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Sample records for all-atom explicit solvent

  1. Variational Optimization of an All-Atom Implicit Solvent Force Field to Match Explicit Solvent Simulation Data.

    PubMed

    Bottaro, Sandro; Lindorff-Larsen, Kresten; Best, Robert B

    2013-12-10

    The development of accurate implicit solvation models with low computational cost is essential for addressing many large-scale biophysical problems. Here, we present an efficient solvation term based on a Gaussian solvent-exclusion model (EEF1) for simulations of proteins in aqueous environment, with the primary aim of having a good overlap with explicit solvent simulations, particularly for unfolded and disordered states - as would be needed for multiscale applications. In order to achieve this, we have used a recently proposed coarse-graining procedure based on minimization of an entropy-related objective function to train the model to reproduce the equilibrium distribution obtained from explicit water simulations. Via this methodology, we have optimized both a charge screening parameter and a backbone torsion term against explicit solvent simulations of an α-helical and a β-stranded peptide. The performance of the resulting effective energy function, termed EEF1-SB, is tested with respect to the properties of folded proteins, the folding of small peptides or fast-folding proteins, and NMR data for intrinsically disordered proteins. The results show that EEF1-SB provides a reasonable description of a wide range of systems, but its key advantage over other methods tested is that it captures very well the structure and dimension of disordered or weakly structured peptides. EEF1-SB is thus a computationally inexpensive (~ 10 times faster than Generalized-Born methods) and transferable approximation for treating solvent effects. PMID:24748852

  2. COFFDROP: A Coarse-Grained Nonbonded Force Field for Proteins Derived from All-Atom Explicit-Solvent Molecular Dynamics Simulations of Amino Acids

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    We describe the derivation of a set of bonded and nonbonded coarse-grained (CG) potential functions for use in implicit-solvent Brownian dynamics (BD) simulations of proteins derived from all-atom explicit-solvent molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of amino acids. Bonded potential functions were derived from 1 μs MD simulations of each of the 20 canonical amino acids, with histidine modeled in both its protonated and neutral forms; nonbonded potential functions were derived from 1 μs MD simulations of every possible pairing of the amino acids (231 different systems). The angle and dihedral probability distributions and radial distribution functions sampled during MD were used to optimize a set of CG potential functions through use of the iterative Boltzmann inversion (IBI) method. The optimized set of potential functions—which we term COFFDROP (COarse-grained Force Field for Dynamic Representation Of Proteins)—quantitatively reproduced all of the “target” MD distributions. In a first test of the force field, it was used to predict the clustering behavior of concentrated amino acid solutions; the predictions were directly compared with the results of corresponding all-atom explicit-solvent MD simulations and found to be in excellent agreement. In a second test, BD simulations of the small protein villin headpiece were carried out at concentrations that have recently been studied in all-atom explicit-solvent MD simulations by Petrov and Zagrovic (PLoS Comput. Biol.2014, 5, e1003638). The anomalously strong intermolecular interactions seen in the MD study were reproduced in the COFFDROP simulations; a simple scaling of COFFDROP’s nonbonded parameters, however, produced results in better accordance with experiment. Overall, our results suggest that potential functions derived from simulations of pairwise amino acid interactions might be of quite broad applicability, with COFFDROP likely to be especially useful for modeling unfolded or intrinsically

  3. Parameterization of backbone flexibility in a coarse-grained force field for proteins (COFFDROP) derived from all-atom explicit-solvent molecular dynamics simulations of all possible two-residue peptides

    PubMed Central

    Frembgen-Kesner, Tamara; Andrews, Casey T.; Li, Shuxiang; Ngo, Nguyet Anh; Shubert, Scott A.; Jain, Aakash; Olayiwola, Oluwatoni; Weishaar, Mitch R.; Elcock, Adrian H.

    2015-01-01

    Recently, we reported the parameterization of a set of coarse-grained (CG) nonbonded potential functions, derived from all-atom explicit-solvent molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of amino acid pairs, and designed for use in (implicit-solvent) Brownian dynamics (BD) simulations of proteins; this force field was named COFFDROP (COarse-grained Force Field for Dynamic Representations Of Proteins). Here, we describe the extension of COFFDROP to include bonded backbone terms derived from fitting to results of explicit-solvent MD simulations of all possible two-residue peptides containing the 20 standard amino acids, with histidine modeled in both its protonated and neutral forms. The iterative Boltzmann inversion (IBI) method was used to optimize new CG potential functions for backbone-related terms by attempting to reproduce angle, dihedral and distance probability distributions generated by the MD simulations. In a simple test of the transferability of the extended force field, the angle, dihedral and distance probability distributions obtained from BD simulations of 56 three-residue peptides were compared to results from corresponding explicit-solvent MD simulations. In a more challenging test of the COFFDROP force field, it was used to simulate eight intrinsically disordered proteins and was shown to quite accurately reproduce the experimental hydrodynamic radii (Rhydro), provided that the favorable nonbonded interactions of the force field were uniformly scaled downwards in magnitude. Overall, the results indicate that the COFFDROP force field is likely to find use in modeling the conformational behavior of intrinsically disordered proteins and multi-domain proteins connected by flexible linkers. PMID:26574429

  4. Hydration Properties and Solvent Effects for All-Atom Solutes in Polarizable Coarse-Grained Water.

    PubMed

    Yan, Xin Cindy; Tirado-Rives, Julian; Jorgensen, William L

    2016-08-25

    Due to the importance of water in chemical and biological systems, a coarse-grained representation of the solvent can greatly simplify the description of the system while retaining key thermodynamic properties of the medium. A multiscale solvation model that couples all-atom solutes and polarizable Martini coarse-grained water (AAX/CGS) is developed to reproduce free energies of hydration of organic solutes. Using Monte Carlo/free energy perturbation (MC/FEP) calculations, results from multiscale and all-atom simulations are compared. Improved accuracy is obtained with the AAX/CGS approach for hydrophobic and sulfur- or halogen-containing solutes, but larger deviations are found for polar solute molecules where hydrogen bonding is featured. Furthermore, solvent effects on conformational and tautomeric equilibria of AA solutes were investigated using AA, CG, and GB/SA solvent models. It is found that the CG solvent model can reproduce well the medium effects from experiment and AA simulations; however, the GB/SA solvent model fails in some cases. A 7-30-fold reduction in computational cost is found for the present AAX/CGS multiscale simulations compared to the AA alternative. PMID:26901452

  5. On Using Atomistic Solvent Layers in Hybrid All-Atom/Coarse-Grained Molecular Dynamics Simulations.

    PubMed

    Kuhn, Alexander B; Gopal, Srinivasa M; Schäfer, Lars V

    2015-09-01

    Hybrid all-atom/coarse-grained (AA-CG) simulations in which AA solutes are embedded in a CG environment can provide a significant computational speed-up over conventional fully atomistic simulations and thus alleviate the current length and time scale limitations of molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of large biomolecular systems. On one hand, coarse graining the solvent is particularly appealing, since it typically constitutes the largest part of the simulation system and thus dominates computational cost. On the other hand, retaining atomic-level solvent layers around the solute is desirable for a realistic description of hydrogen bonds and other local solvation effects. Here, we devise and systematically validate fixed resolution AA-CG schemes, both with and without atomistic water layers. To quantify the accuracy and diagnose possible pitfalls, Gibbs free energies of solvation of amino acid side chain analogues were calculated, and the influence of the nature of the CG solvent surrounding (polarizable vs nonpolarizable CG water) and the size of the AA solvent region was investigated. We show that distance restraints to keep the AA solvent around the solute lead to too high of a density in the inner shell. Together with a long-ranged effect due to orientational ordering of water molecules at the AA-CG boundary, this affects solvation free energies. Shifting the onset of the distance restraints slightly away from the central solute significantly improves solvation free energies, down to mean unsigned errors with respect to experiment of 2.3 and 2.6 kJ/mol for the polarizable and nonpolarizable CG water surrounding, respectively. The speed-up of the nonpolarizable model renders it computationally more attractive. The present work thus highlights challenges, and outlines possible solutions, involved with modeling the boundary between different levels of resolution in hybrid AA-CG simulations. PMID:26575936

  6. Constrained Unfolding of a Helical Peptide: Implicit versus Explicit Solvents.

    PubMed

    Bureau, Hailey R; Merz, Dale R; Hershkovits, Eli; Quirk, Stephen; Hernandez, Rigoberto

    2015-01-01

    Steered Molecular Dynamics (SMD) has been seen to provide the potential of mean force (PMF) along a peptide unfolding pathway effectively but at significant computational cost, particularly in all-atom solvents. Adaptive steered molecular dynamics (ASMD) has been seen to provide a significant computational advantage by limiting the spread of the trajectories in a staged approach. The contraction of the trajectories at the end of each stage can be performed by taking a structure whose nonequilibrium work is closest to the Jarzynski average (in naive ASMD) or by relaxing the trajectories under a no-work condition (in full-relaxation ASMD--namely, FR-ASMD). Both approaches have been used to determine the energetics and hydrogen-bonding structure along the pathway for unfolding of a benchmark peptide initially constrained as an α-helix in a water environment. The energetics are quite different to those in vacuum, but are found to be similar between implicit and explicit solvents. Surprisingly, the hydrogen-bonding pathways are also similar in the implicit and explicit solvents despite the fact that the solvent contact plays an important role in opening the helix. PMID:25970521

  7. Constrained Unfolding of a Helical Peptide: Implicit versus Explicit Solvents

    PubMed Central

    Bureau, Hailey R.; Merz, Dale R.; Hershkovits, Eli; Quirk, Stephen; Hernandez, Rigoberto

    2015-01-01

    Steered Molecular Dynamics (SMD) has been seen to provide the potential of mean force (PMF) along a peptide unfolding pathway effectively but at significant computational cost, particularly in all-atom solvents. Adaptive steered molecular dynamics (ASMD) has been seen to provide a significant computational advantage by limiting the spread of the trajectories in a staged approach. The contraction of the trajectories at the end of each stage can be performed by taking a structure whose nonequilibrium work is closest to the Jarzynski average (in naive ASMD) or by relaxing the trajectories under a no-work condition (in full-relaxation ASMD—namely, FR-ASMD). Both approaches have been used to determine the energetics and hydrogen-bonding structure along the pathway for unfolding of a benchmark peptide initially constrained as an α-helix in a water environment. The energetics are quite different to those in vacuum, but are found to be similar between implicit and explicit solvents. Surprisingly, the hydrogen-bonding pathways are also similar in the implicit and explicit solvents despite the fact that the solvent contact plays an important role in opening the helix. PMID:25970521

  8. Bridging implicit and explicit solvent approaches for membrane electrostatics.

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Jung-Hsin; Baker, Nathan A; McCammon, J Andrew

    2002-01-01

    Conformations of a zwitterionic bilayer were sampled from a molecular dynamics simulation and their electrostatic properties analyzed by solution of the Poisson equation. These traditionally implicit electrostatic calculations were performed in the presence of varying amounts of explicit solvent to assess the magnitude of error introduced by a uniform dielectric description of water surrounding the bilayer. It was observed that membrane dipole potential calculations in the presence of explicit water were significantly different than wholly implicit solvent calculations with the calculated dipole potential converging to a reasonable value when four or more hydration layers were included explicitly. PMID:12202363

  9. Single polymer chains in poor solvent: Using the bond fluctuation method with explicit solvent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jentzsch, Christoph; Werner, Marco; Sommer, Jens-Uwe

    2013-03-01

    We use the bond fluctuation model with explicit solvent to study single polymer chains under poor solvent conditions. Static and dynamic properties of the bond fluctuation model with explicit solvent are compared with the implicit solvent model, and the Θ-temperatures are determined for both solvent models. We show that even in the very poor solvent regime, dynamics is not frozen for the explicit solvent model. We investigate some aspects of the structure of a single collapsed globule and show that rather large chain lengths are necessary to reach the scaling regime of a dense sphere. The force-extension curve of a single polymer chain under poor solvent conditions in the fixed end-to-end distance ensemble is analyzed. We find that the transition of the tadpole conformation to the stretched chain conformation is rather smooth because of fluctuation effects, which is in agreement with recent experimental results.

  10. Single polymer chains in poor solvent: using the bond fluctuation method with explicit solvent.

    PubMed

    Jentzsch, Christoph; Werner, Marco; Sommer, Jens-Uwe

    2013-03-01

    We use the bond fluctuation model with explicit solvent to study single polymer chains under poor solvent conditions. Static and dynamic properties of the bond fluctuation model with explicit solvent are compared with the implicit solvent model, and the Θ-temperatures are determined for both solvent models. We show that even in the very poor solvent regime, dynamics is not frozen for the explicit solvent model. We investigate some aspects of the structure of a single collapsed globule and show that rather large chain lengths are necessary to reach the scaling regime of a dense sphere. The force-extension curve of a single polymer chain under poor solvent conditions in the fixed end-to-end distance ensemble is analyzed. We find that the transition of the tadpole conformation to the stretched chain conformation is rather smooth because of fluctuation effects, which is in agreement with recent experimental results. PMID:23485321

  11. An explicit-solvent conformation search method using open software

    PubMed Central

    Gaalswyk, Kari

    2016-01-01

    Computer modeling is a popular tool to identify the most-probable conformers of a molecule. Although the solvent can have a large effect on the stability of a conformation, many popular conformational search methods are only capable of describing molecules in the gas phase or with an implicit solvent model. We have developed a work-flow for performing a conformation search on explicitly-solvated molecules using open source software. This method uses replica exchange molecular dynamics (REMD) to sample the conformational states of the molecule efficiently. Cluster analysis is used to identify the most probable conformations from the simulated trajectory. This work-flow was tested on drug molecules α-amanitin and cabergoline to illustrate its capabilities and effectiveness. The preferred conformations of these molecules in gas phase, implicit solvent, and explicit solvent are significantly different. PMID:27280078

  12. An explicit-solvent conformation search method using open software.

    PubMed

    Gaalswyk, Kari; Rowley, Christopher N

    2016-01-01

    Computer modeling is a popular tool to identify the most-probable conformers of a molecule. Although the solvent can have a large effect on the stability of a conformation, many popular conformational search methods are only capable of describing molecules in the gas phase or with an implicit solvent model. We have developed a work-flow for performing a conformation search on explicitly-solvated molecules using open source software. This method uses replica exchange molecular dynamics (REMD) to sample the conformational states of the molecule efficiently. Cluster analysis is used to identify the most probable conformations from the simulated trajectory. This work-flow was tested on drug molecules α-amanitin and cabergoline to illustrate its capabilities and effectiveness. The preferred conformations of these molecules in gas phase, implicit solvent, and explicit solvent are significantly different. PMID:27280078

  13. Density relaxation and particle motion characteristics in a non-ionic deep eutectic solvent (acetamide + urea): time-resolved fluorescence measurements and all-atom molecular dynamics simulations.

    PubMed

    Das, Anuradha; Das, Suman; Biswas, Ranjit

    2015-01-21

    Temperature dependent relaxation dynamics, particle motion characteristics, and heterogeneity aspects of deep eutectic solvents (DESs) made of acetamide (CH3CONH2) and urea (NH2CONH2) have been investigated by employing time-resolved fluorescence measurements and all-atom molecular dynamics simulations. Three different compositions (f) for the mixture [fCH3CONH2 + (1 - f)NH2CONH2] have been studied in a temperature range of 328-353 K which is ∼120-145 K above the measured glass transition temperatures (∼207 K) of these DESs but much lower than the individual melting temperature of either of the constituents. Steady state fluorescence emission measurements using probe solutes with sharply different lifetimes do not indicate any dependence on excitation wavelength in these metastable molten systems. Time-resolved fluorescence anisotropy measurements reveal near-hydrodynamic coupling between medium viscosity and rotation of a dissolved dipolar solute. Stokes shift dynamics have been found to be too fast to be detected by the time-resolution (∼70 ps) employed, suggesting extremely rapid medium polarization relaxation. All-atom simulations reveal Gaussian distribution for particle displacements and van Hove correlations, and significant overlap between non-Gaussian (α2) and new non-Gaussian (γ) heterogeneity parameters. In addition, no stretched exponential relaxations have been detected in the simulated wavenumber dependent acetamide dynamic structure factors. All these results are in sharp contrast to earlier observations for ionic deep eutectics with acetamide [Guchhait et al., J. Chem. Phys. 140, 104514 (2014)] and suggest a fundamental difference in interaction and dynamics between ionic and non-ionic deep eutectic solvent systems. PMID:25612718

  14. Density relaxation and particle motion characteristics in a non-ionic deep eutectic solvent (acetamide + urea): Time-resolved fluorescence measurements and all-atom molecular dynamics simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, Anuradha; Das, Suman; Biswas, Ranjit

    2015-01-01

    Temperature dependent relaxation dynamics, particle motion characteristics, and heterogeneity aspects of deep eutectic solvents (DESs) made of acetamide (CH3CONH2) and urea (NH2CONH2) have been investigated by employing time-resolved fluorescence measurements and all-atom molecular dynamics simulations. Three different compositions (f) for the mixture [fCH3CONH2 + (1 - f)NH2CONH2] have been studied in a temperature range of 328-353 K which is ˜120-145 K above the measured glass transition temperatures (˜207 K) of these DESs but much lower than the individual melting temperature of either of the constituents. Steady state fluorescence emission measurements using probe solutes with sharply different lifetimes do not indicate any dependence on excitation wavelength in these metastable molten systems. Time-resolved fluorescence anisotropy measurements reveal near-hydrodynamic coupling between medium viscosity and rotation of a dissolved dipolar solute. Stokes shift dynamics have been found to be too fast to be detected by the time-resolution (˜70 ps) employed, suggesting extremely rapid medium polarization relaxation. All-atom simulations reveal Gaussian distribution for particle displacements and van Hove correlations, and significant overlap between non-Gaussian (α2) and new non-Gaussian (γ) heterogeneity parameters. In addition, no stretched exponential relaxations have been detected in the simulated wavenumber dependent acetamide dynamic structure factors. All these results are in sharp contrast to earlier observations for ionic deep eutectics with acetamide [Guchhait et al., J. Chem. Phys. 140, 104514 (2014)] and suggest a fundamental difference in interaction and dynamics between ionic and non-ionic deep eutectic solvent systems.

  15. Density relaxation and particle motion characteristics in a non-ionic deep eutectic solvent (acetamide + urea): Time-resolved fluorescence measurements and all-atom molecular dynamics simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Das, Anuradha; Das, Suman; Biswas, Ranjit

    2015-01-21

    Temperature dependent relaxation dynamics, particle motion characteristics, and heterogeneity aspects of deep eutectic solvents (DESs) made of acetamide (CH{sub 3}CONH{sub 2}) and urea (NH{sub 2}CONH{sub 2}) have been investigated by employing time-resolved fluorescence measurements and all-atom molecular dynamics simulations. Three different compositions (f) for the mixture [fCH{sub 3}CONH{sub 2} + (1 − f)NH{sub 2}CONH{sub 2}] have been studied in a temperature range of 328-353 K which is ∼120-145 K above the measured glass transition temperatures (∼207 K) of these DESs but much lower than the individual melting temperature of either of the constituents. Steady state fluorescence emission measurements using probe solutes with sharply different lifetimes do not indicate any dependence on excitation wavelength in these metastable molten systems. Time-resolved fluorescence anisotropy measurements reveal near-hydrodynamic coupling between medium viscosity and rotation of a dissolved dipolar solute. Stokes shift dynamics have been found to be too fast to be detected by the time-resolution (∼70 ps) employed, suggesting extremely rapid medium polarization relaxation. All-atom simulations reveal Gaussian distribution for particle displacements and van Hove correlations, and significant overlap between non-Gaussian (α{sub 2}) and new non-Gaussian (γ) heterogeneity parameters. In addition, no stretched exponential relaxations have been detected in the simulated wavenumber dependent acetamide dynamic structure factors. All these results are in sharp contrast to earlier observations for ionic deep eutectics with acetamide [Guchhait et al., J. Chem. Phys. 140, 104514 (2014)] and suggest a fundamental difference in interaction and dynamics between ionic and non-ionic deep eutectic solvent systems.

  16. Response behavior of diblock copolymer brushes in explicit solvent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gong, Kai; Marshall, Bennett D.; Chapman, Walter G.

    2012-10-01

    The understanding of phase behavior of copolymer brushes is of fundamental importance for the design of smart materials. In this paper, we have performed classical density functional theory calculations to study diblock copolymer brushes (A-B) in an explicit solvent which prefers the A block to B block. With increasing B-block length (NB), we find a structural transition of the copolymer brush from mixed to collapsed, partial-exposed, and exposed structure, which is qualitatively consistent with experiments. The phase transitions are attributed to the interplay between entropic cost of folding copolymer brushes and enthalpic effect of contact between unlike components. In addition, we examine the effect of different parameters, such as grafting density (ρg), the bottom block length (NA), and the chain length of solvent (NS) on the solvent response of copolymer brushes. The transition chain length (NB) increases with decreasing ρg and NA, and a smaller solvent molecule makes the collapsed structure less stable due to its lower penetration cost. Our results provide the insight to phase behavior of copolymer brushes in selective solvents from a molecular view.

  17. Computations of absolute solvation free energies of small molecules using explicit and implicit solvent model.

    SciTech Connect

    Shivakumar, D.; Deng, Y.; Roux, B.; Biosciences Division; Univ. of Chicago

    2009-01-01

    Accurate determination of absolute solvation free energy plays a critical role in numerous areas of biomolecular modeling and drug discovery. A quantitative representation of ligand and receptor desolvation, in particular, is an essential component of current docking and scoring methods. Furthermore, the partitioning of a drug between aqueous and nonpolar solvents is one of the important factors considered in pharmacokinetics. In this study, the absolute hydration free energy for a set of 239 neutral ligands spanning diverse chemical functional groups commonly found in drugs and drug-like candidates is calculated using the molecular dynamics free energy perturbation method (FEP/MD) with explicit water molecules, and compared to experimental data as well as its counterparts obtained using implicit solvent models. The hydration free energies are calculated from explicit solvent simulations using a staged FEP procedure permitting a separation of the total free energy into polar and nonpolar contributions. The nonpolar component is further decomposed into attractive (dispersive) and repulsive (cavity) components using the Weeks-Chandler-Anderson (WCA) separation scheme. To increase the computational efficiency, all of the FEP/MD simulations are generated using a mixed explicit/implicit solvent scheme with a relatively small number of explicit TIP3P water molecules, in which the influence of the remaining bulk is incorporated via the spherical solvent boundary potential (SSBP). The performances of two fixed-charge force fields designed for small organic molecules, the General Amber force field (GAFF), and the all-atom CHARMm-MSI, are compared. Because of the crucial role of electrostatics in solvation free energy, the results from various commonly used charge generation models based on the semiempirical (AM1-BCC) and QM calculations [charge fitting using ChelpG and RESP] are compared. In addition, the solvation free energies of the test set are also calculated using

  18. Optimized explicit-solvent replica exchange molecular dynamics from scratch.

    PubMed

    Nadler, Walter; Hansmann, Ulrich H E

    2008-08-28

    Replica exchange molecular dynamics (REMD) simulations have become an important tool to study proteins and other biological molecules in silico. However, such investigations require considerable, and often prohibitive, numerical effort when the molecules are simulated in explicit solvents. In this communication we show that in this case the cost can be minimized by choosing the number of replicas as N(opt) approximately 1+0.594 radical C ln(Tmax/Tmin), where C is the specific heat, and the temperatures distributed according to Ti(opt) approximately T min(Tmax/Tmin)(i-1)/(N-1). PMID:18671362

  19. Electrostatic interactions in charged nanoslits within an explicit solvent theory.

    PubMed

    Buyukdagli, Sahin

    2015-11-18

    Within a dipolar Poisson-Boltzmann theory including electrostatic correlations, we consider the effect of explicit solvent structure on solvent and ion partition confined to charged nanopores. We develop a relaxation scheme for the solution of this highly non-linear integro-differential equation for the electrostatic potential. The scheme is an extension of the approach previously introduced for simple planes (Buyukdagli and Blossey 2014 J. Chem. Phys. 140 234903) to nanoslit geometry. We show that the reduced dielectric response of solvent molecules at the membrane walls gives rise to an electric field significantly stronger than the field of the classical Poisson-Boltzmann equation. This peculiarity associated with non-local electrostatic interactions results in turn in an interfacial counterion adsorption layer absent in continuum theories. The observation of this enhanced counterion affinity in the very close vicinity of the interface may have important impacts on nanofluidic transport through charged nanopores. Our results indicate the quantitative inaccuracy of solvent implicit nanofiltration theories in predicting the ionic selectivity of membrane nanopores. PMID:26443128

  20. Electrostatic interactions in charged nanoslits within an explicit solvent theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buyukdagli, Sahin

    2015-11-01

    Within a dipolar Poisson-Boltzmann theory including electrostatic correlations, we consider the effect of explicit solvent structure on solvent and ion partition confined to charged nanopores. We develop a relaxation scheme for the solution of this highly non-linear integro-differential equation for the electrostatic potential. The scheme is an extension of the approach previously introduced for simple planes (Buyukdagli and Blossey 2014 J. Chem. Phys. 140 234903) to nanoslit geometry. We show that the reduced dielectric response of solvent molecules at the membrane walls gives rise to an electric field significantly stronger than the field of the classical Poisson-Boltzmann equation. This peculiarity associated with non-local electrostatic interactions results in turn in an interfacial counterion adsorption layer absent in continuum theories. The observation of this enhanced counterion affinity in the very close vicinity of the interface may have important impacts on nanofluidic transport through charged nanopores. Our results indicate the quantitative inaccuracy of solvent implicit nanofiltration theories in predicting the ionic selectivity of membrane nanopores.

  1. Solvent effects on the electronic absorption spectrum of camphor using continuum, discrete or explicit approaches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kongsted, Jacob; Mennucci, Benedetta; Coutinho, Kaline; Canuto, Sylvio

    2010-01-01

    We address the effect of solvation on the lowest electronic excitation energy of camphor. The solvents considered represent a large variation in-solvent polarity. We consider three conceptually different ways of accounting for the solvent using either an implicit, a discrete or an explicit solvation model. The solvatochromic shifts in polar solvents are found to be in good agreement with the experimental data for all three solvent models. However, both the implicit and discrete solvation models are less successful in predicting solvatochromic shifts for solvents of low polarity. The results presented suggest the importance of using explicit solvent molecules in the case of nonpolar solvents.

  2. Solvent Reaction Field Potential inside an Uncharged Globular Protein: A Bridge between Implicit and Explicit Solvent Models?

    PubMed Central

    Baker, Nathan A.; McCammon, J. Andrew

    2008-01-01

    The solvent reaction field potential of an uncharged protein immersed in Simple Point Charge/Extended (SPC/E) explicit solvent was computed over a series of molecular dynamics trajectories, intotal 1560 ns of simulation time. A finite, positive potential of 13 to 24 kbTec−1 (where T = 300K), dependent on the geometry of the solvent-accessible surface, was observed inside the biomolecule. The primary contribution to this potential arose from a layer of positive charge density 1.0 Å from the solute surface, on average 0.008 ec/Å3, which we found to be the product of a highly ordered first solvation shell. Significant second solvation shell effects, including additional layers of charge density and a slight decrease in the short-range solvent-solvent interaction strength, were also observed. The impact of these findings on implicit solvent models was assessed by running similar explicit-solvent simulations on the fully charged protein system. When the energy due to the solvent reaction field in the uncharged system is accounted for, correlation between per-atom electrostatic energies for the explicit solvent model and a simple implicit (Poisson) calculation is 0.97, and correlation between per-atom energies for the explicit solvent model and a previously published, optimized Poisson model is 0.99. PMID:17949217

  3. Nonadiabatic dynamics of photoinduced proton-coupled electron transfer: comparison of explicit and implicit solvent simulations.

    PubMed

    Auer, Benjamin; Soudackov, Alexander V; Hammes-Schiffer, Sharon

    2012-07-01

    Theoretical approaches for simulating the ultrafast dynamics of photoinduced proton-coupled electron transfer (PCET) reactions in solution are developed and applied to a series of model systems. These processes are simulated by propagating nonadiabatic surface hopping trajectories on electron-proton vibronic surfaces that depend on the solute and solvent nuclear coordinates. The PCET system is represented by a four-state empirical valence bond model, and the solvent is treated either as explicit solvent molecules or as a dielectric continuum, in which case the solvent dynamics is described in terms of two collective solvent coordinates corresponding to the energy gaps associated with electron and proton transfer. The explicit solvent simulations reveal two distinct solvent relaxation time scales, where the faster time scale relaxation corresponds to librational motions of solvent molecules in the first solvation shell, and the slower time scale relaxation corresponds to the bulk solvent dielectric response. The charge transfer dynamics is strongly coupled to both the fast and slow time scale solvent dynamics. The dynamical multistate continuum theory is extended to include the effects of two solvent relaxation time scales, and the resulting coupled generalized Langevin equations depend on parameters that can be extracted from equilibrium molecular dynamics simulations. The implicit and explicit solvent approaches lead to qualitatively similar charge transfer and solvent dynamics for model PCET systems, suggesting that the implicit solvent treatment captures the essential elements of the nonequilibrium solvent dynamics for many systems. A combination of implicit and explicit solvent approaches will enable the investigation of photoinduced PCET processes in a variety of condensed phase systems. PMID:22651684

  4. WAXSiS: a web server for the calculation of SAXS/WAXS curves based on explicit-solvent molecular dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Knight, Christopher J.; Hub, Jochen S.

    2015-01-01

    Small- and wide-angle X-ray scattering (SWAXS) has evolved into a powerful tool to study biological macromolecules in solution. The interpretation of SWAXS curves requires their accurate predictions from structural models. Such predictions are complicated by scattering contributions from the hydration layer and by effects from thermal fluctuations. Here, we describe the new web server WAXSiS (WAXS in solvent) that computes SWAXS curves based on explicit-solvent all-atom molecular dynamics (MD) simulations (http://waxsis.uni-goettingen.de/). The MD simulations provide a realistic model for both the hydration layer and the excluded solvent, thereby avoiding any solvent-related fitting parameters, while naturally accounting for thermal fluctuations. PMID:25855813

  5. An all-atom structure-based potential for proteins: bridging minimal models with all-atom empirical forcefields.

    PubMed

    Whitford, Paul C; Noel, Jeffrey K; Gosavi, Shachi; Schug, Alexander; Sanbonmatsu, Kevin Y; Onuchic, José N

    2009-05-01

    Protein dynamics take place on many time and length scales. Coarse-grained structure-based (Go) models utilize the funneled energy landscape theory of protein folding to provide an understanding of both long time and long length scale dynamics. All-atom empirical forcefields with explicit solvent can elucidate our understanding of short time dynamics with high energetic and structural resolution. Thus, structure-based models with atomic details included can be used to bridge our understanding between these two approaches. We report on the robustness of folding mechanisms in one such all-atom model. Results for the B domain of Protein A, the SH3 domain of C-Src Kinase, and Chymotrypsin Inhibitor 2 are reported. The interplay between side chain packing and backbone folding is explored. We also compare this model to a C(alpha) structure-based model and an all-atom empirical forcefield. Key findings include: (1) backbone collapse is accompanied by partial side chain packing in a cooperative transition and residual side chain packing occurs gradually with decreasing temperature, (2) folding mechanisms are robust to variations of the energetic parameters, (3) protein folding free-energy barriers can be manipulated through parametric modifications, (4) the global folding mechanisms in a C(alpha) model and the all-atom model agree, although differences can be attributed to energetic heterogeneity in the all-atom model, and (5) proline residues have significant effects on folding mechanisms, independent of isomerization effects. Because this structure-based model has atomic resolution, this work lays the foundation for future studies to probe the contributions of specific energetic factors on protein folding and function. PMID:18837035

  6. Modeling Solvent Broadening on the Vibronic Spectra of a Series of Coumarin Dyes. From Implicit to Explicit Solvent Models.

    PubMed

    Cerezo, Javier; Avila Ferrer, Francisco J; Prampolini, Giacomo; Santoro, Fabrizio

    2015-12-01

    We present a protocol to estimate the solvent-induced broadening of electronic spectra based on a model that explicitly takes into account the environment embedding the solute. Starting from a classical approximation of the solvent contribution to the spectrum, the broadening arises from the spread of the excitation energies due to the fluctuation of the solvent coordinates, and it is represented as a Gaussian line shape that convolutes the vibronic spectrum of the solute. The latter is computed in harmonic approximation at room temperature with a time-dependent approach. The proposed protocol for the computation of spectral broadening exploits molecular dynamics (MD) simulations performed on the solute-solvent system, keeping the solute degrees of freedom frozen, followed by the computation of the excitation properties with a quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics (QM/MM) approach. The factors that might influence each step of the protocol are analyzed in detail, including the selection of the empirical force field (FF) adopted in the MD simulations and the QM/MM partition of the system to compute the excitation energies. The procedure is applied to a family of coumarin dyes, and the results are compared with experiments and with the predictions of a very recent work (Cerezo et al., Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys. 2015, 17, 11401-11411), where an implicit model was adopted for the solvent. The final spectra of the considered coumarins were obtained without including ad hoc phenomenological parameters and indicate that the broadenings computed with explicit and implicit models both follow the experimental trend, increasing as the polarity change from the initial to the final state increases. More in detail, the implicit model provides larger estimations of the broadening that are closer to the experimental evidence, while explicit models appear to better capture relative differences arising from different solvents or different solutes. Possible inaccuracies of the adopted

  7. Conformation of a flexible polymer in explicit solvent: Accurate solvation potentials for Lennard-Jones chains.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Mark P; Ye, Yuting; Adhikari, Shishir R

    2015-11-28

    The conformation of a polymer chain in solution is coupled to the local structure of the surrounding solvent and can undergo large changes in response to variations in solvent density and temperature. The many-body effects of solvent on the structure of an n-mer polymer chain can be formally mapped to an exact n-body solvation potential. Here, we use a pair decomposition of this n-body potential to construct a set of two-body potentials for a Lennard-Jones (LJ) polymer chain in explicit LJ solvent. The solvation potentials are built from numerically exact results for 5-mer chains in solvent combined with an approximate asymptotic expression for the solvation potential between sites that are distant along the chain backbone. These potentials map the many-body chain-in-solvent problem to a few-body single-chain problem and can be used to study a chain of arbitrary length, thereby dramatically reducing the computational complexity of the polymer chain-in-solvent problem. We have constructed solvation potentials at a large number of state points across the LJ solvent phase diagram including the vapor, liquid, and super-critical regions. We use these solvation potentials in single-chain Monte Carlo (MC) simulations with n ≤ 800 to determine the size, intramolecular structure, and scaling behavior of chains in solvent. To assess our results, we have carried out full chain-in-solvent MC simulations (with n ≤ 100) and find that our solvation potential approach is quantitatively accurate for a wide range of solvent conditions for these chain lengths. PMID:26627969

  8. Constant pH Molecular Dynamics of Proteins in Explicit Solvent with Proton Tautomerism

    PubMed Central

    Goh, Garrett B.; Hulbert, Benjamin S.; Zhou, Huiqing; Brooks, Charles L.

    2015-01-01

    pH is a ubiquitous regulator of biological activity, including protein-folding, protein-protein interactions and enzymatic activity. Existing constant pH molecular dynamics (CPHMD) models that were developed to address questions related to the pH-dependent properties of proteins are largely based on implicit solvent models. However, implicit solvent models are known to underestimate the desolvation energy of buried charged residues, increasing the error associated with predictions that involve internal ionizable residue that are important in processes like hydrogen transport and electron transfer. Furthermore, discrete water and ions cannot be modeled in implicit solvent, which are important in systems like membrane proteins and ion channels. We report on an explicit solvent constant pH molecular dynamics framework based on multi-site λ-dynamics (CPHMDMSλD). In the CPHMDMSλD framework, we performed seamless alchemical transitions between protonation and tautomeric states using multi-site λ-dynamics, and designed novel biasing potentials to ensure that the physical end-states are predominantly sampled. We show that explicit solvent CPHMDMSλD simulations model realistic pH-dependent properties of proteins such as the Hen-Egg White Lysozyme (HEWL), binding domain of 2-oxoglutarate dehydrogenase (BBL) and N-terminal domain of ribosomal L9 (NTL9), and the pKa predictions are in excellent agreement with experimental values, with a RMSE ranging from 0.72 to 0.84 pKa units. With the recent development of the explicit solvent CPHMDMSλD framework for nucleic acids, accurate modeling of pH-dependent properties of both major class of biomolecules – proteins and nucleic acids is now possible. PMID:24375620

  9. Polymer brushes in explicit poor solvents studied using a new variant of the bond fluctuation model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jentzsch, Christoph; Sommer, Jens-Uwe

    2014-09-01

    Using a variant of the Bond Fluctuation Model which improves its parallel efficiency in particular running on graphic cards we perform large scale simulations of polymer brushes in poor explicit solvent. Grafting density, solvent quality, and chain length are varied. Different morphological structures in particular octopus micelles are observed for low grafting densities. We reconsider the theoretical model for octopus micelles proposed by Williams using scaling arguments with the relevant scaling variable being σ/σc, and with the characteristic grafting density given by σc ˜ N-4/3. We find that octopus micelles only grow laterally, but not in height and we propose an extension of the model by assuming a cylindrical shape instead of a spherical geometry for the micelle-core. We show that the scaling variable σ/σc can be applied to master plots for the averaged height of the brush, the size of the micelles, and the number of chains per micelle. The exponents in the corresponding power law relations for the grafting density and chain length are in agreement with the model for flat cylindrical micelles. We also investigate the surface roughness and find that polymer brushes in explicit poor solvent at grafting densities higher than the stretching transition are flat and surface rippling can only be observed close to the stretching transition.

  10. Polymer brushes in explicit poor solvents studied using a new variant of the bond fluctuation model.

    PubMed

    Jentzsch, Christoph; Sommer, Jens-Uwe

    2014-09-14

    Using a variant of the Bond Fluctuation Model which improves its parallel efficiency in particular running on graphic cards we perform large scale simulations of polymer brushes in poor explicit solvent. Grafting density, solvent quality, and chain length are varied. Different morphological structures in particular octopus micelles are observed for low grafting densities. We reconsider the theoretical model for octopus micelles proposed by Williams using scaling arguments with the relevant scaling variable being σ/σ(c), and with the characteristic grafting density given by σ(c) ~ N(-4/3). We find that octopus micelles only grow laterally, but not in height and we propose an extension of the model by assuming a cylindrical shape instead of a spherical geometry for the micelle-core. We show that the scaling variable σ/σ(c) can be applied to master plots for the averaged height of the brush, the size of the micelles, and the number of chains per micelle. The exponents in the corresponding power law relations for the grafting density and chain length are in agreement with the model for flat cylindrical micelles. We also investigate the surface roughness and find that polymer brushes in explicit poor solvent at grafting densities higher than the stretching transition are flat and surface rippling can only be observed close to the stretching transition. PMID:25217952

  11. Interpretation of Solution X-Ray Scattering by Explicit-Solvent Molecular Dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Po-chia; Hub, Jochen S.

    2015-01-01

    Small- and wide-angle x-ray scattering (SWAXS) and molecular dynamics (MD) simulations are complementary approaches that probe conformational transitions of biomolecules in solution, even in a time-resolved manner. However, the structural interpretation of the scattering signals is challenging, while MD simulations frequently suffer from incomplete sampling or from a force-field bias. To combine the advantages of both techniques, we present a method that incorporates solution scattering data as a differentiable energetic restraint into explicit-solvent MD simulations, termed SWAXS-driven MD, with the aim to direct the simulation into conformations satisfying the experimental data. Because the calculations fully rely on explicit solvent, no fitting parameters associated with the solvation layer or excluded solvent are required, and the calculations remain valid at wide angles. The complementarity of SWAXS and MD is illustrated using three biological examples, namely a periplasmic binding protein, aspartate carbamoyltransferase, and a nuclear exportin. The examples suggest that SWAXS-driven MD is capable of refining structures against SWAXS data without foreknowledge of possible reaction paths. In turn, the SWAXS data accelerates conformational transitions in MD simulations and reduces the force-field bias. PMID:25992735

  12. Computing solvent-induced forces in the solvation approach called Semi Explicit Assembly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brini, Emiliano; Hummel, Michelle H.; Coutsias, Evangelos A.; Fennell, Christopher J.; Dill, Ken A.

    2014-03-01

    Many biologically relevant processes (e.g. protein folding) are often too big and slow to be simulated by computer methods that model atomically detailed water. Faster physical models of water are needed. We have developed an approach called Semi Explicit Assembly (SEA) [C.J. Fennell, C.W. Kehoe, K.A. Dill, PNAS, 108, 3234 (2011)]. It is physical because it uses pre-simulations of explicit-solvent models, and it is fast because at runtime, we just combine the pre-simulated results in rapid computations. SEA has also now been proven physically accurate in two blind tests called SAMPL. Here, we describe the computation of solvation forces in SEA, so that this solvation procedure can be incorporated into standard molecular dynamics codes. We describe experimental tests.

  13. Designing High-Affinity Peptides for Organic Molecules by Explicit Solvent Molecular Dynamics.

    PubMed

    Gladich, Ivan; Rodriguez, Alex; Hong Enriquez, Rolando P; Guida, Filomena; Berti, Federico; Laio, Alessandro

    2015-10-15

    Short peptides offer a cheap alternative to antibodies for developing sensing units in devices for concentration measurement. We here describe a computational procedure that allows designing peptides capable of binding with high affinity a target organic molecule in aqueous or nonstandard solvent environments. The algorithm is based on a stochastic search in the space of the possible sequences of the peptide, and exploits finite temperature molecular dynamics simulations in explicit solvent to check if a proposed mutation improves the binding affinity or not. The procedure automatically produces peptides which form thermally stable complexes with the target. The estimated binding free energy reaches the 13 kcal/mol for Irinotecan anticancer drug, the target considered in this work. These peptides are by construction solvent specific; namely, they recognize the target only in the solvent in which they have been designed. This feature of the algorithm calls for applications in devices in which the peptide-based sensor is required to work in denaturants or under extreme conditions of pressure and temperature. PMID:26398715

  14. Nonadiabatic dynamics of electron transfer in solution: Explicit and implicit solvent treatments that include multiple relaxation time scales

    SciTech Connect

    Schwerdtfeger, Christine A.; Soudackov, Alexander V.; Hammes-Schiffer, Sharon

    2014-01-21

    The development of efficient theoretical methods for describing electron transfer (ET) reactions in condensed phases is important for a variety of chemical and biological applications. Previously, dynamical dielectric continuum theory was used to derive Langevin equations for a single collective solvent coordinate describing ET in a polar solvent. In this theory, the parameters are directly related to the physical properties of the system and can be determined from experimental data or explicit molecular dynamics simulations. Herein, we combine these Langevin equations with surface hopping nonadiabatic dynamics methods to calculate the rate constants for thermal ET reactions in polar solvents for a wide range of electronic couplings and reaction free energies. Comparison of explicit and implicit solvent calculations illustrates that the mapping from explicit to implicit solvent models is valid even for solvents exhibiting complex relaxation behavior with multiple relaxation time scales and a short-time inertial response. The rate constants calculated for implicit solvent models with a single solvent relaxation time scale corresponding to water, acetonitrile, and methanol agree well with analytical theories in the Golden rule and solvent-controlled regimes, as well as in the intermediate regime. The implicit solvent models with two relaxation time scales are in qualitative agreement with the analytical theories but quantitatively overestimate the rate constants compared to these theories. Analysis of these simulations elucidates the importance of multiple relaxation time scales and the inertial component of the solvent response, as well as potential shortcomings of the analytical theories based on single time scale solvent relaxation models. This implicit solvent approach will enable the simulation of a wide range of ET reactions via the stochastic dynamics of a single collective solvent coordinate with parameters that are relevant to experimentally accessible

  15. Nonadiabatic dynamics of electron transfer in solution: explicit and implicit solvent treatments that include multiple relaxation time scales.

    PubMed

    Schwerdtfeger, Christine A; Soudackov, Alexander V; Hammes-Schiffer, Sharon

    2014-01-21

    The development of efficient theoretical methods for describing electron transfer (ET) reactions in condensed phases is important for a variety of chemical and biological applications. Previously, dynamical dielectric continuum theory was used to derive Langevin equations for a single collective solvent coordinate describing ET in a polar solvent. In this theory, the parameters are directly related to the physical properties of the system and can be determined from experimental data or explicit molecular dynamics simulations. Herein, we combine these Langevin equations with surface hopping nonadiabatic dynamics methods to calculate the rate constants for thermal ET reactions in polar solvents for a wide range of electronic couplings and reaction free energies. Comparison of explicit and implicit solvent calculations illustrates that the mapping from explicit to implicit solvent models is valid even for solvents exhibiting complex relaxation behavior with multiple relaxation time scales and a short-time inertial response. The rate constants calculated for implicit solvent models with a single solvent relaxation time scale corresponding to water, acetonitrile, and methanol agree well with analytical theories in the Golden rule and solvent-controlled regimes, as well as in the intermediate regime. The implicit solvent models with two relaxation time scales are in qualitative agreement with the analytical theories but quantitatively overestimate the rate constants compared to these theories. Analysis of these simulations elucidates the importance of multiple relaxation time scales and the inertial component of the solvent response, as well as potential shortcomings of the analytical theories based on single time scale solvent relaxation models. This implicit solvent approach will enable the simulation of a wide range of ET reactions via the stochastic dynamics of a single collective solvent coordinate with parameters that are relevant to experimentally accessible

  16. Correlation analysis for heat denaturation of Trp-cage miniprotein with explicit solvent.

    PubMed

    Kamo, Fumitaka; Ishizuka, Ryosuke; Matubayasi, Nobuyuki

    2016-01-01

    Energetics was analyzed for Trp-cage miniprotein in water to elucidate the solvation effect in heat denaturation. The solvation free energy was computed for a set of protein structures at room and high temperatures with all-atom molecular dynamics simulation combined with the solution theory in the energy representation, and its correlations were investigated against the intramolecular (structural) energy of the protein and the average interaction energy of the protein with the solvent water. It was observed both at room and high temperatures that the solvation free energy is anticorrelated to the structural energy and varies in parallel to the electrostatic component of the protein-water interaction energy without correlations to the van der Waals and excluded-volume components. When the set of folded structures sampled at room temperature was compared with the set of unfolded ones at high temperature, it was found that the preference order of the two sets is in correspondence to the van der Waals and excluded-volume components in the sum of the protein intramolecular and protein-water intermolecular interactions and is not distinguished by the electrostatic component. PMID:26189564

  17. Oxidation induced decomposition of ethylene carbonate from DFT calculations--importance of explicitly treating surrounding solvent.

    PubMed

    Xing, Lidan; Borodin, Oleg

    2012-10-01

    The oxidation induced reactions of the common lithium battery electrolyte solvent ethylene carbonate (EC) have been investigated for EC(2) using density functional theory and for selected reaction paths using Møller-Plesset perturbation theory (MP4). The importance of explicitly treating at least one solvent molecule interacting with EC during oxidation (removal of an electron) on the EC oxidation potential and decomposition reactions was shown by comparing oxidation of EC and EC(2). Accuracy of DFT results was evaluated by comparing with MP4 and G4 values for oxidation of EC. The polarized continuum model (PCM) was used to implicitly include the rest of the surrounding solvent. The oxidation potentials of EC(2) and EC(4) were found to be significantly lower than the intrinsic oxidation potential of an isolated EC and also lower than the oxidation potential of EC-BF(4)(-). The exothermic proton abstraction from the ethylene group of EC by the carbonyl group of another EC was responsible for the decreased oxidative stability of EC(2) and EC(4) compared to EC. The most exothermic path with the smallest barrier for EC(2) oxidation yielded CO(2) and an ethanol radical cation. The reaction paths with the higher barrier yielded oligo(ethylene carbonate) suggesting a pathway for the experimentally observed poly(ethylene carbonate) formation of EC-based electrolytes at cathode surfaces. PMID:22885926

  18. Trypsin-Ligand Binding Free Energies from Explicit and Implicit Solvent Simulations with Polarizable Potential

    PubMed Central

    Jiao, Dian; Zhang, Jiajing; Duke, Robert E.; Li, Guohui; Ren, Pengyu

    2009-01-01

    We have calculated the binding free energies of a series of benzamidine-like inhibitors to trypsin with a polarizable force field using both explicit and implicit solvent approaches. Free energy perturbation has been performed for the ligands in bulk water and in protein complex with molecular dynamics simulations. The calculated binding free energies are well within the accuracy of experimental measurement and the direction of change is predicted correctly in call cases. We analyzed the molecular dipole moments of the ligands in gas, water and protein environments. Neither binding affinity nor ligand solvation free energy in bulk water shows much dependence on the molecular dipole moments of the ligands. Substitution of the aromatic or the charged group in the ligand results in considerable change in the solvation energy in bulk water and protein whereas the binding affinity varies insignificantly due to cancellation. The effect of chemical modification on ligand charge distribution is mostly local. Replacing benzene with diazine has minimal impact on the atomic multipoles at the amidinium group. We have also utilized an implicit solvent based end-state approach to evaluate the binding free energies of these inhibitors. In this approach, the polarizable multipole model combined with Poisson-Boltzmann/surface area (PMPB/SA) provides the electrostatic interaction energy and the polar solvation free energy. Overall the relative binding free energies obtained from the PMPB/SA model are in good agreement with the experimental data. PMID:19399779

  19. Common Structural Transitions in Explicit-Solvent Simulations of Villin Headpiece Folding

    PubMed Central

    Freddolino, Peter L.; Schulten, Klaus

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Molecular dynamics simulations of protein folding can provide very high-resolution data on the folding process; however, due to computational challenges most studies of protein folding have been limited to small peptides, or made use of approximations such as Gō potentials or implicit solvent models. We have performed a set of molecular dynamics simulations totaling >50 μs on the villin headpiece subdomain, one of the most stable and fastest-folding naturally occurring proteins, in explicit solvent. We find that the wild-type villin headpiece reliably folds to a native conformation on timescales similar to experimentally observed folding, but that a fast folding double-norleucine mutant shows significantly more heterogeneous behavior. Along with other recent simulation studies, we note the occurrence of nonnative structures intermediates, which may yield a nativelike signal in the fluorescence measurements typically used to study villin folding. Based on the wild-type simulations, we propose alternative approaches to measure the formation of the native state. PMID:19843466

  20. Increasing the sampling efficiency of protein conformational transition using velocity-scaling optimized hybrid explicit/implicit solvent REMD simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, Yuqi; Wang, Jinan; Shao, Qiang E-mail: Jiye.Shi@ucb.com Zhu, Weiliang E-mail: Jiye.Shi@ucb.com; Shi, Jiye E-mail: Jiye.Shi@ucb.com

    2015-03-28

    The application of temperature replica exchange molecular dynamics (REMD) simulation on protein motion is limited by its huge requirement of computational resource, particularly when explicit solvent model is implemented. In the previous study, we developed a velocity-scaling optimized hybrid explicit/implicit solvent REMD method with the hope to reduce the temperature (replica) number on the premise of maintaining high sampling efficiency. In this study, we utilized this method to characterize and energetically identify the conformational transition pathway of a protein model, the N-terminal domain of calmodulin. In comparison to the standard explicit solvent REMD simulation, the hybrid REMD is much less computationally expensive but, meanwhile, gives accurate evaluation of the structural and thermodynamic properties of the conformational transition which are in well agreement with the standard REMD simulation. Therefore, the hybrid REMD could highly increase the computational efficiency and thus expand the application of REMD simulation to larger-size protein systems.

  1. Increasing the sampling efficiency of protein conformational transition using velocity-scaling optimized hybrid explicit/implicit solvent REMD simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Yuqi; Wang, Jinan; Shao, Qiang; Shi, Jiye; Zhu, Weiliang

    2015-03-01

    The application of temperature replica exchange molecular dynamics (REMD) simulation on protein motion is limited by its huge requirement of computational resource, particularly when explicit solvent model is implemented. In the previous study, we developed a velocity-scaling optimized hybrid explicit/implicit solvent REMD method with the hope to reduce the temperature (replica) number on the premise of maintaining high sampling efficiency. In this study, we utilized this method to characterize and energetically identify the conformational transition pathway of a protein model, the N-terminal domain of calmodulin. In comparison to the standard explicit solvent REMD simulation, the hybrid REMD is much less computationally expensive but, meanwhile, gives accurate evaluation of the structural and thermodynamic properties of the conformational transition which are in well agreement with the standard REMD simulation. Therefore, the hybrid REMD could highly increase the computational efficiency and thus expand the application of REMD simulation to larger-size protein systems.

  2. Constant pH Replica Exchange Molecular Dynamics in Explicit Solvent Using Discrete Protonation States: Implementation, Testing, and Validation

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    By utilizing Graphics Processing Units, we show that constant pH molecular dynamics simulations (CpHMD) run in Generalized Born (GB) implicit solvent for long time scales can yield poor pKa predictions as a result of sampling unrealistic conformations. To address this shortcoming, we present a method for performing constant pH molecular dynamics simulations (CpHMD) in explicit solvent using a discrete protonation state model. The method involves standard molecular dynamics (MD) being propagated in explicit solvent followed by protonation state changes being attempted in GB implicit solvent at fixed intervals. Replica exchange along the pH-dimension (pH-REMD) helps to obtain acceptable titration behavior with the proposed method. We analyzed the effects of various parameters and settings on the titration behavior of CpHMD and pH-REMD in explicit solvent, including the size of the simulation unit cell and the length of the relaxation dynamics following protonation state changes. We tested the method with the amino acid model compounds, a small pentapeptide with two titratable sites, and hen egg white lysozyme (HEWL). The proposed method yields superior predicted pKa values for HEWL over hundreds of nanoseconds of simulation relative to corresponding predicted values from simulations run in implicit solvent. PMID:24803862

  3. Explicit-solvent molecular dynamics simulations of the polysaccharide schizophyllan in water.

    PubMed

    Kony, David B; Damm, Wolfgang; Stoll, Serge; van Gunsteren, Wilfred F; Hünenberger, Philippe H

    2007-07-15

    Schizophyllan is a beta(1-->3)-D-glucan polysaccharide with beta(1-->6)-branched lateral glucose residues that presents a very stiff triple-helical structure under most experimental conditions. Despite the remarkable stability of this structure (which persists up to 120 degrees C in aqueous solution), schizophyllan undergoes a major change of state around 7 degrees C in water that has been hypothesized to result from an order-disorder transition in the lateral residues. This hypothesis is only supported by indirect experimental evidence and detailed knowledge (at the atomic level) concerning hydrogen-bonding networks, interactions with the solvent molecules, orientational freedom of the lateral residues, and orientational correlations among them is still lacking. In this study explicit-solvent molecular dynamics simulations of a schizophyllan fragment (complemented by simulations of its tetrasaccharide monomer) are performed at three different temperatures (273 K, 350 K, and 450 K) and with two different types of boundary conditions (finite nonperiodic or infinite periodic fragment) as an attempt to provide detailed structural and dynamical information about the triple-helical conformation in solution and the mechanism of the low-temperature transition. These simulations suggest that three important driving forces for the high stability of the triple helix are i), the limited conformational work involved in its formation; ii), the formation of a dense hydrogen-bonding network at its center; and iii), the formation of interchain hydrogen bonds between main-chain and lateral glucose residues. However, these simulations evidence a moderate and continuous variation of the simulated observables upon increasing the temperature, rather than a sharp transition between the two lowest temperatures (that could be associated with the state transition). Although water-mediated hydrogen-bonded association of neighboring lateral residues is observed, this interaction is not

  4. Explicit Solvent Simulations of Friction between Brush Layers of Charged and Neutral Bottle-Brush Macromolecules

    SciTech Connect

    Carrillo, Jan-Michael; Brown, W Michael; Dobrynin, Andrey

    2012-01-01

    We study friction between charged and neutral brush layers of bottle-brush macromolecules using molecular dynamics simulations. In our simulations the solvent molecules were treated explicitly. The deformation of the bottle-brush macromolecules under the shear were studied as a function of the substrate separation and shear stress. For charged bottle-brush layers we study effect of the added salt on the brush lubricating properties to elucidate factors responsible for energy dissipation in charged and neutral brush systems. Our simulations have shown that for both charged and neutral brush systems the main deformation mode of the bottle-brush macromolecule is associated with the backbone deformation. This deformation mode manifests itself in the backbone deformation ratio, , and shear viscosity, , to be universal functions of the Weissenberg number W. The value of the friction coefficient, , and viscosity, , are larger for the charged bottle-brush coatings in comparison with those for neutral brushes at the same separation distance, D, between substrates. The additional energy dissipation generated by brush sliding in charged bottle-brush systems is due to electrostatic coupling between bottle-brush and counterion motion. This coupling weakens as salt concentration, cs, increases resulting in values of the viscosity, , and friction coefficient, , approaching corresponding values obtained for neutral brush systems.

  5. Constant pH Molecular Dynamics in Explicit Solvent with Enveloping Distribution Sampling and Hamiltonian Exchange

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    We present a new computational approach for constant pH simulations in explicit solvent based on the combination of the enveloping distribution sampling (EDS) and Hamiltonian replica exchange (HREX) methods. Unlike constant pH methods based on variable and continuous charge models, our method is based on discrete protonation states. EDS generates a hybrid Hamiltonian of different protonation states. A smoothness parameter s is used to control the heights of energy barriers of the hybrid-state energy landscape. A small s value facilitates state transitions by lowering energy barriers. Replica exchange between EDS potentials with different s values allows us to readily obtain a thermodynamically accurate ensemble of multiple protonation states with frequent state transitions. The analysis is performed with an ensemble obtained from an EDS Hamiltonian without smoothing, s = ∞, which strictly follows the minimum energy surface of the end states. The accuracy and efficiency of this method is tested on aspartic acid, lysine, and glutamic acid, which have two protonation states, a histidine with three states, a four-residue peptide with four states, and snake cardiotoxin with eight states. The pKa values estimated with the EDS-HREX method agree well with the experimental pKa values. The mean absolute errors of small benchmark systems range from 0.03 to 0.17 pKa units, and those of three titratable groups of snake cardiotoxin range from 0.2 to 1.6 pKa units. This study demonstrates that EDS-HREX is a potent theoretical framework, which gives the correct description of multiple protonation states and good calculated pKa values. PMID:25061443

  6. Simulation of coupled folding and binding of an intrinsically disordered protein in explicit solvent with metadynamics.

    PubMed

    Han, Mengzhi; Xu, Ji; Ren, Ying; Li, Jinghai

    2016-07-01

    The C-terminal domain of measles virus nucleoprotein is an intrinsically disordered protein that could bind to the X domain (XD) of phosphoprotein P to exert its physiological function. Experiments reveal that the minimal binding unit is a 21-residue α-helical molecular recognition element (α-MoRE-MeV), which adopts a fully helical conformation upon binding to XD. Due to currently limited computing power, direct simulation of this coupled folding and binding process with atomic force field in explicit solvent cannot be achieved. In this work, two advanced sampling methods, metadynamics and parallel tempering, are combined to characterize the free energy surface of this process and investigate the underlying mechanism. Starting from an unbound and partially folded state of α-MoRE-MeV, multiple folding and binding events are observed during the simulation and the energy landscape was well estimated. The results demonstrate that the isolated α-MoRE-MeV resembles a molten globule and rapidly interconverts between random coil and multiple partially helical states in solution. The coupled folding and binding process occurs through the induced fit mechanism, with the residual helical conformations providing the initial binding sites. Upon binding, α-MoRE-MeV can easily fold into helical conformation without obvious energy barriers. Two mechanisms, namely, the system tending to adopt the structure in which the free energy of isolated α-MoRE-MeV is the minimum, and the binding energy of α-MoRE-MeV to its partner protein XD tending to the minimum, jointly dominate the coupled folding and binding process. With the advanced sampling approach, more IDP systems could be simulated and common mechanisms concerning the coupled folding and binding process could be investigated in the future. PMID:27423742

  7. A hybrid MD-kMC algorithm for folding proteins in explicit solvent.

    PubMed

    Peter, Emanuel Karl; Shea, Joan-Emma

    2014-04-14

    We present a novel hybrid MD-kMC algorithm that is capable of efficiently folding proteins in explicit solvent. We apply this algorithm to the folding of a small protein, Trp-Cage. Different kMC move sets that capture different possible rate limiting steps are implemented. The first uses secondary structure formation as a relevant rate event (a combination of dihedral rotations and hydrogen-bonding formation and breakage). The second uses tertiary structure formation events through formation of contacts via translational moves. Both methods fold the protein, but via different mechanisms and with different folding kinetics. The first method leads to folding via a structured helical state, with kinetics fit by a single exponential. The second method leads to folding via a collapsed loop, with kinetics poorly fit by single or double exponentials. In both cases, folding times are faster than experimentally reported values, The secondary and tertiary move sets are integrated in a third MD-kMC implementation, which now leads to folding of the protein via both pathways, with single and double-exponential fits to the rates, and to folding rates in good agreement with experimental values. The competition between secondary and tertiary structure leads to a longer search for the helix-rich intermediate in the case of the first pathway, and to the emergence of a kinetically trapped long-lived molten-globule collapsed state in the case of the second pathway. The algorithm presented not only captures experimentally observed folding intermediates and kinetics, but yields insights into the relative roles of local and global interactions in determining folding mechanisms and rates. PMID:24499973

  8. COMPUTER SIMULATIONS WITH EXPLICIT SOLVENT: Recent Progress in the Thermodynamic Decomposition of Free Energies and in Modeling Electrostatic Effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levy, Ronald M.; Gallicchio, Emilio

    1998-10-01

    This review focuses on recent progress in two areas in which computer simulations with explicit solvent are being applied: the thermodynamic decomposition of free energies, and modeling electrostatic effects. The computationally intensive nature of these simulations has been an obstacle to the systematic study of many problems in solvation thermodynamics, such as the decomposition of solvation and ligand binding free energies into component enthalpies and entropies. With the revolution in computer power continuing, these problems are ripe for study but require the judicious choice of algorithms and approximations. We provide a critical evaluation of several numerical approaches to the thermodynamic decomposition of free energies and summarize applications in the current literature. Progress in computer simulations with explicit solvent of charge perturbations in biomolecules was slow in the early 1990s because of the widespread use of truncated Coulomb potentials in these simulations, among other factors. Development of the sophisticated technology described in this review to handle the long-range electrostatic interactions has increased the predictive power of these simulations to the point where comparisons between explicit and continuum solvent models can reveal differences that have their true physical origin in the inherent molecularity of the surrounding medium.

  9. Infrared and vibrational CD spectra of partially solvated alpha-helices: DFT-based simulations with explicit solvent.

    PubMed

    Turner, David R; Kubelka, Jan

    2007-02-22

    Theoretical simulations are used to investigate the effects of aqueous solvent on the vibrational spectra of model alpha-helices, which are only partly exposed to solvent to mimic alpha-helices in proteins. Infrared absorption (IR) and vibrational circular dichroism (VCD) amide I' spectra for 15-amide alanine alpha-helices are simulated using density functional theory (DFT) calculations combined with the property transfer method. The solvent is modeled by explicit water molecules hydrogen bonded to the solvated amide groups. Simulated spectra for two partially solvated model alpha-helices, one corresponding to a more exposed and the other to a more buried structure, are compared to the fully solvated and unsolvated (gas phase) simulations. The dependence of the amide I spectra on the orientation of the partially solvated helix with respect to the solvent and effects of solvation on the amide I' of 13C isotopically substituted alpha-helices are also investigated. The partial exposure to solvent causes significant broadening of the amide I' bands due to differences in the vibrational frequencies of the explicitly solvated and unsolvated amide groups. The different degree of partial solvation is reflected primarily in the frequency shifts of the unsolvated (buried) amide group vibrations. Depending on which side of the alpha-helix is exposed to solvent, the simulated IR band-shapes exhibit significant changes, from broad and relatively featureless to distinctly split into two maxima. The simulated amide I' VCD band-shapes for the partially solvated alpha-helices parallel the broadening of the IR and exhibit more sign variation, but generally preserve the sign pattern characteristic of the alpha-helical structures and are much less dependent on the alpha-helix orientation with respect to the solvent. The simulated amide I' IR spectra for the model peptides with explicitly hydrogen-bonded water are consistent with the experimental data for small alpha-helical proteins

  10. Implicit versus explicit solvent in free energy calculations of enzyme catalysis: Methyl transfer catalyzed by catechol O-methyltransferase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rod, Thomas H.; Rydberg, Patrik; Ryde, Ulf

    2006-05-01

    We compare free energy calculations for the methyl transfer reaction catalyzed by catechol O-methyltransferase using the quantum mechanical/molecular mechanical free energy method with implicit and explicit solvents. An analogous methylation reaction in a solution is also studied. For the explicit solvent model, we use the three-point transferable intermolecular potential model, and for the implicit model, we use the generalized Born molecular volume model as implemented in CHARMM. We find that activation and reaction free energies calculated with the two models are very similar, despite some structural differences that exist. A significant change in the polarization of the environment occurs as the reaction proceeds. This is more pronounced for the reaction in a solution than for the enzymatic reaction. For the enzymatic reaction, most of the changes take place in the protein rather than in the solvent, and, hence, the benefit of having an instantaneous relaxation of the solvent degrees of freedom is less pronounced for the enzymatic reaction than for the reaction in a solution. This is a likely reason why energies of the enzyme reaction are less sensitive to the choice of atomic radii than are energies of the reaction in a solution.

  11. On the theory of electric double layer with explicit account of a polarizable co-solvent.

    PubMed

    Budkov, Yu A; Kolesnikov, A L; Kiselev, M G

    2016-05-14

    We present a continuation of our theoretical research into the influence of co-solvent polarizability on a differential capacitance of the electric double layer. We formulate a modified Poisson-Boltzmann theory, using the formalism of density functional approach on the level of local density approximation taking into account the electrostatic interactions of ions and co-solvent molecules as well as their excluded volume. We derive the modified Poisson-Boltzmann equation, considering the three-component symmetric lattice gas model as a reference system and minimizing the grand thermodynamic potential with respect to the electrostatic potential. We apply present modified Poisson-Boltzmann equation to the electric double layer theory, showing that accounting for the excluded volume of co-solvent molecules and ions slightly changes the main result of our previous simplified theory. Namely, in the case of small co-solvent polarizability with its increase under the enough small surface potentials of electrode, the differential capacitance undergoes the significant growth. Oppositely, when the surface potential exceeds some threshold value (which is slightly smaller than the saturation potential), the increase in the co-solvent polarizability results in a differential capacitance decrease. However, when the co-solvent polarizability exceeds some threshold value, its increase generates a considerable enhancement of the differential capacitance in a wide range of surface potentials. We demonstrate that two qualitatively different behaviors of the differential capacitance are related to the depletion and adsorption of co-solvent molecules at the charged electrode. We show that an additive of the strongly polarizable co-solvent to an electrolyte solution can shift significantly the saturation potential in two qualitatively different manners. Namely, a small additive of strongly polarizable co-solvent results in a shift of saturation potential to higher surface potentials. On

  12. On the theory of electric double layer with explicit account of a polarizable co-solvent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Budkov, Yu. A.; Kolesnikov, A. L.; Kiselev, M. G.

    2016-05-01

    We present a continuation of our theoretical research into the influence of co-solvent polarizability on a differential capacitance of the electric double layer. We formulate a modified Poisson-Boltzmann theory, using the formalism of density functional approach on the level of local density approximation taking into account the electrostatic interactions of ions and co-solvent molecules as well as their excluded volume. We derive the modified Poisson-Boltzmann equation, considering the three-component symmetric lattice gas model as a reference system and minimizing the grand thermodynamic potential with respect to the electrostatic potential. We apply present modified Poisson-Boltzmann equation to the electric double layer theory, showing that accounting for the excluded volume of co-solvent molecules and ions slightly changes the main result of our previous simplified theory. Namely, in the case of small co-solvent polarizability with its increase under the enough small surface potentials of electrode, the differential capacitance undergoes the significant growth. Oppositely, when the surface potential exceeds some threshold value (which is slightly smaller than the saturation potential), the increase in the co-solvent polarizability results in a differential capacitance decrease. However, when the co-solvent polarizability exceeds some threshold value, its increase generates a considerable enhancement of the differential capacitance in a wide range of surface potentials. We demonstrate that two qualitatively different behaviors of the differential capacitance are related to the depletion and adsorption of co-solvent molecules at the charged electrode. We show that an additive of the strongly polarizable co-solvent to an electrolyte solution can shift significantly the saturation potential in two qualitatively different manners. Namely, a small additive of strongly polarizable co-solvent results in a shift of saturation potential to higher surface potentials. On

  13. Improving an all-atom force field.

    PubMed

    Mohanty, Sandipan; Hansmann, U H E

    2007-07-01

    Experimentally well-characterized proteins that are small enough to be computationally tractable provide useful information for refining existing all-atom force fields. This is used by us for reparametrizing a recently developed all-atom force field. Relying on high statistics parallel tempering simulations of a designed 20 residue beta-sheet peptide, we propose incremental changes that improve the force field's range of applicability. PMID:17677516

  14. Derivation of Reliable Geometries in QM Calculations of DNA Structures: Explicit Solvent QM/MM and Restrained Implicit Solvent QM Optimizations of G-Quadruplexes.

    PubMed

    Gkionis, Konstantinos; Kruse, Holger; Šponer, Jiří

    2016-04-12

    Modern dispersion-corrected DFT methods have made it possible to perform reliable QM studies on complete nucleic acid (NA) building blocks having hundreds of atoms. Such calculations, although still limited to investigations of potential energy surfaces, enhance the portfolio of computational methods applicable to NAs and offer considerably more accurate intrinsic descriptions of NAs than standard MM. However, in practice such calculations are hampered by the use of implicit solvent environments and truncation of the systems. Conventional QM optimizations are spoiled by spurious intramolecular interactions and severe structural deformations. Here we compare two approaches designed to suppress such artifacts: partially restrained continuum solvent QM and explicit solvent QM/MM optimizations. We report geometry relaxations of a set of diverse double-quartet guanine quadruplex (GQ) DNA stems. Both methods provide neat structures without major artifacts. However, each one also has distinct weaknesses. In restrained optimizations, all errors in the target geometries (i.e., low-resolution X-ray and NMR structures) are transferred to the optimized geometries. In QM/MM, the initial solvent configuration causes some heterogeneity in the geometries. Nevertheless, both approaches represent a decisive step forward compared to conventional optimizations. We refine earlier computations that revealed sizable differences in the relative energies of GQ stems computed with AMBER MM and QM. We also explore the dependence of the QM/MM results on the applied computational protocol. PMID:26914292

  15. Energy Landscape of All-Atom Protein-Protein Interactions Revealed by Multiscale Enhanced Sampling

    PubMed Central

    Moritsugu, Kei; Terada, Tohru; Kidera, Akinori

    2014-01-01

    Protein-protein interactions are regulated by a subtle balance of complicated atomic interactions and solvation at the interface. To understand such an elusive phenomenon, it is necessary to thoroughly survey the large configurational space from the stable complex structure to the dissociated states using the all-atom model in explicit solvent and to delineate the energy landscape of protein-protein interactions. In this study, we carried out a multiscale enhanced sampling (MSES) simulation of the formation of a barnase-barstar complex, which is a protein complex characterized by an extraordinary tight and fast binding, to determine the energy landscape of atomistic protein-protein interactions. The MSES adopts a multicopy and multiscale scheme to enable for the enhanced sampling of the all-atom model of large proteins including explicit solvent. During the 100-ns MSES simulation of the barnase-barstar system, we observed the association-dissociation processes of the atomistic protein complex in solution several times, which contained not only the native complex structure but also fully non-native configurations. The sampled distributions suggest that a large variety of non-native states went downhill to the stable complex structure, like a fast folding on a funnel-like potential. This funnel landscape is attributed to dominant configurations in the early stage of the association process characterized by near-native orientations, which will accelerate the native inter-molecular interactions. These configurations are guided mostly by the shape complementarity between barnase and barstar, and lead to the fast formation of the final complex structure along the downhill energy landscape. PMID:25340714

  16. TIGER2 with solvent energy averaging (TIGER2A): An accelerated sampling method for large molecular systems with explicit representation of solvent.

    PubMed

    Li, Xianfeng; Snyder, James A; Stuart, Steven J; Latour, Robert A

    2015-10-14

    The recently developed "temperature intervals with global exchange of replicas" (TIGER2) accelerated sampling method is found to have inaccuracies when applied to systems with explicit solvation. This inaccuracy is due to the energy fluctuations of the solvent, which cause the sampling method to be less sensitive to the energy fluctuations of the solute. In the present work, the problem of the TIGER2 method is addressed in detail and a modification to the sampling method is introduced to correct this problem. The modified method is called "TIGER2 with solvent energy averaging," or TIGER2A. This new method overcomes the sampling problem with the TIGER2 algorithm and is able to closely approximate Boltzmann-weighted sampling of molecular systems with explicit solvation. The difference in performance between the TIGER2 and TIGER2A methods is demonstrated by comparing them against analytical results for simple one-dimensional models, against replica exchange molecular dynamics (REMD) simulations for sampling the conformation of alanine dipeptide and the folding behavior of (AAQAA)3 peptide in aqueous solution, and by comparing their performance in sampling the behavior of hen egg-white lysozyme in aqueous solution. The new TIGER2A method solves the problem caused by solvent energy fluctuations in TIGER2 while maintaining the two important characteristics of TIGER2, i.e., (1) using multiple replicas sampled at different temperature levels to help systems efficiently escape from local potential energy minima and (2) enabling the number of replicas used for a simulation to be independent of the size of the molecular system, thus providing an accelerated sampling method that can be used to efficiently sample systems considered too large for the application of conventional temperature REMD. PMID:26472361

  17. TIGER2 with solvent energy averaging (TIGER2A): An accelerated sampling method for large molecular systems with explicit representation of solvent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xianfeng; Snyder, James A.; Stuart, Steven J.; Latour, Robert A.

    2015-10-01

    The recently developed "temperature intervals with global exchange of replicas" (TIGER2) accelerated sampling method is found to have inaccuracies when applied to systems with explicit solvation. This inaccuracy is due to the energy fluctuations of the solvent, which cause the sampling method to be less sensitive to the energy fluctuations of the solute. In the present work, the problem of the TIGER2 method is addressed in detail and a modification to the sampling method is introduced to correct this problem. The modified method is called "TIGER2 with solvent energy averaging," or TIGER2A. This new method overcomes the sampling problem with the TIGER2 algorithm and is able to closely approximate Boltzmann-weighted sampling of molecular systems with explicit solvation. The difference in performance between the TIGER2 and TIGER2A methods is demonstrated by comparing them against analytical results for simple one-dimensional models, against replica exchange molecular dynamics (REMD) simulations for sampling the conformation of alanine dipeptide and the folding behavior of (AAQAA)3 peptide in aqueous solution, and by comparing their performance in sampling the behavior of hen egg-white lysozyme in aqueous solution. The new TIGER2A method solves the problem caused by solvent energy fluctuations in TIGER2 while maintaining the two important characteristics of TIGER2, i.e., (1) using multiple replicas sampled at different temperature levels to help systems efficiently escape from local potential energy minima and (2) enabling the number of replicas used for a simulation to be independent of the size of the molecular system, thus providing an accelerated sampling method that can be used to efficiently sample systems considered too large for the application of conventional temperature REMD.

  18. Frozen-density embedding theory with average solvent charge densities from explicit atomistic simulations.

    PubMed

    Laktionov, Andrey; Chemineau-Chalaye, Emilie; Wesolowski, Tomasz A

    2016-08-21

    Besides molecular electron densities obtained within the Born-Oppenheimer approximation (ρB(r)) to represent the environment, the ensemble averaged density (〈ρB〉(r)) is also admissible in frozen-density embedding theory (FDET) [Wesolowski, Phys. Rev. A, 2008, 77, 11444]. This makes it possible to introduce an approximation in the evaluation of the solvent effect on quantum mechanical observables consisting of replacing the ensemble averaged observable by the observable evaluated at ensemble averaged ρB(r). This approximation is shown to affect negligibly the solvatochromic shift in the absorption of hydrated acetone. The proposed model provides a continuum type of representation of the solvent, which reflects nevertheless its local structure, and it is to be applied as a post-simulation analysis tool in atomistic level simulations. PMID:26984532

  19. Sampling the equilibrium kinetic network of Trp-cage in explicit solvent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, Weina; Bolhuis, Peter G.

    2014-05-01

    We employed the single replica multiple state transition interface sampling (MSTIS) approach to sample the kinetic (un)folding network of Trp-cage mini-protein in explicit water. Cluster analysis yielded 14 important metastable states in the network. The MSTIS simulation thus resulted in a full 14 × 14 rate matrix. Analysis of the kinetic rate matrix indicates the presence of a near native intermediate state characterized by a fully formed alpha helix, a slightly disordered proline tail, a broken salt-bridge, and a rotated arginine residue. This intermediate was also found in recent IR experiments. Moreover, the predicted rate constants and timescales are in agreement with previous experiments and simulations.

  20. Exploring the energy landscape of a beta hairpin in explicit solvent.

    PubMed

    García, A E; Sanbonmatsu, K Y

    2001-02-15

    We studied the energy landscape of the peptide Ace-GEWTYDDATKTFTVTE-Nme, taken from the C-terminal fragment (41-56) of protein G, in explicit aqueous solution by a highly parallel replica-exchange approach that combines molecular dynamics trajectories with a temperature exchange Monte Carlo process. The combined trajectories in T and configurational space allow a replica to overcome a free energy barrier present at one temperature by increasing T, changing configurations, and cooling in a self-regulated manner, thus allowing sampling of broad regions of configurational space in short (nanoseconds) time scales. The free energy landscape of this system over a wide range of temperatures shows that the system preferentially adopts a beta hairpin structure. However, the peptide also samples other stable ensembles where the peptide adopts helices and helix-turn-helix states, among others. The helical states become increasingly stable at low temperatures, but are slightly less stable than the beta turn ensemble. The energy landscape is rugged at low T, where substates are separated by large energy barriers. These barriers disappear at higher T (approximately 330 K), where the system preferentially adopts a "molten globule" state with structures similar to the beta hairpin. PMID:11151006

  1. Binding energies of five molecular pincers calculated by explicit and implicit solvent models.

    PubMed

    Kessler, Jiří; Jakubek, Milan; Dolenský, Bohumil; Bouř, Petr

    2012-11-01

    Molecular pincers or tweezers are designed to hold and release the target molecule. Potential applications involve drug distribution in medicine, environment technologies, or microindustrial techniques. Typically, the binding is dominated by van der Waals forces. Modeling of such complexes can significantly enhance their design; yet obtaining accurate complexation energies by theory is difficult. In this study, density functional theory (DFT) computations combined with dielectric continuum solvent model are compared with the potential of mean force approach using umbrella sampling and the weighted histogram analysis method (WHAM) with molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. For DFT, functional and basis set effects are discussed. The computed results are compared to experimental data based on NMR spectroscopic measurements of five synthesized tweezers based on the Tröger's basis. Whereas the DFT computations correctly provided the observed trends in complex stability, they failed to produce realistic magnitudes of complexation energies. Typically, the binding was overestimated by DFT if compared to experiment. The simpler semiempirical PM6-DH2X scheme proposed lately yielded better magnitudes of the binding energies than DFT but not the right order. The MD-WHAM simulations provided the most realistic Gibbs binding energies, although the approximate MD force fields were not able to reproduce completely the ordering of relative stabilities of model complexes found by NMR. Yet the modeling provides interesting insight into the complex geometry and flexibility and appears as a useful tool in the tweezers' design. PMID:22782845

  2. An effective all-atom potential for proteins

    PubMed Central

    Irbäck, Anders; Mitternacht, Simon; Mohanty, Sandipan

    2009-01-01

    We describe and test an implicit solvent all-atom potential for simulations of protein folding and aggregation. The potential is developed through studies of structural and thermodynamic properties of 17 peptides with diverse secondary structure. Results obtained using the final form of the potential are presented for all these peptides. The same model, with unchanged parameters, is furthermore applied to a heterodimeric coiled-coil system, a mixed α/β protein and a three-helix-bundle protein, with very good results. The computational efficiency of the potential makes it possible to investigate the free-energy landscape of these 49–67-residue systems with high statistical accuracy, using only modest computational resources by today's standards. PACS Codes: 87.14.E-, 87.15.A-, 87.15.Cc PMID:19356242

  3. Extensive all-atom Monte Carlo sampling and QM/MM corrections in the SAMPL4 hydration free energy challenge.

    PubMed

    Genheden, Samuel; Cabedo Martinez, Ana I; Criddle, Michael P; Essex, Jonathan W

    2014-03-01

    We present our predictions for the SAMPL4 hydration free energy challenge. Extensive all-atom Monte Carlo simulations were employed to sample the compounds in explicit solvent. While the focus of our study was to demonstrate well-converged and reproducible free energies, we attempted to address the deficiencies in the general Amber force field force field with a simple QM/MM correction. We show that by using multiple independent simulations, including different starting configurations, and enhanced sampling with parallel tempering, we can obtain well converged hydration free energies. Additional analysis using dihedral angle distributions, torsion-root mean square deviation plots and thermodynamic cycles support this assertion. We obtain a mean absolute deviation of 1.7 kcal mol(-1) and a Kendall's τ of 0.65 compared with experiment. PMID:24488307

  4. Conformation of a flexible chain in explicit solvent: exact solvation potentials for short Lennard-Jones chains.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Mark P; Adhikari, Shishir R

    2011-07-28

    The average conformation of a flexible chain molecule in solution is coupled to the local solvent structure. In a dense solvent, local chain structure often mirrors the pure solvent structure, whereas, in a dilute solvent, the chain can strongly perturb the solvent structure which, in turn, can lead to either chain expansion or compression. Here we use Monte Carlo (MC) simulation to study such solvent effects for a short Lennard-Lones (LJ) chain in monomeric LJ solvent. For an n-site chain molecule in solution these many-body solvent effects can be formally mapped to an n-body solvation potential. We have previously shown that for hard-sphere and square-well chain-in-solvent systems this n-body potential can be decomposed into a set of two-body potentials. Here, we show that this decomposition is also valid for the LJ system. Starting from high precision MC results for the n = 5 LJ chain-in-solvent system, we use a Boltzmann inversion technique to compute numerically exact sets of two-body solvation potentials which map the many-body chain-in-solvent problem to a few-body single-chain problem. We have carried out this mapping across the full solvent phase diagram including the dilute vapor, dense liquid, and supercritical regions and find that these sets of solvation potentials are able to encode the complete range of solvent effects found in the LJ chain-in-solvent system. We also show that these two-site solvation potentials can be used to obtain accurate multi-site intramolecular distribution functions and we discuss the application of these exact short chain potentials to the study of longer chains in solvent. PMID:21806157

  5. Accurate prediction of explicit solvent atom distribution in HIV-1 protease and F-ATP synthase by statistical theory of liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sindhikara, Daniel; Yoshida, Norio; Hirata, Fumio

    2012-02-01

    We have created a simple algorithm for automatically predicting the explicit solvent atom distribution of biomolecules. The explicit distribution is coerced from the 3D continuous distribution resulting from a 3D-RISM calculation. This procedure predicts optimal location of solvent molecules and ions given a rigid biomolecular structure. We show examples of predicting water molecules near KNI-275 bound form of HIV-1 protease and predicting both sodium ions and water molecules near the rotor ring of F-ATP synthase. Our results give excellent agreement with experimental structure with an average prediction error of 0.45-0.65 angstroms. Further, unlike experimental methods, this method does not suffer from the partial occupancy limit. Our method can be performed directly on 3D-RISM output within minutes. It is useful not only as a location predictor but also as a convenient method for generating initial structures for MD calculations.

  6. Solvent environment conducive to protein aggregation.

    PubMed

    Fernández, Ariel; de las Mercedes Boland, Maria

    2002-10-01

    The effect of solvent structuring induced by molecular crowding is elucidated within a competitive situation involving protein folding and aggregation. Two patterned fragments of amyloidogenic proteins are chosen as study cases and analyzed by molecular dynamics with an implicit treatment of the solvent. The extent of crowding needed to induce aggregation is determined. The results constitute a first step to assess the relevance of in vivo environments in understanding fibrillogenesis. The approach is independently validated by satisfactorily reproducing the results of an all-atom explicit solvent trajectory. PMID:12372617

  7. DFTr optimization and DFTr-MD studies of glucose, ten explicit water molecules enclosed by an implicit solvent, COSMO

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    DFTr optimization studies are carried out on alpha/beta-glucose surrounded by ten explicit water molecules and the glucose/water super-molecule completely enclosed by an implicit solvation model, COSMO. Twenty one starting configurations of the explicit waters were first optimized empirically with t...

  8. All-atom simulations of crowding effects on ubiquitin dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abriata, Luciano A.; Spiga, Enrico; Dal Peraro, Matteo

    2013-08-01

    It is well-known that crowded environments affect the stability of proteins, with strong biological and biotechnological implications; however, beyond this, crowding is also expected to affect the dynamic properties of proteins, an idea that is hard to probe experimentally. Here we report on a simulation study aimed at evaluating the effects of crowding on internal protein dynamics, based on fully all-atom descriptions of the protein, the solvent and the crowder. Our model system consists of ubiquitin, a protein whose dynamic features are closely related to its ability to bind to multiple partners, in a 325 g L-1 solution of glucose in water, a condition widely employed in in vitro studies of crowding effects. We observe a slight reduction in loop flexibility accompanied by a dramatic restriction of the conformational space explored in the timescale of the simulations (˜0.5 µs), indicating that crowding slows down collective motions and the rate of exploration of the conformational space. This effect is attributed to the extensive and long-lasting interactions observed between protein residues and glucose molecules throughout the entire protein surface. Potential implications of the observed effects are discussed.

  9. Human Inducible Hsp70: Structures, Dynamics, and Interdomain Communication from All-Atom Molecular Dynamics Simulations.

    PubMed

    Nicolaï, Adrien; Senet, Patrick; Delarue, Patrice; Ripoll, Daniel R

    2010-08-10

    The 70 kDa human heat shock protein is a major molecular chaperone involved in de novo folding of proteins in vivo and refolding of proteins under stress conditions. Hsp70 is related to several "misfolding diseases" and other major pathologies, such as cancer, and is a target for new therapies. Hsp70 is comprised of two main domains: an N-terminal nucleotide binding domain (NBD) and a C-terminal substrate protein binding domain (SBD). The chaperone function of Hsp70 is based on an allosteric mechanism. Binding of ATP in NBD decreases the affinity of the substrate for SBD, and hydrolysis of ATP is promoted by binding of polypeptide segments in the SBD. No complete structure of human Hsp70 is known. Here, we report two models of human Hsp70, constructed by homology with Saccharomyces cerevisiae cochaperone protein Hsp110 (open model) and with Escherichia coli 70 kDa DnaK (closed model) and relaxed for several tens to hundreds of nanoseconds by using all-atom molecular dynamics simulations in explicit solvent. We obtain two stable states, Hsp70 with SBD open and SBD closed, which agree with experimental and structural information for ATP-Hsp70 and ADP-Hsp70, respectively. The dynamics of the transition from the open to closed states is investigated with a coarse-grained model and normal-mode analysis. The results show that the conformational change between the two states can be represented by a relatively small number of collective modes which involved major conformational changes in the two domains. These modes provide a mechanistic representation of the communication between NBD and SBD and allow us to identify subdomains and residues that appear to have a critical role in the conformational change mechanism that guides the chaperoning cycle of Hsp70. PMID:26613502

  10. Hydrophobic interactions in model enclosures from small to large length scales: non-additivity in explicit and implicit solvent models

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Lingle; Friesner, Richard A.; Berne, B. J.

    2011-01-01

    The binding affinities between a united-atom methane and various model hydrophobic enclosures were studied through high accuracy free energy perturbation methods (FEP). We investigated the non-additivity of the hydrophobic interaction in these systems, measured by the deviation of its binding affinity from that predicted by the pairwise additivity approximation. While only small non-additivity effects were previously reported in the interactions in methane trimers, we found large cooperative effects (as large as −1.14 kcal mol−1 or approximately a 25% increase in the binding affinity) and anti-cooperative effects (as large as 0.45 kcal mol−1) for these model enclosed systems. Decomposition of the total potential of mean force (PMF) into increasing orders of multi-body interactions indicates that the contributions of the higher order multi-body interactions can be either positive or negative in different systems, and increasing the order of multi-body interactions considered did not necessarily improve the accuracy. A general correlation between the sign of the non-additivity effect and the curvature of the solute molecular surface was observed. We found that implicit solvent models based on the molecular surface area (MSA) performed much better, not only in predicting binding affinities, but also in predicting the non-additivity effects, compared with models based on the solvent accessible surface area (SASA), suggesting that MSA is a better descriptor of the curvature of the solutes. We also show how the non-additivity contribution changes as the hydrophobicity of the plate is decreased from the dewetting regime to the wetting regime. PMID:21043426

  11. Theoretical study of the formation of mercury (Hg2+) complexes in solution using an explicit solvation shell in implicit solvent calculations.

    PubMed

    Afaneh, Akef T; Schreckenbach, Georg; Wang, Feiyue

    2014-09-25

    The structures and harmonic vibrational frequencies of water clusters (H2O)n, n = 1-10, have been computed using the M06-L/, B3LYP/, and CAM-BLYP/cc-pVTZ levels of theories. On the basis of the literature and our results, we use three hexamer structures of the water molecules to calculate an estimated "experimental" average solvation free energy of [Hg(H2O)6](2+). Aqueous formation constants (log K) for Hg(2+) complexes, [Hg(L)m(H2O)n](2-mq), L = Cl(-), HO(-), HS(-), and S(2-), are calculated using a combination of experimental (solvation free energies of ligands and Hg(2+)) and calculated gas- and liquid-phase free energies. A combined approach has been used that involves attaching n explicit water molecules to the Hg(2+) complexes such that the first coordination sphere is complete, then surrounding the resulting (Hg(2+)-Lm)-(OH2)n cluster by a dielectric continuum, and using suitable thermodynamic cycles. This procedure significantly improves the agreement between the calculated log K values and experiment. Thus, for some neutral and anionic Hg(II) complexes, particularly Hg(II) metal ion surrounded with homo- or heteroatoms, augmenting implicit solvent calculations with sufficient explicit water molecules to complete the first coordination sphere is required-and adequate-to account for strong short-range hydrogen bonding interactions between the anion and the solvent. Calculated values for formation constants of Hg(2+) complexes with S(2-) and SH(-) are proposed. Experimental measurements of these log K values have been lacking or controversial. PMID:25076413

  12. An All-Atom Force Field for Tertiary Structure Prediction of Helical Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Herges, T.; Wenzel, W.

    2004-01-01

    We have developed an all-atom free-energy force field (PFF01) for protein tertiary structure prediction. PFF01 is based on physical interactions and was parameterized using experimental structures of a family of proteins believed to span a wide variety of possible folds. It contains empirical, although sequence-independent terms for hydrogen bonding. Its solvent-accessible surface area solvent model was first fit to transfer energies of small peptides. The parameters of the solvent model were then further optimized to stabilize the native structure of a single protein, the autonomously folding villin headpiece, against competing low-energy decoys. Here we validate the force field for five nonhomologous helical proteins with 20–60 amino acids. For each protein, decoys with 2–3 Å backbone root mean-square deviation and correct experimental Cβ–Cβ distance constraints emerge as those with the lowest energy. PMID:15507688

  13. Conformational Properties of Sodium Polystyrenesulfonate in Water: Insights from a Coarse-Grained Model with Explicit Solvent.

    PubMed

    Mantha, Sriteja; Yethiraj, Arun

    2015-08-27

    Polymer solutions present a significant computational challenge because chemical realism on small length scales can be important, but the polymer molecules are very large. In polyelectrolyte solutions, there is often the additional complexity that the molecules consist of hydrophobic and charged groups, which makes an accurate treatment of the solvent, water, crucial. One route to achieve this balance is through coarse-grained models where several atoms on a monomer are grouped into one interaction site. In this work, we develop a coarse grained (CG) model for sodium polystyrenesulfonate (NaPSS) in water using a methodology consistent with the MARTINI coarse-graining philosophy, where four heavy atoms are grouped into one CG site. We consider two models for water: polarizable MARTINI (POL) and big multipole water (BMW). In each case, interaction parameters for the polymer sites are obtained by matching the potential of mean force between two monomers to results of atomistic simulations. The force field based on the POL water provides a more reasonable description of polymer properties than that based on the BMW water. We study the properties of single chains using the POL force field. Fully sulfonated chains are rodlike (i.e., the root-mean-square radius of gyration, Rg, scales linearly with degree of polymerization, N). When the fraction of sulfonation, f, is 0.25 or less, the chain collapses into a cylindrical globule. For f = 0.5, pearl-necklace conformations are observed when every second monomer is sulfonated. The lifetime of a counterion around a polymer is on the order of 100 ps, suggesting that there is no counterion condensation. The model is computationally feasible and should allow one to study the effect of local chemistry on the properties of polymers in aqueous solution. PMID:26047770

  14. Non-equilibrium reaction and relaxation dynamics in a strongly interacting explicit solvent: F + CD3CN treated with a parallel multi-state EVB model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glowacki, David R.; Orr-Ewing, Andrew J.; Harvey, Jeremy N.

    2015-07-01

    We describe a parallelized linear-scaling computational framework developed to implement arbitrarily large multi-state empirical valence bond (MS-EVB) calculations within CHARMM and TINKER. Forces are obtained using the Hellmann-Feynman relationship, giving continuous gradients, and good energy conservation. Utilizing multi-dimensional Gaussian coupling elements fit to explicitly correlated coupled cluster theory, we built a 64-state MS-EVB model designed to study the F + CD3CN → DF + CD2CN reaction in CD3CN solvent (recently reported in Dunning et al. [Science 347(6221), 530 (2015)]). This approach allows us to build a reactive potential energy surface whose balanced accuracy and efficiency considerably surpass what we could achieve otherwise. We ran molecular dynamics simulations to examine a range of observables which follow in the wake of the reactive event: energy deposition in the nascent reaction products, vibrational relaxation rates of excited DF in CD3CN solvent, equilibrium power spectra of DF in CD3CN, and time dependent spectral shifts associated with relaxation of the nascent DF. Many of our results are in good agreement with time-resolved experimental observations, providing evidence for the accuracy of our MS-EVB framework in treating both the solute and solute/solvent interactions. The simulations provide additional insight into the dynamics at sub-picosecond time scales that are difficult to resolve experimentally. In particular, the simulations show that (immediately following deuterium abstraction) the nascent DF finds itself in a non-equilibrium regime in two different respects: (1) it is highly vibrationally excited, with ˜23 kcal mol-1 localized in the stretch and (2) its post-reaction solvation environment, in which it is not yet hydrogen-bonded to CD3CN solvent molecules, is intermediate between the non-interacting gas-phase limit and the solution-phase equilibrium limit. Vibrational relaxation of the nascent DF results in a spectral

  15. Non-equilibrium reaction and relaxation dynamics in a strongly interacting explicit solvent: F + CD{sub 3}CN treated with a parallel multi-state EVB model

    SciTech Connect

    Glowacki, David R.; Orr-Ewing, Andrew J.; Harvey, Jeremy N.

    2015-07-28

    We describe a parallelized linear-scaling computational framework developed to implement arbitrarily large multi-state empirical valence bond (MS-EVB) calculations within CHARMM and TINKER. Forces are obtained using the Hellmann-Feynman relationship, giving continuous gradients, and good energy conservation. Utilizing multi-dimensional Gaussian coupling elements fit to explicitly correlated coupled cluster theory, we built a 64-state MS-EVB model designed to study the F + CD{sub 3}CN → DF + CD{sub 2}CN reaction in CD{sub 3}CN solvent (recently reported in Dunning et al. [Science 347(6221), 530 (2015)]). This approach allows us to build a reactive potential energy surface whose balanced accuracy and efficiency considerably surpass what we could achieve otherwise. We ran molecular dynamics simulations to examine a range of observables which follow in the wake of the reactive event: energy deposition in the nascent reaction products, vibrational relaxation rates of excited DF in CD{sub 3}CN solvent, equilibrium power spectra of DF in CD{sub 3}CN, and time dependent spectral shifts associated with relaxation of the nascent DF. Many of our results are in good agreement with time-resolved experimental observations, providing evidence for the accuracy of our MS-EVB framework in treating both the solute and solute/solvent interactions. The simulations provide additional insight into the dynamics at sub-picosecond time scales that are difficult to resolve experimentally. In particular, the simulations show that (immediately following deuterium abstraction) the nascent DF finds itself in a non-equilibrium regime in two different respects: (1) it is highly vibrationally excited, with ∼23 kcal mol{sup −1} localized in the stretch and (2) its post-reaction solvation environment, in which it is not yet hydrogen-bonded to CD{sub 3}CN solvent molecules, is intermediate between the non-interacting gas-phase limit and the solution-phase equilibrium limit. Vibrational

  16. Low molecular weight oligomers of amyloid peptides display β-barrel conformations: A replica exchange molecular dynamics study in explicit solvent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Simone, Alfonso; Derreumaux, Philippe

    2010-04-01

    The self-assembly of proteins and peptides into amyloid fibrils is connected to over 40 pathological conditions including neurodegenerative diseases and systemic amyloidosis. Diffusible, low molecular weight protein and peptide oligomers that form in the early steps of aggregation appear to be the harmful cytotoxic species in the molecular etiology of these diseases. So far, the structural characterization of these oligomers has remained elusive owing to their transient and dynamic features. We here address, by means of full atomistic replica exchange molecular dynamics simulations, the energy landscape of heptamers of the amyloidogenic peptide NHVTLSQ from the beta-2 microglobulin protein. The simulations totaling 5 μs show that low molecular weight oligomers in explicit solvent consist of β-barrels in equilibrium with amorphous states and fibril-like assemblies. The results, also accounting for the influence of the pH on the conformational properties, provide a strong evidence of the formation of transient β-barrel assemblies in the early aggregation steps of amyloid-forming systems. Our findings are discussed in terms of oligomers cytotoxicity.

  17. Probing the Huntingtin 1-17 Membrane Anchor on a Phospholipid Bilayer by Using All-Atom Simulations

    PubMed Central

    Côté, Sébastien; Binette, Vincent; Salnikov, Evgeniy S.; Bechinger, Burkhard; Mousseau, Normand

    2015-01-01

    Mislocalization and aggregation of the huntingtin protein are related to Huntington’s disease. Its first exon—more specifically the first 17 amino acids (Htt17)—is crucial for the physiological and pathological functions of huntingtin. It regulates huntingtin’s activity through posttranslational modifications and serves as an anchor to membrane-containing organelles of the cell. Recently, structure and orientation of the Htt17 membrane anchor were determined using a combined solution and solid-state NMR approach. This prompted us to refine this model by investigating the dynamics and thermodynamics of this membrane anchor on a POPC bilayer using all-atom, explicit solvent molecular dynamics and Hamiltonian replica exchange. Our simulations are combined with various experimental measurements to generate a high-resolution atomistic model for the huntingtin Htt17 membrane anchor on a POPC bilayer. More precisely, we observe that the single α-helix structure is more stable in the phospholipid membrane than the NMR model obtained in the presence of dodecylphosphocholine detergent micelles. The resulting Htt17 monomer has its hydrophobic plane oriented parallel to the bilayer surface. Our results further unveil the key residues interacting with the membrane in terms of hydrogen bonds, salt-bridges, and nonpolar contributions. We also observe that Htt17 equilibrates at a well-defined insertion depth and that it perturbs the physical properties—order parameter, thickness, and area per lipid—of the bilayer in a manner that could favor its dimerization. Overall, our observations reinforce and refine the NMR measurements on the Htt17 membrane anchor segment of huntingtin that is of fundamental importance to its biological functions. PMID:25762330

  18. Large-Scale Analysis of 48 DNA and 48 RNA Tetranucleotides Studied by 1 μs Explicit-Solvent Molecular Dynamics Simulations.

    PubMed

    Schrodt, Michael V; Andrews, Casey T; Elcock, Adrian H

    2015-12-01

    An understanding of how the conformational behavior of single-stranded DNAs and RNAs depend on sequence is likely to be important for attempts to rationalize the thermodynamics of nucleic acid folding. In an attempt to further our understanding of such sequence dependences, we report here the results of 192 (1 μs) explicit-solvent molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of 48 DNA and 48 RNA tetranucleotide sequences performed using recently reported modifications to the AMBER force field. Each tetranucleotide was simulated starting from two different conformations, a fully natively stacked and a completely unstacked conformation, and populations of the various possible base stacking arrangements were analyzed. The simulations indicate that, for both DNA and RNA, the populations of fully natively stacked conformations increase linearly with increasing numbers of purines in the sequence, while the conformational entropies, computed by two complementary methods, decrease. Despite the comparatively short simulation times, the computed free energies of stacking of the 16 possible combinations of bases in the middle of the sequences are found to be in good correspondence with values reported recently from simulations of dinucleoside monophosphates using the same force field. Finally, consistent with recent reports from other groups, non-native stacking interactions, i.e., between bases that are not adjacent in sequence, are shown to be a recurring feature of the simulations; in particular, stacking interactions of bases in a i:i+2 relationship are shown to occur significantly more frequently when the intervening base is a pyrimidine. Given that the high prevalence of non-native stacking interactions is thought to be unrealistic, it appears that further parametrization work will be required before accurate conformational descriptions of single-stranded nucleic acids can be obtained with current force fields. PMID:26580891

  19. A simple and transferable all-atom/coarse-grained hybrid model to study membrane processes.

    PubMed

    Genheden, Samuel; Essex, Jonathan W

    2015-10-13

    We present an efficient all-atom/coarse-grained hybrid model and apply it to membrane processes. This model is an extension of the all-atom/ELBA model applied previously to processes in water. Here, we improve the efficiency of the model by implementing a multiple-time step integrator that allows the atoms and the coarse-grained beads to be propagated at different timesteps. Furthermore, we fine-tune the interaction between the atoms and the coarse-grained beads by computing the potential of mean force of amino acid side chain analogs along the membrane normal and comparing to atomistic simulations. The model was independently validated on the calculation of small-molecule partition coefficients. Finally, we apply the model to membrane peptides. We studied the tilt angle of the Walp23 and Kalp23 helices in two different model membranes and the stability of the glycophorin A dimer. The model is efficient, accurate, and straightforward to use, as it does not require any extra interaction particles, layers of atomistic solvent molecules or tabulated potentials, thus offering a novel, simple approach to study membrane processes. PMID:26574264

  20. DFT studies of carbohydrate solvation: II. MD-DFTr of a super-molecule complex of glucose, explicit waters, and an implicit solvent (COSMO)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    MD-DFTr studies are carried out on the super-molecule solvated complexes of glucose described in paper I. Included were ten explicit water molecules and an implicit solvation model, COSMO, superimposed upon the complex. Starting configurations were taken from DFTr optimized complexes resulting from ...

  1. Hybrid Atomistic and Coarse-Grained Molecular Dynamics Simulations of Polyethylene Glycol (PEG) in Explicit Water.

    PubMed

    Stanzione, Francesca; Jayaraman, Arthi

    2016-05-01

    In-silico design of polymeric biomaterials requires molecular dynamics (MD) simulations that retain essential atomistic/molecular details (e.g., explicit water around the biofunctional macromolecule) while simultaneously achieving large length and time scales pertinent to macroscale function. Such large-scale atomistically detailed macromolecular MD simulations with explicit solvent representation are computationally expensive. One way to overcome this limitation is to use an adaptive resolution scheme (AdResS) in which the explicit solvent molecules dynamically adopt either atomistic or coarse-grained resolution depending on their location (e.g., near or far from the macromolecule) in the system. In this study we present the feasibility and the limitations of AdResS methodology for studying polyethylene glycol (PEG) in adaptive resolution water, for varying PEG length and architecture. We first validate the AdResS methodology for such systems, by comparing PEG and solvent structure with that from all-atom simulations. We elucidate the role of the atomistic zone size and the need for calculating thermodynamic force correction within this AdResS approach to correctly reproduce the structure of PEG and water. Lastly, by varying the PEG length and architecture, we study the hydration of PEG, and the effect of PEG architectures on the structural properties of water. Changing the architecture of PEG from linear to multiarm star, we observe reduction in the solvent accessible surface area of the PEG, and an increase in the order of water molecules in the hydration shells. PMID:27108869

  2. Multiscale approach for the construction of equilibrated all-atom models of a poly(ethylene glycol)-based hydrogel.

    PubMed

    Li, Xianfeng; Murthy, N Sanjeeva; Becker, Matthew L; Latour, Robert A

    2016-06-01

    A multiscale modeling approach is presented for the efficient construction of an equilibrated all-atom model of a cross-linked poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG)-based hydrogel using the all-atom polymer consistent force field (PCFF). The final equilibrated all-atom model was built with a systematic simulation toolset consisting of three consecutive parts: (1) building a global cross-linked PEG-chain network at experimentally determined cross-link density using an on-lattice Monte Carlo method based on the bond fluctuation model, (2) recovering the local molecular structure of the network by transitioning from the lattice model to an off-lattice coarse-grained (CG) model parameterized from PCFF, followed by equilibration using high performance molecular dynamics methods, and (3) recovering the atomistic structure of the network by reverse mapping from the equilibrated CG structure, hydrating the structure with explicitly represented water, followed by final equilibration using PCFF parameterization. The developed three-stage modeling approach has application to a wide range of other complex macromolecular hydrogel systems, including the integration of peptide, protein, and/or drug molecules as side-chains within the hydrogel network for the incorporation of bioactivity for tissue engineering, regenerative medicine, and drug delivery applications. PMID:27013229

  3. CHARMM Additive All-Atom Force Field for Acyclic Polyalcohols, Acyclic Carbohydrates and Inositol

    PubMed Central

    Hatcher, Elizabeth; Guvench, Olgun; MacKerell, Alexander D.

    2009-01-01

    Parametrization of the additive all-atom CHARMM force field for acyclic polyalcohols, acyclic carbohydrates and inositol is conducted. Initial parameters were transferred from the alkanes and hexopyranose carbohydrates, with subsequent development and optimization of parameters unique to the molecules considered in this study. Using the model compounds acetone and acetaldehyde, nonbonded parameters for carbonyls were optimized targeting quantum mechanical interaction data for solute-water pairs and pure solvent thermodynamic data. Bond and angle parameters were adjusted by comparing optimized geometries to small molecule crystal survey data and by performing vibrational analyses on acetone, acetaldehyde and glycerol. C-C-C-C, C-C-C-O, C-C-OH and O-C-C-O torsional parameters for polyol chains were fit to quantum mechanical dihedral potential energy scans comprising over 1500 RIMP2/cc-pVTZ//MP2/6-31G(d) conformations using an automated Monte Carlo simulated annealing procedure. Comparison of computed condensed-phase data, including crystal lattice parameters and densities, NMR proton-proton couplings, densities and diffusion coefficients of aqueous solutions, to experimental data validated the optimized parameters. Parameter development for these compounds proved particularly challenging because of the flexibility of the acyclic sugars and polyalcohols as well as the intramolecular hydrogen bonding between vicinal hydroxyls for all of the compounds. The newly optimized additive CHARMM force field parameters are anticipated to be of utility for atomic level of detail simulations of acyclic polyalcohols, acyclic carbohydrates and inositol in solution. PMID:20160980

  4. 129Xe NMR chemical shift in Xe@C60 calculated at experimental conditions: essential role of the relativity, dynamics, and explicit solvent.

    PubMed

    Standara, Stanislav; Kulhánek, Petr; Marek, Radek; Straka, Michal

    2013-08-15

    The isotropic (129)Xe nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) chemical shift (CS) in Xe@C60 dissolved in liquid benzene was calculated by piecewise approximation to faithfully simulate the experimental conditions and to evaluate the role of different physical factors influencing the (129)Xe NMR CS. The (129)Xe shielding constant was obtained by averaging the (129)Xe nuclear magnetic shieldings calculated for snapshots obtained from the molecular dynamics trajectory of the Xe@C60 system embedded in a periodic box of benzene molecules. Relativistic corrections were added at the Breit-Pauli perturbation theory (BPPT) level, included the solvent, and were dynamically averaged. It is demonstrated that the contribution of internal dynamics of the Xe@C60 system represents about 8% of the total nonrelativistic NMR CS, whereas the effects of dynamical solvent add another 8%. The dynamically averaged relativistic effects contribute by 9% to the total calculated (129)Xe NMR CS. The final theoretical value of 172.7 ppm corresponds well to the experimental (129)Xe CS of 179.2 ppm and lies within the estimated errors of the model. The presented computational protocol serves as a prototype for calculations of (129)Xe NMR parameters in different Xe atom guest-host systems. PMID:23703381

  5. Preformed template fluctuations promote fibril formation: Insights from lattice and all-atom models

    SciTech Connect

    Kouza, Maksim Kolinski, Andrzej; Co, Nguyen Truong; Nguyen, Phuong H.; Li, Mai Suan

    2015-04-14

    Fibril formation resulting from protein misfolding and aggregation is a hallmark of several neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s diseases. Despite the fact that the fibril formation process is very slow and thus poses a significant challenge for theoretical and experimental studies, a number of alternative pictures of molecular mechanisms of amyloid fibril formation have been recently proposed. What seems to be common for the majority of the proposed models is that fibril elongation involves the formation of pre-nucleus seeds prior to the creation of a critical nucleus. Once the size of the pre-nucleus seed reaches the critical nucleus size, its thermal fluctuations are expected to be small and the resulting nucleus provides a template for sequential (one-by-one) accommodation of added monomers. The effect of template fluctuations on fibril formation rates has not been explored either experimentally or theoretically so far. In this paper, we make the first attempt at solving this problem by two sets of simulations. To mimic small template fluctuations, in one set, monomers of the preformed template are kept fixed, while in the other set they are allowed to fluctuate. The kinetics of addition of a new peptide onto the template is explored using all-atom simulations with explicit water and the GROMOS96 43a1 force field and simple lattice models. Our result demonstrates that preformed template fluctuations can modulate protein aggregation rates and pathways. The association of a nascent monomer with the template obeys the kinetics partitioning mechanism where the intermediate state occurs in a fraction of routes to the protofibril. It was shown that template immobility greatly increases the time of incorporating a new peptide into the preformed template compared to the fluctuating template case. This observation has also been confirmed by simulation using lattice models and may be invoked to understand the role of template fluctuations in

  6. Preformed template fluctuations promote fibril formation: Insights from lattice and all-atom models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kouza, Maksim; Co, Nguyen Truong; Nguyen, Phuong H.; Kolinski, Andrzej; Li, Mai Suan

    2015-04-01

    Fibril formation resulting from protein misfolding and aggregation is a hallmark of several neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's and Parkinson's diseases. Despite the fact that the fibril formation process is very slow and thus poses a significant challenge for theoretical and experimental studies, a number of alternative pictures of molecular mechanisms of amyloid fibril formation have been recently proposed. What seems to be common for the majority of the proposed models is that fibril elongation involves the formation of pre-nucleus seeds prior to the creation of a critical nucleus. Once the size of the pre-nucleus seed reaches the critical nucleus size, its thermal fluctuations are expected to be small and the resulting nucleus provides a template for sequential (one-by-one) accommodation of added monomers. The effect of template fluctuations on fibril formation rates has not been explored either experimentally or theoretically so far. In this paper, we make the first attempt at solving this problem by two sets of simulations. To mimic small template fluctuations, in one set, monomers of the preformed template are kept fixed, while in the other set they are allowed to fluctuate. The kinetics of addition of a new peptide onto the template is explored using all-atom simulations with explicit water and the GROMOS96 43a1 force field and simple lattice models. Our result demonstrates that preformed template fluctuations can modulate protein aggregation rates and pathways. The association of a nascent monomer with the template obeys the kinetics partitioning mechanism where the intermediate state occurs in a fraction of routes to the protofibril. It was shown that template immobility greatly increases the time of incorporating a new peptide into the preformed template compared to the fluctuating template case. This observation has also been confirmed by simulation using lattice models and may be invoked to understand the role of template fluctuations in

  7. Preformed template fluctuations promote fibril formation: insights from lattice and all-atom models.

    PubMed

    Kouza, Maksim; Co, Nguyen Truong; Nguyen, Phuong H; Kolinski, Andrzej; Li, Mai Suan

    2015-04-14

    Fibril formation resulting from protein misfolding and aggregation is a hallmark of several neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's and Parkinson's diseases. Despite the fact that the fibril formation process is very slow and thus poses a significant challenge for theoretical and experimental studies, a number of alternative pictures of molecular mechanisms of amyloid fibril formation have been recently proposed. What seems to be common for the majority of the proposed models is that fibril elongation involves the formation of pre-nucleus seeds prior to the creation of a critical nucleus. Once the size of the pre-nucleus seed reaches the critical nucleus size, its thermal fluctuations are expected to be small and the resulting nucleus provides a template for sequential (one-by-one) accommodation of added monomers. The effect of template fluctuations on fibril formation rates has not been explored either experimentally or theoretically so far. In this paper, we make the first attempt at solving this problem by two sets of simulations. To mimic small template fluctuations, in one set, monomers of the preformed template are kept fixed, while in the other set they are allowed to fluctuate. The kinetics of addition of a new peptide onto the template is explored using all-atom simulations with explicit water and the GROMOS96 43a1 force field and simple lattice models. Our result demonstrates that preformed template fluctuations can modulate protein aggregation rates and pathways. The association of a nascent monomer with the template obeys the kinetics partitioning mechanism where the intermediate state occurs in a fraction of routes to the protofibril. It was shown that template immobility greatly increases the time of incorporating a new peptide into the preformed template compared to the fluctuating template case. This observation has also been confirmed by simulation using lattice models and may be invoked to understand the role of template fluctuations in

  8. Self-assembling dipeptides: conformational sampling in solvent-free coarse-grained simulation.

    PubMed

    Villa, Alessandra; Peter, Christine; van der Vegt, Nico F A

    2009-03-28

    We discuss the development of a coarse-grained (CG) model for molecular dynamics (MD) simulation of a hydrophobic dipeptide, diphenylalanine, in aqueous solution. The peptide backbone is described with two CG beads per amino acid, the side groups and charged end groups are each described with one CG bead. In the derivation of interaction functions between CG beads we follow a bottom-up strategy where we devise potentials such that the resulting CG simulation reproduces the conformational sampling and the intermolecular interactions observed in an atomistic simulation of the same peptide. In the CG model, conformational flexibility of the peptide is accounted for through a set of intra-molecular (bonded) potentials. The approach followed to obtain the bonded potentials is discussed in detail. The CG potentials for nonbonded interactions are based on potentials of mean force obtained by atomistic simulations in aqueous solution. Following this approach, solvent mediation effects are included in the effective bead-bead nonbonded interactions and computationally very efficient (solvent-free) simulations of self-assembly processes can be performed. We show that the conformational properties of the all-atom dipeptide in explicit solvent can be accurately reproduced with the CG model. Moreover, preliminary simulations of peptide self-assembly performed with the CG model illustrate good agreement with results obtained from all-atom, explicit solvent simulations. PMID:19280018

  9. All-atom and coarse-grained simulations of the forced unfolding pathways of the SNARE complex.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Wenjun

    2014-07-01

    The SNARE complex, consisting of three proteins (VAMP2, syntaxin, and SNAP-25), is thought to drive membrane fusion by assembling into a four-helix bundle through a zippering process. In support of the above zippering model, a recent single-molecule optical tweezers experiment by Gao et al. revealed a sequential unzipping of SNARE along VAMP2 in the order of the linker domain → the C-terminal domain → the N-terminal domain. To offer detailed structural insights to this unzipping process, we have performed all-atom and coarse-grained steered molecular dynamics (sMD) simulations of the forced unfolding pathways of SNARE using different models and force fields. Our findings are summarized as follows: First, the sMD simulations based on either an all-atom force field (with an implicit solvent model) or a coarse-grained Go model were unable to capture the forced unfolding pathway of SNARE as observed by Gao et al., which may be attributed to insufficient simulation time and inaccurate force fields. Second, the sMD simulations based on a reparameterized coarse-grained model (i.e., modified elastic network model) were able to predict a sequential unzipping of SNARE in good agreement with the findings by Gao et al. The key to this success is to reparameterize the intrahelix and interhelix nonbonded force constants against the pair-wise residue-residue distance fluctuations collected from all-atom MD simulations of SNARE. Therefore, our finding supports the importance of accurately describing the inherent dynamics/flexibility of SNARE (in the absence of force), in order to correctly simulate its unfolding behaviors under force. This study has established a useful computational framework for future studies of the zippering function of SNARE and its perturbations by point mutations with amino-acid level of details, and more generally the forced unfolding pathways of other helix bundle proteins. PMID:24403006

  10. All-Atom Structural Models of the Transmembrane Domains of Insulin and Type 1 Insulin-Like Growth Factor Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Mohammadiarani, Hossein; Vashisth, Harish

    2016-01-01

    The receptor tyrosine kinase superfamily comprises many cell-surface receptors including the insulin receptor (IR) and type 1 insulin-like growth factor receptor (IGF1R) that are constitutively homodimeric transmembrane glycoproteins. Therefore, these receptors require ligand-triggered domain rearrangements rather than receptor dimerization for activation. Specifically, binding of peptide ligands to receptor ectodomains transduces signals across the transmembrane domains for trans-autophosphorylation in cytoplasmic kinase domains. The molecular details of these processes are poorly understood in part due to the absence of structures of full-length receptors. Using MD simulations and enhanced conformational sampling algorithms, we present all-atom structural models of peptides containing 51 residues from the transmembrane and juxtamembrane regions of IR and IGF1R. In our models, the transmembrane regions of both receptors adopt helical conformations with kinks at Pro961 (IR) and Pro941 (IGF1R), but the C-terminal residues corresponding to the juxtamembrane region of each receptor adopt unfolded and flexible conformations in IR as opposed to a helix in IGF1R. We also observe that the N-terminal residues in IR form a kinked-helix sitting at the membrane–solvent interface, while homologous residues in IGF1R are unfolded and flexible. These conformational differences result in a larger tilt-angle of the membrane-embedded helix in IGF1R in comparison to IR to compensate for interactions with water molecules at the membrane–solvent interfaces. Our metastable/stable states for the transmembrane domain of IR, observed in a lipid bilayer, are consistent with a known NMR structure of this domain determined in detergent micelles, and similar states in IGF1R are consistent with a previously reported model of the dimerized transmembrane domains of IGF1R. Our all-atom structural models suggest potentially unique structural organization of kinase domains in each receptor. PMID

  11. Dissociation of a Dynamic Protein Complex Studied by All-Atom Molecular Simulations.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Liqun; Borthakur, Susmita; Buck, Matthias

    2016-02-23

    The process of protein complex dissociation remains to be understood at the atomic level of detail. Computers now allow microsecond timescale molecular-dynamics simulations, which make the visualization of such processes possible. Here, we investigated the dissociation process of the EphA2-SHIP2 SAM-SAM domain heterodimer complex using unrestrained all-atom molecular-dynamics simulations. Previous studies on this system have shown that alternate configurations are sampled, that their interconversion can be fast, and that the complex is dynamic by nature. Starting from different NMR-derived structures, mutants were designed to stabilize a subset of configurations by swapping ion pairs across the protein-protein interface. We focused on two mutants, K956D/D1235K and R957D/D1223R, with attenuated binding affinity compared with the wild-type proteins. In contrast to calculations on the wild-type complexes, the majority of simulations of these mutants showed protein dissociation within 2.4 μs. During the separation process, we observed domain rotation and pivoting as well as a translation and simultaneous rolling, typically to alternate and weaker binding interfaces. Several unsuccessful recapturing attempts occurred once the domains were moderately separated. An analysis of protein solvation suggests that the dissociation process correlates with a progressive loss of protein-protein contacts. Furthermore, an evaluation of internal protein dynamics using quasi-harmonic and order parameter analyses indicates that changes in protein internal motions are expected to contribute significantly to the thermodynamics of protein dissociation. Considering protein association as the reverse of the separation process, the initial role of charged/polar interactions is emphasized, followed by changes in protein and solvent dynamics. The trajectories show that protein separation does not follow a single distinct pathway, but suggest that the mechanism of dissociation is common in

  12. Ab initio prediction of protein structure with both all-atom and simplified force fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scheraga, Harold

    2004-03-01

    Using only a physics-based ab initio method, and both all-atom (ECEPP/3) and simplified united-residue (UNRES) force fields, global optimization of both potential functions with Monte Carlo-plus-Minimization (MCM) and Conformational Space Annealing (CSA), respectively, provides predicted structures of proteins without use of knowledge-based information. The all-atom approach has been applied to the 46-residue protein A, and the UNRES approach has been applied to larger CASP targets. The predicted structures will be described.

  13. Folding peptides and proteins with all-atom physics: methods and applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shell, M. Scott

    2008-03-01

    Computational methods offer powerful tools for investigating proteins and peptides at the molecular-level; however, it has proven challenging to reproduce the long time scale folding processes of these molecules at a level that is both faithful to the atomic driving forces and attainable with modern commodity cluster computing. Alternatively, the past decade has seen significant progress in using bioinformatics-based approaches to infer the three dimensional native structures of proteins, drawing upon extensive knowledge databases of known protein structures [1]. These methods work remarkably well when a homologous protein can be found to provide a structural template for a candidate sequence. However, in cases where homology to database proteins is low, where the folding pathway is of interest, or where conformational flexibility is substantial---as in many emerging protein and peptide technologies---bioinformatics methods perform poorly. There is therefore great interest in seeing purely physics-based approaches succeed. We discuss a purely physics-based, database-free folding method, relying on proper thermal sampling (replica exchange molecular dynamics) and molecular potential energy functions. In order to surmount the tremendous computational demands of all-atom folding simulations, our approach implements a conformational search strategy based on a putative protein folding mechanism called zipping and assembly [2-4]. That is, we explicitly seek out potential folding pathways inferred from short simulations, and iteratively pursue all such routes by coaxing a polypeptide chain along them. The method is called the Zipping and Assembly Method (ZAM) and it works in two parts: (1) the full polypeptide chain is broken into small fragments that are first simulated independently and then successively re-assembled into larger segments with further sampling, and (2) consistently stable structure in fragments is detected and locked into place, in order to avoid re

  14. Coupling all-atom molecular dynamics simulations of ions in water with Brownian dynamics

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of ions (K+, Na+, Ca2+ and Cl−) in aqueous solutions are investigated. Water is described using the SPC/E model. A stochastic coarse-grained description for ion behaviour is presented and parametrized using MD simulations. It is given as a system of coupled stochastic and ordinary differential equations, describing the ion position, velocity and acceleration. The stochastic coarse-grained model provides an intermediate description between all-atom MD simulations and Brownian dynamics (BD) models. It is used to develop a multiscale method which uses all-atom MD simulations in parts of the computational domain and (less detailed) BD simulations in the remainder of the domain. PMID:27118886

  15. Free energetics of carbon nanotube association in aqueous inorganic NaI salt solutions: Temperature effects using all-atom molecular dynamics simulations.

    PubMed

    Ou, Shu-Ching; Cui, Di; Wezowicz, Matthew; Taufer, Michela; Patel, Sandeep

    2015-06-15

    In this study, we examine the temperature dependence of free energetics of nanotube association using graphical processing unit-enabled all-atom molecular dynamics simulations (FEN ZI) with two (10,10) single-walled carbon nanotubes in 3 m NaI aqueous salt solution. Results suggest that the free energy, enthalpy and entropy changes for the association process are all reduced at the high temperature, in agreement with previous investigations using other hydrophobes. Via the decomposition of free energy into individual components, we found that solvent contribution (including water, anion, and cation contributions) is correlated with the spatial distribution of the corresponding species and is influenced distinctly by the temperature. We studied the spatial distribution and the structure of the solvent in different regions: intertube, intratube and the bulk solvent. By calculating the fluctuation of coarse-grained tube-solvent surfaces, we found that tube-water interfacial fluctuation exhibits the strongest temperature dependence. By taking ions to be a solvent-like medium in the absence of water, tube-anion interfacial fluctuation shows similar but weaker dependence on temperature, while tube-cation interfacial fluctuation shows no dependence in general. These characteristics are discussed via the malleability of their corresponding solvation shells relative to the nanotube surface. Hydrogen bonding profiles and tetrahedrality of water arrangement are also computed to compare the structure of solvent in the solvent bulk and intertube region. The hydrophobic confinement induces a relatively lower concentration environment in the intertube region, therefore causing different intertube solvent structures which depend on the tube separation. This study is relevant in the continuing discourse on hydrophobic interactions (as they impact generally a broad class of phenomena in biology, biochemistry, and materials science and soft condensed matter research), and

  16. Free Energetics of Carbon Nanotube Association in Aqueous Inorganic NaI Salt Solutions: Temperature Effects using All-Atom Molecular Dynamics Simulations

    PubMed Central

    Ou, Shu-Ching; Cui, Di; Wezowicz, Matthew; Taufer, Michela; Patel, Sandeep

    2015-01-01

    In this study we examine the temperature dependence of free energetics of nanotube association by using GPU-enabled all-atom molecular dynamics simulations (FEN ZI) with two (10,10) single-walled carbon nanotubes in 3 m NaI aqueous salt solution. Results suggest that the free energy, enthalpy and entropy changes for the association process are all reduced at the high temperature, in agreement with previous investigations using other hydrophobes. Via the decomposition of free energy into individual components, we found that solvent contribution (including water, anion and cation contributions) is correlated with the spatial distribution of the corresponding species and is influenced distinctly by the temperature. We studied the spatial distribution and the structure of the solvent in different regions: intertube, intra-tube and the bulk solvent. By calculating the fluctuation of coarse-grained tube-solvent surfaces, we found that tube-water interfacial fluctuation exhibits the strongest temperature dependence. By taking ions to be a solvent-like medium in the absence of water, tube-anion interfacial fluctuation also shows similar but weaker dependence on temperature, while tube-cation interfacial fluctuation shows no dependence in general. These characteristics are discussed via the malleability of their corresponding solvation shells relative to the nanotube surface. Hydrogen bonding profiles and tetrahedrality of water arrangement are also computed to compare the structure of solvent in the solvent bulk and intertube region. The hydrophobic confinement induces a relatively lower concentration environment in the intertube region, therefore causing different intertube solvent structures which depend on the tube separation. This study is relevant in the continuing discourse on hydrophobic interactions (as they impact generally a broad class of phenomena in biology, biochemistry, and materials science and soft condensed matter research), and interpretations of

  17. Evaluation of protein-protein docking model structures using all-atom molecular dynamics simulations combined with the solution theory in the energy representation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takemura, Kazuhiro; Guo, Hao; Sakuraba, Shun; Matubayasi, Nobuyuki; Kitao, Akio

    2012-12-01

    We propose a method to evaluate binding free energy differences among distinct protein-protein complex model structures through all-atom molecular dynamics simulations in explicit water using the solution theory in the energy representation. Complex model structures are generated from a pair of monomeric structures using the rigid-body docking program ZDOCK. After structure refinement by side chain optimization and all-atom molecular dynamics simulations in explicit water, complex models are evaluated based on the sum of their conformational and solvation free energies, the latter calculated from the energy distribution functions obtained from relatively short molecular dynamics simulations of the complex in water and of pure water based on the solution theory in the energy representation. We examined protein-protein complex model structures of two protein-protein complex systems, bovine trypsin/CMTI-1 squash inhibitor (PDB ID: 1PPE) and RNase SA/barstar (PDB ID: 1AY7), for which both complex and monomer structures were determined experimentally. For each system, we calculated the energies for the crystal complex structure and twelve generated model structures including the model most similar to the crystal structure and very different from it. In both systems, the sum of the conformational and solvation free energies tended to be lower for the structure similar to the crystal. We concluded that our energy calculation method is useful for selecting low energy complex models similar to the crystal structure from among a set of generated models.

  18. Analysis of solvation structure and thermodynamics of ethane and propane in water by reference interaction site model theory using all-atom models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cui, Qizhi; Smith, Vedene H.

    2001-08-01

    Following our previous paper on methane [Cui and Smith, J. Chem. Phys. 113, 10240 (2000)], we study the solvation structures and thermodynamics of ethane and propane in water at the infinite dilution limit by using the hypernetted chain closure reference interaction site model (HNC-RISM) theory with all-atom representations for solute molecules. At four thermodynamic states: temperature T=283.15, 298.15, 313.15, 328.15 K and the corresponding bulk water density ρ=0.9997, 0.9970, 0.9922, 0.9875 g cm-3, all the atomic solute-solvent radial distribution functions are obtained, and the corresponding running coordination numbers and the hydration free energies, energies, enthalpies, and entropies are calculated with the radial distribution functions as input. The hydration structures of ethane and propane are presented and analyzed at the atomic level in terms of the atomic solute-solvent radial distribution functions. With the optimized nonbonded potential parameters based on the CHARMM96 all-atom model for alkanes [Yin and Mackerell, J. Comput. Chem. 19, 334 (1998)], the ethane and propane hydration thermodynamic properties predicted by the HNC-RISM theory are improved in the specified temperature range (10-55 °C).

  19. An all-atom force field developed for Zn₄O(RCO₂)₆ metal organic frameworks.

    PubMed

    Sun, Yingxin; Sun, Huai

    2014-03-01

    An all-atom force field is developed for metal organic frameworks Zn₄O(RCO₂)₆ by fitting to quantum mechanics data. Molecular simulations are conducted to validate the force field by calculating thermal expansion coefficients, crystal bulk and Young's moduli, power spectra, self-diffusion coefficients, and activation energies of self-diffusions for benzene and n-hexane. The calculated results are in good agreement with available experimental data. The proposed force field is suitable for simulations of adsorption or diffusion of organic molecules with flexible frameworks. PMID:24562858

  20. An All-Atom Model of the Structure of Human Copper Transporter 1

    PubMed Central

    Sharikov, Yuriy; Greenberg, Jerry P.; Miller, Mark A.; Kouznetsova, Valentina L.; Larson, Christopher A.; Howell, Stephen B.

    2013-01-01

    Human copper transporter 1 (hCTR1) is the major high affinity copper influx transporter in mammalian cells that also mediates uptake of the cancer chemotherapeutic agent cisplatin. A low resolution structure of hCTR1 determined by cryoelectron microscopy was recently published. Several protein structure simulation techniques were used to create an all-atom model of this important transporter using the low resolution structure as a starting point. The all-atom model provides new insights into the roles of specific residues of the N-terminal extracellular domain, the intracellular loop, and C-terminal region in metal ion transport. In particular, the model demonstrates that the central region of the pore contains four sets of methionine triads in the intramembranous region. The structure confirms that two triads of methionine residues delineate the intramembranous region of the transporter, and further identifies two additional methionine triads that are located in the extracellular N-terminal part of the transporter. Together, the four triads create a structure that promotes stepwise transport of metal ions into and then through the intramembranous channel of the transporter via transient thioether bonds to methionine residues. Putative copper-binding sites in the hCTR1 trimer were identified by a program developed by us for prediction of metal-binding sites. These sites correspond well with the known effects of mutations on the ability of the protein to transport copper and cisplatin. PMID:22569840

  1. Non-equilibrium all-atom molecular dynamics simulations of free and tethered DNA molecules in nanochannel shear flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Guan M.; Sandberg, William C.

    2007-04-01

    In order to gain insight into the mechanical and dynamical behaviour of free and tethered short chains of ss/ds DNA molecules in flow, and in parallel to investigate the properties of long chain molecules in flow fields, we have developed a series of quantum and molecular methods to extend the well developed equilibrium software CHARMM to handle non-equilibrium dynamics. These methods have been applied to cases of DNA molecules in shear flows in nanochannels. Biomolecules, both free and wall-tethered, have been simulated in the all-atom style in solvent-filled nanochannels. The new methods were demonstrated by carrying out NEMD simulations of free single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) molecules of 21 bases as well as double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) molecules of 21 base pairs tethered on gold surfaces in an ionic water shear flow. The tethering of the linker molecule (6-mercapto-1-hexanol) to perfect Au(111) surfaces was parametrized based on density functional theory (DFT) calculations. Force field parameters were incorporated into the CHARMM database. Gold surfaces are simulated in a Lennard-Jones style model that was fitted to the Morse potential model of bulk gold. The bonding force of attachment of the DNA molecules to the gold substrate linker molecule was computed to be up to a few nN when the DNA molecules are fully stretched at high shear rates. For the first time, we calculated the relaxation time of DNA molecules in picoseconds (ps) and the hydrodynamic force up to a few nanoNewtons (nN) per base pair in a nanochannel flow. The velocity profiles in the solvent due to the presence of the tethered DNA molecules were found to be nonlinear only at high shear flow rates. Free ssDNA molecules in a shear flow were observed to behave differently from each other depending upon their initial orientation in the flow field. Both free and tethered DNA molecules are clearly observed to be stretching, rotating and relaxing. Methods developed in this initial work can be incorporated

  2. Gay-Berne and electrostatic multipole based coarse-grain potential in implicit solvent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Johnny; Zhen, Xia; Shen, Hujun; Li, Guohui; Ren, Pengyu

    2011-10-01

    A general, transferable coarse-grain (CG) framework based on the Gay-Berne potential and electrostatic point multipole expansion is presented for polypeptide simulations. The solvent effect is described by the Generalized Kirkwood theory. The CG model is calibrated using the results of all-atom simulations of model compounds in solution. Instead of matching the overall effective forces produced by atomic models, the fundamental intermolecular forces such as electrostatic, repulsion-dispersion, and solvation are represented explicitly at a CG level. We demonstrate that the CG alanine dipeptide model is able to reproduce quantitatively the conformational energy of all-atom force fields in both gas and solution phases, including the electrostatic and solvation components. Replica exchange molecular dynamics and microsecond dynamic simulations of polyalanine of 5 and 12 residues reveal that the CG polyalanines fold into "alpha helix" and "beta sheet" structures. The 5-residue polyalanine displays a substantial increase in the "beta strand" fraction relative to the 12-residue polyalanine. The detailed conformational distribution is compared with those reported from recent all-atom simulations and experiments. The results suggest that the new coarse-graining approach presented in this study has the potential to offer both accuracy and efficiency for biomolecular modeling.

  3. Gay-Berne and electrostatic multipole based coarse-grain potential in implicit solvent

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Johnny; Zhen, Xia; Shen, Hujun; Li, Guohui; Ren, Pengyu

    2011-01-01

    A general, transferable coarse-grain (CG) framework based on the Gay-Berne potential and electrostatic point multipole expansion is presented for polypeptide simulations. The solvent effect is described by the Generalized Kirkwood theory. The CG model is calibrated using the results of all-atom simulations of model compounds in solution. Instead of matching the overall effective forces produced by atomic models, the fundamental intermolecular forces such as electrostatic, repulsion-dispersion, and solvation are represented explicitly at a CG level. We demonstrate that the CG alanine dipeptide model is able to reproduce quantitatively the conformational energy of all-atom force fields in both gas and solution phases, including the electrostatic and solvation components. Replica exchange molecular dynamics and microsecond dynamic simulations of polyalanine of 5 and 12 residues reveal that the CG polyalanines fold into “alpha helix” and “beta sheet” structures. The 5-residue polyalanine displays a substantial increase in the “beta strand” fraction relative to the 12-residue polyalanine. The detailed conformational distribution is compared with those reported from recent all-atom simulations and experiments. The results suggest that the new coarse-graining approach presented in this study has the potential to offer both accuracy and efficiency for biomolecular modeling. PMID:22029338

  4. Gay-Berne and electrostatic multipole based coarse-grain potential in implicit solvent.

    PubMed

    Wu, Johnny; Zhen, Xia; Shen, Hujun; Li, Guohui; Ren, Pengyu

    2011-10-21

    A general, transferable coarse-grain (CG) framework based on the Gay-Berne potential and electrostatic point multipole expansion is presented for polypeptide simulations. The solvent effect is described by the Generalized Kirkwood theory. The CG model is calibrated using the results of all-atom simulations of model compounds in solution. Instead of matching the overall effective forces produced by atomic models, the fundamental intermolecular forces such as electrostatic, repulsion-dispersion, and solvation are represented explicitly at a CG level. We demonstrate that the CG alanine dipeptide model is able to reproduce quantitatively the conformational energy of all-atom force fields in both gas and solution phases, including the electrostatic and solvation components. Replica exchange molecular dynamics and microsecond dynamic simulations of polyalanine of 5 and 12 residues reveal that the CG polyalanines fold into "alpha helix" and "beta sheet" structures. The 5-residue polyalanine displays a substantial increase in the "beta strand" fraction relative to the 12-residue polyalanine. The detailed conformational distribution is compared with those reported from recent all-atom simulations and experiments. The results suggest that the new coarse-graining approach presented in this study has the potential to offer both accuracy and efficiency for biomolecular modeling. PMID:22029338

  5. All-Atom Molecular Dynamics of Virus Capsids as Drug Targets.

    PubMed

    Perilla, Juan R; Hadden, Jodi A; Goh, Boon Chong; Mayne, Christopher G; Schulten, Klaus

    2016-05-19

    Virus capsids are protein shells that package the viral genome. Although their morphology and biological functions can vary markedly, capsids often play critical roles in regulating viral infection pathways. A detailed knowledge of virus capsids, including their dynamic structure, interactions with cellular factors, and the specific roles that they play in the replication cycle, is imperative for the development of antiviral therapeutics. The following Perspective introduces an emerging area of computational biology that focuses on the dynamics of virus capsids and capsid-protein assemblies, with particular emphasis on the effects of small-molecule drug binding on capsid structure, stability, and allosteric pathways. When performed at chemical detail, molecular dynamics simulations can reveal subtle changes in virus capsids induced by drug molecules a fraction of their size. Here, the current challenges of performing all-atom capsid-drug simulations are discussed, along with an outlook on the applicability of virus capsid simulations to reveal novel drug targets. PMID:27128262

  6. All-atom homology model of the Escherichia coli 30S ribosomal subunit.

    PubMed

    Tung, Chang-Shung; Joseph, Simpson; Sanbonmatsu, Kevin Y

    2002-10-01

    Understanding the structural basis of ribosomal function requires close comparison between biochemical and structural data. Although a large amount of biochemical data are available for the Escherichia coli ribosome, the structure has not been solved to atomic resolution. Using a new RNA homology procedure, we have modeled the all-atom structure of the E. coli 30S ribosomal subunit. We find that the tertiary structure of the ribosome core, including the A-, P- and E-sites, is highly conserved. The hypervariable regions in our structure, which differ from the structure of the 30S ribosomal subunit from Thermus thermophilus, are consistent with the cryo-EM map of the E. coli ribosome. PMID:12244297

  7. All-atomic generation and noise-quadrature filtering of squeezed vacuum in hot Rb vapor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horrom, Travis; Romanov, Gleb; Novikova, Irina; Mikhailov, Eugeniy E.

    2013-01-01

    With our all-atomic squeezing and filtering setup, we demonstrate control over the noise amplitudes and manipulation of the frequency-dependent squeezing angle of a squeezed vacuum quantum state by passing it through an atomic medium with electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT). We generate low sideband frequency squeezed vacuum using the polarization self-rotation effect in a hot Rb vapor cell, and direct it through a second atomic vapor subject to EIT conditions. We use the frequency-dependent absorption of the EIT window to demonstrate an example of squeeze amplitude attenuation and squeeze angle rotation of the quantum noise quadratures of the squeezed probe. These studies have implications for quantum memory and storage as well as gravitational wave interferometric detectors.

  8. All-Atom Molecular Dynamics of Virus Capsids as Drug Targets

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Virus capsids are protein shells that package the viral genome. Although their morphology and biological functions can vary markedly, capsids often play critical roles in regulating viral infection pathways. A detailed knowledge of virus capsids, including their dynamic structure, interactions with cellular factors, and the specific roles that they play in the replication cycle, is imperative for the development of antiviral therapeutics. The following Perspective introduces an emerging area of computational biology that focuses on the dynamics of virus capsids and capsid–protein assemblies, with particular emphasis on the effects of small-molecule drug binding on capsid structure, stability, and allosteric pathways. When performed at chemical detail, molecular dynamics simulations can reveal subtle changes in virus capsids induced by drug molecules a fraction of their size. Here, the current challenges of performing all-atom capsid–drug simulations are discussed, along with an outlook on the applicability of virus capsid simulations to reveal novel drug targets. PMID:27128262

  9. Picosecond infrared laser-induced all-atom nonequilibrium molecular dynamics simulation of dissociation of viruses.

    PubMed

    Hoang Man, Viet; Van-Oanh, Nguyen-Thi; Derreumaux, Philippe; Li, Mai Suan; Roland, Christopher; Sagui, Celeste; Nguyen, Phuong H

    2016-04-28

    Since the discovery of the plant pathogen tobacco mosaic virus as the first viral entity in the late 1800s, viruses traditionally have been mainly thought of as pathogens for disease-resistances. However, viruses have recently been exploited as nanoplatforms with applications in biomedicine and materials science. To this aim, a large majority of current methods and tools have been developed to improve the physical stability of viral particles, which may be critical to the extreme physical or chemical conditions that viruses may encounter during purification, fabrication processes, storage and use. However, considerably fewer studies are devoted to developing efficient methods to degrade or recycle such enhanced stability biomaterials. With this in mind, we carry out all-atom nonequilibrium molecular dynamics simulation, inspired by the recently developed mid-infrared free-electron laser pulse technology, to dissociate viruses. Adopting the poliovirus as a representative example, we find that the primary step in the dissociation process is due to the strong resonance between the amide I vibrational modes of the virus and the tuned laser frequencies. This process is determined by a balance between the formation and dissociation of the protein shell, reflecting the highly plasticity of the virus. Furthermore, our method should provide a feasible approach to simulate viruses, which is otherwise too expensive for conventional equilibrium all-atom simulations of such very large systems. Our work shows a proof of concept which may open a new, efficient way to cleave or to recycle virus-based materials, provide an extremely valuable tool for elucidating mechanical aspects of viruses, and may well play an important role in future fighting against virus-related diseases. PMID:27071540

  10. Poly(Ethylene Glycol) in Drug Delivery, Why Does it Work, and Can We do Better? All Atom Molecular Dynamics Simulation Provides Some Answers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bunker, Alex

    We summarize our recent work, using all atom molecular dynamics simulation to study the role of poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) in drug delivery. We have simulated the drug delivery liposome membrane, in both the Gel and Liquid crystalline states. The simulations of the PEGylated membrane have been carried out in the presence of a physiological concentration of NaCl, and two other salts encountered in physiological conditions, KCL and CaCl2. We also simulated targeting moieties on the PEGylated membrane, comparing the behavior of two targeting moieties. We also simulated PEG with three drug molecules for which it is used as a delivery aid: paclitaxel, piroxicam, and hematoporphyrin. We found that the specific properties of PEG, its solubility in both polar and non-polar solvents, and its acting as a polymer electrolyte, have a significant e_ect on its behavior when used in drug delivery.

  11. A Real-Time All-Atom Structural Search Engine for Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Gonzalez, Gabriel; Hannigan, Brett; DeGrado, William F.

    2014-01-01

    Protein designers use a wide variety of software tools for de novo design, yet their repertoire still lacks a fast and interactive all-atom search engine. To solve this, we have built the Suns program: a real-time, atomic search engine integrated into the PyMOL molecular visualization system. Users build atomic-level structural search queries within PyMOL and receive a stream of search results aligned to their query within a few seconds. This instant feedback cycle enables a new “designability”-inspired approach to protein design where the designer searches for and interactively incorporates native-like fragments from proven protein structures. We demonstrate the use of Suns to interactively build protein motifs, tertiary interactions, and to identify scaffolds compatible with hot-spot residues. The official web site and installer are located at http://www.degradolab.org/suns/ and the source code is hosted at https://github.com/godotgildor/Suns (PyMOL plugin, BSD license), https://github.com/Gabriel439/suns-cmd (command line client, BSD license), and https://github.com/Gabriel439/suns-search (search engine server, GPLv2 license). PMID:25079944

  12. All-atom molecular dynamics calculation study of entire poliovirus empty capsids in solution

    SciTech Connect

    Andoh, Y.; Yoshii, N.; Yamada, A.; Kojima, H.; Mizutani, K.; Okazaki, S.; Fujimoto, K.; Nakagawa, A.; Nomoto, A.

    2014-10-28

    Small viruses that belong, for example, to the Picornaviridae, such as poliovirus and foot-and-mouth disease virus, consist simply of capsid proteins and a single-stranded RNA (ssRNA) genome. The capsids are quite stable in solution to protect the genome from the environment. Here, based on long-time and large-scale 6.5 × 10{sup 6} all-atom molecular dynamics calculations for the Mahoney strain of poliovirus, we show microscopic properties of the viral capsids at a molecular level. First, we found equilibrium rapid exchange of water molecules across the capsid. The exchange rate is so high that all water molecules inside the capsid (about 200 000) can leave the capsid and be replaced by water molecules from the outside in about 25 μs. This explains the capsid's tolerance to high pressures and deactivation by exsiccation. In contrast, the capsid did not exchange ions, at least within the present simulation time of 200 ns. This implies that the capsid can function, in principle, as a semipermeable membrane. We also found that, similar to the xylem of trees, the pressure of the solution inside the capsid without the genome was negative. This is caused by coulombic interaction of the solution inside the capsid with the capsid excess charges. The negative pressure may be compensated by positive osmotic pressure by the solution-soluble ssRNA and the counter ions introduced into it.

  13. ALMOST: an all atom molecular simulation toolkit for protein structure determination.

    PubMed

    Fu, Biao; Sahakyan, Aleksandr B; Camilloni, Carlo; Tartaglia, Gian Gaetano; Paci, Emanuele; Caflisch, Amedeo; Vendruscolo, Michele; Cavalli, Andrea

    2014-05-30

    Almost (all atom molecular simulation toolkit) is an open source computational package for structure determination and analysis of complex molecular systems including proteins, and nucleic acids. Almost has been designed with two primary goals: to provide tools for molecular structure determination using various types of experimental measurements as conformational restraints, and to provide methods for the analysis and assessment of structural and dynamical properties of complex molecular systems. The methods incorporated in Almost include the determination of structural and dynamical features of proteins using distance restraints derived from nuclear Overhauser effect measurements, orientational restraints obtained from residual dipolar couplings and the structural restraints from chemical shifts. Here, we present the first public release of Almost, highlight the key aspects of its computational design and discuss the main features currently implemented. Almost is available for the most common Unix-based operating systems, including Linux and Mac OS X. Almost is distributed free of charge under the GNU Public License, and is available both as a source code and as a binary executable from the project web site at http://www.open-almost.org. Interested users can follow and contribute to the further development of Almost on http://sourceforge.net/projects/almost. PMID:24676684

  14. Refined OPLS all-atom force field for saturated phosphatidylcholine bilayers at full hydration.

    PubMed

    Maciejewski, Arkadiusz; Pasenkiewicz-Gierula, Marta; Cramariuc, Oana; Vattulainen, Ilpo; Rog, Tomasz

    2014-05-01

    We report parametrization of dipalmitoyl-phosphatidylcholine (DPPC) in the framework of the Optimized Parameters for Liquid Simulations all-atom (OPLS-AA) force field. We chose DPPC as it is one of the most studied phospholipid species and thus has plenty of experimental data necessary for model validation, and it is also one of the highly important and abundant lipid types, e.g., in lung surfactant. Overall, PCs have not been previously parametrized in the OPLS-AA force field; thus, there is a need to derive its bonding and nonbonding parameters for both the polar and nonpolar parts of the molecule. In the present study, we determined the parameters for torsion angles in the phosphatidylcholine and glycerol moieties and in the acyl chains, as well the partial atomic charges. In these calculations, we used three methods: (1) Hartree-Fock (HF), (2) second order Møller-Plesset perturbation theory (MP2), and (3) density functional theory (DFT). We also tested the effect of the polar environment by using the polarizable continuum model (PCM), and for acyl chains the van der Waals parameters were also adjusted. In effect, six parameter sets were generated and tested on a DPPC bilayer. Out of these six sets, only one was found to be able to satisfactorily reproduce experimental data for the lipid bilayer. The successful DPPC model was obtained from MP2 calculations in an implicit polar environment (PCM). PMID:24745688

  15. All-atom molecular dynamics simulation studies of fully hydrated gel phase DPPG and DPPE bilayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pimthon, Jutarat; Willumeit, Regine; Lendlein, Andreas; Hofmann, Dieter

    2009-03-01

    Here in silico lipid membranes are described providing a structural background of the organization of the lipid components of membranes and aiding further biological or biophysical studies. An all-atom molecular dynamics simulations has been performed to investigate structural and dynamical properties of two fully hydrated gel-phase bilayers of 1,2-dipalmitoyl- sn-glycero-3-phosphoglycerol (DPPG) and 1,2-dipalmitoyl- sn-glycero-3-phospho-ethanolamine (DPPE) bilayers at 303 K. The respective starting configuration of lipids in the simulation bilayer unit cells were taken on the basis of scattering data. In both simulations, we found overall reasonably good agreement with the available experimental data (area per lipid, phosphorus-phosphorus distance). The distribution of the water/counterions at the membrane interface, interactions/orientations of lipid headgroups, and hydrocarbon chain organization were extensively studied in terms of pair distribution functions between main structural components of the system. Intra/intermolecular hydrogen bond formation was discussed in detail. The water orientation at the lipid membrane interface was explored thoroughly in terms of dipole moment as a function of the water molecule positions along the membrane, where we found that the counterions changed the orientation of the water at the interface. Special attention has been devoted to the distribution of the sodium counterions around the DPPG headgroup. We found preferential binding of Na + ions to the phosphate oxygen species.

  16. Molecular jamming—The cystine slipknot mechanical clamp in all-atom simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pepłowski, Łukasz; Sikora, Mateusz; Nowak, Wiesław; Cieplak, Marek

    2011-02-01

    A recent survey of 17 134 proteins has identified a new class of proteins which are expected to yield stretching induced force peaks in the range of 1 nN. Such high force peaks should be due to forcing of a slip-loop through a cystine ring, i.e., by generating a cystine slipknot. The survey has been performed in a simple coarse grained model. Here, we perform all-atom steered molecular dynamics simulations on 15 cystine knot proteins and determine their resistance to stretching. In agreement with previous studies within a coarse grained structure based model, the level of resistance is found to be substantially higher than in proteins in which the mechanical clamp operates through shear. The large stretching forces arise through formation of the cystine slipknot mechanical clamp and the resulting steric jamming. We elucidate the workings of such a clamp in an atomic detail. We also study the behavior of five top strength proteins with the shear-based mechanostability in which no jamming is involved. We show that in the atomic model, the jamming state is relieved by moving one amino acid at a time and there is a choice in the selection of the amino acid that advances the first. In contrast, the coarse grained model also allows for a simultaneous passage of two amino acids.

  17. Molecular jamming--the cystine slipknot mechanical clamp in all-atom simulations.

    PubMed

    Pepłowski, Lukasz; Sikora, Mateusz; Nowak, Wiesław; Cieplak, Marek

    2011-02-28

    A recent survey of 17 134 proteins has identified a new class of proteins which are expected to yield stretching induced force peaks in the range of 1 nN. Such high force peaks should be due to forcing of a slip-loop through a cystine ring, i.e., by generating a cystine slipknot. The survey has been performed in a simple coarse grained model. Here, we perform all-atom steered molecular dynamics simulations on 15 cystine knot proteins and determine their resistance to stretching. In agreement with previous studies within a coarse grained structure based model, the level of resistance is found to be substantially higher than in proteins in which the mechanical clamp operates through shear. The large stretching forces arise through formation of the cystine slipknot mechanical clamp and the resulting steric jamming. We elucidate the workings of such a clamp in an atomic detail. We also study the behavior of five top strength proteins with the shear-based mechanostability in which no jamming is involved. We show that in the atomic model, the jamming state is relieved by moving one amino acid at a time and there is a choice in the selection of the amino acid that advances the first. In contrast, the coarse grained model also allows for a simultaneous passage of two amino acids. PMID:21361557

  18. CHARMM Additive All-Atom Force Field for Phosphate and Sulfate Linked to Carbohydrates

    PubMed Central

    Mallajosyula, Sairam S.; Guvench, Olgun; Hatcher, Elizabeth; MacKerell, Alexander D.

    2012-01-01

    Presented is an extension of the CHARMM additive all-atom carbohydrate force field to enable the modeling of phosphate and sulfate linked to carbohydrates. The parameters are developed in a hierarchical fashion using model compounds containing the key atoms in the full carbohydrates. Target data for parameter optimization included full two-dimensional energy surfaces defined by the glycosidic dihedral angle pairs in the phosphate/sulfate model compound analogs of hexopyranose monosaccharide phosphates and sulfates, as determined by quantum mechanical (QM) MP2/cc-pVTZ single point energies on MP2/6-31+G(d) optimized structures. In order to achieve balanced, transferable dihedral parameters for the dihedral angles, surfaces for all possible anomeric and conformational states were included during the parametrization process. In addition, to model physiologically relevant systems both the mono- and di-anionic charged states were studied for the phosphates. This resulted in over 7000 MP2/cc-pVTZ//MP2/6-31G+(d) model compound conformational energies which, supplemented with QM geometries, were the main target data for the parametrization. Parameters were validated against crystals of relevant monosaccharide derivatives obtained from the Cambridge Structural Database (CSD) and larger systems, namely inositol-(tri/tetra/penta) phosphates non-covalently bound to the pleckstrin homology (PH) domain and oligomeric chondroitin sulfate in solution and in complex with cathepsin K protein. PMID:22685386

  19. All-atom Multiscale Simulation of Cowpea Chlorotic Mottle Virus Capsid Swelling

    PubMed Central

    Miao, Yinglong; Johnson, John E.; Ortoleva, Peter J.

    2010-01-01

    An all-atom multiscale computational modeling approach, Molecular Dynamics/Order Parameter eXtrapolation (MD/OPX), has recently been developed for simulating large bionanosystems. It accelerates MD simulations and addresses rapid atomistic fluctuations and slowly-varying nanoscale dynamics of bionanosystems simultaneously. With modules added to account for water molecules and ions, MD/OPX is applied to simulate the swelling of cowpea chlorotic mottle virus (CCMV) capsid solvated in a host medium in this study. Simulation results show that the N-terminal arms of capsid proteins undergo large deviations from the initial configurations with their length extended quickly during the early stage of capsid swelling. The capsid swelling is a symmetry-breaking process involving local initiation and front propagation. The capsid swelling rate is ~0.25 nm/ns (npn) during early stage of the simulation and propagation of the structural transition across the capsid is roughly 0.6npn. The system conditions that affect swelling of the capsid are analyzed. Prospects for creating a phase diagram for CCMV capsid swelling and using predictions to guide experiments are discussed. PMID:20695471

  20. All-atom molecular dynamics calculation study of entire poliovirus empty capsids in solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andoh, Y.; Yoshii, N.; Yamada, A.; Fujimoto, K.; Kojima, H.; Mizutani, K.; Nakagawa, A.; Nomoto, A.; Okazaki, S.

    2014-10-01

    Small viruses that belong, for example, to the Picornaviridae, such as poliovirus and foot-and-mouth disease virus, consist simply of capsid proteins and a single-stranded RNA (ssRNA) genome. The capsids are quite stable in solution to protect the genome from the environment. Here, based on long-time and large-scale 6.5 × 106 all-atom molecular dynamics calculations for the Mahoney strain of poliovirus, we show microscopic properties of the viral capsids at a molecular level. First, we found equilibrium rapid exchange of water molecules across the capsid. The exchange rate is so high that all water molecules inside the capsid (about 200 000) can leave the capsid and be replaced by water molecules from the outside in about 25 μs. This explains the capsid's tolerance to high pressures and deactivation by exsiccation. In contrast, the capsid did not exchange ions, at least within the present simulation time of 200 ns. This implies that the capsid can function, in principle, as a semipermeable membrane. We also found that, similar to the xylem of trees, the pressure of the solution inside the capsid without the genome was negative. This is caused by coulombic interaction of the solution inside the capsid with the capsid excess charges. The negative pressure may be compensated by positive osmotic pressure by the solution-soluble ssRNA and the counter ions introduced into it.

  1. Local elasticity of strained DNA studied by all-atom simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazur, Alexey K.

    2011-08-01

    Genomic DNA is constantly subjected to various mechanical stresses arising from its biological functions and cell packaging. If the local mechanical properties of DNA change under torsional and tensional stress, the activity of DNA-modifying proteins and transcription factors can be affected and regulated allosterically. To check this possibility, appropriate steady forces and torques were applied in the course of all-atom molecular dynamics simulations of DNA with AT- and GC-alternating sequences. It is found that the stretching rigidity grows with tension as well as twisting. The torsional rigidity is not affected by stretching, but it varies with twisting very strongly, and differently for the two sequences. Surprisingly, for AT-alternating DNA it passes through a minimum with the average twist close to the experimental value in solution. For this fragment, but not for the GC-alternating sequence, the bending rigidity noticeably changes with both twisting and stretching. The results have important biological implications and shed light on earlier experimental observations.

  2. CHARMM Additive All-Atom Force Field for Aldopentofuranoses, Methyl-Aldopentofuranosides and Fructofuranose

    PubMed Central

    Hatcher, Elizabeth; Guvench, Olgun; MacKerell, Alexander D.

    2009-01-01

    An additive all-atom empirical force field for aldopentofuranoses, methyl-aldopentofuranosides (Me-aldopentofuranosides) and fructofuranose carbohydrates, compatible with existing CHARMM carbohydrate parameters, is presented. Building on existing parameters transferred from cyclic ethers and hexopyranoses, parameters were further developed using target data for complete furanose carbohydrates as well as O-methyl tetrahydrofuran. The bond and angle equilibrium parameters were adjusted to reproduce target geometries from a survey of furanose crystal structures, and dihedral parameters were fit to over 1700 quantum mechanical (QM) MP2/cc-pVTZ//MP2/6-31G(d) conformational energies. The conformational energies were for a variety of complete furanose monosaccharides, and included two-dimensional ring pucker energy surfaces. Bonded parameter optimization led to the correct description of the ring pucker for a large set of furanose compounds, while furanose-water interaction energies and distances reproduced QM HF/6-31G(d) results for a number of furanose monosaccharides, thereby validating the nonbonded parameters. Crystal lattice unit cell parameters and volumes, aqueous-phase densities, and aqueous NMR ring pucker and exocyclic data were used to validate the parameters in condensed-phase environments. Conformational sampling analysis of the ring pucker and exocyclic group showed excellent agreement with experimental NMR data, demonstrating that the conformational energetics in aqueous solution are accurately described by the optimized force field. Overall, the parameters reproduce available experimental data well and are anticipated to be of utility in future computational studies of carbohydrates, including in the context of proteins, nucleic acids and/or lipids when combined with existing CHARMM biomolecular force fields. PMID:19694450

  3. Lipid receptor S1P₁ activation scheme concluded from microsecond all-atom molecular dynamics simulations.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Shuguang; Wu, Rongliang; Latek, Dorota; Trzaskowski, Bartosz; Filipek, Slawomir

    2013-01-01

    Sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P) is a lysophospholipid mediator which activates G protein-coupled sphingosine 1-phosphate receptors and thus evokes a variety of cell and tissue responses including lymphocyte trafficking, endothelial development, integrity, and maturation. We performed five all-atom 700 ns molecular dynamics simulations of the sphingosine 1-phosphate receptor 1 (S1P₁) based on recently released crystal structure of that receptor with an antagonist. We found that the initial movements of amino acid residues occurred in the area of highly conserved W269⁶·⁴⁸ in TM6 which is close to the ligand binding location. Those residues located in the central part of the receptor and adjacent to kinks of TM helices comprise of a transmission switch. Side chains movements of those residues were coupled to the movements of water molecules inside the receptor which helped in the gradual opening of intracellular part of the receptor. The most stable parts of the protein were helices TM1 and TM2, while the largest movement was observed for TM7, possibly due to the short intracellular part starting with a helix kink at P⁷·⁵⁰, which might be the first helix to move at the intracellular side. We show for the first time the detailed view of the concerted action of the transmission switch and Trp (W⁶·⁴⁸) rotamer toggle switch leading to redirection of water molecules flow in the central part of the receptor. That event is a prerequisite for subsequent changes in intracellular part of the receptor involving water influx and opening of the receptor structure. PMID:24098103

  4. All-atom 3D structure prediction of transmembrane β-barrel proteins from sequences

    PubMed Central

    Hayat, Sikander; Sander, Chris; Marks, Debora S.

    2015-01-01

    Transmembrane β-barrels (TMBs) carry out major functions in substrate transport and protein biogenesis but experimental determination of their 3D structure is challenging. Encouraged by successful de novo 3D structure prediction of globular and α-helical membrane proteins from sequence alignments alone, we developed an approach to predict the 3D structure of TMBs. The approach combines the maximum-entropy evolutionary coupling method for predicting residue contacts (EVfold) with a machine-learning approach (boctopus2) for predicting β-strands in the barrel. In a blinded test for 19 TMB proteins of known structure that have a sufficient number of diverse homologous sequences available, this combined method (EVfold_bb) predicts hydrogen-bonded residue pairs between adjacent β-strands at an accuracy of ∼70%. This accuracy is sufficient for the generation of all-atom 3D models. In the transmembrane barrel region, the average 3D structure accuracy [template-modeling (TM) score] of top-ranked models is 0.54 (ranging from 0.36 to 0.85), with a higher (44%) number of residue pairs in correct strand–strand registration than in earlier methods (18%). Although the nonbarrel regions are predicted less accurately overall, the evolutionary couplings identify some highly constrained loop residues and, for FecA protein, the barrel including the structure of a plug domain can be accurately modeled (TM score = 0.68). Lower prediction accuracy tends to be associated with insufficient sequence information and we therefore expect increasing numbers of β-barrel families to become accessible to accurate 3D structure prediction as the number of available sequences increases. PMID:25858953

  5. All-Atom Internal Coordinate Mechanics (ICM) Force Field for Hexopyranoses and Glycoproteins

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    We present an extension of the all-atom internal-coordinate force field, ICMFF, that allows for simulation of heterogeneous systems including hexopyranose saccharides and glycan chains in addition to proteins. A library of standard glycan geometries containing α- and β-anomers of the most common hexapyranoses, i.e., d-galactose, d-glucose, d-mannose, d-xylose, l-fucose, N-acetylglucosamine, N-acetylgalactosamine, sialic, and glucuronic acids, is created based on the analysis of the saccharide structures reported in the Cambridge Structural Database. The new force field parameters include molecular electrostatic potential-derived partial atomic charges and the torsional parameters derived from quantum mechanical data for a collection of minimal molecular fragments and related molecules. The ϕ/ψ torsional parameters for different types of glycosidic linkages are developed using model compounds containing the key atoms in the full carbohydrates, i.e., glycosidic-linked tetrahydropyran–cyclohexane dimers. Target data for parameter optimization include two-dimensional energy surfaces corresponding to the ϕ/ψ glycosidic dihedral angles in the disaccharide analogues, as determined by quantum mechanical MP2/6-31G** single-point energies on HF/6-31G** optimized structures. To achieve better agreement with the observed geometries of glycosidic linkages, the bond angles at the O-linkage atoms are added to the internal variable set and the corresponding bond bending energy term is parametrized using quantum mechanical data. The resulting force field is validated on glycan chains of 1–12 residues from a set of high-resolution X-ray glycoprotein structures based on heavy atom root-mean-square deviations of the lowest-energy glycan conformations generated by the biased probability Monte Carlo (BPMC) molecular mechanics simulations from the native structures. The appropriate BPMC distributions for monosaccharide–monosaccharide and protein–glycan linkages are derived

  6. All-atom polarizable force field for DNA based on the classical Drude oscillator model.

    PubMed

    Savelyev, Alexey; MacKerell, Alexander D

    2014-06-15

    Presented is a first generation atomistic force field (FF) for DNA in which electronic polarization is modeled based on the classical Drude oscillator formalism. The DNA model is based on parameters for small molecules representative of nucleic acids, including alkanes, ethers, dimethylphosphate, and the nucleic acid bases and empirical adjustment of key dihedral parameters associated with the phosphodiester backbone, glycosidic linkages, and sugar moiety of DNA. Our optimization strategy is based on achieving a compromise between satisfying the properties of the underlying model compounds in the gas phase targeting quantum mechanical (QM) data and reproducing a number of experimental properties of DNA duplexes in the condensed phase. The resulting Drude FF yields stable DNA duplexes on the 100-ns time scale and satisfactorily reproduce (1) the equilibrium between A and B forms of DNA and (2) transitions between the BI and BII substates of B form DNA. Consistency with the gas phase QM data for the model compounds is significantly better for the Drude model as compared to the CHARMM36 additive FF, which is suggested to be due to the improved response of the model to changes in the environment associated with the explicit inclusion of polarizability. Analysis of dipole moments associated with the nucleic acid bases shows the Drude model to have significantly larger values than those present in CHARMM36, with the dipoles of individual bases undergoing significant variations during the MD simulations. Additionally, the dipole moment of water was observed to be perturbed in the grooves of DNA. PMID:24752978

  7. All-Atom Polarizable Force Field for DNA Based on the Classical Drude Oscillator Model

    PubMed Central

    Savelyev, Alexey; MacKerell, Alexander D.

    2014-01-01

    Presented is a first generation atomistic force field for DNA in which electronic polarization is modeled based on the classical Drude oscillator formalism. The DNA model is based on parameters for small molecules representative of nucleic acids, including alkanes, ethers, dimethylphosphate, and the nucleic acid bases and empirical adjustment of key dihedral parameters associated with the phosphodiester backbone, glycosidic linkages and sugar moiety of DNA. Our optimization strategy is based on achieving a compromise between satisfying the properties of the underlying model compounds in the gas phase targeting QM data and reproducing a number of experimental properties of DNA duplexes in the condensed phase. The resulting Drude force field yields stable DNA duplexes on the 100 ns time scale and satisfactorily reproduces (1) the equilibrium between A and B forms of DNA and (2) transitions between the BI and BII sub-states of B form DNA. Consistency with the gas phase QM data for the model compounds is significantly better for the Drude model as compared to the CHARMM36 additive force field, which is suggested to be due to the improved response of the model to changes in the environment associated with the explicit inclusion of polarizability. Analysis of dipole moments associated with the nucleic acid bases shows the Drude model to have significantly larger values than those present in CHARMM36, with the dipoles of individual bases undergoing significant variations during the MD simulations. Additionally, the dipole moment of water was observed to be perturbed in the grooves of DNA. PMID:24752978

  8. Calculating the binding free energies of charged species based on explicit-solvent simulations employing lattice-sum methods: An accurate correction scheme for electrostatic finite-size effects

    PubMed Central

    Rocklin, Gabriel J.; Mobley, David L.; Dill, Ken A.; Hünenberger, Philippe H.

    2013-01-01

    calculations for a given system, its dependence on the box size being analytical. The latter scheme also provides insight into the physical origin of the finite-size effects. These two schemes also encompass a correction for discrete solvent effects that persists even in the limit of infinite box sizes. Application of either scheme essentially eliminates the size dependence of the corrected charging free energies (maximal deviation of 1.5 kJ mol−1). Because it is simple to apply, the analytical correction scheme offers a general solution to the problem of finite-size effects in free-energy calculations involving charged solutes, as encountered in calculations concerning, e.g., protein-ligand binding, biomolecular association, residue mutation, pKa and redox potential estimation, substrate transformation, solvation, and solvent-solvent partitioning. PMID:24320250

  9. Calculating the binding free energies of charged species based on explicit-solvent simulations employing lattice-sum methods: An accurate correction scheme for electrostatic finite-size effects

    SciTech Connect

    Rocklin, Gabriel J.; Mobley, David L.; Dill, Ken A.; Hünenberger, Philippe H.

    2013-11-14

    -periodic PB calculations for a given system, its dependence on the box size being analytical. The latter scheme also provides insight into the physical origin of the finite-size effects. These two schemes also encompass a correction for discrete solvent effects that persists even in the limit of infinite box sizes. Application of either scheme essentially eliminates the size dependence of the corrected charging free energies (maximal deviation of 1.5 kJ mol{sup −1}). Because it is simple to apply, the analytical correction scheme offers a general solution to the problem of finite-size effects in free-energy calculations involving charged solutes, as encountered in calculations concerning, e.g., protein-ligand binding, biomolecular association, residue mutation, pK{sub a} and redox potential estimation, substrate transformation, solvation, and solvent-solvent partitioning.

  10. A robust all-atom model for LCAT generated by homology modeling.

    PubMed

    Segrest, Jere P; Jones, Martin K; Catte, Andrea; Thirumuruganandham, Saravana P

    2015-03-01

    LCAT is activated by apoA-I to form cholesteryl ester. We combined two structures, phospholipase A2 (PLA2) that hydrolyzes the ester bond at the sn-2 position of oxidized (short) acyl chains of phospholipid, and bacteriophage tubulin PhuZ, as C- and N-terminal templates, respectively, to create a novel homology model for human LCAT. The juxtaposition of multiple structural motifs matching experimental data is compelling evidence for the general correctness of many features of the model: i) The N-terminal 10 residues of the model, required for LCAT activity, extend the hydrophobic binding trough for the sn-2 chain 15-20 Å relative to PLA2. ii) The topography of the trough places the ester bond of the sn-2 chain less than 5 Å from the hydroxyl of the catalytic nucleophile, S181. iii) A β-hairpin resembling a lipase lid separates S181 from solvent. iv) S181 interacts with three functionally critical residues: E149, that regulates sn-2 chain specificity, and K128 and R147, whose mutations cause LCAT deficiency. Because the model provides a novel explanation for the complicated thermodynamic problem of the transfer of hydrophobic substrates from HDL to the catalytic triad of LCAT, it is an important step toward understanding the antiatherogenic role of HDL in reverse cholesterol transport. PMID:25589508

  11. Hierarchical atom type definitions and extensible all-atom force fields.

    PubMed

    Jin, Zhao; Yang, Chunwei; Cao, Fenglei; Li, Feng; Jing, Zhifeng; Chen, Long; Shen, Zhe; Xin, Liang; Tong, Sijia; Sun, Huai

    2016-03-15

    The extensibility of force field is a key to solve the missing parameter problem commonly found in force field applications. The extensibility of conventional force fields is traditionally managed in the parameterization procedure, which becomes impractical as the coverage of the force field increases above a threshold. A hierarchical atom-type definition (HAD) scheme is proposed to make extensible atom type definitions, which ensures that the force field developed based on the definitions are extensible. To demonstrate how HAD works and to prepare a foundation for future developments, two general force fields based on AMBER and DFF functional forms are parameterized for common organic molecules. The force field parameters are derived from the same set of quantum mechanical data and experimental liquid data using an automated parameterization tool, and validated by calculating molecular and liquid properties. The hydration free energies are calculated successfully by introducing a polarization scaling factor to the dispersion term between the solvent and solute molecules. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26537332

  12. A robust all-atom model for LCAT generated by homology modeling[S

    PubMed Central

    Segrest, Jere P.; Jones, Martin K.; Catte, Andrea; Thirumuruganandham, Saravana P.

    2015-01-01

    LCAT is activated by apoA-I to form cholesteryl ester. We combined two structures, phospholipase A2 (PLA2) that hydrolyzes the ester bond at the sn-2 position of oxidized (short) acyl chains of phospholipid, and bacteriophage tubulin PhuZ, as C- and N-terminal templates, respectively, to create a novel homology model for human LCAT. The juxtaposition of multiple structural motifs matching experimental data is compelling evidence for the general correctness of many features of the model: i) The N-terminal 10 residues of the model, required for LCAT activity, extend the hydrophobic binding trough for the sn-2 chain 15–20 Å relative to PLA2. ii) The topography of the trough places the ester bond of the sn-2 chain less than 5 Å from the hydroxyl of the catalytic nucleophile, S181. iii) A β-hairpin resembling a lipase lid separates S181 from solvent. iv) S181 interacts with three functionally critical residues: E149, that regulates sn-2 chain specificity, and K128 and R147, whose mutations cause LCAT deficiency. Because the model provides a novel explanation for the complicated thermodynamic problem of the transfer of hydrophobic substrates from HDL to the catalytic triad of LCAT, it is an important step toward understanding the antiatherogenic role of HDL in reverse cholesterol transport. PMID:25589508

  13. Assembling a xylanase-lichenase chimera through all-atom molecular dynamics simulations.

    PubMed

    Cota, Junio; Oliveira, Leandro C; Damásio, André R L; Citadini, Ana P; Hoffmam, Zaira B; Alvarez, Thabata M; Codima, Carla A; Leite, Vitor B P; Pastore, Glaucia; de Oliveira-Neto, Mario; Murakami, Mario T; Ruller, Roberto; Squina, Fabio M

    2013-08-01

    Multifunctional enzyme engineering can improve enzyme cocktails for emerging biofuel technology. Molecular dynamics through structure-based models (SB) is an effective tool for assessing the tridimensional arrangement of chimeric enzymes as well as for inferring the functional practicability before experimental validation. This study describes the computational design of a bifunctional xylanase-lichenase chimera (XylLich) using the xynA and bglS genes from Bacillus subtilis. In silico analysis of the average solvent accessible surface area (SAS) and the root mean square fluctuation (RMSF) predicted a fully functional chimera, with minor fluctuations and variations along the polypeptide chains. Afterwards, the chimeric enzyme was built by fusing the xynA and bglS genes. XylLich was evaluated through small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) experiments, resulting in scattering curves with a very accurate fit to the theoretical protein model. The chimera preserved the biochemical characteristics of the parental enzymes, with the exception of a slight variation in the temperature of operation and the catalytic efficiency (kcat/Km). The absence of substantial shifts in the catalytic mode of operation was also verified. Furthermore, the production of chimeric enzymes could be more profitable than producing a single enzyme separately, based on comparing the recombinant protein production yield and the hydrolytic activity achieved for XylLich with that of the parental enzymes. PMID:23459129

  14. Free-Energy Barriers and Reaction Mechanisms for the Electrochemical Reduction of CO on the Cu(100) Surface, Including Multiple Layers of Explicit Solvent at pH 0.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Tao; Xiao, Hai; Goddard, William A

    2015-12-01

    The great interest in the photochemical reduction from CO2 to fuels and chemicals has focused attention on Cu because of its unique ability to catalyze formation of carbon-containing fuels and chemicals. A particular goal is to learn how to modify the Cu catalysts to enhance the production selectivity while reducing the energy requirements (overpotential). To enable such developments, we report here the free-energy reaction barriers and mechanistic pathways on the Cu(100) surface, which produces only CH4 (not C2H4 or CH3OH) in acid (pH 0). We predict a threshold potential for CH4 formation of -0.52 V, which compares well to experiments at low pH, -0.45 to -0.50 V. These quantum molecular dynamics simulations included ∼5 layers of explicit water at the water/electrode interface using enhanced sampling methodology to obtain the free energies. We find that that chemisorbed hydroxyl-methylene (CH-OH) is the key intermediate determining the selectivity for methane over methanol. PMID:26562750

  15. All-atom simulation study of protein PTH(1-34) by using the Wang-Landau sampling method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Seung-Yeon; Kwak, Wooseop

    2014-12-01

    We perform simulations of the N-terminal 34-residue protein fragment PTH(1-34), consisting of 581 atoms, of the 84-residue human parathyroid hormone by using the all-atom ECEPP/3 force field and the Wang-Landau sampling method. Through a massive high-performance computation, the density of states and the partition function Z( T), as a continuous function of T, are obtained for PTH(1-34). From the continuous partition function Z( T), the partition function zeros of PTH(1-34) are evaluated for the first time. From both the specific heat and the partition function zeros, two characteristic transition temperatures are obtained for the all-atom protein PTH(1-34). The higher transition temperature T 1 and the lower transition temperature T 2 of PTH(1-34) can be interpreted as the collapse temperature T θ and the folding temperature T f , respectively.

  16. Local order parameters for use in driving homogeneous ice nucleation with all-atom models of water.

    PubMed

    Reinhardt, Aleks; Doye, Jonathan P K; Noya, Eva G; Vega, Carlos

    2012-11-21

    We present a local order parameter based on the standard Steinhardt-Ten Wolde approach that is capable both of tracking and of driving homogeneous ice nucleation in simulations of all-atom models of water. We demonstrate that it is capable of forcing the growth of ice nuclei in supercooled liquid water simulated using the TIP4P/2005 model using over-biassed umbrella sampling Monte Carlo simulations. However, even with such an order parameter, the dynamics of ice growth in deeply supercooled liquid water in all-atom models of water are shown to be very slow, and so the computation of free energy landscapes and nucleation rates remains extremely challenging. PMID:23181323

  17. Bridging between NMA and Elastic Network Models: Preserving All-Atom Accuracy in Coarse-Grained Models

    PubMed Central

    Na, Hyuntae; Jernigan, Robert L.; Song, Guang

    2015-01-01

    Dynamics can provide deep insights into the functional mechanisms of proteins and protein complexes. For large protein complexes such as GroEL/GroES with more than 8,000 residues, obtaining a fine-grained all-atom description of its normal mode motions can be computationally prohibitive and is often unnecessary. For this reason, coarse-grained models have been used successfully. However, most existing coarse-grained models use extremely simple potentials to represent the interactions within the coarse-grained structures and as a result, the dynamics obtained for the coarse-grained structures may not always be fully realistic. There is a gap between the quality of the dynamics of the coarse-grained structures given by all-atom models and that by coarse-grained models. In this work, we resolve an important question in protein dynamics computations—how can we efficiently construct coarse-grained models whose description of the dynamics of the coarse-grained structures remains as accurate as that given by all-atom models? Our method takes advantage of the sparseness of the Hessian matrix and achieves a high efficiency with a novel iterative matrix projection approach. The result is highly significant since it can provide descriptions of normal mode motions at an all-atom level of accuracy even for the largest biomolecular complexes. The application of our method to GroEL/GroES offers new insights into the mechanism of this biologically important chaperonin, such as that the conformational transitions of this protein complex in its functional cycle are even more strongly connected to the first few lowest frequency modes than with other coarse-grained models. PMID:26473491

  18. CHARMM General Force Field (CGenFF): A force field for drug-like molecules compatible with the CHARMM all-atom additive biological force fields

    PubMed Central

    Vanommeslaeghe, K.; Hatcher, E.; Acharya, C.; Kundu, S.; Zhong, S.; Shim, J.; Darian, E.; Guvench, O.; Lopes, P.; Vorobyov, I.; MacKerell, A. D.

    2010-01-01

    The widely used CHARMM additive all-atom force field includes parameters for proteins, nucleic acids, lipids and carbohydrates. In the present paper an extension of the CHARMM force field to drug-like molecules is presented. The resulting CHARMM General Force Field (CGenFF) covers a wide range of chemical groups present in biomolecules and drug-like molecules, including a large number of heterocyclic scaffolds. The parametrization philosophy behind the force field focuses on quality at the expense of transferability, with the implementation concentrating on an extensible force field. Statistics related to the quality of the parametrization with a focus on experimental validation are presented. Additionally, the parametrization procedure, described fully in the present paper in the context of the model systems, pyrrolidine, and 3-phenoxymethylpyrrolidine will allow users to readily extend the force field to chemical groups that are not explicitly covered in the force field as well as add functional groups to and link together molecules already available in the force field. CGenFF thus makes it possible to perform “all-CHARMM” simulations on drug-target interactions thereby extending the utility of CHARMM force fields to medicinally relevant systems. PMID:19575467

  19. Making Programming Knowledge Explicit.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Navrat, Pavol; Rozinajova, Viera

    1993-01-01

    Addresses the question of how to write computer programs using explicit knowledge and rules-based systems. Highlights include the knowledge representation tool; the knowledge base on programming; and results of experiments that tested the system. Appendices include the set of rules for the experimental knowledge base and details of two…

  20. All-atom normal-mode analysis reveals an RNA-induced allostery in a bacteriophage coat protein

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dykeman, Eric C.; Twarock, Reidun

    2010-03-01

    Assembly of the T=3 bacteriophage MS2 is initiated by the binding of a 19 nucleotide RNA stem loop from within the phage genome to a symmetric coat protein dimer. This binding event effects a folding of the FG loop in one of the protein subunits of the dimer and results in the formation of an asymmetric dimer. Since both the symmetric and asymmetric forms of the dimer are needed for the assembly of the protein container, this allosteric switch plays an important role in the life cycle of the phage. We provide here details of an all-atom normal-mode analysis of this allosteric effect. The results suggest that asymmetric contacts between the A -duplex RNA phosphodiester backbone of the stem loop with the EF loop in one coat protein subunit results in an increased dynamic behavior of its FG loop. The four lowest-frequency modes, which encompass motions predominantly on the FG loops, account for over 90% of the increased dynamic behavior due to a localization of the vibrational pattern on a single FG loop. Finally, we show that an analysis of the allosteric effect using an elastic network model fails to predict this localization effect, highlighting the importance of using an all-atom full force field method for this problem.

  1. Solvent substitution

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-01-01

    The DOE Environmental Restoration and Waste Management Office of Technology Development and the Air Force Engineering and Services Center convened the First Annual International Workshop on Solvent Substitution on December 4--7, 1990. The primary objectives of this joint effort were to share information and ideas among attendees in order to enhance the development and implementation of required new technologies for the elimination of pollutants associated with industrial use of hazardous and toxic solvents; and to aid in accelerating collaborative efforts and technology transfer between government and industry for solvent substitution. There were workshop sessions focusing on Alternative Technologies, Alternative Solvents, Recovery/Recycling, Low VOC Materials and Treatment for Environmentally Safe Disposal. The 35 invited papers presented covered a wide range of solvent substitution activities including: hardware and weapons production and maintenance, paint stripping, coating applications, printed circuit boards, metal cleaning, metal finishing, manufacturing, compliance monitoring and process control monitoring. This publication includes the majority of these presentations. In addition, in order to further facilitate information exchange and technology transfer, the US Air Force and DOE solicited additional papers under a general Call for Papers.'' These papers, which underwent review and final selection by a peer review committee, are also included in this combined Proceedings/Compendium. For those involved in handling, using or managing hazardous and toxic solvents, this document should prove to be a valuable resource, providing the most up-to-date information on current technologies and practices in solvent substitution. Individual papers are abstracted separated.

  2. Analysis of Ligand-Receptor Association and Intermediate Transfer Rates in Multienzyme Nanostructures with All-Atom Brownian Dynamics Simulations.

    PubMed

    Roberts, Christopher C; Chang, Chia-En A

    2016-08-25

    We present the second-generation GeomBD Brownian dynamics software for determining interenzyme intermediate transfer rates and substrate association rates in biomolecular complexes. Substrate and intermediate association rates for a series of enzymes or biomolecules can be compared between the freely diffusing disorganized configuration and various colocalized or complexed arrangements for kinetic investigation of enhanced intermediate transfer. In addition, enzyme engineering techniques, such as synthetic protein conjugation, can be computationally modeled and analyzed to better understand changes in substrate association relative to native enzymes. Tools are provided to determine nonspecific ligand-receptor association residence times, and to visualize common sites of nonspecific association of substrates on receptor surfaces. To demonstrate features of the software, interenzyme intermediate substrate transfer rate constants are calculated and compared for all-atom models of DNA origami scaffold-bound bienzyme systems of glucose oxidase and horseradish peroxidase. Also, a DNA conjugated horseradish peroxidase enzyme was analyzed for its propensity to increase substrate association rates and substrate local residence times relative to the unmodified enzyme. We also demonstrate the rapid determination and visualization of common sites of nonspecific ligand-receptor association by using HIV-1 protease and an inhibitor, XK263. GeomBD2 accelerates simulations by precomputing van der Waals potential energy grids and electrostatic potential grid maps, and has a flexible and extensible support for all-atom and coarse-grained force fields. Simulation software is written in C++ and utilizes modern parallelization techniques for potential grid preparation and Brownian dynamics simulation processes. Analysis scripts, written in the Python scripting language, are provided for quantitative simulation analysis. GeomBD2 is applicable to the fields of biophysics, bioengineering

  3. Explicit Fourier wavefield operators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferguson, R. J.; Margrave, G. F.

    2006-04-01

    Explicit wavefield extrapolators are based on direct analytic mathematical formulae that express the output as an extrapolation operator acting on the input, while implicit methods usually require the calculation of the numerical inverse of a matrix to obtain the output. Typically, explicit methods are faster than implicit methods, and they often give more insight into the physics of the wave propagation, but they often suffer from instability. Four different explicit extrapolators based on Fourier theory are presented and analysed. They are: PS (ordinary phase shift), GPSPI (generalized phase shift plus interpolation), NSPS (non-stationary phase shift) and SNPS (symmetric non-stationary phase shift). A formal proof is given that NSPS in a direction orthogonal to the velocity gradient is the mathematical adjoint process to GPSPI in the opposite direction. This motivates the construction of SNPS that combines NSPS and GPSPI in a symmetric fashion. This symmetry (under interchange of input and output lateral coordinates) is required by reciprocity arguments. PS and SNPS are symmetric while NSPS and GPSPI are not. A numerical stability study using SVD (singular value decomposition) shows that all of these extrapolators can become unstable for strong lateral velocity gradients. Unstable operators allow amplitudes to grow non-physically in a recursion. Stability is enhanced by introducing a small (~3 per cent) imaginary component to the velocities. This causes a numerical attenuation that tends to stabilize the operators but does not address the cause of the instability. For the velocity model studied (a very challenging case) GPSPI and NSPS have exactly the same instability while SNPS is always more stable. Instability manifests in a complicated way as a function of extrapolation step size, frequency, velocity gradient, and strength of numerical attenuation. The SNPS operator can be stabilized over a wide range of conditions with considerably less attenuation than is

  4. Explicit superconic curves.

    PubMed

    Cho, Sunggoo

    2016-09-01

    Conics and Cartesian ovals are extremely important curves in various fields of science. In addition, aspheric curves based on conics are useful in optical design. Superconic curves, recently suggested by Greynolds, are extensions of both conics and Cartesian ovals and have been applied to optical design. However, they are not extensions of aspheric curves based on conics. In this work, we investigate another type of superconic curves. These superconic curves are extensions of not only conics and Cartesian ovals but also aspheric curves based on conics. Moreover, these are represented in explicit form, while Greynolds's superconic curves are in implicit form. PMID:27607506

  5. The explicit token store

    SciTech Connect

    Culler, D.E. ); Papadopoulos, G.M. )

    1990-12-01

    This paper presents an unusually simple approach to dynamic dataflow execution, called the Explicit Token Store (ETS) architecture, and its current realization in Monsoon. The essence of dynamic dataflow execution is captured by a simple transition on state bits associated with storage local to a processor. Low-level storage management is performed by the compiler in assigning nodes to slots in an activation frame, rather than dynamically in hardware. The processor is simple, highly pipelined, and quite general. There is exactly one instruction executed for each action on the dataflow graph. Thus, the machine-oriented ETS model provides new insight into the real cost of direct execution of dataflow graphs.

  6. Modeling aqueous solvation with semi-explicit assembly

    PubMed Central

    Fennell, Christopher J.; Kehoe, Charles W.; Dill, Ken A.

    2011-01-01

    We describe a computational solvation model called semi-explicit assembly (SEA). SEA water captures much of the physics of explicit-solvent models but with computational speeds approaching those of implicit-solvent models. We use an explicit-water model to precompute properties of water solvation shells around simple spheres, then assemble a solute’s solvation shell by combining the shells of these spheres. SEA improves upon implicit-solvent models of solvation free energies by accounting for local solute curvature, accounting for near-neighbor nonadditivities, and treating water’s dipole as being asymmetrical with respect to positive or negative solute charges. SEA does not involve parameter fitting, because parameters come from the given underlying explicit-solvation model. SEA is about as accurate as explicit simulations as shown by comparisons against four different homologous alkyl series, a set of 504 varied solutes, solutes taken retrospectively from two solvation-prediction events, and a hypothetical polar-solute series, and SEA is about 100-fold faster than Poisson–Boltzmann calculations. PMID:21300905

  7. Solvent Production

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This article describes production of butanol [acetone-butanol-ethanol, (also called AB or ABE or solvent)] by fermentation using both traditional and current technologies. AB production from agricultural commodities such as corn and molasses was an important historical fermentation. Unfortunately,...

  8. Temperature-Dependent Conformational Properties of Human Neuronal Calcium Sensor-1 Protein Revealed by All-Atom Simulations.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Yuzhen; Ma, Buyong; Qi, Ruxi; Nussinov, Ruth; Zhang, Qingwen

    2016-04-14

    Neuronal calcium sensor-1 (NCS-1) protein has orthologues from Saccharomyces cerevisiae to human with highly conserved amino acid sequences. NCS-1 is an important factor controlling the animal's response to temperature change. This leads us to investigate the temperature effects on the conformational dynamics of human NCS-1 at 310 and 316 K by all-atom molecular dynamics (MD) simulations and dynamic community network analysis. Four independent 500 ns MD simulations show that secondary structure content at 316 K is similar to that at 310 K, whereas the global protein structure is expanded. Loop 3 (L3) adopts an extended state occuping the hydrophobic crevice, and the number of suboptimal communication paths between residue D176 and V190 is reduced at 316 K. The dynamic community network analysis suggests that the interdomain correlation is weakened, and the intradomain coupling is strengthened at 316 K. The elevated temperature reduces the number of the salt bridges, especially in C-domain. This study suggests that the elevated temperature affects the conformational dynamics of human NCS-1 protein. Comparison of the structural dynamics of R102Q mutant and Δ176-190 truncated NCS-1 suggests that the structural and dynamical response of NCS-1 protein to elevated temperature may be one of its intrinsic functional properties. PMID:27007011

  9. All-atom molecular dynamics analysis of multi-peptide systems reproduces peptide solubility in line with experimental observations

    PubMed Central

    Kuroda, Yutaka; Suenaga, Atsushi; Sato, Yuji; Kosuda, Satoshi; Taiji, Makoto

    2016-01-01

    In order to investigate the contribution of individual amino acids to protein and peptide solubility, we carried out 100 ns molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of 106 Å3 cubic boxes containing ~3 × 104 water molecules and 27 tetra-peptides regularly positioned at 23 Å from each other and composed of a single amino acid type for all natural amino acids but cysteine and glycine. The calculations were performed using Amber with a standard force field on a special purpose MDGRAPE-3 computer, without introducing any “artificial” hydrophobic interactions. Tetra-peptides composed of I, V, L, M, N, Q, F, W, Y, and H formed large amorphous clusters, and those containing A, P, S, and T formed smaller ones. Tetra-peptides made of D, E, K, and R did not cluster at all. These observations correlated well with experimental solubility tendencies as well as hydrophobicity scales with correlation coefficients of 0.5 to > 0.9. Repulsive Coulomb interactions were dominant in ensuring high solubility, whereas both Coulomb and van der Waals (vdW) energies contributed to the aggregations of low solubility amino acids. Overall, this very first all-atom molecular dynamics simulation of a multi-peptide system appears to reproduce the basic properties of peptide solubility, essentially in line with experimental observations. PMID:26817663

  10. Insights into the Tunnel Mechanism of Cholesteryl Ester Transfer Protein through All-atom Molecular Dynamics Simulations.

    PubMed

    Lei, Dongsheng; Rames, Matthew; Zhang, Xing; Zhang, Lei; Zhang, Shengli; Ren, Gang

    2016-07-01

    Cholesteryl ester transfer protein (CETP) mediates cholesteryl ester (CE) transfer from the atheroprotective high density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol to the atherogenic low density lipoprotein cholesterol. In the past decade, this property has driven the development of CETP inhibitors, which have been evaluated in large scale clinical trials for treating cardiovascular diseases. Despite the pharmacological interest, little is known about the fundamental mechanism of CETP in CE transfer. Recent electron microscopy (EM) experiments have suggested a tunnel mechanism, and molecular dynamics simulations have shown that the flexible N-terminal distal end of CETP penetrates into the HDL surface and takes up a CE molecule through an open pore. However, it is not known whether a CE molecule can completely transfer through an entire CETP molecule. Here, we used all-atom molecular dynamics simulations to evaluate this possibility. The results showed that a hydrophobic tunnel inside CETP is sufficient to allow a CE molecule to completely transfer through the entire CETP within a predicted transfer time and at a rate comparable with those obtained through physiological measurements. Analyses of the detailed interactions revealed several residues that might be critical for CETP function, which may provide important clues for the effective development of CETP inhibitors and treatment of cardiovascular diseases. PMID:27143480

  11. Insights into the Tunnel Mechanism of Cholesteryl Ester Transfer Protein through All-atom Molecular Dynamics Simulations*

    PubMed Central

    Lei, Dongsheng; Rames, Matthew; Zhang, Xing; Zhang, Lei; Zhang, Shengli; Ren, Gang

    2016-01-01

    Cholesteryl ester transfer protein (CETP) mediates cholesteryl ester (CE) transfer from the atheroprotective high density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol to the atherogenic low density lipoprotein cholesterol. In the past decade, this property has driven the development of CETP inhibitors, which have been evaluated in large scale clinical trials for treating cardiovascular diseases. Despite the pharmacological interest, little is known about the fundamental mechanism of CETP in CE transfer. Recent electron microscopy (EM) experiments have suggested a tunnel mechanism, and molecular dynamics simulations have shown that the flexible N-terminal distal end of CETP penetrates into the HDL surface and takes up a CE molecule through an open pore. However, it is not known whether a CE molecule can completely transfer through an entire CETP molecule. Here, we used all-atom molecular dynamics simulations to evaluate this possibility. The results showed that a hydrophobic tunnel inside CETP is sufficient to allow a CE molecule to completely transfer through the entire CETP within a predicted transfer time and at a rate comparable with those obtained through physiological measurements. Analyses of the detailed interactions revealed several residues that might be critical for CETP function, which may provide important clues for the effective development of CETP inhibitors and treatment of cardiovascular diseases. PMID:27143480

  12. Reorientation and Dimerization of the Membrane-Bound Antimicrobial Peptide PGLa from Microsecond All-Atom MD Simulations

    PubMed Central

    Ulmschneider, Jakob P.; Smith, Jeremy C.; Ulmschneider, Martin B.; Ulrich, Anne S.; Strandberg, Erik

    2012-01-01

    The membrane-active antimicrobial peptide PGLa from Xenopus laevis is known from solid-state 2H-, 15N-, and 19F-NMR spectroscopy to occupy two distinct α-helical surface adsorbed states in membranes: a surface-bound S-state with a tilt angle of ∼95° at low peptide/lipid molar ratio (P/L = 1:200), and an obliquely tilted T-state with a tilt angle of 127° at higher peptide concentration (P/L = 1:50). Using a rapid molecular-dynamics insertion protocol in combination with microsecond-scale simulation, we have characterized the structure of both states in detail. As expected, the amphiphilic peptide resides horizontally on the membrane surface in a monomeric form at a low P/L, whereas the T-state is seen in the simulations to be a symmetric antiparallel dimer, with close contacts between small glycine and alanine residues at the interface. The computed tilt angles and azimuthal rotations, as well as the quadrupolar splittings predicted from the simulations agree with the experimental NMR data. The simulations reveal many structural details previously inaccessible, such as the immersion depth of the peptide in the membrane and the packing of the dimerization interface. The study highlights the ability and limitations of current state-of-the-art multimicrosecond all-atom simulations of membrane-active peptides to complement experimental data from solid-state NMR. PMID:22947863

  13. Insights into activation and RNA binding of trp RNA-binding attenuation protein (TRAP) through all-atom simulations.

    PubMed

    Murtola, Teemu; Vattulainen, Ilpo; Falck, Emma

    2008-06-01

    Tryptophan biosynthesis in Bacillus stearothermophilus is regulated by a trp RNA binding attenuation protein (TRAP). It is a ring-shaped 11-mer of identical 74 residue subunits. Tryptophan binding pockets are located between adjacent subunits, and tryptophan binding activates TRAP to bind RNA. Here, we report results from all-atom molecular dynamics simulations of the system, complementing existing extensive experimental studies. We focus on two questions. First, we look at the activation mechanism, of which relatively little is known experimentally. We find that the absence of tryptophan allows larger motions close to the tryptophan binding site, and we see indication of a conformational change in the BC loop. However, complete deactivation seems to occur on much longer time scales than the 40 ns studied here. Second, we study the TRAP-RNA interactions. We look at the relative flexibilities of the different bases in the complex and analyze the hydrogen bonds between the protein and RNA. We also study the role of Lys37, Lys56, and Arg58, which have been experimentally identified as essential for RNA binding. Hydrophobic stacking of Lys37 with the nearby RNA base is confirmed, but we do not see direct hydrogen bonding between RNA and the other two residues, in contrast to the crystal structure. Rather, these residues seem to stabilize the RNA-binding surface, and their positive charge may also play a role in RNA binding. Simulations also indicate that TRAP is able to attract RNA nonspecifically, and the interactions are quantified in more detail using binding energy calculations. The formation of the final binding complex is a very slow process: within the simulation time scale of 40 ns, only two guanine bases become bound (and no others), indicating that the binding initiates at these positions. In general, our results are in good agreement with experimental studies, and provide atomic-scale insights into the processes. PMID:18186477

  14. A combined coarse-grained and all-atom simulation of TRPV1 channel gating and heat activation

    PubMed Central

    Qin, Feng

    2015-01-01

    The transient receptor potential (TRP) channels act as key sensors of various chemical and physical stimuli in eukaryotic cells. Despite years of study, the molecular mechanisms of TRP channel activation remain unclear. To elucidate the structural, dynamic, and energetic basis of gating in TRPV1 (a founding member of the TRPV subfamily), we performed coarse-grained modeling and all-atom molecular dynamics (MD) simulation based on the recently solved high resolution structures of the open and closed form of TRPV1. Our coarse-grained normal mode analysis captures two key modes of collective motions involved in the TRPV1 gating transition, featuring a quaternary twist motion of the transmembrane domains (TMDs) relative to the intracellular domains (ICDs). Our transition pathway modeling predicts a sequence of structural movements that propagate from the ICDs to the TMDs via key interface domains (including the membrane proximal domain and the C-terminal domain), leading to sequential opening of the selectivity filter followed by the lower gate in the channel pore (confirmed by modeling conformational changes induced by the activation of ICDs). The above findings of coarse-grained modeling are robust to perturbation by lipids. Finally, our MD simulation of the ICD identifies key residues that contribute differently to the nonpolar energy of the open and closed state, and these residues are predicted to control the temperature sensitivity of TRPV1 gating. These computational predictions offer new insights to the mechanism for heat activation of TRPV1 gating, and will guide our future electrophysiology and mutagenesis studies. PMID:25918362

  15. All-atom force field for the prediction of vapor-liquid equilibria and interfacial properties of HFA134a.

    PubMed

    Peguin, Robson P S; Kamath, Ganesh; Potoff, Jeffrey J; da Rocha, Sandro R P

    2009-01-01

    A new all-atom force field capable of accurately predicting the bulk and interfacial properties of 1,1,1,2-tetrafluoroethane (HFA134a) is reported. Parameterization of several force fields with different initial charge configurations from ab initio calculations was performed using the histogram reweighting method and Monte Carlo simulations in the grand canonical ensemble. The 12-6 Lennard-Jones well depth and diameter for the different HFA134a models were determined by fitting the simulation results to pure-component vapor-equilibrium data. Initial screening of the force fields was achieved by comparing the calculated and experimental bulk properties. The surface tension of pure HFA134a served as an additional screening property to help discriminate an optimum model. The proposed model reproduces the experimental saturated liquid and vapor densities, and the vapor pressure for HFA134a within average errors of 0.7%, 4.4%, and 3.1%, respectively. Critical density, temperature, vapor pressure, normal boiling point, and heat of vaporization at 298 K are also in good agreement with experimental data with errors of 0.2%, 0.1%, 6.2%, 0%, 2.2%, respectively. The calculated surface tension is found to be within the experimental range of 7.7-8.1 mN.m(-1). The dipole moment of the different models was found to significantly affect the prediction of the vapor pressure and surface tension. The ability of the HFA134a models in predicting the interfacial tension against water is also discussed. The results presented here are relevant in the development of technologies where the more environmentally friendly HFA134a is utilized as a substitute to the ozone depleting chlorofluorocarbon propellants. PMID:19086791

  16. A coarse-graining approach for molecular simulation that retains the dynamics of the all-atom reference system by implementing hydrodynamic interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Markutsya, Sergiy; Lamm, Monica H

    2014-11-07

    We report on a new approach for deriving coarse-grained intermolecular forces that retains the frictional contribution that is often discarded by conventional coarse-graining methods. The approach is tested for water and an aqueous glucose solution, and the results from the new implementation for coarse-grained molecular dynamics simulation show remarkable agreement with the dynamics obtained from reference all-atom simulations. The agreement between the structural properties observed in the coarse-grained and all-atom simulations is also preserved. We discuss how this approach may be applied broadly to any existing coarse-graining method where the coarse-grained models are rigorously derived from all-atom reference systems.

  17. The Explicit Teaching of Reading.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hancock, Joelie, Ed.

    Exploring the explicit teaching of reading, this book is the result of a group of Australian teachers who took a closer look at their teaching so that they could be clearer to their kindergarten through middle-school students. Chapter 1 is based on a presentation at a Saturday inservice program on explicit teaching. Chapters 2-9 were written by…

  18. Quantum Mechanics/Molecular Mechanics Method Combined with Hybrid All-Atom and Coarse-Grained Model: Theory and Application on Redox Potential Calculations.

    PubMed

    Shen, Lin; Yang, Weitao

    2016-04-12

    We developed a new multiresolution method that spans three levels of resolution with quantum mechanical, atomistic molecular mechanical, and coarse-grained models. The resolution-adapted all-atom and coarse-grained water model, in which an all-atom structural description of the entire system is maintained during the simulations, is combined with the ab initio quantum mechanics and molecular mechanics method. We apply this model to calculate the redox potentials of the aqueous ruthenium and iron complexes by using the fractional number of electrons approach and thermodynamic integration simulations. The redox potentials are recovered in excellent accordance with the experimental data. The speed-up of the hybrid all-atom and coarse-grained water model renders it computationally more attractive. The accuracy depends on the hybrid all-atom and coarse-grained water model used in the combined quantum mechanical and molecular mechanical method. We have used another multiresolution model, in which an atomic-level layer of water molecules around redox center is solvated in supramolecular coarse-grained waters for the redox potential calculations. Compared with the experimental data, this alternative multilayer model leads to less accurate results when used with the coarse-grained polarizable MARTINI water or big multipole water model for the coarse-grained layer. PMID:26930454

  19. Reconciling Structural and Thermodynamic Predictions Using All-Atom and Coarse-Grain Force Fields: The Case of Charged Oligo-Arginine Translocation into DMPC Bilayers

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Using the translocation of short, charged cationic oligo-arginine peptides (mono-, di-, and triarginine) from bulk aqueous solution into model DMPC bilayers, we explore the question of the similarity of thermodynamic and structural predictions obtained from molecular dynamics simulations using all-atom and Martini coarse-grain force fields. Specifically, we estimate potentials of mean force associated with translocation using standard all-atom (CHARMM36 lipid) and polarizable and nonpolarizable Martini force fields, as well as a series of modified Martini-based parameter sets. We find that we are able to reproduce qualitative features of potentials of mean force of single amino acid side chain analogues into model bilayers. In particular, modifications of peptide–water and peptide–membrane interactions allow prediction of free energy minima at the bilayer–water interface as obtained with all-atom force fields. In the case of oligo-arginine peptides, the modified parameter sets predict interfacial free energy minima as well as free energy barriers in almost quantitative agreement with all-atom force field based simulations. Interfacial free energy minima predicted by a modified coarse-grained parameter set are −2.51, −4.28, and −5.42 for mono-, di-, and triarginine; corresponding values from all-atom simulations are −0.83, −3.33, and −3.29, respectively, all in units of kcal/mol. We found that a stronger interaction between oligo-arginine and the membrane components and a weaker interaction between oligo-arginine and water are crucial for producing such minima in PMFs using the polarizable CG model. The difference between bulk aqueous and bilayer center states predicted by the modified coarse-grain force field are 11.71, 14.14, and 16.53 kcal/mol, and those by the all-atom model are 6.94, 8.64, and 12.80 kcal/mol; those are of almost the same order of magnitude. Our simulations also demonstrate a remarkable similarity in the structural aspects of

  20. Significant reduction in errors associated with nonbonded contacts in protein crystal structures: automated all-atom refinement with PrimeX

    SciTech Connect

    Bell, Jeffrey A.; Ho, Kenneth L.; Farid, Ramy

    2012-08-01

    All-atom models derived from moderate-resolution protein crystal structures contain a high frequency of close nonbonded contacts, independent of the major refinement program used for structure determination. All-atom refinement with PrimeX corrects many of these problematic interactions, producing models that are better suited for use in computational chemistry and related applications. All-atom models are essential for many applications in molecular modeling and computational chemistry. Nonbonded atomic contacts much closer than the sum of the van der Waals radii of the two atoms (clashes) are commonly observed in such models derived from protein crystal structures. A set of 94 recently deposited protein structures in the resolution range 1.5–2.8 Å were analyzed for clashes by the addition of all H atoms to the models followed by optimization and energy minimization of the positions of just these H atoms. The results were compared with the same set of structures after automated all-atom refinement with PrimeX and with nonbonded contacts in protein crystal structures at a resolution equal to or better than 0.9 Å. The additional PrimeX refinement produced structures with reasonable summary geometric statistics and similar R{sub free} values to the original structures. The frequency of clashes at less than 0.8 times the sum of van der Waals radii was reduced over fourfold compared with that found in the original structures, to a level approaching that found in the ultrahigh-resolution structures. Moreover, severe clashes at less than or equal to 0.7 times the sum of atomic radii were reduced 15-fold. All-atom refinement with PrimeX produced improved crystal structure models with respect to nonbonded contacts and yielded changes in structural details that dramatically impacted on the interpretation of some protein–ligand interactions.

  1. Explicit Substitutions and All That

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ayala-Rincon, Mauricio; Munoz, Cesar; Busnell, Dennis M. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Explicit substitution calculi are extensions of the Lambda-calculus where the substitution mechanism is internalized into the theory. This feature makes them suitable for implementation and theoretical study of logic-based tools such as strongly typed programming languages and proof assistant systems. In this paper we explore new developments on two of the most successful styles of explicit substitution calculi: the lambda(sigma)- and lambda(s(e))-calculi.

  2. Explicit Substitutions and All That

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ayala-Rincon, Mauricio; Munoz, Cesar

    2000-01-01

    Explicit substitution calculi are extensions of the lambda-calculus where the substitution mechanism is internalized into the theory. This feature makes them suitable for implementation and theoretical study of logic-based tools such as strongly typed programming languages and proof assistant systems. In this paper we explore new developments on two of the most successful styles of explicit substitution calculi: the lambda sigma- and lambda S(e)-calculi.

  3. Significant reduction in errors associated with nonbonded contacts in protein crystal structures: automated all-atom refinement with PrimeX.

    PubMed

    Bell, Jeffrey A; Ho, Kenneth L; Farid, Ramy

    2012-08-01

    All-atom models are essential for many applications in molecular modeling and computational chemistry. Nonbonded atomic contacts much closer than the sum of the van der Waals radii of the two atoms (clashes) are commonly observed in such models derived from protein crystal structures. A set of 94 recently deposited protein structures in the resolution range 1.5-2.8 Å were analyzed for clashes by the addition of all H atoms to the models followed by optimization and energy minimization of the positions of just these H atoms. The results were compared with the same set of structures after automated all-atom refinement with PrimeX and with nonbonded contacts in protein crystal structures at a resolution equal to or better than 0.9 Å. The additional PrimeX refinement produced structures with reasonable summary geometric statistics and similar R(free) values to the original structures. The frequency of clashes at less than 0.8 times the sum of van der Waals radii was reduced over fourfold compared with that found in the original structures, to a level approaching that found in the ultrahigh-resolution structures. Moreover, severe clashes at less than or equal to 0.7 times the sum of atomic radii were reduced 15-fold. All-atom refinement with PrimeX produced improved crystal structure models with respect to nonbonded contacts and yielded changes in structural details that dramatically impacted on the interpretation of some protein-ligand interactions. PMID:22868759

  4. An FFT-based method for modeling protein folding and binding under crowding: benchmarking on ellipsoidal and all-atom crowders.

    PubMed

    Qin, Sanbo; Zhou, Huan-Xiang

    2013-10-01

    It is now well recognized that macromolecular crowding can exert significant effects on protein folding and binding stability. In order to calculate such effects in direct simulations of proteins mixed with bystander macromolecules, the latter (referred to as crowders) are usually modeled as spheres and the proteins represented at a coarse-grained level. Our recently developed postprocessing approach allows the proteins to be represented at the all-atom level but, for computational efficiency, has only been implemented for spherical crowders. Modeling crowder molecules in cellular environments and in vitro experiments as spheres may distort their effects on protein stability. Here we present a new method that is capable for treating aspherical crowders. The idea, borrowed from protein-protein docking, is to calculate the excess chemical potential of the proteins in crowded solution by fast Fourier transform (FFT). As the first application, we studied the effects of ellipsoidal crowders on the folding and binding free energies of all-atom proteins, and found, in agreement with previous direct simulations with coarse-grained protein models, that the aspherical crowders exert greater stabilization effects than spherical crowders of the same volume. Moreover, as demonstrated here, the FFT-based method has the important property that its computational cost does not increase strongly even when the level of details in representing the crowders is increased all the way to all-atom, thus significantly accelerating realistic modeling of protein folding and binding in cell-like environments. PMID:24187527

  5. Folding Simulations for Proteins with Diverse Topologies Are Accessible in Days with a Physics-Based Force Field and Implicit Solvent

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The millisecond time scale needed for molecular dynamics simulations to approach the quantitative study of protein folding is not yet routine. One approach to extend the simulation time scale is to perform long simulations on specialized and expensive supercomputers such as Anton. Ideally, however, folding simulations would be more economical while retaining reasonable accuracy, and provide feedback on structure, stability and function rapidly enough if partnered directly with experiment. Approaches to this problem typically involve varied compromises between accuracy, precision, and cost; the goal here is to address whether simple implicit solvent models have become sufficiently accurate for their weaknesses to be offset by their ability to rapidly provide much more precise conformational data as compared to explicit solvent. We demonstrate that our recently developed physics-based model performs well on this challenge, enabling accurate all-atom simulated folding for 16 of 17 proteins with a variety of sizes, secondary structure, and topologies. The simulations were carried out using the Amber software on inexpensive GPUs, providing ∼1 μs/day per GPU, and >2.5 ms data presented here. We also show that native conformations are preferred over misfolded structures for 14 of the 17 proteins. For the other 3, misfolded structures are thermodynamically preferred, suggesting opportunities for further improvement. PMID:25255057

  6. Solvent wash solution

    DOEpatents

    Neace, J.C.

    1984-03-13

    A process is claimed for removing diluent degradation products from a solvent extraction solution, which has been used to recover uranium and plutonium from spent nuclear fuel. A wash solution and the solvent extraction solution are combined. The wash solution contains (a) water and (b) up to about, and including, 50 vol % of at least one-polar water-miscible organic solvent based on the total volume of the water and the highly-polar organic solvent. The wash solution also preferably contains at least one inorganic salt. The diluent degradation products dissolve in the highly-polar organic solvent and the organic solvent extraction solvent do not dissolve in the highly-polar organic solvent. The highly-polar organic solvent and the extraction solvent are separated.

  7. Solvent wash solution

    DOEpatents

    Neace, James C.

    1986-01-01

    Process for removing diluent degradation products from a solvent extraction solution, which has been used to recover uranium and plutonium from spent nuclear fuel. A wash solution and the solvent extraction solution are combined. The wash solution contains (a) water and (b) up to about, and including, 50 volume percent of at least one-polar water-miscible organic solvent based on the total volume of the water and the highly-polar organic solvent. The wash solution also preferably contains at least one inorganic salt. The diluent degradation products dissolve in the highly-polar organic solvent and the organic solvent extraction solvent do not dissolve in the highly-polar organic solvent. The highly-polar organic solvent and the extraction solvent are separated.

  8. Probing the folded state and mechanical unfolding pathways of T4 lysozyme using all-atom and coarse-grained molecular simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Wenjun; Glenn, Paul

    2015-01-01

    The Bacteriophage T4 Lysozyme (T4L) is a prototype modular protein comprised of an N-terminal and a C-domain domain, which was extensively studied to understand the folding/unfolding mechanism of modular proteins. To offer detailed structural and dynamic insights to the folded-state stability and the mechanical unfolding behaviors of T4L, we have performed extensive equilibrium and steered molecular dynamics simulations of both the wild-type (WT) and a circular permutation (CP) variant of T4L using all-atom and coarse-grained force fields. Our all-atom and coarse-grained simulations of the folded state have consistently found greater stability of the C-domain than the N-domain in isolation, which is in agreement with past thermostatic studies of T4L. While the all-atom simulation cannot fully explain the mechanical unfolding behaviors of the WT and the CP variant observed in an optical tweezers study, the coarse-grained simulations based on the Go model or a modified elastic network model (mENM) are in qualitative agreement with the experimental finding of greater unfolding cooperativity in the WT than the CP variant. Interestingly, the two coarse-grained models predict different structural mechanisms for the observed change in cooperativity between the WT and the CP variant—while the Go model predicts minor modification of the unfolding pathways by circular permutation (i.e., preserving the general order that the N-domain unfolds before the C-domain), the mENM predicts a dramatic change in unfolding pathways (e.g., different order of N/C-domain unfolding in the WT and the CP variant). Based on our simulations, we have analyzed the limitations of and the key differences between these models and offered testable predictions for future experiments to resolve the structural mechanism for cooperative folding/unfolding of T4L.

  9. Probing the folded state and mechanical unfolding pathways of T4 lysozyme using all-atom and coarse-grained molecular simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Zheng, Wenjun Glenn, Paul

    2015-01-21

    The Bacteriophage T4 Lysozyme (T4L) is a prototype modular protein comprised of an N-terminal and a C-domain domain, which was extensively studied to understand the folding/unfolding mechanism of modular proteins. To offer detailed structural and dynamic insights to the folded-state stability and the mechanical unfolding behaviors of T4L, we have performed extensive equilibrium and steered molecular dynamics simulations of both the wild-type (WT) and a circular permutation (CP) variant of T4L using all-atom and coarse-grained force fields. Our all-atom and coarse-grained simulations of the folded state have consistently found greater stability of the C-domain than the N-domain in isolation, which is in agreement with past thermostatic studies of T4L. While the all-atom simulation cannot fully explain the mechanical unfolding behaviors of the WT and the CP variant observed in an optical tweezers study, the coarse-grained simulations based on the Go model or a modified elastic network model (mENM) are in qualitative agreement with the experimental finding of greater unfolding cooperativity in the WT than the CP variant. Interestingly, the two coarse-grained models predict different structural mechanisms for the observed change in cooperativity between the WT and the CP variant—while the Go model predicts minor modification of the unfolding pathways by circular permutation (i.e., preserving the general order that the N-domain unfolds before the C-domain), the mENM predicts a dramatic change in unfolding pathways (e.g., different order of N/C-domain unfolding in the WT and the CP variant). Based on our simulations, we have analyzed the limitations of and the key differences between these models and offered testable predictions for future experiments to resolve the structural mechanism for cooperative folding/unfolding of T4L.

  10. Analysis of solvation structure and thermodynamics of methane in water by reference interaction site model theory using an all-atom model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cui, Qizhi; Smith, Vedene H.

    2000-12-01

    An all-atom molecular model and optimized site-site pair potential parameters are employed for methane solute. By use of the reference interaction site model theory, the methane hydration structure is analyzed at the atomic level and its hydration free energies, energies, enthalpies, and entropies for four different thermodynamic states: temperature T=283.15, 298.15, 313.15, 328.15 K and the corresponding bulk water density ρ=0.9997, 0.9970, 0.9922, 0.9875 g cm-3 are calculated. Our calculated thermodynamic properties are in rather good agreement with experiments.

  11. Free-energy analysis of lysozyme-triNAG binding modes with all-atom molecular dynamics simulation combined with the solution theory in the energy representation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takemura, Kazuhiro; Burri, Raghunadha Reddy; Ishikawa, Takeshi; Ishikura, Takakazu; Sakuraba, Shun; Matubayasi, Nobuyuki; Kuwata, Kazuo; Kitao, Akio

    2013-02-01

    We propose a method for calculating the binding free energy of protein-ligand complexes using all-atom molecular dynamics simulation combined with the solution theory in the energy representation. Four distinct modes for the binding of tri-N-acetyl-D-glucosamine (triNAG) to hen egg-white lysozyme were investigated, one from the crystal structure and three generated by docking predictions. The proposed method was demonstrated to be used to distinguish the most plausible binding mode (crystal model) as the lowest binding energy mode.

  12. Molecular dynamics study of human carbonic anhydrase II in complex with Zn(2+) and acetazolamide on the basis of all-atom force field simulations.

    PubMed

    Wambo, Thierry O; Chen, Liao Y; McHardy, Stanton F; Tsin, Andrew T

    2016-01-01

    Human carbonic anhydrase II (hCAII) represents an ultimate example of the perfectly efficient metalloenzymes, which is capable of catalyzing the hydration of carbon dioxide with a rate approaching the diffusion controlled limit. Extensive experimental studies of this physiologically important metalloprotein have been done to elucidate the fundamentals of its enzymatic actions: what residues anchor the Zn(2+) (or another divalent cation) at the bottom of the binding pocket; how the relevant residues work concertedly with the divalent cation in the reversible conversions between CO2 and HCO3(-); what are the protonation states of the relevant residues and acetazolamide, an inhibitor complexed with hCAII, etc. In this article, we present a detailed computational study on the basis of the all-atom CHARMM force field where Zn(2+) is represented with a simple model of divalent cation using the transferrable parameters available from the current literature. We compute the hydration free energy of Zn(2+), the characteristics of hCAII-Zn(2+) complexation, and the absolute free energy of binding acetazolamide to the hCAII-Zn(2+) complex. In each of these three problems, our computed results agree with the experimental data within the known margin of error without making any case-by-case adjustments to the parameters. The quantitatively accurate insights we gain in this all-atom molecular dynamics study should be helpful in the search and design of more specific inhibitors of this and other carbonic anhydrases. PMID:27232456

  13. Peptides (P1, P2 and its mutations) binding with a graphene sheet: an all-atom to all-residue hierarchical coarse-grained approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuang, Zhifeng; Farmer, Barry; Pandey, Ras

    2013-03-01

    Binding of peptide P2 (EPLQLKM) [1] and its mutations (P2G, P2Q) to a graphene sheet are studied by a coarse-grained computer simulation. Our hierarchical coarse-grained approach involves all-atom MD simulation to assess the binding interaction of each residue with the graphene sheet. Data from all-atom simulations are then used as input to phenomenological interaction in a coarse-grained MC simulation [2]. Binding of each peptide and its residue in corresponding sequence (P2, P2G, P2Q) are evaluated by analyzing the adsorption of each residue, its mobility, and structural profiles. Although it is difficult to identify overall morphological differences in adsorbed peptides by visual inspections, quantitative analysis of the conformational changes of adsorbed peptides shows variations in size among P2E and its mutations. Results on binding of peptide P1 (HSSYWYAFNNKT) may also be presented if data become available. This work is supported by the Air Force Research Laboratory.

  14. Insight into the Properties of Cardiolipin Containing Bilayers from Molecular Dynamics Simulations, Using a Hybrid All-Atom/United-Atom Force Field.

    PubMed

    Aguayo, Daniel; González-Nilo, Fernando D; Chipot, Christophe

    2012-05-01

    Simulation of three models of cardiolipin (CL) containing membranes using a new set of parameters for tetramyristoyl and tetraoleoyl CLs has been developed in the framework of the united-atom CHARMM27-UA and the all-atom CHARMM36 force fields with the aim of performing molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of cardiolipin-containing mixed-lipid membranes. The new parameters use a hybrid representation of all-atom head groups in conjunction with implicit-hydrogen united-atom (UA) to describe the oleoyl and myristoyl chains of the CLs, in lieu of the fully atomistic description, thereby allowing longer simulations to be undertaken. The physicochemical properties of the bilayers were determined and compared with previously reported data. Furthermore, using tetramyristoyl CL mixed with POPG and POPE lipids, a mitochondrial membrane was simulated. The results presented here show the different behavior of the bilayers as a result of the lipid composition, where the length of the acyl chain and the conformation of the headgroup can be associated with the mitochondrial membrane properties. The new hybrid CL parameters prove to be well suited for the simulation of the molecular structure of CL-containing bilayers and can be extended to other lipid bilayers composed of CLs with different acyl chains or alternate head groups. PMID:26593668

  15. NEPTUNIUM SOLVENT EXTRACTION PROCESS

    DOEpatents

    Dawson, L.R.; Fields, P.R.

    1959-10-01

    The separation of neptunium from an aqueous solution by solvent extraction and the extraction of neptunium from the solvent solution are described. Neptunium is separated from an aqueous solution containing tetravalent or hexavalent neptunium nitrate, nitric acid, and a nitrate salting out agent, such as sodium nitrate, by contacting the solution with an organic solvent such as diethyl ether. Subsequently, the neptunium nitrate is extracted from the organic solvent extract phase with water.

  16. Solvent refining process

    SciTech Connect

    Mead, T.C.; Sequeira, A.J.; Smith, B.F.

    1981-10-13

    An improved process is described for solvent refining lubricating oil base stocks from petroleum fractions containing both aromatic and nonaromatic constituents. The process utilizes n-methyl-2-pyrrolidone as a selective solvent for aromatic hydrocarbons wherein the refined oil fraction and the extract fraction are freed of final traces of solvent by stripping with gaseous ammonia. The process has several advantages over conventional processes including a savings in energy required for the solvent refining process, and reduced corrosion of the process equipment.

  17. The Complexity of Explicit Constructions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santhanam, Rahul

    The existence of extremal combinatorial objects, such as Ramsey graphs and expanders, is often shown using the probabilistic method. It is folklore that pseudo-random generators can be used to obtain explicit constructions of these objects, if the test that the object is extremal can be implemented in polynomial time. In this talk, we pose several questions geared towards initiating a structural approach to the relationship between extremal combinatorics and computational complexity. One motivation for such an approach is to understand better why circuit lower bounds are hard. Another is to formalize connections between the two areas, so that progress in one leads automatically to progress in the other.

  18. Simulation of peptide folding with explicit water--a mean solvation method.

    PubMed

    Wu, X W; Sung, S S

    1999-02-15

    A new approach to efficiently calculate solvent effect in computer simulation of macromolecular systems has been developed. Explicit solvent molecules are included in the simulation to provide a mean solvation force for the solute conformational search. Simulations of an alanine dipeptide in aqueous solution showed that the new approach is significantly more efficient than conventional molecular dynamics method in conformational search, mainly because the mean solvation force reduced the solvent damping effect. This approach allows the solute and solvent to be simulated separately with different methods. For the macromolecule, the rigid fragment constraint dynamics method we developed previously allows large time-steps. For the solvent, a combination of a modified force-bias Monte Carlo method and a preferential sampling can efficiently sample the conformational space. A folding simulation of a 16-residue peptide in water showed high efficiency of the new approach. PMID:10024017

  19. Solvents and sustainable chemistry

    PubMed Central

    Welton, Tom

    2015-01-01

    Solvents are widely recognized to be of great environmental concern. The reduction of their use is one of the most important aims of green chemistry. In addition to this, the appropriate selection of solvent for a process can greatly improve the sustainability of a chemical production process. There has also been extensive research into the application of so-called green solvents, such as ionic liquids and supercritical fluids. However, most examples of solvent technologies that give improved sustainability come from the application of well-established solvents. It is also apparent that the successful implementation of environmentally sustainable processes must be accompanied by improvements in commercial performance. PMID:26730217

  20. Solvent recycle/recovery

    SciTech Connect

    Paffhausen, M.W.; Smith, D.L.; Ugaki, S.N.

    1990-09-01

    This report describes Phase I of the Solvent Recycle/Recovery Task of the DOE Chlorinated Solvent Substitution Program for the US Air Force by the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, EG G Idaho, Inc., through the US Department of Energy, Idaho Operations Office. The purpose of the task is to identify and test recovery and recycling technologies for proposed substitution solvents identified by the Biodegradable Solvent Substitution Program and the Alternative Solvents/Technologies for Paint Stripping Program with the overall objective of minimizing hazardous wastes. A literature search to identify recycle/recovery technologies and initial distillation studies has been conducted. 4 refs.

  1. Dual solvent refining process

    SciTech Connect

    Woodle, R.A.

    1982-04-20

    A dual solvent refining process is claimed for solvent refining petroleum based lubricating oil stocks with n-methyl-2-pyrrolidone as selective solvent for aromatic oils wherein a highly paraffinic oil having a narrow boiling range approximating the boiling point of n-methyl-2-pyrrolidone is employed as a backwash solvent. The process of the invention results in an increased yield of refined lubricating oil stock of a predetermined quality and simplifies separation of the solvents from the extract and raffinate oil fractions.

  2. Implicit and Explicit Learning of Languages.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McDermott, James E.

    1999-01-01

    Discusses theoretical and practical issues connected with implicit and explicit learning of languages. Explicit learning is knowledge expressed in the form of rules or definitions; implicit knowledge can be inferred to exist because of observed performance but cannot be clearly described. Hypothesizes why explicit learning can lead to implicit…

  3. Solvent extraction of diatomite

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, W.

    1984-07-24

    There is provided a method of extracting hydrocarbons from a diatomite ore. The particle size of the ore is first reduced to form a processed ore. The processed ore is then mixed with a substantially irregular granular material to form an unstratified ore mixture having increased permeability to an extracting solvent. The unstratified ore mixture is then permeated with an extracting solvent to obtain a hydrocarbon-solvent stream from which hydrocarbons are subsequently separated. The irregular granular material may be sand.

  4. Solvent extraction process

    SciTech Connect

    Woodle, R.A.

    1982-01-19

    A solvent refining process is disclosed utilizing n-methyl-2-pyrrolidone as solvent in which primary extract from the extraction zone is cooled to form a secondary raffinate and secondary extract and the secondary and primary raffinates are blended to produce an increased yield of product of desired quality. In a preferred embodiment of the process, the lubricating oil feedstock to the process is first contacted with a stripping medium previously used in the process for the recovery of solvent from at least one of the product streams whereby solvent contained in said stripping medium is recovered therefrom.

  5. Unified description of solvent effects in the helix-coil transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Badasyan, Artem; Tonoyan, Shushanik A.; Giacometti, Achille; Podgornik, Rudolf; Parsegian, V. Adrian; Mamasakhlisov, Yevgeni Sh.; Morozov, Vladimir F.

    2014-02-01

    We analyze the problem of the helix-coil transition in explicit solvents analytically by using spin-based models incorporating two different mechanisms of solvent action: explicit solvent action through the formation of solvent-polymer hydrogen bonds that can compete with the intrinsic intra-polymer hydrogen bonded configurations (competing interactions) and implicit solvent action, where the solvent-polymer interactions tune biopolymer configurations by changing the activity of the solvent (non-competing interactions). The overall spin Hamiltonian is comprised of three terms: the background in vacuo Hamiltonian of the "Generalized Model of Polypeptide Chain" type and two additive terms that account for the two above mechanisms of solvent action. We show that on this level the solvent degrees of freedom can be explicitly and exactly traced over, the ensuing effective partition function combining all the solvent effects in a unified framework. In this way we are able to address helix-coil transitions for polypeptides, proteins, and DNA, with different buffers and different external constraints. Our spin-based effective Hamiltonian is applicable for treatment of such diverse phenomena as cold denaturation, effects of osmotic pressure on the cold and warm denaturation, complicated temperature dependence of the hydrophobic effect as well as providing a conceptual base for understanding the behavior of intrinsically disordered proteins and their analogues.

  6. All-atom simulations and free-energy calculations of coiled-coil peptides with lipid bilayers: binding strength, structural transition, and effect on lipid dynamics.

    PubMed

    Woo, Sun Young; Lee, Hwankyu

    2016-01-01

    Peptides E and K, which are synthetic coiled-coil peptides for membrane fusion, were simulated with lipid bilayers composed of lipids and cholesterols at different ratios using all-atom models. We first calculated free energies of binding from umbrella sampling simulations, showing that both E and K peptides tend to adsorb onto the bilayer surface, which occurs more strongly in the bilayer composed of smaller lipid headgroups. Then, unrestrained simulations show that K peptides more deeply insert into the bilayer with partially retaining the helical structure, while E peptides less insert and predominantly become random coils, indicating the structural transition from helices to random coils, in quantitative agreement with experiments. This is because K peptides electrostatically interact with lipid phosphates, as well as because hydrocarbons of lysines of K peptide are longer than those of glutamic acids of E peptide and thus form stronger hydrophobic interactions with lipid tails. This deeper insertion of K peptide increases the bilayer dynamics and a vacancy below the peptide, leading to the rearrangement of smaller lipids. These findings help explain the experimentally observed or proposed differences in the insertion depth, binding strength, and structural transition of E and K peptides, and support the snorkeling effect. PMID:26926570

  7. Impact of 2′-hydroxyl sampling on the conformational properties of RNA: Update of the CHARMM all-atom additive force field for RNA

    PubMed Central

    Denning, Elizabeth J.; Priyakumar, U. Deva; Nilsson, Lennart; MacKerell, Alexander D.

    2011-01-01

    Here, we present an update of the CHARMM27 all-atom additive force field for nucleic acids that improves the treatment of RNA molecules. The original CHARMM27 force field parameters exhibit enhanced Watson-Crick (WC) base pair opening which is not consistent with experiment while analysis of MD simulations show the 2′-hydroxyl moiety to almost exclusively sample the O3′ orientation. Quantum mechanical studies of RNA related model compounds indicate the energy minimum associated with the O3′ orientation to be too favorable, consistent with the MD results. Optimization of the dihedral parameters dictating the energy of the 2′-hydroxyl proton targeting the QM data yielded several parameter sets, which sample both the base and O3′ orientations of the 2′-hydroxyl to varying degrees. Selection of the final dihedral parameters was based on reproduction of hydration behavior as related to a survey of crystallographic data and better agreement with experimental NMR J-coupling values. Application of the model, designated CHARMM36, to a collection of canonical and non-canonical RNA molecules reveals overall improved agreement with a range of experimental observables as compared to CHARMM27. The results also indicate the sensitivity of the conformational heterogeneity of RNA to the orientation of the 2′-hydroxyl moiety and support a model whereby the 2′-hydroxyl can enhance the probability of conformational transitions in RNA. PMID:21469161

  8. All-atom simulations and free-energy calculations of coiled-coil peptides with lipid bilayers: binding strength, structural transition, and effect on lipid dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Woo, Sun Young; Lee, Hwankyu

    2016-01-01

    Peptides E and K, which are synthetic coiled-coil peptides for membrane fusion, were simulated with lipid bilayers composed of lipids and cholesterols at different ratios using all-atom models. We first calculated free energies of binding from umbrella sampling simulations, showing that both E and K peptides tend to adsorb onto the bilayer surface, which occurs more strongly in the bilayer composed of smaller lipid headgroups. Then, unrestrained simulations show that K peptides more deeply insert into the bilayer with partially retaining the helical structure, while E peptides less insert and predominantly become random coils, indicating the structural transition from helices to random coils, in quantitative agreement with experiments. This is because K peptides electrostatically interact with lipid phosphates, as well as because hydrocarbons of lysines of K peptide are longer than those of glutamic acids of E peptide and thus form stronger hydrophobic interactions with lipid tails. This deeper insertion of K peptide increases the bilayer dynamics and a vacancy below the peptide, leading to the rearrangement of smaller lipids. These findings help explain the experimentally observed or proposed differences in the insertion depth, binding strength, and structural transition of E and K peptides, and support the snorkeling effect. PMID:26926570

  9. Energetics of nonpolar and polar compounds in cationic, anionic, and nonionic micelles studied by all-atom molecular dynamics simulation combined with a theory of solutions.

    PubMed

    Date, Atsushi; Ishizuka, Ryosuke; Matubayasi, Nobuyuki

    2016-05-21

    Energetic analysis was conducted for nonpolar and polar solutes bound in a cationic micelle of dodecyl trimethyl ammonium bromide (DTAB), an anionic micelle of sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS), and a nonionic micelle of tetraethylene glycol monododecyl ether (Brij30). All-atom molecular dynamics simulation was performed, and the free energies of binding the solutes in the hydrophobic-core and headgroup regions of the micelles were computed using the energy-representation method. It was found in all the micelles examined that aromatic naphthalene is preferably located more outward than aliphatic propane and that the polar solutes are localized at the interface of the hydrophobic and hydrophilic regions. The roles of the surfactant and water were then elucidated by decomposing the free energy into the contributions from the respective species. Water was observed to play a decisive role in determining the binding location of the solute, while the surfactant was found to be more important for the overall stabilization of the solute within the micelle. The effects of attractive and repulsive interactions of the solute with the surfactant and water were further examined, and their competition was analyzed in connection with the preferable location of the solute in the micellar system. PMID:27117093

  10. Effects of Water Models on Binding Affinity: Evidence from All-Atom Simulation of Binding of Tamiflu to A/H5N1 Neuraminidase

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Trang Truc; Viet, Man Hoang

    2014-01-01

    The influence of water models SPC, SPC/E, TIP3P, and TIP4P on ligand binding affinity is examined by calculating the binding free energy ΔGbind of oseltamivir carboxylate (Tamiflu) to the wild type of glycoprotein neuraminidase from the pandemic A/H5N1 virus. ΔGbind is estimated by the Molecular Mechanic-Poisson Boltzmann Surface Area method and all-atom simulations with different combinations of these aqueous models and four force fields AMBER99SB, CHARMM27, GROMOS96 43a1, and OPLS-AA/L. It is shown that there is no correlation between the binding free energy and the water density in the binding pocket in CHARMM. However, for three remaining force fields ΔGbind decays with increase of water density. SPC/E provides the lowest binding free energy for any force field, while the water effect is the most pronounced in CHARMM. In agreement with the popular GROMACS recommendation, the binding score obtained by combinations of AMBER-TIP3P, OPLS-TIP4P, and GROMOS-SPC is the most relevant to the experiments. For wild-type neuraminidase we have found that SPC is more suitable for CHARMM than TIP3P recommended by GROMACS for studying ligand binding. However, our study for three of its mutants reveals that TIP3P is presumably the best choice for CHARMM. PMID:24672329

  11. The Ensemble Folding Kinetics of the FBP28 WW Domain Revealed by an All-atom Monte Carlo Simulation in a Knowledge-based Potential

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Jiabin; Huang, Lei; Shakhnovich, Eugene I.

    2011-01-01

    In this work, we apply a detailed all-atom model with a transferable knowledge-based potential to study the folding kinetics of Formin-Binding protein, FBP28, which is a canonical three-stranded β-sheet WW domain. Replica exchange Monte Carlo (REMC) simulations starting from random coils find native-like (C α RMSD of 2.68Å) lowest energy structure. We also study the folding kinetics of FBP28 WW domain by performing a large number of ab initio Monte Carlo folding simulations. Using these trajectories, we examine the order of formation of two β –hairpins, the folding mechanism of each individual β– hairpin, and transition state ensemble (TSE) of FBP28 WW domain and compare our results with experimental data and previous computational studies. To obtain detailed structural information on the folding dynamics viewed as an ensemble process, we perform a clustering analysis procedure based on graph theory. Further, a rigorous Pfold analysis is used to obtain representative samples of the TSEs showing good quantitative agreement between experimental and simulated Φ values. Our analysis shows that the turn structure between first and second β strands is a partially stable structural motif that gets formed before entering the TSE in FBP28 WW domain and there exist two major pathways for the folding of FBP28 WW domain, which differ in the order and mechanism of hairpin formation. PMID:21365688

  12. C6 Coefficients and Dipole Polarizabilities for All Atoms and Many Ions in Rows 1-6 of the Periodic Table.

    PubMed

    Gould, Tim; Bučko, Tomáš

    2016-08-01

    Using time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT) with exchange kernels, we calculate and test imaginary frequency-dependent dipole polarizabilities for all atoms and many ions in rows 1-6 of the periodic table. These are then integrated over frequency to produce C6 coefficients. Results are presented under different models: straight TDDFT calculations using two different kernels; "benchmark" TDDFT calculations corrected by more accurate quantum chemical and experimental data; and "benchmark" TDDFT with frozen orbital anions. Parametrizations are presented for 411+ atoms and ions, allowing results to be easily used by other researchers. A curious relationship, C6,XY ∝ [αX(0)αY(0)](0.73), is found between C6 coefficients and static polarizabilities α(0). The relationship C6,XY = 2C6,XC6,Y/[(αX/αY)C6,Y + (αY/αX)C6,X] is tested and found to work well (<5% errors) in ∼80% of the cases, but can break down badly (>30% errors) in a small fraction of cases. PMID:27304856

  13. Toward a Coarse Graining/All Atoms Force Field (CG/AA) from a Multiscale Optimization Method: An Application to the MCM-41 Mesoporous Silicates.

    PubMed

    Ghoufi, A; Morineau, D; Lefort, R; Malfreyt, P

    2010-10-12

    Many interesting physical phenomena occur on length and time scales that are not accessible by atomistic molecular simulations. By introducing a coarse graining of the degrees of freedom, coarse-grained (CG) models allow ther study of larger scale systems for longer times. Coarse-grained force fields have been mostly derived for large molecules, including polymeric materials and proteins. By contrast, there exist no satisfactory CG potentials for mesostructured porous solid materials in the literature. This issue has become critical among a growing number of studies on confinement effects on fluid properties, which require both long time and large scale simulations and the conservation of a sufficient level of atomistic description to account for interfacial phenomena. In this paper, we present a general multiscale procedure to derive a hybrid coarse grained/all atoms force field CG/AA model for mesoporous systems. The method is applied to mesostructured MCM-41 molecular sieves, while the parameters of the mesoscopic interaction potentials are obtained and validated from the computation of the adsorption isotherm of methanol by grand canonical molecular dynamic simulation. PMID:26616783

  14. Effect of water on structure and dynamics of [BMIM][PF6] ionic liquid: An all-atom molecular dynamics simulation investigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, Anirban; Ghorai, Pradip Kr.

    2016-03-01

    Composition dependent structural and dynamical properties of aqueous hydrophobic 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium hexafluorophosphate ([BMIM][PF6]) ionic liquid (IL) have been investigated by using all-atom molecular dynamics simulation. We observe that addition of water does not increase significant number of dissociated ions in the solution over the pure state. As a consequence, self-diffusion coefficient of the cation and anion is comparable to each other at all water concentration similar to that is observed for the pure state. Voronoi polyhedra analysis exhibits strong dependence on the local environment of IL concentration. Void and neck distributions in Voronoi tessellation are approximately Gaussian for pure IL but upon subsequent addition of water, we observe deviation from the Gaussian behaviour with an asymmetric broadening with long tail of exponential decay at large void radius, particularly at higher water concentrations. The increase in void space and neck size at higher water concentration facilitates ionic motion, thus, decreasing dynamical heterogeneity and IL reorientation time and increases self-diffusion coefficient significantly.

  15. All-atom simulations and free-energy calculations of coiled-coil peptides with lipid bilayers: binding strength, structural transition, and effect on lipid dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woo, Sun Young; Lee, Hwankyu

    2016-03-01

    Peptides E and K, which are synthetic coiled-coil peptides for membrane fusion, were simulated with lipid bilayers composed of lipids and cholesterols at different ratios using all-atom models. We first calculated free energies of binding from umbrella sampling simulations, showing that both E and K peptides tend to adsorb onto the bilayer surface, which occurs more strongly in the bilayer composed of smaller lipid headgroups. Then, unrestrained simulations show that K peptides more deeply insert into the bilayer with partially retaining the helical structure, while E peptides less insert and predominantly become random coils, indicating the structural transition from helices to random coils, in quantitative agreement with experiments. This is because K peptides electrostatically interact with lipid phosphates, as well as because hydrocarbons of lysines of K peptide are longer than those of glutamic acids of E peptide and thus form stronger hydrophobic interactions with lipid tails. This deeper insertion of K peptide increases the bilayer dynamics and a vacancy below the peptide, leading to the rearrangement of smaller lipids. These findings help explain the experimentally observed or proposed differences in the insertion depth, binding strength, and structural transition of E and K peptides, and support the snorkeling effect.

  16. SOLVENT EXTRACTION OF NEPTUNIUM

    DOEpatents

    Butler, J.P.

    1958-08-12

    A process is described for the recovery of neptuniunn from dissolver solutions by solvent extraction. The neptunium containing solution should be about 5N, in nitric acid.and about 0.1 M in ferrous ion. The organic extracting agent is tributyl phosphate, and the neptuniunn is recovered from the organic solvent phase by washing with water.

  17. ONSITE SOLVENT RECOVERY

    EPA Science Inventory

    This study evaluated the product quality, waste reduction/pollution prevention, and economic aspects of three technologies for onsite solvent recovery: atmospheric batch distillation, vacuum heat-pump distillation, and a low-emission vapor degreaser with closed solvent, liquid an...

  18. Solvent-free synthesis

    EPA Science Inventory

    This chapter gives a brief introduction about solvent-free reactions whose importance can be gauged by the increasing number of publications every year during the last decade. The mechanistic aspects of the reactions under solvent-free conditions have been highlighted. Our observ...

  19. Alternative Green Solvents Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maloney, Phillip R.

    2012-01-01

    Necessary for safe and proper functioning of equipment. Mainly halogenated solvents. Tetrachloride, Trichloroethylene (TCE), CFC-113. No longer used due to regulatory/safety concerns. Precision Cleaning at KSC: Small % of total parts. Used for liquid oxygen (LOX) systems. Dual solvent process. Vertrel MCA (decafluoropentane (DFP) and trons-dichloroethylene) HFE-7100. DFP has long term environmental concerns. Project Goals: a) Identify potential replacements. b) 22 wet chemical processes. c) 3 alternative processes. d) Develop test procedures. e) Contamination and cleaning. f) Analysis. g) Use results to recommend alternative processes. Conclusions: a) No alternative matched Vertrel in this study. b) No clear second place solvent. c) Hydrocarbons- easy; Fluorinated greases- difficult. d) Fluorinated component may be needed in replacement solvent. e) Process may need to make up for shortcoming of the solvent. f) Plasma and SCC02 warrant further testing.

  20. Atomistic simulation based prediction of the solvent effect on the molecular mobility and glass transition of poly (methyl methacrylate)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mishra, Shawn; Keten, Sinan

    2013-01-01

    We present an investigation of the retained solvent effect on the glass transition temperature (Tg) of poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) through all-atom molecular dynamics simulations. Addition of a weakly interactive solvent, tetrahydrofuran (THF), causes a depression of the PMMA Tg that can be identified through an analysis of the mean squared displacement of the polymer chains from atomistic trajectories. Our results are in very good agreement with an atomistically informed theoretical model based on free volume theory and demonstrate the applicability of molecular simulation to discern solvent effects on polymer thermomechanical behavior in silico.

  1. Organic solvent simulations under non-periodic boundary conditions: A library of effective potentials for the GLOB model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mancini, Giordano; Brancato, Giuseppe; Chandramouli, Balasubramanian; Barone, Vincenzo

    2015-04-01

    We extend the library of solvents that can be treated using the GLOB (general liquid optimized boundary) method, that allows to perform MD simulations under non-periodic boundary conditions (NPBC) optimizing effective potentials between explicit molecules and the boundary for four organic solvents: CHCl3, CCl4, CH3OH and CH3CN. We show that GLOB allows reducing the number of explicit solvent shells to be included, while yielding results comparable with PBC and significant advantages over simulations without explicit boundaries. Finally, we provide polynomial fittings for all available GLOB effective potentials (including SPC water) to simplify their implementation in NPBC MD simulations.

  2. Long Dynamics Simulations of Proteins Using Atomistic Force Fields and a Continuum Representation of Solvent Effects: Calculation of Structural and Dynamic Properties

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xianfeng; Hassan, Sergio A.; Mehler, Ernest L.

    2006-01-01

    Long dynamics simulations were carried out on the B1 immunoglobulin-binding domain of streptococcal protein G (ProtG) and bovine pancreatic trypsin inhibitor (BPTI) using atomistic descriptions of the proteins and a continuum representation of solvent effects. To mimic frictional and random collision effects, Langevin dynamics (LD) were used. The main goal of the calculations was to explore the stability of tens-of-nanosecond trajectories as generated by this molecular mechanics approximation and to analyze in detail structural and dynamical properties. Conformational fluctuations, order parameters, cross correlation matrices, residue solvent accessibilities, pKa values of titratable groups, and hydrogen-bonding (HB) patterns were calculated from all of the trajectories and compared with available experimental data. The simulations comprised over 40 ns per trajectory for ProtG and over 30 ns per trajectory for BPTI. For comparison, explicit water molecular dynamics simulations (EW/MD) of 3 ns and 4 ns, respectively, were also carried out. Two continuum simulations were performed on each protein using the CHARMM program, one with the all-atom PAR22 representation of the protein force field (here referred to as PAR22/LD simulations) and the other with the modifications introduced by the recently developed CMAP potential (CMAP/LD simulations). The explicit solvent simulations were performed with PAR22 only. Solvent effects are described by a continuum model based on screened Coulomb potentials (SCP) reported earlier, i.e., the SCP-based implicit solvent model (SCP–ISM). For ProtG, both the PAR22/LD and the CMAP/LD 40-ns trajectories were stable, yielding Cα root mean square deviations (RMSD) of about 1.0 and 0.8 Å respectively along the entire simulation time, compared to 0.8 Å for the EW/MD simulation. For BPTI, only the CMAP/LD trajectory was stable for the entire 30-ns simulation, with a Cα RMSD of ≈ 1.4 Å, while the PAR22/LD trajectory became unstable

  3. Parallel Explicit and Implicit Control of Reaching

    PubMed Central

    Mazzoni, Pietro; Wexler, Nancy S.

    2009-01-01

    Background Human movement can be guided automatically (implicit control) or attentively (explicit control). Explicit control may be engaged when learning a new movement, while implicit control enables simultaneous execution of multiple actions. Explicit and implicit control can often be assigned arbitrarily: we can simultaneously drive a car and tune the radio, seamlessly allocating implicit or explicit control to either action. This flexibility suggests that sensorimotor signals, including those that encode spatially overlapping perception and behavior, can be accurately segregated to explicit and implicit control processes. Methodology/Principal Findings We tested human subjects' ability to segregate sensorimotor signals to parallel control processes by requiring dual (explicit and implicit) control of the same reaching movement and testing for interference between these processes. Healthy control subjects were able to engage dual explicit and implicit motor control without degradation of performance compared to explicit or implicit control alone. We then asked whether segregation of explicit and implicit motor control can be selectively disrupted by studying dual-control performance in subjects with no clinically manifest neurologic deficits in the presymptomatic stage of Huntington's disease (HD). These subjects performed successfully under either explicit or implicit control alone, but were impaired in the dual-control condition. Conclusion/Significance The human nervous system can exert dual control on a single action, and is therefore able to accurately segregate sensorimotor signals to explicit and implicit control. The impairment observed in the presymptomatic stage of HD points to a possible crucial contribution of the striatum to the segregation of sensorimotor signals to multiple control processes. PMID:19847295

  4. SOLVENT EXTRACTION PROCESS

    DOEpatents

    Jonke, A.A.

    1957-10-01

    In improved solvent extraction process is described for the extraction of metal values from highly dilute aqueous solutions. The process comprises contacting an aqueous solution with an organic substantially water-immiscible solvent, whereby metal values are taken up by a solvent extract phase; scrubbing the solvent extract phase with an aqueous scrubbing solution; separating an aqueous solution from the scrubbed solvent extract phase; and contacting the scrubbed solvent phase with an aqueous medium whereby the extracted metal values are removed from the solvent phase and taken up by said medium to form a strip solution containing said metal values, the aqueous scrubbing solution being a mixture of strip solution and an aqueous solution which contains mineral acids anions and is free of the metal values. The process is particularly effective for purifying uranium, where one starts with impure aqueous uranyl nitrate, extracts with tributyl phosphate dissolved in carbon tetrachloride, scrubs with aqueous nitric acid and employs water to strip the uranium from the scrubbed organic phase.

  5. Solvent alternatives guide

    SciTech Connect

    Elion, J.M.; Monroe, K.R.; Hill, E.A.

    1996-06-01

    It is no longer legal to manufacture or import chlorofluorocarbon 113 or methyl chloroform solvents, and companies that currently clean their parts with either material are now required to implement environmentally safe substitutes. To help find alternative methods, Research Triangle Institute`s Surface Cleaning Technology Program has designed a Solvent Alternatives Guide (SAGE), an online tool that enables access to practical information and recommendations for acceptable solvents. Developed in partnership with the US Environmental Protection Agency, SAGE is available free of charge on the Internet`s World Wide Web.

  6. Implicit and Explicit Exercise and Sedentary Identity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berry, Tanya R.; Strachan, Shaelyn M.

    2012-01-01

    We examined the relationship between implicit and explicit "exerciser" and "sedentary" self-identity when activated by stereotypes. Undergraduate participants (N = 141) wrote essays about university students who either liked to exercise or engage in sedentary activities. This was followed by an implicit identity task and an explicit measure of…

  7. Thinking Styles in Implicit and Explicit Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Xie, Qiuzhi; Gao, Xiangping; King, Ronnel B.

    2013-01-01

    This study investigated whether individual differences in thinking styles influence explicit and implicit learning. Eighty-seven university students in China participated in this study. Results indicated that performance in the explicit learning condition was positively associated with Type I thinking styles (i.e. legislative and liberal styles)…

  8. Implicit and Explicit Instruction of Spelling Rules

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kemper, M. J.; Verhoeven, L.; Bosman, A. M. T.

    2012-01-01

    The study aimed to compare the differential effectiveness of explicit and implicit instruction of two Dutch spelling rules. Students with and without spelling disabilities were instructed a spelling rule either implicitly or explicitly in two experiments. Effects were tested in a pretest-intervention-posttest control group design. Experiment 1…

  9. CHLORINATED SOLVENT PLUME CONTROL

    EPA Science Inventory

    This lecture will cover recent success in controlling and assessing the treatment of shallow ground water plumes of chlorinated solvents, other halogenated organic compounds, and methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE).

  10. Continuous countercurrent membrane column for the separation of solute/solvent and solvent/solvent systems

    DOEpatents

    Nerad, Bruce A.; Krantz, William B.

    1988-01-01

    A reverse osmosis membrane process or hybrid membrane - complementary separator process for producing enriched product or waste streams from concentrated and dilute feed streams for both solvent/solvent and solute/solvent systems is described.

  11. Supercritical solvent coal extraction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Compton, L. E. (Inventor)

    1984-01-01

    Yields of soluble organic extract are increased up to about 50% by the supercritical extraction of particulate coal at a temperature below the polymerization temperature for coal extract fragments (450 C.) and a pressure from 500 psig to 5,000 psig by the conjoint use of a solvent mixture containing a low volatility, high critical temperature coal dissolution catalyst such as phenanthrene and a high volatility, low critical temperature solvent such as toluene.

  12. SOLVENT EXTRACTION OF RUTHENIUM

    DOEpatents

    Hyman, H.H.; Leader, G.R.

    1959-07-14

    The separation of rathenium from aqueous solutions by solvent extraction is described. According to the invention, a nitrite selected from the group consisting of alkali nitrite and alkaline earth nitrite in an equimolecular quantity with regard to the quantity of rathenium present is added to an aqueous solution containing ruthenium tetrantrate to form a ruthenium complex. Adding an organic solvent such as ethyl ether to the resulting mixture selectively extracts the rathenium complex.

  13. LLNL solvent substitution

    SciTech Connect

    Benkovitch, M.G.

    1992-12-01

    Allied-Signal Inc., Kansas City Division (KCD), manufactures the electrical, electromechanical, mechanical, and plastic components for nuclear weapons. The KCD has made a commitment to eliminate the use of chlorohydrocarbon (CHC) and chlorofluorocarbon (CFC) solvents to the greatest technical extent possible consistent with nuclear safety and stockpile reliability requirements by July 1993. Several non-halogenated solvents (Exxate 1000, Bioact EC-7, Bioact EC-7R, d-limonene, ACT-100, Kester 5769, and isopropyl alcohol) were evaluated to determine the most effective, non-chlorinated non-fluorinated, alternate solvent cleaning system for a particular electronic assembly in lieu of the current trichloroethylenefisopropyl alcohol baseline cleaning process. All of these solvents were evaluated using current manual spray cleaning processes. The solvents were evaluated for their effectiveness in removing a rosin based RMA solder flux, a particular silicone mold release, and a wide variety of general contaminants (oils, greases, mold releases, resins, etc.) normally found in production departments. A DI water/isopropyl alcohol spray cleaning process was also evaluated for removing two organic acid fluxes. Test samples were contaminated, spray cleaned with the appropriate solvent, and then analyzed for cleanliness. The Meseran Surface Analyzer was used to measure,, organic contamination on the samples before and after cleaning. An Omega Meter Model 600 was also used to detect solder flux residues.

  14. Cleaning without chlorinated solvents

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, L.M.; Simandl, R.F.

    1994-12-31

    Because of health and environmental concerns, many regulations have been passed in recent years regarding the use of chlorinated solvents. The Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant has had an active program to find alternatives for these solvents used in cleaning applications for the past 7 years. During this time frame, the quantity of solvents purchased has been reduced by 92%. The program has been a twofold effort. Vapor degreasers used in batch cleaning-operations have been replaced by ultrasonic cleaning with aqueous detergent, and other organic solvents have been identified for use in hand-wiping or specialty operations. In order to qualify these alternatives for use, experimentation was conducted on cleaning ability as well as effects on subsequent operations such as welding, painting and bonding. Cleaning ability was determined using techniques such as X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR) which are capable of examining monolayer levels of contamination on a surface. Solvents have been identified for removal of rust preventative oils, lapping oils, machining coolants, lubricants, greases, and mold releases. Solvents have also been evaluated for cleaning urethane foam spray guns, swelling of urethanes and swelling of epoxies.

  15. Cleaning without chlorinated solvents

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, L. M.; Simandl, R. F.

    1995-01-01

    Because of health and environmental concerns, many regulations have been passed in recent years regarding the use of chlorinated solvents. The Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant has had an active program to find alternatives for these solvents used in cleaning applications for the past 7 years. During this time frame, the quantity of solvents purchased has been reduced by 92 percent. The program has been a twofold effort. Vapor degreasers used in batch cleaning operations have been replaced by ultrasonic cleaning with aqueous detergent, and other organic solvents have been identified for use in hand-wiping or specialty operations. In order to qualify these alternatives for use, experimentation was conducted on cleaning ability as well as effects on subsequent operations such as welding, painting, and bonding. Cleaning ability was determined using techniques such as x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) which are capable of examining monolayer levels of contamination on a surface. Solvents have been identified for removal of rust preventative oils, lapping oils, machining coolants, lubricants, greases, and mold releases. Solvents have also been evaluated for cleaning urethane foam spray guns, swelling of urethanes, and swelling of epoxies.

  16. Solvent effects on the properties of hyperbranched polythiophenes.

    PubMed

    Torras, Juan; Zanuy, David; Aradilla, David; Alemán, Carlos

    2016-09-21

    The structural and electronic properties of all-thiophene dendrimers and dendrons in solution have been evaluated using very different theoretical approaches based on quantum mechanical (QM) and hybrid QM/molecular mechanics (MM) methodologies: (i) calculations on minimum energy conformations using an implicit solvation model in combination with density functional theory (DFT) or time-dependent DFT (TD-DFT) methods; (ii) hybrid QM/MM calculations, in which the solute and solvent molecules are represented at the DFT level as point charges, respectively, on snapshots extracted from classical molecular dynamics (MD) simulations using explicit solvent molecules, and (iii) QM/MM-MD trajectories in which the solute is described at the DFT or TD-DFT level and the explicit solvent molecules are represented using classical force-fields. Calculations have been performed in dichloromethane, tetrahydrofuran and dimethylformamide. A comparison of the results obtained using the different approaches with the available experimental data indicates that the incorporation of effects associated with both the conformational dynamics of the dendrimer and the explicit solvent molecules is strictly necessary to satisfactorily reproduce the properties of the investigated systems. Accordingly, QM/MM-MD simulations are able to capture such effects providing a reliable description of electronic properties-conformational flexibility relationships in all-Th dendrimers. PMID:27541726

  17. Development of Implicit and Explicit Category Learning

    PubMed Central

    Huang-Pollock, Cynthia L.; Maddox, W. Todd; Karalunas, Sarah L.

    2011-01-01

    We present two studies that examine developmental differences in the implicit and explicit acquisition of category knowledge. College-attending adults consistently outperformed school-aged children on two separate information integration paradigms due to children’s more frequent use of an explicit rule-based strategy. Accuracy rates were also higher for adults on a unidimensional rule-based task due to children’s more frequent use of the irrelevant dimension to guide their behavior. Results across these two studies suggest that the ability to learn categorization structures may be dependent upon a child’s ability to inhibit output from the explicit system. PMID:21377688

  18. Material model library for explicit numerical codes

    SciTech Connect

    Hofmann, R.; Dial, B.W.

    1982-08-01

    A material model logic structure has been developed which is useful for most explicit finite-difference and explicit finite-element Lagrange computer codes. This structure has been implemented and tested in the STEALTH codes to provide an example for researchers who wish to implement it in generically similar codes. In parallel with these models, material parameter libraries have been created for the implemented models for materials which are often needed in DoD applications.

  19. The self-organization of explicit attitudes.

    PubMed

    Wojnowicz, Michael T; Ferguson, Melissa J; Dale, Rick; Spivey, Michael J

    2009-11-01

    How do minds produce explicit attitudes over several hundred milliseconds? Speeded evaluative measures have revealed implicit biases beyond cognitive control and subjective awareness, yet mental processing may culminate in an explicit attitude that feels personally endorsed and corroborates voluntary intentions. We argue that self-reported explicit attitudes derive from a continuous, temporally dynamic process, whereby multiple simultaneously conflicting sources of information self-organize into a meaningful mental representation. While our participants reported their explicit (like vs. dislike) attitudes toward White versus Black people by moving a cursor to a "like" or "dislike" response box, we recorded streaming x- and y-coordinates from their hand-movement trajectories. We found that participants' hand-movement paths exhibited greater curvature toward the "dislike" response when they reported positive explicit attitudes toward Black people than when they reported positive explicit attitudes toward White people. Moreover, these trajectories were characterized by movement disorder and competitive velocity profiles that were predicted under the assumption that the deliberate attitudes emerged from continuous interactions between multiple simultaneously conflicting constraints. PMID:19818047

  20. Separation by solvent extraction

    DOEpatents

    Holt, Jr., Charles H.

    1976-04-06

    17. A process for separating fission product values from uranium and plutonium values contained in an aqueous solution, comprising adding an oxidizing agent to said solution to secure uranium and plutonium in their hexavalent state; contacting said aqueous solution with a substantially water-immiscible organic solvent while agitating and maintaining the temperature at from -1.degree. to -2.degree. C. until the major part of the water present is frozen; continuously separating a solid ice phase as it is formed; separating a remaining aqueous liquid phase containing fission product values and a solvent phase containing plutonium and uranium values from each other; melting at least the last obtained part of said ice phase and adding it to said separated liquid phase; and treating the resulting liquid with a new supply of solvent whereby it is practically depleted of uranium and plutonium.

  1. Halogenated solvent remediation

    DOEpatents

    Sorenson, Kent S.

    2004-08-31

    Methods for enhancing bioremediation of ground water contaminated with nonaqueous halogenated solvents are disclosed. A preferred method includes adding a composition to the ground water wherein the composition is an electron donor for microbe-mediated reductive dehalogenation of the halogenated solvents and enhances mass transfer of the halogenated solvents from residual source areas into the aqueous phase of the ground water. Illustrative compositions effective in these methods include surfactants such as C.sub.2 -C.sub.4 carboxylic acids and hydroxy acids, salts thereof, esters of C.sub.2 -C.sub.4 carboxylic acids and hydroxy acids, and mixtures thereof. Especially preferred compositions for use in these methods include lactic acid, salts of lactic acid, such as sodium lactate, lactate esters, and mixtures thereof. The microbes are either indigenous to the ground water, or such microbes can be added to the ground water in addition to the composition.

  2. Halogenated solvent remediation

    DOEpatents

    Sorenson, Jr., Kent S.

    2008-11-11

    Methods for enhancing bioremediation of ground water contaminated with nonaqueous halogenated solvents are disclosed. An illustrative method includes adding an electron donor for microbe-mediated anaerobic reductive dehalogenation of the halogenated solvents, which electron donor enhances mass transfer of the halogenated solvents from residual source areas into the aqueous phase of the ground water. Illustrative electron donors include C.sub.2-C.sub.4 carboxylic acids and hydroxy acids, salts thereof, esters of C.sub.2-C.sub.4 carboxylic acids and hydroxy acids, and mixtures thereof, of which lactic acid, salts of lactic acid--such as sodium lactate, lactate esters, and mixtures thereof are particularly illustrative. The microbes are either indigenous to the ground water, or such microbes can be added to the ground water in addition to the electron donor.

  3. Breathing with chlorinated solvents

    SciTech Connect

    McCarty, P.L.

    1997-06-06

    Chlorinated solvents are effective cleaners and in the past dirted solvents were dumped into landfills, stored in tanks that often leaked, or spilled. As a result the most common contaminants of organic groundwater at hazardous waste sites are the two major chlorinated solvents - tetrachloroethylene (PCE) and trichloroethylene (TCE). Both are suspected carcinogens and both are highly resistant to biodegradation. Now however, there is a report of a bacterium that can remove all of the chlorine atoms from both by halorespiration to form ethene, an innocuous end product. This article goes on to discuss the background of biodegradation of chlorinated compounds, why it is so difficult, and what the future is in this area. 9 refs., 1 fig.

  4. Solvent resistant copolyimide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, Alice C. (Inventor); St. Clair, Terry L. (Inventor)

    1995-01-01

    A solvent resistant copolyimide was prepared by reacting 4,4'-oxydiphthalic anhydride with a diaimine blend comprising, based on the total amount of the diamine blend, about 75 to 90 mole percent of 3,4'-oxydianiline and about 10 to 25 mole percent p-phenylene diamine. The solvent resistant copolyimide had a higher glass transition temperature when cured at 350.degree. , 371.degree. and 400.degree. C. than LaRC.TM.-IA. The composite prepared from the copolyimide had similar mechanical properties to LaRC.TM.-IA. Films prepared from the copolyimide were resistant to immediate breakage when exposed to solvents such as dimethylacetamide and chloroform. The adhesive properties of the copolyimide were maintained even after testing at 23.degree., 150.degree., 177.degree. and 204.degree. C.

  5. Safe battery solvents

    DOEpatents

    Harrup, Mason K.; Delmastro, Joseph R.; Stewart, Frederick F.; Luther, Thomas A.

    2007-10-23

    An ion transporting solvent maintains very low vapor pressure, contains flame retarding elements, and is nontoxic. The solvent in combination with common battery electrolyte salts can be used to replace the current carbonate electrolyte solution, creating a safer battery. It can also be used in combination with polymer gels or solid polymer electrolytes to produce polymer batteries with enhanced conductivity characteristics. The solvents may comprise a class of cyclic and acyclic low molecular weight phosphazenes compounds, comprising repeating phosphorus and nitrogen units forming a core backbone and ion-carrying pendent groups bound to the phosphorus. In preferred embodiments, the cyclic phosphazene comprises at least 3 phosphorus and nitrogen units, and the pendent groups are polyethers, polythioethers, polyether/polythioethers or any combination thereof, and/or other groups preferably comprising other atoms from Group 6B of the periodic table of elements.

  6. Solvent dewatering coal

    SciTech Connect

    Hardesty, D.E.; Buchholz, H.F.

    1984-07-17

    Drying of wet coal is facilitated by the addition of a nonaqueous solvent, such as acetone, to the coal followed by application of heat to remove both solvent and water from the coal. The coal may be further upgraded by briquetting or pelletizing fine coal particles with waxes and resins extracted from the coal, or the waxes and resins may be left on the coal to reduce the tendency of the coal to reabsorb water. In addition, minerals such as sodium and potassium salts may be removed from the coal to reduce slagging and fouling behavior of the coal.

  7. Anisotropic time-resolved solution X-ray scattering patterns from explicit-solvent molecular dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brinkmann, Levin U. L.; Hub, Jochen S.

    2015-09-01

    Time-resolved wide-angle X-ray scattering (TR-WAXS) is an emerging experimental technique used to track chemical reactions and conformational transitions of proteins in real time. Thanks to increased time resolution of the method, anisotropic TR-WAXS patterns were recently reported, which contain more structural information than isotropic patterns. So far, however, no method has been available to compute anisotropic WAXS patterns of biomolecules, thus limiting the structural interpretation. Here, we present a method to compute anisotropic TR-WAXS patterns from molecular dynamics simulations. The calculations accurately account for scattering of the hydration layer and for thermal fluctuations. For many photo-excitable proteins, given a low intensity of the excitation laser, the anisotropic pattern is described by two independent components: (i) an isotropic component, corresponding to common isotropic WAXS experiments and (ii) an anisotropic component depending on the orientation of the excitation dipole of the solute. We present a set of relations for the calculation of these two components from experimental scattering patterns. Notably, the isotropic component is not obtained by a uniform azimuthal average on the detector. The calculations are illustrated and validated by computing anisotropic WAXS patterns of a spheroidal protein model and of photoactive yellow protein. Effects due to saturated excitation at high intensities of the excitation laser are discussed, including opportunities to extract additional structural information by modulating the laser intensity.

  8. Anisotropic time-resolved solution X-ray scattering patterns from explicit-solvent molecular dynamics.

    PubMed

    Brinkmann, Levin U L; Hub, Jochen S

    2015-09-14

    Time-resolved wide-angle X-ray scattering (TR-WAXS) is an emerging experimental technique used to track chemical reactions and conformational transitions of proteins in real time. Thanks to increased time resolution of the method, anisotropic TR-WAXS patterns were recently reported, which contain more structural information than isotropic patterns. So far, however, no method has been available to compute anisotropic WAXS patterns of biomolecules, thus limiting the structural interpretation. Here, we present a method to compute anisotropic TR-WAXS patterns from molecular dynamics simulations. The calculations accurately account for scattering of the hydration layer and for thermal fluctuations. For many photo-excitable proteins, given a low intensity of the excitation laser, the anisotropic pattern is described by two independent components: (i) an isotropic component, corresponding to common isotropic WAXS experiments and (ii) an anisotropic component depending on the orientation of the excitation dipole of the solute. We present a set of relations for the calculation of these two components from experimental scattering patterns. Notably, the isotropic component is not obtained by a uniform azimuthal average on the detector. The calculations are illustrated and validated by computing anisotropic WAXS patterns of a spheroidal protein model and of photoactive yellow protein. Effects due to saturated excitation at high intensities of the excitation laser are discussed, including opportunities to extract additional structural information by modulating the laser intensity. PMID:26374019

  9. INVESTIGATION OF PLUTONIUM AND URANIUM UPTAKE INTO MCU SOLVENT AND NEXT GENERATION SOLVENT

    SciTech Connect

    Peters, T.; Fink, S.

    2012-01-06

    At the request of the Savannah River Remediation (SRR) customer, the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) examined the plutonium (Pu) and uranium (U) uptake into the Next Generation Solvent (NGS) that will be used at the Salt Waste Processing Facility (SWPF). SRNL examined archived samples of solvent used in Extraction-Scrub-Strip (ESS) tests, as well as samples from new tests designed explicitly to examine the Pu and U uptake. Direct radiocounting for Pu and U provided the best results. Using the radiocounting results, we found that in all cases there were <3.41E-12 g Pu/g of NGS and <1.17E-05 g U/g of NGS in multiple samples, even after extended contact times and high aqueous:organic volume phase ratios. These values are conservative as they do not allow for release or removal of the actinides by scrub, strip, or solvent wash processes. The values do not account for extended use or any increase that may occur due to radiolytic damage of the solvent.

  10. ENGINEERING BULLETIN: SOLVENT EXTRACTION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Solvent extraction does not destroy hazardous contaminants, but is a means of separating those contaminants from soils, sludges, and sediments, thereby reducing the volume of the hazardous material that must be treated. enerally it is used as one in a series of unit operations an...

  11. SOLVENT EXTRACTION TREATMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    Solvent extraction does not destroy wastes, but is a means of separating hazardous contaminants from soils, sludges, and sediments, thereby reducing the volume of the hazardous waste that must be treated. enerally it is used as one ina series of unit operations, and can reduce th...

  12. Organic solvent topical report

    SciTech Connect

    COWLEY, W.L.

    1999-05-13

    This report provides the basis for closing the organic solvent safety issue. Sufficient information is presented to conclude that risk posed by an organic solvent fire is within risk evaluation guidelines. This report updates information contained in Analysis of Consequences of Postulated Solvent Fires in Hanford Site Waste Tanks. WHC-SD-WM-CN-032. Rev. 0A (Cowley et al. 1996). However, this document will not replace Cowley et al (1996) as the primary reference for the Basis for Interim Operation (BIO) until the recently submitted BIO amendment (Hanson 1999) is approved by the US Department of Energy. This conclusion depends on the use of controls for preventing vehicle fuel fires and for limiting the use of flame cutting in areas where hot metal can fall on the waste surface.The required controls are given in the Tank Waste Remediation System Technical Safety Requirements (Noorani 1997b). This is a significant change from the conclusions presented in Revision 0 of this report. Revision 0 of this calcnote concluded that some organic solvent fire scenarios exceeded risk evaluation guidelines, even with controls imposed.

  13. Organic solvent topical report

    SciTech Connect

    Cowley, W.L.

    1998-04-30

    This report is the technical basis for the accident and consequence analyses used in the Hanford Tank Farms Basis for Interim Operation. The report also contains the scientific and engineering information and reference material needed to understand the organic solvent safety issue. This report includes comments received from the Chemical Reactions Subcommittee of the Tank Advisory Panel.

  14. Automated solvent concentrator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Griffith, J. S.; Stuart, J. L.

    1976-01-01

    Designed for automated drug identification system (AUDRI), device increases concentration by 100. Sample is first filtered, removing particulate contaminants and reducing water content of sample. Sample is extracted from filtered residue by specific solvent. Concentrator provides input material to analysis subsystem.

  15. ONSITE SOLVENT RECOVERY

    EPA Science Inventory

    This study evaluated the product quality, waste reduction/pollution prevention, and economic aspects of three technologies for onsite solvent recovery. The technologies were (1) atmospheric batch distillation, (2) vacuum heat-pump distillation, and (3) low-emission vapor degreas...

  16. DESIGNING GREENER SOLVENTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Computer-aided design of chemicals and chemical mixtures provides a powerful tool to help engineers identify cleaner process designs and more-benign alternatives to toxic industrial solvents. Three software programs are discussed: (1) PARIS II (Program for Assisting the Replaceme...

  17. Solvent vapor collector

    DOEpatents

    Ellison, Kenneth; Whike, Alan S.

    1979-01-30

    A solvent vapor collector is mounted on the upstream inlet end of an oven having a gas-circulating means and intended for curing a coating applied to a strip sheet metal at a coating station. The strip sheet metal may be hot and solvent vapors are evaporated at the coating station and from the strip as it passes from the coating station to the oven. Upper and lower plenums within a housing of the collector are supplied with oven gases or air from the gas-circulating means and such gases or air are discharged within the collector obliquely in a downstream direction against the strip passing through that collector to establish downstream gas flows along the top and under surfaces of the strip so as, in turn, to induct solvent vapors into the collector at the coating station. A telescopic multi-piece shroud is usefully provided on the housing for movement between an extended position in which it overlies the coating station to collect solvent vapors released thereat and a retracted position permitting ready cleaning and adjustment of that coating station.

  18. Predictive models of implicit and explicit attitudes.

    PubMed

    Perugini, Marco

    2005-03-01

    Explicit attitudes have long been assumed to be central factors influencing behaviour. A recent stream of studies has shown that implicit attitudes, typically measured with the Implicit Association Test (IAT), can also predict a significant range of behaviours. This contribution is focused on testing different predictive models of implicit and explicit attitudes. In particular, three main models can be derived from the literature: (a) additive (the two types of attitudes explain different portion of variance in the criterion), (b) double dissociation (implicit attitudes predict spontaneous whereas explicit attitudes predict deliberative behaviour), and (c) multiplicative (implicit and explicit attitudes interact in influencing behaviour). This paper reports two studies testing these models. The first study (N = 48) is about smoking behaviour, whereas the second study (N = 109) is about preferences for snacks versus fruit. In the first study, the multiplicative model is supported, whereas the double dissociation model is supported in the second study. The results are discussed in light of the importance of focusing on different patterns of prediction when investigating the directive influence of implicit and explicit attitudes on behaviours. PMID:15901390

  19. Explicit versus spontaneous diffeomorphism breaking in gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bluhm, Robert

    2015-03-01

    Gravitational theories with fixed background fields break local Lorentz and diffeomorphism invariance either explicitly or spontaneously. In the case of explicit breaking it is known that conflicts can arise between the dynamics and geometrical constraints, while spontaneous breaking evades this problem. It is for this reason that in the gravity sector of the Standard-Model extension (SME) it is assumed that the background fields (SME coefficients) originate from spontaneous symmetry breaking. However, in other examples, such as Chern-Simons gravity and massive gravity, diffeomorphism invariance is explicitly broken by the background fields, and the potential conflicts between the dynamics and geometry can be avoided in most cases. An analysis of how this occurs is given, and the conditions that are placed on the metric tensor and gravitational structure as a result of the presence of an explicit-breaking background are described. The gravity sector of the SME is then considered for the case of explicit breaking. However, it is found that a useful post-Newtonian limit is only obtained when the symmetry breaking is spontaneous.

  20. Dehydration-Driven Solvent Exposure of Hydrophobic Surfaces as a Driving Force in Peptide Folding

    SciTech Connect

    Daidone, Isabella; Ulmschneider, Martin; DiNola, Alfredo; Amadei, Andrea; Smith, Jeremy C

    2007-09-01

    Recent work has shown that the nature of hydration of pure hydrophobic surfaces changes with the length scale considered: water hydrogen-bonding networks adapt to small exposed hydrophobic species, hydrating or 'wetting' them at relatively high densities, whereas larger hydrophobic areas are 'dewetted' [Chandler D (2005), Nature 29:640-647]. Here we determine whether this effect is also present in peptides by examining the folding of a {beta}-hairpin (the 14-residue amyloidogenic prion protein H1 peptide), using microsecond time-scale molecular dynamics simulations. Two simulation models are compared, one explicitly including the water molecules, which may thus adapt locally to peptide configurations, and the other using a popular continuum approximation, the generalized Born/surface area implicit solvent model. The results obtained show that, in explicit solvent, peptide conformers with high solvent-accessible hydrophobic surface area indeed also have low hydration density around hydrophobic residues, whereas a concomitant higher hydration density around hydrophilic residues is observed. This dewetting effect stabilizes the fully folded {beta}-hairpin state found experimentally. In contrast, the implicit solvent model destabilizes the fully folded hairpin, tending to cluster hydrophobic residues regardless of the size of the exposed hydrophobic surface. Furthermore, the rate of the conformational transitions in the implicit solvent simulation is almost doubled with respect to that of the explicit solvent. The results suggest that dehydration-driven solvent exposure of hydrophobic surfaces may be a significant factor determining peptide conformational equilibria.

  1. Solvent-Ion Interactions in Salt Water: A Simple Experiment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Willey, Joan D.

    1984-01-01

    Describes a procedurally quick, simple, and inexpensive experiment which illustrates the magnitude and some effects of solvent-ion interactions in aqueous solutions. Theoretical information, procedures, and examples of temperature, volume and hydration number calculations are provided. (JN)

  2. Accelerating an iterative process by explicit annihilation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jespersen, D. C.; Buning, P. G.

    1983-01-01

    A slowly convergent stationary iterative process can be accelerated by explicitly annihilating (i.e., eliminating) the dominant eigenvector component of the error. The dominant eigenvalue or complex pair of eigenvalues can be estimated from the solution during the iteration. The corresponding eigenvector or complex pair of eigenvectors can then be annihilated by applying an explicit Richardson process over the basic iterative method. This can be done entirely in real arithmetic by analytically combining the complex conjugate annihilation steps. The technique is applied to an implicit algorithm for the calculation of two dimensional steady transonic flow over a circular cylinder using the equations of compressible inviscid gas dynamics. This demonstrates the use of explicit annihilation on a nonlinear problem.

  3. Accelerating an iterative process by explicit annihilation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jespersen, D. C.; Buning, P. G.

    1985-01-01

    A slowly convergent stationary iterative process can be accelerated by explicitly annihilating (i.e., eliminating) the dominant eigenvector component of the error. The dominant eigenvalue or complex pair of eigenvalues can be estimated from the solution during the iteration. The corresponding eigenvector or complex pair of eigenvectors can then be annihilated by applying an explicit Richardson process over the basic iterative method. This can be done entirely in real arithmetic by analytically combining the complex conjugate annihilation steps. The technique is applied to an implicit algorithm for the calculation of two dimensional steady transonic flow over a circular cylinder using the equations of compressible inviscid gas dynamics. This demonstrates the use of explicit annihilation on a nonlinear problem.

  4. Electromagnetic Radiation under Explicit Symmetry Breaking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinha, Dhiraj; Amaratunga, Gehan A. J.

    2015-04-01

    We report our observation that radiation from a system of accelerating charges is possible only when there is explicit breaking of symmetry in the electric field in space within the spatial configuration of the radiating system. Under symmetry breaking, current within an enclosed area around the radiating structure is not conserved at a certain instant of time resulting in radiation in free space. Electromagnetic radiation from dielectric and piezoelectric material based resonators are discussed in this context. Finally, it is argued that symmetry of a resonator of any form can be explicitly broken to create a radiating antenna.

  5. Explicitly computing geodetic coordinates from Cartesian coordinates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Huaien

    2013-04-01

    This paper presents a new form of quartic equation based on Lagrange's extremum law and a Groebner basis under the constraint that the geodetic height is the shortest distance between a given point and the reference ellipsoid. A very explicit and concise formulae of the quartic equation by Ferrari's line is found, which avoids the need of a good starting guess for iterative methods. A new explicit algorithm is then proposed to compute geodetic coordinates from Cartesian coordinates. The convergence region of the algorithm is investigated and the corresponding correct solution is given. Lastly, the algorithm is validated with numerical experiments.

  6. Multireference explicitly correlated F12 theories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shiozaki, Toru; Werner, Hans-Joachim

    2013-03-01

    We review our recent developments in multireference explicitly correlated F12 theories (explicitly correlated internally contracted multireference perturbation and multireference configuration interaction theories) that achieve near-basis-set-limit accuracy of the underlying multireference electron correlation methods with basis sets of medium size. The applicability of the multireference F12 theories is the same as that of their non-F12 counterpart, and therefore it is a computational tool with predictive accuracy for complicated electronic structures with strong correlation. A comparison with the earlier developments by others is also discussed.

  7. Explicit Form Focus Instruction: The Effects on Implicit and Explicit Knowledge of ESL Learners

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ebadi, Mandana Rohollahzadeh; Saad, Mohd Rashid Mohd; Abedalaziz, Nabil

    2014-01-01

    The study examines the effect of explicit form focus instruction and specifically metalinguistic information feedback on the development of both implicit and explicit knowledge of adult English as a Second Language (ESL) learners. Ninety-one subjects at the lower intermediate level were carefully selected through placement test at one of the…

  8. Solvent dewaxing of lubricating oils

    SciTech Connect

    Sequeira, A. Jr.

    1991-04-09

    This paper describes improvement in a process for producing a dewaxed lubricating oil from a wax-bearing mineral oil by the steps comprising; mixing the oil with a dewaxing solvent thereby forming an oil-solvent mixture, chilling the oil-solvent mixture to a dewaxing temperature thereby crystallizing the wax and forming an oil-solvent crystalline wax mixture, separating the oil-solvent-crystalline wax mixture to form a dewaxed oil-solvent mixture and crystalline wax, steam stripping the dewaxed oil-solvent mixture at a temperature of 300{degrees}F to 600{degrees}F and pressure of 1 atm to 3 atm, to yield a solvent free dewaxed oil.

  9. DESIGNING ENVIRONMENTALLY BENIGN SOLVENT SUBSTITUTES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Since the signing of 1987 Montreal Protocol, reducing and eliminating the use of harmful solvents has become an internationally imminent environmental protection mission. Solvent substitution is an effective way to achieve this goal. The Program for Assisting the Replacement of...

  10. Testing the semi-explicit assembly model of aqueous solvation in the SAMPL4 challenge.

    PubMed

    Li, Libo; Dill, Ken A; Fennell, Christopher J

    2014-03-01

    Here, we test a method, called semi-explicit assembly (SEA), that computes the solvation free energies of molecules in water in the SAMPL4 blind test challenge. SEA was developed with the intention of being as accurate as explicit-solvent models, but much faster to compute. It is accurate because it uses pre-simulations of simple spheres in explicit solvent to obtain structural and thermodynamic quantities, and it is fast because it parses solute free energies into regionally additive quantities. SAMPL4 provided us the opportunity to make new tests of SEA. Our tests here lead us to the following conclusions: (1) The newest version, called Field-SEA, which gives improved predictions for highly charged ions, is shown here to perform as well as the earlier versions (dipolar and quadrupolar SEA) on this broad blind SAMPL4 test set. (2) We find that both the past and present SEA models give solvation free energies that are as accurate as TIP3P. (3) Using a new approach for force field parameter optimization, we developed improved hydroxyl parameters that ensure consistency with neat-solvent dielectric constants, and found that they led to improved solvation free energies for hydroxyl-containing compounds in SAMPL4. We also learned that these hydroxyl parameters are not just fixing solvent exposed oxygens in a general sense, and therefore do not improve predictions for carbonyl or carboxylic-acid groups. Other such functional groups will need their own independent optimizations for potential improvements. Overall, these tests in SAMPL4 indicate that SEA is an accurate, general and fast new approach to computing solvation free energies. PMID:24474161

  11. Solvent substitution for electronic products

    SciTech Connect

    Benkovich, M.K.

    1992-01-01

    Allied-Signal Inc., Kansas City Division (KCD), manufactures the electrical, electrochemical, mechanical, and plastic components for nuclear weapons. The KCD has made a commitment to eliminate the use of chlorohydrocarbon (CHC) and chlorofluorocarbon (CFC) solvents to the greatest technical extent possible consistent with nuclear safety and stockpile reliability requirements. Current cleaning processes in the production departments use trichloroethylene, 1,1,1-trichloroethane, and various CFC-113 based solvents. Several non-halogenated solvents (Solvent A - an aqueous solvent based on N,N-dimethylacetamide, Solvent B - an aqueous mixture of ethanol amines, Solvent C - a hydrocarbon solvent based on octadecyl acetate, Solvent D - a terpene (d-limonene) hydrocarbon solvent combined with emulsifiers, Solvent E - a terpene (d-limonene) hydrocarbon solvent combined with a separation agent, d-limonene, and isopropyl alcohol) were evaluated to determine the most effective, non-chlorinated, non-fluorinated, alternate solvent cleaning system. All of these solvents were evaluated using current manual spray cleaning processes. The solvents were evaluated for their effectiveness in removing a rosin based RMA solder flux, a particular silicone mold release, and oils, greases, mold releases, resins, etc. The Meseran Surface Analyzer was used to measure organic contamination on the samples before and after cleaning. An Omega Meter Model 600 was also used to detect solder flux residues. Solvents C, D, E and d-limonene the best alternatives to trichloroethylene for removing all of the contaminants tested. For this particular electronic assembly, d-limonene was chosen as the alternate because of material compatibility and long-term reliability concerns.

  12. Glove permeation by organic solvents

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, G.O.; Lum, B.Y.; Carlson, G.J.; Wong, C.M.; Johnson, J.S.

    1981-03-01

    The vapor penetration of 29 common laboratory solvents on 28 protective gloves has been tested and measured using gas-phase, infrared spectrophotometric techniques to determine the permeation characteristics. Five different types of permeation behavior were identified. No one glove offered complete protection against all the solvents tested. The permeation rate of the solvent was found to be inversely proportional to glove thickness for a given manufacturer's material. Of two solvent mixtures tested, one exhibited a large, positive, synergistic rate.

  13. Fantasies and Exposure to Sexually Explicit Magazines.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Malamuth, Neil M.; McIlwraith, Robert D.

    1988-01-01

    Reports a study focusing on the relationship between frequency of exposure to sexually explicit magazines and the frequency of sexual and hostile-aggressive fantasies. Finds no significant relationships for "Playboy" readers, but "Penthouse" readership was best predicted by the interaction of sexual and hostile fantasies. (MS)

  14. From Asking to Answering: Making Questions Explicit

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Washington, Gene

    2006-01-01

    "From Asking To Answering: Making Questions Explicit" describes a pedagogical procedure the author has used in writing classes (expository, technical and creative) to help students better understand the purpose, and effect, of text-questions. It accomplishes this by means of thirteen discrete categories (e.g., CLAIMS, COMMITMENT, ANAPHORA, or…

  15. Sleep Enhances Explicit Recollection in Recognition Memory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Drosopoulos, Spyridon; Wagner, Ullrich; Born, Jan

    2005-01-01

    Recognition memory is considered to be supported by two different memory processes, i.e., the explicit recollection of information about a previous event and an implicit process of recognition based on a contextual sense of familiarity. Both types of memory supposedly rely on distinct memory systems. Sleep is known to enhance the consolidation of…

  16. ECO 202: Explicit Expressions of Ecological Protection

    EPA Science Inventory

    A critical early step in conducting an ecological risk assessment is deciding explicitly which aspects of the environment will be selected for evaluation. This step is often challenging; for example, because of the remarkable diversity of species, ecological communities and ecol...

  17. Orchestrating Semiotic Resources in Explicit Strategy Instruction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shanahan, Lynn E.; Flury-Kashmanian, Caroline

    2014-01-01

    Research and pedagogical information provided to teachers on implementing explicit strategy instruction has primarily focused on teachers' speech, with limited attention to other modes of communication, such as gesture and artefacts. This interpretive case study investigates two teachers' use of different semiotic resources when introducing…

  18. Affective Objectives--Implicit or Explicit?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Hayden R.; Enos, Donald F.

    The author discusses the importance of affective objectives in the educational process, and the difficulties in formulating, providing activities in, and evaluating the attainment of these objectives. A distinction is drawn between explicit objectives (those that should be revealed to the student) and implicit objectives (those that are…

  19. Explicit Instruction in Core Reading Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reutzel, D. Ray; Child, Angela; Jones, Cindy D.; Clark, Sarah K.

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to conduct a content analysis of the types and occurrences of explicit instructional moves recommended for teaching five essentials of effective reading instruction in grades 1, 3, and 5 core reading program teachers' editions in five widely marketed core reading programs. Guided practice was the most frequently…

  20. Explicit Instruction Elements in Core Reading Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Child, Angela R.

    2012-01-01

    Classroom teachers are provided instructional recommendations for teaching reading from their adopted core reading programs (CRPs). Explicit instruction elements or what is also called instructional moves, including direct explanation, modeling, guided practice, independent practice, discussion, feedback, and monitoring, were examined within CRP…

  1. PARIS II: DESIGNING GREENER SOLVENTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    PARIS II (the program for assisting the replacement of industrial solvents, version II), developed at the USEPA, is a unique software tool that can be used for customizing the design of replacement solvents and for the formulation of new solvents. This program helps users avoid ...

  2. Hazardous solvent substitution

    SciTech Connect

    Twitchell, K.E.

    1995-11-01

    Eliminating hazardous solvents is good for the environment, worker safety, and the bottom line. However, even though we are motivated to find replacements, the big question is `What can we use as replacements for hazardous solvents?`You, too, can find replacements for your hazardous solvents. All you have to do is search for them. Search through the vendor literature of hundreds of companies with thousands of products. Ponder the associated material safety data sheets, assuming of course that you can obtain them and, having obtained them, that you can read them. You will want to search the trade magazines and other sources for product reviews. You will want to talk to users about how well the product actually works. You may also want to check US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and other government reports for toxicity and other safety information. And, of course, you will want to compare the product`s constituent chemicals with the many hazardous constituency lists to ensure the safe and legal use of the product in your workplace.

  3. Solvent replacement for green processing.

    PubMed Central

    Sherman, J; Chin, B; Huibers, P D; Garcia-Valls, R; Hatton, T A

    1998-01-01

    The implementation of the Montreal Protocol, the Clean Air Act, and the Pollution Prevention Act of 1990 has resulted in increased awareness of organic solvent use in chemical processing. The advances made in the search to find "green" replacements for traditional solvents are reviewed, with reference to solvent alternatives for cleaning, coatings, and chemical reaction and separation processes. The development of solvent databases and computational methods that aid in the selection and/or design of feasible or optimal environmentally benign solvent alternatives for specific applications is also discussed. Images Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:9539018

  4. SOLVENT FIRE BY-PRODUCTS

    SciTech Connect

    Walker, D; Samuel Fink, S

    2006-05-22

    Southwest Research Institute (SwRI) conducted a burn test of the Caustic-Side Solvent Extraction (CSSX) solvent to determine the combustion products. The testing showed hydrogen fluoride gas is not a combustion product from a solvent fire when up to 70% of the solvent is consumed. The absence of HF in the combustion gases may reflect concentration of the modifier containing the fluoride groups in the unburned portion. SwRI reported results for other gases (CO, HCN, NOx, formaldehyde, and hydrocarbons). The results, with other supporting information, can be used for evaluating the consequences of a facility fire involving the CSSX solvent inventory.

  5. Comparison of protein solution structures refined by molecular dynamics simulation in vacuum, with a generalized Born model, and with explicit water.

    PubMed

    Xia, Bin; Tsui, Vickie; Case, David A; Dyson, H Jane; Wright, Peter E

    2002-04-01

    The inclusion of explicit solvent water in molecular dynamics refinement of NMR structures ought to provide the most physically meaningful accounting for the effects of solvent on structure, but is computationally expensive. In order to evaluate the validity of commonly used vacuum refinements and of recently developed continuum solvent model methods, we have used three different methods to refine a set of NMR solution structures of a medium sized protein, Escherichia coli glutaredoxin 2, from starting structures calculated using the program DYANA. The three different refinement protocols used molecular dynamics simulated annealing with the program AMBER in vacuum (VAC), including a generalized Born (GB) solvent model, and a full calculation including explicit solvent water (WAT). The structures obtained using the three methods of refinements were very similar, a reflection of their generally well-determined nature. However, the structures refined with the generalized Born model were more similar to those from explicit water refinement than those refined in vacuum. Significant improvement was seen in the percentage of backbone dihedral angles in the most favored regions of phi, psi space and in hydrogen bond pattern for structures refined with the GB and WAT models, compared with the structures refined in vacuum. The explicit water calculation took an average of 200 h of CPU time per structure on an SGI cluster, compared to 15-90 h for the GB calculation (depending on the parameters used) and 2 h for the vacuum calculation. The generalized Born solvent model proved to be an excellent compromise between the vacuum and explicit water refinements, giving results comparable to those of the explicit water calculation. Some improvement for phi and psi angle distribution and hydrogen bond pattern can also be achieved by energy minimizing the vacuum structures with the GB model, which takes a much shorter time than MD simulations with the GB model. PMID:12018480

  6. Occupational solvent exposure and cognition

    PubMed Central

    Sabbath, E.L.; Glymour, M.M.; Berr, C.; Singh-Manoux, A.; Zins, M.; Goldberg, M.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: Chronic occupational solvent exposure is associated with long-term cognitive deficits. Cognitive reserve may protect solvent-exposed workers from cognitive impairment. We tested whether the association between chronic solvent exposure and cognition varied by educational attainment, a proxy for cognitive reserve. Methods: Data were drawn from a prospective cohort of French national gas and electricity (GAZEL) employees (n = 4,134). Lifetime exposure to 4 solvent types (chlorinated solvents, petroleum solvents, benzene, and nonbenzene aromatic solvents) was assessed using a validated job-exposure matrix. Education was dichotomized at less than secondary school or below. Cognitive impairment was defined as scoring below the 25th percentile on the Digit Symbol Substitution Test at mean age 59 (SD 2.8; 88% of participants were retired at testing). Log-binomial regression was used to model risk ratios (RRs) for poor cognition as predicted by solvent exposure, stratified by education and adjusted for sociodemographic and behavioral factors. Results: Solvent exposure rates were higher among less-educated patients. Within this group, there was a dose-response relationship between lifetime exposure to each solvent type and RR for poor cognition (e.g., for high exposure to benzene, RR = 1.24, 95% confidence interval 1.09–1.41), with significant linear trends (p < 0.05) in 3 out of 4 solvent types. Recency of solvent exposure also predicted worse cognition among less-educated patients. Among those with secondary education or higher, there was no significant or near-significant relationship between any quantification of solvent exposure and cognition. Conclusions: Solvent exposure is associated with poor cognition only among less-educated individuals. Higher cognitive reserve in the more-educated group may explain this finding. PMID:22641403

  7. Implicit and explicit prejudice and interracial interaction.

    PubMed

    Dovidio, John F; Kawakami, Kerry; Gaertner, Samuel L

    2002-01-01

    The present research examined how implicit racial associations and explicit racial attitudes of Whites relate to behaviors and impressions in interracial interactions. Specifically, the authors examined how response latency and self-report measures predicted bias and perceptions of bias in verbal and nonverbal behavior exhibited by Whites while they interacted with a Black partner. As predicted, Whites' self-reported racial attitudes significantly predicted bias in their verbal behavior to Black relative to White confederates. Furthermore, these explicit attitudes predicted how much friendlier Whites felt that they behaved toward White than Black partners. In contrast, the response latency measure significantly predicted Whites' nonverbal friendliness and the extent to which the confederates and observers perceived bias in the participants' friendliness. PMID:11811635

  8. Extrapolated implicit-explicit time stepping.

    SciTech Connect

    Constantinescu, E. M.; Sandu, A.; Mathematics and Computer Science; Virginia Polytechnic Inst. and State Univ.

    2010-01-01

    This paper constructs extrapolated implicit-explicit time stepping methods that allow one to efficiently solve problems with both stiff and nonstiff components. The proposed methods are based on Euler steps and can provide very high order discretizations of ODEs, index-1 DAEs, and PDEs in the method-of-lines framework. Implicit-explicit schemes based on extrapolation are simple to construct, easy to implement, and straightforward to parallelize. This work establishes the existence of perturbed asymptotic expansions of global errors, explains the convergence orders of these methods, and studies their linear stability properties. Numerical results with stiff ODE, DAE, and PDE test problems confirm the theoretical findings and illustrate the potential of these methods to solve multiphysics multiscale problems.

  9. Solvent Fractionation of Lignin

    SciTech Connect

    Chatterjee, Sabornie; Saito, Tomonori

    2014-01-01

    Lignin is a highly abundant source of renewable carbon that can be considered as a valuable sustainable source of biobased materials. The major issues for the commercial production of value added high performance lignin products are lignin s physical and chemical heterogenities. To overcome these problems, a variety of procedures have been developed to produce pure lignin suitable for high performace applications such as lignin-derived carbon materials. However, most of the isolation procedures affect lignin s properties and structure. In this chapter, a short review of the effect of solvent fractionation on lignin s properties and structure is presented.

  10. Implicit and Explicit Spacecraft Gyro Calibration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bar-Itzhack, Itzhack Y.; Harman, Richard R.

    2004-01-01

    This paper presents a comparison between two approaches to sensor calibration. According to one approach, called explicit, an estimator compares the sensor readings to reference readings, and uses the difference between the two to estimate the calibration parameters. According to the other approach, called implicit, the sensor error is integrated to form a different entity, which is then compared with a reference quantity of this entity, and the calibration parameters are inferred from the difference. In particular this paper presents the comparison between these approaches when applied to in-flight spacecraft gyro calibration. Reference spacecraft rate is needed for gyro calibration when using the explicit approach; however, such reference rates are not readily available for in-flight calibration. Therefore the calibration parameter-estimator is expanded to include the estimation of that reference rate, which is based on attitude measurements in the form of attitude-quaternion. A comparison between the two approaches is made using simulated data. It is concluded that the performances of the two approaches are basically comparable. Sensitivity tests indicate that the explicit filter results are essentially insensitive to variations in given spacecraft dynamics model parameters.

  11. Intersection Type Systems and Explicit Substitutions Calculi

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ventura, Daniel Lima; Ayala-Rincón, Mauricio; Kamareddine, Fairouz

    The λ-calculus with de Bruijn indices, called λ dB , assembles each α-class of λ-terms into a unique term, using indices instead of variable names. Intersection types provide finitary type polymorphism satisfying important properties like principal typing, which allows the type system to include features such as data abstraction (modularity) and separate compilation. To be closer to computation and to simplify the formalisation of the atomic operations involved in β-contractions, several explicit substitution calculi were developed most of which are written with de Bruijn indices. Although untyped and simply types versions of explicit substitution calculi are well investigated, versions with more elaborate type systems (e.g., with intersection types) are not. In previous work, we presented a version for λ dB of an intersection type system originally introduced to characterise principal typings for β-normal forms and provided the characterisation for this version. In this work we introduce intersection type systems for two explicit substitution calculi: the λσ and the λs e . These type system are based on a type system for λ dB and satisfy the basic property of subject reduction, which guarantees the preservation of types during computations.

  12. Age effects on explicit and implicit memory

    PubMed Central

    Ward, Emma V.; Berry, Christopher J.; Shanks, David R.

    2013-01-01

    It is well-documented that explicit memory (e.g., recognition) declines with age. In contrast, many argue that implicit memory (e.g., priming) is preserved in healthy aging. For example, priming on tasks such as perceptual identification is often not statistically different in groups of young and older adults. Such observations are commonly taken as evidence for distinct explicit and implicit learning/memory systems. In this article we discuss several lines of evidence that challenge this view. We describe how patterns of differential age-related decline may arise from differences in the ways in which the two forms of memory are commonly measured, and review recent research suggesting that under improved measurement methods, implicit memory is not age-invariant. Formal computational models are of considerable utility in revealing the nature of underlying systems. We report the results of applying single and multiple-systems models to data on age effects in implicit and explicit memory. Model comparison clearly favors the single-system view. Implications for the memory systems debate are discussed. PMID:24065942

  13. Solvent Blending Strategy to Upgrade MCU CSSX Solvent to Equivalent Next-Generation CSSX Solvent

    SciTech Connect

    Delmau, Laetitia Helene; Moyer, Bruce A

    2012-12-01

    The results of the present study have validated an equal-volume blending strategy for upgrading freshly prepared CSSX solvent to a blended solvent functionally equivalent to NG-CSSX solvent. It is shown that blending fresh CSSX solvent as currently used in MCU with an equal volume of an NG-CSSX solvent concentrate of appropriate composition yields a blended solvent composition (46.5 mM of MaxCalix, 3.5 mM of BOBCalixC6, 0.5 M of Cs-7SB, 3 mM of guanidine suppressor, and 1.5 mM of TOA in Isopar L) that exhibits equivalent batch ESS performance to that of the NG-CSSX solvent containing 50 mM of MaxCalix, 0.5 M of Cs-7SB, and 3 mM of guanidine suppressor in Isopar L. The solvent blend composition is robust to third-phase formation. Results also show that a blend containing up to 60% v/v of CSSX solvent could be accommodated with minimal risk. Extraction and density data for the effect of solvent concentration mimicking diluent evaporation or over-dilution of the equal-volume blended solvent are also given, providing input for setting operational limits. Given that the experiments employed all pristine chemicals, the results do not qualify a blended solvent starting with actual used MCU solvent, which can be expected to have undergone some degree of degradation. Consequently, further work should be considered to evaluate this risk and implement appropriate remediation if needed.

  14. Are mixed explicit/implicit solvation models reliable for studying phosphate hydrolysis? A comparative study of continuum, explicit and mixed solvation models.

    SciTech Connect

    Kamerlin, Shina C. L.; Haranczyk, Maciej; Warshel, Arieh

    2009-05-01

    Phosphate hydrolysis is ubiquitous in biology. However, despite intensive research on this class of reactions, the precise nature of the reaction mechanism remains controversial. In this work, we have examined the hydrolysis of three homologous phosphate diesters. The solvation free energy was simulated by means of either an implicit solvation model (COSMO), hybrid quantum mechanical / molecular mechanical free energy perturbation (QM/MM-FEP) or a mixed solvation model in which N water molecules were explicitly included in the ab initio description of the reacting system (where N=1-3), with the remainder of the solvent being implicitly modelled as a continuum. Here, both COSMO and QM/MM-FEP reproduce Delta Gobs within an error of about 2kcal/mol. However, we demonstrate that in order to obtain any form of reliable results from a mixed model, it is essential to carefully select the explicit water molecules from short QM/MM runs that act as a model for the true infinite system. Additionally, the mixed models tend to be increasingly inaccurate the more explicit water molecules are placed into the system. Thus, our analysis indicates that this approach provides an unreliable way for modelling phosphate hydrolysis in solution.

  15. Surveying implicit solvent models for estimating small molecule absolute hydration free energies

    PubMed Central

    Knight, Jennifer L.

    2011-01-01

    Implicit solvent models are powerful tools in accounting for the aqueous environment at a fraction of the computational expense of explicit solvent representations. Here, we compare the ability of common implicit solvent models (TC, OBC, OBC2, GBMV, GBMV2, GBSW, GBSW/MS, GBSW/MS2 and FACTS) to reproduce experimental absolute hydration free energies for a series of 499 small neutral molecules that are modeled using AMBER/GAFF parameters and AM1-BCC charges. Given optimized surface tension coefficients for scaling the surface area term in the nonpolar contribution, most implicit solvent models demonstrate reasonable agreement with extensive explicit solvent simulations (average difference 1.0-1.7 kcal/mol and R2=0.81-0.91) and with experimental hydration free energies (average unsigned errors=1.1-1.4 kcal/mol and R2=0.66-0.81). Chemical classes of compounds are identified that need further optimization of their ligand force field parameters and others that require improvement in the physical parameters of the implicit solvent models themselves. More sophisticated nonpolar models are also likely necessary to more effectively represent the underlying physics of solvation and take the quality of hydration free energies estimated from implicit solvent models to the next level. PMID:21735452

  16. Implicit and Explicit Timing in Oculomotor Control

    PubMed Central

    Ameqrane, Ilhame; Pouget, Pierre; Wattiez, Nicolas; Carpenter, Roger; Missal, Marcus

    2014-01-01

    The passage of time can be estimated either explicitly, e.g. before leaving home in the morning, or implicitly, e.g. when catching a flying ball. In the present study, the latency of saccadic eye movements was used to evaluate differences between implicit and explicit timing. Humans were required to make a saccade between a central and a peripheral position on a computer screen. The delay between the extinction of a central target and the appearance of an eccentric target was the independent variable that could take one out of four different values (400, 900, 1400 or 1900 ms). In target trials, the delay period lasted for one of the four durations randomly. At the end of the delay, a saccade was initiated by the appearance of an eccentric target. Cue&target trials were similar to target trials but the duration of the delay was visually cued. In probe trials, the duration of the upcoming delay was cued, but there was no eccentric target and subjects had to internally generate a saccade at the estimated end of the delay. In target and cue&target trials, the mean and variance of latency distributions decreased as delay duration increased. In cue&target trials latencies were shorter. In probe trials, the variance increased with increasing delay duration and scalar variability was observed. The major differences in saccadic latency distributions were observed between visually-guided (target and cue&target trials) and internally-generated saccades (probe trials). In target and cue&target trials the timing of the response was implicit. In probe trials, the timing of the response was internally-generated and explicitly based on the duration of the visual cue. Scalar timing was observed only during probe trials. This study supports the hypothesis that there is no ubiquitous timing system in the brain but independent timing processes active depending on task demands. PMID:24728140

  17. Solvents level dipole moments.

    PubMed

    Liang, Wenkel; Li, Xiaosong; Dalton, Larry R; Robinson, Bruce H; Eichinger, Bruce E

    2011-11-01

    The dipole moments of highly polar molecules measured in solution are usually smaller than the molecular dipole moments that are calculated with reaction field methods, whereas vacuum values are routinely calculated in good agreement with available vapor phase data. Whether from Onsager's theory (or variations thereof) or from quantum mechanical methods, the calculated molecular dipoles in solution are found to be larger than those measured. The reason, of course, is that experiments measure the net dipole moment of solute together with the polarized (perturbed) solvent "cloud" surrounding it. Here we show that the reaction field charges that are generated in the quantum mechanical self-consistent reaction field (SCRF) method give a good estimate of the net dipole moment of the solute molecule together with the moment arising from the reaction field charges. This net dipole is a better description of experimental data than the vacuum dipole moment and certainly better than the bare dipole moment of the polarized solute molecule. PMID:21923185

  18. Explicit Integrability of the Generalised Ladder Problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andriopoulos, K.; Leach, P. G. L.

    2007-05-01

    We provide the explicit solution of the n-dimensional generalised ladder system, that is the homogeneous quadratic system of first-order differential equations of the form \\dot{x}i=xi\\sumj=1naijxj, i=1,n, where (aij)=(1+ai-aj), i, j=1,n introduced by Imai and Hirata [J. Phys. Soc. Jpn. 72 (2003) 973]. These systems are characterised by the n2-1 symmetries Yml=xmual-am-1(\\sumj=1nxj\\partialxj-u\\partialxl), but are not the most general systems invariant under these symmetries. The more general systems are called hyperladder systems and we discuss their integrability.

  19. Explicit 3-D Hydrodynamic FEM Program

    2000-11-07

    DYNA3D is a nonlinear explicit finite element code for analyzing 3-D structures and solid continuum. The code is vectorized and available on several computer platforms. The element library includes continuum, shell, beam, truss and spring/damper elements to allow maximum flexibility in modeling physical problems. Many materials are available to represent a wide range of material behavior, including elasticity, plasticity, composites, thermal effects and rate dependence. In addition, DYNA3D has a sophisticated contact interface capability, includingmore » frictional sliding, single surface contact and automatic contact generation.« less

  20. Explicit 3-D Hydrodynamic FEM Program

    SciTech Connect

    2000-11-07

    DYNA3D is a nonlinear explicit finite element code for analyzing 3-D structures and solid continuum. The code is vectorized and available on several computer platforms. The element library includes continuum, shell, beam, truss and spring/damper elements to allow maximum flexibility in modeling physical problems. Many materials are available to represent a wide range of material behavior, including elasticity, plasticity, composites, thermal effects and rate dependence. In addition, DYNA3D has a sophisticated contact interface capability, including frictional sliding, single surface contact and automatic contact generation.

  1. All-atom Simulation of Amyloid Aggregates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berhanu, Workalemahu M.; Alred, Erik J.; Bernhardt, Nathan A.; Hansmann, Ulrich H. E.

    Molecular simulations are now commonly used to complement experiments in the investigation of amyloid formation and their role in human diseases. While various simulations based on enhanced sampling techniques are used in amyloid formation simulations, this article will focus on those using standard atomistic simulations to evaluate the stability of fibril models. Such studies explore the limitations that arise from the choice of force field or polymorphism; and explore the stability of in vivo and in vitro forms of Aβ fibril aggregates, and the role of heterologous seeding as a link between different amyloid diseases.

  2. Fully explicit algorithms for fluid simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clausen, Jonathan

    2011-11-01

    Computing hardware is trending towards distributed, massively parallel architectures in order to achieve high computational throughput. For example, Intrepid at Argonne uses 163,840 cores, and next generation machines, such as Sequoia at Lawrence Livermore, will use over one million cores. Harnessing the increasingly parallel nature of computational resources will require algorithms that scale efficiently on these architectures. The advent of GPU-based computation will serve to accelerate this behavior, as a single GPU contains hundreds of processor ``cores.'' Explicit algorithms avoid the communication associated with a linear solve, thus parallel scalability of these algorithms is typically high. This work will explore the efficiency and accuracy of three explicit solution methodologies for the Navier-Stokes equations: traditional artificial compressibility schemes, the lattice-Boltzmann method, and the recently proposed kinetically reduced local Navier-Stokes equations [Borok, Ansumali, and Karlin (2007)]. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  3. Spatially explicit modelling of cholera epidemics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Finger, F.; Bertuzzo, E.; Mari, L.; Knox, A. C.; Gatto, M.; Rinaldo, A.

    2013-12-01

    Epidemiological models can provide crucial understanding about the dynamics of infectious diseases. Possible applications range from real-time forecasting and allocation of health care resources to testing alternative intervention mechanisms such as vaccines, antibiotics or the improvement of sanitary conditions. We apply a spatially explicit model to the cholera epidemic that struck Haiti in October 2010 and is still ongoing. The dynamics of susceptibles as well as symptomatic and asymptomatic infectives are modelled at the scale of local human communities. Dissemination of Vibrio cholerae through hydrological transport and human mobility along the road network is explicitly taken into account, as well as the effect of rainfall as a driver of increasing disease incidence. The model is calibrated using a dataset of reported cholera cases. We further model the long term impact of several types of interventions on the disease dynamics by varying parameters appropriately. Key epidemiological mechanisms and parameters which affect the efficiency of treatments such as antibiotics are identified. Our results lead to conclusions about the influence of different intervention strategies on the overall epidemiological dynamics.

  4. Explicit stress integration of complex soil models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Jidong; Sheng, Daichao; Rouainia, M.; Sloan, Scott W.

    2005-10-01

    In this paper, two complex critical-state models are implemented in a displacement finite element code. The two models are used for structured clays and sands, and are characterized by multiple yield surfaces, plastic yielding within the yield surface, and complex kinematic and isotropic hardening laws. The consistent tangent operators - which lead to a quadratic convergence when used in a fully implicit algorithm - are difficult to derive or may even not exist. The stress integration scheme used in this paper is based on the explicit Euler method with automatic substepping and error control. This scheme employs the classical elastoplastic stiffness matrix and requires only the first derivatives of the yield function and plastic potential. This explicit scheme is used to integrate the two complex critical-state models - the sub/super-loading surfaces model (SSLSM) and the kinematic hardening structure model (KHSM). Various boundary-value problems are then analysed. The results for the two models are compared with each other, as well with those from standard Cam-clay models. Accuracy and efficiency of the scheme used for the complex models are also investigated. Copyright

  5. Explicitly represented polygon wall boundary model for the explicit MPS method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitsume, Naoto; Yoshimura, Shinobu; Murotani, Kohei; Yamada, Tomonori

    2015-05-01

    This study presents an accurate and robust boundary model, the explicitly represented polygon (ERP) wall boundary model, to treat arbitrarily shaped wall boundaries in the explicit moving particle simulation (E-MPS) method, which is a mesh-free particle method for strong form partial differential equations. The ERP model expresses wall boundaries as polygons, which are explicitly represented without using the distance function. These are derived so that for viscous fluids, and with less computational cost, they satisfy the Neumann boundary condition for the pressure and the slip/no-slip condition on the wall surface. The proposed model is verified and validated by comparing computed results with the theoretical solution, results obtained by other models, and experimental results. Two simulations with complex boundary movements are conducted to demonstrate the applicability of the E-MPS method to the ERP model.

  6. Supercritical multicomponent solvent coal extraction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Corcoran, W. H.; Fong, W. S.; Pichaichanarong, P.; Chan, P. C. F.; Lawson, D. D. (Inventor)

    1983-01-01

    The yield of organic extract from the supercritical extraction of coal with larger diameter organic solvents such as toluene is increased by use of a minor amount of from 0.1 to 10% by weight of a second solvent such as methanol having a molecular diameter significantly smaller than the average pore diameter of the coal.

  7. Toxicological profile for Stoddard solvent

    SciTech Connect

    1995-06-01

    This statement was prepared to give you information about Stoddard solvent and to emphasize the human health effects that may result from exposure to it. The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has identified 1,397 sites on its `National Priorities List` (NPL). Stoddard solvent has been found in at least seven of these sites.

  8. SOLVENT EXTRACTION OF URANIUM VALUES

    DOEpatents

    Feder, H.M.; Ader, M.; Ross, L.E.

    1959-02-01

    A process is presented for extracting uranium salt from aqueous acidic solutions by organic solvent extraction. It consists in contacting the uranium bearing solution with a water immiscible dialkylacetamide having at least 8 carbon atoms in the molecule. Mentioned as a preferred extractant is dibutylacetamide. The organic solvent is usually used with a diluent such as kerosene or CCl/sub 4/.

  9. Solvent degradation products in nuclear fuel processing solvents

    SciTech Connect

    Shook, H.E. Jr.

    1988-06-01

    The Savannah River Plant uses a modified Purex process to recover enriched uranium and separate fission products. This process uses 7.5% tri-n-butyl phosphate (TBP) dissolved in normal paraffin hydrocarbons for the solvent extraction of a nitric acid solution containing the materials to be separated. Periodic problems in product decontamination result from solvent degradation. A study to improve process efficiency has identified certain solvent degradation products and suggested mitigation measures. Undecanoic acid, lauric acid, and tridecanoic acid were tentatively identified as diluent degradation products in recycle solvent. These long-chain organic acids affect phase separation and lead to low decontamination factors. Solid phase extraction (SPE) was used to concentrate the organic acids in solvent prior to analysis by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). SPE and HPLC methods were optimized in this work for analysis of decanoic acid, undecanoic acid, and lauric acid in solvent. Accelerated solvent degradation studies with 7.5% TBP in normal paraffin hydrocarbons showed that long-chain organic acids and long-chain alkyl butyl phosphoric acids are formed by reactions with nitric acid. Degradation of both tributyl phosphate and hydrocarbon can be minimized with purified normal paraffin replacing the standard grade presently used. 12 refs., 1 fig., 3 tabs.

  10. WASH SOLVENT REUSE IN PAINT PRODUCTION

    EPA Science Inventory

    This project evaluated solvent used to clean paint manufacture equipment for its utility in production of subsequent batches of solvent-borne paint. eusing wash solvent would reduce the amount of solvent disposed of as waste. he evaluation of this wash-solvent recovery technology...

  11. COMPUTER AIDED SOLVENT DESIGN FOR THE ENVIRONMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    Solvent substitution is an effective and useful means of eliminating the use of harmful solvents, but finding substitute solvents which are less harmful and as effective as currently used solvents presents significant difficulties. Solvent substitution is a form of reverse engin...

  12. The Definition and Measurement of L2 Explicit Knowledge

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ellis, Rod

    2004-01-01

    A number of theories of second language L2 acquisition acknowledge a role for explicit L2 knowledge. However, the testing of these theories remains problematic because of the lack of a widely accepted means for measuring L2 explicit knowledge. This article seeks to address this lacuna by examining L2 explicit knowledge from two perspectives.…

  13. Developmental Comparisons of Implicit and Explicit Language Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lichtman, Karen

    2013-01-01

    Conventional wisdom holds that children learn languages implicitly whereas older learners learn languages explicitly, and some have claimed that after puberty only explicit language learning is possible. However, older learners often receive more explicit instruction than child L2 learners, which may affect their learning strategies. This study…

  14. Good and Poor Readers' Use of Explicitly Cued Graphic Aids.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reinking, David; And Others

    1988-01-01

    Investigates the effects of explicitly cuing graphic aids in accompanying text. Finds (1) explicit cuing increases attention to graphic aids and recall of information displayed in graphic aids, and (2) poor readers' comprehension of illustrated text is improved by explicit cuing of graphic aids. (RS)

  15. Reporting transparency: making the ethical mandate explicit.

    PubMed

    Nicholls, Stuart G; Langan, Sinéad M; Benchimol, Eric I; Moher, David

    2016-01-01

    Improving the transparency and quality of reporting in biomedical research is considered ethically important; yet, this is often based on practical reasons such as the facilitation of peer review. Surprisingly, there has been little explicit discussion regarding the ethical obligations that underpin reporting guidelines. In this commentary, we suggest a number of ethical drivers for the improved reporting of research. These ethical drivers relate to researcher integrity as well as to the benefits derived from improved reporting such as the fair use of resources, minimizing risk of harms, and maximizing benefits. Despite their undoubted benefit to reporting completeness, questions remain regarding the extent to which reporting guidelines can influence processes beyond publication, including researcher integrity or the uptake of scientific research findings into policy or practice. Thus, we consider investigation on the effects of reporting guidelines an important step in providing evidence of their benefits. PMID:26979591

  16. Explicit 2-D Hydrodynamic FEM Program

    1996-08-07

    DYNA2D* is a vectorized, explicit, two-dimensional, axisymmetric and plane strain finite element program for analyzing the large deformation dynamic and hydrodynamic response of inelastic solids. DYNA2D* contains 13 material models and 9 equations of state (EOS) to cover a wide range of material behavior. The material models implemented in all machine versions are: elastic, orthotropic elastic, kinematic/isotropic elastic plasticity, thermoelastoplastic, soil and crushable foam, linear viscoelastic, rubber, high explosive burn, isotropic elastic-plastic, temperature-dependent elastic-plastic. Themore » isotropic and temperature-dependent elastic-plastic models determine only the deviatoric stresses. Pressure is determined by one of 9 equations of state including linear polynomial, JWL high explosive, Sack Tuesday high explosive, Gruneisen, ratio of polynomials, linear polynomial with energy deposition, ignition and growth of reaction in HE, tabulated compaction, and tabulated.« less

  17. Cesium Concentration in MCU Solvent

    SciTech Connect

    Walker, D

    2006-01-18

    During Modular Caustic-Side Solvent Extraction (CSSX) Unit (MCU) operations, Cs-137 concentrations in product streams will vary depending on the location in the process and on the recent process conditions. Calculations of cesium concentrations under a variety of operating conditions reveal the following: (1) Under nominal operations with salt solution feed containing 1.1 Ci Cs-137 per gallon, the maximum Cs-137 concentration in the process will occur in the strip effluent (SE) and equal 15-16.5 Ci/gal. (2) Under these conditions, the majority of the solvent will contain 0.005 to 0.01 Ci/gal, with a limited portion of the solvent in the contactor stages containing {approx}4 Ci/gal. (3) When operating conditions yield product near 0.1 Ci Cs-137/gal in the decontaminated salt solution (DSS), the SE cesium concentration will be the same or lower than in nominal operations, but majority of the stripped solvent will increase to {approx}2-3 Ci/gal. (4) Deviations in strip and waste stream flow rates cause the largest variations in cesium content: (a) If strip flow rates deviate by -30% of nominal, the SE will contain {approx}23 Ci/gal, although the cesium content of the solvent will increase to only 0.03 Ci/gal; (b) If strip flow rate deviates by -77% (i.e., 23% of nominal), the SE will contain 54 Ci/gal and solvent will contain 1.65 Ci/gal. At this point, the product DSS will just reach the limit of 0.1 Ci/gal, causing the DSS gamma monitors to alarm; and (c) Moderate (+10 to +30%) deviations in waste flow rate cause approximately proportional increases in the SE and solvent cesium concentrations. Recovery from a process failure due to poor cesium stripping can achieve any low cesium concentration required. Passing the solvent back through the contactors while recycling DSS product will produce a {approx}70% reduction during one pass through the contactors (assuming the stripping D value is no worse than 0.36). If the solvent is returned to the solvent hold tank

  18. Positive Evidence Versus Explicit Rule Presentation and Explicit Negative Feedback: A Computer-Assisted Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sanz, Cristina; Morgan-Short, Kara

    2004-01-01

    The facilitative role of explicit information in second language acquisition has been supported by a significant body of research (Alanen, 1995; Carroll & Swain, 1993; de Graaff, 1997; DeKeyser, 1995; Ellis, 1993; Robinson, 1996, 1997), but counterevidence is also available (Rosa & ONeill, 1999; VanPatten & Oikkenon, 1996). This experimental study…

  19. Swelling of lignites in organic solvents

    SciTech Connect

    R.G. Makitra; D.V. Bryk

    2008-10-15

    Data on the swelling of Turkish lignites can be summarized using linear multiparameter equations that take into account various properties of solvents. Factors responsible for the amounts of absorbed solvents are the basicity and cohesion energy density of the solvents.

  20. EXPERIENCES IN DESIGNING SOLVENTS FOR THE ENVIRONMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    To meet the great need of replacing many harmful solvents commonly used by industry and the public with environmentally benign substitute solvents, the PARIS II solvent design software has been developed. Although the difficulty of successfully finding replacements increases with...

  1. Chromatographic NMR in NMR solvents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carrara, Caroline; Viel, Stéphane; Delaurent, Corinne; Ziarelli, Fabio; Excoffier, Grégory; Caldarelli, Stefano

    2008-10-01

    Recently, it was demonstrated that pseudo-chromatographic NMR experiments could be performed using typical chromatographic solids and solvents. This first setup yielded improved separation of the spectral components of the NMR spectra of mixtures using PFG self-diffusion measurements. The method (dubbed Chromatographic NMR) was successively shown to possess, in favorable cases, superior resolving power on non-functionalized silica, compared to its LC counterpart. To further investigate the applicability of the method, we studied here the feasibility of Chromatographic NMR in common deuterated solvents. Two examples are provided, using deuterated chloroform and water, for homologous compounds soluble in these solvents, namely aromatic molecules and alcohols, respectively.

  2. Caustic-Side Solvent Extraction Solvent-Composition Recommendation

    SciTech Connect

    Klatt, L.N.

    2002-05-09

    The U.S. Department of Energy has selected caustic-side solvent extraction as the preferred cesium removal technology for the treatment of high-level waste stored at the Savannah River Site. Data for the solubility of the extractant, calix[4]arene-bis(tert-octyl benzo-crown-6), acquired and reported for the Salt Processing Program down-select decision, showed the original solvent composition to be supersaturated with respect to the extractant. Although solvent samples have been observed for approximately 1 year without any solids formation, work was completed to define a new solvent composition that was thermodynamically stable with respect to solids formation and to expand the operating temperature with respect to third-phase formation. Chemical and physical data as a function of solvent component concentrations were collected. The data included calix[4]arene-bis(tert-octyl benzo-crown-6) solubility; cesium distribution ratio under extraction, scrub, and strip conditions; flow sheet robustness; temperature range of third-phase formation; dispersion numbers for the solvent against waste simulant, scrub and strip acids, and sodium hydroxide wash solutions; solvent density; viscosity; and surface and interfacial tension. These data were mapped against a set of predefined performance criteria. The composition of 0.007 M calix[4]arene-bis(tert-octyl benzo-crown-6), 0.75 M 1-(2,2,3,3-tetrafluoropropoxy)-3-(4-sec-butylphenoxy)-2-propanol, and 0.003 M tri-n-octylamine in the diluent Isopar{reg_sign} L provided the best match between the measured properties and the performance criteria. Therefore, it is recommended as the new baseline solvent composition.

  3. Evaluating the dynamics and electrostatic interactions of folded proteins in implicit solvents.

    PubMed

    Hua, Duy P; Huang, He; Roy, Amitava; Post, Carol Beth

    2016-01-01

    Three implicit solvent models, namely GBMVII, FACTS, and SCPISM, were evaluated for their abilities to emulate an explicit solvent environment by comparing the simulated conformational ensembles, dynamics, and electrostatic interactions of the Src SH2 domain and the Lyn kinase domain. This assessment in terms of structural features in folded proteins expands upon the use of hydration energy as a metric for comparison. All-against-all rms coordinate deviation, average positional fluctuations, and ion-pair distance distribution were used to compare the implicit solvent models with the TIP3P explicit solvent model. Our study shows that the Src SH2 domains solvated with TIP3P, GBMVII, and FACTS sample similar global conformations. Additionally, the Src SH2 ion-pair distance distributions of solvent-exposed side chains corresponding to TIP3P, GBMVII, and FACTS do not differ substantially, indicating that GBMVII and FACTS are capable of modeling these electrostatic interactions. The ion-pair distance distributions of SCPISM are distinct from others, demonstrating that these electrostatic interactions are not adequately reproduced with the SCPISM model. On the other hand, for the Lyn kinase domain, a non-globular protein with bilobal structure and a large concavity on the surface, implicit solvent does not accurately model solvation to faithfully reproduce partially buried electrostatic interactions and lobe-lobe conformations. Our work reveals that local structure and dynamics of small, globular proteins are modeled well using FACTS and GBMVII. Nonetheless, global conformations and electrostatic interactions in concavities of multi-lobal proteins resulting from simulations with implicit solvent models do not match those obtained from explicit water simulations. PMID:26189497

  4. Implicit and explicit ethnocentrism: revisiting the ideologies of prejudice.

    PubMed

    Cunningham, William A; Nezlek, John B; Banaji, Mahzarin R

    2004-10-01

    Two studies investigated relationships among individual differences in implicit and explicit prejudice, right-wing ideology, and rigidity in thinking. The first study examined these relationships focusing on White Americans' prejudice toward Black Americans. The second study provided the first test of implicit ethnocentrism and its relationship to explicit ethnocentrism by studying the relationship between attitudes toward five social groups. Factor analyses found support for both implicit and explicit ethnocentrism. In both studies, mean explicit attitudes toward out groups were positive, whereas implicit attitudes were negative, suggesting that implicit and explicit prejudices are distinct; however, in both studies, implicit and explicit attitudes were related (r = .37, .47). Latent variable modeling indicates a simple structure within this ethnocentric system, with variables organized in order of specificity. These results lead to the conclusion that (a) implicit ethnocentrism exists and (b) it is related to and distinct from explicit ethnocentrism. PMID:15466605

  5. Solvent quality influence on the dielectric properties of polyelectrolyte solutions: A scaling approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bordi, F.; Cametti, C.; Gili, T.; Sennato, S.; Zuzzi, S.; Dou, S.; Colby, R. H.

    2005-09-01

    The dielectric properties of polyelectrolytes in solvent of different quality have been measured in an extended frequency range and the dielectric parameters associated with the polarization induced by counterion fluctuation over some peculiar polyion lengths have been evaluated. Following the scaling theory of polyelectrolyte solutions and the recent models developed by Dobrynin and Rubinstein that explicitly take into account the quality of the solvent on the polyion chain conformation, we have reviewed and summarized a set of scaling laws that describe the dielectric behavior of these systems in the dilute and semidilute regime. Moreover, for poorer solvents, where theory of hydrophobic polyelectrolytes predicts, and computer simulation confirms, a particular chain structure consisting of partially collapsed monomers (beads) connected by monomer strings, we derived a scaling law. These predictions are compared with the results obtained from the dielectric parameters (the dielectric increment Δγ and the relaxation time τion ) of the “intermediate” frequency relaxation of two partially charged polymers, which possess a carbon-based backbone for which water is a poor solvent and ethylene glycol is a good solvent. By varying the solvent composition (a water-ethylene glycol mixture), we have tuned the quality of the solvent, passing from poor to good condition and have observed the predicted scaling for all the systems investigated. These findings give a further support to the scaling theory of polyelectrolyte solutions and to the necklace model for hydrophobic polyelectrolytes in poor solvents.

  6. Critical Casimir interactions and colloidal self-assembly in near-critical solvents.

    PubMed

    Tasios, Nikos; Edison, John R; van Roij, René; Evans, Robert; Dijkstra, Marjolein

    2016-08-28

    A binary solvent mixture close to critical demixing experiences fluctuations whose correlation length, ξ, diverges as the critical point is approached. The solvent-mediated (SM) interaction that arises between a pair of colloids immersed in such a near-critical solvent can be long-ranged and this so-called critical Casimir interaction is well-studied. How a (dense) suspension of colloids will self-assemble under these conditions is poorly understood. Using a two-dimensional lattice model for the solvent and hard disks to represent the colloids, we perform extensive Monte Carlo simulations to investigate the phase behaviour of this model colloidal suspension as a function of colloid size and wettability under conditions where the solvent reservoir is supercritical. Unlike most other approaches, where the solvent is modelled as an implicit background, our model employs an explicit solvent and treats the suspension as a ternary mixture. This enables us to capture important features, including the pronounced fractionation of the solvent in the coexisting colloidal phases, of this complex system. We also present results for the partial structure factors; these shed light on the critical behaviour in the ternary mixture. The degree to which an effective two-body pair potential description can describe the phase behaviour and structure of the colloidal suspension is discussed briefly. PMID:27586941

  7. Reformulation of Maxwell's equations to incorporate near-solute solvent structure.

    PubMed

    Yang, Pei-Kun; Lim, Carmay

    2008-09-01

    Maxwell's equations, which treat electromagnetic interactions between macroscopic charged objects in materials, have explained many phenomena and contributed to many applications in our lives. Derived in 1861 when no methods were available to determine the atomic structure of macromolecules, Maxwell's equations assume the solvent to be a structureless continuum. However, near-solute solvent molecules are highly structured, unlike far-solute bulk solvent molecules. Current methods cannot treat both the near-solute solvent structure and time-dependent electromagnetic interactions in a macroscopic system. Here, we derive "microscopic" electrodynamics equations that can treat macroscopic time-dependent electromagnetic field problems like Maxwell's equations and reproduce the solvent molecular and dipole density distributions observed in molecular dynamics simulations. These equations greatly reduce computational expense by not having to include explicit solvent molecules, yet they treat the solvent electrostatic and van der Waals effects more accurately than continuum models. They provide a foundation to study electromagnetic interactions between molecules in a macroscopic system that are ubiquitous in biology, bioelectromagnetism, and nanotechnology. The general strategy presented herein to incorporate the near-solute solvent structure would enable studies on how complex cellular protein-ligand interactions are affected by electromagnetic radiation, which could help to prevent harmful electromagnetic spectra or find potential therapeutic applications. PMID:18698705

  8. SAGE--SOLVENT ALTERNATIVES GUIDE

    EPA Science Inventory

    SAGE is a comprehensive guide designed to provide pollution prevention information on solvent and process alternatives for parts cleaning and degreasing. SAGE does not recommend any ozone depleting chemicals. SAGE was developed by the Surface Cleaning Program at Research Triang...

  9. SOLV-DB: Solvents Data

    DOE Data Explorer

    SOLV-DB provides a specialized mix of information on commercially available solvents. The development of the database was funded under the Strategic Environmental Research and Development Program (SERDP) with funds from EPA and DOE's Office of Industrial Technologies in EE. The information includes: • Health and safety considerations involved in choosing and using solvents • Chemical and physical data affecting the suitability of a particular solvent for a wide range of potential applications • Regulatory responsibilities, including exposure and effluent limits, hazard classification status with respect to several key statutes, and selected reporting requirements • Environmental fate data, to indicate whether a solvent is likely to break down or persist in air or water, and what types of waste treatment techniques may apply to it • CAS numbers (from Chemical Abstracts Service) and Sax Numbers (from Sax, et.al., Dangerous Properties of Industrial Materials) Supplier Information See help information at http://solvdb.ncms.org/welcome.htm (Specialized Interface)

  10. ON-SITE SOLVENT RECOVERY

    EPA Science Inventory

    This study evaluated the product quality, waste reduction/pollution prevention, and economic aspects of three technologies for onsite solvent recovery: atmospheric batch distillation, vacuum heat-pump distillation, and low-emission vapor degreasing. The atmospheric and vacuum ...

  11. Recovery of surgical workflow without explicit models.

    PubMed

    Ahmadi, Seyed-Ahmad; Sielhorst, Tobias; Stauder, Ralf; Horn, Martin; Feussner, Hubertus; Navab, Nassir

    2006-01-01

    Workflow recovery is crucial for designing context-sensitive service systems in future operating rooms. Abstract knowledge about actions which are being performed is particularly valuable in the OR. This knowledge can be used for many applications such as optimizing the workflow, recovering average workflows for guiding and evaluating training surgeons, automatic report generation and ultimately for monitoring in a context aware operating room. This paper describes a novel way for automatic recovery of the surgical workflow. Our algorithms perform this task without an implicit or explicit model of the surgery. This is achieved by the synchronization of multidimensional state vectors of signals recorded in different operations of the same type. We use an enhanced version of the dynamic time warp algorithm to calculate the temporal registration. The algorithms have been tested on 17 signals of six different surgeries of the same type. The results on this dataset are very promising because the algorithms register the steps in the surgery correctly up to seconds, which is our sampling rate. Our software visualizes the temporal registration by displaying the videos of different surgeries of the same type with varying duration precisely synchronized to each other. The synchronized videos of one surgery are either slowed down or speeded up in order to show the same steps as the ones presented in the videos of the other surgery. PMID:17354918

  12. Theoretical study of solvent effects on the coil-globule transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polson, James M.; Opps, Sheldon B.; Abou Risk, Nicholas

    2009-06-01

    The coil-globule transition of a polymer in a solvent has been studied using Monte Carlo simulations of a single chain subject to intramolecular interactions as well as a solvent-mediated effective potential. This solvation potential was calculated using several different theoretical approaches for two simple polymer/solvent models, each employing hard-sphere chains and hard-sphere solvent particles as well as attractive square-well potentials between some interaction sites. For each model, collapse is driven by variation in a parameter which changes the energy mismatch between monomers and solvent particles. The solvation potentials were calculated using two fundamentally different methodologies, each designed to predict the conformational behavior of polymers in solution: (1) the polymer reference interaction site model (PRISM) theory and (2) a many-body solvation potential (MBSP) based on scaled particle theory introduced by Grayce [J. Chem. Phys. 106, 5171 (1997)]. For the PRISM calculations, two well-studied solvation monomer-monomer pair potentials were employed, each distinguished by the closure relation used in its derivation: (i) a hypernetted-chain (HNC)-type potential and (ii) a Percus-Yevick (PY)-type potential. The theoretical predictions were each compared to results obtained from explicit-solvent discontinuous molecular dynamics simulations on the same polymer/solvent model systems [J. Chem. Phys. 125, 194904 (2006)]. In each case, the variation in the coil-globule transition properties with solvent density is mostly qualitatively correct, though the quantitative agreement between the theory and prediction is typically poor. The HNC-type potential yields results that are more qualitatively consistent with simulation. The conformational behavior of the polymer upon collapse predicted by the MBSP approach is quantitatively correct for low and moderate solvent densities but is increasingly less accurate for higher densities. At high solvent densities

  13. A multi target approach to control chemical reactions in their inhomogeneous solvent environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keefer, Daniel; Thallmair, Sebastian; Zauleck, Julius P. P.; de Vivie-Riedle, Regina

    2015-12-01

    Shaped laser pulses offer a powerful tool to manipulate molecular quantum systems. Their application to chemical reactions in solution is a promising concept to redesign chemical synthesis. Along this road, theoretical developments to include the solvent surrounding are necessary. An appropriate theoretical treatment is helpful to understand the underlying mechanisms. In our approach we simulate the solvent by randomly selected snapshots from molecular dynamics trajectories. We use multi target optimal control theory to optimize pulses for the various arrangements of explicit solvent molecules simultaneously. This constitutes a major challenge for the control algorithm, as the solvent configurations introduce a large inhomogeneity to the potential surfaces. We investigate how the algorithm handles the new challenges and how well the controllability of the system is preserved with increasing complexity. Additionally, we introduce a way to statistically estimate the efficiency of the optimized laser pulses in the complete thermodynamical ensemble.

  14. Modeling of solvent flow effects in enzyme catalysis under physiological conditions.

    PubMed

    Schofield, Jeremy; Inder, Paul; Kapral, Raymond

    2012-05-28

    A stochastic model for the dynamics of enzymatic catalysis in explicit, effective solvents under physiological conditions is presented. Analytically-computed first passage time densities of a diffusing particle in a spherical shell with absorbing boundaries are combined with densities obtained from explicit simulation to obtain the overall probability density for the total reaction cycle time of the enzymatic system. The method is used to investigate the catalytic transfer of a phosphoryl group in a phosphoglycerate kinase-ADP-bis phosphoglycerate system, one of the steps of glycolysis. The direct simulation of the enzyme-substrate binding and reaction is carried out using an elastic network model for the protein, and the solvent motions are described by multiparticle collision dynamics which incorporates hydrodynamic flow effects. Systems where solvent-enzyme coupling occurs through explicit intermolecular interactions, as well as systems where this coupling is taken into account by including the protein and substrate in the multiparticle collision step, are investigated and compared with simulations where hydrodynamic coupling is absent. It is demonstrated that the flow of solvent particles around the enzyme facilitates the large-scale hinge motion of the enzyme with bound substrates, and has a significant impact on the shape of the probability densities and average time scales of substrate binding for substrates near the enzyme, the closure of the enzyme after binding, and the overall time of completion of the cycle. PMID:22667589

  15. Solvent/Non-Solvent Sintering To Make Microsphere Scaffolds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Laurencin, Cato T.; Brown, Justin L.; Nair, Lakshmi

    2011-01-01

    A solvent/non-solvent sintering technique has been devised for joining polymeric microspheres to make porous matrices for use as drug-delivery devices or scaffolds that could be seeded with cells for growing tissues. Unlike traditional sintering at elevated temperature and pressure, this technique is practiced at room temperature and pressure and, therefore, does not cause thermal degradation of any drug, protein, or other biochemical with which the microspheres might be loaded to impart properties desired in a specific application. Also, properties of scaffolds made by this technique are more reproducible than are properties of comparable scaffolds made by traditional sintering. The technique involves the use of two miscible organic liquids: one that is and one that is not a solvent for the affected polymer. The polymeric microspheres are placed in a mold having the size and shape of the desired scaffold, then the solvent/non-solvent mixture is poured into the mold to fill the void volume between the microspheres, then the liquid mixture is allowed to evaporate. Some of the properties of the resulting scaffold can be tailored through choice of the proportions of the liquids and the diameter of the microspheres.

  16. Spatially explicit methane inventory for Switzerland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hiller, Rebecca; Bretscher, Daniel; DelSontro, Tonya; Eugster, Werner; Henne, Stephan; Henneberger, Ruth; Künzle, Thomas; Merbold, Lutz; Neininger, Bruno; Schellenberger, Andreas; Schroth, Martin; Buchmann, Nina; Brunner1, Dominik

    2013-04-01

    Spatially explicit greenhouse gas inventories are gaining in importance as a tool for policy makers to plan and control mitigation measures, and are a required input for atmospheric models used to relate atmospheric concentration measurements with upstream sources. In order to represent the high spatial heterogeneity in Switzerland, we compiled the national methane inventory into a 500 m x 500 m cadaster. In addition to the anthropogenic emissions reported to the United Nation Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC), we also included natural and semi-natural methane fluxes, i.e., emissions from lakes and reservoirs, wetlands, wild animals as well as forest uptake. Methane emissions were disaggregated according to geostatistical information about source location and extent. In Switzerland, highest methane emissions originate from the agricultural sector (152 Gg CH4 yr-1), followed by emissions from waste management (16 Gg CH4 yr-1) with highest contributions from landfills, and the energy sector (13 Gg CH4 yr-1) with highest contributions from the distribution of natural gas. Natural and semi-natural emissions only add a small amount (< 5%) to the total Swiss emissions. For validation, the bottom-up inventory was evaluated against methane concentrations measured from a small research aircraft (METAIR-DIMO) above the Swiss Plateau on 18 different days from May 2009 to August 2010 over. Source sensitivities of the air measured were determined by backward runs of the Lagrangian particle dispersion model FLEXPART-COSMO. Source sensitivities were multiplied with the methane inventory to derive simulated methane concentration time series. While the pattern of the variations can be reproduced well for some flight days (correlation coefficient up to 0.75), the amplitude of the variations for the simulated time series is underestimated by at least 20% suggesting an underestimation of CH4 emissions by the inventory, which is also concluded from inverse estimation

  17. Computational comparison of oxidation stability: Solvent/salt monomers vs solvent-solvent/salt pairs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Dong Young; Park, Min Sik; Lim, Younhee; Kang, Yoon-Sok; Park, Jin-Hwan; Doo, Seok-Gwang

    2015-08-01

    A fundamental understanding of the anodic stabilities of electrolytes is important for the development of advanced high-voltage electrolytes. In this study, we calculated and systematically compared the oxidation stabilities of monomeric solvents and anions, and bimolecular solvent-solvent and anion-solvent systems that are considered to be high-voltage electrolyte components, using ab initio calculations. Oxidation stabilities of solvent or anion monomers without considering specific solvation molecules cannot represent experimental oxidation stabilities. The oxidation of electrolytes usually forms neutral or cationic radicals, which immediately undergo further reactions stabilizing the products. Oxidatively driven intermolecular reactions are the main reason for the lower oxidation stabilities of electrolytes compared with those of monomeric compounds. Electrolyte components such as tetramethylene sulfone (TMS), ethyl methyl sulfone (EMS), bis(oxalate)borate (BOB-), and bis(trifluoromethane)sulfonamide (TFSI-) that minimize such intermolecular chemical reactions on oxidation can maintain the oxidation stabilities of monomers. In predictions of the theoretical oxidation stabilities of electrolytes, simple comparisons of highest occupied molecular orbital energies can be misleading, even if microsolvation or bulk clusters are considered. Instead, bimolecular solvent complexes with a salt anion should be at least considered in oxidation calculations. This study provides important information on fundamental and applied aspects of the development of electrolytes.

  18. Coal liquefaction process with enhanced process solvent

    DOEpatents

    Givens, Edwin N.; Kang, Dohee

    1984-01-01

    In an improved coal liquefaction process, including a critical solvent deashing stage, high value product recovery is improved and enhanced process-derived solvent is provided by recycling second separator underflow in the critical solvent deashing stage to the coal slurry mix, for inclusion in the process solvent pool.

  19. Quantification of Solvent Contribution to the Stability of Noncovalent Complexes.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Haiyang; Tan, Tianwei; Hetényi, Csaba; van der Spoel, David

    2013-10-01

    We introduce an indirect approach to estimate the solvation contributions to the thermodynamics of noncovalent complex formation through molecular dynamics simulation. This estimation is demonstrated by potential of mean force and entropy calculations on the binding process between β-cyclodextrin (host) and four drug molecules puerarin, daidzin, daidzein, and nabumetone (guest) in explicit water, followed by a stepwise extraction of individual enthalpy (ΔH) and entropy (ΔS) terms from the total free energy. Detailed analysis on the energetics of the host-guest complexation demonstrates that flexibility of the binding partners and solvation-related ΔH and ΔS need to be included explicitly for accurate estimation of the binding thermodynamics. From this, and our previous work on the solvent dependency of binding energies (Zhang et al. J. Phys. Chem. B 2012, 116, 12684-12693), it follows that calculations neglecting host or guest flexibility, or those employing implicit solvent, will not be able to systematically predict binding free energies. The approach presented here can be readily adopted for obtaining a deeper understanding of the mechanisms governing noncovalent associations in solution. PMID:26589169

  20. Solvent Effects on Electronic Excitations of an Organic Chromophore.

    PubMed

    Zuehlsdorff, T J; Haynes, P D; Hanke, F; Payne, M C; Hine, N D M

    2016-04-12

    In this work we study the solvatochromic shift of a selected low-energy excited state of alizarin in water by using a linear-scaling implementation of large-scale time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT). While alizarin, a small organic dye, is chosen as a simple example of solute-solvent interactions, the findings presented here have wider ramifications for the realistic modeling of dyes, paints, and pigment-protein complexes. We find that about 380 molecules of explicit water need to be considered in order to yield an accurate representation of the solute-solvent interaction and a reliable solvatochromic shift. By using a novel method of constraining the TDDFT excitation vector, we confirm that the origin of the slow convergence of the solvatochromic shift with system size is due to two different effects. The first factor is a strong redshift of the excitation due to an explicit delocalization of a small fraction of the electron and the hole from the alizarin onto the water, which is mainly confined to within a distance of 7 Å from the alizarin molecule. The second factor can be identified as long-range electrostatic influences of water molecules beyond the 7 Å region on the ground-state properties of alizarin. We also show that these electrostatic influences are not well reproduced by a QM/MM model, suggesting that full QM studies of relatively large systems may be necessary in order to obtain reliable results. PMID:26967019

  1. Examining the assumptions underlying continuum-solvent models.

    PubMed

    Harris, Robert C; Pettitt, B Montgomery

    2015-10-13

    Continuum-solvent models (CSMs) have successfully predicted many quantities, including the solvation-free energies (ΔG) of small molecules, but they have not consistently succeeded at reproducing experimental binding free energies (ΔΔG), especially for protein-protein complexes. Several CSMs break ΔG into the free energy (ΔGvdw) of inserting an uncharged molecule into solution and the free energy (ΔGel) gained from charging. Some further divide ΔGvdw into the free energy (ΔGrep) of inserting a nearly hard cavity into solution and the free energy (ΔGatt) gained from turning on dispersive interactions between the solute and solvent. We show that for 9 protein-protein complexes neither ΔGrep nor ΔGvdw was linear in the solvent-accessible area A, as assumed in many CSMs, and the corresponding components of ΔΔG were not linear in changes in A. We show that linear response theory (LRT) yielded good estimates of ΔGatt and ΔΔGatt, but estimates of ΔΔGatt obtained from either the initial or final configurations of the solvent were not consistent with those from LRT. The LRT estimates of ΔGel differed by more than 100 kcal/mol from the explicit solvent model's (ESM's) predictions, and its estimates of the corresponding component (ΔΔGel) of ΔΔG differed by more than 10 kcal/mol. Finally, the Poisson-Boltzmann equation produced estimates of ΔGel that were correlated with those from the ESM, but its estimates of ΔΔGel were much less so. These findings may help explain why many CSMs have not been consistently successful at predicting ΔΔG for many complexes, including protein-protein complexes. PMID:26574250

  2. Method of treating radioactively contaminated solvent waste

    SciTech Connect

    Jablonski, W.; Mallek, H.; Plum, W.

    1981-07-07

    A method of and apparatus for treating radioactively contaminated solvent waste are claimed. The solvent waste is supplied to material such as peat, vermiculite, diaton, etc. This material effects the distribution or dispersion of the solvent and absorbs the foreign substances found in the solvent waste. Air or an inert gas flows through the material in order to pick up the solvent portions which are volatile as a consequence of their vapor pressure. The thus formed gas mixture, which includes air or inert gas and solvent portions, is purified in a known manner by thermal, electrical, or catalytic combustion of the solvent portions.

  3. Solvent electronic polarization effects on a charge transfer excitation studied by the mean-field QM/MM method

    SciTech Connect

    Nakano, Hiroshi

    2015-12-31

    Electronic polarization effects of a medium can have a significant impact on a chemical reaction in condensed phases. We discuss the effects on the charge transfer excitation of a chromophore, N,N-dimethyl-4-nitroaniline, in various solvents using the mean-field QM/MM method with a polarizable force field. The results show that the explicit consideration of the solvent electronic polarization effects is important especially for a solvent with a low dielectric constant when we study the solvatochromism of the chromophore.

  4. DOE solvent handbook information sheet

    SciTech Connect

    Chavez, A.A.

    1992-01-01

    Solvents and cleaners are used in the Department of Defense (DOD) and the Department of Energy-Defense Program (DOE-DP) maintenance facilities for removing wax, grease, oil, carbon, machining fluids, solder fluxes, mold releases, and other contaminants before repairing or electroplating parts. Private industry also uses cleaners and degreasers for surface preparation of various metals. Growing environmental and worker safety concerns have brought attention to these solvents and cleaners, most of which are classified as toxic. Tightening government regulations have already excluded the use of some chemicals, and restrict the use of various halogenated hydrocarbons because of their atmospheric-ozone depleting effects, as well as their cancer-related risks. As a result, a program was established to develop an efficient, easily accessible, electronic solvent utilization handbook. This is being accomplished by: (1) identifying solvents (alternatives) that are not currently restricted by government regulations for use DOE-DP facilities, and private industry, (2) evaluating their cleaning performance, (3) evaluating their corrosivity, (4) evaluating their air emissions, (5) evaluating the possibility of recycling or recovering all or portions of the alternative degreasers, (6) testing substitute solvents compatibility with non-metallic materials, (7) inputting all of the data gathered (including previous biodegradability information) into a database, and (8) developing a methodology for efficient, widespread access to the data base information system.

  5. DOE solvent handbook information sheet

    SciTech Connect

    Chavez, A.A.

    1992-05-01

    Solvents and cleaners are used in the Department of Defense (DOD) and the Department of Energy-Defense Program (DOE-DP) maintenance facilities for removing wax, grease, oil, carbon, machining fluids, solder fluxes, mold releases, and other contaminants before repairing or electroplating parts. Private industry also uses cleaners and degreasers for surface preparation of various metals. Growing environmental and worker safety concerns have brought attention to these solvents and cleaners, most of which are classified as toxic. Tightening government regulations have already excluded the use of some chemicals, and restrict the use of various halogenated hydrocarbons because of their atmospheric-ozone depleting effects, as well as their cancer-related risks. As a result, a program was established to develop an efficient, easily accessible, electronic solvent utilization handbook. This is being accomplished by: (1) identifying solvents (alternatives) that are not currently restricted by government regulations for use DOE-DP facilities, and private industry, (2) evaluating their cleaning performance, (3) evaluating their corrosivity, (4) evaluating their air emissions, (5) evaluating the possibility of recycling or recovering all or portions of the alternative degreasers, (6) testing substitute solvents compatibility with non-metallic materials, (7) inputting all of the data gathered (including previous biodegradability information) into a database, and (8) developing a methodology for efficient, widespread access to the data base information system.

  6. Helpful hints for physical solvent absorption

    SciTech Connect

    Wolfer, W.

    1982-11-01

    Review of experience with natural gas treatment using physical solvents points to design and operating suggestions. Experiences with three plants using either Selexol or Sepasolv MPE solvent shows that both solvents perform well. The solvents offer economical and problem-free purification of natural gas. The Sepasolv MPE and Selexol solvents are very similar in chemical structure and physical properties. Thus, their application range is almost similar. An exchange is possible in most plants without equipment modification and/or process data.

  7. Long dynamics simulations of proteins using atomistic force fields and a continuum representation of solvent effects: calculation of structural and dynamic properties.

    PubMed

    Li, Xianfeng; Hassan, Sergio A; Mehler, Ernest L

    2005-08-15

    Long dynamics simulations were carried out on the B1 immunoglobulin-binding domain of streptococcal protein G (ProtG) and bovine pancreatic trypsin inhibitor (BPTI) using atomistic descriptions of the proteins and a continuum representation of solvent effects. To mimic frictional and random collision effects, Langevin dynamics (LD) were used. The main goal of the calculations was to explore the stability of tens-of-nanosecond trajectories as generated by this molecular mechanics approximation and to analyze in detail structural and dynamical properties. Conformational fluctuations, order parameters, cross correlation matrices, residue solvent accessibilities, pKa values of titratable groups, and hydrogen-bonding (HB) patterns were calculated from all of the trajectories and compared with available experimental data. The simulations comprised over 40 ns per trajectory for ProtG and over 30 ns per trajectory for BPTI. For comparison, explicit water molecular dynamics simulations (EW/MD) of 3 ns and 4 ns, respectively, were also carried out. Two continuum simulations were performed on each protein using the CHARMM program, one with the all-atom PAR22 representation of the protein force field (here referred to as PAR22/LD simulations) and the other with the modifications introduced by the recently developed CMAP potential (CMAP/LD simulations). The explicit solvent simulations were performed with PAR22 only. Solvent effects are described by a continuum model based on screened Coulomb potentials (SCP) reported earlier, i.e., the SCP-based implicit solvent model (SCP-ISM). For ProtG, both the PAR22/LD and the CMAP/LD 40-ns trajectories were stable, yielding C(alpha) root mean square deviations (RMSD) of about 1.0 and 0.8 A respectively along the entire simulation time, compared to 0.8 A for the EW/MD simulation. For BPTI, only the CMAP/LD trajectory was stable for the entire 30-ns simulation, with a C(alpha) RMSD of approximately 1.4 A, while the PAR22/LD trajectory

  8. Solvent sensitive polymer composite structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiappini, A.; Armellini, C.; Carpentiero, A.; Minati, L.; Righini, G. C.; Ferrari, M.

    2013-11-01

    In this paper we describe a composite system based on polystyrene colloidal nanoparticles assembled and embedded in an elastomeric matrix (polymer colloidal crystal, PCC), in the specific we have designed a PCC structure which displays an iridescent green color that can be attributed to the photonic crystal effect. This effect has been exploited to create a chemical sensor, in fact optical measurements have evidenced that the composite structure presents a different optical response as a function of the solvent applied on the surface. In particular we have demonstrated that the PCC possess, for specific solvents: (i) high sensitivity, (ii) fast response (less than 1s), and (iii) reversibility of the signal change. Finally preliminary results on the PCC have shown that this system can be also used as optical writing substrate using a specific solvent as ink, moreover an erasing procedure is also reported and discussed.

  9. Solvent reorganization of electron transitions in viscous solvents

    SciTech Connect

    Ghorai, Pradip K.; Matyushov, Dmitry V.

    2006-04-14

    We develop a model of electron transfer reactions at conditions of nonergodicity when the time of solvent relaxation crosses the observation time window set up by the reaction rate. Solvent reorganization energy of intramolecular electron transfer in a charge-transfer molecule dissolved in water and acetonitrile is studied by molecular dynamics simulations at varying temperatures. We observe a sharp decrease of the reorganization energy at a temperature identified as the temperature of structural arrest due to cage effect, as discussed by the mode-coupling theory. This temperature also marks the onset of the enhancement of translational diffusion relative to rotational relaxation signaling the breakdown of the Stokes-Einstein relation. The change in the reorganization energy at the transition temperature reflects the dynamical arrest of the slow, collective relaxation of the solvent related to the relaxation of the solvent dipolar polarization. An analytical theory proposed to describe this effect agrees well with both the simulations and experimental Stokes shift data. The theory is applied to the analysis of charge-transfer kinetics in a low-temperature glass former. We show that the reorganization energy is substantially lower than its equilibrium value for the low-temperature portion of the data. The theory predicts the possibility of discontinuous changes in the dependence of the electron transfer rate on the free energy gap when the reaction switches between ergodic and nonergodic regimes.

  10. Solvent diffusion into fluoropolymer membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Aminabhavi, T.M.; Munnolli, R.S.

    1993-12-31

    Solvent diffusion in polymers is important to the physical properties of the material from processing to end-use and shelf-life. Many aspects of diffusion in polymers have been studied using indirect and direct methods. Du Pont`s fluoropolymers are known for their excellent resistance to a variety of organic solvents. This paper describes the measurement of diffusion coefficients and the derived thermodynamic quantities on four different fluoropolymer membranes with several esters. This information is interpreted in terms of the molecular organization and phase structure. Diffusion coefficients are sensitive to structural changes as well as binding and association phenomena.

  11. The Ms. Stereotype Revisited: Implicit and Explicit Facets

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Malcolmson, Kelly A.; Sinclair, Lisa

    2007-01-01

    Implicit and explicit stereotypes toward the title Ms. were examined. Participants read a short description of a target person whose title of address varied (Ms., Mrs., Miss, Mr.). They then rated the person on agentic and communal traits and completed an Implicit Association Test. Replicating earlier research (Dion, 1987), at an explicit level,…

  12. "Make It Explicit!": Improving Collaboration through Increase of Script Coercion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Papadopoulos, P. M.; Demetriadis, S. N.; Weinberger, A.

    2013-01-01

    This paper investigates the impact of the proposed "Make It Explicit!" technique on students' learning when participating in scripted collaborative activities. The method posits that when asking students to proactively articulate their own positions explicitly, then improved peer interaction is triggered in a subsequent…

  13. Gender Differences in Implicit and Explicit Memory for Affective Passages

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burton, Leslie A.; Rabin, Laura; Vardy, Susan Bernstein.; Frohlich, Jonathan; Wyatt, Gwinne; Dimitri, Diana; Constante, Shimon; Guterman, Elan

    2004-01-01

    Thirty-two participants were administered 4 verbal tasks, an Implicit Affective Task, an Implicit Neutral Task, an Explicit Affective Task, and an Explicit Neutral Task. For the Implicit Tasks, participants were timed while reading passages aloud as quickly as possible, but not so quickly that they did not understand. A target verbal passage was…

  14. Measuring Explicit and Implicit Knowledge: A Psychometric Study in SLA

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ebadi, Mandana Rohollahzadeh; Abedalaziz, Nabeel; Saad, Mohd Rashid Mohd

    2015-01-01

    Lack of valid means of measuring explicit and implicit knowledge in acquisition of second language is a concern issue in investigations of explicit and implicit learning. This paper endeavors to validate the use of four tests (i.e., Untimed Judgment Grammatical Test, UJGT; Test of Metalinguistic Knowledge, TMK; Elicited Oral Imitation Test, EOIT;…

  15. Explicit Knowledge and Learning in SLA: A Cognitive Linguistics Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roehr, Karen

    2010-01-01

    SLA researchers agree that explicit knowledge and learning play an important role in adult L2 development. In the field of cognitive linguistics, it has been proposed that implicit and explicit knowledge differ in terms of their internal category structure and the processing mechanisms that operate on their representation in the human mind. It has…

  16. Chinese Undergraduates' Explicit and Implicit Attitudes toward Persons with Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chen, Shuang; Ma, Li; Zhang, Jian-Xin

    2011-01-01

    The present study is aimed at examining implicit and explicit attitudes toward persons with disabilities among Chinese college students. The "Implicit Association Test" was used to measure their implicit attitudes, whereas their explicit attitudes toward persons with disabilities were measured by using a scale of three items. Participants were 56…

  17. Effects of Explicit Instructions, Metacognition, and Motivation on Creative Performance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hong, Eunsook; O'Neil, Harold F.; Peng, Yun

    2016-01-01

    Effects of explicit instructions, metacognition, and intrinsic motivation on creative homework performance were examined in 303 Chinese 10th-grade students. Models that represent hypothesized relations among these constructs and trait covariates were tested using structural equation modelling. Explicit instructions geared to originality were…

  18. Dielectric anisotropy in polar solvents under external fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buyukdagli, Sahin

    2015-08-01

    We investigate dielectric saturation and increment in polar liquids under external fields. We couple a previously introduced dipolar solvent model to a uniform electric field and derive the electrostatic kernel of interacting dipoles. This procedure allows an unambiguous definition of the liquid dielectric permittivity embodying non-linear dielectric response and correlation effects. We find that the presence of the external field results in a dielectric anisotropy characterized by a two-component dielectric permittivity tensor. The increase of the electric field amplifies the permittivity component parallel to the field direction, i.e. dielectric increment is observed along the field. However, the perpendicular component is lowered below the physiological permittivity {{\\varepsilon}w}≈ 77 , indicating dielectric saturation perpendicular to the field. By comparison with Molecular Dynamics simulations from the literature, we show that the mean-field level dielectric response theory underestimates dielectric saturation. The inclusion of dipolar correlations at the weak-coupling level intensify the mean-field level dielectric saturation and improves the agreement with simulation data at weak electric fields. The correlation-corrected theory predicts as well the presence of a metastable configuration corresponding to the antiparallel alignment of dipoles with the field. This prediction can be verified by solvent-explicit simulations where solvent molecules are expected to be trapped transiently in this metastable state.

  19. Organic Solvent Effects in Biomass Conversion Reactions.

    PubMed

    Shuai, Li; Luterbacher, Jeremy

    2016-01-01

    Transforming lignocellulosic biomass into fuels and chemicals has been intensely studied in recent years. A large amount of work has been dedicated to finding suitable solvent systems, which can improve the transformation of biomass into value-added chemicals. These efforts have been undertaken based on numerous research results that have shown that organic solvents can improve both conversion and selectivity of biomass to platform molecules. We present an overview of these organic solvent effects, which are harnessed in biomass conversion processes, including conversion of biomass to sugars, conversion of sugars to furanic compounds, and production of lignin monomers. A special emphasis is placed on comparing the solvent effects on conversion and product selectivity in water with those in organic solvents while discussing the origins of the differences that arise. We have categorized results as benefiting from two major types of effects: solvent effects on solubility of biomass components including cellulose and lignin and solvent effects on chemical thermodynamics including those affecting reactants, intermediates, products, and/or catalysts. Finally, the challenges of using organic solvents in industrial processes are discussed from the perspective of solvent cost, solvent stability, and solvent safety. We suggest that a holistic view of solvent effects, the mechanistic elucidation of these effects, and the careful consideration of the challenges associated with solvent use could assist researchers in choosing and designing improved solvent systems for targeted biomass conversion processes. PMID:26676907

  20. NATURAL ATTENUATION OF CHLORINATED SOLVENTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The protocol will simply describe in detail, with references and illustrations, the approach currently used by staff of the SPRD to evaluate natural attenuation of chlorinated solvents in ground water. Staff of SPRD, and staff of the Air Force Center for environmental excellence...

  1. Nanopapers for organic solvent nanofiltration.

    PubMed

    Mautner, A; Lee, K-Y; Lahtinen, P; Hakalahti, M; Tammelin, T; Li, K; Bismarck, A

    2014-06-01

    Would it not be nice to have an organic solvent nanofiltration membrane made from renewable resources that can be manufactured as simply as producing paper? Here the production of nanofiltration membranes made from nanocellulose by applying a papermaking process is demonstrated. Manufacture of the nanopapers was enabled by inducing flocculation of nanofibrils upon addition of trivalent ions. PMID:24752201

  2. Improved Purex solvent scrubbing methods

    SciTech Connect

    Mailen, J.C.; Tallent, O.K.

    1984-01-01

    Studies of hydrazine and hydroxylamine salts as solvent scrubbing agents that can be decomposed into gases are summarized. Results from testing of countercurrent scrubbers and solid sorber columns that produce lesser amounts of permanent salts are reported. The status of studies of the acid-degradation of paraffin diluent and the options for removal of long-chain organic acids is given.

  3. Physical solvent for gas sweetening

    SciTech Connect

    Ferrin, C. R.; Manning, W. P.

    1984-11-27

    This invention relates to a novel solvent, N-2-methoxyethyl-2-pyrrolidone, that can be used in two ways. First, in the pure or undiluted form, it absorbs hydrogen sulfide and other sulfurous gases selectively and simultaneously dries the gas. Second, when mixed with an alkanolamine and water, it is a superior absorbent of mercaptans, sulfides, and disulfides, and removes acid gases.

  4. Structure of Met-enkephalin in explicit aqueous solution using replica exchange molecular dynamics.

    PubMed

    Sanbonmatsu, K Y; García, A E

    2002-02-01

    Replica exchange molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of Met-enkephalin in explicit solvent reveal helical and nonhelical structures. Four predominant structures of Met-enkephalin are sampled with comparable probabilities (two helical and two nonhelical). The energy barriers between these configurations are low, suggesting that Met-enkephalin switches easily between configurations. This is consistent with the requirement that Met-enkephalin be sufficiently flexible to bind to several different receptors. Replica exchange simulations of 32 ns are shown to sample approximately five times more configurational space than constant temperature MD simulations of the same duration. The energy landscape for the replica exchange simulation is presented. A detailed study of replica trajectories demonstrates that the significant increases in temperature provided by the replica exchange technique enable transitions from nonhelical to helical structures that would otherwise be prevented by kinetic trapping. Met-enkephalin (Type Entrez Proteins; Value A61445; Service Entrez Proteins). PMID:11807951

  5. Replacement solvents for use in chemical synthesis

    DOEpatents

    Molnar, Linda K.; Hatton, T. Alan; Buchwald, Stephen L.

    2001-05-15

    Replacement solvents for use in chemical synthesis include polymer-immobilized solvents having a flexible polymer backbone and a plurality of pendant groups attached onto the polymer backbone, the pendant groups comprising a flexible linking unit bound to the polymer backbone and to a terminal solvating moiety. The polymer-immobilized solvent may be dissolved in a benign medium. Replacement solvents for chemical reactions for which tetrahydrofuran or diethyl may be a solvent include substituted tetrahydrofurfuryl ethers and substituted tetrahydro-3-furan ethers. The replacement solvents may be readily recovered from the reaction train using conventional methods.

  6. Comparison of Fluor Solvent and Selexol processes

    SciTech Connect

    Bucklin, R.W.; Schendel, R.L.

    1984-09-01

    Physical solvent processes can be useful for acid gas removal applications. The necessity for screening physical solvent characteristics to eliminate those solvents that are unsuitable or noncompetitive for a particular application is discussed. The Fluor Solvent and Selexol processes are compared. Selexol has an advantage over other solvents in oil applications involving H/sub 2/S and CO/sub 2/ removal in hydrocarbon systems. Fluor Solvent and Selexol have an experience advantage over other processes in applications for CO/sub 2/ removal only.

  7. All-atom force field for molecular dynamics simulations on organotransition metal solids and liquids. Application to M(CO)(n) (M = Cr, Fe, Ni, Mo, Ru, or W) compounds.

    PubMed

    Bernardes, Carlos E S; Canongia Lopes, José N; Minas da Piedade, Manuel E

    2013-10-31

    A previously developed OPLS-based all-atom force field for organometallic compounds was extended to a series of first-, second-, and third-row transition metals based on the study of M(CO)(n) (M = Cr, Fe, Ni, Mo, Ru, or W) complexes. For materials that are solid at ambient temperature and pressure (M = Cr, Mo, W) the validation of the force field was based on reported structural data and on the standard molar enthalpies of sublimation at 298.15 K, experimentally determined by Calvet-drop microcalorimetry using samples corresponding to a specific and well-characterized crystalline phase: Δ(sub)H(m)° = 72.6 ± 0.3 kJ·mol(–1) for Cr(CO)(6), 73.4 ± 0.3 kJ·mol(–1) for Mo(CO)(6), and 77.8 ± 0.3 kJ·mol(–1) for W(CO)(6). For liquids, where problems of polymorphism or phase mixtures are absent, critically analyzed literature data were used. The force field was able to reproduce the volumetric properties of the test set (density and unit cell volume) with an average deviations smaller than 2% and the experimentally determined enthalpies of sublimation and vaporization with an accuracy better than 2.3 kJ·mol(–1). The Lennard-Jones (12-6) potential function parameters used to calculate the repulsive and dispersion contributions of the metals within the framework of the force field were found to be transferable between chromium, iron, and nickel (first row) and between molybdenum and ruthenium (second row). PMID:24079472

  8. Disentangling Rheumatoid Arthritis Patients' Implicit and Explicit Attitudes toward Methotrexate.

    PubMed

    Linn, Annemiek J; Vandeberg, Lisa; Wennekers, Annemarie M; Vervloet, Marcia; van Dijk, Liset; van den Bemt, Bart J F

    2016-01-01

    Medication non-adherence is a major public health problem that has been termed an 'invisible epidemic.' Non-adherence is not only associated with negative clinical consequences but can also result in substantial healthcare costs. Up to now, effective adherence interventions are scarce and a more comprehensive model of adherence determinants is required to target the determinants for not taking the medication as prescribed. Current approaches only included explicit attitudes such as self-reported evaluations of medication as determinants, neglecting the role of associative processes that shape implicit attitudes. Implicit processes can predict daily behavior more accurately than explicit attitudes. Our aim is to assess explicit and implicit attitudes toward medication and explore the relation with beliefs, adherence and clinical (laboratory) outcomes in chronically ill patients. Fifty two Rheumatic Arthritis (RA) patients' attitudes toward Methotrexate (MTX) were explicitly (self-reported) and implicitly (Single-Category Implicit Association Test) assessed and related to the Beliefs about Medicine Questionnaire, the Compliance Questionnaire on Rheumatology and laboratory parameters [Erythrocyte Sedimentation Rate (ESR), C-Reactive Protein (CRP)]. Results show that explicit attitudes were positive and health-related. Implicit attitudes were, however, negative and sickness-related. Half of the patients displayed explicitly positive but implicitly negative attitudes. Explicit attitudes were positively related to ESR. A positive relationship between implicit attitudes and disease duration was observed. In this study, we have obtained evidence suggesting that the measurement of implicit attitudes and associations provides different information than explicit, self-reported attitudes toward medication. Since patients' implicit attitudes deviated from explicit attitudes, we can conclude that the relationship between implicit attitudes and medication adherence is worthwhile

  9. Disentangling Rheumatoid Arthritis Patients’ Implicit and Explicit Attitudes toward Methotrexate

    PubMed Central

    Linn, Annemiek J.; Vandeberg, Lisa; Wennekers, Annemarie M.; Vervloet, Marcia; van Dijk, Liset; van den Bemt, Bart J. F.

    2016-01-01

    Medication non-adherence is a major public health problem that has been termed an ‘invisible epidemic.’ Non-adherence is not only associated with negative clinical consequences but can also result in substantial healthcare costs. Up to now, effective adherence interventions are scarce and a more comprehensive model of adherence determinants is required to target the determinants for not taking the medication as prescribed. Current approaches only included explicit attitudes such as self-reported evaluations of medication as determinants, neglecting the role of associative processes that shape implicit attitudes. Implicit processes can predict daily behavior more accurately than explicit attitudes. Our aim is to assess explicit and implicit attitudes toward medication and explore the relation with beliefs, adherence and clinical (laboratory) outcomes in chronically ill patients. Fifty two Rheumatic Arthritis (RA) patients’ attitudes toward Methotrexate (MTX) were explicitly (self-reported) and implicitly (Single-Category Implicit Association Test) assessed and related to the Beliefs about Medicine Questionnaire, the Compliance Questionnaire on Rheumatology and laboratory parameters [Erythrocyte Sedimentation Rate (ESR), C-Reactive Protein (CRP)]. Results show that explicit attitudes were positive and health-related. Implicit attitudes were, however, negative and sickness-related. Half of the patients displayed explicitly positive but implicitly negative attitudes. Explicit attitudes were positively related to ESR. A positive relationship between implicit attitudes and disease duration was observed. In this study, we have obtained evidence suggesting that the measurement of implicit attitudes and associations provides different information than explicit, self-reported attitudes toward medication. Since patients’ implicit attitudes deviated from explicit attitudes, we can conclude that the relationship between implicit attitudes and medication adherence is

  10. Coarse kMC-based replica exchange algorithms for the accelerated simulation of protein folding in explicit solvent.

    PubMed

    Peter, Emanuel K; Shea, Joan-Emma; Pivkin, Igor V

    2016-05-14

    In this paper, we present a coarse replica exchange molecular dynamics (REMD) approach, based on kinetic Monte Carlo (kMC). The new development significantly can reduce the amount of replicas and the computational cost needed to enhance sampling in protein simulations. We introduce 2 different methods which primarily differ in the exchange scheme between the parallel ensembles. We apply this approach on folding of 2 different β-stranded peptides: the C-terminal β-hairpin fragment of GB1 and TrpZip4. Additionally, we use the new simulation technique to study the folding of TrpCage, a small fast folding α-helical peptide. Subsequently, we apply the new methodology on conformation changes in signaling of the light-oxygen voltage (LOV) sensitive domain from Avena sativa (AsLOV2). Our results agree well with data reported in the literature. In simulations of dialanine, we compare the statistical sampling of the 2 techniques with conventional REMD and analyze their performance. The new techniques can reduce the computational cost of REMD significantly and can be used in enhanced sampling simulations of biomolecules. PMID:27111190

  11. Hierarchical structure of the energy landscape of proteins revisited by time series analysis. II. Investigation of explicit solvent effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alakent, Burak; Camurdan, Mehmet C.; Doruker, Pemra

    2005-10-01

    Time series analysis tools are employed on the principal modes obtained from the Cα trajectories from two independent molecular-dynamics simulations of α-amylase inhibitor (tendamistat). Fluctuations inside an energy minimum (intraminimum motions), transitions between minima (interminimum motions), and relaxations in different hierarchical energy levels are investigated and compared with those encountered in vacuum by using different sampling window sizes and intervals. The low-frequency low-indexed mode relationship, established in vacuum, is also encountered in water, which shows the reliability of the important dynamics information offered by principal components analysis in water. It has been shown that examining a short data collection period (100ps) may result in a high population of overdamped modes, while some of the low-frequency oscillations (<10cm-1) can be captured in water by using a longer data collection period (1200ps). Simultaneous analysis of short and long sampling window sizes gives the following picture of the effect of water on protein dynamics. Water makes the protein lose its memory: future conformations are less dependent on previous conformations due to the lowering of energy barriers in hierarchical levels of the energy landscape. In short-time dynamics (<10ps), damping factors extracted from time series model parameters are lowered. For tendamistat, the friction coefficient in the Langevin equation is found to be around 40-60cm-1 for the low-indexed modes, compatible with literature. The fact that water has increased the friction and that on the other hand has lubrication effect at first sight contradicts. However, this comes about because water enhances the transitions between minima and forces the protein to reduce its already inherent inability to maintain oscillations observed in vacuum. Some of the frequencies lower than 10cm-1 are found to be overdamped, while those higher than 20cm-1 are slightly increased. As for the long-time dynamics in water, it is found that random-walk motion is maintained for approximately 200ps (about five times of that in vacuum) in the low-indexed modes, showing the lowering of energy barriers between the higher-level minima.

  12. Charged patchy particle models in explicit salt: Ion distributions, electrostatic potentials, and effective interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Yigit, Cemil; Dzubiella, Joachim; Heyda, Jan

    2015-08-14

    We introduce a set of charged patchy particle models (CPPMs) in order to systematically study the influence of electrostatic charge patchiness and multipolarity on macromolecular interactions by means of implicit-solvent, explicit-ion Langevin dynamics simulations employing the Gromacs software. We consider well-defined zero-, one-, and two-patched spherical globules each of the same net charge and (nanometer) size which are composed of discrete atoms. The studied mono- and multipole moments of the CPPMs are comparable to those of globular proteins with similar size. We first characterize ion distributions and electrostatic potentials around a single CPPM. Although angle-resolved radial distribution functions reveal the expected local accumulation and depletion of counter- and co-ions around the patches, respectively, the orientation-averaged electrostatic potential shows only a small variation among the various CPPMs due to space charge cancellations. Furthermore, we study the orientation-averaged potential of mean force (PMF), the number of accumulated ions on the patches, as well as the CPPM orientations along the center-to-center distance of a pair of CPPMs. We compare the PMFs to the classical Derjaguin-Verwey-Landau-Overbeek theory and previously introduced orientation-averaged Debye-Hückel pair potentials including dipolar interactions. Our simulations confirm the adequacy of the theories in their respective regimes of validity, while low salt concentrations and large multipolar interactions remain a challenge for tractable theoretical descriptions.

  13. Charged patchy particle models in explicit salt: Ion distributions, electrostatic potentials, and effective interactions.

    PubMed

    Yigit, Cemil; Heyda, Jan; Dzubiella, Joachim

    2015-08-14

    We introduce a set of charged patchy particle models (CPPMs) in order to systematically study the influence of electrostatic charge patchiness and multipolarity on macromolecular interactions by means of implicit-solvent, explicit-ion Langevin dynamics simulations employing the Gromacs software. We consider well-defined zero-, one-, and two-patched spherical globules each of the same net charge and (nanometer) size which are composed of discrete atoms. The studied mono- and multipole moments of the CPPMs are comparable to those of globular proteins with similar size. We first characterize ion distributions and electrostatic potentials around a single CPPM. Although angle-resolved radial distribution functions reveal the expected local accumulation and depletion of counter- and co-ions around the patches, respectively, the orientation-averaged electrostatic potential shows only a small variation among the various CPPMs due to space charge cancellations. Furthermore, we study the orientation-averaged potential of mean force (PMF), the number of accumulated ions on the patches, as well as the CPPM orientations along the center-to-center distance of a pair of CPPMs. We compare the PMFs to the classical Derjaguin-Verwey-Landau-Overbeek theory and previously introduced orientation-averaged Debye-Hückel pair potentials including dipolar interactions. Our simulations confirm the adequacy of the theories in their respective regimes of validity, while low salt concentrations and large multipolar interactions remain a challenge for tractable theoretical descriptions. PMID:26277163

  14. Charged patchy particle models in explicit salt: Ion distributions, electrostatic potentials, and effective interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yigit, Cemil; Heyda, Jan; Dzubiella, Joachim

    2015-08-01

    We introduce a set of charged patchy particle models (CPPMs) in order to systematically study the influence of electrostatic charge patchiness and multipolarity on macromolecular interactions by means of implicit-solvent, explicit-ion Langevin dynamics simulations employing the Gromacs software. We consider well-defined zero-, one-, and two-patched spherical globules each of the same net charge and (nanometer) size which are composed of discrete atoms. The studied mono- and multipole moments of the CPPMs are comparable to those of globular proteins with similar size. We first characterize ion distributions and electrostatic potentials around a single CPPM. Although angle-resolved radial distribution functions reveal the expected local accumulation and depletion of counter- and co-ions around the patches, respectively, the orientation-averaged electrostatic potential shows only a small variation among the various CPPMs due to space charge cancellations. Furthermore, we study the orientation-averaged potential of mean force (PMF), the number of accumulated ions on the patches, as well as the CPPM orientations along the center-to-center distance of a pair of CPPMs. We compare the PMFs to the classical Derjaguin-Verwey-Landau-Overbeek theory and previously introduced orientation-averaged Debye-Hückel pair potentials including dipolar interactions. Our simulations confirm the adequacy of the theories in their respective regimes of validity, while low salt concentrations and large multipolar interactions remain a challenge for tractable theoretical descriptions.

  15. Dipolar correlations in structured solvents under nanoconfinement.

    PubMed

    Buyukdagli, Sahin; Blossey, Ralf

    2014-06-21

    We study electrostatic correlations in structured solvents confined to nanoscale systems. We derive variational equations of Netz-Orland type for a model liquid composed of finite size dipoles. These equations are solved for both dilute solvents and solvents at physiological concentrations in a slit nanopore geometry. Correlation effects are of major importance for the dielectric reduction and anisotropy of the solvent resulting from dipole image interactions and also lead to a reduction of van der Waals attractions between low dielectric bodies. Finally, by comparison with other recently developed self-consistent theories and experiments, we scrutinize the effect of solvent-membrane interactions on the differential capacitance of the charged liquid in contact with low dielectric substrates. The interfacial solvent depletion driven by solvent-image interactions plays the major role in the observed low values of the experimental capacitance data, while non-locality associated with the extended charge structure of solvent molecules only brings a minor contribution. PMID:24952564

  16. Wash solvent reuse in paint production

    SciTech Connect

    Parsons, A.B.; Heater, K.J.; Olfenbuttel, R.F.

    1994-04-01

    The project evaluated solvent used to clean paint manufacture equipment for its utility in production of subsequent batches of solvent-borne paint. Reusing wash solvent would reduce the amount of solvent disposed of as waste. The evaluation of this wash-solvent recovery technology was conducted by Battelle Memorial Institute for the Pollution Prevention Research Branch of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. The evaluation was conducted with the cooperation and assistance of Vanex Color, Inc. The product quality, waste reduction/pollution prevention, and economic impacts of this technology change, as it has been implemented by Vanex, were examined. Two batches of a solvent-borne alkyd house paint were prepared at Vanex--one batch made with 100%-new solvent and the other with 30%-wash solvent--and sampled for laboratory analysis at Battelle.

  17. Implicit solvent simulations of DPC micelle formation.

    PubMed

    Lazaridis, Themis; Mallik, Buddhadeb; Chen, Yong

    2005-08-11

    The formation of micelles by dodecylphosphocholine (DPC) is modeled by treating the surfactants in atomic detail and the solvent implicitly, in the spirit of the EEF1 solvation model for proteins. The solvation parameters of the DPC atoms are carried over from those of similar atoms in proteins. A slight adjustment of the parameters for the headgroup was found necessary for obtaining an aggregation number consistent with experiment. Molecular dynamics simulations of 960 DPC molecules at different concentrations are used to obtain the aggregation number, the micelle size distribution, and the CMC. At 20 mM concentration we obtain an aggregation number of 53-56 and a CMC of 1.25 mM, values close to the experimental ones. At 100 mM the aggregation number increases to 90. Simulations of individual micelles of varying size show that the effective energy per surfactant molecule is initially a decreasing function of aggregation number but stabilizes at about 60 molecules. The van der Waals term and the desolvation of nonpolar groups contribute to micellization, whereas the desolvation of polar groups opposes it. From the difference between the effective energy and the free energy (calculated from the CMC), the translational and rotational entropy contributions to the free energy are estimated at about 7 kcal/mol per monomer. The micelles obtained here are more irregular than those obtained in explicit water simulations. This modeling approach allows the study of larger surfactant aggregates for longer times and the extraction of thermodynamic in addition to structural information. PMID:16852911

  18. Solvent pretreatment of feed coal for briquetting

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, D.M.; Miller, M.R.

    1980-11-25

    Solvent pretreating of coal fines prior to briquetting results in coal briquettes which have no added binder and which will withstand weathering conditions better than binder containing briquettes. The solvents are generally described as organic Lewis base solvents which are capable of electron donor action, and include among others, acetone, methyl ethyl ketone, and ethylene diamine.

  19. Firing of pulverized solvent refined coal

    DOEpatents

    Derbidge, T. Craig; Mulholland, James A.; Foster, Edward P.

    1986-01-01

    An air-purged burner for the firing of pulverized solvent refined coal is constructed and operated such that the solvent refined coal can be fired without the coking thereof on the burner components. The air-purged burner is designed for the firing of pulverized solvent refined coal in a tangentially fired boiler.

  20. Solvent Extraction of Furfural From Biomass

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Humphrey, M. F.

    1984-01-01

    Solvent-extraction method reduces energy required to remove furfural produced during acid hydrolysis of biomass. Acid hydrolysis performed in vessel containing both solvents and reacting ingredients. With intimate contact between solvents and aqueous hydrolyis liqour, furfural removed form liquor almost as fast as it forms.

  1. The hype with ionic liquids as solvents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kunz, Werner; Häckl, Katharina

    2016-09-01

    In this mini review, we give our personal opinion about the present state of the art concerning Ionic Liquids, proposed as alternative solvents. In particular, we consider their different drawbacks and disadvantages and discuss the critical aspects of the research of Ionic Liquids as solvents. Finally, we point out some aspects on potentially promising Ionic Liquid solvents.

  2. Multidimensional explicit difference schemes for hyperbolic conservation laws

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vanleer, B.

    1983-01-01

    First and second order explicit difference schemes are derived for a three dimensional hyperbolic system of conservation laws, without recourse to dimensional factorization. All schemes are upwind (backward) biased and optimally stable.

  3. Multidimensional explicit difference schemes for hyperbolic conservation laws

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Van Leer, B.

    1984-01-01

    First- and second-order explicit difference schemes are derived for a three-dimensional hyperbolic system of conservation laws, without recourse to dimensional factorization. All schemes are upwind biased and optimally stable.

  4. Exact and Explicit Internal Equatorial Water Waves with Underlying Currents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kluczek, Mateusz

    2016-07-01

    In this paper we present an exact and explicit solution to the geophysical governing equations in the Equatorial region, which represents internal oceanic waves in the presence of a constant underlying current.

  5. Moderators of the Relationship between Implicit and Explicit Evaluation

    PubMed Central

    Nosek, Brian A.

    2005-01-01

    Automatic and controlled modes of evaluation sometimes provide conflicting reports of the quality of social objects. This paper presents evidence for four moderators of the relationship between automatic (implicit) and controlled (explicit) evaluations. Implicit and explicit preferences were measured for a variety of object pairs using a large sample. The average correlation was r = .36, and 52 of the 57 object pairs showed a significant positive correlation. Results of multilevel modeling analyses suggested that: (a) implicit and explicit preferences are related, (b) the relationship varies as a function of the objects assessed, and (c) at least four variables moderate the relationship – self-presentation, evaluative strength, dimensionality, and distinctiveness. The variables moderated implicit-explicit correspondence across individuals and accounted for much of the observed variation across content domains. The resulting model of the relationship between automatic and controlled evaluative processes is grounded in personal experience with the targets of evaluation. PMID:16316292

  6. Explicit and Implicit Emotion Regulation: A Dual-Process Framework

    PubMed Central

    Gyurak, Anett; Gross, James J.; Etkin, Amit

    2012-01-01

    It is widely acknowledged that emotions can be regulated in an astonishing variety of ways. Most research to date has focused on explicit (effortful) forms of emotion regulation. However, there is growing research interest in implicit (automatic) forms of emotion regulation. To organize emerging findings, we present a dual-process framework that integrates explicit and implicit forms of emotion regulation, and argue that both forms of regulation are necessary for well-being. In the first section of this review, we provide a broad overview of the construct of emotion regulation, with an emphasis on explicit and implicit processes. In the second section, we focus on explicit emotion regulation, considering both neural mechanisms that are associated with these processes and their experiential and physiological consequences. In the third section, we turn to several forms of implicit emotion regulation, and integrate the burgeoning literature in this area. We conclude by outlining open questions and areas for future research. PMID:21432682

  7. Implicit and Explicit Learning in Individuals with Agrammatic Aphasia

    PubMed Central

    Schuchard, Julia; Thompson, Cynthia K.

    2013-01-01

    Implicit learning is a process of acquiring knowledge that occurs without conscious awareness of learning, whereas explicit learning involves the use of overt strategies. To date, research related to implicit learning following stroke has been largely restricted to the motor domain and has rarely addressed implications for language. The present study investigated implicit and explicit learning of an auditory word sequence in 10 individuals with stroke-induced agrammatic aphasia and 18 healthy age-matched participants using an adaptation of the Serial Reaction Time task. Individuals with aphasia showed significant learning under implicit, but not explicit, conditions, whereas age-matched participants learned under both conditions. These results suggest significant implicit learning ability in agrammatic aphasia. Furthermore, results of an auditory sentence span task indicated working memory deficits in individuals with agrammatic aphasia, which are discussed in relation to explicit and implicit learning processes. PMID:23532578

  8. Phase Behavioral and Structural Properties of an Efficient Solvent-Free Model of Lipid Bilayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Revalee, Joel; Laradji, Mohamed

    2007-03-01

    High-power computers facilitate the study of lipid bilayer membranes. Any computer model used to simulate such membranes must account for their spontaneous self- assembly due to hydrophobic interactions between lipid tails and water. This is usually done by simulating lipid molecules in explicit solvent. In such simulations most of the system is occupied by the solvent. It is therefore computationally desirable for equilibrium studies of lipid membranes to develop a model that leads to self-assembly of lipids without explicit solvent. We designed such a model, and show that its use leads to faster simulations than what can be achieved with current solvent-free models. This model utilizes soft interactions to account for hydrophobic effects (instead of the Lennard-Jones potential). Investigation of the lipids' diffusion coefficient, single-lipid orientational order parameter and internal energy as functions of temperature reveal a structural phase diagram in the membrane from a gel-like hexatic phase to a fluid phase. The characterization of membrane elastic properties from this model will also be presented.

  9. Albumin (BSA) Adsorption over Graphene in Aqueous Environment: Influence of Orientation, Adsorption Protocol, and Solvent Treatment.

    PubMed

    Vilhena, J G; Rubio-Pereda, Pamela; Vellosillo, Perceval; Serena, P A; Pérez, Rubén

    2016-02-23

    We report 150 ns explicit solvent MD simulations of the adsorption on graphene of albumin (BSA) in two orientations and using two different adsorption protocols, i.e., free and forced adsorption. Our results show that free adsorption occurs with little structural rearrangements. Even taking adsorption to an extreme, by forcing it with a 5 nN downward force applied during the initial 20 ns, we show that along a particular orientation BSA is able to preserve the structural properties of the majority of its binding sites. Furthermore, in all the cases considered in this work, the ibuprofen binding site has shown a strong resilience to structural changes. Finally, we compare these results with implicit solvent simulations and find that the latter predicts an extreme protein unfolding upon adsorption. The origin of this discrepancy is attributed to a poor description of the water entropic forces at interfaces in the implicit solvent methods. PMID:26799950

  10. Prediction of Complex Aerodynamic Flows with Explicit Algebraic Stress Models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abid, Ridha; Morrison, Joseph H.; Gatski, Thomas B.; Speziale, Charles G.

    1996-01-01

    An explicit algebraic stress equation, developed by Gatski and Speziale, is used in the framework of K-epsilon formulation to predict complex aerodynamic turbulent flows. The nonequilibrium effects are modeled through coefficients that depend nonlinearly on both rotational and irrotational strains. The proposed model was implemented in the ISAAC Navier-Stokes code. Comparisons with the experimental data are presented which clearly demonstrate that explicit algebraic stress models can predict the correct response to nonequilibrium flow.

  11. Solvent cleaning system and method for removing contaminants from solvent used in resin recycling

    DOEpatents

    Bohnert, George W.; Hand, Thomas E.; DeLaurentiis, Gary M.

    2009-01-06

    A two step solvent and carbon dioxide based system that produces essentially contaminant-free synthetic resin material and which further includes a solvent cleaning system for periodically removing the contaminants from the solvent so that the solvent can be reused and the contaminants can be collected and safely discarded in an environmentally safe manner.

  12. Cybersex: regulating sexually explicit expression on the Internet.

    PubMed

    Cate, F H

    1996-01-01

    While the First Amendment restricts the power of the government to control access by adults to sexually explicit expression that is not obscene, the government may restrict access by children, provided that those restrictions do not limit adults to reading only "what is fit for children." Controlling access by children presents special problems in the context of broadcasting, because broadcast programming is accessible to children too young to read and because of the impossibility of segregating adults and children in the audience. The Supreme Court therefore permits the government to require "channeling" of sexually explicit programming to times when fewer unsupervised children are in the audience, to facilitate parental control over children's access to sexually explicit material. Although Internet content includes less than one percent of sexually explicit expression, that material has been the subject of intensive media and government attention. Much of that attention ignores (1) the high level of constitutional protection applicable to non-obscene, sexually explicit expression; (2) features of the Internet which facilitate controlling access by children to sexually explicit expression far more effectively than in broadcasting or print media; and (3) the First Amendment values served by permitting expression of all forms on the Internet. PMID:10160233

  13. Insecticide solvents: interference with insecticidal action.

    PubMed

    Brattsten, L B; Wilkinson, C F

    1977-06-10

    Several commercial solvent mixtures commonly used as insecticide carriers in spray formulations increase by more than threefold the microsomal N-demethylation of p-chloro N-methylaniline in midgut preparations of southern army-worm (Spodoptera eridania) larvae exposed orally to the test solvents. Under laboratory conditions, the same solvent mixtures exhibit a protective action against the in vivo toxicity of the insecticide carbaryl to the larvae. The data are discussed with respect to possible solvent-insecticide interactions occurring under field conditions and, more broadly, to potential toxicological hazards of these solvents to humans. PMID:860135

  14. Batch extracting process using magneticparticle held solvents

    DOEpatents

    Nunez, Luis; Vandergrift, George F.

    1995-01-01

    A process for selectively removing metal values which may include catalytic values from a mixture containing same, wherein a magnetic particle is contacted with a liquid solvent which selectively dissolves the metal values to absorb the liquid solvent onto the magnetic particle. Thereafter the solvent-containing magnetic particles are contacted with a mixture containing the heavy metal values to transfer metal values into the solvent carried by the magnetic particles, and then magnetically separating the magnetic particles. Ion exchange resins may be used for selective solvents.

  15. Implicit treatment of solvent dispersion forces in protein simulations

    PubMed Central

    Hassan, Sergio A.

    2015-01-01

    A model is proposed for the evaluation of dispersive forces in a continuum solvent representation for use in large-scale computer simulations. It captures the short and long-range effects of water-exclusion in conditions of partial and anisotropic hydration. The model introduces three parameters, one of which represents the degree of hydration (water occupancy) at any point in the system, which depends on the solute conformation, and two that represent the strength of water-water and water-solute dispersive interactions. It is optimized for proteins, using hydration data of a sub-optimally hydrated binding site and results from dynamics simulations in explicit water. The model is applied to a series of aliphatic-alcohol/protein complexes and a set of binary and ternary complexes of various sizes. Implications for weak and ultra-weak protein-protein association and for simulation in crowded media are discussed. PMID:24919463

  16. Effect of solvents on obligately anaerobic bacteria.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez Martinez, Maria Fernanda; Kelessidou, Niki; Law, Zoe; Gardiner, John; Stephens, Gill

    2008-02-01

    Growth of Acetobacterium woodii and Clostridium sporogenes was studied in the presence of water-immiscible solvents. Nitrogen purging, vacuum distillation or distillation under nitrogen were all suitable as methods to remove oxygen from the solvents, since growth rates and yields of A. woodii were unaffected in the presence of tetradecane which had been degassed by these methods. Varying the solvent volume from 20% to 80% of the culture volume had little effect on growth rate of A. woodii. A.woodii was relatively sensitive to organic solvents since growth was inhibited by alkanes with logP(octanol/water) values below 7.1. C. sporogenes was less solvent sensitive, since it grew without inhibition when the logP of the solvent was > or = 6.6. Nevertheless, both A. woodii and C. sporogenes were more sensitive to solvent polarity than aerobic bacteria. PMID:18083050

  17. Accurate calculation of conformational free energy differences in explicit water: the confinement-solvation free energy approach.

    PubMed

    Esque, Jeremy; Cecchini, Marco

    2015-04-23

    The calculation of the free energy of conformation is key to understanding the function of biomolecules and has attracted significant interest in recent years. Here, we present an improvement of the confinement method that was designed for use in the context of explicit solvent MD simulations. The development involves an additional step in which the solvation free energy of the harmonically restrained conformers is accurately determined by multistage free energy perturbation simulations. As a test-case application, the newly introduced confinement/solvation free energy (CSF) approach was used to compute differences in free energy between conformers of the alanine dipeptide in explicit water. The results are in excellent agreement with reference calculations based on both converged molecular dynamics and umbrella sampling. To illustrate the general applicability of the method, conformational equilibria of met-enkephalin (5 aa) and deca-alanine (10 aa) in solution were also analyzed. In both cases, smoothly converged free-energy results were obtained in agreement with equilibrium sampling or literature calculations. These results demonstrate that the CSF method may provide conformational free-energy differences of biomolecules with small statistical errors (below 0.5 kcal/mol) and at a moderate computational cost even with a full representation of the solvent. PMID:25807150

  18. Advanced integrated solvent extraction systems

    SciTech Connect

    Horwitz, E.P.; Dietz, M.L.; Leonard, R.A.

    1997-10-01

    Advanced integrated solvent extraction systems are a series of novel solvent extraction (SX) processes that will remove and recover all of the major radioisotopes from acidic-dissolved sludge or other acidic high-level wastes. The major focus of this effort during the last 2 years has been the development of a combined cesium-strontium extraction/recovery process, the Combined CSEX-SREX Process. The Combined CSEX-SREX Process relies on a mixture of a strontium-selective macrocyclic polyether and a novel cesium-selective extractant based on dibenzo 18-crown-6. The process offers several potential advantages over possible alternatives in a chemical processing scheme for high-level waste treatment. First, if the process is applied as the first step in chemical pretreatment, the radiation level for all subsequent processing steps (e.g., transuranic extraction/recovery, or TRUEX) will be significantly reduced. Thus, less costly shielding would be required. The second advantage of the Combined CSEX-SREX Process is that the recovered Cs-Sr fraction is non-transuranic, and therefore will decay to low-level waste after only a few hundred years. Finally, combining individual processes into a single process will reduce the amount of equipment required to pretreat the waste and therefore reduce the size and cost of the waste processing facility. In an ongoing collaboration with Lockheed Martin Idaho Technology Company (LMITCO), the authors have successfully tested various segments of the Advanced Integrated Solvent Extraction Systems. Eichrom Industries, Inc. (Darien, IL) synthesizes and markets the Sr extractant and can supply the Cs extractant on a limited basis. Plans are under way to perform a test of the Combined CSEX-SREX Process with real waste at LMITCO in the near future.

  19. Solvent cavitation under solvophobic confinement.

    PubMed

    Ashbaugh, Henry S

    2013-08-14

    The stability of liquids under solvophobic confinement can tip in favor of the vapor phase, nucleating a liquid-to-vapor phase transition that induces attractive forces between confining surfaces. In the case of water adjacent to hydrophobic surfaces, experimental and theoretical evidence support confinement-mediated evaporation stabilization of biomolecular and colloidal assemblies. The macroscopic thermodynamic theory of cavitation under confinement establishes the connection between the size of the confining surfaces, interfacial free energies, and bulk solvent pressure with the critical evaporation separation and interfacial forces. While molecular simulations have confirmed the broad theoretical trends, a quantitative comparison based on independent measurements of the interfacial free energies and liquid-vapor coexistence properties has, to the best of our knowledge, not yet been performed. To overcome the challenges of simulating a large number of systems to validate scaling predictions for a three-dimensional fluid, we simulate both the forces and liquid-vapor coexistence properties of a two-dimensional Lennard-Jones fluid confined between solvophobic plates over a range of plate sizes and reservoir pressures. Our simulations quantitatively agree with theoretical predictions for solvent-mediated forces and critical evaporation separations once the length dependence of the solvation free energy of an individual confining plate is taken into account. The effective solid-liquid line tension length dependence results from molecular scale correlations for solvating microscopic plates and asymptotically decays to the macroscopic value for plates longer than 150 solvent diameters. The success of the macroscopic thermodynamic theory at describing two-dimensional liquids suggests application to surfactant monolayers to experimentally confirm confinement-mediated cavitation. PMID:23947875

  20. SOLVENT EXTRACTION PROCESS FOR PLUTONIUM

    DOEpatents

    Seaborg, G.T.

    1959-04-14

    The separation of plutonium from aqueous inorganic acid solutions by the use of a water immiscible organic extractant liquid is described. The plutonium must be in the oxidized state, and the solvents covered by the patent include nitromethane, nitroethane, nitropropane, and nitrobenzene. The use of a salting out agents such as ammonium nitrate in the case of an aqueous nitric acid solution is advantageous. After contacting the aqueous solution with the organic extractant, the resulting extract and raffinate phases are separated. The plutonium may be recovered by any suitable method.

  1. Solvent refined coal (SRC) process

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-12-01

    This report summarizes the progress of the Solvent Refined Coal (SRC) project by The Pittsburg and Midway Coal Mining Co. at the SRC Pilot Plant in Fort Lewis, Washington and the Gulf Science and Technology Company Process Development Unit (P-99) in Harmarville, Pennsylvania, for the Department of Energy during the month of October, 1980. The Fort Lewis Pilot Plant was shut down the entire month of October, 1980 for inspection and maintenance. PDU P-99 completed two runs during October investigating potential start-up modes for the Demonstration Plant.

  2. Distinct developmental trajectories for explicit and implicit timing.

    PubMed

    Droit-Volet, Sylvie; Coull, Jennifer T

    2016-10-01

    Adults and children aged 5 and 8years were given explicit and implicit timing tasks. These tasks were based on the same temporal representation (the temporal interval between two signals), but in the explicit task participants received overt instructions to judge the duration of the interval, whereas in the implicit task they did not receive any temporal instructions and were asked only to press as quickly as possible after the second signal. In addition, participants' cognitive capacities were assessed with different neuropsychological tests. The results showed that temporal variability (i.e., the spread of performance around the reference interval) decreased as a function of age in the explicit task, being higher in the 5-year-olds than in the 8-year-olds and adults. The higher variability in the youngest children was directly linked to their limited cognitive capacity. By contrast, temporal variability in the implicit timing task remained constant across the different age groups and was unrelated to cognitive capacity. Processing of time, therefore, was independent of age in the implicit task but changed with age in the explicit task, thereby demonstrating distinct developmental trajectories for explicit and implicit timing. PMID:27295205

  3. EdgeMaps: visualizing explicit and implicit relations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dörk, Marian; Carpendale, Sheelagh; Williamson, Carey

    2011-01-01

    In this work, we introduce EdgeMaps as a new method for integrating the visualization of explicit and implicit data relations. Explicit relations are specific connections between entities already present in a given dataset, while implicit relations are derived from multidimensional data based on shared properties and similarity measures. Many datasets include both types of relations, which are often difficult to represent together in information visualizations. Node-link diagrams typically focus on explicit data connections, while not incorporating implicit similarities between entities. Multi-dimensional scaling considers similarities between items, however, explicit links between nodes are not displayed. In contrast, EdgeMaps visualize both implicit and explicit relations by combining and complementing spatialization and graph drawing techniques. As a case study for this approach we chose a dataset of philosophers, their interests, influences, and birthdates. By introducing the limitation of activating only one node at a time, interesting visual patterns emerge that resemble the aesthetics of fireworks and waves. We argue that the interactive exploration of these patterns may allow the viewer to grasp the structure of a graph better than complex node-link visualizations.

  4. Rational solvent selection for cooling crystallizations

    SciTech Connect

    Nass, K.K. . Chemicals Development Div.)

    1994-06-01

    The development of a successful crystallization process for purification and isolation of an organic compound requires the selection of a suitable solvent or solvent mixture; to date, no logical method has been established for determining the best solvent combination. The process chemist or engineer often employs a trial-and-error procedure to identify an appropriate solvent system, the success of which is dependent on experience and intuition. This paper describes a strategy for choosing crystallization solvents based upon equilibrium limits. The approach utilizes a group-contribution method (UNIFAC) to predict a value for the activity coefficient of the solute in a given solvent system at the saturation point. This value is then used to calculate the solubility of the solute at a high'' temperature and a low'' temperature. The resulting solubility values determine the maximum theoretical yield for the process. Both quantities are used to rank order solvents and/or their mixtures relative to one another according to their solvent power and potential process yield. Several examples illustrating the successful application of this method are described, and potential improvements to the algorithm are discussed. Implementation of this strategy will reduce product cycle time, minimize solvent usage, and allow identification of cheaper solvent alternatives.

  5. The solvent component of macromolecular crystals

    PubMed Central

    Weichenberger, Christian X.; Afonine, Pavel V.; Kantardjieff, Katherine; Rupp, Bernhard

    2015-01-01

    The mother liquor from which a biomolecular crystal is grown will contain water, buffer molecules, native ligands and cofactors, crystallization precipitants and additives, various metal ions, and often small-molecule ligands or inhibitors. On average, about half the volume of a biomolecular crystal consists of this mother liquor, whose components form the disordered bulk solvent. Its scattering contributions can be exploited in initial phasing and must be included in crystal structure refinement as a bulk-solvent model. Concomitantly, distinct electron density originating from ordered solvent components must be correctly identified and represented as part of the atomic crystal structure model. Herein, are reviewed (i) probabilistic bulk-solvent content estimates, (ii) the use of bulk-solvent density modification in phase improvement, (iii) bulk-solvent models and refinement of bulk-solvent contributions and (iv) modelling and validation of ordered solvent constituents. A brief summary is provided of current tools for bulk-solvent analysis and refinement, as well as of modelling, refinement and analysis of ordered solvent components, including small-molecule ligands. PMID:25945568

  6. The solvent component of macromolecular crystals.

    PubMed

    Weichenberger, Christian X; Afonine, Pavel V; Kantardjieff, Katherine; Rupp, Bernhard

    2015-05-01

    The mother liquor from which a biomolecular crystal is grown will contain water, buffer molecules, native ligands and cofactors, crystallization precipitants and additives, various metal ions, and often small-molecule ligands or inhibitors. On average, about half the volume of a biomolecular crystal consists of this mother liquor, whose components form the disordered bulk solvent. Its scattering contributions can be exploited in initial phasing and must be included in crystal structure refinement as a bulk-solvent model. Concomitantly, distinct electron density originating from ordered solvent components must be correctly identified and represented as part of the atomic crystal structure model. Herein, are reviewed (i) probabilistic bulk-solvent content estimates, (ii) the use of bulk-solvent density modification in phase improvement, (iii) bulk-solvent models and refinement of bulk-solvent contributions and (iv) modelling and validation of ordered solvent constituents. A brief summary is provided of current tools for bulk-solvent analysis and refinement, as well as of modelling, refinement and analysis of ordered solvent components, including small-molecule ligands. PMID:25945568

  7. Semiflexible polymers under good solvent conditions interacting with repulsive walls.

    PubMed

    Egorov, Sergei A; Milchev, Andrey; Virnau, Peter; Binder, Kurt

    2016-05-01

    Solutions of semiflexible polymers confined by repulsive planar walls are studied by density functional theory and molecular dynamics simulations, to clarify the competition between the chain alignment favored by the wall and the depletion caused by the monomer-wall repulsion. A coarse-grained bead-spring model with a bond bending potential is studied, varying both the contour length and the persistence length of the polymers, as well as the monomer concentration in the solution (good solvent conditions are assumed throughout, and solvent molecules are not included explicitly). The profiles of monomer density and pressure tensor components near the wall are studied, and the surface tension of the solution is obtained. While the surface tension slightly decreases with chain length for flexible polymers, it clearly increases with chain length for stiff polymers. Thus, at fixed density and fixed chain length, the surface tension also increases with increasing persistence length. Chain ends always are enriched near the wall, but this effect is much larger for stiff polymers than for flexible ones. Also the profiles of the mean square gyration radius components near the wall and the nematic order parameter are studied to clarify the conditions where wall-induced nematic order occurs. PMID:27155651

  8. Semiflexible polymers under good solvent conditions interacting with repulsive walls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Egorov, Sergei A.; Milchev, Andrey; Virnau, Peter; Binder, Kurt

    2016-05-01

    Solutions of semiflexible polymers confined by repulsive planar walls are studied by density functional theory and molecular dynamics simulations, to clarify the competition between the chain alignment favored by the wall and the depletion caused by the monomer-wall repulsion. A coarse-grained bead-spring model with a bond bending potential is studied, varying both the contour length and the persistence length of the polymers, as well as the monomer concentration in the solution (good solvent conditions are assumed throughout, and solvent molecules are not included explicitly). The profiles of monomer density and pressure tensor components near the wall are studied, and the surface tension of the solution is obtained. While the surface tension slightly decreases with chain length for flexible polymers, it clearly increases with chain length for stiff polymers. Thus, at fixed density and fixed chain length, the surface tension also increases with increasing persistence length. Chain ends always are enriched near the wall, but this effect is much larger for stiff polymers than for flexible ones. Also the profiles of the mean square gyration radius components near the wall and the nematic order parameter are studied to clarify the conditions where wall-induced nematic order occurs.

  9. Electrochemistry in deep eutectic solvents.

    PubMed

    Nkuku, Chiemela A; LeSuer, Robert J

    2007-11-22

    We report the cyclic voltammetry, chronoamperometry, and scanning electrochemical microscopy of ferrocene dissolved in deep eutectic solvents (DES), consisting of choline chloride (ChCl) and either trifluoroacetamide (TFA) or malonic acid as the hydrogen-bond donor. Despite the use of ultramicroelectrodes, which were required due to the modest conductivities of the DES employed, linear diffusion behavior was observed in cyclic voltammetric experiments. The high viscosity of 1:2 ChCl/TFA relative to non-aqueous electrochemical solvents leads to a low diffusion coefficient, 2.7 x 10(-8) cm2 s(-1) for ferrocene in this medium. Because of the difficulties in achieving steady-state conditions, SECM approach curves were tip velocity dependent. Under certain conditions, SECM approach curves to an insulating substrate displayed a positive-feedback response. Satisfactory simulation of this unexpected behavior was obtained by including convection terms into the mass transport equations typically used for SECM theory. The observance of positive-feedback behavior at an insulating substrate can be described in terms of a dimensionless parameter, the Peclet number, which is the ratio of the convective and diffusive timescales. Fitting insulator approach curves of ferrocene in 1:2 ChCl/TFA shows an apparent increase in the diffusion coefficient with increasing tip velocity, which can be explained by DES behaving as a shear thinning non-Newtonian fluid. PMID:17973421

  10. The time course of explicit and implicit categorization.

    PubMed

    Smith, J David; Zakrzewski, Alexandria C; Herberger, Eric R; Boomer, Joseph; Roeder, Jessica L; Ashby, F Gregory; Church, Barbara A

    2015-10-01

    Contemporary theory in cognitive neuroscience distinguishes, among the processes and utilities that serve categorization, explicit and implicit systems of category learning that learn, respectively, category rules by active hypothesis testing or adaptive behaviors by association and reinforcement. Little is known about the time course of categorization within these systems. Accordingly, the present experiments contrasted tasks that fostered explicit categorization (because they had a one-dimensional, rule-based solution) or implicit categorization (because they had a two-dimensional, information-integration solution). In Experiment 1, participants learned categories under unspeeded or speeded conditions. In Experiment 2, they applied previously trained category knowledge under unspeeded or speeded conditions. Speeded conditions selectively impaired implicit category learning and implicit mature categorization. These results illuminate the processing dynamics of explicit/implicit categorization. PMID:26025556

  11. A hybrid explicit solution technique for quasi-static transients

    SciTech Connect

    Sauve, R.G.; Metzger, D.R.

    1996-12-01

    In certain instances, such as in the modeling of manufacturing process, undesirable dynamic effects may accompany the use of an explicit transient solution, while the use of full dynamic relaxation is inefficient for this class of problem due to critical damping. In this paper, an approach that merges the salient features of dynamic relaxation with those of the fully explicit solution, is presented. The key objective of the method is the removal of unwanted dynamic (e.g., inertial) effects, while providing for a transient kinematic loading history. This work focuses on the development of an adaptive mass algorithm consistent with specified damping and time step for use within the framework of explicit time integration. The paper describes the hybrid solution formulation and the implementation of the proposed algorithm. Applications include an experimental punch test used for material characterization and a rolled joint expansion manufacturing process used for installation of tubes in steam generators, both involving three-dimensional finite deformation.

  12. Local Control Mechanisms of Implicit and Explicit Conflicts.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Liang; Bai, Yang; Ma, Jie; Wang, Yonghui

    2015-01-01

    Congruency sequence effects are observed when the congruency effects following incongruent trials are smaller than those following congruent trials. It is typically assumed that such flexible adjustments are evidence of cognitively controlled dynamic modulations. The present study investigated whether cognitive control acts locally or globally when implicit and explicit conflicts exist simultaneously within a system. The implicit SNARC task and explicit Simon task were combined in a single task. The results showed that congruency effects of one type (e.g., SNARC effect) were only smaller following an incongruent trial of the same type (e.g., SNARC effect), but not when following an incongruent trial of the other type (e.g., Simon effect). These results indicate the operation of local control mechanisms triggered by implicit and explicit conflicts. PMID:25516007

  13. Making context explicit for explanation and incremental knowledge acquisition

    SciTech Connect

    Brezillon, P.

    1996-12-31

    Intelligent systems may be improved by making context explicit in problem solving. This is a lesson drawn from a study of the reasons why a number of knowledge-based systems (KBSs) failed. We discuss the interest to make context explicit in explanation generation and incremental knowledge acquisition, two important aspects of intelligent systems that aim to cooperate with users. We show how context can be used to better explain and incrementally acquire knowledge. The advantages of using context in explanation and incremental knowledge acquisition are discussed through SEPIT, an expert system for supporting diagnosis and explanation through simulation of power plants. We point out how the limitations of such systems may be overcome by making context explicit.

  14. Effect of solvent on the self-assembly of dialanine and diphenylalanine peptides.

    PubMed

    Rissanou, Anastassia N; Georgilis, Evangelos; Kasotakis, Emmanouil; Mitraki, Anna; Harmandaris, Vagelis

    2013-04-18

    Diphenylalanine (FF) is a very common peptide with many potential applications, both biological and technological, due to a large number of different nanostructures which it attains. The current work concerns a detailed study of the self-assembled structures of FF in two different solvents, an aqueous (H2O) and an organic (CH3OH) through simulations and experiments. Detailed atomistic molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of FF in both solvents have been performed, using an explicit solvent model. The self-assembling propensity of FF in water is obvious while in methanol a very weak self-assembling propensity is observed. We studied and compared structural properties of FF in the two different solvents and a comparison with a system of dialanine (AA) in the corresponding solvents was also performed. In addition, temperature-dependence studies were carried out. Finally, the simulation predictions were compared to new experimental data, which were produced in the framework of the present work. A very good qualitative agreement between simulation and experimental observations was found. PMID:23510047

  15. Exploring large-scale phenomena in composite membranes through an efficient implicit-solvent model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laradji, Mohamed; Kumar, P. B. Sunil; Spangler, Eric J.

    2016-07-01

    Several microscopic and mesoscale models have been introduced in the past to investigate various phenomena in lipid membranes. Most of these models account for the solvent explicitly. Since in a typical molecular dynamics simulation, the majority of particles belong to the solvent, much of the computational effort in these simulations is devoted for calculating forces between solvent particles. To overcome this problem, several implicit-solvent mesoscale models for lipid membranes have been proposed during the last few years. In the present article, we review an efficient coarse-grained implicit-solvent model we introduced earlier for studies of lipid membranes. In this model, lipid molecules are coarse-grained into short semi-flexible chains of beads with soft interactions. Through molecular dynamics simulations, the model is used to investigate the thermal, structural and elastic properties of lipid membranes. We will also review here few studies, based on this model, of the phase behavior of nanoscale liposomes, cytoskeleton-induced blebbing in lipid membranes, as well as nanoparticles wrapping and endocytosis by tensionless lipid membranes. Topical Review article submitted to the Journal of Physics D: Applied Physics, May 9, 2016

  16. Parabosons, parafermions, and explicit representations of infinite-dimensional algebras

    SciTech Connect

    Stoilova, N. I.; Van der Jeugt, J.

    2010-03-15

    The goal of this paper is to give an explicit construction of the Fock spaces of the parafermion and the paraboson algebra, for an infinite set of generators. This is equivalent to constructing certain unitary irreducible lowest weight representations of the (infinite rank) Lie algebra so({infinity}) and of the Lie superalgebra osp(1 vertical bar {infinity}). A complete solution to the problem is presented, in which the Fock spaces have basis vectors labeled by certain infinite but stable Gelfand-Zetlin patterns, and the transformation of the basis is given explicitly. Alternatively, the basis vectors can be expressed as semi-standard Young tableaux.

  17. The Intergenerational Transmission of Implicit and Explicit Attitudes Toward Smoking

    PubMed Central

    Sherman, Steven J.; Chassin, Laurie; Presson, Clark; Seo, Dong-Chul; Macy, Jonathan T.

    2009-01-01

    This study examined the intergenerational transmission of implicit and explicit attitudes toward smoking, as well as the role of these attitudes in adolescents’ smoking initiation. There was evidence of intergenerational transmission of implicit attitudes. Mothers who had more positive implicit attitudes had children with more positive implicit attitudes. In turn, these positive implicit attitudes of adolescents predicted their smoking initiation 18-months later. Moreover, these effects were obtained above and beyond the effects of explicit attitudes. These findings provide the first evidence that the intergenerational transmission of implicit cognition may play a role in the intergenerational transmission of an addictive behavior. PMID:20126293

  18. Modeling ductile dynamic fracture with ABAQUS/explicit

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, C.A.; Turner, C.

    1996-05-01

    This paper illustrates the use of advanced constitutive models in ABAQUS/Explicit together with highly focused finite element meshes to simulate the propagation of a fracture in a ductile medium. A double edge-cracked specimen under far field dynamic tensile loading is analyzed, and shows both rectilinear motion or unstable oscillatory motion of the crack depending on the material property constraints. Results are also presented for a simulation of ASTM`s standard fracture test E399. Comparisons of ABAQUS/Explicit results with experiments or other analytical/numerical results are made.

  19. Solvent Extraction External Radiation Stability Testing

    SciTech Connect

    Peterson, R.A.

    2001-01-05

    Personnel irradiated a number of samples of calixarene-based solvent. Analysis of these samples indicated that measurable loss of the calixarene occurred at very high doses (-16 Mrad). No measurable loss of the Cs-7SB modifier occurred at equivalent doses. The primary degradation product, 4-sec-butylphenol, observed during analysis of the samples came from degradation of the modifier. Also, TOA proved more susceptible to damage than the other components of the solvent. The total degradation of the solvent proved relatively minor. The consistent solvent performance, as indicated by the measured D Cs values, after exposure at high total doses serves as evidence of the relatively low degree of degradation of the solvent components. Additional tests employing internal irradiation of solvents with both simulants and SRS tank waste will be completed by the end of March 2001 to provide confirmation of the results presented herein.

  20. Aryne Compatible Solvents are not Always Innocent.

    PubMed

    Suh, Sung-Eun; Chenoweth, David M

    2016-08-19

    Arynes are important and versatile intermediates in a variety of transformations. Commonly used solvents for aryne chemistry include acetonitrile and dichloromethane. Although rarely reported, the reactive nature of aryne intermediates makes them prone to side reactions, which sometimes involve solvent participation. Acetonitrile and dichloromethane are not always innocent solvents and can participate in aryne-based reactions. These results are presented in the context of ongoing mechanistic investigations of the triple aryne-tetrazine reaction. PMID:27486792

  1. Femtosecond dynamics in hydrogen-bonded solvents

    SciTech Connect

    Castner, E.W. Jr.; Chang, Y.J.

    1993-09-01

    We present results on the ultrafast dynamics of pure hydrogen-bonding solvents, obtained using femtosecond Fourier-transform optical-heterodyne-detected, Raman-induced Kerr effect spectroscopy. Solvent systems we have studied include the formamides, water, ethylene glycol, and acetic acid. Inertial and diffusive motions are clearly resolved. We comment on the effect that such ultrafast solvent motions have on chemical reactions in solution.

  2. Accelerated solvent extraction for natural products isolation.

    PubMed

    Mottaleb, Mohammad A; Sarker, Satyajit D

    2012-01-01

    Accelerated solvent extraction (ASE(®)), first introduced in 1995, is an automated rapid extraction technique that utilizes common solvents at elevated temperature and pressure, and thereby increases the efficiency of extraction of organic compounds from solid and semisolid matrices. ASE(®) allows extractions for sample sizes 1-100 g in minutes, reduces solvent uses dramatically, and can be applied to a wide range of matrices, including natural products. PMID:22367894

  3. Solvent effects on ozonolysis reaction intermediates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    del Rio, Emma; Aplincourt, Philippe; Ruiz-López, Manuel F.

    1997-12-01

    Solvent effects on relative stability, electronic and molecular structure of ozonolysis reaction intermediates are analyzed with the help of ab initio MP2/6-31+G ** calculations. A continuum model is employed to account for solute-solvent electrostatic interactions. The results show that there are large effects on the structure and relative stability of carbonyl oxide by substantially favoring its zwitterionic character. A complex formed by carbonyl oxide and formaldehyde is shown to be stable in the gas phase and in solution. This complex can be involved in solvent cage reactions leading to secondary ozonides. Thermodynamically, primary ozonide decomposition is favored by the solvent.

  4. Solvent recovery system provides timely compliance solution

    SciTech Connect

    1996-11-01

    Hoechst Celanese Corp. (Coventry, Rhode Island) faced the challenge of meeting an Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) deadline for solvent recovery within one year. The company also had to ensure that a new solvent recovery system would satisfy Rhode Island state requirements. An initial search for the required technology was fruitless. Finally, MG Industries (Saint Charles, Missouri), an industrial gas supplier, was chosen for the job. Using CRYOSOLV, as the waste stream cools in the cryogenic condenser (heat exchanger), the solvents condense at temperatures below the dewpoint. The recovered solvent can be recycled into the process, while clean gas is vented to the atmosphere.

  5. Chronic solvent abuse. 1. Cognitive sequelae.

    PubMed

    Zur, J; Yule, W

    1990-01-01

    Twelve adolescent males with a history of chronic solvent abuse were compared with 12 delinquent controls on a battery of neuropsychological tests. Toluene was the active constituent most commonly abused. Solvent abusers tended to have lower overall intelligence test scores. On the Bexley Maudsley Automated Screening Test, the solvent abusers scored significantly lower on tests involving visual processing, especially the Symbol Digit Coding test. These results are cautiously interpreted as indicating that chronic solvent abuse carries an increased risk of cognitive impairment. PMID:2311197

  6. MCU MATERIALS COMPATIBILITY WITH CSSX SOLVENT

    SciTech Connect

    Fondeur, F

    2006-01-13

    The Modular Caustic-Side Solvent Extraction (CSSX) Unit (MCU) plans to use several new materials of construction not previously used with CSSX solvent. SRNL researchers tested seven materials proposed for service in seal and gasket applications. None of the materials leached detectable amounts of components into the CSSX solvent during 96 hour tests. All are judged acceptable for use based on their effect on the solvent. However, some of the materials adsorbed solvent or changed dimensions during contact with solvent. Consultation with component and material vendors with regard to performance impact and in-use testing of the materials is recommended. Polyetheretherketone (PEEK), a material selected for use in contactor bearing seals, did not gain weight or change dimensions on contact with CSSX solvent. Analysis of the solvent contacted with this material showed no impurities and the standard dispersion test gave acceptable phase separation results. The material contains a leachable hydrocarbon substance, detectable on exposed surfaces, that did not adversely contaminate the solvent within the limits of the testing. We recommend contacting the vendor to determine the source and purpose of this component, or, alternatively, pursue the infrared analysis of the PEEK in an effort to better define potential impacts.

  7. Process for hydrogenating coal and coal solvents

    DOEpatents

    Tarrer, Arthur R.; Shridharani, Ketan G.

    1983-01-01

    A novel process is described for the hydrogenation of coal by the hydrogenation of a solvent for the coal in which the hydrogenation of the coal solvent is conducted in the presence of a solvent hydrogenation catalyst of increased activity, wherein the hydrogenation catalyst is produced by reacting ferric oxide with hydrogen sulfide at a temperature range of 260.degree. C. to 315.degree. C. in an inert atmosphere to produce an iron sulfide hydrogenation catalyst for the solvent. Optimally, the reaction temperature is 275.degree. C. Alternately, the reaction can be conducted in a hydrogen atmosphere at 350.degree. C.

  8. Hot-solvent miscible displacement

    SciTech Connect

    Awang, M.; Farouq Ali, S.M.

    1980-01-01

    This work describes an experimental and theoretical investigation of miscible displacement under nonisothermal conditions. The hot miscible floods were performed in an adiabatic glass bead pack, displacing one hydrocarbon by a more viscous hydrocarbon, the latter being at an elevated temperature. As a result, dispersion of both mass and heat took place, and was determined by temperature and concentration measurements. The system was simulated by coupled convective-diffusion and thermal conduction-convection equations. The results of the numerical as well as an approximate analytical solution were compared with the experimentally observed behavior. The numerical and experimental results point to the factors which should be considered in the choice of a solvent for a thermal-miscible type oil recovery process.

  9. Green Solvents for Precision Cleaning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grandelli, Heather; Maloney, Phillip; DeVor, Robert; Surma, Jan; Hintze, Paul

    2013-01-01

    Aerospace machinery used in liquid oxygen (LOX) fuel systems must be precision cleaned to achieve a very low level of non-volatile residue (< 1 mg0.1 m2), especially flammable residue. Traditionally chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs) have been used in the precision cleaning of LOX systems, specifically CFC 113 (C2Cl3F3). CFCs have been known to cause the depletion of ozone and in 1987, were banned by the Montreal Protocol due to health, safety and environmental concerns. This has now led to the development of new processes in the precision cleaning of aerospace components. An ideal solvent-replacement is non-flammable, environmentally benign, non-corrosive, inexpensive, effective and evaporates completely, leaving no residue. Highlighted is a green precision cleaning process, which is contaminant removal using supercritical carbon dioxide as the environmentally benign solvent. In this process, the contaminant is dissolved in carbon dioxide, and the parts are recovered at the end of the cleaning process completely dry and ready for use. Typical contaminants of aerospace components include hydrocarbon greases, hydraulic fluids, silicone fluids and greases, fluorocarbon fluids and greases and fingerprint oil. Metallic aerospace components range from small nuts and bolts to much larger parts, such as butterfly valves 18 in diameter. A fluorinated grease, Krytox, is investigated as a model contaminant in these preliminary studies, and aluminum coupons are employed as a model aerospace component. Preliminary studies are presented in which the experimental parameters are optimized for removal of Krytox from aluminum coupons in a stirred-batch process. The experimental conditions investigated are temperature, pressure, exposure time and impeller speed. Temperatures of 308 - 423 K, pressures in the range of 8.3 - 41.4 MPa, exposure times between 5 - 60 min and impeller speeds of 0 - 1000 rpm were investigated. Preliminary results showed up to 86 cleaning efficiency with the

  10. Quantitation of buried contamination by use of solvents. [degradation of silicone polymers by amine solvents

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pappas, S. P.; Hsiao, Y. C.; Hill, L. W.

    1973-01-01

    Spore recovery form cured silicone potting compounds using amine solvents to degrade the cured polymers was investigated. A complete list of solvents and a description of the effect of each on two different silicone polymers is provided.

  11. Wide electrochemical window solvents for use in electrochemical devices and electrolyte solutions incorporating such solvents

    DOEpatents

    Angell, Charles Austen; Zhang, Sheng-Shui; Xu, Kang

    1998-01-01

    The present invention relates to electrolyte solvents for use in liquid or rubbery electrolyte solutions. Specifically, this invention is directed to boron-containing electrolyte solvents and boron-containing electrolyte solutions.

  12. Representing Learning Designs--Making Design Explicit and Shareable

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Conole, Grainne; Wills, Sandra

    2013-01-01

    Most teachers' design practice is implicit and practice based, focusing primarily on discipline content. In recent years, a number of visual design representations have emerged that help guide teachers' design practice, enabling them to create explicit designs, which can then be shared and discussed with others. These design representations help…

  13. Measuring Implicit and Explicit Attitudes toward Foreign-Accented Speech

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pantos, Andrew J.

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this research was to investigate the nature of listeners' attitudes toward foreign-accented speech and the manner in which those attitudes are formed. This study measured 165 participants' implicit and explicit attitudes toward US- and foreign-accented audio stimuli. Implicit attitudes were measured with an audio Implicit…

  14. Explicit versus implicit social cognition testing in autism spectrum disorder.

    PubMed

    Callenmark, Björn; Kjellin, Lars; Rönnqvist, Louise; Bölte, Sven

    2014-08-01

    Although autism spectrum disorder is defined by reciprocal social-communication impairments, several studies have found no evidence for altered social cognition test performance. This study examined explicit (i.e. prompted) and implicit (i.e. spontaneous) variants of social cognition testing in autism spectrum disorder. A sample of 19 adolescents with autism spectrum disorder and 19 carefully matched typically developing controls completed the Dewey Story Test. 'Explicit' (multiple-choice answering format) and 'implicit' (free interview) measures of social cognition were obtained. Autism spectrum disorder participants did not differ from controls regarding explicit social cognition performance. However, the autism spectrum disorder group performed more poorly than controls on implicit social cognition performance in terms of spontaneous perspective taking and social awareness. Findings suggest that social cognition alterations in autism spectrum disorder are primarily implicit in nature and that an apparent absence of social cognition difficulties on certain tests using rather explicit testing formats does not necessarily mean social cognition typicality in autism spectrum disorder. PMID:24104519

  15. Are Explicit Apologies Proportional to the Offenses They Address?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heritage, John; Raymond, Chase Wesley

    2016-01-01

    We consider here Goffman's proposal of proportionality between virtual offenses and remedial actions, based on the examination of 102 cases of explicit apologies. To this end, we offer a typology of the primary apology formats within the dataset, together with a broad categorization of the types of virtual offenses to which these apologies are…

  16. Individual Goals and Academic Literacy: Integrating Authenticity and Explicitness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beck, Sarah W.

    2009-01-01

    Finding a way to integrate authentic learning experiences and explicit instruction is essential if teachers are to adapt to the current policy environment while at the same time acknowledging the rights of students to determine their own goals for literacy learning. Toward this end, the author presents a case study of one student's development as…

  17. Challenging Stereotypes about Academic Writing: Complexity, Elaboration, Explicitness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Biber, Douglas; Gray, Bethany

    2010-01-01

    The stereotypical view of professional academic writing is that it is grammatically complex, with elaborated structures, and with meaning relations expressed explicitly. In contrast, spoken registers, especially conversation, are believed to have the opposite characteristics. Our goal in the present paper is to challenge these stereotypes, based…

  18. Implicit Knowledge, Explicit Knowledge, and General Language Proficiency.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Han, Youngju; Ellis, Rod

    1998-01-01

    Explores ways of measuring implicit and explicit second language (L2) knowledge and examines the relationship between these measures and measures of general language proficiency. Factor analysis revealed a two-factor solution, reflecting a clear distinction between measures that incorporated a time constraint and those that did not. (Author/VWL)

  19. Explicit Constructivism: A Missing Link in Ineffective Lectures?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Prakash, E. S.

    2010-01-01

    This study tested the possibility that interactive lectures explicitly based on activating learners' prior knowledge and driven by a series of logical questions might enhance the effectiveness of lectures. A class of 54 students doing the respiratory system course in the second year of the Bachelor of Medicine and Bachelor of Surgery program in my…

  20. General Equilibrium in a Nutshell: An Explicit Function Example.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yunker, James A.

    1998-01-01

    Describes a general equilibrium model that fills the gap between the general function models described in price-theory textbooks and the numerical practice of general equilibrium analysis used in contemporary policy assessment. This model uses explicit mathematical forms but general parameter values. Includes graphs and statistical tables. (MJP)

  1. Effect of explicit dimension instruction on speech category learning

    PubMed Central

    Chandrasekaran, Bharath; Yi, Han-Gyol; Smayda, Kirsten E.; Maddox, W. Todd

    2015-01-01

    Learning non-native speech categories is often considered a challenging task in adulthood. This difficulty is driven by cross-language differences in weighting critical auditory dimensions that differentiate speech categories. For example, previous studies have shown that differentiating Mandarin tonal categories requires attending to dimensions related to pitch height and direction. Relative to native speakers of Mandarin, the pitch direction dimension is under-weighted by native English speakers. In the current study, we examined the effect of explicit instructions (dimension instruction) on native English speakers' Mandarin tone category learning within the framework of a dual-learning systems (DLS) model. This model predicts that successful speech category learning is initially mediated by an explicit, reflective learning system that frequently utilizes unidimensional rules, with an eventual switch to a more implicit, reflexive learning system that utilizes multidimensional rules. Participants were explicitly instructed to focus and/or ignore the pitch height dimension, the pitch direction dimension, or were given no explicit prime. Our results show that instruction instructing participants to focus on pitch direction, and instruction diverting attention away from pitch height resulted in enhanced tone categorization. Computational modeling of participant responses suggested that instruction related to pitch direction led to faster and more frequent use of multidimensional reflexive strategies, and enhanced perceptual selectivity along the previously underweighted pitch direction dimension. PMID:26542400

  2. Explicit versus Implicit Questioning: Inviting All Children to Think Mathematically

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parks, Amy Noelle

    2010-01-01

    Background/Context: Open-ended, or implicit, questioning has been described as central to reform teaching in mathematics. However, concerns about equity have caused some researchers to question whether this kind of teaching is productive for all children. Purpose: This study explores the role that implicit and explicit questions played in…

  3. Reexamining the Role of Explicit Information in Processing Instruction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fernandez, Claudia

    2008-01-01

    The present study sought to observe, through online treatments, whether explicit information assists acquisition in a way that has not been measured in previous processing instruction (PI) studies. Two experiments examined learners' behavior while they processed Spanish sentences with object-verb-subject (OVS) word order and Spanish subjunctive…

  4. Being Explicit about Modeling: A First Person Study in India

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Setty, Rohit Boggarm

    2013-01-01

    In this dissertation, I examine the work involved in teacher educator modeling. In particular, the study is concerned with modeling that aims to explicitly make teaching practices visible, learnable, and that does so in particularly demonstrative ways. One form of this type of modeling is what I term "dialogic modeling." The study…

  5. Explicitly representing soil microbial processes in Earth system models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wieder, William R.; Allison, Steven D.; Davidson, Eric A.; Georgiou, Katerina; Hararuk, Oleksandra; He, Yujie; Hopkins, Francesca; Luo, Yiqi; Smith, Matthew J.; Sulman, Benjamin; Todd-Brown, Katherine; Wang, Ying-Ping; Xia, Jianyang; Xu, Xiaofeng

    2015-10-01

    Microbes influence soil organic matter decomposition and the long-term stabilization of carbon (C) in soils. We contend that by revising the representation of microbial processes and their interactions with the physicochemical soil environment, Earth system models (ESMs) will make more realistic global C cycle projections. Explicit representation of microbial processes presents considerable challenges due to the scale at which these processes occur. Thus, applying microbial theory in ESMs requires a framework to link micro-scale process-level understanding and measurements to macro-scale models used to make decadal- to century-long projections. Here we review the diversity, advantages, and pitfalls of simulating soil biogeochemical cycles using microbial-explicit modeling approaches. We present a roadmap for how to begin building, applying, and evaluating reliable microbial-explicit model formulations that can be applied in ESMs. Drawing from experience with traditional decomposition models, we suggest the following: (1) guidelines for common model parameters and output that can facilitate future model intercomparisons; (2) development of benchmarking and model-data integration frameworks that can be used to effectively guide, inform, and evaluate model parameterizations with data from well-curated repositories; and (3) the application of scaling methods to integrate microbial-explicit soil biogeochemistry modules within ESMs. With contributions across scientific disciplines, we feel this roadmap can advance our fundamental understanding of soil biogeochemical dynamics and more realistically project likely soil C response to environmental change at global scales.

  6. Flexibles Grouping, Explicit Reading Instruction in Elementary School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dubé, France; Dorval, Catherine; Bessette, Lyne

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this collaborative research is to evaluate the impact of a pedagogical intervention that combines flexible grouping and explicit instruction of reading comprehension strategies. The development of competencies is spread over a two years interval. However, despite this quite long implementation period, several Quebec students still…

  7. Explicit versus Implicit Social Cognition Testing in Autism Spectrum Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Callenmark, Björn; Kjellin, Lars; Rönnqvist, Louise; Bölte, Sven

    2014-01-01

    Although autism spectrum disorder is defined by reciprocal social-communication impairments, several studies have found no evidence for altered social cognition test performance. This study examined explicit (i.e. prompted) and implicit (i.e. spontaneous) variants of social cognition testing in autism spectrum disorder. A sample of 19 adolescents…

  8. Explicit Integration of Extremely Stiff Reaction Networks: Asymptotic Methods

    SciTech Connect

    Guidry, Mike W; Budiardja, R.; Feger, E.; Billings, J. J.; Hix, William Raphael; Messer, O.E.B.; Roche, K. J.; McMahon, E.; He, M.

    2013-01-01

    We show that, even for extremely stiff systems, explicit integration may compete in both accuracy and speed with implicit methods if algebraic methods are used to stabilize the numerical integration. The stabilizing algebra differs for systems well removed from equilibrium and those near equilibrium. This paper introduces a quantitative distinction between these two regimes and addresses the former case in depth, presenting explicit asymptotic methods appropriate when the system is extremely stiff but only weakly equilibrated. A second paper [1] examines quasi-steady-state methods as an alternative to asymptotic methods in systems well away from equilibrium and a third paper [2] extends these methods to equilibrium conditions in extremely stiff systems using partial equilibrium methods. All three papers present systematic evidence for timesteps competitive with implicit methods. Because explicit methods can execute a timestep faster than an implicit method, our results imply that algebraically stabilized explicit algorithms may offer a means to integration of larger networks than have been feasible previously in various disciplines.

  9. Beyond Explicit Rule Learning: Automatizing Second Language Morphosyntax.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DeKeyser, Robert M.

    1997-01-01

    Presents a fine-grained analysis of extensive empirical data on the automatization of explicitly learned rules of morphosyntax in a second language. Results indicate that the learning of morphosyntactic rules is highly skill-specific and that these skills develop gradually over time, adhering to the same power function learning curve as the…

  10. "See Translation": Explicit and Implicit Language Policies on Facebook

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hendus, Ulrike

    2015-01-01

    The currently tested "See Translation" button can be considered an expression of Facebook's explicit language policy. It offers the users fast and easy translations of others' status updates and can therefore be seen as diminishing language barriers and reducing the need for a lingua franca in polylingual networks, thus enhancing…

  11. Attention to Explicit and Implicit Contrast in Verb Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Childers, Jane B.; Hirshkowitz, Amy; Benavides, Kristin

    2014-01-01

    Contrast information could be useful for verb learning, but few studies have examined children's ability to use this type of information. Contrast may be useful when children are told explicitly that different verbs apply, or when they hear two different verbs in a single context. Three studies examine children's attention to different…

  12. Explicitly Representing Soil Microbial Processes In Earth System Models

    SciTech Connect

    Wieder, William R.; Allison, Steven D.; Davidson, Eric A.; Georgiou, Katrina; Hararuk, Oleksandra; He, Yujie; Hopkins, Francesca; Luo, Yiqi; Smith, Mathew J.; Sulman, Benjamin; Todd-Brown, Katherine EO; Wang, Ying-Ping; Xia, Jianyang; Xu, Xiaofeng

    2015-10-26

    Microbes influence soil organic matter (SOM) decomposition and the long-term stabilization of carbon (C) in soils. We contend that by revising the representation of microbial processes and their interactions with the physicochemical soil environment, Earth system models (ESMs) may make more realistic global C cycle projections. Explicit representation of microbial processes presents considerable challenges due to the scale at which these processes occur. Thus, applying microbial theory in ESMs requires a framework to link micro-scale process-level understanding and measurements to macro-scale models used to make decadal- to century-long projections. Here, we review the diversity, advantages, and pitfalls of simulating soil biogeochemical cycles using microbial-explicit modeling approaches. We present a roadmap for how to begin building, applying, and evaluating reliable microbial-explicit model formulations that can be applied in ESMs. Drawing from experience with traditional decomposition models we suggest: (1) guidelines for common model parameters and output that can facilitate future model intercomparisons; (2) development of benchmarking and model-data integration frameworks that can be used to effectively guide, inform, and evaluate model parameterizations with data from well-curated repositories; and (3) the application of scaling methods to integrate microbial-explicit soil biogeochemistry modules within ESMs. With contributions across scientific disciplines, we feel this roadmap can advance our fundamental understanding of soil biogeochemical dynamics and more realistically project likely soil C response to environmental change at global scales.

  13. Implicit and Explicit Learning in Individuals with Agrammatic Aphasia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schuchard, Julia; Thompson, Cynthia K.

    2014-01-01

    Implicit learning is a process of acquiring knowledge that occurs without conscious awareness of learning, whereas explicit learning involves the use of overt strategies. To date, research related to implicit learning following stroke has been largely restricted to the motor domain and has rarely addressed implications for language. The present…

  14. Working Towards Explicit Modelling: Experiences of a New Teacher Educator

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    White, Elizabeth

    2011-01-01

    As a new teacher educator of beginner teachers on the Graduate Teacher Programme in a large School of Education in a UK university, I have reflected on how I have been able to develop the effectiveness of modelling good professional practice to student-teachers. In this paper I will present ways in which I have made modelling more explicit, how…

  15. Explicit Code and Comprehension Instruction for English Learners

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Manyak, Patrick C.; Bauer, Eurydice B.

    2008-01-01

    Explicit code and comprehension instruction is important for English learners (ELs), and several key findings from research on young ELs learning to read initially in English can offer guidelines for developing effective code-based instruction for these children. The authors of this column address comprehension instruction for ELs, suggesting…

  16. Implicit and Explicit Recasts in L2 Oral French Interaction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Erlam, Rosemary; Loewen, Shawn

    2010-01-01

    This laboratory-based study of second- and third-year American university students learning French examines the effectiveness of implicit and explicit corrective feedback on noun-adjective agreement errors. The treatment consisted of one hour of interactive tasks. Implicit feedback was operationalized as a single recast with interrogative…

  17. An Explicitly Correlated Wavelet Method for the Electronic Schroedinger Equation

    SciTech Connect

    Bachmayr, Markus

    2010-09-30

    A discretization for an explicitly correlated formulation of the electronic Schroedinger equation based on hyperbolic wavelets and exponential sum approximations of potentials is described, covering mathematical results as well as algorithmic realization, and discussing in particular the potential of methods of this type for parallel computing.

  18. A Framework for Explicit Vocabulary Instruction with English Language Learners

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nisbet, Deanna L.; Tindall, Evie R.

    2015-01-01

    Academic vocabulary development is critical to the success of all learners--particularly English language learners (ELLs). This article presents a framework for integrating explicit academic vocabulary instruction for ELLs into middle school classrooms. The framework embodies five research-based principles and serves as a vehicle for structuring…

  19. Sexually Explicit Media, Gender Differences, and Evolutionary Theory.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Malamuth, Neil M.

    1996-01-01

    Notes that media scholars often resist the use of the evolutionary paradigm. Discusses two problems: an overly simplistic view of evolutionary models; and a distrust of ideological implications. Develops an evolutionary model proposing that gender differences in the consumption of sexually explicit media is, in part, the result of inherited…

  20. The Role of Explicit Need Strength for Emotions during Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flunger, Barbara; Pretsch, Johanna; Schmitt, Manfred; Ludwig, Peter

    2013-01-01

    According to self-determination theory, the satisfaction of the basic needs for autonomy, competence, and relatedness influences achievement emotions and situational interest. The present study investigated whether domain-specific explicit need strength moderated the impact of need satisfaction/dissatisfaction on the outcomes achievement emotions…

  1. Enhancing "Reading Mastery" Programs Using Explicit "Reading to Learn" Formats

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marchand-Martella, Nancy E.; McGlocklin, Linda M.; Miller, Darcey E.; Martella, Ronald C.

    2006-01-01

    Vocabulary and text comprehension strategies are acknowledged as critical components of any comprehensive reading program. This article highlights the scientifically-based research on effective reading instruction related to vocabulary and comprehension development. Specifically, the article provides explicit formats integrating these important…

  2. Explicit- and Implicit Bullying Attitudes in Relation to Bullying Behavior

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van Goethem, Anne A. J.; Scholte, Ron H. J.; Wiers, Reinout W.

    2010-01-01

    The main aim of this study was to examine whether an assessment of implicit bullying attitudes could add to the prediction of bullying behavior after controlling for explicit bullying attitudes. Primary school children (112 boys and 125 girls, M age = 11 years, 5 months) completed two newly developed measures of implicit bullying attitudes (a…

  3. Making the Tacit Explicit: Children's Strategies for Classroom Writing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Silby, Alison; Watts, Mike

    2015-01-01

    A key highlight of this study is generating evidence of children "making aware the unaware", making tacit knowledge explicit. The research explores the levels of awareness in thinking used by eight 7-8 year-old children when engaged in school-based genre writing tasks. The focus is on analysing children's awareness of their thought…

  4. Revising Geology Labs To Explicitly Use the Scientific Method.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hannula, Kimberly A.

    2003-01-01

    Proposes that content- or skill-based labs can be revised to explicitly involve the scientific method by asking students to propose hypotheses before making observations. Students' self-assessment showed they felt that they learned a great deal from this style of labs and found the labs to be fun; however, students felt that they learned little…

  5. Comparing Switch Costs: Alternating Runs and Explicit Cuing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Altmann, Erik M.

    2007-01-01

    The task-switching literature routinely conflates different operational definitions of switch cost, its predominant behavioral measure. This article is an attempt to draw attention to differences between the two most common definitions, alternating-runs switch cost (ARS) and explicit-cuing switch cost (ECS). ARS appears to include both the costs…

  6. Optimizing Language Instruction: Matters of Explicitness, Practice, and Cue Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stafford, Catherine A.; Bowden, Harriet Wood; Sanz, Cristina

    2012-01-01

    Input exposure is essential for nonprimary language learning, but the importance of explicit instruction and corrective feedback continues to be debated. If instruction is required, how might it be optimized in terms of its nature and timing? In this study, 65 Spanish-English bilinguals were introduced to Latin through an interactive computer…

  7. Implicit and Explicit Category Learning by Capuchin Monkeys (Cebus apella)

    PubMed Central

    Smith, J. David; Crossley, Matthew J.; Boomer, Joseph; Church, Barbara A.; Beran, Michael J.; Ashby, F. Gregory

    2012-01-01

    Current theories of human categorization differentiate an explicit, rule-based system of category learning from an implicit system that slowly associates regions of perceptual space with response outputs. The researchers extended this theoretical differentiation to the category learning of New World primates. Four capuchins learned categories of circular sine-wave gratings that varied in bar spatial frequency and orientation. The rule-based and information-integration tasks, respectively, had one-dimensional and two-dimensional solutions. Capuchins, like humans, strongly dimensionalized the stimuli and learned the rule-based task more easily. The results strengthen the suggestion that nonhuman primates have some structural components of humans’ capacity for explicit categorization, which in humans is linked to declarative cognition and consciousness. The results also strengthen the primate contrast to other vertebrate species that may lack the explicit system. Therefore, the results raise important questions about the origins of the explicit categorization system during cognitive evolution and about its overall phylogenetic distribution. PMID:22023264

  8. Effect of explicit dimensional instruction on speech category learning.

    PubMed

    Chandrasekaran, Bharath; Yi, Han-Gyol; Smayda, Kirsten E; Maddox, W Todd

    2016-02-01

    Learning nonnative speech categories is often considered a challenging task in adulthood. This difficulty is driven by cross-language differences in weighting critical auditory dimensions that differentiate speech categories. For example, previous studies have shown that differentiating Mandarin tonal categories requires attending to dimensions related to pitch height and direction. Relative to native speakers of Mandarin, the pitch direction dimension is underweighted by native English speakers. In the current study, we examined the effect of explicit instructions (dimension instruction) on native English speakers' Mandarin tone category learning within the framework of a dual-learning systems (DLS) model. This model predicts that successful speech category learning is initially mediated by an explicit, reflective learning system that frequently utilizes unidimensional rules, with an eventual switch to a more implicit, reflexive learning system that utilizes multidimensional rules. Participants were explicitly instructed to focus and/or ignore the pitch height dimension, the pitch direction dimension, or were given no explicit prime. Our results show that instruction instructing participants to focus on pitch direction, and instruction diverting attention away from pitch height, resulted in enhanced tone categorization. Computational modeling of participant responses suggested that instruction related to pitch direction led to faster and more frequent use of multidimensional reflexive strategies and enhanced perceptual selectivity along the previously underweighted pitch direction dimension. PMID:26542400

  9. Stable explicit schemes for equations of Schroedinger type

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mickens, Ronald E.

    1989-01-01

    A method for constructing explicit finite-difference schemes which can be used to solve Schroedinger-type partial-differential equations is presented. A forward Euler scheme that is conditionally stable is given by the procedure. The results presented are based on the analysis of the simplest Schroedinger type equation.

  10. Dry Martini, a coarse-grained force field for lipid membrane simulations with implicit solvent.

    PubMed

    Arnarez, Clément; Uusitalo, Jaakko J; Masman, Marcelo F; Ingólfsson, Helgi I; de Jong, Djurre H; Melo, Manuel N; Periole, Xavier; de Vries, Alex H; Marrink, Siewert J

    2015-01-13

    Coarse-grained (CG) models allow simulation of larger systems for longer times by decreasing the number of degrees of freedom compared with all-atom models. Here we introduce an implicit-solvent version of the popular CG Martini model, nicknamed "Dry" Martini. To account for the omitted solvent degrees of freedom, the nonbonded interaction matrix underlying the Martini force field was reparametrized. The Dry Martini force field reproduces relatively well a variety of lipid membrane properties such as area per lipid, bilayer thickness, bending modulus, and coexistence of liquid-ordered and disordered domains. Furthermore, we show that the new model can be applied to study membrane fusion and tether formation, with results similar to those of the standard Martini model. Membrane proteins can also be included, but less quantitative results are obtained. The absence of water in Dry Martini leads to a significant speedup for large systems, opening the way to the study of complex multicomponent membranes containing millions of lipids. PMID:26574224

  11. Simulations of the folding/unfolding of biomolecules under solvent, and pressure perturbations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia, Angel

    2012-02-01

    Proteins exhibit marginal stability, determined by the balance of many competing effects. This stability can be perturbed by changes in temperature, pH, pressure, and other solvent conditions. Osmolytes are small organic compounds that modulate the conformational equilibrium, folded (F) and unfolded (U), of proteins as cosolvents. Protecting osmolytes such as trimethylamine N-oxide (TMAO), glycerol, and sugars that push the equilibrium toward F play a crucial role in maintaining the function of intracellular proteins in extreme environmental conditions. Urea is a denaturing osmolyte that shifts the equilibrium toward U. We will describe calculations of the reversible folding/unfolding equilibrium, under various solution conditions that include urea, high pressure, and different charge states of the Trp-cage miniprotein. The folding/unfolding equilibrium is studied using all-atom Replica exchange MD simulations. For urea, the simulations capture the experimentally observed linear dependence of unfolding free energy on urea concentration. We find that the denaturation is driven by favorable direct interaction of urea with the protein through both electrostatic and van der Waals forces and quantify their contribution. Though the magnitude of direct electrostatic interaction of urea is larger than van der Waals, the difference between unfolded and folded ensembles is dominated by the van der Waals interaction. We also find that hydrogen bonding of urea to the peptide backbone does not play a dominant role in denaturation. The unfolded ensemble sampled depends on urea concentration, with greater urea concentration favoring conformations with greater solvent exposure.

  12. DFT solvation studies of carbohydrates: implicit and explicit solvation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Solvents play a role in carbohydrate structure. Therefore, it is important to include solvation effects in calculations to allow a more realistic comparison with experimental data. A possible way to include solvation effects is to use implicit solvation models such as COSMO and PCM. Another avenu...

  13. SOLVENT RECOVERY AT VANDENBERG AIR FORCE BASE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report gives results of a feasibility study of the addition of vapor recovery and solvent purification equipment for Vandenberg Air Force Base (VAFB) to reuse the large quantities of waste solvent generated in space shuttle preparation operations. (NOTE: Operation of VAFB as ...

  14. Green chemicals: Searching for cleaner solvents

    SciTech Connect

    Lucas, A.

    1994-10-05

    While increased pressure from EPA has solvents producers scrambling to find greener alternatives, many say the cost effectiveness and performance characteristics of traditional technologies are such that they will not disappear quickly. Though a variety of alternative {open_quotes}green{close_quotes} solvents have been developed and commercialized, better means of solvent recovery have also come along, ensuring continued use of many organic solvents. The 1990 Clean Air Act (CAA), designed to eliminate volatile organic compounds (VOCs), ozone depleters, and other hazardous air pollutants (HAPs), has put limits on many organic solvents. Those most under fire are chlorinated solvents, such as methylene chloride, 1,1,1 trichloroethylene (methyl chloroform), and chlorofluorocarbon (CFC)-113. Producers have been developing a variety of lower VOC solvents to replace those being phased out or regulated. Among those likely to experience most growth are aliphatic hydrocarbons to replace chlorinated solvents in cleaning applications. Growth is also expected for alcohols, esters, and glycol ethers for other end-use applications.

  15. Remediating pesticide contaminated soils using solvent extraction

    SciTech Connect

    Sahle-Demessie, E.; Meckes, M.C.; Richardson, T.L.

    1996-12-31

    Bench-scale solvent extraction studies were performed on soil samples obtained from a Superfund site contaminated with high levels of p,p{prime}-DDT, p,p{prime}-DDE and toxaphene. The effectiveness of the solvent extraction process was assessed using methanol and 2-propanol as solvents over a wide range of operating conditions. It was demonstrated that a six-stage methanol extraction using a solvent-to-soil ratio of 1.6 can decrease pesticide levels in the soil by more than 99% and reduce the volume of material requiring further treatment by 25 times or more. The high solubility of the pesticides in methanol resulted in rapid extraction rates, with the system reaching quasi-equilibrium state in 30 minutes. The extraction efficiency was influenced by the number of extraction stages, the solvent-to-soil ratio, and the soil moisture content. Various methods were investigated to regenerate and recycle the solvent. Evaporation and solvent stripping are low cost and reliable methods for removing high pesticide concentrations from the solvent. For low concentrations, GAC adsorption may be used. Precipitating and filtering pesticides by adding water to the methanol/pesticide solution was not successful when tested with soil extracts. 26 refs., 10 figs., 6 tabs.

  16. SOLVENT-FREE ORGANIC SYNTHESES USING MICROWAVES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The latest results on microwave-expedited solvent-free approach as applied to the assembly of organic molecules will be presented. The salient features of this expeditious methodology such as solvent conservation and ease of manipulation etc. will be described in the context of r...

  17. Solvation of rhodamine575 in some solvents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, Amit

    2016-05-01

    FTIR spectra of Rhodamine575 dye in powder form and in different solvents are reported. Positions of some of the observed FTIR bands show noticeable change in solvents. The bands, which shift, have contributions from the vibrational motion of nitrogen atoms of the ethylamine groups, oxygen atom of the carboxylic group attached to the phenyl ring and oxygen atom of the Xanthene ring.

  18. Improved Supercritical-Solvent Extraction of Coal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Compton, L.

    1982-01-01

    Raw coal upgraded by supercritical-solvent extraction system that uses two materials instead of one. System achieved extraction yields of 20 to 49 weight percent. Single-solvent yields are about 25 weight percent. Experimental results show extraction yields may be timedependent. Observed decreases in weight of coal agreed well with increases in ash content of residue.

  19. Supercritical-Multiple-Solvent Extraction From Coal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Corcoran, W.; Fong, W.; Pichaichanarong, P.; Chan, P.; Lawson, D.

    1983-01-01

    Large and small molecules dissolve different constituents. Experimental apparatus used to test supercritical extraction of hydrogen rich compounds from coal in various organic solvents. In decreasing order of importance, relevant process parameters were found to be temperature, solvent type, pressure, and residence time.

  20. Coal mining with a liquid solvent

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lawson, D. D.; Miller, C. G.

    1979-01-01

    Study suggests carbonated water can dissolve or suspend coal and carry it to surface. Mixture of carbon dioxide and water may be coal solvent that will make unmanned mining reality. When used with proposed process monitoring coal solubility with conventional strain gage, solvent is basis for rapid cost effective extraction of coal from underground seams.

  1. REMEDIATION OF CONTAMINATED SOILS BY SOLVENT FLUSHING

    EPA Science Inventory

    Solvent flushing is a potential technique for remediating a waste disposal/spill site contaminated with organic chemicals. This technique involves the injection of a solvent mixture (e.g., water plus alcohols) that enhances contaminant solubility, reduces the retardation factor, ...

  2. Classification of Solvents according to Interaction Mechanisms.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ahmed, Wasi

    1979-01-01

    Presented is a model for solvent effects based on the observation that the excitation energy of all-trans-N-Retinylidenmethyl-n-butylammonium iodide is directly related to the dielectric constant of a series of aromatic and aliphatic solvents as the dielectric constant (e) ranges from 2 to 10.5. (BT)

  3. REMEDIATING PESTICIDE CONTAMINATED SOILS USING SOLVENT EXTRACTION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Bench-scale solvent extraction studies were performed on soil samples obtained from a Superfund site contaminated with high levels of p,p'-DDT, p,p'-DDD,, p,p'-DDE and toxaphene. The effectiveness of the solvent extraction process was assessed using methanol and 2-propanol as sol...

  4. Pneumatic conveying of pulverized solvent refined coal

    DOEpatents

    Lennon, Dennis R.

    1984-11-06

    A method for pneumatically conveying solvent refined coal to a burner under conditions of dilute phase pneumatic flow so as to prevent saltation of the solvent refined coal in the transport line by maintaining the transport fluid velocity above approximately 95 ft/sec.

  5. Lube solvents no threat to waste treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Rowe, E.H.; Tullos, L.F.

    1980-10-01

    Biological treatment of reasonable loads of lubricating oil extraction solvents should pose no problems for a diversified refinery treatment system. Activated sludge, aerated lagoons, or oxidation ponds are the most frequently employed biological processes for treating such wastes. Rates of solvent degradation are reported for phenol and furfural.

  6. A spreadsheet algorithm for stagewise solvent extraction

    SciTech Connect

    Leonard, R.A.; Regalbuto, M.C.

    1993-01-01

    Part of the novelty is the way in which the problem is organized in the spreadsheet. In addition, to facilitate spreadsheet setup, a new calculational procedure has been developed. The resulting Spreadsheet Algorithm for Stagewise Solvent Extraction (SASSE) can be used with either IBM or Macintosh personal computers as a simple yet powerful tool for analyzing solvent extraction flowsheets.

  7. SOLVENT DESIGN UNDER VARYING ENVIRONMENTAL REQUIREMENTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    There is currently a great need to replace many solvents that are commonly used by industry and the public, but whose continued use entails a number of human health and environmental risks. One issue hampering solvent replacement is the general thought that replacement, particul...

  8. ENHANCED PROCESSING OF GREEN SOLVENTS - PHASE I

    EPA Science Inventory

    Solvents are a valuable processing tool in the chemical and related industries. Solvents are used to enhance mass transfer, heat transfer and in most cases are a processing aid and eventually are not used in the final product but to enhance the fabrication of the final pr...

  9. Structure of the polymer-solvent interface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miles, Danny G., Jr.; Schmidt, James W.

    1990-01-01

    The first measurements of ellipticities from the liquid-liquid interface between polymer and solvent mixtures near their consolute points are reported. When scaled according to theory the ellipticities of high molecular weight polystyrene + solvent mixtures are consistent with those from simple, low molecular weight mixtures. The universal value of the scaled ellipticity is approximately 20 percent lower than that predicted by present theories.

  10. EXPERIENCES IN DESIGNING SOLVENTS FOR THE ENVIRONMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    Solvents used throughout industry are chosen to meet specific technological requirements such as solute solubility, cleaning and degreasing, or being a medium for paints and coatings. With the increasing awareness of the human health effects and environmental tisks of solvent use...

  11. EXPERIENCES IN DESIGNING SOLVENTS FOR THE ENVIRONMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    Solvents used throughout industry are chosen to meet specific technological requirements such as solute solubility, cleaning and degreasing, or being a medium for paints and coatings. With the increasing awareness of the human health effects and environmental risks of solvent use...

  12. METHOD FOR SOLVENT-ISOSTATIC PRESSING

    DOEpatents

    Archibald, P.B.

    1962-09-18

    This invention provides a method for producing densely compacted bodies having relatively large dimensions. The method comprises the addition of a small quantity of a suitable solvent to a powder which is to be compacted. The solvent- moistened powder is placed inside a flexible bag, and the bag is suspended in an isostatic press. The solvent is squeezed out of the powder by the isostatic pressure, and the resulting compacted body is recovered. The presence of the solvent markedly decreases the proportion of void space in the powder, thereby resulting in a denser, more homogeneous compact. Another effect of the solvent is that it allows the isostatic pressing operation to be conducted at substantially lower pressures than are conventionally employed. (AEC)

  13. Organic solvent regeneration of granular activated carbon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cross, W. H.; Suidan, M. T.; Roller, M. A.; Kim, B. R.; Gould, J. P.

    1982-09-01

    The use of activated carbon for the treatment of industrial waste-streams was shown to be an effective treatment. The high costs associated with the replacement or thermal regeneration of the carbon have prohibited the economic feasibility of this process. The in situ solvent regeneration of activated carbon by means of organic solvent extraction was suggested as an economically alternative to thermal regeneration. The important aspects of the solvent regeneration process include: the physical and chemical characteristics of the adsorbent, the pore size distribution and energy of adsorption associated with the activated carbon; the degree of solubility of the adsorbate in the organic solvent; the miscibility of the organic solvent in water; and the temperature at which the generation is performed.

  14. Stabilization of Underground Solvent Storage Tanks

    SciTech Connect

    Smail, T.R.

    2003-08-15

    The Old Solvent Tanks (OST), located at the Savannah River Site (SRS) are comprised of 22 underground storage tanks that were used to store spent radioactive solvent and aqueous wastes generated from the plutonium-uranium extraction (PUREX) process. The OSTs were installed at various dates between 1955 and 1968 and used to store the spent solvents until 1974. The spent solvents stored in the OSTs were transferred out from 1976 through 1981 leaving only residual liquids and sludges that could not be pumped out.Final remediation goals include an overlying infiltration control system. If the tanks were to structurally fail, they would collapse causing potential for onsite worker exposure and release of tank contents to the environment. Therefore, as an interim action, methods for stabilizing the tanks were evaluated. This paper will discuss the systems designed to perform and monitor the grouting operation, the grouting process, and the radiological controls and wastes associated with grouting the Old Solvent Tanks.

  15. SOLVENT DISPERSION AND FLOW METER CALCULATION RESULTS

    SciTech Connect

    Nash, C.; Fondeur, F.; Peters, T.

    2013-06-21

    Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) found that the dispersion numbers for the six combinations of CSSX:Next Generation Solvent (NGS) “blend” and pure NGS versus salt solution, caustic wash, and strip aqueous solutions are all good. The dispersion numbers are indications of processability with centrifugal contactors. A comparison of solvent physical and thermal properties shows that the Intek™ solvent flow meter in the plant has a reading biased high versus calibrated flow when NGS is used, versus the standard CSSX solvent. The flow meter, calibrated for CSSX solvent, is predicted to read 2.8 gpm of NGS in a case where the true flow of NGS is 2.16 gpm.

  16. Toxic hepatitis in occupational exposure to solvents

    PubMed Central

    Malaguarnera, Giulia; Cataudella, Emanuela; Giordano, Maria; Nunnari, Giuseppe; Chisari, Giuseppe; Malaguarnera, Mariano

    2012-01-01

    The liver is the main organ responsible for the metabolism of drugs and toxic chemicals, and so is the primary target organ for many organic solvents. Work activities with hepatotoxins exposures are numerous and, moreover, organic solvents are used in various industrial processes. Organic solvents used in different industrial processes may be associated with hepatotoxicity. Several factors contribute to liver toxicity; among these are: species differences, nutritional condition, genetic factors, interaction with medications in use, alcohol abuse and interaction, and age. This review addresses the mechanisms of hepatotoxicity. The main pathogenic mechanisms responsible for functional and organic damage caused by solvents are: inflammation, dysfunction of cytochrome P450, mitochondrial dysfunction and oxidative stress. The health impact of exposure to solvents in the workplace remains an interesting and worrying question for professional health work. PMID:22719183

  17. Small molecule solvation changes due to the presence of salt are governed by the cost of solvent cavity formation and dispersion.

    PubMed

    Li, Libo; Fennell, Christopher J; Dill, Ken A

    2014-12-14

    We are interested in the free energies of transferring nonpolar solutes into aqueous NaCl solutions with salt concentrations upwards of 2 M, the Hofmeister regime. We use the semi-explicit assembly (SEA) computational model to represent these electrolyte solutions. We find good agreement with experiments (Setschenow coefficients) on 43 nonpolar and polar solutes and with TIP3P explicit-solvent simulations. Besides being much faster than explicit solvent calculations, SEA is more accurate than the PB models we tested, successfully capturing even subtle salt effects in both the polar and nonpolar components of solvation. We find that the salt effects are mainly due to changes in the cost of forming nonpolar cavities in aqueous NaCl solutions, and not mainly due to solute-ion electrostatic interactions. PMID:25494789

  18. Hydrocarbon-solvent based cleaners as replacements for chlorinated and CFC solvents

    SciTech Connect

    Schreiner, J.L.; Berlin, E.P.

    1995-12-31

    Chlorinated and CFC solvents have been used for about 30 years to remove various contaminants from products during the manufacturing process. Among the contaminants being removed are oils, greases, and waxes that have petroleum products as the base. Prior to the advent of the chlorinated solvents petroleum distillates were used for these cleaning operations. Processing improvements over the past 30 years now permit production of higher purity hydrocarbons solvents that can be used as replacements for the chlorinated and CFC solvents being phased out. These hydrocarbon solvents are well suited for removal of the various petroleum based contaminants, as one recalls the old adage {open_quotes}like dissolves like.{close_quotes}

  19. PARIS II: Computer Aided Solvent Design for Pollution Prevention

    EPA Science Inventory

    This product is a summary of U.S. EPA researchers' work developing the solvent substitution software tool PARIS II (Program for Assisting the Replacement of Industrial Solvents, version 2.0). PARIS II finds less toxic solvents or solvent mixtures to replace more toxic solvents co...

  20. Predicting the Solubility of Pharmaceutical Cocrystals in Solvent/Anti-Solvent Mixtures.

    PubMed

    Lange, Linda; Heisel, Stefan; Sadowski, Gabriele

    2016-01-01

    In this work, the solubilities of pharmaceutical cocrystals in solvent/anti-solvent systems were predicted using PC-SAFT in order to increase the efficiency of cocrystal formation processes. Modeling results and experimental data were compared for the cocrystal system nicotinamide/succinic acid (2:1) in the solvent/anti-solvent mixtures ethanol/water, ethanol/acetonitrile and ethanol/ethyl acetate at 298.15 K and in the ethanol/ethyl acetate mixture also at 310.15 K. The solubility of the investigated cocrystal slightly increased when adding small amounts of anti-solvent to the solvent, but drastically decreased for high anti-solvent amounts. Furthermore, the solubilities of nicotinamide, succinic acid and the cocrystal in the considered solvent/anti-solvent mixtures showed strong deviations from ideal-solution behavior. However, by accounting for the thermodynamic non-ideality of the components, PC-SAFT is able to predict the solubilities in all above-mentioned solvent/anti-solvent systems in good agreement with the experimental data. PMID:27164075

  1. Charge stabilization in nonpolar solvents.

    PubMed

    Hsu, M F; Dufresne, E R; Weitz, D A

    2005-05-24

    While the important role of electrostatic interactions in aqueous colloidal suspensions is widely known and reasonably well-understood, their relevance to nonpolar suspensions remains mysterious. We measure the interaction potentials of colloidal particles in a nonpolar solvent with reverse micelles. We find surprisingly strong electrostatic interactions characterized by surface potentials, |ezeta|, from 2.0 to 4.4 k(B)T and screening lengths, kappa(-1), from 0.2 to 1.4 microm. Interactions depend on the concentration of reverse micelles and the degree of confinement. Furthermore, when the particles are weakly confined, the values of |ezeta| and kappa extracted from interaction measurements are consistent with bulk measurements of conductivity and electrophoretic mobility. A simple thermodynamic model, relating the structure of the micelles to the equilibrium ionic strength, is in good agreement with both conductivity and interaction measurements. Since dissociated ions are solubilized by reverse micelles, the entropic incentive to charge a particle surface is qualitatively changed from aqueous systems, and surface entropy plays an important role. PMID:15896027

  2. Implicit versus explicit momentum relaxation time solution for semiconductor nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marin, E. G.; Ruiz, F. G.; Godoy, A.; Tienda-Luna, I. M.; Gámiz, F.

    2015-07-01

    We discuss the necessity of the exact implicit Momentum Relaxation Time (MRT) solution of the Boltzmann transport equation in order to achieve reliable carrier mobility results in semiconductor nanowires. Firstly, the implicit solution for a 1D electron gas with a isotropic bandstructure is presented resulting in the formulation of a simple matrix system. Using this solution as a reference, the explicit approach is demonstrated to be inaccurate for the calculation of inelastic anisotropic mechanisms such as polar optical phonons, characteristic of III-V materials. Its validity for elastic and isotropic mechanisms is also evaluated. Finally, the implications of the MRT explicit approach inaccuracies on the total mobility of Si and III-V NWs are studied.

  3. Implicit versus explicit momentum relaxation time solution for semiconductor nanowires

    SciTech Connect

    Marin, E. G. Ruiz, F. G. Godoy, A. Tienda-Luna, I. M.; Gámiz, F.

    2015-07-14

    We discuss the necessity of the exact implicit Momentum Relaxation Time (MRT) solution of the Boltzmann transport equation in order to achieve reliable carrier mobility results in semiconductor nanowires. Firstly, the implicit solution for a 1D electron gas with a isotropic bandstructure is presented resulting in the formulation of a simple matrix system. Using this solution as a reference, the explicit approach is demonstrated to be inaccurate for the calculation of inelastic anisotropic mechanisms such as polar optical phonons, characteristic of III-V materials. Its validity for elastic and isotropic mechanisms is also evaluated. Finally, the implications of the MRT explicit approach inaccuracies on the total mobility of Si and III-V NWs are studied.

  4. Explicitly correlated multireference configuration interaction: MRCI-F12

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shiozaki, Toru; Knizia, Gerald; Werner, Hans-Joachim

    2011-01-01

    An internally contracted multireference configuration interaction is developed which employs wave functions that explicitly depend on the electron-electron distance (MRCI-F12). This MRCI-F12 method has the same applicability as the MRCI method, while having much improved basis-set convergence with little extra computational cost. The F12b approximation is used to arrive at a computationally efficient implementation. The MRCI-F12 method is applied to the singlet-triplet separation of methylene, the dissociation energy of ozone, properties of diatomic molecules, and the reaction barrier and exothermicity of the F + H{}_2 reaction. These examples demonstrate that already with basis sets of moderate size the method provides near complete basis set MRCI accuracy, and hence quantitative agreement with the experimental data. As a side product, we have also implemented the explicitly correlated multireference averaged coupled pair functional method (MRACPF-F12).

  5. Explicitly correlated multireference configuration interaction: MRCI-F12.

    PubMed

    Shiozaki, Toru; Knizia, Gerald; Werner, Hans-Joachim

    2011-01-21

    An internally contracted multireference configuration interaction is developed which employs wave functions that explicitly depend on the electron-electron distance (MRCI-F12). This MRCI-F12 method has the same applicability as the MRCI method, while having much improved basis-set convergence with little extra computational cost. The F12b approximation is used to arrive at a computationally efficient implementation. The MRCI-F12 method is applied to the singlet-triplet separation of methylene, the dissociation energy of ozone, properties of diatomic molecules, and the reaction barrier and exothermicity of the F + H(2) reaction. These examples demonstrate that already with basis sets of moderate size the method provides near complete basis set MRCI accuracy, and hence quantitative agreement with the experimental data. As a side product, we have also implemented the explicitly correlated multireference averaged coupled pair functional method (MRACPF-F12). PMID:21261336

  6. Approximate explicit analytic solution of the Elenbaas-Heller equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liao, Meng-Ran; Li, Hui; Xia, Wei-Dong

    2016-08-01

    The Elenbaas-Heller equation describing the temperature field of a cylindrically symmetrical non-radiative electric arc has been solved, and approximate explicit analytic solutions are obtained. The radial distributions of the heat-flux potential and the electrical conductivity have been figured out briefly by using some special simplification techniques. The relations between both the core heat-flux potential and the electric field with the total arc current have also been given in several easy explicit formulas. Besides, the special voltage-ampere characteristic of electric arcs is explained intuitionally by a simple expression involving the Lambert W-function. The analyses also provide a preliminary estimation of the Joule heating per unit length, which has been verified in previous investigations. Helium arc is used to examine the theories, and the results agree well with the numerical computations.

  7. On explicit algebraic stress models for complex turbulent flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gatski, T. B.; Speziale, C. G.

    1992-01-01

    Explicit algebraic stress models that are valid for three-dimensional turbulent flows in noninertial frames are systematically derived from a hierarchy of second-order closure models. This represents a generalization of the model derived by Pope who based his analysis on the Launder, Reece, and Rodi model restricted to two-dimensional turbulent flows in an inertial frame. The relationship between the new models and traditional algebraic stress models -- as well as anistropic eddy visosity models -- is theoretically established. The need for regularization is demonstrated in an effort to explain why traditional algebraic stress models have failed in complex flows. It is also shown that these explicit algebraic stress models can shed new light on what second-order closure models predict for the equilibrium states of homogeneous turbulent flows and can serve as a useful alternative in practical computations.

  8. An implicit-explicit Eulerian Godunov scheme for compressible flow

    SciTech Connect

    Collins, J.P.; Colella, P.; Glaz, H.M.

    1995-02-01

    A hybrid implicit-explicit scheme is developed for Eulerian hydrodynamics. The hybridization is a continuous switch and operates on each characteristic field separately. The explicit scheme is a version of the second-order Geodunov scheme; the implicit method is only first-order accurate in time but leads to a block tridiagonal matrix inversion for efficiency and is unconditionally stable for the case of linear advection. The methodology is described for the cases of linear advection, for nonlinear scalar problems, and for gas dynamics. An important element of our work is the use of a modified Engquist-Osher flux function in place of the Godunov flux. Several numerical results are presented to demonstrate the properties of the method, especially stable numerical shocks at very high CFL numbers and second-order accurate steady states. 24 refs., 6 figs., 2 tabs.

  9. Discrepancies between implicit and explicit motivation and unhealthy eating behavior.

    PubMed

    Job, Veronika; Oertig, Daniela; Brandstätter, Veronika; Allemand, Mathias

    2010-08-01

    Many people change their eating behavior as a consequence of stress. One source of stress is intrapersonal psychological conflict as caused by discrepancies between implicit and explicit motives. In the present research, we examined whether eating behavior is related to this form of stress. Study 1 (N=53), a quasi-experimental study in the lab, showed that the interaction between the implicit achievement motive disposition and explicit commitment toward an achievement task significantly predicts the number of snacks consumed in a consecutive taste test. In cross-sectional Study 2 (N=100), with a sample of middle-aged women, overall motive discrepancy was significantly related to diverse indices of unsettled eating. Regression analyses revealed interaction effects specifically for power and achievement motivation and not for affiliation. Emotional distress further partially mediated the relationship between the overall motive discrepancy and eating behavior. PMID:20545817

  10. Rate Constant and Reaction Coordinate of Trp-Cage Folding in Explicit Water

    PubMed Central

    Juraszek, Jarek; Bolhuis, Peter G.

    2008-01-01

    We report rate constant calculations and a reaction coordinate analysis of the rate-limiting folding and unfolding process of the Trp-cage mini-protein in explicit solvent using transition interface sampling. Previous transition path sampling simulations revealed that in this (un)folding process the protein maintains its compact configuration, while a (de)increase of secondary structure is observed. The calculated folding rate agrees reasonably with experiment, while the unfolding rate is 10 times higher. We discuss possible origins for this mismatch. We recomputed the rates with the forward flux sampling method, and found a discrepancy of four orders of magnitude, probably caused by the method's higher sensitivity to the choice of order parameter with respect to transition interface sampling. Finally, we used the previously computed transition path-sampling ensemble to screen combinations of many order parameters for the best model of the reaction coordinate by employing likelihood maximization. We found that a combination of the root mean-square deviation of the helix and of the entire protein was, of the set of tried order parameters, the one that best describes the reaction coordination. PMID:18676648

  11. Explicit photochemical mechanism for atmospheric oxidation of n-butane

    SciTech Connect

    Wen, L.

    1992-01-01

    Alkanes, being an important component of atmosphere, serve as precursors to ozone formation in urban and rural air masses. An explicit photochemical oxidation mechanism for n-butane, which is the major hydrocarbon component of automobile exhaust, is created in this work. The yields of organic nitrates from n-butane, n-pentane, and methyl ethyl ketone photooxidations were studied in Teflon bag and smog chamber experiments. Comparing with the expression currently using the most atmospheric model studies, the total butyl nitrates yield obtained in this work is about 36% lower, and the ratio of primary to secondary butyl nitrates is slightly higher. It is shown in this work that the yields of hydroxyl and carbonyl butyl nitrates are very low, and can be ignored in the explicit photochemical mechanisms. The explicit photochemical oxidation mechanism for methyl ethyl ketone (MEK) was created first because it is the major product from photooxidation of n-butane. The explicit photochemical oxidation mechanism for n-butane, created later, draws on the MEK mechanism. The mechanisms were tested by comparing model predictions with experimental observations from smog chamber experiments. The comparisons were conducted for species which had experimental observation data, such as O[sub 3], NO, and NO[sub 2], n-butane, MEK, organic nitrates, and aldehydes species. The sixteen smog chamber experiments, used in model simulations, were conducted during 1978 to 1992. The mechanisms are mainly based on the available kinetic data in literature and the experimental result in this work. The rate constants for some reactions in the mechanisms were adjusted to make a better fit with the experimental observations. These reactions were: reaction of OH and n-butane to form secondary butyl peroxy radical, decomposition of secondary butoxy radical, and reaction of OH and MEK.

  12. An explicit realization of fractional statistics in one dimension

    SciTech Connect

    Sree Ranjani, S. Panigrahi, P.K. Kapoor, A.K. Khare, A.

    2009-05-15

    An explicit realization of anyons is provided, using the three-body Calogero model. The fact that in the coupling domain, -1/4

  13. Exact and explicit solitary wave solutions to some nonlinear equations

    SciTech Connect

    Jiefang Zhang

    1996-08-01

    Exact and explicit solitary wave solutions are obtained for some physically interesting nonlinear evolutions and wave equations in physics and other fields by using a special transformation. These equations include the KdV-Burgers equation, the MKdV-Burgers equation, the combined KdV-MKdV equation, the Newell-Whitehead equation, the dissipative {Phi}{sup 4}-model equation, the generalized Fisher equation, and the elastic-medium wave equation.

  14. Modeling the Explicit Chemistry of Anthropogenic and Biogenic Organic Aerosols

    SciTech Connect

    Madronich, Sasha

    2015-12-09

    The atmospheric burden of Secondary Organic Aerosols (SOA) remains one of the most important yet uncertain aspects of the radiative forcing of climate. This grant focused on improving our quantitative understanding of SOA formation and evolution, by developing, applying, and improving a highly detailed model of atmospheric organic chemistry, the Generation of Explicit Chemistry and Kinetics of Organics in the Atmosphere (GECKO-A) model. Eleven (11) publications have resulted from this grant.

  15. Explicit Low-Thrust Guidance for Reference Orbit Targeting

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lam, Try; Udwadia, Firdaus E.

    2013-01-01

    The problem of a low-thrust spacecraft controlled to a reference orbit is addressed in this paper. A simple and explicit low-thrust guidance scheme with constrained thrust magnitude is developed by combining the fundamental equations of motion for constrained systems from analytical dynamics with a Lyapunov-based method. Examples are given for a spacecraft controlled to a reference trajectory in the circular restricted three body problem.

  16. NFFLOW: A reservoir simulator incorporating explicit fractures (SPE 153890)

    SciTech Connect

    Boyle, E.J.; Sams, W.N.

    2012-01-01

    NFFLOW is a research code that quickly and inexpensively simulates flow in moderately fractured reservoirs. It explicitly recognizes fractures separately from rock matrix. In NFFLOW fracture flow is proportional to the pressure gradient along the fracture, and flow in the rock matrix is determined by Darcy’s Law. The two flow mechanisms are coupled through the pressure gradient between a fracture and its adjacent rock matrix. Presented is a promising change to NFFLOW that allows for flow across a rock matrix block.

  17. Explicitly correlated wave function for a boron atom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puchalski, Mariusz; Komasa, Jacek; Pachucki, Krzysztof

    2015-12-01

    We present results of high-precision calculations for a boron atom's properties using wave functions expanded in the explicitly correlated Gaussian basis. We demonstrate that the well-optimized 8192 basis functions enable a determination of energy levels, ionization potential, and fine and hyperfine splittings in atomic transitions with nearly parts per million precision. The results open a window to a spectroscopic determination of nuclear properties of boron including the charge radius of the proton halo in the 8B nucleus.

  18. Explicit memory, procedural learning and lexical priming in Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Deweer, B; Ergis, A M; Fossati, P; Pillon, B; Boller, F; Agid, Y; Dubois, B

    1994-03-01

    Different aspects of memory functions were studied in two groups of patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD) and in normal elderly controls. The tests included: explicit memory tests with free and cued recall, and recognition measures; learning of a motor skill; learning of a perceptual skill with verbal material; a priming task with the word stem completion paradigm. The data confirmed that, besides severe impairment for all measures of explicit memory, AD patients were able to learn and retain normally a motor skill in the rotor pursuit task, even across a long retention interval. Moreover, sparing of procedural learning was not restricted to motor tasks, since patients learned normally a mirror-reading task, demonstrating (a) rapid acquisition of the procedure, and (b) acquisition of item-specific information for repeated words. This last effect is accounted for in terms of repetition priming effects rather than of explicit memory strategies, since patients had also normal repetition effect in the word stem completion paradigm. PMID:8004981

  19. Explicit Integration of Extremely Stiff Reaction Networks: Partial Equilibrium Methods

    SciTech Connect

    Guidry, Mike W; Billings, J. J.; Hix, William Raphael

    2013-01-01

    In two preceding papers [1,2] we have shown that, when reaction networks are well removed from equilibrium, explicit asymptotic and quasi-steady-state approximations can give algebraically stabilized integration schemes that rival standard implicit methods in accuracy and speed for extremely stiff systems. However, we also showed that these explicit methods remain accurate but are no longer competitive in speed as the network approaches equilibrium. In this paper we analyze this failure and show that it is associated with the presence of fast equilibration timescales that neither asymptotic nor quasi-steady-state approximations are able to remove efficiently from the numerical integration. Based on this understanding, we develop a partial equilibrium method to deal effectively with the new partial equilibrium methods, give an integration scheme that plausibly can deal with the stiffest networks, even in the approach to equilibrium, with accuracy and speed competitive with that of implicit methods. Thus we demonstrate that algebraically stabilized explicit methods may offer alternatives to implicit integration of even extremely stiff systems, and that these methods may permit integration of much larger networks than have been feasible previously in a variety of fields.

  20. Depth migration in transversely isotropic media with explicit operators

    SciTech Connect

    Uzcategui, O.

    1994-12-01

    The author presents and analyzes three approaches to calculating explicit two-dimensional (2D) depth-extrapolation filters for all propagation modes (P, SV, and SH) in transversely isotropic media with vertical and tilted axis of symmetry. These extrapolation filters are used to do 2D poststack depth migration, and also, just as for isotropic media, these 2D filters are used in the McClellan transformation to do poststack 3D depth migration. Furthermore, the same explicit filters can also be used to do depth-extrapolation of prestack data. The explicit filters are derived by generalizations of three different approaches: the modified Taylor series, least-squares, and minimax methods initially developed for isotropic media. The examples here show that the least-squares and minimax methods produce filters with accurate extrapolation (measured in the ability to position steep reflectors) for a wider range of propagation angles than that obtained using the modified Taylor series method. However, for low propagation angles, the modified Taylor series method has smaller amplitude and phase errors than those produced by the least-squares and minimax methods. These results suggest that to get accurate amplitude estimation, modified Taylor series filters would be somewhat preferred in areas with low dips. In areas with larger dips, the least-squares and minimax methods would give a distinctly better delineation of the subsurface structures.