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Sample records for all-angle negative refraction

  1. All-angle negative refraction and active flat lensing of ultraviolet light.

    PubMed

    Xu, Ting; Agrawal, Amit; Abashin, Maxim; Chau, Kenneth J; Lezec, Henri J

    2013-05-23

    Decades ago, Veselago predicted that a material with simultaneously negative electric and magnetic polarization responses would yield a 'left-handed' medium in which light propagates with opposite phase and energy velocities--a condition described by a negative refractive index. He proposed that a flat slab of left-handed material possessing an isotropic refractive index of -1 could act like an imaging lens in free space. Left-handed materials do not occur naturally, and it has only recently become possible to achieve a left-handed response using metamaterials, that is, electromagnetic structures engineered on subwavelength scales to elicit tailored polarization responses. So far, left-handed responses have typically been implemented using resonant metamaterials composed of periodic arrays of unit cells containing inductive-capacitive resonators and conductive wires. Negative refractive indices that are isotropic in two or three dimensions at microwave frequencies have been achieved in resonant metamaterials with centimetre-scale features. Scaling the left-handed response to higher frequencies, such as infrared or visible, has been done by shrinking critical dimensions to submicrometre scales by means of top-down nanofabrication. This miniaturization has, however, so far been achieved at the cost of reduced unit-cell symmetry, yielding a refractive index that is negative along only one axis. Moreover, lithographic scaling limits have so far precluded the fabrication of resonant metamaterials with left-handed responses at frequencies beyond the visible. Here we report the experimental implementation of a bulk metamaterial with a left-handed response to ultraviolet light. The structure, based on stacked plasmonic waveguides, yields an omnidirectional left-handed response for transverse magnetic polarization characterized by a negative refractive index. By engineering the structure to have a refractive index close to -1 over a broad angular range, we achieve Veselago

  2. Parity-Time Symmetric Nonlocal Metasurfaces: All-Angle Negative Refraction and Volumetric Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monticone, Francesco; Valagiannopoulos, Constantinos A.; Alù, Andrea

    2016-10-01

    Lens design for focusing and imaging has been optimized through centuries of developments; however, conventional lenses, even in their most ideal realizations, still suffer from fundamental limitations, such as limits in resolution and the presence of optical aberrations, which are inherent to the laws of refraction. In addition, volume-to-volume imaging of three-dimensional regions of space is not possible with systems based on conventional refractive optics, which are inherently limited to plane-to-plane imaging. Although some of these limitations have been at least theoretically relaxed with the advent of metamaterials, several challenges still stand in the way of ideal imaging of three-dimensional regions of space. Here, we show that the concept of parity-time symmetry, combined with tailored nonlocal responses, enables overcoming some of these challenges, and we propose the design of a loss-immune, linear, transversely invariant, planarized metamaterial lens, with reduced aberrations and the potential to realize volume-to-volume imaging.

  3. Using phonon resonances as a route to all-angle negative refraction in the far-infrared region: the case of crystal quartz.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues da Silva, R; Macêdo da Silva, R; Dumelow, T; da Costa, J A P; Honorato, S B; Ayala, A P

    2010-10-15

    We consider how all-angle negative refraction may be induced in anisotropic crystals by making use of the phonon response. We investigate the example of crystal quartz at far-infrared wavelengths. Reflection and transmission measurements confirm the expected behavior, and show relatively high transmission efficiency at frequencies at which negative refraction occurs.

  4. Tunable all-angle negative refraction and photonic band gaps in two-dimensional plasma photonic crystals with square-like Archimedean lattices

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Hai-Feng E-mail: lsb@nuaa.edu.cn; Liu, Shao-Bin E-mail: lsb@nuaa.edu.cn; Jiang, Yu-Chi

    2014-09-15

    In this paper, the tunable all-angle negative refraction and photonic band gaps (PBGs) in two types of two-dimensional (2D) plasma photonic crystals (PPCs) composed of homogeneous plasma and dielectric (GaAs) with square-like Archimedean lattices (ladybug and bathroom lattices) for TM wave are theoretically investigated based on a modified plane wave expansion method. The type-1 structure is dielectric rods immersed in the plasma background, and the complementary structure is named as type-2 PPCs. Theoretical simulations demonstrate that the both types of PPCs with square-like Archimedean lattices have some advantages in obtaining the higher cut-off frequency, the larger PBGs, more number of PBGs, and the relative bandwidths compared to the conventional square lattices as the filling factor or radius of inserted rods is same. The influences of plasma frequency and radius of inserted rod on the properties of PBGs for both types of PPCs also are discussed in detail. The calculated results show that PBGs can be manipulated by the parameters as mentioned above. The possibilities of all-angle negative refraction in such two types of PPCs at low bands also are discussed. Our calculations reveal that the all-angle negative phenomena can be observed in the first two TM bands, and the frequency range of all-angle negative refraction can be tuned by changing plasma frequency. Those properties can be used to design the optical switching and sensor.

  5. Tunable all-angle negative refraction and photonic band gaps in two-dimensional plasma photonic crystals with square-like Archimedean lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Hai-Feng; Liu, Shao-Bin; Jiang, Yu-Chi

    2014-09-01

    In this paper, the tunable all-angle negative refraction and photonic band gaps (PBGs) in two types of two-dimensional (2D) plasma photonic crystals (PPCs) composed of homogeneous plasma and dielectric (GaAs) with square-like Archimedean lattices (ladybug and bathroom lattices) for TM wave are theoretically investigated based on a modified plane wave expansion method. The type-1 structure is dielectric rods immersed in the plasma background, and the complementary structure is named as type-2 PPCs. Theoretical simulations demonstrate that the both types of PPCs with square-like Archimedean lattices have some advantages in obtaining the higher cut-off frequency, the larger PBGs, more number of PBGs, and the relative bandwidths compared to the conventional square lattices as the filling factor or radius of inserted rods is same. The influences of plasma frequency and radius of inserted rod on the properties of PBGs for both types of PPCs also are discussed in detail. The calculated results show that PBGs can be manipulated by the parameters as mentioned above. The possibilities of all-angle negative refraction in such two types of PPCs at low bands also are discussed. Our calculations reveal that the all-angle negative phenomena can be observed in the first two TM bands, and the frequency range of all-angle negative refraction can be tuned by changing plasma frequency. Those properties can be used to design the optical switching and sensor.

  6. Negative refraction and superconductivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amariti, Antonio; Forcella, Davide; Mariotti, Alberto; Siani, Massimo

    2011-10-01

    We discuss exotic properties of charged hydrodynamical systems, in the broken superconducting phase, probed by electromagnetic waves. Motivated by general arguments from hydrodynamics, we observe that negative refraction, namely the propagation in opposite directions of the phase velocities and of the energy flux, is expected for low enough frequencies. We corroborate this general idea by analyzing a holographic superconductor in the AdS/CFT correspondence, where the response functions can be explicitly computed. We study the dual gravitational theory both in the probe and in the backreacted case. We find that, while in the first case the refractive index is positive at every frequency, in the second case there is negative refraction at low enough frequencies. This is in agreement with hydrodynamic considerations.

  7. Photonic crystal negative refractive optics.

    PubMed

    Baba, Toshihiko; Abe, Hiroshi; Asatsuma, Tomohiko; Matsumoto, Takashi

    2010-03-01

    Photonic crystals (PCs) are multi-dimensional periodic gratings, in which the light propagation is dominated by Bragg diffraction that appears to be refraction at the flat surfaces of the PC. The refraction angle from positive to negative, perfectly or only partially obeying Snell's law, can be tailored using photonic band theory. The negative refraction enables novel prism, collimation, and lens effects. Because PCs usually consist of two transparent media, these effects occur at absorption-free frequencies, affording significant design flexibility for free-space optics. The PC slab, a high-index membrane with a two-dimensional airhole array, must be carefully designed to avoid reflection and diffraction losses. Light focusing based on negative refraction forms a parallel image of a light source, facilitating optical couplers and condenser lenses for wavelength demultiplexing. A compact wavelength demultiplexer can be designed by combining the prism and lens effects. The collimation effect is obtainable not only inside but also outside of the PC by optimizing negative refractive condition.

  8. Negative refraction in semiconductor metamaterials.

    PubMed

    Hoffman, Anthony J; Alekseyev, Leonid; Howard, Scott S; Franz, Kale J; Wasserman, Dan; Podolskiy, Viktor A; Narimanov, Evgenii E; Sivco, Deborah L; Gmachl, Claire

    2007-12-01

    An optical metamaterial is a composite in which subwavelength features, rather than the constituent materials, control the macroscopic electromagnetic properties of the material. Recently, properly designed metamaterials have garnered much interest because of their unusual interaction with electromagnetic waves. Whereas nature seems to have limits on the type of materials that exist, newly invented metamaterials are not bound by such constraints. These newly accessible electromagnetic properties make these materials an excellent platform for demonstrating unusual optical phenomena and unique applications such as subwavelength imaging and planar lens design. 'Negative-index materials', as first proposed, required the permittivity, epsilon, and permeability, mu, to be simultaneously less than zero, but such materials face limitations. Here, we demonstrate a comparatively low-loss, three-dimensional, all-semiconductor metamaterial that exhibits negative refraction for all incidence angles in the long-wave infrared region and requires only an anisotropic dielectric function with a single resonance. Using reflection and transmission measurements and a comprehensive model of the material, we demonstrate that our material exhibits negative refraction. This is furthermore confirmed through a straightforward beam optics experiment. This work will influence future metamaterial designs and their incorporation into optical semiconductor devices.

  9. Negative refraction in a laminate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Willis, J. R.

    2016-12-01

    This work is concerned with the reflection and transmission of waves at a plane interface between a homogeneous elastic half-space and a half-space of elastic material that is periodically laminated. The lamination is always in the direction of the x1-coordinate axis and the displacement is always longitudinal shear, so that the only non-zero displacement component is u3(x1 ,x2 , t). After an initial discussion of Floquet-Bloch waves in the laminated material, brief consideration is given to the reflection-transmission problem, when the interface between the two media is the plane x1 = 0. Nothing unusual emerges: there are just a single reflected wave and a single transmitted wave, undergoing positive group-velocity refraction. Then, the problem is considered when the interface between the two media is the plane x2 = 0. The periodic structure of the interface induces an infinite set of reflected waves and an infinite set of transmitted waves. All need to be taken into account, but most decay exponentially away from the interface. It had previously been recognized that, if the incident wave had appropriate frequency and angle of incidence, a propagating transmitted wave would be generated that would undergo negative group-velocity refraction - behaviour usually associated with a metamaterial. It is established by an example in this work that there is, in addition, a propagating transmitted wave with smaller wavelength but larger group velocity that undergoes positive group-velocity refraction. The work concludes with a brief discussion of this finding, including its implications for the utility (or not) of "effective medium" theory.

  10. Negative refraction and planar focusing based on parity-time symmetric metasurfaces.

    PubMed

    Fleury, Romain; Sounas, Dimitrios L; Alù, Andrea

    2014-07-11

    We introduce a new mechanism to realize negative refraction and planar focusing using a pair of parity-time symmetric metasurfaces. In contrast to existing solutions that achieve these effects with negative-index metamaterials or phase conjugating surfaces, the proposed parity-time symmetric lens enables loss-free, all-angle negative refraction and planar focusing in free space, without relying on bulk metamaterials or nonlinear effects. This concept may represent a pivotal step towards loss-free negative refraction and highly efficient planar focusing by exploiting the largely uncharted scattering properties of parity-time symmetric systems.

  11. Negative refraction in Möbius molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, Y. N.; Shen, Yao; Ai, Qing; Sun, C. P.

    2016-10-01

    We theoretically show the negative refraction existing in Möbius molecules. The negative refractive index is induced by the nontrivial topology of the molecules. With the Möbius boundary condition, the effective electromagnetic fields felt by the electron in a Möbius ring is spatially inhomogeneous. In this regard, the DN symmetry is broken in Möbius molecules and thus the magnetic response is induced through the effective magnetic field. Our findings provide an alternative architecture for negative refractive index materials based on the nontrivial topology of Möbius molecules.

  12. Controlling plasmon hybridization for negative refraction metamaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanté, B.; Burokur, S. N.; Sellier, A.; de Lustrac, A.; Lourtioz, J.-M.

    2009-02-01

    The hybridization scheme of plasmon modes in cut-wire-based left-handed metamaterials is shown to critically depend on the coupling between paired cut wires. We show that an inverted hybridization scheme obtained with an asymmetric alignment of paired cut wires is the most appropriate to negative refraction. This is validated (numerically and experimentally) by the first demonstration of negative refraction in the microwave domain using only periodic ensembles of cut wires.

  13. Electromagnetic waves: Negative refraction by photonic crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ozbay, Ekmel

    2004-03-01

    Recently left-handed materials (LHM) attracted great attention since these materials exhibit negative effective index, which is due to simultaneously negative permeability and permittivity. Pendry proposed that negative effective index in left-handed materials can be used for constructing a perfect lens, which is not limited by diffraction(J. B. Pendry, Negative refraction makes a perfect lens, Phys. Rev. Lett. vol. 85, 3966 (2000)). Negative refraction is also achievable in a dielectric photonic crystal (PC) that has a periodically modulated positive permittivity and a permeability of unity. Luo et al. has studied negative refraction and subwavelength imaging in photonic crystals(C. Luo, S. G. Johnson, J. D. Joannopoulos, J. B. Pendry, Subwavelength Imaging in Photonic Crystals Phys. Rev. B 68, 045115 (2003)). In this presentation, we report our experimental and theoretical investigation of negative refraction and subwavelength focusing of electromagnetic waves in a 2D PC. Our structure consists of a square array of dielectric rods in air. Transmission measurements are performed for experimentally verifying the predicted negative refraction behavior in our structure. Negative index of refraction determined from the experiment is -1.94 which is very close to the theoretical value of -2.06. Negative refraction is observed for the incidence angles of > 20°(Ertugrul Cubukcu, Koray Aydin, Ekmel Ozbay, S. Foteinopolou, and Costas Soukoulis, Negative Refraction by Photonic Crystals, Nature, vol. 423, 604 (2003)). Since we know the optimum frequency for a broad angle negative refraction, we can use our crystal to test the superlensing effect that was predicted for negative refractive materials. Scanning transmission measurement technique is used to measure the spatial power distribution of the focused electromagnetic waves that radiate from a point source. Full width at half maximum of the focused beam is measured to be 0.21λ, which is in good agreement with the finite

  14. Negative Refraction in Rare-Earth Doped Crystals

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-06-09

    refraction remained an academic curiosity for a long time , it is now well-understood that negative refraction may have important and far-reaching...of negative refraction remained an academic curiosity for a long time , it is now well-understood that negative refraction may have important and far...concept of negative refraction remained an academic curiosity for a long time , it is now well-understood that negative refraction may have important and

  15. Negative index of refraction in optical metamaterials.

    PubMed

    Shalaev, Vladimir M; Cai, Wenshan; Chettiar, Uday K; Yuan, Hsiao-Kuan; Sarychev, Andrey K; Drachev, Vladimir P; Kildishev, Alexander V

    2005-12-15

    A double-periodic array of pairs of parallel gold nanorods is shown to have a negative refractive index in the optical range. Such behavior results from the plasmon resonance in the pairs of nanorods for both the electric and the magnetic components of light. The refractive index is retrieved from direct phase and amplitude measurements for transmission and reflection, which are all in excellent agreement with simulations. Both experiments and simulations demonstrate that a negative refractive index n' approximately -0.3 is achieved at the optical communication wavelength of 1.5 microm using the array of nanorods. The retrieved refractive index critically depends on the phase of the transmitted wave, which emphasizes the importance of phase measurements in finding n'.

  16. Tunable plasmon lensing in graphene-based structure exhibiting negative refraction

    PubMed Central

    Zhong, Shifeng; Lu, Yanxin; Li, Chao; Xu, Haixia; Shi, Fenghua; Chen, Yihang

    2017-01-01

    We propose a novel method to achieve tunable plasmon focusing in graphene/photonic-crystal hybrid structure exhibiting all-angle negative refraction at terahertz frequencies. A two-dimensional photonic crystal composed of a square lattice of dielectric rods is constructed on the substrate of a graphene sheet to provide the hyperbolic dispersion relations of the graphene plasmon, giving rise to the all-angle plasmonic negative refraction. Plasmon lensing induced from the negative refraction is observed. We show that the ultracompact graphene-based system can produce sub-diffraction-limited images with the resolution significant smaller than the wavelength of the incident terahertz wave. Moreover, by adjusting the Fermi energy of the graphene, the imaging performance of the proposed system can remain almost invariant for different frequencies. Our results may find applications in diverse fields such as subwavelength spatial light manipulation, biological imaging, and so forth. PMID:28150750

  17. Tunable plasmon lensing in graphene-based structure exhibiting negative refraction.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Shifeng; Lu, Yanxin; Li, Chao; Xu, Haixia; Shi, Fenghua; Chen, Yihang

    2017-02-02

    We propose a novel method to achieve tunable plasmon focusing in graphene/photonic-crystal hybrid structure exhibiting all-angle negative refraction at terahertz frequencies. A two-dimensional photonic crystal composed of a square lattice of dielectric rods is constructed on the substrate of a graphene sheet to provide the hyperbolic dispersion relations of the graphene plasmon, giving rise to the all-angle plasmonic negative refraction. Plasmon lensing induced from the negative refraction is observed. We show that the ultracompact graphene-based system can produce sub-diffraction-limited images with the resolution significant smaller than the wavelength of the incident terahertz wave. Moreover, by adjusting the Fermi energy of the graphene, the imaging performance of the proposed system can remain almost invariant for different frequencies. Our results may find applications in diverse fields such as subwavelength spatial light manipulation, biological imaging, and so forth.

  18. Tunable plasmon lensing in graphene-based structure exhibiting negative refraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhong, Shifeng; Lu, Yanxin; Li, Chao; Xu, Haixia; Shi, Fenghua; Chen, Yihang

    2017-02-01

    We propose a novel method to achieve tunable plasmon focusing in graphene/photonic-crystal hybrid structure exhibiting all-angle negative refraction at terahertz frequencies. A two-dimensional photonic crystal composed of a square lattice of dielectric rods is constructed on the substrate of a graphene sheet to provide the hyperbolic dispersion relations of the graphene plasmon, giving rise to the all-angle plasmonic negative refraction. Plasmon lensing induced from the negative refraction is observed. We show that the ultracompact graphene-based system can produce sub-diffraction-limited images with the resolution significant smaller than the wavelength of the incident terahertz wave. Moreover, by adjusting the Fermi energy of the graphene, the imaging performance of the proposed system can remain almost invariant for different frequencies. Our results may find applications in diverse fields such as subwavelength spatial light manipulation, biological imaging, and so forth.

  19. Negative refraction using Raman transitions and chirality

    SciTech Connect

    Sikes, D. E.; Yavuz, D. D.

    2011-11-15

    We present a scheme that achieves negative refraction with low absorption in far-off resonant atomic systems. The scheme utilizes Raman resonances and does not require the simultaneous presence of an electric-dipole transition and a magnetic-dipole transition near the same wavelength. We show that two interfering Raman tran-sitions coupled to a magnetic-dipole transition can achieve a negative index of refraction with low absorption through magnetoelectric cross-coupling. We confirm the validity of the analytical results with exact numerical simulations of the density matrix. We also discuss possible experimental implementations of the scheme in rare-earth metal atomic systems.

  20. Goos-Hänchen shift in negatively refractive media.

    PubMed

    Berman, P R

    2002-12-01

    The Goos-Hänchen shift is calculated when total internal reflection occurs at an interface between "normal" and negatively refractive media. The shift is negative, consistent with the direction of energy flow in the negatively refractive medium.

  1. Electrodynamics of moving media inducing positive and negative refraction

    SciTech Connect

    Grzegorczyk, Tomasz M.; Kong, Jin Au

    2006-07-15

    Negative refraction is a phenomenon that has been recently reported with left-handed media (either isotropic or not), photonic crystals, and rotated uniaxial media. In this Brief Report, we identify another origin of negative refraction, due to the motion of the transmitted medium parallel to the interface at which refraction occurs. Previous works in this domain have concentrated on media velocities that are above the Cerenkov limit, while we show here that negative refraction is in fact achievable at any velocities of the transmitted medium. A possible experimental implementation is proposed to verify this effect. Next, we consider an isotropic frequency-dispersive medium for which the index of refraction can take negative values, and we study the wave refraction phenomenon as a function of frequency and medium velocity. It is found that the motion of the medium induces a rotation of refraction, which can either enhance or attenuate the natural negative refraction of the medium.

  2. Negative-Refraction Metamaterials: Fundamental Principles and Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eleftheriades, G. V.; Balmain, K. G.

    2005-06-01

    Learn about the revolutionary new technology of negative-refraction metamaterials Negative-Refraction Metamaterials: Fundamental Principles and Applications introduces artificial materials that support the unusual electromagnetic property of negative refraction. Readers will discover several classes of negative-refraction materials along with their exciting, groundbreaking applications, such as lenses and antennas, imaging with super-resolution, microwave devices, dispersion-compensating interconnects, radar, and defense. The book begins with a chapter describing the fundamentals of isotropic metamaterials in which a negative index of refraction is defined. In the following chapters, the text builds on the fundamentals by describing a range of useful microwave devices and antennas. Next, a broad spectrum of exciting new research and emerging applications is examined, including: Theory and experiments behind a super-resolving, negative-refractive-index transmission-line lens 3-D transmission-line metamaterials with a negative refractive index Numerical simulation studies of negative refraction of Gaussian beams and associated focusing phenomena Unique advantages and theory of shaped lenses made of negative-refractive-index metamaterials A new type of transmission-line metamaterial that is anisotropic and supports the formation of sharp steerable beams (resonance cones) Implementations of negative-refraction metamaterials at optical frequencies Unusual propagation phenomena in metallic waveguides partially filled with negative-refractive-index metamaterials Metamaterials in which the refractive index and the underlying group velocity are both negative This work brings together the best minds in this cutting-edge field. It is fascinating reading for scientists, engineers, and graduate-level students in physics, chemistry, materials science, photonics, and electrical engineering.

  3. A Newtonian approach to extraordinarily strong negative refraction.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Hosang; Yeung, Kitty Y M; Umansky, Vladimir; Ham, Donhee

    2012-08-02

    Metamaterials with negative refractive indices can manipulate electromagnetic waves in unusual ways, and can be used to achieve, for example, sub-diffraction-limit focusing, the bending of light in the 'wrong' direction, and reversed Doppler and Cerenkov effects. These counterintuitive and technologically useful behaviours have spurred considerable efforts to synthesize a broad array of negative-index metamaterials with engineered electric, magnetic or optical properties. Here we demonstrate another route to negative refraction by exploiting the inertia of electrons in semiconductor two-dimensional electron gases, collectively accelerated by electromagnetic waves according to Newton's second law of motion, where this acceleration effect manifests as kinetic inductance. Using kinetic inductance to attain negative refraction was theoretically proposed for three-dimensional metallic nanoparticles and seen experimentally with surface plasmons on the surface of a three-dimensional metal. The two-dimensional electron gas that we use at cryogenic temperatures has a larger kinetic inductance than three-dimensional metals, leading to extraordinarily strong negative refraction at gigahertz frequencies, with an index as large as -700. This pronounced negative refractive index and the corresponding reduction in the effective wavelength opens a path to miniaturization in the science and technology of negative refraction.

  4. Multiple scattering induced negative refraction of matter waves

    PubMed Central

    Pinsker, Florian

    2016-01-01

    Starting from fundamental multiple scattering theory it is shown that negative refraction indices are feasible for matter waves passing a well-defined ensemble of scatterers. A simple approach to this topic is presented and explicit examples for systems of scatterers in 1D and 3D are stated that imply negative refraction for a generic incoming quantum wave packet. Essential features of the effective scattering field, densities and frequency spectrum of scatterers are considered. Additionally it is shown that negative refraction indices allow perfect transmission of the wave passing the ensemble of scatterers. Finally the concept of the superlens is discussed, since it is based on negative refraction and can be extended to matter waves utilizing the observations presented in this paper which thus paves the way to ‘untouchable’ quantum systems in analogy to cloaking devices for electromagnetic waves. PMID:26857266

  5. Multiple scattering induced negative refraction of matter waves.

    PubMed

    Pinsker, Florian

    2016-02-09

    Starting from fundamental multiple scattering theory it is shown that negative refraction indices are feasible for matter waves passing a well-defined ensemble of scatterers. A simple approach to this topic is presented and explicit examples for systems of scatterers in 1D and 3D are stated that imply negative refraction for a generic incoming quantum wave packet. Essential features of the effective scattering field, densities and frequency spectrum of scatterers are considered. Additionally it is shown that negative refraction indices allow perfect transmission of the wave passing the ensemble of scatterers. Finally the concept of the superlens is discussed, since it is based on negative refraction and can be extended to matter waves utilizing the observations presented in this paper which thus paves the way to 'untouchable' quantum systems in analogy to cloaking devices for electromagnetic waves.

  6. Chirality-induced negative refraction in magnetized plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Guo, B.

    2013-09-15

    Characteristic equations in magnetized plasma with chirality are derived in simple formulations and the dispersion relations for propagation parallel and perpendicular to the external magnetic field are studied in detail. With the help of the dispersion relations of each eigenwave, the author explores chirality-induced negative refraction in magnetized plasma and investigates the effects of parameters (i.e., chirality degree, external magnetic field, etc.) on the negative refraction. The results show that the chirality is the necessary and only one factor which leads to negative refraction without manipulating electrical permittivity and magnetic permeability. Both increasing the degree of chirality and reducing the external magnetic field can result in greater range negative refraction. Parameter dependence of the effects is calculated and discussed.

  7. Three-dimensional optical metamaterial with a negative refractive index.

    PubMed

    Valentine, Jason; Zhang, Shuang; Zentgraf, Thomas; Ulin-Avila, Erick; Genov, Dentcho A; Bartal, Guy; Zhang, Xiang

    2008-09-18

    Metamaterials are artificially engineered structures that have properties, such as a negative refractive index, not attainable with naturally occurring materials. Negative-index metamaterials (NIMs) were first demonstrated for microwave frequencies, but it has been challenging to design NIMs for optical frequencies and they have so far been limited to optically thin samples because of significant fabrication challenges and strong energy dissipation in metals. Such thin structures are analogous to a monolayer of atoms, making it difficult to assign bulk properties such as the index of refraction. Negative refraction of surface plasmons was recently demonstrated but was confined to a two-dimensional waveguide. Three-dimensional (3D) optical metamaterials have come into focus recently, including the realization of negative refraction by using layered semiconductor metamaterials and a 3D magnetic metamaterial in the infrared frequencies; however, neither of these had a negative index of refraction. Here we report a 3D optical metamaterial having negative refractive index with a very high figure of merit of 3.5 (that is, low loss). This metamaterial is made of cascaded 'fishnet' structures, with a negative index existing over a broad spectral range. Moreover, it can readily be probed from free space, making it functional for optical devices. We construct a prism made of this optical NIM to demonstrate negative refractive index at optical frequencies, resulting unambiguously from the negative phase evolution of the wave propagating inside the metamaterial. Bulk optical metamaterials open up prospects for studies of 3D optical effects and applications associated with NIMs and zero-index materials such as reversed Doppler effect, superlenses, optical tunnelling devices, compact resonators and highly directional sources.

  8. Negative Refraction with Superior Transmission in Graphene-Hexagonal Boron Nitride (hBN) Multilayer Hyper Crystal.

    PubMed

    Sayem, Ayed Al; Rahman, Md Masudur; Mahdy, M R C; Jahangir, Ifat; Rahman, Md Saifur

    2016-05-05

    In this article, we have theoretically investigated the performance of graphene-hexagonal Boron Nitride (hBN) multilayer structure (hyper crystal) to demonstrate all angle negative refraction along with superior transmission. hBN, one of the latest natural hyperbolic materials, can be a very strong contender to form a hyper crystal with graphene due to its excellence as a graphene-compatible substrate. Although bare hBN can exhibit negative refraction, the transmission is generally low due to its high reflectivity. Whereas due to graphene's 2D nature and metallic characteristics in the frequency range where hBN behaves as a type-I hyperbolic material, we have found graphene-hBN hyper-crystals to exhibit all angle negative refraction with superior transmission. Interestingly, superior transmission from the whole structure can be fully controlled by the tunability of graphene without hampering the negative refraction originated mainly from hBN. We have also presented an effective medium description of the hyper crystal in the low-k limit and validated the proposed theory analytically and with full wave simulations. Along with the current extensive research on hybridization of graphene plasmon polaritons with (hyperbolic) hBN phonon polaritons, this work might have some substantial impact on this field of research and can be very useful in applications such as hyper-lensing.

  9. Negative Refraction with Superior Transmission in Graphene-Hexagonal Boron Nitride (hBN) Multilayer Hyper Crystal

    PubMed Central

    Sayem, Ayed Al; Rahman, Md. Masudur; Mahdy, M. R. C.; Jahangir, Ifat; Rahman, Md. Saifur

    2016-01-01

    In this article, we have theoretically investigated the performance of graphene-hexagonal Boron Nitride (hBN) multilayer structure (hyper crystal) to demonstrate all angle negative refraction along with superior transmission. hBN, one of the latest natural hyperbolic materials, can be a very strong contender to form a hyper crystal with graphene due to its excellence as a graphene-compatible substrate. Although bare hBN can exhibit negative refraction, the transmission is generally low due to its high reflectivity. Whereas due to graphene’s 2D nature and metallic characteristics in the frequency range where hBN behaves as a type-I hyperbolic material, we have found graphene-hBN hyper-crystals to exhibit all angle negative refraction with superior transmission. Interestingly, superior transmission from the whole structure can be fully controlled by the tunability of graphene without hampering the negative refraction originated mainly from hBN. We have also presented an effective medium description of the hyper crystal in the low-k limit and validated the proposed theory analytically and with full wave simulations. Along with the current extensive research on hybridization of graphene plasmon polaritons with (hyperbolic) hBN phonon polaritons, this work might have some substantial impact on this field of research and can be very useful in applications such as hyper-lensing. PMID:27146561

  10. Negative light refraction in a gradient medium with ultrasound-modulated refractive index

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naimi, E. K.; Vekilov, Yu. Kh.

    2015-01-01

    The conditions of the formation of a spatially ordered optical structure with an ultrasound-modulated refractive index in a gradient medium have been considered. It has been shown that the excitation of a standing ultrasonic wave in the medium creates a structure consisting of trajectories of separate light beams, which is a superlattice of the "dynamic 4D photonic crystal." Regions corresponding to negative light refraction have been revealed in beam trajectories. Possible fields of application of such structures have been discussed.

  11. Negative refraction at telecommunication wavelengths through plasmon-photon hybridization.

    PubMed

    Kalusniak, Sascha; Sadofev, Sergey; Henneberger, Fritz

    2015-11-16

    We demonstrate negative refraction at telecommunication wavelengths through plasmon-photon hybridization on a simple microcavity with metallic mirrors. Instead of using conventional metals, the plasmonic excitations are provided by a heavily doped semiconductor which enables us to tune them into resonance with the infrared photon modes of the cavity. In this way, the dispersion of the resultant hybrid cavity modes can be widely adjusted. In particular, negative dispersion and negative refraction at telecommunication wavelengths on an all-ZnO monolithical cavity are demonstrated.

  12. Structures with negative index of refraction

    DOEpatents

    Soukoulis, Costas M [Ames, IA; Zhou, Jiangfeng [Ames, IA; Koschny, Thomas [Ames, IA; Zhang, Lei [Ames, IA; Tuttle, Gary [Ames, IA

    2011-11-08

    The invention provides simplified negative index materials (NIMs) using wire-pair structures, 4-gap single ring split-ring resonator (SRR), fishnet structures and overleaf capacitor SRR. In the wire-pair arrangement, a pair of short parallel wires and continuous wires are used. In the 4-gap single-ring SRR, the SRRs are centered on the faces of a cubic unit cell combined with a continuous wire type resonator. Combining both elements creates a frequency band where the metamaterial is transparent with simultaneously negative .di-elect cons. and .mu.. In the fishnet structure, a metallic mesh on both sides of the dielectric spacer is used. The overleaf capacitor SRR changes the gap capacities to small plate capacitors by making the sections of the SRR ring overlap at the gaps separated by a thin dielectric film. This technique is applicable to conventional SRR gaps but it best deploys for the 4-gap single-ring structures.

  13. Dielectric Optical-Controllable Magnifying Lens by Nonlinear Negative Refraction

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Jianjun; Shang, Ce; Zheng, Yuanlin; Feng, Yaming; Chen, Xianfeng; Liang, Xiaogan; Wan, Wenjie

    2015-01-01

    A simple optical lens plays an important role for exploring the microscopic world in science and technology by refracting light with tailored spatially varying refractive indices. Recent advancements in nanotechnology enable novel lenses, such as, superlens and hyperlens, with sub-wavelength resolution capabilities by specially designed materials’ refractive indices with meta-materials and transformation optics. However, these artificially nano- or micro-engineered lenses usually suffer high losses from metals and are highly demanding in fabrication. Here, we experimentally demonstrate, for the first time, a nonlinear dielectric magnifying lens using negative refraction by degenerate four-wave mixing in a plano-concave glass slide, obtaining magnified images. Moreover, we transform a nonlinear flat lens into a magnifying lens by introducing transformation optics into the nonlinear regime, achieving an all-optical controllable lensing effect through nonlinear wave mixing, which may have many potential applications in microscopy and imaging science. PMID:26149952

  14. Dielectric Optical-Controllable Magnifying Lens by Nonlinear Negative Refraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Jianjun; Shang, Ce; Zheng, Yuanlin; Feng, Yaming; Chen, Xianfeng; Liang, Xiaogan; Wan, Wenjie

    2015-07-01

    A simple optical lens plays an important role for exploring the microscopic world in science and technology by refracting light with tailored spatially varying refractive indices. Recent advancements in nanotechnology enable novel lenses, such as, superlens and hyperlens, with sub-wavelength resolution capabilities by specially designed materials’ refractive indices with meta-materials and transformation optics. However, these artificially nano- or micro-engineered lenses usually suffer high losses from metals and are highly demanding in fabrication. Here, we experimentally demonstrate, for the first time, a nonlinear dielectric magnifying lens using negative refraction by degenerate four-wave mixing in a plano-concave glass slide, obtaining magnified images. Moreover, we transform a nonlinear flat lens into a magnifying lens by introducing transformation optics into the nonlinear regime, achieving an all-optical controllable lensing effect through nonlinear wave mixing, which may have many potential applications in microscopy and imaging science.

  15. Overlapping illusions by transformation optics without any negative refraction material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Fei; He, Sailing

    2016-01-01

    A novel method to achieve an overlapping illusion without any negative refraction index material is introduced with the help of the optic-null medium (ONM) designed by an extremely stretching spatial transformation. Unlike the previous methods to achieve such an optical illusion by transformation optics (TO), our method can achieve a power combination and reshape the radiation pattern at the same time. Unlike the overlapping illusion with some negative refraction index material, our method is not sensitive to the loss of the materials. Other advantages over existing methods are discussed. Numerical simulations are given to verify the performance of the proposed devices.

  16. Multilayer structures as negative refractive and left-handed materials.

    PubMed

    Chui, S T; Chan, C T; Lin, Z F

    2006-02-15

    We examine multilayer structures as negative refractive index and left-handed materials, and find that for one polarization there is a wide range (≈90°) of incident angle within which negative refraction will occur. This comes about because the group velocity and the Poynting vector have a large component parallel to the layers, no matter what the angle of incidence of the incoming radiation is. This behaviour in turn comes from the large anisotropy of the phase velocities. If one of the components is a ferromagnetic metal, the system can be a left-handed material above the ferromagnetic resonance frequency.

  17. Ferromagnetic metamaterial with tunable negative index of refraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zou, Da-yong; Jiang, Ai-min; Wu, Rui-xin

    2010-01-01

    We investigate the index of refraction of the ferromagnetic metamaterial, which consists of periodic layered ferrite and semiconductor or metallic mesh. We find that the metamaterial has the negative index; the frequency range and magnitude of the negative index are tunable in applied magnetic fields. The frequency range of the negative index shifts to higher frequencies as the applied magnetic fields increase. The permeability and permittivity of the ferrite and other component materials, as well as their thickness ratios, influence the tunable range of the negative index. It is demonstrated that ferrite-mesh structure has a much lower loss than that of a ferrite-semiconductor structure.

  18. Observation of negative refraction of Dirac fermions in graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Gil-Ho; Park, Geon-Hyoung; Lee, Hu-Jong

    2015-11-01

    Half a century ago, Veselago proposed `left-handed’ materials with negative permittivity and permeability, in which waves propagate with phase and group velocities in opposite directions. Significant work has been undertaken to attain this left-handed response, such as establishing a negative refractive index in so-called metamaterials, which consist of periodic sub-wavelength structures. However, an electronic counterpart has not been demonstrated owing to difficulties in creating repeated structures smaller than the electronic Fermi wavelength of the order ~10 nm. Here, without needing to engineer sub-wavelength structures, we demonstrate negative refractive behaviour of Dirac fermions in graphene, exploiting its unique relativistic band structure. Analysis of both electron focusing through an n-p-n flat lens and negative refraction across n-p junctions confirms left-handed behaviour in the electronic system. This approach to electronic optics is of particular relevance to the on-going efforts to develop novel quantum devices with emerging layered materials.

  19. A microstrip tunable negative refractive index metamaterial and phase shifter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, P.; Gao, J.; Marinis, C. T.; Parimi, P. V.; Vittoria, C.; Harris, V. G.

    2008-11-01

    A tunable negative refractive index metamaterial and miniature phase shifter have been designed and fabricated in a microstrip configuration for applications in radio frequency integrated circuits. The metamaterial consists of plasmonic copper wires and yttrium iron garnet slabs having a low insertion loss of 5dB at the center of the transmission band. The yttrium iron garnet material enables the magnetic field tuning of the negative refractive index in a dynamic frequency band from 7.0to11.0GHz. The insertion phase can be tuned by 45° continuously by varying the bias field from 3.8to4.6kOe at 9.0GHz.

  20. Focusing on Plates: Controlling Guided Waves using Negative Refraction.

    PubMed

    Philippe, Franck D; Murray, Todd W; Prada, Claire

    2015-06-08

    Elastic waves are guided along finite structures such as cylinders, plates, or rods through reflection, refraction, and mode conversion at the interfaces. Such wave propagation is ubiquitous in the world around us, and studies of elastic waveguides first emerged in the later part of the 19(th) century. Early work on elastic waveguides revealed the presence of backward propagating waves, in which the phase velocity and group velocity are anti-parallel. While backward wave propagation exists naturally in very simple finite elastic media, there has been remarkably little attention paid to this phenomenon. Here we report the development of a tunable acoustic lens in an isotropic elastic plate showing negative refraction over a finite acoustic frequency bandwidth. As compared to engineered acoustic materials such as phononic crystals and metamaterials, the design of the acoustic lens is very simple, with negative refraction obtained through thickness changes rather than internal periodicity or sub-wavelength resonant structures. A new class of acoustic devices, including resonators, filters, lenses, and cloaks, may be possible through topography optimization of elastic waveguide structures to exploit the unique properties of backward waves.

  1. Textile inspired flexible metamaterial with negative refractive index

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burgnies, L.; Lheurette, É.; Lippens, D.

    2015-04-01

    This work introduces metallo-dielectric woven fabric as a metamaterial for phase-front manipulation. Dispersion diagram as well as effective medium parameters retrieved from reflection and transmission coefficients point out negative values of refractive index. By numerical simulations, it is evidenced that a pair of meandered metallic wires, arranged in a top to bottom configuration, can yield to a textile metamaterial with simultaneously negative permittivity and permeability. While the effective negative permittivity stems from the metallic grid arrangement, resonating current loop resulting from the top to bottom configuration of two meandered metallic wires in near proximity produces magnetic activity with negative permeability. By adjusting the distance between pairs of metallic wires, the electric plasma frequency can be shifted to overlap the magnetic resonance. Finally, it is shown that the woven metamaterial is insensitive to the incident angle up to around 60°.

  2. Breaking the imaging symmetry in negative refraction lenses.

    PubMed

    Ma, Changbao; Liu, Zhaowei

    2012-01-30

    Optical lenses are pervasive in various areas of sciences and technologies. It is well known that conventional lenses have symmetrical imaging properties along forward and backward directions. In this letter, we show that hyperbolic plasmonic metamaterial based negative refraction lenses perform as either converging lenses or diverging lenses depending on the illumination directions. New imaging equations and properties that are different from those of all the existing optical lenses are also presented. These new imaging properties, including symmetry breaking as well as the super resolving power, significantly expand the horizon of imaging optics and optical system design.

  3. Electromagnetic origins of negative refraction in coupled plasmonic waveguide metamaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aghanejad, Iman; Chau, Kenneth J.; Markley, Loïc

    2016-10-01

    A metamaterial composed of stacked plasmonic waveguides which support backward propagation along the layers has been shown to exhibit a nearly spherical equifrequency contour (EFC) in which the Floquet-Bloch wave vector kFB and Poynting vector S point in opposite directions everywhere on this surface. Experiments performed on this structure have also shown that polarized light beams incident from free space refract to the same side of normal over a wide range of incidence angles. Together, these observations have led researchers to describe this structure as a homogeneous medium with three-dimensionally isotropic negative refractive index; however, a close inspection of the fields throughout the structure as provided in this paper would suggest otherwise. Here, we rigorously analyze the relationship between phase and power flow within the structure by introducing a method to calculate the power flow of all Floquet-Bloch harmonics, information which cannot be obtained from either conventional analysis of EFCs or effective medium theory. Access to power flow of all harmonics enables us to demonstrate the origin of backward power (defined with respect to the direction of kFB), and in doing so, verify the validity of the claimed three-dimensionally isotropic left-handed response and the validity of describing the medium by a simple negative effective index of refraction n =-1 . Knowledge regarding the distribution of power flow across the harmonics can also be used to design highly efficient methods to couple light into and out of these structures. As an example, we show that tailored wave excitation can achieve coupling efficiencies of up to 96%, over 5 times greater than that achieved by normal-incidence plane-wave excitation.

  4. A simple design method of negative refractive index metamaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Dongho; Lee, Wangju; Choi, Jaeick

    2009-11-01

    We propose a very simple design method of negative refractive index (NRI) materials that can overcome some drawbacks of conventional resonant-type NRI materials. The proposed NRI materials consist of single or double metallic patterns printed on a dielectric substrate. Our metamaterials (MTMs) show two properties that are different from other types of MTMs in obtaining effective negative values of permittivity ( ɛ) and permeability ( μ) simultaneously; the geometrical outlines of the metallic patterns are not confined within any specific shape, and the metallic patterns are printed on only one side of the dielectric substrate. Therefore, they are very easy to design and fabricate using common printed circuit board (PCB) technology according to the appropriate application. Excellent agreement between the experiment and prediction data ensures the validity of our design approach.

  5. Negative refraction in one- and two-dimensional lossless plasma dielectric photonic crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Guo, B.

    2013-07-15

    Negative refraction in one- and two-dimensional lossless plasma dielectric photonic crystals consisting of plasma and background materials is theoretically investigated and the necessary conditions for negative refraction in these two structures are obtained. The critical frequency ω{sub 0} and the bandwidth Δω for negative refraction are explored, and the parameter dependence of effects such as plasma filling factor and the dielectric constant of background materials is also examined and discussed.

  6. Negative Refraction in a Uniaxial Absorbent Dielectric Material

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jen, Yi-Jun; Lakhtakia, Akhlesh; Yu, Ching-Wei; Lin, Chin-Te

    2009-01-01

    Refraction of light from an isotropic dielectric medium to an anisotropic dielectric material is a complicated phenomenon that can have several different characteristics not usually discussed in electromagnetics textbooks for undergraduate students. With a simple problem wherein the refracting material is uniaxial with its optic axis normal to the…

  7. Optical negative refraction by four-wave mixing in thin metallic nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palomba, Stefano; Zhang, Shuang; Park, Yongshik; Bartal, Guy; Yin, Xiaobo; Zhang, Xiang

    2012-01-01

    The law of refraction first derived by Snellius and later introduced as the Huygens-Fermat principle, states that the incidence and refracted angles of a light wave at the interface of two different materials are related to the ratio of the refractive indices in each medium. Whereas all natural materials have a positive refractive index and therefore exhibit refraction in the positive direction, artificially engineered negative index metamaterials have been shown capable of bending light waves negatively. Such a negative refractive index is the key to achieving a perfect lens that is capable of imaging well below the diffraction limit. However, negative index metamaterials are typically lossy, narrow band, and require complicated fabrication processes. Recently, an alternative approach to obtain negative refraction from a very thin nonlinear film has been proposed and experimentally demonstrated in the microwave region. However, such approaches use phase conjugation, which makes optical implementations difficult. Here, we report a simple but different scheme to demonstrate experimentally nonlinear negative refraction at optical frequencies using four-wave mixing in nanostructured metal films. The refractive index can be designed at will by simply tuning the wavelengths of the interacting waves, which could have potential impact on many important applications, such as superlens imaging.

  8. Experimental verification and simulation of negative index of refraction using Snell's law.

    PubMed

    Parazzoli, C G; Greegor, R B; Li, K; Koltenbah, B E C; Tanielian, M

    2003-03-14

    We report the results of a Snell's law experiment on a negative index of refraction material in free space from 12.6 to 13.2 GHz. Numerical simulations using Maxwell's equations solvers show good agreement with the experimental results, confirming the existence of negative index of refraction materials. The index of refraction is a function of frequency. At 12.6 GHz we measure and compute the real part of the index of refraction to be -1.05. The measurements and simulations of the electromagnetic field profiles were performed at distances of 14lambda and 28lambda from the sample; the fields were also computed at 100lambda.

  9. Negative refraction with low absorption using Raman transitions with magnetoelectric coupling

    SciTech Connect

    Sikes, D. E.; Yavuz, D. D.

    2010-07-15

    We suggest a scheme for obtaining negative refraction that does not require the simultaneous presence of an electric-dipole and a magnetic-dipole transition near the same transition frequency. The key idea of the scheme is to obtain a strong electric response by using far-off-resonant Raman transitions. We propose to use a pair of electric-dipole Raman transitions and utilize magneto-electric cross coupling to achieve a negative index of refraction without requiring negative permeability. The interference of the two Raman transitions allows tunable negative refraction with low absorption.

  10. Experimental validation of systematically designed acoustic hyperbolic meta material slab exhibiting negative refraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christiansen, Rasmus E.; Sigmund, Ole

    2016-09-01

    This Letter reports on the experimental validation of a two-dimensional acoustic hyperbolic metamaterial slab optimized to exhibit negative refractive behavior. The slab was designed using a topology optimization based systematic design method allowing for tailoring the refractive behavior. The experimental results confirm the predicted refractive capability as well as the predicted transmission at an interface. The study simultaneously provides an estimate of the attenuation inside the slab stemming from the boundary layer effects—insight which can be utilized in the further design of the metamaterial slabs. The capability of tailoring the refractive behavior opens possibilities for different applications. For instance, a slab exhibiting zero refraction across a wide angular range is capable of funneling acoustic energy through it, while a material exhibiting the negative refractive behavior across a wide angular range provides lensing and collimating capabilities.

  11. Total negative refraction in real crystals for ballistic electrons and light.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yong; Fluegel, B; Mascarenhas, A

    2003-10-10

    It is found that there exists a category of material interfaces, readily available, that not only can provide total refraction (i.e., zero reflection) but can also give rise to amphoteric refraction (i.e., both positive and negative refraction) for electromagnetic waves in any frequency domain as well as for ballistic electron waves. These two unusual phenomena are demonstrated experimentally for the propagation of light through such an interface.

  12. Optical bistability in a defect slab with a negative refractive quantum dot nanostructure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jamshidnejad, M.; Asadi Amirabadi, E.; Miraboutalebi, S.; Asadpour, S. H.

    2016-11-01

    We demonstrate optical bistability (OB) in a defect slab doped V-type four-level InGaN/GaN quantum dot nanostructure in the negative refraction frequency band. It has been shown that the OB behavior of such a quantum dot nanostructure system can be controlled by the amplitude of the driving fields and a new parameter for controlling the OB behavior as thickness of the slab medium in the negative refraction band. Meanwhile, we show that the negative refraction frequency band can be controlled by tuning electric permittivity and magnetic permeability by the amplitude of the driving fields and electron concentration in the defect slab doped. Under the numerical simulations, due to the effect of quantum coherence and interference, it is possible to switch bistability by adjusting the optimal conditions in the negative refraction frequency band, which is more practical in all-optical switching or coding elements, and technology based nanoscale devices.

  13. Optical bistability in a defect slab with negative refractive quantum dot nanostructure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jamshidnejad, M.; Asadi Amirabadi, E.; Miraboutalebi, S.; Asadpour, S. H.

    2016-11-01

    We demonstrate optical bistability (OB) in a defect slab doped V-type four-level InGaN/GaN quantum dot nanostructure in the negative refraction frequency band. In this article, will be shown that the OB behavior of such a quantum dot nanostructure system can be controlled by the amplitude of the driving fields and a new parameter for controlling the OB behavior as thickness of the slab medium in the negative refraction band. Meanwhile, we show that the negative refraction frequency band can be controlled by tuning electric permittivity and magnetic permeability by the amplitude of the driving fields and electron concentration in the defect slab doped. Under the numerical simulations, due to the effect of quantum coherence and interference it is possible to switch bistability by adjusting the optimal conditions in the negative refraction frequency band which is more practical in all-optical switching or coding elements and technology based nanoscale devices.

  14. Power-controlled transition from standard to negative refraction in reorientational soft matter.

    PubMed

    Piccardi, Armando; Alberucci, Alessandro; Kravets, Nina; Buchnev, Oleksandr; Assanto, Gaetano

    2014-11-25

    Refraction at a dielectric interface can take an anomalous character in anisotropic crystals, when light is negatively refracted with incident and refracted beams emerging on the same side of the interface normal. In soft matter subject to reorientation, such as nematic liquid crystals, the nonlinear interaction with light allows tuning of the optical properties. We demonstrate that in such material a beam of light can experience either positive or negative refraction depending on input power, as it can alter the spatial distribution of the optic axis and, in turn, the direction of the energy flow when traveling across an interface. Moreover, the nonlinear optical response yields beam self-focusing and spatial localization into a self-confined solitary wave through the formation of a graded-index waveguide, linking the refractive transition to power-driven readdressing of copolarized guided-wave signals, with a number of output ports not limited by diffraction.

  15. Negative refraction for TM polarization in nanosphere dispersed liquid crystal (NDLC) metamaterial

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pawlik, G.; Walasik, W.; Tarnowski, K.; Mitus, A. C.; Khoo, I. C.

    2013-09-01

    We discuss the effect of a negative refraction at the interface of uniaxial anisotropic media in the case of nanosphere dispersed liquid crystal (NDLC) matematerial. Finite Element (FE) calculations (COMSOL Multiphysics) are used to trace the propagation of the electromagnetic wave. We show that for chosen values of the parameters of nanospheres and of nematic liquid crystal (NLC) host negative refraction can be obtained for a wide range of incident angles.

  16. Liquid crystal hyperbolic metamaterial for wide-angle negative-positive refraction and reflection.

    PubMed

    Pawlik, G; Tarnowski, K; Walasik, W; Mitus, A C; Khoo, I C

    2014-04-01

    We show that nanosphere dispersed liquid crystal (NDLC) metamaterial can be characterized in near IR spectral region as an indefinite medium whose real parts of effective ordinary and extraordinary permittivities are opposite in signs. Based on this fact we designed an electro-optic effect: an external electric-field-driven switch between normal refraction, negative refraction, and reflection of TM incident electromagnetic wave from the boundary vacuum/NDLC. A detailed analysis of its functionality is given based on effective medium theory combined with a study of negative refraction in anisotropic metamaterials and finite elements simulations.

  17. Optical Refraction in Silver: Counterposition, Negative Phase Velocity and Orthogonal Phase Velocity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Naqvi, Qaisar A.; Mackay, Tom G.; Lakhtakia, Akhlesh

    2011-01-01

    Complex behaviour associated with metamaterials can arise even in commonplace isotropic dielectric materials. We demonstrate how silver, for example, can support negative phase velocity and counterposition, but not negative refraction, at optical frequencies. The transition from positive to negative phase velocity is not accompanied by remarkable…

  18. Negative and near zero refraction metamaterials based on permanent magnetic ferrites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bi, Ke; Guo, Yunsheng; Zhou, Ji; Dong, Guoyan; Zhao, Hongjie; Zhao, Qian; Xiao, Zongqi; Liu, Xiaoming; Lan, Chuwen

    2014-02-01

    Ferrite metamaterials based on the negative permeability of ferromagnetic resonance in ferrites are of great interest. However, such metamaterials face a limitation that the ferromagnetic resonance can only take place while an external magnetic field applied. Here, we demonstrate a metamaterial based on permanent magnetic ferrite which exhibits not only negative refraction but also near zero refraction without applied magnetic field. The wedge-shaped and slab-shaped structures of permanent magnetic ferrite-based metamaterials were prepared and the refraction properties were measured in a near-field scanning system. The negative and near zero refractive behaviors are confirmed by the measured spatial electric field maps. This work offers new opportunities for the development of ferrite-based metamaterials.

  19. Negative and near zero refraction metamaterials based on permanent magnetic ferrites

    PubMed Central

    Bi, Ke; Guo, Yunsheng; Zhou, Ji; Dong, Guoyan; Zhao, Hongjie; Zhao, Qian; Xiao, Zongqi; Liu, Xiaoming; Lan, Chuwen

    2014-01-01

    Ferrite metamaterials based on the negative permeability of ferromagnetic resonance in ferrites are of great interest. However, such metamaterials face a limitation that the ferromagnetic resonance can only take place while an external magnetic field applied. Here, we demonstrate a metamaterial based on permanent magnetic ferrite which exhibits not only negative refraction but also near zero refraction without applied magnetic field. The wedge-shaped and slab-shaped structures of permanent magnetic ferrite-based metamaterials were prepared and the refraction properties were measured in a near-field scanning system. The negative and near zero refractive behaviors are confirmed by the measured spatial electric field maps. This work offers new opportunities for the development of ferrite-based metamaterials. PMID:24553188

  20. Negative and near zero refraction metamaterials based on permanent magnetic ferrites.

    PubMed

    Bi, Ke; Guo, Yunsheng; Zhou, Ji; Dong, Guoyan; Zhao, Hongjie; Zhao, Qian; Xiao, Zongqi; Liu, Xiaoming; Lan, Chuwen

    2014-02-20

    Ferrite metamaterials based on the negative permeability of ferromagnetic resonance in ferrites are of great interest. However, such metamaterials face a limitation that the ferromagnetic resonance can only take place while an external magnetic field applied. Here, we demonstrate a metamaterial based on permanent magnetic ferrite which exhibits not only negative refraction but also near zero refraction without applied magnetic field. The wedge-shaped and slab-shaped structures of permanent magnetic ferrite-based metamaterials were prepared and the refraction properties were measured in a near-field scanning system. The negative and near zero refractive behaviors are confirmed by the measured spatial electric field maps. This work offers new opportunities for the development of ferrite-based metamaterials.

  1. Negative refractive index and acoustic superlens from multiple scattering in single negative metamaterials.

    PubMed

    Kaina, Nadège; Lemoult, Fabrice; Fink, Mathias; Lerosey, Geoffroy

    2015-09-03

    Metamaterials, man-made composite media structured on a scale much smaller than a wavelength, offer surprising possibilities for engineering the propagation of waves. One of the most interesting of these is the ability to achieve superlensing--that is, to focus or image beyond the diffraction limit. This originates from the left-handed behavior--the property of refracting waves negatively--that is typical of negative index metamaterials. Yet reaching this goal requires the design of 'double negative' metamaterials, which act simultaneously on the permittivity and permeability in electromagnetics, or on the density and compressibility in acoustics; this generally implies the use of two different kinds of building blocks or specific particles presenting multiple overlapping resonances. Such a requirement limits the applicability of double negative metamaterials, and has, for example, hampered any demonstration of subwavelength focusing using left-handed acoustic metamaterials. Here we show that these strict conditions can be largely relaxed by relying on media that consist of only one type of single resonant unit cell. Specifically, we show with a simple yet general semi-analytical model that judiciously breaking the symmetry of a single negative metamaterial is sufficient to turn it into a double negative one. We then demonstrate that this occurs solely because of multiple scattering of waves off the metamaterial resonant elements, a phenomenon often disregarded in these media owing to their subwavelength patterning. We apply our approach to acoustics and verify through numerical simulations that it allows the realization of negative index acoustic metamaterials based on Helmholtz resonators only. Finally, we demonstrate the operation of a negative index acoustic superlens, achieving subwavelength focusing and imaging with spot width and resolution 7 and 3.5 times better than the diffraction limit, respectively. Our findings have profound implications for the

  2. Tunable positive and negative refraction of infrared radiation in graphene-dielectric multilayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, R. Z.; Zhang, Z. M.

    2015-11-01

    Graphene-dielectric multilayers consisting of alternating layers of atom-thick graphene and nanometer-scale dielectric films exhibit characteristics of hyperbolic metamaterials, in which one positive and one negative permittivity are defined for orthogonal directions. Negative permittivity for electric field polarized in the direction parallel to the conductive graphene sheets gives rise to a negative angle of refraction and low-loss transmission for the side-incidence perspective proposed in this work. The Poynting vector tracing demonstrates the switching between positive and negative refraction in the mid-infrared region by tuning the chemical potential of graphene. This adjustable dual-mode metamaterial holds promise for infrared imaging applications.

  3. Tunable positive and negative refraction of infrared radiation in graphene-dielectric multilayers

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, R. Z.; Zhang, Z. M.

    2015-11-09

    Graphene-dielectric multilayers consisting of alternating layers of atom-thick graphene and nanometer-scale dielectric films exhibit characteristics of hyperbolic metamaterials, in which one positive and one negative permittivity are defined for orthogonal directions. Negative permittivity for electric field polarized in the direction parallel to the conductive graphene sheets gives rise to a negative angle of refraction and low-loss transmission for the side-incidence perspective proposed in this work. The Poynting vector tracing demonstrates the switching between positive and negative refraction in the mid-infrared region by tuning the chemical potential of graphene. This adjustable dual-mode metamaterial holds promise for infrared imaging applications.

  4. Dual negative refraction in a two dimension square photonic crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Derbali, J.; AbdelMalek, F.

    2015-09-01

    Dual refraction effect based on the overlapping bands in a two dimensional (2D) photonic crystal (PhC) is demonstrated. The PhC consists of alumina rods with a dielectric constant ε=8.9, arranged in a square lattice in air. To disperse light which has special excitation frequency and a specific incident angle, by this PhC we optimize his structural parameters such as the radius of dielectric rods). It is shown that two focusing phenomena are formed in the PhC image plan; the degeneracy of modes can be applied to realize optical interference and wave front division. The simulation results are obtained by employing the PWM for analyzing bands structure and the finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) to predict the evolution of the electric fields.

  5. Transport measurements of negative refractive behavior in ballistic graphene hetero junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Gil-Ho; Park, Geon-Hyoung; Kim, Minsoo; Lee, Jae Hyeong; Lee, Hu-Jong

    2015-03-01

    We investigated the electronic current refraction at p-n junctions (PNJs) in ballistic monolayer graphene. Given a peculiar band structure of the graphene, the transmission of electrons through a PNJ is predicted to be similar to the optical refraction at the boundary of metamaterials with negative refractive index. In consequence, electrons waves injected at a point in one side of a junction can be refocused into a single point in the other side of the junction, which demonstrates Veselago lensing for the electrons. By adopting high-yield dry-transfer technique, we fabricated fully ballistic graphene devices encapsulated by hexagonal boron nitrides with a local top gate. We will present the signatures of negative refractive transport behavior of electrons in PNJs and also discuss about the electronic current focusing in p-n-p heterojunctions in terms of Veselago lensing.

  6. Photonic band structure of one-dimensional aperiodic superlattices composed of negative refraction metamaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tyc, Michał H.; Salejda, Włodzimierz; Klauzer-Kruszyna, Agnieszka; Tarnowski, Karol

    2007-05-01

    The dispersion relation for polarized light transmitting through a one-dimensional superlattice composed of aperiodically arranged layers made of ordinary dielectric and negative refraction metamaterials is calculated with finite element method. Generalized Fibonacci, generalized Thue-Morse, double-periodic and Rudin-Shapiro superlattices are investigated, using their periodic approximants. Strong dispersion of metamaterials is taken into account. Group velocities and effective refraction indices in the structures are calculated. The self-similar structure of the transmission spectra is observed.

  7. Negative refraction imaging of acoustic metamaterial lens in the supersonic range

    SciTech Connect

    Han, Jianning; Wen, Tingdun; Yang, Peng; Zhang, Lu

    2014-05-15

    Acoustic metamaterials with negative refraction index is the most promising method to overcome the diffraction limit of acoustic imaging to achieve ultrahigh resolution. In this paper, we use localized resonant phononic crystal as the unit cell to construct the acoustic negative refraction lens. Based on the vibration model of the phononic crystal, negative quality parameters of the lens are obtained while excited near the system resonance frequency. Simulation results show that negative refraction of the acoustic lens can be achieved when a sound wave transmiting through the phononic crystal plate. The patterns of the imaging field agree well with that of the incident wave, while the dispersion is very weak. The unit cell size in the simulation is 0.0005 m and the wavelength of the sound source is 0.02 m, from which we show that acoustic signal can be manipulated through structures with dimensions much smaller than the wavelength of incident wave.

  8. Experiments on the Goos-Hänchen shift with negative and positive index of refraction materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orloff, Nathan; Ricci, Michael; Anderson, Collin; Long, Christian; Dutta, Sudeep; Anlage, Steven

    2006-03-01

    The negative Goos-Hänchen shift occurs when a beam of radiation having a finite transverse extent undergoes total internal reflection at a positive to negative index of refraction interface, hence the reflected beam experiences a negative lateral shift. This phenomenon has been predicted for materials with a negative index of refraction. We investigate a composite wire and split-ring resonator medium between 8-12 GHz, based on that first implemented by [1]. In addition, we present an experiment to investigate the Goos-Hänchen shift and show preliminary results on transmission, refraction, and total internal reflection. Work supported by NSF/ECS-0322844. [1] R. Shelby, D. R. Smith and S. Schultz, Science, 292, 77 (2001)

  9. Excitation of guided waves in layered structures with negative refraction.

    PubMed

    Shadrivov, Ilya; Ziolkowski, Richard; Zharov, Alexander; Kivshar, Yuri

    2005-01-24

    We study the electromagnetic beam reflection from layered structures that include the so-called double-negative metamaterials, also called left-handed metamaterials. We predict that such structures can demonstrate a giant lateral Goos-Hänchen shift of the scattered beam accompanied by a splitting of the reflected and transmitted beams due to the resonant excitation of surface waves at the interfaces between the conventional and double-negative materials as well as due to the excitation of leaky modes in the layered structures. The beam shift can be either positive or negative, depending on the type of the guided waves excited by the incoming beam. We also perform finite-difference time-domain simulations and confirm the major effects predicted analytically.

  10. Negative refractive index metamaterials using only metallic cut wires.

    PubMed

    Sellier, Alexandre; Burokur, Shah Nawaz; Kanté, Boubacar; de Lustrac, André

    2009-04-13

    We present, design and analyze a novel planar Left-Handed (LH) metamaterial at microwave frequencies. This metamaterial is composed of only metallic cut wires and is used under normal-to-plane incidence. Using Finite Element Method (FEM) based simulations and microwave experiments, we have investigated the material properties of the structure. Simultaneous negative values are observed for the permittivity epsilon and permeability mu by the inversion method from the transmission and reflection responses. A negative index n is verified in a bulk prism engineered by stacking several layers of the metamaterial. Our work demonstrates the feasibility of a LH metamaterial composed of only cut wires.

  11. Negative refraction and backward wave in pseudochiral mediums: illustrations of Gaussian beams.

    PubMed

    Chern, Ruey-Lin; Chang, Po-Han

    2013-02-11

    We investigate the phenomena of negative refraction and backward wave in pseudochiral mediums, with illustrations of Gaussian beams. Due to symmetry breaking intrinsic in pseudochiral mediums, there exist two elliptically polarized eigenwaves with different wave vectors. As the chirality parameter increases from zero, the two waves begin to split from each other. For a wave incident from vacuum onto a pseudochiral medium, negative refraction may occur for the right-handed wave, whereas backward wave may appear for the left-handed wave. These features are illustrated with Gaussian beams based on Fourier integral formulations for the incident, reflected, and transmitted waves. Negative refraction and backward wave are manifest, respectively, on the energy flow in space and wavefront movement in time.

  12. Three-dimensional negative index of refraction at optical frequencies by coupling plasmonic waveguides.

    PubMed

    Verhagen, Ewold; de Waele, René; Kuipers, L; Polman, Albert

    2010-11-26

    We identify a route towards achieving a negative index of refraction at optical frequencies based on coupling between plasmonic waveguides that support backwards waves. We show how modal symmetry can be exploited in metal-dielectric waveguide pairs to achieve negative refraction of both phase and energy. Control of waveguide coupling yields a metamaterial consisting of a one-dimensional multilayer stack that exhibits an isotropic index of -1 at a free-space wavelength of 400 nm. The concepts developed here may inspire new low-loss metamaterial designs operating close to the metal plasma frequency.

  13. A new wideband negative refractive index metamaterial for dual-band operation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Islam, S. S.; Faruque, M. R. I.; Islam, M. T.; Ali, M. T.

    2017-04-01

    A new wideband negative refractive index (NRI) metamaterial for dual-band operation is introduced in this study. Initially, a bare-H-shaped resonator was designed over the FR-4 substrate material. The refractive index curve for the unit cell, displays more than 3-GHz negative real peak from C-band to some portion of X-band. The proposed design also displays NRI property in the same frequency bands with wider bandwidth, when the Rogers RT 3010 substrate material was employed instead of FR-4 substrate material.

  14. Negative refraction and lensing at visible wavelength: experimental results using a waveguide array.

    PubMed

    Ferrari, José A; Frins, Erna

    2011-07-04

    Experimental results showing "negative refraction" and some kind of "lensing" -in the microwave-infrared range- are often presented in the literature as undisputable evidence of the existence of composite left-handed materials. The purpose of this paper is to present experimental results on "negative refraction" and "lensing" at visible wavelengths involving a waveguide array formed by a tight-packed bundle of glass fibers. We will demonstrate that the observed phenomena are not necessarily evidence of the existence of left-handed materials and that they can be fully explained by classical optic concepts, e.g. light propagation in waveguides.

  15. A Three-Dimensional Self-Supporting Low Loss Microwave Lens with a Negative Refractive Index

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-01-01

    A three-dimensional self-supporting low loss microwave lens with a negative refractive index Isaac M. Ehrenberg , Sanjay E. Sarma, and Bae-Ian Wu...ANSI Std Z39-18 A three-dimensional self-supporting low loss microwave lens with a negative refractive index Isaac M. Ehrenberg ,1 Sanjay E. Sarma,1 and...samples reaches the level of air near 10.25 GHz. 073114-2 Ehrenberg , Sarma, and Wu J. Appl. Phys. 112, 073114 (2012) Downloaded 14 Nov 2012 to

  16. Tunable Negative Refractive Index Metamaterials and Applications at X and Q-bands

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-03-02

    The goal of the current DARPA-ARO funded project is to design, fabricate, and test a tunable negative index metamaterial (TNIM) using ferrites as...Mater., 313 (2007) 187-191. Y. He, P. He, V. G. Harris, and C. Vittoria, “Role of ferrites in negative index metamaterials ”, IEEE Trans. Magnetics...2 3 Final Progress Report Tunable Negative Refractive Index Metamaterials and Applications at X and Q- bands Peng He, Jinsheng Gao, P

  17. Determination of refractive index of a simple negative, positive, or zero power lens using wedged plated interferometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shukla, R. P.; Perera, G. M.; George, M. C.; Venkateswarlu, P.

    1990-01-01

    A nondestructive technique for measuring the refractive index of a negative lens using a wedged plate interferometer is described. The method can be also used for measuring the refractive index of convex or zero power lenses. Schematic diagrams are presented for the use of a wedged plate interferometer for measuring the refractive index of a concave lens and of a convex lens.

  18. Symmetry breaking in metallic cut wire pairs metamaterials for negative refractive index

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burokur, Shah Nawaz; Sellier, Alexandre; Kanté, Boubacar; de Lustrac, André

    2009-05-01

    Metamaterials made of exclusively metallic cut wire pairs have been experimentally demonstrated to exhibit a negative refractive index at optical frequencies. However, other related works have not shown a negative index. In this paper, we propose an easy way to manipulate the magnetic and electric resonances of these metamaterials to produce a negative index. We show that judiciously breaking the symmetry of the structure allows tuning of both resonances leading to an overlapping between the negative permeability and negative permittivity regions. Numerical and experimental parametric studies of several cut wire pairs metamaterials are presented to validate our method at microwave frequencies.

  19. Chiral metamaterials with negative refractive index based on four “U” split ring resonators

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Zhaofeng; Zhao, Rongkuo; Koschny, Thomas; Kafesaki, Maria; Alici, Kamil Boratay; Colak, Evrim; Caglayan, Humeyra; Ozbay, Ekmel; Soukoulis, C.M.

    2010-08-23

    A uniaxial chiral metamaterial is constructed by double-layered four 'U' split ring resonators mutually twisted by 90{sup o}. It shows a giant optical activity and circular dichroism. The retrieval results reveal that a negative refractive index is realized for circularly polarized waves due to the large chirality. The experimental results are in good agreement with the numerical results.

  20. Positive phase evolution of waves propagating along a photonic crystal with negative index of refraction.

    PubMed

    Martínez, Alejandro; Martí, Javier

    2006-10-16

    We analyze propagation of electromagnetic waves in a photonic crystal at frequencies at which it behaves as an effective medium with a negative index in terms of refraction at its interface with free space. We show that the phase evolution along the propagation direction is positive, despite the fact that the photonic crystal displays negative refraction following Snell's law, and explain it in terms of the Fourier components of the Bloch wave. Two distinct behaviors are found at frequencies far and close to the band edge of the negative-index photonic band. These findings contrast with the negative phase evolution that occurs in left-handed materials, so care has to be taken when applying the term left-handed to photonic crystals.

  1. Tunable dual-band ferrite-based metamaterials with dual negative refractions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Y. J.; Wen, G. J.; Yang, Y. J.; Xie, K.

    2012-01-01

    We report on three types of tunable dual-band metamaterial with dual negative refraction in this paper. The three types of metamaterial are composed of ferrite slabs and three different metallic resonators, including split-ring resonators (SRR), Ω-like resonators, and short wire pairs. The ferrite slabs under an applied magnetic bias provide one magnetic resonance frequency band and the three metallic resonators provide another magnetic resonance frequency band, respectively. The continuous wires within the metamaterials provide the negative permittivity in a wide frequency band covering the two magnetic resonance bands. We give the design, analysis and numerical demonstrations of three such types of metamaterial in detail. The effective electromagnetic parameters obtained from the simulated S-parameters indicate that the three types of metamaterial indeed exhibit two negative refraction passbands and the two passbands can also be shifted by changing the magnetic bias. Our results open the way to fabricate tunable dual-band metamaterial cloaks, absorbers, and antennas.

  2. Isotropic optical negative index of refraction metamaterials composed of randomly arranged nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kussow, Adil-Gerai; Akyurtlu, Alkim

    2007-03-01

    We report a strategy for achieving fully isotropic negative refraction index in a homogenized composite medium (HCM) conceptualized using both Maxwell-Garnett's and Lewin's effective medium formulations. The HCM consists of two isotropic dielectric-magnetic media (DMM): one DMM (randomly distributed small gold nanoparticles in free space) provides only negative permittivity, and another DMM (spherical SiC particles) provides only negative permeability via the Mie resonance. We prove, in the framework of the effective medium approach, that the mixture of DMMs (with properly adjusted fill factors and sizes of Au and SiC particles) exhibits isotropic negative refraction index metamaterial (NIM) behavior with negative refraction index of in a broad frequency range of the optical part of the spectrum. This result stands for both random distribution of the spherical constituent SiC particles (or Maxwell-Garnett arrangement), and the regular simple-cubic lattice of the same particles (Lewin's arrangement). Due to the high 3D isotropy of both models, both the analytical and numerical solutions of the scattering problems were found to be close to each other, and NIM behavior has been demonstrated. The calculations were carried out accurately taking into account the losses due to both gold and SiC nanoparticles.

  3. Negative refraction and energy funneling by hyperbolic materials: an experimental demonstration in acoustics.

    PubMed

    García-Chocano, Victor M; Christensen, Johan; Sánchez-Dehesa, José

    2014-04-11

    This Letter reports the design, fabrication, and experimental characterization of hyperbolic materials showing negative refraction and energy funneling of airborne sound. Negative refraction is demonstrated using a stack of five holey Plexiglas plates where their thicknesses, layer separation, hole diameters, and lattice periodicity have been determined to show hyperbolic dispersion around 40 kHz. The resulting hyperbolic material shows a flat band profile in the equifrequency contour allowing the gathering of acoustic energy in a broad range of incident angles and its funneling through the material. Our demonstrations foresee interesting developments based on both phenomena. Acoustic imaging with subwavelength resolution and spot-size converters that harvest and squeeze sound waves irradiating from many directions into a collimated beam are just two possible applications among many.

  4. Symmetry relations in the generalized Lorenz-Mie theory for lossless negative refractive index media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    André Ambrosio, Leonardo

    2016-09-01

    In this paper we present a theoretical analysis of the generalized Lorenz-Mie theory for negative refractive index (NRI) media and spherical scatterers, extending the well-known concepts and definitions found in the literature involving dielectric or positive refractive index (PRI) particles. The consequences of a negative phase velocity and an anti-parallelism of the wave vector with respect to the Poynting vector are investigated and interpreted in this framework and, together with the symmetries found for the beam-shape coefficients when compared to the conventional PRI case, it is shown that the description of plane waves, Gaussian beams and, more generally, on-axis azimuthally symmetric waves along a NRI medium, their fields and all physical properties can be conveniently correlated with that of dielectric media once the electromagnetic response functions are replaced by their corresponding dielectric counterparts.

  5. A three-dimensional self-supporting low loss microwave lens with a negative refractive index

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ehrenberg, Isaac M.; Sarma, Sanjay E.; Wu, Bae-Ian

    2012-10-01

    Demonstrations of focusing with metamaterial lenses have predominantly featured two dimensional structures or stacks of planar elements, both limited by losses which hinder realized gain near the focal region. In this study, we present a plano-concave lens built from a 3D self-supporting metamaterial structure featuring a negative refractive index between 10 and 12 GHz. Fabricated using macroscopic layered prototyping, the lens curvature, negative index and low loss contribute to a recognizable focus and free space gains above 13 dB.

  6. Negative refraction of elastic waves at the deep-subwavelength scale in a single-phase metamaterial.

    PubMed

    Zhu, R; Liu, X N; Hu, G K; Sun, C T; Huang, G L

    2014-11-24

    Negative refraction of elastic waves has been studied and experimentally demonstrated in three- and two-dimensional phononic crystals, but Bragg scattering is impractical for low-frequency wave control because of the need to scale the structures to manageable sizes. Here we present an elastic metamaterial with chiral microstructure made of a single-phase solid material that aims to achieve subwavelength negative refraction of elastic waves. Both negative effective mass density and modulus are observed owing to simultaneous translational and rotational resonances. We experimentally demonstrate negative refraction of the longitudinal elastic wave at the deep-subwavelength scale in the metamaterial fabricated in a stainless steel plate. The experimental measurements are in good agreement with numerical simulations. Moreover, wave mode conversion related with negative refraction is revealed and discussed. The proposed elastic metamaterial may thus be used as a flat lens for elastic wave focusing.

  7. Experimental demonstration of tunable negative phase velocity and negative refraction in a ferromagnetic/ferroelectric composite metamaterial

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Hongjie; Kang, Lei; Zhou, Ji; Zhao, Qian; Li, Longtu; Peng, Liang; Bai, Yang

    2008-11-01

    A tunable left-handed transmission is demonstrated experimentally in a ferromagnetic/ferroelectric composite metamaterial (CMM) consisting of an array of yttrium iron garnet (YIG) rods combined with barium strontium titanate (BST) rods. We observed a passband in the CMM within the overlap of the stop bands of YIG rods alone and BST rods alone. Both measured phase velocity and refractive index of the CMM are shown to be negative at the relevant frequency range. The frequency showing left handedness can be adjusted continuously, dynamically, and reversibly by an applied magnetic field with a sensitive response of 3.5 GHz/kOe.

  8. On the third harmonic generation in a medium with negative pump wave refraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elyutin, S. O.; Maimistov, A. I.; Gabitov, I. R.

    2010-07-01

    The propagation of the pump and its third harmonic pulses in a cubically nonlinear medium is considered theoretically, provided that the linear properties of the medium are characterized by a negative refractive index at the pump frequency and a positive refractive index at the harmonic frequency. For low-intensity interacting waves, the pump and third harmonic pulses propagate in opposite directions, but sufficiently intense pulses can produce a simulton—a solitary two-frequency wave that propagates in a certain direction as a single whole. The system of equations is investigated numerically for a model that, apart from the harmonic generation, includes the second-order group velocity dispersion and the nonlinear self- and cross-phase modulations of the interacting waves. The separation of the pump and harmonic pulses due to the difference in the directions of their group velocities and peculiarities of the Manley-Rowe relation for parametric processes in metamedia are discussed.

  9. Optic-null space medium for cover-up cloaking without any negative refraction index materials.

    PubMed

    Sun, Fei; He, Sailing

    2016-07-07

    With the help of optic-null medium, we propose a new way to achieve invisibility by covering up the scattering without using any negative refraction index materials. Compared with previous methods to achieve invisibility, the function of our cloak is to cover up the scattering of the objects to be concealed by a background object of strong scattering. The concealed object can receive information from the outside world without being detected. Numerical simulations verify the performance of our cloak. The proposed method will be a great addition to existing invisibility technology.

  10. Cavity equations for a positive- or negative-refraction-index material with electric and magnetic nonlinearities.

    PubMed

    Mártin, Daniel A; Hoyuelos, Miguel

    2009-11-01

    We study evolution equations for electric and magnetic field amplitudes in a ring cavity with plane mirrors. The cavity is filled with a positive or negative-refraction-index material with third-order effective electric and magnetic nonlinearities. Two coupled nonlinear equations for the electric and magnetic amplitudes are obtained. We prove that the description can be reduced to one Lugiato-Lefever equation with generalized coefficients. A stability analysis of the homogeneous solution, complemented with numerical integration, shows that any combination of the parameters should correspond to one of three characteristic behaviors.

  11. Cavity equations for a positive- or negative-refraction-index material with electric and magnetic nonlinearities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mártin, Daniel A.; Hoyuelos, Miguel

    2009-11-01

    We study evolution equations for electric and magnetic field amplitudes in a ring cavity with plane mirrors. The cavity is filled with a positive or negative-refraction-index material with third-order effective electric and magnetic nonlinearities. Two coupled nonlinear equations for the electric and magnetic amplitudes are obtained. We prove that the description can be reduced to one Lugiato-Lefever equation with generalized coefficients. A stability analysis of the homogeneous solution, complemented with numerical integration, shows that any combination of the parameters should correspond to one of three characteristic behaviors.

  12. Ultra-compact chiral metamaterial with negative refractive index based on miniaturized structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Minhua; Song, Jian; Wu, Fei

    2017-03-01

    An ultra-compact chiral metamaterial with thin thickness and small unit cells is proposed. Echelon meandered conjugated gammadions are introduced into the planar miniaturized design. In particular, the ratio between period (p) and resonant wavelength (λ) is as small as 1/10.8 in experiment. Negative refractive indexes for circularly polarized waves are demonstrated and the effective parameters are retrieved. The effects of the length of the swing arms, number of folded lines and dielectric layer thickness on the optical activity have also been investigated. This miniaturized structure has great potential application in electronic and photonic devices with small size and integration.

  13. Large and tunable negative refractive index via electromagnetically induced chirality in a semiconductor quantum well nanostructure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Sh.-C.; Zhang, Sh.-Y.; Xu, Y.-Y.

    2014-11-01

    Large and tunable negative refractive index (NRI) via electromagnetically induced chirality is demonstrated in a semiconductor quantum wells (SQWs) nanostructure by using the reported experimental parameters in J.F. Dynes et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 94, 157403 (2005). It is found: the large and controllable NRI with alterable frequency regions is obtained when the coupling laser field and the relative phase are modulated, which will increase the flexibility and possibility of implementing NRI in the SQWs nanostructure. The scheme rooted in the experimental results may lead a new avenue to NRI material in solid-state nanostructure.

  14. Negative-Refractive Bicrystal with Broken Symmetry Produces Asymmetric Electromagnetic Fields in Guided-Wave Heterostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krowne, Clifford M.

    2004-07-01

    Heterostructure arrangements of uniaxial bicrystals have been discovered to produce electromagnetic fields with asymmetric distributions in guide wave structures. The property behind this remarkable phenomenon is the broken crystalline symmetry which allows the new physics to be seen in unsymmetric distributions. Here the theory behind this phenomenon is presented, numerical calculations are performed using an ab initio anisotropic Green’s function approach, and the results provided at 10 GHz for a realistic crystal system with nominal permittivity of 5. Asymmetric distributions seen here are one facet of the broken symmetry property which generates negative refraction for impinging waves on a bicrystal.

  15. Optic-null space medium for cover-up cloaking without any negative refraction index materials

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Fei; He, Sailing

    2016-01-01

    With the help of optic-null medium, we propose a new way to achieve invisibility by covering up the scattering without using any negative refraction index materials. Compared with previous methods to achieve invisibility, the function of our cloak is to cover up the scattering of the objects to be concealed by a background object of strong scattering. The concealed object can receive information from the outside world without being detected. Numerical simulations verify the performance of our cloak. The proposed method will be a great addition to existing invisibility technology. PMID:27383833

  16. Ultrashort Pulse Propagation in Negative Index Materials: From Negative Refraction to Nonlinear Pulse Propagation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2004-12-01

    D’Aguanno and Nadia Mattiucci Time Domain Corporation, 6700 Odyssey Dr, Huntsville AL, 35806 Negative index materials (NIMs) hold the promise...average 1 hour per response, including the time for reviewing instructions, searching existing data sources, gathering and maintaining the data needed, and...Redstone Arsenal, AL 35898; Time Domain Corporation, 6700 Odyssey Dr, Huntsville AL, 35806 8. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION REPORT NUMBER 9. SPONSORING

  17. Photonic band gaps in quasiperiodic photonic crystals with negative refractive index

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasconcelos, M. S.; Mauriz, P. W.; de Medeiros, F. F.; Albuquerque, E. L.

    2007-10-01

    We investigate the photonic band gaps in quasiperiodic photonic crystals made up of both positive (SiO2) and negative refractive index materials using a theoretical model based on a transfer matrix treatment. The quasiperiodic structures are characterized by the nature of their Fourier spectrum, which can be dense pure point (Fibonacci sequences) or singular continuous (Thue-Morse and double-period sequences). These substitutional sequences are described in terms of a series of generations that obey peculiar recursion relations. We discussed the photonic band gap spectra for both the ideal cases, where the negative refractive index material can be approximated as a constant in the frequency range considered, as well as the more realistic case, taking into account the frequency-dependent electric permittivity γ and magnetic permeability μ . We also present a quantitative analysis of the results, pointing out the distribution of the allowed photonic bandwidths for high generations, which gives a good insight about their localization and power laws.

  18. Influence of quantum Hall effect on wave refraction in ferrite-semiconductor superlattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarkhanyan, Roland H.; Niarchos, Dimitris G.

    2008-12-01

    Peculiarities of wave refraction are investigated in periodic structures consisting of alternating layers of ferromagnetic insulator and GaAs-AlGaAs-type semiconductor bilayers. It is shown that in quantum Hall effect conditions, the refractive indices and consequently the refraction angles of the propagating waves are quantized.Two different geometries of the refracting plane are considered: (I) parallel and (II) perpendicular to the quantizing magnetic field. It is shown that in the first case, negative refraction through the lateral surface of the structure is possible. A frequency region is found where the refraction is negative for all angles of incidence and regardless of the sign of permittivity tensor components. Analytical expressions for both phase and group refractive indices are obtained.In the second case, one of the propagating waves (in the birefringent regime) is backward. Despite this, and unlike in the case of non-quantizing magnetic fields, negative refraction is impossible.

  19. Superlensing effect for surface acoustic waves in a pillar-based phononic crystal with negative refractive index

    SciTech Connect

    Addouche, Mahmoud Al-Lethawe, Mohammed A. Choujaa, Abdelkrim Khelif, Abdelkrim

    2014-07-14

    We demonstrate super resolution imaging for surface acoustic waves using a phononic structure displaying negative refractive index. This phononic structure is made of a monolithic square lattice of cylindrical pillars standing on a semi-infinite medium. The pillars act as acoustic resonator and induce a surface propagating wave with unusual dispersion. We found, under specific geometrical parameters, one propagating mode that exhibits negative refraction effect with negative effective index close to −1. Furthermore, a flat lens with finite number of pillars is designed to allow the focusing of an acoustic point source into an image with a resolution of (λ)/3 , overcoming the Rayleigh diffraction limit.

  20. Alternative methods for ray tracing in uniaxial media. Application to negative refraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bellver-Cebreros, Consuelo; Rodriguez-Danta, Marcelo

    2007-03-01

    In previous papers [C. Bellver-Cebreros, M. Rodriguez-Danta, Eikonal equation, alternative expression of Fresnel's equation and Mohr's construction in optical anisotropic media, Opt. Commun. 189 (2001) 193; C. Bellver-Cebreros, M. Rodriguez-Danta, Internal conical refraction in biaxial media and graphical plane constructions deduced from Mohr's method, Opt. Commun. 212 (2002) 199; C. Bellver-Cebreros, M. Rodriguez-Danta, Refraccion conica externa en medios biaxicos a partir de la construccion de Mohr, Opt. Pura AppliE 36 (2003) 33], the authors have developed a method based on the local properties of dielectric permittivity tensor and on Mohr's plane graphical construction in order to study the behaviour of locally plane light waves in anisotropic media. In this paper, this alternative methodology is compared with the traditional one, by emphasizing the simplicity of the former when studying ray propagation through uniaxial media (comparison is possible since, in this case, traditional construction becomes also plane). An original and simple graphical method is proposed in order to determine the direction of propagation given by the wave vector from the knowledge of the extraordinary ray direction (given by Poynting vector). Some properties of light rays in these media not described in the literature are obtained. Finally, two applications are considered: a description of optical birefringence under normal incidence and the study of negative refraction in uniaxial media.

  1. Q-band tunable negative refractive index metamaterial using Sc-doped BaM hexaferrite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, P.; Gao, J.; Chen, Y.; Parimi, P. V.; Vittoria, C.; Harris, V. G.

    2009-08-01

    A simple structured tunable negative refractive index (n) metamaterial (TNIM) has been designed, fabricated and tested in a Q-band rectangular waveguide. The structure consists of one slab of single crystalline scandium-doped barium hexaferrite (Sc-BaM), aligned parallel to two rows of periodic copper wires. The magnetic field tunable passband is measured indicating the occurrence of negative n. The centre frequency of the 5 GHz wide passband, having a transmission peak of -13 dB, is shifted linearly from 40.9 to 43.9 GHz by varying the bias field (H) from 4.0 to 7.0 kOe. The impact of ferrite volume factor (FVF) of the Sc-BaM slab upon the performance of the TNIM composite has been studied qualitatively. A tradeoff effect is illustrated in which the desirable negative permeability (μ) of the ferrite is offset by the detrimental impact of its dielectric property in suppressing the negative permittivity (ɛ) of the nearby plasmonic wires.

  2. All-angle collimation of incident light in μ-near-zero metamaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fedorov, Vladimir Yu.; Nakajima, Takashi

    2013-11-01

    We use the theory of inhomogeneous waves to study the transmission of light in $\\mu$-near-zero metamaterials. We find the effect of all-angle collimation of incident light, which means that the vector of energy flow in a wave transmitted to a $\\mu$-near-zero metamaterial is perpendicular to the interface for any incident angles if an incident wave is s-polarized. This effect is similar to the all-angle collimation of incident light recently found through a different theoretical framework in $\\varepsilon$-near-zero metamaterials for a p-polarized incident wave [S. Feng, Phys. Rev. Lett. 108, 193904 (2012)]. To provide a specific example, we consider the transmission of light in a negative-index metamaterial in the spectral region with a permeability resonance, and show that all-angle collimation indeed takes place at the wavelength for which the real part of permeability is vanishingly small.

  3. All-angle collimation of incident light in μ-near-zero metamaterials.

    PubMed

    Fedorov, Vladimir Yu; Nakajima, Takashi

    2013-11-18

    We use the theory of inhomogeneous waves to study the transmission of light in μ-near-zero metamaterials. We find the effect of all-angle collimation of incident light, which means that the vector of energy flow in a wave transmitted to a μ-near-zero metamaterial is perpendicular to the interface for any incident angles if an incident wave is s-polarized. This effect is similar to the all-angle collimation of incident light recently found through a different theoretical framework in ε-near-zero metamaterials for a p-polarized incident wave [S. Feng, Phys. Rev. Lett. 108, 193904 (2012)]. To provide a specific example, we consider the transmission of light in a negative-index metamaterial in the spectral region with a permeability resonance, and show that all-angle collimation indeed takes place at the wavelength for which the real part of permeability is vanishingly small.

  4. Hidden quantum mirage by negative refraction in semiconductor P-N junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Shu-Hui; Zhu, Jia-Ji; Yang, Wen; Lin, Hai-Qing; Chang, Kai

    2016-08-01

    We predict a robust quantum interference phenomenon in a semiconductor P-N junction: with a local pump on one side of the junction, the response of a local probe on the other side behaves as if the disturbance emanates not from the pump but instead from its mirror image about the junction. This phenomenon follows from the matching of Fermi surfaces of the constituent materials, thus it is robust against the details of the junction (e.g., width, potential profile, and even disorder), in contrast to the widely studied anomalous focusing caused by negative refraction. The recently fabricated P-N junctions in 2D semiconductors provide ideal platforms to explore this phenomenon and its applications to dramatically enhance charge and spin transport as well as carrier-mediated long-range correlation.

  5. Creating wide-band negative-index-of-refraction metamaterials with fractal-based geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Penney, Keith

    2009-11-01

    A burgeoning topic of modern research in electrodynamics and antenna design is the design and fabrication of ``left-handed'' metamaterials. This ``left-handedness'' is often created through use of an array of conductive structures with geometry appropriate for coupling on the wavelength scale with incident radiation to produce a phase-shifted reflected wave that cancels out incoming radiation and prevents transmission. This property has been demonstrated in several papers published in the last decade. In every instance, though the ``left-handed'' response is only exhibited in a small bandwidth centered about a specific frequency (bandwidth typically less that 0.1 GHz). I will show that through use of tessellated, fractal-based structures, one can create a repeatable geometry that exhibits a negative index of refraction (NIR) for multiple frequency bands, limited only by fabrication precision, with the ultimate goal being a wide-band absorptive response.

  6. A negative index of refraction metamaterial based on a wire array embedded in ferrite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dewar, G.

    2005-08-01

    A metamaterial exhibiting a negative index of refraction can be fabricated from an array of conducting wires cladded with non-magnetic dielectric and embedded in a magnetic host medium. The wires are responsible for the ɛ < 0 property and the magnetic medium for the μ < 0 property. A near exact calculation of the electromagnetic response of this metamaterial indicated that the bandwidth over which n < 0 depends primarily on the magnetization of the magnetic host and on the radius of the wire, the outer radius of the cladding, and the lattice constant of the wire array. For readily available materials the dissipation within the medium is mainly due to Ohmic losses within the wire and not magnetic dissipation within the magnetic host. The losses can be minimized by choosing an high conductivity metal for the wire and by having the radius of the wire and outer radius of the cladding as large as practical consistent with maintaining ɛ < 0.

  7. Influence of surface termination on inverse Goos-Hänchen shift of negatively refractive photonic crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Jinbing; Liang, Binming; Chen, Jiabi; Cai, Xiaoshu; Jiang, Qiang; Zhuang, Songlin

    2016-07-01

    The effect of surface termination on the inverse Goos-Hänchen (GH) shift of two-dimensional (2D) negatively refractive photonic crystals (NRPhCs) containing air holes arranged in a hexagonal lattice in a dielectric background is investigated for transverse magnetic (TM) polarization. Results show that the magnitude of the inverse GH shift of 2D-NRPhCs strongly depends on surface termination even for an incident beam with a fixed frequency and incidence angle. Calculation of dispersion of surface mode as a function of termination reveals that large inverse GH shift of 2D-NRPhCs results from the excitation of backward surface mode. In addition, the coupling coefficient of the incident field into the field of surface mode and energy flux around the interface are studied and demonstrate the above conclusion. This paper will provide technical information regarding the combination of various functional photonic elements in the design of integrated optical circuits.

  8. Metamaterials with tunable negative refractive index fabricated from nanoamorphous ferromagnetic microwires and Magnus optical effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanov, A.; Shalygin, A.; Galkin, V.; Vedyayev, A.; Rozanov, K.; Ivanov, V.

    2008-08-01

    For inhomogeneous mediums the optical Magnus effect has been derived. The metamaterials fabricated from amorphous ferromagnet Co-Fe-Cr-B-Si microwires are shown to exhibit a negative refractive index for electromagnetic waves over wide scale of GHz frequencies. Optical properties and optical Magnus effect of such metamaterials are tunable by an external magnetic field. Microwave permeability of glass-coated ferromagnetic amorphous microwire exhibiting a weak negative magnetostriction has been studied. The diameter of the microwire was about 20 μm and the diameter of the metal core was about 12 μm. The microwire was wound to comprise a 7/3 washer-shaped composite sample with the volume fraction of magnetic constituent of about 10%. The permeability of the composite sample was measured in a coaxial line in the frequency range from 0.1 to 10 GHz. The composite was found to exhibit a negative permeability within the frequency range from approximately 0.7 to 1.5 GHz, with the permeability being as low as -0.4. Therefore, microwire-based composites, particularly, crossed arrays of microwires may be employed to develop metamaterials for microwave applications. In the composite, the negative microwave permeability is due to the natural ferromagnetic resonance and the negative microwave permittivity is due to the inherent inductance of the wire. Such metamaterials are advantageous in simple design, isotropic in-plane performance, and possible tunability of performance by external magnetic bias. However, for a feasible metamaterial fabricated from microwire arrays, the wires have to exhibit higher magnitude of the ferromagnetic resonance, higher quality factor, and higher resonance frequency.

  9. Surface Josephson plasma waves in layered superconductors above the plasma frequency: evidence for a negative index of refraction.

    PubMed

    Golick, V A; Kadygrob, D V; Yampol'skii, V A; Rakhmanov, A L; Ivanov, B A; Nori, Franco

    2010-05-07

    We predict a new branch of surface Josephson plasma waves (SJPWs) in layered superconductors for frequencies higher than the Josephson plasma frequency. In this frequency range, the permittivity tensor components along and transverse to the layers have different signs, which is usually associated with negative refraction. However, for these frequencies, the bulk Josephson plasma waves cannot be matched with the incident and reflected waves in the vacuum, and, instead of the negative-refractive properties, abnormal surface modes appear within the frequency band expected for bulk modes. We also discuss the excitation of high-frequency SJPWs by means of the attenuated-total-reflection method.

  10. Multi-band Microwave Antennas and Devices based on Generalized Negative-Refractive-Index Transmission Lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryan, Colan Graeme Matthew

    Focused on the quad-band generalized negative-refractive-index transmission line (G-NRI-TL), this thesis presents a variety of novel printed G-NRI-TL multi-band microwave device and antenna prototypes. A dual-band coupled-line coupler, an all-pass G-NRI-TL bridged-T circuit, a dual-band metamaterial leaky-wave antenna, and a multi-band G-NRI-TL resonant antenna are all new developments resulting from this research. In addition, to continue the theme of multi-band components, negative-refractive-index transmission lines are used to create a dual-band circularly polarized transparent patch antenna and a two-element wideband decoupled meander antenna system. High coupling over two independently-specified frequency bands is the hallmark of the G-NRI-TL coupler: it is 0.35lambda0 long but achieves approximately -3 dB coupling over both bands with a maximum insertion loss of 1 dB. This represents greater design flexibility than conventional coupled-line couplers and less loss than subsequent G-NRI-TL couplers. The single-ended bridged-T G-NRI-TL offers a metamaterial unit cell with an all-pass magnitude response up to 8 GHz, while still preserving the quad-band phase response of the original circuit. It is shown how the all-pass response leads to wider bandwidths and improved matching in quad-band inverters, power dividers, and hybrid couplers. The dual-band metamaterial leaky-wave antenna presented here was the first to be reported in the literature, and it allows broadside radiation at both 2 GHz and 6 GHz without experiencing the broadside stopband common to conventional periodic antennas. Likewise, the G-NRI-TL resonant antenna is the first reported instance of such a device, achieving quad-band operation between 2.5 GHz and 5.6 GHz, with a minimum radiation efficiency of 80%. Negative-refractive-index transmission line loading is applied to two devices: an NRI-TL meander antenna achieves a measured 52% impedance bandwidth, while a square patch antenna incorporates

  11. Volumetric negative-refractive-index metamaterials based upon the shunt-node transmission-line configuration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stickel, Micah; Elek, Francis; Zhu, Jiang; Eleftheriades, George V.

    2007-11-01

    A volumetric negative-refractive-index transmission-line (NRI-TL) metamaterial is presented. This structure constitutes a natural extension of the planar NRI-TL metamaterials1 and maintains the desired features of broad bandwidth and low transmission loss. Unlike their planar counterparts, the proposed volumetric NRI-TL metamaterials can effectively couple incident plane waves from free space. The proposed topology can be readily made by stacking layers that are individually fabricated using standard multilayer printed-circuit board techniques at microwave frequencies. However, the creation of the volumetric structure results in the presence of a parasitic parallel-plate mode. This mode can interfere with the desired backward wave mode of the metamaterial, causing a stop band to appear. To facilitate the rapid analysis of this new design, a multiconductor transmission line model was developed. Through the use of this model and full-wave simulations, it will be demonstrated that this unwanted parallel-plate mode can be eliminated by properly arranging the vertical inductive loading wires. Using this process, it will be shown that a properly designed inductive load can result in a practical NRI metamaterial slab which is matched to free space over a large bandwidth (22%) and with low insertion loss (<-1 dB). This approach can also be used to design NRI-TL metamaterials with backward wave dispersion bandwidths of over 140%.

  12. MgB2 -based negative refraction index metamaterial at visible frequencies: Theoretical analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kussow, Adil-Gerai; Akyurtlu, Alkim; Semichaevsky, Andrey; Angkawisittpan, Niwat

    2007-11-01

    The presented metamaterial consists of the matrix (magnesium diboride MgB2 in a normal state, at room temperature) with randomly (or regularly) embedded spherical nanoparticles of a polaritonic crystal, SiC. The calculations demonstrate explicitly that the metamaterial exhibits negative refraction index behavior with low losses for a scattered wave. The result stands for both random and regular distributions of SiC nanoparticles inside the MgB2 matrix. This favorable situation stems from the Drude-like behavior of both the low-energy, p2(ωp2≈1.9eV) , and the high-energy, p1(ωp1≈6.3eV) , plasmon modes of MgB2 with plasmon losses, γ⩽0.25eV . The effective medium parameters were calculated in the framework of the extended theories of Maxwell-Garnett [Philos. Trans. R. Soc. London, Ser. A 203, 385 (1904)] and Lewin [Proc. Inst. Electr. Eng. 94, 65 (1947)], and the obtained results are validated via ab initio finite difference time domain simulations.

  13. Spatial distribution of the interacting Waves' amplitudes under third harmonic generation in a negative-positive refractive medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ostroukhova, E. I.; Maimistov, A. I.

    2013-09-01

    The process of third harmonic generation in a cubically nonlinear medium that is negatively refractive at the fundamental frequency and positively refractive at the third harmonic frequency is considered. For the stationary case, the amplitude distribution was obtained for waves interacting inside a sample for different values of phase mismatch. In the periodic regime of generation, it is shown that the amplitude of the fundamental wave inside the medium can exceed its value at the input, which is impossible in the standard case of harmonic generation in a medium positively refractive at both frequencies. The influence of energy losses in the sample on the spatial distribution of waves' amplitudes of both frequencies has been studied.

  14. Resonance-based metamaterial in the shallow sub-wavelength regime: negative refractive index and nearly perfect absorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trang Pham, Thi; Nguyen, Hoang Tung; Tuyen Le, Dac; Tong, Ba Tuan; Giang Trinh, Thi; Tuong Pham, Van; Vu, Dinh Lam

    2016-12-01

    The research on magnetic resonances in typical meta-atoms has led to the discovery of electromagnetic metamaterials (MMs). These new materials played a crucial role in achieving extraordinary phenomena as well as promised potential applications. In this paper, we numerically and experimentally investigated two different MM effects: the absorption and the negative refraction, which induced by magnetic resonances in a symmetric structure. The meta-atom sandwich model that includes two parallel flat rings separated by an insulating slab was designed. Firstly, three resonances in sub-wavelength range were demonstrated, revealing the negative permittivity and permeability effects. Notably, negative refractive index (NRI) was gained at the third-gap resonance, resulting from superposition of the rest of the electric resonance and the magnetic one accompanied by multi-plasmon. Moreover, the manipulation of the structural parameters could control the NRI behavior and, interestingly, a nearly perfect absorption peak arises in shallow sub-wavelength regime.

  15. Coexistence of positive and negative refractive index sensitivity in the liquid-core photonic crystal fiber based plasmonic sensor.

    PubMed

    Shuai, Binbin; Xia, Li; Liu, Deming

    2012-11-05

    We present and numerically characterize a liquid-core photonic crystal fiber based plasmonic sensor. The coupling properties and sensing performance are investigated by the finite element method. It is found that not only the plasmonic mode dispersion relation but also the fundamental mode dispersion relation is rather sensitive to the analyte refractive index (RI). The positive and negative RI sensitivity coexist in the proposed design. It features a positive RI sensitivity when the increment of the SPP mode effective index is larger than that of the fundamental mode, but the sensor shows a negative RI sensitivity once the increment of the fundamental mode gets larger. A maximum negative RI sensitivity of -5500nm/RIU (Refractive Index Unit) is achieved in the sensing range of 1.50-1.53. The effects of the structural parameters on the plasmonic excitations are also studied, with a view of tuning and optimizing the resonant spectrum.

  16. Experimental and theoretical verification of focusing in a large, periodically loaded transmission line negative refractive index metamaterial.

    PubMed

    Iyer, Ashwin; Kremer, Peter; Eleftheriades, George

    2003-04-07

    We have previously shown that a new class of Negative Refractive Index (NRI) metamaterials can be constructed by periodically loading a host transmission line medium with inductors and capacitors in a dual (high-pass) configuration. A small planar NRI lens interfaced with a Positive Refractive Index (PRI) parallel-plate waveguide recently succeeded in demonstrating focusing of cylindrical waves. In this paper, we present theoretical and experimental data describing the focusing and dispersion characteristics of a significantly improved device that exhibits minimal edge effects, a larger NRI region permitting precise extraction of dispersion data, and a PRI region consisting of a microstrip grid, over which the fields may be observed. The experimentally obtained dispersion data exhibits excellent agreement with the theory predicted by periodic analysis, and depicts an extremely broadband region from 960MHz to 2.5GHz over which the refractive index remains negative. At the frequency at which the theory predicts a relative refractive index of -1, the measured field distribution shows a focal spot with a maximum beam width under one-half of a guide wavelength. These results are compared with field distributions obtained through mathematical simulations based on the plane-wave expansion technique, and exhibit a qualitative correspondence. The success of this experiment attests to the repeatability of the original experiment and affirms the viability of the transmission line approach to the design of NRI metamaterials.

  17. Effect of energy band gap in graphene on negative refraction through the veselago lens and electron conductance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dahal, Dipendra; Gumbs, Godfrey

    2017-01-01

    A remarkable property of intrinsic graphene is that upon doping, electrons and holes travel through the monolayer thick material with constant velocity which does not depend on energy up to about 0.3 eV (Dirac fermions), as though the electrons and holes are massless particles and antiparticles which move at the Fermi velocity vF. Consequently, there is Klein tunneling at a p-n junction, in which there is no backscattering at normal incidence of massless Dirac fermions. However, this process yielding perfect transmission at normal incidence is expected to be affected when the group velocity of the charge carriers is energy dependent and there is non-zero effective mass for the target particle. We investigate how away from normal incidence the combined effect of incident electron energy ɛ and band gap parameter Δ can determine whether a p-n junction would allow focusing of an electron beam by behaving like a Veselago lens with negative refractive index. We demonstrate that there is a specific region in ɛ - Δ space where the index of refraction is negative, i.e., where monolayer graphene behaves as a metamaterial. Outside this region, the refractive index may be positive or there may be no refraction at all. We compute the ballistic conductance across a p-n junction as a function of Δ and ɛ and compare our results with those for a single electrostatic potential barrier and multiple barriers.

  18. Negative Refractive Bi-Crystal with Broken Symmetry Leading to Unusual Fields in Guided Wave Heterostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krowne, Clifford

    2004-03-01

    A recent finding has shown that a unixial bi-crystal shows negative refraction (NR) [1], a property in common with recent left-handed metamaterials examined for physics of focusing behavior and of field distributions [2], and field contouring effects in electronic structures [3]. This is a very interesting property related to energy wave front motion and has an analog in electron ballistic motion in a semiconductor heterostructure too. The property which yields NR, breaks field symmetry, and allows asymmetric distributions of electromagnetic fields in the cross-section in which heterostructure layering occurs when propagation is normal to this cross-section in a longitudinal direction. What is all the more remarkable is that individual heterostructure layers are not field symmetry breaking and do not lead to asymmetric field distributions. In fact when a single crystal is inserted in a guiding structure, nothing special happens. When heterostructure layering is constructive, successive layers could enhance the effect. We demonstrate here for the first time, using a model stripline structure to guide the wave, that a bi-crystal will indeed produce asymmetric rf electric and magnetic distributions. Calculations were done with an ab initio approach using an anisotropic Greens function which allows the physical properties of the uniaxial crystals to be treated via their tensors. The results have important implications for microwave devices which rely on asymmetric field distributions. One could envision wide application in monolithic integrated circuits in terms of devices utilizing both microwave and millimeter transmission as well as optical transmission using dielectric waveguiding structures. [1] Y. Zhang, B. Fluegel and A. Mascarenhas, Phys. Rev. Lett. 91, 157404 (Oct. 2003). [2] C. M. Krowne, Phys. Rev. Lett. 92, to be publ. (2004). [3] C. M. Krowne, IEEE Trans. Microwave Theory & Tech. 51, (Dec. 2003).

  19. Broad self-trapped and slow light bands based on negative refraction and interference of magnetic coupled modes.

    PubMed

    Fang, Yun-Tuan; Ni, Zhi-Yao; Zhu, Na; Zhou, Jun

    2016-01-13

    We propose a new mechanism to achieve light localization and slow light. Through the study on the coupling of two magnetic surface modes, we find a special convex band that takes on a negative refraction effect. The negative refraction results in an energy flow concellation effect from two degenerated modes on the convex band. The energy flow concellation effect leads to forming of the self-trapped and slow light bands. In the self-trapped band light is localized around the source without reflection wall in the waveguide direction, whereas in the slow light band, light becomes the standing-waves and moving standing-waves at the center and the two sides of the waveguide, respectively.

  20. Measurements of the negative refractive index of sub-diffraction waves propagating in an indefinite permittivity medium.

    PubMed

    Korobkin, Dmitriy; Neuner, Burton; Fietz, Chris; Jegenyes, Nikoletta; Ferro, Gabriel; Shvets, Gennady

    2010-10-25

    An indefinite permittivity medium (IPM) has been fabricated and optically characterized in mid-infrared spectral range (10.7 µm-11.3 µm). Phase and amplitude transmission measurements reveal two remarkable properties of IPMs: (i) transmission of sub-diffraction waves (as short as λ/4) can exceed those of diffraction-limited ones, and (ii) sub-diffraction waves can propagate with negative refractive index. We describe a novel double-detector optical technique relying on the interference between sub-diffraction and diffraction-limited waves for accurate measurement of the transmission amplitude and phase of the former.

  1. Non-linear states of a positive or negative refraction index material in a cavity with feedback

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mártin, D. A.; Hoyuelos, M.

    2010-06-01

    We study a system composed by a cavity with plane mirrors containing a positive or negative refraction index material with third order effective electric and magnetic non-linearities. The aim of the work is to present a general picture of possible non-linear states in terms of the relevant parameters of the system. The parameters are the ones that appear in a reduced description that has the form of the Lugiato-Lefever equation. This equation is obtained from two coupled non-linear Schrödinger equations for the electric and magnetic field amplitudes.

  2. Modulation instability in a zigzag array of nonlinear waveguides with alternating positive and negative refractive indices

    SciTech Connect

    Dovgiy, A A

    2014-12-31

    The modulation instability is analytically investigated in a zigzag array of tunnel-coupled optical waveguides with alternating refractive indices and Kerr nonlinearity. Particular solutions to a system of coupled nonlinear equations are found. They describe the propagation of electromagnetic waves that are uniform along the waveguide and their instability is studied. It is shown that the coupling coefficient between the waveguides, which are non-nearest neighbours, has a significant effect on the instability of the waves in question. When the coupling coefficient exceeds a certain threshold, the modulation instability disappears regardless of the radiation power. The influence of the ratio of the wave amplitudes in adjacent waveguides to the instability of the particular solutions is studied. Different variants of the nonlinear response in waveguides are considered. The studies performed present a new unusual type of the modulation instability in nonlinear periodic systems. (metamaterials)

  3. METHODOLOGICAL NOTES: Negative refractive index for a surface magnetostatic wave propagating through the boundary between a ferrite and ferrite-insulator-metal media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vashkovskii, Anatolii V.; Lokk, Edwin H.

    2004-06-01

    Refraction of a slow surface electromagnetic wave (magnetostatic wave) at the boundary between ferrite and ferrite-insulator-metal media is investigated experimentally and theoretically. The boundary is created in an yttrium iron garnet film by placing a metal plate at a certain distance from its surface. The refractive index is found to depend on the angle of incidence of the wave and can take on any positive or negative values. It is shown that in anisotropic media, in particular, in ferromagnets, due to the noncollinearity of the wave vector and the group velocity vector, negative refraction can occur not only in the earlier predicted case where the incident wave is forward and the refracted wave is backward, but also in the case where both waves are forward.

  4. Exploration of amphoteric and negative refraction imaging of acoustic sources via active metamaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wen, Jihong; Shen, Huijie; Yu, Dianlong; Wen, Xisen

    2013-11-01

    The present work describes the design of three flat superlens structures for acoustic source imaging and explores an active acoustic metamaterial (AAM) to realise such a design. The first two lenses are constructed via the coordinate transform method (CTM), and their constituent materials are anisotropic. The third lens consists of a material that has both a negative density and a negative bulk modulus. In these lenses, the quality of the images is “clear” and sharp; thus, the diffraction limit of classical lenses is overcome. Finally, a multi-control strategy is developed to achieve the desired parameters and to eliminate coupling effects in the AAM.

  5. Simultaneous negative refraction and focusing of fundamental frequency and second-harmonic fields by two-dimensional photonic crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Jun; Zhang, Xiangdong

    2015-09-28

    Simultaneous negative refraction for both the fundamental frequency (FF) and second-harmonic (SH) fields in two-dimensional nonlinear photonic crystals have been found through both the physical analysis and exact numerical simulation. By combining such a property with the phase-matching condition and strong second-order susceptibility, we have designed a SH lens to realize focusing for both the FF and SH fields at the same time. Good-quality non-near field images for both FF and SH fields have been observed. The physical mechanism for such SH focusing phenomena has been disclosed, which is different from the backward SH generation as has been pointed out in the previous investigations. In addition, the effect of absorption losses on the phenomena has also been discussed. Thus, potential applications of these phenomena to biphotonic microscopy technique are anticipated.

  6. Focusing of light by negative refraction in a photonic crystal slab superlens on silicon-on-insulator substrate.

    PubMed

    Matsumoto, Takashi; Eom, Kun-Sun; Baba, Toshihiko

    2006-09-15

    We experimentally demonstrate the light focusing by negative refraction in a photonic crystal slab superlens at wavelengths lambda of 1.26-1.42 microm. The photonic crystal slab was fabricated on silicon-on-insulator substrate with an interface structure optimized for low reflection and diffraction losses. The light focusing in the photonic crystal slab was clearly observed through the intentional out-of-plane radiation or scattering of guided light in the slab. The minimum focused spot width was limited to 1.8 microm(1.4 lambda) owing to aberrations. The focusing characteristics were in good agreement with those obtained from photonic band and finite-difference time-domain analyses.

  7. Simultaneous negative refraction and focusing of fundamental frequency and second-harmonic fields by two-dimensional photonic crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jun; Zhang, Xiangdong

    2015-09-01

    Simultaneous negative refraction for both the fundamental frequency (FF) and second-harmonic (SH) fields in two-dimensional nonlinear photonic crystals have been found through both the physical analysis and exact numerical simulation. By combining such a property with the phase-matching condition and strong second-order susceptibility, we have designed a SH lens to realize focusing for both the FF and SH fields at the same time. Good-quality non-near field images for both FF and SH fields have been observed. The physical mechanism for such SH focusing phenomena has been disclosed, which is different from the backward SH generation as has been pointed out in the previous investigations. In addition, the effect of absorption losses on the phenomena has also been discussed. Thus, potential applications of these phenomena to biphotonic microscopy technique are anticipated.

  8. Tunable dual-band negative refractive index in ferrite-based metamaterials.

    PubMed

    Bi, Ke; Zhou, Ji; Zhao, Hongjie; Liu, Xiaoming; Lan, Chuwen

    2013-05-06

    A tunable dual-band ferrite-based metamaterial has been investigated by experiments and simulations. The negative permeability is realized around the ferromagnetic resonance (FMR) frequency which can be influenced by the dimension of the ferrites. Due to having two negative permeability frequency regions around the two FMR frequencies, the metamaterials consisting of metallic wires and ferrite rods with different sizes possess two passbands in the transmission spectra. The microwave transmission properties of the ferrite-based metamaterials can be not only tuned by the applied magnetic field, but also adjusted by the dimension of the ferrite rods. A good agreement between experimental and simulated results is demonstrated, which confirms that the tunable dual-band ferrite-based metamaterials can be used for cloaks, antennas and absorbers.

  9. Double negative refraction in barium substituted magnesium ferrite in the microwave frequency region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chithra lekha, P.; Kumar, S. Dinesh; Yogesh, N.; Subramanian, V.

    2013-02-01

    The characterization of spinel ferrite metamaterial towards microwave device applications is reported in this work. The spinel MgFe2O4 and Ba0.1Mg0.9Fe2O4 are prepared by molten salt method. The scattering parameters of the metamaterial are measured in the frequency range of 9 to 10 GHz by Nicolson-Ross method with Vector Network Analyzer. A negative permittivity between 9.219 to 9.345 GHz and a negative permeability between 9.703 to 9.901 GHz is observed. For the microwave device design, the 4πMs, Hres, and ΔH are measured from VSM and ferromagnetic resonance at 9.12 GHz respectively.

  10. Negative refraction induced acoustic concentrator and the effects of scattering cancellation, imaging, and mirage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Qi; Cheng, Ying; Liu, Xiao-jun

    2012-07-01

    We present a three-dimensional acoustic concentrator capable of significantly enhancing the sound intensity in the compressive region with scattering cancellation, imaging, and mirage effects. The concentrator shell is built by isotropic gradient negative-index materials, which together with an exterior host medium slab constructs a pair of complementary media. The enhancement factor, which can approach infinity by tuning the geometric parameters, is always much higher than that of a traditional concentrator made by positive-index materials with the same size. The acoustic scattering theory is applied to derive the pressure field distribution of the concentrator, which is consistent with the numerical full-wave simulations. The inherent acoustic impedance match at the interfaces of the shell as well as the inverse processes of “negative refraction—progressive curvature—negative refraction” for arbitrary sound rays can exactly cancel the scattering of the concentrator. In addition, the concentrator shell can also function as an acoustic spherical magnifying superlens, which produces a perfect image with the same shape, with bigger geometric and acoustic parameters located at a shifted position. Then some acoustic mirages are observed whereby the waves radiated from (scattered by) an object located in the center region may seem to be radiated from (scattered by) its image. Based on the mirage effect, we further propose an intriguing acoustic transformer which can transform the sound scattering pattern of one object into another object at will with arbitrary geometric, acoustic, and location parameters.

  11. Transmission of evanescent wave modes through a slab of negative-refractive-index material.

    PubMed

    de Wolf, David A

    2011-02-01

    There has been a long-standing argument about Pendry's suggestion that a plane harmonic evanescent (surface) wave along the interface between free space and a slab of ɛ=-1, μ=-1 double-negative (DNG) medium will emerge on the far side with recovery of phase and amplitude. While this is possible, it is subject to parameter restrictions. This work generalizes previous work and now gives analytical criteria for when to expect such a recovery in a Smith-Kroll DNG medium. Basically this requires, among other things, a relatively narrow bandwidth and relatively small transverse-mode component. There also is a very strong dependence on the ratio of slabwidth to plasma wavelength.

  12. k-vector angular correlations in negative refraction for TM polarization in nanosphere dispersed liquid crystal (NDLC) metamaterial

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pawlik, G.; Walasik, W.; Tarnowski, K.; Mitus, A. C.; Khoo, I. C.

    2013-10-01

    We study the behavior of refracted angle for k-vector at the interface of uniaxial anisotropic media in the case of nanosphere dispersed liquid crystal (NDLC) matematerial. Finite Element (FE) calculations (COMSOL Multiphysics) are used to trace the propagation of the electromagnetic wave. Preliminary results on the influence of incident angle on refracted angle wave-vector are presented.

  13. Refocusing resolution based on negative refractive-photonic crystal group with Ag defects for target detection and imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lian, Yingfei; Zhu, Na; Fang, Yuntuan; Sun, Jiwen; Chen, Junlv; Qian, Huili

    2015-03-01

    Negative refractive-photonic crystal (NR-PC) lenses that can exceed the diffraction limit of focus resolution for imaging and target detection in the near field have gotten more and more special attention in recent years. Three flat lens groups with Ag defects based on NR-PC are designed, and the focusing imaging in the NR-PC three flat lens groups is concluded with the extension of Snell's law, and the influence on the resolution for a target detection dynamic scanning scheme is simulated by using the finite difference time domain method. An optimal-doped structure with Ag defects is achieved by different simulation combinations. The refocusing resolution 0.18834λ is achieved in the optimal structure and there is approximately a 0.06806λ improvement in the refocusing resolution compared to those undoped with Ag (0.2564λ) it also possesses distinct smaller side-lobes than a single flat lens doped with Ag. This means the optimal detecting ability for the three NR-PC flat lens groups with Ag defects is more improved than that for a single undoped and doped with Ag. This is significant for the perfect imaging being achieved for a particle structure.

  14. Fundamentals of negative refractive index optical trapping: forces and radiation pressures exerted by focused Gaussian beams using the generalized Lorenz-Mie theory.

    PubMed

    Ambrosio, Leonardo A; Hernández-Figueroa, Hugo E

    2010-11-04

    Based on the generalized Lorenz-Mie theory (GLMT), this paper reveals, for the first time in the literature, the principal characteristics of the optical forces and radiation pressure cross-sections exerted on homogeneous, linear, isotropic and spherical hypothetical negative refractive index (NRI) particles under the influence of focused Gaussian beams in the Mie regime. Starting with ray optics considerations, the analysis is then extended through calculating the Mie coefficients and the beam-shape coefficients for incident focused Gaussian beams. Results reveal new and interesting trapping properties which are not observed for commonly positive refractive index particles and, in this way, new potential applications in biomedical optics can be devised.

  15. Investigation of negative refractive index in isotropic chiral metamaterials under first and second-order material dispersion with and without conductive loss

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Algadey, Tarig Abobaker

    In recent years, considerable research has been carried out relative to the electromagnetic (EM) propagation and refraction characteristics in metamaterials with emphasis on the origins of negative refractive index. Negative refractive index may be introduced in metamaterials via different methods; one such is the condition whereby the Poynting vector of the EM wave is in opposition to the group velocity in the material. Alternatively, negative refractive index also occurs when the group and phase velocities in the medium are in opposition. The latter phenomenon has been investigated extensively in the literature, including recent work involving chiral metamaterials with material dispersion up to the first order. This dissertation examines the possible emergence of negative refractive index in dispersive chiral (lossless and lossy) metamaterials with material dispersion up to the first and second order. The motivation of this work has two parts- the first part is to determine if using second- as opposed to first-order material dispersion may lead to more practically realizable negative index behavior in the lossless material; the second part is to determine if including the conductive loss to the medium with material dispersion up to the first order (a feature likely to be present in most realistic cases; conductive losses in such materials as nanometals, or dielectric losses in a variety of other nanomaterials, such as lithium niobate and Sic+Ag) may lead to the emergence of negative index. This dissertation investigates the above problems (with the exception of lossy dielectrics, the determination of which is currently ongoing) by using spectral and phasor plane-wave based analytical approaches as well as alternative analysis incorporating practical physical models into the electromagnetic equations. In this work, a spectral approach combined with slowly time-varying phasor analysis is applied leading to the derivation of EM phase and group velocities

  16. Refractive keratoplasty

    SciTech Connect

    Schwab, I.R. )

    1987-01-01

    This book contains 12 chapters. Some of the titles are: Perspectives on refractive surgery; Radial keratotomy; The refractive aspects of corneal transplantation; Wedge resection and relating incisions; Laser surgery of the cornea; and All plastic corneal lenses.

  17. Refractive Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Kellum, Keith

    2000-01-01

    The concept of surgically altering the eye to correct refractive errors has been considered for hundreds of years, but only in the past 60 years has interest grown considerably due to the development of modern refractive surgery techniques such as astigmatic keratotomies to correct astigmatism induced by cataract surgery and future technologies currently being investigated. Modern refractive surgery is more involved than setting the correct parameters on the laser. Patient selection and examination, proper technique, and postoperative follow-up for potential complications are essential for a successful refractive procedure. Critical evaluation of new techniques is vital to avoid the pitfall of overly exuberant enthusiasm for new and unproven methods of refractive surgery. Kellum K. Refractive surgery. The Ochsner Journal 2000; 2:164-167. PMID:21765686

  18. Atmospheric microwave refractivity and refraction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yu, E.; Hodge, D. B.

    1980-01-01

    The atmospheric refractivity can be expressed as a function of temperature, pressure, water vapor content, and operating frequency. Based on twenty-year meteorological data, statistics of the atmospheric refractivity were obtained. These statistics were used to estimate the variation of dispersion, attenuation, and refraction effects on microwave and millimeter wave signals propagating along atmospheric paths. Bending angle, elevation angle error, and range error were also developed for an exponentially tapered, spherical atmosphere.

  19. 1-D, 2-D and 3-D Negative-Refraction Metamaterials at Optical Frequencies: Optical Nano-Transmission-Line and Circuit Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Engheta, Nader; Alu, Andrea

    2006-03-01

    In recent years metamaterials have offered new possibilities for overcoming some of the intrinsic limitations in wave propagation. Their realization at microwave frequencies has followed two different paths; one consisting of embedding resonant inclusions in a host dielectric, and the other following a transmission-line approach, i.e., building 1-D, 2-D, or 3-D cascades of circuit elements, respectively, as linear, planar or bulk right- or left-handed metamaterials. The latter is known to provide larger bandwidth and better robustness to ohmic losses. Extending these concepts to optical frequencies is a challenging task, due to changes in material response to electromagnetic waves at these frequencies. However, recently we have studied theoretically how it may be possible to have circuit nano-elements at these frequencies by properly exploiting plasmonic resonances. Here we present our theoretical work on translating the circuit concepts of right- and left-handed metamaterials into optical frequencies by applying the analogy between nanoparticles and nanocircuit elements in transmission lines. We discuss how it is possible to synthesize optical negative-refraction metamaterials by properly cascading plasmonic and non-plasmonic elements in 1-D, 2-D and 3-D geometries.

  20. The cylindrical air holes of the negative-refraction photonic crystal double flat lens group for lightwave target detection and imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Jian; Shen, Yang; Shen, TingGen; Lian, YingFei; Wang, FeiFei; Xu, Yang

    2013-06-01

    The influence of the cylindrical air holes of the negative-refraction photonic crystal (NR-PC) double flat lens group on the performance of lightwave target detection and imaging is studied in this paper using the finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) method. Numerical simulations indicate that significant enhancement of the scattering signal can be obtained by using a NR-PC flat lens; consequently, great improvement of the refocusing gain as well as the imaging resolution will be provided. We further research the effects of different positions for target detection by using a NR-PC double flat lens group with cylindrical air holes. Then we use defective air holes instead of perfect ones. By using a dynamic scanning scheme, we find that the distance between two flats could be changed flexibly. And it could improve the lateral resolution of target scanning and enlarge the distance between the target and flat greatly. In conclusion, our investigation optimized the performance of the detection and imaging system, and provided the basis for converting an idealized left-handed material lens into a physically realizable NR-PC double flat lens group.

  1. Refraction characteristics of phononic crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nemat-Nasser, Sia

    2015-08-01

    Some of the most interesting refraction properties of phononic crystals are revealed by examining the anti-plane shear waves in doubly periodic elastic composites with unit cells containing rectangular and/or elliptical multi-inclusions. The corresponding band structure, group velocity, and energy-flux vector are calculated using a powerful mixed variational method that accurately and efficiently yields all the field quantities over multiple frequency pass-bands. The background matrix and the inclusions can be anisotropic, each having distinct elastic moduli and mass densities. Equifrequency contours and energy-flux vectors are readily calculated as functions of the wave-vector components. By superimposing the energy-flux vectors on equifrequency contours in the plane of the wave-vector components, and supplementing this with a three-dimensional graph of the corresponding frequency surface, a wealth of information is extracted essentially at a glance. This way it is shown that a composite with even a simple square unit cell containing a central circular inclusion can display negative or positive energy and phase velocity refractions, or simply performs a harmonic vibration (standing wave), depending on the frequency and the wave-vector. Moreover, that the same composite when interfaced with a suitable homogeneous solid can display: (1) negative refraction with negative phase velocity refraction; (2) negative refraction with positive phase velocity refraction; (3) positive refraction with negative phase velocity refraction; (4) positive refraction with positive phase velocity refraction; or even (5) complete reflection with no energy transmission, depending on the frequency, and direction and the wavelength of the plane-wave that is incident from the homogeneous solid to the interface. For elliptical and rectangular inclusion geometries, analytical expressions are given for the key calculation quantities. Expressions for displacement, velocity, linear momentum

  2. Alternative Refractive Surgery Procedures

    MedlinePlus

    ... LASIK Alternative Refractive Surgery Procedures Laser Surgery Recovery Alternative Refractive Surgery Procedures Dec. 12, 2015 Today's refractive ... that releases controlled amounts of radio frequency (RF) energy, instead of a laser, to apply heat to ...

  3. Refractive corneal surgery - discharge

    MedlinePlus

    Nearsightedness surgery - discharge; Refractive surgery - discharge; LASIK - discharge; PRK - discharge ... You had refractive corneal surgery to help improve your vision. This surgery uses a laser to reshape your cornea. It corrects mild-to-moderate nearsightedness, ...

  4. Refraction near the horizon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schaefer, Bradley E.; Liller, William

    1990-01-01

    Variations in astronomical refraction near the horizon are examined. Sunset timings, a sextant mounted on a tripod, and a temperature profile are utilized to derive the variations in refraction data, collected from 7 locations. It is determined that the refraction ranges from 0.234 to 1.678 deg with an rms deviation of 0.16, and it is observed that the variation is larger than previously supposed. Some applications for the variation of refraction value are discussed.

  5. Refractive error blindness.

    PubMed Central

    Dandona, R.; Dandona, L.

    2001-01-01

    Recent data suggest that a large number of people are blind in different parts of the world due to high refractive error because they are not using appropriate refractive correction. Refractive error as a cause of blindness has been recognized only recently with the increasing use of presenting visual acuity for defining blindness. In addition to blindness due to naturally occurring high refractive error, inadequate refractive correction of aphakia after cataract surgery is also a significant cause of blindness in developing countries. Blindness due to refractive error in any population suggests that eye care services in general in that population are inadequate since treatment of refractive error is perhaps the simplest and most effective form of eye care. Strategies such as vision screening programmes need to be implemented on a large scale to detect individuals suffering from refractive error blindness. Sufficient numbers of personnel to perform reasonable quality refraction need to be trained in developing countries. Also adequate infrastructure has to be developed in underserved areas of the world to facilitate the logistics of providing affordable reasonable-quality spectacles to individuals suffering from refractive error blindness. Long-term success in reducing refractive error blindness worldwide will require attention to these issues within the context of comprehensive approaches to reduce all causes of avoidable blindness. PMID:11285669

  6. Design of Amphoteric Refraction Models Using WAVICA and RAYICA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Su, Richard

    2004-01-01

    The phenomenon of refraction of light is due to refractive index mismatches in two different media. However, to achieve this effect, a finite reflection loss is inevitable. A recent finding presented a unique type of interface, ferroelastic materials, that enables refraction without any reflection for either an electron or a light beam. This property is called total refraction. The same type of interface that yields total refraction can also yield amphoteric refraction, where the index of refraction can be either positive or negative depending on the incident angle. This interface could potentially be used to steer light without reflections which could have major applications in high power optics. My goal this summer is to first familiarize myself with the Mathematica software, especially the Wavica and Rayica packages. I will then model the amphoteric refraction by either modifying the Wavica and Rayica packages or using the built-in functions in these packages.

  7. Optical Negative Refraction in Ferrofluids with Magnetocontrollability

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-01-22

    ferrimagnetic nanoparticles of about 10 nm diameter dispersed in a carrier fluid, usually water or kerosene [9]. Two typical kinds of materials for...nm for magnetite, a ferrimagnet and crystallites with the in- verse cubic spinel structure [23]), and "a ¼ 20:61þ 1:27i (which was measured for a Ag

  8. Atmospheric refraction: a history

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lehn, Waldemar H.; van der Werf, Siebren

    2005-09-01

    We trace the history of atmospheric refraction from the ancient Greeks up to the time of Kepler. The concept that the atmosphere could refract light entered Western science in the second century B.C. Ptolemy, 300 years later, produced the first clearly defined atmospheric model, containing air of uniform density up to a sharp upper transition to the ether, at which the refraction occurred. Alhazen and Witelo transmitted his knowledge to medieval Europe. The first accurate measurements were made by Tycho Brahe in the 16th century. Finally, Kepler, who was aware of unusually strong refractions, used the Ptolemaic model to explain the first documented and recognized mirage (the Novaya Zemlya effect).

  9. Atmospheric refraction: a history.

    PubMed

    Lehn, Waldemar H; van der Werf, Siebren

    2005-09-20

    We trace the history of atmospheric refraction from the ancient Greeks up to the time of Kepler. The concept that the atmosphere could refract light entered Western science in the second century B.C. Ptolemy, 300 years later, produced the first clearly defined atmospheric model, containing air of uniform density up to a sharp upper transition to the ether, at which the refraction occurred. Alhazen and Witelo transmitted his knowledge to medieval Europe. The first accurate measurements were made by Tycho Brahe in the 16th century. Finally, Kepler, who was aware of unusually strong refractions, used the Ptolemaic model to explain the first documented and recognized mirage (the Novaya Zemlya effect).

  10. Uncorrected refractive errors.

    PubMed

    Naidoo, Kovin S; Jaggernath, Jyoti

    2012-01-01

    Global estimates indicate that more than 2.3 billion people in the world suffer from poor vision due to refractive error; of which 670 million people are considered visually impaired because they do not have access to corrective treatment. Refractive errors, if uncorrected, results in an impaired quality of life for millions of people worldwide, irrespective of their age, sex and ethnicity. Over the past decade, a series of studies using a survey methodology, referred to as Refractive Error Study in Children (RESC), were performed in populations with different ethnic origins and cultural settings. These studies confirmed that the prevalence of uncorrected refractive errors is considerably high for children in low-and-middle-income countries. Furthermore, uncorrected refractive error has been noted to have extensive social and economic impacts, such as limiting educational and employment opportunities of economically active persons, healthy individuals and communities. The key public health challenges presented by uncorrected refractive errors, the leading cause of vision impairment across the world, require urgent attention. To address these issues, it is critical to focus on the development of human resources and sustainable methods of service delivery. This paper discusses three core pillars to addressing the challenges posed by uncorrected refractive errors: Human Resource (HR) Development, Service Development and Social Entrepreneurship.

  11. Modified Kramers-Kronig relations and sum rules for meromorphic total refractive index

    SciTech Connect

    Peiponen, Kai-Erik; Saarinen, Jarkko J.; Vartiainen, Erik M.

    2003-08-01

    Modified Kramers-Kronig relations and corresponding sum rules are shown to hold for the total refractive index that can be presented as a sum of complex linear and nonlinear refractive indices, respectively. It is suggested that a self-action process, involving the degenerate third-order nonlinear susceptibility, can yield a negative total refractive index at some spectral range.

  12. Refraction corrections for surveying

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lear, W. M.

    1979-01-01

    Optical measurements of range and elevation angle are distorted by the earth's atmosphere. High precision refraction correction equations are presented which are ideally suited for surveying because their inputs are optically measured range and optically measured elevation angle. The outputs are true straight line range and true geometric elevation angle. The 'short distances' used in surveying allow the calculations of true range and true elevation angle to be quickly made using a programmable pocket calculator. Topics covered include the spherical form of Snell's Law; ray path equations; and integrating the equations. Short-, medium-, and long-range refraction corrections are presented in tables.

  13. Conceptualization of Light Refraction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sokolowski, Andrzej

    2013-01-01

    There have been a number of papers dealing quantitatively with light refraction. Yet the conceptualization of the phenomenon that sets the foundation for a more rigorous math analysis is minimized. The purpose of this paper is to fill that gap. (Contains 3 figures.)

  14. Refraction corrections for surveying

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lear, W. M.

    1980-01-01

    Optical measurements of range and elevation angles are distorted by refraction of Earth's atmosphere. Theoretical discussion of effect, along with equations for determining exact range and elevation corrections, is presented in report. Potentially useful in optical site surveying and related applications, analysis is easily programmed on pocket calculator. Input to equation is measured range and measured elevation; output is true range and true elevation.

  15. Littoral Refractivity Prognostic Advancement

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-09-30

    situational awareness of the 3D radio-frequency (RF) propagation environment and a quantitative diagnostic and prognostic capability for assessing sub- and...Rev. 8-98) Prescribed by ANSI Std Z39-18 2 with the benchmark showing the quantitative improvement with each stage of model development...grid point. Modified the NSWCDD littoral clutter model ( LCM ) to accept COAMPS® derived refractivity fields. Analyzed the impact on ducting of

  16. Comparison Between Radar and Automatic Weather Station Refractivity Variability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hallali, Ruben; Dalaudier, Francis; Parent du Chatelet, Jacques

    2016-08-01

    Weather radars measure changes in the refractive index of air in the atmospheric boundary layer. The technique uses the phase of signals from ground targets located around the radar to provide information on atmospheric refractivity related to meteorological quantities such as temperature, pressure and humidity. The approach has been successfully implemented during several field campaigns using operational S-band radars in Canada, UK, USA and France. In order to better characterize the origins of errors, a recent study has simulated temporal variations of refractivity based on Automatic Weather Station (AWS) measurements. This reveals a stronger variability of the refractivity during the summer and in the afternoon when the refractivity is the most sensitive to humidity, probably because of turbulence close to the ground. This raises the possibility of retrieving information on the turbulent state of the atmosphere from the variability in radar refractivity. An analysis based on a 1-year dataset from the operational C-band radar at Trappes (near Paris, France) and AWS refractivity variability measurements was used to measure those temporal and spatial variabilities. Particularly during summer, a negative bias increasing with range is observed between radar and AWS estimations, and is well explained by a model based on Taylor's hypotheses. The results demonstrate the possibility of establishing, depending on season, a quantitative and qualitative link between radar and AWS refractivity variability that reflects low-level coherent turbulent structures.

  17. Black and gray Helmholtz-Kerr soliton refraction

    SciTech Connect

    Sanchez-Curto, Julio; Chamorro-Posada, Pedro; McDonald, Graham S.

    2011-01-15

    Refraction of black and gray solitons at boundaries separating different defocusing Kerr media is analyzed within a Helmholtz framework. A universal nonlinear Snell's law is derived that describes gray soliton refraction, in addition to capturing the behavior of bright and black Kerr solitons at interfaces. Key regimes, defined by beam and interface characteristics, are identified, and predictions are verified by full numerical simulations. The existence of a unique total nonrefraction angle for gray solitons is reported; both internal and external refraction at a single interface is shown possible (dependent only on incidence angle). This, in turn, leads to the proposal of positive or negative lensing operations on soliton arrays at planar boundaries.

  18. Steering and collimating ballistic electrons with amphoteric refraction

    SciTech Connect

    Radu, A.; Dragoman, D.; Iftimie, S.

    2012-07-15

    We show that amphoteric refraction of ballistic electrons, i.e., positive or negative refraction depending on the incidence angle, occurs at an interface between an isotropic and an anisotropic medium and can be employed to steer and collimate electron beams. The steering angle is determined by the materials' parameters, but the degree of collimation can be tuned in a significant range by changing the energy of ballistic electrons.

  19. Fresnel Coefficients of Forward and Backward Waves Refracting at the Interface of Isotropic Media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fisanov, V. V.

    2017-01-01

    The Fresnel coefficients are derived for cross- and co-polarization states of plane electromagnetic wave incident at the interface between two isotropic media. The media can support forward or backward normal waves. Based on introduction of wave type identifiers, without application of the notion of the negative refractive index, phenomena of positive and negative refractions are considered in the general case.

  20. Colored Flag by Double Refraction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reid, Bill

    1994-01-01

    Describes various demonstrations that illustrate double refraction and rotation of the plane of polarization in stressed, transparent plastics, with the consequent production of colored designs. (ZWH)

  1. Refraction, including prisms.

    PubMed

    Hiatt, R L

    1991-02-01

    The literature in the past year on refraction is replete with several isolated but very important topics that have been of interest to strabismologists and refractionists for many decades. The refractive changes in scleral buckling procedures include an increase in axial length as well as an increase in myopia, as would be expected. Tinted lenses in dyslexia show little positive effect in the nonasthmatic patients in one study. The use of spectacles or bifocals as a way to control increase in myopia is refuted in another report. It has been shown that in accommodative esotropia not all patients will be able to escape the use of bifocals in the teenage years, even though surgery might be performed. The hope that disposable contact lenses would cut down on the instance of giant papillary conjunctivitis and keratitis has been given some credence, and the conventional theory that sclerosis alone is the cause of presbyopia is attacked. Also, gas permeable bifocal contact lenses are reviewed and the difficulties of correcting presbyopia by this method outlined. The practice of giving an aphakic less bifocal addition instead of a nonaphakic, based on the presumption of increased effective power, is challenged. In the review of prisms, the majority of articles concern prism adaption. The most significant report is that of the Prism Adaptation Study Research Group (Arch Ophthalmol 1990, 108:1248-1256), showing that acquired esotropia in particular has an increased incidence of stable and full corrections surgically in the prism adaptation group versus the control group.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  2. GRAVSAT/GEOPAUSE refraction study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Llewellyn, S. K.

    1977-01-01

    A ground station network tracked a high altitude spacecraft which in turn tracked a low orbiting satellite. Orbit data are relayed back to the ground stations. A refraction study was performed on this configuration to compute ionospheric and tropospheric refraction effects along the satellite and ground links.

  3. Binocular vision and refractive surgery.

    PubMed

    Finlay, Alison L

    2007-05-01

    Binocular status can have an effect on the outcome of refractive surgery. Some accommodative deviations and anisometropia can be managed effectively. Fully accommodative esotropia has been successfully treated in young patients but the outcome can be less predictable in older patients. High anisometropes are usually unaffected by the change in aniseikonia following refractive surgery but there are exceptions. Failure to recognise and appropriately classify a binocular vision anomaly pre-surgically can result in symptoms that are difficult to manage post-operatively. Refractive surgery producing a binocular vision anomaly where there was none pre-operatively is less common. I present a review of the literature discussing the relationship between binocular vision anomalies and refractive surgery, illustrating the findings with published reports of successful and unsuccessful binocular postoperative outcomes. I argue that predicting the binocular outcome should be considered pre-operatively for every refractive surgery patient.

  4. Refractive index matching and clear emulsions.

    PubMed

    Sun, James Ziming; Erickson, Michael C E; Parr, James W

    2005-01-01

    Refractive index (RI) matching is a unique way of making clear emulsions to meet market trends. However, RI matching has not been sufficiently investigated in terms of physical principles and methodologies. Snell's law (n2 sin r2= n1 sin r1) is applicable to cosmetic emulsions. When oil phase and water phase have equal RI (n2 = n1) values, light will not bend as it strikes obliquely at the emulsion interface. Instead, light is transmitted through the emulsion without refraction, which produces clarity. Theoretical RI values in solution can be calculated with summation of the product of the weight percentage and refractive index of each ingredient (RI(mix) = [W1 x n1 + W2 x n2 + W3 x n3 + + Wn x nn]Wtau). Oil-phase RI values are normally at 1.4 or higher. Glycols are used to adjust the water phase RI, since they typically have larger RI values than water. Noticeable deviations from calculated RI values are seen in experimentally prepared solutions. Three basic deviation types are observed: negative, positive, and slightly negative or positive, which can occur in glycol aqueous solutions at different concentrations. The deviations are attributed to changes in molecular interaction between molecules in solution, which can lead to changes in specific gravity. Negative RI deviation corresponds to a decrease in specific gravity, and positive RI deviation corresponds to an increase in specific gravity. RI values will deviate from calculated values since an increase or decrease in specific gravity leads to a change in optical density.

  5. Refractive index modulation in photo-thermo-refractive fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rotari, Eugeniu; Glebova, Larissa; Glebov, Leonid

    2005-04-01

    Refractive index decrement was discovered in a fiber made from photo-thermo-refractive (PTR) glass. PTR glass is a fluorosilicate glass doped with cerium and silver which demonstrates refractive index change after UV exposure and thermal development due to precipitation of NaF nanocrystals in the irradiated areas. This glass is widely used for volume holographic optical elements recording. Photosensitivity in PTR optical fibers has been shown after exposure to radiation at 325 nm for about 1 J/cm2 followed by thermal development at 520°C. Refractive index difference between exposed and unexposed areas was about 1000 ppm. A Bragg mirror at 1088 nm was recorded in such fiber which showed narrow band reflection within 1 nm.

  6. Nonlinear refractive index of photo-thermo-refractive glass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santran, Stephane; Martinez-Rosas, Miguel; Canioni, Lionel; Sarger, Laurent; Glebova, Larissa N.; Tirpak, Alan; Glebov, Leonid B.

    2006-03-01

    Nonlinear properties of a photo-thermo-refractive (PTR) glass are studied and compared with those in fused silica and a conventional optical glass. PTR glass is a new photosensitive medium for high-efficiency phase volume hologram recording which manifests a linear refractive index modulation after exposure to UV radiation followed by thermal treatment. Nonlinear optical properties of PTR glass exposed to femtosecond laser pulses are studied. Diffraction patterns in a propagated laser beam focused in the sample were detected by a CCD, while a nonlinear refractive index was measured by a collinear-orthogonal-polarization-pump-probe (COP3) method. It was found that nonlinear refractive index of PTRG is n2 = 3.3 × 10-20 m2/W (0.33 ppm cm2/GW) which is about the same as for the fused silica. It is important that n2 in PTR glass does not vary after UV exposure and thermal development.

  7. Recent advances in refractive surgery

    PubMed Central

    Yu, E Y; Jackson, W B

    1999-01-01

    Refractive errors are some of the most common ophthalmic abnormalities world-wide and are associated with significant morbidity. Tremendous advances in treating refractive errors have occurred over the past 20 years. The arrival of the excimer laser has allowed a level of accuracy in modifying the cornea that was unattainable before. Although refractive surgery is generally safe and effective, it does carry some risks. Careful patient selection, meticulous surgical technique and frequent follow-up can avoid most complications. The experience of a surgical team can also affect the outcome and the incidence of complications. The future should bring continued improvement in outcomes, fewer complications and exciting new options for treating refractive errors. PMID:10333840

  8. Effect of refractive error on temperament and character properties

    PubMed Central

    Kalkan Akcay, Emine; Canan, Fatih; Simavli, Huseyin; Dal, Derya; Yalniz, Hacer; Ugurlu, Nagihan; Gecici, Omer; Cagil, Nurullah

    2015-01-01

    AIM To determine the effect of refractive error on temperament and character properties using Cloninger's psychobiological model of personality. METHODS Using the Temperament and Character Inventory (TCI), the temperament and character profiles of 41 participants with refractive errors (17 with myopia, 12 with hyperopia, and 12 with myopic astigmatism) were compared to those of 30 healthy control participants. Here, temperament comprised the traits of novelty seeking, harm-avoidance, and reward dependence, while character comprised traits of self-directedness, cooperativeness, and self-transcendence. RESULTS Participants with refractive error showed significantly lower scores on purposefulness, cooperativeness, empathy, helpfulness, and compassion (P<0.05, P<0.01, P<0.05, P<0.05, and P<0.01, respectively). CONCLUSION Refractive error might have a negative influence on some character traits, and different types of refractive error might have different temperament and character properties. These personality traits may be implicated in the onset and/or perpetuation of refractive errors and may be a productive focus for psychotherapy. PMID:25709911

  9. Generalized Vector Laws of Reflection and Refraction of Forward and Backward Waves in the Presence of a Metasurface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fisanov, V. V.

    2016-12-01

    Vector formulations of laws of reflection and refraction of plane electromagnetic waves from the plane metasurface that separates two isotropic media and is characterized by phase gradients are obtained and analyzed. The media support the forward or backward normal waves that differ by identifiers. Critical angles of total internal reflection are presented, and conditions of occurrence of negative refraction and negative reflection are specified. Retroreflection and special cases of wave refraction are considered, and restrictions on the metasurface parameters are given.

  10. Simulations of Ferrite-Dielectric-Wire Composite Negative Index Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rachford, Frederic J.; Armstead, Douglas N.; Harris, Vincent G.; Vittoria, Carmine

    2007-08-01

    We perform extensive finite difference time domain simulations of ferrite based negative index of refraction composites. A wire grid is employed to provide negative permittivity. The ferrite and wire grid interact to provide both negative and positive index of refraction transmission peaks in the vicinity of the ferrite resonance. Notwithstanding the extreme anisotropy in the index of refraction of the composite, negative refraction is seen at the composite air interface allowing the construction of a focusing concave lens with a magnetically tunable focal length.

  11. Double-negative acoustic metamaterial.

    PubMed

    Li, Jensen; Chan, C T

    2004-11-01

    We show here the existence of acoustic metamaterial, in which both the effective density and bulk modulus are simultaneously negative, in the true and strict sense of an effective medium. Our double-negative acoustic system is an acoustic analogue of Veselago's medium in electromagnetism, and shares many unique consequences, such as negative refractive index. The double negativity in acoustics is derived from low-frequency resonances, as in the case of electromagnetism, but the negative density and modulus are derived from a single resonance structure as distinct from electromagnetism in which the negative permeability and negative permittivity originates from different resonance mechanisms.

  12. Peripheral refraction and the development of refractive error: a review.

    PubMed

    Charman, W Neil; Radhakrishnan, Hema

    2010-07-01

    It has been suggested that emmetropic and low-hyperopic eyes in which the refractive error in the periphery of the visual field is relatively hyperopic with respect to the axial refraction may be at greater risk of developing myopia than eyes with similar refractions but relatively myopic peripheral refractive errors. The animal and human evidence to support this hypothesis is reviewed. The most persuasive studies are those in which emmetropization has been shown to occur in infant rhesus monkeys with ablated foveas but intact peripheral fields, and the demonstration that, in similar animals, lens-induced relative peripheral hyperopia produces central axial myopia. Evidence for emmetropization in animals with severed optic nerves suggests that emmetropization is primarily controlled at the retinal level but that the higher levels of the visual system play a significant role in refining the process: there appear to be no directly equivalent human studies. Since any contribution of the higher centres to the control of refractive development must depend upon the sensitivity to defocus, the results of human studies of the changes in depth-of-focus across the field and of the contribution of the retinal periphery to the accommodation response are discussed. Although peripheral resolution is relatively insensitive to focus, this is not the case for detection. Moreover accommodation occurs to peripheral stimuli out to a field angle of at least 10 deg, and the presence of a peripheral stimulus can influence the accommodation to a central target. Although the basic hypothesis that a relatively hyperopic peripheral refractive error can drive the development of human myopia remains unproven, the available data support the possibility of an interaction between the states of focus on axis and in the periphery.

  13. Nematicons across interfaces: anomalous refraction and reflection of solitons in liquid Crystals.

    PubMed

    Peccianti, Marco; Assanto, Gaetano

    2007-06-25

    The robustness of nematicons, i. e. spatial solitons in nematic liquid crystals, can be exploited to implement counter-intuitive negative reflection and refraction schemes for optical signal manipulation at interfaces.

  14. Refraction of coastal ocean waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shuchman, R. A.; Kasischke, E. S.

    1981-01-01

    Refraction of gravity waves in the coastal area off Cape Hatteras, NC as documented by synthetic aperture radar (SAR) imagery from Seasat orbit 974 (collected on September 3, 1978) is discussed. An analysis of optical Fourier transforms (OFTs) from more than 70 geographical positions yields estimates of wavelength and wave direction for each position. In addition, independent estimates of the same two quantities are calculated using two simple theoretical wave-refraction models. The OFT results are then compared with the theoretical results. A statistical analysis shows a significant degree of linear correlation between the data sets. This is considered to indicate that the Seasat SAR produces imagery whose clarity is sufficient to show the refraction of gravity waves in shallow water.

  15. Octonacci photonic crystals with negative refraction index materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brandão, E. R.; Vasconcelos, M. S.; Anselmo, D. H. A. L.

    2016-12-01

    We investigate the optical transmission spectra for s-polarized (TE) and p-polarized (TM) waves in one-dimensional photonic quasicrystals on a quasiperiodic multilayer structure made up by alternate layers of SiO2 and metamaterials, organized by following the Octonacci sequence. Maxwell's equations and the transfer-matrix technique are used to derive the transmission spectra for the propagation of normally and obliquely incident optical fields. We assume Drude-Lorentz-type dispersive response for the dielectric permittivity and magnetic permeability of the metamaterials. For normally incident waves, we observe that the spectra does not have self-similar behavior or mirror symmetry and it also features the absence of optical band gap. Also for normally incident waves, we show regions of full transmittance when the incident angle θC = 0° in a particular frequency range.

  16. Crystalline lens and refractive development.

    PubMed

    Iribarren, Rafael

    2015-07-01

    Individual refractive errors usually change along lifespan. Most children are hyperopic in early life. This hyperopia is usually lost during growth years, leading to emmetropia in adults, but myopia also develops in children during school years or during early adult life. Those subjects who remain emmetropic are prone to have hyperopic shifts in middle life. And even later, at older ages, myopic shifts are developed with nuclear cataract. The eye grows from 15 mm in premature newborns to approximately 24 mm in early adult years, but, in most cases, refractions are maintained stable in a clustered distribution. This growth in axial length would represent a refractive change of more than 40 diopters, which is compensated by changes in corneal and lens powers. The process which maintains the balance between the ocular components of refraction during growth is still under study. As the lens power cannot be measured in vivo, but can only be calculated based on the other ocular components, there have not been many studies of lens power in humans. Yet, recent studies have confirmed that the lens loses power during growth in children, and that hyperopic and myopic shifts in adulthood may be also produced by changes in the lens. These studies in children and adults give a picture of the changing power of the lens along lifespan. Other recent studies about the growth of the lens and the complexity of its internal structure give clues about how these changes in lens power are produced along life.

  17. Refractive Index Enhancement in Gases

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-02-29

    experimentally demonstrated the key ingredients of this approach in Rubidium vapor where we have observe enhanced refractive index with vanishing absorption...beam, Ep. We have recently experimentally demonstrated this effect in a 1-mm-long Rubidium (Rb) vapor cell at high vapor densities. Here, we utilize

  18. Index of Refraction without Geometry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Farkas, N.; Henriksen, P. N.; Ramsier, R. D.

    2006-01-01

    This article presents several activities that permit students to determine the index of refraction of transparent solids and liquids using simple equipment without the need for geometrical relationships, special lighting or optical instruments. Graphical analysis of the measured data is shown to be a useful method for determining the index of…

  19. REFLECTION AND REFRACTION, VOLUME 2.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    KLAUS, DAVID J.; AND OTHERS

    THIS VOLUME 2 OF A TWO-VOLUME SET PROVIDES AUTOINSTRUCTION IN PHYSICS. THE UNITS COVERED IN THIS VOLUME ARE (1) REFLECTION OF LIGHT, (2) PHOTOMETRY, (3) POLARIZATION, (4) REFRACTION OF LIGHT, (5) SNELL'S LAW, (6) LENSES, FOCUS, AND FOCAL POINTS, (7) IMAGE FORMATION, AND (8) ABERRATIONS, THE EYE, AND MAGNIFICATION. THE INTRODUCTION AND UNITS ON…

  20. Fiber optic refractive index monitor

    SciTech Connect

    Weiss, Jonathan David

    2002-01-01

    A sensor for measuring the change in refractive index of a liquid uses the lowest critical angle of a normal fiber optic to achieve sensitivity when the index of the liquid is significantly less than the index of the fiber core. Another embodiment uses a liquid filled core to ensure that its index is approximately the same as the liquid being measured.

  1. Abnormal refraction of microwave in ferrite/wire metamaterials.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Hongjie; Li, Bo; Zhou, Ji; Kang, Lei; Zhao, Qian; Li, Weibin

    2011-08-15

    We report the experimentally observed abnormal refraction in metamaterials (MMs) consisting of ferrite rods and metallic wires with two kinds of configurations. Negative refraction (NR) and positive refraction (PR) are demonstrated in an MM constructed with parallel-arranged rods and wires. The frequencies of both NR and PR can be adjusted dynamically and together by an applied magnetic field and the PR occurs at frequencies slightly lower than that of the NR. The NR is attributed to simultaneously negative effective permittivity and permeability, and the PR is resulted from positive effective permittivity and permeability with the positive effective permittivity originating from electromagnetic coupling between the closest rod and wire. By making the rod cross the wire to reduce the coupling, we observed sole NR in an MM consisting of the cross-arranged rods and wires. Theoretical analysis explained qualitatively the abnormal refraction behaviors of microwave for the two kinds of MMs and it is supported by the retrieved effective parameters and field distributions.

  2. Triangulation in Random Refractive Distortions.

    PubMed

    Alterman, Marina; Schechner, Yoav Y; Swirski, Yohay

    2017-03-01

    Random refraction occurs in turbulence and through a wavy water-air interface. It creates distortion that changes in space, time and with viewpoint. Localizing objects in three dimensions (3D) despite this random distortion is important to some predators and also to submariners avoiding the salient use of periscopes. We take a multiview approach to this task. Refracted distortion statistics induce a probabilistic relation between any pixel location and a line of sight in space. Measurements of an object's random projection from multiple views and times lead to a likelihood function of the object's 3D location. The likelihood leads to estimates of the 3D location and its uncertainty. Furthermore, multiview images acquired simultaneously in a wide stereo baseline have uncorrelated distortions. This helps reduce the acquisition time needed for localization. The method is demonstrated in stereoscopic video sequences, both in a lab and a swimming pool.

  3. [Refractive surgery and flight safety].

    PubMed

    Draeger, J

    1998-09-01

    For both VFR and as IFR flight, visual assessment is the major source of information for the pilot. The new possibilities for change of refraction by means of corneal refractive surgery have led to an increasing demand from pilots for these new methods. Can these methods successfully be applied for aviation purposes? The valid regulations for medical standards of pilots, as well as the future international regulations such as JAR and ICAO, are explained in this respect. A report is given on the work of the Advisory Board of the German Federal Government Air Traffic Authority and on the cases treated so far and their outcome, and recommendations are expressed. Concerning the legal situation and clinical experience, advice for pilots, aviation medical examiners and ophthalmologists is given.

  4. Refractive keratoplasty. Keratophakia and keratomileusis.

    PubMed

    Troutman, R C; Swinger, C

    1982-01-01

    Early experience with the refractive keratoplasty techniques of José Barraquer--keratophakia and hypermetropic keratomileusis is presented. In contradistinction to the alloplastic lens substitutes currently being employed for the integral correction of aphakia, Barraquer's techniques would seem to offer a more permanent, more physiologic, full-time optical correction of the aphakic state. Their use is limited only by the condition of the patient's cornea and, in fact, may be applied not only in aphakia but also in phakic eyes with higher degrees of hyperopia or myopia. In the opinion of the authors, the refractive keratoplasty techniques of Barraquer can be performed by any well-instructed ophthalmic surgeon. These techniques offer to many patients a satisfactory, and potentially a physiologically superior alternative to alloplastic lens substitute for aphakic correction.

  5. Refractive keratoplasty: keratophakia and keratomileusis.

    PubMed

    Troutman, R C; Swinger, C

    1978-01-01

    We have presented our early experience with the refractive keratoplasty techniques of Doctor Jose Barraquer--keratophakia and hypermetropic keratomileusis. In contradistinction to the alloplastic lens substitutes currently being employed for the integral correction of aphakia, his techniques would seem to offer a more permanent, more physiologic, full-time optical correction of the aphakic state. Their use is limited only by the condition of the patient's corneaa and, in fact, may be applied not only in aphakia but also in phakic eyes with higher degrees of hyperopia or myopia. In the opinion of the authors, the refractive keratoplasty techniques of Barraquer can be perfored by any well-instructed ophthalmic surgeon. These techniques offer to many patients a satisfactory and potentially a physiologically superior alternative to alloplastic lens substitute for aphakic correction.

  6. Electro-refractive photonic device

    SciTech Connect

    Zortman, William A.; Watts, Michael R.

    2015-06-09

    The various technologies presented herein relate to phase shifting light to facilitate any of light switching, modulation, amplification, etc. Structures are presented where a second layer is juxtaposed between a first layer and a third layer with respective doping facilitating formation of p-n junctions at the interface between the first layer and the second layer, and between the second layer and the third layer. Application of a bias causes a carrier concentration change to occur at the p-n junctions which causes a shift in the effective refractive index per incremental change in an applied bias voltage. The effective refractive index enhancement can occur in both reverse bias and forward bias. The structure can be incorporated into a waveguide, an optical resonator, a vertical junction device, a horizontal junction device, a Mach-Zehnder interferometer, a tuneable optical filter, etc.

  7. Comment on ''Perfect imaging with positive refraction in three dimensions''

    SciTech Connect

    Merlin, R.

    2010-11-15

    Leonhardt and Philbin [Phys. Rev. A 81, 011804(R) (2010)] have recently constructed a mathematical proof that the Maxwell's fish-eye lens provides perfect imaging of electromagnetic waves without negative refraction. In this comment, we argue that the unlimited resolution is an artifact of having introduced an unphysical drain at the position of the geometrical image. The correct solution gives focusing consistent with the standard diffraction limit.

  8. Laser refractive tomography of phase objects

    SciTech Connect

    Raskovskaya, I L

    2013-06-30

    The principles are outlined of laser refractive tomography - a method for reconstructing the values of the refractive index in the cross sections of phase objects, which involves the use of three-dimensional refractive images (3D refractograms) of structured laser radiation. A simulation algorithm is realised and examples are provided of characteristic 3D refractograms obtained by solving the direct problem of refraction of structured radiation. A method was developed for reconstructing the values of refractive index under conditions of strong refraction, which is based on the visualisation of ray trajectories inside an optically inhomogeneous medium. A classification is made of possible approaches to the solution of the inverse problem of refraction based on the visualisation of ray trajectories. Examples are given of cross section reconstruction and quantitative diagnostics of phase objects. (laser imaging)

  9. On retrieving refractive index of dust-like particles using shape distributions of ellipsoids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kemppinen, O.; Nousiainen, T.; Merikallio, S.; Räisänen, P.

    2015-06-01

    Ellipsoid-based retrievals are widely used for investigating optical properties of non-ellipsoidal atmospheric particles, such as dust. In this work, the applicability of ellipsoids for retrieving the refractive index of dust-like target model particles from scattering data is investigated. This is a pure modeling study, where stereogrammetrically retrieved model dust shapes are used as targets. The primary objective is to study whether the refractive index of these target particles can be inverted from their scattering matrices using ellipsoidal model particles. To achieve this, first scattering matrices for the target model particles with known refractive indices are computed. On one hand, a non-negative least squares fitting is performed, separately for different scattering matrix elements, for a set of 46 differently shaped ellipsoids by using different assumed refractive indices. Then, the fitting error is evaluated to establish whether the ellipsoidal base best matches the target scattering matrix elements when the correct refractive index is assumed. On the other hand, we also test whether the ellipsoids best match the target data with the correct refractive index, if a predefined (uniform) shape distribution for ellipsoids is assumed, instead of optimizing the shape distribution separately for each tested refractive index. The results show that for both of these approaches using the ellipsoids with the true refractive index produces good results, but also that for each element even better results are acquired by using wrong refractive indices. In addition, the best agreement is found for different scattering matrix elements using different refractive indices. The findings imply that the inversion of refractive index of non-ellipsoidal particles may not be reliable using ellipsoids. Furthermore, it is demonstrated that the differences in single-scattering albedo and asymmetry parameter between the best-match ellipsoid ensemble and the target particles may

  10. Retrieving microphysical properties of dust-like particles using ellipsoids: the case of refractive index

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kemppinen, O.; Nousiainen, T.; Merikallio, S.; Räisänen, P.

    2015-10-01

    Distributions of ellipsoids are often used to simulate the optical properties of non-ellipsoidal atmospheric particles, such as dust. In this work, the applicability of ellipsoids for retrieving the refractive index of dust-like target model particles from scattering data is investigated. This is a pure modeling study, in which stereogrammetrically retrieved model dust shapes are used as targets. The primary objective is to study whether the refractive index of these target particles can be inverted from their scattering matrices using ellipsoidal model particles. To achieve this, first scattering matrices for the target model particles with known refractive indices are computed. First, a non-negative least squares fitting is performed, individually for each scattering matrix element, for 46 differently shaped ellipsoids by using different assumed refractive indices. Then, the fitting error is evaluated to establish whether the ellipsoid ensemble best matches the target scattering matrix elements when the correct refractive index is assumed. Second, we test whether the ellipsoids best match the target data with the correct refractive index, when a predefined (uniform) shape distribution for ellipsoids is assumed, instead of optimizing the shape distribution separately for each tested refractive index. The results show not only that for both of these approaches using ellipsoids with the true refractive index produces good results but also that for each scattering matrix element even better results are acquired by using wrong refractive indices. In addition, the best agreement is obtained for different scattering matrix elements using different refractive indices. The findings imply that retrieval of refractive index of non-ellipsoidal particles whose single-scattering properties have been modeled with ellipsoids may not be reliable. Furthermore, it is demonstrated that the differences in single-scattering albedo and asymmetry parameter between the best

  11. Anomalous refraction of light through slanted-nanoaperture arrays on metal surface

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Myungji; Jung, Yun Suk; Xi, Yonggang; Kim, Hong Koo

    2015-09-07

    We report a nanoapertured metal surface that demonstrates anomalous refraction of light for a wide range of incident angles. A nanoslit aperture is designed to serve as a tilted vertical-dipole whose radiation pattern orients to a glancing angle direction to substrate. An array of such slanted nanoslits formed in a metal film redirects an incident beam into the direction of negative refraction angle: the aperture-transmitted wave makes a far-field propagation to the tilt-oriented direction of radiation pattern. The thus-designed nanoaperture array demonstrates the −1st order diffraction (i.e., to the negative refraction-angle direction) with well-suppressed background transmission (the zero-order direct transmission and other higher-order diffractions). Engineering the radiation pattern of nanoaperture offers an approach to overcoming the limits of conventional diffractive/refractive optics and complementing metasurface-based nano-optics.

  12. Reflection and refraction properties of plane waves on the interface of uniaxially anisotropic chiral media.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Qiang; Cui, Tie Jun

    2006-12-01

    We have investigated the reflection and refraction properties of plane waves incident from free space into a uniaxially anisotropic chiral medium, where the chirality appears only in one direction and the host medium can be either an isotropic dielectric or an anisotropic electric plasma. We show that the reflection and refraction properties are closely related to the dispersion relation of the chiral medium and that negative phase refractions and/or negative group refractions may occur. We further demonstrate that the two eigenwaves within the uniaxially anisotropic chiral medium behave differently with respect to the incident angle, and in some cases only one of them can be supported and transmitted. We have studied the critical angle and Brewster's angle with some special properties. We have also discussed the potential application of the uniaxially anisotropic chiral medium for the polarization beam splitter. Numerical results are given to validate our analysis.

  13. Investigation of refracting flows for acoustic suppression

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sloan, D.; Purves, R. B.; Farquhar, B. W.

    1977-01-01

    An experimental program to determine the possibility of using refracting flows for the suppression of aircraft inlet noise has been completed. Observations of wave behavior in accelerating duct flows have suggested that acoustic wave refraction could be used to direct inlet noise away from the ground upward to where it causes less annoyance. Measurements have also shown that acoustic wave refraction can cause large improvements in the effectiveness of acoustic lining material.

  14. Investigation of refracting flows for acoustic suppression

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sloan, D.; Purves, R. B.; Farquhar, B. W.

    1977-01-01

    An experimental investigation to determine the possibility of using refracting flows for the suppression of aircraft inlet noise is described. Observations of wave refraction in duct flows and measurements of the increase in effectiveness of acoustic linings due to refraction have suggested methods for the design of engine inlet ducts which can either suppress noise internally or direct it to where it causes less annoyance.

  15. Detecting motion through dynamic refraction.

    PubMed

    Alterman, Marina; Schechner, Yoav Y; Perona, Pietro; Shamir, Joseph

    2013-01-01

    Refraction causes random dynamic distortions in atmospheric turbulence and in views across a water interface. The latter scenario is experienced by submerged animals seeking to detect prey or avoid predators, which may be airborne or on land. Man encounters this when surveying a scene by a submarine or divers while wishing to avoid the use of an attention-drawing periscope. The problem of inverting random refracted dynamic distortions is difficult, particularly when some of the objects in the field of view (FOV) are moving. On the other hand, in many cases, just those moving objects are of interest, as they reveal animal, human, or machine activity. Furthermore, detecting and tracking these objects does not necessitate handling the difficult task of complete recovery of the scene. We show that moving objects can be detected very simply, with low false-positive rates, even when the distortions are very strong and dominate the object motion. Moreover, the moving object can be detected even if it has zero mean motion. While the object and distortion motions are random and unknown, they are mutually independent. This is expressed by a simple motion feature which enables discrimination of moving object points versus the background.

  16. Refractive index of plant cell walls

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gausman, H. W.; Allen, W. A.; Escobar, D. E.

    1974-01-01

    Air was replaced with media of higher refractive indices by vacuum infiltration in leaves of cucumber, blackeye pea, tomato, and string bean plants, and reflectance of noninfiltrated and infiltrated leaves was spectrophotometrically measured. Infiltrated leaves reflected less light than noninfiltrated leaves over the 500-2500-nm wavelength interval because cell wall-air interfaces were partly eliminated. Minimal reflectance should occur when the average refractive index of plant cell walls was matched by the infiltrating fluid. Although refractive indices that resulted in minimal reflectance differed among the four plant genera, an average value of 1.425 approximates the refractive index of plant cell walls for the four plant genera.

  17. Statistical Analysis of Refractivity in UAE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Ansari, Kifah; Al-Mal, Abdulhadi Abu; Kamel, Rami

    2007-07-01

    This paper presents the results of the refractivity statistics in the UAE (United Arab Emirates) for a period of 14 years (1990-2003). Six sites have been considered using meteorological surface data (Abu Dhabi, Dubai, Sharjah, Al-Ain, Ras Al-Kaimah, and Al-Fujairah). Upper air (radiosonde) data were available at one site only, Abu Dhabi airport, which has been considered for the refractivity gradient statistics. Monthly and yearly averages are obtained for the two parameters, refractivity and refractivity gradient. Cumulative distributions are also provided.

  18. Measurement of a broadband negative index with space-coiling acoustic metamaterials.

    PubMed

    Xie, Yangbo; Popa, Bogdan-Ioan; Zigoneanu, Lucian; Cummer, Steven A

    2013-04-26

    We report the experimental demonstration of a broadband negative refractive index obtained in a labyrinthine acoustic metamaterial structure. Two different approaches were employed to prove the metamaterial negative index nature: one-dimensional extractions of effective parameters from reflection and transmission measurements and two-dimensional prism-based measurements that convincingly show the transmission angle corresponding to negative refraction. The transmission angles observed in the latter case also agree very well with the refractive index obtained in the one-dimensional measurements and numerical simulations. We expect this labyrinthine metamaterial to become the unit cell of choice for practical acoustic metamaterial devices that require broadband and significantly negative indices of refraction.

  19. Image Quality Analysis of Eyes Undergoing LASER Refractive Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Sarkar, Samrat; Vaddavalli, Pravin Krishna; Bharadwaj, Shrikant R.

    2016-01-01

    Laser refractive surgery for myopia increases the eye’s higher-order wavefront aberrations (HOA’s). However, little is known about the impact of such optical degradation on post-operative image quality (IQ) of these eyes. This study determined the relation between HOA’s and IQ parameters (peak IQ, dioptric focus that maximized IQ and depth of focus) derived from psychophysical (logMAR acuity) and computational (logVSOTF) through-focus curves in 45 subjects (18 to 31yrs) before and 1-month after refractive surgery and in 40 age-matched emmetropic controls. Computationally derived peak IQ and its best focus were negatively correlated with the RMS deviation of all HOA’s (HORMS) (r≥-0.5; p<0.001 for all). Computational depth of focus was positively correlated with HORMS (r≥0.55; p<0.001 for all) and negatively correlated with peak IQ (r≥-0.8; p<0.001 for all). All IQ parameters related to logMAR acuity were poorly correlated with HORMS (r≤|0.16|; p>0.16 for all). Increase in HOA’s after refractive surgery is therefore associated with a decline in peak IQ and a persistence of this sub-standard IQ over a larger dioptric range, vis-à-vis, before surgery and in age-matched controls. This optical deterioration however does not appear to significantly alter psychophysical IQ, suggesting minimal impact of refractive surgery on the subject’s ability to resolve spatial details and their tolerance to blur. PMID:26859302

  20. Measuring Variable Refractive Indices Using Digital Photos

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lombardi, S.; Monroy, G.; Testa, I.; Sassi, E.

    2010-01-01

    A new procedure for performing quantitative measurements in teaching optics is presented. Application of the procedure to accurately measure the rate of change of the variable refractive index of a water-denatured alcohol mixture is described. The procedure can also be usefully exploited for measuring the constant refractive index of distilled…

  1. Retinal Image Simulation of Subjective Refraction Techniques.

    PubMed

    Perches, Sara; Collados, M Victoria; Ares, Jorge

    2016-01-01

    Refraction techniques make it possible to determine the most appropriate sphero-cylindrical lens prescription to achieve the best possible visual quality. Among these techniques, subjective refraction (i.e., patient's response-guided refraction) is the most commonly used approach. In this context, this paper's main goal is to present a simulation software that implements in a virtual manner various subjective-refraction techniques--including Jackson's Cross-Cylinder test (JCC)--relying all on the observation of computer-generated retinal images. This software has also been used to evaluate visual quality when the JCC test is performed in multifocal-contact-lens wearers. The results reveal this software's usefulness to simulate the retinal image quality that a particular visual compensation provides. Moreover, it can help to gain a deeper insight and to improve existing refraction techniques and it can be used for simulated training.

  2. Refracting surface plasmon polaritons with nanoparticle arrays.

    PubMed

    Radko, Ilya P; Evlyukhin, Andrey B; Boltasseva, Alexandra; Bozhevolnyi, Sergey I

    2008-03-17

    Refraction of surface plasmon polaritons (SPPs) by various structures formed by a 100-nm-period square lattice of gold nanoparticles on top of a gold film is studied by leakage radiation microscopy. SPP refraction by a triangular-shaped nanoparticle array indicates that the SPP effective refractive index increases inside the array by a factor of approximately 1.08 (for the wavelength 800 nm) with respect to the SPP index at a flat surface. Observations of SPP focusing and deflection by circularly shaped areas as well as SPP waveguiding inside rectangular arrays are consistent with the SPP index increase deduced from the SPP refraction by triangular arrays. The SPP refractive index is found to decrease slightly for longer wavelengths within the wavelength range of 700-860 nm. Modeling based on the Green's tensor formalism is in a good agreement with the experimental results, opening the possibility to design nanoparticle arrays for specific applications requiring in-plane SPP manipulation.

  3. Retinal Image Simulation of Subjective Refraction Techniques

    PubMed Central

    Perches, Sara; Collados, M. Victoria; Ares, Jorge

    2016-01-01

    Refraction techniques make it possible to determine the most appropriate sphero-cylindrical lens prescription to achieve the best possible visual quality. Among these techniques, subjective refraction (i.e., patient’s response-guided refraction) is the most commonly used approach. In this context, this paper’s main goal is to present a simulation software that implements in a virtual manner various subjective-refraction techniques—including Jackson’s Cross-Cylinder test (JCC)—relying all on the observation of computer-generated retinal images. This software has also been used to evaluate visual quality when the JCC test is performed in multifocal-contact-lens wearers. The results reveal this software’s usefulness to simulate the retinal image quality that a particular visual compensation provides. Moreover, it can help to gain a deeper insight and to improve existing refraction techniques and it can be used for simulated training. PMID:26938648

  4. Reversing the direction of space and inverse Doppler effect in positive refraction index media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Fei; He, Sailing

    2017-01-01

    A negative refractive index medium, in which all spatial coordinates are reversed (i.e. a left-hand triplet is formed) by a spatial folding transformation, can create many novel electromagnetic phenomena, e.g. backward wave propagation, and inversed Doppler effect (IDE). In this study, we use coordinate rotation transformation to reverse only two spatial coordinates (e.g. x‧ and y‧), while keeping z‧ unchanged. In this case, some novel phenomena, e.g. radiation-direction-reversing illusions and IDE, can be achieved in a free space region wrapped by the proposed shell without any negative refractive index medium, which is easier for experimental realization and future applications.

  5. Fully 3D refraction correction dosimetry system.

    PubMed

    Manjappa, Rakesh; Makki, S Sharath; Kumar, Rajesh; Vasu, Ram Mohan; Kanhirodan, Rajan

    2016-02-21

    The irradiation of selective regions in a polymer gel dosimeter results in an increase in optical density and refractive index (RI) at those regions. An optical tomography-based dosimeter depends on rayline path through the dosimeter to estimate and reconstruct the dose distribution. The refraction of light passing through a dose region results in artefacts in the reconstructed images. These refraction errors are dependant on the scanning geometry and collection optics. We developed a fully 3D image reconstruction algorithm, algebraic reconstruction technique-refraction correction (ART-rc) that corrects for the refractive index mismatches present in a gel dosimeter scanner not only at the boundary, but also for any rayline refraction due to multiple dose regions inside the dosimeter. In this study, simulation and experimental studies have been carried out to reconstruct a 3D dose volume using 2D CCD measurements taken for various views. The study also focuses on the effectiveness of using different refractive-index matching media surrounding the gel dosimeter. Since the optical density is assumed to be low for a dosimeter, the filtered backprojection is routinely used for reconstruction. We carry out the reconstructions using conventional algebraic reconstruction (ART) and refractive index corrected ART (ART-rc) algorithms. The reconstructions based on FDK algorithm for cone-beam tomography has also been carried out for comparison. Line scanners and point detectors, are used to obtain reconstructions plane by plane. The rays passing through dose region with a RI mismatch does not reach the detector in the same plane depending on the angle of incidence and RI. In the fully 3D scanning setup using 2D array detectors, light rays that undergo refraction are still collected and hence can still be accounted for in the reconstruction algorithm. It is found that, for the central region of the dosimeter, the usable radius using ART-rc algorithm with water as RI matched

  6. Fully 3D refraction correction dosimetry system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manjappa, Rakesh; Sharath Makki, S.; Kumar, Rajesh; Mohan Vasu, Ram; Kanhirodan, Rajan

    2016-02-01

    The irradiation of selective regions in a polymer gel dosimeter results in an increase in optical density and refractive index (RI) at those regions. An optical tomography-based dosimeter depends on rayline path through the dosimeter to estimate and reconstruct the dose distribution. The refraction of light passing through a dose region results in artefacts in the reconstructed images. These refraction errors are dependant on the scanning geometry and collection optics. We developed a fully 3D image reconstruction algorithm, algebraic reconstruction technique-refraction correction (ART-rc) that corrects for the refractive index mismatches present in a gel dosimeter scanner not only at the boundary, but also for any rayline refraction due to multiple dose regions inside the dosimeter. In this study, simulation and experimental studies have been carried out to reconstruct a 3D dose volume using 2D CCD measurements taken for various views. The study also focuses on the effectiveness of using different refractive-index matching media surrounding the gel dosimeter. Since the optical density is assumed to be low for a dosimeter, the filtered backprojection is routinely used for reconstruction. We carry out the reconstructions using conventional algebraic reconstruction (ART) and refractive index corrected ART (ART-rc) algorithms. The reconstructions based on FDK algorithm for cone-beam tomography has also been carried out for comparison. Line scanners and point detectors, are used to obtain reconstructions plane by plane. The rays passing through dose region with a RI mismatch does not reach the detector in the same plane depending on the angle of incidence and RI. In the fully 3D scanning setup using 2D array detectors, light rays that undergo refraction are still collected and hence can still be accounted for in the reconstruction algorithm. It is found that, for the central region of the dosimeter, the usable radius using ART-rc algorithm with water as RI matched

  7. The BHVI-EyeMapper: Peripheral Refraction and Aberration Profiles

    PubMed Central

    Fedtke, Cathleen; Ehrmann, Klaus; Falk, Darrin; Bakaraju, Ravi C.; Holden, Brien A.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Purpose The aim of this article was to present the optical design of a new instrument (BHVI-EyeMapper, EM), which is dedicated to rapid peripheral wavefront measurements across the visual field for distance and near, and to compare the peripheral refraction and higher-order aberration profiles obtained in myopic eyes with and without accommodation. Methods Central and peripheral refractive errors (M, J180, and J45) and higher-order aberrations (C[3, 1], C[3, 3], and C[4, 0]) were measured in 26 myopic participants (mean [±SD] age, 20.9 [±2.0] years; mean [±SD] spherical equivalent, −3.00 [±0.90] diopters [D]) corrected for distance. Measurements were performed along the horizontal visual field with (−2.00 to −5.00 D) and without (+1.00 D fogging) accommodation. Changes as a function of accommodation were compared using tilt and curvature coefficients of peripheral refraction and aberration profiles. Results As accommodation increased, the relative peripheral refraction profiles of M and J180 became significantly (p < 0.05) more negative and the profile of M became significantly (p < 0.05) more asymmetric. No significant differences were found for the J45 profiles (p > 0.05). The peripheral aberration profiles of C[3, 1], C[3, 3], and C[4, 0] became significantly (p < 0.05) less asymmetric as accommodation increased, but no differences were found in the curvature. Conclusions The current study showed that significant changes in peripheral refraction and higher-order aberration profiles occurred during accommodation in myopic eyes. With its extended measurement capabilities, that is, permitting rapid peripheral refraction and higher-order aberration measurements up to visual field angles of ±50 degrees for distance and near (up to −5.00 D), the EM is a new advanced instrument that may provide additional insights in the ongoing quest to understand and monitor myopia development. PMID:25105690

  8. [Does refractive surgery really make eyeglasses superfluous?].

    PubMed

    Seiler, T

    2001-06-14

    Spectacles have become a problem of life-style in some societies. In the USA, in 1999 approximately 1 million LASIK operations have been performed to correct myopia and astigmatism and in Europe the frequency of refractive surgery stead by increases. However, only 3 to 5% of these operations are medically indicated. Refractive surgery is evaluated regarding safety and efficacy. Modern laser techniques demonstrate excellent refractive results: photorefractive keratectomy (PRK) achieved refractive success rates of 90% and more with complication rates of 0.5% and less. PRK is, therefore, a valuable technique for corrections of myopia up to -6.0 D. Similar efficacy is obtained with LASIK (laser in situ keratomileusis) in corrections up to -10 D, however, the complication rate is somewhat higher. Laser correction of hyperopia is equally successful regarding the refractive success but shows an even higher complication rate and the patient satisfaction is lower. Modern refractive laser surgery may replace spectacles in the majority of the cases, however, none of the techniques is free of complications. Therefore, we understand refractive surgery still to be inferior to the correction of ametropia by means of spectacles and any such operation should be attempted only after thorough discussion.

  9. Reflection and refraction of flexural waves at geometric boundaries.

    PubMed

    Evans, Arthur A; Levine, Alex J

    2013-07-19

    We present a theory of flexural wave propagation on elastic shells having nontrivial geometry and develop an analogy to geometric optics. The transport of momentum within the shell itself is anisotropic due to the curvature, and as such complex classical effects such as birefringence are generically found. We determine the equations of reflection and refraction of such waves at boundaries between different local geometries, showing that waves are totally internally reflected, especially at boundaries between regions of positive and negative Gaussian curvature. We verify these effects by using finite element simulations and discuss the ramifications of these effects for the statistical mechanics of thin curved materials.

  10. Refractive effects in 9Be scattering and nuclear rainbow ghosts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Satchler, G. R.; Fulmer, C. B.; Auble, R. L.; Ball, J. B.; Bertrand, F. E.; Erb, K. A.; Gross, E. E.; Hensley, D. C.

    1983-08-01

    Data for the elastic scattering of 9Be on 12C and 16O at 158 MeV provide evidence of refractive effects that allow the optical potentials to be determined with little ambiguity. The real potentials are deep. Large angle data indicate dominance of negative-angle scattering from the far side of the target nucleus. The analysis also implies a residual rainbow phenomenon, contrary to what has been seen previously in heavy-ion scattering. We suggest this be called a rainbow ghost. Operated by Union Carbide Corporation under contract W-7405-eng-26 with the US Department of Energy.

  11. [Calculations of mean refraction and variation of refraction using a dioptric space].

    PubMed

    Touzeau, O; Costantini, E; Gaujoux, T; Borderie, V; Laroche, L

    2010-11-01

    Polar notations (sphere, cylinder, and axis) of refraction perfectly characterize a single refraction but are not suitable for statistical analysis or graphic representation. While the spherical component of refraction can be easily analyzed by the spherical equivalent, statistical analysis of astigmatism requires non-polar expressions of refraction. Indeed, the cylinder and axis of astigmatism are not independent data. In addition, axis is a directional data including a non-trigonometric cycle. Refraction can be written in a non-polar notation by three rectangular coordinates (x, y, z), which can also represent the spherocylinder by one point in a dioptric space. These three coordinates constitute three independent (orthogonal) variables that correspond to a sphere-equivalent component and a pair of Jackson cross-cylinder components, oriented at 0°/90° (WTR/ATR astigmatism) and 45°/135° (oblique astigmatism). Statistical analysis and graphical representation become less complicated when using rectangular coordinates of refraction. Rectangular coordinates of the mean refraction are obtained by average rectangular coordinates. Similarly, rectangular coordinates of refraction change are obtained by a single subtraction of rectangular coordinates between the final and initial refractions. After statistical analysis, the rectangular coordinates obtained can be converted into a polar form for a more easily understood result. Finally, non-polar notations including rectangular coordinates are useful for statistical and graphical analysis, which would be difficult with only conventional polar notations of refraction.

  12. Formation of bulk refractive index structures

    DOEpatents

    Potter, Jr., Barrett George; Potter, Kelly Simmons; Wheeler, David R.; Jamison, Gregory M.

    2003-07-15

    A method of making a stacked three-dimensional refractive index structure in photosensitive materials using photo-patterning where first determined is the wavelength at which a photosensitive material film exhibits a change in refractive index upon exposure to optical radiation, a portion of the surfaces of the photosensitive material film is optically irradiated, the film is marked to produce a registry mark. Multiple films are produced and aligned using the registry marks to form a stacked three-dimensional refractive index structure.

  13. Atmospheric refraction errors in laser ranging systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gardner, C. S.; Rowlett, J. R.

    1976-01-01

    The effects of horizontal refractivity gradients on the accuracy of laser ranging systems were investigated by ray tracing through three dimensional refractivity profiles. The profiles were generated by performing a multiple regression on measurements from seven or eight radiosondes, using a refractivity model which provided for both linear and quadratic variations in the horizontal direction. The range correction due to horizontal gradients was found to be an approximately sinusoidal function of azimuth having a minimum near 0 deg azimuth and a maximum near 180 deg azimuth. The peak to peak variation was approximately 5 centimeters at 10 deg elevation and decreased to less than 1 millimeter at 80 deg elevation.

  14. Understanding refraction contrast using a comparison of absorption and refraction computed tomographic techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiebe, S.; Rhoades, G.; Wei, Z.; Rosenberg, A.; Belev, G.; Chapman, D.

    2013-05-01

    Refraction x-ray contrast is an imaging modality used primarily in a research setting at synchrotron facilities, which have a biomedical imaging research program. The most common method for exploiting refraction contrast is by using a technique called Diffraction Enhanced Imaging (DEI). The DEI apparatus allows the detection of refraction between two materials and produces a unique ''edge enhanced'' contrast appearance, very different from the traditional absorption x-ray imaging used in clinical radiology. In this paper we aim to explain the features of x-ray refraction contrast as a typical clinical radiologist would understand. Then a discussion regarding what needs to be considered in the interpretation of the refraction image takes place. Finally we present a discussion about the limitations of planar refraction imaging and the potential of DEI Computed Tomography. This is an original work that has not been submitted to any other source for publication. The authors have no commercial interests or conflicts of interest to disclose.

  15. Isaac Newton and the astronomical refraction.

    PubMed

    Lehn, Waldemar H

    2008-12-01

    In a short interval toward the end of 1694, Isaac Newton developed two mathematical models for the theory of the astronomical refraction and calculated two refraction tables, but did not publish his theory. Much effort has been expended, starting with Biot in 1836, in the attempt to identify the methods and equations that Newton used. In contrast to previous work, a closed form solution is identified for the refraction integral that reproduces the table for his first model (in which density decays linearly with elevation). The parameters of his second model, which includes the exponential variation of pressure in an isothermal atmosphere, have also been identified by reproducing his results. The implication is clear that in each case Newton had derived exactly the correct equations for the astronomical refraction; furthermore, he was the first to do so.

  16. A fully automated remote refraction system.

    PubMed

    Dyer, A M; Kirk, A H

    2000-01-01

    Traditional methods of performing refractions depend on a trained refractionist being present with the subject and conducting an interactive form of subjective testing. A fully automated refraction system was installed in 13 optical dispensaries and after 15 months the patient and statistical information was gathered. The data from all operators were consistent and suggested a lack of operator effect on the refraction results. The mean of the SD of subjective sphere measurements was 0.2, or slightly less than a quarter dioptre, which would be an acceptable level of accuracy for ordering corrective lenses. The present study suggests an absence of operator influence on the results of the refractions and a degree of consistency and accuracy compatible with the prescription of lenses.

  17. Influence of refractive correction on ocular dominance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakayama, Nanami; Kawamorita, Takushi; Uozato, Hiroshi

    2010-07-01

    We investigated the effects of refractive correction and refractive defocus on the assessment of sensory ocular dominance. In 25 healthy subjects (4 males and 21 females) aged between 20 and 31 years, a quantitative measurement of sensory ocular dominance was performed with refractive correction and the addition of a positive lens on the dominant eye. Sensory ocular dominance was measured with a chart using binocular rivalry targets. The reversal point changed after the addition of a +1.00 D lens on the dominant eye in all subjects. However, sighting ocular dominance and stereopsis did not change after the addition of a positive lens on the dominant eye ( P > 0:05, Wilcoxon test). These results suggest that refractive correction affects sensory ocular dominance, indicating the possible development of a new type of occlusion for amblyopia in the future.

  18. REFractions: The Representing Equivalent Fractions Game

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tucker, Stephen I.

    2014-01-01

    Stephen Tucker presents a fractions game that addresses a range of fraction concepts including equivalence and computation. The REFractions game also improves students' fluency with representing, comparing and adding fractions.

  19. Hybrid high refractive index polymer coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yubao; Flaim, Tony; Mercado, Ramil; Fowler, Shelly; Holmes, Douglas; Planje, Curtis

    2005-04-01

    Thermally curable hybrid high refractive index polymer solutions have been developed. These solutions are stable up to 6 months under room temperature storage conditions and can be easily spin-coated onto a desired substrate. When cured at elevated temperature, the hybrid polymer coating decomposes to form a metal oxide-rich film that has a high refractive index. The resulting films have refractive indices higher than 1.90 in the entire visible region and achieve film thicknesses of 300-900 nm depending on the level of metal oxide loading, cure temperature being used, and number of coatings. The formed films show greater than 90% internal transmission in the visible wavelength (400-700 nm). These hybrid high refractive index films are mechanically robust, are stable upon exposure to both heat and UV radiation, and are currently being investigated for microlithographic patterning potential.

  20. Negative-permittivity plasma generation in negative-permeability space with high-energy metamaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakai, Osamu; Nakamura, Yoshihiro; Iwai, Akinori; Iio, Satoshi

    2016-10-01

    Plasma generation by electromagnetic waves in negative-permeability space is analyzed using experimental results and theoretical models. Installation of negative-permeability metamaterials triggers drastic changes to the propagation of electromagnetic waves. Unlike usual cases in which permeability is  +1, negative permeability induces evanescent modes in a space without plasma. However, if permittivity becomes negative due to high-electron-density or overdense plasma, electromagnetic waves can propagate because negative-refractive-index states emerge. In this study, reviewing our previous experimental data, we study the underlying physical processes in plasma generation in terms of wave propagation and parameters of wave media. We confirm nonlinear (transition) processes in the phase of density evolution up to the negative permittivity state and negative-refractive-index states in the quasi-steady phase. We also note that such energetic metamaterials are built up when we use plasma, unlike conventional metamaterials composed of solid-state materials.

  1. [Polar and non polar notations of refraction].

    PubMed

    Touzeau, O; Gaujoux, T; Costantini, E; Borderie, V; Laroche, L

    2010-01-01

    Refraction can be expressed by four polar notations which correspond to four different combinations of spherical or cylindrical lenses. Conventional expressions of refraction (plus and minus cylinder notation) are described by sphere, cylinder, and axis. In the plus cylinder notation, the axis visualizes the most powerful meridian. The axis usually corresponds to the bow tie axis in curvature maps. Plus cylinder notation is also valuable for all relaxing procedures (i.e., selective suture ablation, arcuate keratotomy, etc.). In the cross-cylinder notation, two orthogonal cylinders can describe (without the sphere component) the actual refraction of both the principal meridians. This notation must be made before performing the vertex calculation. Using an association of a Jackson cross-cylinder and a spherical equivalent, refraction can be broken down into two pure components: astigmatism and sphere. All polar notations of refraction may perfectly characterize a single refraction but are not suitable for statistical analysis, which requires nonpolar expression. After doubling the axis, a rectangular projection breaks down the Jackson cross-cylinder, which has a polar axis, into two Jackson cross-cylinders on the 0 degrees /90 degrees and 45 degrees /135 degrees axis. This procedure results in the loss of the directional nature of the data. Refraction can be written in a nonpolar notation by three rectangular coordinates (x,y,z), which can also represent the spherocylinder by one point in a dioptric space. These three independent (orthogonal) variables have a concrete optical significance: a spherical component, a direct/inverse (WTR/ATR) component, and an oblique component of the astigmatism. Finally, nonpolar notations are useful for statistical analysis and graphical representation of refraction.

  2. Indices of refraction for the HITRAN compilation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Massie, S. T.

    1994-01-01

    Indices of refraction of sulfuric acid solutions, water, and ice, which will become part of the HITRAN database, are discussed. Representative calculations are presented for the sulfate aerosol, to illustrate the broadband spectral features of i.r. aerosol extinction spectra. Values of the sulfuric acid mass density are used in an application of the Lorentz-Lorenz equation, which is used to estimate the sensitivity of extinction coefficients to temperature dependent refractive indices.

  3. On the effective refractive index of blood

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nahmad-Rohen, Alexander; Contreras-Tello, Humberto; Morales-Luna, Gesuri; García-Valenzuela, Augusto

    2016-01-01

    We calculated the real and imaginary parts of the effective refractive index {n}{eff} of blood as functions of wavelength from 400 to 800 nm; we employed van de Hulst’s theory, together with the anomalous diffraction approximation, for the calculation. We modelled blood as a mixture of plasma and erythrocytes. Our results indicate that erythrocyte orientation has a strong effect on {n}{eff}, making blood an optically anisotropic medium except when the erythrocytes are randomly oriented. In the case in which their symmetry axis is perpendicular to the wave vector, {n}{eff} equals the refractive index of plasma at certain wavelengths. Furthermore, the erythrocytes’ shape affects their contribution to {n}{eff} in an important way, implying that studies on the effective refractive index of blood should avoid approximating them as spheres or spheroids. Finally, the effective refractive index of blood predicted by van de Hulst’s theory is different from what would be obtained by averaging the refractive indices of its constituents weighted by volume; such a volume-weighted average is appropriate only for haemolysed blood. We then measured the real part of the refractive index of various blood solutions using two different experimental setups. One of the most important results of our expriment is that {n}{eff} is measurable to a good degree of precision even for undiluted blood, although not all measuring apparatuses are appropriate. The experimental data is self-consistent and in reasonable agreement with our theoretical calculations.

  4. Heritability of refractive value and ocular biometrics.

    PubMed

    Paget, Sandrine; Vitezica, Zulma G; Malecaze, François; Calvas, Patrick

    2008-02-01

    The aim of this work was to analyse genetic influences on ocular refractive value and axial length using the hypothesis of a polygenic control. The genealogical records of 55 families were used in the analyses. The cohort included 723 individuals and clinical data were collected for 445 individuals with a mean age of 37.86 years. Ocular refraction was determined by standard autorefractometry. Axial length was evaluated by scan ultrasonography. Gender, age and ethnic origin were included as covariates in the statistical analyses. Using variance component analysis via a Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) method, we estimated the heritability of refractive value and axial length in the pedigree. We then performed a segregation analysis, using Loki, a (MCMC) linkage analysis program for multilocus inheritance models, examining different inheritance models with polygenic components. Polygenic control was modelled under an additive infinitesimal model (which assumes infinite loci with small effects, with additive actions) and under a finite locus model (i.e. several causal loci). The estimates of heritability were 0.20 (95% confidence interval (CI) 0.04-0.36) for refractive value and 0.20 (95% CI 0.03-0.43) for axial length. Segregation analyses suggested that ocular refraction and axial length are under a polygenic control. A finite number of genes were identified with or without a polygenic, infinitesimal component. Ocular refraction is mildly-moderately heritable in the studied population.

  5. ON THE SOURCE OF ASTROMETRIC ANOMALOUS REFRACTION

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, M. Suzanne; McGraw, John T.; Zimmer, Peter C.; Pier, Jeffrey R.

    2013-03-15

    More than a century ago, astronomers using transit telescopes to determine precise stellar positions were hampered by an unexplained periodic shifting of the stars they were observing. With the advent of CCD transit telescopes in the past three decades, this unexplained motion, termed 'anomalous refraction' by these early astronomers, is again being observed. Anomalous refraction is described as a low-frequency, large angular scale ({approx}2 Degree-Sign ) motion of the entire image plane with respect to the celestial coordinate system as observed and defined by astrometric catalogs. These motions, of typically several tenths of an arcsecond amplitude with timescales on the order of 10 minutes, are ubiquitous to ground-based drift-scan astrometric measurements regardless of location or telescopes used and have been attributed to the effect of tilting of equal-density layers of the atmosphere. The cause of this tilting has often been attributed to atmospheric gravity waves, but this cause has never been confirmed. Although theoretical models of atmospheric refraction show that atmospheric gravity waves are a plausible cause of anomalous refraction, an observational campaign specifically directed at defining this relationship provides clear evidence that anomalous refraction is not consistent with the passage of atmospheric gravity waves. The source of anomalous refraction is found to be meter-scale, slowly evolving quasi-coherent dynamical structures in the boundary layer below 60 m above ground level.

  6. Multimeridional refraction: dependence of the measurement accuracy on the number of meridians refracted.

    PubMed

    Oechsner, U; Kusel, R

    1997-06-01

    A Monte Carlo simulation of multimeridional refraction measurements was used to investigate the dependence of the accuracy of the measurement on the number of meridians refracted, N, and on the standard deviation of a measurement in a single meridian, sigma. For the description of the measurement errors, the residual refraction values were used, i.e., the parameters of the refraction remaining after application of the measured correction. The distributions of the residual refraction values were found to be independent of the "true" refraction values; in addition, by means of a factor square root of N/sigma, reduced residual refraction values could be defined which also were independent of N and sigma. A vector space proposed by Lakshminarayanan and Varadharajan (based on Long's power matrix) was used to represent the joint distribution of the residual refraction values in three-dimensional space. It was found to be a three-variate Gaussian distribution with zero mean and diagonal covariance matrix. It could further be shown that the vector space proposed by Harris is identical to the one used, up to a linear transformation. Several criteria, based on the one- and three-dimensional distributions and corresponding to different levels of accuracy, are discussed resulting in a wide range of answers about the number of meridians to be refracted.

  7. Origin of crystallization-induced refractive index changes in photo-thermo-refractive glass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lumeau, Julien; Glebova, Larissa; Golubkov, Valerii; Zanotto, Edgar D.; Glebov, Leonid B.

    2009-11-01

    Photo-thermo-refractive (PTR) glass is a multi-component silicate that undergoes localized refractive index decrease after UV-exposure and thermal treatment for partial crystallization. Based on this refractive index change, high efficiency volume Bragg gratings have been developed in PTR glass and have been successfully used for laser beam control. However, despite the fact that this type of glass has been widely studied and used over the last 20 years, the origin of the refractive index change upon crystallization is poorly understood. In this paper, we introduce three possible mechanisms (the precipitation of nano-sized NaF crystals and the associated local chemical changes of the glass matrix, the volumetric changes due to relaxation, and the local residual stresses) for the refractive index decrement in PTR glass and estimate the partial refractive index change due to each mechanism. Refractive index measurements are compared with high temperature XRD experiments and a general approach for the simulation of the refractive index change in PTR glass is proposed. We show that among the studied variables the residual stresses surrounding the crystals are the main responsible for the local refractive index decrement in this glass.

  8. Interferometric Methods of Measuring Refractive Indices and Double-Refraction of Fibres.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hamza, A. A.; El-Kader, H. I. Abd

    1986-01-01

    Presents two methods used to measure the refractive indices and double-refraction of fibers. Experiments are described, with one involving the use of Pluta microscope in the double-beam interference technique, the other employing the multiple-beam technique. Immersion liquids are discussed that can be used in the experiments. (TW)

  9. Double Negative Materials (DNM), Phenomena and Applications

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-07-01

    9 Feynman , R. P., R. B. Leighton, and M. Sands. Quantum physics . Vol. 1 of The Feynman Lectures on Physics (Addison-Wesley, 1964...involved in justifying basic physical questions of causality, validity of the concept of negative index of refraction interpretation of experimental...Materials ......................................... 2-4 3. Basic Physics Phenomena

  10. Determination of the Dispersion of the Principal Refractive Indices for Birefringent Polypropylene Films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bezruchenko, V. S.; Murauski, An. A.; Muravsky, Al. A.

    2014-07-01

    We present a novel method for determining the dispersion of the refractive indices of birefringent films, based on treatment of transmission spectra, in which we observe interference of light. The dispersion curves n x (λ) and n y (λ) were determined by treatment of transmission spectra obtained for normal incidence of radiation on a P2-25 birefringent fi lm, and n z (λ) was determined for oblique incidence of radiation. From the results of determination of the dispersions of the principal refractive indices of a birefringent P2-25 polypropylene film (Mogilevkhimvolokno OAO, Belarus), we established that the sample is a negative biaxial retarder with N z = 2.9.

  11. [Retinal detachment in various myopic refractions].

    PubMed

    Alimanović-Halilović, Emina

    2009-01-01

    The basic aim of this study was to find the group of "critical" myopic refraction with the highest occurrence of retinal detachment. In the study, 180 myopic eyes were analyzed. Upon the targeted ophthalmological anamnesis, definition of the objective refraction, and indirect binocular ophthalmoscopy, we analyzed the distribution of retinal detachment and the area affected in relation to refraction. All the eyes were divided into groups according to the refraction height. Average age of our patients ranged from 48.43 to 51.60 years with SD from 13.88 to 18.45. We did not find a statistically significant difference for a certain age. The study covered 102 (56.6%) male and 78 (43.3%) female patients. The highest occurrence of retinal detachment was found in Refraction Group from 3.5 to 7.49 dsph, total 21 (11.6%). The retinal detachments usually affected 2/4 or 3/4 of the eye fundus surface respectively.

  12. Refractive Secondary Concentrators for Solar Thermal Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wong, Wayne A.; Macosko, Robert P.

    1999-01-01

    The NASA Glenn Research Center is developing technologies that utilize solar energy for various space applications including electrical power conversion, thermal propulsion, and furnaces. Common to all of these applications is the need for highly efficient, solar concentration systems. An effort is underway to develop the innovative single crystal refractive secondary concentrator, which uses refraction and total internal reflection to efficiently concentrate and direct solar energy. The refractive secondary offers very high throughput efficiencies (greater than 90%), and when used in combination with advanced primary concentrators, enables very high concentration ratios (10,0(X) to 1) and very high temperatures (greater than 2000 K). Presented is an overview of the refractive secondary concentrator development effort at the NASA Glenn Research Center, including optical design and analysis techniques, thermal modeling capabilities, crystal materials characterization testing, optical coatings evaluation, and component testing. Also presented is a discussion of potential future activity and technical issues yet to be resolved. Much of the work performed to date has been in support of the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center's Solar Thermal Propulsion Program. The many benefits of a refractive secondary concentrator that enable efficient, high temperature thermal propulsion system designs, apply equally well to other solar applications including furnaces and power generation systems such as solar dynamics, concentrated thermal photovoltaics, and thermionics.

  13. Thai Negation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alam, Samsul

    A study analyzed the structure of negative sentences in the Thai language, based on data gathered from two native speakers. It is shown that the Thai negative marker generally occurs between the noun phrase (subject) and the verb phrase in simple active sentences and in passive sentences. Negation of noun phrases is also allowed in Thai, with a…

  14. Negative Plasma Densities Raise Questions

    SciTech Connect

    Hazi, A

    2006-01-26

    Nearly all the matter encountered on Earth is either a solid, liquid, or gas. Yet plasma-the fourth state of matter-comprises more than 99 percent of the visible universe. Understanding the physical characteristics of plasmas is important to many areas of scientific research, such as the development of fusion as a clean, renewable energy source. Lawrence Livermore scientists study the physics of plasmas in their pursuit to create fusion energy, because plasmas are an integral part of that process. When deuterium and tritium are heated to the extreme temperatures needed to achieve and sustain a fusion reaction (about 100 million degrees), the electrons in these light atoms become separated from the nuclei. This process of separation is called ionization, and the resulting collection of negatively charged free electrons and positively charged nuclei is known as a plasma. Although plasmas and gases have many similar properties, plasmas differ from gases in that they are good conductors of electricity and can generate magnetic fields. For the past decade, x-ray laser interferometry has been used in the laboratory for measuring a plasma's index of refraction to determine plasma density. (The index of refraction for a given material is defined as the wavelength of light in a vacuum divided by the wavelength of light traveling through the material.) Until now, plasma physicists expected to find an index of refraction less than one. Researchers from Livermore and Colorado State University recently conducted experiments on aluminum plasmas at the Laboratory's COMET laser facility and observed results in which the index of refraction was greater than one. This surprising result implied a negative electron density. Livermore physicist Joseph Nilsen and his colleagues from Livermore and the University of Notre Dame have performed sophisticated calculations to explain this phenomenon. Previously, researchers believed that only free electrons contributed to the index of

  15. Seismic refraction analysis: the path forward

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Haines, Seth S.; Zelt, Colin; Doll, William

    2012-01-01

    Seismic Refraction Methods: Unleashing the Potential and Understanding the Limitations; Tucson, Arizona, 29 March 2012 A workshop focused on seismic refraction methods took place on 29 May 2012, associated with the 2012 Symposium on the Application of Geophysics to Engineering and Environmental Problems. This workshop was convened to assess the current state of the science and discuss paths forward, with a primary focus on near-surface problems but with an eye on all applications. The agenda included talks on these topics from a number of experts interspersed with discussion and a dedicated discussion period to finish the day. Discussion proved lively at times, and workshop participants delved into many topics central to seismic refraction work.

  16. Interferometric atmospheric refractive-index environmental monitor.

    PubMed

    Ludman, J E; Ludman, J J; Callahan, H; Caulfield, H J; Watt, D; Sampson, J L; Robinson, J; Davis, S; Hunt, A

    1995-06-20

    Long, open-path, outdoor interferometric measurement of the index of refraction as a function of wavelength (spectral refractivity) requires a number of innovations. These include active compensation for vibration and turbulence. The use of electronic compensation produces an electronic signal that is ideal for extracting data. This allows the appropriate interpretation of those data and the systematic and fast scanning of the spectrum by the use of bandwidths that are intermediate between lasers (narrow bandwidth) and white light (broad bandwidth). An Environmental Interferometer that incorporates these features should be extremely valuable in both pollutant detection and pollutant identification. Spectral refractivity measurements complement the information available from spectral absorption instruments (e.g., a Fourier-transform infrared spectrometer). The Environmental Interferometer currently uses an electronic compensating device with a 1-kHz response time, and therefore rapid spectral scans are feasibe so that it is possible to monitor the time evolution of pollutant events.

  17. Refraction of microwave signals by water vapor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldfinger, A. D.

    1980-01-01

    Tropospheric water vapor causes a refractive path length effect which is typically 5-10% of the 'dry' tropospheric effect and as large as several meters at elevation angles below 5 deg. The vertical water vapor profile is quite variable, and measurements of intensive atmospheric parameters such as temperature and humidity limited to the surface do not adequately predict the refractive effect. It is suggested that a water vapor refraction model that is a function of the amount of precipitable water alone can be successful at low elevation angles. From an extensive study of numerical ray tracings through radiosonde balloon data, such a model has been constructed. The model predicts the effect at all latitudes and elevation angles between 2 and 10 deg to an accuracy of better than 4% (11 cm at 3 deg elevation angle).

  18. Refraction by a spherical nematic bubble

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sherman, Richard David

    1989-08-01

    A formalism is developed to study refraction by a spherical nematic bubble. It is applicable to bubbles that are larger than light wavelengths, but smaller than the dimensions for excitation of director-fluctuation-induced scattering. The technique yields a nonlinear differential equation and an associated integral which govern the trajectory of a ray inside a nematic region for an arbitrary director configuration. Explicit solutions are provided for five simple interior arrangements-isotropic, onion skin, radial star, horizontal (bottle brush), and vertical. It is then demonstrated that for extraordinary-ordinary refractive-index difference small compared to either, interfacial refraction at the bubble surface is the dominant contribution; deviations from a rectilinear path are small. When ranked in terms of decreasing scattering effectiveness, the sequence is horizontal, onion, isotropic, radial, and vertical if the light is linearly polarized and coupling optimally to the extraordinary index component; for unpolarized incoherent light the order becomes isotropic, horizontal, onion, radial, and vertical.

  19. Fiber optic liquid refractive index sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhardwaj, Vanita; Gangwar, Rahul Kumar; Singh, Vinod Kumar

    2015-08-01

    In this present work we report fabrication of fiber optic liquid refractive index (RI) measurement sensor based on Michelson Interferometer method. This sensor was assembled by using graded index multimode (MM) fiber with core diameter 50 µm and the cladding of fiber was removed by simple chemical method. To perform this experiment a 2×2 3dB coupler is used. The fiber ends are then immersed in solvent and solution to provide reference and refractive index measurements, respectively. This method was successfully used to measure refractive index of Sodium Chloride (NaCl)-Water solution at different concentrations. The fringe contrast sensitivity of device is 92.90 dB/RIU measured in the RI range from 1.34 to 1.42 which is better than Mach-Zehnder Interferometer sensor [1] and Fabry perot based sensor [2]. The fabrication of sensor is simple, low cost and highly sensitive.

  20. Nonlinear Optics in Negative Index Metamaterials

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-06-05

    analytical model and solutions for nonlinear wave propagation in waveguide couplers with opposite signs of the linear refractive index, non-zero phase... couplers based on either double-negative or strongly anisotropic metamaterials that are likely to enable ultra-compact optical strorage and memory...Venugopal, Zhaxylyk Kudyshev, Natalia Litchinitser. Asymmetric Positive-Negative IndexNonlinear Waveguide Couplers , IEEE Journal of Selected Topics in

  1. Influence of refractive index and molecular weight of alcohol agents on skin optical clearing effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mao, Zhongzhen; Zheng, Ying; Hu, Yating; Lu, Wei; Luo, Qingming; Zhu, Dan

    2007-02-01

    In order to discuss the relative factors affecting the optical clearing effect of agents on skin tissues, six hydroxy-terminated and saturated alcohols with different refractive index and molecular weight were chosen as the optical clearing agents (OCAs). After being treated by different OCAs, the change of transmitted intensity of porcine skins in vitro was measured by single integrating sphere system. The results showed the optical clearing effects of six OCAs, i.e., glycerol, PEG400, PEG200, 1,3-propylene glycol, 1,4-butanediol and 1-butanol, arranged in the descending order. Based on the above results, the refractive index and molecular weight was further discussed. The optical clearing effect of alcohols has been deduced to have negative correlation with refractive index (r=-0.608), but no correlation with molecular weight (r= 0.008).

  2. A Liquid Prism for Refractive Index Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edmiston, Michael D.

    2001-11-01

    A hollow glass prism filled with liquid becomes a "liquid prism". A simple method for constructing hollow glass prisms is presented. A method is given for a demonstration that uses the liquid prism with a laser or laser pointer so the audience can observe differences in refractive index for various liquids. The demonstration provides a quick and easy determination of the sugar content of soft drinks and juices. The prism makes it easy to determine a numerical value for the refractive index of a liquid.

  3. Refractive acoustic devices for airborne sound.

    PubMed

    Cervera, F; Sanchis, L; Sánchez-Pérez, J V; Martínez-Sala, R; Rubio, C; Meseguer, F; López, C; Caballero, D; Sánchez-Dehesa, J

    2002-01-14

    We show that a sonic crystal made of periodic distributions of rigid cylinders in air acts as a new material which allows the construction of refractive acoustic devices for airborne sound. It is demonstrated that, in the long-wave regime, the crystal has low impedance and the sound is transmitted at subsonic velocities. Here, the fabrication and characterization of a convergent lens are presented. Also, an example of a Fabry-Perot interferometer based on this crystal is analyzed. It is concluded that refractive devices based on sonic crystals behave in a manner similar to that of optical systems.

  4. Plasmonic crystal enhanced refractive index sensing

    SciTech Connect

    Stein, Benedikt; Devaux, Eloïse; Genet, Cyriaque Ebbesen, Thomas W.

    2014-06-23

    We demonstrate experimentally how the local anisotropy of the dispersion relation of surface plasmon modes propagating over periodic metal gratings can lead to an enhancement of the figure of merit of refractive index sensors. Exploiting the possibility to acquire defocused images of the Fourier space of a highly stable leakage radiation microscope, we report a twofold increase in sensing sensitivity close to the band gap of a one-dimensional plasmonic crystal where the anisotropy of the band structure is the most important. A practical sensing resolution of O(10{sup −6}) refractive index units is demonstrated.

  5. Ray Curvature and Refraction of Wave Packets.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1978-09-01

    1!~~~~~ _ ‘ AD AOM 302 FLORIDA STATE UNIV TALLAHASSEE DEPT OF OCEANOGRAPHY FIG B/3 RAY CURVATURE AND REFRACTION OF WAVE PACKETS. (U) SEP 78 .J E...BREEDING N00014—77—C—0329 UNCLASSIFIED TR JE6 3 NL _ _ _ rwii__ _ ~iU ir!I I -~~ RAYOJR\\1L~[UREAND REFRACI ION OF WAVE F1~\\CKET~S ~y J. Ernest Breeding...01 29 014 -~ Technical Report No. JEB-3 Department of Oceanography • Florida State University RAY CURVATURE AND REFRACTION OF WAVE PACKETS b O G • J

  6. Implantable collamer lens for residual refractive error after corneal refractive surgery

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xun; Wang, Xiao-Ying; Zhang, Xi; Chen, Zhi; Zhou, Xing-Tao

    2016-01-01

    AIM To assess the safety, efficacy, predictability and stability of implantable collamer lens (ICL) for residual refractive error after corneal refractive surgery. METHODS This study evaluated 19 eyes of 12 patients who underwent ICL implantation after corneal refractive surgeries. They were followed up for 1y to 5y of uncorrected distance visual acuity (UDVA), corrected distance visual acuity (CDVA), manifest refractive error, flat and steep K value, axial length, intraocular pressure, corneal endothelial cell density, adverse events after ICL surgery. RESULTS The mean follow-up period was 39.05±19.22 mo (range, 1-5y). Spherical equivalent refractive error changed from -7.45±3.02 D preoperatively to -0.85±1.10 D 1wk to 1mo after ICL implantation, with the safety and efficacy indices being 1.12 and 1.15, respectively. A total of 52.63% of eyes were within ±0.5 D of the predicted spherical equivalents, 73.68% were within ±1.0 D. A trend of mild regression towards myopia with axial elongation after 5y was observed. One eye with mild anterior capsule opacity and retinal detachment 1y after surgery were observed. CONCLUSION ICL implantation is safe and effective for the correction of residual refractive error after corneal refractive surgeries, especially in moderate to high residual myopia. PMID:27803858

  7. Refractive index of air: 3. The roles of CO2, H2O, and refractivity virials.

    PubMed

    Ciddor, Philip E

    2002-04-20

    The author's recent studies of the refractive index of air are extended, and several assumptions made therein are further examined. It is shown that the alternative dispersion equations for CO2, which are due to Edlen [Metrologia 2, 71 (1966)] and Old et al. [J. Opt. Soc. Am. 61, 89 (1971)] result in differences of less than 2 x 10(-9) in the phase refractive index and less than 3 x 10(-9) in the group refractive index for current and predicted concentrations of CO2. However, because the dispersion equation given by Old et al. is consistent with experimental data in the near infrared, it is preferable to the equation used by Edlen, which is valid only in the ultraviolet and the visible. The classical measurement by Barrell and Sears [Philos. Trans. R. Soc. London Ser. A 238, 1 (1939)] on the refractivity of moist air is shown to have some procedural errors in addition to the one discussed by Birch and Downs [Metrologia 30, 155 (1993)]. It is shown that for normal atmospheric conditions the higher refractivity virial coefficients related to the Lorentz-Lorenz relation are adequately incorporated into the empirically determined first refractivity virial. As a guide to users the practical limits to the calculation of the refractive index of the atmosphere that result from the uncertainties in the measurement of the various atmospheric parameters are summarized.

  8. Calculations of atmospheric refraction for spacecraft remote-sensing applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chu, W. P.

    1983-01-01

    Analytical solutions to the refraction integrals appropriate for ray trajectories along slant paths through the atmosphere are derived in this paper. This type of geometry is commonly encountered in remote-sensing applications utilizing an occultation technique. The solutions are obtained by evaluating higher-order terms from expansion of the refraction integral and are dependent on the vertical temperature distributions. Refraction parameters such as total refraction angles, air masses, and path lengths can be accurately computed. It is also shown that the method can be used for computing refraction parameters in astronomical refraction geometry for large zenith angles.

  9. NEGATIVE SYMPTOMS AND NEGATIVE SCHIZOPHRENIA

    PubMed Central

    Chaturvedi, S.K.; Gopinath, P.S.; Mathai, P. John; Michael, Albert

    1984-01-01

    SUMMARY This study determines the frequency distribution of prominent negative symptoms in a group of chronic, hospitalised schizophrenics. Thirty chronic Schizophrenic (D.S.M. III) patients were rated on the scale for Assessment of Negative Symptoms (SANS) and the prominent negative symptoms were correlated with age, sex and certain illness variables. Majority (80%) of patients had some or the other negative symptom, except thought blocking which was found in none. The subjective awareness of the symptoms was poor. Most negative symptoms were present to a severe degree in about 40% of cases. However, no significant correlation was found between severe negative symptoms and age or sex. Similarly, duration of illness, duration of hospitalisation or current medications did not influence negative symptoms to any appreciable degree. The implications are discussed. PMID:21965985

  10. Joint analysis of refractions with surface waves: An inverse solution to the refraction-traveltime problem

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ivanov, J.; Miller, R.D.; Xia, J.; Steeples, D.; Park, C.B.

    2006-01-01

    We describe a possible solution to the inverse refraction-traveltime problem (IRTP) that reduces the range of possible solutions (nonuniqueness). This approach uses a reference model, derived from surface-wave shear-wave velocity estimates, as a constraint. The application of the joint analysis of refractions with surface waves (JARS) method provided a more realistic solution than the conventional refraction/tomography methods, which did not benefit from a reference model derived from real data. This confirmed our conclusion that the proposed method is an advancement in the IRTP analysis. The unique basic principles of the JARS method might be applicable to other inverse geophysical problems. ?? 2006 Society of Exploration Geophysicists.

  11. Tropospheric Refractivity Profiles Inferred from RF Measurements-Passive Refractive Index by Satellite Monitoring (PRISM).

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-10-24

    238, Integrated Refractive Effects Prediction System (IREPS), Interim User’s Manual , by HV Hitney and RA Paulus, March 1979. 7 Two methods are used by...refractivity, N, as (n-I) X 10’, which has values in the range 0 to 500. For radio frequencies, the refractivity is related to atmospheric tempera - ture...acquisition band, the first local oscillators are manually ad3usted to drive the IF to its nominal 5 kHz. Both first local oscillators (Hewlett Packard

  12. Refractive Optics for Hard X-ray Transmission Microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Simon, M.; Last, A.; Mohr, J.; Nazmov, V.; Reznikova, E.; Ahrens, G.; Voigt, A.

    2011-09-09

    For hard x-ray transmission microscopy at photon energies higher than 15 keV we design refractive condenser and imaging elements to be used with synchrotron light sources as well as with x-ray tube sources. The condenser lenses are optimized for low x-ray attenuation--resulting in apertures greater than 1 mm--and homogeneous intensity distribution on the detector plane, whereas the imaging enables high-resolution (<100 nm) full-field imaging. To obtain high image quality at reasonable exposure times, custom-tailored matched pairs of condenser and imaging lenses are being developed. The imaging lenses (compound refractive lenses, CRLs) are made of SU-8 negative resist by deep x-ray lithography. SU-8 shows high radiation stability. The fabrication technique enables high-quality lens structures regarding surface roughness and arrangement precision with arbitrary 2D geometry. To provide point foci, crossed pairs of lenses are used. Condenser lenses have been made utilizing deep x-ray lithographic patterning of thick SU-8 layers, too, whereas in this case, the aperture is limited due to process restrictions. Thus, in terms of large apertures, condenser lenses made of structured and rolled polyimide film are more attractive. Both condenser types, x-ray mosaic lenses and rolled x-ray prism lenses (RXPLs), are considered to be implemented into a microscope setup. The x-ray optical elements mentioned above are characterized with synchrotron radiation and x-ray laboratory sources, respectively.

  13. Refractive Surgery in Systemic and Autoimmune Disease

    PubMed Central

    AlKharashi, Majed; Bower, Kraig S.; Stark, Walter J.; Daoud, Yassine J.

    2014-01-01

    Patients with underlying systemic disease represent challenging treatment dilemma to the refractive surgeon. The refractive error in this patient population is accompanied by a systemic disease that may have an ocular or even a corneal component. The literature is rather sparse about the use of laser refractive surgery (LRS) and such procedure is not approved by the United States Food and Drug Administration (FDA) in this patient population. Patients with collagen vascular disease, diabetes mellitus (DM), allergic and atopic disease, or human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) are never ideal for LRS. Patients with uncontrolled systemic disease or ocular involvement of the disease should not undergo LRS. However, a patient with well-controlled and mild disease, no ocular involvement, and not on multidrug regimen may be a suitable candidate if they meet stringent criteria. There is a need for a large, multicenter, controlled trial to address the safety and efficacy of LRS in patients with systemic disease before such technology can be widely adopted by the refractive surgery community. PMID:24669141

  14. A Mechanical Analogue of the Refracting Telescope

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vannoni, Maurizio; Molesini, Giuseppe; Sordini, Andrea; Straulino, Samuele

    2011-01-01

    The recent celebration of the discoveries made by Galileo four centuries ago has attracted new attention to the refracting telescope and to its use as an instrument for the observation of the night sky. This has offered the opportunity for addressing in the classroom the basic principles explaining the operation of the telescope. When doing so, a…

  15. Subjective refraction: the mechanism underlying the routine.

    PubMed

    Harris, W F

    2007-11-01

    The routine of subjective refraction is usually understood, explained and taught in terms of the relative positions of line or point foci and the retina. This paper argues that such an approach makes unnecessary and sometimes invalid assumptions about what is actually happening inside the eye. The only assumption necessary in fact is that the subject is able to guide the refractionist to (or close to) the optimum power for refractive compensation. The routine works even in eyes in which the interval of Sturm does not behave as supposed; it would work, in fact, regardless of the structure of the eye. The idealized subjective refraction routine consists of two steps: the first finds the best sphere (the stigmatic component) and the second finds the remaining Jackson cross-cylinder (the antistigmatic component). The model makes use of the concept of symmetric dioptric power space. The second part of the refraction routine can be performed with Jackson cross-cylinders alone. However, it is usually taught and practiced using spheres, cylinders and Jackson cross-cylinders in a procedure that is not easy to understand and learn. Recognizing that this part of the routine is equivalent to one involving Jackson cross-cylinders only allows one to teach and understand the procedure more naturally and easily.

  16. Refraction of light by light in vacuum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarazin, Xavier; Couchot, François; Djannati-Ataï, Arache; Guilbaud, Olivier; Kazamias, Sophie; Pittman, Moana; Urban, Marcel

    2016-01-01

    In very intense electromagnetic fields, the vacuum refractive index is expected to be modified due to nonlinear quantum electrodynamics (QED) properties. Several experimental tests using high intensity lasers have been proposed to observe electromagnetic nonlinearities in vacuum, such as the diffraction or the reflection of intense laser pulses. We propose a new approach which consists in observing the refraction, i.e. the rotation of the waveplanes of a probe laser pulse crossing a transverse vacuum index gradient. The latter is produced by the interaction of two very intense and ultra short laser pulses, used as pump pulses. At the maximum of the index gradient, the refraction angle of the probe pulse is estimated to be 0.2 × (w0/10 μm)-3 × I/1J prad, where I is the total energy of the two pump pulses and w0 is the minimum waist (fwhm) at the interaction area. Assuming the most intense laser pulses attainable by the LASERIX facility (I = 25 J, 30 fs fwhm duration, 800 nm central wavelength) and assuming a minimum waist of w = 10 μm (fwhm) (corresponding to an intensity of the order of 1021 W/cm2), the expected maximum refraction angle is about 5 prad. An experimental setup, using a Sagnac interferometer, is proposed to perform this measurement.

  17. Validation of Ray Tracing Code Refraction Effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heath, Stephanie L.; McAninch, Gerry L.; Smith, Charles D.; Conner, David A.

    2008-01-01

    NASA's current predictive capabilities using the ray tracing program (RTP) are validated using helicopter noise data taken at Eglin Air Force Base in 2007. By including refractive propagation effects due to wind and temperature, the ray tracing code is able to explain large variations in the data observed during the flight test.

  18. Blending History with Physics: Acoustic Refraction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ross, Charles D.

    2000-01-01

    Argues that the study of refraction of sound waves, although usually neglected, is an excellent ancillary to the normal optical approach in physics courses. Discusses the historical context of interest in the science behind outdoor sound propagation, particularly during the Civil War in the United States. (WRM)

  19. Reflection, refraction, and the Legendre transform.

    PubMed

    Gutiérrez, Cristian E

    2011-02-01

    We construct in dimension two a mirror that reflects collimated rays into a set of directions that amplify the image and an optical lens so that collimated rays are refracted into a set of directions with a prescribed magnification factor. The profiles of these optical surfaces are given by explicit formulas involving the Legendre transformation.

  20. Compound refractive X-ray lens

    DOEpatents

    Nygren, David R.; Cahn, Robert; Cederstrom, Bjorn; Danielsson, Mats; Vestlund, Jonas

    2000-01-01

    An apparatus and method for focusing X-rays. In one embodiment, his invention is a commercial-grade compound refractive X-ray lens. The commercial-grade compound refractive X-ray lens includes a volume of low-Z material. The volume of low-Z material has a first surface which is adapted to receive X-rays of commercially-applicable power emitted from a commercial-grade X-ray source. The volume of low-Z material also has a second surface from which emerge the X-rays of commercially-applicable power which were received at the first surface. Additionally, the commercial-grade compound refractive X-ray lens includes a plurality of openings which are disposed between the first surface and the second surface. The plurality of openings are oriented such that the X-rays of commercially-applicable power which are received at the first surface, pass through the volume of low-Z material and through the plurality openings. In so doing, the X-rays which emerge from the second surface are refracted to a focal point.

  1. Refractive Indices of Gases at Microwave Frequencies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goodhead, D. T.; And Others

    1976-01-01

    Describes a simple microwave interferometer capable of measuring small phase shifts. Proposes laboratory exercises involving the use of the interferometer in the determination of refractive indices of gases and the analysis of the reflection in a test chamber. (Author/CP)

  2. Specific features of measuring the optical power of artificial refractive and diffractive-refractive eye lenses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lenkova, G. A.

    2016-08-01

    Methods for monitoring the optical power of artificial refractive eye lenses (intraocular lenses) based on measuring focal lengths in air and in medium are analyzed. The methods for determining the refraction of diffractive-refractive lenses (in particular, of MIOL-Akkord type), with allowance for the specific features of the diffractive structure, are considered. A computer simulation of the measurement of the focal length of MIOL-Akkord lenses is performed. The effective optical power of the diffractive component of these lenses is shown to depend on the diaphragm diameter. The optimal diaphragm diameter, at which spherical aberrations do not affect the position of foci, is found to be 3 mm. Possible errors in measuring the focal lengths are analyzed, and the necessary corrections that must be introduced into measurement results and calculations of refractions are determined.

  3. Effects of myopic spectacle correction and radial refractive gradient spectacles on peripheral refraction.

    PubMed

    Tabernero, Juan; Vazquez, Daniel; Seidemann, Anne; Uttenweiler, Dietmar; Schaeffel, Frank

    2009-08-01

    The recent observation that central refractive development might be controlled by the refractive errors in the periphery, also in primates, revived the interest in the peripheral optics of the eye. We optimized an eccentric photorefractor to measure the peripheral refractive error in the vertical pupil meridian over the horizontal visual field (from -45 degrees to 45 degrees ), with and without myopic spectacle correction. Furthermore, a newly designed radial refractive gradient lens (RRG lens) that induces increasing myopia in all radial directions from the center was tested. We found that for the geometry of our measurement setup conventional spectacles induced significant relative hyperopia in the periphery, although its magnitude varied greatly among different spectacle designs and subjects. In contrast, the newly designed RRG lens induced relative peripheral myopia. These results are of interest to analyze the effect that different optical corrections might have on the emmetropization process.

  4. Automatic Refraction: How It Is Done: Some Clinical Results

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Safir, Aran; And Others

    1973-01-01

    Compaired are methods of determining visual refraction needs of young children or other unreliable observers by means of retinosocopy or the Opthalmetron, an automatic instrument which can be operated by a technician with no knowledge of refraction. (DB)

  5. [Results of refractive surgery in hyperopic and combined astigmatism].

    PubMed

    Vlaicu, Valeria

    2013-01-01

    The refractive surgery includes a lot of procedures for changing the refraction of the eye to obtain a better visual acuity with no glasses or contact lenses. LASIK is the most commonly performed laser refractive surgery today. The goal is to present the postoperative evolution of the refraction and visual acuity after LASIK for Mixed and Hyperopic Astigmatism. The results show that LASIK is safe and predictible if we have well performed interventions and well-selected patients.

  6. Refractive Changes Induced by Strabismus Corrective Surgery in Adults

    PubMed Central

    Leshno, Ari; Ziv-Baran, Tomer; Stolovitch, Chaim

    2017-01-01

    Purpose. To investigate refractive changes after strabismus correction procedures among adults. Methods. Retrospective chart review of adult patients who had horizontal recti muscles surgery with preoperative and postoperative cycloplegic refraction measurements. The preoperative refraction was mathematically subtracted from the postoperative refraction, and the induced refractive changes were statistically analyzed. Vector analysis was used to examine the magnitude of the toric change. The proportion of clinically significant refractive change was evaluated as well. Results. Thirty-one eyes from 22 subjects met the criteria and were included in the final analysis. A significant postoperative refractive change of the spherical equivalent towards myopia and a change of the astigmatism in the with-the-rule direction were observed. In a subset of 9 cases a third cycloplegic refraction measurement demonstrated stable refraction compared to the 1-month postoperative measurement. In 10 cases of single eye surgery, significant refractive changes were observed only in the operated side when compared to the sound eye. The induced surgical refractive change was of clinical significance (≥0.5 D) in 11 eyes of 9 patients (40.9% of patients). Conclusions. Refractive changes are a significant side effect of horizontal strabismus corrective surgery among adults. Therefore, patients should be informed about it prior to surgery and should be rerefracted in the postoperative period. PMID:28191347

  7. Postoperative refraction in the second eye having cataract surgery.

    PubMed

    Leffler, Christopher T; Wilkes, Martin; Reeves, Juliana; Mahmood, Muneera A

    2011-01-01

    Introduction. Previous cataract surgery studies assumed that first-eye predicted and observed postoperative refractions are equally important for predicting second-eye postoperative refraction. Methods. In a retrospective analysis of 173 patients having bilateral sequential phacoemulsification, multivariable linear regression was used to predict the second-eye postoperative refraction based on refractions predicted by the SRK-T formula for both eyes, the first-eye postoperative refraction, and the difference in IOL selected between eyes. Results. The first-eye observed postoperative refraction was an independent predictor of the second eye postoperative refraction (P < 0.001) and was weighted more heavily than the first-eye predicted refraction. Compared with the SRK-T formula, this model reduced the root-mean-squared (RMS) error of the predicted refraction by 11.3%. Conclusions. The first-eye postoperative refraction is an independent predictor of the second-eye postoperative refraction. The first-eye predicted refraction is less important. These findings may be due to interocular symmetry.

  8. Shuttle program: Computing atmospheric scale height for refraction corrections

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lear, W. M.

    1980-01-01

    Methods for computing the atmospheric scale height to determine radio wave refraction were investigated for different atmospheres, and different angles of elevation. Tables of refractivity versus altitude are included. The equations used to compute the refraction corrections are given. It is concluded that very accurate corrections are determined with the assumption of an exponential atmosphere.

  9. Low-loss negative index metamaterials for X, Ku, and K microwave bands

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, David A.; Vedral, L. James; Smith, David A.; Pinchuk, Anatoliy O.; Musselman, Randall L.

    2015-04-15

    Low-loss, negative-index of refraction metamaterials were designed and tested for X, Ku, and K microwave frequency bands. An S-shaped, split-ring resonator was used as a unit cell to design homogeneous slabs of negative-index metamaterials. Then, the slabs of metamaterials were cut unto prisms to measure experimentally the negative index of refraction of a plane electromagnetic wave. Theoretical simulations using High-Frequency Structural Simulator, a finite element equation solver, were in good agreement with experimental measurements. The negative index of refraction was retrieved from the angle- and frequency-dependence of the transmitted intensity of the microwave beam through the metamaterial prism and compared well to simulations; in addition, near-field electromagnetic intensity mapping was conducted with an infrared camera, and there was also a good match with the simulations for expected frequency ranges for the negative index of refraction.

  10. Analytical properties of the effective refractive index

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puzko, R. S.; Merzlikin, A. M.

    2017-01-01

    The propagation of a plane wave through a periodic layered system is considered in terms of the effective parameters. The problem of introduction of effective parameters is discussed. It was demonstrated that although the effective admittance cannot be introduced, it is possible to introduce the effective refractive index, which tends toward the Rytov value when the system size increases. It was shown that the effective wave vector derivative is an analytical function of frequency. In particular, the Kramers-Kronig-like relations for real and imaginary parts of the effective wave vector derivative were obtained. The Kramers-Kronig-like relations for the effective refractive index were also considered. The results obtained numerically were proved by exact solution of Maxwell's equations in the specific case of an "equi-impedance" system.

  11. Effective spectral dispersion of refractive index modulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vojtíšek, Petr; Květoň, Milan; Richter, Ivan

    2017-04-01

    For diffraction effects inside photopolymer materials, which act as volume diffraction systems (e.g. gratings), refractive index modulation is one of the key parameters. Due to its importance it is necessary to study this parameter from many perspectives, one of which is its value for different spectral components, i.e. its spectral dispersion. In this paper, we discuss this property and present an approach to experimental and numerical extraction and analysis (via rigorous coupled wave analysis and Cauchy’s empirical relation) of the effective dispersion of refractive index modulation based on an analysis of transmittance maps measured in an angular-spectral plane. It is indicated that the inclusion of dispersion leads to a significantly better description of the real grating behavior (which is often necessary in various design implementations of diffraction gratings) and that this estimation can be carried out for all the diffraction orders present.

  12. Uncladded sensing fiber for refractive index measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhardwaj, V.; Gangwar, R. K.; Pathak, A. K.; Singh, V. K.

    2016-05-01

    The formation of chemically etched optical fiber for use in refractive index sensor is addressed. This presented design of a refractive index (RI) sensor is based on recording the power loss exhibited by radiation propagating through an etched multimode fiber (MMF) immersed in the liquid under study. The decreasing diameters of fibers are found to be strongly dependent on the temperature and etchant composition. This experiment was performed for different unclad etched fibers for same sensing length and the RI changes from 1.33 RIU to 1.38 RIU. When the multimode fiber (MMF) is etched for 12 hours the sensitivity of the sensor is approximately 204.25dBm/RIU, which is larger than without etched fiber having sensitivity 127.2dBm/RIU.

  13. Nonlinear refraction and reflection travel time tomography

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Zhang, Jiahua; ten Brink, U.S.; Toksoz, M.N.

    1998-01-01

    We develop a rapid nonlinear travel time tomography method that simultaneously inverts refraction and reflection travel times on a regular velocity grid. For travel time and ray path calculations, we apply a wave front method employing graph theory. The first-arrival refraction travel times are calculated on the basis of cell velocities, and the later refraction and reflection travel times are computed using both cell velocities and given interfaces. We solve a regularized nonlinear inverse problem. A Laplacian operator is applied to regularize the model parameters (cell slownesses and reflector geometry) so that the inverse problem is valid for a continuum. The travel times are also regularized such that we invert travel time curves rather than travel time points. A conjugate gradient method is applied to minimize the nonlinear objective function. After obtaining a solution, we perform nonlinear Monte Carlo inversions for uncertainty analysis and compute the posterior model covariance. In numerical experiments, we demonstrate that combining the first arrival refraction travel times with later reflection travel times can better reconstruct the velocity field as well as the reflector geometry. This combination is particularly important for modeling crustal structures where large velocity variations occur in the upper crust. We apply this approach to model the crustal structure of the California Borderland using ocean bottom seismometer and land data collected during the Los Angeles Region Seismic Experiment along two marine survey lines. Details of our image include a high-velocity zone under the Catalina Ridge, but a smooth gradient zone between. Catalina Ridge and San Clemente Ridge. The Moho depth is about 22 km with lateral variations. Copyright 1998 by the American Geophysical Union.

  14. The ionospheric refraction at 38 MHz.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milogradov-Turin, J.

    The investigation of the observed shift of the North Polar Spur (NPS) at the 38 MHz survey of Milogradov-Turin and Smith (1973) in respect to the position of the NPS on the survey at 408 MHz convolved to the same resolution (Haslam and Salter 1977) has shown that there is no dependence of the NPS position on frequency and that the ionospheric refraction should be larger than believed.

  15. Matched Index of Refraction Flow Facility

    ScienceCinema

    Mcllroy, Hugh

    2016-07-12

    What's 27 feet long, 10 feet tall and full of mineral oil (3000 gallons' worth)? If you said INL's Matched Index of Refraction facility, give yourself a gold star. Scientists use computers to model the inner workings of nuclear reactors, and MIR helps validate those models. INL's Hugh McIlroy explains in this video. You can learn more about INL energy research at the lab's facebook site http://www.facebook.com/idahonationallaboratory.

  16. Matched Index of Refraction Flow Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Mcllroy, Hugh

    2010-01-01

    What's 27 feet long, 10 feet tall and full of mineral oil (3000 gallons' worth)? If you said INL's Matched Index of Refraction facility, give yourself a gold star. Scientists use computers to model the inner workings of nuclear reactors, and MIR helps validate those models. INL's Hugh McIlroy explains in this video. You can learn more about INL energy research at the lab's facebook site http://www.facebook.com/idahonationallaboratory.

  17. Autonomous satellite navigation by stellar refraction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gounley, R.; White, R.; Gai, E.

    1983-01-01

    This paper describes an error analysis of an autonomous navigator using refraction measurements of starlight passing through the upper atmosphere. The analysis is based on a discrete linear Kalman filter. The filter generated steady-state values of navigator performance for a variety of test cases. Results of these simulations show that in low-earth orbit position-error standard deviations of less than 0.100 km may be obtained using only 40 star sightings per orbit.

  18. Lens Design Using Group Indices of Refraction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vaughan, A. H.

    1995-01-01

    An approach to lens design is described in which the ratio of the group velocity to the speed of light (the group index) in glass is used, in conjunction with the more familiar phase index of refraction, to control certain chromatic properties of a system of thin lenses in contact. The first-order design of thin-lens systems is illustrated by examples incorporating the methods described.

  19. Emerging Technology in Refractive Cataract Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Saraiva, João; Neatrour, Kristin; Waring IV, George O.

    2016-01-01

    Technology in cataract surgery is constantly evolving to meet the goals of both surgeons and patients. Recent major advances in refractive cataract surgery include innovations in preoperative and intraoperative diagnostics, femtosecond laser-assisted cataract surgery (FLACS), and a new generation of intraocular lenses (IOLs). This paper presents the latest technologies in each of these major categories and discusses how these contributions serve to improve cataract surgery outcomes in a safe, effective, and predictable manner. PMID:27433353

  20. Refraction effects of atmosphere on geodetic measurements to celestial bodies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Joshi, C. S.

    1973-01-01

    The problem is considered of obtaining accurate values of refraction corrections for geodetic measurements of celestial bodies. The basic principles of optics governing the phenomenon of refraction are defined, and differential equations are derived for the refraction corrections. The corrections fall into two main categories: (1) refraction effects due to change in the direction of propagation, and (2) refraction effects mainly due to change in the velocity of propagation. The various assumptions made by earlier investigators are reviewed along with the basic principles of improved models designed by investigators of the twentieth century. The accuracy problem for various quantities is discussed, and the conclusions and recommendations are summarized.

  1. Optofluidic two-dimensional grating volume refractive index sensor.

    PubMed

    Sarkar, Anirban; Shivakiran Bhaktha, B N; Khastgir, Sugata Pratik

    2016-09-10

    We present an optofluidic reservoir with a two-dimensional grating for a lab-on-a-chip volume refractive index sensor. The observed diffraction pattern from the device resembles the analytically obtained fringe pattern. The change in the diffraction pattern has been monitored in the far-field for fluids with different refractive indices. Reliable measurements of refractive index variations, with an accuracy of 6×10-3 refractive index units, for different fluids establishes the optofluidic device as a potential on-chip tool for monitoring dynamic refractive index changes.

  2. Compound Refractive Lenses for Thermal Neutron Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Gary, Charles K.

    2013-11-12

    This project designed and built compound refractive lenses (CRLs) that are able to focus, collimate and image using thermal neutrons. Neutrons are difficult to manipulate compared to visible light or even x rays; however, CRLs can provide a powerful tool for focusing, collimating and imaging neutrons. Previous neutron CRLs were limited to long focal lengths, small fields of view and poor resolution due to the materials available and manufacturing techniques. By demonstrating a fabrication method that can produce accurate, small features, we have already dramatically improved the focal length of thermal neutron CRLs, and the manufacture of Fresnel lens CRLs that greatly increases the collection area, and thus efficiency, of neutron CRLs. Unlike a single lens, a compound lens is a row of N lenslets that combine to produce an N-fold increase in the refraction of neutrons. While CRLs can be made from a variety of materials, we have chosen to mold Teflon lenses. Teflon has excellent neutron refraction, yet can be molded into nearly arbitrary shapes. We designed, fabricated and tested Teflon CRLs for neutrons. We demonstrated imaging at wavelengths as short as 1.26 ? with large fields of view and achieved resolution finer than 250 μm which is better than has been previously shown. We have also determined designs for Fresnel CRLs that will greatly improve performance.

  3. Adjustable hybrid diffractive/refractive achromatic lens

    PubMed Central

    Valley, Pouria; Savidis, Nickolaos; Schwiegerling, Jim; Dodge, Mohammad Reza; Peyman, Gholam; Peyghambarian, N.

    2011-01-01

    We demonstrate a variable focal length achromatic lens that consists of a flat liquid crystal diffractive lens and a pressure-controlled fluidic refractive lens. The diffractive lens is composed of a flat binary Fresnel zone structure and a thin liquid crystal layer, producing high efficiency and millisecond switching times while applying a low ac voltage input. The focusing power of the diffractive lens is adjusted by electrically modifying the sub-zones and re-establishing phase wrapping points. The refractive lens includes a fluid chamber with a flat glass surface and an opposing elastic polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) membrane surface. Inserting fluid volume through a pump system into the clear aperture region alters the membrane curvature and adjusts the refractive lens’ focal position. Primary chromatic aberration is remarkably reduced through the coupling of the fluidic and diffractive lenses at selected focal lengths. Potential applications include miniature color imaging systems, medical and ophthalmic devices, or any design that utilizes variable focal length achromats. PMID:21503055

  4. Correction of subtle refractive error in aviators.

    PubMed

    Rabin, J

    1996-02-01

    Optimal visual acuity is a requirement for piloting aircraft in military and civilian settings. While acuity can be corrected with glasses, spectacle wear can limit or even prohibit use of certain devices such as night vision goggles, helmet mounted displays, and/or chemical protective masks. Although current Army policy is directed toward selection of pilots who do not require spectacle correction for acceptable vision, refractive error can become manifest over time, making optical correction necessary. In such cases, contact lenses have been used quite successfully. Another approach is to neglect small amounts of refractive error, provided that vision is at least 20/20 without correction. This report describes visual findings in an aviator who was fitted with a contact lens to correct moderate astigmatism in one eye, while the other eye, with lesser refractive error, was left uncorrected. Advanced methods of testing visual resolution, including high and low contrast visual acuity and small letter contrast sensitivity, were used to compare vision achieved with full spectacle correction to that attained with the habitual, contact lens correction. Although the patient was pleased with his habitual correction, vision was significantly better with full spectacle correction, particularly on the small letter contrast test. Implications of these findings are considered.

  5. Imaging techniques with refractive beam shaping optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laskin, Alexander; Laskin, Vadim

    2012-10-01

    Applying of the refractive beam shapers in real research optical setups as well as in industrial installations requires very often manipulation of a final laser spot size. In many cases this task can be easily solved by using various imaging optical layouts presuming creating an image of a beam shaper output aperture. Due to the unique features of the refractive beam shapers of field mapping type, like flat wave front and low divergence of the collimated resulting beam with flattop or another intensity profile, there is a freedom in building of various imaging systems with using ordinary optical components, including off-the-shelf ones. There will be considered optical layouts providing high, up to 1/200×, de-magnifying factors, combining of refractive beam shapers like πShaper with scanning systems, building of relay imaging systems with extended depth of field. These optical layouts are widely used in such laser technologies like drilling holes in PCB, welding, various micromachining techniques with galvo-mirror scanning, interferometry and holography, various SLM-based applications. Examples of real implementations and experimental results will be presented as well.

  6. Surgical options for correction of refractive error following cataract surgery.

    PubMed

    Abdelghany, Ahmed A; Alio, Jorge L

    2014-01-01

    Refractive errors are frequently found following cataract surgery and refractive lens exchange. Accurate biometric analysis, selection and calculation of the adequate intraocular lens (IOL) and modern techniques for cataract surgery all contribute to achieving the goal of cataract surgery as a refractive procedure with no refractive error. However, in spite of all these advances, residual refractive error still occasionally occurs after cataract surgery and laser in situ keratomileusis (LASIK) can be considered the most accurate method for its correction. Lens-based procedures, such as IOL exchange or piggyback lens implantation are also possible alternatives especially in cases with extreme ametropia, corneal abnormalities, or in situations where excimer laser is unavailable. In our review, we have found that piggyback IOL is safer and more accurate than IOL exchange. Our aim is to provide a review of the recent literature regarding target refraction and residual refractive error in cataract surgery.

  7. Negative Certainty

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ariso, José María

    2017-01-01

    The definitions of "negative knowledge" and the studies in this regard published to date have not considered the categorial distinction Wittgenstein established between knowledge and certainty. Hence, the important role that certainty, despite its omission, should have in these definitions and studies has not yet been shown. In this…

  8. Negative Numbers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Galbraith, Mary J.

    1974-01-01

    Examination of models for representing integers demonstrates that formal operational thought is required for establishing the operations on integers. Advocated is the use of many models for introducing negative numbers but, apart from addition, it is recommended that operations on integers be delayed until the formal operations stage. (JP)

  9. Deviations of Lambert-Beer's law affect corneal refractive parameters after refractive surgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiménez, José R.; Rodríguez-Marín, Francisco; Anera, Rosario G.; Jiménez Del Barco, Luis

    2006-06-01

    We calculate whether deviations of Lambert-Beer’s law, which regulates depth ablation during corneal ablation, significantly influence corneal refractive parameters after refractive surgery and whether they influence visual performance. For this, we compute a point-to-point correction on the cornea while assuming a non-linear (including a quadratic term) fit for depth ablation. Post-surgical equations for refractive parameters using a non-linear fit show significant differences with respect to parameters obtained from a linear fit (Lambert-Beer’s law). Differences were also significant for corneal aberrations. These results show that corneal-ablation algorithms should include analytical information on deviations from Lambert-Beer’s law for achieving an accurate eye correction.

  10. Electromagnetic field energy density in homogeneous negative index materials.

    PubMed

    Shivanand; Webb, Kevin J

    2012-05-07

    An exact separation of both electric and magnetic energies into stored and lost energies is shown to be possible in the special case when the wave impedance is independent of frequency. A general expression for the electromagnetic energy density in such a dispersive medium having a negative refractive index is shown to be accurate in comparison with numerical results. Using an example metamaterial response that provides a negative refractive index, it is shown that negative time-averaged stored energy can occur. The physical meaning of this negative energy is explained as the energy temporarily borrowed by the field from the material. This observation for negative index materials is of interest when approaching properties for a perfect lens. In the broader context, the observation of negative stored energy is of consequence in the study of dispersive materials.

  11. Uniaxial epsilon-near-zero metamaterials: from superlensing to double refraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zapata-Rodríguez, Carlos J.; Pastor, David; Miret, Juan J.; Vuković, Slobodan

    2014-01-01

    We investigated optical properties of nanostructured metal-dielectric multilayered lattices under the conditions of epsilon-near-zero (ENZ), a concept derived from the effective-medium approach (EMA). We theoretically found that the periodic array of metallic nanolayers may exhibit either superlensing driven by broadband canalization from point emitters or single-polarization double refraction, and conventional positive as well as negative, even at subwavelength regimes. For the latter case, we formulated a modified EMA, and subsequently a generalized refraction law, that describes both refractive behaviors concurrently. The modal coupling of plasmonic lattice resonances, and nonlocality induced by partial screening across the nanolayer length, are responsible for these distinct effects. Numerical simulations show that deep-subwavelength lensing along the optical axis of Ag-GaAs metamaterial is clearly enhanced at optical wavelengths. On the other hand, transverse-magnetic-polarized radiation that is obliquely incident on the ENZ periodic nanostructures with the same materials in the infrared (around 1.55 μm) undergoes double refraction neighboring 50/50 beamsplitting.

  12. Two-dimensional refractive index profiling of optical fibers by modified refractive near-field technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El Sayed, A.; Pilz, Soenke; Ryser, Manuel; Romano, Valerio

    2016-02-01

    The refractive index distribution in the core-cladding region of an optical fiber plays an important role in determining the transmission and dispersion properties of the waveguide. The refracted near-field technique (RNF) is among the most widespread techniques used for measuring the refractive index profile of optical fibers and is based on illuminating the end-facet of a fiber with a focused beam whose vertex angle greatly exceeds the acceptance angle of the fiber, which is immersed in an index matching liquid. What one observes are then the refracted unguided rays rather than the guided rays. Nevertheless, the standard refracted near-field technique cannot be applied to a wide range of optical fibers e.g. if their shapes are not axially symmetric. In this work we demonstrate a modified method which allows 2-D imaging of the refractive index profile and thereby overcoming the axial symmetric limitation of the standard RNF. The new system is operating at 630 nm and based on the same principle of the RNF, but the optical path is reversed so that the light at the fiber end-facet is collected by an objective lens and detected by a CCD camera. The method does not require scanning over the fiber end-facet. Thus the system is faster and less sensitive to vibrations and external conditions compared to the standard RNF, furthermore it allows averaging to improve the signal to noise ratio. The spatial resolution of the system is determined by the numerical aperture of the objective and by the resolution of the CCD camera. To calibrate the setup, a reference multi-step index fiber provided by National Physical Laboratory was used.

  13. Two-dimensional refractive index profiling of optical fibers by modified refractive near-field technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El Sayed, A.; Pilz, Soenke; Ryser, Manuel; Romano, Valerio

    2016-04-01

    The refractive index distribution in the core-cladding region of an optical fiber plays an important role in determining the transmission and dispersion properties of the waveguide. The refracted near-field technique (RNF) is among the most widespread techniques used for measuring the refractive index profile of optical fibers and is based on illuminating the end-facet of a fiber with a focused beam whose vertex angle greatly exceeds the acceptance angle of the fiber, which is immersed in an index matching liquid. What one observes are then the refracted unguided rays rather than the guided rays. Nevertheless, the standard refracted near-field technique cannot be applied to a wide range of optical fibers e.g. if their shapes are not axially symmetric. In this work we demonstrate a modified method which allows 2-D imaging of the refractive index profile and thereby overcoming the axial symmetric limitation of the standard RNF. The new system is operating at 630 nm and based on the same principle of the RNF, but the optical path is reversed so that the light at the fiber end-facet is collected by an objective lens and detected by a CCD camera. The method does not require scanning over the fiber end-facet. Thus the system is faster and less sensitive to vibrations and external conditions compared to the standard RNF, furthermore it allows averaging to improve the signal to noise ratio. The spatial resolution of the system is determined by the numerical aperture of the objective and by the resolution of the CCD camera. To calibrate the setup, a reference multi-step index fiber provided by National Physical Laboratory was used.

  14. Measurement of refractive index distribution of biotissues by scanning focused refractive index microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Tengqian; Ye, Qing; Wang, Xiao-Wan; Wang, Jin; Deng, Zhi-Chao; Mei, Jian-Chun; Zhou, Wen-Yuan; Zhang, Chun-Ping; Tian, Jian-Guo

    2014-11-01

    We adapt the improved scanning focused refractive-index microscopy (SFRIM) technique to the quantitative study of biological tissues. Delicate refractive index (RI) imaging of a porcine muscle tissue is obtained in a reflection mode. Some modifications are made to the SFRIM for better two dimension (2-D) observation of the tissues. The RI accuracy is 0.002. The central spatial resolution of SFRIM achieves 1μm, smaller than the size of the focal spot. Our method is free from signal distortion. The experimental result demonstrates that SFRIM is a potential technique in a wide field of biomedical research.

  15. Refraction of nonlinear beams by localized refractive index changes in nematic liquid crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Assanto, Gaetano; Minzoni, Antonmaria A.; Smyth, Noel F.; Worthy, Annette L.

    2010-11-15

    The propagation of solitary waves in nematic liquid crystals in the presence of localized nonuniformities is studied. These nonuniformities can be caused by external electric fields, other light beams, or any other mechanism which results in a modified director orientation in a localized region of the liquid-crystal cell. The net effect is that the solitary wave undergoes refraction and trajectory bending. A general modulation theory for this refraction is developed, and particular cases of circular, elliptical, and rectangular perturbations are considered. The results are found to be in excellent agreement with numerical solutions.

  16. EDITORIAL: Sensitive structures: refractive indices in nanotechnology Sensitive structures: refractive indices in nanotechnology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demming, Anna

    2012-12-01

    Refractive index effects using nanoscale systems are frequently applied in new imaging, sensing and even visibility cloaking technology. In this issue, researchers in Japan use simulations and experiments to describe the confinement of optical vortices in nanoscale fin structures and the sensitivity of these systems to the refractive index of the surrounding media [1]. The effects of refraction as light rays pass between different media were recorded as long ago as the first century AD, by Ptolemy [2]. Over the following centuries the phenomena inspired Ibn Sahl in 984 [3], Thomas Harriot in 1602 [4], Willebrord Snellius in 1621 [5] and Rene Descartes in 1637 [6] to independently derive the more accurate and elegant equation for refraction so familiar to us today. Recent studies of the interactions between light and matter continue to reveal a wealth of phenomena that originate in the effects of the refractive indices of materials. Nanostructures can be used to manipulate conditions that affect the refractive indices of materials, such as temperature. A E Aliev et al at the University of Texas reported a striking demonstration of temperature-dependent refractive index effects using a free-standing, highly aligned carbon nanotube aerogel sheet [7]. They used the extremely low thermal capacitance and high heat transfer ability of transparent carbon nanotube sheets to enable high-frequency modulation of the sheet temperature over an enormous temperature range. The resulting sharp, rapidly changing gradient of the refractive index in the surrounding liquid or gas makes objects seem to disappear and can be used for visibility cloaking. Light-matter interaction resonances, where light is confined at the nanoscale, can be extremely sensitive to changes in the refractive index of the surrounding media [8], even allowing single-molecule detection [9]. Plasmons, the collective oscillations of electrons in response to incident light, are a typical example. Researchers at Rice

  17. Ketamine-xylazine anesthesia causes hyperopic refractive shift in mice

    PubMed Central

    Tkatchenko, Tatiana V.; Tkatchenko, Andrei V.

    2010-01-01

    Mice have increasingly been used as a model for studies of myopia. The key to successful use of mice for myopia research is the ability to obtain accurate measurements of refractive status of their eyes. In order to obtain accurate measurements of refractive errors in mice, the refraction needs to be performed along the optical axis of the eye. This represents a particular challenge, because mice are very difficult to immobilize. Recently, ketamine-xylazine anesthesia has been used to immobilize mice before measuring refractive errors, in combination with tropicamide ophthalmic solution to induce mydriasis. Although these drugs have increasingly been used while refracting mice, their effects on the refractive state of the mouse eye have not yet been investigated. Therefore, we have analyzed the effects of tropicamide eye drops and ketamine-xylazine anesthesia on refraction in P40 C57BL/6J mice. We have also explored two alternative methods to immobilize mice, i.e. the use of a restraining platform and pentobarbital anesthesia. We found that tropicamide caused a very small, but statistically significant, hyperopic shift in refraction. Pentobarbital did not have any substantial effect on refractive status, whereas ketamine-xylazine caused a large and highly significant hyperopic shift in refraction. We also found that the use of a restraining platform represents good alternative for immobilization of mice prior to refraction. Thus, our data suggest that ketamine-xylazine anesthesia should be avoided in studies of refractive development in mice and underscore the importance of providing appropriate experimental conditions when measuring refractive errors in mice. PMID:20813132

  18. Quantum vacuum emission from a refractive-index front

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacquet, Maxime; König, Friedrich

    2015-08-01

    A moving boundary separating two otherwise homogeneous regions of a dielectric is known to emit radiation from the quantum vacuum. An analytical framework based on the Hopfield model, describing a moving refractive-index step in 1 +1 dimensions for realistic dispersive media has been developed by S. Finazzi and I. Carusotto [Phys. Rev. A 87, 023803 (2013)], 10.1103/PhysRevA.87.023803. We expand the use of this model to calculate explicitly spectra of all modes of positive and negative norms. Furthermore, for lower step heights we obtain a unique set of mode configurations encompassing black-hole and white-hole setups. This leads to a realistic emission spectrum featuring black-hole and white-hole emission for different frequencies. We also present spectra as measured in the laboratory frame that include all modes, in particular a dominant negative-norm mode, which is the partner mode in any Hawking-type emission. We find that the emission spectrum is highly structured into intervals of emission with black-hole, white-hole, and no horizons. Finally, we estimate the number of photons emitted as a function of the step height and find a power law of 2.5 for low step heights.

  19. Transient thermal effect, nonlinear refraction and nonlinear absorption properties of graphene oxide sheets in dispersion.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiao-Liang; Liu, Zhi-Bo; Li, Xiao-Chun; Ma, Qiang; Chen, Xu-Dong; Tian, Jian-Guo; Xu, Yan-Fei; Chen, Yong-Sheng

    2013-03-25

    The nonlinear refraction (NLR) properties of graphene oxide (GO) in N, N-Dimethylformamide (DMF) was studied in nanosecond, picosecond and femtosecond time regimes by Z-scan technique. Results show that the dispersion of GO in DMF exhibits negative NLR properties in nanosecond time regime, which is mainly attributed to transient thermal effect in the dispersion. The dispersion also exhibits negative NLR in picosecond and femtosecond time regimes, which are arising from sp(2)- hybridized carbon domains and sp(3)- hybridized matrix in GO sheets. To illustrate the relations between NLR and nonlinear absorption (NLA), NLA properties of the dispersion were also studied in nanosecond, picosecond and femtosecond time regimes.

  20. The Alvarez and Lohmann refractive lenses revisited.

    PubMed

    Barbero, Sergio

    2009-05-25

    Alvarez and Lohmann lenses are variable focus optical devices based on lateral shifts of two lenses with cubic-type surfaces. I analyzed the optical performance of these types of lenses computing the first order optical properties (applying wavefront refraction and propagation) without the restriction of the thin lens approximation, and the spot diagram using a ray tracing algorithm. I proposed an analytic and numerical method to select the most optimum coefficients and the specific configuration of these lenses. The results show that Lohmann composite lens is slightly superior to Alvarez one because the overall thickness and optical aberrations are smaller.

  1. Refraction and reflection of diffusion fronts.

    PubMed

    Remhof, A; Wijngaarden, R J; Griessen, R

    2003-04-11

    Diffusion waves form the basis of several measurement technologies in materials science as well as in biological systems. They are, however, so heavily damped that their observation is a real challenge to the experimentalist. We show that accurate information about the refraction-like and reflection-like behavior of diffusion waves can be obtained by studying diffusion fronts. For this we use hydrogen in a metal as a model system and visualize its 2D migration with an optical indicator. The similarities between classical optics and diffusion, in particular, the applicability of Snell's law to diffusive systems are discussed. Our measurements are in good agreement with numerical simulations.

  2. Near-zero refractive index photonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liberal, Iñigo; Engheta, Nader

    2017-03-01

    Structures with near-zero parameters (for example, media with near-zero relative permittivity and/or relative permeability, and thus a near-zero refractive index) exhibit a number of unique features, such as the decoupling of spatial and temporal field variations, which enable the exploration of qualitatively different wave dynamics. This Review summarizes the underlying principles and salient features, physical realizations and technological potential of these structures. In doing so, we revisit their distinctive impact on multiple optical processes, including scattering, guiding, trapping and emission of light. Their role in emphasizing secondary responses of matter such as nonlinear, non-reciprocal and non-local effects is also discussed.

  3. Tamm plasmon-polariton with negative group velocity induced by a negative index meta-material capping layer at metal-Bragg reflector interface.

    PubMed

    Liu, Cunding; Kong, Mingdong; Li, Bincheng

    2014-05-05

    Influence of a negative refractive index meta-material (NIM) capping layer on properties of Tamm plasmon-polariton at the interface of metal-Bragg reflector structure is investigated. Conditions for excitation of the plasmon-polariton is determined from reflectivity mapping calculation and analyzed with cavity mode theory. For specific thicknesses of capping layers, Tamm plasmon-polariton with negative group velocity is revealed in a wide region of frequency. Different from backward optical propagation induced by negative effective-group-refractive-index in dispersive media, negative group velocity of Tamm plasmon-polariton results from opposite signs of cross-section-integrated field energy and Poynting vector.

  4. Calculation of electron wave functions and refractive index of Ne

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Min; Liu, Wei; Zhang, Tao

    2008-10-01

    The radial wave functions of inner electron shell and outer electron shell of a Ne atom were obtained by the approximate analytical method and tested by calculating the ground state energy of the Ne atom. The equivalent volume of electron cloud and the refractive index of Ne were calculated. The calculated refractive index agrees well with the experimental result. Relationship between the refractive index and the wave function of Ne was discovered.

  5. Determination of refractive index by Moiré deflectometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmadi, Mohammad; Madanipour, Khosro; Javadianvarjovi, Soheila

    2015-06-01

    Determination of refractive index is an important characteristic of material which is crucial parameter for physicists and engineers. Moiré deflectometry technique is convenient, easy-aligning, nondestructive, non-contact and fairly accurate method for refractive index measurement of gas, liquid, solid. In this paper we investigate the theory of the technique and simulate some relations then finally measure refractive index of a glassy lamella, n=1.536.

  6. Fiber in-line Michelson Interferometer for refractive index sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liao, C. R.; Wang, D. N.; Wang, Min; Yang, Minghong; Wang, Yiping

    2013-09-01

    A fiber in-line Michelson interferometer based on open micro-cavity is demonstrated, which is fabricated by femtosecond laser micromachining and thin film coating technique. In refractive index sensing, this interferometer operates in a reflection mode of detection, exhibits compact sensor head, good mechanical reliability, wide operation range and high sensitivity of 975nm/RIU (refractive index unit) at the refractive index value of 1.484.

  7. Refractive index fiber sensor based on Brillouin fast light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Jiali; Gan, Jiulin; Zhang, Zhishen; Yang, Tong; Deng, Huaqiu; Yang, Zhongmin

    2014-01-01

    A new type of refractive index fiber sensor was invented by combining the evanescent-field scattering sensing mechanism with the Brillouin fast light scheme. Superluminal light was realized using Brillouin lasing oscillation in a fiber ring cavity. The refractive index of the solution around the microfiber within the cavity is related to the group velocity of the fast light. This fast light refractive index sensor offers an alternative for high-accuracy sensing applications.

  8. Retinal evaluation and treatment after refractive corneal surgery.

    PubMed

    Swinger, C A; Kraushar, M F

    1985-08-01

    Refractive corneal surgery (a collective term used to describe a variety of surgical procedures that alter the refractive status of the eye through the surgical modification of corneal curvature) shows promise for use in situations where current methods of optical correction do not meet the patient's needs. This article reviews our experiences with the retinal evaluation of patients who have undergone corneal refractive surgery and offers recommendations for the treatment of retinal pathology after such surgery.

  9. Achromatic doublets using group indices of refraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosete-Aguilar, M.; Estrada-Silva, F. C.; Román-Moreno, C. J.; Ortega-Martínez, R.

    2008-03-01

    One main function of short pulses is to concentrate energy in time and space [1]. The use of refractive lenses allows us to concentrate energy in a small volume of focusing around the focal point of the lens. When using refractive lenses, there are three effects that affect the concentration of energy around the focal point of the lens. These are the group velocity dispersion (GVD), the propagation time difference (PTD), and the aberrations of the lens. In this paper, we study lenses which are diffraction limited so that the monochromatic aberrations are negligible; the group velocity dispersion and the propagation time difference are the main effects affecting the spreading of the pulse at the focus. We will show that for 100-fs pulses the spatial spreading is larger than the temporal spreading of the pulse. It is already known that the effect of spatial spreading of the pulse due to PTD can be reduced by using achromatic optics. We use the theory proposed by A. Vaughan to analyze simple lenses and normal achromatic doublets, where normal means doublets that we can buy from catalogs. We then use the Vaughan theory to design achromatic doublets in phase and group, which produce no spatial spreading of the pulse, i.e., PTD = 0, when the doublet is designed for the carrier of the pulse. We compare these phase and group achromatic doublets with normal achromatic doublets. Finally, we show that apochromatic optics can give a much better correction of PTD than using normal achromatic doublets.

  10. Demonstration of optical interference filters utilizing tunable refractive index layers.

    PubMed

    Poxson, David J; Mont, Frank W; Schubert, Martin F; Kim, Jong Kyu; Cho, Jaehee; Schubert, E Fred

    2010-11-08

    Optical interference filters utilizing tunable refractive index layers are shown to have higher spectral fidelity as compared to conventional filters consisting of non-tunable refractive index layers. To demonstrate this increase in spectral fidelity, we design and compare a variety of optical interference filters employing both tunable and non-tunable refractive index layers. Additionally, a five-layer optical interference filter utilizing tunable refractive index layers is designed and fabricated for use with a Xenon lamp to replicate the Air Mass 0 solar irradiance spectrum and is shown to have excellent spectral fidelity.

  11. Two different looks at Kepler’s refraction experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grusche, Sascha; Wagner, Steffen

    2016-11-01

    Most refraction experiments are theory-laden and far from everyday experience. Accordingly, many students fail to apply the law of refraction to phenomena. To guide students from phenomena to theory, teachers can use a refraction experiment proposed by Kepler, where measurements are based on shadow images. For a different look at Kepler’s experiment, one can use the principle of reversibility to get equivalent results, but based on apparent depth. For this reversal, rays of light are reinterpreted as lines of sight, and vice versa. The principle allows students to relate refracted rays to shifted images, and applies to other optical phenomena.

  12. Refractivity estimation from sea clutter: An invited review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karimian, Ali; Yardim, Caglar; Gerstoft, Peter; Hodgkiss, William S.; Barrios, Amalia E.

    2011-12-01

    Non-standard radio wave propagation in the atmosphere is caused by anomalous changes of the atmospheric refractivity index. In recent years, refractivity from clutter (RFC) has been an active field of research to complement traditional ways of measuring the refractivity profile in maritime environments which rely on direct sensing of the environmental parameters. Higher temporal and spatial resolution of the refractivity profile, together with a lower cost and convenience of operations have been the promising factors that brought RFC under consideration. Presented is an overview of the basic concepts, research and achievements in the field of RFC. Topics that require more attention in future studies also are discussed.

  13. Implementation of transformed lenses in bed of nails reducing refractive index maximum value and sub-unity regions.

    PubMed

    Prado, Daniel R; Osipov, Andrey V; Quevedo-Teruel, Oscar

    2015-03-15

    Transformation optics with quasi-conformal mapping is applied to design a Generalized Maxwell Fish-eye Lens (GMFEL) which can be used as a power splitter. The flattened focal line obtained as a result of the transformation allows the lens to adapt to planar antenna feeding systems. Moreover, sub-unity refraction index regions are reduced because of the space compression effect of the transformation, reducing the negative impact of removing those regions when implementing the lens. A technique to reduce the maximum value of the refractive index is presented to compensate for its increase because of the transformation. Finally, the lens is implemented with the bed of nails technology, employing a commercial dielectric slab to improve the range of the effective refractive index. The lens was simulated with a 3D full-wave simulator to validate the design, obtaining an original and feasible power splitter based on a dielectric lens.

  14. Lifetime Reduction and Enhanced Emission of Single Photon Color Centers in Nanodiamond via Surrounding Refractive Index Modification

    PubMed Central

    Khalid, Asma; Chung, Kelvin; Rajasekharan, Ranjith; Lau, Desmond W.M.; Karle, Timothy J.; Gibson, Brant C.; Tomljenovic-Hanic, Snjezana

    2015-01-01

    The negatively-charged nitrogen vacancy (NV−) center in diamond is of great interest for quantum information processing and quantum key distribution applications due to its highly desirable long coherence times at room temperature. One of the challenges for their use in these applications involves the requirement to further optimize the lifetime and emission properties of the centers. Our results demonstrate the reduction of the lifetime of NV− centers, and hence an increase in the emission rate, achieved by modifying the refractive index of the environment surrounding the nanodiamond (ND). By coating the NDs in a polymer film, experimental results and numerical calculations show an average of 63% reduction in the lifetime and an average enhancement in the emission rate by a factor of 1.6. This strategy is also applicable for emitters other than diamond color centers where the particle refractive index is greater than the refractive index of the surrounding media. PMID:26109500

  15. Effect of Refractive Correction Error on Retinal Nerve Fiber Layer Thickness: A Spectralis Optical Coherence Tomography Study

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Xiaoli; Chen, Yutong; Liu, Xianjie; Ning, Hong

    2016-01-01

    Background Identifying and assessing retinal nerve fiber layer defects are important for diagnosing and managing glaucoma. We aimed to investigate the effect of refractive correction error on retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL) thickness measured with Spectralis spectral-domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT). Material/Methods We included 68 participants: 32 healthy (normal) and 36 glaucoma patients. RNFL thickness was measured using Spectralis SD-OCT circular scan. Measurements were made with a refractive correction of the spherical equivalent (SE), the SE+2.00D and the SE–2.00D. Results Average RNFL thickness was significantly higher in the normal group (105.88±10.47 μm) than in the glaucoma group (67.67±17.27 μm, P<0.001). In the normal group, +2.00D of refractive correction error significantly affected measurements of average (P<0.001) and inferior quadrant (P=0.037) RNFL thickness. In the glaucoma group, +2.00D of refractive correction error significantly increased average (P<0.001) and individual quadrant (superior: P=0.016; temporal: P=0.004; inferior: P=0.008; nasal: P=0.003) RNFL measurements compared with those made with the proper refractive correction. However, −2.00D of refractive correction error did not significantly affect RNFL thickness measurements in either group. Conclusions Positive defocus error significantly affects RNFL thickness measurements made by the Spectralis SD-OCT. Negative defocus error did not affect RNFL measurement examined. Careful correction of refractive error is necessary to obtain accurate baseline and follow-up RNFL thickness measurements in healthy and glaucomatous eyes. PMID:28030536

  16. Baseline peripheral refractive error and changes in axial refraction during one year in a young adult population

    PubMed Central

    Hartwig, Andreas; Charman, William Neil; Radhakrishnan, Hema

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To determine whether the initial characteristics of individual patterns of peripheral refraction relate to subsequent changes in refraction over a one-year period. Methods 54 myopic and emmetropic subjects (mean age: 24.9 ± 5.1 years; median 24 years) with normal vision were recruited and underwent conventional non-cycloplegic subjective refraction. Peripheral refraction was also measured at 5° intervals over the central 60° of horizontal visual field, together with axial length. After one year, measurements of subjective refraction and axial length were repeated on the 43 subjects who were still available for examination. Results In agreement with earlier studies, higher myopes tended to show greater relative peripheral hyperopia. There was, however, considerable inter-subject variation in the pattern of relative peripheral refractive error (RPRE) at any level of axial refraction. Across the group, mean one-year changes in axial refraction and axial length did not differ significantly from zero. There was no correlation between changes in these parameters for individual subjects and any characteristic of their RPRE. Conclusion No evidence was found to support the hypothesis that the pattern of RPRE is predictive of subsequent refractive change in this age group. PMID:26188389

  17. Refractive beam shapers for focused laser beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laskin, Alexander; Laskin, Vadim; Ostrun, Aleksei

    2016-09-01

    Focusing of laser radiation is most often used approach in various industrial micromachining applications like scribing, PCB drilling, and is important in scientific researches like laser heating in geophysics experiments with diamond anvil cells (DAC). Control of intensity distribution in focal spot is important task since optimum intensity profiles are rather flat-top, doughnut or "inverse-Gauss" than typical for lasers Gaussian profile. Because of high intensity of modern CW and pulsed lasers it is advisable to use refractive beam shaping optics with smooth optical surfaces providing high radiation resistance. Workable optical solutions can be built on the base of diffraction theory conclusion that flat-top intensity profile in focal plane of a lens is created when input beam has Airy-disk intensity distribution. It is suggested to apply refractive beam shapers converting, with minimum wavefront deformation, Gaussian profile of TEM00 beam to a beam with Airy disk intensity distribution, thereby optimizing conditions of interference near the focal plane of a lens after the beam shaper and providing flat-top, doughnut, "inverse-Gauss" profiles. This approach allows operation with CW and ultra-short pulse lasers, using F-theta lenses and objectives, mirror scanners, provides extended depth of field similar to Rayleigh length of comparable TEM00 beam, easy integration in industrial equipment, simple adjustment procedure and switching between profiles, telescope and collimator implementations. There will be considered design basics of beam shapers, analysis of profile behaviour near focal plane, examples of implementations in micromachining systems and experimental DAC setups, results of profile measurements and material processing.

  18. Cylindrical radiant energy direction device with refractive medium

    DOEpatents

    Winston, Roland

    1978-01-01

    A device is provided for directing radiant energy and includes a refractive element and a reflective boundary. The reflective boundary is so contoured that incident energy directed thereto by the refractive element is directed to the exit surface thereof or onto the surface of an energy absorber positioned at the exit surface.

  19. Surface refractivity measurements at NASA spacecraft tracking sites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmid, P. E.

    1972-01-01

    High-accuracy spacecraft tracking requires tropospheric modeling which is generally scaled by either estimated or measured values of surface refractivity. This report summarizes the results of a worldwide surface-refractivity test conducted in 1968 in support of the Apollo program. The results are directly applicable to all NASA radio-tracking systems.

  20. Index of Refraction Measurements Using a Laser Distance Meter

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ochoa, Romulo; Fiorillo, Richard; Ochoa, Cris

    2014-01-01

    We present a simple method to determine the refractive indices of transparent media using a laser distance meter. Indices of refraction have been obtained by measuring the speed of light in materials. Some speed of light techniques use time-of-flight measurements in which pulses are emitted by lasers and the time interval is measured for the pulse…

  1. Anterior segment surgery IOLs, lasers, and refractive keratoplasty

    SciTech Connect

    Stark, W.J.; Terry, A.C.; Maumenee, A.E.

    1987-01-01

    The contributors to this text combine their expertise to make this book available on intraocular lenses, refractive corneal surgery, and the use of the YAG laser. Included is information on; IOL power calculations; the use of the YAG laser; retinal damage by short wavelength light; reviews of corneal refractive surgery; possibilities for the medical prevention of cataracts; and more.

  2. Modification of the DSN radio frequency angular tropospheric refraction model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berman, A. L.

    1977-01-01

    The previously derived DSN Radio Frequency Angular Tropospheric Refraction Model contained an assumption which was subsequently seen to be at a variance with the theoretical basis of angular refraction. The modification necessary to correct the model is minor in that the value of a constant is changed.

  3. Refraction in Terms of the Deviation of the Light.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goldberg, Fred M.

    1985-01-01

    Discusses refraction in terms of the deviation of light. Points out that in physics courses where very little mathematics is used, it might be more suitable to describe refraction entirely in terms of the deviation, rather than by introducing Snell's law. (DH)

  4. Determining the Thickness and Refractive Index of a Mirror

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Uysal, Ahmet

    2010-01-01

    When a laser beam reflects from a back surface glass mirror and falls on a screen, a pattern of discrete bright spots is created by partial reflection and refraction of the light at the air-glass interface and reflection at the mirror surface (Fig. 1). This paper explains how this phenomenon can be used to determine the refractive index and the…

  5. Unbiased Estimation of Refractive State of Aberrated Eyes

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Jesson; Vasudevan, Balamurali; Himebaugh, Nikole; Bradley, Arthur; Thibos, Larry

    2011-01-01

    To identify unbiased methods for estimating the target vergence required to maximize visual acuity based on wavefront aberration measurements. Experiments were designed to minimize the impact of confounding factors that have hampered previous research. Objective wavefront refractions and subjective acuity refractions were obtained for the same monochromatic wavelength. Accommodation and pupil fluctuations were eliminated by cycloplegia. Unbiased subjective refractions that maximize visual acuity for high contrast letters were performed with a computer controlled forced choice staircase procedure, using 0.125 diopter steps of defocus. All experiments were performed for two pupil diameters (3mm and 6mm). As reported in the literature, subjective refractive error does not change appreciably when the pupil dilates. For 3 mm pupils most metrics yielded objective refractions that were about 0.1D more hyperopic than subjective acuity refractions. When pupil diameter increased to 6 mm, this bias changed in the myopic direction and the variability between metrics also increased. These inaccuracies were small compared to the precision of the measurements, which implies that most metrics provided unbiased estimates of refractive state for medium and large pupils. A variety of image quality metrics may be used to determine ocular refractive state for monochromatic (635nm) light, thereby achieving accurate results without the need for empirical correction factors. PMID:21777601

  6. Diffractive-refractive correction units for plastic compact zoom lenses.

    PubMed

    Greisukh, Grigoriy I; Ezhov, Evgeniy G; Kalashnikov, Alexander V; Stepanov, Sergei A

    2012-07-10

    A method of designing a plastic zoom lens with a diffractive-refractive hybrid corrector, comprising one diffractive lens and one refractive lens, is described. The efficiency of this method is demonstrated by designing a compact zoom lens for a mobile phone. This zoom design, incorporating lenses made only of two commercial optical plastics (polymethylmethacrylate and polycarbonate), provides high optical performance.

  7. Measurement of Refractive Index Using a Michelson Interferometer.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fendley, J. J.

    1982-01-01

    Describes a novel and simple method of measuring the refractive index of transparent plates using a Michelson interferometer. Since it is necessary to use a computer program when determining the refractive index, undergraduates could be given the opportunity of writing their own programs. (Author/JN)

  8. Helping Secondary School Students Develop a Conceptual Understanding of Refraction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ashmann, Scott; Anderson, Charles W.; Boeckman, Heather

    2016-01-01

    Using real-world examples, ray diagrams, and a cognitive apprenticeship cycle, this paper focuses on developing students' conceptual (not mathematical) understanding of refraction. Refraction can be a difficult concept for students to comprehend if they do not have well-designed opportunities to practice explaining situations where reflection and…

  9. Comment on "Refractive indices of biaxial crystals evaluated from the refractive indices ellipsoid equation"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hernández-Rodríguez, Cecilio; Fragoso-López, Ana Belén

    2014-02-01

    In 2007 Yin, Zhang and Tian [1] [Yin et al., 2007] derived the expressions of the refractive indices of biaxial crystals evaluated from the refractive indices ellipsoid equation. In the past we have researched about the simultaneous measurement of birefringence and optical activity in different crystals [2] [Hernández-Rodríguez et al., 2000], [3] [Hernández-Rodríguez and Gómez-Garrido, 2000], [4] [Herreros-Cedrés et al., 2003], [5] [Herreros-Cedrés et al., 2005] and [6] [Herreros-Cedrés et al., 2007], and recently, when we used their methods for the study of nonlinear crystals such as KTiOAsO4 (KTA) and KTiOPO4 (KTP), we found some errors in some expressions in their paper which were used by other authors [7] [Gao et al., 2003].

  10. CHARMS: The Cryogenic, High-Accuracy Refraction Measuring System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frey, Bradley; Leviton, Douglas

    2004-01-01

    The success of numerous upcoming NASA infrared (IR) missions will rely critically on accurate knowledge of the IR refractive indices of their constituent optical components at design operating temperatures. To satisfy the demand for such data, we have built a Cryogenic, High-Accuracy Refraction Measuring System (CHARMS), which, for typical 1R materials. can measure the index of refraction accurate to (+ or -) 5 x 10sup -3 . This versatile, one-of-a-kind facility can also measure refractive index over a wide range of wavelengths, from 0.105 um in the far-ultraviolet to 6 um in the IR, and over a wide range of temperatures, from 10 K to 100 degrees C, all with comparable accuracies. We first summarize the technical challenges we faced and engineering solutions we developed during the construction of CHARMS. Next we present our "first light," index of refraction data for fused silica and compare our data to previously published results.

  11. Software for teaching refraction of light with the semicircle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mihas, Pavlos

    2016-11-01

    Software is presented for teaching elementary optics using a transparent semicircle. We demonstrate the use of the semicircle to investigate Snell’s lawand students can are presented with the difficulties involved in experiments. An Excel spreadsheet can show to students that small errors in positioning of the semicircle can result in a non-constant index of refraction. Students can study the effect of changing some of the parameters of placement of a semicircle on the accuracy of the experimental results. They can see from the analysis of data that much better results are obtained by doing regression analysis rather than by just taking the average value of the index of refraction. Measuring the critical angle also gives a method of calculating the index of refraction. Another way to measure the index of refraction is the use of the semicircle as a lens and from its focal length we can deduce the index of refraction.

  12. Ducting and Boundary Layer Refractivity Bias Correction in GPS Radio Occultation Soundings with MODIS over the Subtropical Eastern Pacific Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, F.; Ao, C. O.; Adhikari, L.; Yu, X.

    2015-12-01

    Over the subtropical eastern Pacific, a large stratus cloud deck is often trapped below a strong inversion layer resulting from the combination of strong free tropospheric subsidence and the cool sea surface temperature underneath. The stable inversion leads to a sharp moisture decrease and a large negative refractivity gradient that often causes ducting right above the cloudy boundary layer (CBL). The presence of duct results in systematically negative biases in the GPS radio occultation (RO) refractivity (i.e., N-bias) inside the CBL due to a non-unique retrieval problem. An independent physical constraint is required to extract a unique and bias-free RO refractivity observation. In the overcast scenario, the inversion base temperature corresponds well to the cloud-top-temperature (CTT) of the stratus, which can be precisely measured from MODIS (Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer) longwave infrared window channel. In this presentation, the MODIS CTT measurements are used as an independent constraint to correct the systematic biases in the near co-incident RO refractivity soundings from COSMIC (Constellation Observing System for Meteorology, Ionosphere, and Climate). The sensitivity analysis on the reconstruction technique and the comparison of the reconstructed (bias-free) RO profiles with the radiosonde and ECMWF reanalysis will be presented. The synergy of GPS RO and MODIS cloud measurements provides model-independent observation of CBL thermodynamic structures that are crucial for understanding the boundary layer and low cloud processes in global weather and climate model simulations.

  13. The inverse problem of refraction travel times, part II: Quantifying refraction nonuniqueness using a three-layer model

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ivanov, J.; Miller, R.D.; Xia, J.; Steeples, D.

    2005-01-01

    This paper is the second of a set of two papers in which we study the inverse refraction problem. The first paper, "Types of Geophysical Nonuniqueness through Minimization," studies and classifies the types of nonuniqueness that exist when solving inverse problems depending on the participation of a priori information required to obtain reliable solutions of inverse geophysical problems. In view of the classification developed, in this paper we study the type of nonuniqueness associated with the inverse refraction problem. An approach for obtaining a realistic solution to the inverse refraction problem is offered in a third paper that is in preparation. The nonuniqueness of the inverse refraction problem is examined by using a simple three-layer model. Like many other inverse geophysical problems, the inverse refraction problem does not have a unique solution. Conventionally, nonuniqueness is considered to be a result of insufficient data and/or error in the data, for any fixed number of model parameters. This study illustrates that even for overdetermined and error free data, nonlinear inverse refraction problems exhibit exact-data nonuniqueness, which further complicates the problem of nonuniqueness. By evaluating the nonuniqueness of the inverse refraction problem, this paper targets the improvement of refraction inversion algorithms, and as a result, the achievement of more realistic solutions. The nonuniqueness of the inverse refraction problem is examined initially by using a simple three-layer model. The observations and conclusions of the three-layer model nonuniqueness study are used to evaluate the nonuniqueness of more complicated n-layer models and multi-parameter cell models such as in refraction tomography. For any fixed number of model parameters, the inverse refraction problem exhibits continuous ranges of exact-data nonuniqueness. Such an unfavorable type of nonuniqueness can be uniquely solved only by providing abundant a priori information

  14. Measurement of refractive index profile of non-symmetric, complex silica preforms with high refractive index differences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Probostova, Jana; Slanicka, Jiri; Mrazek, Jan; Podrazky, Ondrej; Benda, Adam; Peterka, Pavel

    2016-04-01

    Refractive index profile measurement is a key instrument for characterization of optical properties of preforms, which are used for drawing of high-quality optical fibers. Common industrial optical preform analyzers have been designed for measurement of simple symmetric structures such as step-index or graded-index preforms with refractive index close to the silica (n=1.457 at 633 nm). However, these conditions are usually far from more complex structures used in fiber lasers or in fiber sensor area. Preforms for the drawing of advanced optical fibers, such as Bragg, microstructure or photonic crystal fibers, are usually constituted from stacks with non-symmetric internal structure or composed of alternating layers with high refractive index contrasts. In this paper we present comparison of refractive index profile measurements of simple as well as complex structures with high refractive index differences simulating the Bragg structures. Commercial Photon Kinetics 2600 preform analyzer was used for the refractive index profile measurements. A set of concentrically arranged silica tubes was welded to form a complex preforms. Free space between the tubes was filled by immersion with varying refractive indices to simulate the Bragg structure. Up to three tubes were used for the analysis and the refractive indices of immersion were changed from 1.4 to 1.5. When refractive index of immersion was independently measured the structure of preform was defined. Profiles of these "known" structures were compared to measured data processed by originally proposed algorithm. The work provides an extension of issues of refractive index profile measurements in non-symmetric complex silica structures by a commercial preform analyzer and proposes more convenient methods of numeric data processing.

  15. Zoned near-zero refractive index fishnet lens antenna: Steering millimeter waves

    SciTech Connect

    Pacheco-Peña, V. Orazbayev, B. Beaskoetxea, U. Beruete, M.; Navarro-Cía, M.

    2014-03-28

    A zoned fishnet metamaterial lens is designed, fabricated, and experimentally demonstrated at millimeter wavelengths to work as a negative near-zero refractive index lens suitable for compact lens antenna configurations. At the design frequency f = 56.7 GHz (λ{sub 0} = 5.29 mm), the zoned fishnet metamaterial lens, designed to have a focal length FL = 9λ{sub 0}, exhibits a refractive index n = −0.25. The focusing performance of the diffractive optical element is briefly compared with that of a non-zoned fishnet metamaterial lens and an isotropic homogeneous zoned lens made of a material with the same refractive index. Experimental and numerically-computed radiation diagrams of the fabricated zoned lens are presented and compared in detail with that of a simulated non-zoned lens. Simulation and experimental results are in good agreement, demonstrating an enhancement generated by the zoned lens of 10.7 dB, corresponding to a gain of 12.26 dB. Moreover, beam steering capability of the structure by shifting the feeder on the xz-plane is demonstrated.

  16. Cryogenic Refractive Index and Coefficient of Thermal Expansion for the S-TIH1 Glass

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Quijada, Manuel A.; Leviton, Douglas; Content, David

    2013-01-01

    Using the CHARMS facility at NASA GSFC, we have measured the cryogenic refractive index of the Ohara S-TIH1 glass from 0.40 to 2.53 micrometers and from 120 to 300 K. We have also examined the spectral dispersion and thermo-optic coefficients (dn/dT). We also derived temperature-dependent Sellmeier models from which refractive index may be calculated for any wavelength and temperature within the stated ranges of each model. The S-TIH1 glass we tested exhibited unusual behavior in the thermo-optic coefficient. We found that for delta < 0.5 micrometers, the index of refraction decrease with a decrease in temperature (positive dn/dT). However, the situation was reversed for delta larger than 0.63 micrometers, where the index will increase with a decrease in temperature (negative dn/dT). We also measured the coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) for the similar batch of S-TIH1 glass in order to understand its thermal properties. The CTE showed a monotonic change with a decrease in temperature.

  17. Cattle egrets are less able to cope with light refraction than are other herons.

    PubMed

    Katzir; Strod; Schechtman; Hareli; Arad

    1999-03-01

    The majority of heron species (Aves, Ardeidae) forage on aquatic prey in shallow water. Prey detection, aiming and the beginning of the capture strikes are performed while the heron's eyes are above water. For most angles, as a result of air/water light refraction, the apparent image available to a heron is vertically displaced from the prey's real position. Herons must therefore correct for refraction. We tested the hypothesis that species that forage in aquatic habitats should be more able to correct for image disparity than those of terrestrial habitats. The ability of hand-reared herons of four species to capture stationary prey (fish) underwater (submerged) or in air (aerial) was tested. Three species (little egret Egretta garzetta, squacco heron Ardeola ralloides, and night heron Nycticorax nycticorax) normally forage in aquatic habitats while the fourth (cattle egret Bubulcus ibis) forages in terrestrial habitats. No individuals missed aerial prey. Success rates of little egrets and of squacco herons with submerged prey were high, while night herons became less successful with increased prey depth and/or distance. In cattle egrets, success rate was low and negatively correlated with prey depth. The observed interspecific differences may thus be related to (1) differential ability to correct for air/water light refraction and (2) the species' foraging behaviour. We suggest that cattle egrets are in the process of losing their ability to cope with submerged prey. Copyright 1999 The Association for the Study of Animal Behaviour.

  18. The Northern Walker Lane Seismic Refraction Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Louie, J. N.; Smith, S. B.; Thelen, W.; Scott, J. B.; Clark, M.

    2002-12-01

    We are developing a three-dimensional reference seismic velocity model for the western Great Basin region of Nevada and eastern California. The northern Walker Lane had not been characterized well by previous work. In May 2002 we collected a new crustal refraction profile from Battle Mountain, Nev. across western Nevada, the Reno area, Lake Tahoe, and the northern Sierra to Auburn, Calif. Mine blasts and earthquakes were recorded by 199 Texan instruments (loaned by the PASSCAL Instrument Center) extending across this more than 450-km-long transect. The seismic sources at the eastern end were mining blasts at Barrick's GoldStrike pit. We recorded additional blasts at the Florida Canyon and other mines between Lovelock and Battle Mountain, Nevada. The GoldStrike mine produced several ripple-fired blasts using 10,000-40,000 kg of ANFO each. First arrivals from the larger blasts are obvious to distances exceeding 250 km in the raw records. A M2.4 earthquake near Bridgeport, Calif. also produced pickable P-wave arrivals across at least half the transect, providing fan-shot data. We recorded only during working hours, and so missed an M4 earthquake that occurred at night. Events of M2 occurred during our recording to the west on the San Andreas fault near Pinnacles, Calif.; M3 events occurred near Portola and Mammoth Lakes, Calif. Arrivals from M5 events in the Mariana and Kuril Islands also appear in the records. Time-picks from these earthquakes may be possible after more work on synthetic-time modeling, data filtering, and display. We plan to record blasts at quarries in the western Sierra in future experiments, for a direct refraction reversal. We will compare our time picks against times generated from regional velocity models, to identify potential crustal and upper-mantle velocity anomalies. Such anomalies may be associated with the Battle Mountain heat-flow high, the northern Walker Lane belt, or the northern Sierran block.

  19. Cycloplegic refraction is the gold standard for epidemiological studies.

    PubMed

    Morgan, Ian G; Iribarren, Rafael; Fotouhi, Akbar; Grzybowski, Andrzej

    2015-09-01

    Many studies on children have shown that lack of cycloplegia is associated with slight overestimation of myopia and marked errors in estimates of the prevalence of emmetropia and hyperopia. Non-cycloplegic refraction is particularly problematic for studies of associations with risk factors. The consensus around the importance of cycloplegia in children left undefined at what age, if any, cycloplegia became unnecessary. It was often implicitly assumed that cycloplegia is not necessary beyond childhood or early adulthood, and thus, the protocol for the classical studies of refraction in older adults did not include cycloplegia. Now that population studies of refractive error are beginning to fill the gap between schoolchildren and older adults, whether cycloplegia is required for measuring refractive error in this age range, needs to be defined. Data from the Tehran Eye Study show that, without cycloplegia, there are errors in the estimation of myopia, emmetropia and hyperopia in the age range 20-50, just as in children. Similar results have been reported in an analysis of data from the Beaver Dam Offspring Eye Study. If the only important outcome measure of a particular study is the prevalence of myopia, then cycloplegia may not be crucial in some cases. But, without cycloplegia, measurements of other refractive categories as well as spherical equivalent are unreliable. In summary, the current evidence suggests that cycloplegic refraction should be considered as the gold standard for epidemiological studies of refraction, not only in children, but in adults up to the age of 50.

  20. Refractive Errors Affect the Vividness of Visual Mental Images

    PubMed Central

    Palermo, Liana; Nori, Raffaella; Piccardi, Laura; Zeri, Fabrizio; Babino, Antonio; Giusberti, Fiorella; Guariglia, Cecilia

    2013-01-01

    The hypothesis that visual perception and mental imagery are equivalent has never been explored in individuals with vision defects not preventing the visual perception of the world, such as refractive errors. Refractive error (i.e., myopia, hyperopia or astigmatism) is a condition where the refracting system of the eye fails to focus objects sharply on the retina. As a consequence refractive errors cause blurred vision. We subdivided 84 individuals according to their spherical equivalent refraction into Emmetropes (control individuals without refractive errors) and Ametropes (individuals with refractive errors). Participants performed a vividness task and completed a questionnaire that explored their cognitive style of thinking before their vision was checked by an ophthalmologist. Although results showed that Ametropes had less vivid mental images than Emmetropes this did not affect the development of their cognitive style of thinking; in fact, Ametropes were able to use both verbal and visual strategies to acquire and retrieve information. Present data are consistent with the hypothesis of equivalence between imagery and perception. PMID:23755186

  1. Recursive Bayesian electromagnetic refractivity estimation from radar sea clutter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasudevan, Sathyanarayanan; Anderson, Richard H.; Kraut, Shawn; Gerstoft, Peter; Rogers, L. Ted; Krolik, Jeffrey L.

    2007-04-01

    Estimation of the range- and height-dependent index of refraction over the sea surface facilitates prediction of ducted microwave propagation loss. In this paper, refractivity estimation from radar clutter returns is performed using a Markov state space model for microwave propagation. Specifically, the parabolic approximation for numerical solution of the wave equation is used to formulate the refractivity from clutter (RFC) problem within a nonlinear recursive Bayesian state estimation framework. RFC under this nonlinear state space formulation is more efficient than global fitting of refractivity parameters when the total number of range-varying parameters exceeds the number of basis functions required to represent the height-dependent field at a given range. Moreover, the range-recursive nature of the estimator can be easily adapted to situations where the refractivity modeling changes at discrete ranges, such as at a shoreline. A fast range-recursive solution for obtaining range-varying refractivity is achieved by using sequential importance sampling extensions to state estimation techniques, namely, the forward and Viterbi algorithms. Simulation and real data results from radar clutter collected off Wallops Island, Virginia, are presented which demonstrate the ability of this method to produce propagation loss estimates that compare favorably with ground truth refractivity measurements.

  2. Metamaterials with tunable refractive index fabricated from amorphous ferromagnetic microwires and optical Magnus effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanov, Andrey; Vedyayev, Anatoly; Galkin, Vladimir; Shalygin, Alexander; Ivanov, Valery

    2009-03-01

    For homogeneous NPVM (negative phase--velocity mediums) [V. G. Veselago, Soviet Physics - Uspekhi 10 (1968) 509; T. G. Mackay, A. Lakhtakia, Phys. Rev. E 69 (2004) 026602] anomalous effects such as negative refraction, light pressure, Doppler shift, Cherenkov-Vavilov radiation, Goos-Hanchen effect have been discovered in different frequency ranges. In this presentation the optical circular polarized effect is calculated for inhomogeneous mediums (optical Magnus effect) and it is shown that it is anomalous in NPVM with respect to ``right-handed'' materials. The proposed metamaterials fabricated from glass coated amorphous ferromagnetic Co-Fe-Cr-B-Si microwires are shown to exhibit a negative refractive index for electromagnetic waves over scale of GHz frequencies [A.V. Ivanov, A.N. Shalygin, A.V. Vedyayev, V.A. Ivanov, JETP Letters 85 (2007) 565]. The magnetostatic interaction between microwires has been taken into account. The phase and group velocities in proposed metamaterial have been calculated. The ratio of thereof depends monotonically on the size of the microwires. Optical properties of such metamaterials are tunable by an external magnetic field and mechanical stress.

  3. Analysis of critically refracted longitudinal waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pei, Ning; Bond, Leonard J.

    2015-03-01

    Fabrication processes, such as, welding, forging, and rolling can induce residual stresses in metals that will impact product performance and phenomena such as cracking and corrosion. To better manage residual stress tools are needed to map their distribution. The critically refracted ultrasonic longitudinal (LCR) wave is one such approach that has been used for residual stress characterization. It has been shown to be sensitive to stress and less sensitive to the effects of the texture of the material. Although the LCR wave is increasingly widely applied, the factors that influence the formation of the LCR beam are seldom discussed. This paper reports a numerical model used to investigate the transducers' parameters that can contribute to the directionality of the LCR wave and hence enable performance optimization when used for industrial applications. An orthogonal test method is used to study the transducer parameters which influence the LCR wave beams. This method provides a design tool that can be used to study and optimize multiple parameter experiments and it can identify which parameter or parameters are of most significance. The simulation of the sound field in a 2-D "water-steel" model is obtained using a Spatial Fourier Analysis method. The effects of incident angle, standoff, the aperture and the center frequency of the transducer were studied. Results show that the aperture of the transducer, the center frequency and the incident angle are the most important factors in controlling the directivity of the resulting LCR wave fields.

  4. Analysis of critically refracted longitudinal waves

    SciTech Connect

    Pei, Ning Bond, Leonard J.

    2015-03-31

    Fabrication processes, such as, welding, forging, and rolling can induce residual stresses in metals that will impact product performance and phenomena such as cracking and corrosion. To better manage residual stress tools are needed to map their distribution. The critically refracted ultrasonic longitudinal (LCR) wave is one such approach that has been used for residual stress characterization. It has been shown to be sensitive to stress and less sensitive to the effects of the texture of the material. Although the LCR wave is increasingly widely applied, the factors that influence the formation of the LCR beam are seldom discussed. This paper reports a numerical model used to investigate the transducers' parameters that can contribute to the directionality of the LCR wave and hence enable performance optimization when used for industrial applications. An orthogonal test method is used to study the transducer parameters which influence the LCR wave beams. This method provides a design tool that can be used to study and optimize multiple parameter experiments and it can identify which parameter or parameters are of most significance. The simulation of the sound field in a 2-D 'water-steel' model is obtained using a Spatial Fourier Analysis method. The effects of incident angle, standoff, the aperture and the center frequency of the transducer were studied. Results show that the aperture of the transducer, the center frequency and the incident angle are the most important factors in controlling the directivity of the resulting LCR wave fields.

  5. Variable thickness double-refracting plate

    DOEpatents

    Hadeishi, Tetsuo

    1976-01-01

    This invention provides an A.C., cyclic, current-controlled, phase retardation plate that uses a magnetic clamp to produce stress birefringence. It was developed for an Isotope-Zeeman Atomic Absorption Spectrometer that uses polarization modulation to effect automatic background correction in atomic absorption trace-element measurements. To this end, the phase retardation plate of the invention is a variable thickness, photoelastic, double-refracting plate that is alternately stressed and released by the magnetic clamp selectively to modulate specific components selected from the group consisting of circularly and plane polarized Zeeman components that are produced in a dc magnetic field so that they correspond respectively to Zeeman reference and transmission-probe absorption components. The polarization modulation changes the phase of these polarized Zeeman components, designated as .sigma. reference and .pi. absorption components, so that every half cycle the components change from a transmission mode to a mode in which the .pi. component is blocked and the .sigma. components are transmitted. Thus, the Zeeman absorption component, which corresponds in amplitude to the amount of the trace element to be measured in a sample, is alternately transmitted and blocked by a linear polarizer, while the circularly polarized reference components are continuously transmitted thereby. The result is a sinusoidally varying output light amplitude whose average corresponds to the amount of the trace element present in the sample.

  6. Development of High Refractive Index Conjugated Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graham, Matthew; Jin, Shi; Cheng, Stephen Z. D.

    2007-03-01

    The goal of this project is to fabricate a polymeric material with a complete 3-D PBG, to bring the tailorable physical, electrical, and optical properties of polymeric materials to 3-D PBG materials. Because of its conjugated nature and the presence of a heavy sulfur atom in its repeat unit, poly(thiophene) (PT) is predicted to have one of the highest polymeric refractive indices, but the reported n values for PT are 1.4 at 633 nm. This discrepancy is because the potential needed to electrosynthesize PT, the only method available to synthesize thick and high quality PT films, is higher than its degradation potential. It was found that by polymerizing thiophene with an optimized monomer concentration, proton trap concentration, and reaction temperature in a strong aprotic Lewis acid solvent, the polymerization potential could be reduced below the degradation potential of PT. The resultant PT film had a significantly elevated n Photonic templates were then constructed using a combination of Colvin's method^ with monodisperse spheres and mechanical annealing. High n PT was used to infiltrate the templates, and the templates were removed leaving a polymeric inverse opal with the possibility of a complete 3-D PBG.

  7. Refractive microlenses for ultraflat photolithographic projection systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voelkel, Reinhard; Eisner, Martin; Ossmann, Christian; Weible, Kenneth J.

    2000-08-01

    We report on the fabrication of high quality microlens arrays on 4', 6' and 8'-fused silica wafers. Refractive, plano-convex microlenses are fabricated by using photolithography; a reflow or melting resist technique and reactive ion etching. A diffraction-limited optical performance (p-v wave aberrations of < (lambda) /8, Strehl ratio GTR 0.97) is achieved. Aspherical lens profiles are obtained by varying the etch parameters during the reactive ion etching transfer. The microlens arrays are used for Microlens Projection Lithography (MPL) and within UV-light illumination systems. Microlens Projection Lithography is an innovative technique using KARL SUSS Mask Aligners equipped with an ultra-flat microlens-based projection system. The projection system consists of 500.000 identical micro-objectives side- by-side. Each micro-objective consists of 3 to 4 microlenses. A fully symmetrical optical design eliminates coma, distortion and lateral color. The lens system is frontal- and backside telecentric to provide a unit magnification (+1) over the whole depth of focus. Each micro- objective images a small part of the photomask pattern onto the wafer. The partial images from different channels overlap consistently and form a complete aerial image of the photomask. Microlens Projection Lithography provides an increased depth of focus (GTR 50 microns) at a larger working distance ($GTR 1 mm)than standard proximity printing. Microlens Projection Lithography allows photolithography on curved on non-planar substrates, in V-grooves, holes, etc. using a KARL SUSS Mask Aligner.

  8. Failure Analysis of Sapphire Refractive Secondary Concentrators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salem, Jonathan A.; Quinn, George D.

    2009-01-01

    Failure analysis was performed on two sapphire, refractive secondary concentrators (RSC) that failed during elevated temperature testing. Both concentrators failed from machining/handling damage on the lens face. The first concentrator, which failed during testing to 1300 C, exhibited a large r-plane twin extending from the lens through much of the cone. The second concentrator, which was an attempt to reduce temperature gradients and failed during testing to 649 C, exhibited a few small twins on the lens face. The twins were not located at the origin, but represent another mode of failure that needs to be considered in the design of sapphire components. In order to estimate the fracture stress from fractographic evidence, branching constants were measured on sapphire strength specimens. The fractographic analysis indicated radial tensile stresses of 44 to 65 MPa on the lens faces near the origins. Finite element analysis indicated similar stresses for the first RSC, but lower stresses for the second RSC. Better machining and handling might have prevented the fractures, however, temperature gradients and resultant thermal stresses need to be reduced to prevent twinning.

  9. Detection system for ocular refractive error measurement.

    PubMed

    Ventura, L; de Faria e Sousa, S J; de Castro, J C

    1998-05-01

    An automatic and objective system for measuring ocular refractive errors (myopia, hyperopia and astigmatism) was developed. The system consists of projecting a light target (a ring), using a diode laser (lambda = 850 nm), at the fundus of the patient's eye. The light beams scattered from the retina are submitted to an optical system and are analysed with regard to their vergence by a CCD detector (matrix). This system uses the same basic principle for the projection of beams into the tested eye as some commercial refractors, but it is innovative regarding the ring-shaped measuring target for the projection system and the detection system where a matrix detector provides a wider range of measurement and a less complex system for the optical alignment. Also a dedicated electronic circuit was not necessary for treating the electronic signals from the detector (as the usual refractors do); instead a commercial frame grabber was used and software based on the heuristic search technique was developed. All the guiding equations that describe the system as well as the image processing procedure are presented in detail. Measurements in model eyes and in human eyes are in good agreement with retinoscopic measurements and they are also as precise as these kinds of measurements require (0.125D and 5 degrees).

  10. Climate Absolute Radiance and Refractivity Observatory (CLARREO)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leckey, John P.

    2015-01-01

    The Climate Absolute Radiance and Refractivity Observatory (CLARREO) is a mission, led and developed by NASA, that will measure a variety of climate variables with an unprecedented accuracy to quantify and attribute climate change. CLARREO consists of three separate instruments: an infrared (IR) spectrometer, a reflected solar (RS) spectrometer, and a radio occultation (RO) instrument. The mission will contain orbiting radiometers with sufficient accuracy, including on orbit verification, to calibrate other space-based instrumentation, increasing their respective accuracy by as much as an order of magnitude. The IR spectrometer is a Fourier Transform spectrometer (FTS) working in the 5 to 50 microns wavelength region with a goal of 0.1 K (k = 3) accuracy. The FTS will achieve this accuracy using phase change cells to verify thermistor accuracy and heated halos to verify blackbody emissivity, both on orbit. The RS spectrometer will measure the reflectance of the atmosphere in the 0.32 to 2.3 microns wavelength region with an accuracy of 0.3% (k = 2). The status of the instrumentation packages and potential mission options will be presented.

  11. Giant negative Goos-Hänchen shifts for a photonic crystal with a negative effective index.

    PubMed

    He, Jinlong; Yi, Jin; He, Sailing

    2006-04-03

    The Goos-Hänchen effects are investigated for a monochromatic Gaussian beam totally reflected by a photonic crystal with a negative effective index. By choosing an appropriate thickness for the homogeneous cladding layer, a giant negative GH lateral shift can be obtained and the totally reflected beam retains a single beam of good profile even for a very narrow incident beam. The GH lateral shift can be very sensitive to the change of the refractive index of the cladding layer, and this property can be utilized for e.g. the switching applications.

  12. Refractive index and temperature nanosensor with plasmonic waveguide system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kong, Yan; Qiu, Peng; Wei, Qi; Quan, Wei; Wang, Shouyu; Qian, Weiying

    2016-07-01

    A surface plasmon polariton sensor consisting of two metal-insulator-metal waveguides and a transverse rectangular resonator is proposed. Both refractive index and temperature sensing characteristics are analyzed by investigating the transmission spectra which demonstrates that the transmission peak wavelength shifting satisfies linear relation with environmental refractive index and temperature, respectively. The proposed design provides high refractive index and temperature sensitivity as 3.38×106%/RIU and 82%/K estimated by integrated response of the sensor, and owns the potentials for high-throughput array sensing. It is believed that the nanoscale sensor can be applied in spot detection for high speed multi-parameter sensing and accurate measurements.

  13. Studies of atmospheric refraction effects on laser data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dunn, P. J.; Pearce, W. A.; Johnson, T. S.

    1982-01-01

    The refraction effect from three perspectives was considered. An analysis of the axioms on which the accepted correction algorithms were based was the first priority. The integrity of the meteorological measurements on which the correction model is based was also considered and a large quantity of laser observations was processed in an effort to detect any serious anomalies in them. The effect of refraction errors on geodetic parameters estimated from laser data using the most recent analysis procedures was the focus of the third element of study. The results concentrate on refraction errors which were found to be critical in the eventual use of the data for measurements of crustal dynamics.

  14. Refractive phenomena in the shock wave dispersion with variable gradients

    SciTech Connect

    Markhotok, A.; Popovic, S.

    2010-06-15

    In this article the refraction effects in the weak shock wave (SW) dispersion on an interface with a temperature variation between two mediums are described. In the case of a finite-gradient boundary, the effect of the SW dispersion is remarkably stronger than in the case of a step change in parameters. In the former case the vertical component of velocity for the transmitted SW (the refraction effect) must be taken into account. Results of comparative calculations based on the two-dimensional model corrected for the refraction effect show significant differences in the shapes of the dispersed SW fronts.

  15. Determination of the refractive index of paper with clearing agents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fabritius, Tapio; Saarela, Juha; Myllyla, Risto

    2006-01-01

    The refractive index of paper was determined by measuring the propagation delay of photons in optically cleared paper boards. The determination was based on the assumption that photon propagation delay achieves minimum value as the paper is optimally cleared. The measured paper sheets was made from elemental chlorine-free market pulp, i.e. fully bleached, unbeaten, softwood kraft pulp. Nine different clearing agents with a refraction index between 1.329 and 1.741 were eLuperimented with. According to the streakmem measurements, the refractive index of the test paper was 1.557.

  16. Analyzing refractive index changes and differential bending in microcantilever arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huber, François; Lang, Hans Peter; Hegner, Martin; Despont, Michel; Drechsler, Ute; Gerber, Christoph

    2008-08-01

    A new microcantilever array design is investigated comprising eight flexible microcantilevers introducing two solid bars, enabling to subtract contributions from differences in refractive index in an optical laser read out system. Changes in the refractive index do not contribute undesirably to bending signals at picomolar to micromolar DNA or protein concentrations. However, measurements of samples with high salt concentrations or serum are affected, requiring corrections for refractive index artifacts. Moreover, to obtain a deeper understanding of molecular stress formation, the differential curvature of cantilevers is analyzed by positioning the laser spots along the surface of the levers during pH experiments.

  17. Analytical models of optical refraction in the troposphere.

    PubMed

    Nener, Brett D; Fowkes, Neville; Borredon, Laurent

    2003-05-01

    An extremely accurate but simple asymptotic description (with known error) is obtained for the path of a ray propagating over a curved Earth with radial variations in refractive index. The result is sufficiently simple that analytic solutions for the path can be obtained for linear and quadratic index profiles. As well as rendering the inverse problem trivial for these profiles, this formulation shows that images are uniformly magnified in the vertical direction when viewed through a quadratic refractive-index profile. Nonuniform vertical distortions occur for higher-order refractive-index profiles.

  18. Making waves round a structured cloak: lattices, negative refraction and fringes

    PubMed Central

    Colquitt, D. J.; Jones, I. S.; Movchan, N. V.; Movchan, A. B.; Brun, M.; McPhedran, R. C.

    2013-01-01

    Using the framework of transformation optics, this paper presents a detailed analysis of a non-singular square cloak for acoustic, out-of-plane shear elastic and electromagnetic waves. Analysis of wave propagation through the cloak is presented and accompanied by numerical illustrations. The efficacy of the regularized cloak is demonstrated and an objective numerical measure of the quality of the cloaking effect is provided. It is demonstrated that the cloaking effect persists over a wide range of frequencies. As a demonstration of the effectiveness of the regularized cloak, a Young's double slit experiment is presented. The stability of the interference pattern is examined when a cloaked and uncloaked obstacle are successively placed in front of one of the apertures. This novel link with a well-known quantum mechanical experiment provides an additional method through which the quality of cloaks may be examined. In the second half of the paper, it is shown that an approximate cloak may be constructed using a discrete lattice structure. The efficiency of the approximate lattice cloak is analysed and a series of illustrative simulations presented. It is demonstrated that effective cloaking may be obtained by using a relatively simple lattice structure, particularly, in the low-frequency regime. PMID:24062625

  19. Making waves round a structured cloak: lattices, negative refraction and fringes.

    PubMed

    Colquitt, D J; Jones, I S; Movchan, N V; Movchan, A B; Brun, M; McPhedran, R C

    2013-09-08

    Using the framework of transformation optics, this paper presents a detailed analysis of a non-singular square cloak for acoustic, out-of-plane shear elastic and electromagnetic waves. Analysis of wave propagation through the cloak is presented and accompanied by numerical illustrations. The efficacy of the regularized cloak is demonstrated and an objective numerical measure of the quality of the cloaking effect is provided. It is demonstrated that the cloaking effect persists over a wide range of frequencies. As a demonstration of the effectiveness of the regularized cloak, a Young's double slit experiment is presented. The stability of the interference pattern is examined when a cloaked and uncloaked obstacle are successively placed in front of one of the apertures. This novel link with a well-known quantum mechanical experiment provides an additional method through which the quality of cloaks may be examined. In the second half of the paper, it is shown that an approximate cloak may be constructed using a discrete lattice structure. The efficiency of the approximate lattice cloak is analysed and a series of illustrative simulations presented. It is demonstrated that effective cloaking may be obtained by using a relatively simple lattice structure, particularly, in the low-frequency regime.

  20. Long-Wave Infrared Semiconductor Negative Refraction Metamaterials for High-Resolution Imaging

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-02-14

    Press, 1992). 23. E. Palik , ed., The Handbook of Optical Constants of Solids (Academic, 1997). 24. For details see COMSOL Multiphysics User’s Guide and...SIAM, Philadelphia, 1999. 22The Handbook of Optical Constants of Solids, edited by E. D. Palik Aca- demic, New York, 1997. FIG. 4. Color online a

  1. Plasmonic space folding: focusing surface plasmons via negative refraction in complementary media.

    PubMed

    Kadic, Muamer; Guenneau, Sebastien; Enoch, Stefan; Ramakrishna, S Anantha

    2011-09-27

    We extend designs of perfect lenses to the focusing of surface plasmon polaritons (SPPs) propagating at the interface between two anisotropic media of opposite permittivity sign. We identify the role played by the components of anisotropic and heterogeneous tensors of permittivity and permeability, deduced from a coordinate transformation, in the dispersion relation governing propagation of SPPs. We illustrate our theory with three-dimensional finite element computations for focusing of SPPs by perfect flat and cylindrical lenses. Finally, we propose a design of a flat SPP lens consisting of dielectric cylinders arranged in a periodic fashion (along a hexagonal array) on a metal plate.

  2. Manipulating one-way space wave and its refraction by time-reversal and parity symmetry breaking

    PubMed Central

    Poo, Yin; He, Cheng; Xiao, Chao; Lu, Ming-Hui; Wu, Rui-Xin; Chen, Yan-Feng

    2016-01-01

    One-way transmission and negative refraction are the exotic wave properties founded in photonic crystals which attract a great attention due to their promising applications in photonic devices. How to integrate such two phenomena in one material or device is interesting and valuable. In this work, we theoretically and experimentally demonstrate that one-way electromagnetic space wave can be realized by means of two-dimensional magnetic photonic crystals. Simultaneously breaking the time-reversal and parity symmetries of the magnetic photonic crystals designed, we observe oblique incident space wave propagating one-way in the magnetic photonic crystals with positive or negative refraction occurring at interfaces, which can be manipulated upon the incident angle and operating frequency. Our work may offer a potential platform to realize some exotic photoelectronic and microwave devices such as one-way imaging and one-way cloaking. PMID:27387438

  3. Manipulating one-way space wave and its refraction by time-reversal and parity symmetry breaking.

    PubMed

    Poo, Yin; He, Cheng; Xiao, Chao; Lu, Ming-Hui; Wu, Rui-Xin; Chen, Yan-Feng

    2016-07-08

    One-way transmission and negative refraction are the exotic wave properties founded in photonic crystals which attract a great attention due to their promising applications in photonic devices. How to integrate such two phenomena in one material or device is interesting and valuable. In this work, we theoretically and experimentally demonstrate that one-way electromagnetic space wave can be realized by means of two-dimensional magnetic photonic crystals. Simultaneously breaking the time-reversal and parity symmetries of the magnetic photonic crystals designed, we observe oblique incident space wave propagating one-way in the magnetic photonic crystals with positive or negative refraction occurring at interfaces, which can be manipulated upon the incident angle and operating frequency. Our work may offer a potential platform to realize some exotic photoelectronic and microwave devices such as one-way imaging and one-way cloaking.

  4. Manipulating one-way space wave and its refraction by time-reversal and parity symmetry breaking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poo, Yin; He, Cheng; Xiao, Chao; Lu, Ming-Hui; Wu, Rui-Xin; Chen, Yan-Feng

    2016-07-01

    One-way transmission and negative refraction are the exotic wave properties founded in photonic crystals which attract a great attention due to their promising applications in photonic devices. How to integrate such two phenomena in one material or device is interesting and valuable. In this work, we theoretically and experimentally demonstrate that one-way electromagnetic space wave can be realized by means of two-dimensional magnetic photonic crystals. Simultaneously breaking the time-reversal and parity symmetries of the magnetic photonic crystals designed, we observe oblique incident space wave propagating one-way in the magnetic photonic crystals with positive or negative refraction occurring at interfaces, which can be manipulated upon the incident angle and operating frequency. Our work may offer a potential platform to realize some exotic photoelectronic and microwave devices such as one-way imaging and one-way cloaking.

  5. Refractive cylinder outcomes after calculating toric intraocular lens cylinder power using total corneal refractive power

    PubMed Central

    Davison, James A; Potvin, Richard

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To determine whether the total corneal refractive power (TCRP) value, which is based on measurement of both anterior and posterior corneal astigmatism, is effective for toric intraocular lens (IOL) calculation with AcrySof® Toric IOLs. Patients and methods A consecutive series of cataract surgery cases with AcrySof toric IOL implantation was studied retrospectively. The IOLMaster® was used for calculation of IOL sphere, the Pentacam® TCRP 3.0 mm apex/ring value was used as the keratometry input to the AcrySof Toric IOL Calculator and the VERION™ Digital Marker for surgical orientation. The keratometry readings from the VERION reference unit were recorded but not used in the actual calculation. Vector differences between expected and actual residual refractive cylinder were calculated and compared to simulated vector errors using the collected VERION keratometry data. Results In total, 83 eyes of 56 patients were analyzed. Residual refractive cylinder was 0.25 D or lower in 58% of eyes and 0.5 D or lower in 80% of eyes. The TCRP-based calculation resulted in a statistically significantly lower vector error (P<0.01) and significantly more eyes with a vector error ≤0.5 D relative to the VERION-based calculation (P=0.02). The TCRP and VERION keratometry readings suggested a different IOL toric power in 53/83 eyes. In these 53 eyes the TCRP vector error was lower in 28 cases, the VERION error was lower in five cases, and the error was equal in 20 cases. When the anterior cornea had with-the-rule astigmatism, the VERION was more likely to suggest a higher toric power and when the anterior cornea had against-the-rule astigmatism, the VERION was less likely to suggest a higher toric power. Conclusion Using the TCRP keratometry measurement in the AcrySof toric calculator may improve overall postoperative refractive results. Consideration of measured posterior corneal astigmatism, rather than a population-averaged value, appears advantageous. PMID:26316693

  6. Precise determination of the refractive index of suspended particles: light transmission as a function of refractive index mismatch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McClymer, J. P.

    2016-08-01

    Many fluids appear white because refractive index differences lead to multiple scattering. In this paper, we use safe, low-cost commercial index matching fluids to quantitatively study light transmission as a function of index mismatch, reduce multiple scattering to allow single scattering probes, and to precisely determine the index of refraction of suspended material. The transmission profile is compared with Rayleigh-Gans and Mie theory predictions. The procedure is accessible as a student laboratory project, while providing advantages over other standard methods of measuring the refractive index of an unknown nanoparticle, making it valuable to researchers.

  7. The science of negative index materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soukoulis, Costas M.; Zhou, Jiangfeng; Koschny, Thomas; Kafesaki, Maria; Economou, Eleftherios N.

    2008-07-01

    Metamaterials are designed to have structures that make available properties not found in Nature. Their unique properties (such as negative index of refraction, n) can be extended from GHz all the way to optical frequencies. We review the scaling properties of metamaterials that have been fabricated and give negative n and negative permeability, μ. It is found that most of the experimentally realized metamaterials have λ/a between 2 (THz and optical region) and 12 (GHz region), where λ is the operation wavelength and a is the size of the unit cell. The transmission losses for the experimental structures and the ratio λ/a for the simulated structures are presented. Finally, a comparison of the different metamaterial designs (fishnet, cut and/or continuous wires, and split-ring resonators and wires) is given.

  8. Computational imaging using lightweight diffractive-refractive optics.

    PubMed

    Peng, Yifan; Fu, Qiang; Amata, Hadi; Su, Shuochen; Heide, Felix; Heidrich, Wolfgang

    2015-11-30

    Diffractive optical elements (DOE) show great promise for imaging optics that are thinner and more lightweight than conventional refractive lenses while preserving their light efficiency. Unfortunately, severe spectral dispersion currently limits the use of DOEs in consumer-level lens design. In this article, we jointly design lightweight diffractive-refractive optics and post-processing algorithms to enable imaging under white light illumination. Using the Fresnel lens as a general platform, we show three phase-plate designs, including a super-thin stacked plate design, a diffractive-refractive-hybrid lens, and a phase coded-aperture lens. Combined with cross-channel deconvolution algorithm, both spherical and chromatic aberrations are corrected. Experimental results indicate that using our computational imaging approach, diffractive-refractive optics is an alternative candidate to build light efficient and thin optics for white light imaging.

  9. Refractive index of K9 Glass under Shock Loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Changming; Wang, Xiang; Cai, Lingcang; Liu, Cangli

    2013-06-01

    We study K9 glass refraction index under shock loading conducted on powder gun,all experimental tests are plate impact loading. The impact veceloty range from 300m/s to 1200m/s, and the measure method is laser interferometer Photon Doppler Velocimetry(PDV) to measure the particle velocity both at the impact interface and free surface, The shock pressure from 2 GPa to 8 GPa, values for refraction are found from velocity corrections that must be made to account for refraction-index changes in the K9 glass due to shock wave motion. Experiment results show that refraction-index of K9 glass changes with the shock pressure in line relations, it can be as measure window to study the interesting materials under 10 GPa during the shock loading.

  10. Photoresist Exposure Parameter Extraction from Refractive Index Change during Exposure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sohn, Young-Soo; Sung, Moon-Gyu; Lee, Young-Mi; Lee, Eun-Mi; Oh, Jin-Kyung; Byun, Sung-Hwan; Jeong, Yeon-Un; Oh, Hye-Keun; An, Ilsin; Lee, Kun-Sang; Park, In-Ho; Cho, Joon-Yeon; Lee, Sang-Ho

    1998-12-01

    The refractive indices of photoresist are usually measured byan ellipsometer or spectrophotometer, but the values are limited to pre-exposure. It is known thatthe real and imaginary indices are changed during the exposure.But there is little report on these variations since itis difficult to measure this refractive index change at deep ultraviolet. The DillABC parameters show a significant variation with the resist and substrate thicknessas well as the experimental conditions.A method is suggested to extract the parameters from the refractive index changes.We can get the refractive index change and extract the Dill ABC exposure parameters from that.The multiple thin film interference calculation is used to fit the measured transmittance data.The results of our experiments and calculations for several resists including193 nm chemically amplified resists are compared with other methods.The results are agreed well with the full multilayer thin film simulation.

  11. Asronomical refraction: Computational methods for all zenith angles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Auer, L. H.; Standish, E. M.

    2000-01-01

    It is shown that the problem of computing astronomical refraction for any value of the zenith angle may be reduced to a simple, nonsingular, numerical quadrature when the proper choice is made for the independent variable of integration.

  12. An Analogue Model for Teaching Reflection and Refraction of Waves.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bates, Harry E.

    1980-01-01

    Describes a concrete model for teaching the concepts of reflection and refraction without the use of formal mathematics. The model has been tested in five sections of a physics course for nonscience majors at Towson State University, Baltimore, Maryland. (HM)

  13. Spatially Varying Index of Refraction: An Open Ended Undergraduate Topic.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Krueger, David A.

    1980-01-01

    Presents an experiment on the bending of light in a medium with a continuously varying index of refraction. Several theoretical approaches for the analysis of this experiment, designed for college physics students, are also presented. (HM)

  14. Resolving controversy of unusually high refractive index of a tubulin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krivosudský, O.; Dráber, P.; Cifra, M.

    2017-02-01

    The refractive index of a tubulin is an important parameter underlying fundamental electromagnetic and biophysical properties of microtubules – protein fibers essential for several cell functions including cell division. Yet, the only experimental data available in the current literature show values of the tubulin refractive index (n=2.36\\text{--}2.90) which are much higher than what the established theories predict based on the weighted contribution of the polarizability of individual amino acids constituting the protein. To resolve this controversy, we report here modeling and rigorous experimental analysis of the refractive index of a purified tubulin dimer. Our experimental data revealed that the refractive index of the tubulin is n=1.64 at wavelength 589 nm and 25 °C, that is much closer to the values predicted by the established theories than what the earlier experimental data provide.

  15. Refracting solar energy concentrator and thin flexible fresnel lens

    SciTech Connect

    Appeldorn, R.H.

    1989-07-18

    This patent describes a solar energy concentrator. It comprises: a target area; lens means including a sheet of thin flexible transparent polymeric film having a first surface and a second surface, and having a plurality of lenticular light refracting prisms forming the second surface for refracting incident solar radiation striking the lens means at an acute angle to the lens means; support means for supporting the lens means above the target area and the lens means being mounted upon the support means to open toward the target area whereby the lens means is folded at at least one line parallel to the lenticular light refracting prisms to define at least two sections, and the light refracting prisms being defined for focusing the incident solar radiation onto the target area. The efficiency of the concentrator is not materially affected by image deterioration at the target area due to bowing of the sections of the lens means during use.

  16. Miniature interferometer for refractive index measurement in microfluidic chip

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Minghui; Geiser, Martial; Truffer, Frederic; Song, Chengli

    2012-12-01

    The design and development of the miniaturized interferometer for measurement of the refractive index or concentration of sub-microliter volume aqueous solution in microfludic chip is presented. It is manifested by a successful measurement of the refractive index of sugar-water solution, by utilizing a laser diode for light source and the small robust instrumentation for practical implementation. Theoretically, the measurement principle and the feasibility of the system are analyzed. Experimental device is constructed with a diode laser, lens, two optical plate and a complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS). Through measuring the positional changes of the interference fringes, the refractive index change are retrieved. A refractive index change of 10-4 is inferred from the measured image data. The entire system is approximately the size of half and a deck of cards and can operate on battery power for long time.

  17. Helping secondary school students develop a conceptual understanding of refraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ashmann, Scott; Anderson, Charles W.; Boeckman, Heather

    2016-07-01

    Using real-world examples, ray diagrams, and a cognitive apprenticeship cycle, this paper focuses on developing students’ conceptual (not mathematical) understanding of refraction. Refraction can be a difficult concept for students to comprehend if they do not have well-designed opportunities to practice explaining situations where reflection and refraction occur. The use of ray diagrams can be useful in (a) the teacher modelling a correct explanation to a situation where refraction occurs and (b) for students to create as they practice other examples. This paper includes eight examples of increasing complexity that use a cognitive apprenticeship cycle approach to scaffold student learning. The first examples (rock fish, floating penny) are shown and a solution is modeled using a ray diagram. Three more examples (bent pencil, dropping an item in water, sunrise/sunset) are presented for students to practice, with each becoming more sophisticated. Three assessment exercises are then provided (two dots, three coins, broken tube).

  18. Refractive eye surgery - what to ask your doctor

    MedlinePlus

    What to ask your doctor about refractive eye surgery; Nearsightedness surgery - what to ask your doctor; LASIK - what to ... Will this surgery help my type of vision problem? Will I still need glasses or contact lenses after the surgery? Will ...

  19. Ectasia risk factors in refractive surgery

    PubMed Central

    Santhiago, Marcony R; Giacomin, Natalia T; Smadja, David; Bechara, Samir J

    2016-01-01

    This review outlines risk factors of post-laser in situ keratomileusis (LASIK) ectasia that can be detected preoperatively and presents a new metric to be considered in the detection of ectasia risk. Relevant factors in refractive surgery screening include the analysis of intrinsic biomechanical properties (information obtained from corneal topography/tomography and patient’s age), as well as the analysis of alterable biomechanical properties (information obtained from the amount of tissue altered by surgery and the remaining load-bearing tissue). Corneal topography patterns of placido disk seem to play a pivotal role as a surrogate of corneal strength, and abnormal corneal topography remains to be the most important identifiable risk factor for ectasia. Information derived from tomography, such as pachymetric and epithelial maps as well as computational strategies, to help in the detection of keratoconus is additional and relevant. High percentage of tissue altered (PTA) is the most robust risk factor for ectasia after LASIK in patients with normal preoperative corneal topography. Compared to specific residual stromal bed (RSB) or central corneal thickness values, percentage of tissue altered likely provides a more individualized measure of biomechanical alteration because it considers the relationship between thickness, tissue altered through ablation and flap creation, and ultimate RSB thickness. Other recognized risk factors include low RSB, thin cornea, and high myopia. Age is also a very important risk factor and still remains as one of the most overlooked ones. A comprehensive screening approach with the Ectasia Risk Score System, which evaluates multiple risk factors simultaneously, is also a helpful tool in the screening strategy. PMID:27143849

  20. Refractive error among urban preschool children in Xuzhou, China

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xiaojuan; Liu, Dan; Feng, Ruifang; Zhao, Huashuo; Wang, Qinmei

    2014-01-01

    The prevalence of refractive errors in urban preschool children in Xuzhou, China remains unknown. Children attending twelve randomly selected kindergartens participated in this study. Visual acuity, ocular alignment, cover-uncover test, cycloplegic refraction, slit-lamp and funduscopy were performed under a standardized testing environment. Cycloplegic streak retinoscopy was performed for all subjects. The mean spherical equivalent (SE) refractive error was the main outcome measure. Emmetropia was defined as refractive status between +1.75 diopters (D) and -0.75D. Myopia, hyperopia, astigmatism and anisometropia were defined as SE < -0.50D, SE > +2.0 D, cylindrical error > 1.0 D and SE difference ≥ 1 D between fellow eyes, respectively. Out of 2349 eligible children, 2255 (96%) children completed a refractive examination. Of the 2255 children, the mean SE of right eyes was +1.14 ± 0.95 diopters (D). Mean SE of the right eyes did not decline with age (r = -0.01; P = 0.56). The majority (86.6%) of children were emmetropia. The prevalence of myopia and hyperopia was 0.9% and 14.3%, respectively. The mean astigmatism for the right eyes was 0.87 ± 0.62 D. The prevalence of With-the-rule, against the rule and oblique astigmatism was 93.8%, 4.7% and 1.5%, respectively. The mean anisometropia between two eyes was 0.14 ± 0.38 D. The most common type of refractive error was hyperopia (14.3%), followed by astigmatism (8.8%), anisometropia (3.2%), and myopia (0.9%). The refractive status in this population of urban Xuzhou preschool children was stable and there was no evidence of a myopic refractive shift over this age range in our cross-sectional study. PMID:25674266

  1. A general relationship for the second virial refraction coefficient

    SciTech Connect

    Seminogov, V.N.; Sinel'nikov, S.P.; Timoshenko, N.I.; Yamnov, A.L.

    1986-05-01

    Experimental data have been used to obtain a general formula for the second virial refraction coefficient as a function of temperature. A qualitative analysis of the formula is given. Laser techinques have substantially extended the scope for optical methods in thermophysical research, including high-temperature processes. The general formula for the second virial refraction coefficient presented enables one to calculate polarizabilities at low densities.

  2. Apparatus and method to compensate for refraction of radiation

    DOEpatents

    Allen, G.R.; Moskowitz, P.E.

    1990-03-27

    An apparatus to compensate for refraction of radiation passing through a curved wall of an article is provided. The apparatus of a preferred embodiment is particularly advantageous for use in arc tube discharge diagnostics. The apparatus of the preferred embodiment includes means for pre-refracting radiation on a predetermined path by an amount equal and inverse to refraction which occurs when radiation passes through a first wall of the arc tube such that, when the radiation passes through the first wall of the arc tube and into the cavity thereof, the radiation passes through the cavity approximately on the predetermined path; means for releasably holding the article such that the radiation passes through the cavity thereof; and means for post-refracting radiation emerging from a point of the arc tube opposite its point of entry by an amount equal and inverse to refraction which occurs when radiation emerges from the arc tube. In one embodiment the means for pre-refracting radiation includes a first half tube comprising a longitudinally bisected tube obtained from a tube which is approximately identical to the arc tube's cylindrical portion and a first cylindrical lens, the first half tube being mounted with its concave side facing the radiation source and the first cylindrical lens being mounted between the first half tube and the arc tube and the means for post-refracting radiation includes a second half tube comprising a longitudinally bisected tube obtained from a tube which is approximately identical to the arc tube's cylindrical portion and a second cylindrical lens, the second half tube being mounted with its convex side facing the radiation source and the second cylindrical lens being mounted between the arc tube and the second half tube. Methods to compensate for refraction of radiation passing into and out of an arc tube is also provided. 4 figs.

  3. Apparatus and method to compensate for refraction of radiation

    DOEpatents

    Allen, Gary R.; Moskowitz, Philip E.

    1990-01-01

    An apparatus to compensate for refraction of radiation passing through a curved wall of an article is provided. The apparatus of a preferred embodiment is particularly advantageous for use in arc tube discharge diagnostics. The apparatus of the preferred embodiment includes means for pre-refracting radiation on a predetermined path by an amount equal and inverse to refraction which occurs when radiation passes through a first wall of the arc tube such that, when the radiation passes through the first wall of the arc tube and into the cavity thereof, the radiation passes through the cavity approximately on the predetermined path; means for releasably holding the article such that the radiation passes through the cavity thereof; and means for post-refracting radiation emerging from a point of the arc tube opposite its point of entry by an amount equal and inverse to refraction which occurs when radiation emerges from the arc tube. In one embodiment the means for pre-refracting radiation includes a first half tube comprising a longitudinally bisected tube obtained from a tube which is approximately identical to the arc tube's cylindrical portion and a first cylindrical lens, the first half tube being mounted with its concave side facing the radiation source and the first cylindrical lens being mounted between the first half tube and the arc tube and the means for post-refracting radiation includes a second half tube comprising a longitudinally bisected tube obtained from a tube which is approximately identical to the arc tube's cylindrical portion and a second cylindrical lens, the second half tube being mounted with its convex side facing the radiation source and the second cylindrical lens being mounted between the arc tube and the second half tube. Methods to compensate for refraction of radiation passing into and out of an arc tube is also provided.

  4. Recent developments in refractive concentrators for space photovoltaic power systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Piszczor, Michael F.; Oneill, Mark J.

    1993-01-01

    Since SPRAT 11, significant progress has been made in the development of refractive concentrator elements and components designed specifically for space applications. The status of the mini-dome Fresnel lens concentrator array is discussed and then the results of work recently completed in the area of prismatic cell covers for concentrator systems are summarized. This is followed by a brief discussion of some work just starting in the area of line-focus refractive concentrators for space.

  5. Refractive error among urban preschool children in Xuzhou, China.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaojuan; Liu, Dan; Feng, Ruifang; Zhao, Huashuo; Wang, Qinmei

    2014-01-01

    The prevalence of refractive errors in urban preschool children in Xuzhou, China remains unknown. Children attending twelve randomly selected kindergartens participated in this study. Visual acuity, ocular alignment, cover-uncover test, cycloplegic refraction, slit-lamp and funduscopy were performed under a standardized testing environment. Cycloplegic streak retinoscopy was performed for all subjects. The mean spherical equivalent (SE) refractive error was the main outcome measure. Emmetropia was defined as refractive status between +1.75 diopters (D) and -0.75D. Myopia, hyperopia, astigmatism and anisometropia were defined as SE < -0.50D, SE > +2.0 D, cylindrical error > 1.0 D and SE difference ≥ 1 D between fellow eyes, respectively. Out of 2349 eligible children, 2255 (96%) children completed a refractive examination. Of the 2255 children, the mean SE of right eyes was +1.14 ± 0.95 diopters (D). Mean SE of the right eyes did not decline with age (r = -0.01; P = 0.56). The majority (86.6%) of children were emmetropia. The prevalence of myopia and hyperopia was 0.9% and 14.3%, respectively. The mean astigmatism for the right eyes was 0.87 ± 0.62 D. The prevalence of With-the-rule, against the rule and oblique astigmatism was 93.8%, 4.7% and 1.5%, respectively. The mean anisometropia between two eyes was 0.14 ± 0.38 D. The most common type of refractive error was hyperopia (14.3%), followed by astigmatism (8.8%), anisometropia (3.2%), and myopia (0.9%). The refractive status in this population of urban Xuzhou preschool children was stable and there was no evidence of a myopic refractive shift over this age range in our cross-sectional study.

  6. Seismic refraction survey of the ANS preferred site

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, R.K.; Hopkins, R.A.; Doll, W.E.

    1992-02-01

    Between September 19, 1991 and October 8, 1991 personnel from Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc. (Energy Systems), Automated Sciences Group, Inc., and Marrich, Inc. performed a seismic refraction survey at the Advanced Neutron Source (ANS) preferred site. The purpose of this survey was to provide estimates of top-of-rock topography, based on seismic velocities, and to delineate variations in rock and soil velocities. Forty-four seismic refraction spreads were shot to determine top-of-rock depths at 42 locations. Nine of the seismic spreads were shot with long offsets to provide 216 top-of-rock depths for 4 seismic refraction profiles. The refraction spread locations were based on the grid for the ANS Phase I drilling program. Interpretation of the seismic refraction data supports the assumption that the top-of-rock surface generally follows the local topography. The shallow top-of-rock interface interpreted from the seismic refraction data is also supported by limited drill information at the site. Some zones of anomalous data are present that could be the result of locally variable weathering, a localized variation in shale content, or depth to top-of-rock greater than the site norm.

  7. Comparison between focometer and autorefractor in the measurement of refractive error among students in underserved community of sub-Saharan Africa.

    PubMed

    Aina, A S; Oluleye, T S; Olusanya, B A

    2016-11-01

    PurposeTo compare focometer and autorefractor in the measurement of refractive errors among students in an underserved community of sub-Saharan Africa.MethodsThe study was a descriptive comparative cross-sectional study conducted in October/November 2014 among secondary school students of Ijaiye-Orile, Oyo State, Nigeria. Students were selected using systematic random sampling method. Ocular examination and measurement of refractive error was carried out on each student using a focometer and an autorefractor.ResultsA total of 230 students were studied. Mean age of the students was 15.1±1.9 years with a range of 13-21 years. Refractive error was detected in 95 (41.3%) of the students using autorefractor and in 81 (35.2%) with focometer. Among those found to have refractive error using autorefractor, 75 (78.9%) students had a difference of ≤±0.75 DS between the autorefractor and focometer readings. The sensitivity and specificity of the focometer relative to the autorefractor was 73.7% and 91.9%, respectively.ConclusionThe focometer is comparable to the autorefractor in the measurement of refractive error because of its high sensitivity and specificity. The high positive and negative predictive values makes the focometer an effective tool for both screening and diagnosis of refractive error in rural areas among secondary schools students. Its use would make refractive service available and affordable to individuals living in the resource poor rural communities thereby reducing the burden of refractive error in such areas. The focometer should also be a useful tool in school eye health programs.

  8. Global cost of correcting vision impairment from uncorrected refractive error

    PubMed Central

    Fricke, TR; Wilson, DA; Schlenther, G; Naidoo, KS; Resnikoff, S; Frick, KD

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Objective To estimate the global cost of establishing and operating the educational and refractive care facilities required to provide care to all individuals who currently have vision impairment resulting from uncorrected refractive error (URE). Methods The global cost of correcting URE was estimated using data on the population, the prevalence of URE and the number of existing refractive care practitioners in individual countries, the cost of establishing and operating educational programmes for practitioners and the cost of establishing and operating refractive care facilities. The assumptions made ensured that costs were not underestimated and an upper limit to the costs was derived using the most expensive extreme for each assumption. Findings There were an estimated 158 million cases of distance vision impairment and 544 million cases of near vision impairment caused by URE worldwide in 2007. Approximately 47 000 additional full-time functional clinical refractionists and 18 000 ophthalmic dispensers would be required to provide refractive care services for these individuals. The global cost of educating the additional personnel and of establishing, maintaining and operating the refractive care facilities needed was estimated to be around 20 000 million United States dollars (US$) and the upper-limit cost was US$ 28 000 million. The estimated loss in global gross domestic product due to distance vision impairment caused by URE was US$ 202 000 million annually. Conclusion The cost of establishing and operating the educational and refractive care facilities required to deal with vision impairment resulting from URE was a small proportion of the global loss in productivity associated with that vision impairment. PMID:23109740

  9. Pre- and Postcycloplegic Refractions in Children and Adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Dan; Wang, Yan; Yang, Xianrong; Yang, Dayong; Guo, Kai; Guo, Yuanyuan; Jing, Xinxia; Pan, Chen-Wei

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To determine the difference between cycloplegic and non-cycloplegic refractive error and its associated factors in Chinese children and adolescents with a high prevalence of myopia. Methods A school-based study including 1565 students aged 6 to 21 years was conducted in 2013 in Ejina, Inner Mongolia, China. Comprehensive eye examinations were performed. Pre-and postcycloplegic refractive error were measured using an auto-refractor. For cycloplegic refraction, one drop of topical 1.0% cyclopentolate was administered to each eye twice with a 5-minute interval and a third drop was administered 15 minutes after the second drop if the pupil size was less than 6 mm or if the pupillary light reflex was still present. Results Two drops of cyclopentolate were found to be sufficient in 59% of the study participants while the other 41% need an additional drop. The prevalence of myopia was 89.5% in participants aged over 12 years and 68.6% in those aged 12 years or younger (P<0.001). When myopia was defined as spherical equivalent (SE) of less than -0.5 diopter (D), the prevalence estimates were 76.7% (95% confidence interval [CI] 74.6–78.8) and 54.1% (95%CI 51.6–56.6) before and after cycloplegic refraction, respectively. When hyperopia was defined as SE of more than 0.5D, the prevalence was only 2.8% (95%CI 1.9–3.6) before cycloplegic refraction while it was 15.5% (95%CI 13.7–17.3) after cycloplegic refraction. Increased difference between cycloplegic and non-cycloplegic refractive error was associated with decreased intraocular pressures (P = 0.01). Conclusions Lack of cycloplegia in refractive error measurement was associated with significant misclassifications in both myopia and hyperopia among Chinese children and adolescents. Decreased intraocular pressure was related to a greater difference between cycloplegic and non-cycloplegic refractive error. PMID:27907165

  10. Water absorption in a refractive index model for bacterial spores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siegrist, K. M.; Thrush, E.; Airola, M.; Carr, A. K.; Limsui, D. M.; Boggs, N. T.; Thomas, M. E.; Carter, C. C.

    2009-05-01

    The complexity of biological agents can make it difficult to identify the important factors impacting scattering characteristics among variables such as size, shape, internal structure and biochemical composition, particle aggregation, and sample additives. This difficulty is exacerbated by the environmentally interactive nature of biological organisms. In particular, bacterial spores equilibrate with environmental humidity by absorption/desorption of water which can affect both the complex refractive index and the size/shape distributions of particles - two factors upon which scattering characteristics depend critically. Therefore accurate analysis of experimental data for determination of refractive index must take account of particle water content. First, spectral transmission measurements to determine visible refractive index done on suspensions of bacterial spores must account for water (or other solvent) uptake. Second, realistic calculations of aerosol scattering cross sections should consider effects of atmospheric humidity on particle water content, size and shape. In this work we demonstrate a method for determining refractive index of bacterial spores bacillus atropheus (BG), bacillus thuringiensis (BT) and bacillus anthracis Sterne (BAs) which accounts for these effects. Visible index is found from transmission measurements on aqueous and DMSO suspensions of particles, using an anomalous diffraction approximation. A simplified version of the anomalous diffraction theory is used to eliminate the need for knowledge of particle size. Results using this approach indicate the technique can be useful in determining the visible refractive index of particles when size and shape distributions are not well known but fall within the region of validity of anomalous dispersion theory.

  11. The molecular refractive function of lens γ-crystallins

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Huaying; Brown, Patrick H.; Magone, M. Teresa; Schuck, Peter

    2011-01-01

    γ-crystallins constitute the major protein component in the nucleus of the vertebrate eye lens. Present at very high concentrations, they exhibit extreme solubility and thermodynamic stability to prevent scattering of light and the formation of cataracts. However, functions beyond this structural role have remained mostly unclear. Here, we calculate molecular refractive index increments of crystallins. We show that all lens γ-crystallins have evolved a significantly elevated molecular refractive index increment, which is far above those of most proteins, including non-lens members of the βγ-crystallin family from different species. The same trait has evolved in parallel in crystallins of different phyla, including in the S-crystallins of cephalopods. A high refractive index increment can lower the crystallin concentration required to achieve a suitable refractive power of the lens, and thereby reduce their propensity to aggregate and form cataract. To produce a significant increase of the refractive index increment, a substantial global shift in the amino acid composition is required, which can naturally explain the highly unusual amino acid composition of γ-crystallins and their functional homologues. This function provides a new perspective for interpreting their molecular structure. PMID:21684289

  12. Empirical modelling to predict the refractive index of human blood

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yahya, M.; Saghir, M. Z.

    2016-02-01

    Optical techniques used for the measurement of the optical properties of blood are of great interest in clinical diagnostics. Blood analysis is a routine procedure used in medical diagnostics to confirm a patient’s condition. Measuring the optical properties of blood is difficult due to the non-homogenous nature of the blood itself. In addition, there is a lot of variation in the refractive indices reported in the literature. These are the reasons that motivated the researchers to develop a mathematical model that can be used to predict the refractive index of human blood as a function of concentration, temperature and wavelength. The experimental measurements were conducted on mimicking phantom hemoglobin samples using the Abbemat Refractometer. The results analysis revealed a linear relationship between the refractive index and concentration as well as temperature, and a non-linear relationship between refractive index and wavelength. These results are in agreement with those found in the literature. In addition, a new formula was developed based on empirical modelling which suggests that temperature and wavelength coefficients be added to the Barer formula. The verification of this correlation confirmed its ability to determine refractive index and/or blood hematocrit values with appropriate clinical accuracy.

  13. Optofluidic whispering gallery mode microcapillary lasers for refractive index sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    François, Alexandre; Riesen, Nicolas; Gardner, Kristy; Monro, Tanya M.; Meldrum, Al

    2016-12-01

    Whispering gallery modes (WGMs) allow for remarkable refractive index sensing performance with extremely low detection limits, and thus have found use in various emerging label free biosensing applications. Among the different types of resonators which have been studied, microcapillaries have the unique property of having the evanescent fields extend into and sample the medium inside the resonator, which is particularly interesting because the resonator itself serves as a microfluidic channel. Here, lasing of the WGMs in fluorescent microcapillaries is demonstrated for the first time, and their application to refractive index sensing is investigated. The laser gain medium used here is embedded inside a high refractive index polymer coating deposited onto the inner surface of the capillary. Lasing can only be realized for thick polymer coatings (in this case >= 800 nm), with higher Q factor but also stronger confinement of the propagating wave, which lowers the refractive index sensitivity compared to non-lasing capillaries which can have thinner polymer coatings. We however find that the large improvement in signal-to-noise ratio and Q factor realized upon lasing more than compensates for the reduced sensitivity, resulting in an order-of-magnitude improvement in the detection limit for refractive index sensing.

  14. Imaging Shallow Salt With 3D Refraction Migration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vanschuyver, C. J.; Hilterman, F. J.

    2005-05-01

    In offshore West Africa, numerous salt walls are within 200 m of sea level. Because of the shallowness of these salt walls, reflections from the salt top can be difficult to map, making it impossible to build an accurate velocity model for subsequent pre-stack depth migration. An accurate definition of salt boundaries is critical to any depth model where salt is present. Unfortunately, when a salt body is very shallow, the reflection from the upper interface can be obscured due to large offsets between the source and near receivers and also due to the interference from multiples and other near-surface noise events. A new method is described using 3D migration of the refraction waveforms which is simplified because of several constraints in the model definition. The azimuth and dip of the refractor is found by imaging with Kirchhoff theory. A Kirchhoff migration is performed where the traveltime values are adjusted to use the CMP refraction traveltime equation. I assume the sediment and salt velocities to be known such that once the image time is specified, then the dip and azimuth of the refraction path can be found. The resulting 3D refraction migrations are in excellent depth agreement with available well control. In addition, the refraction migration time picks of deeper salt events are in agreement with time picks of the same events on the reflection migration.

  15. Clinical refraction in three-dimensional dioptric space revisited.

    PubMed

    Raasch, T

    1997-06-01

    The traditional clinical designation of spherocylindrical power unambiguously specifies the refractive properties of a thin lens or refractive surface. This representation of dioptric power is not, however, optimum in mathematical terms, as is apparent when, for example, two spherocylindrical lens powers are added. Alternative systems have been described which are not subject to this same type of difficulty, and the essential feature of these other systems is that spherocylindrical power is defined in terms of a three-dimensional dioptric space in which the axes are usually orthogonal. The advantages of this orthogonality can be exploited in the practice of clinical refraction, provided lens powers in these three dimensions can be physically implemented. Systems using these characteristics have been introduced in the past, but the clinical community has not adopted them on a widespread basis. However, systems which take advantages of these features do have unique advantages relative to traditional clinical refraction procedures. These characteristics, and refractive procedures which exploit their advantages, are described.

  16. Estimating refractivity from propagation loss in turbulent media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagner, Mark; Gerstoft, Peter; Rogers, Ted

    2016-12-01

    This paper estimates lower atmospheric refractivity (M-profile) given an electromagnetic (EM) propagation loss (PL) measurement. Specifically, height-independent PL measurements over a range of 10-80 km are used to infer information about the existence and potential parameters of atmospheric ducts in the lowest 1 km of the atmosphere. The main improvement made on previous refractivity estimations is inclusion of range-dependent fluctuations due to turbulence in the forward propagation model. Using this framework, the maximum likelihood (ML) estimate of atmospheric refractivity has good accuracy, and with prior information about ducting the maximum a priori (MAP) refractivity estimate can be found. Monte Carlo methods are used to estimate the mean and covariance of PL, which are fed into a Gaussian likelihood function for evaluation of estimated refractivity probability. Comparisons were made between inversions performed on propagation loss data simulated by a wide angle parabolic equation (PE) propagation model with added homogeneous and inhomogeneous turbulence. It was found that the turbulence models produce significantly different results, suggesting that accurate modeling of turbulence is key.

  17. Evaluation of simplified evaporation duct refractivity models for inversion problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saeger, J. T.; Grimes, N. G.; Rickard, H. E.; Hackett, E. E.

    2015-10-01

    To assess a radar system's instantaneous performance on any given day, detailed knowledge of the meteorological conditions is required due to the dependency of atmospheric refractivity on thermodynamic properties such as temperature, water vapor, and pressure. Because of the significant challenges involved in obtaining these data, recent efforts have focused on development of methods to obtain the refractivity structure inversely using radar measurements and radar wave propagation models. Such inversion techniques generally use simplified refractivity models in order to reduce the parameter space of the solution. Here the accuracy of three simple refractivity models is examined for the case of an evaporation duct. The models utilize the basic log linear shape classically associated with evaporation ducts, but each model depends on various parameters that affect different aspects of the profile, such as its shape and duct height. The model parameters are optimized using radiosonde data, and their performance is compared to these atmospheric measurements. The optimized models and data are also used to predict propagation using a parabolic equation code with the refractivity prescribed by the models and measured data, and the resulting propagation patterns are compared. The results of this study suggest that the best log linear model formulation for an inversion problem would be a two-layer model that contains at least three parameters: duct height, duct curvature, and mixed layer slope. This functional form permits a reasonably accurate fit to atmospheric measurements as well as embodies key features of the profile required for correct propagation prediction with as few parameters as possible.

  18. Reflection and Refraction of Acoustic Waves by a Shock Wave

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brillouin, J.

    1957-01-01

    The presence of sound waves in one or the other of the fluid regions on either side of a shock wave is made apparent, in the region under superpressure, by acoustic waves (reflected or refracted according to whether the incident waves lie in the region of superpressure or of subpressure) and by thermal waves. The characteristics of these waves are calculated for a plane, progressive, and uniform incident wave. In the case of refraction, the refracted acoustic wave can, according to the incidence, be plane, progressive, and uniform or take the form of an 'accompanying wave' which remains attached to the front of the shock while sliding parallel to it. In all cases, geometrical constructions permit determination of the kinematic characteristics of the reflected or refractive acoustic waves. The dynamic relationships show that the amplitude of the reflected wave is always less than that of the incident wave. The amplitude of the refracted wave, whatever its type, may in certain cases be greater than that of the incident wave.

  19. On the anodic aluminium oxide refractive index of nanoporous templates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hierro-Rodriguez, A.; Rocha-Rodrigues, P.; Valdés-Bango, F.; Alameda, J. M.; Jorge, P. A. S.; Santos, J. L.; Araujo, J. P.; Teixeira, J. M.; Guerreiro, A.

    2015-11-01

    In the present study, we have determined the intrinsic refractive index of anodic aluminium oxide, which is originated by the formation of nanoporous alumina templates. Different templates have been fabricated by the conventional two-step anodization procedure in oxalic acid. Their porosities were modified by chemical wet etching allowing the tuning of their effective refractive indexes (air-filled nanopores  +  anodic aluminium oxide). By standard spectroscopic light transmission measurements, the effective refractive index for each different template was extracted in the VIS-NIR region. The determination of the intrinsic anodic aluminium oxide refractive index was performed by using the Maxwell-Garnett homogenization theory. The results are coincident for all the fabricated samples. The obtained refractive index (~1.55) is quite lower (~22%) than the commonly used Al2O3 handbook value (~1.75), showing that the amorphous nature of the anodic oxide structure strongly conditions its optical properties. This difference is critical for the correct design and modeling of optical plasmonic metamaterials based on anodic aluminium oxide nanoporous templates.

  20. Application of seismic-refraction techniques to hydrologic studies

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Haeni, F.P.

    1986-01-01

    Seismic-refraction methods have been extensively used in petroleum, mineral, and engineering investigations and to some extent, for hydrologic applications during the past 30 years. Recent advances in equipment, sound sources, and computer-interpretation techniques make seismic-refraction methods a highly effective and economical means of obtaining subsurface data in hydrologic studies. Aquifers that can be defined by one or more high seismic-velocity surfaces, such as alluvial or glacial deposits in consolidated rock valleys, limestone or sandstone underlain by metamorphic or igneous rock, or saturated unconsolidated deposits overlain by unsaturated unconsolidated deposits, are ideally suited for applying seismic-refraction methods. These methods allow the economical collection of subsurface data and provide the basis for more efficient collection of subsurface data by test drilling or aquifer tests and results in improved hydrologic studies. This manual briefly reviews the basics of seismic refraction theory and principles. It emphasizes the use of this technique in hydrologic investigations and describes the planning, equipment, field procedures, and interpretation techniques needed for this type of study. Examples of the use of seismic refraction techniques in a wide variety of hydrologic studies are presented. (USGS)

  1. Application of seismic-refraction techniques to hydrologic studies

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Haeni, F.P.

    1988-01-01

    During the past 30 years, seismic-refraction methods have been used extensively in petroleum, mineral, and engineering investigations and to some extent for hydrologic applications. Recent advances in equipment, sound sources, and computer interpretation techniques make seismic refraction a highly effective and economical means of obtaining subsurface data in hydrologic studies. Aquifers that can be defined by one or more high-seismic-velocity surface, such as (1) alluvial or glacial deposits in consolidated rock valleys, (2) limestone or sandstone underlain by metamorphic or igneous rock, or (3) saturated unconsolidated deposits overlain by unsaturated unconsolidated deposits, are ideally suited for seismic-refraction methods. These methods allow economical collection of subsurface data, provide the basis for more efficient collection of data by test drilling or aquifer tests, and result in improved hydrologic studies. This manual briefly reviews the basics of seismic-refraction theory and principles. It emphasizes the use of these techniques in hydrologic investigations and describes the planning, equipment, field procedures, and interpretation techniques needed for this type of study. Further-more, examples of the use of seismic-refraction techniques in a wide variety of hydrologic studies are presented.

  2. Modeling refractive metasurfaces in series as a single metasurface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toor, Fatima; Guneratne, Ananda C.

    2016-03-01

    Metasurfaces are boundaries between two media that are engineered to induce an abrupt phase shift in propagating light over a distance comparable to the wavelength of the light. Metasurface applications exploit this rapid phase shift to allow for precise control of wavefronts. The phase gradient is used to compute the angle at which light is refracted using the generalized Snell's Law. [1] In practice, refractive metasurfaces are designed using a relatively small number of phaseshifting elements such that the phase gradient is discrete rather than continuous. Designing such a metasurface requires finding phase-shifting elements that cover a full range of phases (a phase range) from 0 to 360 degrees. We demonstrate an analytical technique to calculate the refraction angle due to multiple metasurfaces arranged in series without needing to account for the effect of each individual metasurface. The phase gradients of refractive metasurfaces in series may be summed to obtain the phase gradient of a single equivalent refractive metasurface. This result is relevant to any application that requires a system with multiple metasurfaces, such as biomedical imaging [2], wavefront correctors [3], and beam shaping [4].

  3. Refractive index dependence of Papilio Ulysses butterfly wings reflectance spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Isnaeni, Muslimin, Ahmad Novi; Birowosuto, Muhammad Danang

    2016-02-01

    We have observed and utilized butterfly wings of Papilio Ulysses for refractive index sensor. We noticed this butterfly wings have photonic crystal structure, which causes blue color appearance on the wings. The photonic crystal structure, which consists of cuticle and air void, is approximated as one dimensional photonic crystal structure. This photonic crystal structure opens potential to several optical devices application, such as refractive index sensor. We have utilized small piece of Papilio Ulysses butterfly wings to characterize refractive index of several liquid base on reflectance spectrum of butterfly wings in the presence of sample liquid. For comparison, we simulated reflectance spectrum of one dimensional photonic crystal structure having material parameter based on real structure of butterfly wings. We found that reflectance spectrum peaks shifted as refractive index of sample changes. Although there is a slight difference in reflectance spectrum peaks between measured spectrum and calculated spectrum, the trend of reflectance spectrum peaks as function of sample's refractive index is the similar. We assume that during the measurement, the air void that filled by sample liquid is expanded due to liquid pressure. This change of void shape causes non-similarity between measured spectrum and calculated spectrum.

  4. Transient Thermal Analysis of a Refractive Secondary Solar Concentrator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Geng, Steven M.; Macosko, Robert P.

    1999-01-01

    A secondary concentrator is an optical device that accepts solar energy from a primary concentrator and further intensifies and directs the solar flux. The refractive secondary is one such device; fabricated from an optically clear solid material that can efficiently transmit the solar energy by way of refraction and total internal reflection. When combined with a large state-of-the-art rigid or inflatable primary concentrator, the refractive secondary enables solar concentration ratios of 10,000 to 1. In support of potential space solar thermal power and propulsion applications, the NASA Glenn Research Center is developing a single-crystal refractive secondary concentrator for use at temperatures exceeding 2000K. Candidate optically clear single-crystal materials like sapphire and zirconia are being evaluated for this application. To support this evaluation, a three-dimensional transient thermal model of a refractive secondary concentrator in a typical solar thermal propulsion application was developed. This paper describes the model and presents thermal predictions for both sapphire and zirconia prototypes. These predictions are then used to establish parameters for analyzing and testing the materials for their ability to survive thermal shock and stress.

  5. Refractive index of quark-gluon plasma: Kinetic theory with a Bhatnagar-Gross-Krook collisional kernel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Bing-feng; Hou, De-fu; Li, Jia-rong

    2016-10-01

    We derive the electric permittivity ɛ and magnetic permeability μM of the quark-gluon plasma (QGP) with the kinetic theory associated with a Bhatnagar-Gross-Krook (BGK) collisional kernel. Based on them, we study the effect of collisions on the refractive index of QGP. Compared to the collisionless case, collisions change the ω -behavior of ɛ and μM dramatically, which is responsible for the fact that the real and imaginary parts of n2 and the Depine-Lakhtakia index nDL are smooth functions of ω . For a small collision rate ν , the Depine-Lakhtakia index nDL is negative in some frequency range. When the collision rate increases, the frequency range for nDL<0 becomes narrower. Numerical results show a critical collision rate ν ˜0.2 mD, above which the Depine-Lakhtakia index nDL is positive for all frequency regions, which indicates a normal refractive index. In contrast to the collisionless case, there exists some frequency range in which nDL<0 and the propagating mode may satisfy the dispersion relation n2ω2=k2 simultaneously, which implies the existence of a negative refractive index.

  6. Tunable negative index metamaterial using yttrium iron garnet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Yongxue; He, Peng; Dae Yoon, Soack; Parimi, P. V.; Rachford, F. J.; Harris, V. G.; Vittoria, C.

    2007-06-01

    A magnetic field tunable, broadband, low-loss, negative refractive index metamaterial is fabricated using yttrium iron garnet (YIG) and a periodic array of copper wires. The tunability is demonstrated from 18 to 23 GHz under an applied magnetic field with a figure of merit of 4.2 GHz/kOe. The tuning bandwidth is measured to be 5 GHz compared to 0.9 GHz for fixed field. We measure a minimum insertion loss of 4 dB (or 5.7 dB/cm) at 22.3 GHz. The measured negative refractive index bandwidth is 0.9 GHz compared to 0.5 GHz calculated by the transfer function matrix theory and 1 GHz calculated by finite element simulation.

  7. Observations of Anomalous Refraction with Co-housed Telescopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, Malinda S.; McGraw, J. T.; Zimmer, P. C.

    2013-01-01

    Anomalous refraction is described as a low frequency, large angular scale motion of the entire image plane with respect to the celestial coordinate system as observed and defined by previous astrometric catalogs. These motions of typically several tenths of an arcsecond with timescales on the order of ten minutes are ubiquitous to drift-scan ground-based astrometric measurements regardless of location or telescopes used and have been attributed to meter scale slowly evolving coherent dynamical structures in the boundary-layer below 60 meters. The localized nature of the effect and general inconsistency of the motions seen by even closely spaced telescopes in individual domes has led to the hypothesis that the dome or other type of telescope housing may be responsible. This hypothesis is tested by observing anomalous refraction using two telescopes housed in a single roll-off roof observatory building with the expected outcome that the two telescopes will see correlated anomalous refraction induced motions.

  8. Dirac directional emission in anisotropic zero refractive index photonic crystals.

    PubMed

    He, Xin-Tao; Zhong, Yao-Nan; Zhou, You; Zhong, Zhi-Chao; Dong, Jian-Wen

    2015-08-14

    A certain class of photonic crystals with conical dispersion is known to behave as isotropic zero-refractive-index medium. However, the discrete building blocks in such photonic crystals are limited to construct multidirectional devices, even for high-symmetric photonic crystals. Here, we show multidirectional emission from low-symmetric photonic crystals with semi-Dirac dispersion at the zone center. We demonstrate that such low-symmetric photonic crystal can be considered as an effective anisotropic zero-refractive-index medium, as long as there is only one propagation mode near Dirac frequency. Four kinds of Dirac multidirectional emitters are achieved with the channel numbers of five, seven, eleven, and thirteen, respectively. Spatial power combination for such kind of Dirac directional emitter is also verified even when multiple sources are randomly placed in the anisotropic zero-refractive-index photonic crystal.

  9. Refractive results after corneal triple procedures (PK+ECCE+IOL)

    PubMed

    Claoué, C; Ficker, L; Kirkness, C; Steele, A

    1993-01-01

    We have analysed the refractive results of corneal triple procedures (penetrating keratoplasty with extracapsular cataract extraction and posterior chamber intraocular lens implantation) in 52 eyes of 47 patients with a mean follow-up of 39 months. The patients were predominantly old and female and most received unilateral surgery. The contralateral acuity was 6/24 or worse in more than 50% of cases at the time of surgery. Many of these patients were significantly ametropic pre-operatively. Biometry does not seem to have improved the refractive results in those patients in whom it was attempted. The majority of patients were hypermetropic when their refraction stabilised, with resulting poor uncorrected visual performance. Possible improvements are discussed.

  10. Refractive index of carcinogen-induced rat mammary tumours

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zysk, Adam M.; Chaney, Eric J.; Boppart, Stephen A.

    2006-05-01

    Near-infrared optical techniques for clinical breast cancer screening in humans are rapidly advancing. Based on the computational inversion of the photon diffusion process through the breast, these techniques rely on optical tissue models for accurate image reconstruction. Recent interest has surfaced regarding the effect of refractive index variations on these reconstructions. Although many data exist regarding the scattering and absorption properties of normal and diseased tissue, no measurements of refractive index appear in the literature. In this paper, we present near-infrared refractive index data acquired from N-methyl-N-nitrosourea-induced rat mammary tumours, which are similar in pathology and disease progression to human ductal carcinoma. Eight animals, including one control, were employed in this study, yielding data from 32 tumours as well as adjacent adipose and connective tissues.

  11. Refractive index sensor based on tapered multicore fiber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Chuanbiao; Ning, Tigang; Li, Jing; Pei, Li; Li, Chao; Lin, Heng

    2017-01-01

    A novel refractive index (RI) sensor based on middle-tapered multicore fiber (TMCF) is proposed and experimentally demonstrated. The sensing structure consists of two singlemode fibers (SMF) and simply spliced a section tapered four-core fiber between them. The light injected from the SMF into the multicore fiber (MCF) will excite multiple cladding mode, and interference between these modes can be affected by the surrounding refractive index (SRI), which also dictates the wavelength shift of the transmission spectrum. Our experimental investigations achieved a sensitivity around 171.2 nm/RIU for a refractive index range from 1.3448 to 1.3774. All sensors fabricated in this paper show good linearity in terms of the spectral wavelength shift versus changes in RI.

  12. Photonic crystal fiber tip interferometer for refractive index sensing.

    PubMed

    Mileńko, Karolina; Hu, Dora Juan Juan; Shum, Perry Ping; Zhang, Taishi; Lim, Jun Long; Wang, Yixin; Woliński, Tomasz R; Wei, Huifeng; Tong, Weijun

    2012-04-15

    In this paper we present an interferometer based on photonic crystal fiber (PCF) tip ended with a solid silica-sphere for refractive index sensing. The sensor is fabricated by splicing one end of the holey PCF to a single mode fiber (SMF) and applying arc at the other end to form a solid sphere. The sensor has been experimentally tested for refractive index and temperature sensing by monitoring its wavelength shift. Measurement results show that the sensor has the resolution of the order of 8.7×10(-4) over the refractive index range of 1.33-1.40, and temperature sensitivity of the order of 10 pm/°C in the range of 20-100 °C.

  13. Refraction effects on the Galileo probe telemetry carrier frequency

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Atkinson, D. H.; Spilker, T. R.

    1991-01-01

    As the Galileo probe relay radio link (RRL) signal propagates outward through the Jovian atmosphere, the atmosphere will manifest itself in two ways. First, the geometric path length of the signal is increased, resulting in a small change of the RRL signal departure angle from the proble (transmitter). Secondly, the velocity of the signal is decreased. For a spherical, static atmosphere with a known profile of refractivity versus altitude the effects of refraction on the RRL frequency can be found using a variation of standard ray-tracing techniques, whereby the ray departure angle is found by an iterative process. From the dispersive characteristics of a mixture of hydrogen and helium with trace amounts of methane and ammonia a simple model of the Jovian atmosphere is constructed assuming spherical symmetry and uniform mixing. The contribution to the RRL Doppler frequency arising from refraction is calculated, and its effect on the Doppler wind measurements is discussed.

  14. How To Prepare Materials With a Desired Refraction Coefficient?

    SciTech Connect

    Ramm, A. G.

    2010-05-21

    In this talk a method is described for preparing materials with a desired refraction coefficient. The method consists of embedding into a material with known refraction coefficient many small particles of size a. The number of particles per unit volume around any point is prescribed, the distance between neighboring particles is O(a{sup (2-kappa/3)}) as a->0, 00. The refraction coefficient is the coefficient n{sup 2}(x) in the wave equation [nabla{sup 2}+kappa{sup 2}n{sup 2}(x)]u = 0.

  15. Linearly decayed evanescent optical field in planar refractive index well

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jianhua; Tao, Li

    2017-04-01

    Evanescent optical field with linearly decaying profile is theoretically analyzed at the critical angle of incidence in a planar structure of one dimensional refractive index well (RIW). The linearity of the evanescent field is due to the presence of the second refractive index barrier, which also shifts the position of total internal reflection (TIR) away from the critical angle. The decaying rate is determined by the refractive indices of the two barriers, as well as the width of the well. With this linearly decayed evanescent field (LDEF), various profiles across the well, for example uniform one, can be formed via appropriate combination of the LDEFs, which can promote new applications in fields of material analysis and sensing in the molecular scale.

  16. SH-wave refraction/reflection and site characterization

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wang, Z.; Street, R.L.; Woolery, E.W.; Madin, I.P.

    2000-01-01

    Traditionally, nonintrusive techniques used to characterize soils have been based on P-wave refraction/reflection methods. However, near-surface unconsolidated soils are oftentimes water-saturated, and when groundwater is present at a site, the velocity of the P-waves is more related to the compressibility of the pore water than to the matrix of the unconsolidated soils. Conversely, SH-waves are directly relatable to the soil matrix. This makes SH-wave refraction/reflection methods effective in site characterizations where groundwater is present. SH-wave methods have been used extensively in site characterization and subsurface imaging for earthquake hazard assessments in the central United States and western Oregon. Comparison of SH-wave investigations with geotechnical investigations shows that SH-wave refraction/reflection techniques are viable and cost-effective for engineering site characterization.

  17. Enhanced Nonlinear Refractive Index in ɛ -Near-Zero Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caspani, L.; Kaipurath, R. P. M.; Clerici, M.; Ferrera, M.; Roger, T.; Kim, J.; Kinsey, N.; Pietrzyk, M.; Di Falco, A.; Shalaev, V. M.; Boltasseva, A.; Faccio, D.

    2016-06-01

    New propagation regimes for light arise from the ability to tune the dielectric permittivity to extremely low values. Here, we demonstrate a universal approach based on the low linear permittivity values attained in the ɛ -near-zero (ENZ) regime for enhancing the nonlinear refractive index, which enables remarkable light-induced changes of the material properties. Experiments performed on Al-doped ZnO (AZO) thin films show a sixfold increase of the Kerr nonlinear refractive index (n2) at the ENZ wavelength, located in the 1300 nm region. This in turn leads to ultrafast light-induced refractive index changes of the order of unity, thus representing a new paradigm for nonlinear optics.

  18. Anomalous refraction of guided waves via embedded acoustic metasurfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Hongfei; Semperlotti, Fabio

    2016-04-01

    We illustrate the design of acoustic metasurfaces based on geometric tapers and embedded in thin-plate structures. The metasurface is an engineered discontinuity that enables anomalous refraction of guided wave modes according to the Generalized Snell's Law. Locally-resonant geometric torus-like tapers are designed in order to achieve metasurfaces having discrete phase-shift profiles that enable a high level of control of refraction of the wavefronts. Results of numerical simulations show that anomalous refraction can be achieved on transmitted anti-symmetric modes (A0) either when using a symmetric (S0) or anti-symmetric (A0) incident wave, where the former case clearly involves mode conversion mechanisms.

  19. Exposed core microstructured optical fiber Bragg gratings: refractive index sensing.

    PubMed

    Warren-Smith, Stephen C; Monro, Tanya M

    2014-01-27

    Bragg gratings have been written in exposed-core microstructured optical fibers for the first time using a femtosecond laser. Second and third order gratings have been written and both show strong reflectivity at 1550 nm, with bandwidths as narrow as 60 pm. Due to the penetration of the guided field outside the fiber the Bragg reflections are sensitive to the external refractive index. As different modes have different sensitivities to refractive index but the same temperature sensitivity the sensor can provide temperature-compensated refractive index measurements. Since these Bragg gratings have been formed by physical ablation, these devices can also be used for high temperature sensing, demonstrated here up to 800°C. The fibers have been spliced to single mode fiber for improved handling and integration with commercial interrogation units.

  20. Analysis of seasonal changes in residual refraction 1-year after corneal laser refractive surgery: a retrospective study

    PubMed Central

    Luger, Michiel H.A.; Ewering, Tobias; Arba-Mosquera, Samuel

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To analyze the effect of seasonal changes in residual refraction 1-year after corneal refractive surgery using the SCHWIND AMARIS laser system. Methods 5740 consecutive treatments have been retrospectively reviewed. For all eyes, aspheric treatments were planned with the Custom Ablation Manager software and the ablations were performed with the SCHWIND AMARIS system (SCHWIND eye-tech-solutions). Seasonal outcomes were evaluated in terms of residual refraction stratified per treatment month, as well as stratified per year season. Student's T test comparing stratified values with global ones was used for the statistical analysis. Results Treatments performed in April, June, August, September, and October showed relative undercorrections of the spherical equivalent (SE) (−0.09D), whereas treatments performed in January, February, and March showed relative overcorrections of the SE (+0.13D). Similarly, treatments performed in spring and summer showed relative undercorrections of the SE (−0.04D), whereas treatments performed in winter showed relative overcorrections of the SE (+0.10D). Conclusions Seasonal differences in refractive outcomes were observed among a large scale population. The effect of these environmental variables on refractive outcomes warrants further evaluation. PMID:25000869

  1. Peripheral Refraction with and without Contact Lens Correction

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Jie; Clark, Christopher A.; Soni, P. Sarita; Thibos, Larry N.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose Peripheral refractive error degrades the quality of retinal images and has been hypothesized to be a stimulus for the development of refractive error. The purpose of this study was to investigate the changes in refractive error across the horizontal visual field produced by contact lenses (CLs) and to quantify the effect of CLs on peripheral image blur. Methods A commercial Shack-Hartmann aberrometer measured ocular wavefront aberrations in 5° steps across the central 60° of visual field along the horizontal meridian before and after CLs correction. Wavefront refractions for peripheral lines-of-sight were based on the full elliptical pupil encountered in peripheral measurements. Curvature of field is the change in peripheral spherical equivalent relative to the eye’s optical axis. Results Hyperopic curvature of field in the naked eye increases with increasing amounts central myopic refractive error as predicted by Atchison (2006). For an eccentricity of E degrees, field curvature is approximately E percent of foveal refractive error. Rigid gas permeable (RGP) lenses changed field curvature in the myopic direction twice as much as soft contact lenses (SCLs). Both of these effects varied with CLs power. For all lens powers, SCL cut the degree of hyperopic field curvature in half whereas RGP lenses nearly eliminated field curvature. The benefit of reduced field curvature was partially offset by increased oblique astigmatism. The net reduction of retinal blur due to CLs is approximately constant across the visual field. Conclusions Both SCL and RGP lenses reduced the degree of hyperopic field curvature present in myopic eyes, with RGP lenses having greater effect. The tradeoff between field curvature and off-axis astigmatism with RGP lenses may limit their effectiveness for control of myopia progression. These results suggest that axial growth mechanisms that depend on retinal image quality will be affected more by RGP than by SCL lenses. PMID:20601913

  2. Barren Acidic Soil Assessment using Seismic Refraction Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tajudin, S. A. A.; Abidin, M. H. Z.; Madun, A.; Zawawi, M. H.

    2016-07-01

    Seismic refraction method is one of the geophysics subsurface exploration techniques used to determine subsurface profile characteristics. From past experience, seismic refraction method is commonly used to detect soil layers, overburden, bedrock, etc. However, the application of this method on barren geomaterials remains limited due to several reasons. Hence, this study was performed to evaluate the subsurface profile characteristics of barren acidic soil located in Ayer Hitam, Batu Pahat, Johor using seismic refraction survey. The seismic refraction survey was conducted using ABEM Terraloc MK 8 (seismograph), a sledge hammer weighing 7 kg (source) and 24 units of 10 Hz geophones (receiver). Seismic data processing was performed using OPTIM software which consists of SeisOpt@picker (picking the first arrival and seismic configureuration data input) and SeisOpt@2D (generating 2D image of barren acidic soil based on seismic velocity (primary velocity, Vp) distribution). It was found that the barren acidic soil profile consists of three layers representing residual soil (Vp= 200-400 m/s) at 0-2 m, highly to completely weathered soil (Vp= 500-1800 m/s) at 3-8 m and shale (Vp= 2100-6200 m/s) at 9-20 m depth. Furthermore, result verification was successfully done through the correlation of seismic refraction data based on physical mapping and the geological map of the study area. Finally, it was found that the seismic refraction survey was applicable for subsurface profiling of barren acidic soil as it was very efficient in terms of time, cost, large data coverage and sustainable.

  3. High slope efficiency and high refractive index change in direct-written Yb-doped waveguide lasers with depressed claddings.

    PubMed

    Palmer, Guido; Gross, Simon; Fuerbach, Alexander; Lancaster, David G; Withford, Michael J

    2013-07-15

    We report the first Yb:ZBLAN and Yb:IOG10 waveguide lasers fabricated by the fs-laser direct-writing technique. Pulses from a Titanium-Sapphire laser oscillator with 5.1 MHz repetition rate were utilized to generate negative refractive index modifications in both glasses. Multiple modifications were aligned in a depressed cladding geometry to create a waveguide. For Yb:ZBLAN we demonstrate high laser slope efficiency of 84% with a maximum output power of 170 mW. By using Yb:IOG10 a laser performance of 25% slope efficiency and 72 mW output power was achieved and we measured a remarkably high refractive index change exceeding Δn = 2.3 × 10(-2).

  4. Inter-tester Agreement in Refractive Error Measurements

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Jiayan; Maguire, Maureen G.; Ciner, Elise; Kulp, Marjean T.; Quinn, Graham E.; Orel-Bixler, Deborah; Cyert, Lynn A.; Moore, Bruce; Ying, Gui-Shuang

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To determine the inter-tester agreement of refractive error measurements between lay and nurse screeners using the Retinomax Autorefractor (Retinomax) and the SureSight Vision Screener (SureSight). Methods Trained lay and nurse screeners measured refractive error in 1452 preschoolers (3- to 5-years old) using the Retinomax and the SureSight in a random order for screeners and instruments. Inter-tester agreement between lay and nurse screeners was assessed for sphere, cylinder and spherical equivalent (SE) using the mean difference and the 95% limits of agreement. The mean inter-tester difference (lay minus nurse) was compared between groups defined based on child’s age, cycloplegic refractive error, and the reading’s confidence number using analysis of variance. The limits of agreement were compared between groups using the Brown-Forsythe test. Inter-eye correlation was accounted for in all analyses. Results The mean inter-tester differences (95% limits of agreement) were −0.04 (−1.63, 1.54) Diopter (D) sphere, 0.00 (−0.52, 0.51) D cylinder, and −0.04 (1.65, 1.56) D SE for the Retinomax; and 0.05 (−1.48, 1.58) D sphere, 0.01 (−0.58, 0.60) D cylinder, and 0.06 (−1.45, 1.57) D SE for the SureSight. For either instrument, the mean inter-tester differences in sphere and SE did not differ by the child’s age, cycloplegic refractive error, or the reading’s confidence number. However, for both instruments, the limits of agreement were wider when eyes had significant refractive error or the reading’s confidence number was below the manufacturer’s recommended value. Conclusions Among Head Start preschool children, trained lay and nurse screeners agree well in measuring refractive error using the Retinomax or the SureSight. Both instruments had similar inter-tester agreement in refractive error measurements independent of the child’s age. Significant refractive error and a reading with low confidence number were associated with worse inter

  5. Refractive index matching applied to fecal smear clearing.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, Claúdio S

    2005-01-01

    Thick smears of human feces can be made adequate for identification of helminth eggs by means of refractive index matching. Although this effect can be obtained by simply spreading a fleck of feces on a microscope slide, a glycerol solution has been routinely used to this end. Aiming at practicability, a new quantitative technique has been developed. To enhance both sharpness and contrast of the images, a sucrose solution (refractive index = 1.49) is used, which reduces the effect of light-scattering particulates. To each slide a template-measured (38.5 mm3) fecal sample is transferred. Thus, egg counts and sensitivity evaluations are easily made.

  6. Refraction of sound by a shear layer - Experimental assessment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schlinker, R. H.; Amiet, R. K.

    1979-01-01

    An experimental study was conducted to determine the refraction angle and amplitude changes associated with sound transmission through a circular, open jet shear layer. Both on-axis and off-axis acoustic source locations were used. Source frequency varied from 1 kHz to 10 kHz while freestream Mach number varied from 0.1 to 0.4. The experimental results were compared with an existing refraction theory which was extended to account for off-axis source positions. A simple experiment was also conducted to assess the importance of turbulence scattering between 1 kHz and 25 kHz.

  7. Quantum dot-embedded microspheres for remote refractive index sensing

    PubMed Central

    Pang, Shuo; Beckham, Richard E.; Meissner, Kenith E.

    2008-01-01

    We present a refractometric sensor based on quantum dot-embedded polystyrene microspheres. Optical resonances within a microsphere, known as whispering-gallery modes (WGMs), produce narrow spectral peaks. For sensing applications, spectral shifts of these peaks are sensitive to changes in the local refractive index. In this work, two-photon excited luminescence from the quantum dots couples into several WGMs within the microresonator. By optimizing the detection area, the spectral visibility of the WGMs is improved. The spectral shifts are measured as the surrounding index of the refraction changes. The experimental sensitivity is about five times greater than that predicted by the Mie theory. PMID:19488403

  8. Analysis of ionospheric refraction error corrections for GRARR systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mallinckrodt, A. J.; Parker, H. C.; Berbert, J. H.

    1971-01-01

    A determination is presented of the ionospheric refraction correction requirements for the Goddard range and range rate (GRARR) S-band, modified S-band, very high frequency (VHF), and modified VHF systems. The relation ships within these four systems are analyzed to show that the refraction corrections are the same for all four systems and to clarify the group and phase nature of these corrections. The analysis is simplified by recognizing that the range rate is equivalent to a carrier phase range change measurement. The equation for the range errors are given.

  9. Geodetic Refraction: Effects of Electromagnetic Wave Propagation Through the Atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bossy, L.; Paquet, P.

    The atmospheric refraction has always been one of the main perturbations of classical terrestrial geodesy. For the future, and taking into account that a precision of a few centimeters is attainable over distances of few thousand kilometers, the monitoring of the atmospheric perturbation also requires a strong improvement for space applications that are mainly based on radio techniques. This is the reason why, for 2 decades, the interest in refraction studies has increased, as reflected in this monograph, which is entirely devoted to the properties of the atmospheric effects on various geodetic measurements and to their evaluation.

  10. Effective group index of refraction in non-thermal plasma photonic crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Mousavi, A.; Sadegzadeh, S.

    2015-11-15

    Plasma photonic crystals (PPCs) are periodic arrays that consist of alternate layers of micro-plasma and dielectric. These structures are used to control the propagation of electromagnetic waves. This paper presents a survey of research on the effect of non-thermal plasma with bi-Maxwellian distribution function on one dimensional PPC. A plasma with temperature anisotropy is not in thermodynamic equilibrium and can be described by the bi-Maxwellian distribution function. By using Kronig-Penny's model, the dispersion relation of electromagnetic modes in one dimensional non-thermal PPC (NPPC) is derived. The band structure, group velocity v{sub g}, and effective group index of refraction n{sub eff}(g) of such NPPC structure with TeO{sub 2} as the material of dielectric layers have been studied. The concept of negative group velocity and negative n{sub eff}(g), which indicates an anomalous behaviour of the PPCs, are also observed in the NPPC structures. Our numerical results provide confirmatory evidence that unlike PPCs there are finite group velocity and non-zero effective group indexes of refraction in photonic band gaps (PBGs) that lie in certain ranges of normalized frequency. In other words, inside the PBGs of NPPCs, n{sub eff}(g) becomes non-zero and photons travel with a finite group velocity. In this special case, this velocity varies alternately between 20c and negative values of the order 10{sup 3}c (c is the speed of light in vacuum)

  11. On Multiplying Negative Numbers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crowley, Mary L.; Dunn, Kenneth A.

    1985-01-01

    Comments on the history of negative numbers, some methods that can be used to introduce the multiplication of negative numbers to students, and an explanation of why the product of two negative numbers is a positive number are included. (MNS)

  12. An over-refraction program for the TI 59 card-programmable calculator.

    PubMed

    Carter, J H

    1979-07-01

    Over-refraction provides a powerful method for the refractive examination of the aphakic or highly ametropic patient. Nevertheless, in the past, practical difficulties that attend mathematical or graphical combination of over-refraction and original spherocylinders have tended to limit the clinical use of over-refraction methods. Programmable calculators, now available inexpensively, render over-refraction clinically practical. An over-refraction program for the Texas Instruments TI-59 Card-Programmable Calculator is presented. Program running time, exclusive of data entry and readout, is under 15 sec.

  13. Ray splitting in the reflection and refraction of surface acoustic waves in anisotropic solids.

    PubMed

    Every, A G; Maznev, A A

    2010-05-01

    This paper examines the conditions for, and provides examples of, ray splitting in the reflection and refraction of surface acoustic waves (SAW) in elastically anisotropic solids at straight obstacles such as edges, surface breaking cracks, and interfaces between different solids. The concern here is not with the partial scattering of an incident SAW's energy into bulk waves, but with the occurrence of more than one SAW ray in the reflected and/or transmitted wave fields, by analogy with birefringence in optics and mode conversion of bulk elastic waves at interfaces. SAW ray splitting is dependent on the SAW slowness curve possessing concave regions, which within the constraint of wave vector conservation parallel to the obstacle allows multiple outgoing SAW modes for certain directions of incidence and orientation of obstacle. The existence of pseudo-SAW for a given surface provides a further channel for ray splitting. This paper discusses some typical material configurations for which SAW ray splitting occurs. An example is provided of mode conversion entailing backward reflection or negative refraction. Experimental demonstration of ray splitting in the reflection of a laser generated SAW in GaAs(111) is provided. The calculation of SAW mode conversion amplitudes lies outside the scope of this paper.

  14. Measurement of nonlinear refractive index of organic materials by z-scan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fontalvo, M.; Garcia, A.; Valbuena, S.; Racedo, F.

    2016-02-01

    The nonlinear effects characterization by using the Z-Scan transmission technique in many materials has generated great in forest according to the technological necessities. The majority part of the nonlinear effects can be described by the classic electromagnetic theory, with the electrical susceptibility in the constitutive equation that relates the electrical polarization with the electrical field. In this work the sign and refractive index magnitude and the nonlinear absorption coefficient of the following organic substance were determined: methylene-blue, rodamine LD, vegetable powder and gentian violet a hundred percent pure dissolved in isopropyl alcohol, a laser Nd: YAG was used as a source excitation. The bunch of laser was focused with a lens of ten centimeters of focal length; by using a displacement system the sweeping of twenty centimeters was realized. The following results of the normalized curves of the transmittance in function of the z position were obtained applying the Sheik- Bahae theory: The nonlinear refractive index of the dye shows an increase in function of its concentration and the power of exciting of the laser with negative nonlinear sign in the majority of the sample.

  15. Giant Magneto-Refractive Effect in Cu-Co Granular Thin Films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uran, Serif; Wang, Jian Q.; Grimsditch, Marcos

    2003-03-01

    Magnetic-field-induced changes in infrared transmission from sputtered Co/Cu granular thin films are studied. Negative Giant Magneto-Refractive effect (GME) with changes as large as 1(42nm thick) at 600 cm-1 with a magnetic field of 1550 Gauss. The magnitude of the effect gradually decreases toward higher wavenumbers and eventually approaches to zero at 1400 cm-1. Beyond this point the GME shows a sign switching and positive magneto-refractive effect of about 1was achieved at about 1600 cm-1. This observation is in contrast to results from earlier studies of Co/Ag and Fe/Cr/Fe films.[1, 2] For Co/Ag granular films, the magnitude of the MRE effect decreases toward zero at about 2700 cm-1 and no clear sign switching was observed.[1] An earlier study on Fe/Cr/Fe tri-layer system showed that the magnitude of the effect decreases to zero at 5000 cm-1 and no sign-switching was observed.[2] These studies on granular and multiplayer samples also demonstrated 1higher field values, i.e., 5000 Gauss. Detailed experimental results and possible explanations will be discussed. [1] V. G. Kravets, et al., Phys. Rev. B, 65, 054415, 2002 [2] S. Uran et al., Phys. Rev. B, 57, 2705, 1998

  16. Negative permeability from random particle composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hussain, Shahid

    2017-04-01

    Artificial media, such as those composed of periodically-spaced wires for negative permittivity and split ring resonators for negative permeability have been extensively investigated for negative refractive index (NRI) applications (Smith et al., 2004; Pendry et al., 1999) [1,2]. This paper presents an alternative method for producing negative permeability: granular (or particulate) composites incorporating magnetic fillers. Artificial media, such as split-ring resonators, are designed to produce a magnetic resonance feature, which results in negative permeability over a narrow frequency range about the resonance frequency. The position of the feature is dependent upon the size of the inclusion. The material in this case is anisotropic, such that the feature is only observable when the materials are orientated in a specific direction relative to the applied field. A similar resonance can be generated in magnetic granular (particulate) materials: ferromagnetic resonance from the natural spin resonance of particles. Although the theoretical resonance profiles in granular composites shows the permeability dipping to negative values, this is rarely observed experimentally due to resonance damping effects. Results are presented for iron in spherical form and in flake form, dispersed in insulating host matrices. The two particle shapes show different permeability performance, with the magnetic flakes producing a negative contribution. This is attributed to the stronger coupling with the magnetic field resulting from the high aspect ratio of the flakes. The accompanying ferromagnetic resonance is strong enough to overcome the effects of damping and produce negative permeability. The size of random particle composites is not dictated by the wavelength of the applied field, so the materials are potentially much thinner than other, more traditional artificial composites at microwave frequencies.

  17. Refraction-enhanced tomography of mouse and rabbit lungs

    SciTech Connect

    Sera, T.; Uesugi, K.; Yagi, N.

    2005-09-15

    In order to evaluate the effectiveness of edge enhancement by refraction in computed tomography, images of a cross section of a euthanized mouse thorax were recorded at low (20 keV) and high (72 keV) x-ray energies at a spatial resolution of about 40 {mu}m. Compared with the images obtained with the detector at 30 cm from an object, when the object was located at 113 cm from the detector, the contrast between tissues and air was improved at both energies. The improvement was more pronounced at 72 keV where the absorption contrast was weaker. This effect was due to refraction at the surfaces of alveolar membranes and small airways which creates areas with apparently high and low linear attenuation coefficients within tissues. The edge enhancement by refraction was also effective in images of a euthanized rabbit thorax at x-ray energies of 40 and 70 keV at a spatial resolution of about 0.15 mm. These results raise the possibility that the refraction contrast may be utilized to obtain a high-resolution tomographic image of human lung and bone with low dose.

  18. GEOPHYSICS, ASTRONOMY AND ASTROPHYSICS: Refractivity estimation from radar sea clutter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Si-Xun; Zhao, Xiao-Feng; Sheng, Zheng

    2009-11-01

    This paper addresses the problem of estimating lower atmospheric refractivity under the nonstandard propagation conditions frequently encountered in low altitude maritime radar applications. The vertical structure of the refractive environment is modeled by using a five-parameter model, and the horizontal structure is modeled as range-independent. The electromagnetic propagation in the troposphere is simulated by using a split-step fast Fourier transform based on parabolic approximation to the wave equation. A global search marked as a modified genetic algorithm (MGA) for the 5 environmental parameters is performed by using a genetic algorithm (GA) integrated with a simulated annealing technique. The retrieved results from simulated runs demonstrate the ability of this method to make atmospheric refractivity estimations. A comparison with the classical GA and the Bayesian Markov Chain Monte Carlo (Bayesian-MCMC) technique shows that the MGA can not only shorten the inverse time but also improve the inverse precision. For real data cases, the inversion values do not match the reference data very well. The inverted profile, however, can be used to synoptically describe the real refractive structure.

  19. Unidirectional transmission using array of zero-refractive-index metamaterials

    SciTech Connect

    Fu, Yangyang; Xu, Lin; Hong Hang, Zhi; Chen, Huanyang

    2014-05-12

    In this Letter, we find that high efficient unidirectional transmission occurs for an array of prisms made of zero-refractive-index metamaterials. As a specific demonstration, we further design the device using Dirac-cone-like photonic crystals. The device can function for a broadband of spectrum. Numerical simulations are performed to verify the one-way wave functionality.

  20. Refractive index and its impact on pseudophakic dysphotopsia

    PubMed Central

    Radmall, Bryce R; Floyd, Anne; Oakey, Zack; Olson, Randall J

    2015-01-01

    Purpose It has been shown that the biggest dissatisfier for uncomplicated cataract surgery patients is pseudophakic dysphotopsia (PD). While edge design of an intraocular lens (IOL) impacts this problem, refractive index is still controversial as to its impact. This retrospective cohort study was designed to determine the role of increasing refractive index in PD. Patients and methods This study was conducted at the John A. Moran Eye Center, University of Utah, USA. A retrospective chart review identified patients who received one of two hydrophobic acrylic single piece IOLs (AcrySof WF SP [SN60WF] or Tecnis SP [ZCB00]), which differed mainly by refractive index (1.55 versus 1.47). Eighty-seven patients who had received implantation of a one-piece hydrophobic acrylic IOL were enrolled. Patients were included if the surgery had been uncomplicated and took place at least a year before study participation. All eligible patients had 20/20 best corrected vision, without any disease known to impact visual quality. In addition to conducting a record review, the enrolled patients were surveyed for PD, using a modified National Eye Institute Visual Function questionnaire, as well as for overall satisfaction with visual quality. Results Statistical analysis demonstrated no difference between the two cohorts regarding PD, general visual function, and overall visual satisfaction. Conclusion The study suggests that with the two IOLs assessed, increasing the refractive index does not increase incidence of PD or decrease overall visual satisfaction. PMID:26229427

  1. A Widely Tunable Refractive Index in a Nanolayered Photonic Material

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2004-05-03

    ethylene - octene ! ~EO!, and the glassy polymer, polycarbonate ~PC! were fabricated using a con- tinuous multilayer co-extrusion process.13 PC possesses...both a substantially larger refractive index and a substantially larger elastic modulus than poly~ ethylene - octene !. Three composite films were

  2. Calculation of refraction indices of triple chalcogenide crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamenshchikov, V. N.; Suslikov, L. M.

    2015-04-01

    We use Harrison's bond-orbital method to calculate high frequency refraction indices of AgGaS2, CdGa2S4, and CdGa2Se4 crystals. We demonstrate a satisfactory agreement between obtained results and experimental data.

  3. Nano-imprint gold grating as refractive index sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumari, Sudha; Mohapatra, Saswat; Moirangthem, Rakesh S.

    2016-05-01

    Large scale of fabrication of plasmonic nanostructures has been a challenging task due to time consuming process and requirement of expensive nanofabrication tools such as electron beam lithography system, focused ion beam system, and extreme UV photolithography system. Here, we present a cost-effective fabrication technique so called soft nanoimprinting to fabricate nanostructures on the larger sample area. In our fabrication process, a commercially available optical DVD disc was used as a template which was imprinted on a polymer glass substrate to prepare 1D polymer nano-grating. A homemade nanoimprinting setup was used in this fabrication process. Further, a label-free refractive index sensor was developed by utilizing the properties of surface plasmon resonance (SPR) of a gold coated 1D polymer nano-grating. Refractive index sensing was tested by exposing different solutions of glycerol-water mixture on the surface of gold nano-grating. The calculated bulk refractive index sensitivity was found to be 751nm/RIU. We believed that our proposed SPR sensor could be a promising candidate for developing low-cost refractive index sensor with high sensitivity on a large scale.

  4. S-wave refraction survey of alluvial aggregate

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ellefsen, Karl J.; Tuttle, Gary J.; Williams, Jackie M.; Lucius, Jeffrey E.

    2005-01-01

    An S-wave refraction survey was conducted in the Yampa River valley near Steamboat Springs, Colo., to determine how well this method could map alluvium, a major source of construction aggregate. At the field site, about 1 m of soil overlaid 8 m of alluvium that, in turn, overlaid sedimentary bedrock. The traveltimes of the direct and refracted S-waves were used to construct velocity cross sections whose various regions were directly related to the soil, alluvium, and bed-rock. The cross sections were constrained to match geologic logs that were developed from drill-hole data. This constraint minimized the ambiguity in estimates of the thickness and the velocity of the alluvium, an ambiguity that is inherent to the S-wave refraction method. In the cross sections, the estimated S-wave velocity of the alluvium changed in the horizontal direction, and these changes were attributed to changes in composition of the alluvium. The estimated S-wave velocity of the alluvium was practically constant in the vertical direc-tion, indicating that the fine layering observed in the geologic logs could not be detected. The S-wave refraction survey, in conjunction with independent information such as geologic logs, was found to be suitable for mapping the thickness of the alluvium.

  5. Refraction effects in soft x-ray multilayer blazed gratings.

    PubMed

    Voronov, D L; Salmassi, F; Meyer-Ilse, J; Gullikson, E M; Warwick, T; Padmore, H A

    2016-05-30

    A 2500 lines/mm Multilayer Blazed Grating (MBG) optimized for the soft x-ray wavelength range was fabricated and tested. The grating coated with a W/B4C multilayer demonstrated a record diffraction efficiency in the 2nd blazed diffraction order in the energy range from 500 to 1200 eV. Detailed investigation of the diffraction properties of the grating demonstrated that the diffraction efficiency of high groove density MBGs is not limited by the normal shadowing effects that limits grazing incidence x-ray grating performance. Refraction effects inherent in asymmetrical Bragg diffraction were experimentally confirmed for MBGs. The refraction affects the blazing properties of the MBGs and results in a shift of the resonance wavelength of the gratings and broadening or narrowing of the grating bandwidth depending on diffraction geometry. The true blaze angle of the MBGs is defined by both the real structure of the multilayer stack and by asymmetrical refraction effects. Refraction effects can be used as a powerful tool in providing highly efficient suppression of high order harmonics.

  6. Statistics of the residual refraction errors in laser ranging data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gardner, C. S.

    1977-01-01

    A theoretical model for the range error covariance was derived by assuming that the residual refraction errors are due entirely to errors in the meteorological data which are used to calculate the atmospheric correction. The properties of the covariance function are illustrated by evaluating the theoretical model for the special case of a dense network of weather stations uniformly distributed within a circle.

  7. Studies of the Reflection, Refraction and Internal Reflection of Light

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lanchester, P. C.

    2014-01-01

    An inexpensive apparatus and associated experiments are described for studying the basic laws of reflection and refraction of light at an air-glass interface, and multiple internal reflections within a glass block. In order to motivate students and encourage their active participation, a novel technique is described for determining the refractive…

  8. The experience in production of composite refraction lenses from beryllium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Semenov, A. A.; Zabrodin, A. V.; Gorlevskiy, V. V.; Sheverdyaev, M. S.; Lizunov, A. V.; Brylev, D. A.; Anikin, A. S.; Klykov, S. S.; Kozlova, E. V.; Lesina, I. G.; Nebera, A. L.; Morozov, I. A.; Demin, A. V.; Buzmakov, A. V.; Dymshicz, Yu. M.; Volkov, V. V.; Zhigalina, O. M.; Konarev, P. V.; Khmelenin, D. N.; Seregin, A. V.; Senin, R. A.; Roshchin, B. S.; Asadchikov, V. E.

    2017-01-01

    The choice of beryllium-based material for the use in X-ray optics has been substantiated based on electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction data. The first results of applying refraction lenses made of this material are reported.

  9. Velocity aberration and atmospheric refraction in satellite laser communication experiments.

    PubMed

    Nugent, L J; Condon, R J

    1966-11-01

    The effects of satellite velocity aberration and atmospheric refraction on the direction of propagation of lagser radiation reflected from a satellite back to an observer on the earth are examined. A velocity aberration analysis for the two-dimensional case where the satellite passes directly overhead at velocity v is presented to first order in v/c in order to illustrate the method. The equations for the more general threedimensional case are then given to first order in v/c, and it is indicated that higher order treatments are normally unnecessary in typical experimental considerations. Following this, a simple approximate equation giving the atmospheric refraction to an accuracy of a few microradians is developed; it is indicated that greater accuracy is not important because of laser pointing limitations imposed by atmospheric scattering and turbulence. The atmospheric refraction equation depends only on the apparent zenith angle of the satellite reflector relative to the earth-based laser, on the satelli-te altitude, and on the index of refraction of the laser radiation in the atmosphere at the earth's surface. Both of these developments should be useful in the design and interpretation of satellite laser-communication experiments.

  10. Wave Refraction During the May 2002 Rarefaction Event

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, C. W.; Mullan, D. J.; Ness, N. F.; Skoug, R. M.

    2002-12-01

    In previous work [Smith et al., 2001] we examined IMF wave refraction during the May 1999 rarefaction interval known as ``The Day The Solar Wind Disappeared.'' On that day, Alfvén speeds remained elevated over an extended region. Analysis of the recorded ACE fields and plasma data revealed depressed magnetic fluctuation levels, reduced compression in the fluctuations, and a reduced wave-like component within the region of elevated Alfvén speed, all consistent with wave refraction. The May 2002 event provides a third such period (the second identified event occured 2 weeks prior to the May 1999 period) and it again demonstrates properties which are consistent with refraction. Smith, C.~W., D.~J. Mullan, N.~F. Ness, R.~M. Skoug, and J.~Steinberg, Day the solar wind almost disappeared: Magnetic field fluctuations, wave refraction and dissipation, J. Geophys. Res., A106, 18,625--18,634, 2001. Efforts at the Bartol Research Institute were supported by CIT subcontract PC251439 under NASA grant NAG5-6912 for support of the ACE magnetic field experiment and by the NASA Delaware Space College Grant. Work at Los Alamos was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy with financial support from the NASA ACE program.

  11. Ultra low-loss, isotropic optical negative-index metamaterial based on hybrid metal-semiconductor nanowires

    PubMed Central

    Paniagua-Domínguez, R.; Abujetas, D. R.; Sánchez-Gil, J. A.

    2013-01-01

    Recently, many fascinating properties predicted for metamaterials (negative refraction, superlensing, electromagnetic cloaking,…) were experimentally demonstrated. Unfortunately, the best achievements have no direct translation to the optical domain, without being burdened by technological and conceptual difficulties. Of particular importance within the realm of optical negative-index metamaterials (NIM), is the issue of simultaneously achieving strong electric and magnetic responses and low associated losses. Here, hybrid metal-semiconductor nanowires are proposed as building blocks of optical NIMs. The metamaterial thus obtained, highly isotropic in the plane normal to the nanowires, presents a negative index of refraction in the near-infrared, with values of the real part well below −1, and extremely low losses (an order of magnitude better than present optical NIMs). Tunability of the system allows to select the operating range in the whole telecom spectrum. The design is proven in configurations such as prisms and slabs, directly observing negative refraction. PMID:23514968

  12. Dual interferometer system for measuring index of refraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goodwin, Eric Peter

    The optical power of a lens is determined by the surface curvature and the refractive index, n. Knowledge of the index is required for accurate lens design models and for examining material variations from sample to sample. The refractive index of glass can be accurately measured using a prism spectrometer, but measuring the index of soft contact lens materials presents many challenges. These materials are non-rigid, thin, and must remain hydrated in a saline solution during testing. Clearly an alternative to a prism spectrometer must be used to accurately measure index. A Dual Interferometer System has been designed, built and characterized as a novel method for measuring the refractive index of transparent optical materials, including soft contact lens materials. The first interferometer is a Low Coherence Interferometer in a Twyman-Green configuration with a scanning reference mirror. The contact lens material sample is placed in a measurement cuvette, where it remains hydrated. By measuring the locations of the multiple optical interfaces, the physical thickness t of the material is measured. A new algorithm has been developed for processing the low coherence signals obtained from the reflection at each optical interface. The second interferometer is a Mach-Zehnder interferometer with a tunable HeNe laser light source. This interferometer measures the optical path length (OPL) of the test sample in the cuvette in transmission as a function of five wavelengths in the visible spectrum. This is done using phase-shifting interferometry. Multiple thickness regions are used to solve 2pi phase ambiguities in the OPL. The outputs of the two interferometers are combined to determine the refractive index as a function of wavelength: n(lambda) = OPL(lambda)/t. Since both t and OPL are measured using a detector array, n is measured at hundreds of thousands of data points. A measurement accuracy of 0.0001 in refractive index is achieved with this new instrument, which is

  13. Refractive Secondary Solar Concentrator Demonstrated High-Temperature Operation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wong, Wayne A.

    2002-01-01

    Space applications that utilize solar thermal energy--such as electric power conversion systems, thermal propulsion systems, and furnaces--require highly efficient solar concentration systems. The NASA Glenn Research Center is developing the refractive secondary concentrator, which uses refraction and total internal reflection to efficiently concentrate and direct solar energy. When used in combination with advanced lightweight primary concentrators, such as inflatable thin films, the refractive secondary concentrator enables very high system concentration ratios and very high temperatures. Last year, Glenn successfully demonstrated a secondary concentrator throughput efficiency of 87 percent, with a projected efficiency of 93 percent using an antireflective coating. Building on this achievement, Glenn recently successfully demonstrated high-temperature operation of the secondary concentrator when it was used to heat a rhenium receiver to 2330 F. The high-temperature demonstration of the concentrator was conducted in Glenn's 68-ft long Tank 6 thermal vacuum facility equipped with a solar simulator. The facility has a rigid panel primary concentrator that was used to concentrate the light from the solar simulator onto the refractive secondary concentrator. NASA Marshall Space Flight Center provided a rhenium cavity, part of a solar thermal propulsion engine, to serve as the high-temperature receiver. The prototype refractive secondary concentrator, measuring 3.5 in. in diameter and 11.2 in. long, is made of single-crystal sapphire. A water-cooled splash shield absorbs spillage light outside of the 3.5-in. concentrator aperture. Multilayer foil insulation composed of tungsten, molybdenum, and niobium is used to minimize heat loss from the hightemperature receiver. A liquid-cooled canister calorimeter is used to measure the heat loss through the multilayer foil insulation.

  14. Temperature-dependent Refractive Index of Silicon and Germanium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frey, Bradley J.; Leviton, Douglas B.; Madison, Timothy J.

    2006-01-01

    Silicon and germanium are perhaps the two most well-understood semiconductor materials in the context of solid state device technologies and more recently micromachining and nanotechnology. Meanwhile, these two materials are also important in the field of infrared lens design. Optical instruments designed for the wavelength range where these two materials are transmissive achieve best performance when cooled to cryogenic temperatures to enhance signal from the scene over instrument background radiation. In order to enable high quality lens designs using silicon and germanium at cryogenic temperatures, we have measured the absolute refractive index of multiple prisms of these two materials using the Cryogenic, High-Accuracy Refraction Measuring System (CHARMS) at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center, as a function of both wavelength and temperature. For silicon, we report absolute refractive index and thermo-optic coefficient (dn/dT) at temperatures ranging from 20 to 300 K at wavelengths from 1.1 to 5.6 pin, while for germanium, we cover temperatures ranging from 20 to 300 K and wavelengths from 1.9 to 5.5 microns. We compare our measurements with others in the literature and provide temperature-dependent Sellmeier coefficients based on our data to allow accurate interpolation of index to other wavelengths and temperatures. Citing the wide variety of values for the refractive indices of these two materials found in the literature, we reiterate the importance of measuring the refractive index of a sample from the same batch of raw material from which final optical components are cut when absolute accuracy greater than k5 x 10" is desired.

  15. DISCRIMINATING BETWEEN CLOUDY, HAZY, AND CLEAR SKY EXOPLANETS USING REFRACTION

    SciTech Connect

    Misra, Amit K.; Meadows, Victoria S.

    2014-11-01

    We propose a method to distinguish between cloudy, hazy, and clear sky (free of clouds and hazes) exoplanet atmospheres that could be applicable to upcoming large aperture space- and ground-based telescopes such as the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) and the European Extremely Large Telescope (E-ELT). These facilities will be powerful tools for characterizing transiting exoplanets, but only after a considerable amount of telescope time is devoted to a single planet. A technique that could provide a relatively rapid means of identifying haze-free targets (which may be more valuable targets for characterization) could potentially increase the science return for these telescopes. Our proposed method utilizes broadband observations of refracted light in the out-of-transit spectrum. Light refracted through an exoplanet atmosphere can lead to an increase of flux prior to ingress and subsequent to egress. Because this light is transmitted at pressures greater than those for typical cloud and haze layers, the detection of refracted light could indicate a cloud- or haze-free atmosphere. A detection of refracted light could be accomplished in <10 hr for Jovian exoplanets with JWST and <5 hr for super-Earths/mini-Neptunes with E-ELT. We find that this technique is most effective for planets with equilibrium temperatures between 200 and 500 K, which may include potentially habitable planets. A detection of refracted light for a potentially habitable planet would strongly suggest the planet was free of a global cloud or haze layer, and therefore a promising candidate for follow-up observations.

  16. An updated equation for the refractive index of air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Wenchen; Dai, Zuoxiao; Dai, Ning; Chen, Ren; Sun, Xiaojie; Xia, Xiang; Li, Tao; Ma, Bei; Sheng, Hao

    2014-12-01

    Laser has been widely used in spectroscopic and metrological measurement. High-precision laser metrology is affected by the refractive index of air. In order to apply the algorithm for the refractive index of air in some situation where low calculation complexity and high-precision are needed, the algorithm of the refractive index of Rueger is updated. As the errors of Rueger's algorithm are mainly affected by temperature, humidity, and the concentration of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere as well as laser wavelength, we do some revisions about these effects of the factors of atmosphere in Rueger's algorithm. The conditions of standard air is redefined in this paper because of the average concentration of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere has been changed in the past few decades. As the concentration of carbon dioxide in the air is not constant, the effect of carbon dioxide on the refractive index of air is taken into consideration in the updated algorithm. The updated algorithm adapts to the real atmosphere well. The effects of dry air and humid air on the algorithm are also corrected, and the refractive index of air calculated by the updated algorithm is much closer to that of Philip E.Ciddor's algorithm defined as reference algorithm in the paper because of its high-precision. The performance of the updated algorithm is also analyzed in this paper. It is compared to that of the reference algorithm and the real measured data. Comparing results show that the performance of the algorithm has been improved after the correction. Comparing to the reference algorithm, the performance of the updated algorithm is a little bit lower, but the updated algorithm is much simpler and easier to be applied. Comparing to Rueger's algorithm, the performance of the updated algorithm is much higher and the complexity of the updated algorithm increases very small. The updated algorithm meets low calculation complexity and high-precision requirements.

  17. Treatment of Anisometropic Amblyopia in Children with Refractive Correction

    PubMed Central

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the effectiveness of refractive correction alone for the treatment of untreated anisometropic amblyopia in children 3 to <7 years old. Design: Prospective, multicenter, noncomparative intervention. Participants: 84 children 3 to <7 years old with untreated anisometropic amblyopia ranging from 20/40 to 20/250. Methods: Optimal refractive correction was provided and visual acuity was measured with the new spectacle correction at baseline, and at 5-week intervals until visual acuity stabilized or amblyopia resolved. Main Outcome Measures: Maximum improvement in best-corrected visual acuity in the amblyopic eye and proportion of children whose amblyopia resolved (interocular difference of 1 line or less) with refractive correction alone. Results: Amblyopia improved with optical correction by 2 or more lines in 77% of the patients and resolved in 27%. Improvement took up to 30 weeks for stabilization criteria to be met. After stabilization, additional improvement occurred with spectacles alone in 21 of 34 patients followed in a control group of a subsequent randomized trial, with amblyopia resolving in 6. Treatment outcome was not related to age, but was related to better baseline visual acuity and lesser amounts of anisometropia. Conclusion: Refractive correction alone improves visual acuity in many cases and results in resolution of amblyopia in at least one third of 3 to <7-year-old children with untreated anisometropic amblyopia. While most cases of resolution occur with moderate (20/40 to 20/100) amblyopia, the average 3-line improvement in visual acuity resulting from treatment with spectacles may lessen the burden of subsequent amblyopia therapy for those with denser levels of amblyopia. Precis Refractive correction alone improves visual acuity in many cases and results in resolution of amblyopia in at least one third of children 3 to <7 years old with untreated anisometropic amblyopia. PMID:16751032

  18. Variations of refraction angles from observations of the Moon from space.

    PubMed

    Kireev, S V; Sokolovskiy, S V

    1994-12-20

    We present the results of measurements of optical refraction angles from photographs of the Moon taken from the orbital station Mir. We made estimations of rms fluctuations of refraction angles and of the characteristics of multipath propagation.

  19. Measurement of optical glass refractive index free from effect of environmental temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Jian-rong; Hao, Qun; Zhu, Qiu-dong; Hu, Yao; Cheng, Xu

    2010-08-01

    A method based on measurement of critical refraction angle is proposed for measurement of optical glass refractive index independent of environment temperature. The critical refraction angle difference between the test sample and a standard refractive index block is measured first, and then the refractive index difference is obtained by a linear regression algorithm and the refractive index of the sample can be calculated from it. The requirement for environmental temperature is 25+/-5 °C , which can be easily satisfied on the production line. Compared with the non-linear algorithm used for direct measurement, this method is simpler, more efficient, and can directly get the refractive index value at standard temperature. Experimental result shows that the measurement repeatability is 1×10-5. The method can be used for fast and accurate measurement of the refractive index for the same glass material in mass production (e.g. X-cube made of K9 optical glass).

  20. Predicted and measured boundary layer refraction for advanced turboprop propeller noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dittmar, James H.; Krejsa, Eugene A.

    1990-01-01

    Currently, boundary layer refraction presents a limitation to the measurement of forward arc propeller noise measured on an acoustic plate in the NASA Lewis 8- by 6-Foot Supersonic Wind Tunnel. The use of a validated boundary layer refraction model to adjust the data could remove this limitation. An existing boundary layer refraction model is used to predict the refraction for cases where boundary layer refraction was measured. In general, the model exhibits the same qualitative behavior as the measured refraction. However, the prediction method does not show quantitative agreement with the data. In general, it overpredicts the amount of refraction for the far forward angles at axial Mach number of 0.85 and 0.80 and underpredicts the refraction at axial Mach numbers of 0.75 and 0.70. A more complete propeller source description is suggested as a way to improve the prediction method.

  1. Double Negativity in 3D Space Coiling Metamaterials

    PubMed Central

    Maurya, Santosh K.; Pandey, Abhishek; Shukla, Shobha; Saxena, Sumit

    2016-01-01

    Metamaterials displaying negative refractive index has remarkable potential to facilitate the manipulation of incident waves for wide variety of applications such as cloaking, superlensing and the like. Space-coiling approach is a recently explored technique to achieve extreme properties. The space coiling phenomena cause less energy absorption as compared to local resonating phenomena for obtaining extreme parameters. Here we show extreme properties in doubly negative 3D space coiling acoustic metamaterials. Frequency dispersive spectrum of extreme constitutive parameters has been calculated for 2D maze and 3D space coiling labyrinthine structure. This is in good agreement to the calculated acoustic band dispersion. PMID:27649966

  2. Compact wavelength demultiplexing using focusing negative index photonic crystal superprisms.

    PubMed

    Momeni, Babak; Huang, Jiandong; Soltani, Mohammad; Askari, Murtaza; Mohammadi, Saeed; Rakhshandehroo, Mohammad; Adibi, Ali

    2006-03-20

    Here, we demonstrate a compact photonic crystal wavelength demultiplexing device based on a diffraction compensation scheme with two orders of magnitude performance improvement over the conventional superprism structures reported to date. We show that the main problems of the conventional superprism-based wavelength demultiplexing devices can be overcome by combining the superprism effect with two other main properties of photonic crystals, i.e., negative diffraction and negative refraction. Here, a 4-channel optical demultiplexer with a channel spacing of 8 nm and cross-talk level of better than -6.5 dB is experimentally demonstrated using a 4500 microm(2) photonic crystal region.

  3. Double Negativity in 3D Space Coiling Metamaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maurya, Santosh K.; Pandey, Abhishek; Shukla, Shobha; Saxena, Sumit

    2016-09-01

    Metamaterials displaying negative refractive index has remarkable potential to facilitate the manipulation of incident waves for wide variety of applications such as cloaking, superlensing and the like. Space-coiling approach is a recently explored technique to achieve extreme properties. The space coiling phenomena cause less energy absorption as compared to local resonating phenomena for obtaining extreme parameters. Here we show extreme properties in doubly negative 3D space coiling acoustic metamaterials. Frequency dispersive spectrum of extreme constitutive parameters has been calculated for 2D maze and 3D space coiling labyrinthine structure. This is in good agreement to the calculated acoustic band dispersion.

  4. Nonlinear refractive index measurements and self-action effects in Roselle-Hibiscus Sabdariffa solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henari, F. Z.; Al-Saie, A.

    2006-12-01

    We report the observation of self-action phenomena, such as self-focusing, self-defocusing, self-phase modulation and beam fanning in Roselle-Hibiscus Sabdariffa solutions. This material is found to be a new type of natural nonlinear media, and the nonlinear reflective index coefficient has been determined using a Z-scan technique and by measuring the critical power for the self-trapping effect. Z-scan measurements show that this material has a large negative nonlinear refractive index, n 2 = 1 × 10-4 esu. A comparison between the experimental n 2 values and the calculated thermal value for n 2 suggests that the major contribution to nonlinear response is of thermal origin.

  5. Refractive surgery training during residency – do not be afraid of the dark

    PubMed Central

    Balparda, Kepa; Díaz, Ana María; Londoño, Ana María

    2014-01-01

    Refractive errors are a fairly common eye condition worldwide, and the ophthalmologist should be capable of offering the patient both nonsurgical and surgical solutions to their refractive conditions. Nevertheless, currently, refractive surgery training during residency is poor at best. This paper explores recent evidence to suggest that postsurgical results of patients operated on by residents are not inferior to those operated on by experienced staff. It points out the urgent need to improve the current approach to refractive surgery training. PMID:25429199

  6. Eye-Ball Rebuilding Using Splines with a View to Refractive Surgery Simulation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2001-07-01

    Refractive Surgery Simulation DISTRIBUTION: Approved for public release, distribution unlimited This paper is part of the following report: TITLE: Algorithms...compilation report: ADP013708 thru ADP013761 UNCLASSIFIED Eye-ball rebuilding using splines with a view to refractive surgery simulation Mathieu Lamard...ophthalmology, refractive surgery has experiencied an important expansion for about fifteen years. It allows the surgeons to correct different refractive errors

  7. Refractive results with the use of AT.Lisa intraocular lens (2008-2015).

    PubMed

    Filip, Mircea; Nicolae, Miruna; Filip, Andrei; Antonescu, Cristina; Dragne, Carmen; Triantafyllidis, Grigorios; Moisescu, Raluca; Lutic, Irina; Ungureanu, Ileana; Teodorov, Anamaria

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to evaluate the refractive results on a large cohort of patients who were implanted spherical or toric multifocal IOL's for cataract surgery or for refractive purpose. Preoperative refractive investigations included auto refractometer topography, pentacam, contact and noncontact biometry and many non-refractive investigations. The target in multifocal IOL usage was emmetropia and it was achieved in most cases. Ametropia occurrence involved correction in different ways.

  8. Optical refractive index of air: dependence on pressure, temperature and composition.

    PubMed

    Owens, J C

    1967-01-01

    The theoretical background and present status of formulas for the refractive index of air are reviewed. In supplement to Edlén's recently revised formula for relative refractivity, the density dependence of refractive index is reanalyzed. New formulas are presented for both phase and group refractive index which are more useful over a wide range of pressure, temperature, and composition than any presently available. The application of the new formulas to optical distance measuring is briefly discussed.

  9. Culture-negative endocarditis

    MedlinePlus

    ... inflammation of the lining of one or more heart valves, but no endocarditis-causing germs can be found ... the heart, where they can settle on damaged heart valves. Alternative Names Endocarditis (culture-negative) Images Culture-negative ...

  10. Refractive Index Compensation in Over-Determined Interferometric Systems

    PubMed Central

    Lazar, Josef; Holá, Miroslava; Číp, Ondřej; Čížek, Martin; Hrabina, Jan; Buchta, Zdeněk

    2012-01-01

    We present an interferometric technique based on a differential interferometry setup for measurement under atmospheric conditions. The key limiting factor in any interferometric dimensional measurement are fluctuations of the refractive index of air representing a dominating source of uncertainty when evaluated indirectly from the physical parameters of the atmosphere. Our proposal is based on the concept of an over-determined interferometric setup where a reference length is derived from a mechanical frame made from a material with a very low thermal coefficient. The technique allows one to track the variations of the refractive index of air on-line directly in the line of the measuring beam and to compensate for the fluctuations. The optical setup consists of three interferometers sharing the same beam path where two measure differentially the displacement while the third evaluates the changes in the measuring range, acting as a tracking refractometer. The principle is demonstrated in an experimental setup. PMID:23202037

  11. Refractive index compensation in over-determined interferometric systems.

    PubMed

    Lazar, Josef; Holá, Miroslava; Číp, Ondřej; Čížek, Martin; Hrabina, Jan; Buchta, Zdeněk

    2012-10-19

    We present an interferometric technique based on a differential interferometry setup for measurement under atmospheric conditions. The key limiting factor in any interferometric dimensional measurement are fluctuations of the refractive index of air representing a dominating source of uncertainty when evaluated indirectly from the physical parameters of the atmosphere. Our proposal is based on the concept of an over-determined interferometric setup where a reference length is derived from a mechanical frame made from a material with a very low thermal coefficient. The technique allows one to track the variations of the refractive index of air on-line directly in the line of the measuring beam and to compensate for the fluctuations. The optical setup consists of three interferometers sharing the same beam path where two measure differentially the displacement while the third evaluates the changes in the measuring range, acting as a tracking refractometer. The principle is demonstrated in an experimental setup.

  12. The whistler mode refractive index as a function of gyrofrequency

    SciTech Connect

    Albert, J. M.

    2011-08-15

    The refractive index for a constant-frequency whistler mode wave in an electron-proton plasma is considered as a function of position, through the local gyrofrequencies {Omega}{sub e,i}. The full cold plasma dispersion relation is used. The wave frequency can take any value up to the smaller of {Omega}{sub e} and the plasma frequency {omega}{sub pe}, but {omega}{sub pe} is allowed to take any fixed value, as is the wavenormal angle. It is rigorously established that the refractive index is a decreasing function of {Omega}{sub e}. One application of this is to finding locations of Landau and cyclotron resonances, to evaluate the effects of whistler mode waves on radiation belt electrons.

  13. Focusing high-energy x rays by compound refractive lenses.

    PubMed

    Snigirev, A; Kohn, V; Snigireva, I; Souvorov, A; Lengeler, B

    1998-02-01

    Compound lenses made from low-Z materials (e.g., Be, B, C, and Al) set up as a linear array of refractive lenses are proposed for submicrometer focusing of high-energy x rays (>5 keV) in one or two dimensions. A theory of focusing based on Maxwell's equation and the Fresnel-Kirchhoff approach is presented. Compound refractive lenses were manufactured by drilling into an Al block a linear array of 200 closely spaced holes 0.5 mm in diameter for linear focusing and two crossed arrays of 100 holes each for point focusing. Focal spots of 3.7 mum and 8 mum x 18 mum were obtained at 30 keV for linear and two-dimensional lenses, respectively. Different technologies of manufacturing and possible applications of the proposed lenses are discussed.

  14. The feasibility of large refracting telescopes for solar coronal research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nelson, Peter G.; Tomczyk, Steven; Elmore, David F.; Kolinski, Donald J.

    2008-07-01

    Measuring magnetic fields in the solar corona requires a large aperture telescope with exceptionally low levels of scattered light. For internally-occulted coronagraphs the main source is scattering from dust or microroughness on the primary lens or mirror. We show refracting primaries offer significantly lower levels for both sources. To observe magnetic fields in the solar corona with scientifically interesting spatial and temporal resolutions, a 1 meter aperture or larger is required. For a long time such large-scale refractors have been deemed impractical or impossible to construct due to gravitational deformation of the lens. We present the results of finite-element and optical analyses of the gravitational deformation, stress-induced birefringence, and absorptive heating of a (see manuscript)1.5 meter f/5 fused silica lens. These studies demonstrate the traditional objections to large refractors are unfounded and large refracting primaries have unique capabilities.

  15. Imaging based refractometer for hyperspectral refractive index detection

    DOEpatents

    Baba, Justin S.; Boudreaux, Philip R.

    2015-11-24

    Refractometers for simultaneously measuring refractive index of a sample over a range of wavelengths of light include dispersive and focusing optical systems. An optical beam including the range of wavelengths is spectrally spread along a first axis and focused along a second axis so as to be incident to an interface between the sample and a prism at a range of angles of incidence including a critical angle for at least one wavelength. An imaging detector is situated to receive the spectrally spread and focused light from the interface and form an image corresponding to angle of incidence as a function of wavelength. One or more critical angles are identified and corresponding refractive indices are determined.

  16. Complex refractive index of Martian dust - Mariner 9 ultraviolet observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pang, K.; Ajello, J. M.; Hord, C. W.; Egan, W. G.

    1976-01-01

    Mariner 9 ultraviolet spectrometer observations of the 1971 dust clouds obscuring the surface of Mars have been analyzed by matching the observed dust phase function with Mie scattering calculations for size distributions of homogeneous and isotropic material. Preliminary results indicate an effective particle radius of not less than 0.2. The real component of the index of refraction is not less than 1.8 at both 268 and 305 nm; corresponding values for the imagery component are 0.02 and 0.01. These values are consistent with those found by Mead (1970) for the visible and near-visible wavelengths. The refractive index and the absorption coefficient increase rapidly with decreasing wavelength in going from the visible to the ultraviolet, indicating the presence of an ultraviolet absorption band which may shield organisms from ultraviolet irradiation.

  17. Effect of parallel refraction on magnetospheric upper hybrid waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Engel, J.; Kennel, C. F.

    1984-01-01

    Large amplitude (not less than 10 mV/m) electrostatic plasma waves near the upper hybrid (UH) frequency have been observed from 0 to 50 deg magnetic latitude (MLAT) during satellite plasma-pause crossings. A three-dimensional numerical ray-tracing calculation, based on an electron distribution measured during a GEOS 1 dayside intense upper-hybrid wave event, suggests how UH waves might achieve such large amplitudes away from the geomagnetic equator. Refractive effects largely control the wave amplification and, in particular, the unavoidable refraction due to parallel geomagnetic field gradients restricts growth to levels below those observed. However, a cold electron density gradient parallel to the field can lead to upper hybrid wave growth that can account for the observed emission levels.

  18. Shock wave refraction enhancing conditions on an extended interface

    SciTech Connect

    Markhotok, A.; Popovic, S.

    2013-04-15

    We determined the law of shock wave refraction for a class of extended interfaces with continuously variable gradients. When the interface is extended or when the gas parameters vary fast enough, the interface cannot be considered as sharp or smooth and the existing calculation methods cannot be applied. The expressions we derived are general enough to cover all three types of the interface and are valid for any law of continuously varying parameters. We apply the equations to the case of exponentially increasing temperature on the boundary and compare the results for all three types of interfaces. We have demonstrated that the type of interface can increase or inhibit the shock wave refraction. Our findings can be helpful in understanding the results obtained in energy deposition experiments as well as for controlling the shock-plasma interaction in other settings.

  19. INDEX OF REFRACTION OF SHOCK LOADED SODA-LIME GLASS

    SciTech Connect

    Alexander, C. S.

    2009-12-28

    Soda-lime glass (SLG) is a potential low-cost VISAR window for use at moderate shock pressures (up to 2430 GPa) where the material remains transparent. In order for SLG to be practical as a VISAR window, the correction factor, which describes the frequency correction related to the strain dependence of the refractive index, and hence the index of refraction itself, must be characterized as a function of pressure. Characterization data are reported in this paper and compared to previous results. The present data show good agreement with those of Dandekar [J. Appl. Phys. 84, 6614 (1998)] and separate study results by Gibbons and Ahrens [J. Geophys. Res. 76, 5489 (1971)] up to 7 GPa. However, at stresses over 7 GPa, marked discrepancies are evident between the present data and that of Gibbons and Ahrens. Differences in test methods may explain these discrepancies.

  20. Correction of group refraction index based on pulse trains interference

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Dong; Aketagawa, Masato

    2015-02-01

    We propose a new concept for an unconventional type of two-color method for interferometry-based length measurements based on the adjacent pulse repetition interval length (APRIL), which is the physical length associated with the pulse repetition period. We demonstrate by numerical simulations that if the wavelength-based two-color method can eliminate the inhomogeneous disturbance of effects caused by the phase refractive index, then the APRIL-based two-color method can eliminate the air turbulence of errors induced by the group refractive index. We show that our analysis will benefit the pulse-laser-based two-color method, which secures traceability to the definition of the meter.

  1. Sharp Nose Lens Design Using Refractive Index Gradient

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-06-01

    the normal (N’) were defined previously (equations 3.32, 3.39). 22 The refracted angle at the rear surface: I cos IR N’ (3.41) Both the ray and the...tan-1 [ Yz(l) (4.14)BF -- 22 (I) 4 4 (h) Solve for the Refractive Angles at the Front Surface As in the homogeneous case: 28 n (J) + 12 ’ (J) = 8(J...I- : 22 t.4fl. 11N nv w co -- 4N 0 C -1245 ;.:.;x X 00 (" m.𔄃�,1 -ni 91W’W’.-1.9rnr9’..11 991 rr .im mmmmm n119199mlnmmm9 .91"Cmml amrfMmm imr

  2. Nonlinear refraction of silver hydrosols during their aggregation

    SciTech Connect

    Karpov, S V; Kodirov, M K; Ryasnyansky, A I; Slabko, V V

    2001-10-31

    The relation between the degree of aggregation of silver hydrosols and their nonlinear refractive index n{sub 2} is studied experimentally. It is found that the sign of n{sub 2} at a wavelength of 1.064 {mu}m changes with increasing the aggregation degree, which corresponds to the replacing of self-focusing by self-defocusing. The observed effects are explained based on the analysis of a change in nonlinear dispersion of the medium, taking into account the interaction between phases and the photochromic effects, which are typical for colloidal structures with fractal geometry. It is shown that the change in the sign of the nonlinear refractive index of hydrosols upon irradiation by laser pulses of duration of less than 10{sup -7} s is caused by the perturbation of resonances of silver and water and by the competition between Kerr nonlinear polarisations involving these resonances. (nonlinear optical phenomena and devices)

  3. Negative ion generator

    DOEpatents

    Stinnett, Regan W.

    1984-01-01

    A negative ion generator is formed from a magnetically insulated transmission line having a coating of graphite on the cathode for producing negative ions and a plurality of apertures on the opposed anode for the release of negative ions. Magnetic insulation keeps electrons from flowing from the cathode to the anode. A transverse magnetic field removes electrons which do escape through the apertures from the trajectory of the negative ions.

  4. Negative ion generator

    DOEpatents

    Stinnett, R.W.

    1984-05-08

    A negative ion generator is formed from a magnetically insulated transmission line having a coating of graphite on the cathode for producing negative ions and a plurality of apertures on the opposed anode for the release of negative ions. Magnetic insulation keeps electrons from flowing from the cathode to the anode. A transverse magnetic field removes electrons which do escape through the apertures from the trajectory of the negative ions. 8 figs.

  5. Nonresonant Transient Refractive Index Spectroscopy in Semiconductor Quantum Dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zharkov, D. K.; Leontyev, A. V.; Shmelev, A. G.; Nikiforov, V. G.; Lobkov, V. S.

    2015-09-01

    We report transient refractive index change in semiconductor nanoparticles dispersed in polymethylmethacrylate matrix via pump-probe experiment. At lower pump intensities the detected signal consists of the pulse autocorrelation-shaped part and another part delayed by 300 fs. The latter's relative intensity depends on the pump level. However in CdS monocrystal the detected signal was found to lack this second feature completely.

  6. Fiber Optic-Based Refractive Index Sensing at INESC Porto

    PubMed Central

    Jorge, Pedro A. S.; Silva, Susana O.; Gouveia, Carlos; Tafulo, Paula; Coelho, Luis; Caldas, Paulo; Viegas, Diana; Rego, Gaspar; Baptista, José M.; Santos, José L.; Frazão, Orlando

    2012-01-01

    A review of refractive index measurement based on different types of optical fiber sensor configurations and techniques is presented. It addresses the main developments in the area, with particular focus on results obtained at INESC Porto, Portugal. The optical fiber sensing structures studied include those based on Bragg and long period gratings, on micro-interferometers, on plasmonic effects in fibers and on multimode interference in a large spectrum of standard and microstructured optical fibers. PMID:22969405

  7. Kepler: Analogies in the search for the law of refraction.

    PubMed

    Cardona, Carlos Alberto

    2016-10-01

    This paper examines the methodology used by Kepler to discover a quantitative law of refraction. The aim is to argue that this methodology follows a heuristic method based on the following two Pythagorean principles: (1) sameness is made known by sameness, and (2) harmony arises from establishing a limit to what is unlimited. We will analyse some of the author's proposed analogies to find the aforementioned law and argue that the investigation's heuristic pursues such principles.

  8. Nonlocal nonlinear refraction in Hibiscus sabdariffa with large phase shifts.

    PubMed

    Ramírez-Martínez, D; Alvarado-Méndez, E; Trejo-Durán, M; Vázquez-Guevara, M A

    2014-10-20

    In this work we present a study of nonlinear optical properties in organic materials (hibiscus sabdariffa). Our results demonstrate that the medium exhibits a highly nonlocal nonlinear response. We show preliminary numerical results of the transmittance as nonlocal response by considering, simultaneously, the nonlinear absorption and refraction in media. Numerical results are accord to measurement obtained by Z- scan technique where we observe large phase shifts. We also analyze the far field diffraction ring patterns of the sample.

  9. New Refractive Surgery Procedures and Their Implications for Aviation Safety

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-04-01

    and the introduction of corneal topography analysis have led to the development of a safer and more effective LTK procedure . The patient’s...myopia: clinical results in sighted eyes . Ophthalmol. May 1993; 100(5):739-45 . 25 46 . Klyce SD, Smolek MK . Corneal topography of ex- cimer laser...of the cornea as a quantitative descriptor in corneal topography . J Cataract Refract Surg. Feb 1993; 19(Suppl):S155-65 . 53 . Gartry DS . Treating

  10. Refraction data survey: 2nd generation correlation of myopia.

    PubMed

    Greene, Peter R; Medina, Antonio

    2016-10-01

    The objective herein is to provide refraction data, myopia progression rate, prevalence, and 1st and 2nd generation correlations, relevant to whether myopia is random or inherited. First- and second-generation ocular refraction data are assembled from N = 34 families, average of 2.8 children per family. From this group, data are available from N = 165 subjects. Inter-generation regressions are performed on all the data sets, including correlation coefficient r, and myopia prevalence [%]. Prevalence of myopia is [M] = 38.5 %. Prevalence of high myopes with |R| >6 D is [M-] = 20.5 %. Average refraction is  = -1.84 D ± 3.22 (N = 165). For the high myopes, |R| >6 D, prevalence for the parents is [M-] = 25 %, for the 2nd generation [M-] = 16.5 %. Average myopia level for the high myopes, both generations, is  = -7.52 D ± 1.31 D (N = 33). Regression parameters are calculated for all the data sets, yielding correlation coefficients in the range r = 0.48-0.72 for some groups of myopes and high myopes, fathers to daughters, and mothers to sons. Also of interest, some categories show essentially no correlation, -0.20 < r < 0.20, indicating that the refractive errors occur randomly. Time series results show myopia diopter rates = -0.50 D/year.

  11. Controllable nonlinear refraction characteristics in hydrogenated nanocrystalline silicon

    SciTech Connect

    Zheng, D. Q.; Ye, Q. H.; Shen, W. Z.; Su, W. A.

    2014-02-07

    Nonlinear refraction (NLR) of hydrogenated nanocrystalline silicon (nc-Si:H) has been investigated through the close aperture Z-scan method. We demonstrate a significant NLR and a unique feature of controllable NLR characteristics between saturable and Kerr NLR with the incident photon energy. We numerically evaluate the proportion of these two mechanisms in different wavelengths by a modified NLR equation. The band tail of nc-Si:H appears to play a crucial role in such NLR responses.

  12. Lithium metal for x-ray refractive optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pereira, Nino R.; Arms, Dohn A.; Clarke, Roy; Dierker, Steve B.; Dufresne, Eric; Foster, D.

    2001-12-01

    Lithium is the best material for refractive x-ray lenses, with peak performance around 8 keV. To date we have built a prototype of Cederstrom's so-called alligator lens, and have tested the lens with beamline 7ID's 10 keV x-rays on the Advanced Photon Source at Argonne National Laboratories. To date we have attained only a threefold gain, most likely limited by surface roughness that is avoidable with more careful manufacturing techniques.

  13. Ocular Changes during Pregnancy and Their Effects on Refraction.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-09-26

    pregnancy and menstrual cycle effects, or from studies dealing with ocular changes produced by the use of oral contraceptives which mimic many of the...using oral contraceptives reported that refractive changes toward increased myopia ocurred, but 7,9,9 did not specify any amounts. Thus, there is no...there was not universal agreement on this point. In two separate studies of 72 and 74 women taking oral contraceptives , the first reported general

  14. Ultrashort laser pulse interaction with photo-thermo-refractive glass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siiman, Leo A.

    Photo-thermo-refractive (PTR) glass is an ideal photosensitive material for recording phase volume holograms. It is a homogeneous multi-component silicate glass that demonstrates all the advantages of optical glass: thermal stability, high laser damage threshold, and a wide transparency range. Moreover the ability to record phase patterns (i.e. spatial refractive index variations) into PTR glass has resulted in the fabrication of volume holograms with diffraction efficiency greater than 99%. The conventional method of recording a hologram in PTR glass relies on exposure to continuous-wave ultraviolet laser radiation. In this dissertation the interaction between infrared ultrashort laser pulses and PTR glass is studied. It is shown that photosensitivity in PTR glass can be extended from the UV region to longer wavelengths (near-infrared) by exposure to ultrashort laser pulses. It is found that there exists a focusing geometry and laser pulse intensity interval for which photoionization and refractive index change in PTR glass after thermal development occur without laser-induced optical damage. Photoionization of PTR glass by IR ultrashort laser pulses is explained in terms of strong electric field ionization. This phenomenon is used to fabricate phase optical elements in PTR glass. The interaction between ultrashort laser pulses and volume holograms in PTR glass is studied in two laser intensity regimes. At intensities below ˜10 12 W/cm2 properties such as diffraction efficiency, angular divergence, selectivity, and pulse front tilt are shown to agree with the theory of linear diffraction for broad spectral width lasers. A volume grating pair arrangement is shown to correct the laser pulse distortions arising from pulse front tilt and angular divergence. At higher intensities of irradiation, nonlinear generation and diffraction of third harmonic is observed for three types of interactions: sum-frequency generation, front-surface THG generation, and THG due to

  15. Measuring Refractive Index Using the Focal Displacement Method (Postprint)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-05-01

    measurements of wafer- shaped InAs and InSb,” Appl. Opt. 47, 164–168 (2008). 6. H. J. Choi , H. H. Lim, H. S. Moon, T. B. Eom, J. J. Ju, and M. Cha...coefficients of germanium and silicon,” Appl. Opt. 15, 2348–2351 (1976). 13. P. Hlidek, J. Bok , J. Franc, and R. Grill, “Refractive index of CdTe: spectral and

  16. Enhancement of Far Field Sound Levels by Refractive Focusing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomson, D. W.; Roth, S. D.

    1981-01-01

    The enhancement of sound pressure levels resulting from refractive focusing was calculated for meteorological conditions representative of those observed at the MOD-1 site near Boone, N.C. The results show that 10 to 20dB enhancements can occur over ranges of several hundred meters. Localized enhancements in excess of 20dB can occur but will probably be of limited duration as a consequence of normal temporally varying meteorological conditions.

  17. Refractive Index Measurement of Fibers Through Fizeau Interferometry

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-08-01

    3 Table 2. Lasers used in interferometer for fiber refractive index measurement. Manufacturer Model Wavelength Laserglow Technologies , Inc...1.4605, well within the acceptable range of error. A similarly precise listed value for S-2 glass was not found, but the manufacturer lists the...internally manufactured fibers. The interferometer is shown to produce accurate, repeatable results for fibers with a cross-sectional area of over

  18. Measurements of refractive index and physical thickness using optical coherence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Guiju; Wang, Xiangzhao; Ren, Hongwu; Zhang, Weizai; Zhang, Lianying; Fang, Zujie

    2000-05-01

    The measurements of refractive index and thickness of various transparent plates and films are very important for quality control. Additionally, the knowledge of refractive index, and thickness is significant in biomedicine for the treatment of many kinds of tumors. In this paper, we propose a new method for noninvasive and simultaneous measurement of refractive indices and physical thickness of specimens, which consist of surrounding and interior components with different refractive indices. In our experiment, we measure the refractive index and the physical thickness of a multimode fiber and a lotus root with a hollow hole, respectively. The experimental results verify the feasibility of this method.

  19. Sentential Negation in English

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mowarin, Macaulay

    2009-01-01

    This paper undertakes a detailed analysis of sentential negation in the English language with Chomsky's Government-Binding theory of Transformational Grammar as theoretical model. It distinguishes between constituent and sentential negation in English. The essay identifies the exact position of Negation phrase in an English clause structure. It…

  20. Determining index of refraction from polarimetric hyperspectral radiance measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, Jacob A.; Gross, Kevin C.

    2015-09-01

    Polarimetric hyperspectral imaging (P-HSI) combines two of the most common remote sensing modalities. This work leverages the combination of these techniques to improve material classification. Classifying and identifying materials requires parameters which are invariant to changing viewing conditions, and most often a material's reflectivity or emissivity is used. Measuring these most often requires assumptions be made about the material and atmospheric conditions. Combining both polarimetric and hyperspectral imaging, we propose a method to remotely estimate the index of refraction of a material. In general, this is an underdetermined problem because both the real and imaginary components of index of refraction are unknown at every spectral point. By modeling the spectral variation of the index of refraction using a few parameters, however, the problem can be made overdetermined. A number of different functions can be used to describe this spectral variation, and some are discussed here. Reducing the number of spectral parameters to fit allows us to add parameters which estimate atmospheric downwelling radiance and transmittance. Additionally, the object temperature is added as a fit parameter. The set of these parameters that best replicate the measured data is then found using a bounded Nelder-Mead simplex search algorithm. Other search algorithms are also examined and discussed. Results show that this technique has promise but also some limitations, which are the subject of ongoing work.