Phenomenological Study of Leaderless Women's Groups.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kees, Nathalie L.

    1999-01-01

    Presents results of a study of eight leaderless groups. Findings included a serendipitous forming process, minimal norming, a support system extending beyond the group, a spontaneous and flexible group process, and unresolved issues. Focus and purpose of the groups were found to be the factors that have changed over time. Discusses results in…

  12. UnitedHealth Group

    Cancer.gov

    UnitedHealth Group provides accessible and affordable services, improved quality of care, coordinated health care efforts, and a supportive environment for shared decision making between patients and their physicians.

  13. SRNL Atmospheric Technologies Group

    ScienceCinema

    Viner, Brian; Parker, Matthew J.

    2016-07-12

    The Savannah River National Laboratory, Atmospheric Technologies Group, conducts a best-in class Applied Meteorology Program to ensure the Department of Energy’s Savannah River Site is operated safely and complies with stringent environmental regulations.

  14. Indictment of Ability Grouping

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tuckman, Bruce

    1972-01-01

    The use of ability grouping restricts students to interact with others who have been identified as similar in ability and carries with it the stigma of failure and the operation of the self-fulfilling prophecy. (Author)

  15. Building Bunk Group Buddies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nelson, Denise Cabrero

    2000-01-01

    Describes how camp counselors can foster camaraderie among campers through participative decision making, name games, listening, adventure courses, storytelling, spending time in nature, decorating cabins, avoiding favoritism, setting rules, admitting faults, setting group goals, and praising sincere efforts. (TD)

  16. Functional Group Analysis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Walter T., Jr.; Patterson, John M.

    1980-01-01

    Discusses analytical methods selected from current research articles. Groups information by topics of general interest, including acids, aldehydes and ketones, nitro compounds, phenols, and thiols. Cites 97 references. (CS)

  17. Group Support Systems (GSS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hamel, Gary P.; Wijesinghe, R.

    1996-01-01

    Groupware is a term describing an emerging computer software technology enhancing the ability of people to work together as a group, (a software driven 'group support system'). This project originated at the beginning of 1992 and reports were issued describing the activity through May 1995. These reports stressed the need for process as well as technology. That is, while the technology represented a computer assisted method for groups to work together, the Group Support System (GSS) technology als required an understanding of the facilitation process electronic meetings demand. Even people trained in traditional facilitation techniques did not necessarily aimlessly adopt groupware techniques. The latest phase of this activity attempted to (1) improve the facilitation process by developing training support for a portable groupware computer system, and (2) to explore settings and uses for the portable groupware system using different software, such as Lotus Notes.

  18. Is Group Counseling Neglected?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Owen, Susanne M.

    1972-01-01

    Group counseling is valuable for the psychological and social readjustment of newly disabled persons and their families, with the counselor and physician having major roles in personal rehabilitation. (AG)

  19. User Working Group Charter

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2014-04-29

    ... Amended 2010   The Langley Atmospheric Science Data Center (ASDC) User Working Group (UWG) is chartered by the Earth Observing ... of the ASDC user interface, development of the Information Management System (IMS), and ASDC user conferences requirements for and ...

  20. SRNL Atmospheric Technologies Group

    SciTech Connect

    Viner, Brian; Parker, Matthew J.

    2016-05-10

    The Savannah River National Laboratory, Atmospheric Technologies Group, conducts a best-in class Applied Meteorology Program to ensure the Department of Energy’s Savannah River Site is operated safely and complies with stringent environmental regulations.

  1. Electrochemical form grinding. Fnal report

    SciTech Connect

    Stiles, R.W.

    1980-06-01

    Electrochemical form grinding cutting tests were performed on 25 17-4 PH stainless steel bars by a copper resin aluminum oxide wheel formed from a diamond form block. Tests investigated methods of dressing a form into a grinding wheel, nozzle design, optimum machine settings, and tolerance capabilities. The electrolyte was distributed evenly onto the wheel by a form-fitting nozzle, and a minimum of two passes, rough and finish, were made because of current density variations throughout the cut. Tolerance held on the form test samples was +- 0.12 mm on the contour, with an average 0.12 mm overcut.

  2. Crystal structure of carnidazole form II from synchrotron X-ray powder diffraction: structural comparison with form I, the hydrated form and the low energy conformations in vacuo.

    PubMed

    de Armas, Héctor Novoa; Peeters, Oswald M; Blaton, Norbert; Van den Mooter, Guy; De Ridder, Dirk J A; Schenk, Henk

    2006-10-01

    The crystal structure of carnidazole form II, O-methyl [2-(2-methyl-5-nitro-1H-imidazole-1-yl)ethyl]thiocarbamate, has been determined using synchrotron X-ray powder diffraction in combination with simulated annealing and whole profile pattern matching, and refined by the Rietveld method. For structure solution, 12 degrees of freedom were defined: one motion group and six torsions. Form II crystallizes in space group P2(1)/n, Z=4, with unit cell parameters after Rietveld refinement: a=13.915(4), b=8.095(2), c=10.649(3) A, beta=110.83(1) degrees, and V=1121.1(5) A3. The two polymorphic forms, as well as the hydrate, crystallize in the monoclinic space group P2(1)/n having four molecules in the cell. In form II, the molecules are held together by forming two infinite zig-zag chains via hydrogen bonds of the type N--H...N, the same pattern as in form I. A conformational study of carnidazole, at semiempirical PM3 level, was performed using stochastic approaches based on modification of the flexible torsion angles. The values of the torsion angles for the molecules of the two polymorphic forms and the hydrate of carnidazole are compared to those obtained from the conformational search. Form I and form II are enantiotropic polymorphic pairs this agrees with the fact that the two forms are conformational polymorphs.

  3. Magnetograph group summary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Harrison P.

    1989-01-01

    The Magnetograph Group focussed on the techniques and many practical problems of interleaving ground-based measurements of magnetic fields from diverse sites and instruments to address the original scientific objectives. The predominant view of the discussion group was that present instrumentation and analysis resources do not warrant immediate, specific plans for further worldwide campaigns of cooperative magnetograph observing. The several reasons for this view, together with many caveats, qualifications, and suggestions for future work are presented.

  4. Basic Pile Group Behavior.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-09-01

    geotechnical engineer to obtain the values of the soil modulus and the coefficient of horizontal subgrade reaction. The methods provided in this Appendix must...describes a computerized method for pile group design and analysis as practiced in the Corps of Engineers and proposes criteria for sys- tematizing... Engineers , and to propose criteria for systematizing this method in a computer program. This paper describes a computerized method of pile group analysis

  5. Eight salt forms of sulfadiazine.

    PubMed

    Buist, Amanda R; Dennany, Lynn; Kennedy, Alan R; Manzie, Craig; McPhie, Katherine; Walker, Brandon

    2014-09-01

    Proton transfer to the sulfa drug sulfadiazine [systematic name: 4-amino-N-(pyrimidin-2-yl)benzenesulfonamide] gave eight salt forms. These are the monohydrate and methanol hemisolvate forms of the chloride (2-{[(4-azaniumylphenyl)sulfonyl]azanidyl}pyrimidin-1-ium chloride monohydrate, C(10)H(11)N(4)O(2)S(+) · Cl(-) · H2O, (I), and 2-{[(4-azaniumylphenyl)sulfonyl]azanidyl}pyrimidin-1-ium chloride methanol hemisolvate, C(10)H(11)N(4)O(2)S(+) · Cl(-) · (0.5)CH(3)OH, (II)); a bromide monohydrate (2-{[(4-azaniumylphenyl)sulfonyl]azanidyl}pyrimidin-1-ium bromide monohydrate, C(10)H(11)N(4)O(2)S(+) · Br(-) · H2O, (III)), which has a disordered water channel; a species containing the unusual tetraiodide dianion [bis(2-{[(4-azaniumylphenyl)sulfonyl]azanidyl}pyrimidin-1-ium) tetraiodide, 2C(10)H(11)N(4)O(2)S(+) · I4(2-), (IV)], where the [I4](2-) ion is located at a crystallographic inversion centre; a tetrafluoroborate monohydrate (2-{[(4-azaniumylphenyl)sulfonyl]azanidyl}pyrimidin-1-ium tetrafluoroborate monohydrate, C(10)H(11)N(4)O(2)S(+) · BF(4)(-) · H2O, (V)); a nitrate (2-{[(4-azaniumylphenyl)sulfonyl]azanidyl}pyrimidin-1-ium nitrate, C(10)H(11)N(4)O(2)S(+) · NO(3)(-), (VI)); an ethanesulfonate {4-[(pyrimidin-2-yl)sulfamoyl]anilinium ethanesulfonate, C(10)H(11)N(4)O(2)S(+) · C(2)H(5)SO(3)(-), (VII)}; and a dihydrate of the 4-hydroxybenzenesulfonate {4-[(pyrimidin-2-yl)sulfamoyl]anilinium 4-hydroxybenzenesulfonate dihydrate, C(10)H(11)N(4)O(2)S(+) · HOC(6)H(4)SO(3)(-) · 2H2O, (VIII)}. All these structures feature alternate layers of cations and of anions where any solvent is associated with the anion layers. The two sulfonate salts are protonated at the aniline N atom and the amide N atom of sulfadiazine, a tautomeric form of the sulfadiazine cation that has not been crystallographically described before. All the other salt forms are instead protonated at the aniline group and on one N atom of the pyrimidine ring. Whilst all eight species are based upon

  6. Physicochemical studies on cetylammonium bromide and its modified (mono-, di-, and trihydroxyethylated) head group analogues. Their micellization characteristics in water and thermodynamic and structural aspects of water-in-oil microemulsions formed with them along with n-hexanol and isooctane.

    PubMed

    Mitra, Debolina; Chakraborty, Indranil; Bhattacharya, Subhash C; Moulik, Satya P; Roy, Sangita; Das, Debapratim; Das, Prasanta K

    2006-06-15

    The micellization behavior of cetylammonium bromide and its mono-, di-, and trihydroxyethylated head group analogues and water/oil (w/o) microemulsion formation with them have been studied with detailed thermodynamic and structural considerations. The critical micellar concentration, micellar aggregation number, and behavior of the surfactants at the air/solution interface have been studied in detail. The results have been analyzed and discussed. The formation of the w/o microemulsion stabilized by the aforesaid surfactants in conjunction with the cosurfactant n-hexanol in isooctane has been investigated by the dilution method. The energetics of the transfer of cosurfactant from oil to the interface has been estimated. The structural parameters, namely, droplet dimension, droplet number, and population of surfactant and cosurfactant on the droplet surface, have also been estimated. The efficacy of the surfactants in respect to water dispersion in oil and cosurfactant concentration level at the oil/water interface has been worked out. Such microemulsions are prospective compartmentalized systems to assist enzyme activities. In this respect, the trihydroxyethylated head group analogue in the above series has been found to be a better performer for the preparation and stabilization of microemulsions that has correlated well with its performance than the others in the hydrolysis of p-nitrophenyl-n-hexanoate by the enzyme Chromobacterium viscosum lipase.

  7. Interobject grouping facilitates visual awareness.

    PubMed

    Stein, Timo; Kaiser, Daniel; Peelen, Marius V

    2015-01-01

    In organizing perception, the human visual system takes advantage of regularities in the visual input to perceptually group related image elements. Simple stimuli that can be perceptually grouped based on physical regularities, for example by forming an illusory contour, have a competitive advantage in entering visual awareness. Here, we show that regularities that arise from the relative positioning of complex, meaningful objects in the visual environment also modulate visual awareness. Using continuous flash suppression, we found that pairs of objects that were positioned according to real-world spatial regularities (e.g., a lamp above a table) accessed awareness more quickly than the same object pairs shown in irregular configurations (e.g., a table above a lamp). This advantage was specific to upright stimuli and abolished by stimulus inversion, meaning that it did not reflect physical stimulus confounds or the grouping of simple image elements. Thus, knowledge of the spatial configuration of objects in the environment shapes the contents of conscious perception.

  8. Heated die facilitates tungsten forming

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chattin, J. H.; Haystrick, J. E.; Laughlin, J. C.; Leidy, R. A.

    1966-01-01

    Tungsten forming in a press brake employs a bottom die assembly with a heating manifold between two water-cooled die sections. The manifold has hydrogen-oxygen burners spaced along its length for even heat during forming.

  9. Facilities removal working group

    SciTech Connect

    1997-03-01

    This working group`s first objective is to identify major economic, technical, and regulatory constraints on operator practices and decisions relevant to offshore facilities removal. Then, the group will try to make recommendations as to regulatory and policy adjustments, additional research, or process improvements and/or technological advances, that may be needed to improve the efficiency and effectiveness of the removal process. The working group will focus primarily on issues dealing with Gulf of Mexico platform abandonments. In order to make the working group sessions as productive as possible, the Facilities Removal Working Group will focus on three topics that address a majority of the concerns and/or constraints relevant to facilities removal. The three areas are: (1) Explosive Severing and its Impact on Marine Life, (2) Pile and Conductor Severing, and (3) Deep Water Abandonments This paper will outline the current state of practice in the offshore industry, identifying current regulations and specific issues encountered when addressing each of the three main topics above. The intent of the paper is to highlight potential issues for panel discussion, not to provide a detailed review of all data relevant to the topic. Before each panel discussion, key speakers will review data and information to facilitate development and discussion of the main issues of each topic. Please refer to the attached agenda for the workshop format, key speakers, presentation topics, and panel participants. The goal of the panel discussions is to identify key issues for each of the three topics above. The working group will also make recommendations on how to proceed on these key issues.

  10. Coordinating Group report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-01-01

    In December 1992, western governors and four federal agencies established a Federal Advisory Committee to Develop On-site Innovative Technologies for Environmental Restoration and Waste Management (the DOIT Committee). The purpose of the Committee is to advise the federal government on ways to improve waste cleanup technology development and the cleanup of federal sites in the West. The Committee directed in January 1993 that information be collected from a wide range of potential stakeholders and that innovative technology candidate projects be identified, organized, set in motion, and evaluated to test new partnerships, regulatory approaches, and technologies which will lead to improve site cleanup. Five working groups were organized, one to develop broad project selection and evaluation criteria and four to focus on specific contaminant problems. A Coordinating Group comprised of working group spokesmen and federal and state representatives, was set up to plan and organize the routine functioning of these working groups. The working groups were charged with defining particular contaminant problems; identifying shortcomings in technology development, stakeholder involvement, regulatory review, and commercialization which impede the resolution of these problems; and identifying candidate sites or technologies which could serve as regional innovative demonstration projects to test new approaches to overcome the shortcomings. This report from the Coordinating Group to the DOIT Committee highlights the key findings and opportunities uncovered by these fact-finding working groups. It provides a basis from which recommendations from the DOIT Committee to the federal government can be made. It also includes observations from two public roundtables, one on commercialization and another on regulatory and institutional barriers impeding technology development and cleanup.

  11. Superplastic Forming of Titanium Structures

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1975-04-01

    configurations. These configurations included rectangular and circular pan sections, stepped side walls, beads, joggles , and multiple parts formed at one...capability of being formed to a complex configuration with well-formed beads and Joggles , tight bend radii, and 90-degree return flanges. Since titanium...Coming operation. The configuration consists of joggles and steps positioned into the basic forming box to produce a four-cavity tool symmetrical about

  12. Synthesis of New Elastomers with Controlled Structures Based on Alkylene Oxides, Grafted by ROMP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spurcaciu, Bogdan; Dragutan, Ileana; Nicolae, Cristian-Andi; Buzdugan, Emil; Dragutan, Valerian

    Poly(propylene oxide-ran-allyl glycidyl ether) (PPO-AGE) copolymers have been prepared using as initiating system an alkyl aluminum compound, controlled amounts of water and different organic compounds that act as cocatalysts, e.g. ethers, diols, phosphines, salicylic acid derivatives, and organozinc compounds. Among the investigated catalysts the most productive systems showed to be the ternary systems derived from triisobutylaluminum (TIBA) and water having Zn(acac)2 as a third component. These copolymers have subsequently been grafted by ringopening metathesis polymerization (ROMP) with cyclooctene in the presence of Grubbs first-generation ruthenium (Ru) catalyst to produce new comblike copolymers.

  13. 40 CFR 721.10661 - Methylenebis[isocyanatobenzene], polymer with alkanedoic acid, alkylene glycols, alkoxylated...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... CONTROL ACT SIGNIFICANT NEW USES OF CHEMICAL SUBSTANCES Significant New Uses for Specific Chemical... alkanepolyol and substituted trialkoxysilane (generic). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as methylenebis , polymer...

  14. 40 CFR 721.10494 - Reaction product of trimethylolpropane triacrylate and alkylene imine (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Reaction product of trimethylolpropane... Significant New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10494 Reaction product of trimethylolpropane.... (1) The chemical substance identified generically as reaction product of...

  15. 40 CFR 721.10494 - Reaction product of trimethylolpropane triacrylate and alkylene imine (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Reaction product of trimethylolpropane... Significant New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10494 Reaction product of trimethylolpropane.... (1) The chemical substance identified generically as reaction product of...

  16. Transmission coupling mechanisms: cultural group selection

    PubMed Central

    Boyd, Robert; Richerson, Peter J.

    2010-01-01

    The application of phylogenetic methods to cultural variation raises questions about how cultural adaption works and how it is coupled to cultural transmission. Cultural group selection is of particular interest in this context because it depends on the same kinds of mechanisms that lead to tree-like patterns of cultural variation. Here, we review ideas about cultural group selection relevant to cultural phylogenetics. We discuss why group selection among multiple equilibria is not subject to the usual criticisms directed at group selection, why multiple equilibria are a common phenomena, and why selection among multiple equilibria is not likely to be an important force in genetic evolution. We also discuss three forms of group competition and the processes that cause populations to shift from one equilibrium to another and create a mutation-like process at the group level. PMID:21041204

  17. Development of cancer cooperative groups in Japan.

    PubMed

    Fukuda, Haruhiko

    2010-09-01

    Investigator-initiated clinical trials are essential for improving the standard of care for cancer patients, because pharmaceutical companies do not conduct trials that evaluate combination chemotherapy using drugs from different companies, surgery, radiotherapy or multimodal treatments. Government-sponsored cooperative groups have played a vital role in developing cancer therapeutics since the 1950s in the USA; however, the establishment of these groups in Japan did not take place until 30 years later. Methodological standards for multicenter cancer clinical trials were established in the 1980s by the National Cancer Institute and cooperative groups. The Japan Clinical Oncology Group, one of the largest cooperative groups in the country, was instituted in 1990. Its data center and operations office, formed during the 1990s, applied the standard methods of US cooperative groups. At present, the Japan Clinical Oncology Group consists of 14 subgroups, a Data Center, an Operations Office, nine standing committees and an Executive Committee represented by the Japan Clinical Oncology Group Chair. Quality control and quality assurance at the Japan Clinical Oncology Group, including regular central monitoring, statistical methods, interim analyses, adverse event reporting and site visit audit, have complied with international standards. Other cooperative groups have also been established in Japan since the 1980s; however, nobody figures out all of them. A project involving the restructuring of US cooperative groups has been ongoing since 2005. Learning from the success of this project will permit further progress of the cancer clinical trials enterprise in Japan.

  18. Polyimides containing amide and perfluoroisopropylidene connecting groups

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dezern, James F. (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    New, thermooxidatively stable polyimides were prepared from the reaction of aromatic dianhydrides containing isopropylidene bridging groups with aromatic diamines containing amide connecting groups between the rings. Several of these polyimides were shown to be semi-crystalline as evidenced by wide angle x ray scattering and differential scanning calorimetry. Most of the polyimides form tough, flexible films with high tensile properties. These polyimide films exhibit enhanced solubility in organic solvents.

  19. The Military Cooperation Group

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-12-01

    stay in their respective countries and continue to face their host nation contacts daily. For host nation relations , it may be more expedient to...NAVAL POSTGRADUATE SCHOOL MONTEREY, CALIFORNIA THESIS Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited THE MILITARY...THIS PAGE INTENTIONALLY LEFT BLANK i REPORT DOCUMENTATION PAGE Form Approved OMB No. 0704-0188 Public reporting burden for this

  20. Warm Forming of Mg Sheets: From Incremental to Electromagnetic Forming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ulacia, Ibai; Galdos, Lander; Esnaola, Jon Ander; Larrañaga, Jon; Arruebarrena, Gurutze; de Argandoña, Eneko Saenz; Hurtado, Iñaki

    2014-07-01

    Magnesium alloys are generating interest in the automotive and aeronautic industries due to their low density and potential to reduce gross vehicular weight. However, the formability of these alloys is poor and they are very difficult to be formed at room temperature due to their strong basal texture in rolled form. In this paper, the potential of magnesium alloy sheets to be processed at warm conditions is studied for four different forming technologies: incremental forming (IF), deep drawing (DD), hydroforming (HF), and electromagnetic forming (EMF). Forming mechanisms and process window are experimentally characterized by monitoring different process parameters. Special focus is made on the influence of the forming temperature and the strain rate. Thus, experiments at temperatures from room to 523 K (250 °C) and a wide range of strain rates, between 10-3 up to 103 s-1 according to each process nature and scope, are conducted. It is observed that, even the inherent forming rate range of each process vary considerably, increasing forming temperature increases formability for all of these forming processes. In the other hand, an opposing effect of the strain rate is observed between the quasi-static processes (IF, DD, and HF) and the high speed process (EMF). Thus, a detrimental effect on formability is observed when increasing strain rate for quasi-static processes, while a mild increase is observed for EMF.

  1. Instructions to working groups

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Foushee, H. Clayton

    1987-01-01

    The key to the success of this workshop is your active participation in the working group process. The goals of this workshop are to address four major questions regarding Cockpit Resource Management (CRM) Training. To some extent the working group topic areas parallel these issues, but in some cases they do not. However, it is important for all of the working groups to keep these general questions in mind during their deliberations: (1) What are the essential elements of an optimal CRM Training program; (2) What are the strengths and weaknesses of current approaches to CRM Training; (3) How can CRM Training best be implemented, and what barriers exist; and (4) Is CRM Training effective, do we know, and if not, how can we find out.

  2. Illinois Wind Workers Group

    SciTech Connect

    David G. Loomis

    2012-05-28

    The Illinois Wind Working Group (IWWG) was founded in 2006 with about 15 members. It has grown to over 200 members today representing all aspects of the wind industry across the State of Illinois. In 2008, the IWWG developed a strategic plan to give direction to the group and its activities. The strategic plan identifies ways to address critical market barriers to the further penetration of wind. The key to addressing these market barriers is public education and outreach. Since Illinois has a restructured electricity market, utilities no longer have a strong control over the addition of new capacity within the state. Instead, market acceptance depends on willing landowners to lease land and willing county officials to site wind farms. Many times these groups are uninformed about the benefits of wind energy and unfamiliar with the process. Therefore, many of the project objectives focus on conferences, forum, databases and research that will allow these stakeholders to make well-educated decisions.

  3. Upgraded Coal Interest Group

    SciTech Connect

    Evan Hughes

    2009-01-08

    The Upgraded Coal Interest Group (UCIG) is an EPRI 'users group' that focuses on clean, low-cost options for coal-based power generation. The UCIG covers topics that involve (1) pre-combustion processes, (2) co-firing systems and fuels, and (3) reburn using coal-derived or biomass-derived fuels. The UCIG mission is to preserve and expand the economic use of coal for energy. By reducing the fuel costs and environmental impacts of coal-fired power generation, existing units become more cost effective and thus new units utilizing advanced combustion technologies are more likely to be coal-fired.

  4. Bell, group and tangle

    SciTech Connect

    Solomon, A. I.

    2010-03-15

    The 'Bell' of the title refers to bipartite Bell states, and their extensions to, for example, tripartite systems. The 'Group' of the title is the Braid Group in its various representations; while 'Tangle' refers to the property of entanglement which is present in both of these scenarios. The objective of this note is to explore the relation between Quantum Entanglement and Topological Links, and to show that the use of the language of entanglement in both cases is more than one of linguistic analogy.

  5. Index of NASA prefixed forms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    This Handbook sets forth information for the guidance of all users of the NASA Forms Management Program System. It is issued in accordance with the Federal Information Resources Management Regulation (FIRMR), Subpart 201-9.1. This Handbook sets forth an alpha-functional index of NASA-prefixed forms by title, identifying number, and unit of issue. The automated processing two-letter code (NF) has been substituted for the spelling out of the NASA form-prefix preceding the form number. To indicate a description in lieu of a distinct title, the entire reference under the Form Title/Description column has been enclosed in parentheses. A list of current forms, shown by number and page, is included for cross-reference and to preclude the ordering of those forms which have been deleted from the system. This Handbook will be updated, as appropriate. NHB 1420.2H dated July 1986, is cancelled.

  6. 76 FR 61725 - Agency Information Collection Activities: Case Submission Form, Case Assistance Form; (Form DHS...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-05

    ... SECURITY Agency Information Collection Activities: Case Submission Form, Case Assistance Form; (Form DHS... CIS Ombudsman to identify the issue such as: (1) A case problem which is a request for information.... SUMMARY: The Department of Homeland Security, Office of the Citizenship and Immigration Service...

  7. Valuing Support Groups

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Graziosi, Elena

    2010-01-01

    For people living with or caring for someone with a disability, being able to talk to someone who can relate to their feelings of frustration during difficult times, offer practical advice on an issue, or even understand the importance of a small success, can make a difference. Support groups are a mainstay for individuals coping with daily…

  8. LCDs Revolutionize Group Training.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mandell, Mel

    1987-01-01

    Describes a screen projector based on liquid crystal display (LCD) that duplicates the monitor of a microcomputer and may be used in group training sessions for demonstration purposes. Suggestions of what features to look for and a buyer's guide are provided. (CLB)

  9. Test Group Rethinks Questions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gewertz, Catherine

    2012-01-01

    A group that is developing tests for half the states in the nation has dramatically reduced the length of its assessment in a bid to balance the desire for a more meaningful and useful exam with concerns about the amount of time spent on testing. The decision by the Smarter Balanced Assessment Consortium reflects months of conversation among its…

  10. Working Group Report: Neutrinos

    SciTech Connect

    de Gouvea, A.; Pitts, K.; Scholberg, K.; Zeller, G. P.

    2013-10-16

    This document represents the response of the Intensity Frontier Neutrino Working Group to the Snowmass charge. We summarize the current status of neutrino physics and identify many exciting future opportunities for studying the properties of neutrinos and for addressing important physics and astrophysics questions with neutrinos.

  11. Dimensions of Group Interaction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dawidowicz, Paula

    2008-01-01

    The correlation between positive and negative group interactions and one or another of individuals' attitudes or characteristics--moral development, critical thinking, resilience, and self efficacy--has been examined previously. However, no systemic examination of individuals' development of patterns of these characteristics and those patterns'…

  12. American Ethnic Groups.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sowell, Thomas, Ed.; Collins, Lynn D., Ed.

    The essays in this volume focus on the historical and social evolution of six American ethnic groups. Thomas Sowell discusses similarities and differences in the experiences of antebellum "free persons of color," emancipated slaves and their descendants, and West Indian immigrants, and examines trends in the socioeconomic status of black…

  13. Abandoning wells working group

    SciTech Connect

    1997-03-01

    The primary objective of this working group is to identify major technical, regulatory, and environmental issues that are relevant to the abandonment of offshore wellbores. Once the issues have been identified, the working group also has the objective of making recommendations or providing potential solutions for consideration. Areas for process improvement will be identified and {open_quotes}best practices{close_quotes} will be discussed and compared to {open_quotes}minimum standards.{close_quotes} The working group will primarily focus on wellbore abandonment in the Gulf of Mexico. However, workshop participants are encouraged to discuss international issues which may be relevant to wellbore abandonment practices in the Gulf of Mexico. The Abandoning Wells Group has identified several major areas for discussion that have concerns related to both operators and service companies performing wellbore abandonments in the Gulf of Mexico. The following broad topics were selected for the agenda: (1) MMS minimum requirements and state regulations. (2) Co-existence of best practices, new technology, and P & A economics. (3) Liability and environmental issues relating to wellbore abandonment.

  14. Leukosis/Sarcoma Group

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The leukosis/sarcoma (L/S) group of diseases designates a variety of transmissible benign and malignant neoplasms of chickens caused by members that belong to the family Retroviridae. Because the expansion of the literature on this disease, it is no longer feasible to cite all relevant publications ...

  15. Functional Group Analysis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Walter T., Jr.; Patterson, John M.

    1984-01-01

    Literature on analytical methods related to the functional groups of 17 chemical compounds is reviewed. These compounds include acids, acid azides, alcohols, aldehydes, ketones, amino acids, aromatic hydrocarbons, carbodiimides, carbohydrates, ethers, nitro compounds, nitrosamines, organometallic compounds, peroxides, phenols, silicon compounds,…

  16. The Pressure Group Cooker.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Graves, Bill

    1992-01-01

    Administrators across the nation have encountered vigorous challenges against textbooks, practices, and procedures that critics find laden with occult and New Age values. Attacks are becoming more aggressive, better organized, and well financed. This article and accompanying sidebars discuss pressure group tactics and ways to counter them. The…

  17. National Melon Research Group

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The National Melon Research Group met with the Cucurbitaceae 2010 conference in Charleston, South Carolina at 7:00 P.M. on November 17. The discussion was focused solely on cucurbit powdery mildew (CPM). Several reported increased problem with CPM or apparent changes in race. Ales Lebeda (Palacký Un...

  18. Ground Rules for Groups.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schwarz, Roger M.

    1994-01-01

    Tips for effective groups include the following: test assumptions, share relevant information, focus on interests, be specific, agree on meanings, explain reasons, disagree openly, invite feedback, jointly design solutions, discuss nondiscussable issues, keep focused, eliminate distractions, expect all to participate, decide by consensus, and…

  19. Modeling Small Group Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Draskovic, I.; Holdrinet, R.; Bulte, J.; Bolhuis, S.; Van Leeuwe, J.

    2004-01-01

    This article presents findings from an empirical study on the relations between the variables comprising learning mechanisms in small collaborative groups. Variables comprising the central learning mechanisms component were "task related interactions," "knowledge elaborations," and "subjective estimation of knowledge acquisition." Student related…

  20. International Study Tour Groups

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Reilly, Frances L.; Matt, John J.; McCaw, William P.; Kero, Patty; Stewart, Courtney; Haddouch, Reda

    2014-01-01

    Using the context of international study tour groups, this study examined the personal and professional transformation that occurred among host faculty and staff at The University of Montana-Missoula as a result of their interactions with traveling academics from other countries. Data were collected from participant responses (n = 27) using a…

  1. Group Counseling: Health Related.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McFadden, Johnnie

    1979-01-01

    Diabetes and sickle cell anemia (SCA) are two health-related characteristics that distinguish young people from their peers. This article outlines the problems of children with diabetes and SCA and presents the goals and format for group counseling of these populations and their parents. (Author/BEF)

  2. Grouping Illumination Frameworks

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zdravkovic, Suncica; Economou, Elias; Gilchrist, Alan

    2012-01-01

    According to Koffka (1935), the lightness of a target surface is determined by the relationship between the target and the illumination frame of reference to which it belongs. However, each scene contains numerous illumination frames, and judging each one separately would lead to an enormous amount of computing. Grouping those frames that are in…

  3. Assessing Minority Group Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Phillips, Beeman N., Ed.

    Contents of this book include the following collection of articles: "Assessing Minority Group Children: Challenges for School Psychologists," Thomas Oakland; "The NEA Testing Moratorium," Boyd Bosma; "Cultural Myopia: The Need for a Corrective Lens," Martin H. Gerry; "Assumptions Underlying Psychological Testing," T. Ernest Newland;…

  4. External Interest Group Impingements.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Millard, Richard M.

    The history of the interrelation among state approval, accreditation, and institutional eligibility is considered. It is suggested that faculty and college administrators can be either an internal or external group in relationship to the planning process. The federal government, or the state government, passes legislation that may have both…

  5. Native American Cultural Groups.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roy, Loriene, Comp.

    Part of a larger report on the Four Directions Project, an American Indian technology innovation project, this section includes 13 "pathfinders" to locating information on Native American and other indigenous cultural groups. The pathfinders were designed by students in the Graduate School of Library and Information Science at the…

  6. Media Criticism Group Speech

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ramsey, E. Michele

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To integrate speaking practice with rhetorical theory. Type of speech: Persuasive. Point value: 100 points (i.e., 30 points based on peer evaluations, 30 points based on individual performance, 40 points based on the group presentation), which is 25% of course grade. Requirements: (a) References: 7-10; (b) Length: 20-30 minutes; (c)…

  7. Educator Study Groups: A Professional Development Tool to Enhance Inclusion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Herner-Patnode, Leah

    2009-01-01

    Professional development can take many forms. The most effective development includes individual educators in the formation and planning process. Educator study groups are one form of professional development that allows major stakeholders in the education process the autonomy to develop individual and group goals. This often translates into an…

  8. DSNF AND OTHER WASTE FORM DEGRADATION ABSTRACTION

    SciTech Connect

    J. CUNNANE

    2004-11-19

    Several hundred distinct types of DOE-owned spent nuclear fuel (DSNF) may potentially be disposed in the Yucca Mountain repository. These fuel types represent many more types than can be viably individually examined for their effect on the Total System Performance Assessment for the License Application (TSPA-LA). Additionally, for most of these fuel types, there is no known direct experimental test data for the degradation and dissolution of the waste form in repository groundwaters. The approach used in the TSPA-LA model is, therefore, to assess available information on each of 11 groups of DSNF, and to identify a model that can be used in the TSPA-LA model without differentiating between individual codisposal waste packages containing different DSNF types. The purpose of this report is to examine the available data and information concerning the dissolution kinetics of DSNF matrices for the purpose of abstracting a degradation model suitable for use in describing degradation of the DSNF inventory in the Total System Performance Assessment for the License Application. The data and information and associated degradation models were examined for the following types of DSNF: Group 1--Naval spent nuclear fuel; Group 2--Plutonium/uranium alloy (Fermi 1 SNF); Group 3--Plutonium/uranium carbide (Fast Flux Test Facility-Test Fuel Assembly SNF); Group 4--Mixed oxide and plutonium oxide (Fast Flux Test Facility-Demonstration Fuel Assembly/Fast Flux Test Facility-Test Demonstration Fuel Assembly SNF); Group 5--Thorium/uranium carbide (Fort St. Vrain SNF); Group 6--Thorium/uranium oxide (Shippingport light water breeder reactor SNF); Group 7--Uranium metal (N Reactor SNF); Group 8--Uranium oxide (Three Mile Island-2 core debris); Group 9--Aluminum-based SNF (Foreign Research Reactor SNF); Group 10--Miscellaneous Fuel; and Group 11--Uranium-zirconium hydride (Training Research Isotopes-General Atomics SNF). The analyses contained in this document provide an ''upper-limit'' (i

  9. Group B streptococcal opacity variants.

    PubMed Central

    Pincus, S H; Cole, R L; Wessels, M R; Corwin, M D; Kamanga-Sollo, E; Hayes, S F; Cieplak, W; Swanson, J

    1992-01-01

    Colony opacity variants were detected for type III group B streptococci (GBS). Transparent colonies predominate in the parent GBS, with occasional colonies having opaque portions. Two stable opaque variants (1.1 and 1.5) were compared with three transparent clones (1.2, 1.3, and 1.4). All grew well on blood agar and on GC medium, but variant 1.1 failed to grow on Todd-Hewitt medium. Scanning and transmission electron microscopy demonstrated that colony opacity correlated with bacterial aggregation status, with opaque variants forming longer and more organized chains. Opaque-transparent switches were observed in both directions for most variants, with transparent to opaque noted most frequently, but 1.5 did not switch at all. Switching of the opacity phenotype was observed both in vitro and in neonatal mice. Relationships between colony opacity and several cell surface phenomena were explored. (i) Opaque variant 1.1 had two surface proteins (46 and 75 kDa) that were either unique or greatly overexpressed. (ii) Variant 1.1 was deficient in type III polysaccharide, while 1.5 lacked group B antigen. Diminished capsular polysaccharide of variant 1.1 was reflected in reduced negative electrophoretic mobility and in increased buoyant density. (iii) Transparent variant colonies growing closest to a penicillin disk were opaque, but colonial variants did not differ in their sensitivity to penicillin. These data indicate that GBS can exist in both opaque and transparent forms, with opaque appearance occurring by multiple routes. Opaque variants grow poorly on Todd-Hewitt medium generally used for isolation of GBS, so any possible relationships between opacity variation and pathogenesis of GBS infection are unknown. Images PMID:1592825

  10. Dynamical theory of dense groups of galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mamon, Gary A.

    1990-01-01

    It is well known that galaxies associate in groups and clusters. Perhaps 40% of all galaxies are found in groups of 4 to 20 galaxies (e.g., Tully 1987). Although most groups appear to be so loose that the galaxy interactions within them ought to be insignificant, the apparently densest groups, known as compact groups appear so dense when seen in projection onto the plane of the sky that their members often overlap. These groups thus appear as dense as the cores of rich clusters. The most popular catalog of compact groups, compiled by Hickson (1982), includes isolation among its selection critera. Therefore, in comparison with the cores of rich clusters, Hickson's compact groups (HCGs) appear to be the densest isolated regions in the Universe (in galaxies per unit volume), and thus provide in principle a clean laboratory for studying the competition of very strong gravitational interactions. The $64,000 question here is then: Are compact groups really bound systems as dense as they appear? If dense groups indeed exist, then one expects that each of the dynamical processes leading to the interaction of their member galaxies should be greatly enhanced. This leads us to the questions: How stable are dense groups? How do they form? And the related question, fascinating to any theorist: What dynamical processes predominate in dense groups of galaxies? If HCGs are not bound dense systems, but instead 1D change alignments (Mamon 1986, 1987; Walke & Mamon 1989) or 3D transient cores (Rose 1979) within larger looser systems of galaxies, then the relevant question is: How frequent are chance configurations within loose groups? Here, the author answers these last four questions after comparing in some detail the methods used and the results obtained in the different studies of dense groups.

  11. Perceiving individuals and groups: expectancies, dispositional inferences, and causal attributions.

    PubMed

    Susskind, J; Maurer, K; Thakkar, V; Hamilton, D L; Sherman, J W

    1999-02-01

    Two experiments investigated differences in forming impressions of individual and group targets. Experiment 1 showed that when forming an impression of an individual, perceivers made more extreme trait judgments, made those judgments more quickly and with greater confidence, and recalled more information than when the impression target was a group. Experiment 2 showed that when participants were forming an impression of an individual, expectancy-inconsistent behaviors spontaneously triggered causal attributions to resolve the inconsistency; this was not the case when the impression target was a group. Results are interpreted as reflecting perceivers' a priori assumptions of unity and coherence in individual versus group targets.

  12. Undercuts by Laser Shock Forming

    SciTech Connect

    Wielage, Hanna; Vollertsen, Frank

    2011-05-04

    In laser shock forming TEA-CO{sub 2}-laser induced shock waves are used to form metal foils, such as aluminum or copper. The process utilizes an initiated plasma shock wave on the target surface, which leads to a forming of the foil. A challenge in forming technologies is the manufacturing of undercuts. By conventional forming methods these special forms are not feasible. In this article, it is presented that undercuts in the micro range can be produced by laser shock deep drawing. Different drawing die diameters, drawing die depths and the material aluminum in the thicknesses 20 and 50 {mu}m were investigated. It will be presented that smaller die diameters facilitate undercuts compared to bigger die diameters. The phenomena can be explained by Barlow's formula. Furthermore, it is shown which maximum undercut depth at different die diameters can be reached. To this end, cross-sections of the different parameter combinations are displayed.

  13. Testing Job Applicants from Disadvantaged Groups.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Doppelt, Jerome E.; Bennett, George K.

    1967-01-01

    Companies have been accused of using tests as a means of maintaining unfair discrimination against groups which have already suffered from many forms of discrimination. It does not follow, however, that tests themselves merit condemnation. Employers who use tests do so because the information furnished by tests is valuable to them in making hiring…

  14. On Group Stability in Hierarchies and Networks.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Demange, Gabrielle

    2004-01-01

    A hierarchical structure is a widespread organizational form in many areas. My aim in this paper is to provide a rationale for this fact based on two premises. First, a group organizes itself so as to achieve efficient coordination. Second, efficient coordination is achieved only if subgroups as well as individuals agree to cooperate. Even in…

  15. Some applications of Lie groups in astrodynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jackson, A. A.

    1983-01-01

    Differential equations that arise in astrodynamics are examined from the standpoint of Lie group theory. A summary of the Lie method is given for first degree differential equations. The Kepler problem in Hamiltonian form is treated by this method. Extension of the Lie method to optimal trajectories is outlined.

  16. Narrative and Deliberation in Small Group Forums

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ryfe, David M.

    2006-01-01

    In a videotape analysis of five National Issues Forums, I investigate the nature of deliberative talk in small group deliberative settings. I show that deliberative talk in these forums mostly takes the form of storytelling. I argue that storytelling helps participants overcome barriers to deliberation, such as lack of knowledge and the need to…

  17. Seal for fluid forming tools

    DOEpatents

    Golovashchenko, Sergey Fedorovich [Beverly Hills, MI; Bonnen, John Joseph Francis [Milford, MI

    2012-03-20

    An electro-hydraulic forming tool for forming a sheet metal blank in a one-sided die has first and second rigid rings that engage opposite sides of a sheet metal blank. The rigid rings are contained within slots on a die portion and a hydraulic force applicator portion of the forming tool. The seals are either resiliently biased by an elastomeric member or inherently resiliently biased into contact with the blank.

  18. Metallurgical Characterization of Superplastic Forming

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-09-01

    PANEL J (GRAIN SIZE - 4.4 pm, VOLUME % PRIMARY ALPHA - 47). Alpha pain size Beta Wain size Final alpha Forming cycle Total stmain, at forming at forming...12.2 j ro, (b) groi %= size -7.7 /jm, and Wc grain size SA gm.8 ro 248 6 /NJ • " ’••• - , • •,• • , • "• •’ W " l! •r ,p • P

  19. Solid form additives and method of forming same

    SciTech Connect

    Schuettenberg, A.D.; Gragson, J.T.

    1987-01-27

    This patent describes a solid form additive comprising: a normally liquid fuel additive selected from carburetor detergent additives, antiknock additives, deposit-control additives, and mixtures thereof, suitable for use in fuel comprising gasoline for internal combustion engines; and a structural agent for containing the fuel additive and for providing dimensional stability to the solid form additive, the structural agent being soluble and dispersible in the fuel; wherein the fuel additive comprises between about 25% and about 75% by weight of the solid form additive; and wherein the solid form additive is a pellet having structural agent and fuel additive essentially homogeneously dispersed throughout the solid form additive; and wherein the pellet is coated with a sealing agent.

  20. Functional group analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, W.T. Jr.; Patterson, J.M.

    1986-04-01

    Analytical methods for functional group analysis are reviewed. Literature reviewed is from the period of December 1983 through November 1985 and presents methods for determining the following compounds: acids, acid halides, active hydrogen, alcohols, aldehydes, ketones, amides, amines, amino acids, anhydrides, aromatic hydrocarbons, azo compounds, carbohydrates, chloramines, esters, ethers, halogen compounds, hydrazines, isothiocyanates, nitro compounds, nitroso compounds, organometallic compounds, oxiranes, peroxides, phenols, phosphorus compounds, quinones, silicon compounds, sulfates, sulfonyl chlorides, thioamides, thiols, and thiosemicarbazones. 150 references.

  1. Danish Breast Cancer Cooperative Group

    PubMed Central

    Christiansen, Peer; Ejlertsen, Bent; Jensen, Maj-Britt; Mouridsen, Henning

    2016-01-01

    Aim of database Danish Breast Cancer Cooperative Group (DBCG), with an associated database, was introduced as a nationwide multidisciplinary group in 1977 with the ultimate aim to improve the prognosis in breast cancer. Since then, the database has registered women diagnosed with primary invasive nonmetastatic breast cancer. The data reported from the departments to the database included details of the characteristics of the primary tumor, of surgery, radiotherapy, and systemic therapies, and of follow-up reported on specific forms from the departments in question. Descriptive data From 1977 through 2014, ~110,000 patients are registered in the nationwide, clinical database. The completeness has gradually improved to more than 95%. DBCG has continuously prepared evidence-based guidelines on diagnosis and treatment of breast cancer and conducted quality control studies to ascertain the degree of adherence to the guidelines in the different departments. Conclusion Utilizing data from the DBCG database, a long array of high-quality DBCG studies of various designs and scope, nationwide or in international collaboration, have contributed to the current updating of the guidelines, and have been an instrumental resource in the improvement of management and prognosis of breast cancer in Denmark. Thus, since the establishment of DBCG, the prognosis in breast cancer has continuously improved with a decrease in 5-year mortality from ~37% to 15%. PMID:27822082

  2. DOE Waste Treatability Group Guidance

    SciTech Connect

    Kirkpatrick, T.D.

    1995-01-01

    This guidance presents a method and definitions for aggregating U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) waste into streams and treatability groups based on characteristic parameters that influence waste management technology needs. Adaptable to all DOE waste types (i.e., radioactive waste, hazardous waste, mixed waste, sanitary waste), the guidance establishes categories and definitions that reflect variations within the radiological, matrix (e.g., bulk physical/chemical form), and regulated contaminant characteristics of DOE waste. Beginning at the waste container level, the guidance presents a logical approach to implementing the characteristic parameter categories as part of the basis for defining waste streams and as the sole basis for assigning streams to treatability groups. Implementation of this guidance at each DOE site will facilitate the development of technically defined, site-specific waste stream data sets to support waste management planning and reporting activities. Consistent implementation at all of the sites will enable aggregation of the site-specific waste stream data sets into comparable national data sets to support these activities at a DOE complex-wide level.

  3. Group Variables and Gaming Success.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Norris, Dwight R.; Niebuhr, Robert E.

    1980-01-01

    Describes a study designed to determine the effects of group cohesiveness on group performance in a management game and, to examine the effects voluntary v assigned group membership has on the cohesiveness of the group. (Author/LLS)

  4. Combined Waste Form Cost Trade Study

    SciTech Connect

    Dirk Gombert; Steve Piet; Timothy Trickel; Joe Carter; John Vienna; Bill Ebert; Gretchen Matthern

    2008-11-01

    A new generation of aqueous nuclear fuel reprocessing, now in development under the auspices of the DOE Office of Nuclear Energy (NE), separates fuel into several fractions, thereby partitioning the wastes into groups of common chemistry. This technology advance enables development of waste management strategies that were not conceivable with simple PUREX reprocessing. Conventional wisdom suggests minimizing high level waste (HLW) volume is desirable, but logical extrapolation of this concept suggests that at some point the cost of reducing volume further will reach a point of diminishing return and may cease to be cost-effective. This report summarizes an evaluation considering three groupings of wastes in terms of cost-benefit for the reprocessing system. Internationally, the typical waste form for HLW from the PUREX process is borosilicate glass containing waste elements as oxides. Unfortunately several fission products (primarily Mo and the noble metals Ru, Rh, Pd) have limited solubility in glass, yielding relatively low waste loading, producing more glass, and greater disposal costs. Advanced separations allow matching the waste form to waste stream chemistry, allowing the disposal system to achieve more optimum waste loading with improved performance. Metals can be segregated from oxides and each can be stabilized in forms to minimize the HLW volume for repository disposal. Thus, a more efficient waste management system making the most effective use of advanced waste forms and disposal design for each waste is enabled by advanced separations and how the waste streams are combined. This trade-study was designed to juxtapose a combined waste form baseline waste treatment scheme with two options and to evaluate the cost-benefit using available data from the conceptual design studies supported by DOE-NE.

  5. Improving the forming capability of laser dynamic forming by using rubber as a forming medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Zongbao; Liu, Huixia; Wang, Xiao; Wang, Cuntang

    2016-04-01

    Laser dynamic forming (LDF) is a novel high velocity forming technique, which employs laser-generated shock wave to load the sample. The forming velocity induced by the high energy laser pulse may exceed the critical forming velocity, resulting in the occurrence of premature fracture. To avoid the above premature fracture, rubber is introduced in LDF as a forming medium to prolong the loading duration in this paper. Laser induced shock wave energy is transferred to the sample in different forming stages, so the forming velocity can be kept below the critical forming velocity when the initial laser energy is high for fracture. Bulge forming experiments with and without rubber were performed to study the effect of rubber on loading duration. The experimental results show that, the shock wave energy attenuates during the propagation through the rubber layer, the rubber can avoid the premature fracture. So the plastic deformation can continue, the forming capability of LDF is improved. Due to the severe plastic deformation under rubber compression, adiabatic shear bands (ASB) occur in LDF with rubber. The material softening in ASB leads to the irregular fracture, which is different from the premature fracture pattern (regular fracture) in LDF without rubber. To better understand this deformation behavior, Johnson-Cook model is used to simulate the dynamic response and the evolution of ASB of copper sample. The simulation results also indicate the rubber can prolong the loading duration.

  6. Grouping Students for Increased Achievements.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holloway, John H.

    2001-01-01

    Reviews results of four recent studies exploring the effects of various student-grouping schemes on academic achievement. Grouping plans included multiage classrooms, full-time ability grouping, and within-classroom grouping. Two studies investigated administrator attitudes toward student grouping. Several studies found that grouping plans…

  7. A Latent Class Approach to Examining Forms of Peer Victimization

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bradshaw, Catherine P.; Waasdorp, Tracy E.; O'Brennan, Lindsey M.

    2013-01-01

    There is growing interest in gender differences in the experience of various forms of peer victimization; however, much of the work to date has used traditional variable-centered approaches by focusing on scales or individual forms of victimization in isolation. The current study explored whether there were discrete groups of adolescents who…

  8. Method of forming ceramic bricks

    DOEpatents

    Poeppel, Roger B.; Claar, Terry D.; Silkowski, Peter

    1988-09-06

    A method for forming free standing ceramic bricks for use as tritium breeder material is disclosed. Aqueous solutions of sodium carbonate and potassium carbonate are mixed with an organic hydrocolloid dispersion and powdered lithium carbonate, spray dried, and ceramic bricks formed by molding in a die and firing.

  9. Method of forming ceramic bricks

    DOEpatents

    Poeppel, R.B.; Claar, T.D.; Silkowski, P.

    1987-04-22

    A method for forming free standing ceramic bricks for use as tritium breeder material is disclosed. Aqueous solutions of sodium carbonate and potassium carbonate are mixed with an organic hydrocolloid dispersion and powdered lithium carbonate, spray dried, and ceramic bricks formed by molding in a die and firing.

  10. The Using Evaluation Data Form.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roecks, Alan L.; Casper, Paul

    The Using Evaluation Data Form (UEDF) represents a psychological lever for getting a program's decision maker to consider major evaluation findings. The form may be used at any point of the evaluation process when sufficient data exist to support a finding deserving of action or reaction by the project staff. By local policy, it is required for…

  11. Method of forming ceramic bricks

    DOEpatents

    Poeppel, Roger B.; Claar, Terry D.; Silkowski, Peter

    1988-01-01

    A method for forming free standing ceramic bricks for use as tritium breeder material is disclosed. Aqueous solutions of sodium carbonate and potassium carbonate are mixed with an organic hydrocolloid dispersion and powdered lithium carbonate, spray dried, and ceramic bricks formed by molding in a die and firing.

  12. When Permission Forms Work Best

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zirkel, Perry A.

    2005-01-01

    Public schools routinely require permission or release forms for field trips and other activities of potential liability. The legal status of such forms varies, but they are generally considered neither rock-solid protection nor legally valueless in terms of immunity. This article presents a case involving a student who sustained bicycle injuries…

  13. Benchmark 3 - Incremental sheet forming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elford, Michael; Saha, Pradip; Seong, Daeyong; Haque, MD Ziaul; Yoon, Jeong Whan

    2013-12-01

    Benchmark-3 is designed to predict strains, punch load and deformed profile after spring-back during single tool incremental sheet forming. AA 7075-O material has been selected. A corn shape is formed to 45 mm depth with an angle of 45°. Problem description, material properties, and simulation reports with experimental data are summarized.

  14. Multiplicative form of the Lagrangian

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Surawuttinack, K.; Yoo-Kong, S.; Tanasittikosol, M.

    2016-12-01

    We obtain an alternative class of Lagrangians in the so-called the multiplicative form for a system with one degree of freedom in the nonrelativistic and the relativistic cases. This new form of the Lagrangian can be regarded as a one-parameter class with the parameter λ obtained using an extension of the standard additive form of the Lagrangian because both forms yield the same equation of motion. We note that the multiplicative form of the Lagrangian can be regarded as a generating function for obtaining an infinite hierarchy of Lagrangians that yield the same equation of motion. This nontrivial set of Lagrangians confirms that the Lagrange function is in fact nonunique.

  15. Local Group Cosmology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martínez-Delgado, David

    2013-11-01

    List of contributors; List of participants; Preface; Acknowledgments; Abbreviations; 1. The formation of the Milky Way in the CDM paradigm Ken Freeman; 2. Dark matter content and tidal effects in Local Group dwarf galaxies Steven R. Majewski; 3. Notes on the missing satellites problem James Bullock; 4. The Milky Way satellite galaxies Pavel Kroupa; 5. Stellar tidal streams Rodrigo Ibata; 6. Tutorial: the analysis of colour-magnitude diagrams David Valls-Gabaud; 7. Tutorial: modeling tidal streams using N-body simulations Jorge Peñarrubia.

  16. Theory and modeling group

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holman, Gordon D.

    1989-01-01

    The primary purpose of the Theory and Modeling Group meeting was to identify scientists engaged or interested in theoretical work pertinent to the Max '91 program, and to encourage theorists to pursue modeling which is directly relevant to data which can be expected to result from the program. A list of participants and their institutions is presented. Two solar flare paradigms were discussed during the meeting -- the importance of magnetic reconnection in flares and the applicability of numerical simulation results to solar flare studies.

  17. STEAM GENERATOR GROUP PROJECT

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, R. A.; Lewis, M

    1985-09-01

    This report is a summary of progress in the Surry Steam Generator Group Project for 1984. Information is presented on the analysis of two baseline eddy current inspections of the generator. Round robin series of tests using standard in-service inspection techniques are described along with some preliminary results. Observations are reported of degradation found on tubing specimens removed from the generator, and on support plates characterized in-situ. Residual stresses measured on a tubing specimen are reported. Two steam generator repair demonstrations are described; one for antivibration bar replacement, and one on tube repair methods. Chemical analyses are shown for sludge samples removed from above the tube sheet.

  18. Systems special investigation group

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    An interim report concerning the Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF) is presented by a Boeing Systems special investigation group (SIG). The SIG activities were divided into five engineering disciplines: electrical, mechanical, optics, thermal, and batteries/solar cells. The responsibilities of the SIG included the following areas: support de-integration at Kennedy Space Center (KSC); testing of hardware at Boeing; review of principal investigator (PI) test plans and test results; support of test activities at PI labs; and collation of all test results into the SIG database.

  19. Quantum modular forms, mock modular forms, and partial theta functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kimport, Susanna

    Defined by Zagier in 2010, quantum modular forms have been the subject of an explosion of recent research. Many of these results are aimed at discovering examples of these functions, which are defined on the rational numbers and have "nice" modularity properties. Though the subject is in its early stages, numerous results (including Zagier's original examples) show these objects naturally arising from many areas of mathematics as limits of other modular-like functions. One such family of examples is due to Folsom, Ono, and Rhoades, who connected these new objects to partial theta functions (introduced by Rogers in 1917) and mock modular forms (about which there is a rich theory, whose origins date back to Ramanujan in 1920). In this thesis, we build off of the work of Folsom, Ono, and Rhoades by providing an infinite family of quantum modular forms of arbitrary positive half-integral weight. Further, this family of quantum modular forms "glues" mock modular forms to partial theta functions and is constructed from a so-called "universal" mock theta function by extending a method of Eichler and Zagier (originally defined for holomorphic Jacobi forms) into a non-holomorphic setting. In addition to the infinite family, we explore the weight 1/2 and 3/2 functions in more depth. For both of these weights, we are able to explicitly write down the quantum modular form, as well as the corresponding "errors to modularity," which can be shown to be Mordell integrals of specific theta functions and, as a consequence, are real-analytic functions. Finally, we turn our attention to the partial theta functions associated with these low weight examples. Berndt and Kim provide asymptotic expansions for a certain class of partial theta functions as q approaches 1 radially within the unit disk. Here, we extend this work to not only obtain asymptotic expansions for this class of functions as q approaches any root of unity, but also for a certain class of derivatives of these functions

  20. Team Development and Group Processes of Virtual Learning Teams.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Scott D.; Suriya, Chanidprapa; Won Yoon, Seung; Berrett, Jared V.; La Fleur, Jason

    2002-01-01

    This study of distance education students enrolled in a masters program taught entirely online describes the community building process of virtual learning teams as they form, establish roles and group norms, and address conflict. Topics include interaction within groups; factors that guided group process and decision making; collaboration; use of…

  1. 64 FR 6116 - Glen Canyon Technical work Group

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    1999-02-08

    ... work Group AGENCY: Bureau of Reclamation, Interior. ACTION: Notice of public meeting. SUMMARY: The Glen Canyon Technical Work Group (TWG) was formed as an official subcommittee of the Glen Canyon Adaptive Management Work Group (AMWG) on September 10, 1997. The TWG members were named by the members of the AMWG...

  2. 63 FR 13071 - Glen Canyon Technical Work Group; Public Meetings

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    1998-03-17

    ... Bureau of Reclamation Glen Canyon Technical Work Group; Public Meetings SUMMARY: The Glen Canyon Technical Work Group (TWG) was formed as an official subcommittee of the Glen Canyon Adaptive Management Work Group (AMWG) on September 10, 1997. The TWG members were named by the members of the AMWG and...

  3. 64 FR 10487 - Glen Canyon Technical Work Group

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    1999-03-04

    ... Bureau of Reclamation Glen Canyon Technical Work Group AGENCY: Bureau of Reclamation, Interior. ACTION: Notice of public meetings. SUMMARY: The Glen Canyon Technical Work Group (TWG) was formed as an official subcommittee of the Glen Canyon Adaptive Management Work Group (AMWG). The TWG members were named by members...

  4. 63 FR 46467 - Glen Canyon Technical Work Group

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    1998-09-01

    ... Bureau of Reclamation Glen Canyon Technical Work Group AGENCY: Bureau of Reclamation, Interior. ] ACTION: Notice of public meetings. SUMMARY: The Glen Canyon Technical Work Group (TWG) was formed as an official subcommittee of the Glen Canyon Adaptive Management Work Group (AMWG) on September 10, 1997. The TWG...

  5. 62 FR 49526 - Glen Canyon Technical Work Group

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    1997-09-22

    ... Bureau of Reclamation Glen Canyon Technical Work Group AGENCY: Bureau of Reclamation, Interior. ACTION: Notice of public meetings. SUMMARY: The Glen Canyon Technical Work Group (TWG) was formed as an official subcommittee of the Glen Canyon Adaptive Management Work Group (AMWG) on September 10, 1997. The TWG...

  6. 64 FR 47517 - Glen Canyon Technical Work Group

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    1999-08-31

    ... No: 99-22653] DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR Bureau of Reclamation Glen Canyon Technical Work Group... Technical Work Group (TWG) was formed as an official subcommittee of the Glen Canyon Dam Adaptive Management Work Group (AMWG). The TWG members were named by members of the AMWG and provide advice and...

  7. 62 FR 66385 - Glen Canyon Technical Work Group

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    1997-12-18

    ... Bureau of Reclamation Glen Canyon Technical Work Group AGENCY: Bureau of Reclamation, DOI. ACTION: Notice of public meetings. SUMMARY: The Glen Canyon Technical Work Group (TWG) was formed as an official subcommittee of the Glen Canyon Adaptive Management Work Group (AMWG) on September 10, 1997. The TWG...

  8. 62 FR 63383 - Glen Canyon Technical Work Group

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    1997-11-28

    ... Bureau of Reclamation Glen Canyon Technical Work Group AGENCY: Bureau of Reclamation, Interior. ACTION: Amended Notice of Public Meeting. SUMMARY: The Glen Canyon Technical Work Group (TWG) was formed as an official subcommittee of the Glen Canyon Adaptive Management Work Group (AMWG) on September 10, 1997....

  9. 62 FR 66385 - Glen Canyon Technical Work Group

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    1997-12-18

    ... Bureau of Reclamation Glen Canyon Technical Work Group AGENCY: Bureau of Reclamation, DOI. ACTION: Notice of public meeting. SUMMARY: The Glen Canyon Technical Work Group (TWG) was formed as an official subcommittee of the Glen Canyon Adaptive Management Work Group (AMWG) on September 10, 1997. The TWG...

  10. Group Health Education in Inpatient Rehabilitation: Patients' Role Perceptions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schöpf, Andrea C.; Ullrich, Antje; Nagl, Michaela; Farin, Erik

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Group health education is an important aspect of medical rehabilitation. While interaction and active involvement are important characteristics of group health education, little is known about patients' understanding of their role in this form of education. This study explored patients' understanding of their role in group health…

  11. A Framework for Semantic Group Formation in Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ounnas, Asma; Davis, Hugh C.; Millard, David E.

    2009-01-01

    Collaboration has long been considered an effective approach to learning. However, forming optimal groups can be a time consuming and complex task. Different approaches have been developed to assist teachers allocate students to groups based on a set of constraints. However, existing tools often fail to assign some students to groups creating a…

  12. Reading Discussion Groups for Teachers: Connecting Theory to Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fenton-Smith, Ben; Stillwell, Christopher

    2011-01-01

    This article explores how teachers can engage with ideas (research findings, theory, and professional knowledge) through participation in a reading discussion group. Focusing on one group formed by English language teachers at a Japanese university, the study employs survey data, attendance statistics, and observational notes regarding the group's…

  13. When Group Membership Gets Personal: A Theory of Identity Fusion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Swann, William B., Jr.; Jetten, Jolanda; Gomez, Angel; Whitehouse, Harvey; Bastian, Brock

    2012-01-01

    Identity fusion is a relatively unexplored form of alignment with groups that entails a visceral feeling of oneness with the group. This feeling is associated with unusually porous, highly permeable borders between the personal and social self. These porous borders encourage people to channel their personal agency into group behavior, raising the…

  14. New forms of Stolz-Cesaró lemma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mortici, Cristinel

    2011-07-01

    The aim of this article is to give new forms of Stolz-Cesaró lemma involving the limit group id="UM0001"> group>

  15. AO Group Annual Report

    SciTech Connect

    Olivier, S

    2005-10-04

    The Adaptive Optics (AO) Group in I Division develops and tests a broad range of advanced wavefront control technologies. Current applications focus on: Remote sensing, High power lasers, Astronomy, and Human vision. In the area of remote sensing, the AO Group leads a collaborative effort with LLNL's Nonproliferation, Arms Control & International Security (NAI) Directorate on Enhanced Surveillance Imaging. The ability to detect and identify individual people or vehicles from long-range is an important requirement for proliferation detection and homeland security. High-resolution imaging along horizontal paths through the atmosphere is limited by turbulence, which blurs and distorts the image. For ranges over {approx}one km, visible image resolution can be reduced by over an order of magnitude. We have developed an approach based on speckle imaging that can correct the turbulence-induced blurring and provide high resolution imagery. The system records a series of short exposure images which freeze the atmospheric effects. We can then estimate the image magnitude and phase using a bispectral estimation algorithm which cancels the atmospheric effects while maintaining object information at the diffraction limit of the imaging system.

  16. Group Psychotherapy and Group Methods in Community Mental Health Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pattison, E. Mansell

    An ad hoc committee of the American Group Psychotherapy Association (AGPA) was charged to investigate the use of group methods in Community mental health centers (CMHC), to assess the conceptual basis for the use of various group methods, to relate the use of group methods to group psychotherapy, and to evaluate trends in this area of mental…

  17. Group Development in Self-Help Groups for College Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fuehrer, Ann E.; Keys, Christopher B.

    Research on mutual-aid groups has begun to examine reasons for joining and outcomes, but few investigations have focused on the processes of group development or interaction. The applicability of a therapy-group development model to student mutual-aid groups was examined to determine the extent to which specified formal group structure and…

  18. Clinical Forms of Chikungunya in Gabon, 2010

    PubMed Central

    Caron, Mélanie; Grard, Gilda; Mombo, Illich; Bikié, Branly; Paupy, Christophe; Becquart, Pierre; Bisvigou, Ulrich; Leroy, Eric Maurice

    2012-01-01

    Background Chikungunya virus (CHIKV) has caused multiple outbreaks in tropical and temperate areas worldwide, but the clinical and biological features of this disease are poorly described, particularly in Africa. We report a prospective study of clinical and biological features during an outbreak that occurred in Franceville, Gabon in 2010. Methodology/Principal Findings We collected, in suspect cases (individuals presenting with at least one of the following symptoms or signs: fever, arthralgias, myalgias, headaches, rash, fatigue, nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, bleeding, or jaundice), blood samples, demographic and clinical characteristics and outcome. Hematological and biochemical tests, blood smears for malaria parasites and quantitative PCR for CHIKV then dengue virus were performed. CHIKV+ patients with concomitant malaria and/or dengue were excluded from the study. From May to July 2010, data on 270 laboratory-confirmed CHIK patients were recorded. Fever and arthralgias were reported by respectively 85% and 90% of patients, while myalgias, rash and hemorrhage were noted in 73%, 42% and 2% of patients. The patients were grouped into 4 clinical categories depending on the existence of fever and/or joint pain. On this basis, mixed forms accounted for 78.5% of cases, arthralgic forms 12.6%, febrile forms 6.7% and unusual forms (without fever and arthralgias) 2.2%. No cases of organ failure or death were reported. Elevated liver enzyme and creatinine levels, anemia and lymphocytopenia were the predominant biological abnormalities, and lymphocytopenia was more severe in patients with high viral loads (p = 0.01). Conclusions/Significance During CHIK epidemics, some patients may not have classical symptoms. The existence of unusual forms and the absence of severe forms of CHIK call for surveillance to detect any change in pathogenicity. PMID:22348166

  19. Moderating effects of group status, cohesion, and ethnic composition on socialization of aggression in children's peer groups.

    PubMed

    Shi, Bing; Xie, Hongling

    2014-09-01

    We explored the effects of 3 group features (i.e., status, cohesion, and ethnic composition) on socialization processes of aggression in early adolescents' natural peer social groups. Gender differences in these effects were also determined. A total of 245 seventh-grade individuals belonging to 65 peer groups were included in the analyses. All 3 group features moderated the strength of group socialization on physical aggression with the exception of group status on girls' physical aggression. Stronger socialization of physical aggression occurred in higher status, more cohesive, or ethnically more homogeneous groups. In contrast, only group cohesion moderated the strength of group socialization on social aggression among girls. These findings suggest that somewhat different processes may be involved in peer group influences on different forms of aggression. Future intervention and prevention efforts for adolescent aggression should consider peer group membership and group features simultaneously.

  20. Process to form mesostructured films

    DOEpatents

    Brinker, C.J.; Anderson, M.T.; Ganguli, R.; Lu, Y.F.

    1999-01-12

    This invention comprises a method to form a family of supported films with pore size in the approximate range 0.8-20 nm exhibiting highly ordered microstructures and porosity derived from an ordered micellar or liquid-crystalline organic-inorganic precursor structure that forms during film deposition. Optically transparent, 100-500-nm thick films exhibiting a unique range of microstructures and uni-modal pore sizes are formed in seconds in a continuous coating operation. Applications of these films include sensors, membranes, low dielectric constant interlayers, anti-reflective coatings, and optical hosts. 12 figs.

  1. Process to form mesostructured films

    DOEpatents

    Brinker, C. Jeffrey; Anderson, Mark T.; Ganguli, Rahul; Lu, Yunfeng

    1999-01-01

    This invention comprises a method to form a family of supported films film with pore size in the approximate range 0.8-20 nm exhibiting highly ordered microstructures and porosity derived from an ordered micellar or liquid-crystalline organic-inorganic precursor structure that forms during film deposition. Optically transparent, 100-500-nm thick films exhibiting a unique range of microstructures and uni-modal pore sizes are formed in seconds in a continuous coating operation. Applications of these films include sensors, membranes, low dielectric constant interlayers, anti-reflective coatings, and optical hosts.

  2. Sofia Science Working Group

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zmuidzinas, J.

    1997-01-01

    The purpose of this grant was to enable the Principal Investigator (P.I.) to travel to and participate in the meetings and activities of the NASA SOFIA Science Working Group (SSWG), and to spend time working on some of the associated technical issues relating to the SOFIA (Stratospheric Observatory for Infrared Astronomy) project. The SOFIA Science Working Group was established to help develop the plans and specifications for the next-generation airborne observatory ("SOFIA"), which is now under development. The P.I. was asked to serve on the SSWG due to his experience in airborne astronomy: he has developed several astronomical instruments for the Kuiper Airborne Observatory NASA's previous airborne astronomy platform (which was decommissioned in 1995 in preparation for SOFIA). SOFIA, which will be a 747 SP aircraft carrying a 2.7 meter diameter telescope, is a joint project sponsored by NASA and DLR (the German space agency), and is now under development by a consortium including Universities Space Research Association (USRA), Raytheon, Sterling Software, and United Airlines. Further details on the SOFIA project can be found on the internet at http: //sofia. arc. nasa. gov. Rather than develop the SOFIA observatory in-house, NASA decided to privatize the project by issuing a Request for Proposals (RFP). The respondents to this RFP were consortia of private organizations which together had the required facilities and expertise to be able to carry out the project; the winner was the group led by USRA. One of the main roles of the SSWG was to help develop the technical specifications for the SOFIA observatory. In particular, the SSWG provided advice to NASA on the specifications that were written into the RFP, particularly those which had an important impact on the scientific productivity of the observatory. These specifications were discussed at the meetings of the SSWG, which were held primarily at NASA/Ames (in California) and at NASA Headquarters (in Washington

  3. The chemistry of five accessory rock-forming apatites

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lee, Donald E.; Rose, Harry J.; Brandt, Elaine L. Munson; Van Loenen, Richard E.

    1973-01-01

    Chemical and physical data are given for five samples of rock-forming apatite from diverse geologic environments in Nevada and Colorado.  Four of these apatites contain rare-earth assemblages in which the cerium group is well represented but the yttrium group predominates.  The fifth apatite contains a highly fractionated assemblage of the lighter (cerium group) rare earths similar to the assemblage typical of alkulic rocks.

  4. Multiple forming tools in incremental forming - Influence of the forming strategies on sheet contour

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dang, T.; Tebaay, L. M.; Gies, S.; Tekkaya, A. E.

    2016-10-01

    Single point incremental forming (SPIF) is a well known process which is used for rapid prototyping or for small-quantity production. The feature of this process is the flexible manufacturing of complex hollow shapes with the use of basic equipments. However, this forming process takes very long time. To speed up the process time, multiple forming tools can be used simultaneously. This paper presents the influence of the multiple tools in SPIF on the formed shape. The conventional SPIF with a single tool is taken into account for a comparative analysis. The results in this study showed that the tool arrangements and its distance have a significant effect on the geometrical accuracy. Moreover, it is shown the influence between the vertical step size of the tool and the strain distributions. This knowledge can be used for generation of new forming strategies.

  5. 64 FR 25905 - Glen Canyon Dam Adaptive Management Work Group (AMWG) and Glen Canyon Technical Work Group (TWG)

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    1999-05-13

    ... Bureau of Reclamation Glen Canyon Dam Adaptive Management Work Group (AMWG) and Glen Canyon Technical Work Group (TWG) AGENCY: Bureau of Reclamation, Interior. ACTION: Notice of public meetings. SUMMARY: The Glen Canyon Technical Work Group was formed as an official subcommittee of the Glen Canyon...

  6. Wind-formed gravel bed forms, Wright Valley, Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gillies, John A.; Nickling, William G.; Tilson, Michael; Furtak-Cole, Eden

    2012-12-01

    Bed forms composed of gravel size particles (≈50% of particles >4 mm) are observed in the Wright Valley of the McMurdo Dry Valley system in Antarctica. These bed forms are characterized by a very asymmetrical shape with a mean aspect ratio of 0.025 (standard deviation 0.005), mean wavelength of 2.7 m (±0.49 m), and a mean height of 0.06 m (±0.01 m). Particle size analysis of the bed form sediments shows bimodality with a peak near 9 mm and another between 0.5 mm and 0.25 mm. Time-integrated sediment trap samples of horizontal saltation and creep flux indicate the flux of particles ≥4 mm during the two-year monitoring period was extremely low. Measurements of the horizontal displacement of tracer particles (14 mm, 12 mm, 10 mm, 8 mm, and 6 mm diameter) placed onto the bed forms corroborate the low particle flux measurements and limited movement of particles. The bed forms share form and grain size characteristics with both ripples and mega-ripples, showing poor sorting of particles across a single wavelength except for a slight coarsening at the crest similar to ripples, but their sinuosity suggest that transverse instabilities affect their formation similar to mega-ripples. Based on the data for the prevailing environmental conditions it can be argued that the Wright Valley form is an expression of gravel particles moved solely by highly intermittent creep processes. This also argues for the need for a very long period of time for their evolution, on the order of centuries.

  7. Renormalization Group Tutorial

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bell, Thomas L.

    2004-01-01

    Complex physical systems sometimes have statistical behavior characterized by power- law dependence on the parameters of the system and spatial variability with no particular characteristic scale as the parameters approach critical values. The renormalization group (RG) approach was developed in the fields of statistical mechanics and quantum field theory to derive quantitative predictions of such behavior in cases where conventional methods of analysis fail. Techniques based on these ideas have since been extended to treat problems in many different fields, and in particular, the behavior of turbulent fluids. This lecture will describe a relatively simple but nontrivial example of the RG approach applied to the diffusion of photons out of a stellar medium when the photons have wavelengths near that of an emission line of atoms in the medium.

  8. NOSS science working group

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    The members of the NOSS Science Working Group are John Apel, Pacific Marine Environmental Laboratories/NOAA; Tim Barnett, Scripps Institution of Oceanography; Francis Bretherton (chairman), National Center for Atmospheric Research; Otis Brown, University of Miami; Joost Businger, University of Washington; Garrett Campbell, NCAR; Mark Cane, Massachusetts Institute of Technology; Robert Edwards, National Marine Fisheries Service/NOAA; James Mueller, Naval Postgraduate School; Peter Niiler, Oregon State University; James J. O'Brien, Florida State University; Norman Phillips, National Meteorological Center/NOAA; Owen Phillips, The Johns Hopkins University; Stephen Piacsek, NSTL Station, NORDA; Trevor Platt, Bedford Institute of Oceanography; Stephen Pond, University of British Columbia; Stanley Ruttenberg (executive secretary), NCAR; William Schmitz, Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution; Jerry Schubel, State University of New York; Robert Stewart, Scripps; Norbert Untersteiner, NOAA; and Alan Weinstein, Naval Environmental Prediction Research Facility.

  9. Working Group Report: Sensors

    SciTech Connect

    Artuso, M.; et al.,

    2013-10-18

    Sensors play a key role in detecting both charged particles and photons for all three frontiers in Particle Physics. The signals from an individual sensor that can be used include ionization deposited, phonons created, or light emitted from excitations of the material. The individual sensors are then typically arrayed for detection of individual particles or groups of particles. Mounting of new, ever higher performance experiments, often depend on advances in sensors in a range of performance characteristics. These performance metrics can include position resolution for passing particles, time resolution on particles impacting the sensor, and overall rate capabilities. In addition the feasible detector area and cost frequently provides a limit to what can be built and therefore is often another area where improvements are important. Finally, radiation tolerance is becoming a requirement in a broad array of devices. We present a status report on a broad category of sensors, including challenges for the future and work in progress to solve those challenges.

  10. SOFIA Science Working Group

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zmuldzinas, J.

    1997-01-01

    The SOFIA Science Working Group was established to help develop the plans and specifications for the next-generation airborne observatory ("SOFIA"), which is now under development. The P.I. has developed several astronomical instruments for the Kuiper Airborne Observatory, NASA's previous airborne astronomy platform (which was decommisioned in 1995 in preparation for SOFIA). SOFIA, which will be a 747 SP aircraft carrying a 2.7 meter diameter telescope, is a joint project sponsored by NASA and DLR (the German space agency), and is now under development by a consortium including Universities Space Research Association (USRA), Raytheon, Sterling Software, and United Airlines. Rather than develop the SOFIA observatory in-house, NASA decided to privatize the project by issuing a Request for Proposals (RFP). The respondents to this RFP were consortia of private organizations which together had the required facilities and expertise to be able to carry out the project; the winner was the group led by USRA. One of the main roles of the SSWG was to help develop the technical specifications for the SOFIA observatory. In particular, the SSWG provided advice to NASA on the specifications that were written into the RFP, particularly those which had an important impact on the scientific productivity of the observatory. These specifications were discussed at the meetings of the SSWG, which were held primarily at NASA/Ames (in California) and at NASA Headquarters (in Washington DC). Apart from these meetings, members of the SSWG were expected to perform more detailed analyses of the impact of certain parameters and specifications on the performance of astronomical instruments. The SSWG ended its activities with the selection of the USRA team in January 1997.

  11. Biaxially textured articles formed by power metallurgy

    DOEpatents

    Goyal, Amit; Williams, Robert K.; Kroeger, Donald M.

    2003-08-26

    A biaxially textured alloy article having a magnetism less than pure Ni includes a rolled and annealed compacted and sintered powder-metallurgy preform article, the preform article having been formed from a powder mixture selected from the group of mixtures consisting of: at least 60 at % Ni powder and at least one of Cr powder, W powder, V powder, Mo powder, Cu powder, Al powder, Ce powder, YSZ powder, Y powder, Mg powder, and RE powder; the article having a fine and homogeneous grain structure; and having a dominant cube oriented {100}<100> orientation texture; and further having a Curie temperature less than that of pure Ni.

  12. Biaxially textured articles formed by powder metallurgy

    DOEpatents

    Goyal, Amit; Williams, Robert K.; Kroeger, Donald M.

    2003-08-19

    A biaxially textured alloy article having a magnetism less than pure Ni includes a rolled and annealed compacted and sintered powder-metallurgy preform article, the preform article having been formed from a powder mixture selected from the group of mixtures consisting of: at least 60 at % Ni powder and at least one of Cr powder, W powder, V powder, Mo powder, Cu powder, Al powder, Ce powder, YSZ powder, Y powder, Mg powder, and RE powder; the article having a fine and homogeneous grain structure; and having a dominant cube oriented {100}<100> orientation texture; and further having a Curie temperature less than that of pure Ni.

  13. Biaxially textured articles formed by powder metallurgy

    DOEpatents

    Goyal, Amit; Williams, Robert K.; Kroeger, Donald M.

    2004-09-14

    A biaxially textured alloy article having a magnetism less than pure Ni includes a rolled and annealed compacted and sintered powder-metallurgy preform article, the preform article having been formed from a powder mixture selected from the group of mixtures consisting of: at least 60 at % Ni powder and at least one of Cr powder, W powder, V powder, Mo powder, Cu powder, Al powder, Ce powder, YSZ powder, Y powder, Mg powder, and RE powder; the article having a fine and homogeneous grain structure; and having a dominant cube oriented {100}<100> orientation texture; and further having a Curie temperature less than that of pure Ni.

  14. Biaxially textured articles formed by powder metallurgy

    DOEpatents

    Goyal, Amit; Williams, Robert K.; Kroeger, Donald M.

    2003-07-29

    A biaxially textured alloy article having a magnetism less than pure Ni includes a rolled and annealed compacted and sintered powder-metallurgy preform article, the preform article having been formed from a powder mixture selected from the group of mixtures consisting of: at least 60 at % Ni powder and at least one of Cr powder, W powder, V powder, Mo powder, Cu powder, Al powder, Ce powder, YSZ powder, Y powder, Mg powder, and RE powder; the article having a fine and homogeneous grain structure; and having a dominant cube oriented {100}<100> orientation texture; and further having a Curie temperature less than that of pure Ni.

  15. Biaxially textured articles formed by powder metallurgy

    DOEpatents

    Goval, Amit; Williams, Robert K.; Kroeger, Donald M.

    2005-06-07

    A biaxially textured alloy article having a magnetism less than pure Ni includes a rolled and annealed compacted and sintered powder-metallurgy preform article, the preform article having been formed from a powder mixture selected from the group of mixtures consisting of: at least 60 at % Ni powder and at least one of Cr powder, W powder, V powder, Mo powder, Cu powder, Al powder, Ce powder, YSZ powder, Y powder, Mg powder, and RE powder; the article having a fine and homogeneous grain structure; and having a dominant cube oriented {100}<100> orientation texture; and further having a Curie temperature less than that of pure Ni.

  16. Biaxially textured articles formed by powder metallurgy

    DOEpatents

    Goyal, Amit; Williams, Robert K.; Kroeger, Donald M.

    2003-08-05

    A biaxially textured alloy article having a magnetism less than pure Ni includes a rolled and annealed compacted and sintered powder-metallurgy preform article, the preform article having been formed from a powder mixture selected from the group of ternary mixtures consisting of: Ni powder, Cu powder, and Al powder, Ni powder, Cr powder, and Al powder; Ni powder, W powder and Al powder; Ni powder, V powder, and Al powder; Ni powder, Mo powder, and Al powder; the article having a fine and homogeneous grain structure; and having a dominant cube oriented {100}<100> orientation texture; and further having a Curie temperature less than that of pure Ni.

  17. Biaxially textured articles formed by powder metallurgy

    DOEpatents

    Goyal, Amit; Williams, Robert K.; Kroeger, Donald M.

    2003-08-26

    A biaxially textured alloy article having a magnetism less than pure Ni includes a rolled and annealed compacted and sintered powder-metallurgy preform article, the preform article having been formed from a powder mixture selected from the group of mixtures consisting of: at least 60 at % Ni powder and at least one of Cr powder, W powder, V powder, Mo powder, Cu powder, Al powder, Ce powder, YSZ powder, Y powder, Mg powder, and RE powder; the article having a fine and homogeneous grain structure; and having a dominant cube oriented {100}<100> orientation texture; and further having a Curie temperature less than that of pure Ni.

  18. Biaxially textured articles formed by powder metallurgy

    DOEpatents

    Goyal, Amit; Williams, Robert K.; Kroeger, Donald M.

    2005-05-10

    A biaxially textured alloy article having a magnetism less than pure Ni includes a rolled and annealed compacted and sintered powder-metallurgy preform article, the preform article having been formed from a powder mixture selected from the group of mixtures consisting of at least 60 at % Ni powder and at least one of Cr powder, W powder, V powder, Mo powder, Cu powder, Al powder, Ce powder, YSZ powder, Y powder, Mg powder, and RE powder; the article having a fine and homogeneous grain structure; and having a dominant cube oriented {100}<100> orientation texture; and further having a Curie temperature less than that of pure Ni.

  19. Biaxially textured articles formed by powder metallurgy

    DOEpatents

    Goyal, Amit; Williams, Robert K.; Kroeger, Donald M.

    2004-09-28

    A biaxially textured alloy article having a magnetism less than pure Ni includes a rolled and annealed compacted and sintered powder-metallurgy preform article, the preform article having been formed from a powder mixture selected from the group of mixtures consisting of: at least 60 at % Ni powder and at least one of Cr powder, W powder, V powder, Mo powder, Cu powder, Al powder, Ce powder, YSZ powder, Y powder, Mg powder, and RE powder; the article having a fine and homogeneous grain structure; and having a dominant cube oriented {100}<100> orientation texture; and further having a Curie temperature less than that of pure Ni.

  20. Biaxially textured articles formed by powder metallurgy

    DOEpatents

    Goyal, Amit; Williams, Robert K.; Kroeger, Donald M.

    2005-01-25

    A biaxially textured alloy article having a magnetism less than pure Ni includes a rolled and annealed compacted and sintered powder-metallurgy preform article, the preform article having been formed from a powder mixture selected from the group of mixtures consisting of: at least 60 at % Ni powder and at least one of Cr powder, W powder, V powder, Mo powder, Cu powder, Al powder, Ce powder, YSZ powder, Y powder, Mg powder, and RE powder; the article having a fine and homogeneous grain structure; and having a dominant cube oriented {100}<100> orientation texture; and further having a Curie temperature less than that of pure Ni.